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Sample records for pressure sensing studies

  1. Relative microvascular pressure sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Min; Zemp, Roger

    2016-03-01

    Microcirculation may be characterized by the vascular pressure as it is influenced by pressure-driven perfusion. Crosssections of blood vessels can be visualized by photoacoustic imaging and compressing on vessels causes deformation. The photoacoustic signals of blood, when compressed to the point of vessel collapse, may or may not vanish depending on the buckling process it undergoes. We form relative pressure images of microvessels by tracking vessel collapse as a function of externally applied pressure using photoacoustic imaging.

  2. PRESSURE SENSING DEVICE

    DOEpatents

    Pope, K.E.

    1959-12-15

    This device is primarily useful as a switch which is selectively operable to actuate in response to either absolute or differential predetermined pressures. The device generally comprises a pressure-tight housing divided by a movable impermeable diaphragm into two chambers, a reference pressure chamber and a bulb chamber containing the switching means and otherwise filled with an incompressible non-conducting fluid. The switch means comprises a normally collapsed bulb having an electrically conductive outer surface and a vent tube leading to the housing exterior. The normally collapsed bulb is disposed such that upon its inflation, respensive to air inflow from the vent, two contacts fixed within the bulb chamber are adapted to be electrically shorted by the conducting outer surface of the bulb.

  3. Efficacy of a pressure-sensing mattress cover system for reducing interface pressure: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Wong, Holly; Kaufman, Jaime; Baylis, Barry; Conly, John M; Hogan, David B; Stelfox, Henry T; Southern, Danielle A; Ghali, William A; Ho, Chester H

    2015-09-29

    Interface pressure is a key risk factor in the development of pressure ulcers. Visual feedback of continuous interface pressure between the body and support surface could inform clinicians on repositioning strategies and play a key role in an overall strategy for the prevention and management of pressure ulcers. A parallel two-group randomized controlled clinical trial will be conducted to study the effect of continuous pressure imaging on reducing interface pressure and on the incidence of pressure ulcers in vulnerable hospital patients. A total of 678 eligible consenting inpatients at risk of pressure ulcer development in a tertiary acute care institution will be randomly allocated to either having the ForeSite PT™ system with the liquid-crystal display monitor turned on to provide visual feedback to the clinicians while also collecting continuous interface pressure data (intervention group) or to having the ForeSite PT™ system with monitor turned off (that is, not providing visual feedback) but still collecting continuous interface pressure data (control group), in a ratio of 1:1. Continuous interface pressure data will be collected in both groups for 3 days (72 h). Data collection will continue until discharge for a subset of approximately 60 patients. The primary outcome will be the differences in the two groups' interface pressure analysis. Interface pressure readings will be collected through hourly samplings of continuous interface pressure recordings. Secondary outcomes will be the differences between the two groups in pressure-related skin and soft tissue changes in areas at risk of pressure ulcer (obtained at baseline within 24 h of admission) and on the third day of the trial or at discharge and perceptions of the intervention by patients and clinicians (obtained on the third day or at discharge). This will be the first randomized controlled trial to investigate the effect of visual feedback with continuous interface pressure of vulnerable hospital

  4. Remote tire pressure sensing technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robinson, Howard H. (Inventor); Mcginnis, Timothy A. (Inventor); Daugherty, Robert H. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    A remote tire pressure sensing technique is provided which uses vibration frequency to determine tire pressure. A vibration frequency measuring device is attached to the external surface of a tire which is then struck with an object, causing the tire to vibrate. The frequency measuring device measures the vibrations and converts the vibrations into corresponding electrical impulses. The electrical impulses are then fed into the frequency analyzing system which uses the electrical impulses to determine the relative peaks of the vibration frequencies as detected by the frequency measuring device. The measured vibration frequency peaks are then compared to predetermined data describing the location of vibration frequency peaks for a given pressure, thereby determining the air pressure of the tire.

  5. Study on demodulated signal distribution and acoustic pressure phase sensitivity of a self-interfered distributed acoustic sensing system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shang, Ying; Yang, Yuan-Hong; Wang, Chen; Liu, Xiao-Hui; Wang, Chang; Peng, Gang-Ding

    2016-06-01

    We propose a demodulated signal distribution theory for a self-interfered distributed acoustic sensing system. The distribution region of Rayleigh backscattering including the acoustic sensing signal in the sensing fiber is investigated theoretically under different combinations of both the path difference and pulse width Additionally we determine the optimal solution between the path difference and pulse width to obtain the maximum phase change per unit length. We experimentally test this theory and realize a good acoustic pressure phase sensitivity of  -150 dB re rad/(μPa·m) of fiber in the frequency range from 200 Hz to 1 kHz.

  6. Acoustic Wave Propagation in Pressure Sense Lines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vitarius, Patrick; Gregory, Don A.; Wiley, John; Korman, Valentin

    2003-01-01

    Sense lines are used in pressure measurements to passively transmit information from hostile environments to areas where transducers can be used. The transfer function of a sense line can be used to obtain information about the measured environment from the protected sensor. Several properties of this transfer function are examined, including frequency dependence, Helmholtz resonance, and time of flight delay.

  7. Plantar Pressure Detection with Fiber Bragg Gratings Sensing System

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Tsair-Chun; Lin, Jhe-Jhun; Guo, Lan-Yuen

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, a novel fiber-optic sensing system based on fiber Bragg gratings (FBGs) to measure foot plantar pressure is proposed. This study first explores the Pedar-X insole foot pressure types of the adult-size chart and then defines six measurement areas to effectively identify four foot types: neutral foot, cavus foot, supinated foot and flat foot. The plantar pressure signals are detected by only six FBGs, which are embedded in silicone rubber. The performance of the fiber optic sensing is examined and compared with a digital pressure plate of i-Step P1000 with 1024 barometric sensors. In the experiment, there are 11 participants with different foot types to participate in the test. The Pearson correlation coefficient, which is determined from the measured results of the homemade fiber-optic plantar pressure system and i-Step P1000 plantar pressure plate, reaches up to 0.671 (p < 0.01). According to the measured results from the plantar pressure data, the proposed fiber optic sensing system can successfully identify the four different foot types. Measurements of this study have demonstrated the feasibility of the proposed system so that it can be an alternative for plantar pressure detection systems. PMID:27782089

  8. Plantar Pressure Detection with Fiber Bragg Gratings Sensing System.

    PubMed

    Liang, Tsair-Chun; Lin, Jhe-Jhun; Guo, Lan-Yuen

    2016-10-22

    In this paper, a novel fiber-optic sensing system based on fiber Bragg gratings (FBGs) to measure foot plantar pressure is proposed. This study first explores the Pedar-X insole foot pressure types of the adult-size chart and then defines six measurement areas to effectively identify four foot types: neutral foot, cavus foot, supinated foot and flat foot. The plantar pressure signals are detected by only six FBGs, which are embedded in silicone rubber. The performance of the fiber optic sensing is examined and compared with a digital pressure plate of i-Step P1000 with 1024 barometric sensors. In the experiment, there are 11 participants with different foot types to participate in the test. The Pearson correlation coefficient, which is determined from the measured results of the homemade fiber-optic plantar pressure system and i-Step P1000 plantar pressure plate, reaches up to 0.671 (p < 0.01). According to the measured results from the plantar pressure data, the proposed fiber optic sensing system can successfully identify the four different foot types. Measurements of this study have demonstrated the feasibility of the proposed system so that it can be an alternative for plantar pressure detection systems.

  9. The configuration of plantar pressure sensing cells for wearable measurement of COP coordinates.

    PubMed

    Wang, Dian; Cai, Ping; Mao, Zhiyong

    2016-10-26

    Wearable measurement of center of pressure (COP) coordinates is the key of obtaining the measurement of natural gait. Plantar pressure insole is the right sensing unit for plantar pressure monitoring for long-term outdoor measurements and the control of walking assisting exoskeleton robot. It's necessary to study the configuration of pressure sensing cells. This study explored the sensing cell configuration for the plantar pressure insole. The data of plantar pressure of walking is collected for layout variants. The RMSE of COP coordinates estimations are used as the evaluation criteria. The RMSE of COP coordinates decreases from 8.00 to 3.20 mm as the amount of pressure sensing cells increases from 2 to 7. The size of pressure sensing cells contribute to reduce the RMSE of COP coordinates and 7 pressure sensing cells, with the size of 2.0-2.5 cm have the satisfying performance. Adding pressure sensing cell in the heel and hallux area increase the accuracy of estimating COP coordinates. Comparison results indicate that the configuration of 7 pressure sensing cells has a satisfying measurement performance.

  10. Fiber optic pressure sensing method based on Sagnac interferometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yi; Zhuang, Zhi; Chen, Ying; Yang, Yuanhong

    2014-11-01

    Pressure method using polarization-maintaining photonic crystal fiber (PM-PCF) as sensing element based on Sagnac interferometer is proposed to monitor inter layer pressure in especial compact structure. Sensing model is analyzed and test system is set up, which is validated by experiment. The birefringence can be modified by the deformation of PM-PCF under transverse pressure, realizing pressure measurement by detecting the wavelength shift of one specific valley from output of the Sagnac interferometer. The experiment results show that the output interference fringes were shifted linearly with pressure. The dynamic range of 0 kN ~10kN, sensing precision of 2.6%, and pressure sensitivity of 0.4414nm/kN are achieved, and the strain relaxation phenomenon of cushion can be observed obviously. The sensor has better engineering practicability and capability to restrain interference brought up by fluctuation of environment temperature, which temperature sensitivity is -11.8pm/°C.

  11. Compensating for pneumatic distortion in pressure sensing devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitmore, Stephen A.; Leondes, Cornelius T.

    1990-01-01

    A technique of compensating for pneumatic distortion in pressure sensing devices was developed and verified. This compensation allows conventional pressure sensing technology to obtain improved unsteady pressure measurements. Pressure distortion caused by frictional attenuation and pneumatic resonance within the sensing system makes obtaining unsteady pressure measurements by conventional sensors difficult. Most distortion occurs within the pneumatic tubing which transmits pressure impulses from the aircraft's surface to the measurement transducer. To avoid pneumatic distortion, experiment designers mount the pressure sensor at the surface of the aircraft, (called in-situ mounting). In-situ transducers cannot always fit in the available space and sometimes pneumatic tubing must be run from the aircraft's surface to the pressure transducer. A technique to measure unsteady pressure data using conventional pressure sensing technology was developed. A pneumatic distortion model is reduced to a low-order, state-variable model retaining most of the dynamic characteristics of the full model. The reduced-order model is coupled with results from minimum variance estimation theory to develop an algorithm to compensate for the effects of pneumatic distortion. Both postflight and real-time algorithms are developed and evaluated using simulated and flight data.

  12. Pressure Sensing with Fiber Optics and Interferometry.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-12-01

    fiber optic pressure sensor could be commercially useful. Besides the changes already mentioned, the diaphragms must be etched...4 Michelson Interferometer ............. 4 Diaphragm mechanics................6 Fiber Optics ...................8 ANIII. Fiber Optic Pressure...achieved by mounting the diaphragm on the end of a single mode optical fiber ; the coupling apparatus used permits interference to occur with the fiber

  13. Microfluidic pressure sensing using trapped air compression.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, Nimisha; Burns, Mark A

    2007-05-01

    We have developed a microfluidic method for measuring the fluid pressure head experienced at any location inside a microchannel. The principal component is a microfabricated sealed chamber with a single inlet and no exit; the entrance to the single inlet is positioned at the location where pressure is to be measured. The pressure measurement is then based on monitoring the movement of a liquid-air interface as it compresses air trapped inside the microfabricated sealed chamber and calculating the pressure using the ideal gas law. The method has been used to measure the pressure of the air stream and continuous liquid flow inside microfluidic channels (d approximately 50 microm). Further, a pressure drop has also been measured using multiple microfabricated sealed chambers. For air pressure, a resolution of 700 Pa within a full-scale range of 700-100 kPa was obtained. For liquids, pressure drops as low as 70 Pa were obtained in an operating range from 70 Pa to 10 kPa. Since the method primarily uses a microfluidic sealed chamber, it does not require additional fabrication steps and may easily be incorporated in several lab-on-a-chip fluidic applications for laminar as well as turbulent flow conditions.

  14. Microfluidic pressure sensing using trapped air compression

    PubMed Central

    Srivastava, Nimisha; Burns, Mark A.

    2010-01-01

    We have developed a microfluidic method for measuring the fluid pressure head experienced at any location inside a microchannel. The principal component is a microfabricated sealed chamber with a single inlet and no exit; the entrance to the single inlet is positioned at the location where pressure is to be measured. The pressure measurement is then based on monitoring the movement of a liquid–air interface as it compresses air trapped inside the microfabricated sealed chamber and calculating the pressure using the ideal gas law. The method has been used to measure the pressure of the air stream and continuous liquid flow inside microfluidic channels (d ~ 50 μm). Further, a pressure drop has also been measured using multiple microfabricated sealed chambers. For air pressure, a resolution of 700 Pa within a full-scale range of 700–100 kPa was obtained. For liquids, pressure drops as low as 70 Pa were obtained in an operating range from 70 Pa to 10 kPa. Since the method primarily uses a microfluidic sealed chamber, it does not require additional fabrication steps and may easily be incorporated in several lab-on-a-chip fluidic applications for laminar as well as turbulent flow conditions. PMID:17476384

  15. Low tension graphene drums for electromechanical pressure sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patel, Raj N.; Mathew, John P.; Borah, Abhinandan; Deshmukh, Mandar M.

    2016-03-01

    We present a process to fabricate electromechanical pressure sensors using multilayer graphene in a sealed drum geometry. The drum resonators are fabricated on insulating sapphire substrates with a local back gate for direct radio frequency ({\\text{}}{{rf}}) actuation and detection of the mechanical modes. Using this scheme, we show the detection and electrostatic tuning of multiple resonant modes of the membrane up to 200 MHz. The geometry of the device also helps in attaining low tensile stress in the membrane, thereby giving high gate tunability (∼1 MHz/V) of the resonator modes. We study the resonant frequency shifts in the presence of helium gas and demonstrate a sensing capability of 1 Torr pressure in a cryogenic environment.

  16. Pneumatic distortion compensation for aircraft surface pressure sensing devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitmore, Stephen A.; Leondes, Cornelius T.

    1991-01-01

    In this paper a technique of compensating for pneumatic distortion in aircraft surface pressure sensing devices is developed. The compensation allows conventional pressure sensing technology to obtain improved unsteady pressure measurements. Pressure distortion caused by frictional attenuation and pneumatic resonance within the sensing system makes obtaining unsteady pressure measurements by conventional sensors difficult. Typically, most of the distortion occurs within the pneumatic tubing used to transmit pressure impulses from the surface of the aircraft to the measurement transducer. This paper develops a second-order distortion model that accurately describes the behavior of the primary wave harmonic of the pneumatic tubing. The model is expressed in state-variable form and is coupled with standard results from minimum-variance estimation theory to develop an algorithm to compensate for the effects of pneumatic distortion. Both postflight and real-time algorithms are developed and evaluated using simulated and flight data. Covariance selection and filter-tuning examples are presented. Results presented verify that, given appropriate covariance magnitudes, the algorithms accurately reconstruct surface pressure values from remotely sensed pressure measurements.

  17. Pneumatic distortion compensation for aircraft surface pressure sensing devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitmore, Stephen A.; Leondes, Cornelius T.

    1991-01-01

    In this paper a technique of compensating for pneumatic distortion in aircraft surface pressure sensing devices is developed. The compensation allows conventional pressure sensing technology to obtain improved unsteady pressure measurements. Pressure distortion caused by frictional attenuation and pneumatic resonance within the sensing system makes obtaining unsteady pressure measurements by conventional sensors difficult. Typically, most of the distortion occurs within the pneumatic tubing used to transmit pressure impulses from the surface of the aircraft to the measurement transducer. This paper develops a second-order distortion model that accurately describes the behavior of the primary wave harmonic of the pneumatic tubing. The model is expressed in state-variable form and is coupled with standard results from minimum-variance estimation theory to develop an algorithm to compensate for the effects of pneumatic distortion. Both postflight and real-time algorithms are developed and evaluated using simulated and flight data. Covariance selection and filter-tuning examples are presented. Results presented verify that, given appropriate covariance magnitudes, the algorithms accurately reconstruct surface pressure values from remotely sensed pressure measurements.

  18. Pressure sensing with optical fiber-tip air bubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Wenbing; Fu, Cailing; Wang, D. N.; Wang, Ying

    2013-09-01

    Optical fiber-tip air bubbles are demonstrated for pressure sensing with ultrahigh sensitivity. The air bubble locates in the end facet of a single mode fiber (SMF) that spliced with a silica tube, which is naturally formed and acts as a compressible Fabry-Pérot interferometer (FPI) cavity when immersing the silica tube into liquid. The proposed device exhibits pressure sensitivity of <1000 nm/kPa. This kind of compressible FPI cavity may find potential applications in highly sensitive pressure and/or acoustic sensing.

  19. Single-Tip Probe Senses Pressure Or Temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trimarchi, Paul

    1993-01-01

    Single-tip probe designed for use in supersonic wind tunnel switched to sense pressure or temperature measurements nearly simultaneous at that point. Includes small valve like valves used in bicycle and automotive tires, called "Schraeder valve". Tire valve opened or closed by push rod and solenoid. In open position, flow past thermocouple enables measurements of temperature. In closed position, flow blocked and pressure in probe backs up to pressure transducer.

  20. Fiber-Optic Photoelastic Device Senses Pressure Of Hot Gas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Redner, Alex S.; Wesson, L. N.

    1995-01-01

    Fiber-optic/photoelastic device measures gas pressures up to 600 psi at operating temperatures as high as 1,100 degrees C. Pressure on fused-silica sensing element gives rise to birefringence via photoelastic effect. Polarization of light changed by birefringence; change in polarization measured and used to infer pressure causing it. Device prototype of gas-pressure sensor for aircraft engine. Mounted in engine at or near desired measurement point, where it responds to both time-varying and steady components of pressure.

  1. Highly compressible fluorescent particles for pressure sensing in liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cellini, F.; Peterson, S. D.; Porfiri, M.

    2017-05-01

    Pressure sensing in liquids is important for engineering applications ranging from industrial processing to naval architecture. Here, we propose a pressure sensor based on highly compressible polydimethylsiloxane foam particles embedding fluorescent Nile Red molecules. The particles display pressure sensitivities as low as 0.0018 kPa-1, which are on the same order of magnitude of sensitivities reported in commercial pressure-sensitive paints for air flows. We envision the application of the proposed sensor in particle image velocimetry toward an improved understanding of flow kinetics in liquids.

  2. Hydrostatic pressure sensing with surface-core fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osório, Jonas H.; Franco, Marcos A. R.; Cordeiro, Cristiano M. B.

    2015-09-01

    In this paper, we report the employment of surface-core fibers for hydrostatic pressure sensing. To our knowledge, this is the first demonstration of the use of these fibers for the referenced purpose. Theoretical simulations of the fiber structure were performed in order to estimate fiber phase and group birefringence values and its pressure sensitivity coefficient. In order to test fiber performance when acting as a pressure sensor, the same was placed in an polarimetric setup and its spectral response was measured. A sensitivity of 4.8 nm/MPa was achieved, showing good resemblance to the expected sensitivity value (4.6 nm/MPa).

  3. Human Behavior Recognition Using Foot Pressure Sensing Shoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugimoto, Chika; Ozaki, Kenji; Ezoe, Ryosuke; Hosaka, Hiroshi; Yamato, Hiroyuki

    To recognize human behavior in unlimited environments, sensing shoes for measuring foot pressure distribution were developed. Seven pressure sensors were installed on an insole, and a measurement module was embedded in the shoe. An analysis for discriminating the user's movements from the foot pressure distribution was examined, considering the movements, walking, running, standing, sitting, going upstairs and downstairs, and cycling. These seven actions were discriminated using feature quantities such as the average, standard deviation, maximum, and difference deviation extracted from the data of three sensors by discriminant analysis. The evaluation results showed highly accurate behavior recognition based on foot pressure at some points. In addition, by canonical discriminant analysis, six discriminant functions which classify the seven actions with an accuracy of 100% were derived by using feature quantities extracted from five sensors. The results confirmed that discriminant analysis can be used for automatically recognizing human behaviors based on foot pressure data.

  4. Development of a Piezoelectric Vacuum Sensing Component for a Wide Pressure Range

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Bing-Yu; Hsieh, Fan-Chun; Lin, Che-Yu; Chen, Shao-En; Chen, Fong-Zhi; Wu, Chia-Che

    2014-01-01

    In this study, we develop a clamped–clamped beam-type piezoelectric vacuum pressure sensing element. The clamped–clamped piezoelectric beam is composed of a PZT layer and a copper substrate. A pair of electrodes is set near each end. An input voltage is applied to a pair of electrodes to vibrate the piezoelectric beam, and the output voltage is measured at the other pair. Because the viscous forces on the piezoelectric beam vary at different air pressures, the vibration of the beam depends on the vacuum pressure. The developed pressure sensor can sense a wide range of pressure, from 6.5 × 10−6 to 760 Torr. The experimental results showed that the output voltage is inversely proportional to the gas damping ratio, and thus, the vacuum pressure was estimated from the output voltage. PMID:25421736

  5. Soft, Transparent, Electronic Skin for Distributed and Multiple Pressure Sensing

    PubMed Central

    Levi, Alessandro; Piovanelli, Matteo; Furlan, Silvano; Mazzolai, Barbara; Beccai, Lucia

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we present a new optical, flexible pressure sensor that can be applied as smart skin to a robot or to consumer electronic devices. We describe a mechano-optical transduction principle that can allow the encoding of information related to an externally applied mechanical stimulus, e.g., contact, pressure and shape of contact. The physical embodiment that we present in this work is an electronic skin consisting of eight infrared emitters and eight photo-detectors coupled together and embedded in a planar PDMS waveguide of 5.5 cm diameter. When a contact occurs on the sensing area, the optical signals reaching the peripheral detectors experience a loss because of the Frustrated Total Internal Reflection and deformation of the material. The light signal is converted to electrical signal through an electronic system and a reconstruction algorithm running on a computer reconstructs the pressure map. Pilot experiments are performed to validate the tactile sensing principle by applying external pressures up to 160 kPa. Moreover, the capabilities of the electronic skin to detect contact pressure at multiple subsequent positions, as well as its function on curved surfaces, are validated. A weight sensitivity of 0.193 gr−1 was recorded, thus making the electronic skin suitable to detect pressures in the order of few grams. PMID:23686140

  6. Soft, transparent, electronic skin for distributed and multiple pressure sensing.

    PubMed

    Levi, Alessandro; Piovanelli, Matteo; Furlan, Silvano; Mazzolai, Barbara; Beccai, Lucia

    2013-05-17

    In this paper we present a new optical, flexible pressure sensor that can be applied as smart skin to a robot or to consumer electronic devices. We describe a mechano-optical transduction principle that can allow the encoding of information related to an externally applied mechanical stimulus, e.g., contact, pressure and shape of contact. The physical embodiment that we present in this work is an electronic skin consisting of eight infrared emitters and eight photo-detectors coupled together and embedded in a planar PDMS waveguide of 5.5 cm diameter. When a contact occurs on the sensing area, the optical signals reaching the peripheral detectors experience a loss because of the Frustrated Total Internal Reflection and deformation of the material. The light signal is converted to electrical signal through an electronic system and a reconstruction algorithm running on a computer reconstructs the pressure map. Pilot experiments are performed to validate the tactile sensing principle by applying external pressures up to 160 kPa. Moreover, the capabilities of the electronic skin to detect contact pressure at multiple subsequent positions, as well as its function on curved surfaces, are validated. A weight sensitivity of 0.193 gr(-1) was recorded, thus making the electronic skin suitable to detect pressures in the order of few grams.

  7. Biocompatible Pressure Sensing Skins for Minimally Invasive Surgical Instruments

    PubMed Central

    Arabagi, Veaceslav; Felfoul, Ouajdi; Gosline, Andrew H.; Wood, Robert J.; Dupont, Pierre E.

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents 800-μm thick, biocompatible sensing skins composed of arrays of pressure sensors. The arrays can be configured to conform to the surface of medical instruments so as to act as disposable sensing skins. In particular, the fabrication of cylindrical geometries is considered here for use on endoscopes. The sensing technology is based on polydimethylsiloxane synthetic silicone encapsulated microchannels filled with a biocompatible salt-saturated glycerol solution, functioning as the conductive medium. A multi-layer manufacturing approach is introduced that enables stacking sensing microchannels, mechanical stress concentration features, and electrical routing via flexcircuits in a thickness of less than 1 mm. The proposed approach is inexpensive and does not require clean room tools or techniques. The mechanical stress concentration features are implemented using a patterned copper layer that serves to improve sensing range and sensitivity. Sensor performance is demonstrated experimentally using a sensing skin mounted on a neuroendoscope insertion cannula and is shown to outperform previously developed non-biocompatible sensors. PMID:27642266

  8. Biocompatible Pressure Sensing Skins for Minimally Invasive Surgical Instruments.

    PubMed

    Arabagi, Veaceslav; Felfoul, Ouajdi; Gosline, Andrew H; Wood, Robert J; Dupont, Pierre E

    2016-03-01

    This paper presents 800-μm thick, biocompatible sensing skins composed of arrays of pressure sensors. The arrays can be configured to conform to the surface of medical instruments so as to act as disposable sensing skins. In particular, the fabrication of cylindrical geometries is considered here for use on endoscopes. The sensing technology is based on polydimethylsiloxane synthetic silicone encapsulated microchannels filled with a biocompatible salt-saturated glycerol solution, functioning as the conductive medium. A multi-layer manufacturing approach is introduced that enables stacking sensing microchannels, mechanical stress concentration features, and electrical routing via flexcircuits in a thickness of less than 1 mm. The proposed approach is inexpensive and does not require clean room tools or techniques. The mechanical stress concentration features are implemented using a patterned copper layer that serves to improve sensing range and sensitivity. Sensor performance is demonstrated experimentally using a sensing skin mounted on a neuroendoscope insertion cannula and is shown to outperform previously developed non-biocompatible sensors.

  9. Compensating for pneumatic distortion in pressure sensing devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitmore, Stephen A.; Leondes, Cornelius T.

    1990-01-01

    A general numerical technique for obtaining unsteady pressure measurements using conventional pressure sensing technology has been developed. A pneumatic distortion model, based on the Navier-Stokes equations of momentum and continuity, was reduced to a low-order, state-variable model retaining most of the dynamic characteristics of the full model. The reduced-order model is coupled with results from minimum variance estimation theory to develop an algorithm to compensate the effects of pneumatic distortion. Both postflight and real-time algorithms were developed and evaluated using simulated and flight data.

  10. Optimizing a remote sensing instrument to measure atmospheric surface pressure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peckham, G. E.; Gatley, C.; Flower, D. A.

    1983-01-01

    Atmospheric surface pressure can be remotely sensed from a satellite by an active instrument which measures return echoes from the ocean at frequencies near the 60 GHz oxygen absorption band. The instrument is optimized by selecting its frequencies of operation, transmitter powers and antenna size through a new procedure baesd on numerical simulation which maximizes the retrieval accuracy. The predicted standard deviation error in the retrieved surface pressure is 1 mb. In addition the measurements can be used to retrieve water vapor, cloud liquid water and sea state, which is related to wind speed.

  11. Compensating for pneumatic distortion in pressure sensing devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitmore, Stephen A.; Leondes, Cornelius T.

    1990-01-01

    A general numerical technique for obtaining unsteady pressure measurements using conventional pressure sensing technology has been developed. A pneumatic distortion model, based on the Navier-Stokes equations of momentum and continuity, was reduced to a low-order, state-variable model retaining most of the dynamic characteristics of the full model. The reduced-order model is coupled with results from minimum variance estimation theory to develop an algorithm to compensate the effects of pneumatic distortion. Both postflight and real-time algorithms were developed and evaluated using simulated and flight data.

  12. Ultrasoft Electronics for Hyperelastic Strain, Pressure, and Direct Curvature Sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Majidi, Carmel; Kramer, Rebecca; Wood, Robert

    2011-03-01

    Progress in soft robotics, wearable computing, and programmable matter demands a new class of ultrasoft electronics for tactile control, contact detection, and deformation mapping. This next generation of sensors will remain electrically functional under extreme deformation without influencing the natural mechanics of the host system. Ultrasoft strain and pressure sensing has previously been demonstrated with elastomer sheets (eg. PDMS, silicone rubber) embedded with microchannels of conductive liquid (mercury, eGaIn). Building on these efforts, we introduce a novel method for direct curvature sensing that registers the location and intensity of surface curvature. An elastomer sheet is embedded with micropatterned cavities and microchannels of conductive liquid. Bending the elastomer or placing it on a curved surface leads to a change in channel cross-section and a corresponding change in its electrical resistance. In contrast to conventional methods of curvature sensing, this approach does not depend on semi-rigid components or differential strain measurement. Direct curvature sensing completes the portfolio of sensing elements required to completely map hyperelastic deformation for future soft robotics and computing. NSF MRSEC DMR-0820484.

  13. SiC-based optical interferometry at high pressures and temperatures for pressure and chemical sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dakshinamurthy, Surendramohan; Quick, Nathaniel R.; Kar, Aravinda

    2006-05-01

    Crystalline silicon carbide is a chemically inert wide band gap semiconductor with good mechanical strength and oxidation-resistant properties at elevated temperatures, which make it a good sensor material for harsh environments such as combustion chambers and turbine systems. For such cases, optical sensors are generally superior to electrical sensors in many aspects such as responsivity, detectivity, and sensitivity. This paper presents a wireless technique for pressure and chemical sensing based on the pressure-and temperature-dependent refractive indices of silicon carbide. A helium-neon laser with a wavelength of 632.8 nm was used as a probe laser to obtain the complementary Airy pattern of the laser power reflected off a silicon carbide wafer segment at high temperatures (up to 300 °C) and pressures (up to 400 psi). The interference patterns revealed unique characteristics for nitrogen and argon test gases. This pattern is different at the same pressure and temperature for the two gases, indicating the chemical sensing selectivity capability of silicon carbide. Also the pattern changes with pressures for the same gas, indicating the pressure sensing capability. The refractive index of silicon carbide has been obtained for different pressures and temperatures using the interference pattern. A three-layer model has been employed to determine the refractive indices of the gases using the reflected power data.

  14. An implantable pressure sensing system with electromechanical interrogation scheme.

    PubMed

    Kim, Albert; Powell, C R; Ziaie, Babak

    2014-07-01

    In this paper, we report on the development of an implantable pressure sensing system that is powered by mechanical vibrations in the audible acoustic frequency range. This technique significantly enhances interrogation range, alleviates the misalignment issues commonly encountered with inductive powering, and simplifies the external receiver circuitry. The interrogation scheme consists of two phases: a mechanical vibration phase and an electrical radiation phase. During the first phase, a piezoelectric cantilever acts as an acoustic receiver and charges a capacitor by converting sound vibration harmonics occurring at its resonant frequency into electrical power. In the subsequent electrical phase, when the cantilever is not vibrating, the stored electric charge is discharged across an LC tank whose inductor is pressure sensitive; hence, when the LC tank oscillates at its natural resonant frequency, it radiates a high-frequency signal that is detectable using an external receiver and its frequency corresponds to the measured pressure. The pressure sensitive inductor consists of a planar coil (single loop of wire) with a ferrite core whose distance to the coil varies with applied pressure. A prototype of the implantable pressure sensor is fabricated and tested, both in vitro and in vivo (swine bladder). A pressure sensitivity of 1 kHz/cm H2O is achieved with minimal misalignment sensitivity (26% drop at 90° misalignment between the implanted device and acoustic source; 60% drop at 90° misalignment between the implanted device and RF receiver coil).

  15. Enhanced acoustic sensing through wave compression and pressure amplification in anisotropic metamaterials.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yongyao; Liu, Haijun; Reilly, Michael; Bae, Hyungdae; Yu, Miao

    2014-10-15

    Acoustic sensors play an important role in many areas, such as homeland security, navigation, communication, health care and industry. However, the fundamental pressure detection limit hinders the performance of current acoustic sensing technologies. Here, through analytical, numerical and experimental studies, we show that anisotropic acoustic metamaterials can be designed to have strong wave compression effect that renders direct amplification of pressure fields in metamaterials. This enables a sensing mechanism that can help overcome the detection limit of conventional acoustic sensing systems. We further demonstrate a metamaterial-enhanced acoustic sensing system that achieves more than 20 dB signal-to-noise enhancement (over an order of magnitude enhancement in detection limit). With this system, weak acoustic pulse signals overwhelmed by the noise are successfully recovered. This work opens up new vistas for the development of metamaterial-based acoustic sensors with improved performance and functionalities that are highly desirable for many applications.

  16. Optimization of design parameters for bulk micromachined silicon membranes for piezoresistive pressure sensing application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belwanshi, Vinod; Topkar, Anita

    2016-05-01

    Finite element analysis study has been carried out to optimize the design parameters for bulk micro-machined silicon membranes for piezoresistive pressure sensing applications. The design is targeted for measurement of pressure up to 200 bar for nuclear reactor applications. The mechanical behavior of bulk micro-machined silicon membranes in terms of deflection and stress generation has been simulated. Based on the simulation results, optimization of the membrane design parameters in terms of length, width and thickness has been carried out. Subsequent to optimization of membrane geometrical parameters, the dimensions and location of the high stress concentration region for implantation of piezoresistors have been obtained for sensing of pressure using piezoresistive sensing technique.

  17. Optimization of design parameters for bulk micromachined silicon membranes for piezoresistive pressure sensing application

    SciTech Connect

    Belwanshi, Vinod; Topkar, Anita

    2016-05-23

    Finite element analysis study has been carried out to optimize the design parameters for bulk micro-machined silicon membranes for piezoresistive pressure sensing applications. The design is targeted for measurement of pressure up to 200 bar for nuclear reactor applications. The mechanical behavior of bulk micro-machined silicon membranes in terms of deflection and stress generation has been simulated. Based on the simulation results, optimization of the membrane design parameters in terms of length, width and thickness has been carried out. Subsequent to optimization of membrane geometrical parameters, the dimensions and location of the high stress concentration region for implantation of piezoresistors have been obtained for sensing of pressure using piezoresistive sensing technique.

  18. A novel, intelligent, pressure-sensing colostomy plug for reducing fecal leakage.

    PubMed

    Chen, Fei; Li, Zhi-Chao; Li, Qiang; Liang, Fei-Xue; Guo, Xiong-Bo; Huang, Zong-Hai

    2015-06-01

    This study aims to describe and report the effectiveness of a novel, pressure-sensing colostomy plug for reducing fecal leakage. Nine miniature Tibetan pigs, aged 6-8 months, were given colostomies and divided into three groups (n = 3 each group). A novel pressure-sensing colostomy plug was placed in each pig and set to indicate when intestinal pressures of either 5, 10, or 15 mm Hg, respectively, were reached. When the pressure thresholds were reached, the animals' bowels were examined for the presence of stool and/or stomal leakage, and the data were recorded at weeks 1, 4, and 8 after surgery. The colostomy plug calibrated to 15 mm Hg pressure demonstrated the greatest accuracy in predicting the presence of stool in the bowels of study animals, averaging >90% sensitivity. In general, the sensitivity for predicting the presence of stool did not vary significantly over time, though there was a slight increase in accuracy in the 5 mm Hg group at later time-points. The sensitivity for predicting stool in the bowel did not change significantly over time in any of the three groups. Stomal leakage was found to be inversely proportional to the pressure-sensor setting, in that the 15 mm Hg group exhibited the greatest amount of leakage. This difference, however, was found to be significant only at week 1 postsurgery. The intelligent, pressure-sensing colostomy plug was able to accurately predict the presence of stool in the bowel and maintain continence, allowing negligible leakage.

  19. Mississippi Sound Remote Sensing Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Atwell, B. H.

    1973-01-01

    The Mississippi Sound Remote Sensing Study was initiated as part of the research program of the NASA Earth Resources Laboratory. The objective of this study is development of remote sensing techniques to study near-shore marine waters. Included within this general objective are the following: (1) evaluate existing techniques and instruments used for remote measurement of parameters of interest within these waters; (2) develop methods for interpretation of state-of-the-art remote sensing data which are most meaningful to an understanding of processes taking place within near-shore waters; (3) define hardware development requirements and/or system specifications; (4) develop a system combining data from remote and surface measurements which will most efficiently assess conditions in near-shore waters; (5) conduct projects in coordination with appropriate operating agencies to demonstrate applicability of this research to environmental and economic problems.

  20. High-pressure, fluorescence-based sensing of calcium ions using Indo-1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryan, Jordan; Zachwieja, Erik; Savage, Sara R.; Urayama, Paul

    2009-10-01

    Because calcium is used as a near-universal signaling ion in biological systems, accurate sensing of calcium-ion concentration under pressure is important in understanding pressure effects on cellular physiology. Indo-1 is a dual-wavelength fluorophore with an emission spectrum that changes upon calcium-ion binding. Despite studies under physiological pressures of up to 50 MPa showing piezochromic behavior in the excited-state emission, Indo-1 continues to follow two-state binding-unbinding behavior. This demonstrates that Indo-1 remains useful under pressure as a probe for quantitative calcium-ion sensing. The two-state model is also used to determine the thermodynamic volume change upon calcium dissociation from Indo-1, which we find to be consistent with other metal-ion chelators.

  1. Validation and determination of the sensing area of the KINOTEX sensor as part of development of a new mattress with an interface pressure-sensing system.

    PubMed

    Sakai, Kozue; Nakagami, Gojiro; Matsui, Noriko; Sanada, Hiromi; Kitagawa, Atsuko; Tadaka, Etsuko; Sugama, Junko

    2008-02-01

    The purpose of the present study was to examine the validity of the KINOTEX sensor via comparison with an existing sensor and to determine the sensing areas for a new alternating-air mattress that incorporates an interface pressure-sensing system. The study design was an evaluation study to validate and determine the sensing area of the KINOTEX sensor in comparison with another sensor. Study participants were fifty-one healthy volunteers over eighteen years of age, and the two sensors were placed between participants and an alternating-air mattress. We measured the contact area, full weight load, and maximum pressure in the calcaneal region using two sensors and obtained a graphic pressure distribution of >40 mmHg in the lateral and supine positions. Correlation coefficients between sensors were r = 0.88 (p < 0.001) for the contact area, r = 0.89 (p < 0.001) for full weight load, and r = 0.72 (p < 0.001) at maximum pressure in the calcaneal region. Ninety-one percent of the pressure distribution was recorded in the central 50 cm of the bed, and 94.6% was recorded within an area 160 cm in length need the foot of the bed. We investigated the correlation between the KINOTEX sensor and an existing sensor and determined the necessary sensing area. Results suggested the feasibility of developing a new alternating-air mattress incorporating an interface pressure-sensing system to help prevent pressure ulcers.

  2. On the spectrum of radiation pressure driven optomechanical oscillator and its application in sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, F.; Hossein-Zadeh, M.

    2013-05-01

    We study the RF spectrum of radiation pressure driven optomechanical oscillators (OMO). Using experiments and theoretical estimations we have characterized the relative amplitude of OMO's spectral components as a function of optical detuning and optical input power. We have identified a regime where the optical resonance shift can be directly extracted from the RF spectrum for resonant optical sensing applications.

  3. Synthesis of metal oxide composite nanosheets and their pressure sensing properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tariq Saeed Chani, Muhammad; Bahadar Khan, Sher; Karimov, Kh. S.; Abid, M.; Asiri, Abdullah M.; Akhtar, Kalsoom

    2015-02-01

    This study presents the synthesis of metal oxides composite nanosheets (oxides of cobalt, zinc and iron) and their pressure sensing properties. A transducer has been fabricated to directly measure the resistance—pressure and impedance—pressure relationships of pristine nanopowder. At the initial stage, a nanopowder sample of 10 mm diameter and 1 mm height was placed in the transducer and by applying pressure of up to 8.15 kN/m2; the DC resistance and the impedance are reduced by 44% on average. It can be explained by the densification of the samples and a decrease in porosity due to the effect of pressure. It was also observed that the DC resistance increases with time and saturated within 8 min. It is considered that this phenomenon is based on the effect of displacement currents of bound charges. The dependences of the impedance phase (θ) on frequency and pressure have also been investigated.

  4. Flexible Distributed Pressure Sensing Strip for a Urethral Catheter1

    PubMed Central

    Ahmadi, Mahdi; Rajamani, Rajesh; Timm, Gerald; Sezen, A.S.

    2015-01-01

    A multi-sensor flexible strip is developed for a urethral catheter to measure distributed pressure in a human urethra. The developed sensor strip has important clinical applications in urodynamic testing for analyzing the causes of urinary incontinence in patients. There are two major challenges in the development of the sensor. First, a highly sensitive sensor strip that is flexible enough for urethral insertion into a human body is required and second, the sensor has to work reliably in a liquid in-vivo environment in the human body. Capacitive force sensors are designed and micro-fabricated using polyimide/PDMS substrates and copper electrodes. To remove the parasitic influence of urethral tissues which create fringe capacitance that can lead to significant errors, a reference fringe capacitance measurement sensor is incorporated on the strip. The sensing strip is embedded on a catheter and experimental in-vitro evaluation is presented using a bench-top pressure chamber. The sensors on the strip are able to provide the required sensitivity and range. Preliminary experimental results also show promise that by using measurements from the reference parasitic sensor on the strip, the influence of parasitics from human tissue on the pressure measurements can be removed. PMID:27065719

  5. Introducing the Pressure-Sensing Palatograph--The Next Frontier in Electropalatography

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murdoch, Bruce; Goozee, Justine; Veidt, Martin; Scott, Dion; Meyers, Ian

    2004-01-01

    Primary Objective. To extend the capabilities of current electropalatography (EPG) systems by developing a pressure-sensing EPG system. An initial trial of a prototype pressure-sensing palate will be presented. Research Design. The processes involved in designing the pressure sensors are outlined, with Hall effect transistors being selected. These…

  6. Introducing the Pressure-Sensing Palatograph--The Next Frontier in Electropalatography

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murdoch, Bruce; Goozee, Justine; Veidt, Martin; Scott, Dion; Meyers, Ian

    2004-01-01

    Primary Objective. To extend the capabilities of current electropalatography (EPG) systems by developing a pressure-sensing EPG system. An initial trial of a prototype pressure-sensing palate will be presented. Research Design. The processes involved in designing the pressure sensors are outlined, with Hall effect transistors being selected. These…

  7. Studies on Five Senses Treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Sadaka; Miao, Tiejun; Oyama-Higa, Mayumi

    2011-06-01

    This study proposed a therapy from complementary and alternative medicine to treat mental disorder by through interactions of five senses between therapist and patient. In this method sounding a certain six voices play an important role in healing and recovery. First, we studied effects of speaking using scalp- EEG measurement. Chaos analysis of EEG showed a largely enhanced largest Lyapunov exponent (LLE) during the speaking. In addition, EEG power spectrum showed an increase over most frequencies. Second, we performed case studies on mental disorder using the therapy. Running power spectrum of EEG of patients indicated decreasing power at end of treatment, implying five senses therapy induced relaxed and lowered energy in central neural system. The results agreed with patient's reports that there were considerable decline in anxiety and improvements in mood.

  8. Mississippi Sound remote sensing study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Atwell, B. H.; Thomann, G. C.

    1972-01-01

    Remote sensing techniques are being developed to study near shore marine waters in the Mississippi Sound. Specific elements of the investigation include: (1) evaluation of existing techniques and instrument capabilities for remote measurement of parameters which characterize near shore water; (2) integration of these parameters into a system which will make possible the definition of circulation characteristics; (3) conduct of applications experiments; and (4) definition of hardware development requirements and/or system specifications. Efforts have emphasized: (1) development of a satisfactory system of gathering ground truth over the entire area of Mississippi Sound to aid in evaluating remotely sensed data; (2) conduct of two data acquisition experiments; (3) analysis of individual sensor data from completed flights; and (4) pursuit of methods which will allow interrelations between data from individual sensors in order to add another dimension to the study.

  9. Pressure-sensing performance of upright cylinders in a Mach 10 boundary-layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Steven; Murphy, Kelly

    1994-01-01

    An experimental research program to provide basic knowledge of the pressure-sensing performance of upright, flushported cylinders in a hypersonic boundary layer is described. Three upright cylinders of 0.25-, 0.5- and l.0-in. diameters and a conventional rake were placed in the test section sidewall boundary layer of the 31 Inch Mach 10 Wind Tunnel at NASA Langley Research Center, Hampton, Virginia. Boundary-layer pressures from these cylinders were compared to those measured with a conventional rake. A boundary-layer thickness-to-cylinder-diameter ratio of 8 proved sufficient to accurately measure an overall pressure profile and ascertain the boundary-layer thickness. Effects of Reynolds number, flow angularity, and shock wave impingement on pressure measurement were also investigated. Although Reynolds number effects were negligible at the conditions studied, flow angularity above 10 deg significantly affects the measured pressures. Shock wave impingement was used to investigate orifice-to-orifice pressure crosstalk. No crosstalk was measured. The lower pressure measured above the oblique shock wave impingement showed no influence of the higher pressure generated at the lower port locations.

  10. The immediate effects of lidocaine iontophoresis using interferential current on pressure sense threshold and tactile sensation.

    PubMed

    Yoosefinejad, Amin Kordi; Motealleh, Alireza; Abbasnia, Keramatollah

    2016-01-01

    Iontophoresis is the noninvasive delivery of ions using direct current. The direct current has some disadvantages such as skin burning. Interferential current is a kind of alternating current without limitations of direct current; so the purpose of this study is to investigate and compare the effects of lidocaine, interferential current and lidocaine iontophoresis using interferential current. 30 healthy women aged 20-24 years participated in this randomized clinical trial study. Pressure, tactile and pain thresholds were evaluated before and after the application of treatment methods. Pressure, tactile and pain sensitivity increased significantly after the application of lidocaine alone (p < 0.005) and lidocaine iontophoresis using interferential current (p < 0.0001). Lidocaine iontophoresis using interferential current can increase perception threshold of pain, tactile stimulus and pressure sense more significantly than lidocaine and interferential current alone.

  11. The design of hydraulic pressure regulators that are stable without the use of sensing line restrictors or frictional dampers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gold, H.

    1977-01-01

    A direct-acting hydraulic pressure regulator design which incorporates stability margin, response and droop margin is developed. The pressure regulator system does not involve a nonlinear sensing line restrictor (which may degrade transient response) or linear damping (which is sensitive to clearance and viscosity). The direct-acting hydraulic pressure regulator makes use of the technique of lead network stabilization (i.e., the tuned stabilizer concept). An analytically derived circuit pressure regulator is tested to study the stability limit under a parallel capacitive plus resistive load and the stabilizing effect of the tuned stabilizer.

  12. Differential pressure sensing system for airfoils usable in turbine engines

    DOEpatents

    Yang, Wen-Ching; Stampahar, Maria E.

    2005-09-13

    A detection system for identifying airfoils having a cooling systems with orifices that are plugged with contaminants or with showerheads having a portion burned off. The detection system measures pressures at different locations and calculates or measures a differential pressure. The differential pressure may be compared with a known benchmark value to determine whether the differential pressure has changed. Changes in the differential pressure may indicate that one or more of the orifices in a cooling system of an airfoil are plugged or that portions of, or all of, a showerhead has burned off.

  13. Transient Behavior of Lumped-Constant Systems for Sensing Gas Pressures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Delio, Gene J; Schwent, Glennon V; Cesaro, Richard S

    1949-01-01

    The development of theoretical equations describing the behavior of a lumped-constant pressure-sensing system under transient operation Is presented with experimental data that show agreement with the equations. A pressure-sensing system 'consisting of a tube terminating in a reservoir is investigated for the transient relation between a presSure disturbance at the open end of the tube and the pressure response in the reservoir. Design parameters are presented that can be adjusted to achieve a desired performance fran such a system when the system is considered as a transfer member of a control loop.

  14. Development of Pressure sensing Particles through SERS and Upconversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Widejko, Ryan; Wang, Fenglin; Anker, Jeff

    2012-03-01

    With the increasing distance of space travel, there is a critical need for non-invasive point-of-care diagnostic techniques. According to the NASA Human Research Roadmap, the ``lack of non-invasive diagnostic imaging capability and techniques to diagnose identified Exploration Medical Conditions involving internal body parts,'' is a critical capability gap for long distance space travel. To address this gap, we developed a novel technique for non-invasive monitoring of strain on implanted devices. We constructed a prototype tension-indicating washer with an upconversion spectrum that depended upon strain. The washer was made of a polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) mixture with upconversion particles embedded in it. This mixture was cured onto a lenticular lens. Methylene blue dye solution was sealed between the lenticular lens and PDMS so that pressure on the washer displaced the dye and uncovered the upconversion particles. We also began work on a tension-indicating screw based upon surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS). Future work for this project is to quantitatively correlate the spectral intensity with pressure, further develop SERS washers, and construct SERS and/or upconversion screws or bolts. Non-invasive tension-indicating devices and techniques such as these can be applied to orthopedics, used as a general technique for measuring micro-strain, verifying proper assembly of equipment, and observing/studying bolt loosening.

  15. Crocodile-inspired dome-shaped pressure receptors for passive hydrodynamic sensing.

    PubMed

    Kanhere, Elgar; Wang, Nan; Kottapalli, Ajay Giri Prakash; Asadnia, Mohsen; Subramaniam, Vignesh; Miao, Jianmin; Triantafyllou, Michael

    2016-08-22

    Passive mechanosensing is an energy-efficient and effective recourse for autonomous underwater vehicles (AUVs) for perceiving their surroundings. The passive sensory organs of aquatic animals have provided inspiration to biomimetic researchers for developing underwater passive sensing systems for AUVs. This work is inspired by the 'integumentary sensory organs' (ISOs) which are dispersed on the skin of crocodiles and are equipped with slowly adapting (SA) and rapidly adapting (RA) receptors. ISOs assist crocodiles in locating the origin of a disturbance, both on the water surface and under water, thereby enabling them to hunt prey even in a dark environment and turbid waters. In this study, we construct SA dome receptors embedded with microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) piezoresistive sensors to measure the steady-state pressures imparted by flows and RA dome receptors embedded with MEMS piezoelectric sensors to detect oscillatory pressures in water. Experimental results manifest the ability of SA and RA dome receptors to sense the direction of steady-state flows and oscillatory disturbances, respectively. As a proof of concept, the SA domes are tested on the hull of a kayak under various pressure variations owing to different types of movements of the hull. Our results indicate that the dome receptors are capable of discerning the angle of attack and speed of the flow.

  16. Chirped fiber Bragg grating sensor for pressure and position sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swart, Pieter L.; Lacquet, Beatrys M.; Chtcherbakov, Anatolii A.

    2005-05-01

    We present a chirped fiber Bragg grating sensor that should be suitable for esophageal motility studies. The device uses the time-dependent group delay response of a chirped fiber Bragg grating to measure the peristaltic pressure wave that propagates down the esophagus with the transport of a bolus to the stomach. In contrast to existing transducers that only measure at discrete points, the output of this device is a continuous function of length along the esophagus. This paper presents ex-vivo experimental results. There is a linear relation between the wavelength location of the maximum phase perturbation and the position along the sensor where the perturbation occurred. The maximum phase change itself is directly proportional to the magnitude of the applied load at a specific position.

  17. Research study of pressure instrumentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoogenboom, L.; Hull-Allen, G.

    1984-07-01

    To obtain a more vibration resistant pressure sensor for use on the Space Shuttle Main Engine, a proximity probe based, diaphragm type pressure sensor breadboard was developed. A fiber optic proximity probe was selected as the sensor. In combination with existing electronics, a thermal stability evaluation of the entire probe system was made. Based upon the results, a breadboard design of the pressure sensor and electronics was made and fabricated. A brief series of functional experiments was made with the breadboard to calibrate, thermally compensate, and linearize its response. In these experiments, the performance obtained in the temperature range of -320 F (liquid N2) to +200 F was comparable to that of the strain gage based sensor presently in use on the engine. In tests at NASA-Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC), after some time at or near liquid nitrogen temperatures, the sensor output varied over the entire output range. These large spurious signals were attributed to condensation of air in the sensing gap. In the next phase of development of this sensor, an evaluation of fabrication techniques toward greater thermal and mechanical stability of the fiber probe assembly must be made. In addition to this, a positive optics to metal seal must be developed to withstand the pressure that would result from a diaphragm failure.

  18. Using LysoSensor Yellow/Blue DND-160 to sense acidic pH under high hydrostatic pressures.

    PubMed

    DePedro, Hector Michael; Urayama, Paul

    2009-01-15

    LysoSensor Yellow/Blue DND-160, a dual-wavelength fluorophore commonly used for sensing pH in acidic organelles, possesses solvatochromic behavior believed to originate from an intramolecular charge transfer (ICT). Given this, we investigated whether DND-160 can be used for acidic pH sensing under hydrostatic pressures up to 510 atm, a range suitable for studying a wide variety of cellular processes. We found that the emission spectrum of the protonated form does not exhibit sensitivity to pressure, whereas the deprotonated form shows a piezochromic shift consistent with increased ICT character. Although pressure effects on the apparent pKa are buffer solvent dependent, DND-160 retains two-state behavior, making it a useful acidic pH probe under pressure.

  19. Use of Remotely Sensed Data to Evaluate the Relationship between Living Environment and Blood Pressure

    PubMed Central

    Estes, Maurice G.; Al-Hamdan, Mohammad Z.; Crosson, William; Estes, Sue M.; Quattrochi, Dale; Kent, Shia; McClure, Leslie Ain

    2009-01-01

    Background Urbanization has been correlated with hypertension (HTN) in developing countries undergoing rapid economic and environmental transitions. Objectives We examined the relationships among living environment (urban, suburban, and rural), day/night land surface temperatures (LST), and blood pressure in selected regions from the REasons for Geographic and Racial Differences in Stroke (REGARDS) cohort. Also, the linking of data on blood pressure from REGARDS with National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) science data is relevant to NASA’s strategic goals and missions, particularly as a primary focus of the agency’s Applied Sciences Program. Methods REGARDS is a national cohort of 30,228 people from the 48 contiguous United States with self-reported and measured blood pressure levels. Four metropolitan regions (Philadelphia, PA; Atlanta, GA; Minneapolis, MN; and Chicago, IL) with varying geographic and health characteristics were selected for study. Satellite remotely sensed data were used to characterize the LST and land cover/land use (LCLU) environment for each area. We developed a method for characterizing participants as living in urban, suburban, or rural living environments, using the LCLU data. These data were compiled on a 1-km grid for each region and linked with the REGARDS data via an algorithm using geocoding information. Results REGARDS participants in urban areas have higher systolic and diastolic blood pressure than do those in suburban or rural areas, and also a higher incidence of HTN. In univariate models, living environment is associated with HTN, but after adjustment for known HTN risk factors, the relationship was no longer present. Conclusion Further study regarding the relationship between HTN and living environment should focus on additional environmental characteristics, such as air pollution. The living environment classification method using remotely sensed data has the potential to facilitate additional research

  20. Use of remotely sensed data to evaluate the relationship between living environment and blood pressure.

    PubMed

    Estes, Maurice G; Al-Hamdan, Mohammad Z; Crosson, William; Estes, Sue M; Quattrochi, Dale; Kent, Shia; McClure, Leslie Ain

    2009-12-01

    Urbanization has been correlated with hypertension (HTN) in developing countries undergoing rapid economic and environmental transitions. We examined the relationships among living environment (urban, suburban, and rural), day/night land surface temperatures (LST), and blood pressure in selected regions from the REasons for Geographic and Racial Differences in Stroke (REGARDS) cohort. Also, the linking of data on blood pressure from REGARDS with National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) science data is relevant to NASA's strategic goals and missions, particularly as a primary focus of the agency's Applied Sciences Program. REGARDS is a national cohort of 30,228 people from the 48 contiguous United States with self-reported and measured blood pressure levels. Four metropolitan regions (Philadelphia, PA; Atlanta, GA; Minneapolis, MN; and Chicago, IL) with varying geographic and health characteristics were selected for study. Satellite remotely sensed data were used to characterize the LST and land cover/land use (LCLU) environment for each area. We developed a method for characterizing participants as living in urban, suburban, or rural living environments, using the LCLU data. These data were compiled on a 1-km grid for each region and linked with the REGARDS data via an algorithm using geocoding information. REGARDS participants in urban areas have higher systolic and diastolic blood pressure than do those in suburban or rural areas, and also a higher incidence of HTN. In univariate models, living environment is associated with HTN, but after adjustment for known HTN risk factors, the relationship was no longer present. Further study regarding the relationship between HTN and living environment should focus on additional environmental characteristics, such as air pollution. The living environment classification method using remotely sensed data has the potential to facilitate additional research linking environmental variables to public health concerns.

  1. Demodulation System for Fiber Optic Bragg Grating Dynamic Pressure Sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lekki, John D.; Adamovsky, Grigory; Floyd, Bertram

    2001-01-01

    Fiber optic Bragg gratings have been used for years to measure quasi-static phenomena. In aircraft engine applications there is a need to measure dynamic signals such as variable pressures. In order to monitor these pressures a detection system with broad dynamic range is needed. This paper describes an interferometric demodulator that was developed and optimized for this particular application. The signal to noise ratio was maximized through temporal coherence analysis. The demodulator was incorporated in a laboratory system that simulates conditions to be measured. Several pressure sensor configurations incorporating a fiber optic Bragg grating were also explored. The results of the experiments are reported in this paper.

  2. Pressure sensing by flexible, organic, field effect transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manunza, I.; Sulis, A.; Bonfiglio, A.

    2006-10-01

    A mechanical sensor based on a pentacene field effect transistor has been fabricated. The pressure dependence of the output current has been investigated by applying a mechanical stimulus by means of a pressurized air flow. Experimental results show a reversible current dependence on pressure. Data analysis suggests that variations of threshold voltage, mobility and contact resistance are responsible for current variations. Thanks to the flexibility of the substrate and the low cost of the technology, this device opens the way for flexible mechanical sensors that can be used in a variety of innovative applications such as e-textiles and robotic interfaces.

  3. Temperature-insensitive pressure or strain sensing technology with fiber optic hybrid Sagnac interferometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Yuanhong; Lu, Lin; Liu, Shuo; Jin, Wei; Han, Zonghu; Cao, Yaohui

    2016-05-01

    The transmission spectrum characteristic of two-segment polarization maintaining fibers Sagnac interferometer was investigated and simulated in detail and a temperature-insensitive pressure or strain sensing technology was proposed. An experimental hybrid Sagnac interferometer was built and the solid core polarization maintaining photonic crystal fiber was taken as the sensing probe. The side pressure sensitive coefficients and the temperature crosstalk drift were measured and compared. The experimental results show that the side pressure sensitive coefficient was ~0.2877 nm/N and the temperature drift was less than 0.1 pm/°C.

  4. Hydrostatic Pressure Sensing with High Birefringence Photonic Crystal Fibers

    PubMed Central

    Fávero, Fernando C.; Quintero, Sully M. M.; Martelli, Cicero; Braga, Arthur M.B.; Silva, Vinícius V.; Carvalho, Isabel C. S.; Llerena, Roberth W. A.; Valente, Luiz C. G.

    2010-01-01

    The effect of hydrostatic pressure on the waveguiding properties of high birefringence photonic crystal fibers (HiBi PCF) is evaluated both numerically and experimentally. A fiber design presenting form birefringence induced by two enlarged holes in the innermost ring defining the fiber core is investigated. Numerical results show that modal sensitivity to the applied pressure depends on the diameters of the holes, and can be tailored by independently varying the sizes of the large or small holes. Numerical and experimental results are compared showing excellent agreement. A hydrostatic pressure sensor is proposed and demonstrated using an in-fiber modal interferometer where the two orthogonally polarized modes of a HiBi PCF generate fringes over the optical spectrum of a broad band source. From the analysis of experimental results, it is concluded that, in principle, an operating limit of 92 MPa in pressure could be achieved with 0.0003% of full scale resolution. PMID:22163435

  5. Hydrostatic pressure sensing with high birefringence photonic crystal fibers.

    PubMed

    Fávero, Fernando C; Quintero, Sully M M; Martelli, Cicero; Braga, Arthur M B; Silva, Vinícius V; Carvalho, Isabel C S; Llerena, Roberth W A; Valente, Luiz C G

    2010-01-01

    The effect of hydrostatic pressure on the waveguiding properties of high birefringence photonic crystal fibers (HiBi PCF) is evaluated both numerically and experimentally. A fiber design presenting form birefringence induced by two enlarged holes in the innermost ring defining the fiber core is investigated. Numerical results show that modal sensitivity to the applied pressure depends on the diameters of the holes, and can be tailored by independently varying the sizes of the large or small holes. Numerical and experimental results are compared showing excellent agreement. A hydrostatic pressure sensor is proposed and demonstrated using an in-fiber modal interferometer where the two orthogonally polarized modes of a HiBi PCF generate fringes over the optical spectrum of a broad band source. From the analysis of experimental results, it is concluded that, in principle, an operating limit of 92 MPa in pressure could be achieved with 0.0003% of full scale resolution.

  6. Integrated optical interferometer with micromechanical diaphragm for pressure sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Brabander, Gregory N.; Boyd, Joseph T.; Beheim, Glenn

    1994-10-01

    An electrically passive optical pressure sensor has been fabricated which uses a integrated-optical Y-junction ring resonator to measure the strain induced in a micromachined silicon diaphragm. A silicon substrate is etched from the side opposite the silicon oxynitride optical waveguides to produce a rectangular diaphragm whose long edge lies underneath a straight section in the ring. Pressure-induced changes in the resonant frequency of the ring are measured using a frequency swept laser diode. A linear response to pressure is observed for the TM mode with a sensitivity of 0.0094 rad/kPa. The transmissivity function of the resonator is derived and compared with measured response. This pressure sensor is rugged, amenable to batch fabrication, and it provides a link insensitive readout.

  7. A pressure sensitive ionic gel FET for tactile sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamada, S.; Sato, T.; Toshiyoshi, H.

    2017-06-01

    Field-effect-transistor (FET) is combined with an ionic gel to realize a pressure sensitive ionic-gel field-effect-transistor (PSG-FET) of high sensitivity and low operational voltage. The ionic gels form a layer of charge accumulation in a nanometric scale called the electrical double layer (EDL) on each electrode upon voltage application and exhibit quite high capacitance. The source-drain current through the ZnO channel increases from the initial 44 nA (without pressure) to 783 μA (with pressure, 7 kPa), yielding an ON/OFF contrast as large as 1.7 × 104, due to EDLs, which is interpreted as a pressure sensitivity of 2.2 × 103 kPa-1. Judging from the drain current and the gate voltage properties, the threshold voltage is calculated to be 2.8 V owing the large capacitance created by the ionic gel.

  8. Pressure and shear sensing based on microstrip antennas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohammad, I.; Huang, H.

    2012-04-01

    A foot ulcer is the initiating factor in 85% of all diabetic amputations. Ulcer formation is believed to be contributed by both pressure and shear forces. There are commercially available instruments that can measure plantar pressure. However, instruments for plantar shear measurement are limited. In this paper, we investigate the application of antenna sensors for shear and pressure measurement. The principle of operation of both antenna sensors will be discussed first, followed by detailed descriptions on the antenna designs, sensor fabrication, experimental setup, procedure and results. Because the antenna sensors are small in size, can be wirelessly interrogated, and are frequency multiplexable, we plan to embed them in shoes for simultaneous mapping of plantar shear and pressure distributions in the future.

  9. Pressure sensing using a completely flexible organic transistor.

    PubMed

    Manunza, I; Bonfiglio, A

    2007-06-15

    In this paper, we report on pressure sensors based on completely flexible organic thin film transistors (OTFTs). A flexible and transparent plastic foil (Mylar) is employed both as substrate and gate dielectric. Gold source and drain electrodes are patterned on the upper side of the foil while the gate electrode lies on the opposite side; a vacuum-sublimed pentacene film is used as active layer. The pressure dependence of the output current has been investigated by applying to the gate side of the device a mechanical stimulus by means of a pressurized airflow. Experimental results show a reversible dependence of the current on the pressure. The data analysis suggests that the current variations are due to pressure-induced variations of mobility, threshold voltage and possibly contact resistance. The drain current variation is reproducible, linear and reversible even though it displays a hysteresis. Moreover, the sensor responds very fast to the mechanical stimulus (i.e. within tens-hundreds of milliseconds) but the time required to reach the steady state is much higher (tens-hundreds of seconds). Electrical characteristics with and without applied pressure have been carried out in air without any extra ad hoc read-out circuit or equipment. The reported devices show potential advantages of flexibility of the structure, low cost and versatility of the device structure for sensor technologies. Many innovative and attractive applications as wearable electronics, e-textiles, e-skin for robots can be considered.

  10. High temperature fiber optic microphone having a pressure-sensing reflective membrane under tensile stress

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zuckerwar, Allan J. (Inventor); Cuomo, Frank W. (Inventor); Robbins, William E. (Inventor); Hopson, Purnell, Jr. (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    A fiber optic microphone is provided for measuring fluctuating pressures. An optical fiber probe having at least one transmitting fiber for transmitting light to a pressure-sensing membrane and at least one receiving fiber for receiving light reflected from a stretched membrane is provided. The pressure-sensing membrane may be stretched for high frequency response. Further, a reflecting surface of the pressure-sensing membrane may have dimensions which substantially correspond to dimensions of a cross section of the optical fiber probe. Further, the fiber optic microphone can be made of materials for use in high temperature environments, for example greater than 1000 F. A fiber optic probe is also provided with a backplate for damping membrane motion. The backplate further provides a means for on-line calibration of the microphone.

  11. Fiber optic microphone having a pressure sensing reflective membrane and a voltage source for calibration purpose

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zuckerwar, Allan J. (Inventor); Cuomo, Frank W. (Inventor); Robbins, William E. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    A fiber optic microphone is provided for measuring fluctuating pressures. An optical fiber probe having at least one transmitting fiber for transmitting light to a pressure-sensing membrane and at least one receiving fiber for receiving light reflected from a stretched membrane is provided. The pressure-sensing membrane may be stretched for high frequency response. Further, a reflecting surface of the pressure-sensing membrane may have dimensions which substantially correspond to dimensions of a cross section of the optical fiber probe. Further, the fiber optic microphone can be made of materials for use in high temperature environments, for example greater than 1000 F. A fiber optic probe is also provided with a back plate for damping membrane motion. The back plate further provides a means for on-line calibration of the microphone.

  12. Evaluation of pressure sensing concepts: A technology assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Shepard, R.L.; Thacker, L.H.

    1993-09-01

    Advanced distributed control systems for electric power plants will require more accurate and reliable pressure gauges than those now installed. Future developments in power plant control systems are expected to use digital/optical networks rather than the analog/electric data transmission used in existing plants. Many pressure transmitters now installed use oil filling to separate process fluids from the gauge mechanism and are subject to insidious failures when the oil leaks. Testing and maintenance of pressure channels occupy a disproportionately large amount of effort to restore their accuracy and verify their operability. These and similar concerns have prompted an assessment of a broad spectrum of sensor technologies to aid in selecting the most likely candidates for adaptation to power plant applications. Ten representative conventional and thirty innovational pressure sensors are described and compared. Particular emphasis is focused on two categories: Silicon-integrated pressure sensors and fiber-optic sensors, and both of these categories are discussed in detail. Additional attractive concepts include variable reluctance gauges and resonant structure gauges that may not require oil buffering from the process fluid.

