Science.gov

Sample records for pressure sensing studies

  1. PRESSURE SENSING DEVICE

    DOEpatents

    Pope, K.E.

    1959-12-15

    This device is primarily useful as a switch which is selectively operable to actuate in response to either absolute or differential predetermined pressures. The device generally comprises a pressure-tight housing divided by a movable impermeable diaphragm into two chambers, a reference pressure chamber and a bulb chamber containing the switching means and otherwise filled with an incompressible non-conducting fluid. The switch means comprises a normally collapsed bulb having an electrically conductive outer surface and a vent tube leading to the housing exterior. The normally collapsed bulb is disposed such that upon its inflation, respensive to air inflow from the vent, two contacts fixed within the bulb chamber are adapted to be electrically shorted by the conducting outer surface of the bulb.

  2. Study on demodulated signal distribution and acoustic pressure phase sensitivity of a self-interfered distributed acoustic sensing system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shang, Ying; Yang, Yuan-Hong; Wang, Chen; Liu, Xiao-Hui; Wang, Chang; Peng, Gang-Ding

    2016-06-01

    We propose a demodulated signal distribution theory for a self-interfered distributed acoustic sensing system. The distribution region of Rayleigh backscattering including the acoustic sensing signal in the sensing fiber is investigated theoretically under different combinations of both the path difference and pulse width Additionally we determine the optimal solution between the path difference and pulse width to obtain the maximum phase change per unit length. We experimentally test this theory and realize a good acoustic pressure phase sensitivity of  -150 dB re rad/(μPa·m) of fiber in the frequency range from 200 Hz to 1 kHz.

  3. Acoustic Wave Propagation in Pressure Sense Lines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vitarius, Patrick; Gregory, Don A.; Wiley, John; Korman, Valentin

    2003-01-01

    Sense lines are used in pressure measurements to passively transmit information from hostile environments to areas where transducers can be used. The transfer function of a sense line can be used to obtain information about the measured environment from the protected sensor. Several properties of this transfer function are examined, including frequency dependence, Helmholtz resonance, and time of flight delay.

  4. Plantar Pressure Detection with Fiber Bragg Gratings Sensing System.

    PubMed

    Liang, Tsair-Chun; Lin, Jhe-Jhun; Guo, Lan-Yuen

    2016-10-22

    In this paper, a novel fiber-optic sensing system based on fiber Bragg gratings (FBGs) to measure foot plantar pressure is proposed. This study first explores the Pedar-X insole foot pressure types of the adult-size chart and then defines six measurement areas to effectively identify four foot types: neutral foot, cavus foot, supinated foot and flat foot. The plantar pressure signals are detected by only six FBGs, which are embedded in silicone rubber. The performance of the fiber optic sensing is examined and compared with a digital pressure plate of i-Step P1000 with 1024 barometric sensors. In the experiment, there are 11 participants with different foot types to participate in the test. The Pearson correlation coefficient, which is determined from the measured results of the homemade fiber-optic plantar pressure system and i-Step P1000 plantar pressure plate, reaches up to 0.671 (p < 0.01). According to the measured results from the plantar pressure data, the proposed fiber optic sensing system can successfully identify the four different foot types. Measurements of this study have demonstrated the feasibility of the proposed system so that it can be an alternative for plantar pressure detection systems.

  5. Plantar Pressure Detection with Fiber Bragg Gratings Sensing System

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Tsair-Chun; Lin, Jhe-Jhun; Guo, Lan-Yuen

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, a novel fiber-optic sensing system based on fiber Bragg gratings (FBGs) to measure foot plantar pressure is proposed. This study first explores the Pedar-X insole foot pressure types of the adult-size chart and then defines six measurement areas to effectively identify four foot types: neutral foot, cavus foot, supinated foot and flat foot. The plantar pressure signals are detected by only six FBGs, which are embedded in silicone rubber. The performance of the fiber optic sensing is examined and compared with a digital pressure plate of i-Step P1000 with 1024 barometric sensors. In the experiment, there are 11 participants with different foot types to participate in the test. The Pearson correlation coefficient, which is determined from the measured results of the homemade fiber-optic plantar pressure system and i-Step P1000 plantar pressure plate, reaches up to 0.671 (p < 0.01). According to the measured results from the plantar pressure data, the proposed fiber optic sensing system can successfully identify the four different foot types. Measurements of this study have demonstrated the feasibility of the proposed system so that it can be an alternative for plantar pressure detection systems. PMID:27782089

  6. Fiber optic pressure sensing method based on Sagnac interferometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yi; Zhuang, Zhi; Chen, Ying; Yang, Yuanhong

    2014-11-01

    Pressure method using polarization-maintaining photonic crystal fiber (PM-PCF) as sensing element based on Sagnac interferometer is proposed to monitor inter layer pressure in especial compact structure. Sensing model is analyzed and test system is set up, which is validated by experiment. The birefringence can be modified by the deformation of PM-PCF under transverse pressure, realizing pressure measurement by detecting the wavelength shift of one specific valley from output of the Sagnac interferometer. The experiment results show that the output interference fringes were shifted linearly with pressure. The dynamic range of 0 kN ~10kN, sensing precision of 2.6%, and pressure sensitivity of 0.4414nm/kN are achieved, and the strain relaxation phenomenon of cushion can be observed obviously. The sensor has better engineering practicability and capability to restrain interference brought up by fluctuation of environment temperature, which temperature sensitivity is -11.8pm/°C.

  7. Compensating for pneumatic distortion in pressure sensing devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitmore, Stephen A.; Leondes, Cornelius T.

    1990-01-01

    A technique of compensating for pneumatic distortion in pressure sensing devices was developed and verified. This compensation allows conventional pressure sensing technology to obtain improved unsteady pressure measurements. Pressure distortion caused by frictional attenuation and pneumatic resonance within the sensing system makes obtaining unsteady pressure measurements by conventional sensors difficult. Most distortion occurs within the pneumatic tubing which transmits pressure impulses from the aircraft's surface to the measurement transducer. To avoid pneumatic distortion, experiment designers mount the pressure sensor at the surface of the aircraft, (called in-situ mounting). In-situ transducers cannot always fit in the available space and sometimes pneumatic tubing must be run from the aircraft's surface to the pressure transducer. A technique to measure unsteady pressure data using conventional pressure sensing technology was developed. A pneumatic distortion model is reduced to a low-order, state-variable model retaining most of the dynamic characteristics of the full model. The reduced-order model is coupled with results from minimum variance estimation theory to develop an algorithm to compensate for the effects of pneumatic distortion. Both postflight and real-time algorithms are developed and evaluated using simulated and flight data.

  8. Microfluidic pressure sensing using trapped air compression.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, Nimisha; Burns, Mark A

    2007-05-01

    We have developed a microfluidic method for measuring the fluid pressure head experienced at any location inside a microchannel. The principal component is a microfabricated sealed chamber with a single inlet and no exit; the entrance to the single inlet is positioned at the location where pressure is to be measured. The pressure measurement is then based on monitoring the movement of a liquid-air interface as it compresses air trapped inside the microfabricated sealed chamber and calculating the pressure using the ideal gas law. The method has been used to measure the pressure of the air stream and continuous liquid flow inside microfluidic channels (d approximately 50 microm). Further, a pressure drop has also been measured using multiple microfabricated sealed chambers. For air pressure, a resolution of 700 Pa within a full-scale range of 700-100 kPa was obtained. For liquids, pressure drops as low as 70 Pa were obtained in an operating range from 70 Pa to 10 kPa. Since the method primarily uses a microfluidic sealed chamber, it does not require additional fabrication steps and may easily be incorporated in several lab-on-a-chip fluidic applications for laminar as well as turbulent flow conditions.

  9. Low tension graphene drums for electromechanical pressure sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patel, Raj N.; Mathew, John P.; Borah, Abhinandan; Deshmukh, Mandar M.

    2016-03-01

    We present a process to fabricate electromechanical pressure sensors using multilayer graphene in a sealed drum geometry. The drum resonators are fabricated on insulating sapphire substrates with a local back gate for direct radio frequency ({\\text{}}{{rf}}) actuation and detection of the mechanical modes. Using this scheme, we show the detection and electrostatic tuning of multiple resonant modes of the membrane up to 200 MHz. The geometry of the device also helps in attaining low tensile stress in the membrane, thereby giving high gate tunability (∼1 MHz/V) of the resonator modes. We study the resonant frequency shifts in the presence of helium gas and demonstrate a sensing capability of 1 Torr pressure in a cryogenic environment.

  10. Pneumatic distortion compensation for aircraft surface pressure sensing devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitmore, Stephen A.; Leondes, Cornelius T.

    1991-01-01

    In this paper a technique of compensating for pneumatic distortion in aircraft surface pressure sensing devices is developed. The compensation allows conventional pressure sensing technology to obtain improved unsteady pressure measurements. Pressure distortion caused by frictional attenuation and pneumatic resonance within the sensing system makes obtaining unsteady pressure measurements by conventional sensors difficult. Typically, most of the distortion occurs within the pneumatic tubing used to transmit pressure impulses from the surface of the aircraft to the measurement transducer. This paper develops a second-order distortion model that accurately describes the behavior of the primary wave harmonic of the pneumatic tubing. The model is expressed in state-variable form and is coupled with standard results from minimum-variance estimation theory to develop an algorithm to compensate for the effects of pneumatic distortion. Both postflight and real-time algorithms are developed and evaluated using simulated and flight data. Covariance selection and filter-tuning examples are presented. Results presented verify that, given appropriate covariance magnitudes, the algorithms accurately reconstruct surface pressure values from remotely sensed pressure measurements.

  11. Single-Tip Probe Senses Pressure Or Temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trimarchi, Paul

    1993-01-01

    Single-tip probe designed for use in supersonic wind tunnel switched to sense pressure or temperature measurements nearly simultaneous at that point. Includes small valve like valves used in bicycle and automotive tires, called "Schraeder valve". Tire valve opened or closed by push rod and solenoid. In open position, flow past thermocouple enables measurements of temperature. In closed position, flow blocked and pressure in probe backs up to pressure transducer.

  12. Fiber-Optic Photoelastic Device Senses Pressure Of Hot Gas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Redner, Alex S.; Wesson, L. N.

    1995-01-01

    Fiber-optic/photoelastic device measures gas pressures up to 600 psi at operating temperatures as high as 1,100 degrees C. Pressure on fused-silica sensing element gives rise to birefringence via photoelastic effect. Polarization of light changed by birefringence; change in polarization measured and used to infer pressure causing it. Device prototype of gas-pressure sensor for aircraft engine. Mounted in engine at or near desired measurement point, where it responds to both time-varying and steady components of pressure.

  13. Hydrostatic pressure sensing with surface-core fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osório, Jonas H.; Franco, Marcos A. R.; Cordeiro, Cristiano M. B.

    2015-09-01

    In this paper, we report the employment of surface-core fibers for hydrostatic pressure sensing. To our knowledge, this is the first demonstration of the use of these fibers for the referenced purpose. Theoretical simulations of the fiber structure were performed in order to estimate fiber phase and group birefringence values and its pressure sensitivity coefficient. In order to test fiber performance when acting as a pressure sensor, the same was placed in an polarimetric setup and its spectral response was measured. A sensitivity of 4.8 nm/MPa was achieved, showing good resemblance to the expected sensitivity value (4.6 nm/MPa).

  14. Human Behavior Recognition Using Foot Pressure Sensing Shoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugimoto, Chika; Ozaki, Kenji; Ezoe, Ryosuke; Hosaka, Hiroshi; Yamato, Hiroyuki

    To recognize human behavior in unlimited environments, sensing shoes for measuring foot pressure distribution were developed. Seven pressure sensors were installed on an insole, and a measurement module was embedded in the shoe. An analysis for discriminating the user's movements from the foot pressure distribution was examined, considering the movements, walking, running, standing, sitting, going upstairs and downstairs, and cycling. These seven actions were discriminated using feature quantities such as the average, standard deviation, maximum, and difference deviation extracted from the data of three sensors by discriminant analysis. The evaluation results showed highly accurate behavior recognition based on foot pressure at some points. In addition, by canonical discriminant analysis, six discriminant functions which classify the seven actions with an accuracy of 100% were derived by using feature quantities extracted from five sensors. The results confirmed that discriminant analysis can be used for automatically recognizing human behaviors based on foot pressure data.

  15. Development of a Piezoelectric Vacuum Sensing Component for a Wide Pressure Range

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Bing-Yu; Hsieh, Fan-Chun; Lin, Che-Yu; Chen, Shao-En; Chen, Fong-Zhi; Wu, Chia-Che

    2014-01-01

    In this study, we develop a clamped–clamped beam-type piezoelectric vacuum pressure sensing element. The clamped–clamped piezoelectric beam is composed of a PZT layer and a copper substrate. A pair of electrodes is set near each end. An input voltage is applied to a pair of electrodes to vibrate the piezoelectric beam, and the output voltage is measured at the other pair. Because the viscous forces on the piezoelectric beam vary at different air pressures, the vibration of the beam depends on the vacuum pressure. The developed pressure sensor can sense a wide range of pressure, from 6.5 × 10−6 to 760 Torr. The experimental results showed that the output voltage is inversely proportional to the gas damping ratio, and thus, the vacuum pressure was estimated from the output voltage. PMID:25421736

  16. Soft, transparent, electronic skin for distributed and multiple pressure sensing.

    PubMed

    Levi, Alessandro; Piovanelli, Matteo; Furlan, Silvano; Mazzolai, Barbara; Beccai, Lucia

    2013-05-17

    In this paper we present a new optical, flexible pressure sensor that can be applied as smart skin to a robot or to consumer electronic devices. We describe a mechano-optical transduction principle that can allow the encoding of information related to an externally applied mechanical stimulus, e.g., contact, pressure and shape of contact. The physical embodiment that we present in this work is an electronic skin consisting of eight infrared emitters and eight photo-detectors coupled together and embedded in a planar PDMS waveguide of 5.5 cm diameter. When a contact occurs on the sensing area, the optical signals reaching the peripheral detectors experience a loss because of the Frustrated Total Internal Reflection and deformation of the material. The light signal is converted to electrical signal through an electronic system and a reconstruction algorithm running on a computer reconstructs the pressure map. Pilot experiments are performed to validate the tactile sensing principle by applying external pressures up to 160 kPa. Moreover, the capabilities of the electronic skin to detect contact pressure at multiple subsequent positions, as well as its function on curved surfaces, are validated. A weight sensitivity of 0.193 gr(-1) was recorded, thus making the electronic skin suitable to detect pressures in the order of few grams.

  17. Soft, Transparent, Electronic Skin for Distributed and Multiple Pressure Sensing

    PubMed Central

    Levi, Alessandro; Piovanelli, Matteo; Furlan, Silvano; Mazzolai, Barbara; Beccai, Lucia

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we present a new optical, flexible pressure sensor that can be applied as smart skin to a robot or to consumer electronic devices. We describe a mechano-optical transduction principle that can allow the encoding of information related to an externally applied mechanical stimulus, e.g., contact, pressure and shape of contact. The physical embodiment that we present in this work is an electronic skin consisting of eight infrared emitters and eight photo-detectors coupled together and embedded in a planar PDMS waveguide of 5.5 cm diameter. When a contact occurs on the sensing area, the optical signals reaching the peripheral detectors experience a loss because of the Frustrated Total Internal Reflection and deformation of the material. The light signal is converted to electrical signal through an electronic system and a reconstruction algorithm running on a computer reconstructs the pressure map. Pilot experiments are performed to validate the tactile sensing principle by applying external pressures up to 160 kPa. Moreover, the capabilities of the electronic skin to detect contact pressure at multiple subsequent positions, as well as its function on curved surfaces, are validated. A weight sensitivity of 0.193 gr−1 was recorded, thus making the electronic skin suitable to detect pressures in the order of few grams. PMID:23686140

  18. Biocompatible Pressure Sensing Skins for Minimally Invasive Surgical Instruments

    PubMed Central

    Arabagi, Veaceslav; Felfoul, Ouajdi; Gosline, Andrew H.; Wood, Robert J.; Dupont, Pierre E.

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents 800-μm thick, biocompatible sensing skins composed of arrays of pressure sensors. The arrays can be configured to conform to the surface of medical instruments so as to act as disposable sensing skins. In particular, the fabrication of cylindrical geometries is considered here for use on endoscopes. The sensing technology is based on polydimethylsiloxane synthetic silicone encapsulated microchannels filled with a biocompatible salt-saturated glycerol solution, functioning as the conductive medium. A multi-layer manufacturing approach is introduced that enables stacking sensing microchannels, mechanical stress concentration features, and electrical routing via flexcircuits in a thickness of less than 1 mm. The proposed approach is inexpensive and does not require clean room tools or techniques. The mechanical stress concentration features are implemented using a patterned copper layer that serves to improve sensing range and sensitivity. Sensor performance is demonstrated experimentally using a sensing skin mounted on a neuroendoscope insertion cannula and is shown to outperform previously developed non-biocompatible sensors. PMID:27642266

  19. Compensating for pneumatic distortion in pressure sensing devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitmore, Stephen A.; Leondes, Cornelius T.

    1990-01-01

    A general numerical technique for obtaining unsteady pressure measurements using conventional pressure sensing technology has been developed. A pneumatic distortion model, based on the Navier-Stokes equations of momentum and continuity, was reduced to a low-order, state-variable model retaining most of the dynamic characteristics of the full model. The reduced-order model is coupled with results from minimum variance estimation theory to develop an algorithm to compensate the effects of pneumatic distortion. Both postflight and real-time algorithms were developed and evaluated using simulated and flight data.

  20. Optimizing a remote sensing instrument to measure atmospheric surface pressure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peckham, G. E.; Gatley, C.; Flower, D. A.

    1983-01-01

    Atmospheric surface pressure can be remotely sensed from a satellite by an active instrument which measures return echoes from the ocean at frequencies near the 60 GHz oxygen absorption band. The instrument is optimized by selecting its frequencies of operation, transmitter powers and antenna size through a new procedure baesd on numerical simulation which maximizes the retrieval accuracy. The predicted standard deviation error in the retrieved surface pressure is 1 mb. In addition the measurements can be used to retrieve water vapor, cloud liquid water and sea state, which is related to wind speed.

  1. SiC-based optical interferometry at high pressures and temperatures for pressure and chemical sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dakshinamurthy, Surendramohan; Quick, Nathaniel R.; Kar, Aravinda

    2006-05-01

    Crystalline silicon carbide is a chemically inert wide band gap semiconductor with good mechanical strength and oxidation-resistant properties at elevated temperatures, which make it a good sensor material for harsh environments such as combustion chambers and turbine systems. For such cases, optical sensors are generally superior to electrical sensors in many aspects such as responsivity, detectivity, and sensitivity. This paper presents a wireless technique for pressure and chemical sensing based on the pressure-and temperature-dependent refractive indices of silicon carbide. A helium-neon laser with a wavelength of 632.8 nm was used as a probe laser to obtain the complementary Airy pattern of the laser power reflected off a silicon carbide wafer segment at high temperatures (up to 300 °C) and pressures (up to 400 psi). The interference patterns revealed unique characteristics for nitrogen and argon test gases. This pattern is different at the same pressure and temperature for the two gases, indicating the chemical sensing selectivity capability of silicon carbide. Also the pattern changes with pressures for the same gas, indicating the pressure sensing capability. The refractive index of silicon carbide has been obtained for different pressures and temperatures using the interference pattern. A three-layer model has been employed to determine the refractive indices of the gases using the reflected power data.

  2. An implantable pressure sensing system with electromechanical interrogation scheme.

    PubMed

    Kim, Albert; Powell, C R; Ziaie, Babak

    2014-07-01

    In this paper, we report on the development of an implantable pressure sensing system that is powered by mechanical vibrations in the audible acoustic frequency range. This technique significantly enhances interrogation range, alleviates the misalignment issues commonly encountered with inductive powering, and simplifies the external receiver circuitry. The interrogation scheme consists of two phases: a mechanical vibration phase and an electrical radiation phase. During the first phase, a piezoelectric cantilever acts as an acoustic receiver and charges a capacitor by converting sound vibration harmonics occurring at its resonant frequency into electrical power. In the subsequent electrical phase, when the cantilever is not vibrating, the stored electric charge is discharged across an LC tank whose inductor is pressure sensitive; hence, when the LC tank oscillates at its natural resonant frequency, it radiates a high-frequency signal that is detectable using an external receiver and its frequency corresponds to the measured pressure. The pressure sensitive inductor consists of a planar coil (single loop of wire) with a ferrite core whose distance to the coil varies with applied pressure. A prototype of the implantable pressure sensor is fabricated and tested, both in vitro and in vivo (swine bladder). A pressure sensitivity of 1 kHz/cm H2O is achieved with minimal misalignment sensitivity (26% drop at 90° misalignment between the implanted device and acoustic source; 60% drop at 90° misalignment between the implanted device and RF receiver coil).

  3. Enhanced acoustic sensing through wave compression and pressure amplification in anisotropic metamaterials.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yongyao; Liu, Haijun; Reilly, Michael; Bae, Hyungdae; Yu, Miao

    2014-10-15

    Acoustic sensors play an important role in many areas, such as homeland security, navigation, communication, health care and industry. However, the fundamental pressure detection limit hinders the performance of current acoustic sensing technologies. Here, through analytical, numerical and experimental studies, we show that anisotropic acoustic metamaterials can be designed to have strong wave compression effect that renders direct amplification of pressure fields in metamaterials. This enables a sensing mechanism that can help overcome the detection limit of conventional acoustic sensing systems. We further demonstrate a metamaterial-enhanced acoustic sensing system that achieves more than 20 dB signal-to-noise enhancement (over an order of magnitude enhancement in detection limit). With this system, weak acoustic pulse signals overwhelmed by the noise are successfully recovered. This work opens up new vistas for the development of metamaterial-based acoustic sensors with improved performance and functionalities that are highly desirable for many applications.

  4. A novel, intelligent, pressure-sensing colostomy plug for reducing fecal leakage.

    PubMed

    Chen, Fei; Li, Zhi-Chao; Li, Qiang; Liang, Fei-Xue; Guo, Xiong-Bo; Huang, Zong-Hai

    2015-06-01

    This study aims to describe and report the effectiveness of a novel, pressure-sensing colostomy plug for reducing fecal leakage. Nine miniature Tibetan pigs, aged 6-8 months, were given colostomies and divided into three groups (n = 3 each group). A novel pressure-sensing colostomy plug was placed in each pig and set to indicate when intestinal pressures of either 5, 10, or 15 mm Hg, respectively, were reached. When the pressure thresholds were reached, the animals' bowels were examined for the presence of stool and/or stomal leakage, and the data were recorded at weeks 1, 4, and 8 after surgery. The colostomy plug calibrated to 15 mm Hg pressure demonstrated the greatest accuracy in predicting the presence of stool in the bowels of study animals, averaging >90% sensitivity. In general, the sensitivity for predicting the presence of stool did not vary significantly over time, though there was a slight increase in accuracy in the 5 mm Hg group at later time-points. The sensitivity for predicting stool in the bowel did not change significantly over time in any of the three groups. Stomal leakage was found to be inversely proportional to the pressure-sensor setting, in that the 15 mm Hg group exhibited the greatest amount of leakage. This difference, however, was found to be significant only at week 1 postsurgery. The intelligent, pressure-sensing colostomy plug was able to accurately predict the presence of stool in the bowel and maintain continence, allowing negligible leakage.

  5. Mississippi Sound Remote Sensing Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Atwell, B. H.

    1973-01-01

    The Mississippi Sound Remote Sensing Study was initiated as part of the research program of the NASA Earth Resources Laboratory. The objective of this study is development of remote sensing techniques to study near-shore marine waters. Included within this general objective are the following: (1) evaluate existing techniques and instruments used for remote measurement of parameters of interest within these waters; (2) develop methods for interpretation of state-of-the-art remote sensing data which are most meaningful to an understanding of processes taking place within near-shore waters; (3) define hardware development requirements and/or system specifications; (4) develop a system combining data from remote and surface measurements which will most efficiently assess conditions in near-shore waters; (5) conduct projects in coordination with appropriate operating agencies to demonstrate applicability of this research to environmental and economic problems.

  6. On the spectrum of radiation pressure driven optomechanical oscillator and its application in sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, F.; Hossein-Zadeh, M.

    2013-05-01

    We study the RF spectrum of radiation pressure driven optomechanical oscillators (OMO). Using experiments and theoretical estimations we have characterized the relative amplitude of OMO's spectral components as a function of optical detuning and optical input power. We have identified a regime where the optical resonance shift can be directly extracted from the RF spectrum for resonant optical sensing applications.

  7. Flexible Distributed Pressure Sensing Strip for a Urethral Catheter1

    PubMed Central

    Ahmadi, Mahdi; Rajamani, Rajesh; Timm, Gerald; Sezen, A.S.

    2015-01-01

    A multi-sensor flexible strip is developed for a urethral catheter to measure distributed pressure in a human urethra. The developed sensor strip has important clinical applications in urodynamic testing for analyzing the causes of urinary incontinence in patients. There are two major challenges in the development of the sensor. First, a highly sensitive sensor strip that is flexible enough for urethral insertion into a human body is required and second, the sensor has to work reliably in a liquid in-vivo environment in the human body. Capacitive force sensors are designed and micro-fabricated using polyimide/PDMS substrates and copper electrodes. To remove the parasitic influence of urethral tissues which create fringe capacitance that can lead to significant errors, a reference fringe capacitance measurement sensor is incorporated on the strip. The sensing strip is embedded on a catheter and experimental in-vitro evaluation is presented using a bench-top pressure chamber. The sensors on the strip are able to provide the required sensitivity and range. Preliminary experimental results also show promise that by using measurements from the reference parasitic sensor on the strip, the influence of parasitics from human tissue on the pressure measurements can be removed. PMID:27065719

  8. Studies on Five Senses Treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Sadaka; Miao, Tiejun; Oyama-Higa, Mayumi

    2011-06-01

    This study proposed a therapy from complementary and alternative medicine to treat mental disorder by through interactions of five senses between therapist and patient. In this method sounding a certain six voices play an important role in healing and recovery. First, we studied effects of speaking using scalp- EEG measurement. Chaos analysis of EEG showed a largely enhanced largest Lyapunov exponent (LLE) during the speaking. In addition, EEG power spectrum showed an increase over most frequencies. Second, we performed case studies on mental disorder using the therapy. Running power spectrum of EEG of patients indicated decreasing power at end of treatment, implying five senses therapy induced relaxed and lowered energy in central neural system. The results agreed with patient's reports that there were considerable decline in anxiety and improvements in mood.

  9. Introducing the Pressure-Sensing Palatograph--The Next Frontier in Electropalatography

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murdoch, Bruce; Goozee, Justine; Veidt, Martin; Scott, Dion; Meyers, Ian

    2004-01-01

    Primary Objective. To extend the capabilities of current electropalatography (EPG) systems by developing a pressure-sensing EPG system. An initial trial of a prototype pressure-sensing palate will be presented. Research Design. The processes involved in designing the pressure sensors are outlined, with Hall effect transistors being selected. These…

  10. Mississippi Sound remote sensing study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Atwell, B. H.; Thomann, G. C.

    1972-01-01

    Remote sensing techniques are being developed to study near shore marine waters in the Mississippi Sound. Specific elements of the investigation include: (1) evaluation of existing techniques and instrument capabilities for remote measurement of parameters which characterize near shore water; (2) integration of these parameters into a system which will make possible the definition of circulation characteristics; (3) conduct of applications experiments; and (4) definition of hardware development requirements and/or system specifications. Efforts have emphasized: (1) development of a satisfactory system of gathering ground truth over the entire area of Mississippi Sound to aid in evaluating remotely sensed data; (2) conduct of two data acquisition experiments; (3) analysis of individual sensor data from completed flights; and (4) pursuit of methods which will allow interrelations between data from individual sensors in order to add another dimension to the study.

  11. Pressure-sensing performance of upright cylinders in a Mach 10 boundary-layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Steven; Murphy, Kelly

    1994-01-01

    An experimental research program to provide basic knowledge of the pressure-sensing performance of upright, flushported cylinders in a hypersonic boundary layer is described. Three upright cylinders of 0.25-, 0.5- and l.0-in. diameters and a conventional rake were placed in the test section sidewall boundary layer of the 31 Inch Mach 10 Wind Tunnel at NASA Langley Research Center, Hampton, Virginia. Boundary-layer pressures from these cylinders were compared to those measured with a conventional rake. A boundary-layer thickness-to-cylinder-diameter ratio of 8 proved sufficient to accurately measure an overall pressure profile and ascertain the boundary-layer thickness. Effects of Reynolds number, flow angularity, and shock wave impingement on pressure measurement were also investigated. Although Reynolds number effects were negligible at the conditions studied, flow angularity above 10 deg significantly affects the measured pressures. Shock wave impingement was used to investigate orifice-to-orifice pressure crosstalk. No crosstalk was measured. The lower pressure measured above the oblique shock wave impingement showed no influence of the higher pressure generated at the lower port locations.

  12. The immediate effects of lidocaine iontophoresis using interferential current on pressure sense threshold and tactile sensation.

    PubMed

    Yoosefinejad, Amin Kordi; Motealleh, Alireza; Abbasnia, Keramatollah

    2016-01-01

    Iontophoresis is the noninvasive delivery of ions using direct current. The direct current has some disadvantages such as skin burning. Interferential current is a kind of alternating current without limitations of direct current; so the purpose of this study is to investigate and compare the effects of lidocaine, interferential current and lidocaine iontophoresis using interferential current. 30 healthy women aged 20-24 years participated in this randomized clinical trial study. Pressure, tactile and pain thresholds were evaluated before and after the application of treatment methods. Pressure, tactile and pain sensitivity increased significantly after the application of lidocaine alone (p < 0.005) and lidocaine iontophoresis using interferential current (p < 0.0001). Lidocaine iontophoresis using interferential current can increase perception threshold of pain, tactile stimulus and pressure sense more significantly than lidocaine and interferential current alone.

  13. LWIR Microgrid Polarimeter for Remote Sensing Studies

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-02-28

    Polarimeter for Remote Sensing Studies 5b. GRANT NUMBER FA9550-08-1-0295 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d. PROJECT NUMBER 1. Scott Tyo 5e. TASK...and tested at the University of Arizona, and preliminary images are shown in this final report. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Remote Sensing , polarimetry 16...7.0 LWIR Microgrid Polarimeter for Remote Sensing Studies J. Scott Tyo College of Optical Sciences University of Arizona Tucson, AZ, 85721 tyo

  14. Differential pressure sensing system for airfoils usable in turbine engines

    DOEpatents

    Yang, Wen-Ching; Stampahar, Maria E.

    2005-09-13

    A detection system for identifying airfoils having a cooling systems with orifices that are plugged with contaminants or with showerheads having a portion burned off. The detection system measures pressures at different locations and calculates or measures a differential pressure. The differential pressure may be compared with a known benchmark value to determine whether the differential pressure has changed. Changes in the differential pressure may indicate that one or more of the orifices in a cooling system of an airfoil are plugged or that portions of, or all of, a showerhead has burned off.

  15. Transient Behavior of Lumped-Constant Systems for Sensing Gas Pressures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Delio, Gene J; Schwent, Glennon V; Cesaro, Richard S

    1949-01-01

    The development of theoretical equations describing the behavior of a lumped-constant pressure-sensing system under transient operation Is presented with experimental data that show agreement with the equations. A pressure-sensing system 'consisting of a tube terminating in a reservoir is investigated for the transient relation between a presSure disturbance at the open end of the tube and the pressure response in the reservoir. Design parameters are presented that can be adjusted to achieve a desired performance fran such a system when the system is considered as a transfer member of a control loop.

  16. Crocodile-inspired dome-shaped pressure receptors for passive hydrodynamic sensing.

    PubMed

    Kanhere, Elgar; Wang, Nan; Kottapalli, Ajay Giri Prakash; Asadnia, Mohsen; Subramaniam, Vignesh; Miao, Jianmin; Triantafyllou, Michael

    2016-08-22

    Passive mechanosensing is an energy-efficient and effective recourse for autonomous underwater vehicles (AUVs) for perceiving their surroundings. The passive sensory organs of aquatic animals have provided inspiration to biomimetic researchers for developing underwater passive sensing systems for AUVs. This work is inspired by the 'integumentary sensory organs' (ISOs) which are dispersed on the skin of crocodiles and are equipped with slowly adapting (SA) and rapidly adapting (RA) receptors. ISOs assist crocodiles in locating the origin of a disturbance, both on the water surface and under water, thereby enabling them to hunt prey even in a dark environment and turbid waters. In this study, we construct SA dome receptors embedded with microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) piezoresistive sensors to measure the steady-state pressures imparted by flows and RA dome receptors embedded with MEMS piezoelectric sensors to detect oscillatory pressures in water. Experimental results manifest the ability of SA and RA dome receptors to sense the direction of steady-state flows and oscillatory disturbances, respectively. As a proof of concept, the SA domes are tested on the hull of a kayak under various pressure variations owing to different types of movements of the hull. Our results indicate that the dome receptors are capable of discerning the angle of attack and speed of the flow.

  17. High-pressure optical studies

    SciTech Connect

    Drickamer, H.G.

    1981-01-01

    High pressure experimentation may concern intrinsically high pressure phenomena, or it may be used to gain a better understanding of states or processes at one atmosphere. The latter application is probably more prevelant in condensed matter physics. Under this second rubric one may either use high pressure to perturb various electronic energy levels and from this pressure tuning characterize states or processes, or one can use pressure to change a macroscopic parameter in a controlled way, then measure the effect on some molecular property. In this paper, the pressure tuning aspect is emphasized, with a lesser discussion of macroscopic - molecular relationships. In rare earth chelates the efficiency of 4f-4f emission of the rare earth is controlled by the feeding from the singlet and triplet levels of the organic ligand. These ligand levels can be strongly shifted by pressure. A study of the effect of pressure on the emission efficiency permits one to understand the effect of ligand modification at one atmosphere. Photochromic crystals change color upon irradiation due to occupation of a metastable ground state. In thermochromic crystals, raising the temperature accomplishes the same results. For a group of molecular crystals (anils) at high pressure, the metastable state can be occupied at room temperature. The relative displacement of the energy levels at high pressure also inhibits the optical process. Effects on luminescence intensity are shown to be consistent. In the area of microscopic - molecular relationships, the effect of viscosity and dielectric properties on rates of non-radiative (thermal) and radiative emission, and on peak energy for luminescence is demonstrated. For systems which can emit from either of two excited states depending on the interaction with the environment, the effect of rigidity of the medium on the rate of rearrangement of the excited state is shown.

  18. Demodulation System for Fiber Optic Bragg Grating Dynamic Pressure Sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lekki, John D.; Adamovsky, Grigory; Floyd, Bertram

    2001-01-01

    Fiber optic Bragg gratings have been used for years to measure quasi-static phenomena. In aircraft engine applications there is a need to measure dynamic signals such as variable pressures. In order to monitor these pressures a detection system with broad dynamic range is needed. This paper describes an interferometric demodulator that was developed and optimized for this particular application. The signal to noise ratio was maximized through temporal coherence analysis. The demodulator was incorporated in a laboratory system that simulates conditions to be measured. Several pressure sensor configurations incorporating a fiber optic Bragg grating were also explored. The results of the experiments are reported in this paper.

  19. Integrated optical interferometer with micromechanical diaphragm for pressure sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Brabander, Gregory N.; Boyd, Joseph T.; Beheim, Glenn

    1994-10-01

    An electrically passive optical pressure sensor has been fabricated which uses a integrated-optical Y-junction ring resonator to measure the strain induced in a micromachined silicon diaphragm. A silicon substrate is etched from the side opposite the silicon oxynitride optical waveguides to produce a rectangular diaphragm whose long edge lies underneath a straight section in the ring. Pressure-induced changes in the resonant frequency of the ring are measured using a frequency swept laser diode. A linear response to pressure is observed for the TM mode with a sensitivity of 0.0094 rad/kPa. The transmissivity function of the resonator is derived and compared with measured response. This pressure sensor is rugged, amenable to batch fabrication, and it provides a link insensitive readout.

  20. Pressure and shear sensing based on microstrip antennas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohammad, I.; Huang, H.

    2012-04-01

    A foot ulcer is the initiating factor in 85% of all diabetic amputations. Ulcer formation is believed to be contributed by both pressure and shear forces. There are commercially available instruments that can measure plantar pressure. However, instruments for plantar shear measurement are limited. In this paper, we investigate the application of antenna sensors for shear and pressure measurement. The principle of operation of both antenna sensors will be discussed first, followed by detailed descriptions on the antenna designs, sensor fabrication, experimental setup, procedure and results. Because the antenna sensors are small in size, can be wirelessly interrogated, and are frequency multiplexable, we plan to embed them in shoes for simultaneous mapping of plantar shear and pressure distributions in the future.

  1. Hydrostatic pressure sensing with high birefringence photonic crystal fibers.

    PubMed

    Fávero, Fernando C; Quintero, Sully M M; Martelli, Cicero; Braga, Arthur M B; Silva, Vinícius V; Carvalho, Isabel C S; Llerena, Roberth W A; Valente, Luiz C G

    2010-01-01

    The effect of hydrostatic pressure on the waveguiding properties of high birefringence photonic crystal fibers (HiBi PCF) is evaluated both numerically and experimentally. A fiber design presenting form birefringence induced by two enlarged holes in the innermost ring defining the fiber core is investigated. Numerical results show that modal sensitivity to the applied pressure depends on the diameters of the holes, and can be tailored by independently varying the sizes of the large or small holes. Numerical and experimental results are compared showing excellent agreement. A hydrostatic pressure sensor is proposed and demonstrated using an in-fiber modal interferometer where the two orthogonally polarized modes of a HiBi PCF generate fringes over the optical spectrum of a broad band source. From the analysis of experimental results, it is concluded that, in principle, an operating limit of 92 MPa in pressure could be achieved with 0.0003% of full scale resolution.

  2. Pressure sensing using a completely flexible organic transistor.

    PubMed

    Manunza, I; Bonfiglio, A

    2007-06-15

    In this paper, we report on pressure sensors based on completely flexible organic thin film transistors (OTFTs). A flexible and transparent plastic foil (Mylar) is employed both as substrate and gate dielectric. Gold source and drain electrodes are patterned on the upper side of the foil while the gate electrode lies on the opposite side; a vacuum-sublimed pentacene film is used as active layer. The pressure dependence of the output current has been investigated by applying to the gate side of the device a mechanical stimulus by means of a pressurized airflow. Experimental results show a reversible dependence of the current on the pressure. The data analysis suggests that the current variations are due to pressure-induced variations of mobility, threshold voltage and possibly contact resistance. The drain current variation is reproducible, linear and reversible even though it displays a hysteresis. Moreover, the sensor responds very fast to the mechanical stimulus (i.e. within tens-hundreds of milliseconds) but the time required to reach the steady state is much higher (tens-hundreds of seconds). Electrical characteristics with and without applied pressure have been carried out in air without any extra ad hoc read-out circuit or equipment. The reported devices show potential advantages of flexibility of the structure, low cost and versatility of the device structure for sensor technologies. Many innovative and attractive applications as wearable electronics, e-textiles, e-skin for robots can be considered.

  3. Temperature-insensitive pressure or strain sensing technology with fiber optic hybrid Sagnac interferometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Yuanhong; Lu, Lin; Liu, Shuo; Jin, Wei; Han, Zonghu; Cao, Yaohui

    2016-05-01

    The transmission spectrum characteristic of two-segment polarization maintaining fibers Sagnac interferometer was investigated and simulated in detail and a temperature-insensitive pressure or strain sensing technology was proposed. An experimental hybrid Sagnac interferometer was built and the solid core polarization maintaining photonic crystal fiber was taken as the sensing probe. The side pressure sensitive coefficients and the temperature crosstalk drift were measured and compared. The experimental results show that the side pressure sensitive coefficient was ~0.2877 nm/N and the temperature drift was less than 0.1 pm/°C.

  4. Fiber optic microphone having a pressure sensing reflective membrane and a voltage source for calibration purpose

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zuckerwar, Allan J. (Inventor); Cuomo, Frank W. (Inventor); Robbins, William E. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    A fiber optic microphone is provided for measuring fluctuating pressures. An optical fiber probe having at least one transmitting fiber for transmitting light to a pressure-sensing membrane and at least one receiving fiber for receiving light reflected from a stretched membrane is provided. The pressure-sensing membrane may be stretched for high frequency response. Further, a reflecting surface of the pressure-sensing membrane may have dimensions which substantially correspond to dimensions of a cross section of the optical fiber probe. Further, the fiber optic microphone can be made of materials for use in high temperature environments, for example greater than 1000 F. A fiber optic probe is also provided with a back plate for damping membrane motion. The back plate further provides a means for on-line calibration of the microphone.

  5. High temperature fiber optic microphone having a pressure-sensing reflective membrane under tensile stress

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zuckerwar, Allan J. (Inventor); Cuomo, Frank W. (Inventor); Robbins, William E. (Inventor); Hopson, Purnell, Jr. (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    A fiber optic microphone is provided for measuring fluctuating pressures. An optical fiber probe having at least one transmitting fiber for transmitting light to a pressure-sensing membrane and at least one receiving fiber for receiving light reflected from a stretched membrane is provided. The pressure-sensing membrane may be stretched for high frequency response. Further, a reflecting surface of the pressure-sensing membrane may have dimensions which substantially correspond to dimensions of a cross section of the optical fiber probe. Further, the fiber optic microphone can be made of materials for use in high temperature environments, for example greater than 1000 F. A fiber optic probe is also provided with a backplate for damping membrane motion. The backplate further provides a means for on-line calibration of the microphone.

  6. Integrated Optical Interferometers with Micromachined Diaphragms for Pressure Sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeBrabander, Gregory N.; Boyd, Joseph T.

    1996-01-01

    Optical pressure sensors have been fabricated which use an integrated optical channel waveguide that is part of an interferometer to measure the pressure-induced strain in a micromachined silicon diaphragm. A silicon substrate is etched from the back of the wafer leaving a rectangular diaphragm. On the opposite side of the wafer, ring resonator and Mach-Zehnder interferometers are formed with optical channel waveguides made from a low pressure chemical vapor deposited film of silicon oxynitride. The interferometer's phase is altered by pressure-induced stress in a channel segment positioned over the long edge of the diaphragm. The phase change in the ring resonator is monitored using a link-insensitive swept frequency laser diode, while in the Mach-Zehnder it is determined using a broad band super luminescent diode with subsequent wavelength separation. The ring resonator was found to be highly temperature sensitive, while the Mach-Zehnder, which had a smaller optical path length difference, was proportionally less so. The quasi-TM mode was more sensitive to pressure, in accord with calculations. Waveguide and sensor theory, sensitivity calculations, a fabrication sequence, and experimental results are presented.

  7. Evaluation of pressure sensing concepts: A technology assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Shepard, R.L.; Thacker, L.H.

    1993-09-01

    Advanced distributed control systems for electric power plants will require more accurate and reliable pressure gauges than those now installed. Future developments in power plant control systems are expected to use digital/optical networks rather than the analog/electric data transmission used in existing plants. Many pressure transmitters now installed use oil filling to separate process fluids from the gauge mechanism and are subject to insidious failures when the oil leaks. Testing and maintenance of pressure channels occupy a disproportionately large amount of effort to restore their accuracy and verify their operability. These and similar concerns have prompted an assessment of a broad spectrum of sensor technologies to aid in selecting the most likely candidates for adaptation to power plant applications. Ten representative conventional and thirty innovational pressure sensors are described and compared. Particular emphasis is focused on two categories: Silicon-integrated pressure sensors and fiber-optic sensors, and both of these categories are discussed in detail. Additional attractive concepts include variable reluctance gauges and resonant structure gauges that may not require oil buffering from the process fluid.

  8. Electrochemical studies at high pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Cruanes, M.T.

    1993-01-01

    This research has dealt with the development and application of a methodology that permits electrochemical measurements at high pressure. The initial efforts focused on the design and construction of an electrochemical cell functional at hydrostatic pressures as high as 10 kbar. This cell was equipped with an Ag/AgCl/KCl (0.1M) reference electrode which provides reliable control of the potential at all pressures. The potential of this reference electrode can be considered to be constant with pressure. Measurements of formal potentials (E[degrees][prime]) of several transition-metal complexes vs the Ag/AgCl electrode rendered volumes of reactions whose magnitudes support the prediction of the negligible pressure dependence of the reference electrode. The main systems that have been investigated at high pressure are surface-modified electrodes. The author studied the effect of compression on the dynamics of charge transport in quaternized poly(4-vinylpyridine) (QPVP) films placed on gold electrodes, loaded with potassium ferricyanide, and equilibrated in potassium nitrate. Pressure accomplished the continuous change in the structure of the polymer network. This change causes a pronounced restriction in the propagation of charge and in the motion of mass. This high-pressure methodology has also allowed the spatial characterization of electron transfer events taking place between a gold electrode and ferrocene molecules covalently attached to the end of 1-undodecanethiol chains self-assembled on the electrode surface. The volumes of reaction and activation for the oxidation process are both positive, indicating that a volume expansion is associated with the formation of ferricinium. A model is proposed in which the creation of a vacancy in the self-assembled monolayer, for the accommodation of the ferricinium ion or a charge-compensating anion, is coupled with the electron transfer step.

  9. A flexible liquid crystal polymer MEMS pressure sensor array for fish-like underwater sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kottapalli, A. G. P.; Asadnia, M.; Miao, J. M.; Barbastathis, G.; Triantafyllou, M. S.

    2012-11-01

    In order to perform underwater surveillance, autonomous underwater vehicles (AUVs) require flexible, light-weight, reliable and robust sensing systems that are capable of flow sensing and detecting underwater objects. Underwater animals like fish perform a similar task using an efficient and ubiquitous sensory system called a lateral-line constituting of an array of pressure-gradient sensors. We demonstrate here the development of arrays of polymer microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) pressure sensors which are flexible and can be readily mounted on curved surfaces of AUV bodies. An array of ten sensors with a footprint of 60 (L) mm × 25 (W) mm × 0.4 (H) mm is fabricated using liquid crystal polymer (LCP) as the sensing membrane material. The flow sensing and object detection capabilities of the array are illustrated with proof-of-concept experiments conducted in a water tunnel. The sensors demonstrate a pressure sensitivity of 14.3 μV Pa-1. A high resolution of 25 mm s-1 is achieved in water flow sensing. The sensors can passively sense underwater objects by transducing the pressure variations generated underwater by the movement of objects. The experimental results demonstrate the array’s ability to detect the velocity of underwater objects towed past by with high accuracy, and an average error of only 2.5%.

  10. The calcium-sensing receptor and calcimimetics in blood pressure modulation.

    PubMed

    Smajilovic, Sanela; Yano, Shozo; Jabbari, Reza; Tfelt-Hansen, Jacob

    2011-10-01

    Calcium is a crucial second messenger in the cardiovascular system. However, calcium may also be an extracellular first messenger through a G-protein-coupled receptor that senses extracellular concentration (Ca(2+)(o)), the calcium-sensing receptor (CaR). The most prominent physiological function of the CaR is to maintain the extracellular Ca(2+) level in a very tight range by regulating the circulating levels of parathyroid hormone (PTH). This control over PTH and Ca(2+) levels is partially lost in patients suffering from primary and secondary hyperparathyroidism. Allosteric modulators of the CaR (calcimimetics) are the first drugs in their class to become available for clinical use and have been shown to successfully treat certain forms of primary and secondary hyperparathyroidism. In addition, several studies suggest beneficial effects of calcimimetics on cardiovascular risk factors associated with hyperparathyroidism. Although a plethora of studies demonstrated the CaR in heart and blood vessels, exact roles of the receptor in the cardiovascular system still remain to be elucidated. However, several studies point toward a possibility that the CaR might be involved in the regulation of vascular tone. This review will summarize the current knowledge on the possible functions of the CaR and calcimimetics on blood pressure regulation.

  11. A hybrid fiber-optic sensing system for down-hole pressure and distributed temperature measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Ke; Zhou, Xinlei; Yang, Bokai; Peng, Wei; Yu, Qingxu

    2015-10-01

    A hybrid fiber-optic sensing technique, combining the extrinsic Fabry-Perot interferometer (EFPI) based pressure sensor with the incoherent optical frequency domain reflectometry (IOFDR) based distributed temperature sensor (DTS), is presented for down-hole measurements. By using a laser diode as the common light source, a highly integrated hybrid EFPI/DTS sensing system has been developed with a single fiber. With the injection current of the laser diode below lasing threshold, the broadband spontaneous emission light is used for EFPI based pressure sensing; while with the injection current above the threshold, the stimulated emission light is used for Raman based distributed temperature sensing. There is no overlap between the spectral range of the reflected light from the EFPI sensor and the spectral range of the Raman scattered light. Pressure and distributed temperature can thus be measured by using wavelength-division multiplexing (WDM) technology. Experimental results show that both the pressure and the distributed temperature are measured with little interference. Furthermore, the pressure measurement can be compensated by the measured temperature values.

  12. A dynamic pressure generator for checking complete pressure sensing systems installed on an airplane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Demarco, D. M.

    1974-01-01

    A portable dynamic pressure generator, how it operates, and a test setup on an airplane are described. The generator is capable of providing a sinusoidal pressure having a peak-to-peak amplitude of 3.5 N/sq cm (5 psi) at frequencies ranging from 100 hertz to 200 hertz. A typical power spectral density plot of data from actual dynamic pressure fluctuation tests within the air inlet of the YF-12 airplane is presented.

  13. Simultaneous shear and pressure sensing based on patch antenna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Hao; Huang, Haiying

    2015-04-01

    In this paper, we presented a microstrip patch antenna sensor that is capable to measure the shear and normal deformations simultaneously. The sensor was designed based on the electromagnetic interference between a microstrip patch antenna and a metallic reflector separated by a distance. By placing the reflector on top of the patch antenna, the electromagnetic wave radiated by the patch antenna is reflected by the reflector and interferes with the electromagnetic field of the radiation patch, which in turn changes the antenna resonant frequencies. Since the antenna resonant frequencies are related to the lateral and vertical positions of the metallic reflector, the shear force and normal pressure that shift the reflector laterally and vertically can be detected by monitoring the antenna resonant frequencies. The numerical simulation and experimental measurements were carried out to evaluate the relationship between the antenna resonant frequencies and the shear and normal displacements. A data processing scheme was developed to inversely determine the shear and normal displacements from the antenna resonant frequencies.

  14. In-shoe plantar pressure measurement and analysis system based on fabric pressure sensing array.

    PubMed

    Shu, Lin; Hua, Tao; Wang, Yangyong; Qiao Li, Qiao; Feng, David Dagan; Tao, Xiaoming

    2010-05-01

    Spatial and temporal plantar pressure distributions are important and useful measures in footwear evaluation, athletic training, clinical gait analysis, and pathology foot diagnosis. However, present plantar pressure measurement and analysis systems are more or less uncomfortable to wear and expensive. This paper presents an in-shoe plantar pressure measurement and analysis system based on a textile fabric sensor array, which is soft, light, and has a high-pressure sensitivity and a long service life. The sensors are connected with a soft polymeric board through conductive yarns and integrated into an insole. A stable data acquisition system interfaces with the insole, wirelessly transmits the acquired data to remote receiver through Bluetooth path. Three configuration modes are incorporated to gain connection with desktop, laptop, or smart phone, which can be configured to comfortably work in research laboratories, clinics, sport ground, and other outdoor environments. A real-time display and analysis software is presented to calculate parameters such as mean pressure, peak pressure, center of pressure (COP), and shift speed of COP. Experimental results show that this system has stable performance in both static and dynamic measurements.

  15. Self-motion effects on hydrodynamic pressure sensing: part I. forward-backward motion.

    PubMed

    Akanyeti, Otar; Chambers, Lily D; Ježov, Jaas; Brown, Jennifer; Venturelli, Roberto; Kruusmaa, Maarja; Megill, William M; Fiorini, Paolo

    2013-06-01

    In underwater locomotion, extracting meaningful information from local flows is as desirable as it is challenging, due to complex fluid-structure interaction. Sensing and motion are tightly interconnected; hydrodynamic signals generated by the external stimuli are modified by the self-generated flow signals. Given that very little is known about self-generated signals, we used onboard pressure sensors to measure the pressure profiles over the head of a fusiform-shape craft while moving forward and backward harmonically. From these measurements we obtained a second-order polynomial model which incorporates the velocity and acceleration of the craft to estimate the surface pressure within the swimming range up to one body length/second (L s(-1)). The analysis of the model reveals valuable insights into the temporal and spatial changes of the pressure intensity as a function of craft's velocity. At low swimming velocities (<0.2 L s(-1)) the pressure signals are more sensitive to the acceleration of the craft than its velocity. However, the inertial effects gradually become less important as the velocity increases. The sensors on the front part of the craft are more sensitive to its movements than the sensors on the sides. With respect to the hydrostatic pressure measured in still water, the pressure detected by the foremost sensor reaches values up to 300 Pa at 1 L s(-1) swimming velocity, whereas the pressure difference between the foremost sensor and the next one is less than 50 Pa. Our results suggest that distributed pressure sensing can be used in a bimodal sensing strategy. The first mode detects external hydrodynamic events taking place around the craft, which requires minimal sensitivity to the self-motion of the craft. This can be accomplished by moving slowly with a constant velocity and by analyzing the pressure gradient as opposed to absolute pressure recordings. The second mode monitors the self-motion of the craft. It is shown here that

  16. A piezoelectric micro control valve with integrated capacitive sensing for ambulant blood pressure waveform monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Groen, Maarten S.; Wu, Kai; Brookhuis, Robert A.; van Houwelingen, Marc J.; Brouwer, Dannis M.; Lötters, Joost C.; Wiegerink, Remco J.

    2014-12-01

    We have designed and characterized a MEMS microvalve with built-in capacitive displacement sensing and fitted it with a miniature piezoelectric actuator to achieve active valve control. The integrated displacement sensor enables high bandwidth proportional control of the gas flow through the valve. This is an essential requirement for non-invasive blood pressure waveform monitoring based on following the arterial pressure with a counter pressure. Using the capacitive sensor, we demonstrate negligible hysteresis in the valve control characteristics. Fabrication of the valve requires only two mask steps for deep reactive ion etching (DRIE) and one release etch.

  17. Conducting a wind sensing study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Byer, R. L.

    1985-01-01

    Signal-to-noise requirements, and how signal-to-noise determines wind velocity measurement accuracy were studied. A Nd:YAG-based system was found to be competitive with a CO2-based system. Hardware was developed for a coherent Nd:YAG LIDAR system, and is being integrated into a functioning system. A diode-pumped monolithic rod laser to be used as a reference oscillator, a high-power, single-mode ring laser, for use as a master oscillator, and a high-gain, multipass amplifier were constructed.

  18. A harsh environment wireless pressure sensing solution utilizing high temperature electronics.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jie

    2013-02-27

    Pressure measurement under harsh environments, especially at high temperatures, is of great interest to many industries. The applicability of current pressure sensing technologies in extreme environments is limited by the embedded electronics which cannot survive beyond 300 °C ambient temperature as of today. In this paper, a pressure signal processing and wireless transmission module based on the cutting-edge Silicon Carbide (SiC) devices is designed and developed, for a commercial piezoresistive MEMS pressure sensor from Kulite Semiconductor Products, Inc. Equipped with this advanced high-temperature SiC electronics, not only the sensor head, but the entire pressure sensor suite is capable of operating at 450 °C. The addition of wireless functionality also makes the pressure sensor more flexible in harsh environments by eliminating the costly and fragile cable connections. The proposed approach was verified through prototype fabrication and high temperature bench testing from room temperature up to 450 °C. This novel high-temperature pressure sensing technology can be applied in real-time health monitoring of many systems involving harsh environments, such as military and commercial turbine engines.

  19. A Harsh Environment Wireless Pressure Sensing Solution Utilizing High Temperature Electronics

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jie

    2013-01-01

    Pressure measurement under harsh environments, especially at high temperatures, is of great interest to many industries. The applicability of current pressure sensing technologies in extreme environments is limited by the embedded electronics which cannot survive beyond 300 °C ambient temperature as of today. In this paper, a pressure signal processing and wireless transmission module based on the cutting-edge Silicon Carbide (SiC) devices is designed and developed, for a commercial piezoresistive MEMS pressure sensor from Kulite Semiconductor Products, Inc. Equipped with this advanced high-temperature SiC electronics, not only the sensor head, but the entire pressure sensor suite is capable of operating at 450 °C. The addition of wireless functionality also makes the pressure sensor more flexible in harsh environments by eliminating the costly and fragile cable connections. The proposed approach was verified through prototype fabrication and high temperature bench testing from room temperature up to 450 °C. This novel high-temperature pressure sensing technology can be applied in real-time health monitoring of many systems involving harsh environments, such as military and commercial turbine engines. PMID:23447006

  20. PyzoFlex: a printed piezoelectric pressure sensing foil for human machine interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zirkl, M.; Scheipl, G.; Stadlober, B.; Rendl, C.; Greindl, P.; Haller, M.; Hartmann, P.

    2013-09-01

    Ferroelectric material supports both pyro- and piezoelectric effects that can be used for sensing pressures on large, bended surfaces. We present PyzoFlex, a pressure-sensing input device that is based on a ferroelectric material (PVDF:TrFE). It is constructed by a sandwich structure of four layers that can easily be printed on any substrate. The PyzoFlex foil is sensitive to pressure- and temperature changes, bendable, energy-efficient, and it can easily be produced by a screen-printing routine. Even a hovering input-mode is feasible due to its pyroelectric effect. In this paper, we introduce this novel, fully printed input technology and discuss its benefits and limitations.

  1. Pressure sensing of the atmosphere by solar occultation using broadband CO(2) absorption.

    PubMed

    Park, J H; Russell Iii, J M; Drayson, S R

    1979-06-15

    A technique for obtaining pressure at the tangent point in an IR solar occultation experiment is described. By measuring IR absorption in bands of atmospheric CO(2) (e.g., 2.0 microm, 2.7 microm, or 4.3 microm), mean pressure values for each tangent point layer (vertical thickness 2 km or less) of the atmosphere can be obtained with rms errors of less than 3%. The simultaneous retrieval of pressure and gas concentration in a remote-sensing experiment will increase the accuracy of inverted gas concentrations and minimize the dependence of the experiment on pressure or mass path error resulting from use of climatological pressure data, satellite ephemeris, and instrument pointing accuracy.

  2. Initial development and testing of a novel foam-based pressure sensor for wearable sensing

    PubMed Central

    Dunne, Lucy E; Brady, Sarah; Smyth, Barry; Diamond, Dermot

    2005-01-01

    Background This paper provides an overview of initial research conducted in the development of pressure-sensitive foam and its application in wearable sensing. The foam sensor is composed of polypyrrole-coated polyurethane foam, which exhibits a piezo-resistive reaction when exposed to electrical current. The use of this polymer-coated foam is attractive for wearable sensing due to the sensor's retention of desirable mechanical properties similar to those exhibited by textile structures. Methods The development of the foam sensor is described, as well as the development of a prototype sensing garment with sensors in several areas on the torso to measure breathing, shoulder movement, neck movement, and scapula pressure. Sensor properties were characterized, and data from pilot tests was examined visually. Results The foam exhibits a positive linear conductance response to increased pressure. Torso tests show that it responds in a predictable and measurable manner to breathing, shoulder movement, neck movement, and scapula pressure. Conclusion The polypyrrole foam shows considerable promise as a sensor for medical, wearable, and ubiquitous computing applications. Further investigation of the foam's consistency of response, durability over time, and specificity of response is necessary. PMID:15740623

  3. The Study of Number Sense and Teaching Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tsao, Yea-Ling; Lin, Yi-Chung

    2011-01-01

    The goal of this study was to investigate understanding of inservice elementary school teachers in Taiwan about number sense, teaching strategies of number sense and the development of number sense of students; and the profile of integrating number sense into mathematical instruction , and teaching practice. Data was gathered through interviews of…

  4. Tuning the sensing range of silicon pressure sensor by trench etching technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chou, Yu-Tuan; Lin, Hung-Yi; Hu, Hsin-Hua

    2006-01-01

    The silicon pressure sensor has been developed for over thirty years and widely used in automobiles, medical instruments, commercial electronics, etc. There are many different specifications of silicon pressure sensors that cover a very large sensing range, from less than 1 psi to as high as 1000 psi. The key elements of the silicon pressure sensor are a square membrane and the piezoresistive strain gages near the boundary of the membrane. The dimensions of the membrane determine the full sensing range and the sensitivity of the silicon sensor, including thickness and in-plane length. Unfortunately, in order to change the sensing range, the manufacturers need to order a customized epi wafer to get the desired thickness. All masks (usually six) have to be re-laid and re-fabricated for different membrane sizes. The existing technology requires at least three months to deliver the prototype for specific customer requests or the new application market. This research proposes a new approach to dramatically reduce the prototyping time from three months to one week. The concept is to tune the rigidity of the sensing membrane by modifying the boundary conditions without changing the plenary size. An extra mask is utilized to define the geometry and location of deep-RIE trenches and all other masks remain the same. Membranes with different depths and different patterns of trenches are designed for different full sensing ranges. The simulation results show that for a 17um thick and 750um wide membrane, the adjustable range by tuning trench depth is about 45% (from 5um to 10um), and can go to as high as 100% by tuning both the pattern and depth of the trenches. Based on an actual test in a product fabrication line, we verified that the total delivery time can be minimized to one week to make the prototyping very effective and cost-efficient.

  5. Fabrication and performance of pressure-sensing device consisting of electret film and organic semiconductor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kodzasa, Takehito; Nobeshima, Daiki; Kuribara, Kazunori; Uemura, Sei; Yoshida, Manabu

    2017-04-01

    We propose a new concept of a pressure-sensitive device that consists of an organic electret film and an organic semiconductor. This device exhibits high sensitivity and selectivity against various types of pressure. The sensing mechanism of this device originates from a modulation of the electric conductivity of the organic semiconductor film induced by the interaction between the semiconductor film and the charged electret film placed face to face. It is expected that a complicated sensor array will be fabricated by using a roll-to-roll manufacturing system, because this device can be prepared by an all-printing and simple lamination process without high-level positional adjustment for printing processes. This also shows that this device with a simple structure is suitable for application to a highly flexible device array sheet for an Internet of Things (IoT) or wearable sensing system.

  6. Formulation of a minimum variance deconvolution technique for compensation of pneumatic distortion in pressure sensing devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitmore, Stephen A.

    1990-01-01

    Increasingly, aircraft system designs require that aerodynamic parameters derived from pneumatic measurements be employed as control-system feedbacks. Such high frequency pressure measurements' accuracy is compromised by pressure distortion due to frictional attenuation and pneumatic resonance within the sensing system. A pneumatic distortion model is here formulated and reduced to a low-order state-variable model which retains most of the full model's dynamic characteristics. This reduced-order model is coupled with standard results from minimum variance estimation theory to develop an algorithm to compensate for pneumatic-distortion effects.

  7. Surface studies of gas sensing metal oxides.

    PubMed

    Batzill, Matthias; Diebold, Ulrike

    2007-05-21

    The relation of surface science studies of single crystal metal oxides to gas sensing applications is reviewed. Most metal oxide gas sensors are used to detect oxidizing or reducing gases and therefore this article focuses on surface reduction processes and the interaction of oxygen with these surfaces. The systems that are discussed are: (i) the oxygen vacancy formation on the surface of the ion conductor CeO(2)(111); (ii) interaction of oxygen with TiO(2) (both adsorption processes and the incorporation of oxygen into the TiO(2)(110) lattice are discussed); (iii) the varying surface composition of SnO(2)(101) and its consequence for the adsorption of water; and (iv) Cu modified ZnO(0001)-Zn surfaces and its interaction with oxygen. These examples are chosen to give a comprehensive overview of surface science studies of different kinds of gas sensing materials and to illustrate the potential that surface science studies have to give fundamental insight into gas sensing phenomena.

  8. Technology study of quantum remote sensing imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bi, Siwen; Lin, Xuling; Yang, Song; Wu, Zhiqiang

    2016-02-01

    According to remote sensing science and technology development and application requirements, quantum remote sensing is proposed. First on the background of quantum remote sensing, quantum remote sensing theory, information mechanism, imaging experiments and prototype principle prototype research situation, related research at home and abroad are briefly introduced. Then we expounds compress operator of the quantum remote sensing radiation field and the basic principles of single-mode compression operator, quantum quantum light field of remote sensing image compression experiment preparation and optical imaging, the quantum remote sensing imaging principle prototype, Quantum remote sensing spaceborne active imaging technology is brought forward, mainly including quantum remote sensing spaceborne active imaging system composition and working principle, preparation and injection compression light active imaging device and quantum noise amplification device. Finally, the summary of quantum remote sensing research in the past 15 years work and future development are introduced.

  9. High Pressure Sensing and Dynamics Using High Speed Fiber Bragg Grating Interrogation Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Rodriguez, G.; Sandberg, R. L.; Lalone, B. M.; Marshall, B. R.; Grover, M.; Stevens, G. D.; Udd, E.

    2014-06-01

    Fiber Bragg gratings (FBGs) are developing into useful sensing tools for measuring high pressure dynamics in extreme environments under shock loading conditions. Approaches using traditional diode array coupled FBG interrogation systems are often limited to readout speeds in the sub-MHz range. For shock wave physics, required detection speeds approaching 100 MHz are desired. We explore the use of two types of FBG sensing systems that are aimed at applying this technology as embedded high pressure probes for transient shock events. Both approaches measure time resolved spectral shifts in the return light from short (few mm long) uniform FBGs at 1550 nm. In the first approach, we use a fiber coupled spectrometer to demultiplex spectral channels into an array (up to 12) of single element InGaAs photoreceivers. By monitoring the detectors during a shock impact event with high speed recording, we are able to track the pressure induced spectral shifting in FBG down to a time resolution of 20 ns. In the second approach, developed at the Special Technologies Lab, a coherent mode-locked fiber laser is used to illuminate the FBG sensor. After the sensor, wavelength-to-time mapping is accomplished with a chromatic dispersive element, and entire spectra are sampled using a single detector at the modelocked laser repetition rate of 50 MHz. By sampling with a 12 GHz InGaAs detector, direct wavelength mapping in time is recorded, and the pressure induced FBG spectral shift is sampled at 50 MHz. Here, the sensing systems are used to monitor the spectral shifts of FBGs that are immersed into liquid water and shock compressed using explosives. In this configuration, the gratings survive to pressures approaching 50 kbar. We describe both approaches and present the measured spectral shifts from the shock experiments.

