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Sample records for prestroke oral anticoagulation

  1. Oral Anticoagulant Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Gallus, Alexander S.; Wittkowsky, Ann; Crowther, Mark; Hylek, Elaine M.; Palareti, Gualtiero

    2012-01-01

    Background: The objective of this article is to summarize the published literature concerning the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of oral anticoagulant drugs that are currently available for clinical use and other aspects related to their management. Methods: We carried out a standard review of published articles focusing on the laboratory and clinical characteristics of the vitamin K antagonists; the direct thrombin inhibitor, dabigatran etexilate; and the direct factor Xa inhibitor, rivaroxaban Results: The antithrombotic effect of each oral anticoagulant drug, the interactions, and the monitoring of anticoagulation intensity are described in detail and discussed without providing specific recommendations. Moreover, we describe and discuss the clinical applications and optimal dosages of oral anticoagulant therapies, practical issues related to their initiation and monitoring, adverse events such as bleeding and other potential side effects, and available strategies for reversal. Conclusions: There is a large amount of evidence on laboratory and clinical characteristics of vitamin K antagonists. A growing body of evidence is becoming available on the first new oral anticoagulant drugs available for clinical use, dabigatran and rivaroxaban. PMID:22315269

  2. The novel oral anticoagulants.

    PubMed

    Rojas-Hernandez, Cristhiam M; Garcia, David A

    2013-03-01

    After the introduction of warfarin, long-term oral anticoagulation treatment remained unchanged for more than 50 years. Most recently, with the development and approval of new oral anticoagulants, the treatment of medical conditions that require thrombosis prophylaxis and long-term anticoagulation has become more complex. In the case of venous thromboembolism (VTE) prevention after orthopedic surgery, the new oral agents will be less costly than the parenteral alternative. In other settings (such as atrial fibrillation or treatment of acute VTE), the new agents will offer additional convenience at higher cost, but the degree to which they will reduce clinically important events such as thrombosis or bleeding will be limited, especially for patients on optimally controlled warfarin. As the use of the new oral anticoagulants becomes more widespread, it will be important for all clinicians to have a basic understanding of their pharmacology, advantages, and limitations. Although the need to measure or reverse the effect of these drugs will arise infrequently, clinicians--especially hematologists--will desire evidence-based recommendations about how to manage such scenarios, which will require research studies.

  3. The Monitoring of Oral Anticoagulants

    PubMed Central

    Carter, Cedric J.

    1988-01-01

    The author briefly reviews the use of anticoagulants, describing the specific tests their use requires. These tests are usually performed in a specialized laboratory. The clinical implication of the laboratory's use of different prothrombin time systems is explained. Implications of the use of oral anticoagulants in family practice are discussed. PMID:21253057

  4. Reimagining Anticoagulation Clinics in the Era of Direct Oral Anticoagulants.

    PubMed

    Barnes, Geoffrey D; Nallamothu, Brahmajee K; Sales, Anne E; Froehlich, James B

    2016-03-01

    Anticoagulation clinics were initially developed to provide safe and effective care for warfarin-treated patients with atrial fibrillation, venous thromboembolism, and mechanical valve replacement. Traditionally, these patients required ongoing laboratory monitoring and warfarin dose adjustment by expert providers. With the introduction of direct oral anticoagulants (dabigatran, rivaroxaban, apixaban, and edoxaban), many have questioned the need for anticoagulation clinic. However, we think that the growing number of oral anticoagulant choices creates an urgent need for expanding the traditional role of the anticoagulation clinic. We outline 3 key purposes that a reimagined anticoagulation clinic would serve: (1) to assist patients and clinicians with selecting the most appropriate drug and dose from a growing list of anticoagulant options (including warfarin), (2) to help patients minimize the risk of serious bleeding complications with careful long-term monitoring and peri-procedural management, and (3) to encourage ongoing adherence to these life-saving medications. We also describe how repurposing anticoagulation clinics as broader medication safety clinics would promote safe and effective care across a range of cardiovascular conditions for high-risk medications (eg, spironolactone, amiodarone). Finally, we highlight a few existing health systems that are overcoming key challenges to implementing a reimagined anticoagulation or medication safety clinic structure.

  5. Reimagining Anticoagulation Clinics in the Era of Direct Oral Anticoagulants

    PubMed Central

    Barnes, Geoffrey D.; Nallamothu, Brahmajee K.; Sales, Anne E.; Froehlich, James B.

    2016-01-01

    Anticoagulation clinics were initially developed to provide safe and effective care for warfarin-treated patients with atrial fibrillation, venous thromboembolism and mechanical valve replacement. Traditionally, these patients required ongoing laboratory monitoring and warfarin dose adjustment by expert providers. With the introduction of direct oral anticoagulants (dabigatran, rivaroxaban, apixaban and edoxaban), many have questioned the need for anticoagulation clinic. However, we believe the growing number of oral anticoagulant choices creates an urgent need for expanding the traditional role of the anticoagulation clinic. We outline three key purposes that a “re-imagined” anticoagulation clinic would serve: 1) to assist patients and clinicians with selecting the most appropriate drug and dose from a growing list of anticoagulant options (including warfarin), 2) to help patients minimize the risk of serious bleeding complications with careful long-term monitoring and peri-procedural management, and 3) to encourage ongoing adherence to these life-saving medications. We also describe how re-purposing anticoagulation clinics as broader “medication safety clinics” would promoting safe and effective care across a range of cardiovascular conditions for high-risk medications (e.g. spironolactone, amiodarone). Finally, we highlight a few existing health systems that are overcoming key challenges to implementing a re-imagined anticoagulation or medication safety clinic structure. PMID:26933047

  6. The debate concerning oral anticoagulation: whether to suspend oral anticoagulants during dental treatment.

    PubMed

    António, Natália; Castro, Graça; Ramos, Domingos; Machado, António; Gonçalves, Lino; Macedo, Tice; Providência, Luís A

    2008-04-01

    The management of patients taking long-term oral anticoagulants who require dental surgery is still highly controversial. The risk of bleeding associated with dental treatment under oral anticoagulants must be weighed against the risk of thromboembolism associated with suspension of antithrombotic therapy. Mortality and morbidity associated with thromboembolic events are higher than those associated with hemorrhagic events after minor oral surgery procedures. Evidence-based information does not support oral anticoagulant suspension before minor oral surgery. The authors propose a management protocol for chronically anticoagulated patients who require a dental procedure, to reduce both thromboembolic risk and the risk of bleeding.

  7. Monitoring anticoagulant therapy with new oral agents

    PubMed Central

    Ramos-Esquivel, Allan

    2015-01-01

    Thromboembolic disease is a major leading cause of mortality and morbidity in industrialized countries. Currently, the management of these patients is challenging due to the availability of new drugs with proven efficacy and security compared to traditional oral vitamin K antagonists. These compounds are characterized by a predictable pharmacokinetic profile for which blood monitoring is not routinely needed. Nevertheless, some data have suggested inter-patient variability in the anticoagulant effect of these drugs, raising concerns about their effectiveness and safety. Although mass-spectrometry is the gold standard to determine drug plasma concentrations, this method is not widely available in every-day practice and some coagulation assays are commonly used to determine the anticoagulant effect of these drugs. The present review aims to summarize the current knowledge regarding the clinical question of how and when to monitor patients with new anticoagulant oral agents. PMID:26713281

  8. Newer Oral Anticoagulants: Stroke Prevention and Pitfalls

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Anand; Goddeau Jr, Richard P.; Henninger, Nils

    2016-01-01

    Warfarin is very effective in preventing stroke in patients with atrial fibrillation. However, its use is limited due to fear of hemorrhagic complications, unpredictable anticoagulant effects related to multiple drug interactions and dietary restrictions, a narrow therapeutic window, frequent difficulty maintaining the anticoagulant effect within a narrow therapeutic window, and the need for inconvenient monitoring. Several newer oral anticoagulants have been approved for primary and secondary prevention of stroke in patients with non-valvular atrial fibrillation. These agents have several advantages relative to warfarin therapy. As a group, these direct oral anticoagulants (DOAC), which include the direct thrombin inhibitor, dabigatran, and the factor Xa inhibitors (rivaroxaban, apixaban, and edoxaban), are more effective than dose adjusted warfarin for prevention of all-cause stroke (including both ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke), and have an overall more favorable safety profile. Nevertheless, an increased risk of gastrointestinal bleeding (with the exception of apixaban), increased risk for thrombotic complication with sudden discontinuation, and inability to accurately assess and reverse anticoagulant effect require consideration prior to therapy initiation, and pose a challenge for decision making in acute stroke therapy. PMID:27347226

  9. Oral anticoagulant treatment with and without aspirin.

    PubMed

    Altman, R; Rouvier, J; Gurfinkel, E

    1995-07-01

    For preventing thromboembolic events, the concurrent use of oral anticoagulant and antiplatelet drugs has been proposed. In prosthetic heart valves the use of moderate intensity anticoagulants [International Normalized Ratio (INR) 2-3] plus aspirin (100 mg/day) decreases the amount and severity of embolic episodes. The possibility that the same regimen could provide benefit in the prevention of thrombotic events in other arterial diseases is also indicated by the ATACS trial in unstable angina. The ongoing studies in ischemic heart diseases will also give the answer to this possibility.

  10. Novel oral anticoagulants in atrial fibrillation: which novel oral anticoagulant for which patient?

    PubMed

    Prisco, Domenico; Cenci, Caterina; Silvestri, Elena; Ciucciarelli, Lucia; Di Minno, Giovanni

    2015-07-01

    Atrial fibrillation is the most common rhythm disorder and represents a major public health problem because it carries an increased risk of arterial thromboembolism and ischemic stroke. Current european society of cardiology guidelines recommend to stratify atrial fibrillation patients according to the CHA2DS2-VASc score and to administer anticoagulation, preferably with novel oral anticoagulants, that is, dabigatran, rivaroxaban, or apixaban, if the CHA2DS2-VASc score is at least 1. All novel anticoagulants have shown the same, if not greater, efficacy and safety as warfarin, with some advantages. The choice among the novel oral anticoagulants depends on their different pharmacokinetic profile, patients' stroke and bleeding risk, comorbidities, drug tolerability and costs and, finally, patients' preferences.

  11. [Therapeutic equivalence of the new oral anticoagulants].

    PubMed

    Moreno Villar, A; Nacle López, I; Barbero Hernández, M J; Lizan Tudela, L

    2015-10-01

    In an attempt to minimize the economic impact due to the incorporation of innovative drugs, health authorities have promoted and supported the evaluation and market positioning of drugs, as equivalent therapeutic alternatives. This issue has recently gained importance, possibly due to the current economic crisis. The equivalent therapeutic alternatives are justified by the need to compete on price, and by the authorities recommendation to establish therapeutic equivalence, price and financing of medicinal products at the same time. The establishment of the new oral anticoagulants and the equivalent therapeutic alternatives is a problematic issue if it is based on the absence of direct comparisons between different drugs and the questionable methodology used in the current indirect comparisons. Currently, it is difficult to determine when a new oral anticoagulant is more recommendable than others, but efforts are being made in order to propose alternatives for the decision based on patient characteristics.

  12. [New oral anticoagulants in atrial fibrillation].

    PubMed

    Veltkamp, R; Hacke, W

    2011-02-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) causes at least 20% of all ischemic strokes. In large randomized trials of primary and secondary stroke prevention, anticoagulation with vitamin K antagonists (VKA) protected much more efficiently than antiplatelet agents against stroke. Because of the problematic pharmacological properties of VKA only part of the AF patients are currently being treated with oral anticoagulants (OAK). The targeted development of specific oral inhibitors of the central coagulation factors thrombin and factor Xa allows reliable anticoagulation without regular coagulation monitoring. In the present review, pharmacological properties of the different agents are compared. Of the four large randomized phase 3 studies in AF (RELY, ROCKET-AF, ARISTOTLE, ENGAGE-AF) with the primary efficacy endpoint stroke and systemic embolism, the published data from the RELY trial indicate a superior efficacy of dabigatran etexilate (2 × 150 mg/day) and a lower risk of intracranial hemorrhage compared to warfarin. Favorable preliminary results have been demonstrated for the factor Xa inhibitor rivaroxaban. Apixaban was more efficacious than ASA and had a similar risk of hemorrhage in the AVERROES study. Thus, the available data suggest a favorable benefit-risk ratio for the new substances in addition to improved patient comfort. Currently unresolved issues relate to the verification of patient adherence by suitable coagulation tests and to the emergency coagulation diagnostics and therapy in acute ischemic or hemorrhagic strokes under the new OAC.

  13. Dental management of patients taking novel oral anticoagulants (NOAs): Dabigatran

    PubMed Central

    Albaladejo, Alberto; Alvarado, Alfonso

    2017-01-01

    Background A new group of oral anticoagulants (dabigatran, rivaroxaban, apixaban and edoxaban) with clear advantages over classic dicoumarin oral anticoagulants (warfarin and acenocoumarol) has been developed in recent years. Patients being treated with oral anticoagulants are at higher risk for bleeding when undergoing dental treatments. Material and Methods A literature search was conducted through April 2016 for publications in the ISI Web of Knowledge, PubMed and Cochrane Library using the keywords “dabigatran”, “rivaroxaban”, “apixaban”, “edoxaban”, “new oral anticoagulants”, “novel oral anticoagulants”, “bleeding” and “dental treatment”. Results There is no need for regular coagulation monitoring of patients on dabigatran therapy. Whether or not to temporarily discontinue dabigatran must be assessed according to the bleeding risk involved in the dental procedure to be performed. Conclusions The number of patients under treatment with new oral anticoagulants will increase in the coming years. It is essential to know about the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of new oral anticoagulants and about their interactions with other drugs. It is necessary to develop clinical guidelines for the perioperative and postoperative management of these new oral anticoagulants in oral surgical procedures, and to carefully evaluate the bleeding risk of dental treatment, as well as the thrombotic risk of suppressing the new oral anticoagulant. Key words:Dabigatran, rivaroxaban, apixaban, edoxaban, novel oral anticoagulants, bleeding. PMID:28210451

  14. Novel oral anticoagulants in plastic surgery.

    PubMed

    Munson, C F; Reid, A J

    2016-05-01

    Novel oral anticoagulants (NOACs) have emerged as a good alternative to warfarin in the prevention of stroke for patients with atrial fibrillation. NOAC use is increasing rapidly; therefore, greater understanding of their use in the perioperative period is important for optimal care. Studies and reviews that reported on the use of NOACs were identified, with particular focus on the perioperative period. PubMed was searched for relevant articles published between January 2000 and August 2015. The inevitable rise in the use of NOACs such as rivaroxaban (Xarelto™), apixaban (Eliquis™), edoxaban (Lixiana™) and dabigatran (Pradaxa™) may present a simplified approach to perioperative anticoagulant management due to fewer drug interactions, rapidity of onset of action and relatively short half-lives. Coagulation status, however, cannot reliably be monitored and no antidotes are currently available. When planning for discontinuation of NOACs, special consideration of renal function is required. Advice regarding the management of bleeding complications is provided for consideration in emergency surgery. In extreme circumstances, haemodialysis may be considered for bleeding with the use of dabigatran. NOACs will increasingly affect operative planning in plastic surgery. In order to reduce the incidence of complications associated with anticoagulation, the management of NOACs in the perioperative period requires knowledge of the time of last dose, renal function and the bleeding risk of the planned procedure. Consideration of these factors will allow appropriate interpretation of the current guidelines.

  15. Self management of oral anticoagulation: randomised trial

    PubMed Central

    Fitzmaurice, D A; Murray, E T; McCahon, D; Holder, R; Raftery, J P; Hussain, S; Sandhar, H; Hobbs, F D R

    2005-01-01

    Objective To determine the clinical effectiveness of self management compared with routine care in patients on long term oral anticoagulants. Design Multicentre open randomised controlled trial. Setting Midlands region of the UK. Participants 617 patients aged over 18 and receiving warfarin randomised to intervention (n = 337) and routine care (n = from 2470 invited; 193/337 (57%) completed the 12 month intervention. Intervention Intervention patients used a point of care device to measure international normalised ratio twice a week and a simple dosing chart to interpret their dose of warfarin. Main outcome measure Percentage of time spent within the therapeutic range of international normalised ratio. Results No significant differences were found in percentage of time in the therapeutic range between self managment and routine care (70% v 68%). Self managed patients with poor control before the study showed an improvement in control that was not seen in the routine care group. Nine patients (2.8/100 patient years) had serious adverse events in the self managed group, compared with seven (2.7/100 patient years) in the routine care arm (χ2(df = 1) = 0.02, P = 0.89). Conclusion With appropriate training, self management is safe and reliable for a sizeable proportion of patients receiving oral anticoagulation treatment. It may improve the time spent the therapeutic range for patients with initially poor control. Trial registration ISRCTN 19313375. PMID:16216821

  16. Interpretation of coagulation test results under direct oral anticoagulants.

    PubMed

    Mani, H

    2014-06-01

    Diagnostic of global coagulation parameters is part of the daily clinical routine practice in conservative as well in operative disciplines. The correct interpretation of in vitro test results in context to the ex vivo influence of anticoagulant drugs and the in vivo hemostatic system of the individual patient is dependent on the doctors clinical and laboratory experience. This article shortly reviews the laboratory interference of oral anticoagulants including the target-specific inhibitors dabigatran, rivaroxaban and apixaban on coagulation parameters and discusses the potential of several methods for measuring the anticoagulant effect of the direct oral anticoagulants.

  17. Oral anticoagulant therapy in patients undergoing dental surgery.

    PubMed

    Weibert, R T

    1992-10-01

    The literature on dental surgery in patients receiving oral anticoagulants is reviewed, and methods of managing anticoagulant therapy to minimize the risk of complications are discussed. Although blood loss during and after oral surgery in patients receiving oral anticoagulant drugs can be substantial, research indicates that most bleeding incidents are not serious and can be controlled by local measures. Studies of 241 anticoagulant-treated patients undergoing more than 500 dental extractions during the 1950s and 1960s showed that only 9 had postoperative bleeding. More recent studies indicate that continued anticoagulation can increase the frequency of prolonged bleeding and delay wound healing. An antifibrinolytic mouthwash containing tranexamic acid can effectively suppress postoperative bleeding. Gelatin sponges, oxidized cellulose, and microcrystalline collagen are other useful hemostatic agents. A reduction in the intensity of anticoagulation therapy has been recommended; the prothrombin time should be measured shortly before the procedure in such patients. In many patients the duration of subtherapeutic anticoagulation must be minimized to reduce the possibility of thromboembolism. An option for high-risk patients is to switch them to heparin. Each patient must be evaluated individually, and the level of risk of the dental procedure and the risk of thromboembolism should be taken into account. In patients taking oral anticoagulants who must undergo dental surgery, careful control of the intensity of anticoagulation and improved methods of local hemostasis can minimize the risk of hemorrhagic complications and thromboembolism.

  18. Novel oral anticoagulants in acute coronary syndrome.

    PubMed

    Costopoulos, Charis; Niespialowska-Steuden, Maria; Kukreja, Neville; Gorog, Diana A

    2013-09-10

    Coronary artery disease (CAD) is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide with a prevalence that has now reached pandemic levels as a consequence of the rapid modernization of the developing world. Its presentation as an acute coronary syndrome (ACS) is a frequent reason for hospital admission and of profound implications for personal, societal and global health. Despite improvements in the management of ACS with anti-platelet and anticoagulant therapy and revascularization techniques, many patients continue to suffer recurrent ischemic events. The need to reduce future cardiovascular events has led to the development of novel therapies to prevent coronary thrombosis, targeting thrombin-mediated pathways. These include direct Xa inhibitors (apixaban, rivaroxaban and darexaban), direct thrombin inhibitors (dabigatran) and PAR 1 antagonists (vorapaxar and atopaxar). This article critically reviews the comparative mechanisms of action, the risks and benefits, together with the clinical evidence base for the use of these novel oral agents in the management of ACS patients.

  19. [Antidotes to novel direct oral anticoagulants].

    PubMed

    Khorev, N G; Momot, A P; Kon'kova, V O

    During the last 10 years, several novel direct oral anticoagulants (NOACs) have entered the clinical arena and were registered in the Russian Federation for use in patients presenting with atrial fibrillation, venous thrombosis, and pulmonary artery thromboembolism. NOACs are classified into two groups: direct thrombin inhibitor (notably dabigatran) and factor Xa inhibitors (including rivaroxaban, apixaban, and edoxaban). Their disadvantage is lack of specific antidotes in case of an emergency situation (injury, infarction, stroke requiring thrombolysis, urgent operation). The review contains the data on the existing therapeutic regimens of treating haemorrhage on the background of taking these coagulants. This is followed by analysing the present-day results of clinical trials aimed at working out pharmaceutical agents (andexanet alpha, idarucizumab, aripazine) being antidotes to direct thrombin inhibitor and the factor Xa inhibitors. Administration of these agents makes it possible to reverse coagulation and minimize the aftermaths of haemorrhage in patients taking these drugs, in emergency situations.

  20. Personalizing oral anticoagulant treatment in patients with atrial fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Capranzano, Piera; Miccichè, Eligio; D'Urso, Lucia; Privitera, Fiorella; Tamburino, Corrado

    2013-08-01

    For decades, warfarin has remained the standard oral anticoagulation for stroke prevention in atrial fibrillation (AF). Three novel oral anticoagulants (NOACs) have been recently approved for stroke prevention in non-valvular AF: dabigatran, rivaroxaban and apixaban. Better pharmacological and clinical profiles make these newcomers a preferable alternative over warfarin. Current AF guidelines do not endorse NOACs over warfarin, or one NOAC over another. Indeed, choice of the anticoagulation regimen should be personalized based on the relative efficacy and safety of different agents across subgroups stratified by thrombotic and bleeding risk, as well as on other clinical factors, including anticoagulation control on warfarin, drug interactions, compliance and need for coagulation monitoring. This review appraises i) the randomized evidence on approved NOACs versus warfarin in AF across subgroups stratified by risk factors of stroke and bleeding and by the anticoagulation level reached on warfarin; and ii) clinical factors impacting on the anticoagulation regimen selection.

  1. Managing dentoalveolar surgical procedures in patients taking new oral anticoagulants.

    PubMed

    Sivolella, Stefano; De Biagi, Marleen; Brunello, Giulia; Berengo, Mario; Pengo, Vittorio

    2015-09-01

    The development of new orally administered anticoagulants, such as dabigatran, rivaroxaban, and apixaban, in the past few years has focused on avoiding some of the drawbacks associated with warfarin. This work aims to illustrate the main features of the most commonly used new oral anticoagulants, reviewing the current literature on the management of patients taking these drugs and needing oral and implant surgery, and discussing the currently proposed related guidelines.

  2. Management of acute stroke in patients taking novel oral anticoagulants

    PubMed Central

    Hankey, Graeme J; Norrving, Bo; Hacke, Werner; Steiner, Thorsten

    2014-01-01

    Each year, 1·0–2·0% of individuals with atrial fibrillation and 0·1–0·2% of those with venous thromboembolism who are receiving one of the novel oral anticoagulants (dabigatran, rivaroxaban, or apixaban) can be expected to experience an acute ischemic stroke. Additionally, 0·2–0·5% of individuals with atrial fibrillation who are receiving one of the novel oral anticoagulants can be expected to experience an intracranial hemorrhage. This opinion piece addresses the current literature and offers practical approaches to the management of patients receiving novel oral anticoagulants who present with an ischemic or hemorrhagic stroke. Specifically, we discuss the role of thrombolysis in anticoagulated patients with acute ischemic stroke and factors to consider concerning restarting anticoagulation after acute ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke. PMID:24891030

  3. Peri-procedural management of patients taking oral anticoagulants.

    PubMed

    Daniels, Paul R

    2015-07-14

    The use of oral anticoagulants is becoming increasingly common. For many years warfarin was the main oral anticoagulant available, but therapeutic options have expanded with the introduction of oral direct thrombin (dabigatran) and factor Xa inhibitors (apixaban, rivaroxaban, and edoxaban). Management of patients taking any oral anticoagulant in the peri-procedural period poses a challenge to medical and surgical providers because of the competing risks of thrombosis and hemorrhage. Bridging therapy has been used to minimize time without anticoagulation when warfarin is interrupted for invasive procedures, but validated strategies based on high quality data are lacking. Existing data suggest that the use of bridging therapy may increase the risk of bleeding for some patients without reducing the risk of thrombosis. Clinical trials are currently under way to answer these questions. Because the half lives and time to anticoagulant activity of newer oral anticoagulants are shorter than for warfarin, bridging therapy is not thought to be necessary with these agents. Peri-procedural management of patients taking these agents is complicated by the lack of demonstrated reversal agents in emergency situations, although specific antidotes are being developed and tested. Existing guidelines for peri-procedural management of patients on oral anticoagulants highlight the importance of individualized patient decision making and suggest strategies to minimize complications. From a patient's perspective, given the uncertainties surrounding optimal management, explicit discussions regarding risks and benefits of treatment options and demonstration of effective communication among medical and surgical providers are essential.

  4. [Role of new oral anticoagulants in interventional cardiology].

    PubMed

    Brasselet, C; Duval, S

    2012-12-01

    New oral anticoagulants constitute an important breakthrough for cardiologists and their patients. After reviewing their mechanism of action, their role in the context of interventional cardiology, particularly for patients with acute coronary syndromes, is discussed.

  5. Clinical considerations on the posology of direct oral anticoagulants.

    PubMed

    Sáez-Peñataro, J; Avendaño-Solá, C; González-Juanatey, J R

    2016-10-01

    The efficacy of dicoumarin anticoagulants has been shown in patients with nonvalvular atrial fibrillation. However, they have drawbacks such as the need to adjust the dosage and the interaction with drugs and food. Direct oral anticoagulants are an effective and safe alternative and have a less complicated clinical management. There is considerable debate on the selection criteria for the posology regimens of direct oral anticoagulants. The differences among them and their administration regimens have raised questions about the clinical, pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic selection criteria that support the posology. This review critically analyses the available evidence and its impact on the final selection of the dosage regimen.

  6. New Oral Anticoagulants and Their Reversal.

    PubMed

    Pinto, Ian; Giri, Anshu; Arshad, Umbreen; Gajra, Ajeet

    2015-01-01

    The advent of new oral anticoagulants (NOAC) has increased the armamentarium against thromboembolic diseases but has given rise to a conundrum on their reversal. NOAC's have comparable efficacy to traditional vitamin K antagonists with similar rates of major bleeding. However there is no standardized method for reversal of these agents and no specific antidote. This is of concern not only in acute bleeding episodes but also in clinical scenarios where emergency surgery is required. Recent studies have investigated reversal of dabigatran, rivaroxaban, and apixaban using prothrombin complex concentrates (PCC), recombinant factor VIIa, and in the case of dabigatran, a monoclonal antibody. These studies have been encouraging in showing improvement of bleeding times and blood loss in most models, especially with the use of PCCs and the dabigatran antibody. Of note the majority of common currently used coagulation assays may not correlate with clinical reversal. The management of overt bleeding with NOACs is difficult due to the lack of clinical trials. Current animal trials, case reports and hemostatic testing on human blood have shown some promise; provide guidance but warrant further investigation.

  7. New oral anticoagulants: are coagulation units still required?

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Chronic antithrombotic therapy involves the use of anticoagulants, antiplatelets given either as monotherapy or in combination for the prevention of thrombotic complications. The most feared and sometimes fatal complication with this therapy is bleeding. It should be considered a “golden rule” that a drug or combination of drugs that maximizes efficiency (decreased thromboembolic risk) will probably be less safe (increased risk of bleeding), and this holds true either for single therapy or during combined therapy. The chances of bleeding indicated by risk tables can be useful but show only a snapshot, and the biological, social, environmental, and drug changes and therapeutic adherence also determine changes in the risk of thrombosis and bleeding. Bleeding is an eventuality that occurs in places of “locus minoris resistentiae,” and the results of careful phase 3 studies thus cannot be completely predictive of outcomes when a medication is introduced on the pharmaceutical market. With the use of warfarin, the International Normalized Ratio (INR) that has been established to indicate adequately balanced therapy is between 2.0 and 3.0. With the new oral anticoagulants, the pharmaceutical companies emphasize that it is not necessary to monitor anticoagulant effects. In studies with different doses of new oral anticoagulants, however, incidence of clinically significant bleeding complications have been directly related to the doses. Therefore, therapeutic excesses can condition bleeding risk and therapeutic limitation can increase thrombotic risk, especially when short-acting drugs such as the new oral anticoagulants are used. Hence, it is imperative to establish an appropriate method for monitoring new oral anticoagulants, setting levels of safety and effectiveness through periodic dosage and monitoring of their anticoagulant effects. Therefore, we still recommend the use of anticoagulation units for monitoring during treatment with the new oral anticoagulants

  8. Management of oral anticoagulation in patients undergoing minor dental procedures.

    PubMed

    Alaali, Yathreb; Barnes, Geoffrey D; Froehlich, James B; Kaatz, Scott

    2012-08-01

    Approximately 4.2 million patients in the United States are taking warfarin, making it the 11th most prescribed drug. Warfarin is primarily used for treatment of venous thromboembolic disease and stroke prevention in patients with atrial fibrillation and mechanical heart valves. Dentists frequently encounter anticoagulated patients and are faced with management decisions in these patients who require dental procedures. Observational studies suggest the risk of thrombosis if anticoagulation is suspended during dental procedures is higher than the risk of bleeding if anticoagulation is not suspended. Several groups now offer guidelines that recommend most minor dental procedures should be performed while on therapeutic warfarin. The recent approval of several new oral anticoagulants has introduced greater complexity to the management of the anticoagulated patient, and this narrative review will discuss current guidelines, the scientific underpinnings of the guidelines, and offer some practical suggestions for patients that are receiving the new agents.

  9. New antiplatelet drugs and new oral anticoagulants.

    PubMed

    Koenig-Oberhuber, V; Filipovic, M

    2016-09-01

    In our daily anaesthetic practice, we are confronted with an increasing number of patients treated with either antiplatelet or anticoagulant agents. During the last decade, changes have occurred that make the handling of antithrombotic medication a challenging part of anaesthetic perioperative management. In this review, the authors discuss the most important antiplatelet and anticoagulant drugs, the perioperative management, the handling of bleeding complications, and the interpretation of some laboratory analyses related to these agents.

  10. The management of dental patients taking new generation oral anticoagulants.

    PubMed

    Scott, Alun; Gibson, John; Crighton, Alexander

    2014-11-01

    Recently, new oral anticoagulants have been introduced as alternatives to warfarin. While national guidelines for treatment of dental patients taking warfarin as an anticoagulant are well-established, no such information is available for these novel therapeutic agents. At present, the local guidance available is contradictory between different health boards/health planning units, and liaison with the medical practitioner managing the individual patient's anticoagulation is imperative if any invasive procedure is proposed. This paper examines the available evidence regarding these drugs and sets out proposals for clinical guidance of dental practitioners treating these patients in primary dental care.

  11. New oral anticoagulants in patients with chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Belmar Vega, Lara; de Francisco, A L M; Bada da Silva, Jairo; Galván Espinoza, Luis; Fernández Fresnedo, Gema

    2016-12-08

    Patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) develop bleeding and thrombotic tendencies, so the indication of anticoagulation at the onset of atrial fibrillation (AF) is complex. AF is the most common chronic cardiac arrhythmia, and thromboembolism and ischemic stroke in particular are major complications. In recent years, new oral anticoagulant drugs have been developed, and they have shown superiority over the classical AVK in preventing stroke, systemic embolism and bleeding risk, constituting an effective alternative to those resources.

  12. Alternative to oral dicoumarin anticoagulants: Considerations in dental care

    PubMed Central

    Mingarro-de-León, Ana

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: For over 50 years, vitamin K antagonists such as warfarin (Aldocumar®) and acenocoumarol (Sintrom®) have been the gold standard for reducing the risk of cerebrovascular events. In the last 5 years alternative anticoagulants have been evaluated that act directly upon a concrete target within the coagulation cascade, thereby affording a more predictable anticoagulant effect. The present study offers an update on the new oral anticoagulants and reviews the implications referred to the dental care of patients administered these substances. Material and methods: An exhaustive PubMed-Medline and Cochrane Library search was made of the main alternatives to conventional oral anticoagulation, covering those studies published in English and Spanish over the last 10 years. Specialized textbooks and pharmaceutical catalogs were also consulted. A total of 184 articles were identified, of which 76 met the inclusion criteria. Results: The new oral anticoagulants dabigatran, rivaroxaban and apixaban are safe and effective, and offer a series of advantages, including rapid action, no need for constant monitoring, few drug and food interactions, and a broad therapeutic margin. These drugs are expensive, however, and some lack a specific antidote, while others must be administered twice a day. Regarding the dental treatment of patients receiving these drugs, suspension or modification of the background medication is not required when performing invasive dental procedures, except where indicated by the prescribing physician. Conclusions: The new oral anticoagulants do not pose significantly greater risks than conventional oral anticoagulants when providing invasive dental treatment, and their suspension is not strictly required in such situations. Key words:Dabigatran, rivaroxaban, apixaban, dental, hemostasis. PMID:24455094

  13. Development and Validation of an Oral Anticoagulation Knowledge Tool (AKT)

    PubMed Central

    Obamiro, Kehinde O.; Chalmers, Leanne; Bereznicki, Luke R. E.