  13. Integrated Optical Interferometers with Micromachined Diaphragms for Pressure Sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeBrabander, Gregory N.; Boyd, Joseph T.

    1996-01-01

    Optical pressure sensors have been fabricated which use an integrated optical channel waveguide that is part of an interferometer to measure the pressure-induced strain in a micromachined silicon diaphragm. A silicon substrate is etched from the back of the wafer leaving a rectangular diaphragm. On the opposite side of the wafer, ring resonator and Mach-Zehnder interferometers are formed with optical channel waveguides made from a low pressure chemical vapor deposited film of silicon oxynitride. The interferometer's phase is altered by pressure-induced stress in a channel segment positioned over the long edge of the diaphragm. The phase change in the ring resonator is monitored using a link-insensitive swept frequency laser diode, while in the Mach-Zehnder it is determined using a broad band super luminescent diode with subsequent wavelength separation. The ring resonator was found to be highly temperature sensitive, while the Mach-Zehnder, which had a smaller optical path length difference, was proportionally less so. The quasi-TM mode was more sensitive to pressure, in accord with calculations. Waveguide and sensor theory, sensitivity calculations, a fabrication sequence, and experimental results are presented.

  14. A flexible liquid crystal polymer MEMS pressure sensor array for fish-like underwater sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kottapalli, A. G. P.; Asadnia, M.; Miao, J. M.; Barbastathis, G.; Triantafyllou, M. S.

    2012-11-01

    In order to perform underwater surveillance, autonomous underwater vehicles (AUVs) require flexible, light-weight, reliable and robust sensing systems that are capable of flow sensing and detecting underwater objects. Underwater animals like fish perform a similar task using an efficient and ubiquitous sensory system called a lateral-line constituting of an array of pressure-gradient sensors. We demonstrate here the development of arrays of polymer microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) pressure sensors which are flexible and can be readily mounted on curved surfaces of AUV bodies. An array of ten sensors with a footprint of 60 (L) mm × 25 (W) mm × 0.4 (H) mm is fabricated using liquid crystal polymer (LCP) as the sensing membrane material. The flow sensing and object detection capabilities of the array are illustrated with proof-of-concept experiments conducted in a water tunnel. The sensors demonstrate a pressure sensitivity of 14.3 μV Pa-1. A high resolution of 25 mm s-1 is achieved in water flow sensing. The sensors can passively sense underwater objects by transducing the pressure variations generated underwater by the movement of objects. The experimental results demonstrate the array’s ability to detect the velocity of underwater objects towed past by with high accuracy, and an average error of only 2.5%.

  15. High-pressure optical studies

    SciTech Connect

    Drickamer, H.G.

    1981-01-01

    High pressure experimentation may concern intrinsically high pressure phenomena, or it may be used to gain a better understanding of states or processes at one atmosphere. The latter application is probably more prevelant in condensed matter physics. Under this second rubric one may either use high pressure to perturb various electronic energy levels and from this pressure tuning characterize states or processes, or one can use pressure to change a macroscopic parameter in a controlled way, then measure the effect on some molecular property. In this paper, the pressure tuning aspect is emphasized, with a lesser discussion of macroscopic - molecular relationships. In rare earth chelates the efficiency of 4f-4f emission of the rare earth is controlled by the feeding from the singlet and triplet levels of the organic ligand. These ligand levels can be strongly shifted by pressure. A study of the effect of pressure on the emission efficiency permits one to understand the effect of ligand modification at one atmosphere. Photochromic crystals change color upon irradiation due to occupation of a metastable ground state. In thermochromic crystals, raising the temperature accomplishes the same results. For a group of molecular crystals (anils) at high pressure, the metastable state can be occupied at room temperature. The relative displacement of the energy levels at high pressure also inhibits the optical process. Effects on luminescence intensity are shown to be consistent. In the area of microscopic - molecular relationships, the effect of viscosity and dielectric properties on rates of non-radiative (thermal) and radiative emission, and on peak energy for luminescence is demonstrated. For systems which can emit from either of two excited states depending on the interaction with the environment, the effect of rigidity of the medium on the rate of rearrangement of the excited state is shown.

  16. Active Sensing Air Pressure Using Differential Absorption Barometric Radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, B.

    2016-12-01

    Tropical storms and other severe weathers cause huge life losses and property damages and have major impacts on public safety and national security. Their observations and predictions need to be significantly improved. This effort tries to develop a feasible active microwave approach that measures surface air pressure, especially over open seas, from space using a Differential-absorption BArometric Radar (DiBAR) operating at 50-55 GHz O2 absorption band in order to constrain assimilated dynamic fields of numerical weather Prediction (NWP) models close to actual conditions. Air pressure is the most important variable that drives atmospheric dynamics, and currently can only be measured by limited in-situ observations over oceans. Even over land there is no uniform coverage of surface air pressure measurements. Analyses show that with the proposed space radar the errors in instantaneous (averaged) pressure estimates can be as low as 4mb ( 1mb) under all weather conditions. NASA Langley research team has made substantial progresses in advancing the DiBAR concept. The feasibility assessment clearly shows the potential of surface barometry using existing radar technologies. The team has also developed a DiBAR system design, fabricated a Prototype-DiBAR (P-DiBAR) for proof-of-concept, conducted laboratory, ground and airborne P-DiBAR tests. The flight test results are consistent with the instrumentation goals. The precision and accuracy of radar surface pressure measurements are within the range of the theoretical analysis of the DiBAR concept. Observational system simulation experiments for space DiBAR performance based on the existing DiBAR technology and capability show substantial improvements in tropical storm predictions, not only for the hurricane track and position but also for the hurricane intensity. DiBAR measurements will provide us an unprecedented level of the prediction and knowledge on global extreme weather and climate conditions.

  17. IPE Operations Field Effect Standard (Pressure Sensing Suit)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-02-18

    pads may be the only practical option for providing high levels of liquid protection at these locations. If this is the case, then sensors would no...preventing the pads having to be exchanged between different activities. It is also be recommended that the dynamic range of the sensors be increased. Man-in...use of protective pads at critical pressure points should be considered in future CBRN apparel design. Technology Transfer UNCLASSIFIED

  18. Electrochemical studies at high pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Cruanes, M.T.

    1993-01-01

    This research has dealt with the development and application of a methodology that permits electrochemical measurements at high pressure. The initial efforts focused on the design and construction of an electrochemical cell functional at hydrostatic pressures as high as 10 kbar. This cell was equipped with an Ag/AgCl/KCl (0.1M) reference electrode which provides reliable control of the potential at all pressures. The potential of this reference electrode can be considered to be constant with pressure. Measurements of formal potentials (E[degrees][prime]) of several transition-metal complexes vs the Ag/AgCl electrode rendered volumes of reactions whose magnitudes support the prediction of the negligible pressure dependence of the reference electrode. The main systems that have been investigated at high pressure are surface-modified electrodes. The author studied the effect of compression on the dynamics of charge transport in quaternized poly(4-vinylpyridine) (QPVP) films placed on gold electrodes, loaded with potassium ferricyanide, and equilibrated in potassium nitrate. Pressure accomplished the continuous change in the structure of the polymer network. This change causes a pronounced restriction in the propagation of charge and in the motion of mass. This high-pressure methodology has also allowed the spatial characterization of electron transfer events taking place between a gold electrode and ferrocene molecules covalently attached to the end of 1-undodecanethiol chains self-assembled on the electrode surface. The volumes of reaction and activation for the oxidation process are both positive, indicating that a volume expansion is associated with the formation of ferricinium. A model is proposed in which the creation of a vacancy in the self-assembled monolayer, for the accommodation of the ferricinium ion or a charge-compensating anion, is coupled with the electron transfer step.

  19. The calcium-sensing receptor and calcimimetics in blood pressure modulation.

    PubMed

    Smajilovic, Sanela; Yano, Shozo; Jabbari, Reza; Tfelt-Hansen, Jacob

    2011-10-01

    Calcium is a crucial second messenger in the cardiovascular system. However, calcium may also be an extracellular first messenger through a G-protein-coupled receptor that senses extracellular concentration (Ca(2+)(o)), the calcium-sensing receptor (CaR). The most prominent physiological function of the CaR is to maintain the extracellular Ca(2+) level in a very tight range by regulating the circulating levels of parathyroid hormone (PTH). This control over PTH and Ca(2+) levels is partially lost in patients suffering from primary and secondary hyperparathyroidism. Allosteric modulators of the CaR (calcimimetics) are the first drugs in their class to become available for clinical use and have been shown to successfully treat certain forms of primary and secondary hyperparathyroidism. In addition, several studies suggest beneficial effects of calcimimetics on cardiovascular risk factors associated with hyperparathyroidism. Although a plethora of studies demonstrated the CaR in heart and blood vessels, exact roles of the receptor in the cardiovascular system still remain to be elucidated. However, several studies point toward a possibility that the CaR might be involved in the regulation of vascular tone. This review will summarize the current knowledge on the possible functions of the CaR and calcimimetics on blood pressure regulation.

  20. A hybrid fiber-optic sensing system for down-hole pressure and distributed temperature measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Ke; Zhou, Xinlei; Yang, Bokai; Peng, Wei; Yu, Qingxu

    2015-10-01

    A hybrid fiber-optic sensing technique, combining the extrinsic Fabry-Perot interferometer (EFPI) based pressure sensor with the incoherent optical frequency domain reflectometry (IOFDR) based distributed temperature sensor (DTS), is presented for down-hole measurements. By using a laser diode as the common light source, a highly integrated hybrid EFPI/DTS sensing system has been developed with a single fiber. With the injection current of the laser diode below lasing threshold, the broadband spontaneous emission light is used for EFPI based pressure sensing; while with the injection current above the threshold, the stimulated emission light is used for Raman based distributed temperature sensing. There is no overlap between the spectral range of the reflected light from the EFPI sensor and the spectral range of the Raman scattered light. Pressure and distributed temperature can thus be measured by using wavelength-division multiplexing (WDM) technology. Experimental results show that both the pressure and the distributed temperature are measured with little interference. Furthermore, the pressure measurement can be compensated by the measured temperature values.

  1. A dynamic pressure generator for checking complete pressure sensing systems installed on an airplane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Demarco, D. M.

    1974-01-01

    A portable dynamic pressure generator, how it operates, and a test setup on an airplane are described. The generator is capable of providing a sinusoidal pressure having a peak-to-peak amplitude of 3.5 N/sq cm (5 psi) at frequencies ranging from 100 hertz to 200 hertz. A typical power spectral density plot of data from actual dynamic pressure fluctuation tests within the air inlet of the YF-12 airplane is presented.

  2. Simultaneous shear and pressure sensing based on patch antenna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Hao; Huang, Haiying

    2015-04-01

    In this paper, we presented a microstrip patch antenna sensor that is capable to measure the shear and normal deformations simultaneously. The sensor was designed based on the electromagnetic interference between a microstrip patch antenna and a metallic reflector separated by a distance. By placing the reflector on top of the patch antenna, the electromagnetic wave radiated by the patch antenna is reflected by the reflector and interferes with the electromagnetic field of the radiation patch, which in turn changes the antenna resonant frequencies. Since the antenna resonant frequencies are related to the lateral and vertical positions of the metallic reflector, the shear force and normal pressure that shift the reflector laterally and vertically can be detected by monitoring the antenna resonant frequencies. The numerical simulation and experimental measurements were carried out to evaluate the relationship between the antenna resonant frequencies and the shear and normal displacements. A data processing scheme was developed to inversely determine the shear and normal displacements from the antenna resonant frequencies.

  3. A piezoelectric micro control valve with integrated capacitive sensing for ambulant blood pressure waveform monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Groen, Maarten S.; Wu, Kai; Brookhuis, Robert A.; van Houwelingen, Marc J.; Brouwer, Dannis M.; Lötters, Joost C.; Wiegerink, Remco J.

    2014-12-01

    We have designed and characterized a MEMS microvalve with built-in capacitive displacement sensing and fitted it with a miniature piezoelectric actuator to achieve active valve control. The integrated displacement sensor enables high bandwidth proportional control of the gas flow through the valve. This is an essential requirement for non-invasive blood pressure waveform monitoring based on following the arterial pressure with a counter pressure. Using the capacitive sensor, we demonstrate negligible hysteresis in the valve control characteristics. Fabrication of the valve requires only two mask steps for deep reactive ion etching (DRIE) and one release etch.

  4. Self-motion effects on hydrodynamic pressure sensing: part I. forward-backward motion.

    PubMed

    Akanyeti, Otar; Chambers, Lily D; Ježov, Jaas; Brown, Jennifer; Venturelli, Roberto; Kruusmaa, Maarja; Megill, William M; Fiorini, Paolo

    2013-06-01

    In underwater locomotion, extracting meaningful information from local flows is as desirable as it is challenging, due to complex fluid-structure interaction. Sensing and motion are tightly interconnected; hydrodynamic signals generated by the external stimuli are modified by the self-generated flow signals. Given that very little is known about self-generated signals, we used onboard pressure sensors to measure the pressure profiles over the head of a fusiform-shape craft while moving forward and backward harmonically. From these measurements we obtained a second-order polynomial model which incorporates the velocity and acceleration of the craft to estimate the surface pressure within the swimming range up to one body length/second (L s(-1)). The analysis of the model reveals valuable insights into the temporal and spatial changes of the pressure intensity as a function of craft's velocity. At low swimming velocities (<0.2 L s(-1)) the pressure signals are more sensitive to the acceleration of the craft than its velocity. However, the inertial effects gradually become less important as the velocity increases. The sensors on the front part of the craft are more sensitive to its movements than the sensors on the sides. With respect to the hydrostatic pressure measured in still water, the pressure detected by the foremost sensor reaches values up to 300 Pa at 1 L s(-1) swimming velocity, whereas the pressure difference between the foremost sensor and the next one is less than 50 Pa. Our results suggest that distributed pressure sensing can be used in a bimodal sensing strategy. The first mode detects external hydrodynamic events taking place around the craft, which requires minimal sensitivity to the self-motion of the craft. This can be accomplished by moving slowly with a constant velocity and by analyzing the pressure gradient as opposed to absolute pressure recordings. The second mode monitors the self-motion of the craft. It is shown here that

  5. In-shoe plantar pressure measurement and analysis system based on fabric pressure sensing array.

    PubMed

    Shu, Lin; Hua, Tao; Wang, Yangyong; Qiao Li, Qiao; Feng, David Dagan; Tao, Xiaoming

    2010-05-01

    Spatial and temporal plantar pressure distributions are important and useful measures in footwear evaluation, athletic training, clinical gait analysis, and pathology foot diagnosis. However, present plantar pressure measurement and analysis systems are more or less uncomfortable to wear and expensive. This paper presents an in-shoe plantar pressure measurement and analysis system based on a textile fabric sensor array, which is soft, light, and has a high-pressure sensitivity and a long service life. The sensors are connected with a soft polymeric board through conductive yarns and integrated into an insole. A stable data acquisition system interfaces with the insole, wirelessly transmits the acquired data to remote receiver through Bluetooth path. Three configuration modes are incorporated to gain connection with desktop, laptop, or smart phone, which can be configured to comfortably work in research laboratories, clinics, sport ground, and other outdoor environments. A real-time display and analysis software is presented to calculate parameters such as mean pressure, peak pressure, center of pressure (COP), and shift speed of COP. Experimental results show that this system has stable performance in both static and dynamic measurements.

  6. PyzoFlex: a printed piezoelectric pressure sensing foil for human machine interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zirkl, M.; Scheipl, G.; Stadlober, B.; Rendl, C.; Greindl, P.; Haller, M.; Hartmann, P.

    2013-09-01

    Ferroelectric material supports both pyro- and piezoelectric effects that can be used for sensing pressures on large, bended surfaces. We present PyzoFlex, a pressure-sensing input device that is based on a ferroelectric material (PVDF:TrFE). It is constructed by a sandwich structure of four layers that can easily be printed on any substrate. The PyzoFlex foil is sensitive to pressure- and temperature changes, bendable, energy-efficient, and it can easily be produced by a screen-printing routine. Even a hovering input-mode is feasible due to its pyroelectric effect. In this paper, we introduce this novel, fully printed input technology and discuss its benefits and limitations.

  7. A harsh environment wireless pressure sensing solution utilizing high temperature electronics.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jie

    2013-02-27

    Pressure measurement under harsh environments, especially at high temperatures, is of great interest to many industries. The applicability of current pressure sensing technologies in extreme environments is limited by the embedded electronics which cannot survive beyond 300 °C ambient temperature as of today. In this paper, a pressure signal processing and wireless transmission module based on the cutting-edge Silicon Carbide (SiC) devices is designed and developed, for a commercial piezoresistive MEMS pressure sensor from Kulite Semiconductor Products, Inc. Equipped with this advanced high-temperature SiC electronics, not only the sensor head, but the entire pressure sensor suite is capable of operating at 450 °C. The addition of wireless functionality also makes the pressure sensor more flexible in harsh environments by eliminating the costly and fragile cable connections. The proposed approach was verified through prototype fabrication and high temperature bench testing from room temperature up to 450 °C. This novel high-temperature pressure sensing technology can be applied in real-time health monitoring of many systems involving harsh environments, such as military and commercial turbine engines.

  8. A Harsh Environment Wireless Pressure Sensing Solution Utilizing High Temperature Electronics

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jie

    2013-01-01

    Pressure measurement under harsh environments, especially at high temperatures, is of great interest to many industries. The applicability of current pressure sensing technologies in extreme environments is limited by the embedded electronics which cannot survive beyond 300 °C ambient temperature as of today. In this paper, a pressure signal processing and wireless transmission module based on the cutting-edge Silicon Carbide (SiC) devices is designed and developed, for a commercial piezoresistive MEMS pressure sensor from Kulite Semiconductor Products, Inc. Equipped with this advanced high-temperature SiC electronics, not only the sensor head, but the entire pressure sensor suite is capable of operating at 450 °C. The addition of wireless functionality also makes the pressure sensor more flexible in harsh environments by eliminating the costly and fragile cable connections. The proposed approach was verified through prototype fabrication and high temperature bench testing from room temperature up to 450 °C. This novel high-temperature pressure sensing technology can be applied in real-time health monitoring of many systems involving harsh environments, such as military and commercial turbine engines. PMID:23447006

  9. Conducting a wind sensing study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Byer, R. L.

    1985-01-01

    Signal-to-noise requirements, and how signal-to-noise determines wind velocity measurement accuracy were studied. A Nd:YAG-based system was found to be competitive with a CO2-based system. Hardware was developed for a coherent Nd:YAG LIDAR system, and is being integrated into a functioning system. A diode-pumped monolithic rod laser to be used as a reference oscillator, a high-power, single-mode ring laser, for use as a master oscillator, and a high-gain, multipass amplifier were constructed.

  10. Pressure sensing of Fabry-Perot interferometer with a microchannel demodulated by a FBG

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Yongqin; Chen, Xue; Huang, Quandong; Du, Chenlin; Ruan, Shuangchen

    2015-07-01

    A novel and compact fiber-probe pressure sensor was demonstrated based on micro Fabry-Perot interferometer (FPI). The device was fabricated by splicing both ends of a short section simplified hollow-core photonic crystal fiber (SHCPCF) with single mode fibers (SMFs), and then a micro channel was drilled by femtosecond laser micromachining in the SHC-PCF to significantly enhance the pressure sensitivity. The pressure sensing characteristics based on micro-FPI have been investigated by measuring the signals through the demodulation of phase since the external signal imposing on the interferometer will induce the phase change of interference signal. Then a FBG was cascaded to demodulate the signal. A micro FPI demonstrates a maximum pressure sensitivity of 32 dB/MPa, while a low temperature cross-sensitivity of 0.27 KPa/°C. Hence it may have potential for pressure applications in harsh environment.

  11. Pressure sensing of the atmosphere by solar occultation using broadband CO(2) absorption.

    PubMed

    Park, J H; Russell Iii, J M; Drayson, S R

    1979-06-15

    A technique for obtaining pressure at the tangent point in an IR solar occultation experiment is described. By measuring IR absorption in bands of atmospheric CO(2) (e.g., 2.0 microm, 2.7 microm, or 4.3 microm), mean pressure values for each tangent point layer (vertical thickness 2 km or less) of the atmosphere can be obtained with rms errors of less than 3%. The simultaneous retrieval of pressure and gas concentration in a remote-sensing experiment will increase the accuracy of inverted gas concentrations and minimize the dependence of the experiment on pressure or mass path error resulting from use of climatological pressure data, satellite ephemeris, and instrument pointing accuracy.

  12. The association of remotely-sensed outdoor temperature with blood pressure levels in REGARDS: a cross-sectional study of a large, national cohort of African-American and white participants

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Evidence is mounting regarding the clinically significant effect of temperature on blood pressure. Methods In this cross-sectional study the authors obtained minimum and maximum temperatures and their respective previous week variances at the geographic locations of the self-reported residences of 26,018 participants from a national cohort of blacks and whites, aged 45+. Linear regression of data from 20,623 participants was used in final multivariable models to determine if these temperature measures were associated with levels of systolic or diastolic blood pressure, and whether these relations were modified by stroke-risk region, race, education, income, sex hypertensive medication status, or age. Results After adjustment for confounders, same-day maximum temperatures 20°F lower had significant associations with 1.4 mmHg (95% CI: 1.0, 1.9) higher systolic and 0.5 mmHg (95% CI: 0.3, 0.8) higher diastolic blood pressures. Same-day minimum temperatures 20°F lower had a significant association with 0.7 mmHg (95% CI: 0.3, 1.0) higher systolic blood pressures but no significant association with diastolic blood pressure differences. Maximum and minimum previous-week temperature variabilities showed significant but weak relationships with blood pressures. Parameter estimates showed effect modification of negligible magnitude. Conclusions This study found significant associations between outdoor temperature and blood pressure levels, which remained after adjustment for various confounders including season. This relationship showed negligible effect modification. PMID:21247466

  13. Initial development and testing of a novel foam-based pressure sensor for wearable sensing

    PubMed Central

    Dunne, Lucy E; Brady, Sarah; Smyth, Barry; Diamond, Dermot

    2005-01-01

    Background This paper provides an overview of initial research conducted in the development of pressure-sensitive foam and its application in wearable sensing. The foam sensor is composed of polypyrrole-coated polyurethane foam, which exhibits a piezo-resistive reaction when exposed to electrical current. The use of this polymer-coated foam is attractive for wearable sensing due to the sensor's retention of desirable mechanical properties similar to those exhibited by textile structures. Methods The development of the foam sensor is described, as well as the development of a prototype sensing garment with sensors in several areas on the torso to measure breathing, shoulder movement, neck movement, and scapula pressure. Sensor properties were characterized, and data from pilot tests was examined visually. Results The foam exhibits a positive linear conductance response to increased pressure. Torso tests show that it responds in a predictable and measurable manner to breathing, shoulder movement, neck movement, and scapula pressure. Conclusion The polypyrrole foam shows considerable promise as a sensor for medical, wearable, and ubiquitous computing applications. Further investigation of the foam's consistency of response, durability over time, and specificity of response is necessary. PMID:15740623

  14. LAVA Pressure Transducer Trade Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oltman, Samuel B.

    2016-01-01

    The Regolith and Environment Science and Oxygen and Lunar Volatile Extraction (RESOLVE) payload will transport the (LAVA) subsystem to hydrogen-rich locations on the moon supporting NASA's in-situ resource utilization (ISRU) programs. There, the LAVA subsystem will analyze volatiles that evolve from heated regolith samples in order to quantify how much water is present. To do this, the system needs resilient pressure transducers (PTs) to calculate the moles in the gas samples. The PT trade study includes a comparison of newly-procured models to a baseline unit with prior flight history in order to determine the PT model with the best survivability in flight-forward conditions.

  15. The Study of Number Sense and Teaching Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tsao, Yea-Ling; Lin, Yi-Chung

    2011-01-01

    The goal of this study was to investigate understanding of inservice elementary school teachers in Taiwan about number sense, teaching strategies of number sense and the development of number sense of students; and the profile of integrating number sense into mathematical instruction , and teaching practice. Data was gathered through interviews of…

  16. Tuning the sensing range of silicon pressure sensor by trench etching technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chou, Yu-Tuan; Lin, Hung-Yi; Hu, Hsin-Hua

    2006-01-01

    The silicon pressure sensor has been developed for over thirty years and widely used in automobiles, medical instruments, commercial electronics, etc. There are many different specifications of silicon pressure sensors that cover a very large sensing range, from less than 1 psi to as high as 1000 psi. The key elements of the silicon pressure sensor are a square membrane and the piezoresistive strain gages near the boundary of the membrane. The dimensions of the membrane determine the full sensing range and the sensitivity of the silicon sensor, including thickness and in-plane length. Unfortunately, in order to change the sensing range, the manufacturers need to order a customized epi wafer to get the desired thickness. All masks (usually six) have to be re-laid and re-fabricated for different membrane sizes. The existing technology requires at least three months to deliver the prototype for specific customer requests or the new application market. This research proposes a new approach to dramatically reduce the prototyping time from three months to one week. The concept is to tune the rigidity of the sensing membrane by modifying the boundary conditions without changing the plenary size. An extra mask is utilized to define the geometry and location of deep-RIE trenches and all other masks remain the same. Membranes with different depths and different patterns of trenches are designed for different full sensing ranges. The simulation results show that for a 17um thick and 750um wide membrane, the adjustable range by tuning trench depth is about 45% (from 5um to 10um), and can go to as high as 100% by tuning both the pattern and depth of the trenches. Based on an actual test in a product fabrication line, we verified that the total delivery time can be minimized to one week to make the prototyping very effective and cost-efficient.

  17. Fabrication and performance of pressure-sensing device consisting of electret film and organic semiconductor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kodzasa, Takehito; Nobeshima, Daiki; Kuribara, Kazunori; Uemura, Sei; Yoshida, Manabu

    2017-04-01

    We propose a new concept of a pressure-sensitive device that consists of an organic electret film and an organic semiconductor. This device exhibits high sensitivity and selectivity against various types of pressure. The sensing mechanism of this device originates from a modulation of the electric conductivity of the organic semiconductor film induced by the interaction between the semiconductor film and the charged electret film placed face to face. It is expected that a complicated sensor array will be fabricated by using a roll-to-roll manufacturing system, because this device can be prepared by an all-printing and simple lamination process without high-level positional adjustment for printing processes. This also shows that this device with a simple structure is suitable for application to a highly flexible device array sheet for an Internet of Things (IoT) or wearable sensing system.

  18. Formulation of a minimum variance deconvolution technique for compensation of pneumatic distortion in pressure sensing devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitmore, Stephen A.

    1990-01-01

    Increasingly, aircraft system designs require that aerodynamic parameters derived from pneumatic measurements be employed as control-system feedbacks. Such high frequency pressure measurements' accuracy is compromised by pressure distortion due to frictional attenuation and pneumatic resonance within the sensing system. A pneumatic distortion model is here formulated and reduced to a low-order state-variable model which retains most of the full model's dynamic characteristics. This reduced-order model is coupled with standard results from minimum variance estimation theory to develop an algorithm to compensate for pneumatic-distortion effects.

  19. Formulation of a minimum variance deconvolution technique for compensation of pneumatic distortion in pressure sensing devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitmore, Stephen A.

    1990-01-01

    Increasingly, aircraft system designs require that aerodynamic parameters derived from pneumatic measurements be employed as control-system feedbacks. Such high frequency pressure measurements' accuracy is compromised by pressure distortion due to frictional attenuation and pneumatic resonance within the sensing system. A pneumatic distortion model is here formulated and reduced to a low-order state-variable model which retains most of the full model's dynamic characteristics. This reduced-order model is coupled with standard results from minimum variance estimation theory to develop an algorithm to compensate for pneumatic-distortion effects.

  20. Surface studies of gas sensing metal oxides.

    PubMed

    Batzill, Matthias; Diebold, Ulrike

    2007-05-21

    The relation of surface science studies of single crystal metal oxides to gas sensing applications is reviewed. Most metal oxide gas sensors are used to detect oxidizing or reducing gases and therefore this article focuses on surface reduction processes and the interaction of oxygen with these surfaces. The systems that are discussed are: (i) the oxygen vacancy formation on the surface of the ion conductor CeO(2)(111); (ii) interaction of oxygen with TiO(2) (both adsorption processes and the incorporation of oxygen into the TiO(2)(110) lattice are discussed); (iii) the varying surface composition of SnO(2)(101) and its consequence for the adsorption of water; and (iv) Cu modified ZnO(0001)-Zn surfaces and its interaction with oxygen. These examples are chosen to give a comprehensive overview of surface science studies of different kinds of gas sensing materials and to illustrate the potential that surface science studies have to give fundamental insight into gas sensing phenomena.

  1. Technology study of quantum remote sensing imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bi, Siwen; Lin, Xuling; Yang, Song; Wu, Zhiqiang

    2016-02-01

    According to remote sensing science and technology development and application requirements, quantum remote sensing is proposed. First on the background of quantum remote sensing, quantum remote sensing theory, information mechanism, imaging experiments and prototype principle prototype research situation, related research at home and abroad are briefly introduced. Then we expounds compress operator of the quantum remote sensing radiation field and the basic principles of single-mode compression operator, quantum quantum light field of remote sensing image compression experiment preparation and optical imaging, the quantum remote sensing imaging principle prototype, Quantum remote sensing spaceborne active imaging technology is brought forward, mainly including quantum remote sensing spaceborne active imaging system composition and working principle, preparation and injection compression light active imaging device and quantum noise amplification device. Finally, the summary of quantum remote sensing research in the past 15 years work and future development are introduced.

  2. High pressure sensing and dynamics using high speed fiber Bragg grating interrogation systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez, G.; Sandberg, R. L.; Lalone, B. M.; Marshall, B. R.; Grover, M.; Stevens, G.; Udd, E.

    2014-06-01

    Fiber Bragg gratings (FBGs) are developing into useful sensing tools for measuring high pressure dynamics in extreme environments under shock loading conditions. Approaches using traditional diode array coupled FBG interrogation systems are often limited to readout speeds in the sub-MHz range. For shock wave physics, required detection speeds approaching 100 MHz are desired. We explore the use of two types of FBG sensing systems that are aimed at applying this technology as embedded high pressure probes for transient shock events. Both approaches measure time resolved spectral shifts in the return light from short (few mm long) uniform FBGs at 1550 nm. In the first approach, we use a fiber coupled spectrometer to demultiplex spectral channels into an array (up to 12) of single element InGaAs photoreceivers. By monitoring the detectors during a shock impact event with high speed recording, we are able to track the pressure induced spectral shifting in FBG down to a time resolution of 20 ns. In the second approach, developed at the Special Technologies Lab, a coherent mode-locked fiber laser is used to illuminate the FBG sensor. After the sensor, wavelength-to-time mapping is accomplished with a chromatic dispersive element, and entire spectra are sampled using a single detector at the modelocked laser repetition rate of 50 MHz. By sampling with a 12 GHz InGaAs detector, direct wavelength mapping in time is recorded, and the pressure induced FBG spectral shift is sampled at 50 MHz. Here, the sensing systems are used to monitor the spectral shifts of FBGs that are immersed into liquid water and shock compressed using explosives. In this configuration, the gratings survive to pressures approaching 50 kbar. We describe both approaches and present the measured spectral shifts from the shock experiments.

  3. High Pressure Sensing and Dynamics Using High Speed Fiber Bragg Grating Interrogation Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Rodriguez, G.; Sandberg, R. L.; Lalone, B. M.; Marshall, B. R.; Grover, M.; Stevens, G. D.; Udd, E.

    2014-06-01

    Fiber Bragg gratings (FBGs) are developing into useful sensing tools for measuring high pressure dynamics in extreme environments under shock loading conditions. Approaches using traditional diode array coupled FBG interrogation systems are often limited to readout speeds in the sub-MHz range. For shock wave physics, required detection speeds approaching 100 MHz are desired. We explore the use of two types of FBG sensing systems that are aimed at applying this technology as embedded high pressure probes for transient shock events. Both approaches measure time resolved spectral shifts in the return light from short (few mm long) uniform FBGs at 1550 nm. In the first approach, we use a fiber coupled spectrometer to demultiplex spectral channels into an array (up to 12) of single element InGaAs photoreceivers. By monitoring the detectors during a shock impact event with high speed recording, we are able to track the pressure induced spectral shifting in FBG down to a time resolution of 20 ns. In the second approach, developed at the Special Technologies Lab, a coherent mode-locked fiber laser is used to illuminate the FBG sensor. After the sensor, wavelength-to-time mapping is accomplished with a chromatic dispersive element, and entire spectra are sampled using a single detector at the modelocked laser repetition rate of 50 MHz. By sampling with a 12 GHz InGaAs detector, direct wavelength mapping in time is recorded, and the pressure induced FBG spectral shift is sampled at 50 MHz. Here, the sensing systems are used to monitor the spectral shifts of FBGs that are immersed into liquid water and shock compressed using explosives. In this configuration, the gratings survive to pressures approaching 50 kbar. We describe both approaches and present the measured spectral shifts from the shock experiments.

  4. Validating the method of pressure sensing to optimize flapping foil energy extraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Persichetti, Amanda J.

    Renewable energy resources are in high demand due to a world-wide desire for cleaner energy production. Flapping foil tidal driven systems have begun being tested and implemented at prototype scales. These prototype systems use limited control to maximize energy production. This thesis uses biological inspiration from the sensory system in fish to enhance the efficiency of these energy harnessing systems with the use of surface mounted pressure sensing. Eight pressure sensors were found to be a good balance for quantity with respect to cost and accuracy. Optimal locations around the foil were determined from application of a Random Search algorithm and a fluid moment approximation. A 2-D numerical code was created to simulate a NACA0015 flapping foil in uniform potential flow. A wide parameter space of sinusoidal heave and pitch motions was run and a database of force, pressure, and efficiency values along with flow visualization was built. An efficiency of 0.43 was reached for the trajectory of motion with a pitch amplitude of 90 degrees, heave amplitude of 1.25 and a Strouhal number of 0.5. A control platform dependent on pressure measurements at the eight sensor locations was created in the 2-D numerical code. By implementing basic control, motion trajectories converge to the optimal motion based on pressure comparisons around the foil to pressure traces from the motion with highest efficiency. In addition, a laboratory for experimental testing and validation was set-up. The motion control system was connected and tested for a tow tank set-up. Motion programs were written for the same parameter space modeled in this thesis. Through numerical modeling, pressure sensing was found to be an effective method to enhancing the efficiency of a flapping foil energy extraction system.

  5. The vascular Ca2+-sensing receptor regulates blood vessel tone and blood pressure

    PubMed Central

    Schepelmann, M.; Yarova, P. L.; Lopez-Fernandez, I.; Davies, T. S.; Brennan, S. C.; Edwards, P. J.; Aggarwal, A.; Graça, J.; Rietdorf, K.; Matchkov, V.; Fenton, R. A.; Chang, W.; Krssak, M.; Stewart, A.; Broadley, K. J.; Ward, D. T.; Price, S. A.; Edwards, D. H.; Kemp, P. J.

    2015-01-01

    The extracellular calcium-sensing receptor CaSR is expressed in blood vessels where its role is not completely understood. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that the CaSR expressed in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC) is directly involved in regulation of blood pressure and blood vessel tone. Mice with targeted CaSR gene ablation from vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC) were generated by breeding exon 7 LoxP-CaSR mice with animals in which Cre recombinase is driven by a SM22α promoter (SM22α-Cre). Wire myography performed on Cre-negative [wild-type (WT)] and Cre-positive SM22αCaSRΔflox/Δflox [knockout (KO)] mice showed an endothelium-independent reduction in aorta and mesenteric artery contractility of KO compared with WT mice in response to KCl and to phenylephrine. Increasing extracellular calcium ion (Ca2+) concentrations (1–5 mM) evoked contraction in WT but only relaxation in KO aortas. Accordingly, diastolic and mean arterial blood pressures of KO animals were significantly reduced compared with WT, as measured by both tail cuff and radiotelemetry. This hypotension was mostly pronounced during the animals' active phase and was not rescued by either nitric oxide-synthase inhibition with nitro-l-arginine methyl ester or by a high-salt-supplemented diet. KO animals also exhibited cardiac remodeling, bradycardia, and reduced spontaneous activity in isolated hearts and cardiomyocyte-like cells. Our findings demonstrate a role for CaSR in the cardiovascular system and suggest that physiologically relevant changes in extracellular Ca2+ concentrations could contribute to setting blood vessel tone levels and heart rate by directly acting on the cardiovascular CaSR. PMID:26538090

  6. The vascular Ca2+-sensing receptor regulates blood vessel tone and blood pressure.

    PubMed

    Schepelmann, M; Yarova, P L; Lopez-Fernandez, I; Davies, T S; Brennan, S C; Edwards, P J; Aggarwal, A; Graça, J; Rietdorf, K; Matchkov, V; Fenton, R A; Chang, W; Krssak, M; Stewart, A; Broadley, K J; Ward, D T; Price, S A; Edwards, D H; Kemp, P J; Riccardi, D

    2016-02-01

    The extracellular calcium-sensing receptor CaSR is expressed in blood vessels where its role is not completely understood. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that the CaSR expressed in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC) is directly involved in regulation of blood pressure and blood vessel tone. Mice with targeted CaSR gene ablation from vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC) were generated by breeding exon 7 LoxP-CaSR mice with animals in which Cre recombinase is driven by a SM22α promoter (SM22α-Cre). Wire myography performed on Cre-negative [wild-type (WT)] and Cre-positive (SM22α)CaSR(Δflox/Δflox) [knockout (KO)] mice showed an endothelium-independent reduction in aorta and mesenteric artery contractility of KO compared with WT mice in response to KCl and to phenylephrine. Increasing extracellular calcium ion (Ca(2+)) concentrations (1-5 mM) evoked contraction in WT but only relaxation in KO aortas. Accordingly, diastolic and mean arterial blood pressures of KO animals were significantly reduced compared with WT, as measured by both tail cuff and radiotelemetry. This hypotension was mostly pronounced during the animals' active phase and was not rescued by either nitric oxide-synthase inhibition with nitro-l-arginine methyl ester or by a high-salt-supplemented diet. KO animals also exhibited cardiac remodeling, bradycardia, and reduced spontaneous activity in isolated hearts and cardiomyocyte-like cells. Our findings demonstrate a role for CaSR in the cardiovascular system and suggest that physiologically relevant changes in extracellular Ca(2+) concentrations could contribute to setting blood vessel tone levels and heart rate by directly acting on the cardiovascular CaSR.

  7. Applications of tunable high energy/pressure pulsed lasers to atmospheric transmission and remote sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hess, R. V.; Seals, R. K.

    1974-01-01

    Atmospheric transmission of high energy C12 O2(16) lasers were improved by pulsed high pressure operation which, due to pressure broadening of laser lines, permits tuning the laser 'off' atmospheric C12 O2(16) absorption lines. Pronounced improvement is shown for horizontal transmission at altitudes above several kilometers, and for vertical transmission through the entire atmosphere. The atmospheric transmission of tuned C12 O2(16) lasers compares favorably with C12 O2(18) isotope lasers and CO lasers. The advantages of tunable, high energy, high pressure pulsed lasers over tunable diode lasers and waveguide lasers, in combining high energies with a large tuning range, are evaluated for certain applications to remote sensing of atmospheric constituents and pollutants. Pulsed operation considerably increases the signal to noise ratio without seriously affecting the high spectral resolution of signal detection obtained with laser heterodyning.

  8. Integrated electrofluidic circuits: pressure sensing with analog and digital operation functionalities for microfluidics.

    PubMed

    Wu, Chueh-Yu; Lu, Jau-Ching; Liu, Man-Chi; Tung, Yi-Chung

    2012-10-21

    Microfluidic technology plays an essential role in various lab on a chip devices due to its desired advantages. An automated microfluidic system integrated with actuators and sensors can further achieve better controllability. A number of microfluidic actuation schemes have been well developed. In contrast, most of the existing sensing methods still heavily rely on optical observations and external transducers, which have drawbacks including: costly instrumentation, professional operation, tedious interfacing, and difficulties of scaling up and further signal processing. This paper reports the concept of electrofluidic circuits - electrical circuits which are constructed using ionic liquid (IL)-filled fluidic channels. The developed electrofluidic circuits can be fabricated using a well-developed multi-layer soft lithography (MSL) process with polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) microfluidic channels. Electrofluidic circuits allow seamless integration of pressure sensors with analog and digital operation functions into microfluidic systems and provide electrical readouts for further signal processing. In the experiments, the analog operation device is constructed based on electrofluidic Wheatstone bridge circuits with electrical outputs of the addition and subtraction results of the applied pressures. The digital operation (AND, OR, and XOR) devices are constructed using the electrofluidic pressure controlled switches, and output electrical signals of digital operations of the applied pressures. The experimental results demonstrate the designed functions for analog and digital operations of applied pressures are successfully achieved using the developed electrofluidic circuits, making them promising to develop integrated microfluidic systems with capabilities of precise pressure monitoring and further feedback control for advanced lab on a chip applications.

  9. Satellite remote sensing in epidemiological studies.

    PubMed

    Sorek-Hamer, Meytar; Just, Allan C; Kloog, Itai

    2016-04-01

    Particulate matter air pollution is a ubiquitous exposure linked with multiple adverse health outcomes for children and across the life course. The recent development of satellite-based remote-sensing models for air pollution enables the quantification of these risks and addresses many limitations of previous air pollution research strategies. We review the recent literature on the applications of satellite remote sensing in air quality research, with a focus on their use in epidemiological studies. Aerosol optical depth (AOD) is a focus of this review and a significant number of studies show that ground-level particulate matter can be estimated from columnar AOD. Satellite measurements have been found to be an important source of data for particulate matter model-based exposure estimates, and recently have been used in health studies to increase the spatial breadth and temporal resolution of these estimates. It is suggested that satellite-based models improve our understanding of the spatial characteristics of air quality. Although the adoption of satellite-based measures of air quality in health studies is in its infancy, it is rapidly growing. Nevertheless, further investigation is still needed in order to have a better understanding of the AOD contribution to these prediction models in order to use them with higher accuracy in epidemiological studies.

  10. Randomized crossover trial of a pressure sensing visual feedback system to improve mask fitting in noninvasive ventilation.

    PubMed

    Brill, Anne-Kathrin; Moghal, Mohammad; Morrell, Mary J; Simonds, Anita K

    2017-10-01

    A good mask fit, avoiding air leaks and pressure effects on the skin are key elements for a successful noninvasive ventilation (NIV). However, delivering practical training for NIV is challenging, and it takes time to build experience and competency. This study investigated whether a pressure sensing system with real-time visual feedback improved mask fitting. During an NIV training session, 30 healthcare professionals (14 trained in mask fitting and 16 untrained) performed two mask fittings on the same healthy volunteer in a randomized order: one using standard mask-fitting procedures and one with additional visual feedback on mask pressure on the nasal bridge. Participants were required to achieve a mask fit with low mask pressure and minimal air leak (<10 L/min). Pressure exerted on the nasal bridge, perceived comfort of mask fit and staff- confidence were measured. Compared with standard mask fitting, a lower pressure was exerted on the nasal bridge using the feedback system (71.1 ± 17.6 mm Hg vs 63.2 ± 14.6 mm Hg, P < 0.001). Both untrained and trained healthcare professionals were able to reduce the pressure on the nasal bridge (74.5 ± 21.2 mm Hg vs 66.1 ± 17.4 mm Hg, P = 0.023 and 67 ± 12.1 mm Hg vs 60 ± 10.6 mm Hg, P = 0.002, respectively) using the feedback system and self-rated confidence increased in the untrained group. Real-time visual feedback using pressure sensing technology supported healthcare professionals during mask-fitting training, resulted in a lower pressure on the skin and better mask fit for the volunteer, with increased staff confidence. © 2017 Asian Pacific Society of Respirology.

  11. CO2 sensing at atmospheric pressure using fiber Fabry-Perot interferometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Wenwen; He, Yelu; Zhao, Yangfan; Shen, Shilei; Wang, Ruohui; Qiao, Xueguang

    2017-05-01

    A Fabry-Perot interferometer (FPI) for CO2 gas sensing at atmospheric pressure is proposed and experimentally demonstrated. The gas sensing material is poly(ethyleneimine) (PEI)/poly(vinylalcohol) (PVA) compound, which exhibits reversible refrative index change upon absorption and release of CO2 gas molecules. The FPI is fabricated by coating a PEI/P VA film with a thickness of 15μm film at the end face of a single-mode fiber (SMF). A well-confined interference spectrum with fringe contrast of 19.5 dB and free spectra range (FSR) of 33.15 nm is obtained. The proposed FPI sensor is sensitive to the CO2 gas concentration change, and a sensitivity of 0.2833nm/PCT is obtained. The FPI sensor provides a solution in the development of low-cost and compact gas sensors for CO2 leakage monitoring.

  12. Sensing the characteristic acoustic impedance of a fluid utilizing acoustic pressure waves

    PubMed Central

    Antlinger, Hannes; Clara, Stefan; Beigelbeck, Roman; Cerimovic, Samir; Keplinger, Franz; Jakoby, Bernhard

    2012-01-01

    Ultrasonic sensors can be used to determine physical fluid parameters like viscosity, density, and speed of sound. In this contribution, we present the concept for an integrated sensor utilizing pressure waves to sense the characteristic acoustic impedance of a fluid. We note that the basic setup generally allows to determine the longitudinal viscosity and the speed of sound if it is operated in a resonant mode as will be discussed elsewhere. In this contribution, we particularly focus on a modified setup where interferences are suppressed by introducing a wedge reflector. This enables sensing of the liquid's characteristic acoustic impedance, which can serve as parameter in condition monitoring applications. We present a device model, experimental results and their evaluation. PMID:23565036

  13. Bio-Inspired Pressure Sensitive Foam Arrays for use in Hydrodynamic Sensing Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dusek, Jeff; Triantafyllou, Michael; Lang, Jeffrey

    2015-11-01

    Shallow, turbid, and highly dynamic coastal waters provide a challenging environment for safe and reliable operation of marine vehicles faced with a distinct environmentally driven perceptual deficit. In nature, fish have solved this perplexing sensory problem and exhibit an intimate knowledge of the near-body flow field. This enhanced perception is mediated by the ability to discern and interpret hydrodynamic flow structures through the velocity and pressure sensing capabilities of the fish's lateral line. Taking cues from biological sensory principles, highly conformal pressure sensor arrays have been developed utilizing a novel piezoresistive carbon black-PDMS foam active material. By leveraging the low Young's modulus and watertight structure of closed-cell PDMS (silicone) foam, the sensor arrays are well suited for hydrodynamic sensing applications and prolonged exposure to fluid environments. Prototype arrays were characterized experimentally using hydrodynamic stimuli inspired by biological flows, and were found to exhibit a high degree of sensitivity while improving on the flexibility, robustness, and cost of existing pressure sensors.

  14. BreathSens: A Continuous On-Bed Respiratory Monitoring System With Torso Localization Using an Unobtrusive Pressure Sensing Array.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jason J; Huang, Ming-Chun; Xu, Wenyao; Zhang, Xiaoyi; Stevens, Luke; Alshurafa, Nabil; Sarrafzadeh, Majid

    2015-09-01

    The ability to continuously monitor respiration rates of patients in homecare or in clinics is an important goal. Past research showed that monitoring patient breathing can lower the associated mortality rates for long-term bedridden patients. Nowadays, in-bed sensors consisting of pressure sensitive arrays are unobtrusive and are suitable for deployment in a wide range of settings. Such systems aim to extract respiratory signals from time-series pressure sequences. However, variance of movements, such as unpredictable extremities activities, affect the quality of the extracted respiratory signals. BreathSens, a high-density pressure sensing system made of e-Textile, profiles the underbody pressure distribution and localizes torso area based on the high-resolution pressure images. With a robust bodyparts localization algorithm, respiratory signals extracted from the localized torso area are insensitive to arbitrary extremities movements. In a study of 12 subjects, BreathSens demonstrated its respiratory monitoring capability with variations of sleep postures, locations, and commonly tilted clinical bed conditions.

  15. Sensing performances of ZnO nanostructures grown under different oxygen pressures to hydrogen

    SciTech Connect

    Chu, Jin; Peng, Xiaoyan; Wang, Zhenbo; Feng, Peter

    2012-12-15

    Graphical abstract: Display Omitted Highlights: ► Surface morphology depends on the oxygen pressure. ► Structural degradation was observed for the ZnO samples when oxygen pressure was overhigh. ► The sensitivity of the ZnO-based sensors increase with grown oxygen pressure. -- Abstract: For extensive use in an industrialized process of individual ZnO nanostructures applied in gas sensors, a simple, inexpensive, and safe synthesis process is required. Here, nanostructured ZnO films were grown by a pulsed laser deposition technique under different oxygen pressures. Scanning electron microscopy images show nanopores, nanotips, and nanoparticles are obtained and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy data indicate oxygen concentration of the synthesized samples increases monotonously with oxygen pressure. The sensor based on ZnO with high oxygen concentration has high sensitivity, rapid response (9 s) and recovery (80 s) behavior to 500 ppm hydrogen below 150 °C. Experimental data indicate that high oxygen concentration effectively improves the sensing properties of nanostructured ZnO.

  16. Coherent pulse interrogation system for fiber Bragg grating sensing of strain and pressure in dynamic extremes of materials

    DOE PAGES

    Rodriguez, George; Jaime, Marcelo; Balakirev, Fedor; ...

    2015-05-21

    A 100 MHz fiber Bragg grating (FBG) interrogation system is described and applied to strain and pressure sensing. The approach relies on coherent pulse illumination of the FBG sensor with a broadband short pulse from a femtosecond modelocked erbium fiber laser. After interrogation of the FBG sensor, a long multi-kilometer run of single mode fiber is used for chromatic dispersion to temporally stretch the spectral components of the reflected pulse from the FBG sensor. Dynamic strain or pressure induced spectral shifts in the FBG sensor are detected as a pulsed time domain waveform shift after encoding by the chromatic dispersivemore » line. Signals are recorded using a single 35 GHz photodetector and a 50 GSamples per second, 25 GHz bandwidth, digitizing oscilloscope. Application of this approach to high-speed strain sensing in magnetic materials in pulsed magnetic fields to ~150 T is demonstrated. The FBG wavelength shifts are used to study magnetic field driven magnetostriction effects in LaCoO₃. A sub-microsecond temporal shift in the FBG sensor wavelength attached to the sample under first order phase change appears as a fractional length change (strain: ΔL/L<10⁻⁴) in the material. A second application used FBG sensing of pressure dynamics to nearly 2 GPa in the thermal ignition of the high explosive PBX-9501 is also demonstrated. In conclusion, both applications demonstrate the use of this FBG interrogation system in dynamical extreme conditions that would otherwise not be possible using traditional FBG interrogation approaches that are deemed too slow to resolve such events.« less

  17. Coherent pulse interrogation system for fiber Bragg grating sensing of strain and pressure in dynamic extremes of materials

    SciTech Connect

    Rodriguez, George; Jaime, Marcelo; Balakirev, Fedor; Mielke, Chuck H.; Azad, Abul; Marshall, Bruce; La Lone, Brandon M.; Henson, Bryan; Smilowitz, Laura

    2015-05-21

    A 100 MHz fiber Bragg grating (FBG) interrogation system is described and applied to strain and pressure sensing. The approach relies on coherent pulse illumination of the FBG sensor with a broadband short pulse from a femtosecond modelocked erbium fiber laser. After interrogation of the FBG sensor, a long multi-kilometer run of single mode fiber is used for chromatic dispersion to temporally stretch the spectral components of the reflected pulse from the FBG sensor. Dynamic strain or pressure induced spectral shifts in the FBG sensor are detected as a pulsed time domain waveform shift after encoding by the chromatic dispersive line. Signals are recorded using a single 35 GHz photodetector and a 50 GSamples per second, 25 GHz bandwidth, digitizing oscilloscope. Application of this approach to high-speed strain sensing in magnetic materials in pulsed magnetic fields to ~150 T is demonstrated. The FBG wavelength shifts are used to study magnetic field driven magnetostriction effects in LaCoO₃. A sub-microsecond temporal shift in the FBG sensor wavelength attached to the sample under first order phase change appears as a fractional length change (strain: ΔL/L<10⁻⁴) in the material. A second application used FBG sensing of pressure dynamics to nearly 2 GPa in the thermal ignition of the high explosive PBX-9501 is also demonstrated. In conclusion, both applications demonstrate the use of this FBG interrogation system in dynamical extreme conditions that would otherwise not be possible using traditional FBG interrogation approaches that are deemed too slow to resolve such events.

  18. Coherent pulse interrogation system for fiber Bragg grating sensing of strain and pressure in dynamic extremes of materials

    DOE PAGES

    Rodriguez, George; Jaime, Marcelo; Balakirev, Fedor; ...

    2015-05-21

    A 100 MHz fiber Bragg grating (FBG) interrogation system is described and applied to strain and pressure sensing. The approach relies on coherent pulse illumination of the FBG sensor with a broadband short pulse from a femtosecond modelocked erbium fiber laser. After interrogation of the FBG sensor, a long multi-kilometer run of single mode fiber is used for chromatic dispersion to temporally stretch the spectral components of the reflected pulse from the FBG sensor. Dynamic strain or pressure induced spectral shifts in the FBG sensor are detected as a pulsed time domain waveform shift after encoding by the chromatic dispersivemore » line. Signals are recorded using a single 35 GHz photodetector and a 50 GSamples per second, 25 GHz bandwidth, digitizing oscilloscope. Application of this approach to high-speed strain sensing in magnetic materials in pulsed magnetic fields to ~150 T is demonstrated. The FBG wavelength shifts are used to study magnetic field driven magnetostriction effects in LaCoO₃. A sub-microsecond temporal shift in the FBG sensor wavelength attached to the sample under first order phase change appears as a fractional length change (strain: ΔL/L<10⁻⁴) in the material. A second application used FBG sensing of pressure dynamics to nearly 2 GPa in the thermal ignition of the high explosive PBX-9501 is also demonstrated. In conclusion, both applications demonstrate the use of this FBG interrogation system in dynamical extreme conditions that would otherwise not be possible using traditional FBG interrogation approaches that are deemed too slow to resolve such events.« less

  19. Piezoresistive Effect in Plasma-Doping of Graphene Sheet for High-Performance Flexible Pressure Sensing Application.

    PubMed

    Haniff, M A S M; Hafiz, S M; Huang, N M; Rahman, S A; Wahid, K A A; Syono, M I; Azid, I A

    2017-05-03

    This paper presents a straightforward plasma treatment modification of graphene with an enhanced piezoresistive effect for the realization of a high-performance pressure sensor. The changes in the graphene in terms of its morphology, structure, chemical composition, and electrical properties after the NH3/Ar plasma treatment were investigated in detail. Through a sufficient plasma treatment condition, our studies demonstrated that plasma-treated graphene sheet exhibits a significant increase in sensitivity by one order of magnitude compared to that of the unmodified graphene sheet. The plasma-doping introduced nitrogen (N) atoms inside the graphene structure and was found to play a significant role in enhancing the pressure sensing performance due to the tunneling behavior from the localized defects. The high sensitivity and good robustness demonstrated by the plasma-treated graphene sensor suggest a promising route for simple, low-cost, and ultrahigh resolution flexible sensors.

  20. A combination of thermal methods to assess coronary pressure and flow dynamics with a pressure-sensing guide wire.

    PubMed

    van der Horst, Arjen; Van't Veer, Marcel; van der Sligte, Robin A M; Rutten, Marcel C M; Pijls, Nico H J; van de Vosse, Frans N

    2013-03-01

    Measurement of coronary pressure and absolute flow dynamics have shown great potential in discerning different types of coronary circulatory disease. In the present study, the feasibility of assessing pressure and flow dynamics with a combination of two thermal methods, developed in combination with a pressure-sensor-tipped guide wire, was evaluated in an in vitro coronary model. A continuous infusion thermodilution method was employed to determine the average flow, whereas a thermal anemometric method was utilized to assess the pressure and flow dynamics, simultaneously. In the latter method, the electrical power supplied to an element, kept at constant temperature above ambient temperature, was used as a measure for the shear rate. It was found that, using a single calibration function, the method was able to assess coronary pressure and flow dynamics for different flow amplitudes, heart rates, and different pressure wires. However, due to the fact that the thermal anemometric method cannot detect local shear rate reversal, the method was unable to reliably measure flow dynamics close to zero. Nevertheless, the combined methodology was able to reliably assess diastolic hemodynamics. The diastolic peak flow and average diastolic resistance could be determined with a small relative error of (8 ± 7)% and (7 ± 5)%, respectively.

  1. Fourier analysis for hydrostatic pressure sensing in a polarization-maintaining photonic crystal fiber.

    PubMed

    Childs, Paul; Wong, Allan C L; Fu, H Y; Liao, Yanbiao; Tam, Hwayaw; Lu, Chao; Wai, P K A

    2010-12-20

    We measured the hydrostatic pressure dependence of the birefringence and birefringent dispersion of a Sagnac interferometric sensor incorporating a length of highly birefringent photonic crystal fiber using Fourier analysis. Sensitivity of both the phase and chirp spectra to hydrostatic pressure is demonstrated. Using this analysis, phase-based measurements showed a good linearity with an effective sensitivity of 9.45 nm/MPa and an accuracy of ±7.8 kPa using wavelength-encoded data and an effective sensitivity of -55.7 cm(-1)/MPa and an accuracy of ±4.4 kPa using wavenumber-encoded data. Chirp-based measurements, though nonlinear in response, showed an improvement in accuracy at certain pressure ranges with an accuracy of ±5.5 kPa for the full range of measured pressures using wavelength-encoded data and dropping to within ±2.5 kPa in the range of 0.17 to 0.4 MPa using wavenumber-encoded data. Improvements of the accuracy demonstrated the usefulness of implementing chirp-based analysis for sensing purposes.

  2. Fourier analysis for hydrostatic pressure sensing in a polarization-maintaining photonic crystal fiber

    SciTech Connect

    Childs, Paul; Wong, Allan C. L.; Fu, H. Y.; Liao, Yanbiao; Tam, Hwayaw; Lu Chao; Wai, P. K. A.

    2010-12-20

    .We measured the hydrostatic pressure dependence of the birefringence and birefringent dispersion of a Sagnac interferometric sensor incorporating a length of highly birefringent photonic crystal fiber using Fourier analysis. Sensitivity of both the phase and chirp spectra to hydrostatic pressure is demonstrated. Using this analysis, phase-based measurements showed a good linearity with an effective sensitivity of 9.45nm/MPa and an accuracy of {+-}7.8kPa using wavelength-encoded data and an effective sensitivity of -55.7cm{sup -1}/MPa and an accuracy of {+-}4.4kPa using wavenumber-encoded data. Chirp-based measurements, though nonlinear in response, showed an improvement in accuracy at certain pressure ranges with an accuracy of {+-}5.5kPa for the full range of measured pressures using wavelength-encoded data and dropping to within {+-}2.5kPa in the range of 0.17 to 0.4MPa using wavenumber-encoded data. Improvements of the accuracy demonstrated the usefulness of implementing chirp-based analysis for sensing purposes.

  3. Temporospatial and kinetic characteristics of sheep walking on a pressure sensing walkway

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jongmin; Breur, Gert J.

    2008-01-01

    The walking gait of sheep was analyzed in terms of temporospatial and kinetic parameters and weight distribution among the 4 limbs. Eighteen mature female Suffolk-mix sheep walked comfortably with a halter-guide over a 1.5-m pressure sensing walkway. Six valid trials were acquired for each sheep without any previous selection or habituation. Stance phases of the forelimb and hind limb were 66.3% and 68.9%, respectively, of total gait cycle, and limb velocity was 1.06 m/s in both forelimbs and hind limbs while walking. The mean peak vertical force (PVF) and vertical impulse (VI) as percentage of body weight in the forelimbs were 52.5% and 19.9%, respectively, and those of the hind limbs were 38.5% and 14.9%, respectively. More body weight was loaded on the forelimbs than the hind limbs, at 59% and 41% of body weight, respectively. The walking gait of sheep measured with the pressure sensing (PS) walkway was similar to that reported in dogs and horses. The PS walkway enabled collection of temporospatial and kinetic data, and simplified the process of data collection. PMID:18214162

  4. Natural Resource Information System. Remote Sensing Studies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leachtenauer, J.; And Others

    A major design objective of the Natural Resource Information System entailed the use of remote sensing data as an input to the system. Potential applications of remote sensing data were therefore reviewed and available imagery interpreted to provide input to a demonstration data base. A literature review was conducted to determine the types and…

  5. Natural Resource Information System. Remote Sensing Studies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leachtenauer, J.; And Others

    A major design objective of the Natural Resource Information System entailed the use of remote sensing data as an input to the system. Potential applications of remote sensing data were therefore reviewed and available imagery interpreted to provide input to a demonstration data base. A literature review was conducted to determine the types and…

  6. Pressure Studies of Protein Dynamics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-02-28

    a frozen and metastable complex system In the present section was generated by a flashlamp-pumped dye laser (Phase-R DL- treat the equilibrium region...determination of the relative thermodynamic parameters of the and the temperature was monitored with a Si diode on the pressure We assume that the A substates...temperature controller (Model proteins is essentially linear from 200 to 320 K. 2" The entropy 93C). A silicon diode mounted on the sample cell

  7. Stretchable electronic skin based on silver nanowire composite fiber electrodes for sensing pressure, proximity, and multidirectional strain.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Yin; Wang, Ranran; Zhai, Haitao; Sun, Jing

    2017-03-17

    Electronic skin (E-skin) has been attracting great research interest and effort due to its potential applications in wearable health monitoring, smart prosthetics, robot skins and so on. To expand its applications, two key challenges lie in the realization of device stretchability, and independent sensing of pressure and multidirectional lateral strain. Here we made a combination of rational device structure and artfully engineered sensing materials to fulfill the mentioned demands. The as-prepared E-skin took a simple orthogonal configuration to enable both capacitive mode for pressure sensing and resistive mode for multidirectional strain sensing, independently. Pre-cracked silver nanowire based fibers with helical microstructures were utilized as basic electrodes to endow the E-skin with intrinsic stretchability and strain sensing capability. Through dielectric layer optimization, the pressure sensing sensitivity was greatly enhanced, with a detection limit of 1.5 Pa. For application demonstrations, we utilized the E-skin as both flat and curved platforms for pressure mapping, and also as human motion sensors, such as palm and thumb bending.

  8. Dielectric elastomer strain and pressure sensing enable reactive soft fluidic muscles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veale, Allan J.; Anderson, Iain A.; Xie, Sheng Q.

    2016-04-01

    Wearable assistive devices are the future of rehabilitation therapy and bionic limb technologies. Traditional electric, hydraulic, and pneumatic actuators can provide the precise and powerful around-the-clock assistance that therapists cannot deliver. However, they do so in the confines of highly controlled factory environments, resulting in actuators too rigid, heavy, and immobile for wearable applications. In contrast, biological skeletal muscles have been designed and proven in the uncertainty of the real world. Bioinspired artificial muscle actuators aim to mimic the soft, slim, and self-sensing abilities of natural muscle that make them tough and intelligent. Fluidic artificial muscles are a promising wearable assistive actuation candidate, sharing the high-force, inherent compliance of their natural counterparts. Until now, they have not been able to self-sense their length, pressure, and force in an entirely soft and flexible system. Their use of rigid components has previously been a requirement for the generation of large forces, but reduces their reliability and compromises their ability to be comfortably worn. We present the unobtrusive integration of dielectric elastomer (DE) strain and pressure sensors into a soft Peano fluidic muscle, a planar alternative to the relatively bulky McKibben muscle. Characterization of these DE sensors shows they can measure the full operating range of the Peano muscle: strains of around 18% and pressures up to 400 kPa with changes in capacitance of 2.4 and 10.5 pF respectively. This is a step towards proprioceptive artificial muscles, paving the way for wearable actuation that can truly feel its environment.

  9. Magnetoelastic sensing apparatus and method for remote pressure query of an environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grimes, Craig A. (Inventor); Stoyanov, Plamen G. (Inventor); Kouzoudis, Dimitris (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    A pressure sensing apparatus for operative arrangement within an environment, having: a sensor comprising a hermetically-sealed receptacle, at least one side of which has an flexible membrane to which a magnetically hard element is attached. Enclosed within the receptacle is a magnetostrictive element that vibrates in response to a time-varying magnetic field. Also included is a receiver to measure a plurality of successive values for magneto-elastic emission intensity of the sensor taken over an operating range of successive interrogation frequencies to identify a resonant frequency value for the sensor. Additional features include: (a) the magnetically hard element may be adhered to an inner or outer side of, or embedded within, the membrane; (b) the magnetostrictive element can include one or more of a variety of different pre-formed, hardened regions; (c) the magneto-elastic emission may be a primarily acoustic or electromagnetic emission; and (d) in the event the time-varying magnetic field is emitted as a single pulse or series of pulses, the receiver unit can detect a transitory time-response of the emission intensity of each pulse (detected after a threshold amplitude value for the transitory time-response is observed). A Fourier transform of the time-response can yield results in the frequency domain. Also, an associated method of sensing pressure of an environment is included that uses a sensor having a magnetostrictive element to identify a magneto-elastic resonant frequency value therefore. Using the magneto-elastic resonant frequency value identified, a value for the pressure of the environment can be identified.

  10. Development of a simultaneous vibration and pressure stimulation system for cognitive studies.

    PubMed

    Chung, Soon-Cheol; Choi, Mi-Hyun; Park, Sung-Jun; Lee, Jung-Chul; Jeong, Ul-Ho; Baek, Ji-Hye; You, Ji-Hye; Choi, Young Chil; Lim, Dae-Woon; Yi, Jeong-Han; Kim, Hyung-Sik

    2014-01-01

    In this study, a tactile stimulator that could separately or simultaneously display the vibrotactile and pressure sense was developed. The developed system consisted of a control unit, a drive unit, and an actuator, and can be operated with PC or manually. This system quantitatively controls the stimulation parameters such as the stimulation intensity, duration, frequency, and stimulation type. A preliminary electroencephalogram (EEG) experiment for three types of stimulation (vibrotactile, pressure sense, vibrotactile + pressure sense) highlights that the system could be used in complex tactile cognitive studies. An event-related desynchronization (ERD) and synchronization (ERS) were measured at the area of C3 and C4 for all three types of stimulation, and a clear response was identified in the contralateral somatosensory area from the brain topology. Therefore, it is expected that this system could be widely used in single and complex human tactile cognition and perception studies for vibrotactile and pressure sensation.

  11. Formulation of a General Technique for Predicting Pneumatic Attenuation Errors in Airborne Pressure Sensing Devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitmore, Stephen A.

