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Sample records for pressure-gradient soliton compression

  1. The Compressible Laminar Boundary Layer with Heat Transfer and Arbitrary Pressure Gradient

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cohen, Clarence B; Reshotko, Eli

    1956-01-01

    An approximate method for the calculation of the compressible laminar boundary layer with heat transfer and arbitrary pressure gradient, based on Thwaites' correlation concept, is presented. With the definition of dimensionless shear and heat-transfer parameters and an assumed correlation of these parameters in terms of a momentum parameter, a complete system of relations for calculating skin friction and heat transfer results. Knowledge of velocity or temperature profiles is not necessary in using this calculation method. When the method is applied to a convergent-divergent, axially symmetric rocket nozzle, it shows that high rates of heat transfer are obtained at the initial stagnation point and at the throat of the nozzle. Also indicated are negative displacement thicknesses in the convergent portion of the nozzle; these occur because of the high density within the lower portions of the cooled boundary layer. (author)

  2. Calculation of turbulent boundary layers with heat transfer and pressure gradient utilizing a compressibility transformation. Part 1: Summary report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Economos, C.; Boccio, J.

    1971-01-01

    The analysis uses a compressibility transformation and utilizes higher order closure rules to complete the transformation. By requiring that the momentum equations in differential form be satisfied at the wall and at the sublayer edge, correspondence rules are obtained which relate the variable property (VP) flow to a constant property (CP) flow in which mass transfer and pressure gradient occur simultaneously. A new CP formulation is developed and numerical results for a variety of cases are presented. Comparisons with earlier forms of the transformation and with experiment are included. For the zero pressure gradient case some differences between the various predictions are observed. For the several pressure gradient cases examined, the results are found to be essentially identical to those given by first order closure rules; i.e., by a form of transformation which relates the VP flow to a CP flow with pressure gradient but zero mass transfer.

  3. Charts and Tables for Estimating the Stability of the Compressible Laminar Boundary Layer with Heat Transfer and Arbitrary Pressure Gradient

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tetervin, Neal

    1959-01-01

    The minimum critical Reynolds numbers for the similar solutions of the compressible laminar boundary layer computed by Cohen and Reshotko and also for the Falkner and Skan solutions as recomputed by Smith have been calculated by Lin's rapid approximate method for two-dimensional disturbances. These results enable the stability of the compressible laminar boundary layer with heat transfer and pressure gradient to be easily estimated after the behavior of the boundary layer has been computed by the approximate method of Cohen and Reshotko. The previously reported unusual result (NACA Technical Note 4037) that a highly cooled stagnation point flow is more unstable than a highly cooled flat-plate flow is again encountered. Moreover, this result is found to be part of the more general result that a favorable pressure gradient is destabilizing for very cool walls when the Mach number is less than that for complete stability. The minimum critical Reynolds numbers for these wall temperature ratios are, however, all larger than any value of the laminar-boundary-layer Reynolds number likely to be encountered. For Mach numbers greater than those for which complete stability occurs a favorable pressure gradient is stabilizing, even for very cool walls.

  4. Analysis and calculation by integral methods of laminar compressible boundary-layer with heat transfer and with and without pressure gradient

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morduchow, Morris

    1955-01-01

    A survey of integral methods in laminar-boundary-layer analysis is first given. A simple and sufficiently accurate method for practical purposes of calculating the properties (including stability) of the laminar compressible boundary layer in an axial pressure gradient with heat transfer at the wall is presented. For flow over a flat plate, the method is applicable for an arbitrarily prescribed distribution of temperature along the surface and for any given constant Prandtl number close to unity. For flow in a pressure gradient, the method is based on a Prandtl number of unity and a uniform wall temperature. A simple and accurate method of determining the separation point in a compressible flow with an adverse pressure gradient over a surface at a given uniform wall temperature is developed. The analysis is based on an extension of the Karman-Pohlhausen method to the momentum and the thermal energy equations in conjunction with fourth- and especially higher degree velocity and stagnation-enthalpy profiles.

  5. Observation of soliton compression in silicon photonic crystals

    PubMed Central

    Blanco-Redondo, A.; Husko, C.; Eades, D.; Zhang, Y.; Li, J.; Krauss, T.F.; Eggleton, B.J.

    2014-01-01

    Solitons are nonlinear waves present in diverse physical systems including plasmas, water surfaces and optics. In silicon, the presence of two photon absorption and accompanying free carriers strongly perturb the canonical dynamics of optical solitons. Here we report the first experimental demonstration of soliton-effect pulse compression of picosecond pulses in silicon, despite two photon absorption and free carriers. Here we achieve compression of 3.7 ps pulses to 1.6 ps with <10 pJ energy. We demonstrate a ~1-ps free-carrier-induced pulse acceleration and show that picosecond input pulses are critical to these observations. These experiments are enabled by a dispersion-engineered slow-light photonic crystal waveguide and an ultra-sensitive frequency-resolved electrical gating technique to detect the ultralow energies in the nanostructured device. Strong agreement with a nonlinear Schrödinger model confirms the measurements. These results further our understanding of nonlinear waves in silicon and open the way to soliton-based functionalities in complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor-compatible platforms. PMID:24423977

  6. Soliton instability and fold formation in laterally compressed graphene.

    PubMed

    de Lima, Amauri Libério; Müssnich, Lucas A M; Manhabosco, Taíse M; Chacham, Hélio; Batista, Ronaldo J C; de Oliveira, Alan Barros

    2015-01-30

    We investigate-through simulations and analytical calculations-the consequences of uniaxial lateral compression applied to the upper layer of multilayer graphene. The simulations of compressed graphene show that strains larger than 2.8% induce soliton-like deformations that further develop into large, mobile folds. Such folds were indeed experimentally observed in graphene and other solid lubricants two-dimensional (2D) materials. Interestingly, in the soliton-fold regime, the shear stress decreases with the strain s, initially as s(-2/3) and rapidly going to zero. Such instability is consistent with the recently observed negative dynamic compressibility of 2D materials. We also predict that the curvatures of the soliton-folds are given by r(c) = δ√(β/2α) where 1 ≤ δ ≤ 2 and β and α are respectively related to the layer bending modulus and to the interlayer binding energy of the material. This finding might allow experimental estimates of the β/α ratio of 2D materials from fold morphology.

  7. Ion-acoustic compressive and rarefactive solitons in an electron-beam plasma system

    SciTech Connect

    Yadav, L.L.; Tiwari, R.S.; Sharma, S.R. )

    1994-03-01

    Using the general formulation of reductive perturbation method, the Korteweg--de Vries (KdV) equation is derived for an electron-beam plasma with hot isothermal beam and plasma electrons and warm ions. The soliton solution of the KdV equation is discussed in detail. It is found that above a critical velocity of electron-beam two additional ion-acoustic soliton branches appear. It is found that corresponding to two linear modes, the system supports the existence of compressive as well as rarefactive solitons depending upon the plasma parameters, while corresponding to other two wave modes, the system supports only rarefactive solitons. The effect of different parameters on the characteristics of solitons have been investigated in detail.

  8. Effect of intrapulse stimulated Raman scattering on soliton-effect pulse compression in optical fibers.

    PubMed

    Agrawal, G P

    1990-02-15

    The effect of intrapulse stimulated Raman scattering (ISRS) on the quality of soliton-effect pulse compression is analyzed by solving the generalized nonlinear Schrödinger equation numerically. The results show that ISRS can improve the performance of soliton-effect pulse compressors both qualitatively and quantitatively. The compressed pulse is shorter with a higher peak power when ISRS is taken into account. Furthermore it is pedestal free as it separates from the background. The separation is due to the soliton self-frequency shift initiated by the process of ISRS. It can also be understood in terms of the soliton decay. The optimum fiber length is found to be longer than that expected in the absence of ISRS.

  9. Compressive and rarefactive dressed solitons in plasma with nonthermal electrons and positrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdelwahed, H. G.; El-Shewy, E. K.; Zahran, M. A.; Elwakil, S. A.

    2016-02-01

    The study of dressed solitary ion waves in a collisionless unmagnetized plasma composed warm fluid of ion, nonthermal distributed positrons and electrons are discussed. Concerning nonlinear ion acoustic waves, a reductive perturbation method is applied to obtain the KdV equation in terms of first order potential. Our results exemplify that, if soliton amplitude enlarged, the shape of the wave sidetrack from KdV equation. In order to improve the soliton shape, the perturbed KdV equation is suggest. In particular, the effects of nonthermal positrons and ionic temperature on the electrostatic dressed rarefactive and compressive soliton structures are discussed.

  10. Compressive and rarefactive DIA solitons beyond the KdV limit

    SciTech Connect

    Mamun, A. A.; Deeba, F.

    2012-04-15

    The modified Gardner equation (MGE), showing the existence of compressive and rarefactive dust-ion-acoustic (DIA) solitons in a nonplanar dusty plasma (containing inertial ions, Boltzmann electrons, and negatively charged stationary dust) beyond the KdV Korteweg-de Vries (KdV) limit, is derived and numerically solved. The basic features of the compressive and rarefactive cylindrical and spherical DIA solitons, which are found to exist beyond the KdV limit, i.e., exist for {mu} {approx} 2/3 (where {mu} = Z{sub n}n{sub d0}/n{sub i0}, z{sub d} is the number of electrons residing onto the dust grain surface, n{sub d0}(n{sub i0}) is the dust (ion) number density at equilibrium, and {mu} {approx} 2/3 means that {mu} is not equal to 2/3, but it is around 2/3) are identified. These solitons (which can be referred to as DIA Gardner solitons (DIA-GSs)) are completely different from the KdV solitons because {mu} = 2/3 corresponds to the vanishing of the nonlinear coefficient of the KdV equation, and {mu} {approx} 2/3 corresponds to extremely large amplitude KdV solitons for which the validity of the reductive perturbation method breaks down. It is also shown that the properties of the nonplanar (cylindrical and spherical) DIA-GSs are significantly different from those of the one dimensional planar ones.

  11. Compressive and rarefactive ion acoustic solitons in a magnetized two-ion component plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ur-Rehman, Hafeez; Mahmood, S.; Aman-ur-Rehman

    2014-10-01

    The formation of compressive (hump) and rarefactive (dip) ion acoustic solitons is studied in magnetized O+- H+- e and O+- H-- e plasmas. The hydrodynamics equations are described for cold heavy (oxygen) ions, warm light (hydrogen) ions and isothermal Boltzmann distributed electrons along with Poisson equations in the presence of a magnetic field. The reductive perturbation method is used to derive the nonlinear Zakharov-Kuznetsov (ZK) equation for an ion acoustic wave in magnetized two-ion component plasma. It is found that two modes of ion acoustic waves with fast and slow speeds can propagate in the linear limit in such a plasma. It is noticed that, in the case of positively charged light hydrogen ions O+- H+- e plasmas, the slow ion acoustic wave solitons formed both potential hump as well as dip structures, while fast ion acoustic wave solitons give only hump structures. However in the case of negatively charged light hydrogen ions O+- H-- e plasmas, the slow ion acoustic wave solitons formed potential hump structures while fast ion acoustic wave solitons produce dip structures. The variations in the amplitude and width of the nonlinear slow and fast ion acoustic wave structures with density, temperature of light ions and magnetic field intensity are obtained in magnetized two-ion component plasmas. The magnetic field has its effect only on the width of the nonlinear ion acoustic wave structures in two-ion component plasmas.

  12. Deterministic single soliton generation and compression in microring resonators avoiding the chaotic region.

    PubMed

    Jaramillo-Villegas, Jose A; Xue, Xiaoxiao; Wang, Pei-Hsun; Leaird, Daniel E; Weiner, Andrew M

    2015-04-20

    A path within the parameter space of detuning and pump power is demonstrated in order to obtain a single cavity soliton (CS) with certainty in SiN microring resonators in the anomalous dispersion regime. Once the single CS state is reached, it is possible to continue a path to compress it, broadening the corresponding single free spectral range (FSR) Kerr frequency comb. The first step to achieve this goal is to identify the stable regions in the parameter space via numerical simulations of the Lugiato-Lefever equation (LLE). Later, using this identification, we define a path from the stable modulation instability (SMI) region to the stable cavity solitons (SCS) region avoiding the chaotic and unstable regions. PMID:25968998

  13. Characterization and compression of dissipative-soliton-resonance pulses in fiber lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Daojing; Li, Lei; Zhou, Junyu; Zhao, Luming; Tang, Dingyuan; Shen, Deyuan

    2016-03-01

    We report numerical and experimental studies of dissipative-soliton-resonance (DSR) in a fiber laser with a nonlinear optical loop mirror. The DSR pulse presents temporally a flat-top profile and a clamped peak power. Its spectrum has a rectangle profile with characteristic steep edges. It shows a unique behavior as pulse energy increases: The rectangle part of the spectrum is unchanged while the newly emerging spectrum sits on the center part and forms a peak. Experimental observations match well with the numerical results. Moreover, the detailed evolution of the DSR pulse compression is both numerically and experimentally demonstrated for the first time. An experimentally obtained DSR pulse of 63 ps duration is compressed down to 760 fs, with low-intensity pedestals using a grating pair. Before being compressed to its narrowest width, the pulse firstly evolves into a cat-ear profile, and the corresponding autocorrelation trace shows a crown shape, which distinguishes itself from properties of other solitons formed in fiber lasers.

  14. Characterization and compression of dissipative-soliton-resonance pulses in fiber lasers.

    PubMed

    Li, Daojing; Li, Lei; Zhou, Junyu; Zhao, Luming; Tang, Dingyuan; Shen, Deyuan

    2016-01-01

    We report numerical and experimental studies of dissipative-soliton-resonance (DSR) in a fiber laser with a nonlinear optical loop mirror. The DSR pulse presents temporally a flat-top profile and a clamped peak power. Its spectrum has a rectangle profile with characteristic steep edges. It shows a unique behavior as pulse energy increases: The rectangle part of the spectrum is unchanged while the newly emerging spectrum sits on the center part and forms a peak. Experimental observations match well with the numerical results. Moreover, the detailed evolution of the DSR pulse compression is both numerically and experimentally demonstrated for the first time. An experimentally obtained DSR pulse of 63 ps duration is compressed down to 760 fs, with low-intensity pedestals using a grating pair. Before being compressed to its narrowest width, the pulse firstly evolves into a cat-ear profile, and the corresponding autocorrelation trace shows a crown shape, which distinguishes itself from properties of other solitons formed in fiber lasers. PMID:27025189

  15. Characterization and compression of dissipative-soliton-resonance pulses in fiber lasers

    PubMed Central

    Li, Daojing; Li, Lei; Zhou, Junyu; Zhao, Luming; Tang, Dingyuan; Shen, Deyuan

    2016-01-01

    We report numerical and experimental studies of dissipative-soliton-resonance (DSR) in a fiber laser with a nonlinear optical loop mirror. The DSR pulse presents temporally a flat-top profile and a clamped peak power. Its spectrum has a rectangle profile with characteristic steep edges. It shows a unique behavior as pulse energy increases: The rectangle part of the spectrum is unchanged while the newly emerging spectrum sits on the center part and forms a peak. Experimental observations match well with the numerical results. Moreover, the detailed evolution of the DSR pulse compression is both numerically and experimentally demonstrated for the first time. An experimentally obtained DSR pulse of 63 ps duration is compressed down to 760 fs, with low-intensity pedestals using a grating pair. Before being compressed to its narrowest width, the pulse firstly evolves into a cat-ear profile, and the corresponding autocorrelation trace shows a crown shape, which distinguishes itself from properties of other solitons formed in fiber lasers. PMID:27025189

  16. Pressure gradient influence in turbulent boundary layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reuther, Nico; Kaehler, Christian J.

    2015-11-01

    Understanding wall-bounded turbulence is still an ongoing process. Although remarkable progress has been made in the last decades, many challenges still remain. Mean flow statistics are well understood in case of zero pressure gradient flows. However, almost all turbulent boundary layers in technical applications, such as aircrafts, are subjected to a streamwise pressure gradient. When subjecting turbulent boundary layers to adverse pressure gradients, significant changes in the statistical behavior of the near-wall flow have been observed in experimental studies conducted however the details dynamics and characteristics of these flows has not been fully resolved. The sensitivity to Reynolds number and the dependency on several parameters, including the dependence on the pressure gradient parameter, is still under debate and very little information exists about statistically averaged quantities such as the mean velocity profile or Reynolds stresses. In order to improve the understanding of wall-bounded turbulence, this work experimentally investigates turbulent boundary layer subjected to favorable and adverse pressure gradients by means of Particle Image Velocimetry over a wide range of Reynolds numbers, 4200 pressure gradient.

  17. Compressive solitons in a moving e-p plasma under the effect of dust grains and an external magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malik, Rakhee; Malik, Hitendra K.

    2013-12-01

    A theoretical investigation concerning the propagation of compressive solitons in a plasma comprising electrons, positrons, and dust grains is presented by considering the dust grains of either positive charge or negative charge. Using reductive perturbation technique, a relevant Korteweg-deVries (KdV) equation is derived and then solved to obtain the expressions of amplitude and width of the solitons. The magnetic field is found to alter the dispersive property of the plasma, and hence, only the width of the solitons is reduced in the presence of higher magnetic field. Soliton amplitude is found to decrease/increase and the width to increase/decrease for the higher densities of negatively/positively charged dust grains. Moreover, the amplitude of such a soliton remains larger in the case of positively charged dust grains in comparison with the negatively charged dust grains. The effect of electron/positron drift velocities of the charged species is not pronounced on the properties of the compressive solitons. Under the limiting cases, our calculations reduce to the calculations by other investigators. This substantiates the generality of the present analysis.

  18. Shape optimization of pressure gradient microphones

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norum, T. D.; Seiner, J. M.

    1977-01-01

    Recently developed finite element computer programs were utilized to investigate the influence of the shape of a body on its scattering field with the aim of determining the optimal shape for a Pressure Gradient Microphone (PGM). Circular cylinders of various aspect ratios were evaluated to choose the length to diameter ratio best suited for a dual element PGM application. Alterations of the basic cylindrical shape by rounding the edges and recessing at the centerline were also studied. It was found that for a + or - 1 db deviation from a linear pressure gradient response, a circular cylinder of aspect ratio near 0.5 was most suitable, yielding a useful upper frequency corresponding to ka = 1.8. The maximum increase in this upper frequency limit obtained through a number of shape alterations was only about 20 percent. An initial experimental evaluation of a single element cylindrical PGM of aspect ratio 0.18 utilizing a piezoresistive type sensor was also performed and is compared to the analytical results.

  19. Pressure gradient induced generation of microbubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evangelio, Alvaro; Campo-Cortes, Francisco; Gordillo, Jose Manuel

    2015-11-01

    It is well known that the controlled production of monodisperse bubbles possesses uncountable applications in medicine, pharmacy and industry. Here we provide with a detailed physical description of the bubble formation processes taking place in a type of flow where the liquid pressure gradient can be straightforwardly controlled. In our experiments, a gas flow rate discharges through a cylindrical needle into a pressurized chamber. The pressure gradient created from the exit of the injection needle towards the entrance of a extraction duct promotes the stretching of the gas ligament downstream. In our analysis, which is supported by an exhaustive experimental study in which the liquid viscosity is varied by three orders of magnitude, different regimes can be distinguished depending mainly on the Reynolds number. Through our physical modeling, we provide closed expressions for both the bubbling frequencies and for the bubble diameters as well as the conditions under which a monodisperse generation is obtained in all regimes found. The excellent agreement between our expressions and the experimental data fully validates our physical modeling.

  20. Comment on "Electrostatic compressive and rarefactive shocks and solitons in relativistic plasmas occurring in polar regions of pulsar"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hafez, M. G.; Talukder, M. R.; Hossain Ali, M.

    2016-05-01

    The aim of this comment is to show the solution of the KdVB equation used by Shah et al. (Astrophys. Space Sci. 335:529-537, 2011, doi: 10.1007/s10509-011-0766-y) is not correct. So, the numerical results that are predicted in this manuscript should not be helpful for further investigations in a plasma laboratory. For this reason, we have employed the Bernoulli's equation method to obtain the correct form of analytical solution to this equation, which is appropriate for the study of electrostatic compressive and rarefactive shocks and solitons in relativistic plasmas occurring in polar regions of pulsar.

  1. Nappe emplacement under lateral pressure gradient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Podladchikov, Yury; Schmalholz, Stefan

    2014-05-01

    New thin viscous approximation is under development specifically targeted to model spontaneous initiation and tens of kilometers horizontal displacement of tectonic nappes. Nappes are few kilometers thing and tens of kilometers long rock units trusted towards foreland often preserving internal lithological consistency and laying at near horizontal position at the end of the emplacement. Significant shear stresses and deviation of principal stresses from vertical is required to explain this very peculiar strain localization style from mechanical point of view. There is also a need for the explanation of their common appearances in most collisional settings. Both pure shear thin sheet and flexural models kinematically eliminate nappes formation. Spreading viscous sheet models, such as used to model glaciers, are also not applicable as the direction of motion is upward, against gravity. The reason for this discrepancy is the hydrostatic pressure approximation of the gravity-driven spreading models. Actually, the thin sheet approximation is not sensitive to the assumptions made on pressure profile. Lateral non-lithostatic pressure gradient-driven viscous sheet model is appropriate for modeling of nappes. In turn, significant non-lithostatic pressure must be supported by flexural rigidity of overlying and underlying units. Lateral gradients of this non-lithostatic pressure are responsible for the significant shear stress and, therefore, deviation of principal stress from vertical.

  2. Two techniques for temporal pulse compression in gas-filled hollow-core kagomé photonic crystal fiber.

    PubMed

    Mak, K F; Travers, J C; Joly, N Y; Abdolvand, A; Russell, P St J

    2013-09-15

    We demonstrate temporal pulse compression in gas-filled kagomé hollow-core photonic crystal fiber (PCF) using two different approaches: fiber-mirror compression based on self-phase modulation under normal dispersion, and soliton effect self-compression under anomalous dispersion with a decreasing pressure gradient. In the first, efficient compression to near-transform-limited pulses from 103 to 10.6 fs was achieved at output energies of 10.3 μJ. In the second, compression from 24 to 6.8 fs was achieved at output energies of 6.6 μJ, also with near-transform-limited pulse shapes. The results illustrate the potential of kagomé-PCF for postprocessing the output of fiber lasers. We also show that, using a negative pressure gradient, ultrashort pulses can be delivered directly into vacuum.

  3. Subcycle solitonic breathers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voronin, A. A.; Zheltikov, A. M.

    2014-10-01

    Optical breathing solitons are known to display well-resolved cycles where the phase of pulse compression is followed by pulse stretching. Here we show that, in the extreme regimes where the soliton pulse width approaches the field cycle, the field waveform dynamics can drastically differ from this textbook scenario. We demonstrate that such extremely short soliton transients can develop optical shock waves, which seed parametric amplification, facilitating, along with ionization nonlinearity, soliton compression to subcycle pulse widths. This pulse compression scenario is shown to enable the generation of sub-quarter-cycle multigigawatt optical field waveforms in the mid infrared.

  4. Pre-onset Azimuthal Pressure Gradient and Associated Auroral Intensifications Related to Dipolarization Fronts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xing, X.; Lyons, L. R.; Angelopoulos, V.; Zhou, X.; Donovan, E.; Larson, D. E.; Carlson, C. W.; Auster, U.

    2011-12-01

    found for some events. These suggest that the transient azimuthal pressure gradient enhancement near the onset meridian could result from the azimuthal difference of the ion acceleration caused by the localized dipolarization fronts that reach the near-Earth plasma sheet at the onset meridian. The associated transient upward FAC enhancement, which leads to the thin onset arc intensification, would thus be related to the current pair generated in the plasma compression region ahead of the dipolarization front. Thus the earthward penetrating plasma flow channels could play a dominant role in leading to substorm onset.

  5. Optimal disturbances in boundary layers subject to streamwise pressure gradient

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ashpis, David E.; Tumin, Anatoli

    2003-01-01

    An analysis of the optimal non-modal growth of perturbations in a boundary layer in the presence of a streamwise pressure gradient is presented. The analysis is based on PSE equations for an incompressible fluid. Examples with Falkner-Scan profiles indicate that a favorable pressure gradient decreases the non-modal growth, while an unfavorable pressure gradient leads to an increase of the amplification. It is suggested that the transient growth mechanism be utilized to choose optimal parameters of tripping elements on a low-pressure turbine (LPT) airfoil. As an example, a boundary layer flow with a streamwise pressure gradient corresponding to the pressure distribution over a LPT airfoil is considered. It is shown that there is an optimal spacing of the tripping elements and that the transient growth effect depends on the starting point.

  6. Numerical Study of the Transverse Stability of Compressive and Rarefactive Alfven Solitons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamilton, R.; Haneberg, C.

    2015-12-01

    A numerical study of the stability of DNLS bright and dark solitons subject to oblique perturbations is reported. The DNLS equation is a weakly nonlinear, weakly dispersive and one dimensional limiting form of MHD with the inclusion of Hall dispersion which has been shown to remain valid for plane wave propagation parallel, as well as quasiparallel, to the ambient magnetic field. Related analytic work has dealt with the transverse stability of circularly polarized Alfven waves [E. Mjolhus, T. Hada, J. Plasma Phys., 43, 257 - 268 (1990)] describing stability in relation to the propagation angle of the perturbation and the wave's amplitude and wavenumber. The amplitude and wavenumber relation for transverse stability has a striking similarity to the criterion for modulational instability. A prior analytic work [M. S. Ruderman, Fluid Dyn. 22, 299, (1987)] found the dark soliton to be unstable. Our numerical results are established in the context of these analytic results. Additionally, the transverse stability properties of dark solitons will be addressed as they relate to their role in representing magnetic decreases observed in interplanetary space.

  7. Compressive and rarefactive dust-ion-acoustic Gardner solitons in a multi-component dusty plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Ema, S. A.; Ferdousi, M.; Mamun, A. A.

    2015-04-15

    The linear and nonlinear propagations of dust-ion-acoustic solitary waves (DIASWs) in a collisionless four-component unmagnetized dusty plasma system containing nonextensive electrons, inertial negative ions, Maxwellian positive ions, and negatively charged static dust grains have been investigated theoretically. The linear properties are analyzed by using the normal mode analysis and the reductive perturbation method is used to derive the nonlinear equations, namely, the Korteweg-de Vries (K-dV), the modified K-dV (mK-dV), and the Gardner equations. The basic features (viz., polarity, amplitude, width, etc.) of Gardner solitons (GS) are found to exist beyond the K-dV limit and these dust-ion-acoustic GS are qualitatively different from the K-dV and mK-dV solitons. It is observed that the basic features of DIASWs are affected by various plasma parameters (viz., electron nonextensivity, negative-to-positive ion number density ratio, electron-to-positive ion number density ratio, electron-to-positive ion temperature ratio, etc.) of the considered plasma system. The findings of our results obtained from this theoretical investigation may be useful in understanding the nonlinear structures and the characteristics of DIASWs propagating in both space and laboratory plasmas.

  8. Enhanced magnetic reconnection in the presence of pressure gradients

    SciTech Connect

    Pueschel, M. J.; Terry, P. W.; Told, D.; Jenko, F.

    2015-06-15

    Magnetic reconnection in the presence of background pressure gradients is studied, with special attention to parallel (compressional) magnetic fluctuations. A process is reported that reconnects fields through coupling of drift-wave-type instabilities with current sheets. Its time scale is set not by the reconnecting field but by inhomogeneities of the background density or temperature. The observed features can be attributed to a pressure-gradient-driven linear instability which interacts with the reconnecting system but is fundamentally different from microtearing. In particular, this mode relies on parallel magnetic fluctuations and the associated drift. For turbulent reconnection, similar or even stronger enhancements are reported. In the solar corona, this yields a critical pressure gradient scale length of about 200 km below which this new process becomes dominant over the tearing instability.

  9. Pressure Gradient Estimation Based on Ultrasonic Blood Flow Measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nitta, Naotaka; Homma, Kazuhiro; Shiina, Tsuyoshi

    2006-05-01

    Mechanical load to the blood vessel wall, such as shear stress and pressure, which occurs in blood flow dynamics, contribute greatly to plaque rupture in arteriosclerosis and to biochemical activation of endothelial cells. Therefore, noninvasive estimations of these mechanical loads are able to provide useful information for the prevention of vascular diseases. Although the pressure is the dominant component of mechanical load, for practical purposes, the pressure gradient is also often important. So far, we have investigated the estimation of the kinematic viscosity coefficient using a combination of the Navier-Stokes equations and ultrasonic velocity measurement. In this paper, a method for pressure gradient estimation using the estimated kinematic viscosity coefficient is proposed. The validity of the proposed method was investigated on the basis of the analysis with the data obtained by computer simulation and a flow phantom experiment. These results revealed that the proposed method can provide a valid estimation of the pressure gradient.

  10. Evolution of a Planar Wake in Adverse Pressure Gradient

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Driver, David M.; Mateer, George G.

    2016-01-01

    In the interest of improving the predictability of high-lift systems at maximum lift conditions, a series of fundamental experiments were conducted to study the effects of adverse pressure gradient on a wake flow. Mean and fluctuating velocities were measured with a two-component laser-Doppler velocimeter. Data were obtained for several cases of adverse pressure gradient, producing flows ranging from no reversed flow to massively reversed flow. While the turbulent Reynolds stresses increase with increasing size of the reversed flow region, the gradient of Reynolds stress does not. Computations using various turbulence models were unable to reproduce the reversed flow.

  11. Acoustic waves in gases with strong pressure gradients

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zorumski, William E.

    1989-01-01

    The effect of strong pressure gradients on the acoustic modes (standing waves) of a rectangular cavity is investigated analytically. When the cavity response is represented by a sum of modes, each mode is found to have two resonant frequencies. The lower frequency is near the Viaesaela-Brundt frequency, which characterizes the buoyant effect, and the higher frequency is above the ordinary acoustic resonance frequency. This finding shows that the propagation velocity of the acoustic waves is increased due to the pressure gradient effect.

  12. Accurate pressure gradient calculations in hydrostatic atmospheric models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carroll, John J.; Mendez-Nunez, Luis R.; Tanrikulu, Saffet

    1987-01-01

    A method for the accurate calculation of the horizontal pressure gradient acceleration in hydrostatic atmospheric models is presented which is especially useful in situations where the isothermal surfaces are not parallel to the vertical coordinate surfaces. The present method is shown to be exact if the potential temperature lapse rate is constant between the vertical pressure integration limits. The technique is applied to both the integration of the hydrostatic equation and the computation of the slope correction term in the horizontal pressure gradient. A fixed vertical grid and a dynamic grid defined by the significant levels in the vertical temperature distribution are employed.

  13. Statistics of pressure and pressure gradient in homogeneous isotropic turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gotoh, T.; Rogallo, R. S.

    1994-01-01

    The statistics of pressure and pressure gradient in stationary isotropic turbulence are measured within direct numerical simulations at low to moderate Reynolds numbers. It is found that the one-point pdf of the pressure is highly skewed and that the pdf of the pressure gradient is of stretched exponential form. The power spectrum of the pressure P(k) is found to be larger than the corresponding spectrum P(sub G)(k) computed from a Gaussian velocity field having the same energy spectrum as that of the DNS field. The ratio P(k)/P(sub G)(k), a measure of the pressure-field intermittence, grows with wavenumber and Reynolds number as -R(sub lambda)(exp 1/2)log(k/k(sub d)) for k less than k(sub d)/2 where k(sub d) is the Kolmogorov wavenumber. The Lagrangian correlations of pressure gradient and velocity are compared and the Lagrangian time scale of the pressure gradient is observed to be much shorter than that of the velocity.

  14. Pressure Gradient Effects on Hypersonic Cavity Flow Heating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Everhart, Joel L.; Alter, Stephen J.; Merski, N. Ronald; Wood, William A.; Prabhu, Ramdas K.

    2007-01-01

    The effect of a pressure gradient on the local heating disturbance of rectangular cavities tested at hypersonic freestream conditions has been globally assessed using the two-color phosphor thermography method. These experiments were conducted in the Langley 31-Inch Mach 10 Tunnel and were initiated in support of the Space Shuttle Return-To-Flight Program. Two blunted-nose test surface geometries were developed, including an expansion plate test surface with nearly constant negative pressure gradient and a flat plate surface with nearly zero pressure gradient. The test surface designs and flow characterizations were performed using two-dimensional laminar computational methods, while the experimental boundary layer state conditions were inferred using the measured heating distributions. Three-dimensional computational predictions of the entire model geometry were used as a check on the design process. Both open-flow and closed-flow cavities were tested on each test surface. The cavity design parameters and the test condition matrix were established using the computational predictions. Preliminary conclusions based on an analysis of only the cavity centerline data indicate that the presence of the pressure gradient did not alter the open cavity heating for laminar-entry/laminar-exit flows, but did raise the average floor heating for closed cavities. The results of these risk-reduction studies will be used to formulate a heating assessment of potential damage scenarios occurring during future Space Shuttle flights.

  15. Pressure Gradient Effects on Hypersonic Cavity Flow Heating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Everhart, Joel L.; Alter, Stephen J.; Merski, N. Ronald; Wood, William A.; Prabhu, Ramadas K.

    2006-01-01

    The effect of a pressure gradient on the local heating disturbance of rectangular cavities tested at hypersonic freestream conditions has been globally assessed using the two-color phosphor thermography method. These experiments were conducted in the Langley 31-Inch Mach 10 Tunnel and were initiated in support of the Space Shuttle Return-To-Flight Program. Two blunted-nose test surface geometries were developed, including an expansion plate test surface with nearly constant negative pressure gradient and a flat plate surface with nearly zero pressure gradient. The test surface designs and flow characterizations were performed using two-dimensional laminar computational methods, while the experimental boundary layer state conditions were inferred using the measured heating distributions. Three-dimensional computational predictions of the entire model geometry were used as a check on the design process. Both open-flow and closed-flow cavities were tested on each test surface. The cavity design parameters and the test condition matrix were established using the computational predictions. Preliminary conclusions based on an analysis of only the cavity centerline data indicate that the presence of the pressure gradient did not alter the open cavity heating for laminar-entry/laminar-exit flows, but did raise the average floor heating for closed cavities. The results of these risk-reduction studies will be used to formulate a heating assessment of potential damage scenarios occurring during future Space Shuttle flights.

  16. Optimal Disturbances in Boundary Layers Subject to Streamwise Pressure Gradient

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ashpis, David E.; Tumin, Anatoli

    2003-01-01

    An analysis of the non-modal growth of perturbations in a boundary layer in the presence of a streamwise pressure gradient is presented. The analysis is based on PSE equations for an incompressible fluid. Examples with Falkner- Skan profiles indicate that a favorable pressure gradient decreases the non-modal growth while an unfavorable pressure gradient leads to an increase of the amplification. It is suggested that the transient growth mechanism be utilized to choose optimal parameters of tripping elements on a low-pressure turbine (LPT) airfoil. As an example, a boundary-layer flow with a streamwise pressure gradient corresponding to the pressure distribution over a LPT airfoil is considered. It is shown that there is an optimal spacing of the tripping elements and that the transient growth effect depends on the starting point. The amplification is found to be small at the LPT s very low Reynolds numbers, but there is a possibility to enhance the transient energy growth by means of wall cooling.

  17. Pressure Gradients in the Inner Surf and Outer Swash Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kidwell, A.; Puleo, J. A.; Torres-Freyermuth, A.

    2010-12-01

    The swash zone is a highly dynamic region of the beach profile. Although there has been significant progression in understanding the complex hydrodynamics of the swash zone, an improvement in the understanding of the sediment transport mechanisms deserves further investigation. Prior studies have demonstrated that the existing formulations derived from the energetics-type formulation do not accurately and consistently predict sediment transport. Thus, measurements and numerical modeling can contribute in the improvement of the current predictive capability of sediment transport. A potential enhancement to nearshore sediment transport is the horizontal pressure gradient. However, measuring the dynamic pressure gradient in nearshore flows is a difficult task. For instance, standard pressure sensors are generally ill-suited for this type of measurement in shallow swash flows due to the obstructing size of the sensor and the potential for flow interference. With improved measurement apparati and techniques, it is possible to obtain measurements of the horizontal pressure gradient. Our current research includes laboratory and numerical model investigation of the horizontal pressure gradient in the inner surf and outer swash zone. An inexpensive differential pressure gauge is employed allowing for a pressure port on the order of 2 mm diameter. Four pressure sensor pairs are installed 1 cm above the bed with a cross-shore spacing of 8 cm. The sensors are deployed just outside of and at various locations within the outer swash zone to determine spatio-temporal pressure variations. The measurement of total pressure coupled with the corresponding free surface measurements from co-located capacitance wave gauges yields time series of the hydrostatic and dynamic pressure and pressure gradients. A VOF-type RANS model is employed in this investigation. Firstly, the numerical model is validated with swash measurements. Then, model simulations will be performed in order to

  18. Computation of Turbulent Wake Flows in Variable Pressure Gradient

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duquesne, N.; Carlson, J. R.; Rumsey, C. L.; Gatski, T. B.

    1999-01-01

    Transport aircraft performance is strongly influenced by the effectiveness of high-lift systems. Developing wakes generated by the airfoil elements are subjected to strong pressure gradients and can thicken very rapidly, limiting maximum lift. This paper focuses on the effects of various pressure gradients on developing symmetric wakes and on the ability of a linear eddy viscosity model and a non-linear explicit algebraic stress model to accurately predict their downstream evolution. In order to reduce the uncertainties arising from numerical issues when assessing the performance of turbulence models, three different numerical codes with the same turbulence models are used. Results are compared to available experimental data to assess the accuracy of the computational results.

  19. On Localized Vapor Pressure Gradients Governing Condensation and Frost Phenomena.

    PubMed

    Nath, Saurabh; Boreyko, Jonathan B

    2016-08-23

    Interdroplet vapor pressure gradients are the driving mechanism for several phase-change phenomena such as condensation dry zones, interdroplet ice bridging, dry zones around ice, and frost halos. Despite the fundamental nature of the underlying pressure gradients, the majority of studies on these emerging phenomena have been primarily empirical. Using classical nucleation theory and Becker-Döring embryo formation kinetics, here we calculate the pressure field for all possible modes of condensation and desublimation in order to gain fundamental insight into how pressure gradients govern the behavior of dry zones, condensation frosting, and frost halos. Our findings reveal that in a variety of phase-change systems the thermodynamically favorable mode of nucleation can switch between condensation and desublimation depending upon the temperature and wettability of the surface. The calculated pressure field is used to model the length of a dry zone around liquid or ice droplets over a broad parameter space. The long-standing question of whether the vapor pressure at the interface of growing frost is saturated or supersaturated is resolved by considering the kinetics of interdroplet ice bridging. Finally, on the basis of theoretical calculations, we propose that there exists a new mode of frost halo that is yet to be experimentally observed; a bimodal phase map is developed, demonstrating its dependence on the temperature and wettability of the underlying substrate. We hope that the model and predictions contained herein will assist future efforts to exploit localized vapor pressure gradients for the design of spatially controlled or antifrosting phase-change systems. PMID:27463696

  20. On Localized Vapor Pressure Gradients Governing Condensation and Frost Phenomena.

    PubMed

    Nath, Saurabh; Boreyko, Jonathan B

    2016-08-23

    Interdroplet vapor pressure gradients are the driving mechanism for several phase-change phenomena such as condensation dry zones, interdroplet ice bridging, dry zones around ice, and frost halos. Despite the fundamental nature of the underlying pressure gradients, the majority of studies on these emerging phenomena have been primarily empirical. Using classical nucleation theory and Becker-Döring embryo formation kinetics, here we calculate the pressure field for all possible modes of condensation and desublimation in order to gain fundamental insight into how pressure gradients govern the behavior of dry zones, condensation frosting, and frost halos. Our findings reveal that in a variety of phase-change systems the thermodynamically favorable mode of nucleation can switch between condensation and desublimation depending upon the temperature and wettability of the surface. The calculated pressure field is used to model the length of a dry zone around liquid or ice droplets over a broad parameter space. The long-standing question of whether the vapor pressure at the interface of growing frost is saturated or supersaturated is resolved by considering the kinetics of interdroplet ice bridging. Finally, on the basis of theoretical calculations, we propose that there exists a new mode of frost halo that is yet to be experimentally observed; a bimodal phase map is developed, demonstrating its dependence on the temperature and wettability of the underlying substrate. We hope that the model and predictions contained herein will assist future efforts to exploit localized vapor pressure gradients for the design of spatially controlled or antifrosting phase-change systems.

  1. [Measuring the intracoronary pressure gradient--value and methodologic limitations].

    PubMed

    Sievert, H; Kaltenbach, M

    1987-06-01

    Measurements of pressure gradients were performed in a fluid-filled model. The hydrostatically regulated perfusion pressure, as well as the diameter of the tube segments and the regulation of the flow by peripheral resistance, were comparable to conditions in human coronary arteries. Pressure gradients above 20 mm Hg were only measured with a reduction in cross-sectional area of more than 90%. Even after increasing the flow four-fold, which corresponds to the human coronary flow reserve, as well as after probing the stenosis with different catheters (2F-5F), gradients greater than 20 mm Hg were only recorded with high-grade stenoses (more than 80% reduction in cross-sectional area). The findings in this model demonstrate that measurement of pressure gradients allows only a quantitative differentiation between high-grade (greater than 80%) and low-grade (less than 80%) stenoses. The catheter itself can substantially contribute to the gradient by vessel obstruction, depending on the diameter of the catheter and of the coronary vessel. A quantitative assessment of the stenosis therefore requires knowledge of the pre- and post-stenotic vessel diameter as well as of the catheter diameter. However, pressure measurements during transluminal coronary angioplasty should not be abandoned. They can be useful to aid catheter positioning and to estimate dilatation efficacy. Moreover, measurement of coronary capillary wedge pressure during balloon expansion provides valuable information about the extent of collateralisation. PMID:2957862

  2. Pressure gradient phenomena during horizontal oil-water flow

    SciTech Connect

    Angeli, P.; Hewitt, G.F.

    1996-12-01

    Pressure gradients were measured during the cocurrent dispersed flow of oil (1.6 mPa viscosity) and water in two 1 inch nominal bore horizontal test sections made from stainless steel and acrylic resin. Measurements were made for mixture velocities above 1.1 m/s in the steel pipe and above 1.7 m/s in the acrylic pipe and up to 3.9 m/s, where fully dispersed flow exists (Angeli, 1996). Water volume fractions ranged from 5% to 85%, while phase inversion appeared between 37% and 40% water volume fraction in both pipes. Analysis of the results showed that the homogeneous model, where the mixture of the two fluids is treated as one pseudofluid with properly averaged physical properties, cannot satisfactorily predict the pressure gradients occurring during the dispersed flow. Pressure gradients increased suddenly at the phase inversion point, while the experimental friction factors, especially in the oil continuous flows, appeared to be lower than the predictions of the homogeneous model or sometimes even lower than the single phase oil and water flow friction factors.

  3. Estimation of pressure gradients at renal artery stenoses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yim, Peter J.; Cebral, Juan R.; Weaver, Ashley; Lutz, Robert J.; Vasbinder, G. Boudewijn C.

    2003-05-01

    Atherosclerotic disease of the renal artery can reduce the blood flow leading to renovascular hypertension and ischemic nephopathy. The kidney responds to a decrease in blood flow by activation of the renin-angiotensin system that increases blood pressure and can result in severe hypertension. Percutaneous translumenal angioplasty (PTA) may be indicated for treatment of renovascular hypertension (RVH). However, direct measurement of renal artery caliber and degree of stenosis has only moderate specificity for detection of RVH. A confounding factor in assessment of the proximal renal artery is that diffuse atherosclerotic disease of the distal branches of the renal artery can produce the same effect on blood-flow as atherosclerotic disease of the proximal renal artery. A methodology is proposed for estimation of pressure gradients at renal artery stenoses from magnetic resonance imaging that could improve the evaluation of renal artery disease. In the proposed methodology, pressure gradients are estimated using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modeling. Realistic CFD models are constructed from images of vessel shape and measurements of blood-flow rates which are available from magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) and phase-contrast magnetic resonance (MR) imaging respectively. CFD measurement of renal artery pressure gradients has been validated in a physical flow-through model.

  4. Pore-pressure gradients in the proximity of a submarine buried pipeline

    SciTech Connect

    Magda, W.

    1995-12-31

    This paper is concerned with the two-dimensional finite-element modeling of the wave-induced pore-pressure field in the proximity of a submarine pipeline buried in sandy seabed sediments subject to continuous loading of regular surface waves. Neglecting inertial forces, a linear elastic stress-strain relationship for the soil, and Darcy`s law for the flow of pore-fluid are assumed. The model takes into account the compressibility of both components (i.e., pore-fluid and soil skeleton) of the two-phase medium. The results of numerical computations are discussed with respect to the hydraulic gradient in the upper part of seabed sediments just above the buried submarine pipeline. The pore-pressure gradient is studied as a function of geometry (depth of burial) as well as soil and pore-fluid compressibility parameters where the later of which is defined in terms of soil saturation conditions.

  5. Solitons in spiral polymeric macromolecules.

    PubMed

    Savin, A V; Manevitch, L I

    2000-06-01

    The problem of the existence and stability of dynamical soliton regimes in a helix polymer is solved numerically. For the polytetrafluoroethylene macromolecule, within a model in which deformations of the valence and torsion angles and the valence bonds are taken into account, two types of soliton solutions are found. The first type describes the propagation of a solitary wave of torsional displacements of a helix chain. The twisting of the chain is a result of the compression of dihedral (torsion) angles. The second type describes the propagation of a solitary wave of longitudinal displacements of a helix chain. The longitudinal compression of the chain is a result of the compression of the valence angles and bonds. The solitons have a finite narrow spectrum of supersonic velocities: the soliton of torsion has a spectrum above the velocity of long-wavelength phonons of torsion while the spectrum of the solitons of compression lies above the velocity of long-wavelength phonons of longitudinal displacement. Numerical simulations of the soliton dynamics show their stability in the intervals of admissible velocities. The elasticity of soliton interactions under their collisions is demonstrated. The formation of solitons induced by deformation of end bonds of the helix chain has been modeled. It is shown that helicity of the macromolecule is the necessary condition for existence of torsional solitons. PMID:11088403

  6. Non-invasive measurement of pressure gradients using ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olesen, Jacob B.; Traberg, Marie S.; Pihl, Michael J.; Jensen, Jørgen A.

    2013-03-01

    A non-invasive method for estimating 2-D pressure gradients from ultrasound vector velocity data is presented. The method relies on in-plane vector velocity elds acquired using the Transverse Oscillation method. The pressure gradients are estimated by applying the Navier-Stokes equations for isotropic uids to the estimated velocity elds. The velocity elds were measured for a steady ow on a carotid bifurcation phantom (Shelley Medical, Canada) with a 70% constriction on the internal branch. Scanning was performed with a BK8670 linear transducer (BK Medical, Denmark) connected to a BK Medical 2202 UltraView Pro Focus scanner. The results are validated through nite element simulations of the carotid ow model where the geometry is determined from MR images. This proof of concept study was conducted at nine ultrasound frames per second. Estimated pressure gradients along the longitudinal direction of the constriction varied from 0 kPa/m to 10 kPa/m with a normalized bias of -9.1% for the axial component and -7.9% for the lateral component. The relative standard deviation of the estimator, given in reference to the peak gradient, was 28.4% in the axial direction and 64.5% in the lateral direction. A study made across the constriction was also conducted. This yielded magnitudes from 0 kPa/m to 7 kPa/m with a normalized bias of -5.7% and 13.9% for the axial and lateral component, respectively. The relative standard deviations of this study were 45.2% and 83.2% in the axial and lateral direction, respectively.

  7. Inner scaling for boundary layers in strong pressure-gradients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nickels, Tim

    2003-11-01

    Strong pressure-gradients can have a marked effect on scaling in the inner region of turbulent boundary layers. In particular the usual universal logarithmic law for the mean velocity profile "breaks down" in these circumstances. It is shown that the modification to the mean velocity can be explained by a universal critical Reynolds number for the sublayer. Further it is shown that this theoretical model also provides the correct scaling for the streamwise turbulence intensity and Reynolds shear-stress. The concept can be further extended to explain modifications due to other imposed effects such as wall suction.

  8. Dithering transitions in resistive pressure-gradient-driven turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia, L.; Carreras, B.A.; Lynch, V.E.; Diamond, P.H. |

    1994-12-31

    A self-consistent model of the L to H transition has been derived from coupled nonlinear envelope equations for the fluctuation level, and radial electric field shear, E{prime}{sub r}. This model is based on general properties of the coupling between turbulence and averaged sheared flows. To extract these generic properties several turbulence models have been investigated. Here, some of the results obtained with the resistive pressure-gradient-driven turbulence are presented with special emphasis on the structure of the Reynolds stress and the existence of limit cycle solutions.

  9. Characteristics of turbulence in boundary layer with zero pressure gradient

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klebanoff, P S

    1955-01-01

    The results of an experimental investigation of a turbulent boundary layer with zero pressure gradient are presented. Measurements with the hot-wire anemometer were made of turbulent energy and turbulent shear stress, probability density and flattening factor of u-fluctuation (fluctuation in x-direction), spectra of turbulent energy and shear stress, and turbulent dissipation. The importance of the region near the wall and the inadequacy of the concept of local isotropy are demonstrated. Attention is given to the energy balance and the intermittent character of the outer region of the boundary layer. Also several interesting features of the spectral distribution of the turbulent motions are discussed.

  10. Vandenberg Air Force Base Pressure Gradient Wind Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shafer, Jaclyn A.

    2013-01-01

    Warning category winds can adversely impact day-to-day space lift operations at Vandenberg Air Force Base (VAFB) in California. NASA's Launch Services Program and other programs at VAFB use wind forecasts issued by the 30 Operational Support Squadron Weather Flight (30 OSSWF) to determine if they need to limit activities or protect property such as a launch vehicle. The 30 OSSWF tasked the AMU to develop an automated Excel graphical user interface that includes pressure gradient thresholds between specific observing stations under different synoptic regimes to aid forecasters when issuing wind warnings. This required the AMU to determine if relationships between the variables existed.

  11. Effectiveness of Micro-Blowing Technique in Adverse Pressure Gradients

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Welch, Gerard E.; Larosiliere, Louis M.; Hwang, Danny P.; Wood, Jerry R.

    2001-01-01

    The impact of the micro-blowing technique (MBT) on the skin friction and total drag of a strut in a turbulent, strong adverse-pressure-gradient flow is assessed experimentally over a range of subsonic Mach numbers (0.3 less than M less than 0.7) and reduced blowing fractions (0 less than or equal to 2F/C (sub f,o) less than or equal to 1.75). The MBT-treated strut is situated along the centerline of a symmetric 2-D diffuser with a static pressure rise coefficient of 0.6. In agreement with presented theory and earlier experiments in zero-pressure-gradient flows, the effusion of blowing air reduces skin friction significantly (e.g., by 60% at reduced blowing fractions near 1.75). The total drag of the treated strut with blowing is significantly lower than that of the treated strut in the limit of zero-blowing; further, the total drag is reduced below that of the baseline (solid-plate) strut, provided that the reduced blowing fractions are sufficiently high. The micro-blowing air is, however, deficient in streamwise momentum and the blowing leads to increased boundary-layer and wake thicknesses and shape factors. Diffuser performance metrics and wake surveys are used to discuss the impact of various levels of micro-blowing on the aerodynamic blockage and loss.

  12. Implicit Large-Eddy Simulations of Zero-Pressure Gradient, Turbulent Boundary Layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sekhar, Susheel; Mansour, Nagi N.

    2015-01-01

    A set of direct simulations of zero-pressure gradient, turbulent boundary layer flows are conducted using various span widths (62-630 wall units), to document their influence on the generated turbulence. The FDL3DI code that solves compressible Navier-Stokes equations using high-order compact-difference scheme and filter, with the standard recycling/rescaling method of turbulence generation, is used. Results are analyzed at two different Re values (500 and 1,400), and compared with spectral DNS data. They show that a minimum span width is required for the mere initiation of numerical turbulence. Narrower domains ((is) less than 100 w.u.) result in relaminarization. Wider spans ((is) greater than 600 w.u.) are required for the turbulent statistics to match reference DNS. The upper-wall boundary condition for this setup spawns marginal deviations in the mean velocity and Reynolds stress profiles, particularly in the buffer region.

  13. Effect of Pressure Gradients on Plate Response and Radiation in a Supersonic Turbulent Boundary Layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frendi, Abdelkader

    1997-01-01

    Using the model developed by the author for zero-pressure gradient turbulent boundary layers, results are obtained for adverse and favorable pressure gradients. It is shown that when a flexible plate is located in an adverse pressure gradient area, it vibrates more than if it were in a favorable pressure gradient one. Therefore the noise generated by the plate in an adverse pressure gradient is much greater than that due to the plate in a favorable pressure gradient. The effects of Reynolds number and boundary layer thickness are also analyzed and found to have the same effect in both adverse and favorable pressure gradient cases. Increasing the Reynolds number is found to increase the loading on the plate and therefore acoustic radiation. An increase in boundary layer thickness is found to decrease the level of the high frequencies and therefore the response and radiation at these frequencies. The results are in good qualitative agreement with experimental measurements.

  14. Pressure Gradient Effects On Two-Dimensional Plasma Expansion

    SciTech Connect

    Moon, S; Smith, R F; Dunn, J; Keenan, R; Nilsen, J; Hunter, J R; Filevich, J; Rocca, J J; Marconi, M C; Shlyaptsev, V N

    2004-10-05

    Recent advances in interferometry has allowed for the characterization of the electron density expansion within a laser produced plasma to within 10 {micro}m of the target surface and over picosecond timescales. This technique employs the high brightness output of the transient gain Ni-like Pd collisional x-ray laser at 14.7 nm to construct an effective moving picture of the two-dimensional (2-D) expansion of the plasma. We present experimentally measured density profiles of an expanding Al plasma generated through laser irradiation in a 14mm line focus geometry. Significant lateral expansion was observed at all times as well as a pronounced on-axis electron density dip. Detailed modeling with a 2-D plasma physics code gives good agreement to experimental observations. Large pressure gradients associated with the tight focal spot conditions are calculated to dominate in shaping the plasma density profile.

  15. Protein osmotic pressure gradients and microvascular reflection coefficients.

    PubMed

    Drake, R E; Dhother, S; Teague, R A; Gabel, J C

    1997-08-01

    Microvascular membranes are heteroporous, so the mean osmotic reflection coefficient for a microvascular membrane (sigma d) is a function of the reflection coefficient for each pore. Investigators have derived equations for sigma d based on the assumption that the protein osmotic pressure gradient across the membrane (delta II) does not vary from pore to pore. However, for most microvascular membranes, delta II probably does vary from pore to pore. In this study, we derived a new equation for sigma d. According to our equation, pore-to-pore differences in delta II increase the effect of small pores and decrease the effect of large pores on the overall membrane osmotic reflection coefficient. Thus sigma d for a heteroporous membrane may be much higher than previously derived equations indicate. Furthermore, pore-to-pore delta II differences increase the effect of plasma protein osmotic pressure to oppose microvascular fluid filtration. PMID:9277520

  16. Radio jet refraction in galactic atmospheres with static pressure gradients

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henriksen, R. N.; Vallee, J. P.; Bridle, A. H.

    1981-01-01

    A theory based on the refraction of radio jets in the extended atmosphere of an elliptical galaxy, is proposed for double radio sources with a Z or S morphology. The model describes a collimated jet of supersonic material that bends self-consistently under the influence of external static pressure gradients, and may alternatively be seen as a continuous-jet version of the buoyancy model proposed by Gull (1973). Emphasis is placed on (1) S-shaped radio sources identified with isolated galaxies, such as 3C 293, whose radio structures should be free of distortions resulting from motion relative to a cluster medium, and (2) small-scale, galaxy-dominated rather than environment-dominated S-shaped sources such as the inner jet structure of Fornax A.

  17. Radio jet refraction in galactic atmospheres with static pressure gradients

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henriksen, R. N.; Vallee, J. P.; Bridle, A. H.

    1981-01-01

    A theory of double radio sources which have a 'Z' or 'S' morphology is proposed, based on the refraction of radio jets in the extended atmosphere of an elliptical galaxy. The model describes a collimated jet of supersonic material bending self-consistently under the influence of external static pressure gradients. Gravity and magnetic fields are neglected in the simplest case except insofar as they determine the static pressure distribution. The calculation is a straightforward extension of a method used to calculate a ram-pressure model for twin radio trails ('C' morphology). It may also be described as a continuous-jet version of a buoyancy model proposed in 1973. The model has the added virtue of invoking a galactic atmosphere similar to those already indicated by X-ray measurements of some other radio galaxies and by models for the collimation of other radio jets.

  18. Modeling of Propagation of Interacting Cracks Under Hydraulic Pressure Gradient

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Hai; Mattson, Earl Douglas; Podgorney, Robert Karl

    2015-04-01

    A robust and reliable numerical model for fracture initiation and propagation, which includes the interactions among propagating fractures and the coupling between deformation, fracturing and fluid flow in fracture apertures and in the permeable rock matrix, would be an important tool for developing a better understanding of fracturing behaviors of crystalline brittle rocks driven by thermal and (or) hydraulic pressure gradients. In this paper, we present a physics-based hydraulic fracturing simulator based on coupling a quasi-static discrete element model (DEM) for deformation and fracturing with conjugate lattice network flow model for fluid flow in both fractures and porous matrix. Fracturing is represented explicitly by removing broken bonds from the network to represent microcracks. Initiation of new microfractures and growth and coalescence of the microcracks leads to the formation of macroscopic fractures when external and/or internal loads are applied. The coupled DEM-network flow model reproduces realistic growth pattern of hydraulic fractures. In particular, simulation results of perforated horizontal wellbore clearly demonstrate that elastic interactions among multiple propagating fractures, fluid viscosity, strong coupling between fluid pressure fluctuations within fractures and fracturing, and lower length scale heterogeneities, collectively lead to complicated fracturing patterns.

  19. Optimal Disturbances in Boundary Layers Subject to Streamwise Pressure Gradient

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tumin, Anatoli; Ashpis, David E.