    2016-01-01

    Background Assessing and improving patients’ anticoagulation knowledge can lead to better treatment outcomes. While validated knowledge instruments exist for use in people taking warfarin, these tools are not necessarily applicable to patients taking direct-acting oral anticoagulants. Objective To develop and validate an oral anticoagulation knowledge instrument that is applicable to all oral anticoagulant medications. Methods Ten anticoagulation experts participated in the development of the Anticoagulation Knowledge Tool to ensure content validity. The knowledge instrument was administered to three groups of participants comprising of 44 pharmacists, 50 patients and 50 members of the general public. A subgroup of participants in the patient and pharmacist group were retested approximately 2–3 months after the initial testing. Statistical tests were conducted to determine the validity and reliability of the scale, and item analysis was used to determine the performance of individual questions. Results The 28-item instrument developed had a scale content validity index of 0.92, supporting content validity. The pharmacist group’s mean score was significantly higher than that of the patient group, and the patient group scored significantly higher than the general public group (94% vs 62% vs 20%, respectively; p<0.001), supporting construct validity. Internal consistency reliability was acceptable with a Cronbach’s α value of > 0.7 across the three groups, and the test–retest reliability was confirmed with a Pearson’s correlation coefficient of 0.72 and 0.78 for the pharmacist and patient groups, respectively. Conclusion The Anticoagulation Knowledge Tool is a valid and reliable instrument that can be used in routine clinical practice to assess patients’ anticoagulation knowledge. PMID:27351746

  14. [Management of new oral anticoagulants in gastrointestinal bleeding and endoscopy].

    PubMed

    del Molino, Fátima; Gonzalez, Isabel; Saperas, Esteve

    2015-10-01

    New oral direct anticoagulants agents are alternatives to warfarin for long-term anticoagulation in a growing number of patients that require long-term anticoagulation for atrial fibrillation, deep venous thrombosis and pulmonary embolism. These new agents with predictable pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamics profiles offer a favorable global safety profile, but increased gastrointestinal bleeding compared to the vitamin K antagonists. Many gastroenterologists are unfamiliar and may be wary of these newer drugs, since Clinical experience is limited and no specific antidote is available to reverse their anticoagulant effect. In this article the risk of these new agents and, how to manage these agents in both the presence of acute gastrointestinal bleeding and in patients undergoing endoscopic procedures is reviewed.

  15. [Improvements in oral anticoagulant therapy for atrial fibrillation].

    PubMed

    Briongos Figuero, Sem; García Santos-Gallego, Carlos; Badimón, Juan José

    2013-12-07

    For the last decades vitamin K antagonists have been the most effective anticoagulant treatment of atrial fibrillation. New molecules are being designed, mainly due to the great amount of disadvantages in the management of conventional anticoagulation. Dabigatran, rivaroxaban and apixaban will soon be available as an alternative to warfarin/acenocumarol. All of them have demonstrated to be non-inferior to warfarin in preventing stroke and systemic embolism, with even dabigatran 150 mg bid and apixaban being superior. They have also a lower risk of bleeding, especially regarding severe/fatal and intracranial hemorrhages. This is a real revolution. The advance of these new anticoagulants will be limited only by the higher cost, and will progressively become the protagonists of oral anticoagulation in patients with nonvalvular atrial fibrillation.

  16. New oral anticoagulants and their implications for dental patients.

    PubMed

    O'Connell, John Edward; Stassen, Leo F A

    2014-01-01

    Anticoagulation therapy is used in several conditions to prevent or treat thromboembolism. Over the last 40 years, warfarin has been the oral anticoagulant of choice and has been considered the mainstay of treatment. However, its use is limited by a narrow therapeutic index and complex pharmacodynamics, necessitating regular monitoring and dose adjustments. Recently, two new oral anticoagulants--dabigatran etexilate (a direct thrombin inhibitor) and rivaroxiban (a factor Xa inhibitor)--have been approved for use in North America and Europe. Unlike warfarin, dabigatran and rivaroxiban are relatively small molecules that work as anticoagulants by targeting specific single steps of the coagulation cascade. Their advantages, relative to warfarin, include: predictable pharmacokinetics; limited food and drug interactions; rapid onset of action; and, short half-life. They require no monitoring. However, they lack a specific reversal agent. The number of patients taking dabigatran and rivaroxaban is increasing. Therefore, it is inevitable that dentists will be required to perform invasive procedures on this cohort of patients. This paper outlines the various properties of the new oral anticoagulants and the most recent guidelines regarding the management of these dental patients taking these medications.

  17. Perioperative Management of Direct Oral Anticoagulants (DOACs): A Systemic Review

    PubMed Central

    Sunkara, Tagore; Ofori, Emmanuel; Zarubin, Vadim; Caughey, Megan E.; Gaduputi, Vinaya; Reddy, Madhavi

    2016-01-01

    Direct oral anticoagulants (DOACs) are in wide use among patients requiring both short- and long-term anticoagulation, mainly due to their ease of use and the lack of monitoring requirements. With growing use of DOACs, it is imperative that physicians be able to manage patients on these medications, especially in the perioperative period. We aim to provide guidance on the management of DOACs in the perioperative period. In this review, we performed an extensive literature search summarizing the management of patients on direct-acting anticoagulants in the perioperative period. A total of four direct-acting oral anticoagulants were considered appropriate for inclusion in this review. The drugs were dabigatran etexilate mesylate (Pradaxa), rivaroxaban (Xarelto), apixaban (Eliquis), and edoxaban (Savaysa). Management of patients on DOACs in the perioperative period involves an assessment of thromboembolic event risk while off anticoagulation compared to the relative risk of bleeding if such drug is continued. DOACs may not need to be discontinued in minor surgeries or procedures, and in major surgeries, they may be discontinued hours prior depending on drug pharmacokinetics and renal function of the patients. PMID:28008269

  18. Dental procedures in patients receiving oral anticoagulation therapy.

    PubMed

    Saour, J N; Ali, H A; Mammo, L A; Sieck, J O

    1994-05-01

    Over a 10-year period a uniform management plan for patients receiving long term oral anticoagulation therapy for prosthetic heart valves and needing dental procedures was instituted. Those undergoing dental extraction or gum hygiene in the presence of gross gum pathology (Group A) had their oral anticoagulation discontinued two days prior to the procedure which was carried out only if the INR was 1.5 or less on the day of the procedure. Patients who needed dental fillings or gum hygiene in the absence of gross gum pathology (Group B) continued their anticoagulation therapy and had these procedures completed provided the INR was 3.0 or less. The main outcome measured were valve thrombosis, thromboembolism and excessive bleeding requiring hospitalization and/or blood transfusion. In Group A, 240 procedures were carried out; 212 dental extractions and 28 dental hygiene in the presence of gross gum pathology. They had a brief period of under-anticoagulation (3-7 days) to an INR of 1.5 or less. In Group B, 156 procedures were performed. No patient developed valve thrombosis or thromboembolism. Two patients, both in Group A needed hospitalization for observation but no blood transfusion. This management plan was easy to implement. Patients needed one extra visit to the anticoagulation clinic within one week of the procedure. It was both safe and effective.

  19. Novel oral anticoagulants in secondary prevention of stroke.

    PubMed

    Diener, H C; Easton, J D; Hankey, G J; Hart, R G

    2013-06-01

    In patients with atrial fibrillation (AF) oral anticoagulation with vitamin-K antagonists (warfarin, phenprocoumon) is effective both for primary and secondary stroke prevention yielding a 60-70% relative reduction in stroke risk compared with placebo, as well as a mortality reduction of 26 percent. Vitamin-K antagonists have a number of well documented shortcomings. Recently the results of randomised trials for three new oral anticoagulants that do not exhibit the limitations of vitamin-K antagonists have been published. These include direct factor Xa inhibitors (rivaroxaban and apixaban) and a direct thrombin inhibitor (dabigatran). The studies (RE-LY, ROCKET-AF, ARISTOTLE, AVERROES) provide promising results for the new agents, including higher efficacy and a significantly lower incidence of intracranial bleeds compared with warfarin or aspirin. The new drugs show similar results in secondary as well as in primary stroke prevention in patients with AF. Apixaban was demonstrated to be clearly superior to aspirin and had the same rate of major bleeding complications. Meta-analyses show that the novel anticoagulants are superior to warfarin for the reduction of stroke, major bleeding and intracranial bleeds. New anticoagulants add to the therapeutic options for patients with AF, and offer a number of advantages over warfarin, for both the clinician and patient, including a favorable bleeding profile and convenience of use. Aspirin is no longer an option in secondary stroke prevention in patients with atrial fibrillation. Consideration of these new anticoagulants will improve clinical decision making.

  20. How we treat bleeding associated with direct oral anticoagulants

    PubMed Central

    Marano, Giuseppe; Vaglio, Stefania; Pupella, Simonetta; Liumbruno, Giancarlo M.; Franchini, Massimo

    2016-01-01

    Direct oral anticoagulants are at least as effective as vitamin K antagonists for the prevention and treatment of thromboembolism. Unfortunately, differently from vitamin K antagonists, they have the great drawback of lacking specific antidotes in the case of bleeding or emergency situations such as trauma, stroke requiring thrombolysis, and urgent surgery. The progressive development of antidotes for these new drugs, which, it is hoped, will become available in the near future, will allow better and safer management of the rapid reversal of their anticoagulant effect. PMID:27136433

  1. [Vitamin K antagonist, direct oral anticoagulants: Where is the truth?

    PubMed

    Laroche, J-P; Schved, J-F

    2016-12-01

    Vitamin K antagonists (VKA) and direct oral anticoagulants (DOACs) are now in competition. The companies are trying to replace VKA by DOACs, totally or at least greatly VKA should VKA disappear in favor of DOACs? There are still many questions about DOACs. The purpose of this article is to make a well-considered decision in this area. The aim is not to denigrate one or the other but to share things between these two families of anticoagulants. Physicians using these drugs must have a full knowledge about compared efficacy and safety. We feel necessary to increase distance between effective results of the clinical trials and industrial communication around DOACs.

  2. Intracranial hemorrhage during administration of a novel oral anticoagulant

    PubMed Central

    Tempaku, Akira

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Oral anticoagulants are widely administered to patients with atrial fibrillation in order to prevent the onset of cardiogenic embolisms. However, intracranial bleeding during anticoagulant therapy often leads to fatal outcomes. Accordingly, the use of novel oral anticoagulants (NOACs), which less frequently have intracranial bleeding as a complication, is expanding. A nationwide survey of intracranial bleeding and its prognosis in Japan reported that intracranial bleeding of advanced severity was not common after NOAC administration. In this report, two cases from our institute are presented. Patients: Case 1 was an 85-year-old man with a right frontal lobe hemorrhage while under dabigatran therapy. Case 2 was an 81-year-old man who had cerebellar hemorrhage while under rivaroxaban therapy. Result: In both patients, the clinical course progressed without aggravation of bleeding or neurological abnormalities once anticoagulant therapy was discontinued. Conclusion: These observations suggest that intracranial hemorrhage during NOAC therapy is easily controlled by discontinuation of the drug. NOAC administration may therefore be appropriate despite the risk of such severe complications. Further case studies that include a subgroup analysis with respect to each NOAC or patient background will be required to establish appropriate guidelines for the prevention of cardiogenic embolisms in patients with atrial fibrillation. PMID:27928459

  3. Use of novel oral anticoagulant agents in venous thromboembolism

    PubMed Central

    Madan, Shivanshu; Shah, Shenil; Dale, Patrick; Partovi, Sasan

    2016-01-01

    New oral anticoagulants (NOAC) serve as alternatives for patients currently using warfarin for the prevention and treatment of venous thromboembolic (VTE) disease. This article provides a brief summary of the clinical use of these drugs as well as a review of the landmark clinical trials which evaluated described their safety and efficacy. As more data becomes available, a fundamental understanding of these medications will be vital to cardiovascular practitioners managing patients with VTE. PMID:28123977

  4. Management of antiplatelet and anticoagulant therapy for endoscopic procedures: Introduction to novel oral anticoagulants.

    PubMed

    González Bárcenas, Martha L; Pérez Aisa, Ángeles

    2016-02-01

    The development of novel antithrombotic therapy in the past few years and its prescription in patients with cardiovascular and circulatory disease has widened the spectrum of drugs that need to be considered when performing an endoscopic procedure. The balance between the thrombotic risk patients carry due to their medical history and the bleeding risk involved in endoscopic procedures should be thoroughly analyzed by Gastroenterologists. New oral anticoagulants (NOACs) impose an additional task. These agents, that specifically target factor IIa or Xa, do not dispose of an anticoagulation monitoring method nor have an antidote to revert their effect, just as with antiplatelet agents. Understanding the fundamental aspects of these drugs provides the necessary knowledge to determine the ideal period the antithrombotic therapy should be interrupted in order to perform the endoscopic procedure, offering maximum safety for patients and optimal results.

  5. Bridging of oral anticoagulation therapy for invasive procedures.

    PubMed

    Spyropoulos, Alex C

    2005-09-01

    The management of patients who need temporary interruption of chronic oral anticoagulant (OAC) therapy for an elective surgical or invasive procedure is problematic and complex. Patient and procedural risk factors for thrombosis and bleeding, anticoagulant-related risks of bleeding, and clinical consequences of a thrombotic or bleeding event need to be assessed and properly risk-stratified in the perioperative period. Certain procedures, such as dental, endoscopic, and cutaneous procedures, can be completed without discontinuing OAC, but most procedures with a high bleeding risk (including major surgeries) will necessitate temporary discontinuation of OAC. Bridging therapy with shorter-acting anticoagulants, such as heparin, for patients at intermediate to high risk of thromboembolism represents one strategy to maintain functional anticoagulation during this period. Large, prospective cohort studies and registries of patients on chronic OAC who underwent bridging therapy mostly with low-molecular-weight heparin have been completed recently. This paper reviews these clinical data on bridging therapy and provides an evidence-based perioperative management strategy for the at-risk patient on chronic OAC.

  6. [Novel oral anticoagulants and atrial fibrillation in the elderly].

    PubMed

    Hanon, Olivier

    2013-12-01

    Atrial fibrillation treatment relies on anticoagulation therapy that reduces the risk of stroke. Vitamin K antagonists (VKA) were the only oral anticoagulant drugs for more than 50 years, but they are difficult to manage especially in the elderly. In France, VKA are the main cause of iatrogenic hospitalizations with about 17,000 hospitalizations per year and around 4,000 to 5,000 deaths per year. Pharmacologic properties of VKA, especially the narrow therapeutic margin explain the complexity of their management. Several studies have shown that patients treated with VKA were on average only 50% of the time with an INR in the therapeutic range. In other words, patients are, half of the time, either-under treated or over-treated. Within this framework, development of new oral anticoagulant drugs appeared necessary, in order to obtain drugs with larger therapeutic margin and a better risk/benefit profile than VKA. Three large randomized clinical trials including almost 50,000 patients with 20,000 subjects over 75 years old and 8,000 over 80 years old, show a better risk/benefit profile of the new oral anticoagulants (NOAC) than VKA, characterized by a 50% reduction of cerebral hemorrhages, 22% reduction of stroke and 12% reduction of total mortality. Meanwhile, their renal elimination and the lack of control of the biological efficacy need to be taken into account for their prescription. Renal failure (estimated glomerular filtration rate according to Cockcroft formula < 30 mL/min) contraindicates their use. Their half-life is shorter than that of VKA and the biological monitoring is not available, thus a good adherence to the treatment is important. Studies specifically conducted among geriatric older population with poly-pathologies and frail are therefore needed to evaluate tolerance of NOAC in real life conditions.

  7. [Secondary anticoagulant prophylaxis with low molecular heparins or oral anticoagulants and bone mineral density].

    PubMed

    Wawrzyńska, L; Przedlacki, J; Hajduk, B; Tomkowski, W; Fijałkowska, A; Ostrowski, K; Torbicki, A

    2000-11-01

    A broad spectrum of indications for low molecular weight heparin (LMWH) requires an assessment of side effects especially during prolonged administration. There are common risk factors for venous thromboembolism (VTE) and osteoporosis; heparin is "the drug of choice" for VTE treatment. The aim of our study was to assess the effect of treatment and prophylaxis with LMWH (enoxaparine sodium) and oral anticoagulant (acenocoumarol) for bone structure. Material consists of in- and outpatients. 49 densitometries were performed in 31 patients (in 15 cases double examination). We observed a decrease of bone mineral density in comparison to the initial examination in most cases: mean change of bone mass for examined areas was 3.05%.

  8. Novel oral Anticoagulants in Non-Valvular Atrial Fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    da Silva, Rose M.F.L.

    2014-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation is the most frequent arrhythmia in clinical practice, reaching 2% of the people in the world and is associated with systemic embolism. Thus, the use of anticoagulants is indicated if CHA2DS2-VASc score ≥2 or in patients with previous transient ischemic attack or stroke. For decades, warfarin, a vitamin K antagonist, was the only choice for chronic oral anticoagulation. Recently, novel oral anticoagulants (NOACs) have been introduced, offering similar (or better) effectiveness, safety, and convenience to the vitamin K antagonists. Dabigatran was the first NOAC approved and is a direct thrombin inhibitor. Rivaroxaban and apixaban are factor Xa inhibitors. They display rapid onset of action, more predictable of pharmacological profile, less interactions with other drugs, lack of significant effects in the diet, and less risk of intracranial hemorrhage than warfarin. Despite that dose adjustment is necessary for patients with chronic kidney disease or according to body weight, these new drugs do not require regular monitoring. There are recommendations for the start and follow-up therapy with NOACs, planning for cardioversion, ablation and surgical interventions and the management of bleeding. This article is a review of the major studies of the NOACs. The clinical use of these drugs in patients with non-valvular atrial fibrillation is presented. PMID:25470147

  9. Antidotes for novel oral anticoagulants: current status and future potential.

    PubMed

    Crowther, Mark; Crowther, Mark A

    2015-08-01

    The direct thrombin inhibitor dabigatran and the anti-Xa agents rivaroxaban, edoxaban, and apixaban are a new generation of oral anticoagulants. Their advantage over the vitamin K antagonists is the lack of the need for monitoring and dose adjustment. Their main disadvantage is currently the absence of a specific reversal agent. Dabigatran's, unlike the anti-Xa agents, absorption can be reduced by activated charcoal if administered shortly after ingestion and it can be removed from the blood with hemodialysis. Prothrombin complex concentrate, activated prothrombin complex concentrate, and recombinant factor VIIa all show some activity in reversing the anticoagulant effect of these drugs but this is based on ex vivo, animal, and volunteer studies. It is unclear, which, if any, of these drugs is the most suitable for emergency reversal. Three novel molecules (idarucizumab, andexanet, and PER977) may provide the most effective and safest way of reversal. These agents are currently in premarketing studies.

  10. The target-specific oral anticoagulants: practical considerations.

    PubMed

    Garcia, David A

    2014-12-05

    More than 4 years have passed since the first approval of a target-specific oral anticoagulant (TSOAC) in the United States, and the number of clinicians who have prescribed (or considered prescribing) one or more of these medications is increasing. Although these agents may, in properly selected patients, offer advantages over more traditional therapies, their lack of familiarity can be intimidating. Clinicians who are prescribing the TSOACs face a number of management questions not definitively answered by the registration trials. This chapter reviews some of these situations, including updated information on the periprocedural management of TSOACs and the latest evidence about how to best measure TSOAC effect. The lack of an antidote and other considerations that may be relevant when deciding between newer and more traditional anticoagulant medications are also discussed.

  11. Comparing the quality of oral anticoagulant management by anticoagulation clinics and by family physicians: a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, S. Jo-Anne; Wells, Philip S.; Kovacs, Michael J.; Lewis, Geoffrey M.; Martin, Janet; Burton, Erica; Anderson, David R.

    2003-01-01

    Background There is growing evidence that better outcomes are achieved when anticoagulation is managed by anticoagulation clinics rather than by family physicians. We carried out a randomized controlled trial to evaluate these 2 models of anticoagulant care. Methods We randomly allocated patients who were expected to require warfarin sodium for 3 months either to anticoagulation clinics located in 3 Canadian tertiary hospitals or to their family physician practices. We evaluated the quality of oral anticoagulant management by comparing the proportion of time that the international normalized ratio (INR) of patients receiving warfarin sodium was within the target therapeutic range ± 0.2 INR units (expanded therapeutic range) while they were managed in anticoagulation clinics as opposed to family physicians' care over 3 months. We measured the rates of thromboembolic and major hemorrhagic events and patient satisfaction in the 2 groups. Results Of the 221 patients enrolled, 112 were randomly assigned to anticoagulation clinics and 109 to family physicians. The INR values of patients who were managed by anticoagulation clinics were within the expanded therapeutic range 82% of the time versus 76% of the time for those managed by family physicians (p = 0.034). High-risk INR values (defined as being < 1.5 or > 5.0) were more commonly observed in patients managed by family physicians (40%) than in patients managed by anticoagulation clinics (30%, p = 0.005). More INR measurements were performed by family physicians than by anticoagulation clinics (13 v. 11, p = 0.001). Major bleeding events (2 [2%] v. 1 [1%]), thromboembolic events (1 [1%] v. 2 [2%]) and deaths (5 [4%] v. 6 [6%]) occurred at a similar frequency in the anticoagulation clinic and family physician groups respectively. Of the 170 (77%) patients who completed the patient satisfaction questionnaire, more were satisfied when their anticoagulant management was managed through anticoagulation clinics than by

  12. Upper gastrointestinal endoscopy in emergency setting for patients receiving oral anticoagulants – practice updates

    PubMed Central

    Oprita, R; Oprita, B; Diaconescu, B; Bratu, MR; Berceanu, D

    2017-01-01

    Anticoagulants are frequently used medications in diverse cardiovascular diseases. Their uses highly increase the risk of bleeding from upper and lower gastrointestinal sources, whether there is a classic vitamin K antagonist or a novel oral anticoagulant. Their interruption can promote procoagulation status with different thromboembolic accidents. Discontinuation of oral anticoagulants before the elective procedures is standardized but there are no guidelines for managing bleeding lesions of upper gastrointestinal tract concomitant with anticoagulation. Also, because some of the anticoagulants are new comers, there is no specific antidote, and so their anticoagulation effect cannot be antagonized fast in order to reduce the bleeding. Therefore, the endoscopic hemostasis must be definitive and efficient. This is a short review of the current management for the bleeding lesions of the upper gastrointestinal tract in patients taking oral anticoagulants. PMID:28255372

  13. [Oral anticoagulation in chronic kidney disease with atrial fibrillation].

    PubMed

    Expósito, Víctor; Seras, Miguel; Fernández-Fresnedo, Gema

    2015-05-21

    Atrial fibrillation is a common finding in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD), which increases markedly the embolism risk. The CHADS2 and HAS-BLED scales, used in the general population to assess the risk/benefit of oral anticoagulation (OAC), underestimate respectively the risk of embolism and haemorrhage in CKD, making it difficult to decide whether to use OAC or not. Based on the available evidence, it seems indicated to use OAC in stage 3 CKD, while it is controversial in advanced stages. New OAC such as dabigatran and rivaroxaban have been approved in stage 3 CKD but their role is still somewhat uncertain.

  14. Evaluating the Initiation of Novel Oral Anticoagulants in Medicare Beneficiaries

    PubMed Central

    Baik, Seo Hyon; Hernandez, Inmaculada; Zhang, Yuting

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND As alternatives to warfarin, 2 novel oral anticoagulants (NOACs), dabigatran and rivaroxaban, were approved in 2010 and 2011 to prevent stroke and other thromboembolic events in patients with atrial fibrillation. It is unclear how patient characteristics are associated with the initiation of anticoagulants. OBJECTIVE To evaluate how patient demographics, clinical characteristics, types of insurance, and patient out-of-pocket spending affect the initiation of warfarin and 2 NOACs—dabigatran and rivaroxaban. METHODS We used pharmacy claims data from a 5% random sample of Medicare beneficiaries to identify patients who were newly diagnosed with atrial fibrillation between October 1, 2010, and October 31, 2012, and who were prescribed an oral anticoagulant within 60 days of diagnosis. We identified key predictors of initiation of NOACs using a multinomial logistic regression model with generalized logit link. RESULTS Patients who were black and who had a history of acute myocardial infarction, stroke or transient ischemic attack, chronic kidney disease, or congestive heart failure were significantly associated with lower odds of receiving NOACs compared with warfarin. Age greater than 65 years, a history of hypertension, and use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs were positively associated with the initiation of NOACs. Rivaroxaban was most likely to be initiated among women, followed by warfarin and dabigatran. Individuals receiving a low-income subsidy were more likely to initiate warfarin than NOACs, even though they paid little copayment. Individuals with supplemental Part D drug coverage, such as national Programs for All-Inclusive Care for the Elderly or employer-sponsored plans, were more likely to initiate NOACs compared with warfarin. CONCLUSIONS We found that race, sex, type of Part D plans, and some clinical conditions were associated with the initiation of NOACs relative to warfarin. But patient demographic and clinical characteristics did

  15. New oral anticoagulants and dual antiplatelet therapy: Focus on apixaban.

    PubMed

    Pelliccia, Francesco; Rollini, Fabiana; Marazzi, Giuseppe; Greco, Cesare; Gaudio, Carlo; Angiolillo, Dominick J; Rosano, Giuseppe

    2016-12-15

    The combination of AF and coronary artery disease not only is a common clinical setting, it is also a complex setting to deal with anticoagulation and antiplatelet therapy, and it is associated with significantly higher mortality rates. Unfortunately, there are no sufficient data available to optimally guide clinical practice in such settings. This review focuses specifically on newer oral anticoagulants (NOACs) associated with dual antiplatelet therapy (DAPT) in patients with coronary artery disease undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). There are no randomized studies comparing vitamin K antagonists and NOACs in patients with AF undergoing PCI either for acute coronary syndromes or for stable patients, i.e. those patients who have an indication to receive DAPT. Moreover, new antiplatelet agents such as ticagrelor and prasugrel have entered the market for acute coronary syndromes. So far, there are no large-scale randomized studies published evaluating these newer antiplatelet agents in patients with AF receiving either vitamin K antagonists or NOACs, adding to the uncertainty on how to use these antithrombotics in combination when both coronary artery disease (unstable or stable patients) and AF converge in a given patient. The lack of large outcome trials and the large number of possible combinations are reflected in the wide variety of practices in the real world. To date, given the lack of data, watchfulness when using NOACs as component of DAPT or triple oral antithrombotic therapy is warranted.

  16. Dietary vitamin K guidance: an effective strategy for stable control of oral anticoagulation?

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Numerous factors have been identified as risk factors for instability of oral anticoagulation, including variability in vitamin K intake. However few studies have directly tested the feasibility of manipulating dietary vitamin K to achieve stable oral anticoagulation. Recent findings from a rando...

  17. Novel oral anticoagulants and reversal agents: Considerations for clinical development.

    PubMed

    Sarich, Troy C; Seltzer, Jonathan H; Berkowitz, Scott D; Costin', James; Curnutte, John T; Gibson, C Michael; Hoffman, Maureane; Kaminskas, Edvardas; Krucoff, Mitchell W; Levy, Jerrold H; Mintz, Paul D; Reilly, Paul A; Sager, Philip T; Singer, Daniel E; Stockbridge, Norman; Weitz, Jeffrey I; Kowey, Peter R

    2015-06-01

    This white paper provides a summary of presentations and discussions that were held at an Anticoagulant-Induced Bleeding and Reversal Agents Think Tank co-sponsored by the Cardiac Safety Research Consortium and the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) at the FDA's White Oak Headquarters on April 22, 2014. Attention focused on a development pathway for reversal agents for the novel oral anticoagulants (NOACs). This is important because anticoagulation is still widely underused for stroke prevention in patients with atrial fibrillation. Undertreatment persists, although NOACs, in general, overcome some of the difficulties associated with anticoagulation provided by vitamin K antagonists. One reason for the lack of a wider uptake is the absence of NOAC reversal agents. As there are neither widely accepted academic and industry standards nor a definitive regulatory policy on the development of such reversal agents, this meeting provided a forum for leaders in the fields of cardiovascular clinical trials and cardiovascular safety to discuss the issues and develop recommendations. Attendees included representatives from pharmaceutical companies; regulatory agencies; end point adjudication specialist groups; contract research organizations; and active, academically based physicians. There was wide and solid consensus that NOACs overall offer improvements in convenience, efficacy, and safety compared with warfarin, even without reversal agents. Still, it was broadly accepted that it would be helpful to have reversal agents available for clinicians to use. Because it is not feasible to do definitive outcomes studies demonstrating a reversal agent's clinical benefits, it was felt that these agents could be approved for use in life-threatening bleeding situations if the molecules were well characterized preclinically, their pharmacodynamic and pharmacokinetic profiles were well understood, and showed no harmful adverse events in early human testing. There was also consensus

  18. [Anticoagulation in atrial fibrillation in the elderly: the geriatrician point of view with a focus on the direct oral anticoagulants].

    PubMed

    Vogel, T; Geny, B; Kaltenbach, G; Lang, P-O

    2015-01-01

    Prescribing anticoagulant therapy when the CHA₂DS₂-VASc score is ≥ 1 prevents strokes secondary to non-valvular atrial fibrillation (AF). However, it is important to remember that whether the aged population has the highest risk of stroke in case of AF, under anticoagulant therapy this population is also at the highest risk of bleeding. Vitamin K antagonists were for decades the molecules of reference with benefits even after 75 years of age. The direct oral anticoagulants have overcome the biological constraints inherent to monitoring vitamin K antagonists and provide a more stable pharmacological action with a limited number of drug-drug interactions. However, the widespread use of these molecules in the older population remains controversial. In this review article, indications and modalities of administration of anticoagulant therapy in the elderly will be detailed and discussed on the basis of the most recent recommendations proposed in particular by the European Society of Cardiology. Particular attention will be paid to new oral anticoagulant therapies compared with vitamin K antagonists and antiplatelet agents.

  19. Non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants and heart failure.

    PubMed

    Isnard, Richard; Bauer, Fabrice; Cohen-Solal, Alain; Damy, Thibaud; Donal, Erwan; Galinier, Michel; Hagège, Albert; Jourdain, Patrick; Leclercq, Christophe; Sabatier, Rémi; Trochu, Jean-Noël; Cohen, Ariel

    2016-11-01

    Thromboembolism contributes to morbidity and mortality in patients with heart failure (HF), and atrial fibrillation (AF) is one of the main factors promoting this complication. As they share many risk factors, HF and AF frequently coexist, and patients with both conditions are at a particularly high risk of thromboembolism. Non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants (NOACs) are direct antagonists of thrombin (dabigatran) and factor Xa (rivaroxaban, apixaban and edoxaban), and were designed to overcome the limitations of vitamin K antagonists. Compared with warfarin in non-valvular AF, NOACs demonstrated non-inferiority with better safety, most particularly for intracranial haemorrhages. Therefore, the European Society of Cardiology guidelines recommend NOACs for most patients with non-valvular AF. Subgroups of patients with both AF and HF from the pivotal studies investigating the safety and efficacy of NOACs have been analysed and, for each NOAC, results were similar to those of the total analysis population. A recent meta-analysis of these subgroups has confirmed the better efficacy and safety of NOACs in patients with AF and HF - particularly the 41% decrease in the incidence of intracranial haemorrhages. The prothrombotic state associated with HF suggests that patients with HF in sinus rhythm could also benefit from treatment with NOACs. However, in the absence of clinical trial data supporting this indication, current guidelines do not recommend anticoagulant treatment of patients with HF in sinus rhythm. In conclusion, recent analyses of pivotal studies support the use of NOACs in accordance with their indications in HF patients with non-valvular AF.

  20. Factors Affecting Patients' Perception On, and Adherence To, Anticoagulant Therapy: Anticipating the Role of Direct Oral Anticoagulants.

    PubMed

    Pandya, Ekta Y; Bajorek, Beata

    2017-04-01

    The role of the direct oral anticoagulants (DOACs) in practice has been given extensive consideration recently, albeit largely from the clinician's perspective. However, the effectiveness and safety of using anticoagulants is highly dependent on the patient's ability to manage and take these complex, high-risk medicines. This structured narrative review explores the published literature to identify the factors underpinning patients' non-adherence to anticoagulants in atrial fibrillation (AF), and subsequently contemplates to what extent the DOACs might overcome the known challenges with traditional warfarin therapy. This review comprised a two-tier search of various databases and search platforms (CINAHL, Cochrane, Current Contents Connect, EMBASE, MEDLINE Ovid, EBSCO, PubMed, Google, Google Scholar) to yield 47 articles reporting patients perspectives on, and patients adherence to, anticoagulant therapy. The findings from the literature were synthesised under five interacting dimensions of adherence: therapy-related factors, patient-related factors, condition-related factors, social-economic factors and health system factors. Factors negatively affecting patients' day-to-day lives (especially regular therapeutic drug monitoring, dose adjustments, dietary considerations) predominantly underpin a patient's reluctance to take warfarin therapy, leading to non-adherence. Other patient-related factors underpinning non-adherence include patients' perceptions and knowledge about the purpose of anticoagulation; understanding of the risks and benefits of therapy; socioeconomic status; and expectations of care from health professionals. In considering these findings, it is apparent that the DOACs may overcome some of the barriers to traditional warfarin therapy at least to an extent, particularly the need for regular monitoring, frequent dose adjustment and dietary considerations. However, their high cost, twice-daily dosing and gastrointestinal adverse effects may present

  1. Oral Anticoagulants and Atrial Fibrillation: An Update for the Clinical Nurse.

    PubMed

    Spivak, Inna E

    2015-01-01

    Anticoagulation is an important strategy for the prevention of stroke associated with atrial fibrillation. Development of new oral agents has created a need to educate nurses to administer these medications and provide patient education.

