Science.gov

Sample records for pressurized hot water

  1. Pressurized water nuclear reactor system with hot leg vortex mitigator

    DOEpatents

    Lau, Louis K. S.

    1990-01-01

    A pressurized water nuclear reactor system includes a vortex mitigator in the form of a cylindrical conduit between the hot leg conduit and a first section of residual heat removal conduit, which conduit leads to a pump and a second section of residual heat removal conduit leading back to the reactor pressure vessel. The cylindrical conduit is of such a size that where the hot leg has an inner diameter D.sub.1, the first section has an inner diameter D.sub.2, and the cylindrical conduit or step nozzle has a length L and an inner diameter of D.sub.3 ; D.sub.3 /D.sub.1 is at least 0.55, D.sub.2 is at least 1.9, and L/D.sub.3 is at least 1.44, whereby cavitation of the pump by a vortex formed in the hot leg is prevented.

  2. Geothermal hot water system

    SciTech Connect

    Dittell, E.W.

    1983-05-10

    Geothermal hot water system including a hot water tank and a warm water tank which are heated independently of each other by a close loop freon system. The closed loop freon system includes a main condenser which heats water for the warm water tank and a super-heated condenser which heats water for the hot water tank, and where the freon passes through a water evaporator which is heated by water such as from a well or other suitable source. The water evaporator in the closed loop freon system passes the water through but no environmental change to the water. An electrical circuit including aquastats in the warm water tank connected therethrough controls operation of the closed loop freon system including respective pumps on the super-heated condenser and main condenser for pumping water. Pumps pump water through the main condenser for the warm tank and through the super-heated condenser for the hot tank. The system provides for energy conservation in that the head pressure of the compressor is kept in the lower operating ranges as determined by the discharge flow of the main condenser which varies by the head pressure and temperature flow control which varies by temperature. The geothermal hot water system uses a least amount of energy in heating the water in the hot tank as well as the warm tank.

  3. Effect of pressurized hot water extraction on antioxidants from grape pomace before and after enological fermentation.

    PubMed

    Vergara-Salinas, José R; Bulnes, Pedro; Zúñiga, María Carolina; Pérez-Jiménez, Jara; Torres, Josep Lluís; Mateos-Martín, María Luisa; Agosin, Eduardo; Pérez-Correa, José R

    2013-07-17

    Grape pomace was extracted with pressurized hot water at laboratory scale before and after fermentation to explore the effects of fermentation and extraction temperature (50-200 °C) and time (5 and 30 min) on total extracted antioxidant levels and activity and to determine the content and recovery efficiency of main grape polyphenols, anthocyanins, and tannins. Fermented pomace yielded more total antioxidants (TAs), antioxidant activity, and tannins, than unfermented pomace but fewer anthocyanins. Elevating the extraction temperature increased TA extraction and antioxidant activity. Maximum anthocyanin extraction yields were achieved at 100 °C and at 150 °C for tannins and tannin-anthocyanin adducts. Using higher temperatures and longer extraction times resulted in a sharp decrease of polyphenol extraction yield. Relevant proanthocyanidin amounts were extracted only at 50 and 100 °C. Finally, TA recovery and activity were not directly related to the main polyphenol content when performing pressurized hot water grape pomace extraction.

  4. In hot water, again

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basden, Alastair; Watkins, Sheila

    2009-10-01

    Regarding Norman Willcox's letter about the problems of using solar panels for domestic heating (August p21), I also have thermal solar panels installed. However, contrary to his disappointing experience, I have found that they provide my family with a useful amount of hot water. In our system, the solar energy is used to heat a store of water, which has no other source of heat. Mains-pressure cold water passes through this store via a heat exchanger, removing heat from it and warming up. If the water becomes warm enough, an unpowered thermostatic valve allows it to go straight to the hot taps (mixing it with cold if it is too hot). However, if it is not hot enough, then the water is directed first through our previously installed gaspowered combination boiler and then to the taps.

  5. Pressurized Hot Water Extraction of anthocyanins from red onion: A study on extraction and degradation rates.

    PubMed

    Petersson, Erik V; Liu, Jiayin; Sjöberg, Per J R; Danielsson, Rolf; Turner, Charlotta

    2010-03-17

    Pressurized Hot Water Extraction (PHWE) is a quick, efficient and environmentally friendly technique for extractions. However, when using PHWE to extract thermally unstable analytes, extraction and degradation effects occur at the same time, and thereby compete. At first, the extraction effect dominates, but degradation effects soon take over. In this paper, extraction and degradation rates of anthocyanins from red onion were studied with experiments in a static batch reactor at 110 degrees C. A total extraction curve was calculated with data from the actual extraction and degradation curves, showing that more anthocyanins, 21-36% depending on the species, could be extracted if no degradation occurred, but then longer extraction times would be required than those needed to reach the peak level in the apparent extraction curves. The results give information about the different kinetic processes competing during an extraction procedure. Copyright 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. The initial responses of hot liquid water released under low atmospheric pressures: Experimental insights

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bargery, Alistair Simon; Lane, Stephen J.; Barrett, Alexander; Wilson, Lionel; Gilbert, Jennie S.

    2010-11-01

    Experiments have been performed to simulate the shallow ascent and surface release of water and brines under low atmospheric pressure. Atmospheric pressure was treated as an independent variable and water temperature and vapor pressure were examined as a function of total pressure variation down to low pressures. The physical and thermal responses of water to reducing pressure were monitored with pressure transducers, temperature sensors and visible imaging. Data were obtained for pure water and for solutions with dissolved NaCl or CO 2. The experiments showed the pressure conditions under which the water remained liquid, underwent a rapid phase change to the gas state by boiling, and then solidified because of removal of latent heat. Liquid water is removed from phase equilibrium by decompression. Solid, liquid and gaseous water are present simultaneously, and not at the 611 Pa triple point, because dynamic interactions between the phases maintain unstable temperature gradients. After phase changes stop, the system reverts to equilibrium with its surroundings. Surface and shallow subsurface pressure conditions were simulated for Mars and the icy satellites of the outer Solar System. Freezing by evaporation in the absence of wind on Mars is shown to be unlikely for pure water at pressures greater than c. 670 Pa, and for saline solutions at pressures greater than c. 610 Pa. The physical nature of ice that forms depends on the salt content. Ice formed from saline water at pressures less than c. 610 Pa could be similar to terrestrial sea ice. Ice formed from pure water at pressures less than c. 100 Pa develops a low thermal conductivity and a 'honeycomb' structure created by sublimation. This ice could have a density as low as c. 450 kg m -3 and a thermal conductivity as low as 1.6 W m -1 K -1, and is highly reflective, more akin to snow than the clear ice from which it grew. The physical properties of ice formed from either pure or saline water at low pressures will

  7. Effect of pressure on the micro-explosion of water/oil emulsion droplets over a hot plate

    SciTech Connect

    Cho, P. ); Law, C.K. ); Mizomoto, M. )

    1991-02-01

    The purpose of the present investigation is experimentally to study the micro-explosion behavior of water/oil emulsion droplets over a hot plate in general, and the effect of pressure on this droplet/plate system in particular. The technological relevance of this study stems from the interest in direct injection high-compression-ratio engines because droplet/wall interaction is believed to be an important process within these engines, and because water/oil emulsion is most suitable for application with the heavier oils used by them. From the fundamental viewpoint it is not clear a priori that insights gained from results of freely falling droplets can be readily applied to the present system. This is because droplet gasification behavior over a hot plate (commonly known as the Leidenfrost phenomenon) is a nonmonotonic one. Specifically, for a droplet originally in contact with the plate, with increasing plate temperature the droplet lifetime will first decrease, then increase rapidly as the droplet attempts to levitate itself by its outgoing vapor, and finally decrease gradually when it is in the totally levitated mode. Furthermore, a change in pressure not only will shift the transition plate temperatures for the different gasification modes, but it can also conceivably alter the nucleation mode of the superheated water microdroplets depending on whether the emulsion droplet is in physical contact with the plate.

  8. Prediction of Severe Accident Counter Current Natural Circulation Flows in the Hot Leg of a Pressurized Water Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Boyd, Christopher F.

    2006-07-01

    During certain phases of a severe accident in a pressurized water reactor (PWR), the core becomes uncovered and steam carries heat to the steam generators through natural circulation. For PWR's with U-tube steam generators and loop seals filled with water, a counter current flow pattern is established in the hot leg. This flow pattern has been experimentally observed and has been predicted using computational fluid dynamics (CFD). Predictions of severe accident behavior are routinely carried out using severe accident system analysis codes such as SCDAP/RELAP5 or MELCOR. These codes, however, were not developed for predicting the three-dimensional natural circulation flow patterns during this phase of a severe accident. CFD, along with a set of experiments at 1/7. scale, have been historically used to establish the flow rates and mixing for the system analysis tools. One important aspect of these predictions is the counter current flow rate in the nearly 30 inch diameter hot leg between the reactor vessel and steam generator. This flow rate is strongly related to the amount of energy that can be transported away from the reactor core. This energy transfer plays a significant role in the prediction of core failures as well as potential failures in other reactor coolant system piping. CFD is used to determine the counter current flow rate during a severe accident. Specific sensitivities are completed for parameters such as surge line flow rates, hydrogen content, as well as vessel and steam generator temperatures. The predictions are carried out for the reactor vessel upper plenum, hot leg, a portion of the surge line, and a steam generator blocked off at the outlet plenum. All predictions utilize the FLUENT V6 CFD code. The volumetric flow in the hot leg is assumed to be proportional to the square root of the product of normalized density difference, gravity, and hydraulic diameter to the 5. power. CFD is used to determine the proportionality constant in the range

  9. Solar Hot Water Heater

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    The solar panels pictured below, mounted on a Moscow, Idaho home, are part of a domestic hot water heating system capable of providing up to 100 percent of home or small business hot water needs. Produced by Lennox Industries Inc., Marshalltown, Iowa, the panels are commercial versions of a collector co-developed by NASA. In an effort to conserve energy, NASA has installed solar collectors at a number of its own facilities and is conducting research to develop the most efficient systems. Lewis Research Center teamed with Honeywell Inc., Minneapolis, Minnesota to develop the flat plate collector shown. Key to the collector's efficiency is black chrome coating on the plate developed for use on spacecraft solar cells, the coating prevents sun heat from "reradiating," or escaping outward. The design proved the most effective heat absorber among 23 different types of collectors evaluated in a Lewis test program. The Lennox solar domestic hot water heating system has three main components: the array of collectors, a "solar module" (blue unit pictured) and a conventional water heater. A fluid-ethylene glycol and water-is circulated through the collectors to absorb solar heat. The fluid is then piped to a double-walled jacket around a water tank within the solar module.

  10. Use of pressurized hot water extraction and high performance liquid chromatography-inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry for water soluble halides speciation in atmospheric particulate matter.

    PubMed

    Moreda-Piñeiro, Jorge; Alonso-Rodríguez, Elia; Moreda-Piñeiro, Antonio; Moscoso-Pérez, Carmen; López-Mahía, Purificación; Muniategui-Lorenzo, Soledad; Prada-Rodríguez, Darío

    2012-11-15

    The feasibility of pressurized hot water extraction (PHWE) has been novelty investigated to speed up water soluble halide species (bromide, Br(-); bromate, BrO(3)(-); iodide, I(-) and iodate, IO(3)(-)) leaching from atmospheric particulate matter (PM(10) and PM(2.5)). Total bromine and iodine and total water soluble bromine and iodine have been assessed by inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). Water-soluble bromine and iodine species were also measured by ICP-MS after anion exchange high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Variables inherent to the pressurized hot water extraction process (temperature, modifier concentration, static time, pressure, number of cycles and dispersing agent mass) were fully studied. Results showed that the pressurized leaching procedure can be performed in 9 min (5 min for pre-heating, 2 min of static time, 1 min of purge time, and 1 min of end relief time). The use of diluted acetic acid as a modifier did not improve the target recoveries. Dispersing agent (diatomaceous earth) was not needed, which reduces the time for filling the cells. Water-soluble halides were reached under the following extraction conditions: extraction temperature of 100 °C, pressure of 1500 psi, static time of 2 min and 1 extraction cycle. Optimized HPLC conditions consisted of an isocratic elution with 175 mM ammonium nitrate plus 15% (v/v) methanol as mobile phase (optimum flow rate of at 1.5 mL min(-1)). Analytical performances, such as limits of detection and quantification, repeatability and analytical recoveries of the over-all procedure have been established. Results obtained show water soluble halides accounted for approximately 20.9±1.3 and 11.8±0.6% of the total bromine and total iodine, respectively. A 79 and 89% of bromine and iodine was non-water soluble, which may be organic non-water soluble species. Br(-) and IO(3)(-) were found to be the major species, and they accounted for 100% of the total water-soluble bromine and

  11. Ethanol and co-product generation from pressurized batch hot water pretreated T85 bermudagrass and Merkeron napiergrass using recombinant Escherichia coli as biocatalyst

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Pretreatment of grasses is required to maximize ethanol yield during fermentation. T85 bermudagrass and Merkeron napiergrass (Pennisetum purpureum Schumach.) were either left untreated or were pressurized batch hot water (PBHW) pretreated for 2 minutes at 230°C at 5% w/v whole grass solids loading. ...

  12. Acidified pressurized hot water for the continuous extraction of cadmium and lead from plant materials prior to ETAAS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morales-Muñoz, S.; Luque-García, J. L.; Luque de Castro, M. D.

    2003-01-01

    Acidified and pressurized hot water is proposed for the continuous leaching of Cd and Pb from plants prior to determination by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry. Beech leaves (a certified reference material—CRM 100—where the analytes were not certified) were used for optimizing the method by a multivariate approach. The samples (0.5 g) were subjected to dynamic extraction with water modified with 1% v/v HNO 3 at 250 °C as leachant. A kinetics study was performed in order to know the pattern of the extraction process. The method was validated with a CRM (olive leaves, 062 from the BCR) where the analytes had been certified. The agreement between the certified values and those found using the proposed method demonstrates its usefulness. The repeatability and within-laboratory reproducibility were 3.7 and 2.3% for Cd and 1.04% and 6.3% for Pb, respectively. The precision of the method, together with its efficiency, rapidity, and environmental acceptability, makes it a good alternative for the determination of trace metals in plant material.

  13. Determining the distribution of pharmaceutically active compounds (PhACs) in soils and sediments by pressurized hot water extraction (PHWE).

    PubMed

    Biel-Maeso, Miriam; Corada-Fernández, Carmen; Lara-Martín, Pablo A

    2017-10-01

    The occurrence of pharmaceutically active compounds (PhACs) in the environment may pose a potential risk for humans and ecosystems. Wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) are recognized as one of the main sources of these chemicals into both aquatic and terrestrial environments. The objectives of the study were to determine the presence of a wide variety of PhACs (n = 45) in sewage-impacted sediments and soils from the Guadalete River basin (SW Spain) by developing and applying an environmentally friendly multi-residue method based on pressurized hot water extraction (PHWE). Different parameters were optimized, including extraction temperature, pH, solvents, and clean-up. Extraction recoveries were analyte dependent, varying between 50% and 140% for most of the analytes when using pure water as extraction solvent at 100 °C. Determination of PhACs was performed by ultra-high performance liquid chromatography - tandem mass spectrometry (UPLC-MS/MS), enabling method detection (mLODs) and quantification (mLOQs) limits between <0.01 and 0.83 ng g(-1) and from 0.02 to 2.75 ng g(-1), respectively. Regarding the sampling area, 14 out of 45 target compounds were detected in soils and sediments. Analgesic/anti-inflammatories was the therapeutic group most commonly detected, reaching concentrations up to 20 ng g(-1). Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Remediation approach for organic compounds and arsenic co-contaminated soil using pressurized hot water extraction process.

    PubMed

    Islam, Mohammad Nazrul; Jo, Young-Tae; Jeong, Yeon-Jae; Park, Jeong-Hun

    2017-09-15

    Successful remediation of soil with co-existing organics contaminants and arsenic (As) is a challenge as the chemical and remediation technologies are different for each group of pollutants. In this study, the treatment effectiveness of pressurized hot water (PHW) extraction process was investigated for remediation of soil co-contaminated with phenol, crude oil, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and As. An elimination percentage of about 99% was achieved for phenol, and in the range of 63-100% was observed for the PAHs at 260 °C for 90 min operation. The performance of PHW extraction in the removal of total petroleum hydrocarbons was found to be 86%. Of the 87 mg/kg of As in untreated soil, 67% of which was eliminated after treatment. The removal of organic contaminants was mainly via desorption, dissolution and degradation in subcritical water, while As was eliminated probably by oxidation and dissolution of arsenic-bearing minerals. According to the experimental results, PHW extraction process can be suggested as an alternative cleaning technology, instead of using any organic solvents for remediation of such co-contaminated soil.

  15. Space Shuttle Main Engine Low Pressure Oxidizer Turbo-Pump Inducer Dynamic Environment Characterization through Water Model and Hot-Fire Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arellano, Patrick; Patton, Marc; Schwartz, Alan; Stanton, David

    2006-01-01

    The Low Pressure Oxidizer Turbopump (LPOTP) inducer on the Block II configuration Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) experienced blade leading edge ripples during hot firing. This undesirable condition led to a minor redesign of the inducer blades. This resulted in the need to evaluate the performance and the dynamic environment of the redesign, relative to the current configuration, as part of the design acceptance process. Sub-scale water model tests of the two inducer configurations were performed, with emphasis on the dynamic environment due to cavitation induced vibrations. Water model tests were performed over a wide range of inlet flow coefficient and pressure conditions, representative of the scaled operating envelope of the Block II SSME, both in flight and in ground hot-fire tests, including all power levels. The water test hardware, facility set-up, type and placement of instrumentation, the scope of the test program, specific test objectives, data evaluation process and water test results that characterize and compare the two SSME LPOTP inducers are discussed. In addition, dynamic characteristics of the two water models were compared to hot fire data from specially instrumented ground tests. In general, good agreement between the water model and hot fire data was found, which confirms the value of water model testing for dynamic characterization of rocket engine turbomachinery.

  16. Space Shuttle Main Engine Low Pressure Oxidizer Turbo-Pump Inducer Dynamic Environment Characterization through Water Model and Hot-Fire Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arellano, Patrick; Patton, Marc; Schwartz, Alan; Stanton, David

    2006-01-01

    The Low Pressure Oxidizer Turbopump (LPOTP) inducer on the Block II configuration Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) experienced blade leading edge ripples during hot firing. This undesirable condition led to a minor redesign of the inducer blades. This resulted in the need to evaluate the performance and the dynamic environment of the redesign, relative to the current configuration, as part of the design acceptance process. Sub-scale water model tests of the two inducer configurations were performed, with emphasis on the dynamic environment due to cavitation induced vibrations. Water model tests were performed over a wide range of inlet flow coefficient and pressure conditions, representative of the scaled operating envelope of the Block II SSME, both in flight and in ground hot-fire tests, including all power levels. The water test hardware, facility set-up, type and placement of instrumentation, the scope of the test program, specific test objectives, data evaluation process and water test results that characterize and compare the two SSME LPOTP inducers are discussed. In addition, dynamic characteristics of the two water models were compared to hot fire data from specially instrumented ground tests. In general, good agreement between the water model and hot fire data was found, which confirms the value of water model testing for dynamic characterization of rocket engine turbomachinery.

  17. Extending the applicability of pressurized hot water extraction to compounds exhibiting limited water solubility by pH control: curcumin from the turmeric rhizome.

    PubMed

    Euterpio, Maria Anna; Cavaliere, Chiara; Capriotti, Anna Laura; Crescenzi, Carlo

    2011-11-01

    Pressurized hot water extraction (PHWE, also known as subcritical water extraction) is commonly considered to be an environmentally friendly extraction technique that could potentially replace traditional methods that use organic solvents. Unfortunately, the applicability of this technique is often limited by the very low water solubility of the target compounds, even at high temperatures. In this paper, the scope for broadening the applicability of PHWE by adjusting the pH of the water used in the extraction is demonstrated in the extraction of curcumin (which exhibits very limited water solubility) from untreated turmeric (Curcuma longa L.) rhizomes. Although poor extraction yields were obtained, even at high temperatures when using degassed water or neutral phosphate buffer as the extraction medium, yields exceeding those obtained by Soxhlet extraction were achieved using highly acidic pH buffers due to curcumin protonation. The influence of the temperature, pH, and buffer concentration on the extraction yield were investigated in detail by means of a series of designed experiments. Optimized conditions for the extraction of curcumin from turmeric by PHWE were estimated at 197 °C using 62 g/L buffer concentration at pH 1.6. The relationships between these variables were subjected to statistical analysis using response surface methodology.

  18. A green and effective approach for characterisation and quality control of chrysanthemum by pressurized hot water extraction in combination with HPLC with UV absorbance detection.

    PubMed

    Liu, Feng; Ong, Eng Shi; Li, Sam Fong Yau

    2013-12-01

    Chrysanthemum is a ubiquitous plant with many species and wide uses, and it is usually consumed as functional food. The main aim of this paper is to demonstrate that chromatographic fingerprints obtained from the HPLC/UV analysis of the pressurized hot water extraction (PHWE) extracts together with the aid of principal component analysis (PCA), allowed for the clustering of various chrysanthemums of different species and provenance. In addition, a parallel study of pressurized fluid extraction (PFE) with methanol was carried out for comparison. From the results, a clearer separation and clustering was obtained with the environmentally-benign water extracts compared with methanol extracts. This study shows that PHWE in combination with HPLC/UV and PCA can be used successfully as a green and effective approach for characterisation and quality control of ubiquitous functional food such as chrysanthemum.

  19. Determination of chlorobenzenes in textiles by pressurized hot water extraction followed by vortex-assisted liquid-liquid microextraction and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yang; Zhu, Yan

    2013-12-06

    A method for quantitative determination of chlorobenzenes in textiles is developed, using pressurized hot water extraction (PHWE), vortex-assisted liquid-liquid microextraction (VALLME) and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). VALLME serves as a trapping step after PHWE. The extraction conditions are investigated, as well as the quantitative features such as linearity, limits of detection (LODs), limits of quantification (LOQs), repeatabilities and reproducibilities between days. LOQs of 0.018-0.032mg/kg were achieved. The present method provides good repeatabilities (RSD<6.9%) and demonstrates that PHWE-VALLME-GC-MS is a simple, rapid and environmentally friendly method for determination of chlorobenzenes in textiles.

  20. An on-line method for pressurized hot water extraction and enzymatic hydrolysis of quercetin glucosides from onions.

    PubMed

    Lindahl, Sofia; Liu, Jiayin; Khan, Samiullah; Karlsson, Eva Nordberg; Turner, Charlotta

    2013-06-27

    A novel environmentally sound continuous-flow hot water extraction and enzymatic hydrolysis method for determination of quercetin in onion raw materials was successfully constructed using a stepwise optimization approach. In the first step, enzymatic hydrolysis of quercetin-3,4'-diglucoside to quercetin was optimized using a three level central composite design considering temperature (75-95°C), pH (3-6) and volume concentration of ethanol (5-15%). The enzyme used was a thermostable β-glucosidase variant (termed TnBgl1A_N221S/P342L) covalently immobilized on either of two acrylic support-materials (Eupergit(®) C 250L or monolithic cryogel). Optimal reaction conditions were irrespective of support 84°C, 5% ethanol and pH 5.5, and at these conditions, no significant loss of enzyme activity was observed during 72 h of use. In a second step, hot water extractions from chopped yellow onions, run at the optimal temperature for hydrolysis, were optimized in a two level design with respect to pH (2.6 and 5.5), ethanol concentration (0 and 5%) and flow rate (1 and 3 mL min(-1)) Obtained results showed that the total quercetin extraction yield was 1.7 times higher using a flow rate of 3 mL min(-1) (extraction time 90 min), compared to a flow rate of 1 mL min(-1) (extraction time 240 min). Presence of 5% ethanol was favorable for the extraction yield, while a further decrease in pH was not, not even for the extraction step alone. Finally, the complete continuous flow method (84°C, 5% ethanol, pH 5.5, 3 mL min(-1)) was used to extract quercetin from yellow, red and shallot onions and resulted in higher or similar yield (e.g. 8.4±0.7 μmol g(-1) fresh weight yellow onion) compared to a conventional batch extraction method using methanol as extraction solvent. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Solar hot-water system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    Design data brochure describes domestic solar water system that uses direct-feed system designed to produce 80 gallons of 140 F hot water per day to meet needs of single family dwelling. Brochure also reviews annual movements of sun relative to earth and explains geographic considerations in collector orientation and sizing.

  2. Evaluation of the extraction efficiency of thermally labile bioactive compounds in Gastrodia elata Blume by pressurized hot water extraction and microwave-assisted extraction.

    PubMed

    Teo, Chin Chye; Tan, Swee Ngin; Yong, Jean Wan Hong; Hew, Choy Sin; Ong, Eng Shi

    2008-02-22

    Our earlier work showed that the stability of the bioactive compounds gastrodin (GA) and vanillyl alcohol (VA) in Gastrodia elata Blume behaved differently with varying compositions of water-ethanol using pressurized liquid extraction (PLE) at room temperature. To have a better understanding of the extraction process of these thermally labile compounds under elevated temperature conditions, pressurized hot water extraction (PHWE) and microwave-assisted extraction (MAE) methods were proposed. PHWE and MAE showed that GA and VA could be extracted using pure water under optimized conditions of temperature and extraction time. The extraction efficiency of GA and VA by the proposed methods was found to be higher or comparable to heating under reflux using water. The marker compounds present in the plant extracts were determined by RP-HPLC. The optimized conditions were found to be different for the two proposed methods on extraction of GA and VA. The method precision (RSD, n=6) was found to vary from 0.92% to 3.36% for the two proposed methods on different days. Hence, PHWE and MAE methods were shown to be feasible alternatives for the extraction of thermally labile marker compounds present in medicinal plants.

  3. Hot water supply system

    SciTech Connect

    Sakamoto, M.; Saito, T.

    1984-05-22

    A novel pulse combustion water heater is compact in size and less noisy than previous models. The pulse combustor, suction muffler, blower, and exhaust muffler are all located at the lower portion of the storage tank, making it compact and easy to soundproof. The exhaust pipe extends to the top of the tank to heat the water, then descends back into the soundproofed base to discharge the condensed flue gases.

  4. Optimisation of the hot conditioning of carbon steel surfaces of primary heat transport system of Pressurized Heavy Water Reactors using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiran Kumar, M.; Gaonkar, Krishna; Ghosh, Swati; Kain, Vivekanand; Bojinov, Martin; Saario, Timo

    2010-06-01

    Hot conditioning operation of the primary heat transport system is an important step prior to the commissioning of Pressurized Heavy Water Reactors. One of the major objectives of the operation is to develop a stable and protective magnetite layer on the inner surfaces of carbon steel piping. The correlation between stable magnetite film growth on carbon steel surfaces and the period of exposure to hot conditioning environment is generally established by a combination of weight change measurements and microscopic/morphological observations of the specimens periodically removed during the operation. In the present study, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) at room temperature is demonstrated as an alternate, quantitative technique to arrive at an optimal duration of the exposure period. Specimens of carbon steel were exposed for 24, 35 and 48 h during hot conditioning of primary heat transport system of two Indian PHWRs. The composition and morphology of oxide films grown during exposure was characterized by X-ray diffraction and optical microscopy. Further, ex situ electrochemical impedance spectra of magnetite films formed after each exposure were measured, in 1 ppm Li + electrolyte at room temperature as a function of potential in a range of -0.8 to +0.3 VSCE. The defect density of the magnetite films formed after each exposure was estimated by Mott-Schottky analysis of capacitances extracted from the impedance spectra. Further the ionic resistance of the oxide was also extracted from the impedance spectra. Defect density was observed to decrease with increase in exposure time and to saturate after 35 h, indicating stabilisation of the barrier layer part of the magnetite film. The values of the ionic transport resistance start to increase after 35-40 h of exposure. The quantitative ability of EIS technique to assess the film quality demonstrates that it can be used as a supplementary tool to the thickness and morphological characterizations of samples

  5. Solar Hot Water Hourly Simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, Howard Andrew

    2009-12-31

    The Software consists of a spreadsheet written in Microsoft Excel which provides an hourly simulation of a solar hot water heating system (including solar geometry, solar collector efficiency as a function of temperature, energy balance on storage tank and lifecycle cost analysis).

  6. HOT WATER DRILL FOR TEMPERATE ICE.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Taylor, Philip L.

    1984-01-01

    The development of a high-pressure hot-water drill is described, which has been used reliably in temperate ice to depths of 400 meters with an average drill rate of about 1. 5 meters per minute. One arrangement of the equipment weighs about 500 kilograms, and can be contained on two sleds, each about 3 meters long. Simplified performance equations are given, and experiments with nozzle design suggest a characteristic number describing the efficiency of each design, and a minimum bore-hole diameter very close to 6 centimeters for a hot water drill. Also discussed is field experience with cold weather, water supply, and contact with englacial cavities and the glacier bed.

  7. 10 CFR 431.102 - Definitions concerning commercial water heaters, hot water supply boilers, and unfired hot water...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... supply boilers, and unfired hot water storage tanks. 431.102 Section 431.102 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY... Water Heaters, Hot Water Supply Boilers and Unfired Hot Water Storage Tanks § 431.102 Definitions concerning commercial water heaters, hot water supply boilers, and unfired hot water storage tanks. Link...

  8. 10 CFR 431.102 - Definitions concerning commercial water heaters, hot water supply boilers, and unfired hot water...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... supply boilers, and unfired hot water storage tanks. 431.102 Section 431.102 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY... Water Heaters, Hot Water Supply Boilers and Unfired Hot Water Storage Tanks § 431.102 Definitions concerning commercial water heaters, hot water supply boilers, and unfired hot water storage tanks....

  9. 10 CFR 431.102 - Definitions concerning commercial water heaters, hot water supply boilers, and unfired hot water...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... supply boilers, and unfired hot water storage tanks. 431.102 Section 431.102 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY... Water Heaters, Hot Water Supply Boilers and Unfired Hot Water Storage Tanks § 431.102 Definitions concerning commercial water heaters, hot water supply boilers, and unfired hot water storage tanks....

  10. OUT Success Stories: Solar Hot Water Technology

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Clyne, R.

    2000-08-01

    Solar hot water technology was made great strides in the past two decades. Every home, commercial building, and industrial facility requires hot water. DOE has helped to develop reliable and durable solar hot water systems. For industrial applications, the growth potential lies in large-scale systems, using flat-plate and trough-type collectors. Flat-plate collectors are commonly used in residential hot water systems and can be integrated into the architectural design of the building.

  11. Rapid analysis of essential oil from Fructus Amomi by pressurized hot water extraction followed by solid-phase microextraction and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Deng, Chunhui; Wang, Aiqin; Shen, Shun; Fu, Daxi; Chen, Jiakuan; Zhang, Xiangmin

    2005-06-15

    In this paper, a simple, rapid, solvent-free and low-cost method of pressurized hot water extraction (PHWE) followed by headspace solid-phase microextraction (HS-SPME) and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) was developed for the analysis of essential oil in a traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) of the dried ripe fruit of Fructus Amomi (Sha Ren). The essential oil in the TCM (0.050 g) was extracted by water at 50 bar and 150 degrees C, followed by extraction and concentration by SPME fibers at 80 degrees C for 15min and analysis by GC-MS. The PHWE and HS-SPME parameters were optimized. Thirty-five compounds in the TCM were identified by PHWE-HS-SPME. Among them, camphor, an active compound, in the TCM samples was quantitatively analyzed. The proposed method required little time to prepare the sample. Moreover, little sample mass and no organic solvent was needed. The precision of the present method was found to be good (R.S.D. <10.0%). It is shown that PHWE-SPME-GC-MS is an alternative method for the determination of volatile components in TCMs and can be used as a powerful tool for TCM quality assessment.

  12. Environmentally friendly analysis of emerging contaminants by pressurized hot water extraction-stir bar sorptive extraction-derivatization and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Pintado-Herrera, Marina G; González-Mazo, Eduardo; Lara-Martín, Pablo A

    2013-01-01

    This work describes the development, optimization, and validation of a new method for the simultaneous determination of a wide range of pharmaceuticals (beta-blockers, lipid regulators…) and personal care products (fragrances, UV filters, phthalates…) in both aqueous and solid environmental matrices. Target compounds were extracted from sediments using pressurized hot water extraction followed by stir bar sorptive extraction. The first stage was performed at 1,500 psi during three static extraction cycles of 5 min each after optimizing the extraction temperature (50-150 °C) and addition of organic modifiers (% methanol) to water, the extraction solvent. Next, aqueous extracts and water samples were processed using polydimethylsiloxane bars. Several parameters were optimized for this technique, including extraction and desorption time, ionic strength, presence of organic modifiers, and pH. Finally, analytes were extracted from the bars by ultrasonic irradiation using a reduced amount of solvent (0.2 mL) prior to derivatization and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis. The optimized protocol uses minimal amounts of organic solvents (<10 mL/sample) and time (≈8 h/sample) compared to previous existing methodologies. Low standard deviation (usually below 10%) and limits of detection (sub-ppb) vouch for the applicability of the methodology for the analysis of target compounds at trace levels. Once developed, the method was applied to determine concentrations of these compounds in several types of sample (wastewater, seawater, pore water, and sediment) from Cadiz Bay (SW Spain). To our knowledge, these findings represent the first information available on the presence of some of the target compounds in the marine environment.

  13. Nanostructured TiO2 and ZnO prepared by using pressurized hot water and their eco-toxicological evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Troppová, Ivana; Matějová, Lenka; Sezimová, Hana; Matěj, Zdeněk; Peikertová, Pavlína; Lang, Jaroslav

    2017-06-01

    The eco-toxicological effects of unconventionally prepared nanostructured TiO2 and ZnO were evaluated in this study, since both oxides are keenly investigated semiconductor photocatalysts in the last three decades. Unconventional processing by pressurized hot water was applied in order to crystallize oxide materials as an alternative to standard calcination. Acute biological toxicity of the synthesized oxides was evaluated using germination of Sinapis alba seed (ISO 11269-1) and growth of Lemna minor fronds (ISO 20079) and was compared to commercially available TiO2 Degussa P25. Toxicity results revealed that synthesized ZnO as well as TiO2 is toxic contrary to commercial TiO2 Degussa P25 which showled stimulation effect to L. minor and no toxicity to S. alba. ZnO was significantly more toxic than TiO2. The effect of crystallite size was considered, and it was revealed that small crystallite size and large surface area are not the toxicity-determining factors. Factors such as the rate of nanosized crystallites aggregation and concentration, shape and surface properties of TiO2 nanoparticles affect TiO2 toxicity to both plant species. Seriously, the dissolution of Ti4+ ions from TiO2 was also observed which may contribute to its toxicity. In case of ZnO, the dissolution of Zn2+ ions stays the main cause of its toxicity.

  14. Effects of temperature and time on polyphenolic content and antioxidant activity in the pressurized hot water extraction of deodorized thyme (Thymus vulgaris).

    PubMed

    Vergara-Salinas, José R; Pérez-Jiménez, Jara; Torres, Josep Lluís; Agosin, Eduardo; Pérez-Correa, José R

    2012-11-07

    The effects of temperature (50-200 °C) and contact time (5-30 min) on the pressurized hot water extraction of deodorized thyme were explored for antioxidant activity, polyphenol profiles, and total antioxidants. Six not previously reported polyphenolic compounds were identified in thyme. An inverse correlation was found between the antioxidant activity and total antioxidants with the amount and diversity of polyphenols. The highest total extract yield and antioxidant activity were obtained at 200 °C, although maximum polyphenol extraction yields of hydroxycinnamic acids, flavones, flavonols/flavanones, and total polyphenols were detected at 100 °C and 5 min. Higher temperatures and longer exposure times reduced extract polyphenol diversity. Dihydroxyphenyllactic acid was the only phenolic compound for which extraction yield increased with temperature, probably as a product of the thermal degradation of rosmarinic acid. Consequently, for extracting phenolics from thyme, 100 °C and 5 min would be appropriate operating conditions, whereas antioxidant-active nonphenolic compounds were favored at higher temperatures and exposure times.

  15. Biofilm formation in a hot water system.

    PubMed

    Bagh, L K; Albrechtsen, H J; Arvin, E; Ovesen, K

    2002-01-01

    The biofilm formation rate was measured in situ in a hot water system in an apartment building by specially designed sampling equipment, and the net growth of the suspended bacteria was measured by incubation of water samples with the indigeneous bacteria. The biofilm formation rate reached a higher level in the hot water distribution system (2.1 d(-1) to 2.3 d(-1)) than in the hot water tank (1.4 d(-1) to 2.2 d(-1)) indicating an important area for surface associated growth. The net growth rate of the suspended bacteria measured in hot water from the top, middle and bottom of the hot water tank, in the sludge, or in the water from the distribution system was negligible. This indicated that bacterial growth took place on the inner surfaces in the hot water system and biofilm formation and detachment of bacteria could account for most of the suspended bacteria actually measured in hot water. Therefore, attempts to reduce the number of bacteria in a hot water system have to include the distribution system as well as the hot water tank.

  16. Hot water use at coin laundries

    SciTech Connect

    Lowenstein, A.; Hiller, C.C.

    1999-07-01

    Detailed data on hot water use for one year are presented for two coin laundries. The first is a three-machine laundry that serves half a 50-unit apartment house, and the second is an eight-machine laundry that serves an 82-unit apartment house. For the smaller laundry, the maximum possible demand--i.e., three machines simultaneously filling with hot water--occurred more than once per month. For the larger laundry, the maximum instantaneous demand was equivalent to four machines simultaneously filling with hot water. At this site, the shortest interval in which hot water use equaled that for all eight machines running hot washes was 35 minutes. The data on hot water use for the two laundries were used to validate a methodology for sizing hot water heaters that had been presented at an ASHRAE Symposium. This methodology, which accounts for heating rate, storage capacity, and water temperatures, successfully predicted the conditions when the water heaters would and would not be adequate for the measured loads. The data are an important part of ongoing efforts to characterize the highly diverse universe of hot water use in commercial buildings.

  17. Automated on-fiber derivatization with headspace SPME-GC-MS-MS for the determination of primary amines in sewage sludge using pressurized hot water extraction.

    PubMed

    Llop, Anna; Pocurull, Eva; Borrull, Francesc

    2011-07-01

    An automated, environmentally friendly, simple, selective, and sensitive method was developed for the determination of ten primary aliphatic amines in sewage sludge at μg/kg dry weight (d.w.). The procedure involves a pressurized hot water extraction (PHWE) of the analytes from the solid matrix, followed by a fully automated on-fiber derivatization with 2,3,4,5-pentafluorobenzaldehyde (PFBAY) and headspace solid-phase microextraction (HS-SPME) and subsequent gas chromatography ion-trap tandem mass spectrometry (GC-IT-MS-MS) analysis. The limits of detection (LODs) of the method were between 0.5 and 45 μg/kg (d.w.) for all compounds except for ethyl-, isopropyl-, and amylamine, whose LODs were 70, 109, and 116 μg/kg (d.w.), respectively. The limits of quantification (LOQs) were between 10 and 350 μg/kg (d.w.). Repeatability and intermediate precision, expressed as RSD(%) (n=3), were lower than 18 and 21%, respectively. The method developed enabled to determine primary aliphatic amines in sludge from various urban and industrial sewage treatment plants as well as from a potable treatment plant. Most of the primary aliphatic amines were found in the sewage sludge samples analyzed corresponding to the maximum concentrations to the samples from the urban plant: for instance, isobutylamine and methylamine were found at 7728 and 12 536 μg/kg (d.w.), respectively. Amylamine was detected only in few samples but always at concentrations lower than its LOQ.

  18. Practical hot oiling and hot watering for paraffin control

    SciTech Connect

    Mansure, A.J.; Barker, K.M.

    1994-03-01

    One of the common oil-field wellbore problems is paraffin deposition. Even though hot oiling or hot watering is usually the first method tried for removing paraffin, few operators appreciate the limitations of ``hot oiling`` and the potential for the fluid to aggravate well problems and cause formation damage. Field tests have shown that the chemical and thermal processes that occur during ``hot oiling`` are very complex and that there are significant variations in practices among operators. Key issues include: (1) During a typical hot oiling job, a significant amount of the fluid injected into the well goes into the formation, and hence, particulates and chemicals in the fluid have the potential to damage the formation. (2) Hot oiling can vaporize oil in the tubing faster than the pump lifts oil. This interrupts paraffin removal from the well, and thus the wax is refined into harder deposits, goes deeper into the well, and can stick rods. These insights have been used to determine good ``hot oiling`` practices designed to maximize wax removal and minimize formation damage.

  19. Basics of Solar Heating & Hot Water Systems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Inst. of Architects, Washington, DC.

    In presenting the basics of solar heating and hot water systems, this publication is organized from the general to the specific. It begins by presenting functional and operational descriptions of solar heating and domestic hot water systems, outlining the basic concepts and terminology. This is followed by a description of solar energy utilization…

  20. Basics of Solar Heating & Hot Water Systems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Inst. of Architects, Washington, DC.

    In presenting the basics of solar heating and hot water systems, this publication is organized from the general to the specific. It begins by presenting functional and operational descriptions of solar heating and domestic hot water systems, outlining the basic concepts and terminology. This is followed by a description of solar energy utilization…

  1. Solar Energy for Space Heating & Hot Water.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Energy Research and Development Administration, Washington, DC. Div. of Solar Energy.

    This pamphlet reviews the direct transfer of solar energy into heat, particularly for the purpose of providing space and hot water heating needs. Owners of buildings and homes are provided with a basic understanding of solar heating and hot water systems: what they are, how they perform, the energy savings possible, and the cost factors involved.…

  2. Design data brochure: Solar hot water system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    A design calculation is detailed for a single-family residence housing a family of four in a nonspecific geographical area. The solar water heater system is designed to provide 80 gallons of 140 F hot water per day.

  3. Low power, frost resistant, inexpensive solar hot water heater

    SciTech Connect

    Loth, J.L.

    1980-09-01

    The object of the work reported was to maximize the thermal capacity of a solar collector and to use city water pressure to force the hot water from the collector to the inlet of the regular domestic hot water heater when water was being used in the house. The frost resistance feature was to be obtained by using an air-filled plastic tube inside the collector water passages so that when freezing the ice expansion would collapse the plastic tube rather than bursting the copper lines. The frost resistance feature was extensively tested during the winter of 1979-1980. Repeated thawing and freezing and thawing showed that the presence of the air-filled plastic tube delayed but did not prevent bursting. Thermal storage is effected by a mixture of cement and anthracite surrounding the copper water pipe. This proved too heavy and the performance was too dependent upon hot water use. A preheater and circulating pump were added. (LEW)

  4. Dynamical Crossover in Hot Dense Water: The Hydrogen Bond Role.

    PubMed

    Ranieri, Umbertoluca; Giura, Paola; Gorelli, Federico A; Santoro, Mario; Klotz, Stefan; Gillet, Philippe; Paolasini, Luigi; Koza, Michael Marek; Bove, Livia E

    2016-09-01

    We investigate the terahertz dynamics of liquid H2O as a function of pressure along the 450 K isotherm, by coupled quasielastic neutron scattering and inelastic X-ray scattering experiments. The pressure dependence of the single-molecule dynamics is anomalous in terms of both microscopic translation and rotation. In particular, the Stokes-Einstein-Debye equations are shown to be violated in hot water compressed to the GPa regime. The dynamics of the hydrogen bond network is only weakly affected by the pressure variation. The time scale of the structural relaxation driving the collective dynamics increases by a mere factor of 2 along the investigated isotherm, and the structural relaxation strength turns out to be almost pressure independent. Our results point at the persistence of the hydrogen bond network in hot dense water up to ice VII crystallization, thus questioning the long-standing perception that hydrogen bonds are broken in liquid water under the effect of compression.

  5. Disaggregating Hot Water Use and Predicting Hot Water Waste in Five Test Homes

    SciTech Connect

    Henderson, Hugh; Wade, Jeremy

    2014-04-01

    While it is important to make the equipment (or "plant") in a residential hot water system more efficient, the hot water distribution system also affects overall system performance and energy use. Energy wasted in heating water that is not used is estimated to be on the order of 10%-30% of total domestic hot water (DHW) energy use. This field monitoring project installed temperature sensors on the distribution piping (on trunks and near fixtures) in five houses near Syracuse, NY, and programmed a data logger to collect data at 5 second intervals whenever there was a hot water draw. This data was used to assign hot water draws to specific end uses in the home as well as to determine the portion of each hot water that was deemed useful (i.e., above a temperature threshold at the fixture). Overall, the procedures to assign water draws to each end use were able to successfully assign about 50% of the water draws, but these assigned draws accounted for about 95% of the total hot water use in each home. The amount of hot water deemed as useful ranged from low of 75% at one house to a high of 91% in another. At three of the houses, new water heaters and distribution improvements were implemented during the monitoring period and the impact of these improvements on hot water use and delivery efficiency were evaluated.

  6. Disaggregating Hot Water Use and Predicting Hot Water Waste in Five Test Homes

    SciTech Connect

    Henderson, H.; Wade, J.

    2014-04-01

    While it is important to make the equipment (or 'plant') in a residential hot water system more efficient, the hot water distribution system also affects overall system performance and energy use. Energy wasted in heating water that is not used is estimated to be on the order of 10 to 30 percent of total domestic hot water (DHW) energy use. This field monitoring project installed temperature sensors on the distribution piping (on trunks and near fixtures) and programmed a data logger to collect data at 5 second intervals whenever there was a hot water draw. This data was used to assign hot water draws to specific end uses in the home as well as to determine the portion of each hot water that was deemed useful (i.e., above a temperature threshold at the fixture). Five houses near Syracuse NY were monitored. Overall, the procedures to assign water draws to each end use were able to successfully assign about 50% of the water draws, but these assigned draws accounted for about 95% of the total hot water use in each home. The amount of hot water deemed as useful ranged from low of 75% at one house to a high of 91% in another. At three of the houses, new water heaters and distribution improvements were implemented during the monitoring period and the impact of these improvements on hot water use and delivery efficiency were evaluated.

  7. NORTH PORTAL - HOT WATER CALCULATION - CHANGE HOUSE FACILITY #5008

    SciTech Connect

    R. Blackstone

    1996-01-25

    The purpose of this design analysis and calculation is to determine the demand for hot water and to size the supply main piping for the Change House Facility No.5008 in accordance with the Uniform Plumbing Code (UPC) (Section 4.4.1) and U.S. Department of Energy Order 6430.1A-1540. The method used for the calculations is based on Section 4.4.1. The first step is to determine the maximum pressure drop between the most remote plumbing fixture and the main supply. The pressure drop for the hot water system is based on the total length of the supply piping from the cold water supply source through the water heater to the most remote hot water outlet. Equivalent fixture units are then assigned using Section 4.4.1. For hot water, the values are reduced by 25 percent in accordance with the UPC. The demand load in gpm is then determined based on the number of fixture units. The demand load and the pressure drop between the source and the most remote fixture is used to determine the pipe size and the corresponding friction losses for a given flow velocity not to exceed 10 feet/second.

  8. Hot water flushing for immiscible displacement of a viscous NAPL.

    PubMed

    O'Carroll, Denis M; Sleep, Brent E

    2007-05-14

    Thermal remediation techniques, such as hot water flooding, are emerging technologies that have been proposed for the removal of nonaqueous phase liquids (NAPLs) from the subsurface. In this study a combined laboratory and modeling investigation was conducted to determine if hot water flooding techniques would improve NAPL mass removal compared to ambient temperature water flushing. Two experiments were conducted in a bench scale two-dimensional sandbox (55 cmx45 cmx1.3 cm) and NAPL saturations were quantified using a light transmission apparatus. In these immiscible displacement experiments the aqueous phase, at 22 degrees C and 50 degrees C, displaced a zone with initial NAPL saturations on the order of 85%. The interfacial tension and viscosity of the selected light NAPL, Voltesso 35, are strongly temperature-dependent. Experimental results suggest that hot water flooding reduced the size of the high NAPL saturation zone, in comparison to the cold water flood, and yielded greater NAPL mass recovery (75% NAPL removal vs. 64%). Hot water flooding did not, however, result in lower residual NAPL saturations. A numerical simulator was modified to include simultaneous flow of water and organic phases, energy transport, temperature and pressure. Model predictions of mass removal and NAPL saturation profiles compared well with observed behavior. A sensitivity analysis indicates that the utility of hot water flooding improves with the increasing temperature dependence of NAPL hydraulic properties.

  9. Prototype solar heating and hot water systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    Progress made in the development of a solar hot water and space heating system is described in four quarterly reports. The program schedules, technical status and other program activities from 6 October 1976 through 30 September 1977 are provided.

  10. Motel solar-hot-water system with nonpressurized storage--Jacksonville, Florida

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    Modular roof-mounted copper-plated arrays collect solar energy; heated water drains from them into 1,000 gallon nonpressurized storage tank which supplies energy to existing pressurized motel hot water lines. System provides 65 percent of hot water demand. Report described systems parts and operation, maintenance, and performance and provides warranty information.

  11. Solar-powered hot-water system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collins, E. R.

    1979-01-01

    Hot-water system requires no external power except solar energy. System is completely self-controlling. It includes solar-powered pump, solar-thermally and hydrothermally operated valves, and storage tank filled with open-celled foam, to maintain thermal stratification in stored water.

  12. 10 CFR 431.102 - Definitions concerning commercial water heaters, hot water supply boilers, and unfired hot water...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... attached. Thermal efficiency for an instantaneous water heater, a storage water heater or a hot water... the amount of energy consumed by the water heater as measured during the thermal efficiency test... 10 Energy 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Definitions concerning commercial water heaters, hot...

  13. Hot Jupiter with Hidden Water (Artist Concept)

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2016-06-08

    Hot Jupiters, exoplanets around the same size as Jupiter that orbit very closely to their stars, often have cloud or haze layers in their atmospheres. This may prevent space telescopes from detecting atmospheric water that lies beneath the clouds, according to a study in the Astrophysical Journal. As much as half of the water in the atmospheres of these exoplanets may be blocked by these clouds or hazes, research suggests. The study, led by researchers at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, California, examined hot Jupiters that had been observed with the Hubble Space Telescope. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA20687

  14. 46 CFR 53.05-2 - Relief valve requirements for hot water boilers (modifies HG-400.2).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Relief valve requirements for hot water boilers... (CONTINUED) MARINE ENGINEERING HEATING BOILERS Pressure Relieving Devices (Article 4) § 53.05-2 Relief valve requirements for hot water boilers (modifies HG-400.2). (a) The relief valve requirements for hot water...

  15. 46 CFR 53.05-2 - Relief valve requirements for hot water boilers (modifies HG-400.2).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Relief valve requirements for hot water boilers... (CONTINUED) MARINE ENGINEERING HEATING BOILERS Pressure Relieving Devices (Article 4) § 53.05-2 Relief valve requirements for hot water boilers (modifies HG-400.2). (a) The relief valve requirements for hot water...

  16. 46 CFR 53.05-2 - Relief valve requirements for hot water boilers (modifies HG-400.2).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Relief valve requirements for hot water boilers... (CONTINUED) MARINE ENGINEERING HEATING BOILERS Pressure Relieving Devices (Article 4) § 53.05-2 Relief valve requirements for hot water boilers (modifies HG-400.2). (a) The relief valve requirements for hot water...

  17. 46 CFR 53.05-2 - Relief valve requirements for hot water boilers (modifies HG-400.2).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Relief valve requirements for hot water boilers... (CONTINUED) MARINE ENGINEERING HEATING BOILERS Pressure Relieving Devices (Article 4) § 53.05-2 Relief valve requirements for hot water boilers (modifies HG-400.2). (a) The relief valve requirements for hot water...

  18. 46 CFR 53.05-2 - Relief valve requirements for hot water boilers (modifies HG-400.2).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Relief valve requirements for hot water boilers... (CONTINUED) MARINE ENGINEERING HEATING BOILERS Pressure Relieving Devices (Article 4) § 53.05-2 Relief valve requirements for hot water boilers (modifies HG-400.2). (a) The relief valve requirements for hot water...

  19. Residential hot water distribution systems: Roundtablesession

    SciTech Connect

    Lutz, James D.; Klein, Gary; Springer, David; Howard, Bion D.

    2002-08-01

    Residential building practice currently ignores the lossesof energy and water caused by the poor design of hot water systems. Theselosses include: combustion and standby losses from water heaters, thewaste of water (and energy) while waiting for hot water to get to thepoint of use; the wasted heat as water cools down in the distributionsystem after a draw; heat losses from recirculation systems and thediscarded warmth of waste water as it runs down the drain. Severaltechnologies are available that save energy (and water) by reducing theselosses or by passively recovering heat from wastewater streams and othersources. Energy savings from some individual technologies are reported tobe as much as 30 percent. Savings calculations of prototype systemsincluding bundles of technologies have been reported above 50 percent.This roundtable session will describe the current practices, summarizethe results of past and ongoing studies, discuss ways to think about hotwater system efficiency, and point to areas of future study. We will alsorecommend further steps to reduce unnecessary losses from hot waterdistribution systems.

  20. Pressure-Temperature Simulation at Brady Hot Springs

    DOE Data Explorer

    Feigl, Kurt (ORCID:0000000220596708)

    2017-07-11

    These files contain the output of a model calculation to simulate the pressure and temperature of fluid at Brady Hot Springs, Nevada, USA. The calculation couples the hydrologic flow (Darcy's Law) with simple thermodynamics. The epoch of validity is 24 March 2015. Coordinates are UTM Easting, Northing, and Elevation in meters. Temperature is specified in degrees Celsius. Pressure is specified in Pascal.

  1. Prototype solar heating and hot water system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    Progress is reported in the development of a solar heating and hot water system which uses a pyramidal optics solar concentrator for heating, and consists of the following subsystems: collector, control, transport, and site data acquisition. Improvements made in the components and subsystems are discussed.

  2. Prototype solar domestic hot water systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    Construction of a double wall heat exchanger using soft copper tube coiled around a hot water storage tank was completed and preliminary tests were conducted. Solar transport water to tank potable water heat exchange tests were performed with a specially constructed test stand. Work was done to improve the component hardware and system design for the solar water heater. The installation of both a direct feed system and a double wall heat exchanger system provided experience and site data to enable informative decisions to be made as the solar market expands into areas where freeze protection is required.

  3. Hot water, fresh beer, and salt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crawford, Frank S.

    1990-11-01

    In the ``hot chocolate effect'' the best musical scales (those with the finest tone quality, largest range, and best tempo) are obtained by adding salt to a glass of hot water supersaturated with air. Good scales can also be obtained by adding salt to a glass of freshly opened beer (supersaturated with CO2) provided you first (a) get rid of much of the excess CO2 so as to produce smaller, hence slower, rising bubbles, and (b) get rid of the head of foam, which damps the standing wave and ruins the tone quality. Finally the old question, ``Do ionizing particles produce bubbles in fresh beer?'' is answered experimentally.