    1988-01-01

    Presented is a mathematical model derived from the Navier-Stokes equations of momentum and continuity, which may be accurately used to predict the behavior of conventionally mounted pneumatic sensing systems subject to arbitrary pressure inputs. Numerical techniques for solving the general model are developed. Both step and frequency response lab tests were performed. These data are compared with solutions of the mathematical model and show excellent agreement. The procedures used to obtain the lab data are described. In-flight step and frequency response data were obtained. Comparisons with numerical solutions of the math model show good agreement. Procedures used to obtain the flight data are described. Difficulties encountered with obtaining the flight data are discussed.

  12. Formulaton of a general technique for predicting pneumatic attenuation errors in airborne pressure sensing devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitmore, Stephen A.

    1988-01-01

    Presented is a mathematical model, derived from the Navier-Stokes equations of momentum and continuity, which may be accurately used to predict the behavior of conventionally mounted pneumatic sensing systems subject to arbitrary pressure inputs. Numerical techniques for solving the general model are developed. Both step and frequency response lab tests were performed. These data are compared against solutions of the mathematical model. The comparisons show excellent agreement. The procedures used to obtain the lab data are described. In-flight step and frequency response data were obtained. Comparisons with numerical solutions of the mathematical model show good agreement. Procedures used to obtain the flight data are described. Difficulties encountered with obtaining the flight data are discussed.

  13. NASA Remote Sensing Data for Epidemiological Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maynard, Nancy G.; Vicente, G. A.

    2002-01-01

    In response to the need for improved observations of environmental factors to better understand the links between human health and the environment, NASA has established a new program to significantly improve the utilization of NASA's diverse array of data, information, and observations of the Earth for health applications. This initiative, lead by Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) has the following goals: (1) To encourage interdisciplinary research on the relationships between environmental parameters (e.g., rainfall, vegetation) and health, (2) Develop practical early warning systems, (3) Create a unique system for the exchange of Earth science and health data, (4) Provide an investigator field support system for customers and partners, (5) Facilitate a system for observation, identification, and surveillance of parameters relevant to environment and health issues. The NASA Environment and Health Program is conducting several interdisciplinary projects to examine applications of remote sensing data and information to a variety of health issues, including studies on malaria, Rift Valley Fever, St. Louis Encephalitis, Dengue Fever, Ebola, African Dust and health, meningitis, asthma, and filariasis. In addition, the NASA program is creating a user-friendly data system to help provide the public health community with easy and timely access to space-based environmental data for epidemiological studies. This NASA data system is being designed to bring land, atmosphere, water and ocean satellite data/products to users not familiar with satellite data/products, but who are knowledgeable in the Geographic Information Systems (GIS) environment. This paper discusses the most recent results of the interdisciplinary environment-health research projects and provides an analysis of the usefulness of the satellite data to epidemiological studies. In addition, there will be a summary of presently-available NASA Earth science data and a description of how it may be obtained.

  14. NASA Remote Sensing Data for Epidemiological Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maynard, Nancy G.; Vicente, G. A.

    2002-01-01

    In response to the need for improved observations of environmental factors to better understand the links between human health and the environment, NASA has established a new program to significantly improve the utilization of NASA's diverse array of data, information, and observations of the Earth for health applications. This initiative, lead by Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) has the following goals: (1) To encourage interdisciplinary research on the relationships between environmental parameters (e.g., rainfall, vegetation) and health, (2) Develop practical early warning systems, (3) Create a unique system for the exchange of Earth science and health data, (4) Provide an investigator field support system for customers and partners, (5) Facilitate a system for observation, identification, and surveillance of parameters relevant to environment and health issues. The NASA Environment and Health Program is conducting several interdisciplinary projects to examine applications of remote sensing data and information to a variety of health issues, including studies on malaria, Rift Valley Fever, St. Louis Encephalitis, Dengue Fever, Ebola, African Dust and health, meningitis, asthma, and filariasis. In addition, the NASA program is creating a user-friendly data system to help provide the public health community with easy and timely access to space-based environmental data for epidemiological studies. This NASA data system is being designed to bring land, atmosphere, water and ocean satellite data/products to users not familiar with satellite data/products, but who are knowledgeable in the Geographic Information Systems (GIS) environment. This paper discusses the most recent results of the interdisciplinary environment-health research projects and provides an analysis of the usefulness of the satellite data to epidemiological studies. In addition, there will be a summary of presently-available NASA Earth science data and a description of how it may be obtained.

  15. (High-pressure structural studies of promethium)

    SciTech Connect

    Haire, R.G.

    1988-11-15

    The primary object of the foreign travel was to carry out collaborative high-pressure structural studies at the European Institute for Transuranium Elements (EITU), Karlsruhe, Federal Republic of Germany. These studies reestablished previous collaborative investigations by ORNL and EITU that have been very productive scientifically during the past few years. The study during the present travel period was limited to a structural study of promethium metal under pressure.

  16. MEMS Fabry-Perot sensor interrogated by optical system-on-a-chip for simultaneous pressure and temperature sensing.

    PubMed

    Pang, Cheng; Bae, Hyungdae; Gupta, Ashwani; Bryden, Kenneth; Yu, Miao

    2013-09-23

    We present a micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMS) based Fabry-Perot (FP) sensor along with an optical system-on-a-chip (SOC) interrogator for simultaneous pressure and temperature sensing. The sensor employs a simple structure with an air-backed silicon membrane cross-axially bonded to a 45° polished optical fiber. This structure renders two cascaded FP cavities, enabling simultaneous pressure and temperature sensing in close proximity along the optical axis. The optical SOC consists of a broadband source, a MEMS FP tunable filter, a photodetector, and the supporting circuitry, serving as a miniature spectrometer for retrieving the two FP cavity lengths. Within the measured pressure and temperature ranges, experimental results demonstrate that the sensor exhibits a good linear response to external pressure and temperature changes.

  17. A hybrid Raman/EFPI/FBG sensing system for distributed temperature and key-point pressure measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Ke; Zhou, Xinlei; Yang, Yang; Yu, Qingxu

    2015-08-01

    We demonstrate a hybrid sensing scheme, combining the incoherent optical frequency domain reflectometry (IOFDR) based Raman distributed temperature sensor (DTS) with the extrinsic Fabry-Perot interferometer (EFPI) based pressure sensor, for down-hole monitoring. The pressure measurement is compensated by a fiber Bragg grating (FBG) based temperature sensor. By using a laser diode as the common light source, a hybrid Raman/EFPI/FBG sensing system has been developed with a single fiber. The stimulated emission light and the spontaneous emission light of the laser diode are used for DTS and EFPI-FBG interrogations respectively. There can be no overlap between the spectral range of the Raman backscattered light and the spectral range of the reflected light from the EFPI-FBG sensor. Distributed temperature and pressure can thus be measured by using wavelength-division multiplexing (WDM) technology. Experimental results show that, both the distributed temperature and the key-point pressure can be measured alternatively with little interference.

  18. Blood pulse wave velocity and pressure sensing via fiber based and free space based optical sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sirkis, Talia; Beiderman, Yevgeny; Agdarov, Sergey; Beiderman, Yafim; Zalevsky, Zeev

    2017-02-01

    Continuous noninvasive measurement of vital bio-signs, such as cardiopulmonary parameters, is an important tool in evaluation of the patient's physiological condition and health monitoring. On the demand of new enabling technologies, some works have been done in continuous monitoring of blood pressure and pulse wave velocity. In this paper, we introduce two techniques for non-contact sensing of vital bio signs. In the first approach the optical sensor is based on single mode in-fibers Mach-Zehnder interferometer (MZI) to detect heartbeat, respiration and pulse wave velocity (PWV). The introduced interferometer is based on a new implanted scheme. It replaces the conventional MZI realized by inserting of discontinuities in the fiber to break the total internal reflection and scatter/collect light. The proposed fiber sensor was successfully incorporated into shirt to produce smart clothing. The measurements obtained from the smart clothing could be obtained in comfortable manner and there is no need to have an initial calibration or a direct contact between the sensor and the skin of the tested individual. In the second concept we show a remote noncontact blood pulse wave velocity and pressure measurement based on tracking the temporal changes of reflected secondary speckle patterns produced in human skin when illuminated by a laser beams. In both concept experimental validation of the proposed schemes is shown and analyzed.

  19. Sensitivity enhancement using annealed polymer optical-fibre-based sensors for pressure sensing applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pospori, A.; Marques, C. A. F.; Sáez-Rodríguez, D.; Nielsen, K.; Bang, O.; Webb, D. J.

    2016-05-01

    Thermal annealing can be used to induce a permanent negative Bragg wavelength shift for polymer fibre grating sensors and it was originally used for multiplexing purposes. Recently, researchers showed that annealing can also provide additional benefits, such as strain and humidity sensitivity enhancement and augmented temperature operational range. The annealing process can change both the optical and mechanical properties of the fibre. In this paper, the annealing effects on the stress and force sensitivities of PMMA fibre Bragg grating sensors are investigated. The incentive for that investigation was an unexpected behaviour observed in an array of sensors which were used for liquid level monitoring. One sensor exhibited much lower pressure sensitivity and that was the only one that was not annealed. To further investigate the phenomenon, additional sensors were photo-inscribed and characterised with regard their stress and force sensitivities. Then, the fibres were annealed by placing them in hot water, controlling with that way the humidity factor. After annealing, stress and force sensitivities were measured again. The results show that the annealing can improve the stress and force sensitivity of the devices. This can provide better performing sensors for use in stress, force and pressure sensing applications.

  20. Feasibility study ASCS remote sensing/compliance determination system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duggan, I. E.; Minter, T. C., Jr.; Moore, B. H.; Nosworthy, C. T.

    1973-01-01

    A short-term technical study was performed by the MSC Earth Observations Division to determine the feasibility of the proposed Agricultural Stabilization and Conservation Service Automatic Remote Sensing/Compliance Determination System. For the study, the term automatic was interpreted as applying to an automated remote-sensing system that includes data acquisition, processing, and management.

  1. Experimental validation of a millimeter wave radar technique to remotely sense atmospheric pressure at the Earth's surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flower, D. A.; Peckham, G. E.; Bradford, W. J.

    1984-01-01

    Experiments with a millimeter wave radar operating on the NASA CV-990 aircraft which validate the technique for remotely sensing atmospheric pressure at the Earth's surface are described. Measurements show that the precise millimeter wave observations needed to deduce pressure from space with an accuracy of 1 mb are possible, that sea surface reflection properties agree with theory and that the measured variation of differential absorption with altitude corresponds to that expected from spectroscopic models.

  2. Intra- and inter-rater reliability of maximum inspiratory pressure measured using a portable capsule-sensing pressure gauge device in healthy adults

    PubMed Central

    Jalan, Nikita S; Daftari, Sonam S; Retharekar, Seemi S; Rairikar, Savita A; Shyam, Ashok M; Sancheti, Parag K

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Measurement of maximum inspiratory pressure is the most prevalent method used in clinical practice to assess the strength of the inspiratory muscles. Although there are many devices available for the assessment of inspiratory muscle strength, there is a dearth of literature describing the reliability of devices that can be used in clinical patient assessment. The capsule-sensing pressure gauge (CSPG-V) is a new tool that measures the strength of inspiratory muscles; it is easy to use, noninvasive, inexpensive and lightweight. OBJECTIVE: To test the intra- and inter-rater reliability of a CSPG-V device in healthy adults. METHODS: A cross-sectional study involving 80 adult subjects with a mean (± SD) age of 22±3 years was performed. Using simple randomization, 40 individuals (20 male, 20 female) were used for intrarater and 40 (20 male, 20 female) were used for inter-rater reliability testing of the CSPG-V device. The subjects performed three inspiratory efforts, which were sustained for at least 3 s; the best of the three readings was used for intra- and inter-rater comparison. The intra- and inter-rater reliability were calculated using intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs). RESULTS: The intrarater reliability ICC was 0.962 and the inter-rater reliability ICC was 0.922. CONCLUSION: Results of the present study suggest that maximum inspiratory pressure measured using a CSPG-V device has excellent intraand inter-rater reliability, and can be used as a diagnostic and prognostic tool in patients with respiratory muscle impairment. PMID:26089737

  3. Theoretical studies of iridium under pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grussendorff, Sharon; Chetty, N.; Dreysse, H.

    2003-06-01

    Recent experiments on Ir under pressure (Cerenius and Dubrovinsky 2000 J. Alloys Compounds 306 26) show a transition to a superlattice structure comprising 14 atomic layers. This observation has implications for high-pressure applications since Ir, with its high bulk modulus and high thermal stability, is ideally suited for use as a gasket for high-temperature, high-pressure diamond anvil cell experiments. We perform first-principles total energy calculations to study the crystal phases and defect structures of Ir under pressure. We have extended the bond-orientation model (Chetty and Weinert 1997 Phys. Rev. B 56 10844) to compute all of the ~ 2N defect structures as a function of atomic volume. We find Ir in the FCC structure to be extremely stable for pressures up to about 60 GPa. We also calculate the stacking fault energies of Ir.

  4. Energy efficiency in cognitive radio network: Study of cooperative sensing using different channel sensing methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Chenxuan

    When cognitive radio (CR) operates, it starts by sensing spectrum and looking for idle bandwidth. There are several methods for CR to make a decision on either the channel is occupied or idle, for example, energy detection scheme, cyclostationary detection scheme and matching filtering detection scheme [1]. Among them, the most common method is energy detection scheme because of its algorithm and implementation simplicities [2]. There are two major methods for sensing, the first one is to sense single channel slot with varying bandwidth, whereas the second one is to sense multiple channels and each with same bandwidth. After sensing periods, samples are compared with a preset detection threshold and a decision is made on either the primary user (PU) is transmitting or not. Sometimes the sensing and decision results can be erroneous, for example, false alarm error and misdetection error may occur. In order to better control error probabilities and improve CR network performance (i.e. energy efficiency), we introduce cooperative sensing; in which several CR within a certain range detect and make decisions on channel availability together. The decisions are transmitted to and analyzed by a data fusion center (DFC) to make a final decision on channel availability. After the final decision is been made, DFC sends back the decision to the CRs in order to tell them to stay idle or start to transmit data to secondary receiver (SR) within a preset transmission time. After the transmission, a new cycle starts again with sensing. This thesis report is organized as followed: Chapter II review some of the papers on optimizing CR energy efficiency. In Chapter III, we study how to achieve maximal energy efficiency when CR senses single channel with changing bandwidth and with constrain on misdetection threshold in order to protect PU; furthermore, a case study is given and we calculate the energy efficiency. In Chapter IV, we study how to achieve maximal energy efficiency when CR

  5. Sensing fluid pressure during plucking events in a natural bedrock channel and experimental flume

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilkinson, C.; Harbor, D. J.; Keel, D.; Levy, S.; Kuehner, J. P.

    2016-12-01

    River channel erosion by plucking is believed to be the dominant erosional process in channels with fractured or jointed bedrock. However, despite its significance as an erosional mechanism, plucking is poorly studied in both laboratory and natural channels. In previous flume studies, model bedrock was plucked by fluid forces alone in nonuniform flow near jumps and waves even where blocks do not protrude into the flow. Here we develop sensor systems to test the hypothesis that bed fluid pressure gradients lift "pluckable" bedrock blocks in a natural field setting and a hydraulic flume. The field setting closely mimics the previous flume setup; the instrumented block is downstream of a roughly 1m step and exhibits no protrusion into the flow. The presence of the step promotes nonuniform flow which changes pressure in the bedrock crack network; slabs of bedrock that have slid downstream and sediment that has been pushed upstream 3-4 m under the bed and in the cracks suggest the influence of pressure differences throughout the crack network and below the bed. In this initial deployment, we evaluate a sensor that monitors movement and simultaneous pressure above and below the block. Sensors are emplaced in a 26kg, 45-cm-long, 20-cm-wide block broken from a 4.5-m-long, 11-cm-thick sandstone bed with a dense network of cracks nearly parallel to flow direction and include a tri-axial accelerometer/gyroscope and two fluid pressure sensors. The electronics are housed in a custom-designed 3D-printed ABS waterproof capsule that is mounted in a vertical hole through the rock. A concurrent flume study develops the sensors necessary to investigate the longitudinal pressure difference below a step using multiple analog sensors (0-1 psi gauge pressure) mounted flush to a false floor under the center of a 30x14-cm test zone. The 15-mm-wide sensors are aligned along the flow centerline and are placed under 25 1-cm-thick "pluckable" bedrock blocks constructed with a proprietary

  6. Building Kindergartners' Number Sense: A Randomized Controlled Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jordan, Nancy C.; Glutting, Joseph; Dyson, Nancy; Hassinger-Das, Brenna; Irwin, Casey

    2012-01-01

    Math achievement in elementary school is mediated by performance and growth in number sense during kindergarten. The aim of the present study was to test the effectiveness of a targeted small-group number sense intervention for high-risk kindergartners from low-income communities. Children were randomly assigned to 1 of 3 groups (n = 44 in each…

  7. Building Kindergartners' Number Sense: A Randomized Controlled Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jordan, Nancy C.; Glutting, Joseph; Dyson, Nancy; Hassinger-Das, Brenna; Irwin, Casey

    2012-01-01

    Math achievement in elementary school is mediated by performance and growth in number sense during kindergarten. The aim of the present study was to test the effectiveness of a targeted small-group number sense intervention for high-risk kindergartners from low-income communities. Children were randomly assigned to 1 of 3 groups (n = 44 in each…

  8. The Birmingham blood pressure school study.

    PubMed Central

    De Giovanni, J. V.; Pentecost, B. L.; Beevers, D. G.; Beevers, M.; Jackson, S. H.; Bannan, L. T.; Osbourne, V. L.; Mathews, K.

    1983-01-01

    Four-hundred and twenty-eight school leavers of 3 ethnic groups (white, black and Asian) were screened for blood pressure, resting pulse rate and general anthropometric characteristics. Asian pupils were both shorter and lighter than the other two groups whilst black males were heavier and taller. There was no significant difference in the mean systolic or diastolic blood pressure between the 3 groups, although the black pupils had a stronger family history of hypertension, particularly on the mother's side. These observations differ in some respects from other ethnic blood pressure studies and establish values for the local population. PMID:6647172

  9. Fiber in-line Mach-Zehnder interferometer based on an inner air-cavity for high-pressure sensing.

    PubMed

    Talataisong, W; Wang, D N; Chitaree, R; Liao, C R; Wang, C

    2015-04-01

    We demonstrate a fiber in-line Mach-Zehnder interferometer based on an inner air-cavity with open micro-channel for high-pressure sensing applications. The inner air-cavity is fabricated by combining femtosecond laser micromachining and the fusion splicing technique. The micro-channel is drilled on the top of the inner air-cavity to allow the high-pressure gas to flow in. The fiber in-line device is miniature, robust, and stable in operation and exhibits a high pressure sensitivity of ∼8,239  pm/MPa.

  10. High pressure studies of potassium perchlorate

    DOE PAGES

    Pravica, Michael; Wang, Yonggang; Sneed, Daniel; ...

    2016-07-29

    Two experiments are reported on KClO4 at extreme conditions. A static high pressure Raman study was first conducted to 18.9 GPa. Evidence for at least two new phases was observed: one between 2.4 and 7.7 GPa (possibly sluggish), and the second near 11.7 GPa. Then, the X-ray induced decomposition rate of potassium perchlorate (KClO4 hv→ KCl + 2O2) was studied up to 15.2 GPa. The time-dependent growth of KCl and O2 was monitored. The decomposition rate slowed at higher pressures. As a result, we present the first direct evidence for O2 crystallization at higher pressures, demonstrating that O2 molecules aggregatemore » at high pressure.« less

  11. High pressure studies of potassium perchlorate

    SciTech Connect

    Pravica, Michael; Wang, Yonggang; Sneed, Daniel; Reiser, Sharissa; White, Melanie

    2016-07-29

    Two experiments are reported on KClO4 at extreme conditions. A static high pressure Raman study was first conducted to 18.9 GPa. Evidence for at least two new phases was observed: one between 2.4 and 7.7 GPa (possibly sluggish), and the second near 11.7 GPa. Then, the X-ray induced decomposition rate of potassium perchlorate (KClO4 hv→ KCl + 2O2) was studied up to 15.2 GPa. The time-dependent growth of KCl and O2 was monitored. The decomposition rate slowed at higher pressures. As a result, we present the first direct evidence for O2 crystallization at higher pressures, demonstrating that O2 molecules aggregate at high pressure.

  12. Design of an osmotic pressure sensor for sensing an osmotically active substance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ch, Nagesh; Paily, Roy P.

    2015-04-01

    A pressure sensor based on the osmosis principle has been designed and demonstrated successfully for the sensing of the concentration levels of an osmotically active substance. The device is fabricated using the bulk micro-machining technique on a silicon on insulator (SOI) substrate. The substrate has a square cavity on the bottom side to fill with the reference glucose solution and a silicon (Si) membrane on the top side for the actuation. Two sets of devices, having membrane thicknesses of 10 µm and 25 µm, but the same area of 3 mm ×3 mm, are fabricated. The cavity is filled with a glucose solution of 100 mg dL-1 and it is sealed with a semi-permeable membrane made up of cellulose acetate material. The glucose solution is employed to prove the functionality of the device and it is tested for different glucose concentration levels, ranging from 50 mg dL-1 to 450 mg dL-1. The output voltage obtained for the corresponding glucose concentration levels ranges from -6.7 mV to 22.7 mV for the 10 µm device and from -1.7 mV to 4 mV for the 25 µm device. The device operation was simulated using the finite element method (FEM) and the finite volume method (FVM), and the simulation and experimental results match closely. A response time of 40 min is obtained in the case of the 10 µm device compared to one of 30 min for the 25 µm device. The response times obtained for these devices are found to be small compared to those in similar works based on the osmosis principle. This pressure sensor has the potential to provide controlled drug delivery if it can be integrated with other microfluidic devices.

  13. An Insertable Passive LC Pressure Sensor Based on an Alumina Ceramic for In Situ Pressure Sensing in High-Temperature Environments.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Jijun; Li, Chen; Jia, Pinggang; Chen, Xiaoyong; Zhang, Wendong; Liu, Jun; Xue, Chenyang; Tan, Qiulin

    2015-08-31

    Pressure measurements in high-temperature applications, including compressors, turbines, and others, have become increasingly critical. This paper proposes an implantable passive LC pressure sensor based on an alumina ceramic material for in situ pressure sensing in high-temperature environments. The inductance and capacitance elements of the sensor were designed independently and separated by a thermally insulating material, which is conducive to reducing the influence of the temperature on the inductance element and improving the quality factor of the sensor. In addition, the sensor was fabricated using thick film integrated technology from high-temperature materials that ensure stable operation of the sensor in high-temperature environments. Experimental results showed that the sensor accurately monitored pressures from 0 bar to 2 bar at temperatures up to 800 °C. The sensitivity, linearity, repeatability error, and hysteretic error of the sensor were 0.225 MHz/bar, 95.3%, 5.5%, and 6.2%, respectively.

  14. Compressive Sensing Based Machine Learning Strategy For Characterizing The Flow Around A Cylinder With Limited Pressure Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Bright, Ido; Lin, Guang; Kutz, Nathan

    2013-12-05

    Compressive sensing is used to determine the flow characteristics around a cylinder (Reynolds number and pressure/flow field) from a sparse number of pressure measurements on the cylinder. Using a supervised machine learning strategy, library elements encoding the dimensionally reduced dynamics are computed for various Reynolds numbers. Convex L1 optimization is then used with a limited number of pressure measurements on the cylinder to reconstruct, or decode, the full pressure field and the resulting flow field around the cylinder. Aside from the highly turbulent regime (large Reynolds number) where only the Reynolds number can be identified, accurate reconstruction of the pressure field and Reynolds number is achieved. The proposed data-driven strategy thus achieves encoding of the fluid dynamics using the L2 norm, and robust decoding (flow field reconstruction) using the sparsity promoting L1 norm.

  15. Compressive sensing based machine learning strategy for characterizing the flow around a cylinder with limited pressure measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bright, Ido; Lin, Guang; Kutz, J. Nathan

    2013-12-01

    Compressive sensing is used to determine the flow characteristics around a cylinder (Reynolds number and pressure/flow field) from a sparse number of pressure measurements on the cylinder. Using a supervised machine learning strategy, library elements encoding the dimensionally reduced dynamics are computed for various Reynolds numbers. Convex L1 optimization is then used with a limited number of pressure measurements on the cylinder to reconstruct, or decode, the full pressure field and the resulting flow field around the cylinder. Aside from the highly turbulent regime (large Reynolds number) where only the Reynolds number can be identified, accurate reconstruction of the pressure field and Reynolds number is achieved. The proposed data-driven strategy thus achieves encoding of the fluid dynamics using the L2 norm, and robust decoding (flow field reconstruction) using the sparsity promoting L1 norm.

  16. Feasibility of Locating Leakages in Sewage Pressure Pipes Using the Distributed Temperature Sensing Technology.

    PubMed

    Apperl, Benjamin; Pressl, Alexander; Schulz, Karsten

    2017-01-01

    The cost effective maintenance of underwater pressure pipes for sewage disposal in Austria requires the detection and localization of leakages. Extrusion of wastewater in lakes can heavily influence the water and bathing quality of surrounding waters. The Distributed Temperature Sensing (DTS) technology is a widely used technique for oil and gas pipeline leakage detection. While in pipeline leakage detection, fiber optic cables are installed permanently at the outside or within the protective sheathing of the pipe; this paper aims at testing the feasibility of detecting leakages with temporary introduced fiber optic cable inside the pipe. The detection and localization were tested in a laboratory experiment. The intrusion of water from leakages into the pipe, producing a local temperature drop, served as indicator for leakages. Measurements were taken under varying measurement conditions, including the number of leakages as well as the positioning of the fiber optic cable. Experiments showed that leakages could be detected accurately with the proposed methodology, when measuring resolution, temperature gradient and measurement time were properly selected. Despite the successful application of DTS for leakage detection in this lab environment, challenges in real system applications may arise from temperature gradients within the pipe system over longer distances and the placement of the cable into the real pipe system.

  17. Computational study of materials under pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasinathan, Deepa

    2006-07-01

    Pressure possesses perhaps the greatest of all the physical variables. First principles electronic structure calculations have contributed significantly to high perssure studies, especially of solids. In this work, the results of the first principles analysis of CoN, MnO and Li under pressure are presented. From total energy calculations, we can establish that CoN takes a paramagnetic zincblende structure at ambient pressure, rather than rocksalt as sometimes suggested. We also predict a first order phase transition to a ferromagnetic state at 43 GPa, a weak ferromagnet not far from a ferromagnetic quantum critical point. MnO, a classic prototype for a Mott insulator exibits rich physics as a function of pressure, including structural phase transition, volume collapse, insulator - metal transition, etc. This system has been a long standing challenge to methods based on density functional theory. Our study provides some of the first detailed information on how magnetic moments in a real material may begin to disintegrate without vanishing identically, at or near a Mott transition, when correlation is taken into account. Li, the simplest metal becomes a superconductor under pressure, with the highest Tc observed in any elemental metal. Using both total energy and linear response calculations we observe increasingly strong electron-phonon coupling concentrated along intersections of Kohn anomaly surfaces with the evolving Fermi surface, that drives this simple metal to become a superconductor under pressure.

  18. Natural Resource Information System, remote sensing studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leachtenauer, J.; Hirsch, R.; Williams, V.; Tucker, R.

    1972-01-01

    Potential applications of remote sensing data were reviewed, and available imagery was interpreted to provide input to a demonstration data base. A literature review was conducted to determine the types and qualities of imagery required to satisfy identified data needs. Ektachrome imagery available over the demonstration areas was reviewed to establish the feasibility of interpreting cultural features, range condition, and timber type. Using the same imagery, a land use map was prepared for the demonstration area. The feasibility of identifying commercial timber areas using a density slicing technique was tested on multispectral imagery available for a portion of the demonstration area.

  19. Preliminary feasibility analysis of a pressure modulator radiometer for remote sensing of tropospheric constituents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Orr, H. D., III; Rarig, P. L.

    1981-01-01

    A pressure modulator radiometer operated in a nadir viewing mode from the top of a midlatitude summer model of the atmosphere was theoretically studied for monitoring the mean volumetric mixing ratio of carbon monoxide in the troposphere. The mechanical characteristics of the instrument on the Nimbus 7 stratospheric and mesospheric sounder experiment are assumed and CO is assumed to be the only infrared active constituent. A line by line radiative transfer computer program is used to simulate the upwelling radiation reaching the top of the atmosphere. The performance of the instrument is examined as a function of the mean pressure in and the length of the instrument gas correlation cell. Instrument sensitivity is described in terms of signal to noise ratio for a 10 percent change in CO mixing ratio. Sensitivity to mixing ratio changes is also studied. It is concluded that tropospheric monitoring requires a pressure modulator drive having a larger swept volume and producing higher compression ratios at higher mean cell pressures than the Nimbus 7 design.

  20. Smoke Sense Study Supported by Citizen Scientists Fact Sheet

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    EPA researchers are conducting a citizen science study called Smoke Sense to determine the extent to which exposure to wildland fire smoke affects health and productivity, and develop health risk communication strategies that protect public health.

  1. Fiber-Optic Sensor with Simultaneous Temperature, Pressure, and Chemical Sensing Capabilities

    SciTech Connect

    Kennedy, Jermaine L.

    2009-03-12

    This project aimed to develop a multifunctional sensor suitable for process control application in chemical and petrochemical industries. Specifically, the objective was to demonstrate a fiber optic sensing system capable of simultaneous temperature, pressure, and chemical composition determinations based on a single strand of sapphire optical fiber. These capabilities were to be achieved through the incorporation of a phosphor and a Bragg grating into the fiber, as well as the exploitation of the evanescent field interaction of the optical radiation inside the fiber with the surrounding chemical medium. The integration of the three functions into a single probe, compared to having three separate probes, would not only substantially reduce the cost of the combined system, but would also minimize the intrusion into the reactor. Such a device can potentially increase the energy efficiency in the manufacture of chemical and petrochemical products, as well as reduce waste and lead to improved quality. In accordance with the proposed research plan, the individual temperature, pressure and chemical sensors where fabricated and characterized first. Then towards the end of the program, an integrated system was implemented. The sapphire fibers were grown on a laser heated pedestal growth system. The temperature sensor was based on the fluorescence decay principle, which exploits the temperature dependence of the fluorescence decay rate of the selected phosphor. For this project, Cr3+ was chosen as the phosphor, and it was incorporated into the sapphire fiber by coating a short length of the source rod with a thin layer of Cr2O3. After the viability of the technique was established and the growth parameters optimized, the temperature sensor was characterized up to 300 °C and its long term stability was verified. The chemical sensor determined the concentration of chemicals through evanescent field absorption. Techniques to increase the

  2. The study of quantum remote sensing principle prototype

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bi, Siwen; Zhang, Ying

    2015-07-01

    High signal to noise ratio and high resolution have been the goal of remote sensing. Since the classical electromagnetic wave is influenced by the diffraction limit and quantum noise limit, increasing the resolution has been close to the limit of remote sensing, In this situation, in 14 years, the author through quantum remote sensing based theory, scientific experiment and the key technology research of the three phases, before the end of December 2014 completed the study of quantum remote sensing principle prototype. Quantum remote sensing prototype is based on the theory of quantum optics, which takes manipulation, preparation and control in quantum optical field as the experimental method. Through the experiment, the results obtained are the coherent light detection imaging resolution 2-3 times. Based on a large number of experimental studies, we completed the key technology of quantum remote sensing principle prototype, scheme design and principle prototype system. Through the test, the technical indicators of the principle prototype meet the requirements, which provide technical foundation for quantum remote sensing engineering principle prototype.

  3. Raman study of opal at high pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farfan, G.; Wang, S.; Mao, W. L.

    2011-12-01

    More commonly known for their beauty and lore as gemstones, opals are also intriguing geological materials which may have potential for materials science applications. Opal lacks a definite crystalline structure, and is composed of an amorphous packing of hydrated silica (SiO2) spheroids, which provides us with a unique nano-scaled mineraloid with properties unlike those of other amorphous materials like glass. Opals from different localities were studied at high pressure using a diamond anvil cell to apply pressure and Raman spectroscopy to look at changes in bonding as pressure was increased. We first tested different samples from Virgin Valley, NV, Spencer, ID, Juniper Ridge, OR, and Australia, which contain varying amounts of water at ambient conditions, using Raman spectroscopy to determine if they were opal-CT (semicrystalline cristobalite-trydimite volcanic origin) or opal-A (amorphous sedimentary origin). We then used x-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy in a diamond anvil cell to see how their bonding and structure changed under compression and to determine what effect water content had on their high pressure behavior. Comparison of our results on opal to other high pressure studies of amorphous materials like glass has implications from a geological and materials science standpoint.

  4. Multilayered gold/silica nanoparticulate bilayer devices using layer-by-layer self organisation for flexible bending and pressure sensing applications

    SciTech Connect

    Shah Alam, Md.; Mohammed, Waleed S.; Dutta, Joydeep

    2014-02-17

    A pressure and bending sensor was fabricated using multilayer thin films fabricated on a flexible substrate based on layer-by-layer self-organization of 18 nm gold nanoparticles separated by a dielectric layer of 30 nm silica nanoparticles. 50, 75, and 100 gold-silica bi-layered films were deposited and the device characteristics were studied. A threshold voltage was required for electron conduction which increases from 2.4 V for 50 bi-layers to 3.3 V for 100 bi-layers. Upon bending of the device up to about 52°, the threshold voltage and slope of the I-V curves change linearly. Electrical characterization of the multilayer films was carried out under ambient conditions with different pressures and bending angles in the direct current mode. This study demonstrates that the developed multilayer thin films can be used as pressure as well as bending sensing applications.

  5. Pressure-sensing properties of single-walled carbon nanotubes covered with a corona-poled piezoelectric polymer

    SciTech Connect

    Ikawa, Takeshi; Tabata, Hiroshi Yoshizawa, Takeshi; Utaka, Ken; Kubo, Osamu; Katayama, Mitsuhiro

    2016-07-18

    Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) have been studied extensively as sensing elements for chemical and biochemical sensors because of their excellent electrical properties, their ultrahigh ratio of surface area to volume, and the consequent extremely high sensitivity of their surface to the surrounding environment. The extremely high sensitivity indicates that SWNTs can operate as excellent transducers when combined with piezoelectric materials. In this paper, we present a touch sensor based on SWNT thin-film transistors (SWNT-TFTs) covered with a thin film of the piezoelectric polymer poly(vinylidene fluoride-trifluoroethylene) (P(VDF-TrFE)). Devices were fabricated by spin-coating a P(VDF-TrFE) layer on an SWNT-TFT, which was followed by in situ corona poling to polarize the P(VDF-TrFE) layer. We studied the effect of the corona polarity on the device characteristics and revealed that poling with a negative corona discharge induced a large amount of hole doping in the SWNTs and improved the touch-sensing performance of the devices, while a positive discharge had a negligible effect. The poled devices exhibited regular, stable, and positive drain current modulation in response to intermittent pressing, and the response was proportional to the magnitude of the applied pressure, suggesting that it was caused by the piezoelectric effect of the polarized P(VDF-TrFE) layer. Furthermore, we also fabricated a device using horizontally aligned SWNTs with a lower SWNT density as an alternative transducer to an SWNT thin film, which demonstrated sensitivity as high as 70%/MPa.

  6. Pressure-sensing properties of single-walled carbon nanotubes covered with a corona-poled piezoelectric polymer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ikawa, Takeshi; Tabata, Hiroshi; Yoshizawa, Takeshi; Utaka, Ken; Kubo, Osamu; Katayama, Mitsuhiro

    2016-07-01

    Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) have been studied extensively as sensing elements for chemical and biochemical sensors because of their excellent electrical properties, their ultrahigh ratio of surface area to volume, and the consequent extremely high sensitivity of their surface to the surrounding environment. The extremely high sensitivity indicates that SWNTs can operate as excellent transducers when combined with piezoelectric materials. In this paper, we present a touch sensor based on SWNT thin-film transistors (SWNT-TFTs) covered with a thin film of the piezoelectric polymer poly(vinylidene fluoride-trifluoroethylene) (P(VDF-TrFE)). Devices were fabricated by spin-coating a P(VDF-TrFE) layer on an SWNT-TFT, which was followed by in situ corona poling to polarize the P(VDF-TrFE) layer. We studied the effect of the corona polarity on the device characteristics and revealed that poling with a negative corona discharge induced a large amount of hole doping in the SWNTs and improved the touch-sensing performance of the devices, while a positive discharge had a negligible effect. The poled devices exhibited regular, stable, and positive drain current modulation in response to intermittent pressing, and the response was proportional to the magnitude of the applied pressure, suggesting that it was caused by the piezoelectric effect of the polarized P(VDF-TrFE) layer. Furthermore, we also fabricated a device using horizontally aligned SWNTs with a lower SWNT density as an alternative transducer to an SWNT thin film, which demonstrated sensitivity as high as 70%/MPa.

  7. Remote sensing of the atmosphere of Mars using infrared pressure modulation and filter radiometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccleese, D. J.; Schofield, J. T.; Zurek, R. W.; Martonchik, J. V.; Haskins, R. D.

    1986-01-01

    The study of the atmosphere and climate of Mars will soon be advanced considerably by the Mars Observer mission. This paper describes the atmospheric sounder for this mission and how it will measure key Martian atmospheric parameters using IR gas correlation and filter radiometry. The instrument now under development will provide high-resolution vertical profiles of atmospheric temperature, pressure, water vapor, dust, and clouds using limb sounding techniques as well as nadir observations of surface thermal properties and polar radiative balance.

  8. Contribution of quorum sensing to the virulence of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in pressure ulcer infection in rats.

    PubMed

    Nakagami, Gojiro; Morohoshi, Tomohiro; Ikeda, Tsukasa; Ohta, Yasunori; Sagara, Hiroshi; Huang, Lijuan; Nagase, Takashi; Sugama, Junko; Sanada, Hiromi

    2011-01-01

    The impact of quorum sensing (QS) in in vivo models of infection has been widely investigated, but there are no descriptions for ischemic wound infection. To explore the role of QS in Pseudomonas aeruginosa in the establishment of ischemic wound infection, we challenged a pressure ulcer model in rats with the PAO-1, PAO-1 derivatives ΔlasIΔrhlI and ΔlasRΔrhlR strains, which cannot induce the virulence factor under QS control, thus the reduced tissue destruction was expended in these mutant strains. However unexpectedly, on postwounding day 3, the inflammatory responses in the three groups were similarly severe and the numbers of bacteria in tissue samples did not differ among the three strains. Biofilm formation was immature in QS-deficient strains, defined by the absence of dense bacterial aggregates and extracellular polymeric substance, which was confirmed by scanning electron microscopy. The Pseudomonas aeruginosa QS signal, acylated homoserine lactone, was only quantified from wound samples in the PAO-1 group. The swimming and twitching motilities were significantly enhanced in the ΔlasRΔrhlR group compared with the PAO-1 group in vitro. A significantly larger wound area was correlated with the bacterial motility. The inflammation in the early phase of bacterial challenge to wounds with immature biofilm formation in the QS-deficient strains indicated that the role of QS was more crucial for the chronic phase than for the acute phase of infection. The present findings indicate a difference in the importance of QS in ischemic wound infections compared with other infection models.

  9. High pressure studies of planetary matter

    SciTech Connect

    Ross, M.

    1989-06-01

    Those materials which are of greatest interest to the physics of the deep planetary interiors are Fe, H/sub 2/, He and the Ices. These are sufficiently diverse and intensively studied to offer an overview of present day high pressure research. 13 refs., 1 fig.

  10. Using dual-antenna nanosecond pulse near-field sensing technology for non-contact and continuous blood pressure measurement.

    PubMed

    Lin, Hong-Dun; Lee, Yen-Shien; Chuang, Bor-Nian

    2012-01-01

    Long-term and continuous non-invasive blood pressure monitoring has shown that it is the most important to clinical diagnosis of cardiovascular diseases and personal home health care. Currently, there are many preferable non-invasive methods, including optical sensor, pressure-sensitive transducers, and applanation tonometry, to get insight of blood pressure and flow signal detection. However, the operation of traditional monitors is cuff accessories needed, and also the sensing probes needed to exert pressure to the user directly. The measurement procedure is limited by long-term, continuous measurement and also easy to cause discomfort. To improve these issues, the non-pressurized and non-invasive measuring method will become an important innovation improvement. In this paper, the novel nanosecond pulse near-field sensing (NPNS) based screening technology with dual-antenna, which includes radio frequency (RF) pulse transmission and two combined flat antenna connected to transceiver of miniature radar, is proposed to derive relative blood pressure parameters from measured blood flow activity (Pulse Wave Velocity, PWV). A dedicated analysis software is also provided to calculate cardiovascular parameters, including PWV, average systolic time, diastolic and systolic pressure, for clinical and homecare applications. To evaluate the performance, the proposed method was applied on blood pressure measurement at the body site of limbs (brachial and leg). As a result, it shows error of DBP and SBP is 5.18±1.61 and 4.09 ± 1.69 mmHg in average compared with the measurement result from commercial product, and performs the capability of continuous long-term monitoring in real-time.

  11. Naval Remote Ocean Sensing System (NROSS) study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    A set of hardware similar to the SEASAT A configuration requirement, suitable for installation and operation aboard a NOAA-D bus and a budgetary cost for one (1) protoflight model was provided. The scatterometer sensor is conceived as one of several sensors for the Navy Remote Ocean Sensing System (NROSS) Satellite Program. Deliverables requested were to include a final report with appropriate sketches and block diagrams showing the scatterometer design/configuration and a budgetary cost for all labor and materials to design, fabricate, test, and integrate this hardware into a NOAA-D satellite bus. This configuration consists of two (2) hardware assembles - a transmitter/receiver (T/R) assembly and an integrated electronics assembly (IEA). The T/R assembly as conceived is best located at the extreme opposite end of the satellite away from the solar array assembly and oriented in position to enable one surface of the assembly to have unobstructed exposure to space. The IEA is planned to be located at the bottom (Earth viewing) side of the satellite and requires a radiating plate.

  12. Can remote sensing help citizen-science based phenological studies?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delbart, Nicolas; Elisabeth, Beaubien; Laurent, Kergoat; Thuy, Le Toan

    2017-04-01

    Citizen science networks and remote sensing are both efficient to collect massive data related to phenology. However both differ in their advantages and drawbacks for this purpose. Contrarily to remote sensing, citizen science allows distinguishing species-specific phenological responses to climate variability. On the other hand, large portions of territory of a country like Canada are not covered by citizen science networks, and the time series are often incomplete. The main mode of interaction between both types of data consists in validating the maps showing the ecosystem foliage transition times, such as the green-up date, obtained from remote sensing data with field observations, and in particular those collected by citizen scientists. Thus the citizen science phenology data bring confidence to remote sensing based studies. However, one can merely find studies in which remote sensing is used to improve in any way citizen science based study. Here we present bi-directional interactions between both types of data. We first use phenological data from the PlantWatch citizen science network to show that one remote sensing method green-up date relates to the leaf-out date of woody species but also to the whole plant community phenology at the regional level, including flowering phenology. Second we use a remote sensing time series to constrain the analysis of citizen data to overcome the main drawbacks that is the incompleteness of time series. In particular we analyze the interspecies differences in phenology at the scale of so-called "pheno-regions" delineated using remote sensing green-up maps.

  13. Studies on pressure-gain combustion engines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsutomi, Yu

    Various aspects of the pressure-gain combustion engine are investigated analytically and experimentally in the current study. A lumped parameter model is developed to characterize the operation of a valveless pulse detonation engine. The model identified the function of flame quenching process through gas dynamic process. By adjusting fuel manifold pressure and geometries, the duration of the air buffer can be effectively varied. The parametric study with the lumped parameter model has shown that engine frequency of up to approximately 15 Hz is attainable. However, requirements for upstream air pressure increases significantly with higher engine frequency. The higher pressure requirement indicates pressure loss in the system and lower overall engine performance. The loss of performance due to the pressure loss is a critical issue for the integrated pressure-gain combustors. Two types of transitional methods are examined using entropy-based models. An accumulator based transition has obvious loss due to sudden area expansion, but it can be minimized by utilizing the gas dynamics in the combustion tube. An ejector type transition has potential to achieve performance beyond the limit specified by a single flow path Humphrey cycle. The performance of an ejector was discussed in terms of apparent entropy and mixed flow entropy. Through an ideal ejector, the apparent part of entropy increases due to the reduction in flow unsteadiness, but entropy of the mixed flow remains constant. The method is applied to a CFD simulation with a simple manifold for qualitative evaluation. The operation of the wave rotor constant volume combustion rig is experimentally examined. The rig has shown versatility of operation for wide range of conditions. Large pressure rise in the rotor channel and in a section of the exhaust duct are observed even with relatively large leakage gaps on the rotor. The simplified analysis indicated that inconsistent combustion is likely due to insufficient

  14. Characterization of Thick and Thin Film SiCN for Pressure Sensing at High Temperatures

    PubMed Central

    Leo, Alfin; Andronenko, Sergey; Stiharu, Ion; Bhat, Rama B.

    2010-01-01

    Pressure measurement in high temperature environments is important in many applications to provide valuable information for performance studies. Information on pressure patterns is highly desirable for improving performance, condition monitoring and accurate prediction of the remaining life of systems that operate in extremely high temperature environments, such as gas turbine engines. A number of technologies have been recently investigated, however these technologies target specific applications and they are limited by the maximum operating temperature. Thick and thin films of SiCN can withstand high temperatures. SiCN is a polymer-derived ceramic with liquid phase polymer as its starting material. This provides the advantage that it can be molded to any shape. CERASET™ also yields itself for photolithography, with the addition of photo initiator 2, 2-Dimethoxy-2-phenyl-acetophenone (DMPA), thereby enabling photolithographical patterning of the pre-ceramic polymer using UV lithography. SiCN fabrication includes thermosetting, crosslinking and pyrolysis. The technology is still under investigation for stability and improved performance. This work presents the preparation of SiCN films to be used as the body of a sensor for pressure measurements in high temperature environments. The sensor employs the phenomenon of drag effect. The pressure sensor consists of a slender sensitive element and a thick blocking element. The dimensions and thickness of the films depend on the intended application of the sensors. Fabrication methods of SiCN ceramics both as thin (about 40–60 μm) and thick (about 2–3 mm) films for high temperature applications are discussed. In addition, the influence of thermosetting and annealing processes on mechanical properties is investigated. PMID:22205871

  15. Characterization of thick and thin film SiCN for pressure sensing at high temperatures.

    PubMed

    Leo, Alfin; Andronenko, Sergey; Stiharu, Ion; Bhat, Rama B

    2010-01-01

    Pressure measurement in high temperature environments is important in many applications to provide valuable information for performance studies. Information on pressure patterns is highly desirable for improving performance, condition monitoring and accurate prediction of the remaining life of systems that operate in extremely high temperature environments, such as gas turbine engines. A number of technologies have been recently investigated, however these technologies target specific applications and they are limited by the maximum operating temperature. Thick and thin films of SiCN can withstand high temperatures. SiCN is a polymer-derived ceramic with liquid phase polymer as its starting material. This provides the advantage that it can be molded to any shape. CERASET™ also yields itself for photolithography, with the addition of photo initiator 2, 2-Dimethoxy-2-phenyl-acetophenone (DMPA), thereby enabling photolithographical patterning of the pre-ceramic polymer using UV lithography. SiCN fabrication includes thermosetting, crosslinking and pyrolysis. The technology is still under investigation for stability and improved performance. This work presents the preparation of SiCN films to be used as the body of a sensor for pressure measurements in high temperature environments. The sensor employs the phenomenon of drag effect. The pressure sensor consists of a slender sensitive element and a thick blocking element. The dimensions and thickness of the films depend on the intended application of the sensors. Fabrication methods of SiCN ceramics both as thin (about 40-60 μm) and thick (about 2-3 mm) films for high temperature applications are discussed. In addition, the influence of thermosetting and annealing processes on mechanical properties is investigated.

  16. Integration of a capacitive pressure sensing system into the outer catheter wall for coronary artery FFR measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stam, Frank; Kuisma, Heikki; Gao, Feng; Saarilahti, Jaakko; Gomes Martins, David; Kärkkäinen, Anu; Marrinan, Brendan; Pintal, Sebastian

    2017-05-01

    The deadliest disease in the world is coronary artery disease (CAD), which is related to a narrowing (stenosis) of blood vessels due to fatty deposits, plaque, on the arterial walls. The level of stenosis in the coronary arteries can be assessed by Fractional Flow Reserve (FFR) measurements. This involves determining the ratio between the maximum achievable blood flow in a diseased coronary artery and the theoretical maximum flow in a normal coronary artery. The blood flow is represented by a pressure drop, thus a pressure wire or pressure sensor integrated in a catheter can be used to calculate the ratio between the coronary pressure distal to the stenosis and the normal coronary pressure. A 2 Fr (0.67mm) outer diameter catheter was used, which required a high level of microelectronics miniaturisation to fit a pressure sensing system into the outer wall. The catheter has an eccentric guidewire lumen with a diameter of 0.43mm, which implies that the thickest catheter wall section provides less than 210 microns height for flex assembly integration consisting of two dies, a capacitive MEMS pressure sensor and an ASIC. In order to achieve this a very thin circuit flex was used, and the two chips were thinned down to 75 microns and flip chip mounted face down on the flex. Many challenges were involved in obtaining a flex layout that could wrap into a small tube without getting the dies damaged, while still maintaining enough flexibility for the catheter to navigate the arterial system.

  17. An Analytical Explanation for the X-43A Flush Air Data Sensing System Pressure Mismatch Between Flight and Theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ellsworth, Joel C.

    2010-01-01

    Following the successful Mach 7 flight test of the X-43A, unexpectedly low pressures were measured by the aft set of the onboard Flush Air Data Sensing System s pressure ports. These in-flight aft port readings were significantly lower below Mach 3.5 than was predicted by theory. The same lower readings were also seen in the Mach 10 flight of the X-43A and in wind-tunnel data. The pre-flight predictions were developed based on 2-dimensional wedge flow, which fails to predict some of the significant 3-dimensional flow features in this geometry at lower Mach numbers. Using Volterra s solution to the wave equation as a starting point, a three-dimensional finite wedge approximation to flow over the X-43A forebody is presented. The surface pressures from this approximation compare favorably with the measured wind tunnel and flight data at speeds of Mach 2.5 and 3.

  18. Pressure Safety: Advanced Self-Study 30120

    SciTech Connect

    Glass, George

    2016-02-29

    Pressure Safety Advance Self-Study (Course 30120) consists of an introduction, five modules, and a quiz. To receive credit in UTrain for completing this course, you must score 80% or better on the 15-question quiz (check UTrain). Directions for initiating the quiz are appended to the end of this training manual. This course contains several links to LANL websites. UTrain might not support active links, so please copy links into the address line in your browser.

  19. Progress Report: Pressure Vessel Burst Test Study

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-08-01

    report is provided on a program developed to study through test and analysis, the characteristics of blast waves and fragmentation generated by ruptured ...vessels were composite overwrapped pressure vessels ( COPV ) and were cut with a shaped charge (no groove) around its center. The burst location on the...and the shaped charge cut area (shown with dotted lines). BURST INITIATION Longitudinal stress in the circumferential grooves (for developing axial

  20. Study of interfacial phenomena for bio/chemical sensing applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Min, Hwall

    This work presents the fundamental study of biological and chemical interfacial phenomena and (bio)chemical sensing applications using high frequency resonator arrays. To realize a versatile (bio)chemical sensing system for the fundamental study as well as their practical applications, the following three distinct components were studied and developed: i) detection platforms with high sensitivity, ii) novel innovative sensing materials with high selectivity, iii) analytical model for data interpretation. 8-pixel micromachined quartz crystal resonator (muQCR) arrays with a fundamental resonance frequency of 60 ¡V 90 MHz have been used to provide a reliable detection platform with high sensitivity. Room temperature ionic liquid (RTIL) has been explored and integrated into the sensing system as a smart chemical sensing material. The use of nanoporous gold (np-Au) enables the combination of the resonator and surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy for both quantitative and qualitative measurement. A statistical model for the characterization of resonator behavior to study the protein adsorption kinetics is developed by random sequential adsorption (RSA) approach with the integration of an effective surface depletion theory. The investigation of the adsorption kinetics of blood proteins is reported as the fundamental study of biological phenomena using the proposed sensing system. The aim of this work is to study different aspects of protein adsorption and kinetics of adsorption process with blood proteins on different surfaces. We specifically focus on surface depletion effect in conjunction with the RSA model to explain the observed adsorption isotherm characteristics. A number of case studies on protein adsorption conducted using the proposed sensing system has been discussed. Effort is specifically made to understand adsorption kinetics, and the effect of surface on the adsorption process as well as the properties of the adsorbed protein layer. The second half of the

  1. Fiber-optic gas pressure sensing with a laser-heated silicon-based Fabry-Perot interferometer.

    PubMed

    Liu, Guigen; Han, Ming

    2015-06-01

    We report a novel fiber-optic sensor for measurement of static gas pressure based on the natural convection of a heated silicon pillar attached to a fiber tip functioning as a Fabry-Perot interferometer (FPI). A visible laser beam is guided by the fiber to efficiently heat the silicon pillar, while an infrared whitelight source, also guided by the fiber, is used to measure the temperature of the FPI, which is influenced both by the laser power and the pressure through natural convection. We theoretically and experimentally show that, by monitoring the fringe shift caused by the laser heating, air pressure sensing with little temperature cross-sensitivity can be achieved. The pressure sensitivity can be easily tuned by adjusting the heating laser power. In our experiment, the sensor performance within the temperature range from 20°C to 50°C and the pressure range from 0 to 1400 psi has been characterized, showing an average sensitivity of -0.52  pm/psi. Compared to the passive version of the sensor, the pressure sensitivity was ∼15 times larger, and the temperature cross-sensitivity was ∼100 times smaller.

  2. A Compressed Sensing Based Method for Reducing the Sampling Time of A High Resolution Pressure Sensor Array System.

    PubMed

    Sun, Chenglu; Li, Wei; Chen, Wei

    2017-08-10

    For extracting the pressure distribution image and respiratory waveform unobtrusively and comfortably, we proposed a smart mat which utilized a flexible pressure sensor array, printed electrodes and novel soft seven-layer structure to monitor those physiological information. However, in order to obtain high-resolution pressure distribution and more accurate respiratory waveform, it needs more time to acquire the pressure signal of all the pressure sensors embedded in the smart mat. In order to reduce the sampling time while keeping the same resolution and accuracy, a novel method based on compressed sensing (CS) theory was proposed. By utilizing the CS based method, 40% of the sampling time can be decreased by means of acquiring nearly one-third of original sampling points. Then several experiments were carried out to validate the performance of the CS based method. While less than one-third of original sampling points were measured, the correlation degree coefficient between reconstructed respiratory waveform and original waveform can achieve 0.9078, and the accuracy of the respiratory rate (RR) extracted from the reconstructed respiratory waveform can reach 95.54%. The experimental results demonstrated that the novel method can fit the high resolution smart mat system and be a viable option for reducing the sampling time of the pressure sensor array.

  3. TRPC5 channels participate in pressure-sensing in aortic baroreceptors

    PubMed Central

    Lau, On-Chai; Shen, Bing; Wong, Ching-On; Tjong, Yung-Wui; Lo, Chun-Yin; Wang, Hui-Chuan; Huang, Yu; Yung, Wing-Ho; Chen, Yang-Chao; Fung, Man-Lung; Rudd, John Anthony; Yao, Xiaoqiang

    2016-01-01

    Blood pressure is maintained within a normal physiological range by a sophisticated regulatory mechanism. Baroreceptors serve as a frontline sensor to detect the change in blood pressure. Nerve signals are then sent to the cardiovascular control centre in the brain in order to stimulate baroreflex responses. Here, we identify TRPC5 channels as a mechanical sensor in aortic baroreceptors. In Trpc5 knockout mice, the pressure-induced action potential firings in the afferent nerve and the baroreflex-mediated heart rate reduction are attenuated. Telemetric measurements of blood pressure demonstrate that Trpc5 knockout mice display severe daily blood pressure fluctuation. Our results suggest that TRPC5 channels represent a key pressure transducer in the baroreceptors and play an important role in maintaining blood pressure stability. Because baroreceptor dysfunction contributes to a variety of cardiovascular diseases including hypertension, heart failure and myocardial infarction, our findings may have important future clinical implications. PMID:27411851

  4. Wearable Sensing of In-Ear Pressure for Heart Rate Monitoring with a Piezoelectric Sensor

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jang-Ho; Jang, Dae-Geun; Park, Jung Wook; Youm, Se-Kyoung

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we developed a novel heart rate (HR) monitoring approach in which we measure the pressure variance of the surface of the ear canal. A scissor-shaped apparatus equipped with a piezoelectric film sensor and a hardware circuit module was designed for high wearability and to obtain stable measurement. In the proposed device, the film sensor converts in-ear pulse waves (EPW) into electrical current, and the circuit module enhances the EPW and suppresses noise. A real-time algorithm embedded in the circuit module performs morphological conversions to make the EPW more distinct and knowledge-based rules are used to detect EPW peaks. In a clinical experiment conducted using a reference electrocardiogram (ECG) device, EPW and ECG were concurrently recorded from 58 healthy subjects. The EPW intervals between successive peaks and their corresponding ECG intervals were then compared to each other. Promising results were obtained from the samples, specifically, a sensitivity of 97.25%, positive predictive value of 97.17%, and mean absolute difference of 0.62. Thus, highly accurate HR was obtained from in-ear pressure variance. Consequently, we believe that our proposed approach could be used to monitor vital signs and also utilized in diverse applications in the near future. PMID:26389912

  5. Wearable Sensing of In-Ear Pressure for Heart Rate Monitoring with a Piezoelectric Sensor.

    PubMed

    Park, Jang-Ho; Jang, Dae-Geun; Park, Jung Wook; Youm, Se-Kyoung

    2015-09-16

    In this study, we developed a novel heart rate (HR) monitoring approach in which we measure the pressure variance of the surface of the ear canal. A scissor-shaped apparatus equipped with a piezoelectric film sensor and a hardware circuit module was designed for high wearability and to obtain stable measurement. In the proposed device, the film sensor converts in-ear pulse waves (EPW) into electrical current, and the circuit module enhances the EPW and suppresses noise. A real-time algorithm embedded in the circuit module performs morphological conversions to make the EPW more distinct and knowledge-based rules are used to detect EPW peaks. In a clinical experiment conducted using a reference electrocardiogram (ECG) device, EPW and ECG were concurrently recorded from 58 healthy subjects. The EPW intervals between successive peaks and their corresponding ECG intervals were then compared to each other. Promising results were obtained from the samples, specifically, a sensitivity of 97.25%, positive predictive value of 97.17%, and mean absolute difference of 0.62. Thus, highly accurate HR was obtained from in-ear pressure variance. Consequently, we believe that our proposed approach could be used to monitor vital signs and also utilized in diverse applications in the near future.

  6. Water column correction for coral reef studies by remote sensing.

    PubMed

    Zoffoli, Maria Laura; Frouin, Robert; Kampel, Milton

    2014-09-11

    Human activity and natural climate trends constitute a major threat to coral reefs worldwide. Models predict a significant reduction in reef spatial extension together with a decline in biodiversity in the relatively near future. In this context, monitoring programs to detect changes in reef ecosystems are essential. In recent years, coral reef mapping using remote sensing data has benefited from instruments with better resolution and computational advances in storage and processing capabilities. However, the water column represents an additional complexity when extracting information from submerged substrates by remote sensing that demands a correction of its effect. In this article, the basic concepts of bottom substrate remote sensing and water column interference are presented. A compendium of methodologies developed to reduce water column effects in coral ecosystems studied by remote sensing that include their salient features, advantages and drawbacks is provided. Finally, algorithms to retrieve the bottom reflectance are applied to simulated data and actual remote sensing imagery and their performance is compared. The available methods are not able to completely eliminate the water column effect, but they can minimize its influence. Choosing the best method depends on the marine environment, available input data and desired outcome or scientific application.

  7. Water Column Correction for Coral Reef Studies by Remote Sensing

    PubMed Central

    Zoffoli, Maria Laura; Frouin, Robert; Kampel, Milton

    2014-01-01

    Human activity and natural climate trends constitute a major threat to coral reefs worldwide. Models predict a significant reduction in reef spatial extension together with a decline in biodiversity in the relatively near future. In this context, monitoring programs to detect changes in reef ecosystems are essential. In recent years, coral reef mapping using remote sensing data has benefited from instruments with better resolution and computational advances in storage and processing capabilities. However, the water column represents an additional complexity when extracting information from submerged substrates by remote sensing that demands a correction of its effect. In this article, the basic concepts of bottom substrate remote sensing and water column interference are presented. A compendium of methodologies developed to reduce water column effects in coral ecosystems studied by remote sensing that include their salient features, advantages and drawbacks is provided. Finally, algorithms to retrieve the bottom reflectance are applied to simulated data and actual remote sensing imagery and their performance is compared. The available methods are not able to completely eliminate the water column effect, but they can minimize its influence. Choosing the best method depends on the marine environment, available input data and desired outcome or scientific application. PMID:25215941

  8. Study of Melon Permittivities for Quality Sensing

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    ABSTRACT Permittivities (dielectric constants and dielectric loss factors) were determined at frequencies between 10 MHz and 20 GHz for mature cantaloupe, honeydew melons, and watermelons grown during three consecutive years and studied in relation to the sweetness of the edible tissue as determine...

  9. Effect of air-pressure on room temperature hydrogen sensing characteristics of nanocrystalline doped tin oxide MEMS-based sensor.

    PubMed

    Shukla, Satyajit; Ludwig, Lawrence; Cho, Hyoung J; Duarte, Julian; Seal, Sudipta

    2005-11-01

    Nanocrystalline indium oxide (In2O3)-doped tin oxide (SnO2) thin film sensor has been sol-gel dip-coated on a microelectrochemical system (MEMS) device using a sol-gel dip-coating technique. Hydrogen (H2) at ppm-level has been successfully detected at room temperature using the present MEMS-based sensor. The room temperature H2 sensing characteristics (sensitivity, response and recovery time, and recovery rate) of the present MEMS-based sensor has been investigated as a function of air-pressure (50-600 Torr) with and without the ultraviolet (UV) radiation exposure. It has been demonstrated that, the concentration of the surface-adsorbed oxygen-ions (which is related to the sensor-resistance in air), the ppm-level H2, and the oxygen (O2) partial pressure are the three major factors, which determine the variation in the room temperature H2 sensing characteristics of the present MEMS-based sensor as a function of air-pressure.

  10. Impedance sensing device enables early detection of pressure ulcers in vivo.

    PubMed

    Swisher, Sarah L; Lin, Monica C; Liao, Amy; Leeflang, Elisabeth J; Khan, Yasser; Pavinatto, Felippe J; Mann, Kaylee; Naujokas, Agne; Young, David; Roy, Shuvo; Harrison, Michael R; Arias, Ana Claudia; Subramanian, Vivek; Maharbiz, Michel M

    2015-03-17

    When pressure is applied to a localized area of the body for an extended time, the resulting loss of blood flow and subsequent reperfusion to the tissue causes cell death and a pressure ulcer develops. Preventing pressure ulcers is challenging because the combination of pressure and time that results in tissue damage varies widely between patients, and the underlying damage is often severe by the time a surface wound becomes visible. Currently, no method exists to detect early tissue damage and enable intervention. Here we demonstrate a flexible, electronic device that non-invasively maps pressure-induced tissue damage, even when such damage cannot be visually observed. Using impedance spectroscopy across flexible electrode arrays in vivo on a rat model, we find that impedance is robustly correlated with tissue health across multiple animals and wound types. Our results demonstrate the feasibility of an automated, non-invasive 'smart bandage' for early detection of pressure ulcers.

  11. A highly sensitive pressure sensor using a double-layered graphene structure for tactile sensing.

    PubMed

    Chun, Sungwoo; Kim, Youngjun; Oh, Hyeong-Sik; Bae, Giyeol; Park, Wanjun

    2015-07-21

    In this paper, we propose a graphene sensor using two separated single-layered graphenes on a flexible substrate for use as a pressure sensor, such as for soft electronics. The working pressure corresponds to the range in which human perception recognizes surface morphologies. A specific design of the sensor structure drives the piezoresistive character due to the contact resistance between two graphene layers and the electromechanical properties of graphene itself. Accordingly, sensitivity in resistance change is given by two modes for low pressure (-0.24 kPa(-1)) and high pressure (0.039 kPa(-1)) with a crossover pressure (700 Pa). This sensor can detect infinitesimal pressure as low as 0.3 Pa with uniformly applied vertical force. With the attachment of the artificial fingerprint structure (AFPS) on the sensor, the detection ability for both the locally generated shear force and actual human touch confirms recognition of the surface morphology constructed by periodic structures.

  12. Red River chloride remote sensing study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    Side looking radar, infrared thermal imagery and color photography, together with a few examples of black and white panoramic photos, are used to supplement information on the natural saline pollution problem that is hydrologically and geologically oriented. The study area was explored concurrently by ground methods and a reasonably good understanding of hydrogeological conditions has been achieved. Examples of the products acquired, their interpretation, and use techniques are included.

  13. Full Dynamic-Range Pressure Sensor Matrix Based on Optical and Electrical Dual-Mode Sensing.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiandi; Que, Miaoling; Chen, Mengxiao; Han, Xun; Li, Xiaoyi; Pan, Caofeng; Wang, Zhong Lin

    2017-04-01

    A pressure-sensor matrix (PSM) with full dynamic range can accurately detect and spatially map pressure profiles. A 100 × 100 large-scale PSM gives both electrical and optical signals by itself without applying an external power source. The device represents a major step toward digital imaging, and the visible display of the pressure distribution covers a large dynamic range. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  14. An Ultrasonic and Air Pressure Sensing System for Detection of Behavior before Getting out of Bed Aided by Fuzzy Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamaguchi, Hayato; Nakajima, Hiroshi; Taniguchi, Kazuhiko; Kobashi, Syoji; Hata, Yutaka

    This paper proposes a sensing system for a behavior detection system using an ultrasonic oscillosensor and an air pressure sensor. The ultrasonic oscillosensor sensor has a cylindrical tank filled with water. It detects the vibration of the target object from the signal reflected from the water surface. This sensor can detect a biological vibration by setting to the bottom bed frame. The air pressure sensor consists of a polypropylene sheet and an air pressure sensor, and detects the pressure information by setting under the bed's mattress. An increase (decrease) in the load placed on the bed is detected by the increase (decrease) in the pressure of the air held in the tube attached to the sheet. We propose a behavior detection system using both sensors, complementally. The system recognizes three states (nobody in bed, keeping quiet in bed, moving in bed) using both sensors, and we detect the behavior before getting out of bed by recognized these states. Fuzzy logic plays a primary role in the system. As the fundamental experiment, we applied the system to five healthy volunteers, the system successfully recognized three states, and detected the behavior before getting out of bed. As the clinical experiment, we applied the system to four elderly patients with dementia, the system exactly detected the behavior before getting out of the bed with enough time for medical care support.