  10. Validating the method of pressure sensing to optimize flapping foil energy extraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Persichetti, Amanda J.

    Renewable energy resources are in high demand due to a world-wide desire for cleaner energy production. Flapping foil tidal driven systems have begun being tested and implemented at prototype scales. These prototype systems use limited control to maximize energy production. This thesis uses biological inspiration from the sensory system in fish to enhance the efficiency of these energy harnessing systems with the use of surface mounted pressure sensing. Eight pressure sensors were found to be a good balance for quantity with respect to cost and accuracy. Optimal locations around the foil were determined from application of a Random Search algorithm and a fluid moment approximation. A 2-D numerical code was created to simulate a NACA0015 flapping foil in uniform potential flow. A wide parameter space of sinusoidal heave and pitch motions was run and a database of force, pressure, and efficiency values along with flow visualization was built. An efficiency of 0.43 was reached for the trajectory of motion with a pitch amplitude of 90 degrees, heave amplitude of 1.25 and a Strouhal number of 0.5. A control platform dependent on pressure measurements at the eight sensor locations was created in the 2-D numerical code. By implementing basic control, motion trajectories converge to the optimal motion based on pressure comparisons around the foil to pressure traces from the motion with highest efficiency. In addition, a laboratory for experimental testing and validation was set-up. The motion control system was connected and tested for a tow tank set-up. Motion programs were written for the same parameter space modeled in this thesis. Through numerical modeling, pressure sensing was found to be an effective method to enhancing the efficiency of a flapping foil energy extraction system.

  11. The vascular Ca2+-sensing receptor regulates blood vessel tone and blood pressure

    PubMed Central

    Schepelmann, M.; Yarova, P. L.; Lopez-Fernandez, I.; Davies, T. S.; Brennan, S. C.; Edwards, P. J.; Aggarwal, A.; Graça, J.; Rietdorf, K.; Matchkov, V.; Fenton, R. A.; Chang, W.; Krssak, M.; Stewart, A.; Broadley, K. J.; Ward, D. T.; Price, S. A.; Edwards, D. H.; Kemp, P. J.

    2015-01-01

    The extracellular calcium-sensing receptor CaSR is expressed in blood vessels where its role is not completely understood. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that the CaSR expressed in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC) is directly involved in regulation of blood pressure and blood vessel tone. Mice with targeted CaSR gene ablation from vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC) were generated by breeding exon 7 LoxP-CaSR mice with animals in which Cre recombinase is driven by a SM22α promoter (SM22α-Cre). Wire myography performed on Cre-negative [wild-type (WT)] and Cre-positive SM22αCaSRΔflox/Δflox [knockout (KO)] mice showed an endothelium-independent reduction in aorta and mesenteric artery contractility of KO compared with WT mice in response to KCl and to phenylephrine. Increasing extracellular calcium ion (Ca2+) concentrations (1–5 mM) evoked contraction in WT but only relaxation in KO aortas. Accordingly, diastolic and mean arterial blood pressures of KO animals were significantly reduced compared with WT, as measured by both tail cuff and radiotelemetry. This hypotension was mostly pronounced during the animals' active phase and was not rescued by either nitric oxide-synthase inhibition with nitro-l-arginine methyl ester or by a high-salt-supplemented diet. KO animals also exhibited cardiac remodeling, bradycardia, and reduced spontaneous activity in isolated hearts and cardiomyocyte-like cells. Our findings demonstrate a role for CaSR in the cardiovascular system and suggest that physiologically relevant changes in extracellular Ca2+ concentrations could contribute to setting blood vessel tone levels and heart rate by directly acting on the cardiovascular CaSR. PMID:26538090

  12. Applications of tunable high energy/pressure pulsed lasers to atmospheric transmission and remote sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hess, R. V.; Seals, R. K.

    1974-01-01

    Atmospheric transmission of high energy C12 O2(16) lasers were improved by pulsed high pressure operation which, due to pressure broadening of laser lines, permits tuning the laser 'off' atmospheric C12 O2(16) absorption lines. Pronounced improvement is shown for horizontal transmission at altitudes above several kilometers, and for vertical transmission through the entire atmosphere. The atmospheric transmission of tuned C12 O2(16) lasers compares favorably with C12 O2(18) isotope lasers and CO lasers. The advantages of tunable, high energy, high pressure pulsed lasers over tunable diode lasers and waveguide lasers, in combining high energies with a large tuning range, are evaluated for certain applications to remote sensing of atmospheric constituents and pollutants. Pulsed operation considerably increases the signal to noise ratio without seriously affecting the high spectral resolution of signal detection obtained with laser heterodyning.

  13. Integrated electrofluidic circuits: pressure sensing with analog and digital operation functionalities for microfluidics.

    PubMed

    Wu, Chueh-Yu; Lu, Jau-Ching; Liu, Man-Chi; Tung, Yi-Chung

    2012-10-21

    Microfluidic technology plays an essential role in various lab on a chip devices due to its desired advantages. An automated microfluidic system integrated with actuators and sensors can further achieve better controllability. A number of microfluidic actuation schemes have been well developed. In contrast, most of the existing sensing methods still heavily rely on optical observations and external transducers, which have drawbacks including: costly instrumentation, professional operation, tedious interfacing, and difficulties of scaling up and further signal processing. This paper reports the concept of electrofluidic circuits - electrical circuits which are constructed using ionic liquid (IL)-filled fluidic channels. The developed electrofluidic circuits can be fabricated using a well-developed multi-layer soft lithography (MSL) process with polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) microfluidic channels. Electrofluidic circuits allow seamless integration of pressure sensors with analog and digital operation functions into microfluidic systems and provide electrical readouts for further signal processing. In the experiments, the analog operation device is constructed based on electrofluidic Wheatstone bridge circuits with electrical outputs of the addition and subtraction results of the applied pressures. The digital operation (AND, OR, and XOR) devices are constructed using the electrofluidic pressure controlled switches, and output electrical signals of digital operations of the applied pressures. The experimental results demonstrate the designed functions for analog and digital operations of applied pressures are successfully achieved using the developed electrofluidic circuits, making them promising to develop integrated microfluidic systems with capabilities of precise pressure monitoring and further feedback control for advanced lab on a chip applications.

  14. Bio-Inspired Pressure Sensitive Foam Arrays for use in Hydrodynamic Sensing Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dusek, Jeff; Triantafyllou, Michael; Lang, Jeffrey

    2015-11-01

    Shallow, turbid, and highly dynamic coastal waters provide a challenging environment for safe and reliable operation of marine vehicles faced with a distinct environmentally driven perceptual deficit. In nature, fish have solved this perplexing sensory problem and exhibit an intimate knowledge of the near-body flow field. This enhanced perception is mediated by the ability to discern and interpret hydrodynamic flow structures through the velocity and pressure sensing capabilities of the fish's lateral line. Taking cues from biological sensory principles, highly conformal pressure sensor arrays have been developed utilizing a novel piezoresistive carbon black-PDMS foam active material. By leveraging the low Young's modulus and watertight structure of closed-cell PDMS (silicone) foam, the sensor arrays are well suited for hydrodynamic sensing applications and prolonged exposure to fluid environments. Prototype arrays were characterized experimentally using hydrodynamic stimuli inspired by biological flows, and were found to exhibit a high degree of sensitivity while improving on the flexibility, robustness, and cost of existing pressure sensors.

  15. Sensing the characteristic acoustic impedance of a fluid utilizing acoustic pressure waves

    PubMed Central

    Antlinger, Hannes; Clara, Stefan; Beigelbeck, Roman; Cerimovic, Samir; Keplinger, Franz; Jakoby, Bernhard

    2012-01-01

    Ultrasonic sensors can be used to determine physical fluid parameters like viscosity, density, and speed of sound. In this contribution, we present the concept for an integrated sensor utilizing pressure waves to sense the characteristic acoustic impedance of a fluid. We note that the basic setup generally allows to determine the longitudinal viscosity and the speed of sound if it is operated in a resonant mode as will be discussed elsewhere. In this contribution, we particularly focus on a modified setup where interferences are suppressed by introducing a wedge reflector. This enables sensing of the liquid's characteristic acoustic impedance, which can serve as parameter in condition monitoring applications. We present a device model, experimental results and their evaluation. PMID:23565036

  16. BreathSens: A Continuous On-Bed Respiratory Monitoring System With Torso Localization Using an Unobtrusive Pressure Sensing Array.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jason J; Huang, Ming-Chun; Xu, Wenyao; Zhang, Xiaoyi; Stevens, Luke; Alshurafa, Nabil; Sarrafzadeh, Majid

    2015-09-01

    The ability to continuously monitor respiration rates of patients in homecare or in clinics is an important goal. Past research showed that monitoring patient breathing can lower the associated mortality rates for long-term bedridden patients. Nowadays, in-bed sensors consisting of pressure sensitive arrays are unobtrusive and are suitable for deployment in a wide range of settings. Such systems aim to extract respiratory signals from time-series pressure sequences. However, variance of movements, such as unpredictable extremities activities, affect the quality of the extracted respiratory signals. BreathSens, a high-density pressure sensing system made of e-Textile, profiles the underbody pressure distribution and localizes torso area based on the high-resolution pressure images. With a robust bodyparts localization algorithm, respiratory signals extracted from the localized torso area are insensitive to arbitrary extremities movements. In a study of 12 subjects, BreathSens demonstrated its respiratory monitoring capability with variations of sleep postures, locations, and commonly tilted clinical bed conditions.

  17. Feasibility Study of Compressive Sensing Underwater Imaging Lidar

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-03-28

    Compressive Sensing Underwater Imaging Lidar 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER N00014-12-1-0921 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6...Feasibility study of Compressive Sensing Underwater Imaging Lidar Bing Ouyang phone: (772) 242-2288 fax : (772) 242-2257 email: bouvang@hboi.fau.edu...study of the frame based Compressive Sensing concept. ■ Another related project "Airborne Compressive Sensing Topographic Lidar " is being

  18. Pressure Studies of Protein Dynamics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-02-28

    a frozen and metastable complex system In the present section was generated by a flashlamp-pumped dye laser (Phase-R DL- treat the equilibrium region...determination of the relative thermodynamic parameters of the and the temperature was monitored with a Si diode on the pressure We assume that the A substates...temperature controller (Model proteins is essentially linear from 200 to 320 K. 2" The entropy 93C). A silicon diode mounted on the sample cell

  19. A combination of thermal methods to assess coronary pressure and flow dynamics with a pressure-sensing guide wire.

    PubMed

    van der Horst, Arjen; Van't Veer, Marcel; van der Sligte, Robin A M; Rutten, Marcel C M; Pijls, Nico H J; van de Vosse, Frans N

    2013-03-01

    Measurement of coronary pressure and absolute flow dynamics have shown great potential in discerning different types of coronary circulatory disease. In the present study, the feasibility of assessing pressure and flow dynamics with a combination of two thermal methods, developed in combination with a pressure-sensor-tipped guide wire, was evaluated in an in vitro coronary model. A continuous infusion thermodilution method was employed to determine the average flow, whereas a thermal anemometric method was utilized to assess the pressure and flow dynamics, simultaneously. In the latter method, the electrical power supplied to an element, kept at constant temperature above ambient temperature, was used as a measure for the shear rate. It was found that, using a single calibration function, the method was able to assess coronary pressure and flow dynamics for different flow amplitudes, heart rates, and different pressure wires. However, due to the fact that the thermal anemometric method cannot detect local shear rate reversal, the method was unable to reliably measure flow dynamics close to zero. Nevertheless, the combined methodology was able to reliably assess diastolic hemodynamics. The diastolic peak flow and average diastolic resistance could be determined with a small relative error of (8 ± 7)% and (7 ± 5)%, respectively.

  20. Fourier analysis for hydrostatic pressure sensing in a polarization-maintaining photonic crystal fiber.

    PubMed

    Childs, Paul; Wong, Allan C L; Fu, H Y; Liao, Yanbiao; Tam, Hwayaw; Lu, Chao; Wai, P K A

    2010-12-20

    We measured the hydrostatic pressure dependence of the birefringence and birefringent dispersion of a Sagnac interferometric sensor incorporating a length of highly birefringent photonic crystal fiber using Fourier analysis. Sensitivity of both the phase and chirp spectra to hydrostatic pressure is demonstrated. Using this analysis, phase-based measurements showed a good linearity with an effective sensitivity of 9.45 nm/MPa and an accuracy of ±7.8 kPa using wavelength-encoded data and an effective sensitivity of -55.7 cm(-1)/MPa and an accuracy of ±4.4 kPa using wavenumber-encoded data. Chirp-based measurements, though nonlinear in response, showed an improvement in accuracy at certain pressure ranges with an accuracy of ±5.5 kPa for the full range of measured pressures using wavelength-encoded data and dropping to within ±2.5 kPa in the range of 0.17 to 0.4 MPa using wavenumber-encoded data. Improvements of the accuracy demonstrated the usefulness of implementing chirp-based analysis for sensing purposes.

  1. Fourier analysis for hydrostatic pressure sensing in a polarization-maintaining photonic crystal fiber

    SciTech Connect

    Childs, Paul; Wong, Allan C. L.; Fu, H. Y.; Liao, Yanbiao; Tam, Hwayaw; Lu Chao; Wai, P. K. A.

    2010-12-20

    .We measured the hydrostatic pressure dependence of the birefringence and birefringent dispersion of a Sagnac interferometric sensor incorporating a length of highly birefringent photonic crystal fiber using Fourier analysis. Sensitivity of both the phase and chirp spectra to hydrostatic pressure is demonstrated. Using this analysis, phase-based measurements showed a good linearity with an effective sensitivity of 9.45nm/MPa and an accuracy of {+-}7.8kPa using wavelength-encoded data and an effective sensitivity of -55.7cm{sup -1}/MPa and an accuracy of {+-}4.4kPa using wavenumber-encoded data. Chirp-based measurements, though nonlinear in response, showed an improvement in accuracy at certain pressure ranges with an accuracy of {+-}5.5kPa for the full range of measured pressures using wavelength-encoded data and dropping to within {+-}2.5kPa in the range of 0.17 to 0.4MPa using wavenumber-encoded data. Improvements of the accuracy demonstrated the usefulness of implementing chirp-based analysis for sensing purposes.

  2. Temporospatial and kinetic characteristics of sheep walking on a pressure sensing walkway

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jongmin; Breur, Gert J.

    2008-01-01

    The walking gait of sheep was analyzed in terms of temporospatial and kinetic parameters and weight distribution among the 4 limbs. Eighteen mature female Suffolk-mix sheep walked comfortably with a halter-guide over a 1.5-m pressure sensing walkway. Six valid trials were acquired for each sheep without any previous selection or habituation. Stance phases of the forelimb and hind limb were 66.3% and 68.9%, respectively, of total gait cycle, and limb velocity was 1.06 m/s in both forelimbs and hind limbs while walking. The mean peak vertical force (PVF) and vertical impulse (VI) as percentage of body weight in the forelimbs were 52.5% and 19.9%, respectively, and those of the hind limbs were 38.5% and 14.9%, respectively. More body weight was loaded on the forelimbs than the hind limbs, at 59% and 41% of body weight, respectively. The walking gait of sheep measured with the pressure sensing (PS) walkway was similar to that reported in dogs and horses. The PS walkway enabled collection of temporospatial and kinetic data, and simplified the process of data collection. PMID:18214162

  3. Natural Resource Information System. Remote Sensing Studies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leachtenauer, J.; And Others

    A major design objective of the Natural Resource Information System entailed the use of remote sensing data as an input to the system. Potential applications of remote sensing data were therefore reviewed and available imagery interpreted to provide input to a demonstration data base. A literature review was conducted to determine the types and…

  4. Stretchable electronic skin based on silver nanowire composite fiber electrodes for sensing pressure, proximity, and multidirectional strain.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Yin; Wang, Ranran; Zhai, Haitao; Sun, Jing

    2017-03-17

    Electronic skin (E-skin) has been attracting great research interest and effort due to its potential applications in wearable health monitoring, smart prosthetics, robot skins and so on. To expand its applications, two key challenges lie in the realization of device stretchability, and independent sensing of pressure and multidirectional lateral strain. Here we made a combination of rational device structure and artfully engineered sensing materials to fulfill the mentioned demands. The as-prepared E-skin took a simple orthogonal configuration to enable both capacitive mode for pressure sensing and resistive mode for multidirectional strain sensing, independently. Pre-cracked silver nanowire based fibers with helical microstructures were utilized as basic electrodes to endow the E-skin with intrinsic stretchability and strain sensing capability. Through dielectric layer optimization, the pressure sensing sensitivity was greatly enhanced, with a detection limit of 1.5 Pa. For application demonstrations, we utilized the E-skin as both flat and curved platforms for pressure mapping, and also as human motion sensors, such as palm and thumb bending.

  5. Magnetoelastic sensing apparatus and method for remote pressure query of an environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grimes, Craig A. (Inventor); Stoyanov, Plamen G. (Inventor); Kouzoudis, Dimitris (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    A pressure sensing apparatus for operative arrangement within an environment, having: a sensor comprising a hermetically-sealed receptacle, at least one side of which has an flexible membrane to which a magnetically hard element is attached. Enclosed within the receptacle is a magnetostrictive element that vibrates in response to a time-varying magnetic field. Also included is a receiver to measure a plurality of successive values for magneto-elastic emission intensity of the sensor taken over an operating range of successive interrogation frequencies to identify a resonant frequency value for the sensor. Additional features include: (a) the magnetically hard element may be adhered to an inner or outer side of, or embedded within, the membrane; (b) the magnetostrictive element can include one or more of a variety of different pre-formed, hardened regions; (c) the magneto-elastic emission may be a primarily acoustic or electromagnetic emission; and (d) in the event the time-varying magnetic field is emitted as a single pulse or series of pulses, the receiver unit can detect a transitory time-response of the emission intensity of each pulse (detected after a threshold amplitude value for the transitory time-response is observed). A Fourier transform of the time-response can yield results in the frequency domain. Also, an associated method of sensing pressure of an environment is included that uses a sensor having a magnetostrictive element to identify a magneto-elastic resonant frequency value therefore. Using the magneto-elastic resonant frequency value identified, a value for the pressure of the environment can be identified.

  6. Dielectric elastomer strain and pressure sensing enable reactive soft fluidic muscles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veale, Allan J.; Anderson, Iain A.; Xie, Sheng Q.

    2016-04-01

    Wearable assistive devices are the future of rehabilitation therapy and bionic limb technologies. Traditional electric, hydraulic, and pneumatic actuators can provide the precise and powerful around-the-clock assistance that therapists cannot deliver. However, they do so in the confines of highly controlled factory environments, resulting in actuators too rigid, heavy, and immobile for wearable applications. In contrast, biological skeletal muscles have been designed and proven in the uncertainty of the real world. Bioinspired artificial muscle actuators aim to mimic the soft, slim, and self-sensing abilities of natural muscle that make them tough and intelligent. Fluidic artificial muscles are a promising wearable assistive actuation candidate, sharing the high-force, inherent compliance of their natural counterparts. Until now, they have not been able to self-sense their length, pressure, and force in an entirely soft and flexible system. Their use of rigid components has previously been a requirement for the generation of large forces, but reduces their reliability and compromises their ability to be comfortably worn. We present the unobtrusive integration of dielectric elastomer (DE) strain and pressure sensors into a soft Peano fluidic muscle, a planar alternative to the relatively bulky McKibben muscle. Characterization of these DE sensors shows they can measure the full operating range of the Peano muscle: strains of around 18% and pressures up to 400 kPa with changes in capacitance of 2.4 and 10.5 pF respectively. This is a step towards proprioceptive artificial muscles, paving the way for wearable actuation that can truly feel its environment.

  7. (High-pressure structural studies of promethium)

    SciTech Connect

    Haire, R.G.

    1988-11-15

    The primary object of the foreign travel was to carry out collaborative high-pressure structural studies at the European Institute for Transuranium Elements (EITU), Karlsruhe, Federal Republic of Germany. These studies reestablished previous collaborative investigations by ORNL and EITU that have been very productive scientifically during the past few years. The study during the present travel period was limited to a structural study of promethium metal under pressure.

  8. Formulaton of a general technique for predicting pneumatic attenuation errors in airborne pressure sensing devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitmore, Stephen A.

    1988-01-01

    Presented is a mathematical model, derived from the Navier-Stokes equations of momentum and continuity, which may be accurately used to predict the behavior of conventionally mounted pneumatic sensing systems subject to arbitrary pressure inputs. Numerical techniques for solving the general model are developed. Both step and frequency response lab tests were performed. These data are compared against solutions of the mathematical model. The comparisons show excellent agreement. The procedures used to obtain the lab data are described. In-flight step and frequency response data were obtained. Comparisons with numerical solutions of the mathematical model show good agreement. Procedures used to obtain the flight data are described. Difficulties encountered with obtaining the flight data are discussed.

  9. Formulation of a General Technique for Predicting Pneumatic Attenuation Errors in Airborne Pressure Sensing Devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitmore, Stephen A.

    1988-01-01

    Presented is a mathematical model derived from the Navier-Stokes equations of momentum and continuity, which may be accurately used to predict the behavior of conventionally mounted pneumatic sensing systems subject to arbitrary pressure inputs. Numerical techniques for solving the general model are developed. Both step and frequency response lab tests were performed. These data are compared with solutions of the mathematical model and show excellent agreement. The procedures used to obtain the lab data are described. In-flight step and frequency response data were obtained. Comparisons with numerical solutions of the math model show good agreement. Procedures used to obtain the flight data are described. Difficulties encountered with obtaining the flight data are discussed.

  10. Intracellular sodium sensing: SIK1 network, hormone action and high blood pressure.

    PubMed

    Jaitovich, Ariel; Bertorello, Alejandro M

    2010-12-01

    Sodium is the main determinant of body fluid distribution. Sodium accumulation causes water retention and, often, high blood pressure. At the cellular level, the concentration and active transport of sodium is handled by the enzyme Na(+),K(+)-ATPase, whose appearance enabled evolving primitive cells to cope with osmotic stress and contributed to the complexity of mammalian organisms. Na(+),K(+)-ATPase is a platform at the hub of many cellular signaling pathways related to sensing intracellular sodium and dealing with its detrimental excess. One of these pathways relies on an intracellular sodium-sensor network with the salt-inducible kinase 1 (SIK1) at its core. When intracellular sodium levels rise, and after the activation of calcium-related signals, this network activates the Na(+),K(+)-ATPase and expel the excess of sodium from the cytosol. The SIK1 network also mediates sodium-independent signals that modulate the activity of the Na(+),K(+)-ATPase, like dopamine and angiotensin, which are relevant per se in the development of high blood pressure. Animal models of high blood pressure, with identified mutations in components of multiple pathways, also have alterations in the SIK1 network. The introduction of some of these mutants into normal cells causes changes in SIK1 activity as well. Some cellular processes related to the metabolic syndrome, such as insulin effects on the kidney and other tissues, also appear to involve the SIK1. Therefore, it is likely that this protein, by modulating active sodium transport and numerous hormonal responses, represents a "crossroad" in the development and adaptation to high blood pressure and associated diseases.

  11. Theoretical studies of iridium under pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grussendorff, Sharon; Chetty, N.; Dreysse, H.

    2003-06-01

    Recent experiments on Ir under pressure (Cerenius and Dubrovinsky 2000 J. Alloys Compounds 306 26) show a transition to a superlattice structure comprising 14 atomic layers. This observation has implications for high-pressure applications since Ir, with its high bulk modulus and high thermal stability, is ideally suited for use as a gasket for high-temperature, high-pressure diamond anvil cell experiments. We perform first-principles total energy calculations to study the crystal phases and defect structures of Ir under pressure. We have extended the bond-orientation model (Chetty and Weinert 1997 Phys. Rev. B 56 10844) to compute all of the ~ 2N defect structures as a function of atomic volume. We find Ir in the FCC structure to be extremely stable for pressures up to about 60 GPa. We also calculate the stacking fault energies of Ir.

  12. NASA Remote Sensing Data for Epidemiological Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maynard, Nancy G.; Vicente, G. A.

    2002-01-01

    In response to the need for improved observations of environmental factors to better understand the links between human health and the environment, NASA has established a new program to significantly improve the utilization of NASA's diverse array of data, information, and observations of the Earth for health applications. This initiative, lead by Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) has the following goals: (1) To encourage interdisciplinary research on the relationships between environmental parameters (e.g., rainfall, vegetation) and health, (2) Develop practical early warning systems, (3) Create a unique system for the exchange of Earth science and health data, (4) Provide an investigator field support system for customers and partners, (5) Facilitate a system for observation, identification, and surveillance of parameters relevant to environment and health issues. The NASA Environment and Health Program is conducting several interdisciplinary projects to examine applications of remote sensing data and information to a variety of health issues, including studies on malaria, Rift Valley Fever, St. Louis Encephalitis, Dengue Fever, Ebola, African Dust and health, meningitis, asthma, and filariasis. In addition, the NASA program is creating a user-friendly data system to help provide the public health community with easy and timely access to space-based environmental data for epidemiological studies. This NASA data system is being designed to bring land, atmosphere, water and ocean satellite data/products to users not familiar with satellite data/products, but who are knowledgeable in the Geographic Information Systems (GIS) environment. This paper discusses the most recent results of the interdisciplinary environment-health research projects and provides an analysis of the usefulness of the satellite data to epidemiological studies. In addition, there will be a summary of presently-available NASA Earth science data and a description of how it may be obtained.

  13. The Birmingham blood pressure school study.

    PubMed Central

    De Giovanni, J. V.; Pentecost, B. L.; Beevers, D. G.; Beevers, M.; Jackson, S. H.; Bannan, L. T.; Osbourne, V. L.; Mathews, K.

    1983-01-01

    Four-hundred and twenty-eight school leavers of 3 ethnic groups (white, black and Asian) were screened for blood pressure, resting pulse rate and general anthropometric characteristics. Asian pupils were both shorter and lighter than the other two groups whilst black males were heavier and taller. There was no significant difference in the mean systolic or diastolic blood pressure between the 3 groups, although the black pupils had a stronger family history of hypertension, particularly on the mother's side. These observations differ in some respects from other ethnic blood pressure studies and establish values for the local population. PMID:6647172

  14. Feasibility study ASCS remote sensing/compliance determination system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duggan, I. E.; Minter, T. C., Jr.; Moore, B. H.; Nosworthy, C. T.

    1973-01-01

    A short-term technical study was performed by the MSC Earth Observations Division to determine the feasibility of the proposed Agricultural Stabilization and Conservation Service Automatic Remote Sensing/Compliance Determination System. For the study, the term automatic was interpreted as applying to an automated remote-sensing system that includes data acquisition, processing, and management.

  15. A hybrid Raman/EFPI/FBG sensing system for distributed temperature and key-point pressure measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Ke; Zhou, Xinlei; Yang, Yang; Yu, Qingxu

    2015-08-01

    We demonstrate a hybrid sensing scheme, combining the incoherent optical frequency domain reflectometry (IOFDR) based Raman distributed temperature sensor (DTS) with the extrinsic Fabry-Perot interferometer (EFPI) based pressure sensor, for down-hole monitoring. The pressure measurement is compensated by a fiber Bragg grating (FBG) based temperature sensor. By using a laser diode as the common light source, a hybrid Raman/EFPI/FBG sensing system has been developed with a single fiber. The stimulated emission light and the spontaneous emission light of the laser diode are used for DTS and EFPI-FBG interrogations respectively. There can be no overlap between the spectral range of the Raman backscattered light and the spectral range of the reflected light from the EFPI-FBG sensor. Distributed temperature and pressure can thus be measured by using wavelength-division multiplexing (WDM) technology. Experimental results show that, both the distributed temperature and the key-point pressure can be measured alternatively with little interference.

  16. MEMS Fabry-Perot sensor interrogated by optical system-on-a-chip for simultaneous pressure and temperature sensing.

    PubMed

    Pang, Cheng; Bae, Hyungdae; Gupta, Ashwani; Bryden, Kenneth; Yu, Miao

    2013-09-23

    We present a micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMS) based Fabry-Perot (FP) sensor along with an optical system-on-a-chip (SOC) interrogator for simultaneous pressure and temperature sensing. The sensor employs a simple structure with an air-backed silicon membrane cross-axially bonded to a 45° polished optical fiber. This structure renders two cascaded FP cavities, enabling simultaneous pressure and temperature sensing in close proximity along the optical axis. The optical SOC consists of a broadband source, a MEMS FP tunable filter, a photodetector, and the supporting circuitry, serving as a miniature spectrometer for retrieving the two FP cavity lengths. Within the measured pressure and temperature ranges, experimental results demonstrate that the sensor exhibits a good linear response to external pressure and temperature changes.

  17. Sensitivity enhancement using annealed polymer optical-fibre-based sensors for pressure sensing applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pospori, A.; Marques, C. A. F.; Sáez-Rodríguez, D.; Nielsen, K.; Bang, O.; Webb, D. J.

    2016-05-01

    Thermal annealing can be used to induce a permanent negative Bragg wavelength shift for polymer fibre grating sensors and it was originally used for multiplexing purposes. Recently, researchers showed that annealing can also provide additional benefits, such as strain and humidity sensitivity enhancement and augmented temperature operational range. The annealing process can change both the optical and mechanical properties of the fibre. In this paper, the annealing effects on the stress and force sensitivities of PMMA fibre Bragg grating sensors are investigated. The incentive for that investigation was an unexpected behaviour observed in an array of sensors which were used for liquid level monitoring. One sensor exhibited much lower pressure sensitivity and that was the only one that was not annealed. To further investigate the phenomenon, additional sensors were photo-inscribed and characterised with regard their stress and force sensitivities. Then, the fibres were annealed by placing them in hot water, controlling with that way the humidity factor. After annealing, stress and force sensitivities were measured again. The results show that the annealing can improve the stress and force sensitivity of the devices. This can provide better performing sensors for use in stress, force and pressure sensing applications.

  18. High pressure studies of potassium perchlorate

    SciTech Connect

    Pravica, Michael; Wang, Yonggang; Sneed, Daniel; Reiser, Sharissa; White, Melanie

    2016-07-29

    Two experiments are reported on KClO4 at extreme conditions. A static high pressure Raman study was first conducted to 18.9 GPa. Evidence for at least two new phases was observed: one between 2.4 and 7.7 GPa (possibly sluggish), and the second near 11.7 GPa. Then, the X-ray induced decomposition rate of potassium perchlorate (KClO4 hv→ KCl + 2O2) was studied up to 15.2 GPa. The time-dependent growth of KCl and O2 was monitored. The decomposition rate slowed at higher pressures. As a result, we present the first direct evidence for O2 crystallization at higher pressures, demonstrating that O2 molecules aggregate at high pressure.

  19. High pressure studies of potassium perchlorate

    DOE PAGES

    Pravica, Michael; Wang, Yonggang; Sneed, Daniel; ...

    2016-07-29

    Two experiments are reported on KClO4 at extreme conditions. A static high pressure Raman study was first conducted to 18.9 GPa. Evidence for at least two new phases was observed: one between 2.4 and 7.7 GPa (possibly sluggish), and the second near 11.7 GPa. Then, the X-ray induced decomposition rate of potassium perchlorate (KClO4 hv→ KCl + 2O2) was studied up to 15.2 GPa. The time-dependent growth of KCl and O2 was monitored. The decomposition rate slowed at higher pressures. As a result, we present the first direct evidence for O2 crystallization at higher pressures, demonstrating that O2 molecules aggregatemore » at high pressure.« less

  20. Intra- and inter-rater reliability of maximum inspiratory pressure measured using a portable capsule-sensing pressure gauge device in healthy adults

    PubMed Central

    Jalan, Nikita S; Daftari, Sonam S; Retharekar, Seemi S; Rairikar, Savita A; Shyam, Ashok M; Sancheti, Parag K

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Measurement of maximum inspiratory pressure is the most prevalent method used in clinical practice to assess the strength of the inspiratory muscles. Although there are many devices available for the assessment of inspiratory muscle strength, there is a dearth of literature describing the reliability of devices that can be used in clinical patient assessment. The capsule-sensing pressure gauge (CSPG-V) is a new tool that measures the strength of inspiratory muscles; it is easy to use, noninvasive, inexpensive and lightweight. OBJECTIVE: To test the intra- and inter-rater reliability of a CSPG-V device in healthy adults. METHODS: A cross-sectional study involving 80 adult subjects with a mean (± SD) age of 22±3 years was performed. Using simple randomization, 40 individuals (20 male, 20 female) were used for intrarater and 40 (20 male, 20 female) were used for inter-rater reliability testing of the CSPG-V device. The subjects performed three inspiratory efforts, which were sustained for at least 3 s; the best of the three readings was used for intra- and inter-rater comparison. The intra- and inter-rater reliability were calculated using intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs). RESULTS: The intrarater reliability ICC was 0.962 and the inter-rater reliability ICC was 0.922. CONCLUSION: Results of the present study suggest that maximum inspiratory pressure measured using a CSPG-V device has excellent intraand inter-rater reliability, and can be used as a diagnostic and prognostic tool in patients with respiratory muscle impairment. PMID:26089737

  1. Experimental validation of a millimeter wave radar technique to remotely sense atmospheric pressure at the Earth's surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flower, D. A.; Peckham, G. E.; Bradford, W. J.

    1984-01-01

    Experiments with a millimeter wave radar operating on the NASA CV-990 aircraft which validate the technique for remotely sensing atmospheric pressure at the Earth's surface are described. Measurements show that the precise millimeter wave observations needed to deduce pressure from space with an accuracy of 1 mb are possible, that sea surface reflection properties agree with theory and that the measured variation of differential absorption with altitude corresponds to that expected from spectroscopic models.

  2. Energy efficiency in cognitive radio network: Study of cooperative sensing using different channel sensing methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Chenxuan

    When cognitive radio (CR) operates, it starts by sensing spectrum and looking for idle bandwidth. There are several methods for CR to make a decision on either the channel is occupied or idle, for example, energy detection scheme, cyclostationary detection scheme and matching filtering detection scheme [1]. Among them, the most common method is energy detection scheme because of its algorithm and implementation simplicities [2]. There are two major methods for sensing, the first one is to sense single channel slot with varying bandwidth, whereas the second one is to sense multiple channels and each with same bandwidth. After sensing periods, samples are compared with a preset detection threshold and a decision is made on either the primary user (PU) is transmitting or not. Sometimes the sensing and decision results can be erroneous, for example, false alarm error and misdetection error may occur. In order to better control error probabilities and improve CR network performance (i.e. energy efficiency), we introduce cooperative sensing; in which several CR within a certain range detect and make decisions on channel availability together. The decisions are transmitted to and analyzed by a data fusion center (DFC) to make a final decision on channel availability. After the final decision is been made, DFC sends back the decision to the CRs in order to tell them to stay idle or start to transmit data to secondary receiver (SR) within a preset transmission time. After the transmission, a new cycle starts again with sensing. This thesis report is organized as followed: Chapter II review some of the papers on optimizing CR energy efficiency. In Chapter III, we study how to achieve maximal energy efficiency when CR senses single channel with changing bandwidth and with constrain on misdetection threshold in order to protect PU; furthermore, a case study is given and we calculate the energy efficiency. In Chapter IV, we study how to achieve maximal energy efficiency when CR

  3. Building Kindergartners' Number Sense: A Randomized Controlled Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jordan, Nancy C.; Glutting, Joseph; Dyson, Nancy; Hassinger-Das, Brenna; Irwin, Casey

    2012-01-01

    Math achievement in elementary school is mediated by performance and growth in number sense during kindergarten. The aim of the present study was to test the effectiveness of a targeted small-group number sense intervention for high-risk kindergartners from low-income communities. Children were randomly assigned to 1 of 3 groups (n = 44 in each…

  4. Design of an osmotic pressure sensor for sensing an osmotically active substance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ch, Nagesh; Paily, Roy P.

    2015-04-01

    A pressure sensor based on the osmosis principle has been designed and demonstrated successfully for the sensing of the concentration levels of an osmotically active substance. The device is fabricated using the bulk micro-machining technique on a silicon on insulator (SOI) substrate. The substrate has a square cavity on the bottom side to fill with the reference glucose solution and a silicon (Si) membrane on the top side for the actuation. Two sets of devices, having membrane thicknesses of 10 µm and 25 µm, but the same area of 3 mm ×3 mm, are fabricated. The cavity is filled with a glucose solution of 100 mg dL-1 and it is sealed with a semi-permeable membrane made up of cellulose acetate material. The glucose solution is employed to prove the functionality of the device and it is tested for different glucose concentration levels, ranging from 50 mg dL-1 to 450 mg dL-1. The output voltage obtained for the corresponding glucose concentration levels ranges from -6.7 mV to 22.7 mV for the 10 µm device and from -1.7 mV to 4 mV for the 25 µm device. The device operation was simulated using the finite element method (FEM) and the finite volume method (FVM), and the simulation and experimental results match closely. A response time of 40 min is obtained in the case of the 10 µm device compared to one of 30 min for the 25 µm device. The response times obtained for these devices are found to be small compared to those in similar works based on the osmosis principle. This pressure sensor has the potential to provide controlled drug delivery if it can be integrated with other microfluidic devices.

  5. Raman study of opal at high pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farfan, G.; Wang, S.; Mao, W. L.

    2011-12-01

    More commonly known for their beauty and lore as gemstones, opals are also intriguing geological materials which may have potential for materials science applications. Opal lacks a definite crystalline structure, and is composed of an amorphous packing of hydrated silica (SiO2) spheroids, which provides us with a unique nano-scaled mineraloid with properties unlike those of other amorphous materials like glass. Opals from different localities were studied at high pressure using a diamond anvil cell to apply pressure and Raman spectroscopy to look at changes in bonding as pressure was increased. We first tested different samples from Virgin Valley, NV, Spencer, ID, Juniper Ridge, OR, and Australia, which contain varying amounts of water at ambient conditions, using Raman spectroscopy to determine if they were opal-CT (semicrystalline cristobalite-trydimite volcanic origin) or opal-A (amorphous sedimentary origin). We then used x-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy in a diamond anvil cell to see how their bonding and structure changed under compression and to determine what effect water content had on their high pressure behavior. Comparison of our results on opal to other high pressure studies of amorphous materials like glass has implications from a geological and materials science standpoint.

  6. Compressive Sensing Based Machine Learning Strategy For Characterizing The Flow Around A Cylinder With Limited Pressure Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Bright, Ido; Lin, Guang; Kutz, Nathan

    2013-12-05

    Compressive sensing is used to determine the flow characteristics around a cylinder (Reynolds number and pressure/flow field) from a sparse number of pressure measurements on the cylinder. Using a supervised machine learning strategy, library elements encoding the dimensionally reduced dynamics are computed for various Reynolds numbers. Convex L1 optimization is then used with a limited number of pressure measurements on the cylinder to reconstruct, or decode, the full pressure field and the resulting flow field around the cylinder. Aside from the highly turbulent regime (large Reynolds number) where only the Reynolds number can be identified, accurate reconstruction of the pressure field and Reynolds number is achieved. The proposed data-driven strategy thus achieves encoding of the fluid dynamics using the L2 norm, and robust decoding (flow field reconstruction) using the sparsity promoting L1 norm.

  7. Preliminary feasibility analysis of a pressure modulator radiometer for remote sensing of tropospheric constituents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Orr, H. D., III; Rarig, P. L.

    1981-01-01

    A pressure modulator radiometer operated in a nadir viewing mode from the top of a midlatitude summer model of the atmosphere was theoretically studied for monitoring the mean volumetric mixing ratio of carbon monoxide in the troposphere. The mechanical characteristics of the instrument on the Nimbus 7 stratospheric and mesospheric sounder experiment are assumed and CO is assumed to be the only infrared active constituent. A line by line radiative transfer computer program is used to simulate the upwelling radiation reaching the top of the atmosphere. The performance of the instrument is examined as a function of the mean pressure in and the length of the instrument gas correlation cell. Instrument sensitivity is described in terms of signal to noise ratio for a 10 percent change in CO mixing ratio. Sensitivity to mixing ratio changes is also studied. It is concluded that tropospheric monitoring requires a pressure modulator drive having a larger swept volume and producing higher compression ratios at higher mean cell pressures than the Nimbus 7 design.

  8. Fiber-Optic Sensor with Simultaneous Temperature, Pressure, and Chemical Sensing Capabilities

    SciTech Connect

    Kennedy, Jermaine L.

    2009-03-12

    This project aimed to develop a multifunctional sensor suitable for process control application in chemical and petrochemical industries. Specifically, the objective was to demonstrate a fiber optic sensing system capable of simultaneous temperature, pressure, and chemical composition determinations based on a single strand of sapphire optical fiber. These capabilities were to be achieved through the incorporation of a phosphor and a Bragg grating into the fiber, as well as the exploitation of the evanescent field interaction of the optical radiation inside the fiber with the surrounding chemical medium. The integration of the three functions into a single probe, compared to having three separate probes, would not only substantially reduce the cost of the combined system, but would also minimize the intrusion into the reactor. Such a device can potentially increase the energy efficiency in the manufacture of chemical and petrochemical products, as well as reduce waste and lead to improved quality. In accordance with the proposed research plan, the individual temperature, pressure and chemical sensors where fabricated and characterized first. Then towards the end of the program, an integrated system was implemented. The sapphire fibers were grown on a laser heated pedestal growth system. The temperature sensor was based on the fluorescence decay principle, which exploits the temperature dependence of the fluorescence decay rate of the selected phosphor. For this project, Cr3+ was chosen as the phosphor, and it was incorporated into the sapphire fiber by coating a short length of the source rod with a thin layer of Cr2O3. After the viability of the technique was established and the growth parameters optimized, the temperature sensor was characterized up to 300 °C and its long term stability was verified. The chemical sensor determined the concentration of chemicals through evanescent field absorption. Techniques to increase the

  9. Studies on pressure-gain combustion engines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsutomi, Yu

    Various aspects of the pressure-gain combustion engine are investigated analytically and experimentally in the current study. A lumped parameter model is developed to characterize the operation of a valveless pulse detonation engine. The model identified the function of flame quenching process through gas dynamic process. By adjusting fuel manifold pressure and geometries, the duration of the air buffer can be effectively varied. The parametric study with the lumped parameter model has shown that engine frequency of up to approximately 15 Hz is attainable. However, requirements for upstream air pressure increases significantly with higher engine frequency. The higher pressure requirement indicates pressure loss in the system and lower overall engine performance. The loss of performance due to the pressure loss is a critical issue for the integrated pressure-gain combustors. Two types of transitional methods are examined using entropy-based models. An accumulator based transition has obvious loss due to sudden area expansion, but it can be minimized by utilizing the gas dynamics in the combustion tube. An ejector type transition has potential to achieve performance beyond the limit specified by a single flow path Humphrey cycle. The performance of an ejector was discussed in terms of apparent entropy and mixed flow entropy. Through an ideal ejector, the apparent part of entropy increases due to the reduction in flow unsteadiness, but entropy of the mixed flow remains constant. The method is applied to a CFD simulation with a simple manifold for qualitative evaluation. The operation of the wave rotor constant volume combustion rig is experimentally examined. The rig has shown versatility of operation for wide range of conditions. Large pressure rise in the rotor channel and in a section of the exhaust duct are observed even with relatively large leakage gaps on the rotor. The simplified analysis indicated that inconsistent combustion is likely due to insufficient

  10. The study of quantum remote sensing principle prototype

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bi, Siwen; Zhang, Ying

    2015-07-01

    High signal to noise ratio and high resolution have been the goal of remote sensing. Since the classical electromagnetic wave is influenced by the diffraction limit and quantum noise limit, increasing the resolution has been close to the limit of remote sensing, In this situation, in 14 years, the author through quantum remote sensing based theory, scientific experiment and the key technology research of the three phases, before the end of December 2014 completed the study of quantum remote sensing principle prototype. Quantum remote sensing prototype is based on the theory of quantum optics, which takes manipulation, preparation and control in quantum optical field as the experimental method. Through the experiment, the results obtained are the coherent light detection imaging resolution 2-3 times. Based on a large number of experimental studies, we completed the key technology of quantum remote sensing principle prototype, scheme design and principle prototype system. Through the test, the technical indicators of the principle prototype meet the requirements, which provide technical foundation for quantum remote sensing engineering principle prototype.

  11. Multilayered gold/silica nanoparticulate bilayer devices using layer-by-layer self organisation for flexible bending and pressure sensing applications

    SciTech Connect

    Shah Alam, Md.; Mohammed, Waleed S.; Dutta, Joydeep

    2014-02-17

    A pressure and bending sensor was fabricated using multilayer thin films fabricated on a flexible substrate based on layer-by-layer self-organization of 18 nm gold nanoparticles separated by a dielectric layer of 30 nm silica nanoparticles. 50, 75, and 100 gold-silica bi-layered films were deposited and the device characteristics were studied. A threshold voltage was required for electron conduction which increases from 2.4 V for 50 bi-layers to 3.3 V for 100 bi-layers. Upon bending of the device up to about 52°, the threshold voltage and slope of the I-V curves change linearly. Electrical characterization of the multilayer films was carried out under ambient conditions with different pressures and bending angles in the direct current mode. This study demonstrates that the developed multilayer thin films can be used as pressure as well as bending sensing applications.

  12. Pressure-sensing properties of single-walled carbon nanotubes covered with a corona-poled piezoelectric polymer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ikawa, Takeshi; Tabata, Hiroshi; Yoshizawa, Takeshi; Utaka, Ken; Kubo, Osamu; Katayama, Mitsuhiro

    2016-07-01

    Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) have been studied extensively as sensing elements for chemical and biochemical sensors because of their excellent electrical properties, their ultrahigh ratio of surface area to volume, and the consequent extremely high sensitivity of their surface to the surrounding environment. The extremely high sensitivity indicates that SWNTs can operate as excellent transducers when combined with piezoelectric materials. In this paper, we present a touch sensor based on SWNT thin-film transistors (SWNT-TFTs) covered with a thin film of the piezoelectric polymer poly(vinylidene fluoride-trifluoroethylene) (P(VDF-TrFE)). Devices were fabricated by spin-coating a P(VDF-TrFE) layer on an SWNT-TFT, which was followed by in situ corona poling to polarize the P(VDF-TrFE) layer. We studied the effect of the corona polarity on the device characteristics and revealed that poling with a negative corona discharge induced a large amount of hole doping in the SWNTs and improved the touch-sensing performance of the devices, while a positive discharge had a negligible effect. The poled devices exhibited regular, stable, and positive drain current modulation in response to intermittent pressing, and the response was proportional to the magnitude of the applied pressure, suggesting that it was caused by the piezoelectric effect of the polarized P(VDF-TrFE) layer. Furthermore, we also fabricated a device using horizontally aligned SWNTs with a lower SWNT density as an alternative transducer to an SWNT thin film, which demonstrated sensitivity as high as 70%/MPa.

  13. Contribution of quorum sensing to the virulence of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in pressure ulcer infection in rats.

    PubMed

    Nakagami, Gojiro; Morohoshi, Tomohiro; Ikeda, Tsukasa; Ohta, Yasunori; Sagara, Hiroshi; Huang, Lijuan; Nagase, Takashi; Sugama, Junko; Sanada, Hiromi

    2011-01-01

    The impact of quorum sensing (QS) in in vivo models of infection has been widely investigated, but there are no descriptions for ischemic wound infection. To explore the role of QS in Pseudomonas aeruginosa in the establishment of ischemic wound infection, we challenged a pressure ulcer model in rats with the PAO-1, PAO-1 derivatives ΔlasIΔrhlI and ΔlasRΔrhlR strains, which cannot induce the virulence factor under QS control, thus the reduced tissue destruction was expended in these mutant strains. However unexpectedly, on postwounding day 3, the inflammatory responses in the three groups were similarly severe and the numbers of bacteria in tissue samples did not differ among the three strains. Biofilm formation was immature in QS-deficient strains, defined by the absence of dense bacterial aggregates and extracellular polymeric substance, which was confirmed by scanning electron microscopy. The Pseudomonas aeruginosa QS signal, acylated homoserine lactone, was only quantified from wound samples in the PAO-1 group. The swimming and twitching motilities were significantly enhanced in the ΔlasRΔrhlR group compared with the PAO-1 group in vitro. A significantly larger wound area was correlated with the bacterial motility. The inflammation in the early phase of bacterial challenge to wounds with immature biofilm formation in the QS-deficient strains indicated that the role of QS was more crucial for the chronic phase than for the acute phase of infection. The present findings indicate a difference in the importance of QS in ischemic wound infections compared with other infection models.

  14. Using dual-antenna nanosecond pulse near-field sensing technology for non-contact and continuous blood pressure measurement.

    PubMed

    Lin, Hong-Dun; Lee, Yen-Shien; Chuang, Bor-Nian

    2012-01-01

    Long-term and continuous non-invasive blood pressure monitoring has shown that it is the most important to clinical diagnosis of cardiovascular diseases and personal home health care. Currently, there are many preferable non-invasive methods, including optical sensor, pressure-sensitive transducers, and applanation tonometry, to get insight of blood pressure and flow signal detection. However, the operation of traditional monitors is cuff accessories needed, and also the sensing probes needed to exert pressure to the user directly. The measurement procedure is limited by long-term, continuous measurement and also easy to cause discomfort. To improve these issues, the non-pressurized and non-invasive measuring method will become an important innovation improvement. In this paper, the novel nanosecond pulse near-field sensing (NPNS) based screening technology with dual-antenna, which includes radio frequency (RF) pulse transmission and two combined flat antenna connected to transceiver of miniature radar, is proposed to derive relative blood pressure parameters from measured blood flow activity (Pulse Wave Velocity, PWV). A dedicated analysis software is also provided to calculate cardiovascular parameters, including PWV, average systolic time, diastolic and systolic pressure, for clinical and homecare applications. To evaluate the performance, the proposed method was applied on blood pressure measurement at the body site of limbs (brachial and leg). As a result, it shows error of DBP and SBP is 5.18±1.61 and 4.09 ± 1.69 mmHg in average compared with the measurement result from commercial product, and performs the capability of continuous long-term monitoring in real-time.

  15. Naval Remote Ocean Sensing System (NROSS) study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    A set of hardware similar to the SEASAT A configuration requirement, suitable for installation and operation aboard a NOAA-D bus and a budgetary cost for one (1) protoflight model was provided. The scatterometer sensor is conceived as one of several sensors for the Navy Remote Ocean Sensing System (NROSS) Satellite Program. Deliverables requested were to include a final report with appropriate sketches and block diagrams showing the scatterometer design/configuration and a budgetary cost for all labor and materials to design, fabricate, test, and integrate this hardware into a NOAA-D satellite bus. This configuration consists of two (2) hardware assembles - a transmitter/receiver (T/R) assembly and an integrated electronics assembly (IEA). The T/R assembly as conceived is best located at the extreme opposite end of the satellite away from the solar array assembly and oriented in position to enable one surface of the assembly to have unobstructed exposure to space. The IEA is planned to be located at the bottom (Earth viewing) side of the satellite and requires a radiating plate.

  16. Pressure Safety: Advanced Self-Study 30120

    SciTech Connect

    Glass, George

    2016-02-29

    Pressure Safety Advance Self-Study (Course 30120) consists of an introduction, five modules, and a quiz. To receive credit in UTrain for completing this course, you must score 80% or better on the 15-question quiz (check UTrain). Directions for initiating the quiz are appended to the end of this training manual. This course contains several links to LANL websites. UTrain might not support active links, so please copy links into the address line in your browser.

  17. Progress Report: Pressure Vessel Burst Test Study

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-08-01

    report is provided on a program developed to study through test and analysis, the characteristics of blast waves and fragmentation generated by ruptured ...vessels were composite overwrapped pressure vessels ( COPV ) and were cut with a shaped charge (no groove) around its center. The burst location on the...and the shaped charge cut area (shown with dotted lines). BURST INITIATION Longitudinal stress in the circumferential grooves (for developing axial

  18. Characterization of Thick and Thin Film SiCN for Pressure Sensing at High Temperatures

    PubMed Central

    Leo, Alfin; Andronenko, Sergey; Stiharu, Ion; Bhat, Rama B.

    2010-01-01

    Pressure measurement in high temperature environments is important in many applications to provide valuable information for performance studies. Information on pressure patterns is highly desirable for improving performance, condition monitoring and accurate prediction of the remaining life of systems that operate in extremely high temperature environments, such as gas turbine engines. A number of technologies have been recently investigated, however these technologies target specific applications and they are limited by the maximum operating temperature. Thick and thin films of SiCN can withstand high temperatures. SiCN is a polymer-derived ceramic with liquid phase polymer as its starting material. This provides the advantage that it can be molded to any shape. CERASET™ also yields itself for photolithography, with the addition of photo initiator 2, 2-Dimethoxy-2-phenyl-acetophenone (DMPA), thereby enabling photolithographical patterning of the pre-ceramic polymer using UV lithography. SiCN fabrication includes thermosetting, crosslinking and pyrolysis. The technology is still under investigation for stability and improved performance. This work presents the preparation of SiCN films to be used as the body of a sensor for pressure measurements in high temperature environments. The sensor employs the phenomenon of drag effect. The pressure sensor consists of a slender sensitive element and a thick blocking element. The dimensions and thickness of the films depend on the intended application of the sensors. Fabrication methods of SiCN ceramics both as thin (about 40–60 μm) and thick (about 2–3 mm) films for high temperature applications are discussed. In addition, the influence of thermosetting and annealing processes on mechanical properties is investigated. PMID:22205871

  19. An Analytical Explanation for the X-43A Flush Air Data Sensing System Pressure Mismatch Between Flight and Theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ellsworth, Joel C.

    2010-01-01

    Following the successful Mach 7 flight test of the X-43A, unexpectedly low pressures were measured by the aft set of the onboard Flush Air Data Sensing System s pressure ports. These in-flight aft port readings were significantly lower below Mach 3.5 than was predicted by theory. The same lower readings were also seen in the Mach 10 flight of the X-43A and in wind-tunnel data. The pre-flight predictions were developed based on 2-dimensional wedge flow, which fails to predict some of the significant 3-dimensional flow features in this geometry at lower Mach numbers. Using Volterra s solution to the wave equation as a starting point, a three-dimensional finite wedge approximation to flow over the X-43A forebody is presented. The surface pressures from this approximation compare favorably with the measured wind tunnel and flight data at speeds of Mach 2.5 and 3.

  20. Study of interfacial phenomena for bio/chemical sensing applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Min, Hwall

    This work presents the fundamental study of biological and chemical interfacial phenomena and (bio)chemical sensing applications using high frequency resonator arrays. To realize a versatile (bio)chemical sensing system for the fundamental study as well as their practical applications, the following three distinct components were studied and developed: i) detection platforms with high sensitivity, ii) novel innovative sensing materials with high selectivity, iii) analytical model for data interpretation. 8-pixel micromachined quartz crystal resonator (muQCR) arrays with a fundamental resonance frequency of 60 ¡V 90 MHz have been used to provide a reliable detection platform with high sensitivity. Room temperature ionic liquid (RTIL) has been explored and integrated into the sensing system as a smart chemical sensing material. The use of nanoporous gold (np-Au) enables the combination of the resonator and surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy for both quantitative and qualitative measurement. A statistical model for the characterization of resonator behavior to study the protein adsorption kinetics is developed by random sequential adsorption (RSA) approach with the integration of an effective surface depletion theory. The investigation of the adsorption kinetics of blood proteins is reported as the fundamental study of biological phenomena using the proposed sensing system. The aim of this work is to study different aspects of protein adsorption and kinetics of adsorption process with blood proteins on different surfaces. We specifically focus on surface depletion effect in conjunction with the RSA model to explain the observed adsorption isotherm characteristics. A number of case studies on protein adsorption conducted using the proposed sensing system has been discussed. Effort is specifically made to understand adsorption kinetics, and the effect of surface on the adsorption process as well as the properties of the adsorbed protein layer. The second half of the

  1. Wearable Sensing of In-Ear Pressure for Heart Rate Monitoring with a Piezoelectric Sensor

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jang-Ho; Jang, Dae-Geun; Park, Jung Wook; Youm, Se-Kyoung

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we developed a novel heart rate (HR) monitoring approach in which we measure the pressure variance of the surface of the ear canal. A scissor-shaped apparatus equipped with a piezoelectric film sensor and a hardware circuit module was designed for high wearability and to obtain stable measurement. In the proposed device, the film sensor converts in-ear pulse waves (EPW) into electrical current, and the circuit module enhances the EPW and suppresses noise. A real-time algorithm embedded in the circuit module performs morphological conversions to make the EPW more distinct and knowledge-based rules are used to detect EPW peaks. In a clinical experiment conducted using a reference electrocardiogram (ECG) device, EPW and ECG were concurrently recorded from 58 healthy subjects. The EPW intervals between successive peaks and their corresponding ECG intervals were then compared to each other. Promising results were obtained from the samples, specifically, a sensitivity of 97.25%, positive predictive value of 97.17%, and mean absolute difference of 0.62. Thus, highly accurate HR was obtained from in-ear pressure variance. Consequently, we believe that our proposed approach could be used to monitor vital signs and also utilized in diverse applications in the near future. PMID:26389912

  2. Wearable Sensing of In-Ear Pressure for Heart Rate Monitoring with a Piezoelectric Sensor.

    PubMed

    Park, Jang-Ho; Jang, Dae-Geun; Park, Jung Wook; Youm, Se-Kyoung

    2015-09-16

    In this study, we developed a novel heart rate (HR) monitoring approach in which we measure the pressure variance of the surface of the ear canal. A scissor-shaped apparatus equipped with a piezoelectric film sensor and a hardware circuit module was designed for high wearability and to obtain stable measurement. In the proposed device, the film sensor converts in-ear pulse waves (EPW) into electrical current, and the circuit module enhances the EPW and suppresses noise. A real-time algorithm embedded in the circuit module performs morphological conversions to make the EPW more distinct and knowledge-based rules are used to detect EPW peaks. In a clinical experiment conducted using a reference electrocardiogram (ECG) device, EPW and ECG were concurrently recorded from 58 healthy subjects. The EPW intervals between successive peaks and their corresponding ECG intervals were then compared to each other. Promising results were obtained from the samples, specifically, a sensitivity of 97.25%, positive predictive value of 97.17%, and mean absolute difference of 0.62. Thus, highly accurate HR was obtained from in-ear pressure variance. Consequently, we believe that our proposed approach could be used to monitor vital signs and also utilized in diverse applications in the near future.

  3. RF BREAKDOWN STUDIES USING PRESSURIZED CAVITIES

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Rolland

    2014-09-21

    Many present and future particle accelerators are limited by the maximum electric gradient and peak surface fields that can be realized in RF cavities. Despite considerable effort, a comprehensive theory of RF breakdown has not been achieved and mitigation techniques to improve practical maximum accelerating gradients have had only limited success. Part of the problem is that RF breakdown in an evacuated cavity involves a complex mixture of effects, which include the geometry, metallurgy, and surface preparation of the accelerating structures and the make-up and pressure of the residual gas in which plasmas form. Studies showed that high gradients can be achieved quickly in 805 MHz RF cavities pressurized with dense hydrogen gas, as needed for muon cooling channels, without the need for long conditioning times, even in the presence of strong external magnetic fields. This positive result was expected because the dense gas can practically eliminate dark currents and multipacting. In this project we used this high pressure technique to suppress effects of residual vacuum and geometry that are found in evacuated cavities in order to isolate and study the role of the metallic surfaces in RF cavity breakdown as a function of magnetic field, frequency, and surface preparation. One of the interesting and useful outcomes of this project was the unanticipated collaborations with LANL and Fermilab that led to new insights as to the operation of evacuated normal-conducting RF cavities in high external magnetic fields. Other accomplishments included: (1) RF breakdown experiments to test the effects of SF6 dopant in H2 and He gases with Sn, Al, and Cu electrodes were carried out in an 805 MHz cavity and compared to calculations and computer simulations. The heavy corrosion caused by the SF6 components led to the suggestion that a small admixture of oxygen, instead of SF6, to the hydrogen would allow the same advantages without the corrosion in a practical muon beam line. (2) A

  4. Study of Melon Permittivities for Quality Sensing

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    ABSTRACT Permittivities (dielectric constants and dielectric loss factors) were determined at frequencies between 10 MHz and 20 GHz for mature cantaloupe, honeydew melons, and watermelons grown during three consecutive years and studied in relation to the sweetness of the edible tissue as determine...

  5. Water Column Correction for Coral Reef Studies by Remote Sensing

    PubMed Central

    Zoffoli, Maria Laura; Frouin, Robert; Kampel, Milton

    2014-01-01

    Human activity and natural climate trends constitute a major threat to coral reefs worldwide. Models predict a significant reduction in reef spatial extension together with a decline in biodiversity in the relatively near future. In this context, monitoring programs to detect changes in reef ecosystems are essential. In recent years, coral reef mapping using remote sensing data has benefited from instruments with better resolution and computational advances in storage and processing capabilities. However, the water column represents an additional complexity when extracting information from submerged substrates by remote sensing that demands a correction of its effect. In this article, the basic concepts of bottom substrate remote sensing and water column interference are presented. A compendium of methodologies developed to reduce water column effects in coral ecosystems studied by remote sensing that include their salient features, advantages and drawbacks is provided. Finally, algorithms to retrieve the bottom reflectance are applied to simulated data and actual remote sensing imagery and their performance is compared. The available methods are not able to completely eliminate the water column effect, but they can minimize its influence. Choosing the best method depends on the marine environment, available input data and desired outcome or scientific application. PMID:25215941

  6. Water column correction for coral reef studies by remote sensing.

    PubMed

    Zoffoli, Maria Laura; Frouin, Robert; Kampel, Milton

    2014-09-11

    Human activity and natural climate trends constitute a major threat to coral reefs worldwide. Models predict a significant reduction in reef spatial extension together with a decline in biodiversity in the relatively near future. In this context, monitoring programs to detect changes in reef ecosystems are essential. In recent years, coral reef mapping using remote sensing data has benefited from instruments with better resolution and computational advances in storage and processing capabilities. However, the water column represents an additional complexity when extracting information from submerged substrates by remote sensing that demands a correction of its effect. In this article, the basic concepts of bottom substrate remote sensing and water column interference are presented. A compendium of methodologies developed to reduce water column effects in coral ecosystems studied by remote sensing that include their salient features, advantages and drawbacks is provided. Finally, algorithms to retrieve the bottom reflectance are applied to simulated data and actual remote sensing imagery and their performance is compared. The available methods are not able to completely eliminate the water column effect, but they can minimize its influence. Choosing the best method depends on the marine environment, available input data and desired outcome or scientific application.

  7. Red River chloride remote sensing study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    Side looking radar, infrared thermal imagery and color photography, together with a few examples of black and white panoramic photos, are used to supplement information on the natural saline pollution problem that is hydrologically and geologically oriented. The study area was explored concurrently by ground methods and a reasonably good understanding of hydrogeological conditions has been achieved. Examples of the products acquired, their interpretation, and use techniques are included.

  8. Impedance sensing device enables early detection of pressure ulcers in vivo.

    PubMed

    Swisher, Sarah L; Lin, Monica C; Liao, Amy; Leeflang, Elisabeth J; Khan, Yasser; Pavinatto, Felippe J; Mann, Kaylee; Naujokas, Agne; Young, David; Roy, Shuvo; Harrison, Michael R; Arias, Ana Claudia; Subramanian, Vivek; Maharbiz, Michel M

    2015-03-17

    When pressure is applied to a localized area of the body for an extended time, the resulting loss of blood flow and subsequent reperfusion to the tissue causes cell death and a pressure ulcer develops. Preventing pressure ulcers is challenging because the combination of pressure and time that results in tissue damage varies widely between patients, and the underlying damage is often severe by the time a surface wound becomes visible. Currently, no method exists to detect early tissue damage and enable intervention. Here we demonstrate a flexible, electronic device that non-invasively maps pressure-induced tissue damage, even when such damage cannot be visually observed. Using impedance spectroscopy across flexible electrode arrays in vivo on a rat model, we find that impedance is robustly correlated with tissue health across multiple animals and wound types. Our results demonstrate the feasibility of an automated, non-invasive 'smart bandage' for early detection of pressure ulcers.

  9. Effect of air-pressure on room temperature hydrogen sensing characteristics of nanocrystalline doped tin oxide MEMS-based sensor.

    PubMed

    Shukla, Satyajit; Ludwig, Lawrence; Cho, Hyoung J; Duarte, Julian; Seal, Sudipta

    2005-11-01

    Nanocrystalline indium oxide (In2O3)-doped tin oxide (SnO2) thin film sensor has been sol-gel dip-coated on a microelectrochemical system (MEMS) device using a sol-gel dip-coating technique. Hydrogen (H2) at ppm-level has been successfully detected at room temperature using the present MEMS-based sensor. The room temperature H2 sensing characteristics (sensitivity, response and recovery time, and recovery rate) of the present MEMS-based sensor has been investigated as a function of air-pressure (50-600 Torr) with and without the ultraviolet (UV) radiation exposure. It has been demonstrated that, the concentration of the surface-adsorbed oxygen-ions (which is related to the sensor-resistance in air), the ppm-level H2, and the oxygen (O2) partial pressure are the three major factors, which determine the variation in the room temperature H2 sensing characteristics of the present MEMS-based sensor as a function of air-pressure.