  2. Clinical strategies for selecting oral anticoagulants in patients with atrial fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    Sherwood, Matthew W.; Becker, Richard C.

    2014-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation is a common arrhythmia. One of the important aspects of the management of atrial fibrillation is stroke prevention. Warfarin has been the longstanding anticoagulant used for stroke prevention in patients with atrial fibrillation. There are now three novel oral anticoagulants, which have been studied in randomized controlled trials and subsequently approved by the Federal Drug Administration for stroke prevention in patients with atrial fibrillation. Special patient populations, including renal insufficiency, elderly, prior stroke, and extreme body weights, were represented to varying degrees in the clinical trials of the novel oral anticoagulants. Furthermore, there is variation in the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of each anticoagulant, which affect the patient populations differently. Patients and clinicians are faced with the task of selecting among the available anticoagulants, and this review is designed to be a tool for clinical decision-making. PMID:23846737

  3. Differences between warfarin and new oral anticoagulants in dental clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Miranda, M; Martinez, L S; Franco, R; Forte, V; Barlattani, A; Bollero, P

    2016-01-01

    The oral anticoagulant therapy is used for the cure and the prevention of thromboembolic diseases. In the last fifty years the warfarin has been considered the oral anticoagulant of choice. However, its use is limited by a narrow therapeutic index and by a complex pharmacodynamics, which requires regular adjustments and monitoring of the dose. Recently, three new oral anticoagulant - dabigatran etexilato (direct thrombin inhibitor), rivaroxaban and apixaban (Xa factor direct inhibitor) - have been approved for use in europe. Increasing the number of patients taking these drugs, it is important that the dentist knows these new oral anticoagulants, their indications and methods of action, in particular for the management of patients, who require invasive treatments. With regard to the management of the patient threated with the new oral anticoagulants (NAO), there have been new significant changes in the procedure compared to the one followed by patients treated with warfarin. This led to the development of new guidelines that the dentist has to follow in order to ensure a safe and appropriate dental treatment and reduce any postoperative complications. The aim of this work is to evaluate the effectiveness of the new oral anticoagulants compared to warfarin, especially in terms of risks of bleeding events and intra and postoperative complications, in patients requiring multiple dental extractions.

  4. Differences between warfarin and new oral anticoagulants in dental clinical practice

    PubMed Central

    MIRANDA, M.; MARTINEZ, L.S.; FRANCO, R.; FORTE, V.; BARLATTANI, A.; BOLLERO, P.

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY The oral anticoagulant therapy is used for the cure and the prevention of thromboembolic diseases. In the last fifty years the warfarin has been considered the oral anticoagulant of choice. However, its use is limited by a narrow therapeutic index and by a complex pharmacodynamics, which requires regular adjustments and monitoring of the dose. Recently, three new oral anticoagulant – dabigatran etexilato (direct thrombin inhibitor), rivaroxaban and apixaban (Xa factor direct inhibitor) – have been approved for use in europe. Increasing the number of patients taking these drugs, it is important that the dentist knows these new oral anticoagulants, their indications and methods of action, in particular for the management of patients, who require invasive treatments. With regard to the management of the patient threated with the new oral anticoagulants (NAO), there have been new significant changes in the procedure compared to the one followed by patients treated with warfarin. This led to the development of new guidelines that the dentist has to follow in order to ensure a safe and appropriate dental treatment and reduce any postoperative complications. The aim of this work is to evaluate the effectiveness of the new oral anticoagulants compared to warfarin, especially in terms of risks of bleeding events and intra and postoperative complications, in patients requiring multiple dental extractions. PMID:28042443

  5. Safety and efficacy of bone wax in patients on oral anticoagulant therapy.

    PubMed

    Krasny, Marta; Krasny, Kornel; Fiedor, Piotr

    2014-01-01

    Cardiovascular conditions, apart from neoplastic diseases, remain the major cause of death in developed countries; therefore, the number of patients receiving oral anticoagulants is constantly increasing. Anticoagulant therapy considerably reduced mortality in patients with history of myocardial infarction among others. Although many interventions may be performed without withdrawal of the anticoagulant and tooth extraction was qualified as a procedure of low hemorrhage risk, a majority of dentists refer the patient to a cardiologist several days before the elective tooth extraction to withdraw anticoagulants. The aim of the study was to evaluate the efficacy and safety of bone wax used to stop bleeding after dental procedures in a group of patients on chronic anticoagulant therapy and find an answer to a question, whether it is justified to temporarily withdraw anticoagulants for this type of procedures. The study involved 176 patients on chronic anticoagulant therapy undergoing tooth extraction (154 subjects) or surgical extraction of a retained tooth (48 subjects). After the procedure, in each case the alveolus was filled with bone wax to stop bleeding. In all patients involved in the study bleeding from the alveolus was successfully stopped during the procedure. None of the subjects reported increased bleeding from the operational site after coming back home. Bone wax is a good, efficient, and safe material to block bleeding from the alveolus following tooth extractions, also in patients on chronic anticoagulant therapy. The study demonstrated that withdrawal or adjustment of anticoagulant therapy is not necessary before an elective tooth extraction.

  6. Drug and dietary interactions of warfarin and novel oral anticoagulants: an update.

    PubMed

    Nutescu, Edith; Chuatrisorn, Ittiporn; Hellenbart, Erika

    2011-04-01

    Clinicians and patients around the world have been intrigued by the concept of developing an oral anticoagulant with a broad therapeutic window and few drug and dietary interactions that can be administered at fixed doses with no or minimal monitoring. The recently approved oral direct thrombin inhibitor dabigatran, along with the emerging oral anti-factor Xa inhibitors, rivaroxaban, apixaban, and edoxaban, have been developed to address many of the shortcomings of warfarin therapy. As warfarin is associated with extensive food and drug interactions, there is also a need to consider such interactions with the new oral anticoagulants. While to date few drug and dietary interactions have been reported with the new oral anticoagulants, it is still early in their development and clinical use cycle. Pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic profiles will have to be closely accounted for when determining the likelihood of a potential drug interaction prior to therapy initiation. As the list of drugs and supplements that interact with warfarin is continuously expanding, and the knowledge on drug interactions with the novel oral anticoagulants is still in its infancy, clinicians need to be vigilant when initiating any of these agents or when any changes in the patient's medication profile occur and perform a close screening for potential drug and dietary interactions. The objective of this paper is to give an update on drug and dietary interactions with warfarin and the novel oral anticoagulants, dabigatran, rivaroxaban, apixaban, and edoxaban.

  7. Suboptimal use of non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants

    PubMed Central

    Başaran, Özcan; Dogan, Volkan; Beton, Osman; Tekinalp, Mehmet; Aykan, Ahmet Cağri; Kalaycioğlu, Ezgi; Bolat, Ismail; Taşar, Onur; Şafak, Özgen; Kalcik, Macit; Yaman, Mehmet; İnci, Sinan; Altintaş, Bernas; Kalkan, Sedat; Kirma, Cevat; Biteker, Murat

    2016-01-01

    Abstract This study aimed to investigate the potential misuse of novel oral anticoagulants (NOACs) and the physicians’ adherence to current European guideline recommendations in real-world using a large dataset from Real-life Multicenter Survey Evaluating Stroke Prevention Strategies in Turkey (RAMSES Study). RAMSES study is a prospective, multicenter, nationwide registry (ClinicalTrials.gov identifier NCT02344901). In this subgroup analysis of RAMSES study, patients who were on NOACs were classified as appropriately treated (AT), undertreated (UT), and overtreated (OT) according to the European Society of Cardiology (ESC) guidelines. The independent predictors of UT and OT were determined by multivariate logistic regression. Of the 2086 eligible patients, 1247 (59.8%) received adequate treatment. However, off-label use was detected in 839 (40.2%) patients; 634 (30.4%) patients received UT and 205 (9.8%) received OT. Independent predictors of UT included >65 years of age, creatinine clearance ≥50 mL/min, urban living, existing dabigatran treatment, and HAS-BLED score of <3, whereas that of OT were creatinine clearance <50 mL/min, ongoing rivaroxaban treatment, and HAS-BLED score of ≥3. The suboptimal use of NOACs is common because of physicians’ poor compliance to the guideline recommendations in patients with nonvalvular atrial fibrillation (NVAF). Older patients who were on dabigatran treatment with good renal functions and low risk of bleeding were at risk of UT, whereas patients who were on rivaroxaban treatment with renal impairment and high risk of bleeding were at risk of OT. Therefore, a greater emphasis should be given to prescribe the recommended dose for the specified patients. PMID:27583892

  8. Utilization and prescribing patterns of direct oral anticoagulants

    PubMed Central

    Whitworth, Maegan M; Haase, Krystal K; Fike, David S; Bharadwaj, Ravindra M; Young, Rodney B; MacLaughlin, Eric J

    2017-01-01

    Background Scant literature exists evaluating utilization patterns for direct oral anticoagulants (DOACs). Objectives The primary objective was to assess DOAC prescribing in patients with venous thromboembolism (VTE) and nonvalvular atrial fibrillation (NVAF) in outpatient clinics. Secondary objectives were to compare utilization between family medicine (FM) and internal medicine (IM) clinics, characterize potentially inappropriate use, and identify factors associated with adverse events (AEs). Methods This was a retrospective cohort study of adults with NVAF or VTE who received a DOAC at FM or IM clinics between 10/19/2010 and 10/23/2014. Descriptive statistics were utilized for the primary aim. Fisher’s exact test was used to evaluate differences in prescribing using an adapted medication appropriateness index. Logistic regression evaluated factors associated with inappropriate use and AEs. Results One-hundred twenty patients were evaluated. At least 1 inappropriate criterion was met in 72 patients (60.0%). The most frequent inappropriate criteria were dosage (33.0%), duration of therapy (18.4%), and correct administration (18.0%). Apixaban was dosed inappropriately most frequently. There was no difference in dosing appropriateness between FM and IM clinics. The odds of inappropriate choice were lower with apixaban compared to other DOACs (odds ratio [OR]=0.088; 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.008–0.964; p=0.047). Twenty-seven patients (22.5%) experienced an AE while on a DOAC, and the odds of bleeding doubled with each inappropriate criterion met (OR=1.949; 95% CI 1.190–3.190; p=0.008). Conclusion Potentially inappropriate prescribing of DOACs is frequent with the most common errors being dosing, administration, and duration of therapy. These results underscore the importance of prescriber education regarding the appropriate use and management of DOACs. PMID:28331354

  9. Old and new oral anticoagulants: Food, herbal medicines and drug interactions.

    PubMed

    Di Minno, Alessandro; Frigerio, Beatrice; Spadarella, Gaia; Ravani, Alessio; Sansaro, Daniela; Amato, Mauro; Kitzmiller, Joseph P; Pepi, Mauro; Tremoli, Elena; Baldassarre, Damiano

    2017-02-05

    The most commonly prescribed oral anticoagulants worldwide are the vitamin K antagonists (VKAs) such as warfarin. Factors affecting the pharmacokinetics of VKAs are important because deviations from their narrow therapeutic window can result in bleedings due to over-anticoagulation or thrombosis because of under-anticoagulation. In addition to pharmacodynamic interactions (e.g., augmented bleeding risk for concomitant use of NSAIDs), interactions with drugs, foods, herbs, and over-the-counter medications may affect the risk/benefit ratio of VKAs. Direct oral anticoagulants (DOACs) including Factor Xa inhibitors (rivaroxaban, apixaban and edoxaban) and thrombin inhibitor (dabigatran) are poised to replace warfarin. Phase-3 studies and real-world evaluations have established that the safety profile of DOACs is superior to those of VKAs. However, some pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic interactions are expected. Herein we present a critical review of VKAs and DOACs with focus on their potential for interactions with drugs, foods, herbs and over-the-counter medications.

  10. New oral anticoagulants in severe trauma patients: enemy at the gates?

    PubMed

    Egea-Guerrero, J J; Quintana Díaz, M

    2015-04-01

    The high incidence of trauma, especially in elderly people anticoagulated with new oral anticoagulants (NOAs), has become a major challenge, particularly in critical situations with life-threatening bleeding. Under these circumstances, urgent NOA reversion becomes mandatory. Prothrombin complex has become a frequent indication in critical situations in which rapid reversal of anticoagulation is needed and where the use of fresh frozen plasma is limited. This study offers our point of view regarding the usefulness of NOAs, not only in the prevention of cardioembolic events but also as regards their emergent reversion in cases of severe bleeding associated to trauma.

  11. [Efficacy and safety of oral anticoagulants in frail elderly patients with atrial fibrillation: an unsolved problem].

    PubMed

    Alboni, Paolo; Stucci, Nicola; Cojocaru, Elena; Ungar, Andrea

    2017-03-01

    At present, the efficacy and safety of anticoagulants, warfarin, or new oral anticoagulants in frail patients remain unknown, as these patients have largely been excluded from both randomized trials and "real-world" studies; as a result, the guidelines do not provide guidance for the management of this population. Frail patients with atrial fibrillation (AF) are significantly less likely to receive oral anticoagulants compared to their nonfrail counterparts; is that an expression of reasonable prudence or malpractice? In this regard, some aspects of physical frailty should be considered: (i) increased vulnerability to stressors, including pharmacological agents with potential severe adverse effects; (ii) frail elderly patients are at high risk of falls and, therefore, of severe traumatic hemorrhages on oral anticoagulation; (iii) frail patients are more likely to have complications during intercurrent affections, potentially responsible for hemorrhages. Prospective "real-world" studies including frail AF patients are necessary. Waiting for more evidence, the doubt whether to prescribe or not an oral anticoagulant to frail AF patients remains legitimate.

  12. Beyond warfarin: the new generation of oral anticoagulants and their implications for the management of dental patients.

    PubMed

    Firriolo, F John; Hupp, Wendy S

    2012-04-01

    Warfarin has been the primary anticoagulant drug used in the USA for more than 50 years. However, 2 novel types of oral anticoagulants have recently been approved for use in the USA. These are direct thrombin inhibitors (e.g., dabigatran etexilate) and factor Xa inhibitors (e.g., rivaroxaban). Dental health care providers may soon encounter patients who are being prescribed these medications. This article describes the pharmacologic properties and medical uses of these new oral anticoagulants. Also discussed are implications for the management of dental patients being treated with these new oral anticoagulants, including potential interactions with drugs commonly used or prescribed in the course of dental treatment.

  13. Improved anticoagulant effect of fucosylated chondroitin sulfate orally administered as gastro-resistant tablets.

    PubMed

    Fonseca, Roberto J C; Sucupira, Isabela D; Oliveira, Stephan Nicollas M C G; Santos, Gustavo R C; Mourão, Paulo A S

    2017-04-03

    Fucosylated chondroitin sulfate (FucCS) is a potent anticoagulant polysaccharide extracted from sea cucumber. Its anticoagulant activity is attributed to the presence of unique branches of sulfated fucose. Although this glycosaminoglycan exerts an antithrombotic effect following oral administration, high doses are necessary to achieve the maximum effect. The diminished activity of FucCS following oral administration is likely due to its degradation in the gastrointestinal tract and its limited ability to cross the intestinal cell membranes. The latter aspect is particularly difficult to overcome. However, gastro-resistant tablet formulation may help limit the degradation of FucCS in the gastrointestinal tract. In the present work, we found that the oral administration of FucCS as gastro-resistant tablets produces a more potent and prolonged anticoagulant effect compared with its administration as an aqueous solution, with no significant changes in the bleeding tendency or arterial blood pressure. Experiments using animal models of arterial thrombosis initiated by endothelial injury demonstrated that FucCS delivered as gastro-protective tablets produced a potent antithrombotic effect, whereas its aqueous solution was ineffective. However, there was no significant difference between the effects of FucCS delivered as gastro-resistant tablets or as aqueous solution in a venous thrombosis model, likely due to the high dose of thromboplastin used. New oral anticoagulants tested in these experimental models for comparison showed significantly increased bleeding tendencies. Our study provides a framework for developing effective oral anticoagulants based on sulfated polysaccharides from marine organisms. The present results suggest that FucCS is a promising oral anticoagulant.

  14. Trends in oral anticoagulant choice for acute stroke patients with nonvalvular atrial fibrillation in Japan: The SAMURAI‐NVAF Study

    PubMed Central

    Arihiro, Shoji; Todo, Kenichi; Yamagami, Hiroshi; Kimura, Kazumi; Furui, Eisuke; Terasaki, Tadashi; Shiokawa, Yoshiaki; Kamiyama, Kenji; Takizawa, Shunya; Okuda, Satoshi; Okada, Yasushi; Kameda, Tomoaki; Nagakane, Yoshinari; Hasegawa, Yasuhiro; Mochizuki, Hiroshi; Ito, Yasuhiro; Nakashima, Takahiro; Takamatsu, Kazuhiro; Nishiyama, Kazutoshi; Kario, Kazuomi; Sato, Shoichiro; Koga, Masatoshi; Nagatsuka, K; Minematsu, K; Nakagawara, J; Akiyama, H; Shibazaki, K; Maeda, K; Shibuya, S; Yoshimura, S; Endo, K; Miyagi, T; Osaki, M; Kobayashi, J; Okata, T; Tanaka, E; Sakamoto, Y; Takizawa, H; Takasugi, J; Tokunaga, K; Homma, K; Kinoshita, N; Matsuki, T; Higashida, K; Shiozawa, M; Kanai, H; Uehara, S

    2015-01-01

    Background Large clinical trials are lack of data on non‐vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants for acute stroke patients. Aim To evaluate the choice of oral anticoagulants at acute hospital discharge in stroke patients with nonvalvular atrial fibrillation and clarify the underlying characteristics potentially affecting that choice using the multicenter Stroke Acute Management with Urgent Risk‐factor Assessment and Improvement‐NVAF registry (ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01581502). Method The study included 1192 acute ischemic stroke/transient ischemic attack patients with nonvalvular atrial fibrillation (527 women, 77·7 ± 9·9 years old) between September 2011 and March 2014, during which three nonvitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulant oral anticoagulants were approved for clinical use. Oral anticoagulant choice at hospital discharge (median 23‐day stay) was assessed. Results Warfarin was chosen for 650 patients, dabigatran for 203, rivaroxaban for 238, and apixaban for 25. Over the three 10‐month observation periods, patients taking warfarin gradually decreased to 46·5% and those taking nonvitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants increased to 48·0%. As compared with warfarin users, patients taking nonvitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants included more men, were younger, more frequently had small infarcts, and had lower scores for poststroke CHADS 2, CHA 2 DS 2‐VASc, and HAS‐BLED, admission National Institutes of Health stroke scale, and discharge modified Rankin Scale. Nonvitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants were started at a median of four‐days after stroke onset without early intracranial hemorrhage. Patients starting nonvitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants earlier had smaller infarcts and lower scores for the admission National Institutes of Health stroke scale and the discharge modified Rankin Scale than those starting later. Choice of nonvitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants was independently associated with 20‐day or

  15. Direct oral anticoagulants: key considerations for use to prevent stroke in patients with nonvalvular atrial fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    Ment, Jerome

    2015-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common cardiac arrhythmia worldwide. Strokes that occur as a complication of AF are usually more severe and associated with a higher disability or morbidity and mortality rate compared with non-AF-related strokes. The risk of stroke in AF is dependent on several risk factors; AF itself acts as an independent risk factor for stroke. The combination of effective anticoagulation therapy, risk stratification (based on stroke risk scores, such as CHADS2 and CHA2DS2-VASc), and recommendations provided by guidelines is essential for decreasing the risk of stroke in patients with AF. Although effective in preventing the occurrence of stroke, vitamin K antagonists (VKAs; eg, warfarin) are associated with several limitations. Therefore, direct oral anticoagulants, such as apixaban, dabigatran etexilate, edoxaban, and rivaroxaban, have emerged as an alternative to the VKAs for stroke prevention in patients with nonvalvular AF. Compared with the VKAs, these agents have more favorable pharmacological characteristics and, unlike the VKAs, they are given at fixed doses without the need for routine coagulation monitoring. It remains important that physicians use these direct oral anticoagulants responsibly to ensure optimal safety and effectiveness. This article provides an overview of the existing data on the direct oral anticoagulants, focusing on management protocols for aiding physicians to optimize anticoagulant therapy in patients with nonvalvular AF, particularly in special patient populations (eg, those with renal impairment) and other specific clinical situations. PMID:26089678

  16. Direct oral anticoagulants: key considerations for use to prevent stroke in patients with nonvalvular atrial fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Ment, Jerome

    2015-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common cardiac arrhythmia worldwide. Strokes that occur as a complication of AF are usually more severe and associated with a higher disability or morbidity and mortality rate compared with non-AF-related strokes. The risk of stroke in AF is dependent on several risk factors; AF itself acts as an independent risk factor for stroke. The combination of effective anticoagulation therapy, risk stratification (based on stroke risk scores, such as CHADS2 and CHA2DS2-VASc), and recommendations provided by guidelines is essential for decreasing the risk of stroke in patients with AF. Although effective in preventing the occurrence of stroke, vitamin K antagonists (VKAs; e.g., warfarin) are associated with several limitations. Therefore, direct oral anticoagulants, such as apixaban, dabigatran etexilate, edoxaban, and rivaroxaban, have emerged as an alternative to the VKAs for stroke prevention in patients with nonvalvular AF. Compared with the VKAs, these agents have more favorable pharmacological characteristics and, unlike the VKAs, they are given at fixed doses without the need for routine coagulation monitoring. It remains important that physicians use these direct oral anticoagulants responsibly to ensure optimal safety and effectiveness. This article provides an overview of the existing data on the direct oral anticoagulants, focusing on management protocols for aiding physicians to optimize anticoagulant therapy in patients with nonvalvular AF, particularly in special patient populations (e.g., those with renal impairment) and other specific clinical situations.

  17. Antithrombotic management in patients with percutaneous coronary intervention requiring oral anticoagulation

    PubMed Central

    Undas, Anetta

    2016-01-01

    The dynamic evolution of therapeutic options including the use of vitamin K antagonists (VKA), non-vitamin K oral anticoagulants (NOAC), more potent antiplatelet drugs as well as new generation drug-eluting stents could lead to the view that the current recommendations on the management of patients with percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) requiring oral anticoagulation do not keep up with the results of several clinical studies published within the last 5 years. In the present overview, we summarize the recent advances in antithrombotic management used in atrial fibrillation patients undergoing PCI for stable coronary artery disease or acute coronary syndrome (ACS). The safety and efficacy of prasugrel and ticagrelor taken with oral anticoagulants also remain to be established in randomized trials; therefore the P2Y12 inhibitor clopidogrel on top of aspirin or without is now recommended to be used together with a VKA or NOAC. It is still unclear which dose of a NOAC in combination with antiplatelet agents and different stents should be used in this clinical setting and whether indeed NOAC are safer compared with VKA in such cardiovascular patients. Moreover, we discuss the use of anticoagulation in addition to antiplatelet therapy for secondary prevention in patients with ACS. To minimize bleeding risk in anticoagulated patients following PCI or ACS, the right agent should be prescribed to the right patient at the right dose and supported by regular clinical evaluation and laboratory testing, especially assessment of renal function when a NOAC is used. PMID:27980542

  18. Trials of Novel Oral Anticoagulants for Stroke Prevention In Patients with Non-valvular Atrial Fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    Halperin, Jonathan L; Dorian, Paul

    2014-01-01

    Patients with non-valvular atrial fibrillation (AF) face an increased risk of stroke compared with those in normal sinus rhythm. The vitamin K antagonist warfarin, available for over half a century, is highly effective in reducing the risk of stroke in patients with AF, but it is a difficult drug to use properly. As a result, it is challenging to keep the anticoagulant effect of warfarin in the desired range. Newer oral anticoagulants (NOACs) that directly inhibit Factor IIa (thrombin) or Factor Xa provide reliable anticoagulation when administer in fixed oral doses without routine coagulation monitoring. This manuscript will review in detail the pivotal trials of these NOACs that led to their approval as well as comment on the factors that should influence their selection. PMID:24821657

  19. Use of novel oral anticoagulants for patients with atrial fibrillation: systematic review and clinical implications.

    PubMed

    Albert, Nancy M

    2014-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF), a common arrhythmia, increases the risk of ischemic stroke. Stroke and bleeding scores for patients with AF can help to stratify risk and determine the need for antithrombotic therapy, for which warfarin has been the gold standard. Although highly effective, warfarin has several limitations that can lead to its underuse. Data from randomized, Phase III clinical trials of the novel oral anticoagulants, dabigatran, a direct thrombin inhibitor, and rivaroxaban and apixaban, both factor Xa inhibitors, indicate these drugs are at least noninferior to warfarin for the prevention of stroke and systemic embolism. They are easier to administer, and have an equivalent or lower risk of bleeding versus warfarin. A better understanding of the risks and benefits of the novel oral anticoagulants, and their use in clinical practice, will prepare clinicians to anticipate and address educational and clinical needs of AF patients and their families, and promote evidence-based prescription of appropriate and safe anticoagulation therapy.

  20. [Perioperative management of direct oral anticoagulant in emergency surgery and bleeding. Haemostasis monitoring and treatment].

    PubMed

    Hidalgo, F; Gómez-Luque, A; Ferrandis, R; Llau, J V; de Andrés, J; Gomar, C; Sierra, P; Castillo, J; Torres, L M

    2015-10-01

    There is an almost unanimous consensus on the management of the direct new oral anticoagulants, dabigatran, rivaroxaban, and apixaban in elective surgery. However, this general consensus does not exist in relation with the direct new oral anticoagulants use in emergency surgery, especially in the bleeding patient. For this reason, a literature review was performed using the MEDLINE-PubMed. An analysis was made of the journal articles, reviews, systematic reviews, and practices guidelines published between 2000 and 2014 using the terms "monitoring" and "reversal". From this review, it was shown that the routine tests of blood coagulation, such as the prothrombin time and activated partial thromboplastin time, have a limited efficacy in the perioperative control of blood coagulation in these patients. There is currently no antidote to reverse the effects of these drugs, although the possibility of using concentrated prothrombin complex and recombinant activated factor vii has been suggested for the urgent reversal of the anticoagulant effect.

  1. Treatment Changes among Users of Non-Vitamin K Antagonist Oral Anticoagulants in Atrial Fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Hellfritzsch, Maja; Husted, Steen Elkjaer; Grove, Erik Lerkevang; Rasmussen, Lotte; Poulsen, Birgitte Klindt; Johnsen, Søren Paaske; Hallas, Jesper; Pottegård, Anton

    2017-02-01

    Patients with atrial fibrillation discontinuing anticoagulant therapy are left unprotected against ischaemic stroke. Further, switching between oral anticoagulants may be associated with a transiently increased risk of bleeding or thromboembolism. However, there is a paucity of real-life data on pattern of switching and discontinuation of oral anticoagulants. To address this, we conducted a nationwide drug utilization study including all registered Danish atrial fibrillation patients initiating a non-VKA oral anticoagulant (NOAC) between August 2011 and February 2016. We assessed changes in anticoagulant treatment, including switching between oral anticoagulants and discontinuation of NOACs, and explored patient characteristics predicting these changes. We identified 50,632 patients with atrial fibrillation initiating NOAC therapy within the study period. The majority initiated dabigatran (49.9%) and one-third had previously used VKA. Within 1 year, 10.1% switched to VKA, 4.8% switched to another NOAC and 14.4% discontinued treatment. The frequencies of switching to VKA and discontinuation were highest among NOAC users of young age (<55 years) and with low CHA2 DS2 -VASc score (=0). However, the majority of patients (87.3%) stopping NOAC treatment had a CHA2 DS2 -VASc score ≥1. We conclude that switching from VKA to NOAC, and to a lesser extent from NOAC to VKA, is common, as is early treatment discontinuation. The majority of treatment changes are observed in patients at increased risk of stroke. More research is warranted on the risks of bleeding and thromboembolism associated with switching and discontinuation of NOACs as well as the underlying reasons why these treatment changes occur.

  2. [Prophylaxis of thromboembolism in atrial fibrillation: new oral anticoagulants and left atrial appendage closure].

    PubMed

    Zeus, Tobias; Kelm, Malte; Bode, Christoph

    2015-08-01

    Thrombo-embolic prophylaxis is a key element within the therapy of atrial fibrillation/atrial flutter. Besides new oral anticoagulants the concept of left atrial appendage occlusion has approved to be a good alternative option, especially in patients with increased risk of bleeding.

  3. Guidelines for the management of patients on oral anticoagulants requiring dental surgery.

    PubMed

    Perry, D J; Noakes, T J C; Helliwell, P S

    2007-10-13

    The objective of these guidelines is to provide healthcare professionals, including primary care dental practitioners, with clear guidance on the management of patients on oral anticoagulants requiring dental surgery. The guidance may not be appropriate in all cases and individual patient circumstances may dictate an alternative approach.

  4. Novel oral anticoagulants for stroke prevention in patients with atrial fibrillation: dawn of a new era.

    PubMed

    Contractor, Tahmeed; Levin, Vadim; Martinez, Matthew W; Marchlinski, Francis E

    2013-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is an important cause of ischemic stroke and is the underlying cause of > 20% of all strokes, with increasing age being a risk factor. Until recently, warfarin was the only available oral anticoagulant used to decrease this risk in patients with AF. However, there are several disadvantages of warfarin use, such as the requirement for monitoring the international normalized ratio, its wide range of drug-food interactions, and its narrow therapeutic index. Thus, there has been a strong impetus for the development of newer oral anticoagulants with predictable pharmacokinetics that obviate the need for monitoring the international normalized ratio. The US Food and Drug Administration has approved a direct thrombin inhibitor (dabigatran) and 2 factor Xa inhibitors (rivaroxaban and apixaban) for stroke prevention in patients with nonvalvular AF. There are several other new oral anticoagulant agents on the horizon, including the factor Xa inhibitor edoxaban. This review article discusses the pharmacological properties, clinical trial data, and practical issues associated with the use of these novel oral anticoagulants.

  5. Dental Procedures in Patients with Atrial Fibrillation and New Oral Anticoagulants

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    This review discusses the basic pharmacology of new oral anticoagulants that are used for prevention of thromboembolism in patients with atrial fibrillation. It presents available evidence, and provides recommendations for the management of patients requiring invasive procedures in dental practice. PMID:26835072

  6. Oral surgery for patients on anticoagulant therapy: current thoughts on patient management.

    PubMed

    Doonquah, Ladi; Mitchell, Anika D

    2012-01-01

    Minor oral surgical procedures make up a significant part of the daily practice of dentistry. With the increased sophistication of medical technology and medications there is increased likelihood of performing surgery on patients who are being treated for conditions that require some type of anticoagulant therapy. These patients are at an increased risk for perioperative bleeding or thrombotic complications if anticoagulation is discontinued or the dosage is adjusted. Therefore, a fine balance needs to be obtained and adequate preparation of these patients is the key to establishing this balance. This article reviews suggested approaches to the management of such patients.

  7. Use of novel oral anticoagulant agents in atrial fibrillation: current evidence and future perspective

    PubMed Central

    Madan, Shivanshu; Shah, Shenil; Partovi, Sasan

    2014-01-01

    The increasing availability of novel oral anticoagulants (NOAC) for the prevention of stroke and systemic embolism in patients with nonvalvular atrial fibrillation (AF) offers alternatives for patients currently prescribed warfarin. This article provides a brief overview on the mechanism and clinical use of these drugs as well as a review of the pivotal clinical trials providing the basis for each agent’s safety and efficacy. While these agents are currently Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved for anticoagulation of patients with nonvalvular AF, additional studies continually emerge offering further insight into the application of these agents in other areas. PMID:25276617

  8. New oral anticoagulants: discussion on monitoring and adherence should start now!

    PubMed

    Ten Cate, Hugo

    2013-06-28

    New oral anticoagulants (NOACs) have been introduced to improve anticoagulant therapy worldwide, but safe implementation may require additional measures. First, optimization of dose adjustment based on therapeutic levels of the drug may be more appropriate than fixed dose therapy. The development and implementation in quantitative laboratory assays will enable further dose optimization. Second, non-adherence to medication is a potential threat to the safe use of NOACs. Since cardiovascular medication may not be optimally used in about 50% of patients, procedures to improve adherence are imperative, also for NOAC therapy and in particular in elderly patients.