    2003-01-01

    Laminar-turbulent transition in shear flows is still an enigma in the area of fluid mechanics. The conventional explanation of the phenomenon is based on the instability of the shear flow with respect to infinitesimal disturbances. The conventional hydrodynamic stability theory deals with the analysis of normal modes that might be unstable. The latter circumstance is accompanied by an exponential growth of the disturbances that might lead to laminar-turbulent transition. Nevertheless, in many cases, the transition scenario bypasses the exponential growth stage associated with the normal modes. This type of transition is called bypass transition. An understanding of the phenomenon has eluded us to this day. One possibility is that bypass transition is associated with so-called algebraic (non-modal) growth of disturbances in shear flows. In the present work, an analysis of the optimal disturbances/streamwise vortices associated with the transient growth mechanism is performed for boundary layers in the presence of a streamwise pressure gradient. The theory will provide the optimal spacing of the control elements in the spanwise direction and their placement in the streamwise direction.

  20. Importance of pressure gradient in solid oxide fuel cell electrodes for modeling study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ni, Meng; Leung, Dennis Y. C.; Leung, Michael K. H.

    The pressure gradients in the electrodes of a solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) are frequently neglected without any justification in calculating the concentration overpotentials of the SOFC electrodes in modeling studies. In this short communication, a comparative study has been conducted to study the effect of pressure gradients on mass transfer and the resulting concentration overpotentials of an SOFC running on methane (CH 4) fuel. It is found that the pressure gradients in both anode and cathode are significant in the fuel cell electrochemical activities. Neglecting the anode pressure gradient in the calculation can lead to underestimation of the concentration overpotential by about 20% at a typical current density of 5000 A m -2 and at a temperature of 1073 K. The deviation can be even larger at a higher temperature. At the cathode, neglecting the pressure gradient can result in overestimation of the concentration overpotential by about 10% under typical working conditions.

  1. Estimation of pressure gradients in pulsatile flow from magnetic resonance acceleration measurements.

    PubMed

    Tasu, J P; Mousseaux, E; Delouche, A; Oddou, C; Jolivet, O; Bittoun, J

    2000-07-01

    A method for estimating pressure gradients from MR images is demonstrated. Making the usual assumption that the flowing medium is a Newtonian fluid, and with appropriate boundary conditions, the inertial forces (or acceleration components of the flow) are proportional to the pressure gradients. The technique shown here is based on an evaluation of the inertial forces from Fourier acceleration encoding. This method provides a direct measurement of the total acceleration defined as the sum of the velocity derivative vs. time and the convective acceleration. The technique was experimentally validated by comparing MR and manometer pressure gradient measurements obtained in a pulsatile flow phantom. The results indicate that the MR determination of pressure gradients from an acceleration measurement is feasible with a good correlation with the true measurements (r = 0.97). The feasibility of the method is demonstrated in the aorta of a normal volunteer. Magn Reson Med 44:66-72, 2000. PMID:10893523

  2. Experimental analysis of the boundary layer transition with zero and positive pressure gradient

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arnal, D.; Jullen, J. C.; Michel, R.

    1980-01-01

    The influence of a positive pressure gradient on the boundary layer transition is studied. The mean velocity and turbulence profiles of four cases are examined. As the intensity of the pressure gradient is increased, the Reynolds number of the transition onset and the length of the transition region are reduced. The Tollmein-Schlichting waves disturb the laminar regime; the amplification of these waves is in good agreement with the stability theory. The three dimensional deformation of the waves leads finally to the appearance of turbulence. In the case of zero pressure gradient, the properties of the turbulent spots are studied by conditional sampling of the hot-wire signal; in the case of positive pressure gradient, the turbulence appears in a progressive manner and the turbulent spots are much more difficult to characterize.

  3. A turbulent boundary layer at low Reynolds number with adverse pressure gradient

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watmuff, J. H.; Westphal, R. V.

    1989-01-01

    The evolution of a low Re(theta) turbulent boundary layer in an adverse pressure gradient (APG) is studied for comparison with CFD simulations by Spalart (1988). A short region of favorable pressure gradient is applied first to establish a self-preserving layer which is a suitable initial condition for the simulations. The APG is then applied rapidly such that Beta(x) of about 2 for Re(theta) of about 1500.

  4. A model for jet-noise analysis using pressure-gradient correlations on an imaginary cone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norum, T. D.

    1974-01-01

    The technique for determining the near and far acoustic field of a jet through measurements of pressure-gradient correlations on an imaginary conical surface surrounding the jet is discussed. The necessary analytical developments are presented, and their feasibility is checked by using a point source as the sound generator. The distribution of the apparent sources on the cone, equivalent to the point source, is determined in terms of the pressure-gradient correlations.

  5. Reflection of ion acoustic solitons in a plasma having negative ions

    SciTech Connect

    Chauhan, S.S.; Malik, H.K.; Dahiya, R.P.

    1996-11-01

    Reflection of compressive and rarefactive ion acoustic solitons propagating in an inhomogeneous plasma in the presence of negative ions is investigated. Modified Korteweg{endash}deVries equations for incident and reflected solitons are derived and solved. The amplitude of incident and reflected solitons increases with negative to positive ion density ratio. With increasing density ratio, reflection of rarefactive solitons is reinforced whereas that of compressive solitons weakened. The rarefactive solitons are found to undergo stronger reflection than the compressive ones. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  6. On determining characteristic length scales in pressure-gradient turbulent boundary layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vinuesa, R.; Bobke, A.; Örlü, R.; Schlatter, P.

    2016-05-01

    In the present work, we analyze three commonly used methods to determine the edge of pressure gradient turbulent boundary layers: two based on composite profiles, the one by Chauhan et al. ["Criteria for assessing experiments in zero pressure gradient boundary layers," Fluid Dyn. Res. 41, 021404 (2009)] and the one by Nickels ["Inner scaling for wall-bounded flows subject to large pressure gradients," J. Fluid Mech. 521, 217-239 (2004)], and the other one based on the condition of vanishing mean velocity gradient. Additionally, a new method is introduced based on the diagnostic plot concept by Alfredsson et al. ["A new scaling for the streamwise turbulence intensity in wall-bounded turbulent flows and what it tells us about the `outer' peak," Phys. Fluids 23, 041702 (2011)]. The boundary layers developing over the suction and pressure sides of a NACA4412 wing section, extracted from a direct numerical simulation at chord Reynolds number Rec = 400 000, are used as the test case, besides other numerical and experimental data from favorable, zero, and adverse pressure-gradient flat-plate turbulent boundary layers. We find that all the methods produce robust results with mild or moderate pressure gradients, although the composite-profile techniques require data preparation, including initial estimations of fitting parameters and data truncation. Stronger pressure gradients (with a Rotta-Clauser pressure-gradient parameter β larger than around 7) lead to inconsistent results in all the techniques except the diagnostic plot. This method also has the advantage of providing an objective way of defining the point where the mean streamwise velocity is 99% of the edge velocity and shows consistent results in a wide range of pressure gradient conditions, as well as flow histories. Collapse of intermittency factors obtained from a wide range of pressure-gradient and Re conditions on the wing further highlights the robustness of the diagnostic plot method to determine the

  7. Rarefactive and compressive soliton waves in unmagnetized dusty plasma with non-thermal electron and ion distribution

    SciTech Connect

    Eslami, Esmaeil Baraz, Rasoul

    2014-02-15

    Sagdeev's pseudo potential method is employed to study dust acoustic solitary waves in an unmagnetized plasma containing negatively charged dusts with non-thermal electron and ion. The range of parameters for the existence of solitary waves using the analytical expression of the Sagdeev potential has been found. It is observed that, depending on the values of the plasma parameters like ion to electron temperature ratio σ, non-thermal parameters β and γ, electron to ion density ratio μ, and the value of the Mach number M, both rarefactive and compressive solitary waves may exist.

  8. Quantifying Dynamic Changes in Plantar Pressure Gradient in Diabetics with Peripheral Neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Lung, Chi-Wen; Hsiao-Wecksler, Elizabeth T.; Burns, Stephanie; Lin, Fang; Jan, Yih-Kuen

    2016-01-01

    Diabetic foot ulcers remain one of the most serious complications of diabetes. Peak plantar pressure (PPP) and peak pressure gradient (PPG) during walking have been shown to be associated with the development of diabetic foot ulcers. To gain further insight into the mechanical etiology of diabetic foot ulcers, examination of the pressure gradient angle (PGA) has been recently proposed. The PGA quantifies directional variation or orientation of the pressure gradient during walking and provides a measure of whether pressure gradient patterns are concentrated or dispersed along the plantar surface. We hypothesized that diabetics at risk of foot ulceration would have smaller PGA in key plantar regions, suggesting less movement of the pressure gradient over time. A total of 27 participants were studied, including 19 diabetics with peripheral neuropathy and 8 non-diabetic control subjects. A foot pressure measurement system was used to measure plantar pressures during walking. PPP, PPG, and PGA were calculated for four foot regions – first toe (T1), first metatarsal head (M1), second metatarsal head (M2), and heel (HL). Consistent with prior studies, PPP and PPG were significantly larger in the diabetic group compared with non-diabetic controls in the T1 and M1 regions, but not M2 or HL. For example, PPP was 165% (P = 0.02) and PPG was 214% (P < 0.001) larger in T1. PGA was found to be significantly smaller in the diabetic group in T1 (46%, P = 0.04), suggesting a more concentrated pressure gradient pattern under the toe. The proposed PGA may improve our understanding of the role of pressure gradient on the risk of diabetic foot ulcers. PMID:27486576

  9. A Study of Wake Development and Structure in Constant Pressure Gradients

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, Flint O.; Nelson, R. C.; Liu, Xiaofeng

    2000-01-01

    Motivated by the application to high-lift aerodynamics for commercial transport aircraft, a systematic investigation into the response of symmetric/asymmetric planar turbulent wake development to constant adverse, zero, and favorable pressure gradients has been conducted. The experiments are performed at a Reynolds number of 2.4 million based on the chord of the wake generator. A unique feature of this wake study is that the pressure gradients imposed on the wake flow field are held constant. The experimental measurements involve both conventional LDV and hot wire flow field surveys of mean and turbulent quantities including the turbulent kinetic energy budget. In addition, similarity analysis and numerical simulation have also been conducted for this wake study. A focus of the research has been to isolate the effects of both pressure gradient and initial wake asymmetry on the wake development. Experimental results reveal that the pressure gradient has a tremendous influence on the wake development, despite the relatively modest pressure gradients imposed. For a given pressure gradient, the development of an initially asymmetric wake is different from the initially symmetric wake. An explicit similarity solution for the shape parameters of the symmetric wake is obtained and agrees with the experimental results. The turbulent kinetic energy budget measurements of the symmetric wake demonstrate that except for the convection term, the imposed pressure gradient does not change the fundamental flow physics of turbulent kinetic energy transport. Based on the turbulent kinetic energy budget measurements, an approach to correct the bias error associated with the notoriously difficult dissipation estimate is proposed and validated through the comparison of the experimental estimate with a direct numerical simulation result.

  10. On determining characteristic length scales in pressure gradient turbulent boundary layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vinuesa, Ricardo; Örlü, Ramis; Schlatter, Philipp

    2016-04-01

    In the present work we analyze three methods used to determine the edge of pressure gradient turbulent boundary layers: two based on composite profiles, the one by Chauhan et al. (Fluid Dyn. Res. 41:021401, 2009) and the one by Nickels (J. Fluid Mech. 521:217–239, 2004), and the other one based on the condition of vanishing mean velocity gradient. Additionally, a new method is introduced based on the diagnostic plot concept by Alfredsson et al. (Phys. Fluids 23:041702, 2011). The boundary layer developing over the suction side of a NACA4412 wing profile, extracted from a direct numerical simulation at Rec = 400,000, is used as the test case. We find that all the methods produce robust results with mild or moderate pressure gradients, but stronger pressure gradients (with β larger than around 7) lead to inconsistent results in all the techniques except the diagnostic plot. This method also has the advantage of providing an objective way of defining the point where the mean streamwise velocity is 99% of the edge velocity, and shows consistent results in a wide range of pressure gradient conditions, as well as flow histories. Therefore, the technique based on the diagnostic plot is a robust method to determine the boundary layer thickness (equivalent to δ99) and edge velocity in pressure gradient turbulent boundary layers.

  11. Intraarterial Pressure Gradients After Randomized Angioplasty or Stenting of Iliac Artery Lesions

    SciTech Connect

    Tetteroo, Eric; Haaring, Cees; Graaf, Yolanda van der; Schaik, Jan P.J. van; Engelen, A.D. van; Mali, Willem P.T.M.

    1996-11-15

    Purpose: To determine initial technical results of percutaneous transluminal angioplasty (PTA) and stent procedures in the iliac artery, mean intraarterial pressure gradients were recorded before and after each procedure. Methods: We randomly assigned 213 patients with typical intermittent claudication to primary stent placement (n= 107) or primary PTA (n= 106), with subsequent stenting in the case of a residual mean pressure gradient of > 10 mmHg (n= 45). Eligibility criteria included angiographic iliac artery stenosis (> 50% diameter reduction) and/or a peak systolic velocity ratio > 2.5 on duplex examination. Mean intraarterial pressures were simultaneously recorded above and below the lesion, at rest and also during vasodilatation in the case of a resting gradient {<=} 10 mmHg. Results: Pressure gradients in the primary stent group were 14.9 {+-} 10.4 mmHg before and 2.9 {+-} 3.5 mmHg after stenting. Pressure gradients in the primary PTA group were 17.3 {+-} 11.3 mmHg pre-PTA, 4.2 {+-} 5.4 mmHg post-PTA, and 2.5 {+-} 2.8 mmHg after selective stenting. Compared with primary stent placement, PTA plus selective stent placement avoided application of a stent in 63% (86/137) of cases, resulting in a considerable cost saving. Conclusion: Technical results of primary stenting and PTA plus selective stenting are similar in terms of residual pressure gradients.

  12. On determining characteristic length scales in pressure gradient turbulent boundary layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vinuesa, Ricardo; Örlü, Ramis; Schlatter, Philipp

    2016-04-01

    In the present work we analyze three methods used to determine the edge of pressure gradient turbulent boundary layers: two based on composite profiles, the one by Chauhan et al. (Fluid Dyn. Res. 41:021401, 2009) and the one by Nickels (J. Fluid Mech. 521:217-239, 2004), and the other one based on the condition of vanishing mean velocity gradient. Additionally, a new method is introduced based on the diagnostic plot concept by Alfredsson et al. (Phys. Fluids 23:041702, 2011). The boundary layer developing over the suction side of a NACA4412 wing profile, extracted from a direct numerical simulation at Rec = 400,000, is used as the test case. We find that all the methods produce robust results with mild or moderate pressure gradients, but stronger pressure gradients (with β larger than around 7) lead to inconsistent results in all the techniques except the diagnostic plot. This method also has the advantage of providing an objective way of defining the point where the mean streamwise velocity is 99% of the edge velocity, and shows consistent results in a wide range of pressure gradient conditions, as well as flow histories. Therefore, the technique based on the diagnostic plot is a robust method to determine the boundary layer thickness (equivalent to δ99) and edge velocity in pressure gradient turbulent boundary layers.

  13. Pressure gradient effects on the development of hairpin vortices in an initially laminar boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, Blaine Keith

    An experimental study was conducted in Lehigh University's low-speed water channel to examine the effects of a zero, adverse, and favorable pressure gradients on the development of single hairpin vortices. Single hairpin vortices were generated in an initially laminar environment using controlled fluid injection through a streamwise slot at a Re(delta)* = 380, 440, and 570. Behavior of hairpin structures was determined by the use of dye and hydrogen bubble flow visualization techniques. Visualization results indicate that as a single hairpin vortex convects downstream a complicated growth process due to viscous-inviscid interactions and Biot-Savart deformation results in the generation of secondary and subsidiary vortices, eventually yielding a turbulent spot-like structure. The hairpin vortex structures are observed to be strongly affected by the presence of a pressure gradient, undergoing significant spatial growth changes, as well as experiencing significant flow structure modifications. As the hairpin initiation location is moved further into an adverse pressure gradient, the hairpin vortex lifts and rotates farther away from the surface relative to the behavior in a zero pressure gradient. Regions of low and high-velocity fluid near the surface are accentuated within an adverse pressure gradient, which amplifies the low-speed streak formation and breakdown process, accelerating the formation of vortical substructures and ejection of fluid from the surface.

  14. Vertical two-phase flow regimes and pressure gradients: Effect of viscosity

    SciTech Connect

    Da Hlaing, Nan; Sirivat, Anuvat; Siemanond, Kitipat; Wilkes, James O.

    2007-05-15

    The effect of liquid viscosity on the flow regimes and the corresponding pressure gradients along the vertical two-phase flow was investigated. Experiment was carried out in a vertical transparent tube of 0.019 m in diameter and 3 m in length and the pressure gradients were measured by a U-tube manometer. Water and a 50 vol.% glycerol solution were used as the working fluids whose kinematic viscosities were 0.85 x 10{sup -6} and 4.0 x 10{sup -6} m{sup 2}/s, respectively. In our air-liquid annular two-phase flow, the liquid film of various thicknesses flowed adjacent to the wall and the gas phase flowed at the center of the tube. The superficial air velocity, j{sub air}, was varied between 0.0021 and 58.7 m/s and the superficial liquid velocity, j{sub liquid}, was varied between 0 and 0.1053 m/s. In the bubble, the slug and the slug-churn flow regimes, the pressure gradients decreased with increasing Reynolds number. But in the annular and the mist flow regimes, pressure gradients increased with increasing Reynolds number. Finally, the experimentally measured pressure gradient values were compared and are in good agreement with the theoretical values. (author)

  15. The influence of free-stream turbulence on turbulent boundary layers with mild adverse pressure gradients

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoffmann, Jon A.

    1988-01-01

    The influence of near isotropic free-stream turbulence on the shape factors and skin friction coefficients of turbulent bounday layers is presented for the cases of zero and mild adverse pressure gradients. With free-stream turbulence, improved fluid mixing occurs in boundary layers with adverse pressure gradients relative to the zero pressure gradient condition, with the same free-stream turbulence intensity and length scale. Stronger boundary layers with lower shape factors occur as a result of a lower ratio of the integral scale of turbulence to the boundary layer thickness, and to vortex stretching of the turbulent eddies in the free stream, both of which act to improve the transmission of momentum from the free stream to the boundary layers.

  16. The influence of free-stream turbulence on turbulent boundary layers with mild adverse pressure gradients

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoffmann, J. A.; Kassir, S. M.; Larwood, S. M.

    1989-01-01

    The influence of near isotropic free-stream turbulence on the shape factors and skin friction coefficients of turbulent boundary layers is presented for the cases of zero and mild adverse pressure gradients. With free-stream turbulence, improved fluid mixing occurs in boundary layers with adverse pressure gradients relative to the zero pressure gradient condition, with the same free-stream turbulence intensity and length scale. Stronger boundary layers with lower shape factors occur as a result of a lower ratio of the integral scale of turbulence to the boundary layer thickness, and to vortex stretching of the turbulent eddies in the free-stream, both of which act to improve the transmission of momentum from the free-stream to the boundary layers.

  17. Arterial Pressure Gradients during Upright Posture and 30 deg Head Down Tilt

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sanchez, E. R; William, J. M.; Ueno, T.; Ballard, R. E.; Hargens, A. R.; Holton, Emily M. (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    Gravity alters local blood pressure within the body so that arterial pressures in the head and foot are lower and higher, respectively, than that at heart level. Furthermore, vascular responses to local alterations of arterial pressure are probably important to maintain orthostatic tolerance upon return to the Earth after space flight. However, it has been difficult to evaluate the body's arterial pressure gradient due to the lack of noninvasive technology. This study was therefore designed to investigate whether finger arterial pressure (FAP), measured noninvasively, follows a normal hydrostatic pressure gradient above and below heart level during upright posture and 30 deg head down tilt (HDT). Seven healthy subjects gave informed consent and were 19 to 52 years old with a height range of 158 to 181 cm. A Finapres device measured arterial pressure at different levels of the body by moving the hand from 36 cm below heart level (BH) to 72 cm above heart level (AH) in upright posture and from 36 cm BH to 48 cm AH during HDT in increments of 12 cm. Mean FAP creased by 85 mmHg transitioning from BH to AH in upright posture, and the pressure gradient calculated from hydrostatic pressure difference (rho(gh)) was 84 mmHg. In HDT, mean FAP decreased by 65 mmHg from BH to AH, and the calculated pressure gradient was also 65 mmHg. There was no significant difference between the measured FAP gradient and the calculated pressure gradient, although a significant (p = 0.023) offset was seen for absolute arterial pressure in upright posture. These results indicate that arterial pressure at various levels can be obtained from the blood pressure at heart level by calculating rho(gh) + an offset. The offset equals the difference between heart level and the site of measurement. In summary, we conclude that local blood pressure gradients can be measured by noninvasive studies of FAP.

  18. Soliton production with nonlinear homogeneous lines

    DOE PAGES

    Elizondo-Decanini, Juan M.; Coleman, Phillip D.; Moorman, Matthew W.; Petney, Sharon Joy Victor; Dudley, Evan C.; Youngman, Kevin; Penner, Tim Dwight; Fang, Lu; Myers, Katherine M.

    2015-11-24

    Low- and high-voltage Soliton waves were produced and used to demonstrate collision and compression using diode-based nonlinear transmission lines. Experiments demonstrate soliton addition and compression using homogeneous nonlinear lines. We built the nonlinear lines using commercially available diodes. These diodes are chosen after their capacitance versus voltage dependence is used in a model and the line design characteristics are calculated and simulated. Nonlinear ceramic capacitors are then used to demonstrate high-voltage pulse amplification and compression. The line is designed such that a simple capacitor discharge, input signal, develops soliton trains in as few as 12 stages. We also demonstrated outputmore » voltages in excess of 40 kV using Y5V-based commercial capacitors. The results show some key features that determine efficient production of trains of solitons in the kilovolt range.« less

  19. Soliton production with nonlinear homogeneous lines

    SciTech Connect

    Elizondo-Decanini, Juan M.; Coleman, Phillip D.; Moorman, Matthew W.; Petney, Sharon Joy Victor; Dudley, Evan C.; Youngman, Kevin; Penner, Tim Dwight; Fang, Lu; Myers, Katherine M.

    2015-11-24

    Low- and high-voltage Soliton waves were produced and used to demonstrate collision and compression using diode-based nonlinear transmission lines. Experiments demonstrate soliton addition and compression using homogeneous nonlinear lines. We built the nonlinear lines using commercially available diodes. These diodes are chosen after their capacitance versus voltage dependence is used in a model and the line design characteristics are calculated and simulated. Nonlinear ceramic capacitors are then used to demonstrate high-voltage pulse amplification and compression. The line is designed such that a simple capacitor discharge, input signal, develops soliton trains in as few as 12 stages. We also demonstrated output voltages in excess of 40 kV using Y5V-based commercial capacitors. The results show some key features that determine efficient production of trains of solitons in the kilovolt range.

  20. Effect of quadratic pressure gradient term on a one-dimensional moving boundary problem based on modified Darcy's law

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Wenchao; Yao, Jun; Chen, Zhangxin; Liu, Yuewu

    2016-02-01

    A relatively high formation pressure gradient can exist in seepage flow in low-permeable porous media with a threshold pressure gradient, and a significant error may then be caused in the model computation by neglecting the quadratic pressure gradient term in the governing equations. Based on these concerns, in consideration of the quadratic pressure gradient term, a basic moving boundary model is constructed for a one-dimensional seepage flow problem with a threshold pressure gradient. Owing to a strong nonlinearity and the existing moving boundary in the mathematical model, a corresponding numerical solution method is presented. First, a spatial coordinate transformation method is adopted in order to transform the system of partial differential equations with moving boundary conditions into a closed system with fixed boundary conditions; then the solution can be stably numerically obtained by a fully implicit finite-difference method. The validity of the numerical method is verified by a published exact analytical solution. Furthermore, to compare with Darcy's flow problem, the exact analytical solution for the case of Darcy's flow considering the quadratic pressure gradient term is also derived by an inverse Laplace transform. A comparison of these model solutions leads to the conclusion that such moving boundary problems must incorporate the quadratic pressure gradient term in their governing equations; the sensitive effects of the quadratic pressure gradient term tend to diminish, with the dimensionless threshold pressure gradient increasing for the one-dimensional problem.

  1. A General Pressure Gradient Formulation for Ocean Models - Part II: Energy, Momentum, and Bottom Torque Consistency

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Song, Y.; Wright, D.

    1998-01-01

    A formulation of the pressure gradient force for use in models with topography-following coordinates is proposed and diagnostically analyzed by Song. We investigate numerical consistency with respect to global energy conservation, depth-integrated momentum changes, and the represent of the bottom pressure torque.

  2. Some features of surface pressure fluctuations in turbulent boundary layers with zero and favorable pressure gradients

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcgrath, B. E.; Simpson, R. L.

    1987-01-01

    Measurements of surface pressure fluctuation spectra, coherence and convective wave speeds from zero and favorable pressure gradient turbulent boundary layers are reported for momentum Reynolds numbers from 3000 to 18,800. The acceleration parameter K is near 2 x 10 to the -7 power for the favorable pressure gradient flow. The outer variables, U sub e, tau sub w and delta sub 1 non-dimensionalize and collapse the spectra for the low to middle range of frequencies for most test cases. The grouping using the inner variable, U sub tau and gamma, collapse the spectra for the middle to high range of frequencies for all test cases. The value of p'/tau sub w was near 3.8 and 2.8 for the smallest values of d+ in the zero and favorable pressure gradient flows, respectively. The coherence exhibits a decay that is not exponential in some cases, but the Corcos similarity parameters omega Delta x/U sub c and omega Delta z/U sub c collapse the data for all test cases. The ratio of U sub c/U sub e increases with omega delta sub 1/U sub e up to omega delta sub 1/U sub e on the order of unity, where U sub c/U sub e becomes nearly constant. This was observed in the present results for both streamwise pressure gradient flows. The experimental results presented show good agreement with previous research.

  3. Compressing μJ-level pulses from 250  fs to sub-10  fs at 38-MHz repetition rate using two gas-filled hollow-core photonic crystal fiber stages.

    PubMed

    Mak, K F; Seidel, M; Pronin, O; Frosz, M H; Abdolvand, A; Pervak, V; Apolonski, A; Krausz, F; Travers, J C; Russell, P St J

    2015-04-01

    Compression of 250-fs, 1-μJ pulses from a KLM Yb:YAG thin-disk oscillator down to 9.1 fs is demonstrated. A kagomé-PCF with a 36-μm core-diameter is used with a pressure gradient from 0 to 40 bar of krypton. Compression to 22 fs is achieved by 1200  fs2 group-delay-dispersion provided by chirped mirrors. By coupling the output into a second kagomé-PCF with a pressure gradient from 0 to 25 bar of argon, octave spanning spectral broadening via the soliton-effect is observed at 18-W average output power. Self-compression to 9.1 fs is measured, with compressibility to 5 fs predicted. Also observed is strong emission in the visible via dispersive wave generation, amounting to 4% of the total output power.

  4. Compressing μJ-level pulses from 250  fs to sub-10  fs at 38-MHz repetition rate using two gas-filled hollow-core photonic crystal fiber stages.

    PubMed

    Mak, K F; Seidel, M; Pronin, O; Frosz, M H; Abdolvand, A; Pervak, V; Apolonski, A; Krausz, F; Travers, J C; Russell, P St J

    2015-04-01

    Compression of 250-fs, 1-μJ pulses from a KLM Yb:YAG thin-disk oscillator down to 9.1 fs is demonstrated. A kagomé-PCF with a 36-μm core-diameter is used with a pressure gradient from 0 to 40 bar of krypton. Compression to 22 fs is achieved by 1200  fs2 group-delay-dispersion provided by chirped mirrors. By coupling the output into a second kagomé-PCF with a pressure gradient from 0 to 25 bar of argon, octave spanning spectral broadening via the soliton-effect is observed at 18-W average output power. Self-compression to 9.1 fs is measured, with compressibility to 5 fs predicted. Also observed is strong emission in the visible via dispersive wave generation, amounting to 4% of the total output power. PMID:25831302

  5. Polynomial regularization for robust MRI-based estimation of blood flow velocities and pressure gradients.

    PubMed

    Delles, Michael; Rengier, Fabian; Ley, Sebastian; von Tengg-Kobligk, Hendrik; Kauczor, Hans-Ulrich; Dillmann, Rüdiger; Unterhinninghofen, Roland

    2011-01-01

    In cardiovascular diagnostics, phase-contrast MRI is a valuable technique for measuring blood flow velocities and computing blood pressure values. Unfortunately, both velocity and pressure data typically suffer from the strong image noise of velocity-encoded MRI. In the past, separate approaches of regularization with physical a-priori knowledge and data representation with continuous functions have been proposed to overcome these drawbacks. In this article, we investigate polynomial regularization as an exemplary specification of combining these two techniques. We perform time-resolved three-dimensional velocity measurements and pressure gradient computations on MRI acquisitions of steady flow in a physical phantom. Results based on the higher quality temporal mean data are used as a reference. Thereby, we investigate the performance of our approach of polynomial regularization, which reduces the root mean squared errors to the reference data by 45% for velocities and 60% for pressure gradients.

  6. Applicability of the isotropic vorticity theory to an adverse pressure gradient flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arora, S. C.; Azad, R. S.

    1980-03-01

    The isotropic vorticity theory is examined for an adverse pressure gradient flow on the basis of experimental data obtained in a conical diffuser. This conical diffuser is the same as that used by Okwuobi and Azad (1973), having an 8-deg included angle and an area ratio of 4:1 with fully developed pipe flow at the entry. The experiments are conducted in a low-speed open-circuit wind tunnel. It is shown that the rates and ratio of production and dissipation of the turbulent vorticity are constant in the core region of the diffuser but increase significantly in the wall layer. The validity of the analysis of Batchelor and Townsend (1947) for isotropic vorticity is discussed. The results suggest that even in a shear flow subjected to adverse pressure gradient, the isotropic theory of vorticity can be applied to a region far removed from the wall.

  7. Vertical two-phase flow regimes and pressure gradients under the influence of SDS surfactant

    SciTech Connect

    Duangprasert, Tanabordee; Sirivat, Anuvat; Siemanond, Kitipat; Wilkes, James O.

    2008-01-15

    Two-phase gas/liquid flows in vertical pipes have been systematically investigated. Water and SDS surfactant solutions at various concentrations were used as the working fluids. In particular, we focus our work on the influence of surfactant addition on the flow regimes, the corresponding pressure gradients, and the bubble sizes and velocity. Adding the surfactant lowers the air critical Reynolds numbers for the bubble-slug flow and the slug flow transitions. The pressure gradients of SDS solutions are lower than those of pure water especially in the slug flow and the slug-churn flow regimes, implying turbulent drag reduction. At low Re{sub air}, the bubble sizes of the surfactant solution are lower than those of pure water due to the increase in viscosity. With increasing and at high Re{sub air}, the bubble sizes of the SDS solution become greater than those of pure water which is attributed to the effect of surface tension. (author)

  8. Sound scattering by rigid oblate spheroids, with implication to pressure gradient microphones

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maciulaitis, A.; Seiner, J.; Norum, T. D.

    1976-01-01

    The frequency limit below which sound scattering by a microphone body is sufficiently small to permit accurate pressure gradient measurements was determined. The sound pressure was measured at various points on the surface of a rigid oblate spheroid illuminated by spherical waves generated by a point source at a large distance from the spheroid, insuring an essentially plane sound field. The measurements were made with small pressure microphones flush mounted from the inside of the spheroid model. Numerical solutions were obtained for a variety of spheroid shapes, including that of the experimental model. Very good agreement was achieved between the experimental and theoretical results. It was found that scattering effects are insignificant if the ratio of the major circumference of the spheroid to the wavelength of the incident sound is less than about 0.7, this number being dependent upon the shape of the spheroid. This finding can be utilized in the design of pressure gradient microphones.

  9. Predicting the onset of turbulence in the presence of a pressure gradient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charles, R. D.

    1983-12-01

    An analytical study is presented regarding the determination of a pressure gradient dependent criterion for flow transition from laminar to turbulent flow. The results obtained were derived from two parallel approaches to flow stability; one of wave-dependent stability and the other of vorticity-dependent stability. In both cases, one of a variable transition Reynolds number dependent upon the ambient pressure gradient and the other one of a constant transition Reynolds number bases on the boundary-layer displacement thickness, the prediction results were either as good or better than those from available prediction methods. In addition these two criteria were used to predict transition locations on a NACA 0018 airfoil, again with favorable results.

  10. An inclined jet in crossflow under the effect of streamwise pressure gradients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coletti, Filippo; Elkins, Christopher J.; Eaton, John K.

    2013-09-01

    An inclined turbulent jet discharging a passive scalar into a turbulent crossflow is investigated under conditions of favorable, zero and adverse streamwise pressure gradient. Experiments are conducted in water by means of magnetic resonance velocimetry and magnetic resonance concentration measurements. The velocity ratio and density ratio are equal to one for all cases. The flow configuration is relevant to film cooling technology, the molecular properties of the fluid being immaterial in the fully turbulent regime. Under favorable pressure gradient (FPG), the streamwise acceleration tilts the jet trajectory toward the wall, which would be beneficial for the film cooling performance. However, the counter-rotating vortex pair is strengthened in the accelerating flow by streamwise stretching. Also, the crossflow boundary layer is significantly thickened by increasingly adverse pressure gradient, which affects the mass transfer from the jet. Overall, the more intense counter-rotating vortices and the thinner boundary layer associated with increasingly FPG enhance the scalar dispersion into the main flow, hampering the film cooling performance in terms of surface effectiveness.

  11. The F-Region Gravity and Pressure Gradient Current Systems: A Review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alken, P.; Maute, A.; Richmond, A. D.

    2016-07-01

    The ionospheric gravity and pressure-gradient current systems are most prominent in the low-latitude F-region due to the plasma density enhancement known as the equatorial ionization anomaly (EIA). This enhancement of plasma density which builds up during the day and lasts well into the evening supports a toroidal gravity current which flows eastward around the Earth in the F-region during the daytime and evening, and eventually returns westward through the E-region. The existence of pressure-gradients in the EIA region also gives rise to a poloidal diamagnetic current system, whose flow direction acts to reduce the ambient geomagnetic field inside the plasma. The gravity and pressure-gradient currents are among the weaker ionospheric sources, with current densities of a few nA/m2, however they produce clear signatures of about 5-7 nT in magnetic measurements made by low-Earth orbiting satellites. In this work, we review relevant observational and modeling studies of these two current systems and present new results from a 3D ionospheric electrodynamics model which allows us to visualize the entire flow pattern of these currents throughout the ionosphere as well as calculate their magnetic perturbations.

  12. Behavior of a horizontal air curtain subjected to a vertical pressure gradient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linden, James; Phelps, LeEllen

    2012-09-01

    We present the details on an experiment to investigate the behavior of an air curtain that is subjected to a transverse pressure gradient. The setup simulates the conditions that will be present in the Advanced Technology Solar Telescope (ATST), a 4-meter solar observatory that will be built on Haleakala, Hawaii. A test rig was built to replicate the region at which the optical path crosses a temperature and pressure boundary between the telescope mount region, which is at the ambient temperature and pressure, and a warmer, pressurized lab space directly below. Use of an air curtain in place of an optically-transmitting window at the interface would allow science observations at a wider range of scientific wavelengths. With the air curtain exhibiting transitional flow behavior across the boundary, and applied pressure gradients of up to 6.5 Pa, we found that the air curtain was able to hold a pressure gradient of 0.25 Pa. As the applied pressure was increased, transient turbulent regions formed at the interface, and predictable flow behavior only occurred in the region closest to the air curtain blower. Computer modeling is used to validate the test data, identify laminar regions of the air curtain where minimal image distortion would occur, and explore the relationship between the applied pressure, effective pressure difference, and air curtain profile.

  13. Pressure gradient sensors for bearing determination in shallow water tracking ranges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stein, Peter J.; Euerle, Steven E.; Menoche, Richard K.; Janiesch, Robert E.

    1996-04-01

    Underwater acoustic tracking has traditionally used only the arrival time of tracking pings to localize targets. This implies that the ping transmitted from a target must be received at a minimum of three separate nodes (receiver locations) in order to determine the position. For deep water ranges this was acceptable. In shallow water, where propagation ranges are limited, this requires a large number of nodes. This makes shallow water ranges very costly. An effort is underway to use pressure gradient hydrophones as receivers and measure the bearing of the ping arrival along with arrival time, thereby locating the target using only one tracking node. This allows for increased node spacing and greatly reduced cost. However, the accuracy required for training ranges is on the order of 1 degree. Further, the directional receiver must be housed so as to withstand impacts from fishing operations. Research including design, fabrication, and testing of conventional and unconventional pressure gradient hydrophones, the housing, and signal processing methods are discussed. Extensive testing has already been conducted using a 1″ diameter by 5″ long multimode hydrophone. A shallow water tracking test was conducted at the NUWC Lake Seneca test facility. The results demonstrate the feasibility of tracking using a single pressure gradient hydrophone with an accuracy of 50 yds out to 2 kyds. The effects of multiple paths and scattering are also discussed.

  14. Self-similar turbulent boundary layer with imposed pressure gradient. Four flow regimes

    SciTech Connect

    Vigdorovich, I. I.

    2014-11-15

    Self-similar flows of an incompressible fluid in a turbulent boundary layer, when the free-stream velocity is a power function (with the exponent m) of the longitudinal coordinate, have been studied. It has been shown that there are four different self-similar flow regimes corresponding to four individual similarity parameters one of which is the known Clauser parameter and the three other parameters have been established for the first time. At adverse pressure gradient, when the exponent m lies in a certain range depending on Reynolds number, the problem has two solutions with different values of the boundary-layer thickness and skin friction; consequently, hysteresis in a pre-separation flow is possible. Separation occurs not at the minimal value of m that corresponds to the strongest adverse pressure gradient, but at m = −0.216 −0.4 Re{sub p}{sup −1/3} + O(Re{sub p}{sup −2/3}), where Re{sub p} is the Reynolds number based on longitudinal pressure gradient. The theoretical results are in good agreement with experimental data.

  15. Acoustic solitons in inhomogeneous pair-ion plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Shah, Asif; Mahmood, S.; Haque, Q.

    2010-12-15

    The acoustic solitons are investigated in inhomogeneous unmagnetized pair ion plasmas. The Korteweg-de Vries (KdV) like equation with an additional term due to density gradients is deduced by employing reductive perturbation technique. It is noticed that pair-ion plasma system is conducive for the propagation of compressive as well as rarefactive solitons. The increase in the temperature ratio causes the amplitude of the rarefactive soliton to decrease. However, the amplitude of the compressive solitons is found to be increased as the temperature ratio of ions is enhanced. The amplitude of both compressive and rarefactive solitons is found to be increased as the density gradient parameter is increased. The equlibrium density profile is assumed to be exponential. The numerical results are shown for illustration.

  16. Resource Letter Sol-1: Solitons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Degasperis, Antonio

    1998-06-01

    This Resource Letter provides a guide to the literature on the theory of solitons and its relevance in physics. Journal articles and books are cited for the following topics: the history of solitons, construction of soliton equations and of soliton solutions, solitons and mathematics, quantum solitons, solitons in physics and near-integrable equations.

  17. Reevaluation of compressible-flow Preston tube calibrations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, J. M.

    1977-01-01

    Revised zero-pressure-gradient, adiabatic wall skin-friction-balance data covering a Mach number range from 1.6 to 4.6 led to a reevaluation of existing compressible flow Preston tube calibration equations.

  18. Nonlinear tunneling of optical soliton in 3 coupled NLS equation with symbolic computation

    SciTech Connect

    Mani Rajan, M.S.; Mahalingam, A.; Uthayakumar, A.

    2014-07-15

    We investigated the soliton solution for N coupled nonlinear Schrödinger (CNLS) equations. These equations are coupled due to the cross-phase-modulation (CPM). Lax pair of this system is obtained via the Ablowitz–Kaup–Newell–Segur (AKNS) scheme and the corresponding Darboux transformation is constructed to derive the soliton solution. One and two soliton solutions are generated. Using two soliton solutions of 3 CNLS equation, nonlinear tunneling of soliton for both with and without exponential background has been discussed. Finally cascade compression of optical soliton through multi-nonlinear barrier has been discussed. The obtained results may have promising applications in all-optical devices based on optical solitons, study of soliton propagation in birefringence fiber systems and optical soliton with distributed dispersion and nonlinearity management. -- Highlights: •We consider the nonlinear tunneling of soliton in birefringence fiber. •3-coupled NLS (CNLS) equation with variable coefficients is considered. •Two soliton solutions are obtained via Darboux transformation using constructed Lax pair. •Soliton tunneling through dispersion barrier and well are investigated. •Finally, cascade compression of soliton has been achieved.

  19. Numerical simulations of the bending of narrow-angle-tail radio jets by ram pressure or pressure gradients

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soker, Noam; Sarazin, Craig L.; O'Dea, Christopher P.

    1988-01-01

    Three-dimensional numerical hydrodynamic simulations are used to study the bending of radio jets. The simulations are compared with observations of jets in narrow-angle-tail radio sources. Two mechanisms for the observed bending are considered: direct bending of quasi-continuous jets by ram pressure from intergalactic gas and bending by pressure gradients in the interstellar gas of the host galaxy, the pressure gradients themselves being the result of ram pressure by intergalactic gas. It is shown that the pressure gradients are much less effective in bending jets, implying that the jets have roughly 30 times lower momentum fluxes if they are bent by this mechanism. Ram-pressure bending produces jets with 'kidney-shaped' cross sections; when observed from the side, these jets appear to have diffuse extensions on the downstream side. On the other hand, pressure-gradient bending causes the jets to be densest near their upstream side.

  20. Visualization of turbulent wedges under favorable pressure gradients using shear-sensitive and temperature-sensitive liquid crystals.

    PubMed

    Chong, Tze-Pei; Zhong, Shan; Hodson, Howard P

    2002-10-01

    Turbulent wedges induced by a three-dimensional surface roughness placed on a flat plate were studied using both shear sensitive and temperature sensitive liquid crystals, respectively denoted by SSLC and TSLC. The experiments were carried out at a free-stream velocity of 28 m/sec at three different favorable pressure gradients. The purpose of this investigation was to examine the spreading angles of the turbulent wedges, as indicated by their associated surface shear stresses and heat transfer characteristics, and to obtain more insight about the behavior of transitional momentum and thermal boundary layers when a streamwise pressure gradient exists. It was shown that under a zero pressure gradient the spreading angles indicated by the two types of liquid crystals are the same, but the difference increases as the level of the favorable pressure gradient increases. The result from the present study is important for modelling the transition of thermal boundary layers over gas turbine blades. PMID:12496003

  1. Stability of the flow in a soft tube deformed due to an applied pressure gradient.

    PubMed

    Verma, M K S; Kumaran, V

    2015-04-01

    A linear stability analysis is carried out for the flow through a tube with a soft wall in order to resolve the discrepancy of a factor of 10 for the transition Reynolds number between theoretical predictions in a cylindrical tube and the experiments of Verma and Kumaran [J. Fluid Mech. 705, 322 (2012)]. Here the effect of tube deformation (due to the applied pressure difference) on the mean velocity profile and pressure gradient is incorporated in the stability analysis. The tube geometry and dimensions are reconstructed from experimental images, where it is found that there is an expansion and then a contraction of the tube in the streamwise direction. The mean velocity profiles at different downstream locations and the pressure gradient, determined using computational fluid dynamics, are found to be substantially modified by the tube deformation. The velocity profiles are then used in a linear stability analysis, where the growth rates of perturbations are calculated for the flow through a tube with the wall modeled as a neo-Hookean elastic solid. The linear stability analysis is carried out for the mean velocity profiles at different downstream locations using the parallel flow approximation. The analysis indicates that the flow first becomes unstable in the downstream converging section of the tube where the flow profile is more pluglike when compared to the parabolic flow in a cylindrical tube. The flow is stable in the upstream diverging section where the deformation is maximum. The prediction for the transition Reynolds number is in good agreement with experiments, indicating that the downstream tube convergence and the consequent modification in the mean velocity profile and pressure gradient could reduce the transition Reynolds number by an order of magnitude. PMID:25974574

  2. Stability of the flow in a soft tube deformed due to an applied pressure gradient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verma, M. K. S.; Kumaran, V.

    2015-04-01

    A linear stability analysis is carried out for the flow through a tube with a soft wall in order to resolve the discrepancy of a factor of 10 for the transition Reynolds number between theoretical predictions in a cylindrical tube and the experiments of Verma and Kumaran [J. Fluid Mech. 705, 322 (2012), 10.1017/jfm.2011.55]. Here the effect of tube deformation (due to the applied pressure difference) on the mean velocity profile and pressure gradient is incorporated in the stability analysis. The tube geometry and dimensions are reconstructed from experimental images, where it is found that there is an expansion and then a contraction of the tube in the streamwise direction. The mean velocity profiles at different downstream locations and the pressure gradient, determined using computational fluid dynamics, are found to be substantially modified by the tube deformation. The velocity profiles are then used in a linear stability analysis, where the growth rates of perturbations are calculated for the flow through a tube with the wall modeled as a neo-Hookean elastic solid. The linear stability analysis is carried out for the mean velocity profiles at different downstream locations using the parallel flow approximation. The analysis indicates that the flow first becomes unstable in the downstream converging section of the tube where the flow profile is more pluglike when compared to the parabolic flow in a cylindrical tube. The flow is stable in the upstream diverging section where the deformation is maximum. The prediction for the transition Reynolds number is in good agreement with experiments, indicating that the downstream tube convergence and the consequent modification in the mean velocity profile and pressure gradient could reduce the transition Reynolds number by an order of magnitude.

  3. Cascaded generation of coherent Raman dissipative solitons.

    PubMed

    Kharenko, Denis S; Bednyakova, Anastasia E; Podivilov, Evgeniy V; Fedoruk, Mikhail P; Apolonski, Alexander; Babin, Sergey A

    2016-01-01

    The cascaded generation of a conventional dissipative soliton (at 1020 nm) together with Raman dissipative solitons of the first (1065 nm) and second (1115 nm) orders inside a common fiber laser cavity is demonstrated experimentally and numerically. With sinusoidal (soft) spectral filtering, the generated solitons are mutually coherent at a high degree and compressible down to 300 fs. Numerical simulation shows that an even higher degree of coherence and shorter pulses could be achieved with step-like (hard) spectral filtering. The approach can be extended toward a high-order coherent Raman dissipative soliton source offering numerous applications such as frequency comb generation, pulse synthesis, biomedical imaging, and the generation of a coherent mid-infrared supercontinuum. PMID:26696187

  4. Self-consistent high-Reynolds-number asymptotics for zero-pressure-gradient turbulent boundary layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monkewitz, Peter A.; Chauhan, Kapil A.; Nagib, Hassan M.

    2007-11-01

    The asymptotic behavior of mean velocity and integral parameters in flat plate turbulent boundary layers under zero pressure gradient are studied for Reynolds numbers approaching infinity. Using the classical two-layer approach of Millikan, Rotta, and Clauser with a logarithmic velocity profile in the overlap region between "inner" and "outer" layers, a fully self-consistent leading-order description of the mean velocity profile and all integral parameters is developed. It is shown that this description fits most high Reynolds number data, and in particular their Reynolds number dependence, exceedingly well; i.e., within experimental errors.

  5. Heat transfer in MHD flow with pressure gradient, suction and injection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soundalgekar, V. M.; Ramana Murty, T. V.

    1980-04-01

    Numerical solutions to the MHD Falkner-Skan equation and the corresponding heat transfer equation have been obtained by taking into consideration the effects of suction and injection as well as the pressure gradient parameter. Velocity and temperature profiles are graphed and the numerical values of skin friction and the rate of heat transfer are tabulated. It is observed that an increase in the magnetic field parameter leads to an increase in velocity, skin friction, and rate of heat transfer and to a fall in temperature. In addition, an increase in suction leads to a reduction in the skin friction value and the rate of heat transfer, opposite to the case of injection.

  6. Boundary-layer transition on a plate subjected to simultaneous spanwise and chordwise pressure gradients

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boldman, D. R.; Brinich, P. F.

    1974-01-01

    The boundary-layer transition on a short plate was studied by means of the china-clay visual technique. The plate model was mounted in a wind tunnel so that it was subjected to small simultaneous spanwise and chordwise pressure gradients. Results of the experimental study, which was performed at three subsonic velocities, indicated that the transition pattern was appreciably curved in the spanwise direction but quite smooth and well behaved. Reasonable comparisons between predictions of transition and experiment were obtained from two finite-difference two-dimensional boundary-layer calculation methods which incorporated transition models based on the concept of a transition intermittency factor.

  7. The effect of electron thermal conduction on plasma pressure gradient during reconnection of magnetic field lines

    SciTech Connect

    Chu, T.K.

    1987-12-01

    The interplay of electron cross-field thermal conduction and the reconnection of magnetic field lines around an m = 1 magnetic island prior to a sawtooth crash can generate a large pressure gradient in a boundary layer adjacent to the reconnecting surface, leading to an enhanced gradient of poloidal beta to satisfy the threshold condition for ideal MHD modes. This narrow boundary layer and the short onset time of a sawtooth crash can be supported by fine-grained turbulent processes in a tokamak plasma. 11 refs.

  8. Coherent structures in a zero-pressure-gradient and a strongly decelerated boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simens, Mark P.; Gungor, Ayse G.; Maciel, Yvan

    2016-04-01

    Coherent structures in a strongly decelerated large-velocity-defect turbulent boundary layer (TBL) and a zero pressure gradient (ZPG) boundary layer are analysed by direct numerical simulation (DNS). The characteristics of the one-point velocity stastistics are also considered. The adverse pressure gradient (APG) TBL simulation is a new one carried out by the present authors. The APG TBL begins as a zero pressure gradient boundary layer, decelerates under a strong adverse pressure gradient, and separates near the end of the domain in the form of a very thin separation bubble. The one-point velocity statistics in the outer region of this large-defect boundary layer are compared to those of two other large-velocity-defect APG TBLs (one in dynamic equilibrium, the other in disequilibrium) and a mixing layer. In the upper half of the large-defect boundary layers, the velocity statistics are similar to those of the mixing layer. The dominant peaks of turbulence production and Reynolds stresses are located in the middle of the boundary layers. Three-dimensional spatial correlations of (u, u) and (u, v) show that coherence is lost in the streamwise and spanwise directions as the velocity defect increases. Near-wall streaks tend to disappear in the large-defect zone of the flow to be replaced by more disorganized u motions. Near-wall sweeps and ejections are also less numerous. In the outer region, the u structures tend to be shorter, less streaky, and more inclined with respect to the wall than in the ZPG TBL. The sweeps and ejections are generally bigger with respect to the boundary layer thickness in the large-defect boundary layer, even if the biggest structures are found in the ZPG TBL. Large sweeps and ejections that reach the wall region (wall-attached) are less streamwise elongated and they occupy less space than in the ZPG boundary layer. The distinction between wall-attached and wall-detached structures is not as pronounced in the large-defect TBL.

  9. Pressure-gradient effects on hypersonic turbulent skin friction and boundary-layer profiles.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hopkins, E. J.; Keener, E. R.

    1972-01-01

    Local skin friction, total-temperature profiles, and pitot-pressure profiles were measured on the wall of a Mach-7.4 wind tunnel. The wall to adiabatic wall temperature ratio was varied from 0.3 to 0.5. Boundary-layer characteristics were compared with those predicted by a finite-difference method. Local skin friction was predicted to within 15%. Pressure-gradient effects on the temperature and Mach number distributions and the shape factor (displacement thickness/momentum thickness) were underpredicted, but the velocity distributions were closely predicted.

  10. Local pressure gradients due to incipience of boiling in subcooled flows

    SciTech Connect

    Ruggles, A.E.; McDuffee, J.L.

    1995-09-01

    Models for vapor bubble behavior and nucleation site density during subcooled boiling are integrated with boundary layer theory in order to predict the local pressure gradient and heat transfer coefficient. Models for bubble growth rate and bubble departure diameter are used to scale the movement of displaced liquid in the laminar sublayer. An added shear stress, analogous to a turbulent shear stress, is derived by considering the liquid movement normal to the heated surface. The resulting mechanistic model has plausible functional dependence on wall superheat, mass flow, and heat flux and agrees well with data available in the literature.

  11. Gap heating with pressure gradients. [for Shuttle Orbiter thermal protection system tiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scott, C. D.; Maraia, R. J.

    1979-01-01

    The heating rate distribution and temperature response on the gap walls of insulating tiles is analyzed to determine significant phenomena and parameters in flows where there is an external surface pressure gradient. Convective heating due to gap flow, modeled as fully developed pipe flow, is coupled with a two-dimensional thermal model of the tiles that includes conduction and radiative heat transfer. To account for geometry and important environmental parameters, scale factors are obtained by curve-fitting measured temperatures to analytical solutions. These scale factors are then used to predict the time-dependent gap heat flux and temperature response of tile gaps on the Space Shuttle Orbiter during entry.

  12. Measurement of the Turbulence Kinetic Energy Budget of a Turbulent Planar Wake Flow in Pressure Gradients

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Xiao-Feng; Thomas, Flint O.; Nelson, Robert C.

    2001-01-01

    Turbulence kinetic energy (TKE) is a very important quantity for turbulence modeling and the budget of this quantity in its transport equation can provide insight into the flow physics. Turbulence kinetic energy budget measurements were conducted for a symmetric turbulent wake flow subjected to constant zero, favorable and adverse pressure gradients in year-three of research effort. The purpose of this study is to clarify the flow physics issues underlying the demonstrated influence of pressure gradient on wake development and provide experimental support for turbulence modeling. To ensure the reliability of these notoriously difficult measurements, the experimental procedure was carefully designed on the basis of an uncertainty analysis. Four different approaches, based on an isotropic turbulence assumption, a locally axisymmetric homogeneous turbulence assumption, a semi-isotropy assumption and a forced balance of the TKE equation, were applied for the estimate of the dissipation term. The pressure transport term is obtained from a forced balance of the turbulence kinetic energy equation. This report will present the results of the turbulence kinetic energy budget measurement and discuss their implication on the development of strained turbulent wakes.

  13. Internal pressure gradient errors in σ-coordinate ocean models in high resolution fjord studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berntsen, Jarle; Thiem, Øyvind; Avlesen, Helge

    2015-08-01

    Terrain following ocean models are today applied in coastal areas and fjords where the topography may be very steep. Recent advances in high performance computing facilitate model studies with very high spatial resolution. In general, numerical discretization errors tend to zero with the grid size. However, in fjords and near the coast the slopes may be very steep, and the internal pressure gradient errors associated with σ-models may be significant even in high resolution studies. The internal pressure gradient errors are due to errors when estimating the density gradients in σ-models, and these errors are investigated for two idealized test cases and for the Hardanger fjord in Norway. The methods considered are the standard second order method and a recently proposed method that is balanced such that the density gradients are zero for the case ρ = ρ(z) where ρ is the density and z is the vertical coordinate. The results show that by using the balanced method, the errors may be reduced considerably also for slope parameters larger than the maximum suggested value of 0.2. For the Hardanger fjord case initialized with ρ = ρ(z) , the errors in the results produced with the balanced method are orders of magnitude smaller than the corresponding errors in the results produced with the second order method.

  14. Flow Control Device Evaluation for an Internal Flow with an Adverse Pressure Gradient

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jenkins, Luther N.; Gorton, Susan Althoff; Anders, Scott G.

    2002-01-01

    The effectiveness of several active and passive devices to control flow in an adverse pressure gradient with secondary flows present was evaluated in the 15 Inch Low Speed Tunnel at NASA Langley Research Center. In this study, passive micro vortex generators, micro bumps, and piezoelectric synthetic jets were evaluated for their flow control characteristics using surface static pressures, flow visualization, and 3D Stereo Digital Particle Image Velocimetry. Data also were acquired for synthetic jet actuators in a zero flow environment. It was found that the micro vortex generator is very effective in controlling the flow environment for an adverse pressure gradient, even in the presence of secondary vortical flow. The mechanism by which the control is effected is a re-energization of the boundary layer through flow mixing. The piezoelectric synthetic jet actuators must have sufficient velocity output to produce strong longitudinal vortices if they are to be effective for flow control. The output of these devices in a laboratory or zero flow environment will be different than the output in a flow environment. In this investigation, the output was higher in the flow environment, but the stroke cycle in the flow did not indicate a positive inflow into the synthetic jet.

  15. Pressure gradient effects on heat transfer to reusable surface insulation tile-array gaps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Throckmorton, D. A.

    1975-01-01

    An experimental investigation was performed to determine the effect of pressure gradient on the heat transfer within space shuttle reusable surface insulation (RSI) tile-array gaps under thick, turbulent boundary-layer conditions. Heat-transfer and pressure measurements were obtained on a curved array of full-scale simulated RSI tiles in a tunnel-wall boundary layer at a nominal free-stream Mach number and free-stream Reynolds numbers. Transverse pressure gradients of varying degree were induced over the model surface by rotating the curved array with respect to the flow. Definition of the tunnel-wall boundary-layer flow was obtained by measurement of boundary-layer pitot pressure profiles, wall pressure, and heat transfer. Flat-plate heat-transfer data were correlated and a method was derived for prediction of heat transfer to a smooth curved surface in the highly three-dimensional tunnel-wall boundary-layer flow. Pressure on the floor of the RSI tile-array gap followed the trends of the external surface pressure. Heat transfer to the surface immediately downstream of a transverse gap is higher than that for a smooth surface at the same location. Heating to the wall of a transverse gap, and immediately downstream of it, at its intersection with a longitudinal gap is significantly greater than that for the simple transverse gap.

  16. Myocardial fractional flow reserve: a biplane angiocardiographic alternative to the pressure gradient method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schrijver, Marc; Slump, Cornelis H.; Storm, Corstiaan J.

    2001-05-01

    Pijls and De Bruyne (1993) developed a method employing intravascular blood pressure gradients to calculate the Myocardial Fractional Flow Reserve (FFR). This flow reserve is a better indication of the functional severity of a coronary stenosis than percentage diameter or luminal area reduction as provided by traditional Quantitative Coronary Angiography (QCA). However, to use this method, all of the relevant artery segments have to be select intra-operatively. After the procedure, only the segments for which a pressure reading is available can be graded. We previously introduced another way to assess the functional severity of stenosis using angiographic projections: the Relative Coronary Flow Reserve (RCFR). It is based on standard densitometric blood velocity and flow reserve methods, but without the need to estimate the geometry of the artery. This paper demonstrates that this RCFR method yields -- in theory -- the same results as the FFR, and can be given an almost identical interpretation. This provides the opportunity to use the RCFR retrospectively, when pressure gradients are not available for the segment(s) of interest.