  10. Capillary pressure studies under low gravity conditions.

    PubMed

    Kovalchuk, V I; Ravera, F; Liggieri, L; Loglio, G; Pandolfini, P; Makievski, A V; Vincent-Bonnieu, S; Krägel, J; Javadi, A; Miller, R

    2010-12-15

    For the understanding of short-time adsorption phenomena and high-frequency relaxations at liquid interfaces particular experimental techniques are needed. The most suitable method for respective studies is the capillary pressure tensiometry. However, under gravity conditions there are rather strong limitations, in particular due to convections and interfacial deformations. This manuscript provides an overview of the state of the art of experimental tools developed for short-time and high-frequency investigations of liquid drops and bubbles under microgravity. Besides the brief description of instruments, the underlying theoretical basis will be presented and limits of the applied methods under ground and microgravity conditions will be discussed. The results on the role of surfactants under highly dynamic conditions will be demonstrated by some selected examples studied in two space shuttle missions on Discovery in 1998 and Columbia in 2003.

  11. Feasibility of leakage detection in lake pressure pipes using the Distributed Temperature Sensing Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Apperl, Benjamin; Pressl, Alexander; Schulz, Karsten

    2016-04-01

    This contribution describes a feasibility study carried out in the laboratory for the detection of leakages in lake pressure pipes using high-resolution fiber-optic temperature measurements (DTS). The usage of the DTS technology provides spatiotemporal high-resolution temperature measurements along a fibre optic cable. An opto-electrical device serves both as a light emitter as well as a spectrometer for measuring the scattering of light. The fiber optic cable serves as linear sensor. Measurements can be taken at a spatial resolution of up to 25 cm with a temperature accuracy of higher than 0.1 °C. The first warmer days after the winter stagnation provoke a temperature rise of superficial layers of lakes with barely stable temperature stratification. The warmer layer in the epilimnion differs 4 °C to 5 °C compared to the cold layers in the meta- or hypolimnion before water circulation in spring starts. The warmer water from the surface layer can be rinsed on the entire length of the pipe. Water intrudes at leakages by generating a slightly negative pressure in the pipe. This provokes a local temperature change, in case that the penetrating water (seawater) differs in temperature from the water pumped through the pipe. These temperature changes should be detectable and localized with a DTS cable introduced in the pipe. A laboratory experiment was carried out to determine feasibility as well as limits and problems of this methodology. A 6 m long pipe, submerged in a water tank at constant temperature, was rinsed with water 5-10 °C warmer than the water in the tank. Temperature measurements were taken continuously along the pipe. A negative pressure of 0.1 bar provoked the intrusion of colder water from the tank into the pipe through the leakages, resulting in local temperature changes. Experiments where conducted with different temperature gradients, leakage sizes, number of leaks as well as with different positioning of the DTS cable inside the pipe. Results

  12. The design of hydraulic pressure regulators that are stable without the use of sensing line restrictors or frictional dampers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gold, H.

    1977-01-01

    Parameters controlled in design determine the stability of hydraulic pressure regulators in service. The non-linear sensing line restrictor can provide stability, but degrades the transient response. Linear damping is not always physically realizable and is sensitive to clearance and viscosity. Design relationships are analytically derived through which regulators can be made to be stable without the use of either of these damping means. The analytical distinctions between the parameters derived and those in prior literature are discussed. An analytically derived circuit component that stabilizes an otherwise unstable regulator and its experimental verification is described.

  13. Applications of Remote Sensing to Alien Invasive Plant Studies

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Cho-ying; Asner, Gregory P.

    2009-01-01

    Biological invasions can affect ecosystems across a wide spectrum of bioclimatic conditions. Therefore, it is often important to systematically monitor the spread of species over a broad region. Remote sensing has been an important tool for large-scale ecological studies in the past three decades, but it was not commonly used to study alien invasive plants until the mid 1990s. We synthesize previous research efforts on remote sensing of invasive plants from spatial, temporal and spectral perspectives. We also highlight a recently developed state-of-the-art image fusion technique that integrates passive and active energies concurrently collected by an imaging spectrometer and a scanning-waveform light detection and ranging (LiDAR) system, respectively. This approach provides a means to detect the structure and functional properties of invasive plants of different canopy levels. Finally, we summarize regional studies of biological invasions using remote sensing, discuss the limitations of remote sensing approaches, and highlight current research needs and future directions. PMID:22408558

  14. Studies in a moving bed pressure gasifier

    SciTech Connect

    Krishnudu, T.; Madhusudhan, B.; Reddy, S.N.; Sastry, V.S.R.; Rao, K.S.; Vaidyeswaran, R.

    1989-04-01

    Sequential layer samples were collected from a moving bed pressure gasification pilot plant operating at 2.0 MPa after it was quenched by cutting off the supply of oxygen and steam, and the samples were then analyzed. The studies were made with two low-rank coals. Based on the proximate and ultimate analyses and Gray-King assay, three zones - fast devolatilization, slow devolatilization with gasification, and gasification - could be indicated in the gasifier. From a correlation obtained earlier between volatile matter content in the char and the temperature of low-temperature carbonization in a Lurgi Spuelgas type of reactor, the temperature profile in the gasifier was predicted using the volatile matter content in the sequential layer samples. About two-thirds of the total fuel bed height of 3500 mm was for fast and slow devolatilizations and the rest for gasification.

  15. High pressure study of acetophenone azine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, X. D.; Ding, Z. J.; Zhang, Z. M.

    2009-02-01

    High pressure Raman spectra of acetophenone azine (APA) have been measured up to 17.7 GPa with a diamond anvil cell. Two crystalline-to-crystalline phase transformations are found at pressures about 3.6 and 5.8 GPa. A disappearance of external modes and the C-H vibration at pressures higher than 8.7 GPa suggests that the sample undergoes a phase transition to amorphous or orientationally disordered (plastic) state, and the amorphization was completed at about 12.1 GPa. The disordered state is unstable and, then, a polymerization transformation reaction occurs with a further pressure increase. After the pressure has been released, the polymerization state can remain at the ambient condition, indicating that the virgin crystalline state is not recovered. The results show that the phenomenon underlying the pressure induced phase transition of APA may involve profound changes in the coordination environments of the symmetric aromatic azine.

  16. Raman Study of SWNT Under High Pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venkateswaran, U.; Rao, A. M.; Richter, E.; Eklund, P. C.; Smalley, R. E.

    1998-03-01

    A gasketed Merrill-Bassett-type diamond anvil cell was used for high pressure Raman measurements at room temperature. A 4:1 methanol-ethanol mixture served as the pressure transmitting medium. The radial mode (denoted as R, occuring at 186 cm-1 at 1 bar) and tangential modes (designated T_1, T_2, and T_3, located, respectively, at 1550, 1567, and 1593 cm-1 at 1 bar) were recorded for several representative pressures. With increasing pressure, both the R and T modes shift to higher frequencies with gradual weakening of intensity and broadening of linewidth. The radial mode disappears around ~ 2 GPa whereas the tangential modes, albeit weak in intensity, persist until 5.2 GPa. The decrease in Raman intensity under pressure can be attributed to a loss of resonance, since the strong Raman signals observed at ambient pressure have been interpreted as due a resonance with the electronic bands [1]. The R and T mode frequencies are fit to quadratic function of pressure i.e., ω=ω(0)+aP+bP^2 where `a' represents the linear pressure shift of the mode frequency which is proportional to the mode Gruneisen parameter. The linear pressure coefficient for the R mode is found to be nearly twice that of the high frequency T mode. A. M. Rao et al., Science 275, 187, 1997

  17. The use of remote sensing for landslide studies in Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tofani, Veronica; Agostini, Andrea; Segoni, Samuele; Catani, Filippo; Casagli, Nicola

    2013-04-01

    results can be obtained combining remote sensing with ground based networks data and in field observations, as this can allow defining the deformation patterns of a landslide and its relationship with the triggering conditions . According to the research and working experience of the compilers, remote sensing is generally considered to have a medium effectiveness/reliability for landslide studies. Moreover this depends also on how remote sensing is used: an increase in the number of used remote sensing data type (aerial photos, satellite optical, satellite radar etc.), corresponds to a growth of the degree of effectiveness/reliability. In general the number of parameters detectable through remote sensing is linked to the number of techniques employed: an increase in the number of measured parameters is related to an increase in the number of the techniques used, both for monitoring and for detection/mapping. Many answers reported the possibility of detecting more than one parameters by only using radar technologies: this could be considered as an indicator of a better efficiency of radar with respect to optical techniques. The results of the questionnaire thus contribute to draw a sketch of the use of remote sensing in current landslide studies and show that remote sensing can be considered a powerful and well established instrument for landslides mapping, monitoring and hazard analysis and highlight that a wide range of available techniques and source data can be approached depending on the size and velocity of the investigated phenomena

  18. A highly sensitive pressure sensor using a double-layered graphene structure for tactile sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chun, Sungwoo; Kim, Youngjun; Oh, Hyeong-Sik; Bae, Giyeol; Park, Wanjun

    2015-07-01

    In this paper, we propose a graphene sensor using two separated single-layered graphenes on a flexible substrate for use as a pressure sensor, such as for soft electronics. The working pressure corresponds to the range in which human perception recognizes surface morphologies. A specific design of the sensor structure drives the piezoresistive character due to the contact resistance between two graphene layers and the electromechanical properties of graphene itself. Accordingly, sensitivity in resistance change is given by two modes for low pressure (-0.24 kPa-1) and high pressure (0.039 kPa-1) with a crossover pressure (700 Pa). This sensor can detect infinitesimal pressure as low as 0.3 Pa with uniformly applied vertical force. With the attachment of the artificial fingerprint structure (AFPS) on the sensor, the detection ability for both the locally generated shear force and actual human touch confirms recognition of the surface morphology constructed by periodic structures.In this paper, we propose a graphene sensor using two separated single-layered graphenes on a flexible substrate for use as a pressure sensor, such as for soft electronics. The working pressure corresponds to the range in which human perception recognizes surface morphologies. A specific design of the sensor structure drives the piezoresistive character due to the contact resistance between two graphene layers and the electromechanical properties of graphene itself. Accordingly, sensitivity in resistance change is given by two modes for low pressure (-0.24 kPa-1) and high pressure (0.039 kPa-1) with a crossover pressure (700 Pa). This sensor can detect infinitesimal pressure as low as 0.3 Pa with uniformly applied vertical force. With the attachment of the artificial fingerprint structure (AFPS) on the sensor, the detection ability for both the locally generated shear force and actual human touch confirms recognition of the surface morphology constructed by periodic structures. Electronic

  19. Remote sensing for studying atmospheric aerosols in Malaysia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanniah, Kasturi D.; Kamarul Zaman, Nurul A. F.

    2015-10-01

    The aerosol system is Southeast Asia is complex and the high concentrations are due to population growth, rapid urbanization and development of SEA countries. Nevertheless, only a few studies have been carried out especially at large spatial extent and on a continuous basis to study atmospheric aerosols in Malaysia. In this review paper we report the use of remote sensing data to study atmospheric aerosols in Malaysia and document gaps and recommend further studies to bridge the gaps. Satellite data have been used to study the spatial and seasonal patterns of aerosol optical depth (AOD) in Malaysia. Satellite data combined with AERONET data were used to delineate different types and sizes of aerosols and to identify the sources of aerosols in Malaysia. Most of the aerosol studies performed in Malaysia was based on station-based PM10 data that have limited spatial coverage. Thus, satellite data have been used to extrapolate and retrieve PM10 data over large areas by correlating remotely sensed AOD with ground-based PM10. Realising the critical role of aerosols on radiative forcing numerous studies have been conducted worldwide to assess the aerosol radiative forcing (ARF). Such studies are yet to be conducted in Malaysia. Although the only source of aerosol data covering large region in Malaysia is remote sensing, satellite observations are limited by cloud cover, orbital gaps of satellite track, etc. In addition, relatively less understanding is achieved on how the atmospheric aerosol interacts with the regional climate system. These gaps can be bridged by conducting more studies using integrated approach of remote sensing, AERONET and ground based measurements.

  20. Dual-gate low-voltage organic transistor for pressure sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsuji, Yushi; Sakai, Heisuke; Feng, Linrun; Guo, Xiaojun; Murata, Hideyuki

    2017-02-01

    We simultaneously achieved low-voltage operation (‑5 V) and large drain current (I D) modulation in a dual-gate organic pressure sensor in which a piezoelectric layer was stacked on a low-voltage organic field-effect transistor (OFET). During testing, I D changed from 3.9 × 10‑9 to 2.5 × 10‑11 A when a 300 kPa pressure load was applied, and I D clearly responded to the pressure load and release. An endurance cycle test of the device was performed using a pressure load of 100 kPa, and the I D modulation was consistently reproduced throughout the test.

  1. Study the gas sensing properties of boron nitride nanosheets

    SciTech Connect

    Sajjad, Muhammad; Feng, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • We synthesized boron nitride nanosheets (BNNSs) on silicon substrate. • We analyzed gas sensing properties of BNNSs-based gas-sensor device. • CH{sub 4} gas is used to measure gas-sensing properties of the device. • Quick response and recovery time of the device is recorded. • BNNSs showed excellent sensitivity to the working gas. - Abstract: In the present communication, we report on the synthesis of boron nitride nanosheets (BNNSs) and study of their gas sensing properties. BNNSs are synthesized by irradiating pyrolytic hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) target using CO{sub 2} laser pulses. High resolution transmission electron microscopic measurements (HRTEM) revealed 2-dientional honeycomb crystal lattice structure of BNNSs. HRTEM, electron diffraction, XRD and Raman scattering measurements clearly identified h-BN. Gas sensing properties of synthesized BNNSs were analyzed with prototype gas sensor using methane as working gas. A systematic response curve of the sensor is recorded in each cycle of gas “in” and “out”; suggesting excellent sensitivity and high performance of BNNSs-based gas-sensor.

  2. Global Remote Sensing of Precipitating Electron Energies: A Comparison of Substorms and Pressure Pulse Related Intensifications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chua, D.; Parks, G. K.; Brittnacher, M. J.; Germany, G. A.; Spann, J. F.

    2000-01-01

    The Polar Ultraviolet Imager (UVI) observes aurora responses to incident solar wind pressure pulses and interplanetary shocks such its those associated with coronal mass ejections. Previous observations have demonstrated that the arrival of it pressure pulse at the front of the magnetosphere results in highly disturbed geomagnetic conditions and a substantial increase in both dayside and nightside aurora precipitations. Our observations show it simultaneous brightening over bread areas of the dayside and nightside auroral in response to a pressure pulse, indicating that more magnetospheric regions participate as sources for auroral precipitation than during isolate substorm. We estimate the characteristic energies of incident auroral electrons using Polar UVI images and compare the precipitation energies during pressure pulse associated event to those during isolated substorms. We estimate the characteristic energies of incident auroral electrons using Polar UVI images and compare the precipitation energies during pressure pulse associated events to those during isolated auroral substorms. Electron precipitation during substorms has characteristic energies greater than 10 KeV and is structured both in local time and in magnetic latitude. For auroral intensifications following the arrival of'a pressure pulse or interplanetary shock. Electron precipitation is less spatially structured and has greater flux of lower characteristic energy electrons (Echar less than 7 KeV) than during isolated substorm onsets. These observations quantify the differences between global and local auroral precipitation processes and will provide a valuable experimental check for models of sudden storm commencements and magnetospheric response to perturbations in the solar wind.

  3. Pressure wave propagation studies for oscillating cascades

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huff, Dennis L.

    1992-01-01

    The unsteady flowfield around an oscillating cascade of flat plates is studied using a time marching Euler code. Exact solutions based on linear theory serve as model problems to study pressure wave propagation in the numerical solution. The importance of using proper unsteady boundary conditions, grid resolution, and time step is demonstrated. Results show that an approximate non-reflecting boundary condition based on linear theory does a good job of minimizing reflections from the inflow and outflow boundaries and allows the placement of the boundaries to be closer than cases using reflective boundary conditions. Stretching the boundary to dampen the unsteady waves is another way to minimize reflections. Grid clustering near the plates does a better job of capturing the unsteady flowfield than cases using uniform grids as long as the CFL number is less than one for a sufficient portion of the grid. Results for various stagger angles and oscillation frequencies show good agreement with linear theory as long as the grid is properly resolved.

  4. Pressure wave propagation studies for oscillating cascades

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huff, Dennis L.

    1992-01-01

    The unsteady flow field around an oscillating cascade of flat plates is studied using a time marching Euler code. Exact solutions based on linear theory serve as model problems to study pressure wave propagation in the numerical solution. The importance of using proper unsteady boundary conditions, grid resolution, and time step is demonstrated. Results show that an approximate non-reflecting boundary condition based on linear theory does a good job of minimizing reflections from the inflow and outflow boundaries and allows the placement of the boundaries to be closer than cases using reflective boundary conditions. Stretching the boundary to dampen the unsteady waves is another way to minimize reflections. Grid clustering near the plates does a better job of capturing the unsteady flow field than cases using uniform grids as long as the CFL number is less than one for a sufficient portion of the grid. Results for various stagger angles and oscillation frequencies show good agreement with linear theory as long as the grid is properly resolved.

  5. Comparative study of infrared wavefront sensing solutions for adaptive optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plantet, C.; Fusco, T.; Guerineau, N.; Derelle, S.; Robert, C.

    2016-07-01

    The development of new low-noise infrared detectors, such as RAPID (CEA LETI/Sofradir) or SAPHIRA (Selex), has given the possibility to consider infrared wavefront sensing at low ux. We propose here a comparative study of near infrared (J and H bands) wavefront sensing concepts for mid and high orders estimation on a 8m- class telescope, relying on three existing wavefront sensors: the Shack-Hartmann sensor, the pyramid sensor and the quadri-wave lateral shearing interferometer. We consider several conceptual designs using the RAPID camera, making a trade-off between background flux, optical thickness and compatibility with a compact cryostat integration. We then study their sensitivity to noise in order to compare them in different practical scenarios. The pyramid provides the best performance, with a gain up to 0.5 magnitude, and has an advantageous setup.

  6. Nanostructured giant magneto-impedance multilayers deposited onto flexible substrates for low pressure sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernández, Eduardo; Kurlyandskaya, Galina V.; García-Arribas, Alfredo; Svalov, Andrey V.

    2012-04-01

    Nanostructured FeNi-based multilayers are very suitable for use as magnetic sensors using the giant magneto-impedance effect. New fields of application can be opened with these materials deposited onto flexible substrates. In this work, we compare the performance of samples prepared onto a rigid glass substrate and onto a cyclo olefin copolymer flexible one. Although a significant reduction of the field sensitivity is found due to the increased effect of the stresses generated during preparation, the results are still satisfactory for use as magnetic field sensors in special applications. Moreover, we take advantage of the flexible nature of the substrate to evaluate the pressure dependence of the giant magneto-impedance effect. Sensitivities up to 1 Ω/Pa are found for pressures in the range of 0 to 1 Pa, demostrating the suitability of these nanostructured materials deposited onto flexible substrates to build sensitive pressure sensors.

  7. Nanostructured giant magneto-impedance multilayers deposited onto flexible substrates for low pressure sensing.

    PubMed

    Fernández, Eduardo; Kurlyandskaya, Galina V; García-Arribas, Alfredo; Svalov, Andrey V

    2012-04-23

    Nanostructured FeNi-based multilayers are very suitable for use as magnetic sensors using the giant magneto-impedance effect. New fields of application can be opened with these materials deposited onto flexible substrates. In this work, we compare the performance of samples prepared onto a rigid glass substrate and onto a cyclo olefin copolymer flexible one. Although a significant reduction of the field sensitivity is found due to the increased effect of the stresses generated during preparation, the results are still satisfactory for use as magnetic field sensors in special applications. Moreover, we take advantage of the flexible nature of the substrate to evaluate the pressure dependence of the giant magneto-impedance effect. Sensitivities up to 1 Ω/Pa are found for pressures in the range of 0 to 1 Pa, demostrating the suitability of these nanostructured materials deposited onto flexible substrates to build sensitive pressure sensors.

  8. Nanostructured giant magneto-impedance multilayers deposited onto flexible substrates for low pressure sensing

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Nanostructured FeNi-based multilayers are very suitable for use as magnetic sensors using the giant magneto-impedance effect. New fields of application can be opened with these materials deposited onto flexible substrates. In this work, we compare the performance of samples prepared onto a rigid glass substrate and onto a cyclo olefin copolymer flexible one. Although a significant reduction of the field sensitivity is found due to the increased effect of the stresses generated during preparation, the results are still satisfactory for use as magnetic field sensors in special applications. Moreover, we take advantage of the flexible nature of the substrate to evaluate the pressure dependence of the giant magneto-impedance effect. Sensitivities up to 1 Ω/Pa are found for pressures in the range of 0 to 1 Pa, demostrating the suitability of these nanostructured materials deposited onto flexible substrates to build sensitive pressure sensors. PMID:22525096

  9. A comparative study for massive data compression in long-distance distributed optical fiber sensing systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Huijuan; Liu, Jun; Xu, Jiwei; Zhang, Linqiang; Li, Hanyu; Zhang, Weili; Rao, Yunjiang

    2015-07-01

    With the growing demand for monitoring length and channel number of the fully distributed optical fiber sensors (DOFSs), the amount of sensing data is increasing rapidly, and there will be a heavy pressure for the massive data storage and transmission. In this paper, two lossless compression algorithms of Lempel-Ziv-Welch (LZW) and Huffman are comparatively studied to effectively compress the huge amount of data of typical DOFSs, e.g. Φ -OTDR, POTDR, and BOTDA systems. The comparison results show that the LZW based on dictionary has a better performance in the consuming time and compression ratio for the DOFS data.

  10. Laboratory simulation of tropospheric pollution sensing with a pressure modulator radiometer /PMR/

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hinton, D. E.; Odell, E. L. G.

    1979-01-01

    The optical properties of carbon monoxide gas uniformly distributed in the atmosphere have been simulated in a 20.48 cm long cell in the laboratory. The altitude of the peak of the weighting function for several concentrations was found using a Pressure Modulator Radiometer (PMR). The effect of a fluctuating background radiance and gaseous nitrous oxide on the carbon monoxide signals were examined.

  11. Sensing Pressure Distribution on a Lower-Limb Exoskeleton Physical Human-Machine Interface

    PubMed Central

    De Rossi, Stefano Marco Maria; Vitiello, Nicola; Lenzi, Tommaso; Ronsse, Renaud; Koopman, Bram; Persichetti, Alessandro; Vecchi, Fabrizio; Ijspeert, Auke Jan; van der Kooij, Herman; Carrozza, Maria Chiara

    2011-01-01

    A sensory apparatus to monitor pressure distribution on the physical human-robot interface of lower-limb exoskeletons is presented. We propose a distributed measure of the interaction pressure over the whole contact area between the user and the machine as an alternative measurement method of human-robot interaction. To obtain this measure, an array of newly-developed soft silicone pressure sensors is inserted between the limb and the mechanical interface that connects the robot to the user, in direct contact with the wearer’s skin. Compared to state-of-the-art measures, the advantage of this approach is that it allows for a distributed measure of the interaction pressure, which could be useful for the assessment of safety and comfort of human-robot interaction. This paper presents the new sensor and its characterization, and the development of an interaction measurement apparatus, which is applied to a lower-limb rehabilitation robot. The system is calibrated, and an example its use during a prototypical gait training task is presented. PMID:22346574

  12. Method for sensing and measuring a concentration or partial pressure of a reactant used in a redox reaction

    DOEpatents

    Findl, E.

    1984-12-21

    A method for sensing or measuring the partial pressure or concentration of an electroactive species used in conjunction with an electrolyte, the method being characterized by providing a constant current between an anode and a cathode of an electrolyte-containing cell, while measuring changes in voltage that occur between either the anode and cathode or between a reference electrode and one of the main electrodes of the cell, thereby to determine the concentration or partial pressure of the electro-active species as a function of said measured voltage changes. The method of the invention can be practiced using either a cell having only an anode and a cathode, or using a cell having an anode and a cathode in combination with a reference electrode. Accurate measurements of small concentrations or partial pressures of electro-active species are obtainable with the method of the invention, by using constant currents of only a few microamperes between the anode and cathode of the cell, while the concentration-determining voltage is measured.

  13. Studies in chemical physics through high-pressure luminescence

    SciTech Connect

    Drickamer, H.G.

    1981-01-01

    Energy transfer in chelates of Eu/sup 3 +/ with ligands (dibenzylmethane) was studied as a function of pressure. Rate of thermal dissipation of electronic excitation was correlated with viscosity and dielectric constant for indoles in a series of solvents, and with pressure for porphyrins. Effects of medium (dielectric constant, viscosity) on complexes were studied. Studies on 3-hydroxyflavone are also summarized. These studies show the power of high pressure luminescence as a tool in chemical physics. 11 figures. (DLC)

  14. Highly birefringent polymer side-hole fiber for hydrostatic pressure sensing.

    PubMed

    Martynkien, Tadeusz; Wojcik, Grzegorz; Mergo, Pawel; Urbanczyk, Waclaw

    2015-07-01

    We report on the fabrication of a birefringent side-hole polymer optical fiber with an elliptical core made of polymethyl metacrylate-polystyrene (PMMA/PS) copolymer and pure PMMA cladding. The fiber core is located in a narrow PMMA bridge separating the holes. Two fibers with different bridge thickness were fabricated and characterized. We demonstrate, experimentally and numerically, that, by narrowing the bridge between the holes, one can increase simultaneously the fiber birefringence and the polarimetric sensitivity to hydrostatic pressure. In the fiber with the bridge as narrow as 5 μm, we achieved a record-high polarimetric sensitivity to hydrostatic pressure ranging between 175 and 140 rad/MPa/m in the spectral range of 600-830 nm. The phase modal birefringence in this fiber is also high and exceeds 3×10(-5) at 600 nm, which results in small polarization cross talk.

  15. Remote sensing of atmospheric pressure and sea state using laser altimeters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gardner, C. S.

    1985-01-01

    Short-pulse multicolor laser ranging systems are currently being developed for satellite ranging applications. These systems use Q-switched pulsed lasers and streak-tube cameras to provide timing accuracies approaching a few picoseconds. Satellite laser ranging systems have been used to evaluate many important geophysical phenomena such as fault motion, polar motion and solid earth tides, by measuring the orbital perturbations of retroreflector equipped satellites. Some existing operational systems provide range resolution approaching a few millimeters. There is currently considerable interest in adapting these highly accurate systems for use as airborne and satellite based altimeters. Potential applications include the measurement of sea state, ground topography and atmospheric pressure. This paper reviews recent progress in the development of multicolor laser altimeters for use in monitoring sea state and atmospheric pressure.

  16. Remote Sensing Global Surface Air Pressure Using Differential Absorption BArometric Radar (DiBAR)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, Bing; Harrah, Steven; Lawrence, Wes; Hu, Yongxiang; Min, Qilong

    2016-01-01

    Tropical storms and severe weathers are listed as one of core events that need improved observations and predictions in World Meteorological Organization and NASA Decadal Survey (DS) documents and have major impacts on public safety and national security. This effort tries to observe surface air pressure, especially over open seas, from space using a Differential-absorption BArometric Radar (DiBAR) operating at the 50-55 gigahertz O2 absorption band. Air pressure is among the most important variables that affect atmospheric dynamics, and currently can only be measured by limited in-situ observations over oceans. Analyses show that with the proposed space radar the errors in instantaneous (averaged) pressure estimates can be as low as approximately 4 millibars (approximately 1 millibar under all weather conditions). With these sea level pressure measurements, the forecasts of severe weathers such as hurricanes will be significantly improved. Since the development of the DiBAR concept about a decade ago, NASA Langley DiBAR research team has made substantial progress in advancing the concept. The feasibility assessment clearly shows the potential of sea surface barometry using existing radar technologies. The team has developed a DiBAR system design, fabricated a Prototype-DiBAR (P-DiBAR) for proof-of-concept, conducted lab, ground and airborne P-DiBAR tests. The flight test results are consistent with the instrumentation goals. Observational system simulation experiments for space DiBAR performance based on the existing DiBAR technology and capability show substantial improvements in tropical storm predictions, not only for the hurricane track and position but also for the hurricane intensity. DiBAR measurements will lead us to an unprecedented level of the prediction and knowledge on global extreme weather and climate conditions.

  17. Simple Fabry-Perot based Instrument for Surface Pressure Sensing from Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heaps, William S.

    2002-01-01

    Mitchel and O'Brien observed in 1989 that a passive satellite measurement using the oxygen A band could exhibit a precision of better than 1% when used to make a surface pressure measurement. I will present a design and performance simulation for a Fabry-Perot interferometer based instrument which should exceed this level of performance. The design is small, inexpensive, and rugged. Preliminary results from a laboratory prototype of the instrument will be presented.

  18. Differential absorption lidars for remote sensing of atmospheric pressure and temperature profiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Korb, C. Laurence; Schwemmer, Geary K.; Famiglietti, Joseph; Walden, Harvey; Prasad, Coorg

    1995-01-01

    A near infrared differential absorption lidar technique is developed using atmospheric oxygen as a tracer for high resolution vertical profiles of pressure and temperature with high accuracy. Solid-state tunable lasers and high-resolution spectrum analyzers are developed to carry out ground-based and airborne measurement demonstrations and results of the measurements presented. Numerical error analysis of high-altitude airborne and spaceborne experiments is carried out, and system concepts developed for their implementation.

  19. Study of blood flow sensing with microwave radiometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Porter, R. A.; Wentz, F. J., III

    1973-01-01

    A study and experimental investigation has been performed to determine the feasibility of measuring regional blood flow and volume in man by means of microwave radiometry. An indication was expected of regional blood flow from measurement of surface and subsurface temperatures with a sensitive radiometer. Following theoretical modeling of biological tissue, to determine the optimum operating frequency for adequate sensing depth, a sensitive microwave radiometer was designed for operation at 793 MHz. A temperature sensitivity of of 0.06 K rms was realized in this equipment. Measurements performed on phantom tissue models, consisting of beef fat and lean beefsteak showed that the radiometer was capable of sensing temperatures from a depth between 3.8 and 5.1 cm. Radiometric and thermodynamic temperature measurements were also performed on the hind thighs of large dogs. These showed that the radiometer could sense subsurface temperatures from a depth of, at least, 1.3 cm. Delays caused by externally-generated RF interference, coupled with the lack of reliable blood flow measurement equipment, prevented correlation of radiometer readings with reginal blood flow. For the same reasons, it was not possible to extend the radiometric observations to human subjects.

  20. Research on pressure tactile sensing technology based on fiber Bragg grating array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Jinxue; Jiang, Qi; Huang, Yuanyang; Li, Yibin; Jia, Yuxi; Rong, Xuewen; Song, Rui; Liu, Hongbin

    2015-09-01

    A pressure tactile sensor based on the fiber Bragg grating (FBG) array is introduced in this paper, and the numerical simulation of its elastic body was implemented by finite element software (ANSYS). On the basis of simulation, fiber Bragg grating strings were implanted in flexible silicone to realize the sensor fabrication process, and a testing system was built. A series of calibration tests were done via the high precision universal press machine. The tactile sensor array perceived external pressure, which is demodulated by the fiber grating demodulation instrument, and three-dimension pictures were programmed to display visually the position and size. At the same time, a dynamic contact experiment of the sensor was conducted for simulating robot encountering other objects in the unknown environment. The experimental results show that the sensor has good linearity, repeatability, and has the good effect of dynamic response, and its pressure sensitivity was 0.03 nm/N. In addition, the sensor also has advantages of anti-electromagnetic interference, good flexibility, simple structure, low cost and so on, which is expected to be used in the wearable artificial skin in the future.

  1. Bio-Inspired Pressure Sensing for Active Yaw Control of Underwater Vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Amy; Triantafyllou, Michael

    2012-11-01

    A towed underwater vehicle equipped with a bio-inspired artificial lateral line was constructed and tested with the goal of active detection and correction of the vehicle's angle of attack. Preliminary experiments demonstrate that a low number of sensors are sufficient to enable the discrimination between different orientations, and that a basic proportional controller is capable of keeping the vehicle aligned with the direction of flow. We propose that a model based controller could be developed to improve system response. Toward this, we derive a vehicle model based on a first-order 3D Rankine Source Panel Method, which is shown to be competent in estimating the pressure field in the region of interest during motion at constant angles of attack, and during execution of dynamic maneuvers. To solve the inverse problem of estimating the vehicle orientation given specific pressure measurements, an Unscented Kalman Filter is developed around the model. It is shown to provide a close estimation of the vehicle state using experimentally collected pressure measurements. This demonstrates that an artificial lateral line is a promising technology for dynamically mediating the angle of a body relative to the oncoming flow.

  2. Multipoint Pressure and Temperature Sensing Fiber Optic Cable for Monitoring CO2 Sequestration

    SciTech Connect

    Challener, William

    2015-02-10

    This report describes the work completed on contract DE-FE0010116. The goal of this two year project was to develop and demonstrate in the laboratory a highly accurate multi-point pressure measurement fiber optic cable based on MEMS pressure sensors suitable for downhole deployment in a CO2 sequestration well. The sensor interrogator was also to be demonstrated in a remote monitoring system and environmental testing was to be completed to indicate its downhole survivability over a lengthy period of time (e.g., 20 years). An interrogator system based on a pulsed laser excitation was shown to be capable of multiple (potentially 100+) simultaneous sensor measurements. Two sensors packages were completed and spliced in a cable onto the same fiber and measured. One sensor package was subsequently measured at high temperatures and pressures in supercritical CO2, while the other package was measured prior and after being subjected to high torque stresses to mimic downhole deployment. The environmental and stress tests indicated areas in which the package design should be further improved.

  3. Vertically aligned multiwalled carbon nanotubes for pressure, tactile and vibration sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yilmazoglu, O.; Popp, A.; Pavlidis, D.; Schneider, J. J.; Garth, D.; Schüttler, F.; Battenberg, G.

    2012-03-01

    We report a simple method for the micro-nano integration of flexible, vertically aligned multiwalled CNT arrays sandwiched between a top and bottom carbon layer via a porous alumina (Al2O3) template approach. The electromechanical properties of the flexible CNT arrays have been investigated under mechanical stress conditions. First experiments show highly sensitive piezoresistive sensors with a resistance decrease of up to ˜35% and a spatial resolution of <1 mm. The results indicate that these CNT structures can be utilized for tactile sensing components. They also confirm the feasibility of accessing and utilizing nanoscopic CNT bundles via lithographic processing. The method involves room-temperature processing steps and standard microfabrication techniques.

  4. Pressure studies of deep levels in semiconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Samara, G.A.

    1989-01-01

    The effects of pressure on the energetics and kinetics of electron emission and capture processes by several important deep levels in Si are discussed. The results yield the first quantitative measures of the breathing mode lattice relaxations accompanying these processes. 2 refs., 1 fig.

  5. High-resolution, high-pressure NMR studies of proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Jonas, J; Ballard, L; Nash, D

    1998-01-01

    Advanced high-resolution NMR spectroscopy, including two-dimensional NMR techniques, combined with high pressure capability, represents a powerful new tool in the study of proteins. This contribution is organized in the following way. First, the specialized instrumentation needed for high-pressure NMR experiments is discussed, with specific emphasis on the design features and performance characteristics of a high-sensitivity, high-resolution, variable-temperature NMR probe operating at 500 MHz and at pressures of up to 500 MPa. An overview of several recent studies using 1D and 2D high-resolution, high-pressure NMR spectroscopy to investigate the pressure-induced reversible unfolding and pressure-assisted cold denaturation of lysozyme, ribonuclease A, and ubiquitin is presented. Specifically, the relationship between the residual secondary structure of pressure-assisted, cold-denatured states and the structure of early folding intermediates is discussed. PMID:9649405

  6. Case study: the treatment or palliative care of pressure ulcers.

    PubMed

    Hampton, S

    As nurse education increases there are reduced justifications for the existence of pressure ulcers. Patient assessment, along with rationalization of equipment and repositioning techniques, reduces the potential for pressure ulcer formation. Therefore, the future for pressure ulcer prevention will rely on nurse education and motivation. The patient featured in this case study suffered unnecessarily from pressure ulcers as, after her admission to a new nursing home where she was given the appropriate pressure-relieving and wound-dressing treatment, the ulcers were showing signs of healing.

  7. Osmium Metal Studied under High Pressure and Nonhydrostatic Stress

    SciTech Connect

    Weinberger,M.; Tolbert, S.; Kavner, A.

    2008-01-01

    Interest in osmium as an ultra-incompressible material and as an analog for the behavior of iron at high pressure has inspired recent studies of its mechanical properties. We have measured elastic and plastic deformation of Os metal at high pressures using in situ high pressure x-ray diffraction in the radial geometry. We show that Os has the highest yield strength observed for any pure metal, supporting up to 10 GPa at a pressure of 26 GPa. Furthermore, our data indicate changes in the nonhydrostatic apparent c/a ratio and clear lattice preferred orientation effects at pressures above 15 GPa.

  8. The Use of Satellite Remote Sensing in Epidemiological Studies

    PubMed Central

    Sorek-Hamer, Meytar; Just, Allan C.; Kloog, Itai

    2016-01-01

    Purpose of review Particulate matter (PM) air pollution is a ubiquitous exposure linked with multiple adverse health outcomes for children and across the life course. The recent development of satellite based remote sensing models for air pollution enables the quantification of these risks and addresses many limitations of previous air pollution research strategies. We review the recent literature on the applications of satellite remote sensing in air quality research, with a focus on their use in epidemiological studies. Recent findings Aerosol optical depth (AOD) is a focus of this review and a significant number of studies show that ground-level PM can be estimated from columnar AOD. Satellite measurements have been found to be an important source of data for PM model-based exposure estimates, and recently have been used in health studies to increase the spatial breadth and temporal resolution of these estimates. Summary It is suggested that satellite-based models improve our understanding of the spatial characteristics of air quality. Although the adoption of satellite-based measures of air quality in health studies is in its infancy, it is rapidly growing. Nevertheless, further investigation is still needed in order to have a better understanding of the AOD contribution to these prediction models in order to use them with higher accuracy in epidemiological studies. PMID:26859287

  9. Orifice-induced pressure error studies in Langley 7- by 10-foot high-speed tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Plentovich, E. B.; Gloss, B. B.

    1986-01-01

    For some time it has been known that the presence of a static pressure measuring hole will disturb the local flow field in such a way that the sensed static pressure will be in error. The results of previous studies aimed at studying the error induced by the pressure orifice were for relatively low Reynolds number flows. Because of the advent of high Reynolds number transonic wind tunnels, a study was undertaken to assess the magnitude of this error at high Reynolds numbers than previously published and to study a possible method of eliminating this pressure error. This study was conducted in the Langley 7- by 10-Foot High-Speed Tunnel on a flat plate. The model was tested at Mach numbers from 0.40 to 0.72 and at Reynolds numbers from 7.7 x 1,000,000 to 11 x 1,000,000 per meter (2.3 x 1,000,000 to 3.4 x 1,000,000 per foot), respectively. The results indicated that as orifice size increased, the pressure error also increased but that a porous metal (sintered metal) plug inserted in an orifice could greatly reduce the pressure error induced by the orifice.

  10. Basic Studies on High Pressure Air Plasmas

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-08-30

    33, 2268 (2000). [3] Non- Equilibrium Air Plasmas at Atmospheric Pressure, K.H. Becker, U. Kogelschatz, K.H. Schoenbach, and R.J. Barker, eds., IOP...10). Note that LIFBASE assumes local thermodynamic equilibrium . 120 100 oExperimentalm Siuation 80 60 20- 0 -J ~ LkXi 3060 3070 3080 3090 3100...Dual laser interferometer for plasma density measurements on large tokamaks >>, Rev. Sci. Instrum. 49 p.919 (1978) [5] C.W. Gowers, C. Lamb, « A

  11. High-Pressure Study on Lead Fluorapatite

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, X.; Shieh, S; Fleet, M; Akhmetov, A

    2008-01-01

    The compressional behavior of a synthetic lead fluorapatite [Pb9.35(PO4)6F2] has been investigated in situ up to about 16.7 GPa at 300 K, using a diamond-anvil cell and synchrotron X-ray diffraction. We find that the compressibility of lead fluorapatite is significantly different from that of fluorapatite [Ca10(PO4)6F2], chlorapatite [Ca10(PO4)6Cl2], and hydroxylapatite [Ca10(PO4)6(OH)2]: lead fluorapatite is much more compressible, and elastically isotropic in the investigated pressure range. The pressure-volume data fitted to the third-order Birch-Murnaghan equation yield an isothermal bulk modulus (KT) of 54.3(18) GPa and the pressure derivative (KT') of 8.1(6). If KT' is fixed at 4, the obtained KT is 68.4(16) GPa, which is approximately only two-thirds of the isothermal bulk modulus of the calcium apatites.

  12. High-pressure Raman study of Terephthalonitrile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, DongFei; Zhang, KeWei; Song, MingXing; Zhai, NaiCui; Sun, ChengLin; Li, HaiBo

    2017-02-01

    The in situ high-pressure Raman spectra of Terephthalonitrile (TPN) have been investigated from ambient to 12.6 GPa at room temperature. All the fundamental vibrational modes of TPN at ambient were assigned based on the first-principle calculations. A detailed Raman spectroscopy analysis revealed that TPN underwent a phase transition at 5.3 GPa. The frequencies of the TPN Raman peaks increase with increasing the pressure which can be attributed to the reduction in the interatomic distances and the escalation of effective force constants. The intensity of the C-C-C ring-out-plane deformation mode increases gradually as the frequency remains almost constant during the compression which can be explained by the existence of π-π interactions in TPN molecules. Additionally, the pressure-induced structural changes of TPN on the Fermi resonance between the C ≡ N out-of-plane vibration mode and the C - CN out-of-plane vibration mode have been analyzed.

  13. Thermal anemometric assessment of coronary flow reserve with a pressure-sensing guide wire: an in vitro evaluation.

    PubMed

    van der Horst, Arjen; Geven, Maartje C F; Rutten, Marcel C M; Pijls, Nico H J; van de Vosse, Frans N

    2011-07-01

    Assessment of coronary flow reserve (CFR) with a commercially available pressure-sensor-tipped guide wire using the principle of thermal anemometry could provide major clinical benefits both in determining and in distinguishing between epicardial and microvascular coronary artery disease. In constant-temperature thermal anemometry, the electrical power required to maintain an element at a constant temperature is a measure for the local shear rate. Here, the feasibility of applying this thermoconvection method to a pressure-sensing guide wire is investigated using an in vitro model. A theoretical relation between electrical power and steady shear rate based on boundary layer theory was tested in an experimental set-up. In steady flow, a reproducible relation between electrical power and shear rate was obtained with an overheat temperature of 20K, which was in good agreement with theory. The relation between shear rate and flow, however, depends on geometry of the artery and position of the guide wire inside the vessel. Although this means that this thermoconvection method is less useful for absolute flow measurements, CFR could be assessed even for unsteady flow using the steady calibration curve with a mean relative difference of (3±5)% compared to CFR derived from the golden standard using an ultrasonic flow measurement device.

  14. Pressure sensing in high-refractive-index liquids using long-period gratings nanocoated with silicon nitride.

    PubMed

    Smietana, Mateusz; Bock, Wojtek J; Mikulic, Predrag; Chen, Jiahua

    2010-01-01

    The paper presents a novel pressure sensor based on a silicon nitride (SiNx) nanocoated long-period grating (LPG). The high-temperature, radio-frequency plasma-enhanced chemical-vapor-deposited (RF PECVD) SiNx nanocoating was applied to tune the sensitivity of the LPG to the external refractive index. The technique allows for deposition of good quality, hard and wear-resistant nanofilms as required for optical sensors. Thanks to the SiNx nanocoating it is possible to overcome a limitation of working in the external-refractive-index range, which for a bare fiber cannot be close to that of the cladding. The nanocoated LPG-based sensing structure we developed is functional in high-refractive-index liquids (nD>1.46) such as oil or gasoline, with pressure sensitivity as high as when water is used as a working liquid. The nanocoating developed for this experiment not only has the highest refractive index ever achieved in LPGs (n>2.2 at λ=1,550 nm), but is also the thinnest (<100 nm) able to tune the external-refractive-index sensitivity of the gratings. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first time a nanocoating has been applied on LPGs that is able to simultaneously tune the refractive-index sensitivity and to enable measurements of other parameters.

  15. A Study on the Influence of Speed on Road Roughness Sensing: The SmartRoadSense Case †

    PubMed Central

    Alessandroni, Giacomo; Carini, Alberto; Lattanzi, Emanuele; Freschi, Valerio; Bogliolo, Alessandro

    2017-01-01

    SmartRoadSense is a crowdsensing project aimed at monitoring the conditions of the road surface. Using the sensors of a smartphone, SmartRoadSense monitors the vertical accelerations inside a vehicle traveling the road and extracts a roughness index conveying information about the road conditions. The roughness index and the smartphone GPS data are periodically sent to a central server where they are processed, associated with the specific road, and aggregated with data measured by other smartphones. This paper studies how the smartphone vertical accelerations and the roughness index are related to the vehicle speed. It is shown that the dependence can be locally approximated with a gamma (power) law. Extensive experimental results using data extracted from SmartRoadSense database confirm the gamma law relationship between the roughness index and the vehicle speed. The gamma law is then used for improving the SmartRoadSense data aggregation accounting for the effect of vehicle speed. PMID:28178224

  16. A Study on the Influence of Speed on Road Roughness Sensing: The SmartRoadSense Case.

    PubMed

    Alessandroni, Giacomo; Carini, Alberto; Lattanzi, Emanuele; Freschi, Valerio; Bogliolo, Alessandro

    2017-02-07

    SmartRoadSense is a crowdsensing project aimed at monitoring the conditions of the road surface. Using the sensors of a smartphone, SmartRoadSense monitors the vertical accelerations inside a vehicle traveling the road and extracts a roughness index conveying information about the road conditions. The roughness index and the smartphone GPS data are periodically sent to a central server where they are processed, associated with the specific road, and aggregated with data measured by other smartphones. This paper studies how the smartphone vertical accelerations and the roughness index are related to the vehicle speed. It is shown that the dependence can be locally approximated with a gamma (power) law. Extensive experimental results using data extracted from SmartRoadSense database confirm the gamma law relationship between the roughness index and the vehicle speed. The gamma law is then used for improving the SmartRoadSense data aggregation accounting for the effect of vehicle speed.

  17. Remote sensing applications for transportation and traffic engineering studies: A review of the literature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Epps, J. W.

    1973-01-01

    Current references were surveyed for the application of remote sensing to traffic and transportation studies. The major problems are presented that concern traffic engineers and transportation managers, and the literature references that discuss remote sensing applications are summarized.

  18. Dietary phosphorus and blood pressure: international study of macro- and micro-nutrients and blood pressure.

    PubMed

    Elliott, Paul; Kesteloot, Hugo; Appel, Lawrence J; Dyer, Alan R; Ueshima, Hirotsugu; Chan, Queenie; Brown, Ian J; Zhao, Liancheng; Stamler, Jeremiah

    2008-03-01

    Raised blood pressure is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide; improved nutritional approaches to population-wide prevention are required. Few data are available on dietary phosphorus and blood pressure and none are available on possible combined effects of phosphorus, magnesium, and calcium on blood pressure. The International Study of Macro- and Micro-Nutrients and Blood Pressure is a cross-sectional epidemiologic study of 4680 men and women ages 40 to 59 from 17 population samples in Japan, China, United Kingdom, and United States. Blood pressure was measured 8 times at 4 visits. Dietary intakes were obtained from four 24-hour recalls plus data on supplement use. Dietary phosphorus was inversely associated with blood pressure in a series of predefined multiple regression models, with the successive addition of potential confounders, both nondietary and dietary. Estimated blood pressure differences per 232 mg/1000 kcal (2 SD) of higher dietary phosphorus were -1.1 to -2.3 mm Hg systolic/-0.6 to -1.5 mm Hg diastolic (n=4680) and -1.6 to -3.5 mm Hg systolic/-0.8 to -1.8 mm Hg diastolic for 2238 "nonintervened" individuals, ie, those without special diet/nutritional supplements or diagnosis/treatment for cardiovascular disease or diabetes. Dietary calcium and magnesium, correlated with phosphorus (partial r=0.71 and r=0.68), were inversely associated with blood pressure. Blood pressures were lower by 1.9 to 4.2 mm Hg systolic/1.2 to 2.4 mm Hg diastolic for people with intakes above versus below country-specific medians for all 3 of the minerals. These results indicate the potential for increased phosphorus/mineral intake to lower blood pressure as part of the recommendations for healthier eating patterns for the prevention and control of prehypertension and hypertension.

  19. Validity and Usefulness of `Wearable Blood Pressure Sensing' for Detection of Inappropriate Short-Term Blood Pressure Variability in the Elderly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iijima, Katsuya; Kameyama, Yumi; Akishita, Masahiro; Ouchi, Yasuyoshi; Yanagimoto, Shintaro; Imai, Yasushi; Yahagi, Naoki; Lopez, Guillaume; Shuzo, Masaki; Yamada, Ichiro

    An increase in short-term blood pressure (BP) variability is a characteristic feature in the elderly. It makes the management of hemodynamics more difficult, because it is frequently seen disturbed baro-reflex function and increased arterial stiffness, leading to isolated systolic hypertension. Large BP variability aggravates hypertensive target organ damage and is an independent risk factor for the cardiovascular (CV) events in elderly hypertensive patients. Therefore, appropriate control in BP is indispensable to manage lifestyle-related diseases and to prevent subsequent CV events. In addition, accumulating recent reports show that excessive BP variability is also associated with a decline in cognitive function and fall in the elderly. In the clinical settings, we usually evaluate their health condition, mainly with single point BP measurement using cuff inflation. However, unfortunately we are not able to find the close changes in BP by the traditional way. Here, we can show our advantageous approach of continuous BP monitoring using newly developing device `wearable BP sensing' without a cuff stress in the elderly. The new device could reflect systolic BP and its detailed changes, in consistent with cuff-based BP measurement. Our new challenge suggests new possibility of its clinical application with high accuracy.

  20. Morphological studies of resonances in plasmonic metasurfaces for SPR sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lelek, Jakub; Kwiecien, Pavel; Richter, Ivan; Homola, Jiří

    2015-05-01

    We investigate selected periodic arrays of nanostructures inspired by metasurfaces originally used in metamaterial structures and evaluate their potential for surface plasmon resonance applicable in sensing. Building blocks including rectangles, cut wires, crosses, fishnets, split ring resonators were ordered on suitable substrates and their reflection (R), transmission (T), and loss energy (L) spectra were calculated. The numerical studies were performed using our efficient in-house two-dimensional rigorous coupled-wave analysis technique. Our technique incorporates all the key improvements of the method available, taking into account both proper Fourier factorization rules, adaptive spatial resolution techniques, as well as structural symmetries. Using the R, T, and L spectra, we investigated spectral sensitivity of SPR and calculated the respective SPR sensor characteristics, such as figures of merit (FOM), enabling direct comparison of various structural morphologies for potential sensing applications. Also, optimization of the structures in terms of FOM has been performed to identify the most promising candidates. Additionally, to allow for interpretation of spectral resonant features and the interplay of individual and surface lattice resonances, we were gradually changing the morphology of individual building blocks from one type of element to another one. We believe that this study will bring insight into plasmonic behavior of nanostructured metasurfaces and will further benefit research into SPR biosensors.

  1. Effect of osmolytes on pressure-induced unfolding of proteins: a high-pressure SAXS study.

    PubMed

    Krywka, Christina; Sternemann, Christian; Paulus, Michael; Tolan, Metin; Royer, Catherine; Winter, Roland

    2008-12-22

    Herein, we explore the effect of different types of osmolytes on the high-pressure stability and tertiary structure of a well-characterized monomeric protein, staphylococcal nuclease (SNase). Changes in the denaturation pressure and the radius of gyration are obtained in the presence of different concentrations of trimethylamine N-oxide (TMAO), glycerol and urea. To reveal structural changes in the protein upon compression at various osmolyte conditions, small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) experiments were carried out. To this end, a new high-pressure cell suitable for high-precision SAXS studies at synchrotron sources was built, which allows one to carry out scattering experiments up to maximum pressures of about 7 kbar. Our data clearly indicate that the osmolytes that stabilize proteins against temperature-induced unfolding drastically increase their pressure stability and that the elliptically shaped curve of the pressure-temperature-stability diagram of proteins is shifted to higher temperatures and pressures with increasing osmolyte concentration. A drastic stabilization is observed for the osmolyte TMAO, which exhibits not only a significant stabilization against temperature-induced unfolding, but also a particularly strong stabilization of the protein against pressure. In fact, such findings are in accordance with in vivo studies (for example P. J. Yancey, J. Exp. Biol. 2005, 208, 2819-2830), where unusually high TMAO concentrations in some deep-sea animals were found. Conversely, chaotropic agents such as urea have a strong destabilizing effect on both the temperature and pressure stability of the protein. Our data also indicate that sufficiently high TMAO concentrations might be able to largely offset the destabilizing effect of urea. The different scenarios observed are discussed in the context of recent experimental and theoretical studies.

  2. An apparatus for studying scintillator properties at high isostatic pressures

    SciTech Connect

    Gaume, R. M.; Lam, S.; Gascon, M.; Feigelson, R. S.; Setyawan, W.; Curtarolo, S.

    2013-01-15

    We describe the design and operation of a unique hydraulic press for the study of scintillator materials under isostatic pressure. This press, capable of developing a pressure of a gigapascal, consists of a large sample chamber pressurized by a two-stage hydraulic amplifier. The optical detection of the scintillation light emitted by the sample is performed, through a large aperture optical port, by a photodetector located outside the pressure vessel. In addition to providing essential pressure-dependent studies on the emission characteristics of radioluminescent materials, this apparatus is being developed to elucidate the mechanisms behind the recently observed dependency of light-yield nonproportionality on electronic band structure. The variation of the light output of a Tl:CsI crystal under 511-keV gamma excitation and hydrostatic pressure is given as an example.

  3. Absorption coefficients of CFC-11 and CFC-12 needed for atmospheric remote sensing and global warming studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Varanasi, Prasad

    1992-01-01

    Spectral absorption coefficients k(v) in the atmospheric window are reported for CFC-11 and CFC-12. Data obtained with a grating spectrometer are compared with NCAR cross sections and measurements of k(v) made with a tunable diode laser spectrometer at various temperature-pressure combinations representing tangent heights or layers in the atmosphere are presented. The results are suitable for atmospheric remote sensing and global warming studies.

  4. A high throughput geocomputing system for remote sensing quantitative retrieval and a case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, Yong; Chen, Ziqiang; Xu, Hui; Ai, Jianwen; Jiang, Shuzheng; Li, Yingjie; Wang, Ying; Guang, Jie; Mei, Linlu; Jiao, Xijuan; He, Xingwei; Hou, Tingting

    2011-12-01

    The quality and accuracy of remote sensing instruments have been improved significantly, however, rapid processing of large-scale remote sensing data becomes the bottleneck for remote sensing quantitative retrieval applications. The remote sensing quantitative retrieval is a data-intensive computation application, which is one of the research issues of high throughput computation. The remote sensing quantitative retrieval Grid workflow is a high-level core component of remote sensing Grid, which is used to support the modeling, reconstruction and implementation of large-scale complex applications of remote sensing science. In this paper, we intend to study middleware components of the remote sensing Grid - the dynamic Grid workflow based on the remote sensing quantitative retrieval application on Grid platform. We designed a novel architecture for the remote sensing Grid workflow. According to this architecture, we constructed the Remote Sensing Information Service Grid Node (RSSN) with Condor. We developed a graphic user interface (GUI) tools to compose remote sensing processing Grid workflows, and took the aerosol optical depth (AOD) retrieval as an example. The case study showed that significant improvement in the system performance could be achieved with this implementation. The results also give a perspective on the potential of applying Grid workflow practices to remote sensing quantitative retrieval problems using commodity class PCs.

  5. Study of Zn-Cu Ferrite Nanoparticles for LPG Sensing

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Anuj; Baranwal, Ravi Kant; Bharti, Ajaya; Vakil, Z.; Prajapati, C. S.

    2013-01-01

    Nanostructured zinc-copper mixed ferrite was synthesized using sol-gel method. XRD patterns of different compositions of zinc-copper ferrite, Zn(1−x)CuxFe2O4 (x = 0.0, 0.25, 0.50, 0.75), revealed single phase inverse spinel ferrite in all the samples synthesized. With increasing copper concentration, the crystallite size was found to be increased from 28 nm to 47 nm. The surface morphology of all the samples studied by the Scanning Electron Microscopy there exhibits porous structure of particles throughout the samples. The pellets of the samples are prepared for LPG sensing characteristics. The sensing is carried out at different operating temperatures (200, 225, and 250°C) with the variation of LPG concentrations (0.2, 0.4, and 0.6 vol%). The maximum sensitivity of 55.33% is observed at 250°C operating for the 0.6 vol% LPG. PMID:23864833

  6. Study of Zn-Cu ferrite nanoparticles for LPG sensing.

    PubMed

    Jain, Anuj; Baranwal, Ravi Kant; Bharti, Ajaya; Vakil, Z; Prajapati, C S

    2013-01-01

    Nanostructured zinc-copper mixed ferrite was synthesized using sol-gel method. XRD patterns of different compositions of zinc-copper ferrite, Zn(1-x)Cu(x)Fe2O4 (x = 0.0, 0.25, 0.50, 0.75), revealed single phase inverse spinel ferrite in all the samples synthesized. With increasing copper concentration, the crystallite size was found to be increased from 28 nm to 47 nm. The surface morphology of all the samples studied by the Scanning Electron Microscopy there exhibits porous structure of particles throughout the samples. The pellets of the samples are prepared for LPG sensing characteristics. The sensing is carried out at different operating temperatures (200, 225, and 250°C) with the variation of LPG concentrations (0.2, 0.4, and 0.6 vol%). The maximum sensitivity of 55.33% is observed at 250°C operating for the 0.6 vol% LPG.

  7. Sense of Place and Health in Hamilton, Ontario: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Allison; Kitchen, Peter

    2012-01-01

    The concept of sense of place has received considerable attention by social scientists in recent years. Research has indicated that a person's sense of place is influenced by a number of factors including the built environment, socio-economic status (SES), well-being and health. Relatively few studies have examined sense of place at the…

  8. Thermogravimetric study of vapor pressure of TATP synthesized without recrystallization.

    PubMed

    Mbah, Jonathan; Knott, Debra; Steward, Scott

    2014-11-01

    This study aims at characterizing the vapor pressure signatures generated by triacetone triperoxide (TATP) that was synthesized without recrystallization by thermogravimmetric analysis (TGA) for exploitation by standoff detection technologies of explosive devices. The thermal behavior of the nonrecrystallized sample was compared with reported values. Any phase change, melting point and decomposition identification were studied by differential scanning calorimeter. Vapor pressures were estimated by the Langmuir method of evaporation from an open surface in a vacuum. Vapor pressures of TATP at different temperatures were calculated using the linear logarithmic relationship obtained from benzoic acid reference standard. Sublimation of TATP was found to follow apparent zero-order kinetics and sublimes at steady rates at 298 K and above. While the enthalpy of sublimation found, 71.7 kJ mol(-1), is in agreement with reported values the vapor pressures deviated significantly. The differences in the vapor pressures behavior are attributable to the synthesis pathway chosen in this study.

  9. Study of 3D remote sensing system based on optical scanning holography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Shihu; Yan, Lei

    2009-06-01

    High-precision and real-time remote sensing imaging system is an important part of remote sensing development. Holography is a method of wave front record and recovery which was presented by Dennis Gabor. As a new kind of holography techniques, Optical scanning holography (OSH) and remote sensing imaging are intended to be combined together and applied in acquisition and interference measurement of remote sensing. The key principles and applicability of OSH are studied and the mathematic relation between Fresnel Zone Plate number, numerical aperture and object distance was deduced, which are proved to be feasible for OSH to apply in large scale remote sensing. At last, a new three-dimensional reflected OSH remote sensing imaging system is designed with the combination of scanning technique to record hologram patterns of large scale remote sensing scenes. This scheme is helpful for expanding OSH technique to remote sensing in future.

  10. Remote sensing of cloud top pressure/height from SEVIRI: analysis of ten current retrieval algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamann, U.; Walther, A.; Baum, B.; Bennartz, R.; Bugliaro, L.; Derrien, M.; Francis, P.; Heidinger, A.; Joro, S.; Kniffka, A.; Le Gléau, H.; Lockhoff, M.; Lutz, H.-J.; Meirink, J. F.; Minnis, P.; Palikonda, R.; Roebeling, R.; Thoss, A.; Platnick, S.; Watts, P.; Wind, G.

    2014-01-01

    The role of clouds remains the largest uncertainty in climate projections. They influence solar and thermal radiative transfer and the earth's water cycle. Therefore, there is an urgent need for accurate cloud observations to validate climate models and to monitor climate change. Passive satellite imagers measuring radiation at visible to thermal infrared wavelengths provide a wealth of information on cloud properties. Among others, the cloud top height (CTH) - a crucial parameter to estimate the thermal cloud radiative forcing - can be retrieved. In this paper we investigate the skill of ten current retrieval algorithms to estimate the CTH using observations from the Spinning Enhanced Visible and InfraRed Imager (SEVIRI) onboard Meteosat Second Generation (MSG). In the first part we compare the ten SEVIRI cloud top pressure (CTP) datasets with each other. The SEVIRI algorithms catch the latitudinal variation of the CTP in a similar way. The agreement is better in the extratropics than in the tropics. In the tropics multi-layer clouds and thin cirrus layers complicate the CTP retrieval, whereas good agreement is found for the cores of the deep convective system having a high optical depth. Furthermore, a good agreement between the algorithms is observed for trade wind cumulus and marine stratocumulus clouds. In the second part of the paper the SEVIRI retrievals are compared to CTH observations from the Cloud-Aerosol LIdar with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIOP) and Cloud Profiling Radar (CPR) instruments. It is important to note that the different measurement techniques cause differences in the retrieved CHT data. SEVIRI measures a radiatively effective CTH, while the CTH of the active instruments is derived from the return time of the emitted signal. Therefore some systematic diffrences are expected. On average the CTHs detected by the SEVIRI algorithms are 1.0 to 2.5 km lower than CALIOP observations, and the correlation coefficients between the SEVIRI and the

  11. Remote sensing of cloud top pressure/height from SEVIRI: analysis of ten current retrieval algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamann, U.; Walther, A.; Baum, B.; Bennartz, R.; Bugliaro, L.; Derrien, M.; Francis, P. N.; Heidinger, A.; Joro, S.; Kniffka, A.; Le Gléau, H.; Lockhoff, M.; Lutz, H.-J.; Meirink, J. F.; Minnis, P.; Palikonda, R.; Roebeling, R.; Thoss, A.; Platnick, S.; Watts, P.; Wind, G.

    2014-09-01

    The role of clouds remains the largest uncertainty in climate projections. They influence solar and thermal radiative transfer and the earth's water cycle. Therefore, there is an urgent need for accurate cloud observations to validate climate models and to monitor climate change. Passive satellite imagers measuring radiation at visible to thermal infrared (IR) wavelengths provide a wealth of information on cloud properties. Among others, the cloud top height (CTH) - a crucial parameter to estimate the thermal cloud radiative forcing - can be retrieved. In this paper we investigate the skill of ten current retrieval algorithms to estimate the CTH using observations from the Spinning Enhanced Visible and InfraRed Imager (SEVIRI) onboard Meteosat Second Generation (MSG). In the first part we compare ten SEVIRI cloud top pressure (CTP) data sets with each other. The SEVIRI algorithms catch the latitudinal variation of the CTP in a similar way. The agreement is better in the extratropics than in the tropics. In the tropics multi-layer clouds and thin cirrus layers complicate the CTP retrieval, whereas a good agreement among the algorithms is found for trade wind cumulus, marine stratocumulus and the optically thick cores of the deep convective system. In the second part of the paper the SEVIRI retrievals are compared to CTH observations from the Cloud-Aerosol LIdar with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIOP) and Cloud Profiling Radar (CPR) instruments. It is important to note that the different measurement techniques cause differences in the retrieved CTH data. SEVIRI measures a radiatively effective CTH, while the CTH of the active instruments is derived from the return time of the emitted radar or lidar signal. Therefore, some systematic differences are expected. On average the CTHs detected by the SEVIRI algorithms are 1.0 to 2.5 km lower than CALIOP observations, and the correlation coefficients between the SEVIRI and the CALIOP data sets range between 0.77 and 0.90. The

  12. Microseismicity Induced by Fluid Pressure Drop (Laboratory Study)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turuntaev, Sergey; Zenchenko, Evgeny; Melchaeva, Olga

    2013-04-01

    Pore pressure change in saturated porous rocks may result in its fracturing (Maury et Fourmaintraux, 1993) and corresponding microseismic event occurrences. Microseismicity due to fluid injection is considered in numerous papers (Maxwell, 2010, Shapiro et al., 2005). Another type of the porous medium fracturing is related with rapid pore pressure drop at some boundary. The mechanism of such fracturing was considered by (Khristianovich, 1985) as a model of sudden coal blowing and by (Alidibirov, Panov, 1998) as a model of volcano eruptions. If the porous saturated medium has a boundary where it directly contacted with fluid under the high pressure (in a hydraulic fracture or in a borehole), and the pressure at that boundary is dropped, the conditions for tensile cracks can be achieved at some distance from the boundary. In the paper, the results of experimental study of saturated porous sample fracturing due to pore pressure rapid drop are discussed. The samples (82 mm high, ∅60 mm) were made of quartz sand, which was cemented by "liquid glass" glue with mass fraction 1%. The sample (porosity 35%, uniaxial unconfined compression strength 2.5 MPa) was placed in a mould and saturated by oil. The upper end of the sample contacted with the mould upper lid, the lower end contacted with fluid. The fluid pressure was increased to 10 MPa and then discharged through the bottom nipple. The pressure increases/drops were repeated 30-50 times. Pore pressure and acoustic emission (AE) were registered by transducers mounted into upper and bottom lids of the mould. It was found, that AE sources (corresponded to microfracturing) were spreading from the open end to the closed end of the sample, and that maximal number of AE events was registered at some distance from the opened end. The number of AE pulses increased with every next pressure drop, meanwhile the number of pulses with high amplitudes diminished. It was found that AE maximal rate corresponded to the fluid pressure

  13. Remote sensing study of Maumee River effects of Lake Erie

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Svehla, R.; Raquet, C.; Shook, D.; Salzman, J.; Coney, T.; Wachter, D.; Gedney, R.