  4. Alternatives for reducing hot-water bills

    SciTech Connect

    Bennington, G.E.; Spewak, P.C.

    1981-06-01

    A two stage approach to reducing residential water heating bills is described. In Stage I, simple conservation measures were included to reduce the daily hot water energy consumption and the energy losses from the water tank. Once these savings are achieved, Stage II considers more costly options for further reducing the water heating bill. Four alternatives are considered in Stage II: gas water heaters; solar water heaters (two types); heat pump water heaters; and heat recovery from a heat pump or air conditioner. To account for variations within the MASEC region, information on water heating in Rapid City, Minneapolis, Chicago, Detroit, and Kansas City is presented in detail. Information on geography, major population centers, fuel prices, climate, and state solar incentives is covered. (MCW)

  5. 7 CFR 305.22 - Hot water immersion treatment schedules.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 5 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Hot water immersion treatment schedules. 305.22... Hot water immersion treatment schedules. (a) T102-d. (1) Fruit must be grown and treated in Hawaii. (2) Fruit must be submerged at least 4 inches below the water's surface in a hot water immersion...

  6. When hot water freezes before cold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katz, J. I.

    2009-01-01

    I suggest that the origin of the Mpemba effect (the freezing of hot water before cold) is due to freezing-point depression by solutes, either gaseous or solid, whose solubility decreases with increasing temperature so that they are removed when water is heated. The solutes are concentrated ahead of the freezing front by zone refining in water that has not been heated, reducing the temperature of the freezing front, and thereby reducing the temperature gradient and heat flux, slowing the progress of the freezing front. I present a simple calculation of this effect, and suggest experiments to test this hypothesis.

  7. Hot and cold water issues deftly described.

    PubMed

    Baillie, Jonathan

    2016-02-01

    Speaking at a Legionella Control Association Open Day on 9 October last year in Tamworth, Mike Quest, an LCA director and Committee Member who is an independent water hygiene and safety consultant and an NHS Authorising Engineer, presented his standpoint on effective risk assessment and monitoring of complex hot and cold water systems. He also focused on some of the challenges for engineering and estates teams in maintaining water temperatures within 'safe limits' in modern buildings, with reference to the complications he had seen in a hospital project he has recently been working on.

  8. Performance of solar energy hot water systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cramer, M. A.; Evans, K. D.; Rosenbusch, J. M.; Weinstein, R. A.

    The results of performance comparisons of four solar hot water/building heat installations of the National Solar Data Network are presented. The sites were monitored by various sensors and data were processed remotely at a central location. Statistics are presented for seasonal hot water demand, solar fraction, fuel saved, supply and delivery temperatures, auxiliary fuel required, and costs, in addition to specifications of passive, active, or hybrid configuration. Lowest collector efficiencies were experienced during the summer months (7%), rising to 58% in winter conditions. System efficiencies ranged from 21-41%, with the highest value occurring at the site with passive components. Constant circulation of heating fluid in a large building was found to lower the system efficiency. One solar system, in a warm climate, with thermosiphon collector and storage, is suggested to satisfy 100% of the system load if proper pipe insulation is implemented

  9. Installation package for a solar heating and hot water system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    Development and installation of two commercial solar heating and hot water systems are reported. The systems consist of the following subsystems: collector, storage, transport, hot water, auxiliary energy and controls. General guidelines are provided which may be utilized in development of detailed installation plans and specifications. In addition, operation, maintenance and repair of a solar heating and hot water system instructions are included.

  10. Legionella Infection Risk from Domestic Hot Water

    PubMed Central

    Montagna, M. Teresa; Romano-Spica, Vincenzo; Stampi, Serena; Stancanelli, Giovanna; Triassi, Maria; Neglia, Rachele; Marchesi, Isabella; Fantuzzi, Guglielmina; Tatò, Daniela; Napoli, Christian; Quaranta, Gianluigi; Laurenti, Patrizia; Leoni, Erica; De Luca, Giovanna; Ossi, Cristina; Moro, Matteo; D’Alcalà, Gabriella Ribera

    2004-01-01

    We investigated Legionella and Pseudomonas contamination of hot water in a cross-sectional multicentric survey in Italy. Chemical parameters (hardness, free chlorine, and trace elements) were determined. Legionella spp. were detected in 33 (22.6%) and Pseudomonas spp. in 56 (38.4%) of 146 samples. Some factors associated with Legionella contamination were heater type, tank distance and capacity, water plant age, and mineral content. Pseudomonas presence was influenced by water source, hardness, free chlorine, and temperature. Legionella contamination was associated with a centralized heater, distance from the heater point >10 m, and a water plant >10 years old. Furthermore, zinc levels of <20 μg/L and copper levels of >50 μg/L appeared to be protective against Legionella colonization. Legionella species and serogroups were differently distributed according to heater type, water temperature, and free chlorine, suggesting that Legionella strains may have a different sensibility and resistance to environmental factors and different ecologic niches. PMID:15109413

  11. 21 CFR 880.6085 - Hot/cold water bottle.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Hot/cold water bottle. 880.6085 Section 880.6085... Devices § 880.6085 Hot/cold water bottle. (a) Identification. A hot/cold water bottle is a device intended for medical purposes that is in the form of a container intended to be filled with hot or cold...

  12. 21 CFR 880.6085 - Hot/cold water bottle.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Hot/cold water bottle. 880.6085 Section 880.6085... Devices § 880.6085 Hot/cold water bottle. (a) Identification. A hot/cold water bottle is a device intended for medical purposes that is in the form of a container intended to be filled with hot or cold...

  13. 21 CFR 880.6085 - Hot/cold water bottle.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Hot/cold water bottle. 880.6085 Section 880.6085... Devices § 880.6085 Hot/cold water bottle. (a) Identification. A hot/cold water bottle is a device intended for medical purposes that is in the form of a container intended to be filled with hot or cold...

  14. 21 CFR 880.6085 - Hot/cold water bottle.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Hot/cold water bottle. 880.6085 Section 880.6085... Devices § 880.6085 Hot/cold water bottle. (a) Identification. A hot/cold water bottle is a device intended for medical purposes that is in the form of a container intended to be filled with hot or cold...

  15. Hot spot conditions during cavitation in water

    SciTech Connect

    Didenko, Y.T.; McNamara, W.B. III; Suslick, K.S.

    1999-06-23

    Liquids irradiated with high-intensity ultrasound undergo acoustic cavitation--the formation, growth, and implosive collapse of bubbles. The energy stored during the growth of the bubble in the rarefaction phase of the acoustic field is released when the bubble violently collapses in the compression phase of the acoustic field, as acoustic noise, shock waves, chemical reactions, and the emission of light (sonoluminescence, SL). This violent collapse is predicted to generate a hot spot of thousands of Kelvin within the bubble, but, to date, there have been only a limited number of experimental measurements of the temperature of this hot spot. Although the SL of water has been studied for more than 50 years, the effective hot spot temperature during aqueous cavitation remains unresolved. Given the importance of aqueous cavitation (sonography and bioeffects of ultrasound, sonochemical remediation of aqueous pollutants, synthetic applications of sonochemistry, etc.), the authors decided to apply previous spectroscopic analysis of SL of nonaqueous liquids to aqueous solutions doped with small amounts of hydrocarbons. The authors have collected and analyzed excited-state C{sub 2} NBSL (multi-bubble sonoluminescence, light emission from the clouds of cavitating bubbles) spectra from mixtures of organic liquids in water at 20 kHz and find an effective emission temperature of 4,300 {+-} 200 K.

  16. Hot water, fresh beer, and salt

    SciTech Connect

    Crawford, F.S. Physics Department, University of California, Berkeley, CA )

    1990-11-01

    In the hot chocolate effect'' the best musical scales (those with the finest tone quality, largest range, and best tempo) are obtained by adding salt to a glass of hot water supersaturated with air. Good scales can also be obtained by adding salt to a glass of freshly opened beer (supersaturated with CO{sub 2}) provided you first (a) get rid of much of the excess CO{sub 2} so as to produce smaller, hence slower, rising bubbles, and (b) get rid of the head of foam, which damps the standing wave and ruins the tone quality. Finally the old question, Do ionizing particles produce bubbles in fresh beer '' is answered experimentally.

  17. High Pressure Industrial Water Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    In conjunction with Space Shuttle Main Engine testing at Stennis, the Nordberg Water Pumps at the High Pressure Industrial Water Facility provide water for cooling the flame deflectors at the test stands during test firings.

  18. Polymer optical fiber tapering using hot water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mizuno, Yosuke; Ujihara, Hiroki; Lee, Heeyoung; Hayashi, Neisei; Nakamura, Kentaro

    2017-06-01

    We perform a pilot trial of highly convenient taper fabrication for polymer optical fibers (POFs) using hot water. A ∼380-mm-long POF taper is successfully fabricated, and its ∼150-mm-long waist has a uniform outer diameter of ∼230 µm. The shape is in good agreement with the theoretical prediction. The optical loss dependence on the strain applied to the waist shows an interesting behavior exhibiting three regimes, the origins of which are inferred by microscopic observations. We then discuss the controllability of the taper length.

  19. Getting into hot water Problematizing hot water service demand: The case of Old Cairo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Culhane, Thomas Henry

    This dissertation analyzes hot water demand and service infrastructure in two neighboring but culturally distinct communities of the urban poor in the inner-city area of central Cairo. The communities are the Historic Islamic Cairo neighborhood of Darb Al Ahmar at the foot of Al-Azhar park, and the Zurayib neighborhood of Manshiyat Nasser where the Coptic Zabaleen Recyclers live. The study focuses on the demand side of the hot water issue and involves consideration of built-environment infrastructures providing piped water, electricity, bottled gas, sewage, and the support structures (wiring and plumbing) for consumer durables (appliances such as hot water heaters, stoves, refrigerators, air conditioners) as well as water pumps and water storage tanks. The study asks the questions "How do poor communities in Cairo value hot water" and "How do cost, infrastructure and cultural preferences affect which attributes of hot water service are most highly preferred?". To answer these questions household surveys based primarily on the World Bank LSMS modules were administered by professional survey teams from Darb Al Ahmar's Aga Khan Trust for Culture and the Zabaleen's local NGO "Spirit of Youth" in their adjacent conununities in and surrounding historic Cairo. In total 463 valid surveys were collected, (231 from Darb Al Ahmar, 232 from the Zabaleen). The surveys included a contingent valuation question to explore Willingness to Pay for improved hot water service; the surveys queried household assets as proxies for income. The dissertation's findings reveal that one quarter of the residents of Darb Al Ahmar and two-thirds of the residents of Manshiyet Nasser's Zabaleen lack conventional water heating service. Instead they employ various types of stoves and self-built contraptions to heat water, usually incurring considerable risk and opportunity costs. However the thesis explores the notion that this is rational "satisficing" behavior; despite the shortcomings of such self

  20. Detection of Hot Halo Gets Theory Out of Hot Water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2006-02-01

    Scientists using NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory have detected an extensive halo of hot gas around a quiescent spiral galaxy. This discovery is evidence that galaxies like our Milky Way are still accumulating matter from the gradual inflow of intergalactic gas. "What we are likely witnessing here is the ongoing galaxy formation process," said Kristian Pedersen of the University of Copenhagen, Denmark, and lead author of a report on the discovery. Chandra observations show that the hot halo extends more than 60,000 light years on either side of the disk of the galaxy known as NGC 5746. The detection of such a large halo alleviates a long-standing problem for the theory of galaxy formation. Spiral galaxies are thought to form from enormous clouds of intergalactic gas that collapse to form giant, spinning disks of stars and gas. Chandra X-ray Image of NGC 5746 Chandra X-ray Image of NGC 5746 One prediction of this theory is that large spiral galaxies should be immersed in halos of hot gas left over from the galaxy formation process. Hot gas has been detected around spiral galaxies in which vigorous star formation is ejecting matter from the galaxy, but until now hot halos due to infall of intergalactic matter have not been detected. "Our observations solve the mystery of the missing hot halos around spiral galaxies," said Pedersen. "The halos exist, but are so faint that an extremely sensitive telescope such as Chandra is needed to detect them." DSS Optical Image of NGC 5746 DSS Optical Image of NGC 5746 NGC 5746 is a massive spiral galaxy about a 100 million light years from Earth. Its disk of stars and gas is viewed almost edge-on. The galaxy shows no signs of unusual star formation, or energetic activity from its nuclear region, making it unlikely that the hot halo is produced by gas flowing out of the galaxy. "We targeted NGC 5746 because we thought its distance and orientation would give us the best chance to detect a hot halo caused by the infall of

  1. Catalytic behaviour of dense hot water.

    PubMed

    Wu, Christine J; Fried, Laurence E; Yang, Lin H; Goldman, Nir; Bastea, Sorin

    2009-04-01

    Water is known to exhibit fascinating physical properties at high pressure and temperature. Its remarkable structural and phase complexities suggest the possibility of exotic chemical reactivity under extreme conditions, although this remains largely unstudied. Detonations of high explosives containing oxygen and hydrogen produce water at thousands of kelvin and tens of gigapascals, similar to conditions in the interiors of giant planets. These systems thus provide a unique means of elucidating the chemistry of 'extreme water'. Here, we show that water has an unexpected role in catalysing complex explosive reactions--contrary to the current view that it is simply a stable detonation product. Using first-principles atomistic simulations of the detonation of the high explosive pentaerythritol tetranitrate, we discovered that H(2)O (source), H (reducer) and OH (oxidizer) act as a dynamic team that transports oxygen between reaction centres. Our finding suggests that water may catalyse reactions in other explosives and in planetary interiors.

  2. Catalytic Behavior of Dense Hot Water

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, C J; Fried, L E; Yang, L H; Goldman, N; Bastea, S

    2008-06-05

    Water is known to exhibit fascinating physical properties at high pressures and temperatures. Its remarkable structural and phase complexity suggest the possibility of exotic chemical reactivity under extreme conditions, though this remains largely unstudied. Detonations of high explosives containing oxygen and hydrogen produce water at thousands of K and tens of GPa, similar to conditions of giant planetary interiors. These systems thus provide a unique means to elucidate the chemistry of 'extreme water'. Here we show that water plays an unexpected role in catalyzing complex explosive reactions - contrary to the current view that it is simply a stable detonation product. Using first-principles atomistic simulations of the detonation of high explosive pentaerythritol tetranitrate (PETN), we discovered that H{sub 2}O (source), H (reducer) and OH (oxidizer) act as a dynamic team that transports oxygen between reaction centers. Our finding suggests that water may catalyze reactions in other explosives and in planetary interiors.

  3. Design package for solar domestic hot water system

    SciTech Connect

    1980-09-01

    Information used to evaluate the initial design of the Elcam, Inc., Solar Domestic Hot Water System is presented. Included are such items as the system performance specification, detailed design drawings and other information. Elcam, Inc., has developed two solar heated prototype hot water systems and two heat exchangers. The hot water systems consist of the following subsystems: collector, storage, control, transport, auxiliary energy, and government-furnished Site Data Acquisition. The two systems are installed at Tempe, Arizona, and San Diego, California.

  4. Motel solar hot-water installation--Atlanta, Georgia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    Analysis of hardness of local water, average insolation for site, and daily hot water requirements insures suitability of solar-energy system design. Report describes two units which are designed to supply 81 percent of motel's annual hot water demand based on hypothetical 85 percent occupancy. Report includes drawings, operating and maintenance instructions, and test results for 1 day of operation.

  5. Prototype solar heating and hot water systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    Alternative approaches to solar heating and hot water system configurations were studied, parametrizing the number and location of the dampers, the number and location of the fans, the interface locations with the furnace, the size and type of subsystems, and operating modes. A two-pass air-heating collector was selected based on efficiency and ease of installation. Also, an energy transport module was designed to compactly contain all the mechanical and electrical control components. System performance calculations were carried out over a heating season for the tentative site location at Tunkhnana, Pa. Results illustrate the effect of collector size, storage capacity, and use of a reflector. Factors which affected system performance include site location, insulative quality of the house, and of the system components. A preliminary system performance specification is given.

  6. Organic compounds in hot-water-soluble fractions from water repellent soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atanassova, Irena; Doerr, Stefan

    2014-05-01

    Water repellency (WR) is a soil property providing hydrophobic protection and preventing rapid microbial decomposition of organic matter entering the soil with litter or plant residues. Global warming can cause changes in WR, thus influencing water storage and plant productivity. Here we assess two different approaches for analysis of organic compounds composition in hot water extracts from accelerated solvent extraction (ASE) of water repellent soils. Extracts were lyophilized, fractionated on SiO2 (sand) and SPE cartridge, and measured by GC/MS. Dominant compounds were aromatic acids, short chain dicarboxylic acids (C4-C9), sugars, short chain fatty acids (C8-C18), and esters of stearic and palmitic acids. Polar compounds (mainly sugars) were adsorbed on applying SPE clean-up procedure, while esters were highly abundant. In addition to the removal of polar compounds, hydrophobic esters and hydrocarbons (alkanes and alkenes < C20) were extracted through desorption of complex colloids stabilized as micelles in dissolved organic carbon (DOC). Water repellency was completely eliminated by hot water under high pressure. The molecular composition of HWSC can play a critical role in stabilization and destabilization of soil organic matter (SOM), particle wettability and C dynamics in soils. Key words: soil water repellency, hot water soluble carbon (HWSC), GC/MS, hydrophobic compounds

  7. Water Pressure. Water in Africa.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garrett, Carly Sporer

    The Water in Africa Project was realized over a 2-year period by a team of Peace Corps volunteers. As part of an expanded, detailed design, resources were collected from over 90 volunteers serving in African countries, photos and stories were prepared, and standards-based learning units were created for K-12 students. This unit, "Water…

  8. Preliminary design package for Sunspot Domestic Hot Water Heating System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    The design review includes a drawing list, auto-control logic, measurement definitions, and other document pertaining to the solar heated prototype hot water systems and two heat exchangers. The hot water systems consist of the following subsystems: collector, storage, control transport, auxiliary energy, and site data acquisition.

  9. Design package for solar domestic hot water system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    The initial design of a solar domestic hot water system is considered. The system performance specification and detailed design drawings are included. The hot water systems consist of the following subsystems: collector, storage, control, transport, auxiliary energy, and government-furnished site data acquisition. The two systems are installed at Tempe, Arizona, and San Diego, California.

  10. Benefits of insulating domestic hot water pipework. Research memo

    SciTech Connect

    Stephen, F.R.

    1986-03-01

    A computer program was developed to simulate a domestic hot-water system and was used to investigate the likely losses of energy and hot water in distribution pipework. Predictions were obtained on the effects of insulating pipework and the improvements in system efficiency for various daily draw-off patterns.

  11. Solar Hot Water for Motor Inn--Texas City, Texas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    Final report describes solar domestic-hot-water heater installation at LaQuinta Motor Inn, Texas City, Texas which furnished 63% of total hot-water load of new 98-unit inn. Report presents a description of system, drawings and photographs of collectors, operations and maintenance instructions, manufacturers' specifications for pumps, and an engineer's report on performance.

  12. Analysis Model for Domestic Hot Water Distribution Systems: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Maguire, J.; Krarti, M.; Fang, X.

    2011-11-01

    A thermal model was developed to estimate the energy losses from prototypical domestic hot water (DHW) distribution systems for homes. The developed model, using the TRNSYS simulation software, allows researchers and designers to better evaluate the performance of hot water distribution systems in homes. Modeling results were compared with past experimental study results and showed good agreement.

  13. Prototype solar heating and cooling systems including potable hot water

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    Progress is reviewed in the development, delivery, and support of two prototype solar heating and cooling systems including potable hot water. The system consisted of the following subsystems: collector, auxiliary heating, potable hot water, storage, control, transport, and government-furnished site data acquisition.

  14. Prototype solar heating and cooling systems including potable hot water

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    These combined quarterly reports summarize the activities from November 1977 through September 1978, and over the progress made in the development, delivery and support of two prototype solar heating and cooling systems including potable hot water. The system consists of the following subsystems: solar collector, auxiliary heating, potable hot water, storage, control, transport, and government-furnished site data acquisition.

  15. 21 CFR 880.6085 - Hot/cold water bottle.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Hot/cold water bottle. 880.6085 Section 880.6085 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GENERAL HOSPITAL AND PERSONAL USE DEVICES General Hospital and Personal Use Miscellaneous Devices § 880.6085 Hot/cold water bottle....

  16. Too hot to handle? Hot water bottle injuries in Sydney, Australia.

    PubMed

    Goltsman, David; Li, Zhe; Bruce, Eleanor; Darton, Anne; Thornbury, Kelly; Maitz, Peter K M; Kennedy, Peter

    2015-06-01

    Hot water bottles are frequently used in the community as a source of warmth, and to alleviate a number of medical symptoms. In Australia it is believed that over 500,000 water bottles are sold annually (Whittam et al., 2010). This simple treatment is known to result in significant burns and has led to mandatory labeling requirements on hot water bottles in Australia. Despite this, few published studies have documented the incidence and nature of burns sustained through their use. This study aimed to assess the incidence, causation and outcome of hot water bottle burns presenting to a major burn trauma unit in Sydney (Australia). The New South Wales Agency for Clinical Innovation Statewide Burn Injury database and admission data to the Concord Hospital Burns Injury Unit (major treatment unit) provided information on hot water bottle burns occurring between 2005 and 2013. Demographic details, cause of burn, burn depth, total burn surface area (%TBSA), and outcome of burn were ascertained. In order to assess the burn potential of hot water bottles, a separate study examined the thermic properties of hot water bottles in 'real life' scenarios. There were 155 hot water bottle burn presentations resulting in 41 admissions and 24 grafts. The majority of patients were female, and most burns resulted from appliance rupture when used for local pain relief. Patients had an average TBSA of 2.4%. Burns patients were slightly more likely to reside in areas with greater socio-economic disadvantage. In real life scenarios, hot water bottles were shown to retain heat over 50°C for at least 3 hours (h). Hot water bottles are a source of common and preventable burns in the community, with women being more at risk than men. Hot water bottles may retain harmful levels of heat over an extended period of time. Additional labeling requirements pertaining to the longevity of hot water bottles and their use among people especially at risk of burns (i.e. children, the elderly, patients who

  17. dc-ac hot-wire procedure for determining thermophysical properties under pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nilsson, O.; Sandberg, O.; Bäckström, G.

    1986-09-01

    The paper describes a new hot-wire method for simultaneous determination of thermal conductivity and heat capacity per unit volume of electrically insulating liquids and solids under pressure. The method uses dc heating of the hot wire, whereas the temperature increase is recorded by an ac bridge circuit. The temperature data obtained are analyzed using the exact solution instead of the commonly used long time approximation. The procedure was tested on a number of alcohols and water and the accuracy was found to be 1.5%. New data on glycerol up to 1.5 GPa are presented. The appearance of an automagnetoresistance effect when Ni is employed as hot-wire probe is discussed.

  18. Solar Hot Water for an Industrial Laundry--Fresno, California

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    Final report describes an integrated wastewater-heat recovery system and solar preheating system to supply part of hot-water requirements of an industrial laundry. Large retrofit solar-water-heating system uses lightweight collectors.

  19. Residential solar hot water system--Tempe, Arizona

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    Domestic hot water for single story home is heated by two 4 by 8 foot solar collectors. Solar energy saved 5.54 million Btu in six month period; savings with increased water consumption would be significantly higher.

  20. Residential solar hot water system--Tempe, Arizona

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    Domestic hot water for single story home is heated by two 4 by 8 foot solar collectors. Solar energy saved 5.54 million Btu in six month period; savings with increased water consumption would be significantly higher.

  1. Hot water epilepsy in a pregnant woman: a case report.

    PubMed

    Milanlıoğlu, Aysel; Tombul, Temel; Sayın, Refah

    2010-01-01

    Hot water epilepsy is a unique form of reflex epilepsy precipitated by the stimulus of bathing with hot water poured over the head. It is mostly seen in infants and children, with a predominance in males. Unlikely, we present a 32-year-old pregnancy woman with the incipient of reflex seizures triggered by pouring hot water over the head while having a bath during the gestation period and treated successfully with carbamazepine 400 mg/day therapy. Hot water epilepsy is known as a benign and self-limited reflex epilepsy, by firstly avoiding hot water or long showers and secondly using intermittent benzodiazepines or conventional antiepileptic drugs, may be sufficient to be seizure-free.

  2. Hot Water Epilepsy in a Pregnant Woman: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Milanlıoğlu, Aysel; Tombul, Temel; Sayın, Refah

    2010-01-01

    Hot water epilepsy is a unique form of reflex epilepsy precipitated by the stimulus of bathing with hot water poured over the head. It is mostly seen in infants and children, with a predominance in males. Unlikely, we present a 32-year-old pregnancy woman with the incipient of reflex seizures triggered by pouring hot water over the head while having a bath during the gestation period and treated successfully with carbamazepine 400 mg/day therapy. Hot water epilepsy is known as a benign and self-limited reflex epilepsy, by firstly avoiding hot water or long showers and secondly using intermittent benzodiazepines or conventional antiepileptic drugs, may be sufficient to be seizure-free. PMID:21209736

  3. Bonding changes in hot fluid hydrogen at megabar pressures

    PubMed Central

    Subramanian, Natarajan; Goncharov, Alexander F.; Struzhkin, Viktor V.; Somayazulu, Maddury; Hemley, Russell J.

    2011-01-01

    Raman spectroscopy in laser-heated diamond anvil cells has been employed to probe the bonding state and phase diagram of dense hydrogen up to 140 GPa and 1,500 K. The measurements were made possible as a result of the development of new techniques for containing and probing the hot, dense fluid, which is of fundamental importance in physics, planetary science, and astrophysics. A pronounced discontinuous softening of the molecular vibron was found at elevated temperatures along with a large broadening and decrease in intensity of the roton bands. These phenomena indicate the existence of a state of the fluid having significantly modified intramolecular bonding. The results are consistent with the existence of a pressure-induced transformation in the fluid related to the presence of a temperature maximum in the melting line as a function of pressure. PMID:21447715

  4. High-pressure combinatorial process integrating hot isostatic pressing.

    PubMed

    Fujimoto, Kenjiro; Morita, Hiroki; Goshima, Yuji; Ito, Shigeru

    2013-12-09

    A high-pressure combinatorial process integrating hot isostatic pressing (HIP) was developed by providing a reaction vessel with a high-pressure tightness based on a commercial flange. The reaction vessel can be used up to 200 MPa and 500 °C under HIP processing condition. Preparation of spinel-type MgAl2O4 from Mg(OH)2, Al(OH)3 and AlOOH was performed using the reaction vessel under 200 MPa and 500 °C as demonstration. The entire powder library was characterized using powder X-ray diffraction patterns, and the single phase of spinel-type MgAl2O4 was obtained from Mg(OH)2+Al(OH)3. These assessments corresponded with previously published data.

  5. New printed circuit heat exchanger with S-shaped fins for hot water supplier

    SciTech Connect

    Ngo, Tri Lam; Kato, Yasuyoshi; Nikitin, Konstantin; Tsuzuki, Nobuyoshi

    2006-08-15

    A new PCHE with an S-shaped fin configuration was applied to a hot water supplier in which cold water of 7{sup o}C is warmed to 90{sup o}C through heat-exchange with supercritical CO{sub 2} of 118{sup o}C and 11.5MPa pressure. The fin and plate configurations were determined using 3D CFD simulations for the CO{sub 2} side and H{sub 2}O side and the thermal-hydraulic performance of hot water supplier was evaluated. Compared with a hot water supplier that is currently used in a residential heat pump, the new PCHE provides about 3.3 times less volume; and lower pressure drop by 37% in the CO{sub 2} side and by 10 times in H{sub 2}O side. (author)

  6. Solar hot water system installed at Day's Lodge, Atlanta, Georgia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    The solar energy hot water system installed in the Days Inns of America, Inc., Atlanta, Georgia is described. This system provides for 81 percent of the total hot water demand. There are two separate systems, each serving one building of the lodge (total of 65 suites). The entire system contains only potable city water. The 1024 square feet of Grumman Sunstream Model 332 liquid flat plate collectors and the outside piping drain whenever the collector plates approach freezing or when power is interrupted. Solar heated water from the two above ground cement lined steel tanks (1000 gallon tank) is drawn into the electric Domestic Hot Water (DHW) tanks as hot water is drawn. Electric resistance units in the DHW tanks top off the solar heated water, if needed, to reach thermostat setting.

  7. Experimental Investigation on Oil Enhancement Mechanism of Hot Water Injection in tight reservoirs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yongmao, Hao; Mingjing, Lu; Chengshun, Dong; Jianpeng, Jia; Yuliang, Su; Guanglong, Sheng

    2016-01-01

    Aimed at enhancing the oil recovery of tight reservoirs, the mechanism of hot water flooding was studied in this paper. Experiments were conducted to investigate the influence of hot water injection on oil properties, and the interaction between rock and fluid, petrophysical property of the reservoirs. Results show that with the injected water temperature increasing, the oil/water viscosity ratio falls slightly in a tight reservoir which has little effect on oil recovery. Further it shows that the volume factor of oil increases significantly which can increase the formation energy and thus raise the formation pressure. At the same time, oil/water interfacial tension decreases slightly which has a positive effect on production though the reduction is not obvious. Meanwhile, the irreducible water saturation and the residual oil saturation are both reduced, the common percolation area of two phases is widened and the general shape of the curve improves. The threshold pressure gradient that crude oil starts to flow also decreases. It relates the power function to the temperature, which means it will be easier for oil production and water injection. Further the pore characteristics of reservoir rocks improves which leads to better water displacement. Based on the experimental results and influence of temperature on different aspects of hot water injection, the flow velocity expression of two-phase of oil and water after hot water injection in tight reservoirs is obtained.

  8. Microbial silica deposition in geothermal hot waters.

    PubMed

    Inagaki, F; Motomura, Y; Ogata, S

    2003-02-01

    A combined use of molecular ecological techniques and geochemical surveys revealed that thermophilic or hyperthermophilic microorganisms living in geothermal environments are likely to be implicated in the formation of biogenic siliceous deposits. Electron microscopic observations indicated that numerous microorganism-like fabrics were preserved in naturally occurring siliceous deposits such as siliceous sinter, geyserite, and silica scale, which suggests microbial contribution to silica precipitation. Molecular phylogenetic analyses suggested that extreme thermophilic bacteria within the genera Thermus and Hydrogenobacter are predominant components among the indigenous microbial community in siliceous deposits formed in pipes and equipment of Japanese geothermal power plants. These bacteria seem to actively contribute to the rapid formation of huge siliceous deposits. Additionally, in vitro examination suggested that Thermus cells induced the precipitation of supersaturated amorphous silica during the exponential growth phase, concomitant with the production of a specific cell envelope protein. Dissolved silica in geothermal hot water may be a significant component in the maintenance of position and survival of microorganisms in limited niches.

  9. When does hot water freeze faster then cold water? A search for the Mpemba effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brownridge, James D.

    2011-01-01

    It is possible to consistently observe hot water freezing faster than cold water under certain conditions. All conditions except the initial temperature of water specimens must be the same and remain so during cooling, and the cold water must supercool to a temperature significantly lower than the temperature to which the hot water supercools. For hot water at an initial temperature of >≈80 °C and cold water at <≈20 °C, the cold water must supercool to a temperature of at least ≈5.5 °C, lower than the temperature to which hot water supercools. With these conditions satisfied, we observed initially hot water freezing before the initially cold water 28 times in 28 attempts. If the cold water does not supercool, it will freeze before the hot water because it always cools to 0 °C first regardless of the initial temperatures.

  10. Cycle Simulation of HotWater Fired Absorption Chiller

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esaki, Shuji; Iramina, Kazuyasu; Kobayashi, Takahiro; Ohnou, Masayuki; Kaneko, Toshiyuki; Soga, Takashi

    The design limits were examined to determine the lowest temperature for hot water that can be used as a heat source to drive a hot water fired absorption chiller. Advantage was taken of the fact that the cycle calculation method using the minimum temperature difference is quite effective. This minimum temperature difference was the lower of the two temperature differences used to get the logarithmic mean temperature difference that need to design the evaporator, absorber, condenser and generator in an absorption refrigerator. This report proposes a new solution algorithm employing this minimum temperature difference to make a cycle simulation of the hot water fired absorption chiller. It shows the lowest usable temperature for hot water and makes clear the chilled water and cooling water temperature conditions that can provide the lowest temperature.

  11. Tool for Generating Realistic Residential Hot Water Event Schedules: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Hendron, B.; Burch, J.; Barker, G.

    2010-08-01

    The installed energy savings for advanced residential hot water systems can depend greatly on detailed occupant use patterns. Quantifying these patterns is essential for analyzing measures such as tankless water heaters, solar hot water systems with demand-side heat exchangers, distribution system improvements, and recirculation loops. This paper describes the development of an advanced spreadsheet tool that can generate a series of year-long hot water event schedules consistent with realistic probability distributions of start time, duration and flow rate variability, clustering, fixture assignment, vacation periods, and seasonality. This paper also presents the application of the hot water event schedules in the context of an integral-collector-storage solar water heating system in a moderate climate.

  12. Diverse fragment clustering and water exclusion identify protein hot spots.

    PubMed

    Kulp, John L; Kulp, John L; Pompliano, David L; Guarnieri, Frank

    2011-07-20

    Simulated annealing of chemical potential located the highest affinity positions of eight organic probes and water on eight static structures of hen egg white lysozyme (HEWL) in various conformational states. In all HELW conformations, a diverse set of organic probes clustered in the known binding site (hot spot). Fragment clusters at other locations were excluded by tightly-bound waters so that only the hot-spot cluster remained in each case. The location of the hot spot was correctly predicted irrespective of the protein conformation and without accounting for protein flexibility during the simulations. Any one of the static structures could have been used to locate the hot spot. A site on a protein where a diversity of organic probes is calculated to cluster, but where water specifically does not bind, identifies a potential small-molecule binding site or protein-protein interaction hot spot.

  13. Preliminary design package for solar heating and hot water system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    Two prototype solar heating and hot water systems for use in single-family dwellings or commercial buildings were designed. Subsystems included are: collector, storage, transport, hot water, auxiliary energy, and government-furnished site data acquisition. The systems are designed for Yosemite, California, and Pueblo, Colorado. The necessary information to evaluate the preliminary design for these solar heating and hot water systems is presented. Included are a proposed instrumentation plan, a training program, hazard analysis, preliminary design drawings, and other information about the design of the system.

  14. High-pressure water facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    NASA Test Operations Group employees, from left, Todd Pearson, Tim Delcuze and Rodney Wilkinson maintain a water pump in Stennis Space Center's high-pressure water facility. The three were part of a group of employees who rode out Hurricane Katrina at the facility and helped protect NASA's rocket engine test complex.

  15. High-pressure water facility

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2006-02-15

    NASA Test Operations Group employees, from left, Todd Pearson, Tim Delcuze and Rodney Wilkinson maintain a water pump in Stennis Space Center's high-pressure water facility. The three were part of a group of employees who rode out Hurricane Katrina at the facility and helped protect NASA's rocket engine test complex.

  16. High-pressure water facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    NASA Test Operations Group employees, from left, Todd Pearson, Tim Delcuze and Rodney Wilkinson maintain a water pump in Stennis Space Center's high-pressure water facility. The three were part of a group of employees who rode out Hurricane Katrina at the facility and helped protect NASA's rocket engine test complex.

  17. Uranium in hot water tanks: a source of TENORM.

    PubMed

    DeVol, T A; Woodruff, R L

    2004-12-01

    Uranium deposits were detected inside hot water tanks using gamma-ray spectroscopic techniques and corroborated by the difference in the uranium concentration of the groundwater entering and leaving the hot water tanks. In-situ gamma-ray spectroscopy was performed using a transportable high-purity germanium (HPGe) gamma-ray spectrometer to estimate the mass of uranium in the hot water tanks. Gamma-ray spectroscopic analyses of hot water tanks in four residences with groundwater uranium concentration between 732 and 7,667 mug L revealed an estimated 3.5 to 69 g of uranium in each hot water tank. The uranium deposit within the tanks was indicated by the 143.8, 163.4, and 185.7 keV gamma rays of U and confirmed with the 63.3, 92.3, and 92.8 keV gamma rays of Th as well as the 1,001 keV peak of Pa. An average decrease in uranium concentration of 23% was observed in the groundwater that passed through the hot water tanks. Additionally, once "uranium free" water entered the hot water tanks, the uranium deposits within the tanks resulted in an increase in the uranium concentration in the effluent water. The groundwater had an alkalinity in the range of 46-96 mg L as CaCO3 and a pH range of 7.3-8.1. The accumulation of uranium in these hot water tanks results in them being classified as technologically enhanced naturally occurring radioactive materials (TENORM).

  18. Recovery of energy from geothermal brine and other hot water sources

    DOEpatents

    Wahl, III, Edward F.; Boucher, Frederic B.

    1981-01-01

    Process and system for recovery of energy from geothermal brines and other hot water sources, by direct contact heat exchange between the brine or hot water, and an immiscible working fluid, e.g. a hydrocarbon such as isobutane, in a heat exchange column, the brine or hot water therein flowing countercurrent to the flow of the working fluid. The column can be operated at subcritical, critical or above the critical pressure of the working fluid. Preferably, the column is provided with a plurality of sieve plates, and the heat exchange process and column, e.g. with respect to the design of such plates, number of plates employed, spacing between plates, area thereof, column diameter, and the like, are designed to achieve maximum throughput of brine or hot water and reduction in temperature differential at the respective stages or plates between the brine or hot water and the working fluid, and so minimize lost work and maximize efficiency, and minimize scale deposition from hot water containing fluid including salts, such as brine. Maximum throughput approximates minimum cost of electricity which can be produced by conversion of the recovered thermal energy to electrical energy.

  19. Water cooled static pressure probe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lagen, Nicholas T. (Inventor); Eves, John W. (Inventor); Reece, Garland D. (Inventor); Geissinger, Steve L. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    An improved static pressure probe containing a water cooling mechanism is disclosed. This probe has a hollow interior containing a central coolant tube and multiple individual pressure measurement tubes connected to holes placed on the exterior. Coolant from the central tube symmetrically immerses the interior of the probe, allowing it to sustain high temperature (in the region of 2500 F) supersonic jet flow indefinitely, while still recording accurate pressure data. The coolant exits the probe body by way of a reservoir attached to the aft of the probe. The pressure measurement tubes are joined to a single, larger manifold in the reservoir. This manifold is attached to a pressure transducer that records the average static pressure.

  20. Hot flashes and blood pressure in middle-aged Japanese women.

    PubMed

    Kagitani, Hideaki; Asou, Yosuke; Ishihara, Noriko; Hoshide, Satoshi; Kario, Kazuomi

    2014-04-01

    Some Western studies have reported that hot flashes are risk factors of cardiovascular diseases. We aimed to investigate the association between hot flashes and blood pressure in middle-aged Japanese women. Annual medical checkup data from 1,058 healthy middle-aged Japanese women were analyzed. Nonstandardized coefficients (B), which were calculated by multiple linear regression analysis, were used to evaluate differences in blood pressure resulting from hot flashes. The prevalence of current hot flashes was 20.2%, and the experience of hot flashes was significantly more frequent according to age (P < 0.01). Systolic blood pressure was significantly higher in women currently experiencing hot flashes and in those experiencing them within the previous month than in those without such experience (B = 6.0, P < 0.01; B = 3.7, P < 0.05, respectively). Diastolic blood pressure was significantly higher in women currently experiencing hot flashes than in those without such experience (B = 3.9; P < 0.01). Among current smokers, systolic blood pressure was 16.4mm Hg higher in those currently experiencing hot flashes (P < 0.01), but this difference was less among nonsmokers (P < 0.05). In addition, pulse pressure was 10.5mm Hg higher in current smokers currently experiencing hot flashes than in other current smokers (P < 0.01), but not among nonsmokers. In middle-aged Japanese women, hot flashes were associated with higher pulse pressure among smokers but not among nonsmokers.

  1. View of Inverted Siphon crossing Hot Water (or White) Canyon. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View of Inverted Siphon crossing Hot Water (or White) Canyon. Looking northeast - Childs-Irving Hydroelectric Project, Irving System, Inverted Siphon, Forest Service Road 708/502, Camp Verde, Yavapai County, AZ

  2. Temperature field study of hot water circulation pump shaft system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Y. Y.; Kong, F. Y.; Daun, X. H.; Zhao, R. J.; Hu, Q. L.

    2016-05-01

    In the process of engineering application under the condition of hot water circulation pump, problems of stress concentration caused by the temperature rise may happen. In order to study the temperature field in bearing and electric motor chamber of the hot water circulation pump and optimize the structure, in present paper, the model of the shaft system is created through CREO. The model is analyzed by ANSYS workbench, in which the thermal boundary conditions are applied to calculate, which include the calorific values from the bearings, the thermal loss from electric motor and the temperature from the transporting medium. From the result, the finite element model can reflect the distribution of thermal field in hot water circulation pump. Further, the results show that the maximum temperature locates in the bearing chamber.The theoretical guidance for the electric motor heat dissipation design of the hot water circulation pump can be achieved.

  3. Classifications of central solar domestic hot water systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, J. Y.; Hao, B.; Peng, C.; Wang, S. S.

    2016-08-01

    Currently, there are many means by which to classify solar domestic hot water systems, which are often categorized according to their scope of supply, solar collector positions, and type of heat storage tank. However, the lack of systematic and scientific classification as well as the general disregard of the thermal performance of the auxiliary heat source is important to DHW systems. Thus, the primary focus of this paper is to determine a classification system for solar domestic hot water systems based on the positions of the solar collector and auxiliary heating device, both respectively and in combination. Field-testing data regarding many central solar DHW systems demonstrates that the position of the auxiliary heat source clearly reflects the operational energy consumption. The consumption of collective auxiliary heating hot water system is much higher than individual auxiliary heating hot water system. In addition, costs are significantly reduced by the separation of the heat storage tank and the auxiliary heating device.

  4. Design and installation of solar heating and hot water systems

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, J.R.

    1983-01-01

    A no-nonsense explanation of information on the use of solar energy for heating, cooling, and producing hot water. The work is both scholarly and practical. Background of high school algebra is the only mathematics expected. Worked examples but no exercises. Contents: Solar radiation. Heating loads. Design and analysis of flat-place liquid-heating collectors. Flat-plate air-heating collectors. Evacuated solar collectors. Solar hot water systems. Solar ponds. Active solar heating and cooling systems.

  5. Improving the efficiency of domestic hot-water systems

    SciTech Connect

    Stephen, F.R.

    1986-03-01

    The siting of hot-water cylinders remote from taps, and the use of long interconnecting pipework, does not give energy-efficient systems. A computer program was developed to simulate the domestic hot-water system in dwellings, and is used to predict the effects of several parameters such as cylinder insulation, pipework insulation and dead-leg length. An efficient system would comprise a foam-insulated cylinder, appropriately sized, feeding taps through insulated pipework; those parameters are discussed.

  6. Solar hot water system installed at Anderson, South Carolina

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    A description is given of the solar energy hot water system installed in the Days Inns of America, Inc., at Anderson, South Carolina. The building is a low-rise, two-story 114-room motel. The solar system was designed to provide 40 percent of the total hot water demand. The collector is a flat plate, liquid with an area of 750 square feet. Operation of this system was begun in November 1977, and has performed flawlessly for one year.

  7. Motel solar-hot-water system--Dallas, Texas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    Report describes system which meets 64 percent of hot water requirements of 120 room motel. Key system components include 1,000 square foot, roof-mounted collector array, 1,000 gallon storage tank, tube-in-shell heat exchanger, and three domestic hot-water tanks. Report contains calibration instructions for differential temperature controllers, shutdown procedures, and operation guidelines, performance analysis, and manufacturers' maintenance literature.

  8. Prototype solar heating and cooling systems, including potable hot water

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bloomquist, D.; Oonk, R. L.

    1977-01-01

    Progress made in the development, delivery, and support of two prototype solar heating and cooling systems including potable hot water is reported. The system consists of the following subsystems: collector, auxiliary heating, potable hot water, storage, control, transport, and government-furnished site data acquisition. A comparison of the proposed Solaron Heat Pump and Solar Desiccant Heating and Cooling Systems, installation drawings, data on the Akron House at Akron, Ohio, and other program activities are included.

  9. Solar hot water system installed at Las Vegas, Nevada

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    A solar energy hot water system installed in a motor inn at Las Vegas, Nevada is described. The inn is a three story building with a flat roof for installation of the solar panels. The system consists of 1,200 square feet of liquid flat plate collectors, a 2,500 gallon insulated vertical steel storage tank, two heat exchangers, and pumps and controls. The system was designed to supply approximately 74 percent of the total hot water load.

  10. Hot tap water legislation in the United States.

    PubMed

    Peck, Michael; Brewer, Ann Chang; Pressman, Melissa; Blank, Elizabeth; Mickalide, Angela

    2010-01-01

    Excessively hot tap water results in an estimated 1500 hospital admissions and up to 50 deaths in the United States every year. This study reviewed the current state of tap water temperature regulation in the United States, including the model plumbing code standards on which state legislation in this area is based; assessed the level of public awareness regarding the risk, prevalence, and severity of such injuries; and identified specific prevention measures. Relevant information was obtained from state legislative codes, model code development organizations, the US Consumer Product Safety Commission, and a survey of knowledge, attitudes, and behaviors related to tap water temperature safety. Model building and plumbing codes related to tap water temperature regulation and their subsequent adoption by state legislatures vary widely across the United States. The states also vary with respect to the authority provided to lower levels of government (counties or municipalities) to modify and enforce code provisions. Public awareness of hot tap water hazards and implementation of preventive measures are limited. A broader and more uniform application of codes for regulating tap water temperature in both institutional and residential settings can be achieved through input from affected users, government agencies, legislators, advocacy organizations, and the general public. Safer hot water temperatures and a reduction in scald injuries can be achieved through regulating hot water temperature level at the thermostat, installing temperature-regulating valves at the tap, and raising public awareness of hot tap water hazards.

  11. Rare SLC1A1 variants in hot water epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Karan, Kalpita Rashimi; Satishchandra, P; Sinha, Sanjib; Anand, Anuranjan

    2017-03-21

    Hot water epilepsy is sensory epilepsy, wherein seizures are triggered by an unusual stimulus: contact with hot water. Although genetic factors contribute to the etiology of hot water epilepsy, molecular underpinnings of the disorder remain largely unknown. We aimed to identify the molecular genetic basis of the disorder by studying families with two or more of their members affected with hot water epilepsy. Using a combination of genome-wide linkage mapping and whole exome sequencing, a missense variant was identified in SLC1A1 in a three-generation family. Further, we examined SLC1A1in probands of 98 apparently unrelated HWE families with positive histories of seizures provoked by contact with hot water. In doing so, we found three rare variants, p.Asp174Asn, p.Val251Ile and p.Ile304Met in the gene. SLC1A1 is a neuronal glutamate transporter which limits excitotoxicity and its loss-of-function leads to age-dependent neurodegeneration. We examined functional attributes of the variants in cultured mammalian cells. All three non-synonymous variants affected glutamate uptake, exhibited altered glutamate kinetics and anion conductance properties of SLC1A1. These observations provide insights into the molecular basis of hot water epilepsy and show the role of SLC1A1 variants in this intriguing neurobehavioral disorder.

  12. Hot spots and hot moments in riparian zones: Potential for improved water quality management

    Treesearch

    Philippe Vidon; Craig Allan; Douglas Burns; Tim P. Duval; Noel Gurwick; Shreeram Inamdar; Richard Lowrance; Judy Okay; Durelle Scott; Stephen Sebestyen

    2010-01-01

    Biogeochemical and hydrological processes in riparian zones regulate contaminant movement to receiving waters and often mitigate the impact of upland sources of contaminants on water quality. These heterogeneous processes have recently been conceptualized as "hot spots and moments" of retention, degradation, or production. Nevertheless, studies investigating...

  13. Effect of extraction vessel geometry and flow homogeneity on recoveries of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in pressurised hot water extraction.

    PubMed

    Andersson, Terhi; Pihtsalmi, Tina; Hartonen, Kari; Hyötyläinen, Tuulia; Riekkola, Marja-Liisa

    2003-08-01

    Extraction vessels of different length, internal diameter and volume were tested to evaluate the effect of vessel geometry on the recovery of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) from certified sediment by pressurised hot water extraction (PHWE). Pressurised hot water extractions were performed at 300 degrees C with both liquid water (pressure 250 kg cm(-2)) and steam (pressure 50 kg cm(-2)). In addition, the effects on the recoveries of sediment packing and water flow direction were examined in two vessels. The geometry of the vessel, the packing of the sediment and the flow direction of the water had only minor effect on the recoveries.

  14. Concentration of Mycobacterium avium by hospital hot water systems.

    PubMed

    du Moulin, G C; Stottmeier, K D; Pelletier, P A; Tsang, A Y; Hedley-Whyte, J

    1988-09-16

    Water from 34 sites on two temporarily vacant hospital floors was analyzed for the presence of mycobacteria. These sites included 18 cold water taps and 16 hot water taps, including shower heads. A total of 14 sites (41%) demonstrated the presence of Mycobacterium avium as confirmed by biochemical characterization, DNA/rRNA probe analysis, and seroagglutination. Of positive sites, 11 were hot water sources with an average temperature of 55 degrees C and yielding up to 500 colony-forming units per 100 mL. Seven of 11 strains analyzed for glycolipid antigens were identified with the type 4 serovar, the preponderant serovar of M avium in patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome from the Boston area. Potable hot water systems, particularly those that generate aerosols, may contain concentrations of M avium greater than those found in cold water systems and could serve as an environmental source for colonization and infection of immunocompromised persons.

  15. Synthesis of bacterial cellulose using hot water extracted wood sugars.

    PubMed

    Erbas Kiziltas, Esra; Kiziltas, Alper; Gardner, Douglas J

    2015-06-25

    Bacterial cellulose (BC), a type of nanopolymer produced by Acetobacter xylinum is a nanostructured material with unique properties and wide applicability. However, a standard medium used for the cultivation of BC, the Hestrin-Schramm medium, is expensive and prevents wide scale extension of BC applications. In this research, a relatively low-cost culture media was successfully developed from wood hot water extracts for the Acetobacter xylinus 23769 strain. Hot water extract (HWE) is a residual material originating from pulp mills and lignocellulosic biorefineries and consists of mainly monomeric sugars, organic acids and organics. The effects of different pH (5, 6, 7 and 8) and temperatures (26, 28 and 30°C) were also examined in this research. There were no significant differences in the crystallinity and the recorded Iα fraction of cellulose produced between Hestrin-Schramm and the HWE medium. The maximum production of 0.15g/l of BC was obtained at a pH of 8 and temperature of 28°C. Glucose and xylose in the HWE were the main nutrient sources utilized in all BC cultivations based on high-pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC) results. HWE was shown to be a suitable carbon source for BC production, and a process was established for BC production from lignocellulosic feedstocks without using any modification of the HWE. HWE is an abundant and relatively inexpensive forest by-product. Using HWE for BC production could reduce burdens on the environment and also, achieve the goal of large scale BC production at low cost without using added culture nutrients. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. TYPICAL HOT WATER DRAW PATTERNS BASED ON FIELD DATA

    SciTech Connect

    Lutz, Jim; Melody, Moya

    2012-11-08

    There is significant variation in hot water use and draw patterns among households. This report describes typical hot water use patterns in single-family residences in North America. We found that daily hot water use is highly variable both among residences and within the same residence. We compared the results of our analysis of the field data to the conditions and draw patterns established in the current U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) test procedure for residential water heaters. The results show a higher number of smaller draws at lower flow rates than used in the test procedure. The data from which the draw patterns were developed were obtained from 12 separate field studies. This report describes the ways in which we managed, cleaned, and analyzed the data and the results of our data analysis. After preparing the data, we used the complete data set to analyze inlet and outlet water temperatures. Then we divided the data into three clusters reflecting house configurations that demonstrated small, medium, or large median daily hot water use. We developed the three clusters partly to reflect efforts of the ASHRAE standard project committee (SPC) 118.2 to revise the test procedure for residential water heaters to incorporate a range of draw patterns. ASHRAE SPC 118.2 has identified the need to separately evaluate at least three, and perhaps as many as five, different water heater capacities. We analyzed the daily hot water use data within each cluster in terms of volume and number of hot water draws. The daily draw patterns in each cluster were characterized using distributions for volume of draws, duration of draws, time since previous draw, and flow rates.

  17. Assessment of Thermal Protection Afforded by Hot Water Diving Suits

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-07-03

    Assessment of Thermal Protect! " Afforded by Hot Water Diving Suits A AA L. A. Kuehn Diver thermal comfort in cold water is presently only...with proper control oj inlet suit water flow% and temperature, as well as heating of inspired gas, this suit technology suffices for thermal comfort for...technology provides in part to the convective heat loss that it prpsents, sustained long-term thermal comfort in cold water, Webb (W) has defined a

  18. Is hot water immersion an effective treatment for marine envenomation?

    PubMed Central

    Atkinson, P R T; Boyle, A; Hartin, D; McAuley, D

    2006-01-01

    Envenomation by marine creatures is common. As more people dive and snorkel for leisure, the incidence of envenomation injuries presenting to emergency departments has increased. Although most serious envenomations occur in the temperate or tropical waters of the Indo‐Pacific region, North American and European waters also provide a habitat for many stinging creatures. Marine envenomations can be classified as either surface stings or puncture wounds. Antivenom is available for a limited number of specific marine creatures. Various other treatments such as vinegar, fig juice, boiled cactus, heated stones, hot urine, hot water, and ice have been proposed, although many have little scientific basis. The use of heat therapies, previously reserved for penetrating fish spine injuries, has been suggested as treatment for an increasing variety of marine envenomation. This paper reviews the evidence for the effectiveness of hot water immersion (HWI) and other heat therapies in the management of patients presenting with pain due to marine envenomation. PMID:16794088

  19. Is hot water immersion an effective treatment for marine envenomation?

    PubMed

    Atkinson, P R T; Boyle, A; Hartin, D; McAuley, D

    2006-07-01

    Envenomation by marine creatures is common. As more people dive and snorkel for leisure, the incidence of envenomation injuries presenting to emergency departments has increased. Although most serious envenomations occur in the temperate or tropical waters of the Indo-Pacific region, North American and European waters also provide a habitat for many stinging creatures. Marine envenomations can be classified as either surface stings or puncture wounds. Antivenom is available for a limited number of specific marine creatures. Various other treatments such as vinegar, fig juice, boiled cactus, heated stones, hot urine, hot water, and ice have been proposed, although many have little scientific basis. The use of heat therapies, previously reserved for penetrating fish spine injuries, has been suggested as treatment for an increasing variety of marine envenomation. This paper reviews the evidence for the effectiveness of hot water immersion (HWI) and other heat therapies in the management of patients presenting with pain due to marine envenomation.