  17. Acoustic receptivity due to weak surface inhomogeneities in adverse pressure gradient boundary layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choudhari, Meelan; Ng, Lian; Streett, Craig

    1995-01-01

    The boundary layer receptivity to free-stream acoustic waves in the presence of localized surface disturbances is studied for the case of incompressible Falkner-Skan flows with adverse pressure gradients. These boundary layers are unstable to both viscous and inviscid (i.e., inflectional) modes, and the finite Reynolds number extension of the Goldstein-Ruban theory provides a convenient method to compare the efficiency of the localized receptivity processes in these two cases. The value of the efficiency function related to the receptivity caused by localized distortions in surface geometry is relatively insensitive to the type of instability mechanism, provided that the same reference length scale is used to normalize the efficiency function for each type of instability. In contrast, when the receptivity is induced by variations in wall suction velocity or in wall admittance distribution, the magnitudes of the related efficiency functions, as well as the resulting coupling coefficients, are smaller for inflectional (i.e., Rayleigh) modes than for the viscous Tollmien-Schlichting waves. The reduced levels of receptivity can be attributed mainly to the shorter wavelengths and higher frequencies of the inflectional modes. Because the most critical band of frequencies shifts toward higher values, the overall efficiency of the wall suction- and the wall admittance-induced receptivity decreases with an increase in the adverse pressure gradient.

  18. Experimental feasibility of investigating acoustic waves in Couette flow with entropy and pressure gradients

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parrott, Tony L.; Zorumski, William E.; Rawls, John W., Jr.

    1990-01-01

    The feasibility is discussed for an experimental program for studying the behavior of acoustic wave propagation in the presence of strong gradients of pressure, temperature, and flow. Theory suggests that gradients effects can be experimentally observed as resonant frequency shifts and mode shape changes in a waveguide. A convenient experimental geometry for such experiments is the annular region between two co-rotating cylinders. Radial temperature gradients in a spinning annulus can be generated by differentially heating the two cylinders via electromagnetic induction. Radial pressure gradients can be controlled by varying the cylinder spin rates. Present technology appears adequate to construct an apparatus to allow independent control of temperature and pressure gradients. A complicating feature of a more advanced experiment, involving flow gradients, is the requirement for independently controlled cylinder spin rates. Also, the boundary condition at annulus terminations must be such that flow gradients are minimally disturbed. The design and construction of an advanced apparatus to include flow gradients will require additional technology development.

  19. Transpiration Induces Radial Turgor Pressure Gradients in Wheat and Maize Roots.

    PubMed Central

    Rygol, J.; Pritchard, J.; Zhu, J. J.; Tomos, A. D.; Zimmermann, U.

    1993-01-01

    Previous studies have shown both the presence and the absence of radial turgor and osmotic pressure gradients across the cortex of roots. In this work, gradients were sought in the roots of wheat (Triticum aestivum) and maize (Zea mays) under conditions in which transpiration flux across the root was varied This was done by altering the relative humidity above the plant, by excising the root, or by using plants in which the leaves were too young to transpire. Roots of different ages (4-65 d) were studied and radial profiles at different distances from the tip (5-30 mm) were measured. In both species, gradients of turgor and osmotic pressure (increasing inward) were found under transpiring conditions but not when transpiration was inhibited. The presence of radial turgor and osmotic pressure gradients, and the behavior of the gradient when transpiration is interrupted, indicate that active membrane transport or radial solvent drag may play an important role in the distribution of solutes across the root cortex in transpiring plants. Contrary to the conventional view, the flow of water and solutes across the symplastic pathway through the plasmodesmata cannot be inwardly directed under transpiring conditions. PMID:12231957

  20. Fluctuating longshore pressure gradient on the pacific northwest shelf: A dynamical analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Hickey, B.M.

    1984-02-01

    The majority of papers on Pacific Northwest shelf dynamics have emphasized the relationship between longshore wind stress tau/sub s/ and longshore velocity v. However, attempts to illustrate a balance of momentum in the longshore direction have not been encouraging. tau/sub s//H (where H is water depth) has insufficient magnitude to balance the vertically averaged longshore acceleration V/sub s/, at least during summer. In this paper it is demonstrated that the missing momentum is provided by the longshore pressure gradient force -p/sub y/. The pressure gradient was estimated using tide gauge and atmospheric pressure data at stations separated by roughly 400 km. Seasonal and long-term means from Hickey and Pola and, in some cases, nonseasonal monthly anomalies from Enfield and Allen were added to the sum of the tide gauge and atmospheric pressure data to form time series ot total subsurface pressure. The pressure data were multiplied by an offshore decay factor to simulate coastal trapping.

  1. Fluctuating longshore pressure gradient on the Pacific Northwest shelf: A dynamical analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Hickey, B.M.

    1984-02-01

    The majority of papers on Pacific Northwest shelf dynamics have emphasized the relationship between longshore wind stress tau/sub s/ and longshore velocity v. However, attempts to illustrate a balance of momentum in the longshore direction have not been encouraging. tau/sub s//H (where H is water depth) has insufficient magnitude to balance the vertically averaged longshore acceleration V/sub s/, at least during summer. In this paper it is demonstrated that the missing momentum is provided by the longshore pressure gradient force -p/sub y/. The pressure gradient was estimated using tide gauge and atmospheric pressure data at stations separated by roughly 400 km. Seasonal and long-term means from Hickey and Pola and, in some cases, nonseasonal monthly anomalies from Enfield and Allen were added to the sum of the tide gauge and atmospheric pressure data to form time series of total subsurface pressure. The pressure data were multiplied by an offshore decay factor to simulate coastal trapping.

  2. Mixed mode transition in zero and adverse pressure gradient boundary layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bose, Rikhi; Durbin, Paul

    2015-11-01

    Flow regimes exist where interaction of Klebanoff streaks and the Tollmien-Sclichting waves trigger transition but either mode is individually insufficient. Such interaction between orderly and bypass routes of transition is called Mixed mode transition. In zero pressure gradient boundary layers, mixed mode transition follows three routes depending upon strength of these perturbation modes. At high free-stream turbulence intensity (Tu), bypass transition is dominant and the flow is very weakly sensitive to the TS mode strength. In the presence of a strong TS mode, low Tu triggers secondary instability of the TS wave forming Λ vortices. The Λ vortices are forced response due to the weak streaks rather than resonance mechanism seen in monochromatic excitations. When both of these modes are weak, secondary instability of streaks trigger consequent breakdown to turbulent spots. Three-dimensional visualization of the perturbation fields shows toroidal n = 0 and helical n = 1 modes observed in instability of axisymmetric jets and wakes. In adverese pressure gradient boundary layers, the presence of an inflection point significantly increases the growth rate of TS mode thereby strengthening the secondary instability route and the interaction is more interesting. This work was supported by NSF grant CBET-1228195. Computer time was provided by the Extreme Science and Engineering Discovery Environment (XSEDE).

  3. Solitons on Tori and Soliton Crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Speight, J. M.

    2014-11-01

    Necessary conditions for a soliton on a torus to be a soliton crystal, that is, a spatially periodic array of topological solitons in stable equilibrium, are derived. The stress tensor of the soliton must be L 2 orthogonal to , the space of parallel symmetric bilinear forms on TM, and, further, a certain symmetric bilinear form on , called the hessian, must be positive. It is shown that, for baby Skyrme models, the first condition actually implies the second. It is also shown that, for any choice of period lattice Λ, there is a baby Skyrme model which supports a soliton crystal of periodicity Λ. For the three-dimensional Skyrme model, it is shown that any soliton solution on a cubic lattice which satisfies a virial constraint and is equivariant with respect to (a subgroup of) the lattice symmetries automatically satisfies both tests. This verifies, in particular, that the celebrated Skyrme crystal of Castillejo et al., and Kugler and Shtrikman, passes both tests.

  4. Studies on soliton energy at critical and noncritical densities of negative ions in an inhomogeneous magnetized warm plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Dhananjay K.; Malik, Hitendra K.

    2007-11-01

    Considering an inhomogeneous plasma having finite-temperature negative and positive ions, and the isothermal electrons in the presence of an external magnetic field, the solitons at noncritical and critical densities of the negative ions are studied through Korteweg-deVries (KdV) and modified Korteweg-deVries (mKdV) equations, respectively. The compressive (rarefactive) KdV solitons are found to propagate when the negative ion concentration is less (greater) than the critical density of the negative ions. At the critical density, both the compressive and the rarefactive solitons of equal amplitudes are found to occur. The energies of the compressive KdV soliton and the mKdV solitons are found to increase and that of the rarefactive KdV soliton is found to decrease with the negative ion density. Soliton energy for both the KdV and the mKdV solitons gets lowered under the effect of stronger magnetic field. The effect of ion temperature is to increase the energy of the compressive KdV soliton, whereas the energy of the rarefactive KdV soliton as well as of the mKdV solitons gets decreased. The variation of the energy with the obliqueness of the magnetic field is different for the KdV and the mKdV solitons.

  5. Studies on soliton energy at critical and noncritical densities of negative ions in an inhomogeneous magnetized warm plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, Dhananjay K.; Malik, Hitendra K.

    2007-11-15

    Considering an inhomogeneous plasma having finite-temperature negative and positive ions, and the isothermal electrons in the presence of an external magnetic field, the solitons at noncritical and critical densities of the negative ions are studied through Korteweg-deVries (KdV) and modified Korteweg-deVries (mKdV) equations, respectively. The compressive (rarefactive) KdV solitons are found to propagate when the negative ion concentration is less (greater) than the critical density of the negative ions. At the critical density, both the compressive and the rarefactive solitons of equal amplitudes are found to occur. The energies of the compressive KdV soliton and the mKdV solitons are found to increase and that of the rarefactive KdV soliton is found to decrease with the negative ion density. Soliton energy for both the KdV and the mKdV solitons gets lowered under the effect of stronger magnetic field. The effect of ion temperature is to increase the energy of the compressive KdV soliton, whereas the energy of the rarefactive KdV soliton as well as of the mKdV solitons gets decreased. The variation of the energy with the obliqueness of the magnetic field is different for the KdV and the mKdV solitons.

  6. Ponderable soliton stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chiu, Hong-Yee

    1990-01-01

    The theory of Lee and Pang (1987), who obtained solutions for soliton stars composed of zero-temperature fermions and bosons, is applied here to quark soliton stars. Model soliton stars based on a simple physical model of the proton are computed, and the properties of the solitons are discussed, including the important problem of the existence of a limiting mass and thus the possible formation of black holes of primordial origin. It is shown that there is a definite mass limit for ponderable soliton stars, so that during cooling a soliton star might reach a stage beyond which no equilibrium configuration exists and the soliton star probably will collapse to become a black hole. The radiation of ponderable soliton stars may alter the short-wavelength character of the cosmic background radiation, and may be observed as highly redshifted objects at z of about 100,000.

  7. Topological Solitons in Physics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parsa, Zohreh

    1979-01-01

    A broad definition of solitons and a discussion of their role in physics is given. Vortices and magnetic monopoles which are examples of topological solitons in two and three spatial dimensions are described in some detail. (BB)

  8. Anderson Localization of Solitons

    SciTech Connect

    Sacha, Krzysztof; Zakrzewski, Jakub; Mueller, Cord A.; Delande, Dominique

    2009-11-20

    At low temperature, a quasi-one-dimensional ensemble of atoms with an attractive interaction forms a bright soliton. When exposed to a weak and smooth external potential, the shape of the soliton is hardly modified, but its center-of-mass motion is affected. We show that in a spatially correlated disordered potential, the quantum motion of a bright soliton displays Anderson localization. The localization length can be much larger than the soliton size and could be observed experimentally.

  9. Large amplitude ion-acoustic solitons in dusty plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiwari, R. S.; Jain, S. L.; Mishra, M. K.

    2011-08-01

    Characteristics of ion-acoustic soliton in dusty plasma, including the dynamics of heavily charged massive dust grains, are investigated following the Sagdeev Potential formalism. Retaining fourth order nonlinearities of electric potential in the expansion of the Sagdeev Potential in the energy equation for a pseudo particle and integrating the resulting energy equation, large amplitude soliton solution is determined. Variation of amplitude (A), half width (W) at half maxima and the product P = AW2 of the Korteweg-deVries (KdV), dressed and large amplitude soliton as a function of wide range of dust concentration are numerically studied for recently observed parameters of dusty plasmas. We have also presented the region of existence of large amplitude ion-acoustic soliton in the dusty plasma by analyzing the structure of the pseudo potential. It is found that in the presence of positively charged dust grains, system supports only compressive solitons, on the other hand, in the presence of negatively charged dust grains, the system supports compressive solitons up to certain critical concentration of dust grains and above this critical concentration, the system can support rarefactive solitons also. The effects of dust concentration, charge, and mass of the dust grains, on the characteristics of KdV, dressed and large amplitude the soliton, i.e., amplitude (A), half width at half maxima (W), and product of amplitude (A) and half width at half maxima (P = AW2), are discussed in detail

  10. Large amplitude ion-acoustic solitons in dusty plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Tiwari, R. S.; Jain, S. L.; Mishra, M. K.

    2011-08-15

    Characteristics of ion-acoustic soliton in dusty plasma, including the dynamics of heavily charged massive dust grains, are investigated following the Sagdeev Potential formalism. Retaining fourth order nonlinearities of electric potential in the expansion of the Sagdeev Potential in the energy equation for a pseudo particle and integrating the resulting energy equation, large amplitude soliton solution is determined. Variation of amplitude (A), half width (W) at half maxima and the product P = AW{sup 2} of the Korteweg-deVries (KdV), dressed and large amplitude soliton as a function of wide range of dust concentration are numerically studied for recently observed parameters of dusty plasmas. We have also presented the region of existence of large amplitude ion-acoustic soliton in the dusty plasma by analyzing the structure of the pseudo potential. It is found that in the presence of positively charged dust grains, system supports only compressive solitons, on the other hand, in the presence of negatively charged dust grains, the system supports compressive solitons up to certain critical concentration of dust grains and above this critical concentration, the system can support rarefactive solitons also. The effects of dust concentration, charge, and mass of the dust grains, on the characteristics of KdV, dressed and large amplitude the soliton, i.e., amplitude (A), half width at half maxima (W), and product of amplitude (A) and half width at half maxima (P = AW{sup 2}), are discussed in detail.

  11. Direct Numerical Simulation and Theories of Wall Turbulence with a Range of Pressure Gradients

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coleman, G. N.; Garbaruk, A.; Spalart, P. R.

    2014-01-01

    A new Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS) of Couette-Poiseuille flow at a higher Reynolds number is presented and compared with DNS of other wall-bounded flows. It is analyzed in terms of testing semi-theoretical proposals for universal behavior of the velocity, mixing length, or eddy viscosity in pressure gradients, and in terms of assessing the accuracy of two turbulence models. These models are used in two modes, the traditional one with only a dependence on the wall-normal coordinate y, and a newer one in which a lateral dependence on z is added. For pure Couette flow and the Couette-Poiseuille case considered here, this z-dependence allows some models to generate steady streamwise vortices, which generally improves the agreement with DNS and experiment. On the other hand, it complicates the comparison between DNS and models.

  12. MRI Assessment of Diastolic and Systolic Intraventricular Pressure Gradients in Heart Failure.

    PubMed

    Jain, Snigdha; Londono, Francisco J; Segers, Patrick; Gillebert, Thierry C; De Buyzere, Marc; Chirinos, Julio A

    2016-02-01

    A deep phenotypic characterization of heart failure (HF) is important for a better understanding of its pathophysiology. In particular, novel noninvasive techniques for the characterization of functional abnormalities in HF with preserved ejection fraction are currently needed. While echocardiography is widely used to assess ventricular function, standard echocardiographic techniques provide a limited understanding of ventricular filling. The application of fluid dynamics theory, along with assessments of flow velocity fields in multiple dimensions in the ventricle, can be used to assess intraventricular pressure gradients (IVPGs), which in turn may provide valuable insights into ventricular diastolic and systolic function. Advances in imaging techniques now allow for accurate estimations of systolic and diastolic IVPGs, using noninvasive methods that are easily applicable in clinical research. In this review, we describe the basic concepts regarding intraventricular flow measurements and the derivation of IVPGs. We also review existing literature exploring the role of IVPGs in HF. PMID:26780916

  13. Comparison of invasive and non-invasive pressure gradients in aortic arch obstruction

    PubMed Central

    Wisotzkey, Bethany L.; Hornik, Christoph P.; Green, Amanda S.; Barker, Piers C. A.

    2016-01-01

    Background Aortic arch obstruction can be evaluated by catheter peak-to-peak gradient or by Doppler peak instantaneous pressure gradient. Previous studies have shown moderate correlation in discrete coarctation, but few have assessed correlation in patients with more complex aortic reconstruction. Methods We carried out retrospective comparison of cardiac catheterisations and pre- and post-catheterisation echocardiograms in 60 patients with native/recurrent coarctation or aortic reconstruction. Aortic arch obstruction was defined as peak-to-peak gradient ≥25 mmHg in patients with native/recurrent coarctation and ≥10 mmHg in aortic reconstruction. Results Diastolic continuation of flow was not associated with aortic arch obstruction in either group. Doppler peak instantaneous pressure gradient, with and without the expanded Bernoulli equation, weakly correlated with peak-to-peak gradient even in patients with a normal cardiac index (r=0.36, p=0.016, and r=0.49, p=0.001, respectively). Receiver operating characteristic curve analysis identified an area under the curve of 0.61 for patients with all types of obstruction, with a cut-off point of 45 mmHg correctly classifying 64% of patients with arch obstruction (sensitivity 39%, specificity 89%). In patients with aortic arch reconstruction who had a cardiac index ≥3 L/min/m2, a cut-off point of 23 mmHg correctly classified 69% of patients (71% sensitivity, 50% specificity) with an area under the curve of 0.82. Conclusion The non-invasive assessment of aortic obstruction remains challenging. The greatest correlation of Doppler indices was noted in patients with aortic reconstruction and a normal cardiac index. PMID:25602135

  14. Probability density function method for variable-density pressure-gradient-driven turbulence and mixing

    SciTech Connect

    Bakosi, Jozsef; Ristorcelli, Raymond J

    2010-01-01

    Probability density function (PDF) methods are extended to variable-density pressure-gradient-driven turbulence. We apply the new method to compute the joint PDF of density and velocity in a non-premixed binary mixture of different-density molecularly mixing fluids under gravity. The full time-evolution of the joint PDF is captured in the highly non-equilibrium flow: starting from a quiescent state, transitioning to fully developed turbulence and finally dissipated by molecular diffusion. High-Atwood-number effects (as distinguished from the Boussinesq case) are accounted for: both hydrodynamic turbulence and material mixing are treated at arbitrary density ratios, with the specific volume, mass flux and all their correlations in closed form. An extension of the generalized Langevin model, originally developed for the Lagrangian fluid particle velocity in constant-density shear-driven turbulence, is constructed for variable-density pressure-gradient-driven flows. The persistent small-scale anisotropy, a fundamentally 'non-Kolmogorovian' feature of flows under external acceleration forces, is captured by a tensorial diffusion term based on the external body force. The material mixing model for the fluid density, an active scalar, is developed based on the beta distribution. The beta-PDF is shown to be capable of capturing the mixing asymmetry and that it can accurately represent the density through transition, in fully developed turbulence and in the decay process. The joint model for hydrodynamics and active material mixing yields a time-accurate evolution of the turbulent kinetic energy and Reynolds stress anisotropy without resorting to gradient diffusion hypotheses, and represents the mixing state by the density PDF itself, eliminating the need for dubious mixing measures. Direct numerical simulations of the homogeneous Rayleigh-Taylor instability are used for model validation.

  15. Observations of pressure gradient driven m = 1 internal kink mode in EAST tokamak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Liqing; Hu, Liqun; Chen, Kaiyun; Li, Erzhong; Wang, Fudi; Xu, Ming; Duan, Yanmin; Shi, Tonghui; Zhang, Jizong; Zhou, Ruijie; Chen, Yebin

    2012-12-01

    Pressure gradient driven m = 1 internal kink mode destabilization that follows an L-H transition is observed in the operational region of the EAST tokamak, which manifests in periodic oscillations in soft x-ray (SXR) and Mirnov coil signals. Using tomography with the high resolution soft x-ray detection array, we find that the rotation direction of the 1/1 kink mode is in the ion diamagnetic drift direction in poloidal cross-section. A large displacement of the hot core is attributable to the shift of the 1/1 internal kink mode. In contrast to stationary oscillations with fixed frequency, various frequency chirping behavior is observed with this 1/1 kink mode. Furthermore, we also occasionally observe that a 2/1 neoclassical tearing mode (NTM) is triggered by a 1/1 internal kink mode via mode coupling in a high-performance plasma. The spatial structure of a 2/2 mode, which is the harmonic mode of the 1/1 kink mode, is also presented in this paper. Large amounts of medium-Z impurities accumulate in the central plasma region where the 1/1 kink mode instability bursts. Finally, we also find that the frequency beating associated with a 1/1 kink mode is a consequence of plasma rotation. Based on all of these observations, we propose that the plasma pressure gradient, the driving force in kink modes, is plausibly the product of an intense concentration of impurities, which are related to plasma rotation.

  16. A pressure gradient facilitates mass flow in the oomycete Achlya bisexualis.

    PubMed

    Muralidhar, Abishek; Swadel, Emma; Spiekerman, Marjolein; Suei, Sandy; Fraser, Miranda; Ingerfeld, Manfred; Tayagui, Ayelen B; Garrill, Ashley

    2016-02-01

    We have used a single cell pressure probe and observed movement of microinjected oil droplets to investigate mass flow in the oomycete Achlya bisexualis. To facilitate these experiments, split Petri dishes that had media containing different sorbitol concentrations (and hence a different osmotic potential) on each side of the dish were inoculated with a single zoospore. An initial germ tube grew out from this and formed a mycelium that extended over both sides of the Petri dish. Hyphae growing on the 0 M sorbitol side of the dish had a mean turgor ( ± sem) of 0.53 ± 0.03 MPa (n = 13) and on the 0.3 M sorbitol side had a mean turgor ( ± sem) of 0.3 ± 0.027 MPa (n = 9). Oil droplets that had been microinjected into the hyphae moved towards the lower turgor area of the mycelia (i.e. retrograde movement when microinjected into hyphae on the 0 M sorbitol side of the split Petri dish and anterograde movement when microinjected into hyphae on the 0.3 M sorbitol side of the Petri dish). In contrast, the movement of small refractile vesicles occurred in both directions irrespective of the pressure gradient. Experiments with neutral red indicate that the dye is able to move through the mycelia from one side of a split Petri dish to the other, suggesting that there is no compartmentation. This study shows that hyphae that are part of the same mycelia can have different turgor pressures and that this pressure gradient can drive mass flow.

  17. Internally mounted thin-liquid-film skin-friction meter - Comparison with floating element method with and without pressure gradient

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hornung, Hans; Seto, Jeffrey

    1991-01-01

    A new, robust oil film skin friction meter was designed and constructed. This enables skin friction measurements remotely and from within the model, as well as avoiding the need to know the location of the leading edge of the film. The instrument was tested by comparing measurements with those given by a floating element gage in a zero pressure gradient flat plate turbulent boundary layer. Both instruments agreed satisfactorily with the well-known curve for this case. Significant discrepancies between the two instruments were observed in the case of adverse and favorable pressure gradients. The discrepancies were of opposite sign for opposite-sign pressure gradients as is consistent with the error expected from floating-element gages. Additional confidence in the oil film technique is supplied by the good agreement of the behavior of the film profile with predictions from lubrication theory.

  18. FFT integration of instantaneous 3D pressure gradient fields measured by Lagrangian particle tracking in turbulent flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huhn, F.; Schanz, D.; Gesemann, S.; Schröder, A.

    2016-09-01

    Pressure gradient fields in unsteady flows can be estimated through flow measurements of the material acceleration in the fluid and the assumption of the governing momentum equation. In order to derive pressure from its gradient, almost exclusively two numerical methods have been used to spatially integrate the pressure gradient until now: first, direct path integration in the spatial domain, and second, the solution of the Poisson equation for pressure. Instead, we propose an alternative third method that integrates the pressure gradient field in Fourier space. Using a FFT function, the method is fast and easy to implement in programming languages for scientific computing. We demonstrate the accuracy of the integration scheme on a synthetic pressure field and apply it to an experimental example based on time-resolved material acceleration data from high-resolution Lagrangian particle tracking with the Shake-The-Box method.

  19. The turbulent boundary layer on a porous plate: An experimental study of the heat transfer behavior with adverse pressure gradients

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blackwell, B. F.; Kays, W. M.; Moffat, R. J.

    1972-01-01

    An experimental investigation of the heat transfer behavior of the near equilibrium transpired turbulent boundary layer with adverse pressure gradient has been carried out. Stanton numbers were measured by an energy balance on electrically heated plates that form the bottom wall of the wind tunnel. Two adverse pressure gradients were studied. Two types of transpiration boundary conditions were investigated. The concept of an equilibrium thermal boundary layer was introduced. It was found that Stanton number as a function of enthalpy thickness Reynolds number is essentially unaffected by adverse pressure gradient with no transpiration. Shear stress, heat flux, and turbulent Prandtl number profiles were computed from mean temperature and velocity profiles. It was concluded that the turbulent Prandtl number is greater than unity in near the wall and decreases continuously to approximately 0.5 at the free stream.

  20. Supersolitons: Solitonic Excitations in Atomic Soliton Chains

    SciTech Connect

    Novoa, David; Michinel, Humberto; Perez-Garcia, Victor M.

    2008-10-03

    We show that, by tuning interactions in nonintegrable vector nonlinear Schroedinger equations modeling Bose-Einstein condensates and other relevant physical systems, it is possible to achieve a regime of elastic particlelike collisions between solitons. This would allow one to construct a Newton's cradle with solitons and supersolitons: localized collective excitations in solitary-wave chains.

  1. Modification of the MML turbulence model for adverse pressure gradient flows. M.S. Thesis - Akron Univ., 1993

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Conley, Julianne M.

    1994-01-01

    Computational fluid dynamics is being used increasingly to predict flows for aerospace propulsion applications, yet there is still a need for an easy to use, computationally inexpensive turbulence model capable of accurately predicting a wide range of turbulent flows. The Baldwin-Lomax model is the most widely used algebraic model, even though it has known difficulties calculating flows with strong adverse pressure gradients and large regions of separation. The modified mixing length model (MML) was developed specifically to handle the separation which occurs on airfoils and has given significantly better results than the Baldwin-Lomax model. The success of these calculations warrants further evaluation and development of MML. The objective of this work was to evaluate the performance of MML for zero and adverse pressure gradient flows, and modify it as needed. The Proteus Navier-Stokes code was used for this study and all results were compared with experimental data and with calculations made using the Baldwin-Lomax algebraic model, which is currently available in Proteus. The MML model was first evaluated for zero pressure gradient flow over a flat plate, then modified to produce the proper boundary layer growth. Additional modifications, based on experimental data for three adverse pressure gradient flows, were also implemented. The adapted model, called MMLPG (modified mixing length model for pressure gradient flows), was then evaluated for a typical propulsion flow problem, flow through a transonic diffuser. Three cases were examined: flow with no shock, a weak shock and a strong shock. The results of these calculations indicate that the objectives of this study have been met. Overall, MMLPG is capable of accurately predicting the adverse pressure gradient flows examined in this study, giving generally better agreement with experimental data than the Baldwin-Lomax model.

  2. Comparison of experiments and simulations for zero pressure gradient turbulent boundary layers at moderate Reynolds numbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Örlü, Ramis; Schlatter, Philipp

    2013-06-01

    A detailed comparison between recent direct numerical simulation (DNS) and experiments of a turbulent boundary layer under zero pressure gradient at Re θ = 2,500 and 4,000 (based on the free-stream velocity and momentum-loss thickness) is presented. The well-resolved DNS is computed in a long spatial domain (Schlatter and Örlü in J Fluid Mech 659:116, 2010a), including the disturbance strip, while the experiments consist of single hot-wire probe and oil-film interferometry measurements. Remarkably, good agreement is obtained for integral quantities such as skin friction and shape factor, as well as mean and fluctuating streamwise velocity profiles, higher-order moments and probability density distributions. The agreement also extends to spectral/structural quantities such as the amplitude modulation of the small scales by the large-scale motion and temporal spectral maps throughout the boundary layer. Differences within the inner layer observed for statistical and spectral quantities could entirely be removed by spatially averaging the DNS to match the viscous-scaled length of the hot-wire sensor, thereby explaining observed differences solely by insufficient spatial resolution of the hot-wire sensor. For the highest Reynolds number, Re θ = 4,000, the experimental data exhibit a more pronounced secondary spectral peak in the outer region ( y/ δ 99 = 0.1) related to structures with length on the order of 5-7 boundary layer thicknesses, which is weaker and slightly moved towards lower temporal periods in the DNS. The cause is thought to be related to the limited spanwise box size which constrains the growth of the very large structures. In the light of the difficulty to obtain "canonical" flow conditions, both in DNS and the wind tunnel where effects such as boundary treatment, pressure gradient and turbulence tripping need to be considered, the present cross-validation of the data sets, at least for the present Re θ -range, provides important reference data

  3. Survey and bibliography on attainment of laminar flow control in air using pressure gradient and suction, volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bushnell, D. M.; Tuttle, M. H.

    1979-01-01

    A survey was conducted and a bibliography compiled on attainment of laminar flow in air through the use of favorable pressure gradient and suction. This report contains the survey, summaries of data for both ground and flight experiments, and abstracts of referenced reports. Much early information is also included which may be of some immediate use as background material for LFC applications.

  4. An irrotation correction on pressure gradient and orthogonal-path integration for PIV-based pressure reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhongyi; Gao, Qi; Wang, Chengyue; Wei, Runjie; Wang, Jinjun

    2016-06-01

    Particle image velocimetry (PIV)-based pressure reconstruction has become a popular technique in experimental fluid mechanics. Noise or errors in raw velocity field would significantly affect the quality of pressure reconstruction in PIV measurement. To reduce experimental errors in pressure gradient and improve the precision of reconstructed pressure field, a minimal 2-norm criteria-based new technique called irrotation correction (IC) with orthogonal decomposition is developed. The pressure reconstruction is therefore composed of three steps: calculation of pressure gradient from time-resolved velocity fields of PIV, an irrotation correction on the pressure gradient field, and finally a simple orthogonal-path integration (OPI) for pressure. Systematic assessments of IC algorithm are performed on synthetic solid-body rotation flow, direct numerical simulations of a channel flow and an isotropic turbulent flow. The results show that IC is a robust algorithm which can significantly improve the accuracy of pressure reconstruction primarily in the low wave number domain. After irrotation correction, noisy pressure gradient field ideally becomes an irrotational field on which the pressure integration is independent of integrating paths. Therefore, an OPI algorithm is proposed to perform the pressure integration in an efficient way with very few integration paths. This makes the new technique to be a doable method on three-dimensional pressure reconstruction with acceptable computational cost.

  5. Estimation of diastolic intraventricular pressure gradients by Doppler M-mode echocardiography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenberg, N. L.; Vandervoort, P. M.; Firstenberg, M. S.; Garcia, M. J.; Thomas, J. D.

    2001-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that small intraventricular pressure gradients (IVPG) are important for efficient filling of the left ventricle (LV) and as a sensitive marker for ischemia. Unfortunately, there has previously been no way of measuring these noninvasively, severely limiting their research and clinical utility. Color Doppler M-mode (CMM) echocardiography provides a spatiotemporal velocity distribution along the inflow tract throughout diastole, which we hypothesized would allow direct estimation of IVPG by using the Euler equation. Digital CMM images, obtained simultaneously with intracardiac pressure waveforms in six dogs, were processed by numerical differentiation for the Euler equation, then integrated to estimate IVPG and the total (left atrial to left ventricular apex) pressure drop. CMM-derived estimates agreed well with invasive measurements (IVPG: y = 0.87x + 0.22, r = 0.96, P < 0.001, standard error of the estimate = 0.35 mmHg). Quantitative processing of CMM data allows accurate estimation of IVPG and tracking of changes induced by beta-adrenergic stimulation. This novel approach provides unique information on LV filling dynamics in an entirely noninvasive way that has previously not been available for assessment of diastolic filling and function.

  6. Functional assessment of the stenotic carotid artery by CFD-based pressure gradient evaluation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xin; Zhang, Heye; Ren, Lijie; Xiong, Huahua; Gao, Zhifan; Xu, Pengcheng; Huang, Wenhua; Wu, Wanqing

    2016-09-01

    The functional assessment of a hemodynamic significant stenosis base on blood pressure variation has been applied for evaluation of the myocardial ischemic event. This functional assessment shows great potential for improving the accuracy of the classification of the severity of carotid stenosis. To explore the value of grading the stenosis using a pressure gradient (PG)-we had reconstructed patient-specific carotid geometries based on MRI images-computational fluid dynamics were performed to analyze the PG in their stenotic arteries. Doppler ultrasound image data and the corresponding MRI image data of 19 patients with carotid stenosis were collected. Based on these, 31 stenotic carotid arterial geometries were reconstructed. A combinatorial boundary condition method was implemented for steady-state computer fluid dynamics simulations. Anatomic parameters, including tortuosity (T), the angle of bifurcation, and the cross-sectional area of the remaining lumen, were collected to investigate the effect on the pressure distribution. The PG is highly correlated with the severe stenosis (r = 0.902), whereas generally, the T and the angle of the bifurcation negatively correlate to the pressure drop of the internal carotid artery stenosis. The calculation required <10 min/case, which made it prepared for the fast diagnosis of the severe stenosis. According to the results, we had proposed a potential threshold value for distinguishing severe stenosis from mild-moderate stenosis (PG = 0.88). In conclusion, the PG could serve as the additional factor for improving the accuracy of grading the severity of the stenosis.

  7. The streamwise development of Goertler vortices in a favorable pressure gradient

    SciTech Connect

    Finnis, M.V.; Brown, A.

    1996-01-01

    Measurements are presented of the streamwise velocity variation within a laminar boundary layer on a concave surface of 4 m radius of curvature for which the free-stream velocity gradient factor ({nu}/U{sub 0}{sup 2})dU{sub 0}/dx was approximately 1 {times} 10{sup {minus}6}. The velocity variation was consistent with the presence of counterrotating vortices resulting from the Goertler instability. The vortices exhibited exponential growth over the streamwise extent of the measurements to a disturbance amplitude of approximately 13% of the local free-stream velocity. The vortex growth rates were found to be less than those for a zero velocity gradient factor, indicating that a favorable pressure gradient stabilizes the flow with respect to the Goertler instability. Boundary layer profiles at local upwash and downwash positions are compared with the linear theory for which the mean flow was modeled using the Pohlhausen approximation to the solution of the boundary layer equations. The agreement between the measured and predicted profiles indicates that the linear stability theory can provide a fair approximation to the small amplitude growth of the Goertler instability.

  8. Acoustic scattering by circular cylinders of various aspect ratios. [pressure gradient microphones

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maciulaitis, A.

    1979-01-01

    The effects of acoustic scattering on the useful frequency range of pressure gradient microphones were investigated experimentally between ka values of 0.407 and 4.232 using two circular cylindrical models (L/D = 0.5 and 0.25) having a 25 cm outside diameter. Small condenser microphones, attached to preamplifiers by flexible connectors, were installed from inside the cylindrical bodies, and flush mounted on the exterior surface of the cylinders. A 38 cm diameter woofer in a large speaker enclosure was used as the sound source. Surface pressure augmentation and phase differences were computed from measured data for various sound wave incidence angles. Results are graphically compared with theoretical predictions supplied by NASA for ka = 0.407, 2.288, and 4.232. All other results are tabulated in the appendices. With minor exceptions, the experimentally determined pressure augmentations agreed within 0.75 dB with theoretical predictions. The agreement for relative phase angles was within 5 percent without any exceptions. Scattering parameter variations with ka and L/D ratio, as computed from experimental data, are also presented.

  9. Functional assessment of the stenotic carotid artery by CFD-based pressure gradient evaluation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xin; Zhang, Heye; Ren, Lijie; Xiong, Huahua; Gao, Zhifan; Xu, Pengcheng; Huang, Wenhua; Wu, Wanqing

    2016-09-01

    The functional assessment of a hemodynamic significant stenosis base on blood pressure variation has been applied for evaluation of the myocardial ischemic event. This functional assessment shows great potential for improving the accuracy of the classification of the severity of carotid stenosis. To explore the value of grading the stenosis using a pressure gradient (PG)-we had reconstructed patient-specific carotid geometries based on MRI images-computational fluid dynamics were performed to analyze the PG in their stenotic arteries. Doppler ultrasound image data and the corresponding MRI image data of 19 patients with carotid stenosis were collected. Based on these, 31 stenotic carotid arterial geometries were reconstructed. A combinatorial boundary condition method was implemented for steady-state computer fluid dynamics simulations. Anatomic parameters, including tortuosity (T), the angle of bifurcation, and the cross-sectional area of the remaining lumen, were collected to investigate the effect on the pressure distribution. The PG is highly correlated with the severe stenosis (r = 0.902), whereas generally, the T and the angle of the bifurcation negatively correlate to the pressure drop of the internal carotid artery stenosis. The calculation required <10 min/case, which made it prepared for the fast diagnosis of the severe stenosis. According to the results, we had proposed a potential threshold value for distinguishing severe stenosis from mild-moderate stenosis (PG = 0.88). In conclusion, the PG could serve as the additional factor for improving the accuracy of grading the severity of the stenosis. PMID:27371686

  10. Doppler echo evaluation of pulmonary venous-left atrial pressure gradients: human and numerical model studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Firstenberg, M. S.; Greenberg, N. L.; Smedira, N. G.; Prior, D. L.; Scalia, G. M.; Thomas, J. D.; Garcia, M. J.

    2000-01-01

    The simplified Bernoulli equation relates fluid convective energy derived from flow velocities to a pressure gradient and is commonly used in clinical echocardiography to determine pressure differences across stenotic orifices. Its application to pulmonary venous flow has not been described in humans. Twelve patients undergoing cardiac surgery had simultaneous high-fidelity pulmonary venous and left atrial pressure measurements and pulmonary venous pulsed Doppler echocardiography performed. Convective gradients for the systolic (S), diastolic (D), and atrial reversal (AR) phases of pulmonary venous flow were determined using the simplified Bernoulli equation and correlated with measured actual pressure differences. A linear relationship was observed between the convective (y) and actual (x) pressure differences for the S (y = 0.23x + 0.0074, r = 0.82) and D (y = 0.22x + 0.092, r = 0.81) waves, but not for the AR wave (y = 0. 030x + 0.13, r = 0.10). Numerical modeling resulted in similar slopes for the S (y = 0.200x - 0.127, r = 0.97), D (y = 0.247x - 0. 354, r = 0.99), and AR (y = 0.087x - 0.083, r = 0.96) waves. Consistent with numerical modeling, the convective term strongly correlates with but significantly underestimates actual gradient because of large inertial forces.

  11. Pick-up ion pressure gradients modulating the solar wind dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fahr, Hans J.; Fichtner, Horst

    1995-01-01

    Neutral interstellar atoms penetrate deeply into the inner heliosphere before they become ionized by various processes. As ions they are picked-up by the frozen-in magnetic fields and are convected outwards with the solar wind plasma. Thereby the primary plasma flow is mass, momentum, and energy-loaded. The dynamics of the distant multi-constituent solar wind is, however, not solely determined by these loading processes, but is also affected by the wave-mediated pick-up ion pressure gradients derivable from the pick-up ion distribution function. The action of the radial components of these pressures essentially counter balances the decelerating effect of the solar wind momentum loading, diminishing strongly the deceleration of the distant solar wind. Furthermore the latitudinal components of the pick-up ion pressures induce latitudinal forces acting on the multiconstituent solar plasma outflow and inducing nonradial bulk flow components. The enforced nonradial outflow geometry on the upwind hemisphere may partly be responsible for the magnetic flux deficit which was claimed since several years in the PIONEER-10 magnetic flux data.

  12. Quadratic spatial soliton interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jankovic, Ladislav

    Quadratic spatial soliton interactions were investigated in this Dissertation. The first part deals with characterizing the principal features of multi-soliton generation and soliton self-reflection. The second deals with two beam processes leading to soliton interactions and collisions. These subjects were investigated both theoretically and experimentally. The experiments were performed by using potassium niobate (KNBO 3) and periodically poled potassium titanyl phosphate (KTP) crystals. These particular crystals were desirable for these experiments because of their large nonlinear coefficients and, more importantly, because the experiments could be performed under non-critical-phase-matching (NCPM) conditions. The single soliton generation measurements, performed on KNBO3 by launching the fundamental component only, showed a broad angular acceptance bandwidth which was important for the soliton collisions performed later. Furthermore, at high input intensities multi-soliton generation was observed for the first time. The influence on the multi-soliton patterns generated of the input intensity and beam symmetry was investigated. The combined experimental and theoretical efforts indicated that spatial and temporal noise on the input laser beam induced multi-soliton patterns. Another research direction pursued was intensity dependent soliton routing by using of a specially engineered quadratically nonlinear interface within a periodically poled KTP sample. This was the first time demonstration of the self-reflection phenomenon in a system with a quadratic nonlinearity. The feature investigated is believed to have a great potential for soliton routing and manipulation by engineered structures. A detailed investigation was conducted on two soliton interaction and collision processes. Birth of an additional soliton resulting from a two soliton collision was observed and characterized for the special case of a non-planar geometry. A small amount of spiraling, up to 30

  13. Pure-quartic solitons

    PubMed Central

    Blanco-Redondo, Andrea; Martijn, de Sterke C.; Sipe, J.E.; Krauss, Thomas F.; Eggleton, Benjamin J.; Husko, Chad

    2016-01-01

    Temporal optical solitons have been the subject of intense research due to their intriguing physics and applications in ultrafast optics and supercontinuum generation. Conventional bright optical solitons result from the interaction of anomalous group-velocity dispersion and self-phase modulation. Here we experimentally demonstrate a class of bright soliton arising purely from the interaction of negative fourth-order dispersion and self-phase modulation, which can occur even for normal group-velocity dispersion. We provide experimental and numerical evidence of shape-preserving propagation and flat temporal phase for the fundamental pure-quartic soliton and periodically modulated propagation for the higher-order pure-quartic solitons. We derive the approximate shape of the fundamental pure-quartic soliton and discover that is surprisingly Gaussian, exhibiting excellent agreement with our experimental observations. Our discovery, enabled by precise dispersion engineering, could find applications in communications, frequency combs and ultrafast lasers. PMID:26822758

  14. Pure-quartic solitons.

    PubMed

    Blanco-Redondo, Andrea; de Sterke, C Martijn; Martijn, de Sterke C; Sipe, J E; Krauss, Thomas F; Eggleton, Benjamin J; Husko, Chad

    2016-01-01

    Temporal optical solitons have been the subject of intense research due to their intriguing physics and applications in ultrafast optics and supercontinuum generation. Conventional bright optical solitons result from the interaction of anomalous group-velocity dispersion and self-phase modulation. Here we experimentally demonstrate a class of bright soliton arising purely from the interaction of negative fourth-order dispersion and self-phase modulation, which can occur even for normal group-velocity dispersion. We provide experimental and numerical evidence of shape-preserving propagation and flat temporal phase for the fundamental pure-quartic soliton and periodically modulated propagation for the higher-order pure-quartic solitons. We derive the approximate shape of the fundamental pure-quartic soliton and discover that is surprisingly Gaussian, exhibiting excellent agreement with our experimental observations. Our discovery, enabled by precise dispersion engineering, could find applications in communications, frequency combs and ultrafast lasers. PMID:26822758

  15. Vector soliton fission.

    PubMed

    Lu, F; Lin, Q; Knox, W H; Agrawal, Govind P

    2004-10-29

    We investigate the vectorial nature of soliton fission in an isotropic nonlinear medium both theoretically and experimentally. As a specific example, we show that supercontinuum generation in a tapered fiber is extremely sensitive to the input state of polarization. Multiple vector solitons generated through soliton fission exhibit different states of elliptical polarization while emitting nonsolitonic radiation with complicated polarization features. Experiments performed with a tapered fiber agree with our theoretical description.

  16. Unexpected Behavior on Nonlinear Tunneling of Chirped Ultrashort Soliton Pulse in Non-Kerr Media with Raman Effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajan, M. S. Mani

    2016-08-01

    In this manuscript, the ultrashort soliton pulse propagation through nonlinear tunneling in cubic quintic media is investigated. The effect of chirping on propagation characteristics of the soliton pulse is analytically investigated using similarity transformation. In particular, we investigate the propagation dynamics of ultrashort soliton pulse through dispersion barrier for both chirp and chirp-free soliton. By investigating the obtained soliton solution, we found that chirping has strong influence on soliton dynamics such as pulse compression with amplification. These two important dynamics of chirped soliton in cubic quintic media open new possibilities to improve the solitonic communication system. Moreover, we surprisingly observe that a dispersion well is formed for the chirped case whereas a barrier is formed for the chirp-free case, which has certain applications in the construction of logic gate devices to achieve ultrafast switching.

  17. Massive soliton stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chiu, Hong-Yee

    1990-01-01

    The structure of nontopological solutions of Einstein field equations as proposed by Friedberg, Lee, and Pang (1987) is examined. This analysis incorporates finite temperature effects and pair creation. Quarks are assumed to be the only species that exist in interior of soliton stars. The possibility of primordial creation of soliton stars in the incomplete decay of the degenerate vacuum in early universe is explored. Because of dominance of pair creation inside soliton stars, the luminosity of soliton stars is not determined by its radiative transfer characteristics, and the surface temperature of soliton stars can be the same as its interior temperature. It is possible that soliton stars are intense X-ray radiators at large distances. Soliton stars are nearly 100 percent efficient energy converters, converting the rest energy of baryons entering the interior into radiation. It is possible that a sizable number of baryons may also be trapped inside soliton stars during early epochs of the universe. In addition, if soliton stars exist they could assume the role played by massive black holes in galactic centers.

  18. Massive soliton stars

    SciTech Connect

    Chiu, Hongyee )

    1990-05-01

    The structure of nontopological solutions of Einstein field equations as proposed by Friedberg, Lee, and Pang (1987) is examined. This analysis incorporates finite temperature effects and pair creation. Quarks are assumed to be the only species that exist in interior of soliton stars. The possibility of primordial creation of soliton stars in the incomplete decay of the degenerate vacuum in early universe is explored. Because of dominance of pair creation inside soliton stars, the luminosity of soliton stars is not determined by its radiative transfer characteristics, and the surface temperature of soliton stars can be the same as its interior temperature. It is possible that soliton stars are intense X-ray radiators at large distances. Soliton stars are nearly 100 percent efficient energy converters, converting the rest energy of baryons entering the interior into radiation. It is possible that a sizable number of baryons may also be trapped inside soliton stars during early epochs of the universe. In addition, if soliton stars exist they could assume the role played by massive black holes in galactic centers. 27 refs.

  19. Cardiovascular design in fin whales: high-stiffness arteries protect against adverse pressure gradients at depth.

    PubMed

    Lillie, M A; Piscitelli, M A; Vogl, A W; Gosline, J M; Shadwick, R E

    2013-07-15

    Fin whales have an incompliant aorta, which, we hypothesize, represents an adaptation to large, depth-induced variations in arterial transmural pressures. We hypothesize these variations arise from a limited ability of tissues to respond to rapid changes in ambient ocean pressures during a dive. We tested this hypothesis by measuring arterial mechanics experimentally and modelling arterial transmural pressures mathematically. The mechanical properties of mammalian arteries reflect the physiological loads they experience, so we examined a wide range of fin whale arteries. All arteries had abundant adventitial collagen that was usually recruited at very low stretches and inflation pressures (2-3 kPa), making arterial diameter largely independent of transmural pressure. Arteries withstood significant negative transmural pressures (-7 to -50 kPa) before collapsing. Collapse was resisted by recruitment of adventitial collagen at very low stretches. These findings are compatible with the hypothesis of depth-induced variation of arterial transmural pressure. Because transmural pressures depend on thoracic pressures, we modelled the thorax of a diving fin whale to assess the likelihood of significant variation in transmural pressures. The model predicted that deformation of the thorax body wall and diaphragm could not always equalize thoracic and ambient pressures because of asymmetrical conditions on dive descent and ascent. Redistribution of blood could partially compensate for asymmetrical conditions, but inertial and viscoelastic lag necessarily limits tissue response rates. Without pressure equilibrium, particularly when ambient pressures change rapidly, internal pressure gradients will develop and expose arteries to transient pressure fluctuations, but with minimal hemodynamic consequence due to their low compliance.

  20. Improvement in diastolic intraventricular pressure gradients in patients with HOCM after ethanol septal reduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rovner, Aleksandr; Smith, Rebecca; Greenberg, Neil L.; Tuzcu, E. Murat; Smedira, Nicholas; Lever, Harry M.; Thomas, James D.; Garcia, Mario J.

    2003-01-01

    We sought to validate measurement of intraventricular pressure gradients (IVPG) and analyze their change in patients with hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy (HOCM) after ethanol septal reduction (ESR). Quantitative analysis of color M-mode Doppler (CMM) images may be used to estimate diastolic IVPG noninvasively. Noninvasive IVPG measurement was validated in 10 patients undergoing surgical myectomy. Echocardiograms were then analyzed in 19 patients at baseline and after ESR. Pulsed Doppler data through the mitral valve and pulmonary venous flow were obtained. CMM was used to obtain the flow propagation velocity (Vp) and to calculate IVPG off-line. Left atrial pressure was estimated with the use of previously validated Doppler equations. Data were compared before and after ESR. CMM-derived IVPG correlated well with invasive measurements obtained before and after surgical myectomy [r = 0.8, P < 0.01, Delta(CMM - invasive IVPG) = 0.09 +/- 0.45 mmHg]. ESR resulted in a decrease of resting LVOT systolic gradient from 62 +/- 10 to 29 +/- 5 mmHg (P < 0.001). There was a significant increase in the Vp and IVPG (from 48 +/- 5to 74 +/- 7 cm/s and from 1.5 +/- 0.2 to 2.6 +/- 0.3 mmHg, respectively, P < 0.001 for both). Estimated left atrial pressure decreased from 16.2 +/- 1.1 to 11.5 +/- 0.9 mmHg (P < 0.001). The increase in IVPG correlated with the reduction in the LVOT gradient (r = 0.6, P < 0.01). Reduction of LVOT obstruction after ESR is associated with an improvement in diastolic suction force. Noninvasive measurements of IVPG may be used as an indicator of diastolic function improvement in HOCM.

  1. Restoration of Liver Function and Portosystemic Pressure Gradient after TIPSS and Late TIPSS Occlusion

    SciTech Connect

    Maedler, U.; Hansmann, J.; Duex, M.; Noeldge, G.; Sauer, P.; Richter, G.M.

    2002-03-15

    TIPSS (transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt) may be indicated to control bleeding from esophageal and gastric varicose veins, to reduce ascites, and to treat patients with Budd-Chiari syndrome and veno-occlusive disease. Numerous measures to improve the safety and methodology of the procedure have helped to increase the technical and clinical success. Follow-up of TIPSS patients has revealed shunt stenosis to occur more often in patients with preserved liver function (Child A, Child B). In addition, the extent of liver cirrhosis is the main factor that determines prognosis in the long term. Little is known about the effects of TIPSS with respect to portosystemic hemodynamics. This report deals with a cirrhotic patient who stopped drinking 7 months prior to admission. He received TIPSS to control ascites and recurrent esophageal bleeding. Two years later remarkable hypertrophy of the left liver lobe and shunt occlusion was observed. The portosystemic pressure gradient dropped from 24 mmHg before TIPSS to 11 mmHg and remained stable after shunt occlusion. The Child's B cirrhosis prior to TIPSS turned into Child's A cirrhosis and remained stable during the follow-up period of 32 months. This indicates that liver function of TIPSS patients may recover due to hypertrophy of the remaining non-cirrhotic liver tissue. In addition the hepatic hemodynamics may return to normal. In conclusion, TIPSS cannot cure cirrhosis but its progress may be halted if the cause can be removed. This may result in a normal portosystemic gradient, leading consequently to shunt occlusion.

  2. Contributions to the application of solitons in optical communication systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mostofi, Amir

    The field of optical soliton communication systems has made remarkable progress in the recent past, and yet it is still growing in many different directions. This thesis is essentially a collection of a variety of numerical investigations that were conducted in an attempt to introduce some new ideas in this area, as well as shed further light on certain already considered issues. The thesis consists of the following general topics: (1)A new multilevel TDM soliton transmission system has been proposed, where each channel transmits its data in the form of picosecond fundamental solitons of a unique amplitude. At the receiver, the pulses are compressed to the subpicosecond level, and separated in the wavelength domain, by taking advantage of the different Raman-induced self-wavelength shifts experienced. Through numerical simulations and noise analyses, the feasibility of the system has been investigated. (2)The use of trains of unequal- amplitude solitons for improving the undoing of soliton interactions in periodically amplified systems using optical phase conjugation has been considered and compared with the case of phase-alternation between neighbouring solitons. (3)It has been found that dispersion-decreasing fibres with the commonly used hyperbolic dispersion profile are not always a good option for near adiabatic, pedestal-free compression of soliton pulses. In fact, they appear to be inferior to some other simple dispersion profiles, such as linear, Gaussian, and exponential, particularly when compression of subpicosecond solitons is involved. (4)The fact that nonlinear couplers with constant core separation cannot be fabricated with very long lengths has been considered to pose a problem for reliable observation of soliton propagation in them. The nonconstancy of the core separation has been modelled in this thesis in terms of random fluctuations in the coupling coefficient, and the effects of these fluctuations on both dynamical switching and static

  3. An experimental investigation of a low Reynolds number turbulent boundary layer subject to an adverse pressure gradient

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watmuff, J. H.

    1990-01-01

    The evolution of a low Re(sub theta) turbulent boundary layer in an adverse pressure gradient (APG) is being studied for comparison with direct numerical simulations by Spalart. A short region of favorable pressure gradient (FPG) is applied first to establish a self preserving layer with Re(sub theta) equals approx. 600, which is a suitable initial condition for simulations. The APG is then applied rapidly such that beta equals approx. 2 at Re(sub theta) equals approx. 1500. The streamwise extent of the measurements exceeds the current capabilities of direct simulation so that the results should also serve as a useful data base for Reynolds averaged boundary layer prediction methods and in the future for direct simulation schemes as computer technology evolves.

  4. Impact of edge current density and pressure gradient on the stability of DIII-D high performance discharges

    SciTech Connect

    Lao, L.L.; Ferron, J.R.; Strait, E.J.

    1997-06-01

    One of the major goals of advanced tokamak research is to develop plasma configurations with good confinement and improved stability at high {beta}. In DIII-D, various high performance configurations with H- and VH-mode edges have been produced. These include discharges with poloidal cross sections in the forms of dee and crecent shapes, single- and double-null divertors, and with various central magnetic shear profiles and current profile peakedness. All these discharges exhibit confinement in the outer plasma region which leads to a large edge pressure gradient and a large edge bootstrap current driven by this steep pressure gradient. These edge conditions often drive an instability near the edge region which can severely degrade the discharge performance. An understanding of this edge instability is essential to sustain an enhance discharge performance.

  5. Discrete cavity solitons.

    PubMed

    Peschel, U; Egorov, O; Lederer, F

    2004-08-15

    We derive evolution equations describing light propagation in an array of coupled-waveguide resonators and predict the existence of discrete cavity solitons. We identify stable, unstable, and oscillating solitons by varying the coupling strength between the anticontinuous and the continuous limit. PMID:15357356

  6. Lossless polariton solitons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Komineas, Stavros; Shipman, Stephen P.; Venakides, Stephanos

    2016-02-01

    Photons and excitons in a semiconductor microcavity interact to form exciton-polariton condensates. These are governed by a nonlinear quantum-mechanical system involving exciton and photon wavefunctions. We calculate all non-traveling harmonic soliton solutions for the one-dimensional lossless system. There are two frequency bands of bright solitons when the inter-exciton interactions produce an attractive nonlinearity and two frequency bands of dark solitons when the nonlinearity is repulsive. In addition, there are two frequency bands for which the exciton wavefunction is discontinuous at its symmetry point, where it undergoes a phase jump of π. A band of continuous dark solitons merges with a band of discontinuous dark solitons, forming a larger band over which the soliton far-field amplitude varies from 0 to ∞; the discontinuity is initiated when the operating frequency exceeds the free exciton frequency. The far fields of the solitons in the lowest and highest frequency bands (one discontinuous and one continuous dark) are linearly unstable, whereas the other four bands have linearly stable far fields, including the merged band of dark solitons.

  7. Semirelativity and Kink Solitons

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nowak, Mariusz Karol

    2014-01-01

    It is hard to observe relativistic effects in everyday life. However, table experiments using a mechanical transmission line for solitons may be an efficient and simple way to show effects such as Lorentz contraction in a classroom. A kink soliton is a deformation of a lattice of several dozen or more pendulums placed on a wire and connected by a…

  8. A wall-layer model for large-eddy simulations of turbulent flows with/out pressure gradient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duprat, C.; Balarac, G.; Métais, O.; Congedo, P. M.; Brugière, O.

    2011-01-01

    In this work, modeling of the near-wall region in turbulent flows is addressed. A new wall-layer model is proposed with the goal to perform high-Reynolds number large-eddy simulations of wall bounded flows in the presence of a streamwise pressure gradient. The model applies both in the viscous sublayer and in the inertial region, without any parameter to switch from one region to the other. An analytical expression for the velocity field as a function of the distance from the wall is derived from the simplified thin-boundary equations and by using a turbulent eddy coefficient with a damping function. This damping function relies on a modified van Driest formula to define the mixing-length taking into account the presence of a streamwise pressure gradient. The model is first validated by a priori comparisons with direct numerical simulation data of various flows with and without streamwise pressure gradient and with eventual flow separation. Large-eddy simulations are then performed using the present wall model as wall boundary condition. A plane channel flow and the flow over a periodic arrangement of hills are successively considered. The present model predictions are compared with those obtained using the wall models previously proposed by Spalding, Trans. ASME, J. Appl. Mech 28, 243 (2008) and Manhart et al., Theor. Comput. Fluid Dyn. 22, 243 (2008). It is shown that the new wall model allows for a good prediction of the mean velocity profile both with and without streamwise pressure gradient. It is shown than, conversely to the previous models, the present model is able to predict flow separation even when a very coarse grid is used.