  15. Feasibility of leakage detection in lake pressure pipes using the Distributed Temperature Sensing Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Apperl, Benjamin; Pressl, Alexander; Schulz, Karsten

    2016-04-01

    This contribution describes a feasibility study carried out in the laboratory for the detection of leakages in lake pressure pipes using high-resolution fiber-optic temperature measurements (DTS). The usage of the DTS technology provides spatiotemporal high-resolution temperature measurements along a fibre optic cable. An opto-electrical device serves both as a light emitter as well as a spectrometer for measuring the scattering of light. The fiber optic cable serves as linear sensor. Measurements can be taken at a spatial resolution of up to 25 cm with a temperature accuracy of higher than 0.1 °C. The first warmer days after the winter stagnation provoke a temperature rise of superficial layers of lakes with barely stable temperature stratification. The warmer layer in the epilimnion differs 4 °C to 5 °C compared to the cold layers in the meta- or hypolimnion before water circulation in spring starts. The warmer water from the surface layer can be rinsed on the entire length of the pipe. Water intrudes at leakages by generating a slightly negative pressure in the pipe. This provokes a local temperature change, in case that the penetrating water (seawater) differs in temperature from the water pumped through the pipe. These temperature changes should be detectable and localized with a DTS cable introduced in the pipe. A laboratory experiment was carried out to determine feasibility as well as limits and problems of this methodology. A 6 m long pipe, submerged in a water tank at constant temperature, was rinsed with water 5-10 °C warmer than the water in the tank. Temperature measurements were taken continuously along the pipe. A negative pressure of 0.1 bar provoked the intrusion of colder water from the tank into the pipe through the leakages, resulting in local temperature changes. Experiments where conducted with different temperature gradients, leakage sizes, number of leaks as well as with different positioning of the DTS cable inside the pipe. Results

  16. The design of hydraulic pressure regulators that are stable without the use of sensing line restrictors or frictional dampers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gold, H.

    1977-01-01

    Parameters controlled in design determine the stability of hydraulic pressure regulators in service. The non-linear sensing line restrictor can provide stability, but degrades the transient response. Linear damping is not always physically realizable and is sensitive to clearance and viscosity. Design relationships are analytically derived through which regulators can be made to be stable without the use of either of these damping means. The analytical distinctions between the parameters derived and those in prior literature are discussed. An analytically derived circuit component that stabilizes an otherwise unstable regulator and its experimental verification is described.

  17. Applications of Remote Sensing to Alien Invasive Plant Studies

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Cho-ying; Asner, Gregory P.

    2009-01-01

    Biological invasions can affect ecosystems across a wide spectrum of bioclimatic conditions. Therefore, it is often important to systematically monitor the spread of species over a broad region. Remote sensing has been an important tool for large-scale ecological studies in the past three decades, but it was not commonly used to study alien invasive plants until the mid 1990s. We synthesize previous research efforts on remote sensing of invasive plants from spatial, temporal and spectral perspectives. We also highlight a recently developed state-of-the-art image fusion technique that integrates passive and active energies concurrently collected by an imaging spectrometer and a scanning-waveform light detection and ranging (LiDAR) system, respectively. This approach provides a means to detect the structure and functional properties of invasive plants of different canopy levels. Finally, we summarize regional studies of biological invasions using remote sensing, discuss the limitations of remote sensing approaches, and highlight current research needs and future directions. PMID:22408558

  18. Studies on droplet evaporation and combustion in high pressures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sato, J.

    1993-01-01

    High pressure droplet evaporation and combustion have been studied up to 15 MPa under normal and microgravity fields. From the evaporation studies, it has been found that in the supercritical environments, the droplet evaporation rate and lifetime take a maximum and a minimum at an ambient pressure over the critical pressure. Its maximum and minimum points move toward the lower ambient pressures if the ambient temperature is increased. It has been found from the combustion studies that the burning life time takes a minimum at an ambient pressure being equal to the critical pressure. It is attributable to both the pressure dependency of the diffusion rate and the droplet evaporation characteristics described above.

  19. RF BREAKDOWN STUDIES USING PRESSURIZED CAVITIES

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Rolland

    2014-09-21

    Many present and future particle accelerators are limited by the maximum electric gradient and peak surface fields that can be realized in RF cavities. Despite considerable effort, a comprehensive theory of RF breakdown has not been achieved and mitigation techniques to improve practical maximum accelerating gradients have had only limited success. Part of the problem is that RF breakdown in an evacuated cavity involves a complex mixture of effects, which include the geometry, metallurgy, and surface preparation of the accelerating structures and the make-up and pressure of the residual gas in which plasmas form. Studies showed that high gradients can be achieved quickly in 805 MHz RF cavities pressurized with dense hydrogen gas, as needed for muon cooling channels, without the need for long conditioning times, even in the presence of strong external magnetic fields. This positive result was expected because the dense gas can practically eliminate dark currents and multipacting. In this project we used this high pressure technique to suppress effects of residual vacuum and geometry that are found in evacuated cavities in order to isolate and study the role of the metallic surfaces in RF cavity breakdown as a function of magnetic field, frequency, and surface preparation. One of the interesting and useful outcomes of this project was the unanticipated collaborations with LANL and Fermilab that led to new insights as to the operation of evacuated normal-conducting RF cavities in high external magnetic fields. Other accomplishments included: (1) RF breakdown experiments to test the effects of SF6 dopant in H2 and He gases with Sn, Al, and Cu electrodes were carried out in an 805 MHz cavity and compared to calculations and computer simulations. The heavy corrosion caused by the SF6 components led to the suggestion that a small admixture of oxygen, instead of SF6, to the hydrogen would allow the same advantages without the corrosion in a practical muon beam line. (2) A

  20. The use of remote sensing for landslide studies in Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tofani, Veronica; Agostini, Andrea; Segoni, Samuele; Catani, Filippo; Casagli, Nicola

    2013-04-01

    results can be obtained combining remote sensing with ground based networks data and in field observations, as this can allow defining the deformation patterns of a landslide and its relationship with the triggering conditions . According to the research and working experience of the compilers, remote sensing is generally considered to have a medium effectiveness/reliability for landslide studies. Moreover this depends also on how remote sensing is used: an increase in the number of used remote sensing data type (aerial photos, satellite optical, satellite radar etc.), corresponds to a growth of the degree of effectiveness/reliability. In general the number of parameters detectable through remote sensing is linked to the number of techniques employed: an increase in the number of measured parameters is related to an increase in the number of the techniques used, both for monitoring and for detection/mapping. Many answers reported the possibility of detecting more than one parameters by only using radar technologies: this could be considered as an indicator of a better efficiency of radar with respect to optical techniques. The results of the questionnaire thus contribute to draw a sketch of the use of remote sensing in current landslide studies and show that remote sensing can be considered a powerful and well established instrument for landslides mapping, monitoring and hazard analysis and highlight that a wide range of available techniques and source data can be approached depending on the size and velocity of the investigated phenomena

  1. A highly sensitive pressure sensor using a double-layered graphene structure for tactile sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chun, Sungwoo; Kim, Youngjun; Oh, Hyeong-Sik; Bae, Giyeol; Park, Wanjun

    2015-07-01

    In this paper, we propose a graphene sensor using two separated single-layered graphenes on a flexible substrate for use as a pressure sensor, such as for soft electronics. The working pressure corresponds to the range in which human perception recognizes surface morphologies. A specific design of the sensor structure drives the piezoresistive character due to the contact resistance between two graphene layers and the electromechanical properties of graphene itself. Accordingly, sensitivity in resistance change is given by two modes for low pressure (-0.24 kPa-1) and high pressure (0.039 kPa-1) with a crossover pressure (700 Pa). This sensor can detect infinitesimal pressure as low as 0.3 Pa with uniformly applied vertical force. With the attachment of the artificial fingerprint structure (AFPS) on the sensor, the detection ability for both the locally generated shear force and actual human touch confirms recognition of the surface morphology constructed by periodic structures.In this paper, we propose a graphene sensor using two separated single-layered graphenes on a flexible substrate for use as a pressure sensor, such as for soft electronics. The working pressure corresponds to the range in which human perception recognizes surface morphologies. A specific design of the sensor structure drives the piezoresistive character due to the contact resistance between two graphene layers and the electromechanical properties of graphene itself. Accordingly, sensitivity in resistance change is given by two modes for low pressure (-0.24 kPa-1) and high pressure (0.039 kPa-1) with a crossover pressure (700 Pa). This sensor can detect infinitesimal pressure as low as 0.3 Pa with uniformly applied vertical force. With the attachment of the artificial fingerprint structure (AFPS) on the sensor, the detection ability for both the locally generated shear force and actual human touch confirms recognition of the surface morphology constructed by periodic structures. Electronic

  2. Remote sensing for studying atmospheric aerosols in Malaysia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanniah, Kasturi D.; Kamarul Zaman, Nurul A. F.

    2015-10-01

    The aerosol system is Southeast Asia is complex and the high concentrations are due to population growth, rapid urbanization and development of SEA countries. Nevertheless, only a few studies have been carried out especially at large spatial extent and on a continuous basis to study atmospheric aerosols in Malaysia. In this review paper we report the use of remote sensing data to study atmospheric aerosols in Malaysia and document gaps and recommend further studies to bridge the gaps. Satellite data have been used to study the spatial and seasonal patterns of aerosol optical depth (AOD) in Malaysia. Satellite data combined with AERONET data were used to delineate different types and sizes of aerosols and to identify the sources of aerosols in Malaysia. Most of the aerosol studies performed in Malaysia was based on station-based PM10 data that have limited spatial coverage. Thus, satellite data have been used to extrapolate and retrieve PM10 data over large areas by correlating remotely sensed AOD with ground-based PM10. Realising the critical role of aerosols on radiative forcing numerous studies have been conducted worldwide to assess the aerosol radiative forcing (ARF). Such studies are yet to be conducted in Malaysia. Although the only source of aerosol data covering large region in Malaysia is remote sensing, satellite observations are limited by cloud cover, orbital gaps of satellite track, etc. In addition, relatively less understanding is achieved on how the atmospheric aerosol interacts with the regional climate system. These gaps can be bridged by conducting more studies using integrated approach of remote sensing, AERONET and ground based measurements.

  3. Capillary pressure studies under low gravity conditions.

    PubMed

    Kovalchuk, V I; Ravera, F; Liggieri, L; Loglio, G; Pandolfini, P; Makievski, A V; Vincent-Bonnieu, S; Krägel, J; Javadi, A; Miller, R

    2010-12-15

    For the understanding of short-time adsorption phenomena and high-frequency relaxations at liquid interfaces particular experimental techniques are needed. The most suitable method for respective studies is the capillary pressure tensiometry. However, under gravity conditions there are rather strong limitations, in particular due to convections and interfacial deformations. This manuscript provides an overview of the state of the art of experimental tools developed for short-time and high-frequency investigations of liquid drops and bubbles under microgravity. Besides the brief description of instruments, the underlying theoretical basis will be presented and limits of the applied methods under ground and microgravity conditions will be discussed. The results on the role of surfactants under highly dynamic conditions will be demonstrated by some selected examples studied in two space shuttle missions on Discovery in 1998 and Columbia in 2003.

  4. Dual-gate low-voltage organic transistor for pressure sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsuji, Yushi; Sakai, Heisuke; Feng, Linrun; Guo, Xiaojun; Murata, Hideyuki

    2017-02-01

    We simultaneously achieved low-voltage operation (‑5 V) and large drain current (I D) modulation in a dual-gate organic pressure sensor in which a piezoelectric layer was stacked on a low-voltage organic field-effect transistor (OFET). During testing, I D changed from 3.9 × 10‑9 to 2.5 × 10‑11 A when a 300 kPa pressure load was applied, and I D clearly responded to the pressure load and release. An endurance cycle test of the device was performed using a pressure load of 100 kPa, and the I D modulation was consistently reproduced throughout the test.

  5. Study the gas sensing properties of boron nitride nanosheets

    SciTech Connect

    Sajjad, Muhammad; Feng, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • We synthesized boron nitride nanosheets (BNNSs) on silicon substrate. • We analyzed gas sensing properties of BNNSs-based gas-sensor device. • CH{sub 4} gas is used to measure gas-sensing properties of the device. • Quick response and recovery time of the device is recorded. • BNNSs showed excellent sensitivity to the working gas. - Abstract: In the present communication, we report on the synthesis of boron nitride nanosheets (BNNSs) and study of their gas sensing properties. BNNSs are synthesized by irradiating pyrolytic hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) target using CO{sub 2} laser pulses. High resolution transmission electron microscopic measurements (HRTEM) revealed 2-dientional honeycomb crystal lattice structure of BNNSs. HRTEM, electron diffraction, XRD and Raman scattering measurements clearly identified h-BN. Gas sensing properties of synthesized BNNSs were analyzed with prototype gas sensor using methane as working gas. A systematic response curve of the sensor is recorded in each cycle of gas “in” and “out”; suggesting excellent sensitivity and high performance of BNNSs-based gas-sensor.

  6. Comparison of temporospatial and kinetic variables of walking in small and large dogs on a pressure-sensing walkway.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jongmin; Kazmierczak, Kris A; Breur, Gert J

    2011-09-01

    To compare temporospatial variables (TSVs) and kinetic variables (KVs) for fore-limbs and hind limbs of small and large dogs of various breeds during walking and to determine associations among body weight (BW), TSVs, and KVs in these groups. 12 adult dogs with no evidence of lameness. Dogs (grouped according to BW as small [< 10 kg; n = 6] or large [> 25 kg; 6]) were walked in a straight line at their preferred velocity on a wooden platform with an embedded pressure-sensing walkway. Five valid trials were analyzed for each dog; mean TSVs and KVs were determined for each group. The TSVs and KVs for forelimbs and hind limbs were compared between groups, and correlations among BW, TSVs, and KVs were determined. Small dogs had significantly smaller TSVs and KVs than did large dogs. Temporal variables of small dogs and absolute vertical force variables of small and large dogs increased as BW increased. However, normalized peak vertical force and weight distribution values among the 4 limbs were similar between groups. Substantial similarities and differences were detected in gait characteristics between small and large dogs. Results indicated TSVs and KVs can be used for comparison of the walking gait between dogs or for comparison of variables between limbs in an individual dog. Use of the pressure-sensing walkway is a simple method for acquisition of TSVs and KVs for large and small dogs.

  7. Global Remote Sensing of Precipitating Electron Energies: A Comparison of Substorms and Pressure Pulse Related Intensifications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chua, D.; Parks, G. K.; Brittnacher, M. J.; Germany, G. A.; Spann, J. F.

    2000-01-01

    The Polar Ultraviolet Imager (UVI) observes aurora responses to incident solar wind pressure pulses and interplanetary shocks such its those associated with coronal mass ejections. Previous observations have demonstrated that the arrival of it pressure pulse at the front of the magnetosphere results in highly disturbed geomagnetic conditions and a substantial increase in both dayside and nightside aurora precipitations. Our observations show it simultaneous brightening over bread areas of the dayside and nightside auroral in response to a pressure pulse, indicating that more magnetospheric regions participate as sources for auroral precipitation than during isolate substorm. We estimate the characteristic energies of incident auroral electrons using Polar UVI images and compare the precipitation energies during pressure pulse associated event to those during isolated substorms. We estimate the characteristic energies of incident auroral electrons using Polar UVI images and compare the precipitation energies during pressure pulse associated events to those during isolated auroral substorms. Electron precipitation during substorms has characteristic energies greater than 10 KeV and is structured both in local time and in magnetic latitude. For auroral intensifications following the arrival of'a pressure pulse or interplanetary shock. Electron precipitation is less spatially structured and has greater flux of lower characteristic energy electrons (Echar less than 7 KeV) than during isolated substorm onsets. These observations quantify the differences between global and local auroral precipitation processes and will provide a valuable experimental check for models of sudden storm commencements and magnetospheric response to perturbations in the solar wind.

  8. Global Remote Sensing of Precipitating Electron Energies: A Comparison of Substorms and Pressure Pulse Related Intensifications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chua, D.; Parks, G. K.; Brittnacher, M. J.; Germany, G. A.; Spann, J. F.

    2000-01-01

    The Polar Ultraviolet Imager (UVI) observes aurora responses to incident solar wind pressure pulses and interplanetary shocks such its those associated with coronal mass ejections. Previous observations have demonstrated that the arrival of it pressure pulse at the front of the magnetosphere results in highly disturbed geomagnetic conditions and a substantial increase in both dayside and nightside aurora precipitations. Our observations show it simultaneous brightening over bread areas of the dayside and nightside auroral in response to a pressure pulse, indicating that more magnetospheric regions participate as sources for auroral precipitation than during isolate substorm. We estimate the characteristic energies of incident auroral electrons using Polar UVI images and compare the precipitation energies during pressure pulse associated event to those during isolated substorms. We estimate the characteristic energies of incident auroral electrons using Polar UVI images and compare the precipitation energies during pressure pulse associated events to those during isolated auroral substorms. Electron precipitation during substorms has characteristic energies greater than 10 KeV and is structured both in local time and in magnetic latitude. For auroral intensifications following the arrival of'a pressure pulse or interplanetary shock. Electron precipitation is less spatially structured and has greater flux of lower characteristic energy electrons (Echar less than 7 KeV) than during isolated substorm onsets. These observations quantify the differences between global and local auroral precipitation processes and will provide a valuable experimental check for models of sudden storm commencements and magnetospheric response to perturbations in the solar wind.

  9. Remote sensing and geologic studies of the planetary crusts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hawke, B. R.

    1983-01-01

    Dark haloed craters and regions of the Moon which were sites of ancient volcanism were remotely sensed as well as KREEP deposits in the Inbrium region. The relationship between geology and geochemistry in the Undarum/Spumans region was also examined. Results are summarized for observations of the Reiner Gamma formation, studies of impact cratering mechanics and processes, spectral variations of asteroidal surfaces, albedo and color variations on Ganymede, and studies of lunar impact structures.

  10. High pressure study of acetophenone azine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, X. D.; Ding, Z. J.; Zhang, Z. M.

    2009-02-01

    High pressure Raman spectra of acetophenone azine (APA) have been measured up to 17.7 GPa with a diamond anvil cell. Two crystalline-to-crystalline phase transformations are found at pressures about 3.6 and 5.8 GPa. A disappearance of external modes and the C-H vibration at pressures higher than 8.7 GPa suggests that the sample undergoes a phase transition to amorphous or orientationally disordered (plastic) state, and the amorphization was completed at about 12.1 GPa. The disordered state is unstable and, then, a polymerization transformation reaction occurs with a further pressure increase. After the pressure has been released, the polymerization state can remain at the ambient condition, indicating that the virgin crystalline state is not recovered. The results show that the phenomenon underlying the pressure induced phase transition of APA may involve profound changes in the coordination environments of the symmetric aromatic azine.

  11. Vapor pressure osmometry studies on buckminsterfullerene

    SciTech Connect

    Honeychuck, R.V.; Cruger, T.W.; Milliken, J. |

    1993-12-31

    Vapor pressure osmometry has been employed in studies of solutions of buckminsterfullerene (C{sub 60}. Two aromatic solvents were selected in order to obtain solutions which would be as concentrated as possible. The number-average molecular weights M{sub n} of C{sub 60} determined by analysis of the data are 930 {+-} 5 g mol{sup {minus}1} in chlorobenzene and 700 {+-} 10 g mol{sup {minus}1} in toluene), so the M{sub n} obtained in chlorobenzene is unexpected. Both determinations were performed with the same batch of C{sub 60}, which was processed to yield material of very high purity. The amount of interstitial N{sub 2} was determined using an appropriate method. The role if interstitial molecules, solvents in the crystal lattice, solvent-fullerene complexes, C{sub 70}, and C{sub 60} dimers in these measurements will be discussed.

  12. Studies in a moving bed pressure gasifier

    SciTech Connect

    Krishnudu, T.; Madhusudhan, B.; Reddy, S.N.; Sastry, V.S.R.; Rao, K.S.; Vaidyeswaran, R.

    1989-04-01

    Sequential layer samples were collected from a moving bed pressure gasification pilot plant operating at 2.0 MPa after it was quenched by cutting off the supply of oxygen and steam, and the samples were then analyzed. The studies were made with two low-rank coals. Based on the proximate and ultimate analyses and Gray-King assay, three zones - fast devolatilization, slow devolatilization with gasification, and gasification - could be indicated in the gasifier. From a correlation obtained earlier between volatile matter content in the char and the temperature of low-temperature carbonization in a Lurgi Spuelgas type of reactor, the temperature profile in the gasifier was predicted using the volatile matter content in the sequential layer samples. About two-thirds of the total fuel bed height of 3500 mm was for fast and slow devolatilizations and the rest for gasification.

  13. Raman Study of SWNT Under High Pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venkateswaran, U.; Rao, A. M.; Richter, E.; Eklund, P. C.; Smalley, R. E.

    1998-03-01

    A gasketed Merrill-Bassett-type diamond anvil cell was used for high pressure Raman measurements at room temperature. A 4:1 methanol-ethanol mixture served as the pressure transmitting medium. The radial mode (denoted as R, occuring at 186 cm-1 at 1 bar) and tangential modes (designated T_1, T_2, and T_3, located, respectively, at 1550, 1567, and 1593 cm-1 at 1 bar) were recorded for several representative pressures. With increasing pressure, both the R and T modes shift to higher frequencies with gradual weakening of intensity and broadening of linewidth. The radial mode disappears around ~ 2 GPa whereas the tangential modes, albeit weak in intensity, persist until 5.2 GPa. The decrease in Raman intensity under pressure can be attributed to a loss of resonance, since the strong Raman signals observed at ambient pressure have been interpreted as due a resonance with the electronic bands [1]. The R and T mode frequencies are fit to quadratic function of pressure i.e., ω=ω(0)+aP+bP^2 where `a' represents the linear pressure shift of the mode frequency which is proportional to the mode Gruneisen parameter. The linear pressure coefficient for the R mode is found to be nearly twice that of the high frequency T mode. A. M. Rao et al., Science 275, 187, 1997

  14. Comparative study of infrared wavefront sensing solutions for adaptive optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plantet, C.; Fusco, T.; Guerineau, N.; Derelle, S.; Robert, C.

    2016-07-01

    The development of new low-noise infrared detectors, such as RAPID (CEA LETI/Sofradir) or SAPHIRA (Selex), has given the possibility to consider infrared wavefront sensing at low ux. We propose here a comparative study of near infrared (J and H bands) wavefront sensing concepts for mid and high orders estimation on a 8m- class telescope, relying on three existing wavefront sensors: the Shack-Hartmann sensor, the pyramid sensor and the quadri-wave lateral shearing interferometer. We consider several conceptual designs using the RAPID camera, making a trade-off between background flux, optical thickness and compatibility with a compact cryostat integration. We then study their sensitivity to noise in order to compare them in different practical scenarios. The pyramid provides the best performance, with a gain up to 0.5 magnitude, and has an advantageous setup.

  15. Nanostructured giant magneto-impedance multilayers deposited onto flexible substrates for low pressure sensing

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Nanostructured FeNi-based multilayers are very suitable for use as magnetic sensors using the giant magneto-impedance effect. New fields of application can be opened with these materials deposited onto flexible substrates. In this work, we compare the performance of samples prepared onto a rigid glass substrate and onto a cyclo olefin copolymer flexible one. Although a significant reduction of the field sensitivity is found due to the increased effect of the stresses generated during preparation, the results are still satisfactory for use as magnetic field sensors in special applications. Moreover, we take advantage of the flexible nature of the substrate to evaluate the pressure dependence of the giant magneto-impedance effect. Sensitivities up to 1 Ω/Pa are found for pressures in the range of 0 to 1 Pa, demostrating the suitability of these nanostructured materials deposited onto flexible substrates to build sensitive pressure sensors. PMID:22525096

  16. Nanostructured giant magneto-impedance multilayers deposited onto flexible substrates for low pressure sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernández, Eduardo; Kurlyandskaya, Galina V.; García-Arribas, Alfredo; Svalov, Andrey V.

    2012-04-01

    Nanostructured FeNi-based multilayers are very suitable for use as magnetic sensors using the giant magneto-impedance effect. New fields of application can be opened with these materials deposited onto flexible substrates. In this work, we compare the performance of samples prepared onto a rigid glass substrate and onto a cyclo olefin copolymer flexible one. Although a significant reduction of the field sensitivity is found due to the increased effect of the stresses generated during preparation, the results are still satisfactory for use as magnetic field sensors in special applications. Moreover, we take advantage of the flexible nature of the substrate to evaluate the pressure dependence of the giant magneto-impedance effect. Sensitivities up to 1 Ω/Pa are found for pressures in the range of 0 to 1 Pa, demostrating the suitability of these nanostructured materials deposited onto flexible substrates to build sensitive pressure sensors.

  17. Nanostructured giant magneto-impedance multilayers deposited onto flexible substrates for low pressure sensing.

    PubMed

    Fernández, Eduardo; Kurlyandskaya, Galina V; García-Arribas, Alfredo; Svalov, Andrey V

    2012-04-23

    Nanostructured FeNi-based multilayers are very suitable for use as magnetic sensors using the giant magneto-impedance effect. New fields of application can be opened with these materials deposited onto flexible substrates. In this work, we compare the performance of samples prepared onto a rigid glass substrate and onto a cyclo olefin copolymer flexible one. Although a significant reduction of the field sensitivity is found due to the increased effect of the stresses generated during preparation, the results are still satisfactory for use as magnetic field sensors in special applications. Moreover, we take advantage of the flexible nature of the substrate to evaluate the pressure dependence of the giant magneto-impedance effect. Sensitivities up to 1 Ω/Pa are found for pressures in the range of 0 to 1 Pa, demostrating the suitability of these nanostructured materials deposited onto flexible substrates to build sensitive pressure sensors.

  18. Remote sensing of a low pressure plasma in the radio near field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelly, Seán; McNally, Patrick J.

    2017-09-01

    A novel approach to remotely monitor low pressure non-equilibrium plasmas is reported. A magnetic field antenna is positioned in the near field of a capacitively coupled plasma. Magnetic flux from plasma currents, present near the viewport, is intercepted by a calibrated loop antenna placed outside the chamber. The induced signal current is correlated to bulk plasma currents. The comparison of relative harmonic amplitudes shows resonance features for lower operating pressures. The geometric resonance and electron-neutral collision frequencies are evaluated from resonant harmonic features. This approach advances remote, noninvasive, and installation-free plasma monitoring, which is of particular interest to industrial scenarios.

  19. A comparative study for massive data compression in long-distance distributed optical fiber sensing systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Huijuan; Liu, Jun; Xu, Jiwei; Zhang, Linqiang; Li, Hanyu; Zhang, Weili; Rao, Yunjiang

    2015-07-01

    With the growing demand for monitoring length and channel number of the fully distributed optical fiber sensors (DOFSs), the amount of sensing data is increasing rapidly, and there will be a heavy pressure for the massive data storage and transmission. In this paper, two lossless compression algorithms of Lempel-Ziv-Welch (LZW) and Huffman are comparatively studied to effectively compress the huge amount of data of typical DOFSs, e.g. Φ -OTDR, POTDR, and BOTDA systems. The comparison results show that the LZW based on dictionary has a better performance in the consuming time and compression ratio for the DOFS data.

  20. Sensing Pressure Distribution on a Lower-Limb Exoskeleton Physical Human-Machine Interface

    PubMed Central

    De Rossi, Stefano Marco Maria; Vitiello, Nicola; Lenzi, Tommaso; Ronsse, Renaud; Koopman, Bram; Persichetti, Alessandro; Vecchi, Fabrizio; Ijspeert, Auke Jan; van der Kooij, Herman; Carrozza, Maria Chiara

    2011-01-01

    A sensory apparatus to monitor pressure distribution on the physical human-robot interface of lower-limb exoskeletons is presented. We propose a distributed measure of the interaction pressure over the whole contact area between the user and the machine as an alternative measurement method of human-robot interaction. To obtain this measure, an array of newly-developed soft silicone pressure sensors is inserted between the limb and the mechanical interface that connects the robot to the user, in direct contact with the wearer’s skin. Compared to state-of-the-art measures, the advantage of this approach is that it allows for a distributed measure of the interaction pressure, which could be useful for the assessment of safety and comfort of human-robot interaction. This paper presents the new sensor and its characterization, and the development of an interaction measurement apparatus, which is applied to a lower-limb rehabilitation robot. The system is calibrated, and an example its use during a prototypical gait training task is presented. PMID:22346574

  1. Sensing pressure distribution on a lower-limb exoskeleton physical human-machine interface.

    PubMed

    De Rossi, Stefano Marco Maria; Vitiello, Nicola; Lenzi, Tommaso; Ronsse, Renaud; Koopman, Bram; Persichetti, Alessandro; Vecchi, Fabrizio; Ijspeert, Auke Jan; van der Kooij, Herman; Carrozza, Maria Chiara

    2011-01-01

    A sensory apparatus to monitor pressure distribution on the physical human-robot interface of lower-limb exoskeletons is presented. We propose a distributed measure of the interaction pressure over the whole contact area between the user and the machine as an alternative measurement method of human-robot interaction. To obtain this measure, an array of newly-developed soft silicone pressure sensors is inserted between the limb and the mechanical interface that connects the robot to the user, in direct contact with the wearer's skin. Compared to state-of-the-art measures, the advantage of this approach is that it allows for a distributed measure of the interaction pressure, which could be useful for the assessment of safety and comfort of human-robot interaction. This paper presents the new sensor and its characterization, and the development of an interaction measurement apparatus, which is applied to a lower-limb rehabilitation robot. The system is calibrated, and an example its use during a prototypical gait training task is presented.

  2. Laboratory simulation of tropospheric pollution sensing with a pressure modulator radiometer /PMR/

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hinton, D. E.; Odell, E. L. G.

    1979-01-01

    The optical properties of carbon monoxide gas uniformly distributed in the atmosphere have been simulated in a 20.48 cm long cell in the laboratory. The altitude of the peak of the weighting function for several concentrations was found using a Pressure Modulator Radiometer (PMR). The effect of a fluctuating background radiance and gaseous nitrous oxide on the carbon monoxide signals were examined.

  3. Sensing of blood pressure increase by transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 receptors on baroreceptors.

    PubMed

    Sun, Hao; Li, De-Pei; Chen, Shao-Rui; Hittelman, Walter N; Pan, Hui-Lin

    2009-12-01

    The arterial baroreceptor is critically involved in the autonomic regulation of homoeostasis. The transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) receptor is expressed on both somatic and visceral sensory neurons. Here, we examined the TRPV1 innervation of baroreceptive pathways and its functional significance in the baroreflex. Resiniferatoxin (RTX), an ultrapotent analog of capsaicin, was used to ablate TRPV1-expressing afferent neurons and fibers in adult rats. Immunofluorescence labeling revealed that TRPV1 immunoreactivity was present on nerve fibers and terminals in the adventitia of the ascending aorta and aortic arch, the nodose ganglion neurons, and afferent fibers in the solitary tract of the brainstem. RTX treatment eliminated TRPV1 immunoreactivities in the aorta, nodose ganglion, and solitary tract. Renal sympathetic nerve activity, blood pressure, and heart rate were recorded in anesthetized rats. The baroreflex was triggered by lowering and raising blood pressure through intravenous infusion of sodium nitroprusside and phenylephrine, respectively. Inhibition of sympathetic nerve activity and heart rate by the phenylephrine-induced increase in blood pressure was largely impaired in RTX-treated rats. The maximum gain of the baroreflex function was significantly lower in RTX-treated than vehicle-treated rats. Furthermore, blocking of TRPV1 receptors significantly blunted the baroreflex and decreased the maximum gain of baroreflex function in the high blood pressure range. Our findings provide important new information that TRPV1 is expressed along the entire baroreceptive afferent pathway. TRPV1 receptors expressed on baroreceptive nerve endings can function as mechanoreceptors to detect the increase in blood pressure and maintain the homoeostasis.

  4. Method for sensing and measuring a concentration or partial pressure of a reactant used in a redox reaction

    DOEpatents

    Findl, E.

    1984-12-21

    A method for sensing or measuring the partial pressure or concentration of an electroactive species used in conjunction with an electrolyte, the method being characterized by providing a constant current between an anode and a cathode of an electrolyte-containing cell, while measuring changes in voltage that occur between either the anode and cathode or between a reference electrode and one of the main electrodes of the cell, thereby to determine the concentration or partial pressure of the electro-active species as a function of said measured voltage changes. The method of the invention can be practiced using either a cell having only an anode and a cathode, or using a cell having an anode and a cathode in combination with a reference electrode. Accurate measurements of small concentrations or partial pressures of electro-active species are obtainable with the method of the invention, by using constant currents of only a few microamperes between the anode and cathode of the cell, while the concentration-determining voltage is measured.

  5. Studies in remote sensing of Southern California and related environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowden, L. W.

    1971-01-01

    A summary is presented of the research activities in southern California to determine whether meaningful geographic information was obtainable by use of remote sensing in an area already well documented or if the techniques and methodology could be transferred to related environments. Several broad characteristics of the regional geography were investigated with regards to their feasibility to be studied by aircraft and spacecraft sensors to improve the inventory and understanding of resources and environmental circumstances and to serve as models for future geographic analysis of other regions when using remote sensing devices. Sample activities are described in detail and three experiments producing worthwhile results are highlighted: mapping montane vegetation with color IR imagery, analysis of urban residual environment using color IR aerial photography, and regional agricultural land use mapping tested against color IR photography.

  6. The study of pressure measurement techniques and devices in the range of 10(exp -1) to 10(exp -5) torr (2 millipsi to 0.2 micropsi)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoffman, John H.

    1990-01-01

    The atmospheric pressure range was studied in a region where conventional pressure sensing devices do not provide meaningful measurements. However, a hot filament gauge was developed and miniaturized which will measure the pressure in the 10(exp -1) to 10(exp -5) torr (2 millipsi to 0.2 micropsi) region, hence the name Micropsi gauge. Laboratory studies were made comparing the currently available devices with the newly developed miniature low power 'Micropsi' pressure sensor.

  7. Pressure wave propagation studies for oscillating cascades

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huff, Dennis L.

    1992-01-01

    The unsteady flowfield around an oscillating cascade of flat plates is studied using a time marching Euler code. Exact solutions based on linear theory serve as model problems to study pressure wave propagation in the numerical solution. The importance of using proper unsteady boundary conditions, grid resolution, and time step is demonstrated. Results show that an approximate non-reflecting boundary condition based on linear theory does a good job of minimizing reflections from the inflow and outflow boundaries and allows the placement of the boundaries to be closer than cases using reflective boundary conditions. Stretching the boundary to dampen the unsteady waves is another way to minimize reflections. Grid clustering near the plates does a better job of capturing the unsteady flowfield than cases using uniform grids as long as the CFL number is less than one for a sufficient portion of the grid. Results for various stagger angles and oscillation frequencies show good agreement with linear theory as long as the grid is properly resolved.

  8. Pressure wave propagation studies for oscillating cascades

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huff, Dennis L.

    1992-01-01

    The unsteady flow field around an oscillating cascade of flat plates is studied using a time marching Euler code. Exact solutions based on linear theory serve as model problems to study pressure wave propagation in the numerical solution. The importance of using proper unsteady boundary conditions, grid resolution, and time step is demonstrated. Results show that an approximate non-reflecting boundary condition based on linear theory does a good job of minimizing reflections from the inflow and outflow boundaries and allows the placement of the boundaries to be closer than cases using reflective boundary conditions. Stretching the boundary to dampen the unsteady waves is another way to minimize reflections. Grid clustering near the plates does a better job of capturing the unsteady flow field than cases using uniform grids as long as the CFL number is less than one for a sufficient portion of the grid. Results for various stagger angles and oscillation frequencies show good agreement with linear theory as long as the grid is properly resolved.

  9. Pressure wave propagation studies for oscillating cascades

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huff, Dennis L.

    1992-01-01

    The unsteady flowfield around an oscillating cascade of flat plates is studied using a time marching Euler code. Exact solutions based on linear theory serve as model problems to study pressure wave propagation in the numerical solution. The importance of using proper unsteady boundary conditions, grid resolution, and time step is demonstrated. Results show that an approximate non-reflecting boundary condition based on linear theory does a good job of minimizing reflections from the inflow and outflow boundaries and allows the placement of the boundaries to be closer than cases using reflective boundary conditions. Stretching the boundary to dampen the unsteady waves is another way to minimize reflections. Grid clustering near the plates does a better job of capturing the unsteady flowfield than cases using uniform grids as long as the CFL number is less than one for a sufficient portion of the grid. Results for various stagger angles and oscillation frequencies show good agreement with linear theory as long as the grid is properly resolved.

  10. Kinetic and temporospatial parameters in male and female cats walking over a pressure sensing walkway

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Several factors may influence kinetic data measurements, including body conformation and body mass. In addition, gender differences in gait pattern have been observed in healthy humans. Therefore, the aim of this study was to compare the kinetic and temporospatial parameters in clinically healthy male and female cats using a pressure-sensitive walkway. Eighteen crossbreed adult cats were divided into two groups: G1 had ten male cats (nine neutered) aged from 1 to 4 years and body mass 3.1-6.8 kg; G2 had eight spayed female cats, aged from 1 to 6 years and body mass 3.3-4.75 kg. The data from the first five valid trials were collected for each cat. A trial was considered valid if the cat maintained a velocity between 0.54-0.74 m/s and acceleration from -0.20 to 0.20 m/s2. The peak vertical force (PVF), vertical impulse (VI), gait cycle time, stance time, swing time, stride length, and percentage body weight distribution among the four limbs were determined. In addition, the lengths of each forelimb and each hind limb were measured using a tape with the animal standing. Results No significant differences were observed in each group in either the forelimbs or the hind limbs or between the left and right sides for any of the variables. For both groups, the PVF (%BW), the VI, and the percentage body weight distribution were higher at the forelimbs than the hind limbs. The stride length was larger for males; however, the other kinetic and temporospatial variables did not show any statistically significant differences between the groups. The lengths of the forelimbs and hind limbs were larger in the male cats. There was a significant moderate positive correlation between the stride length and the length of the limbs. Conclusions In conclusion, the only difference observed between male and female cats was the stride length, and this was due to the greater body size of male cats. This difference did not affect other temporospatial or kinetics variables

  11. Remote sensing of atmospheric pressure and sea state using laser altimeters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gardner, C. S.

    1985-01-01

    Short-pulse multicolor laser ranging systems are currently being developed for satellite ranging applications. These systems use Q-switched pulsed lasers and streak-tube cameras to provide timing accuracies approaching a few picoseconds. Satellite laser ranging systems have been used to evaluate many important geophysical phenomena such as fault motion, polar motion and solid earth tides, by measuring the orbital perturbations of retroreflector equipped satellites. Some existing operational systems provide range resolution approaching a few millimeters. There is currently considerable interest in adapting these highly accurate systems for use as airborne and satellite based altimeters. Potential applications include the measurement of sea state, ground topography and atmospheric pressure. This paper reviews recent progress in the development of multicolor laser altimeters for use in monitoring sea state and atmospheric pressure.

  12. Remote Sensing Global Surface Air Pressure Using Differential Absorption BArometric Radar (DiBAR)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, Bing; Harrah, Steven; Lawrence, Wes; Hu, Yongxiang; Min, Qilong

    2016-01-01

    Tropical storms and severe weathers are listed as one of core events that need improved observations and predictions in World Meteorological Organization and NASA Decadal Survey (DS) documents and have major impacts on public safety and national security. This effort tries to observe surface air pressure, especially over open seas, from space using a Differential-absorption BArometric Radar (DiBAR) operating at the 50-55 gigahertz O2 absorption band. Air pressure is among the most important variables that affect atmospheric dynamics, and currently can only be measured by limited in-situ observations over oceans. Analyses show that with the proposed space radar the errors in instantaneous (averaged) pressure estimates can be as low as approximately 4 millibars (approximately 1 millibar under all weather conditions). With these sea level pressure measurements, the forecasts of severe weathers such as hurricanes will be significantly improved. Since the development of the DiBAR concept about a decade ago, NASA Langley DiBAR research team has made substantial progress in advancing the concept. The feasibility assessment clearly shows the potential of sea surface barometry using existing radar technologies. The team has developed a DiBAR system design, fabricated a Prototype-DiBAR (P-DiBAR) for proof-of-concept, conducted lab, ground and airborne P-DiBAR tests. The flight test results are consistent with the instrumentation goals. Observational system simulation experiments for space DiBAR performance based on the existing DiBAR technology and capability show substantial improvements in tropical storm predictions, not only for the hurricane track and position but also for the hurricane intensity. DiBAR measurements will lead us to an unprecedented level of the prediction and knowledge on global extreme weather and climate conditions.

  13. Differential absorption lidars for remote sensing of atmospheric pressure and temperature profiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Korb, C. Laurence; Schwemmer, Geary K.; Famiglietti, Joseph; Walden, Harvey; Prasad, Coorg

    1995-01-01

    A near infrared differential absorption lidar technique is developed using atmospheric oxygen as a tracer for high resolution vertical profiles of pressure and temperature with high accuracy. Solid-state tunable lasers and high-resolution spectrum analyzers are developed to carry out ground-based and airborne measurement demonstrations and results of the measurements presented. Numerical error analysis of high-altitude airborne and spaceborne experiments is carried out, and system concepts developed for their implementation.

  14. Simple Fabry-Perot based Instrument for Surface Pressure Sensing from Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heaps, William S.

    2002-01-01

    Mitchel and O'Brien observed in 1989 that a passive satellite measurement using the oxygen A band could exhibit a precision of better than 1% when used to make a surface pressure measurement. I will present a design and performance simulation for a Fabry-Perot interferometer based instrument which should exceed this level of performance. The design is small, inexpensive, and rugged. Preliminary results from a laboratory prototype of the instrument will be presented.

  15. Study of blood flow sensing with microwave radiometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Porter, R. A.; Wentz, F. J., III

    1973-01-01

    A study and experimental investigation has been performed to determine the feasibility of measuring regional blood flow and volume in man by means of microwave radiometry. An indication was expected of regional blood flow from measurement of surface and subsurface temperatures with a sensitive radiometer. Following theoretical modeling of biological tissue, to determine the optimum operating frequency for adequate sensing depth, a sensitive microwave radiometer was designed for operation at 793 MHz. A temperature sensitivity of of 0.06 K rms was realized in this equipment. Measurements performed on phantom tissue models, consisting of beef fat and lean beefsteak showed that the radiometer was capable of sensing temperatures from a depth between 3.8 and 5.1 cm. Radiometric and thermodynamic temperature measurements were also performed on the hind thighs of large dogs. These showed that the radiometer could sense subsurface temperatures from a depth of, at least, 1.3 cm. Delays caused by externally-generated RF interference, coupled with the lack of reliable blood flow measurement equipment, prevented correlation of radiometer readings with reginal blood flow. For the same reasons, it was not possible to extend the radiometric observations to human subjects.

  16. Bio-Inspired Pressure Sensing for Active Yaw Control of Underwater Vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Amy; Triantafyllou, Michael

    2012-11-01

    A towed underwater vehicle equipped with a bio-inspired artificial lateral line was constructed and tested with the goal of active detection and correction of the vehicle's angle of attack. Preliminary experiments demonstrate that a low number of sensors are sufficient to enable the discrimination between different orientations, and that a basic proportional controller is capable of keeping the vehicle aligned with the direction of flow. We propose that a model based controller could be developed to improve system response. Toward this, we derive a vehicle model based on a first-order 3D Rankine Source Panel Method, which is shown to be competent in estimating the pressure field in the region of interest during motion at constant angles of attack, and during execution of dynamic maneuvers. To solve the inverse problem of estimating the vehicle orientation given specific pressure measurements, an Unscented Kalman Filter is developed around the model. It is shown to provide a close estimation of the vehicle state using experimentally collected pressure measurements. This demonstrates that an artificial lateral line is a promising technology for dynamically mediating the angle of a body relative to the oncoming flow.

  17. Research on pressure tactile sensing technology based on fiber Bragg grating array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Jinxue; Jiang, Qi; Huang, Yuanyang; Li, Yibin; Jia, Yuxi; Rong, Xuewen; Song, Rui; Liu, Hongbin

    2015-09-01

    A pressure tactile sensor based on the fiber Bragg grating (FBG) array is introduced in this paper, and the numerical simulation of its elastic body was implemented by finite element software (ANSYS). On the basis of simulation, fiber Bragg grating strings were implanted in flexible silicone to realize the sensor fabrication process, and a testing system was built. A series of calibration tests were done via the high precision universal press machine. The tactile sensor array perceived external pressure, which is demodulated by the fiber grating demodulation instrument, and three-dimension pictures were programmed to display visually the position and size. At the same time, a dynamic contact experiment of the sensor was conducted for simulating robot encountering other objects in the unknown environment. The experimental results show that the sensor has good linearity, repeatability, and has the good effect of dynamic response, and its pressure sensitivity was 0.03 nm/N. In addition, the sensor also has advantages of anti-electromagnetic interference, good flexibility, simple structure, low cost and so on, which is expected to be used in the wearable artificial skin in the future.

  18. Multipoint Pressure and Temperature Sensing Fiber Optic Cable for Monitoring CO2 Sequestration

    SciTech Connect

    Challener, William

    2015-02-10

    This report describes the work completed on contract DE-FE0010116. The goal of this two year project was to develop and demonstrate in the laboratory a highly accurate multi-point pressure measurement fiber optic cable based on MEMS pressure sensors suitable for downhole deployment in a CO2 sequestration well. The sensor interrogator was also to be demonstrated in a remote monitoring system and environmental testing was to be completed to indicate its downhole survivability over a lengthy period of time (e.g., 20 years). An interrogator system based on a pulsed laser excitation was shown to be capable of multiple (potentially 100+) simultaneous sensor measurements. Two sensors packages were completed and spliced in a cable onto the same fiber and measured. One sensor package was subsequently measured at high temperatures and pressures in supercritical CO2, while the other package was measured prior and after being subjected to high torque stresses to mimic downhole deployment. The environmental and stress tests indicated areas in which the package design should be further improved.

  19. Vertically aligned multiwalled carbon nanotubes for pressure, tactile and vibration sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yilmazoglu, O.; Popp, A.; Pavlidis, D.; Schneider, J. J.; Garth, D.; Schüttler, F.; Battenberg, G.

    2012-03-01

    We report a simple method for the micro-nano integration of flexible, vertically aligned multiwalled CNT arrays sandwiched between a top and bottom carbon layer via a porous alumina (Al2O3) template approach. The electromechanical properties of the flexible CNT arrays have been investigated under mechanical stress conditions. First experiments show highly sensitive piezoresistive sensors with a resistance decrease of up to ˜35% and a spatial resolution of <1 mm. The results indicate that these CNT structures can be utilized for tactile sensing components. They also confirm the feasibility of accessing and utilizing nanoscopic CNT bundles via lithographic processing. The method involves room-temperature processing steps and standard microfabrication techniques.

  20. A Bioinspired Mineral Hydrogel as a Self-Healable, Mechanically Adaptable Ionic Skin for Highly Sensitive Pressure Sensing.

    PubMed

    Lei, Zhouyue; Wang, Quankang; Sun, Shengtong; Zhu, Wencheng; Wu, Peiyi

    2017-06-01

    In the past two decades, artificial skin-like materials have received increasing research interests for their broad applications in artificial intelligence, wearable devices, and soft robotics. However, profound challenges remain in terms of imitating human skin because of its unique combination of mechanical and sensory properties. In this work, a bioinspired mineral hydrogel is developed to fabricate a novel type of mechanically adaptable ionic skin sensor. Due to its unique viscoelastic properties, the hydrogel-based capacitive sensor is compliant, self-healable, and can sense subtle pressure changes, such as a gentle finger touch, human motion, or even small water droplets. It might not only show great potential in applications such as artificial intelligence, human/machine interactions, personal healthcare, and wearable devices, but also promote the development of next-generation mechanically adaptable intelligent skin-like devices. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  1. Interface pressure mapping pilot study to select surfaces that effectively redistribute pediatric occipital pressure.

    PubMed

    Higer, Samantha; James, Thomas

    2016-02-01

    The aim of this pilot study was to better inform clinical decisions to prevent pediatric occipital pressure ulcers with quantitative data to choose an appropriate reactive support surface. A commercially available capacitive pressure mapping system (XSENSOR, X3 Medical Seat System, Calgary, Canada) was used to evaluate a standard pediatric mattress and four commercially available pressure-redistributing support surfaces. The pressure mapping system was validated for use in the pediatric population through studies on sensitivity, accuracy, creep, and repeatability. Then, a pilot pressure mapping study on healthy children under 6 years old (n = 22) was performed to determine interface pressure and pressure distribution between the occipital region of the skull and each surface: standard mattress, gel, foam, air and fluidized. The sensor was adequate to measure pressure generated by pediatric occipital loading, with 0.5-9% error in accuracy in the 25-95 mmHg range. The air surface had the lowest mean interface pressure (p < .005) and lowest peak pressure index (PPI), defined as the peak pressure averaged over four sensels, (p < .005). Mean interface pressure for mattress, foam, fluidized, gel, and air materials were 24.8 ± 4.42, 24.1 ± 1.89, 19.4 ± 3.25, 17.9 ± 3.10, and 14.2 ± 1.41 mmHg, respectively. The air surface also had the most homogenous pressure distribution, with the highest mean to PPI ratio (p < .005) and relatively high contact area compared to the other surfaces (p < .005). The air surface was the most effective pressure-redistributing material for pediatric occipital pressure as it had the lowest interface pressure and a homogeneous pressure distribution. This implies effective envelopment of the bony prominence of the occiput and increasing contact area to decrease peak pressure points. Copyright © 2015 Tissue Viability Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Distributed sensing of carbon-epoxy composites and composite wound pressure vessels using fiber Bragg gratings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grant, Joseph; Kaul, Raj K.; Taylor, Scott L.; Myer, George; Jackson, Kurt V.; Sharma, Anup

    2003-07-01

    Multiple Fiber Bragg-gratings are embedded in carbon-epoxy laminates as well as in composite wound pressure vessel. Structural properties of such composites are investigated. The measurements include stress-strain relation in laminates and Poisson"s ratio in several specimens with varying orientation of the optical fiber Bragg-sensor with respect to the carbon fiber in an epoxy matrix. Additionally, fiber Bragg gratings are bonded on the surface of these laminates and cylinders fabricated out of carbon-epoxy composites and multiple points are monitored and compared for strain measurements at several locations.

  3. Assessment of intraocular pressure sensing using an implanted reflective flexible membrane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nazarov, Andrey; Knyazer, Boris; Lifshitz, Tova; Schvartzman, Mark; Abdulhalim, Ibrahim

    2017-04-01

    Glaucoma is a neurodegenerative condition that is the leading cause of irreversible blindness worldwide. Elevated intraocular pressure (IOP) is the main cause for the development of the disease. The symptoms of this form, such as deterioration of vision and scotomas (loss of visual fields), appear in the latter stages of the disease. Therefore, an IOP monitoring device is needed for better, simpler, and faster diagnosis, and to enable a fast treatment response. We present a theoretical assessment as well as preliminary experimental results of a simple approach for easy, optical, IOP self-monitoring. It is based on a polydimethylsiloxane membrane coated with a reflective layer and a Hartmann-Shack wavefront sensor. Nearly linear correlation is found between membrane deformation and Zernike coefficients representing defocus primary spherical aberration, with high sensitivity and negligible dependence on the measurement distance. The proposed device is expected to provide an accurate IOP measurement resolution of less than ±0.2 mm Hg with a pressure dependence on working distances <0.7 mm Hg/cm for a thick membrane; the corresponding values for a thin membrane are ±0.45 mm Hg and <0.6 mm Hg/cm, respectively, at typical IOP values-up to 40 mm Hg.

  4. Assessment of intraocular pressure sensing using an implanted reflective flexible membrane.

    PubMed

    Nazarov, Andrey; Knyazer, Boris; Lifshitz, Tova; Schvartzman, Mark; Abdulhalim, Ibrahim

    2017-04-01

    Glaucoma is a neurodegenerative condition that is the leading cause of irreversible blindness worldwide. Elevated intraocular pressure (IOP) is the main cause for the development of the disease. The symptoms of this form, such as deterioration of vision and scotomas (loss of visual fields), appear in the latter stages of the disease. Therefore, an IOP monitoring device is needed for better, simpler, and faster diagnosis, and to enable a fast treatment response. We present a theoretical assessment as well as preliminary experimental results of a simple approach for easy, optical, IOP self-monitoring. It is based on a polydimethylsiloxane membrane coated with a reflective layer and a Hartmann–Shack wavefront sensor. Nearly linear correlation is found between membrane deformation and Zernike coefficients representing defocus primary spherical aberration, with high sensitivity and negligible dependence on the measurement distance. The proposed device is expected to provide an accurate IOP measurement resolution of less than ± 0.2 ?? mm ? Hg with a pressure dependence on working distances < 0.7 ?? mm ? Hg / cm for a thick membrane; the corresponding values for a thin membrane are ± 0.45 ?? mm ? Hg and < 0.6 ?? mm ? Hg / cm , respectively, at typical IOP values—up to 40 mm Hg.

  5. The Use of Satellite Remote Sensing in Epidemiological Studies

    PubMed Central

    Sorek-Hamer, Meytar; Just, Allan C.; Kloog, Itai

    2016-01-01

    Purpose of review Particulate matter (PM) air pollution is a ubiquitous exposure linked with multiple adverse health outcomes for children and across the life course. The recent development of satellite based remote sensing models for air pollution enables the quantification of these risks and addresses many limitations of previous air pollution research strategies. We review the recent literature on the applications of satellite remote sensing in air quality research, with a focus on their use in epidemiological studies. Recent findings Aerosol optical depth (AOD) is a focus of this review and a significant number of studies show that ground-level PM can be estimated from columnar AOD. Satellite measurements have been found to be an important source of data for PM model-based exposure estimates, and recently have been used in health studies to increase the spatial breadth and temporal resolution of these estimates. Summary It is suggested that satellite-based models improve our understanding of the spatial characteristics of air quality. Although the adoption of satellite-based measures of air quality in health studies is in its infancy, it is rapidly growing. Nevertheless, further investigation is still needed in order to have a better understanding of the AOD contribution to these prediction models in order to use them with higher accuracy in epidemiological studies. PMID:26859287

  6. A Study on the Influence of Speed on Road Roughness Sensing: The SmartRoadSense Case †

    PubMed Central

    Alessandroni, Giacomo; Carini, Alberto; Lattanzi, Emanuele; Freschi, Valerio; Bogliolo, Alessandro

    2017-01-01

    SmartRoadSense is a crowdsensing project aimed at monitoring the conditions of the road surface. Using the sensors of a smartphone, SmartRoadSense monitors the vertical accelerations inside a vehicle traveling the road and extracts a roughness index conveying information about the road conditions. The roughness index and the smartphone GPS data are periodically sent to a central server where they are processed, associated with the specific road, and aggregated with data measured by other smartphones. This paper studies how the smartphone vertical accelerations and the roughness index are related to the vehicle speed. It is shown that the dependence can be locally approximated with a gamma (power) law. Extensive experimental results using data extracted from SmartRoadSense database confirm the gamma law relationship between the roughness index and the vehicle speed. The gamma law is then used for improving the SmartRoadSense data aggregation accounting for the effect of vehicle speed. PMID:28178224

  7. A Study on the Influence of Speed on Road Roughness Sensing: The SmartRoadSense Case.

    PubMed

    Alessandroni, Giacomo; Carini, Alberto; Lattanzi, Emanuele; Freschi, Valerio; Bogliolo, Alessandro

    2017-02-07

    SmartRoadSense is a crowdsensing project aimed at monitoring the conditions of the road surface. Using the sensors of a smartphone, SmartRoadSense monitors the vertical accelerations inside a vehicle traveling the road and extracts a roughness index conveying information about the road conditions. The roughness index and the smartphone GPS data are periodically sent to a central server where they are processed, associated with the specific road, and aggregated with data measured by other smartphones. This paper studies how the smartphone vertical accelerations and the roughness index are related to the vehicle speed. It is shown that the dependence can be locally approximated with a gamma (power) law. Extensive experimental results using data extracted from SmartRoadSense database confirm the gamma law relationship between the roughness index and the vehicle speed. The gamma law is then used for improving the SmartRoadSense data aggregation accounting for the effect of vehicle speed.

  8. Low-Speed Pressure Sensitive Paint Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Owen, Brown; Mehta, Rabindra; Nixon, David (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    A series of low speed (M less than 0.2) experiments using University of Washington Fib-07 Pressure Sensitive Paint (PSP) have been conducted at NASA Ames on a NACA 0012 airfoil. Significant improvements in results have been shown: PSP calibration errors of the improved data (with pressure taps as a reference) now agree with theoretical error limits. Additional measurements on the 0012 airfoil using Temperature Sensitive Paint have been made. These TSP measurements now fully quantify the impact of temporal temperature changes on model surfaces on PSP measurements. Finally, simultaneous PSP - TSP measurements have been performed, allowing in-situ temperature correction of PSP data with good results.

  9. Thermal anemometric assessment of coronary flow reserve with a pressure-sensing guide wire: an in vitro evaluation.

    PubMed

    van der Horst, Arjen; Geven, Maartje C F; Rutten, Marcel C M; Pijls, Nico H J; van de Vosse, Frans N

    2011-07-01

    Assessment of coronary flow reserve (CFR) with a commercially available pressure-sensor-tipped guide wire using the principle of thermal anemometry could provide major clinical benefits both in determining and in distinguishing between epicardial and microvascular coronary artery disease. In constant-temperature thermal anemometry, the electrical power required to maintain an element at a constant temperature is a measure for the local shear rate. Here, the feasibility of applying this thermoconvection method to a pressure-sensing guide wire is investigated using an in vitro model. A theoretical relation between electrical power and steady shear rate based on boundary layer theory was tested in an experimental set-up. In steady flow, a reproducible relation between electrical power and shear rate was obtained with an overheat temperature of 20K, which was in good agreement with theory. The relation between shear rate and flow, however, depends on geometry of the artery and position of the guide wire inside the vessel. Although this means that this thermoconvection method is less useful for absolute flow measurements, CFR could be assessed even for unsteady flow using the steady calibration curve with a mean relative difference of (3±5)% compared to CFR derived from the golden standard using an ultrasonic flow measurement device. Copyright © 2011 IPEM. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Pressure sensing in high-refractive-index liquids using long-period gratings nanocoated with silicon nitride.

    PubMed

    Smietana, Mateusz; Bock, Wojtek J; Mikulic, Predrag; Chen, Jiahua

    2010-01-01

    The paper presents a novel pressure sensor based on a silicon nitride (SiNx) nanocoated long-period grating (LPG). The high-temperature, radio-frequency plasma-enhanced chemical-vapor-deposited (RF PECVD) SiNx nanocoating was applied to tune the sensitivity of the LPG to the external refractive index. The technique allows for deposition of good quality, hard and wear-resistant nanofilms as required for optical sensors. Thanks to the SiNx nanocoating it is possible to overcome a limitation of working in the external-refractive-index range, which for a bare fiber cannot be close to that of the cladding. The nanocoated LPG-based sensing structure we developed is functional in high-refractive-index liquids (nD>1.46) such as oil or gasoline, with pressure sensitivity as high as when water is used as a working liquid. The nanocoating developed for this experiment not only has the highest refractive index ever achieved in LPGs (n>2.2 at λ=1,550 nm), but is also the thinnest (<100 nm) able to tune the external-refractive-index sensitivity of the gratings. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first time a nanocoating has been applied on LPGs that is able to simultaneously tune the refractive-index sensitivity and to enable measurements of other parameters.

  11. Pressure Sensing in High-Refractive-Index Liquids Using Long-Period Gratings Nanocoated with Silicon Nitride

    PubMed Central

    Smietana, Mateusz; Bock, Wojtek J.; Mikulic, Predrag; Chen, Jiahua

    2010-01-01

    The paper presents a novel pressure sensor based on a silicon nitride (SiNx) nanocoated long-period grating (LPG). The high-temperature, radio-frequency plasma-enhanced chemical-vapor-deposited (RF PECVD) SiNx nanocoating was applied to tune the sensitivity of the LPG to the external refractive index. The technique allows for deposition of good quality, hard and wear-resistant nanofilms as required for optical sensors. Thanks to the SiNx nanocoating it is possible to overcome a limitation of working in the external-refractive-index range, which for a bare fiber cannot be close to that of the cladding. The nanocoated LPG-based sensing structure we developed is functional in high-refractive-index liquids (nd > 1.46) such as oil or gasoline, with pressure sensitivity as high as when water is used as a working liquid. The nanocoating developed for this experiment not only has the highest refractive index ever achieved in LPGs (n > 2.2 at λ = 1,550 nm), but is also the thinnest (<100 nm) able to tune the external-refractive-index sensitivity of the gratings. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first time a nanocoating has been applied on LPGs that is able to simultaneously tune the refractive-index sensitivity and to enable measurements of other parameters. PMID:22163527

  12. Raman spectroscopic study of cyclohexane at pressures below 1000 MPa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiao, Erwei; Zheng, Haifei

    2017-10-01

    At present, the room temperature freezing pressure of cyclohexane is still uncertain, and the phase transition pressure of solid I - solid III is not reliable at ambient temperature. In this work, we have performed a Raman spectroscopic study of cyclohexane in a Moissanite anvil cell at pressures below 1000 MPa at 25 °C, and analyzed the characteristic of Raman brands νs(CH2), νas(CH2) and νb(Ring). Two phase transition pressures 80 MPa and 550 MPa were determined by a quartz pressure gauge, and they are the room temperature freezing pressure of cyclohexane and the phase transition pressure of solid I to solid III, respectively. Furthermore, from the phase diagram of cyclohexane, it is inferred that pressure plays an important role on the stability of cyclohexane as the main constituent of oil, and it can be beneficial to understanding the formation, migration and preservation of petroleum in subterranean rock strata.

  13. Studies in chemical physics through high-pressure luminescence

    SciTech Connect

    Drickamer, H.G.

    1981-01-01

    Energy transfer in chelates of Eu/sup 3 +/ with ligands (dibenzylmethane) was studied as a function of pressure. Rate of thermal dissipation of electronic excitation was correlated with viscosity and dielectric constant for indoles in a series of solvents, and with pressure for porphyrins. Effects of medium (dielectric constant, viscosity) on complexes were studied. Studies on 3-hydroxyflavone are also summarized. These studies show the power of high pressure luminescence as a tool in chemical physics. 11 figures. (DLC)

  14. Remote sensing applications for transportation and traffic engineering studies: A review of the literature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Epps, J. W.

    1973-01-01

    Current references were surveyed for the application of remote sensing to traffic and transportation studies. The major problems are presented that concern traffic engineers and transportation managers, and the literature references that discuss remote sensing applications are summarized.

  15. Pressure studies of deep levels in semiconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Samara, G.A.

    1989-01-01

    The effects of pressure on the energetics and kinetics of electron emission and capture processes by several important deep levels in Si are discussed. The results yield the first quantitative measures of the breathing mode lattice relaxations accompanying these processes. 2 refs., 1 fig.

  16. Proof-of-concept study of monitoring bolt connection status using a piezoelectric based active sensing method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Tao; Song, Gangbing; Wang, Zhigang; Li, Yourong

    2013-08-01

    Aimed at monitoring bolt connection status and detecting bolt loosening, a piezoceramic based active sensing method is developed in this article. Two piezoceramic patches are bonded to the two different parts of a bolted connection. In the active sensing approach, one piezoceramic patch is used as an actuator to generate an ultrasonic wave, and the other one is used to detect the wave that propagates through the bolted connection. The received energy depends on the interface fastening pressure which is determined by the bolt torque. By analyzing the received energy, the status of bolt connection and bolt loosening can be detected. To study the effectiveness of the proposed method, an experiment apparatus is set up, and the experimental results show that the wave energy propagated across the interface is proportional to the torque level that is used to pretension the bolt. This experimental study demonstrates the potential of the piezoceramic based active sensing method for the monitoring of bolt loosening status.

  17. Validity and Usefulness of `Wearable Blood Pressure Sensing' for Detection of Inappropriate Short-Term Blood Pressure Variability in the Elderly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iijima, Katsuya; Kameyama, Yumi; Akishita, Masahiro; Ouchi, Yasuyoshi; Yanagimoto, Shintaro; Imai, Yasushi; Yahagi, Naoki; Lopez, Guillaume; Shuzo, Masaki; Yamada, Ichiro

    An increase in short-term blood pressure (BP) variability is a characteristic feature in the elderly. It makes the management of hemodynamics more difficult, because it is frequently seen disturbed baro-reflex function and increased arterial stiffness, leading to isolated systolic hypertension. Large BP variability aggravates hypertensive target organ damage and is an independent risk factor for the cardiovascular (CV) events in elderly hypertensive patients. Therefore, appropriate control in BP is indispensable to manage lifestyle-related diseases and to prevent subsequent CV events. In addition, accumulating recent reports show that excessive BP variability is also associated with a decline in cognitive function and fall in the elderly. In the clinical settings, we usually evaluate their health condition, mainly with single point BP measurement using cuff inflation. However, unfortunately we are not able to find the close changes in BP by the traditional way. Here, we can show our advantageous approach of continuous BP monitoring using newly developing device `wearable BP sensing' without a cuff stress in the elderly. The new device could reflect systolic BP and its detailed changes, in consistent with cuff-based BP measurement. Our new challenge suggests new possibility of its clinical application with high accuracy.

  18. Orifice-induced pressure error studies in Langley 7- by 10-foot high-speed tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Plentovich, E. B.; Gloss, B. B.

    1986-01-01

    For some time it has been known that the presence of a static pressure measuring hole will disturb the local flow field in such a way that the sensed static pressure will be in error. The results of previous studies aimed at studying the error induced by the pressure orifice were for relatively low Reynolds number flows. Because of the advent of high Reynolds number transonic wind tunnels, a study was undertaken to assess the magnitude of this error at high Reynolds numbers than previously published and to study a possible method of eliminating this pressure error. This study was conducted in the Langley 7- by 10-Foot High-Speed Tunnel on a flat plate. The model was tested at Mach numbers from 0.40 to 0.72 and at Reynolds numbers from 7.7 x 1,000,000 to 11 x 1,000,000 per meter (2.3 x 1,000,000 to 3.4 x 1,000,000 per foot), respectively. The results indicated that as orifice size increased, the pressure error also increased but that a porous metal (sintered metal) plug inserted in an orifice could greatly reduce the pressure error induced by the orifice.