  20. Modeling patterns of hot water use in households

    SciTech Connect

    Lutz, J.D.; Liu, Xiaomin; McMahon, J.E.

    1996-11-01

    This report presents a detailed model of hot water use patterns in individual household. The model improves upon an existing model by including the effects of four conditions that were previously unaccounted for: the absence of a clothes washer; the absence of a dishwasher; a household consisting of seniors only; and a household that does not pay for its own hot water use. Although these four conditions can significantly affect residential hot water use, and have been noted in other studies, this is the first time that they have been incorporated into a detailed model. This model allows detailed evaluation of the impact of potential efficiency standards for water heaters and other market transformation policies. 21 refs., 3 figs., 10 tabs.

  1. Modeling patterns of hot water use in households

    SciTech Connect

    Lutz, James D.; Liu, Xiaomin; McMahon, James E.; Dunham, Camilla; Shown, Leslie J.; McCure, Quandra T.

    1996-01-01

    This report presents a detailed model of hot water use patterns in individual households. The model improves upon an existing model by including the effects of four conditions that were previously unaccounted for: the absence of a clothes washer; the absence of a dishwasher; a household consisting of seniors only; and a household that does not pay for its own hot water use. Although these four conditions can significantly affect residential hot water use, and have been noted in other studies, this is the first time that they have been incorporated into a detailed model. This model allows detailed evaluation of the impact of potential efficiency standards for water heaters and other market transformation policies.

  2. Water resources of Grant and Hot Spring Counties, Arkansas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Halberg, Henry N.; Bryant, Charles T.; Hines, Marion S.

    1968-01-01

    In Grant and Hot Spring Counties the Ouachita, Saline, and Caddo Rivers yield large quantities of soft, good-quality water. Small streams in southeastern Hot Spring County and some of the small streams in the Ouachita Mountains have relatively high base flow; in Grant County small streams yield little water during dry periods. At times, sewage and mine drainage pollute the Ouachiba River from the Garland County line to a point a few miles below Lake Catherine. At low flow, Hurricane Creek water is unfit for most uses. The Sparta Sand, the principal aquifer, yields as much as 8.50 gpm of soft water in Grant County. The Carrizo Sand and Cane River Formation are potentially important aquifers in Grant County and southeastern Hot Spring County. The Wilcox Group yields as much as 300 gpm of fresh water in southeastern Hot Spring County and southwestern Grant County; in the rest of Grant County its water is brackish. The alluvium along .the principal streams and ,the consolidated rocks of the Ouachita Mountains yield small quantities of water that vary in quality from place to place. Some of .the water from the alluvium has high nitrate content and may be a hazard to health.

  3. Solar hot water system installed at Day's Lodge, Atlanta, Georgia

    SciTech Connect

    1980-09-01

    The solar energy hot water system installed in the Days Inns of America, Inc., Day's Lodge I-85 and Shallowford Road, NE Atlanta, Georgia is described. This system is one of eleven systems planned under this grant and was designed to provide for 81% of the total hot water demand. There are two separate systems, each serving one building of the lodge (total of 65 suites). The entire system contains only potable city water. The 1024 square feet of Grumman Sunstream Model 332 liquid flat plate collectors and the outside piping drains whenever the collector plates approach freezing or when power is interrupted. Solar heated water from the two above ground cement lined steel tanks (1000 gallon tank) is drawn into the electric domestic hot water (DHW) tanks as hot water is drawn. Electric resistance units in the DHW tanks top off the solar heated water, if needed, to reach thermostat setting. Operation of this system was begun in August, 1979. The solar components were partly funded ($18,042 of $36,084 cost) by the Department of Energy.

  4. Small-scale Geothermal Power Plants Using Hot Spring Water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tosha, T.; Osato, K.; Kiuchi, T.; Miida, H.; Okumura, T.; Nakashima, H.

    2013-12-01

    The installed capacity of the geothermal power plants has been summed up to be about 515MW in Japan. However, the electricity generated by the geothermal resources only contributes to 0.2% of the whole electricity supply. After the catastrophic earthquake and tsunami devastated the Pacific coast of north-eastern Japan on Friday, March 11, 2011, the Japanese government is encouraging the increase of the renewable energy supply including the geothermal. It needs, however, more than 10 years to construct the geothermal power plant with more than 10MW capacity since the commencement of the development. Adding the problem of the long lead time, high temperature fluid is mainly observed in the national parks and the high quality of the geothermal resources is limited. On the other hand hot springs are often found. The utilisation of the low temperature hot water becomes worthy of notice. The low temperature hot water is traditionally used for bathing and there are many hot springs in Japan. Some of the springs have enough temperature and enthalpy to turn the geothermal turbine but a new technology of the binary power generation makes the lower temp fluid to generate electricity. Large power generators with the binary technology are already installed in many geothermal fields in the world. In the recent days small-scale geothermal binary generators with several tens to hundreds kW capacity are developed, which are originally used by the waste heat energy in an iron factory and so on. The newly developed binary unit is compact suitable for the installation in a Japanese inn but there are the restrictions for the temperature of the hot water and the working fluid. The binary power unit using alternatives for chlorofluorocarbon as the working fluid is relatively free from the restriction. KOBELCO, a company of the Kobe Steel Group, designed and developed the binary power unit with an alternative for chlorofluorocarbon. The unit has a 70 MW class electric generator. Three

  5. Intractable rectal stricture caused by hot water enema.

    PubMed

    Kye, Bong-Hyeon; Kim, Hyung-Jin; Lee, Kang Moon; Cho, Hyeon-Min

    2011-11-01

    Rectal burns caused by hot water enema have been reported only occasionally and the majority of them were treated in a conservative manner. Although intractable rectal stricture caused by rectal burn is rare, it may be treated by endoscopic intervention or surgery. A 52-year-old woman who had used various methods of enema to treat her chronic constipation eventually undertook a hot water enema herself. After that, anal pain and constipation became aggravated prompting her to visit our clinic. Although various nonoperative treatments including endoscopic stenting were performed, her obstructive symptom did not improve and endoscopic findings had not changed. Hence, we performed a laparoscopic proctosigmoidectomy and transanal coloanal anastomosis with ileal diversion to treat the disease, and as a result, her obstructive symptom improved well. Corrective surgery such as resection of involved segment with anastomosis may be beneficial in relieving obstructive symptoms of an intractable rectal stricture caused by hot water enema.

  6. Intractable rectal stricture caused by hot water enema

    PubMed Central

    Kye, Bong-Hyeon; Kim, Hyung-Jin; Lee, Kang Moon

    2011-01-01

    Rectal burns caused by hot water enema have been reported only occasionally and the majority of them were treated in a conservative manner. Although intractable rectal stricture caused by rectal burn is rare, it may be treated by endoscopic intervention or surgery. A 52-year-old woman who had used various methods of enema to treat her chronic constipation eventually undertook a hot water enema herself. After that, anal pain and constipation became aggravated prompting her to visit our clinic. Although various nonoperative treatments including endoscopic stenting were performed, her obstructive symptom did not improve and endoscopic findings had not changed. Hence, we performed a laparoscopic proctosigmoidectomy and transanal coloanal anastomosis with ileal diversion to treat the disease, and as a result, her obstructive symptom improved well. Corrective surgery such as resection of involved segment with anastomosis may be beneficial in relieving obstructive symptoms of an intractable rectal stricture caused by hot water enema. PMID:22148129

  7. Mycobacterium avium complex in day care hot water systems, and persistence of live cells and DNA in hot water pipes.

    PubMed

    Bukh, Annette S; Roslev, Peter

    2014-04-01

    The Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) is a group of opportunistic human pathogens that may thrive in engineered water systems. MAC has been shown to occur in drinking water supplies based on surface water, but less is known about the occurrence and persistence of live cells and DNA in public hot water systems based on groundwater. In this study, we examined the occurrence of MAC in hot water systems of public day care centers and determined the persistence of live and dead M. avium cells and naked DNA in model systems with the modern plumbing material cross-linked polyethylene (PEX). The occurrence of MAC and co-occurrence of Legionella spp. and Legionella pneumophila were determined using cultivation and qPCR. Co-occurrences of MAC and Legionella were detected in water and/or biofilms in all hot water systems at temperatures between 40 and 54 °C. Moderate correlations were observed between abundance of culturable MAC and that of MAC genome copies, and between MAC and total eubacterial genome copies. No quantitative relationship was observed between occurrence of Legionella and that of MAC. Persistence in hot water of live and dead M. avium cells and naked DNA was studied using PEX laboratory model systems at 44 °C. Naked DNA and DNA in dead M. avium cells persisted for weeks. Live M. avium increased tenfold in water and biofilms on PEX. The results suggest that water and biofilms in groundwater-based hot water systems can constitute reservoirs of MAC, and that amplifiable naked DNA is relatively short-lived, whereas PEX plumbing material supports persistence and proliferation of M. avium.

  8. Hot gas cleanup test facility for gasification and pressurized combustion. Quarterly technical progress report, April 1--June 30, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-12-01

    This quarterly technical progress report summarizes work completed during the Seventh Quarter of the First Budget Period, April 1 through June 30, 1992, under the Department of Energy (DOE) Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC21-90MC25140 entitled ``Hot Gas Cleanup Test Facility for Gasification and Pressurized Combustion.`` The conceptual design of the facility was extended to include a within scope, phased expansion of the existing Hot Gas Cleanup Test Facility Cooperative Agreement to also address systems integration issues of hot particulate removal in advanced coal-based power generation systems. This expansion will include the consideration of the following modules at the test facility in addition to the existing Transport Reactor gas source and Hot Gas Cleanup Units: Carbonizer/Pressurized Circulating Fluidized Bed Gas Source; Hot Gas Cleanup Units to mate to all gas streams. Combustion Gas Turbine; Fuel Cell and associated gas treatment; and Externally Fired Gas Turbine/Water Augmented Gas Turbine. This expansion to the Hot Gas Cleanup Test Facility is herein referred to as the Power Systems Development Facility (PSDF).

  9. Mental workload under time pressure can trigger frequent hot flashes in menopausal women.

    PubMed

    Park, Mi Kyong; Satoh, Noriaki; Kumashiro, Masaharu

    2008-07-01

    The aim of this study is to examine the relationship between mental workload and occurrence of hot flashes. Twelve women with moderate to severe menopausal hot flashes participated in the study. Subjects participated in both a mental arithmetic task (Task) and control (Non-task) experiments. We measured heart rate, heart rate variability, blood pressure, near infrared spectroscopy, skin temperature, and skin potential level. The incidence of hot flashes was greater in Task than in Non-task. No significant differences between before, during and after hot flashes emerged for the percentage of correct responses and reaction time. However, the percentage of correct responses for two subjects among the ten who experienced hot flashes in Task substantially declined during hot flashes. Chest skin temperatures increased in both Task and Non-task during hot flashes, and regional oxygen saturation was significantly higher in Non-task than in Task. The present study suggested that mental workload under time pressure might be a risk factor for menopausal hot flashes, and the performance of most people who experienced hot flashes was not affected by hot flashes, however, work-related difficulties due to cognitive disturbance during hot flashes might arise in some people.

  10. Solar domestic hot water system installed at Texas City, Texas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    This is the final technical report of the solar energy system located at LaQuinta Motor Inn, Texas City, Texas. The system was designed to supply 63 percent of the total hot water load for a new 98 unit motor inn. The solar energy system consists of a 2100 square feet Raypack liquid flat plate collector subsystem and a 2500 gallon storage subsystem circulating hot water producing 3.67 x 10 to the 8th power Btu/year. Abstracts from the site files, specification references, drawings, installation, operation, and maintenance instructions are included.

  11. Utilization of geothermal hot water for controlled horticulture

    SciTech Connect

    Ueda, F.; Suda, U.; Shibata, T.

    1980-01-01

    Ground-surface radiator tubes and underground radiator pipes are used, so that the geothermal hot water is circulated twice in a horticulture facility to extend the available thermal range. Means of minimizing the unevenness of ground temperature is then investigated. The purpose is to seek optimal temperature conditions to use geothermal hot water for controlled horticulture in snowy and cold areas. For the experiment, insofar as practical, highly economical equipment and materials were employed. In addition, the facility was such that it could be easily set up by a horticulture producer.

  12. LARGO hot water system thermal performance test report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    The thermal performance tests and results on the LARGO Solar Hot Water System under natural environmental conditions is presented. Some objectives of these evaluations are to determine the amount of energy collected, the amount of energy delivered to the household as contributed by solar power supplied to operate the system and auxiliary power to maintain tank temperature at proper level, overall system efficiency and to determine temperature distribution within the tank. The Solar Hot Water system is termed a Dump-type because of the draining system for freeze protection. The solar collector is a single glazed flat plate. An 82-gallon domestic water heater is provided as the energy storage vessel. Water is circulated through the collector and water heater by a 5.3 GPM capacity pump, and control of the pump motor is achieved by a differential temperature controller.

  13. Pouring 'Cold Water' on Hot Accretion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rubin, A. E.

    1995-09-01

    The extensive recrystallization of type-6 OC has been interpreted as having resulted either from prograde thermal metamorphism of initially cold, unequilibrated material [1,2] or from autometamorphism due to slow cooling of material that accreted while still hot (1000-1200 K). Although the physical implausibility of hot accretion has been addressed [3], no comprehensive evaluation has been made of arguments in its favor. As shown below, these arguments are based on incomplete data, flawed experiments or improbable interpretations. Correlation between petrologic type and Ca in low-Ca pyroxene. Models of prograde metamorphism assume that, with increasing temperature, opx acquires Ca at the expense of diopside. Analyses of pyroxene in 10 H chondrites showed no correlation between Ca in pyroxene cores and increasing petrologic type [4], but more extensive data sets show such correlations [1,5,6]. A review of data for 51 OC [7] shows a progressive increase in the Wo content of low-Ca pyroxene with petrologic type: Wo 0.4-1.2 in type-3 and -4; Wo 1.2-1.6 in type-5; and Wo 1.6-2.2 in type-6. Striated opx. Undeformed striated opx were interpreted as having formed from inverted protopyroxene during slow cooling [8]; striated opx from H4 Quenggouk were found to convert into normal opx within 1 week during annealing at 1100 K [9]. Because prograde metamorphism probably lasted ~60 Ma [10], there should be no striated opx remaining in type-4 or -5 OC. However, samples of 99% twinned clinopyroxene (analogous to that in chondrules in type-3 OC) annealed for >3 weeks at <=1250 K exhibited only very minor inversion to opx [11-13]. These experiments are consistent with prograde metamorphism; it seems likely that Quenggouk pyroxene probably had a substantial proportion of opx lamellae to begin with. Spinodal decomposition textures and cooling rates. Spinodal decomposition textures in pyroxene in type 4-5 OC were observed to have the same periodicities as those in type-3 OC [14]; it

  14. New hot-water use data for commercial buildings

    SciTech Connect

    Thrasher, W.H.; DeWerth, D.W. )

    1994-09-01

    This article reports that researchers have found that hot water usage in certain commercial buildings may be significantly higher than designers expect. ASHRAE Technical Committee 6.6, Service Water Heating, recognized the need for a comprehensive compilation and evaluation of available hot water usage information in residential and commercial installations. The bulk of the commercial building hot water demand and sizing information presented in Chapter 44 of the 1991 ASHRAE Handbook--HVAC Application is based on a comprehensive study published in 1969. However, information received by members of TC 6.6 and data appearing in some of the current literature suggest that the Handbook values may be too conservative. Because of conflicting information in the literature and possible variations in lifestyles and use patterns since the Handbook values were originally published, ASHRAE sponsored research project RP-600 to study and review these issues. In this research project, domestic hot water consumption was monitored at five separate commercial buildings in four building category types: one nursing home, two dormitories (one coed and one women's), one full-service restaurant and one hotel.

  15. Running hot water: A systems approach to energy conservation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wulff, P.

    1982-03-01

    Ways to conserve energy in domestic hot water systems are discussed. Examination of the Swedish situation shows that centralized systems, where water heating is a subsidiary of space heating, waste energy because water cools in the pipes after use, and the entire system must operate in summer. Also, water temperature is often much higher than required. Solar panels, individual water heaters, heat pumps, and heat exchangers could contribute to energy conservation, but changes in consumer behavior can also be extremely effective. For example, dish washing energy requirements were reduced by 80% in one neighborhood by giving each apartment a plastic bowl for washing up.

  16. Structural Integrity of Water Reactor Pressure Boundary Components.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-08-01

    tests of reference steels of the NRC light water reactor, pressure vessel irradiation dosimetry program. SECURITY CLAS5IICATION 0PHiS PA6GMbn" Dfat ...multiple specimen R- curve approach; NRL emphasis was on the SSC procedure as it is being developed for hot- cell testing of irradiated materials. MULTIPLE...a second autoclave, capable of testing 50 or 100 mm (2T or 4T) thick CT or WOL specimens, was installed in a hot cell and a test was started on 2T-CT

  17. Hot-film static-pressure probe for surveying flow fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ashby, G. C., Jr.; Weinstein, L. M.

    1981-01-01

    A static pressure probe employing hot-film sensors has been developed for the rapid measurement of the static pressure fields surrounding analytic shapes in hypersonic flows. The hot-film probe is a modification of the standard static pressure probe, consisting of a front hot-film sensor operated as a resistance thermometer, a rear sensor operated at an overheat ratio of 1.5 to 1.8 and a small sonic orifice installed inside the tubing of a conventional device. The probe has been calibrated in helium and air over a range of temperatures and pressures in a bell jar apparatus, with a repeatability of the data to within + or - 0.015 mm Hg. Comparative tests of the hot-film and conventional static pressure probes in a hypersonic helium wind tunnel at Mach 20 and various Reynolds numbers have indicated the settling time of the hot-film probe to be on the order of milliseconds, as compared with 30 sec for the conventional probe. The pressures measured by the two probes were found to be within 10% of each other. Although the hot-film probe makes flow-field static pressure surveys more practical in blowdown hypersonic wind tunnels, viscous and flow angle effects still must be assessed under the conditions of use.

  18. Solar Hot Water Heating by Natural Convection.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Noble, Richard D.

    1983-01-01

    Presents an undergraduate laboratory experiment in which a solar collector is used to heat water for domestic use. The working fluid is moved by natural convection so no pumps are required. Experimental apparatus is simple in design and operation so that data can be collected quickly and easily. (Author/JN)

  19. Solar Hot Water Heating by Natural Convection.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Noble, Richard D.

    1983-01-01

    Presents an undergraduate laboratory experiment in which a solar collector is used to heat water for domestic use. The working fluid is moved by natural convection so no pumps are required. Experimental apparatus is simple in design and operation so that data can be collected quickly and easily. (Author/JN)

  20. Estimating Energy and Water Losses in Residential Hot WaterDistribution Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Lutz, James

    2005-02-26

    Residential single family building practice currently ignores the losses of energy and water caused by the poor design of hot water systems. These losses include; the waste of water while waiting for hot water to get to the point of use; the wasted heat as water cools down in the distribution system after a draw; and the energy needed to reheat water that was already heated once before. Average losses of water are estimated to be 6.35 gallons (24.0 L) per day. (This is water that is rundown the drain without being used while waiting for hot water.) The amount of wasted hot water has been calculated to be 10.9 gallons (41.3L) per day. (This is water that was heated, but either is not used or issued after it has cooled off.) A check on the reasonableness of this estimate is made by showing that total residential hot water use averages about 52.6 gallons (199 L) per day. This indicates about 20 percent of average daily hot water is wasted.

  1. Solar Hot Water for a Motor Inn -- Las Vegas, Nevada

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    Solar hot-water installation at motor inn in Las Vegas, Nevada is described in report containing descriptions of design, philosophy, operation of system and problems and solutions. Provides drawings of solar roof plan, operator's instructions, manufacturers' brochures and copy of acceptance report.

  2. Preliminary design package for solar heating and hot water system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    The preliminary design review on the development of a multi-family solar heating and domestic hot water prototype system is presented. The report contains the necessary information to evaluate the system. The system consists of the following subsystems: collector, storage, transport, control and Government-furnished site data acquisition.

  3. LOFTrelated semiscale test scene. Water has been dyed red. Hot ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    LOFT-related semiscale test scene. Water has been dyed red. Hot steam blowdown exits semiscale at TAN-609 at A&M complex. Edge of building is along left edge of view. Date: 1971. INEEL negative no. 71-376 - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Area North, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  4. Preliminary design package for solar hot water system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    This package includes technical information, schematics, drawings and brochures of the solar hot water system. This system consists of the following subsystems: collector, storage, transport, control, auxiliary energy, and Government-furnished site data acquisition. The two units being manufactured will be installed at Loxahatchee, Florida, and Macon, Georgia.

  5. 9. Tower building. Hot water tap floor shown. Mixing vat ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    9. Tower building. Hot water tap floor shown. Mixing vat at center level. Juices mix and flow and left lower level. Copper kettles are down below view level. Looking toward front of building. - Tivoli-Union Brewery, 1320-1348 Tenth Street, Denver, Denver County, CO

  6. Installation package for SIMS prototype system 2, solar hot water

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    The prototype system 2 solar hot water was designed for use in a single family dwelling and consists of the following subsystems: collector, storage, energy transport, and control. Guidelines are presented for utilization in the development of detailed installation plans and specifications. Instruction on operation, maintenance, and repair of the system is discussed.

  7. [Effects of hot water bath or sauna on patients with congestive heart failure: acute hemodynamic improvement by thermal vasodilation].

    PubMed

    Tei, C; Horikiri, Y; Park, J C; Jeong, J W; Chang, K S; Tanaka, N; Toyama, Y

    1994-01-01

    The acute hemodynamic effects of thermal vasodilation caused by exposure to hot water bath or sauna in chronic congestive heart failure were investigated in 32 patients (mean age 57 +/- 15 years old) with dilated cardiomyopathy (25 idiopathic and 7 ischemic). The clinical symptoms were New York Heart Association Class II in 2 patients, III in 17 and IV in 13, and the mean ejection fraction was 25 +/- 9% (9-44%). Exposure to hot water bath was for 10 minutes at 41 degrees C in a semi-sitting position, and to sauna for 15 minutes at 60 degrees C in a supine position using a special far infrared ray sauna chamber. Blood pressure, electrocardiogram, two-dimensional and Doppler echocardiograms, expiration gas, and intracardiac pressure tracings were recorded before (control), during, and 30 minutes after hot water bath or sauna. 1. The increase in oxygen consumption was only 0.3 Mets during hot water bath or sauna, and returned to the control level 30 minutes later. 2. The deep temperature in the main pulmonary artery increased by 1.0-1.2 degrees C on average at the end of hot water bath or sauna. 3. Heart rate increased significantly (p < 0.01) by 20-25/min during bathing and still increased 30 min later. 4. Systolic blood pressure did not change significantly during and after hot water bath or sauna, while, diastolic blood pressure decreased significantly during (p < 0.05) and after sauna (p < 0.01), and after hot water bath (p < 0.01).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  8. Vapor pressure of water nanodroplets.

    PubMed

    Factorovich, Matías H; Molinero, Valeria; Scherlis, Damián A

    2014-03-26

    Classical thermodynamics is assumed to be valid up to a certain length-scale, below which the discontinuous nature of matter becomes manifest. In particular, this must be the case for the description of the vapor pressure based on the Kelvin equation. However, the legitimacy of this equation in the nanoscopic regime can not be simply established, because the determination of the vapor pressure of very small droplets poses a challenge both for experiments and simulations. In this article we make use of a grand canonical screening approach recently proposed to compute the vapor pressures of finite systems from molecular dynamics simulations. This scheme is applied to water droplets, to show that the applicability of the Kelvin equation extends to unexpectedly small lengths, of only 1 nm, where the inhomogeneities in the density of matter occur within spatial lengths of the same order of magnitude as the size of the object. While in principle this appears to violate the main assumptions underlying thermodynamics, the density profiles reveal, however, that structures of this size are still homogeneous in the nanosecond time-scale. Only when the inhomogeneity in the density persists through the temporal average, as it is the case for clusters of 40 particles or less, do the macroscopic thermodynamics and the molecular descriptions depart from each other.

  9. Predictive modeling for hot water inactivation of planktonic and biofilm-associated Sphingomonas parapaucimobilis to support hot water sanitization programs.

    PubMed

    Kaatz Wahlen, Laura; Parker, Al; Walker, Diane; Pasmore, Mark; Sturman, Paul

    2016-08-01

    Hot water sanitization is a common means to maintain microbial control in process equipment for industries where microorganisms can degrade product or cause safety issues. This study compared the hot water inactivation kinetics of planktonic and biofilm-associated Sphingomonas parapaucimobilis at temperatures relevant to sanitization processes used in the pharmaceutical industry, viz. 65, 70, 75, and 80°C. Biofilms exhibited greater resistance to hot water than the planktonic cells. Both linear and nonlinear statistical models were developed to predict the log reduction as a function of temperature and time. Nonlinear Michaelis-Menten modeling provided the best fit for the inactivation data. Using the model, predictions were calculated to determine the times at which specific log reductions are achieved. While ≥80°C is the most commonly cited temperature for hot water sanitization, the predictive modeling suggests that temperatures ≥75°C are also effective at inactivating planktonic and biofilm bacteria in timeframes appropriate for the pharmaceutical industry.

  10. Performance Monitoring of Residential Hot Water Distribution Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Liao, Anna; Lanzisera, Steven; Lutz, Jim; Fitting, Christian; Kloss, Margarita; Stiles, Christopher

    2014-08-11

    Current water distribution systems are designed such that users need to run the water for some time to achieve the desired temperature, wasting energy and water in the process. We developed a wireless sensor network for large-scale, long time-series monitoring of residential water end use. Our system consists of flow meters connected to wireless motes transmitting data to a central manager mote, which in turn posts data to our server via the internet. This project also demonstrates a reliable and flexible data collection system that could be configured for various other forms of end use metering in buildings. The purpose of this study was to determine water and energy use and waste in hot water distribution systems in California residences. We installed meters at every end use point and the water heater in 20 homes and collected 1s flow and temperature data over an 8 month period. For a typical shower and dishwasher events, approximately half the energy is wasted. This relatively low efficiency highlights the importance of further examining the energy and water waste in hot water distribution systems.

  11. Fiber-Optic Photoelastic Device Senses Pressure Of Hot Gas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Redner, Alex S.; Wesson, L. N.

    1995-01-01

    Fiber-optic/photoelastic device measures gas pressures up to 600 psi at operating temperatures as high as 1,100 degrees C. Pressure on fused-silica sensing element gives rise to birefringence via photoelastic effect. Polarization of light changed by birefringence; change in polarization measured and used to infer pressure causing it. Device prototype of gas-pressure sensor for aircraft engine. Mounted in engine at or near desired measurement point, where it responds to both time-varying and steady components of pressure.

  12. Gas-fired submerged combustion SOLENCON Hot Water Boiler

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, A.W.

    1982-10-01

    A natural gas-fired hot water boiler was built with performance goals of 100,000 Btu/h and better than 90% efficiency. The boiler is a submerged-combustion flue-gas condensing unit. It consists of a water tank with a natural gas burner at the bottom. Flue gases are drawn from the burner and expelled into the water by water jets near the surface of the water in the tank. Six jets in a manifold spray water at high velocity through the flue gases. The flue gas is induced to mix with the water and enters the tank water as a mixture. Near perfect heat transfer between the flue gas and tank water occurs since the flue gases expelled out of a vent in the top of the tank are essentially the same temperature as the water in the tank. Test results show a 98% thermal conversion of energy when used at temperature levels below 130/sup 0/F. At approximately 130/sup 0/F and below, water is condensed from flue gases obtaining about 1000 Btu/lb of condensed water. Flue gas condensation seems to gradually taper off and latent heat is lost as the temperature increases. The SOLENCON boiler is useful as a swimming pool heater, radiant heating with water temperatures below 130/sup 0/F, and as a preheater for feedwater of large boilers. Efficiencies drop to less than 80% when the boiler is maintained above 150/sup 0/F as would be required for domestic hot water and hydronic heating systems.

  13. Definition of hydraulic stability of KVGM-100 hot-water boiler and minimum water flow rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belov, A. A.; Ozerov, A. N.; Usikov, N. V.; Shkondin, I. A.

    2016-08-01

    In domestic power engineering, the methods of quantitative and qualitative-quantitative adjusting the load of the heat supply systems are widely distributed; furthermore, during the greater part of the heating period, the actual discharge of network water is less than estimated values when changing to quantitative adjustment. Hence, the hydraulic circuits of hot-water boilers should ensure the water velocities, minimizing the scale formation and excluding the formation of stagnant zones. The results of the calculations of hot-water KVGM-100 boiler and minimum water flow rate for the basic and peak modes at the fulfillment of condition of the lack of surface boil are presented in the article. The minimal flow rates of water at its underheating to the saturation state and the thermal flows in the furnace chamber were defined. The boiler hydraulic calculation was performed using the "Hydraulic" program, and the analysis of permissible and actual velocities of the water movement in the pipes of the heating surfaces was carried out. Based on the thermal calculations of furnace chamber and thermal- hydraulic calculations of heating surfaces, the following conclusions were drawn: the minimum velocity of water movement (by condition of boiling surface) at lifting movement of environment increases from 0.64 to 0.79 m/s; it increases from 1.14 to 1.38 m/s at down movement of environmental; the minimum water flow rate by the boiler in the basic mode (by condition of the surface boiling) increased from 887 t/h at the load of 20% up to 1074 t/h at the load of 100%. The minimum flow rate is 1074 t/h at nominal load and is achieved at the pressure at the boiler outlet equal to 1.1 MPa; the minimum water flow rate by the boiler in the peak mode by condition of surface boiling increases from 1669 t/h at the load of 20% up to 2021 t/h at the load of 100%.

  14. Pressurized hot water extraction with on-line fluorescence monitoring: a comparison of the static, dynamic, and static-dynamic modes for the removal of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons from environmental solid samples.

    PubMed

    Morales-Muñoz, S; Luque-García, J L; Luque de Castro, M D

    2002-08-15

    A comparison of the feasibility of the three operational modes of pressurized hot solvent extraction (PHSE) (namely, static, where a fixed extractant volume is used; dynamic, where the extractant continually flows through the sample; and static-dynamic mode, which consists of a combination of the two previous modes) for the extraction of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) from environmental solid samples (such as soil, sediment, trout, and sardine) has been performed. In all cases, a sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) aqueous solution was used as leaching agent. The use of a flow injection manifold between the extractor and a molecular fluorescence detector allowed real-time on-line fluorescence monitoring of the PAHs extracted from the samples, thus working as a screening system and providing qualitative and semiquantitative information on the target analytes extracted from both natural and spiked samples. The on-line monitoring option allowed the extraction kinetics to be monitored and the end of the leaching step to be determined independently of the sample matrix, thereby reducing extraction times. Efficiencies close to 100% have been provided by the three modes, which differ in the extraction time required for total removal of the target compounds. The time needed for the dynamic mode was shorter than that for the static mode. However, the establishment of a static extraction step prior to dynamic extraction was the key to shorten the time required for complete extraction. The method has been applied to a certified reference material (CRM 524, BCR, industrial soil/organics) for quality assurance/validation.

  15. Evaluation of Residential Hot Water Distribution Ssytems by Numeric Simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Wendt, ROBERT

    2005-08-17

    The objective of this project was to evaluate the performance and economics of various domestic hot water distribution systems in representative California residences. While the greatest opportunities for improved efficiency occur in new construction, significant improvements can also be made in some existing distribution systems. Specific objectives of the project tasks were: (1) Simulate potential energy savings of, perform cost-benefit analyses of, and identify market barriers to alternative new systems. (2) Simulate potential energy savings of, perform cost-benefit analyses of, and identify market barriers to maintenance, repair, and retrofit modifications of existing systems. (3) Evaluate potential impact of adopting alternative hot water distribution systems and report project findings. The outcome of this project is to provide homeowners, homebuilders, systems suppliers, municipal code officials and utility providers (both electric and water/sewer) with a neutral, independent, third party, cost-benefit analysis of alternative hot water distribution systems for use in California. The results will enable these stakeholders to make informed decisions regarding which system is most appropriate for use.

  16. Hot Gas Cleanup Test Facility for gasification and pressurized combustion

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-01-01

    The objective of this project is to evaluate hot gas particle control technologies using coal-derived gas streams. This will entail the design, construction, installation, and use of a flexible test facility which can operate under realistic gasification and combustion conditions. The major particulate control device issues to be addressed include the integration of the particulate control devices into coal utilization systems, on-line cleaning techniques, chemical and thermal degradation of components, fatigue or structural failures, blinding, collection efficiency as a function of particle size, and scale-up of particulate control systems to commercial size. The major emphasis during this reporting period was finishing the conceptual design for the test facility and discussions on the potential expansion of the test facility. Results are discussed for the following subtasks of conceptual design: design bases; quasifier/combustor and hot stream design; balance of plant designs; and particulate collection.

  17. Effect of hot water extraction and liquid hot water pretreatment on the fungal degradation of biomass feedstocks.

    PubMed

    Wan, Caixia; Li, Yebo

    2011-10-01

    Exhaustive hot water extraction (HWE) and liquid hot water (LHW) pretreatment were evaluated for their effects on degradation of biomass feedstocks (i.e., corn stover, wheat straw, and soybean straw) by Ceriporiopsis subvermispora. HWE (85 °C for 10 min) partially removed water soluble extractives and subsequently improved fungal degradation on wheat straw while it had little or no effect on the fungal degradation of corn stover and soybean straw. In contrast, LHW pretreatment at 170 °C for 3 min improved the fungal degradation of soybean straw; thus, lignin removal of 36.70% and glucose yield of 64.25% were obtained from the combined LHW and fungal pretreatment. However, corn stover, which was effectively degraded by fungal pretreatment alone, was less affected by this combined pretreatment. Our results indicated that a HWE or LHW pretreatment conducted under mild conditions worked synergistically with fungal degradation for some recalcitrant feedstocks. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Effects of press sizes on internal steam pressure during particleboard hot-pressing process

    Treesearch

    Zhiyong Cai; Michael Birkeland; James M. Wescott; Jane O' Dell; Jerrold E. Winandy

    2009-01-01

    Internal steam pressure produced during the hot-pressing cycle in particleboard production is critical to the newly developed bond strength that will determine the overall performance of particleboard. The difference between the accumulation of internal steam pressure for small panels made in the laboratory and that of large commercial-sized panels makes it difficult...

  19. Overheating in Hot Water- and Steam-Heated Multifamily Buildings

    SciTech Connect

    Dentz, J.; Varshney, K.; Henderson, H.

    2013-10-01

    Apartment temperature data have been collected from the archives of companies that provide energy management systems (EMS) to multifamily buildings in the Northeast U.S. The data have been analyzed from more than 100 apartments in eighteen buildings where EMS systems were already installed to quantify the degree of overheating. This research attempts to answer the question, 'What is the magnitude of apartment overheating in multifamily buildings with central hot water or steam heat?' This report provides valuable information to researchers, utility program managers and building owners interested in controlling heating energy waste and improving resident comfort. Apartment temperature data were analyzed for deviation from a 70 degrees F desired setpoint and for variation by heating system type, apartment floor level and ambient conditions. The data shows that overheating is significant in these multifamily buildings with both hot water and steam heating systems.

  20. Influence of hot plasma pressure on the global structure of Saturn’s magnetodisk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Achilleos, N.; Guio, P.; Arridge, C. S.; Sergis, N.; Wilson, R. J.; Thomsen, M. F.; Coates, A. J.

    2010-10-01

    Using a model of force balance in Saturn's disk-like magnetosphere, we show that variations in hot plasma pressure can change the magnetic field configuration. This effect changes (i) the location of the magnetopause, even at fixed solar wind dynamic pressure, and (ii) the magnetic mapping between ionosphere and disk. The model uses equatorial observations as a boundary condition—we test its predictions over a wide latitude range by comparison with a Cassini high-inclination orbit of magnetic field and hot plasma pressure data. We find reasonable agreement over time scales larger than the period of Saturn kilometric radiation (also known as the camshaft period).

  1. Calibrating/testing meters in hot water test bench VM7

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kling, E.; Stolt, K.; Lau, P.; Mattiasson, K.

    A Hot Water Test Bench, VM7, has been developed and constructed for the calibration and testing of volume and flowmeters, in a project at the National Volume Measurement Laboratory at the Swedish National Testing and Research Institute. The intended area of use includes use as a reference at audit measurements, e.g. for accredited laboratories, calibration of meters for the industry and for the testing of hot water meters. The objective of the project, which was initiated in 1989, was to design equipment with stable flow and with a minimal temperature drop even at very low flow rates. The principle of the design is a closed system with two pressure tanks at different pressures. The water is led from the high pressure tank through the test object and the volume standard, in the form of master meters or a piston prover alternatively, to the low pressure tank. Calibrations/tests are made comparing the indication of the test object to that of master meters covering the current flow rate. These are, in the same test cycle, calibrated to the piston prover. Alternatively, the test object can be calibrated directly to the piston prover.

  2. Preliminary design package for solar heating and hot water system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    The preliminary design review on the development of two prototype solar heating and hot water systems is presented. The information contained in this report includes system certification, system functional description, system configuration, system specification, system performance and other documents pertaining to the progress and the design of the system. This system, which is intended for use in the normal single-family residence, consists of the following subsystems: collector, storage, control, transport, and Government-furnished Site Data Acquisition.

  3. 46 CFR 63.25-3 - Electric hot water supply boilers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Electric hot water supply boilers. 63.25-3 Section 63.25... AUXILIARY BOILERS Requirements for Specific Types of Automatic Auxiliary Boilers § 63.25-3 Electric hot water supply boilers. (a) Electric hot water supply boilers that have a capacity not greater than...

  4. 46 CFR 63.25-3 - Electric hot water supply boilers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Electric hot water supply boilers. 63.25-3 Section 63.25... AUXILIARY BOILERS Requirements for Specific Types of Automatic Auxiliary Boilers § 63.25-3 Electric hot water supply boilers. (a) Electric hot water supply boilers that have a capacity not greater than...

  5. 46 CFR 63.25-3 - Electric hot water supply boilers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Electric hot water supply boilers. 63.25-3 Section 63.25... AUXILIARY BOILERS Requirements for Specific Types of Automatic Auxiliary Boilers § 63.25-3 Electric hot water supply boilers. (a) Electric hot water supply boilers that have a capacity not greater than...

  6. 46 CFR 63.25-3 - Electric hot water supply boilers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Electric hot water supply boilers. 63.25-3 Section 63.25... AUXILIARY BOILERS Requirements for Specific Types of Automatic Auxiliary Boilers § 63.25-3 Electric hot water supply boilers. (a) Electric hot water supply boilers that have a capacity not greater than...

  7. 46 CFR 63.25-3 - Electric hot water supply boilers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Electric hot water supply boilers. 63.25-3 Section 63.25... AUXILIARY BOILERS Requirements for Specific Types of Automatic Auxiliary Boilers § 63.25-3 Electric hot water supply boilers. (a) Electric hot water supply boilers that have a capacity not greater than...

  8. Domestic hot water consumption in four low-income apartment buildings

    SciTech Connect

    Vine, E.; Diamond, R.; Szydlowski, R.

    1986-06-01

    Domestic hot water consumption is a major source of energy use in multifamily buildings. In contrast to space heating energy consumption, in which behavioral factors compete with the effect of climate, domestic hot water consumption is highly dependent on behavior. Consequently, knowledge of usage patterns is useful in understanding domestic hot water consumption, whether for calculating baseline usage or for estimating retrofit performance.

  9. Antioxidant Activities of Hot Water Extracts from Various Spices

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Il-Suk; Yang, Mi-Ra; Lee, Ok-Hwan; Kang, Suk-Nam

    2011-01-01

    Recently, the natural spices and herbs such as rosemary, oregano, and caraway have been used for the processing of meat products. This study investigates the antioxidant activity of 13 spices commonly used in meat processing plants. The hot water extracts were then used for evaluation of total phenolic content, total flavonoids content and antioxidant activities. Our results show that the hot water extract of oregano gave the highest extraction yield (41.33%) whereas mace (7.64%) gave the lowest. The DPPH radical scavenging ability of the spice extracts can be ranked against ascorbic acid in the order ascorbic acid > clove > thyme > rosemary > savory > oregano. The values for superoxide anion radical scavenging activities were in the order of marjoram > rosemary > oregano > cumin > savory > basil > thyme > fennel > coriander > ascorbic acid. When compared to ascorbic acid (48.72%), the hydroxyl radical scavenging activities of turmeric and mace were found to be higher (p < 0.001). Clove had the highest total phenolic content (108.28 μg catechin equivalent (CE)/g). The total flavonoid content of the spices varied from 324.08 μg quercetin equivalent (QE)/g for thyme to 3.38 μg QE/g for coriander. Our results indicate that hot water extract of several spices had a high antioxidant activity which is partly due to the phenolic and flavonoid compounds. This provides basic data, having implications for further development of processed food products. PMID:21747728

  10. Antioxidant activities of hot water extracts from various spices.

    PubMed

    Kim, Il-Suk; Yang, Mi-Ra; Lee, Ok-Hwan; Kang, Suk-Nam

    2011-01-01

    Recently, the natural spices and herbs such as rosemary, oregano, and caraway have been used for the processing of meat products. This study investigates the antioxidant activity of 13 spices commonly used in meat processing plants. The hot water extracts were then used for evaluation of total phenolic content, total flavonoids content and antioxidant activities. Our results show that the hot water extract of oregano gave the highest extraction yield (41.33%) whereas mace (7.64%) gave the lowest. The DPPH radical scavenging ability of the spice extracts can be ranked against ascorbic acid in the order ascorbic acid > clove > thyme > rosemary > savory > oregano. The values for superoxide anion radical scavenging activities were in the order of marjoram > rosemary > oregano > cumin > savory > basil > thyme > fennel > coriander > ascorbic acid. When compared to ascorbic acid (48.72%), the hydroxyl radical scavenging activities of turmeric and mace were found to be higher (p < 0.001). Clove had the highest total phenolic content (108.28 μg catechin equivalent (CE)/g). The total flavonoid content of the spices varied from 324.08 μg quercetin equivalent (QE)/g for thyme to 3.38 μg QE/g for coriander. Our results indicate that hot water extract of several spices had a high antioxidant activity which is partly due to the phenolic and flavonoid compounds. This provides basic data, having implications for further development of processed food products.

  11. Exposure to chlorination by-products from hot water uses.

    PubMed

    Weisel, C P; Chen, W J

    1994-02-01

    Exposures to chlorination by-products (CBP) within public water supplies are multiroute in water. Cold water is primarily used for ingestion while a mixture of cold water and hot water is used for showering, bathing others, dish washing, etc. These latter two activities result in inhalation and dermal exposure. Heating water was observed to change the concentration of various CBP. An increase in the trihalomethanes (THM) concentrations and a decrease in the haloacetonitriles and halopropanones concentration, though an initial rise in the concentration of dichloropropanone, were observed. The extent of the increase in the THM is dependent on the chlorine residual present. Therefore, estimates of total exposure to CBP from public water supplies need to consider any changes in their concentration with different water uses. The overall THM exposures calculated using the THM concentration in heated water were 50% higher than those calculated using the THM concentration present in cold water. The estimated lifetime cancer risk associated with exposure to THM in water during the shower is therefore underestimated by 50% if the concentration of THM in cold water is used in the risk assessment.

  12. Solar heating and hot water system installed at Listerhill, Alabama

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    The Solar system was installed into a new building and was designed to provide 79% of the estimated annual space heating load and 59% of the estimated annual potable hot water requirement. The collectors are flat plate, liquid manufactured by Reynolds Metals Company and cover a total area of 2344 square feet. The storage medium is water inhibited with NALCO 2755 and the container is an underground, unpressurized steel tank with a capacity of 5000 gallons. This report describes in considerable detail the solar heating facility and contains detailed drawings of the completed system.

  13. A central solar domestic hot water system - Performance and economic analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolf, D.; Tamir, A.; Kudish, A. I.

    1980-02-01

    A solar-assisted central hot water system was retrofitted onto one of the student dormitory complexes. The system consisted of twenty commercial solar collectors, of the pipe and plate type, and central hot water tank connected to two dormitory buildings. The system has two loops: (1) a solar loop, in which the heated water circulates between the collector panels and the central hot water tank, and (2) a consumer loop, where the solar-heated water circulates between the central hot water tank and the dormitory. The solar-heated water circulates through the individual electric hot water tanks which serve as individual hot water storage and booster units, and the mains water is introduced at the bottom of the central tank to replace consumed water. The description of the system, the design and its performance, together with an economic analysis, are presented.

  14. Legionella contamination in hot water of Italian hotels.

    PubMed

    Borella, Paola; Montagna, Maria Teresa; Stampi, Serena; Stancanelli, Giovanna; Romano-Spica, Vincenzo; Triassi, Maria; Marchesi, Isabella; Bargellini, Annalisa; Tatò, Daniela; Napoli, Christian; Zanetti, Franca; Leoni, Erica; Moro, Matteo; Scaltriti, Stefania; Ribera D'Alcalà, Gabriella; Santarpia, Rosalba; Boccia, Stefania

    2005-10-01

    A cross-sectional multicenter survey of Italian hotels was conducted to investigate Legionella spp. contamination of hot water. Chemical parameters (hardness, free chlorine concentration, and trace element concentrations), water systems, and building characteristics were evaluated to study risk factors for colonization. The hot water systems of Italian hotels were strongly colonized by Legionella; 75% of the buildings examined and 60% of the water samples were contaminated, mainly at levels of > or =10(3) CFU liter(-1), and Legionella pneumophila was the most frequently isolated species (87%). L. pneumophila serogroup 1 was isolated from 45.8% of the contaminated sites and from 32.5% of the hotels examined. When a multivariate logistic model was used, only hotel age was associated with contamination, but the risk factors differed depending on the contaminating species and serogroup. Soft water with higher chlorine levels and higher temperatures were associated with L. pneumophila serogroup 1 colonization, whereas the opposite was observed for serogroups 2 to 14. In conclusion, Italian hotels, particularly those located in old buildings, represent a major source of risk for Legionnaires' disease due to the high frequency of Legionella contamination, high germ concentration, and major L. pneumophila serogroup 1 colonization. The possible role of chlorine in favoring the survival of Legionella species is discussed.

  15. A Realistic Hot Water Draw Specification for Rating Solar Water Heaters

    SciTech Connect

    Burch, J.

    2012-06-01

    In the United States, annual performance ratings for solar water heaters are simulated, using TMY weather and specified water draw. This paper proposes a more realistic ratings draw that eliminates most bias by improving mains inlet temperature and by specifying realistic hot water use. Presented at the 2012 World Renewable Energy Forum; Denver, Colorado; May 13-17, 2012.

  16. Effect of hot water treatments on quality of highbush blueberries.

    PubMed

    Fan, L; Forney, C F; Song, J; Doucette, C; Jordan, M A; McRae, K B; Walker, B A

    2008-08-01

    Highbush blueberries, cv 'Burlington', were treated with 22, 45, 50, or 60 degrees C water for 15 or 30 s along with an untreated control. Fruit were then stored for 0, 1, 2, or 4 wk at 0 degrees C and 2 or 9 d at 20 degrees C prior to evaluation of microbial population and fruit quality. After 4 wk of storage, the hot water treatment at 60 degrees C resulted in 92% marketable berries, followed by 90% at 50 degrees C, 88% at 45 degrees C, and 83% at 22 degrees C compared with 76% in untreated controls. Decay incidence was reduced to 0.6%, 1.2%, 1.4%, or 2.8% with 60, 50, 45, or 22 degrees C water treatments, respectively, compared with 5.1% in controls following 4 wk at 0 degrees C and 2 d at 20 degrees C. After an additional 7 d at 20 degrees C, decay in fruit treated at 60 degrees C for 15 or 30 s remained at 1.8% and 0.4%, respectively, compared to 37.4% in controls. Weight loss of berries treated with hot water was 0.4% against 3.8% in controls, and shriveled and split berries were also reduced compared to controls (P<0.001). Aerobic plate count and yeast and mold count were reduced by 0.45 to 0.7 log at 60 degrees C for 30 s. Botrytis cinerea and Colletotrichum sp. were the dominant fungal pathogens causing decay of Burlington blueberries during storage. Hot water treatments also immediately induced an increase in ethanol and reduced fruit titratable acidity and soluble solids content, but had no significant effect on fruit firmness, pH, or most flavor volatile concentrations.

  17. [Application of thermoplastic elastomer in hot-melt pressure sensitive adhesives for transtermal drug delivery].

    PubMed

    Yan, Xiaoping; Zheng, Rui; Guan, Shijie; Yi, Bowen

    2009-06-01

    Development of drug dosage forms to a great extent depends on the development of drug auxiliary materials. The development of a new type of polymeric drug auxiliary materials will bring on the developing of a novel dosage forms technology and a flood of new drug dosage forms. Thermoplastic elastomer is a new type of drug polymeric auxiliary materials, at present, which has a broad application in the field of hot-melt pressure sensitive adhesives. This review mainly discussed a new transtermal Chinese drug delivery system, including matrix composition of the formula, modified thermoplastic elastomer for hot-melt pressure sensitive adhesives and their development prospects in the traditional Chinese drug delivery system. It suggested that thermoplastic elastomer of hot-melt pressure sensitive adhesives has broad development prospects in the field of the transtermal drug delivery system for traditional Chinese medicine.

  18. Solar hot water demonstration project at Red Star Industrial Laundry, Fresno, California

    SciTech Connect

    1980-07-01

    The Final Report of the Solar Hot Water System located at the Red Star Industrial Laundry, 3333 Sabre Avenue, Fresno, California, is presented. The system was designed as an integrated wastewater heat recovery and solar preheating system to supply a part of the hot water requirements. It was estimated that the natural gas demand for hot water heating could be reduced by 56 percent (44 percent heat reclamation and 12 percent solar). The system consists of a 16,500 gallon tube-and-shell wastewater heat recovery subsystem combined with a pass-through 6,528 square foot flat plate Ying Manufacturing Company Model SP4120 solar collector subsystem, a 12,500 gallon fiber glass water storage tank subsystem, pumps, heat exchangers, controls, and associated plumbing. The design output of the solar subsystem is approximately 2.6 x 10/sup 9/ Btu/year. Auxiliary energy is provided by a gas fired low pressure boiler servicing a 4,000 gallon service tank. This project is part of the US Department of Energy's Solar Demonstration Program with DOE sharing $184,841 of the $260,693 construction cost. The system was turned on in July 1977, and acceptance tests completed in September 1977. The demonstration period for this project ends September 2, 1982.

  19. A model of force balance in Jupiter's magnetodisc including hot plasma pressure anisotropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nichols, J. D.; Achilleos, N.; Cowley, S. W. H.

    2015-12-01

    We present an iterative vector potential model of force balance in Jupiter's magnetodisc that includes the effects of hot plasma pressure anisotropy. The fiducial model produces results that are consistent with Galileo magnetic field and plasma data over the whole radial range of the model. The hot plasma pressure gradient and centrifugal forces dominate in the regions inward of ˜20 RJ and outward of ˜50 RJ, respectively, while for realistic values of the pressure anisotropy, the anisotropy current is either the dominant component or at least comparable with the hot plasma pressure gradient current in the region in between. With the inclusion of hot plasma pressure anisotropy, the ˜1.2 and ˜2.7° shifts in the latitudes of the main oval and Ganymede footprint, respectively, associated with variations over the observed range of the hot plasma parameter Kh, which is the product of hot pressure and unit flux tube volume, are comparable to the shifts observed in auroral images. However, the middle magnetosphere is susceptible to the firehose instability, with peak equatorial values of βh∥e-βh⊥e≃1 - 2, for Kh=2.0 - 2.5 × 107 Pa m T-1. For larger values of Kh,βh∥e-βh⊥e exceeds 2 near ˜25 RJ and the model does not converge. This suggests that small-scale plasmoid release or "drizzle" of iogenic plasma may often occur in the middle magnetosphere, thus forming a significant mode of plasma mass loss, alongside plasmoids, at Jupiter.

  20. Hotel in the Bahamas profits from solar hot water system

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-01-01

    On Paradise Island, located in the Bahamas, American Energy Technologies Inc. (AET) recently designed and supplied a domestic solar water heating system for the new Comfort Suites Hotel. AET is a Florida manufacturer of solar thermal collectors. The hotel has 150 rooms. Hot water usage entails the laundry facilities and the limited kitchen facilities. Access to hot showers is more of a luxury in some places, but guests at the Comfort Suites Hotel need not be concerned. During the development of the hotel, it was noted that the high heating costs of the propane-fueled hotel boiler were somewhat prohibitive. Propane cost approximately $1.67/gallon, causing the cost of heating water for the hotel to be estimated at over $1,000 per month. To offset the high heating costs, a 49-collector system on a 3200 gallon storage tank was designed into the plans for the new facility. The 49 roof mounted collectors were placed on a direct solar link to the 3200 gallon storage tank. The water is preheated before it gets to the boiler, cutting costs tremendously.

  1. Pressure of the hot gas in simulations of galaxy clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Planelles, S.; Fabjan, D.; Borgani, S.; Murante, G.; Rasia, E.; Biffi, V.; Truong, N.; Ragone-Figueroa, C.; Granato, G. L.; Dolag, K.; Pierpaoli, E.; Beck, A. M.; Steinborn, Lisa K.; Gaspari, M.

    2017-06-01

    We analyse the radial pressure profiles, the intracluster medium (ICM) clumping factor and the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (SZ) scaling relations of a sample of simulated galaxy clusters and groups identified in a set of hydrodynamical simulations based on an updated version of the treepm-SPH GADGET-3 code. Three different sets of simulations are performed: the first assumes non-radiative physics, the others include, among other processes, active galactic nucleus (AGN) and/or stellar feedback. Our results are analysed as a function of redshift, ICM physics, cluster mass and cluster cool-coreness or dynamical state. In general, the mean pressure profiles obtained for our sample of groups and clusters show a good agreement with X-ray and SZ observations. Simulated cool-core (CC) and non-cool-core (NCC) clusters also show a good match with real data. We obtain in all cases a small (if any) redshift evolution of the pressure profiles of massive clusters, at least back to z = 1. We find that the clumpiness of gas density and pressure increases with the distance from the cluster centre and with the dynamical activity. The inclusion of AGN feedback in our simulations generates values for the gas clumping (√{C}_{ρ }˜ 1.2 at R200) in good agreement with recent observational estimates. The simulated YSZ-M scaling relations are in good accordance with several observed samples, especially for massive clusters. As for the scatter of these relations, we obtain a clear dependence on the cluster dynamical state, whereas this distinction is not so evident when looking at the subsamples of CC and NCC clusters.