    1975-01-01

    The effects of river inputs on boundary waters were studied in partial support of the task to assess the significance of river inputs into receiving waters, dispersion of pollutants, and water quality. The effects of the spring runoff of the Maumee River on Lake Erie were assessed by a combination of ship survey and remote sensing techniques. The imagery obtained from a multispectral scanner of the west basin of Lake Erie is discussed: this clearly showed the distribution of particulates throughout the covered area. This synoptic view, in addition to its qualitative value, is very useful in selecting sampling stations for shipboard in situ measurements, and for extrapolating these quantitative results throughout the area of interest.

  14. Skutterudites under pressure: An ab initio study

    SciTech Connect

    Ram, Swetarekha; Kanchana, V.; Valsakumar, M. C.

    2014-03-07

    Ab initio results on the band structure, density of states, and Fermi surface (FS) properties of LaRu{sub 4}X{sub 12} (X = P, As, Sb) are presented at ambient pressure as well as under compression. The analysis of density of states reveals the major contribution at the Fermi level to be mainly from the Ru-d and X-p states. We have a complicated Fermi surface with both electron and hole characters for all the three compounds which is derived mainly from the Ru-d and X-p states. There is also a simpler FS with hole character derived from the P-p{sub z} orbital for LaRu{sub 4}P{sub 12} and Ru-d{sub z{sup 2}} orbital in the case of As and Sb containing compounds. More interestingly, Fermi surface nesting feature is observed only in the case of the LaRu{sub 4}P{sub 12}. Under compression, we observe the topology of the complicated FS sheet of LaRu{sub 4}As{sub 12} to change around V/V{sub 0} = 0.85, leading to a behaviour similar to that of a multiband superconductor, and in addition, we have two more hole pockets centered around Γ at V/V{sub 0} = 0.8 for the same compound. Apart from this, we find the hole pocket to vanish at V/V{sub 0} = 0.8 in the case of LaRu{sub 4}Sb{sub 12} and the opening of the complicated FS sheet gets reduced. The de Haas van Alphen calculation shows the number of extremal orbits in the complicated sheet to change in As and Sb containing compounds under compression, where we also observe the FS topology to change.

  15. Physiologic Pressure and Flow Changes During Parabolic Flight (Pilot Study)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pantalos, George; Sharp, M. Keith; Mathias, John R.; Hargens, Alan R.; Watenpaugh, Donald E.; Buckey, Jay C.

    1999-01-01

    The objective of this study was to obtain measurement of cutaneous tissue perfusion central and peripheral venous pressure, and esophageal and abdominal pressure in human test subjects during parabolic flight. Hemodynamic data recorded during SLS-I and SLS-2 missions have resulted in the paradoxical finding of increased cardiac stroke volume in the presence of a decreased central venous pressure (CVP) following entry in weightlessness. The investigators have proposed that in the absence of gravity, acceleration-induced peripheral vascular compression is relieved, increasing peripheral vascular capacity and flow while reducing central and peripheral venous pressure, This pilot study seeks to measure blood pressure and flow in human test subjects during parabolic flight for different postures.

  16. Baseline pressure errors (BPEs) extensively influence intracranial pressure scores: results of a prospective observational study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Monitoring of intracranial pressure (ICP) is a cornerstone in the surveillance of neurosurgical patients. The ICP is measured against a baseline pressure (i.e. zero - or reference pressure). We have previously reported that baseline pressure errors (BPEs), manifested as spontaneous shift or drifts in baseline pressure, cause erroneous readings of mean ICP in individual patients. The objective of this study was to monitor the frequency and severity of BPEs. To this end, we performed a prospective, observational study monitoring the ICP from two separate ICP sensors (Sensors 1 and 2) placed in close proximity in the brain. We characterized BPEs as differences in mean ICP despite near to identical ICP waveform in Sensors 1 and 2. Methods The study enrolled patients with aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage in need of continuous ICP monitoring as part of their intensive care management. The two sensors were placed close to each other in the brain parenchyma via the same burr hole. The monitoring was performed as long as needed from a clinical perspective and the ICP recordings were stored digitally for analysis. For every patient the mean ICP as well as the various ICP wave parameters of the two sensors were compared. Results Sixteen patients were monitored median 164 hours (ranges 70 – 364 hours). Major BPEs, as defined by marked differences in mean ICP despite similar ICP waveform, were seen in 9 of them (56%). The BPEs were of magnitudes that had the potential to alter patient management. Conclusions Baseline Pressure Errors (BPEs) occur in a significant number of patients undergoing continuous ICP monitoring and they may alter patient management. The current practice of measuring ICP against a baseline pressure does not comply with the concept of State of the Art. Monitoring of the ICP waves ought to become the new State of the Art as they are not influenced by BPEs. PMID:24472296

  17. Outreach Programs, Peer Pressure, and Common Sense: What Motivates Homeowners to Mitigate Wildfire Risk?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCaffrey, Sarah M.; Stidham, Melanie; Toman, Eric; Shindler, Bruce

    2011-09-01

    In recent years, altered forest conditions, climate change, and the increasing numbers of homes built in fire prone areas has meant that wildfires are affecting more people. An important part of minimizing the potential negative impacts of wildfire is engaging homeowners in mitigating the fire hazard on their land. It is therefore important to understand what makes homeowners more or less willing to take action. The research presented here comes from a study that interviewed a total of 198 homeowners in six communities in the western United States about the activities they had undertaken to mitigate their fire risk, the factors that contributed to their decisions, and their future intentions. The current paper reports on findings from the first half of the longitudinal study, after 3 years we will return to interview the current homeowner on the same properties to assess maintenance actions and facilitating and limiting factors. Overall we found a body of individuals who understand the fire risk, are taking numerous mitigation actions, and think that these actions have reduced their risk. These homeowners typically did not expect the government to do it for them: they wanted information about what to do and, in some cases, assistance with the work, but saw taking care of their property primarily as their responsibility. Responses also show that key information sources and motivating factors vary by location and that it is not inherently necessary to have relationships between community members to create defensible space.

  18. Outreach programs, peer pressure, and common sense: what motivates homeowners to mitigate wildfire risk?

    PubMed

    McCaffrey, Sarah M; Stidham, Melanie; Toman, Eric; Shindler, Bruce

    2011-09-01

    In recent years, altered forest conditions, climate change, and the increasing numbers of homes built in fire prone areas has meant that wildfires are affecting more people. An important part of minimizing the potential negative impacts of wildfire is engaging homeowners in mitigating the fire hazard on their land. It is therefore important to understand what makes homeowners more or less willing to take action. The research presented here comes from a study that interviewed a total of 198 homeowners in six communities in the western United States about the activities they had undertaken to mitigate their fire risk, the factors that contributed to their decisions, and their future intentions. The current paper reports on findings from the first half of the longitudinal study, after 3 years we will return to interview the current homeowner on the same properties to assess maintenance actions and facilitating and limiting factors. Overall we found a body of individuals who understand the fire risk, are taking numerous mitigation actions, and think that these actions have reduced their risk. These homeowners typically did not expect the government to do it for them: they wanted information about what to do and, in some cases, assistance with the work, but saw taking care of their property primarily as their responsibility. Responses also show that key information sources and motivating factors vary by location and that it is not inherently necessary to have relationships between community members to create defensible space.

  19. High pressure phase transitions in lawsonite at simultaneous high pressure and temperature: A single crystal study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Bannon, E. F., III; Vennari, C.; Beavers, C. C. G.; Williams, Q. C.

    2015-12-01

    Lawsonite (CaAl2Si2O7(OH)2.H2O) is a hydrous mineral with a high overall water content of ~11.5 wt.%. It is a significant carrier of water in subduction zones to depths greater than ~150 km. The structure of lawsonite has been extensively studied under room temperature, high-pressure conditions. However, simultaneous high-pressure and high-temperature experiments are scarce. We have conducted synchrotron-based simultaneous high-pressure and temperature single crystal experiments on lawsonite up to a maximum pressure of 8.4 GPa at ambient and high temperatures. We used a natural sample of lawsonite from Valley Ford, California (Sonoma County). At room pressure and temperature lawsonite crystallizes in the orthorhombic system with Cmcm symmetry. Room temperature compression indicates that lawsonite remains in the orthorhombic Cmcm space group up to ~9.0 GPa. Our 5.0 GPa crystal structure is similar to the room pressure structure, and shows almost isotropic compression of the crystallographic axes. Unit cell parameters at 5.0 GPa are a- 5.7835(10), b- 8.694(2), and c- 13.009(3). Single-crystal measurements at simultaneous high-pressure and temperature (e.g., >8.0 GPa and ~100 oC) can be indexed to a monoclinic P-centered unit cell. Interestingly, a modest temperature increase of ~100 oC appears to initiate the orthorhombic to monoclinic phase transition at ~0.6-2.4 GPa lower than room temperature compression studies have shown. There is no evidence of dehydration or H atom disorder under these conditions. This suggests that the orthorhombic to monoclinic transition could be kinetically impeded at 298 K, and that monoclinic lawsonite could be the dominant water carrier through much of the depth range of upper mantle subduction processes.

  20. Pressure-dependent photoluminescence study of ZnO nanowires

    SciTech Connect

    Shan, W.; Walukiewicz, W.; Ager III, J.W.; Yu, K.M.; Zhang, Y.; Mao, S.S.; Kling, R.

    2004-09-13

    The pressure dependence of the photoluminescence (PL) transition associated with the fundamental band gap of ZnO nanowires has been studied at pressures up to 15 GPa. ZnO nanowires are found to have a higher structural phase transition pressure around 12 GPa as compared to 9.0 GPa for bulk ZnO. The pressure-induced energy shift of the near band-edge luminescence emission yields a linear pressure coefficient of 29.6 meV/GPa with a small sublinear term of -0.43 meV/GPa{sup 2}. An effective hydrostatic deformation potential -3.97 eV for the direct band gap of the ZnO nanowires is derived from the result.

  1. Genome-wide association study identifies six new loci influencing pulse pressure and mean arterial pressure.

    PubMed

    Wain, Louise V; Verwoert, Germaine C; O'Reilly, Paul F; Shi, Gang; Johnson, Toby; Johnson, Andrew D; Bochud, Murielle; Rice, Kenneth M; Henneman, Peter; Smith, Albert V; Ehret, Georg B; Amin, Najaf; Larson, Martin G; Mooser, Vincent; Hadley, David; Dörr, Marcus; Bis, Joshua C; Aspelund, Thor; Esko, Tõnu; Janssens, A Cecile J W; Zhao, Jing Hua; Heath, Simon; Laan, Maris; Fu, Jingyuan; Pistis, Giorgio; Luan, Jian'an; Arora, Pankaj; Lucas, Gavin; Pirastu, Nicola; Pichler, Irene; Jackson, Anne U; Webster, Rebecca J; Zhang, Feng; Peden, John F; Schmidt, Helena; Tanaka, Toshiko; Campbell, Harry; Igl, Wilmar; Milaneschi, Yuri; Hottenga, Jouke-Jan; Vitart, Veronique; Chasman, Daniel I; Trompet, Stella; Bragg-Gresham, Jennifer L; Alizadeh, Behrooz Z; Chambers, John C; Guo, Xiuqing; Lehtimäki, Terho; Kühnel, Brigitte; Lopez, Lorna M; Polašek, Ozren; Boban, Mladen; Nelson, Christopher P; Morrison, Alanna C; Pihur, Vasyl; Ganesh, Santhi K; Hofman, Albert; Kundu, Suman; Mattace-Raso, Francesco U S; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Sijbrands, Eric J G; Uitterlinden, Andre G; Hwang, Shih-Jen; Vasan, Ramachandran S; Wang, Thomas J; Bergmann, Sven; Vollenweider, Peter; Waeber, Gérard; Laitinen, Jaana; Pouta, Anneli; Zitting, Paavo; McArdle, Wendy L; Kroemer, Heyo K; Völker, Uwe; Völzke, Henry; Glazer, Nicole L; Taylor, Kent D; Harris, Tamara B; Alavere, Helene; Haller, Toomas; Keis, Aime; Tammesoo, Mari-Liis; Aulchenko, Yurii; Barroso, Inês; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Galan, Pilar; Hercberg, Serge; Lathrop, Mark; Eyheramendy, Susana; Org, Elin; Sõber, Siim; Lu, Xiaowen; Nolte, Ilja M; Penninx, Brenda W; Corre, Tanguy; Masciullo, Corrado; Sala, Cinzia; Groop, Leif; Voight, Benjamin F; Melander, Olle; O'Donnell, Christopher J; Salomaa, Veikko; d'Adamo, Adamo Pio; Fabretto, Antonella; Faletra, Flavio; Ulivi, Sheila; Del Greco, Fabiola M; Facheris, Maurizio; Collins, Francis S; Bergman, Richard N; Beilby, John P; Hung, Joseph; Musk, A William; Mangino, Massimo; Shin, So-Youn; Soranzo, Nicole; Watkins, Hugh; Goel, Anuj; Hamsten, Anders; Gider, Pierre; Loitfelder, Marisa; Zeginigg, Marion; Hernandez, Dena; Najjar, Samer S; Navarro, Pau; Wild, Sarah H; Corsi, Anna Maria; Singleton, Andrew; de Geus, Eco J C; Willemsen, Gonneke; Parker, Alex N; Rose, Lynda M; Buckley, Brendan; Stott, David; Orru, Marco; Uda, Manuela; van der Klauw, Melanie M; Zhang, Weihua; Li, Xinzhong; Scott, James; Chen, Yii-Der Ida; Burke, Gregory L; Kähönen, Mika; Viikari, Jorma; Döring, Angela; Meitinger, Thomas; Davies, Gail; Starr, John M; Emilsson, Valur; Plump, Andrew; Lindeman, Jan H; Hoen, Peter A C 't; König, Inke R; Felix, Janine F; Clarke, Robert; Hopewell, Jemma C; Ongen, Halit; Breteler, Monique; Debette, Stéphanie; Destefano, Anita L; Fornage, Myriam; Mitchell, Gary F; Smith, Nicholas L; Holm, Hilma; Stefansson, Kari; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; Samani, Nilesh J; Preuss, Michael; Rudan, Igor; Hayward, Caroline; Deary, Ian J; Wichmann, H-Erich; Raitakari, Olli T; Palmas, Walter; Kooner, Jaspal S; Stolk, Ronald P; Jukema, J Wouter; Wright, Alan F; Boomsma, Dorret I; Bandinelli, Stefania; Gyllensten, Ulf B; Wilson, James F; Ferrucci, Luigi; Schmidt, Reinhold; Farrall, Martin; Spector, Tim D; Palmer, Lyle J; Tuomilehto, Jaakko; Pfeufer, Arne; Gasparini, Paolo; Siscovick, David; Altshuler, David; Loos, Ruth J F; Toniolo, Daniela; Snieder, Harold; Gieger, Christian; Meneton, Pierre; Wareham, Nicholas J; Oostra, Ben A; Metspalu, Andres; Launer, Lenore; Rettig, Rainer; Strachan, David P; Beckmann, Jacques S; Witteman, Jacqueline C M; Erdmann, Jeanette; van Dijk, Ko Willems; Boerwinkle, Eric; Boehnke, Michael; Ridker, Paul M; Jarvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Chakravarti, Aravinda; Abecasis, Goncalo R; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Newton-Cheh, Christopher; Levy, Daniel; Munroe, Patricia B; Psaty, Bruce M; Caulfield, Mark J; Rao, Dabeeru C; Tobin, Martin D; Elliott, Paul; van Duijn, Cornelia M

    2011-09-11

    Numerous genetic loci have been associated with systolic blood pressure (SBP) and diastolic blood pressure (DBP) in Europeans. We now report genome-wide association studies of pulse pressure (PP) and mean arterial pressure (MAP). In discovery (N = 74,064) and follow-up studies (N = 48,607), we identified at genome-wide significance (P = 2.7 × 10(-8) to P = 2.3 × 10(-13)) four new PP loci (at 4q12 near CHIC2, 7q22.3 near PIK3CG, 8q24.12 in NOV and 11q24.3 near ADAMTS8), two new MAP loci (3p21.31 in MAP4 and 10q25.3 near ADRB1) and one locus associated with both of these traits (2q24.3 near FIGN) that has also recently been associated with SBP in east Asians. For three of the new PP loci, the estimated effect for SBP was opposite of that for DBP, in contrast to the majority of common SBP- and DBP-associated variants, which show concordant effects on both traits. These findings suggest new genetic pathways underlying blood pressure variation, some of which may differentially influence SBP and DBP.

  2. Genome-wide association study identifies six new loci influencing pulse pressure and mean arterial pressure

    PubMed Central

    Wain, Louise V; Verwoert, Germaine C; O’Reilly, Paul F; Shi, Gang; Johnson, Toby; Johnson, Andrew D; Bochud, Murielle; Rice, Kenneth M; Henneman, Peter; Smith, Albert V; Ehret, Georg B; Amin, Najaf; Larson, Martin G; Mooser, Vincent; Hadley, David; Dörr, Marcus; Bis, Joshua C; Aspelund, Thor; Esko, Tõnu; Janssens, A Cecile JW; Zhao, Jing Hua; Heath, Simon; Laan, Maris; Fu, Jingyuan; Pistis, Giorgio; Luan, Jian’an; Arora, Pankaj; Lucas, Gavin; Pirastu, Nicola; Pichler, Irene; Jackson, Anne U; Webster, Rebecca J; Zhang, Feng; Peden, John F; Schmidt, Helena; Tanaka, Toshiko; Campbell, Harry; Igl, Wilmar; Milaneschi, Yuri; Hotteng, Jouke-Jan; Vitart, Veronique; Chasman, Daniel I; Trompet, Stella; Bragg-Gresham, Jennifer L; Alizadeh, Behrooz Z; Chambers, John C; Guo, Xiuqing; Lehtimäki, Terho; Kühnel, Brigitte; Lopez, Lorna M; Polašek, Ozren; Boban, Mladen; Nelson, Christopher P; Morrison, Alanna C; Pihur, Vasyl; Ganesh, Santhi K; Hofman, Albert; Kundu, Suman; Mattace-Raso, Francesco US; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Sijbrands, Eric JG; Uitterlinden, Andre G; Hwang, Shih-Jen; Vasan, Ramachandran S; Wang, Thomas J; Bergmann, Sven; Vollenweider, Peter; Waeber, Gérard; Laitinen, Jaana; Pouta, Anneli; Zitting, Paavo; McArdle, Wendy L; Kroemer, Heyo K; Völker, Uwe; Völzke, Henry; Glazer, Nicole L; Taylor, Kent D; Harris, Tamara B; Alavere, Helene; Haller, Toomas; Keis, Aime; Tammesoo, Mari-Liis; Aulchenko, Yurii; Barroso, Inês; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Galan, Pilar; Hercberg, Serge; Lathrop, Mark; Eyheramendy, Susana; Org, Elin; Sõber, Siim; Lu, Xiaowen; Nolte, Ilja M; Penninx, Brenda W; Corre, Tanguy; Masciullo, Corrado; Sala, Cinzia; Groop, Leif; Voight, Benjamin F; Melander, Olle; O’Donnell, Christopher J; Salomaa, Veikko; d’Adamo, Adamo Pio; Fabretto, Antonella; Faletra, Flavio; Ulivi, Sheila; Del Greco, M Fabiola; Facheris, Maurizio; Collins, Francis S; Bergman, Richard N; Beilby, John P; Hung, Joseph; Musk, A William; Mangino, Massimo; Shin, So-Youn; Soranzo, Nicole; Watkins, Hugh; Goel, Anuj; Hamsten, Anders; Gider, Pierre; Loitfelder, Marisa; Zeginigg, Marion; Hernandez, Dena; Najjar, Samer S; Navarro, Pau; Wild, Sarah H; Corsi, Anna Maria; Singleton, Andrew; de Geus, Eco JC; Willemsen, Gonneke; Parker, Alex N; Rose, Lynda M; Buckley, Brendan; Stott, David; Orru, Marco; Uda, Manuela; van der Klauw, Melanie M; Zhang, Weihua; Li, Xinzhong; Scott, James; Chen, Yii-Der Ida; Burke, Gregory L; Kähönen, Mika; Viikari, Jorma; Döring, Angela; Meitinger, Thomas; Davies, Gail; Starr, John M; Emilsson, Valur; Plump, Andrew; Lindeman, Jan H; ’t Hoen, Peter AC; König, Inke R; Felix, Janine F; Clarke, Robert; Hopewell, Jemma C; Ongen, Halit; Breteler, Monique; Debette, Stéphanie; DeStefano, Anita L; Fornage, Myriam; Mitchell, Gary F; Smith, Nicholas L; Holm, Hilma; Stefansson, Kari; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; Samani, Nilesh J; Preuss, Michael; Rudan, Igor; Hayward, Caroline; Deary, Ian J; Wichmann, H-Erich; Raitakari, Olli T; Palmas, Walter; Kooner, Jaspal S; Stolk, Ronald P; Jukema, J Wouter; Wright, Alan F; Boomsma, Dorret I; Bandinelli, Stefania; Gyllensten, Ulf B; Wilson, James F; Ferrucci, Luigi; Schmidt, Reinhold; Farrall, Martin; Spector, Tim D; Palmer, Lyle J; Tuomilehto, Jaakko; Pfeufer, Arne; Gasparini, Paolo; Siscovick, David; Altshuler, David; Loos, Ruth JF; Toniolo, Daniela; Snieder, Harold; Gieger, Christian; Meneton, Pierre; Wareham, Nicholas J; Oostra, Ben A; Metspalu, Andres; Launer, Lenore; Rettig, Rainer; Strachan, David P; Beckmann, Jacques S; Witteman, Jacqueline CM; Erdmann, Jeanette; van Dijk, Ko Willems; Boerwinkle, Eric; Boehnke, Michael; Ridker, Paul M; Jarvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Chakravarti, Aravinda; Abecasis, Goncalo R; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Newton-Cheh, Christopher; Levy, Daniel; Munroe, Patricia B; Psaty, Bruce M; Caulfield, Mark J; Rao, Dabeeru C

    2012-01-01

    Numerous genetic loci influence systolic blood pressure (SBP) and diastolic blood pressure (DBP) in Europeans 1-3. We now report genome-wide association studies of pulse pressure (PP) and mean arterial pressure (MAP). In discovery (N=74,064) and follow-up studies (N=48,607), we identified at genome-wide significance (P= 2.7×10-8 to P=2.3×10-13) four novel PP loci (at 4q12 near CHIC2/PDGFRAI, 7q22.3 near PIK3CG, 8q24.12 in NOV, 11q24.3 near ADAMTS-8), two novel MAP loci (3p21.31 in MAP4, 10q25.3 near ADRB1) and one locus associated with both traits (2q24.3 near FIGN) which has recently been associated with SBP in east Asians. For three of the novel PP signals, the estimated effect for SBP was opposite to that for DBP, in contrast to the majority of common SBP- and DBP-associated variants which show concordant effects on both traits. These findings indicate novel genetic mechanisms underlying blood pressure variation, including pathways that may differentially influence SBP and DBP. PMID:21909110

  3. High Pressure Strength Study on NaCl

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mi, Z.; Shieh, S. R.; High Pressure Mineral Physics Group

    2010-12-01

    Yield strength is regarded as one important property related to rheological characteristics of minerals in the Earth’s interior. The strength study of NaCl, a popular pressure medium in static high pressure experiments, has been carried out under non-hydrostatic conditions in a diamond anvil cell up to 43 GPa at room temperature using radial energy dispersive X-ray diffraction technique. Phase transformation from B1 (rock salt structure) to B2 (CsCl structure) starts at 29.4 GPa, and is complete at 32.1 GPa. Bulk modulus obtained by third order Birch-Manurgham equation of state is 25.5 GPa with pressure derivative 4.6 for B1 phase, and 30.78 GPa with pressure derivative 4.32 GPa for B2 phase, which are in a good agreement with previous studies. The differential stress of NaCl B1 phase shows very gentle increase with pressure, which indicates that NaCl is a very good pressure-transmitting medium at pressure below 30 GPa. However, the differential stress increases more abruptly for B2 phase and this may imply that NaCl can no longer be regarded as a “soft” pressure medium at very high pressures. For B1 phase, (111) is the strongest plane and (200) is the weakest plane, while (200) becomes the strongest plane in B2 phase. Pure NaCl is weaker than mixture MgO and NaCl, which indicates that soft material become stronger when mixed with hard material. The yield strength of B2 obtained through energy dispersive X-ray diffraction technique increase linearly, while the value derived by pressure gradient method shows jagged trend.

  4. Commercial use of remote sensing in agriculture: a case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gnauck, Gary E.

    1999-12-01

    Over 25 years of research have clearly shown that an analysis of remote sensing imagery can provide information on agricultural crops. Most of this research has been funded by and directed toward the needs of government agencies. Commercial use of agricultural remote sensing has been limited to very small-scale operations supplying remote sensing services to a few selected customers. Datron/Transco Inc. undertook an internally funded remote sensing program directed toward the California cash crop industry (strawberries, lettuce, tomatoes, other fresh vegetables and cotton). The objectives of this program were twofold: (1) to assess the need and readiness of agricultural land managers to adopt remote sensing as a management tool, and (2) determine what technical barriers exist to large-scale implementation of this technology on a commercial basis. The program was divided into three phases: Planning, Engineering Test and Evaluation, and Commercial Operations. Findings: Remote sensing technology can deliver high resolution multispectral imagery with rapid turnaround, that can provide information on crop stress insects, disease and various soil parameters. The limiting factors to the use of remote sensing in agriculture are a lack of familiarization by the land managers, difficulty in translating 'information' into increased revenue or reduced cost for the land manager, and the large economies of scale needed to make the venture commercially viable.

  5. Cardiovascular pressure measurement in safety assessment studies: technology requirements and potential errors.

    PubMed

    Sarazan, R Dustan

    2014-01-01

    these factors are understood, a pressure sensing and measurement system can be selected that is optimized for the experimental model being studied, thus eliminating errors or inaccurate results.

  6. Lidar Remote Sensing for Forest Canopy Studies 2014

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Remote sensing has facilitated extraordinary advances in modeling, mapping, and the understanding of ecosystems. Conventional sensors have significant limitations for ecological and forest applications. The sensitivity and accuracy of these devices have repeatedly been shown to fall with increasing ...

  7. Stiffness Study of Wound-Filament Pressure Vessels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Verderaime, V.

    1986-01-01

    Report presents theoretical and experimental study of stiffness of lightweight, jointed pressure vessels made of wound graphite fibers and epoxy. Specimens fabricated from layers of graphite fibers, wet with epoxy, on aluminum mandrel. Segment ends thickened with interspersed layers of axially oriented fibers to reduce pinhole bearing stresses and local deformations. Segments cured at 390 degrees F (199 degrees C). Report presents results of vibrational tests of one-quarter-scale models of wound-filament pressure vessels.

  8. Pressure denaturation of apomyoglobin: a molecular dynamics simulation study.

    PubMed

    McCarthy, Andrés N; Grigera, J Raúl

    2006-03-01

    The effect of pressure on the structure and mobility of Sperm Wale Apomyoglobin was studied by Molecular Dynamics computer simulation at 1 bar and 3 kbar (1 atm=1.01325 bar=101.325 kPa). The results are in good agreement with the available experimental data, allowing further analysis of other features of the effect of pressure on the protein solution. From the analysis of Secondary Structures (SS) along the trajectories it is observed that alpha-helixes are favoured under pressure at the expense of bends, turns and 3-helixes. The studies of mobility show that although the general mobility is restricted under pressure this is not true for some particular residues. The studies of tertiary structure show important conformational changes. The evolution of the Solvent Accessed Surface (SAS) with pressure shows a notorious increase due almost completely to a biased raise in the hydrophobic area exposed, which consequently shows that the hydrophobic interaction is considerably weaker under high hydrostatic pressure conditions.

  9. Exploring Remote Sensing Products Online with Giovanni for Studying Urbanization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shen, Suhung; Leptoukh, Gregory G.; Gerasimov, Irina; Kempler, Steve

    2012-01-01

    Recently, a Large amount of MODIS land products at multi-spatial resolutions have been integrated into the online system, Giovanni, to support studies on land cover and land use changes focused on Northern Eurasia and Monsoon Asia regions. Giovanni (Goddard Interactive Online Visualization ANd aNalysis Infrastructure) is a Web-based application developed by the NASA Goddard Earth Sciences Data and Information Services Center (GES-DISC) providing a simple and intuitive way to visualize, analyze, and access Earth science remotely-sensed and modeled data. The customized Giovanni Web portals (Giovanni-NEESPI and Giovanni-MAIRS) are created to integrate land, atmospheric, cryospheric, and social products, that enable researchers to do quick exploration and basic analyses of land surface changes and their relationships to climate at global and regional scales. This presentation documents MODIS land surface products in Giovanni system. As examples, images and statistical analysis results on land surface and local climate changes associated with urbanization over Yangtze River Delta region, China, using data in Giovanni are shown.

  10. Current status of high conversion pressurized water reactor design studies

    SciTech Connect

    Umeoka, T.; Kono, T.; Toyoda, Y.; Ogino, M.; Iwai, S.; Hishida, H.

    1988-01-01

    Preliminary design studies on high conversion pressurized water reactors (HCPWRs) have been completed, and plant design studies are currently being performed to improve the feasibility of HCPWRs. The present status of the feasibility studies is covered, and the related validation tests to be conducted in the coming years are reviewed.

  11. High pressure Mössbauer studies of magnetic Np intermetallics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moser, J.; Gal, J.; Potzel, W.; Wortmann, G.; Kalvius, G. M.; Dunlap, B. D.; Lam, D. J.; Spirlet, J. C.

    1980-10-01

    A high pressure (50 kbar) Mössbauer spectrometer for the 60 keV resonance in 237Np for temperatures between 1.4 and 100 K is described. It was used to study the magnetic properties of some neptunium intermetallics under pressure. For the cubic Laves phase compounds NpOs 2 and NpAl 2 a drastic decrease of the ordering temperature, the hyperfine field, and the isomer shift under increasing pressure was observed. It shows that their magnetic properties are primarily determined by the Np-Np separation which controls the width and hybridization of the 5f band. In contrast, an increase of ordering temperature coupled with a decrease of isomer shift with pressure was found in tetragonal NpCo 2Si 2, while the hyperfine field remains constant. This suggests that its magnetic properties must arise from different sources.

  12. Propagation Limitations in Remote Sensing.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    Contents: Multi-sensors and systems in remote sensing ; Radar sensing systems over land; Remote sensing techniques in oceanography; Influence of...propagation media and background; Infrared techniques in remote sensing ; Photography in remote sensing ; Analytical studies in remote sensing .

  13. Land cover, land use and malaria in the Amazon: a systematic literature review of studies using remotely sensed data

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The nine countries sharing the Amazon forest accounted for 89% of all malaria cases reported in the Americas in 2008. Remote sensing can help identify the environmental determinants of malaria transmission and their temporo-spatial evolution. Seventeen studies characterizing land cover or land use features, and relating them to malaria in the Amazon subregion, were identified. These were reviewed in order to improve the understanding of the land cover/use class roles in malaria transmission. The indicators affecting the transmission risk were summarized in terms of temporal components, landscape fragmentation and anthropic pressure. This review helps to define a framework for future studies aiming to characterize and monitor malaria. PMID:23758827

  14. Study of fluid parameters in high pressure descaling valves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adhikari, Param; Panta, Yogendra

    2012-11-01

    Our work is focused on the high pressure valves used for descaling purposes in steel mills. A reverse flow operation was set in one of such valves due to piping constraints. Computational approaches are being utilized to understand the fluid phenomena at such high pressures. Though the valve geometry accounts for the complete fluid flow path, a study has been initiated from an axisymmetric model of the valve core. The highly energized fluid from the descaling pump sets off a static pressure of 5000 psi at the valve inlet. It is responsible for continuous fluid flow rate of up to 208 gpm for fully open position. A Shear Stress Transport turbulence model is utilized to study pressure at nearly closed position of the poppet part while Renormalization Group Turbulence model is compared with Shear Stress Transport turbulence model for full opening position. A very low pressure developed below the poppet seat suggests the onset of cavitation zones which may lead to leakage. A full 3D model is studied after a complete studies of fluid phenomenon in the axisymmetric geometry. Using ANSYS Fluent, a commercial CFD software package, the poppet valve assembly was processed for modeling, meshing and setting up of physical parameters. Computational results show the cavitation intensities higher at small openings than at larger openings which is further verified by literature research and currently comparing with experiments.

  15. Optical spectroscopic studies of heme proteins at high pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Swanson, B.I.; Agnew, S.F.; Ondrias, M.R.; Alden, R.G.

    1986-01-22

    There has been considerable interest in studying the physical and chemical behavior of small molecules at high static pressure by using diamond-anvil cells. In contrast to the relatively rich chemistry now developing on small molecules at high densities, studies of metalloproteins have largely been limited to relatively low pressures (<7 kbar) using UV-vis absorption, magnetic susceptibility, or NMR spectroscopy. Low-pressure studies of a variety of oxidized heme proteins have conclusively shown evidence for spin-state changes for the iron site at pressures above 1 kbar. Optical absorption studies of reduced heme proteins, while not conclusive, have also been interpreted in terms of spin-state changes. Other changes within the heme pocket most notably in the proximal histidine in the ..beta..-chain of Hb via proton NMR, have also been detected. The molecular bases for these changes and the behavior of the heme electronic states at higher pressures, however, remain open questions. In this paper both resonance Raman and absorption spectroscopy are used to address these problems in reduced heme proteins. Resonance Raman scattering is well suited for this application as it provides a structurally specific probe of the heme active site. 11 references, 2 figures.

  16. A Study of Teaching and Learning Number Sense for Sixth Grade Students in Taiwan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yang, Der-Ching; Hsu, Chun-Jen; Huang, Ming-Chiang

    2004-01-01

    Two public schools (A and B) from two cities in southern Taiwan were selected to participate in this study. In each school, two sixth grade classes (an experimental and a control class) were studied. Number sense activities were conducted in the experimental classes through process-oriented teaching model to help children develop number sense,…

  17. The Study of Graphic Sense and Its Effects on the Acquisition of Literacy. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hernandez-Chavez, Eduardo; Curtis, Jan

    This report describes a study on the development of children's conceptualizations of written language, that is, their graphic sense. The study investigated three issues: (1) whether acquisition of literacy is a developmental process common to all normal children, (2) whether the levels of graphic sense tend to be associated with particular…

  18. Sense of Community in a Blended Technology Integration Course: A Design-Based Research Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harrison, J. Buckley; West, Richard E.

    2014-01-01

    This design-based research study explored whether "sense of community" was maintained while flexibility in the course was increased through an adoption of a unique blended learning model. Data collected in this study show a significant drop in the sense of connectedness score from a mean of 50.8 out of 66 to a mean of 39.68 in the first…

  19. Pressures in Tumuli: A Study of Tumuli Formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hansen, James E.

    2005-01-01

    Tumuli form via localized inflation in surface lava flows. These domed features have widths of 10-20 m, lengths of 10-150 m, and heights of 1-9 m. The axial fracture exposes a brittle crust overlying a ductilely deformed layer. The total crustal thickness is typically less than lm. Tumuli are observed on both terrestrial and martian lava flow surfaces, and provide insight on the flow formation processes and rates. Past studies have estimated the inflation pressure using a bending model for a circular, thin elastic plate, assuming small deflection (Rossi and Gudmundson, 1996). This formulation results in unrealistic pressures for some tumuli. We thus examine alternative models, including those with different shapes, bending of the ductile crust, large deflection, plastic deformation, and thick plate bending. Using the thickness of the ductile crust in the equations for thin, circular plates reduces most pressures to reasonable values. Alternative plate shapes do not cause a significant reduction in inflation pressure. Although the large deflection equations should be applicable based on the plate thickness to tumuli height ratios, they give even less realistic pressures. Tumuli with unrealistic pressures appear to have exceeded the critical bending moment, and have relatively thick crusts, requiring thick plate bending models.

  20. Early Days of Pressure Denaturation Studies of Proteins.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Keizo

    2015-01-01

    The denaturation of protein by pressure has been generally well known since the findings of the perfect coagulation of egg white by a pressure of 7,000 atm within 30 min by Bridgman (J Biol Chem 19:511-512, 1914), and Kiyama and Yanagimoto (Rev Phys Chem Jpn 21:41-43, 1951) confirmed that the coagulation occurs above 3,880 kg cm(-2). Grant et al. (Science 94:616, 1941) and Suzuki and Kitamura (Abstracts of 30th annual meeting of Japanese Biochemical Society, 1957) found that SH groups are detected at the compressed sample of ovalbumin. On the other hand, Johnson and Campbell (J Cell Comp Physiol 26:43-49, 1945), Tongur (Kolloid Zhur 11:274-279, 1949; Biokhimiya 17:495-503, 1952) and Suzuki et al. (Mem Res Inst Sci Eng Ritsumeikan Univ 3:1-4, 1958) reported that the thermal denaturation of proteins is retarded in a few examples by the low pressure of about 1,000 atm. Before 1960, the studies of denaturation under high pressure were, however, rare and almost qualitative compared with those by heat, acid, urea and so on, so that there was no theory for the influence of hydrostatic pressure on the mechanism of denaturation. Here I review how I started experiments and analysis on pressure denaturation of proteins in early days of 1950s and 1960s in my laboratory and others.

  1. High pressure system for 3-D study of elastic anisotropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lokajicek, T.; Pros, Z.; Klima, K.

    2003-04-01

    New high pressure system was designed for the study of elastic anisotropy of condensed matter under high confining pressure up to 700 MPa. Simultaneously could be measured dynamic and static parameters: a) dynamic parameters by ultrasonic sounding, b) static parameters by measuring of spherical sample deformation. The measurement is carried out on spherical samples diameter 50 +/- 0.01 mm. Higher value of confining pressure was reached due to the new construction of sample positioning unit. The positioning unit is equipped with two Portecap step motors, which are located inside the vessel and make possible to rotate with the sphere and couple of piezoceramic transducers. Sample deformation is measured in the same direction as ultrasonic signal travel time. Only electric leads connects inner part of high pressure vessel with surrounding environment. Experimental set up enables: - simultaneous P-wave ultrasonic sounding, - measurement of current sample deformation at sounding points, - measurement of current value of confining pressure and - measurement of current stress media temperature. Air driven high pressure pump Haskel is used to produce high value of confining pressure up to 700 MPa. Ultrasonic signals are recorded by digital scope Agilent 54562 with sampling frequency 100 MHz. Control and measuring software was developed under Agilent VEE software environment working under MS Win 2000 operating system. Measuring set up was tested by measurement of monomineral spherical samples of quartz and corundum. Both of them have trigonal symmetry. The measurement showed that the P-wave velocity range of quartz was between 5.7-7.0 km/sec. and velocity range of corundum was between 9.7-10.9 km/sec. High pressure resistant LVDT transducers Mesing together with Intronix electronic unit were used to monitor sample deformation. Sample deformation is monitored with the accuracy of 0.1 micron. All test measurements proved the good accuracy of the whole measuring set up. This

  2. Nanostructured surfaces using thermal nanoimprint lithography: Applications in thin membrane technology, piezoelectric energy harvesting and tactile pressure sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nabar, Bhargav Pradip

    Nanoimprint lithography (NIL) is emerging as a viable contender for fabrication of large-scale arrays of 5-500 nm features. The work presented in this dissertation aims to leverage the advantages of NIL for realization of novel Nano Electro Mechanical Systems (NEMS). The first application is a nanoporous membrane blood oxygenator system. A fabrication process for realization of thin nanoporous membranes using thermal nanoimprint lithography is presented. Suspended silicon nitride membranes were fabricated by Low-Pressure Chemical Vapor Deposition (LPCVD) in conjunction with a potassium hydroxide-based bulk micromachining process. Nanoscale features were imprinted into a commercially available thermoplastic polymer resist using a pre-fabricated silicon mold. The pattern was reversed and transferred to a thin aluminum oxide layer by means of a novel two stage lift-off technique. The patterned aluminum oxide was used as an etch mask in a CHF3/He based reactive ion etch process to transfer the pattern to silicon nitride. Highly directional etch profiles with near vertical sidewalls and excellent Si3N4/Al2O3 etch selectivity was observed. One-micrometer-thick porous membranes with varying dimensions of 250x250 microm2 to 450x450 microm 2 and pore diameter of 400 nm have been engineered and evaluated. Results indicate that the membranes have consistent nanopore dimensions and precisely defined porosity, which makes them ideal as gas exchange interfaces in blood oxygenation systems as well as other applications such as dialysis. Additionally, bulk -- micromachined microfluidic channels have been developed for uniform, laminar blood flow with minimal cell trauma. NIL has been used for ordered growth of crystalline nanostructures for sensing and energy harvesting. Highly ordered arrays of crystalline ZnO nanorods have been fabricated using a polymer template patterned by thermal nanoimprint lithography, in conjunction with a low temperature hydrothermal growth process. Zinc

  3. Moving, sensing intersectionality: a case study of Miss China Europe.

    PubMed

    Chow, Yiu Fai

    2011-01-01

    Every year, Miss China Europe, a transnational beauty pageant organized for the Chinese diaspora, is held in the Netherlands. The hypervisuality of Chinese diasporic women at the event stands in painful contrast to their everyday invisibility, whether in the Netherlands, China, or elsewhere in the world. Informed by intersectional and transnational feminist scholarship, this empirical study zooms in on one group of women, ethnic Chinese born and/or growing up in the Netherlands, to identify and recuperate their neglected lived experience in a particular historical-cultural context. It takes their own voices as central, hopefully to contribute to their visibility. It aims to provide an understanding of diasporic Chinese women as living in the dynamics not only of their multiple subordinations but also of their subjective consciousness, experienced autonomy, and agency. Drawing insights from the subjective accounts of both contestants and audiences of Miss China Europe, I suggest that one way to foreground marginalized women's agency is to understand their intersectionality in terms of movements and sensory experiences. On the one hand, while the contestants articulated a readiness to perform their modern and yet Chinese selves, they were making movements along two intersecting axes of inequality and power relations - Chineseness and Dutchness - precisely to negotiate their sense of inequality and power relations. On the other hand, among the audiences, two major topics - the blood issue (or whether Chineseness should be defined by ancestry) and the language problem (or whether Chineseness should be defined by the ability to speak Chinese) - were raised regularly, underscoring a complex viewing experience of seeing and hearing, of the tension between visual and audio identifications.

  4. Thomas Paine's "Common Sense": A Study in Polarity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blair, Carole

    Thomas Paine's "Common Sense," published in 1776, was a significant rhetorical event, having a polarizing effect on a situation marked by confusion and conflicting loyalties, in which prevailing views favored reconciliation of the American colonies with England. Paine's rhetoric intensified the conflict, forcing a cognitive restructuring…

  5. Field Study for Remote Sensing: An instructor's manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wake, W. H. (Editor); Hull, G. A. (Editor)

    1981-01-01

    The need for and value of field work (surface truthing) in the verification of image identification from high atitude infrared and multispectral space sensor images are discussed in this handbook which presents guidelines for developing instructional and research procedures in remote sensing of the environment.

  6. Studies of the sensing mechanism in the tubuloglomerular feedback pathway.

    PubMed

    Wright, F S; Mandin, H; Persson, A E

    1982-08-01

    Two aspects of the single nephron feedback response previously observed by us have been reexamined. The first, the effect of modifying the composition of fluid used to perfuse the loop of Henle of a single nephron, was studied in rats by comparing flow-induced changes in stop-flow pressure (PSF) with three different perfusion solutions: artificial tubule fluid (ATF); 0.3 M mannitol (M); and mannitol plus 25 to 30 mM sodium chloride (M + E). The second, triggering of the feedback response by injection of ionic current into the distal tubule, was studied in similarly prepared rats by monitoring PSF while passing current. Increasing the rate of loop of Henle perfusion with either ATF or M + E resulted in similar decreases in PSF. In contrast, with M, changes in PSF were usually transient and if persistent were smaller than the changes observed with the other two solutions. When loops of Henle were perfused with ATF at a constant rate, injection of current into the early distal tubule making the lumen more negative resulted in decreases in PSF. Currents of opposite polarity caused no change in PSF if loop flow rate was low; these currents increased PSF if the loop flow rates had previously been high. Current-induced feedback responses were obtained with micropipette electrodes filled with either potassium chloride or lithium acetate. Addition of 10(-4) M furosemide blocked the current-induced feedback responses.

  7. Studies of Protein Solution Properties Using Osmotic Pressure Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Agena, S.; Bogle, David; Pusey, Marc; Agena, S.

    1998-01-01

    Examination of the protein crystallization process involves investigation of the liquid and solid state and a protein's properties in these states. Liquid state studies such as protein self association in solution by light scattering methods or other methods have been used to examine a protein Is properties and therefore its crystallization process and conditions. Likewise can osmotic pressure data be used to examine protein properties and various published osmotic pressure studies were examined by us to correlate osmotic pressure to protein solution properties. The solution behavior of serum albumin, alpha - chymotrypsin, beta - lactoglobulin and ovalbumin was examined over a range of temperatures, pH values and different salt types and concentrations. Using virial expansion and a local composition model the non ideal solution behavior in form of the activity coefficients (thermodynamic) was described for the systems. This protein activity coefficient data was related to a protein's solubility behavior and this process and the results will be presented.

  8. Recent studies on nanosecond-timescale pressurized gas discharges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yatom, S.; Shlapakovski, A.; Beilin, L.; Stambulchik, E.; Tskhai, S.; Krasik, Ya E.

    2016-12-01

    The results of recent experimental and numerical studies of nanosecond high-voltage discharges in pressurized gases are reviewed. The discharges were ignited in a diode filled by different gases within a wide range of pressures by an applied pulsed voltage or by a laser pulse in the gas-filled charged resonant microwave cavity. Fast-framing imaging of light emission, optical emission spectroscopy, x-ray foil spectrometry and coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering were used to study temporal and spatial evolution of the discharge plasma density and temperature, energy distribution function of runaway electrons and dynamics of the electric field in the plasma channel. The results obtained allow a deeper understanding of discharge dynamical properties in the nanosecond timescale, which is important for various applications of these types of discharges in pressurized gases.

  9. Recent studies on nanosecond-timescale pressurized gas discharges

    SciTech Connect

    Yatom, S.; Shlapakovski, A.; Beilin, L.; Stambulchik, E.; Tskhai, S.; Krasik, Ya E.

    2016-10-05

    The results of recent experimental and numerical studies of nanosecond high-voltage discharges in pressurized gases are reviewed. The discharges were ignited in a diode filled by different gases within a wide range of pressures by an applied pulsed voltage or by a laser pulse in the gas-filled charged resonant microwave cavity. Fast-framing imaging of light emission, optical emission spectroscopy, X-ray foil spectrometry and coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering were used to study temporal and spatial evolution of the discharge plasma density and temperature, energy distribution function of runaway electrons and dynamics of the electric field in the plasma channel. The results obtained allow a deeper understanding of discharge dynamical properties in the nanosecond timescale, which is important for various applications of these types of discharges in pressurized gases.

  10. Recent studies on nanosecond-timescale pressurized gas discharges

    DOE PAGES

    Yatom, S.; Shlapakovski, A.; Beilin, L.; ...

    2016-10-05

    The results of recent experimental and numerical studies of nanosecond high-voltage discharges in pressurized gases are reviewed. The discharges were ignited in a diode filled by different gases within a wide range of pressures by an applied pulsed voltage or by a laser pulse in the gas-filled charged resonant microwave cavity. Fast-framing imaging of light emission, optical emission spectroscopy, X-ray foil spectrometry and coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering were used to study temporal and spatial evolution of the discharge plasma density and temperature, energy distribution function of runaway electrons and dynamics of the electric field in the plasma channel. The resultsmore » obtained allow a deeper understanding of discharge dynamical properties in the nanosecond timescale, which is important for various applications of these types of discharges in pressurized gases.« less

  11. The Rise and Fall of Boot Camps: A Case Study in Common-Sense Corrections

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cullen, Francis T.; Blevins, Kristie R.; Trager, Jennifer S.; Gendreau, Paul

    2005-01-01

    "Common sense" is often used as a powerful rationale for implementing correctional programs that have no basis in criminology and virtually no hope of reducing recidivism. Within this context, we undertake a case study in "common-sense' corrections by showing how the rise of boot camps, although having multiple causes, was ultimately legitimized…

  12. Number Sense in Kindergarten: A Factor-Analytic Study of the Construct

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lago, Rachel M.; DiPerna, James Clyde

    2010-01-01

    Number sense skills provide the foundation for the acquisition of higher order mathematical skills and concepts. However, there is disagreement over the definition of number sense, the specific skills that make up the construct, and the psychometric properties of measures used to assess these skills. In the current study, 10 brief tasks…

  13. Monitoring of quorum-sensing molecules during minifermentation studies in wine yeast.

    PubMed

    Zupan, Jure; Avbelj, Martina; Butinar, Bojan; Kosel, Janez; Šergan, Matej; Raspor, Peter

    2013-03-13

    At high cell density or under low nutrient conditions, yeasts collectively adapt their metabolism by secreting aromatic alcohols in what is known as quorum sensing. However, the mechanisms and role of quorum sensing in yeast are poorly understood, and the methodology behind this process is not well established. This paper describes an effective approach to study quorum sensing in yeast fermentations. The separation, detection, and quantification of the putative quorum-sensing molecules 2-phenylethanol, tryptophol, and tyrosol have been optimized on a simple HPLC-based system. With the use of a phenyl HPLC column and a fluorescence detector, the sensitivity of the system was significantly increased. This allowed extraction and concentration procedures to be eliminated and the process to be scaled down to 2 mL minifermentations. Additionally, an innovative method for rapid viable-cell counting is presented. This study forms the basis for detailed studies in kinetics and regulation of quorum sensing in yeast fermentation.

  14. Calibration apparatus for recess mounted pressure transducers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marcolini, Michael A.; Miller, William T., Jr.; Baals, Robert A.; Martin, Ruth M.

    1992-04-01

    Measurement of surface pressure fluctuations is important in aerodynamic studies and is conventionally accomplished via thin surface mounted transducers. These transducers contaminate the airflow, leading to the use of transducers located beneath the surface and communicating thereto via a pipette. This solution creates its own problem of transducer calibration due to the structure of the pipette. A calibration apparatus and method for calibrating a pressure transducer are provided. The pressure transducer is located within a test structure having a pipette leading from an outer structure surface to the pressure transducer. The calibration apparatus defines an acoustic cavity. A first end of the acoustic cavity is adapted to fluidly communicate with the pipette leading to the pressure transducer, wherein a channel is formed from the acoustic cavity to the transducer. An acoustic driver is provided for acoustically exciting fluid in the acoustic cavity to generate pressure waves which propagate to the pressure transducer. A pressure sensing microphone is provided for sensing the pressure fluctuations in the cavity near the cavity end, whereby this sensed pressure is compared with a simultaneously pressure sensed by the pressure transducer to permit calibration of the pressure transducer sensings. Novel aspects of the present invention include its use of a calibration apparatus to permit in-situ calibration of recess mounted pressure transducers.

  15. Morphology and gas sensing characteristics of density-controlled CuO nanostructures obtained by varying the oxygen partial pressure during growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Dongjin; Jin, Changhyun; Noh, Youngwook; Park, Seokhyun; Choi, Sun-Woo

    2016-07-01

    By exerting different O2 partial pressures (0, 20, 40, and 60 sccm) onto copper substrates, we discovered that the growth parameter, namely, the O2 flow rate, affects the degree of nucleation, diameter, length, and crystalline quality of CuO nanowires (NWs). Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) were used to analyze the evolution of the morphological and the microstructural changes in the CuO nanostructures. The formation of a Cu2O interlayer between the Cu and the CuO layers could be adjusted by controlling more precisely the O2 flow rate. In addition, the reducing (H2S) and the oxidizing (O2, NO2, and SO2) gas sensing performances of these O2-assisted CuO NWs were compared with those of CuO NWs grown in static air. The response to the reducing H2S of the sensors based on CuO NWs grown using O2 at 40 sccm showed a higher electrical change and faster response and recovery times than the sensors based on CuO NWs grown using lower O2 flow rates, including the ones grown in static air and/or used for sensing oxidizing gases (O2, NO2, and SO2) did. On the basis of their growth and their gas-sensing applications, the possible mechanisms characteristic of the density-controlled CuO NWs grown using various O2 partial pressures are discussed.

  16. Plume diagnostics of SRM static firings for pressure perturbation studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sambamurthi, J. K.; Alvarado, Alexis; Mathias, Edward C.

    1995-01-01

    During the shuttle launches, the solid rocket motors (SRM) occasionally experience pressure perturbations (8-13 psi) between 65 and 75 seconds into the motor burn time. The magnitudes of these perturbations are very small in comparison with the operating motor chamber pressure, which is over 600 psi during this time frame. These SRM pressure perturbations are believed to be caused primarily by the expulsion of slag (aluminum oxide). Two SRM static tests, TEM-11 and FSM-4, were instrumented extensive]y for the study of the phenomenon associated with pressure perturbations. The test instrumentation used included nonintrusive optical and infrared diagnostics of the plume, such as high-speed photography, radiometers, and thermal image cameras. Results from all these nonintrusive observations strongly support the scenario that the pressure perturbation event in the shuttle SRM is caused primarily by the expulsion of molten slag. The slag was also expelled preferentially near the bottom of the nozzle due to slag accumulation at the bottom of the aft end of the horizontally oriented motor.

  17. Microscopic pressure-cooker model for studying molecules in confinement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santamaria, Ruben; Adamowicz, Ludwik; Rosas-Acevedo, Hortensia

    2015-04-01

    A model for a system of a finite number of molecules in confinement is presented and expressions for determining the temperature, pressure, and volume of the system are derived. The present model is a generalisation of the Zwanzig-Langevin model because it includes pressure effects in the system. It also has general validity, preserves the ergodic hypothesis, and provides a formal framework for previous studies of hydrogen clusters in confinement. The application of the model is illustrated by an investigation of a set of prebiotic compounds exposed to varying pressure and temperature. The simulations performed within the model involve the use of a combination of molecular dynamics and density functional theory methods implemented on a computer system with a mixed CPU-GPU architecture.

  18. High-pressure studies on heavy fermion systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Chen; Zongfa, Weng; Smidman, Michael; Xin, Lu; Huiqiu, Yuan

    2016-07-01

    In this review article, we give a brief overview of heavy fermions, which are prototype examples of strongly correlated electron systems. We introduce the application of physical pressure in heavy fermion systems to construct their pressure phase diagrams and to study the close relationship between superconductivity (SC) and other electronic instabilities, such as antiferromagnetism (AFM), ferromagnetism (FM), and valence transitions. Field-angle dependent heat capacity and point-contact spectroscopic measurements under pressure are taken as examples to illustrate their ability to investigate novel physical properties of the emergent electronic states. Project supported by the National Basic Research Program of China (Grant No. 2011CBA00103), the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11174245 and 11374257), the Science Challenge Program of China, and the Fundamental Research Funds for the Central Universities of China.

  19. High pressure cosmochemistry applied to major planetary interiors: Experimental studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nicol, M. F.; Johnson, M.; Boone, S.

    1985-01-01

    The measurement of equilibria in binary fluid-solid systems in diamond anvil cells, represents a major advance of the art of high-pressure experimentation. Vibrational spectroscopy, direct visual observations, and X-ray diffraction crystallography of materials confined in externally heated cells are the primary experimental probes being used. Adiabats in these systems are being measured in order to constrain models of heat flow in these bodies and to detect phase transitions by thermal anomalies. Other studies are directed toward interpreting high pressure reactions in these systems that are suggested by shockwave measurements, and developing methods for reaching high temperatures and high pressures of planetary interest in diamond cells. The overall objective of this project is to determine the properties of the H2-He-H2O-HN3-CH4 system and related small-molecule systems that are needed to constrain theoretical models of the interiors of the major planets.

  20. Aging study of boiling water reactor high pressure injection systems

    SciTech Connect

    Conley, D.A.; Edson, J.L.; Fineman, C.F.

    1995-03-01

    The purpose of high pressure injection systems is to maintain an adequate coolant level in reactor pressure vessels, so that the fuel cladding temperature does not exceed 1,200{degrees}C (2,200{degrees}F), and to permit plant shutdown during a variety of design basis loss-of-coolant accidents. This report presents the results of a study on aging performed for high pressure injection systems of boiling water reactor plants in the United States. The purpose of the study was to identify and evaluate the effects of aging and the effectiveness of testing and maintenance in detecting and mitigating aging degradation. Guidelines from the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission`s Nuclear Plant Aging Research Program were used in performing the aging study. Review and analysis of the failures reported in databases such as Nuclear Power Experience, Licensee Event Reports, and the Nuclear Plant Reliability Data System, along with plant-specific maintenance records databases, are included in this report to provide the information required to identify aging stressors, failure modes, and failure causes. Several probabilistic risk assessments were reviewed to identify risk-significant components in high pressure injection systems. Testing, maintenance, specific safety issues, and codes and standards are also discussed.

  1. Microbial Evolution at High Pressure: Deep Sea and Laboratory Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartlett, D. H.

    2011-12-01

    Elevated hydrostatic pressures are present in deep-sea and deep-Earth environments where this physical parameter has influenced the evolution and characteristics of life. Piezophilic (high-pressure-adapted) microbes have been isolated from diverse deep-sea settings, and would appear likely to occur in deep-subsurface habitats as well. In order to discern the factors enabling life at high pressure my research group has explored these adaptations at various levels, most recently including molecular analyses of deep-sea trench communities, and through the selective evolution of the model microbe Escherichia coli in the laboratory to progressively higher pressures. Much of the field work has focused on the microbes present in the deeper portions of the Puerto Rico Trench (PRT)and in the Peru-Chile Trench (PCT), from 6-8.5 km below the sea surface (~60-85 megapascals pressure). Culture-independent phylogenetic data on the Bacteria and Archaea present on particles or free-living, along with data on the microeukarya present was complemented with genomic analyses and the isolation and characterization of microbes in culture. Metagenomic analyses of the PRT revealed increased genome sizes and an overrepresentation at depth of sulfatases for the breakdown of sulfated polysaccharides and specific categories of transporters, including those associated with the transport of diverse cations or carboxylate ions, or associated with heavy metal resistance. Single-cell genomic studies revealed several linneages which recruited to the PRT metagenome far better than existing marine microbial genome sequences. analyses. Novel high pressure culture approaches have yielded new piezophiles including species preferring very low nutrient levels, those living off of hydrocarbons, and those adapted to various electron donor/electron acceptor combinations. In order to more specifically focus on functions enabling life at increased pressure selective evolution experiments were performed with

  2. High-pressure structural study of MnF2

    DOE PAGES

    Stavrou, Elissaios; Yao, Yansun; Goncharov, Alexander F.; ...

    2015-02-01

    In this study, manganese fluoride (MnF2) with the tetragonal rutile-type structure has been studied using a synchrotron angle-dispersive powder x-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy in a diamond anvil cell up to 60 GPa at room temperature combined with first-principles density functional calculations. The experimental data reveal two pressure-induced structural phase transitions with the following sequence: rutile → SrI2 type (3 GPa)→ α–PbCl2 type (13 GPa). Complete structural information, including interatomic distances, has been determined in the case of MnF2 including the exact structure of the debated first high-pressure phase. First-principles density functional calculations confirm this phase transition sequence, and themore » two calculated transition pressures are in excellent agreement with the experiment. Lattice dynamics calculations also reproduce the experimental Raman spectra measured for the ambient and high-pressure phases. The results are discussed in line with the possible practical use of rutile-type fluorides in general and specifically MnF2 as a model compound to reveal the HP structural behavior of rutile-type SiO2 (Stishovite).« less

  3. Large Area One-Step Facile Processing of Microstructured Elastomeric Dielectric Film for High Sensitivity and Durable Sensing over Wide Pressure Range.

    PubMed

    Chen, Sujie; Zhuo, Bengang; Guo, Xiaojun

    2016-08-10

    Once the requirement of sensitivity has been met, to enable a flexible pressure sensor technology to be widely adopted as an economic and convenient way for sensing diverse human body motions, critical factors need to be considered including low manufacturing cost, a large pressure detection range, and low power consumption. In this work, a facile approach is developed for one-step processing of a large area microstructured elastomer film with high density microfeatures of air voids, which can be seamlessly integrated into the process flow for fabricating flexible capacitive sensors. The fabricated sensors exhibit fast response and high sensitivity in the low pressure range to be able to detect very weak pressure down to 1 Pa and perform reliable wrist pulse monitoring. Compared to previous work, more advantageous features of this sensor are relatively high sensitivity being maintained in a wide pressure range up to 250 kPa and excellent durability under heavy load larger than 1 MPa, attributed to the formed dense air voids inside the film. A smart insole made with the sensor can accurately monitor the real-time walking or running behaviors and even a small weight change less than 1 kg under a heavy load of a 70 kg adult. For both application examples of wrist pulse monitoring and smart insole, the sensors are operated in a 3.3 V electronic system powered by a Li-ion battery, showing the potential for power-constrained wearable applications.

  4. Remote Sensing Study of The Volga Delta Flooding Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsitsenko, K. V.; Shalygin, A. L.

    The Volga Delta is the lowest part of the Volga basin where the river divides to hun- dreds of branches of different scales, forming a great amount of islands and permanent or temporary lakes. Considerable part of these islands can be covered temporarily by the river water during the spring-flood, or for a long time by the Caspian Sea water during the high Sea level stages. The main part of the Volga runoff losses (in average about 10 km3/year) takes place in the Delta. These losses depend on the proportion of land and water areas, depending in its turn on the Caspian Sea level and on the Volga river flow phase. The rice irrigation, which requires great amounts of water, causes considerable anthropogenic runoff losses in the Delta. Remote sensing study of the Volga Delta was carried out to define the following: - The Sea border of the Delta and its dynamics depending on the Sea level; - Water surface area dynamics in the Delta depending on the Volga hydrological phase and the spring flood volume; - The inter-year and long-term landuse dynamics in the Delta. 13 digital satellite images of the Delta from 1970s - 1990s were used for realization of the study: 3 Landsat-MSS (USA, 4 spectral bands), 4 Landsat-TM (USA, 7 bands) and 6 Resource-01 (Russia, 2-4 bands), chosen on a principle of scope both all amplitude of the Sea level and various phases of the Volga hydrological regime. Classification of the images was car- ried out by means of the GIS-system ILWIS, using both original spectral bands and calculated artificial bands, such as NDVI, SWCI, LWCI, etc. From 4 to 5 bands with the least correlation were used for classification of each image. Analysis of classifica- tion results has shown that water surface in the Delta during low-flow period occupied 5-7% of the area, sharply growing (to 50%) during the spring high water. The area of half-submerged reeds, located along the Sea coast, reduced from 34% in 1970s to 20- 24% in 1980s, and by 1995 the significant part of

  5. High pressure dielectric studies on the structural and orientational glass.

    PubMed

    Kaminska, E; Tarnacka, M; Jurkiewicz, K; Kaminski, K; Paluch, M

    2016-02-07

    High pressure dielectric studies on the H-bonded liquid D-glucose and Orientationally Disordered Crystal (ODIC) 1,6-anhydro-D-glucose (levoglucosan) were carried out. It was shown that in both compounds, the structural relaxation is weakly sensitive to compression. It is well reflected in the low pressure coefficient of the glass transition and orientational glass transition temperatures which is equal to 60 K/GPa for both D-glucose and 1,6-anhydro-D-glucose. Although it should be noted that ∂Tg(0)/∂p evaluated for the latter compound seems to be enormously high with respect to other systems forming ODIC phase. We also found that the shape of the α-loss peak stays constant for the given relaxation time independently on the thermodynamic condition. Consequently, the Time Temperature Pressure (TTP) rule is satisfied. This experimental finding seems to be quite intriguing since the TTP rule was shown to work well in the van der Waals liquids, while in the strongly associating compounds, it is very often violated. We have also demonstrated that the sensitivity of the structural relaxation process to the temperature change measured by the steepness index (mp) drops with pressure. Interestingly, this change is much more significant in the case of D-glucose with respect to levoglucosan, where the fragility changes only slightly with compression. Finally, kinetics of ODIC-crystal phase transition was studied at high compression. It is worth mentioning that in the recent paper, Tombari and Johari [J. Chem. Phys. 142, 104501 (2015)] have shown that ODIC phase in 1,6-anhydro-D-glucose is stable in the wide range of temperatures and there is no tendency to form more ordered phase at ambient pressure. On the other hand, our isochronal measurements performed at varying thermodynamic conditions indicated unquestionably that the application of pressure favors solid (ODIC)-solid (crystal) transition in 1,6-anhydro-D-glucose. This result mimics the impact of pressure on the

  6. High Pressure X-Ray Diffraction Studies of Nanocrystalline Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palosz, B.; Stel'makh, S.; Grzanka, E.; Gierlotka, S.; Palosz, W.