  19. High-resolution, high-pressure NMR studies of proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Jonas, J; Ballard, L; Nash, D

    1998-01-01

    Advanced high-resolution NMR spectroscopy, including two-dimensional NMR techniques, combined with high pressure capability, represents a powerful new tool in the study of proteins. This contribution is organized in the following way. First, the specialized instrumentation needed for high-pressure NMR experiments is discussed, with specific emphasis on the design features and performance characteristics of a high-sensitivity, high-resolution, variable-temperature NMR probe operating at 500 MHz and at pressures of up to 500 MPa. An overview of several recent studies using 1D and 2D high-resolution, high-pressure NMR spectroscopy to investigate the pressure-induced reversible unfolding and pressure-assisted cold denaturation of lysozyme, ribonuclease A, and ubiquitin is presented. Specifically, the relationship between the residual secondary structure of pressure-assisted, cold-denatured states and the structure of early folding intermediates is discussed. PMID:9649405

  20. Morphological studies of resonances in plasmonic metasurfaces for SPR sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lelek, Jakub; Kwiecien, Pavel; Richter, Ivan; Homola, Jiří

    2015-05-01

    We investigate selected periodic arrays of nanostructures inspired by metasurfaces originally used in metamaterial structures and evaluate their potential for surface plasmon resonance applicable in sensing. Building blocks including rectangles, cut wires, crosses, fishnets, split ring resonators were ordered on suitable substrates and their reflection (R), transmission (T), and loss energy (L) spectra were calculated. The numerical studies were performed using our efficient in-house two-dimensional rigorous coupled-wave analysis technique. Our technique incorporates all the key improvements of the method available, taking into account both proper Fourier factorization rules, adaptive spatial resolution techniques, as well as structural symmetries. Using the R, T, and L spectra, we investigated spectral sensitivity of SPR and calculated the respective SPR sensor characteristics, such as figures of merit (FOM), enabling direct comparison of various structural morphologies for potential sensing applications. Also, optimization of the structures in terms of FOM has been performed to identify the most promising candidates. Additionally, to allow for interpretation of spectral resonant features and the interplay of individual and surface lattice resonances, we were gradually changing the morphology of individual building blocks from one type of element to another one. We believe that this study will bring insight into plasmonic behavior of nanostructured metasurfaces and will further benefit research into SPR biosensors.

  1. Osmium Metal Studied under High Pressure and Nonhydrostatic Stress

    SciTech Connect

    Weinberger,M.; Tolbert, S.; Kavner, A.

    2008-01-01

    Interest in osmium as an ultra-incompressible material and as an analog for the behavior of iron at high pressure has inspired recent studies of its mechanical properties. We have measured elastic and plastic deformation of Os metal at high pressures using in situ high pressure x-ray diffraction in the radial geometry. We show that Os has the highest yield strength observed for any pure metal, supporting up to 10 GPa at a pressure of 26 GPa. Furthermore, our data indicate changes in the nonhydrostatic apparent c/a ratio and clear lattice preferred orientation effects at pressures above 15 GPa.

  2. Case study: the treatment or palliative care of pressure ulcers.

    PubMed

    Hampton, S

    As nurse education increases there are reduced justifications for the existence of pressure ulcers. Patient assessment, along with rationalization of equipment and repositioning techniques, reduces the potential for pressure ulcer formation. Therefore, the future for pressure ulcer prevention will rely on nurse education and motivation. The patient featured in this case study suffered unnecessarily from pressure ulcers as, after her admission to a new nursing home where she was given the appropriate pressure-relieving and wound-dressing treatment, the ulcers were showing signs of healing.

  3. Absorption coefficients of CFC-11 and CFC-12 needed for atmospheric remote sensing and global warming studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Varanasi, Prasad

    1992-01-01

    Spectral absorption coefficients k(v) in the atmospheric window are reported for CFC-11 and CFC-12. Data obtained with a grating spectrometer are compared with NCAR cross sections and measurements of k(v) made with a tunable diode laser spectrometer at various temperature-pressure combinations representing tangent heights or layers in the atmosphere are presented. The results are suitable for atmospheric remote sensing and global warming studies.

  4. Absorption coefficients of CFC-11 and CFC-12 needed for atmospheric remote sensing and global warming studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Varanasi, Prasad

    1992-01-01

    Spectral absorption coefficients k(v) in the atmospheric window are reported for CFC-11 and CFC-12. Data obtained with a grating spectrometer are compared with NCAR cross sections and measurements of k(v) made with a tunable diode laser spectrometer at various temperature-pressure combinations representing tangent heights or layers in the atmosphere are presented. The results are suitable for atmospheric remote sensing and global warming studies.

  5. Basic Studies on High Pressure Air Plasmas

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-08-30

    33, 2268 (2000). [3] Non- Equilibrium Air Plasmas at Atmospheric Pressure, K.H. Becker, U. Kogelschatz, K.H. Schoenbach, and R.J. Barker, eds., IOP...10). Note that LIFBASE assumes local thermodynamic equilibrium . 120 100 oExperimentalm Siuation 80 60 20- 0 -J ~ LkXi 3060 3070 3080 3090 3100...Dual laser interferometer for plasma density measurements on large tokamaks >>, Rev. Sci. Instrum. 49 p.919 (1978) [5] C.W. Gowers, C. Lamb, « A

  6. A high throughput geocomputing system for remote sensing quantitative retrieval and a case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, Yong; Chen, Ziqiang; Xu, Hui; Ai, Jianwen; Jiang, Shuzheng; Li, Yingjie; Wang, Ying; Guang, Jie; Mei, Linlu; Jiao, Xijuan; He, Xingwei; Hou, Tingting

    2011-12-01

    The quality and accuracy of remote sensing instruments have been improved significantly, however, rapid processing of large-scale remote sensing data becomes the bottleneck for remote sensing quantitative retrieval applications. The remote sensing quantitative retrieval is a data-intensive computation application, which is one of the research issues of high throughput computation. The remote sensing quantitative retrieval Grid workflow is a high-level core component of remote sensing Grid, which is used to support the modeling, reconstruction and implementation of large-scale complex applications of remote sensing science. In this paper, we intend to study middleware components of the remote sensing Grid - the dynamic Grid workflow based on the remote sensing quantitative retrieval application on Grid platform. We designed a novel architecture for the remote sensing Grid workflow. According to this architecture, we constructed the Remote Sensing Information Service Grid Node (RSSN) with Condor. We developed a graphic user interface (GUI) tools to compose remote sensing processing Grid workflows, and took the aerosol optical depth (AOD) retrieval as an example. The case study showed that significant improvement in the system performance could be achieved with this implementation. The results also give a perspective on the potential of applying Grid workflow practices to remote sensing quantitative retrieval problems using commodity class PCs.

  7. High-Pressure Study on Lead Fluorapatite

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, X.; Shieh, S; Fleet, M; Akhmetov, A

    2008-01-01

    The compressional behavior of a synthetic lead fluorapatite [Pb9.35(PO4)6F2] has been investigated in situ up to about 16.7 GPa at 300 K, using a diamond-anvil cell and synchrotron X-ray diffraction. We find that the compressibility of lead fluorapatite is significantly different from that of fluorapatite [Ca10(PO4)6F2], chlorapatite [Ca10(PO4)6Cl2], and hydroxylapatite [Ca10(PO4)6(OH)2]: lead fluorapatite is much more compressible, and elastically isotropic in the investigated pressure range. The pressure-volume data fitted to the third-order Birch-Murnaghan equation yield an isothermal bulk modulus (KT) of 54.3(18) GPa and the pressure derivative (KT') of 8.1(6). If KT' is fixed at 4, the obtained KT is 68.4(16) GPa, which is approximately only two-thirds of the isothermal bulk modulus of the calcium apatites.

  8. High-pressure Raman study of Terephthalonitrile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, DongFei; Zhang, KeWei; Song, MingXing; Zhai, NaiCui; Sun, ChengLin; Li, HaiBo

    2017-02-01

    The in situ high-pressure Raman spectra of Terephthalonitrile (TPN) have been investigated from ambient to 12.6 GPa at room temperature. All the fundamental vibrational modes of TPN at ambient were assigned based on the first-principle calculations. A detailed Raman spectroscopy analysis revealed that TPN underwent a phase transition at 5.3 GPa. The frequencies of the TPN Raman peaks increase with increasing the pressure which can be attributed to the reduction in the interatomic distances and the escalation of effective force constants. The intensity of the C-C-C ring-out-plane deformation mode increases gradually as the frequency remains almost constant during the compression which can be explained by the existence of π-π interactions in TPN molecules. Additionally, the pressure-induced structural changes of TPN on the Fermi resonance between the C ≡ N out-of-plane vibration mode and the C - CN out-of-plane vibration mode have been analyzed.

  9. Study of Zn-Cu Ferrite Nanoparticles for LPG Sensing

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Anuj; Baranwal, Ravi Kant; Bharti, Ajaya; Vakil, Z.; Prajapati, C. S.

    2013-01-01

    Nanostructured zinc-copper mixed ferrite was synthesized using sol-gel method. XRD patterns of different compositions of zinc-copper ferrite, Zn(1−x)CuxFe2O4 (x = 0.0, 0.25, 0.50, 0.75), revealed single phase inverse spinel ferrite in all the samples synthesized. With increasing copper concentration, the crystallite size was found to be increased from 28 nm to 47 nm. The surface morphology of all the samples studied by the Scanning Electron Microscopy there exhibits porous structure of particles throughout the samples. The pellets of the samples are prepared for LPG sensing characteristics. The sensing is carried out at different operating temperatures (200, 225, and 250°C) with the variation of LPG concentrations (0.2, 0.4, and 0.6 vol%). The maximum sensitivity of 55.33% is observed at 250°C operating for the 0.6 vol% LPG. PMID:23864833

  10. Scalability Issues for Remote Sensing Infrastructure: A Case Study

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yang; Picard, Sean; Williamson, Carey

    2017-01-01

    For the past decade, a team of University of Calgary researchers has operated a large “sensor Web” to collect, analyze, and share scientific data from remote measurement instruments across northern Canada. This sensor Web receives real-time data streams from over a thousand Internet-connected sensors, with a particular emphasis on environmental data (e.g., space weather, auroral phenomena, atmospheric imaging). Through research collaborations, we had the opportunity to evaluate the performance and scalability of their remote sensing infrastructure. This article reports the lessons learned from our study, which considered both data collection and data dissemination aspects of their system. On the data collection front, we used benchmarking techniques to identify and fix a performance bottleneck in the system’s memory management for TCP data streams, while also improving system efficiency on multi-core architectures. On the data dissemination front, we used passive and active network traffic measurements to identify and reduce excessive network traffic from the Web robots and JavaScript techniques used for data sharing. While our results are from one specific sensor Web system, the lessons learned may apply to other scientific Web sites with remote sensing infrastructure. PMID:28468262

  11. Scalability Issues for Remote Sensing Infrastructure: A Case Study.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yang; Picard, Sean; Williamson, Carey

    2017-04-29

    For the past decade, a team of University of Calgary researchers has operated a large "sensor Web" to collect, analyze, and share scientific data from remote measurement instruments across northern Canada. This sensor Web receives real-time data streams from over a thousand Internet-connected sensors, with a particular emphasis on environmental data (e.g., space weather, auroral phenomena, atmospheric imaging). Through research collaborations, we had the opportunity to evaluate the performance and scalability of their remote sensing infrastructure. This article reports the lessons learned from our study, which considered both data collection and data dissemination aspects of their system. On the data collection front, we used benchmarking techniques to identify and fix a performance bottleneck in the system's memory management for TCP data streams, while also improving system efficiency on multi-core architectures. On the data dissemination front, we used passive and active network traffic measurements to identify and reduce excessive network traffic from the Web robots and JavaScript techniques used for data sharing. While our results are from one specific sensor Web system, the lessons learned may apply to other scientific Web sites with remote sensing infrastructure.

  12. Study of Zn-Cu ferrite nanoparticles for LPG sensing.

    PubMed

    Jain, Anuj; Baranwal, Ravi Kant; Bharti, Ajaya; Vakil, Z; Prajapati, C S

    2013-01-01

    Nanostructured zinc-copper mixed ferrite was synthesized using sol-gel method. XRD patterns of different compositions of zinc-copper ferrite, Zn(1-x)Cu(x)Fe2O4 (x = 0.0, 0.25, 0.50, 0.75), revealed single phase inverse spinel ferrite in all the samples synthesized. With increasing copper concentration, the crystallite size was found to be increased from 28 nm to 47 nm. The surface morphology of all the samples studied by the Scanning Electron Microscopy there exhibits porous structure of particles throughout the samples. The pellets of the samples are prepared for LPG sensing characteristics. The sensing is carried out at different operating temperatures (200, 225, and 250°C) with the variation of LPG concentrations (0.2, 0.4, and 0.6 vol%). The maximum sensitivity of 55.33% is observed at 250°C operating for the 0.6 vol% LPG.

  13. Sense of Place and Health in Hamilton, Ontario: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Allison; Kitchen, Peter

    2012-01-01

    The concept of sense of place has received considerable attention by social scientists in recent years. Research has indicated that a person's sense of place is influenced by a number of factors including the built environment, socio-economic status (SES), well-being and health. Relatively few studies have examined sense of place at the…

  14. Sense of Place and Health in Hamilton, Ontario: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Allison; Kitchen, Peter

    2012-01-01

    The concept of sense of place has received considerable attention by social scientists in recent years. Research has indicated that a person's sense of place is influenced by a number of factors including the built environment, socio-economic status (SES), well-being and health. Relatively few studies have examined sense of place at the…

  15. Dietary phosphorus and blood pressure: international study of macro- and micro-nutrients and blood pressure.

    PubMed

    Elliott, Paul; Kesteloot, Hugo; Appel, Lawrence J; Dyer, Alan R; Ueshima, Hirotsugu; Chan, Queenie; Brown, Ian J; Zhao, Liancheng; Stamler, Jeremiah

    2008-03-01

    Raised blood pressure is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide; improved nutritional approaches to population-wide prevention are required. Few data are available on dietary phosphorus and blood pressure and none are available on possible combined effects of phosphorus, magnesium, and calcium on blood pressure. The International Study of Macro- and Micro-Nutrients and Blood Pressure is a cross-sectional epidemiologic study of 4680 men and women ages 40 to 59 from 17 population samples in Japan, China, United Kingdom, and United States. Blood pressure was measured 8 times at 4 visits. Dietary intakes were obtained from four 24-hour recalls plus data on supplement use. Dietary phosphorus was inversely associated with blood pressure in a series of predefined multiple regression models, with the successive addition of potential confounders, both nondietary and dietary. Estimated blood pressure differences per 232 mg/1000 kcal (2 SD) of higher dietary phosphorus were -1.1 to -2.3 mm Hg systolic/-0.6 to -1.5 mm Hg diastolic (n=4680) and -1.6 to -3.5 mm Hg systolic/-0.8 to -1.8 mm Hg diastolic for 2238 "nonintervened" individuals, ie, those without special diet/nutritional supplements or diagnosis/treatment for cardiovascular disease or diabetes. Dietary calcium and magnesium, correlated with phosphorus (partial r=0.71 and r=0.68), were inversely associated with blood pressure. Blood pressures were lower by 1.9 to 4.2 mm Hg systolic/1.2 to 2.4 mm Hg diastolic for people with intakes above versus below country-specific medians for all 3 of the minerals. These results indicate the potential for increased phosphorus/mineral intake to lower blood pressure as part of the recommendations for healthier eating patterns for the prevention and control of prehypertension and hypertension.

  16. Study of 3D remote sensing system based on optical scanning holography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Shihu; Yan, Lei

    2009-06-01

    High-precision and real-time remote sensing imaging system is an important part of remote sensing development. Holography is a method of wave front record and recovery which was presented by Dennis Gabor. As a new kind of holography techniques, Optical scanning holography (OSH) and remote sensing imaging are intended to be combined together and applied in acquisition and interference measurement of remote sensing. The key principles and applicability of OSH are studied and the mathematic relation between Fresnel Zone Plate number, numerical aperture and object distance was deduced, which are proved to be feasible for OSH to apply in large scale remote sensing. At last, a new three-dimensional reflected OSH remote sensing imaging system is designed with the combination of scanning technique to record hologram patterns of large scale remote sensing scenes. This scheme is helpful for expanding OSH technique to remote sensing in future.

  17. Effect of osmolytes on pressure-induced unfolding of proteins: a high-pressure SAXS study.

    PubMed

    Krywka, Christina; Sternemann, Christian; Paulus, Michael; Tolan, Metin; Royer, Catherine; Winter, Roland

    2008-12-22

    Herein, we explore the effect of different types of osmolytes on the high-pressure stability and tertiary structure of a well-characterized monomeric protein, staphylococcal nuclease (SNase). Changes in the denaturation pressure and the radius of gyration are obtained in the presence of different concentrations of trimethylamine N-oxide (TMAO), glycerol and urea. To reveal structural changes in the protein upon compression at various osmolyte conditions, small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) experiments were carried out. To this end, a new high-pressure cell suitable for high-precision SAXS studies at synchrotron sources was built, which allows one to carry out scattering experiments up to maximum pressures of about 7 kbar. Our data clearly indicate that the osmolytes that stabilize proteins against temperature-induced unfolding drastically increase their pressure stability and that the elliptically shaped curve of the pressure-temperature-stability diagram of proteins is shifted to higher temperatures and pressures with increasing osmolyte concentration. A drastic stabilization is observed for the osmolyte TMAO, which exhibits not only a significant stabilization against temperature-induced unfolding, but also a particularly strong stabilization of the protein against pressure. In fact, such findings are in accordance with in vivo studies (for example P. J. Yancey, J. Exp. Biol. 2005, 208, 2819-2830), where unusually high TMAO concentrations in some deep-sea animals were found. Conversely, chaotropic agents such as urea have a strong destabilizing effect on both the temperature and pressure stability of the protein. Our data also indicate that sufficiently high TMAO concentrations might be able to largely offset the destabilizing effect of urea. The different scenarios observed are discussed in the context of recent experimental and theoretical studies.

  18. Remote sensing of cloud top pressure/height from SEVIRI: analysis of ten current retrieval algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamann, U.; Walther, A.; Baum, B.; Bennartz, R.; Bugliaro, L.; Derrien, M.; Francis, P. N.; Heidinger, A.; Joro, S.; Kniffka, A.; Le Gléau, H.; Lockhoff, M.; Lutz, H.-J.; Meirink, J. F.; Minnis, P.; Palikonda, R.; Roebeling, R.; Thoss, A.; Platnick, S.; Watts, P.; Wind, G.

    2014-09-01

    The role of clouds remains the largest uncertainty in climate projections. They influence solar and thermal radiative transfer and the earth's water cycle. Therefore, there is an urgent need for accurate cloud observations to validate climate models and to monitor climate change. Passive satellite imagers measuring radiation at visible to thermal infrared (IR) wavelengths provide a wealth of information on cloud properties. Among others, the cloud top height (CTH) - a crucial parameter to estimate the thermal cloud radiative forcing - can be retrieved. In this paper we investigate the skill of ten current retrieval algorithms to estimate the CTH using observations from the Spinning Enhanced Visible and InfraRed Imager (SEVIRI) onboard Meteosat Second Generation (MSG). In the first part we compare ten SEVIRI cloud top pressure (CTP) data sets with each other. The SEVIRI algorithms catch the latitudinal variation of the CTP in a similar way. The agreement is better in the extratropics than in the tropics. In the tropics multi-layer clouds and thin cirrus layers complicate the CTP retrieval, whereas a good agreement among the algorithms is found for trade wind cumulus, marine stratocumulus and the optically thick cores of the deep convective system. In the second part of the paper the SEVIRI retrievals are compared to CTH observations from the Cloud-Aerosol LIdar with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIOP) and Cloud Profiling Radar (CPR) instruments. It is important to note that the different measurement techniques cause differences in the retrieved CTH data. SEVIRI measures a radiatively effective CTH, while the CTH of the active instruments is derived from the return time of the emitted radar or lidar signal. Therefore, some systematic differences are expected. On average the CTHs detected by the SEVIRI algorithms are 1.0 to 2.5 km lower than CALIOP observations, and the correlation coefficients between the SEVIRI and the CALIOP data sets range between 0.77 and 0.90. The

  19. Remote sensing of cloud top pressure/height from SEVIRI: analysis of ten current retrieval algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamann, U.; Walther, A.; Baum, B.; Bennartz, R.; Bugliaro, L.; Derrien, M.; Francis, P.; Heidinger, A.; Joro, S.; Kniffka, A.; Le Gléau, H.; Lockhoff, M.; Lutz, H.-J.; Meirink, J. F.; Minnis, P.; Palikonda, R.; Roebeling, R.; Thoss, A.; Platnick, S.; Watts, P.; Wind, G.

    2014-01-01

    The role of clouds remains the largest uncertainty in climate projections. They influence solar and thermal radiative transfer and the earth's water cycle. Therefore, there is an urgent need for accurate cloud observations to validate climate models and to monitor climate change. Passive satellite imagers measuring radiation at visible to thermal infrared wavelengths provide a wealth of information on cloud properties. Among others, the cloud top height (CTH) - a crucial parameter to estimate the thermal cloud radiative forcing - can be retrieved. In this paper we investigate the skill of ten current retrieval algorithms to estimate the CTH using observations from the Spinning Enhanced Visible and InfraRed Imager (SEVIRI) onboard Meteosat Second Generation (MSG). In the first part we compare the ten SEVIRI cloud top pressure (CTP) datasets with each other. The SEVIRI algorithms catch the latitudinal variation of the CTP in a similar way. The agreement is better in the extratropics than in the tropics. In the tropics multi-layer clouds and thin cirrus layers complicate the CTP retrieval, whereas good agreement is found for the cores of the deep convective system having a high optical depth. Furthermore, a good agreement between the algorithms is observed for trade wind cumulus and marine stratocumulus clouds. In the second part of the paper the SEVIRI retrievals are compared to CTH observations from the Cloud-Aerosol LIdar with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIOP) and Cloud Profiling Radar (CPR) instruments. It is important to note that the different measurement techniques cause differences in the retrieved CHT data. SEVIRI measures a radiatively effective CTH, while the CTH of the active instruments is derived from the return time of the emitted signal. Therefore some systematic diffrences are expected. On average the CTHs detected by the SEVIRI algorithms are 1.0 to 2.5 km lower than CALIOP observations, and the correlation coefficients between the SEVIRI and the

  20. High-pressure studies of pharmaceutical compounds and energetic materials.

    PubMed

    Fabbiani, Francesca P A; Pulham, Colin R

    2006-10-01

    The effects of high pressure on pharmaceutical compounds and energetic materials can have important implications for both the properties and performance of these important classes of material. Pharmaceutical compounds are frequently subjected to pressure during processing and formulation, causing interconversion between solid forms that may affect properties such as solubility and bio-availability. Energetic materials experience extremes of both pressure and temperature under conditions of detonation and deflagration, causing changes in properties such as sensitivity to shock and chemical reactivity. This tutorial review outlines the various methods used to study these materials at high pressure, describes how pressure can be used to explore polymorphism, and provides examples of compounds that have been studied at high pressure.

  1. An apparatus for studying scintillator properties at high isostatic pressures

    SciTech Connect

    Gaume, R. M.; Lam, S.; Gascon, M.; Feigelson, R. S.; Setyawan, W.; Curtarolo, S.

    2013-01-15

    We describe the design and operation of a unique hydraulic press for the study of scintillator materials under isostatic pressure. This press, capable of developing a pressure of a gigapascal, consists of a large sample chamber pressurized by a two-stage hydraulic amplifier. The optical detection of the scintillation light emitted by the sample is performed, through a large aperture optical port, by a photodetector located outside the pressure vessel. In addition to providing essential pressure-dependent studies on the emission characteristics of radioluminescent materials, this apparatus is being developed to elucidate the mechanisms behind the recently observed dependency of light-yield nonproportionality on electronic band structure. The variation of the light output of a Tl:CsI crystal under 511-keV gamma excitation and hydrostatic pressure is given as an example.

  2. Continuous blood pressure recordings simultaneously with functional brain imaging: studies of the glymphatic system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zienkiewicz, Aleksandra; Huotari, Niko; Raitamaa, Lauri; Raatikainen, Ville; Ferdinando, Hany; Vihriälä, Erkki; Korhonen, Vesa; Myllylä, Teemu; Kiviniemi, Vesa

    2017-03-01

    The lymph system is responsible for cleaning the tissues of metabolic waste products, soluble proteins and other harmful fluids etc. Lymph flow in the body is driven by body movements and muscle contractions. Moreover, it is indirectly dependent on the cardiovascular system, where the heart beat and blood pressure maintain force of pressure in lymphatic channels. Over the last few years, studies revealed that the brain contains the so-called glymphatic system, which is the counterpart of the systemic lymphatic system in the brain. Similarly, the flow in the glymphatic system is assumed to be mostly driven by physiological pulsations such as cardiovascular pulses. Thus, continuous measurement of blood pressure and heart function simultaneously with functional brain imaging is of great interest, particularly in studies of the glymphatic system. We present our MRI compatible optics based sensing system for continuous blood pressure measurement and show our current results on the effects of blood pressure variations on cerebral brain dynamics, with a focus on the glymphatic system. Blood pressure was measured simultaneously with near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) combined with an ultrafast functional brain imaging (fMRI) sequence magnetic resonance encephalography (MREG, 3D brain 10 Hz sampling rate).

  3. Intradiscal pressure measurements above an instrumented fusion. A cadaveric study.

    PubMed

    Weinhoffer, S L; Guyer, R D; Herbert, M; Griffith, S L

    1995-03-01

    An in vitro study to determine the intradiscal pressure changes during flexion in levels above a simulated fusion was performed. To determine if intradiscal pressure increases more during flexion in discs above an instrumented spinal segment compared to an uninstrumented segment. The progressive degeneration of intervertebral discs adjacent to a fused or fixed segment is a phenomenon that is noted but poorly understood. Intuitively, the degeneration appears to be a function of altered biomechanics of the motion segments in the spine. Two intervertebral disc levels were evaluated, L3-L4 and L4-L5 from each of six fresh frozen cadaver spines. Pressure measurements were taken with the spine uninstrumented, with bilateral pedicle screw-rod instrumentation from L5 to S1, and with bilateral pedicle screw-rod instrumentation from L4 to S1. Pressure measurements were accomplished with Millar Mikro-Tip pressure transducers. The transducers were placed within the nucleus pulposus of L3-L4 and L4-L5 intervertebral discs. Pressure data were recorded by computer data acquisition. The pressure data were compared by intervertebral level and by the effects of added instrumentation. In general, the addition of instrumentation significantly affected the intradiscal pressure in the levels above a simulated fusion. The intradiscal pressure increased as the amount of levels involved in the simulated fusion increased. The intradiscal pressure increased as flexion motion increased. A greater increase was seen at the L4-L5 level than the L3-L4 level. When L5-S1 fixation was added, the intradiscal pressure increased. When L4-S1 fixation was added, the intradiscal pressure further increased. This study demonstrated increasing intradiscal pressures during flexion.

  4. Remote sensing study of Maumee River effects of Lake Erie

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Svehla, R.; Raquet, C.; Shook, D.; Salzman, J.; Coney, T.; Wachter, D.; Gedney, R.

    1975-01-01

    The effects of river inputs on boundary waters were studied in partial support of the task to assess the significance of river inputs into receiving waters, dispersion of pollutants, and water quality. The effects of the spring runoff of the Maumee River on Lake Erie were assessed by a combination of ship survey and remote sensing techniques. The imagery obtained from a multispectral scanner of the west basin of Lake Erie is discussed: this clearly showed the distribution of particulates throughout the covered area. This synoptic view, in addition to its qualitative value, is very useful in selecting sampling stations for shipboard in situ measurements, and for extrapolating these quantitative results throughout the area of interest.

  5. Geologic and remote sensing studies of Rima Mozart

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coombs, Cassandra R.; Hawke, B. Ray; Wilson, Lionel

    1988-01-01

    Geologic, photographic, and remote sensing data on Rima Mozart are analyzed to study the processes responsible for the formation of lunar sinuous rilles. The results show that it is unlikely that a complete lava tube could have existed along the Rima Mozart rille. A total eruptive volume of 6372 cu km has been determined for an open channel or tube with an eruption rate of about 80,000 cu m/s and a duration of 947 days. Near-infrared spectral reflectance data and 2.8-cm and 70-cm radar observations indicate that volcanic activity was responsible for the formation of the rille and that pyroclastic deposits are present around Kathleen and Ann as well as at the base of the Apennines.

  6. Applications of thermal remote sensing to detailed ground water studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Souto-Maior, J.

    1973-01-01

    Three possible applications of thermal (8-14 microns) remote sensing to detailed hydrogeologic studies are discussed in this paper: (1) the direct detection of seeps and springs, (2) the indirect evaluation of shallow ground water flow through its thermal effects on the land surface, and (3) the indirect location of small volumes of ground water inflow into surface water bodies. An investigation carried out with this purpose in an area containing a complex shallow ground water flow system indicates that the interpretation of the thermal imageries is complicated by many factors, among which the most important are: (1) altitude, angle of view, and thermal-spatial resolution of the sensor; (2) vegetation type, density, and vigor; (3) topography; (4) climatological and micrometeorological effects; (5) variation in soil type and soil moisture; (6) variation in volume and temperature of ground water inflow; (7) the hydraulic characteristics of the receiving water body, and (8) the presence of decaying organic material.

  7. Self-Powered Viscosity and Pressure Sensing in Microfluidic Systems Based on the Piezoelectric Energy Harvesting of Flowing Droplets.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhao; Tan, Lun; Pan, Xumin; Liu, Gao; He, Yahua; Jin, Wenchao; Li, Meng; Hu, Yongming; Gu, Haoshuang

    2017-08-30

    The rapid development of microscaled piezoelectric energy harvesters has provided a simple and highly efficient way for building self-powered sensor systems through harvesting the mechanical energy from the ambient environment. In this work, a self-powered microfluidic sensor that can harvest the mechanical energy of the fluid and simultaneously monitor their characteristics was fabricated by integrating the flexible piezoelectric poly(vinylidene fluoride) (PVDF) nanofibers with the well-designed microfluidic chips. Those devices could generate open-circuit high output voltage up to 1.8 V when a droplet of water is flowing past the suspended PVDF nanofibers and result in their periodical deformations. The impulsive output voltage signal allowed them to be utilized for droplets or bubbles counting in the microfluidic systems. Furthermore, the devices also exhibited self-powered sensing behavior due to the decreased voltage amplitude with increasing input pressure and liquid viscosity. The drop of output voltage could be attributed to the variation of flow condition and velocity of the droplets, leading to the reduced deformation of the piezoelectric PVDF layer and the decrease of the generated piezoelectric potential.

  8. A Study of Ocean Mass and Transport with Remote Sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, Chia-Wei

    We use GRACE data and estimates of ice sheet mass balance by the mass budget method to study regional ocean mass changes. Regional ocean mass varies because of ocean dynamics and gravitational attraction resulted from mass redistribution within the Earth system and associated crustal deformation. The effects combining gravitational attraction and crustal deformation are commonly called the sea level fingerprint (SLF). We focus on the SLF due to its large cumulative sea level potential and importance for accurate ocean mass estimates over regional scales. We conduct SLF sensitivity test with the mass estimate over the ice sheet regions from the mass budget method. Our tests show that the required accuracy of mass load estimates on land can be achieved by using GRACE data. We determine a set of improved scaling factors to restore the magnitude of the GRACE signal attenuated from a series of processing steps applied to remove systematic noise. We derive the SLF signals by accounting the mass load changes in the whole Earth system from GRACE. The SLF is validated with in-situ ocean bottom pressure measurements and sea level derived from steric-corrected altimetry. The validations show good agreement in the seasonal signal at the 1-degree resolution. We investigate the ocean transport error due to SLF signal in the North Atlantic. A spurious meridional geostrophic transport is created due to the SLF gradient across the Atlantic ocean. This spurious transport is equivalent to half of the seasonal variation in the upper mid-ocean geostrophic transport shown in the in-situ transport measurements. The work shows the importance of removing SLF in OBP measurements used to derive geostrophic flow. GRACE provides valuable constraints for extracting the ocean bottom pressure estimates. We introduced an improved ocean bottom pressure product from GRACE which can be used to study mass and current changes near coastal regions. This required removing the land mass change signal

  9. High Pressure Equation of State Studies Using Ethanol-Methanol And Argon As Pressure Medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Godwal, B. K.; Speziale, S.; Clark, S.; Yan, J.; Jeanloz, R.

    2008-12-01

    Experimental high pressure studies are extremely important to planetary science, material science and to the development of condensed matter theory. With experimental difficulties in creating the extreme pressure temperature conditions appropriate to planetary interiors, the approach used is to obtain the thermodynamic data on materials of interest by extrapolating the condensed matter theory which has been benchmarked with the outcome of high pressure experiments to the available high pressures. However the high pressure data used to match the theory heavily depends on the use of pressure media; like ethanol-methanol, silicon oil, argon and helium. Unfortunately still there exist controversy in the literature even with the use of helium as pressure medium as illustrated by the unsettled debate on Zn and Os among different groups. We have measured the equation of state of intermetallic compound AuIn2 and Cd0.8Hg0.2 alloy using ethanol-methanol and argon to the pressure of 20 GPa to confirm the appearance of anomalies in the data due to occurrence of subtle electronic phase transitions. However these anomalies can also be attributed to oriented lattice strains and local non-hydrostatic conditions. We have tried to remove these at room temperature by stabilizing the sample in argon medium in the diamond anvil cell with proper annealing as indicated by the uniformity of the pressure across the sample by ruby fluorescence measurements. We will present the data revealing the electronic transition in AuIn2 at 2.7 GPa and in Cd0.8Hg0.2 near 9 and 18 GPa.

  10. Outreach Programs, Peer Pressure, and Common Sense: What Motivates Homeowners to Mitigate Wildfire Risk?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCaffrey, Sarah M.; Stidham, Melanie; Toman, Eric; Shindler, Bruce

    2011-09-01

    In recent years, altered forest conditions, climate change, and the increasing numbers of homes built in fire prone areas has meant that wildfires are affecting more people. An important part of minimizing the potential negative impacts of wildfire is engaging homeowners in mitigating the fire hazard on their land. It is therefore important to understand what makes homeowners more or less willing to take action. The research presented here comes from a study that interviewed a total of 198 homeowners in six communities in the western United States about the activities they had undertaken to mitigate their fire risk, the factors that contributed to their decisions, and their future intentions. The current paper reports on findings from the first half of the longitudinal study, after 3 years we will return to interview the current homeowner on the same properties to assess maintenance actions and facilitating and limiting factors. Overall we found a body of individuals who understand the fire risk, are taking numerous mitigation actions, and think that these actions have reduced their risk. These homeowners typically did not expect the government to do it for them: they wanted information about what to do and, in some cases, assistance with the work, but saw taking care of their property primarily as their responsibility. Responses also show that key information sources and motivating factors vary by location and that it is not inherently necessary to have relationships between community members to create defensible space.

  11. Outreach programs, peer pressure, and common sense: what motivates homeowners to mitigate wildfire risk?

    PubMed

    McCaffrey, Sarah M; Stidham, Melanie; Toman, Eric; Shindler, Bruce

    2011-09-01

    In recent years, altered forest conditions, climate change, and the increasing numbers of homes built in fire prone areas has meant that wildfires are affecting more people. An important part of minimizing the potential negative impacts of wildfire is engaging homeowners in mitigating the fire hazard on their land. It is therefore important to understand what makes homeowners more or less willing to take action. The research presented here comes from a study that interviewed a total of 198 homeowners in six communities in the western United States about the activities they had undertaken to mitigate their fire risk, the factors that contributed to their decisions, and their future intentions. The current paper reports on findings from the first half of the longitudinal study, after 3 years we will return to interview the current homeowner on the same properties to assess maintenance actions and facilitating and limiting factors. Overall we found a body of individuals who understand the fire risk, are taking numerous mitigation actions, and think that these actions have reduced their risk. These homeowners typically did not expect the government to do it for them: they wanted information about what to do and, in some cases, assistance with the work, but saw taking care of their property primarily as their responsibility. Responses also show that key information sources and motivating factors vary by location and that it is not inherently necessary to have relationships between community members to create defensible space.

  12. Thermogravimetric study of vapor pressure of TATP synthesized without recrystallization.

    PubMed

    Mbah, Jonathan; Knott, Debra; Steward, Scott

    2014-11-01

    This study aims at characterizing the vapor pressure signatures generated by triacetone triperoxide (TATP) that was synthesized without recrystallization by thermogravimmetric analysis (TGA) for exploitation by standoff detection technologies of explosive devices. The thermal behavior of the nonrecrystallized sample was compared with reported values. Any phase change, melting point and decomposition identification were studied by differential scanning calorimeter. Vapor pressures were estimated by the Langmuir method of evaporation from an open surface in a vacuum. Vapor pressures of TATP at different temperatures were calculated using the linear logarithmic relationship obtained from benzoic acid reference standard. Sublimation of TATP was found to follow apparent zero-order kinetics and sublimes at steady rates at 298 K and above. While the enthalpy of sublimation found, 71.7 kJ mol(-1), is in agreement with reported values the vapor pressures deviated significantly. The differences in the vapor pressures behavior are attributable to the synthesis pathway chosen in this study.

  13. Commercial use of remote sensing in agriculture: a case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gnauck, Gary E.

    1999-12-01

    Over 25 years of research have clearly shown that an analysis of remote sensing imagery can provide information on agricultural crops. Most of this research has been funded by and directed toward the needs of government agencies. Commercial use of agricultural remote sensing has been limited to very small-scale operations supplying remote sensing services to a few selected customers. Datron/Transco Inc. undertook an internally funded remote sensing program directed toward the California cash crop industry (strawberries, lettuce, tomatoes, other fresh vegetables and cotton). The objectives of this program were twofold: (1) to assess the need and readiness of agricultural land managers to adopt remote sensing as a management tool, and (2) determine what technical barriers exist to large-scale implementation of this technology on a commercial basis. The program was divided into three phases: Planning, Engineering Test and Evaluation, and Commercial Operations. Findings: Remote sensing technology can deliver high resolution multispectral imagery with rapid turnaround, that can provide information on crop stress insects, disease and various soil parameters. The limiting factors to the use of remote sensing in agriculture are a lack of familiarization by the land managers, difficulty in translating 'information' into increased revenue or reduced cost for the land manager, and the large economies of scale needed to make the venture commercially viable.

  14. Microseismicity Induced by Fluid Pressure Drop (Laboratory Study)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turuntaev, Sergey; Zenchenko, Evgeny; Melchaeva, Olga

    2013-04-01

    Pore pressure change in saturated porous rocks may result in its fracturing (Maury et Fourmaintraux, 1993) and corresponding microseismic event occurrences. Microseismicity due to fluid injection is considered in numerous papers (Maxwell, 2010, Shapiro et al., 2005). Another type of the porous medium fracturing is related with rapid pore pressure drop at some boundary. The mechanism of such fracturing was considered by (Khristianovich, 1985) as a model of sudden coal blowing and by (Alidibirov, Panov, 1998) as a model of volcano eruptions. If the porous saturated medium has a boundary where it directly contacted with fluid under the high pressure (in a hydraulic fracture or in a borehole), and the pressure at that boundary is dropped, the conditions for tensile cracks can be achieved at some distance from the boundary. In the paper, the results of experimental study of saturated porous sample fracturing due to pore pressure rapid drop are discussed. The samples (82 mm high, ∅60 mm) were made of quartz sand, which was cemented by "liquid glass" glue with mass fraction 1%. The sample (porosity 35%, uniaxial unconfined compression strength 2.5 MPa) was placed in a mould and saturated by oil. The upper end of the sample contacted with the mould upper lid, the lower end contacted with fluid. The fluid pressure was increased to 10 MPa and then discharged through the bottom nipple. The pressure increases/drops were repeated 30-50 times. Pore pressure and acoustic emission (AE) were registered by transducers mounted into upper and bottom lids of the mould. It was found, that AE sources (corresponded to microfracturing) were spreading from the open end to the closed end of the sample, and that maximal number of AE events was registered at some distance from the opened end. The number of AE pulses increased with every next pressure drop, meanwhile the number of pulses with high amplitudes diminished. It was found that AE maximal rate corresponded to the fluid pressure

  15. High-pressure studies of cyclohexane to 40 GPa.

    PubMed

    Pravica, Michael; Shen, Yongrong; Quine, Zachary; Romano, Edward; Hartnett, David

    2007-04-26

    We present data from two room temperature synchrotron X-ray powder diffraction studies of cyclohexane up to approximately 40 and approximately 20 GPa. In the first experiment, pressure cycling was employed wherein pressure was varied up to approximately 16 GPa, reduced to 3.5 GPa, and then raised again to 40 GPa. Initially, the sample was found to be in the monoclinic phase (P12(1)/n1) at approximately 8.4 GPa. Beyond this pressure, the sample adopted triclinic unit cell symmetry (P1) which remained so even when the pressure was reduced to 3.5 GPa, indicating significant hysteresis and metastability. In the second experiment, pressure was more slowly varied, and the monoclinic unit cell structure (P12(1)/n1) was observed at lower pressures up to approximately 7 GPa, above which a phase transformation into the P1 triclinic unit cell symmetry occurred. Thus, the pressure onset of the triclinic phase may be dependent upon the pressurizing conditions. High-pressure Raman data that further emphasize a phase transition (probably into phase VI) around 10 GPa are also presented. We also have further evidence for a phase VII, which is probably triclinic.

  16. Skutterudites under pressure: An ab initio study

    SciTech Connect

    Ram, Swetarekha; Kanchana, V.; Valsakumar, M. C.

    2014-03-07

    Ab initio results on the band structure, density of states, and Fermi surface (FS) properties of LaRu{sub 4}X{sub 12} (X = P, As, Sb) are presented at ambient pressure as well as under compression. The analysis of density of states reveals the major contribution at the Fermi level to be mainly from the Ru-d and X-p states. We have a complicated Fermi surface with both electron and hole characters for all the three compounds which is derived mainly from the Ru-d and X-p states. There is also a simpler FS with hole character derived from the P-p{sub z} orbital for LaRu{sub 4}P{sub 12} and Ru-d{sub z{sup 2}} orbital in the case of As and Sb containing compounds. More interestingly, Fermi surface nesting feature is observed only in the case of the LaRu{sub 4}P{sub 12}. Under compression, we observe the topology of the complicated FS sheet of LaRu{sub 4}As{sub 12} to change around V/V{sub 0} = 0.85, leading to a behaviour similar to that of a multiband superconductor, and in addition, we have two more hole pockets centered around Γ at V/V{sub 0} = 0.8 for the same compound. Apart from this, we find the hole pocket to vanish at V/V{sub 0} = 0.8 in the case of LaRu{sub 4}Sb{sub 12} and the opening of the complicated FS sheet gets reduced. The de Haas van Alphen calculation shows the number of extremal orbits in the complicated sheet to change in As and Sb containing compounds under compression, where we also observe the FS topology to change.

  17. Physiologic Pressure and Flow Changes During Parabolic Flight (Pilot Study)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pantalos, George; Sharp, M. Keith; Mathias, John R.; Hargens, Alan R.; Watenpaugh, Donald E.; Buckey, Jay C.

    1999-01-01

    The objective of this study was to obtain measurement of cutaneous tissue perfusion central and peripheral venous pressure, and esophageal and abdominal pressure in human test subjects during parabolic flight. Hemodynamic data recorded during SLS-I and SLS-2 missions have resulted in the paradoxical finding of increased cardiac stroke volume in the presence of a decreased central venous pressure (CVP) following entry in weightlessness. The investigators have proposed that in the absence of gravity, acceleration-induced peripheral vascular compression is relieved, increasing peripheral vascular capacity and flow while reducing central and peripheral venous pressure, This pilot study seeks to measure blood pressure and flow in human test subjects during parabolic flight for different postures.

  18. Baseline pressure errors (BPEs) extensively influence intracranial pressure scores: results of a prospective observational study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Monitoring of intracranial pressure (ICP) is a cornerstone in the surveillance of neurosurgical patients. The ICP is measured against a baseline pressure (i.e. zero - or reference pressure). We have previously reported that baseline pressure errors (BPEs), manifested as spontaneous shift or drifts in baseline pressure, cause erroneous readings of mean ICP in individual patients. The objective of this study was to monitor the frequency and severity of BPEs. To this end, we performed a prospective, observational study monitoring the ICP from two separate ICP sensors (Sensors 1 and 2) placed in close proximity in the brain. We characterized BPEs as differences in mean ICP despite near to identical ICP waveform in Sensors 1 and 2. Methods The study enrolled patients with aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage in need of continuous ICP monitoring as part of their intensive care management. The two sensors were placed close to each other in the brain parenchyma via the same burr hole. The monitoring was performed as long as needed from a clinical perspective and the ICP recordings were stored digitally for analysis. For every patient the mean ICP as well as the various ICP wave parameters of the two sensors were compared. Results Sixteen patients were monitored median 164 hours (ranges 70 – 364 hours). Major BPEs, as defined by marked differences in mean ICP despite similar ICP waveform, were seen in 9 of them (56%). The BPEs were of magnitudes that had the potential to alter patient management. Conclusions Baseline Pressure Errors (BPEs) occur in a significant number of patients undergoing continuous ICP monitoring and they may alter patient management. The current practice of measuring ICP against a baseline pressure does not comply with the concept of State of the Art. Monitoring of the ICP waves ought to become the new State of the Art as they are not influenced by BPEs. PMID:24472296

  19. Lidar Remote Sensing for Forest Canopy Studies 2014

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Remote sensing has facilitated extraordinary advances in modeling, mapping, and the understanding of ecosystems. Conventional sensors have significant limitations for ecological and forest applications. The sensitivity and accuracy of these devices have repeatedly been shown to fall with increasing ...

  20. High-pressure studies on the calcium-ion-sensitive fluorophore Fluo-4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frey, Eric W.; Urayama, Paul

    2007-10-01

    Fluorescence-based methods for intracellular calcium ion sensing are well established at ambient pressure. Because calcium ions play a ubiquitous role in cellular signaling, extending techniques of intracellular calcium-sensing to high pressures would play an important role in understanding the large variety of piezophysiologic effects. Here, we characterize the intracellular calcium-ion-sensitive fluorophore Fluo-4 under hydrostatic pressures up to 500 atm (50 MPa). Using an EGTA/MOPS solution as a calcium-buffer reference, we investigate the pressure dependence of the reaction pK and determine the thermodynamic volume change associated with the Fluo-4 calcium-binding reaction.

  1. High pressure phase transitions in lawsonite at simultaneous high pressure and temperature: A single crystal study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Bannon, E. F., III; Vennari, C.; Beavers, C. C. G.; Williams, Q. C.

    2015-12-01

    Lawsonite (CaAl2Si2O7(OH)2.H2O) is a hydrous mineral with a high overall water content of ~11.5 wt.%. It is a significant carrier of water in subduction zones to depths greater than ~150 km. The structure of lawsonite has been extensively studied under room temperature, high-pressure conditions. However, simultaneous high-pressure and high-temperature experiments are scarce. We have conducted synchrotron-based simultaneous high-pressure and temperature single crystal experiments on lawsonite up to a maximum pressure of 8.4 GPa at ambient and high temperatures. We used a natural sample of lawsonite from Valley Ford, California (Sonoma County). At room pressure and temperature lawsonite crystallizes in the orthorhombic system with Cmcm symmetry. Room temperature compression indicates that lawsonite remains in the orthorhombic Cmcm space group up to ~9.0 GPa. Our 5.0 GPa crystal structure is similar to the room pressure structure, and shows almost isotropic compression of the crystallographic axes. Unit cell parameters at 5.0 GPa are a- 5.7835(10), b- 8.694(2), and c- 13.009(3). Single-crystal measurements at simultaneous high-pressure and temperature (e.g., >8.0 GPa and ~100 oC) can be indexed to a monoclinic P-centered unit cell. Interestingly, a modest temperature increase of ~100 oC appears to initiate the orthorhombic to monoclinic phase transition at ~0.6-2.4 GPa lower than room temperature compression studies have shown. There is no evidence of dehydration or H atom disorder under these conditions. This suggests that the orthorhombic to monoclinic transition could be kinetically impeded at 298 K, and that monoclinic lawsonite could be the dominant water carrier through much of the depth range of upper mantle subduction processes.

  2. Pressure-dependent photoluminescence study of ZnO nanowires

    SciTech Connect

    Shan, W.; Walukiewicz, W.; Ager III, J.W.; Yu, K.M.; Zhang, Y.; Mao, S.S.; Kling, R.

    2004-09-13

    The pressure dependence of the photoluminescence (PL) transition associated with the fundamental band gap of ZnO nanowires has been studied at pressures up to 15 GPa. ZnO nanowires are found to have a higher structural phase transition pressure around 12 GPa as compared to 9.0 GPa for bulk ZnO. The pressure-induced energy shift of the near band-edge luminescence emission yields a linear pressure coefficient of 29.6 meV/GPa with a small sublinear term of -0.43 meV/GPa{sup 2}. An effective hydrostatic deformation potential -3.97 eV for the direct band gap of the ZnO nanowires is derived from the result.

  3. Genome-wide association study identifies six new loci influencing pulse pressure and mean arterial pressure.

    PubMed

    Wain, Louise V; Verwoert, Germaine C; O'Reilly, Paul F; Shi, Gang; Johnson, Toby; Johnson, Andrew D; Bochud, Murielle; Rice, Kenneth M; Henneman, Peter; Smith, Albert V; Ehret, Georg B; Amin, Najaf; Larson, Martin G; Mooser, Vincent; Hadley, David; Dörr, Marcus; Bis, Joshua C; Aspelund, Thor; Esko, Tõnu; Janssens, A Cecile J W; Zhao, Jing Hua; Heath, Simon; Laan, Maris; Fu, Jingyuan; Pistis, Giorgio; Luan, Jian'an; Arora, Pankaj; Lucas, Gavin; Pirastu, Nicola; Pichler, Irene; Jackson, Anne U; Webster, Rebecca J; Zhang, Feng; Peden, John F; Schmidt, Helena; Tanaka, Toshiko; Campbell, Harry; Igl, Wilmar; Milaneschi, Yuri; Hottenga, Jouke-Jan; Vitart, Veronique; Chasman, Daniel I; Trompet, Stella; Bragg-Gresham, Jennifer L; Alizadeh, Behrooz Z; Chambers, John C; Guo, Xiuqing; Lehtimäki, Terho; Kühnel, Brigitte; Lopez, Lorna M; Polašek, Ozren; Boban, Mladen; Nelson, Christopher P; Morrison, Alanna C; Pihur, Vasyl; Ganesh, Santhi K; Hofman, Albert; Kundu, Suman; Mattace-Raso, Francesco U S; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Sijbrands, Eric J G; Uitterlinden, Andre G; Hwang, Shih-Jen; Vasan, Ramachandran S; Wang, Thomas J; Bergmann, Sven; Vollenweider, Peter; Waeber, Gérard; Laitinen, Jaana; Pouta, Anneli; Zitting, Paavo; McArdle, Wendy L; Kroemer, Heyo K; Völker, Uwe; Völzke, Henry; Glazer, Nicole L; Taylor, Kent D; Harris, Tamara B; Alavere, Helene; Haller, Toomas; Keis, Aime; Tammesoo, Mari-Liis; Aulchenko, Yurii; Barroso, Inês; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Galan, Pilar; Hercberg, Serge; Lathrop, Mark; Eyheramendy, Susana; Org, Elin; Sõber, Siim; Lu, Xiaowen; Nolte, Ilja M; Penninx, Brenda W; Corre, Tanguy; Masciullo, Corrado; Sala, Cinzia; Groop, Leif; Voight, Benjamin F; Melander, Olle; O'Donnell, Christopher J; Salomaa, Veikko; d'Adamo, Adamo Pio; Fabretto, Antonella; Faletra, Flavio; Ulivi, Sheila; Del Greco, Fabiola M; Facheris, Maurizio; Collins, Francis S; Bergman, Richard N; Beilby, John P; Hung, Joseph; Musk, A William; Mangino, Massimo; Shin, So-Youn; Soranzo, Nicole; Watkins, Hugh; Goel, Anuj; Hamsten, Anders; Gider, Pierre; Loitfelder, Marisa; Zeginigg, Marion; Hernandez, Dena; Najjar, Samer S; Navarro, Pau; Wild, Sarah H; Corsi, Anna Maria; Singleton, Andrew; de Geus, Eco J C; Willemsen, Gonneke; Parker, Alex N; Rose, Lynda M; Buckley, Brendan; Stott, David; Orru, Marco; Uda, Manuela; van der Klauw, Melanie M; Zhang, Weihua; Li, Xinzhong; Scott, James; Chen, Yii-Der Ida; Burke, Gregory L; Kähönen, Mika; Viikari, Jorma; Döring, Angela; Meitinger, Thomas; Davies, Gail; Starr, John M; Emilsson, Valur; Plump, Andrew; Lindeman, Jan H; Hoen, Peter A C 't; König, Inke R; Felix, Janine F; Clarke, Robert; Hopewell, Jemma C; Ongen, Halit; Breteler, Monique; Debette, Stéphanie; Destefano, Anita L; Fornage, Myriam; Mitchell, Gary F; Smith, Nicholas L; Holm, Hilma; Stefansson, Kari; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; Samani, Nilesh J; Preuss, Michael; Rudan, Igor; Hayward, Caroline; Deary, Ian J; Wichmann, H-Erich; Raitakari, Olli T; Palmas, Walter; Kooner, Jaspal S; Stolk, Ronald P; Jukema, J Wouter; Wright, Alan F; Boomsma, Dorret I; Bandinelli, Stefania; Gyllensten, Ulf B; Wilson, James F; Ferrucci, Luigi; Schmidt, Reinhold; Farrall, Martin; Spector, Tim D; Palmer, Lyle J; Tuomilehto, Jaakko; Pfeufer, Arne; Gasparini, Paolo; Siscovick, David; Altshuler, David; Loos, Ruth J F; Toniolo, Daniela; Snieder, Harold; Gieger, Christian; Meneton, Pierre; Wareham, Nicholas J; Oostra, Ben A; Metspalu, Andres; Launer, Lenore; Rettig, Rainer; Strachan, David P; Beckmann, Jacques S; Witteman, Jacqueline C M; Erdmann, Jeanette; van Dijk, Ko Willems; Boerwinkle, Eric; Boehnke, Michael; Ridker, Paul M; Jarvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Chakravarti, Aravinda; Abecasis, Goncalo R; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Newton-Cheh, Christopher; Levy, Daniel; Munroe, Patricia B; Psaty, Bruce M; Caulfield, Mark J; Rao, Dabeeru C; Tobin, Martin D; Elliott, Paul; van Duijn, Cornelia M

    2011-09-11

    Numerous genetic loci have been associated with systolic blood pressure (SBP) and diastolic blood pressure (DBP) in Europeans. We now report genome-wide association studies of pulse pressure (PP) and mean arterial pressure (MAP). In discovery (N = 74,064) and follow-up studies (N = 48,607), we identified at genome-wide significance (P = 2.7 × 10(-8) to P = 2.3 × 10(-13)) four new PP loci (at 4q12 near CHIC2, 7q22.3 near PIK3CG, 8q24.12 in NOV and 11q24.3 near ADAMTS8), two new MAP loci (3p21.31 in MAP4 and 10q25.3 near ADRB1) and one locus associated with both of these traits (2q24.3 near FIGN) that has also recently been associated with SBP in east Asians. For three of the new PP loci, the estimated effect for SBP was opposite of that for DBP, in contrast to the majority of common SBP- and DBP-associated variants, which show concordant effects on both traits. These findings suggest new genetic pathways underlying blood pressure variation, some of which may differentially influence SBP and DBP.

  4. Genome-wide association study identifies six new loci influencing pulse pressure and mean arterial pressure

    PubMed Central

    Wain, Louise V; Verwoert, Germaine C; O’Reilly, Paul F; Shi, Gang; Johnson, Toby; Johnson, Andrew D; Bochud, Murielle; Rice, Kenneth M; Henneman, Peter; Smith, Albert V; Ehret, Georg B; Amin, Najaf; Larson, Martin G; Mooser, Vincent; Hadley, David; Dörr, Marcus; Bis, Joshua C; Aspelund, Thor; Esko, Tõnu; Janssens, A Cecile JW; Zhao, Jing Hua; Heath, Simon; Laan, Maris; Fu, Jingyuan; Pistis, Giorgio; Luan, Jian’an; Arora, Pankaj; Lucas, Gavin; Pirastu, Nicola; Pichler, Irene; Jackson, Anne U; Webster, Rebecca J; Zhang, Feng; Peden, John F; Schmidt, Helena; Tanaka, Toshiko; Campbell, Harry; Igl, Wilmar; Milaneschi, Yuri; Hotteng, Jouke-Jan; Vitart, Veronique; Chasman, Daniel I; Trompet, Stella; Bragg-Gresham, Jennifer L; Alizadeh, Behrooz Z; Chambers, John C; Guo, Xiuqing; Lehtimäki, Terho; Kühnel, Brigitte; Lopez, Lorna M; Polašek, Ozren; Boban, Mladen; Nelson, Christopher P; Morrison, Alanna C; Pihur, Vasyl; Ganesh, Santhi K; Hofman, Albert; Kundu, Suman; Mattace-Raso, Francesco US; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Sijbrands, Eric JG; Uitterlinden, Andre G; Hwang, Shih-Jen; Vasan, Ramachandran S; Wang, Thomas J; Bergmann, Sven; Vollenweider, Peter; Waeber, Gérard; Laitinen, Jaana; Pouta, Anneli; Zitting, Paavo; McArdle, Wendy L; Kroemer, Heyo K; Völker, Uwe; Völzke, Henry; Glazer, Nicole L; Taylor, Kent D; Harris, Tamara B; Alavere, Helene; Haller, Toomas; Keis, Aime; Tammesoo, Mari-Liis; Aulchenko, Yurii; Barroso, Inês; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Galan, Pilar; Hercberg, Serge; Lathrop, Mark; Eyheramendy, Susana; Org, Elin; Sõber, Siim; Lu, Xiaowen; Nolte, Ilja M; Penninx, Brenda W; Corre, Tanguy; Masciullo, Corrado; Sala, Cinzia; Groop, Leif; Voight, Benjamin F; Melander, Olle; O’Donnell, Christopher J; Salomaa, Veikko; d’Adamo, Adamo Pio; Fabretto, Antonella; Faletra, Flavio; Ulivi, Sheila; Del Greco, M Fabiola; Facheris, Maurizio; Collins, Francis S; Bergman, Richard N; Beilby, John P; Hung, Joseph; Musk, A William; Mangino, Massimo; Shin, So-Youn; Soranzo, Nicole; Watkins, Hugh; Goel, Anuj; Hamsten, Anders; Gider, Pierre; Loitfelder, Marisa; Zeginigg, Marion; Hernandez, Dena; Najjar, Samer S; Navarro, Pau; Wild, Sarah H; Corsi, Anna Maria; Singleton, Andrew; de Geus, Eco JC; Willemsen, Gonneke; Parker, Alex N; Rose, Lynda M; Buckley, Brendan; Stott, David; Orru, Marco; Uda, Manuela; van der Klauw, Melanie M; Zhang, Weihua; Li, Xinzhong; Scott, James; Chen, Yii-Der Ida; Burke, Gregory L; Kähönen, Mika; Viikari, Jorma; Döring, Angela; Meitinger, Thomas; Davies, Gail; Starr, John M; Emilsson, Valur; Plump, Andrew; Lindeman, Jan H; ’t Hoen, Peter AC; König, Inke R; Felix, Janine F; Clarke, Robert; Hopewell, Jemma C; Ongen, Halit; Breteler, Monique; Debette, Stéphanie; DeStefano, Anita L; Fornage, Myriam; Mitchell, Gary F; Smith, Nicholas L; Holm, Hilma; Stefansson, Kari; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; Samani, Nilesh J; Preuss, Michael; Rudan, Igor; Hayward, Caroline; Deary, Ian J; Wichmann, H-Erich; Raitakari, Olli T; Palmas, Walter; Kooner, Jaspal S; Stolk, Ronald P; Jukema, J Wouter; Wright, Alan F; Boomsma, Dorret I; Bandinelli, Stefania; Gyllensten, Ulf B; Wilson, James F; Ferrucci, Luigi; Schmidt, Reinhold; Farrall, Martin; Spector, Tim D; Palmer, Lyle J; Tuomilehto, Jaakko; Pfeufer, Arne; Gasparini, Paolo; Siscovick, David; Altshuler, David; Loos, Ruth JF; Toniolo, Daniela; Snieder, Harold; Gieger, Christian; Meneton, Pierre; Wareham, Nicholas J; Oostra, Ben A; Metspalu, Andres; Launer, Lenore; Rettig, Rainer; Strachan, David P; Beckmann, Jacques S; Witteman, Jacqueline CM; Erdmann, Jeanette; van Dijk, Ko Willems; Boerwinkle, Eric; Boehnke, Michael; Ridker, Paul M; Jarvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Chakravarti, Aravinda; Abecasis, Goncalo R; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Newton-Cheh, Christopher; Levy, Daniel; Munroe, Patricia B; Psaty, Bruce M; Caulfield, Mark J; Rao, Dabeeru C

    2012-01-01

    Numerous genetic loci influence systolic blood pressure (SBP) and diastolic blood pressure (DBP) in Europeans 1-3. We now report genome-wide association studies of pulse pressure (PP) and mean arterial pressure (MAP). In discovery (N=74,064) and follow-up studies (N=48,607), we identified at genome-wide significance (P= 2.7×10-8 to P=2.3×10-13) four novel PP loci (at 4q12 near CHIC2/PDGFRAI, 7q22.3 near PIK3CG, 8q24.12 in NOV, 11q24.3 near ADAMTS-8), two novel MAP loci (3p21.31 in MAP4, 10q25.3 near ADRB1) and one locus associated with both traits (2q24.3 near FIGN) which has recently been associated with SBP in east Asians. For three of the novel PP signals, the estimated effect for SBP was opposite to that for DBP, in contrast to the majority of common SBP- and DBP-associated variants which show concordant effects on both traits. These findings indicate novel genetic mechanisms underlying blood pressure variation, including pathways that may differentially influence SBP and DBP. PMID:21909110

  5. Propagation Limitations in Remote Sensing.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    Contents: Multi-sensors and systems in remote sensing ; Radar sensing systems over land; Remote sensing techniques in oceanography; Influence of...propagation media and background; Infrared techniques in remote sensing ; Photography in remote sensing ; Analytical studies in remote sensing .

  6. High Pressure Strength Study on NaCl

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mi, Z.; Shieh, S. R.; High Pressure Mineral Physics Group

    2010-12-01

    Yield strength is regarded as one important property related to rheological characteristics of minerals in the Earth’s interior. The strength study of NaCl, a popular pressure medium in static high pressure experiments, has been carried out under non-hydrostatic conditions in a diamond anvil cell up to 43 GPa at room temperature using radial energy dispersive X-ray diffraction technique. Phase transformation from B1 (rock salt structure) to B2 (CsCl structure) starts at 29.4 GPa, and is complete at 32.1 GPa. Bulk modulus obtained by third order Birch-Manurgham equation of state is 25.5 GPa with pressure derivative 4.6 for B1 phase, and 30.78 GPa with pressure derivative 4.32 GPa for B2 phase, which are in a good agreement with previous studies. The differential stress of NaCl B1 phase shows very gentle increase with pressure, which indicates that NaCl is a very good pressure-transmitting medium at pressure below 30 GPa. However, the differential stress increases more abruptly for B2 phase and this may imply that NaCl can no longer be regarded as a “soft” pressure medium at very high pressures. For B1 phase, (111) is the strongest plane and (200) is the weakest plane, while (200) becomes the strongest plane in B2 phase. Pure NaCl is weaker than mixture MgO and NaCl, which indicates that soft material become stronger when mixed with hard material. The yield strength of B2 obtained through energy dispersive X-ray diffraction technique increase linearly, while the value derived by pressure gradient method shows jagged trend.

  7. Cardiovascular pressure measurement in safety assessment studies: technology requirements and potential errors.

    PubMed

    Sarazan, R Dustan

    2014-01-01

    these factors are understood, a pressure sensing and measurement system can be selected that is optimized for the experimental model being studied, thus eliminating errors or inaccurate results.

  8. Exploring Remote Sensing Products Online with Giovanni for Studying Urbanization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shen, Suhung; Leptoukh, Gregory G.; Gerasimov, Irina; Kempler, Steve

    2012-01-01

    Recently, a Large amount of MODIS land products at multi-spatial resolutions have been integrated into the online system, Giovanni, to support studies on land cover and land use changes focused on Northern Eurasia and Monsoon Asia regions. Giovanni (Goddard Interactive Online Visualization ANd aNalysis Infrastructure) is a Web-based application developed by the NASA Goddard Earth Sciences Data and Information Services Center (GES-DISC) providing a simple and intuitive way to visualize, analyze, and access Earth science remotely-sensed and modeled data. The customized Giovanni Web portals (Giovanni-NEESPI and Giovanni-MAIRS) are created to integrate land, atmospheric, cryospheric, and social products, that enable researchers to do quick exploration and basic analyses of land surface changes and their relationships to climate at global and regional scales. This presentation documents MODIS land surface products in Giovanni system. As examples, images and statistical analysis results on land surface and local climate changes associated with urbanization over Yangtze River Delta region, China, using data in Giovanni are shown.

  9. Under Pressure, NBPTS Releases Full Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keller, Bess

    2006-01-01

    Officials of the National Board for Professional Teaching Standards decided to post the report by veteran researcher William L. Sanders on the group's Web site after saying that they intended to stick with an "overview." The overview, which was largely critical of the study, appeared after the board was pressed to "publish something" by a…

  10. Sense of coherence predicts uncomplicated delivery: a prospective observational study.

    PubMed

    Oz, Yasmin; Sarid, Orly; Peleg, Roni; Sheiner, Eyal

    2009-03-01

    The present study aimed to investigate factors predicting uncomplicated deliveries and specifically whether a sense of coherence (SOC) and perceived stress can predict such deliveries. A prospective observational study was conducted employing self-administered SOC and perceived stress scale (PSS) questionnaires with pregnant women attending the outpatient clinic for routine surveillance. Following delivery, data regarding maternal and fetal delivery complications were collected from the participants' medical records. Of one hundred forty-five women completing the study, 43.4% completed the delivery process without complications. Women experiencing delivery complications, on average, had lower SOC scores (67.7 +/- 1.19 vs. 72.2 +/- 1.32, p = 0.014). Maternal complications (as opposed to fetal complications) accounted for this divergence and were related to lower SOC scores (67.74 +/- 1.19 vs. 72.18 +/- 1.32, p = 0.01). PSS was not associated with uncomplicated delivery (18.82 +/- 0.59 vs. 17.98 +/- 0.62, p = 0.341). Nulliparity, however, was associated with higher occurrence of complicated delivery (31.9% of complicated vs. 13.2% of uncomplicated deliveries, p = 0.007). Multivariable analysis demonstrated that high SOC (OR = 1.042; 95% CI = 1.004-1.08; p = 0.03) and nulliparity (OR = 0.293; 95% CI = 0.113-0.758; p = 0.011) both were independent predictors of uncomplicated delivery, directly and inversely, respectively. In conclusion, higher SOC scores are an independent protective factor for the prediction of uncomplicated delivery.