  2. THE PRESSURE PROFILES OF HOT GAS IN LOCAL GALAXY GROUPS

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, M.; Sarazin, C.; Sehgal, N.; Voit, G. M.; Donahue, M.; Jones, C.; Forman, W.; Vikhlinin, A.

    2011-02-01

    Recent measurements of the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (SZ) angular power spectrum from the South Pole Telescope and the Atacama Cosmology Telescope demonstrate the importance of understanding baryon physics when using the SZ power spectrum to constrain cosmology. This is challenging since roughly half of the SZ power at l = 3000 is from low-mass systems with 10{sup 13} h {sup -1} M{sub sun} < M{sub 500} < 1.5 x 10{sup 14} h {sup -1} M{sub sun}, which are more difficult to study than systems of higher mass. We present a study of the thermal pressure content for a sample of local galaxy groups from Sun et al. The group Y{sub sph,500}-M{sub 500} relation agrees with the one for clusters derived by Arnaud et al. The group median pressure profile also agrees with the universal pressure profile for clusters derived by Arnaud et al. With this in mind, we briefly discuss several ways to alleviate the tension between the measured low SZ power and the predictions from SZ templates.

  3. Hot water supply apparatus comprising a thermodynamic circuit

    SciTech Connect

    Chapelle, J.A.; Levacher, J.; Sanzey, E.; Vironneau, P.

    1982-12-21

    A hot water supply apparatus comprises a thermodynamic circuit having a compressor, a condensor for heat exchange between the thermodynamic fluid in the circuit and a high temperature source. That circuit further includes an evaporator arranged for heat exchange with a non-freezable heat carrying fluid which is circulated in a solar energy collecting circuit. A tank receives a body of water for heat storage. An heat exchanger is arranged in the circuit for circulation of the heat carrying fluid and is physically located above the tank. It may be combined with the evaporator. A pump directs a flow of water from the storage tank to sprinkling means associated with the heat exchanger whereby the apparatus operates as ice manufacturing device under severe cold conditions, when there is insufficient heating energy available from the sun.

  4. Overheating in Hot Water- and Steam-Heated Multifamily Buildings

    SciTech Connect

    Dentz, J.; Varshney, K.; Henderson, H.

    2013-10-01

    In this project, the ARIES Building America team collected apartment temperature data from the archives of companies that provide energy management systems (EMS) to multifamily buildings in the Northeast U.S. Data was analyzed from more than 100 apartments in eighteen buildings where EMS systems were already installed to quantify the degree of overheating in an effort to answer the question, "What is the magnitude of apartment overheating in multifamily buildings with central hot water or steam heat?" This report provides valuable information to researchers, utility program managers and building owners interested in controlling heating energy waste and improving resident comfort.

  5. Solar hot water system installed at Mobile, Alabama. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1980-10-01

    This final report describes the solar energy hot water system installed at LaQuinta Motor Inn Inc., at Mobile, Alabama. The building is a 122 unit motel. The system consists of six rows of ten collectors and three rows of eleven collectors (1990 square feet) mounted on the roof. Griswald flow control valves were installed to regulate the flow to each row. Two Heliotrope electronic thermometers with a combined capability of measuring the temperatures of 22 different locations were installed for monitoring purposes. Engineering drawings, component specifications, and operator instructions are included.

  6. Effects of applied pressure on hot-pressing of Beta-SiC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kinoshita, M.; Matsumura, H.; Iwasa, M.; Hayami, R.

    1984-01-01

    The effects of applied pressure on the densification during hot pressing of beta-SiC compacts were investigated. Beta-SiC powder is Starck made and has the average particle size of about 0.7 micrometer. Hot pressing experiments were carried out in graphite dies at temperatures of 1700 deg to 2300 deg C and at the pressures up to 1000 kg/sq cm. The compacts containing 1 weight percent B4C were examined. Sintered compacts were examined for microstructure and the Rockwell A-scale hardness was measured. The B4C addition was very effective to mitigate the hot pressing conditions. It is found that densification goes with the strengthening of the bonding and does not occur in particle deformation due to concentrated stress.

  7. Solar hot water systems for the southeastern United States: principles and construction of breadbox water heaters

    SciTech Connect

    1983-02-01

    The use of solar energy to provide hot water is among the easier solar technologies for homeowners to utilize. In the Southeastern United States, because of the mild climate and abundant sunshine, solar energy can be harnessed to provide a household's hot water needs during the non-freezing weather period mid-April and mid-October. This workbook contains detailed plans for building breadbox solar water heaters that can provide up to 65% of your hot water needs during warm weather. If fuel costs continue to rise, the annual savings obtained from a solar water heater will grow dramatically. The designs in this workbook use readily available materials and the construction costs are low. Although these designs may not be as efficient as some commercially available systems, most of a household's hot water needs can be met with them. The description of the breadbox water heater and other types of solar systems will help you make an informed decision between constructing a solar water heater or purchasing one. This workbook is intended for use in the southeastern United States and the designs may not be suitable for use in colder climates.

  8. Water making hot rocks soft: How hydrothermal alteration affects volcano stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ball, J. L.

    2015-12-01

    My research involves using numerical models of groundwater flow and slope stability to determine how long-term hydrothermal alteration in stratovolcanoes can cause increases in pore fluid pressure that lead to edifice collapse. Or in simpler terms: We can use computers to figure out how and why water that moves through hot rocks changes them into softer rocks that want to fall down. It's important to pay attention to the soft rocks even if they look safe because this can happen a long time after the stuff that makes them hot goes away or becomes cool. Wet soft rocks can go very far from high places and run over people in their way. I want show where the soft wet rocks are and how they might fall down so people will be safer.

  9. A new method of thermoablation with hot water vapour for localized tumours.

    PubMed

    Hiltbrand, E; Belenger, J; Binzoni, T; Buchegger, F; Costa, M; Mehier, H

    2004-01-01

    A new method of thermoablation with hot water vapour based on a new type of microtube was developed. This approach allows tumours, with volume and anatomical positions not accessible to other techniques (cryoablation, radiofrequency ablation, laser ablation) to be treated. The method was tested on a human colon carcinoma grafted subcutaneously in Swiss nude mice and the experiment monitored under magnetic resonance imaging. It was found that 2.52 cal s(-1) per cm3 of tumour were necessary to reduce tumour size. The microtube is built to withstand a large range of temperatures and pressures and is biocompatible. A specific feature of this technique is that, besides hot vapour, several types of drugs can be delivered through the same microtube depending of the location, type or size of the tumour. These properties make it a unique device for multi-therapeutic treatments.

  10. 10 CFR 431.106 - Uniform test method for the measurement of energy efficiency of commercial water heaters and hot...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... efficiency of commercial water heaters and hot water supply boilers (other than commercial heat pump water... PROGRAM FOR CERTAIN COMMERCIAL AND INDUSTRIAL EQUIPMENT Commercial Water Heaters, Hot Water Supply Boilers... of energy efficiency of commercial water heaters and hot water supply boilers (other than...

  11. 10 CFR 431.106 - Uniform test method for the measurement of energy efficiency of commercial water heaters and hot...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... efficiency of commercial water heaters and hot water supply boilers (other than commercial heat pump water... PROGRAM FOR CERTAIN COMMERCIAL AND INDUSTRIAL EQUIPMENT Commercial Water Heaters, Hot Water Supply Boilers... of energy efficiency of commercial water heaters and hot water supply boilers (other than...

  12. Wood-stove hot-water systems. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Leitman, S.

    1982-07-01

    The objective of this grant was to evaluate the efficiency and economics of installing hot water heating systems or wood stoves. To evaluate the efficiency, six systems were installed in North Florida households and monitored over two heating systems. Three of the systems installed were placed in the flue pipe and three in the stove box. Tests indicate the in-pipe systems yielded on an average 1575 to 1675 Btu/hour, while in-stove systems yielded from 1850 to 2700 Btu/hour on the average. A detailed analysis of the economics of system performance concluded that the installation of wood-stove hot water heating systems is a marginal investment for the Tallahassee area without the current energy tax credit program and a reasonably good investment with it. It was determined that if a person used the stove as a regular heat source in the Tallahassee area and system cost was near $400.00 that person was guaranteed to recover their investment in current dollars within the useful life of the system. As a person travels north to areas where the heating season is longer, these systems become more justified.

  13. Cellulase production on bagasse pretreated with hot water.

    PubMed

    Bigelow, Mary; Wyman, Charles E

    2002-01-01

    Because pretreatment of biomass with hot water only in differential flow systems offers very digestible cellulose and potentially less inhibition by liquid hydrolysate, solids and liquid hydrolysate from bagasse pretreated with hot water were fed to a batch cellulase production system using the Rut C30 strain of Trichoderma reesei to determine the suitability of these substrates for cellulase production. The organism was found to be sensitive to inhibitors in the liquid hydrolysate but could be adapted to improve its tolerance. In addition, filtering of the material reduced inhibitory effects. The organism was also sensitive to some component in the solids, and they had to be washed heavily to achieve good growth and cellulase production rates. Even then, a lag was found before enzyme production would commence on pretreated solids whereas no such lag was experienced with Solka Floc. However, once enzyme production began, as high and even somewhat greater cellulase productivities were realized with washed pretreated solids. Adding lignin to Solka Floc delayed enzyme production, suggesting that lignin or other materials in the lignin solids could cause the lag observed for pretreated bagasse, but more studies are needed to resolve the actual reason for this delay.

  14. Combustion characteristics and design of hot water boiler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xuemin; Yang, Dinghua; Lu, Junfu; Guan, Jian; Qi, Guoli

    2017-03-01

    In order to understand the combustion characteristics of biomass, a detailed comparison with coal was made. There are many differences between biomass and coal in combustion characteristics. The burning rate of biomass is much higher than coal. The burning rate of biomass char is also higher than coal char. During biomass combustion, HCl, SO2 and NO x emissions mainly concentrate in volatile combustion stage, while CO2 emission mainly concentrates in char combustion stage. The slagging tendency of biomass ash is severer than coal ash and the adhesive force of biomass ash is higher. However, the wearing tendency of biomass ash is minor. Aiming at the particularity of biomass fuels, this paper briefly introduces the design of biomass hot water boilers. On this basis, a 2.8 MW biomass hot water boiler was developed and tested under the loads of 1.7 MW and 2.8MW. The running results show that the carbon content of bottom slag significantly decreases as the load increases. The boiler efficiency is higher than 85% under both loads.

  15. Fractionation of sugar cane with hot, compressed, liquid water

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, S.G.; Kam, L.C.; Zemann, A.J.; Antal, M.J. Jr.

    1996-08-01

    Sugar-cane bagasse and leaves (10--15 g oven-dry basis) were fractionated without size reduction by a rapid (45 s to 4 min), immersed percolation using only hot (190--230 C), compressed (P > P{sub sat}), liquid water (0.6--1.2 kg). Over 50% of the biomass could be solubilized. All of the hemicellulose, together with much of the acid-insoluble lignin in the bagasse (>60%), was solubilized, while less than 10% of the cellulose entered the liquid phase. Moreover, recovery of the hemicellulose as monomeric sugars (after a mild posthydrolysis) exceeded 80%. Less than 5% of the hemicellulose was converted to furfural. Percolation beyond that needed to immerse the biomass in hot liquid water did not result in increased solubilization. The yield of lignocellulosic residue was also not sensitive to the form of the sugar cane used (bagasse or leaves) or its moisture content (8--50%). Commercial applications for this fractionation process include the pretreatment of lignocellulosics for bioconversion to ethanol and the production of pulp and paper products.

  16. Metal oxide nanostructures by a simple hot water treatment.

    PubMed

    Saadi, Nawzat S; Hassan, Laylan B; Karabacak, Tansel

    2017-08-02

    Surfaces with metal oxide nanostructures have gained considerable interest in applications such as sensors, detectors, energy harvesting cells, and batteries. However, conventional fabrication techniques suffer from challenges that hinder wide and effective applications of such surfaces. Most of the metal oxide nanostructure synthesis methods are costly, complicated, non-scalable, environmentally hazardous, or applicable to only certain few materials. Therefore, it is crucial to develop a simple metal oxide nanostructure fabrication method that can overcome all these limitations and pave the way to the industrial application of such surfaces. Here, we demonstrate that a wide variety of metals can form metal oxide nanostructures on their surfaces after simply interacting with hot water. This method, what we call hot water treatment, offers the ability to grow metal oxide nanostructures on most of the metals in the periodic table, their compounds, or alloys by a one-step, scalable, low-cost, and eco-friendly process. In addition, our findings reveal that a "plugging" mechanism along with surface diffusion is critical in the formation of such nanostructures. This work is believed to be of importance especially for researchers working on the growth of metal oxide nanostructures and their application in functional devices.

  17. Optimum hot water temperature for absorption solar cooling

    SciTech Connect

    Lecuona, A.; Ventas, R.; Venegas, M.; Salgado, R.; Zacarias, A.

    2009-10-15

    The hot water temperature that maximizes the overall instantaneous efficiency of a solar cooling facility is determined. A modified characteristic equation model is used and applied to single-effect lithium bromide-water absorption chillers. This model is based on the characteristic temperature difference and serves to empirically calculate the performance of real chillers. This paper provides an explicit equation for the optimum temperature of vapor generation, in terms of only the external temperatures of the chiller. The additional data required are the four performance parameters of the chiller and essentially a modified stagnation temperature from the detailed model of the thermal collector operation. This paper presents and discusses the results for small capacity machines for air conditioning of homes and small buildings. The discussion highlights the influence of the relevant parameters. (author)

  18. Hot electron dominated rapid transverse ionization growth in liquid water.

    PubMed

    Brown, Michael S; Erickson, Thomas; Frische, Kyle; Roquemore, William M

    2011-06-20

    Pump/probe optical-transmission measurements are used to monitor in space and time the ionization of a liquid column of water following impact of an 800-nm, 45-fs pump pulse. The pump pulse strikes the 53-μm-diameter column normal to its axis with intensities up to 2 × 10(15) W/cm2. After the initial photoinization and for probe delay times < 500 fs, the neutral water surrounding the beam is rapidly ionized in the transverse direction, presumably by hot electrons with initial velocities of 0.55 times the speed of light (relativistic kinetic energy of ~100 keV). Such velocities are unusual for condensed-matter excitation at the stated laser intensities.

  19. Nature of sonoluminescence: noble gas radiation excited by hot electrons in cold water

    PubMed

    Garcia; Levanyuk; Osipov

    2000-08-01

    It was proposed before that single bubble sonoluminescence (SBSL) may be caused by strong electric fields occurring in water near the surface of collapsing gas bubbles because of the flexoelectric effect involving polarization resulting from a gradient of pressure. Here we show that these fields can indeed provoke dynamic electric breakdown in a micron-size region near the bubble and consider the scenario of the SBSL. The scenario is (i) at the last stage of incomplete collapse of the bubble, the gradient of pressure in water near the bubble surface has such a value and a sign that the electric field arising from the flexoelectric effect exceeds the threshold field of the dynamic electrical breakdown of water and is directed to the bubble center; (ii) mobile electrons are generated because of thermal ionization of water molecules near the bubble surface; (iii) these electrons are accelerated in "cold" water by the strong electric fields; (iv) these hot electrons transfer noble gas atoms dissolved in water to high-energy excited states and optical transitions between these states produce SBSL UV flashes in the transparency window of water; (v) the breakdown can be repeated several times and the power and duration of the UV flash are determined by the multiplicity of the breakdowns. The SBSL spectrum is found to resemble a black-body spectrum where temperature is given by the effective temperature of the hot electrons. The pulse energy and some other characteristics of the SBSL are found to be in agreement with the experimental data when realistic estimates are made.

  20. Realistic Hot Water Draw Specification for Rating Solar Water Heaters: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Burch, J.

    2012-06-01

    In the United States, annual performance ratings for solar water heaters are simulated, using TMY weather and specified water draw. A more-realistic ratings draw is proposed that eliminates most bias by improving mains inlet temperature and by specifying realistic hot water use. This paper outlines the current and the proposed draws and estimates typical ratings changes from draw specification changes for typical systems in four cities.

  1. Water-Based Pressure-Sensitive Paints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jordan, Jeffrey D.; Watkins, A. Neal; Oglesby, Donald M.; Ingram, JoAnne L.

    2006-01-01

    Water-based pressure-sensitive paints (PSPs) have been invented as alternatives to conventional organic-solvent-based pressure-sensitive paints, which are used primarily for indicating distributions of air pressure on wind-tunnel models. Typically, PSPs are sprayed onto aerodynamic models after they have been mounted in wind tunnels. When conventional organic-solvent-based PSPs are used, this practice creates a problem of removing toxic fumes from inside the wind tunnels. The use of water-based PSPs eliminates this problem. The waterbased PSPs offer high performance as pressure indicators, plus all the advantages of common water-based paints (low toxicity, low concentrations of volatile organic compounds, and easy cleanup by use of water).

  2. Water Delivery--It's All about Pressure

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roman, Harry T.

    2005-01-01

    There is a great deal of wisdom in the old saying "water seeks its level." In fact, the concept has bearing on a very practical side of human life as well, since the public water delivery system is based on it. In this article, the author discusses the concept behind water pressure and describes how the water systems work based on this concept.…

  3. Water Delivery--It's All about Pressure

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roman, Harry T.

    2005-01-01

    There is a great deal of wisdom in the old saying "water seeks its level." In fact, the concept has bearing on a very practical side of human life as well, since the public water delivery system is based on it. In this article, the author discusses the concept behind water pressure and describes how the water systems work based on this concept.…

  4. Presence of Thermophilic Bacteria in Laundry and Domestic Hot-Water Heaters

    PubMed Central

    Brock, Thomas D.; Boylen, Kathryn L.

    1973-01-01

    Thermophilic bacteria resembling Thermus aquaticus were isolated from hot water taken from domestic and commercial hot-water tanks. Cold water from the same locations never yielded thermophilic bacteria, suggesting that the bacteria were growing in the tanks. In contrast to the T. aquaticus isolates from hot springs, the present isolates were rarely pigmented. In general, the hotter sources more frequently yielded bacteria. PMID:4568892

  5. A modular solar system provides hot water for alligator farm

    SciTech Connect

    Healey, H.M. )

    1994-03-01

    This article describes an 8,000 ft[sup 2] (743 m[sup 2]), site-built, large volume, Integral Collector Storage (ICS) solar water heating system installed at the farm to preheat water for the building washdown as part of a Florida Energy Office demonstration project. The project utilized at Foster Farms was a Shallow Solar Pond (SSP)--a modular, site-built, solar water heating system capable of providing in excess of 5,000 heated gallons (19 m[sup 3]) per day. During the past 10 years, a large number of solar systems have been proposed to provide economical hot water for industrial processes. Most of these water heating systems have proven to be too costly or too complex to compete with the traditional water heating methods using conventional fuels. Technology initiated at Lawrence Livermore Laboratory and expanded upon by the Tennessee Valley Authority was shown to have outstanding potential in Florida. This technology, which was utilized at Foster Farms, consists of a site-built large-volume ICAS system called the Shallow Solar Pond. Shallow Solar Pond (SSP) systems utilize the modular approach in which modules, built in a standardized size, are tied together to supply the required load. The SSP module can be ground mounted or installed on a roof. Each SSP module is typically 16 ft (5 m) wide and up to 200 ft (61 m) in length. The module contains one or two flat waterbags similar to a waterbed. The bags rest on a layer of insulation or bed of sand inside concrete or fiberglass curbs. The bag is protected against damage and heat loss by greenhouse-type glazing. A typical 200 ft [times] 16 ft (61 m [times] 5 m) pond, filled to a 4 in. (10 cm) depth, holds approximately 8,000 gallons (30 m[sup 3]) of water.

  6. Thermal characteristics of air-water spray impingement cooling of hot metallic surface under controlled parametric conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nayak, Santosh Kumar; Mishra, Purna Chandra

    2016-06-01

    Experimental results on the thermal characteristics of air-water spray impingement cooling of hot metallic surface are presented and discussed in this paper. The controlling input parameters investigated were the combined air and water pressures, plate thickness, water flow rate, nozzle height from the target surface and initial temperature of the hot surface. The effects of these input parameters on the important thermal characteristics such as heat transfer rate, heat transfer coefficient and wetting front movement were measured and examined. Hot flat plate samples of mild steel with dimension 120 mm in length, 120 mm breadth and thickness of 4 mm, 6 mm, and 8 mm respectively were tested. The air assisted water spray was found to be an effective cooling media and method to achieve very high heat transfer rate from the surface. Higher heat transfer rate and heat transfer coefficients were obtained for the lesser i.e, 4 mm thick plates. Increase in the nozzle height reduced the heat transfer efficiency of spray cooling. At an inlet water pressure of 4 bar and air pressure of 3 bar, maximum cooling rates 670°C/s and average cooling rate of 305.23°C/s were achieved for a temperature of 850°C of the steel plate.

  7. Installation package for a domestic solar heating and hot water system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    The installation of two prototype solar heating and hot water systems is described. The systems consists of the following subsystems: solar collector, storage, control, transport, and auxiliary energy.

  8. Water-Based Pressure Sensitive Paint

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oglesby, Donald M.; Ingram, JoAnne L.; Jordan, Jeffrey D.; Watkins, A. Neal; Leighty, Bradley D.

    2004-01-01

    Preparation and performance of a water-based pressure sensitive paint (PSP) is described. A water emulsion of an oxygen permeable polymer and a platinum porphyrin type luminescent compound were dispersed in a water matrix to produce a PSP that performs well without the use of volatile, toxic solvents. The primary advantages of this PSP are reduced contamination of wind tunnels in which it is used, lower health risk to its users, and easier cleanup and disposal. This also represents a cost reduction by eliminating the need for elaborate ventilation and user protection during application. The water-based PSP described has all the characteristics associated with water-based paints (low toxicity, very low volatile organic chemicals, and easy water cleanup) but also has high performance as a global pressure sensor for PSP measurements in wind tunnels. The use of a water-based PSP virtually eliminates the toxic fumes associated with the application of PSPs to a model in wind tunnels.

  9. Hot-wire calibration in a nonisothermal incompressible pressure variant flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hugo, Ronald J.; Nowlin, Scott R.; Eaton, Frank D.; Bishop, Kenneth P.; McCrae, Kimberley A.

    1999-08-01

    The calibration procedure for a hot-wire anemometer system operating in a non-isothermal pressure-variant flow field is presented. Sensing of atmospheric velocity and temperature fluctuations from an altitude-variant platform using hot- wire anemometry equipment operating in both constant- temperature and constant-current modes requires calibration for velocity, temperature, and atmospheric pressure variations. Calibration tests to provide the range of velocity, temperature and pressure variations anticipated during Air Force Research Lab, Directed Energy Directorate- sponsored kite/tethered-balloon experiments were conducted and the result of these tests presented. The calibration tests were performed by placing the kite/tethered-balloon sensor package on a vehicle and driving from Kirtland AFB, NM to the top of Sandia Crest, a 10678 ft mountain range to the east of Albuquerque, NM. By varying the velocity of the van and conducting the test at different times of the day, variations in velocity, temperature and pressure within the range of those encountered during the kite/tethered-balloon experiments were obtained. The method of collapsing the calibration data is presented. Problems associated with collecting hot-wire anemometry data in a non-laboratory environment are discussed. Example data sets of temperature and velocity collected during the kite/tethered-balloon experiments are presented.

  10. Conversion of lignocellulosics pretreated with liquid hot water to ethanol

    SciTech Connect

    Walsum, G.P. van; Laser, M.S.; Lynd, L.R.

    1996-12-31

    Lignocellulosic materials pretreated using liquid hot water (LHW) (220{degrees}C, 5 MPa, 120 s) were fermented to ethanol by batch simultaneous saccharification and fermentation (SSF) using Saccharomyces cerevisiae in the presence of Trichoderma reesei cellulose. SSF of sugarcane bagasse (as received), aspen chips (smallest dimension 3 mm), and mixed hardwood flour (-60 +70 mesh) resulted in 90% conversion to ethanol in 2-5 d at enzyme loadings of 15-30 FPU/g. In most cases, 90% of the final conversion was achieved within 75 h of inoculation. Comminution of the pretreated substrates did not affect the conversion to ethanol. The hydrolysate produced from the LHW pretreatment showed slight inhibition of batch growth of S. cerevisiae. Solids pretreated at a concentration of 100 g/L were as reactive as those pretreated at a lower concentration, provided that the temperature was maintained at 220{degrees}C. 51 refs., 3 figs., 4 tabs.

  11. Residential solar hot water: Determinants of demand in New Hampshire

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Downes, Mary A.

    As New Hampshire pursues public policy goals embedded in the Renewable Portfolio Standard, the Regional Greenhouse Gas Initiative, the Climate Action Plan, and other legislation and documentation, many advocates and policy makers are looking for reductions in fossil fuel use in the residential sector. This paper analyzes the results of a survey of New Hampshire residents undertaken in the autumn of 2009 regarding attitudes toward energy policy, and willingness to invest in renewable energy. Regarding residential solar hot water, the survey finds that the price at which half of New Hampshire homeowners would consider purchasing such a system is $5536. Seriousness of commitment is also tested, showing significant barriers to follow-through. These barriers and potential means of overcoming them are examined, based on concepts from economics and related fields. The paper concludes with recommendations for further research.

  12. Carbonate ion-enriched hot spring water promotes skin wound healing in nude rats.

    PubMed

    Liang, Jingyan; Kang, Dedong; Wang, Yingge; Yu, Ying; Fan, Jianglin; Takashi, En

    2015-01-01

    Hot spring or hot spa bathing (Onsen) is a traditional therapy for the treatment of certain ailments. There is a common belief that hot spring bathing has therapeutic effects for wound healing, yet the underlying molecular mechanisms remain unclear. To examine this hypothesis, we investigated the effects of Nagano hot spring water (rich in carbonate ion, 42°C) on the healing process of the skin using a nude rat skin wound model. We found that hot spring bathing led to an enhanced healing speed compared to both the unbathed and hot-water (42°C) control groups. Histologically, the hot spring water group showed increased vessel density and reduced inflammatory cells in the granulation tissue of the wound area. Real-time RT-PCR analysis along with zymography revealed that the wound area of the hot spring water group exhibited a higher expression of matrix metalloproteinases-2 and -9 compared to the two other control groups. Furthermore, we found that the enhanced wound healing process induced by the carbonate ion-enriched hot spring water was mediated by thermal insulation and moisture maintenance. Our results provide the evidence that carbonate ion-enriched hot spring water is beneficial for the treatment of skin wounds.

  13. Cold Water Jets on a Hot Si surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Ji Yong; Min, Chang-Ki; Cahill, David; Granick, Steve

    2010-03-01

    We are using a femtosecond pump-probe apparatus to study heat transfer when a pulsed jet of liquid water impinges on a hot Pt-coated Si surface (Leidenfrost Effect). The light source in the experiment is a 100 mW Er:fiber laser operating at a wavelength of λ=1550 nm; the total volume of the pulsed water jet is ˜0.9 mm^3. The temperature change within the Si substrate at a distance of 50 microns from the interface is measured by a novel time-resolved thermometry based on two-photon absorption. We measure the thermal conductance of the water layer within 50 nm of the interface by time-domain thermo-reflectance; changes in the thermal conductance provide a direct measurement of the contact time of the liquid. We convert the integral of the temperature excursion to the energy transferred using a Green's function solution of heat conduction in the Si substrate. Both the energy transferred and contact time show a smooth evolution from high values at 110C to low values at 210C without any clear indication of a Leidenfrost point.

  14. Numerical Simulation of a Solar Domestic Hot Water System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mongibello, L.; Bianco, N.; Di Somma, M.; Graditi, G.; Naso, V.

    2014-11-01

    An innovative transient numerical model is presented for the simulation of a solar Domestic Hot Water (DHW) system. The solar collectors have been simulated by using a zerodimensional analytical model. The temperature distributions in the heat transfer fluid and in the water inside the tank have been evaluated by one-dimensional models. The reversion elimination algorithm has been used to include the effects of natural convection among the water layers at different heights in the tank on the thermal stratification. A finite difference implicit scheme has been implemented to solve the energy conservation equation in the coil heat exchanger, and the energy conservation equation in the tank has been solved by using the finite difference Euler implicit scheme. Energy conservation equations for the solar DHW components models have been coupled by means of a home-made implicit algorithm. Results of the simulation performed using as input data the experimental values of the ambient temperature and the solar irradiance in a summer day are presented and discussed.

  15. Water pressure and flow regulation for water-cooled lasers.

    PubMed

    Chambers, J K; Talansky, M L

    1988-05-01

    We experienced laser water valve failure resulting from poor water quality, frequent laser shutdowns from low water flow rates, and unnecessary service calls shortly after installing a new laser. The water valve failure resulted from deposits and corrosion. A dirt/rust water filter was installed, and no further water valve failure has occurred. A flow meter was added to the water system to adjust flow rates. It clearly shows when laser shutdowns are caused by low flow rates and indicates the need for water filter changes. Water pressure was monitored and is most affected by use of the laser. A convenient electric water control, activated by the laser key switch, has proved to be reliable. The water control is kept open by a timer ten minutes after the laser is shut off. We determined that our laser shutdowns were related to transient drops in water flow rates and possibly to draw off of water in other parts of the hospital.

  16. Feasibility study and roadmap to improve residential hot water distribution systems

    SciTech Connect

    Lutz, James D.

    2004-03-31

    Residential building practice currently ignores the losses of energy and water caused by the poor design of hot water systems. These losses include: the waste of water while waiting for hot water to get to the point of use; the wasted heat as water cools down in the distribution system after a draw; and the energy to reheat water that was already heated once before. A feasibility study and an action plan for a proposed research project involving residential hot water distribution systems is being developed. The feasibility study will use past work to estimate of hot water and energy loses caused by current hot water distribution systems in residences. Proposed research project, or roadmap, will develop recommendations for improvements to residential hot water distribution systems. The roadmap addresses the technical obstacles and gaps in our knowledge that prevent water and energy reductions and market adoption of water- and energy-efficient technologies. The initial results of the feasibility study are presented here along with a discussion of a roadmap to improve the efficiency of residential hot water distribution systems.

  17. PWR (pressurized water reactor) pressurizer transient response: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Murphy, S.I.

    1987-08-01

    To predict PWR pressurizer transients, Ahl proposed a three region model with a universal coefficient to represent condensation on the water surface. Specifically, this work checks the need for three regions and the modeling of the interfacial condensation coefficient. A computer model has been formulated using the basic mass and energy conservation laws. A two region vapor and liquid model was first used to predict transients run on a one-eleventh scale Freon pressurizer. These predictions verified the need for a second liquid region. As a result, a three region model was developed and used to predict full-scale pressurizer transients at TMI-2, Shippingport, and Stade. Full-scale pressurizer predictions verified the three region model and pointed out the shortcomings of Ahl's universal condensation coefficient. In addition, experiments were run using water at low pressure to study interface condensation. These experiments showed interface condensation to be significant only when spray flow is turned on; this result was incorporated in the final three region model.

  18. Investigating the Mpemba Effect: When Hot Water Freezes Faster than Cold Water

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ibekwe, R. T.; Cullerne, J. P.

    2016-01-01

    Under certain conditions a body of hot liquid may cool faster and freeze before a body of colder liquid, a phenomenon known as the Mpemba Effect. An initial difference in temperature of 3.2 °C enabled warmer water to reach 0 °C in 14% less time than colder water. Convection currents in the liquid generate a temperature gradient that causes more…

  19. Investigating the Mpemba Effect: When Hot Water Freezes Faster than Cold Water

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ibekwe, R. T.; Cullerne, J. P.

    2016-01-01

    Under certain conditions a body of hot liquid may cool faster and freeze before a body of colder liquid, a phenomenon known as the Mpemba Effect. An initial difference in temperature of 3.2 °C enabled warmer water to reach 0 °C in 14% less time than colder water. Convection currents in the liquid generate a temperature gradient that causes more…

  20. Water solubility in pyrope at high pressures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mookherjee, M.; Karato, S.-

    2006-12-01

    To address how much water is stored within the Earth's mantle, we need to understand the water solubility in the nominally anhydrous minerals. Much is known about olivine and pyroxene. Garnet is another important component, approaching 40% by volume in the transition zone. Only two studies on water solubility in pyrope at high-pressures exist which contradict each other. Lu and Keppler (1997) observed increase in water solubility in a natural pyrope up to 200 ppm wt of water, till 10 GPa. They concluded that the proton is located in the interstitial site. Withers et al. (1998) on the contrary, observed increasing water content in Mg-rich pyrope till 6 GPa, then sudden decrease of water, beyond detection, at 7 GPa. Based on infrared spectra, Withers et al. (1998), concluded hydrogarnet (Si^{4+} replaced by 4H+ to form O4H4) substitution in synthetic magnesium rich pyrope. They argued that at high pressure owing to larger volume, hydrogarnet substitution is unstable and water is expelled out of garnet. In transition zone conditions, however, majorite garnet seems to contain around 600-700 ppm wt of water (Bolfan-Casanova et al. 2000; Katayama et al. 2003). The cause for such discrepancy is not clear and whether garnet could store a significant amount of water at mantle condition is unconstrained. In order to understand the solubility mechanism of water in pyrope at high-pressure, we have conducted high- pressure experiments on naturally occurring single crystals of pyrope garnet (from Arizona, Aines and Rossman, 1984). To ascertain water-saturated conditions, we use olivine single-crystal as an internal standard. Preliminary results indicate that natural pyrope is capable of dissolving water at high-pressures, however, water preferentially enters olivine than in pyrope. We are undertaking systematic study to estimate the solubility of water in pyrope as a function of pressure. This will enable us to develop solubility models to understand the defect mechanisms

  1. Solar production of industrial process hot water: Operation and evaluation of the Campbell Soup hot water solar facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kull, J. I.; Neimeyer, W. N.; Youngblood, S. B.

    1980-12-01

    The operation and evaluation of a solar hot water facility is summarized. The period of evaluation was for 12 months from October 1979 through September 1980. The objective of the work was to obtain additional, long term data on the operation and performance of the facility. Minor modifications to the facility were completed. The system was operated for 15 months, and 12 months of detailed data were evaluated. The facility was available for operation and of the time during the last 8 months of evaluation. A detailed description of the solar facility and of the operating experience is given, and a summary of system performance for the 12 month operation/evaluation period is presented. Recommendations for large scale solar facilities based on this project's experience are given, and an environmental impact assessment is provided.

  2. Solar heating, cooling, and domestic hot water system installed at Kaw Valley State Bank and Trust Company, Topeka, Kansas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    The building has approximately 5600 square feet of conditioned space. Solar energy was used for space heating, space cooling, and preheating domestic hot water (DHW). The solar energy system had an array of evacuated tube-type collectors with an area of 1068 square feet. A 50/50 solution of ethylene glycol and water was the transfer medium that delivered solar energy to a tube-in-shell heat exchanger that in turn delivered solar heated water to a 1100 gallon pressurized hot water storage tank. When solar energy was insufficient to satisfy the space heating and/or cooling demand, a natural gas-fired boiler provided auxiliary energy to the fan coil loops and/or the absorption chillers. Extracts from the site files, specification references, drawings, and installation, operation and maintenance instructions are presented.

  3. Water-Pressure Distribution on Seaplane Float

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, F L

    1929-01-01

    The investigation presented in this report was conducted for the purpose of determining the distribution and magnitude of water pressures likely to be experienced on seaplane hulls in service. It consisted of the development and construction of apparatus for recording water pressures lasting one one-hundredth second or longer and of flight tests to determine the water pressures on a UO-1 seaplane float under various conditions of taxiing, taking off, and landing. The apparatus developed was found to operate with satisfactory accuracy and is suitable for flight tests on other seaplanes. The tests on the UO-1 showed that maximum pressures of about 6.5 pounds per square inch occur at the step for the full width of the float bottom. Proceeding forward from the step the maximum pressures decrease in magnitude uniformly toward the bow, and the region of highest pressures narrows toward the keel. Immediately abaft the step the maximum pressures are very small, but increase in magnitude toward the stern and there once reached a value of about 5 pounds per square inch. (author)

  4. Pressure probe and hot-film probe rsponses to acoustic excitation in mean flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parrott, T. L.; Jones, M. G.

    1986-01-01

    An experiment was conducted to compare the relative responses of a hot-film probe and a pressure probe positioned in a flow duct carrying mean flow and progressive acoustic waves. The response of each probe was compared with that of a condenser-type microphone flush mounted in the duct wall for flow Mach numbers up to about 0.5. The response of the pressure probe was less than that of the flush-mounted microphone by not more than about 2.1 dB at the highest centerline Mach number. This decreased response of the probe can likely be attributed to flow-induced impedance changes at the probe sensor orifices. The response of the hot-film probe, expressed in terms of fluctuating pressure, was greater than that of the flush-mounted microphone by as much as 6.0 dB at the two higher centerline Mach numbers. Removal of the contribution from fluctuating temperature in the hot-film analytical model greatly improved the agreement between the two transducer responses.

  5. Thermal shock fracture of hot silicon carbide immersed in water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Youho; McKrell, Thomas J.; Kazimi, Mujid S.

    2015-12-01

    High purity CVD-SiC, considered as a nuclear grade cladding material, exhibits thermal shock tolerance ∼1260 °C in room temperature water and beyond it (>1260 °C) in saturated water. Being thinner than the tested specimen thickness (1.5 mm × 2.0 mm), the actual cladding (0.57 mm) is anticipated to exhibit enhanced thermal shock tolerance. This implies that thermal shock alone may not shatter the SiC cladding in reflood. Level of fuel rod internal pressure will be a decisive factor in predicting cladding fracture during reflood. Decreasing water subcooling significantly reduces thermal shock fracture danger of ceramic materials. Thermal shock experiments showed strength retention for both pressureless sintered-SiC and CVD SiC, as well as Al2O3 samples quenched from temperatures up to 1260 °C in saturated water. Solid-liquid contacts during nucleate and transition boiling, and boiling incipience upon water bath entering are a highly probable origin of thermal shock fracture in water quenching.

  6. Solar heating and hot water system installed at office building, One Solar Place, Dallas, Texas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    A solar heating on cooling system is described which is designed to provide 87 percent of the space heating needs, 100 percent of the potable hot water needs and is sized for future absorption cooling. The collection subsystem consists of 28 solargenics, series 76, flat plate collectors with a total area of 1,596 square feet. The solar loop circulates an ethylene glyco water solution through the collectors into a hot water system exchanger. The water storage subsystem consists of a heat exchanger, two 2,300 gallon concrete hot water storage tanks with built in heat exchangers and a back-up electric boiler. The domestic hot water subsystem sends hot water to the 10,200 square feet floor area office building hot water water fixtures. The building cold water system provides make up to the solar loop, the heating loop, and the hot water concrete storage tanks. The design, construction, cost analysis, operation and maintenance of the solar system are described.

  7. Solar heating and hot water system installed at office building, One Solar Place, Dallas, Texas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1980-06-01

    A solar heating on cooling system is described which is designed to provide 87 percent of the space heating needs, 100 percent of the potable hot water needs and is sized for future absorption cooling. The collection subsystem consists of 28 solargenics, series 76, flat plate collectors with a total area of 1,596 square feet. The solar loop circulates an ethylene glyco water solution through the collectors into a hot water system exchanger. The water storage subsystem consists of a heat exchanger, two 2,300 gallon concrete hot water storage tanks with built in heat exchangers and a back-up electric boiler. The domestic hot water subsystem sends hot water to the 10,200 square feet floor area office building hot water water fixtures. The building cold water system provides make up to the solar loop, the heating loop, and the hot water concrete storage tanks. The design, construction, cost analysis, operation and maintenance of the solar system are described.

  8. Dynamics of microdroplets over the surface of hot water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Umeki, Takahiro; Ohata, Masahiko; Nakanishi, Hiizu; Ichikawa, Masatoshi

    2015-01-01

    When drinking a cup of coffee under the morning sunshine, you may notice white membranes of steam floating on the surface of the hot water. They stay notably close to the surface and appear to almost stick to it. Although the membranes whiffle because of the air flow of rising steam, peculiarly fast splitting events occasionally occur. They resemble cracking to open slits approximately 1 mm wide in the membranes, and leave curious patterns. We studied this phenomenon using a microscope with a high-speed video camera and found intriguing details: i) the white membranes consist of fairly monodispersed small droplets of the order of 10 μm ii) they levitate above the water surface by 10 ~ 100 μm iii) the splitting events are a collective disappearance of the droplets, which propagates as a wave front of the surface wave with a speed of 1 ~ 2 m/s and iv) these events are triggered by a surface disturbance, which results from the disappearance of a single droplet.

  9. Dynamics of microdroplets over the surface of hot water

    PubMed Central

    Umeki, Takahiro; Ohata, Masahiko; Nakanishi, Hiizu; Ichikawa, Masatoshi

    2015-01-01

    When drinking a cup of coffee under the morning sunshine, you may notice white membranes of steam floating on the surface of the hot water. They stay notably close to the surface and appear to almost stick to it. Although the membranes whiffle because of the air flow of rising steam, peculiarly fast splitting events occasionally occur. They resemble cracking to open slits approximately 1 mm wide in the membranes, and leave curious patterns. We studied this phenomenon using a microscope with a high-speed video camera and found intriguing details: i) the white membranes consist of fairly monodispersed small droplets of the order of 10 μm; ii) they levitate above the water surface by 10 ~ 100 μm; iii) the splitting events are a collective disappearance of the droplets, which propagates as a wave front of the surface wave with a speed of 1 ~ 2 m/s; and iv) these events are triggered by a surface disturbance, which results from the disappearance of a single droplet. PMID:25623086

  10. 7 CFR 305.21 - Hot water dip treatment schedule for mangoes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 5 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Hot water dip treatment schedule for mangoes. 305.21... Hot water dip treatment schedule for mangoes. Mangoes may be treated using schedule T102-a: (a) Fruit must be presorted by weight class. Treatment of mixed loads is not allowed. (b) The mangoes must...

  11. Solar hot water demonstration project at Red Star Industrial Laundry, Fresno, California

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    The performance of a Solar Hot Water System at a laundry in Fresno, California is described. The system features an integrated wastewater heat recovery subsystem and a solar preheating system designed to supply a part of the hot water requirements. Performance data for a six month period are projected to an annual savings of $18,703.

  12. Rotating shell eggs immersed in hot water for the purpose of pasteurization

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Pasteurization of shell eggs for inactivation of Salmonella using hot water immersion can be used to improve their safety. The rotation of a shell egg immersed in hot water has previously been simulated by computational fluid dynamics (CFD); however, experimental data to verify the results do not ex...

  13. Development of Standardized Domestic Hot Water Event Schedules for Residential Buildings

    SciTech Connect

    Hendron, R.; Burch, J.

    2008-08-01

    The Building America Research Benchmark is a standard house definition created as a point of reference for tracking progress toward multi-year energy savings targets. As part of its development, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory has established a set of domestic hot water events to be used in conjunction with sub-hourly analysis of advanced hot water systems.

  14. LABORATORY STUDY ON THE USE OF HOT WATER TO RECOVER LIGHT OILY WASTES FROM SANDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This laboratory research project investigated the use of hot water to recover oily contaminants that are less dense than water, highly viscous at ambient temperatures, and essentially nonvolatile. Displacement experiments were conducted at constant temperatures in the range from ...

  15. Risk of Burns from Eruptions of Hot Water Overheated in Microwave Ovens

    MedlinePlus

    ... Products Risk of Burns from Eruptions of Hot Water Overheated in Microwave Ovens Share Tweet Linkedin Pin ... What Can Consumers Do to Avoid Super-Heated Water? Follow the precautions and recommendations found in the ...

  16. LABORATORY STUDY ON THE USE OF HOT WATER TO RECOVER LIGHT OILY WASTES FROM SANDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This laboratory research project investigated the use of hot water to recover oily contaminants that are less dense than water, highly viscous at ambient temperatures, and essentially nonvolatile. Displacement experiments were conducted at constant temperatures in the range from ...

  17. Supercooling and the Mpemba effect: When hot water freezes quicker than cold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Auerbach, David

    1995-10-01

    Temperature measurements taken near vessel walls show that initially hot water may well begin to freeze quicker than cold. This is not, as previously surmised, due to the cooling history of the water (e.g., air expulsion during heating). Rather, supercooling virtually always takes place. On those occasions where the cold water supercools sufficiently more than the hot the Mpemba scenario is the following: The hot water supercools, but only slightly, before spontaneously freezing. Superficially it looks completely frozen. The cold water (in larger volume than that of the hot sample) supercools to a lower local temperature than the hot before it spontaneously freezes. This scenario can occur more often for ambient cooling temperatures between -6 °C and -12 °C.

  18. Dynamics of nanoconfined water under pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diallo, S. O.; Jażdżewska, M.; Palmer, J. C.; Mamontov, E.; Gubbins, K. E.; Śliwińska-Bartkowiak, M.

    2013-08-01

    We report a study of the effects of pressure on the diffusivity of water molecules confined in single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWNT) with average mean pore diameter of ˜16 Å. The measurements were carried out using high-resolution neutron scattering, over the temperature range 220≤T≤260 K, and at two pressure conditions: ambient and elevated pressure. The high pressure data were collected at constant volume on cooling, with P varying from ˜1.92 kbar at temperature T=260 K to ˜1.85 kbar at T=220 K. Analysis of the observed dynamic structure factor S(Q,E) reveals the presence of two relaxation processes, a faster diffusion component (FC) associated with the motion of “caged” or restricted molecules, and a slower component arising from the free water molecules diffusing within the SWNT matrix. While the temperature dependence of the slow relaxation time exhibits a Vogel-Fulcher-Tammann law and is non-Arrhenius in nature, the faster component follows an Arrhenius exponential law at both pressure conditions. The application of pressure remarkably slows down the overall molecular dynamics, in agreement with previous observations, but most notably affects the slow relaxation. The faster relaxation shows marginal or no change with pressure within the experimental conditions.

  19. High pressure water jet cutting and stripping

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoppe, David T.; Babai, Majid K.

    1991-01-01

    High pressure water cutting techniques have a wide range of applications to the American space effort. Hydroblasting techniques are commonly used during the refurbishment of the reusable solid rocket motors. The process can be controlled to strip a thermal protective ablator without incurring any damage to the painted surface underneath by using a variation of possible parameters. Hydroblasting is a technique which is easily automated. Automation removes personnel from the hostile environment of the high pressure water. Computer controlled robots can perform the same task in a fraction of the time that would be required by manual operation.

  20. High pressure water jet mining machine

    DOEpatents

    Barker, Clark R.

    1981-05-05

    A high pressure water jet mining machine for the longwall mining of coal is described. The machine is generally in the shape of a plowshare and is advanced in the direction in which the coal is cut. The machine has mounted thereon a plurality of nozzle modules each containing a high pressure water jet nozzle disposed to oscillate in a particular plane. The nozzle modules are oriented to cut in vertical and horizontal planes on the leading edge of the machine and the coal so cut is cleaved off by the wedge-shaped body.

  1. Generation of Hot Water from Hot-Dry for Heavy-Oil Recovery in Northern Alberta, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pathak, V.; Babadagli, T.; Majorowicz, J. A.; Unsworth, M. J.

    2011-12-01

    The focus of prior applications of hot-dry-rock (HDR) technology was mostly aimed at generating electricity. In northern Alberta, the thermal gradient is low and, therefore, this technology is not suitable for electricity generation. On the other hand, the cost of steam and hot water, and environmental impacts, are becoming critical issues in heavy-oil and bitumen recovery in Alberta. Surface generation of steam or hot-water accounts for six percent of Canada's natural gas consumption and about 50 million tons of CO2 emission. Lowered cost and environmental impacts are critical in the widespread use of steam (for in-situ recovery) and hot-water (for surface extraction of bitumen) in this region. This paper provides an extensive analysis of hot-water generation to be used in heavy-oil/bitumen recovery. We tested different modeling approaches used to determine the amount of energy produced during HDR by history matching to example field data. The most suitable numerical and analytical models were used to apply the data obtained from different regions containing heavy-oil/bitumen deposits in northern Alberta. The heat generation capacity of different regions was determined and the use of this energy (in the form of hot-water) for surface extraction processes was evaluated. Original temperature gradients were applied as well as realistic basement formation characteristics through an extensive hydro thermal analysis in the region including an experimental well drilled to the depth of 2,500m. Existing natural fractures and possible hydraulic fracturing scenarios were evaluated from the heat generation capacity and the economics points of view. The main problem was modeling difficulties, especially determination and representation of fracture network characteristics. A sensitivity analysis was performed for the selected high temperature gradient regions in Alberta. In this practice, the characteristics of hydraulic fractures, injection rate, depth, the distance between

  2. Continuous hot pressurized solvent extraction of 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl free radical scavenging compounds from Taiwan yams (Dioscorea alata).

    PubMed

    Chen, Po-Yen; Tu, Yu-Xun; Wu, Cheng-Tar; Jong, Ting-Ting; Chang, Chieh-Ming J

    2004-04-07

    This study investigates a semicontinuous hot pressurized fluid extraction process and the scavenging activity on the 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) free radical of the extract from Taiwan yams (Dioscorea alata). Liquid-liquid extractions were preliminarily employed to generate six fractions, initially extracted by ethanol. Then, the aqueous solution of dried crude ethanol extract was sequentially fractionated by hexane, chloroform, ethyl acetate, and n-butanol. The EC50 value was defined as the UV absorption of DPPH concentrations sufficiently decreased to 50% of the original value. It was found that all peel portions have a better effect on scavenging of the DPPH free radical than meat portions, especially for the ethyl acetate partition of the peel portion of Tainung #2 yam. Its EC50 value (14.5 microg mL(-1)) was even lower than that of ascorbic acid (21.4 microg mL(-1)). Furthermore, semicontinuous hot pressurized ethanol was superior to hot pressurized water in extracting the compound scavenging the DPPH radical from the Purpurea-Roxb peel. The recovery of four unknown compounds corresponded to the scavenging ratio of DPPH free radical in the hot pressurized ethanol extract. Finally, three-level and four-factor experimental design revealed that ethanol ratio and temperature were the most effective factors in order. Conditions of 80% of aqueous ethanol, 20.0 kg/kg solid ratio, 180 psig (1.342 MPa), and 100 degrees C were preferred to extract those antioxidants from the yam peel.

  3. Validation of a Hot Water Distribution Model Using Laboratory and Field Data

    SciTech Connect

    Backman, C.; Hoeschele, M.

    2013-07-01

    Characterizing the performance of hot water distribution systems is a critical step in developing best practice guidelines for the design and installation of high performance hot water systems. Developing and validating simulation models is critical to this effort, as well as collecting accurate input data to drive the models. In this project, the Building America research team ARBI validated the newly developed TRNSYS Type 604 pipe model against both detailed laboratory and field distribution system performance data. Validation efforts indicate that the model performs very well in handling different pipe materials, insulation cases, and varying hot water load conditions. Limitations of the model include the complexity of setting up the input file and long simulation run times. This project also looked at recent field hot water studies to better understand use patterns and potential behavioral changes as homeowners convert from conventional storage water heaters to gas tankless units. The team concluded that the current Energy Factor test procedure overestimates typical use and underestimates the number of hot water draws, which has implications for both equipment and distribution system performance. Gas tankless water heaters were found to impact how people use hot water, but the data does not necessarily suggest an increase in usage. Further study in hot water usage and patterns is needed to better define these characteristics in different climates and home vintages.

  4. Validation of a Hot Water Distribution Model Using Laboratory and Field Data

    SciTech Connect

    Backman, C.; Hoeschele, M.

    2013-07-01

    Characterizing the performance of hot water distribution systems is a critical step in developing best practice guidelines for the design and installation of high performance hot water systems. Developing and validating simulation models is critical to this effort, as well as collecting accurate input data to drive the models. In this project, the ARBI team validated the newly developed TRNSYS Type 604 pipe model against both detailed laboratory and field distribution system performance data. Validation efforts indicate that the model performs very well in handling different pipe materials, insulation cases, and varying hot water load conditions. Limitations of the model include the complexity of setting up the input file and long simulation run times. In addition to completing validation activities, this project looked at recent field hot water studies to better understand use patterns and potential behavioral changes as homeowners convert from conventional storage water heaters to gas tankless units. Based on these datasets, we conclude that the current Energy Factor test procedure overestimates typical use and underestimates the number of hot water draws. This has implications for both equipment and distribution system performance. Gas tankless water heaters were found to impact how people use hot water, but the data does not necessarily suggest an increase in usage. Further study in hot water usage and patterns is needed to better define these characteristics in different climates and home vintages.

  5. Low cost sonoluminescence experiment in pressurized water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernal, L.; Insabella, M.; Bilbao, L.

    2012-06-01

    We present a low cost design for demostration and mesurements of light emmision from a sonoluminescence experiment. Using presurized water introduced in an acrylic cylinder and one piezoelectric from an ultrasonic cleaner, we are able to generate cavitacion zones with emission of light. The use of argon to pressurize the water improves the emission an the light can be seen at naked eye in a softlit ambient.

  6. Occurrence of legionellae in hot water distribution systems of Finnish apartment buildings.

    PubMed

    Zacheus, O M; Martikainen, P J

    1994-12-01

    The occurrence of legionellae in the hot water distribution systems of 67 buildings located in different parts of Finland was studied. Most of the buildings were apartment buildings. They had different hot water temperatures, and some received their cold potable water from surface water plants and some from ground water plants. Hot water samples were taken from taps, showers, and water mains just before and after the heat exchanger. Legionella pneumophila was isolated from 30% of the distribution systems. In the legionella-positive samples the legionella concentration varied from < 50 to 3.2 x 10(5) colony-forming units (cfu)/L (mean 2.7 x 10(3) cfu/L). The highest concentration of legionellae was found in the shower water. Legionellae appeared more often and with higher concentrations in hot water systems using cold water processed in surface water plants than in hot water systems associated with ground water plants. A high organic matter content in surface waters might favor the occurrence of legionellae and also the growth of other heterotrophic microbes. Mean water temperature just after heating was slightly higher in the legionella-negative systems than in the legionella-positive systems (53.5 vs. 51.5 degrees C).

  7. Hot-compressed water extraction of polysaccharides from soy hulls.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hua-Min; Wang, Fei-Yun; Liu, Yu-Lan

    2016-07-01

    The polysaccharides of soy hulls were extracted by hot-compressed water at temperatures of 110 from 180°C and various treatment times (10-150min) in a batch system. It was determined that a moderate temperature and short time are suitable for the preparation of polysaccharides. The structure of xylan and the inter- and intra-chain hydrogen bonding of cellulose fibrils in the soy hulls were not significantly broken down. The polysaccharides obtained were primarily composed of α-L-arabinofuranosyl units, 4-O-methyl-glucuronic acid units and α-D-galactose units attached with substituted units. A sugar analysis indicated that arabinose was the major component, constituting 35.6-46.9% of the polysaccharide products extracted at 130°C, 140°C, and 150°C. This investigation contributes to the knowledge of the polysaccharides of soy by-products, which can reduce the environmental impact of waste from the food industries.