  9. Novel oral anticoagulants for stroke prevention in atrial fibrillation: focus on apixaban.

    PubMed

    Potpara, Tatjana S; Polovina, Marija M; Licina, Marina M; Stojanovic, Radan M; Prostran, Milica S; Lip, Gregory Y H

    2012-06-01

    Stroke prevention in atrial fibrillation (AF) has been challenging over decades, mostly due to a number of difficulties associated with oral vitamin K antagonists (VKAs), which have been the most effective stroke prevention treatment for a long time. The oral direct thrombin inhibitors (e.g., dabigatran) and oral direct inhibitors of factor Xa (e.g., rivaroxaban, apixaban) have emerged recently as an alternative to VKAs for stroke prevention in AF. These drugs act rapidly, and have a predictable and stable dose-related anticoagulant effect with a few clinically relevant drug-drug interactions. The novel oral anticoagulants are used in fixed doses with no need for regular laboratory monitoring of anticoagulation intensity. However, each of these drugs has distinct pharmacological properties that could influence optimal use in clinical practice. The following phase 3 randomized trials with novel oral anticoagulants versus warfarin for stroke prevention in AF have been completed: the Randomized Evaluation of Long-term Anticoagulant therapy (RE-LY) trial with dabigatran, the Rivaroxaban Once daily oral direct Factor Xa inhibition Compared with vitamin K antagonism for prevention of stroke and Embolism Trial in Atrial Fibrillation (ROCKET-AF) trial with rivaroxaban, and the Apixaban for Reduction of Stroke and Other Thromboembolism Events in Atrial Fibrillation (ARISTOTLE) trial with apixaban. Moreover, the Apixaban Versus Acetylsalicylic Acid to prevent Strokes (AVERROES) trial included patients with AF who have failed or were unsuitable for warfarin, and compared apixaban versus aspirin for stroke prevention in AF. Overall, apixaban has two large trials for stroke prevention in AF showing benefits not only over warfarin, but also over aspirin among those patients who have failed or refused warfarin. In the ARISTOTLE trial, apixaban was superior to warfarin in the reduction of stroke or systemic embolism, major bleeding, intracranial hemorrhage, and all-cause mortality

  10. Prescribing trends of atrial fibrillation patients who switched from warfarin to a direct oral anticoagulant.

    PubMed

    Hale, Zachary D; Kong, Xiowen; Haymart, Brian; Gu, Xiaokui; Kline-Rogers, Eva; Almany, Steve; Kozlowski, Jay; Krol, Gregory D; Kaatz, Scott; Froehlich, James B; Barnes, Geoffrey D

    2017-02-01

    Direct oral anticoagulant (DOAC) agents offer several lifestyle and therapeutic advantages for patients relative to warfarin in the treatment of atrial fibrillation (AF). These alternative agents are increasingly used in the treatment of AF, however the adoption practices, patient profiles, and reasons for switching to a DOAC from warfarin have not been well studied. Through the Michigan Anticoagulation Quality Improvement Initiative, abstracted data from 3873 AF patients, enrolled between 2010 and 2015, were collected on demographics and comorbid conditions, stroke and bleeding risk scores, and reasons for anticoagulant switching. Over the study period, patients who switched from warfarin to a DOAC had similar baseline characteristics, risk scores, and insurance status but differed in baseline CrCl. The most common reasons for switching were patient related ease of use concerns (37.5%) as opposed to clinical reasons (16.5% of patients). Only 13% of patients that switched to a DOAC switched back to warfarin by the end of the study period.

  11. Tooth Extraction in Patients on Oral Anticoagulants: Prospective Study Conducted in 108 Brazilian Patients

    PubMed Central

    Pereira, Claudio Maranhão; Gasparetto, Patrícia Freire; Carneiro, Danilo Santos; Corrêa, Maria Elvira P.; Souza, Cármino Antônio

    2011-01-01

    Introduction. Dental treatment performed in patients receiving continuous oral anticoagulant drug therapy is becoming increasingly common in dental offices. For these patients it is imperative to carry out careful anamnesis, as well as a multiprofessional clinical evaluation with regard to the risk and control of hemorrhagic or thromboembolic episodes. Objectives and Material and Methods. The aim is to evaluate postextraction hemorrhagic or thromboembolic episodes in patients who have been on anticoagulant medications for an uninterrupted period of 48 months. Results. Among the 108 patients evaluated, 215 extractions were performed in which there was only one case of postoperative bleeding. Warfarin was used by 98 patients; Warfarin associated with salicylic acetic acid by 9 patients and salicylic acetic acid in only 1 patient. As regards the serologic tests performed, International Normalized Ratio (INR) ranged from 0.8 to 4.9, with a mean of 3.15. Conclusion. Extractions in patients on oral anticoagulants must be performed in the least traumatic manner possible. It is not necessary to stop anticoagulant therapy to perform extractions. Local hemostasis techniques, such as obliterative sutures alone are sufficient to prevent hemorrhagic complications. PMID:21991458

  12. Minimizing bleeding risk in patients receiving direct oral anticoagulants for stroke prevention

    PubMed Central

    Habert, Jeffrey Steven

    2016-01-01

    Many primary care physicians are wary about using direct oral anticoagulants (DOACs) in patients with nonvalvular atrial fibrillation (AF). Factors such as comorbidities, concomitant medications, and alcohol misuse increase concerns over bleeding risk, especially in elderly and frail patients with AF. This article discusses strategies to minimize the risk of major bleeding events in patients with AF who may benefit from oral anticoagulant therapy for stroke prevention. The potential benefits of the DOACs compared with vitamin K antagonists, in terms of a lower risk of intracranial hemorrhage, are discussed, together with the identification of reversible risk factors for bleeding and correct dose selection of the DOACs based on a patient’s characteristics and concomitant medications. Current bleeding management strategies, including the new reversal agents for the DOACs and the prevention of bleeding during preoperative anticoagulation treatment, in addition to health care resource use associated with anticoagulation treatment and bleeding, are also discussed. Implementing a structured approach at an individual patient level will minimize the overall risk of bleeding and should increase physician confidence in using the DOACs for stroke prevention in their patients with nonvalvular AF. PMID:27785089

  13. [Factors influencing activity of oral anticoagulants. Interactions with drugs and food].

    PubMed

    Sawicka-Powierza, Jolanta; Rogowska-Szadkowska, Dorota; Ołtarzewska, Alicja Małgorzata; Chlabicz, Sławomir

    2008-05-01

    Oral anticoagulants (OAC) are commonly used as a life-long therapy in prevention of systemic embolism in patients with atrial fibrillation, valvular heart disease and prosthetic hart valves and in the primary and secondary prevention of venous thromboembolism. They are also used for the prevention of thromboembolic events in patients with acute myocardial infarction and with angina pectoris, in patients with biological hart valves and after some types of orthopaedics surgery. The International Normalized Ratio (INR) is used to evaluate the efficacy of anti-coagulant therapy. The risk of thromboembolic and haemorrhagic complications increases when the INR is out of the therapeutic range. The aim of this study was to present information about the factors influencing activity of oral anticoagulants and interactions between oral anticoagulants and drugs or food. The effect of oral anticoagulants is influenced by genetic and environmental factors such as: medicines, food, diseases and pre-existing conditions. A common mutation in the gene coding for the cytochrome P450 (CYP2C9), with one or more combinations of its polymorphisms, is responsible for the reduced warfarin requirements or for the resistance to warfarin. A mutation in the factor IX is responsible for the risk of bleeding during OAC therapy without excessive prolongation of the prothrombin time (PT). Drugs, herbs and multivitamin supplements can alter the absorption, pharmacokinetics or pharmakodynamics of OAC. Nonsteroid anti-inflammatory drugs and paracetamol in combination with OAC seem to be the most dangerous because they are available without prescription and are used without medical consultation. Patients on OAC therapy are sensitive to changing dietary intake of vitamin K, which is supplied from phylloquinones in plants or from vitamin K-containing medicines. The effect of OAC can be influenced by other existing factors like: fever, diarrhoea, alcohol abuse or physical hyperactivity. Some malignancies

  14. Oral anticoagulation to reduce risk of stroke in patients with atrial fibrillation: current and future therapies.

    PubMed

    Amin, Alpesh

    2013-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is associated with an increased incidence and severity of strokes. The burden of AF-related stroke is expected to increase in parallel with the aging of the population. Oral anticoagulation with warfarin has been the pharmacologic standard for stroke risk reduction in patients with AF. When used with close attention to dosing and monitoring, warfarin is effective prophylactic therapy against thromboembolic stroke. However, it is underused by physicians, in part because of the known risks of adverse events with warfarin. Consequently, many patients with AF live with an avoidably elevated risk of stroke. New options, ie, oral anticoagulants with novel mechanisms of action, have recently been approved to reduce the risk of stroke in AF, and others are in development. These newer agents may address some of the complexities of warfarin use while providing similar or better efficacy and safety.

  15. [Non-vitamin K dependent oral anticoagulants : What is important in intensive care medicine].

    PubMed

    Gulba, D C; Broscaru, L

    2017-03-01

    Since first used in 2009, non-vitamin K oral anticoagulants (NOAC) have gained world-wide acceptance. Two groups of NOAC are currently used: the direct thrombin antagonist dabigatran and three direct factor  Xa antagonists apixaban, edoxaban, and ricaroxaban. With their increasing use for prevention of thromboembolism, the probability increases that NOAC-pretreated patients are admitted to emergency departments or intensive care units.The clinical challenge in NOAC preanticoagulated patients is to adequately cope with the given anticoagulated status of such patients. Because of their short half-life, many patients will be adequately treated with a "wait and see" approach, and surgeries and interventions are postponed until anticoagulant activities have totally subsided. In the few cases where immediate action is mandated, based on appropriate risk assessments it can be decided either to take the increased hemorrhagic risk of early intervention or to transfuse factor concentrates like PPSB or FEIBA which can safely reverse the anticoagulant activities of the three factor Xa antagonists (and potentially also of dabigatran). Recently a humanized Fab antibody fragment for dabigatran, idarucizumab, has been introduced onto the market, that can immediately reverse the anticoagulant effects of dabigatran. For the reversal of dabigatran, idarucizumab is therefore the drug of choice.In addition, in some specific indications of emergency and intensive care medicine, the primary use of a NOAC can be considered advantageous. Such indications are early cardioversion in patients admitted for new episodes of atrial fibrillation and patients with acute pulmonary embolism. For the widespread use of low-molecular-weight heparins in such indications, however, the decision to use a NOAC for anticoagulant therapy is frequently postponed to the treatment phase when the stabilized patient is already treated on the general ward.

  16. [Acute coronary syndrome: Is there a place for direct oral anticoagulants?

    PubMed

    Cayla, Guillaume; Leclercq, Florence; Schmutz, Laurent; Cornillet, Luc; Ledermann, Bertrand; Messner, Patrick; Lattuca, Benoit

    2016-10-01

    Venous thromboembolism and atrial fibrillation are two important indications of direct oral anticoagulants. Acute coronary syndrome is another potential indication of prolonged antithrombotic therapy in addition to antiplatelet therapy. Phase 2 and 3 studies were conducted with different molecules at different doses in acute coronary syndrome in addition to dual antiplatelet therapy. Studies have not shown a reduction of ischemic events for dabigatran and apixaban, but an excess of bleeding complications was observed. A reduction of ischemic events and stent thrombosis was observed with low dose of rivaroxaban taken twice a day but with an increased risk of major bleeding complications. This data was used to obtain a European marketing authorization but the positioning of the molecule remains difficult. A new study is currently being conducted to test rivaroxaban in association with a P2Y12 inhibitor without aspirin. Direct oral anticoagulants can also be used after percutaneous coronary intervention in patients requiring long-term oral anticoagulants. Dedicated studies are currently being conducted to confirm the optimal doses and the ideal association of antithrombotic drugs.

  17. Periodontal and biochemical bone metabolism assessment on a chronic oral anticoagulation population treated with dicoumarins

    PubMed Central

    López-Lacomba, Daniel; Roa-López, Antonio; González-Jaranay, Maximino; Gómez-Moreno, Gerardo

    2017-01-01

    Background The aim is to evaluate periodontal alteration and biochemical markers associated with bone turnover in chronic oral with dicoumarins anticoagulant treatment patients. Material and Methods 80 patients treated with oral anticoagulants were divided into 2 cohort: Group A (n=36) 6 month to 1 year with anticoagulant treatment and Group B (n=44) > 2 years with anticoagulant treatment. Clinical evaluation included: Clinical attachment level (CAL), plaque index (PI) and gingival index (GI). Analytically biochemical parameters of bone remodeling (calcium and phosphorus), formation (total acid phosphatase, alkaline phosphatase and osteocalcin) and resorption (tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase and beta-crosslaps) were evaluated. Results High values of PI (67-100%) especially in men and in Group B were observed. Men with anticoagulation treatment length showed an increased GI (49.167 vs 78.083) while Group B women showed a decreased GI in comparison with Group A (59.389 vs 42.120). Women presented a greater average CAL than men as well as Group B vs Group A but without statistical significance. All biochemical markers were decreased respect to values of general population. Osteocalcin in GroupB women showed a statistically significant outcome vs GroupA (p=0.004). Acid phosphatase (total and tartrate-resistant) has a slight increase in Group B women versus Group A, and Beta-crosslap showed lower values in Group A men than Group B and slightly lower in Group A women versus Group B, without statistical significance. Conclusions Patients showed a slight to moderate degree of periodontal affectation, especially gingivitis related to bacterial plaque. Periodontal disorders tended to be more severe in Group B. While bone remodeling showed an overall decrease with greater affectation of bone neoformation phenomena, bone destruction tended to recover and normalize in time. Key words:Periodontal disease, dicoumarin, biochemical markers, bone remodeling. PMID:28160591

  18. Dabigatran: A new oral anticoagulant. Guidelines to follow in oral surgery procedures. A systematic review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Ramírez-Martínez-Acitores, Lucía; López-Pintor, Rosa Mª; Casañas-Gil, Elisabeth; Hernández-Vallejo, Gonzalo

    2016-01-01

    Background Dabigatran is a newly commercialized drug that is replacing other anticoagulants in the prevention of venous thromboembolism, stroke and systemic arterial valve embolism. It acts directly on thrombin presenting in a dynamic and predictable way, which does not require monitoring these patients. Therefore, we consider the need to assess whether their use increases the risk of bleeding involved before any dental treatment. Material and Methods We performed a systematic review with a bibliographic search in PubMed/Medline along with the Cochrane Library. We excluded articles dealing with all anticoagulants other than dabigatran, and works about surgical treatments in anatomical locations other than the oral cavity. Results We included a total of 13 papers of which 1 was a randomized clinical trial, 9 narrative literature reviews, 1 case series, 2 clinical cases and 1 expert opinion. Because we did not obtain any properly designed clinical trials, we were unable to conduct a meta-analysis. Conclusions Currently, there is no consensus on the procedure to be followed in patients taking dabigatran. However, all authors agree to treat each case individually in accordance to the risk of embolism, postoperative bleeding and renal function. Also, it is necessary to perform minimally invasive interventions, and take the appropriate local anti-hemolytic measures. Key words:Oral anticoagulants, dabigatran, risk of bleeding, oral surgery, dentistry. PMID:27694780

  19. [Restraints to anticoagulation prescription in atrial fibrillation and attitude towards the new oral anticoagulants].

    PubMed

    Pereira-Da-Silva, Tiago; Souto Moura, Teresa; Azevedo, Luísa; Sá Pereira, Margarida; Virella, Daniel; Alves, Marta; Borges, Luís

    2013-01-01

    Introdução e Objetivos: Avaliar a taxa de prescrição de anticoagulantes orais na fibrilhação auricular, os fatores associados à não prescrição, os motivos referidos pelos clínicos para não prescrição de anticoagulantes incluindo os de nova geração e realizar estudo evolutivo a médio prazo. Material e Métodos: Estudo prospetivo sobre casos consecutivos de doentes com fibrilhação auricular com alta hospitalar. Registaram- se os scores CHA2DS2VASc e HASBLED, comorbilidades associadas e a medicação prévia e à data de alta. Na alta hospitalar, o médico assistente indicou em questionário o motivo de não prescrição de anticoagulantes orais e dos novos anticoagulantes orais. Exclusão: contra-indicação absoluta para anticoagulação, CHA2DS2VASc ≤ 1 e doença valvular. Os doentes foram reavaliados um ano após o recrutamento do primeiro doente. Resultados: Identificaram-se 103 candidatos a anticoagulação oral (79,6 ± 8,0 anos; CHA2DS2VASc 5,8 ± 1,4; HASBLED 2,6 ± 1,0; HASBLED ≥ 3 em 55,3%); os anticoagulantes foram prescritos em 34,0%. Fatores associados à não prescrição por ordem decrescente de relevância: uso prévio de antiagregantes, doente acamado e/ou demente, ausência de insuficiência cardíaca e número de fatores de risco hemorrágico. Razões invocadas para não prescrição por ordem decrescente de frequência: risco hemorrágico elevado, pequeno benefício, incapacidade de seguir o esquema terapêutico e dificuldade na monitorização da razão normalizada internacional (INR). Os novos anticoagulantes não foram prescritos e as razões invocadas foram, por ordem decrescente de frequência: informação insuficiente sobre estes fármacos, risco hemorrágico elevado, custo elevado e pequeno benefício. Aos 8,2 ± 2,5 meses de estudo evolutivo 33,3% dos doentes encontravam-se sob anticoagulação sem que os novos anticoagulantes tivessem sido prescritos. Conclusões: Nesta amostra, a taxa de prescrição de

  20. Pharmacology of antithrombotic drugs: an assessment of oral antiplatelet and anticoagulant treatments.

    PubMed

    Mega, Jessica L; Simon, Tabassome

    2015-07-18

    Antithrombotic drugs, which include antiplatelet and anticoagulant therapies, prevent and treat many cardiovascular disorders and, as such, are some of the most commonly prescribed drugs worldwide. The first drugs designed to inhibit platelets or coagulation factors, such as the antiplatelet clopidogrel and the anticoagulant warfarin, significantly reduced the risk of thrombotic events at the cost of increased bleeding in patients. However, both clopidogrel and warfarin have some pharmacological limitations including interpatient variability in antithrombotic effects in part due to the metabolism, interactions (eg, drug, environment, and genetic), or targets of the drugs. Increased knowledge of the pharmacology of antithrombotic drugs and the mechanisms underlying thrombosis has led to the development of newer drugs with faster onset of action, fewer interactions, and less interpatient variability in their antithrombotic effects than previous antithrombotic drugs. Treatment options now include the next-generation antiplatelet drugs prasugrel and ticagrelor, and, in terms of anticoagulants, inhibitors that directly target factor IIa (dabigatran) or Xa (rivaroxaban, apixaban, edoxaban) are available. In this Series paper we review the pharmacological properties of these most commonly used oral antithrombotic drugs, and explore the development of antiplatelet and anticoagulant therapies.

  1. Recent advances in the development of specific antidotes for target-specific oral anticoagulants.

    PubMed

    Mo, Yoonsun; Yam, Felix K

    2015-02-01

    Warfarin, a vitamin K antagonist, has been the only orally available anticoagulant for > 60 years. During the past decade, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration has approved several target-specific oral anticoagulants (TSOACs) for the prophylaxis and treatment of arterial and venous thromboembolism and stroke prevention in patients with nonvalvular atrial fibrillation. These new agents have several advantages over warfarin including more predictable pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics, fewer food and drug interactions, and lack of need for routine coagulation monitoring. However, unlike warfarin, currently no antidotes are available to reverse the anticoagulant effect of TSOACs. Specific antidotes for TSOACs may not be needed in most situations due to their short half-life, yet the absence of antidotes for these agents is a concern, especially in emergent situations such as life-threatening major bleeding or nonelective major surgery. Several specific antidotes for TSOACs including idarucizumab, andexanet alfa, and aripazine have been developed and have shown promise in early clinical trials evaluating their efficacy and safety. In this narrative review, the progress made in developing specific antidotes for TSOACs is summarized based on the latest available preclinical and clinical data.

  2. Pharmacokinetics of eight anticoagulant rodenticides in mice after single oral administration.

    PubMed

    Vandenbroucke, V; Bousquet-Melou, A; De Backer, P; Croubels, S

    2008-10-01

    The first aim of the study was to investigate the pharmacokinetics of eight anticoagulant rodenticides (brodifacoum, bromadiolone, chlorophacinone, coumatetralyl, difenacoum, difethialone, flocoumafen and warfarin) in plasma and liver of the mouse after single oral administration. Eight groups of mice dosed orally with a different anticoagulant rodenticide in a dose equal to one-half the lethal dose 50 (LD(50)), were killed at various times up to 21 days after administration. The eight anticoagulant rodenticides were assayed in plasma and liver by an LC-ESI-MS/MS method. Depending on the compound, the limit of quantification was set at 1 or 5 ng/mL in plasma. In liver, the limit of quantification was set at 250 ng/g for coumatetralyl and warfarin and at 100 ng/g for the other compounds. The elimination half-lives in plasma for first-generation rodenticides were shorter than those for second-generation rodenticides. Coumatetralyl, a first-generation product, had a plasma elimination half-life of 0.52 days. Brodifacoum, a second-generation product, showed a plasma elimination half-life of 91.7 days. The elimination half-lives in liver varied from 15.8 days for coumatetralyl to 307.4 days for brodifacoum. The second aim of the study was to illustrate the applicability of the developed method in a clinical case of a dog suspected of rodenticide poisoning.

  3. Management of bleeding with oral anticoagulants in patients with atrial fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Bosch, J; Eikelboom, J W

    2015-01-01

    Fear of bleeding is a common barrier to the use of anticoagulants. Warfarin has been the only oral anticoagulant for more than 60 years and warfarin-related bleeding is reported to be the most common drug-related cause of emergency hospitalization in elderly Americans. Non-vitamin K oral antagonists were introduced five years ago and compared with warfarin are associated with lower risk of intracranial bleeding, and similar or lower case fatality after major bleeding. Despite their superior safety profile, serious bleeding can occur. Most bleeding can be managed with holding the drug, local measures to control the bleeding and transfusion support as required because the NOACs have a relatively short half life and their anticoagulant effect rapidly dissipates. In patients with ongoing bleeding despite supportive measures and in those with life-threatening bleeding, consideration may be given to the use of general hemostatic agents. Experimental and animal evidence suggests that 3 and 4 factor prothrombin complex concentrates can improve hemostasis in the presence of a NOAC and this is reinforced by anecdotal evidence in humans. Specific antidotes are currently in phase 3 trials and could become available in the near future.

  4. Effective management of venous thromboembolism in the community: non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Raj

    2016-01-01

    Anticoagulation therapy is essential for the effective treatment and secondary prevention of venous thromboembolism (VTE). For many years, anticoagulation for acute VTE was limited to the use of initial parenteral heparin, overlapping with and followed by a vitamin K antagonist. Although highly effective, this regimen has several limitations and is particularly challenging when given in an ambulatory setting. Current treatment pathways for most patients with deep-vein thrombosis typically involve initial hospital or community-based ambulatory care with subsequent follow-up in a secondary care setting. With the introduction of non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants (NOACs) into routine clinical practice, it is now possible for the initial acute management of patients with deep-vein thrombosis to be undertaken by primary care. As hospital admissions associated with VTE become shorter, primary care will play an increasingly important role in the long-term management of these patients. Although the NOACs can potentially simplify patient management and improve clinical outcomes, primary care physicians may be less familiar with these new treatments compared with traditional therapy. To assist primary care physicians in further understanding the role of the NOACs, this article outlines the main differences between NOACs and traditional anticoagulation therapy and discusses the benefit–risk profile of the different NOACs in the treatment and secondary prevention of recurrent VTE. Key considerations for the use of NOACs in the primary care setting are highlighted, including dose transition, risk assessment and follow-up, duration of anticoagulant therapy, how to minimize bleeding risks, and the importance of patient education and counseling. PMID:27217793

  5. Combined administration of antibiotics and direct oral anticoagulants: a renewed indication for laboratory monitoring?

    PubMed

    Lippi, Giuseppe; Favaloro, Emmanuel J; Mattiuzzi, Camilla

    2014-10-01

    The recent development and marketing of novel direct oral anticoagulants (DOACs) represents a paradigm shift in the management of patients requiring long-term anticoagulation. The advantages of these compounds over traditional therapy with vitamin K antagonists include a reportedly lower risk of severe hemorrhages and the limited need for laboratory measurements. However, there are several scenarios in which testing should be applied. The potential for drug-to-drug interaction is one plausible but currently underrecognized indication for laboratory assessment of the anticoagulant effect of DOACs. In particular, substantial concern has been raised during Phase I studies regarding the potential interaction of these drugs with some antibiotics, especially those that interplay with permeability glycoprotein (P-gp) and cytochrome 3A4 (CYP3A4). A specific electronic search on clinical trials published so far confirms that clarithromycin and rifampicin significantly impair the bioavailability of dabigatran, whereas clarithromycin, erythromycin, fluconazole, and ketoconazole alter the metabolism of rivaroxaban in vivo. Because of their more recent development, no published data were found for apixaban and edoxaban, or for potential interactions of DOACs with other and widely used antibiotics. It is noteworthy, however, that an online resource based on Food and Drug Administration and social media information, reports several hemorrhagic and thrombotic events in patients simultaneously taking dabigatran and some commonly used antibiotics such as amoxicillin, cephalosporin, and metronidazole. According to these reports, the administration of antibiotics in patients undergoing therapy with DOACs would seem to require accurate evaluation as to whether dose adjustments (personalized or antibiotic class driven) of the anticoagulant drug may be advisable. This might be facilitated by direct laboratory assessments of their anticoagulant effect ex vivo.

  6. Why develop antidotes and reversal agents for non-vitamin K oral anticoagulants?

    PubMed

    Washam, Jeffrey B; Piccini, Jonathan P

    2016-02-01

    Over the past several years, non-vitamin K oral anticoagulants (NOACs) have been introduced into clinical practice for the treatment of venous thromboembolism and prevention of stroke in patients with nonvalvular atrial fibrillation. Clinical trials have shown these agents to have similar or less risk of major bleeding as compared to warfarin therapy. Moreover, when patients do experience a major bleeding event administration of advanced factor products is rare, and post-bleed outcomes are similar in those receiving a NOAC compared to those receiving warfarin. However, there are situations where urgent reversal of NOAC anticoagulation would be desirable. The following review focuses on the outcomes and management strategies for patients experiencing a major bleed with warfarin or NOAC agents and describes the rationale for the development of therapies capable of targeted NOAC-reversal.

  7. Oral anticoagulants and status of antidotes for the reversal of bleeding risk.

    PubMed

    Ebright, Joseph; Mousa, Shaker A

    2015-03-01

    Anticoagulants have been used in clinical practice for more than 50 years. Their indications expand, as more people are diagnosed each year with atrial fibrillation and venous thromboembolism. Vitamin K antagonists have been the most popular choice due to their effectiveness and their ability to reverse bleeding using a known antidote; oral and intravenous vitamin K have long been known to reverse the effects of warfarin. With new classes of anticoagulants making their way onto the market, such as factor Xa inhibitors (rivaroxaban, apixaban) and direct thrombin inhibitors (dabigatran), the need for new reversal agents is paramount. Patients tend to be more receptive to these medications because they do not require routine blood monitoring, can be used at fixed doses, and do not have major drug or food interactions. Antidotes for these medications have shown promise in animal models and are currently in clinical trials.

  8. Non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants: new choices for patient management in atrial fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Saliba, Walid

    2015-10-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is a significant problem for the aging population and remains a major factor underlying stroke risk. Warfarin anticoagulation has been proven effective for stroke prevention in AF, but can be difficult to manage and requires frequent monitoring. The non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants (NOACs) have been shown to be as effective as warfarin for stroke prevention in nonvalvular AF (NVAF) and are associated with a reduced risk of bleeding compared with warfarin. Dabigatran, rivaroxaban, apixaban, and edoxaban have been approved in the USA for reducing the risk of stroke in patients with NVAF. In this article, AF risk assessment is discussed and NOAC phase III clinical trials for the prevention of stroke and systemic embolic events are reviewed. Further, differences in stroke and bleeding outcomes between NOACs are highlighted, the use of NOACs for cardioversion and special patient populations is discussed, and management considerations for patients with AF are reviewed.

  9. Evaluation of computerized decision support for oral anticoagulation management based in primary care.

    PubMed Central

    Fitzmaurice, D A; Hobbs, F D; Murray, E T; Bradley, C P; Holder, R

    1996-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Increasing indications for oral anticoagulation has led to pressure on general practices to undertake therapeutic monitoring. Computerized decision support (DSS) has been shown to be effective in hospitals for improving clinical management. Its usefulness in primary care has previously not been investigated. AIM: To test the effectiveness of using DSS for oral anticoagulation monitoring in primary care by measuring the proportions of patients adequately controlled, defined as within the appropriate therapeutic range of International Normalised Ratio (INR). METHOD: All patients receiving warfarin from two Birmingham inner city general practices were invited to attend a practice-based anticoagulation clinic. In practice A all patients were managed using DSS. In practice B patients were randomized to receive dosing advice either through DSS or through the local hospital laboratory. Clinical outcomes, adverse events and patient acceptability were recorded. RESULTS: Forty-nine patients were seen in total. There were significant improvements in INR control from 23% to 86% (P > 0.001) in the practice where all patients received dosing through DSS. In the practice where patients were randomized to either DSS or hospital dosing, logistic regression showed a significant trend for improvement in intervention patients which was not apparent in the hospital-dosed patients (P < 0.001). Mean recall times were significantly extended in patients who were dosed by the practice DSS through the full 12 months (24 days to 36 days) (P = 0.033). Adverse events were comparable between hospital and practice-dosed patients, although a number of esoteric events occurred. Patient satisfaction with the practice clinics was high. CONCLUSION: Computerized DSS enables the safe and effective transfer of anticoagulation management from hospital to primary care and may result in improved patient outcome in terms of the level of control, frequency of review and general acceptability. PMID

  10. Stroke prevention in the elderly atrial fibrillation patient with comorbid conditions: focus on non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants

    PubMed Central

    Turagam, Mohit K; Velagapudi, Poonam; Flaker, Greg C

    2015-01-01

    Stroke prevention in elderly atrial fibrillation patients remains a challenge. There is a high risk of stroke and systemic thromboembolism but also a high risk of bleeding if anticoagulants are prescribed. The elderly have increased chronic kidney disease, coronary artery disease, polypharmacy, and overall frailty. For all these reasons, anticoagulant use is underutilized in the elderly. In this manuscript, the benefits of non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants compared with warfarin in the elderly patient population with multiple comorbid conditions are reviewed. PMID:26366064

  11. [New oral anticoagulants: emerging clinical data and role of the primary care physician].

    PubMed

    Motte, S

    2011-09-01

    New oral anticoagulants offer several potential advantages including oral administration, fixed doses, no regular coagulation monitoring and dose adjustment and wide therapeutic index. The results from clinical studies for prevention and treatment of venous thromboembolism and for stroke prevention in patients with atrial fibrillation show that these agents are at least as effective as or superior to currently available therapies depending on the molecules and dose regimen. Physicians will have to make choices among available new agents taking into account their pharmacokinetic properties, half-life, route of elimination and patient comorbidities. But the use of these new agents in daily practice raises some issues such as temporary discontinuation in patients undergoing invasive procedures and management of patients with bleeding in the absence of specific antidote. New oral anticoagulants should be used with caution in daily practice in special populations such as elderly patients, patients with renal impairment and patients with cancer. Primary care physicians will have to play a role in monitoring and evaluating the long-term efficacy and safety of these agents in daily practice.

  12. Direct-acting oral anticoagulants: pharmacology, indications, management, and future perspectives.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Outes, Antonio; Suárez-Gea, Ma Luisa; Lecumberri, Ramón; Terleira-Fernández, Ana Isabel; Vargas-Castrillón, Emilio

    2015-11-01

    In recent years, several direct-acting oral anticoagulants (DOAC) have become available for use in Europe and other regions in indications related to prophylaxis and treatment of venous and arterial thromboembolism. They include the oral direct thrombin inhibitor dabigatran etexilate (Pradaxa, Boehringer Ingelheim) and the oral direct FXa inhibitors rivaroxaban (Xarelto, Bayer HealthCare), apixaban (Eliquis, Bristol-Myers Squibb), and edoxaban (Lixiana/Savaysa, Daiichi-Sankyo). The new compounds have a predictable dose response and few drug-drug interactions (unlike vitamin k antagonists), and they do not require parenteral administration (unlike heparins). However, they accumulate in patients with renal impairment, lack widely available monitoring tests for measuring its anticoagulant activity, and no specific antidotes for neutralization in case of overdose and/or severe bleeding are currently available. In this review, we describe the pharmacology of the DOAC, the efficacy, and safety data from pivotal studies that support their currently approved indications and discuss the postmarketing experience available. We also summarize practical recommendations to ensure an appropriate use of the DOAC according to existing data. Finally, we discuss relevant ongoing studies and future perspectives.

  13. Battle of oral anticoagulants in the field of atrial fibrillation scrutinized from a clinical practice (the real world) perspective

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Warfarin has a long history of benefit and has become the gold standard medication for the prevention of ischemic stroke in patients with atrial fibrillation. Nevertheless, it is far from perfect and there is no doubt that new drugs must be found to replace warfarin. The new oral anticoagulants that are on the market or awaiting approval or under research offer some benefits but not enough to replace warfarin until results of additional studies can show an adequate balance between effectiveness/safety and cost/benefit. There are several issues concerning the new oral anticoagulants. It is essential that the effect of any anticoagulant can be measured in plasma. But to date, there is no test to assess the effect or therapeutic range for the new oral anticoagulants. There is no antidote to neutralize the action of the new drugs in cases of bleeding or when acute surgical intervention is necessary. Dabigatran requires dose adjustment in patients with moderate renal impairment and is contraindicated in patients with severe renal failure. Rivaroxaban should be used with caution in patients with severe renal impairment. Apixaban excretion is also partly dependent on renal function, although the impact of renal insufficiency has not yet been determined. How anticoagulant bridging can be done before surgery has not yet been established. In conclusion, although thousands of patients have been treated in phase III studies, additional data are necessary before conclusions can be drawn on the potential for these new anticoagulant drugs to replace warfarin in patients with atrial fibrillation. PMID:21794130

  14. The case against using hypertension as the only criterion for oral anticoagulation in atrial fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Rabkin, Simon W; Moe, Gordon

    2015-05-01

    According to recent guidelines for atrial fibrillation (AF) management, the presence of hypertension warrants anticoagulation, often involving the use of newer oral anticoagulants (NOACs). To discuss this idea, we posited the case against this proposition. We note that the data on hypertension that formulated the most commonly used Congestive Heart Failure, Hypertension, Age, Diabetes, Stroke/Transient Ischemic Attack (CHADS2) risk algorithm were not clearly defined and that there are insufficient data that hypertension in the presence of AF produces a meaningful incremental increase in stroke risk over and above the stroke risk increase for hypertension alone. Data exist that persons younger than 65 years of age with only 1 stroke risk factor such as hypertension, have a very small stroke risk. We further note that there are no quantitative data to allow clinicians to decide the level of blood pressure that meaningfully increases stroke risk in AF. Furthermore, there are insufficient data on the blood pressure level at which the risk of cerebral hemorrhage outweighs the risk of cardioembolic events. Clinical trials of NOACs in AF did not usually include hypertension as the only entry criteria. Another issue is the recent changes in the level of blood pressure for the diagnosis of hypertension based on home and ambulatory blood pressure measurement, which were not used to construct either stroke risk algorithms or entry criteria for NOAC clinical trials. These considerations highlight some of the complexities of using hypertension as a sole criterion for decision-making for anticoagulation in AF.