  9. Pressure Gradient Error of Spectral Element Dynamical Core associated with Topographic Forcing: Comparison with the Spherical Harmonics Dynamical Core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Hyun-Gyu; Cheong, Hyeong-Bin; Jeong, Han-Byeol; Kim, Won-Ho

    2015-04-01

    Response characteristics of the spectral element hydrostatic dynamical core on the cubed sphere to the global topographic forcing are investigated in terms of pressure gradient error, and it is compared with the spherical harmonics hydrostatic dynamical core. The vertical hybrid-pressure coordinate and finite difference method are introduced to both dynamical cores, and explicit and implicit hyper-diffusion schemes are applied to spectral element dynamical core and spherical harmonics dynamical core, respectively. The model atmosphere at initial time is set to the quiescent environment so that the term affecting on the time tendency of the momentum equation at the first time step is the pressure gradient term only which is influenced by the observed surface topography. During 6 days of time integration, the spurious flow is generated due to inaccurate numerical approximations of pressure gradient term for each dynamical core. High zonal wind speed which can be regarded as numerical error is occurred commonly in two dynamical cores around steep topography (e.g., the Tibetan Plateau, the Rocky Mountains, and the Andes Mountains), but the maximum zonal wind speed at day 6 of spectral element dynamical core is 8-9 times larger than that of spherical harmonics dynamical core. The vertically averaged kinetic energy spectrum at day 6 shows very different trend between two dynamical cores. By performing the experiments with the scale-separated topography, it turns out that these kinetic energy spectrum trends are mainly caused by the small-scale topography. A simple change of pressure gradient term into log-pressure form is found to significantly reduce numerical error (up to 63% of maximum wind speed in case of spectral element dynamical core) and noise-like small-scale phenomena.

  10. Solitons in optomechanical arrays.

    PubMed

    Gan, Jing-Hui; Xiong, Hao; Si, Liu-Gang; Lü, Xin-You; Wu, Ying

    2016-06-15

    We show that optical solitons can be obtained with a one-dimensional optomechanical array that consists of a chain of periodically spaced identical optomechanical systems. Unlike conventional optical solitons, which originate from nonlinear polarization, the optical soliton here stems from a new mechanism, namely, phonon-photon interaction. Under proper conditions, the phonon-photon induced nonlinearity that refers to the optomechanical nonlinearity will exactly compensate the dispersion caused by photon hopping of adjacent optomechanical systems. Moreover, the solitons are capable of exhibiting very low group velocity, depending on the photon hopping rate, which may lead to many important applications, including all-optical switches and on-chip optical architecture. This work may extend the range of optomechanics and nonlinear optics and provide a new field to study soliton theory and develop corresponding applications. PMID:27304261

  11. Multicolor cavity soliton.

    PubMed

    Luo, Rui; Liang, Hanxiao; Lin, Qiang

    2016-07-25

    We show a new class of complex solitary wave that exists in a nonlinear optical cavity with appropriate dispersion characteristics. The cavity soliton consists of multiple soliton-like spectro-temporal components that exhibit distinctive colors but coincide in time and share a common phase, formed together via strong inter-soliton four-wave mixing and Cherenkov radiation. The multicolor cavity soliton shows intriguing spectral locking characteristics and remarkable capability of spectrum management to tailor soliton frequencies, which would be very useful for versatile generation and manipulation of multi-octave spanning phase-locked Kerr frequency combs, with great potential for applications in frequency metrology, optical frequency synthesis, and spectroscopy. PMID:27464131

  12. Computational evaluation of intraventricular pressure gradients based on a fluid-structure approach.

    PubMed

    Redaelli, A; Montevecchi, F M

    1996-11-01

    The dynamics of intraventricular blood flow, i.e. its rapid evolution, implies the rise of intraventricular pressure gradients (IPGs) characteristic of the inertia-driven events as experimentally observed by Pasipoularides (1987, 1990) and by Falsetti et al. (1986). The IPG time course is determined by the wall contraction which, in turn, depends on the load applied, namely the intraventricular pressure which is the sum of the aortic pressure (i.e., the systemic net response) and the IPG. Hence the IPGs account, at least in part, for the wall movement. These considerations suggest the necessity of a comprehensive analysis of the ventricular mechanics involving both ventricular wall mechanics and intraventricular fluid dynamics as each domain determines the boundary conditions of the other. This paper presents a computational approach to ventricular ejection mechanics based on a fluid-structure interaction calculation for the evaluation of the IPG time course. An axisymmetric model of the left ventricle is utilized. The intraventricular fluid is assumed to be Newtonian. The ventricle wall is thin and is composed of two sets of counter-rotating fibres which behave according to the modified version of Wong's sarcomere model proposed by Montevecchi and Pietrabissa and Pietrabissa et al. (1987, 1991). The full Navier-Stokes equations describing the fluid domain are solved using Galerkin's weighted residual approach in conjunction with finite element approximation (FIDAP). The wall displacement is solved using the multiplane quasi-Newton method proposed by Buzzi Ferraris and Tronconi (1985). The interaction procedure is performed by means of an external macro which compares the flow fields and the wall displacement and appropriately modifies the boundary conditions to reach the simultaneous and congruous convergence of the two problems. The results refer to a simulation of the ventricular ejection with a heart rate of 72 bpm. In this phase the ventricle ejects 61 cm3

  13. Preventing Damaging Pressure Gradients at the Walls of an Inflatable Space System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scialdone, John J.

    2000-01-01

    An inflatable structural system to deploy a space system such as a solar shield, an antenna or another similar instrument, requires a stiffening element after it is extended by the inflated gas pressure. The stiffening element has to be packaged in a folded configuration before the deployment. It must be relatively small, lightweight, non-damaging to the inflated system, and be able to become stiff in a short time. One stiffening method is to use a flexible material inserted in the deployable system, which, upon a temperature curing, can become stiff and is capable to support the entire structure. There are two conditions during the space operations when the inflated volume could be damaged: during the transonic region of the launch phase and when the curing of the rigidizing element occurs. In both cases, an excess of pressure within the volume containing the rigid element could burst the walls of the low-pressure gas inflated portion of the system. This paper investigates those two conditions and indicates the vents, which will prevent those damaging overpressures. Vent openings at the non-inflated volumes have been calculated for the conditions existing during the launch. Those vents allow the initially folded volume to exhaust the trapped atmospheric gas at approximately the same rate as the ambient pressure drops. That will prevent pressure gradients across the container walls which otherwise could be as high as 14.7 psi. The other condition occurring during the curing of the stiffening element has been investigated. This has required the testing of the element to obtain the gas generation during the curing and the transformation from a pliable material to a rigid one. The tested material is a composite graphite/epoxy weave. The outgassing of the uncured sample at 121C was carried with the Cahn Microbalance and with other outgassing facilities including the micro-CVCM ASTM E-595 facility. The tests provided the mass of gas evolved during the test. That data

  14. Preventing Damaging Pressure Gradients at the Walls of an Inflatable Space System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scialdone, John J.; Powers, Edward I. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    An inflatable structural system to deploy a space system such as a solar shield, an antenna or another similar instrument requires a stiffening element after it is extended by the inflated gas pressure. The stiffening element has to be packaged in folded configuration before the deployment. It must be relatively small, lightweight, non-damaging to the inflated system and be able to become stiff in a short time. One stiffening method is to use a flexible material inserted in the deployable system, which, upon a temperature curing, can become stiff and is capable of supporting the entire structure. There are two conditions during the space operations when the inflated volume could be damaged: during the transonic region of the launch phase and when the curing of the rigidizing element occurs. In both cases, an excess of pressure within the volume containing the rigid element could burst the walls of the low-pressure gas inflated portion of the system. This paper investigates those two conditions and indicates the vents, which will prevent those damaging overpressures. Vent openings at the non-inflated volumes have been calculated for the conditions existing during the launch. Those vents allow the initially folded volume to exhaust the trapped atmospheric gas at approximately the same rate as the ambient pressure drops. That will prevent pressure gradients across the container walls which otherwise could be as high as 14.7 psi. The other condition occurring during the curing of the stiffening element has been investigated. This has required the testing of the element to obtain the gas generation during the curing and the transformation from a pliable material to a rigid on The tested material is a composite graphite/epoxy weave. The outgassing of the uncured sample at 121 deg Celcius was carried with the Cahn Microbalance and with other outgassing facilities including the micro-CVCM ASTM E-595 facility. The test provided the mass of gas evolved during the test. That

  15. Ion-acoustic dressed solitons in a dusty plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Tiwari, R.S.; Mishra, M.K.

    2006-06-15

    Using the reductive perturbation method, equations for ion-acoustic waves governing the evolution of first- and second-order potentials in a dusty plasma including the dynamics of charged dust grains have been derived. The renormalization procedure of Kodama and Taniuti is used to obtain a steady state nonsecular solution of these equations. The variation of velocity and width of the Korteweg-de Vries (KdV) as well as dressed solitons with amplitude have been studied for different concentrations and charge multiplicity of dust grains. The higher-order perturbation corrections to the KdV soliton description significantly affect the characteristics of the solitons in dusty plasma. It is found that in the presence of positively charged dust grains the system supports only compressive solitons. However, the plasma with negatively charged dust grains can support compressive solitons only up to a certain concentration of dust. Above this critical concentration of negative charge, the dusty plasma can support rarefactive solitons. An expression for the critical concentration of negatively charged dust in terms of charge and mass ratio of dust grains with plasma ions is also derived.

  16. Ion-acoustic Gardner Solitons in electron-positron-ion plasma with two-electron temperature distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rehman, Momin A.; Mishra, M. K.

    2016-01-01

    The ion-acoustic solitons in collisionless plasma consisting of warm adiabatic ions, isothermal positrons, and two temperature distribution of electrons have been studied. Using reductive perturbation method, Korteweg-de Vries (K-dV), the modified K-dV (m-KdV), and Gardner equations are derived for the system. The soliton solution of the Gardner equation is discussed in detail. It is found that for a given set of parameter values, there exists a critical value of β=Tc/Th, (ratio of cold to hot electron temperature) below which only rarefactive KdV solitons exist and above it compressive KdV solitons exist. At the critical value of β, both compressive and rarefactive m-KdV solitons co-exist. We have also investigated the soliton in the parametric regime where the KdV equation is not valid to study soliton solution. In this region, it is found that below the critical concentration the system supports rarefactive Gardner solitons and above it compressive Gardner solitons are found. The effects of temperature ratio of two-electron species, cold electron concentration, positron concentration on the characteristics of solitons are also discussed.

  17. Bipolar solitons of the focusing nonlinear Schrödinger equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zhongxuan; Feng, Qi; Lin, Chengyou; Chen, Zhaoyang; Ding, Yingchun

    2016-11-01

    The focusing nonlinear Schrödinger equation (NLSE) is a universal model for studying solitary waves propagation in nonlinear media. The NLSE is especially important in understanding how solitons on a condensate background (SCB) appear from a small perturbation through modulation instability. We study theoretically the one- and two-soliton solutions of the NLSE in presence of a condensate by using the dressing method. It is found that a class of bipolar elliptically polarized solitons with the choice of specific parameters in the one- and two-soliton solutions. Collisions among these solitons are studied by qualitative analysis and graphical illustration. We also generalize the concept of the quasi-Akhmediev breather to the bipolar solitons and show how it can be used for wave profile compression down to the extremely short duration. Our results extend previous studies in this area of the SCB and play an important role in the theory of freak wave.

  18. Akhmediev breathers, Kuznetsov-Ma solitons and rogue waves in a dispersion varying optical fiber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Wen-Rong; Tian, Bo; Sun, Ya; Chai, Jun; Jiang, Yan

    2016-03-01

    Dispersion varying fibres have applications in optical pulse compression techniques. We investigate Akhmediev breathers, Kuznetsov-Ma (KM) solitons and optical rogue waves in a dispersion varying optical fibre based on a variable-coefficient nonlinear Schrödinger equation. Analytical solutions in the forms of Akhmediev breathers, KM solitons and rogue waves up to the second order of that equation are obtained via the generalised Darboux transformation and integrable constraint. The properties of Akhmediev breathers, KM solitons and rogue waves in a dispersion varying optical fibre, e.g. dispersion decreasing fibre (DDF) or a periodically distributed system (PDS), are discussed: in a DDF we observe the compression behaviours of KM solitons and rogue waves on a monotonically increasing background. The amplitude of each peak of the KM soliton increases, while the width of each peak of the KM soliton gradually decreases along the propagation distance; in a PDS, the amplitude of each peak of the KM soliton varies periodically along the propagation distance on a periodic background. Different from the KM soliton, the Akhmediev breather and rogue waves repeat their behaviours along the propagation distance without the compression.

  19. A skin friction law for compressible turbulent flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barnwell, Richard W.; Wahls, Richard A.

    1989-01-01

    An algebraic skin friction law is derived for adiabatic, compressible, equilibrium, turbulent boundary layer flow. An outer solution in terms of the Clauser defect stream function is matched to an inner empirical expression composed of compressible laws of the wall and wake. The modified Crocco temperature-velocity relationship and the Clauser eddy viscousity model are used in the outer solution. The skin friction law pertains for all pressure gradients in the incompressible through supersonic range and for small pressure gradients in the hypersonic range. Excellent comparisons with experiment are obtained in the appropriate parameter ranges. The application to numerical computation is discussed.

  20. Coherent soliton communication lines

    SciTech Connect

    Yushko, O. V. Redyuk, A. A.; Fedoruk, M. P.; Turitsyn, S. K.

    2014-11-15

    The data transmission in coherent fiber-optical communication lines using solitons with a variable phase is studied. It is shown that nonlinear coherent structures (solitons) can be applied for effective signal transmission over a long distance using amplitude and optical-phase keying of information. The optimum ratio of the pulse width to the bit slot at which the spectral efficiency (transmitted bits per second and hertz) is maximal is determined. It is shown that soliton fiber-optical communication lines can ensure data transmission at a higher spectral efficiency as compared to traditional communication lines and at a high signal-to-noise ratio.

  1. Temporal dark polariton solitons.

    PubMed

    Kartashov, Yaroslav V; Skryabin, Dmitry V

    2016-04-15

    We predict that strong coupling between waveguide photons and excitons of quantum well embedded into waveguide results in the formation of hybrid-dark and antidark light-matter solitons. Such temporal solitons exist due to interplay between repulsive excitonic nonlinearity and giant group-velocity dispersion arising in the vicinity of excitonic resonance. Such fully conservative states do not require external pumping to counteract losses and form continuous families parameterized by the power-dependent phase shift and velocity of their motion. Dark solitons are stable in the considerable part of their existence domain, while antidark solitons are always unstable. Both families exist outside the forbidden frequency gap of the linear system. PMID:27082338

  2. The diastolic flow velocity-pressure gradient relation and dpv50 to assess the hemodynamic significance of coronary stenoses.

    PubMed

    Marques, Koen M J; van Eenige, Machiel J; Spruijt, Hugo J; Westerhof, Nico; Twisk, Jos; Visser, Cees A; Visser, Frans C

    2006-12-01

    To evaluate the hemodynamic impact of coronary stenoses, the fractional (FFR) or coronary flow velocity reserve (CFVR) usually is measured. The combined measurement of instantaneous flow velocity and pressure gradient (v-dp relation) is rarely used in humans. We derived from the v-dp relation a new index, dp(v50) (pressure gradient at flow velocity of 50 cm/s), and compared the diagnostic performance of dp(v50), CFVR, and FFR. Before coronary angiography was performed, patients underwent noninvasive stress testing. In all coronary vessels with an intermediate or severe stenosis, the flow velocity, aortic, and distal coronary pressure were measured simultaneously with a Doppler and pressure guidewire after induction of hyperemia. After regression analysis of all middiastolic flow velocity and pressure gradient data, the dp(v50) was calculated. With the use of the results of noninvasive stress testing, the dp(v50) cutoff value was established at 22.4 mmHg. In 77 patients, 124 coronary vessels with a mean 39% (SD 19) diameter stenosis were analyzed. In 43 stenoses, ischemia was detected. We found a sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of 56%, 86%, and 76% for CFVR; 77%, 99%, and 91% for FFR; and 95%, 95%, and 95% for dp(v50). To establish that dp(v50) is not dependent on maximal hyperemia, dp(v50) was recalculated after omission of the highest quartile of flow velocity data, showing a difference of 3%. We found that dp(v50) provided the highest sensitivity and accuracy compared with FFR and CFVR in the assessment of coronary stenoses. In contrast to CFVR and FFR, assessment of dp(v50) is not dependent on maximal hyperemia.

  3. A Study of the Development of Steady and Periodic Unsteady Turbulent Wakes Through Curved Channels at Positive, Zero, and Negative Streamwise Pressure Gradients, Part 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schobeiri, M. T.; John, J.

    1996-01-01

    The turbomachinery wake flow development is largely influenced by streamline curvature and streamwise pressure gradient. The objective of this investigation is to study the development of the wake under the influence of streamline curvature and streamwise pressure gradient. The experimental investigation is carried out in two phases. The first phase involves the study of the wake behind a stationary circular cylinder (steady wake) in curved channels at positive, zero, and negative streamwise pressure gradients. The mean velocity and Reynolds stress components are measured using a X-hot-film probe. The measured quantities obtained in probe coordinates are transformed to a curvilinear coordinate system along the wake centerline and are presented in similarity coordinates. The results of the steady wakes suggest strong asymmetry in velocity and Reynolds stress components. However, the velocity defect profiles in similarity coordinates are almost symmetrical and follow the same distribution as the zero pressure gradient straight wake. The results of Reynolds stress distributions show higher values on the inner side of the wake than the outer side. Other quantities, including the decay of maximum velocity defect, growth of wake width, and wake integral parameters, are also presented for the three different pressure gradient cases of steady wake. The decay rate of velocity defect is fastest for the negative streamwise pressure gradient case and slowest for the positive pressure gradient case. Conversely, the growth of the wake width is fastest for the positive streamwise pressure gradient case and slowest for the negative streamwise pressure gradient. The second phase studies the development of periodic unsteady wakes generated by the circular cylinders of the rotating wake generator in a curved channel at zero streamwise pressure gradient. Instantaneous velocity components of the periodic unsteady wakes, measured with a stationary X-hot-film probe, are analyzed by the

  4. A Modified Mixing Length Turbulence Model for Zero and Adverse Pressure Gradients. M.S. Thesis - Akron Univ., 1993

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Conley, Julianne M.; Leonard, B. P.

    1994-01-01

    The modified mixing length (MML) turbulence model was installed in the Proteus Navier-Stokes code, then modified to make it applicable to a wider range of flows typical of aerospace propulsion applications. The modifications are based on experimental data for three flat-plate flows having zero, mild adverse, and strong adverse pressure gradients. Three transonic diffuser test cases were run with the new version of the model in order to evaluate its performance. All results are compared with experimental data and show improvements over calculations made using the Baldwin-Lomax turbulence model, the standard algebraic model in Proteus.

  5. The influence of a high pressure gradient on unsteady velocity perturbations in the case of a turbulent supersonic flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dussauge, J. P.; Debieve, J. F.

    1980-01-01

    The amplification or reduction of unsteady velocity perturbations under the influence of strong flow acceleration or deceleration was studied. Supersonic flows with large velocity, pressure gradients, and the conditions in which the velocity fluctuations depend on the action of the average gradients of pressure and velocity rather than turbulence, are described. Results are analyzed statistically and interpreted as a return to laminar process. It is shown that this return to laminar implies negative values in the turbulence production terms for kinetic energy. A simple geometrical representation of the Reynolds stress production is given.

  6. Pressure-gradient-driven nearshore circulation on a beach influenced by a large inlet-tidal shoal system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, F.; Hanes, D. M.; Kirby, J. T.; Erikson, L.; Barnard, P.; Eshleman, J.

    2011-04-01

    The nearshore circulation induced by a focused pattern of surface gravity waves is studied at a beach adjacent to a major inlet with a large ebb tidal shoal. Using a coupled wave and wave-averaged nearshore circulation model, it is found that the nearshore circulation is significantly affected by the heterogeneous wave patterns caused by wave refraction over the ebb tidal shoal. The model is used to predict waves and currents during field experiments conducted near the mouth of San Francisco Bay and nearby Ocean Beach. The field measurements indicate strong spatial variations in current magnitude and direction and in wave height and direction along Ocean Beach and across the ebb tidal shoal. Numerical simulations suggest that wave refraction over the ebb tidal shoal causes wave focusing toward a narrow region at Ocean Beach. Due to the resulting spatial variation in nearshore wave height, wave-induced setup exhibits a strong alongshore nonuniformity, resulting in a dramatic change in the pressure field compared to a simulation with only tidal forcing. The analysis of momentum balances inside the surf zone shows that, under wave conditions with intensive wave focusing, the alongshore pressure gradient associated with alongshore nonuniform wave setup can be a dominant force driving circulation, inducing heterogeneous alongshore currents. Pressure-gradient-forced alongshore currents can exhibit flow reversals and flow convergence or divergence, in contrast to the uniform alongshore currents typically caused by tides or homogeneous waves.

  7. Pressure-gradient-driven nearshore circulation on a beach influenced by a large inlet-tidal shoal system

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Shi, F.; Hanes, D.M.; Kirby, J.T.; Erikson, L.; Barnard, P.; Eshleman, J.

    2011-01-01

    The nearshore circulation induced by a focused pattern of surface gravity waves is studied at a beach adjacent to a major inlet with a large ebb tidal shoal. Using a coupled wave and wave-averaged nearshore circulation model, it is found that the nearshore circulation is significantly affected by the heterogeneous wave patterns caused by wave refraction over the ebb tidal shoal. The model is used to predict waves and currents during field experiments conducted near the mouth of San Francisco Bay and nearby Ocean Beach. The field measurements indicate strong spatial variations in current magnitude and direction and in wave height and direction along Ocean Beach and across the ebb tidal shoal. Numerical simulations suggest that wave refraction over the ebb tidal shoal causes wave focusing toward a narrow region at Ocean Beach. Due to the resulting spatial variation in nearshore wave height, wave-induced setup exhibits a strong alongshore nonuniformity, resulting in a dramatic change in the pressure field compared to a simulation with only tidal forcing. The analysis of momentum balances inside the surf zone shows that, under wave conditions with intensive wave focusing, the alongshore pressure gradient associated with alongshore nonuniform wave setup can be a dominant force driving circulation, inducing heterogeneous alongshore currents. Pressure-gradient- forced alongshore currents can exhibit flow reversals and flow convergence or divergence, in contrast to the uniform alongshore currents typically caused by tides or homogeneous waves.

  8. Mathematical frontiers in optical solitons

    PubMed Central

    Bronski, Jared C.; Segev, Mordechai; Weinstein, Michael I.

    2001-01-01

    Solitons are localized concentrations of field energy, resulting from a balance of dispersive and nonlinear effects. They are ubiquitous in the natural sciences. In recent years optical solitons have arisen in new and exciting contexts that differ in many ways from the original context of coherent propagation in a uniform medium. We review recent developments in incoherent spatial solitons and in gap solitons in periodic structures. PMID:11687646

  9. Ion-acoustic solitons in negative ion plasma with two-electron temperature distributions

    SciTech Connect

    Mishra, M. K.; Tiwari, R. S.; Chawla, J. K.

    2012-06-15

    Ion-acoustic solitons in a warm positive and negative ion species with different masses, concentrations, and charge states with two electron temperature distributions are studied. Using reductive perturbation method, Korteweg de-Vries (KdV) and modified-KdV (m-KdV) equations are derived for the system. The soliton solution of the KdV and m-KdV equations is discussed in detail. It is found that if the ions have finite temperatures, then there exist two types of modes, namely slow and fast ion-acoustic modes. It is also investigated that the parameter determining the nature of soliton (i.e., whether the system will support compressive or rarefactive solitons) is different for slow and fast modes. For the slow mode, the parameter is the relative temperature of the two ion species; whereas for the fast mode, it is the relative concentration of the two ion species. At a critical concentration of negative ions, both compressive and rarefactive solitons coexist. The amplitude and width of the solitons are discussed in detail at critical concentration for m-KdV solitons. The effect of the relative temperature of the two-electron and cold-electron concentration on the characteristics of the solitons are also discussed.

  10. Noncommuting Momenta of Topological Solitons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, Haruki; Murayama, Hitoshi

    2014-05-01

    We show that momentum operators of a topological soliton may not commute among themselves when the soliton is associated with the second cohomology H2 of the target space. The commutation relation is proportional to the winding number, taking a constant value within each topological sector. The noncommutativity makes it impossible to specify the momentum of a topological soliton, and induces a Magnus force.

  11. Semirelativity and kink solitons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karol Nowak, Mariusz

    2014-05-01

    It is hard to observe relativistic effects in everyday life. However, table experiments using a mechanical transmission line for solitons may be an efficient and simple way to show effects such as Lorentz contraction in a classroom. A kink soliton is a deformation of a lattice of several dozen or more pendulums placed on a wire and connected by a spring, or, exactly, a group of pendulums having angles of rotation from 0 to 2π. Kink solitons are localized waves that propagate along one space direction with undeformed shape and some particle-like properties. In this paper I will focus on the semirelativistic properties of mechanical kink solitons. The critical velocity of these solitons is not the speed of light, but the speed of linear waves in that certain transmission line. This feature enables everybody to observe phenomena such as length contraction or the relativistic mass-energy relation in a table experiment. Simultaneously, phenomena such as particle-antiparticle interaction can be studied experimentally.

  12. Dissipative soliton in actively mode-locked fiber laser.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ruixin; Dai, Yitang; Yan, Li; Wu, Jian; Xu, Kun; Li, Yan; Lin, Jintong

    2012-03-12

    A dissipative soliton in an all-normal-dispersion actively mode-locked ytterbium-doped fiber laser is reported for the first time. Pulses with 10-ps duration and edge-to-edge bandwidth of 9 nm are generated, and then extra-cavity compressed down to 560 fs due to the large chirp. Widely wavelength tuning between 1031 and 1080 nm is achieved by adjusting the driving frequency only. Our simulation shows that the proposed laser operates in the dissipative soliton shaping regime.

  13. Soliton driven angiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Bonilla, L. L.; Carretero, M.; Terragni, F.; Birnir, B.

    2016-01-01

    Angiogenesis is a multiscale process by which blood vessels grow from existing ones and carry oxygen to distant organs. Angiogenesis is essential for normal organ growth and wounded tissue repair but it may also be induced by tumours to amplify their own growth. Mathematical and computational models contribute to understanding angiogenesis and developing anti-angiogenic drugs, but most work only involves numerical simulations and analysis has lagged. A recent stochastic model of tumour-induced angiogenesis including blood vessel branching, elongation, and anastomosis captures some of its intrinsic multiscale structures, yet allows one to extract a deterministic integropartial differential description of the vessel tip density. Here we find that the latter advances chemotactically towards the tumour driven by a soliton (similar to the famous Korteweg-de Vries soliton) whose shape and velocity change slowly. Analysing these collective coordinates paves the way for controlling angiogenesis through the soliton, the engine that drives this process. PMID:27503562

  14. Soliton driven angiogenesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonilla, L. L.; Carretero, M.; Terragni, F.; Birnir, B.

    2016-08-01

    Angiogenesis is a multiscale process by which blood vessels grow from existing ones and carry oxygen to distant organs. Angiogenesis is essential for normal organ growth and wounded tissue repair but it may also be induced by tumours to amplify their own growth. Mathematical and computational models contribute to understanding angiogenesis and developing anti-angiogenic drugs, but most work only involves numerical simulations and analysis has lagged. A recent stochastic model of tumour-induced angiogenesis including blood vessel branching, elongation, and anastomosis captures some of its intrinsic multiscale structures, yet allows one to extract a deterministic integropartial differential description of the vessel tip density. Here we find that the latter advances chemotactically towards the tumour driven by a soliton (similar to the famous Korteweg-de Vries soliton) whose shape and velocity change slowly. Analysing these collective coordinates paves the way for controlling angiogenesis through the soliton, the engine that drives this process.

  15. Spinning superconducting electrovacuum soliton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dymnikova, Irina

    2006-08-01

    In nonlinear electrodynamics coupled to general relativity and satisfying the weak energy condition, a spherically symmetric electrically charged electrovacuum soliton has obligatory de Sitter center in which the electric field vanishes while the energy density of electromagnetic vacuum achieves its maximal value. De Sitter vacuum supplies a particle with the finite positive electromagnetic mass related to breaking of space-time symmetry from the de Sitter group in the origin. By the Gürses-Gürsey algorithm based on the Newman-Trautman technique it is transformed into a spinning electrovacuum soliton asymptotically Kerr-Newman for a distant observer. De Sitter center becomes de Sitter equatorial disk which has both perfect conductor and ideal diamagnetic properties. The interior de Sitter vacuum disk displays superconducting behavior within a single spinning soliton. All this concerns both black hole and particle-like structures.

  16. Soliton driven angiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Bonilla, L L; Carretero, M; Terragni, F; Birnir, B

    2016-01-01

    Angiogenesis is a multiscale process by which blood vessels grow from existing ones and carry oxygen to distant organs. Angiogenesis is essential for normal organ growth and wounded tissue repair but it may also be induced by tumours to amplify their own growth. Mathematical and computational models contribute to understanding angiogenesis and developing anti-angiogenic drugs, but most work only involves numerical simulations and analysis has lagged. A recent stochastic model of tumour-induced angiogenesis including blood vessel branching, elongation, and anastomosis captures some of its intrinsic multiscale structures, yet allows one to extract a deterministic integropartial differential description of the vessel tip density. Here we find that the latter advances chemotactically towards the tumour driven by a soliton (similar to the famous Korteweg-de Vries soliton) whose shape and velocity change slowly. Analysing these collective coordinates paves the way for controlling angiogenesis through the soliton, the engine that drives this process. PMID:27503562

  17. Baryons as Solitons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajeev, Sarada Gangadharan

    In this dissertation we study the soliton models of baryons originally proposed by Skyrme. Baryons are interpreted in the naive quark model as bound states of three quarks. Here, we interpret them as solitonic bound states of mesons. This is natural in Quantum Chromodynamics, the theory of strong interactions. The low energy properties of chromodynamics are well accounted for by the chiral model. The Wess-Zumino anomaly plays a crucial role in this model. A derivation within the canonical formulation of the Wess-Zumino is given. It is shown that the anomaly leads to a modification of the current algebra. An operator that creates solitonic states out of the vacuum is constructed. It is shown that this operator is fermionic if the number of colors is odd. The Wess -Zumino anomaly is shown to be responsible for this fact. The anomaly is studied in detail in the simpler context of a two dimensional theory. The operator creating solitons is constructed and its equations of motion are found. This model has an infinite number of conserved charges satisfying a Kac-Moody algebra. A derivation of the Wess-Zumino anomaly starting from Quantum Chromodynamics is given. Further the Skyrme constant is calculated, within certain approximations. This enables us to calculate the mass of the soliton and it agrees with the baryon mass to 20%. The constants D and F that couple the baryons to mesons are also computed. They also agree to about 20%. Thus the identification of baryons as solitons of the chiral model is established.

  18. Defect solitons in photonic lattices.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jianke; Chen, Zhigang

    2006-02-01

    Nonlinear defect modes (defect solitons) and their stability in one-dimensional photonic lattices with focusing saturable nonlinearity are investigated. It is shown that defect solitons bifurcate out from every infinitesimal linear defect mode. Low-power defect solitons are linearly stable in lower bandgaps but unstable in higher bandgaps. At higher powers, defect solitons become unstable in attractive defects, but can remain stable in repulsive defects. Furthermore, for high-power solitons in attractive defects, we found a type of Vakhitov-Kolokolov (VK) instability which is different from the usual VK instability based on the sign of the slope in the power curve. Lastly, we demonstrate that in each bandgap, in addition to defect solitons which bifurcate from linear defect modes, there is also an infinite family of other defect solitons which can be stable in certain parameter regimes. PMID:16605473

  19. First results of a study on turbulent boundary layers in oscillating flow with a mean adverse pressure gradient

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Houdeville, R.; Cousteix, J.

    1979-01-01

    The development of a turbulent unsteady boundary layer with a mean pressure gradient strong enough to induce separation, in order to complete the extend results obtained for the flat plate configuration is presented. The longitudinal component of the velocity is measured using constant temperature hot wire anemometer. The region where negative velocities exist is investigated with a laser Doppler velocimeter system with BRAGG cells. The boundary layer responds by forced pulsation to the perturbation of potential flow. The unsteady effects observed are very important. The average location of the zero skin friction point moves periodically at the perturbation frequency. Average velocity profiles from different instants in the cycle are compared. The existence of a logarithmic region enables a simple calculation of the maximum phase shift of the velocity in the boundary layer. An attempt of calculation by an integral method of boundary layer development is presented, up to the point where reverse flow starts appearing.

  20. Observation of a critical pressure gradient for the stabilization of interchange modes in simple magnetized toroidal plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Federspiel, L.; Labit, B.; Ricci, P.; Fasoli, A.; Furno, I.; Theiler, C.

    2009-09-15

    The existence of a critical pressure gradient needed to drive the interchange instability is experimentally demonstrated in the simple magnetized torus TORoidal Plasma EXperiment [A. Fasoli et al., Phys. Plasmas 13, 055902 (2006)]. This gradient is reached during a scan in the neutral gas pressure p{sub n}. Around a critical value for p{sub n}, depending on the magnetic configuration and on the injected rf power, a small increase in the neutral gas pressure triggers a transition in the plasma behavior. The pressure profile is locally flattened, stabilizing the interchange mode observed at lower neutral gas densities. The measured value for the critical gradient is close to the linear theory estimate.

  1. An experimental study of the properties of surface pressure fluctuations in strong adverse pressure gradient turbulent boundary layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simpson, R. L.

    1984-01-01

    Experimental data were obtained on blade self-noise generation by strong adverse-pressure-gradient attached boundary layers and by separated turbulent boundary layers that accompany stall. Two microphones were calibrated, placed in plastic housing, and installed in a wind tunnel where observations of acoustic and turbulent signals permitted decomposition of the surface pressure fluctuation signals into the propagated acoustic part and the turbulent-flow generated portion. To determine the convective wave speed of the turbulent contributions, the microphones were spaced a small distance apart in the streamwise direction and correlations were obtained. The turbulent surface pressure spectra upstream of detachment and downstream of the beginning of separation are discussed as well as measurements of turbulent velocity spectra and wavespeeds.

  2. A Computational Study on the Effects of Dynamic Roughness Application to Separated Transitional Flows Affected by Adverse Pressure Gradient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campitelli, Gennaro

    The study of transitional flows is considered crucial for many practical engineering applications. In fact, a comprehensive understanding of the laminar-turbulent transition phenomenon often helps to improve the overall performance of apparatuses such as airfoils, wind turbines, hulls and turbomachinery blades. In addition to understanding and prediction of transitional flows, active research continues in the area of boundary layer control, which includes control of phenomena such as flow separation and transition. For instance, optimum geometrical shaping may be followed by the adoption on the wall-surface of riblets to adjust pressure gradient and reduce drag. Further "flow control" may also be acquired by introducing active devices able to modify the flow field in order to accomplish a desired aerodynamic task. Such flow manipulation is often achieved by using time-dependent forcing mechanisms which promote natural instabilities amplifying the control effectiveness. Localized energy inputs such as Lorentz-force actuator, piezoelectric flaps and synthetic jets all produce a consistent boundary layer mixing enhancement with lift increase and drag abatement. The current numerical study attempts to demonstrate the efficacy of dynamic roughness (DR) on altering separated-reattached transitional flows under adverse pressure gradient. It has already been proven how DR, acting on the boundary sublayer perturbation, is able to suppress (partially or completely) the typical leading edge separation for an airfoil at different angles of attack. This makes DR particularly suitable for separated flow control applications where the shear layer reattaches presenting the characteristic laminar separation bubble. A numerical sensitivity study has been conducted with an efficient orthogonal design taking into account four different control parameters on three levels (actuation frequency, humps height, rows displacement, synchronization) to provide an optimum DR setup which limits

  3. Calculation methods for compressible turbulent boundary layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bushnell, D. M.; Cary, A. M., Jr.; Harris, J. E.

    1976-01-01

    Calculation procedures for non-reacting compressible two- and three-dimensional turbulent boundary layers were reviewed. Integral, transformation and correlation methods, as well as finite difference solutions of the complete boundary layer equations summarized. Alternative numerical solution procedures were examined, and both mean field and mean turbulence field closure models were considered. Physics and related calculation problems peculiar to compressible turbulent boundary layers are described. A catalog of available solution procedures of the finite difference, finite element, and method of weighted residuals genre is included. Influence of compressibility, low Reynolds number, wall blowing, and pressure gradient upon mean field closure constants are reported.

  4. All-fiber nonlinearity- and dispersion-managed dissipative soliton nanotube mode-locked laser

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Z.; Popa, D. Wittwer, V. J.; Milana, S.; Hasan, T.; Jiang, Z.; Ferrari, A. C.; Ilday, F. Ö.

    2015-12-14

    We report dissipative soliton generation from an Yb-doped all-fiber nonlinearity- and dispersion-managed nanotube mode-locked laser. A simple all-fiber ring cavity exploits a photonic crystal fiber for both nonlinearity enhancement and dispersion compensation. The laser generates stable dissipative solitons with large linear chirp in the net normal dispersion regime. Pulses that are 8.7 ps long are externally compressed to 118 fs, outperforming current nanotube-based Yb-doped fiber laser designs.

  5. Formation of quasiparallel Alfven solitons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamilton, R. L.; Kennel, C. F.; Mjolhus, E.

    1992-01-01

    The formation of quasi-parallel Alfven solitons is investigated through the inverse scattering transformation (IST) for the derivative nonlinear Schroedinger (DNLS) equation. The DNLS has a rich complement of soliton solutions consisting of a two-parameter soliton family and a one-parameter bright/dark soliton family. In this paper, the physical roles and origins of these soliton families are inferred through an analytic study of the scattering data generated by the IST for a set of initial profiles. The DNLS equation has as limiting forms the nonlinear Schroedinger (NLS), Korteweg-de-Vries (KdV) and modified Korteweg-de-Vries (MKdV) equations. Each of these limits is briefly reviewed in the physical context of quasi-parallel Alfven waves. The existence of these limiting forms serves as a natural framework for discussing the formation of Alfven solitons.

  6. Multiphase Transport in Porous Media: Gas-Liquid Separation Using Capillary Pressure Gradients International Space Station (ISS) Flight Experiment Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wheeler, Richard R., Jr.; Holtsnider, John T.; Dahl, Roger W.; Deeks, Dalton; Javanovic, Goran N.; Parker, James M.; Ehlert, Jim

    2013-01-01

    Advances in the understanding of multiphase flow characteristics under variable gravity conditions will ultimately lead to improved and as of yet unknown process designs for advanced space missions. Such novel processes will be of paramount importance to the success of future manned space exploration as we venture into our solar system and beyond. In addition, because of the ubiquitous nature and vital importance of biological and environmental processes involving airwater mixtures, knowledge gained about fundamental interactions and the governing properties of these mixtures will clearly benefit the quality of life here on our home planet. The techniques addressed in the current research involving multiphase transport in porous media and gas-liquid phase separation using capillary pressure gradients are also a logical candidate for a future International Space Station (ISS) flight experiment. Importantly, the novel and potentially very accurate Lattice-Boltzmann (LB) modeling of multiphase transport in porous media developed in this work offers significantly improved predictions of real world fluid physics phenomena, thereby promoting advanced process designs for both space and terrestrial applications.This 3-year research effort has culminated in the design and testing of a zero-g demonstration prototype. Both the hydrophilic (glass) and hydrophobic (Teflon) media Capillary Pressure Gradient (CPG) cartridges prepared during the second years work were evaluated. Results obtained from ground testing at 1-g were compared to those obtained at reduced gravities spanning Martian (13-g), Lunar (16-g) and zero-g. These comparisons clearly demonstrate the relative strength of the CPG phenomena and the efficacy of its application to meet NASAs unique gas-liquid separation (GLS) requirements in non-terrestrial environments.LB modeling software, developed concurrently with the zero-g test effort, was shown to accurately reproduce observed CPG driven gas-liquid separation

  7. Kinks of the Transplant Renal Artery Without Accompanying Intraarterial Pressure Gradient Do Not Require Correction: Five-Year Outcome Study

    SciTech Connect

    Chua, Gim Chuah; Snowden, Sue; Patel, Uday

    2004-11-15

    Significant transplant renal artery stenosis (TRAS) results in an intraarterial pressure gradient and increasing graft dysfunction correctable by endovascular therapy. Kinks of the transplant artery cause velocity gradients on Doppler ultrasound, but some will have no intraarterial pressure gradient across the kink. It is not known whether these nonflow limiting kinks progress further to threaten graft function and should undergo endovascular correction. This is a longitudinal study of conservatively managed arterial kinks to define their natural history. Fourteen patients who had undergone angiography over a 5-year period for suspected TRAS had kinks of the renal artery. True intraarterial pressures were measured in all cases by slow withdrawal of an end-hole catheter after intraarterial injection of a vasodilator. Those with a significant pressure change ({>=}10% change in peak systolic pressure across the area of suspicion) underwent endovascular treatment. The rest were managed conservatively, with maximal antihypertensive therapy. Outcome of all 14 cases was determined by follow-up of creatinine levels, blood pressure (BP) control and graft outcome over a 3-5-year period (median 4 years). Of the 14 patients with kinks, 10 were male and 4 female; age range 23-67 years (mean 47 years). Eleven had received cadaveric transplants and 3 were allografts; 12 had end-to-side and 2 end-to-end anastomosis, 11/14 cases had an intraarterial pressure ratio of <10% and at median 4 years follow-up on conservative treatment, the serum creatinine of these 11 patients did not differ significantly from those who underwent successful endovascular treatment (mean 118 {mu}mol/l versus 149 {mu}mol/l; p = 0.30, Mann Whitney test). Mean blood pressure was 137/82 mmHg, with a range of 124-155/56-95 mmHg. Only one patient has required an unexplainable increase in antihypertensive medication. Grafts (2/11) were lost and both had chronic rejection on histology. There were no unexplained

  8. Quantum theory of Manakov solitons

    SciTech Connect

    Rand, Darren; Prucnal, Paul R.; Steiglitz, Ken

    2005-05-15

    A fully quantum mechanical model of two-component Manakov solitons is developed in both the Heisenberg and Schroedinger representations, followed by an analytical, linearized quantum theory of Manakov solitons in the Heisenberg picture. This theory is used to analyze the vacuum-induced fluctuations of Manakov soliton propagation and collision. The vacuum fluctuations induce phase diffusion and dispersion in Manakov soliton propagation. Calculations of the position, polarization angle, and polarization state fluctuations show an increase in collision-induced noise with a decrease in the relative velocity between the two solitons, as expected because of an increase in the interaction length. Fluctuations in both the polarization angle and state are shown to be independent of propagation distance, opening up possibilities for communications, switching, and logic, exploiting these properties of Manakov solitons. Calculations of the phase noise reveal, surprisingly, that the collision-induced fluctuations can be reduced slightly below the level of fluctuations in the absence of collision, due to cross-correlation effects between the collision-induced phase and amplitude fluctuations of the soliton. The squeezing effect of Manakov solitons is also studied and proven, unexpectedly, to have the same theoretical optimum as scalar solitons.

  9. Dynamics of Dissipative Temporal Solitons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peschel, U.; Michaelis, D.; Bakonyi, Z.; Onishchukov, G.; Lederer, F.

    The properties and the dynamics of localized structures, frequently termed solitary waves or solitons, define, to a large extent, the behavior of the relevant nonlinear system [1]. Thus, it is a crucial and fundamental issue of nonlinear dynamics to fully characterize these objects in various conservative and dissipative nonlinear environments. Apart from this fundamental point of view, solitons (henceforth we adopt this term, even for localized solutions of non-integrable systems) exhibit a remarkable potential for applications, particularly if optical systems are considered. Regarding the type of localization, one can distinguish between temporal and spatial solitons. Spatial solitons are self-confined beams, which are shape-invariant upon propagation. (For an overview, see [2, 3]). It can be anticipated that they could play a vital role in all-optical processing and logic, since we can use their complex collision behavior [4]. Temporal solitons, on the other hand, represent shapeinvariant (or breathing) pulses. It is now common belief that robust temporal solitons will play a major role as elementary units (bits) of information in future all-optical networks [5, 6]. Until now, the main emphasis has been on temporal and spatial soliton families in conservative systems, where energy is conserved. Recently, another class of solitons, which are characterized by a permanent energy exchange with their environment, has attracted much attention. These solitons are termed dissipative solitons or auto-solitons. They emerge as a result of a balance between linear (delocalization and losses) and nonlinear (self-phase modulation and gain/loss saturation) effects. Except for very few cases [7], they form zero-parameter families and their features are entirely fixed by the underlying optical system. Cavity solitons form a prominent type. They appear as spatially-localized transverse peaks in transmission or reflection, e.g. from a Fabry-Perot cavity. They rely strongly on the

  10. Biological soliton in multicellular movement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuwayama, Hidekazu; Ishida, Shuji

    2013-07-01

    Solitons have been observed in various physical phenomena. Here, we show that the distinct characteristics of solitons are present in the mass cell movement of non-chemotactic mutants of the cellular slime mould Dictyostelium discoideum. During starvation, D. discoideum forms multicellular structures that differentiate into spore or stalk cells and, eventually, a fruiting body. Non-chemotactic mutant cells do not form multicellular structures; however, they do undergo mass cell movement in the form of a pulsatile soliton-like structure (SLS). We also found that SLS induction is mediated by adhesive cell-cell interactions. These observations provide novel insights into the mechanisms of biological solitons in multicellular movement.

  11. Composite nonlinear structure within the magnetosonic soliton interactions in a spin-1/2 degenerate quantum plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Han, Jiu-Ning Luo, Jun-Hua; Li, Jun-Xiu; Li, Sheng-Chang; Liu, Shi-Wei; Yang, Yang; Duan, Wen-Shan; Han, Juan-Fang

    2015-06-15

    We study the basic physical properties of composite nonlinear structure induced by the head-on collision of magnetosonic solitons. Solitary waves are assumed to propagate in a quantum electron-ion magnetoplasma with spin-1/2 degenerate electrons. The main interest of the present work is to investigate the time evolution of the merged composite structure during a specific time interval of the wave interaction process. We consider three cases of colliding-situation, namely, compressive-rarefactive solitons interaction, compressive-compressive solitons interaction, and rarefactive-rarefactive solitons interaction, respectively. Compared with the last two colliding cases, the changing process of the composite structure is more complex for the first situation. Moreover, it is found that they are obviously different for the last two colliding cases.

  12. Ex-Vivo Lymphatic Perfusion System for Independently Controlling Pressure Gradient and Transmural Pressure in Isolated Vessels

    PubMed Central

    Kornuta, Jeffrey A.; Dixon, J. Brandon

    2015-01-01

    In addition to external forces, collecting lymphatic vessels intrinsically contract to transport lymph from the extremities to the venous circulation. As a result, the lymphatic endothelium is routinely exposed to a wide range of dynamic mechanical forces, primarily fluid shear stress and circumferential stress, which have both been shown to affect lymphatic pumping activity. Although various ex-vivo perfusion systems exist to study this innate pumping activity in response to mechanical stimuli, none are capable of independently controlling the two primary mechanical forces affecting lymphatic contractility: transaxial pressure gradient, ΔP, which governs fluid shear stress; and average transmural pressure, Pavg, which governs circumferential stress. Hence, the authors describe a novel ex-vivo lymphatic perfusion system (ELPS) capable of independently controlling these two outputs using a linear, explicit model predictive control (MPC) algorithm. The ELPS is capable of reproducing arbitrary waveforms within the frequency range observed in the lymphatics in vivo, including a time-varying ΔP with a constant Pavg, time-varying ΔP and Pavg, and a constant ΔP with a time-varying Pavg. In addition, due to its implementation of syringes to actuate the working fluid, a post-hoc method of estimating both the flow rate through the vessel and fluid wall shear stress over multiple, long (5 sec) time windows is also described. PMID:24809724

  13. The Reynolds shear stress in zero pressure gradient turbulent boundary layers derived from log-law asymptotics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monkewitz, Peter A.; Nagib, Hassan M.

    2008-11-01

    The Reynolds shear stress (RS) in zero pressure gradient turbulent boundary layers is established using recently developed composite mean velocity profiles based on the ``log-law'' in the overlap region between inner and outer profiles. The contribution of the normal stress difference is discussed and considered to be of secondary importance. From this analysis, an asymptotic expansion for the maximum RS and its location is developed. The hypotheses underlying this analysis are discussed and the results are compared with experiments and DNS. Using the friction velocity as scale, the analytic approximation of the RS agrees reasonably well with low-Re experimental results. However, when comparing with high-Re experiments, the agreement is generally limited as the experimental accuracy and resolution becomes problematic near the wall. Comparison with DNS, on the other hand, is shown to be affected by the delicate numerical treatment of the free stream boundary condition. Finally, the present asymptotics will be compared to the results of Sreenivasan, Panton and others for channels and pipes.

  14. The pattern of parallel edge plasma flows due to pressure gradients, recycling, and resonant magnetic perturbations in DIII-D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frerichs, H.; Schmitz, O.; Evans, T.; Feng, Y.; Reiter, D.

    2015-07-01

    High resolution plasma transport simulations with the EMC3-EIRENE code have been performed to address the parallel plasma flow structure in the boundary of a poloidal divertor configuration with non-axisymmetric perturbations at DIII-D. Simulation results show that a checkerboard pattern of flows with alternating direction is generated inside the separatrix. This pattern is aligned with the position of the main resonances (i.e., where the safety factor is equal to rational values q = m / n for a perturbation field with base mode number n): m pairs of alternating forward and backward flow channel exist for each resonance. The poloidal oscillations are aligned with the subharmonic Melnikov function, which indicates that the plasma flow is generated by parallel pressure gradients along perturbed field lines. An additional scrape-off layer-like domain is introduced by the perturbed separatrix which guides field lines from the interior to the divertor targets, resulting in an enhanced outward flow that is consistent with the experimentally observed particle pump-out effect. However, while the lobe structure of the perturbed separatrix is very well reflected in the temperature profile, the same lobes can appear to be smaller in the flow profile due to a competition between high upstream pressure and downstream particle sources driving flows in opposite directions.

  15. Optimizing OBS data using shielding and by removing ocean wave loading noise with Pressure and Horizontal Pressure Gradient Sensor Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webb, Spahr C.; Barclay, Andrew H.

    2016-04-01

    Ocean bottom seismometer (OBS) data, particularly from sites in shallow water are notoriously noisy. Ocean currents generate forces on an unshielded OBS sensor causing time varying tilt that greatly raises noise levels. Shallow burial can mitigate this source of noise, but is expensive and difficult to accomplish, particularly for large fleets of instruments. Large shields can provide significant reduction in noise levels as demonstrated with Cascadia Array OBS data. A recent test deployment investigated the relative motion of the shield and the sensor within the shield, providing guidance on the effectiveness of shielding. Even with shielding or burial, deformation of the seafloor caused by loading by the ocean waves raises seismic noise levels. We have previously shown the vertical component noise can be reduced using data from pressure sensors to predict the vertical deformation and remove it from the vertical record. We recently deployed a new OBS instrument in shallow water (80m) that measured two horizontal components of pressure gradient and show these data can be used to reduce wave induced deformation noise from horizontal component seismic data.

  16. Convective heat transfer studies at high temperatures with pressure gradient for inlet flow Mach number of 0.45

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pedrosa, A. C. F.; Nagamatsu, H. T.; Hinckel, J. A.

    1984-01-01

    Heat transfer measurements were determined for a flat plate with and without pressure gradient for various free stream temperatures, wall temperature ratios, and Reynolds numbers for an inlet flow Mach number of 0.45, which is a representative inlet Mach number for gas turbine rotor blades. A shock tube generated the high temperature and pressure air flow, and a variable geometry test section was used to produce inlet flow Mach number of 0.45 and accelerate the flow over the plate to sonic velocity. Thin-film platinum heat gages recorded the local heat flux for laminar, transition, and turbulent boundary layers. The free stream temperatures varied from 611 R (339 K) to 3840 R (2133 K) for a T(w)/T(r,g) temperature ratio of 0.87 to 0.14. The Reynolds number over the heat gages varied from 3000 to 690,000. The experimental heat transfer data were correlated with laminar and turbulent boundary layer theories for the range of temperatures and Reynolds numbers and the transition phenomenon was examined.

  17. Experimental Study on the Flow Regimes and Pressure Gradients of Air-Oil-Water Three-Phase Flow in Horizontal Pipes

    PubMed Central

    Al-Hadhrami, Luai M.; Shaahid, S. M.; Tunde, Lukman O.; Al-Sarkhi, A.

    2014-01-01

    An experimental investigation has been carried out to study the flow regimes and pressure gradients of air-oil-water three-phase flows in 2.25 ID horizontal pipe at different flow conditions. The effects of water cuts, liquid and gas velocities on flow patterns and pressure gradients have been studied. The experiments have been conducted at 20°C using low viscosity Safrasol D80 oil, tap water and air. Superficial water and oil velocities were varied from 0.3 m/s to 3 m/s and air velocity varied from 0.29 m/s to 52.5 m/s to cover wide range of flow patterns. The experiments were performed for 10% to 90% water cuts. The flow patterns were observed and recorded using high speed video camera while the pressure drops were measured using pressure transducers and U-tube manometers. The flow patterns show strong dependence on water fraction, gas velocities, and liquid velocities. The observed flow patterns are stratified (smooth and wavy), elongated bubble, slug, dispersed bubble, and annular flow patterns. The pressure gradients have been found to increase with the increase in gas flow rates. Also, for a given superficial gas velocity, the pressure gradients increased with the increase in the superficial liquid velocity. The pressure gradient first increases and then decreases with increasing water cut. In general, phase inversion was observed with increase in the water cut. The experimental results have been compared with the existing unified Model and a good agreement has been noticed. PMID:24523645

  18. Experimental study on the flow regimes and pressure gradients of air-oil-water three-phase flow in horizontal pipes.

    PubMed

    Al-Hadhrami, Luai M; Shaahid, S M; Tunde, Lukman O; Al-Sarkhi, A

    2014-01-01

    An experimental investigation has been carried out to study the flow regimes and pressure gradients of air-oil-water three-phase flows in 2.25 ID horizontal pipe at different flow conditions. The effects of water cuts, liquid and gas velocities on flow patterns and pressure gradients have been studied. The experiments have been conducted at 20 °C using low viscosity Safrasol D80 oil, tap water and air. Superficial water and oil velocities were varied from 0.3 m/s to 3 m/s and air velocity varied from 0.29 m/s to 52.5 m/s to cover wide range of flow patterns. The experiments were performed for 10% to 90% water cuts. The flow patterns were observed and recorded using high speed video camera while the pressure drops were measured using pressure transducers and U-tube manometers. The flow patterns show strong dependence on water fraction, gas velocities, and liquid velocities. The observed flow patterns are stratified (smooth and wavy), elongated bubble, slug, dispersed bubble, and annular flow patterns. The pressure gradients have been found to increase with the increase in gas flow rates. Also, for a given superficial gas velocity, the pressure gradients increased with the increase in the superficial liquid velocity. The pressure gradient first increases and then decreases with increasing water cut. In general, phase inversion was observed with increase in the water cut. The experimental results have been compared with the existing unified Model and a good agreement has been noticed. PMID:24523645

  19. Experimental study on the flow regimes and pressure gradients of air-oil-water three-phase flow in horizontal pipes.

    PubMed

    Al-Hadhrami, Luai M; Shaahid, S M; Tunde, Lukman O; Al-Sarkhi, A

    2014-01-01

    An experimental investigation has been carried out to study the flow regimes and pressure gradients of air-oil-water three-phase flows in 2.25 ID horizontal pipe at different flow conditions. The effects of water cuts, liquid and gas velocities on flow patterns and pressure gradients have been studied. The experiments have been conducted at 20 °C using low viscosity Safrasol D80 oil, tap water and air. Superficial water and oil velocities were varied from 0.3 m/s to 3 m/s and air velocity varied from 0.29 m/s to 52.5 m/s to cover wide range of flow patterns. The experiments were performed for 10% to 90% water cuts. The flow patterns were observed and recorded using high speed video camera while the pressure drops were measured using pressure transducers and U-tube manometers. The flow patterns show strong dependence on water fraction, gas velocities, and liquid velocities. The observed flow patterns are stratified (smooth and wavy), elongated bubble, slug, dispersed bubble, and annular flow patterns. The pressure gradients have been found to increase with the increase in gas flow rates. Also, for a given superficial gas velocity, the pressure gradients increased with the increase in the superficial liquid velocity. The pressure gradient first increases and then decreases with increasing water cut. In general, phase inversion was observed with increase in the water cut. The experimental results have been compared with the existing unified Model and a good agreement has been noticed.

  20. Analytical design of soliton molecules in fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moubissi, A.-B.; Nse Biyoghe, S.; Mback, C. B. L.; Ekogo, T. B.; Ben-Bolie, G. H.; Kofane, T. C.; Tchofo Dinda, P.

    2016-09-01

    We present an analytical method for designing fiber systems for a highly stable propagation of soliton molecules. This analytical design uses the variational equations of the soliton molecule to determine the parameters of the most suitable fiber system for any desired soliton, thus reducing dramatically the cost of the whole procedure of design, for both the appropriate fiber system and the desired soliton molecule.

  1. Primordial origin of nontopological solitons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frieman, Joshua A.; Gelmini, Graciela B.; Gleiser, Marcelo; Kolb, Edward W.

    1988-01-01

    The formation of nontopological solitons in a second-order phase transition in the early universe is discussed. Ratios of dimensionless coupling constants in the Lagrangian determine their abundance and mass. For a large range of parameters, nontopological solitons can be cosmologically significant, contributing a significant fraction of the present mass density of the universe.

  2. Thermophoresis of an antiferromagnetic soliton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Se Kwon; Tchernyshyov, Oleg; Tserkovnyak, Yaroslav

    2015-07-01

    We study the dynamics of an antiferromagnetic soliton under a temperature gradient. To this end, we start by phenomenologically constructing the stochastic Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert equation for an antiferromagnet with the aid of the fluctuation-dissipation theorem. We then derive the Langevin equation for the soliton's center of mass by the collective coordinate approach. An antiferromagentic soliton behaves as a classical massive particle immersed in a viscous medium. By considering a thermodynamic ensemble of solitons, we obtain the Fokker-Planck equation, from which we extract the average drift velocity of a soliton. The diffusion coefficient is inversely proportional to a small damping constant α , which can yield a drift velocity of tens of m/s under a temperature gradient of 1 K/mm for a domain wall in an easy-axis antiferromagnetic wire with α ˜10-4 .