  8. Hydrolysis kinetics of tulip tree xylan in hot compressed water.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Junho; Lee, Hun Wook; Sim, Seungjae; Myint, Aye Aye; Park, Hee Jeong; Lee, Youn-Woo

    2016-08-01

    Lignocellulosic biomass, a promising renewable resource, can be converted into numerous valuable chemicals post enzymatic saccharification. However, the efficacy of enzymatic saccharification of lignocellulosic biomass is low; therefore, pretreatment is necessary to improve the efficiency. Here, a kinetic analysis was carried out on xylan hydrolysis, after hot compressed water pretreatment of the lignocellulosic biomass conducted at 180-220°C for 5-30min, and on subsequent xylooligosaccharide hydrolysis. The weight ratio of fast-reacting xylan to slow-reacting xylan was 5.25 in tulip tree. Our kinetic results were applied to three different reaction systems to improve the pretreatment efficiency. We found that semi-continuous reactor is promising. Lower reaction temperatures and shorter space times in semi-continuous reactor are recommended for improving xylan conversion and xylooligosaccharide yield. In the theoretical calculation, 95% of xylooligosaccharide yield and xylan conversion were achieved simultaneously with high selectivity (desired product/undesired product) of 100 or more. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  9. Solar heating and hot water system installed at Shoney's Restaurant, North Little Rock, Arkansas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    A solar heating system designed to supply a major portion of the space and water heating requirements for a restaurant is described. The restaurant has a floor space of approximately 4,650 square feet and requires approximate 1500 gallons of hot water daily. The solar energy system consists of 1,428 square feet of Chamberlain flat plate liquid collector subsystem, and a 1500 gallon storage subsystem circulating hot water producing 321 x 10 to the 6th power Btu/Yr (specified) building heating and hot water heating.

  10. Seasonal dynamics of bacterial community structure and composition in cold and hot drinking water derived from surface water reservoirs.

    PubMed

    Henne, Karsten; Kahlisch, Leila; Höfle, Manfred G; Brettar, Ingrid

    2013-10-01

    In temperate regions, seasonal variability of environmental factors affects the bacterial community in source water and finished drinking water. Therefore, the bacterial core community and its seasonal variability in cold and the respective hot drinking water was investigated. The bacterial core community was studied by 16S rRNA-based SSCP fingerprint analyses and band sequencing of DNA and RNA extracts of cold and hot water (60 °C). The bacterial communities of cold and hot drinking water showed a highly different structure and phylogenetic composition both for RNA and DNA extracts. For cold drinking water substantial seasonal dynamics of the bacterial community was observed related to environmental factors such as temperature and precipitation affecting source and drinking water. Phylogenetic analyses of the cold water community indicated that the majority of phylotypes were very closely affiliated with those detected in former studies of the same drinking water supply system (DWSS) in the preceding 6 years, indicating a high stability over time. The hot water community was very stable over time and seasons and highly distinct from the cold water with respect to structure and composition. The hot water community displayed a lower diversity and its phylotypes were mostly affiliated with bacteria of high temperature habitats with high growth rates indicated by their high RNA content. The conversion of the cold to the hot water bacterial community is considered as occurring within a few hours by the following two processes, i) by decay of most of the cold water bacteria due to heating, and ii) rapid growth of the high temperature adapted bacteria present in the hot water (co-heated with the cold water in the same device) using the nutrients released from the decaying cold water bacteria. The high temperature adapted bacteria originated partially from low abundant but beforehand detected members of the cold water; additionally, the rare members ("seed bank ") of the

  11. Archaeoglobus fulgidus Isolated from Hot North Sea Oil Field Waters

    PubMed Central

    Beeder, Janiche; Nilsen, Roald Kåre; Rosnes, Jan Thomas; Torsvik, Terje; Lien, Torleiv

    1994-01-01

    A hyperthermophilic sulfate reducer, strain 7324, was isolated from hot (75°C) oil field waters from an oil production platform in the Norwegian sector of the North Sea. It was enriched on a complex medium and isolated on lactate with sulfate. The cells were nonmotile, irregular coccoid to disc shaped, and 0.3 to 1.0 μm wide. The temperature for growth was between 60 and 85°C with an optimum of 76°C. Lactate, pyruvate, and valerate plus H2 were utilized as carbon and energy sources with sulfate as electron acceptor. Lactate was completely oxidized to CO2. The cells contained an active carbon monoxide dehydrogenase but no 2-oxoglutarate dehydrogenase activity, indicating that lactate was oxidized to CO2 via the acetyl coenzyme A/carbon monoxide dehydrogenase pathway. The cells produced small amounts of methane simultaneously with sulfate reduction. F420 was detected in the cells which showed a blue-green fluorescence at 420 nm. On the basis of morphological, physiological, and serological features, the isolate was classified as an Archaeoglobus sp. Strain 7324 showed 100% DNA-DNA homology with A. fulgidus Z, indicating that it belongs to the species A. fulgidus. Archaeoglobus sp. has been selectively enriched and immunomagnetically captured from oil field waters from three different platforms in the North Sea. Our results show that strain 7324 may grow in oil reservoirs at 70 to 85°C and contribute to hydrogen sulfide formation in this environment. Images PMID:16349231

  12. Effects of pressure and temperature on hot pressing a sialon. [Si-Al-O-N ceramics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yeh, H. C.; Waters, W. J.

    1977-01-01

    The combined effects of temperature and pressure on the resulting density of a sialon (i.e., a ceramic composed of Si, Al, O, and N) are evaluated. Pressures in the 3.5-27.5 MPa range and temperatures in the 1550-1750 C range are considered. It is found that: (1) fully dense sialon bodies may be produced at lower temperatures than those usually used in the field, (2) the phase equilibrium reaction is increased by increased pressure, (3) the iso-density contour may be used to help design the desired microstructure, (4) phase changes occurring in the sample during hot pressing influenced sialon densification to a large extent, and (5) microstructures exceeding 98% theoretical density suggest that plastic deformation has contributed to densification.

  13. Effects of pressure and temperature on hot pressing a sialon. [Si-Al-O-N ceramics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yeh, H. C.; Waters, W. J.

    1977-01-01

    The combined effects of temperature and pressure on the resulting density of a sialon (i.e., a ceramic composed of Si, Al, O, and N) are evaluated. Pressures in the 3.5-27.5 MPa range and temperatures in the 1550-1750 C range are considered. It is found that: (1) fully dense sialon bodies may be produced at lower temperatures than those usually used in the field, (2) the phase equilibrium reaction is increased by increased pressure, (3) the iso-density contour may be used to help design the desired microstructure, (4) phase changes occurring in the sample during hot pressing influenced sialon densification to a large extent, and (5) microstructures exceeding 98% theoretical density suggest that plastic deformation has contributed to densification.

  14. Hot and cold water as a supercritical solvent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuentevilla, Daphne Anne

    This dissertation addresses the anomalous properties of water at high temperatures near the vapor-liquid critical point and at low temperatures in the supercooled liquid region. The first part of the dissertation is concerned with the concentration dependence of the critical temperature, density, and pressure of an aqueous sodium chloride solution. Because of the practical importance of an accurate knowledge of critical parameters for industrial, geochemical, and biological applications, an empirical equation for the critical locus of aqueous sodium chloride solutions was adopted in 1999 by the International Association for the Properties of Water and Steam (IAPWS) as a guideline. However, since this original Guideline on the Critical Locus of Aqueous Solutions of Sodium Chloride was developed, two new theoretical developments occurred, motivating the first part of this dissertation. Here, I present a theory-based formulation for the critical parameters of aqueous sodium chloride solutions as a proposed replacement for the empirical formulation currently in use. This formulation has been published in the International Journal of Thermophysics and recommended by the Executive Committee of IAPWS for adoption as a Revised Guideline on the Critical Locus of Aqueous Solutions of Sodium Chloride. The second part of the dissertation addresses a new concept, considering cold water as a supercritical solvent. Based on the idea of a second, liquid-liquid, critical point in supercooled water, we explore the possibility of supercooled water as a novel supercooled solvent through the thermodynamics of critical phenomena. In 2006, I published a Physical Review letter presenting a parametric scaled equation of state for supercooled-water. Further developments based on this work led to a phenomenological mean-field "two-state" model, clarifying the nature of the phase separation in a polyamorphic single-component liquid. In this dissertation, I modify this two-state model to

  15. Aquatic Ecosystem Exposure Associated with Atmospheric Mercury Deposition: Importance of Watershed and Water Body Hot Spots and Hot Moments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knightes, C. D.; Golden, H. E.

    2008-12-01

    Atmospheric deposition of divalent mercury (Hg(II)) is the often the primary driving force for mercury contamination in fish tissue, resulting in mercury exposure to wildlife and humans. In lake systems associated with small watersheds, direct deposition to the water surface is typically the dominant mercury loading source; however, in lake systems with large watersheds and river systems, these inputs may be relatively small compared to loadings from the watershed via erosion and surface runoff. Within each system, transformation of the deposited mercury into the environmentally relevant form, methylmercury (MeHg), proceeds at different rates largely regulated by physical characteristics such as watershed land use types and water body hydraulic residence times, as water body chemistry, such as pH and trophic status Therefore, to fully represent mercury exposure in aquatic ecosystems, we must couple watershed models with water body models and explore where, why, and when hot spots and hot moments of transformation and transport occur. Here we link the simulated atmospheric mercury deposition results from the Community Multi-Scale Air Quality (CMAQ) model, a spatially distributed grid-based watershed mercury (Hg) model (GBMM), and the Water Quality Analysis Simulation Program (WASP). We use this multi-media modeling framework to simulate mercury species cycling over time for the different river reaches and watersheds within the Cape Fear River Basin, North Carolina. Through these simulations we investigate the importance of specific watershed and surface water system characteristics in simulating MeHg exposure concentrations. Because GBMM is a spatially-distributed model we are able to investigate the importance of such factors (i.e., watershed area, land-use types, and land-use percentages) in transporting and transforming deposited mercury. We present how particular land-use types and land-use change influence total loading and total mercury concentrations, how

  16. Water geochemistry and hydrogeology of the shallow aquifer at Roosevelt Hot Springs, southern Utah: A hot dry rock prospect

    SciTech Connect

    Vuataz, F.D.; Goff, F.

    1987-12-01

    On the western edge of the geothermal field, three deep holes have been drilled that are very hot but mostly dry. Two of them (Phillips 9-1 and Acord 1-26 wells) have been studied by Los Alamos National Laboratory for the Hot Dry Rock (HDR) resources evaluation program. A review of data and recommendations have been formulated to evaluate the HDR geothermal potential at Roosevelt. The present report is directed toward the study of the shallow aquifer of the Milford Valley to determine if the local groundwater would be suitable for use as make-up water in an HDR system. This investigation is the result of a cooperative agreement between Los Alamos and Phillips Petroleum Co., formerly the main operator of the Roosevelt Hot Springs Unit. The presence of these hot dry wells and the similar setting of the Roosevelt area to the prototype HDR site at Fenton Hill, New Mexico, make Roosevelt a very good candidate site for creation of another HDR geothermal system. This investigation has two main objectives: to assess the water geochemistry of the valley aquifer, to determine possible problems in future make-up water use, such as scaling or corrosion in the wells and surface piping, and to assess the hydrogeology of the shallow groundwaters above the HDR zone, to characterize the physical properties of the aquifer. These two objectives are linked by the fact that the valley aquifer is naturally contaminated by geothermal fluids leaking out of the hydrothermal reservoir. In an arid region where good-quality fresh water is needed for public water supply and irrigation, nonpotable waters would be ideal for an industrial use such as injection into an HDR energy extraction system. 50 refs., 10 figs., 10 tabs.

  17. Hot water swallows improve symptoms and accelerate esophageal clearance in esophageal motility disorders.

    PubMed

    Triadafilopoulos, G; Tsang, H P; Segall, G M

    1998-06-01

    Cold liquid ingestion may precipitate episodes of dysphagia and chest pain in patients with spastic esophageal motility disorders. The effect of hot liquids on esophageal symptoms, esophageal peristalsis, and clearance and any potential therapeutic benefit in such patients has not been examined. Using esophageal scintigraphy and manometry, we have investigated the effects of hot water swallows on dysphagia, chest pain, and esophageal motility and clearance in patients with esophageal motility disorders. We studied 48 men and women with intermittent dysphagia to both solids and liquids, chest pain, and/or regurgitation. All patients underwent upper endoscopy, barium swallow, and esophageal manometry using standard techniques. Esophageal scintigraphy assessed esophageal transit time (ETT) and retrograde intraesophageal movement of bolus at baseline (22 degrees C) and after hot (60 degrees C) water swallows. Esophageal manometry assessed the amplitude and duration of esophageal contractions in response to baseline and hot water swallows. Patients were followed clinically for as long as 6 months to assess symptomatic response. We found that baseline esophageal scintigraphy revealed a mean ETT of 48.5 seconds; after hot water swallow, mean ETT was 27.8 seconds (p < 0.001). The number of secondary peaks at baseline was 3.5; after hot water swallow, it was 2.1 (p < 0.001). Baseline esophageal manometry showed a mean esophageal body contraction amplitude of 188 mm Hg (mean duration, 11.8 seconds) in response to wet swallows and 125 mm Hg (mean duration, 5.7 seconds) with hot water swallows (p < 0.001). Clinically, 28 (58%) of 48 patients noted significant (>50%) improvement of their symptoms and have been ingesting hot water or other hot liquids regularly with their meals. We conclude that hot water accelerates esophageal clearance, decreases the amplitude and duration of esophageal body contractions, and improves symptoms in patients with esophageal motility disorders

  18. Hot gas cleanup test facility for gasification and pressurized combustion. Quarterly report, April--June 1995

    SciTech Connect

    1995-08-01

    This quarterly technical progress report summarizes the work completed during the first quarter, April 1 through June 30, 1995. The objective of this project is to evaluate hot gas particle control technologies using coal-derived gas streams. This will entail the design, construction, installation, and use of a flexible test facility which can operate under realistic gasificafion and combustion conditions. The major particulate control device issues to be addressed include the integration of the particulate control devices into coal utilization systems, on-line cleaning techniques, chemical and thermal degradation of components, fatigue or structural failures, blinding, collection efficiency as a function of particle size, and scale-up of particulate control systems to commercial size. The conceptual design of the facility was extended to include a within scope, phased expansion of the existing Hot Gas Cleanup Test Facility Cooperative Agreement to also address systems integration issues of hot particulate removal in advanced coal-based power generation systems. This expansion included the consideration of the following modules at the test facility in addition to the original Transport Reactor gas source and Hot Gas Cleanup Units: Carbonizer/pressurized circulating fluidized bed gas source; hot gas cleanup units to mate to all gas streams; combustion gas turbine; and fuel cell and associated gas treatment. The major emphasis during this reporting period was continuing the detailed design of the facility towards completion and integrating the particulate control devices (PCDS) into the structural and process designs. Substantial progress in construction activities was achieved during the quarter. Delivery and construction of the process structural steel continued at a good pace during the quarter.

  19. Hot Gas Cleanup Test Facility for gasification and pressurized combustion. Quarterly report, October--December 1994

    SciTech Connect

    1995-02-01

    The objective of this project is to evaluate hot gas particle control technologies using coal-derived gas streams. This will entail the design, construction, installation, and use of a flexible test facility which can operate under realistic gasification and combustion conditions. The major particulate control device issues to be addressed include the integration of the particulate control devices into coal utilization systems, on-line cleaning techniques, chemical and thermal degradation of components, fatigue or structural failures, blinding, collection efficiency as a function of particle size, and scale-up of particulate control systems to commercial size. The conceptual design of the facility was extended to include a within scope, phased expansion of the existing Hot Gas Cleanup Test Facility Cooperative Agreement to also address systems integration issues of hot particulate removal in advanced coal-based power generation systems. This expansion included the consideration of the following modules at the test facility in addition to the original Transport Reactor gas source and Hot Gas Cleanup Units: carbonizer/pressurized circulating fluidized bed gas source; hot gas cleanup units to mate to all gas streams; combustion gas turbine; and fuel cell and associated gas treatment. The major emphasis during this reporting period was continuing the detailed design of the facility and integrating the particulate control devices (PCDs) into structural and process designs. Substantial progress in underground construction activities was achieved during the quarter. Delivery and construction of coal handling and process structural steel began during the quarter. Delivery and construction of coal handling and process structural steel began during the quarter. MWK equipment at the grade level and the first tier are being set in the structure.

  20. Tritiated Water on Molecular Sieve: Water Dynamics and Pressure Observations

    SciTech Connect

    Walters, R.T.

    1999-04-23

    The production of fusion energy in a Tokamak using deuterium and tritium requires the safe handling and processing of exhaust gases that contain various amounts of tritium. Initial operation of the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR), Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, oxidized exhaust gases for tritium recovery or long-term storage. One of the most efficient and safest ways to contain tritiated water is to sorb it onto a pelletized 4A molecular sieve. A Disposable Molecular Sieve Bed (DMSB) was designed as a pressure vessel because of the possibility of pressure generation from the radiolysis of tritiated water on molecular sieve. Hydrogen production contributes to the complexity of the containers used to transport and store tritiated water, and increases the fabrication costs. Two months after removing a DMSB from the process at TFTR, a pressure in excess of that predicted from self-radiolysis was observed. Interestingly, pressure measurements at longer times (up to 2.5 years) showed less pressure than expected. Pressure was not being generated in the DMSBs at the predicted rate. This was unexpected and prompted an investigation into the mechanism responsible for the anomalous pressure measurements.

  1. Static Characteristics of Absorption Chiller-Heater Supplying Cold and Hot Water Simultaneously

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inoue, Naoyuki; Irie, Tomoyoshi

    Absorption chiller-heaters which can supply both chilled water and hot water at the same time, are used for cooling and heating air conditioning systems. In this paper, we classified absorption cold and hot water generating cycles and control methods, studied these absorption cycles by cycle simulation. In economizer cycle, condensed refrigerant which heats hot water is transported to cooling cycle and used effectively for cooling chilled water, Concerning with transported condensed refrigerant, there are two methods, all condensed refrigerant or required refrigerant for cooling are transported to cooling cycle, and required refrigerant method is better for energy saving. Adding improvement of solution control to this economizer cycle, simultaneous cold and hot water supplying chiller-heaters have good characteristics of energy saving in the all region.

  2. Influence of carbonated drinking water on tibia strength of domestic cockerels reared in hot environments.

    PubMed

    Kreider, E M; Nelson, S M; Harrison, P C

    1990-12-01

    To determine the effects of heat stress and drinking water treatments on physical characteristics of skeletal tissue, tibias of cockerels ranging in age from 4 to 11 weeks were tested for breaking strength. Birds were subjected to either a thermoneutral environment (21 +/- 2 C) or a hot environment (37 +/- 2 C) and supplied with either tap or carbonated drinking water. Breaking strength of tibias was reduced in the hot environment; however, consumption of carbonated drinking water in the hot environment resulted in bone strength comparable with that associated with thermoneutral environment (both types of water). Also, bones from birds of the carbonated water-37 C treatment group had less phase breaks and tended to separate with a single break. Results indicate that hot environment and carbonated drinking water not only affect the previously reported morphologic and chemical characteristics of developing bone, but also their physical attributes.

  3. Tongue pressure patterns during water swallowing.

    PubMed

    Kennedy, Daniel; Kieser, Jules; Bolter, Chris; Swain, Michael; Singh, Bhavia; Waddell, J Neil

    2010-03-01

    Bolus propulsion during the normal oral phase of swallowing is thought to be characterised by the sequential elevation of the front, middle, and posterior regions of the dorsum of the tongue. However, the coordinated orchestration of lingual movement is still poorly understood. This study examined how pressures generated by the tongue against the hard palate differed between three points along the midline of the tongue. Specifically, we tested three hypotheses: (1) that there are defined individual patterns of pressure change within the mouth during liquid swallowing; (2) that there are significant negative pressures generated at defined moments during normal swallowing; and, (3) that liquid swallowing is governed by the interplay of pressures generated in an anteroposterior direction in the mouth. Using a metal appliance described previously, we measured absolute pressures during water swallows in six healthy volunteers (4 male, 2 female) with an age range of 25-35 years. Participants performed three 10-ml water swallows from a small cup on five separate days, thus providing data for a total of 15 separate water swallows. There was a distinct pattern to the each of the pressure signals, and this pattern was preserved in the mean obtained when the data were pooled. Furthermore, raw signals from the same subjects presented consistent patterns at each of the five testing sessions. In all subjects, pressure at the anterior and hind palate tended to be negative relative to the preswallow value; at mid-palate, however, pressure changes were less consistent between individuals. When the pressure differences between the sites were calculated, we found that during the swallow a net negative pressure difference developed between anterior and mid-palate and a net positive pressure difference developed between mid-palate and hind palate. Large, rapid fluctuations in pressure occurred at all sites and these varied several-fold between subjects. When the brief sharp reduction

  4. Solar heating and hot water system installed at Cherry Hill, New Jersey

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    The solar heating and hot water system installed in existing buildings at the Cherry Hill Inn in Cherry Hill, New Jersey is described in detail. The system is expected to furnish 31.5% of the overall heating load and 29.8% of the hot water load. The collectors are liquid evacuated tube type. The storage system is an above ground insulated steel water tank with a capacity of 7,500 gallons.

  5. Production and recovery of monosaccharides from lignocellulose hot water extracts in a pulp mill biorefinery.

    PubMed

    Sainio, Tuomo; Kallioinen, Mari; Nakari, Olli; Mänttäri, Mika

    2013-05-01

    Processing of hemicelluloses obtained with pressurized hot water extraction (PHWE) from Scots pine to monosaccharides and other chemicals was investigated experimentally. A process scheme consisting of ultrafiltration, acid hydrolysis, and chromatographic separation was proposed and evaluated. A two-stage ultrafiltration was found necessary for efficient fractionation of the wood extract. It was shown that the monosaccharides can be released from a concentrated hemicellulose fraction with sulfuric acid hydrolysis without a significant loss of yield due to decomposition of monosaccharides. Acid hydrolysate was successfully fractionated with ion exchange chromatography and the hydrolysis acid was recovered for reuse. The product fractions obtained include polyphenols and high molar mass hemicelluloses (from UF stage 1), arabinose (from UF stage 2), as well as acetic acid and a mixture of monosaccharides (xylose, galactose, mannose, glucose) from chromatography. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Liquid hot water pretreatment of lignocellulosic biomass for bioethanol production accompanying with high valuable products.

    PubMed

    Zhuang, Xinshu; Wang, Wen; Yu, Qiang; Qi, Wei; Wang, Qiong; Tan, Xuesong; Zhou, Guixiong; Yuan, Zhenhong

    2016-01-01

    Pretreatment is an essential prerequisite to overcome recalcitrance of biomass and enhance the ethanol conversion efficiency of polysaccharides. Compared with other pretreatment methods, liquid hot water (LHW) pretreatment not only reduces the downstream pressure by making cellulose more accessible to the enzymes but minimizes the formation of degradation products that inhibit the growth of fermentative microorganisms. Herein, this review summarized the improved LHW process for different biomass feedstocks, the decomposition behavior of biomass in the LHW process, the enzymatic hydrolysis of LHW-treated substrates, and production of high value-added products and ethanol. Moreover, a combined process producing ethanol and high value-added products was proposed basing on the works of Guangzhou Institute of Energy Conversion to make LHW pretreatment acceptable in the biorefinery of cellulosic ethanol.

  7. Preliminary results from hot-water drilling and borehole instrumentation on Store Glacier, West Greenland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doyle, S. H.; Christoffersen, P.; Hubbard, B. P.; Young, T. J.; Hofstede, C. M.; Box, J.; Todd, J.; Bougamont, M. H.; Hubbard, A.

    2015-12-01

    As part of the Subglacial Access and Fast Ice Research Experiment (SAFIRE) pressurised hot water was used to drill four 603-616 m-long boreholes to the bed of the Greenland Ice Sheet at a site located 30 km from the calving front of fast-flowing, marine-terminating Store Glacier (70° N, ~1000 m elevation). Despite the boreholes freezing within hours, 4 wired sensor strings were successfully deployed in three of the boreholes. These included a thermistor string to obtain the englacial temperature profile installed in the same borehole as a string of tilt sensors to measure borehole deformation, and two sets of water pressure, electrical conductivity and turbidity sensors installed just above the bed in separate, adjacent boreholes. The boreholes made a strong hydrological connection to the bed during drilling, draining rapidly to ~80 m below the ice surface. The connection of subsequent boreholes was observed as a perturbation in water pressure and temperature recorded in neighbouring boreholes, indicating an effective hydrological sub- or en-glacial connection between them. The sensors, which were all connected to loggers at the surface by cables, operated for between ~30 and 80+ days before indications suggest that the cables stretched and then snapped - with the lowermost sensors failing first. The records obtained from these sensors reveal (i) high and increasing water pressure varying diurnally close to overburden albeit of a small magnitude (~ 0.3 m H2O), (ii) a minimum extrapolated englacial temperature of -21°C with above-freezing temperatures at the bed, and (iv) high rates of internal deformation and strain increasing towards the bed as evinced by increasing tilt with depth. These borehole observations are complemented by GPS measurements of ice motion, meteorological data, and seismic and radar surveys.

  8. LWRS Fuels Pathway: Engineering Design and Fuels Pathway Initial Testing of the Hot Water Corrosion System

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. John Garnier; Dr. Kevin McHugh

    2012-09-01

    The Advanced LWR Nuclear Fuel Development R&D pathway performs strategic research focused on cladding designs leading to improved reactor core economics and safety margins. The research performed is to demonstrate the nuclear fuel technology advancements while satisfying safety and regulatory limits. These goals are met through rigorous testing and analysis. The nuclear fuel technology developed will assist in moving existing nuclear fuel technology to an improved level that would not be practical by industry acting independently. Strategic mission goals are to improve the scientific knowledge basis for understanding and predicting fundamental nuclear fuel and cladding performance in nuclear power plants, and to apply this information in the development of high-performance, high burn-up fuels. These will result in improved safety, cladding, integrity, and nuclear fuel cycle economics. To achieve these goals various methods for non-irradiated characterization testing of advanced cladding systems are needed. One such new test system is the Hot Water Corrosion System (HWCS) designed to develop new data for cladding performance assessment and material behavior under simulated off-normal reactor conditions. The HWCS is capable of exposing prototype rodlets to heated, high velocity water at elevated pressure for long periods of time (days, weeks, months). Water chemistry (dissolved oxygen, conductivity and pH) is continuously monitored. In addition, internal rodlet heaters inserted into cladding tubes are used to evaluate repeated thermal stressing and heat transfer characteristics of the prototype rodlets. In summary, the HWCS provides rapid ex-reactor evaluation of cladding designs in normal (flowing hot water) and off-normal (induced cladding stress), enabling engineering and manufacturing improvements to cladding designs before initiation of the more expensive and time consuming in-reactor irradiation testing.

  9. Microstructure and Texture of Y123 Ceramics after Hot Deformation by Torsion Under Pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imayev, M. F.; Kabirova, D. B.; Pavlova, V. V.

    2015-10-01

    The method of EBSD analysis has been used to investigate the microstructure and texture of the YBa2Cu3O7-х (Y123) ceramics, deformed by hot torsion under quasi-hydrostatic pressure. It is shown that the local average grain size does not depend on the distance to the center of the sample. The texture along a radius of the samples is inhomogeneous. The presence of a ring-shaped region with very weak texture has been detected both in a sample with strong texture and in a sample with weak average texture.

  10. Hot-water pretreatment of cattails for extraction of cellulose.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Bo; Shahbazi, Abolghasem; Wang, Lijun; Diallo, Oumou; Whitmore, Allante

    2011-07-01

    To date in the US, production of renewable fuels, particularly ethanol, is primarily from food crops that are high in sugar and starch. The use of arable land for fuel rather than food production and the use of a food source for fuel rather than food have created issues in pricing and availability of traditional foods and feed. The use of cattails to produce biofuel will add value to land and also reduce emissions of greenhouse gases by replacing petroleum products. In order to investigate the feasibility of converting cattails into cellulosic ethanol, a hot-water pretreatment process was studied using a Dionex accelerated solvent extractor (ASE) varying treatment temperature and time. The pretreatment at 190°C for more than 10 min could effectively dissolve the xylan fraction of cattails as soluble oligomers. Both the glucose yield and xylose yield obtained from the pretreated cattails increased with the escalation of the final pretreatment temperature, treatment time or enzyme loading. When cattails were pretreated at 190°C for 15 min, the highest glucose yield of 77.6% from the cellulose was achieved in 48 h using a cellulase loading of 60 FPU/g glucan. The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae (ATCC 24858) was able to ferment glucose released by cattail cellulose, resulting in approximately 88.7 ± 2.8% of the theoretical ethanol yield. The higher enzyme loading of 60 FPU/g glucan will significantly increase costs. It is recommended that further studies be carried out using cattails as a feedstock for bio-fuels, especially to optimize the economics of biological conversion processes for cattails with regard to reducing enzyme usage, energy input, glucose yield and xylose yield.

  11. Final report : testing and evaluation for solar hot water reliability.

    SciTech Connect

    Caudell, Thomas P.; He, Hongbo; Menicucci, David F.; Mammoli, Andrea A.; Burch, Jay

    2011-07-01

    Solar hot water (SHW) systems are being installed by the thousands. Tax credits and utility rebate programs are spurring this burgeoning market. However, the reliability of these systems is virtually unknown. Recent work by Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) has shown that few data exist to quantify the mean time to failure of these systems. However, there is keen interest in developing new techniques to measure SHW reliability, particularly among utilities that use ratepayer money to pay the rebates. This document reports on an effort to develop and test new, simplified techniques to directly measure the state of health of fielded SHW systems. One approach was developed by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and is based on the idea that the performance of the solar storage tank can reliably indicate the operational status of the SHW systems. Another approach, developed by the University of New Mexico (UNM), uses adaptive resonance theory, a type of neural network, to detect and predict failures. This method uses the same sensors that are normally used to control the SHW system. The NREL method uses two additional temperature sensors on the solar tank. The theories, development, application, and testing of both methods are described in the report. Testing was performed on the SHW Reliability Testbed at UNM, a highly instrumented SHW system developed jointly by SNL and UNM. The two methods were tested against a number of simulated failures. The results show that both methods show promise for inclusion in conventional SHW controllers, giving them advanced capability in detecting and predicting component failures.

  12. Single-step microwave-assisted hot water extraction of hemicelluloses from selected lignocellulosic materials - A biorefinery approach.

    PubMed

    Mihiretu, Gezahegn T; Brodin, Malin; Chimphango, Annie F; Øyaas, Karin; Hoff, Bård H; Görgens, Johann F

    2017-10-01

    The viability of single-step microwave-induced pressurized hot water conditions for co-production of xylan-based biopolymers and bioethanol from aspenwood sawdust and sugarcane trash was investigated. Extraction of hemicelluloses was conducted using microwave-assisted pressurized hot water system. The effects of temperature and time on extraction yield and enzymatic digestibility of resulting solids were determined. Temperatures between 170-200°C for aspenwood and 165-195°C for sugarcane trash; retention times between 8-22min for both feedstocks, were selected for optimization purpose. Maximum xylan extraction yields of 66 and 50%, and highest cellulose digestibilities of 78 and 74%, were attained for aspenwood and sugarcane trash respectively. Monomeric xylose yields for both feedstocks were below 7%, showing that the xylan extracts were predominantly in non-monomeric form. Thus, single-step microwave-assisted hot water method is viable biorefinery approach to extract xylan from lignocelluloses while rendering the solid residues sufficiently digestible for ethanol production. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Pressurized water reactor flow skirt apparatus

    SciTech Connect

    Kielb, John F.; Schwirian, Richard E.; Lee, Naugab E.; Forsyth, David R.

    2016-04-05

    A pressurized water reactor vessel having a flow skirt formed from a perforated cylinder structure supported in the lower reactor vessel head at the outlet of the downcomer annulus, that channels the coolant flow through flow holes in the wall of the cylinder structure. The flow skirt is supported at a plurality of circumferentially spaced locations on the lower reactor vessel head that are not equally spaced or vertically aligned with the core barrel attachment points, and the flow skirt employs a unique arrangement of hole patterns that assure a substantially balanced pressure and flow of the coolant over the entire underside of the lower core support plate.

  14. Development of Absorption Heat Pump Driven by Low Temperature Hot Water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoshida, Toshihiro; Nakamura, Naoto; Asai, Hiroshi; Hasatani, Masanobu; Watanabe, Fujio; Fujisawa, Ryou

    We developed an Adsorption Heat Pump (AHP) system, which applies silica-gel as adsorbent and H2O as refrigerant, and is possibly intended to use low temperature hot water (333K) as a driving force. The growing importance to save energy, leads us to develop energy saving systems such as Co-generation systems, including fuel cell system. It is important to use low temperature hot water in order to achieve high efficiency in total. It is, however, noticed that the lower water temperature is, the more difficult its' heat recovery becomes. We reported experimental results of the AHP system, and estimated the possibility to apply low temperature hot water from fuel cell system to the AHP system. We showed quantitatively that the AHP system is able to be driven by low temperature hot water(333K).

  15. Solar heating and hot water system installed at Shoney's Restaurant, North Little Rock, Arkansas. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1980-08-01

    The solar heating system is designed to supply a major portion of the space and water heating requirements for a newly built Shoney's Big Boy Restaurant which was installed with completion occurring in December 1979. The restaurant has a floor space of approximately 4,650 square feet and requires approximately 1500 gallons of hot water daily. The solar energy system consists of 1,428 square feet of Chamberlain flat plate liquid collector subsystem, and a 1500 gallon storage subsystem circulating hot water producing 321 x 10/sup 6/ Btu/yr (specified) building heating and hot water heating. Designer - Energy Solutions, Incorporated. Contractor - Stephens Brothers, Incorporated. This report includes extracts from site files, specification references for solar modifications to existing building heating and hot water systems, drawings installation, operation and maintenance instructions.

  16. Cold-Climate Solar Domestic Hot Water Systems Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Burch, J.; Salasovich, J.; Hillman, T.

    2005-11-01

    The Solar Heating and Lighting Sub-program has set the key goal to reduce the cost of saved energy [Csav, defined as (total cost, $)/(total discounted savings, kWh_thermal)] for solar domestic water heaters (SDWH) by at least 50%. To determine if this goal is attainable and prioritize R&D for cold-climate SDWH, life-cycle analyses were done with hypothetical lower-cost components in glycol, drainback, and thermosiphon systems. Balance-of-system (BOS, everything but the collector) measures included replacing metal components with polymeric versions and system simplification. With all BOS measures in place, Csav could be reduced more than 50% with a low-cost, selectively-coated, glazed polymeric collector, and slightly less than 50% with either a conventional selective metal-glass or a non-selective glazed polymer collector. The largest percent reduction in Csav comes from replacing conventional pressurized solar storage tanks and metal heat exchangers with un-pressurized polymer tanks with immersed polymer heat exchangers, which could be developed with relatively low-risk R&D.

  17. Water, ammonia, and H 2S mixing ratios in Jupiter's five-micron hot spots: A dynamical model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedson, A. James

    2005-09-01

    The Galileo probe entered the jovian atmosphere at the southern edge of a 5-micron hot spot, one of typically 8-10 quasi-evenly-spaced longitudinal areas of anomalously high 5-micron IR emission that reside in a narrow latitude band centered on +7.5 degrees. These hot spots are characterized primarily by a low abundance of the cloud particles that dominate the 5-micron opacity at other locations on the planet, and by significant desiccation of ammonia, water and hydrogen sulfide in the upper layers of the troposphere. Ortiz et al. [1998. Evolution and persistence of 5-micron hot spots at the Galileo probe entry latitude. J. Geophys. Res. 103, 23,051-23,069] found that the latitude and drift rate of the hot spots could be explained if they are formed by an equatorially trapped Rossby wave of meridional degree 1 moving with a phase speed between 99 and 103 m s -1 relative to System III. Here we model additional properties of the hot spots in terms of the amplitude saturation of such a wave propagating in the weakly stratified deep troposphere. We identify the hot spots with locations where the wave plus mean thermal stratification becomes marginally stable. In these locations, potential temperature isotherms stretch downward to very deep levels in the troposphere. Since fluid parcels follow these isotherms under adiabatic flow conditions, the parcels dive downward when they enter the portion of the wave associated with the hot spot and soar upward upon leaving the spot. We show that this model can account for the anomalous vertical profiles of NH 3, H 2O, and H 2S mixing ratio measured by the Galileo probe. Pressures vary by as much as 20 bar over potential temperature isotherms in solutions that produce sufficient desiccation of water and H 2S in hot spots. Approximately 6×10 of Jupiter's internal heat flux must be tapped to maintain the wave over the mean hot spot lifetime of 10 7 s. The results suggest that the phenomenon that causes hot spots may occur widely

  18. Cold Helium Pressurization for Liquid Oxygen/Liquid Methane Propulsion Systems: Fully-Integrated Hot-Fire Test Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morehead, R. L.; Atwell, M. J.; Melcher, J. C.; Hurlbert, E. A.

    2016-01-01

    Hot-fire test demonstrations were successfully conducted using a cold helium pressurization system fully integrated into a liquid oxygen (LOX) / liquid methane (LCH4) propulsion system (Figure 1). Cold helium pressurant storage at near liquid nitrogen (LN2) temperatures (-275 F and colder) and used as a heated tank pressurant provides a substantial density advantage compared to ambient temperature storage. The increased storage density reduces helium pressurant tank size and mass, creating payload increases of 35% for small lunar-lander sized applications. This degree of mass reduction also enables pressure-fed propulsion systems for human-rated Mars ascent vehicle designs. Hot-fire test results from the highly-instrumented test bed will be used to demonstrate system performance and validate integrated models of the helium and propulsion systems. A pressurization performance metric will also be developed as a means to compare different active pressurization schemes.

  19. Effects of high shock pressures and pore morphology on hot spot mechanisms in HMX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Springer, H. K.; Tarver, C. M.; Bastea, S.

    2017-01-01

    The shock initiation and detonation behavior of heterogeneous solid explosives is governed by its microstructure and reactive properties. New additive manufacturing techniques offer unprecedented control of explosive microstructures previously impossible, enabling us to develop novel explosives with tailored shock sensitivity and detonation properties. Since microstructure-performance relationships are not well established for explosives, there is little material design guidance for these manufacturing techniques. In this study, we explore the effects of high shock pressures (15-38 GPa) with long shock durations and different pore morphologies on hot spot mechanisms in HMX. HMX is chosen as the model material because we have experimental data on many of the chemical-thermal-mechanical properties required for pore collapse simulations. Our simulations are performed using the multi-physics arbitrary Lagrangian Eulerian finite element hydrocode, ALE3D, with Cheetah-based models for the unreacted and the product equation-of-states. We use a temperature-dependent specific heat with the unreacted equation-of-state and a temperature-dependent viscosity model to ensure accurate shock temperatures for subsequent chemistry. The Lindemann Law model is used for shock melting in HMX. In contrast to previous pore collapse studies at lower shock pressures (≤10 GPa) in HMX and shorter post-collapse burning times, our calculations show that shock melting occurs above 15 GPa due to higher bulk heating and a prominent elongated ("jet-like") hot spot region forms at later times. The combination of the elongated, post-collapse hot spot region and the higher bulk heating with increasing pressure dramatically increases the growth rate of reaction. Our calculations show that the reaction rate, dF/dt, increases with increasing shock pressure. We decompose the reaction rate into ignition ((dF/dt)ig) and growth ((dF/dt)gr) phases to better analyze our results. We define the ignition phase

  20. Fabrication and characterization of Si3N4 ceramics without additives by high pressure hot pressing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shimada, M.; Tanaka, A.; Yamada, T.; Koizumi, M.

    1984-01-01

    High pressure hot-pressing of Si3N4 without additives was performed using various kinds of Si3N4 powder as starting materials, and the relation between densification and alpha-beta phase transformation was studied. The temperature dependences of Vickers microhardness and fracture toughness were also examined. Densification of Si3N4 was divided into three stages, and it was found that densification and phase transformation of Si3N4 under pressure were closely associated. The results of the temperature dependence of Vickers microhardness indicated that the high-temperature hardness was strongly influenced not only by the density and microstructure of sintered body but also by the purity of starting powder. The fracture toughness values of Si3N4 bodies without additives were 3.29-4.39 MN/m to the 3/2 power and independent of temperature up to 1400 C.

  1. Tritium issues in commercial pressurized water reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, G.

    2008-07-15

    Tritium has become an important radionuclide in commercial Pressurized Water Reactors because of its mobility and tendency to concentrate in plant systems as tritiated water during the recycling of reactor coolant. Small quantities of tritium are released in routine regulated effluents as liquid water and as water vapor. Tritium has become a focus of attention at commercial nuclear power plants in recent years due to inadvertent, low-level, chronic releases arising from routine maintenance operations and from component failures. Tritium has been observed in groundwater in the vicinity of stations. The nuclear industry has undertaken strong proactive corrective measures to prevent recurrence, and continues to eliminate emission sources through its singular focus on public safety and environmental stewardship. This paper will discuss: production mechanisms for tritium, transport mechanisms from the reactor through plant, systems to the environment, examples of routine effluent releases, offsite doses, basic groundwater transport and geological issues, and recent nuclear industry environmental and legal ramifications. (authors)

  2. Hypersensitivity Pneumonitis-like Granulomatous Lung Disease with Nontuberculous Mycobacteria from Exposure to Hot Water Aerosols

    PubMed Central

    Sood, Akshay; Sreedhar, Rajgopal; Kulkarni, Pradeep; Nawoor, Abdur Ray

    2007-01-01

    Objective Human activities associated with aerosol-generating hot water sources are increasingly popular. Recently, a hypersensitivity pneumonitis (HP)-like granulomatous lung disease, with non-tuberculous mycobacteria from exposure to hot water aerosols from hot tubs/spas, showers, and indoor swimming pools, has been described in immunocompetent individuals (also called “hot tub lung”). Our objective in this study was to examine four additional cases of hot tub lung and compare these cases with others reported in the English print literature on this disease. Data sources and extraction We retrospectively reviewed all cases (n = 4) of presumptively diagnosed hot tub lung in immunocompetent individuals at the various physician practices in Springfield, Illinois, during 2001–2005. In addition, we searched MEDLINE for cases of hot tub lung described in the literature. Data synthesis We summarized the clinical presentation and investigations of four presumptive cases and reviewed previously reported cases of hot tub lung. Conclusions There is a debate in the literature whether hot tub lung is an HP or a direct infection of the lung by nontuberculous mycobacteria. Primary prevention of this disease relies on ventilation and good use practices. Secondary prevention of this disease requires education of both the general public and clinicians to allow for the early diagnosis of this disease. PMID:17384775

  3. PRESSURIZED WATER REACTOR CORE WITH PLUTONIUM BURNUP

    DOEpatents

    Puechl, K.H.

    1963-09-24

    A pressurized water reactor is described having a core containing Pu/sup 240/ in which the effective microscopic neutronabsorption cross section of Pu/sup 240/ in unconverted condition decreases as the time of operation of the reactor increases, in order to compensate for loss of reactivity resulting from fission product buildup during reactor operation. This means serves to improve the efficiency of the reactor operation by reducing power losses resulting from control rods and burnable poisons. (AEC)

  4. Pressure broadening of oxygen by water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drouin, Brian J.; Payne, Vivienne; Oyafuso, Fabiano; Sung, Keeyoon; Mlawer, Eli

    2014-01-01

    A need for precise air-mass retrievals utilizing the near-infrared O2 A-band has motivated measurements of the water-broadening in oxygen. Experimental challenges have resulted in very little water broadened oxygen data. Existing water broadening data for the O2 A-band is of insufficient precision for application to the atmospheric data. Line shape theory suggests that approximate O2 pressure broadening parameters for one spectral region, such as the A-band, may be obtained from comparable spectral regions such as the O2 60 GHz Q-branch, which is also used prominently in remote sensing. We have measured precise O2-H2O broadening for the 60 GHz Q-branch and the pure-rotational transitions at room temperature with a Zeeman-modulated absorption cell using a frequency-multiplier spectrometer. Intercomparisons of these data and other O2 pressure broadening data sets confirm the expectation of only minor band-to-band scaling of pressure broadening. The measurement provides a basis for fundamental parameterization of retrieval codes for the long-wavelength atmospheric measured values. Finally, we demonstrate the use of these measurements for retrievals of air-mass via remote sensing of the oxygen A-band.

  5. Building America Top Innovations 2012: Model Simulating Real Domestic Hot Water Use

    SciTech Connect

    none,

    2013-01-01

    This Building America Top Innovations profile describes Building America research that is improving domestic hot water modeling capabilities to more effectively address one of the largest energy uses in residential buildings.

  6. Design package for a complete residential solar space heating and hot water system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    Information necessary to evaluate the design of a solar space heating and hot water system is reported. System performance specifications, the design data brochure, the system description, and other information pertaining to the design are included.

  7. Remediation of PAH spiked soils: concentrated H2O2 treatment/continuous hot water extraction-oxidation.

    PubMed

    Rivas, Javier; Gimeno, Olga; de la Calle, Ruth G; Portela, Juan R; de la Ossa, Enrique Martínez

    2009-09-15

    Artificially contaminated soil with four different polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (acenaphthene, phenathrene, anthracene and fluoranthene) has been separately treated by two different processes: (A) concentrated hydrogen peroxide at mild conditions of temperature (343-393 K) and pressure (0.5 MPa) and (B) hot water extraction at relatively high temperature (523-657 K) and pressure (10 MPa). Both methods achieve acceptable PAH removal percentages from soil. Acenaphthene (the most soluble PAH) is completely removed with treatment A regardless of the operating conditions used. Under optimum conditions, the rest of PAHs are also eliminated to a high extent with both technologies. Temperature and hydrogen peroxide amount seem to play a major role in process A. Similarly, temperature and water flowrate are the most influencing parameters in process B. In the latter case, a post-stage for the extracting water cleaning is required.

  8. Hot Topics/New Initiatives | Drinking Water in New England ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    2017-04-10

    Information on Drinking Water in New England. Major Topics covered include: Conservation, Private Wells, Preventing Contamination, Drinking Water Sources, Consumer Confidence Reports, and Drinking Water Awards.

  9. Solar Cogeneration of Electricity and Hot Water at DoD Installations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-06-01

    of tools that enables a developer or installer to size the solar cogeneration system based on the roof layout and to do the full design and...EW-201248) Solar Cogeneration of Electricity and Hot Water at DoD Installations June 2014 This report was prepared under contract to the...2014 ESTCP COST AND PERFORMANCE REPORT Solar Cogeneration of Electricity and Hot Water at DoD Installations W912HQ-12-C-0053 EW-201248Ratson

  10. Solar hot water system installed at Las Vegas, Nevada. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1981-01-01

    The solar hot water system installed at LaQuinta Motor Inn Inc., at Las Vegas, Nevada is described. The Inn is a three-story building with a flat roof for installation of the solar panels. The system consists of 1200 square feet of liquid flat plate collectors, a 2500 gallon insulated vertical steel storage tank, two heat exchangers and pumps and controls. The system was designed to supply approximately 74 percent of the total hot water load.

  11. Hourly use profiles for solar domestic hot water heaters in the National Solar Data Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barvir, E. J.; Doak, L. G.; Waterman, R. E.; Gervasio, C.

    Daily hot water rates of consumption and the Hourly Profiles of Daily Hot Water Consumption for single and multiple family dwellings are provided in this paper. These new statistics obtained from the National Solar Data Network (NSDN) are significantly different from the statistics currently being used in TRNSYS, SOLCOST and F-Chart. The NSDN statistics suggest that both the daily demand and hourly use profiles used in performance models should be revised.

  12. Hourly use profiles for solar domestic hot water heaters in the National Solar Data Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barvir, E. J.; Doak, L. G.; Waterman, R. E.; Gervasio, C.

    Daily hot water rates of consumption and the Hourly Profiles of Daily Hot Water Consumption for single and multiple family dwellings are provided. These new statistics obtained from the National Solar Data Network (NSDN) are significantly different from the statistics currently being used in TRNSYS, SOLCOST and F-Chart. The NSDN statistics suggest that both the daily demand and hourly use profiles used in performance models should be revised.

  13. 10 CFR 431.106 - Uniform test method for the measurement of energy efficiency of commercial water heaters and hot...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Instantaneous Water Heaters and Hot Water Supply Boilers* Thermal Efficiency ANSI Z21.10.3-1998, § 2.9** A. For... Instantaneous Water Heaters and Hot Water Supply Boilers* Thermal Efficiency ANSI Z21.10.3-1998, § 2.9** (2) Oil...) Assume that the thermal efficiency (Et) of electric water heaters with immersed heating elements is...

  14. Improvement of sugar yields from corn stover using sequential hot water pretreatment and disk milling.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sun Min; Dien, Bruce S; Tumbleson, M E; Rausch, Kent D; Singh, Vijay

    2016-09-01

    Efficient pretreatment is essential for economic conversion of lignocellulosic feedstocks into monosaccharides for biofuel production. To realize high sugar yields with low inhibitor concentrations, hot water or dilute acid pretreatment followed by disk milling is proposed. Corn stover at 20% solids was pretreated with hot water at 160-200°C for 4-8min with and without subsequent milling. Hot water pretreatment and disk milling acted synergistically to improve glucose and xylose yields by 89% and 134%, respectively, compared to hot water pretreatment alone. Hot water pretreated (180°C for 4min) and milled samples had the highest glucose and xylose yields among all hot water pretreated and milled samples, which were comparable to samples pretreated with 0.55% dilute acid at 160°C for 4min. However, samples pretreated with 1% dilute acid at 150°C for 4min and disk milled had the highest observed glucose (87.3%) and xylose yields (83.4%). Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  15. Hot spots and hot moments in riparian zones: potential for improved water quality management

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Despite considerable heterogeneity over space and time, biogeochemical and hydrological processes in riparian zones regulate contaminant movement to receiving waters and often mitigate the impact of upland sources of contaminants on water quality. Recently, these heterogeneous processes have been co...

  16. Hot water extraction with in situ wet oxidation: kinetics of PAHs removal from soil.

    PubMed

    Dadkhah, Ali A; Akgerman, Aydin

    2006-09-01

    Finding environmentally friendly and cost-effective methods to remediate soils contaminated with polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) is currently a major concern of researchers. In this study, a series of small-scale semi-continuous extractions--with and without in situ wet oxidation--were performed on soils polluted with PAHs, using subcritical water (i.e. liquid water at high temperatures and pressures, but below the critical point) as the removal agent. Experiments were performed in a 300 mL reactor using an aged soil sample. To find the desorption isotherms and oxidation reaction rates, semi-continuous experiments with residence times of 1 and 2 h were performed using aged soil at 250 degrees C and hydrogen peroxide as oxidizing agent. In all combined extraction and oxidation flow experiments, PAHs in the remaining soil after the experiments were almost undetectable. In combined extraction and oxidation no PAHs could be detected in the liquid phase after the first 30 min of the experiments. Based on these results, extraction with hot water, if combined with oxidation, should reduce the cost of remediation and can be used as a feasible alternative technique for remediating contaminated soils and sediments.

  17. Quality of fresh-cut 'Kent' mango slices prepared from hot-water or non-hot water-treated fruit

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    This study addressed the effects of hot water (HW) quarantine treatment as mandated by the USDA-APHIS, for all mangoes imported to the United States, on the visual and compositional quality factors, aroma volatile production, respiration rate, and electrolyte leakage of fresh-cut 'Kent' mango slices...

  18. Hot water surface pasteurisation of lamb carcasses: microbial effects and cost-benefit considerations.

    PubMed

    Hauge, Sigrun J; Wahlgren, Magnus; Røtterud, Ole-Johan; Nesbakken, Truls

    2011-03-15

    Although hot water pasteurisation of carcasses is accepted as a general intervention in USA, this is not the case in Europe. The aims of this study were (i) to evaluate the microbiological effects of hot water pasteurisation of lamb carcasses, both after slaughtering and dressing and following subsequent chilling and storage; (ii) to discuss hot water pasteurisation from a public health and cost-benefit perspective; (iii) to discuss the benefits of hot water pasteurisation compared with use of separate meat processing streams for high-risk carcasses; (iv) to evaluate the use of recycled hot water in a hygienic context and in relation to EU regulations; and (v) to consider the technological and sensory aspects of hot water pasteurisation of lamb carcasses. Samples were collected from 420 naturally contaminated lamb carcasses, with 50% of the carcasses (n=210) subject to hot water pasteurisation at 82 °C for 8s immediately after slaughter. Surface swab samples from 4500 cm² areas on carcasses were collected at slaughter, after chilling for 24 h, and after chilling for five days. The microbial analyses included Escherichia coli, Enterobacteriaceae, Bacillus cereus, Clostridium perfringens and aerobic plate count (APC). A resuscitation step using Tryptone Soya Agar was included in the microbiological analyses. Hot water pasteurisation significantly reduced the levels of E. coli, Enterobacteriaceae, B. cereus and APC (all P<0.001). E. coli colony forming unit (CFU) reduction was 99.5%, corresponding to a reduction of 1.85 log CFU per carcass. E. coli was isolated from 66% of control carcasses and from 26% of pasteurised carcasses. After 24h storage, the reduction in E. coli was increased to 2.02 log, and after five days E. coli could not be isolated from the pasteurised carcasses. These results suggest that surface pasteurisation could be an important and efficient procedure (critical control point) for reducing generic E. coli and thereby shiga toxin-producing E

  19. Modifications of water chemistry for pressurized water reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Fletcher, W.D.

    1987-01-01

    For commercial pressurized water reactors, the evolution of the water chemistry for both the reactor coolant systems (RCS) and the balance of plant (BOP) systems has been in concert with or responsive to the changes in specified materials and operating experience. Much of the early reactor coolant chemistry was identified within a program to develop the use of boric acid as a water soluble neutron absorber for chemical shim. Boric acid was selected as the absorber. The BOP steam and feedwater cycle chemistry was largely a translation from conventional low-pressure boiler water chemistry with specific changes to account for new materials in major components. Today's chemistry for the reactor and BOP systems has undergone significant changes since circa 1950. With advances in the design duty of the plant components and with a much better understanding of the mechanisms of corrosion of component materials, the water chemistry practices and methods of control are more successfully aimed at plant reliability than ever before. This paper presents a review of several important advances in water chemistry, as applied to both the RCS and the BOP and the basis for their adoption.