  11. Dark chocolate and blood pressure: a novel study from Jordan.

    PubMed

    Al-Safi, Saafan A; Ayoub, Nehad M; Al-Doghim, Imad; Aboul-Enein, Faisal H

    2011-11-01

    The goal of this study was to assess the effect of dark chocolate intake on cardiovascular parameters like blood pressure and heart rate values in a normotensive population. This is a randomized cross-sectional study involving a total of 14,310 adults that were selected from various regions of Jordan. Well-trained pharmacy students interviewed participants in the outpatient settings. Participants reported their weekly intake of dark chocolate that has been further classified into mild (1-2 bars/week), moderate (3-4 bars/week), and high intake ( > 4 bars/week). For each participant, the systolic blood pressure (SBP), diastolic blood pressure (DBP), and heart rate were measured three times with (10-15) minute intervals in the sitting position and the resting state. The arterial blood pressure (ABP) was calculated from the measured SBP and DBP values. All measured blood pressure values were significantly decreased for participants who reported higher dark chocolate consumption. Our results showed that heart rate values were not affected by variable intake of dark chocolate. In addition, increasing dark chocolate intake was associated with a significant decrease of blood pressure values in participants irrespective of the family history of hypertension or the age of the individual. However, heart rate values were unaffected. Higher intake of dark chocolate can be associated with lower values of blood pressure, while its effect on heart rate values was not consistent.

  12. Successful factors to prevent pressure ulcers - an interview study.

    PubMed

    Hommel, Ami; Gunningberg, Lena; Idvall, Ewa; Bååth, Carina

    2017-01-01

    To explore successful factors to prevent pressure ulcers in hospital settings. Pressure ulcer prevalence has been recognised as a quality indicator for both patient safety and quality of care in hospital and community settings. Most pressure ulcer can be prevented if effective measures are implemented and evaluated. The Swedish Association of Local Authorities and Regions initiated nationwide pressure ulcer prevalence studies in 2011. In 2014, after four years of measurement, the prevalence was still unacceptably high on a national level. The mean prevalence of pressure ulcer in the spring of 2014 was 14% in hospital settings with a range from 2·7-36·4%. Qualitative semistructured interviews were conducted. A qualitative content analysis, in addition to Promoting Action on Research Implementation in Health Services frameworks, was used in the analysis of the data text. Individual interviews and focus groups were used to create opportunities for both individual responses and group interactions. The study was conducted at six hospitals during the fall of 2014. Three main categories were identified as successful factors to prevent pressure ulcer in hospitals: creating a good organisation, maintaining persistent awareness and realising the benefits for patients. The goal for all healthcare personnel must be delivering high-quality, sustainable care to patients. Prevention of pressure ulcer is crucial in this work. It seems to be easier for small hospitals (with a low number of units/beds) to develop and sustain an effective organisation in prevention work. The nurse managers' attitude and engagement are crucial to enable the personnel to work actively with pressure ulcer prevention. Strategies are proposed to advance clinical leadership, knowledge, skills and abilities for the crucial implementation of pressure ulcer prevention. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Land cover, land use and malaria in the Amazon: a systematic literature review of studies using remotely sensed data

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The nine countries sharing the Amazon forest accounted for 89% of all malaria cases reported in the Americas in 2008. Remote sensing can help identify the environmental determinants of malaria transmission and their temporo-spatial evolution. Seventeen studies characterizing land cover or land use features, and relating them to malaria in the Amazon subregion, were identified. These were reviewed in order to improve the understanding of the land cover/use class roles in malaria transmission. The indicators affecting the transmission risk were summarized in terms of temporal components, landscape fragmentation and anthropic pressure. This review helps to define a framework for future studies aiming to characterize and monitor malaria. PMID:23758827

  14. The Study of Graphic Sense and Its Effects on the Acquisition of Literacy. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hernandez-Chavez, Eduardo; Curtis, Jan

    This report describes a study on the development of children's conceptualizations of written language, that is, their graphic sense. The study investigated three issues: (1) whether acquisition of literacy is a developmental process common to all normal children, (2) whether the levels of graphic sense tend to be associated with particular…

  15. A Study of Teaching and Learning Number Sense for Sixth Grade Students in Taiwan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yang, Der-Ching; Hsu, Chun-Jen; Huang, Ming-Chiang

    2004-01-01

    Two public schools (A and B) from two cities in southern Taiwan were selected to participate in this study. In each school, two sixth grade classes (an experimental and a control class) were studied. Number sense activities were conducted in the experimental classes through process-oriented teaching model to help children develop number sense,…

  16. Sense of Community in a Blended Technology Integration Course: A Design-Based Research Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harrison, J. Buckley; West, Richard E.

    2014-01-01

    This design-based research study explored whether "sense of community" was maintained while flexibility in the course was increased through an adoption of a unique blended learning model. Data collected in this study show a significant drop in the sense of connectedness score from a mean of 50.8 out of 66 to a mean of 39.68 in the first…

  17. High Pressure Studies of UO3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jenei, Zsolt; Lipp, Magnus; Klepeis, Jae-Hyun; Baer, Bruce; Cynn, Hyunchae; Evans, William; Park, Changyong; Popov, Dimitri

    2011-03-01

    It has been reported that upon compression t ambient temperature δ -UO3 becomes amorphous at 2.2 GPa. (Journal of Alloys and Compounds 315 p59--61). We studied the properties of γ -UO3 in diamond anvil cell up to 75 GPa. Powder diffraction experiments performed at HPCAT/Advanced Photon Source show the crystalline uranium trioxide transforms to an amorphous solid between 12 and 14 GPa and remains amorphous up to 75 GPa. The transition has been confirmed by Raman spectroscopy as well. In this paper we'll present our findings on the amorphous transition together with the equation of state of both the crystalline phase and the amorphous phase. This work performed under the auspices of the US DOE by LLNL under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344 HPCAT is supported by CIW, CDAC, UNLV and LLNL through funding from DOE-NNSA, DOE-BES and NSF. APS is supported by DOE-BES, under Contract No. DE-AC02-06CH11357.

  18. Nanostructured surfaces using thermal nanoimprint lithography: Applications in thin membrane technology, piezoelectric energy harvesting and tactile pressure sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nabar, Bhargav Pradip

    Nanoimprint lithography (NIL) is emerging as a viable contender for fabrication of large-scale arrays of 5-500 nm features. The work presented in this dissertation aims to leverage the advantages of NIL for realization of novel Nano Electro Mechanical Systems (NEMS). The first application is a nanoporous membrane blood oxygenator system. A fabrication process for realization of thin nanoporous membranes using thermal nanoimprint lithography is presented. Suspended silicon nitride membranes were fabricated by Low-Pressure Chemical Vapor Deposition (LPCVD) in conjunction with a potassium hydroxide-based bulk micromachining process. Nanoscale features were imprinted into a commercially available thermoplastic polymer resist using a pre-fabricated silicon mold. The pattern was reversed and transferred to a thin aluminum oxide layer by means of a novel two stage lift-off technique. The patterned aluminum oxide was used as an etch mask in a CHF3/He based reactive ion etch process to transfer the pattern to silicon nitride. Highly directional etch profiles with near vertical sidewalls and excellent Si3N4/Al2O3 etch selectivity was observed. One-micrometer-thick porous membranes with varying dimensions of 250x250 microm2 to 450x450 microm 2 and pore diameter of 400 nm have been engineered and evaluated. Results indicate that the membranes have consistent nanopore dimensions and precisely defined porosity, which makes them ideal as gas exchange interfaces in blood oxygenation systems as well as other applications such as dialysis. Additionally, bulk -- micromachined microfluidic channels have been developed for uniform, laminar blood flow with minimal cell trauma. NIL has been used for ordered growth of crystalline nanostructures for sensing and energy harvesting. Highly ordered arrays of crystalline ZnO nanorods have been fabricated using a polymer template patterned by thermal nanoimprint lithography, in conjunction with a low temperature hydrothermal growth process. Zinc

  19. Structural study of helical polyfluorene under high quasihydrostatic pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knaapila, M.; Konôpková, Z.; Torkkeli, M.; Haase, D.; Liermann, H.-P.; Guha, S.; Scherf, U.

    2013-02-01

    We report on an x-ray diffraction (XRD) study of helical poly[9,9-bis(2-ethylhexyl)fluorene] (PF2/6) under high quasihydrostatic pressure and show an effect of pressure on the torsion angle (dihedral angle) between adjunct repeat units and on the hexagonal unit cell. A model for helical backbone conformation is constructed. The theoretical position for the most prominent 00l x-ray reflection is calculated as a function of torsion angle. The XRD of high molecular weight PF2/6 (Mn=30 kg/mol) is measured through a diamond anvil cell upon pressure increase from 1 to 10 GPa. The theoretically considered 00l reflection is experimentally identified, and its shift with the increasing pressure is found to be consistent with the decreasing torsion angle between 2 and 6 GPa. This indicates partial backbone planarization towards a more open helical structure. The h00 peak is identified, and its shift together with the broadening of 00l implies impairment of the ambient hexagonal order, which begins at or below 2 GPa. Previously collected high-pressure photoluminescence data are reanalyzed and are found to be qualitatively consistent with the XRD data. This paper provides an example of how the helical π-conjugated backbone structure can be controlled by applying high quasihydrostatic pressure without modifications in its chemical structure. Moreover, it paves the way for wider use of high-pressure x-ray scattering in the research of π-conjugated polymers.

  20. Stiffness Study of Wound-Filament Pressure Vessels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Verderaime, V.

    1986-01-01

    Report presents theoretical and experimental study of stiffness of lightweight, jointed pressure vessels made of wound graphite fibers and epoxy. Specimens fabricated from layers of graphite fibers, wet with epoxy, on aluminum mandrel. Segment ends thickened with interspersed layers of axially oriented fibers to reduce pinhole bearing stresses and local deformations. Segments cured at 390 degrees F (199 degrees C). Report presents results of vibrational tests of one-quarter-scale models of wound-filament pressure vessels.

  1. High-Pressure Burning Rate Studies of Solid Rocket Propellants

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-01-01

    fect of plasticizer, oxidizer particle size, catalyst , and binder type were investigated. 1 INTRODUCTION Increasing performance remains a principal...level of catalyst . Examination of the high -pressure burning of the catalyzed propellants was the intent of examining Propellants W and X; however, it is... HIGH -PRESSURE BURNING RATE STUDIES OF SOLID ROCKET PROPELLANTS A. I. Atwood, K.P. Ford, and C. J. Wheeler Naval Air Warfare Center Weapons Division 1

  2. Pressure denaturation of apomyoglobin: a molecular dynamics simulation study.

    PubMed

    McCarthy, Andrés N; Grigera, J Raúl

    2006-03-01

    The effect of pressure on the structure and mobility of Sperm Wale Apomyoglobin was studied by Molecular Dynamics computer simulation at 1 bar and 3 kbar (1 atm=1.01325 bar=101.325 kPa). The results are in good agreement with the available experimental data, allowing further analysis of other features of the effect of pressure on the protein solution. From the analysis of Secondary Structures (SS) along the trajectories it is observed that alpha-helixes are favoured under pressure at the expense of bends, turns and 3-helixes. The studies of mobility show that although the general mobility is restricted under pressure this is not true for some particular residues. The studies of tertiary structure show important conformational changes. The evolution of the Solvent Accessed Surface (SAS) with pressure shows a notorious increase due almost completely to a biased raise in the hydrophobic area exposed, which consequently shows that the hydrophobic interaction is considerably weaker under high hydrostatic pressure conditions.

  3. Moving, sensing intersectionality: a case study of Miss China Europe.

    PubMed

    Chow, Yiu Fai

    2011-01-01

    Every year, Miss China Europe, a transnational beauty pageant organized for the Chinese diaspora, is held in the Netherlands. The hypervisuality of Chinese diasporic women at the event stands in painful contrast to their everyday invisibility, whether in the Netherlands, China, or elsewhere in the world. Informed by intersectional and transnational feminist scholarship, this empirical study zooms in on one group of women, ethnic Chinese born and/or growing up in the Netherlands, to identify and recuperate their neglected lived experience in a particular historical-cultural context. It takes their own voices as central, hopefully to contribute to their visibility. It aims to provide an understanding of diasporic Chinese women as living in the dynamics not only of their multiple subordinations but also of their subjective consciousness, experienced autonomy, and agency. Drawing insights from the subjective accounts of both contestants and audiences of Miss China Europe, I suggest that one way to foreground marginalized women's agency is to understand their intersectionality in terms of movements and sensory experiences. On the one hand, while the contestants articulated a readiness to perform their modern and yet Chinese selves, they were making movements along two intersecting axes of inequality and power relations - Chineseness and Dutchness - precisely to negotiate their sense of inequality and power relations. On the other hand, among the audiences, two major topics - the blood issue (or whether Chineseness should be defined by ancestry) and the language problem (or whether Chineseness should be defined by the ability to speak Chinese) - were raised regularly, underscoring a complex viewing experience of seeing and hearing, of the tension between visual and audio identifications.

  4. Metallization of Silica Analogue: High pressure study of Barium Iodide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smart, T. J.; Harrison, L. M.; O'Bannon, E. F., III; Stackhouse, S.; Godwal, B. K.; Williams, Q. C.; Jeanloz, R.

    2016-12-01

    In this study we observed the transition from an insulating to metallic bonding type of BaI2. To document the metallization of this compound, we use an absorption edge infrared spectroscopy technique to observe the closure of bandgap with increasing pressure. BaI2 is expected to become fully metallic under 100 GPa, which would be the lowest metallization pressure of the AX2compound group. Band gap measured as a function of pressure will be compared with results from first principles quantum mechanical calculations. The Chemical bonding properties of materials of large Exo-planets are difficult to study directly; the bulk of the rocky material is believed to be siliceous, but the physical properties of silica are not well understood at high pressures and temperatures.Rrecent studies suggest that silica transforms from an insulating to a metallic state at high pressures. With the distinction between a planetary core and its mantle characterized by the type of chemical bonding as well as composition, this change in chemical bonding type is profound in planetary sciences. Although the high-pressure structures of SiO2 are not well known past the stishovite phase, the AX2 analogs like BaI2 have been observed to follow a systematic sequence of high-pressure transformations with a succession of coordination changes. The sequence is well- established up to the cotunnite phase (orthorhombic structure, space group: Pnma), the highest-coordination structure observed in AX2 compounds at ambient pressure (predicted to be acquired in SiO2 by 750 GPa). This makes materials that possess the cotunnite structure, as BaI2 does at ambient conditions useful as structural analogs to silica.

  5. Thomas Paine's "Common Sense": A Study in Polarity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blair, Carole

    Thomas Paine's "Common Sense," published in 1776, was a significant rhetorical event, having a polarizing effect on a situation marked by confusion and conflicting loyalties, in which prevailing views favored reconciliation of the American colonies with England. Paine's rhetoric intensified the conflict, forcing a cognitive restructuring…

  6. Thomas Paine's "Common Sense": A Study in Polarity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blair, Carole

    Thomas Paine's "Common Sense," published in 1776, was a significant rhetorical event, having a polarizing effect on a situation marked by confusion and conflicting loyalties, in which prevailing views favored reconciliation of the American colonies with England. Paine's rhetoric intensified the conflict, forcing a cognitive restructuring…

  7. Field Study for Remote Sensing: An instructor's manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wake, W. H. (Editor); Hull, G. A. (Editor)

    1981-01-01

    The need for and value of field work (surface truthing) in the verification of image identification from high atitude infrared and multispectral space sensor images are discussed in this handbook which presents guidelines for developing instructional and research procedures in remote sensing of the environment.

  8. [Role of pulse pressure, systolic blood pressure, and diastolic blood pressure in the prediction of cardiovascular risk. Cohort study].

    PubMed

    Baena-Díez, José Miguel; Bermúdez-Chillida, Noemí; García-Lareo, Manel; Olivia Byram, Alice; Vidal-Solsona, Marc; Vilató-García, Mónica; Gómez-Fernández, Claudia; Vásquez-Lazo, Javier Ernesto

    2008-03-22

    To analize the role of pulse pressure (PP), systolic (SBP) and diastolic blood pressure (DBP), in the prediction of cardiovascular risk. A prospective cohort study carried out in 2 primary care center, including 932 patients aged between 35-84 years old, without cardiovascular events, selected by simple random sampling, and with an 8 year follow-up. PP, SBP, and DBP were categorized in tertiles, comparing the upper with the 2 lowers. First cardiovascular event, whether fatal or not, such as coronary heart disease, cerebrovascular disease, and peripheral arterial disease was recorded as a composite variable. Results were studied according to Cox models, adjusting for age, sex, smoking, total cholesterol, high density lipoprotein cholesterol, and diabetes mellitus. We studied the correlation between PP with SBP, DBP, and cardiovascular risk factors. We registered 85 cardiovascular events: 43 cases of coronary heart disease, 27 cerebrovascular disease, and 17 peripheral arterial disease. The adjusted hazard ratios for composite variable were: upper PP tertile (>/= 59 mmHg) = 1.3 (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.8-2.1); upper SBP tertile (>/= 140 mmHg) = 1.5 (95% CI, 1.0-2.5); upper DBP tertile (>/= 84 mmHg) = 1.1 (95% CI, 0.7-1.8). Results were similar for specific cardiovascular events. PP was correlated with SBP (r = 0.825; p < 0.001), age (r = 0.422; p < 0.001), diabetes mellitus (r = 0.242; p < 0.001), and smoking (r = -0.158; p = 0.01), with adjusted hazard ratio for these variables of 1.0 (95% CI, 0.6-1.9). PP is an arterial pressure component very correlated with SBP and other factors, but is not a better cardiovascular risk predictor than SBP.

  9. Study on Calculation Model of Culvert Soil Pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jing; Tian, Xiao-yan; Gao, Xiao-mei

    2017-09-01

    Culvert diseases are prevalent in highway engineering. There are many factors involved in the occurrence of the disease, and the problem is complex. However, the design cannot accurately determine the role of the soil pressure on the culvert is the main reason to the disease. Based on the theoretical analysis and field test, this paper studies the characteristics of the stress and deformation of the culvert-soil structure. According to the theory of soil mechanics, the calculation model of vertical soil pressure at the top of culvert is determined, and the formula of vertical soil pressure at the top of culvert is deduced. Through the field test of the vertical soil pressure at the top of culvert of several engineering examples, the calculation formula of this paper is verified, which can provide reference for future practical engineering.

  10. High pressure Mössbauer studies of magnetic Np intermetallics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moser, J.; Gal, J.; Potzel, W.; Wortmann, G.; Kalvius, G. M.; Dunlap, B. D.; Lam, D. J.; Spirlet, J. C.

    1980-10-01

    A high pressure (50 kbar) Mössbauer spectrometer for the 60 keV resonance in 237Np for temperatures between 1.4 and 100 K is described. It was used to study the magnetic properties of some neptunium intermetallics under pressure. For the cubic Laves phase compounds NpOs 2 and NpAl 2 a drastic decrease of the ordering temperature, the hyperfine field, and the isomer shift under increasing pressure was observed. It shows that their magnetic properties are primarily determined by the Np-Np separation which controls the width and hybridization of the 5f band. In contrast, an increase of ordering temperature coupled with a decrease of isomer shift with pressure was found in tetragonal NpCo 2Si 2, while the hyperfine field remains constant. This suggests that its magnetic properties must arise from different sources.

  11. Current status of high conversion pressurized water reactor design studies

    SciTech Connect

    Umeoka, T.; Kono, T.; Toyoda, Y.; Ogino, M.; Iwai, S.; Hishida, H.

    1988-01-01

    Preliminary design studies on high conversion pressurized water reactors (HCPWRs) have been completed, and plant design studies are currently being performed to improve the feasibility of HCPWRs. The present status of the feasibility studies is covered, and the related validation tests to be conducted in the coming years are reviewed.

  12. Studies of the sensing mechanism in the tubuloglomerular feedback pathway.

    PubMed

    Wright, F S; Mandin, H; Persson, A E

    1982-08-01

    Two aspects of the single nephron feedback response previously observed by us have been reexamined. The first, the effect of modifying the composition of fluid used to perfuse the loop of Henle of a single nephron, was studied in rats by comparing flow-induced changes in stop-flow pressure (PSF) with three different perfusion solutions: artificial tubule fluid (ATF); 0.3 M mannitol (M); and mannitol plus 25 to 30 mM sodium chloride (M + E). The second, triggering of the feedback response by injection of ionic current into the distal tubule, was studied in similarly prepared rats by monitoring PSF while passing current. Increasing the rate of loop of Henle perfusion with either ATF or M + E resulted in similar decreases in PSF. In contrast, with M, changes in PSF were usually transient and if persistent were smaller than the changes observed with the other two solutions. When loops of Henle were perfused with ATF at a constant rate, injection of current into the early distal tubule making the lumen more negative resulted in decreases in PSF. Currents of opposite polarity caused no change in PSF if loop flow rate was low; these currents increased PSF if the loop flow rates had previously been high. Current-induced feedback responses were obtained with micropipette electrodes filled with either potassium chloride or lithium acetate. Addition of 10(-4) M furosemide blocked the current-induced feedback responses.

  13. Sense of Place and Health in Hamilton, Ontario: A Case Study.

    PubMed

    Williams, Allison; Kitchen, Peter

    2012-09-01

    The concept of sense of place has received considerable attention by social scientists in recent years. Research has indicated that a person's sense of place is influenced by a number of factors including the built environment, socio-economic status (SES), well-being and health. Relatively few studies have examined sense of place at the neighbourhood level, particularly among communities exhibiting different levels of SES. This article investigates sense of place among three neighbourhood groups in Hamilton, Ontario representing areas of low, mixed and high SES. It analyses data from a 16-point sense of place scale derived from the Hamilton Household Quality of Life Survey carried out in 2010-2011 among 1,002 respondents. The paper found that sense of place was highest among residents of the high SES neighbourhood group as well as among home owners, people residing in single-detached homes, retired residents and those living in their neighbourhood for more than 10 years. From a health perspective, the paper found that a strong association existed between sense of place and self-perceived mental health across the three neighbourhood groups. Furthermore, by way of regression modeling, the paper examined the factors influencing health-related sense of place. Among the sample of respondents, a strong connection was found between housing, particularly home ownership, and high levels of health-related sense of place.

  14. The Rise and Fall of Boot Camps: A Case Study in Common-Sense Corrections

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cullen, Francis T.; Blevins, Kristie R.; Trager, Jennifer S.; Gendreau, Paul

    2005-01-01

    "Common sense" is often used as a powerful rationale for implementing correctional programs that have no basis in criminology and virtually no hope of reducing recidivism. Within this context, we undertake a case study in "common-sense' corrections by showing how the rise of boot camps, although having multiple causes, was ultimately legitimized…

  15. The Rise and Fall of Boot Camps: A Case Study in Common-Sense Corrections

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cullen, Francis T.; Blevins, Kristie R.; Trager, Jennifer S.; Gendreau, Paul

    2005-01-01

    "Common sense" is often used as a powerful rationale for implementing correctional programs that have no basis in criminology and virtually no hope of reducing recidivism. Within this context, we undertake a case study in "common-sense' corrections by showing how the rise of boot camps, although having multiple causes, was ultimately legitimized…

  16. Number Sense in Kindergarten: A Factor-Analytic Study of the Construct

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lago, Rachel M.; DiPerna, James Clyde

    2010-01-01

    Number sense skills provide the foundation for the acquisition of higher order mathematical skills and concepts. However, there is disagreement over the definition of number sense, the specific skills that make up the construct, and the psychometric properties of measures used to assess these skills. In the current study, 10 brief tasks…

  17. Morphology and gas sensing characteristics of density-controlled CuO nanostructures obtained by varying the oxygen partial pressure during growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Dongjin; Jin, Changhyun; Noh, Youngwook; Park, Seokhyun; Choi, Sun-Woo

    2016-07-01

    By exerting different O2 partial pressures (0, 20, 40, and 60 sccm) onto copper substrates, we discovered that the growth parameter, namely, the O2 flow rate, affects the degree of nucleation, diameter, length, and crystalline quality of CuO nanowires (NWs). Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) were used to analyze the evolution of the morphological and the microstructural changes in the CuO nanostructures. The formation of a Cu2O interlayer between the Cu and the CuO layers could be adjusted by controlling more precisely the O2 flow rate. In addition, the reducing (H2S) and the oxidizing (O2, NO2, and SO2) gas sensing performances of these O2-assisted CuO NWs were compared with those of CuO NWs grown in static air. The response to the reducing H2S of the sensors based on CuO NWs grown using O2 at 40 sccm showed a higher electrical change and faster response and recovery times than the sensors based on CuO NWs grown using lower O2 flow rates, including the ones grown in static air and/or used for sensing oxidizing gases (O2, NO2, and SO2) did. On the basis of their growth and their gas-sensing applications, the possible mechanisms characteristic of the density-controlled CuO NWs grown using various O2 partial pressures are discussed.

  18. Monitoring of quorum-sensing molecules during minifermentation studies in wine yeast.

    PubMed

    Zupan, Jure; Avbelj, Martina; Butinar, Bojan; Kosel, Janez; Šergan, Matej; Raspor, Peter

    2013-03-13

    At high cell density or under low nutrient conditions, yeasts collectively adapt their metabolism by secreting aromatic alcohols in what is known as quorum sensing. However, the mechanisms and role of quorum sensing in yeast are poorly understood, and the methodology behind this process is not well established. This paper describes an effective approach to study quorum sensing in yeast fermentations. The separation, detection, and quantification of the putative quorum-sensing molecules 2-phenylethanol, tryptophol, and tyrosol have been optimized on a simple HPLC-based system. With the use of a phenyl HPLC column and a fluorescence detector, the sensitivity of the system was significantly increased. This allowed extraction and concentration procedures to be eliminated and the process to be scaled down to 2 mL minifermentations. Additionally, an innovative method for rapid viable-cell counting is presented. This study forms the basis for detailed studies in kinetics and regulation of quorum sensing in yeast fermentation.

  19. Study of fluid parameters in high pressure descaling valves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adhikari, Param; Panta, Yogendra

    2012-11-01

    Our work is focused on the high pressure valves used for descaling purposes in steel mills. A reverse flow operation was set in one of such valves due to piping constraints. Computational approaches are being utilized to understand the fluid phenomena at such high pressures. Though the valve geometry accounts for the complete fluid flow path, a study has been initiated from an axisymmetric model of the valve core. The highly energized fluid from the descaling pump sets off a static pressure of 5000 psi at the valve inlet. It is responsible for continuous fluid flow rate of up to 208 gpm for fully open position. A Shear Stress Transport turbulence model is utilized to study pressure at nearly closed position of the poppet part while Renormalization Group Turbulence model is compared with Shear Stress Transport turbulence model for full opening position. A very low pressure developed below the poppet seat suggests the onset of cavitation zones which may lead to leakage. A full 3D model is studied after a complete studies of fluid phenomenon in the axisymmetric geometry. Using ANSYS Fluent, a commercial CFD software package, the poppet valve assembly was processed for modeling, meshing and setting up of physical parameters. Computational results show the cavitation intensities higher at small openings than at larger openings which is further verified by literature research and currently comparing with experiments.

  20. Optical spectroscopic studies of heme proteins at high pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Swanson, B.I.; Agnew, S.F.; Ondrias, M.R.; Alden, R.G.

    1986-01-22

    There has been considerable interest in studying the physical and chemical behavior of small molecules at high static pressure by using diamond-anvil cells. In contrast to the relatively rich chemistry now developing on small molecules at high densities, studies of metalloproteins have largely been limited to relatively low pressures (<7 kbar) using UV-vis absorption, magnetic susceptibility, or NMR spectroscopy. Low-pressure studies of a variety of oxidized heme proteins have conclusively shown evidence for spin-state changes for the iron site at pressures above 1 kbar. Optical absorption studies of reduced heme proteins, while not conclusive, have also been interpreted in terms of spin-state changes. Other changes within the heme pocket most notably in the proximal histidine in the ..beta..-chain of Hb via proton NMR, have also been detected. The molecular bases for these changes and the behavior of the heme electronic states at higher pressures, however, remain open questions. In this paper both resonance Raman and absorption spectroscopy are used to address these problems in reduced heme proteins. Resonance Raman scattering is well suited for this application as it provides a structurally specific probe of the heme active site. 11 references, 2 figures.

  1. Early Days of Pressure Denaturation Studies of Proteins.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Keizo

    2015-01-01

    The denaturation of protein by pressure has been generally well known since the findings of the perfect coagulation of egg white by a pressure of 7,000 atm within 30 min by Bridgman (J Biol Chem 19:511-512, 1914), and Kiyama and Yanagimoto (Rev Phys Chem Jpn 21:41-43, 1951) confirmed that the coagulation occurs above 3,880 kg cm(-2). Grant et al. (Science 94:616, 1941) and Suzuki and Kitamura (Abstracts of 30th annual meeting of Japanese Biochemical Society, 1957) found that SH groups are detected at the compressed sample of ovalbumin. On the other hand, Johnson and Campbell (J Cell Comp Physiol 26:43-49, 1945), Tongur (Kolloid Zhur 11:274-279, 1949; Biokhimiya 17:495-503, 1952) and Suzuki et al. (Mem Res Inst Sci Eng Ritsumeikan Univ 3:1-4, 1958) reported that the thermal denaturation of proteins is retarded in a few examples by the low pressure of about 1,000 atm. Before 1960, the studies of denaturation under high pressure were, however, rare and almost qualitative compared with those by heat, acid, urea and so on, so that there was no theory for the influence of hydrostatic pressure on the mechanism of denaturation. Here I review how I started experiments and analysis on pressure denaturation of proteins in early days of 1950s and 1960s in my laboratory and others.

  2. Pressures in Tumuli: A Study of Tumuli Formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hansen, James E.

    2005-01-01

    Tumuli form via localized inflation in surface lava flows. These domed features have widths of 10-20 m, lengths of 10-150 m, and heights of 1-9 m. The axial fracture exposes a brittle crust overlying a ductilely deformed layer. The total crustal thickness is typically less than lm. Tumuli are observed on both terrestrial and martian lava flow surfaces, and provide insight on the flow formation processes and rates. Past studies have estimated the inflation pressure using a bending model for a circular, thin elastic plate, assuming small deflection (Rossi and Gudmundson, 1996). This formulation results in unrealistic pressures for some tumuli. We thus examine alternative models, including those with different shapes, bending of the ductile crust, large deflection, plastic deformation, and thick plate bending. Using the thickness of the ductile crust in the equations for thin, circular plates reduces most pressures to reasonable values. Alternative plate shapes do not cause a significant reduction in inflation pressure. Although the large deflection equations should be applicable based on the plate thickness to tumuli height ratios, they give even less realistic pressures. Tumuli with unrealistic pressures appear to have exceeded the critical bending moment, and have relatively thick crusts, requiring thick plate bending models.

  3. Pressures in Tumuli: A Study of Tumuli Formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hansen, James E.

    2005-01-01

    Tumuli form via localized inflation in surface lava flows. These domed features have widths of 10-20 m, lengths of 10-150 m, and heights of 1-9 m. The axial fracture exposes a brittle crust overlying a ductilely deformed layer. The total crustal thickness is typically less than lm. Tumuli are observed on both terrestrial and martian lava flow surfaces, and provide insight on the flow formation processes and rates. Past studies have estimated the inflation pressure using a bending model for a circular, thin elastic plate, assuming small deflection (Rossi and Gudmundson, 1996). This formulation results in unrealistic pressures for some tumuli. We thus examine alternative models, including those with different shapes, bending of the ductile crust, large deflection, plastic deformation, and thick plate bending. Using the thickness of the ductile crust in the equations for thin, circular plates reduces most pressures to reasonable values. Alternative plate shapes do not cause a significant reduction in inflation pressure. Although the large deflection equations should be applicable based on the plate thickness to tumuli height ratios, they give even less realistic pressures. Tumuli with unrealistic pressures appear to have exceeded the critical bending moment, and have relatively thick crusts, requiring thick plate bending models.

  4. High pressure system for 3-D study of elastic anisotropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lokajicek, T.; Pros, Z.; Klima, K.

    2003-04-01

    New high pressure system was designed for the study of elastic anisotropy of condensed matter under high confining pressure up to 700 MPa. Simultaneously could be measured dynamic and static parameters: a) dynamic parameters by ultrasonic sounding, b) static parameters by measuring of spherical sample deformation. The measurement is carried out on spherical samples diameter 50 +/- 0.01 mm. Higher value of confining pressure was reached due to the new construction of sample positioning unit. The positioning unit is equipped with two Portecap step motors, which are located inside the vessel and make possible to rotate with the sphere and couple of piezoceramic transducers. Sample deformation is measured in the same direction as ultrasonic signal travel time. Only electric leads connects inner part of high pressure vessel with surrounding environment. Experimental set up enables: - simultaneous P-wave ultrasonic sounding, - measurement of current sample deformation at sounding points, - measurement of current value of confining pressure and - measurement of current stress media temperature. Air driven high pressure pump Haskel is used to produce high value of confining pressure up to 700 MPa. Ultrasonic signals are recorded by digital scope Agilent 54562 with sampling frequency 100 MHz. Control and measuring software was developed under Agilent VEE software environment working under MS Win 2000 operating system. Measuring set up was tested by measurement of monomineral spherical samples of quartz and corundum. Both of them have trigonal symmetry. The measurement showed that the P-wave velocity range of quartz was between 5.7-7.0 km/sec. and velocity range of corundum was between 9.7-10.9 km/sec. High pressure resistant LVDT transducers Mesing together with Intronix electronic unit were used to monitor sample deformation. Sample deformation is monitored with the accuracy of 0.1 micron. All test measurements proved the good accuracy of the whole measuring set up. This

  5. Calibration apparatus for recess mounted pressure transducers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marcolini, Michael A.; Miller, William T., Jr.; Baals, Robert A.; Martin, Ruth M.

    1992-04-01

    Measurement of surface pressure fluctuations is important in aerodynamic studies and is conventionally accomplished via thin surface mounted transducers. These transducers contaminate the airflow, leading to the use of transducers located beneath the surface and communicating thereto via a pipette. This solution creates its own problem of transducer calibration due to the structure of the pipette. A calibration apparatus and method for calibrating a pressure transducer are provided. The pressure transducer is located within a test structure having a pipette leading from an outer structure surface to the pressure transducer. The calibration apparatus defines an acoustic cavity. A first end of the acoustic cavity is adapted to fluidly communicate with the pipette leading to the pressure transducer, wherein a channel is formed from the acoustic cavity to the transducer. An acoustic driver is provided for acoustically exciting fluid in the acoustic cavity to generate pressure waves which propagate to the pressure transducer. A pressure sensing microphone is provided for sensing the pressure fluctuations in the cavity near the cavity end, whereby this sensed pressure is compared with a simultaneously pressure sensed by the pressure transducer to permit calibration of the pressure transducer sensings. Novel aspects of the present invention include its use of a calibration apparatus to permit in-situ calibration of recess mounted pressure transducers.

  6. The intraocular pressure response to dehydration: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Hunt, Andrew P; Feigl, Beatrix; Stewart, Ian B

    2012-05-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the intraocular pressure response to differing levels of dehydration. Seven males participated in 90 min of treadmill walking (5 km h(-1) and 1% grade) in both temperate (22 °C) and hot (43 °C) conditions. At baseline and 30 min intervals intraocular pressure, nude body mass, body temperature and heart rate were recorded. Statistically significant interactions (p < 0.05) were observed for intraocular pressure (hot condition: baseline 17.0 ± 2.9, 30 min 15.6 ± 3.5, 60 min 14.5 ± 3.7 and 90 min 13.6 ± 2.9 mmHg; temperate condition: baseline 16.8 ± 2.7, 30 min 16.5 ± 2.6, 60 min 15.8 ± 2.5 and 90 min 15.7 ± 1.8 mmHg) and body mass loss (hot condition: 30 min -1.07 ± 0.35, 60 min -2.17 ± 0.55 and 90 min -3.13 ± 0.74%; temperate condition: 30 min -0.15 ± 0.11, 60 min -0.47 ± 0.18 and 90 min -0.78 ± 0.25%). Significant linear regressions (p < 0.05) were observed for intraocular pressure and body mass loss (adjusted r(2) = 0.24) and intraocular pressure change and body mass loss (adjusted r(2) = 0.51). In conclusion, intraocular pressure was progressively reduced during a period of exercise causing dehydration, but remained relatively stable when hydration was maintained. The present study revealed a moderate relationship between dehydration (body mass loss) and intraocular pressure change.

  7. Remote sensing applications in African agriculture and natural resources: Highlighting and managing the stress of increasing population pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amissah-Arthur, Abigail; Balstad Miller, Roberta

    Given current population trends and projections in sub-Saharan Africa, it is anticipated that substantial intensification of agricultural cropland is certain within the next decades. In the absence of adoption of improved technologies poor rural populations in this region will continue to degrade and mine the natural resources to ensure their survival. All these actions will have far-reaching implications for environmental quality and human health. However, only through the integration of environment and development concerns with greater attention to these link can we achieve the goal of fulfilling the basic needs, improved living standards for all, better protected and managed eco-systems and a safer, more prosperous future. The paper reviews case studies and provides examples of the integration, analysis, and visualization of information from remotely sensed, biophysical and socioeconomic information to assess the present situation hindering agricultural development in sub-Saharan Africa. These studies show the interactions between socio-economic and environmental factors that can help governments and policy-makers assess the scope of the problems, examine alternatives and decide on a course of action. Sound decisions depend on accurate information, yet most African countries face severe competing demands for the financial and human commitments necessary to staff an information system equal to its policy-making requirements. The role of international data centers is reviewed in terms of their abilities to develop and maintain information systems that bring together available accumulated knowledge and data. This permits comparative studies, which make it possible to develop a better understanding of the relationships among demographic dynamics, technology, cultural behavioral norms, and land resources and hence better decision making for sustainable development.

  8. Remote sensing of cloud-top pressure using reflected solar radiation in the oxygen A-band

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, M.-L. C.

    1985-01-01

    An algorithm has been developed for using the reflection of solar radiation in the oxygen A-band to determine cloud-top altitude. Because of multiple scattering and molecular absorption inside the cloud, the reflection of clouds is substantially modified in comparison with a mirror cloud, which is assumed to have a 100 percent reflection. To infer true cloud-top altitude, therefore, it is necessary to accurately estimate the amount of 'photon penetration'. Theoretical calculations indicate that the amount of photon penetration depends on the altitude, the scaled volume scattering coefficient, and the scaled optical thickness of the cloud. Algorithms using the reflection in the oxygen A-band to determine the cloud-top pressure have been applied to an aircraft field experiment in conjunction with CCOPE, 1981. Results of this study are very encouraging, especially for extended clouds.

  9. Dynamic high-pressure studies of an electrothermal capillary

    SciTech Connect

    Benson, D.A.; Cahill, P.A.

    1990-01-01

    This paper describes arc discharge tests conducted in a prepressurized, constant-volume pressure vessel to study arc behavior over a wide range of current densities, discharge durations and initial vessel pressures. This method allows controlled access to a wider range of conditions than those previously studied in capillary tests. We have investigated aspects of the radiative heat transfer by calculating the material opacity and mean free paths of photons for conditions typical of arc diagnostics. We also performed one-dimensional Eulerian hydrodynamic calculations of the boundary layer behavior in the radiative diffusion approximation. These calculations, which describe the radial mass flow and heat transfer in the absence of turbulent flow effects, show the characteristic times for equilibrium of the high-pressure arc. Finally, we describe progress on a promising means for increasing the mass flux from the capillary discharge through the use of chemically reactive media on the capillary walls. 20 refs., 7 figs.

  10. Recent studies on nanosecond-timescale pressurized gas discharges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yatom, S.; Shlapakovski, A.; Beilin, L.; Stambulchik, E.; Tskhai, S.; Krasik, Ya E.

    2016-12-01

    The results of recent experimental and numerical studies of nanosecond high-voltage discharges in pressurized gases are reviewed. The discharges were ignited in a diode filled by different gases within a wide range of pressures by an applied pulsed voltage or by a laser pulse in the gas-filled charged resonant microwave cavity. Fast-framing imaging of light emission, optical emission spectroscopy, x-ray foil spectrometry and coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering were used to study temporal and spatial evolution of the discharge plasma density and temperature, energy distribution function of runaway electrons and dynamics of the electric field in the plasma channel. The results obtained allow a deeper understanding of discharge dynamical properties in the nanosecond timescale, which is important for various applications of these types of discharges in pressurized gases.

  11. Studies of Protein Solution Properties Using Osmotic Pressure Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Agena, S.; Bogle, David; Pusey, Marc; Agena, S.

    1998-01-01

    Examination of the protein crystallization process involves investigation of the liquid and solid state and a protein's properties in these states. Liquid state studies such as protein self association in solution by light scattering methods or other methods have been used to examine a protein Is properties and therefore its crystallization process and conditions. Likewise can osmotic pressure data be used to examine protein properties and various published osmotic pressure studies were examined by us to correlate osmotic pressure to protein solution properties. The solution behavior of serum albumin, alpha - chymotrypsin, beta - lactoglobulin and ovalbumin was examined over a range of temperatures, pH values and different salt types and concentrations. Using virial expansion and a local composition model the non ideal solution behavior in form of the activity coefficients (thermodynamic) was described for the systems. This protein activity coefficient data was related to a protein's solubility behavior and this process and the results will be presented.

  12. Recent studies on nanosecond-timescale pressurized gas discharges

    SciTech Connect

    Yatom, S.; Shlapakovski, A.; Beilin, L.; Stambulchik, E.; Tskhai, S.; Krasik, Ya E.

    2016-10-05

    The results of recent experimental and numerical studies of nanosecond high-voltage discharges in pressurized gases are reviewed. The discharges were ignited in a diode filled by different gases within a wide range of pressures by an applied pulsed voltage or by a laser pulse in the gas-filled charged resonant microwave cavity. Fast-framing imaging of light emission, optical emission spectroscopy, X-ray foil spectrometry and coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering were used to study temporal and spatial evolution of the discharge plasma density and temperature, energy distribution function of runaway electrons and dynamics of the electric field in the plasma channel. The results obtained allow a deeper understanding of discharge dynamical properties in the nanosecond timescale, which is important for various applications of these types of discharges in pressurized gases.

  13. Recent studies on nanosecond-timescale pressurized gas discharges

    DOE PAGES

    Yatom, S.; Shlapakovski, A.; Beilin, L.; ...

    2016-10-05

    The results of recent experimental and numerical studies of nanosecond high-voltage discharges in pressurized gases are reviewed. The discharges were ignited in a diode filled by different gases within a wide range of pressures by an applied pulsed voltage or by a laser pulse in the gas-filled charged resonant microwave cavity. Fast-framing imaging of light emission, optical emission spectroscopy, X-ray foil spectrometry and coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering were used to study temporal and spatial evolution of the discharge plasma density and temperature, energy distribution function of runaway electrons and dynamics of the electric field in the plasma channel. The resultsmore » obtained allow a deeper understanding of discharge dynamical properties in the nanosecond timescale, which is important for various applications of these types of discharges in pressurized gases.« less

  14. Recent studies on nanosecond-timescale pressurized gas discharges

    SciTech Connect

    Yatom, S.; Shlapakovski, A.; Beilin, L.; Stambulchik, E.; Tskhai, S.; Krasik, Ya E.

    2016-10-05

    The results of recent experimental and numerical studies of nanosecond high-voltage discharges in pressurized gases are reviewed. The discharges were ignited in a diode filled by different gases within a wide range of pressures by an applied pulsed voltage or by a laser pulse in the gas-filled charged resonant microwave cavity. Fast-framing imaging of light emission, optical emission spectroscopy, X-ray foil spectrometry and coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering were used to study temporal and spatial evolution of the discharge plasma density and temperature, energy distribution function of runaway electrons and dynamics of the electric field in the plasma channel. The results obtained allow a deeper understanding of discharge dynamical properties in the nanosecond timescale, which is important for various applications of these types of discharges in pressurized gases.

  15. Patellofemoral Contact Pressures After Patellar Distalization: A Biomechanical Study.

    PubMed

    Yang, Justin S; Fulkerson, John P; Obopilwe, Elifho; Voss, Andreas; Divenere, Jessica; Mazzocca, Augustus D; Edgar, Cory M

    2017-08-22

    To measure the patellofemoral contact pressure in early flexion after a tibial tubercle distalization osteotomy. Ten matched-pair fresh-frozen cadaveric knees were studied. The average Blackburne-Peel ratio of the native knees was 0.91. The knees were placed on a testing rig, with a fixed femur and tibia mobile through 90° of flexion. Individual quadriceps heads and the iliotibial band were separated and loaded with 205 N in anatomic directions using a weighted pulley system. A straight tubercle distalization osteotomy of 1 cm was performed and fixed with screws, with and without a lateral release. Patellofemoral contact pressures were measured at 0°, 10°, 20°, 30°, 45°, 60°, and 90° of flexion using pressure-sensitive films on the medial trochlea and lateral trochlea. Contact force, area, and pressure were measured in the following states: (1) in the native knee, (2) after distalization, and (3) after distalization with lateral release. The average Blackburne-Peel ratio after distalization was 0.64. Tibial tubercle distalization resulted in a 6-fold increase in mean contact pressure at 0° (0.15 MPa vs 0.90 MPa, P < .001) and a 55% increase at 10° of flexion (0.70 MPa vs 1.09 MPa, P = .02). Mean contact pressure was similar from 20° to 90° of flexion (P > .1). After distalization, the total contact area was significantly higher at 0° of flexion (17.7 mm(2) vs 58.4 mm(2), P = .02). Lateral release after distalization did not significantly change contact pressure (P > .21). Our results suggest that patella baja, as a result of excessive patellar distalization, can cause increased patellofemoral contact pressures during early flexion at 0° and 10°. No changes were seen in contact pressure from 20° to 90°. Care should be taken to prevent excessive distalization of the patella to avoid patella baja and increased patellofemoral contact pressures during early flexion. Copyright © 2017 Arthroscopy Association of North America. Published by

  16. Study of pore pressure reaction on hydraulic fracturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trimonova, Mariia; Baryshnikov, Nikolay; Turuntaev, Sergey; Zenchenko, Evgeniy; Zenchenko, Petr

    2017-04-01

    We represent the results of the experimental study of the hydraulic fracture propagation influence on the fluid pore pressure. Initial pore pressure was induced by injection and production wells. The experiments were carried out according to scaling analysis based on the radial model of the fracture. All required geomechanical and hydrodynamical properties of a sample were derived from the scaling laws. So, gypsum was chosen as a sample material and vacuum oil as a fracturing fluid. The laboratory setup allows us to investigate the samples of cylindrical shape. It can be considered as an advantage in comparison with standard cubic samples, because we shouldn't consider the stress field inhomogeneity induced by the corners. Moreover, we can set 3D-loading by this setting. Also the sample diameter is big enough (43cm) for placing several wells: the fracturing well in the center and injection and production wells on two opposite sides of the central well. The experiment consisted of several stages: a) applying the horizontal pressure; b) applying the vertical pressure; c) water solution injection in the injection well with a constant pressure; d) the steady state obtaining; e) the oil injection in the central well with a constant rate. The pore pressure was recorded in the 15 points along bottom side of the sample during the whole experiment. We observe the pore pressure change during all the time of the experiment. First, the pore pressure changed due to water injection. Then we began to inject oil in the central well. We compared the obtained experimental data on the pore pressure changes with the solution of the 2D single-phase equation of pore-elasticity, and we found significant difference. The variation of the equation parameters couldn't help to resolve the discrepancy. After the experiment, we found that oil penetrated into the sample before and after the fracture initiation. This fact encouraged us to consider another physical process - the oil

  17. Large Area One-Step Facile Processing of Microstructured Elastomeric Dielectric Film for High Sensitivity and Durable Sensing over Wide Pressure Range.

    PubMed

    Chen, Sujie; Zhuo, Bengang; Guo, Xiaojun

    2016-08-10

    Once the requirement of sensitivity has been met, to enable a flexible pressure sensor technology to be widely adopted as an economic and convenient way for sensing diverse human body motions, critical factors need to be considered including low manufacturing cost, a large pressure detection range, and low power consumption. In this work, a facile approach is developed for one-step processing of a large area microstructured elastomer film with high density microfeatures of air voids, which can be seamlessly integrated into the process flow for fabricating flexible capacitive sensors. The fabricated sensors exhibit fast response and high sensitivity in the low pressure range to be able to detect very weak pressure down to 1 Pa and perform reliable wrist pulse monitoring. Compared to previous work, more advantageous features of this sensor are relatively high sensitivity being maintained in a wide pressure range up to 250 kPa and excellent durability under heavy load larger than 1 MPa, attributed to the formed dense air voids inside the film. A smart insole made with the sensor can accurately monitor the real-time walking or running behaviors and even a small weight change less than 1 kg under a heavy load of a 70 kg adult. For both application examples of wrist pulse monitoring and smart insole, the sensors are operated in a 3.3 V electronic system powered by a Li-ion battery, showing the potential for power-constrained wearable applications.

  18. Remote Sensing Study of The Volga Delta Flooding Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsitsenko, K. V.; Shalygin, A. L.

    The Volga Delta is the lowest part of the Volga basin where the river divides to hun- dreds of branches of different scales, forming a great amount of islands and permanent or temporary lakes. Considerable part of these islands can be covered temporarily by the river water during the spring-flood, or for a long time by the Caspian Sea water during the high Sea level stages. The main part of the Volga runoff losses (in average about 10 km3/year) takes place in the Delta. These losses depend on the proportion of land and water areas, depending in its turn on the Caspian Sea level and on the Volga river flow phase. The rice irrigation, which requires great amounts of water, causes considerable anthropogenic runoff losses in the Delta. Remote sensing study of the Volga Delta was carried out to define the following: - The Sea border of the Delta and its dynamics depending on the Sea level; - Water surface area dynamics in the Delta depending on the Volga hydrological phase and the spring flood volume; - The inter-year and long-term landuse dynamics in the Delta. 13 digital satellite images of the Delta from 1970s - 1990s were used for realization of the study: 3 Landsat-MSS (USA, 4 spectral bands), 4 Landsat-TM (USA, 7 bands) and 6 Resource-01 (Russia, 2-4 bands), chosen on a principle of scope both all amplitude of the Sea level and various phases of the Volga hydrological regime. Classification of the images was car- ried out by means of the GIS-system ILWIS, using both original spectral bands and calculated artificial bands, such as NDVI, SWCI, LWCI, etc. From 4 to 5 bands with the least correlation were used for classification of each image. Analysis of classifica- tion results has shown that water surface in the Delta during low-flow period occupied 5-7% of the area, sharply growing (to 50%) during the spring high water. The area of half-submerged reeds, located along the Sea coast, reduced from 34% in 1970s to 20- 24% in 1980s, and by 1995 the significant part of

  19. Studies of Methane Counterflow Flames at Low Pressures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burrell, Robert Roe

    Methane is the smallest hydrocarbon molecule, the fuel most widely studied in fundamental flame structure studies, and a major component of natural gas. Despite many decades of research into the fundamental chemical kinetics involved in methane oxidation, ongoing advancements in research suggest that more progress can be made. Though practical combustors of industrial and commercial significance operate at high pressures and turbulent flow conditions, fundamental understanding of combustion chemistry in flames is more readily obtained for low pressure and laminar flow conditions. Measurements were performed from 1 to 0.1 atmospheres for premixed methane/air and non-premixed methane-nitrogen/oxygen flames in a counterflow. Comparative modeling with quasi-one-dimensional strained flame codes revealed bias-induced errors in measured velocities up to 8% at 0.1 atmospheres due to tracer particle phase velocity slip in the low density gas reacting flow. To address this, a numerically-assisted correction scheme consisting of direct simulation of the particle phase dynamics in counterflow was implemented. Addition of reactions describing the prompt dissociation of formyl radicals to an otherwise unmodified USC Mech II kinetic model was found to enhance computed flame reactivity and substantially improve the predictive capability of computed results for measurements at the lowest pressures studied. Yet, the same modifications lead to overprediction of flame data at 1 atmosphere where results from the unmodified USC Mech II kinetic mechanism agreed well with ambient pressure flame data. The apparent failure of a single kinetic model to capture pressure dependence in methane flames motivates continued skepticism regarding the current understanding of pressure dependence in kinetic models, even for the simplest fuels.

  20. Neutron scattering studies of ferromagnetic superconductor UGe2 under pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sokolov, D. A.; Huxley, A. D.; Ritz, R.; Pfleiderer, C.; Keller, T.

    2010-03-01

    Observation of an unconventional superconductivity in ferromagnetic UGe2 when ferromagnetism is suppressed by pressure indicates a dramatic modification of its electronic structure near the Quantum Critical Point [1]. We present high resolution measurements of the lattice constants of ferromagnetic superconductor UGe2 under pressure probed by a novel technique, which utilizes Larmor precession of polarized neutrons and surpasses the resolution of conventional scattering methods by an order of magnitude. We have observed sharp anomalies at the Curie temperature, TC and at TX, which marks the crossover regime. Our studies under pressure of 10, and 12 kbar indicate that the sharp anomaly corresponding to TC shifted to lower temperature in agreement with a phase diagram. At the pressure corresponding to an onset of superconductivity, 10kbar, the lattice expansion corresponding to ferromagnetic transition undergoes a first order transition and increases by a factor of 3. The results indicate a complex response of the electronic structure of UGe2 to external pressure and suggest a strong magnetoelastic coupling as one of multiple energy scales that stabilize superconductivity in UGe2. [1] S. S. Saxena, et al., Nature 406, 587 (2000)

  1. High-pressure study of isoviolanthrone by Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Xiao-Miao; Huang, Qiao-Wei; Zhang, Jiang; Zhong, Guo-Hua; Lin, Hai-Qing; Chen, Xiao-Jia

    2014-06-01

    Vibrational properties of isoviolanthrone are investigated by Raman scattering at pressures up to 30.5 GPa and room temperature. A complete characterization of phonon spectra under pressure is given for this material. The onset of a phase transition at 11.0 GPa and the formation of a new phase above 13.8 GPa are identified from both the frequency shifts and the changes in the full width half maxima of the intra- and internal modes. The transition is proposed to result from the changes of intra- and intermolecular bonding. The tendencies of the intensity ratios with pressure are in good agreement with the pressure dependence of the resistance at room temperature, indicating that the phase transition may be an electronic origin. The absence of the changes in the lattice modes indicates that the observed phase transition is probably a result of the structural distortions or reorganizations. The reversible character of the transition upon compression and decompression is determined in the entire pressure region studied.

  2. Plume diagnostics of SRM static firings for pressure perturbation studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sambamurthi, J. K.; Alvarado, Alexis; Mathias, Edward C.

    1995-01-01

    During the shuttle launches, the solid rocket motors (SRM) occasionally experience pressure perturbations (8-13 psi) between 65 and 75 seconds into the motor burn time. The magnitudes of these perturbations are very small in comparison with the operating motor chamber pressure, which is over 600 psi during this time frame. These SRM pressure perturbations are believed to be caused primarily by the expulsion of slag (aluminum oxide). Two SRM static tests, TEM-11 and FSM-4, were instrumented extensive]y for the study of the phenomenon associated with pressure perturbations. The test instrumentation used included nonintrusive optical and infrared diagnostics of the plume, such as high-speed photography, radiometers, and thermal image cameras. Results from all these nonintrusive observations strongly support the scenario that the pressure perturbation event in the shuttle SRM is caused primarily by the expulsion of molten slag. The slag was also expelled preferentially near the bottom of the nozzle due to slag accumulation at the bottom of the aft end of the horizontally oriented motor.

  3. High pressure cosmochemistry applied to major planetary interiors: Experimental studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nicol, M. F.; Johnson, M.; Boone, S.

    1985-01-01

    The measurement of equilibria in binary fluid-solid systems in diamond anvil cells, represents a major advance of the art of high-pressure experimentation. Vibrational spectroscopy, direct visual observations, and X-ray diffraction crystallography of materials confined in externally heated cells are the primary experimental probes being used. Adiabats in these systems are being measured in order to constrain models of heat flow in these bodies and to detect phase transitions by thermal anomalies. Other studies are directed toward interpreting high pressure reactions in these systems that are suggested by shockwave measurements, and developing methods for reaching high temperatures and high pressures of planetary interest in diamond cells. The overall objective of this project is to determine the properties of the H2-He-H2O-HN3-CH4 system and related small-molecule systems that are needed to constrain theoretical models of the interiors of the major planets.

  4. High-pressure studies on heavy fermion systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Chen; Zongfa, Weng; Smidman, Michael; Xin, Lu; Huiqiu, Yuan

    2016-07-01

    In this review article, we give a brief overview of heavy fermions, which are prototype examples of strongly correlated electron systems. We introduce the application of physical pressure in heavy fermion systems to construct their pressure phase diagrams and to study the close relationship between superconductivity (SC) and other electronic instabilities, such as antiferromagnetism (AFM), ferromagnetism (FM), and valence transitions. Field-angle dependent heat capacity and point-contact spectroscopic measurements under pressure are taken as examples to illustrate their ability to investigate novel physical properties of the emergent electronic states. Project supported by the National Basic Research Program of China (Grant No. 2011CBA00103), the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11174245 and 11374257), the Science Challenge Program of China, and the Fundamental Research Funds for the Central Universities of China.

  5. Microscopic pressure-cooker model for studying molecules in confinement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santamaria, Ruben; Adamowicz, Ludwik; Rosas-Acevedo, Hortensia

    2015-04-01

    A model for a system of a finite number of molecules in confinement is presented and expressions for determining the temperature, pressure, and volume of the system are derived. The present model is a generalisation of the Zwanzig-Langevin model because it includes pressure effects in the system. It also has general validity, preserves the ergodic hypothesis, and provides a formal framework for previous studies of hydrogen clusters in confinement. The application of the model is illustrated by an investigation of a set of prebiotic compounds exposed to varying pressure and temperature. The simulations performed within the model involve the use of a combination of molecular dynamics and density functional theory methods implemented on a computer system with a mixed CPU-GPU architecture.

  6. The application of remote sensing techniques to the study of ophiolites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, Shuhab D.; Mahmood, Khalid

    2008-08-01

    Satellite remote sensing methods are a powerful tool for detailed geologic analysis, especially in inaccessible regions of the earth's surface. Short-wave infrared (SWIR) bands are shown to provide spectral information bearing on the lithologic, structural, and geochemical character of rock bodies such as ophiolites, allowing for a more comprehensive assessment of the lithologies present, their stratigraphic relationships, and geochemical character. Most remote sensing data are widely available for little or no cost, along with user-friendly software for non-specialists. In this paper we review common remote sensing systems and methods that allow for the discrimination of solid rock (lithologic) components of ophiolite complexes and their structural relationships. Ophiolites are enigmatic rock bodies which associated with most, if not all, plate collision sutures. Ophiolites are ideal for remote sensing given their widely recognized diversity of lithologic types and structural relationships. Accordingly, as a basis for demonstrating the utility of remote sensing techniques, we briefly review typical ophiolites in the Tethyan tectonic belt. As a case study, we apply integrated remote sensing studies of a well-studied example, the Muslim Bagh ophiolite, located in Balochistan, western Pakistan. On this basis, we attempt to demonstrate how remote sensing data can validate and reconcile existing information obtained from field studies. The lithologic and geochemical diversity of Muslim Bagh are representative of Tethyan ophiolites. Despite it's remote location it has been extensively mapped and characterized by structural and geochemical studies, and is virtually free of vegetative cover. Moreover, integrating the remote sensing data with 'ground truth' information thus offers the potential of an improved template for interpreting remote sensing data sets of other ophiolites for which little or no field information is available.

  7. The Myres Hill remote sensing intercomparison study: preliminary results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clive, P. J. M.; Chindurza, I.; Ravey, I.; Bass, J.; Boyle, R. J.; Jones, P.; Lang, S. J.; Bradley, S.; Hay, L.; Oldroyd, A.; Stickland, M.

    2008-05-01

    Two remote sensing techniques (SODAR and LIDAR) have been developed for measuring wind speed and turbulence from ground level up to altitudes of 300 m or higher. Although originally developed in the defence sector, these techniques are now generating considerable interest in the renewable energy and meteorological sectors. Despite the benefits of these instruments they are not yet generally accepted for due diligence measurements by wind energy developers and financial institutions. There is a requirement for a series of independent assessments of these new metrology techniques, comparing their measurements with the approved cup-type anemometer readings. This is being addressed at TUV NEL's Myres Hill wind turbine test site in a measurement programme supported by the DIUS National Measurement Systems Measurement for Innovators scheme and a consortium of 21 industrial collaborators. Data from SODAR and LIDAR systems are being compared with results from cup-type anemometers mounted at different heights on an 80m meteorological mast. An ultrasonic sensor is also mounted on the mast. The objective of the test programme is to assess the effectiveness of SODAR and LIDAR wind speed measurement techniques under different operating regimes and atmospheric conditions. Results from the measurements will provide definitive data on the performance of the remote wind speed sensing techniques under test on complex terrain typical of many wind farm sites. Preliminary measurements based on data acquired during the initial measurement campaign are presented.

  8. Ethical implications of location and accelerometer measurement in health research studies with mobile sensing devices.

    PubMed

    Fuller, Daniel; Shareck, Martine; Stanley, Kevin

    2017-10-01

    Quantification of individual behaviours using mobile sensing devices, including physical activity and spatial location, is a rapidly growing field in both academic research and the corporate world. In this case study, we summarize the literature examining the ethical aspects of mobile sensing and argue that a robust discussion about the ethical implications of mobile sensing for research purposes has not occurred sufficiently in the literature. Based on our literature summary and guided by basic ethical principles set out in Canadian, US, and International Ethics documents we propose four areas where further discussion should occur: consent, privacy and confidentiality, mitigating risk, and consideration of vulnerable populations. We argue that ongoing consent is crucial for participants to be aware of the precision and volume of data that is collected with mobile sensing devices. Related to privacy we discuss that participants may not agree that anonymized data is sufficient for privacy and confidentiality when mobile sensing data are collected. There has been some discussion about mitigating risk in the literature. We highlight that the researchers' obligations toward mitigating risks that are not directly related to the study purpose are unclear and require considerable discussion. Finally, using mobile sensing devices to study vulnerable populations requires careful consideration, particularly with respect to balancing research needs with participant burden. Based on our discussion, we identify a broad set of unanswered questions about the ethics of mobile sensing that should be addressed by the research community. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Microbial Evolution at High Pressure: Deep Sea and Laboratory Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartlett, D. H.

    2011-12-01

    Elevated hydrostatic pressures are present in deep-sea and deep-Earth environments where this physical parameter has influenced the evolution and characteristics of life. Piezophilic (high-pressure-adapted) microbes have been isolated from diverse deep-sea settings, and would appear likely to occur in deep-subsurface habitats as well. In order to discern the factors enabling life at high pressure my research group has explored these adaptations at various levels, most recently including molecular analyses of deep-sea trench communities, and through the selective evolution of the model microbe Escherichia coli in the laboratory to progressively higher pressures. Much of the field work has focused on the microbes present in the deeper portions of the Puerto Rico Trench (PRT)and in the Peru-Chile Trench (PCT), from 6-8.5 km below the sea surface (~60-85 megapascals pressure). Culture-independent phylogenetic data on the Bacteria and Archaea present on particles or free-living, along with data on the microeukarya present was complemented with genomic analyses and the isolation and characterization of microbes in culture. Metagenomic analyses of the PRT revealed increased genome sizes and an overrepresentation at depth of sulfatases for the breakdown of sulfated polysaccharides and specific categories of transporters, including those associated with the transport of diverse cations or carboxylate ions, or associated with heavy metal resistance. Single-cell genomic studies revealed several linneages which recruited to the PRT metagenome far better than existing marine microbial genome sequences. analyses. Novel high pressure culture approaches have yielded new piezophiles including species preferring very low nutrient levels, those living off of hydrocarbons, and those adapted to various electron donor/electron acceptor combinations. In order to more specifically focus on functions enabling life at increased pressure selective evolution experiments were performed with

  10. Aging study of boiling water reactor high pressure injection systems

    SciTech Connect

    Conley, D.A.; Edson, J.L.; Fineman, C.F.

    1995-03-01

    The purpose of high pressure injection systems is to maintain an adequate coolant level in reactor pressure vessels, so that the fuel cladding temperature does not exceed 1,200{degrees}C (2,200{degrees}F), and to permit plant shutdown during a variety of design basis loss-of-coolant accidents. This report presents the results of a study on aging performed for high pressure injection systems of boiling water reactor plants in the United States. The purpose of the study was to identify and evaluate the effects of aging and the effectiveness of testing and maintenance in detecting and mitigating aging degradation. Guidelines from the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission`s Nuclear Plant Aging Research Program were used in performing the aging study. Review and analysis of the failures reported in databases such as Nuclear Power Experience, Licensee Event Reports, and the Nuclear Plant Reliability Data System, along with plant-specific maintenance records databases, are included in this report to provide the information required to identify aging stressors, failure modes, and failure causes. Several probabilistic risk assessments were reviewed to identify risk-significant components in high pressure injection systems. Testing, maintenance, specific safety issues, and codes and standards are also discussed.

  11. An integrated study of earth resources in the state of California using remote sensing techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    University of California investigations to determine the usefulness of modern remote sensing techniques have concentrated on the water resources of the state. The studies consider in detail the supply, demand, and impact relationships.

  12. NASA ER-2: Flying Laboratory for Earth Science Studies and Remote Sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Navarro, Robert

    2007-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation shows views of the ER-2, NASA's Flying Laboratory for Earth Science Studies and Remote Sensing. The presentation briefly reviews the successes of the ER-2, and what the facility provides.

  13. Smoke Sense Study: A Citizen Science Project Using a Mobile App

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    EPA researchers are planning a citizen science study called Smoke Sense to determine the extent to which exposure to wildland fire smoke affects health and productivity, and to develop health risk communication strategies that protect public health.

  14. Beyond "Perezhivanie," Sense, and Language: An Empirical Study of Early Childhood Teachers' Subjective Senses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Madeira Coelho, Cristina M.

    2016-01-01

    Based on the Theory of Subjectivity in a cultural-historical perspective, this paper presents an empirical study of two infant teachers and their subjective dynamics of being "enchanted" with singular aspects of their professional lives. Through the constructive-interpretative principle driven from the Qualitative Epistemology, the study…

  15. Strength study of carbon dioxide under high pressures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaci, L.; Shieh, S. R.; Kiefer, B.

    2011-12-01

    Carbon dioxide (CO2) is one of the greenhouse gases that can be readily found in the Earth's atmosphere and possibly inside the Earth. The strength and elasticity study of carbon dioxide (CO2) under high pressures is important to understand the rheological behavior of CO2 that may be relevant to the CO2 storage issue within the Earth and also the evolution of other planets. Quantitative measurements of the strength of CO2 were achieved in a diamond anvil cell using x-ray diffraction in a radial geometry. CO2 sample was cryogenically loaded into a beryllium gasket and a thin foil of gold about 20 x 20 um2 was placed at the center of the gasket hole to serve as a pressure standard. The x-ray diffraction data were collected at beamline X17C of National Synchrotron Light Source, Brookhaven National Laboratory. We have determined the strength using three different methods. We analyze the peak broadening measurements in the axial direction, peak shifts in radial direction associated with lattice strains theory and also we measured pressure gradient of the CO2 under stress using ruby florescence method. Our results show that the ratios of differential stress to shear modulus are ranging from 0.006(5) to 0.04(18), exhibiting a positive slope within the applied pressure to 12 GPa. The differential stress was calculated as 0.029(3)-0.224(28) GPa, with the inputs of shear module from theoretical calculations. Our differential stress values are close to those of argon data at low pressures. In addition, our results show no pressure gradient of CO2 below 20 GPa. This fact suggests that up to 20GPa the differential stress supported by CO2 is mainly arising from elastic deformation. This is also supported by the linear positive trend of differential strain demonstrating the elastic regime up to 12 GPa.