    2004-01-01

    Experimental evidence obtained for a variety of nanocrystalline materials suggest that the crystallographic structure of a very small size particle deviates from that in the bulk crystals. In this paper we show the effect of the surface of nanocrystals on their structure by the analysis of generation and distribution of macro- and micro-strains at high pressures and their dependence on the grain size in nanocrystalline powders of Sic. We studied the structure of Sic nanocrystals by in-situ high-pressure powder diffraction technique using synchrotron and neutron sources and hydrostatic or isostatic pressure conditions. The diffraction measurements were done in HASYLAB at DESY using a Diamond Anvil Cell (DAC) in the energy dispersive geometry in the diffraction vector range up to 3.5 - 4/A and under pressures up to 50 GPa at room temperature. In-situ high pressure neutron diffraction measurements were done at LANSCE in Los Alamos National Laboratory using the HIPD and HIPPO diffractometers with the Paris-Edinburgh and TAP-98 cells, respectively, in the diffraction vector range up to 26 Examination of the response of the material to external stresses requires nonstandard methodology of the materials characterization and description. Although every diffraction pattern contains a complete information on macro- and micro-strains, a high pressure experiment can reveal only those factors which contribute to the characteristic diffraction patterns of the crystalline phases present in the sample. The elastic properties of powders with the grain size from several nm to micrometers were examined using three methodologies: (l), the analysis of positions and widths of individual Bragg reflections (used for calculating macro- and micro-strains generated during densification) [I], (2). the analysis of the dependence of the experimental apparent lattice parameter, alp, on the diffraction vector Q [2], and (3), the atomic Pair Distribution Function (PDF) technique [3]. The results

  7. The application of remote sensing techniques to the study of ophiolites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, Shuhab D.; Mahmood, Khalid

    2008-08-01

    Satellite remote sensing methods are a powerful tool for detailed geologic analysis, especially in inaccessible regions of the earth's surface. Short-wave infrared (SWIR) bands are shown to provide spectral information bearing on the lithologic, structural, and geochemical character of rock bodies such as ophiolites, allowing for a more comprehensive assessment of the lithologies present, their stratigraphic relationships, and geochemical character. Most remote sensing data are widely available for little or no cost, along with user-friendly software for non-specialists. In this paper we review common remote sensing systems and methods that allow for the discrimination of solid rock (lithologic) components of ophiolite complexes and their structural relationships. Ophiolites are enigmatic rock bodies which associated with most, if not all, plate collision sutures. Ophiolites are ideal for remote sensing given their widely recognized diversity of lithologic types and structural relationships. Accordingly, as a basis for demonstrating the utility of remote sensing techniques, we briefly review typical ophiolites in the Tethyan tectonic belt. As a case study, we apply integrated remote sensing studies of a well-studied example, the Muslim Bagh ophiolite, located in Balochistan, western Pakistan. On this basis, we attempt to demonstrate how remote sensing data can validate and reconcile existing information obtained from field studies. The lithologic and geochemical diversity of Muslim Bagh are representative of Tethyan ophiolites. Despite it's remote location it has been extensively mapped and characterized by structural and geochemical studies, and is virtually free of vegetative cover. Moreover, integrating the remote sensing data with 'ground truth' information thus offers the potential of an improved template for interpreting remote sensing data sets of other ophiolites for which little or no field information is available.

  8. The Myres Hill remote sensing intercomparison study: preliminary results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clive, P. J. M.; Chindurza, I.; Ravey, I.; Bass, J.; Boyle, R. J.; Jones, P.; Lang, S. J.; Bradley, S.; Hay, L.; Oldroyd, A.; Stickland, M.

    2008-05-01

    Two remote sensing techniques (SODAR and LIDAR) have been developed for measuring wind speed and turbulence from ground level up to altitudes of 300 m or higher. Although originally developed in the defence sector, these techniques are now generating considerable interest in the renewable energy and meteorological sectors. Despite the benefits of these instruments they are not yet generally accepted for due diligence measurements by wind energy developers and financial institutions. There is a requirement for a series of independent assessments of these new metrology techniques, comparing their measurements with the approved cup-type anemometer readings. This is being addressed at TUV NEL's Myres Hill wind turbine test site in a measurement programme supported by the DIUS National Measurement Systems Measurement for Innovators scheme and a consortium of 21 industrial collaborators. Data from SODAR and LIDAR systems are being compared with results from cup-type anemometers mounted at different heights on an 80m meteorological mast. An ultrasonic sensor is also mounted on the mast. The objective of the test programme is to assess the effectiveness of SODAR and LIDAR wind speed measurement techniques under different operating regimes and atmospheric conditions. Results from the measurements will provide definitive data on the performance of the remote wind speed sensing techniques under test on complex terrain typical of many wind farm sites. Preliminary measurements based on data acquired during the initial measurement campaign are presented.

  9. An integrated study of earth resources in the state of California using remote sensing techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    University of California investigations to determine the usefulness of modern remote sensing techniques have concentrated on the water resources of the state. The studies consider in detail the supply, demand, and impact relationships.

  10. Pressurized honeycombs as soft-actuators: a theoretical study

    PubMed Central

    Guiducci, Lorenzo; Fratzl, Peter; Bréchet, Yves J. M.; Dunlop, John W. C.

    2014-01-01

    The seed capsule of Delosperma nakurense is a remarkable example of a natural hygromorph, which unfolds its protecting valves upon wetting to expose its seeds. The beautiful mechanism responsible for this motion is generated by a specialized organ based on an anisotropic cellular tissue filled with a highly swelling material. Inspired by this system, we study the mechanics of a diamond honeycomb internally pressurized by a fluid phase. Numerical homogenization by means of iterative finite-element (FE) simulations is adapted to the case of cellular materials filled with a variable pressure fluid phase. Like its biological counterpart, it is shown that the material architecture controls and guides the otherwise unspecific isotropic expansion of the fluid. Deformations up to twice the original dimensions can be achieved by simply setting the value of input pressure. In turn, these deformations cause a marked change of the honeycomb geometry and hence promote a stiffening of the material along the weak direction. To understand the mechanism further, we also developed a micromechanical model based on the Born model for crystal elasticity to find an explicit relation between honeycomb geometry, swelling eigenstrains and elastic properties. The micromechanical model is in good qualitative agreement with the FE simulations. Moreover, we also provide the force-stroke characteristics of a soft actuator based on the pressurized anisotropic honeycomb and show how the internal pressure has a nonlinear effect which can result in negative values of the in-plane Poisson's ratio. As nature shows in the case of the D. nakurense seed capsule, cellular materials can be used not only as low-weight structural materials, but also as simple but convenient actuating materials. PMID:24966238

  11. New remote sensing techniques facilitate study of earth's far-flung volcanos

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mouginis-Mark, Peter J.; Pieri, David C.

    1990-01-01

    The study of volcanos using remote sensing is discussed. The dynamics of volcanic eruptions and the interactions between volcanos and the atmosphere and ecosphere are examined. Remote sensing equipment can effectively detect mud flows, pyroclastic falls, debris avalanches, lava flows, and hazards to aircraft from eruption plumes. Consideration is given to the use of thermal IR imaging, weather satellites, and polar-orbiting satellites to study such features as lava flow, silica content, and SO2 distribution.

  12. Remote Sensing Studies of Anorthosite Deposits on the Moon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hawke, B. R.; Taylor, G. J.; Lucey, P. G.; Peterson, C. A.; Blewett, D. T.; Spudis, P. D.

    1995-09-01

    Introduction: In recent years, we have been conducting a variety of remote sensing studies of lunar basin and crater deposits in order to determine the composition of surface units and to investigate the stratigraphy of the lunar crust [1-6]. Special attention has been given to determining the distribution and modes of occurrence of pure anorthosite (plagioclase >90%) in order to answer the critical question of whether or not the lunar crust is enriched in plagioclase. In previous studies, we have utilized telescopic near-infrared spectra to determine the lithology of relatively small areas (2-10 km) of the lunar surface. Now, high resolution multispectral images are available from the Galileo and Clementine missions. We are currently utilizing a variety of techniques to extract compositional information from these new data sets. Chief among these is the production of FeO abundance maps from Clementine and Galileo multispectral images using the method presented by Lucey et al. [7]. Distribution and Modes of Occurrence: Orientale Basin region. With the exception of the Inner Rook massifs, all the highland units associated with the Orientale Basin appear to be composed of either noritic anorthosite or anorthositic norite. Our spectral data indicate that the Inner Rook ring is composed of pure anorthosite [1,2]. Relatively low (<4%) FeO values are exhibited by most portions of this mountain range. Grimaldi Basin region. Spectra obtained for the inner ring of Grimaldi indicate that portions of this ring are composed of pure anorthosite. Low FeO values are also displayed by segments of the inner ring. Other highlands units in the Grimaldi region are composed of more mafic material [2,5]. Humorum Basin region. At least a portion of the inner ring of Humorum is composed of anorthosite [2,6]. However, Galileo and Clementine data demonstrate that the entire ring is not composed of anorthosite, and no anorthosites have yet been identified on the outer Humorum rings. Nectaris

  13. Studying bacterial quorum-sensing at the single cell level

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delfino Perez, Pablo; Pelakh, Leslie; Young, Jonathan; Johnson, Elaine; Hagen, Stephen

    2010-03-01

    Like many bacterial species, Vibrio fischeri can detect its own population density through a quorum sensing (QS) mechanism. The bacterium releases a signal molecule (AI, autoinducer), which accumulates at high population density and triggers a genetic switch. In V.fischeri this leads to bioluminescence. Little is known about how stochastic gene expression affects QS at the level of single cells. We are imaging the luminescence of individual V.fischeri cells in a flow chamber and directly measuring the intercell variability in AI activation of the QS circuit. Our single-cell luminescence experiments allow us to track cells over time and characterize variations in their response to AI levels. We find heterogeneous response to the external signal: at a given AI concentration some cells may be strongly luminescent while others are virtually dark. The analysis of noise in the individual cell response can eventually lead to a better understanding of how cells use QS to gather information about their environment.

  14. Advanced Multispectral Scanner (AMS) study. [aircraft remote sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    The status of aircraft multispectral scanner technology was accessed in order to develop preliminary design specifications for an advanced instrument to be used for remote sensing data collection by aircraft in the 1980 time frame. The system designed provides a no-moving parts multispectral scanning capability through the exploitation of linear array charge coupled device technology and advanced electronic signal processing techniques. Major advantages include: 10:1 V/H rate capability; 120 deg FOV at V/H = 0.25 rad/sec; 1 to 2 rad resolution; high sensitivity; large dynamic range capability; geometric fidelity; roll compensation; modularity; long life; and 24 channel data acquisition capability. The field flattening techniques of the optical design allow wide field view to be achieved at fast f/nos for both the long and short wavelength regions. The digital signal averaging technique permits maximization of signal to noise performance over the entire V/H rate range.

  15. High Pressure XANES studies on Mn dopeHigh Pressure XANES studies on Mn doped Bi2 Te3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Light, Brian; Kumar, Ravhi; Baker, Jason; Dharmalingam, Prabhakaran; Park, Changyong; Unlv Team; Hpcat; Carnegie Institute Of Washington Collaboration

    Bi2Te3, Bi2Se3, and Sb2Te3 are narrow band-gap semiconductors have been extensively studied along with their alloys due to their promising technological applications as thermoelectric materials. More recently pressure induced superconductivity and structural transition have been observed in these materials around 7 GPa [1, 2]. Here we have performed high pressure x-ray near edge spectroscopy (XANES) measurements at Bi L-III edge on Mn (0.1) doped Bi2Te3 samples to understand the variation of the Bi valence across the pressure induced superconductivity regime. We have inferred notable changes in the Bi valence at high pressure conditions. The results will be discussed in detail. Work at the University of Nevada Las Vegas (ALC) is funded by U.S. Department of Energy Award DE-SC0001928. Portions of this work were performed at HPCAT (Sector 16), Advanced Photon Source (APS), Argonne National Laboratory. HPCAT is supported by DOE-BES, DOE-NNSA, NSF, and the W.M. Keck Foundation. APS is supported by DOE-BES, under Contract No. DE-AC02-06CH1135.

  16. Recent Advances in Maya Studies Using Remotely Sensed Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sever, Tom; Irwin, Daniel; Arnold, James E. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The Peten region of northern Guatemala is one of the last places on earth where major archeological sites remain to be discovered. It was in this region that the Maya civilization began, flourished, and abruptly disappeared. Remote sensing technology is helping to locate and map ancient Maya sites that are threatened today by accelerating deforestation and looting. Thematic Mapper and IKONOS satellite and airborne Star3i radar data, combined with Global Positioning System (GPS) technology, are successfully detecting ancient Maya features such as cities, roadways, canals, and water reservoirs. Satellite imagery is also being used to map the baJos, which are seasonally flooded swamps that cover over 40% of the land surface. The use of bajos for farming has been a source of debate within the professional community for many years. But the recent detection and verification of cultural features within the bajo system by our research team are providing conclusive evidence that the ancient Maya had adapted well to wetland environments from the earliest times and utilized them until the time of the Maya collapse. The combination of water management and bajo farming is an important resource for the future of the current inhabitants who are experiencing rapid population growth. Remote sensing imagery is also demonstrating that in the Preclassic period (600 BC- AD 250), the Maya had already achieved a high organizational level as evidenced by the construction of massive temples and an elaborate inter-connecting roadway system. Although they experienced several setbacks such as droughts and hurricanes, the Maya nevertheless managed the delicate forest ecosystem successfully for several centuries. However, around AD 800, something happened to the Maya to cause their rapid decline and eventual disappearance from the region. The evidence indicates that at this time there was increased climatic dryness, extensive deforestation, overpopulation, and widespread warfare. This raises a

  17. A Pressure Sensing System for Heart Rate Monitoring with Polymer-Based Pressure Sensors and an Anti-Interference Post Processing Circuit

    PubMed Central

    Shu, Yi; Li, Cheng; Wang, Zhe; Mi, Wentian; Li, Yuxing; Ren, Tian-Ling

    2015-01-01

    Heart rate measurement is a basic and important issue for either medical diagnosis or daily health monitoring. In this work great efforts have been focused on realizing a portable, comfortable and low cost solution for long-term domestic heart rate monitoring. A tiny but efficient measurement system composed of a polymer-based flexible pressure sensor and an analog anti-interference readout circuit is proposed; manufactured and tested. The proposed polymer-based pressure sensor has a linear response and high sensitivity of 13.4 kPa−1. With the circuit’s outstanding capability in removing interference caused by body movement and the highly sensitive flexible sensor device, comfortable long-term heart rate monitoring becomes more realistic. Comparative tests prove that the proposed system has equivalent capability (accuracy: <3%) in heart rate measurement to the commercial product. PMID:25648708

  18. The effects of pressure sensor acoustics on airdata derived from a High-angle-of-attack Flush Airdata Sensing (HI-FADS) system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitmore, Stephen A.; Moes, Timothy R.

    1991-01-01

    The accuracy of a nonintrusive high angle-of-attack flush airdata sensing (HI-FADS) system was verified for quasi-steady flight conditions up to 55 deg angle of attack during the F-18 High Alpha Research Vehicle (HARV) Program. The system is a matrix of nine pressure ports arranged in annular rings on the aircraft nose. The complete airdata set is estimated using nonlinear regression. Satisfactory frequency response was verified to the system Nyquist frequency (12.5 Hz). The effects of acoustical distortions within the individual pressure sensors of the nonintrusive pressure matrix on overall system performance are addressed. To quantify these effects, a frequency-response model describing the dynamics of acoustical distortion is developed and simple design criteria are derived. The model adjusts measured HI-FADS pressure data for the acoustical distortion and quantifies the effects of internal sensor geometries on system performance. Analysis results indicate that sensor frequency response characteristics very greatly with altitude, thus it is difficult to select satisfactory sensor geometry for all altitudes. The solution used presample filtering to eliminate resonance effects, and short pneumatic tubing sections to reduce lag effects. Without presample signal conditioning the system designer must use the pneumatic transmission line to attenuate the resonances and accept the resulting altitude variability.

  19. A study of remote sensing as applied to regional and small watersheds. Volume 1: Summary report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ambaruch, R.

    1974-01-01

    The accuracy of remotely sensed measurements to provide inputs to hydrologic models of watersheds is studied. A series of sensitivity analyses on continuous simulation models of three watersheds determined: (1)Optimal values and permissible tolerances of inputs to achieve accurate simulation of streamflow from the watersheds; (2) Which model inputs can be quantified from remote sensing, directly, indirectly or by inference; and (3) How accurate remotely sensed measurements (from spacecraft or aircraft) must be to provide a basis for quantifying model inputs within permissible tolerances.

  20. Impulsive pressurization of neuronal cells for traumatic brain injury study.

    PubMed

    Nienaber, Matthew; Lee, Jeong Soon; Feng, Ruqiang; Lim, Jung Yul

    2011-10-12

    A novel impulsive cell pressurization experiment has been developed using a Kolsky bar device to investigate blast-induced traumatic brain injury (TBI). We demonstrate in this video article how blast TBI-relevant impulsive pressurization is applied to the neuronal cells in vitro. This is achieved by using well-controlled pressure pulse created by a specialized Kolsky bar device, with complete pressure history within the cell pressurization chamber recorded. Pressurized neuronal cells are inspected immediately after pressurization, or further incubated to examine the long-term effects of impulsive pressurization on neurite/axonal outgrowth, neuronal gene expression, apoptosis, etc. We observed that impulsive pressurization at about 2 MPa induces distinct neurite loss relative to unpressurized cells. Our technique provides a novel method to investigate the molecular/cellular mechanisms of blast TBI, via impulsive pressurization of brain cells at well-controlled pressure magnitude and duration.

  1. Drinking water fluoride and blood pressure? An environmental study.

    PubMed

    Amini, Hassan; Taghavi Shahri, Seyed Mahmood; Amini, Mohamad; Ramezani Mehrian, Majid; Mokhayeri, Yaser; Yunesian, Masud

    2011-12-01

    The relationship between intakes of fluoride (F) from drinking water and blood pressure has not yet been reported. We examined the relationship of F in ground water resources (GWRs) of Iran with the blood pressure of Iranian population in an ecologic study. The mean F data of the GWRs (as a surrogate for F levels in drinking water) were derived from a previously conducted study. The hypertension prevalence and the mean of systolic and diastolic blood pressures (SBP & DBP) of Iranian population by different provinces and genders were also derived from the provincial report of non-communicable disease risk factor surveillance of Iran. Statistically significant positive correlations were found between the mean concentrations of F in the GWRs and the hypertension prevalence of males (r = 0.48, p = 0.007), females (r = 0.36, p = 0.048), and overall (r = 0.495, p = 0.005). Also, statistically significant positive correlations between the mean concentrations of F in the GWRs and the mean SBP of males (r = 0.431, p = 0.018), and a borderline correlation with females (r = 0.352, p = 0.057) were found. In conclusion, we found the increase of hypertension prevalence and the SBP mean with the increase of F level in the GWRs of Iranian population.

  2. Numerical study of low pressure nuclear thermal rockets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Suk C.; Stubbs, Robert M.

    1992-01-01

    The flowfields and performance of low pressure nuclear thermal rockets, which use hydrogen as a propellant, are studied by solving the Navier-Stokes equations and the species equations. A finite-rate chemistry model is used in the species equations, and the turbulence is simulated by the Baldwin-Lomax turbulence model with a modified van Driest's damping constant. The calculated results for the chamber temperatures of 3200 K and 4000 K with a chamber pressure range of 0.1 atm to 6 atm are presented as contours, centerline variations, and exit profiles. The performance values from the present calculations, such as the vacuum specific impulse and thrust, are compared with those from the 1D, inviscid equilibrium and frozen flow code.

  3. CAVITATION DAMAGE STUDY VIA A NOVEL REPETITIVE PRESSURE PULSE APPROACH

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Jy-An John; Ren, Fei; Wang, Hong

    2010-01-01

    Cavitation damage can significantly affect system performance. Thus, there is great interest in characterizing cavitation damage and improving materials resistance to cavitation damage. In this paper, we present a novel methodology to simulate cavitation environment. A pulsed laser is utilized to induce optical breakdown in the cavitation media, with the emission of shock wave and the generation of bubbles. The pressure waves induced by the optical breakdown fluctuate/propagate within the media, which enables the cavitation to occur and to further develop cavitation damage at the solid boundary. Using the repetitive pulsed-pressure apparatus developed in the current study, cavitation damage in water media was verified on stainless steel and aluminum samples. Characteristic cavitation damages such as pitting and indentation are observed on sample surfaces using scanning electron microscopy.

  4. Optimization of sensing and feedback control for vibration/flutter of rotating disk by PZT actuators via air coupled pressure.

    PubMed

    Yan, Tianhong; Xu, Xinsheng; Han, Jianqiang; Lin, Rongming; Ju, Bingfeng; Li, Qing

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, a feedback control mechanism and its optimization for rotating disk vibration/flutter via changes of air-coupled pressure generated using piezoelectric patch actuators are studied. A thin disk rotates in an enclosure, which is equipped with a feedback control loop consisting of a micro-sensor, a signal processor, a power amplifier, and several piezoelectric (PZT) actuator patches distributed on the cover of the enclosure. The actuator patches are mounted on the inner or the outer surfaces of the enclosure to produce necessary control force required through the airflow around the disk. The control mechanism for rotating disk flutter using enclosure surfaces bonded with sensors and piezoelectric actuators is thoroughly studied through analytical simulations. The sensor output is used to determine the amount of input to the actuator for controlling the response of the disk in a closed loop configuration. The dynamic stability of the disk-enclosure system, together with the feedback control loop, is analyzed as a complex eigenvalue problem, which is solved using Galerkin's discretization procedure. The results show that the disk flutter can be reduced effectively with proper configurations of the control gain and the phase shift through the actuations of PZT patches. The effectiveness of different feedback control methods in altering system characteristics and system response has been investigated. The control capability, in terms of control gain, phase shift, and especially the physical configuration of actuator patches, are also evaluated by calculating the complex eigenvalues and the maximum displacement produced by the actuators. To achieve a optimal control performance, sizes, positions and shapes of PZT patches used need to be optimized and such optimization has been achieved through numerical simulations.

  5. Recent Advances in Maya Studies Using Remotely Sensed Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sever, Tom; Irwin, Daniel; Arnold, James E. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The Peten region of northern Guatemala is one of the last places on earth where major archeological sites remain to be discovered. It was in this region that the Maya civilization began, flourished, and abruptly disappeared. Remote sensing technology is helping to locate and map ancient Maya sites that are threatened today by accelerating deforestation and looting. Thematic Mapper and IKONOS satellite and airborne Star3i radar data, combined with Global Positioning System (GPS) technology, are successfully detecting ancient Maya features such as cities, roadways, canals, and water reservoirs. Satellite imagery is also being used to map the bajos, which are seasonally flooded swamps that cover over 40% of the land surface. The use of baJos for farming has been a source of debate within the professional community for many years. But the recent detection and verification of cultural features within the baJo system by our research team are providing conclusive evidence that the ancient Maya had adapted well to wetland environments from the earliest times and utilized them until the time of the Maya collapse. The combination of water management and baJo farming is an important resource for the future of the current inhabitants who are experiencing rapid population growth. Remote sensing imagery is also demonstrating that in the Preclassic period (600 BC- AD 250), the Maya had already achieved a high organizational level as evidenced by the construction of massive temples and an elaborate inter-connecting roadway system. Although they experienced several setbacks such as droughts and hurricanes, the Maya nevertheless managed the delicate forest ecosystem successfully for several centuries. However, around AD 800, something happened to the Maya to cause their rapid decline and eventual disappearance from the region. The evidence indicates that at this time there was increased climatic dryness, extensive deforestation, overpopulation, and widespread warfare. This raises a

  6. A numerical study of high-pressure droplet vaporization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Curtis, E. W.; Farrell, P. V.

    1992-08-01

    The evaporation of single, spherical fuel droplets in a high-pressure, high-temperature environment has been studied numerically. The model is fully transient in both the liquid and the vapor phases. Transport properties are functions of temperature, pressure, and composition, and vary throughout the liquid droplet and the vapor boundary layer. Equilibrium at the liquid-vapor interface is calculated using the Peng-Robinson equation of state, and accounts for diffusion of the gas into the liquid droplet. The Peng-Robinson equation of state is also used to calculate the enthalpy of vaporization of the fuel species as well as the liquid and vapor mixture densities. The proposed model is compared with data obtained for a variety of liquids. Transient effects in both the liquid and vapor phases are found to have a large effect on the droplet heatup and vaporization process. At very high temperature and pressure conditions the droplets were found to reach their thermodynamic critical mixing point in a totally transient process.

  7. High-pressure studies of cycloheptane up to 30 GPa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Chunli; Cui, Qiliang; Liu, Zhenxian

    2013-06-01

    High-pressure synchrotron angle dispersive x-ray diffraction, Raman scattering and infrared absorption studies have been performed on cycloheptane (C7H14) up to 30 GPa at room temperature by using diamond anvil cell techniques. The synchrotron x-ray diffraction results indicate that the liquid cyclopentane undergoes two phase transitions at around 0.5 and 1.0 GPa, respectively. Then, it gradually turns into glass state starting from 3.0 GPa. The features of the Raman scattering and infrared absorption show no significant changes with increasing pressure below 3 GPa. This implies that the two phases observed by the x-ray diffraction can be attributed to plastic phases in which the cycloheptane molecules are held in an ordered structure while the molecular orientation is disordered. Up on further compression, all Raman and infrared bands begin broadening around 3.0 GPa that provide further evidence on the transition to glass state. Our results also suggest different paths on phase transitions under isothermal compression at room temperature compare to that previously reported under isobaric cooling at ambient pressure. This work was supported by the NSF of China (91014004, 11004074,11074089), the specialized Research Fund for the Doctoral Program of Higher Education (20110061110011, 20100061120093), and the National Basic Research Program of China (2011CB808200).

  8. Assessment of the role of remote sensing in the study of inland and coastal waters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Curfman, H. J.; Oberholtzer, J. D.; Schertler, R. J.

    1980-01-01

    Several problems within Great Lakes, coastal, and continental shelf water were selected and organized under the topical headings of Productivity, Sedimentation, Water Dynamics, Eutrophication, and Hazardous Substances. The measurements required in the study of each of the problems were identified. An assessment was made of the present capability and the potential of remote sensing to make these measurements. The relevant remote-sensing technology for each of these classifications was discussed and needed advancements indicated.

  9. Data handling and validation from Wisconsin's remote vehicle emissions sensing studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rendahl, Craig S.

    1995-05-01

    The Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources and Department of Transportation (WDOT) are conducting a joint study to determine the effectiveness of applying optical sensing techniques to vehicular emission monitoring. Two field studies using Remote Sensing Technologies, Inc. remote sensing equipment was conducted in 1993 and 1994. This paper describes the data handling and data validation activities of these studies, including identification of data elements. Data handling was performed by the same people who conducted the 180,000 vehicle emissions tests. A contemporary commercial spreadsheet from Borland International, Inc. was used to import the raw data from the remote sensor. The data was reviewed with the spreadsheet then moved into a Borland relational database product. The relational database permitted structured queries against databases of vehicle inspection/maintenance (I/M) data from WDOT, National Insurance Crime Bureau, and EnviroTest. We determined effective cut points for vehicles of different ages which delineated high-polluting vehicles (gross emitters) from vehicles in compliance. The I/M data was also used to intercompare the remote sensing results with traditional testing results. Remote sensing test results were then compared for errors of commission and omission with respect to I/M test. Ultimately, this remote sensing database technique could serve as a means for identifying gross emitters who would be required to visit an I/M facility for an out-of-cycle emissions test.

  10. Experimental study on pressure drop of bends in dense phase pneumatic conveying under high pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Gaoyang; Liang, Cai; Chen, Xiaoping; Xu, Pan; Xu, Guiling; Shen, Liu

    2014-04-01

    The transport test using nitrogen as conveying gas are carried out at high operating pressure up to 4MPa in the experimental equipment for dense phase pneumatic conveying. The transport powders in the experiment are anthracite coal and petroleum coke. The pressure drop characteristics in bends are acquired with the different transport powder. The experimental results show that under the similar mass flow, the pressure drop of vertical upward bend is greater than the horizontal bend and the horizontal bend is greater than the vertical downward bend at the same superficial gas velocity, while there is a best superficial gas velocity minimizes the pressure drop of the bend. Under the similar mass flow rate and the similar particle size, the pressure drop of the bend with the petroleum coke is greater than the pressure drop with the anthracite coal as the same superficial gas velocity. According to Barth's additional pressure drop method, the pressure drop fitting formulas of the vertical upward bend, the horizontal bend and the vertical downward bend are obtained, and the predicted results are in accordance with that of the experiments.

  11. Maternal Blood Pressure During Pregnancy and Early Childhood Blood Pressures in the Offspring: The GUSTO Birth Cohort Study.

    PubMed

    Lim, Wai-Yee; Lee, Yung-Seng; Yap, Fabian Kok-Peng; Aris, Izzudin Mohd; Lek, Ngee; Meaney, Michael; Gluckman, Peter D; Godfrey, Keith M; Kwek, Kenneth; Chong, Yap-Seng; Saw, Seang-Mei; Pan, An

    2015-11-01

    Although epidemiological studies suggest that offspring of women with preeclampsia are at increased risk to higher blood pressures and cardiovascular disease, little is known about the nature of blood pressures between the mother and her offspring. As blood pressures comprise of both pulsatile (systolic blood pressure [SBP] and pulse pressure [PP]) and stable (diastolic blood pressure [DBP]) components, and they differ between central and peripheral sites, we sought to examine maternal peripheral and central blood pressure components in relation to offspring early childhood blood pressures. A prospective birth cohort of 567 Chinese, Malay, and Indian mother-offspring with complete blood pressure information were studied. Maternal brachial artery SBP, DBP, and PP were measured at 26 to 28 weeks gestation; and central SBP and PP were estimated from radial artery waveforms. Offspring brachial artery SBP, DBP, and PP were measured at 3 years of age. Associations between continuous variables of maternal blood pressures (peripheral SBP, DBP, PP, central SBP, and PP) and offspring blood pressures (peripheral SBP, DBP, and PP) were examined using multiple linear regression with adjustment for maternal characteristics (age, education level, parity, smoking status, alcohol consumption and physical activity during pregnancy, and pre-pregnancy BMI) and offspring characteristics (sex, ethnicity, BMI, and height at 3 years of age). In the multivariate models, offspring peripheral SBP increased by 0.08 (95% confidence interval 0.00-0.17, P = 0.06) mmHg with every 1-mmHg increase in maternal central SBP, and offspring peripheral PP increased by 0.10 (0.01-0.18, P = 0.03) mmHg for every 1-mmHg increase in maternal central PP. The relations of maternal-offspring peripheral blood pressures (SBP, DBP, and PP) were positive but not statistically significant, and the corresponding values were 0.05 (-0.03 to 0.13; P = 0.21), 0.03 (-0.04 to 0.10; P = 0.35), and 0.05 (-0

  12. An Experimental Study of the Effects of External Physiological Parameters on the Photoplethysmography Signals in the Context of Local Blood Pressure (Hydrostatic Pressure Changes)

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Hongwei; Poeggel, Sven; Newe, Thomas; Lewis, Elfed; Viphavakit, Charusluk; Leen, Gabriel

    2017-01-01

    A comprehensive study of the effect of a wide range of controlled human subject motion on Photoplethysmographic signals is reported. The investigation includes testing of two separate groups of 5 and 18 subjects who were asked to undertake set exercises whilst simultaneously monitoring a wide range of physiological parameters including Breathing Rate, Heart Rate and Localised Blood Pressure using commercial clinical sensing systems. The unique finger mounted PPG probe equipped with miniature three axis accelerometers for undertaking this investigation was a purpose built in-house version which is designed to facilitate reproducible application to a wide range of human subjects and the study of motion. The subjects were required to undertake several motion based exercises including standing, sitting and lying down and transitions between these states. They were also required to undertake set arm movements including arm-swinging and wrist rotation. A comprehensive set of experimental results corresponding to all motion inducing exercises have been recorded and analysed including the baseline (BL) value (DC component) and the amplitude of the oscillation of the PPG. All physiological parameters were also recorded as a simultaneous time varying waveform. The effects of the motion and specifically the localised Blood Pressure (BP) have been studied and related to possible influences of the Autonomic Nervous System (ANS) and hemodynamic pressure variations. It is envisaged that a comprehensive study of the effect of motion and the localised pressure fluctuations will provide valuable information for the future minimisation of motion artefact effect on the PPG signals of this probe and allow the accurate assessment of total haemoglobin concentration which is the primary function of the probe. PMID:28287428

  13. Ultra-Supercritical Pressure CFB Boiler Conceptual Design Study

    SciTech Connect

    Zhen Fan; Steve Goidich; Archie Robertson; Song Wu

    2006-06-30

    Electric utility interest in supercritical pressure steam cycles has revived in the United States after waning in the 1980s. Since supercritical cycles yield higher plant efficiencies than subcritical plants along with a proportional reduction in traditional stack gas pollutants and CO{sub 2} release rates, the interest is to pursue even more advanced steam conditions. The advantages of supercritical (SC) and ultra supercritical (USC) pressure steam conditions have been demonstrated in the high gas temperature, high heat flux environment of large pulverized coal-fired (PC) boilers. Interest in circulating fluidized bed (CFB) combustion, as an alternative to PC combustion, has been steadily increasing. Although CFB boilers as large as 300 MWe are now in operation, they are drum type, subcritical pressure units. With their sizes being much smaller than and their combustion temperatures much lower than those of PC boilers (300 MWe versus 1,000 MWe and 1600 F versus 3500 F), a conceptual design study was conducted herein to investigate the technical feasibility and economics of USC CFB boilers. The conceptual study was conducted at 400 MWe and 800 MWe nominal plant sizes with high sulfur Illinois No. 6 coal used as the fuel. The USC CFB plants had higher heating value efficiencies of 40.6 and 41.3 percent respectively and their CFB boilers, which reflect conventional design practices, can be built without the need for an R&D effort. Assuming construction at a generic Ohio River Valley site with union labor, total plant costs in January 2006 dollars were estimated to be $1,551/kW and $1,244/kW with costs of electricity of $52.21/MWhr and $44.08/MWhr, respectively. Based on the above, this study has shown that large USC CFB boilers are feasible and that they can operate with performance and costs that are competitive with comparable USC PC boilers.

  14. A miniaturized carbon dioxide gas sensor based on sensing of pH-sensitive hydrogel swelling with a pressure sensor.

    PubMed

    Herber, S; Bomer, J; Olthuis, W; Bergveld, P; van den Berg, A

    2005-09-01

    A measurement concept has been realized for the detection of carbon dioxide, where the CO(2) induced pressure generation by an enclosed pH-sensitive hydrogel is measured with a micro pressure sensor. The application of the sensor is the quantification of the partial pressure of CO(2) (Pco(2)) in the stomach as diagnosis for gastrointestinal ischemia. The principle is put to the proof by examining the sensor response to changes in Pco(2). Furthermore, the response time, temperature-sensitivity and resolution are determined. The sensor responds well to changes in Pco(2) with a maximum pressure generation of 0.29 x 10(5) Pa at 20 kPa CO(2). The 90% response time varies between 1.5 and 4.5 minutes at 37( composite function)C. The sensor shows a linear temperature-sensitivity which can easily be compensated for, and enables detection of Pco(2) changes as small as 0.5 kPa CO(2).

  15. Determination of the partial pressure of thallium in high-pressure lamp arcs: A comparative study

    SciTech Connect

    Karabourniotis, D.; Couris, S.; Damelincourt, J.J.; Aubes, M.

    1986-08-01

    The partial pressure of thallium in high-pressure Hg-TlI discharges with different mercury, thallium, and electron pressures has been measured by using the optically thin line Tl 655 nm and the self-reversed line Tl 535 nm. The partial pressure of the arc axis has been measured from the line Tl 655nm. The effective partial pressure has been measured from the self-reversed line Tl 535 nm on the basis of the multiparameter method, and it has been calculated from the known axis pressure of thallium and the calculation of its radial variation by taking into account the chemical reactions. The experimental results confirm the dispersion character of the blue wing of the line Tl 535 nm. The systematic difference obtained between the measured and calculated effective pressure, particularly at the moment of minimum electron density, may be interpreted by deviations from the local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) caused by overpopulation of the upper level of the line Tl 535 nm.

  16. The major influence of the atmosphere on intracranial pressure: an observational study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herbowski, Leszek

    2017-01-01

    The impact of the atmosphere on human physiology has been studied widely within the last years. In practice, intracranial pressure is a pressure difference between intracranial compartments and the surrounding atmosphere. This means that gauge intracranial pressure uses atmospheric pressure as its zero point, and therefore, this method of pressure measurement excludes the effects of barometric pressure's fluctuation. The comparison of these two physical quantities can only take place through their absolute value relationship. The aim of this study is to investigate the direct effect of barometric pressure on the absolute intracranial pressure homeostasis. A prospective observational cross-sectional open study was conducted in Szczecin, Poland. In 28 neurosurgical patients with suspected normal-pressure hydrocephalus, intracranial intraventricular pressure was monitored in a sitting position. A total of 168 intracranial pressure and atmospheric pressure measurements were performed. Absolute atmospheric pressure was recorded directly. All values of intracranial gauge pressure were converted to absolute pressure (the sum of gauge intracranial pressure and local absolute atmospheric pressure). The average absolute mean intracranial pressure in the patients is 1006.6 hPa (95 % CI 1004.5 to 1008.8 hPa, SEM 1.1), and the mean absolute atmospheric pressure is 1007.9 hPa (95 % CI 1006.3 to 1009.6 hPa, SEM 0.8). The observed association between atmospheric and intracranial pressure is strongly significant (Spearman correlation r = 0.87, p < 0.05) and all the measurements are perfectly reliable (Bland-Altman coefficient is 4.8 %). It appears from this study that changes in absolute intracranial pressure are related to seasonal variation. Absolute intracranial pressure is shown to be impacted positively by atmospheric pressure.

  17. The major influence of the atmosphere on intracranial pressure: an observational study.

    PubMed

    Herbowski, Leszek

    2017-01-01

    The impact of the atmosphere on human physiology has been studied widely within the last years. In practice, intracranial pressure is a pressure difference between intracranial compartments and the surrounding atmosphere. This means that gauge intracranial pressure uses atmospheric pressure as its zero point, and therefore, this method of pressure measurement excludes the effects of barometric pressure's fluctuation. The comparison of these two physical quantities can only take place through their absolute value relationship. The aim of this study is to investigate the direct effect of barometric pressure on the absolute intracranial pressure homeostasis. A prospective observational cross-sectional open study was conducted in Szczecin, Poland. In 28 neurosurgical patients with suspected normal-pressure hydrocephalus, intracranial intraventricular pressure was monitored in a sitting position. A total of 168 intracranial pressure and atmospheric pressure measurements were performed. Absolute atmospheric pressure was recorded directly. All values of intracranial gauge pressure were converted to absolute pressure (the sum of gauge intracranial pressure and local absolute atmospheric pressure). The average absolute mean intracranial pressure in the patients is 1006.6 hPa (95 % CI 1004.5 to 1008.8 hPa, SEM 1.1), and the mean absolute atmospheric pressure is 1007.9 hPa (95 % CI 1006.3 to 1009.6 hPa, SEM 0.8). The observed association between atmospheric and intracranial pressure is strongly significant (Spearman correlation r = 0.87, p < 0.05) and all the measurements are perfectly reliable (Bland-Altman coefficient is 4.8 %). It appears from this study that changes in absolute intracranial pressure are related to seasonal variation. Absolute intracranial pressure is shown to be impacted positively by atmospheric pressure.

  18. High pressure stopped-flow apparatus for the rapid mixing and subsequent study of two fluids under high hydrostatic pressures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karan, Daniel M.; Macey, Robert I.

    1980-08-01

    A stopped-flow apparatus is described for the rapid mixing and subsequent study of two dissimilar fluids under pressures up to 1200 bar. The device consists of two identical pressure chambers which contain the two fluids, a third pressure chamber which contains gas to maintain the pressure in the system, an optical port for photometric observation, and various connections. The device has been used to measure reaction times on the order of a hundred milliseconds to tens of seconds, using a maximum of 2 ml of each reagent per experimental determination. The dead time is found to be 5-25 ms with minium average flow velocities of 2.0 m/s. The construction and operation of the device are described and examples of water transport data in red blood cells and the bromophenolblue indicated chemical reaction of NaHCO3 and HCl under pressure are presented.

  19. [Preliminary study of colloid osmotic pressure for cardiopulmonary bypass].

    PubMed

    Wang, D; Xiang, L; Luo, J

    1996-12-01

    The ideal colloid osmotic pressure is beneficial to decrease the fluid accumulated in the pulmonary and other tissue during cardiopulmonary bypass. Schupbach reported the proper colloidosmotic pressure for cardiopulmonary bypass was 2.1 kPa (16 mmHg). Colloid osmotic pressures of blood and priming fluid during cardiopulmonary bypass were measured in 28 patients with heart disease by using colloid osmotic pressure detection apparatus. The value of colloid osmotic pressure suitable for the designed standard was apparently different among the Gelofusine group and other groups. P value was 0.005. Priming fluid for cardiopulmonary bypass needs to satisfy the quality and the quantity of colloid osmotic pressure. Using Albumin isn't economical. Whole blood and plazma are not suitable for increasing colloid osmotic pressure. Hydroxyethyl starch or Gelofusine is best choice in priming to get designed standard of colloid osmotic pressure. The ratio of hydroxyethyl starch or Gelofusine in priming fluid should beyond 1/2.

  20. Compressed-tube pressure cell for optical studies at ocean pressures: Application to glucose mutarotation kinetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamelas, F. J.

    2016-12-01

    A self-contained compressed-tube pressure cell is tested to 25 MPa. The cell is very simple to construct and offers stable pressure control with optical access to fluid samples. The physical path length of light through the cell is large enough to measure optical activity. The entire system is relatively small and portable, and it is vibration-free, since a compressor is not used. Operation of the cell is demonstrated by measuring the mutarotation rate of aqueous glucose solutions at 25 °C. A logarithmic plot of the rate constant vs. pressure yields an activation volume for mutarotation of -22 cm3/mol, approximately twice the value measured previously at higher pressures.

  1. High-Pressure Burning Rate Studies of Solid Rocket Propellants

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-01-01

    due to unstable burning in this pressure regime and a critical dependence on the method of data reduction. The burning becomes more stable at pressures ... depends only on pressure and propellant temperature. 2. Heat losses from the bomb are minimal. 3. The equation of state for the gases is known...to obtain the thermochemical parameters of impetus, covolume , temperature, and speci¦c heat as a function of pressure for the propellants. The

  2. High pressure studies on nanometer sized clusters: Structural, optical, and cooperative properties

    SciTech Connect

    Tolbert, Sarah Helen

    1995-05-01

    High-pressure Se EXAFS is used to study pressure-induced structural transformations in CdSe nanocrystals. The transformation is wurtzite to rock salt, at a pressure much higher than in bulk. High-pressure XRD is used to confirm the EXAFS results. Diffraction peak widths indicate that nanocrystals do not fragment upon transformation. Optical absorption correlates with structural transformations and is used to measure transition pressures; transformation pressure increases smoothly as nanocrystal size decreases. Thermodynamics of transformation is modeled using an elevated surface energy in the high-pressure phase. High-pressure study of Si nanocrystals show large increases in transformation pressure in crystallites to 500{angstrom} diameter, and an overall change in crystallite shape upon transformation is seen from XRD line widths. C{sub 60} single crystals were studied using Raman scattering; results provide information about the clusters` rotational state. Optical properties of high-pressure phase CdSe clusters were studied.

  3. Remote sensing of atmospheric pressure and sea state from satellites using short-pulse multicolor laser altimeters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gardner, C. S.; Tsai, B. M.; Abshire, J. B.

    1983-01-01

    Short pulse multicolor laser ranging systems are currently being developed for satellite ranging applications. These systems use Q-switched pulsed lasers and streak tube cameras to provide timing accuracies approaching a few picoseconds. Satellite laser ranging systems was used to evaluate many important geophysical phenomena such as fault motion, polar motion and solid earth tides, by measuring the orbital perturbations of retroreflector equipped satellites. Some existing operational systems provide range resolution approaching a few millimeters. There is currently considerable interest in adapting these highly accurate systems for use as airborne and satellite based altimeters. Potential applications include the measurement of sea state, ground topography and atmospheric pressure. This paper reviews recent progress in the development of multicolor laser altimeters for use in monitoring sea state and atmospheric pressure.

  4. Purpose, Policy, and Possibilities: Social Studies Teachers' Sense-Making of Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Root, Debra Ann

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore how high school social studies teachers made sense of curriculum work. The setting was a large, urban area in Texas with high percentages of students who were considered economically disadvantaged. The context of the study was important because these teachers were implementing revised standards and new…

  5. Optical sensing using fiber Bragg gratings for monitoring structural damage in composite over-wrapped pressure vessels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grant, J.

    2005-09-01

    Composite Over-Wrap Vessels are widely used in the aerospace community. They made of thin-walled bottles that are over wrapped with high strength fibers embedded in a matrix material. There is a strong drive to reduce the weight of space borne vehicles and thus pushes designers to adopt COPVs that are over wrapped with graphite fibers embedded in its epoxy matrix. Unfortunately, this same fiber/matrix configuration is more susceptible to impact damage than others and to make matters worse; there is a regime where impacts that damage the over wrap leave no visible scar on the COPV surface. In this paper FBG sensors are presented as a means of monitoring and detecting these types of damage. The FBG sensors are surface mounted to the COPVs and optically interrogated to explore the structural properties of these composite pressure vessels. These gratings optically inscribed into the core of a single mode fiber are used as a tool to monitor the stress strain relation in the composite matrix. The response of these fiber-optic sensors is investigated by pressurizing the cylinder up to its burst pressure of around 4500 psi. A Fiber Optic Demodulation System built by Blue Road Research, is used for interrogation of the Bragg gratings.

  6. Intracranial pressure monitoring

    MedlinePlus

    ... head. The monitor senses the pressure inside the skull and sends measurements to a recording device. ... are 3 ways to monitor pressure in the skull (intracranial pressure). INTRAVENTRICULAR CATHETER The intraventricular catheter is ...

  7. Landfill monitoring using remote sensing: a case study of Glina, Romania.

    PubMed

    Iacoboaea, Cristina; Petrescu, Florian

    2013-10-01

    Landfill monitoring is one of the most important components of waste management. This article presents a case study on landfill monitoring using remote sensing technology. The study area was the Glina landfill, one of the largest municipal waste disposal sites in Romania. The methodology consisted of monitoring the differences of temperature computed for several distinct waste disposal zones with respect to a ground reference area, all of them located within the landfill site. The remote sensing data used were Landsat satellite multi-temporal data. The differences of temperature were computed using Landsat thermal infrared data. The study confirmed the use of multi-temporal Landsat imagery as a complementary data source.

  8. Hydrostatic pressure studies of polyvinylidine fluoride (PVDF) and its copolymers

    SciTech Connect

    Samara, G.A.; Bauer, F.

    1987-01-01

    The frequency, temperature and hydrostatic pressure (less than or equal to10 kbar) dependences of the dielectric properties, molecular relaxations and phase transitions in PVDF and a copolymer with a 30% trifluorethylene were investigated. For the copolymer, both the ferroelectric transition (T/sub c/) and dynamic melting (T/sub m/) temperatures exhibit large increases with pressure. PVDF itself does not exhibit a T/sub c/ below T/sub m/, but its T/sub m/ also shows a large increase with pressure. The pressure and frequency dependences suggest an explanation for why it is possible to use these polymers as piezoelectric shock wave gauges to relatively high shock pressures.

  9. [Aerodynamics study on pressure changes inside pressure-type whole-body plethysmograph produced by flowing air].

    PubMed

    Xu, Wei-Hua; Shen, Hua-Hao

    2010-02-25

    When using pressure-type plethysmography to test lung function of rodents, calculation of lung volume is always based on Boyle's law. The precondition of Boyle's law is that perfect air is static. However, air in the chamber is flowing continuously when a rodent breathes inside the chamber. Therefore, Boyle's law, a principle of air statics, may not be appropriate for measuring pressure changes of flowing air. In this study, we deduced equations for pressure changes inside pressure-type plethysmograph and then designed three experiments to testify the theoretic deduction. The results of theoretic deduction indicated that increased pressure was generated from two sources: one was based on Boyle's law, and the other was based on the law of conservation of momentum. In the first experiment, after injecting 0.1 mL, 0.2 mL, 0.4 mL of air into the plethysmograph, the pressure inside the chamber increased sharply to a peak value, then promptly decreased to horizontal pressure. Peak values were significantly higher than the horizontal values (P<0.001). This observation revealed that flowing air made an extra effect on air pressure in the plethysmograph. In the second experiment, the same volume of air was injected into the plethysmograph at different frequencies (0, 0.5, 1, 2, 3 Hz) and pressure changes inside were measured. The results showed that, with increasing frequencies, the pressure changes in the chamber became significantly higher (P<0.001). In the third experiment, small animal ventilator and pipette were used to make two types of airflow with different functions of time. The pressure changes produced by the ventilator were significantly greater than those produced by the pipette (P<0.001). Based on the data obtained, we draw the conclusion that, the flow of air plays a role in pressure changes inside the plethysmograph, and the faster the airflow is, the higher the pressure changes reach. Furthermore, the type of airflow also influences the pressure changes.

  10. [Genesis study of omphacite at high pressure and high temperature].

    PubMed

    Xiao, Ben-Fu; Yi, Li; Wang, Duo-Jun; Xie, Chao; Tang, Xue-Wu; Liu, Lei; Cui, Yue-Ju

    2013-11-01

    The melting and recrystallizing experiments of alkali basalt powder and mixture of pure oxides mixed as stoichiometry were performed at 3 GPa and 1 200 degrees C. Electronic microprobe analysis and Raman spectra showed that the recrystallized products were omphacites, the FWHM (full width at half maximum) of the Raman peak was narrow and its shape was sharp, which is attributed to the stable Si-O tetrahedral structure and the high degree of order in omphacite. Based on the results of previous studies, the influencing factors of omphacite genesis and its primary magma were discussed. The results showed that the formation of omphacite could be affected by many factors, such as the composition of parent rocks, the concentration of fluid in the system and the conditions of pressure and temperature. This result could support some experimental evidences on the genesis studies of omphacite and eclogite.

  11. Privileged but Pressured? A Study of Affluent Youth

    PubMed Central

    Becker, Bronwyn E.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to build on preliminary findings of unusually high internalizing symptoms and substance use among suburban high school students. The sample consisted of 302 sixth- and seventh-grade students in an affluent, suburban community. Findings corroborated expectations regarding several domains of vulnerability, showing (1) high rates of clinically significant depressive symptoms among older girls, (2) significant links between various internalizing symptoms and substance use among both boys and girls, and (3) peers’ approval of substance use among older boys. In exploring potential causes of distress in this suburban sample, associations were found for achievement pressures (particularly excessive perfectionistic strivings), and isolation from parents (particularly low perceived closeness to mothers). Findings of this study are discussed in terms of widespread stereotypes about affluent families, as well as implications for future research and preventive interventions for a subgroup of youth typically viewed as being at “low risk.” PMID:12361321

  12. Intradiscal Pressure Changes during Manual Cervical Distraction: A Cadaveric Study

    PubMed Central

    Gudavalli, M. R.; Potluri, T.; Carandang, G.; Havey, R. M.; Voronov, L. I.; Cox, J. M.; Rowell, R. M.; Kruse, R. A.; Joachim, G. C.; Patwardhan, A. G.; Henderson, C. N. R.; Goertz, C.

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this study was to measure intradiscal pressure (IDP) changes in the lower cervical spine during a manual cervical distraction (MCD) procedure. Incisions were made anteriorly, and pressure transducers were inserted into each nucleus at lower cervical discs. Four skilled doctors of chiropractic (DCs) performed MCD procedure on nine specimens in prone position with contacts at C5 or at C6 vertebrae with the headpiece in different positions. IDP changes, traction forces, and manually applied posterior-to-anterior forces were analyzed using descriptive statistics. IDP decreases were observed during MCD procedure at all lower cervical levels C4-C5, C5-C6, and C6-C7. The mean IDP decreases were as high as 168.7 KPa. Mean traction forces were as high as 119.2 N. Posterior-to-anterior forces applied during manual traction were as high as 82.6 N. Intraclinician reliability for IDP decrease was high for all four DCs. While two DCs had high intraclinician reliability for applied traction force, the other two DCs demonstrated only moderate reliability. IDP decreases were greatest during moving flexion and traction. They were progressevely less pronouced with neutral traction, fixed flexion and traction, and generalized traction. PMID:24023587

  13. Intradiscal Pressure Changes during Manual Cervical Distraction: A Cadaveric Study.

    PubMed

    Gudavalli, M R; Potluri, T; Carandang, G; Havey, R M; Voronov, L I; Cox, J M; Rowell, R M; Kruse, R A; Joachim, G C; Patwardhan, A G; Henderson, C N R; Goertz, C

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this study was to measure intradiscal pressure (IDP) changes in the lower cervical spine during a manual cervical distraction (MCD) procedure. Incisions were made anteriorly, and pressure transducers were inserted into each nucleus at lower cervical discs. Four skilled doctors of chiropractic (DCs) performed MCD procedure on nine specimens in prone position with contacts at C5 or at C6 vertebrae with the headpiece in different positions. IDP changes, traction forces, and manually applied posterior-to-anterior forces were analyzed using descriptive statistics. IDP decreases were observed during MCD procedure at all lower cervical levels C4-C5, C5-C6, and C6-C7. The mean IDP decreases were as high as 168.7 KPa. Mean traction forces were as high as 119.2 N. Posterior-to-anterior forces applied during manual traction were as high as 82.6 N. Intraclinician reliability for IDP decrease was high for all four DCs. While two DCs had high intraclinician reliability for applied traction force, the other two DCs demonstrated only moderate reliability. IDP decreases were greatest during moving flexion and traction. They were progressevely less pronouced with neutral traction, fixed flexion and traction, and generalized traction.

  14. Pilot study: Assessing repeatability of the EcoWalk platform resistive pressure sensors to measure plantar pressure during barefoot standing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zequera, Martha; Perdomo, Oscar; Wilches, Carlos; Vizcaya, Pedro

    2013-06-01

    Plantar pressure provides useful information to assess the feet's condition. These systems have emerged as popular tools in clinical environment. These systems present errors and no compensation information is presented by the manufacturer, leading to uncertainty in the measurements. Ten healthy subjects, 5 females and 5 males, were recruited. Lateral load distribution, antero-posterior load distribution, average pressure, contact area, and force were recorded. The aims of this study were to assess repeatability of the EcoWalk system and identify the range of pressure values observed in the normal foot. The coefficient of repeatability was less than 4% for all parameters considered.

  15. Distributed Sensing of Carbon-Epoxy Composites and Filament Wound Pressure Vessels Using Fiber-Bragg Gratings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grant, J.; Kaul, R.; Taylor, S.; Myer, G.; Jackson, K.; Osei, A.; Sharma, A.

    2003-01-01

    Multiple Fiber Bragg-gratings are embedded in carbon-epoxy laminates as well as in composite wound pressure vessel. Structural properties of such composites are investigated. The measurements include stress-strain relation in laminates and Poisson's ratio in several specimens with varying orientation of the optical fiber Bragg-sensor with respect to the carbon fiber in an epoxy matrix. Additionally, fiber Bragg gratings are bonded on the surface of these laminates and cylinders fabricated out of carbon-epoxy composites and multiple points are monitored and compared for strain measurements at several locations.

  16. Verifying Pressure of Water on Dams, a Case Study

    PubMed Central

    Bayrak, Temel

    2008-01-01

    Sensing and monitoring deformation pattern of dams is often one of the most effective ways to understand their safety status. The main objective of the present study is to find the extent to which rising reservoir level affects the mechanism of deformation of the Yamula dam under certain changes in the reservoir level conditions during the first filling period. A new dynamic deformation analysis technique was developed to analyze four geodetic monitoring records consisting of vertical and horizontal displacements of nine object points established on the dam and six reference points surrounding it, to see whether the rising reservoir level is responsible for the vertical and horizontal deformations during the first filling period. The largest displacements were determined in the middle points of the dam construction. There is an apparent linear relationship between the dam subsidence and the reservoir level. The dynamic deformation model was developed to model this situation. The model infers a causative relationship between the reservoir level and the dam deformations. The analysis of the results determines the degree of the correlation between the change in the reservoir level and the observed structural deformation of the dam. PMID:27873819

  17. Effect of water ethanol solvents mixture on textural and gas sensing properties of tin oxide prepared using epoxide-assisted sol-gel process and dried at ambient pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahadik, D. B.; Lee, Yoon Kwang; Park, Chang-Sun; Chung, Hee-Yoon; Hong, Min-Hee; Jung, Hae-Noo-Ree; Han, Wooje; Park, Hyung-Ho

    2015-12-01

    High-surface-area tin oxide aerogels have been synthesized by an ambient-pressure drying method, using a non-alkoxide tin precursor and a hybrid sol-gel technique. The tin precursor was dissolved in different volume ratios of mixed water and ethanol solvents, and gelation was attained by means of an epoxide-initiated gelation process. The solvent in the gel was successively replaced with low-surface-tension solvents, and finally the gels were dried at ambient pressure in an oven. It was observed that solvent combinations significantly altered the textural properties of tin oxide aerogels. The solvent exchange process used prior to ambient-pressure drying helped to minimize impurities originating from the tin precursor. The tin oxide aerogels had the maximum specific surface area of 209 m2/g and small crystallite size (<6.5 nm) after an annealing treatment at 500 °C for 2 h. The sensitivity of a SnO2 sensor to CO gas was found to be strongly affected as the specific surface area of its constituent tin oxide aerogel was increased from 121 m2/g to 209 m2/g. This study offers evidence of the effects of tin oxide aerogel's specific surface area upon its gas sensing performance.

  18. Application of remote sensing to study nearshore circulation. [and the continental shelf

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zeigler, J.; Lobecker, R.; Stauble, D.; Welch, C.; Haas, L.; Fang, C. S.

    1974-01-01

    The research to use remote sensing techniques for studying the continental shelf is reported. The studies reported include: (1) nearshore circulation in the vincinity of a natural tidal inlet; (2) identification of indicators of biological activity; (3) remote navigation system for tracking free drifting buoys; (4) experimental design of an estuaring tidal circulation; and (5) Skylab support work.

  19. Why surface-truth field study is needed in remote-sensing instruction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wake, W. H.

    1981-01-01

    Especially designed field studies are needed in remote sensing technology transfer courses regardless of the field work provided by the students'/trainees' major disciplines because the remote sensing discipline has unique emphases and needs. Modification of existng schedules to include field work provides the equivalent of extending the duration of the program with the added benefit of enhancing learning achievements per actual program day. The process of surface truth field instruction, levels of student capabilities and stages in the development of surface truth field studies are discussed.

  20. Hispanics, Blacks Less Likely to Get High Blood Pressure Treatment: Study

    MedlinePlus

    ... Hispanics, Blacks Less Likely to Get High Blood Pressure Treatment: Study Less than half from any group ... less likely than whites to get high blood pressure under control, a new study suggests. Researchers reviewed ...

  1. Electron-tunneling modulation in percolating network of graphene quantum dots: fabrication, phenomenological understanding, and humidity/pressure sensing applications.

    PubMed

    Sreeprasad, T S; Rodriguez, Alfredo Alexander; Colston, Jonathan; Graham, Augustus; Shishkin, Evgeniy; Pallem, Vasanta; Berry, Vikas

    2013-04-10

    The two-dimensional (2D) electron cloud, flexible carbon-carbon bonds, chemical modifiability, and size-dependent quantum-confinement and capacitance makes graphene nanostructures (GN) a widely tunable material for electronics. Here we report the oxidation-led edge-roughening and cleavage of long graphene nanoribbons (GNRs) (150 nm wide) synthesized via nanotomy (nanoscale cutting) of graphite (with 2 nm edged diamond knife) to produce graphene quantum dots (GQD). These GQDs (~100-200 nm) selectively interfaced with polyelectrolyte microfiber (diameter = 2-20 μm) form an electrically percolating-network exhibiting a characteristic Coulomb blockade signature with a dry tunneling distance of 0.58 nm and conduction activation energy of 3 meV. We implement this construct to demonstrate the functioning of humidity and pressure sensors and outline their governing model. Here, a 0.36 nm decrease in the average tunneling-barrier-width between GQDs (tunneling barrier = 5.11 eV) increases the conductivity of the device by 43-fold. These devices leverage the modulation in electron tunneling distances caused by pressure and humidity induced water transport across the hygroscopic polymer microfiber (Henry's constant = 0.215 Torr(-1)). This is the foremost example of GQD-based electronic sensors. We envision that this polymer-interfaced GQD percolating network will evolve a new class of sensors leveraging the low mass, low capacitance, high conductivity, and high sensitivity of GQD and the interfacial or dielectric properties of the polymer fiber.

  2. Calix[4]arene coated QCM sensors for detection of VOC emissions: Methylene chloride sensing studies.

    PubMed

    Temel, Farabi; Tabakci, Mustafa

    2016-06-01

    This paper describes the sensing studies of QCM sensors with coated some calixarene derivatives bearing different functional groups for some selected Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs) such as acetone, acetonitrile, carbon tetrachloride, chloroform, methylene chloride (MC), N,N-dimethylformamide, 1,4-dioxane, ethanol, ethyl acetate, xylene, methanol, n-hexane and toluene. The initial experiments have revealed that whole the calix[4]arene modified QCM sensors exhibited strongest sensing ability to MC emissions. Thus, the detailed studies were performed for only MC emissions after the determination of relatively more effective calix-coated QCM sensors for MC emissions in aqueous media. The results demonstrated that QCM sensor coated with calix-7 bearing both amino and imidazole groups was most useful sensor for MC emissions with 54.1ppm of detection limit. Moreover, it was understood that cyclic structures, H-bonding capabilities and also good preorganization properties of calixarene derivatives played an important role in VOC sensing processes.

  3. Can Remote Sensing Detect Aquifer Characteristics?: A Case Study in the Guarani Aquifer System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richey, A. S.; Thomas, B.; Famiglietti, J. S.

    2013-12-01

    Global water supply resiliency depends on groundwater, especially regions threatened by population growth and climate change. Aquifer characteristics, even as basic as confined versus unconfined, are necessary to prescribe regulations to sustainably manage groundwater supplies. A significant barrier to sustainable groundwater management exists in the difficulties associated with mapping groundwater resources and characteristics at a large spatial scale. This study addresses this challenge by investigating if remote sensing, including with NASA's Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE), can detect and quantify key aquifer parameters and characteristics. We explore this through a case study in the Guarani Aquifer System (GAS) of South America, validating our remote sensing-based findings against the best available regional estimates. The use of remote sensing to advance the understanding of large aquifers is beneficial to sustainable groundwater management, especially in a trans-boundary system, where consistent information exchange can occur within hydrologic boundaries instead of political boundaries.

  4. A tactile vision substitution system for the study of active sensing.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Brian; Hsieh, Cheng-Han; Yu, Sung-Nien; Ahissar, Ehud; Arieli, Amos; Zilbershtain-Kra, Yael

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents a tactile vision substitution system (TVSS) for the study of active sensing. Two algorithms, namely image processing and trajectory tracking, were developed to enhance the capability of conventional TVSS. Image processing techniques were applied to reduce the artifacts and extract important features from the active camera and effectively converted the information into tactile stimuli with much lower resolution. A fixed camera was used to record the movement of the active camera. A trajectory tracking algorithm was developed to analyze the active sensing strategy of the TVSS users to explore the environment. The image processing subsystem showed advantageous improvement in extracting object's features for superior recognition. The trajectory tracking subsystem, on the other hand, enabled accurately locating the portion of the scene pointed by the active camera and providing profound information for the study of active sensing strategy applied by TVSS users.

  5. TU-CD-304-09: Feasibility Study for Thermoplastic Mask Set Up Monitoring Using Force Sensing Resistor (FSR) Sensor

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, T; Cho, M; Kang, S; Kim, D; Kim, K; Shin, D; Suh, T; Kim, S

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To improve the setup accuracy of thermoplastic mask, we developed a new monitoring method based on force sensing technology and evaluated its feasibility. Methods: The thermoplastic mask setup monitoring system consists of a force sensing resistor sensor unit, a signal transport device, a control PC and an in-house software. The system is designed to monitor pressure variation between the mask and patient in real time. It also provides a warning to the user when there is a possibility of movement. A preliminary study was performed to evaluate the reliability of the sensor unit and developed monitoring system with a head phantom. Then, a simulation study with volunteers was conducted to evaluate the feasibility of the monitoring system. Note that the sensor unit can have multiple end-sensors and every end-sensor was confirmed to be within 2% reliability in pressure reading through a screening test. Results: To evaluate the reproducibility of the proposed monitoring system in practice, we simulated a mask setup with the head phantom. FRS sensors were attached on the face of the head phantom and pressure was monitored. For 3 repeated mask setups on the phantom, the variation of the pressure was less than 3% (only 1% larger than 2% potential uncertainty confirmed in the screening test). In the volunteer study, we intended to verify that the system could detect patient movements within the mask. Thus, volunteers were asked to turn their head or lift their chin. The system was able to detect movements effectively, confirming the clinical feasibility of the monitoring system developed. Conclusion: Through the proposed setup monitoring method, it is possible to monitor patient motion inside a mask in real time, which has never been possible with most commonly used systems using non-radiographic technology such as infrared camera system and surface imaging system. This work was supported by the Radiation Technology R&D program (No. 2013M2A2A7043498) and the Mid

  6. Epistatic study reveals two genetic interactions in blood pressure regulation

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Although numerous candidate gene and genome-wide association studies have been performed on blood pressure, a small number of regulating genetic variants having a limited effect have been identified. This phenomenon can partially be explained by possible gene-gene/epistasis interactions that were little investigated so far. Methods We performed a pre-planned two-phase investigation: in phase 1, one hundred single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in 65 candidate genes were genotyped in 1,912 French unrelated adults in order to study their two-locus combined effects on blood pressure (BP) levels. In phase 2, the significant epistatic interactions observed in phase 1 were tested in an independent population gathering 1,755 unrelated European adults. Results Among the 9 genetic variants significantly associated with systolic and diastolic BP in phase 1, some may act through altering the corresponding protein levels: SNPs rs5742910 (Padjusted≤0.03) and rs6046 (Padjusted =0.044) in F7 and rs1800469 (Padjusted ≤0.036) in TGFB1; whereas some may be functional through altering the corresponding protein structure: rs1800590 (Padjusted =0.028, SE=0.088) in LPL and rs2228570 (Padjusted ≤9.48×10-4) in VDR. The two epistatic interactions found for systolic and diastolic BP in the discovery phase: VCAM1 (rs1041163) * APOB (rs1367117), and SCGB1A1 (rs3741240) * LPL (rs1800590), were tested in the replication population and we observed significant interactions on DBP. In silico analyses yielded putative functional properties of the SNPs involved in these epistatic interactions trough the alteration of corresponding protein structures. Conclusions These findings support the hypothesis that different pathways and then different genes may act synergistically in order to modify BP. This could highlight novel pathophysiologic mechanisms underlying hypertension. PMID:23298194

  7. Study of pressing machine pressure relief characteristics based on AMESim

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chuanli; Zhang, Hui; Yu, Caofeng; Wu, Xiaolei

    2016-01-01

    When a working cylinder of the pressing machine working cylinder was stuck and underwent retracted conversion, pressure shock was high in working cylinder cavity and flow pulsation was distinct in the pipeline due to the high working pressure and frequent retracted transformation of the working cylinder, which not only shortened the service life of the pressing machine, but also exerted serious impacts on the machining precision and quality, especially after the pressing machine applied loads and high-pressure oil in work rod end cavity of working cylinder needed to be relieved in a short time. In order to research and analyze the better pressure relief characteristics of the two types of pressure relief circuits of the pressing machine, the paper established models, carried out simulation and analysis and then made contrastive analysis of the working cylinder rod velocity, rod acceleration and port pressure pulsation according to the simulation results.