  20. Solar hot water system installed at Days Inn Motel, Jacksonville, Florida

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    The solar system was designed to provide 65 percent of the hot water demand. Water in the liquid flat plate collector (900 square feet) system automatically drains into the 1000 gallon lined and vented steel storage tank when the pump is not running. Heat is transferred from storage to Domestic Hot Water (DHW) tanks through a tube and shell heat exchanger. A circulating pump between the DHW tanks and heat exchanger enables solar heated water to help make up DHW standby losses. All pumps are controlled by differential temperature.

  1. Solar hot water system installed at Days Inn Motel, Jacksonville, Florida

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1980-09-01

    The solar system was designed to provide 65 percent of the hot water demand. Water in the liquid flat plate collector (900 square feet) system automatically drains into the 1000 gallon lined and vented steel storage tank when the pump is not running. Heat is transferred from storage to Domestic Hot Water (DHW) tanks through a tube and shell heat exchanger. A circulating pump between the DHW tanks and heat exchanger enables solar heated water to help make up DHW standby losses. All pumps are controlled by differential temperature.

  2. NIR intensity sensor for water pressure monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Wei-Chih; Wu, Chun-Wei; Chen, Ling-Chih

    2017-04-01

    Secondary cooling presents control challenges. Conventional feedback control systems cannot be used effectively due to the insufficient reliability of temperature sensors. Here we propose a simple optical technique in placing intensity based portable optical sensor for a rapid nondestructive calibration of water distribution and pressure on dummy bar from nozzles in the secondary cooling system. For non-destructive testing, the proposed system would make use of the data collected by the optical sensor array to help calibrate the water nozzles in temperature control in cooling system. In this paper, we will present the design and characterization a new optical water pressure sensor. Initial field test shows this NIR intensity sensor is capable of operating in the specified range with good repeatability and low hysteresis. Experiment result shows that the impedance of sensing material changes relative linearly with relative humidity, and also features fast response ( 4s). The overall sensing range of the sensor is from 20 to 80% and the sensitivity is about 2%.

  3. Still too hot: Examination of water temperature and water heater characteristics 24 years after manufacturers adopt voluntary temperature setting

    PubMed Central

    Shields, Wendy C.; McDonald, Eileen; Frattaroli, Shannon; Zhu, Jeffrey; Perry, Elise C.; Gielen, Andrea C.

    2013-01-01

    Objective Although water heater manufacturers adopted a voluntary standard in the 1980’s to pre-set thermostats on new water heaters to 120°F, tap water scald burns cause an estimated 1,500 hospital admissions and 100 deaths per year in the United States. This study reports on water temperatures in 976 urban homes and identifies water heater and household characteristics associated with having safe temperatures. Methods The temperature of the hot water, type and size of water heater, date of manufacture and the setting of the temperature gauge were recorded. Demographic data including number of people living in the home and home ownership were also recorded. Results Hot water temperature was unsafe in 41% of homes. Homeowners were more likely to have safer hot water temperature (≤ 120°F) than renters (63% vs. 54%; p<0.01). For 11% of gas water heaters, the water temperature was ≥ 130°F, although the gauge was set at less than 75% of its maximum setting. In a multivariate logistic regression, electric water heaters were more likely to have safe hot water temperatures than gas water heaters (OR=4.99; p<0.01). Water heaters with more gallons per person in the household were more likely to be at or below the recommended 120°F. Conclusions Our results suggest that hot water temperatures remain dangerously high for a substantial proportion of urban homes despite the adoption of voluntary standards to preset temperature settings by manufacturers. This research highlights the need for improved prevention strategies such as installing thermostatic mixing valves to ensure a safer temperature. PMID:23514986

  4. Numerical simulation of high pressure water jet impacting concrete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jialiang; Wang, Mengjin; Zhang, Di

    2017-08-01

    High pressure water jet technology is an unconventional concrete crushing technology. In order to reveal the mechanism of high pressure water jet impacting concrete, it built a three-dimensional numerical model of high pressure water jet impacting concrete based on fluid mechanics and damage mechanics. And the numerical model was verified by theoretical analysis and experiments. Based on this model, it studied the stress characteristics in concrete under high pressure water jet impacting at different time, and quantified the damage evolution rules in concrete along the water jet radial direction. The results can provide theoretical basis and guidance for the high pressure water jet crushing concrete technology.

  5. Model supporting the use of pressure in the hot slumping of glass substrates for X-ray telescopes.

    PubMed

    Salmaso, Bianca; Brizzolari, Claudia; Spiga, Daniele

    2016-10-17

    Thin glass foils are nowadays considered good substrates for lightweight focusing optics, especially for X-ray telescopes. The desired shape can be imparted to the foils by hot slumping, a process that replicates the shape of a slumping mould. During thermal slumping, when the glass and the mould come into contact, ripples in the glass surface appear spontaneously if the thermal expansions are mismatched. In our hot slumping setup, pressure is applied to ease the mould shape replication and to enhance the ripple relaxation. Starting from an existing model developed to explain the ripple formation in hot-slumped glass foils without pressure, we have developed a model that includes the pressure to support our experimental results.

  6. Using Solar Hot Water to Address Piping Heat Losses in Multifamily Buildings

    SciTech Connect

    Springer, David; Seitzler, Matt; Backman, Christine; Weitzel, Elizabeth

    2015-10-01

    Solar thermal water heating is most cost effective when applied to multifamily buildings and some states offer incentives or other inducements to install them. However, typical solar water heating designs do not allow the solar generated heat to be applied to recirculation losses, only to reduce the amount of gas or electric energy needed for hot water that is delivered to the fixtures. For good reasons, hot water that is recirculated through the building is returned to the water heater, not to the solar storage tank. The project described in this report investigated the effectiveness of using automatic valves to divert water that is normally returned through the recirculation piping to the gas or electric water heater instead to the solar storage tank. The valves can be controlled so that the flow is only diverted when the returning water is cooler than the water in the solar storage tank.

  7. Building America Case Study: Addressing Multifamily Piping Losses with Solar Hot Water, Davis, California

    SciTech Connect

    2016-12-01

    Solar thermal water heating is most cost effective when applied to multifamily buildings and some states offer incentives or other inducements to install them. However, typical solar water heating designs do not allow the solar generated heat to be applied to recirculation losses, only to reduce the amount of gas or electric energy needed for hot water that is delivered to the fixtures. For good reasons, hot water that is recirculated through the building is returned to the water heater, not to the solar storage tank. The project described in this report investigated the effectiveness of using automatic valves to divert water that is normally returned through the recirculation piping to the gas or electric water heater instead to the solar storage tank. The valves can be controlled so that the flow is only diverted when the returning water is cooler than the water in the solar storage tank.

  8. Low-Cost Solar Domestic Hot Water Systems for Mild Climates

    SciTech Connect

    Burch, J.; Christensen, C.; Merrigan, T.; Hewett, R.; Jorgensen, G.

    2005-01-01

    In FY99, Solar Heating and Lighting set the goal to reduce the life-cycle cost of saved-energy for solar domestic hot water (SDHW) systems in mild climates by 50%, primarily through use of polymer technology. Two industry teams (Davis Energy Group/SunEarth (DEG/SE) and FAFCO) have been developing un-pressurized integral-collector-storage (ICS) systems having load-side heat exchangers, and began field-testing in FY04. DEG/SE?s ICS has a rotomolded tank and thermoformed glazing. Based upon manufacturing issues, costs, and poor performance, the FAFCO team changed direction in late FY04 from an un-pressurized ICS to a direct thermosiphon design based upon use of pool collectors. Support for the teams is being provided for materials testing, modeling, and system testing. New ICS system models have been produced to model the new systems. A new ICS rating procedure for the ICS systems is undergoing testing and validation. Pipe freezing, freeze protection valves, and overheating have been tested and analyzed.

  9. Sporadic Legionnaires' disease: the role of domestic electric hot-water tanks.

    PubMed

    Dufresne, S F; Locas, M C; Duchesne, A; Restieri, C; Ismaïl, J; Lefebvre, B; Labbé, A C; Dion, R; Plante, M; Laverdière, M

    2012-01-01

    Sporadic community-acquired legionellosis (SCAL) can be acquired through contaminated aerosols from residential potable water. Electricity-dependent hot-water tanks are widely used in the province of Quebec (Canada) and have been shown to be frequently contaminated with Legionella spp. We prospectively investigated the homes of culture-proven SCAL patients from Quebec in order to establish the proportion of patients whose domestic potable hot-water system was contaminated with the same Legionella isolate that caused their pneumonia. Water samples were collected in each patient's home. Environmental and clinical isolates were compared using pulsed-field gel electrophoresis. Thirty-six patients were enrolled into the study. Legionella was recovered in 12/36 (33%) homes. The residential and clinical isolates were found to be microbiologically related in 5/36 (14%) patients. Contaminated electricity-heated domestic hot-water systems contribute to the acquisition of SCAL. The proportion is similar to previous reports, but may be underestimated.

  10. Hot granules medium pressure forming process of AA7075 conical parts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Guojiang; Zhao, Changcai; Peng, Yaxin; Li, Ying

    2015-05-01

    High strength aluminum alloy plate has a low elongation at room temperature, which leads to the forming of its components need a high temperature. Liquid or gas is used as the pressure-transfer medium in the existing flexible mould forming process, the heat resistance of the medium and pressurizing device makes the application of aluminum alloy plate thermoforming restricted. To solve this problem, the existing medium is replaced by the heat-resisting solid granules and the general pressure equipments are applied. Based on the pressure-transfer performance test of the solid granules medium, the feasibility that the assumption of the extended Drucker-Prager linear model can be used in the finite element analysis is proved. The constitutive equation, the yield function and the theoretical forming limit diagram(FLD) of AA7075 sheet are established. Through the finite element numerical simulation of hot granules medium pressure forming(HGMF) process, not only the influence laws of the process parameters, such as forming temperature, the blank-holder gap and the diameter of the slab, on sheet metal forming performance are discussed, but also the broken area of the forming process is analyzed and predicted, which are coincided with the technological test. The conical part whose half cone angle is 15° and relative height H/d 0 is 0.57, is formed in one process at 250°C. The HGMF process solves the problems of loading and seal in the existing flexible mould forming process and provides a novel technology for thermoforming of light alloy plate, such as magnesium alloy, aluminium alloy and titanium alloy.

  11. The Relation between Hot Flashes and Ambulatory Blood Pressure: The Hilo Women’s Health Study

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Daniel E.; Sievert, Lynnette L.; Morrison, Lynn A.; Rahberg, Nichole; Reza, Angela

    2011-01-01

    Objectives Hot flashes (HFs) have been associated with elevated blood pressure, but studies have not examined the relationship between objectively measured HFs and blood pressure during normal daily activities. The objectives of this study are to examine ambulatory blood pressure (BP) differences between women who report HFs and those who do not, and to observe whether an objectively measured HF is associated with transient changes in BP. Methods A sample of 202 women in Hilo, Hawaii aged 45–55 years were asked to fill out a questionnaire that included demographic information and an inventory of symptoms. The women underwent simultaneous 24-hour monitoring of ambulatory BP and HFs, while keeping a diary that included mood and HF reports. Results No significant difference was present in mean BP between women who reported having a HF during the past 2 weeks and those who did not. When measurements controlled for negative mood reports and posture, there was a highly significant elevation in Z scores of systolic BP when a measured, objective HF occurred within 10 minutes preceding a BP reading, and a significant elevation of Z scores of diastolic BP when a subjectively reported HF occurred within 10 minutes after a BP reading. Conclusions These results suggest that objectively measured HFs precede transient elevations of systolic BP, but it is unclear if there is a causal relationship. These results also suggest that women experience subjective HFs within 10 minutes after a transient increase in diastolic BP. Again, the causal relationship is not understood. PMID:21183716

  12. Solar heating, cooling and domestic hot water system installed at Columbia Gas System Service Corporation, Columbus, Ohio

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    The solar energy system installed in the building has 2,978 sq ft of single axis tracking, concentrating collectors and provides solar energy for space heating, space cooling and domestic hot water. A 1,200,000 Btu/hour water tube gas boiler provides hot water for space heating. Space cooling is provided by a 100 ton hot water fired absorption chiller. Domestic hot water heating is provided by a 50 gallon natural gas domestic storage water heater. Extracts from the site files, specification references, drawings, installation, operation and maintenance instructions are included.

  13. Solar heating, cooling and domestic hot water system installed at Columbia Gas System Service Corp. , Columbus, Ohio. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1980-11-01

    The Solar Energy System located at the Columbia Gas Corporation, Columbus, Ohio, has 2978 ft/sup 2/ of Honeywell single axis tracking, concentrating collectors and provides solar energy for space heating, space cooling and domestic hot water. A 1,200,000 Btu/h Bryan water-tube gas boiler provides hot water for space heating. Space cooling is provided by a 100 ton Arkla hot water fired absorption chiller. Domestic hot water heating is provided by a 50 gallon natural gas domestic storage water heater. Extracts are included from the site files, specification references, drawings, installation, operation and maintenance instructions.

  14. Investigating the Mpemba Effect: when hot water freezes faster than cold water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ibekwe, R. T.; Cullerne, J. P.

    2016-03-01

    Under certain conditions a body of hot liquid may cool faster and freeze before a body of colder liquid, a phenomenon known as the Mpemba Effect. An initial difference in temperature of 3.2 °C enabled warmer water to reach 0 °C in 14% less time than colder water. Convection currents in the liquid generate a temperature gradient that causes more rapid heat loss by surface radiation and evaporation than obtains for uniform temperature. This more rapid cooling enables the initially warmer liquid to overtake the cooler liquid, reaching 0 °C earlier and freezing first. Liquid cooling under natural convection follows a five-fourths power law (temperature of liquid T , temperature of surroundings {{T}a} , cooling constant k ): \\frac{\\text{d}T}{\\text{d}t}=k{{≤ft(T-{{T}a}\\right)}\\frac{5{4}}} . In this investigation we found that with evaporation this becomes a four-thirds power law:

  15. Integral Hot Gas Pressure Forming of an AA2219 Aluminum Alloy Ellipsoidal Shell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, S. J.; Zhang, R.; Zhang, W. W.

    2017-02-01

    To overcome the poor plastic deformation performance of AA2219 aluminum alloy sheet and its weld seam at room temperature, an integral hot gas pressure forming (IHGPF) process for a combined welded ellipsoidal shell was proposed. A simulation of the IHGPF process was conducted to analyze the axis length variation and thickness distribution during the forming process of the combined welded ellipsoidal shell at elevated temperature. The results demonstrated that lengths of the short and long axes were 150 mm and 220 mm, respectively, and that maximum wall thinning occurred at the pole. Furthermore, an experiment was conducted using IHGPF, and the forming accuracy was measured by three-dimensional video technology. A sound ellipsoidal shell with final axis length ratio of 1.5 was obtained with a shell diameter accuracy of more than 99.3%. It was experimentally proven that an aluminum alloy ellipsoidal shell can be formed using the proposed IHGPF technology.

  16. Integral Hot Gas Pressure Forming of an AA2219 Aluminum Alloy Ellipsoidal Shell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, S. J.; Zhang, R.; Zhang, W. W.

    2017-04-01

    To overcome the poor plastic deformation performance of AA2219 aluminum alloy sheet and its weld seam at room temperature, an integral hot gas pressure forming (IHGPF) process for a combined welded ellipsoidal shell was proposed. A simulation of the IHGPF process was conducted to analyze the axis length variation and thickness distribution during the forming process of the combined welded ellipsoidal shell at elevated temperature. The results demonstrated that lengths of the short and long axes were 150 mm and 220 mm, respectively, and that maximum wall thinning occurred at the pole. Furthermore, an experiment was conducted using IHGPF, and the forming accuracy was measured by three-dimensional video technology. A sound ellipsoidal shell with final axis length ratio of 1.5 was obtained with a shell diameter accuracy of more than 99.3%. It was experimentally proven that an aluminum alloy ellipsoidal shell can be formed using the proposed IHGPF technology.

  17. Hot isostatic atmospheric pressure casting H-K9L lightweight mirror

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Jianfeng; Wang, Yi; Qiu, Gufeng; Ni, Yin; Huang, QiTai; Wang, Gang; Tang, Xiaojun

    2016-10-01

    Glass lightweight mirror can be made by Hot Isostatic Atmospheric Pressure (HIAP) casting method which melting small glass chunks into a mold that made lots of hexagon-shaped pockets in the back of the mirror. Alumina-silica refractory cores which used to form honeycomb mold can withstand over 950 degree Celsius temperature. Furnace temperature rises to 950 degree Celsius after H4 H-K9L chunks loaded into mold, holds this temperature over 2 hours and then drops to room temperature slowly. HIAP casting lightweight blank can used to form 1/60 λ RMS (λ=0.6328μm) mirror and this method can use to made big diameter lightweight blank.

  18. Status of hot spring water development in Korea 2014

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Cholwoo; Park, Chan-Hee; Cho, Yong-Chan

    2015-04-01

    As of 2014, a number of Oncheon (hot spring) sites in Korea is 447. 207 sites among the total sites are located in the south-east part of Korea, because geothermal gradient in the region is higher than the average geothermal gradient of 25℃/km in Korea. The higher gradient leads to reduced drilling cost. 50% of the Oncheon sites are alkaline and their pH is higher than 8.5. pH for other 43% is between 7.5 and 8.5. As for the ion-type of Oncheon, 55% is are primarily the type of Na-HCO3. 20 % of Oncheon is the type of Na-Cl secondarily. 9% of Oncheon is the type of Na-SO4. While the well drilled deepest is 2,003 m from the surface, the average depth is 747 m. The highest temperature of hot spring is 78℃, while the average temperature is 30℃. The area of Oncheon development was big until year 2000. Since then, the development area has shrunk to less than 20,000m2 to reduce risks for initial investment and stabilize the Oncheon management. Keywords : Hot spring, Geothermal gradient, Temperature

  19. Apparatus and method for pumping hot, erosive slurry of coal solids in coal derived, water immiscible liquid

    DOEpatents

    Ackerman, Carl D.

    1983-03-29

    An apparatus for and method of pumping hot, erosive slurry of coal solids in a coal derived, water immiscible liquid to higher pressure involves the use of a motive fluid which is miscible with the liquid of the slurry. The apparatus includes a pump 12, a remote check valve 14 and a chamber 16 between and in fluid communication with the pump 12 and check valve 14 through conduits 18,20. Pump 12 exerts pressure on the motive fluid and thereby on the slurry through a concentration gradient of coal solids within chamber 16 to alternately discharge slurry under pressure from the outlet port of check valve 14 and draw slurry in through the inlet port of check valve 14.

  20. Exponential Boundary Observers for Pressurized Water Pipe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hermine Som, Idellette Judith; Cocquempot, Vincent; Aitouche, Abdel

    2015-11-01

    This paper deals with state estimation on a pressurized water pipe modeled by nonlinear coupled distributed hyperbolic equations for non-conservative laws with three known boundary measures. Our objective is to estimate the fourth boundary variable, which will be useful for leakage detection. Two approaches are studied. Firstly, the distributed hyperbolic equations are discretized through a finite-difference scheme. By using the Lipschitz property of the nonlinear term and a Lyapunov function, the exponential stability of the estimation error is proven by solving Linear Matrix Inequalities (LMIs). Secondly, the distributed hyperbolic system is preserved for state estimation. After state transformations, a Luenberger-like PDE boundary observer based on backstepping mathematical tools is proposed. An exponential Lyapunov function is used to prove the stability of the resulted estimation error. The performance of the two observers are shown on a water pipe prototype simulated example.

  1. Mercury in water and biomass of microbial communities in hot springs of Yellowstone National Park, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    King, S.A.; Behnke, S.; Slack, K.; Krabbenhoft, D.P.; Nordstrom, D.K.; Burr, M.D.; Striegl, R.G.

    2006-01-01

    Ultra-clean sampling methods and approaches typically used in pristine environments were applied to quantify concentrations of Hg species in water and microbial biomass from hot springs of Yellowstone National Park, features that are geologically enriched with Hg. Microbial populations of chemically-diverse hot springs were also characterized using modern methods in molecular biology as the initial step toward ongoing work linking Hg speciation with microbial processes. Molecular methods (amplification of environmental DNA using 16S rDNA primers, cloning, denatured gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) screening of clone libraries, and sequencing of representative clones) were used to examine the dominant members of microbial communities in hot springs. Total Hg (THg), monomethylated Hg (MeHg), pH, temperature, and other parameters influential to Hg speciation and microbial ecology are reported for hot springs water and associated microbial mats. Several hot springs indicate the presence of MeHg in microbial mats with concentrations ranging from 1 to 10 ng g-1 (dry weight). Concentrations of THg in mats ranged from 4.9 to 120,000 ng g-1 (dry weight). Combined data from surveys of geothermal water, lakes, and streams show that aqueous THg concentrations range from l to 600 ng L-1. Species and concentrations of THg in mats and water vary significantly between hot springs, as do the microorganisms found at each site. ?? 2006.

  2. Geometrically centered region: a "wet" model of protein binding hot spots not excluding water molecules.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhenhua; Li, Jinyan

    2010-12-01

    A protein interface can be as "wet" as a protein surface in terms of the number of immobilized water molecules. This important water information has not been explicitly taken by computational methods to model and identify protein binding hot spots, overlooking the water role in forming interface hydrogen bonds and in filing cavities. Hot spot residues are usually clustered at the core of the protein binding interfaces. However, traditional machine learning methods often identify the hot spot residues individually, breaking the cooperativity of the energetic contribution. Our idea in this work is to explore the role of immobilized water and meanwhile to capture two essential properties of hot spots: the compactness in contact and the far distance from bulk solvent. Our model is named geometrically centered region (GCR). The detection of GCRs is based on novel tripartite graphs, and atom burial levels which are a concept more intuitive than SASA. Applying to a data set containing 355 mutations, we achieved an F measure of 0.6414 when ΔΔG ≥ 1.0 kcal/mol was used to define hot spots. This performance is better than Robetta, a benchmark method in the field. We found that all but only one of the GCRs contain water to a certain degree, and most of the outstanding hot spot residues have water-mediated contacts. If the water is excluded, the burial level values are poorly related to the ΔΔG, and the model loses its performance remarkably. We also presented a definition for the O-ring of a GCR as the set of immediate neighbors of the residues in the GCR. Comparative analysis between the O-rings and GCRs reveals that the newly defined O-ring is indeed energetically less important than the GCR hot spot, confirming a long-standing hypothesis. Copyright © 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  3. Dental fluorosis associated with drinking water from hot springs in Choma district in southern province, Zambia.

    PubMed

    Shitumbanuma, V; Tembo, F; Tembo, J M; Chilala, S; Van Ranst, E

    2007-02-01

    This study was conducted to investigate the high incidence of mottled teeth among residents of an area with hot springs in the Choma District of the Southern Province of Zambia. A survey involving 128 pupils was conducted at a Basic School to collect data on pupil's backgrounds and their main sources of drinking water between birth and age 7. A dental specialist examined the pupils' teeth and samples of drinking water were collected from locations where the majority of the pupils lived. It was analysed for fluorides and other drinking water quality parameters. Results of the survey showed a highly significant (P < 0.001) association between pupils' main sources of drinking water between birth and age 7 and the incidence of discoloured teeth. All (100%) pupils who drank water from hot springs before age 7 had moderate to severe fluorosis, while the majority (96.7%) of the pupils who drank water from other sources had no dental fluorosis. Fluoride concentrations ranged from 5.95 to 10.09 mg/l in water from hot springs, and from 0.03 to 0.6 mg/l in water from other sources. Fluoride levels in water from hot spring water samples exceeded the 1.5 mg/l WHO guideline value for drinking water, while those in water from other sources were significantly (P < 0.05) lower than this. We conclude that the high prevalence of mottled teeth among residents of the study area is a case of endemic dental fluorosis associated with drinking water from hot springs containing high concentrations of fluoride.

  4. Blood Pressure Treatment Adherence and Control after Participation in the ReHOT

    PubMed Central

    de Jesus, Nathália Silva; Nogueira, Armando da Rocha; Pachu, Cacilda Oliveira; Luiz, Ronir Raggio; de Oliveira, Glaucia Maria Moraes

    2016-01-01

    Background Lack of adherence to pharmacological treatment is one of the main causes of low control rates in hypertension. Objective To verify treatment adherence and associated factors, as well as blood pressure (BP) control in participants of the Resistant Hypertension Optimal Treatment (ReHOT) clinical trial. Method Cross-sectional study including all 109 patients who had completed the ReHOT for at least 6 months. We excluded those participants who failed to respond to the new recruitment after three phone contact attempts. We evaluated the BP control by ambulatory BP monitoring (ABPM; controlled levels: 24-hour systolic and diastolic BP < 130 x 80 mmHg) and analyzed the patients' treatment adherence using the Morisky Medication Adherence Scale (MMAS) questionnaire validated by Bloch, Melo, and Nogueira (2008). The statistical analysis was performed with the software IBM SPSS statistics 21.0. We tested the normality of the data distribution with kurtosis and skewness. The variables tested in the study are presented with descriptive statistics. Comparisons between treatment adherence and other variables were performed with Student's t test for independent variables and Pearson's chi-square or Fisher's exact test. To conduct analyses among patients considering adherence to treatment and BP control, we created four groups: G0, G1, G2, and G3. We considered a 5% significance level in all tests. Results During the ReHOT, 80% of the patients had good BP control and treatment adherence. Of 96 patients reevaluated in the present study, only 52.1% had controlled hypertension when assessed by ABPM, while 31.3% were considered adherent by the MMAS. Regarding other ABPM measures, we observed an absence of a nocturnal dip in 64.6% of the patients and a white-coat effect and false BP control in 23% and 12.5%, respectively. Patients' education level showed a trend towards being a determinant factor associated with lack of adherence (p = 0.05). Resistant hypertension and number

  5. Solar heating and domestic hot water system installed at North Dallas High School. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-05-01

    This Document is the Final Technical Report of the Solar Energy System located at the North Dallas High School, Dallas, Texas. The system is designed as a retrofit in a three story with basement, concrete frame high school building. The building was air conditioned with an electric drive 300-ton chilled water central system in 1973. The building contains 126,000 square feet and the solar energy system will preheat 100 percent of domestic hot water and supply 47.5 percent of annual building heating requirements. During the building cooling seasons, the solar energy system will supply 100 percent of domestic hot water. The solar energy system consists of 4800 square feet (320 panels) Lennox/Honeywell flat plate liquid collector subsystem, and a 10,000 gallon steel tank storage subsystem circulating hot water producing 686.6 x 10/sup 6/ Btu/year (specified) building heating and domestic hot water heating. The start up date is December 4, 1979. Extracts from the site files, specification references for solar modification to existing building heating and domestic hot water systems, drawings, installation, operation and maintenance instructions are presented.

  6. TiO2 Processed by pressurized hot solvents as a novel photocatalyst for photocatalytic reduction of carbon dioxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reli, Martin; Kobielusz, Marcin; Matějová, Lenka; Daniš, Stanislav; Macyk, Wojciech; Obalová, Lucie; Kuśtrowski, Piotr; Rokicińska, Anna; Kočí, Kamila

    2017-01-01

    Anatase-brookite TiO2 photocatalysts were prepared by the sol-gel process controlled within reverse micelles and processing by pressurized hot solvents-water/methanol/water (TiO2(M)) and water/ethanol/water (TiO2(E)), as an unconventional alternative to common calcination. The main goal of this work was to prepare anatase-brookite mixtures by processing by two different alcohols (methanol and ethanol) and evaluate the influence of the alcohol on the photocatalytic activity. Prepared photocatalysts were characterized by organic elemental analysis, nitrogen physisorption, XRD, UV-vis, photoelectrochemical and spectroelectrochemical measurements and XPS. The prepared photocatalysts efficiency was tested on the photocatalytic reduction of carbon dioxide and compared with commercial TiO2 Evonik P25. Both prepared nanocomposites were more efficient towards methane production but Evonik P25 was the most efficient towards hydrogen generated through water splitting. The higher performance of anatase-brookite mixture towards methane production can be explained by (i) a higher photocatalytic activity of brookite than rutile; (ii) a large surface area of anatase-brookite composites enabling better carbon dioxide adsorption; (iii) the photoinduced electron transfer from the brookite conduction band to the anatase conduction band. On the other hand, a higher production of hydrogen in the presence of Evonik P25 is caused by a better charge separation in anatase-rutile than anatase-brookite phase compositions. TiO2(M) appeared more active than TiO2(E) in the photocatalytic reduction of carbon dioxide due to a lower density of defects created in the crystal lattice.

  7. Hot compressed water extraction curve for palm oil and beta carotene concentration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharizan, M. S. M.; Azian, M. N.; Yoshiyuki, Y.; Kamal, A. A. M.; Che Yunus, M. A.

    2016-06-01

    Hot compressed water extraction (HCWE) is a promising green alternative for palm oil milling. The kinetic characteristic of HCWE for palm oil and it β-carotene concentration was experimentally investigated in this study at the different temperature and pressure. Semi-batch HCW extractor from 120 to 180 oC and 30 to 50 bar was used to evaluated the process for 60 mins of extraction in 10 mins interval. The results obtain using the HCWE process was compared with other extraction method. The oil extraction achieved the maximum extraction rate within 20 mins of extraction in most of the condition and starting to decrease until 60 mins of extraction time. The extraction rate for β-carotene was achieved the maximum rate in 10 mins and starting to decrease until 30 mins. None of β-carotene concentration had been extracted out from the palm oil mesocarp after 30 mins of extraction in all condition. The oil recovery of using HCWE was relatively low compare with the mechanical screw press, subcritical R134b, supercritical carbon dioxide and hexane extraction due to the oil loses in the oil-water emulsion. However, the β-carotene concentration in extracted oil using HCWE was improved compare with commercial crude palm oil (CPO) and subcritical R134a extraction.

  8. Differential physiological effects during tonic painful hand immersion tests using hot and ice water.

    PubMed

    Streff, Anouk; Kuehl, Linn K; Michaux, Gilles; Anton, Fernand

    2010-03-01

    The cold pressor test (CPT) is an empirically validated test commonly used in research on stress, pain and cardiovascular reactivity. Surprisingly, the equivalent test with water heated to noxious temperatures (hot water immersion test, HIT) has not been thoroughly investigated. The aim of the present study was to characterize the physiological effects and psychophysics of both tests and to analyze whether the autonomic responses are mainly induced by baroreflexes or a consequence of the pain experience itself. The study consisted of a single session including one CPT (4+/-0.2 degrees C) and one HIT (47+/-0.5 degrees C; cut-off point 5 min) trial performed on 30 healthy drug free volunteers aged 19-57 (median 24) yrs. The sequence of both trials was alternated and participants were randomly assigned to sequence order and parallelized with respect to gender. Physiological parameters (cardiovascular, respiratory and electrodermal activity) and subjective pain intensity were continuously monitored. In addition, pain detection and tolerance thresholds as well as pain unpleasantness were assessed. Both tests were comparable with regard to the time course and intensity of subjective pain. However, a significantly higher increase of blood pressure could be observed during the CPT when compared to the HIT. The HIT appears less confounded with thermoregulatory baroreflex activity and therefore seems to be a more appropriate model for tonic pain.

  9. Arbuscular mycorrhizas influence Lycium barbarum tolerance of water stress in a hot environment.

    PubMed

    Hu, Wentao; Zhang, Haoqiang; Chen, Hui; Tang, Ming

    2017-02-09

    Arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi can assist their hosts to cope with water stress and other abiotic stresses in different ways. In order to test whether AM plants have a greater capacity than control plants to cope with water stress, we investigated the water status and photosynthetic capacity of Lycium barbarum colonized or not by the AM fungus Rhizophagus irregularis under three water conditions during a hot summer. Sugar levels and transcriptional responses of both plant and AM fungus aquaporin genes in roots were analyzed. Compared with control plants, AM plants increased transpiration rate and stomatal conductance but decreased leaf relative water content under moderate water stress. Severe water stress, however, did not inhibit the quantum yield of PSII photochemistry in AM plants versus control plants. AM plants had higher expression levels of plasma membrane intrinsic proteins or tonoplast intrinsic proteins and Rir-AQP2 and lower leaf temperature than control plants under dry-hot stress. Additionally, AM plant sugar levels under normal water conditions were similar to those of control plants under moderate water stress, but sugar levels of AM plants especially increased with severe water stress. When these aspects of performance of AM and control plants under different water conditions are compared overall, AM plants displayed an obvious superiority over control plants at coping with moderate water stress in the hot environment; AM plants maintained normal photochemical processes under severe water stress, while sugar levels were affected strongly.

  10. Environmental effects of poly(phenylene ether) blends after long-term exposure to potable hot water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maclean, Steven

    In recent years, engineering thermoplastic resins have been contemplated for use in a variety pressurized fluid handling components such as potable water delivery pipes, fitting and valves. In this research, rigid blends of glassy poly(phenylene ether) (PPE) polymer are studied to assess their suitability in long-term, potable, hot water environments. Three distinct PPE-based model compounds were prepared for this research: (i) a 50/50 blend of PPE and high impact polystyrene (HIPS); (ii) a 50/50 blend of PPE and HIPS with the inclusion of an anti-oxidant package and; (iii) a blend consisting of capped PPE, crystal polystyrene and styrene-ethyelene-butylene-styrene (SEBS) rubber. A fourth engineering thermoplastic, namely bisphenol-A polysulfone (PSU), was incorporated into the study as a benchmark material due to its proven reliability in hot water applications. Aging experiments were carried out for 8,000 hours in an 80°C water bath and an 80°C convection oven to characterize physical property retention and degradation mechanisms in each material. During water bath immersion, excessive, non-Fickian water diffusion occurred in both PPE/HIPS blends which led to water clustering and disc shaped microcavities on the order of 50 to 100 mum in diameter. These voids in the bulk caused appreciable losses in tensile elongation and fatigue resistance. The capped PPE/PS/SEBS blend, however, managed water uptake more effectively and its chemistry deterred water clustering. With further improvements to the formulation, such as larger rubber domains or an alternative impact modifier, the capped PPE blend may be able to offer physical property retention equal to that of PSU. With the exception of slight craze formation at sharp specimen edges during hot water immersion, the PSU material proved to be an exceptional material candidate throughout the entire experimentation. Surprisingly long-term hot water exposure did not cause gross chemical degradation in any of the materials

  11. Hot-water treatments for control of Planococcus ficus (Homoptera: Pseudococcidae) on dormant grape cuttings.

    PubMed

    Haviland, David R; Bentley, Walter J; Daane, Kent M

    2005-08-01

    Hot-water immersions were tested for control of mealybug Planococcus ficus (Signoret), on dormant grape cuttings used for nursery stock. A range of hot-water temperatures (47-58 degrees C) were evaluated at immersion periods of 2, 5, 10, or 20 min, by using a total of 353,720 mealybugs across all treatments. A 5-min immersion at 51 degrees C is effective in killing > 99% of P. ficus. At or above this immersion period and temperature, there was no difference in mealybug stage mortality. We evaluated a commercial operation, which used a 5-min immersion in each of three water tanks: preheating (30.0 +/- 3 degrees C), hot-water (52.8 +/- 0.3 degrees C), and cooling (23 +/- 3 degrees C). The commercial procedure provided 99.8-100% mealybug control in each of three separate trials.

  12. Deparaffinization of formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissue blocks using hot water instead of xylene.

    PubMed

    Kalantari, Narges; Bayani, Masomeh; Ghaffari, Taraneh

    2016-08-15

    This study aimed to deparaffinize formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissues using hot water instead of xylene and measuring the quantity and quality of the extracted DNA from the respective tissues. To deparaffinize the tissue sections with hot water, small sections were exposed to 90 °C distilled sterile water. After 25 FFPE tissue samples were deparaffinized with the hot water method, DNA was then extracted. The mean of optical density and the ratio of absorbance of the DNA solution were 220.01 ± 36.1 ng/μl and 1.65 ± 0.1, respectively. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) analysis of the toll-like receptor 4(TLR4) gene showed that the method can be used as a tool for different applications. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Conjugation of Hot-Melt Extrusion with High-Pressure Homogenization: a Novel Method of Continuously Preparing Nanocrystal Solid Dispersions.

    PubMed

    Ye, Xingyou; Patil, Hemlata; Feng, Xin; Tiwari, Roshan V; Lu, Jiannan; Gryczke, Andreas; Kolter, Karl; Langley, Nigel; Majumdar, Soumyajit; Neupane, Dipesh; Mishra, Sanjay R; Repka, Michael A

    2016-02-01

    Over the past few decades, nanocrystal formulations have evolved as promising drug delivery systems owing to their ability to enhance the bioavailability and maintain the stability of poorly water-soluble drugs. However, conventional methods of preparing nanocrystal formulations, such as spray drying and freeze drying, have some drawbacks including high cost, time and energy inefficiency, traces of residual solvent, and difficulties in continuous operation. Therefore, new techniques for the production of nanocrystal formulations are necessary. The main objective of this study was to introduce a new technique for the production of nanocrystal solid dispersions (NCSDs) by combining high-pressure homogenization (HPH) and hot-melt extrusion (HME). Efavirenz (EFZ), a Biopharmaceutics Classification System class II drug, which is used for the treatment of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) type I, was selected as the model drug for this study. A nanosuspension (NS) was first prepared by HPH using sodium lauryl sulfate (SLS) and Kollidon® 30 as a stabilizer system. The NS was then mixed with Soluplus® in the extruder barrel, and the water was removed by evaporation. The decreased particle size and crystalline state of EFZ were confirmed by scanning electron microscopy, zeta particle size analysis, and differential scanning calorimetry. The increased dissolution rate was also determined. EFZ NCSD was found to be highly stable after storage for 6 months. In summary, the conjugation of HPH with HME technology was demonstrated to be a promising novel method for the production of NCSDs.

  14. Evaluation of the impact of hot water treatment on the sensory quality of fresh tomatoes

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Minimizing the effects of chilling injury during shelf-life is important for maintaining the sensory quality of fresh tomato fruit. Postharvest hot water treatments within certain limits of exposure time and water temperature have been shown to increase the resistance of tomatoes to chilling injury....

  15. Effect of hot water extracted hardwood and softwood chips on particleboard properties

    Treesearch

    Manuel Raul Pelaez-Samaniego; Vikram Yadama; Tsai Garcia-Perez; Eini Lowell; Thomas Amidon

    2014-01-01

    The affinity of particleboard (PB) to water is one of the main limitations for using PB in moisture-rich environments. PB dimensional stability and durability can be improved by reducing the available hydroxyl groups in wood through hemicellulose removal, for example, by hot water extraction (HWE), which increases wood resistance to moisture uptake. The resulting...

  16. Solar energy meets 50 pecent of motel hot water needs--Key West, Florida

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    Final report describes domestic water preheat installed in 148 room motel. Equipment meets 50 percent of needs when motel is 100 percent occupied; equivalently, it supplies 100 percent of hot water when occupancy is 50 percent. System consists of 1,400 square feet of flat plate liquid solar collectors, storage tanks, pump, controller, and hardware.

  17. Solar energy meets 50 pecent of motel hot water needs--Key West, Florida

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    Final report describes domestic water preheat installed in 148 room motel. Equipment meets 50 percent of needs when motel is 100 percent occupied; equivalently, it supplies 100 percent of hot water when occupancy is 50 percent. System consists of 1,400 square feet of flat plate liquid solar collectors, storage tanks, pump, controller, and hardware.

  18. Design of Recycle Pressurized Water Reactor with Heavy Water Moderation

    SciTech Connect

    Hibi, Koki; Uchita, Masato

    2004-03-15

    This study presents the conceptual design of the recycle pressurized water reactor (RPWR), which is an innovative PWR fueled with mixed oxide, moderated by heavy water, and having breeding ratios around 1.1. Most of the systems of RPWR can employ those of PWRs. The RPWR has no boric acid systems and has a small tritium removal system. The construction and operation costs would be similar to those of current PWRs. Heavy water cost has decreased drastically with up-to-date producing methods. The reliability of the systems of the RPWR is high, and the research and development cost for RPWR is very low because the core design is fundamentally based on the current PWR technology.

  19. Enhancing microbiological safety of fresh orange juice by fruit immersion in hot water and chemical sanitizers.

    PubMed

    Pao, S; Davis, C L

    1999-07-01

    Trials were conducted with hot water and chemicals to sanitize Valencia oranges contaminated by natural microflora or inoculated with Escherichia coli. Microbial loads and sensory quality of fresh juice extracted from surface-heated fruit were also evaluated. E. coli on fruit surfaces was reduced by either hot water or chemical treatments. An estimated 5-log reduction of E. coli was attained by immersing inoculated fruit in hot water at 80 degrees C for 1 min or 70 degrees C for 2 min. Immersing inoculated fruit in various chemical solutions at about 30 degrees C for 8 min only reduced E. coli by about 1.8- to 3.1-log cycles on nonstem-scar surfaces of the fruit. In general, both hot water and chemical treatments were less effective at removing microflora from the stem-scar area. Rapid hot-water immersions at 80 degrees C for 1 min and 70 degrees C for 2 min reduced both fruit-surface and initial juice microbial loads without altering original sensory quality of fresh juice.

  20. Modeling DBPs formation in drinking water in residential plumbing pipes and hot water tanks.

    PubMed

    Chowdhury, Shakhawat; Rodriguez, Manuel J; Sadiq, Rehan; Serodes, Jean

    2011-01-01

    Disinfection byproducts (DBPs) in municipal supply water are a concern because of their possible risks to human health. Risk assessment studies often use DBP data in water distribution systems (WDS). However, DBPs in tap water may be different because of stagnation of the water in plumbing pipes (PP) and heating in hot water tanks (HWT). This study investigated occurrences and developed predictive models for DBPs in the PP and the HWT of six houses from three municipal water systems in Quebec (Canada) in a year-round study. Trihalomethanes (THMs) in PP and HWT were observed to be 1.4-1.8 and 1.9-2.7 times the THMs in the WDS, respectively. Haloacetic acid (HAAs) in PP and HWT were observed to be variable (PP/WDS = 0.23-2.24; HWT/WDS = 0.53-2.61). Using DBPs occurrence data from these systems, three types of linear models (main factors; main factors, interactions and higher orders; logarithmic) and two types of nonlinear models (three parameters Logistic and four parameters Weibull) were investigated to predict DBPs in the PP and HWT. Significant factors affecting DBPs formation in the PP and HWT were identified through numerical and graphical techniques. The R(2) values of the models varied between 0.77 and 0.96, indicating excellent predictive ability for THMs and HAAs in the PP and the HWT. The models were found to be statistically significant. The models were validated using additional data. These models can be used to predict DBPs increase from WDS (water entry point of house) to the PP and HWT, and could thereby help gain a better understanding of human exposure to DBPs and their associated risks.

  1. Solar heating and hot water system installed at Arlington Raquetball Club, Arlington, Virginia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    A solar space and water heating system is described. The solar energy system consists of 2,520 sq. ft. of flat plate solar collectors and a 4,000 gallon solar storage tank. The transfer medium in the forced closed loop is a nontoxic antifreeze solution (50 percent water, 50 percent propylene glycol). The service hot water system consists of a preheat coil (60 ft. of 1 1/4 in copper tubing) located in the upper third of the solar storage tank and a recirculation loop between the preheat coil and the existing electric water heaters. The space heating system consists of two separate water to air heat exchangers located in the ducts of the existing space heating/cooling systems. The heating water is supplied from the solar storage tank. Extracts from site files, specification references for solar modifications to existing building heating and hot water systems, and installation, operation and maintenance instructions are included.

  2. Cold Helium Pressurization for Liquid Oxygen / Liquid Methane Propulsion Systems: Fully-Integrated Initial Hot-Fire Test Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morehead, R. L.; Atwell, M. J.; Melcher, J. C.; Hurlbert, E. A.

    2016-01-01

    A prototype cold helium active pressurization system was incorporated into an existing liquid oxygen (LOX) / liquid methane (LCH4) prototype planetary lander and hot-fire tested to collect vehicle-level performance data. Results from this hot-fire test series were used to validate integrated models of the vehicle helium and propulsion systems and demonstrate system effectiveness for a throttling lander. Pressurization systems vary greatly in complexity and efficiency between vehicles, so a pressurization performance metric was also developed as a means to compare different active pressurization schemes. This implementation of an active repress system is an initial sizing draft. Refined implementations will be tested in the future, improving the general knowledge base for a cryogenic lander-based cold helium system.

  3. PRESSURE EQUILIBRIUM BETWEEN THE LOCAL INTERSTELLAR CLOUDS AND THE LOCAL HOT BUBBLE

    SciTech Connect

    Snowden, S. L.; Chiao, M.; Collier, M. R.; Porter, F. S.; Thomas, N. E.; Galeazzi, M.; Uprety, Y.; Ursino, E.; Koutroumpa, D.; Lallement, R.; Puspitarini, L.; Lepri, S. T.; McCammon, D.; Morgan, K.; Walsh, B. M.

    2014-08-10

    Three recent results related to the heliosphere and the local interstellar medium (ISM) have provided an improved insight into the distribution and conditions of material in the solar neighborhood. These are the measurement of the magnetic field outside of the heliosphere by Voyager 1, the improved mapping of the three-dimensional structure of neutral material surrounding the Local Cavity using extensive ISM absorption line and reddening data, and a sounding rocket flight which observed the heliospheric helium focusing cone in X-rays and provided a robust estimate of the contribution of solar wind charge exchange emission to the ROSAT All-Sky Survey 1/4 keV band data. Combining these disparate results, we show that the thermal pressure of the plasma in the Local Hot Bubble (LHB) is P/k = 10, 700 cm{sup –3} K. If the LHB is relatively free of a global magnetic field, it can easily be in pressure (thermal plus magnetic field) equilibrium with the local interstellar clouds, eliminating a long-standing discrepancy in models of the local ISM.

  4. More on noble gases in Yellowstone National Park hot waters

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mazor, E.; Fournier, R.O.

    1973-01-01

    Water and gas samples from research wells in hydrothermal areas of Yellowstone National Park, U.S.A., have been mass spectrometrically analyzed for their rare gas contents and isotopic composition. In agreement with previous findings, the rare gases have been found to originate from infiltrating run-off water, saturated with air at 10 to 20??C. The atmospheric rare gas retention values found for the water varied between 3 and 87 per cent. The fine structure of the Ar, Kr and Xe abundance pattern in the water reveals fraotionational enrichment of the heavier gases due to partial outgassing of the waters. Radiogenic He and Ar have been detected. No positive evidence for magmatic water contribution has been found. Nevertheless, additions of magmatic waters free of rare gas can not be excluded, but if present the proportion is significantly less than 13 to 36 per cent. ?? 1973.

  5. Development of three-pipe DHC system with once-through domestic hot water supply

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-03-01

    Wide use of computers in the United States and installation of different heat recovery systems in buildings reduce the requirements for heating. At the same time, heating, cooling and domestic hot water are often required simultaneously or in a daily cycle (morning heating and afternoon cooling). Also at any given time, some buildings in a service area may require heating, while others require cooling. The present method of serving these needs is the use of four-pipe system with supply and return pipes for heating and domestic hot water service and supply and return pipes for cooling. Both such systems typically circulate water from the district heating and cooling (DHC) plant through user heat exchangers back to the DHC plant in a closed cycle. In order to reduce costs, a three-pipe system is proposed. One pipe supplies hot water for heating and domestic hot water, the second pipe supplies chilled water, and the third pipe is a common return. The purpose of this project was to perform a preliminary investigation of the three-pipe system with once-through hot water supply. In order to accomplish this goal the following tasks have been performed: (1) Technical and economic analysis of the applicability of the three-pipe system in different climatic zones of the United States, (2) Assessment of the corrosion control methods and treatment in the DHC systems, (3) Assessment of the existing code requirements as applied to the three-pipe system with once-through water supply, and (4) Corrosion and water quality field tests in the Jamestown District Heating System as applicable to the once-through water supply. 10 refs., 11 figs.

  6. Influence of Locally Derived Recharge on the Water Quality and Temperature of Springs in Hot Springs National Park, Arkansas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bell, Richard W.; Hays, Phillip D.

    2007-01-01

    The hot springs of Hot Springs National Park consist of a mixture of water from two recharge components: a primary hot-water component and a secondary cold-water component. Widespread distribution of fractures enables mixing of the hot- and cold-water components of flow near the discharge area for the springs. Urbanization in the area near the hot springs of Hot Springs National Park has increased the potential for degradation of the quality of surface-water runoff and locally derived ground-water recharge to the hot springs. Previous studies by the U.S. Geological Survey have indicated that water from some cold-water springs and wells in the vicinity of Hot Springs, Arkansas, showed evidence of contamination and that water from locally derived cold-water recharge might contribute 25 percent of the total flow to the hot springs after storms. Water samples were collected during base-flow conditions at nine hot springs and two cold-water springs in September 2000. Nine hot springs and one cold-water spring were resampled in October 2001 after a storm that resulted in a measurable decrease in water temperature in selected hot springs. Water samples were analyzed for a variety of dissolved chemical constituents (nutrients, major ions, trace elements, pesticides, semivolatile compounds, isotopes, and radiochemicals), physical properties, field measurements, and bacteria. Comparison of analyses of samples collected during base-flow conditions from the springs in 2000 and during a storm event in 2001 with the results from earlier studies dating back to the late 1800's indicates that little change in major, minor, and trace constituent chemistry has occurred and that the water continues to be of excellent quality. Water-quality data show distinguishable differences in water chemistry of the springs during base-flow and stormflow conditions, indicating changing input of cold-water recharge relative to hot-water recharge. Silica, total dissolved solids, strontium, barium

  7. Hot flashes: emerging cardiovascular risk factors in recent and late postmenopause and their association with higher blood pressure.

    PubMed

    Silveira, Juliano S; Clapauch, Ruth; Souza, Maria das Graças C de; Bouskela, Eliete

    2016-08-01

    The aim of the study was to compare the endothelial function of symptomatic (self-reported hot flashes >3 on a scale of 0-10) versus asymptomatic (≤3) women in different postmenopause stages, and to examine if the association between hot flashes and endothelial function was independent of classical cardiovascular risk factors observed during the analysis. Noninvasive venous occlusion plethysmography within two groups: recent (recent postmenopause [RPM], <10 y, n = 63) and late (late postmenopause [LPM], ≥10 y, n = 67) postmenopause. Symptomatic women showed lower forearm blood flow and lower percentage increment of it during the reactive hyperemia response; higher systolic (P < 0.0001 in RPM and P = 0.0008 in LPM) and diastolic (P = 0.0005 in RPM and P = 0.0219 in LPM) blood pressure; highest score for perimenopausal hot flashes (P = 0.0007 in RPM and P < 0.0001 in LPM), longer duration of prior oral contraceptive use (P = 0.009 in RPM and P = 0.0253 in LPM), and higher current sleep disorders (P < 0.0001 in RPM and P = 0.0281 in LPM) compared with asymptomatic ones. In the LPM group, symptomatic women also had higher prevalence of previous hypertension diagnosis (P = 0.0092). During multivariate analysis, blood flow during the reactive hyperemia response was associated with hot flashes after adjusting for age, body mass index, and systolic blood pressure (odds ratio 0.55 [0.36-0.84] in RPM and odds ratio 0.7 [0.5-0.97] in LPM). In both phases, recent and late post menopause, hot flashes were associated with endothelial dysfunction and higher systolic and diastolic blood pressure, but the relationship between hot flashes and endothelial dysfunction was independent of blood pressure.

  8. Chemical indicators of subsurface temperature applied to hot spring waters of Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming, U.S.A.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fournier, R.O.; Truesdell, A.H.

    1970-01-01

    Under favorable conditions the chemistry of hot springs may give reliable indications of subsurface temperatures and circulation patterns. These chemical indicators can be classified by the type of process involved: {A table is presented}. All these indicators have certain limitations. The silica geothermometer gives results independent of the local mineral suite and gas partial pressures, but may be affected by dilution. Alkali ratios are strongly affected by the local mineral suite and the formation of complex ions. Carbonate-chloride ratios are strongly affected by subsurface PCO2. The relative concentration of volatiles can be very misleading in high-pressure liquid systems. In Yellowstone National Park most thermal waters issue from hot, shallow aquifers with pressures in excess of hydrostatic by 2 to 6 bars and with large flows (the flow of hot spring water from the Park is greater than 4000 liters per second). These conditions should be ideal for the use of chemical indicators to estimate aquifer temperatures. In five drill holes aquifer temperatures were within 2??C of that predicted from the silica content of nearby hot springs; the temperature level off at a lower value than predicted in only one hole, and in four other holes drilling was terminated before the predicted aquifer temperature was reached. The temperature-Na/K ratio relationship does not follow any published experimental or empirical curve for water-feldspar or water-clay reactions. We suspect that ion exchange reactions involving zeolites in the Yellowstone rocks result in higher Na/K ratios at given temperatures than result from feldspar or clay reactions. Comparison of SiO2 and Cl/(HCO3 + CO3) suggest that because of higher subsurface PCO2 in Upper Geyser Basin a given Cl/(HCO3 + CO3) ratio there means a higher temperature than in Lower Geyser Basin. No correlation was found in Yellowstone Park between the subsurface regions of highest temperature and the relative concentration of volatile

  9. Our Environment in Hot Water: Comparing Water Heaters, A Life Cycle Approach Comparing Tank and Tankless Water Heaters in California

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Alison; McMahon, James; Masanet, Eric; Lutz, Jim

    2008-08-13

    Residential water heating is a large source of energy use in California homes. This project took a life cycle approach to comparing tank and tankless water heaters in Northern and Southern California. Information about the life cycle phases was calculated using the European Union's Methodology study for EcoDesign of Energy-using Products (MEEUP) and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's Life Cycle Inventory (NREL LCI) database. In a unit-to-unit comparison, it was found that tankless water heaters would lessen impacts of water heating by reducing annual energy use by 2800 MJ/year (16% compared to tank), and reducing global warming emissions by 175 kg CO2 eqv./year (18% reduction). Overall, the production and combustion of natural gas in the use phase had the largest impact. Total waste, VOCs, PAHs, particulate matter, and heavy-metals-to-air categories were also affected relatively strongly by manufacturing processes. It was estimated that tankless water heater users would have to use 10 more gallons of hot water a day (an increased usage of approximately 20%) to have the same impact as tank water heaters. The project results suggest that if a higher percentage of Californians used tankless water heaters, environmental impacts caused by water heating would be smaller.

  10. Investigation on actuation and thermo-mechanical behaviour of Shape Memory Alloy spring using hot water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chouhan, Priya; Nath, Tameshwer; Lad, B. K.; Palani, I. A.

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, hot water is used as an actuation media for Shape memory alloy and its impact on the morphology of structure of Nitinol Shape Memory Alloy (SMA), is presented. With hot water actuation as the temperature reaches 70-80°C, spring gets fully compressed for the first few cycles followed by a displacement loss in actuation. This actuation loss is then studied with different characterization methods such as Thermo Gravimetric Analysis (TGA) and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM). With SEM results, it can be inferred that the energy source is not deteriorating the structure. Results observed from TGA shows high oxygen content at lower temperature limits with hot water actuation which suggest the need of conducting experiments in inert atmosphere. As a possible mechanism, a new actuation medium is introduced and various results can be seen in the paper discussed below.