  3. Gray solitons on the surface of water.

    PubMed

    Chabchoub, A; Kimmoun, O; Branger, H; Kharif, C; Hoffmann, N; Onorato, M; Akhmediev, N

    2014-01-01

    The dynamics of surface gravity water waves can be described by the self-defocusing nonlinear Schrödinger equation. Recent observations of black solitons on the surface of water confirmed its validity for finite, below critical depth. The black soliton is a limiting case of a family of gray soliton solutions with finite amplitude depressions. Here, we report observations of gray solitons in water waves, thus, complementing our previous observations of black solitons. PMID:24580162

  4. Dynamical behavior of the soliton formation and propagation in magnetized plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, G. C.; Sarma, J.; Gao, Yi-Tian; Uberoi, C.

    2000-06-01

    Despite many theoretical studies on soliton formation and its propagation in plasmas, no study with multicomponent magnetized plasma has derived the special nonlinear wave equation, called the Zakharov-Kuznetsov equation [V. E. Zakharov and E. A. Kuznetsov, Sov. Phys. JETP 39, 285 (1974)]. Thus, the main emphasis has been given to employing the hyperbolic-type method for finding the soliton features in relation to laboratory and space plasma environments. Where this method has been unsuccessful, an alternate method has been developed to yield the soliton propagation. The features of the nonlinear plasma-acoustic waves, which depend on the plasma composition, affect the coexistence of compressive and rarefactive solitary waves. Later, allowing for the higher order nonlinearity in the dynamics, one is led to further different solitary waves along with double layers. The main aim of the present study is to use a new formalism for finding the soliton propagation from the nonlinear wave equation with strong, as well as weak, nonlinearity. The coexistence of different nonlinear acoustic modes due to the interaction of multiple charges in plasma is shown. Moreover, the theoretical observations revealed many other soliton-like structures, which could be similar to the dip and hump solitons observed by the Freja Scientific Satellite and the collapsed solitons expected in the propagation of solar flares, as well as in the interplanetary space plasmas.

  5. The Role of Postintervention Pullback Pressure Gradient in Percutaneous Transluminal Angioplasty for Central Vein Stenosis in Dialysis Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Yu-Sheng; Yang, Cheng-Hsu; Chu, Chi-Ming; Fang, Chi-Yung Chen, Chien-Jen; Hsu, Jen-Te Yang, Teng-Yao; Hang, Chi-Ling Wu, Chiung-Jen

    2013-10-15

    Purpose: The severity of residual stenosis (RS) sometimes cannot be accurately measured by angiography during central vein intervention. This study evaluated the role of pullback pressure measurement during central vein stenosis (CVS) intervention. Methods: A retrospective review enrolled 94 consecutive dialysis patients who underwent CVS interventions but not stenting procedures. Patients were classified into 2 groups by either angiography or pressure gradient (PG) criteria, respectively. Groups divided by angiographic result were successful group (RS {<=}30 %) and acceptable group (50 % {>=} RS > 30 %), while groups divided by PG were low PG group (PG {<=}5 mmHg) and high PG group (PG >5 mmHg). Baseline characteristics and 12-month patency rates between the groups were analyzed. Results: The angiography results placed 63 patients in the successful group and 31 patients in the acceptable group. The patency rate at 12 month was not statistically different (P = 0.167). When the patients were reclassified by the postintervention pullback PG, the patency rate at 12 months was significant (P = 0.048). Further analysis in groups redivided by different combinations of RS and PG criteria identified significant differences in the group with both RS {<=}30 % and PG {<=}5 mmHg compared with those with either RS >30 % (P = 0.047) or PG >5 mmHg (P = 0.027). In addition, there was a significant difference between those with both RS {<=}30 % and PG {<=}5 mmHg compared with those with both RS >30 % and PG >5 mmHg (P = 0.027). Conclusion: Postintervention PG can better predict long-term outcomes after angioplasty for CVS in nonstented dialysis patients than angiography.

  6. Evidence for impact induced pressure gradients on the Allende CV3 parent body: Consequences for fluid and volatile transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tait, Alastair W.; Fisher, Kent R.; Srinivasan, Poorna; Simon, Justin I.

    2016-11-01

    Carbonaceous chondrites, such as those associated with the Vigarano (CV) parent body, exhibit a diverse range of oxidative/reduced alteration mineralogy (McSween, 1977). Although fluids are often cited as the medium by which this occurs (Rubin, 2012), a mechanism to explain how this fluid migrates, and why some meteorite subtypes from the same planetary body are more oxidized than others remains elusive. In our study we examined a slab of the well-known Allende (CV3OxA) meteorite. Using several petrological techniques (e.g., Fry's and Flinn) and Computerized Tomography (CT) we discover it exhibits a strong penetrative planar fabric, resulting from strain partitioning among its major components: Calcium-Aluminum-rich Inclusions (CAIs) (64.5%CT) > matrix (21.5%Fry) > chondrules (17.6%CT). In addition to the planar fabric, we found a strong lineation defined by the alignment of the maximum elongation of flattened particles interpreted to have developed by an impact event. The existence of a lineation could either be non-coaxial deformation, or the result of a mechanically heterogeneous target material. In the later case it could have formed due to discontinuous patches of sub-surface ice and/or fabrics developed through prior impact compaction (MacPherson and Krot, 2014), which would have encouraged preferential flow within the target material immediately following the impact, compacting pore spaces. We suggest that structurally controlled movement of alteration fluids in the asteroid parent body along pressure gradients contributed to the formation of secondary minerals, which may have ultimately lead to the different oxidized subtypes.

  7. An experimental investigation of a low Reynolds number turbulent boundary layer subject to an adverse pressure gradient

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watmuff, Jonathan H.

    1989-01-01

    A very low Reynolds number turbulent boundary layer subject to an adverse pressure gradient is studied. The aim is to obtain highly accurate mean-flow and turbulence measurements under conditions that can be closely related to the numerical simulations of Philippe Spalart for the purposes of CFD validation. Much of the Boundary Layer Wind Tunnel was completely rebuilt with a new wider contraction and working section which will improve compatibility with the simulations. A unique sophisticated high-speed computer controlled 3-D probe traversing mechanism was integrated into the test section. Construction of the tunnel and traverse is discussed in some detail. The hardware is now complete, and measurements are in progress. The mean-flow data indicate that a suitably two-dimensional base flow was established. Automation of the probe positioning and data acquistion have led to a decreased running time for total pressure measurements. However, the most significant benefits are expected to occur when using hot-wire probes. Calibrations can be performed automatically and there is no need to handle fragile probes when moving between measuring stations. Techniques are being developed which require sampling of the signals from moving hot-wire probes on the basis of their position in the flow. Measurements can be made in high intensity turbulence by flying probes upstream at high speed so that the relative magnitude of the turbulent velocity fluctuations are reduced. In regions, where the turbulence intensity is not too large, the probe can also be repetitively scanned across very dense spatial grids in other directions. With this technique, a complete profile can be measured in about 1/3 the time and with a spatial density about 50 times that obtainable using a stationary probe.

  8. Functional Heart Valve Scaffolds Obtained by Complete Decellularization of Porcine Aortic Roots in a Novel Differential Pressure Gradient Perfusion System.

    PubMed

    Sierad, Leslie Neil; Shaw, Eliza Laine; Bina, Alexander; Brazile, Bryn; Rierson, Nicholas; Patnaik, Sourav S; Kennamer, Allison; Odum, Rebekah; Cotoi, Ovidiu; Terezia, Preda; Branzaniuc, Klara; Smallwood, Harrison; Deac, Radu; Egyed, Imre; Pavai, Zoltan; Szanto, Annamaria; Harceaga, Lucian; Suciu, Horatiu; Raicea, Victor; Olah, Peter; Simionescu, Agneta; Liao, Jun; Movileanu, Ionela; Harpa, Marius; Simionescu, Dan Teodor

    2015-12-01

    There is a great need for living valve replacements for patients of all ages. Such constructs could be built by tissue engineering, with perspective of the unique structure and biology of the aortic root. The aortic valve root is composed of several different tissues, and careful structural and functional consideration has to be given to each segment and component. Previous work has shown that immersion techniques are inadequate for whole-root decellularization, with the aortic wall segment being particularly resistant to decellularization. The aim of this study was to develop a differential pressure gradient perfusion system capable of being rigorous enough to decellularize the aortic root wall while gentle enough to preserve the integrity of the cusps. Fresh porcine aortic roots have been subjected to various regimens of perfusion decellularization using detergents and enzymes and results compared to immersion decellularized roots. Success criteria for evaluation of each root segment (cusp, muscle, sinus, wall) for decellularization completeness, tissue integrity, and valve functionality were defined using complementary methods of cell analysis (histology with nuclear and matrix stains and DNA analysis), biomechanics (biaxial and bending tests), and physiologic heart valve bioreactor testing (with advanced image analysis of open-close cycles and geometric orifice area measurement). Fully acellular porcine roots treated with the optimized method exhibited preserved macroscopic structures and microscopic matrix components, which translated into conserved anisotropic mechanical properties, including bending and excellent valve functionality when tested in aortic flow and pressure conditions. This study highlighted the importance of (1) adapting decellularization methods to specific target tissues, (2) combining several methods of cell analysis compared to relying solely on histology, (3) developing relevant valve-specific mechanical tests, and (4) in vitro testing

  9. Progressive compression versus graduated compression for the management of venous insufficiency.

    PubMed

    Shepherd, Jan

    2016-09-01

    Venous leg ulceration (VLU) is a chronic condition associated with chronic venous insufficiency (CVI), where the most frequent complication is recurrence of ulceration after healing. Traditionally, graduated compression therapy has been shown to increase healing rates and also to reduce recurrence of VLU. Graduated compression occurs because the circumference of the limb is narrower at the ankle, thereby producing a higher pressure than at the calf, which is wider, creating a lower pressure. This phenomenon is explained by the principle known as Laplace's Law. Recently, the view that compression therapy must provide a graduated pressure gradient has been challenged. However, few studies so far have focused on the potential benefits of progressive compression where the pressure profile is inverted. This article will examine the contemporary concept that progressive compression may be as effective as traditional graduated compression therapy for the management of CVI. PMID:27594309

  10. CALL FOR PAPERS: Optical solitons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drummond, P. D.; Haelterman, Marc; Vilaseca, R.

    2003-06-01

    A topical issue of Journal of Optics B: Quantum and Semiclassical Optics will be devoted to recent advances in optical solitons. The topics to be covered will include, but are not limited to: bulletProperties, control and dynamics of temporal solitons bulletProperties, control and dynamics of spatial solitons bulletCavity solitons in passive and active resonators bulletThree-dimensional spatial solitons bulletDark, bright, grey solitons; interface dynamics bulletCompound or vector solitons; incoherent solitons bulletLight and matter solitons in BEC bulletNonlinear localized structures in microstructured and nanostructured materials (photonic crystals, etc) bulletAngular momentum effects associated with localized light structures; vortex solitons bulletQuantum effects associated with localized light structures bulletInteraction of solitons with atoms and other media bulletApplications of optical solitons The DEADLINE for submission of contributions is 31 July 2003 to allow the topical issue to appear in about February 2004. All papers will be peer-reviewed in accordance with the normal refereeing procedures and standards of Journal of Optics B: Quantum and Semiclassical Optics. Advice on publishing your work in the journal may be found at www.iop.org/journals/authors/jopb. Submissions should ideally be in either standard LaTeX form or Microsoft Word. There are no page charges for publication. In addition to the usual 50 free reprints, the corresponding author of each paper published will receive a complimentary copy of the topical issue. Contributions to the topical issue should if possible be submitted electronically at www.iop.org/journals/jopb. or by e-mail to jopb@iop.org. Authors unable to submit online or by e-mail may send hard copy contributions (enclosing the electronic code) to: Dr Claire Bedrock (Publisher), Journal of Optics B: Quantum and Semiclassical Optics, Institute of Physics Publishing, Dirac House, Temple Back, Bristol BS1 6BE, UK. All

  11. Dust acoustic solitons with variable particle charge: role of the ion distribution.

    PubMed

    Ivlev, A V; Morfill, G

    2001-02-01

    Dust-acoustic solitons of large amplitude with variable particle charge are studied using the Sagdeev quasipotential analysis. Two limiting cases of ion distribution are considered separately: Boltzmann and highly energetic cold ions. It is shown that in both cases only compressive (density) solitons are possible. The charge variation is not important in rarefied particle clouds, but becomes crucial if the particle number density is sufficiently high. Analytical expressions for the range of Mach numbers where solitons might exist are obtained. It is found that solitons are allowed in the supersonic regime, and that in dense clouds the width of the Mach number range remains finite for the Boltzmann ions, but tends to zero for highly energetic ions.

  12. Observation of dust acoustic multi-solitons in a strongly coupled dusty plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boruah, A.; Sharma, S. K.; Nakamura, Y.; Bailung, H.

    2016-09-01

    The excitation and propagation of low frequency dust acoustic multi-solitons are investigated in an unmagnetized strongly coupled dusty plasma. A floating 2D dusty medium is produced in an RF discharge Ar plasma with silica micro-particles. Dust acoustic perturbations are excited by applying a negative sinusoidal pulse of frequency 1-2 Hz and amplitude 4-20 V to an exciter grid. An initial large amplitude dust density compression breaks into a number of solitary pulses which are identified as dust acoustic solitons. The observed multi-soliton evolution is compared with numerical simulations of modified Korteweg de Vries (KdV)-Burger equation. The characteristics of the generated solitons are in good agreement with the theory.

  13. Deceleration of the small solitons in the soliton lattice: KdV-type framework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shurgalina, Ekaterina; Gorshkov, Konstantin; Talipova, Tatiana; Pelinovsky, Efim

    2016-04-01

    As it is known the solitary waves (solitons) in the KdV-systems move with speed which exceeds the speed of propagation of long linear waves (sound speed). Due to interaction between them, solitons do not lose their individuality (elastic interaction). Binary interaction of neigborough solitons is the major contribution in the dynamics of soliton gas. Taking into account the integrability of the classic and modified Korteweg-de Vries equations the process of the soliton interaction can be analyzed in the framework of the rigorous analytical two-soliton solutions. Main physical conclusion from this solution is the phase shift which is positive for large solitons and negative for small solitons. This fact influences the average velocity of individual soliton in the soliton lattice or soliton gas. We demonstrate that soliton of relative small amplitude moves in soliton gas in average in opposite (negative) direction, meanwhile a free soliton moves always in the right direction. Approximated analytical theory is created for the soliton motion in the periodic lattice of big solitons of the same amplitudes, and the critical amplitude of the small soliton changed its averaged speed is found. Numerical simulation is conducted for a statistical assembly of solitons with random amplitudes and phases. The application of developed theory to the long surface and internal waves is discussed.

  14. Solitons in quadratic media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colin, M.; Di Menza, L.; Saut, J. C.

    2016-03-01

    In this paper, we investigate the properties of solitonic structures arising in quadratic media. First, we recall the derivation of systems governing the interaction process for waves propagating in such media and we check the local and global well-posedness of the corresponding Cauchy problem. Then, we look for stationary states in the context of normal or anomalous dispersion regimes, that lead us to either elliptic or non-elliptic systems and we address the problem of orbital stability. Finally, some numerical experiments are carried out in order to compute localized states for several regimes and to study dynamic stability as well as long-time asymptotics.

  15. Davydov solitons in polypeptides

    SciTech Connect

    Scott, A.

    1984-10-01

    The experimental evidence for self-trapping of amide-I (CO stretching) vibrational energy in crystalline acetanilide (a model protein) is reviewed and related to A. S. Davydov's theory of solitons as a mechanism for energy storage and transport in protein. Particular attention is paid to the construction of quantum states that contain N amide-I vibrational quanta. It is noted that the N = 2 state is almost exactly resonant with the free energy that is released upon hydrolysis of adenosine triphosphate. 30 references, 4 figures, 3 tables.

  16. Davydov Solitons in Polypeptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scott, A. C.

    1985-08-01

    The experimental evidence for self-trapping of amide-I (CO stretching) vibrational energy in crystalline acetanilide (a model protein) is reviewed and related to A. S. Davydov's theory of solitons as a mechanism for energy storage and transport in protein. Particular attention is paid to the construction of quantum states that contain N amide-I vibrational quanta. It is noted that the `N = 2' state is almost exactly resonant with the free energy that is released upon hydrolysis of adenosine triphosphate.

  17. [Repeated percutaneous transluminal septal myocardial ablation leads to reduction of left ventricular outflow-tract pressure gradient in hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy: a case report].

    PubMed

    Takeda, Masafumi; Mori, Takao; Ohashi, Yoshitaka; Ichikawa, Shinobu; Terashima, Mitsuyasu; Ejiri, Junya; Awano, Kojiro

    2006-06-01

    A 61-year-old man with hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy was treated twice with percutaneous transluminal septal myocardial ablation (PTSMA). The first procedure improved the left ventricular outflow tract pressure gradient (LVOTG) from 148 to 48 mmHg and the New York Heart Association (NYHA) class from III to II in a week. However, the LVOTG increased to 197 mmHg and the NYHA class worsened to III within 3 months. In spite of medical treatment with beta-blocker, syncope attack occurred suddenly. Repeated PTSMA was performed. Just after the second procedure, the LVOTG did not decrease. However, the LVOTG decreased to 81 mmHg and the NYHA class improved to II with 3 months. The different response of pressure gradient in the acute and chronic phase with repeated PTSMA was interesting. PMID:16800375

  18. The turbulent boundary layer on a porous plate: An experimental study of the fluid mechanics for adverse free stream pressure gradients

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, P. S.; Kays, W. M.; Moffat, R. J.

    1972-01-01

    An experimental investigation of transpired turbulent boundary layers in zero and adverse pressure gradients has been carried out. Profiles of: (1) the mean velocity, (2) the three intensities of the turbulent fluctuations, and (3) the Reynolds stress were obtained by hot-wire anemometry. The friction coefficients were measured by using an integrated form of the boundary layer equation to extrapolate the measured shear stress profiles to the wall.

  19. Study of the Phan-Thien-Tanner Equation of Viscoelastic Blood Non- Newtonian Flow in a Pipe-Shaped Artery under an Emotion-Induced Pressure Gradient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boubaker, Karem; Khan, Yasir

    2012-11-01

    In this paper, a three-dimensional, unsteady state non-Newtonian fluid flow in a pipe-shaped artery of viscoelastic blood is considered in the presence of emotion-induced pressure gradient. The results have been expressed in terms of radial profiles of both axial velocity and viscosity and were presented numerically by using the shooting technique coupled with the Newtonian method and the Boubaker polynomials expansion scheme. The effects of some parameters on the dynamics are analyzed.

  20. An experimental investigation of heat transfer to reusable surface insulation tile array gaps in a turbulent boundary layer with pressure gradient. M.S. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Throckmorton, D. A.

    1975-01-01

    An experimental investigation was performed to determine the effect of pressure gradient on the heat transfer to space shuttle reusable surface insulation (RSI) tile array gaps under thick, turbulent boundary layer conditions. Heat transfer and pressure measurements were obtained on a curved array of full-scale simulated RSI tiles in a tunnel wall boundary layer at a nominal freestream Mach number of 10.3 and freestream unit Reynolds numbers of 1.6, 3.3, and and 6.1 million per meter. Transverse pressure gradients were induced over the model surface by rotating the curved array with respect to the flow. Definition of the tunnel wall boundary layer flow was obtained by measurement of boundary layer pitot pressure profiles, and flat plate wall pressure and heat transfer. Flat plate wall heat transfer data were correlated and a method was derived for prediction of smooth, curved array heat transfer in the highly three-dimensional tunnel wall boundary layer flow and simulation of full-scale space shuttle vehicle pressure gradient levels was assessed.

  1. Characterization of the startup transient electrokinetic flow in rectangular channels of arbitrary dimensions, zeta potential distribution, and time-varying pressure gradient.

    PubMed

    Miller, Andrew; Villegas, Arturo; Diez, F Javier

    2015-03-01

    The solution to the startup transient EOF in an arbitrary rectangular microchannel is derived analytically and validated experimentally. This full 2D transient solution describes the evolution of the flow through five distinct periods until reaching a final steady state. The derived analytical velocity solution is validated experimentally for different channel sizes and aspect ratios under time-varying pressure gradients. The experiments used a time resolved micro particle image velocimetry technique to calculate the startup transient velocity profiles. The measurements captured the effect of time-varying pressure gradient fields derived in the analytical solutions. This is tested by using small reservoirs at both ends of the channel which allowed a time-varying pressure gradient to develop with a time scale on the order of the transient EOF. Results showed that under these common conditions, the effect of the pressure build up in the reservoirs on the temporal development of the transient startup EOF in the channels cannot be neglected. The measurements also captured the analytical predictions for channel walls made of different materials (i.e., zeta potentials). This was tested in channels that had three PDMS and one quartz wall, resulting in a flow with an asymmetric velocity profile due to variations in the zeta potential between the walls. PMID:25502599

  2. Investigation of the effects of pressure gradient, temperature and wall temperature ratio on the stagnation point heat transfer for circular cylinders and gas turbine vanes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nagamatsu, H. T.; Duffy, R. E.

    1984-01-01

    Low and high pressure shock tubes were designed and constructed for the purpose of obtaining heat transfer data over a temperature range of 390 to 2500 K, pressures of 0.3 to 42 atm, and Mach numbers of 0.15 to 1.5 with and without pressure gradient. A square test section with adjustable top and bottom walls was constructed to produce the favorable and adverse pressure gradient over the flat plate with heat gages. A water cooled gas turbine nozzle cascade which is attached to the high pressure shock tube was obtained to measuse the heat flux over pressure and suction surfaces. Thin-film platinum heat gages with a response time of a few microseconds were developed and used to measure the heat flux for laminar, transition, and turbulent boundary layers. The laminar boundary heat flux on the shock tube wall agreed with Mirel's flat plate theory. Stagnation point heat transfer for circular cylinders at low temperature compared with the theoretical prediction, but for a gas temperature of 922 K the heat fluxes were higher than the predicted values. Preliminary flat plate heat transfer data were measured for laminar, transition, and turbulent boundary layers with and without pressure gradients for free-stream temperatures of 350 to 2575 K and flow Mach numbers of 0.11 to 1.9. The experimental heat flux data were correlated with the laminar and turbulent theories and the agreement was good at low temperatures which was not the case for higher temperatures.

  3. Relationship between early diastolic intraventricular pressure gradients, an index of elastic recoil, and improvements in systolic and diastolic function

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Firstenberg, M. S.; Smedira, N. G.; Greenberg, N. L.; Prior, D. L.; McCarthy, P. M.; Garcia, M. J.; Thomas, J. D.

    2001-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Early diastolic intraventricular pressure gradients (IVPGs) have been proposed to relate to left ventricular (LV) elastic recoil and early ventricular "suction." Animal studies have demonstrated relationships between IVPGs and systolic and diastolic indices during acute ischemia. However, data on the effects of improvements in LV function in humans and the relationship to IVPGs are lacking. METHODS AND RESULTS: Eight patients undergoing CABG and/or infarct exclusion surgery had a triple-sensor high-fidelity catheter placed across the mitral valve intraoperatively for simultaneous recording of left atrial (LA), basal LV, and apical LV pressures. Hemodynamic data obtained before bypass were compared with those with similar LA pressures and heart rates obtained after bypass. From each LV waveform, the time constant of LV relaxation (tau), +dP/dt(max), and -dP/dt(max) were determined. Transesophageal echocardiography was used to determined end-diastolic (EDV) and end-systolic (ESV) volumes and ejection fractions (EF). At similar LA pressures and heart rates, IVPG increased after bypass (before bypass 1.64+/-0.79 mm Hg; after bypass 2.67+/-1.25 mm Hg; P<0.01). Significant improvements were observed in ESV, as well as in apical and basal +dP/dt(max), -dP/dt(max), and tau (each P<0.05). Overall, IVPGs correlated inversely with both ESV (IVPG=-0.027[ESV]+3.46, r=-0.64) and EDV (IVPG=-0.027[EDV]+4.30, r=-0.70). Improvements in IVPGs correlated with improvements in apical tau (Deltatau =5.93[DeltaIVPG]+4.76, r=0.91) and basal tau (Deltatau =2.41[DeltaIVPG]+5.13, r=-0.67). Relative changes in IVPGs correlated with changes in ESV (DeltaESV=-0.97[%DeltaIVPG]+23.34, r=-0.79), EDV (DeltaEDV=-1.16[%DeltaIVPG]+34.92, r=-0.84), and EF (DeltaEF=0.38[%DeltaIVPG]-8.39, r=0.85). CONCLUSIONS: Improvements in LV function also increase IVPGs. These changes in IVPGs, suggestive of increases in LV suction and elastic recoil, correlate directly with improvements in LV relaxation

  4. Bell's Theorem and Entangled Solitons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rybakov, Yu. P.; Kamalov, T. F.

    2016-09-01

    Entangled solitons construction being introduced in the nonlinear spinor field model, the Einstein—Podolsky—Rosen (EPR) spin correlation is calculated and shown to coincide with the quantum mechanical one for the 1/2-spin particles.

  5. The history of the soliton

    SciTech Connect

    Newell, A.C.

    1983-12-01

    It is pointed out that the discovery of the soliton, its remarkable properties, and the incredible richness of structure involved in its mathematical description occurred in two stages and over a period of almost 140 years. The first reported incident related to the phenomenon of the soliton involves the 'Wave of Translation' described by Scott Russell (1844). Another important development occurred in connection with questions concerning the reason for the finite heat conductivity of solids. These questions led to the conduction of a numerical study by Fermi et al. (1955). The results of this study, called the Fermi-Pasta-Ulam (FPU) experiment, were the motivation for investigations in which the soliton was discovered. This discovery was announced by Zabusky and Kruskal (1965). Attention is also given to the conservation laws and the Miura transformation, the inverse scattering transform, the Lax equation, developments in nonlinear optics, soliton factories, and the need for a unifying point of view.

  6. Longitudinal solitons in carbon nanotubes

    SciTech Connect

    Astakhova, T. Yu.; Gurin, O. D.; Menon, M.; Vinogradov, G. A.

    2001-07-15

    We present results on soliton excitations in carbon nanotubes (CNT's) using Brenner's many-body potential. Our numerical simulations demonstrate high soliton stability in (10,10) CNT's. The interactions of solitons and solitary excitation with CNT defect are found to be inelastic if the excitations and defects length scales are comparable, resulting in a substantial part of soliton energy being distributed inhomogeneously over the defect bonds. In these solitary-excitation--cap collisions the local energy of a few bonds in the cap can exceed the average energy by an order of magnitude and more. This phenomenon, denoted the ''Tsunami effect,'' can contribute dynamically to the recently proposed ''kinky chemistry.'' We also present results of changes in the local density of states and variations in the atomic partial charges estimated at different time instants of the solitary-excitation Tsunami at the nanotube cap.

  7. Hairy AdS solitons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anabalón, Andrés; Astefanesei, Dumitru; Choque, David

    2016-11-01

    We construct exact hairy AdS soliton solutions in Einstein-dilaton gravity theory. We examine their thermodynamic properties and discuss the role of these solutions for the existence of first order phase transitions for hairy black holes. The negative energy density associated to hairy AdS solitons can be interpreted as the Casimir energy that is generated in the dual filed theory when the fermions are antiperiodic on the compact coordinate.

  8. Soliton structure in crystalline acetanilide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eilbeck, J. C.; Lomdahl, P. S.; Scott, A. C.

    1984-10-01

    The theory of self-trapping of amide I vibrational energy in crystalline acetanilide is studied in detail. A spectrum of stationary, self-trapped (soliton) solutions is determined and tested for dynamic stability. Only those solutions for which the amide I energy is concentrated near a single molecule were found to be stable. Exciton modes were found to be unstable to decay into solitons.

  9. Soliton structure in crystalline acetanilide

    SciTech Connect

    Eilbeck, J.C.; Lomdahl, P.S.; Scott, A.C.

    1984-10-15

    The theory of self-trapping of amide I vibrational energy in crystalline acetanilide is studied in detail. A spectrum of stationary, self-trapped (soliton) solutions is determined and tested for dynamic stability. Only those solutions for which the amide I energy is concentrated near a single molecule were found to be stable. Exciton modes were found to be unstable to decay into solitons.

  10. A study of turbulence on compression ramps with k-epsilon and Reynolds stress models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, J.; Taulbee, D. B.; Holden, M. S.

    1990-01-01

    A theoretical study was conducted to determine the effects of adverse pressure gradient and compressibility in modeling turbulent compressible flows. The kinetic energy/dissipation and Reynolds stress model predictions are presented and compared with experimental data. The effects of compressibility, which include the mass averaged fluctuation term, the pressure dilatation term, and the dilatation dissipation, are important in modeling the turbulent compressible flows. The normal stresses and longitudinal strain rates also have an effect in the prediction of turbulent energy productions on the curved surfaces. A new compressible formulation of the pressure strain term, which includes the dilatation effects, in the Reynolds stress equation is presented.

  11. Soliton quenching NLTL impulse circuit with a pulse forming network at the output

    DOEpatents

    McEwan, T.E.; Dallum, G.E.

    1998-09-08

    An impulse forming circuit is disclosed which produces a clean impulse from a nonlinear transmission line compressed step function without customary soliton ringing by means of a localized pulse shaping and differentiating network which shunts the nonlinear transmission line output to ground. 5 figs.

  12. Soliton quenching NLTL impulse circuit with a pulse forming network at the output

    DOEpatents

    McEwan, Thomas E.; Dallum, Gregory E.

    1998-01-01

    An impulse forming circuit is disclosed which produces a clean impulse from a nonlinear transmission line compressed step function without customary soliton ringing by means of a localized pulse shaping and differentiating network which shunts the nonlinear transmission line output to ground.

  13. Geometric solitons of Hamiltonian flows on manifolds

    SciTech Connect

    Song, Chong; Sun, Xiaowei; Wang, Youde

    2013-12-15

    It is well-known that the LIE (Locally Induction Equation) admit soliton-type solutions and same soliton solutions arise from different and apparently irrelevant physical models. By comparing the solitons of LIE and Killing magnetic geodesics, we observe that these solitons are essentially decided by two families of isometries of the domain and the target space, respectively. With this insight, we propose the new concept of geometric solitons of Hamiltonian flows on manifolds, such as geometric Schrödinger flows and KdV flows for maps. Moreover, we give several examples of geometric solitons of the Schrödinger flow and geometric KdV flow, including magnetic curves as geometric Schrödinger solitons and explicit geometric KdV solitons on surfaces of revolution.

  14. Properties of an optical soliton gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwache, A.; Mitschke, F.

    1997-06-01

    We consider light pulses propagating in an optical fiber ring resonator with anomalous dispersion. New pulses are fed into the resonator in synchronism with its round-trip time. We show that solitary pulse shaping leads to a formation of an ensemble of subpulses that are identified as solitons. All solitons in the ensemble are in perpetual relative motion like molecules in a fluid; thus we refer to the ensemble as a soliton gas. Properties of this soliton gas are determined numerically.

  15. Analytical solution for photorefractive screening solitons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Królikowski, Wieslaw; Luther-Davies, Barry; McCarthy, Glen; Bledowski, Aleksander

    2000-02-01

    We study formation and interaction of one-dimensional screening solitons in a photorefractive medium with sublinear dependence of the photoconductivity on light intensity. We find an exact analytical solution to the corresponding nonlinear Schrödinger equation. We show that these solitons are stable in propagation and their interaction is generic for solitons of saturable nonlinearity. In particular, they may fuse or ``give birth'' to new solitons upon collision.

  16. Multifrequency gap solitons in nonlinear photonic crystals.

    PubMed

    Xie, Ping; Zhang, Zhao-Qing

    2003-11-21

    We predict the existence of multifrequency gap solitons (MFGSs) in both one- and two-dimensional nonlinear photonic crystals. A MFGS is a single intrinsic mode possessing multiple frequencies inside the gap. Its existence is a result of synergic nonlinear coupling among solitons or soliton trains at different frequencies. Its formation can either lower the threshold fields of the respective frequency components or stabilize their excitations. These MFGSs form a new class of stable gap solitons.

  17. Kummer solitons in strongly nonlocal nonlinear media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, Wei-Ping; Belić, Milivoj

    2009-01-01

    We solve the three-dimensional (3D) time-dependent strongly nonlocal nonlinear Schrödinger equation (NNSE) in spherical coordinates, with the help of Kummer's functions. We obtain analytical solitary solutions, which we term the Kummer solitons. We compare analytical solutions with the numerical solutions of NNSE. We discuss higher-order Kummer spatial solitons, which can exist in various forms, such as the 3D vortex solitons and the multipole solitons.

  18. Soliton resonance in bose-einstein condensate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zak, Michail; Kulikov, I.

    2002-01-01

    A new phenomenon in nonlinear dispersive systems, including a Bose-Einstein Condensate (BEC), has been described. It is based upon a resonance between an externally induced soliton and 'eigen-solitons' of the homogeneous cubic Schrodinger equation. There have been shown that a moving source of positive /negative potential induces bright /dark solitons in an attractive / repulsive Bose condensate.

  19. Quantization of the chiral soliton in medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagai, S.; Sawado, N.; Shiiki, N.

    2006-01-01

    Chiral solitons coupled with quarks in medium are studied based on the Wigner-Seitz approximation. The chiral quark soliton model is used to obtain the classical soliton solutions. To investigate nucleon and Δ in matter, the semi-classical quantization is performed by the cranking method. The saturation for nucleon matter and Δ matter are observed.

  20. Critical density of a soliton gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El, G. A.

    2016-02-01

    We quantify the notion of a dense soliton gas by establishing an upper bound for the integrated density of states of the quantum-mechanical Schrödinger operator associated with the Korteweg-de Vries soliton gas dynamics. As a by-product of our derivation, we find the speed of sound in the soliton gas with Gaussian spectral distribution function.

  1. Control of optical solitons by light waves.

    PubMed

    Grigoryan, V S; Hasegawa, A; Maruta, A

    1995-04-15

    A new method of controlling optical solitons by means of light wave(s) in fibers is presented. By a proper choice of light wave(s), parametric four-wave mixing can control the soliton shape as well as the soliton parameters (amplitude, frequency, velocity, and position).

  2. Prediction of turbulent boundary layers with a second-moment closure: Part 1--Effects of periodic pressure gradient, wall transpiration,and free-stream turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Shima, N. . College of Engineering)

    1993-03-01

    The purpose of this two-part paper is to assess the performance of a second-moment closure applicable up to a wall. In the present part, the turbulence model is applied to the boundary layers with periodic pressure gradient, with wall transpiration and with free-stream turbulence. The predictions are shown to be in good agreement with experiments and a direct simulation. In particular, a tendency towards relaminarization and a subsequent retransition in the oscillating boundary layer are faithfully reproduced, and the effect of the length scale of free-stream turbulence is correctly captured.

  3. PIC simulation of compressive and rarefactive dust ion-acoustic solitary waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhong-Zheng; Zhang, Heng; Hong, Xue-Ren; Gao, Dong-Ning; Zhang, Jie; Duan, Wen-Shan; Yang, Lei

    2016-08-01

    The nonlinear propagations of dust ion-acoustic solitary waves in a collisionless four-component unmagnetized dusty plasma system containing nonextensive electrons, inertial negative ions, Maxwellian positive ions, and negatively charged static dust grains have been investigated by the particle-in-cell method. By comparing the simulation results with those obtained from the traditional reductive perturbation method, it is observed that the rarefactive KdV solitons propagate stably at a low amplitude, and when the amplitude is increased, the prime wave form evolves and then gradually breaks into several small amplitude solitary waves near the tail of soliton structure. The compressive KdV solitons propagate unstably and oscillation arises near the tail of soliton structure. The finite amplitude rarefactive and compressive Gardner solitons seem to propagate stably.

  4. Complex solitons with real energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cen, Julia; Fring, Andreas

    2016-09-01

    Using Hirota’s direct method and Bäcklund transformations we construct explicit complex one and two-soliton solutions to the complex Korteweg-de Vries (KdV) equation, the complex modified KdV (mKdV) equation and the complex sine-Gordon equation. The one-soliton solutions of trigonometric and elliptic type turn out to be { P }{ T }-symmetric when a constant of integration is chosen to be purely imaginary with one special choice corresponding to solutions recently found by Khare and Saxena. We show that alternatively complex { P }{ T }-symmetric solutions to the KdV equation may also be constructed alternatively from real solutions to the mKdV by means of Miura transformations. The multi-soliton solutions obtained from Hirota’s method break the { P }{ T }-symmetric, whereas those obtained from Bäcklund transformations are { P }{ T }-invariant under certain conditions. Despite the fact that some of the Hamiltonian densities are non-Hermitian, the total energy is found to be positive in all cases, that is irrespective of whether they are { P }{ T }-symmetric or not. The reason is that the symmetry can be restored by suitable shifts in space-time and the fact that any of our N-soliton solutions may be decomposed into N separate { P }{ T }-symmetrizable one-soliton solutions.

  5. Complex solitons with real energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cen, Julia; Fring, Andreas

    2016-09-01

    Using Hirota’s direct method and Bäcklund transformations we construct explicit complex one and two-soliton solutions to the complex Korteweg–de Vries (KdV) equation, the complex modified KdV (mKdV) equation and the complex sine-Gordon equation. The one-soliton solutions of trigonometric and elliptic type turn out to be { P }{ T }-symmetric when a constant of integration is chosen to be purely imaginary with one special choice corresponding to solutions recently found by Khare and Saxena. We show that alternatively complex { P }{ T }-symmetric solutions to the KdV equation may also be constructed alternatively from real solutions to the mKdV by means of Miura transformations. The multi-soliton solutions obtained from Hirota’s method break the { P }{ T }-symmetric, whereas those obtained from Bäcklund transformations are { P }{ T }-invariant under certain conditions. Despite the fact that some of the Hamiltonian densities are non-Hermitian, the total energy is found to be positive in all cases, that is irrespective of whether they are { P }{ T }-symmetric or not. The reason is that the symmetry can be restored by suitable shifts in space–time and the fact that any of our N-soliton solutions may be decomposed into N separate { P }{ T }-symmetrizable one-soliton solutions.

  6. Thermal diffusion of Boussinesq solitons.

    PubMed

    Arévalo, Edward; Mertens, Franz G

    2007-10-01

    We consider the problem of the soliton dynamics in the presence of an external noisy force for the Boussinesq type equations. A set of ordinary differential equations (ODEs) of the relevant coordinates of the system is derived. We show that for the improved Boussinesq (IBq) equation the set of ODEs has limiting cases leading to a set of ODEs which can be directly derived either from the ill-posed Boussinesq equation or from the Korteweg-de Vries (KdV) equation. The case of a soliton propagating in the presence of damping and thermal noise is considered for the IBq equation. A good agreement between theory and simulations is observed showing the strong robustness of these excitations. The results obtained here generalize previous results obtained in the frame of the KdV equation for lattice solitons in the monatomic chain of atoms. PMID:17995127

  7. Solitons and nonlinear wave equations

    SciTech Connect

    Dodd, Roger K.; Eilbeck, J. Chris; Gibbon, John D.; Morris, Hedley C.

    1982-01-01

    A discussion of the theory and applications of classical solitons is presented with a brief treatment of quantum mechanical effects which occur in particle physics and quantum field theory. The subjects addressed include: solitary waves and solitons, scattering transforms, the Schroedinger equation and the Korteweg-de Vries equation, and the inverse method for the isospectral Schroedinger equation and the general solution of the solvable nonlinear equations. Also considered are: isolation of the Korteweg-de Vries equation in some physical examples, the Zakharov-Shabat/AKNS inverse method, kinks and the sine-Gordon equation, the nonlinear Schroedinger equation and wave resonance interactions, amplitude equations in unstable systems, and numerical studies of solitons. 45 references.

  8. Soliton dynamics in proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Foerner, W.

    1996-12-31

    The mechanism for energy and signal transport in proteins is suggested by Davydov is discussed. This mechanism is based on a coupling of amide-I oscillators to acoustic phonons in a hydrogen bonded chain. Results as obtained with the usually used ansaetze are discussed. The quality of these states for an approximate solution of the time-dependent Schroedinger equation is investigated. It is found that the semiclassical ansatz is a poor approximation, while the more sophisticated {vert_bar}D{sub 1}> state seems to represent the exact dynamics quite well. Calculations at a temperature of 300K for one chain, as well as for three coupled ones (as they are present in an {alpha}-helix) are presented and discussed. From the calculations it is evident, that Davydov solitons are stable for reasonable parameter values at 300K only for special initial excitation at one terminal site of the chain, which has to be the one having a C=O group not directly coupled to the lattice. Since the model for temperature effects used was critisized from the theoretical point of view, we suggest an improved theory for temperature effects. Recent experimental findings, that also normal modes describing mainly N-H stretching vibrations are their coupling to the hydrogen bonds, instead of amide-I, should be considered are discussed.

  9. Soliton-induced electric currents in plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trukhachev, F. M.; Tomov, A. V.

    2016-09-01

    This is a theoretical study of the nonequilibrium motion of charged particles in an electric field of solitons. We show that the self-consistent electric field of ion-acoustic and electron-acoustic solitons is characterized by one-way transfer of charged particles at a distance of several Debye radii. The dependence of relevant local currents on the amplitude of solitons is determined. We consider the practically important case of a moving cascade consisting of many solitons and show that the induced currents have a significant constant component. The kinetic energy acquired by charged particles in the soliton field is calculated. The temporal resolution required for the recording of soliton-induced currents is estimated. The calculations presented here can be used to interpret the results of experiments conducted to study solitons in the space plasma.

  10. Numerical investigation of a coupled moving boundary model of radial flow in low-permeable stress-sensitive reservoir with threshold pressure gradient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen-Chao, Liu; Yue-Wu, Liu; Cong-Cong, Niu; Guo-Feng, Han; Yi-Zhao, Wan

    2016-02-01

    The threshold pressure gradient and formation stress-sensitive effect as the two prominent physical phenomena in the development of a low-permeable reservoir are both considered here for building a new coupled moving boundary model of radial flow in porous medium. Moreover, the wellbore storage and skin effect are both incorporated into the inner boundary conditions in the model. It is known that the new coupled moving boundary model has strong nonlinearity. A coordinate transformation based fully implicit finite difference method is adopted to obtain its numerical solutions. The involved coordinate transformation can equivalently transform the dynamic flow region for the moving boundary model into a fixed region as a unit circle, which is very convenient for the model computation by the finite difference method on fixed spatial grids. By comparing the numerical solution obtained from other different numerical method in the existing literature, its validity can be verified. Eventually, the effects of permeability modulus, threshold pressure gradient, wellbore storage coefficient, and skin factor on the transient wellbore pressure, the derivative, and the formation pressure distribution are analyzed respectively. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 51404232), the China Postdoctoral Science Foundation (Grant No. 2014M561074), and the National Science and Technology Major Project, China (Grant No. 2011ZX05038003).

  11. Effects of Periodic Unsteady Wake Flow and Pressure Gradient on Boundary Layer Transition Along the Concave Surface of a Curved Plate. Part 3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schobeiri, M. T.; Radke, R. E.

    1996-01-01

    Boundary layer transition and development on a turbomachinery blade is subjected to highly periodic unsteady turbulent flow, pressure gradient in longitudinal as well as lateral direction, and surface curvature. To study the effects of periodic unsteady wakes on the concave surface of a turbine blade, a curved plate was utilized. On the concave surface of this plate, detailed experimental investigations were carried out under zero and negative pressure gradient. The measurements were performed in an unsteady flow research facility using a rotating cascade of rods positioned upstream of the curved plate. Boundary layer measurements using a hot-wire probe were analyzed by the ensemble-averaging technique. The results presented in the temporal-spatial domain display the transition and further development of the boundary layer, specifically the ensemble-averaged velocity and turbulence intensity. As the results show, the turbulent patches generated by the wakes have different leading and trailing edge velocities and merge with the boundary layer resulting in a strong deformation and generation of a high turbulence intensity core. After the turbulent patch has totally penetrated into the boundary layer, pronounced becalmed regions were formed behind the turbulent patch and were extended far beyond the point they would occur in the corresponding undisturbed steady boundary layer.

  12. Magnetic turbulence and pressure gradient feedback effect of the 1/2 mode soft-hard magnetohydrodynamic limit in large helical device

    SciTech Connect

    Varela, J.; Watanabe, K. Y.; Ohdachi, S.; Narushima, Y.

    2014-09-15

    The aim of this study was to analyze the feedback process between the magnetic turbulence and the pressure gradients in Large Helical Device (LHD) inward-shifted configurations as well as its role in the transition between the soft-hard magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) regimes for instabilities driven by the mode 1/2 in the middle plasma. In the present paper, we summarize the results of two simulations with different Lundquist numbers, S=2.5×10{sup 5} and 10{sup 6}, assuming a plasma in the slow reconnection regime. The results for the high Lundquist number simulation show that the magnetic turbulence and the pressure gradient in the middle plasma region of LHD are below the critical value to drive the transition to the hard MHD regime, therefore only relaxations in the soft MHD limit are triggered (1/2 sawtooth-like events) [Phys. Plasmas 19, 082512 (2012)]. In the case of the simulation with low Lundquist number, the system reaches the hard MHD limit and a plasma collapse is observed.

  13. Phase structure of soliton molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hause, A.; Hartwig, H.; Seifert, B.; Stolz, H.; Böhm, M.; Mitschke, F.

    2007-06-01

    Temporal optical soliton molecules were recently demonstrated; they potentially allow further increase of data rates in optical telecommunication. Their binding mechanism relies on the internal phases, but these have not been experimentally accessible so far. Conventional frequency-resolved optical gating techniques are not suited for measurement of their phase profile: Their algorithms fail to converge due to zeros both in their temporal and their spectral profile. We show that the VAMPIRE (very advanced method of phase and intensity retrieval of E -fields) method performs reliably. With VAMPIRE the phase profile of soliton molecules has been measured, and further insight into the mechanism is obtained.

  14. Phase structure of soliton molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Hause, A.; Hartwig, H.; Seifert, B.; Stolz, H.; Boehm, M.; Mitschke, F.

    2007-06-15

    Temporal optical soliton molecules were recently demonstrated; they potentially allow further increase of data rates in optical telecommunication. Their binding mechanism relies on the internal phases, but these have not been experimentally accessible so far. Conventional frequency-resolved optical gating techniques are not suited for measurement of their phase profile: Their algorithms fail to converge due to zeros both in their temporal and their spectral profile. We show that the VAMPIRE (very advanced method of phase and intensity retrieval of E-fields) method performs reliably. With VAMPIRE the phase profile of soliton molecules has been measured, and further insight into the mechanism is obtained.

  15. Soliton interactions and the formation of solitonic patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sears, Suzanne M.

    From the stripes of a zebra, to the spirals of cream in a hot cup of coffee, we are surrounded by patterns in the natural world. But why are there patterns? Why drives their formation? In this thesis we study some of the diverse ways patterns can arise due to the interactions between solitary waves in nonlinear systems, sometimes starting from nothing more than random noise. What follows is a set of three studies. In the first, we show how a nonlinear system that supports solitons can be driven to generate exact (regular) Cantor set fractals. As an example, we use numerical simulations to demonstrate the formation of Cantor set fractals by temporal optical solitons. This fractal formation occurs in a cascade of nonlinear optical fibers through the dynamical evolution of a single input soliton. In the second study, we investigate pattern formation initiated by modulation instability in nonlinear partially coherent wave fronts and show that anisotropic noise and/or anisotropic correlation statistics can lead to ordered patterns such as grids and stripes. For the final study, we demonstrate the spontaneous clustering of solitons in partially coherent wavefronts during the final stages of pattern formation initiated by modulation instability and noise. Experimental observations are in agreement with theoretical predictions and are confirmed using numerical simulations.

  16. Modified Korteweg--deVries solitons in a warm plasma with negative ions

    SciTech Connect

    Kalita, B.C. , India ) Kalita, M.K. )

    1990-03-01

    The propagation of ion-acoustic solitons in a warm plasma in the presence of negative ions has been investigated theoretically through the modified Korteweg--deVries (KdV) equation. In the case of the first-order velocity perturbation of the positive ions bearing a constant ratio to that of the negative ions, the existence of both compressive and rarefactive solitons at different critical densities for different temperature ratios has been established when the mass ratio is greater than unity. It is also demonstrated in this case that no modified KdV soliton exists at the critical density in a warm plasma with negative ions when the mass ratio is less than unity.

  17. Compressibility Corrections to Closure Approximations for Turbulent Flow Simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Cloutman, L D

    2003-02-01

    We summarize some modifications to the usual closure approximations for statistical models of turbulence that are necessary for use with compressible fluids at all Mach numbers. We concentrate here on the gradient-flu approximation for the turbulent heat flux, on the buoyancy production of turbulence kinetic energy, and on a modification of the Smagorinsky model to include buoyancy. In all cases, there are pressure gradient terms that do not appear in the incompressible models and are usually omitted in compressible-flow models. Omission of these terms allows unphysical rates of entropy change.

  18. Soliton molecules: Experiments and optimization

    SciTech Connect

    Mitschke, Fedor

    2014-10-06

    Stable compound states of several fiber-optic solitons have recently been demonstrated. In the first experiment their shape was approximated, for want of a better description, by a sum of Gaussians. Here we discuss an optimization strategy which helps to find preferable shapes so that the generation of radiative background is reduced.

  19. Vibrational soliton: an experimental overview

    SciTech Connect

    Bigio, I.J.

    1986-03-08

    To date the most convincing evidence of vibrational solitons in biopolymers has been found in two very disparate systems: Davydov-like excitations in hydrogen-bonded linear chains (acetanilide and N-methylacetamide) which are not biopolymers but plausible structural paradigms for biopolymers, and longitudinal accoustic modes of possibly nonlinear character in biologically viable DNA. 17 refs., 4 figs.

  20. Solitons induced by boundary conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, R.L.

    1987-01-01

    Although soliton phenomena have attracted wide attention since 1965, there are still not enough efforts paid to mixed-boundary - initial-value problems that are important in real physical cases. The main purpose of this thesis is to study carefully the various boundary-induced soliton under different initial conditions. The author states with three sets of nonlinear equations: KdV equations and Boussinesq equations (for water); two-fluid equations for cold-ion plasma. He was interested in four types of problems involved with water solitons: excitation by different time-dependent boundary conditions under different initial conditions; head-on and over-taking collisions; reflection at a wall and the excitation by pure initial conditions. For KdV equations, only cases one and four are conducted. The results from two fully nonlinear KdV and Boussinesq equations are compared, and agree extremely well. The Boussinesq equations permit solition head-on collisions and reflections, studied the first time. The results from take-over collision agree with KdV results. For the ion-acoustic plasma, a set of Boussinesq-type equations was derived from the standard two-fluid equations for the ion-acoustic plasma. It theoretically proves the essential nature of the solitary wave solutions of the cold-ion plasma. The ion acoustic solitons are also obtained by prescribing a potential phi/sub 0/ at one grid point.

  1. A comparison of experimental and theoretical results for leakage, pressure gradients, and rotordynamic coefficients for tapered annular gas seal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elrod, D. A.; Childs, D. W.

    1986-01-01

    A brief review of current annular seal theory and a discussion of the predicted effect on stiffness of tapering the seal stator are presented. An outline of Nelson's analytical-computational method for determining rotordynamic coefficients for annular compressible-flow seals is included. Modifications to increase the maximum rotor speed of an existing air-seal test apparatus at Texas A&M University are described. Experimental results, including leakage, entrance-loss coefficients, pressure distributions, and normalized rotordynamic coefficients, are presented for four convergent-tapered, smooth-rotor, smooth-stator seals. A comparison of the test results shows that an inlet-to-exit clearance ratio of 1.5 to 2.0 provides the maximum direct stiffness, a clearance ratio of 2.5 provides the greatest stability, and a clearance ratio of 1.0 provides the least stability. The experimental results are compared to theoretical results from Nelson's analysis with good agreement. Test results for cross-coupled stiffness show less sensitivity of fluid prerotation than predicted.

  2. Numerical investigation of soliton dynamics, injection into the transition region of a soliton diode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdollahi, Soheil; Raissi, Farshid

    2013-06-01

    We investigate soliton-antisoliton interactions by numerical simulation of a nonlinear transmission line. Long Josephson junction acts as a nonlinear transmission line in which soliton solutions are obtained form Sine-Gordon equation. By proper initial and boundary conditions solitons and antisolitons are obtained inside the same junction, simulating the so called soliton diode. The role of loss in the annihilation of solitons and antisolitons injected to the transition region of the soliton diode is investigated by numerical simulation of their dynamics and phase revolution along the junction. It is shown that such loss can greatly reduce the speed of solitons and antisolitons, lowering the frequency response of the device. A so called “locally-lossy” soliton diode is proposed and it is shown that this configuration maintains annihilation process without much degradation of the device speed.

  3. All-fiber ultrafast thulium-doped fiber ring laser with dissipative soliton and noise-like output in normal dispersion by single-wall carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, QingQing; Chen, Tong; Li, Mingshan; Zhang, Botao; Lu, Yongfeng; Chen, Kevin P.

    2013-07-01

    An ultrafast thulium-doped fiber laser with large net normal dispersion has been developed to produce dissipative soliton and noise-like outputs at 1.9 μm. The mode-locked operation was enabled by using single-wall carbon nanotubes as saturable absorber for all-fiber configuration. Dissipative soliton in normal dispersion produced by the fiber laser oscillator was centered at 1947 nm with 4.1-nm FWHM bandwidth and 0.45 nJ/pulse. The output dissipative soliton pulses were compressed to 2.3 ps outside the laser cavity.

  4. Unambiguous demonstration of soliton evolution in slow-light silicon photonic crystal waveguides with SFG-XFROG.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiujian; Liao, Jiali; Nie, Yongming; Marko, Matthew; Jia, Hui; Liu, Ju; Wang, Xiaochun; Wong, Chee Wei

    2015-04-20

    We demonstrate the temporal and spectral evolution of picosecond soliton in the slow light silicon photonic crystal waveguides (PhCWs) by sum frequency generation cross-correlation frequency resolved optical grating (SFG-XFROG) and nonlinear Schrödinger equation (NLSE) modeling. The reference pulses for the SFG-XFROG measurements are unambiguously pre-characterized by the second harmonic generation frequency resolved optical gating (SHG-FROG) assisted with the combination of NLSE simulations and optical spectrum analyzer (OSA) measurements. Regardless of the inevitable nonlinear two photon absorption, high order soliton compressions have been observed remarkably owing to the slow light enhanced nonlinear effects in the silicon PhCWs. Both the measurements and the further numerical analyses of the pulse dynamics indicate that, the free carrier dispersion (FCD) enhanced by the slow light effects is mainly responsible for the compression, the acceleration, and the spectral blue shift of the soliton. PMID:25969070

  5. Mode-locked fiber laser with cascaded generation of coherent Raman dissipative solitons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kharenko, Denis S.; Bednyakova, Anastasia E.; Podivilov, Evgenii V.; Fedoruk, Mikhail P.; Apolonskiy, Alexander A.; Babin, Sergey A.

    2016-03-01

    We experimentally demonstrate a cascaded generation of a conventional dissipative soliton (DS) at 1020 nm and Raman dissipative solitons (RDS) of the first (1065 nm) and second (1115 nm) orders inside a common fiber laser cavity. The generated high-energy pulses are shown to be linearly-chirped and compressible to 200-300 fs durations for all wavelengths. Moreover, the pulses are mutually coherent that has been confirmed by efficient coherent combining exhibiting ~75 fs and <40 fs interference fringes within the combined pulse envelope of a DS with the first-order RDS and the second-order RDS respectively. The numerical simulation was performed with sinusoidal (soft) and step-like (hard) spectral filters and took into account the discreetness of the laser elements. Shown that even higher degree of coherence and shorter pulses could be achieved with hard spectral filtering. This approach opens the door towards cascaded generation of multiple coherent dissipative solitons in a broad spectral range (so-called dissipative soliton comb). The demonstrated source of coherent dissipative solitons can improve numerous areas such as frequency comb generation, pulse synthesis, biomedical imaging and the generation of coherent mid-infrared supercontinuum.

  6. Making beam splitters with dark soliton collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Steiglitz, Ken

    2010-10-15

    We show with numerical simulations that for certain simple choices of parameters, the waveguides induced by colliding dark solitons in a Kerr medium yield a complete family of beam splitters for trapped linear waves, ranging from total transmission to total deflection. The way energy is transferred from one waveguide to another is similar to that of a directional coupler, but no special fabrication is required. Dark soliton beam splitters offer potential advantages over their bright soliton counterparts: Their transfer characteristics do not depend on the relative phase or speed of the colliding solitons; dark solitons are generally more robust than bright solitons; and the probe peaks at nulls of the pump, enhancing the signal-to-noise ratio for probe detection. The last factor is especially important for possible application to quantum information processing.

  7. Numerical study of compressibility effects on the reversed shear Alfvén eigenmode in tokamak plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Limin; Zhang, Xianmei; Sheng, Zheng-Mao

    2013-08-15

    Compressibility effects on the reversed shear Alfvén eigenmode in tokamak plasma are studied numerically. It is shown that compressibility is favorable for the existence of the reversed shear Alfvén eigenmode even without the pressure gradient, and the frequency of the reversed shear Alfvén eigenmode is modified by the geodesic frequency, which is consistent with an analytical theory.