  16. New remote sensing techniques facilitate study of earth's far-flung volcanos

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mouginis-Mark, Peter J.; Pieri, David C.

    1990-01-01

    The study of volcanos using remote sensing is discussed. The dynamics of volcanic eruptions and the interactions between volcanos and the atmosphere and ecosphere are examined. Remote sensing equipment can effectively detect mud flows, pyroclastic falls, debris avalanches, lava flows, and hazards to aircraft from eruption plumes. Consideration is given to the use of thermal IR imaging, weather satellites, and polar-orbiting satellites to study such features as lava flow, silica content, and SO2 distribution.

  17. New remote sensing techniques facilitate study of earth's far-flung volcanos

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mouginis-Mark, Peter J.; Pieri, David C.

    1990-01-01

    The study of volcanos using remote sensing is discussed. The dynamics of volcanic eruptions and the interactions between volcanos and the atmosphere and ecosphere are examined. Remote sensing equipment can effectively detect mud flows, pyroclastic falls, debris avalanches, lava flows, and hazards to aircraft from eruption plumes. Consideration is given to the use of thermal IR imaging, weather satellites, and polar-orbiting satellites to study such features as lava flow, silica content, and SO2 distribution.

  18. High-pressure structural study of MnF2

    DOE PAGES

    Stavrou, Elissaios; Yao, Yansun; Goncharov, Alexander F.; ...

    2015-02-01

    In this study, manganese fluoride (MnF2) with the tetragonal rutile-type structure has been studied using a synchrotron angle-dispersive powder x-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy in a diamond anvil cell up to 60 GPa at room temperature combined with first-principles density functional calculations. The experimental data reveal two pressure-induced structural phase transitions with the following sequence: rutile → SrI2 type (3 GPa)→ α–PbCl2 type (13 GPa). Complete structural information, including interatomic distances, has been determined in the case of MnF2 including the exact structure of the debated first high-pressure phase. First-principles density functional calculations confirm this phase transition sequence, and themore » two calculated transition pressures are in excellent agreement with the experiment. Lattice dynamics calculations also reproduce the experimental Raman spectra measured for the ambient and high-pressure phases. The results are discussed in line with the possible practical use of rutile-type fluorides in general and specifically MnF2 as a model compound to reveal the HP structural behavior of rutile-type SiO2 (Stishovite).« less

  19. Remote Sensing Studies of Anorthosite Deposits on the Moon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hawke, B. R.; Taylor, G. J.; Lucey, P. G.; Peterson, C. A.; Blewett, D. T.; Spudis, P. D.

    1995-09-01

    Introduction: In recent years, we have been conducting a variety of remote sensing studies of lunar basin and crater deposits in order to determine the composition of surface units and to investigate the stratigraphy of the lunar crust [1-6]. Special attention has been given to determining the distribution and modes of occurrence of pure anorthosite (plagioclase >90%) in order to answer the critical question of whether or not the lunar crust is enriched in plagioclase. In previous studies, we have utilized telescopic near-infrared spectra to determine the lithology of relatively small areas (2-10 km) of the lunar surface. Now, high resolution multispectral images are available from the Galileo and Clementine missions. We are currently utilizing a variety of techniques to extract compositional information from these new data sets. Chief among these is the production of FeO abundance maps from Clementine and Galileo multispectral images using the method presented by Lucey et al. [7]. Distribution and Modes of Occurrence: Orientale Basin region. With the exception of the Inner Rook massifs, all the highland units associated with the Orientale Basin appear to be composed of either noritic anorthosite or anorthositic norite. Our spectral data indicate that the Inner Rook ring is composed of pure anorthosite [1,2]. Relatively low (<4%) FeO values are exhibited by most portions of this mountain range. Grimaldi Basin region. Spectra obtained for the inner ring of Grimaldi indicate that portions of this ring are composed of pure anorthosite. Low FeO values are also displayed by segments of the inner ring. Other highlands units in the Grimaldi region are composed of more mafic material [2,5]. Humorum Basin region. At least a portion of the inner ring of Humorum is composed of anorthosite [2,6]. However, Galileo and Clementine data demonstrate that the entire ring is not composed of anorthosite, and no anorthosites have yet been identified on the outer Humorum rings. Nectaris

  20. Studying bacterial quorum-sensing at the single cell level

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delfino Perez, Pablo; Pelakh, Leslie; Young, Jonathan; Johnson, Elaine; Hagen, Stephen

    2010-03-01

    Like many bacterial species, Vibrio fischeri can detect its own population density through a quorum sensing (QS) mechanism. The bacterium releases a signal molecule (AI, autoinducer), which accumulates at high population density and triggers a genetic switch. In V.fischeri this leads to bioluminescence. Little is known about how stochastic gene expression affects QS at the level of single cells. We are imaging the luminescence of individual V.fischeri cells in a flow chamber and directly measuring the intercell variability in AI activation of the QS circuit. Our single-cell luminescence experiments allow us to track cells over time and characterize variations in their response to AI levels. We find heterogeneous response to the external signal: at a given AI concentration some cells may be strongly luminescent while others are virtually dark. The analysis of noise in the individual cell response can eventually lead to a better understanding of how cells use QS to gather information about their environment.

  1. Advanced Multispectral Scanner (AMS) study. [aircraft remote sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    The status of aircraft multispectral scanner technology was accessed in order to develop preliminary design specifications for an advanced instrument to be used for remote sensing data collection by aircraft in the 1980 time frame. The system designed provides a no-moving parts multispectral scanning capability through the exploitation of linear array charge coupled device technology and advanced electronic signal processing techniques. Major advantages include: 10:1 V/H rate capability; 120 deg FOV at V/H = 0.25 rad/sec; 1 to 2 rad resolution; high sensitivity; large dynamic range capability; geometric fidelity; roll compensation; modularity; long life; and 24 channel data acquisition capability. The field flattening techniques of the optical design allow wide field view to be achieved at fast f/nos for both the long and short wavelength regions. The digital signal averaging technique permits maximization of signal to noise performance over the entire V/H rate range.

  2. The effects of pressure sensor acoustics on airdata derived from a High-angle-of-attack Flush Airdata Sensing (HI-FADS) system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitmore, Stephen A.; Moes, Timothy R.

    1991-01-01

    The accuracy of a nonintrusive high angle-of-attack flush airdata sensing (HI-FADS) system was verified for quasi-steady flight conditions up to 55 deg angle of attack during the F-18 High Alpha Research Vehicle (HARV) Program. The system is a matrix of nine pressure ports arranged in annular rings on the aircraft nose. The complete airdata set is estimated using nonlinear regression. Satisfactory frequency response was verified to the system Nyquist frequency (12.5 Hz). The effects of acoustical distortions within the individual pressure sensors of the nonintrusive pressure matrix on overall system performance are addressed. To quantify these effects, a frequency-response model describing the dynamics of acoustical distortion is developed and simple design criteria are derived. The model adjusts measured HI-FADS pressure data for the acoustical distortion and quantifies the effects of internal sensor geometries on system performance. Analysis results indicate that sensor frequency response characteristics very greatly with altitude, thus it is difficult to select satisfactory sensor geometry for all altitudes. The solution used presample filtering to eliminate resonance effects, and short pneumatic tubing sections to reduce lag effects. Without presample signal conditioning the system designer must use the pneumatic transmission line to attenuate the resonances and accept the resulting altitude variability.

  3. Recent Advances in Maya Studies Using Remotely Sensed Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sever, Tom; Irwin, Daniel; Arnold, James E. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The Peten region of northern Guatemala is one of the last places on earth where major archeological sites remain to be discovered. It was in this region that the Maya civilization began, flourished, and abruptly disappeared. Remote sensing technology is helping to locate and map ancient Maya sites that are threatened today by accelerating deforestation and looting. Thematic Mapper and IKONOS satellite and airborne Star3i radar data, combined with Global Positioning System (GPS) technology, are successfully detecting ancient Maya features such as cities, roadways, canals, and water reservoirs. Satellite imagery is also being used to map the baJos, which are seasonally flooded swamps that cover over 40% of the land surface. The use of bajos for farming has been a source of debate within the professional community for many years. But the recent detection and verification of cultural features within the bajo system by our research team are providing conclusive evidence that the ancient Maya had adapted well to wetland environments from the earliest times and utilized them until the time of the Maya collapse. The combination of water management and bajo farming is an important resource for the future of the current inhabitants who are experiencing rapid population growth. Remote sensing imagery is also demonstrating that in the Preclassic period (600 BC- AD 250), the Maya had already achieved a high organizational level as evidenced by the construction of massive temples and an elaborate inter-connecting roadway system. Although they experienced several setbacks such as droughts and hurricanes, the Maya nevertheless managed the delicate forest ecosystem successfully for several centuries. However, around AD 800, something happened to the Maya to cause their rapid decline and eventual disappearance from the region. The evidence indicates that at this time there was increased climatic dryness, extensive deforestation, overpopulation, and widespread warfare. This raises a

  4. A study of remote sensing as applied to regional and small watersheds. Volume 1: Summary report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ambaruch, R.

    1974-01-01

    The accuracy of remotely sensed measurements to provide inputs to hydrologic models of watersheds is studied. A series of sensitivity analyses on continuous simulation models of three watersheds determined: (1)Optimal values and permissible tolerances of inputs to achieve accurate simulation of streamflow from the watersheds; (2) Which model inputs can be quantified from remote sensing, directly, indirectly or by inference; and (3) How accurate remotely sensed measurements (from spacecraft or aircraft) must be to provide a basis for quantifying model inputs within permissible tolerances.

  5. Comparative Study for N D-Dimensional Quantum Oscillators with Respect Fractional Derivative Senses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bekhouche, Randa; Meftah, Mohammed Tayeb; Korichi, Zineb

    2017-09-01

    In this paper, we focus our study on some systems in statistical mechanics based on the fractional quantum mechanics. At first, we present the partition function of a system composed of N independent fractional quantum oscillators in D-dimensional space. Secondly, based on the three fractional derivatives senses (Liouville, Reimann-Liouville, and Caputo), we calculate the partition function for each sense and we apply the result to 3-dimensional quantum oscillator. By this application, we have shown that the derivative senses, generally, lead to different partition functions.

  6. A Pressure Sensing System for Heart Rate Monitoring with Polymer-Based Pressure Sensors and an Anti-Interference Post Processing Circuit

    PubMed Central

    Shu, Yi; Li, Cheng; Wang, Zhe; Mi, Wentian; Li, Yuxing; Ren, Tian-Ling

    2015-01-01

    Heart rate measurement is a basic and important issue for either medical diagnosis or daily health monitoring. In this work great efforts have been focused on realizing a portable, comfortable and low cost solution for long-term domestic heart rate monitoring. A tiny but efficient measurement system composed of a polymer-based flexible pressure sensor and an analog anti-interference readout circuit is proposed; manufactured and tested. The proposed polymer-based pressure sensor has a linear response and high sensitivity of 13.4 kPa−1. With the circuit’s outstanding capability in removing interference caused by body movement and the highly sensitive flexible sensor device, comfortable long-term heart rate monitoring becomes more realistic. Comparative tests prove that the proposed system has equivalent capability (accuracy: <3%) in heart rate measurement to the commercial product. PMID:25648708

  7. Intraocular pressure and estimated cerebrospinal fluid pressure. The Beijing Eye Study 2011.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ya Xing; Jonas, Jost B; Wang, Ningli; You, Qi Sheng; Yang, Diya; Xie, Xiao Bin; Xu, Liang

    2014-01-01

    To examine a potential association between intraocular pressure (IOP) and cerebrospinal fluid pressure (CSFP) in a population-based setting. The population-based Beijing Eye Study 2011 included 3468 individuals with a mean age of 64.6±9.8 years (range: 50-93 years). A detailed ophthalmic examination was performed. Based on a previous study with lumbar cerebrospinal fluid pressure (CSFP) measurements, CSFP was calculated as CSFP [mm Hg] = 0.44×Body Mass Index [kg/m2]+0.16×Diastolic Blood Pressure [mm Hg]-0.18×Age [Years]. In multivariate analysis, IOP was associated with higher estimated CSFP (P<0.001; standardized correlation coefficient beta: 0.27; regression coefficient B: 0.20; 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.16, 0.24), after adjusting for thinner central corneal thickness (P<0.001; beta: 0.45; B: 0.04;95%CI: 0.04,0.04), smaller corneal curvature radius (P<0.001; beta:-0.11; B:-1.13;95%CI:-1.61,-0.64), shallower anterior chamber depth (P = 0.01; beta:-0.05; B:-0.33;95%CI:-0.59,-0.08) and longer axial length (P = 0.002; beta: 0.08; B: 0.20;95%CI: 0.08,0.32)), and after adjusting for the systemic parameters of higher pulse rate (P<0.001; beta: 0.08; B: 0.02;95%CI: 0.01,0.03), higher prevalence of arterial hypertension (P = 0.002; beta: 0.06; B: 0.32;95%CI: 0.12,0.53)), frequency of drinking alcohol (P = 0.02; beta: 0.04; B: 0.09;95%CI: 0.01,0.17), higher blood concentration of triglycerides (P = 0.001; beta: 0.06; B: 0.06;95%CI: 0.02,0.10) and cholesterol (P = 0.049; beta: 0.04; B: 0.08;95%CI: 0.00,0.17), and body mass index (P<0.001; beta:-0.13; B:-0.09;95%CI:-0.13,-0.06). In a parallel manner, estimated CSFP (mean: 10.8±3.7 mm Hg) was significantly associated with higher IOP (P<0.001; beta: 0.13; B: 0.18;95%CI: 0.13,0.23) after adjusting for rural region of habitation (P<0.001; beta:-0.37; B:-2.78;95%CI:-3.07,-2.48), higher systolic blood pressure (P<0.001; beta: 0.34; B: 0.06;95%CI: 0.05,0.07), higher pulse rate (P = 0

  8. Combined pressurized air solar heat sensing head assembly and a pressurized water drive system used to move solar energy collectors in tracking the sun

    SciTech Connect

    Wood, K.G.

    1987-03-03

    This patent describes a pressurized water drive system to move a power transmission in one direction or a opposite direction, comprising: (a) two sealed sections of compact, collapsible, flat hose arranged in a line, each section having one end to be joined to an end of the other section, and each section having a second end having an orifice, and each section being arranged in up and down side by side portions for endwise compression of the hose section. The hose section under compression has water contained in the hose section drained out of the end orifice, where the other section is expanded by receiving water under pressure through the other section orifice; (b) a power take off secured to the two sealed sections where they are joined together; (c) a housing within which the two sealed sections expand and contract, having an elongated opening to accommodate the transitory movement of the power take off, and having openings to provide access to the orifices on the two sealed sections; (d) a water control assembly to direct pressurized water alternately to respective orifices of the two sealed sections of one section of the flat hose and thereby expanding the flat hose, moving the power take off in one direction or in the opposite direction by expanding the other section of flat hose; and (e) a power transmission, connected to the power take off, to transmit the motion of the power take off to solar energy collectors in their tracing of the sun.

  9. High-pressure structural study of MnF2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stavrou, Elissaios; Yao, Yansun; Goncharov, Alexander F.; Konôpková, Zuzana; Raptis, Constantine

    2016-02-01

    Manganese fluoride (MnF2) with the tetragonal rutile-type structure has been studied using a synchrotron angle-dispersive powder x-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy in a diamond anvil cell up to 60 GPa at room temperature combined with first-principles density functional calculations. The experimental data reveal two pressure-induced structural phase transitions with the following sequence: rutile → SrI2 type (3 GPa)→ α -PbCl2 type (13 GPa). Complete structural information, including interatomic distances, has been determined in the case of MnF2 including the exact structure of the debated first high-pressure phase. First-principles density functional calculations confirm this phase transition sequence, and the two calculated transition pressures are in excellent agreement with the experiment. Lattice dynamics calculations also reproduce the experimental Raman spectra measured for the ambient and high-pressure phases. The results are discussed in line with the possible practical use of rutile-type fluorides in general and specifically MnF2 as a model compound to reveal the HP structural behavior of rutile-type SiO2 (Stishovite).

  10. Pressure ulcers and lateral rotation beds: a case study.

    PubMed

    Russell, Teresa; Logsdon, Angela

    2003-05-01

    During a 6-month period, the WOC nurses at a 500-bed medical treatment facility noticed the development of nosocomial pressure ulcers on the sacrum, occiput, and heel areas of patients who were placed on lateral rotation specialty beds because they had pulmonary disorders. Measures were taken to address the problem by repositioning the patients and through a staff education program. Repositioning included repositioning the patient's head every 2 hours, thorough skin assessments every 2 hours, and ensuring that the patient's heels were subject to zero pressure. Staff education centered on the importance of using a risk assessment tool (the Braden scale) and understanding the clinical uses for lateral rotation beds. During the subsequent 6 months, the incidence of hospital-acquired pressure ulcers decreased by 52%. Efforts to further decrease the number of pressure ulcers related to the use of lateral rotation beds continue. Issues such as length of stay on the bed and the appropriateness of manufacturer's guidelines still need to be addressed at this facility. This case study highlights the potential issues associated with lateral rotation beds and identifies the need for further research.

  11. High Pressure X-Ray Diffraction Studies of Nanocrystalline Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palosz, B.; Stel'makh, S.; Grzanka, E.; Gierlotka, S.; Palosz, W.

    2004-01-01

    Experimental evidence obtained for a variety of nanocrystalline materials suggest that the crystallographic structure of a very small size particle deviates from that in the bulk crystals. In this paper we show the effect of the surface of nanocrystals on their structure by the analysis of generation and distribution of macro- and micro-strains at high pressures and their dependence on the grain size in nanocrystalline powders of Sic. We studied the structure of Sic nanocrystals by in-situ high-pressure powder diffraction technique using synchrotron and neutron sources and hydrostatic or isostatic pressure conditions. The diffraction measurements were done in HASYLAB at DESY using a Diamond Anvil Cell (DAC) in the energy dispersive geometry in the diffraction vector range up to 3.5 - 4/A and under pressures up to 50 GPa at room temperature. In-situ high pressure neutron diffraction measurements were done at LANSCE in Los Alamos National Laboratory using the HIPD and HIPPO diffractometers with the Paris-Edinburgh and TAP-98 cells, respectively, in the diffraction vector range up to 26 Examination of the response of the material to external stresses requires nonstandard methodology of the materials characterization and description. Although every diffraction pattern contains a complete information on macro- and micro-strains, a high pressure experiment can reveal only those factors which contribute to the characteristic diffraction patterns of the crystalline phases present in the sample. The elastic properties of powders with the grain size from several nm to micrometers were examined using three methodologies: (l), the analysis of positions and widths of individual Bragg reflections (used for calculating macro- and micro-strains generated during densification) [I], (2). the analysis of the dependence of the experimental apparent lattice parameter, alp, on the diffraction vector Q [2], and (3), the atomic Pair Distribution Function (PDF) technique [3]. The results

  12. High pressure dielectric studies on the structural and orientational glass.

    PubMed

    Kaminska, E; Tarnacka, M; Jurkiewicz, K; Kaminski, K; Paluch, M

    2016-02-07

    High pressure dielectric studies on the H-bonded liquid D-glucose and Orientationally Disordered Crystal (ODIC) 1,6-anhydro-D-glucose (levoglucosan) were carried out. It was shown that in both compounds, the structural relaxation is weakly sensitive to compression. It is well reflected in the low pressure coefficient of the glass transition and orientational glass transition temperatures which is equal to 60 K/GPa for both D-glucose and 1,6-anhydro-D-glucose. Although it should be noted that ∂Tg(0)/∂p evaluated for the latter compound seems to be enormously high with respect to other systems forming ODIC phase. We also found that the shape of the α-loss peak stays constant for the given relaxation time independently on the thermodynamic condition. Consequently, the Time Temperature Pressure (TTP) rule is satisfied. This experimental finding seems to be quite intriguing since the TTP rule was shown to work well in the van der Waals liquids, while in the strongly associating compounds, it is very often violated. We have also demonstrated that the sensitivity of the structural relaxation process to the temperature change measured by the steepness index (mp) drops with pressure. Interestingly, this change is much more significant in the case of D-glucose with respect to levoglucosan, where the fragility changes only slightly with compression. Finally, kinetics of ODIC-crystal phase transition was studied at high compression. It is worth mentioning that in the recent paper, Tombari and Johari [J. Chem. Phys. 142, 104501 (2015)] have shown that ODIC phase in 1,6-anhydro-D-glucose is stable in the wide range of temperatures and there is no tendency to form more ordered phase at ambient pressure. On the other hand, our isochronal measurements performed at varying thermodynamic conditions indicated unquestionably that the application of pressure favors solid (ODIC)-solid (crystal) transition in 1,6-anhydro-D-glucose. This result mimics the impact of pressure on the

  13. High Pressure X-Ray Diffraction Studies of Nanocrystalline Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palosz, B.; Stel'makh, S.; Grzanka, E.; Gierlotka, S.; Palosz, W.

    2004-01-01

    Experimental evidence obtained for a variety of nanocrystalline materials suggest that the crystallographic structure of a very small size particle deviates from that in the bulk crystals. In this paper we show the effect of the surface of nanocrystals on their structure by the analysis of generation and distribution of macro- and micro-strains at high pressures and their dependence on the grain size in nanocrystalline powders of Sic. We studied the structure of Sic nanocrystals by in-situ high-pressure powder diffraction technique using synchrotron and neutron sources and hydrostatic or isostatic pressure conditions. The diffraction measurements were done in HASYLAB at DESY using a Diamond Anvil Cell (DAC) in the energy dispersive geometry in the diffraction vector range up to 3.5 - 4/A and under pressures up to 50 GPa at room temperature. In-situ high pressure neutron diffraction measurements were done at LANSCE in Los Alamos National Laboratory using the HIPD and HIPPO diffractometers with the Paris-Edinburgh and TAP-98 cells, respectively, in the diffraction vector range up to 26 Examination of the response of the material to external stresses requires nonstandard methodology of the materials characterization and description. Although every diffraction pattern contains a complete information on macro- and micro-strains, a high pressure experiment can reveal only those factors which contribute to the characteristic diffraction patterns of the crystalline phases present in the sample. The elastic properties of powders with the grain size from several nm to micrometers were examined using three methodologies: (l), the analysis of positions and widths of individual Bragg reflections (used for calculating macro- and micro-strains generated during densification) [I], (2). the analysis of the dependence of the experimental apparent lattice parameter, alp, on the diffraction vector Q [2], and (3), the atomic Pair Distribution Function (PDF) technique [3]. The results

  14. High pressure dielectric studies on the structural and orientational glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaminska, E.; Tarnacka, M.; Jurkiewicz, K.; Kaminski, K.; Paluch, M.

    2016-02-01

    High pressure dielectric studies on the H-bonded liquid d-glucose and Orientationally Disordered Crystal (ODIC) 1,6-anhydro-d-glucose (levoglucosan) were carried out. It was shown that in both compounds, the structural relaxation is weakly sensitive to compression. It is well reflected in the low pressure coefficient of the glass transition and orientational glass transition temperatures which is equal to 60 K/GPa for both d-glucose and 1,6-anhydro-d-glucose. Although it should be noted that ∂ Tg 0 / ∂ p evaluated for the latter compound seems to be enormously high with respect to other systems forming ODIC phase. We also found that the shape of the α-loss peak stays constant for the given relaxation time independently on the thermodynamic condition. Consequently, the Time Temperature Pressure (TTP) rule is satisfied. This experimental finding seems to be quite intriguing since the TTP rule was shown to work well in the van der Waals liquids, while in the strongly associating compounds, it is very often violated. We have also demonstrated that the sensitivity of the structural relaxation process to the temperature change measured by the steepness index (mp) drops with pressure. Interestingly, this change is much more significant in the case of d-glucose with respect to levoglucosan, where the fragility changes only slightly with compression. Finally, kinetics of ODIC-crystal phase transition was studied at high compression. It is worth mentioning that in the recent paper, Tombari and Johari [J. Chem. Phys. 142, 104501 (2015)] have shown that ODIC phase in 1,6-anhydro-d-glucose is stable in the wide range of temperatures and there is no tendency to form more ordered phase at ambient pressure. On the other hand, our isochronal measurements performed at varying thermodynamic conditions indicated unquestionably that the application of pressure favors solid (ODIC)-solid (crystal) transition in 1,6-anhydro-d-glucose. This result mimics the impact of pressure on the

  15. Optimization of sensing and feedback control for vibration/flutter of rotating disk by PZT actuators via air coupled pressure.

    PubMed

    Yan, Tianhong; Xu, Xinsheng; Han, Jianqiang; Lin, Rongming; Ju, Bingfeng; Li, Qing

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, a feedback control mechanism and its optimization for rotating disk vibration/flutter via changes of air-coupled pressure generated using piezoelectric patch actuators are studied. A thin disk rotates in an enclosure, which is equipped with a feedback control loop consisting of a micro-sensor, a signal processor, a power amplifier, and several piezoelectric (PZT) actuator patches distributed on the cover of the enclosure. The actuator patches are mounted on the inner or the outer surfaces of the enclosure to produce necessary control force required through the airflow around the disk. The control mechanism for rotating disk flutter using enclosure surfaces bonded with sensors and piezoelectric actuators is thoroughly studied through analytical simulations. The sensor output is used to determine the amount of input to the actuator for controlling the response of the disk in a closed loop configuration. The dynamic stability of the disk-enclosure system, together with the feedback control loop, is analyzed as a complex eigenvalue problem, which is solved using Galerkin's discretization procedure. The results show that the disk flutter can be reduced effectively with proper configurations of the control gain and the phase shift through the actuations of PZT patches. The effectiveness of different feedback control methods in altering system characteristics and system response has been investigated. The control capability, in terms of control gain, phase shift, and especially the physical configuration of actuator patches, are also evaluated by calculating the complex eigenvalues and the maximum displacement produced by the actuators. To achieve a optimal control performance, sizes, positions and shapes of PZT patches used need to be optimized and such optimization has been achieved through numerical simulations.

  16. Optimization of Sensing and Feedback Control for Vibration/Flutter of Rotating Disk by PZT Actuators via Air Coupled Pressure

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Tianhong; Xu, Xinsheng; Han, Jianqiang; Lin, Rongming; Ju, Bingfeng; Li, Qing

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, a feedback control mechanism and its optimization for rotating disk vibration/flutter via changes of air-coupled pressure generated using piezoelectric patch actuators are studied. A thin disk rotates in an enclosure, which is equipped with a feedback control loop consisting of a micro-sensor, a signal processor, a power amplifier, and several piezoelectric (PZT) actuator patches distributed on the cover of the enclosure. The actuator patches are mounted on the inner or the outer surfaces of the enclosure to produce necessary control force required through the airflow around the disk. The control mechanism for rotating disk flutter using enclosure surfaces bonded with sensors and piezoelectric actuators is thoroughly studied through analytical simulations. The sensor output is used to determine the amount of input to the actuator for controlling the response of the disk in a closed loop configuration. The dynamic stability of the disk-enclosure system, together with the feedback control loop, is analyzed as a complex eigenvalue problem, which is solved using Galerkin’s discretization procedure. The results show that the disk flutter can be reduced effectively with proper configurations of the control gain and the phase shift through the actuations of PZT patches. The effectiveness of different feedback control methods in altering system characteristics and system response has been investigated. The control capability, in terms of control gain, phase shift, and especially the physical configuration of actuator patches, are also evaluated by calculating the complex eigenvalues and the maximum displacement produced by the actuators. To achieve a optimal control performance, sizes, positions and shapes of PZT patches used need to be optimized and such optimization has been achieved through numerical simulations. PMID:22163788

  17. Teams under pressure in the emergency department: an interview study.

    PubMed

    Flowerdew, Lynsey; Brown, Ruth; Russ, Stephanie; Vincent, Charles; Woloshynowych, Maria

    2012-12-01

    To identify key stressors for emergency department (ED) staff, investigate positive and negative behaviours associated with working under pressure and consider interventions that may improve how the ED team functions. This was a qualitative study involving semistructured interviews. Data were collected from staff working in the ED of a London teaching hospital. A purposive sampling method was employed to recruit staff from a variety of grades and included both doctors and nurses. 22 staff members took part in the study. The most frequently mentioned stressors included the '4-hour' target, excess workload, staff shortages and lack of teamwork, both within the ED and with inpatient staff. Leadership and teamwork were found to be mediating factors between objective stress (eg, workload and staffing) and the subjective experience. Participants described the impact of high pressure on communication practices, departmental overview and the management of staff and patients. The study also revealed high levels of misunderstanding between senior and junior staff. Suggested interventions related to leadership and teamwork training, advertising staff breaks, efforts to help staff remain calm under pressure and addressing team motivation. This study highlights the variety of stressors that ED staff are subject to and considers a number of cost-efficient interventions. Medical education needs to expand to include training in leadership and other 'non-technical' skills in addition to traditional clinical skills.

  18. Assessment of the role of remote sensing in the study of inland and coastal waters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Curfman, H. J.; Oberholtzer, J. D.; Schertler, R. J.

    1980-01-01

    Several problems within Great Lakes, coastal, and continental shelf water were selected and organized under the topical headings of Productivity, Sedimentation, Water Dynamics, Eutrophication, and Hazardous Substances. The measurements required in the study of each of the problems were identified. An assessment was made of the present capability and the potential of remote sensing to make these measurements. The relevant remote-sensing technology for each of these classifications was discussed and needed advancements indicated.

  19. Recent Advances in Maya Studies Using Remotely Sensed Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sever, Tom; Irwin, Daniel; Arnold, James E. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The Peten region of northern Guatemala is one of the last places on earth where major archeological sites remain to be discovered. It was in this region that the Maya civilization began, flourished, and abruptly disappeared. Remote sensing technology is helping to locate and map ancient Maya sites that are threatened today by accelerating deforestation and looting. Thematic Mapper and IKONOS satellite and airborne Star3i radar data, combined with Global Positioning System (GPS) technology, are successfully detecting ancient Maya features such as cities, roadways, canals, and water reservoirs. Satellite imagery is also being used to map the bajos, which are seasonally flooded swamps that cover over 40% of the land surface. The use of baJos for farming has been a source of debate within the professional community for many years. But the recent detection and verification of cultural features within the baJo system by our research team are providing conclusive evidence that the ancient Maya had adapted well to wetland environments from the earliest times and utilized them until the time of the Maya collapse. The combination of water management and baJo farming is an important resource for the future of the current inhabitants who are experiencing rapid population growth. Remote sensing imagery is also demonstrating that in the Preclassic period (600 BC- AD 250), the Maya had already achieved a high organizational level as evidenced by the construction of massive temples and an elaborate inter-connecting roadway system. Although they experienced several setbacks such as droughts and hurricanes, the Maya nevertheless managed the delicate forest ecosystem successfully for several centuries. However, around AD 800, something happened to the Maya to cause their rapid decline and eventual disappearance from the region. The evidence indicates that at this time there was increased climatic dryness, extensive deforestation, overpopulation, and widespread warfare. This raises a

  20. Pressurized honeycombs as soft-actuators: a theoretical study

    PubMed Central

    Guiducci, Lorenzo; Fratzl, Peter; Bréchet, Yves J. M.; Dunlop, John W. C.

    2014-01-01

    The seed capsule of Delosperma nakurense is a remarkable example of a natural hygromorph, which unfolds its protecting valves upon wetting to expose its seeds. The beautiful mechanism responsible for this motion is generated by a specialized organ based on an anisotropic cellular tissue filled with a highly swelling material. Inspired by this system, we study the mechanics of a diamond honeycomb internally pressurized by a fluid phase. Numerical homogenization by means of iterative finite-element (FE) simulations is adapted to the case of cellular materials filled with a variable pressure fluid phase. Like its biological counterpart, it is shown that the material architecture controls and guides the otherwise unspecific isotropic expansion of the fluid. Deformations up to twice the original dimensions can be achieved by simply setting the value of input pressure. In turn, these deformations cause a marked change of the honeycomb geometry and hence promote a stiffening of the material along the weak direction. To understand the mechanism further, we also developed a micromechanical model based on the Born model for crystal elasticity to find an explicit relation between honeycomb geometry, swelling eigenstrains and elastic properties. The micromechanical model is in good qualitative agreement with the FE simulations. Moreover, we also provide the force-stroke characteristics of a soft actuator based on the pressurized anisotropic honeycomb and show how the internal pressure has a nonlinear effect which can result in negative values of the in-plane Poisson's ratio. As nature shows in the case of the D. nakurense seed capsule, cellular materials can be used not only as low-weight structural materials, but also as simple but convenient actuating materials. PMID:24966238

  1. Seafloor Pressure Array Studies at Ultra-Low Frequencies

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-01-01

    named the Noise And Coherence Hydrophone and OBS Study ( NACHOS ). Note the relative stability of the microseism peak, both in amplitude and frequency... NACHOS deployment came from two sources; local weather was obtained from bridge observations of the R/P Flip which was drifting in the area above the...Figure 6: The NACHOS instruments that provided data for the analysis. Circles sis weather maps of the represent OBSs and squares are pressure gauges

  2. Data handling and validation from Wisconsin's remote vehicle emissions sensing studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rendahl, Craig S.

    1995-05-01

    The Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources and Department of Transportation (WDOT) are conducting a joint study to determine the effectiveness of applying optical sensing techniques to vehicular emission monitoring. Two field studies using Remote Sensing Technologies, Inc. remote sensing equipment was conducted in 1993 and 1994. This paper describes the data handling and data validation activities of these studies, including identification of data elements. Data handling was performed by the same people who conducted the 180,000 vehicle emissions tests. A contemporary commercial spreadsheet from Borland International, Inc. was used to import the raw data from the remote sensor. The data was reviewed with the spreadsheet then moved into a Borland relational database product. The relational database permitted structured queries against databases of vehicle inspection/maintenance (I/M) data from WDOT, National Insurance Crime Bureau, and EnviroTest. We determined effective cut points for vehicles of different ages which delineated high-polluting vehicles (gross emitters) from vehicles in compliance. The I/M data was also used to intercompare the remote sensing results with traditional testing results. Remote sensing test results were then compared for errors of commission and omission with respect to I/M test. Ultimately, this remote sensing database technique could serve as a means for identifying gross emitters who would be required to visit an I/M facility for an out-of-cycle emissions test.

  3. Distributed sensing of Composite Over-wrapped Pressure Vessel using Fiber-Bragg Gratings at Ambient and Cryogenic Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grant, Joseph

    2005-01-01

    Fiber Bragg gratings are use to monitor the structural properties of composite pressure vessels. These gratings optically inscribed into the core of a single mode fiber are used as a tool to monitor the stress strain relation in laminate structure. The fiber Bragg sensors are both embedded within the composite laminates and bonded to the surface of the vessel with varying orientations with respect to the carbon fiber in the epoxy matrix. The response of these fiber-optic sensors is investigated by pressurizing the cylinder up to its burst pressure of around 2800 psi. This is done at both ambient and cryogenic temperatures using water and liquid nitrogen. The recorded response is compared with the response from conventional strain gauge also present on the vessel. Additionally, several vessels were tested that had been damaged to simulate different type of events, such as cut tow, delimitation and impact damage.

  4. Distributed Sensing of Composite Over-wrapped Pressure Vessel Using Fiber-Bragg Gratings at Ambient and Cryogenic Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grant, Joseph

    2004-01-01

    Fiber Bragg gratings are use to monitor the structural properties of composite pressure vessels. These gratings optically inscribed into the core of a single mode fiber are used as a tool to monitor the stress strain relation in laminate structure. The fiber Bragg sensors are both embedded within the composite laminates and bonded to the surface of the vessel with varying orientations with respect to the carbon fiber in the epoxy matrix. The response of these fiber-optic sensors is investigated by pressurizing the cylinder up to its burst pressure of around 2800 psi. This is done at both ambient and cryogenic temperatures using water and liquid nitrogen. The recorded response is compared with the response from conventional strain gauge also present on the vessel. Additionally, several vessels were tested that had been damaged to simulate different type of events, such as cut tow, delimitation and impact damage.

  5. High Pressure XANES studies on Mn dopeHigh Pressure XANES studies on Mn doped Bi2 Te3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Light, Brian; Kumar, Ravhi; Baker, Jason; Dharmalingam, Prabhakaran; Park, Changyong; Unlv Team; Hpcat; Carnegie Institute Of Washington Collaboration

    Bi2Te3, Bi2Se3, and Sb2Te3 are narrow band-gap semiconductors have been extensively studied along with their alloys due to their promising technological applications as thermoelectric materials. More recently pressure induced superconductivity and structural transition have been observed in these materials around 7 GPa [1, 2]. Here we have performed high pressure x-ray near edge spectroscopy (XANES) measurements at Bi L-III edge on Mn (0.1) doped Bi2Te3 samples to understand the variation of the Bi valence across the pressure induced superconductivity regime. We have inferred notable changes in the Bi valence at high pressure conditions. The results will be discussed in detail. Work at the University of Nevada Las Vegas (ALC) is funded by U.S. Department of Energy Award DE-SC0001928. Portions of this work were performed at HPCAT (Sector 16), Advanced Photon Source (APS), Argonne National Laboratory. HPCAT is supported by DOE-BES, DOE-NNSA, NSF, and the W.M. Keck Foundation. APS is supported by DOE-BES, under Contract No. DE-AC02-06CH1135.

  6. Impulsive pressurization of neuronal cells for traumatic brain injury study.

    PubMed

    Nienaber, Matthew; Lee, Jeong Soon; Feng, Ruqiang; Lim, Jung Yul

    2011-10-12

    A novel impulsive cell pressurization experiment has been developed using a Kolsky bar device to investigate blast-induced traumatic brain injury (TBI). We demonstrate in this video article how blast TBI-relevant impulsive pressurization is applied to the neuronal cells in vitro. This is achieved by using well-controlled pressure pulse created by a specialized Kolsky bar device, with complete pressure history within the cell pressurization chamber recorded. Pressurized neuronal cells are inspected immediately after pressurization, or further incubated to examine the long-term effects of impulsive pressurization on neurite/axonal outgrowth, neuronal gene expression, apoptosis, etc. We observed that impulsive pressurization at about 2 MPa induces distinct neurite loss relative to unpressurized cells. Our technique provides a novel method to investigate the molecular/cellular mechanisms of blast TBI, via impulsive pressurization of brain cells at well-controlled pressure magnitude and duration.

  7. A remote sensing study of Pacific hurricane Ava

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ross, D.; Mcfadden, J.; Au, B.; Brown, W.

    1974-01-01

    Aircraft, Skylab, NOAA-2, ATS-3, and NIMBUS-5 recently obtained a variety of measurements of Pacific hurricane Ava. These measurements are unusually broad in scope and include satellite observed passive microwave emissivities at 13.9 and 19.5 GHz, active microwave scattering cross-sections at 13.9 GHz, and near infrared and visible images. Essentially simultaneous aircraft measurements of wind speed, waves, whitecaps, 1.4 and 13-15 GHz passive microwave emissivities, 1.4 GHz active microwave images, sea surface temperatures, pressure fields, and aerosol size distributions were also obtained. A brief description of sensors and platforms is presented along with some in-depth details of results obtained.

  8. Drinking water fluoride and blood pressure? An environmental study.

    PubMed

    Amini, Hassan; Taghavi Shahri, Seyed Mahmood; Amini, Mohamad; Ramezani Mehrian, Majid; Mokhayeri, Yaser; Yunesian, Masud

    2011-12-01

    The relationship between intakes of fluoride (F) from drinking water and blood pressure has not yet been reported. We examined the relationship of F in ground water resources (GWRs) of Iran with the blood pressure of Iranian population in an ecologic study. The mean F data of the GWRs (as a surrogate for F levels in drinking water) were derived from a previously conducted study. The hypertension prevalence and the mean of systolic and diastolic blood pressures (SBP & DBP) of Iranian population by different provinces and genders were also derived from the provincial report of non-communicable disease risk factor surveillance of Iran. Statistically significant positive correlations were found between the mean concentrations of F in the GWRs and the hypertension prevalence of males (r = 0.48, p = 0.007), females (r = 0.36, p = 0.048), and overall (r = 0.495, p = 0.005). Also, statistically significant positive correlations between the mean concentrations of F in the GWRs and the mean SBP of males (r = 0.431, p = 0.018), and a borderline correlation with females (r = 0.352, p = 0.057) were found. In conclusion, we found the increase of hypertension prevalence and the SBP mean with the increase of F level in the GWRs of Iranian population.

  9. CAVITATION DAMAGE STUDY VIA A NOVEL REPETITIVE PRESSURE PULSE APPROACH

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Jy-An John; Ren, Fei; Wang, Hong

    2010-01-01

    Cavitation damage can significantly affect system performance. Thus, there is great interest in characterizing cavitation damage and improving materials resistance to cavitation damage. In this paper, we present a novel methodology to simulate cavitation environment. A pulsed laser is utilized to induce optical breakdown in the cavitation media, with the emission of shock wave and the generation of bubbles. The pressure waves induced by the optical breakdown fluctuate/propagate within the media, which enables the cavitation to occur and to further develop cavitation damage at the solid boundary. Using the repetitive pulsed-pressure apparatus developed in the current study, cavitation damage in water media was verified on stainless steel and aluminum samples. Characteristic cavitation damages such as pitting and indentation are observed on sample surfaces using scanning electron microscopy.

  10. Numerical study of low pressure nuclear thermal rockets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Suk C.; Stubbs, Robert M.

    1992-01-01

    The flowfields and performance of low pressure nuclear thermal rockets, which use hydrogen as a propellant, are studied by solving the Navier-Stokes equations and the species equations. A finite-rate chemistry model is used in the species equations, and the turbulence is simulated by the Baldwin-Lomax turbulence model with a modified van Driest's damping constant. The calculated results for the chamber temperatures of 3200 K and 4000 K with a chamber pressure range of 0.1 atm to 6 atm are presented as contours, centerline variations, and exit profiles. The performance values from the present calculations, such as the vacuum specific impulse and thrust, are compared with those from the 1D, inviscid equilibrium and frozen flow code.

  11. A miniaturized carbon dioxide gas sensor based on sensing of pH-sensitive hydrogel swelling with a pressure sensor.

    PubMed

    Herber, S; Bomer, J; Olthuis, W; Bergveld, P; van den Berg, A

    2005-09-01

    A measurement concept has been realized for the detection of carbon dioxide, where the CO(2) induced pressure generation by an enclosed pH-sensitive hydrogel is measured with a micro pressure sensor. The application of the sensor is the quantification of the partial pressure of CO(2) (Pco(2)) in the stomach as diagnosis for gastrointestinal ischemia. The principle is put to the proof by examining the sensor response to changes in Pco(2). Furthermore, the response time, temperature-sensitivity and resolution are determined. The sensor responds well to changes in Pco(2) with a maximum pressure generation of 0.29 x 10(5) Pa at 20 kPa CO(2). The 90% response time varies between 1.5 and 4.5 minutes at 37( composite function)C. The sensor shows a linear temperature-sensitivity which can easily be compensated for, and enables detection of Pco(2) changes as small as 0.5 kPa CO(2).

  12. The TRINITY Study: distribution of systolic blood pressure reductions

    PubMed Central

    Sugimoto, Danny H; Chrysant, Steven G; Melino, Michael; Lee, James; Fernandez, Victor; Heyrman, Reinilde

    2013-01-01

    Background Elevated systolic blood pressure is more difficult to control than elevated diastolic blood pressure. The objective of this prespecified analysis of the Triple Therapy with Olmesartan Medoxomil, Amlodipine, and Hydrochlorothiazide in Hypertensive Patients Study (TRINITY) was to compare the efficacy of olmesartan medoxomil (OM) 40 mg, amlodipine besylate (AML) 10 mg, and hydrochlorothiazide (HCTZ) 25 mg triple-combination treatment with the component dual-combination treatments in reducing elevated seated systolic blood pressure (SeSBP). Methods The 12-week TRINITY study randomized participants to either one of the three component dual-combination treatments (OM 40 mg/AML 10 mg, OM 40 mg/HCTZ 25 mg, or AML 10 mg/HCTZ 25 mg) or the triple-combination treatment. The primary outcome of this analysis was the categorical distribution of SeSBP reductions at week 12 from baseline with OM 40 mg/AML 10 mg/HCTZ 25 mg versus the dual-combination treatments. Results SeSBP reductions >50 mmHg were seen in 24.4% of participants receiving triple-combination treatment versus 8.1%–15.8% receiving dual-combination treatment. More participants receiving triple-combination treatment achieved the SeSBP target of <140 mmHg (73.6% versus 51.3%–58.8%; P < 0.001) and the seated blood pressure target of <140/90 mmHg (69.9% versus 41.1%–53.4%; P < 0.001). Prevalence and severity of adverse events were similar in all treatment groups. Conclusion Treatment with OM 40 mg/AML 10 mg/HCTZ 25 mg was well tolerated and more effective in reducing SeSBP than the dual-combination treatments. PMID:23901293

  13. [Experimental study. Reduction of pressure in areas of risk of developing pressure ulcers with a hydrocellular dressing].

    PubMed

    Torra i Bou, J E; Rueda López, J; Ramón Cantón, C

    2000-03-01

    The handling of pressure is a basic measure in the prevention and treatment of bed sores. It is possible to reduce and ease pressure by various means including changes in posture, use of special surfaces for handling pressure as well as the use of local applications or external applications which reduce pressure. Today nurses have a large quantity of external applications available to use although only some hydrocellular ones are capable to reduce pressure due to their hydrocellular structure. An experimental study was designed to calculate the level of pressure before and after applying an Allevyn hydrocellular external application in the area of the sacrum, ischium, and heel of three healthy volunteers; first, Volunteer A, a 85 kg. 170 cm man; second, Volunteer B, a 54.3 kg. 159 cm woman; and third, Volunteer C, a 69.4 kg 164 cm man. Measures were taken on two types of surfaces: a viscoelastic foam mattress and a conventional hospital mattress. All measurements were repeated at 0, 30, 45 and 60 degrees of inclination. Pressure was determined by means of a Talley pressure monitor, Oxford Pressure Monitor MK II. A total of 144 pressure reading were taken. The overall average reduction after applying a external hydrocellular application on all volunteers, at all inclinations and on all surfaces for each of the three zones were 19.5% in the sacrum, 13.8% in the ischium and 20.15% in the heel. Even though our study has its limitations, such as young, healthy volunteers, we can establish that the external hydrocellular application studied does have a local reducing effect on pressure. Since every external hydrocellular application has its own specific structure, the results of our study can not be applied with certainty to other external applications inside the hydrocellular group.

  14. Contribution of parental blood pressures to association between low birth weight and adult high blood pressure: cross sectional study

    PubMed Central

    Walker, Brian R; McConnachie, Alex; Noon, Joseph P; Webb, David J; Watt, Graham C M

    1998-01-01

    Objective: To examine the possibility that low birth weight is a feature of the inherited predisposition to high blood pressure. Design: Cross sectional study. Setting: Primary care medical centre in Edinburgh. Subjects: One offspring of 452 families (231 men and 221 women aged 16-26 years) in whom blood pressure, weight, and height were measured in 1986 and whose parents had blood pressure measured in 1979. Birth weights were obtained from case records (270 offspring) or by questionnaires sent to the mothers (182 offspring). Main outcome measures: Birth weight and adult systolic blood pressure in offspring in relation to parental blood pressure. Results: If parental blood pressures were not considered, a 1 kg decrease in birth weight was associated with a 2.24 mm Hg increase in systolic blood pressure of offspring (P=0.06) after correction for current weight and sex. However, parental blood pressures correlated positively with blood pressure of offspring, and higher maternal blood pressure was associated with lower birth weight (−3.03 g/mm Hg, P<0.01). After correction for parental blood pressures, a 1 kg decrease in birth weight was associated with only a 1.71 mm Hg increase in the systolic blood pressure of the offspring (P=0.15). Conclusions: Low birth weight is a feature of the inherited predisposition to hypertension, perhaps because it is associated with higher maternal blood pressure during pregnancy. Parental blood pressure may be an important confounding factor in the relation between low birth weight and subsequent hypertension. Key messages Hypertension has both inherited and environmental causes The relation between low birth weight and hypertension in later life may result from the mother’s nutritional environment during pregnancy This study found that mothers who have higher blood pressure in later life deliver babies with lower birth weight, who also develop higher blood pressure Hereditary factors therefore explain part of the

  15. High-pressure studies of cycloheptane up to 30 GPa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Chunli; Cui, Qiliang; Liu, Zhenxian

    2013-06-01

    High-pressure synchrotron angle dispersive x-ray diffraction, Raman scattering and infrared absorption studies have been performed on cycloheptane (C7H14) up to 30 GPa at room temperature by using diamond anvil cell techniques. The synchrotron x-ray diffraction results indicate that the liquid cyclopentane undergoes two phase transitions at around 0.5 and 1.0 GPa, respectively. Then, it gradually turns into glass state starting from 3.0 GPa. The features of the Raman scattering and infrared absorption show no significant changes with increasing pressure below 3 GPa. This implies that the two phases observed by the x-ray diffraction can be attributed to plastic phases in which the cycloheptane molecules are held in an ordered structure while the molecular orientation is disordered. Up on further compression, all Raman and infrared bands begin broadening around 3.0 GPa that provide further evidence on the transition to glass state. Our results also suggest different paths on phase transitions under isothermal compression at room temperature compare to that previously reported under isobaric cooling at ambient pressure. This work was supported by the NSF of China (91014004, 11004074,11074089), the specialized Research Fund for the Doctoral Program of Higher Education (20110061110011, 20100061120093), and the National Basic Research Program of China (2011CB808200).

  16. X-ray Diffraction Study of Arsenopyrite at High Pressure

    SciTech Connect

    D Fan; M Ma; W Zhou; S Wei; Z Chen; H Xie

    2011-12-31

    The high-pressure X-ray diffraction study of a natural arsenopyrite was investigated up to 28.2 GPa using in situ angle-dispersive X-ray diffraction and a diamond anvil cell at National Synchrotron Light Source, Brookhaven National Laboratory. The 16:3:1 methanol-ethanol-water mixture was used as a pressure-transmitting medium. Pressures were measured using the ruby-fluorescence method. No phase change has been observed up to 28.2 GPa. The isothermal equation of state (EOS) was determined. The values of K{sub 0}, and K'{sub 0} refined with a third-order Birch-Murnaghan EOS are K{sub 0} = 123(9) GPa, and K'{sub 0} = 5.2(8). Furthermore, we confirm that the linear compressibilities ({beta}) along a, b and c directions of arsenopyrite is elastically isotropic ({beta}{sub a} = 6.82 x 10{sup -4}, {beta}{sub b} = 6.17 x 10{sup -4} and {beta}{sub c} = 6.57 x 10{sup -4} GPa{sup -1}).

  17. X-ray diffraction study of arsenopyrite at high pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, D. W.; Ma, M. N.; Zhou, W. G.; Wei, S. Y.; Chen, Z. Q.; Xie, H. S.

    2011-02-01

    The high-pressure X-ray diffraction study of a natural arsenopyrite was investigated up to 28.2 GPa using in situ angle-dispersive X-ray diffraction and a diamond anvil cell at National Synchrotron Light Source, Brookhaven National Laboratory. The 16:3:1 methanol-ethanol-water mixture was used as a pressure-transmitting medium. Pressures were measured using the ruby-fluorescence method. No phase change has been observed up to 28.2 GPa. The isothermal equation of state (EOS) was determined. The values of K 0, and K' 0 refined with a third-order Birch-Murnaghan EOS are K 0 = 123(9) GPa, and K' 0 = 5.2(8). Furthermore, we confirm that the linear compressibilities (β) along a, b and c directions of arsenopyrite is elastically isotropic (β a = 6.82 × 10-4, β b = 6.17 × 10-4 and β c = 6.57 × 10-4 GPa-1).

  18. A numerical study of high-pressure droplet vaporization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Curtis, E. W.; Farrell, P. V.

    1992-08-01

    The evaporation of single, spherical fuel droplets in a high-pressure, high-temperature environment has been studied numerically. The model is fully transient in both the liquid and the vapor phases. Transport properties are functions of temperature, pressure, and composition, and vary throughout the liquid droplet and the vapor boundary layer. Equilibrium at the liquid-vapor interface is calculated using the Peng-Robinson equation of state, and accounts for diffusion of the gas into the liquid droplet. The Peng-Robinson equation of state is also used to calculate the enthalpy of vaporization of the fuel species as well as the liquid and vapor mixture densities. The proposed model is compared with data obtained for a variety of liquids. Transient effects in both the liquid and vapor phases are found to have a large effect on the droplet heatup and vaporization process. At very high temperature and pressure conditions the droplets were found to reach their thermodynamic critical mixing point in a totally transient process.

  19. 2014 CRL Blood Pressure Study of Life Insurance Applicants.

    PubMed

    Fulks, Michael; Dolan, Vera F; Stout, Robert L

    2015-01-01

    Objective .- Define the relative mortality risk by systolic (SBP) and diastolic blood pressure (DBP) in a relatively healthy cohort split by age and sex with adjustment for smoking status, other findings and admitted heart disease history. Method .- Blood pressure (BP in mm Hg), build, laboratory studies and limited medical history are collected when people apply for individual life insurance. Information on 2,472,706 applicants tested by Clinical Reference Laboratory from 1993 to 2007 was utilized with follow-up for vital status using the September 2011 Social Security Death Master File identifying 31,033 deaths. Data was analyzed by SBP and DBP split by age and sex accounting for smoking and for BMI, urine protein/creatinine ratio and history of heart disease in a Cox multivariate survival analysis. Separate analysis by admitted hypertension history was also conducted. Results are presented by SBP and DBP for 4 age-sex groups with and without added covariates beyond age and smoking status. Results .- Relative mortality progressively increased by SBP level from the 90 to 119 band (down to 80 in younger women) upward with little additional impact by DBP. Addition of covariates beyond age and smoking resulted in a 5% to 10% reduction in relative risk. Although high DBP had limited impact, a pulse pressure/SBP ratio >½ identified 1% of applicants at high mortality risk, with little difference in risk for ratios ≤½. Hypertension history with current BP control was associated with a 10% to 25% increase in relative mortality risk as compared to those with similar BP but no such history. Conclusion .- Increasing SBP is closely associated with increasing relative mortality, starting from the lowest SBP. Increasing DBP has little additional impact, but a pulse pressure/SBP ratio >½ is a potent marker of increased risk as well. Accounting for build and other laboratory findings reduces risk modestly. A history of hypertension with current control increases risk.

  20. An Experimental Study of the Effects of External Physiological Parameters on the Photoplethysmography Signals in the Context of Local Blood Pressure (Hydrostatic Pressure Changes)

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Hongwei; Poeggel, Sven; Newe, Thomas; Lewis, Elfed; Viphavakit, Charusluk; Leen, Gabriel

    2017-01-01

    A comprehensive study of the effect of a wide range of controlled human subject motion on Photoplethysmographic signals is reported. The investigation includes testing of two separate groups of 5 and 18 subjects who were asked to undertake set exercises whilst simultaneously monitoring a wide range of physiological parameters including Breathing Rate, Heart Rate and Localised Blood Pressure using commercial clinical sensing systems. The unique finger mounted PPG probe equipped with miniature three axis accelerometers for undertaking this investigation was a purpose built in-house version which is designed to facilitate reproducible application to a wide range of human subjects and the study of motion. The subjects were required to undertake several motion based exercises including standing, sitting and lying down and transitions between these states. They were also required to undertake set arm movements including arm-swinging and wrist rotation. A comprehensive set of experimental results corresponding to all motion inducing exercises have been recorded and analysed including the baseline (BL) value (DC component) and the amplitude of the oscillation of the PPG. All physiological parameters were also recorded as a simultaneous time varying waveform. The effects of the motion and specifically the localised Blood Pressure (BP) have been studied and related to possible influences of the Autonomic Nervous System (ANS) and hemodynamic pressure variations. It is envisaged that a comprehensive study of the effect of motion and the localised pressure fluctuations will provide valuable information for the future minimisation of motion artefact effect on the PPG signals of this probe and allow the accurate assessment of total haemoglobin concentration which is the primary function of the probe. PMID:28287428

  1. Experimental study on pressure drop of bends in dense phase pneumatic conveying under high pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Gaoyang; Liang, Cai; Chen, Xiaoping; Xu, Pan; Xu, Guiling; Shen, Liu

    2014-04-01

    The transport test using nitrogen as conveying gas are carried out at high operating pressure up to 4MPa in the experimental equipment for dense phase pneumatic conveying. The transport powders in the experiment are anthracite coal and petroleum coke. The pressure drop characteristics in bends are acquired with the different transport powder. The experimental results show that under the similar mass flow, the pressure drop of vertical upward bend is greater than the horizontal bend and the horizontal bend is greater than the vertical downward bend at the same superficial gas velocity, while there is a best superficial gas velocity minimizes the pressure drop of the bend. Under the similar mass flow rate and the similar particle size, the pressure drop of the bend with the petroleum coke is greater than the pressure drop with the anthracite coal as the same superficial gas velocity. According to Barth's additional pressure drop method, the pressure drop fitting formulas of the vertical upward bend, the horizontal bend and the vertical downward bend are obtained, and the predicted results are in accordance with that of the experiments.

  2. Remote sensing of atmospheric pressure and sea state from satellites using short-pulse multicolor laser altimeters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gardner, C. S.; Tsai, B. M.; Abshire, J. B.

    1983-01-01

    Short pulse multicolor laser ranging systems are currently being developed for satellite ranging applications. These systems use Q-switched pulsed lasers and streak tube cameras to provide timing accuracies approaching a few picoseconds. Satellite laser ranging systems was used to evaluate many important geophysical phenomena such as fault motion, polar motion and solid earth tides, by measuring the orbital perturbations of retroreflector equipped satellites. Some existing operational systems provide range resolution approaching a few millimeters. There is currently considerable interest in adapting these highly accurate systems for use as airborne and satellite based altimeters. Potential applications include the measurement of sea state, ground topography and atmospheric pressure. This paper reviews recent progress in the development of multicolor laser altimeters for use in monitoring sea state and atmospheric pressure.

  3. Maternal Blood Pressure During Pregnancy and Early Childhood Blood Pressures in the Offspring: The GUSTO Birth Cohort Study.

    PubMed

    Lim, Wai-Yee; Lee, Yung-Seng; Yap, Fabian Kok-Peng; Aris, Izzudin Mohd; Lek, Ngee; Meaney, Michael; Gluckman, Peter D; Godfrey, Keith M; Kwek, Kenneth; Chong, Yap-Seng; Saw, Seang-Mei; Pan, An

    2015-11-01

    Although epidemiological studies suggest that offspring of women with preeclampsia are at increased risk to higher blood pressures and cardiovascular disease, little is known about the nature of blood pressures between the mother and her offspring. As blood pressures comprise of both pulsatile (systolic blood pressure [SBP] and pulse pressure [PP]) and stable (diastolic blood pressure [DBP]) components, and they differ between central and peripheral sites, we sought to examine maternal peripheral and central blood pressure components in relation to offspring early childhood blood pressures. A prospective birth cohort of 567 Chinese, Malay, and Indian mother-offspring with complete blood pressure information were studied. Maternal brachial artery SBP, DBP, and PP were measured at 26 to 28 weeks gestation; and central SBP and PP were estimated from radial artery waveforms. Offspring brachial artery SBP, DBP, and PP were measured at 3 years of age. Associations between continuous variables of maternal blood pressures (peripheral SBP, DBP, PP, central SBP, and PP) and offspring blood pressures (peripheral SBP, DBP, and PP) were examined using multiple linear regression with adjustment for maternal characteristics (age, education level, parity, smoking status, alcohol consumption and physical activity during pregnancy, and pre-pregnancy BMI) and offspring characteristics (sex, ethnicity, BMI, and height at 3 years of age). In the multivariate models, offspring peripheral SBP increased by 0.08 (95% confidence interval 0.00-0.17, P = 0.06) mmHg with every 1-mmHg increase in maternal central SBP, and offspring peripheral PP increased by 0.10 (0.01-0.18, P = 0.03) mmHg for every 1-mmHg increase in maternal central PP. The relations of maternal-offspring peripheral blood pressures (SBP, DBP, and PP) were positive but not statistically significant, and the corresponding values were 0.05 (-0.03 to 0.13; P = 0.21), 0.03 (-0.04 to 0.10; P = 0.35), and 0.05 (-0

  4. Catalytic gasification studies in a pressurized fluid-bed unit

    SciTech Connect

    Mudge, L.K.; Baker, E.G.; Mitchell, D.H.; Robertus, R.J.; Brown, M.D.

    1983-07-01

    The purpose of the project is to evaluate the technical and economic feasibility of producing specific gas products via the catalytic gasification of biomass. This report presents the results of research conducted from October 1980 to November 1982. In the laboratory scale studis, active catalysts were developed for generation of synthesis gases from wood by steam gasification. A trimetallic catalyst, Ni-Co-Mo on silica-alumina doped with 2 wt % Na, was found to retain activity indefinitely for generation of a methanol synthesis gas from wood at 1380/sup 0/F (750/sup 0/C) and 1 atm (100 kPa) absolute pressure. Catalysts for generation of a methane-rich gas were deactivated rapidly and could not be regenerated as required for economic application. Sodium carbonate and potassium carbonate were effective as catalysts for conversion of wood to synthesis gases and methane-rich gas and should be economically viable. Catalytic gasification conditions were found to be suitable for processing of alternative feedstocks: bagasse, alfalfa, rice hulls, and almond hulls. The PDU was operated successfully at absolute pressures of up to 10 atm (1000 kPa) and temperatures of up to 1380/sup 0/F (750/sup 0/C). Yields of synthesis gases at elevated pressure were greater than those used for previous economic evaluations. A trimetallic catalyst, Ni-Cu-Mo on silica-alumina, did not display a long life as did the doped trimetallic catalyst used in laboratory studies. A computer program for a Radio Shack TRS-80 Model I microcomputer was developed to evaluate rapidly the economics of producing either methane or methanol from wood. The program is based on economic evaluations reported in previous studies. Improved yields from the PDU studies were found to result in a reduction of about 9 cents/gal in methanol cost.

  5. Optical sensing using fiber Bragg gratings for monitoring structural damage in composite over-wrapped pressure vessels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grant, J.

    2005-09-01

    Composite Over-Wrap Vessels are widely used in the aerospace community. They made of thin-walled bottles that are over wrapped with high strength fibers embedded in a matrix material. There is a strong drive to reduce the weight of space borne vehicles and thus pushes designers to adopt COPVs that are over wrapped with graphite fibers embedded in its epoxy matrix. Unfortunately, this same fiber/matrix configuration is more susceptible to impact damage than others and to make matters worse; there is a regime where impacts that damage the over wrap leave no visible scar on the COPV surface. In this paper FBG sensors are presented as a means of monitoring and detecting these types of damage. The FBG sensors are surface mounted to the COPVs and optically interrogated to explore the structural properties of these composite pressure vessels. These gratings optically inscribed into the core of a single mode fiber are used as a tool to monitor the stress strain relation in the composite matrix. The response of these fiber-optic sensors is investigated by pressurizing the cylinder up to its burst pressure of around 4500 psi. A Fiber Optic Demodulation System built by Blue Road Research, is used for interrogation of the Bragg gratings.

  6. Purpose, Policy, and Possibilities: Social Studies Teachers' Sense-Making of Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Root, Debra Ann

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore how high school social studies teachers made sense of curriculum work. The setting was a large, urban area in Texas with high percentages of students who were considered economically disadvantaged. The context of the study was important because these teachers were implementing revised standards and new…

  7. Study on temperature and damage sensing capability of Portland cement paste through the thermoelectric measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, Tsung-Chin; Tai, Ko-Hung; Su, Yu-Min

    2017-04-01

    This study attempted to investigate the self-sensing capability of Portland cement composites in sensing temperature and detecting damages through the measurements of materials' thermoelectric properties. Specimens were made of Ordinary Portland Cement (OPC) with the water to cement ratio of 0.4. Temperature sensing property was characterized at various ages of the specimens from 28 to 49 days and at dried/moisturized conditions. It was found there exists an approximately linear relationship between temperature differences (ΔT) and the measured thermoelectric potentials, which is known as the Seebeck effect. This linearity was observed to be varied but able to be characterized for cement pastes at different ages and water saturation conditions. Mechanical loading that introduced different types and degrees of damages also translated into the variations of thermoelectric properties. Specifically, different types of compressive loads were tested for comparison. The study results have shown that Seebeck coefficient dropped with introduced damages, and restored with the subsequent re-curing as well as the continued cement hydration. Mild and moderate damages can be partially or fully restored, while severe damages that have resulted in significant drop of the Seebeck coefficients would restrain the self-restoration. Determination of the damage threshold was not yet revealed in this study, while it was shown obviously there existed one. Our investigation results indicated that characterizing the self-sensing capability of Portland cement composites is achievable through the measurements of thermoelectric properties. This study, in particular, has showcased the temperature sensing and damage detection capability.

  8. Landfill monitoring using remote sensing: a case study of Glina, Romania.

    PubMed

    Iacoboaea, Cristina; Petrescu, Florian

    2013-10-01

    Landfill monitoring is one of the most important components of waste management. This article presents a case study on landfill monitoring using remote sensing technology. The study area was the Glina landfill, one of the largest municipal waste disposal sites in Romania. The methodology consisted of monitoring the differences of temperature computed for several distinct waste disposal zones with respect to a ground reference area, all of them located within the landfill site. The remote sensing data used were Landsat satellite multi-temporal data. The differences of temperature were computed using Landsat thermal infrared data. The study confirmed the use of multi-temporal Landsat imagery as a complementary data source.

  9. Ultra-Supercritical Pressure CFB Boiler Conceptual Design Study

    SciTech Connect

    Zhen Fan; Steve Goidich; Archie Robertson; Song Wu

    2006-06-30

    Electric utility interest in supercritical pressure steam cycles has revived in the United States after waning in the 1980s. Since supercritical cycles yield higher plant efficiencies than subcritical plants along with a proportional reduction in traditional stack gas pollutants and CO{sub 2} release rates, the interest is to pursue even more advanced steam conditions. The advantages of supercritical (SC) and ultra supercritical (USC) pressure steam conditions have been demonstrated in the high gas temperature, high heat flux environment of large pulverized coal-fired (PC) boilers. Interest in circulating fluidized bed (CFB) combustion, as an alternative to PC combustion, has been steadily increasing. Although CFB boilers as large as 300 MWe are now in operation, they are drum type, subcritical pressure units. With their sizes being much smaller than and their combustion temperatures much lower than those of PC boilers (300 MWe versus 1,000 MWe and 1600 F versus 3500 F), a conceptual design study was conducted herein to investigate the technical feasibility and economics of USC CFB boilers. The conceptual study was conducted at 400 MWe and 800 MWe nominal plant sizes with high sulfur Illinois No. 6 coal used as the fuel. The USC CFB plants had higher heating value efficiencies of 40.6 and 41.3 percent respectively and their CFB boilers, which reflect conventional design practices, can be built without the need for an R&D effort. Assuming construction at a generic Ohio River Valley site with union labor, total plant costs in January 2006 dollars were estimated to be $1,551/kW and $1,244/kW with costs of electricity of $52.21/MWhr and $44.08/MWhr, respectively. Based on the above, this study has shown that large USC CFB boilers are feasible and that they can operate with performance and costs that are competitive with comparable USC PC boilers.