  11. Performance of Generator of Absorption Refrigerating Machine Powered by Hot Water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kunugi, Yoshifumi; Usui, Sanpei; Ouchi, Tomihisa; Fukuda, Tamio

    For 70 kW generator of absorption refrigerating machine powered by the hot water, lifted liquid rate of the bubble lift pump has a maximum value at some vapor flow rate of refrigerant and hot water inlet temperature. This is in agreement with results of small size bubble lift pump. Maximum lifted liquid rate G0 is correlated by the equation G0 = 5, 000σ1.5, where σ is the degree of submergence. In this case, diameter of pump tube was 41.6mm, and length of it were 1,300 and 1,500mm. The range of hot water inlet temperature was 78 - 100°C. Multitube heat flux of first generator is about two times that of second generator at the same superheat.

  12. Overview of Current Hot Water Propulsion Activities at Berlin University of Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolditz, M.; Pilz, N.; Adirim, H.; Rudloff, P.; Gorsch, M.; Kron, M.

    2004-10-01

    The AQUARIUS working group has been founded in 1991 on the initiative of students at the Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics at Berlin University of Technology. It works mainly on the development, manufacturing and testing of hot water propulsion systems. Upon having launched numerous single stage rockets, a two stage hot water rocket (AQUARIUS X-PRO) was developed and launched for the first time in world history. In order to perform thrust experiments for a deeper understanding of the propulsion efficiency and the influence of varying nozzle parameters on exhaust characteristics, a dedicated hot water test facility has been built. For more than five years,ground-based take-off assistance systems for future reusable launch vehicles have been the subject of intense investigation.

  13. Burn Injuries Caused by Hot Water Bottles: Audit and Loop Closure

    PubMed Central

    Whittam, Alex; Wilson, Ailsa; Greenwood, John E.

    2010-01-01

    Objectives: To reduce the annual incidence of hot water bottle burns by reviewing cases, classifying injury, invoking a multimedia campaign to increase public awareness. To stimulate state, federal, and international government review of manufacturing standards with a view to reinforcing legislation. Methods: A multimedia warning was launched following the scalding death of an elderly lady. Our database allowed identification of all patients injured by hot water bottles; their medical notes were thoroughly reviewed. Results: The review divided cases into bottle failure and/or patient misuse. Early legislation in New Zealand resulted in bottle withdrawal from sale, mirrored by recent legislation in Australia. Legislation and the multimedia campaign have seen admissions from hot water bottle burns markedly decreased. Conclusions: Thorough audit of specific burn etiologies, with effective broadcasting of hazard, can result in reduction or abolition of future injury from that source and may prompt appropriate legislation to further protect the general public. PMID:20090860

  14. Infections Acquired via Fresh Water: From Lakes to Hot Tubs.

    PubMed

    Ayi, Bertha

    2015-12-01

    This chapter is unique in its focus on infections that are acquired in water. For those who like to swim and spend time in water parks and pools, the exposure to water and therefore the risk of infection is higher. Recreational water illnesses are illnesses related to recreation in water. Of these recreational water illnesses, infections are the most common because water laden with microorganisms or contaminated by human activity gains access to healthy tissue through the skin and body orifices. Infection occurs by inhalation, ingestion, or direct invasion of the respiratory and gastrointestinal tract. Gastrointestinal infections are the most common. This chapter discusses skin and soft tissue infections, ocular infections, urinary tract infections, pulmonary infections, central nervous system infections, and disseminated infections that can occur as people come into contact with natural nonmarine water bodies as well as manmade aquatic environments. Most of these infections are mild but can occasionally be life threatening. There is a focus on the latest methods to treat these infections. Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a very common pathogen in water. The chapter discusses P. aeruginosa dermatitis at length and also looks at keratitis and pneumonia caused by this organism. The chapter also discusses the latest treatments for primary amoebic meningoencephalitis, a severe life-threatening illness with a high mortality, caused by Naegleria fowleri. Finally, there is an in-depth discussion of the notorious gastrointestinal illnesses such as norovirus and Cryptosporidium parvum that can affect large numbers of people at a time.

  15. Physicochemical and phytochemical properties of cold and hot water extraction from Hibiscus sabdariffa.

    PubMed

    Ramirez-Rodrigues, Milena M; Plaza, Maria L; Azeredo, Alberto; Balaban, Murat O; Marshall, Maurice R

    2011-04-01

    Hibiscus cold (25 °C) and hot (90 °C) water extracts were prepared in various time-temperature combinations to determine equivalent extraction conditions regarding their physicochemical and phytochemical properties. Equivalent anthocyanins concentration was obtained at 25 °C for 240 min and 90 °C for 16 min. Total phenolics were better extracted with hot water that also resulted in a higher antioxidant capacity in these extracts. Similar polyphenolic profiles were observed between fresh and dried hibiscus extracts. Hibiscus acid and 2 derivatives were found in all extracts. Hydroxybenzoic acids, caffeoylquinic acids, flavonols, and anthocyanins constituted the polyphenolic compounds identified in hibiscus extracts. Two major anthocyanins were found in both cold and hot extracts: delphynidin-3-sambubioside and cyanidin-3-sambubioside. In general, both cold and hot extractions yielded similar phytochemical properties; however, under cold extraction, color degradation was significantly lower and extraction times were 15-fold longer. Hibiscus beverages are prepared from fresh or dried calyces by a hot extraction and pasteurized, which can change organoleptic, nutritional, and color attributes. Nonthermal technologies such as dense phase carbon dioxide may maintain their fresh-like color, flavor, and nutrients. This research compares the physicochemical and phytochemical changes resulting from a cold and hot extraction of fresh and dried hibiscus calyces and adds to the knowledge of work done on color, quality attributes, and antioxidant capacity of unique tropical products. In addition, the research shows how these changes could lead to alternative nonthermal processes for hibiscus.

  16. Blood Pressure Treatment Adherence and Control after Participation in the ReHOT.

    PubMed

    Jesus, Nathália Silva de; Nogueira, Armando da Rocha; Pachu, Cacilda Oliveira; Luiz, Ronir Raggio; Oliveira, Glaucia Maria Moraes de

    2016-11-01

    Lack of adherence to pharmacological treatment is one of the main causes of low control rates in hypertension. To verify treatment adherence and associated factors, as well as blood pressure (BP) control in participants of the Resistant Hypertension Optimal Treatment (ReHOT) clinical trial. Cross-sectional study including all 109 patients who had completed the ReHOT for at least 6 months. We excluded those participants who failed to respond to the new recruitment after three phone contact attempts. We evaluated the BP control by ambulatory BP monitoring (ABPM; controlled levels: 24-hour systolic and diastolic BP < 130 x 80 mmHg) and analyzed the patients' treatment adherence using the Morisky Medication Adherence Scale (MMAS) questionnaire validated by Bloch, Melo, and Nogueira (2008). The statistical analysis was performed with the software IBM SPSS statistics 21.0. We tested the normality of the data distribution with kurtosis and skewness. The variables tested in the study are presented with descriptive statistics. Comparisons between treatment adherence and other variables were performed with Student's t test for independent variables and Pearson's chi-square or Fisher's exact test. To conduct analyses among patients considering adherence to treatment and BP control, we created four groups: G0, G1, G2, and G3. We considered a 5% significance level in all tests. During the ReHOT, 80% of the patients had good BP control and treatment adherence. Of 96 patients reevaluated in the present study, only 52.1% had controlled hypertension when assessed by ABPM, while 31.3% were considered adherent by the MMAS. Regarding other ABPM measures, we observed an absence of a nocturnal dip in 64.6% of the patients and a white-coat effect and false BP control in 23% and 12.5%, respectively. Patients' education level showed a trend towards being a determinant factor associated with lack of adherence (p = 0.05). Resistant hypertension and number of medications were significantly

  17. Investigation and Construction of a Thermosyphoning Solar Hot Water System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Harvey

    1978-01-01

    Describes how a thermosyphoning solar water heater capable of heating 110 kilogram of water to 80 degree Celsius and maintaining this temperature for 24 hours was constructed by four students in the fifth form of Sekolah Date Abdul Razak, Seremban, Malaysia in 1976. (HM)

  18. Opportunities for utility involvement with solar domestic hot water

    SciTech Connect

    Carlisle, N.; Christensen, C.; Barrett, L.

    1992-05-01

    Solar water heating is one of a number of options that can be considered under utility demand-side management (DSM) programs. Utilities perceive a range of potential benefits for solar water heating in terms of customer service, energy conservation, load management, environmental enhancement, and public relations. The solar industry may benefit from utility marketing efforts, economies of scale, added credibility, financing options, and long-term maintenance arrangements. This paper covers three topics: (1) the energy and demand impacts of solar water heating on utility load profiles based on the results of four studies in the literature, (2) the results of workshops sponsored by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) to identify key issues faced by utilities in considering residential solar water heating as a DSM option, (3) several current or planned utility programs to promote solar water heating. 7 refs.

  19. Risk factors for contamination of domestic hot water systems by Legionellae

    SciTech Connect

    Alary, M.; Joly, J.R. )

    1991-08-01

    To assess risk factors associated with the contamination of the domestic environment by legionellae, 211 houses in the Quebec City area were randomly selected and water samples were collected from the hot water tank, the shower heads, and the most frequently used faucet. After centrifugation, concentrated samples were seeded in triplicate on BCYE and GPV media. Data on the characteristics of the hot water system and plumbing in the house and on the personal habils of the occupants were collected for each house. Among these 211 houses, hot water was provided by either an oil or gas heater in 33 and by an electric heater in 178. Legionellae were isolated from none of the samples from houses with oil or gas heaters and from 39% (69 of 178) of those with electric water heaters. This association remained highly significant after control for water temperature and other variables in a stratified analysis. In the 178 houses with an electric heater, 12% of the faucets, 15% of the shower heads, and 37% of the water heaters were contaminated. Legionella pneumophila serogroups 2 and 4 were the most frequently isolated strains. Logistic regression showed that factors associated with electric water heater contamination were (1) location of the house in older districts of the city (2) old age of the water heater, and (3) low water temperature. Contamination of the water heater was the only factor significantly associated with the contamination of peripheral outlets. This study shows that the presence of an electric heater is strongly associated with contamination of domestic hot water systems by Legionellae. The public health importance of this contamination is still unknown.

  20. The Brackets Design and Stress Analysis of a Refinery's Hot Water Pipeline

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, San-Ping; He, Yan-Lin

    2016-05-01

    The reconstruction engineering which reconstructs the hot water pipeline from a power station to a heat exchange station requires the new hot water pipeline combine with old pipe racks. Taking the allowable span calculated based on GB50316 and the design philosophy of the pipeline supports into account, determine the types and locations of brackets. By analyzing the stresses of the pipeline in AutoPIPE, adjusting the supports at dangerous segments, recalculating in AutoPIPE, at last determine the types, locations and numbers of supports reasonably. Then the overall pipeline system will satisfy the requirement of the ASME B31.3.

  1. Temperature stratification from thermal diodes in solar hot water storage tank

    SciTech Connect

    Rhee, Jinny; Campbell, Andrew; Mariadass, Adele; Morhous, Branden

    2010-03-15

    In this brief note, we have experimentally measured the temperature stratification in a solar hot water storage tank resulting from a simulated solar heating load. Various modifications using a double chimney device that acts as a thermal diode were examined with the intent of maximizing temperature stratification. The greatest stratification was seen with a unique thermal diode arrangement named the express-elevator design, so-called for the direct hot water path from the bottom third of the tank to the top third. (author)

  2. Performance Test: Okaw Bluff Bathhouse Solar Hot Water System.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-06-01

    Dieterich standard annubars with differential pressure transducer for flow rate measurements. -Tem-tex resistance temperature detector sensors hooked in...compilation and output. Second, flow rate measurements will be improved by adding specially calibrated annubars on all flow loops for more thorough system

  3. Hot gas cleanup test facility for gasification and pressurized combustion project. Quarterly report, October--December 1995

    SciTech Connect

    1996-02-01

    The objective of this project is to evaluate hot gas particle control technologies using coal-derived gas streams. This will entail the design, construction, installation, and use of a flexible test facility which can operate under realistic gasification and combustion conditions. The conceptual design of the facility was extended to include a within scope, phased expansion of the existing Hot Gas Cleanup Test Facility Cooperative Agreement to also address systems integration issues of hot particulate removal in advanced coal-based power generation systems. This expansion included the consideration of the following modules at the test facility in addition to the original Transport Reactor gas source and Hot Gas Cleanup Units: Carbonizer/pressurized circulating fluidized bed gas source; hot gas cleanup units to mate to all gas streams; combustion gas turbine; and fuel cell and associated gas treatment. This expansion to the Hot Gas Cleanup Test Facility is herein referred to as the Power Systems Development Facility (PSDF). The major emphasis during this reporting period was continuing the detailed design of the facility towards completion and integrating the balance-of-plant processes and particulate control devices (PCDs) into the structural and process designs. Substantial progress in construction activities was achieved during this quarter.

  4. Water Pressure Distribution on a Flying Boat Hull

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, F L

    1931-01-01

    This is the third in a series of investigations of the water pressures on seaplane floats and hulls, and completes the present program. It consisted of determining the water pressures and accelerations on a Curtiss H-16 flying boat during landing and taxiing maneuvers in smooth and rough water.

  5. Hot-water aquifer storage: A field test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parr, A. D.; Molz, F. J.; Andersen, P. F.

    1980-01-01

    The basic water injection cycle used in a large-scale field study of heat storage in a confined aquifer near Mobile, Alabama is described. Water was pumped from an upper semi-confined aquifer, passed through a boiler where it was heated to a temperature of about 55 C, and injected into a medium sand confined aquifer. The injection well has a 6-inch (15-cm) partially-penetrating steel screen. The top of the storage formation is about 40 meters below the surface and the formation thickness is about 21 meters. In the first cycle, after a storage period of 51 days, the injection well was pumped until the temperature of the recovered water dropped to 33 c. At that point 55,300 cubic meters of water had been withdrawn and 66 percent of the injected energy had been recovered. The recovery period for the second cycle continued until the water temperature was 27.5 C and 100,100 cubic meters of water was recovered. At the end of the cycle about 90 percent of the energy injected during the cycle had been recovered.

  6. Infrared emission of hot water in the atmosphere of Mira

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamura, I.; de Jong, T.; Cami, J.

    1999-08-01

    The ISO/SWS spectrum of o Cet taken at its maximum exhibits an absorption-like feature between 3.5 and 4.0 mu m. We present evidence that the feature is due to emission of H_2O and SiO molecules, in a layer extended to about two stellar radii with an excitation temperature of 2000 K. These hot molecules are also observed in a spectrum of Z Cas near minimum, but this time in absorption. A simple plane-parallel model is used to fit the spectra of these two stars. The H_2O column densities and excitation temperatures in the layers are found to be similar in both stars. The difference of the H_2O band is thus primarily due to the layer size. The H_2O layers seem to be more extended at visual maximum, probably related to the stellar pulsation. The estimated lower limit to the local gas density in the layers of ~ 10(11) cm(-3) is in good agreement with theoretical predictions from dynamical model atmospheres. Based on observations with ISO, an ESA project with instruments funded by ESA Member States (especially the PI countries: France, Germany, the Netherlands and the United Kingdom) with the participation of ISAS and NASA. The SWS is a joint project of SRON and MPE.

  7. Clean subglacial access: prospects for future deep hot-water drilling

    PubMed Central

    Pearce, David; Hodgson, Dominic A.; Smith, Andrew M.; Rose, Mike; Ross, Neil; Mowlem, Matt; Parnell, John

    2016-01-01

    Accessing and sampling subglacial environments deep beneath the Antarctic Ice Sheet presents several challenges to existing drilling technologies. With over half of the ice sheet believed to be resting on a wet bed, drilling down to this environment must conform to international agreements on environmental stewardship and protection, making clean hot-water drilling the most viable option. Such a drill, and its water recovery system, must be capable of accessing significantly greater ice depths than previous hot-water drills, and remain fully operational after connecting with the basal hydrological system. The Subglacial Lake Ellsworth (SLE) project developed a comprehensive plan for deep (greater than 3000 m) subglacial lake research, involving the design and development of a clean deep-ice hot-water drill. However, during fieldwork in December 2012 drilling was halted after a succession of equipment issues culminated in a failure to link with a subsurface cavity and abandonment of the access holes. The lessons learned from this experience are presented here. Combining knowledge gained from these lessons with experience from other hot-water drilling programmes, and recent field testing, we describe the most viable technical options and operational procedures for future clean entry into SLE and other deep subglacial access targets. PMID:26667913

  8. Clean subglacial access: prospects for future deep hot-water drilling.

    PubMed

    Makinson, Keith; Pearce, David; Hodgson, Dominic A; Bentley, Michael J; Smith, Andrew M; Tranter, Martyn; Rose, Mike; Ross, Neil; Mowlem, Matt; Parnell, John; Siegert, Martin J

    2016-01-28

    Accessing and sampling subglacial environments deep beneath the Antarctic Ice Sheet presents several challenges to existing drilling technologies. With over half of the ice sheet believed to be resting on a wet bed, drilling down to this environment must conform to international agreements on environmental stewardship and protection, making clean hot-water drilling the most viable option. Such a drill, and its water recovery system, must be capable of accessing significantly greater ice depths than previous hot-water drills, and remain fully operational after connecting with the basal hydrological system. The Subglacial Lake Ellsworth (SLE) project developed a comprehensive plan for deep (greater than 3000 m) subglacial lake research, involving the design and development of a clean deep-ice hot-water drill. However, during fieldwork in December 2012 drilling was halted after a succession of equipment issues culminated in a failure to link with a subsurface cavity and abandonment of the access holes. The lessons learned from this experience are presented here. Combining knowledge gained from these lessons with experience from other hot-water drilling programmes, and recent field testing, we describe the most viable technical options and operational procedures for future clean entry into SLE and other deep subglacial access targets.

  9. Carrier concentration modulation by hot pressing pressure in n-type nanostructured Bi(Se)Te alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, Tsung-ta E.; LeBeau, James M.; Venkatasubramanian, Rama; Thomas, Peter; Stuart, Judy; Koch, Carl C.

    2013-09-01

    We demonstrate experimentally that an optimal hot pressing pressure is required for high thermoelectric power factor in different n-type Bi(Se)Te alloys for a given processing temperature. This phenomenon is attributed to the variations in carrier concentration, which changes the Seebeck coefficient and therefore the power factor. The variations could arise from the difference in the concentration of charged antisite defects as their formation energy changes with pressures. Furthermore, modifications of the energy gap resulting from the lattice distortions at high pressure also likely play a role.

  10. Solar heating and hot water system installed at office building, One Solar Place, Dallas, Texas. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-06-01

    This document is the Final Report of the Solar Energy System Installed at the First Solar Heated Office Building, One Solar Place, Dallas, Texas. The Solar System was designed to provide 87 percent of the space heating needs, 100 percent of the potable hot water needs and is sized for future absorption cooling. The collection subsystem consists of 28 Solargenics, series 76, flat plate collectors with a total area of 1596 square feet. The solar loop circulates an ethylene glycol-water solution through the collectors into a hot water system heat exchanger. The hot water storage subsystem consists of a heat exchanger, two 2300 gallon concrete hot water storage tanks with built in heat exchangers and a back-up electric boiler. The domestic hot water subsystem sends hot water to the 10,200 square feet floor area office building hot water fixtures. The building cold water system provides make-up to the solar loop, the heating loop, and the hot water concrete storage tanks. The design, construction, cost analysis, operation and maintenance of the solar system are described. The system became operational July 11, 1979.

  11. Preparation of Substrate for Flavorant from Chicken Bone Residue with Hot-Pressure Process.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jin-Zhi; Dong, Xian-Bing; Yue, Jian-Ying; Zhang, Chun-Hui; Jia, Wei; Li, Xia

    2016-03-01

    Hot-pressure extraction (HPE), which is regarded as a "green" technology, was applied to extract nutrients (protein, collagen, and minerals) from chicken bone residue (CBR). Amino acids (AA), color, and volatile flavor compounds of chicken bone extract (CBE) were also investigated. Results showed that contents of protein, total soluble solids, minerals, and collagen of CBE were positively correlated with extraction time and temperature. High ratios of protein (83.51%) and collagen (96.81%) were obtained with 135 °C and 120 min. Essential AA accounted for 31.03% to 47.73% of total AA in CBE. The percentage of bitter AA in TAA decreased from 28.94% to 25.02% at 0 min to 20.19% and 21.41% at 120 min, although fresh AA increased from 46.35% to 50.84% (0 min) to 53.14% (120 min) at 130 and 135 °C, respectively, indicating CBE was nutritionally beneficial with good flavor. Color and volatile flavor of CBE improved significantly after extraction, although calcium in CBE (4.2 to 4.8 mg/100 g) was relatively low compared with that of CBR (1078 mg/100 g). It can be concluded that HPE is a promising way to transform CBR into a nutritious flavorant substrate, but it is not an efficient way to extract calcium.

  12. Effects of Hot-Pressure Extraction Time on Composition and Gelatin Properties of Chicken Bone Extracts.

    PubMed

    Yue, Jian-Ying; Wang, Jin-Zhi; Zhang, Chun-Hui; Jia, Wei; Li, Xia; Sun, Zhen

    2017-03-29

    Hot-pressure extraction was utilized in this study to extract proteins from chicken bones at 130 °C. The obtained extracts were further used to prepare gelatin gels. Results demonstrated that the extraction time can significantly affect the composition of the chicken bone extracts (P < 0.05). High-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) analysis indicated that the protein fraction of molecular weight (MW) >30 KDa was only visible in the extracts collected between 40 and 60 min. The highest contents of hydroxyproline, imino acids, and hydrophobic amino acids were all achieved in the chicken bone extracts after 120 min of extraction, being 3.9, 7.7, and 16.0 mg/g, respectively. The prepared gelatin properties were evaluated in terms of viscosity, storage and loss modulus, stability, gel strength, and their microstructures. Results indicated that gelatins made from chicken bone extracts of 20, 40, and 60 min extraction had better properties compared to that of 90 and 120 min. Significant correlations were identified between gelatin's composition and properties (P < 0.05). The abundance of proteins with MW of <10 KDa and 10 to 30 KDa was found to be the predominant factor that can affect the gelatin's properties. This study illustrated a promising and natural way to obtain edible gelatins from chicken bones.

  13. Use of submersible pressure transducers in water-resources investigations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Freeman, Lawrence A.; Carpenter, Michael C.; Rosenberry, Donald O.; Rousseau, Joseph P.; Unger, Randy; McLean, John S.

    2004-01-01

    Submersible pressure transducers, developed in the early 1960s, have made the collection of water-level and pressure data much more convenient than former methods. Submersible pressure transducers, when combined with electronic data recorders have made it possible to collect continuous or nearly continuous water-level or pressure data from wells, piezometers, soil-moisture tensiometers, and surface water gages. These more frequent measurements have led to an improved understanding of the hydraulic processes in streams, soils, and aquifers. This manual describes the operational theory behind submersible pressure transducers and provides information about their use in hydrologic investigations conducted by the U.S. Geological Survey.

  14. Hot-water heating system having an air eliminator

    SciTech Connect

    Pompei, F.

    1984-06-26

    An improved forced-liquid flow, circulatory system for removing gas entrained or dissolved in the liquid. The system includes a circulatory liquid-flow network and means for forcing the liquid to flow through the circulatory network. A by-pass line is situated around the region where the lowest gas solubility in the liquid occurs in the circulatory network. Such lowest gas solubility occurs at the point of generally highest temperature and lowest pressure, as determined most precisely by Henry's Law. Gas-liquid separator means is located in the by-pass line. The separator means separates the gas from the liquid and expels the gas from the circulatory network.

  15. Abrasive water-jet cutting; remote hot cell application

    SciTech Connect

    Leist, K.J.; Funnell, G.J.

    1988-09-01

    In the process of selecting a failed equipment cut-up tool for the Process Facility Modifications (PFM) Project, a system using an Abrasive Water Jet (AWJ) was developed and tested for remote disassembly of failed equipment by the Westinghouse Hanford Company, PFM Mechanical Development Unit.

  16. NORTH PORTAL-HOT WATER CALCULATION-SHOP BUILDING #5006

    SciTech Connect

    R. Blackstone

    2006-01-25

    The purpose of this design analysis and calculation is to determine the demand for domestic cold water and to size the supply main for the Shop Building No.5006 in accordance with the Uniform Plumbing Code (UPC) (Section 4.4.1) and the U.S. Department of Energy, Order 6430.1A-1540 (Section 4.4.2).

  17. Solar heating, cooling, and domestic hot water system installed at Kaw Valley State Bank and Trust Company, Topeka, Kansas. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1980-11-01

    The building has approximately 5600 square feet of conditioned space. Solar energy is used for space heating, space cooling, and preheating domestic hot water (DHW). The solar energy system has an array of evacuated tube-type collectors with an area of 1068 square feet. A 50/50 solution of ethylene glycol and water is the transfer medium that delivers solar energy to a tube-in-shell heat exchanger that in turn delivers solar-heated water to a 1100 gallon pressurized hot water storage tank. When solar energy is insufficient to satisfy the space heating and/or cooling demand, a natural gas-fired boiler provides auxiliary energy to the fan coil loops and/or the absorption chillers. Extracts from the site files, specification references, drawings, and installation, operation and maintenance instructions are included.

  18. Dairy farm hot water: an economic evaluation of solar collectors vs. heat exchangers

    SciTech Connect

    Heid, W.G. Jr.; Williams, E.V.

    1982-01-01

    Two alternative systems for heating water - solar collectors and heat exchangers - were compared to determine the more economical choice by dairy farmers. Btu requirements and discounted payback were estimated for three dairy herd sizes, 40, 90, and 140 cows. The analysis was performed for two locations in Kansas, Dodge City and Topeka. These locations were chosen because their average daily insolation is around 600,000 Btu/ft/sup 2/ which is representative of many of the dairying regions in the western half of the United States. Both the solar hot water and the heat exchanger systems analyzed in this study were sized according to manufacturer specifications. For the basic analysis, it was assumed that the solar collector system was 52% efficient and supplied a solar fraction of about 50%. Performance of the heat exchanger was measured at three levels, 60, 70, and 80%. The fraction of Btu requirements supplied varied with herd size. Herd size is an important factor to consider as farmers select the more appropriate alternative technology. Discounted payback for heat exchangers decreased rapidly as herd size increased, reaching 1 to 2 years, with tax credits, for the 140-cow herd size. Because less hot water per cow is needed in large dairies, heat exchangers will supply a large percentage of the hot water requirements for a 140-cow herd dairy. Heat exchangers appear to be ideally suited, both technically and economically, for commercial-sized dairy herds. Conversely, the discounted payback for solar hot water systems was about the same for all three herd sizes and above the payback level of heat exchangers even at the small herd size. Only for herds of less than 40 cows are solar hot water systems competitive with heat exchangers.

  19. Water-quality appraisal. Mammoth Creek and Hot Creek, Mono County, California

    SciTech Connect

    Setmire, J.G.

    1984-06-01

    A late summer reconnaissance in 1981 and a spring high-flow sampling in 1982 of Mammoth Creek and Hot Creek, located in the Mammoth crest area of the Sierra Nevada, indicated that three water-quality processes were occurring: (1) mineralization; (2) eutrophication; and (3) sedimentation. Limited areas of fecal contamination were also observed. Mineralization due primarily to geothermal springs increased dissolved-solids concentration downstream, which changed the chemical composition of the water. The percentage of calcium decreased gradually, the percentage of magnesium and sodium increased, and the percentage of fluoride, sulfate, and chloride fluctuated, but increased overall. These changes produced water quality in Mammoth Creek similar to that of the springs forming Hot Creek. Twin Lakes and the reach of Hot Creek below the fish hatchery showed evidence of eutrophication. Twin Lakes had floating mats of algae and a high dissolved-oxygen saturation of 147% at a pH of 9.2. Hot Creek had abundant growth of aquatic vascular plants and algae, dissolved-oxygen saturations ranging from 65% to 200%, algal growth potential of 30 milligrams per liter, nitrate concentration of 0.44 milligram per liter, and phosphate concentration of 0.157 milligram per liter. Sediment deposition was determined from detailed observations of bed-material composition, which showed that fine material was deposited at Sherwin Creek Road and downstream. Fecal contamination was indicated by fecal-coliform bacteria counts of 250 colonies per 100 milliliters and fecal-streptococcal bacteria counts greater than 1000 colonies per 100 milliliters. Although bacterial sampling was sporadic and incomplete, it did indicate adverse effects on water quality for the following beneficial uses that have been identified for Mammoth Creek and Hot Creek: (1) municipal supply; (2) cold-water habitat; and (3) contact and noncontact water recreation. 6 refs., 15 figs., 15 tabs.

  20. Disparity in disinfection byproducts concentration between hot and cold tap water.

    PubMed

    Liu, Boning; Reckhow, David A

    2015-03-01

    The quality of water entering a distribution system may differ substantially from the quality at the point of exposure to the consumer. This study investigated temporal variations in the levels of regulated and non-regulated disinfection byproducts (DBPs) in cold and hot tap water in a home on a medium-sized municipal water system. In addition, samples were collected directly from the water plant with some being held in accordance with a simulated distribution system (SDS) test protocol. The location for this work was a system in western Massachusetts, USA that uses free chlorine as a final disinfectant. Very little short term variability of DBPs at the point of entry (POE) was observed. The concentration of DBPs in the time-variable SDS test was similar to concentrations in the cold water tap. For most DBPs, the concentrations continued to increase as the cold water tap sample was held for the time-variable SDS incubation period. However, the impact of heating on DBP levels was compound specific. For example, the concentrations of trihalomethanes (THMs), dichloroacetic acid (DCAA) and chloropicrin (CP) were substantially higher in the hot water tap than in the cold water time-variable SDS samples. In contrast, the concentration of trichloroacetic acid (TCAA) was lower in the heated hot tap water, but about equal to that observed in the cold tap water. The situation was more pronounced for dichloroacetonitrile (DCAN), bromodichloroacetic acid (BDCAA), bromochloroacetic acid (BCAA) and 1,1,1-trichloropropanone (TCP), which all showed lower concentrations in the hot water then in either of the cold water samples (instantaneous or time-variable SDS). The latter was viewed as a clear indication of thermally-induced decomposition. The ratio of unknown total organic halide (UTOX) to TOX was substantially lower in the hot tap water as the THM to TOX ratio became correspondingly larger. The results of this study show that DBP exposure in the home is not well represented by

  1. Natural radioactivity in geothermal waters, Alhambra Hot Springs and nearby areas, Jefferson County, Montana

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Leonard, Robert B.; Janzer, Victor J.

    1978-01-01

    Radioactive hot springs issue from a fault zone in crystalline rock of the Boulder batholith at Alhambra, Jefferson County, in southwestern Montana. The discharge contains high concentrations of radon, and the gross alpha activity and the concentration of adium-226 exceed maximum levels recommended by the Environmental Protection Agency for drinking water. Part of the discharge is diverted for space heating, bathing, and domestic use. The radioactive thermal waters at measured temperatures of about 60°C are of the sodium bicarbonate type and saturated with respect to calcium carbonate. Radium-226 in the rock and on fractured surfaces or coprecipitated with calcium carbonate probably is the principal source of radon that is dissolved in the thermal water and discharged with other gases from some wells and springs. Local surface water and shallow ground water are of the calcium bicarbonate type and exhibit low background activity. The temperature, percent sodium, and radioactivity of mixed waters adjacent to the fault zone increase with depth. Samples from most of the major hot springs in southwestern Montana have been analyzed for gross alpha and beta activity. The high level of radioactivity at Alhambra appears to be related to leaching of radioactive material from siliceous veins by ascending thermal waters and is not a normal characteristic of hot springs issuing from fractured crystalline rock in Montana.

  2. Draft Genome Sequence of Deinococcus sp. Strain RL Isolated from Sediments of a Hot Water Spring

    PubMed Central

    Mahato, Nitish Kumar; Tripathi, Charu; Verma, Helianthous; Singh, Neha

    2014-01-01

    Deinococcus sp. strain RL, a moderately thermophilic bacterium, was isolated from sediments of a hot water spring in Manikaran, India. Here, we report the draft genome (2.79 Mbp) of this strain, which contains 62 contigs and 2,614 coding DNA sequences, with an average G+C content of 69.4%. PMID:25035332

  3. Solar heating and domestic hot water system installed at North Dallas High School

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    The solar energy system located at the North Dallas High School, Dallas, Texas is discussed. The system is designed as a retrofit in a three story with basement, concrete frame high school building. Extracts from the site files, specification references for solar modification to existing building heating and domestic hot water systems, drawings, installation, operation and maintenance instructions are included.

  4. Mango fruit aroma volatile production following quarantine hot water treatment and subsequent ripening

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Mangos are an important tropical fruit crop worldwide that are appreciated for their attractive peel and flesh colors, juicy texture, sweetness, and unique aroma. Mangos exported to the U.S. receive quarantine hot water treatment (QHWT) at 46.1 °C for 65 to 110 min (depending on fruit shape and size...

  5. Dry heat and hot water treatments for disinfesting cottonseed of Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. vasinfectum

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The potential of low- and high-temperature dry heat, and hot water treatments, for disinfesting cottonseed of Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. vasinfectum was investigated. Naturally infected seeds from Louisiana were air-heated in incubators set at temperatures of 30, 35, and 40 degrees C for up to 24 we...

  6. Evaluation of the impact of hot water treatment on the sensory quality of fresh tomatoes

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Minimizing the effects of chilling injury during shelf-life is important for maintaining the sensory quality of fresh tomato fruit. Postharvest hot water treatments within certain limits of exposure time and temperature have been shown to increase resistance of tomatoes to chilling injury. Mature-gr...

  7. Don't Let Legal Issues Put You in Hot Water! A Safety and Liability Primer

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zirkle, Chris

    2013-01-01

    Providing a safe classroom and laboratory environment should be the first priority of any career-technical and technology/engineering education instructor. Doing so not only increases the opportunity for student learning, but it also keeps instructors "out of hot water" with respect to legal issues of liability. In today's litigious…

  8. Spattering and Crackle of Hot Cooking Oil with Water: A Classroom Demonstration and Discussion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pinto, Gabriel; Gauthier, Carmen V.

    2009-01-01

    Any student that has spent time in the kitchen knows that hot vegetable oil will pop and spatter violently after coming into contact with water such as that on the surface of foods (meat, fish, potatoes, etc.). This well-known effect can be used as an instructional resource to promote cooperative, active, and inquiry-based learning about central…

  9. Solar heating and hot water system installed at Charlotte Memorial Hospital, Charlotte, North Carolina. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1981-05-01

    Included in this report is detailed information regarding the design and installation of a heating and hot water system in a commercial application. This information includes descriptions of system and building, design philosophy, control logic operation modes, design and installation drawing and a brief description of problems encountered and their solutions.

  10. Spattering and Crackle of Hot Cooking Oil with Water: A Classroom Demonstration and Discussion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pinto, Gabriel; Gauthier, Carmen V.

    2009-01-01

    Any student that has spent time in the kitchen knows that hot vegetable oil will pop and spatter violently after coming into contact with water such as that on the surface of foods (meat, fish, potatoes, etc.). This well-known effect can be used as an instructional resource to promote cooperative, active, and inquiry-based learning about central…

  11. Solar heating and hot water system installed at Charlotte Memorial Hospital, Charlotte, North Carolina

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    Detailed information regarding the design and installation of a heating and hot water system in a commercial application is given. This information includes descriptions of system and building, design philosophy, control logic operation modes, design and installation drawing and a brief description of problems encountered and their solutions.

  12. Ecofriendly hot water treatment reduces postharvest decay and elicits defense response in kiwifruit

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Hot water treatment (HWT) of fruit is an effective approach for managing postharvest decay of fruits and vegetables. In the present study, the effects of HWT (45 degrees C for 10 min) on the growth of Botrytis cinerea and Penicillium expansum in vitro, and gray (B. cinerea) and blue mold (P. expans...

  13. 21 CFR 890.5720 - Water circulating hot or cold pack.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Water circulating hot or cold pack. 890.5720 Section 890.5720 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES PHYSICAL MEDICINE DEVICES Physical Medicine Therapeutic Devices § 890.5720...

  14. 21 CFR 890.5720 - Water circulating hot or cold pack.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Water circulating hot or cold pack. 890.5720 Section 890.5720 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES PHYSICAL MEDICINE DEVICES Physical Medicine Therapeutic Devices § 890.5720...

  15. Don't Let Legal Issues Put You in Hot Water! A Safety and Liability Primer

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zirkle, Chris

    2013-01-01

    Providing a safe classroom and laboratory environment should be the first priority of any career-technical and technology/engineering education instructor. Doing so not only increases the opportunity for student learning, but it also keeps instructors "out of hot water" with respect to legal issues of liability. In today's litigious…

  16. Effects of hot-water extraction on the thermochemical conversion of shrub willow via fast pyrolysis

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Hot-water extraction (TM) (HWE) is a pretreatment technology designed to facilitate the subsequent hydrolysis of cellulose by removing the majority of the hemicellulose and ash content from the solid biomass. The HWE process generates salable sugars and other products as part of the process. The bio...

  17. Hot water extracted wood fiber for production of wood plastic composites (WPCs)

    Treesearch

    Manuel Raul Pelaez-Samaniego; Vikram Yadama; Eini Lowell; Thomas E. Amidon; Timothy L. Chaffee

    2013-01-01

    Undebarked ponderosa pine chips were treated by hot water extraction to modify the chemical composition. In the treated pine (TP) , the mass was reduced by approximately 20%, and the extract was composed mainly of degradation products of hemicelluloses. Wood flour produced from TP and unextracted chips (untreated pine, UP) was blended with high-density polyethylene (...

  18. Closed-circulation system for motel hot water--Savannah, Georgia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    Inexpensive guy wires support roof-mounted solar-energy collectors. Mounting system withstands 120 mph winds with no roof penetrations. Collectors circulate 50 percent ethylene glycol solution eliminating need for drain system for freeze protection. Heat exchanger transfers energy to domestic hot water which heats to 140 F.

  19. Hot water surface pasteurization for inactivating Salmonella on surfaces of mature green tomatoes

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Outbreaks of salmonellosis have been associated with the consumption of tomatoes contaminated with Salmonella. Commercial washing processes for tomatoes are limited in their ability to inactivate and/or remove this human pathogen. Our objective was to develop a hot water surface pasteurization pro...

  20. 21 CFR 890.5720 - Water circulating hot or cold pack.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Water circulating hot or cold pack. 890.5720 Section 890.5720 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES PHYSICAL MEDICINE DEVICES Physical Medicine Therapeutic Devices § 890.5720...

  1. 21 CFR 890.5720 - Water circulating hot or cold pack.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Water circulating hot or cold pack. 890.5720 Section 890.5720 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES PHYSICAL MEDICINE DEVICES Physical Medicine Therapeutic Devices § 890.5720...

  2. 21 CFR 890.5720 - Water circulating hot or cold pack.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Water circulating hot or cold pack. 890.5720 Section 890.5720 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES PHYSICAL MEDICINE DEVICES Physical Medicine Therapeutic Devices § 890.5720...

  3. Efficacy of brown sugar flotation and hot water methods for detecting Rhagoletis indifferens (Dipt., Tephritidae) larvae

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The brown sugar flotation and hot water methods are accepted procedures for detecting larval western cherry fruit fly, Rhagoletis indifferens Curran, in sweet cherry [Prunus avium (L.) L.] and could be included in a systems approach for showing the absence of larvae in fruit. The methods require cr...

  4. Minerals, phenolic compounds, and antioxidant capacity of citrus peel extract by hot water.

    PubMed

    Xu, G H; Chen, J C; Liu, D H; Zhang, Y H; Jiang, P; Ye, X Q

    2008-01-01

    Some dried citrus peels, more familiar as chenpi in China, have been widely used in traditional Chinese medicines from ancient times. This paper reports the efficiency of infusion cooking on extracting minerals and phenolic compounds (flavanone glycosides [FGs], polymethoxylated flavones [PMFs], and phenolic acids), and also antioxidant activity of hot water extract of citrus peels. Peels of 2 citrus varieties, namely, Satsuma mandarin (C. unshiu Marc.) and Ponkan (C. poonensis Hort. ex Tanaka), which belong to C. reticulata, were selected. As a result, hot water extraction was efficient in extracting phenolic acids and some minerals. As for citrus flavonoids, narirutin, nobiletin, and tangeretin were easier to extract than hesperidin. The result of antioxidant capacity assays indicated that for citrus peels, hot water extract had almost the same capacity as the methanol extract. We suggested that Ponkan was more suitable as the source of chenpi, since its hot water extract had much higher content of phenolic acids, FGs and PMFs, and higher antioxidant capacity than those of Satsuma mandarin. Generally, to raise the extraction temperature or to prolong the time could not yield higher content of phenolic compounds and stronger antioxidant capacity, though the content of minerals increased to some extent. Furthermore, a 2nd-time extraction seemed necessary since considerable minerals and phenolic compounds could be obtained by doing so. Finally, we suggested that 2 times extraction at 100 degrees C for 30 min was proper to extract the minerals and phenolic compounds in chenpi.

  5. Feasibility of Heating Domestic Hot Water for Apartments with Solar Energy.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    solar energy retrofitted to the existing heating system to supply heat for the space heating requirements is not economically justified. However...more simple in design. For these reasons, the economical use of solar energy to heat the domestic hot water in these apartments appears promising. (Author)

  6. Mixing Hot and Cold Water Streams at a T-Junction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sharp, David; Zhang, Mingqian; Xu, Zhenghe; Ryan, Jim; Wanke, Sieghard; Afacan, Artin

    2008-01-01

    A simple mixing of a hot- and cold-water stream at a T-junction was investigated. The main objective was to use mass and energy balance equations to predict mass low rates and the temperature of the mixed stream after the T-junction, and then compare these with the measured values. Furthermore, the thermocouple location after the T-junction and…

  7. Inactivation of salmonella in shell eggs by hot water immersion and its effect on quality

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Thermal inactivation kinetics of heat resistant strains of Salmonella Enteritidis in shell eggs processed by hot water immersion were determined, and the effects of the processing on egg quality were evaluated. Shell eggs were inoculated with a composite of heat resistant Salmonella Enteritidis (SE)...

  8. Antiinflammatory Activity of Hot Water Infusion of Nyctanthes arbo-tristis Flowers

    PubMed Central

    Ratnasooriya, W. D.; Jayakody, J. R. A. C.; Handunnetti, S. M.; Ratnasooriya, C. D. T.; Weerasekera, K. R.

    2015-01-01

    In Sri Lankan ethnomedicate it is claimed the flowers of Nyctanthes arbo-tristis is effective in the treatment of inflammatory conditions but this has not been scientifically validated. This experiment was carried to investigate the antinflammatory potential of hot water infusion of Nyctanthes arbo-tristis flowers. Oral antiinflammatory activity of hot water infusion of Nyctanthes arbo-tristis flowers (concentrations: 3.75, 7.5, 12.5 and 18.75 mg/kg) was assessed in rats using both acute (carrageenan-induced paw oedema assay) and chronic (formaldehyde induced-paw oedema and cotton pellet-granuloma tests) inflammatory models. In an attempt to investigate its mode of action, antihistamine activity (by wheal test), inhibition of prostaglandin synthesis (by enteropooling test), inhibition of Tumor necrosis factorα secretion (using human mononuclear cells), and suppression of vascular permeability (acetic acid-induced vascular permeability test) and cytotoxicity (Evans blue test) were assessed. In the carrageenan-induced paw oedema test, hot water infusion simultaneously suppressed both initial and late stages of inflammation in an inversely dose related manner. Hot water infusion also inhibited paw oedema in formalin and cotton pellet granuloma tests. In addition, this infusion exhibited marked anti histamine activity, prostaglandin synthesis inhibition and suppression of vascular permeability. These findings scientifically support the traditional use of Nyctanthes arbo-tristis flowers in treatment of inflammatory conditions. PMID:26798178

  9. Economic evaluation of a solar hot-water system--Palm Beach County, Florida

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    Report projects solar-energy costs and savings for residential hot-water system over 20 year period. Evaluation uses technical and economic models with inputs based on working characteristics of installed system. Primary analysis permits calculation of economic viability for four other U.S. sites.

  10. Solar heating and hot water system installed at Alderson Broaddus College, Philippi, West Virginia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    Data needed necessary to evaluate the design and operation of a solar energy heating and hot water system installed in a commercial application are presented. The information includes system descriptions, acceptance test data, schematics, as built drawing, problems encountered, all solutions and photographs of the system at various stages of completion.

  11. Verification test report on a solar heating and hot water system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    Information is provided on the development, qualification and acceptance verification of commercial solar heating and hot water systems and components. The verification includes the performances, the efficiences and the various methods used, such as similarity, analysis, inspection, test, etc., that are applicable to satisfying the verification requirements.

  12. System design package for SIMS prototype system 2, solar hot water

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    Information necessary to evaluate the design and assembly of a solar hot water system is presented. A prototype system designed for use in a single family dwelling is investigated in terms of the following subsystems: collector, storage, energy transport, and control.

  13. Mixing Hot and Cold Water Streams at a T-Junction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sharp, David; Zhang, Mingqian; Xu, Zhenghe; Ryan, Jim; Wanke, Sieghard; Afacan, Artin

    2008-01-01

    A simple mixing of a hot- and cold-water stream at a T-junction was investigated. The main objective was to use mass and energy balance equations to predict mass low rates and the temperature of the mixed stream after the T-junction, and then compare these with the measured values. Furthermore, the thermocouple location after the T-junction and…

  14. Factors Influencing Survival of Legionella pneumophila Serotype 1 in Hot Spring Water and Tap Water

    PubMed Central

    Ohno, Akira; Kato, Naoyuki; Yamada, Koji; Yamaguchi, Keizo

    2003-01-01

    The factors involved in the survival of Legionella pneumophila in the microcosms of both hot spring water and tap water were studied by examining cultivability and metabolic activity. L. pneumophila could survive by maintaining metabolic activity but was noncultivable in all microcosms at 42°C, except for one microcosm with a pH of <2.0. Lower temperatures supported survival without loss of cultivability. The cultivability declined with increasing temperature, although metabolic activity was observed at temperatures of up to 45°C. The optimal range of pH for survival was between 6.0 and 8. The metabolic activity could be maintained for long periods even in microcosms with high concentrations of salt. The cultivability of organisms in the post-exponential phase in a tap water microcosm with a low inoculum size was more rapidly reduced than that of organisms in the exponential phase. In contrast, the loss of cultivability in microcosms of a high inoculum size was significant in the exponential phase. Random(ly) amplified polymorphic DNA analysis of microcosms where cultivability was lost but metabolic activity was retained showed no change compared to cells grown freshly, although an effect on the amplified DNA band pattern by production of stress proteins was expected. Resuscitation by the addition of Acanthamoeba castellanii to the microcosm in which cultivability was completely lost but metabolic activity was maintained was observed only in part of the cell population. Our results suggest that L. pneumophila cell populations can potentially survive as free organisms for long periods by maintaining metabolic activity but temporarily losing cultivability under strict environments and requiring resuscitation by ingestion by amoebas. PMID:12732519

  15. Determining Atmospheric Pressure Using a Water Barometer

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lohrengel, C. Frederick, II; Larson, Paul R.

    2012-01-01

    The atmosphere is an envelope of compressible gases that surrounds Earth. Because of its compressibility and nonuniform heating by the Sun, it is in constant motion. The atmosphere exerts pressure on Earth's surface, but that pressure is in constant flux. This experiment allows students to directly measure atmospheric pressure by measuring the…

  16. Determining Atmospheric Pressure Using a Water Barometer

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lohrengel, C. Frederick, II; Larson, Paul R.

    2012-01-01

    The atmosphere is an envelope of compressible gases that surrounds Earth. Because of its compressibility and nonuniform heating by the Sun, it is in constant motion. The atmosphere exerts pressure on Earth's surface, but that pressure is in constant flux. This experiment allows students to directly measure atmospheric pressure by measuring the…

  17. Hot water tank for use with a combination of solar energy and heat-pump desuperheating

    DOEpatents

    Andrews, J.W.

    1980-06-25

    A water heater or system is described which includes a hot water tank having disposed therein a movable baffle to function as a barrier between the incoming volume of cold water entering the tank and the volume of heated water entering the tank which is heated by the circulation of the cold water through a solar collector and/or a desuperheater of a heat pump so as to optimize the manner in which heat is imparted to the water in accordance to the demand on the water heater or system. A supplemental heater is also provided and it is connected so as to supplement the heating of the water in the event that the solar collector and/or desuperheater cannot impart all of the desired heat input into the water.

  18. Hot water tank for use with a combination of solar energy and heat-pump desuperheating

    DOEpatents

    Andrews, John W.

    1983-06-28

    A water heater or system which includes a hot water tank having disposed therein a movable baffle to function as a barrier between the incoming volume of cold water entering the tank and the volume of heated water entering the tank which is heated by the circulation of the cold water through a solar collector and/or a desuperheater of a heat pump so as to optimize the manner in which heat is imparted to the water in accordance to the demand on the water heater or system. A supplemental heater is also provided and it is connected so as to supplement the heating of the water in the event that the solar collector and/or desuperheater cannot impart all of the desired heat input into the water.

  19. Energy and environmental research emphasizing low-rank coal: Task 1.7, Hot-water extraction of nonpolar organic pollutants from soils

    SciTech Connect

    Hawthorne, S.B.

    1995-01-01

    Supercritical water extraction of organic pollutants from solids is extremely effective because supercritical water has a low dielectric constant and can, therefore, efficiently solvate organics. However, the decrease in the dielectric constant of water can be achieved at much milder conditions (pressures of a few bar and temperatures of ca. 200{degrees}{minus}250{degrees}C) than the conditions used for supercritical water (pressure > 221 bar and temperature > 374{degrees}C) extractions. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) were extracted from a highly contaminated soil using using water at temperatures ranging from 50{degrees} to 400{degrees}C, and pressures from 5 to 600 bar. Most PAHs could not be extracted at 50{degrees}C but were completely removed at a temperature of 250{degrees}C. Additional increases to 300{degrees}C (still subcritical conditions) and 400{degrees}C (supercritical water) did not increase the recoveries significantly. The removal of PAHs had very little dependence on pressure when the temperature was 250{degrees}C, except that steam extraction (at 5 bar) yielded lower recoveries than the liquid water extractions (at 50, 350, and 600 bar). Therefore, the optimal conditions for extracting PAHs using water were 50 bar and 250{degrees}C (hot water). Based on the extraction rates obtained for several of the PAHs, the solubility of high molecular weight PAHs increased at least several thousandfold by increasing the water temperature to 200{degrees}{minus}300{degrees}C. Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) were extracted from an industry soil and a sediment using hot-water (subcritical) extraction at 50 bar and 250{degrees}C. The high removal efficiencies of PCBs from soil and sediment agree very well with those obtained for PAHs from highly contaminated soil at the same extraction conditions, demonstrating that water is a potentially useful extraction solvent for many organics.

  20. Solar hot water system installed at Days Inn Motel, Dallas, Texas (Valley View)

    SciTech Connect

    1980-09-01

    The solar hot water system installed in the Days Inns of America, Inc., Days Inn Motel (120 rooms), I-35/2276 Valley View Lane, Dallas, Texas is described. The solar system was designed by ILI Incorporated to provide 65 percent of the total domestic hot water (DHW) demand. The Solar Energy Products, model CU-30WW liquid (water) flat plate collector (1000 square feet) system automatically drains into the 1000 gallon steel storage tank when the solar pump is not running. This system is one of eleven systems planned. Heat is transferred from the DHW tanks through a shell and tube heat exchanger. A circulating pump between the DHW tanks and heat exchanger enables solar heated water to help make up standby losses. All pumps are controlled by differential temperature controllers. The operation of this system was begun March 11, 1980. The solar components were partly funded ($15,000 of 30,000 cost) by a Department of Energy grant.

  1. Solar heating and hot water system installed at Saint Louis, Missouri

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    The solar heating and hot water system installed at the William Tao & Associates, Inc., office building in St. Louis, Missouri is described, including maintenance and construction problems, final drawings, system requirements, and manufacturer's component data. The solar system was designed to provide 50 percent of the hot water requirements and 45 percent of the space heating needs for a 900 sq ft office space and drafting room. The solar facility has 252 sq ft of glass tube concentrator collectors and a 1000 gallon steel storage tank buried below a concrete slab floor. Freeze protection is provided by a propylene glycol/water mixture in the collector loop. The collectors are roof mounted on a variable tilt array which is adjusted seasonally and is connected to the solar thermal storage tank by a tube-in-shell heat exchanger. Incoming city water is preheated through the solar energy thermal storage tank.

  2. Preliminary examination of oil bonding at sand surfaces and its influence on hot water separation

    SciTech Connect

    Hupka, J.; Budzich, M.; Miller, J.D.

    1991-12-31

    The efficiency of water-based separation of oil from sand particles is dependent on the nature of the oil-sand association and a preliminary examination of this bonding has been completed. The degree of hydration of the sand surface at the time of contact with oil was related to the subsequent efficiency of the oil-sand separation process. Variables which influence hot water separation were correlated by multiple linear regression, and a second order experimental model was obtained. The processing temperature appeared to be the most significant variable, followed by digestion time and pH. Oil-coated sand particles which had intrinsic water left on their surface during sample preparation were easily processed in hot water separation experiments, and 64 to 90% of the oil was removed. On the other hand, only 1 to 23% separation and oil recovery was possible when a calcinated sand-oil mixture was used.

  3. Preliminary examination of oil bonding at sand surfaces and its influence on hot water separation

    SciTech Connect

    Hupka, J.; Budzich, M.; Miller, J.D.

    1991-01-01

    The efficiency of water-based separation of oil from sand particles is dependent on the nature of the oil-sand association and a preliminary examination of this bonding has been completed. The degree of hydration of the sand surface at the time of contact with oil was related to the subsequent efficiency of the oil-sand separation process. Variables which influence hot water separation were correlated by multiple linear regression, and a second order experimental model was obtained. The processing temperature appeared to be the most significant variable, followed by digestion time and pH. Oil-coated sand particles which had intrinsic water left on their surface during sample preparation were easily processed in hot water separation experiments, and 64 to 90% of the oil was removed. On the other hand, only 1 to 23% separation and oil recovery was possible when a calcinated sand-oil mixture was used.