  15. Non-VKA Oral Anticoagulants: Accurate Measurement of Plasma Drug Concentrations.

    PubMed

    Douxfils, Jonathan; Mani, Helen; Minet, Valentine; Devalet, Bérangère; Chatelain, Bernard; Dogné, Jean-Michel; Mullier, François

    2015-01-01

    Non-VKA oral anticoagulants (NOACs) have now widely reached the lucrative market of anticoagulation. While the marketing authorization holders claimed that no routine monitoring is required and that these compounds can be given at fixed doses, several evidences arisen from the literature tend to demonstrate the opposite. New data suggests that an assessment of the response at the individual level could improve the benefit-risk ratio of at least dabigatran. Information regarding the association of rivaroxaban and apixaban exposure and the bleeding risk is available in the drug approval package on the FDA website. These reviews suggest that accumulation of these compounds increases the risk of experiencing a bleeding complication. Therefore, in certain patient populations such as patients with acute or chronic renal impairment or with multiple drug interactions, measurement of drug exposure may be useful to ensure an optimal treatment response. More specific circumstances such as patients experiencing a haemorrhagic or thromboembolic event during the treatment duration, patients who require urgent surgery or an invasive procedure, or patient with a suspected overdose could benefit from such a measurement. This paper aims at providing guidance on how to best estimate the intensity of anticoagulation using laboratory assays in daily practice.

  16. Non-vitamin-K oral anticoagulants and laboratory testing: now and in the future

    PubMed Central

    Salmonson, Tomas; Dogné, Jean-Michel; Janssen, Heidi; Garcia Burgos, Juan; Blake, Paul

    2017-01-01

    In contrast to vitamin K antagonists, no routine coagulation monitoring is required in patients taking non-vitamin-K oral anticoagulants (NOACs). However, dosing must take into account factors such as patient age, renal function, and accompanying haemorrhagic risk. There has been considerable debate about when laboratory measurement might be appropriate and which tests should be used. A workshop at the European Medicines Agency recently discussed the evidence about laboratory measurement from formal studies, clinical experience, and the multiple perspectives on NOAC treatment, and considered how our knowledge might be further enhanced. PMID:28025213

  17. Dabigatran etexilate: the first oral anticoagulant available in the United States since warfarin.

    PubMed

    Tran, Arlene; Cheng-Lai, Angela

    2011-01-01

    For more than 5 decades, warfarin has been the mainstay of therapy when oral anticoagulation is required. It has been shown to be effective in the prevention as well as treatment of various thromboembolic disorders. However, drawbacks of warfarin, such as time-consuming requirements for frequent international normalized ratio monitoring, as well as drug and food interactions, have encouraged the development of alternative oral agents. One such agent, dabigatran, has risen up to the challenge. Due to its predictable anticoagulation response, dabigatran does not require routine anticoagulation monitoring. Another advantage dabigatran has over warfarin is its more favorable drug and food interaction profiles. Dabigatran was shown to be noninferior to warfarin in studies evaluating the prevention of stroke and systemic embolism in patients with atrial fibrillation, thus leading to the US Food and Drug Administration approval for this indication. Dabigatran has also demonstrated efficacy in the prevention of venous thromboembolism in patients undergoing total hip or knee replacement surgery as well as the prevention of recurrent venous thromboembolism, although these are not current Food and Drug Administration-approved indications. The safety profile appears to be similar to warfarin with regards to overall bleeding risk, though the risk for gastrointestinal bleeds was higher in patients on dabigatran 150 mg twice daily. Disadvantages of dabigatran may include a higher frequency of dyspepsia compared with warfarin, lack of dosing information in severe renal impairment, possible missed opportunities for periodic health examinations and interventions due to elimination of regular physician's visit for international normalized ratio monitoring, and drug costs. This article provides an overview of the clinical studies, pharmacokinetic profile, adverse effects, drug interactions as well as advantages and disadvantages associated with dabigatran.

  18. Practical management of bleeding in patients receiving non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants.

    PubMed

    Weitz, Jeffrey I; Pollack, Charles V

    2015-11-25

    Non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants (NOACs) are increasingly used in the prevention and treatment of venous thromboembolism and in the prevention of stroke in patients with non-valvular atrial fibrillation. In phase III clinical trials and meta-analyses, the NOACs were at least as effective as vitamin K antagonists (VKAs) and were associated with a similar or lower incidence of major bleeding, including consistent and significant decreases in intracranial bleeding, although with an increase in gastrointestinal bleeding for some agents compared with VKAs. Subsequent real-world evidence supports these outcomes. Despite this, physicians have concerns about serious bleeding or emergencies because there are no specific reversal agents for the NOACs. However, in clinical trials, patients receiving NOACs generally had similar or better outcomes after these events than those taking VKAs. As with any bleeding, anticoagulant-related bleeding should first be stratified according to severity and location; risk can be minimised by ongoing assessment. Management protocols for NOAC-related bleeding are similar to those for VKAs but should take into account the pharmacological profile of the specific drug. Because of their short half-lives, NOAC-related mild bleeding can often be controlled by temporarily withholding treatment. More severe bleeding requires standard escalating haemodynamic support measures, and non-specific reversal agents can be considered in life-threatening situations, based on limited clinical data. Specific and rapid reversal agents are not currently available for any oral anticoagulant and restoration of coagulation may not necessarily lead to better outcomes. Nevertheless, specific NOAC reversal agents are in development and show promise in healthy volunteers.

  19. Decision-making about the use of non-vitamin K oral anticoagulant therapies for patients with atrial fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Eckman, Mark H

    2016-02-01

    Until recently, vitamin K antagonists, warfarin being the most commonly used agent in the United States, have been the only oral anticoagulant therapies available to prevent stroke in patients with atrial fibrillation (AF). In the last 5 years four new, non-vitamin K oral anticoagulants, the so-called NOACs or novel oral anticoagulants, have come to market and been approved by the Federal Drug Administration. Despite comparable if not superior efficacy in preventing AF-related stroke, and generally lower risks of major hemorrhage, particularly intracranial bleeding, the uptake of these agents has been slow. A number of barriers stand in the way of the more widespread use of these novel agents. Chief among them is concern about the lack of antidotes or reversal agents. Other concerns include the need for strict medication adherence, since missing even a single dose can lead to a non-anticoagulated state; out-of-pocket costs for patients; the lack of easily available laboratory tests to quantitatively assess the level of anticoagulant activity when these agents are being used; contraindications to use in patients with severe chronic kidney disease; and black-box warnings about the increased risk of thromboembolic events if these agents are discontinued prematurely. Fortunately, a number of reversal agents are in the pipeline. Three reversal agents, idarucizumab, andexanet alfa, and aripazine, have already progressed to human studies and show great promise as either antidotes for specific drugs or as universal reversal agents. The availability of these reversal agents will likely increase the clinical use of the non-vitamin K oral anticoagulants. In light of the many complex and nuanced issues surrounding the choice of an optimal anticoagulant for any AF patient, a patient-centered/shared decision-making approach will be useful.

  20. Direct oral anticoagulants and antiplatelet agents. Clinical relevance and options for laboratory testing.

    PubMed

    Sibbing, D; Spannagl, M

    2014-01-01

    Oral anticoagulants and platelet receptor blockers are widely used in clinical practice with the aim of reducing the risk of thrombotic complications in patients with cardiovascular diseases. Their regular intake and adequate antithrombotic action is vital and this is way numerous assays have been developed for laboratory testing and monitoring of these agents. Available assays can be stratified into pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic assays. Such assays are increasingly used in clinical routine and their daily use is triggered by the advent of the novel direct oral anticoagulants (DOACs) as an alternative for vitamin K antagonist (VKA) treatment, which are dabigatran, rivaroxaban and apixaban, and by the advent of prasugrel or ticagrelor as an alternative for clopidogrel with regard to platelet P2Y12 receptor inhibition. In this review the most important and most commonly used laboratory assays are summarized as well as their clinical implications with the focus on DOACs as an alternative for VKAs and the different P2Y12 receptor blockers for antiplatelet treatment.

  1. Non-Vitamin K Oral Anticoagulants in Stroke Patients: Practical Issues

    PubMed Central

    Diener, Hans-Christoph; Kleinschnitz, Christoph

    2016-01-01

    Non-vitamin-K oral anticoagulants (NOACs) represent a major advance in the prevention of stroke in patients with atrial fibrillation (AF), offering a similar, if not superior, efficacy and safety profile and several practical advantages over oral vitamin K antagonists (VKAs). The rapid onset of action of the NOACs, their relatively short half-live, and the availability of specific reversal agents may be advantageous when managing acute ischemic strokes, and in the post-stroke, post-transient ischemic attack, and post-intracranial hemorrhage settings. In this review article, we offer practical guidance on the use of NOACs in these settings, focusing on managing the acute event and on initiating or resuming anticoagulation for secondary prevention. We also assess the use of NOACs to prevent stroke and bleeding in patients with AF who have chronic kidney disease, are elderly, or cognitively impaired, and we offer guidance on optimizing the use of NOACs and VKAs in these patient groups in the absence of evidence-based guidelines. PMID:27165264

  2. Effect of oral anticoagulants on the outcome of faecal immunochemical test

    PubMed Central

    Bujanda, L; Sarasqueta, C; Lanas, Á; Quintero, E; Cubiella, J; Hernandez, V; Morillas, J D; Perez-Fernández, T; Salas, D; Andreu, M; Carballo, F; Bessa, X; Portillo, I; Jover, R; Balaguer, F; Cosme, A; Castells, A

    2014-01-01

    Background: We aimed to evaluate whether oral anticoagulants (OACs) alter faecal immunochemical test (FIT) performance in average-risk colorectal cancer (CRC) screening. Methods: Individuals aged 50–69 years were invited to receive one FIT sample (cutoff 75 ng ml–1) between November 2008 and June 2011. Results: Faecal immunochemical test was positive in 9.3% (21 out of 224) of users of OAC and 6.2% (365 out of 5821) of non-users (P-trend=0.07). The positive predictive value (PPV) for advanced neoplasia (AN) in non-users was 50.4% vs 47.6% in users (odds ratio, 0.70; 95% CI, 0.3–1.8; P=0.5). The PPV for AN in OAC more antiplatelets (aspirin or clopidogrel) was 75% (odds ratio, 2; 95% CI, 0.4–10.8; P=0.4). Conclusions: Oral anticoagulant did not significantly modify the PPV for AN in this population-based colorectal screening program. The detection rate of advanced adenoma was higher in the combination OAC more antiplatelets. PMID:24496455

  3. Direct-Acting Oral Anticoagulants: Practical Considerations for Emergency Medicine Physicians.

    PubMed

    Peacock, W Frank; Rafique, Zubaid; Singer, Adam J

    2016-01-01

    Nonvalvular atrial fibrillation- (NVAF-) related stroke and venous thromboembolism (VTE) are cardiovascular diseases associated with significant morbidity and economic burden. The historical standard treatment of VTE has been the administration of parenteral heparinoid until oral warfarin therapy attains a therapeutic international normalized ratio. Warfarin has been the most common medication for stroke prevention in NVAF. Warfarin use is complicated by a narrow therapeutic window, unpredictable dose response, numerous food and drug interactions, and requirements for frequent monitoring. To overcome these disadvantages, direct-acting oral anticoagulants (DOACs)-dabigatran, rivaroxaban, apixaban, and edoxaban-have been developed for the prevention of stroke or systemic embolic events (SEE) in patients with NVAF and for the treatment of VTE. Advantages of DOACs include predictable pharmacokinetics, few drug-drug interactions, and low monitoring requirements. In clinical studies, DOACs are noninferior to warfarin for the prevention of NVAF-related stroke and the treatment and prevention of VTE as well as postoperative knee and hip surgery VTE prophylaxis, with decreased bleeding risks. This review addresses the practical considerations for the emergency physician in DOAC use, including dosing recommendations, laboratory monitoring, anticoagulation reversal, and cost-effectiveness. The challenges of DOACs, such as the lack of specific laboratory measurements and antidotes, are also discussed.

  4. Computer-aided dosage in oral anticoagulation therapy using phenprocoumon. Problems and approaches.

    PubMed

    Cromme, L; Völler, H; Gäbler, F; Salzwedel, A; Taborski, U

    2010-11-01

    Oral anticoagulation using vitamin K antagonists has been established for over 50 years. Although it is highly effective in preventing thromboembolic incidents, its therapeutic control still remains problematic. Therefore, a computer-aided approach is recommended for deriving dosages. Up to now, the dosage is often based on the visual inspection of previous INR measurements, average weekly doses, and the INR target range. Statistical variations of measurement results and time-delayed effects of dosages, however, frequently result in the misinterpretation of data and suggest pseudo-trends. Treating physicians are not only responsible for determining the patient-specific maintenance dose, but must also respond to deviating INR values, overdosage or underdosage, initiate the oral anticoagulation therapy, and control the INR level in case of a new target range (bridging). Instructive examples are provided to illustrate the described difficulties. A computer-aided expert system is currently developed to ensure the therapeutic safety under the specified conditions. We present preliminary results from a study designed to validate mathematical models underlying such expert systems.

  5. Sailing between Scylla and Charybdis: oral long-term anticoagulation in dialysis patients.

    PubMed

    Krüger, Thilo; Brandenburg, Vincent; Schlieper, Georg; Marx, Nikolaus; Floege, Jürgen

    2013-03-01

    End-stage renal disease (ESRD) patients exhibit an increased risk of bleeding compared with non-chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients due to uraemic platelet dysfunction, altered vessel architecture and other factors. This renders any long-term oral anticoagulation potentially difficult. While there is little doubt that ESRD patients with recurrent thromboembolism or a mechanical cardiac valve should receive vitamin K antagonists (coumarins), the use of coumarins in ESRD patients with atrial fibrillation is a matter of debate. In non-CKD patients, current guidelines strongly recommend the use of oral anticoagulants for stroke prophylaxis in atrial fibrillation if certain risk factors are present (CHA2DS2-VASc score). This recommendation is often extrapolated to patients with advanced CKD or ESRD but data supporting this practice are weak to absent. Besides an increased bleeding risk in ESRD patients, coumarins will also accelerate cardiovascular calcification and are potent risk factors for the development of calcific uraemic arteriolopathy (calciphylaxis). Novel coumarin alternatives such as direct thrombin inhibitors are promising but none is currently approved for use in ESRD patients. Whether interventional treatment strategies such as atrial appendage occlusion are safe and effective options in advanced CKD is also as yet unresolved. This review attempts to balance the potential risks and benefits of coumarin usage in ESRD patients and to give the best possible recommendations for everyday patient care.

  6. Direct-Acting Oral Anticoagulants: Practical Considerations for Emergency Medicine Physicians

    PubMed Central

    Peacock, W. Frank; Rafique, Zubaid; Singer, Adam J.

    2016-01-01

    Nonvalvular atrial fibrillation- (NVAF-) related stroke and venous thromboembolism (VTE) are cardiovascular diseases associated with significant morbidity and economic burden. The historical standard treatment of VTE has been the administration of parenteral heparinoid until oral warfarin therapy attains a therapeutic international normalized ratio. Warfarin has been the most common medication for stroke prevention in NVAF. Warfarin use is complicated by a narrow therapeutic window, unpredictable dose response, numerous food and drug interactions, and requirements for frequent monitoring. To overcome these disadvantages, direct-acting oral anticoagulants (DOACs)—dabigatran, rivaroxaban, apixaban, and edoxaban—have been developed for the prevention of stroke or systemic embolic events (SEE) in patients with NVAF and for the treatment of VTE. Advantages of DOACs include predictable pharmacokinetics, few drug-drug interactions, and low monitoring requirements. In clinical studies, DOACs are noninferior to warfarin for the prevention of NVAF-related stroke and the treatment and prevention of VTE as well as postoperative knee and hip surgery VTE prophylaxis, with decreased bleeding risks. This review addresses the practical considerations for the emergency physician in DOAC use, including dosing recommendations, laboratory monitoring, anticoagulation reversal, and cost-effectiveness. The challenges of DOACs, such as the lack of specific laboratory measurements and antidotes, are also discussed. PMID:27293895

  7. Review of atrial fibrillation outcome trials of oral anticoagulant and antiplatelet agents.

    PubMed

    Bassand, Jean-Pierre

    2012-03-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is strongly associated with cardioembolic stroke, and thromboprophylaxis is an established means of reducing stroke risk in patients with AF. Oral vitamin K antagonists such as warfarin have been the mainstay of therapy for stroke prevention in patients with AF. However, they are associated with a number of limitations, including excessive bleeding when not adequately controlled. Antiplatelet agents do not match vitamin K antagonists in terms of their preventive efficacy. Dual-antiplatelet therapy (clopidogrel and acetylsalicylic acid) or combined antiplatelet-vitamin K antagonist therapy in AF has also failed to provide convincing evidence of their additional benefit over vitamin K antagonists alone. Novel oral anticoagulants, including the direct thrombin inhibitor dabigatran and direct Factor Xa inhibitors such as rivaroxaban, apixaban, and edoxaban, have now been approved or are currently in late-stage clinical development in AF. These newer agents may provide a breakthrough in the optimal management of stroke risk.

  8. Odontostomatologic management of patients receiving oral anticoagulant therapy: a retrospective multicentric study

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Today, we frequently find patients taking oral anticoagulant therapy (OAT), a prophylaxis against the occurrence of thromboembolic events. An oral surgeon needs to know how to better manage such patients, in order to avoid hemorrhagic and thromboembolic complications. Materials and methods A group of 193 patients (119 men aged between 46 and 82 and 74 women aged between 54 and 76) undergoing OAT for more than 5 years were managed with a standardized management protocol and a 2-months follow-up. The aim of the present study was to apply a protocol, which could provide a safe intra- and postoperative management of patients on OAT. Results Among the 193 patients, only 2 had postoperative complications. Conclusions We think that the protocol used in the present study can be used for complete safety in the treatment of this type of patients. PMID:21771331

  9. New Oral Anticoagulants vs Vitamin K Antagonists: Benefits for Health-Related Quality of Life in Patients with Atrial Fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    Alegret, Josep M.; Viñolas, Xavier; Arias, Miguel A.; Martínez-Rubio, Antoni; Rebollo, Pablo; Ràfols, Carles; Martínez-Sande, José L.

    2014-01-01

    New oral anticoagulants (NOAC) have demonstrated their efficacy as an alternative to vitamin K antagonists (VKA) in the prophylaxis of cardioembolic events in patients with atrial fibrillation (AF). However, evidence on the benefits of NOAC in health-related quality of life (HRQoL) is lacking.We evaluated changes in HRQoL related to oral anticoagulation therapy employing a specific questionnaire in a cohort of 416 patients with AF undergoing electrical cardioversion. In terms of HRQoL, we observed a progressive adaptation to treatment with VKA; satisfaction with NOAC remained constant. Older age, higher left ventricular ejection fraction and NOAC were associated with better HRQoL. PMID:24843316

  10. A clinician’s perspective: novel oral anticoagulants to reduce the risk of stroke in nonvalvular atrial fibrillation – full speed ahead or proceed with caution?

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Eugene

    2014-01-01

    Over the past few years, three novel oral anticoagulants, dabigatran, rivaroxaban, and apixaban, have been approved in the USA and Europe to reduce the risk of stroke or systemic embolism in patients with nonvalvular atrial fibrillation, and the results of a Phase III trial for a fourth novel oral anticoagulant, edoxaban, have recently been published. The aim of this review is to examine this indication from a clinician’s perspective, highlighting efficacy and safety results from the major trials with these novel oral agents. Clinical issues regarding bleeding, monitoring, and reversal are discussed, along with requirements to consider when interrupting treatment with a novel oral anticoagulant for the purpose of transitioning to another anticoagulant and prior to cardioversion, ablation, percutaneous coronary intervention, or emergency surgery. The cost-effectiveness of each of the approved novel oral anticoagulants is reviewed, and the author provides recommendations for selecting appropriate patients for these agents. PMID:25187724

  11. Optimizing the use of oral anticoagulant therapy for atrial fibrilation in primary care: a pharmacist-led intervention.

    PubMed

    Virdee, Mandeep S; Stewart, Derek

    2017-02-01

    Background Updated evidence-based guidelines for the management of atrial fibrillation (AF) necessitate patient review, particularly with respect to oral anticoagulants, to ensure maximum health gain around stroke prophylaxis. Objective To quantify the level of anticoagulation utilisation in patients with a CHA2DS2-VASc ≥1/≥2 (male/female) according to evidence-based guidelines and to assess the impact of a pharmacist-led intervention to optimise therapy. Setting Fifteen general medical practices in Liverpool, North-West England with a practice population of 99,129. Method GRASP-AF software was employed to interrogate patient electronic medical records to identify and risk stratify AF patients (using CHA2DS2-VASc). A pharmacist then reviewed the medical records of those of patients not anticoagulated and with a CHA2DS2-VASc ≥1/≥2 (male/female). Recommendations were discussed with a general practitioner (GP) and those patients in whom the need for anticoagulation was agreed were invited for a consultation with either the pharmacist or GP and therapy optimised where appropriate. The GPs were responsible for managing those patients referred for diagnosis confirmation or further specialist opinion. Main outcome measure Proportion of patients eligible/not eligible for anticoagulation; proportions in whom anticoagulants initiated, refused, antiplatelets discontinued. Results Five hundred and twenty-three patients (31% of patients identified with AF and a CHA2DS2-VASc ≥1/≥2 (male/female)) were not receiving an anticoagulant (26 subsequently died or left the practice leaving 497). Three hundred and eighty-two (77%) pharmacist recommendations to a GP were agreed without modification. Following outcomes of diagnostic investigations and specialist referrals, 202 (41%) patients were candidates for anticoagulation, 251 (51%) were not eligible for anticoagulation, 103 (21%) were anticoagulated (56 warfarin, 47 DOAC). Conclusion A pharmacist-led intervention re

  12. Haemorrhagic Transformation after Ischaemic Stroke in Patients Taking Non-vitamin K Antagonist Oral Anticoagulants

    PubMed Central

    Purrucker, Jan C.; Haas, Kirsten; Wolf, Marcel; Rizos, Timolaos; Khan, Shujah; Kraft, Peter; Poli, Sven; Dziewas, Rainer; Meyne, Johannes; Palm, Frederick; Jander, Sebastian; Möhlenbruch, Markus; Heuschmann, Peter U.; Veltkamp, Roland

    2017-01-01

    Background and Purpose To evaluate the frequency and outcome of haemorrhagic transformation (HT) after ischaemic stroke in patients treated with non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants (NOACs). Methods Patients with stroke on treatment with a NOAC were prospectively enrolled in this multicentre observational study between February 2012 and 2015. Brain imaging at admission and follow-up imaging until day 7 were reviewed for HT. Functional outcome was assessed by the modified Rankin scale (mRS) before the index event, at discharge, and at 3-months. Results 231 patients without recanalisation therapy (no-RT), and 32 patients with RT were eligible for analysis. Any HT was present at admission in 9/231 no-RT patients (3.9%, 95% CI 2.0 to 7.3) and in none of the patients with RT. In patients with follow-up imaging (no-RT, n=129, and RT, n=32), HT was present in 14.0% (no-RT; 95% CI, 8.9 to 21.1), and 40.6% (RT, 95% CI, 25.5 to 57.8), respectively. After adjustment for stroke severity, this difference between the no-RT and RT groups became non-significant. Symptomatic ICH was observed in 1 patient per group. HT was not associated with unfavourable outcome (mRS 3-6) at 3-months in multivariable analysis. Resumption of OAC after stroke was delayed in patients with HT compared to those without (15 d [IQR, 5–26] vs. 1 d [0–4], P<0.001). Conclusions The frequency and severity of HT after stroke on NOAC appears similar to previous reports for vitamin K antagonists and no anticoagulation. Whether asymptomatic HT should delay resumption of preventive anticoagulation requires further investigation. PMID:28178406

  13. Gastrointestinal bleeding in patients on novel oral anticoagulants: Risk, prevention and management

    PubMed Central

    Cheung, Ka-Shing; Leung, Wai K

    2017-01-01

    Novel oral anticoagulants (NOACs), which include direct thrombin inhibitor (dabigatran) and direct factor Xa inhibitors (rivaroxaban, apixaban and edoxaban), are gaining popularity in the prevention of embolic stroke in non-valvular atrial fibrillation as well as in the prevention and treatment of venous thromboembolism. However, similar to traditional anticoagulants, NOACs have the side effects of bleeding, including gastrointestinal bleeding (GIB). Results from both randomized clinical trials and observations studies suggest that high-dose dabigatran (150 mg b.i.d), rivaroxaban and high-dose edoxaban (60 mg daily) are associated with a higher risk of GIB compared with warfarin. Other risk factors of NOAC-related GIB include concomitant use of ulcerogenic agents, older age, renal impairment, Helicobacter pylori infection and a past history of GIB. Prevention of NOAC-related GIB includes proper patient selection, using a lower dose of certain NOACs and in patients with renal impairment, correction of modifiable risk factors, and prescription of gastroprotective agents. Overt GIB can be managed by withholding NOACs followed by delayed endoscopic treatment. In severe bleeding, additional measures include administration of activated charcoal, use of specific reversal agents such as idarucizumab for dabigatran and andexanent alfa for factor Xa inhibitors, and urgent endoscopic management. PMID:28373761

  14. New options for anticoagulation following total hip arthroplasty and total knee arthroplasty: new oral agents on the horizon.

    PubMed

    Amin, Alpesh

    2012-08-01

    Patients undergoing surgery for total hip arthroplasty (THA) or total knee arthroplasty (TKA) are at particularly high risk for developing venous thromboembolism (VTE). Despite the existence of effective therapies for VTE prevention, THA/TKA patients remain at risk for developing thrombi. Furthermore, the incidence of VTE is predicted to increase as an aging and increasingly obese population experiences joint damage necessitating THA and TKA. Current guidelines recommend the use of a wide range of antithrombotic agents in patients undergoing THA and TKA. These agents include vitamin K antagonists, low-molecular-weight heparins, fondaparinux, and the new oral anticoagulants. However, adherence to guidelines in clinical practice is disappointingly low. The limitations of traditional anticoagulants present management challenges following orthopedic surgery. Vitamin K antagonists present a number of drawbacks, including a narrow therapeutic window and unpredictable pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics. The subcutaneous route of administration of fondaparinux and low-molecular-weight heparins may make them unacceptable to patients in the outpatient setting. The introduction of a new generation of anticoagulants promises to address many of the drawbacks associated with the traditional agents. Clinical studies have shown the new oral anticoagulants to be as effective as traditional thromboprophylaxis, with good tolerability profiles. Clinical knowledge of these new agents will be essential to ensure that patients receive appropriate care following orthopedic surgery. This article will discuss the prevention of VTE after THA and TKA based on current evidence-based practice guidelines, the limitations of conventional anticoagulants, and the promise of new therapeutics.

  15. Unanswered questions and research priorities to optimise stroke prevention in atrial fibrillation with the new oral anticoagulants.

    PubMed

    Hankey, Graeme J

    2014-05-05

    This review article discusses the following, as yet unanswered, questions and research priorities to optimise patient management and stroke prevention in atrial fibrillation with the new direct oral anticoagulants (NOACs): 1. In patients prescribed a NOAC, can the anticoagulant effects or plasma concentrations of the NOACs be measured rapidly and reliably and, if so, can "cut-off points" between which anticoagulation is therapeutic (i.e. the "therapeutic range") be defined? 2. In patients who are taking a NOAC and bleeding (e.g. intracerebral haemorrhage), can the anticoagulant effects of the direct NOACs be reversed rapidly and, if so, can NOAC-associated bleeding and complications be minimised and patient outcome improved? 3. In patients taking a NOAC who experience an acute ischaemic stroke, to what degree of anticoagulation or plasma concentration of NOAC, if any, can thrombolysis be administered safely and effectively? 4. In patients with a recent cardioembolic ischaemic stroke, what is the optimal time to start (or re-start) anticoagulation with a NOAC (or warfarin)? 5. In anticoagulated patients who experience an intracranial haemorrhage, can anticoagulation with a NOAC be re-started safely and effectively, and if so when? 6. Are the NOACs effective and safe in multimorbid geriatric people (who commonly have atrial fibrillation and are at high risk of stroke but also bleeding)? 7. Can dose-adjusted NOAC therapy augment the established safety and efficacy of fixed-dose unmonitored NOAC therapy? 8. Is there a dose or dosing regimen for each NOAC that is as effective and safe as adjusted-dose warfarin for patients with atrial fibrillation who have mechanical prosthetic heart valves? 9. What is the long-term safety of the NOACs?

  16. Hypercoagulable states: an algorithmic approach to laboratory testing and update on monitoring of direct oral anticoagulants

    PubMed Central

    Nakashima, Megan O.

    2014-01-01

    Hypercoagulability can result from a variety of inherited and, more commonly, acquired conditions. Testing for the underlying cause of thrombosis in a patient is complicated both by the number and variety of clinical conditions that can cause hypercoagulability as well as the many potential assay interferences. Using an algorithmic approach to hypercoagulability testing provides the ability to tailor assay selection to the clinical scenario. It also reduces the number of unnecessary tests performed, saving cost and time, and preventing potential false results. New oral anticoagulants are powerful tools for managing hypercoagulable patients; however, their use introduces new challenges in terms of test interpretation and therapeutic monitoring. The coagulation laboratory plays an essential role in testing for and treating hypercoagulable states. The input of laboratory professionals is necessary to guide appropriate testing and synthesize interpretation of results. PMID:25025009

  17. [Treatment safety of non-vitamin K oral anticoagulants in patients with atrial fibrillation].

    PubMed

    Hohnloser, S H

    2016-02-01

    Non-vitamin K oral anticoagulants (NOAC) have now become established for stroke prevention in atrial fibrillation. The efficacy is at least as good if not better than that of vitamin K antagonists (VKA). The risk for major bleeding is less for NOAC than for VKA, with a particular superiority concerning the avoidance of intracerebral hemorrhage. The outcome after major bleeding is more favorable in patients receiving NOAC compared to those treated with VKA. Specific reversal agents for NOAC are currently being tested which neutralize the effects of NOAC within minutes and the clinical introduction of the first one for the thrombin inhibitor dabigatran is imminent. Such specific antidotes will further improve the safety profile of NAOC.

  18. Periprocedural management of anticoagulation in patients taking novel oral anticoagulants: Review of the literature and recommendations for specific populations and procedures.

    PubMed

    Mar, Philip L; Familtsev, Dmitry; Ezekowitz, Michael D; Lakkireddy, Dhanunjaya; Gopinathannair, Rakesh

    2016-01-01

    An increasing number of individuals are on novel oral anticoagulants (NOAC) for anticoagulation instead of vitamin K antagonists (VKA) and roughly 10% of these individuals will require interruption of these agents for procedures annually. Recent evidence surrounding bridging as well as the FDA approval of a new NOAC call for a comprehensive review and update regarding periprocedural NOAC management. The periprocedural management of NOACs involves striking a balance between the risks of bleeding and thromboembolism associated with interruption, bridging, and reinitiation of anticoagulation. NOACs have a distinct pharmacokinetic advantage in this setting with their quick onset and elimination from the body. Procedures at low risk for bleeding do not require interruption and can be scheduled at the start of the next dosing interval. Procedures at moderate-high risk of bleeding require interruption of NOAC for 5 half lives prior to the procedure to allow for adequate elimination of the drug. In light of new evidence highlighting the risks of bleeding, and given shorter "unprotected" times with NOAC interruption versus VKA, patients at low-moderate risk for thromboembolism should not be bridged when "unprotected" time is less than 96 h. For patients at high risk for thromboembolism, individual patient and surgical factors need to be considered before the decision to bridge is made. The benefit of bridging these patients who have a considerable risk of bleeding may not outweigh the benefits. Focused randomized studies on periprocedural management of NOACs are urgently needed.

  19. Net Clinical Benefit of Oral Anticoagulants: A Multiple Criteria Decision Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yea-Huei Kao; Lu, Christine Y.