  8. In situ studies of microbial inactivation during high pressure processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maldonado, Jose Antonio; Schaffner, Donald W.; Cuitiño, Alberto M.; Karwe, Mukund V.

    2016-01-01

    High pressure processing (HPP) has been shown to reduce microbial concentration in foods. The mechanisms of microbial inactivation by HPP have been associated with damage to cell membranes. The real-time response of bacteria to HPP was measured to elucidate the mechanisms of inactivation, which can aid in designing more effective processes. Different pressure cycling conditions were used to expose Enterobacter aerogenes cells to HPP. Propidium iodide (PI) was used as a probe, which fluoresces after penetrating cells with damaged membranes and binding with nucleic acids. A HPP vessel with sapphire windows was used for measuring fluorescence in situ. Membrane damage was detected during pressurization and hold time, but not during depressurization. The drop in fluorescence was larger than expected after pressure cycles at higher pressure and longer times. This indicated possible reversible disassociation of ribosomes resulting in additional binding of PI to exposed RNA under pressure and its release after depressurization.

  9. Application of remote sensing technology in the study of vegetation: Example of vegetation of zhejiang province in China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    CHU, MengRu

    2015-04-01

    Application of remote sensing technology in the study of vegetation: Example of vegetation of zhejiang province in China Remote sensing technology , is one of the pillars of the space information technology in the 21st century ,play an important role in the study of vegetation. Vegetation coverage as an important parameter reflecting surface information, has been an important research topic in the field of vegetation remote sensing. Administrative region in zhejiang Province as the study area, use of microwave remote sensing and hyperspectral remote sensing technology, combined with the related data, to survey the area of forest resources in zhejiang Province, establishes an index system of sustainable forest resources management ability in zhejiang, and to evaluate its ability. Remote Sensing is developed in the 1960 s of the earth observation technology, comprehensive instruments refers to the application, not contact with the object detection phase, the target characteristics of electromagnetic waves recorded from a distance, through the analysis, reveals the characteristics of the object properties and changes of comprehensive detection technology. Investigation of vegetation is an important application field of remote sensing investigation. Vegetation is an important factor of environment, and also is one of the best sign to reflect the regional ecological environment, at the same times is the interpretation of soil, hydrological elements such as logo, individual or prospecting indicator plant. Vegetation imaging and interpretation of research results for environmental monitoring, biodiversity conservation, agriculture, forestry and other relevant departments to provide information services.Microwave remote sensing hyperspectral remote sensing technology and application in the research of vegetation is an important direction of remote sensing technology in the future. This paper introduces the principle of microwave remote sensing and hyperspectral remote

  10. CONDENSED MATTER: ELECTRONIC STRUCTURE, ELECTRICAL, MAGNETIC, AND OPTICAL PROPERTIES: Influence of Oxygen Pressure on Structural and Sensing Properties of β-Ga2O3 Nanomaterial by Thermal Evaporation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Hai-Lin; Fan, Duo-Wang

    2009-11-01

    We prepare the gallium oxide (β-Ga2O3) nanomaterials from gallium and oxygen by thermal evaporation in the argon atmosphere and research their oxygen sensing under UV illumination with different oxygen pressures. X-ray diffraction reveals that the synthesized product is monoclinic gallium oxide, it is further confirmed by electron diffraction of transmission electron microscope, and its morphology through the observation using scanning electron microscope reveals that β-Ga2O3 nanobelts with a breadth less than 100 nm and length of several micrometers are synthesized under low oxygen pressure, while the nano/microbelts are synthesized under high oxygen pressure. Room-temperature oxygen sensing is tested under at 254 nm illumination and it is found that the current decreases quickly first and then slowly with oxygen pressure from low to high.

  11. Exploring Your Sense of Smell. Science Study Aid No. 10.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boeschen, John; And Others

    This Science Study Aid (SSA), structured for grade levels 7-9, is based on work of the U.S. Department of Agriculture's Agricultural Research Service (ARS) conducted at the Western Regional Research Center in Berkeley, California. It is concerned with food aroma, its intensity and character, and olfactory threshold determinations. The SSA provides…

  12. Making Sense of Bali: Unintended Outcomes of Study Abroad Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hill, Bob; Thomas, Noel

    2005-01-01

    Study abroad programmes for teacher education students are increasingly being evaluated to determine their effectiveness in achieving intended outcomes. There is a danger, however, that such evaluations will ignore valuable but unintended and serendipitous outcomes of such programmes. This paper investigates an example of such an outcome, the…

  13. In vivo evaluation of a novel, wrist-mounted arterial pressure sensing device versus the traditional hand-held tonometer.

    PubMed

    Vardoulis, Orestis; Saponas, T Scott; Morris, Dan; Villar, Nicolas; Smith, Greg; Patel, Shwetak; Tan, Desney

    2016-10-01

    Although hemodynamic parameters can be assessed non-invasively, state-of-the-art non-invasive systems generally require an expert operator and are not applicable for ambulatory measurements. These limitations have restricted our understanding of the continuous behavior of hemodynamic parameters. In this manuscript, we introduce a novel wrist-mounted device that incorporates an array of pressure sensors which can be used to extract arterial waveforms and relevant pulse wave analysis biomarkers. In vivo evaluation is performed with Bland-Altman analysis to compare the novel sensor to a gold-standard hand-held tonometer by assessing their reproducibility and agreement in peripheral augmentation index (AIx) estimation at the radial artery. Arterial waves from 28 randomly selected participants were recorded in a controlled environment. Initially we assess the reproducibility of AIx results for both devices. The intra-class correlation coefficient (ICC) and mean difference ± SD were [0.913, 0.033±0.048] and [0.859, 0.039±0.076] for the hand-held and the wrist-mounted tonometer respectively. We then show that the AIx values derived from the novel tonometer have good agreement, accuracy, and precision when compared against the AIx values derived from the reference hand-held tonometer (ICC 0.927, mean difference 0.026±0.049). In conclusion, we have presented evidence that the new wrist-mounted arterial pressure sensor records arterial waveforms that can be processed to yield AIx values that are in good agreement with its traditional hand-held counterpart.

  14. Utilization of remote sensing in Alaska permafrost studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, D. K.

    1981-01-01

    Permafrost related features such as: aufeis, tundra, thaw lakes and subsurface ice features were studied. LANDSAT imagery was used to measure the extent and distribution of aufeis in Arctic Slope rivers over a period of 7 years. Interannual extent of large aufeis fields was found to vary significantly. Digital LANDSAT data were used to study the short term effects of a tundra fire which burned a 48 sq km area in northwestern Alaska. Vegetation regrowth was inferred from Landsat spectral reflectance increases and compared to in-situ measurements. Aircraft SAR (Synethic Aperture Radar) imagery was used in conjunction with LANDSAT imagery used in conjunction with LANDSAT imagery to qualitatively determine depth categories for thaw lakes in northern Alaska.

  15. Brain Networks Responsible for Sense of Agency: An EEG Study

    PubMed Central

    Shim, Miseon; Nahab, Fatta B.; Park, Jihye; Kim, Do-Won; Kakareka, John; Miletta, Nathanial; Hallett, Mark

    2015-01-01

    Background Self-agency (SA) is a person’s feeling that his action was generated by himself. The neural substrates of SA have been investigated in many neuroimaging studies, but the functional connectivity of identified regions has rarely been investigated. The goal of this study is to investigate the neural network related to SA. Methods SA of hand movements was modulated with virtual reality. We examined the cortical network relating to SA modulation with electroencephalography (EEG) power spectrum and phase coherence of alpha, beta, and gamma frequency bands in 16 right-handed, healthy volunteers. Results In the alpha band, significant relative power changes and phase coherence of alpha band were associated with SA modulation. The relative power decrease over the central, bilateral parietal, and right temporal regions (C4, Pz, P3, P4, T6) became larger as participants more effectively controlled the virtual hand movements. The phase coherence of the alpha band within frontal areas (F7-FP2, F7-Fz) was directly related to changes in SA. The functional connectivity was lower as the participants felt that they could control their virtual hand. In the other frequency bands, significant phase coherences were observed in the frontal (or central) to parietal, temporal, and occipital regions during SA modulation (Fz-O1, F3-O1, Cz-O1, C3-T4L in beta band; FP1-T6, FP1-O2, F7-T4L, F8-Cz in gamma band). Conclusions Our study suggests that alpha band activity may be the main neural oscillation of SA, which suggests that the neural network within the anterior frontal area may be important in the generation of SA. PMID:26270552

  16. Remote sensing and GIS integration for land cover analysis, a case study: Bozcaada Island.

    PubMed

    Bektas, F; Goksel, C

    2005-01-01

    In this study, remote sensing and geographic information system (GIS) techniques were used in order to accomplish land cover change of Bozcaada Island, Turkey, by using multitemporal Landsat Thematic Mapper data. Digital image processing techniques were conducted for the processes of image enhancement, manipulation, registration and classification for land cover change analysis. The land cover changes between two different dates were visualized and analyzed by using Geographic Information System techniques. The results showed that remotely sensed data and GIS are effective and powerful tools for carrying out changes on land cover of the island and monitoring of its impact on the environment.

  17. Ultrathin gas permeable oxide membranes for chemical sensing: Nanoporous Ta2O5 test study

    DOE PAGES

    Imbault, Alexander; Wang, Yue; Kruse, Peter; ...

    2015-09-25

    Conductometric gas sensors made of gas permeable metal oxide ultrathin membranes can combine the functions of a selective filter, preconcentrator, and sensing element and thus can be particularly promising for the active sampling of diluted analytes. Here we report a case study of the electron transport and gas sensing properties of such a membrane made of nanoporous Ta2O5. These membranes demonstrated a noticeable chemical sensitivity toward ammonia, ethanol, and acetone at high temperatures above 400 °C. Furthermore, different from traditional thin films, such gas permeable, ultrathin gas sensing elements can be made suspended enabling advanced architectures of ultrasensitive analytical systemsmore » operating at high temperatures and in harsh environments.« less

  18. Application of remote sensing to monitoring and studying dispersion in ocean dumping

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, R. W.; Ohlhorst, C. W.

    1981-01-01

    Remotely sensed wide area synoptic data provides information on ocean dumping that is not readily available by other means. A qualitative approach has been used to map features, such as river plumes. Results of quantitative analyses have been used to develop maps showing quantitative distributions of one or more water quality parameters, such as suspended solids or chlorophyll a. Joint NASA/NOAA experiments have been conducted at designated dump areas in the U.S. coastal zones to determine the applicability of aircraft remote sensing systems to map plumes resulting from ocean dumping of sewage sludge and industrial wastes. A second objective is related to the evaluation of previously developed quantitative analysis techniques for studying dispersion of materials in these plumes. It was found that plumes resulting from dumping of four waste materials have distinctive spectral characteristics. The development of a technology for use in a routine monitoring system, based on remote sensing techniques, is discussed.

  19. A feasibility study of using remotely sensed data for water resource models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruff, J. F.

    1973-01-01

    Remotely sensed data were collected to demonstrate the feasibility of applying the results to water resource problems. Photographs of the Wolf Creek watershed in southwestern Colorado were collected over a one year period. Cloud top temperatures were measured using a radiometer. Thermal imagery of the Wolf Creek Pass area was obtained during one pre-dawn flight. Remote sensing studies of water resource problems for user agencies were also conducted. The results indicated that: (1) remote sensing techniques could be used to assist in the solution of water resource problems; (2) photogrammetric determination of snow depths is feasible; (3) changes in turbidity or suspended material concentration can be observed; and (4) surface turbulence can be related to bed scour; and (5) thermal effluents into rivers can be monitored.

  20. Experimental study on strain sensing by small-diameter FBG

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Rong-mei; Li, Qiufeng; Zhu, Lujia; Liang, Dakai

    2016-11-01

    Fiber Bragg grating (FBG) sensors were attractive in various fields for structural health monitoring. Because of their accurate performance and real time response, embedded FBG sensors are promising for strain monitoring in composite materials. As an optical fiber sensor was embedded inside a composite, interface would form around the embedded optical fiber and the host polymer composite. In order to study the influence of the embedded optical fiber to the mechanical character, finite elemental analysis was applied to study the stress distribution inside the composite. Keeping the resin rich area the same size, laminates with optical fibers in different diameters, which were 250 and 125 micrometers, were analyzed. The simulation results represent that stress singularity would occur around the embedded optical fiber. The singularity value for the laminate with optical fiber at 250 micrometer was higher than that with optical fiber at 125 micrometer. Micro- cracks would arise at the stress singularity point. Therefore, the optical fiber in smaller diameter was preferred since the mechanical strength could be higher. Four points bending test was carried out on a steel beam with a small-diameter FBG on the bottom surface. Besides, a strain gauge was stuck on bottom to validate the monitoring results by FBG sensor. The tested results indicated that the strain monitoring results by the small-diameter FBG sensor almost identical with the theoretical ones and what recorded by strain gauge. The maximum testing error for the designed FBG is less than 2% compared with the theoretical one.

  1. Pressure sensor

    DOEpatents

    Mee, David K.; Ripley, Edward B.; Nienstedt, Zachary C.; Nienstedt, Alex W.; Howell, Jr., Layton N.

    2015-09-29

    Disclosed is a passive, in-situ pressure sensor. The sensor includes a sensing element having a ferromagnetic metal and a tension inducing mechanism coupled to the ferromagnetic metal. The tension inducing mechanism is operable to change a tensile stress upon the ferromagnetic metal based on a change in pressure in the sensing element. Changes in pressure are detected based on changes in the magnetic switching characteristics of the ferromagnetic metal when subjected to an alternating magnetic field caused by the change in the tensile stress. The sensing element is embeddable in a closed system for detecting pressure changes without the need for any penetrations of the system for power or data acquisition by detecting changes in the magnetic switching characteristics of the ferromagnetic metal caused by the tensile stress.

  2. High-Pressure Oxygen Generation for Outpost EVA Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jeng, Frank F.; Conger, Bruce; Ewert, Michael K.; Anderson, Molly S.

    2009-01-01

    The amount of oxygen consumption for crew extravehicular activity (EVA) in future lunar exploration missions will be significant. Eight technologies to provide high pressure EVA O2 were investigated. They are: high pressure O2 storage, liquid oxygen (LOX) storage followed by vaporization, scavenging LOX from Lander followed by vaporization, LOX delivery followed by sorption compression, water electrolysis followed by compression, stand-alone high pressure water electrolyzer, Environmental Control and Life Support System (ECLSS) and Power Elements sharing a high pressure water electrolyzer, and ECLSS and In-Situ Resource Utilization (ISRU) Elements sharing a high pressure electrolyzer. A trade analysis was conducted comparing launch mass and equivalent system mass (ESM) of the eight technologies in open and closed ECLSS architectures. Technologies considered appropriate for the two architectures were selected and suggested for development.

  3. High pressure laser plasma studies. [energy pathways in He-Ar gas mixtures at low pressure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wells, W. E.

    1980-01-01

    The operation of a nuclear pumped laser, operating at a wavelength of 1.79 micron m on the 3d(1/2-4p(3/2) transition in argon with helium-3 as the majority gas is discussed. The energy pathways in He-Ar gas were investigated by observing the effects of varying partial pressures on the emissions of levels lying above the 4p level in argon during a pulsed afterglow. An attempt is made to determine the population mechanisms of the 3d level in pure argon by observing emission from the same transition in a high pressure plasma excited by a high energy electron beam. Both collisional radiative and dissociative recombination are discussed.

  4. Land Cover Change and Remote Sensing in the Classroom: An Exercise to Study Urban Growth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Delahunty, Tina; Lewis-Gonzales, Sarah; Phelps, Jack; Sawicki, Ben; Roberts, Charles; Carpenter, Penny

    2012-01-01

    The processes and implications of urban growth are studied in a variety of disciplines as urban growth affects both the physical and human landscape. Remote sensing methods provide ways to visualize and mathematically represent urban growth; and resultant land cover change data enable both quantitative and qualitative analysis. This article helps…

  5. A study of suspended solids in the Requena Dam by remote sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Azuara, P. R.; Hidalgo, L. L.

    1977-01-01

    Remote sensing was applied to a preliminary study of suspended solids in the Requena Dam. Aerial and terrestrial photographs were analyzed by photointerpretation and microdensitometry. Field measurements and sampling were also made. A relationship between ground data for the concentration of suspended solids and the transmissibility of the aerial infrared film was suggested.

  6. An Exploratory Study of a Number Sense Program to Develop Kindergarten Students' Number Proficiency

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sood, Sheetal; Jitendra, Asha K.

    2013-01-01

    This study examined the effectiveness of a number sense program on kindergarten students' number proficiency and responsiveness to treatment as a function of students' risk for mathematics difficulties. The program targeted development of relationships among numbers (e.g., spatial, more and less). A total of 101 kindergarten students (not at risk:…

  7. Turkish Version of the Principals' Sense of Efficacy Scale: Validity and Reliability Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Isik, Ayse Negis; Derinbay, Deniz

    2015-01-01

    Problem Statement: Principals are known as important actors in effective schools. So it is important to know which variables influence principals' success. One of these predictors can be self-efficacy. However, there is very few research about principals' sense of efficacy. Purpose of the Study: The purpose of this research was to test the…

  8. Sense of Coherence, Hope and Values among Adolescents under Missile Attacks: A Longitudinal Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Braun-Lewensohn, Orna; Sagy, Shifra

    2010-01-01

    This study aimed to explore measures of spirituality--sense of coherence (SOC), hope and values--among adolescents living in a violent political area and experiencing missile attacks. The three variables represent attributes of spirituality, such as searching for meaning and purpose in life, hope and feelings about the future, as well as values…

  9. The National Research Council study: "Making sense of ballistic missile defense"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilkening, Dean A.

    2014-05-01

    This chapter explains and summarizes the main findings of a recent National Research Council study entitled Making Sense of Ballistic Missile Defense: An Assessment of Concepts and Systems for U.S. Boost-Phase Missile Defense in Comparison to Other Alternatives.

  10. Making Sense of 'Big Data' in Provenance Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vermeesch, P.

    2014-12-01

    Huge online databases can be 'mined' to reveal previously hidden trends and relationships in society. One could argue that sedimentary geology has entered a similar era of 'Big Data', as modern provenance studies routinely apply multiple proxies to dozens of samples. Just like the Internet, sedimentary geology now requires specialised statistical tools to interpret such large datasets. These can be organised on three levels of progressively higher order:A single sample: The most effective way to reveal the provenance information contained in a representative sample of detrital zircon U-Pb ages are probability density estimators such as histograms and kernel density estimates. The widely popular 'probability density plots' implemented in IsoPlot and AgeDisplay compound analytical uncertainty with geological scatter and are therefore invalid.Several samples: Multi-panel diagrams comprising many detrital age distributions or compositional pie charts quickly become unwieldy and uninterpretable. For example, if there are N samples in a study, then the number of pairwise comparisons between samples increases quadratically as N(N-1)/2. This is simply too much information for the human eye to process. To solve this problem, it is necessary to (a) express the 'distance' between two samples as a simple scalar and (b) combine all N(N-1)/2 such values in a single two-dimensional 'map', grouping similar and pulling apart dissimilar samples. This can be easily achieved using simple statistics-based dissimilarity measures and a standard statistical method called Multidimensional Scaling (MDS).Several methods: Suppose that we use four provenance proxies: bulk petrography, chemistry, heavy minerals and detrital geochronology. This will result in four MDS maps, each of which likely show slightly different trends and patterns. To deal with such cases, it may be useful to use a related technique called 'three way multidimensional scaling'. This results in two graphical outputs: an MDS

  11. Does pressure antagonize anesthesia? High-pressure stopped-flow study of firefly luciferase and anatomy of initial flash.

    PubMed Central

    Ueda, I; Minami, H; Matsuki, H; Inoue, T

    1999-01-01

    The antagonizing effect of high pressure against anesthesia is well known. With purified firefly luciferase, however,. Biophys. J. 60:1309-1314) reported that high pressure did not affect the initial flash intensity. Firefly luciferase emits a burst of light when the substrates luciferin and ATP are added in the presence of O2. The light intensity decays rapidly and the weak light lasts for hours. The initial flash is a transient event and is not in a steady state. The steady state is represented by the slope of the linear part of the integral of the light output. The present study used a high-pressure stopped-flow system to compare the pressure effects on the initial flash intensity and the steady-state light intensity. The flash intensity did not change by the application of hydrostatic pressure in the presence or absence of chloroform or 1-octanol. In contrast, high pressure increased the steady-state light intensity. The application of 12 MPa pressure increased the steady-state light intensity of firefly luciferase inhibited by 5 mM chloroform or 0.7 mM 1-octanol by 19.7% and 18.8%, respectively. When analyzed by the rapid reaction kinetics of the transition state theory, the initial peak intensity represents the total amount of active enzyme and is unrelated to the reaction rate. Anesthetics inhibited the initial flash by unfolding the protein, thereby decreasing the concentration of the active enzyme. Pressure affected the steady-state light intensity by changing the reaction rates. PMID:9876160

  12. Spatial and spectral resolution necessary for remotely sensed vegetation studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rock, B. N.

    1982-01-01

    An outline is presented of the required spatial and spectral resolution needed for accurate vegetation discrimination and mapping studies as well as for determination of state of health (i.e., detection of stress symptoms) of actively growing vegetation. Good success was achieved in vegetation discrimination and mapping of a heterogeneous forest cover in the ridge and valley portion of the Appalachians using multispectral data acquired with a spatial resolution of 15 m (IFOV). A sensor system delivering 10 to 15 m spatial resolution is needed for both vegetation mapping and detection of stress symptoms. Based on the vegetation discrimination and mapping exercises conducted at the Lost River site, accurate products (vegetation maps) are produced using broad-band spectral data ranging from the .500 to 2.500 micron portion of the spectrum. In order of decreasing utility for vegetation discrimination, the four most valuable TM simulator VNIR bands are: 6 (1.55 to 1.75 microns), 3 (0.63 to 0.69 microns), 5 (1.00 to 1.30 microns) and 4 (0.76 to 0.90 microns).

  13. Remote sensing and geologic studies of the orientale basin region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hawke, B. Ray; Lucey, P. G.; Taylor, G. J.; Bell, Jeffrey F.; Peterson, C. A.; Blewett, D.; Horton, K.; Spudis, P. D.

    1991-06-01

    Both visual and near-infrared spectral observations are combined with multispectral imaging to study the Orientale interior and exterior, the Cruger region, Grimaldi Region, the Schiller-Schickard Region, and the Humorum Region of the Moon. It was concluded that anorthosites occur in the Inner Rook Mountains of Orientale, the inner ring of Grimaldi, and the main ring of Humorum. Imaging spectroscopy shows that the entire eastern Inner Rook Mountains are composed of anorthosites. Orientale ejecta are strikingly like the surface materials in the region where Apollo 16 landed. This similarity indicates similar mineralogy, i.e., noritic anorthosite. Thus, Orientile ejecta is more mafic than the Inner Rook Mountains. This situation is also true for the Nectaris, Humorum, and Gramaldi basins. Isolated areas of the Orientale region show the presence of gabbroic rocks, but, in general, Orientale ejecta are noritic anorthosites, which contain much more low-Ca pyroxene than high-Ca pyroxene. Ancient (pre-Orientale) mare volcanism apparently occurred in several areas of the western limb.

  14. Remote sensing and geologic studies of the orientale basin region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hawke, B. Ray; Lucey, P. G.; Taylor, G. J.; Bell, Jeffrey F.; Peterson, C. A.; Blewett, D.; Horton, K.; Spudis, P. D.

    1991-01-01

    Both visual and near-infrared spectral observations are combined with multispectral imaging to study the Orientale interior and exterior, the Cruger region, Grimaldi Region, the Schiller-Schickard Region, and the Humorum Region of the Moon. It was concluded that anorthosites occur in the Inner Rook Mountains of Orientale, the inner ring of Grimaldi, and the main ring of Humorum. Imaging spectroscopy shows that the entire eastern Inner Rook Mountains are composed of anorthosites. Orientale ejecta are strikingly like the surface materials in the region where Apollo 16 landed. This similarity indicates similar mineralogy, i.e., noritic anorthosite. Thus, Orientile ejecta is more mafic than the Inner Rook Mountains. This situation is also true for the Nectaris, Humorum, and Gramaldi basins. Isolated areas of the Orientale region show the presence of gabbroic rocks, but, in general, Orientale ejecta are noritic anorthosites, which contain much more low-Ca pyroxene than high-Ca pyroxene. Ancient (pre-Orientale) mare volcanism apparently occurred in several areas of the western limb.

  15. Remote sensing applied to land-use studies in Wyoming

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Breckenridge, R. M.; Marrs, R. W.; Murphy, D. J.

    1973-01-01

    Impending development of Wyoming's vast fuel resources requires a quick and efficient method of land use inventory and evaluation. Preliminary evaluations of ERTS-1 imagery have shown that physiographic and land use inventory maps can be compiled by using a combination of visual and automated interpretation techniques. Test studies in the Powder River Basin showed that ERTS image interpretations can provide much of the needed physiographic and land use information. Water impoundments as small as one acre were detected and water bodies larger than five acres could be mapped and their acreage estimated. Flood plains and irrigated lands were successfully mapped, and some individual crops were identified and mapped. Coniferous and deciduous trees were mapped separately using color additive analysis on the ERTS multispectral imagery. Gross soil distinctions were made with the ERTS imagery, and were found to be closely related to the bedrock geology. Several broad unstable areas were identified. These were related to specific geologic and slope conditions and generally extended through large regions. Some new oil fields and all large open-cut coal mines were mapped. The most difficult task accomplished was that of mapping urban areas. Work in the urban areas provides a striking example of snow enhancement and the detail available from a snow enhanced image.

  16. Active Remote Sensing of Ocean Parameters, AN Engineering Study.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Byrne, James Dennis

    A study is made of a proposed method to measure the sound velocity, turbidity, and calculate the temperature as a function of depth in the ocean. A laser is used to generate a beam of light which is scattered by the sea. Brillouin scattering causes shifts of the wavelength of the incident laser light by an amount proportional to the sound velocity in the sea. Several instrumental designs for measuring this shift are considered. Fabry-Perot interferometers were chosen for use in prototype instruments. Initial laboratory experiments are described. A field experiment with a single Fabry-Perot used photographically and photoelectrically is described. This field experiment achieved what we believe to be the first measurement of the Brillouin effect in seawater under field conditions. A new double Fabry-Perot instrument was designed which could be adapted to a lidar system. If a value for the salinity is assumed, the instrument can be used to determine temperature. The performance of this system as a temperature transducer was tested in the laboratory. Using ten second observations temperature was measured with an rms estimate of error of 0.4(DEGREES)C in fresh water. Sound velocity measurement accuracy is estimated at better than 0.1% m/sec over the range of temperatures which were measured. Using modern interferometers and a more powerful laser this result could be greatly improved. Recommendations and cost estimates for a future instrument are included. Auxiliary methods which could allow the unambiguous computation of temperature and salinity from sound velocity data are discussed in Appendix one.

  17. Resonant micro and nanoelectromechanical systems: Actuation and biological sensing studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ilic, Bojan

    spherical latex particles. Finally, this thesis describes studies of dynamic detection of vibrational characteristics of suspended NEMS oscillators through direct coupling with a micromechanical probe. Changes in the dynamic amplitude and phase of the probe allow the measurement of the mechanical quality factor. Measured spectral response of the NEMS is in good agreement with optical characterization and modelling results.

  18. Ultrasonic nebulization atmospheric pressure glow discharge - Preliminary study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greda, Krzysztof; Jamroz, Piotr; Pohl, Pawel

    2016-07-01

    Atmospheric pressure glow microdischarge (μAPGD) generated between a small-sized He nozzle jet anode and a flowing liquid cathode was coupled with ultrasonic nebulization (USN) for analytical optical emission spectrometry (OES). The spatial distributions of the emitted spectra from the novel coupled USN-μAPGD system and the conventional μAPGD system were compared. In the μAPGD, the maxima of the intensity distribution profiles of the atomic emission lines Ca, Cd, In, K, Li, Mg, Mn, Na and Sr were observed in the near cathode region, whereas, in the case of the USN-μAPGD, they were shifted towards the anode. In the novel system, the intensities of the analytical lines of the studied metals were boosted from several to 35 times. As compared to the conventional μAPGD-OES with the introduction of analytes through the sputtering and/or the electrospray-like nebulization of the flowing liquid cathode solution, the proposed method with the USN introduction of analytes in the form of a dry aerosol provides improved detectability of the studied metals. The detection limits of metals achieved with the USN-μAPGD-OES method were in the range from 0.08 μg L- 1 for Li to 52 μg L- 1 for Mn.

  19. Analysis of urinary metabolites for metabolomic study by pressurized CEC.

    PubMed

    Xie, Guoxiang; Su, Mingming; Li, Peng; Gu, Xue; Yan, Chao; Qiu, Yunping; Li, Houkai; Jia, Wei

    2007-12-01

    A new approach for the metabolomic study of urinary samples using pressurized CEC (pCEC) with gradient elution is proposed as an alternative chromatographic separation tool with higher degree of resolution, selectivity, sensitivity, and efficiency. The pCEC separation of urinary samples was performed on a RP column packed with C(18), 5 microm particles with an ACN/water mobile phase containing TFA. The effects of the acid modifiers, applied voltage, mobile phase, and detection wavelength were systematically evaluated using eight spiked standards, as well as urine samples. A typical analytical trial of urine samples from Sprague Dawley (S.D.) rats exposed to high-energy diet was carried out following sample pretreatment. Significant differences in urinary metabolic profiles were observed between the high energy diet-induced obesity rats and the healthy control rats at the 6th wk postdose. Multivariate statistical analysis revealed the differential metabolites in response to the diet, which were partially validated with the putative standards. This work suggests that such a pCEC-based separation and analysis method may provide a new and cost-effective platform for metabolomic study uniquely positioned between the conventional chromatographic tools such as HPLC, and hyphenated analytical techniques such as LC-MS.

  20. High-pressure study of tetramethylsilane by Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Zhen-Xing; Zhang, Jian-Bo; Troyan, Ivan; Palasyuk, Taras; Eremets, Mikhail; Chen, Xiao-Jia

    2012-01-01

    High-pressure behavior of tetramethylsilane, one of the Group IVa hydrides, was investigated by Raman scattering measurements at pressures up to 142 GPa and room temperature. Our results revealed the phase transitions at 0.6, 9, and 16 GPa from both the mode frequency shifts with pressure and the changes of the full width half maxima of these modes. These transitions were suggested to result from the changes in the inter- and intra-molecular bonding of this material. We also observed two other possible phase transitions at 49-69 GPa and 96 GPa. No indication of metallization in tetramethylsilane was found with stepwise compression to 142 GPa.

  1. High-pressure study of tetramethylsilane by Raman spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Qin, Zhen-Xing; Zhang, Jian-Bo; Troyan, Ivan; Palasyuk, Taras; Eremets, Mikhail; Chen, Xiao-Jia

    2012-01-14

    High-pressure behavior of tetramethylsilane, one of the Group IVa hydrides, was investigated by Raman scattering measurements at pressures up to 142 GPa and room temperature. Our results revealed the phase transitions at 0.6, 9, and 16 GPa from both the mode frequency shifts with pressure and the changes of the full width half maxima of these modes. These transitions were suggested to result from the changes in the inter- and intra-molecular bonding of this material. We also observed two other possible phase transitions at 49-69 GPa and 96 GPa. No indication of metallization in tetramethylsilane was found with stepwise compression to 142 GPa.

  2. A study of solar radiation pressure acting on GPS satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Froideval, Laurent Olivier

    An increasing number of GPS applications require a high level of accuracy. To reduce the error contributed by the GPS ephemerides, an accurate modeling of the forces acting on GPS satellites is necessary. These forces can be categorized into gravitational and non-gravitational forces. The non-gravitational forces are a significant contribution to the total force on a GPS satellite but they are still not fully understood whereas the gravitational forces are well modeled. This study focuses on two non-gravitational forces: Solar Radiation Pressure (SRP) and the y-bias force. Different SRP models are available in the University of Texas Multi-Satellite Orbit Determination Program (MSODP). The recently developed University College London model was implemented for the purpose of this study. Several techniques to compute parameters associated with SRP models and the y-bias force during an orbit prediction were examined. Using the International GNSS Service (IGS) precise ephemerides as a reference, five different models were compared in the study. Satellite Laser Ranging (SLR) residuals were also studied to validate the approach. Results showed that the analytical UCL model performed as well as a purely empirical model such as the Extended CODE model. This is important since analytical models attempt to represent the physical phenomena and thus might be better suited to separate SRP from other forces. The y-bias force was then shown to have a once per revolution effect. The time evolution of the y-bias was found to be dependent on the SRP model used, the satellite Block type, the orbital plane, and the attitude of the satellite which suggests that estimates of y-bias contain errors from other sources, particularly the SRP models. The dependency of the y-bias evolution on the orbital plane suggests that the orientation of the plane towards the Sun is important.

  3. High-Pressure Microscopy for Studying Molecular Motors.

    PubMed

    Nishiyama, Masayoshi

    2015-01-01

    Movement is a fundamental characteristic of all living things. This biogenic function is carried out by various nanometer-sized molecular machines. Molecular motor is a typical molecular machinery in which the characteristic features of proteins are integrated; these include enzymatic activity, energy conversion, molecular recognition and self-assembly. These biologically important reactions occur with the association of water molecules that surround the motors. Applied pressures can alter the intermolecular interactions between the motors and water. In this chapter we describe the development of a high-pressure microscope and a new motility assay that enables the visualization of the motility of molecular motors under conditions of high-pressure. Our results demonstrate that applied pressure dynamically changes the motility of molecular motors such as kinesin, F1-ATPase and bacterial flagellar motors.

  4. CSF hydrodynamic studies in man. 1. Method of constant pressure CSF infusion.

    PubMed Central

    Ekstedt, J

    1977-01-01

    The constant pressure method for the study of the hydrodynamics of CSF is presented. By infusing artificial CSF at constant pressures and recording the resultant flow, it is possible to obtain information about the hydrodynamic conductance of the CSF outflow pathways. By lowering the infusion pressure below the pressure of the sagittal sinus all CSF produced can be collected and the CSF formation rate may thus be calculated. There is a rectilinear relationship between CSF pressure and the flow necessary to maintain the pressure. It is thus concluded that the arachnoidal villi, when once opened, are not further distended by pressure. This method makes possible indirect calculation of the pressure of the sagittal sinus and the pressure difference between the subarachnoid space and the sagittal sinus. Images PMID:864474

  5. Psychoacoustic and Electrophysiologic Studies of Hearing under Hyperbaric Pressure.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-05-01

    pressure- The auditory thresholds of the chinchilla have been measured at surface and at 33’, 66’, and 99’ in the hyperbaric chamber, and these...during increased atmospheric pressures and different breathing mixtures- Temporary threshold shifts in the chinchilla were investigated using a stimulus...The animal model chosen was the chinchilla . The methodologies for recording BSERs in the chinchilla , implanting electrodes, and stabilizing the head

  6. Pressurized-water reactor internals aging degradation study. Phase 1

    SciTech Connect

    Luk, K.H.

    1993-09-01

    This report documents the results of a Phase I study on the effects of aging degradations on pr internals. Primary stressers for internals an generated by the primary coolant flow in the they include unsteady hydrodynamic forces and pump-generated pressure pulsations. Other stressors are applied loads, manufacturing processes, impurities in the coolant and exposures to fast neutron fluxes. A survey of reported aging-related failure information indicates that fatigue, stress corrosion cracking (SCC) and mechanical wear are the three major aging-related degradation mechanisms for PWR internals. Significant reported failures include thermal shield flow-induced vibration problems, SCC in guide tube support pins and core support structure bolts, fatigue-induced core baffle water-jet impingement problems and excess wear in flux thimbles. Many of the reported problems have been resolved by accepted engineering practices. Uncertainties remain in the assessment of long-term neutron irradiation effects and environmental factors in high-cycle fatigue failures. Reactor internals are examined by visual inspections and the technique is access limited. Improved inspection methods, especially one with an early failure detection capability, can enhance the safety and efficiency of reactor operations.

  7. Lead-Chalcogenides Under Pressure: Ab-Initio Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Dinesh C.; Hamid, Idris

    ab-initio calculations using fully relativistic pseudo-potential have been performed to investigate the high pressure phase transition, elastic and electronic properties of lead-chalcogenides including the less known lead polonium. The calculated ground state parameters, for the rock-salt structure show good agreement with the experimental data. The enthalpy calculations show that these materials undergo a first-order phase transition from rock-salt to CsCl structure at 19.4, 15.5, 11.5 and 7.3 GPa for PbS, PbSe, PbTe and PbPo, respectively. Present calculations successfully predicted the location of the band gap at L-point of Brillouin zone as well as the value of the band gap in every case at ambient pressure. It is observed that unlike other lead-chalcogenides, PbPo is semi-metal at ambient pressure. The pressure variation of the energy gap indicates that these materials metalized under high pressures. For this purpose, the electronic structure of these materials has also been computed in parent as well as in high pressure phase.

  8. Membrane potential dye imaging of ventromedial hypothalamus neurons from adult mice to study glucose sensing.

    PubMed

    Vazirani, Reema P; Fioramonti, Xavier; Routh, Vanessa H

    2013-11-27

    Studies of neuronal activity are often performed using neurons from rodents less than 2 months of age due to the technical difficulties associated with increasing connective tissue and decreased neuronal viability that occur with age. Here, we describe a methodology for the dissociation of healthy hypothalamic neurons from adult-aged mice. The ability to study neurons from adult-aged mice allows the use of disease models that manifest at a later age and might be more developmentally accurate for certain studies. Fluorescence imaging of dissociated neurons can be used to study the activity of a population of neurons, as opposed to using electrophysiology to study a single neuron. This is particularly useful when studying a heterogeneous neuronal population in which the desired neuronal type is rare such as for hypothalamic glucose sensing neurons. We utilized membrane potential dye imaging of adult ventromedial hypothalamic neurons to study their responses to changes in extracellular glucose. Glucose sensing neurons are believed to play a role in central regulation of energy balance. The ability to study glucose sensing in adult rodents is particularly useful since the predominance of diseases related to dysfunctional energy balance (e.g. obesity) increase with age.

  9. Procedures for the description of agricultural crops and soils in optical and microwave remote sensing studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cihlar, J.; Dobson, M. C.; Schmugge, T.; Hoogeboom, P.; Janse, A. R. P.

    1987-01-01

    This paper describes procedures for characterizing agricultural crops and soils in remote sensing studies. The procedures are based on the accumulated experience of a number of researchers active in this field. Therefore, they represent a compromise between the theoretically desirable and the practically feasible, and should thus be an effective aid in further studies of this type. Although the guidelines were prepared specifically for microwave studies, adjustments were made to render the procedures applicable to optical studies as well. Given the increasing number of research teams involved in remote sensing applied to agriculture, there is an opportunity to acquire a broad data base on soils and crops in various geographic regions. To allow intercomparisons of such data, they must be obtained in a consistent manner. By following the proposed procedures and reporting results using the parameters described here, such intercomparisons should be possible on a continental or a global scale.

  10. Overview of the Integrated Pressurized Thermal-Shock (IPTS) study

    SciTech Connect

    Cheverton, R.D.

    1990-01-01

    By the early 1980s, (PTS)-related, deterministic, vessel-integrity studies sponsored by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) indicated a potential for failure of some PWR vessels before design end of life, in the event of a postulated severe PTS transient. In response, the NRC established screening criteria, in the form of limiting values of the reference nil-ductility transition temperature (RT{sub NDT}), and initiated the development of a probabilistic methodology for evaluating vessel integrity. This latter effort, referred to as the Integrated Pressurized Thermal-Shock (IPTS) Program, included development of techniques for postulating PTS transients, estimating their frequencies, and calculating the probability of vessel failure for a specific transient. Summing the products of frequency of transient and conditional probability of failure for each of the many postulated transients provide a calculated value of the frequency of failure. The IPTS Program also included the application of the IPTS methodology to three US PWR plants (Oconee-1, Calvert Cliffs-1, and HBRobinson-2) and the specification of a maximum permissible value of the calculated frequency of vessel failure. Another important purpose of the IPTS study was to determine, through application of the IPTS methodology, which design and operating features, parameters, and PTS transients were dominant in affecting the calculated frequency of failure. The scope of the IPTS Program included the development of a probabilistic fracture-mechanics capability, modification of the TRAC and RELAP5 thermal/hydraulic codes, and development of the methodology for estimating the uncertainty in the calculated frequency of vessel failure.

  11. Airborne Geophysics and Remote Sensing Applied to Study Greenland Ice Dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Csatho, Beata M.

    2003-01-01

    Overview of project: we combined and jointly analysed geophysical, remote sensing and glaciological data for investigating the temporal changes in ice flow and the role of geologic control on glacial drainage. The project included two different studies, the investigation of recent changes of the Kangerlussuaq glacier and the study of geologic control of ice flow in NW Greenland, around the Humboldt, Petermann and Ryder glaciers.

  12. Miniaturized neural sensing and optogenetic stimulation system for behavioral studies in the rat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Min Hyuck; Nam, Ilho; Ryu, Youngki; Wellman, Laurie W.; Sanford, Larry D.; Yoon, Hargsoon

    2015-04-01

    Real time sensing of localized electrophysiological and neurochemical signals associated with spontaneous and evoked neural activity is critically important for understanding neural networks in the brain. Our goal is to enhance the functionality and flexibility of a neural sensing and stimulation system for the observation of brain activity that will enable better understanding from the level of individual cells to that of global structures. We have thus developed a miniaturized electronic system for in-vivo neurotransmitter sensing and optogenetic stimulation amenable to behavioral studies in the rat. The system contains a potentiostat, a data acquisition unit, a control unit, and a wireless data transfer unit. For the potentiostat, we applied embedded op-amps to build single potential amperometry for electrochemical sensing of dopamine. A light emitting diode is controlled by a microcontroller and pulse width modulation utilized to control optogenetic stimulation within a sub-millisecond level. In addition, this proto-typed electronic system contains a Bluetooth module for wireless data communication. In the future, an application-specific integrated circuit (ASIC) will be designed for further miniaturization of the system.

  13. [Study on artificial neural network combined with multispectral remote sensing imagery for forest site evaluation].

    PubMed

    Gong, Yin-Xi; He, Cheng; Yan, Fei; Feng, Zhong-Ke; Cao, Meng-Lei; Gao, Yuan; Miao, Jie; Zhao, Jin-Long

    2013-10-01

    Multispectral remote sensing data containing rich site information are not fully used by the classic site quality evaluation system, as it merely adopts artificial ground survey data. In order to establish a more effective site quality evaluation system, a neural network model which combined remote sensing spectra factors with site factors and site index relations was established and used to study the sublot site quality evaluation in the Wangyedian Forest Farm in Inner Mongolia Province, Chifeng City. Based on the improved back propagation artificial neural network (BPANN), this model combined multispectral remote sensing data with sublot survey data, and took larch as example, Through training data set sensitivity analysis weak or irrelevant factor was excluded, the size of neural network was simplified, and the efficiency of network training was improved. This optimal site index prediction model had an accuracy up to 95.36%, which was 9.83% higher than that of the neural network model based on classic sublot survey data, and this shows that using multi-spectral remote sensing and small class survey data to determine the status of larch index prediction model has the highest predictive accuracy. The results fully indicate the effectiveness and superiority of this method.

  14. Study of Elastic Sensing Elements for Vibration-Resistant Pressure Gauges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pirogov, S. P.; Chuba, A. Yu; Cherentsov, D. A.

    2016-10-01

    The paper provides substantiation of the necessity to determine the natural oscillations frequencies of manometric tubular springs. A mathematical model of manometric tubular springs is overviewed. Based on the given model a computer program was developed that was incorporated into a software suit for manometric tubular spring calculations. The results of numerical experiments in the software suit allowed us to identify the impact of geometric parameters on the natural oscillation frequency.

  15. Geographic techniques and recent applications of remote sensing to landscape-water quality studies

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Griffith, J.A.

    2002-01-01

    This article overviews recent advances in studies of landscape-water quality relationships using remote sensing techniques. With the increasing feasibility of using remotely-sensed data, landscape-water quality studies can now be more easily performed on regional, multi-state scales. The traditional method of relating land use and land cover to water quality has been extended to include landscape pattern and other landscape information derived from satellite data. Three items are focused on in this article: 1) the increasing recognition of the importance of larger-scale studies of regional water quality that require a landscape perspective; 2) the increasing importance of remotely sensed data, such as the imagery-derived normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) and vegetation phenological metrics derived from time-series NDVI data; and 3) landscape pattern. In some studies, using landscape pattern metrics explained some of the variation in water quality not explained by land use/cover. However, in some other studies, the NDVI metrics were even more highly correlated to certain water quality parameters than either landscape pattern metrics or land use/cover proportions. Although studies relating landscape pattern metrics to water quality have had mixed results, this recent body of work applying these landscape measures and satellite-derived metrics to water quality analysis has demonstrated their potential usefulness in monitoring watershed conditions across large regions.

  16. Molecular dynamics study of helium bubble pressure in tungsten

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Jiechao; Li, Min; Wang, Jun; Hou, Qing

    2015-06-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations were performed to calculate the stress field in a tungsten matrix containing a nano-scale helium bubble. A helium bubble in tungsten is found to consist of a core and an interface of finite thickness of approximately 0.6 nm. The core contains only helium atoms that are uniformly distributed. The interface is composed of both helium and tungsten atoms. In the periphery region of the helium bubble, the stress filed is found to follow the stress formula based on the elasticity theory of solid. The pressure difference between both sides of the interface can be well described by the Young-Laplace equation for the core size of a helium bubble as small as 0.48 nm. A comparison was performed between the pressure in the helium bubble core and the pressure in pure helium. For a core size larger than 0.3 nm, the pressure in the core of a helium bubble is in good agreement with the pressure in pure helium of the same helium density. These results provide guidance to larger scale simulation methods, such as in kinetic Monte Carlo methods and rate theory.

  17. High pressure studies of the erbium hydrogen system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palasyuk, T.; Tkacz, M.; Vajda, P.

    2005-07-01

    High-pressure X-ray diffraction investigations up to 25 GPa using diamond anvil cell techniques (DAC) have been carried out on erbium and a series of erbium hydrides. The equations of state have been evaluated for ErH 1.95, ErH 2.091 (in the β-phase) and for γ-ErH 3. For comparison, the compressibility of pure erbium metal has also been determined in the same pressure range. A rapid drop of lattice volume at a pressure of about 14.5 GPa has been observed for ErH 2.091 accompanied by a color change of reflected light. This phenomenon was not observed in ErH 1.95 where the molar volume varied smoothly up to the highest pressure. A pressure-induced transformation from hexagonal to cubic phase has been detected for erbium trihydride. For pure erbium metal, a transition from hexagonal to samarium structure has been revealed, confirming previously reported behavior.

  18. Gahnite under high pressure: A XRD insitu study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lathe, Christian; Wehber, Michael; Schilling, Frank; Mueller, Hans

    2013-06-01

    Placing P-T-t constraints on planetary differentiation Natural gahnite has the ideal formula ZnAl2O4. Together with franklinite (ZnFe2O4) it forms a limited solid solution at high temperatures an occurs as an accessory phase in magmatic and metamorphic rocks, but mainly in the Franklin marble and skarn deposits (Carvalho and Sclar 1988, Frondel and Baum 1974). A natural gahnite sample was investigated with large volume presses at the Synchrotron source DESY. Pressure was stepwise increased to 5 GPa at the MAX80 and 15 GPa at MAX200x and diffraction patterns were collected after each step. The determined volume-pressure-data are fitted to a 2nd and 3rd order Birch-Murnaghan equation of state to obtain the isothermal bulk modulus KT0 and its pressure derivative K'. Isothermal bulk modulus was derived from XRD data. Using a 2nd and 3rd order Birch-Murnaghan equation of state revealed KT02nd = 207(4) GPa KT03rd = 204(4) GPa and K' = 4.9(3), respectively. A significant change of the pressure derivatives of C11, C12 and C44 at a pressure of approximately 15 GPa indicates a 2nd order phase transition in gahnite.

  19. Observing and Studying Extreme Low Pressure Events with Altimetry

    PubMed Central

    Carrère, Loren; Mertz, Françoise; Dorandeu, Joel; Quilfen, Yves; Patoux, Jerome

    2009-01-01

    The ability of altimetry to detect extreme low pressure events and the relationship between sea level pressure and sea level anomalies during extra-tropical depressions have been investigated. Specific altimeter treatments have been developed for tropical cyclones and applied to obtain a relevant along-track sea surface height (SSH) signal: the case of tropical cyclone Isabel is presented here. The S- and C-band measurements are used because they are less impacted by rain than the Ku-band, and new sea state bias (SSB) and wet troposphere corrections are proposed. More accurate strong altimeter wind speeds are computed thanks to the Young algorithm. Ocean signals not related to atmospheric pressure can be removed with accuracy, even within a Near Real Time context, by removing the maps of sea level anomaly (SLA) provided by SSALTO/Duacs. In the case of Extra-Tropical Depressions, the classical altimeter processing can be used. Ocean signal not related to atmospheric pressure is along-track filtered. The sea level pressure (SLP)-SLA relationship is investigated for the North Atlantic, North Pacific and Indian oceans; three regression models are proposed allowing restoring an altimeter SLP with a mean error of 5 hPa if compared to ECMWF or buoys SLP. The analysis of barotropic simulation outputs points out the regional variability of the SLP/Model Sea Level relationship and the wind effects. PMID:22573955

  20. High-pressure SANS and fluorescence unfolding study of calmodulin.

    PubMed

    Gibrat, Gabriel; Hoa, Gaston Hui Bon; Craescu, Constantin T; Assairi, Liliane; Blouquit, Yves; Annighöfer, Burkhard; May, Roland P; Bellissent-Funel, Marie-Claire

    2014-09-01

    Apo-calmodulin, a small soluble mainly α protein, is a calcium-dependent protein activator. Calcium binding affects the calmodulin conformation but also its stability. Calcium free form unfolds between 40 and 80°C, whereas the calcium-saturated form is stable up to temperatures as high as 100°C, forbidding comparison of the thermal unfolding pathways of the two forms. Thus, this paper focuses especially on the conformation of pressure-induced unfolding states of both forms of calmodulin, by combining small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) with biophysical techniques such as tyrosines and ANS fluorescence. In contrast to heat denaturation (Gibrat et al., BBA, 2012), the pressure denaturation of calmodulin is reversible up to pressures of 3000bar (300MPa). A pressure-induced compact intermediate state has been found for the two calmodulin forms, but their unfolding pathways are different. A domain compaction and an increase of the ANS fluorescence of holo form have been evidenced. On the contrary, a domain dilatation and an ANS fluorescence decrease have been found for the apo form. The pressure induced an increase of the interdomain distance for both calmodulin forms, suggesting that the central linker of calmodulin is flexible in solution.

  1. Nondestructive characterization of embrittlement in reactor pressure vessel steels -- A feasibility study

    SciTech Connect

    McHenry, H.I.; Alers, G.A.

    1998-03-01

    The Nuclear Regulatory Commission recently initiated a study by NIST to assess the feasibility of using physical-property measurements for evaluating radiation embrittlement in reactor pressure vessel (RPV) steels. Ultrasonic and magnetic measurements provide the most promising approaches for nondestructive characterization of RPV steels because elastic waves and magnetic fields can sense the microstructural changes that embrittle materials. The microstructural changes of particular interest are copper precipitation hardening, which is the likely cause of radiation embrittlement in RPV steels, and the loss of dislocation mobility that is an attribute of the ductile-to-brittle transition. Measurements were made on a 1% copper steel, ASTM grade A710, in the annealed, peak-aged and overaged conditions, and on an RPV steel, ASTM grade A533B. Nonlinear ultrasonic and micromagnetic techniques were the most promising measures of precipitation hardening. Ultrasonic velocity measurements and the magnetic properties associated with hysteresis-loop measurements were not particularly sensitive to either precipitation hardening or the ductile-to-brittle transition. Measurements of internal friction using trapped ultrasonic resonance modes detected energy losses due to the motion of pinned dislocations; however, the ultrasonic attenuation associated with these measurements was small compared to the attenuation caused by beam spreading that would occur in conventional ultrasonic testing of RPVs.

  2. N-Doped Ordered Mesoporous Carbon Originated from a Green Biological Dye for Electrochemical Sensing and High-Pressure CO2 Storage.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Shenghai; Xu, Hongbo; Yuan, Qunhui; Shen, Hangjia; Zhu, Xuefeng; Liu, Yi; Gan, Wei

    2016-01-13

    Herein, a series of nitrogen-doped ordered mesoporous carbons (NOMCs) with tunable porous structure were synthesized via a hard-template method with a green biological dye as precursor, under various carbonization temperatures (700-1100 °C). Compared with the ordered mesoporous silica-modified and unmodified electrodes, the use of electrodes coated by NOMCs (NOMC-700-NOMC-1100) resulted in enhanced signals and well-resolved oxidation peaks in electrocatalytic sensing of catechol and hydroquinone isomers, attributable to NOMCs' open porous structures and increased edge-plane defect sites on the N-doped carbon skeleton. Electrochemical sensors using NOMC-1000-modified electrode were fabricated and proved feasible in tap water sample analyses. The NOMCs were also used as sorbents for high-pressure CO2 storage. The NOMC with the highest N content exhibits the best CO2 absorption capacities of 800.8 and 387.6 mg/g at 273 and 298 K (30 bar), respectively, which is better than those of other NOMC materials and some recently reported CO2 sorbents with well-ordered 3D porous structures. Moreover, this NOMC shows higher affinity for CO2 than for N2, a benefit of its higher nitrogen content in the porous carbon framework.

  3. High-pressure optical spectroscopy study of natural siderite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taran, Michail N.; Müller, Jan; Friedrich, Alexandra; Koch-Müller, Monika

    2017-03-01

    Optical absorption spectra of siderite were taken across the high-spin (HS)-to-low-spin (LS) transition up to a pressure of 70 GPa in the spectral range between 28,500 and 10,000 cm-1. Up to a pressure of 44.5 GPa, a pair of two overlapping broad bands was observed that are caused by the electronic spin-allowed 5 T 2g → 5 E g transition of the octahedrally coordinated Fe2+. Furthermore, eight spin-forbidden bands are observable at high pressures up to 44.5 GPa, but they are gradually overlapped by the increasing high-energy absorption edge to be tracked down over the whole pressure range. Due to the HS-to-LS-spin-state transition of Fe2+ between 44.5 and 47.6 GPa, a new broad intense absorption band appears on the steep background of the edge, which is assigned to the electronic spin-allowed 1 A 1g → 1 T 1g transition of octahedral Fe2+ in LS configuration. We estimated a mean octahedral module K_{oct}^{spectr} of Fe2+ in the LS state for pressure range 47.6-65.5 GPa as 263 (17) GPa. Especially, a strong intensification of the spin-allowed and spin-forbidden bands with increasing pressure is observed in the HS state. This is assumed to be caused by the borrowing of intensity from the UV absorption bands, which are allowed by the Laporte selection rule and are caused by electronic ligand-to-metal charge-transfer transitions.

  4. LHDAC setup for high temperature and high pressure studies

    SciTech Connect

    Patel, Nishant N. Meenakshi, S. Sharma, Surinder M.

    2014-04-24

    A ytterbium fibre laser (λ = 1.07 μm) based laser heated diamond anvil cell (LHDAC) facility has been recently set up at HP and SRPD, BARC for simultaneous high temperature and high pressure investigation of material properties. Synthesis of GaN was carried out at pressure of ∼9 GPa and temperature of ∼1925 K in a Mao-Bell type diamond anvil cell (DAC) using the LHDAC facility. The retrieved sample has been characterized using our laboratory based micro Raman setup.

  5. The Increasing Use of Remote Sensing Data in Studying the Climatological Impacts on Public Health

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kempler, S.; Benedict, K. K.; Ceccato, P.; Golden, M.; Maxwell, S.; Morain, S.; Soebiyanto, R.; Tong, D.

    2011-12-01

    One of the most fortunate outcomes of the capture and transformation of remote sensing data into applied information is their usefulness and impacts to better understanding climatological impacts on public health. Today, with petabytes of remote sensing data providing global coverage of climatological parameters, public health research and policy decision makers have an unprecedented (and growing) data record that relates the effects of climatic parameters, such as rainfall, heat, soil moisture, etc. to incidences and spread of disease, as well as predictive modeling. In addition, tools and services that specifically serve public health researchers and respondents have grown in response to the needs of the these information users. This presentation provides: A perspective of the use of remote sensing data in public health research; NASA funded systems developed to facilitate specific public health decision and public support services, and: Insights on remote sensing data and information services that are available for public health studies and decision making. After providing a review of the use of remote sensing data, the following specific services will be discussed: - Rainfall, Vegetation and Water Bodies Monitoring for Malaria Surveillance - Heat Evaluation and Assessment - Multi-resolution Nested Dust Forecast - Socioeconomic Data and Application Center (SEDAC) Health Related Data and Services - Goddard Earth Sciences Data and Information Services Center (GES DISC) Health Related Data and Services The purpose of this presentation is to provide a (strong) flavor of the data and information services available to public health research and decision making, to invoke new ways of thinking about how public health work can be accomplished, and stimulate new ideas on how information services can be further utilized.

  6. Satellite remote sensing and multiscale geophysical investigations for geoarcheology: case studies from Perù

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capozzoli, Luigi; Delle Rose, Marco; Lasaponara, Rosa; Masini, Nicola; Rizzo, Enzo; Romano, Gerardo

    2013-04-01

    Satellite remote sensing as well as geophysical techniques proved to be successful tools for characterizing archaeological areas. In order to provide useful information on the presence of buried structures and the iteration between the aqueducts (Puquios) and the local hydrogeological setting, a multi-disciplinary and multi-scale approach based on the integration of satellite remote sensing and geophysical techniques was applied in different sites of Perù. Such investigations were carried out by the Italian mission ITACA, funded by the Italian Ministry Affairs and composed of researchers of two institutes of CNR (IMAA and IBAM), which provides a scientific support for archaeological research, since 2007. In detail, the archaeological Cahuachi site (0-400 AD) was investigated by geoelectrical and georadar prospecting, in order to highlight buried structures and platforms. The detection and characterization of perhispanic aqueducts and canals were the main aims in the Nasca drainage basin and in the Ceremonial Centre of Pachacamac (500-1400 ADF). Finally, the integration of all data acquired by the different remote sensing techniques allowed for spatially characterizing the archaeological features, thus providing important information for the planning of next archaeological excavations and glimpses into the use and management of water resources by prehispanic civilizations. References Lasaponara R., Masini N., Rizzo E., Orefici G. 2011. New discoveries in the Piramide Naranjada in Cahuachi (Peru) using satellite, Ground Probing Radar and magnetic investigations, Journal of Archaeological Science, 38(9), 2031-2039, doi:10.1016/j.jas.2010.12.010 Masini N., Lasaponara R., Rizzo E., Orefici G. 2012. Integrated Remote Sensing Approach in Cahuachi (Peru): Studies and Results of the ITACA Mission (2007-2010), In: Lasaponara R., Masini N. (Eds) 2012, Satellite Remote Sensing: a new tool for Archaeology, Springer, Verlag Berlin Heidelberg, ISBN 978-90-481-8800-0, doi: 10

  7. Serpentines, talc, chlorites, and their high-pressure phase transitions: a Raman spectroscopic study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reynard, Bruno; Bezacier, Lucile; Caracas, Razvan

    2015-09-01

    Raman spectra of magnesian phyllosilicates belonging to the serpentine, talc, and chlorite groups have been obtained at ambient conditions, and at high pressures and up to 200 °C in order to study high-pressure transformations in the 10 GPa range. The complex and distinct Raman spectra of these minerals allow straightforward identification, which may otherwise be difficult from optical microscopy. High-pressure measurements are in good agreement with DFT calculations for talc and lizardite. Pressure-induced displacive modifications are identified in lizardite and antigorite serpentines, and in chlorite at ~4, 7 and 8 GPa, respectively, while talc shows no transition up to ~11 GPa. At high temperature, the high-pressure distortions of serpentines shift to higher pressures. Given the stability limits of these minerals, and the natural range of P-T conditions, none of the high-pressure distortions observed at high pressure are likely to occur at depth in the Earth.

  8. Analytical Studies of High-Pressure MHD Accelerators

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-09-01

    ETEsT ,J I I I0,000 15,000 20,000 STAGNATION ENTHALPY, Btu/Ib Figure 3. Stagnation pressure, enthalpy requirement for reentry facility. Table 1...the opposing induced voltage uB. That oppos- ing voltage, of course, varies linearly with B, and the applied volt- age must be increased uniformly

  9. High pressure studies on extended phases of CO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montoya, Javier A.; Lee, Mal-Soon; Scandolo, Sandro

    2010-03-01

    Recent findings have shown that the chemistry of CO2 at high pressure and temperature is richer than previously thought and that the activation of the C=O bond that can give origin to different forms of non-molecular CO2. Such findings may have important implications for the understanding of the Earth's deep carbon cycle and CO2 sequestration technologies. First principles simulations of CO2's electronic properties under different pressure and temperature conditions can constrain the thermodynamic phase diagram of CO2 and explore P-T conditions necessary for the C=O bond activation. We have shown that at about 50 GPa molecular CO2 can transform to a metastable amorphous form characterized by an almost equal proportion of three- and four-fold coordinated carbon atoms [1], while higher carbon coordination does not take place up to at least 900 GPa [2-3]. We have also found that doping with transition metals can reduce the activation barrier and transition pressure for the C=O bond activation in CO2 [4]. Our results suggest that pressure can radically alter the oxidation chemistry of carbon. [1] J. A. Montoya et al., PRL 100, 163002 (2008) [2] J. Sun et al., PNAS 106, 6077 (2009) [3] M-S. Lee, J. A. Montoya and S. Scandolo, PRB 79, 144102 (2009) [4] J. A. Montoya, R. Rousseau, and S. Scandolo, unpublished.

  10. Study, Examinations, and Stress: Blood Pressure Assessments in College Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hughes, Brian M.

    2005-01-01

    The issue of stress associated with higher education and its impact on markers of student health is explored in three experiments looking at blood pressure levels in college students. All participants were full-time undergraduate students of psychology. In Experiment 1, academic fear of failure, assessed using psychometric testing, was found to be…

  11. Pressure field study of the Tevatron cold compressors

    SciTech Connect

    Klebaner, A.L.; Martinez, A.; Soyars, W.M.; Theilacker, J.C.; /Fermilab

    2003-01-01

    The Fermilab Tevatron cryogenic system utilizes high-speed centrifugal cold compressors, manufactured by Ishikawajima-Harima Heavy Industries Co. Ltd. (IHI), for high-energy operations [1]. The compressor is designed to pump 60 g/sec of 3.6 K saturated helium vapor at a pressure ratio of 2.8, with an off-design range of 40 to 70 g/sec. Operating speeds are between 40 and 95 krpm, with a speed of 80 krpm at the design point. Different heat loads and magnet quench performance of each of the twenty-four satellite refrigerators dictates different process pressure and flow rates of the cold compressors. Reducing the process flow rate can cause the centrifugal cold compressor to stop pumping and subsequently surge. Tests have been conducted at the Cryogenic Test Facility at Fermilab to map the pressure field and appropriate efficiency of the IHI hydrodynamic cold compressor. The information allows tuning of each of the twenty-four Tevatron satellite refrigerators to avoid cold compressor operation near the surge and choke lines. A new impeller has also been tested. The Tevatron cold compressor pressure field and efficiency data with the new impeller are presented in this paper.

  12. Remote Sensing of Chaparral Fire Potential: Case Study in Topanga Canyon, California.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    Remote sensing techniques, especially the use of color infrared aerial photography, provide a useful tool for fire hazard analysis, including interpetive information about fuel volumes, physiognomic plant groupings, the relationships of buildings to both natural and planted vegetation, and fire vulnerability of roofing materials. In addition, the behavior of the September, 1970 Wright Fire in the Topanga study area suggested the validity of the fire potential analysis which had been made prior to that conflagration.