  10. The San Antonio Biethnic Children's Blood Pressure Study: auscultatory findings.

    PubMed

    Menard, S W; Park, M K; Yuan, C H

    1999-01-01

    The purpose of this study were to: (a) examine for possible ethnicity-related and gender-related differences in blood pressure (BP) in Mexican American and non-Hispanic White schoolchildren; (b) compare auscultatory and oscillometric BP levels; and (c) establish auscultatory BP standards using the width of the BP cuff based on the circumference of the arm in schoolchildren in K-12. Participants were 6259 schoolchildren in kindergarten through 12th grade in the San Antonio, Texas, area. Auscultatory and oscillometric BP readings were obtained in random sequence, using BP cuff width 40% to 50% of the circumference of the upper arm. Averages of 3 readings were used for statistical analyses. Auscultatory systolic pressures (SPs) in preadolescent Mexican American boys and girls were higher (1 to 3 mm Hg) auscultatory (SP) than in their White counterparts, but the difference was clinically not important. Diastolic pressures (DP) showed no important differences. Auscultatory SPs in 13- to 18-year-old boys of both ethnic groups were significantly (P < .05) higher (3 to 12 mm Hg) than they were for girls, with no ethnic differences. Oscillometric SP was higher than auscultatory SP in children of all ages studied. Oscillometric (DP) was slightly lower (0 to 5 mm Hg) than was auscultatory K4 and higher (4 to 5 mm Hg) than was auscultatory K5 DP. No important ethnicity-related difference was found for auscultatory BP, but significant gender-related differences (boys greater than girls) were found in SP in subjects ages 13 to 18 years. Differences in BP readings by oscillometric and auscultatory methods do not allow interchange of readings. This study provides, for the first time, auscultatory BP standards using BP cuff width 40% to 50% of the arm circumference.

  11. Intracranial pressure monitoring

    MedlinePlus

    ... head. The monitor senses the pressure inside the skull and sends measurements to a recording device. ... are 3 ways to monitor pressure in the skull (intracranial pressure). INTRAVENTRICULAR CATHETER The intraventricular catheter is ...

  12. Determination of the partial pressure of thallium in high-pressure lamp arcs: A comparative study

    SciTech Connect

    Karabourniotis, D.; Couris, S.; Damelincourt, J.J.; Aubes, M.

    1986-08-01

    The partial pressure of thallium in high-pressure Hg-TlI discharges with different mercury, thallium, and electron pressures has been measured by using the optically thin line Tl 655 nm and the self-reversed line Tl 535 nm. The partial pressure of the arc axis has been measured from the line Tl 655nm. The effective partial pressure has been measured from the self-reversed line Tl 535 nm on the basis of the multiparameter method, and it has been calculated from the known axis pressure of thallium and the calculation of its radial variation by taking into account the chemical reactions. The experimental results confirm the dispersion character of the blue wing of the line Tl 535 nm. The systematic difference obtained between the measured and calculated effective pressure, particularly at the moment of minimum electron density, may be interpreted by deviations from the local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) caused by overpopulation of the upper level of the line Tl 535 nm.

  13. Pseudopotential study of barium chalcogenides under hydrostatic pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benamrani, A.; Kassali, K.; Bouamama, Kh.

    2010-03-01

    We present first-principles calculations within the pseudo-potential plane wave method in the local density approximation (LDA) and the generalised gradient approximation so as to study the structural properties of BaX (X=S, Se and Te) in both NaCl and CsCl structures. The elastic, vibrational properties and lattice dynamics are calculated with the LDA and the density functional perturbation theory. The pressure dependence of the structural, vibrational and lattice dynamics has been investigated by varying the volume. A good agreement is obtained between our calculation and the available experimental and theoretical data.

  14. The major influence of the atmosphere on intracranial pressure: an observational study.

    PubMed

    Herbowski, Leszek

    2017-01-01

    The impact of the atmosphere on human physiology has been studied widely within the last years. In practice, intracranial pressure is a pressure difference between intracranial compartments and the surrounding atmosphere. This means that gauge intracranial pressure uses atmospheric pressure as its zero point, and therefore, this method of pressure measurement excludes the effects of barometric pressure's fluctuation. The comparison of these two physical quantities can only take place through their absolute value relationship. The aim of this study is to investigate the direct effect of barometric pressure on the absolute intracranial pressure homeostasis. A prospective observational cross-sectional open study was conducted in Szczecin, Poland. In 28 neurosurgical patients with suspected normal-pressure hydrocephalus, intracranial intraventricular pressure was monitored in a sitting position. A total of 168 intracranial pressure and atmospheric pressure measurements were performed. Absolute atmospheric pressure was recorded directly. All values of intracranial gauge pressure were converted to absolute pressure (the sum of gauge intracranial pressure and local absolute atmospheric pressure). The average absolute mean intracranial pressure in the patients is 1006.6 hPa (95 % CI 1004.5 to 1008.8 hPa, SEM 1.1), and the mean absolute atmospheric pressure is 1007.9 hPa (95 % CI 1006.3 to 1009.6 hPa, SEM 0.8). The observed association between atmospheric and intracranial pressure is strongly significant (Spearman correlation r = 0.87, p < 0.05) and all the measurements are perfectly reliable (Bland-Altman coefficient is 4.8 %). It appears from this study that changes in absolute intracranial pressure are related to seasonal variation. Absolute intracranial pressure is shown to be impacted positively by atmospheric pressure.

  15. The major influence of the atmosphere on intracranial pressure: an observational study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herbowski, Leszek

    2017-01-01

    The impact of the atmosphere on human physiology has been studied widely within the last years. In practice, intracranial pressure is a pressure difference between intracranial compartments and the surrounding atmosphere. This means that gauge intracranial pressure uses atmospheric pressure as its zero point, and therefore, this method of pressure measurement excludes the effects of barometric pressure's fluctuation. The comparison of these two physical quantities can only take place through their absolute value relationship. The aim of this study is to investigate the direct effect of barometric pressure on the absolute intracranial pressure homeostasis. A prospective observational cross-sectional open study was conducted in Szczecin, Poland. In 28 neurosurgical patients with suspected normal-pressure hydrocephalus, intracranial intraventricular pressure was monitored in a sitting position. A total of 168 intracranial pressure and atmospheric pressure measurements were performed. Absolute atmospheric pressure was recorded directly. All values of intracranial gauge pressure were converted to absolute pressure (the sum of gauge intracranial pressure and local absolute atmospheric pressure). The average absolute mean intracranial pressure in the patients is 1006.6 hPa (95 % CI 1004.5 to 1008.8 hPa, SEM 1.1), and the mean absolute atmospheric pressure is 1007.9 hPa (95 % CI 1006.3 to 1009.6 hPa, SEM 0.8). The observed association between atmospheric and intracranial pressure is strongly significant (Spearman correlation r = 0.87, p < 0.05) and all the measurements are perfectly reliable (Bland-Altman coefficient is 4.8 %). It appears from this study that changes in absolute intracranial pressure are related to seasonal variation. Absolute intracranial pressure is shown to be impacted positively by atmospheric pressure.

  16. High pressure stopped-flow apparatus for the rapid mixing and subsequent study of two fluids under high hydrostatic pressures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karan, Daniel M.; Macey, Robert I.

    1980-08-01

    A stopped-flow apparatus is described for the rapid mixing and subsequent study of two dissimilar fluids under pressures up to 1200 bar. The device consists of two identical pressure chambers which contain the two fluids, a third pressure chamber which contains gas to maintain the pressure in the system, an optical port for photometric observation, and various connections. The device has been used to measure reaction times on the order of a hundred milliseconds to tens of seconds, using a maximum of 2 ml of each reagent per experimental determination. The dead time is found to be 5-25 ms with minium average flow velocities of 2.0 m/s. The construction and operation of the device are described and examples of water transport data in red blood cells and the bromophenolblue indicated chemical reaction of NaHCO3 and HCl under pressure are presented.

  17. Distributed Sensing of Carbon-Epoxy Composites and Filament Wound Pressure Vessels Using Fiber-Bragg Gratings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grant, J.; Kaul, R.; Taylor, S.; Myer, G.; Jackson, K.; Osei, A.; Sharma, A.

    2003-01-01

    Multiple Fiber Bragg-gratings are embedded in carbon-epoxy laminates as well as in composite wound pressure vessel. Structural properties of such composites are investigated. The measurements include stress-strain relation in laminates and Poisson's ratio in several specimens with varying orientation of the optical fiber Bragg-sensor with respect to the carbon fiber in an epoxy matrix. Additionally, fiber Bragg gratings are bonded on the surface of these laminates and cylinders fabricated out of carbon-epoxy composites and multiple points are monitored and compared for strain measurements at several locations.

  18. Distributed Sensing of Carbon-Epoxy Composites and Filament Wound Pressure Vessels Using Fiber-Bragg Gratings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grant, J.; Kaul, R.; Taylor, S.; Myer, G.; Jackson, K.; Osei, A.; Sharma, A.

    2003-01-01

    Multiple Fiber Bragg-gratings are embedded in carbon-epoxy laminates as well as in composite wound pressure vessel. Structural properties of such composites are investigated. The measurements include stress-strain relation in laminates and Poisson's ratio in several specimens with varying orientation of the optical fiber Bragg-sensor with respect to the carbon fiber in an epoxy matrix. Additionally, fiber Bragg gratings are bonded on the surface of these laminates and cylinders fabricated out of carbon-epoxy composites and multiple points are monitored and compared for strain measurements at several locations.

  19. Distributed sensing of carbon-epoxy composites and filament wound pressure vessels using fiber-bragg gratings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grant, Joseph; Kaul, Raj K.; Taylor, Scott L.; Myer, George; Jackson, Kurt V.; Sharma, Anup

    2002-11-01

    Multiple Fiber Bragg-gratings are embedded in carbon-epoxy laminates as well as in composite wound pressure vessel. Structural properties of such composites are investigated. The measurements include stress-strain relation in laminates and Poisson"s ration in several specimens with varying orientation of the optical fiber Bragg-sensor with respect to the carbon fiber in an epoxy matrix. Additionally, fiber Bragg gratings are bonded on the surface of these laminates and cylinders fabricated out of carbon-epoxy composites and multiple points are monitored and compared for strain measurements at several locations.

  20. Effect of water ethanol solvents mixture on textural and gas sensing properties of tin oxide prepared using epoxide-assisted sol-gel process and dried at ambient pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahadik, D. B.; Lee, Yoon Kwang; Park, Chang-Sun; Chung, Hee-Yoon; Hong, Min-Hee; Jung, Hae-Noo-Ree; Han, Wooje; Park, Hyung-Ho

    2015-12-01

    High-surface-area tin oxide aerogels have been synthesized by an ambient-pressure drying method, using a non-alkoxide tin precursor and a hybrid sol-gel technique. The tin precursor was dissolved in different volume ratios of mixed water and ethanol solvents, and gelation was attained by means of an epoxide-initiated gelation process. The solvent in the gel was successively replaced with low-surface-tension solvents, and finally the gels were dried at ambient pressure in an oven. It was observed that solvent combinations significantly altered the textural properties of tin oxide aerogels. The solvent exchange process used prior to ambient-pressure drying helped to minimize impurities originating from the tin precursor. The tin oxide aerogels had the maximum specific surface area of 209 m2/g and small crystallite size (<6.5 nm) after an annealing treatment at 500 °C for 2 h. The sensitivity of a SnO2 sensor to CO gas was found to be strongly affected as the specific surface area of its constituent tin oxide aerogel was increased from 121 m2/g to 209 m2/g. This study offers evidence of the effects of tin oxide aerogel's specific surface area upon its gas sensing performance.

  1. [Preliminary study of colloid osmotic pressure for cardiopulmonary bypass].

    PubMed

    Wang, D; Xiang, L; Luo, J

    1996-12-01

    The ideal colloid osmotic pressure is beneficial to decrease the fluid accumulated in the pulmonary and other tissue during cardiopulmonary bypass. Schupbach reported the proper colloidosmotic pressure for cardiopulmonary bypass was 2.1 kPa (16 mmHg). Colloid osmotic pressures of blood and priming fluid during cardiopulmonary bypass were measured in 28 patients with heart disease by using colloid osmotic pressure detection apparatus. The value of colloid osmotic pressure suitable for the designed standard was apparently different among the Gelofusine group and other groups. P value was 0.005. Priming fluid for cardiopulmonary bypass needs to satisfy the quality and the quantity of colloid osmotic pressure. Using Albumin isn't economical. Whole blood and plazma are not suitable for increasing colloid osmotic pressure. Hydroxyethyl starch or Gelofusine is best choice in priming to get designed standard of colloid osmotic pressure. The ratio of hydroxyethyl starch or Gelofusine in priming fluid should beyond 1/2.

  2. Studies of Alkali Sorption Kinetics for Pressurized Fluidized Bed Combustion by High Pressure Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Wolf, K.J.; Willenborg, W.; Fricke, C.; Prikhodovsky, A.; Hilpert, K.; Singheiser, L.

    2002-09-20

    This work describes the first approach to use High Pressure Mass Spectrometry (HPMS) for the quantification and analysis of alkali species in a gas stream downstream a sorbent bed of different tested alumosilicates.

  3. Compressed-tube pressure cell for optical studies at ocean pressures: Application to glucose mutarotation kinetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamelas, F. J.

    2016-12-01

    A self-contained compressed-tube pressure cell is tested to 25 MPa. The cell is very simple to construct and offers stable pressure control with optical access to fluid samples. The physical path length of light through the cell is large enough to measure optical activity. The entire system is relatively small and portable, and it is vibration-free, since a compressor is not used. Operation of the cell is demonstrated by measuring the mutarotation rate of aqueous glucose solutions at 25 °C. A logarithmic plot of the rate constant vs. pressure yields an activation volume for mutarotation of -22 cm3/mol, approximately twice the value measured previously at higher pressures.

  4. Why surface-truth field study is needed in remote-sensing instruction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wake, W. H.

    1981-01-01

    Especially designed field studies are needed in remote sensing technology transfer courses regardless of the field work provided by the students'/trainees' major disciplines because the remote sensing discipline has unique emphases and needs. Modification of existng schedules to include field work provides the equivalent of extending the duration of the program with the added benefit of enhancing learning achievements per actual program day. The process of surface truth field instruction, levels of student capabilities and stages in the development of surface truth field studies are discussed.

  5. Why surface-truth field study is needed in remote-sensing instruction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wake, W. H.

    1981-01-01

    Especially designed field studies are needed in remote sensing technology transfer courses regardless of the field work provided by the students'/trainees' major disciplines because the remote sensing discipline has unique emphases and needs. Modification of existng schedules to include field work provides the equivalent of extending the duration of the program with the added benefit of enhancing learning achievements per actual program day. The process of surface truth field instruction, levels of student capabilities and stages in the development of surface truth field studies are discussed.

  6. Application of remote sensing to study nearshore circulation. [and the continental shelf

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zeigler, J.; Lobecker, R.; Stauble, D.; Welch, C.; Haas, L.; Fang, C. S.

    1974-01-01

    The research to use remote sensing techniques for studying the continental shelf is reported. The studies reported include: (1) nearshore circulation in the vincinity of a natural tidal inlet; (2) identification of indicators of biological activity; (3) remote navigation system for tracking free drifting buoys; (4) experimental design of an estuaring tidal circulation; and (5) Skylab support work.

  7. Electron-tunneling modulation in percolating network of graphene quantum dots: fabrication, phenomenological understanding, and humidity/pressure sensing applications.

    PubMed

    Sreeprasad, T S; Rodriguez, Alfredo Alexander; Colston, Jonathan; Graham, Augustus; Shishkin, Evgeniy; Pallem, Vasanta; Berry, Vikas

    2013-04-10

    The two-dimensional (2D) electron cloud, flexible carbon-carbon bonds, chemical modifiability, and size-dependent quantum-confinement and capacitance makes graphene nanostructures (GN) a widely tunable material for electronics. Here we report the oxidation-led edge-roughening and cleavage of long graphene nanoribbons (GNRs) (150 nm wide) synthesized via nanotomy (nanoscale cutting) of graphite (with 2 nm edged diamond knife) to produce graphene quantum dots (GQD). These GQDs (~100-200 nm) selectively interfaced with polyelectrolyte microfiber (diameter = 2-20 μm) form an electrically percolating-network exhibiting a characteristic Coulomb blockade signature with a dry tunneling distance of 0.58 nm and conduction activation energy of 3 meV. We implement this construct to demonstrate the functioning of humidity and pressure sensors and outline their governing model. Here, a 0.36 nm decrease in the average tunneling-barrier-width between GQDs (tunneling barrier = 5.11 eV) increases the conductivity of the device by 43-fold. These devices leverage the modulation in electron tunneling distances caused by pressure and humidity induced water transport across the hygroscopic polymer microfiber (Henry's constant = 0.215 Torr(-1)). This is the foremost example of GQD-based electronic sensors. We envision that this polymer-interfaced GQD percolating network will evolve a new class of sensors leveraging the low mass, low capacitance, high conductivity, and high sensitivity of GQD and the interfacial or dielectric properties of the polymer fiber.

  8. Can Remote Sensing Detect Aquifer Characteristics?: A Case Study in the Guarani Aquifer System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richey, A. S.; Thomas, B.; Famiglietti, J. S.

    2013-12-01

    Global water supply resiliency depends on groundwater, especially regions threatened by population growth and climate change. Aquifer characteristics, even as basic as confined versus unconfined, are necessary to prescribe regulations to sustainably manage groundwater supplies. A significant barrier to sustainable groundwater management exists in the difficulties associated with mapping groundwater resources and characteristics at a large spatial scale. This study addresses this challenge by investigating if remote sensing, including with NASA's Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE), can detect and quantify key aquifer parameters and characteristics. We explore this through a case study in the Guarani Aquifer System (GAS) of South America, validating our remote sensing-based findings against the best available regional estimates. The use of remote sensing to advance the understanding of large aquifers is beneficial to sustainable groundwater management, especially in a trans-boundary system, where consistent information exchange can occur within hydrologic boundaries instead of political boundaries.

  9. Calix[4]arene coated QCM sensors for detection of VOC emissions: Methylene chloride sensing studies.

    PubMed

    Temel, Farabi; Tabakci, Mustafa

    2016-06-01

    This paper describes the sensing studies of QCM sensors with coated some calixarene derivatives bearing different functional groups for some selected Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs) such as acetone, acetonitrile, carbon tetrachloride, chloroform, methylene chloride (MC), N,N-dimethylformamide, 1,4-dioxane, ethanol, ethyl acetate, xylene, methanol, n-hexane and toluene. The initial experiments have revealed that whole the calix[4]arene modified QCM sensors exhibited strongest sensing ability to MC emissions. Thus, the detailed studies were performed for only MC emissions after the determination of relatively more effective calix-coated QCM sensors for MC emissions in aqueous media. The results demonstrated that QCM sensor coated with calix-7 bearing both amino and imidazole groups was most useful sensor for MC emissions with 54.1ppm of detection limit. Moreover, it was understood that cyclic structures, H-bonding capabilities and also good preorganization properties of calixarene derivatives played an important role in VOC sensing processes.

  10. A tactile vision substitution system for the study of active sensing.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Brian; Hsieh, Cheng-Han; Yu, Sung-Nien; Ahissar, Ehud; Arieli, Amos; Zilbershtain-Kra, Yael

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents a tactile vision substitution system (TVSS) for the study of active sensing. Two algorithms, namely image processing and trajectory tracking, were developed to enhance the capability of conventional TVSS. Image processing techniques were applied to reduce the artifacts and extract important features from the active camera and effectively converted the information into tactile stimuli with much lower resolution. A fixed camera was used to record the movement of the active camera. A trajectory tracking algorithm was developed to analyze the active sensing strategy of the TVSS users to explore the environment. The image processing subsystem showed advantageous improvement in extracting object's features for superior recognition. The trajectory tracking subsystem, on the other hand, enabled accurately locating the portion of the scene pointed by the active camera and providing profound information for the study of active sensing strategy applied by TVSS users.

  11. High pressure studies on nanometer sized clusters: Structural, optical, and cooperative properties

    SciTech Connect

    Tolbert, Sarah Helen

    1995-05-01

    High-pressure Se EXAFS is used to study pressure-induced structural transformations in CdSe nanocrystals. The transformation is wurtzite to rock salt, at a pressure much higher than in bulk. High-pressure XRD is used to confirm the EXAFS results. Diffraction peak widths indicate that nanocrystals do not fragment upon transformation. Optical absorption correlates with structural transformations and is used to measure transition pressures; transformation pressure increases smoothly as nanocrystal size decreases. Thermodynamics of transformation is modeled using an elevated surface energy in the high-pressure phase. High-pressure study of Si nanocrystals show large increases in transformation pressure in crystallites to 500{angstrom} diameter, and an overall change in crystallite shape upon transformation is seen from XRD line widths. C{sub 60} single crystals were studied using Raman scattering; results provide information about the clusters` rotational state. Optical properties of high-pressure phase CdSe clusters were studied.

  12. Does the position or contact pressure of the stethoscope make any difference to clinical blood pressure measurements: an observational study.

    PubMed

    Pan, Fan; Zheng, Dingchang; He, Peiyu; Murray, Alan

    2014-12-01

    This study aimed to investigate the effect of stethoscope position and contact pressure on auscultatory blood pressure (BP) measurement. Thirty healthy subjects were studied. Two identical stethoscopes (one under the cuff, the other outside the cuff) were used to simultaneously and digitally record 2 channels of Korotkoff sounds during linear cuff pressure deflation. For each subject, 3 measurements with different contact pressures (0, 50, and 100 mm Hg) on the stethoscope outside the cuff were each recorded at 3 repeat sessions. The Korotkoff sounds were replayed twice on separate days to each of 2 experienced listeners to determine systolic and diastolic BPs (SBP and DBP). Variance analysis was performed to study the measurement repeatability and the effect of stethoscope position and contact pressure on BPs. There was no significant BP difference between the 3 repeat sessions, between the 2 determinations from each listener, between the 2 listeners and between the 3 stethoscope contact pressures (all P > 0.06). There was no significant SBP difference between the 2 stethoscope positions at the 2 lower stethoscope pressures (P = 0.23 and 0.45), but there was a small (0.4 mm Hg, clinically unimportant) significant difference (P = 0.005) at the highest stethoscope pressure. The key result was that, DBP from the stethoscope under the cuff was significantly lower than that from outside the cuff by 2.8 mm Hg (P < 0.001, 95% confidence interval -3.5 to -2.1 mm Hg). Since it is known that the traditional Korotkoff sound method, with the stethoscope outside the cuff, tends to give a higher DBP than the true intra-arterial pressure, this study could suggest that the stethoscope position under the cuff, and closer to the arterial occlusion, might yield measurements closer to the actual invasive DBP.

  13. Application of remote sensing technology in the study of vegetation: Example of vegetation of zhejiang province in China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    CHU, MengRu

    2015-04-01

    Application of remote sensing technology in the study of vegetation: Example of vegetation of zhejiang province in China Remote sensing technology , is one of the pillars of the space information technology in the 21st century ,play an important role in the study of vegetation. Vegetation coverage as an important parameter reflecting surface information, has been an important research topic in the field of vegetation remote sensing. Administrative region in zhejiang Province as the study area, use of microwave remote sensing and hyperspectral remote sensing technology, combined with the related data, to survey the area of forest resources in zhejiang Province, establishes an index system of sustainable forest resources management ability in zhejiang, and to evaluate its ability. Remote Sensing is developed in the 1960 s of the earth observation technology, comprehensive instruments refers to the application, not contact with the object detection phase, the target characteristics of electromagnetic waves recorded from a distance, through the analysis, reveals the characteristics of the object properties and changes of comprehensive detection technology. Investigation of vegetation is an important application field of remote sensing investigation. Vegetation is an important factor of environment, and also is one of the best sign to reflect the regional ecological environment, at the same times is the interpretation of soil, hydrological elements such as logo, individual or prospecting indicator plant. Vegetation imaging and interpretation of research results for environmental monitoring, biodiversity conservation, agriculture, forestry and other relevant departments to provide information services.Microwave remote sensing hyperspectral remote sensing technology and application in the research of vegetation is an important direction of remote sensing technology in the future. This paper introduces the principle of microwave remote sensing and hyperspectral remote

  14. Sense and readability: participant information sheets for research studies.

    PubMed

    Ennis, Liam; Wykes, Til

    2016-02-01

    Informed consent in research is partly achieved through the use of information sheets. There is a perception however that these information sheets are long and complex. The recommended reading level for patient information is grade 6, or 11-12 years old. To investigate whether the readability of participant information sheets has changed over time, whether particular study characteristics are related to poorer readability and whether readability and other study characteristics are related to successful study recruitment. Method: We obtained 522 information sheets from the UK National Institute for Health Research Clinical Research Network: Mental Health portfolio database and study principal investigators. Readability was assessed with the Flesch reading index and the Grade level test. Information sheets increased in length over the study period. The mean grade level across all information sheets was 9.8, or 15-16 years old. A high level of patient involvement was associated with more recruitment success and studies involving pharmaceutical or device interventions were the least successful. The complexity of information sheets had little bearing on successful recruitment. Information sheets are far more complex than the recommended reading level of grade 6 for patient information. The disparity may be exacerbated by an increasing focus on legal content. Researchers would benefit from clear guidance from ethics committees on writing succinctly and accessibly and how to balance the competing legal issues with the ability of participants to understand what a study entails. © The Royal College of Psychiatrists 2016.

  15. Sense and readability: participant information sheets for research studies

    PubMed Central

    Ennis, Liam; Wykes, Til

    2016-01-01

    Background Informed consent in research is partly achieved through the use of information sheets. There is a perception however that these information sheets are long and complex. The recommended reading level for patient information is grade 6, or 11–12 years old. Aims To investigate whether the readability of participant information sheets has changed over time, whether particular study characteristics are related to poorer readability and whether readability and other study characteristics are related to successful study recruitment. Method We obtained 522 information sheets from the UK National Institute for Health Research Clinical Research Network: Mental Health portfolio database and study principal investigators. Readability was assessed with the Flesch reading index and the Grade level test. Results Information sheets increased in length over the study period. The mean grade level across all information sheets was 9.8, or 15–16 years old. A high level of patient involvement was associated with more recruitment success and studies involving pharmaceutical or device interventions were the least successful. The complexity of information sheets had little bearing on successful recruitment. Conclusions Information sheets are far more complex than the recommended reading level of grade 6 for patient information. The disparity may be exacerbated by an increasing focus on legal content. Researchers would benefit from clear guidance from ethics committees on writing succinctly and accessibly and how to balance the competing legal issues with the ability of participants to understand what a study entails. PMID:26382948

  16. TU-CD-304-09: Feasibility Study for Thermoplastic Mask Set Up Monitoring Using Force Sensing Resistor (FSR) Sensor

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, T; Cho, M; Kang, S; Kim, D; Kim, K; Shin, D; Suh, T; Kim, S

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To improve the setup accuracy of thermoplastic mask, we developed a new monitoring method based on force sensing technology and evaluated its feasibility. Methods: The thermoplastic mask setup monitoring system consists of a force sensing resistor sensor unit, a signal transport device, a control PC and an in-house software. The system is designed to monitor pressure variation between the mask and patient in real time. It also provides a warning to the user when there is a possibility of movement. A preliminary study was performed to evaluate the reliability of the sensor unit and developed monitoring system with a head phantom. Then, a simulation study with volunteers was conducted to evaluate the feasibility of the monitoring system. Note that the sensor unit can have multiple end-sensors and every end-sensor was confirmed to be within 2% reliability in pressure reading through a screening test. Results: To evaluate the reproducibility of the proposed monitoring system in practice, we simulated a mask setup with the head phantom. FRS sensors were attached on the face of the head phantom and pressure was monitored. For 3 repeated mask setups on the phantom, the variation of the pressure was less than 3% (only 1% larger than 2% potential uncertainty confirmed in the screening test). In the volunteer study, we intended to verify that the system could detect patient movements within the mask. Thus, volunteers were asked to turn their head or lift their chin. The system was able to detect movements effectively, confirming the clinical feasibility of the monitoring system developed. Conclusion: Through the proposed setup monitoring method, it is possible to monitor patient motion inside a mask in real time, which has never been possible with most commonly used systems using non-radiographic technology such as infrared camera system and surface imaging system. This work was supported by the Radiation Technology R&D program (No. 2013M2A2A7043498) and the Mid

  17. Studies in remotely sensed geophysical parameter retrieval and analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perkey, Donald J.

    1993-01-01

    This report describes Universities Space Research Association (USRA) activities in support of the Geophysical Parameter Retrieval and Analysis studies. Specifically it addresses personnel assigned to the effort, travel, consultant participants, technical progress, and contract spending.

  18. CONDENSED MATTER: ELECTRONIC STRUCTURE, ELECTRICAL, MAGNETIC, AND OPTICAL PROPERTIES: Influence of Oxygen Pressure on Structural and Sensing Properties of β-Ga2O3 Nanomaterial by Thermal Evaporation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Hai-Lin; Fan, Duo-Wang

    2009-11-01

    We prepare the gallium oxide (β-Ga2O3) nanomaterials from gallium and oxygen by thermal evaporation in the argon atmosphere and research their oxygen sensing under UV illumination with different oxygen pressures. X-ray diffraction reveals that the synthesized product is monoclinic gallium oxide, it is further confirmed by electron diffraction of transmission electron microscope, and its morphology through the observation using scanning electron microscope reveals that β-Ga2O3 nanobelts with a breadth less than 100 nm and length of several micrometers are synthesized under low oxygen pressure, while the nano/microbelts are synthesized under high oxygen pressure. Room-temperature oxygen sensing is tested under at 254 nm illumination and it is found that the current decreases quickly first and then slowly with oxygen pressure from low to high.

  19. [Aerodynamics study on pressure changes inside pressure-type whole-body plethysmograph produced by flowing air].

    PubMed

    Xu, Wei-Hua; Shen, Hua-Hao

    2010-02-25

    When using pressure-type plethysmography to test lung function of rodents, calculation of lung volume is always based on Boyle's law. The precondition of Boyle's law is that perfect air is static. However, air in the chamber is flowing continuously when a rodent breathes inside the chamber. Therefore, Boyle's law, a principle of air statics, may not be appropriate for measuring pressure changes of flowing air. In this study, we deduced equations for pressure changes inside pressure-type plethysmograph and then designed three experiments to testify the theoretic deduction. The results of theoretic deduction indicated that increased pressure was generated from two sources: one was based on Boyle's law, and the other was based on the law of conservation of momentum. In the first experiment, after injecting 0.1 mL, 0.2 mL, 0.4 mL of air into the plethysmograph, the pressure inside the chamber increased sharply to a peak value, then promptly decreased to horizontal pressure. Peak values were significantly higher than the horizontal values (P<0.001). This observation revealed that flowing air made an extra effect on air pressure in the plethysmograph. In the second experiment, the same volume of air was injected into the plethysmograph at different frequencies (0, 0.5, 1, 2, 3 Hz) and pressure changes inside were measured. The results showed that, with increasing frequencies, the pressure changes in the chamber became significantly higher (P<0.001). In the third experiment, small animal ventilator and pipette were used to make two types of airflow with different functions of time. The pressure changes produced by the ventilator were significantly greater than those produced by the pipette (P<0.001). Based on the data obtained, we draw the conclusion that, the flow of air plays a role in pressure changes inside the plethysmograph, and the faster the airflow is, the higher the pressure changes reach. Furthermore, the type of airflow also influences the pressure changes.

  20. Hydrostatic pressure studies of polyvinylidine fluoride (PVDF) and its copolymers

    SciTech Connect

    Samara, G.A.; Bauer, F.

    1987-01-01

    The frequency, temperature and hydrostatic pressure (less than or equal to10 kbar) dependences of the dielectric properties, molecular relaxations and phase transitions in PVDF and a copolymer with a 30% trifluorethylene were investigated. For the copolymer, both the ferroelectric transition (T/sub c/) and dynamic melting (T/sub m/) temperatures exhibit large increases with pressure. PVDF itself does not exhibit a T/sub c/ below T/sub m/, but its T/sub m/ also shows a large increase with pressure. The pressure and frequency dependences suggest an explanation for why it is possible to use these polymers as piezoelectric shock wave gauges to relatively high shock pressures.

  1. In vivo evaluation of a novel, wrist-mounted arterial pressure sensing device versus the traditional hand-held tonometer.

    PubMed

    Vardoulis, Orestis; Saponas, T Scott; Morris, Dan; Villar, Nicolas; Smith, Greg; Patel, Shwetak; Tan, Desney

    2016-10-01

    Although hemodynamic parameters can be assessed non-invasively, state-of-the-art non-invasive systems generally require an expert operator and are not applicable for ambulatory measurements. These limitations have restricted our understanding of the continuous behavior of hemodynamic parameters. In this manuscript, we introduce a novel wrist-mounted device that incorporates an array of pressure sensors which can be used to extract arterial waveforms and relevant pulse wave analysis biomarkers. In vivo evaluation is performed with Bland-Altman analysis to compare the novel sensor to a gold-standard hand-held tonometer by assessing their reproducibility and agreement in peripheral augmentation index (AIx) estimation at the radial artery. Arterial waves from 28 randomly selected participants were recorded in a controlled environment. Initially we assess the reproducibility of AIx results for both devices. The intra-class correlation coefficient (ICC) and mean difference ± SD were [0.913, 0.033±0.048] and [0.859, 0.039±0.076] for the hand-held and the wrist-mounted tonometer respectively. We then show that the AIx values derived from the novel tonometer have good agreement, accuracy, and precision when compared against the AIx values derived from the reference hand-held tonometer (ICC 0.927, mean difference 0.026±0.049). In conclusion, we have presented evidence that the new wrist-mounted arterial pressure sensor records arterial waveforms that can be processed to yield AIx values that are in good agreement with its traditional hand-held counterpart.

  2. Exploring Your Sense of Smell. Science Study Aid No. 10.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boeschen, John; And Others

    This Science Study Aid (SSA), structured for grade levels 7-9, is based on work of the U.S. Department of Agriculture's Agricultural Research Service (ARS) conducted at the Western Regional Research Center in Berkeley, California. It is concerned with food aroma, its intensity and character, and olfactory threshold determinations. The SSA provides…

  3. Making Sense of Bali: Unintended Outcomes of Study Abroad Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hill, Bob; Thomas, Noel

    2005-01-01

    Study abroad programmes for teacher education students are increasingly being evaluated to determine their effectiveness in achieving intended outcomes. There is a danger, however, that such evaluations will ignore valuable but unintended and serendipitous outcomes of such programmes. This paper investigates an example of such an outcome, the…

  4. Chemical and biological sensing needs for health effects studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breysse, Patrick N.

    2012-06-01

    Exposure assessment is an integral component of occupational and environmental epidemiology, risk assessment and management, as well as regulatory compliance. For the most part, air sampling and analysis tools used in occupational and environmental exposure assessments are based on technologies that have changed little since the 1970s. In many cases the lack of simple, inexpensive, exposure assessment technologies has limited epidemiologists' and risk assessors' ability to evaluate the environmental and occupational causes of disease. While there have been tremendous investments and advances in medical diagnostic and biomonitoring technologies (e.g., glucose testing, human genetics), there has been less effort invested in advancing the science of exposure assessment. Recent developments in sensor technology have focused on medical and homeland security applications. Developing and applying new sensors to health effects studies can revolutionize the way epidemiologic studies are conducted. Time-series studies that investigate short-term (hours to days) changes in exposure that are linked to changes in health care encounters, symptoms, and biological markers of preclinical disease and/or susceptibility are needed to more fully evaluate the impact of chemicals and other agents on health. Current sampling technology limits our ability to assess time-varying concentrations. The purpose of this paper is to discuss the current state of air sampling and health assessment and the potential application of novel sensor technology for use in health effects studies.

  5. Making Sense of Bali: Unintended Outcomes of Study Abroad Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hill, Bob; Thomas, Noel

    2005-01-01

    Study abroad programmes for teacher education students are increasingly being evaluated to determine their effectiveness in achieving intended outcomes. There is a danger, however, that such evaluations will ignore valuable but unintended and serendipitous outcomes of such programmes. This paper investigates an example of such an outcome, the…

  6. Pilot study: Assessing repeatability of the EcoWalk platform resistive pressure sensors to measure plantar pressure during barefoot standing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zequera, Martha; Perdomo, Oscar; Wilches, Carlos; Vizcaya, Pedro

    2013-06-01

    Plantar pressure provides useful information to assess the feet's condition. These systems have emerged as popular tools in clinical environment. These systems present errors and no compensation information is presented by the manufacturer, leading to uncertainty in the measurements. Ten healthy subjects, 5 females and 5 males, were recruited. Lateral load distribution, antero-posterior load distribution, average pressure, contact area, and force were recorded. The aims of this study were to assess repeatability of the EcoWalk system and identify the range of pressure values observed in the normal foot. The coefficient of repeatability was less than 4% for all parameters considered.

  7. Privileged but pressured? A study of affluent youth.

    PubMed

    Luthar, Suniya S; Becker, Bronwyn E

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to build on preliminary findings of unusually high internalizing symptoms and substance use among suburban high school students. The sample consisted of 302 sixth- and seventh-grade students in an affluent, suburban community. Findings corroborated expectations regarding several domains of vulnerability, showing (1) high rates of clinically significant depressive symptoms among older girls, (2) significant links between various internalizing symptoms and substance use among both boys and girls, and (3) peers' approval of substance use among older boys. In exploring potential causes of distress in this suburban sample, associations were found for achievement pressures (particularly excessive perfectionistic strivings), and isolation from parents (particularly low perceived closeness to mothers). Findings of this study are discussed in terms of widespread stereotypes about affluent families, as well as implications for future research and preventive interventions for a subgroup of youth typically viewed as being at "low risk."

  8. [Genesis study of omphacite at high pressure and high temperature].

    PubMed

    Xiao, Ben-Fu; Yi, Li; Wang, Duo-Jun; Xie, Chao; Tang, Xue-Wu; Liu, Lei; Cui, Yue-Ju

    2013-11-01

    The melting and recrystallizing experiments of alkali basalt powder and mixture of pure oxides mixed as stoichiometry were performed at 3 GPa and 1 200 degrees C. Electronic microprobe analysis and Raman spectra showed that the recrystallized products were omphacites, the FWHM (full width at half maximum) of the Raman peak was narrow and its shape was sharp, which is attributed to the stable Si-O tetrahedral structure and the high degree of order in omphacite. Based on the results of previous studies, the influencing factors of omphacite genesis and its primary magma were discussed. The results showed that the formation of omphacite could be affected by many factors, such as the composition of parent rocks, the concentration of fluid in the system and the conditions of pressure and temperature. This result could support some experimental evidences on the genesis studies of omphacite and eclogite.

  9. Privileged but Pressured? A Study of Affluent Youth

    PubMed Central

    Becker, Bronwyn E.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to build on preliminary findings of unusually high internalizing symptoms and substance use among suburban high school students. The sample consisted of 302 sixth- and seventh-grade students in an affluent, suburban community. Findings corroborated expectations regarding several domains of vulnerability, showing (1) high rates of clinically significant depressive symptoms among older girls, (2) significant links between various internalizing symptoms and substance use among both boys and girls, and (3) peers’ approval of substance use among older boys. In exploring potential causes of distress in this suburban sample, associations were found for achievement pressures (particularly excessive perfectionistic strivings), and isolation from parents (particularly low perceived closeness to mothers). Findings of this study are discussed in terms of widespread stereotypes about affluent families, as well as implications for future research and preventive interventions for a subgroup of youth typically viewed as being at “low risk.” PMID:12361321

  10. Intradiscal Pressure Changes during Manual Cervical Distraction: A Cadaveric Study.

    PubMed

    Gudavalli, M R; Potluri, T; Carandang, G; Havey, R M; Voronov, L I; Cox, J M; Rowell, R M; Kruse, R A; Joachim, G C; Patwardhan, A G; Henderson, C N R; Goertz, C

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this study was to measure intradiscal pressure (IDP) changes in the lower cervical spine during a manual cervical distraction (MCD) procedure. Incisions were made anteriorly, and pressure transducers were inserted into each nucleus at lower cervical discs. Four skilled doctors of chiropractic (DCs) performed MCD procedure on nine specimens in prone position with contacts at C5 or at C6 vertebrae with the headpiece in different positions. IDP changes, traction forces, and manually applied posterior-to-anterior forces were analyzed using descriptive statistics. IDP decreases were observed during MCD procedure at all lower cervical levels C4-C5, C5-C6, and C6-C7. The mean IDP decreases were as high as 168.7 KPa. Mean traction forces were as high as 119.2 N. Posterior-to-anterior forces applied during manual traction were as high as 82.6 N. Intraclinician reliability for IDP decrease was high for all four DCs. While two DCs had high intraclinician reliability for applied traction force, the other two DCs demonstrated only moderate reliability. IDP decreases were greatest during moving flexion and traction. They were progressevely less pronouced with neutral traction, fixed flexion and traction, and generalized traction.

  11. Intradiscal Pressure Changes during Manual Cervical Distraction: A Cadaveric Study

    PubMed Central

    Gudavalli, M. R.; Potluri, T.; Carandang, G.; Havey, R. M.; Voronov, L. I.; Cox, J. M.; Rowell, R. M.; Kruse, R. A.; Joachim, G. C.; Patwardhan, A. G.; Henderson, C. N. R.; Goertz, C.

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this study was to measure intradiscal pressure (IDP) changes in the lower cervical spine during a manual cervical distraction (MCD) procedure. Incisions were made anteriorly, and pressure transducers were inserted into each nucleus at lower cervical discs. Four skilled doctors of chiropractic (DCs) performed MCD procedure on nine specimens in prone position with contacts at C5 or at C6 vertebrae with the headpiece in different positions. IDP changes, traction forces, and manually applied posterior-to-anterior forces were analyzed using descriptive statistics. IDP decreases were observed during MCD procedure at all lower cervical levels C4-C5, C5-C6, and C6-C7. The mean IDP decreases were as high as 168.7 KPa. Mean traction forces were as high as 119.2 N. Posterior-to-anterior forces applied during manual traction were as high as 82.6 N. Intraclinician reliability for IDP decrease was high for all four DCs. While two DCs had high intraclinician reliability for applied traction force, the other two DCs demonstrated only moderate reliability. IDP decreases were greatest during moving flexion and traction. They were progressevely less pronouced with neutral traction, fixed flexion and traction, and generalized traction. PMID:24023587

  12. Utilization of remote sensing in Alaska permafrost studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, D. K.

    1981-01-01

    Permafrost related features such as: aufeis, tundra, thaw lakes and subsurface ice features were studied. LANDSAT imagery was used to measure the extent and distribution of aufeis in Arctic Slope rivers over a period of 7 years. Interannual extent of large aufeis fields was found to vary significantly. Digital LANDSAT data were used to study the short term effects of a tundra fire which burned a 48 sq km area in northwestern Alaska. Vegetation regrowth was inferred from Landsat spectral reflectance increases and compared to in-situ measurements. Aircraft SAR (Synethic Aperture Radar) imagery was used in conjunction with LANDSAT imagery used in conjunction with LANDSAT imagery to qualitatively determine depth categories for thaw lakes in northern Alaska.

  13. Highly distributed multi-point, temperature and pressure compensated, fiber optic oxygen sensors (FOxSense) for aircraft fuel tank environment and safety monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendoza, Edgar A.; Kempen, Cornelia; Sun, Sunjian; Esterkin, Yan

    2014-09-01

    This paper describes recent progress towards the development and qualification of a highly distributed, multi-point, all optical pressure and temperature compensated, fiber optic oxygen sensor (FOxSense™) system for closed-loop monitoring and safety of the oxygen ullage environment inside fuel tanks of military and commercial aircraft. The alloptical FOxSense™ system uses a passive, multi-parameter (O2/T&P) fiber optic sensor probe with no electrical connections leading to the sensors install within the fuel tanks of an aircraft. The all optical sensor consists of an integrated multi-parameter fiber optic sensor probe that integrates a fuel insensitive fluorescence based optical oxygen optrode with built-in temperature and pressure optical optrodes for compensation of temperature and pressure variants induced in the fluorescence response of the oxygen optrode. The distributed (O2/T&P) fiber optic sensors installed in the fuel tanks of the aircraft are connected to the FOxSense optoelectronic system via a fiber optic cable conduit reaching to each fuel tank in the aircraft. A multichannel frequency-domain fiber optic sensor read-out (FOxSense™) system is used to interrogate the optical signal of all three sensors in real-time and to display the fuel tank oxygen environment suitable for aircraft status and alarm applications. Preliminary testing of the all optical fiber optic oxygen sensor have demonstrated the ability to monitor the oxygen environment inside a simulated fuel tank in the range of 0% O2 to 40% O2 concentrations, temperatures from (-) 40°C to (+) 60°C, and altitudes from 0-ft to 40,000-ft.

  14. Application of remote sensing to monitoring and studying dispersion in ocean dumping

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, R. W.; Ohlhorst, C. W.

    1981-01-01

    Remotely sensed wide area synoptic data provides information on ocean dumping that is not readily available by other means. A qualitative approach has been used to map features, such as river plumes. Results of quantitative analyses have been used to develop maps showing quantitative distributions of one or more water quality parameters, such as suspended solids or chlorophyll a. Joint NASA/NOAA experiments have been conducted at designated dump areas in the U.S. coastal zones to determine the applicability of aircraft remote sensing systems to map plumes resulting from ocean dumping of sewage sludge and industrial wastes. A second objective is related to the evaluation of previously developed quantitative analysis techniques for studying dispersion of materials in these plumes. It was found that plumes resulting from dumping of four waste materials have distinctive spectral characteristics. The development of a technology for use in a routine monitoring system, based on remote sensing techniques, is discussed.

  15. Ultrathin gas permeable oxide membranes for chemical sensing: Nanoporous Ta2O5 test study

    DOE PAGES

    Imbault, Alexander; Wang, Yue; Kruse, Peter; ...

    2015-09-25

    Conductometric gas sensors made of gas permeable metal oxide ultrathin membranes can combine the functions of a selective filter, preconcentrator, and sensing element and thus can be particularly promising for the active sampling of diluted analytes. Here we report a case study of the electron transport and gas sensing properties of such a membrane made of nanoporous Ta2O5. These membranes demonstrated a noticeable chemical sensitivity toward ammonia, ethanol, and acetone at high temperatures above 400 °C. Furthermore, different from traditional thin films, such gas permeable, ultrathin gas sensing elements can be made suspended enabling advanced architectures of ultrasensitive analytical systemsmore » operating at high temperatures and in harsh environments.« less

  16. Application of remote sensing to monitoring and studying dispersion in ocean dumping

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, R. W.; Ohlhorst, C. W.

    1981-01-01

    Remotely sensed wide area synoptic data provides information on ocean dumping that is not readily available by other means. A qualitative approach has been used to map features, such as river plumes. Results of quantitative analyses have been used to develop maps showing quantitative distributions of one or more water quality parameters, such as suspended solids or chlorophyll a. Joint NASA/NOAA experiments have been conducted at designated dump areas in the U.S. coastal zones to determine the applicability of aircraft remote sensing systems to map plumes resulting from ocean dumping of sewage sludge and industrial wastes. A second objective is related to the evaluation of previously developed quantitative analysis techniques for studying dispersion of materials in these plumes. It was found that plumes resulting from dumping of four waste materials have distinctive spectral characteristics. The development of a technology for use in a routine monitoring system, based on remote sensing techniques, is discussed.

  17. A feasibility study of using remotely sensed data for water resource models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruff, J. F.

    1973-01-01

    Remotely sensed data were collected to demonstrate the feasibility of applying the results to water resource problems. Photographs of the Wolf Creek watershed in southwestern Colorado were collected over a one year period. Cloud top temperatures were measured using a radiometer. Thermal imagery of the Wolf Creek Pass area was obtained during one pre-dawn flight. Remote sensing studies of water resource problems for user agencies were also conducted. The results indicated that: (1) remote sensing techniques could be used to assist in the solution of water resource problems; (2) photogrammetric determination of snow depths is feasible; (3) changes in turbidity or suspended material concentration can be observed; and (4) surface turbulence can be related to bed scour; and (5) thermal effluents into rivers can be monitored.

  18. Remote sensing and GIS integration for land cover analysis, a case study: Bozcaada Island.

    PubMed

    Bektas, F; Goksel, C

    2005-01-01

    In this study, remote sensing and geographic information system (GIS) techniques were used in order to accomplish land cover change of Bozcaada Island, Turkey, by using multitemporal Landsat Thematic Mapper data. Digital image processing techniques were conducted for the processes of image enhancement, manipulation, registration and classification for land cover change analysis. The land cover changes between two different dates were visualized and analyzed by using Geographic Information System techniques. The results showed that remotely sensed data and GIS are effective and powerful tools for carrying out changes on land cover of the island and monitoring of its impact on the environment.

  19. Brain Networks Responsible for Sense of Agency: An EEG Study

    PubMed Central

    Shim, Miseon; Nahab, Fatta B.; Park, Jihye; Kim, Do-Won; Kakareka, John; Miletta, Nathanial; Hallett, Mark

    2015-01-01

    Background Self-agency (SA) is a person’s feeling that his action was generated by himself. The neural substrates of SA have been investigated in many neuroimaging studies, but the functional connectivity of identified regions has rarely been investigated. The goal of this study is to investigate the neural network related to SA. Methods SA of hand movements was modulated with virtual reality. We examined the cortical network relating to SA modulation with electroencephalography (EEG) power spectrum and phase coherence of alpha, beta, and gamma frequency bands in 16 right-handed, healthy volunteers. Results In the alpha band, significant relative power changes and phase coherence of alpha band were associated with SA modulation. The relative power decrease over the central, bilateral parietal, and right temporal regions (C4, Pz, P3, P4, T6) became larger as participants more effectively controlled the virtual hand movements. The phase coherence of the alpha band within frontal areas (F7-FP2, F7-Fz) was directly related to changes in SA. The functional connectivity was lower as the participants felt that they could control their virtual hand. In the other frequency bands, significant phase coherences were observed in the frontal (or central) to parietal, temporal, and occipital regions during SA modulation (Fz-O1, F3-O1, Cz-O1, C3-T4L in beta band; FP1-T6, FP1-O2, F7-T4L, F8-Cz in gamma band). Conclusions Our study suggests that alpha band activity may be the main neural oscillation of SA, which suggests that the neural network within the anterior frontal area may be important in the generation of SA. PMID:26270552

  20. Verifying Pressure of Water on Dams, a Case Study

    PubMed Central

    Bayrak, Temel

    2008-01-01

    Sensing and monitoring deformation pattern of dams is often one of the most effective ways to understand their safety status. The main objective of the present study is to find the extent to which rising reservoir level affects the mechanism of deformation of the Yamula dam under certain changes in the reservoir level conditions during the first filling period. A new dynamic deformation analysis technique was developed to analyze four geodetic monitoring records consisting of vertical and horizontal displacements of nine object points established on the dam and six reference points surrounding it, to see whether the rising reservoir level is responsible for the vertical and horizontal deformations during the first filling period. The largest displacements were determined in the middle points of the dam construction. There is an apparent linear relationship between the dam subsidence and the reservoir level. The dynamic deformation model was developed to model this situation. The model infers a causative relationship between the reservoir level and the dam deformations. The analysis of the results determines the degree of the correlation between the change in the reservoir level and the observed structural deformation of the dam. PMID:27873819

  1. Experimental study on strain sensing by small-diameter FBG

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Rong-mei; Li, Qiufeng; Zhu, Lujia; Liang, Dakai

    2016-11-01

    Fiber Bragg grating (FBG) sensors were attractive in various fields for structural health monitoring. Because of their accurate performance and real time response, embedded FBG sensors are promising for strain monitoring in composite materials. As an optical fiber sensor was embedded inside a composite, interface would form around the embedded optical fiber and the host polymer composite. In order to study the influence of the embedded optical fiber to the mechanical character, finite elemental analysis was applied to study the stress distribution inside the composite. Keeping the resin rich area the same size, laminates with optical fibers in different diameters, which were 250 and 125 micrometers, were analyzed. The simulation results represent that stress singularity would occur around the embedded optical fiber. The singularity value for the laminate with optical fiber at 250 micrometer was higher than that with optical fiber at 125 micrometer. Micro- cracks would arise at the stress singularity point. Therefore, the optical fiber in smaller diameter was preferred since the mechanical strength could be higher. Four points bending test was carried out on a steel beam with a small-diameter FBG on the bottom surface. Besides, a strain gauge was stuck on bottom to validate the monitoring results by FBG sensor. The tested results indicated that the strain monitoring results by the small-diameter FBG sensor almost identical with the theoretical ones and what recorded by strain gauge. The maximum testing error for the designed FBG is less than 2% compared with the theoretical one.

  2. Sense of Coherence, Hope and Values among Adolescents under Missile Attacks: A Longitudinal Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Braun-Lewensohn, Orna; Sagy, Shifra

    2010-01-01

    This study aimed to explore measures of spirituality--sense of coherence (SOC), hope and values--among adolescents living in a violent political area and experiencing missile attacks. The three variables represent attributes of spirituality, such as searching for meaning and purpose in life, hope and feelings about the future, as well as values…

  3. An Exploratory Study of a Number Sense Program to Develop Kindergarten Students' Number Proficiency

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sood, Sheetal; Jitendra, Asha K.

    2013-01-01

    This study examined the effectiveness of a number sense program on kindergarten students' number proficiency and responsiveness to treatment as a function of students' risk for mathematics difficulties. The program targeted development of relationships among numbers (e.g., spatial, more and less). A total of 101 kindergarten students (not at risk:…

  4. An exploratory study of the application of sense of community in a local festival

    Treesearch

    Alvin H. Yu; Fengfeng. Ke

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify and measure the empirical relationships between a festival and one of its possible social effects: residents' perceptions of a sense of community (SOC). A mixed research method was utilized to explore how a multicultural festival in Harrisburg, Pennsylvania affected residents' perceived SOC. Survey questionnaires were...

  5. Land Cover Change and Remote Sensing in the Classroom: An Exercise to Study Urban Growth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Delahunty, Tina; Lewis-Gonzales, Sarah; Phelps, Jack; Sawicki, Ben; Roberts, Charles; Carpenter, Penny

    2012-01-01

    The processes and implications of urban growth are studied in a variety of disciplines as urban growth affects both the physical and human landscape. Remote sensing methods provide ways to visualize and mathematically represent urban growth; and resultant land cover change data enable both quantitative and qualitative analysis. This article helps…

  6. Sense of Coherence, Hope and Values among Adolescents under Missile Attacks: A Longitudinal Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Braun-Lewensohn, Orna; Sagy, Shifra

    2010-01-01

    This study aimed to explore measures of spirituality--sense of coherence (SOC), hope and values--among adolescents living in a violent political area and experiencing missile attacks. The three variables represent attributes of spirituality, such as searching for meaning and purpose in life, hope and feelings about the future, as well as values…

  7. Turkish Version of the Principals' Sense of Efficacy Scale: Validity and Reliability Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Isik, Ayse Negis; Derinbay, Deniz

    2015-01-01

    Problem Statement: Principals are known as important actors in effective schools. So it is important to know which variables influence principals' success. One of these predictors can be self-efficacy. However, there is very few research about principals' sense of efficacy. Purpose of the Study: The purpose of this research was to test the…

  8. An Exploratory Study of a Number Sense Program to Develop Kindergarten Students' Number Proficiency

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sood, Sheetal; Jitendra, Asha K.

    2013-01-01

    This study examined the effectiveness of a number sense program on kindergarten students' number proficiency and responsiveness to treatment as a function of students' risk for mathematics difficulties. The program targeted development of relationships among numbers (e.g., spatial, more and less). A total of 101 kindergarten students (not at risk:…

  9. A study of suspended solids in the Requena Dam by remote sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Azuara, P. R.; Hidalgo, L. L.

    1977-01-01

    Remote sensing was applied to a preliminary study of suspended solids in the Requena Dam. Aerial and terrestrial photographs were analyzed by photointerpretation and microdensitometry. Field measurements and sampling were also made. A relationship between ground data for the concentration of suspended solids and the transmissibility of the aerial infrared film was suggested.

  10. Land Cover Change and Remote Sensing in the Classroom: An Exercise to Study Urban Growth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Delahunty, Tina; Lewis-Gonzales, Sarah; Phelps, Jack; Sawicki, Ben; Roberts, Charles; Carpenter, Penny

    2012-01-01

    The processes and implications of urban growth are studied in a variety of disciplines as urban growth affects both the physical and human landscape. Remote sensing methods provide ways to visualize and mathematically represent urban growth; and resultant land cover change data enable both quantitative and qualitative analysis. This article helps…

  11. The National Research Council study: "Making sense of ballistic missile defense"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilkening, Dean A.

    2014-05-01

    This chapter explains and summarizes the main findings of a recent National Research Council study entitled Making Sense of Ballistic Missile Defense: An Assessment of Concepts and Systems for U.S. Boost-Phase Missile Defense in Comparison to Other Alternatives.

  12. Hispanics, Blacks Less Likely to Get High Blood Pressure Treatment: Study

    MedlinePlus

    ... Hispanics, Blacks Less Likely to Get High Blood Pressure Treatment: Study Less than half from any group ... less likely than whites to get high blood pressure under control, a new study suggests. Researchers reviewed ...

  13. Making Sense of 'Big Data' in Provenance Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vermeesch, P.

    2014-12-01

    Huge online databases can be 'mined' to reveal previously hidden trends and relationships in society. One could argue that sedimentary geology has entered a similar era of 'Big Data', as modern provenance studies routinely apply multiple proxies to dozens of samples. Just like the Internet, sedimentary geology now requires specialised statistical tools to interpret such large datasets. These can be organised on three levels of progressively higher order:A single sample: The most effective way to reveal the provenance information contained in a representative sample of detrital zircon U-Pb ages are probability density estimators such as histograms and kernel density estimates. The widely popular 'probability density plots' implemented in IsoPlot and AgeDisplay compound analytical uncertainty with geological scatter and are therefore invalid.Several samples: Multi-panel diagrams comprising many detrital age distributions or compositional pie charts quickly become unwieldy and uninterpretable. For example, if there are N samples in a study, then the number of pairwise comparisons between samples increases quadratically as N(N-1)/2. This is simply too much information for the human eye to process. To solve this problem, it is necessary to (a) express the 'distance' between two samples as a simple scalar and (b) combine all N(N-1)/2 such values in a single two-dimensional 'map', grouping similar and pulling apart dissimilar samples. This can be easily achieved using simple statistics-based dissimilarity measures and a standard statistical method called Multidimensional Scaling (MDS).Several methods: Suppose that we use four provenance proxies: bulk petrography, chemistry, heavy minerals and detrital geochronology. This will result in four MDS maps, each of which likely show slightly different trends and patterns. To deal with such cases, it may be useful to use a related technique called 'three way multidimensional scaling'. This results in two graphical outputs: an MDS

  14. Spatial and spectral resolution necessary for remotely sensed vegetation studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rock, B. N.

    1982-01-01

    An outline is presented of the required spatial and spectral resolution needed for accurate vegetation discrimination and mapping studies as well as for determination of state of health (i.e., detection of stress symptoms) of actively growing vegetation. Good success was achieved in vegetation discrimination and mapping of a heterogeneous forest cover in the ridge and valley portion of the Appalachians using multispectral data acquired with a spatial resolution of 15 m (IFOV). A sensor system delivering 10 to 15 m spatial resolution is needed for both vegetation mapping and detection of stress symptoms. Based on the vegetation discrimination and mapping exercises conducted at the Lost River site, accurate products (vegetation maps) are produced using broad-band spectral data ranging from the .500 to 2.500 micron portion of the spectrum. In order of decreasing utility for vegetation discrimination, the four most valuable TM simulator VNIR bands are: 6 (1.55 to 1.75 microns), 3 (0.63 to 0.69 microns), 5 (1.00 to 1.30 microns) and 4 (0.76 to 0.90 microns).

  15. Remote sensing and geologic studies of the orientale basin region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hawke, B. Ray; Lucey, P. G.; Taylor, G. J.; Bell, Jeffrey F.; Peterson, C. A.; Blewett, D.; Horton, K.; Spudis, P. D.

    1991-06-01

    Both visual and near-infrared spectral observations are combined with multispectral imaging to study the Orientale interior and exterior, the Cruger region, Grimaldi Region, the Schiller-Schickard Region, and the Humorum Region of the Moon. It was concluded that anorthosites occur in the Inner Rook Mountains of Orientale, the inner ring of Grimaldi, and the main ring of Humorum. Imaging spectroscopy shows that the entire eastern Inner Rook Mountains are composed of anorthosites. Orientale ejecta are strikingly like the surface materials in the region where Apollo 16 landed. This similarity indicates similar mineralogy, i.e., noritic anorthosite. Thus, Orientile ejecta is more mafic than the Inner Rook Mountains. This situation is also true for the Nectaris, Humorum, and Gramaldi basins. Isolated areas of the Orientale region show the presence of gabbroic rocks, but, in general, Orientale ejecta are noritic anorthosites, which contain much more low-Ca pyroxene than high-Ca pyroxene. Ancient (pre-Orientale) mare volcanism apparently occurred in several areas of the western limb.

  16. Remote sensing and geologic studies of the orientale basin region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hawke, B. Ray; Lucey, P. G.; Taylor, G. J.; Bell, Jeffrey F.; Peterson, C. A.; Blewett, D.; Horton, K.; Spudis, P. D.

    1991-01-01

    Both visual and near-infrared spectral observations are combined with multispectral imaging to study the Orientale interior and exterior, the Cruger region, Grimaldi Region, the Schiller-Schickard Region, and the Humorum Region of the Moon. It was concluded that anorthosites occur in the Inner Rook Mountains of Orientale, the inner ring of Grimaldi, and the main ring of Humorum. Imaging spectroscopy shows that the entire eastern Inner Rook Mountains are composed of anorthosites. Orientale ejecta are strikingly like the surface materials in the region where Apollo 16 landed. This similarity indicates similar mineralogy, i.e., noritic anorthosite. Thus, Orientile ejecta is more mafic than the Inner Rook Mountains. This situation is also true for the Nectaris, Humorum, and Gramaldi basins. Isolated areas of the Orientale region show the presence of gabbroic rocks, but, in general, Orientale ejecta are noritic anorthosites, which contain much more low-Ca pyroxene than high-Ca pyroxene. Ancient (pre-Orientale) mare volcanism apparently occurred in several areas of the western limb.

  17. Remote sensing applied to land-use studies in Wyoming

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Breckenridge, R. M.; Marrs, R. W.; Murphy, D. J.

    1973-01-01

    Impending development of Wyoming's vast fuel resources requires a quick and efficient method of land use inventory and evaluation. Preliminary evaluations of ERTS-1 imagery have shown that physiographic and land use inventory maps can be compiled by using a combination of visual and automated interpretation techniques. Test studies in the Powder River Basin showed that ERTS image interpretations can provide much of the needed physiographic and land use information. Water impoundments as small as one acre were detected and water bodies larger than five acres could be mapped and their acreage estimated. Flood plains and irrigated lands were successfully mapped, and some individual crops were identified and mapped. Coniferous and deciduous trees were mapped separately using color additive analysis on the ERTS multispectral imagery. Gross soil distinctions were made with the ERTS imagery, and were found to be closely related to the bedrock geology. Several broad unstable areas were identified. These were related to specific geologic and slope conditions and generally extended through large regions. Some new oil fields and all large open-cut coal mines were mapped. The most difficult task accomplished was that of mapping urban areas. Work in the urban areas provides a striking example of snow enhancement and the detail available from a snow enhanced image.

  18. Pressure sensor

    DOEpatents

    Mee, David K.; Ripley, Edward B.; Nienstedt, Zachary C.; Nienstedt, Alex W.; Howell, Jr., Layton N.

    2015-09-29

    Disclosed is a passive, in-situ pressure sensor. The sensor includes a sensing element having a ferromagnetic metal and a tension inducing mechanism coupled to the ferromagnetic metal. The tension inducing mechanism is operable to change a tensile stress upon the ferromagnetic metal based on a change in pressure in the sensing element. Changes in pressure are detected based on changes in the magnetic switching characteristics of the ferromagnetic metal when subjected to an alternating magnetic field caused by the change in the tensile stress. The sensing element is embeddable in a closed system for detecting pressure changes without the need for any penetrations of the system for power or data acquisition by detecting changes in the magnetic switching characteristics of the ferromagnetic metal caused by the tensile stress.

  19. Study of pressing machine pressure relief characteristics based on AMESim

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chuanli; Zhang, Hui; Yu, Caofeng; Wu, Xiaolei

    2016-01-01

    When a working cylinder of the pressing machine working cylinder was stuck and underwent retracted conversion, pressure shock was high in working cylinder cavity and flow pulsation was distinct in the pipeline due to the high working pressure and frequent retracted transformation of the working cylinder, which not only shortened the service life of the pressing machine, but also exerted serious impacts on the machining precision and quality, especially after the pressing machine applied loads and high-pressure oil in work rod end cavity of working cylinder needed to be relieved in a short time. In order to research and analyze the better pressure relief characteristics of the two types of pressure relief circuits of the pressing machine, the paper established models, carried out simulation and analysis and then made contrastive analysis of the working cylinder rod velocity, rod acceleration and port pressure pulsation according to the simulation results.

  20. In situ studies of microbial inactivation during high pressure processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maldonado, Jose Antonio; Schaffner, Donald W.; Cuitiño, Alberto M.; Karwe, Mukund V.

    2016-01-01

    High pressure processing (HPP) has been shown to reduce microbial concentration in foods. The mechanisms of microbial inactivation by HPP have been associated with damage to cell membranes. The real-time response of bacteria to HPP was measured to elucidate the mechanisms of inactivation, which can aid in designing more effective processes. Different pressure cycling conditions were used to expose Enterobacter aerogenes cells to HPP. Propidium iodide (PI) was used as a probe, which fluoresces after penetrating cells with damaged membranes and binding with nucleic acids. A HPP vessel with sapphire windows was used for measuring fluorescence in situ. Membrane damage was detected during pressurization and hold time, but not during depressurization. The drop in fluorescence was larger than expected after pressure cycles at higher pressure and longer times. This indicated possible reversible disassociation of ribosomes resulting in additional binding of PI to exposed RNA under pressure and its release after depressurization.