    2015-01-01

    Background This study quantitatively evaluated the comparative efficacy and safety of new oral anticoagulants (dabigatran, rivaroxaban, and apizaban) and warfarin for treatment of nonvalvular atrial fibrillation. We also compared these agents under different scenarios, including population with high risk of stroke and for primary vs. secondary stroke prevention. Methods We used multiple criteria decision analysis (MCDA) to assess the benefit-risk of these medications. Our MCDA models contained criteria for benefits (prevention of ischemic stroke and systemic embolism) and risks (intracranial and extracranial bleeding). We calculated a performance score for each drug accounting for benefits and risks in comparison to treatment alternatives. Results Overall, new agents had higher performance scores than warfarin; in order of performance scores: dabigatran 150 mg (0.529), rivaroxaban (0.462), apixaban (0.426), and warfarin (0.191). For patients at a higher risk of stroke (CHADS2 score≥3), apixaban had the highest performance score (0.686); performance scores for other drugs were 0.462 for dabigatran 150 mg, 0.392 for dabigatran 110 mg, 0.271 for rivaroxaban, and 0.116 for warfarin. Dabigatran 150 mg had the highest performance score for primary stroke prevention, while dabigatran 110 mg had the highest performance score for secondary prevention. Conclusions Our results suggest that new oral anticoagulants might be preferred over warfarin. Selecting appropriate medicines according to the patient’s condition based on information from an integrated benefit-risk assessment of treatment options is crucial to achieve optimal clinical outcomes. PMID:25897861

  20. Stroke prevention in atrial fibrillation: established oral anticoagulants versus novel anticoagulants-translating clinical trial data into practice.

    PubMed

    Ezekowitz, Michael D; Spahr, Judy; Ghosh, Pradeepto; Corelli, Kathryn

    2014-09-01

    Anticoagulation for stroke prevention in atrial fibrillation (AF) is effective. Pivotal trials RE-LY, ROCKET AF, ARISTOTLE, and ENGAGE-AF TIMI 48 tested novel agents against warfarin (W). In RE-LY, an open-label trial, dabigatran 150 mg BID (D150) was superior (35%) and 110 mg BID (D110) was noninferior to W. D150 reduced ischemic strokes by 25% and intracerebral bleeds by 74%, but increased major GI bleeds by 0.5 % per year. In ROCKET AF, a double-blind study, rivaroxaban 20 mg daily, downtitrated to 15 mg daily (if CrCl was <49) was noninferior for efficacy and safety, with an increase in GI bleeds. In ARISTOTLE, a double-blind study, apixaban 5 mg BID (downtitrated to 2.5 mg BID if two of the following were present: age, >80; weight, <60 kg; or serum creatinine, >1.5 mg) was superior for safety (31%), efficacy (21%), and all-cause mortality (11%). In ENGAGE-AF TIMI 48, edoxaban 60 mg once daily (30 mg once daily if CrCl 30-50 ml/min, weight <60 kg, or concomitant verapamil or quinidine) was noninferior to W for efficacy, but reduced major bleeding (20%). To translate clinical trials to practice, understanding the disease and each anticoagulant is essential. For all novel agents, rapid anticoagulation, absence of monitoring, and a short half-life differentiate them from W. Bleed rates were either noninferior or lower than for W, without an antidote. Patient compliance is critical. Knowledge of renal function is essential and maintaining patients on therapy is key.

  1. Preclinical safety evaluation of low molecular weight heparin-deoxycholate conjugates as an oral anticoagulant.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ji-young; Jeon, Ok-Cheol; Moon, Hyun Tae; Hwang, Seung Rim; Byun, Youngro

    2016-01-01

    The preclinical safety of a newly developed oral anticoagulant, the low molecular weight heparin-deoxycholate conjugate (OH09208), was evaluated by a comprehensive evaluating program in compliance with standard guidelines. The single dose oral toxicity study in rats receiving 2000 and 5000 mg kg(-1) of OH09208 did not reveal any mortality, unusual body weight changes or necropsy findings. The results of the 4-week oral toxicity study with a 4-week recovery program in rats receiving OH09208 in doses of 100, 300 and 1000 mg kg(-1) day(-1) did not reveal any mortality, or indicate any unusual clinical signs, or show any toxicokinetic relationships to the administration of OH09208. Although the increase in liver enzymes in one male dog treated with 300 mg kg(-1) day(-1) and one female dog treated with 1000 mg kg(-1) day(-1) could not be excluded from the effect of the test substance, no other toxicologically significant changes were observed in the 4-week oral toxicity study with a 4-week recovery in beagle dogs. Thus, while the no-observed-adverse-effect level value from the 4-week study in both male and female rats was 1000 mg kg(-1) day(-1), those from the 4-week study in male and female beagle dogs were 300 and 1000 mg kg(-1) day(-1), respectively. Furthermore, OH09208 did not induce anaphylactic reactions in guinea pigs, micronucleated bone marrow cells in male ICR mice, chromosomal aberration in Chinese hamster lung cell lines, bacterial reverse mutation, and any abnormalities in hERG current assay, mouse central nervous system and dog cardiovascular studies. Overall, there were no unexpected toxicities in this preclinical study that might have precluded the safe administration of OH09208 to humans.

  2. "Zeus" a new oral anticoagulant therapy dosing algorithm: a cohort study.

    PubMed

    Cafolla, A; Melizzi, R; Baldacci, E; Pignoloni, P; Dragoni, F; Campanelli, M; Caraccini, R; Foà, R

    2011-10-01

    The demand for oral anticoagulant therapy (OAT) has constantly increased during the last ten years with an extended use of computer assistance. Many mathematical algorithms have been projected to suggest doses and time to next visit for patients on OAT. We designed a new algorithm: "Zeus". A "before-after" study was planned to compare the efficacy and safety of this algorithm dosing OAT with manual dosage decided by the same expert physicians according to the target of International Normalized Ratio (INR). The study analysed data of 1876 patients managed with each of the two modalities for eight months, with an interval of two years between them. The aim was to verify the increased quality of therapy by time spent in INR target and efficiency and safety of Zeus algorithm. Time in therapeutic range (TTR) was significantly (p < 0.0001) higher during the algorithm dosing period in comparison with the TTR during manual management period (62.3% vs 50.3%). The number of PT/INR tests above 5 was significantly (p < 0.001) reduced by algorithm suggested prescriptions in comparison with manual those (254 vs 537 times). The anticoagulant drug amount prescribed according to the algorithm suggestions was significantly (p < 0.0001) lower than that of the manual method. The number of clinical events observed in patients during the algorithm management time was significantly (p < 0.05) lower than that in those managed with the manual dosage. This study confirms the clinical utility of the computer-assisted OAT and shows the efficacy and safety of the Zeus algorithm.

  3. Characteristics of Symptomatic Intracranial Hemorrhage in Patients Receiving Non-Vitamin K Antagonist Oral Anticoagulant Therapy

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The first non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulant (NOAC) introduced to the market in Japan was dabigatran in March 2011, and three more NOACs, rivaroxaban, apixaban, and edoxaban, have since become available. Randomized controlled trials of NOACs have revealed that intracranial hemorrhage (ICH) occurs less frequently with NOACs compared with warfarin. However, the absolute incidence of ICH associated with NOACs has increased with greater use of these anticoagulants, and we wanted to explore the incidence, clinical characteristics, and treatment course of patients with NOACs-associated ICH. Methods We retrospectively analyzed the characteristics of symptomatic ICH patients receiving NOACs between March 2011 and September 2014. Results ICH occurred in 6 patients (5 men, 1 woman; mean ± SD age, 72.8 ± 3.2 years). Mean time to onset was 146.2 ± 111.5 days after starting NOACs. Five patients received rivaroxaban and 1 patient received apixaban. None received dabigatran or edoxaban. Notably, no hematoma expansion was observed within 24 h of onset in the absence of infusion of fresh frozen plasma, activated prothrombin complex concentrate, recombinant activated factor VIIa or hemodialysis. When NOAC therapy was initiated, mean HAS-BLED and PANWARDS scores were 1.5 ± 0.5 and 39.5 ± 7.7, respectively. Mean systolic blood pressure was 137.8 ± 15.9 mmHg within 1 month before spontaneous ICH onset. Conclusion Six symptomatic ICHs occurred early in NOAC therapy but hematoma volume was small and did not expand in the absence of infusion of reversal agents or hemodialysis. The occurrence of ICH during NOAC therapy is possible even when there is acceptable mean systolic blood pressure control (137.8 ± 15.9 mmHg) and HAS-BLED score ≤ 2. Even stricter blood pressure lowering and control within the acceptable range may be advisable to prevent ICH during NOAC therapy. PMID:26171862

  4. Pregnancy outcome in patients exposed to direct oral anticoagulants - and the challenge of event reporting.

    PubMed

    Beyer-Westendorf, Jan; Michalski, Franziska; Tittl, Luise; Middeldorp, Saskia; Cohen, Hannah; Abdul Kadir, Rezan; Arachchillage, Deepa Jayakody; Arya, Roopen; Ay, Cihan; Marten, Sandra

    2016-09-27

    Today, direct oral anticoagulants (DOAC) are widely used alternatives to Vitamin-K antagonists (VKA). Women of reproductive age may become pregnant during anticoagulation and, while VKA carry an embryotoxic potential, the risk of DOAC embryopathy is unknown. As a result, some patients elect to terminate pregnancy for fear of DOAC embryotoxicity. To assess the risk of DOAC embryopathy, we reviewed cases of DOAC exposure in pregnancy collected from physicians, literature and pharmacovigilance systems of drug authorities and manufacturers. A total of 357 reports including duplicates were available from which 233 unique cases could be identified. Information on pregnancy outcome was available in only 137/233 cases (58.8 %): 67 live births (48.9 %); 31 miscarriages (22.6 %); 39 elective pregnancy terminations (28.5 %). In 93 cases (39.9 %) no outcome data were available (including 3 cases of ongoing pregnancy). Of the 137 pregnancies with reported outcomes, seven showed abnormalities (5.1 %) of which three (2.2 %) could potentially be interpreted as embryopathy: live birth with facial dysmorphism; miscarriage in week 10 with limb abnormality; elective pregnancy termination due to a foetal cardiac defect in a woman who had to terminate a previous pregnancy due to Fallot tetralogy. Within its limitations (small numbers, incomplete outcome data) our results do not indicate that DOAC exposure in pregnancy carries a high risk of embryopathy or that DOAC exposure per se should be used to direct patient counselling towards pregnancy termination. Pregnancy outcome data are inconsistently captured in pharmacovigilance databases indicating the strong need for a more robust system of reporting.

  5. Reversal agents for oral antiplatelet and anticoagulant treatment during bleeding events: current strategies.

    PubMed

    Raimondi, Peter; Hylek, Elaine M; Aronis, Konstantinos N

    2016-12-05

    There is an increasing prevalence of cardiovascular diseases that warrant antithrombotic therapy. Antithrombotic therapy includes antiplatelet agents and anticoagulation therapy with vitamin K antagonists (VKAs) or non-Vitamin K oral anticoagulants (NOACs). Antithrombotic therapy is associated with increased rates of bleeding. In this review we summarize the evidence and provide strategies for the management of severe bleeding in the setting of antithrombotic therapy. There is limited data on the management of bleeding in the setting of antiplatelet therapy. We recommend discontinuation of the antiplatelet, as well as administration of platelet transfusions and desmopressin only in the setting of life-threatening bleeding. For patients presenting with severe bleeding in the setting of VKAs, we recommend discontinuation of VKA and prompt administration of 10 mg intravenous vitamin K plus 50 units/kg 4-factor prothrombin complex concentrate (PCC). If 4-factor PCC is not available 3-factor PCC or fresh frozen plasma (FFP) can be used, but these are inferior to 4-factor PCC. For patients presenting with severe bleeding while on dabigatran, we recommend discontinuation of dabigatran and intravenous administration of 5g idarucizumab. There is currently no available reversal agent for factor Xa inhibitors. Andexanet alpha is a factor Xa-specific inhibitor that is currently undergoing FDA review. Until andexanet alpha becomes available we recommend discontinuation of the factor Xa inhibitor and administration of 50 units/kg 4-factor PCC. The decision to discontinue and/or reverse antithrombotic therapy should be made on a case-by-case basis and the competing risk from discontinuation and/or reversal of antithrombotic therapy should be taken in consideration.

  6. The need to clot: a review of current management strategies for adverse bleeding events with new oral anticoagulants.

    PubMed

    Whalley, D; Skappak, C; Lang, E S

    2014-07-01

    The new factor Xa inhibitors and direct thrombin inhibitors have offered alternatives to traditional anticoagulants, with benefits of no routine monitoring, less drug interactions, and oral administration. Current approved uses of these agents include prophylaxis of stroke in non-valvular atrial fibrillation and prevention of venous thromboembolism (VTE) following hip and knee arthroplasty. However, concern over bleeding risk in the context of having no specific antidotes available is a topic of focus for many physicians in an acute care setting. This manuscript examines the recent literature in the management of acute bleeding and the various methods of reversing anticoagulation in this setting. Literature published over the last 18 months (2011/07/01-present) was gathered from PubMed, Ovid, and Medline under a combined search strategy covering bleeding, reversal, and new oral anticoagulants, both factor Xa and direct thrombin inhibitors. The use of prothrombin complex concentrate, fresh frozen plasma, activated recombinant factor VII, activated prothrombin complex concentrate, as well as adjuncts of charcoal, hemodialysis, and antifibrinolytics are discussed. Recommendations are based on the determination of the severity of the bleed and physiological markers of anticoagulation, and involve the use of prothrombin complex concentrate, activated recombinant factor VII, and adjunctive therapy as appropriate.

  7. Direct oral anticoagulant use in nonvalvular atrial fibrillation with valvular heart disease: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Owens, Ryan E; Kabra, Rajesh; Oliphant, Carrie S

    2016-12-22

    Direct oral anticoagulants (DOACs) are indicated for stroke prevention in patients with nonvalvular atrial fibrillation (NVAF), which, according to the American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association/Heart Rhythm Society atrial fibrillation (AF) guidelines, excludes patients with rheumatic mitral stenosis, a mechanical or bioprosthetic heart valve, or mitral valve repair. However, the data regarding use of DOACs in AF patients with other types of valvular heart disease (VHD) are unclear. We aimed to summarize and evaluate the literature regarding the safety and efficacy of DOAC use in NVAF patients with other types of VHD. After an extensive literature search, a total of 1 prospective controlled trial, 4 subanalyses, and 1 abstract were identified. Efficacy of the DOAC agents in NVAF patients with VHD mirrored the overall trial results. Bleeding risk was significantly increased in VHD patients treated with rivaroxaban, but not for dabigatran or apixaban. Of the bioprosthetic valve patients enrolled in the Apixaban for Reduction in Stroke and Other Thromboembolic Events in Atrial Fibrillation (ARISTOTLE) trial, no safety or efficacy concerns were identified. In conclusion, subanalyses of DOAC landmark AF trials revealed that dabigatran, rivaroxaban, and apixaban may be safely used in AF patients with certain types of VHD: aortic stenosis, aortic regurgitation, and mitral regurgitation. More evidence is needed before routinely recommending these agents for patients with bioprosthetic valves or mild mitral stenosis. Patients with moderate to severe mitral stenosis or mechanical valves should continue to receive warfarin, as these patients were excluded from all landmark AF trials.

  8. An evidence summary of the management of patients taking direct oral anticoagulants (DOACs) undergoing dental surgery.

    PubMed

    Johnston, S

    2016-05-01

    Direct oral anticoagulant (DOAC) drugs (dabigatran, rivaroxaban, and apixaban) have emerged in the last decade to overcome some of the drawbacks of existing medications. To date, little is known about the dental management of patients taking these drugs. This study was undertaken to establish the evidence for the management of patients undergoing dental procedures while taking these medications. A rapid review approach was used to identify clinical and scientific research related to dental surgery performed in patients taking DOACs in order to produce an evidence summary. The rapid review did not identify any systematic reviews or original clinical trials and the overall quality of evidence found was poor. Most of the literature consisted of non-structured review articles and guidance documents based on assumptions from non-dental data and expert opinion, and recommendations on best practice varied throughout. The findings from the review of the literature varied considerably. Currently, recommendations are based on poor quality scientific data and clinical trials are required to establish best evidence-based practice guidance.

  9. [Multidisciplinary meeting about the use of direct oral anticoagulants in nonvalvular atrial fibrillation].

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Reyes, Humberto; Arauz-Góngora, Antonio; Asensio-Lafuente, Enrique; Celaya-Cota, Manuel de Jesús; Cordero-Cabra, Alejandro; Guevara-Valdivia, Milton; Izaguirre-Avila, Raúl; Lara-Vaca, Susano; Mariona-Moreno, Vitelio; Martínez-Flores, Enrique; Nava-Townsend, Santiago; Pozas-Garza, Gerardo; Rodríguez-Diez, Gerardo

    2016-08-27

    Knowing the real impact of atrial fibrillation in the stroke, the Sociedad Mexicana of Electrofisiología y Estimulación Cardiaca (SOMEEC) had the initiative to develop a multidisciplinary meeting of experts the with the purpose to update the available scientific evidence from clinical practice guidelines, meta-analyses, controlled clinical trials, and complementing with the experience and views of a group of experts. To meet this goal, SOMEEC gathered a group of specialists in the area of cardiology, electrophysiology, neurology and hematology that given their experience in certain areas, they share the scientific evidence with the panel of experts to leave open a discussion about the information presented in this article. This document brings together the best scientific evidence available and aims to be a useful tool in the decision to use of new oral anticoagulants in nonvalvular atrial fibrillation and ischemic heart disease, or relating to the management of patients with stroke or renal failure, and even those that will be submitted to elective surgery and invasive procedures. In the same, they handled comparative schemes of follow-up and treatment which simplifies the decision making by the specialists participants.

  10. New Insights into Nonvitamin K Antagonist Oral Anticoagulants' Reversal of Intracerebral Hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Yasaka, Masahiro

    2015-01-01

    The nonvitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants (NOACs) dabigatran, rivaroxaban, apixaban, and edoxaban are associated with an equal or lower incidence of stroke and systemic embolism and a much lower incidence of intracranial hemorrhage and hemorrhagic stroke than warfarin is, without the need for routine laboratory monitoring. However, reversal strategies are not currently established in the case of NOAC-related hemorrhagic stroke. In emergency situations, well-defined management for NOAC-related hemorrhagic stroke may improve clinical outcomes. Thus, in this chapter, general measures initially required to prevent the expansion of intracerebral hematomas, charcoal administration to reduce NOAC absorption from the gastrointestinal tract, application of hemodialysis to remove dabigatran, and coagulation factor therapy including 4-factor prothrombin complex concentrate and recombinant activated factor VII are reviewed. The specific reversal agents idarucizumab, which is a monoclonal antibody against dabigatran; andexanet alfa, a recombinant human factor Xa decoy for Xa inhibitors; and PER977, a small synthetic molecule for reversal of both Xa and thrombin inhibitors, are currently under development. These agents will facilitate the clinical management of NOAC-associated hemorrhagic stroke and other severe bleeding.

  11. Direct oral anticoagulants: Current indications and unmet needs in the treatment of venous thromboembolism.

    PubMed

    Bertoletti, Laurent; Ollier, Edouard; Duvillard, Cécile; Delavenne, Xavier; Beyens, Marie-Noëlle; De Magalhaes, Elodie; Bellet, Florelle; Basset, Thierry; Mismetti, Patrick; Laporte, Silvy

    2017-04-01

    The treatment of acute venous thromboembolism (VTE) is being completely modified with the development of direct oral anticoagulants (DOACs). Rivaroxaban, apixaban and edoxaban directly inhibit factor Xa, whereas dabigatran inhibits factor IIa. All these drugs are proposed orally, and share pharmacological similarities: fixed doses without any therapeutic drug monitoring, key role of the transporter proteins P-glycoprotein for all of them and metabolism mediated by CYP3A4 for the anti-Xa, short half-life with variable rate of renal elimination. More than 25 000 patients with acute VTE were included in phase-III studies. Rivaroxaban and apixaban challenged all the conventional therapy (parenteral heparins followed by anti-vitamin K antagonists) whereas edoxaban and dabigatran challenged only anti-vitamin K antagonists. All the DOACs met the non-inferiority efficacy endpoint (recurrent VTE during treatment), whereas the large non-inferiority margin was debated for dabigatran. However, they were associated with better safety and a decreased risk of major bleeding. According to indirect comparisons, there were no statistically significant differences between DOACs in terms of efficacy but some differences are not excluded in term of safety. Although DOACs allow for simplification of treatment in the majority of patients with acute VTE, their risk/benefit ratio is questioned in elderly patients, patients with mild-to-severe renal impairment, and in some clinical subgroups such as cancer or chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension. Validated reversal strategies (potentially based on laboratory monitoring) are expected for patients with major bleeding, overdose or with a need for surgery.

  12. Impact of self-funding on patient experience of oral anticoagulation self-monitoring: a qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    Tompson, Alice; Heneghan, Carl; Sutton, Stephen; Fitzmaurice, David; Ward, Alison

    2016-01-01

    Objective To explore the impact self-funding has on patient experience of oral anticoagulation therapy self-monitoring. Design Semistructured, qualitative interviews were conducted. Transcripts were analysed thematically using constant comparison. Setting England. Participants Interviewees were participants of the Cohort Study of Anticoagulation Self-Monitoring (CASM). Cohort members were recruited as they bought a monitor from the major manufacturer in the UK. A purposive sample was invited to be interviewed on completion of the 12-month cohort follow-up. Data Patient narratives on their experiences of self-monitoring their oral anticoagulation therapy in non-trial conditions. Results 26 interviews were completed. Interviewees viewed purchasing the monitoring device as a long-term commitment balancing the limitations of clinic-based monitoring against the cost. They were unable to try out the monitor prior to purchase and therefore had to be confident in their own ability to use it. The variable provision of self-monitoring equipment caused resentment, and interviewees were uncomfortable negotiating with healthcare professionals. High test strip usage while learning how to use the monitor caused anxiety that was exacerbated by worries about their cost. However, self-funding did mean that interviewees felt a sense of ownership and were determined to persevere to overcome problems. Conclusions Self-funding has negative implications in terms of equity of access; however, the money invested acts as a barrier to discontinuation. If oral anticoagulation therapy self-monitoring devices and consumables were provided free of charge in routine care, the training and support available in England may need to be reviewed to prevent discontinuation rates rising to those observed in clinical trials. PMID:28011812

  13. Prospective pilot trial of PerMIT versus standard anticoagulation service management of patients initiating oral anticoagulation.

    PubMed

    Borgman, Mark P; Pendleton, Robert C; McMillin, Gwendolyn A; Reynolds, Kristen K; Vazquez, Sara; Freeman, Andrew; Wilson, Andrew; Valdes, Roland; Linder, Mark W

    2012-09-01

    We performed a randomised pilot trial of PerMIT, a novel decision support tool for genotype-based warfarin initiation and maintenance dosing, to assess its efficacy for improving warfarin management. We prospectively studied 26 subjects to compare PerMIT-guided management with routine anticoagulation service management. CYP2C9 and VKORC1 genotype results for 13 subjects randomly assigned to the PerMIT arm were recorded within 24 hours of enrolment. To aid in INR interpretation, PerMIT calculates estimated loading and maintenance doses based on a patient's genetic and clinical characteristics and displays calculated S-warfarin plasma concentrations based on planned or administered dosages. In comparison to control subjects, patients in the PerMIT study arm demonstrated a 3.6-day decrease in the time to reach a stabilised INR within the target therapeutic range (4.7 vs. 8.3 days, p = 0.015); a 12.8% increase in time spent within the therapeutic interval over the first 25 days of therapy (64.3% vs. 55.3%, p = 0.180); and a 32.9% decrease in the frequency of warfarin dose adjustments per INR measurement (38.3% vs. 57.1%, p = 0.007). Serial measurements of plasma S-warfarin concentrations were also obtained to prospectively evaluate the accuracy of the pharmacokinetic model during induction therapy. The PerMIT S-warfarin plasma concentration model estimated 62.8% of concentrations within 0.15 mg/l. These pilot data suggest that the PerMIT method and its incorporation of genotype/phenotype information may help practitioners increase the safety, efficacy, and efficiency of warfarin therapeutic management.

  14. Critique on the use of the standardized avian acute oral toxicity test for first generation anticoagulant rodenticides

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Vyas, Nimish B.; Rattner, Barnett A.

    2012-01-01

    Avian risk assessments for rodenticides are often driven by the results of standardized acute oral toxicity tests without regards to a toxicant's mode of action and time course of adverse effects. First generation anticoagulant rodenticides (FGARs) generally require multiple feedings over several days to achieve a threshold concentration in tissue and cause adverse effects. This exposure regimen is much different than that used in the standardized acute oral toxicity test methodology. Median lethal dose values derived from standardized acute oral toxicity tests underestimate the environmental hazard and risk of FGARs. Caution is warranted when FGAR toxicity, physiological effects, and pharmacokinetics derived from standardized acute oral toxicity testing are used for forensic confirmation of the cause of death in avian mortality incidents and when characterizing FGARs' risks to free-ranging birds.

  15. Novel Oral Anticoagulants for Venous Thromboembolism with Special Emphasis on Risk of Hemorrhagic Complications and Reversal Agents

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Zaheer; Hassan, Seemeen; Salzman, Gary A.

    2016-01-01

    Warfarin was the only oral anticoagulant available for the treatment of venous thromboembolism for about half a century until the recent approval of novel oral agents dabigatran, rivoraxaban and apixaban. This presents new classes of medications less cumbersome to use. They do not require frequent laboratory monitoring or have nurmerous drug interactions. On the other hand it also poses a challenge to the physicians deciding which agent to use in specific patient populations, how to predict the bleeding risk compared to warfarin and between the different novel agents and how to manage bleeding with relatively recent discovery of few potential antidotes. This review summarizes the major trials that led to the approval of these agents and their exclusion criteria helping physicians understand which patient types might not benefit from these agents. It provides clinical pearls invaluable in everyday practice such as transitioning between traditional and novel anticoagulants, dose adjustments for high risk populations, drug interactions and cost analysis. Futhermore, the review provides direct comparisons with warfarin and indirect comparisons among the novel agents in terms of efficacy and bleeding risk narrating the numbers of patients with intracranial, gastrointestinal and fatal hemorrhages in each of the major trials. We hope that this review will help the physicians inform their patients about the benefits and risks of these agents and enable them to make an informed selection of the most appropriate anticoagulant. PMID:27594818

  16. New orally active anticoagulant agents for the prevention and treatment of venous thromboembolism in cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Gerotziafas, Grigoris T; Mahé, Isabelle; Elalamy, Ismail

    2014-01-01

    Patients with cancer have a 6–7-fold higher risk of venous thromboembolism (VTE) as compared with non-cancer patients. Effective and safe anticoagulation for the prevention and treatment of VTE is the cornerstone of the management of patients with cancer, aiming to decrease morbidity and mortality and to improve quality of life. Unfractionated heparin, low molecular weight heparins, fondaparinux and vitamin K antagonists (VKAs) are used in the prevention and treatment of VTE in cancer patients. Heparins and fondaparinux are administered subcutaneously. VKAs are orally active, but they have a narrow therapeutic window, numerous food and drug interactions, and treatment requires regular laboratory monitoring and dose adjustment. These limitations among others have important negative impact on the quality of life of patients and decrease adherence to the treatment. New orally active anticoagulant (NOAC) agents are specific inhibitors of activated factor Xa (FXa) (rivaroxaban and apixaban) or thrombin (dabigatran). It is expected that NOACs will improve antithrombotic treatment. Cancer patients are a particular group that could benefit from treatment with NOACs. However, NOACs present some significant interactions with drugs frequently used in cancer patients, which might influence their pharmacokinetics, compromising their efficacy and safety. In the present review, we analyzed the available data from the subgroups of patients with active cancer who were included in Phase III clinical trials that assessed the efficacy and safety of NOACs in the prevention and treatment of VTE. The data from the Phase III trials in prophylaxis of VTE by rivaroxaban or apixaban highlight that these two agents, although belonging to the same pharmacological group (direct inhibitors of factor Xa), have substantially different profiles of efficacy and safety, especially in hospitalized acutely ill medical patients with active cancer. A limited number of patients with VTE and active

  17. Oral anticoagulation in elderly patients as secondary prevention of cardioembolic strokes

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Stroke incidence increases with age. Atrial fibrillation (AF) is an important risk factor for ischemic stroke and its incidence also increases with age. However oral anticoagulant therapy (OAT) tends to be underused in the elderly population. Methods Elderly patients (> = 80 years) with an ischemic stroke admitted in our department between 1/7/2003 and 31/6/2005 were prospectively evaluated. Baseline characteristics, risk factors, treatment and etiology according to TOAST criteria were recorded. Patients treated with OAT were followed up in order to assess any side effect and stroke recurrence. Mean follow-up was of 19.5 months (7-45) from discharge. Results Sixty four out of a hundred and fifty nine elderly patients (40.25%) were classified as cardioembolic; mean age was 84.5 years (80-97) and 64.6% were women. AF had been previously identified in 60% of them (16.9% were on OAT and 40.6% on antiplatelet therapy). At discharge, 32 patients (49.2%) were on OAT. In the follow-up 4 patients (12.5%) suffered systemic haemorrhages (3 urinary, 1 gastrointestinal bleeding), with no change in their functional status. Mean INR in this group was 5.9 [3-11] and, in 3 of them, OAT was cancelled. No brain haemorrhages were recorded. Ischemic stroke recurred in 4 patients (INR < 1.8 in 3 of them; the other, INR 2.35). Three patients had died at the end of the follow-up, one of them as a consequence of ischemic stroke recurrence. Discussion Twenty eight point eight of stroke patients admitted in the period of study were >80 years. The high proportion of cardioembolic strokes in this age segment contrasts with the general underuse of OAT as antithrombotic prophylaxis. Our study suggests that OAT is a safe strategy when carefully prescribed, even for elderly patients. PMID:20525389

  18. Novel oral anticoagulants for the secondary prevention of cerebral ischemia: a network meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Katsanos, Aristeidis H.; Mavridis, Dimitris; Parissis, John; Deftereos, Spyridon; Frogoudaki, Alexandra; Vrettou, Agathi-Rosa; Ikonomidis, Ignatios; Chondrogianni, Maria; Safouris, Apostolos; Filippatou, Angeliki; Voumvourakis, Konstantinos; Triantafyllou, Nikos; Ellul, John; Karapanayiotides, Theodore; Giannopoulos, Sotirios; Alexandrov, Anne W.; Alexandrov, Andrei V.; Tsivgoulis, Georgios

    2016-01-01

    Background: Novel oral anticoagulants (NOACs) have shown to be both safe and effective for ischemic stroke prevention in patients with nonvalvular atrial fibrillation (NVAF). We conducted a network meta-analysis (NMA) using published data from secondary prevention subgroups of different phase III randomized clinical trials (RCTs) comparing individual NOACs with warfarin. Methods: Eligible studies were identified by searching MEDLINE and SCOPUS and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials databases. First, we conducted a pairwise meta-analysis for each pairwise comparison, and then we performed NMA to combine direct and indirect evidence for any given pair of treatments. The comparative effects of all NOACs against warfarin were ranked with the surface under the cumulative ranking (SUCRA) curve for each outcome. Results: We identified four RCTs (including 15,240 patients) comparing individual NOACs (apixaban, dabigatran, rivaroxaban) with warfarin. Using indirect evidence, dabigatran was related to a significantly lower risk of hemorrhagic stroke compared with rivaroxaban [risk ratio (RR) 0.28; 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.11–0.75], while rivaroxaban was associated with a significantly lower risk of major gastrointestinal bleeding compared with dabigatran (RR 0.14; 95% CI 0.03–0.74). We also performed clustered ranking plot for the primary efficacy and safety endpoints to identify the treatment with the probably best benefit-to-risk ratio profile. Conclusions: The three NOACs showed differences in terms of safety and efficacy for secondary stroke prevention in NVAF. Our findings can serve only as hypothesis generation and require independent confirmation in head-to-head RCTs, owing to the sparse available evidence and increased uncertainty in both indirect effect estimates and ranking of treatments. PMID:27582891

  19. Patients' perspectives on self-testing of oral anticoagulation therapy: Content analysis of patients' internet blogs

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Patients on oral anticoagulant therapy (OAT) require regular testing of the prothrombin time (PT) and the international normalised ratio (INR) to monitor their blood coagulation level to avoid complications of either over or under coagulation. PT/INR can be tested by a healthcare professional or by the patient. The latter mode of the testing is known as patient self-testing or home testing. The objective of this study was to elicit patients' perspectives and experiences regarding PT/INR self-testing using portable coagulometer devices. Methods Internet blog text mining was used to collect 246 blog postings by 108 patients, mainly from the USA and the UK. The content of these qualitative data were analysed using XSight and NVivo software packages. Results The key themes in relation to self-testing of OAT identified were as follows: Patient benefits reported were time saved, personal control, choice, travel reduction, cheaper testing, and peace of mind. Equipment issues included high costs, reliability, quality, and learning how to use the device. PT/INR issues focused on the frequency of testing, INR fluctuations and individual target (therapeutic) INR level. Other themes noted were INR testing at laboratories, the interactions with healthcare professionals in managing and testing OAT and insurance companies' involvement in acquiring the self-testing equipment. Social issues included the pain and stress of taking and testing for OAT. Conclusions Patients' blogs on PT/INR testing provide insightful information that can help in understanding the nature of the experiences and perspectives of patients on self-testing of OAT. The themes identified in this paper highlight the substantial complexities involved in self-testing programmes in the healthcare system. Thus, the issues elicited in this study are very valuable for all stakeholders involved in developing effective self-testing strategies in healthcare that are gaining considerable current momentum

  20. Early introduction of direct oral anticoagulants in cardioembolic stroke patients with non-valvular atrial fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Cappellari, Manuel; Carletti, Monica; Danese, Alessandra; Bovi, Paolo

    2016-10-01

    Direct oral anticoagulants (DOACs) are superior to warfarin in reduction of the intracranial bleeding risk. The aim of the present study was to assess whether early DOAC introduction (1-3 days after onset) in stroke patients with non-valvular atrial fibrillation (nVAF) may be safe and effective, compared with DOAC introduction after 4-7 days. We conducted a prospective analysis based on data collected from 147 consecutive nVAF patients who started DOAC within 7 days after stroke onset. In all patients, we performed pre-DOAC CT scan 24-36 h after onset and follow-up CT scan at 7 days after DOAC introduction. Outcome measures were post-DOAC intracranial bleeding (new any intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) in patients with pre-DOAC infarct without hemorrhagic transformation (HT) or expansion of ICH in patients with pre-DOAC infarct with asymptomatic HT) and post-DOAC recurrent ischemic stroke (any new ischemic infarct) on follow-up CT scan. 97 patients started DOAC after 1-3 days and 50 patients started DOAC after 4-7 days. On pre-DOAC CT scan, 132 patients had an infarct without HT and 15 an infarct with asymptomatic HT. On follow-up CT scan, new any ICH was noted in seven patients (asymptomatic in 6) and asymptomatic expansion of ICH in one patient. We found no association between early DOAC introduction and intracranial bleeding. Large infarct remained the only independent predictor of post-DOAC intracranial bleeding. No patients suffered recurrent ischemic stroke after DOAC introduction. Early DOAC introduction might be safe in carefully selected patients with nVAF who experience small- and medium-sized cardioembolic ischemic strokes. Further investigation will be needed.