  13. Engineering studies related to geodetic and oceanographic remote sensing using short pulsed techniques. [using laser probe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    Theoretical basis is presented for a feasibility study of measuring global ocean surface current pattern from satellites and aircraft. The analysis is supported by some preliminary laboratory experiments. Since the ultimate goal is to establish an operational routine for monitoring the global current pattern, a nondisturbing remote sensing device using a laser probe was developed. Detailed construction of the measuring system and the results of some preliminary observations are also presented.

  14. Application of remote sensing to the geological study of the alkaline complex region of Itatiaia. [Brazil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dejesusparada, N. (Principal Investigator); Rodrigues, J. E.

    1980-01-01

    The methodology of remote sensing applied to geological study in a complex area was evaluated. Itatiaia was selected as a test area, which covers the alkaline massives and its precambrian basement. LANDSAT-MSS and radar mosaic of the RADAMBRASIL Project were used for photointerpretation. Previous geological works were consulted and many discrepancies in the distribution of stratigraphic units were found. Moreover, structural lineaments and talus deposits were clearly delineated.

  15. Feasibility of remote sensing for detecting thermal pollution. Part 1: Feasibility study. Part 2: Implementation plan. [coastal ecology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Veziroglu, T. N.; Lee, S. S.

    1973-01-01

    A feasibility study for the development of a three-dimensional generalized, predictive, analytical model involving remote sensing, in-situ measurements, and an active system to remotely measure turbidity is presented. An implementation plan for the development of the three-dimensional model and for the application of remote sensing of temperature and turbidity measurements is outlined.

  16. Comparative study on a solving model and algorithm for a flush air data sensing system.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yanbin; Xiao, Dibo; Lu, Yuping

    2014-05-23

    With the development of high-performance aircraft, precise air data are necessary to complete challenging tasks such as flight maneuvering with large angles of attack and high speed. As a result, the flush air data sensing system (FADS) was developed to satisfy the stricter control demands. In this paper, comparative stuides on the solving model and algorithm for FADS are conducted. First, the basic principles of FADS are given to elucidate the nonlinear relations between the inputs and the outputs. Then, several different solving models and algorithms of FADS are provided to compute the air data, including the angle of attck, sideslip angle, dynamic pressure and static pressure. Afterwards, the evaluation criteria of the resulting models and algorithms are discussed to satisfy the real design demands. Futhermore, a simulation using these algorithms is performed to identify the properites of the distinct models and algorithms such as the measuring precision and real-time features. The advantages of these models and algorithms corresponding to the different flight conditions are also analyzed, furthermore, some suggestions on their engineering applications are proposed to help future research.

  17. Report of the Workshop on Geologic Applications of Remote Sensing to the Study of Sedimentary Basins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lang, H. R. (Editor)

    1985-01-01

    The Workshop on Geologic Applications of Remote Sensing to the Study of Sedimentary Basins, held January 10 to 11, 1985 in Lakewood, Colorado, involved 43 geologists from industry, government, and academia. Disciplines represented ranged from vertebrate paleontology to geophysical modeling of continents. Deliberations focused on geologic problems related to the formation, stratigraphy, structure, and evolution of foreland basins in general, and to the Wind River/Bighorn Basin area of Wyoming in particular. Geological problems in the Wind River/Bighorn basin area that should be studied using state-of-the-art remote sensing methods were identified. These include: (1) establishing the stratigraphic sequence and mapping, correlating, and analyzing lithofacies of basin-filling strata in order to refine the chronology of basin sedimentation, and (2) mapping volcanic units, fracture patterns in basement rocks, and Tertiary-Holocene landforms in searches for surface manifestations of concealed structures in order to refine models of basin tectonics. Conventional geologic, topographic, geophysical, and borehole data should be utilized in these studies. Remote sensing methods developed in the Wind River/Bighorn Basin area should be applied in other basins.

  18. Comprehensive studies of the dynamics of geosystems with the use of remote sensing techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasilev, L. N.; Kaczyński, R.; Ney, B. I.

    The described research programme for comprehensive studies of changes occuring within geosystems is a part of scientific activity of INTERKOSMOS, which will be executed mainly with the use of remote sensing methods and techniques. The main aim of the programme is to get an insight into the seasonal rithm of environmental changes on both regional and global level. The work will consist of gathering systematized information concerning quantitative and qualitative relations between various components of the environment. The application of remote sensing methods enables the acquisition of such environmental data in dynamic setting. Research will be conducted for areas comprising distinct geosystems and will lead to the detection of diurnal, seasonal and yearly dynamics of geosystems as well as long-term trends. Except cognitive, the programme will also serve the methodological purpose. The first aim will be realized with respect to individual geosystems; the resulting sets of data will consist of matrixes of statistical data characterizing relations between various components of geosystems. The methodological aim will be achieved through the process of practical verification of the preliminary assumptions. Information will be collected from different data acquisition levels namely from satellite and aerial platforms and through ground measurements. Different types of data, such as multispectral photography (SALYUT, KOSMOS), multispectral scanner images (LANDSAT THEMATIC MAPPER, SPOT), infrared photography, radar imagery and spectrometric measurements will be gathered during simultaneous data acquisition projects. All types of observations will be timed in accordance with the natural rithm of the observed phenomena. The paper contains the description of geosystems under anthropogenic stress based on the previous research of the authors. The presented multifactor characteristics of soil and crops is a part of completed studies on agricultural geosystems. The results of

  19. Knee joint position sense of roller hockey players: a comparative study.

    PubMed

    Venâncio, João; Lopes, Diogo; Lourenço, Joaquim; Ribeiro, Fernando

    2016-06-01

    This study aimed to compare knee joint position sense of roller hockey players with an age-matched group of non-athletes. Forty-three male participants voluntarily participated in this cross-sectional study: 21 roller hockey players (mean age: 23.2 ± 4.2 years old, mean weight: 81.8 ± 9.8 kg, mean height: 180.5 ± 4.1 cm) and 22 age-matched non-athletes (mean age: 23.7 ± 3.9 years old, mean weight: 85.0 ± 6.2 kg, mean height: 181.5 ± 5.0 cm). Knee joint position sense of the dominant limb was evaluated using a technique of open-kinetic chain and active knee positioning. Joint position sense was reported using absolute, relative and variable angular errors. The main results indicated that the group of roller hockey players showed significantly lower absolute (2.4 ± 1.2º vs. 6.5 ± 3.2º, p ≤ 0.001) and relative (1.7 ± 2.1º vs. 5.8 ± 4.4º, p ≤ 0.001) angular errors in comparison with the non-athletes group. In conclusion, the results from this present study suggest that proprioceptive acuity, assessed by measuring joint position sense, is increased in roller hockey players. The enhanced proprioception of the roller hockey players could contribute to injury prevention and improved performance during sporting activities.

  20. Influence of cholesterol on non-invasive blood glucose sensing studied with NIR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Jingying; Zhang, Lingling; Gong, Qiliang; Xu, Kexin

    2011-03-01

    There is a growing body of studies suggesting that NIR spectroscopy is feasible to be used to non-invasive blood glucose sensing. However, previous results reported that blood components are very complicated and in which glucose concentration is relatively low. This feature limited the practical application of NIR spectroscopy to in vivo blood glucose detection. This talk aims to elucidate how the cholesterol influences blood glucose sensing. Spectroscopic measurements show that cholesterol appears the similar absorbance peaks to those of glucose within NIR range. Furthermore, PLS modelling results demonstrate that the measurement concentrations of glucose are on the high side while containing cholesterol. For example, when the cholesterol concentration is 200mg/dl, the measurement result of glucose with near-infrared spectroscopy will increase 7.961882mg/dl comparing to cholesterol-free glucose solution. Therefore, it is necessary to take steps to reduce cholesterol's effects.

  1. Postoperative chronic pressure abnormalities in the vitreon study.

    PubMed

    Adile, S L; Peyman, G A; Greve, M D; Millsap, C M; Verma, L K; Wafapoor, H; Soheilian, M

    1994-01-01

    Perfluoroperhydrophenanthrene (Vitreon) was used as an intraoperative hydrokinetic retinal manipulator, followed by C3F8 or SF6 gases, silicone oil, or Vitreon as postoperative tamponading agents in 234 eyes. Two chronic intraoperative pressure abnormalities were defined: hypotony (5 mm Hg or less) and elevated intraocular pressure (IOP) (25 mm Hg or more at three or more postoperative visits). Postoperatively, 28 eyes (12%) had chronically elevated IOP, and 41 (18%) had chronic hypotony. There was no significant difference in the incidence of abnormal IOP among the groups of eyes in which the various tamponading agents had been used. In particular, the use of Vitreon as an intraoperative tool or as a short-term tamponade did not affect the incidence of chronic abnormal IOP any more than did the use of silicone oil, C3F8, or SF6 as tamponading agents.

  2. Pulsed laser kinetic studies of liquids under high pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Eyring, E.M.

    1990-11-29

    A high pressure apparatus has been constructed for measuring rates of reactions in liquids under pressures ranging from 1 atm to 2000 atm. This apparatus is being used to test the effect of ligand bulk on the rate of a thermal ring closure reaction. Microphonic photoacoustic signals obtained by illuminating solid samples with synchrotron soft x-rays and with visible laser beams have been successfully correlated with a theory for photoacoustic signal enhancement by volatile liquids. The concentration dependence of the fluorescence and nonradiative quantum yields for cresyl violet dissolved in methanol has been determined. Stability constants for complexes of lithium ion with four different crown ethers dissolved in a low temperature molten salt have been measured.

  3. Mössbauer studies of neptunium intermetallics at high pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Potzel, Ulrike; Schiessl, W.; Potzel, W.; Moser, J.; Litterst, F. J.; Kratzer, A.; Gal, J.; Kalvius, G. M.; Spirlet, J. C.

    1988-02-01

    Using the 60keV Mössbauer transition in237Np high pressure experiments have been performed up to ˜85kbar between 4.2K and 200K on NpCo2Si2, NpAl2, NpOs2 and NpAs. The delocalization of 5f-electrons with reduced volume is most pronounced in NpOs2 and NpAl2, whereas NpCo2Si2 can be considered as a highly localized magnet. In NpAs 5f-hybridization with electrons of As is dominant. At pressures above ˜25kbar a new magnetic phase is formed.

  4. High Pressure X-Ray Diffraction Studies on Nanocrystalline Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palosz, B.; Stelmakh, S.; Grzanka, E.; Gierlotka, S.; Pielaszek, R.; Bismayer, U.; Werner, S.; Palosz, W.

    2003-01-01

    Application of in situ high pressure powder diffraction technique for examination of specific structural properties of nanocrystals based on the experimental data of SiC nanocrystalline powders of 2 to 30 nrn diameter in diameter is presented. Limitations and capabilities of the experimental techniques themselves and methods of diffraction data elaboration applied to nanocrystals with very small dimensions (< 30 nm) are discussed. It is shown that due to the complex structure, constituting a two-phase, core/surface shell system, no unique lattice parameter value and, consequently, no unique compressibility coefficient can satisfactorily describe the behavior of nanocrystalline powders under pressure. We offer a tentative interpretation of the distribution of macro- and micro-strains in nanoparticles of different grain size.

  5. High-pressure burning rate studies of solid rocket propellants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atwood, A. I.; Ford, K. P.; Wheeler, C. J.

    2013-03-01

    Increased rocket motor performance is a major driver in the development of solid rocket propellant formulations for chemical propulsion systems. The use of increased operating pressure is an option to improve performance potentially without the cost of reformulation. A technique has been developed to obtain burning rate data across a range of pressures from ambient to 345 MPa. The technique combines the use of a low loading density combustion bomb with a high loading density closed bomb technique. A series of nine ammonium perchlorate (AP) based propellants were used to demonstrate the use of the technique, and the results were compared to the neat AP burning rate "barrier". The effect of plasticizer, oxidizer particle size, catalyst, and binder type were investigated.

  6. An exploratory study of a number sense program to develop kindergarten students' number proficiency.

    PubMed

    Sood, Sheetal; Jitendra, Asha K

    2013-01-01

    This study examined the effectiveness of a number sense program on kindergarten students' number proficiency and responsiveness to treatment as a function of students' risk for mathematics difficulties. The program targeted development of relationships among numbers (e.g., spatial, more and less). A total of 101 kindergarten students (not at risk: 22 control and 36 experimental; at risk: 18 and 25) from five classrooms in a high-poverty elementary school participated in the study. Using a quasi-experimental design, classrooms were randomly assigned to either the intervention (number sense instruction, NSI) or control condition. Results indicated significant differences favoring the treatment students on all measures of number sense (e.g., spatial relationships, more and less relationships, benchmarks of five and ten, nonverbal calculations) at posttest and on a 3-week retention test. Furthermore, the effects were not mediated by at-risk status, suggesting that NSI may benefit a wide range of students. Implications in terms of preventing early mathematical learning difficulties are discussed.

  7. A preliminary study for investigating idiopatic normal pressure hydrocephalus by means of statistical parameters classification of intracranial pressure recordings.

    PubMed

    Calisto, A; Bramanti, A; Galeano, M; Angileri, F; Campobello, G; Serrano, S; Azzerboni, B

    2009-01-01

    The objective of this study is to investigate Id-iopatic Normal Pressure Hydrocephalus (INPH) through a multidimensional and multiparameter analysis of statistical data obtained from accurate analysis of Intracranial Pressure (ICP) recordings. Such a study could permit to detect new factors, correlated with therapeutic response, which are able to validate a predicting significance for infusion test. The algorithm developed by the authors computes 13 ICP parameter trends on each of the recording, afterward 9 statistical information from each trend is determined. All data are transferred to the datamining software WEKA. According to the exploited feature-selection techniques, the WEKA has revealed that the most significant statistical parameter is the maximum of Single-Wave-Amplitude: setting a 27 mmHg threshold leads to over 90% of correct classification.

  8. Burning Rate Studies of HMX Propellants at High Pressures

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1975-03-01

    propellant burning should take place rather than HMX burning. The compounds selected for evaluation were: Melting Point Boiling Point (0C) (0 C) acetanilide ... Acetanilide and phenylsulfone, the two very la,, melting cxnpounds, greatly suppressed the KV exotherm peak (rigue 3). However, this change in the TV...Percent IM (Class A/E, 70/30), 2 Percent Additive] Phenyl Hydro- Additive None Acetanilide Anthracene Sulfone Quinone Pressure (Psi) Burning Rate @ 70

  9. Studies of Halogen Bonding Using High-Pressure Diffractometry

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-08

    determined by X-rays. 15. SUBJECT TERMS EOARD, Chemistry 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT SAR 18...C5F5N; trifluoromethyl(trimethylo) silane , CF3Si(CH3)3), have been in- situ pressure frozen in a diamond-anvil cell and their structures determined by X...fluorinated compound investigated was trifluoromethyl(trimethylo) silane . Silanes are important chemical compounds, owing to their physical and

  10. FEASIBILITY STUDY OF PRESSURE PULSING PIPELINE UNPLUGGING TECHNOLOGIES FOR HANFORD

    SciTech Connect

    Servin, M. A.; Garfield, J. S.; Golcar, G. R.

    2012-12-20

    The ability to unplug key waste transfer routes is generally essential for successful tank farms operations. All transfer lines run the risk of plugging but the cross site transfer line poses increased risk due to its longer length. The loss of a transfer route needed to support the waste feed delivery mission impacts the cost and schedule of the Hanford clean up mission. This report addresses the engineering feasibility for two pressure pulse technologies, which are similar in concept, for pipeline unplugging.

  11. MD studies of electron transfer at ambient and elevated pressures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giles, Alex; Spooner, Jacob; Weinberg, Noham

    2013-06-01

    The effect of pressure on the rate constants of outer-sphere electron transfer reactions has often been described using the Marcus-Hush theory. This theory agrees well with experiment when internal reorganization of the ionic system is negligible, however it does not offer a recipe for calculation of the effects that result from significant solute restructuring. We have recently developed a molecular dynamics technique that accurately describes structural dependence of molecular volumes in non-polar and weakly polar systems. We are now extending this approach to the case of highly polar ionic systems where both solvent and solute restructuring components are important. For this purpose we construct pressure-dependent two-dimensional surfaces for electron transfer reactions in coordinate system composed of interionic distance and Marcus-type solvent polarization coordinate, and use these surfaces to describe pressure effects on reaction kinetics. R.A. Marcus. J. Chem. Phys. 24, 966 (1956); 24, 979 (1956); 26, 867 (1957). Discuss. Faraday Soc. 29, 21 (1960). Faraday Discuss. Chem. Soc. 74, 7 (1982); N.S. Hush. Trans. Faraday Soc. 57, 557 (1961).

  12. Concentric-Electrode Organic Electrochemical Transistors: Case Study for Selective Hydrazine Sensing

    PubMed Central

    Pecqueur, Sébastien; Lenfant, Stéphane; Guérin, David; Alibart, Fabien; Vuillaume, Dominique

    2017-01-01

    We report on hydrazine-sensing organic electrochemical transistors (OECTs) with a design consisting of concentric annular electrodes. The design engineering of these OECTs was motivated by the great potential of using OECT sensing arrays in fields such as bioelectronics. In this work, poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene):poly(styrenesulfonate) (PEDOT:PSS)-based OECTs have been studied as aqueous sensors that are specifically sensitive to the lethal hydrazine molecule. These amperometric sensors have many relevant features for the development of hydrazine sensors, such as a sensitivity down to 10−5 M of hydrazine in water, an order of magnitude higher selectivity for hydrazine than for nine other water-soluble common analytes, the capability to entirely recover its base signal after water flushing, and a very low operation voltage. The specificity for hydrazine to be sensed by our OECTs is caused by its catalytic oxidation at the gate electrode, and enables an increase in the output current modulation of the devices. This has permitted the device-geometry study of the whole series of 80 micrometric OECT devices with sub-20-nm PEDOT:PSS layers, channel lengths down to 1 µm, and a specific device geometry of coplanar and concentric electrodes. The numerous geometries unravel new aspects of the OECT mechanisms governing the electrochemical sensing behaviours of the device—more particularly the effect of the contacts which are inherent at the micro-scale. By lowering the device cross-talk, micrometric gate-integrated radial OECTs shall contribute to the diminishing of the readout invasiveness and therefore further promote the development of OECT biosensors. PMID:28287475

  13. Concentric-Electrode Organic Electrochemical Transistors: Case Study for Selective Hydrazine Sensing.

    PubMed

    Pecqueur, Sébastien; Lenfant, Stéphane; Guérin, David; Alibart, Fabien; Vuillaume, Dominique

    2017-03-11

    We report on hydrazine-sensing organic electrochemical transistors (OECTs) with a design consisting of concentric annular electrodes. The design engineering of these OECTs was motivated by the great potential of using OECT sensing arrays in fields such as bioelectronics. In this work, poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene):poly(styrenesulfonate) (PEDOT:PSS)-based OECTs have been studied as aqueous sensors that are specifically sensitive to the lethal hydrazine molecule. These amperometric sensors have many relevant features for the development of hydrazine sensors, such as a sensitivity down to 10(-5) M of hydrazine in water, an order of magnitude higher selectivity for hydrazine than for nine other water-soluble common analytes, the capability to entirely recover its base signal after water flushing, and a very low operation voltage. The specificity for hydrazine to be sensed by our OECTs is caused by its catalytic oxidation at the gate electrode, and enables an increase in the output current modulation of the devices. This has permitted the device-geometry study of the whole series of 80 micrometric OECT devices with sub-20-nm PEDOT:PSS layers, channel lengths down to 1 µm, and a specific device geometry of coplanar and concentric electrodes. The numerous geometries unravel new aspects of the OECT mechanisms governing the electrochemical sensing behaviours of the device-more particularly the effect of the contacts which are inherent at the micro-scale. By lowering the device cross-talk, micrometric gate-integrated radial OECTs shall contribute to the diminishing of the readout invasiveness and therefore further promote the development of OECT biosensors.

  14. Pressure ulcer prevention knowledge among Jordanian nurses: a cross- sectional study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Pressure ulcer remains a significant problem in the healthcare system. In addition to the suffering it causes patients, it bears a growing financial burden. Although pressure ulcer prevention and care have improved in recent years, pressure ulcer still exists and occurs in both hospital and community settings. In Jordan, there are a handful of studies on pressure ulcer. This study aims to explore levels of knowledge and knowledge sources about pressure ulcer prevention, as well as barriers to implementing pressure ulcer prevention guidelines among Jordanian nurses. Methods Using a cross-sectional study design and a self-administered questionnaire, data was collected from 194 baccalaureate and master’s level staff nurses working in eight Jordanian hospitals. From September to October of 2011, their knowledge levels about pressure ulcer prevention and the sources of this knowledge were assessed, along with the barriers which reduce successful pressure ulcer care and prevention. ANOVA and t-test analysis were used to test the differences in nurses’ knowledge according to participants’ characteristics. Means, standard deviation, and frequencies were used to describe nurses’ knowledge levels, knowledge sources, and barriers to pressure ulcer prevention. Results The majority (73%, n = 141) of nurses had inadequate knowledge about pressure ulcer prevention. The mean scores of the test for all participants was 10.84 out of 26 (SD = 2.3, range = 5–17), with the lowest score in themes related to PU etiology, preventive measures to reduce amount of pressure/shear, and risk assessment. In-service training was the second source of education on pressure ulcer, coming after university training. Shortage of staff and lack of time were the most frequently cited barriers to carrying out pressure ulcer risk assessment, documentation, and prevention. Conclusions This study highlights concerns about Jordanian nurses’ knowledge of pressure ulcer prevention. The

  15. Remote Sensing Monitoring of Changes in Soil Salinity: A Case Study in Inner Mongolia, China

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Jingwei; Vincent, Bernard; Yang, Jinzhong; Bouarfa, Sami; Vidal, Alain

    2008-01-01

    This study used archived remote sensing images to depict the history of changes in soil salinity in the Hetao Irrigation District in Inner Mongolia, China, with the purpose of linking these changes with land and water management practices and to draw lessons for salinity control. Most data came from LANDSAT satellite images taken in 1973, 1977, 1988, 1991, 1996, 2001, and 2006. In these years salt-affected areas were detected using a normal supervised classification method. Corresponding cropped areas were detected from NVDI (Normalized Difference Vegetation Index) values using an unsupervised method. Field samples and agricultural statistics were used to estimate the accuracy of the classification. Historical data concerning irrigation/drainage and the groundwater table were used to analyze the relation between changes in soil salinity and land and water management practices. Results showed that: (1) the overall accuracy of remote sensing in detecting soil salinity was 90.2%, and in detecting cropped area, 98%; (2) the installation/innovation of the drainage system did help to control salinity; and (3) a low ratio of cropped land helped control salinity in the Hetao Irrigation District. These findings suggest that remote sensing is a useful tool to detect soil salinity and has potential in evaluating and improving land and water management practices. PMID:27873914

  16. Choosing an Appropriate Infection Model to Study Quorum Sensing Inhibition in Pseudomonas Infections

    PubMed Central

    Papaioannou, Evelina; Utari, Putri Dwi; Quax, Wim J.

    2013-01-01

    Bacteria, although considered for decades to be antisocial organisms whose sole purpose is to find nutrients and multiply are, in fact, highly communicative organisms. Referred to as quorum sensing, cell-to-cell communication mechanisms have been adopted by bacteria in order to co-ordinate their gene expression. By behaving as a community rather than as individuals, bacteria can simultaneously switch on their virulence factor production and establish successful infections in eukaryotes. Understanding pathogen-host interactions requires the use of infection models. As the use of rodents is limited, for ethical considerations and the high costs associated with their use, alternative models based on invertebrates have been developed. Invertebrate models have the benefits of low handling costs, limited space requirements and rapid generation of results. This review presents examples of such models available for studying the pathogenicity of the Gram-negative bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Quorum sensing interference, known as quorum quenching, suggests a promising disease-control strategy since quorum-quenching mechanisms appear to play important roles in microbe-microbe and host-pathogen interactions. Examples of natural and synthetic quorum sensing inhibitors and their potential as antimicrobials in Pseudomonas-related infections are discussed in the second part of this review. PMID:24065108

  17. Novel Magnetic Hydrogen Sensing: A Case Study Using Antiferromagnetic Hematite Nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Punnoose, Alex; Reddy, K. M.; Thurber, A.; Hays, Jason; Engelhard, Mark H.

    2007-04-25

    Hydrogen sensing is a critical component of safety to address wide spread public perceptions of the hazards of production, storage, transportation and use of hydrogen in proposed future automobiles and in various other applications. A nanoscale magnetic hydrogen sensor is proposed based on the experimental observation of systematically varying the saturation magnetization and remanence of nanoscale antiferromagnetic hematite with hydrogen flow. The saturation magnetization and remanence of the nanoscale hematite sample showed an increase of one to two orders of magnitude in the presence of flowing hydrogen gas at concentrations in the 1 to 10% range and at 575 K, suggesting that a practical magnetic hydrogen sensor could be developed using this material and the novel magnetic sensing method. Thermogravimetric analysis of the hematite sample shows significant mass loss when hydrogen gas is introduced. Xray diffraction and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy studies ruled out any impurity phase formation as a result of gas-sample interaction. This work thus facilitates the use of the magnetic properties of an antiferromagnetic material as gas sensing parameters, thus exploring the concept of ‘magnetic gas sensing’.

  18. A kinetic study of bitter taste receptor sensing using immobilized porcine taste bud tissues.

    PubMed

    Wei, Lihui; Qiao, Lixin; Pang, Guangchang; Xie, Junbo

    2017-06-15

    At present, developing an efficient assay method for truly reflecting the real feelings of gustatory tissues is of great importance. In this study, a novel biosensor was fabricated to investigate the kinetic characteristics of the receptors in taste bud tissues sensing bitter substances for the first time. Porcine taste bud tissues were used as the sensing elements, and the sandwich-type sensing membrane was fixed onto a glassy carbon electrode for assembling the biosensor. With the developed sensor, the response currents induced by sucrose octaacetate, denatonium benzoate, and quercetin stimulating corresponding receptors were determined. The results demonstrated that the interaction between the analyst with their receptors were fitting to hyperbola (R(2)=0.9776, 0.9980 and 0.9601), and the activation constants were 8.748×10(-15)mol/L, 1.429×10(-12)mol/L, 6.613×10(-14)mol/L, respectively. The average number of receptors per cell was calculated as 1.75, 28.58, and 13.23, while the signal amplification factors were 1.08×10(4), 2.89×10(3) and 9.76×10(4). These suggest that the sensor can be used to quantitatively describe the interaction characteristics of cells or tissue receptors with their ligands, the role of cellular signaling cascade, the number of receptors, and the signal transmission pathways.

  19. How action selection influences the sense of agency: An ERP study.

    PubMed

    Sidarus, Nura; Vuorre, Matti; Haggard, Patrick

    2017-02-08

    Sense of agency (SoA) refers to the feeling that we are in control of our actions and, through them, of events in the outside world. One influential view claims that the SoA depends on retrospectively matching the expected and actual outcomes of action. However, recent studies have revealed an additional, prospective component to SoA, driven by action selection processes. We used event-related potentials (ERPs) to clarify the neural mechanisms underlying prospective agency. Subliminal priming was used to manipulate the fluency of selecting a left or right hand action in response to a supraliminal target. These actions were followed by one of several coloured circles, after a variable delay. Participants then rated their degree of control over this visual outcome. Incompatible priming impaired action selection, and reduced sense of agency over action outcomes, relative to compatible priming. More negative ERPs immediately after the action, linked to post-decisional action monitoring, were associated with reduced agency ratings over action outcomes. Additionally, feedback-related negativity evoked by the outcome was also associated with reduced agency ratings. These ERP components may reflect brain processes underlying prospective and retrospective components of sense of agency respectively.

  20. Birth setting, transfer and maternal sense of control: results from the DELIVER study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background In the Netherlands, low risk women receive midwife-led care and can choose to give birth at home or in hospital. There is concern that transfer of care during labour from midwife-led care to an obstetrician-led unit leads to negative birth experiences, in particular among those with planned home birth. In this study we compared sense of control, which is a major attribute of the childbirth experience, for women planning home compared to women planning hospital birth under midwife-led care. In particular, we studied sense of control among women who were transferred to obstetric-led care during labour according to planned place of birth: home versus hospital. Methods We used data from the prospective multicentre DELIVER (Data EersteLIjns VERloskunde) cohort-study, conducted in 2009 and 2010 in the Netherlands. Sense of control during labour was assessed 6 weeks after birth, using the short version of the Labour Agentry Scale (LAS-11). A higher LAS-11 score indicates a higher feeling of control. We considered a difference of a minimum of 5.5 points as clinically relevant. Results Nulliparous- and parous women who planned a home birth had a 2.6 (95% CI 1.0, 4.3) and a 3.0 (1.6, 4.4) higher LAS score during first stage of labour respectively and during second stage a higher score of 2.8 (0.9, 4.7) and 2.3 (0.6, 4.0), compared with women who planned a hospital birth. Overall, women who were transferred experienced a lower sense of control than women who were not transferred. Parous women who planned a home birth and who were transferred had a 4.3 (0.2, 8.4) higher LAS score in 2nd stage, compared to those who planned a hospital birth and who were transferred. Conclusion We found no clinically relevant differences in feelings of control among women who planned a home or hospital birth. Transfer of care during labour lowered feelings of control, but feelings of control were similar for transferred women who planned a home or hospital birth. As far as their

  1. Studies of selected transuranium and lanthanide triiodides under pressure using absorption spectrophotometry

    SciTech Connect

    Haire, R.G.; Young, J.P.; Peterson, J.R.; Benedict, U.

    1986-01-01

    The anhydrous triiodides of plutonium, americium, and curium under pressure have been investigated using absorption spectrophotometry. These initial studies on plutonium and curium triiodides together with the published data for americium triiodide show that the rhombohedral (BiI/sub 3/-type structure) form of these compounds can be converted to the same orthorhombic (PuBr/sub 3/-type structure) form by applying pressure at room temperature. Absorption spectrophotometry can often differentiate between two crystallographic forms of materials and has been used in the present high pressure studies to monitor the effects of pressure on the triiodides. A complication in these studies of the triiodides is a significant shift of their absorption edges from the near uv to the visible spectral region with pressure. With curium triiodide this shift causes interference with the major f-f absorption peaks and precludes identification by absorption spectrophotometry of the high pressure phase of CmI/sub 3/. 21 refs., 2 figs.

  2. System Study: High-Pressure Safety Injection 1998–2013

    SciTech Connect

    Schroeder, John Alton

    2015-02-01

    This report presents an unreliability evaluation of the high-pressure safety injection system (HPSI) at 69 U.S. commercial nuclear power plants. Demand, run hours, and failure data from fiscal year 1998 through 2013 for selected components were obtained from the Institute of Nuclear Power Operations (INPO) Consolidated Events Database (ICES). The unreliability results are trended for the most recent 10-year period while yearly estimates for system unreliability are provided for the entire active period. No statistically significant increasing or decreasing trends were identified in the HPSI results.

  3. System Study: High-Pressure Coolant Injection 1998-2012

    SciTech Connect

    T. E. Wierman

    2013-10-01

    This report presents an unreliability evaluation of the high-pressure coolant injection system (HPCI) at 69 U.S. commercial nuclear power plants. Demand, run hours, and failure data from fiscal year 1998 through 2012 for selected components were obtained from the Equipment Performance and Information Exchange (EPIX). The unreliability results are trended for the most recent 10 year period while yearly estimates for system unreliability are provided for the entire active period. No statistically significant increasing or decreasing trends were identified in the HPCI results.

  4. System Study: High-Pressure Coolant Injection 1998–2013

    SciTech Connect

    Schroeder, John Alton

    2015-01-31

    This report presents an unreliability evaluation of the high-pressure coolant injection system (HPCI) at 25 U.S. commercial boiling water reactors. Demand, run hours, and failure data from fiscal year 1998 through 2013 for selected components were obtained from the Institute of Nuclear Power Operations (INPO) Consolidated Events Database (ICES). The unreliability results are trended for the most recent 10-year period, while yearly estimates for system unreliability are provided for the entire active period. No statistically significant increasing or decreasing trends were identified in the HPCI results.

  5. System Study: High-Pressure Core Spray 1998–2012

    SciTech Connect

    T. E. Wierman

    2013-10-01

    This report presents an unreliability evaluation of the high-pressure core spray (HPCS) at 8 U.S. commercial boiling water reactors. Demand, run hours, and failure data from fiscal year 1998 through 2012 for selected components were obtained from the Equipment Performance and Information Exchange (EPIX). The unreliability results are trended for the most recent 10 year period while yearly estimates for system unreliability are provided for the entire active period. No statistically significant increasing or decreasing trends were identified in the HPCS results.

  6. System Study: High-Pressure Core Spray 1998–2013

    SciTech Connect

    Schroeder, John Alton

    2015-01-31

    This report presents an unreliability evaluation of the high-pressure core spray (HPCS) at eight U.S. commercial boiling water reactors. Demand, run hours, and failure data from fiscal year 1998 through 2013 for selected components were obtained from the Institute of Nuclear Power Operations (INPO) Consolidated Events Database (ICES). The unreliability results are trended for the most recent 10-year period, while yearly estimates for system unreliability are provided for the entire active period. No statistically significant increasing or decreasing trends were identified in the HPCS results.

  7. System Study: High-Pressure Core Spray 1998-2014

    SciTech Connect

    Schroeder, John Alton

    2015-12-01

    This report presents an unreliability evaluation of the high-pressure core spray (HPCS) at eight U.S. commercial boiling water reactors. Demand, run hours, and failure data from fiscal year 1998 through 2014 for selected components were obtained from the Institute of Nuclear Power Operations (INPO) Consolidated Events Database (ICES). The unreliability results are trended for the most recent 10 year period, while yearly estimates for system unreliability are provided for the entire active period. No statistically significant increasing or decreasing trends were identified in the HPCS results.

  8. System Study: High-Pressure Coolant Injection 1998-2014

    SciTech Connect

    Schroeder, John Alton

    2015-12-01

    This report presents an unreliability evaluation of the high-pressure coolant injection system (HPCI) at 25 U.S. commercial boiling water reactors. Demand, run hours, and failure data from fiscal year 1998 through 2014 for selected components were obtained from the Institute of Nuclear Power Operations (INPO) Consolidated Events Database (ICES). The unreliability results are trended for the most recent 10 year period, while yearly estimates for system unreliability are provided for the entire active period. No statistically significant increasing or decreasing trends were identified in the HPCI results.

  9. Vandenberg Air Force Base Pressure Gradient Wind Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shafer, Jaclyn A.

    2013-01-01

    Warning category winds can adversely impact day-to-day space lift operations at Vandenberg Air Force Base (VAFB) in California. NASA's Launch Services Program and other programs at VAFB use wind forecasts issued by the 30 Operational Support Squadron Weather Flight (30 OSSWF) to determine if they need to limit activities or protect property such as a launch vehicle. The 30 OSSWF tasked the AMU to develop an automated Excel graphical user interface that includes pressure gradient thresholds between specific observing stations under different synoptic regimes to aid forecasters when issuing wind warnings. This required the AMU to determine if relationships between the variables existed.

  10. High Pressure X-ray Diffraction Study of Potassium Azide

    SciTech Connect

    C Ji; F Zhang; D Hong; H Zhu; J Wu; M Chyu; V Levitas; Y Ma

    2011-12-31

    Crystal structure and compressibility of potassium azide was investigated by in-situ synchrotron powder X-ray diffraction in a diamond anvil cell at room temperature up to 37.7 GPa. In the body-centered tetragonal (bct) phase, an anisotropic compressibility was observed with greater compressibility in the direction perpendicular to the plane containing N{sub 3}{sup -} ions than directions within that plane. The bulk modulus of the bct phase was determined to be 18.6(7) GPa. A pressure-induced phase transition may occur at 15.5 GPa.

  11. System Study: High-Pressure Safety Injection 1998-2014

    SciTech Connect

    Schroeder, John Alton

    2015-12-01

    This report presents an unreliability evaluation of the high-pressure safety injection system (HPSI) at 69 U.S. commercial nuclear power plants. Demand, run hours, and failure data from fiscal year 1998 through 2014 for selected components were obtained from the Institute of Nuclear Power Operations (INPO) Consolidated Events Database (ICES). The unreliability results are trended for the most recent 10 year period, while yearly estimates for system unreliability are provided for the entire active period. No statistically significant increasing or decreasing trends were identified in the HPSI results.

  12. System Study: High-Pressure Safety Injection 1998–2012

    SciTech Connect

    T. E. Wierman

    2013-10-01

    This report presents an unreliability evaluation of the high-pressure safety injection system (HPSI) at 69 U.S. commercial nuclear power plants. Demand, run hours, and failure data from fiscal year 1998 through 2012 for selected components were obtained from the Equipment Performance and Information Exchange (EPIX). The unreliability results are trended for the most recent 10 year period while yearly estimates for system unreliability are provided for the entire active period. No statistically significant increasing or decreasing trends were identified in the HPSI results.

  13. Engineering studies of vectorcardiographs in blood pressure measuring systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mark, R. G.

    1975-01-01

    The following projects involving cardiovascular instrumentation were conducted: (1) the development and fabrication of a three-dimensional display measurement system for vectorcardiograms, (2) the development and fabrication of a cardiovascular monitoring system to noninvasively monitor beat-by-beat the blood pressure and heart rate using aortic pulse wave velocity, (3) the development of software for an interactive system to analyze systolic time interval data, and (4) the development of microprocessor-based physiologic instrumentation, focussing initially on EKG rhythm analysis. Brief descriptions of these projects were given.

  14. Radar studies related to the earth resources program. [remote sensing programs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holtzman, J.

    1972-01-01

    The radar systems research discussed is directed toward achieving successful application of radar to remote sensing problems in such areas as geology, hydrology, agriculture, geography, forestry, and oceanography. Topics discussed include imaging radar and evaluation of its modification, study of digital processing for synthetic aperture system, digital simulation of synthetic aperture system, averaging techniques studies, ultrasonic modeling of panchromatic system, panchromatic radar/radar spectrometer development, measuring octave-bandwidth response of selected targets, scatterometer system analysis, and a model Fresnel-zone processor for synthetic aperture imagery.

  15. Gypsum under pressure: A first-principles study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giacomazzi, Luigi; Scandolo, Sandro

    2010-02-01

    We investigate by means of first-principles methods the structural response of gypsum (CaSO4ṡ2H2O) to pressures within and above the stability range of gypsum-I (P≤4GPa) . Structural and vibrational properties calculated for gypsum-I are in excellent agreement with experimental data. Compression within gypsum-I takes place predominantly through a reduction in the volume of the CaO8 polyhedra and through a distortion of the hydrogen bonds. The distance between CaSO4 layers becomes increasingly incompressible, indicating a mechanical limit to the packing of water molecules between the layers. We find that a structure with collapsed interlayer distances becomes more stable than gypsum-I above about 5 GPa. The collapse is concomitant with a rearrangement of the hydrogen-bond network of the water molecules. Comparison of the vibrational spectra calculated for this structure with experimental data taken above 5 GPa supports the validity of our model for the high-pressure phase of gypsum.

  16. Emotional Autonomy versus Susceptibility to Peer Pressure: A Case Study of Hong Kong Adolescent Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chan, Kwok-Wai; Chan, Siu-Mui

    2008-01-01

    A questionnaire consisting of two scales was administered to 550 Hong Kong secondary students to examine their emotional autonomy and susceptibility to peer pressure. Emotional autonomy was studied by the scale (EAS) developed by Steinberg and Silverberg (1986) and susceptibility to peer pressure was studied by the scale developed by Sim and Koh…

  17. Intracranial pressure increases during weightlessness: A parabolic flights study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denise, P.; Normand, H.; Buzer, L.; Duretete, A.; Avan, P.

    2005-08-01

    The fluid shift induced by weightlessness likely induces an elevated intracranial pressure (ICP). This factor may contribute to space adaptation syndrome (SAS). Recently, it has been shown that ICP can be monitored every few seconds non invasively by otoacoustic emissions (OAE). The OAE of 6 subjects were measured along the course of parabolic flights aboard the zero-gravity A300 Airbus. Built-in noise rejection and signal processing techniques enabled valid OAE signals to be collected and analyzed online in 4 of 6 subjects. On average, the phase of 1 kHz- OAE rotated by -41° from 1 to 1.8 g, and by +78.7° at 0 g relative to 1 g. From reference invasive ICP measurements in a control group of neurosurgery patients, it is possible to infer that ICP increased by about 34 mmHg in transient weightlessness.

  18. Accuracy and repeatability of the gait analysis by the WalkinSense system.

    PubMed

    de Castro, Marcelo P; Meucci, Marco; Soares, Denise P; Fonseca, Pedro; Borgonovo-Santos, Márcio; Sousa, Filipa; Machado, Leandro; Vilas-Boas, João Paulo

    2014-01-01

    WalkinSense is a new device designed to monitor walking. The aim of this study was to measure the accuracy and repeatability of the gait analysis performed by the WalkinSense system. Descriptions of values recorded by WalkinSense depicting typical gait in adults are also presented. A bench experiment using the Trublu calibration device was conducted to statically test the WalkinSense. Following this, a dynamic test was carried out overlapping the WalkinSense and the Pedar insoles in 40 healthy participants during walking. Pressure peak, pressure peak time, pressure-time integral, and mean pressure at eight-foot regions were calculated. In the bench experiments, the repeatability (i) among the WalkinSense sensors (within), (ii) between two WalkinSense devices, and (iii) between the WalkinSense and the Trublu devices was excellent. In the dynamic tests, the repeatability of the WalkinSense (i) between stances in the same trial (within-trial) and (ii) between trials was also excellent (ICC > 0.90). When the eight-foot regions were analyzed separately, the within-trial and between-trials repeatability was good-to-excellent in 88% (ICC > 0.80) of the data and fair in 11%. In short, the data suggest that the WalkinSense has good-to-excellent levels of accuracy and repeatability for plantar pressure variables.

  19. switchSENSE: A new technology to study protein-RNA interactions.

    PubMed

    Cléry, Antoine; Sohier, Thibault J M; Welte, Thomas; Langer, Andreas; Allain, Frédéric H T

    2017-03-09

    Characterization of RNA-binding protein interactions with RNA became inevitable to properly understand the cellular mechanisms involved in gene expression regulation. Structural investigations bring information at the atomic level on these interactions and complementary methods such as Isothermal Titration Calorimetry (ITC) and Surface Plasmon Resonance (SPR) are commonly used to quantify the affinity of these RNA-protein complexes and evaluate the effect of mutations affecting these interactions. The switchSENSE technology has recently been developed and already successfully used to investigate protein interactions with different types of binding partners (DNA, protein/peptide or even small molecules). In this study, we show that this method is also well suited to study RNA binding proteins (RBPs). We could successfully investigate the binding to RNA of three different RBPs (Fox-1, SRSF1 and Tra2-β1) and obtained KD values very close to the ones determined previously by SPR or ITC for these complexes. These results show that the switchSENSE technology can be used as an alternative method to study protein-RNA interactions with KD values in the low micromolar (10(-6)) to nanomolar (10(-7)-10(-9)) and probably picomolar (10(-10)-10(-12)) range. The absence of labelling requirement for the analyte molecules and the use of very low amounts of protein and RNA molecules make the switchSENSE approach very attractive compared to other methods. Finally, we discuss about the potential of this approach in obtaining more sophisticated information such as structural conformational changes upon RBP binding to RNA.

  20. Linear oxygen-sensing response from a rhenium complex induced by heavy atom: synthesis, characterization, photophysical study and sensing performance.

    PubMed

    Wan, Pu; Zhao, Lun; Wang, Lisha; Xu, Guangyang

    2013-08-01

    In this paper, we synthesized a Br-containing ligand of 2-(4-bromophenyl)-5-(pyridin-2-yl)-1,3,4-oxadiazole and its corresponding Re(I) complex. Their synthesis, characterization, single crystal structure, electronic transitions and photophysical property were presented and discussed in detail. This Re(I) complex was found to be a yellow emitter with slim π→π* radiative decay contribution, and its emission was also found to be sensitive towards O2. By doping this Re(I) complex into a polymer matrix, the oxygen-sensing performance of the resulted composite nanofibers was also investigated. Owing to the porous structure of the supporting matrix, the optimal sample gave the highest sensitivity of 3.91 with short response time of only 9 s. In addition, the linearity of the Stern-Volmer plots was greatly improved due to the highly pure emissive center triggered by heavy-atom turbulence effect from Br atom, as indicted by theoretical calculation result.

  1. Linear oxygen-sensing response from a rhenium complex induced by heavy atom: Synthesis, characterization, photophysical study and sensing performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pu, Wan; Lun, Zhao; Lisha, Wang; Guangyang, Xu

    2013-08-01

    In this paper, we synthesized a Br-containing ligand of 2-(4-bromophenyl)-5-(pyridin-2-yl)-1,3,4-oxadiazole and its corresponding Re(I) complex. Their synthesis, characterization, single crystal structure, electronic transitions and photophysical property were presented and discussed in detail. This Re(I) complex was found to be a yellow emitter with slim π → π* radiative decay contribution, and its emission was also found to be sensitive towards O2. By doping this Re(I) complex into a polymer matrix, the oxygen-sensing performance of the resulted composite nanofibers was also investigated. Owing to the porous structure of the supporting matrix, the optimal sample gave the highest sensitivity of 3.91 with short response time of only 9 s. In addition, the linearity of the Stern-Volmer plots was greatly improved due to the highly pure emissive center triggered by heavy-atom turbulence effect from Br atom, as indicted by theoretical calculation result.

  2. High accuracy differential pressure measurements using fluid-filled catheters - A feasibility study in compliant tubes.

    PubMed

    Rotman, Oren Moshe; Weiss, Dar; Zaretsky, Uri; Shitzer, Avraham; Einav, Shmuel

    2015-09-18

    High accuracy differential pressure measurements are required in various biomedical and medical applications, such as in fluid-dynamic test systems, or in the cath-lab. Differential pressure measurements using fluid-filled catheters are relatively inexpensive, yet may be subjected to common mode pressure errors (CMP), which can significantly reduce the measurement accuracy. Recently, a novel correction method for high accuracy differential pressure measurements was presented, and was shown to effectively remove CMP distortions from measurements acquired in rigid tubes. The purpose of the present study was to test the feasibility of this correction method inside compliant tubes, which effectively simulate arteries. Two tubes with varying compliance were tested under dynamic flow and pressure conditions to cover the physiological range of radial distensibility in coronary arteries. A third, compliant model, with a 70% stenosis severity was additionally tested. Differential pressure measurements were acquired over a 3 cm tube length using a fluid-filled double-lumen catheter, and were corrected using the proposed CMP correction method. Validation of the corrected differential pressure signals was performed by comparison to differential pressure recordings taken via a direct connection to the compliant tubes, and by comparison to predicted differential pressure readings of matching fluid-structure interaction (FSI) computational simulations. The results show excellent agreement between the experimentally acquired and computationally determined differential pressure signals. This validates the application of the CMP correction method in compliant tubes of the physiological range for up to intermediate size stenosis severity of 70%.

  3. Flood hazards studies in the Mississippi River basin using remote sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rango, A.; Anderson, A. T.

    1974-01-01

    The Spring 1973 Mississippi River flood was investigated using remotely sensed data from ERTS-1. Both manual and automatic analyses of the data indicated that ERTS-1 is extremely useful as a regional tool for flood mamagement. Quantitative estimates of area flooded were made in St. Charles County, Missouri and Arkansas. Flood hazard mapping was conducted in three study areas along the Mississippi River using pre-flood ERTS-1 imagery enlarged to 1:250,000 and 1:100,000 scale. Initial results indicate that ERTS-1 digital mapping of flood prone areas can be performed at 1:62,500 which is comparable to some conventional flood hazard map scales.

  4. Remote sensing for forest applications in New York: Two case studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stanturf, J. A.; Philipson, W. R.; Balliett, L. K.; Jahn, K. L.

    1981-01-01

    Under-utilized forest resources in the Northeast can supply fiber to new markets. Information on forest resources, however, is often too aggregated to estimate available woody material with sufficient detail for planning specific projects. Over the past year, staff of Cornell University's Remote Sensing Program, under a grant from NASA, assisted New York State agency personnel by assessing available woody material for two potential development projects, a wood-fired power plant and a particle board manufacturing plant. These feasibility studies are reviewed, illustrating how information derived from high-altitude aircraft photographs, LANDSAT imagery, and available supporting data were integrated to arrive at estimates of woody material.

  5. Remote sensing of the earth's biosphere - A tool for studies of the global atmospheric environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bartlett, David S.; Harriss, Robert C.; Bartlett, Karen B.

    1987-01-01

    Recent advances in remote sensing technology and its use for global studies of the biospheric processes are described. Special consideration is given to research related to two issues: (1) quantifying the impacts of natural vegetation and its changing patterns of occurrence on the atmospheric CO2 budget and (2) assessing wetlands (such as the swamps and marshes of Florida's Everglades) as sources of atmospheric CH4. The results include the data from NOAA-AVHRR sensors and from experiments in remote detection of plant growth rate.

  6. How Black women make sense of 'White' and 'Black' fashion magazines: a qualitative think aloud study.

    PubMed

    Ogden, Jane; Russell, Sheriden

    2013-12-01

    This qualitative think aloud study explored how Black women (n = 32) processed information from a White or Black fashion magazine. Comments to the 'White' magazine were characterised by rejection, being critical of the media and ambivalence, whereas they responded to the 'Black' magazine with celebration, identification and a search for depth. Transcending these themes was their self-identity of being a Black woman that was brought to the fore either by a sense of exclusion (White magazine) or engagement (Black magazine). Such an identity provides resilience against the media's thin ideals by minimising the processes of social comparison and internalisation.

  7. Association of blood pressure in late adolescence with subsequent mortality: cohort study of Swedish male conscripts

    PubMed Central

    Neovius, Martin; Tynelius, Per; Rasmussen, Finn

    2011-01-01

    Objective To investigate the nature and magnitude of relations of systolic and diastolic blood pressures in late adolescence to mortality. Design Nationwide cohort study. Setting General community in Sweden. Participants Swedish men (n=1 207 141) who had military conscription examinations between 1969 and 1995 at a mean age of 18.4 years, followed up for a median of 24 (range 0-37) years. Main outcome measures Total mortality, cardiovascular mortality, and non-cardiovascular mortality. Results During follow-up, 28 934 (2.4%) men died. The relation of systolic blood pressure to total mortality was U shaped, with the lowest risk at a systolic blood pressure of about 130 mm Hg. This pattern was driven by the relation to non-cardiovascular mortality, whereas the relation to cardiovascular mortality was monotonically increasing (higher risk with higher blood pressure). The relation of diastolic blood pressure to mortality risk was monotonically increasing and stronger than that of systolic blood pressure, in terms of both relative risk and population attributable fraction (deaths that could be avoided if blood pressure was in the optimal range). Relations to cardiovascular and non-cardiovascular mortality were similar, with an apparent risk threshold at a diastolic blood pressure of about 90 mm Hg, below which diastolic blood pressure and mortality were unrelated, and above which risk increased steeply with higher diastolic blood pressures. Conclusions In adolescent men, the relation of diastolic blood pressure to mortality was more consistent than that of systolic blood pressure. Considering current efforts for earlier detection and prevention of risk, these observations emphasise the risk associated with high diastolic blood pressure in young adulthood. PMID:21343202

  8. Study and application of a high-pressure water jet multi-functional flow test system.

    PubMed

    Shi, Huaizhong; Li, Gensheng; Huang, Zhongwei; Li, Jingbin; Zhang, Yi

    2015-12-01

    As the exploration and development of oil and gas focus more and more on deeper formation, hydraulic issues such as high-pressure water jet rock breaking, wellbore multiphase flow law, cuttings carrying efficiency, and hydraulic fracturing technique during the drilling and completion process have become the key points. To accomplish related researches, a high-pressure water jet multi-functional flow test system was designed. The following novel researches are carried out: study of high-pressure water jet characteristics under confining pressure, wellbore multiphase flow regime, hydraulic pressure properties of down hole tools during jet fracturing and pulsed cavitation jet drilling, and deflector's friction in radial jet drilling. The validity and feasibility of the experimental results provided by the system with various test modules have proved its importance in the research of the high-pressure water jet and well completion technology.

  9. Study and application of a high-pressure water jet multi-functional flow test system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Huaizhong; Li, Gensheng; Huang, Zhongwei; Li, Jingbin; Zhang, Yi

    2015-12-01

    As the exploration and development of oil and gas focus more and more on deeper formation, hydraulic issues such as high-pressure water jet rock breaking, wellbore multiphase flow law, cuttings carrying efficiency, and hydraulic fracturing technique during the drilling and completion process have become the key points. To accomplish related researches, a high-pressure water jet multi-functional flow test system was designed. The following novel researches are carried out: study of high-pressure water jet characteristics under confining pressure, wellbore multiphase flow regime, hydraulic pressure properties of down hole tools during jet fracturing and pulsed cavitation jet drilling, and deflector's friction in radial jet drilling. The validity and feasibility of the experimental results provided by the system with various test modules have proved its importance in the research of the high-pressure water jet and well completion technology.

  10. High pressure transition in amorphous As2S3 studied by EXAFS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaccari, M.; Garbarino, G.; Yannopoulos, S. N.; Andrikopoulos, K. S.; Pascarelli, S.

    2009-12-01

    We report an in situ high pressure investigation of the structural change in vitreous As2S3 up to 60 GPa using the diamond anvil cell and energy dispersive x-ray absorption spectroscopy. The main finding of the present study is a gradual elongation of the average As-S bond length, which takes place in the pressure range of 15-50 GPa. This change is interpreted as a signature of the coordination number increase around As atoms. The negative shift of the As K absorption edge position confirms the progressive metallization of the glass at high pressure. The observed changes are reversible after pressure release.

  11. High pressure flame system for pollution studies with results for methane-air diffusion flames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, I. M.; Maahs, H. G.

    1977-01-01

    A high pressure flame system was designed and constructed for studying nitrogen oxide formation in fuel air combustion. Its advantages and limitations were demonstrated by tests with a confined laminar methane air diffusion flame over the pressure range from 1 to 50 atm. The methane issued from a 3.06 mm diameter port concentrically into a stream of air contained within a 20.5 mm diameter chimney. As the combustion pressure is increased, the flame changes in shape from wide and convex to slender and concave, and there is a marked increase in the amount of luminous carbon. The height of the flame changes only moderately with pressure.

  12. High pressure transition in amorphous As{sub 2}S{sub 3} studied by EXAFS

    SciTech Connect

    Vaccari, M.; Garbarino, G.; Pascarelli, S.; Yannopoulos, S. N.; Andrikopoulos, K. S.

    2009-12-14

    We report an in situ high pressure investigation of the structural change in vitreous As{sub 2}S{sub 3} up to 60 GPa using the diamond anvil cell and energy dispersive x-ray absorption spectroscopy. The main finding of the present study is a gradual elongation of the average As-S bond length, which takes place in the pressure range of 15-50 GPa. This change is interpreted as a signature of the coordination number increase around As atoms. The negative shift of the As K absorption edge position confirms the progressive metallization of the glass at high pressure. The observed changes are reversible after pressure release.

  13. Study of sense of coherence health promoting behavior in north Indian students

    PubMed Central

    Suraj, Senjam; Singh, Amarjeet

    2011-01-01

    Background & objectives: With advances in knowledge about health promotion, public health professionals are in search for the determinants of personal health behaviours. This study was carried out to explore the level of engagement of north Indian students in health promoting behaviours; to determine their sense of coherence scores; and to ascertain the determinants of health promoting behaviours of these students. Methods: A cross-sectional study was done in four randomly selected colleges of Chandigarh during 2007-2008 in 200 students (100 male, 100 female). Their health promoting lifestyle profile (HPLP) and sense of coherence (SOC) scores were estimated using interviews. The data were analyzed using Pearson's product moment correlation, and also stepwise linear regression analysis. Results: Mean HPLP and SOC scores of the students were 138.69 and 130.87, respectively. Females cared more about their health than males. Male students were more involved in physical activities. There was a linear correlation between the total SOC and HPLP scores (r=0.3). Female students (63%) consulted doctors more than males (50%) and washed their hands more regularly (P<0.05). Only 13 per cent students practiced yoga regularly. Female students had more meaningful relationships with friends and had more faith in God. Regression equation revealed that the two independent variables (SOC and age) accounted for 10.8 per cent of the variance in HPLP. Interpretation & conclusion: Students with higher SOC scores had higher HPLP scores. Female students were more health conscious than male students. In general, college students in Chandigarh had a good health promoting lifestyle and good sense of coherence. PMID:22199103

  14. Study of short atmospheric pressure dc glow microdischarge in air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kudryavtsev, Anatoly; Bogdanov, Eugene; Chirtsov, Alexander; Emelin, Sergey

    2011-10-01

    The results of experiments and simulations of short (without positive column) atmospheric pressure dc glow discharge in air are presented. We used metal steel electrodes with a gap of 5-100 microns. The experimental voltage-current characteristic's (VAC) have a constant or slightly increasing form at low gap. The most stable microdischarges were burning with a flat cathode and rounded anode, when the length of the discharge is automatically established near the minimum of the Paschen curve by changing their binding on the anode. In this case microdischarge was stable and it had growing VAC. For simulations we used 2D fluid model with kinetic description of electrons. We solved the balance equations for the vibrationally- and the electronically-excited states of a nitrogen and oxygen molecules; nitrogen and oxygen atoms; ozone molecule; and different nitrogen and oxygen ions with different plasmochemical reactions between them. Simulations predicted the main regions of the dc glow discharges including cathode and anode sheath and plasma of negative glow, Faraday dark space and transition region. Gas heating plays an important role in shaping the discharge profiles. The results of experiments and simulations of short (without positive column) atmospheric pressure dc glow discharge in air are presented. We used metal steel electrodes with a gap of 5-100 microns. The experimental voltage-current characteristic's (VAC) have a constant or slightly increasing form at low gap. The most stable microdischarges were burning with a flat cathode and rounded anode, when the length of the discharge is automatically established near the minimum of the Paschen curve by changing their binding on the anode. In this case microdischarge was stable and it had growing VAC. For simulations we used 2D fluid model with kinetic description of electrons. We solved the balance equations for the vibrationally- and the electronically-excited states of a nitrogen and oxygen molecules; nitrogen

  15. A Context-Sensing Mobile Phone App (Q Sense) for Smoking Cessation: A Mixed-Methods Study

    PubMed Central

    Hopewell, Sarah; Lathia, Neal; Schalbroeck, Rik; Brown, Chloë; Mascolo, Cecilia; McEwen, Andy; Sutton, Stephen

    2016-01-01

    Background A major cause of lapse and relapse to smoking during a quit attempt is craving triggered by cues from a smoker's immediate environment. To help smokers address these cue-induced cravings when attempting to quit, we have developed a context-aware smoking cessation app, Q Sense, which uses a smoking episode-reporting system combined with location sensing and geofencing to tailor support content and trigger support delivery in real time. Objective We sought to (1) assess smokers’ compliance with reporting their smoking in real time and identify reasons for noncompliance, (2) assess the app's accuracy in identifying user-specific high-risk locations for smoking, (3) explore the feasibility and user perspective of geofence-triggered support, and (4) identify any technological issues or privacy concerns. Methods An explanatory sequential mixed-methods design was used, where data collected by the app informed semistructured interviews. Participants were smokers who owned an Android mobile phone and were willing to set a quit date within one month (N=15). App data included smoking reports with context information and geolocation, end-of-day (EoD) surveys of smoking beliefs and behavior, support message ratings, and app interaction data. Interviews were undertaken and analyzed thematically (N=13). Quantitative and qualitative data were analyzed separately and findings presented sequentially. Results Out of 15 participants, 3 (20%) discontinued use of the app prematurely. Pre-quit date, the mean number of smoking reports received was 37.8 (SD 21.2) per participant, or 2.0 (SD 2.2) per day per participant. EoD surveys indicated that participants underreported smoking on at least 56.2% of days. Geolocation was collected in 97.0% of smoking reports with a mean accuracy of 31.6 (SD 16.8) meters. A total of 5 out of 9 (56%) eligible participants received geofence-triggered support. Interaction data indicated that 50.0% (137/274) of geofence-triggered message

  16. Airborne multispectral remote sensing data to estimate several oenological parameters in vineyard production. A case study of application of remote sensing data to precision viticulture in central Italy.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tramontana, Gianluca; Girard, Filippo; Belli, Claudio; Comandini, Maria Cristina; Pietromarchi, Paolo; Tiberi, Domenico; Papale, Dario

    2010-05-01

    It is widely recognized that environmental differences within the vineyard, with respect to soils, microclimate, and topography, can influence grape characteristics and crop yields. Besides, the central Italy landscape is characterized by a high level of fragmentation and heterogeneity It requires stringent Remote sensing technical features in terms of spectral, geometric and temporal resolution to aimed at supporting applications for precision viticulture. In response to the needs of the Italian grape and wine industry for an evaluation of precision viticulture technologies, the DISAFRI (University of Tuscia) and the Agricultural Research Council - Oenological research unit (ENC-CRA) jointly carried out an experimental study during the year 2008. The study was carried out on 2 areas located in the town of Velletri, near Rome; for each area, two varieties (red and white grape) were studied: Nero d'Avola and Sauvignon blanc in first area , Merlot and Sauvignon blanc in second. Remote sensing data were acquired in different periods using a low cost multisensor Airborne remote sensing platform developed by DISAFRI (ASPIS-2 Advanced Spectroscopic Imager System). ASPIS-2, an evolution of the ASPIS sensor (Papale et al 2008, Sensors), is a multispectral sensor based on 4 CCD and 3 interferential filters per CCD. The filters are user selectable during the flight and in this way Aspis is able to acquire data in 12 bands in the visible and near infrared regions with a bandwidth of 10 or 20 nm. To the purposes of this study 7 spectral band were acquired and 15 vegetation indices calculated. During the ripeness period several vegetative and oenochemical parameters were monitored. Anova test shown that several oenochemical variables, such as sugars, total acidity, polyphenols and anthocyanins differ according to the variety taken into consideration. In order to evaluate the time autocorrelation of several oenological parameters value, a simple linear regression between

  17. Kinetic modeling study of toluene pyrolysis at low pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Lidong; Cai, Jianghuai; Zhang, Taichang; Qi, Fei

    2010-09-15

    A detailed kinetic model, consisting of 137 species and 530 reactions, was developed to simulate toluene pyrolysis at low pressure within the temperature range from 1270 to 1870 K. The mole fraction profiles predicted for pyrolysis species up to phenanthrene were in good agreement with the experiment. The decomposition pathways of toluene and the growth pathways to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) were discussed from reaction flux analysis. Toluene decomposes through the reaction sequence C{sub 6}H{sub 5}CH{sub 3}{yields} C{sub 6}H{sub 5}CH{sub 2}{yields}C{sub 7}H{sub 6}{yields}c-C{sub 5}H{sub 5}{yields}C{sub 3}H{sub 3}, which also has a predominant contribution to the production of acetylene. Furthermore, sensitivity analysis showed that the primary decomposition reactions of toluene, C{sub 6}H{sub 5}CH{sub 3}=C{sub 6}H{sub 5}CH{sub 2}+H and C{sub 6}H{sub 5}CH{sub 3}=C{sub 6}H{sub 5}+CH{sub 3}, have great influences on the formation of small molecules, such as phenyl radical, benzyl radical, C2- and C3-species, which are critical to the formation of PAHs in the pyrolysis of toluene. (author)

  18. Simulation study of breast tissue hemodynamics during pressure perturbation.

    PubMed

    Nioka, Shoko; Wen, Simon; Zhang, Jun; Du, Juan; Intes, Xavior; Zhao, Zhongyao; Chance, Britton

    2005-01-01

    We simulated the effects of compression of the breast on blood volume and tissue oxygenation. We sought to answer the question: how does the compression during breast examination impact on the circulatory systems of the breast tissue, namely blood flow, blood pooling, and oxygen concentration? We assumed that the blood was distributed in two compartments, arterial and venous. All the parameters were expressed with oxy- and deoxyhemoglobin quantities and were measured with a non-invasive method, Near Infrared Spectroscopy (NIRS). The simulated data showed that the blood volume pool in the breast decreased due to lower arterial flow and higher venous outflow, as the breast was squeezed under 100 cm H2O with a 10 cm diameter probe (or 78 cm2). The blood volume was reversed when the pressure was released. The breast venous oxygen saturation dropped, but overall tissue saturation (presenting NIRS signal, volume weighted average saturation) was increased. The results showed that simulation can be used to obtain venous and average oxygen saturation as well as blood flow in compressed breast tissues.

  19. A DSMC Study of Low Pressure Argon Discharge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hash, David B.; Meyyappan, Meyya; Arnold, James O. (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    Work toward a self-consistent plasma simulation using the DSMC (Direct Simulation Monte Carlo) method for examination of the flowfields of low-pressure high density plasma reactors is presented. Presently, DSMC simulations for these applications involve either treating the electrons as a fluid or imposing experimentally determined values for the electron number density profile. In either approach, the electrons themselves are not physically simulated. Self-consistent plasma DSMC simulations have been conducted for aerospace applications but at a severe computational cost due in part to the scalar architectures on which the codes were employed. The present work attempts to conduct such simulations at a more reasonable cost using a plasma version of the object-oriented parallel Cornell DSMC code, MONACO, on an IBM SP-2. Due to availability of experimental data, the GEC reference cell is chosen to conduct preliminary investigations. An argon discharge is chosen to conduct preliminary investigations. An argon discharge is examined thus affording a simple chemistry set with eight gas-phase reactions and five species: Ar, Ar(+), Ar(*), Ar(sub 2), and e where Ar(*) is a metastable.

  20. High pressure cosmochemistry applied to major planetary interiors: Experimental studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nicol, M. F.; Johnson, M.; Koumvakalis, A. S.