  8. Validation of pressure gradient and peripheral fractional flow reserve measured by a pressure wire for diagnosis of iliofemoral artery disease with intermediate stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Murata, Naotaka; Aihara, Hideaki; Soga, Yoshimitsu; Tomoi, Yusuke; Hiramori, Seiichi; Kobayashi, Yohei; Ichihashi, Kei; Tanaka, Nobuhiro

    2015-01-01

    Objective To examine the pressure gradient and peripheral fractional flow reserve (pFFR) measured by a pressure wire as indicators of hemodynamic significance in iliofemoral angiographic intermediate stenosis. Background The utility of pressure measurements using a pressure wire with vasodilators is unclear in cases with intermediate iliofemoral stenosis. Methods The mean pressure gradient (MPG) and mean pressure ratio (MPR) were measured at baseline and after injection of isosorbide dinitrate in 23 lesions with angiographically intermediate iliofemoral stenosis. Patients with complex lesions, infrapopliteal artery lesions, chronic total occlusion, and surgical bypass grafts were excluded. Hyperemic MPR was considered equivalent to pFFR. Changes in parameters in response to vasodilators were assessed and correlations of peak systolic velocity ratio (PSVR) with hyperemic MPG and pFFR were examined using duplex ultrasound. Results After injection of isosorbide dinitrate, hyperemic MPG increased significantly (from 9.0±5.7 to 16.3±6.2 mmHg; P<0.05) and hyperemic MPR (pFFR) decreased significantly (from 0.92±0.06 to 0.81±0.07; P<0.05). PSVR was significantly correlated with hyperemic MPG (R=0.52; P<0.05) and pFFR (R=−0.50; P<0.05). The optimal cut-off value of pFFR as an indicator of significant hemodynamic stenosis (PSVR >2.5) was 0.85 (area under the curve 0.72; sensitivity 94%; specificity 50%, P<0.05). Conclusion pFFR measured using a pressure wire is reliable for prediction of hemodynamic significance in iliofemoral intermediate stenosis. PMID:26635488

  9. Utility of continuous wave Doppler echocardiography in the noninvasive assessment of left ventricular outflow tract pressure gradient in patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Panza, J A; Petrone, R K; Fananapazir, L; Maron, B J

    1992-01-01

    Subaortic obstruction is an important determinant of the clinical presentation of and therapeutic approach to patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. Therefore, assessment of the presence and magnitude of the intraventricular pressure gradient is paramount in the clinical evaluation of these patients. To establish the utility of continuous wave Doppler echocardiography in assessing the pressure gradient in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, 28 patients representing the wide hemodynamic spectrum of this disease underwent simultaneous determination of the subaortic gradient by continuous wave Doppler ultrasound and cardiac catheterization. With use of the modified Bernoulli equation, the Doppler-estimated gradient showed a strong correlation with the maximal instantaneous pressure difference measured at catheterization, both under basal conditions (r = 0.93; p less than 0.0001) and during provocative maneuvers (r = 0.89; p less than 0.0001). In 26 of the 28 patients, all assessments of the subaortic gradient were in agreement within 15 mm Hg (average difference 5 +/- 3 mm Hg). In the other two patients there were substantial differences between these measurements (under basal conditions in one patient and after provocation in another), although the Doppler technique predicted the presence of marked subaortic obstruction in each. In both patients the erroneous interpretation was due to superimposition of the mitral regurgitation signal on that of left ventricular outflow. Doppler waveforms from the left ventricular outflow tract showed variability in contour among different patients and in individual patients. Hence, continuous wave Doppler echocardiography is a useful noninvasive method for estimating the subaortic gradient in patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. However, technical factors such as contamination of the outflow tract jet with that of mitral regurgitation and variability in waveform configuration may importantly influence such assessments of the

  10. Solitons in the midst of chaos

    SciTech Connect

    Seghete, Vlad; Menyuk, Curtis R.; Marks, Brian S.

    2007-10-15

    A system of coupled nonlinear Schroedinger equations describes pulse propagation in weakly birefringent optical fibers. Soliton solutions of this system are found numerically through the shooting method. We employ Poincare surface of section plots - a standard dynamical systems approach - to analyze the phase space behavior of these solutions and neighboring trajectories. Chaotic behavior around the solitons is apparent and suggests dynamical instability. A Lyapunov stability analysis confirms this result. Thus, solitons exist in the midst of chaos.

  11. Four-wave-mixing gap solitons

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Yanpeng; Wang Zhiguo; Zheng Huaibin; Yuan Chenzhi; Li Changbiao; Lu Keqing; Xiao Min

    2010-11-15

    We report an experimental demonstration of generating gap soliton trains in a four-wave-mixing (FWM) signal. Such spatial FWM surfacelike gap soliton trains are induced in a periodically modulated self-defocusing atomic medium by the cross-phase modulation, which can be reshaped under different experimental conditions, such as different atomic densities, nonlinear dispersions, and dressing fields. Controlling spatial gap solitons can have important applications in image memory, processing, and communication.

  12. Observation of noise-like solitons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, Yandong; Shum, Ping; Tang, M.; Tang, Ding Y.; Lu, C.; Guo, Xin; Qi, Z. W.; Lin, Feng

    2004-05-01

    Noise-like ultra-short soliton pulses train of 72fs without CW components are observed from Figure-8 passively mode locked fiber laser; noise-like bound states of asymmetrical solitons train with pulse width of 103fs and separation of 585.5fs are also observed. The bound soliton separation and pulsewidth keep unchanged even after 1.2Km Single Mode Fiber transmission.

  13. Soliton splitting in quenched classical integrable systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gamayun, O.; Semenyakin, M.

    2016-08-01

    We take a soliton solution of a classical non-linear integrable equation and quench (suddenly change) its non-linearity parameter. For that we multiply the amplitude or the width of a soliton by a numerical factor η and take the obtained profile as a new initial condition. We find the values of η for which the post-quench solution consists of only a finite number of solitons. The parameters of these solitons are found explicitly. Our approach is based on solving the direct scattering problem analytically. We demonstrate how it works for Korteweg–de Vries, sine-Gordon and non-linear Schrödinger integrable equations.

  14. Discrete surface solitons in two dimensions

    SciTech Connect

    Susanto, H.; Kevrekidis, P. G.; Malomed, B. A.; Carretero-Gonzalez, R.; Frantzeskakis, D. J.

    2007-05-15

    We investigate fundamental localized modes in two-dimensional lattices with an edge (surface). The interaction with the edge expands the stability area for fundamental solitons, and induces a difference between dipoles oriented perpendicular and parallel to the surface. On the contrary, lattice vortex solitons cannot exist too close to the border. We also show, analytically and numerically, that the edge supports a species of localized patterns, which exists too but is unstable in the uniform lattice, namely, a horseshoe-shaped soliton, whose ''skeleton'' consists of three lattice sites. Unstable horseshoes transform themselves into a pair of ordinary solitons.

  15. Traveling dark solitons in superfluid Fermi gases

    SciTech Connect

    Liao Renyuan; Brand, Joachim

    2011-04-15

    Families of dark solitons exist in superfluid Fermi gases. The energy-velocity dispersion and number of depleted particles completely determine the dynamics of dark solitons on a slowly varying background density. For the unitary Fermi gas, we determine these relations from general scaling arguments and conservation of local particle number. We find solitons to oscillate sinusoidally at the trap frequency reduced by a factor of 1/{radical}(3). Numerical integration of the time-dependent Bogoliubov-de Gennes equation determines spatial profiles and soliton-dispersion relations across the BEC-BCS crossover, and proves consistent with the scaling relations at unitarity.

  16. Integrable model for density-modulated quantum condensates: Solitons passing through a soliton lattice.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Daisuke A

    2016-06-01

    An integrable model possessing inhomogeneous ground states is proposed as an effective model of nonuniform quantum condensates such as supersolids and Fulde-Ferrell-Larkin-Ovchinnikov superfluids. The model is a higher-order analog of the nonlinear Schrödinger equation. We derive an n-soliton solution via the inverse scattering theory with elliptic-functional background and reveal various kinds of soliton dynamics such as dark soliton billiards, dislocations, gray solitons, and envelope solitons. We also provide the exact bosonic and fermionic quasiparticle eigenstates and show their tunneling phenomena. The solutions are expressed by a determinant of theta functions. PMID:27415270

  17. Integrable model for density-modulated quantum condensates: Solitons passing through a soliton lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, Daisuke A.

    2016-06-01

    An integrable model possessing inhomogeneous ground states is proposed as an effective model of nonuniform quantum condensates such as supersolids and Fulde-Ferrell-Larkin-Ovchinnikov superfluids. The model is a higher-order analog of the nonlinear Schrödinger equation. We derive an n -soliton solution via the inverse scattering theory with elliptic-functional background and reveal various kinds of soliton dynamics such as dark soliton billiards, dislocations, gray solitons, and envelope solitons. We also provide the exact bosonic and fermionic quasiparticle eigenstates and show their tunneling phenomena. The solutions are expressed by a determinant of theta functions.

  18. Highly coherent mid-IR supercontinuum by self-defocusing solitons in lithium niobate waveguides with all-normal dispersion.

    PubMed

    Guo, Hairun; Zhou, Binbin; Zeng, Xianglong; Bache, Morten

    2014-05-19

    We numerically investigate self-defocusing solitons in a lithium niobate (LN) waveguide designed to have a large refractive index (RI) change. The waveguide evokes strong waveguide dispersion and all-normal dispersion is found in the entire guiding band spanning the near-IR and the beginning of the mid-IR. Meanwhile, a self-defocusing nonlinearity is invoked by the cascaded (phase-mismatched) second-harmonic generation under a quasi-phase-matching pitch. Combining this with the all-normal dispersion, mid-IR solitons can form and the waveguide presents the first all-nonlinear and solitonic device where no linear dispersion (i.e. non-solitonic) regimes exist within the guiding band. Soliton compressions at 2 μm and 3 μm are investigated, with nano-joule single cycle pulse formations and highly coherent octave-spanning supercontinuum generations. With an alternative design on the waveguide dispersion, the soliton spectral tunneling effect is also investigated, with which few-cycle pico-joule pulses at 2 μm are formed by a near-IR pump. PMID:24921341

  19. Regularized degenerate multi-solitons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Correa, Francisco; Fring, Andreas

    2016-09-01

    We report complex PT-symmetric multi-soliton solutions to the Korteweg de-Vries equation that asymptotically contain one-soliton solutions, with each of them possessing the same amount of finite real energy. We demonstrate how these solutions originate from degenerate energy solutions of the Schrödinger equation. Technically this is achieved by the application of Darboux-Crum transformations involving Jordan states with suitable regularizing shifts. Alternatively they may be constructed from a limiting process within the context Hirota's direct method or on a nonlinear superposition obtained from multiple Bäcklund transformations. The proposed procedure is completely generic and also applicable to other types of nonlinear integrable systems.

  20. Regularized degenerate multi-solitons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Correa, Francisco; Fring, Andreas

    2016-09-01

    We report complex {P}{T} -symmetric multi-soliton solutions to the Korteweg de-Vries equation that asymptotically contain one-soliton solutions, with each of them possessing the same amount of finite real energy. We demonstrate how these solutions originate from degenerate energy solutions of the Schrödinger equation. Technically this is achieved by the application of Darboux-Crum transformations involving Jordan states with suitable regularizing shifts. Alternatively they may be constructed from a limiting process within the context Hirota's direct method or on a nonlinear superposition obtained from multiple Bäcklund transformations. The proposed procedure is completely generic and also applicable to other types of nonlinear integrable systems.

  1. Complex Affine Toda Theories and Soliton Solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Zhiqing

    1995-01-01

    Toda field theories (TFT's) constitute a large class of integrable (1 + 1)-dimensional field theories that are relativistically invariant: included are conformal field theories and integrable deformations away from conformality. Because they are soluble, for example, by the inverse scattering method, and because they are related to many other areas of field theory, they have been studied extensively in recent years. Hirota's method is a straightforward procedure to obtain soliton solutions to non-linear integrable equations. In Hirota's method, one first writes the nonlinear equations in Hirota's bilinear form, and then expands the so called tau-functions as a power series in an arbitrary parameter. The power series terminates at some finite order, thus the solutions obtained are exact. For an N-soliton solution, the number of terms in the expansion grows exponentially with N, making direct calculation of N-soliton solutions difficult. We extend Hirota's one -parameter expansion to an N-parameter expansion. In the new expansion series, many terms are identical to those in the (N - 1)-soliton solutions, and new terms grow only linearly with N. Furthermore, we note that the expansion must terminate at some finite order, thus the vanishing of higher order terms can be used as constraints on these new terms. It turns out that these constraints can be used to determine the new terms completely. We used this extended Hirota's method to find N-soliton solutions for complex affine TFT's based on a simply-laced Kac-Moody algebra. Soliton solutions for non-simply-laced complex ATFT's can be obtained for those of simply-laced complex ATFT's by folding or twisting. Even though some soliton solutions have already been obtained for complex ATFT's by various methods, the physical implications of these solutions have not yet been thoroughly discussed. There are infinitely many distinct topological solitons in any given complex affine Toda field theory and most of them have complex

  2. Solitons in negative phase metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boardman, A. D.; Mitchell-Thomas, R. C.; Rapoport, Y. G.; Egan, P.; King, N.

    2008-04-01

    The fundamental approach to a slowly varying amplitude formulation for nonlinear waves in metamaterials will be established. The weakly nonlinear slowly varying amplitude approach will be critically examined and some misunderstandings in the literature will be fully addressed. The extent to which negative phase behaviour has a fundamental influence upon soliton behaviour will be addressed and will include non-paraxiality, self-steepening and nonlinear diffraction. A Lagrangian approach will be presented as a way of developing a clear picture of dynamical behaviour. Exciting examples, involving waveguide and polarization coupling and interferometer systems will illustrate the extent to which non-paraxiality, self-steepening and nonlinear diffraction will be required as part of the soliton behaviour patterns, including coupler systems. In addition, a strongly nonlinear approach will be taken that seeks exact solutions to the nonlinear equations for a metamaterial. The investigations will embrace "optical needles", or autosolitons. A boundary field amplitude approach will be developed that leads to useful and elegant eigenvalue equations that expose in a very clear manner the dependence of wave number upon the optical power density. All the work will be beautifully illustrated with dramatic color-coded outcomes that will also embrace the soliton lens.

  3. Excitation of gap solitons, soliton trains, and soliton sets in finite-sized two-dimensional photonic crystals.

    PubMed

    Xie, Ping; Zhang, Zhao-Qing

    2004-03-01

    We study in detail the excitation of gap solitons in finite-sized two-dimensional photonic crystals under various kinds of source configuration, including two external beams along different incident directions and a point source at different locations inside the sample. We find different types of gap solitons, such as soliton trains along different symmetry axes of the photonic crystal and soliton sets with a higher rotational symmetry. In the case of a single external beam, we find the existence of an optimal beamwidth d(opt) for the excitation of gap solitons, and the value of d(opt) is close to the diameter of single localized envelopes of the excitation. In the case of a point source, it is found that the excitation threshold depends only on the distance between the source and the nearest cylinder, and its value increases nearly exponentially with distance.

  4. Soliton algebra by vortex-beam splitting.

    PubMed

    Minardi, S; Molina-Terriza, G; Di Trapani, P; Torres, J P; Torner, L

    2001-07-01

    We experimentally demonstrate the possibility of breaking up intense vortex light beams into stable and controllable sets of parametric solitons. We report observations performed in seeded second-harmonic generation, but the scheme can be extended to all parametric processes. The number of generated solitons is shown to be determined by a robust arithmetic rule.

  5. Dissipative Solitons that Cannot be Trapped

    SciTech Connect

    Pardo, Rosa; Perez-Garcia, Victor M.

    2006-12-22

    We show that dissipative solitons in systems with high-order nonlinear dissipation cannot survive in the presence of trapping potentials of the rigid wall or asymptotically increasing type. Solitons in such systems can survive in the presence of a weak potential but only with energies out of the interval of existence of linear quantum mechanical stationary states.

  6. Modulated solitons at a singular Hopf bifurcation

    SciTech Connect

    Pismen, L.M.

    1987-02-15

    Dynamics near a singular Hopf bifurcation under conditions of nonlinear self-focusing is dominated by intermediate-scale solitons with amplitudes and speeds evolving on a slower time scale. The long-scale evolution can result in selection of either standing or propagating solitons with either stationary or oscillating amplitude and speed.

  7. Nonplanar solitons collision in ultracold neutral plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    El-Tantawy, S. A.; Moslem, W. M.; El-Metwally, M.; Sabry, R.; El-Labany, S. K.; Schlickeiser, R.

    2013-09-15

    Collisions between two nonplanar ion-acoustic solitons in strongly coupled ultracold neutral plasmas composed of ion fluid and non-Maxwellian (nonthermal or superthermal) electron distributions are investigated. The extended Poincare-Lighthill-Kuo method is used to obtain coupled nonplanar Kortweg-de Vries equations for describing the system. The nonplanar phase shifts after the interaction of the two solitons are calculated. It is found that the properties of the nonplanar colliding solitons and its corresponding phase shifts are different from those in the planar case. The polarity of the colliding solitons strongly depends on the type of the non-Maxwellian electron distributions. A critical nonthermality parameter β{sub c} is identified. For values of β ≤ β{sub c} solitons with double polarity exist, while this behavior cannot occur for superthermal plasmas. The phase shift for nonthermal plasmas increases below β{sub c} for a positive soliton, but it decreases for β > β{sub c} for a negative soliton. For superthermal plasmas, the phase shift enhances rapidly for low values of spectral index κ and higher values of ions effective temperature ratio σ{sub *}. For 2 ≲ κ<10, the phase shift decreases but does not change for κ > 10. The nonlinear structure, as reported here, is useful for controlling the solitons created in forthcoming ultracold neutral plasma experiments.

  8. Ring-laser solitons: A multipass approach

    SciTech Connect

    Hawkins, R.J. ); Yamamoto, Y. )

    1990-11-27

    We show that higher-order solitons are possible in ring lasers by deriving a modified nonlinear Schroedinger equation based on the discrete-element structure of the ring laser and discuss the implications of this derivation for soliton propagation in these lasers. 3 refs.

  9. Nonlinear, stationary electrostatic ion cyclotron waves: Exact solutions for solitons, periodic waves, and wedge shaped waveforms

    SciTech Connect

    McKenzie, J. F.; Doyle, T. B.; Rajah, S. S.

    2012-11-15

    The theory of fully nonlinear stationary electrostatic ion cyclotron waves is further developed. The existence of two fundamental constants of motion; namely, momentum flux density parallel to the background magnetic field and energy density, facilitates the reduction of the wave structure equation to a first order differential equation. For subsonic waves propagating sufficiently obliquely to the magnetic field, soliton solutions can be constructed. Importantly, analytic expressions for the amplitude of the soliton show that it increases with decreasing wave Mach number and with increasing obliquity to the magnetic field. In the subsonic, quasi-parallel case, periodic waves exist whose compressive and rarefactive amplitudes are asymmetric about the 'initial' point. A critical 'driver' field exists that gives rise to a soliton-like structure which corresponds to infinite wavelength. If the wave speed is supersonic, periodic waves may also be constructed. The aforementioned asymmetry in the waveform arises from the flow being driven towards the local sonic point in the compressive phase and away from it in the rarefactive phase. As the initial driver field approaches the critical value, the end point of the compressive phase becomes sonic and the waveform develops a wedge shape. This feature and the amplitudes of the compressive and rarefactive portions of the periodic waves are illustrated through new analytic expressions that follow from the equilibrium points of a wave structure equation which includes a driver field. These expressions are illustrated with figures that illuminate the nature of the solitons. The presently described wedge-shaped waveforms also occur in water waves, for similar 'transonic' reasons, when a Coriolis force is included.

  10. Progress in turbulence modeling for complex flow fields including effects of compressibility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilcox, D. C.; Rubesin, M. W.

    1980-01-01

    Two second-order-closure turbulence models were devised that are suitable for predicting properties of complex turbulent flow fields in both incompressible and compressible fluids. One model is of the "two-equation" variety in which closure is accomplished by introducing an eddy viscosity which depends on both a turbulent mixing energy and a dissipation rate per unit energy, that is, a specific dissipation rate. The other model is a "Reynolds stress equation" (RSE) formulation in which all components of the Reynolds stress tensor and turbulent heat-flux vector are computed directly and are scaled by the specific dissipation rate. Computations based on these models are compared with measurements for the following flow fields: (a) low speed, high Reynolds number channel flows with plane strain or uniform shear; (b) equilibrium turbulent boundary layers with and without pressure gradients or effects of compressibility; and (c) flow over a convex surface with and without a pressure gradient.

  11. Solitons supported by complex PT-symmetric Gaussian potentials

    SciTech Connect

    Hu Sumei; Ma Xuekai; Lu Daquan; Yang Zhenjun; Zheng Yizhou; Hu Wei

    2011-10-15

    The existence and stability of fundamental, dipole, and tripole solitons in Kerr nonlinear media with parity-time-symmetric Gaussian complex potentials are reported. Fundamental solitons are stable not only in deep potentials but also in shallow potentials. Dipole and tripole solitons are stable only in deep potentials, and tripole solitons are stable in deeper potentials than for dipole solitons. The stable regions of solitons increase with increasing potential depth. The power of solitons increases with increasing propagation constant or decreasing modulation depth of the potentials.

  12. Theory of the Jahn-Teller Soliton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clougherty, Dennis

    2006-03-01

    It is demonstrated that under common conditions a molecular solid subject to Jahn-Teller interactions supports stable Q- ball-like non-topological solitons. Such solitons represent a localized lump of excess electric charge in periodic motion accompanied by a time-dependent shape distortion of a set of adjacent molecules. The motion of the distortion can correspond to a true rotation or to a pseudo-rotation about the symmetric shape configuration. These solitons are stable for Jahn-Teller coupling strengths below a critical value; however, as the Jahn- Teller coupling approaches this critical value, the size of the soliton diverges signaling an incipient structural phase transition. The soliton phase mimics features commonly attributed to phase separation in complex solids.

  13. Small amplitude solitons in a warm plasma with smaller and higher order relativistic effects

    SciTech Connect

    Kalita, B. C.; Das, R.

    2007-07-15

    Solitons have been investigated in a warm plasma through the Korteweg-de Vries (KdV) equation, considering a smaller relativistic effect for {gamma}{approx_equal}O(v{sup 2}/c{sup 2}) and {gamma}{sub e}{approx_equal}O(u{sup 2}/c{sup 2}) and higher relativistic effects for {gamma}{approx_equal}O(v{sup 4}/c{sup 4}) and {gamma}{sub e}{approx_equal}O(u{sup 4/}c{sup 4}). Compressive fast ion-acoustic solitons are observed to exist in the entire range (u{sub 0}-v{sub 0}) subject to a suitable mathematical condition satisfied by the initial streaming velocities u{sub 0},v{sub 0} of the electrons and the ions, respectively, electron to ion mass ratio Q(=m{sub e}/m{sub i}) and ion to electron temperature ratio {sigma}(=T{sub i}/T{sub e}). Further, rarefactive solitons of pretty small amplitudes are observed in the small upper range of |u{sub 0}-v{sub 0}| for higher order relativistic effect which are found to change parabolically. It is essentially important to report in our model of plasma, that the higher order relativistic effect slows down the soliton speed to V{<=}0.10 for all temperature ratios {sigma} for small amplitude waves. On the other hand, the smaller order relativistic effect permits the soliton to exist even at a relatively much higher speed V<0.30. Solitons of high (negligible) amplitudes are found to generate at the smaller (greater) difference of initial streamings (u{sub 0}-v{sub 0}) corresponding to both the relativistic effects.

  14. Effects of hot electron inertia on electron-acoustic solitons and double layers

    SciTech Connect

    Verheest, Frank; Hellberg, Manfred A.

    2015-07-15

    The propagation of arbitrary amplitude electron-acoustic solitons and double layers is investigated in a plasma containing cold positive ions, cool adiabatic and hot isothermal electrons, with the retention of full inertial effects for all species. For analytical tractability, the resulting Sagdeev pseudopotential is expressed in terms of the hot electron density, rather than the electrostatic potential. The existence domains for Mach numbers and hot electron densities clearly show that both rarefactive and compressive solitons can exist. Soliton limitations come from the cool electron sonic point, followed by the hot electron sonic point, until a range of rarefactive double layers occurs. Increasing the relative cool electron density further yields a switch to compressive double layers, which ends when the model assumptions break down. These qualitative results are but little influenced by variations in compositional parameters. A comparison with a Boltzmann distribution for the hot electrons shows that only the cool electron sonic point limit remains, giving higher maximum Mach numbers but similar densities, and a restricted range in relative hot electron density before the model assumptions are exceeded. The Boltzmann distribution can reproduce neither the double layer solutions nor the switch in rarefactive/compressive character or negative/positive polarity.

  15. Microwave solitons in magnetic films (invited) (abstract)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boardman, A. D.; Xie, K.; Mehta, H.; Nikitov, S. A.

    1996-04-01

    Nonlinear waves in the form of solitons in magnetic films are attracting attention because of the interesting possibility of making novel spatial, and temporal, soliton devices that will operate in the technologically important microwave (GHz) frequency window. Some fascinating pioneering experimental work has been performed in this area and there is now every possibility that manipulation of solitonlike microwave pulses will be the basis of an entirely new range of devices. Both theory and experiment show that solitons are extremely robust and behave rather like particles. Magnetic films look set to become as successful as optical fibers in supporting bright envelope solitons; yet soliton behavior can often seem hard to comprehend. While they are subtle in their behavior they can be understood from many points of view that are physically, or mathematically, based. This presentation will explain what bright microwave envelope solitons are, drawing upon as much physical insight and analogy as possible. The necessary and sufficient conditions for soliton existence will be carefully set out, especially with respect to their relationship to the input conditions of a device. A substantial number of numerical examples will be used and the prospects for major expansion in the experimental area will be assessed. In the latter part of the presentation some important applications for solitons will be addressed. These will include the analysis of a switching device but logic devices, and various forms of pump-probe arrangements, will also be retrieved. Finally, the optimistic view that solitons in magnetic materials are now realistic tools will be expressed and the opportunities provided by dark and higher-dimensional solitons will be discussed.

  16. Perturbation-induced dynamics of dark solitons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kivshar, Yuri S.; Yang, Xiaoping

    1994-02-01

    We study analytically and numerically the effect of perturbations on (spatial and temporal) dark optical solitons. Our purpose is to elaborate a general analytical approach to describe the dynamics of dark solitons in the presence of physically important effects which break integrability of the primary nonlinear Schrödinger equation. We show that the corresponding perturbation theory differs for the cases of constant and varying backgrounds which support the dark solitons. We present a general formalism describing the perturbation-induced dynamics for both cases and also analyze the influence of several physically important effects, such as linear and two-photon absorption, Raman self-induced scattering, gain with saturation, on the propagation of the dark soliton. As we show, the perturbation-induced dynamics of a dark soliton may be treated as a result of the combined effect of the background evolution and internal soliton dynamics, the latter being characterized by the soliton phase angle. A similar approach is applied to the problem of the dark-soliton propagation on a finite-width background. We analyze adiabatic modification of a dark pulse propagating on a dispersively spreading finite-width background, and we prove analytically that a frequency chirp of the background does not affect the soliton motion. As a matter of fact, the results obtained describe the perturbation-induced dynamics of dark solitons in the so-called adiabatic approximation and, as we show for all the cases analyzed, they are in excellent agreement with direct numerical simulations of the corresponding perturbed nonlinear Schrödinger equation, provided the effects produced by the emitted radiation are small.

  17. Transitional Boundary Layers Under the Influence of High Free Stream Turbulence, Intensive Wall Cooling and High Pressure Gradients in Hot Gas Circulation. Ph.D. Thesis - Technische Hochschule, Karlsruhe, 1985

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rued, Klaus

    1987-01-01

    The requirements for fundamental experimental studies of the influence of free stream turbulence, pressure gradients and wall cooling are discussed. Under turbine-like free stream conditions, comprehensive tests of transitional boundary layers with laminar, reversing and turbulent flow increments were performed to decouple the effects of the parameters and to determine the effects during mutual interaction.

  18. Soliton turbulence in shallow water ocean surface waves.

    PubMed

    Costa, Andrea; Osborne, Alfred R; Resio, Donald T; Alessio, Silvia; Chrivì, Elisabetta; Saggese, Enrica; Bellomo, Katinka; Long, Chuck E

    2014-09-01

    We analyze shallow water wind waves in Currituck Sound, North Carolina and experimentally confirm, for the first time, the presence of soliton turbulence in ocean waves. Soliton turbulence is an exotic form of nonlinear wave motion where low frequency energy may also be viewed as a dense soliton gas, described theoretically by the soliton limit of the Korteweg-deVries equation, a completely integrable soliton system: Hence the phrase "soliton turbulence" is synonymous with "integrable soliton turbulence." For periodic-quasiperiodic boundary conditions the ergodic solutions of Korteweg-deVries are exactly solvable by finite gap theory (FGT), the basis of our data analysis. We find that large amplitude measured wave trains near the energetic peak of a storm have low frequency power spectra that behave as ∼ω-1. We use the linear Fourier transform to estimate this power law from the power spectrum and to filter densely packed soliton wave trains from the data. We apply FGT to determine the soliton spectrum and find that the low frequency ∼ω-1 region is soliton dominated. The solitons have random FGT phases, a soliton random phase approximation, which supports our interpretation of the data as soliton turbulence. From the probability density of the solitons we are able to demonstrate that the solitons are dense in time and highly non-Gaussian.

  19. Soliton Turbulence in Shallow Water Ocean Surface Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costa, Andrea; Osborne, Alfred R.; Resio, Donald T.; Alessio, Silvia; Chrivı, Elisabetta; Saggese, Enrica; Bellomo, Katinka; Long, Chuck E.

    2014-09-01

    We analyze shallow water wind waves in Currituck Sound, North Carolina and experimentally confirm, for the first time, the presence of soliton turbulence in ocean waves. Soliton turbulence is an exotic form of nonlinear wave motion where low frequency energy may also be viewed as a dense soliton gas, described theoretically by the soliton limit of the Korteweg-deVries equation, a completely integrable soliton system: Hence the phrase "soliton turbulence" is synonymous with "integrable soliton turbulence." For periodic-quasiperiodic boundary conditions the ergodic solutions of Korteweg-deVries are exactly solvable by finite gap theory (FGT), the basis of our data analysis. We find that large amplitude measured wave trains near the energetic peak of a storm have low frequency power spectra that behave as ˜ω-1. We use the linear Fourier transform to estimate this power law from the power spectrum and to filter densely packed soliton wave trains from the data. We apply FGT to determine the soliton spectrum and find that the low frequency ˜ω-1 region is soliton dominated. The solitons have random FGT phases, a soliton random phase approximation, which supports our interpretation of the data as soliton turbulence. From the probability density of the solitons we are able to demonstrate that the solitons are dense in time and highly non-Gaussian.

  20. Soliton turbulence in shallow water ocean surface waves.

    PubMed

    Costa, Andrea; Osborne, Alfred R; Resio, Donald T; Alessio, Silvia; Chrivì, Elisabetta; Saggese, Enrica; Bellomo, Katinka; Long, Chuck E

    2014-09-01

    We analyze shallow water wind waves in Currituck Sound, North Carolina and experimentally confirm, for the first time, the presence of soliton turbulence in ocean waves. Soliton turbulence is an exotic form of nonlinear wave motion where low frequency energy may also be viewed as a dense soliton gas, described theoretically by the soliton limit of the Korteweg-deVries equation, a completely integrable soliton system: Hence the phrase "soliton turbulence" is synonymous with "integrable soliton turbulence." For periodic-quasiperiodic boundary conditions the ergodic solutions of Korteweg-deVries are exactly solvable by finite gap theory (FGT), the basis of our data analysis. We find that large amplitude measured wave trains near the energetic peak of a storm have low frequency power spectra that behave as ∼ω-1. We use the linear Fourier transform to estimate this power law from the power spectrum and to filter densely packed soliton wave trains from the data. We apply FGT to determine the soliton spectrum and find that the low frequency ∼ω-1 region is soliton dominated. The solitons have random FGT phases, a soliton random phase approximation, which supports our interpretation of the data as soliton turbulence. From the probability density of the solitons we are able to demonstrate that the solitons are dense in time and highly non-Gaussian. PMID:25238388

  1. Topological characterization of the transition from laminar regime to fully developed turbulence in the resistive pressure-gradient-driven turbulence model

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia, L.; Carreras, B. A.; Llerena, I.; Calvo, I.

    2009-10-15

    For the resistive pressure-gradient-driven turbulence model, the transition from laminar regime to fully developed turbulence is not simple and goes through several phases. For low values of the plasma parameter {beta}, a single quasicoherent structure forms. As {beta} increases, several of these structures may emerge and in turn take the dominant role. Finally, at high {beta}, fully developed turbulence with a broad spectrum is established. A suitable characterization of this transition can be given in terms of topological properties of the flow. Here, we analyze these properties that provide an understanding of the turbulence-induced transport and give a measure of the breaking of the homogeneity of the turbulence. To this end, an approach is developed that allows discriminating between topological properties of plasma turbulence flows that are relevant to the transport dynamics and the ones that are not. This is done using computational homology tools and leads to a faster convergence of numerical results for a fixed level of resolution than previously presented in Phys. Rev. E 78, 066402 (2008)

  2. Analysis of pressure-strain and pressure gradient-scalar covariances in cloud-topped boundary layers: A large-eddy simulation study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heinze, Rieke; Mironov, Dmitrii; Raasch, Siegfried

    2016-03-01

    A detailed analysis of the pressure-scrambling terms (i.e., the pressure-strain and pressure gradient-scalar covariances) in the Reynolds-stress and scalar-flux budgets for cloud-topped boundary layers (CTBLs) is performed using high-resolution large-eddy simulation (LES). Two CTBLs are simulated — one with trade wind shallow cumuli, and the other with nocturnal marine stratocumuli. The pressure-scrambling terms are decomposed into contributions due to turbulence-turbulence interactions, mean velocity shear, buoyancy, and Coriolis effects. Commonly used models of these contributions, including a simple linear model most often used in geophysical applications and a more sophisticated two-component-limit (TCL) nonlinear model, are tested against the LES data. The decomposition of the pressure-scrambling terms shows that the turbulence-turbulence and buoyancy contributions are most significant for cloud-topped boundary layers. The Coriolis contribution is negligible. The shear contribution is generally of minor importance inside the cloudy layers, but it is the leading-order contribution near the surface. A comparison of models of the pressure-scrambling terms with the LES data suggests that the more complex TCL model is superior to the simple linear model only for a few contributions. The linear model is able to reproduce the principal features of the pressure-scrambling terms reasonably well. It can be applied in the second-order turbulence modeling of cloud-topped boundary layer flows, provided some uncertainties are tolerated.

  3. Aerodynamic pressure and heating-rate distributions in tile gaps around chine regions with pressure gradients at a Mach number of 6.6

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hunt, L. Roane; Notestine, Kristopher K.

    1990-06-01

    Surface and gap pressures and heating-rate distributions were obtained for simulated Thermal Protection System (TPS) tile arrays on the curved surface test apparatus of the Langley 8-Foot High Temperature Tunnel at Mach 6.6. The results indicated that the chine gap pressures varied inversely with gap width because larger gap widths allowed greater venting from the gap to the lower model side pressures. Lower gap pressures caused greater flow ingress from the surface and increased gap heating. Generally, gap heating was greater in the longitudinal gaps than in the circumferential gaps. Gap heating decreased with increasing gap depth. Circumferential gap heating at the mid-depth was generally less than about 10 percent of the external surface value. Gap heating was most severe at local T-gap junctions and tile-to-tile forward-facing steps that caused the greatest heating from flow impingement. The use of flow stoppers at discrete locations reduced heating from flow impingement. The use of flow stoppers at discrete locations reduced heating in most gaps but increased heating in others. Limited use of flow stoppers or gap filler in longitudinal gaps could reduce gap heating in open circumferential gaps in regions of high surface pressure gradients.

  4. Aerodynamic pressure and heating-rate distributions in tile gaps around chine regions with pressure gradients at a Mach number of 6.6

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunt, L. Roane; Notestine, Kristopher K.

    1990-01-01

    Surface and gap pressures and heating-rate distributions were obtained for simulated Thermal Protection System (TPS) tile arrays on the curved surface test apparatus of the Langley 8-Foot High Temperature Tunnel at Mach 6.6. The results indicated that the chine gap pressures varied inversely with gap width because larger gap widths allowed greater venting from the gap to the lower model side pressures. Lower gap pressures caused greater flow ingress from the surface and increased gap heating. Generally, gap heating was greater in the longitudinal gaps than in the circumferential gaps. Gap heating decreased with increasing gap depth. Circumferential gap heating at the mid-depth was generally less than about 10 percent of the external surface value. Gap heating was most severe at local T-gap junctions and tile-to-tile forward-facing steps that caused the greatest heating from flow impingement. The use of flow stoppers at discrete locations reduced heating from flow impingement. The use of flow stoppers at discrete locations reduced heating in most gaps but increased heating in others. Limited use of flow stoppers or gap filler in longitudinal gaps could reduce gap heating in open circumferential gaps in regions of high surface pressure gradients.

  5. Optical solitons in liquid crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Yung, Y.S.; Lam, L.; Los Alamos National Lab., NM )

    1989-01-01

    In this paper, we will discuss theoretically the possible existence of optical solitons in the isotropic liquid and in the nematic phase. For the same compound, when heated, the nematic phase will go through a first order transition at temperature T{sub c} to the isotropic liquid phase. As temperature increases from below T{sub c}, the orientation order parameter, Q, decreases, drops to zero abruptly at T{sub c} and remains zero for T > T{sub c}. 10 refs., 1 fig.

  6. Diode-Pumped Soliton and Non-Soliton Mode-Locked Yb:GYSO Lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Jin-Ping; Liang, Xiao-Yan; Li, Jin-Feng; Zheng, Li-He; Su, Liang-Bi; Xu, Jun

    2011-08-01

    Diode-pumped soliton and non-soliton mode-locked Yb:(Gd1-x Yx)2SiO5(x = 0.5) lasers are demonstrated. Pulses as short as 1.4 ps are generated for the soliton mode-locked operation, with a pair of SF10 prisms as the negative dispersion elements. The central wavelength is 1056 nm and the repetition rate is 48 MHz. For the non-soliton mode locking, the output power could achieve ~1.2 W, and the pulse width is about 20 ps. The critical pulse energy in the soliton-mode locked operation against the Q-switched mode locking is much lower than the critical pulse energy in the non-soliton mode-locked operation.

  7. Solitons of axion-dilaton gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Bakas, I. |

    1996-11-01

    We use soliton techniques of the two-dimensional reduced {beta}-function equations to obtain nontrivial string backgrounds from flat space. These solutions are characterized by two integers ({ital n},{ital m}) referring to the soliton numbers of the metric and axion-dilaton sectors, respectively. We show that the Nappi-Witten universe associated with the SL(2){times}SU(2)/SO(1,1){times}U(1) CFT coset arises as a (1,1) soliton in this fashion for certain values of the moduli parameters, while for other values of the soliton moduli we arrive at the SL(2)/SO(1,1){times}SO(1,1){sup 2} background. Ordinary four-dimensional black holes arise as two-dimensional (2,0) solitons, while the Euclidean wormhole background is described as a (0,2) soliton on flat space. The soliton transformations correspond to specific elements of the string Geroch group. These could be used as a starting point for exploring the role of {ital U} dualities in string compactifications to two dimensions. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

  8. Dark solitons in a superfluid Fermi gas

    SciTech Connect

    Antezza, Mauro; Dalfovo, Franco; Stringari, Sandro; Pitaevskii, Lev P.

    2007-10-15

    We investigate the behavior of dark solitons in a superfluid Fermi gas along the BCS-BEC crossover by solving the Bogoliubov-de Gennes equations and looking for real and odd solutions for the order parameter. We show that in the resonance unitary region, where the scattering length is large, the density profile of the soliton has a deep minimum, differently from what happens in the BCS regime. The superfluid gap is found to be significantly quenched by the presence of the soliton due to the occurrence of Andreev fermionic bound states localized near the nodal plane of the order parameter.

  9. Solitons Transport Water through Narrow Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sisan, Thomas B.; Lichter, Seth

    2014-01-01

    Transformative technologies for desalination and chemical separations call for understanding molecular transport through man-made and biological nanochannels. Using numerical simulation of single-file flow of water through carbon nanotubes, we find that flow is due to fast-moving density variations (solitons) that are additive so flow rate is proportional to number of solitons. Simulation results match predictions from a theoretical model for soliton propagation. From 1-300 K flow rates increase as temperature decreases. Our results build a fundamentally new understanding of nanochannel flows and suggest new principles for the design of nanoscale devices.

  10. Solitons transport water through narrow carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Sisan, Thomas B; Lichter, Seth

    2014-01-31

    Transformative technologies for desalination and chemical separations call for understanding molecular transport through man-made and biological nanochannels. Using numerical simulation of single-file flow of water through carbon nanotubes, we find that flow is due to fast-moving density variations (solitons) that are additive so flow rate is proportional to number of solitons. Simulation results match predictions from a theoretical model for soliton propagation. From 1-300 K flow rates increase as temperature decreases. Our results build a fundamentally new understanding of nanochannel flows and suggest new principles for the design of nanoscale devices.

  11. Rarefaction solitons initiated by sheath instability

    SciTech Connect

    Levko, Dmitry

    2015-09-15

    The instability of the cathode sheath initiated by the cold energetic electron beam is studied by the one-dimensional fluid model. Numerical simulations show the generation of travelling rarefaction solitons at the cathode. It is obtained that the parameters of these solitons strongly depend on the parameters of electron beam. The “stretched” variables are derived using the small-amplitude analysis. These variables are used in order to obtain the Korteweg-de Vries equation describing the propagation of the rarefaction solitons through the plasma with cold energetic electron beam.

  12. DNABIT Compress - Genome compression algorithm.

    PubMed

    Rajarajeswari, Pothuraju; Apparao, Allam

    2011-01-01

    Data compression is concerned with how information is organized in data. Efficient storage means removal of redundancy from the data being stored in the DNA molecule. Data compression algorithms remove redundancy and are used to understand biologically important molecules. We present a compression algorithm, "DNABIT Compress" for DNA sequences based on a novel algorithm of assigning binary bits for smaller segments of DNA bases to compress both repetitive and non repetitive DNA sequence. Our proposed algorithm achieves the best compression ratio for DNA sequences for larger genome. Significantly better compression results show that "DNABIT Compress" algorithm is the best among the remaining compression algorithms. While achieving the best compression ratios for DNA sequences (Genomes),our new DNABIT Compress algorithm significantly improves the running time of all previous DNA compression programs. Assigning binary bits (Unique BIT CODE) for (Exact Repeats, Reverse Repeats) fragments of DNA sequence is also a unique concept introduced in this algorithm for the first time in DNA compression. This proposed new algorithm could achieve the best compression ratio as much as 1.58 bits/bases where the existing best methods could not achieve a ratio less than 1.72 bits/bases.

  13. Adiabatic effects in the dynamics of Langmuir solitons

    SciTech Connect

    Astrelin, V.T.; Breizman, B.N.; Sedlacek, Z.; Jungwirth, K.

    1988-06-01

    The adiabatic slowness with which the plasma density profile is reconstructed from localized in large-amplitude Langmuir solitons is characteristic of such solitons. Several examples making use of this feature in the description of the soliton dynamics are given. Specifically, long-lived states in the form of composite solitons ar found. Additional limitations are found on the interaction of solitons with each other and with sound waves. The effect of the adiabatic nature on the formation of solitons from free plasmons is discussed.

  14. Nonautonomous solitons, breathers and rogue waves for the Gross-Pitaevskii equation in the Bose-Einstein condensate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Chuan-Qi; Gao, Yi-Tian; Xue, Long; Wang, Qi-Min

    2016-07-01

    Under investigation in this paper is the Gross-Pitaevskii equation which describes the dynamics of the Bose-Einstein condensate. Lax pair, conservation laws and Darboux transformation (DT) are constructed. Nonautonomous solitons and breathers are derived based on the DT obtained. A kind of modulation instability process is generated. Nonautonomous rogue waves are obtained via the generalized DT. Influence of the nonlinearity, linear external potential, harmonic external potential, and spectral parameter on the propagation and interaction of the nonautonomous solitons, breathers and rogue waves is also discussed. Amplitude of the first-order nonautonomous soliton is proportional to the imaginary part of the spectral parameter and inversely proportional to the nonlinearity parameter. Linear external potential parameter affects the location of the first-order nonautonomous soliton. Head-on interaction, overtaking interaction and bound-state-like nonautonomous solitons can be formed based on the signs of the real parts of the spectral parameters. Quasi-periodic behaviors are exhibited for the nonautonomous breathers. If the harmonic external potential parameter is negative, quasi-period decreases along the positive time axis, with an increase in the amplitude and a compression in the width. Quasi-period decreases with the increase of the nonlinearity parameter. The second-order nonautonomous rogue wave can split into three first-order ones. Nonlinearity parameter has an effect on the amplitude of the rogue wave. Linear external potential parameter influences the location of the rogue wave, while harmonic external potential parameter affects the curved direction of the background.

  15. Modified Korteweg-deVries soliton evolution at critical density of negative ions in an inhomogeneous magnetized cold plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Dhananjay K.; Malik, Hitendra K.

    2007-06-01

    Soliton propagation at critical density of negative ions is studied for weakly inhomogeneous magnetized cold plasma having positive ions, negative ions, and electrons. A general phase velocity relation is obtained and possible modes are studied for different cases involving different constituents of the plasma. Two types of modes (fast and slow) are found to propagate for the equal mass of the positive and negative ions. However, a limit on the obliqueness of magnetic field is obtained for the propagation of slow mode. For both types of modes, a variable coefficient modified Korteweg-deVries equation with an additional term arisen due to the density gradient is realized, which admits solutions for compressive solitons and rarefactive solitons of the same amplitudes at critical negative ion density. The propagation characteristics of these solitons are studied under the effect of densities of ions, magnetic field, and its obliqueness. The amplitudes of fast and slow wave solitons show their opposite behavior with the negative ion concentration, which is consistent with the variation of phase velocities with the negative ion density.

  16. Modified Korteweg-deVries soliton evolution at critical density of negative ions in an inhomogeneous magnetized cold plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, Dhananjay K.; Malik, Hitendra K.

    2007-06-15

    Soliton propagation at critical density of negative ions is studied for weakly inhomogeneous magnetized cold plasma having positive ions, negative ions, and electrons. A general phase velocity relation is obtained and possible modes are studied for different cases involving different constituents of the plasma. Two types of modes (fast and slow) are found to propagate for the equal mass of the positive and negative ions. However, a limit on the obliqueness of magnetic field is obtained for the propagation of slow mode. For both types of modes, a variable coefficient modified Korteweg-deVries equation with an additional term arisen due to the density gradient is realized, which admits solutions for compressive solitons and rarefactive solitons of the same amplitudes at critical negative ion density. The propagation characteristics of these solitons are studied under the effect of densities of ions, magnetic field, and its obliqueness. The amplitudes of fast and slow wave solitons show their opposite behavior with the negative ion concentration, which is consistent with the variation of phase velocities with the negative ion density.

  17. Envelope Solitons in Acoustically Dispersive Vitreous Silica

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cantrell, John H.; Yost, William T.

    2012-01-01

    Acoustic radiation-induced static strains, displacements, and stresses are manifested as rectified or dc waveforms linked to the energy density of an acoustic wave or vibrational mode via the mode nonlinearity parameter of the material. An analytical model is developed for acoustically dispersive media that predicts the evolution of the energy density of an initial waveform into a series of energy solitons that generates a corresponding series of radiation-induced static strains (envelope solitons). The evolutionary characteristics of the envelope solitons are confirmed experimentally in Suprasil W1 vitreous silica. The value (-11.9 plus or minus 1.43) for the nonlinearity parameter, determined from displacement measurements of the envelope solitons via a capacitive transducer, is in good agreement with the value (-11.6 plus or minus 1.16) obtained independently from acoustic harmonic generation measurements. The agreement provides strong, quantitative evidence for the validity of the model.

  18. Soliton solutions of the Hirota's system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yesmakhanova, Kuralay; Shaikhova, Gaukhar; Bekova, Guldana

    2016-08-01

    It is well known that nonlinear integrable systems have attracted a lot of attention among researchers. This fascinating subject of nonlinear science has branched out in almost all areas of technology and science. In nonlinear science soliton solutions play an important role. There are many ways to obtain soliton solutions of the nonlinear evolution equations, such as the Painleve analysis, the Hirota's bilinear method, Darboux transformation (DT) and so on. Among the various methods, the DT has been proved very successful in driving different kinds of solutions for many of the integrable equations from a trivial seed. In this work, we focus on the construction soliton solutions for the 2+1-dimensional Hirota's system, which is modified nonlinear Schrödinger equations. One-soliton solutions are obtained by means of the one-fold Darboux transformation for the 2+1-dimensional Hirota's system.

  19. Relativistic projection and boost of solitons

    SciTech Connect

    Wilets, L.

    1991-01-01

    This report discusses the following topics on the relativistic projection and boost of solitons: The center of mass problem; momentum eigenstates; variation after projection; and the nucleon as a composite. (LSP).

  20. Relativistic projection and boost of solitons

    SciTech Connect

    Wilets, L.

    1991-12-31

    This report discusses the following topics on the relativistic projection and boost of solitons: The center of mass problem; momentum eigenstates; variation after projection; and the nucleon as a composite. (LSP).

  1. Clustering of solitons in weakly correlated wavefronts

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Zhigang; Sears, Suzanne M.; Martin, Hector; Christodoulides, Demetrios N.; Segev, Mordechai

    2002-01-01

    We demonstrate theoretically and experimentally the spontaneous clustering of solitons in partially coherent wavefronts during the final stages of pattern formation initiated by modulation instability and noise. PMID:16578870

  2. Stationary dissipative solitons of Model G

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pulver, Matthew; LaViolette, Paul A.

    2013-07-01

    Model G, the earliest reaction-diffusion system proposed to support the existence of solitons is shown to do so under distant steady-state boundary conditions. Subatomic particle physics phenomenology, including multi-particle bonding, movement in concentration gradients, and a particle structure matching Kelly's charge distribution model of the nucleon, are observed. Lastly, it is shown how a three-variable reversible Brusselator, a close relative of Model G, can also support solitons.

  3. Gap solitons with null-scattering.

    PubMed

    Reddy, K Nireekshan; Dutta Gupta, S

    2014-04-15

    In this Letter, we study the excitation of gap solitons under the conditions of coherent perfect absorption. Our system consists of a symmetric periodic structure with alternating Kerr nonlinear and linear layers illuminated from both ends. We show near-total transfer of incident light energy into the gap solitons resulting in null scattering. We also report on the nonlinear super-scattering states. Both the exact and the approximate results, which show good agreement based on nonlinear characteristic matrix methods, are presented.

  4. Nonlocal soliton scattering in random potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piccardi, Armando; Residori, Stefania; Assanto, Gaetano

    2016-07-01

    We experimentally investigate the transport behaviour of nonlocal spatial optical solitons when launched in and interacting with propagation-invariant random potentials. The solitons are generated in nematic liquid crystals; the randomness is created by suitably engineered illumination of planar voltage-biased cells equipped with a photosensitive wall. We find that the fluctuations follow a super-diffusive trend, with the mean square displacement lowering for decreasing spatial correlation of the noise.

  5. Weakly relativistic electromagnetic solitons in warm plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sundar, Sita

    2016-06-01

    For slowly propagating electromagnetic solitons, validity of the cold plasma model is addressed using a more realistic model involving effects arising due to temperature as well as ion dynamics. Small amplitude single peak structures which are quasineutral are studied, and different regions of existence of bright and dark classes of solitons are delineated. Influence of temperature on spectral characteristics of the solitary structures is presented.

  6. Compression of the Inferior Vena Cava by the Right Iliac Artery: A Rare Variant of May-Thurner Syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Fretz, V.; Binkert, C. A.

    2010-10-15

    May-Thurner syndrome is known as compression of the left common iliac vein by the right common iliac artery. We describe a case of an atypical compression of the inferior vena cava by the right common iliac artery secondary to a high aortic bifurcation. Despite an extensive collateral network, there was a significant venous gradient between the iliac veins and the inferior vena cava above the compression. After stenting the venous pressure gradient disappeared. Follow-up 4 months later revealed a good clinical response with a patent stent.

  7. Gap solitons and soliton trains in finite-sized two-dimensional periodic and quasiperiodic photonic crystals.

    PubMed

    Xie, Ping; Zhang, Zhao-Qing; Zhang, Xiangdong

    2003-02-01

    We demonstrate the existence of the gap solitons and soliton trains in finite-sized two-dimensional periodic nonlinear photonic crystals by using the mutiple-scattering approach with an iterative scheme. In 12-fold symmetric nonlinear quasicrystals, we also demonstrated the existence of symmetric, regular gap solitons, asymmetric single-soliton states, and two-solitons states. We revealed that the existence of symmetric, regular gap solitons in a 12-fold quasicrystal is limited by the geometrical size of the hexagon that forms the core of the dodecahedral cell, which is the building block of the quasicrystal.

  8. Orbital Instability of the Peregrine Soliton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Gorder, Robert A.

    2014-05-01

    The Peregrine soliton is one possible model of a rogue wave. Importantly, this type of soliton corresponds nicely to rogue waves recently observed experimentally in a water tank [A. Chabchoub, N. P. Hoffmann, and N. Akhmediev, Phys. Rev. Lett. 106, 204502 (2011)] and in optical fiber [B. Kibler, J. Fatome, C. Finot, G. Millot, F. Dias, G. Genty, N. Akhmediev, and J. M. Dudley, Nat. Phys. 6, 790 (2010)]. Starting with a family of Peregrine solitons indexed by their spectral parameter, we analytically demonstrate a type of instability in the Peregrine soliton through a concise orbital stability analysis. This analysis is completely analytical, and to verify the approach we also discuss a numerical linear instability analysis. We give the growth/decay rate for these solitons as a function of the initial amplitude, which for each soliton shall depend on the spectral parameter.

  9. Radiating subdispersive fractional optical solitons

    SciTech Connect

    Fujioka, J. Espinosa, A.; Rodríguez, R. F.; Malomed, B. A.

    2014-09-01

    It was recently found [Fujioka et al., Phys. Lett. A 374, 1126 (2010)] that the propagation of solitary waves can be described by a fractional extension of the nonlinear Schrödinger (NLS) equation which involves a temporal fractional derivative (TFD) of order α > 2. In the present paper, we show that there is also another fractional extension of the NLS equation which contains a TFD with α < 2, and in this case, the new equation describes the propagation of radiating solitons. We show that the emission of the radiation (when α < 2) is explained by resonances at various frequencies between the pulses and the linear modes of the system. It is found that the new fractional NLS equation can be derived from a suitable Lagrangian density, and a fractional Noether's theorem can be applied to it, thus predicting the conservation of the Hamiltonian, momentum and energy.

  10. Chladni solitons and the onset of the snaking instability for dark solitons in confined superfluids.

    PubMed

    Muñoz Mateo, A; Brand, J

    2014-12-19

    Complex solitary waves composed of intersecting vortex lines are predicted in a channeled superfluid. Their shapes in a cylindrical trap include a cross, spoke wheels, and Greek Φ, and trace the nodal lines of unstable vibration modes of a planar dark soliton in analogy to Chladni's figures of membrane vibrations. The stationary solitary waves extend a family of solutions that include the previously known solitonic vortex and vortex rings. Their bifurcation points from the dark soliton indicating the onset of new unstable modes of the snaking instability are predicted from scale separation for Bose-Einstein condensates (BECs) and superfluid Fermi gases across the BEC-BCS crossover, and confirmed by full numerical calculations. Chladni solitons could be observed in ultracold gas experiments by seeded decay of dark solitons.

  11. Soliton-guided phase shifter and beam splitter

    SciTech Connect

    Steiglitz, Ken

    2010-03-15

    We propose, analyze, and study numerically a phase shifter for light wave packets trapped by Kerr solitons in a nonlinear medium. We also study numerically a previously proposed soliton-guided nonpolarizing beam splitter.

  12. On soliton solutions of the Wu-Zhang system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inc, Mustafa; Kilic, Bulent; Karatas, Esra; Mohamed Al Qurashi, Maysaa'; Baleanu, Dumitru; Tchier, Fairouz

    2016-03-01

    In this paper, the extended tanh and hirota methods are used to construct soliton solutions for the WuZhang (WZ) system. Singular solitary wave, periodic and multi soliton solutions of the WZ system are obtained.

  13. Effects of pressure gradients between branches of the left coronary artery on the pressure axis intercept and the shape of steady state circumflex pressure-flow relations in dogs

    SciTech Connect

    Messina, L.M.; Hanley, F.L.; Uhlig, P.N.; Baer, R.W.; Grattan, M.T.; Hoffman, J.I.

    1985-01-01

    When steady state pressure-flow relations are studied in the circumflex coronary artery, pressure gradients develop between it and other branches of the left coronary artery. To assess the effects of these pressure gradients, the pressure axis intercept and shape of steady state circumflex pressure-flow relations were compared in the presence and absence of gradients after autoregulation was abolished, both in the beating heart and during long diastoles in dogs. The authors used peripheral coronary pressures and radionuclide-labeled microspheres to assess arterial collateral flow. In the beating heart, interarterial pressure gradients reduced the curvature at low circumflex pressures, and overestimated the mean pressure axis intercept by 7.8 mm Hg (P less than 0.05). The results were similar for the pressure-flow relations derived during long diastoles. This overestimation exaggerates the difference between the pressure axis intercept and coronary sinus pressure. The peripheral coronary pressure and microsphere results indicate that these effects are mediated largely by arterial collateral flow.

  14. Compression embedding

    DOEpatents

    Sandford, II, Maxwell T.; Handel, Theodore G.; Bradley, Jonathan N.

    1998-01-01

    A method and apparatus for embedding auxiliary information into the digital representation of host data created by a lossy compression technique and a method and apparatus for constructing auxiliary data from the correspondence between values in a digital key-pair table with integer index values existing in a representation of host data created by a lossy compression technique. The methods apply to data compressed with algorithms based on series expansion, quantization to a finite number of symbols, and entropy coding. Lossy compression methods represent the original data as ordered sequences of blocks containing integer indices having redundancy and uncertainty of value by one unit, allowing indices which are adjacent in value to be manipulated to encode auxiliary data. Also included is a method to improve the efficiency of lossy compression algorithms by embedding white noise into the integer indices. Lossy compression methods use loss-less compression to reduce to the final size the intermediate representation as indices. The efficiency of the loss-less compression, known also as entropy coding compression, is increased by manipulating the indices at the intermediate stage. Manipulation of the intermediate representation improves lossy compression performance by 1 to 10%.

  15. Compression embedding

    DOEpatents

    Sandford, M.T. II; Handel, T.G.; Bradley, J.N.