  1. Safety and Efficacy of Underdosing Non-vitamin K Antagonist Oral Anticoagulants in Patients Undergoing Catheter Ablation for Atrial Fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    Murakami, Takashi; Hina, Kazuyoshi; Higashiya, Shunichi; Kawamura, Hiroshi; Murakami, Masaaki; Kamikawa, Shigeshi; Komatsubara, Issei; Kusachi, Shozo

    2017-01-01

    Background: Some patients with atrial fibrillation (AF) received underdoses of non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants (NOACs) in the real world. Underdosing is defined as administration of a dose lower than the manufacturer recommended dose. Objectives: To identify the efficacy and safety of underdosing NOACs as perioperative anticoagulation for atrial fibrillation ablation. Methods: We retrospectively analyzed patients who received rivaroxaban or dabigatran etexilate according to dosage: adjusted low dosage (reduced by disturbed renal function; n = 30), underdosage (n = 307), or standard dosage (n = 683). Non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants and dosing decisions were at the discretion of treating cardiologists. Results: Patients who received underdosed NOACs were older, more often female, and had lower body weight and lower renal function than those who received standard dosages. Activated clotting time at baseline in patients who received adjusted low dosage or underdosages was slightly longer than that in patients receiving standard dosages (156 ± 23, 151 ± 224, and 147 ± 24 seconds, respectively). Meaningful differences were not observed in other coagulation parameters. Adjusted low-, under-, and standard-dosing regimens did not differ in perioperative thromboembolic complications (0/30, 0.0%; 1/307, 0.3%; and 0/683, 0%, respectively) or major (0/30, 0.0%; 2/307, 0.6%; 3/683, 0.4%) and minor (1/30, 3.3%; 13/307, 4.2%; 25/683, 3.6%) bleeding episodes. When comparisons were performed for each NOAC, similar results were observed. Conclusions: With consideration of patient condition, age, sex, body weight, body mass index, and renal function, underdosing NOACs was effective and safe as a perioperative anticoagulation therapy for atrial fibrillation ablation. The therapeutic range of NOACs is potentially wider than manufacturer recommendations. PMID:28170360

  2. The Prototype Compound for the Oral Anticoagulants: 3,3'-Methylene bis(4-hydroxycoumarin).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hayward, Rodney C.

    1984-01-01

    Provides background information on the development and action of the coumarin family of anticoagulants, focusing on an experimental procedure for the synthesis of dicumerol. Includes procedures used and safety considerations. (JM)

  3. Oral anticoagulation in patients with atrial fibrillation and medical non-neoplastic disease in a terminal stage.

    PubMed

    Díez-Manglano, Jesús; Bernabeu-Wittel, Máximo; Murcia-Zaragoza, José; Escolano-Fernández, Belén; Jarava-Rol, Guadalupe; Hernández-Quiles, Carlos; Oliver, Miguel; Sanz-Baena, Susana

    2017-02-01

    Many patients with non-neoplastic disease develop atrial fibrillation in advanced stages of their disease. The aim of this study is to determine the factors associated with the use of oral anticoagulants in patients with atrial fibrillation and non-neoplastic medical disease in a terminal stage, and whether their use is associated with a longer survival. Design is prospective, observational, multicentre study. Patients with atrial fibrillation and non-neoplastic disease (severe not reversible organ insufficiency) in a terminal stage were included between February 2009 and September 2010. A 6-month follow-up was carried out. We included 314 patients with a mean (SD) age of 82.6 (7.0) years. Their mean (SD) scores in CHADS2 and ATRIA scales were 3.4 (1.2) and 4.7 (2.0), respectively. Anticoagulants were prescribed to 112 (37.5 %) patients. The use of anticoagulants was associated with age (OR 0.96 95 % CI 0.93-0.99, p = 0.046) and to the Barthel index (OR 1.01 95 % CI 1.00-1.02; p = 0.034). After performing a propensity score matching analysis, 262 patients were included in the survival analysis. After 6 months, 133 (50.8 %) patients were dead. The mortality is higher among patients who are not treated with oral anticoagulants (57.1 vs. 39.4 %; p = 0.006), but it is independently associated only with the Barthel index score (HR 0.99 95 % CI 0.98-1.00; p = 0.039), delirium (HR 1.60, 95 % CI 1.08-2.36; p = 0.018), anorexia (HR 1.58 95 % CI 1.05-2.38; p = 0.027), and with the use of calcium channel blockers (HR 0.50 95 % CI 0.30-0.84; p = 0.009). In patients with atrial fibrillation and non-neoplastic disease in a terminal stage, the use of oral anticoagulants is not independently associated with a higher probability of survival.

  4. Prescription patterns of oral anticoagulants for patients with non-valvular atrial fibrillation: experience at a Japanese single institution.

    PubMed

    Tagaya, Manaka; Yoshikawa, Daiji; Sugishita, Yoshinori; Yamauchi, Fumi; Ito, Takehiro; Kamada, Tomohito; Yoshinaga, Masataka; Mukaide, Daisuke; Fujiwara, Wakaya; Yokoi, Hiroatsu; Hayashi, Mutsuharu; Watanabe, Eiichi; Ishii, Junichi; Ozaki, Yukio; Izawa, Hideo

    2016-06-01

    New oral anticoagulants (NOACs) are now clinically available. However, few studies have demonstrated which patients with non-valvular atrial fibrillation (NVAF) actually receive NOACs in a clinical setting. We analyzed 182 NVAF patients who received oral anticoagulants. Clinical backgrounds and the risk of stroke, systemic embolism, and bleeding associated with oral anticoagulants were investigated. Seventy-three (40 %) patients were treated with NOACs and 109 (60 %) patients were treated with warfarin. A significantly lower mean number of bleeding risk factors was observed among the patients treated with NOACs than among those treated with warfarin (P = 0.010). Of the bleeding risk factors, NOACs were significantly less frequently prescribed in patients with a bleeding history and elderly subjects (>65 years) than in those who received warfarin (P < 0.001 and P = 0.029). A multivariate logistic regression analysis revealed that CHF and bleeding history were independently and significantly associated with the administration of NOACs (P = 0.047 and P = 0.003). The rate of a history of intracranial hemorrhage was comparable between the patients treated with NOACs and those treated with warfarin (P = 1.000). Significantly lower rates of a history of gastrointestinal and other minor bleeding were observed in the patients who received NOACs versus those who received warfarin (P = 0.001 and P = 0.026). NOACs were less frequently prescribed in patients with a history of bleeding, especially those with a history of gastrointestinal bleeding in a clinical setting.

  5. [Treatment with inhibitors of new oral direct anticoagulants in patients with severe bleedings or urgent surgical procedures. The new dabigatran antidote: the place of idarucizumab in clinical practice].

    PubMed

    Boda, Zoltán

    2016-03-20

    Only vitamin K antagonists could be applied as oral anticoagulants over the past six decades. Coumarols have narrow therapeutic range, and unpredictable anticoagulant effects are resulted by multiple drug interactions. Therefore, regular routine monitoring of the international normalized ratio is necessary. There are two groups of factor-specific anticoagulants: molecules with anti-FIIa (dabigatran) and anti-FXa (rivaroxaban, apixaban and edoxaban) effect. Author summarizes the most important clinical features of the new oral anticoagulants, their indications and the possibilities of laboratory controls. Bleedings are the most important side effects of anticoagulants. This review summarizes the current published evidences for new oral anticoagulants reversal (non-specific and specific) agents, especially in cases with severe acute bleedings or urgent surgery procedures. It reports on how to use inhibitors, the recommended doses and the most important clinical results. The review focuses on idarucizumab - already approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration and the European Medicines Agency - which has a key role as the first specific inhibitor of dabigatran.

  6. Aligning health care policy with evidence-based medicine: the case for funding direct oral anticoagulants in atrial fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Stone, James A; Earl, Karen M; O'Neill, Blair J; Sharma, Mukul; Huynh, Thao; Leblanc, Kori; Ward, Richard; Teal, Philip A; Cox, Jafna L

    2014-10-01

    Misalignment between evidence-informed clinical care guideline recommendations and reimbursement policy has created care gaps that lead to suboptimal outcomes for patients denied access to guideline-based therapies. The purpose of this article is to make the case for addressing this growing access barrier to optimal care. Stroke prevention in atrial fibrillation (AF) is discussed as an example. Stroke is an extremely costly disease, imposing a significant human, societal, and economic burden. Stroke in the setting of AF carries an 80% probability of death or disability. Although two-thirds of these strokes are preventable with appropriate anticoagulation, this has historically been underprescribed and poorly managed. National and international guidelines endorse the direct oral anticoagulants as first-line therapy for this indication. However, no Canadian province has provided these agents with an unrestricted listing. These decisions appear to be founded on silo-based cost assessment-the drug costs rather than the total system costs-and thus overlook several important cost-drivers in stroke. The discordance between best scientific evidence and public policy requires health care providers to use a potentially suboptimal therapy in contravention of guideline recommendations. It represents a significant obstacle for knowledge translation efforts that aim to increase the appropriate anticoagulation of Canadians with AF. As health care professionals, we have a responsibility to our patients to engage with policy-makers in addressing and resolving this barrier to optimal patient care.

  7. [Direct oral anticoagulants: what is the exact assessment of coagulation tests and plasma levels by laboratory tests in clinical practice?].

    PubMed

    Gendron, Nicolas; Smadja, David M

    2016-01-01

    Direct oral anticoagulants (DAO), anti-IIa or anti-Xa, are intended to be widely used for the treatment and prevention of thrombotic disorders in venous thromboembolic disease and atrial fibrillation as an alternative of vitamin K antagonists (VKA). Despite predictable pharmacological properties, spontaneous or provoked hemorrhagic risks by DAO are major limitations. Thus, after few years of inconsistence concerning biological implication and in particular coagulation tests, it is now established that we need biology to evaluate hemorrhagic risk before surgery or in hemorrhagic cases.

  8. Predictors of common femoral artery access site complications in patients on oral anticoagulants and undergoing a coronary procedure

    PubMed Central

    Shammas, Nicolas W; Shammas, Gail A; Jones-Miller, Susan; Gumpert, Mileah Rose; Gumpert, Miranda Jade; Harb, Christine; Chammas, Majid Z; Shammas, W John; Khalafallah, Rommy A; Barzgari, Amy; Bou Dargham, Bassel; Daher, Ghassan E; Rachwan, Rayan Jo; Shammas, Andrew N

    2017-01-01

    Background It is unclear whether patients on oral anticoagulants (OAC) undergoing a procedure using common femoral artery access have higher adverse events when compared to patients who are not anticoagulated at the time of the procedure. Methods We retrospectively reviewed data from consecutive patients who underwent a cardiac procedure at a tertiary medical center. Patients were considered (group A) fully or partially anticoagulated if they had an international normalized ratio (INR) ≥1.6 on the day of the procedure or were on warfarin or new OAC within 48 h and 24 h of the procedure, respectively. The nonanticoagulated group (group B) had an INR <1.6 or had stopped their warfarin and new OAC >48 h and >24 h preprocedure, respectively. The index primary end point of the study was defined as the composite end point of major bleeding, vascular complications, or cardiovascular-related death during index hospitalization. The 30-day primary end point was defined as the occurrence of the index primary end point and up to 30 days postprocedure. Results A total of 779 patients were included in this study. Of these patients, 27 (3.5%) patients were in group A. The index primary end point was met in 11/779 (1.4%) patients. The 30-day primary composite end point was met in 18/779 (2.3%) patients. There was no difference in the primary end point at index between group A (1/27 [3.7%]) and group B (10/752 [1.3%]; P=0.3155) and no difference in the 30-day primary composite end point between group A (2/27 [7.4%]) and group B (16/752 [2.1%]; P=0.1313). Multivariable analysis showed that a low creatinine clearance (odds ratio [OR] =0.56; P=0.0200) and underweight patients (<60 kg; OR =3.94; P=0.0300) were independent predictors of the 30-day primary composite end point but not oral anticoagulation (P=0.1500). Conclusion Patients on OAC did not have higher 30-day major adverse events than those who were not anticoagulated at index procedure.

  9. Epidemiology of Intracranial Haemorrhages Associated with Vitamin K Antagonist Oral Anticoagulants in Spain: TAC Registry

    PubMed Central

    Zapata-Wainberg, Gustavo; Ximénez-Carrillo Rico, Álvaro; Benavente Fernández, Lorena; Masjuan Vallejo, Jaime; Gállego Culleré, Jaime; Freijó Guerrero, María del Mar; Egido, José; Gómez Sánchez, José Carlos; Martínez Domeño, Alejandro; Purroy García, Francisco; Vives Pastor, Bárbara; Blanco González, Miguel; Vivancos, José

    2015-01-01

    Background Vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants (VKA-OACs) are effective for primary and secondary prevention of embolic events. The rate of haemorrhagic neurological complications in patients admitted to neurology departments in Spain is not yet known. Aims We aimed to determine the clinical and epidemiological characteristics of patients with intracranial haemorrhage secondary to VKA-OACs as well as the incidence of this severe complication. Methods We conducted a retrospective, descriptive, multi-centre study using information from the medical records of all patients admitted to neurology departments, diagnosed with spontaneous intracranial haemorrhage, and treated with VKA-OACs within a 1-year period. We collected demographic and care data from centres, patients' medical records [demographic data, medical history, haemorrhage origin, vascular risk factors, concomitant treatment, and National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) scores], and patients' outcome at 3 months [independence (modified Rankin Scale score <3) and mortality rate]. Results Twenty-one hospitals serving a population of 8,155,628 inhabitants participated in the study. The total number of cases was 235, the mean age was 78.2 (SD 9.4) years, and the baseline NIHSS score was 11.6 (SD 9.5; median 9; interquartile range 14). The VKA-OACs used were acenocoumarol in 95.3% (224 patients) and warfarin in 4.7% (11 patients). The haemorrhage origin was deep in 29.8%, lobar in 25.5%, intraventricular in 11.5%, extensive in 17.4% (>100 ml), cerebellar in 12.3%, and in the brainstem in 3.4%. The international normalised ratio was within therapeutic ranges at admission (according to indication) in 29.4% (69 patients). The global incidence (cases per 100,000 inhabitants per year) is 2.88. The in-hospital mortality rate was 40%, and 24.3% of the patients were independent at 3 months, while the mortality at 3 months was 42.6%. Conclusion VKA-OAC treatment is associated with a large percentage of all

  10. Efficacy and Safety of Oral Anticoagulants Versus Aspirin for Patients With Atrial Fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jing-Tao; Chen, Ke-Ping; Zhang, Shu

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The purpose of this study was to perform a meta-analysis comparing the effectiveness and safety of anticoagulation to antiplatelet therapy for the prevention of thromboembolic events in patients with atrial fibrillation (AF). MEDLINE, Cochrane, EMBASE, and Google Scholar databases were searched for studies published through May 31, 2014. Randomized controlled trials comparing anticoagulants (warfarin) and antiplatelet therapy in patients with AF were included. The primary outcomes were the rates of stroke and systemic embolism. Secondary outcomes included the rates of hemorrhage/major bleeding and death. Pooled odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated. Nine reports of 8 trials that enrolled 4363 patients (2169 patients received anticoagulation and 2194 antiplatelet therapy) were included. All of the studies compared adjusted-dose warfarin or with aspirin, and the majority of the patients were >70 years of age. Anticoagulants were titrated to an international normalized ratio (INR) of 2.0 to 4.5, and aspirin was administered at a dosage of 75 to 325 mg/d. Death occurred in 206 participants treated with an anticoagulant and 229 participants treated with antiplatelet therapy. There was no significant difference in the overall stroke rate between the groups (OR = 0.667, 95% CI 0.426–1.045, P = 0.08); however, patients with nonrheumatic AF (NRAF) treated with an anticoagulant had a lower risk of stroke (OR = 0.557, 95% CI 0.411–0.753, P < 0.001). Anticoagulants were associated with a lower risk of embolism (OR = 0.616, 95% CI = 0.392–0.966, P = 0.04), and this finding persisted in patients with NRAF (OR = 0.581, 95% CI 0.359–0.941, P = 0.03). No significant difference in the rate of hemorrhage/major bleeding was noted (OR = 1.497, 95% CI 0.730–3.070, P = 0.27), and this finding persisted on subgroup analysis. Anticoagulants appear to be more effective than aspirin in preventing

  11. [New oral anticoagulants for prophylaxis of stroke. Results of an expert conference on practical use in geriatric patients].

    PubMed

    Bahrmann, Philipp; Harms, Fred; Schambeck, Christian Martin; Wehling, Martin; Flohr, Jürgen

    2016-04-01

    Geriatric patients with non-valvular atrial fibrillation (AF) are increasingly being treated with novel oral anticoagulants (NOAC) to prevent ischemic stroke. This article highlights the outcome of an expert meeting on the practical use of NOAC in elderly patients. An interdisciplinary group of experts discussed the current situation of stroke prevention in geriatric patients and its practical management in daily clinical practice. The topic was examined through focused impulse presentations and critical analyses as the basis for the expert consensus. The key issues are summarized in this paper. The European Society of Cardiology (ESC) guidelines from 2012 for the management of patients with non-valvular AF recommend NOAC as the preferred treatment and vitamin K antagonists (VKA) only as an alternative option. Currently, the NOAC factor Xa inhibitors apixaban and rivaroxaban and the thrombin inhibitor dabigatran are more commonly used in clinical practice for patients with AF. Although these drugs have many similarities and are often grouped together it is important to recognize that the pharmacology and dose regimes differ between compounds. Especially n elderly patients NOAC drugs have some advantages compared to VKA, e.g. less drug-drug interactions with concomitant medication and a more favorable risk-benefit ratio mostly driven by the reduction of bleeding. Treatment of anticoagulation in geriatric patients requires weighing the serious risk of stroke against an equally high risk of major bleeding and pharmacoeconomic considerations. Geriatric patients in particular have the greatest benefit from NOAC, which can also be administered in cases of reduced renal function. Regular control of the indications is indispensable, as also for all other medications of the patient. The use of NOAC should certainly not be withheld from geriatric patients who have a clear need for oral anticoagulation.

  12. Comparison of laboratory and immediate diagnosis of coagulation for patients under oral anticoagulation therapy before dental surgery

    PubMed Central

    Kruse-Loesler, Birgit; Kelker, Matthias; Kleinheinz, Johannes

    2005-01-01

    Background Dental surgery can be carried out on patients under oral anticoagulation therapy by using haemostyptic measures. The aim of the study was a comparative analysis of coagulation by laboratory methods and immediate patient diagnosis on the day of the planned procedure. Methods On the planned day of treatment, diagnoses were carried out on 298 patients for Prothrombin Time (PT), the International Normalised Ratio (INR), and Partial Thromboplastin Time (PTT). The decision to proceed with treatment was made with an INR < 4.0 according to laboratory results. Results Planned treatment did not go ahead in 2.7% of cases. Postoperatively, 14.8% resulted in secondary bleeding, but were able to be treated as out-patients. 1.7% had to be treated as in-patients. The average error between the immediate diagnosis and the laboratory method: 95% confidence interval was -5.8 ± 15.2% for PT, -2.7 ± 17.9 s for PTT and 0.23 ± 0.80 for INR. The limits for concordance were 9.4 and -21.1% for PT, 15.2 and -20.5 s for PTT, and 1.03 and -0.57 for INR. Conclusion This study showed a clinically acceptable concordance between laboratory and immediate diagnosis for INR. Concordance for PT and PTT did not meet clinical requirements. For patients under oral anticoagulation therapy, patient INR diagnosis enabled optimisation of the treatment procedure when planning dental surgery. PMID:16316464

  13. Hemostasis and Post-operative Care of Oral Surgical Wounds by Hemcon Dental Dressing in Patients on Oral Anticoagulant Therapy: A Split Mouth Randomized Controlled Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, K.R. Ashok; Sarvagna, Jagadesh; Gadde, Praveen; Chikkaboriah, Shwetha

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Hemostasis is a fundamental management issue post-operatively in minor oral surgical procedures. To ensure safety and therapeutic efficacy in patients, under oral anti coagulant therapy, is complicated by necessity for frequent determination of prothrombin time or international normalised ratio. Aim The aim of the study was to determine whether early hemostasis achieved by using Hemcon Dental Dressing (HDD) will affect post-operative care and surgical healing outcome in minor oral surgical procedures. Materials and Methods A total of 30 patients, aged 18 years to 90 years, except those allergic to seafood, who consented to participate, were enrolled into this study. Patients were required to have two or more surgical sites so that they would have both surgical and control sites. All patients taking Oral Anticoagulation Therapy (OAT) were included for treatment in the study without altering the anticoagulant regimens. Institutional Review Board approval was obtained for the same. The collected data was subjected to statistical analysis using unpaired t-test. Results All HDD surgically treated sites achieved hemostasis in 1.49 minutes and control wounds in 4.06 minutes (p < 0.001). Post-operative pain at HDD treated sites (1.87,1.27 on 1st and 3rd day respectively) was significantly lower than the control sites (4.0,1.87 on 1st and 3rd day respectively) p-value (0.001, 0.001 respectively). HDD treated oral surgery wounds achieved statistically significant improved healing both at 1st and 3rd post-operative days (p <0.0001). Conclusion The HDD has been proven to be a clinically effective hemostatic dressing material that significantly shortens bleeding time following minor oral surgical procedures under local anaesthesia, including those patients taking OAT. Patients receiving the HDD had improved surgical wound healing as compared to controls. PMID:27790577

  14. Use of Non-Vitamin K Antagonist Oral Anticoagulants in Special Patient Populations with Nonvalvular Atrial Fibrillation: A Review of the Literature and Application to Clinical Practice.

    PubMed

    Kalabalik, Julie; Rattinger, Gail B; Sullivan, Jesse; Slugocki, Malgorzata; Carbone, Antonia; Rivkin, Anastasia

    2015-06-01

    Atrial fibrillation is a commonly encountered arrhythmia associated with increased risk for thromboembolic events. Anticoagulation is necessary to decrease the risk of ischemic stroke. Traditionally, warfarin has been the only oral pharmacotherapeutic option for long-term anticoagulation in patients with nonvalvular atrial fibrillation (NVAF). Recently, non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants (NOAC), including dabigatran, rivaroxaban, apixaban, and edoxaban, have become available as alternatives for warfarin in the prevention of stroke in patients with NVAF. Recently published atrial fibrillation guidelines contain new recommendations for risk stratification tools in determining the need for anticoagulant therapy and incorporate NOAC pharmacotherapy options for stroke prevention in patients with NVAF. NOACs offer several advantages over warfarin, including the elimination of routine laboratory monitoring, fewer drug and food interactions, and rapid therapeutic onset and offset. However, the lack of antidote in the case of serious bleeding and lack of data for long-term use in patient populations at risk for bleeding is problematic. Older adults are at high risk for thromboembolic and bleeding events as a result of anticoagulation and require special consideration when selecting anticoagulant therapy. The risk of drug accumulation and bleeding is concerning in the presence of renal impairment. The objective of this review is to provide the clinician with an update on the use of NOACs for NVAF, focusing on older adults and patients with renal impairment in light of recently published atrial fibrillation guidelines. Available data on using NOACs in coronary artery stenting, cardioversion, and ablation are also reviewed.

  15. Pharmacokinetic evaluation of an oral tablet form of low-molecular-weight heparin and deoxycholic acid conjugate as a novel oral anticoagulant.

    PubMed

    Park, J W; Jeon, O C; Kim, S K; Al-Hilal, T A; Lim, K-M; Moon, H T; Kim, C Y; Byun, Y

    2011-06-01

    This study was designed to develop a solid oral dosage form of deoxycholic acid (DOCA)-conjugated low-molecular-weight heparin (LMWH) and to evaluate its oral absorption, distribution, and metabolic stability for the prospect of providing an orally bioavailable LMWH. The LMWH derivative (LHD) was synthesised and then formulated with solubilisers and other pharmaceutical excipients to form a solid tablet. Its absorption and distribution after oral administration were evaluated in mice, rats, and monkeys. The in vitro metabolic stability of LHD was examined by liver microsome assays. More than 80% of LHD was released from the tablet within 60 minutes, guaranteeing rapid tablet disintegration after oral administration. Oral bioavailability of LHD in mice, rats and monkeys were 16.1 ± 3.0, 15.6 ± 6.1, and 15.8 ± 2.5%, respectively. After the oral administration of 131I-tyramine-LHD, most of the absorbed drug remained in the blood circulation and was eliminated mainly through the kidneys. LHD was hardly metabolised by the liver microsomes and showed a stable metabolic pattern similar to that of LMWH. In a rat thrombosis model, 10 mg/kg of orally administered LHD reduced thrombus formation by 60.8%, which was comparable to the anti-thrombotic effect of the subcutaneously injected LMWH (100 IU/kg). Solid tablets of LHD exhibited high oral absorption and statistically significant therapeutic effects in preventing venous thromboembolism. Accordingly, LHD tablets are expected to satisfy the unmet medical need for an oral heparin-based anticoagulant as an alternative to injectable heparin and oral warfarin.

  16. A novel, rapid method to compare the therapeutic windows of oral anticoagulants using the Hill coefficient.

    PubMed

    Chang, Jeremy B; Quinnies, Kayla M; Realubit, Ronald; Karan, Charles; Rand, Jacob H; Tatonetti, Nicholas P

    2016-07-21

    A central challenge in designing and administering effective anticoagulants is achieving the proper therapeutic window and dosage for each patient. The Hill coefficient, nH, which measures the steepness of a dose-response relationship, may be a useful gauge of this therapeutic window. We sought to measure the Hill coefficient of available anticoagulants to gain insight into their therapeutic windows. We used a simple fluorometric in vitro assay to determine clotting activity in platelet poor plasma after exposure to various concentrations of anticoagulants. The Hill coefficient for argatroban was the lowest, at 1.7 ± 0.2 (95% confidence interval, CI), and the Hill coefficient for fondaparinux was the highest, at 4.5 ± 1.3 (95% CI). Thus, doubling the dose of fondaparinux from its IC50 would decrease coagulation activity by nearly a half, whereas doubling the dose of argatroban from its IC50 would decrease coagulation activity by merely one quarter. These results show a significant variation among the Hill coefficients, suggesting a similar variation in therapeutic windows among anticoagulants in our assay.

  17. Determination of non-Vitamin K oral anticoagulant (NOAC) effects using a new-generation thrombelastography TEG 6s system.

    PubMed

    Bliden, Kevin P; Chaudhary, Rahul; Mohammed, Nafees; Muresan, Adina A; Lopez-Espina, Carlos G; Cohen, Eli; Raviv, Gabriel; Doubleday, Marc; Zaman, Fowzia; Mathew, Blessy; Tantry, Udaya S; Gurbel, Paul A

    2017-05-01

    Non vitamin K oral anticoagulants (NOACs) do not require regular monitoring but information about their pharmacodynamic effect may be importantin situations like trauma, stroke oremergent surgery. Currently, no standardized point-of-care test is available to evaluate the anticoagulant effects of NOACs. We evaluated the anticoagulant effect of NOACs with the next generation point-of-care TEG assay (TEG® 6S) based on a fully-automated thrombelastography system. We used two TEG® 6S assays, the DTI assay and Anti-Factor Xa (AFXa) assay, to detect anticoagulant effects and classify NOACs. Blood from healthy volunteers (n = 26) was used to obtain a baseline reference range. Data derived from patients on factor Xa inhibitors (FXi) (rivaroxaban and apixaban) (n = 39), and direct thrombin inhibitors (DTIs) (dabigatran) (n = 25) were compared against the reference range for detection of drug effect and drug classification. TEG®6s R-time highly correlated to each NOAC. Presence of NOACs caused elongation of R-time on the AFXa assay compared to the reference range (4.3 ± 1.7 vs. 1.3 ± 0.3 min. for FXi, p < 0.001 and 3.5 ± 1.2 vs. 1.3 ± 0.3 min. for DTI, p < 0.001). R-time on the DTI assay was elongated only in presence of a DTI (3.4 ± 1.0 vs. 1.5 ± 0.2 min, p < 0.001). The cutoff for detection of a DTI effect was an R time of 1.9 min and for anti-Xa effect was 1.95 min. For detection of NOAC therapy, there was ≥92% sensitivity and ≥95% specificity. The automated TEG®6s NOAC assay may be an effective tool to identify an anticoagulant effect from NOAC therapy and facilitate care of patients with bleeding or at risk of bleeding in the event of needing emergency surgery.

  18. Endoscopy in patients on antiplatelet or anticoagulant therapy, including direct oral anticoagulants: British Society of Gastroenterology (BSG) and European Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy (ESGE) guidelines.

    PubMed

    Veitch, Andrew M; Vanbiervliet, Geoffroy; Gershlick, Anthony H; Boustiere, Christian; Baglin, Trevor P; Smith, Lesley-Ann; Radaelli, Franco; Knight, Evelyn; Gralnek, Ian M; Hassan, Cesare; Dumonceau, Jean-Marc

    2016-04-01

    The risk of endoscopy in patients on antithrombotics depends on the risks of procedural haemorrhage vs. thrombosis due to discontinuation of therapy. P2Y12 receptor antagonists (clopidogrel, prasugrel, ticagrelor): For low-risk endoscopic procedures we recommend continuing P2Y12 receptor antagonists as single or dual antiplatelet therapy (low quality evidence, strong recommendation);For high-risk endoscopic procedures in patients at low thrombotic risk, we recommend discontinuing P2Y12 receptor antagonists five days before the procedure (moderate quality evidence, strong recommendation). In patients on dual antiplatelet therapy, we suggest continuing aspirin (low quality evidence, weak recommendation).For high-risk endoscopic procedures in patients at high thrombotic risk, we recommend continuing aspirin and liaising with a cardiologist about the risk/benefit of discontinuation of P2Y12 receptor antagonists (high quality evidence, strong recommendation). Warfarin: The advice for warfarin is fundamentally unchanged from BSG 2008 guidance. Direct Oral Anticoagulants (DOAC): For low-risk endoscopic procedures we suggest omitting the morning dose of DOAC on the day of the procedure (very low quality evidence, weak recommendation). For high-risk endoscopic procedures, we recommend that the last dose of DOAC be taken ≥ 48 hours before the procedure (very low quality evidence, strong recommendation). For patients on dabigatran with CrCl (or estimated glomerular filtration rate, eGFR) of 30 - 50 mL/min we recommend that the last dose of DOAC be taken 72 hours before the procedure (very low quality evidence, strong recommendation). In any patient with rapidly deteriorating renal function a haematologist should be consulted (low quality evidence, strong recommendation).