    1984-01-01

    Progress is reported on a project to determine the properties and boundaries of high pressure phases of the H2-He-H2O-NH3-CH4 system that are needed to constrain theoretical models of the interiors of the major planets. This project is one of the first attempts to measure phase equilibria in binary fluid-solid systems in diamond anvil cells. Vibrational spectroscopy, direct visual observations, and X-ray diffraction crystallography of materials confined in externally heated cells are the primary experimental probes. Adiabats of these materials are also measured in order to constrain models of heat flow in these bodies and to detect phase transitions by thermal anomalies. Initial efforts involve the NH3-H2O binary. This system is especially relevant to models for surface reconstruction of the icy satellites of Jupiter and Saturn. Thermal analysis experiments were completed for the P-X space, p4GPa:0 or = 0.50, near room temperature. The cryostat, sample handling equipment, and optics needed to extend the optical P-T-X work below room temperature was completed.

  1. Quality control for blood pressure measurement in population studies: Shibata Children's Heart Study.

    PubMed

    Yoshiike, N; Nakayama, T; Yokoyama, T; Tanaka, H; Labarthe, D R

    1997-10-01

    To investigate the relation between observer performance for blood pressure measurement in a training process and in field conditions, measurement values were studied under training and field conditions among 21 blood pressure observers of 1434 subjects aged 6-15 years in Japan. The observers received training by a videotape, which included six audiovisual presentations of a falling mercury column in a standard sphygmomanometer with Korotkoff sounds. Observer bias was measured for each trainee as the mean difference between the observed and the standard values for each blood pressure reading, including systolic (SBP), fourth-phase diastolic (K4), and fifth-phase diastolic (K5) values. In multiple linear regression analyses, each 1 mmHg increment in observer bias was equivalent to 1.27, 0.88, and 1.25 mmHg difference in actual readings of SBP, K4, and K5, respectively, in the field. This finding indicates that observer performance in videotape training is predictive of measurement behavior in the field.

  2. Studies of basic mechanisms in high pressure gases: Applications to high efficiency high power lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Verdeyen, J. T.; Cherrington, B. E.; Leslie, S. G.; Millar, W. S.; Edwards, B. E.

    1976-01-01

    A high power pulsed dye laser was used to optically excite high pressure cesium-xenon mixtures and the resulting measurements are presented. A microwave discharge in rubidium at relatively high xenon pressure was achieved. Preliminary studies of cadium-rare gas mixtures are discussed and a detailed description of the entire experimental apparatus is given.

  3. Using Lesson Study to Enhance Meaningful Understanding on the Topic of Pressure

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leong, Sarisavinarinawatie Shahrani Muhammad; Said, Hardimah Mohd; Shahrill, Masitah; Perera, J. S. H. Quintus

    2016-01-01

    This paper aims to explore how the use of lesson study approach with a constructivist framework could enhance Year 9 students' conceptions of pressure specifically on the topic of manometer reading in determining gas pressure. A diagnostic test was first administered to three Year 10 classes to help teachers identify student difficulties in…

  4. An Inexpensive High Pressure Optical Absorption Cell for IR-VIS-UV Studies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rodgers, V. E.; Angell, C. A.

    1983-01-01

    Describes an optical cell, suitable for high-pressure studies between at least -130 and +150 degrees Celsius, which may be assembled for about $50. Discusses experimental demonstration of principles involved when using the apparatus, including effects of pressure on coordination of ions in solution and on reaction rates in solution. (JN)

  5. Grid workflow validation using ontology-based tacit knowledge: A case study for quantitative remote sensing applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jia; Liu, Longli; Xue, Yong; Dong, Jing; Hu, Yingcui; Hill, Richard; Guang, Jie; Li, Chi

    2017-01-01

    Workflow for remote sensing quantitative retrieval is the ;bridge; between Grid services and Grid-enabled application of remote sensing quantitative retrieval. Workflow averts low-level implementation details of the Grid and hence enables users to focus on higher levels of application. The workflow for remote sensing quantitative retrieval plays an important role in remote sensing Grid and Cloud computing services, which can support the modelling, construction and implementation of large-scale complicated applications of remote sensing science. The validation of workflow is important in order to support the large-scale sophisticated scientific computation processes with enhanced performance and to minimize potential waste of time and resources. To research the semantic correctness of user-defined workflows, in this paper, we propose a workflow validation method based on tacit knowledge research in the remote sensing domain. We first discuss the remote sensing model and metadata. Through detailed analysis, we then discuss the method of extracting the domain tacit knowledge and expressing the knowledge with ontology. Additionally, we construct the domain ontology with Protégé. Through our experimental study, we verify the validity of this method in two ways, namely data source consistency error validation and parameters matching error validation.

  6. Supporting older and younger adults' memory for recent everyday events: A prospective sampling study using SenseCam.

    PubMed

    Mair, Ali; Poirier, Marie; Conway, Martin A

    2017-03-01

    This study measured the effect of a wearable camera, SenseCam, on older and younger adults' memories of recently experienced everyday events. Participants used SenseCam to prospectively sample events from a typical week, which they recalled two weeks later. Recall was cued by a self-generated title only (control condition), by the title and forward-order SenseCam images, or by the title and random-order SenseCam images. In the control condition, older and younger adults' memories were comparably episodic, but older adults recalled more semantic details. Both forward- and random-order SenseCam images were associated with increased episodic and semantic recall in both groups, and there was a small but significant effect of temporal order favouring the forward-order condition. These findings suggest that SenseCam is effective in supporting retrieval of memory for recent events, and the results of the temporal order manipulation also shed light on the mechanism of SenseCam's effect.

  7. Children's sense of coherence and trait emotional intelligence: a longitudinal study exploring the development of somatic complaints.

    PubMed

    Jellesma, Francine C; Rieffe, C; Terwogt, Mark Meerum; Westenberg, P M

    2011-03-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the prospective relationships between sense of coherence, trait emotional intelligence and children's somatic complaints. The study included four waves of data collection with six months in between each wave. Participants were 324 girls and 393 boys (mean age = 10 years and 3 months, SD = 8.5 months) at the first time of data collection. The children filled out self-report questionnaires concerning their somatic complaints, sense of coherence and trait emotional intelligence. Multilevel model analyses were carried out that included cross-sectional and longitudinal effects of sense of coherence and trait emotional intelligence on children's somatic complaints. The results showed that higher levels of trait emotional intelligence and a stronger sense of coherence were associated with fewer somatic complaints in children. These relationships seemed to be bidirectional.

  8. Using Remote Sensing Technology as a Tool for Educational Outreach and for Studying Global Climate Changes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benko, T. M.; Czajkowski, K. P.; Struble, J.; Zhao, L.

    2001-12-01

    Geographic and scientific educations of primary and secondary school children have become topics of concern in Ohio and in the United States. One step towards improving a student's education is to render continuous, outstanding opportunities for teachers to become more knowledgeable by utilizing current technologies. The University of Toledo hosted a one-week, NASA and OhioView sponsored workshop entitled, Observing Earth's Systems from Space, for teachers from grades 5-12 during July 2000 and July 2001. Forty-nine teachers from Ohio, Michigan, and Pennsylvania with Earth Science, Social Studies, and Physics backgrounds attended. Each participant acquired new ideas, plenty of educational materials, and posters of satellite imagery to be used as aids in teaching remote sensing. The teachers received training on weather observing techniques, Global Warming issues, and basic remote sensing knowledge and analytical skills through: 1) presentations given by research scientists and community professionals, 2) integration of the learned material into practical, hands-on lesson plans, and 3) participation in a learning adventure, where their students collected real-time cloud and snow data at their respective schools while university research scientists gathered corresponding satellite imagery. A web-page was developed to continuously and globally share the data and results: www.utoledogis.org. The students entered their data on the web which eventually was sent to the research scientists. The data collected from the students have successfully assisted in the delineation of clouds and snow in satellite imagery and in the validation of cloud/snow remote sensing algorithms. The raw data and the corresponding satellite images are displayed on the web-page with the delineation of clouds and snow depicted. The participation in an actual, long-term research project has added another worthwhile dimension to the learning process for both the teachers and their students.

  9. Making sense of (exceptional) causal relations. A cross-cultural and cross-linguistic study

    PubMed Central

    Le Guen, Olivier; Samland, Jana; Friedrich, Thomas; Hanus, Daniel; Brown, Penelope

    2015-01-01

    In order to make sense of the world, humans tend to see causation almost everywhere. Although most causal relations may seem straightforward, they are not always construed in the same way cross-culturally. In this study, we investigate concepts of “chance,” “coincidence,” or “randomness” that refer to assumed relations between intention, action, and outcome in situations, and we ask how people from different cultures make sense of such non-law-like connections. Based on a framework proposed by Alicke (2000), we administered a task that aims to be a neutral tool for investigating causal construals cross-culturally and cross-linguistically. Members of four different cultural groups, rural Mayan Yucatec and Tseltal speakers from Mexico and urban students from Mexico and Germany, were presented with a set of scenarios involving various types of causal and non-causal relations and were asked to explain the described events. Three links varied as to whether they were present or not in the scenarios: Intention-to-Action, Action-to-Outcome, and Intention-to-Outcome. Our results show that causality is recognized in all four cultural groups. However, how causality and especially non-law-like relations are interpreted depends on the type of links, the cultural background and the language used. In all three groups, Action-to-Outcome is the decisive link for recognizing causality. Despite the fact that the two Mayan groups share similar cultural backgrounds, they display different ideologies regarding concepts of non-law-like relations. The data suggests that the concept of “chance” is not universal, but seems to be an explanation that only some cultural groups draw on to make sense of specific situations. Of particular importance is the existence of linguistic concepts in each language that trigger ideas of causality in the responses from each cultural group. PMID:26579028

  10. [Study on the absolute spectral irradiation calibration method for far ultraviolet spectrometer in remote sensing].

    PubMed

    Yu, Lei; Lin, Guan-Yu; Chen, Bin

    2013-01-01

    The present paper studied spectral irradiation responsivities calibration method which can be applied to the far ultraviolet spectrometer for upper atmosphere remote sensing. It is difficult to realize the calibration for far ultraviolet spectrometer for many reasons. Standard instruments for far ultraviolet waveband calibration are few, the degree of the vacuum experiment system is required to be high, the stabilities of the experiment are hardly maintained, and the limitation of the far ultraviolet waveband makes traditional diffuser and the integrating sphere radiance calibration method difficult to be used. To solve these problems, a new absolute spectral irradiance calibration method was studied, which can be applied to the far ultraviolet calibration. We build a corresponding special vacuum experiment system to verify the calibration method. The light source system consists of a calibrated deuterium lamp, a vacuum ultraviolet monochromater and a collimating system. We used the calibrated detector to obtain the irradiance responsivities of it. The three instruments compose the calibration irradiance source. We used the "calibration irradiance source" to illuminate the spectrometer prototype and obtained the spectral irradiance responsivities. It realized the absolute spectral irradiance calibration for the far ultraviolet spectrometer utilizing the calibrated detector. The absolute uncertainty of the calibration is 7.7%. The method is significant for the ground irradiation calibration of the far ultraviolet spectrometer in upper atmosphere remote sensing.

  11. Role of remote sensing in the study of acid rain impact on aquatic systems

    SciTech Connect

    Schott, J.R.; Wilkinson, M.A.

    1982-01-01

    Results are presented of a study of the capabilities of image analysis of remotely sensed data in the evaluation of the present state and past history of lakes subject to acidification by acid precipitation. Analysis of surface sampling data from nine Adirondack lakes reveals lake pH and alkalinity to be reflected in parameters related to optical properties, exhibiting a positive correlation with chlorophyll and total solids and a negative correlation with Secchi depth. Aerial photographic measurements of lake volume spectral reflectance, when compared with a simple laboratory model of the dependence of chlorophyll, lignin and humic acid contents of water on its optical properties, are also found to correlate with the differences between the in situ lake properties. Finally, analysis of Landsat band 4, 5, and 7 data obtained in September 1972 and 1979 for 18 lakes demonstrates the potential of the data for the isolation of lakes with low alkalinity, and for monitoring the rate of acidification over time providing data is properly calibrated for atmospheric, illumination and sensor response effects. Results thus demonstrate considerable potential for remote sensing in monitoring the impact of acidification on lakes, and point up the need for further studies of multi-temporal Landsat data and the techniques of aerial analysis.

  12. The effect of baseline pressure errors on an intracranial pressure-derived index: results of a prospective observational study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background In order to characterize the intracranial pressure-volume reserve capacity, the correlation coefficient (R) between the ICP wave amplitude (A) and the mean ICP level (P), the RAP index, has been used to improve the diagnostic value of ICP monitoring. Baseline pressure errors (BPEs), caused by spontaneous shifts or drifts in baseline pressure, cause erroneous readings of mean ICP. Consequently, BPEs could also affect ICP indices such as the RAP where in the mean ICP is incorporated. Methods A prospective, observational study was carried out on patients with aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (aSAH) undergoing ICP monitoring as part of their surveillance. Via the same burr hole in the scull, two separate ICP sensors were placed close to each other. For each consecutive 6-sec time window, the dynamic mean ICP wave amplitude (MWA; measure of the amplitude of the single pressure waves) and the static mean ICP, were computed. The RAP index was computed as the Pearson correlation coefficient between the MWA and the mean ICP for 40 6-sec time windows, i.e. every subsequent 4-min period (method 1). We compared this approach with a method of calculating RAP using a 4-min moving window updated every 6 seconds (method 2). Results The study included 16 aSAH patients. We compared 43,653 4-min RAP observations of signals 1 and 2 (method 1), and 1,727,000 6-sec RAP observations (method 2). The two methods of calculating RAP produced similar results. Differences in RAP ≥0.4 in at least 7% of observations were seen in 5/16 (31%) patients. Moreover, the combination of a RAP of ≥0.6 in one signal and <0.6 in the other was seen in ≥13% of RAP-observations in 4/16 (25%) patients, and in ≥8% in another 4/16 (25%) patients. The frequency of differences in RAP >0.2 was significantly associated with the frequency of BPEs (5 mmHg ≤ BPE <10 mmHg). Conclusions Simultaneous monitoring from two separate, close-by ICP sensors reveals significant differences in RAP that

  13. Lifestyle Changes and Pressure Ulcer Prevention in Adults With Spinal Cord Injury in the Pressure Ulcer Prevention Study Lifestyle Intervention

    PubMed Central

    Ghaisas, Samruddhi; Pyatak, Elizabeth A.; Blanche, Erna; Clark, Florence

    2015-01-01

    Pressure ulcers (PrUs) are a major burden to patients with spinal cord injury (SCI), affecting their psychological, physical, and social well-being. Lifestyle choices are thought to contribute to the risk of developing PrUs. This article focuses on the interaction between lifestyle choices and the development of PrUs in community settings among participants in the University of Southern California–Rancho Los Amigos National Rehabilitation Center Pressure Ulcer Prevention Study (PUPS II), a randomized controlled trial of a lifestyle intervention for adults with SCI. We conducted a secondary cross-case analysis of treatment notes of 47 PUPS II participants and identified four patterns relating PrU development to lifestyle changes: positive PrU changes (e.g., healing PrUs) with positive lifestyle changes, negative or no PrU changes with positive lifestyle changes, positive PrU changes with minor lifestyle changes, and negative or no PrU changes with no lifestyle changes. We present case studies exemplifying each pattern. PMID:25553751

  14. Streamlined environmental remediation characterization using remote sensing techniques: Case studies for the US Department of Energy, Oak Ridge Operations

    SciTech Connect

    Carden, D.M.; Smyre, J.L.; Evers, T.K.; King, A.L.

    1996-07-01

    This paper provides an overview of the DOE Oak Ridge Operations Remote Sensing Program and discusses how data from this program have assisted the environmental restoration program in streamlining site-characterization activities. Three case studies are described where remote sensing imagery has provided a more focused understanding of site problems with a resultant reduction in the need for costly and time-consuming, ground-based sampling approaches.

  15. First-principles study of Ni-Al intermetallic compounds under various temperature and pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, Zhiqin; Zhao, Yuhong; Hou, Hua; Tian, Jinzhong; Han, Peide

    2017-03-01

    The pressure dependence behaviors of structural and mechanical properties as well as the effect of temperature on thermodynamic properties of Ni-Al ordered intermetallic compounds (i. e. Ni3Al, Ni5Al3, NiAl, Ni2Al3 and NiAl3) are investigated in details by implementing first-principles calculations. The calculated lattice parameters, bulk modulus and its pressure derivative are well in agreement with available experimental and theoretical values at zero pressure. All the compounds are mechanically stable with pressure going up to 50 GPa, and the volume change resistance of nickel aluminum alloys can be improved by increasing pressure and Ni concentration. The shear deformation resistance, elastic stiffness and microhardness of nickel aluminum alloys can be strengthened by increasing the content of Ni5Al3 and Ni2Al3, and pressure can also enhance these properties of Ni5Al3, NiAl and Ni2Al3. The ductility of Ni3Al, Ni5Al3 and NiAl can be improved by increasing pressure, while brittle nature turns into ductile nature in 20-30 GPa and 10-20 GPa for Ni2Al3 and NiAl3, respectively. Furthermore, the elastic anisotropy of Ni3Al, Ni5Al3, Ni2Al3 and NiAl3 enhances with pressure, while NiAl shows few change with pressure increasing. In addition, Ni3Al is the most sensitive to pressure change among considered compounds. Finally, the Debye temperature, linear thermal expansion coefficient and heat capacity of these compounds are calculated using the quasi-harmonic Debye model in pressure ranging from 0 to 50 GPa and temperature ranging from 0 to 1200 K to elucidate the relationships between thermodynamic parameters and temperature under various pressure. The results are helpful insights into the study of nickel aluminum alloys.

  16. Brain pressure responses in translational head impact: a dimensional analysis and a further computational study.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Wei; Ruan, Shijie; Ji, Songbai

    2015-08-01

    Brain pressure responses resulting from translational head impact are typically related to focal injuries at the coup and contrecoup sites. Despite significant efforts characterizing brain pressure responses using experimental and modeling approaches, a thorough investigation of the key controlling parameters appears lacking. In this study, we identified three parameters specific and important for brain pressure responses induced by isolated linear acceleration a(lin) via a dimensional analysis: a(lin) itself (magnitude and directionality), brain size and shape. These findings were verified using our recently developed Dartmouth Head Injury Model (DHIM). Applying a(lin) to the rigid skull, we found that the temporal profile of the given a(lin) directly determined that of pressure. Brain pressure was also found to be linearly proportional to brain size and dependent on impact direction. In addition, we investigated perturbations to brain pressure responses as a result of non-rigid skull deformation. Finally, DHIM pressure responses were quantitatively validated against two representative cadaveric head impacts (categorized as "good" to "excellent" in performance). These results suggest that both the magnitude and directionality of a(lin) as well as brain size and shape should be considered when interpreting brain pressure responses. Further, a model validated against pressure responses alone is not sufficient to ensure its fidelity in strain-related responses. These findings provide important insights into brain pressure responses in translational head impact and the resulting risk of pressure-induced injury. In addition, they establish the feasibility of creating a pre-computed atlas for real-time tissue-level pressure responses without a direct simulation in the future.

  17. Investigation and Design Studies of SOFC Electrode Performance at Elevated Pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Ted Ohrn; Shung Ik Lee

    2010-07-31

    An experimental program was set forth to study fuel cell performance at pressure and under various compositions. Improvement in cathode electrode performance is on the order of 33-40% at pressures of 6.4 Bara compared to atmospheric pressure. Key cathode operational parameters are the concentration and partial pressure of O2, and temperature. The effect of partial pressure of oxygen (PO2) decreases the activation polarization, although there appears to be a secondary effect of absolute pressure as well. The concentration of oxygen impacts the diffusion component of the polarization, which is largely insensitive to absolute pressure. The effect of pressure was found to reduce the total polarization resistance of full fuel-cells beyond the reduction determined for the cathode alone. The total reduction in ASR was on the order of 0.10 ohm-cm2 for a pressure increase from 1 to 6.5 Bara, with about 70% of the improvement being realized from 1 to 4 Bara. An important finding was that there is an effect of steam on the cathode that is highly temperature dependent. The loss of performance at temperatures below 850 C was very large for the standard LSM + YSZ cathodes.

  18. The efficacy of pressure relief maneuvers in spinal cord injury patients, a clinical study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ho, Thuan; Nguyen, Ahn Thu; Lichy, Alison; Groah, Suzanne; Ramella-Roman, Jessica C.

    2014-02-01

    Pressure reliefs are recommended to wheelchair bound individuals to control and minimize skin damage. To this date recommendation on duration and intervals between pressure reliefs is not clear. Recent studies have shown a relationship between reduction in tissue perfusion and oxygenation due to pressure and skin pathophysiologic changes. We have developed a fiber-optics probe that allows measurement of oxygenation in addition to perfusion in real time; this low profile probe can be utilized while sitting and during pressure reliefs. We have conducted a clinical trial at the National Rehabilitation Hospital on individual with spinal cord injury. The overriding goal of this project was to develop the evidence base for clinical recommendations on pressure reliefs. Results of the study will be presented.

  19. High-Pressure Studies of 1,3,5,7-Cyclooctatetraene: Experiment and Theory

    SciTech Connect

    Tkachev, Sergey N.; Pravica, Michael; Kim, Eunja; Romano, Edward; Weck, Philippe F.

    2008-11-12

    High-pressure studies of 1,3,5,7-cyclooctatetraene have been performed by using Raman spectroscopy up to 16 GPa and compared with complementary density functional calculations. Angular-dispersive X-ray diffraction studies were also performed in the solid state at elevated pressure. The lattice constants of solid 1,3,5,7-cyclooctatetraene obtained from the X-ray diffraction pattern taken at 3.8 GPa and room temperature are in good agreement with theoretical results. At least two phase transitions were observed during pressure increase followed by the loss of long-range crystallographic order, which was also associated with a strong pressure-induced luminescence that allowed estimation of band gap alterations with pressure.

  20. Integrated ground-based and remotely sensed data to support global studies of environmental change

    SciTech Connect

    Olson, R.J.; Turner, R.S.; Garten, C.T.

    1994-09-15

    Data centers routinely archive and distribute large databases of high quality and with rigorous documentation but, to meet the needs of global studies effectively and efficiently, data centers must go beyond these traditional roles. Global studies of environmental change require integrated databases of multiple data types that are accurately coordinated in terms of spatial, temporal and thematic properties. Such datasets must be designed and developed jointly by scientific researchers, computer specialists, and policy analysts. The presentation focuses on our approach for organizing data from ground-based research programs so that the data can be linked with remotely sensed data and other map data into integrated databases with spatial, temporal, and thematic characteristics relevant to global studies. The development of an integrated database for Net Primary Productivity is described to illustrate the process.

  1. Effect of Intensive Versus Standard Clinic-Based Hypertension Management on Ambulatory Blood Pressure: Results From the SPRINT (Systolic Blood Pressure Intervention Trial) Ambulatory Blood Pressure Study.

    PubMed

    Drawz, Paul E; Pajewski, Nicholas M; Bates, Jeffrey T; Bello, Natalie A; Cushman, William C; Dwyer, Jamie P; Fine, Lawrence J; Goff, David C; Haley, William E; Krousel-Wood, Marie; McWilliams, Andrew; Rifkin, Dena E; Slinin, Yelena; Taylor, Addison; Townsend, Raymond; Wall, Barry; Wright, Jackson T; Rahman, Mahboob

    2017-01-01

    The effect of clinic-based intensive hypertension treatment on ambulatory blood pressure (BP) is unknown. The goal of the SPRINT (Systolic Blood Pressure Intervention Trial) ambulatory BP ancillary study was to evaluate the effect of intensive versus standard clinic-based BP targets on ambulatory BP. Ambulatory BP was obtained within 3 weeks of the 27-month study visit in 897 SPRINT participants. Intensive treatment resulted in lower clinic systolic BP (mean difference between groups=16.0 mm Hg; 95% confidence interval, 14.1-17.8 mm Hg), nighttime systolic BP (mean difference=9.6 mm Hg; 95% confidence interval, 7.7-11.5 mm Hg), daytime systolic BP (mean difference=12.3 mm Hg; 95% confidence interval, 10.6-13.9 mm Hg), and 24-hour systolic BP (mean difference=11.2 mm Hg; 95% confidence interval, 9.7-12.8 mm Hg). The night/day systolic BP ratio was similar between the intensive (0.92±0.09) and standard-treatment groups (0.91±0.09). There was considerable lack of agreement within participants between clinic systolic BP and daytime ambulatory systolic BP with wide limits of agreement on Bland-Altman plots. In conclusion, targeting a systolic BP of <120 mm Hg, when compared with <140 mm Hg, resulted in lower nighttime, daytime, and 24-hour systolic BP, but did not change the night/day systolic BP ratio. Ambulatory BP monitoring may be required to assess the effect of targeted hypertension therapy on out of office BP. Further studies are needed to assess whether targeting hypertension therapy based on ambulatory BP improves clinical outcomes.

  2. The experimental study of a new pressure equalization step in the pressure swing adsorption cycle of a portable oxygen concentrator.

    PubMed

    Li, Jianhua

    2014-01-01

    For portable oxygen concentrator by pressure swing adsorption (PSA) method, its volume, mass, power, oxygen flux and oxygen saving efficiency are the most important parameters which are affected strongly by the PSA cycle. In this paper, we propose a new pressure equalization step to optimize the PSA cycle. According to the experimental results, when the product ends of two beds are connected and the feed gas is switched from the high pressure bed to the low pressure bed during the pressure equalization step, the system has a larger oxygen flux, a less energy consumption and a more simple structure.

  3. Theoretical calculations of high-pressure phases of NiF2: An ab initio constant-pressure study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kürkçü, Cihan; Merdan, Ziya; Öztürk, Hülya

    2016-12-01

    We have studied the structural properties of the antiferromagnetic NiF2 tetragonal structure with P42/ mnm symmetry using density functional theory (DFT) under rapid hydrostatic pressure up to 400 GPa. For the exchange correlation energy we used the local density approximation (LDA) of Ceperley and Alder (CA). Two phase transformations are successfully observed through the simulations. The structures of XF2-type compounds crystallize in rutile-type structure. NiF2 undergoes phase transformations from the tetragonal rutile-type structure with space group P42/ mnm to orthorhombic CaCl2-type structure with space group Pnnm and from this orthorhombic phase to monoclinic structure with space group C2/ m at 152 GPa and 360 GPa, respectively. These phase changes are also studied by total energy and enthalpy calculations. According to these calculations, we perdict these phase transformations at about 1.85 and 30 GPa.

  4. Image and spectral fidelity study of hyperspectral remote sensing image scaling up based on wavelet transform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    An, Ni; Ma, Yi; Bao, Yuhai

    2015-08-01

    Wavelet transform is a kind of effective image-scale transformation method, which can achieve multi-scale transformation by distinguishing the low-frequency information and the high-frequency information. Hyperspectral remote sensing data combining image with spectrum has almost continuous spectrum that is the important premise of extracting hyperspectral image information, while scale transformation will inevitably lead to the change of image and spectra. Therefore, it is important to study the image and spectral fidelity after wavelet transform. In this paper, the Proba CHRIS hyperspectral remote sensing image of Yellow River Estuary Wetland is used to investigate the image and spectral fidelity of image transformed by wavelet which remained the low-frequency information. The level 1-3 of up-scale images are obtained and then compared with the original. Then image and spectral fidelity is quantitatively analyzed. The results show that the image fidelity is slightly reduced by up-scale transformation, but near-infrared images have a larger distortion than other bands. With the increasing scaling up, the distortion of spectrum is more and more great, but spectral fidelity is overall well. For the typical wetland objects, Phragmites austrialis has the best spectral correlation, Spartina has a small spectra change, and aquaculture water spectral distortion is most remarkable.

  5. Using remote sensing to study mangroves spatial dynamics under increased nitrogen availability and lower salinity conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silvestri, S.; Whigham, D.; Laanbroek, R.; Rains, M. C.; Verhoeven, J.

    2014-12-01

    The impact of a strong change in the hydrologic conditions of an impoundment in the Indian River Lagoon (FL) dominated by Black mangrove (Avicennia germinans) has been monitored through field campaigns and remote sensing data analysis. The management solution adopted since the spring of 2009 to reduce the number of noxious insects involved pumping estuarine water in the spring and summer seasons. Satellite and airborne data with medium to high spatial resolution have been used to perform a change detection analysis and study the evolution of the spatial distribution of mangrove trees. Empirical relations of vegetation indexes with field data collected over time have been determined, and specifically the correlation with leaf production, branch length increment, soil moisture and salinity, soil NH4 concentration and nitrification/denitrification processes. The field data had already shown how locally the higher nitrogen availability and the lower soil salinity increased Black mangrove growth mainly in areas with dwarf and sparse mangrove cover. The use of high spatial resolution remote sensing has been of key importance to extend this result at the impoundment scale, showing how mangroves expanded overtime.

  6. Comparative Study of Different Methods for Soot Sensing and Filter Monitoring in Diesel Exhausts

    PubMed Central

    Feulner, Markus; Hagen, Gunter; Hottner, Kathrin; Redel, Sabrina; Müller, Andreas; Moos, Ralf

    2017-01-01

    Due to increasingly tighter emission limits for diesel and gasoline engines, especially concerning particulate matter emissions, particulate filters are becoming indispensable devices for exhaust gas after treatment. Thereby, for an efficient engine and filter control strategy and a cost-efficient filter design, reliable technologies to determine the soot load of the filters and to measure particulate matter concentrations in the exhaust gas during vehicle operation are highly needed. In this study, different approaches for soot sensing are compared. Measurements were conducted on a dynamometer diesel engine test bench with a diesel particulate filter (DPF). The DPF was monitored by a relatively new microwave-based approach. Simultaneously, a resistive type soot sensor and a Pegasor soot sensing device as a reference system measured the soot concentration exhaust upstream of the DPF. By changing engine parameters, different engine out soot emission rates were set. It was found that the microwave-based signal may not only indicate directly the filter loading, but by a time derivative, the engine out soot emission rate can be deduced. Furthermore, by integrating the measured particulate mass in the exhaust, the soot load of the filter can be determined. In summary, all systems coincide well within certain boundaries and the filter itself can act as a soot sensor. PMID:28218700

  7. Satellite Remote Sensing Studies of Biological and Biogeochemical Processing in the Ocean

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vernet, Maria

    2001-01-01

    The remote sensing of phycoerythrin-containing phytoplankton by ocean color was evaluated. Phycoerythrin (PE) can be remotely sensed by three methods: surface reflectance (Sathyendranath et al. 1994), by laser-activated fluorescence (Hoge and Swift 1986) and by passive fluorescence (Letelier et al. 1996). In collaboration with Dr. Frank Hoge and Robert Swift during Dr. Maria Vernet's tenure as Senior Visiting Scientist at Wallops Island, the active and passive methods were studied, in particular the detection of PE fluorescence and spectral reflectance from airborne LIDAR (AOL). Airborne instrumentation allows for more detailed and flexible sampling of the ocean surface than satellites thus providing the ideal platform to test model and develop algorithms than can later be applied to ocean color by satellites such as TERRA and AQUA. Dr. Vernet's contribution to the Wallops team included determination of PE in the water column, in conjunction with AOL flights in the North Atlantic Bight. In addition, a new flow-through fluorometer for PE determination by fluorescence was tested and calibrated. Results: several goals were achieved during this period. Cruises to the California Current, North Atlantic Bight, Gulf of Maine and Chesapeake Bay provided sampling under different oceanographic and optical conditions. The ships carried the flow-through fluorometer and samples for the determination of PE were obtained from the flow-through flow. The AOL was flown over the ship's track, usually several flights during the cruise, weather permitting.

  8. Making sense of a new nursing role: a phenomenological study of an organizational change.

    PubMed

    Smith-Blair, N; Smith, B L; Bradley, K J; Gaskamp, C

    1999-01-01

    Although health care organizational change is a constant phenomenon, little is understood as to how staff experience this change. Unsuccessful change efforts have suggested the possible important relationship between understanding staff's experience and improved results. The purpose of this phenomenological study was to describe what staff on a medical-surgical unit experience during the initial phase of the implementation of a nursing care coordinator position, a first step in a broad organizational change. A purposeful sample of 11 nursing and non-nursing staff, considered unit experts, were interviewed using broad, open-ended questions designed to solicit their experience. Additionally, observations and document abstraction were used to add depth and clarification to the interviews. Analysis of data was conducted using a combination of Giorgi's and Colaizzi's procedures. Contextual elements framing staff's experiences included introduction of a new role with no organizational history into an increasingly demanding environment that staff perceived as constantly changing. Major themes of "experiencing the effect" and "struggling to make sense" were revealed. These findings suggest that the introduction of a new role can create turmoil and job insecurity in the current health care environment. Recommendations to support staff's efforts to "make sense" are provided.

  9. Study of Signal Detection, Integration, and Propagation in Quorum Sensing at the Single Cell Level

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Long, Tao; Bassler, Bonnie; Wingreen, Ned

    2007-03-01

    Bacteria respond to their environment and to each other and accordingly adjust their gene-expression levels. Accurate signal detection, appropriate signal integration, and faithful signal propagation are essential for a cell to make correct adjustments in response to various extracellular cues. To better understand this information processing by living cells, we studied a model system -- the quorum-sensing circuit in Vibrio harveyi. Quorum sensing is a process in which bacteria communicate with each other by diffusible chemical molecules, termed ``autoinducers'', to commit to coordinated developmental decisions. Three types of autoinducers are detected coincidently by three parallel receptors. The signals are then integrated into the same signaling pathway and propagated by phosphorylation or dephosphorylation of the pathway components. To quantitatively measure the intracellular response, we applied a fluorescent protein reporter, whose production is regulated by a phosphorylated protein in the pathway. By single-cell microscopy, we can explore features of this information-processing circuit such as coincidence detection, signal integration, noise reduction or filtering, and especially the fidelity in signal processing achieved in the presence of inevitable fluctuations.

  10. Comparative Study of Different Methods for Soot Sensing and Filter Monitoring in Diesel Exhausts.

    PubMed

    Feulner, Markus; Hagen, Gunter; Hottner, Kathrin; Redel, Sabrina; Müller, Andreas; Moos, Ralf

    2017-02-18

    Due to increasingly tighter emission limits for diesel and gasoline engines, especially concerning particulate matter emissions, particulate filters are becoming indispensable devices for exhaust gas after treatment. Thereby, for an efficient engine and filter control strategy and a cost-efficient filter design, reliable technologies to determine the soot load of the filters and to measure particulate matter concentrations in the exhaust gas during vehicle operation are highly needed. In this study, different approaches for soot sensing are compared. Measurements were conducted on a dynamometer diesel engine test bench with a diesel particulate filter (DPF). The DPF was monitored by a relatively new microwave-based approach. Simultaneously, a resistive type soot sensor and a Pegasor soot sensing device as a reference system measured the soot concentration exhaust upstream of the DPF. By changing engine parameters, different engine out soot emission rates were set. It was found that the microwave-based signal may not only indicate directly the filter loading, but by a time derivative, the engine out soot emission rate can be deduced. Furthermore, by integrating the measured particulate mass in the exhaust, the soot load of the filter can be determined. In summary, all systems coincide well within certain boundaries and the filter itself can act as a soot sensor.

  11. [Comparison of two E.E.C. baths by study of the oncotic pressure-pulmonary artery pressure gradient].

    PubMed

    D'Enfert, J; Mathieu-Daudé, J C; Grolleau, D; Saussine, M; Allien, M; Chaptal, P A; du Cailar, J

    1980-01-01

    Variations in oncotic pressure-pulmonary artery diastolic pressure gradient and in intrapulmonary shunt were studied in two groups of patients undergoing surgery with extracorporeal circulation for aortocoronary bypass of excision of an aneurysm. The two groups, differed only in terms of the E.C.C. bath (Group A: Ringer Lactate; Group B: DDextran 60,000). The effects of E.C.C. on these parameters were as follows: - decrease in both groups in the gradient (OP-PAP) (respectively P < 0.001 and P < 0.01) but with a more marked decrease in group A than in group B (P < 0.05) with non-negativisation of the gradient in that group; - non-significant variations in Qs/Qt in both groups without any correlation with gradient (OP-PAP). The onset of pulmonary oedema associated with a decrease in gradient (OP-PAP) leads to the suggestion of the use of Dextrans in pathological situations where OP is low or PAP high and all the more so when both of these factors are present.

  12. Intracranial cerebrospinal fluid measurement studies in suspected idiopathic normal pressure hydrocephalus, secondary normal pressure hydrocephalus, and brain atrophy

    PubMed Central

    Tsunoda, A; Mitsuoka, H; Bandai, H; Endo, T; Arai, H; Sato, K

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To investigate intracranial cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) distribution in patients with a clinical diagnosis of idiopathic normal pressure hydrocephalus (INPH). Methods: 24 patients with a clinical diagnosis of INPH were studied. Control groups comprised 17 patients with secondary normal pressure hydrocephalus (SNPH), 21 patients with brain atrophy, and 18 healthy volunteers. Ventricular volume (VV) and intracranial CSF volume (ICV) were measured using a magnetic resonance based method and the VV/ICV ratio was calculated. Results: The SNPH group showed a marked increase in the VV/ICV ratio compared with the healthy volunteers (37.8% v 15.6%, p < 0.0001). The brain atrophy group showed a significant increase in ICV compared with the healthy volunteers (284.4 ml v 194.7 ml, p =0.0002). The INPH group showed an increase in ICV (281.2 ml, p = 0.0002) and an increase in the VV/ICV ratio (38.0%, p < 0.0001). Fifteen of 24 INPH patients underwent shunting; 11 improved and four did not. Conclusions: The results suggest that INPH patients have brain atrophy in addition to hydrocephalic features. This may help to explain the difficulties encountered in the diagnosis and the unpredictable response rate to shunt surgery in INPH patients. PMID:12397150

  13. Integration of environmental simulation models with satellite remote sensing and geographic information systems technologies: case studies

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Steyaert, Louis T.; Loveland, Thomas R.; Brown, Jesslyn F.; Reed, Bradley C.

    1993-01-01

    Environmental modelers are testing and evaluating a prototype land cover characteristics database for the conterminous United States developed by the EROS Data Center of the U.S. Geological Survey and the University of Nebraska Center for Advanced Land Management Information Technologies. This database was developed from multi temporal, 1-kilometer advanced very high resolution radiometer (AVHRR) data for 1990 and various ancillary data sets such as elevation, ecological regions, and selected climatic normals. Several case studies using this database were analyzed to illustrate the integration of satellite remote sensing and geographic information systems technologies with land-atmosphere interactions models at a variety of spatial and temporal scales. The case studies are representative of contemporary environmental simulation modeling at local to regional levels in global change research, land and water resource management, and environmental simulation modeling at local to regional levels in global change research, land and water resource management and environmental risk assessment. The case studies feature land surface parameterizations for atmospheric mesoscale and global climate models; biogenic-hydrocarbons emissions models; distributed parameter watershed and other hydrological models; and various ecological models such as ecosystem, dynamics, biogeochemical cycles, ecotone variability, and equilibrium vegetation models. The case studies demonstrate the important of multi temporal AVHRR data to develop to develop and maintain a flexible, near-realtime land cover characteristics database. Moreover, such a flexible database is needed to derive various vegetation classification schemes, to aggregate data for nested models, to develop remote sensing algorithms, and to provide data on dynamic landscape characteristics. The case studies illustrate how such a database supports research on spatial heterogeneity, land use, sensitivity analysis, and scaling issues

  14. Multi-temporal analysis of remote sensing and in situ data for the study of delta systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taramelli, A.; Valentini, E.; Filipponi, F.; Gerlaldini, S.; Nguyen Xuan, A.; Zucca, F.; Vollrath, A.

    2014-12-01

    Understanding the future evolution of the Po delta is fundamental to planning and management of this heavily-populated low-lying delta areas. Through the Holocene it was shaped by the interacting effects of sediment supply, sea level and marine reworking. Unlike traditional models, tectonics and climate have also played important roles in the delta's evolution. Superimposed upon the active, but relatively unknown, natural system, human alterations to natural processes have become increasingly important, both (1) indirectly by changing land use and water management within the catchment, and (2) directly within the delta itself due to groundwater withdrawal, flood mitigation efforts, infrastructure development, etc. This human influence has intensified in the near present times as coastal and catchment populations grow, urbanise and develop their economies. The work presented in this paper aimed at investigating the temporal evolution of patterns and processes on the Po Delta (Italy), using remotely sensed datasets. An innovative integration of remote sensing and monitoring method (Permanent Scatter Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar - PSInSAR, Small BAeline Subset - SBAS and Empirical Orthogonal Function - EOF analysis of 20 years of Landsat) has been used to study the temporal evolution of subsidence and its correlation with natural and anthropogenic causes. Results show an increase of the subsidence rates obtained for the last decade: the amount of subsidence due only to natural causes is typically a few millimeters per year, while the man-induced subsidence reaches values of several millimeters per years. Marshlands reclamation, groundwater pumping for agricultural and industrial purposes and methane extraction from gas fields near the coastline are the principal anthropogenic causes. Hence the final study results would emphasise the multiple factors and stresses that are influencing the delta evolution. Such a framework also allows the full range of

  15. Using Calculator-Assisted Instruction to Enhance Low-Achievers in Learning Number Sense: A Case Study of Two Fifth Graders in Taiwan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yang, Der-Ching; Lin, Yung-Chi

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to use calculator-assisted instruction to help two fifth-grade low-achievers learn number sense. The research process includes three stages: (1) pre-test interview to detect what kinds of number sense the students did not have; (2) calculator-assisted instruction to help them develop number sense; and (3) post-test…

  16. A Study of Flood Evacuation Center Using GIS and Remote Sensing Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mustaffa, A. A.; Rosli, M. F.; Abustan, M. S.; Adib, R.; Rosli, M. I.; Masiri, K.; Saifullizan, B.

    2016-07-01

    This research demonstrated the use of Remote Sensing technique and GIS to determine the suitability of an evacuation center. This study was conducted in Batu Pahat areas that always hit by a series of flood. The data of Digital Elevation Model (DEM) was obtained by ASTER database that has been used to delineate extract contour line and elevation. Landsat 8 image was used for classification purposes such as land use map. Remote Sensing incorporate with GIS techniques was used to determined the suitability location of the evacuation center from contour map of flood affected areas in Batu Pahat. GIS will calculate the elevation of the area and information about the country of the area, the road access and percentage of the affected area. The flood affected area map may provide the suitability of the flood evacuation center during the several levels of flood. The suitability of evacuation centers can be determined based on several criteria and the existing data of the evacuation center will be analysed. From the analysis among 16 evacuation center listed, there are only 8 evacuation center suitable for the usage during emergency situation. The suitability analysis was based on the location and the road access of the evacuation center toward the flood affected area. There are 10 new locations with suitable criteria of evacuation center proposed on the study area to facilitate the process of rescue and evacuating flood victims to much safer and suitable locations. The results of this study will help in decision making processes and indirectly will help organization such as fire-fighter and the Department of Social Welfare in their work. Thus, this study can contribute more towards the society.

  17. Electronic topological transition in zinc under pressure: An x-ray absorption spectroscopy study

    SciTech Connect

    Aquilanti, G.; Trapananti, A.; Pascarelli, S.; Minicucci, M.; Principi, E.; Liscio, F.; Twarog, A.

    2007-10-01

    Zinc metal has been studied at high pressure using x-ray absorption spectroscopy. In order to investigate the role of the different degrees of hydrostaticity on the occurrence of structural anomalies following the electronic topological transition, two pressure transmitting media have been used. Results show that the electronic topological transition, if it exists, does not induce an anomaly in the local environment of compressed Zn as a function of hydrostatic pressure and any anomaly must be related to a loss of hydrostaticity of the pressure transmitting medium. The near-edge structures of the spectra, sensitive to variations in the electronic density of states above the Fermi level, do not show any evidence of electronic transition whatever pressure transmitting medium is used.

  18. BiTeCl and BiTeBr: A comparative high-pressure optical study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crassee, I.; Borondics, F.; Tran, M. K.; Autès, G.; Magrez, A.; Bugnon, P.; Berger, H.; Teyssier, J.; Yazyev, O. V.; Orlita, M.; Akrap, A.

    2017-01-01

    We here report a detailed high-pressure infrared transmission study of BiTeCl and BiTeBr. We follow the evolution of two band transitions: the optical excitation β between two Rashba-split conduction bands, and the absorption γ across the band gap. In the low-pressure range, p <4 GPa, for both compounds β is approximately constant with pressure and γ decreases, in agreement with band structure calculations. In BiTeCl, a clear pressure-induced phase transition at 6 GPa leads to a different ground state. For BiTeBr, the pressure evolution is more subtle, and we discuss the possibility of closing and reopening of the band gap. Our data is consistent with a potential Weyl phase in BiTeBr at 5 -6 GPa, followed by the onset of a structural phase transition above 7 GPa.

  19. High pressure Raman scattering study on the phase stability of LuVO{sub 4}

    SciTech Connect

    Rao, Rekha; Garg, Alka B.; Sakuntala, T.; Achary, S.N.; Tyagi, A.K.

    2009-07-15

    High pressure Raman spectroscopic investigations have been carried out on rare earth orthovanadate LuVO{sub 4} upto 26 GPa. Changes in the Raman spectrum around 8 GPa across the reported zircon to scheelite transition are investigated in detail and compared with those observed in other vanadates. Co-existence of the zircon and scheelite phases is observed over a pressure range of about 8-13 GPa. The zircon to scheelite transition is irreversible upon pressure release. Subtle changes are observed in the Raman spectrum above 16 GPa which could be related to scheelite reversible fergusonite transition. Pressure dependencies of the Raman active modes in the zircon and the scheelite phases are reported. - Graphical abstract: Study of scheelite-fergusonite transition in RVO{sub 4} by Raman spectroscopy is rare. Here we report Raman spectroscopic investigations of LuVO{sub 4} at high pressure to obtain insight into nature of post-scheelite phases.

  20. Combined experimental and computational study of high-pressure behavior of triphenylene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Xiao-Miao; Zhong, Guo-Hua; Zhang, Jiang; Huang, Qiao-Wei; Goncharov, Alexander F.; Lin, Hai-Qing; Chen, Xiao-Jia

    2016-05-01

    We have performed measurements of Raman scattering, synchrotron x-ray diffraction, and visible transmission spectroscopy combined with density functional theory calculations to study the pressure effect on solid triphenylene. The spectroscopic results demonstrate substantial change of the molecular configuration at 1.4 GPa from the abrupt change of splitting, disappearance, and appearance of some modes. The structure of triphenylene is found be to stable at high pressures without any evidence of structural transition from the x-ray diffraction patterns. The obtained lattice parameters show a good agreement between experiments and calculations. The obtained band gap systematically decreases with increasing pressure. With the application of pressure, the molecular planes become more and more parallel relative to each other. The theoretical calculations indicate that this organic compound becomes metallic at 180 GPa, fueling the hope for the possible realization of superconductivity at high pressure.

  1. High pressure infrared spectroscopy study on C60∗CS2 solvates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Mingrun; Zhou, Miao; Yao, Mingguang; Ge, Peng; Chen, Shuanglong; Yang, Xigui; Liu, Ran; Liu, Bo; Cui, Tian; Sundqvist, Bertil; Liu, Bingbing

    2017-02-01

    High pressure IR study has been carried out on C60∗CS2 solvates up to 34.8 GPa. It is found that the intercalated CS2 molecules significantly affect the transformations of C60 molecules under pressure. As a probe, the intercalated CS2 molecules can well detect the orientational ordering transition and deformation of C60 molecules under pressure. The chemical stability of CS2 molecules under pressure is also dramatically enhanced due to the spacial shielding effet from C60 molecules around in the solvated crystal. These results provide new insight into the effect of interactions between intercalants and fullerenes on the transformations in fullerene solvates under pressure.

  2. Self-diffusion of lignite/water under different temperatures and pressure: A molecular dynamics study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xinjian; Jin, Yu; Huang, Congliang; He, Jingfeng; Rao, Zhonghao; Zhao, Yuemin

    2016-01-01

    Temperature and pressure have direct and remarkable implications for drying and dewatering effect of low rank coals such as lignite. To understand the microenergy change mechanism of lignite, the molecular dynamics simulation method was performed to study the self-diffusion of lignite/water under different temperatures and pressure. The results showed that high temperature and high pressure can promote the diffusion of lignite/water system, which facilitates the drying and dewatering of lignite. The volume and density of lignite/water system will increase and decrease with temperature increasing, respectively. Though the pressure within simulation range can make lignite density increase, the increasing pressure showed a weak impact on variation of density.

  3. First-principles study of structural and vibrational properties of crystalline silver azide under high pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Weihua; Xiao, Heming

    2007-12-01

    A detailed first-principles study of the structural and vibrational properties of crystalline silver azide under hydrostatic pressure of 0-500 GPa has been performed with density functional theory in the generalized gradient approximation. The crystal structure is relaxed to allow ionic configurations, cell shape, and volume to change without any symmetry constraints. It is found that the silver azide crystal remains orthorhombic structure with Ibam space group for pressures up to 7 GPa, where there is a transition to an I4 /mcm tetragonal symmetry. The lattice parameter and electronic structure are investigated as functions of pressure. The calculated vibrational frequencies at ambient pressure are in agreement with available experimental data. We also discuss the pressure-induced frequency shifts for the internal and lattice modes of silver azide crystal upon compression.

  4. DFT study of Rb-TFA structure after high-pressure action

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scholtzová, Eva

    2011-12-01

    The pressure-induced A-B phase transition of synthetic Rb-tetra-ferri-annite (Rb-TFA) mica was studied theoretically by means of Density Functional Theory (DFT) method. The calculations show that Rb-TFA keeps a Franzini A-type structure up to at least 5.39 GPa of pressure, whereas at higher pressure, it transforms to a Franzini B-type structure. The negative value of the tetrahedral rotation angle α = -4.68° has appeared at 5.56 GPa of calculated pressure. This result is in a relatively good agreement with experimentally estimated phase transition area in the range of 3.36-3.84 GPa. The energy difference between the A and B structures is very small (ΔE = 8 kJ/mol). The detailed analysis of the optimized structural data shows minimal changes in the structure of Rb-TFA after the pressure-induced phase transition.

  5. Single-wall carbon nanotubes under high pressures to 62 GPa studied using designer diamond anvils.

    PubMed

    Patterson, J R; Vohra, Y K; Weir, S T; Akella, J

    2001-06-01

    Single-wall carbon nanotube samples were studied under high pressures to 62 GPa using designer diamond anvils with buried electrical microprobes that allowed for monitoring of the four-probe electrical resistance at elevated pressure. After initial densification, the electrical resistance shows a steady increase from 3 to 42 GPa, followed by a sharp rise above 42 GPa. This sharp rise in electrical resistance at high pressures is attributed to opening of an energy band gap with compression. Nanoindentation hardness measurements on the pressure-treated carbon nanotube samples gave a hardness value of 0.50 +/- 0.03 GPa. This hardness value is approximately 2 orders of magnitude lower than the amorphous carbon phase produced in fullerenes under similar conditions. Therefore, the pressure treatment of single-wall carbon nanotubes to 62 GPa did not produce a superhard carbon phase.

  6. Theoretical study of liquid-immersed exposed-core microstructured optical fibers for sensing.

    PubMed

    Warren-Smith, S C; Afshar, S; Monro, T M

    2008-06-09

    The absorption and fluorescence sensing properties of liquid-immersed exposed-core microstructured optical fibers are explored for the regime where these structures act as supported nanowires with direct access to the sensing environment. For absorption-based sensing we demonstrate that the amount of power propagating in the sensing region of the exposed-core fiber can compete with that of traditional MOFs. For fluorescence-based sensing, we see that in addition to the enhanced fluorescence capture efficiency already predicted for small-core, high refractive index contrast fibers, an improvement of up to 29% can be gained by using liquid-immersed exposed-core fibers. Additionally, calculation of the losses associated with interfaces between filled and unfilled sections predict significant benefit in using high refractive index substrate glasses for liquid-immersed exposed-core fiber sensing. This work demonstrates that, for fiber dimensions of interest, the exposed-core fiber is an attractive new sensor technology.

  7. Sense from Senses. Study Guide. Unit J. ZIM-SCI, Zimbabwe Secondary School Science Project. Year 2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simango, Sam

    The Zimbabwe Secondary School Science Project (ZIM-SCI) developed student study guides, corresponding teaching guides, and science kits for a low-cost science course which could be taught during the first 2 years of secondary school without the aid of qualified teachers and conventional laboratories. This ZIM-SCI study guide presents activities…

  8. Intramuscular pressure varies with depth. The tibialis anterior muscle studied in 12 volunteers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nakhostine, M.; Styf, J. R.; van Leuven, S.; Hargens, A. R.; Gershuni, D. H.

    1993-01-01

    Pressures in the tibialis anterior muscle were recorded at rest and during exercise with transducer-tipped catheters in 12 volunteers while they were supine or standing. The recordings were repeated with venous stasis created by an inflated tourniquet cuff on the thigh. Catheters were placed at 3 different sites in the muscle: catheter I adjacent to the deep surface of the fascia over the anterior compartment; catheter II between the fascia and the central tendon; and catheter III deep in the muscle close to the interosseous membrane. In both the supine and standing positions the intramuscular pressure at rest and the muscle relaxation pressure during exercise, obtained by catheter II, were greater than the corresponding pressures measured by the superficially located catheter I in the normal as well as in the volume loaded limb. The same conditions for pressure measurement consistently revealed lower pressures recorded by catheter III compared to II, but the difference was not significant. Our results indicate that intramuscular pressure increases centripetally, as the centrally lying tendon is approached. We conclude that pressure measurements for diagnosis of acute and chronic compartment syndromes and in ergonomic studies should be based on recordings from a standard location of the catheter within the muscle and a standard posture of the subject.

  9. Relationship of Early Life Stress and Psychological Functioning to Blood Pressure in the CARDIA Study

    PubMed Central

    Lehman, Barbara J.; Taylor, Shelley E.; Kiefe, Catarina I.; Seeman, Teresa E.

    2009-01-01

    Objective Low childhood SES and a harsh early family environment have been linked with health disorders in adulthood. In this study we present a model to help explain these links and relate the model to blood pressure change over a ten-year period in the CARDIA sample. Design Participants (N =2738) completed measures of childhood family environment, parental education, health behavior, and adult negative emotionality. Main Outcome Measures These variables were used to predict initial systolic and diastolic blood pressure, as well as the rate of blood pressure change over ten years. Results Structural equation modeling indicated that family environment was related to negative emotions, which in turn predicted baseline diastolic and systolic blood pressure, as well as change in systolic blood pressure. Parental education directly predicted change in systolic blood pressure. Although African-American participants had higher systolic and diastolic blood pressure and steeper increases over time, multiple group comparisons indicated that the strength of most pathways was similar across race and gender. Conclusion Low childhood SES and harsh family environments help to explain variability in cardiovascular risk. Low SES predicted increased blood pressure over time directly, and also indirectly through associations with childhood family environment, negative emotionality, and health behavior. PMID:19450040

  10. A Wind Tunnel Study on the Mars Pathfinder (MPF) Lander Descent Pressure Sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soriano, J. Francisco; Coquilla, Rachael V.; Wilson, Gregory R.; Seiff, Alvin; Rivell, Tomas

    2001-01-01

    The primary focus of this study was to determine the accuracy of the Mars Pathfinder lander local pressure readings in accordance with the actual ambient atmospheric pressures of Mars during parachute descent. In order to obtain good measurements, the plane of the lander pressure sensor opening should ideally be situated so that it is parallel to the freestream. However, due to two unfavorable conditions, the sensor was positioned in locations where correction factors are required. One of these disadvantages is due to the fact that the parachute attachment point rotated the lander's center of gravity forcing the location of the pressure sensor opening to be off tangent to the freestream. The second and most troublesome factor was that the lander descends with slight oscillations that could vary the amplitude of the sensor readings. In order to accurately map the correction factors required at each sensor position, an experiment simulating the lander descent was conducted in the Martian Surface Wind Tunnel at NASA Ames Research Center. Using a 115 scale model at Earth ambient pressures, the test settings provided the necessary Reynolds number conditions in which the actual lander was possibly subjected to during the descent. In the analysis and results of this experiment, the readings from the lander sensor were converted to the form of pressure coefficients. With a contour map of pressure coefficients at each lander oscillatory position, this report will provide a guideline to determine the correction factors required for the Mars Pathfinder lander descent pressure sensor readings.

  11. Mechanism study on pressure fluctuation of pump-turbine runner with large blade lean angle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yulin, Fan; Xuhe, Wang; Baoshan, Zhu; Dongyue, Zhou; Xijun, Zhou

    2016-11-01

    Excessive pressure fluctuations in the vaneless space can cause mechanical vibration and even mechanical failures in pump-turbine operation. Mechanism studies on the pressure fluctuations and optimization design of blade geometry to reduce the pressure fluctuations have important significance in industrial production. In the present paper, two pump-turbine runners with big positive and negative blade lean angle were designed by using a multiobjective design strategy. Model test showed that the runner with negative blade lean angle not only had better power performance, but also had lower pressure fluctuation than the runner with positive blade lean angle. In order to figure out the mechanism of pressure fluctuation reduction in the vaneless;jik8space, full passage model for both runners were built and transient CFD computations were conducted to simulate the flow states inside the channel. Detailed flow field analyses indicated that the difference of low-pressure area in the trailing edge of blade pressure side were the main causes of pressure fluctuation reduction in the vaneless space.

  12. LOW PRESSURE ULTRAVIOLET STUDIES FOR INACTIVIATION OF GIARDIA MURIS CYSTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This research was initiated to confirm and expand the current database for the inactiviation of Giardia spp. using ultraviolet (UV) radiation. The path taken was to confirm earlier UV research that used excystation as the indication of viability. In this study, an in vitro excyst...

  13. Study on Elastic Helical TDR Sensing Cable for Distributed Deformation Detection

    PubMed Central

    Tong, Renyuan; Li, Ming; Li, Qing

    2012-01-01

    In order to detect distributed ground surface deformation, an elastic helical structure Time Domain Reflectometry (TDR) sensing cable is shown in this paper. This special sensing cable consists of three parts: a silicone rubber rope in the center; a couple of parallel wires coiling around the rope; a silicone rubber pipe covering the sensing cable. By analyzing the relationship between the impedance and the structure of the sensing cable, the impedance model shows that the sensing cable impedance will increase when the cable is stretched. This specific characteristic is verified in the cable stretching experiment which is the base of TDR sensing technology. The TDR experiment shows that a positive reflected signal is created at the stretching deformation point on the sensing cable. The results show that the deformation section length and the stretching elongation will both affect the amplitude of the reflected signal. Finally, the deformation locating experiments show that the sensing cable can accurately detect the deformation point position on the sensing cable. PMID:23012560

  14. A Study by Remote Sensing Methods of Volcanism at Craters of the Moon National Park, Idaho

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haberle, C. W.; Hughes, S. S.; Kobs-Nawotniak, S. E.; Lim, D. S. S.; Garry, B.; Sears, D. W. G.; Downs, M.; Busto, J.; Skok, J. R.; Elphic, R. C.; Kobayashi, L.; Heldmann, J. L.; Christensen, P. R.

    2014-12-01

    Craters of the Moon (COTM) National Park, on the eastern Snake River Plain, and its associated lava fields are currently a focus of the NASA SSERVI FINESSE (Field Investigations to Enable Solar System Science and Exploration) team. COTM was selected for study owing to similarities with volcanic features observed on the Moon, Mars and Vesta. The COTM basaltic lava fields emanate from an 80 km long rift zone where at least eight eruptive episodes, occurring 15,000 to 2,000 BP, have created an expansive volcanic field covering an area of approximately 1,650 km2. This polygenetic volcanic field hosts a diverse collection of basaltic volcanic edifices such as phreatic explosion craters, eruptive fissures, cinder cones, spatter cones, shield volcanoes and expansive lava flows. Engineering challenges and high cost limit the number of robotic and human field investigations of planetary bodies and, due to these constraints, exhaustive remote sensing investigations of planetary surface properties are undertaken prior to field deployment. This creates an unavoidable dependence upon remote sensing, a critical difference between field investigations of planetary bodies and most terrestrial field investigations. Studies of this nature have utility in terrestrial investigations as they can help link spatially encompassing datasets and conserve field resources. We present preliminary results utilizing Earth orbital datasets to determine the efficacy of products derived from remotely sensed data when compared to geologic field observations. Multispectral imaging data (ASTER, AVIRIS, TIMS) collected at a range of spatial and spectral resolutions are paired with high resolution imagery from both orbit and unmanned aircraft systems. This enables the creation of derived products detailing morphology, compositional variation, mineralogy, relative age and vegetation. The surface morphology of flows within COTM differs from flow to flow and observations of these properties can aid in

  15. Sensing the body in chronic pain: a review of psychophysical studies implicating altered body representation.

    PubMed

    Tsay, A; Allen, T J; Proske, U; Giummarra, M J

    2015-05-01

    There is growing evidence that chronic pain conditions can have an associated central pathology, involving both cortical reorganisation and an incongruence between expected and actual sensory-motor feedback. While such findings are primarily driven by the recent proliferation of neuroimaging studies, the psychophysical tasks that complement those investigations have received little attention. In this review, we discuss the literature that involves the subjective appraisal of body representation in patients with chronic pain. We do so by examining three broad sensory systems that form the foundations of the sense of physical self in patients with common chronic pain disorders: (i) reweighting of proprioceptive information; (ii) altered sensitivity to exteroceptive stimuli; and, (iii) disturbed interoceptive awareness of the state of the body. Such findings present compelling evidence for a multisensory and multimodal approach to therapies for chronic pain disorders.

  16. Studying groundwater and surface water interactions using airborne remote sensing in Heihe River basin, northwest China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, C.; Liu, J.; Hu, Y.; Zheng, C.

    2015-05-01

    Managing surface water and groundwater as a unified system is important for water resource exploitation and aquatic ecosystem conservation. The unified approach to water management needs accurate characterization of surface water and groundwater interactions. Temperature is a natural tracer for identifying surface water and groundwater interactions, and the use of remote sensing techniques facilitates basin-scale temperature measurement. This study focuses on the Heihe River basin, the second largest inland river basin in the arid and semi-arid northwest of China where surface water and groundwater undergoes dynamic exchanges. The spatially continuous river-surface temperature of the midstream section of the Heihe River was obtained by using an airborne pushbroom hyperspectral thermal sensor system. By using the hot spot analysis toolkit in the ArcGIS software, abnormally cold water zones were identified as indicators of the spatial pattern of groundwater discharge to the river.

  17. Compressed sensing sodium MRI of cartilage at 7T: Preliminary study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madelin, Guillaume; Chang, Gregory; Otazo, Ricardo; Jerschow, Alexej; Regatte, Ravinder R.

    2012-01-01

    Sodium MRI has been shown to be highly specific for glycosaminoglycan (GAG) content in articular cartilage, the loss of which is an early sign of osteoarthritis (OA). Quantitative sodium MRI techniques are therefore under development in order to detect and assess early biochemical degradation of cartilage, but due to low sodium NMR sensitivity and its low concentration, sodium images need long acquisition times (15-25 min) even at high magnetic fields and are typically of low resolution. In this preliminary study, we show that compressed sensing can be applied to reduce the acquisition time by a factor of 2 at 7T without losing sodium quantification accuracy. Alternatively, the nonlinear reconstruction technique can be used to denoise fully-sampled images. We expect to even further reduce this acquisition time by using parallel imaging techniques combined with SNR-improved 3D sequences at 3T and 7T.

  18. A study of Minnesota land and water resources using remote sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shepherd, W. G. (Principal Investigator)

    1977-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. Both LANDSAT imagery and digital data were studied for usefulness in surveying water conditions of Minnesota lakes. Initial consideration was given to analysis of LANDSAT image densities because of the low technologic and cost requirements. The techniques employed, however, yield inconsistent and unreliable results. A set of criteria are given for using LANDSAT data in identification of three categories of particulate contaminants in Lake Superior. A linear transformation giving the relationship between the residual LANDSAT intensities and concentrations of three contaminants was obtained from correlation of remote sensing data with insitu measurements. LANDSAT imagery was found useful in placing peat bogs and fens in their respective geologic settings. Artificial disturbances and drainageways in peatlands could be recognized and classified.

  19. CMMAD Usability Case Study in Support of Countermine and Hazard Sensing

    SciTech Connect

    Victor G. Walker; David I. Gertman

    2010-04-01

    During field trials, operator usability data were collected in support of lane clearing missions and hazard sensing for two robot platforms with Robot Intelligence Kernel (RIK) software and sensor scanning payloads onboard. The tests featured autonomous and shared robot autonomy levels where tasking of the robot used a graphical interface featuring mine location and sensor readings. The goal of this work was to provide insights that could be used to further technology development. The efficacy of countermine systems in terms of mobility, search, path planning, detection, and localization were assessed. Findings from objective and subjective operator interaction measures are reviewed along with commentary from soldiers having taken part in the study who strongly endorse the system.

  20. Coastal water quality from remote sensing and GIS. A case study on South West Sardinia (Italy)

    SciTech Connect

    Poli, U.; Ippoliti, M.; Venturini, C.; Falcone, P.; Marino, A.

    1997-08-01

    In this paper the application of remote sensing image processing and GIS techniques in monitoring and managing coastal areas is proposed. The methodology has been applied to South-West Sardinia Coast where the environment is endangered by industrial plants and other human activities. The area is characterized by the presence of many submarine springs aligned along coastal cliffs. Water quality parameters (chlorophyll, suspended sediments and temperature) spatial and temporal variations, have been studied using Landsat TM images. Particularly, in this paper are reported the results referred to sea surface thermal gradients, considered as one of the main water quality index. Thermal gradients have been mapped in order to outline water circulation, thermal pollution and presence and distribution of submarine springs. Furthermore, a GIS approach of relating mono and multitemporal TM data with ground referenced information on industrial plants characteristics and distribution has been applied.