    1998-07-07

    A method and apparatus for embedding auxiliary information into the digital representation of host data created by a lossy compression technique and a method and apparatus for constructing auxiliary data from the correspondence between values in a digital key-pair table with integer index values existing in a representation of host data created by a lossy compression technique are disclosed. The methods apply to data compressed with algorithms based on series expansion, quantization to a finite number of symbols, and entropy coding. Lossy compression methods represent the original data as ordered sequences of blocks containing integer indices having redundancy and uncertainty of value by one unit, allowing indices which are adjacent in value to be manipulated to encode auxiliary data. Also included is a method to improve the efficiency of lossy compression algorithms by embedding white noise into the integer indices. Lossy compression methods use loss-less compression to reduce to the final size the intermediate representation as indices. The efficiency of the loss-less compression, known also as entropy coding compression, is increased by manipulating the indices at the intermediate stage. Manipulation of the intermediate representation improves lossy compression performance by 1 to 10%. 21 figs.

  16. Magnetic solitons in a binary Bose-Einstein condensate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qu, Chunlei; Pitaevskii, Lev; Stringari, Sandro

    2016-05-01

    Solitons, the fascinating topological excitations of nonlinear systems, have drawn a considerable research interest in many physical branches. Here I will talk about a magnetic soliton solution to a two-component repulsive Bose gas. The properties of the soliton, including the wave function, the energy and the effective mass, will be presented. I will also discuss the oscillation behaviour of the magnetic solitons in a harmonic trap.

  17. Discrete quadratic solitons with competing second-harmonic components

    SciTech Connect

    Setzpfandt, Frank; Pertsch, Thomas; Sukhorukov, Andrey A.

    2011-11-15

    We describe families of discrete solitons in quadratic waveguide arrays supported by competing cascaded nonlinear interactions between one fundamental and two second-harmonic modes. We characterize the existence, stability, and excitation dynamics of these solitons and show that their features may resemble those of solitons in saturable media. Our results also demonstrate that a power threshold may appear for soliton formation, leading to a suppression of beam self-focusing which explains recent experimental observations.

  18. BOOK REVIEW: Solitons, Instantons, and Twistors Solitons, Instantons, and Twistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Witt, Donald M.

    2011-04-01

    Solitons and instantons play important roles both in pure and applied mathematics as well as in theoretical physics where they are related to the topological structure of the vacuum. Twistors are a useful tool for solving nonlinear differential equations and are useful for the study of the antiself-dual Yang-Mills equations and the Einstein equations. Many books and more advanced monographs have been written on these topics. However, this new book by Maciej Dunajski is a complete first introduction to all of the topics in the title. Moreover, it covers them in a very unique way, through integrable systems. The approach taken in this book is that of mathematical physics à la field theory. The book starts by giving an introduction to integrable systems of ordinary and partial differential equations and proceeds from there. Gauge theories are not covered until chapter 6 which means the reader learning the material for the first time can build up confidence with simpler models of solitons and instantons before encountering them in gauge theories. The book also has an extremely clear introduction to twistor theory useful to both mathematicians and physicists. In particular, the twistor theory presentation may be of interest to string theorists wanting understand twistors. There are many useful connections to research into general relativity. Chapter 9 on gravitational instantons is great treatment useful to anyone doing research in classical or quantum gravity. There is also a nice discussion of Kaluza-Klein monopoles. The three appendices A-C cover the necessary background material of basic differential geometry, complex manifolds, and partial differential equations needed to fully understand the subject. The reader who has some level of expertise in any of the topics covered can jump right into that material without necessarily reading all of the earlier chapters because of the extremely clear writing style of the author. This makes the book an excellent reference on

  19. Regimes of operation states in passively mode-locked fiber soliton ring laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, Y. D.; Shum, P.; Tang, D. Y.; Lu, C.; Guo, X.; Paulose, V.; Man, W. S.; Tam, H. Y.

    2004-06-01

    The principal of passively mode-locked fiber soliton ring lasers is summarized, including its three output operation states: normal soliton, bound-solitons and noise-like pulse. The experimental results of the passively mode-locked fiber soliton ring lasers developed by us are given. Bound-solitons with different discrete separations and three-bound-solitons state have been observed in our fiber laser for the first time. The relationship among three operation states in fiber soliton laser is analyzed.

  20. A new class of non-topological solitons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frieman, Joshua A.; Lynn, Bryan W.

    1989-01-01

    A class of non-topological solitons was constructed in renormalizable scalar field theories with nonlinear self-interactions. For large charge Q, the soliton mass increases linearly with Q, i.e., the soliton mass density is approximately independent of charge. Such objects could be naturally produced in a phase transition in the early universe or in the decay of superconducting cosmic strings.

  1. Bright vector solitons in cross-defocusing nonlinear media

    SciTech Connect

    Yakimenko, A. I.; Prikhodko, O. O.; Vilchynskyi, S. I.

    2010-07-15

    We study two-dimensional soliton-soliton vector pairs in media with self-focusing nonlinearities and defocusing cross interactions. The general properties of the stationary states and their stability are investigated. The different scenarios of instability are observed using numerical simulations. The quasistable propagation regime of the high-power vector solitons is revealed.

  2. Compression embedding

    DOEpatents

    Sandford, M.T. II; Handel, T.G.; Bradley, J.N.

    1998-03-10

    A method of embedding auxiliary information into the digital representation of host data created by a lossy compression technique is disclosed. The method applies to data compressed with lossy algorithms based on series expansion, quantization to a finite number of symbols, and entropy coding. Lossy compression methods represent the original data as integer indices having redundancy and uncertainty in value by one unit. Indices which are adjacent in value are manipulated to encode auxiliary data. By a substantially reverse process, the embedded auxiliary data can be retrieved easily by an authorized user. Lossy compression methods use loss-less compressions known also as entropy coding, to reduce to the final size the intermediate representation as indices. The efficiency of the compression entropy coding, known also as entropy coding is increased by manipulating the indices at the intermediate stage in the manner taught by the method. 11 figs.

  3. Compression embedding

    DOEpatents

    Sandford, II, Maxwell T.; Handel, Theodore G.; Bradley, Jonathan N.

    1998-01-01

    A method of embedding auxiliary information into the digital representation of host data created by a lossy compression technique. The method applies to data compressed with lossy algorithms based on series expansion, quantization to a finite number of symbols, and entropy coding. Lossy compression methods represent the original data as integer indices having redundancy and uncertainty in value by one unit. Indices which are adjacent in value are manipulated to encode auxiliary data. By a substantially reverse process, the embedded auxiliary data can be retrieved easily by an authorized user. Lossy compression methods use loss-less compressions known also as entropy coding, to reduce to the final size the intermediate representation as indices. The efficiency of the compression entropy coding, known also as entropy coding is increased by manipulating the indices at the intermediate stage in the manner taught by the method.

  4. A harmonically mode-locked dark soliton and bright-dark soliton pair ytterbium fiber laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lv, Zhiguo; Teng, Hao; Fang, Shaobo; Jia, Haotian; Wang, Lina; Wang, Junli; Wei, Zhiyi

    2016-06-01

    We report on an experimental study of a dark soliton and bright-dark soliton pair, harmonically mode-locked, all normal dispersion (ANDi) ytterbium fiber laser with a long cavity length. Mode-locked output up to the fourth harmonic with respect to the fundamental repetition rate has been realized. To the best of our knowledge, this the first such demonstration so far in ANDi mode-locked ytterbium fiber lasers with a birefringence filter as spectral modulation component. The experimentally recorded mode-locked spectrum shows that the generation of a dark soliton is always accompanied by strong continuous-wave emission. Furthermore, by changing the pump power, the fundamental bright-dark soliton pair mode-locked operation can be evolved into the state of the second order bright soliton coexisting with the fundamental dark soliton. Additionally, bright-dark soliton pairs, which are symmetric relative to the vertical coordinate, can be interconverted by rotating waveplates in a fixed maximum pump power condition. The generation of the dark pulse is probably due to the large normal dispersion introduced in the ring cavity except for the nonlinearity.

  5. Soliton delivery of few-cycle optical gigawatt pulses in Kagome-lattice hollow-core photonic crystal fibers

    SciTech Connect

    Im, Song-Jin; Husakou, Anton; Herrmann, Joachim

    2010-08-15

    We study the delivery of few-cycle soliton-like pulses at 800 nm with gigawatt power or microjoule energy through a hollow-core kagome-lattice photonic crystal fiber over 1 m with preserved temporal and spectral shape. We show that with optimized pressure of the argon filling, 5 fs input pulses are compressed up to 2.5 fs after 20 cm and restore their shape after 1 m propagation.

  6. Soliton delivery of few-cycle optical gigawatt pulses in Kagome-lattice hollow-core photonic crystal fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Im, Song-Jin; Husakou, Anton; Herrmann, Joachim

    2010-08-01

    We study the delivery of few-cycle soliton-like pulses at 800 nm with gigawatt power or microjoule energy through a hollow-core kagome-lattice photonic crystal fiber over 1 m with preserved temporal and spectral shape. We show that with optimized pressure of the argon filling, 5 fs input pulses are compressed up to 2.5 fs after 20 cm and restore their shape after 1 m propagation.

  7. 280  GHz dark soliton fiber laser.

    PubMed

    Song, Y F; Guo, J; Zhao, L M; Shen, D Y; Tang, D Y

    2014-06-15

    We report on an ultrahigh repetition rate dark soliton fiber laser. We show both numerically and experimentally that by taking advantage of the cavity self-induced modulation instability and the dark soliton formation in a net normal dispersion cavity fiber laser, stable ultrahigh repetition rate dark soliton trains can be formed in a dispersion-managed cavity fiber laser. Stable dark soliton trains with a repetition rate as high as ∼280  GHz have been generated in our experiment. Numerical simulations have shown that the effective gain bandwidth limitation plays an important role on the stabilization of the formed dark solitons in the laser.

  8. Black and gray Helmholtz-Kerr soliton refraction

    SciTech Connect

    Sanchez-Curto, Julio; Chamorro-Posada, Pedro; McDonald, Graham S.

    2011-01-15

    Refraction of black and gray solitons at boundaries separating different defocusing Kerr media is analyzed within a Helmholtz framework. A universal nonlinear Snell's law is derived that describes gray soliton refraction, in addition to capturing the behavior of bright and black Kerr solitons at interfaces. Key regimes, defined by beam and interface characteristics, are identified, and predictions are verified by full numerical simulations. The existence of a unique total nonrefraction angle for gray solitons is reported; both internal and external refraction at a single interface is shown possible (dependent only on incidence angle). This, in turn, leads to the proposal of positive or negative lensing operations on soliton arrays at planar boundaries.

  9. Two dimensional gap solitons in self-defocusing media with PT-symmetric superlattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hongcheng; Christodoulides, D. N.

    2016-09-01

    A theory is presented to study the existence and stability properties of fundamental solitons, multi-peaked gap solitons and vortex solitons in self-defocusing media with PT-symmetric superlattice. In the first gap of the superlattice potential, fundamental, dipole, and in-phase quadruple solitons can exist stably within a wide parameter region, while in-phase two-peaked solitons, out-of-phase quadruple solitons and vortex solitons are always unstable. Compared with simple-lattice solitons in similar potentials, the gap solitons in superlattice have a wider stable range than those in simple-lattice.

  10. Capillary solitons on a levitated medium.

    PubMed

    Perrard, S; Deike, L; Duchêne, C; Pham, C-T

    2015-07-01

    A water cylinder deposited on a heated channel levitates on its own generated vapor film owing to the Leidenfrost effect. This experimental setup permits the study of the one-dimensional propagation of surface waves in a free-to-move liquid system. We report the observation of gravity-capillary waves under a dramatic reduction of gravity (up to a factor 30), leading to capillary waves at the centimeter scale. The generated nonlinear structures propagate without deformation and undergo mutual collisions and reflections at the boundaries of the domain. They are identified as Korteweg-de Vries solitons with negative amplitude and subsonic velocity. The typical width and amplitude-dependent velocities are in excellent agreement with theoretical predictions based on a generalized Korteweg-de Vries equation adapted to any substrate geometry. When multiple solitons are present, they interact and form a soliton turbulencelike spectrum.

  11. Solitonic axion condensates modeling dark matter halos

    SciTech Connect

    Castañeda Valle, David Mielke, Eckehard W.

    2013-09-15

    Instead of fluid type dark matter (DM), axion-like scalar fields with a periodic self-interaction or some truncations of it are analyzed as a model of galaxy halos. It is probed if such cold Bose–Einstein type condensates could provide a viable soliton type interpretation of the DM ‘bullets’ observed by means of gravitational lensing in merging galaxy clusters. We study solitary waves for two self-interacting potentials in the relativistic Klein–Gordon equation, mainly in lower dimensions, and visualize the approximately shape-invariant collisions of two ‘lump’ type solitons. -- Highlights: •An axion model of dark matter is considered. •Collision of axion type solitons are studied in a two dimensional toy model. •Relations to dark matter collisions in galaxy clusters are proposed.

  12. Capillary solitons on a levitated medium.

    PubMed

    Perrard, S; Deike, L; Duchêne, C; Pham, C-T

    2015-07-01

    A water cylinder deposited on a heated channel levitates on its own generated vapor film owing to the Leidenfrost effect. This experimental setup permits the study of the one-dimensional propagation of surface waves in a free-to-move liquid system. We report the observation of gravity-capillary waves under a dramatic reduction of gravity (up to a factor 30), leading to capillary waves at the centimeter scale. The generated nonlinear structures propagate without deformation and undergo mutual collisions and reflections at the boundaries of the domain. They are identified as Korteweg-de Vries solitons with negative amplitude and subsonic velocity. The typical width and amplitude-dependent velocities are in excellent agreement with theoretical predictions based on a generalized Korteweg-de Vries equation adapted to any substrate geometry. When multiple solitons are present, they interact and form a soliton turbulencelike spectrum. PMID:26274114

  13. Capillary solitons on a levitated medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perrard, S.; Deike, L.; Duchêne, C.; Pham, C.-T.

    2015-07-01

    A water cylinder deposited on a heated channel levitates on its own generated vapor film owing to the Leidenfrost effect. This experimental setup permits the study of the one-dimensional propagation of surface waves in a free-to-move liquid system. We report the observation of gravity-capillary waves under a dramatic reduction of gravity (up to a factor 30), leading to capillary waves at the centimeter scale. The generated nonlinear structures propagate without deformation and undergo mutual collisions and reflections at the boundaries of the domain. They are identified as Korteweg-de Vries solitons with negative amplitude and subsonic velocity. The typical width and amplitude-dependent velocities are in excellent agreement with theoretical predictions based on a generalized Korteweg-de Vries equation adapted to any substrate geometry. When multiple solitons are present, they interact and form a soliton turbulencelike spectrum.

  14. A spin dynamics approach to solitonics

    PubMed Central

    Koumpouras, Konstantinos; Bergman, Anders; Eriksson, Olle; Yudin, Dmitry

    2016-01-01

    In magnetic materials a variety of non-collinear ground state configurations may emerge as a result of competition among exchange, anisotropy, and dipole-dipole interaction, yielding magnetic states far more complex than those of homogenous ferromagnets. Of particular interest in this study are particle-like configurations. These particle-like states, e.g., magnetic solitons, skyrmions, or domain walls, form a spatially localised clot of magnetic energy. In this paper we address topologically protected magnetic solitons and explore concepts that potentially might be relevant for logical operations and/or information storage in the rapidly advancing filed of solitonics (and skyrmionics). An ability to easily create, address, and manipulate such structures is among the prerequisite forming a basis of “-onics technology”, and is investigated in detail here using numerical and analytical tools. PMID:27156906

  15. Soliton models for thick branes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peyravi, Marzieh; Riazi, Nematollah; Lobo, Francisco S. N.

    2016-05-01

    In this work, we present new soliton solutions for thick branes in 4+1 dimensions. In particular, we consider brane models based on the sine-Gordon (SG), φ 4 and φ 6 scalar fields, which have broken Z2 symmetry in some cases and are responsible for supporting and stabilizing the thick branes. The origin of the symmetry breaking in these models resides in the fact that the modified scalar field potential may have non-degenerate vacua. These vacua determine the cosmological constant on both sides of the brane. We also study the geodesic equations along the fifth dimension, in order to explore the particle motion in the neighborhood of the brane. Furthermore, we examine the stability of the thick branes, by determining the sign of the w^2 term in the expansion of the potential for the resulting Schrödinger-like equation, where w is the five-dimensional coordinate. It turns out that the φ ^4 brane is stable, while there are unstable modes for certain ranges of the model parameters in the SG and φ ^6 branes.

  16. Moving solitons in a one-dimensional fermionic superfluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Efimkin, Dmitry K.; Galitski, Victor

    2015-02-01

    A fully analytical theory of a traveling soliton in a one-dimensional fermionic superfluid is developed within the framework of time-dependent self-consistent Bogoliubov-de Gennes equations, which are solved exactly in the Andreev approximation. The soliton manifests itself in a kinklike profile of the superconducting order parameter and hosts a pair of Andreev bound states in its core. They adjust to the soliton's motion and play an important role in its stabilization. A phase jump across the soliton and its energy decrease with the soliton's velocity and vanish at the critical velocity, corresponding to the Landau criterion, where the soliton starts emitting quasiparticles and becomes unstable. The "inertial" and "gravitational" masses of the soliton are calculated and the former is shown to be orders of magnitude larger than the latter. This results in a slow motion of the soliton in a harmonic trap, reminiscent of the observed behavior of a solitonlike texture in related experiments in cold fermion gases [T. Yefsah et al., Nature (London) 499, 426 (2013), 10.1038/nature12338]. Furthermore, we calculate the full nonlinear dispersion relation of the soliton and solve the classical equations of motion in a trap. The strong nonlinearity at high velocities gives rise to anharmonic oscillatory motion of the soliton. A careful analysis of this anharmonicity may provide a means to experimentally measure the nonlinear soliton spectrum in superfluids.

  17. Snakelike nonautonomous solitons in a graded-index grating waveguide

    SciTech Connect

    Yang Zhanying; Zhao Lichen; Zhang Tao; Li Yuhang; Yue Ruihong

    2010-04-15

    We present a series of analytical solutions which describe nonautonomous solitons in a planar waveguide with an additional periodical structure, that is, a long-period grating. The explicit functions which describe the evolution of the width, peak, and trajectory of the soliton's wave center are presented exactly. The gain parameter has no effects on the motion of the soliton's wave center or its width; it affects just the evolution of the soliton's peak. The grating term affects the motion of the soliton's wave center without changing its shape. The evolution of the soliton under the propagation-distance-dependent gain term is investigated too. It is reported that an arbitrary additional structure can be added on the graded-index waveguide to control the motion of the soliton without affecting its shape.

  18. Dust acoustic dressed soliton with dust charge fluctuations

    SciTech Connect

    Asgari, H.; Muniandy, S. V.; Wong, C. S.

    2010-06-15

    Modeling of dust acoustic solitons observed in dusty plasma experiment [Bandyopadhyay et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 101, 065006 (2008)] using the Korteweg-de Vries (KdV) equation showed significant discrepancies in the regime of large amplitudes (or high soliton speed). In this paper, higher order perturbation corrections to the standard KdV soliton are proposed and the resulting dressed soliton is shown to describe the experimental data better, in particular, at high soliton speed. The effects of dust charge fluctuations on the dust acoustic dressed soliton in a dusty plasma system are also investigated. The KdV equation and a linear inhomogeneous equation, governing the evolution of first and second order potentials, respectively, are derived for the system by using reductive perturbation technique. Renormalization procedure is used to obtain nonsecular solutions of these coupled equations. The characteristics of dust acoustic dressed solitons with and without dust charge fluctuations are discussed.

  19. Line Soliton Interactions of the Kadomtsev-Petviashvili Equation

    SciTech Connect

    Biondini, Gino

    2007-08-10

    We study soliton solutions of the Kadomtsev-Petviashvili II equation (-4u{sub t}+6uu{sub x}+3u{sub xxx}){sub x}+u{sub yy}=0 in terms of the amplitudes and directions of the interacting solitons. In particular, we classify elastic N-soliton solutions, namely, solutions for which the number, directions, and amplitudes of the N asymptotic line solitons as y{yields}{infinity} coincide with those of the N asymptotic line solitons as y{yields}-{infinity}. We also show that the (2N-1){exclamation_point}{exclamation_point} types of solutions are uniquely characterized in terms of the individual soliton parameters, and we calculate the soliton position shifts arising from the interactions.

  20. Effect of ion and ion-beam mass ratio on the formation of ion-acoustic solitons in magnetized plasma in the presence of electron inertia

    SciTech Connect

    Kalita, B. C.; Barman, S. N.

    2009-05-15

    The propagation of ion-acoustic solitary waves in magnetized plasma with cold ions and ion-beams together with electron inertia has been investigated theoretically through the Korteweg-de Vries equation. Subject to the drift velocity of the ion beam, the existence of compressive solitons is found to become extinct as {alpha} (=cold ion mass/ion-beam mass) tends to 0.01 when {gamma}=0.985 ({gamma} is the beam velocity/phase velocity). Interestingly, a transitional direction of propagation of solitary waves has been unearthed for change over, from compressive solitons to rarefactive solitons based on {alpha} and {sigma}{sub {upsilon}}(=cosine of the angle {theta} made by the wave propagation direction {xi} with the direction of the magnetic field) for fixed Q(=electron mass/ion mass). Further, the direction of propagation of ion-acoustic waves is found to be the deterministic factor to admit compressive or rarefactive solitons subject to beam outsource.

  1. Aging solitons in photorefractive dipolar glasses.

    PubMed

    Parravicini, J; Pierangeli, D; Di Mei, F; Conti, C; Agranat, A J; DelRe, E

    2013-12-16

    We study experimentally the aging of optical spatial solitons in a dipolar glass hosted by a nanodisordered sample of photorefractive potassium-sodium-tantalate-niobate (KNTN). As the system ages, the waves erratically explore varying strengths of the nonlinear response, causing them to break up and scatter. We show that this process can still lead to solitons, but in a generalized form for which the changing response is compensated by changing the normalized wave size and intensity so as to maintain fixed the optical waveform.

  2. Raman solitons with group velocity dispersion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skryabin, D. V.; Yulin, A. V.

    2006-10-01

    We consider the coupled propagation of the pump and Stokes waves in a Raman active medium accounting for the group velocity walk off and group velocity dispersion. Interplay of the Raman coherence and the dispersion can lead to the formation of a complete band gap in the spectrum of linear waves consisting of the two consecutive subgaps located at different frequencies. Using an approximate analytic technique, we find exponentially localized solitons residing in the complete gap, and find algebraic solitons when the gap is closed. Feasibility of observation of these structures in hollow fibers is discussed.

  3. Resonant radiation from oscillating higher order solitons

    SciTech Connect

    Driben, R.; Yulin, A. V.; Efimov, A.

    2015-07-15

    We present radiation mechanism exhibited by a higher order soliton. In a course of its evolution the higher-order soliton emits polychromatic radiation resulting in formation of multipeak frequency comb-like spectral band. The shape and spectral position of this band can be effectively controlled by the relative strength of the third order dispersion. An analytical description is corroborated by numerical simulations. Research showed that for longer pulses the described effect persists also under the action of higher order perturbations such as Raman and self-steepening.

  4. The laboratory investigation of surface envelope solitons: reflection from a vertical wall and collisions of solitons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slunyaev, Alexey; Klein, Marco; Clauss, Günther F.

    2016-04-01

    Envelope soliton solutions are key elements governing the nonlinear wave dynamics within a simplified theory for unidirectional weakly modulated weakly nonlinear wave groups on the water surface. Within integrable models the solitons preserve their structure in collisions with other waves; they do not disperse and can carry energy infinitively long. Steep and short soliton-like wave groups have been shown to exist in laboratory tests [1] and, even earlier, in numerical simulations [2, 3]. Thus, long-living wave groups may play important role in the dynamics of intense sea waves and wave-structure interactions. The solitary wave groups may change the wave statistics and can be taken into account when developing approaches for the deterministic forecasting of dangerous waves, including so-called rogue waves. An experimental campaign has been conducted in the wave basin of the Technical University of Berlin on simulations of intense solitary wave groups. The first successful experimental observation of intense envelope solitons took place in this facility [1]. The new experiments aimed at following main goals: 1) to reproduce intense envelope solitons with different carrier wave lengths; 2) to estimate the rate of envelope soliton dissipation; 3) to consider the reflection of envelope solitons on a vertical wall; 4) to consider head-on collisions of envelope solitons, and 5) to consider overtaking interactions of envelope solitons. Up to 9 wave gauges were used in each experimental run, which enabled registration of the surface movement at different distances from the wavemaker, at different locations across the wave flume and near the wall. Besides surface displacements, the group envelope shapes were directly recorded, with use of phase shifts applied to the modulated waves generated by the wavemaker. [1] A. Slunyaev, G.F. Clauss, M. Klein, M. Onorato, Simulations and experiments of short intense envelope solitons of surface water waves. Phys. Fluids 25, 067105

  5. Transmutation of skyrmions to half-solitons driven by the nonlinear optical spin Hall effect.

    PubMed

    Flayac, H; Solnyshkov, D D; Shelykh, I A; Malpuech, G

    2013-01-01

    We show that the spin domains, generated in the linear optical spin Hall effect by the analog of spin-orbit interaction for exciton polaritons, are associated with the formation of a Skyrmion lattice. In the nonlinear regime, the spin anisotropy of the polariton-polariton interactions results in a spatial compression of the domains and in a transmutation of the Skyrmions into oblique half-solitons. This phase transition is associated with both the focusing of the spin currents and the emergence of a strongly anisotropic emission pattern.

  6. Dissipative soliton generation from a graphene oxide mode-locked Er-doped fiber laser.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jia; Wu, Sida; Li, Huihui; Liu, Jiang; Sun, Ruoyu; Tan, Fangzhou; Yang, Quan-Hong; Wang, Pu

    2012-10-01

    We demonstrated dissipative soliton obtained from a graphene oxide mode-locked Er-doped fiber laser, which operated in normal dispersion cavity by employing the dispersion compensation fiber. The highly chirped pulses at the repetition rate of 19.5 MHz can be compressed from 11 ps to 542 fs by using single mode fiber. Numerical simulations were in good agreement with the experimental results. The hydrophilic graphene oxide with easier fabrication shows great potential to be a novel low-cost saturable absorber in reliable and compact mode-locked fiber laser system.

  7. Analytical multi-soliton solutions of a (2+1)-dimensional breaking soliton equation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shao-Fu

    2016-01-01

    The analytical solutions for a (2+1)-dimensional breaking solution equation is proposed in this paper by using mapping and projective method darboux transformation, and Some exact propagating solutions are constructed for this Breaking equation, and the M × N multi-soliton could be obtained by using Weierstrassp function and setting the perfect parameters. The potential application of breaking Soliton equation will be of great interest in future research.

  8. Kerr-Newman Electron as Spinning Soliton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burinskii, Alexander

    2015-10-01

    Measurable parameters of the electron indicate that its background should be described by the Kerr-Newman (KN) solution. The spin/mass ratio of the electron is extreme large, and the black hole horizons disappear, opening a topological defect of space-time - the Kerr singular ring of Compton size, which may be interpreted as a closed fundamental string of low energy string theory. The singular and two-sheeted structure of the corresponding Kerr space has to be regularised, and we consider the old problem of regularising the source of the KN solution. As a development of the earlier Keres-Israel-Hamity-López model, we describe the model of smooth and regular source forming a gravitating and relativistically rotating soliton based on the chiral field model and the Higgs mechanism of broken symmetry. The model reveals some new remarkable properties: (1) the soliton forms a relativistically rotating bubble of Compton radius, which is filled by the oscillating Higgs field in a pseudo-vacuum state; (2) the boundary of the bubble forms a domain wall which interpolates between the internal flat background and the external exact Kerr-Newman (KN) solution; (3) the phase transition is provided by a system of chiral fields; (4) the vector potential of the external the KN solution forms a closed Wilson loop which is quantised, giving rise to a quantised spin of the soliton; (5) the soliton is bordered by a closed string, which is a part of the general complex stringy structure.

  9. Kerr-Newman electron as spinning soliton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burinskii, Alexander

    2014-09-01

    Measurable parameters of the electron indicate that its background should be described by the Kerr-Newman (KN) solution. The spin/mass ratio of the electron is extreme large and the black hole (BH) horizons disappear, opening a topological defect of space-time — the Kerr singular ring of Compton size, which may be interpreted as a closed fundamental string to low-energy string theory. The singular and two-sheeted structure of the corresponding Kerr space has to be regularized, and we consider the old problem of regularizing the source of the KN solution. As a development of the earlier Keres-Israel-Hamity-López model, we describe the model of smooth and regular source forming a gravitating and relativistically rotating soliton based on the chiral field model and the Higgs mechanism of broken symmetry. The model reveals some new remarkable properties: (1) the soliton forms a relativistically rotating bubble of Compton radius, which is filled by the oscillating Higgs field in a pseudo-vacuum state; (2) the boundary of the bubble forms a domain wall which interpolates between the internal flat background and the external exact KN solution; (3) the phase transition is provided by a system of chiral fields; (4) the vector potential of the external KN solution forms a closed Wilson loop which is quantized, giving rise to a quantized spin of the soliton and (5) the soliton is bordered by a closed string, which is a part of the general complex stringy structure.

  10. Soliton scattering in the Darboux transformation formalism

    SciTech Connect

    Matveev, V.B.; Sall', M.A.

    1987-05-20

    The Darboux transformation technique is applied to derive soliton scattering formulas for the Kadomtsev-Petviashvili equation, the KdV equation, the nonlocal KdV equation, the two-dimensionalized Toda chain and its periodic reductions, in particular the sine-Gordon equation.

  11. Solitons in nucleon-nucleus collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Fogaca, D.A.; Navarra, F.S.

    2004-12-02

    Under certain conditions, the equations of non-relativistic hydrodynamics may provide a Korteweg-de Vries equation (KdV) which gives a soliton solution. We show that this solution and its properties are related to the microscopic features of the nuclear matter equation of state.

  12. Fractional Solitons in Excitonic Josephson Junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, Ya-Fen; Su, Jung-Jung

    2015-10-01

    The Josephson effect is especially appealing to physicists because it reveals macroscopically the quantum order and phase. In excitonic bilayers the effect is even subtler due to the counterflow of supercurrent as well as the tunneling between layers (interlayer tunneling). Here we study, in a quantum Hall bilayer, the excitonic Josephson junction: a conjunct of two exciton condensates with a relative phase ϕ0 applied. The system is mapped into a pseudospin ferromagnet then described numerically by the Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert equation. In the presence of interlayer tunneling, we identify a family of fractional sine-Gordon solitons which resemble the static fractional Josephson vortices in the extended superconducting Josephson junctions. Each fractional soliton carries a topological charge Q that is not necessarily a half/full integer but can vary continuously. The calculated current-phase relation (CPR) shows that solitons with Q = ϕ0/2π is the lowest energy state starting from zero ϕ0 - until ϕ0 > π - then the alternative group of solitons with Q = ϕ0/2π - 1 takes place and switches the polarity of CPR.

  13. Non-linear longitudinal compression effect on dynamics of the transcription bubble in DNA.

    PubMed

    Shikhovtseva, E S; Nazarov, V N

    2016-01-01

    The dependence of the dynamics of transcription bubble on the parameters of non-linear longitudinal compression is presented on the base of simple model of soliton-like conformational switchings in two-component bistable polymer molecules with energetically non-equivalent stable states. It has been shown that under certain conditions the longitudinal compression may be a trap for a conformational switching. PMID:27232455

  14. Near-wall scaling for turbulent boundary layers with adverse pressure gradient. A priori tests on DNS of channel flow with periodic hill constrictions and DNS of separating boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manhart, Michael; Peller, Nikolaus; Brun, Christophe

    2008-05-01

    A new extended inner scaling is proposed for the wall layer of wall-bounded flows under the influence of both wall shear stress and streamwise pressure gradient. This scaling avoids problems of the classical wall coordinates close to flow separation and reattachment. Based on the proposed extended velocity and length scales a universal nondimensional family of velocity profiles is derived for the viscous region in the vicinity of a wall that depend on wall distance and a parameter α quantifying the importance of the streamwise pressure gradient with respect to the wall shear stress in the momentum balance. The performance of the proposed extended scaling is investigated in two different flow fields, a separating and reattaching turbulent boundary layer and a turbulent flow over a periodic arrangement of smoothly contoured hills. Both flows are results of highly resolved direct numerical simulation (DNS). The results show that the viscous assumptions are valid up to about two extended wall units. If the profiles are scaled by the extended inner coordinates, they seem to behave in a universal way. This gives rise to the hope that a universal behavior of velocity profiles can be found in the proposed extended inner coordinates even beyond the validity of the extended viscous law of the wall.

  15. Adiabatic theory of solitons fed by dispersive waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pickartz, Sabrina; Bandelow, Uwe; Amiranashvili, Shalva

    2016-09-01

    We consider scattering of low-amplitude dispersive waves at an intense optical soliton which constitutes a nonlinear perturbation of the refractive index. Specifically, we consider a single-mode optical fiber and a group velocity matched pair: an optical soliton and a nearly perfectly reflected dispersive wave, a fiber-optical analog of the event horizon. By combining (i) an adiabatic approach that is used in soliton perturbation theory and (ii) scattering theory from quantum mechanics, we give a quantitative account of the evolution of all soliton parameters. In particular, we quantify the increase in the soliton peak power that may result in the spontaneous appearance of an extremely large, so-called champion soliton. The presented adiabatic theory agrees well with the numerical solutions of the pulse propagation equation. Moreover, we predict the full frequency band of the scattered dispersive waves and explain an emerging caustic structure in the space-time domain.

  16. Soliton and kink jams in traffic flow with open boundaries.

    PubMed

    Muramatsu, M; Nagatani, T

    1999-07-01

    Soliton density wave is investigated numerically and analytically in the optimal velocity model (a car-following model) of a one-dimensional traffic flow with open boundaries. Soliton density wave is distinguished from the kink density wave. It is shown that the soliton density wave appears only at the threshold of occurrence of traffic jams. The Korteweg-de Vries (KdV) equation is derived from the optimal velocity model by the use of the nonlinear analysis. It is found that the traffic soliton appears only near the neutral stability line. The soliton solution is analytically obtained from the perturbed KdV equation. It is shown that the soliton solution obtained from the nonlinear analysis is consistent with that of the numerical simulation. PMID:11969749

  17. Gravitational two solitons in Levi-Cività spacetime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Igata, Takahisa; Tomizawa, Shinya

    2016-09-01

    Applying the Pomeransky inverse scattering method to the four-dimensional vacuum Einstein equations and using the Levi-Cività solution as a seed, we construct a two-soliton solution with cylindrical symmetry. In our previous work, we constructed the one-soliton solution with a real pole and showed that the singularities that the Levi-Cività background has on an axis can be removed by the choice of certain special parameters, but it still has unavoidable null singularities, as usual one-solitons do. In this work, we show that for the two-soliton solutions, any singularities can be removed by suitable parameter-setting and such solutions describe the propagation of gravitational wave packets. Moreover, in terms of the two-soliton solutions, we mention a time shift phenomenon, the coalescence and the split of solitons as the nonlinear effect of gravitational waves.

  18. Logarithmic laws for compressible turbulent boundary layers

    SciTech Connect

    So, R.M.C.; Zhang, H.S.; Gatski, T.B.; Speziale, C.G.

    1994-11-01

    Dimensional similarity arguments proposed by Millikan are used with the Morkovin hypothesis to deduce logarithmic laws for compressible turbulent boundary layers as an alternative to the traditional van Driest analysis. It is shown that an overlap exists between the wall layer and the defect layer, and this leads to logarithmic behavior in the overlap region. The von Karman constant is found to depend parametrically on the Mach number based on the friction velocity, the dimensionless total heat flux, and the specific heat ratio. Even though it remains constant at approximately 0.41 for a freestream Mach number range of 0 to 4.544 with adiabatic wall boundary conditions, it rises sharply as the Mach number increases significantly beyond 4.544. The intercept of the logarithmic law of the wall is found to depend on the Mach number based on the friction velocity, the dimensionless total heat flux, the Prandtl number evaluated at the wall, and the specific heat ratio. On the other hand, the intercept of the logarithmic defect law is parametric in the pressure gradient parameter and all of the aforementioned dimensionless variables except the Prandtl number. A skin friction law is also deduced for compressible boundary layers. The skin friction coefficient is shown to depend on the momentum thickness Reynolds number, the wall temperature ratio, and all of the other parameters already mentioned. 26 refs.

  19. Amplitude-squeezed fiber-Bragg-grating solitons

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, R.-K.; Lai Yinchieh

    2004-02-01

    Quantum fluctuations of optical fiber-Bragg-grating solitons are investigated numerically by the back-propagation method. It is found that the band-gap effects of the grating act as a nonlinear filter and cause the soliton to be amplitude squeezed. The squeezing ratio saturates after a certain grating length and the optimal squeezing ratio occurs when the pulse energy is slightly above the fundamental soliton energy.

  20. Anisotropic Solitons in Dipolar Bose-Einstein Condensates

    SciTech Connect

    Tikhonenkov, I.; Vardi, A.; Malomed, B. A.

    2008-03-07

    Starting with a Gaussian variational ansatz, we predict anisotropic bright solitons in quasi-2D Bose-Einstein condensates consisting of atoms with dipole moments polarized perpendicular to the confinement direction. Unlike isotropic solitons predicted for the moments aligned with the confinement axis [Phys. Rev. Lett. 95, 200404 (2005)], no sign reversal of the dipole-dipole interaction is necessary to support the solitons. Direct 3D simulations confirm their stability.

  1. Protonic transport through solitons in hydrogen-bonded systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kavitha, L.; Jayanthi, S.; Muniyappan, A.; Gopi, D.

    2011-09-01

    We offer an alternative route for investigating soliton solutions in hydrogen-bonded (HB) chains. We invoke the modified extended tangent hyperbolic function method coupled with symbolic computation to solve the governing equation of motion for proton dynamics. We investigate the dynamics of proton transfer in HB chains through bell-shaped soliton excitations, which trigger the bio-energy transport in most biological systems. This solitonic mechanism of proton transfer could play functional roles in muscular contraction, enzymatic activity and oxidative phosphorylation.

  2. Intricate solitons state in passively mode-locked fiber lasers.

    PubMed

    Amrani, Foued; Salhi, Mohamed; Leblond, Hervé; Haboucha, Adil; Sanchez, François

    2011-07-01

    We report a novel spontaneous soliton pattern formation in a figure-of-eight passively mode-locked erbium-doped double-clad fiber laser. It consists in a condensate phase in which there is almost periodic arrangement of alternate crystal and liquid soliton phases. Thanks to an adapted ansatz for the electric field, we perform a reconstruction allowing to clearly identify the soliton distribution along the cavity.

  3. Sagnac Interferometry Using Bright Matter-Wave Solitons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helm, J. L.; Cornish, S. L.; Gardiner, S. A.

    2015-04-01

    We use an effective one-dimensional Gross-Pitaevskii equation to study bright matter-wave solitons held in a tightly confining toroidal trapping potential, in a rotating frame of reference, as they are split and recombined on narrow barrier potentials. In particular, we present an analytical and numerical analysis of the phase evolution of the solitons and delimit a velocity regime in which soliton Sagnac interferometry is possible, taking account of the effect of quantum uncertainty.

  4. Video Compression

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    Optivision developed two PC-compatible boards and associated software under a Goddard Space Flight Center Small Business Innovation Research grant for NASA applications in areas such as telerobotics, telesciences and spaceborne experimentation. From this technology, the company used its own funds to develop commercial products, the OPTIVideo MPEG Encoder and Decoder, which are used for realtime video compression and decompression. They are used in commercial applications including interactive video databases and video transmission. The encoder converts video source material to a compressed digital form that can be stored or transmitted, and the decoder decompresses bit streams to provide high quality playback.

  5. Bäcklund Transformation and Soliton Solutions for a (3+1)-Dimensional Variable-Coefficient Breaking Soliton Equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Chen; Gao, Yi-Tian; Lan, Zhong-Zhou; Yang, Jin-Wei

    2016-09-01

    In this article, a (3+1)-dimensional variable-coefficient breaking soliton equation is investigated. Based on the Bell polynomials and symbolic computation, the bilinear forms and Bäcklund transformation for the equation are derived. One-, two-, and three-soliton solutions are obtained via the Hirota method. N-soliton solutions are also constructed. Propagation characteristics and interaction behaviors of the solitons are discussed graphically: (i) solitonic direction and position depend on the sign of the wave numbers; (ii) shapes of the multisoliton interactions in the scaled space and time coordinates are affected by the variable coefficients; (iii) multisoliton interactions are elastic for that the velocity and amplitude of each soliton remain unchanged after each interaction except for a phase shift.

  6. Modulation instability and solitons in two-color nematic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horikis, Theodoros P.

    2016-10-01

    The conditions under which stable evolution of two nonlinear interacting waves are derived within the context of nematic liquid crystals. Two cases are considered: plane waves and solitons. In the first case, the modulation instability analysis reveals that while the nonlocal term suppresses the growth rates, substantially, the coupled system exhibits significantly higher growth rates than its scalar counterpart. In the soliton case, the necessary conditions are derived that lead the solitons to exhibit stable, undistorted evolution, suppressing any breathing behavior and radiation, leading to soliton mutual guiding.

  7. Vector pulsing soliton of self-induced transparency in waveguide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adamashvili, G. T.

    2015-01-01

    A theory of an optical resonance vector pulsing soliton in waveguide is developed. A thin transition layer containing semiconductor quantum dots forms the boundary between the waveguide and one of the connected media. Analytical and numerical solutions for the optical vector pulsing soliton in waveguide are obtained. The vector pulsing soliton in the presence of excitonic and bi-excitonic excitations is compared with the soliton for waveguide TM-modes with parameters that can be used in modern optical experiments. It is shown that these nonlinear waves have significantly different parameters and shapes.

  8. Bending of solitons in weak and slowly varying inhomogeneous plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Mukherjee, Abhik Janaki, M. S. Kundu, Anjan

    2015-12-15

    The bending of solitons in two dimensional plane is presented in the presence of weak and slowly varying inhomogeneous ion density for the propagation of ion acoustic soliton in unmagnetized cold plasma with isothermal electrons. Using reductive perturbation technique, a modified Kadomtsev-Petviashvili equation is obtained with a chosen unperturbed ion density profile. The exact solution of the equation shows that the phase of the solitary wave gets modified by a function related to the unperturbed inhomogeneous ion density causing the soliton to bend in the two dimensional plane, while the amplitude of the soliton remains constant.

  9. Soliton model of a photon propagating in dielectrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bersons, I.; Veilande, R.; Balcers, O.

    2016-06-01

    The previously proposed three-dimensional soliton model of a photon propagating in vacuum is modified to describe its propagation in a homogeneous linear dielectric medium. The one-soliton solution of the derived nonlinear equation correctly predicts the energy and the Abraham and Minkowski momenta of the photon in dielectrics. A new nonlinear equation is proposed, which has a one-soliton solution that at every point oscillates with the same frequency and falls exponentially in the longitudinal, as well as in the transverse direction from the centre of the soliton.

  10. Statistical mechanics of the Toda lattice based on soliton dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshida, Fumio; Sakurma, Tetsuro

    1982-05-01

    A classical theory of statistical mechanics of the Toda lattice is presented on the basis of soliton dynamics. Following the inverse spectral theory, the partition function of the Toda lattice is reconstructed from one-particle partition functions of soliton and ripple modes. Discussions are made on the contribution of these modes to the thermodynamic properties of the Toda lattice. At low temperatures, it is shown that the average number of excited solitons has the temperature dependence T13. With the comparison of our results with those from the exact theory, several problems to be worked out are pointed out in our soliton-ripple gas-mixture model.

  11. Bistable moving optical solitons in resonant photonic crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Vlasov, R. A.; Lemeza, A. M.

    2011-08-15

    We consider some new aspects of the formation of moving optical solitons in a medium of Bragg-type resonant grating doped with two-level atoms. For generality, account is taken of the local-field effect assisted by a sufficiently high density of resonant atoms. It is established analytically that there exists a family of soliton solutions to the two-wave Maxwell-Bloch system of equations, with these solitons exhibiting bistable properties. The existence of bistable solitons and their properties are confirmed by numerical simulations.

  12. Nontopological solitons as nucleation sites for cosmological phase transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Metaxas, D.

    2001-04-01

    I consider quantum field theories that admit charged nontopological solitons of the Q-ball type, and use the fact that in a first-order cosmological phase transition, below the critical temperature, there is a value of the soliton charge above which the soliton becomes unstable and expands, converting space to the true vacuum, much like a critical bubble in the case of ordinary tunneling. Using a simple model for the production rate of Q-balls through charge accretion during a random walk out of equilibrium, I calculate the probability for the formation of critical charge solitons and estimate the amount of supercooling needed for the phase transition to be completed.

  13. Spatial solitons in two-photon photorefractive media

    SciTech Connect

    Hou Chunfeng; Pei Yanbo; Zhou Zhongxiang; Sun Xiudong

    2005-05-15

    We provide a theory for spatial solitons due to the two-photon photorefractive effect based on the Castro-Camus model [Opt. Lett. 28, 1129 (2003)]. We present the evolution equation of one-dimensional spatial solitons in two-photon photorefractive media. In steady state and under appropriate external bias conditions, we obtain the dark and bright soliton solutions of the optical wave evolution equation, and also discuss the self-deflection of the bright solitons theoretically by taking into account the diffusion effect.

  14. Spatial solitons in two-photon photorefractive media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, Chunfeng; Pei, Yanbo; Zhou, Zhongxiang; Sun, Xiudong

    2005-05-01

    We provide a theory for spatial solitons due to the two-photon photorefractive effect based on the Castro-Camus model [Opt. Lett. 28, 1129 (2003)]. We present the evolution equation of one-dimensional spatial solitons in two-photon photorefractive media. In steady state and under appropriate external bias conditions, we obtain the dark and bright soliton solutions of the optical wave evolution equation, and also discuss the self-deflection of the bright solitons theoretically by taking into account the diffusion effect.

  15. Dressed solitons in quantum electron-positron-ion plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chatterjee, Prasanta; Roy, Kaushik; Mondal, Ganesh; Muniandy, S. V.; Yap, S. L.; Wong, C. S.

    2009-12-01

    Nonlinear propagation of quantum ion acoustic waves in a dense quantum plasma whose constituents are electrons, positrons, and positive ions is investigated using a quantum hydrodynamic model. The Korteweg-de Vries equation is derived using reductive perturbation technique. The higher order inhomogeneous differential equation is obtained for the dressed soliton. The dynamical equation for dressed soliton is solved using the renormalization method. The conditions for the validity of the higher order correction are described. The effects of quantum parameter, positron concentration, electron to positron Fermi temperature ratio, and soliton velocity on the amplitude and width of the dressed soliton are studied.

  16. Mechanism of multisoliton formation and soliton energy quantization in passively mode-locked fiber lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, D.Y.; Zhao, L.M.; Zhao, B.; Liu, A.Q.

    2005-10-15

    We report results of numerical simulations on multiple-soliton generation and soliton energy quantization in a soliton fiber ring laser passively mode locked by using the nonlinear polarization rotation technique. We found numerically that the formation of multiple solitons in the laser is caused by a peak-power-limiting effect of the laser cavity. It is also the same effect that suppresses the soliton pulse collapse, an intrinsic feature of solitons propagating in gain media, and makes the solitons stable in the laser. Furthermore, we show that the soliton energy quantization observed in the lasers is a natural consequence of the gain competition between the multiple solitons. Enlightened by the numerical result we speculate that multisoliton formation and soliton energy quantization observed in other types of soliton fiber lasers could have a similar mechanism.

  17. The stability of the laminar boundary layer in a compressible fluid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lees, Lester

    1947-01-01

    Report is a continuation of a theoretical investigation of the stability of the laminar boundary layer in a compressible fluid. An approximate estimate for the minimum critical Reynolds number, or stability limit, is obtained in terms of the distribution of the kinematic viscosity and the product of the mean density and mean vorticity across the boundary layer. The extension of the results of the stability analysis to laminar boundary-layer gas flows with a pressure gradient in the direction of the free stream is discussed. (author)

  18. Rogue waves generation via nonlinear soliton collision in multiple-soliton state of a mode-locked fiber laser.

    PubMed

    Peng, Junsong; Tarasov, Nikita; Sugavanam, Srikanth; Churkin, Dmitry

    2016-09-19

    We report for the first time, rogue waves generation in a mode-locked fiber laser that worked in multiple-soliton state in which hundreds of solitons occupied the whole laser cavity. Using real-time spatio-temporal intensity dynamics measurements, it is unveiled that nonlinear soliton collision accounts for the formation of rogue waves in this laser state. The nature of interactions between solitons are also discussed. Our observation may suggest similar formation mechanisms of rogue waves in other systems. PMID:27661869

  19. Strong gravity and structure of topological solitons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rybakov, Yu. P.

    The unification of Skyrme and Faddeev chiral models describing baryons and leptons respectively as topological solitons is suggested within the framework of 16-spinor field ψ = ψ1 ⊕ ψ2 nonlinear model containing two 8-semispinors ψ1 and ψ2. Using Brioschi identity for 8-spinors and special structure of the Higgs potential V implying the spontaneous symmetry breaking, it is possible to realize topological soliton-like excitations of two kinds due to the choice of S2- or S3- manifolds as phase spaces. The interactions with electromagnetic, Yang--Mills and gravitational fields are exhibited through the extention of derivatives via gauge invariance principle. Specific inclusion in the Higgs potential of the Kretschmann gravitational invariant K = RμνσλRμνσλ/48 permits one to obtain the strong gravity behavior at small distances and guarantee the correspondence with Quantum Mechanics at large distances.

  20. The study of electromagnetic cusp solitons

    SciTech Connect

    Verma, Deepa; Das, Amita; Kaw, Predhiman; Tiwari, Sanat Kumar

    2015-01-15

    The formation of a cusp structure in the envelope of electromagnetic solitons for electron-ion plasma at the ion wave breaking point has been shown by Farina and Bulanov [Phys. Rev. Lett. 86, 5289 (2001)]. The analytical form of the cusp structure has been obtained here. The analytical form of the cusp is shown to compare well with the exact numerically obtained solutions. Such cusp solitons occurring at the ion wave breaking point may have relevance to ion acceleration mechanism. In an effort towards studying the dynamical stability of such structures, the time evolution studies have been carried out which show that the structure survives for several plasma periods. However, ultimately it breaks apart due to the instability associated with the forward Raman scattering.

  1. Traffic jams, granular flow, and soliton selection

    SciTech Connect

    Kurtze, D.A.; Hong, D.C.

    1995-07-01

    The flow of traffic on a long section of road without entrances or exits can be modeled by continuum equations similar to those describing fluid flow. In a certain range of traffic density, steady flow becomes unstable against the growth of a cluster, or ``phantom`` traffic jam, which moves at a slower speed than the otherwise homogeneous flow. We show that near the onset of this instability, traffic flow is described by a perturbed Korteweg--de Vries (KdV) equation. The traffic jam can be identified with a soliton solution of the KdV equation. The perturbation terms select a unique member of the continuous family of KdV solitons. These results may also apply to the dynamics of granular relaxation.

  2. Vibron Solitons and Soliton-Induced Infrared Spectra of Crystalline Acetanilide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takeno, S.

    1986-01-01

    Red-shifted infrared spectra at low temperatures of amide I (C=O stretching) vibrations of crystalline acetanilide measured by Careri et al. are shown to be due to vibron solitons, which are nonlinearity-induced localized modes of vibrons arising from their nonlinear interactions with optic-type phonons. A nonlinear eigenvalue equation giving the eigenfrequency of stationary solitons is solved approximately by introducing lattice Green's functions, and the obtained result is in good agreement with the experimental result. Inclusion of interactions with acoustic phonons yields the Debye-Waller factor in the zero-phonon line spectrum of vibron solitons, in a manner analogous to the case of impurity-induced localized harmonic phonon modes in alkali halides.

  3. Perturbation theory for solitons in optical fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaup, D. J.

    1990-11-01

    Using a singular perturbation expansion, we study the evolution of a Raman loss compensated soliton in an optical fiber. Our analytical results agree quite well with the numerical results of Mollenauer, Gordon, and Islam [IEEE J. Quantum Electron. QE-22, 157 (1986)]. However, there are some differences in that our theory predicts an additional structure that was only partially seen in the numerical calculations. Our analytical results do give a quite good qualitative and quantitative check of the numerical results.

  4. Stark effect induced microcavity polariton solitons.

    PubMed

    Zhang, W L; Wu, X M; Wang, F; Ma, R; Li, X F; Rao, Y J

    2015-06-15

    This paper proposes a way of generating polariton solitons (PSs) in a semiconductor microcavity using Stark effect as the trigger mechanism. A Stark pulse performing as the writing beam is used to excite non-resonant fluctuations of polariton, which finally evolves into bright PSs. It is found that a branch of PS solutions versus pump parameters could be found through optimizing parameters of the Stark pulse, and polarization of the generated PS is dependent on the writing beam. PMID:26193554

  5. Linking numbers, spin, and statistics of solitons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilczek, F.; Zee, A.

    1983-01-01

    The spin and statistics of solitons in the (2 + 1)- and (3 + 1)-dimensional nonlinear sigma models is considered. For the (2 + 1)-dimensional case, there is the possibility of fractional spin and exotic statistics; for 3 + 1 dimensions, the usual spin-statistics relation is demonstrated. The linking-number interpretation of the Hopf invariant and the use of suspension considerably simplify the analysis.

  6. Infrared Absorption in Acetanilide by Solitons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Careri, G.; Buontempo, U.; Carta, F.; Gratton, E.; Scott, A. C.

    1983-07-01

    The infrared spectrum of acetanilide shows a new band that is red shifted from the main amide-I maximum by about 15 cm-1, the intensity of which increases at low temperature. It is suggested that this band may arise from the creation of amide-I solitons that are similar (but not identical) to those proposed by Davydov for the alpha helix in proteins.

  7. Topological solitons in 8-spinor mie electrodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Rybakov, Yu. P.

    2013-10-15

    We investigate the effective 8-spinor field model suggested earlier as the generalization of nonlinear Mie electrodynamics. We first study in pure spinorial model the existence of topological solitons endowed with the nontrivial Hopf invariant Q{sub H}, which can be interpreted as the lepton number. Electromagnetic field being included as the perturbation, we estimate the energy and the spin of the localized charged configuration.

  8. Wave-mixing solitons in ferroelectric crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bugaychuk, S.; Kovacs, L.; Mandula, G.; Polgar, K.; Rupp, R. A.

    Although the sine-Gordon equation was originally obtained for the description of four-wave mixing in transmission geometry, it describes self-diffraction of the wave from shifted gratings as well. The sine-Gordon equation governs soliton propagation. The photoinduced amplitude of the refractive-index grating exhibits also a soliton shape in the crystal volume. The origin of this effect is the change of the contrast of light due to energy transfer between coupled waves during their propagation, which occurs in bulk crystals with strong photorefractive gain. The theoretical description shows the possibility to control the soliton properties by changing the input intensity ratio and/or input phase difference of the wave. The effect can lead to diffraction efficiency management, auto-oscillations and bistability of the output waves due to wave-mixing in ferroelectrics. Results on the first experimental observation of non-uniform distribution of the grating amplitude profile and its changes versus input intensity ratio are presented.

  9. Compressed Genotyping

    PubMed Central

    Erlich, Yaniv; Gordon, Assaf; Brand, Michael; Hannon, Gregory J.; Mitra, Partha P.

    2011-01-01

    Over the past three decades we have steadily increased our knowledge on the genetic basis of many severe disorders. Nevertheless, there are still great challenges in applying this knowledge routinely in the clinic, mainly due to the relatively tedious and expensive process of genotyping. Since the genetic variations that underlie the disorders are relatively rare in the population, they can be thought of as a sparse signal. Using methods and ideas from compressed sensing and group testing, we have developed a cost-effective genotyping protocol to detect carriers for severe genetic disorders. In particular, we have adapted our scheme to a recently developed class of high throughput DNA sequencing technologies. The mathematical framework presented here has some important distinctions from the ’traditional’ compressed sensing and group testing frameworks in order to address biological and technical constraints of our setting. PMID:21451737

  10. Higher-order effects in bandwidth-limited soliton propagation in optical fibers

    SciTech Connect

    Aceves, A.B.; De Angelis, C. ); Nalesso, G.; Santagiustina, M. )

    1994-12-15

    By means of numerical studies and soliton perturbation theory we examine the effects of higher-order linear and nonlinear terms in bandwidth-limited amplified soliton propagation. We show that these effects are responsible for strong reductions of soliton--soliton interaction in such systems.

  11. Two-Color Vector Solitons In Nonlocal Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alberucci, Alessandro; Peccianti, Marco; Assanto, Gaetano; Dyadyusha, Andriy; Kaczmarek, Malgosia

    2006-10-01

    We investigate the interaction between two beams differing in wavelength and the properties of dual-frequency spatial solitons in nonlocal birefringent reorientational media. We report the first experimental observations of anisotropic nonlocal vector solitons in unbiased nematic liquid crystals. Model and simulations, based on the paraxiality along the Poynting vectors, include joint walk-off and breathing.

  12. Soliton-dependent plasmon reflection at bilayer graphene domain walls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Lili; Shi, Zhiwen; Zeng, Bo; Wang, Sheng; Kang, Ji-Hun; Joshi, Trinity; Jin, Chenhao; Ju, Long; Kim, Jonghwan; Lyu, Tairu; Shen, Yuen-Ron; Crommie, Michael; Gao, Hong-Jun; Wang, Feng

    2016-08-01

    Layer-stacking domain walls in bilayer graphene are emerging as a fascinating one-dimensional system that features stacking solitons structurally and quantum valley Hall boundary states electronically. The interactions between electrons in the 2D graphene domains and the one-dimensional domain-wall solitons can lead to further new quantum phenomena. Domain-wall solitons of varied local structures exist along different crystallographic orientations, which can exhibit distinct electrical, mechanical and optical properties. Here we report soliton-dependent 2D graphene plasmon reflection at different 1D domain-wall solitons in bilayer graphene using near-field infrared nanoscopy. We observe various domain-wall structures in mechanically exfoliated graphene bilayers, including network-forming triangular lattices, individual straight or bent lines, and even closed circles. The near-field infrared contrast of domain-wall solitons arises from plasmon reflection at domain walls, and exhibits markedly different behaviours at the tensile- and shear-type domain-wall solitons. In addition, the plasmon reflection at domain walls exhibits a peculiar dependence on electrostatic gating. Our study demonstrates the unusual and tunable coupling between 2D graphene plasmons and domain-wall solitons.