  4. The Mpemba effect: When can hot water freeze faster than cold?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeng, Monwhea

    2006-06-01

    We review the Mpemba effect, where initially hot water freezes faster than initially cold water. Although the effect might appear impossible, it has been observed in numerous experiments and was discussed by Aristotle, Francis Bacon, Roger Bacon, and Descartes. It has a rich and fascinating history, including the story of the secondary school student, Erasto Mpemba, who reintroduced the effect to the twentieth century scientific community. The phenomenon is simple to describe and illustrates numerous important issues about the scientific method: the role of skepticism in scientific inquiry, the influence of theory on experiment and observation, the need for precision in the statement of a scientific hypothesis, and the nature of falsifiability. Proposed theoretical mechanisms for the Mpemba effect and the results of contemporary experiments on the phenomenon are surveyed. The observation that hot water pipes are more likely to burst than cold water pipes is also discussed.

  5. 22. Fire Protection Water Pump (low pressure), view to the ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    22. Fire Protection Water Pump (low pressure), view to the southwest. - Washington Water Power Clark Fork River Cabinet Gorge Hydroelectric Development, Powerhouse, North Bank of Clark Fork River at Cabinet Gorge, Cabinet, Bonner County, ID

  6. Stress and Fracture Mechanics Analyses of Boiling Water Reactor and Pressurized Water Reactor Pressure Vessel Nozzles

    SciTech Connect

    Yin, Shengjun; Bass, Bennett Richard; Stevens, Gary; Kirk, Mark

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes stress analysis and fracture mechanics work performed to assess boiling water reactor (BWR) and pressurized water reactor (PWR) nozzles located in the reactor pressure vessel (RPV) adjacent to the core beltline region. Various RPV nozzle geometries were investigated: 1. BWR recirculation outlet nozzle; 2. BWR core spray nozzle3 3. PWR inlet nozzle; ; 4. PWR outlet nozzle; and 5. BWR partial penetration instrument nozzle. The above nozzle designs were selected based on their proximity to the core beltline region, i.e., those nozzle configurations that are located close enough to the core region such that they may receive sufficient fluence prior to end-of-license (EOL) to require evaluation as part of establishing the allowed limits on heatup, cooldown, and hydrotest (leak test) conditions. These nozzles analyzed represent one each of the nozzle types potentially requiring evaluation. The purpose of the analyses performed on these nozzle designs was as follows: To model and understand differences in pressure and thermal stress results using a two-dimensional (2-D) axi-symmetric finite element model (FEM) versus a three-dimensional (3-D) FEM for all nozzle types. In particular, the ovalization (stress concentration) effect of two intersecting cylinders, which is typical of RPV nozzle configurations, was investigated; To verify the accuracy of a selected linear elastic fracture mechanics (LEFM) hand solution for stress intensity factor for a postulated nozzle corner crack for both thermal and pressure loading for all nozzle types; To assess the significance of attached piping loads on the stresses in the nozzle corner region; and To assess the significance of applying pressure on the crack face with respect to the stress intensity factor for a postulated nozzle corner crack.

  7. Economic evaluation of a solar hot-water-system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    Analysis shows economic benefits at six representative sites using actual data from Tempe, Arizona and San Diego, California installations. Model is two-tank cascade water heater with flat-plate collector array for single-family residences. Performances are forecast for Albuquerque, New Mexico; Fort Worth, Texas; Madison, Wisconsin; and Washington, D.C. Costs are compared to net energy savings using variables for each site's environmental conditions, loads, fuel costs, and other economic factors; uncertainty analysis is included.

  8. Changes in antioxidant and fruit quality in hot water-treated ‘Hom Thong’ banana fruit during storage

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The effects of hot water treatment on antioxidant phytochemicals and fruit quality were investigated in banana fruit of cv. Gros Michel (Musa acuminata, AAA Group, locally called cv. Hom Thong) by immersing fruits in hot water (50 'C) for 10 min, before storage at 25 'C for 10 days or 14 'C for 8 da...

  9. Thermal performance of a photographic laboratory process: Solar Hot Water System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walker, J. A.; Jensen, R. N.

    1982-01-01

    The thermal performance of a solar process hot water system is described. The system was designed to supply 22,000 liters (5,500 gallons) per day of 66 C (150 F) process water for photographic processing. The 328 sq m (3,528 sq. ft.) solar field has supplied 58% of the thermal energy for the system. Techniques used for analyzing various thermal values are given. Load and performance factors and the resulting solar contribution are discussed.

  10. Thermal performance of a photographic laboratory process: Solar Hot Water System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, J. A.; Jensen, R. N.

    1982-04-01

    The thermal performance of a solar process hot water system is described. The system was designed to supply 22,000 liters (5,500 gallons) per day of 66 C (150 F) process water for photographic processing. The 328 sq m (3,528 sq. ft.) solar field has supplied 58% of the thermal energy for the system. Techniques used for analyzing various thermal values are given. Load and performance factors and the resulting solar contribution are discussed.

  11. Cancer incidence among population utilizing geothermal hot water: a census-based cohort study.

    PubMed

    Kristbjornsdottir, Adalbjorg; Rafnsson, Vilhjalmur

    2013-12-15

    The aim of the study was to assess whether utilization of geothermal hot-water is associated with risk of cancer. The cohort from census was followed from 1981 to 2010 in nation-wide death and cancer registries. The moving apart of American-Eurasian tectonic plates, observed in Iceland, results in high volcanic activity. The definition of the study populations was based on geological information. The target population was inhabitants of communities located on bedrock younger than 3.3 million years, utilizing hot-water supply generated from geothermal wells since 1972. The two reference populations were inhabitants of communities without this hot-water supply located on areas with less volcanic/geothermal activity, and bedrock older than 3.3 million years. Hazard ratio (HR), and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were adjusted for age, gender, education, housing, reproductive factors and smoking. HR in the geothermal hot-water supply areas for all cancer was 1.15 (95% CI 1.05-1.25) as compared with nongeothermal areas. The HR for breast cancer was 1.40 (1.12-1.75), prostate cancer 1.61 (1.29-2.00), kidney cancer 1.64 (1.11-2.41), lymphatic and haematopoietic tissue cancers 1.45 (1.08-1.95), and for basal cell carcinoma (BCC) of the skin 1.46 (1.16-1.82). Positive exposure-response relations were observed between the risk of these cancers and the degree of volcanic/geothermal activity in the reference areas. Increased incidence of all cancers, breast, prostate, kidney cancer and BCC of the skin was found among the population utilizing geothermal hot-water for decades. More precise information on exposure is needed in future studies.

  12. Special wettable nanostructured copper mesh achieved by a facile hot water treatment process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saadi, Nawzat S.; Hassan, Laylan B.; Brozak, Matt; Karabacak, Tansel

    2017-09-01

    In this research, a special wettable copper mesh with superhydrophobicity and superoleophilicity properties is reported using a low-cost, eco-friendly, rapid, and scalable synthesis method. Hot water treatment (HWT) method is used to integrate the micro-textured copper mesh surface with a nanoscale roughness to achieve a hierarchical micro-nano structured surface. The surface energy of the nanoscale roughened copper mesh reduced by coating the hot water treated mesh with polymer ligands containing thiol or fluorine functional groups of low energy. Surface morphology characterization showed the formation of copper oxide nanostructures on the mesh surface by hot water process performed at 95 °C and under a low dissolved oxygen condition. X-ray diffraction patterns reveal the development of stable, uniformly distributed, and compactly arranged, cubic and plate-like nanostructures of cuprous oxide (Cu2O) on the copper mesh surface. The surface wettability of the as-prepared copper mesh was assessed by contact angle (CA) measurement for water and several oils and organic solvents. CA values showed the formation of special wettable copper mesh surface with superhydrophobic property with water contact angle of about 157° and superoleophilic property with oil contact angle as low as 0°. In addition, the effect of the mesh’s geometry on the wetting property was examined through correlations between wire diameter, pore size, and optimal values for the highest water CA.

  13. Case studies on developing local industry by using hot spring water and geothermal energy

    SciTech Connect

    Sasaki, Akira; Umetsu, Yoshio; Narita, Eiichi

    1997-12-31

    We have investigated the new ways to develop local industries by using hot spring water, geothermal water and geothermal energy from the Matsukawa Geothermal Power Plant in Iwate Prefecture, which is the first geothermal power plant established in Japan. The new dyeing technique, called {open_quotes}Geothermal Dyeing{close_quotes} was invented in which hydrogen sulfide in the water exhibited decoloration effect. By this technique we succeeded to make beautiful color patterns on fabrics. We also invented the new way to make the light wight wood, called {open_quotes}Geo-thermal Wood{close_quotes} by using hot spring water or geothermal water. Since polysaccharides in the wood material were hydrolyzed and taken out during the treatment in the hot spring water, the wood that became lighter is weight and more porous state. On the bases of these results, we have produced {open_quotes}Wooded Soap{close_quotes} on a commercial scale which is the soap, synthesized in the pore of the treated wood in round slice. {open_quotes}Collapsible Wood Cabin{close_quotes} was also produced for enjoyable outdoor life by using the modified properties of Geothermal Wood.

  14. Influence of hot water dip on fruit quality, phenolic compounds and antioxidant capacity of Satsuma mandarin during storage.

    PubMed

    Shen, Yan; Zhong, Liezhou; Sun, Yujing; Chen, Jianchu; Liu, Donghong; Ye, Xingqian

    2013-12-01

    The influence of hot water dips (50, 52 and 54  for 3 min) on fruit quality, phenolic compounds and antioxidant capacity of Satsuma mandarin during 60 days' storage at 10  was investigated. Hot water dips did not affect fruit quality attributes as well as ascorbic acid content, and 50  treatment significantly reduced fruit weight loss. Significant increases of flavonoids were found in all hot water treated fruit from after treatments till 15 days of storage, whereas phenolic acids were not greatly affected. Hot water dipping at 50  significantly increased total phenolics and antioxidant capacity of Satsuma mandarin immediately after treatment and maintained similar levels with control during storage, while 52 and 54  treatments showed relatively lower levels. The results suggested that hot water dipping at 50  for 3 min can be a promising way to retain functional quality of storing Satsuma mandarin.

  15. Nontuberculous mycobacteria in aerosol droplets and bulk water samples from therapy pools and hot tubs.

    PubMed

    Glazer, Craig S; Martyny, John W; Lee, Ben; Sanchez, Tracy L; Sells, Tricia M; Newman, Lee S; Murphy, James; Heifets, Leonid; Rose, Cecile S

    2007-11-01

    Hot tub exposure has been causally associated with a steroid-responsive, granulomatous lung disease featuring nontuberculous mycobacterial (NTM) growth in both clinical and environmental samples. Little is known regarding prevalence of and risk factors for NTM-contamination and associated illness in these settings. In this study, the frequency of NTM growth and aerosolization in 18 public hot tubs and warm water therapy pools and the factors associated with mycobacterial growth were analyzed. Each site was characterized by water chemistry analysis; a questionnaire on maintenance, disinfection, and water quality; and air and water sampling for quantitative NTM culture. NTM were detected in air or water from 13/18 (72%) sites; a strong correlation was found between the maximum air and water NTM concentrations (rho 0.49, p = 0.04). Use of halogen (chlorine or bromine) disinfection was associated with significantly lower air and water concentrations of NTM compared with disinfection using ultraviolet light and hydrogen peroxide (p = 0.01-0.04). Higher water turnover rates were also associated with lower air and water NTM concentrations (p = 0.02-0.03). These findings suggest that NTM are frequently detectable in the air and water of spas and therapy pools and that particular maintenance and disinfection approaches affect NTM bioaerosol concentrations in these settings.

  16. Quality of fresh-cut 'Kent' mango slices prepared from hot water or non hot water treated fruit

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    A quarantine heat treatment consisting of exposure to 46°C water for 65 to 110 minutes (depending on cultivar and fruit size) is mandated by USDA-APHIS for all mangoes (Mangifera indica L.) entering the United States. Heat treatments may affect ripening processes and induce resistance to chilling in...

  17. [INMERSION IN HOT WATER: A NATURAL HELPER IN LABOUR].

    PubMed

    Mosquera Pan, Lucía; Onandia Garate, Maialen; Luces Lago, Ana María; Tizón Bouza, Eva

    2016-01-01

    The pain during the birth process is the result of a pile of physiological, psychological and socio-cultural stimulus. In our society, epidural analgesia is the most common technique used in obstetrics to relieve this pain, despite not being harmless. However, there are other complementary techniques based on methods that have demonstrated analgesic effects and they benefit of lacking adverse effects either on the mother or on the fetus. Among these methods is the immersion in warm water (WI). The aim of this review is to show the usefulness, advantages and disadvantages of WI, to make it an accessible resource for pregnant women and those who are responsible for their care. Literature review about Water Immersion during the first and second stage of labor. The WI as a method to relieve discomfort and pain during labor was popularized by the obstetrician Michel Odent in 7980s. The Spanish Society of Gynecology and Obstetrics, among other associations, highly recommend its use during the cervical dilation period. It is benificial for the mother blood circulation, psychologically and for body mechanics; however, this use in the second stage of labor seems to be more controversial. WI is an analgesic non-invasive, accessible and affordable. Its use is associated with lower rates of intervention by professionals and provide a more focused attention on the needs of pregnant women.

  18. Risk factors for contamination of domestic hot water systems by legionellae.

    PubMed Central

    Alary, M; Joly, J R

    1991-01-01

    To assess risk factors associated with the contamination of the domestic environment by legionellae, 211 houses in the Quebec City area were randomly selected and water samples were collected from the hot water tank, the shower heads, and the most frequently used faucet. After centrifugation, concentrated samples were seeded in triplicate on BCYE and GPV media. Data on the characteristics of the hot water system and plumbing in the house and on the personal habits of the occupants were collected for each house. Among these 211 houses, hot water was provided by either an oil or gas heater in 33 and by an electric heater in 178. Legionellae were isolated from none of the samples from houses with oil or gas heaters and from 39% (69 of 178) of those with electric water heaters (P less than 0.0001). This association remained highly significant after control for water temperature and other variables in a stratified analysis. In the 178 houses with an electric heater, 12% of the faucets, 15% of the shower heads, and 37% of the water heaters were contaminated. Legionella pneumophila serogroups 2 and 4 were the most frequently isolated strains. Logistic regression showed that factors associated with electric water heater contamination were (i) location of the house in older districts of the city (P less than 0.0001), (ii) old age of the water heater (P = 0.003), and (iii) low water temperature (P = 0.05). Contamination of the water heater was the only factor significantly associated with the contamination of peripheral outlets (P less than 0.0001).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1768104

  19. Carbon Dioxide in Exoplanetary Atmospheres: Rarely Dominant Compared to Carbon Monoxide and Water in Hot, Hydrogen-dominated Atmospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heng, Kevin; Lyons, James R.

    2016-02-01

    We present a comprehensive study of the abundance of carbon dioxide in exoplanetary atmospheres in hot, hydrogen-dominated atmospheres. We construct novel analytical models of systems in chemical equilibrium that include carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, water, methane and acetylene and relate the equilibrium constants of the chemical reactions to temperature and pressure via the tabulated Gibbs free energies. We prove that such chemical systems may be described by a quintic equation for the mixing ratio of methane. By examining the abundances of these molecules across a broad range of temperatures (spanning equilibrium temperatures from 600 to 2500 K), pressures (via temperature-pressure profiles that explore albedo and opacity variations) and carbon-to-oxygen ratios, we conclude that carbon dioxide is subdominant compared to carbon monoxide and water. Atmospheric mixing does not alter this conclusion if carbon dioxide is subdominant everywhere in the atmosphere. Carbon dioxide and carbon monoxide may attain comparable abundances if the metallicity is greatly enhanced, but this property is negated by temperatures above 1000 K. For hydrogen-dominated atmospheres, our generic result has the implication that retrieval studies may wish to set the subdominance of carbon dioxide as a prior of the calculation and not let its abundance completely roam free as a fitting parameter, because it directly affects the inferred value of the carbon-to-oxygen ratio and may produce unphysical conclusions. We discuss the relevance of these implications for the hot Jupiter WASP-12b and suggest that some of the previous results are chemically impossible. The relative abundance of carbon dioxide to acetylene is potentially a sensitive diagnostic of the carbon-to-oxygen ratio.

  20. Promising freeze protection alternatives in solar domestic hot water systems

    SciTech Connect

    Bradley, David E.

    1997-01-01

    Since the gains associated with solar thermal energy technologies are comparatively small in relation to the required capital investment, it is vital to maximize conversion efficiency. While providing the necessary function of freeze protection, the heat exchanger commonly included in solar domestic water heating systems represents a system inefficiency. This thesis explores two alternate methods of providing freeze protection without resorting to a heat exchanger. Commonly, collectors are made of rigid copper tubes separated by copper or aluminum fins. Cracking damage can occur when water is allowed to freeze and expand inside the non compliant tubes. The possibility of making collectors out of an elastic material was investigated and shown to be effective. Since unlike copper, elastomers typically have low thermal conductivities, the standard collector performance prediction equations do not apply. Modified thermal performance prediction equations were developed which can be used for both low and high thermal conductivity materials to provide accurate predictions within a limited range of plate geometries. An elastomeric collector plate was then designed and shown to have comparable performance to a copper plate collector whose aperture area is approximately 33% smaller. Another options for providing freeze protection to an SDHW system is to turn it off during the winter. Choosing a three-season operating period means two things. First, the system will have different optimums such as slope and collector area. Second, the wintertime solar energy incident on the collector is unavailable for meeting a heating load. However, the system`s heat exchanger becomes unnecessary and removing it increases the amount of energy that arrives at the storage tank during those periods in which the system is operating.

  1. Solar hot water system installed at Day's Inn Motel, Savannah, Georgia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    The Solar System was designed to provide 50 percent of the total Domestic Hot Water (DHW) demand. Liquid Flat Plate Collectors (900 square feet) are used for the collector subsystem. The collector subsystem is closed loop, using 50 percent Ethylene Glycol solution antifreeze for freeze protection. The 1,000 gallon fiber glass storage tank contains two heat exchangers. One of the heat exchangers heats the storage tank with the collector solar energy. The other heat exchanger preheats the cold supply water as it passes through on the way to the Domestic Hot Water (DHW) tank heaters. Electrical energy supplements the solar energy for the DHW. The Collector Mounting System utilizes guy wires to structurally tie the collector array to the building.

  2. Solar hot water system installed at Day's Inn Motel, Savannah, Georgia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1980-09-01

    The Solar System was designed to provide 50 percent of the total Domestic Hot Water (DHW) demand. Liquid Flat Plate Collectors (900 square feet) are used for the collector subsystem. The collector subsystem is closed loop, using 50 percent Ethylene Glycol solution antifreeze for freeze protection. The 1,000 gallon fiber glass storage tank contains two heat exchangers. One of the heat exchangers heats the storage tank with the collector solar energy. The other heat exchanger preheats the cold supply water as it passes through on the way to the Domestic Hot Water (DHW) tank heaters. Electrical energy supplements the solar energy for the DHW. The Collector Mounting System utilizes guy wires to structurally tie the collector array to the building.

  3. Targeted Removal of Ant Colonies in Ecological Experiments, Using Hot Water

    PubMed Central

    Tschinkel, Walter R.; King, Joshua R.

    2007-01-01

    Ecological experiments on fire ants cannot, or should not, use poison baits to eliminate the fire ants because such baits are not specific to fire ants, or even to ants. Hot water is an extremely effective and specific killing agent for fire ant colonies, but producing large amounts of hot water in the field, and making the production apparatus mobile have been problematical. The construction and use of a charcoal-fired kiln made from a 55-gal. oil drum lined with a sand-fireclay mixture is described. An automobile heater fan powered from a 12-v battery provided a draft. Dual bilge pumps pumped water from a large tank through a long coil of copper tubing within the kiln to produce 4 to 5 l. of hot water per min. The hot water was collected in 20 l. buckets and poured into fire ant nests previously opened by piercing with a stick. The entire assembly was transported in and operated from the back of a pickup truck. Five experimental plots containing 32 to 38 colonies of the fire ant, Solenopsis invicta, Buren (Hymenoptera: Formicidae), were treated with hot water over a period of two years. All colonies on the treatment plots were treated twice with hot water early in 2004, reducing their numbers to zero. However new colonies were formed, and mature colonies expanded into the plots. A third treatment was made in the spring of 2005, after which fire ant populations were suppressed for over a year. Whereas the 5 control plots contained a total of 166 mostly large colonies, the 5 treatment plots contained no live colonies at all. Averaged over a two-year period, a 70% reduction in total number of colonies was achieved (P < 0.001) on the treatment plots, and a 93% reduction of large, mature colonies. Over this same time span, the number of colonies in control plots remained stable. The reduction in colony numbers on the treatment plots was reflected in the pitfall trap samples that recorded a 60% reduction in fire ants. PMID:20233079

  4. Getting into hot water: sick guppies frequent warmer thermal conditions.

    PubMed

    Mohammed, Ryan S; Reynolds, Michael; James, Joanna; Williams, Chris; Mohammed, Azad; Ramsubhag, Adesh; van Oosterhout, Cock; Cable, Jo

    2016-07-01

    Ectotherms depend on the environmental temperature for thermoregulation and exploit thermal regimes that optimise physiological functioning. They may also frequent warmer conditions to up-regulate their immune response against parasite infection and/or impede parasite development. This adaptive response, known as 'behavioural fever', has been documented in various taxa including insects, reptiles and fish, but only in response to endoparasite infections. Here, a choice chamber experiment was used to investigate the thermal preferences of a tropical freshwater fish, the Trinidadian guppy (Poecilia reticulata), when infected with a common helminth ectoparasite Gyrodactylus turnbulli, in female-only and mixed-sex shoals. The temperature tolerance of G. turnbulli was also investigated by monitoring parasite population trajectories on guppies maintained at a continuous 18, 24 or 32 °C. Regardless of shoal composition, infected fish frequented the 32 °C choice chamber more often than when uninfected, significantly increasing their mean temperature preference. Parasites maintained continuously at 32 °C decreased to extinction within 3 days, whereas mean parasite abundance increased on hosts incubated at 18 and 24 °C. We show for the first time that gyrodactylid-infected fish have a preference for warmer waters and speculate that sick fish exploit the upper thermal tolerances of their parasites to self medicate.

  5. The Development of a Roof Integrated Solar Hot Water System

    SciTech Connect

    Menicucci, David F.; Moss, Timothy A.; Palomino, G. Ernest

    2006-09-01

    The Salt River Project (SRP), in conjunction with Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) and Energy Laboratories, Inc. (ELI), collaborated to develop, test, and evaluate an advanced solar water-heating product for new homes. SRP and SNL collaborated under a Department of Energy Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA), with ELI as SRP's industry partner. The project has resulted in the design and development of the Roof Integrated Thermal Siphon (RITH) system, an innovative product that features complete roof integration, a storage tank in the back of the collector and below the roofline, easy installation by homebuilders, and a low installed cost. SRP's market research guided the design, and the laboratory tests conducted at SNL provided information used to refine the design of field test units and indicated that the RITH concept is viable. ELI provided design and construction expertise and is currently configured to manufacture the units. This final report for the project provides all of the pertinent and available materials connected to the project including market research studies, the design features and development of the system, and the testing and evaluation conducted at SNL and at a model home test site in Phoenix, Arizona.

  6. Effects of Pressure and Reaction Time on Bonding of Hydroxyapatite Ceramics and Titanium by Hydrothermal Hot-pressing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Masa-aki; Onoki, Takamasa; Hosoi, Kazuyuki; Hashida, Toshiyuki

    2006-05-01

    Solidification of hydroxyapatite (HA) and its bonding with titanium (Ti) was achieved simultaneously by using a hydrothermal hot-pressing (HHP) method at the low temperature as low as 150 °C. A mixture of calcium hydrogen phosphate dihydrate(DCPD) and calcium hydroxide was used as a starting powder material for solidifying HA. 3-point bending tests were conducted to obtain an estimate of the fracture toughness for the HA/Ti interface. Application of pressures greater than 20MPa was necessary for bonding, and the interface strength increased with the increasing applied pressure. However, the degree of HA formation was lower when the pressure was increased. Excessively long term HHP treatment was shown to be ineffective for the bonding and there was an optimal treatment time. The optimal pressure and treatment time for bonding were estimated to be 40MPa and 12hrs, respectively.

  7. Effects of Pressure and Reaction Time on Bonding of Hydroxyapatite Ceramics and Titanium by Hydrothermal Hot-pressing

    SciTech Connect

    Tanaka, Masa-aki; Onoki, Takamasa; Hashida, Toshiyuki; Hosoi, Kazuyuki

    2006-05-15

    Solidification of hydroxyapatite (HA) and its bonding with titanium (Ti) was achieved simultaneously by using a hydrothermal hot-pressing (HHP) method at the low temperature as low as 150 deg. C. A mixture of calcium hydrogen phosphate dihydrate(DCPD) and calcium hydroxide was used as a starting powder material for solidifying HA. 3-point bending tests were conducted to obtain an estimate of the fracture toughness for the HA/Ti interface. Application of pressures greater than 20MPa was necessary for bonding, and the interface strength increased with the increasing applied pressure. However, the degree of HA formation was lower when the pressure was increased. Excessively long term HHP treatment was shown to be ineffective for the bonding and there was an optimal treatment time. The optimal pressure and treatment time for bonding were estimated to be 40MPa and 12hrs, respectively.

  8. Mechanical simulation of the pressure and the relaxation to thermal equilibrium of a hot and dense rare gas cluster.

    PubMed

    Gross, A; Levine, R D

    2006-11-30

    A cold atomic cluster can be very rapidly heated and compressed by a hypersonic impact at a hard surface. The impact can be simulated by computing a classical trajectory for the motion of the atoms. By suddenly confining the hot and dense cluster within a rigid container, it is possible to monitor the time evolution of the force acting on the faces of the container. It is found that the pressure computed this way very rapidly decays to a time-independent value. After a somewhat longer time, this value reproduces the value for the pressure computed as the sum of the kinetic and internal pressures. This agreement is expected for a system in equilibrium. These observations support the conclusion that there is a fast relaxation to thermal equilibrium in these essentially hard-sphere systems. The deviation from equilibrium is primarily due to the propagation of shock waves within the cluster. The equilibrium pressure can reach up to the megabar range.

  9. European Regional Climate Zone Modeling of a Commercial Absorption Heat Pump Hot Water Heater

    SciTech Connect

    Sharma, Vishaldeep; Shen, Bo; Keinath, Chris; Garrabrant, Michael A.; Geoghegan, Patrick J

    2017-01-01

    High efficiency gas-burning hot water heating takes advantage of a condensing heat exchanger to deliver improved combustion efficiency over a standard non-condensing configuration. The water heating is always lower than the gas heating value. In contrast, Gas Absorption Heat Pump (GAHP) hot water heating combines the efficiency of gas burning with the performance increase from a heat pump to offer significant gas energy savings. An ammonia-water system also has the advantage of zero Ozone Depletion Potential and low Global Warming Potential. In comparison with air source electric heat pumps, the absorption system can maintain higher coefficients of performance in colder climates. In this work, a GAHP commercial water heating system was compared to a condensing gas storage system for a range of locations and climate zones across Europe. The thermodynamic performance map of a single effect ammonia-water absorption system was used in a building energy modeling software that could also incorporate the changing ambient air temperature and water mains temperature for a specific location, as well as a full-service restaurant water draw pattern.

  10. Hot Gas Cleanup Test Facility for Gasification and Pressurized Combustion Project. Quarterly report, April--June 1996

    SciTech Connect

    1996-12-31

    The objective of this project is to evaluate hot gas particle control technologies using coal-derived as streams. This will entail the design, construction, installation, and use of a flexible test facility which can operate under realistic gasification and combustion conditions. The major particulate control device issues to be addressed Include the integration of the particulate control devices into coal utilization systems, on-line cleaning, techniques, chemical and thermal degradation of components, fatigue or structural failures, blinding, collection efficiency as a function of particle size, and scale-up of particulate control systems to commercial size. The conceptual design of the facility was extended to include a within scope, phased expansion of the existing, Hot Gas Cleanup Test Facility Cooperative Agreement to also address systems integration issues of hot particulate removal in advanced coal-based power generation systems. This expansion included the consideration of the following modules at the test facility in addition to the original Transport Reactor gas source and Hot Gas Cleanup Units: 1 . Carbonizer/Pressurized Circulating, Fluidized Bed Gas Source; 2. Hot Gas Cleanup Units to mate to all gas streams; 3. Combustion Gas Turbine; 4. Fuel Cell and associated gas treatment. This expansion to the Hot Gas Cleanup Test Facility is herein referred to as the Power Systems Development Facility (PSDF). The major emphasis during, this reporting period was continuing, the detailed design of the FW portion of the facility towards completion and integrating the balance-of-plant processes and particulate control devices (PCDS) into the structural and process designs. Substantial progress in construction activities was achieved during the quarter. Delivery and construction of the process structural steel is complete and the construction of steel for the coal preparation structure is complete.

  11. Solar hot water system installed at Day's Inn Motel, Dallas, Texas (Valley View)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    The solar system was designed to provide 65 percent of the total domestic hot water (DHW) demand. A liquid (water) flat plate collector (1,000 square feet) system automatically drains into the 1,000 gallon steel storage tank when the solar pump is not running. Heat is transferred from the DHW tanks through a shell and tube heat exchanger. A circulating pump between the DHW tanks and heat exchanger enables solar heated water to help make up standby losses. All pumps are controlled by differential temperature controllers.

  12. Solar hot water system installed at Days Inn Motel, Dallas, Texas (Forrest Lane)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    The solar system was designed to provide 65 percent of the total Domestic Hot Water (DHW) demand. The liquid flat plate (water) collector (1,000 square feet) system automatically drains into the 1,000 gallon steel storage tank located in the mechanical room when the pump is not running. Heat is transferred from the storage tank to DHW tanks through a tube and shell heat exchanger. A circulating pump between the DHW tanks and the heat exchanger enables solar heated water to help make DHW tank standby losses. All pumps are controlled by differential temperature.

  13. Solar hot water system installed at Day's Inn Motel, Dallas, Texas (Valley View)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1980-09-01

    The solar system was designed to provide 65 percent of the total domestic hot water (DHW) demand. A liquid (water) flat plate collector (1,000 square feet) system automatically drains into the 1,000 gallon steel storage tank when the solar pump is not running. Heat is transferred from the DHW tanks through a shell and tube heat exchanger. A circulating pump between the DHW tanks and heat exchanger enables solar heated water to help make up standby losses. All pumps are controlled by differential temperature controllers.

  14. Solar hot water system installed at Days Inn Motel, Dallas, Texas (Forrest Lane)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1980-09-01

    The solar system was designed to provide 65 percent of the total Domestic Hot Water (DHW) demand. The liquid flat plate (water) collector (1,000 square feet) system automatically drains into the 1,000 gallon steel storage tank located in the mechanical room when the pump is not running. Heat is transferred from the storage tank to DHW tanks through a tube and shell heat exchanger. A circulating pump between the DHW tanks and the heat exchanger enables solar heated water to help make DHW tank standby losses. All pumps are controlled by differential temperature.

  15. Measure Guideline: Combination Forced-Air Space and Tankless Domestic Hot Water Heating Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Rudd, A.

    2012-08-01

    This document describes design and application guidance for combination space and tankless domestic hot water heating systems (combination systems) used in residential buildings, based on field evaluation, testing, and industry meetings conducted by Building Science Corporation. As residential building enclosure improvements continue to drive heating loads down, using the same water heating equipment for both space heating and domestic water heating becomes attractive from an initial cost and space-saving perspective. This topic is applicable to single- and multi-family residential buildings, both new and retrofitted.

  16. Measure Guideline. Combination Forced-Air Space and Tankless Domestic Hot Water Heating Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Rudd, Armin

    2012-08-01

    This document describes design and application guidance for combination space and tankless domestic hot water heating systems (combination systems) used in residential buildings, based on field evaluation, testing, and industry meetings conducted by Building Science Corporation. As residential building enclosure improvements continue to drive heating loads down, using the same water heating equipment for both space heating and domestic water heating becomes attractive from an initial cost and space-saving perspective. This topic is applicable to single- and multi-family residential buildings, both new and retrofitted.

  17. Gas Engine-Driven Heat Pump Chiller for Air-Conditioning and Hot Water Supply Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujita, Toshihiko; Mita, Nobuhiro; Moriyama, Tadashi; Hoshino, Norimasa; Kimura, Yoshihisa

    In Part 1 of this study, the performance characteristics of a 457kW gas engine-driven heat pump (GHP) chiller have been obtained from a simulation model analysis for both cooling and heating modes and it has been found that the part-load characteristics of the GHP chiller are fairly well. On the back of Part 1, a computer simulation program has been developed for the evaluation of GHP chiller systems to compare with the other types of heat source systems for air-conditioning and hot water supply applications. The simulation program can be used to estimate annual energy consumption, annual CO2 emission, etc. of the systems with the data of monthly and hourly thermal loads on various buildings, outdoor air conditions, and characteristics of various components comprising the systems. By applying this to some cases of medium-scale hotel, office, shop, and hospital buildings, it has been found that the GHP chiller systems have advantages particularly in the cases of hotels and hospitals where a lot of hot water demand exists. It has also been found that the combination of a GHP chiller and a direct-fired absorption water chiller boiler (hot and chilled water generator) appears promising.

  18. Geothermal effects of water penetrating into hot rock boundaries of magma bodies

    SciTech Connect

    Bjornsson, H.; Bjornsson, S.; Sigurgeirsson, T.

    1980-09-01

    Mass balance studies of ice melted at the subglacial caldera Grimsvotn in Iceland indicate a heat release of 5000 MW from the geothermal system in the caldera region. This heat output has been maintained for several centuries. A magmatic source of heat has been postulated but the process of heat extraction remains problematic. Field evidence from watering a molten lava flow has demonstrated that water penetrating into the hot rock boundary layer above the solidifying horizon of the lava can release heat at a rate of 40 kW/m/sup 2/. These observations support theoretical considerations presented by Lister (1974, 1976). It is concluded that the penetration of water into the hot rock boundary of solidifying magma bodies offers the most probable explanation for the sustained intense heat release of many geothermal systems. Further, it is suggested that this process of heat extraction be given consideration in the exploitation of magmatic resources, where the generation of steam might be accelerated by injection of water into the hot rock boundary.

  19. A randomised controlled trial of hot water (45 degrees C) immersion versus ice packs for pain relief in bluebottle stings.

    PubMed

    Loten, Conrad; Stokes, Barrie; Worsley, David; Seymour, Jamie E; Jiang, Simon; Isbister, Geoffrey K

    2006-04-03

    To investigate the effectiveness of hot water immersion for the treatment of Physalia sp. (bluebottle or Portuguese Man-of-War) stings. Open-label, randomised comparison trial. Primary analysis was by intention to treat, with secondary analysis of nematocyst-confirmed stings. One halfway interim analysis was planned. Surf lifesaving first aid facilities at two beaches in eastern Australia from 30 December 2003 to 5 March 2005. 96 subjects presenting after swimming in the ocean for treatment of an apparent sting by a bluebottle. Hot water immersion (45 degrees C) of the affected part versus ice pack application. The primary outcome was a clinically important reduction in pain as measured by the visual analogue scale (VAS). Secondary outcomes were the development of regional or radiating pain, frequency of systemic symptoms, and proportion with pruritus or rash on follow-up. 49 patients received hot water immersion and 47 received ice packs. The two groups had similar baseline features, except patients treated with hot water had more severe initial pain (VAS [mean +/- SD]: 54 +/- 22 mm versus 42 +/- 22 mm). After 10 minutes, 53% of the hot water group reported less pain versus 32% treated with ice (21%; 95% CI, 1%-39%; P = 0.039). After 20 minutes, 87% of the hot water group reported less pain versus 33% treated with ice (54%; 95% CI, 35%-69%; P = 0.002). The trial was stopped after the halfway interim analysis because hot water immersion was shown to be effective (P = 0.002). Hot water was more effective at 20 minutes in nematocyst-confirmed stings (95% versus 29%; P = 0.002). Radiating pain occurred less with hot water (10% versus 30%; P = 0.039). Systemic effects were uncommon in both groups. Immersion in water at 45 degrees C for 20 minutes is an effective and practical treatment for pain from bluebottle stings.

  20. Heat treatment of wheat straw by immersion in hot water decreases mushroom yield in Pleurotus ostreatus.

    PubMed

    Jaramillo Mejía, Santiago; Albertó, Edgardo

    2013-01-01

    The oyster mushroom, Pleurotus ostreatus, is cultivated worldwide. It is one of the most appreciated mushrooms due to its high nutritional value. Immersion of the substrate in hot water is one of the most popular and worldwide treatment used for mushroom farmers. It is cheap and easy to implement. To compare the yields obtained during mushroom production of P. ostreatus using different pre-treatments (immersion in hot water, sterilization by steam and the use of fungicide) to determine if they influence mushroom crop. Four different treatments of substrate (wheat straw) were carried out: (i) immersion in hot water (IHW); (ii) steam sterilization; (iii) chemical; and (iv) untreated. The residual water from the IHW treatment was used to evaluate the mycelium growth and the production of P. ostreatus. Carbendazim treatment produced highest yields (BE: 106.93%) while IHW produced the lowest BE with 75.83%. Sugars, N, P, K and Ca were found in residual water of IHW treatment. The residual water increased the mycelium growth but did not increase yields. We have proved that IHW treatment of substrate reduced yields at least 20% when compared with other straw treatments such as steam, chemical or untreated wheat straw. Nutrients like sugars, proteins and minerals were found in the residual water extract which is the resultant water where the immersion treatment is carried out. The loss of these nutrients would be the cause of yield decrease. Alternative methods to the use of IHW as treatment of the substrate should be considered to reduce economical loss. Copyright © 2012 Revista Iberoamericana de Micología. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  1. Lattuce growth and water use in closed, low pressure environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fowler, P.; Rygalov, V.; Wheeler, R.; Bucklin, R.; Schumacher, N.

    Lettuce (Lactuca sativa L.) cv. Waldmann's Green plants were grown in a clear, hemispherical enclosure at a reduced atmospheric pressure to study the potential for using low pressure greenhouses on planetary missions. The atmosphere was maintained at 25 kPa total pressure, with ˜20 kPa of N_2, ˜5 kPa of O_2, and between 0.1 and 0.2 kPa of CO_2, supplied by CO_2 injection and a feed-back control system. A closed water cycle was maintained inside the low pressure greenhouse by recycling condensed humidity back to the plants, and only adding external water to offset water vapor leakage and uptake in the plant tissue. All plants were grown in a granular, arcillite medium (calcined clay chips), with nutrients supplied by adding time-release fertilizer (Osmocote 20-20-20). Plants were harvested after 45 days, averaging 237 g fresh mass, and 23.7 g dry mass. No obvious adverse effects were noted on the plants, with the exception of some minor "tip-burn" injury to some leaves. Additional studies are planned to compare growth and water flux (evapotranspiration) rates at higher pressures. Preliminary results suggest that water fluxes should be lower at the higher pressures provided equal vapor pressure deficits can be maintained. The results suggest that vegetative crops such as lettuce should grow well at reduced pressures if adequate water, nutrients, and CO_2 are provided.

  2. Development of Simulation System for Hot Gas Filtration by Ceramic Candle Filters on High Temperature and/or High Pressure Conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Park, S.J.; Lim, J.H.; Kim, S.D.; Choi, H.K.; Park, H,S.; Park, Y.O.

    2002-09-19

    Hot gas filtration from industrial processes offers various advantages in terms of improvement of process efficiencies, heat recovery and protection of plant installation. Especially hot gas filtration is an essential technology for pressurized fluidized bed combustion (PFBC) and integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC).

  3. SELECTED CHEMICAL ANALYSES AND GEOTHERMOMETRY OF HOT SPRING WATERS FROM THE CALABOZOS CALDERA, CENTRAL CHILE.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thompson, J.M.; Grunder, A.L.; Hildreth, Wes

    1983-01-01

    Hot springs discharging from the active hydrothermal system associated with the Calabozos caldera, Chile, have measured orifice temperatures as high as 98. 5 degree C and calculated geothermometer temperatures as high as 250 degree C. Three types of spring waters can be identified from the chemical analyses: a Na-Cl type, a Na-HCO//3 type and a Na-mixed anion type. Chloride-enthalpy relations indicate that the hydrothermal reservoir water may attain temperatures near 342 degree C and that most spring waters are mixed with cold meteoric water. Despite the proximity of Mesozoic marine gypsum deposits, the Cl/Br weight ratio of the Calabozos spring waters does not appear to indicate that these waters have a significant 'marine' signature. Refs.

  4. [Body cooling capacity of water circulated cooling pants during lower body exercise in a hot environment].

    PubMed

    Tsutsui, Takao; Idota, Nozomi; Nagano, Chikage; Horie, Seichi; Sogabe, Yasuhiro; Monji, Koichi

    2005-03-01

    We investigated the body cooling capacity of water-circulated cooling pants during lower body exercise in a hot environment. Five subjects were asked to ride a bicycle ergometer and to keep a work rate of 75 W continuously for 20 minutes. They then rest on the ergometer for 15 minutes, in a climate chamber kept at WBGT = 31.5 degrees C. They repeated the same procedure three times under three different conditions; 1) wearing cooling pants with cold water supply; 2) wearing cooling pants without water supply; 3) wearing short pants instead of cooling pants. Esophageal temperature and heart rate of the subjects, when their cooling pants were supplied with cold water, were lower compared with the condition without water supply, and were almost the same as the condition wearing short pants. Water-circulated cooling pants should effectively cool the body at work where the worker has to wear pants that cover his legs to prevent injury.

  5. Hot compressed water pretreatment of oil palm fronds to enhance glucose recovery for production of second generation bio-ethanol.

    PubMed

    Goh, Chun Sheng; Lee, Keat Teong; Bhatia, Subhash

    2010-10-01

    This work presents the pretreatment of oil palm fronds (OPF) using hot compressed water (HCW) to enhance sugar recovery in enzymatic hydrolysis. A central, composite rotatable design was used to optimize the effect of reaction temperature, reaction time and liquid-solid ratio on the pretreatment process. All variables were found to significantly affect the glucose yield. A quadratic polynomial equation was used to model glucose yield by multiple regression analysis, using response surface methodology (RSM). Using a 10 bar pressurized reactor, the optimum conditions for pretreatment of OPF were found at 178 degrees C, 11.1 min and a liquid-solid ratio of 9.6. The predicted glucose yield was 92.78 wt.% at the optimum conditions. Experimental verification of the optimum conditions gave a glucose yield in good agreement with the estimated value of the model.

  6. Solar heating and domestic hot water system installed at Kansas City, Fire Stations, Kansas City, Missouri

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    The solar system was designed to provide 47 percent of the space heating, 8,800 square feet area and 75 percent of the domestic hot water (DHW) load. The solar system consists of 2,808 square feet of Solaron, model 2001, air, flat plate collector subsystem, a concrete box storage subsystem which contains 1,428 cubic feet of 0.5 inch diameter pebbles weighing 71.5 tons, a DHW preheat tank, blowers, pumps, heat exchangers, air ducting, controls and associated plumbing. Two 120 gallon electric DHW heaters supply domestic hot water which is preheated by the solar system. Auxiliary space heating is provided by three electric heat pumps with electric resistance heaters and four 30 kilowatt electric unit heaters. There are six modes of system operation.

  7. Hot water epilepsy: Phenotype and single photon emission computed tomography observations

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Mehul; Satishchandra, Parthasarathy; Aravinda, Hanumanthapura; Bharath, Rose D.; Sinha, Sanjib

    2014-01-01

    We studied the anatomical correlates of reflex hot water epilepsy (HWE) using multimodality investigations viz. magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), electroencephalography (EEG), and single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). Five men (mean age: 27.0 ΁ 5.8 years) with HWE were subjected to MRI of brain, video-EEG studies, and SPECT scan. These were correlated with phenotypic presentations. Seizures could be precipitated in three patients with pouring of hot water over the head and semiology of seizures was suggestive of temporal lobe epilepsy. Ictal SPECT showed hyperperfusion in: left medial temporal — one, left lateral temporal — one, and right parietal — one. Interictal SPECT was normal in all five patients and did not help in localization. MRI and interictal EEG was normal in all the patients. The clinical and SPECT studies suggested temporal lobe as the seizure onset zone in some of the patients with HWE. PMID:25506178

  8. Thermal performance testing and mathematically modeling of integral collector storage solar hot water systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, W. C.

    1985-02-01

    The concept behind the alternative testing method is to characterize the thermal performance of the solar collection elements in the integral system using standard test methods for conventional solar collectors. After measuring the efficiency and incident angle response, the integral collector storage hot water system would be tested using an electrical heat source to simulate the absorbed solar energy. The research included both experimental and analytical investigations on the collector elements and on the complete system. All day tests were performed on two commercial integral collector storage solar domestic hot water systems. Tests were performed under a variety of ambient conditions and irradiance levels. An analytical model was developed to predict the thermal performance of one of the systems. Predicted performance was compared with experimental results.

  9. Specific lignin precipitation for oligosaccharides recovery from hot water wood extract.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiaoqian; Wang, Zhaojiang; Fu, Yingjuan; Li, Zongquan; Qin, Menghua

    2014-01-01

    Hot water extraction is an important strategy of wood fractionation, by which the hemicelluloses can be separated for value-added products, while the residual solid can still be processed into traditional wood products. In this study, a combined process consisting of specific lignin precipitation and dialysis was proposed to recover hemicellulosic oligosaccharides (OS) from hot water extract (HWE). The results showed that polyaluminium chloride (PAC) precipitation was highly specific to large molecular lignin, leading to 25.1% lignin removal with negligible OS loss through charge neutralization mechanism. The separation was further enhanced by dialysis, reaching 37.6% OS recovery from HWE with remarkable purity of 94.1%. By the proposed process, 56.36 g OS, mainly xylooligosaccharides with two fractions of 5.2 and 0.51 kDa was recovered from one kg dried wood. This process can be envisaged as a great contribution to wood biorefinery. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Growth in Acanthamoeba sp. and antibiotic susceptibility of Legionella micdadei isolated from hot spring water samples.

    PubMed

    Furuhata, Katsunori; Ogihara, Kikumi; Okuno, Rumi; Oonaka, Kenji; Fukuyama, Masafumi

    2009-12-01

    As part of an epidemiological study on legionellosis, we attempted to isolate Legionella spp. from hot spring water samples, and were able to isolate Legionella micdadei from 3 (5.5%) of 55 samples. All of these isolates were able to grow within Acanthamoeba sp., suggesting that the isolates will be pathogens. We also confirmed that the K-2 strain from hot spring water grew in guinea pig monocytes. Sensitivity tests using 10 drugs showed that the isolates were most sensitive to imipenem, with the MIC90 of 0.032 microg/ml, were least sensitive to minocycline, with the MIC90 of 4 microg/ml, and were not sensitive to low amounts of other drugs.

  11. Anti-ulcer effect of the hot water extract of black tea (Camellia sinensis).

    PubMed

    Maity, S; Vedasiromoni, J R; Ganguly, D K

    1995-06-01

    The effect of the hot water extract of black tea (Camellia sinensis (L.) O. Kuntze, Theaceae) on ulceration induced by various ulcerogens and by cold restraint stress (CRS) was investigated in albino rats. While prior administration of tea extract for 7 days significantly reduced the incidence of ulcer, ulcer number and ulcer index produced by aspirin, indomethacin, ethanol, reserpine and CRS, it failed to inhibit the ulcers induced by serotonin and histamine. Tea extract also favourably altered the changes in acid and peptic activity of gastric secretion induced by aspirin, indomethacin, ethanol, reserpine and CRS. The observations suggest that the hot water extract of black tea possesses anti-ulcer activity, probably mediated through prostaglandins.

  12. Heated Debates: Hot-Water Immersion or Ice Packs as First Aid for Cnidarian Envenomations?

    PubMed

    Wilcox, Christie L; Yanagihara, Angel A

    2016-04-01

    Cnidarian envenomations are an important public health problem, responsible for more deaths than shark attacks annually. For this reason, optimization of first-aid care is essential. According to the published literature, cnidarian venoms and toxins are heat labile at temperatures safe for human application, which supports the use of hot-water immersion of the sting area(s). However, ice packs are often recommended and used by emergency personnel. After conducting a systematic review of the evidence for the use of heat or ice in the treatment of cnidarian envenomations, we conclude that the majority of studies to date support the use of hot-water immersion for pain relief and improved health outcomes.

  13. Heated Debates: Hot-Water Immersion or Ice Packs as First Aid for Cnidarian Envenomations?

    PubMed Central

    Wilcox, Christie L.; Yanagihara, Angel A.

    2016-01-01

    Cnidarian envenomations are an important public health problem, responsible for more deaths than shark attacks annually. For this reason, optimization of first-aid care is essential. According to the published literature, cnidarian venoms and toxins are heat labile at temperatures safe for human application, which supports the use of hot-water immersion of the sting area(s). However, ice packs are often recommended and used by emergency personnel. After conducting a systematic review of the evidence for the use of heat or ice in the treatment of cnidarian envenomations, we conclude that the majority of studies to date support the use of hot-water immersion for pain relief and improved health outcomes. PMID:27043628

  14. Solar hot water system installed at Quality Inn, Key West, Florida

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1980-04-01

    The solar energy hot water system installed in the Quality Inn, Key West, Florida, which consists of four buildings is described. Three buildings are low-rise, two-story buildings containing 100 rooms. The fourth is a four-story building with 48 rooms. The solar system was designed to provide approximately 50 percent of the energy required for the domestic hot water system. The solar system consists of approximately 1400 square feet of flat plate collector, two 500 gallon storage tanks, a circulating pump, and a controller. Operation of the system was begun in April 1978, and has continued to date with only three minor interruptions for pump repair. In the first year of operation, it was determined that the use of the solar facility resulted in forty percent fuel savings.

  15. Solar hot water systems application to the solar building test facility and the Tech House

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goble, R. L.; Jensen, R. N.; Basford, R. C.

    1976-01-01

    Projects which relate to the current national thrust toward demonstrating applied solar energy are discussed. The first project has as its primary objective the application of a system comprised of a flat plate collector field, an absorption air conditioning system, and a hot water heating system to satisfy most of the annual cooling and heating requirements of a large commercial office building. The other project addresses the application of solar collector technology to the heating and hot water requirements of a domestic residence. In this case, however, the solar system represents only one of several important technology items, the primary objective for the project being the application of space technology to the American home.

  16. Solar hot water system installed at Quality Inn, Key West, Florida

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    The solar energy hot water system installed in the Quality Inn, Key West, Florida, which consists of four buildings is described. Three buildings are low-rise, two-story buildings containing 100 rooms. The fourth is a four-story building with 48 rooms. The solar system was designed to provide approximately 50 percent of the energy required for the domestic hot water system. The solar system consists of approximately 1400 square feet of flat plate collector, two 500 gallon storage tanks, a circulating pump, and a controller. Operation of the system was begun in April 1978, and has continued to date with only three minor interruptions for pump repair. In the first year of operation, it was determined that the use of the solar facility resulted in forty percent fuel savings.

  17. Comparison of some results of program SHOW with other solar hot water computer programs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, M. F.; Baughn, J. W.

    The SHOW (solar hot water) computer program is capable of simulating both one and two tank designs of thermosiphon and pumped solar domestic hot water systems. SHOW differs in a number of ways from other programs, the most notable of which is the emphasis on a thermal/hydraulic model of the stratified storage tank. The predicted performance for a typical two tank pumped system, computed by Program SHOW are compared, with results computed using F-CHART and TRNSYS. The results show fair to good agreement between the various computer programs when comparing the annual percent solar contributions. SHOW is also used to compute the expected performance of a two tank thermosiphon system and to compare its performance to the two tank pumped system.

  18. Solar hot water system installed at Quality Inn, Key West, Florida. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-04-01

    The solar energy hot water system installed in the Quality Inn, Key West, Florida, which consists of four buildings, is described. Three buildings are low-rise, two-story buildings containing 100 rooms. The fourth is a four-story building with 48 rooms. The solar system was designed to provide approximately 50% of the energy required for the domestic hot water system. The solar system consists of approximately 1400 ft/sup 2/ of flat plate collector, two 500 gal storage tanks, a circulating pump, and a controller. Operation of the system was begun in April 1978, and has continued to date with only three minor interruptions for pump repair. In the first year of operation, it was determined that the use of the solar facility resulted in 40% fuel savings.

  19. Hot water extraction and steam explosion as pretreatments for ethanol production from spruce bark.

    PubMed

    Kemppainen, Katariina; Inkinen, Jenni; Uusitalo, Jaana; Nakari-Setälä, Tiina; Siika-aho, Matti

    2012-08-01

    Spruce bark is a source of interesting polyphenolic compounds and also a potential but little studied feedstock for sugar route biorefinery processes. Enzymatic hydrolysis and fermentation of spruce bark sugars to ethanol were studied after three different pretreatments: steam explosion (SE), hot water extraction (HWE) at 80 °C, and sequential hot water extraction and steam explosion (HWE+SE), and the recovery of different components was determined during the pretreatments. The best steam explosion conditions were 5 min at 190 °C without acid catalyst based on the efficiency of enzymatic hydrolysis of the material. However, when pectinase was included in the enzyme mixture, the hydrolysis rate and yield of HWE bark was as good as that of SE and HWE+SE barks. Ethanol was produced efficiently with the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae from the pretreated and hydrolysed materials suggesting the suitability of spruce bark to various lignocellulosic ethanol process concepts. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. On the effects of clouds and hazes in the atmospheres of hot Jupiters: semi-analytical temperature-pressure profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heng, Kevin; Hayek, Wolfgang; Pont, Frédéric; Sing, David K.

    2012-02-01

    Motivated by the work of Guillot, we present a semi-analytical formalism for calculating the temperature-pressure profiles in hot Jovian atmospheres which includes the effects of clouds/hazes and collision-induced absorption. Using the dual-band approximation, we assume that stellar irradiation and thermal emission from the hot Jupiter occur at distinct wavelengths ('shortwave' versus 'longwave'). For a purely absorbing cloud/haze, we demonstrate its dual effect of cooling and warming the upper and lower atmosphere, respectively, which modifies, in a non-trivial manner, the condition for whether a temperature inversion is present in the upper atmosphere. The warming effect becomes more pronounced as the cloud/haze deck resides at greater depths. If it sits below the shortwave photosphere, the warming effect becomes either more subdued or ceases altogether. If shortwave scattering is present, its dual effect is to warm and cool the upper and lower atmospheres, respectively, thus counteracting the effects of enhanced longwave absorption by the cloud/haze. We make a tentative comparison of a four-parameter model to the temperature-pressure data points inferred from the observations of HD 189733b and estimate that its Bond albedo is approximately 10 per cent. Besides their utility in developing physical intuition, our semi-analytical models are a guide for the parameter space exploration of hot Jovian atmospheres via three-dimensional simulations of atmospheric circulation.