  13. Dispersion management for wavelength-division-multiplexed soliton transmission.

    PubMed

    Forysiak, W; Devaney, J F; Smith, N J; Doran, N J

    1997-05-01

    Residual frequency shifts that are due to two-soliton collisions in stepwise exponentially dispersion-tapered fiber are calculated. Two-step dispersion profiles to minimize the frequency shifts and associated timing jitter are specifically identified. These profiles will improve the performance of wavelength-division-multiplexed soliton systems and permit operation with longer amplifier spans over an increased bandwidth. PMID:18185603

  14. Interaction potential between discrete solitons in waveguide arrays.

    PubMed

    Al Khawaja, U; Al-Marzoug, S M; Bahlouli, H; Baizakov, B

    2016-08-01

    Using a variational approach, we obtained the interaction potential between two discrete solitons in optical waveguide arrays. The resulting potential bears the two features of soliton-soliton and soliton-waveguide interaction potentials where the former is similar to that of the continuum case and the latter is similar to the effective Pierls-Nabarro potential. The interplay between the two interaction potentials is investigated by studying its effect on the soliton molecule formation. It is found that the two solitons bind if their initial separation equals an odd number of waveguides, while they do not bind if their separation is an even number, which is a consequence of the two solitons being both either at the intersites (unstable) or being onsite (stable). We derived the equations of motion for the solitons' centre of mass and relative separation and provided analytic solutions for some specific cases. Favourable agreement between the analytical and numerical interaction potentials is obtained. Possible applications of our results to all-optical logic gates are pointed out. PMID:27505780

  15. Dark solitons in a two-component Bose-Einstein condensate.

    PubMed

    Ohberg, P; Santos, L

    2001-04-01

    The creation and interaction of dark solitons in a two-component Bose-Einstein condensate is investigated. For a miscible case, the interaction of dark solitons in different components is studied. Various possible scenarios are presented, including the formation of a soliton-soliton bound pair. We also analyze the soliton propagation in the presence of domains, and show that a dark soliton can be transferred from one component to the other at the domain wall when it exceeds a critical velocity. For lower velocities multiple reflections within the domain are observed, where the soliton is evaporated and accelerated after each reflection until it finally escapes from the domain.

  16. Asymmetric soliton mobility in competing linear-nonlinear parity-time-symmetric lattices.

    PubMed

    Kartashov, Yaroslav V; Vysloukh, Victor A; Torner, Lluis

    2016-09-15

    We address the transverse mobility of spatial solitons in competing parity-time-symmetric linear and nonlinear lattices. The competition between out-of-phase linear and nonlinear lattices results in a drastic mobility enhancement within a range of soliton energies. We show that within such a range, the addition of even a small imaginary part in the linear potential makes soliton mobility strongly asymmetric. For a given initial phase tilt, the velocity of soliton motion grows with an increase of the balanced gain/losses. In this regime of enhanced mobility, tilted solitons can efficiently drag other solitons that were initially at rest to form moving soliton pairs. PMID:27628394

  17. Jahn-Teller solitons, structural phase transitions, and phase separation.

    PubMed

    Clougherty, Dennis P

    2006-02-01

    It is demonstrated that under common conditions a molecular solid subject to Jahn-Teller interactions supports stable Q-ball-like nontopological solitons. Such solitons represent a localized lump of excess electric charge in periodic motion accompanied by a time-dependent shape distortion of a set of adjacent molecules. The motion of the distortion can correspond to a true rotation or to a pseudorotation about the symmetric shape configuration. These solitons are stable for Jahn-Teller coupling strengths below a critical value; however, as the Jahn-Teller coupling approaches this critical value, the size of the soliton diverges signaling an incipient structural phase transition. The soliton phase mimics features commonly attributed to phase separation in complex solids. PMID:16486846

  18. Jahn-Teller Solitons, Structural Phase Transitions, and Phase Separation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clougherty, Dennis P.

    2006-02-01

    It is demonstrated that under common conditions a molecular solid subject to Jahn-Teller interactions supports stable Q-ball-like nontopological solitons. Such solitons represent a localized lump of excess electric charge in periodic motion accompanied by a time-dependent shape distortion of a set of adjacent molecules. The motion of the distortion can correspond to a true rotation or to a pseudorotation about the symmetric shape configuration. These solitons are stable for Jahn-Teller coupling strengths below a critical value; however, as the Jahn-Teller coupling approaches this critical value, the size of the soliton diverges signaling an incipient structural phase transition. The soliton phase mimics features commonly attributed to phase separation in complex solids.

  19. Solitons in spiraling systems: a continuum model for dynamical phyllotaxis

    SciTech Connect

    Nisoli, Cristiano

    2009-01-01

    A novel, protean, topological soliton has been shown to emerge in systems of repulsive particles in cylindrical geometries, whose statics is described by the number-theoretical objects of Phyllotaxis. We present a minimal and local continuum model that can explain many of the features of the phyllotactic soliton, such as speed, screw shift, energy transport and, for Wigner crystal on a nanotube, charge. The treatment applies just as well in general to solitons in spiraling systems. Unlike e.g. Sine-Gornon-like solitons, our soliton can exist between non degenerate structure, implies a power flow through the system, dynamics of the domains it separates, and possesses pulses, both static and dynamic. Its applications include from charge transfer in Wigner Crystals on nanotubes or A to B-DNA transitions.

  20. Onset of transverse instabilities of confined dark solitons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoefer, M. A.; Ilan, B.

    2016-07-01

    We investigate propagating dark soliton solutions of the two-dimensional defocusing nonlinear Schrödinger or Gross-Pitaevskii (NLS-GP) equation that are transversely confined to propagate in an infinitely long channel. Families of single, vortex, and multilobed solitons are computed using a spectrally accurate numerical scheme. The multilobed solitons are unstable to small transverse perturbations. However, the single-lobed solitons are stable if they are sufficiently confined along the transverse direction, which explains their effective one-dimensional dynamics. The emergence of a transverse modulational instability is characterized in terms of a spectral bifurcation. The critical confinement width for this bifurcation is found to coincide with the existence of a propagating vortex solution and the onset of a "snaking" instability in the dark soliton dynamics that, in turn, give rise to vortex or multivortex excitations. These results shed light on the superfluidic hydrodynamics of dispersive shock waves in Bose-Einstein condensates and nonlinear optics.

  1. Edge-soliton-mediated vortex-core reversal dynamics.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ki-Suk; Yoo, Myoung-Woo; Choi, Youn-Seok; Kim, Sang-Koog

    2011-04-01

    We report an additional reversal mechanism of magnetic vortex cores in nanodot elements driven by currents flowing perpendicular to the sample plane, occurring via dynamic transformations between two coupled edge solitons and bulk vortex solitons. This mechanism differs completely from the well-known switching process mediated by the creation and annihilation of vortex-antivortex pairs in terms of the associated topological solitons, energies, and spin-wave emissions. Strongly localized out-of-plane gyrotropic fields induced by the fast motion of the coupled edge solitons enable a magnetization dip that plays a crucial role in the formation of the reversed core magnetization. This work provides a deeper physical insight into the dynamic transformations of magnetic topological solitons in nanoelements.

  2. Waveguides formed by quasi-steady-state photorefractive spatial solitons.

    PubMed

    Morin, M; Duree, G; Salamo, G; Segev, M

    1995-10-15

    We show that a quasi-steady-state photorefractive spatial soliton forms a waveguide structure in the bulk of a photorefractive material. Although the optically induced waveguide is formed by a very low-power (microwatts) soliton beam, it can guide a powerful (watt) beam of a longer wavelength at which the medium is nonphotosensitive. Furthermore, the waveguide survives, either in the dark or when guiding the longerwavelength beam, for a long time after the soliton beam is turned off. We take advantage of the solitons' property of evolution from a relatively broad input beam into a narrow channel and show that the soliton induces a tapered waveguide (an optical funnel) that improves the coupling efficiency of light into the waveguiding structure.

  3. Large amplitude electromagnetic solitons in intense laser plasma interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Bai-Wen; S, Ishiguro; M, Skoric M.

    2006-09-01

    This paper shows that the standing, backward- and forward-accelerated large amplitude relativistic electromagnetic solitons induced by intense laser pulse in long underdense collisionless homogeneous plasmas can be observed by particle simulations. In addition to the inhomogeneity of the plasma density, the acceleration of the solitons also depends upon not only the laser amplitude but also the plasma length. The electromagnetic frequency of the solitons is between about half and one of the unperturbed electron plasma frequency. The electrostatic field inside the soliton has a one-cycle structure in space, while the transverse electric and magnetic fields have half-cycle and one-cycle structure respectively. Analytical estimates for the existence of the solitons and their electromagnetic frequencies qualitatively coincide with our simulation results.

  4. Dark spatial solitons splitting in logarithmically saturable nonlinear media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yuhong; Liu, Baoyuan; Lu, Keqing; Liu, Wangyun; Han, Jun

    2014-12-01

    We numerically simulate the evolution of the dark-notch-bearing optical beam in the logarithmically saturable nonlinear media based on beam propagation method (BPM). The simulation results indicate that the multiple dark spatial solitons are deep, possible in this type of nonlinear media. The number of multiple dark spatial solitons depends on the width of the dark notch, the initial conditions and the peak intensity of the initial input beam. Under the odd and even initial conditions, the odd and even number sequence of multiple dark spatial solitons can be obtained, respectively. For an input beam with fixed optical intensity, the number of dark solitons increases with the width of the initial input dark notch. The behavior of the multiple dark solitons in this type of media is similar to that in a photorefractive nonlinear crystal.

  5. Transition from discrete to continuous Townes solitons in periodic media

    SciTech Connect

    Eilenberger, Falk; Pertsch, Thomas; Szameit, Alexander

    2010-10-15

    We present a comprehensive analysis of how the properties of two-dimensional lattice (''discrete'') solitons in a Kerr medium are influenced by their peak intensity and width. We are able to quantitatively relate the Townes solution for solitons in a two-dimensional, homogeneous media to two distinct regimes of the lattice solitons: to narrow, high-intensity, highly nonlinear solitons and to broad, low-intensity, weakly nonlinear solitons, which experience the periodic potential as an effective homogeneous medium. Both regimes, although they support a different power flow and are affected by completely different diffraction dynamics, are thus traced back to the same physical phenomenon. They are separated by a range of unstable and stable solutions, directly caused by the periodicity of the lattice.

  6. Demonstration of a Piston Plug feed System for Feeding Coal/Biomass Mixtures across a Pressure Gradient for Application to a Commercial CBTL System

    SciTech Connect

    Santosh Gangwal

    2011-06-30

    breaker into the high pressure gasification vessel. A number of runs involving the feeding of coal and biomass mixtures containing 50 to 70 weight % coal into a high pressure gasification vessel simulator have shown that plugs of sufficient density can be formed to provide a seal against pressures up to 450 psig if homogeneity of the mixture can be maintained. However, the in-homogeneity of coal-biomass mixtures can occur during the mixing process because of density, particle size and moisture differences. Also, the much lower compressibility of coal as opposed to biomass can contribute to non-uniform plug formation which can result in weak plugs. Based on present information, the piston plug feeder offered marginal economic advantages over lock-hoppers. The results suggest a modification to the piston feeder that can potentially seal against pressure without the need for forming plugs. This modified design could result in lower power requirements and potentially better economics.

  7. Optimal control of optical soliton parameters: Part 2. Concept of nonlinear Bloch waves in the problem of soliton management

    SciTech Connect

    Serkin, Vladimir N; Belyaeva, T L

    2001-11-30

    It is shown that optical solitons in nonlinear fibre-optic communication systems and soliton lasers can be represented as nonlinear Bloch waves in periodic structures. The Bloch theorem is proved for solitons of the nonlinear Schrodinger equation in systems with the dispersion, the nonlinearity, and the gain (absorption coefficient) periodically changing over the length. The dynamics of formation and interaction, as well as stability of the coupled states of nonlinear Bloch waves are investigated. It is shown that soliton Bloch waves exist only under certain self-matching conditions for the basic parameters of the system and reveal a structural instability with respect to the mismatch between the periods of spatial modulation of the dispersion, nonlinearity or gain. (solitons)

  8. Few-cycle spatiotemporal soliton wave excited by filamentation of a femtosecond laser pulse in materials with anomalous dispersion

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Jiansheng; Li Ruxin; Xu Zhizhan

    2006-10-15

    The nonlinear dynamics of 1.6-{mu}m fs laser pulses propagating in fused silica is investigated by employing a full-order dispersion model. Different from the x-wave generation in normally dispersive media, a few-cycle spatiotemporally compressed soliton wave is generated with the contrary contributions of anomalous group velocity dispersion (GVD) and self-phase-modulation. However, at the tailing edge of the pulse forms a shock wave which generates separate and strong supercontinuum peaked at 670 nm. It is also the origin of conical emission formed both in time and frequency domain with the contribution of normal GVD at visible light.

  9. (1+2)-dimensional strongly nonlocal solitons

    SciTech Connect

    Ouyang Shigen; Guo Qi

    2007-11-15

    Approximate solutions of (1+2)-dimensional strongly nonlocal solitons (SNSs) are presented. It is shown that the power of a SNS in a nematic liquid crystal is in direct proportion to the second power of the degree of nonlocality, the power of a SNS in a nonlocal medium with a logarithmic nonlocal response is in inverse proportion to the second power of its beamwidth, and the power of a SNS in a nonlocal medium with an sth-power decay nonlocal response is in direct proportion to the (s+2)th power of the degree of nonlocality.

  10. Class of supersymmetric solitons with naked singularities

    SciTech Connect

    Cvetic, M.; Youm, D. )

    1995-02-15

    We study vacuum domain walls in a class of four-dimensional [ital N]=1 supergravity theories where along with the matter field, forming the wall, there is more than one dilaton,'' each respecting SU(1,1) symmetry in their subsector. We find [ital supersymmetric] (planar, static) walls, interpolating between a Minkowski vacuum and a new class of supersymmetric vacua which have a naked (planar) singularity. Although such walls correspond to idealized configurations, i.e., they correspond to planar configurations of infinite extent, they provide the first example of supersymmetric classical solitons with naked singularities.

  11. Dissipative Phase Solitons in Semiconductor Lasers.

    PubMed

    Gustave, F; Columbo, L; Tissoni, G; Brambilla, M; Prati, F; Kelleher, B; Tykalewicz, B; Barland, S

    2015-07-24

    We experimentally demonstrate the existence of nondispersive solitary waves associated with a 2π phase rotation in a strongly multimode ring semiconductor laser with coherent forcing. Similarly to Bloch domain walls, such structures host a chiral charge. The numerical simulations based on a set of effective Maxwell-Bloch equations support the experimental evidence that only one sign of chiral charge is stable, which strongly affects the motion of the phase solitons. Furthermore, the reduction of the model to a modified Ginzburg-Landau equation with forcing demonstrates the generality of these phenomena and exposes the impact of the lack of parity symmetry in propagative optical systems. PMID:26252686

  12. Instabilities and Solitons in Minimal Strips

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Machon, Thomas; Alexander, Gareth P.; Goldstein, Raymond E.; Pesci, Adriana I.

    2016-07-01

    We show that highly twisted minimal strips can undergo a nonsingular transition, unlike the singular transitions seen in the Möbius strip and the catenoid. If the strip is nonorientable, this transition is topologically frustrated, and the resulting surface contains a helicoidal defect. Through a controlled analytic approximation, the system can be mapped onto a scalar ϕ4 theory on a nonorientable line bundle over the circle, where the defect becomes a topologically protected kink soliton or domain wall, thus establishing their existence in minimal surfaces. Demonstrations with soap films confirm these results and show how the position of the defect can be controlled through boundary deformation.

  13. Instabilities and Solitons in Minimal Strips.

    PubMed

    Machon, Thomas; Alexander, Gareth P; Goldstein, Raymond E; Pesci, Adriana I

    2016-07-01

    We show that highly twisted minimal strips can undergo a nonsingular transition, unlike the singular transitions seen in the Möbius strip and the catenoid. If the strip is nonorientable, this transition is topologically frustrated, and the resulting surface contains a helicoidal defect. Through a controlled analytic approximation, the system can be mapped onto a scalar ϕ^{4} theory on a nonorientable line bundle over the circle, where the defect becomes a topologically protected kink soliton or domain wall, thus establishing their existence in minimal surfaces. Demonstrations with soap films confirm these results and show how the position of the defect can be controlled through boundary deformation. PMID:27419593

  14. Optical soliton-based logic gates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blair, Steven M.

    1998-09-01

    With the advent of high-bandwidth optical communications, the need for switching technologies capable of handling this information flow becomes imperative. Optical switches are the natural technology to investigate because they eliminate the optical/electronic conversion and their operation can scale with the data rate, unlike electronics. Additional capabilities can be provided through the development of optical logic gates, which have the further properties of data regeneration, gain, cascadability, and the ability to implement more complex operations than possible with a simple switch. The goal of this work is to study in-depth an implementation of optical logic gates based on spatial and spatio-temporal solitons. Optical solitons propagate long distances without change and have additional properties that are beneficial for the representation of binary data such as stability to perturbations and existence above a threshold power or energy. The non- diffracting nature of spatial optical solitons lends to their use in a class of angular deflection logic gates in which a weak signal can alter the propagation of a strong pump in order to change the device state from high to low, thereby implementing a controlled inverter which is cascadable to produce logically-complete, multi-input NOR. A significant portion of this work is devoted to developing a theoretical and numerical framework to describe general, multi-dimensional, nonlinear spatio- temporal wave phenomena. This is accomplished by starting directly from Maxwell's equations and deriving via the multiple-scales perturbation technique a first-order, fully-vectorial, nonlinear wave equation, that is valid beyond the standard slowly-varying amplitude, slowly- varying envelope, and paraxial approximations. In addition to coupling with the orthogonal transverse field, vector coupling with the weak longitudinally- projected field is also treated, along with the cascaded interaction with a weak third-harmonic wave

  15. Optical solitons in graded-index multimode fibres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renninger, W. H.; Wise, F. W.

    2013-04-01

    Solitons are non-dispersing localized waves that occur in diverse physical settings, including liquids, optical fibres, plasmas and condensed matter. They attract interest owing to their particle-like nature and are useful for applications such as in telecommunications. A variety of optical solitons have been observed, but versions that involve both spatial and temporal degrees of freedom are rare. Optical fibres designed to support multiple transverse modes offer opportunities to study wave propagation in a setting that is intermediate between single-mode fibre and free-space propagation. Here we report the observation of optical solitons and soliton self-frequency shifting in graded-index multimode fibre. These wave packets can be modelled as multicomponent solitons, or as solitons of the Gross-Pitaevskii equation. Solitons in graded-index fibres should enable increased data rates in low-cost telecommunications systems, are pertinent to space-division multiplexing, and can offer a new route to mode-area scaling for high-power lasers and transmission.

  16. Non-Markovian Quantum Friction of Bright Solitons in Superfluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Efimkin, Dmitry K.; Hofmann, Johannes; Galitski, Victor

    2016-06-01

    We explore the quantum dynamics of a bright matter-wave soliton in a quasi-one-dimensional bosonic superfluid with attractive interactions. Specifically, we focus on the dissipative forces experienced by the soliton due to its interaction with Bogoliubov excitations. Using the collective coordinate approach and the Keldysh formalism, a Langevin equation of motion for the soliton is derived from first principles. The equation contains a stochastic Langevin force (associated with quantum noise) and a nonlocal in time dissipative force, which appears due to inelastic scattering of Bogoliubov quasiparticles off of the moving soliton. It is shown that Ohmic friction (i.e., a term proportional to the soliton's velocity) is absent in the integrable setup. However, the Markovian approximation gives rise to the Abraham-Lorentz force (i.e., a term proportional to the derivative of the soliton's acceleration), which is known from classical electrodynamics of a charged particle interacting with its own radiation. These Abraham-Lorentz equations famously contain a fundamental causality paradox, where the soliton (particle) interacts with excitations (radiation) originating from future events. We show, however, that the causality paradox is an artifact of the Markovian approximation, and our exact non-Markovian dissipative equations give rise to physical trajectories. We argue that the quantum friction discussed here should be observable in current quantum gas experiments.

  17. Dragging two-dimensional discrete solitons by moving linear defects

    SciTech Connect

    Brazhnyi, Valeriy A.; Malomed, Boris A.

    2011-07-15

    We study the mobility of small-amplitude solitons attached to moving defects which drag the solitons across a two-dimensional (2D) discrete nonlinear Schroedinger lattice. Findings are compared to the situation when a free small-amplitude 2D discrete soliton is kicked in a uniform lattice. In agreement with previously known results, after a period of transient motion the free soliton transforms into a localized mode pinned by the Peierls-Nabarro potential, irrespective of the initial velocity. However, the soliton attached to the moving defect can be dragged over an indefinitely long distance (including routes with abrupt turns and circular trajectories) virtually without losses, provided that the dragging velocity is smaller than a certain critical value. Collisions between solitons dragged by two defects in opposite directions are studied too. If the velocity is small enough, the collision leads to a spontaneous symmetry breaking, featuring fusion of two solitons into a single one, which remains attached to either of the two defects.

  18. Non-Markovian Quantum Friction of Bright Solitons in Superfluids.

    PubMed

    Efimkin, Dmitry K; Hofmann, Johannes; Galitski, Victor

    2016-06-01

    We explore the quantum dynamics of a bright matter-wave soliton in a quasi-one-dimensional bosonic superfluid with attractive interactions. Specifically, we focus on the dissipative forces experienced by the soliton due to its interaction with Bogoliubov excitations. Using the collective coordinate approach and the Keldysh formalism, a Langevin equation of motion for the soliton is derived from first principles. The equation contains a stochastic Langevin force (associated with quantum noise) and a nonlocal in time dissipative force, which appears due to inelastic scattering of Bogoliubov quasiparticles off of the moving soliton. It is shown that Ohmic friction (i.e., a term proportional to the soliton's velocity) is absent in the integrable setup. However, the Markovian approximation gives rise to the Abraham-Lorentz force (i.e., a term proportional to the derivative of the soliton's acceleration), which is known from classical electrodynamics of a charged particle interacting with its own radiation. These Abraham-Lorentz equations famously contain a fundamental causality paradox, where the soliton (particle) interacts with excitations (radiation) originating from future events. We show, however, that the causality paradox is an artifact of the Markovian approximation, and our exact non-Markovian dissipative equations give rise to physical trajectories. We argue that the quantum friction discussed here should be observable in current quantum gas experiments. PMID:27314722

  19. Non-Markovian Quantum Friction of Bright Solitons in Superfluids.

    PubMed

    Efimkin, Dmitry K; Hofmann, Johannes; Galitski, Victor

    2016-06-01

    We explore the quantum dynamics of a bright matter-wave soliton in a quasi-one-dimensional bosonic superfluid with attractive interactions. Specifically, we focus on the dissipative forces experienced by the soliton due to its interaction with Bogoliubov excitations. Using the collective coordinate approach and the Keldysh formalism, a Langevin equation of motion for the soliton is derived from first principles. The equation contains a stochastic Langevin force (associated with quantum noise) and a nonlocal in time dissipative force, which appears due to inelastic scattering of Bogoliubov quasiparticles off of the moving soliton. It is shown that Ohmic friction (i.e., a term proportional to the soliton's velocity) is absent in the integrable setup. However, the Markovian approximation gives rise to the Abraham-Lorentz force (i.e., a term proportional to the derivative of the soliton's acceleration), which is known from classical electrodynamics of a charged particle interacting with its own radiation. These Abraham-Lorentz equations famously contain a fundamental causality paradox, where the soliton (particle) interacts with excitations (radiation) originating from future events. We show, however, that the causality paradox is an artifact of the Markovian approximation, and our exact non-Markovian dissipative equations give rise to physical trajectories. We argue that the quantum friction discussed here should be observable in current quantum gas experiments.

  20. Standard and embedded solitons in nematic optical fibers.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez, R F; Reyes, J A; Espinosa-Cerón, A; Fujioka, J; Malomed, B A

    2003-09-01

    A model for a non-Kerr cylindrical nematic fiber is presented. We use the multiple scales method to show the possibility of constructing different kinds of wave packets of transverse magnetic modes propagating through the fiber. This procedure allows us to generate different hierarchies of nonlinear partial differential equations which describe the propagation of optical pulses along the fiber. We go beyond the usual weakly nonlinear limit of a Kerr medium and derive a complex modified Korteweg-de Vries equation (CM KdV) which governs the dynamics for the amplitude of the wave packet. In this derivation the dispersion, self-focussing, and diffraction in the nematic fiber are taken into account. It is shown that this CM KdV equation has two-parameter families of bright and dark complex solitons. We show analytically that under certain conditions, the bright solitons are actually double-embedded solitons. We explain why these solitons do not radiate at all, even though their wave numbers are contained in the linear spectrum of the system. We study (numerically and analytically) the stability of these solitons. Our results show that these embedded solitons are stable solutions, which is an interesting property since in most systems the embedded solitons are weakly unstable solutions. Finally, we close the paper by making comments on the advantages as well as the limitations of our approach, and on further generalizations of the model and method presented. PMID:14524911

  1. Optical-parametric-oscillator solitons driven by the third harmonic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lutsky, Vitaly; Malomed, Boris A.

    2004-12-01

    We introduce a model of a lossy second-harmonic-generating (χ(2)) cavity externally pumped at the third harmonic, which gives rise to driving terms of a new type, corresponding to a cross-parametric gain. The equation for the fundamental-frequency (FF) wave may also contain a quadratic self-driving term, which is generated by the cubic nonlinearity of the medium. Unlike previously studied phase-matched models of χ(2) cavities driven at the second harmonic or at FF, the present one admits an exact analytical solution for the soliton, at a special value of the gain parameter. Two families of solitons are found in a numerical form, and their stability area is identified through numerical computation of the perturbation eigenvalues (stability of the zero solution, which is a necessary condition for the soliton’s stability, is investigated in an analytical form). One family is a continuation of the special analytical solution. At given values of the parameters, one soliton is stable and the other one is not; they swap their stability at a critical value of the mismatch parameter. The stability of the solitons is also verified in direct simulations, which demonstrate that an unstable pulse rearranges itself into a stable one, or into a delocalized state, or decays to zero. A soliton which was given an initial boost C starts to move but quickly comes to a halt, if the boost is smaller than a critical value Ccr . If C>Ccr , the boost destroys the soliton (sometimes, through splitting into two secondary pulses). Interactions between initially separated solitons are investigated, too. It is concluded that stable solitons always merge into a single one. In the system with weak loss, it appears in a vibrating form, slowly relaxing to the static shape. With stronger loss, the final soliton emerges in the stationary form.

  2. Soliton physics with semiconductor exciton-polaritons in confined systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sich, Maksym; Skryabin, Dmitry V.; Krizhanovskii, Dmitry N.

    2016-10-01

    In the past decade, there has been a significant progress in the study of non-linear polariton phenomena in semiconductor microcavities. One of the key features of non-linear systems is the emergence of solitons. The complexity and the inherently strong nonlinearity of the polariton system made it a perfect sandpit for observing solitonic effects in half-light half-matter environment. This review focuses on the theory and the latest experimental elucidating physics as well as potential applications of conservative and dissipative solitons in exciton-polariton systems.

  3. An(1) Toda solitons and the dressing symmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belich, H.; Paunov, R.

    1997-08-01

    We present an elementary derivation of the solitonlike solutions in the An(1) Toda models which is an alternative to the previously used Hirota method. The solutions of the underlying linear problem corresponding to the N-solitons are calculated. This enables us to obtain explicit expression for the element which, by dressing group action, produces a generic soliton solution. In the particular example of monosolitons we suggest a relation to the vertex operator formalism, previously used by Olive, Turok, and Underwood. Our results can also be considered as generalization of the approach to the sine-Gordon solitons, proposed by Babelon and Bernard.

  4. Femtosecond soliton source with fast and broad spectral tunability.

    PubMed

    Masip, Martin E; Rieznik, A A; König, Pablo G; Grosz, Diego F; Bragas, Andrea V; Martinez, Oscar E

    2009-03-15

    We present a complete set of measurements and numerical simulations of a femtosecond soliton source with fast and broad spectral tunability and nearly constant pulse width and average power. Solitons generated in a photonic crystal fiber, at the low-power coupling regime, can be tuned in a broad range of wavelengths, from 850 to 1200 nm using the input power as the control parameter. These solitons keep almost constant time duration (approximately 40 fs) and spectral widths (approximately 20 nm) over the entire measured spectra regardless of input power. Our numerical simulations agree well with measurements and predict a wide working wavelength range and robustness to input parameters. PMID:19282951

  5. Bright Solitons on Continuous Wave Background in Blood Vessels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiang, Jia-Jie; Jiang, Hua-Jie; Dai, Chao-Qing; Wang, Yue-Yue

    2014-03-01

    The nonlinear Schrödinger equation (NLSE) with variable coefficients in blood vessels is discussed via an NLSE-based constructive method, and exact solutions are obtained including multi-soliton solutions with and without continuous wave backgrounds. The dynamical behaviors of these soliton solutions are studied. The solitonic propagation behaviors such as restraint and sustainment on continuous wave background are discussed by altering the value of dispersion parameter δ. Moreover, the longitude controllable behaviors are also reported by modulating the dispersion parameter δ. These results are potentially useful for future experiments in various blood vessels.

  6. Multiplicative noise can lead to the collapse of dissipative solitons.

    PubMed

    Descalzi, Orazio; Cartes, Carlos; Brand, Helmut R

    2016-07-01

    We investigate the influence of spatially homogeneous multiplicative noise on the formation of localized patterns in the framework of the cubic-quintic complex Ginzburg-Landau equation. We find that for sufficiently large multiplicative noise the formation of stationary and temporally periodic dissipative solitons is suppressed. This result is characterized by a linear relation between the bifurcation parameter and the noise amplitude required for suppression. For the regime associated with exploding dissipative solitons we find a reduction in the number of explosions for larger noise strength as well as a conversion to other types of dissipative solitons or to filling-in and eventually a collapse to the zero solution. PMID:27575135

  7. Symmetry breaking and multipeaked solitons in inhomogeneous gain landscapes

    SciTech Connect

    Kartashov, Yaroslav V.; Vysloukh, Victor A.; Konotop, Vladimir V.

    2011-04-15

    We address one-dimensional soliton formation in a cubic nonlinear medium with two-photon absorption and transversally inhomogeneous gain landscape consisting of a single or several amplifying channels. Existence of the solitons requires certain threshold gain while the properties of solitons strongly depend on whether the number of the amplifying channels is odd or even. In the former case, an increase of the gain leads to symmetry breaking, which occurs through the pitchfork bifurcation, and to emergence of a single or several coexisting stable asymmetric modes. In the case of an even number of amplifying channels, we have found only asymmetric stable states.

  8. Solitons induced by boundary conditions from the Boussinesq equation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chou, Ru Ling; Chu, C. K.

    1990-01-01

    The behavior of solitons induced by boundary excitation is investigated at various time-dependent conditions and different unperturbed water depths, using the Korteweg-de Vries (KdV) equation. Then, solitons induced from Boussinesq equations under similar conditions were studied, making it possible to remove the restriction in the KdV equation and to treat soliton head-on collisions (as well as overtaking collisions) and reflections. It is found that the results obtained from the KdV and the Boussinesq equations are in good agreement.

  9. Effects of vane-induced rotation on diffuser flow distortion in an axisymmetric mixed-compression inlet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meleason, E. T.

    1972-01-01

    An investigation of vane-induced flow rotation to modify distorted steady-state total-pressure patterns in the subsonic diffuser of a supersonic mixed-compression inlet was conducted. Radial static-pressure gradients generated by the rotation was the mechanism used to modify the total-pressure distributions. Significant redistribution of circumferential distortion patterns into more compatible radial patterns was realized, but flow problems near the duct walls reduced the general effectiveness of the technique. Total-pressure losses associated with the swirl vanes were slight. Limited turbulence data indicated that vane istallation resulted in reduced turbulence levels.

  10. Compressible Laminar Boundary Layer over a Yawed Infinite Cylinder with Heat Transfer and Arbitrary Prandtl Number

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reshotko, Eli; Beckwith, Ivan E

    1958-01-01

    The equations are presented for the development of the compressible laminar boundary layer over a yawed infinite cylinder. For compressible flow with a pressure gradient the chordwise and spanwise flows are not independent. Using the Stewartson transformation and a linear viscosity-temperature relation yields a set of three simultaneous ordinary differential equations in a form yielding similar solutions. These equations are solved for stagnation-line flow for surface temperatures from zero to twice the free-stream stagnation temperature and for a wide range of yaw angle and free-stream Mach number. The results indicate that the effect of yaw on the heat-transfer coefficient at the stagnation line depends markedly on the free-stream Mach number. An unusual result of the solutions is that for large yaw angles and stream Mach numbers the chordwise velocity within the boundary layer exceeds the local external chordwise velocity, even for a highly cooled wall.

  11. Watching dark solitons decay into vortex rings in a Bose-Einstein condensate.

    PubMed

    Anderson, B P; Haljan, P C; Regal, C A; Feder, D L; Collins, L A; Clark, C W; Cornell, E A

    2001-04-01

    We have created spatial dark solitons in two-component Bose-Einstein condensates in which the soliton exists in one of the condensate components and the soliton nodal plane is filled with the second component. The filled solitons are stable for hundreds of milliseconds. The filling can be selectively removed, making the soliton more susceptible to dynamical instabilities. For a condensate in a spherically symmetric potential, these instabilities cause the dark soliton to decay into stable vortex rings. We have imaged the resulting vortex rings.

  12. Solitons in PT-symmetric periodic systems with the logarithmically saturable nonlinearity

    PubMed Central

    Zhan, Kaiyun; Tian, Hao; Li, Xin; Xu, Xianfeng; Jiao, Zhiyong; Jia, Yulei

    2016-01-01

    We report on the formation and stability of induced solitons in parity-time (PT) symmetric periodic systems with the logarithmically saturable nonlinearity. Both on-site and off-site lattice solitons exist for the self-focusing nonlinearity. The most intriguing result is that the above solitons can also be realized inside the several higher-order bands of the band structure, due to the change of nonlinear type with the soliton power. Stability analysis shows that on-site solitons are linearly stably, and off-site solitons are unstable in their existence domain. PMID:27596716

  13. Solitons in PT-symmetric periodic systems with the logarithmically saturable nonlinearity.

    PubMed

    Zhan, Kaiyun; Tian, Hao; Li, Xin; Xu, Xianfeng; Jiao, Zhiyong; Jia, Yulei

    2016-01-01

    We report on the formation and stability of induced solitons in parity-time (PT) symmetric periodic systems with the logarithmically saturable nonlinearity. Both on-site and off-site lattice solitons exist for the self-focusing nonlinearity. The most intriguing result is that the above solitons can also be realized inside the several higher-order bands of the band structure, due to the change of nonlinear type with the soliton power. Stability analysis shows that on-site solitons are linearly stably, and off-site solitons are unstable in their existence domain. PMID:27596716

  14. Oblique collision of dust acoustic solitons in a strongly coupled dusty plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Boruah, A.; Sharma, S. K. Bailung, H.; Nakamura, Y.

    2015-09-15

    The oblique collision between two equal amplitude dust acoustic solitons is observed in a strongly coupled dusty plasma. The solitons are subjected to oblique interaction at different colliding angles. We observe a resonance structure during oblique collision at a critical colliding angle which is described by the idea of three wave resonance interaction modeled by Kadomtsev-Petviashvili equation. After collision, the solitons preserve their identity. The amplitude of the resultant wave formed during interaction is measured for different collision angles as well as for different colliding soliton amplitudes. At resonance, the maximum amplitude of the new soliton formed is nearly 3.7 times the initial soliton amplitude.

  15. Solitons in PT-symmetric periodic systems with the logarithmically saturable nonlinearity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhan, Kaiyun; Tian, Hao; Li, Xin; Xu, Xianfeng; Jiao, Zhiyong; Jia, Yulei

    2016-09-01

    We report on the formation and stability of induced solitons in parity-time (PT) symmetric periodic systems with the logarithmically saturable nonlinearity. Both on-site and off-site lattice solitons exist for the self-focusing nonlinearity. The most intriguing result is that the above solitons can also be realized inside the several higher-order bands of the band structure, due to the change of nonlinear type with the soliton power. Stability analysis shows that on-site solitons are linearly stably, and off-site solitons are unstable in their existence domain.

  16. Logic gates with bright dissipative polariton solitons in Bragg cavity systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cancellieri, E.; Chana, J. K.; Sich, M.; Krizhanovskii, D. N.; Skolnick, M. S.; Whittaker, D. M.

    2015-11-01

    Optical solitons are an ideal platform for the implementation of communication lines, since they can be packed extremely close one to another without risking partial loss of the encoded information due to their interaction. On the other hand, soliton-soliton interactions are needed to implement computations and achieve all-optical information processing. Here, we study how bright dissipative polariton solitons interact and exploit their interaction to implement and and or gates with state of the art technology. Moreover, we show that the soliton-soliton interaction can be used to determine the sign of α2, the parameter describing the interaction between polaritons with opposite spin.

  17. Solitons in Skyrme - Faddeev spinor model and quantum mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rybakov, Y.

    2016-07-01

    We discuss the possibility of unification of Skyrme and Faddeev approaches for the description of baryons and leptons respectively as topological solitons within the scope of 16-spinor model. The motivation for such a unification is based on a special 8- semispinor identity invented by the Italian geometrician F. Brioschi. This remarkable identity permits one to realize baryon or lepton states through the effect of spontaneous symmetry breaking emerging due to special structure of the Higgs potential in the model. At large distances from the particle - soliton small excitation of the vacuum satisfies Klein - Gordon equation with some mass that permits one to establish the correspondence with quantum mechanics in special stochastic representation of the wave function for extended particles - solitons. Finally, we illustrate the peculiar properties of stochastic representation by the famous T. Young's experiment with n slits in soliton realization.

  18. Quantum gates controlled by spin chain soliton excitations

    SciTech Connect

    Cuccoli, Alessandro; Nuzzi, Davide; Vaia, Ruggero; Verrucchi, Paola

    2014-05-07

    Propagation of soliton-like excitations along spin chains has been proposed as a possible way for transmitting both classical and quantum information between two distant parties with negligible dispersion and dissipation. In this work, a somewhat different use of solitons is considered. Solitons propagating along a spin chain realize an effective magnetic field, well localized in space and time, which can be exploited as a means to manipulate the state of an external spin (i.e., a qubit) that is weakly coupled to the chain. We have investigated different couplings between the qubit and the chain, as well as different soliton shapes, according to a Heisenberg chain model. It is found that symmetry properties strongly affect the effectiveness of the proposed scheme, and the most suitable setups for implementing single qubit quantum gates are singled out.

  19. Coalescence cascade of dissipative solitons in parametrically driven systems.

    PubMed

    Clerc, M G; Coulibaly, S; Gordillo, L; Mujica, N; Navarro, R

    2011-09-01

    Parametrically driven spatially extended systems exhibit uniform oscillations which are modulationally unstable. The resulting periodic state evolves to the creation of a gas of dissipative solitons. Driven by the interaction of dissipative solitons, the multisoliton state undergoes a cascade of coalescence processes, where the average soliton separation distance obeys a temporal self-similar law. Starting from the soliton pair interaction law, we have derived analytically and characterized the law of this multisoliton coarsening process. A comparison of numerical results obtained with different models such as the parametrically driven damped nonlinear Schrödinger equation, a vertically driven chain of pendula, and a parametrically forced magnetic wire, shows remarkable agreement. Both phenomena, the pair interaction law and the coarsening process, are also observed experimentally in a quasi-one-dimensional layer of Newtonian fluid which is oscillated vertically. PMID:22060473

  20. (2+1) -dimensional stable spatial Raman solitons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shverdin, M. Y.; Yavuz, D. D.; Walker, D. R.

    2004-03-01

    We analyze the formation, propagation, and interaction of stable two-frequency (2+1) -dimensional solitons, formed in a Raman media driven near maximum molecular coherence. The propagating light is trapped in the two transverse dimensions.

  1. Polarization instability of Raman solitons ejected during supercontinuum generation.

    PubMed

    Chao, Qing; Wagner, Kelvin H

    2015-12-28

    We numerically investigate polarization instability of soliton fission and the polarization dynamics of Raman solitons ejected during supercontinuum generation in a photonics crystal fiber using the coupled vector generalized nonlinear Schrödinger equations for both linear and circular birefringent fibers. The evolution of the state of polarizations of the ejected Raman soliton as representated on the Poincaré sphere is affected by both nonlinear and linear polarization rotations on the Poincaré sphere. The polarization dynamics reveal the presence of a polarization separatrix and the emergence of stable slow and unstable fast eigen-polarizations for the Raman solitons ejected in the supercontinuum generation process. Circularly birefringent fiber is investigated and found to simplify the nonlinear polarization dynamics. PMID:26832032

  2. Interaction of solitons with segments with modified dispersion.

    PubMed

    Stoychev, K T; Primatarowa, M T; Kamburova, R S

    2006-06-01

    The interaction of nonlinear Schrödinger solitons with extended inhomogeneities with modified group-velocity (GV) and group-velocity dispersion (GVD) coefficients is investigated numerically. Increased GVD coefficients act as potential barriers and yield reflection or transmission of the incoming soliton. Decreased GVD coefficients act as potential wells, and for a given range of parameters the scattering results exhibit periodically repeating windows of trapping and transmission as a function of the length of the segment. It is shown that the escape of the soliton is due to a resonance between the period of the shape oscillations of the soliton inside the segment and the length of the latter. Segments with modified GV coefficients act as potential wells for both positive and negative values of the GV mismatch and can also lead to periodic capture-transmission scattering patterns.

  3. Magnetic Solitons in a Binary Bose-Einstein Condensate.

    PubMed

    Qu, Chunlei; Pitaevskii, Lev P; Stringari, Sandro

    2016-04-22

    We study solitary waves of polarization (magnetic solitons) in a two-component Bose gas with slightly unequal repulsive intra- and interspin interactions. In experimentally relevant conditions we obtain an analytical solution which reveals that the width and the velocity of magnetic solitons are explicitly related to the spin healing length and the spin sound velocity of the Bose mixture, respectively. We calculate the profiles, the energy, and the effective mass of the solitons in the absence of external fields and investigate their oscillation in a harmonic trap where the oscillation period is calculated as a function of the oscillation amplitude. The stability of magnetic solitons in two dimensions and the conditions for their experimental observation are also briefly discussed.

  4. Magnetic Solitons in a Binary Bose-Einstein Condensate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qu, Chunlei; Pitaevskii, Lev P.; Stringari, Sandro

    2016-04-01

    We study solitary waves of polarization (magnetic solitons) in a two-component Bose gas with slightly unequal repulsive intra- and interspin interactions. In experimentally relevant conditions we obtain an analytical solution which reveals that the width and the velocity of magnetic solitons are explicitly related to the spin healing length and the spin sound velocity of the Bose mixture, respectively. We calculate the profiles, the energy, and the effective mass of the solitons in the absence of external fields and investigate their oscillation in a harmonic trap where the oscillation period is calculated as a function of the oscillation amplitude. The stability of magnetic solitons in two dimensions and the conditions for their experimental observation are also briefly discussed.

  5. Alfvén solitons in a Fermionic quantum plasma.

    PubMed

    Keane, A J; Mushtaq, A; Wheatland, M S

    2011-06-01

    The propagation of Alfvén envelope solitons through a Fermionic quantum plasma is considered. Starting from the governing equations for Hall magnetohydrodynamics including quantum corrections, coupled Zakharov-type equations are derived for circularly polarized Alfvén waves. The equations are numerically solved for time-independent and time-dependent cases. The time-independent case shows that variations in density take the form of dressed density solitons in which an approximately Gaussian peak is surrounded by smaller sinusoidal variations in the density envelope. The mathematical basis for this behavior is explained. A limited time-dependent case is obtained which uses the numerical time-independent soliton solutions as the initial conditions. This confirms that the soliton solutions retain the same profile as they propagate. The relevance of this work to dense astrophysical plasmas like the interiors of white dwarf stars is discussed. PMID:21797498

  6. Bistable dark solitons of a cubic-quintic Helmholtz equation

    SciTech Connect

    Christian, J. M.; McDonald, G. S.; Chamorro-Posada, P.

    2010-05-15

    We provide a report on exact analytical bistable dark spatial solitons of a nonlinear Helmholtz equation with a cubic-quintic refractive-index model. Our analysis begins with an investigation of the modulational instability characteristics of Helmholtz plane waves. We then derive a dark soliton by mapping the desired asymptotic form onto a uniform background field and obtain a more general solution by deploying rotational invariance laws in the laboratory frame. The geometry of the new soliton is explored in detail, and a range of new physical predictions is uncovered. Particular attention is paid to the unified phenomena of arbitrary-angle off-axis propagation and nondegenerate bistability. Crucially, the corresponding solution of paraxial theory emerges in a simultaneous multiple limit. We conclude with a set of computer simulations that examine the role of Helmholtz dark solitons as robust attractors.

  7. Existence domains of dust-acoustic solitons and supersolitons

    SciTech Connect

    Maharaj, S. K.; Bharuthram, R.; Singh, S. V.; Lakhina, G. S.

    2013-08-15

    Using the Sagdeev potential method, the existence of large amplitude dust-acoustic solitons and supersolitons is investigated in a plasma comprising cold negative dust, adiabatic positive dust, Boltzmann electrons, and non-thermal ions. This model supports the existence of positive potential supersolitons in a certain region in parameter space in addition to regular solitons having negative and positive potentials. The lower Mach number limit for supersolitons coincides with the occurrence of double layers whereas the upper limit is imposed by the constraint that the adiabatic positive dust number density must remain real valued. The upper Mach number limits for negative potential (positive potential) solitons coincide with limiting values of the negative (positive) potential for which the negative (positive) dust number density is real valued. Alternatively, the existence of positive potential solitons can terminate when positive potential double layers occur.

  8. Soliton communication lines based on spectrally efficient modulation formats

    SciTech Connect

    Yushko, O V; Redyuk, A A

    2014-06-30

    We report the results of mathematical modelling of optical-signal propagation in soliton fibre-optic communication lines (FOCLs) based on spectrally efficient signal modulation formats. We have studied the influence of spontaneous emission noise, nonlinear distortions and FOCL length on the data transmission quality. We have compared the characteristics of a received optical signal for soliton and conventional dispersion compensating FOCLs. It is shown that in the presence of strong nonlinearity long-haul soliton FOCLs provide a higher data transmission performance, as well as allow higher order modulation formats to be used as compared to conventional communication lines. In the context of a coherent data transmission, soliton FOCLs allow the use of phase modulation with many levels, thereby increasing the spectral efficiency of the communication line. (optical communication lines)

  9. Mode Spectrum and Temporal Soliton Formation in Optical Microresonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herr, T.; Brasch, V.; Jost, J. D.; Mirgorodskiy, I.; Lihachev, G.; Gorodetsky, M. L.; Kippenberg, T. J.

    2014-09-01

    The formation of temporal dissipative solitons in optical microresonators enables compact, high-repetition rate sources of ultrashort pulses as well as low noise, broadband optical frequency combs with smooth spectral envelopes. Here we study the influence of the microresonator mode spectrum on temporal soliton formation in a crystalline MgF2 microresonator. While an overall anomalous group velocity dispersion is required, it is found that higher order dispersion can be tolerated as long as it does not dominate the resonator's mode structure. Avoided mode crossings induced by linear mode coupling in the resonator mode spectrum are found to prevent soliton formation when affecting resonator modes close to the pump laser frequency. The experimental observations are in excellent agreement with numerical simulations based on the nonlinear coupled mode equations. The presented results provide for the first time design criteria for the generation of temporal solitons in optical microresonators.

  10. Stabilization of ring dark solitons in Bose-Einstein condensates

    DOE PAGES

    Wang, Wenlong; Kevrekidis, P. G.; Carretero-González, R.; Frantzeskakis, D. J.; Kaper, Tasso J.; Ma, Manjun

    2015-09-14

    Earlier work has shown that ring dark solitons in two-dimensional Bose-Einstein condensates are generically unstable. In this work, we propose a way of stabilizing the ring dark soliton via a radial Gaussian external potential. We investigate the existence and stability of the ring dark soliton upon variations of the chemical potential and also of the strength of the radial potential. Numerical results show that the ring dark soliton can be stabilized in a suitable interval of external potential strengths and chemical potentials. Furthermore, we also explore different proposed particle pictures considering the ring as a moving particle and find, wheremore » appropriate, results in very good qualitative and also reasonable quantitative agreement with the numerical findings.« less

  11. Stabilization of ring dark solitons in Bose-Einstein condensates

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Wenlong; Kevrekidis, P. G.; Carretero-González, R.; Frantzeskakis, D. J.; Kaper, Tasso J.; Ma, Manjun

    2015-09-14

    Earlier work has shown that ring dark solitons in two-dimensional Bose-Einstein condensates are generically unstable. In this work, we propose a way of stabilizing the ring dark soliton via a radial Gaussian external potential. We investigate the existence and stability of the ring dark soliton upon variations of the chemical potential and also of the strength of the radial potential. Numerical results show that the ring dark soliton can be stabilized in a suitable interval of external potential strengths and chemical potentials. Furthermore, we also explore different proposed particle pictures considering the ring as a moving particle and find, where appropriate, results in very good qualitative and also reasonable quantitative agreement with the numerical findings.

  12. Spectral properties of limiting solitons in optical fibers.

    PubMed

    Amiranashvili, Sh; Bandelow, U; Akhmediev, N

    2014-12-01

    It seems to be self-evident that stable optical pulses cannot be considerably shorter than a single oscillation of the carrier field. From the mathematical point of view the solitary solutions of pulse propagation equations should loose stability or demonstrate some kind of singular behavior. Typically, an unphysical cusp develops at the soliton top, preventing the soliton from being too short. Consequently, the power spectrum of the limiting solution has a special behavior: the standard exponential decay is replaced by an algebraic one. We derive the shortest soliton and explicitly calculate its spectrum for the so-called short pulse equation. The latter applies to ultra-short solitons in transparent materials like fused silica that are relevant for optical fibers. PMID:25606955

  13. Alfvén solitons in a Fermionic quantum plasma.

    PubMed

    Keane, A J; Mushtaq, A; Wheatland, M S

    2011-06-01

    The propagation of Alfvén envelope solitons through a Fermionic quantum plasma is considered. Starting from the governing equations for Hall magnetohydrodynamics including quantum corrections, coupled Zakharov-type equations are derived for circularly polarized Alfvén waves. The equations are numerically solved for time-independent and time-dependent cases. The time-independent case shows that variations in density take the form of dressed density solitons in which an approximately Gaussian peak is surrounded by smaller sinusoidal variations in the density envelope. The mathematical basis for this behavior is explained. A limited time-dependent case is obtained which uses the numerical time-independent soliton solutions as the initial conditions. This confirms that the soliton solutions retain the same profile as they propagate. The relevance of this work to dense astrophysical plasmas like the interiors of white dwarf stars is discussed.

  14. Cranking the Chiral Soliton Bag Model:. Gluonic Effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stern, Jacqueline; Bourenane, Mohamed; Clément, Gérard

    The nucleon-delta mass difference is computed in the chiral soliton bag model with soft confinement of gluons by the cranking method. The resulting value of the effective strong fine structure constant is αs≃0.7.

  15. Magnetic Solitons in a Binary Bose-Einstein Condensate.

    PubMed

    Qu, Chunlei; Pitaevskii, Lev P; Stringari, Sandro

    2016-04-22

    We study solitary waves of polarization (magnetic solitons) in a two-component Bose gas with slightly unequal repulsive intra- and interspin interactions. In experimentally relevant conditions we obtain an analytical solution which reveals that the width and the velocity of magnetic solitons are explicitly related to the spin healing length and the spin sound velocity of the Bose mixture, respectively. We calculate the profiles, the energy, and the effective mass of the solitons in the absence of external fields and investigate their oscillation in a harmonic trap where the oscillation period is calculated as a function of the oscillation amplitude. The stability of magnetic solitons in two dimensions and the conditions for their experimental observation are also briefly discussed. PMID:27152776

  16. Unbreakable PT symmetry of solitons supported by inhomogeneous defocusing nonlinearity.

    PubMed

    Kartashov, Yaroslav V; Malomed, Boris A; Torner, Lluis

    2014-10-01

    We consider bright solitons supported by a symmetric inhomogeneous defocusing nonlinearity growing rapidly enough toward the periphery of the medium, combined with an antisymmetric gain-loss profile. Despite the absence of any symmetric modulation of the linear refractive index, which is usually required to establish a parity-time (PT) symmetry in the form of a purely real spectrum of modes, we show that the PT symmetry is never broken in the present system, and that the system always supports stable bright solitons, i.e., fundamental and multi-pole ones. This fact is connected to the nonlinearizability of the underlying evolution equation. The increase of the gain-loss strength results, in lieu of the PT symmetry breaking, in merger of pairs of different soliton branches, such as fundamental and dipole, or tripole and quadrupole ones. The fundamental and dipole solitons remain stable at arbitrarily large values of the gain-loss coefficient. PMID:25360948

  17. New types of exact quasi-soliton solutions in metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Rongcao; Min, Xuemin; Tian, Jinping; Xue, Wenrui; Zhang, Wenmei

    2016-02-01

    We consider a generalized nonlinear Schrödinger equation describing the propagation of ultrashort pulses in metamaterials (MMs) and present three new types of exact bright, dark, bright-grey quasi-solitons with a free constant associated with their amplitudes, pulse widths and formation conditions. Based on the Drude model, we analyze the existence regions and characteristics of these quasi-solitons in MMs. The results show that these bright and dark (grey) quasi-solitons can exist in wider regions of MMs and their intensities and pulse widths can be adjusted by choosing a suitable free constant. Furthermore, we take the third type of quasi-soliton solution as an example to numerically discuss the stabilities under slight perturbations of the frequency and the initial pulse width. The obtained results are helpful in exploring more solitary waves in MMs and providing a new reference for experimental verification.

  18. Coupled matter-wave solitons in optical lattices

    SciTech Connect

    Golam Ali, Sk; Talukdar, B.

    2009-06-15

    We make use of a potential model to study the dynamics of two coupled matter-wave or Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC) solitons loaded in optical lattices. With separate attention to linear and nonlinear lattices we find some remarkable differences for response of the system to effects of these lattices. As opposed to the case of linear optical lattice (LOL), the nonlinear lattice (NOL) can be used to control the mutual interaction between the two solitons. For a given lattice wave number k, the effective potentials in which the two solitons move are such that the well (V{sub eff}(NOL)), resulting from the juxtaposition of soliton interaction and nonlinear lattice potential, is deeper than the corresponding well V{sub eff}(LOL). But these effective potentials have opposite k dependence in the sense that the depth of V{sub eff}(LOL) increases as k increases and that of V{sub eff}(NOL) decreases for higher k values. We verify that the effectiveness of optical lattices to regulate the motion of the coupled solitons depends sensitively on the initial locations of the motionless solitons as well as values of the lattice wave number. For both LOL and NOL the two solitons meet each other due to mutual interaction if their initial locations are taken within the potential wells with the difference that the solitons in the NOL approach each other rather rapidly and take roughly half the time to meet as compared with the time needed for such coalescence in the LOL. In the NOL, the soliton profiles can move freely and respond to the lattice periodicity when the separation between their initial locations are as twice as that needed for a similar free movement in the LOL. We observe that, in both cases, slow tuning of the optical lattices by varying k with respect to a time parameter {tau} drags the oscillatory solitons apart to take them to different locations. In our potential model the oscillatory solitons appear to propagate undistorted. But a fully numerical calculation

  19. Coupled matter-wave solitons in optical lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golam Ali, Sk; Talukdar, B.

    2009-06-01

    We make use of a potential model to study the dynamics of two coupled matter-wave or Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC) solitons loaded in optical lattices. With separate attention to linear and nonlinear lattices we find some remarkable differences for response of the system to effects of these lattices. As opposed to the case of linear optical lattice (LOL), the nonlinear lattice (NOL) can be used to control the mutual interaction between the two solitons. For a given lattice wave number k, the effective potentials in which the two solitons move are such that the well (Veff(NOL)), resulting from the juxtaposition of soliton interaction and nonlinear lattice potential, is deeper than the corresponding well Veff(LOL). But these effective potentials have opposite k dependence in the sense that the depth of Veff(LOL) increases as k increases and that of Veff(NOL) decreases for higher k values. We verify that the effectiveness of optical lattices to regulate the motion of the coupled solitons depends sensitively on the initial locations of the motionless solitons as well as values of the lattice wave number. For both LOL and NOL the two solitons meet each other due to mutual interaction if their initial locations are taken within the potential wells with the difference that the solitons in the NOL approach each other rather rapidly and take roughly half the time to meet as compared with the time needed for such coalescence in the LOL. In the NOL, the soliton profiles can move freely and respond to the lattice periodicity when the separation between their initial locations are as twice as that needed for a similar free movement in the LOL. We observe that, in both cases, slow tuning of the optical lattices by varying k with respect to a time parameter τ drags the oscillatory solitons apart to take them to different locations. In our potential model the oscillatory solitons appear to propagate undistorted. But a fully numerical calculation indicates that during evolution

  20. An Investigation of the Effect of a Highly Favorable Pressure Gradient on Boundary-Layer Transition as Caused by Various Types of Roughnesses on a 10-foot-Diameter Hemisphere at Subsonic Speeds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peterson, John B., Jr.; Horton, Elmer A.

    1959-01-01

    Tests were made on a 10-foot-diameter hemispherical nose at Reynolds numbers up to 10 x 10(exp 6) and at a maximum Mach number of about 0.1 to determine the effects of a highly favorable pressure gradient on boundary-layer transition caused by roughness. Both two-dimensional and three-dimensional roughness particles were used, and the transition of the boundary layer was determined by hot-wire anemometers. The roughness Reynolds number for transition R(sub k,t) caused by three-dimensional particles such as Carborundum grains, spherical particles, and rimmed craters was found. The results show that for particles immersed in the boundary layer, R(sub k,t) is independent of the particle size or position on the hemispherical nose and depends mainly on the height-to-width ratio of the particle. The values of R(sub k,t) found on the hemispherical nose compare closely with those previously found on a flat plate and on airfoils with roughness. For two-dimensional roughness, the ratio of roughness height to boundary-layer displacement thickness necessary to cause transition was found to increase appreciably as the roughness was moved forward on the nose. Also included in the investigation were studies of the spread of turbulence behind a single particle of roughness and the effect of holes such as pressure orifices.