  19. Endoscopy in patients on antiplatelet or anticoagulant therapy, including direct oral anticoagulants: British Society of Gastroenterology (BSG) and European Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy (ESGE) guidelines

    PubMed Central

    Veitch, Andrew M; Vanbiervliet, Geoffroy; Gershlick, Anthony H; Boustiere, Christian; Baglin, Trevor P; Smith, Lesley-Ann; Radaelli, Franco; Knight, Evelyn; Gralnek, Ian M; Hassan, Cesare; Dumonceau, Jean-Marc

    2016-01-01

    The risk of endoscopy in patients on antithrombotics depends on the risks of procedural haemorrhage versus thrombosis due to discontinuation of therapy. P2Y12 receptor antagonists (clopidogrel, prasugrel, ticagrelor) For low-risk endoscopic procedures we recommend continuing P2Y12 receptor antagonists as single or dual antiplatelet therapy (low quality evidence, strong recommendation); For high-risk endoscopic procedures in patients at low thrombotic risk, we recommend discontinuing P2Y12 receptor antagonists five days before the procedure (moderate quality evidence, strong recommendation). In patients on dual antiplatelet therapy, we suggest continuing aspirin (low quality evidence, weak recommendation). For high-risk endoscopic procedures in patients at high thrombotic risk, we recommend continuing aspirin and liaising with a cardiologist about the risk/benefit of discontinuation of P2Y12 receptor antagonists (high quality evidence, strong recommendation). Warfarin The advice for warfarin is fundamentally unchanged from British Society of Gastroenterology (BSG) 2008 guidance. Direct Oral Anticoagulants (DOAC) For low-risk endoscopic procedures we suggest omitting the morning dose of DOAC on the day of the procedure (very low quality evidence, weak recommendation); For high-risk endoscopic procedures, we recommend that the last dose of DOAC be taken ≥48 h before the procedure (very low quality evidence, strong recommendation). For patients on dabigatran with CrCl (or estimated glomerular filtration rate, eGFR) of 30–50 mL/min we recommend that the last dose of DOAC be taken 72 h before the procedure (very low quality evidence, strong recommendation). In any patient with rapidly deteriorating renal function a haematologist should be consulted (low quality evidence, strong recommendation). PMID:26873868

  20. Patient compliance with new oral anticoagulants after major orthopaedic surgery: rivaroxaban and dabigatran compared with subcutaneous injection of fondaparinux

    PubMed Central

    DI BENEDETTO, PAOLO; VETRUGNO, LUIGI; DE FRANCESCHI, DANIA; GISONNI, RENATO; CAUSERO, ARALDO; ROCCA, GIORGIO DELLA

    2016-01-01

    Purpose the main purpose of our study was to compare patient compliance with the orally administered new oral anticoagulants (NOCs) dabigatran and rivaroxaban compared with subcutaneously injected fondaparinux after major orthopaedic surgery, and to assess patient preference for the oral vs subcutaneous administration route. Methods prophylactic antithrombotic drug therapy with dabigatran (group D; GD, n=32 patients), rivaroxaban (group R; GR, n=38 patients) or fondaparinux (group F; GF, n=30 patients), to prevent deep vein thrombosis, was started immediately after surgery in 100 patients submitted to total hip arthroplasty. Results the patients had a mean age of 68.7±11 years and 62% were female. In GD, 87.5% of patients indicated that they preferred oral intake of medications to subcutaneous injection (12.5%). In GR, 84.2% declared a preference for oral administration over subcutaneous injection (15.8%). In GF, a surprisingly high proportion of patients (73.3%; p < 0.001) declared that they preferred subcutaneous administration of medications over the oral route (26.7%). Overall, the rate of compliance with antithrombotic drug therapy was very high, at 99%. Conclusions intake of the NOAs dabigatran and rivaroxaban following hospital discharge is entirely the responsibility of the patient; a high level of patient compliance with these drugs must therefore be demonstrated in order for them to become well accepted within the medical community. The results of this study showed a very high level of compliance both with orally and subcutaneously administered drugs. Level of evidence Level I, randomized clinical study. PMID:28217657

  1. Outpatient treatment of low-risk venous thromboembolism with monotherapy oral anticoagulation: patient quality of life outcomes and clinician acceptance

    PubMed Central

    Kline, Jeffrey A; Kahler, Zachary P; Beam, Daren M

    2016-01-01

    Background Oral monotherapy anticoagulation has facilitated home treatment of venous thromboembolism (VTE) in outpatients. Objectives The aim of this study was to measure efficacy, safety, as well as patient and physician perceptions produced by a protocol that selected VTE patients as low-risk patients by the Hestia criteria, and initiated home anticoagulation with an oral factor Xa antagonist. Methods Patients were administered the Venous Insufficiency Epidemiological and Economic Study Quality of life/Symptoms questionnaire [VEINEs QoL/Sym] and the physical component summary [PCS] from the Rand 36-Item Short Form Health Survey [SF36]). The primary outcomes were VTE recurrence and hemorrhage at 30 days. Secondary outcomes compared psychometric test scores between patients with deep vein thrombosis (DVT) to those with pulmonary embolism (PE). Patient perceptions were abstracted from written comments and physician perceptions specific to PE outpatient treatment obtained from structured survey. Results From April 2013 to September 2015, 253 patients were treated, including 67 with PE. Within 30 days, 2/253 patients had recurrent DVT and 2/253 had major hemorrhage; all four had DVT at enrollment. The initial PCS scores did not differ between DVT and PE patients (37.2±13.9 and 38.0±12.1, respectively) and both DVT and PE patients had similar improvement over the treatment period (42.2±12.9 and 43.4±12.7, respectively), consistent with prior literature. The most common adverse event was menorrhagia, present in 15% of women. Themes from patient-written responses reflected satisfaction with increased autonomy. Physicians’ (N=116) before-to-after protocol comfort level with home treatment of PE increased 48% on visual analog scale. Conclusion Hestia-negative VTE patients treated with oral monotherapy at home had low rates of VTE recurrence and bleeding, as well as quality of life measurements similar to prior reports. PMID:27143861

  2. Effectiveness of self-managed oral anticoagulant therapy in patients with recurrent venous thromboembolism. A propensity-matched cohort study.

    PubMed

    Larsen, Torben Bjerregaard; Skjøth, Flemming; Grove, Erik Lerkevang; Nielsen, Peter Brønnum; Christensen, Thomas Decker

    2016-08-30

    Patient-self-management (PSM) of oral anticoagulant therapy (OAT) with vitamin K antagonists for venous thromboembolism (VTE) has demonstrated efficacy in randomised, controlled trials. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of PSM of OAT in everyday clinical practice. Prospectively registered patient data were obtained from databases at two hospitals, and cross-linkage with national patient registries provided detailed information on comorbidities and events. Patients with VTE performing PSM affiliated to major PSM centres were included as cases (N=444). A control group of patients on conventional treatment was propensity score selected in a ratio of 1:5 (N=2220) within matched groups. The effectiveness and safety was estimated using recurrent VTE, major bleeding events and all-cause death as outcomes. We found a lower rate of recurrent VTE among PSM patients compared to the control group with a hazard ratio (HR) of 0.63; 95 % confidence interval (CI) 0.42-0.95, whereas no difference was seen with bleeding (HR: 0.95; 95 % CI 0.44-2.02). The risk of all-cause death was lower for PSM patients (HR: 0.41; 95 % CI 0.21-0.81). A net clinical benefit analysis sums the effect on recurrent VTE and bleeding up to a weighted rate difference of 0.86 (95 % CI 0.00-1.72) in favour of PSM. In conclusion, PSM of anticoagulant treatment was associated with a statistically significant lower rate of recurrent VTE and all-cause death compared to patients on conventionally managed anticoagulant treatment. All major thromboembolic outcomes were less frequent among self-managed patients, whereas bleedings were observed with similar frequency.

  3. Balancing efficacy and bleeding risk in the prevention of stroke due to atrial fibrillation with newer oral anticoagulants.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, M B; Verma, Subhash; Mahapatra, Manoranjan; Tripathi, A K; Bhave, Abhay; Deshpande, Anand; Vora, Amit; Dalal, Jamshed J; Shah, A B; Bichu, S

    2012-09-01

    With the evaluation and approval of newer oral anticoagulants such as the factor IIa inhibitor, dabigatran etexilate and the factor Xa inhibitors, rivaroxaban and apixaban, strategies for stroke prevention in atrial fibrillation need a thorough re-evaluation of current options. Clinicians are naturally excited about the imminent introduction of these newer drugs that do not need international normalized ratio (INR) monitoring, besides having no drug-food and minimal drug-drug interactions. However, as with all new drugs, it is always prudent to use these judiciously so that they stay in our therapeutic armamentarium for a long time. More than 56 years after the introduction of warfarin we now have three drugs, viz., dabigatran 150 mg bid, rivaroxaban 20 mg od, and apixaban 5 mg bid which were effective in comparison with warfarin in reducing the risk of stroke and bleeding in the landmark trials, RE-LY, ROCKET-AF, and ARISTOTLE respectively. There is a thin dividing line between physiological hemostasis and pathological thrombosis. Routine INR monitoring may not be required but in special situations, such as prior to major surgery, overdose, non-compliance or stroke while on the anticoagulant, one may wish to know whether there are any laboratory measures of efficacy or means of reversal of over anticoagulation. Similar questions may be raised about other situations such as renal dysfunction, cardioversion, ablation procedures, post-stenting, or switch to and from warfarin, heparin or LMWH? This document is an attempt to address these concerns based on available evidence and give physicians a perspective and practice guidelines on how best to use these agents, both old and new, for optimal patient outcomes, maximizing efficacy and minimizing risk.

  4. Prevention of venous thromboembolism in acutely ill medical patients after the results of recent trials with the new oral anticoagulants.

    PubMed

    Imberti, Davide; Benedetti, Raffaella; Ageno, Walter

    2013-12-01

    Venous thromboembolism (VTE) is a common potentially life-threatening complication in acutely ill medical patients; over 70 % of the fatal episodes of pulmonary embolism during hospitalization occur in non-surgical patients. In the absence of thromboprophylaxis, the incidence of venographically detected deep vein thrombosis is about 15 % in medical patients. Several trials and meta-analyses have clearly demonstrated the prophylactic role of unfractionated heparin, low molecular weight heparin and fondaparinux. Although over the past few years the knowledge of epidemiology, clinical features and prophylaxis in medical patients has significantly improved, there remain a number of controversial areas that require further investigation. Newer VTE risk assessment models have been proposed to select high risk hospitalized medical patients, but they still require external validation; scarce data are available to stratify patients to identify their individual bleeding risk. The optimal duration of thromboprophylaxis in medical patients is still a matter of debate; currently, extended prophylaxis after discharge is not recommended, but it may be required for subgroup of patients with persistently high VTE risk and a negligible risk of bleeding. Based on the results of recent studies, the new oral anticoagulants appear to have a very limited role, if any. However, a better risk stratification of patients who have a persistently increased risk of VTE is warranted to improve the risk to benefit profile of any anticoagulant drug to be used in this setting.

  5. Rivaroxaban and dabigatran etexilate: two new oral anticoagulants for extended postoperative prevention of venous thromboembolism after elective total hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Borris, Lars C

    2010-05-01

    Extended thromboprophylaxis is vital in patients undergoing total hip arthroplasty (THA) because of the prolonged risk of venous thromboembolism (VTE). Despite evidence that extended prophylaxis can reduce the incidence of symptomatic VTE in this high-risk patient population and the evidence-based guideline recommendations, a large proportion of patients still do not receive an adequate duration of thromboprophylaxis. This is partly due to the limitations of conventional anticoagulants, such as the subcutaneous route of administration or the requirement for routine coagulation monitoring and dose adjustment. New oral anticoagulants (such as the direct thrombin inhibitor dabigatran etexilate and the Factor Xa inhibitor rivaroxaban) could address the current unmet need. Phase III clinical studies in VTE prevention in patients undergoing THA and total knee arthroplasty (TKA) showed that dabigatran etexilate was non-inferior to the EU regimen of enoxaparin, but did not achieve non-inferiority to the US regimen of enoxaparin. In contrast, rivaroxaban demonstrated superiority to both enoxaparin regimens for the prevention of VTE after THA and TKA, without a significant increase in major bleeding rates. Their convenient, once-daily, fixed dosing, with no need for routine coagulation monitoring, could facilitate adherence to evidence-based guideline recommendations of extended thromboprophylaxis after THA.

  6. Simple and rapid assay for effect of the new oral anticoagulant (NOAC) rivaroxaban: preliminary results support further tests with all NOACs

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background New oral anticoagulant (NOAC) drugs are known to influence the results of some routine hemostasis tests. Further data are needed to enable routine assessment of the effects of NOAC on clotting parameters in some special circumstances. Methods Following administration of rivaroxaban to patients, at the likely peak and trough activity times, we assessed the effects on prothrombin time (PT), activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT), thrombin time (TT), and clotting time using Russell’s viper venom, and in the presence of phospholipids and calcium reagent available as DVVreagent® and DVVconfirm®. The data were used to determine an adequate NOAC plasma level based on anticoagulant activities expressed as a ratio (patients/normal, R-C). Results DVVconfirm as R-C could be rapidly performed, and the results were reasonably sensitive for rivaroxaban and probably for other FX inhibitors. This assay is not influenced by lupus anticoagulant and heparin, does not require purified NOAC as control, and will measure whole-plasma clotting activity. Conclusions We propose a cut-off R-C value of 4.52 ± 0.33 for safety, but clinical studies are needed to establish whether this cut-off is useful for identifying patients at increased risk of hemorrhage or exhibiting low anticoagulation effect. It also seems possible that normal R-C could indicate an absence of anticoagulant activity when rivaroxaban is discontinued due to episodes of uncontrolled bleeding during anticoagulation or for emergency surgery. PMID:24656069

  7. New Insights into the Pros and Cons of the Clinical Use of Vitamin K Antagonists (VKAs) Versus Direct Oral Anticoagulants (DOACs)

    PubMed Central

    van Gorp, Rick H.; Schurgers, Leon J.

    2015-01-01

    Vitamin K-antagonists (VKA) are the most widely used anticoagulant drugs to treat patients at risk of arterial and venous thrombosis for the past 50 years. Due to unfavorable pharmacokinetics VKA have a small therapeutic window, require frequent monitoring, and are susceptible to drug and nutritional interactions. Additionally, the effect of VKA is not limited to coagulation, but affects all vitamin K-dependent proteins. As a consequence, VKA have detrimental side effects by enhancing medial and intimal calcification. These limitations stimulated the development of alternative anticoagulant drugs, resulting in direct oral anticoagulant (DOAC) drugs, which specifically target coagulation factor Xa and thrombin. DOACs also display non-hemostatic vascular effects via protease-activated receptors (PARs). As atherosclerosis is characterized by a hypercoagulable state indicating the involvement of activated coagulation factors in the genesis of atherosclerosis, anticoagulation could have beneficial effects on atherosclerosis. Additionally, accumulating evidence demonstrates vascular benefit from high vitamin K intake. This review gives an update on oral anticoagulant treatment on the vasculature with a special focus on calcification and vitamin K interaction. PMID:26593943

  8. Anticoagulation Drug Therapy: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Harter, Katherine; Levine, Michael; Henderson, Sean O.

    2015-01-01

    Historically, most patients who required parenteral anticoagulation received heparin, whereas those patients requiring oral anticoagulation received warfarin. Due to the narrow therapeutic index and need for frequent laboratory monitoring associated with warfarin, there has been a desire to develop newer, more effective anticoagulants. Consequently, in recent years many novel anticoagulants have been developed. The emergency physician may institute anticoagulation therapy in the short term (e.g. heparin) for a patient being admitted, or may start a novel anticoagulation for a patient being discharged. Similarly, a patient on a novel anticoagulant may present to the emergency department due to a hemorrhagic complication. Consequently, the emergency physician should be familiar with the newer and older anticoagulants. This review emphasizes the indication, mechanism of action, adverse effects, and potential reversal strategies for various anticoagulants that the emergency physician will likely encounter. PMID:25671002

  9. [The use of the new direct oral anticoagulants among older subjects: The limits of the evidence-based medicine?].

    PubMed

    Vogel, T; Lang, P-O; Kaltenbach, G; Karcher, P

    2015-12-01

    The growing use of direct oral anticoagulants, in particular among older subjects, raises questions about the limits of the evidence-based medicine. The phase III studies that have validated the efficacy and the safety profile of these molecules (dabigatran, rivaroxaban, apixaban, edoxaban) in their both indications, the venous thromboembolic disease and the non-valvular atrial fibrillation raise concerns in four major fields: the financial support of pharmaceutical companies, the links of interest for many authors with the industry, the study design (exclusively non-inferiority studies), and the poor representativeness of the older subjects included. All these points are discussed, using data of sub-groups studies, post-marketing studies and recent meta-analysis. The lack of data for the very old subjects, with frailty or comorbidities, remains the main concern from these phase III studies.

  10. Oral Anticoagulants Initiation in Patients with Atrial Fibrillation: Real-World Data from a Population-Based Cohort.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Bernal, Clara L; Hurtado, Isabel; García-Sempere, Aníbal; Peiró, Salvador; Sanfélix-Gimeno, Gabriel

    2017-01-01

    Objective: Little is known about initial prescription of currently used oral anticoagulants (OAC), and correlated characteristics in real-world practice. We aimed to assess patterns of initiation of Vitamin K antagonists (VKA) and non-VKA oral anticoagulants (NOAC) in naive patients with non-valvular atrial fibrillation and the factors associated with starting treatment with NOAC. Methods: Population-based retrospective cohort study of all patients with NVAF who had a first prescription of OAC from November 2011 to February 2014 in the Valencia region, Spain (n = 21,881). Temporal trends of OAC initiation are described for the whole population and by type of OAC and therapeutic agent. Factors associated with starting treatment with NOAC (vs. VKA) were identified using logistic multivariate regression models. Results: Among the patients initiating OAC, 25% started with NOAC 2 years after market release. Regarding temporal trends, prescription of NOAC doubled during the study period. VKA prescription also increased (by around 13%), resulting in a 30% rise in total treatment initiation with OAC during 2011-2014. NOAC initiation (vs. VKA) was associated with a lower baseline risk of thromboembolism and higher income. Conclusions: In this Spanish population-based cohort, initiation of OAC therapy saw a rapid increase, mainly but not exclusively, due to a two-fold rise in the use of NOAC. Initiation with NOAC was associated with a lower baseline risk of thromboembolism and higher income, which opposes the indications of NOAC use and reflects disparities in care. Inadequate prescription patterns might threaten the effectiveness and safety of these therapies, thus monitoring OAC prescription is necessary and should be setting-specific.

  11. A nationwide registry study to compare bleeding rates in patients with atrial fibrillation being prescribed oral anticoagulants

    PubMed Central

    Halvorsen, Sigrun; Ghanima, Waleed; Fride Tvete, Ingunn; Hoxmark, Cecilie; Falck, Pål; Solli, Oddvar; Jonasson, Christian

    2017-01-01

    Aims We aimed to evaluate bleeding risk in clinical practice in patients with atrial fibrillation (AF) being prescribed dabigatran, rivaroxaban, or apixaban compared with warfarin. Methods Using nationwide registries (Norwegian Patient Registry and Norwegian Prescription Database), we identified AF patients with a first prescription of oral anticoagulants between January 2013 and June 2015. Patients were followed until discontinuation or switching of oral anticoagulants, death, or end of follow-up. The primary endpoint was major or clinically relevant non-major (CRNM) bleeding. Results In total 32 675 AF patients were identified (58% men, median age 74 years): 11 427 patients used warfarin, 7925 dabigatran, 6817 rivaroxaban, and 6506 apixaban. After a median follow-up of 173 days (25th, 75th percentile 84, 340), 2081 (6.37%) patients experienced a first major or CRNM bleeding. Using a Cox proportional hazard model adjusting for baseline characteristics, use of apixaban [hazard ratio (HR) 0.70, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.61–0.80, P < 0.001] and dabigatran (HR 0.74, 95% CI 0.66–0.84, P < 0.001) were associated with a lower risk of major or CRNM bleeding compared with warfarin whereas use of rivaroxaban was not (HR: 1.05, 95% CI 0.94–1.17, P = 0.400). Use of dabigatran and rivaroxaban were associated with higher risk of gastrointestinal bleeding, whereas use of apixaban and dabigatran were associated with lower risk of intracranial bleeding, compared with warfarin. Conclusion In this nationwide cohort study in AF patients, apixaban and dabigatran were associated with a lower risk of major or CRNM bleeding compared with warfarin. The risk of gastrointestinal bleeding was higher with rivaroxaban and dabigatran compared with warfarin. PMID:27680880

  12. The optimal management of patients on oral anticoagulation undergoing coronary artery stenting. The 10th Anniversary Overview.

    PubMed

    Rubboli, A; Faxon, D P; Juhani Airaksinen, K E; Schlitt, A; Marín, F; Bhatt, D L; Lip, G Y H

    2014-12-01

    Even 10 years after the first appearance in the literature of articles reporting on the management of patients on oral anticoagulation (OAC) undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention with stent (PCI-S), this issue is still controversial. Nonetheless, some guidance for the everyday management of this patient subset, accounting for about 5-8 % of all patients referred for PCI-S, has been developed. In general, a period of triple therapy (TT) of OAC, with either vitamin K-antagonists (VKA) or non-vitamin K-antagonist oral anticoagulants (NOAC), aspirin, and clopidogrel is warranted, followed by the combination of OAC, and a single antiplatelet agent for up to 12 months, and then OAC alone. The duration of the initial period of TT is dependent on the individual risk of thromboembolism, and bleeding, as well as the clinical context in which PCI-S is performed (elective vs acute coronary syndrome), and the type of stent implanted (bare-metal vs drug-eluting). In this article, we aim to provide a comprehensive, at-a-glance, overview of the management strategies, which are currently suggested for the peri-procedural, medium-term, and long-term periods following PCI-S in OAC patients. While acknowledging that most of the evidence has been obtained from patients on OAC because of atrial fibrillation, and with warfarin being the most frequently used VKA, we refer in this overview to the whole population of OAC patients undergoing PCI-S. We refer to the whole population of patients on OAC undergoing PCI-S also when OAC is carried out with NOAC rather than VKA, pointing out, when appropriate, the particular management issues.

  13. Oral Anticoagulants Initiation in Patients with Atrial Fibrillation: Real-World Data from a Population-Based Cohort

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez-Bernal, Clara L.; Hurtado, Isabel; García-Sempere, Aníbal; Peiró, Salvador; Sanfélix-Gimeno, Gabriel

    2017-01-01

    Objective: Little is known about initial prescription of currently used oral anticoagulants (OAC), and correlated characteristics in real-world practice. We aimed to assess patterns of initiation of Vitamin K antagonists (VKA) and non-VKA oral anticoagulants (NOAC) in naive patients with non-valvular atrial fibrillation and the factors associated with starting treatment with NOAC. Methods: Population-based retrospective cohort study of all patients with NVAF who had a first prescription of OAC from November 2011 to February 2014 in the Valencia region, Spain (n = 21,881). Temporal trends of OAC initiation are described for the whole population and by type of OAC and therapeutic agent. Factors associated with starting treatment with NOAC (vs. VKA) were identified using logistic multivariate regression models. Results: Among the patients initiating OAC, 25% started with NOAC 2 years after market release. Regarding temporal trends, prescription of NOAC doubled during the study period. VKA prescription also increased (by around 13%), resulting in a 30% rise in total treatment initiation with OAC during 2011–2014. NOAC initiation (vs. VKA) was associated with a lower baseline risk of thromboembolism and higher income. Conclusions: In this Spanish population-based cohort, initiation of OAC therapy saw a rapid increase, mainly but not exclusively, due to a two-fold rise in the use of NOAC. Initiation with NOAC was associated with a lower baseline risk of thromboembolism and higher income, which opposes the indications of NOAC use and reflects disparities in care. Inadequate prescription patterns might threaten the effectiveness and safety of these therapies, thus monitoring OAC prescription is necessary and should be setting-specific. PMID:28261098

  14. Discrepancies between Patients’ Preferences and Educational Programs on Oral Anticoagulant Therapy: A Survey in Community Pharmacies and Hospital Consultations

    PubMed Central

    Macquart de Terline, Diane; Hejblum, Gilles; Fernandez, Christine; Cohen, Ariel; Antignac, Marie

    2016-01-01

    Background Oral anticoagulation therapy is increasingly used for the prevention and treatment of thromboembolic complications in various clinical situations. Nowadays, education programs for patients treated with anticoagulants constitute an integrated component of their management. However, such programs are usually based on the healthcare providers’ perceptions of what patients should know, rather than on patients’ preferences. Objective To investigate patients’ viewpoints on educational needs and preferred modalities of information delivery. Methods We conducted an observational study based on a self-administered questionnaire. To explore several profiles of patients, the study was designed for enrolling patients in two settings: during outpatient consultations in a cardiology department (Saint Antoine Hospital, Paris, France) and in community pharmacies throughout France. Results Of the 371 patients who completed the questionnaire, 187 (50.4%) were recruited during an outpatient consultation and 184 (49.6%) were recruited in community pharmacies. 84.1% of patients were receiving a vitamin K antagonist and 15.6% a direct oral anticoagulant. Patients ranked 16 of 21 (76.2%) questionnaire items on information about their treatment as important or essential; information on adverse effects of treatment was the highest ranked domain (mean score 2.38, 95% CI 2.30–2.46). Pharmacists (1.69, 1.58–1.80), nurses (1.05, 0.95–1.16), and patient associations (0.36, 0.29–0.44), along with group sessions (0.85, 0.75–0.95), the internet (0.77, 0.67–0.88), and delivery of material at the patient’s home (1.26, 1.14–1.38), were ranked poorly in terms of delivering educational material. Conclusion This study revealed substantial discrepancies between patient preferences and current educational programs. These findings should be useful for tailoring future educational programs that are better adapted to patients, with a potential associated enhancement of their

  15. Peri-procedural interrupted oral anticoagulation for atrial fibrillation ablation: comparison of aspirin, warfarin, dabigatran, and rivaroxaban

    PubMed Central

    Winkle, Roger A.; Mead, R. Hardwin; Engel, Gregory; Kong, Melissa H.; Patrawala, Rob A.

    2014-01-01

    Aims Atrial fibrillation ablation requires peri-procedural oral anticoagulation (OAC) to prevent thromboembolic events. There are several options for OAC. We evaluate peri-procedural AF ablation complications using a variety of peri-procedural OACs. Methods and results We examined peri-procedural OAC and groin, bleeding, and thromboembolic complications for 2334 consecutive AF ablations using open irrigated-tip radiofrequency (RF) catheters. Pre-ablation OAC was warfarin in 1113 (47.7%), dabigatran 426 (18.3%), rivaroxaban 187 (8.0%), aspirin 472 (20.2%), and none 136 (5.8%). Oral anticoagulation was always interrupted and intraprocedural anticoagulation was unfractionated heparin (activated clotting time, ACT = 237 ± 26 s). Pre- and post-OAC drugs were the same for 1591 (68.2%) and were different for 743 (31.8%). Following ablation, 693 (29.7%) were treated with dabigatran and 291 (12.5%) were treated with rivaroxaban. There were no problems changing from one OAC pre-ablation to another post-ablation. Complications included 12 (0.51%) pericardial tamponades [no differences for dabigatran (P = 0.457) or rivaroxaban (P = 0.163) compared with warfarin], 12 (0.51%) groin complications [no differences for rivaroxaban (P = 0.709) and fewer for dabigatran (P = 0.041) compared with warfarin]. Only 5 of 2334 (0.21%) required blood transfusions. There were two strokes (0.086%) and no transient ischaemic attacks (TIAs) in the first 48 h post-ablation. Three additional strokes (0.13%), and two TIAs (0.086%) occurred from 48 h to 30 days. Only one stroke had a residual deficit. Compared with warfarin, the neurologic event rate was not different for dabigatran (P = 0.684) or rivaroxaban (P = 0.612). Conclusion Using interrupted OAC, low target intraprocedural ACT, and irrigated-tip RF, the rate of peri-procedural groin, haemorrhagic, and thromboembolic complications was extremely low. There were only minimal differences between OACs. Low-risk patients may remain on aspirin

  16. Estimated Prestroke Peak VO2 Is Related to Circulating IGF-1 Levels During Acute Stroke.

    PubMed

    Mattlage, Anna E; Rippee, Michael A; Abraham, Michael G; Sandt, Janice; Billinger, Sandra A

    2017-01-01

    Background Insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) is neuroprotective after stroke and is regulated by insulin-like binding protein-3 (IGFBP-3). In healthy individuals, exercise and improved aerobic fitness (peak oxygen uptake; peak VO2) increases IGF-1 in circulation. Understanding the relationship between estimated prestroke aerobic fitness and IGF-1 and IGFBP-3 after stroke may provide insight into the benefits of exercise and aerobic fitness on stroke recovery. Objective The purpose of this study was to determine the relationship of IGF-1 and IGFBP-3 to estimated prestroke peak VO2 in individuals with acute stroke. We hypothesized that (1) estimated prestroke peak VO2 would be related to IGF-1 and IGFBP-3 and (2) individuals with higher than median IGF-1 levels will have higher estimated prestroke peak VO2 compared to those with lower than median levels. Methods Fifteen individuals with acute stroke had blood sampled within 72 hours of hospital admission. Prestroke peak VO2 was estimated using a nonexercise prediction equation. IGF-1 and IGFBP-3 levels were quantified using enzyme-linked immunoassay. Results Estimated prestroke peak VO2 was significantly related to circulating IGF-1 levels (r = .60; P = .02) but not IGFBP-3. Individuals with higher than median IGF-1 (117.9 ng/mL) had significantly better estimated aerobic fitness (32.4 ± 6.9 mL kg(-1) min(-1)) than those with lower than median IGF-1 (20.7 ± 7.8 mL kg(-1) min(-1); P = .03). Conclusions Improving aerobic fitness prior to stroke may be beneficial by increasing baseline IGF-1 levels. These results set the groundwork for future clinical trials to determine whether high IGF-1 and aerobic fitness are beneficial to stroke recovery by providing neuroprotection and improving function.

  17. Prestroke Antiplatelet Effect on Symptomatic Intracranial Hemorrhage and Functional Outcome in Intravenous Thrombolysis

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Jay Chol; Lee, Ji Sung; Park, Tai Hwan; Cho, Yong-Jin; Park, Jong-Moo; Kang, Kyusik; Lee, Kyung Bok; Lee, Soo Joo; Kim, Jae Guk; Lee, Jun; Park, Man-Seok; Choi, Kang-Ho; Kim, Joon-Tae; Yu, Kyung-Ho; Lee, Byung-Chul; Oh, Mi-Sun; Cha, Jae-Kwan; Kim, Dae-Hyun; Nah, Hyun-Wook; Kim, Dong-Eog; Ryu, Wi-Sun; Kim, Beom Joon; Bae, Hee-Joon; Kim, Wook-Joo; Shin, Dong-Ick; Yeo, Min-Ju; Sohn, Sung Il; Hong, Jeong-Ho; Lee, Juneyoung; Hong, Keun-Sik

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose About 30%-40% of stroke patients are taking antiplatelet at the time of their strokes, which might increase the risk of symptomatic intracranial hemorrhage (SICH) with intravenous tissue plasminogen activator (IV-TPA) therapy. We aimed to assess the effect of prestroke antiplatelet on the SICH risk and functional outcome in Koreans treated with IV-TPA. Methods From a prospective stroke registry, we identified patients treated with IV-TPA between October 2009 and November 2014. Prestroke antiplatelet use was defined as taking antiplatelet within 7 days before the stroke onset. The primary outcome was SICH. Secondary outcomes were discharge modified Rankin Scale (mRS) score and in-hospital mortality. Results Of 1,715 patients treated with IV-TPA, 441 (25.7%) were on prestroke antiplatelet. Prestroke antiplatelet users versus non-users were more likely to be older, to have multiple vascular risk factors. Prestroke antiplatelet use was associated with an increased risk of SICH (5.9% vs. 3.0%; adjusted odds ratio [OR] 1.79 [1.05-3.04]). However, at discharge, the two groups did not differ in mRS distribution (adjusted OR 0.90 [0.72-1.14]), mRS 0-1 outcome (34.2% vs. 33.7%; adjusted OR 1.27 [0.94-1.72), mRS 0-2 outcome (52.4% vs. 52.9%; adjusted OR 1.21 [0.90-1.63]), and in-hospital mortality (6.1% vs. 4.2%; adjusted OR 1.19 [0.71-2.01]). Conclusions Despite an increased risk of SICH, prestroke antiplatelet users compared to non-users had comparable functional outcomes and in-hospital mortality with IV-TPA therapy. Our results support the use of IV-TPA in eligible patients taking antiplatelet therapy before their stroke onset. PMID:27733024

  18. Addressing barriers to optimal oral anticoagulation use and persistence among patients with atrial fibrillation: Proceedings, Washington, DC, December 3-4, 2012.

    PubMed

    Hess, Paul L; Mirro, Michael J; Diener, Hans-Christoph; Eikelboom, John W; Al-Khatib, Sana M; Hylek, Elaine M; Bosworth, Hayden B; Gersh, Bernard J; Singer, Daniel E; Flaker, Greg; Mega, Jessica L; Peterson, Eric D; Rumsfeld, John S; Steinberg, Benjamin A; Kakkar, Ajay K; Califf, Robert M; Granger, Christopher B

    2014-09-01

    Approximately half of patients with atrial fibrillation and with risk factors for stroke are not treated with oral anticoagulation (OAC), whether it be with vitamin K antagonists (VKAs) or novel OACs (NOACs); and of those treated, many discontinue treatment. Leaders from academia, government, industry, and professional societies convened in Washington, DC, on December 3-4, 2012, to identify barriers to optimal OAC use and adherence and to generate potential solutions. Participants identified a broad range of barriers, including knowledge gaps about stroke risk and the relative risks and benefits of anticoagulant therapies; lack of awareness regarding the potential use of NOAC agents for VKA-unsuitable patients; lack of recognition of expanded eligibility for OAC; lack of availability of reversal agents and the difficulty of anticoagulant effect monitoring for the NOACs; concerns with the bleeding risk of anticoagulant therapy, especially with the NOACs and particularly in the setting of dual antiplatelet therapy; suboptimal time in therapeutic range for VKA; and costs and insurance coverage. Proposed solutions were to define reasons for oral anticoagulant underuse classified in ways that can guide intervention and improve use, to increase awareness of stroke risk as well as the benefits and risks of OAC use via educational initiatives and feedback mechanisms, to better define the role of VKA in the current therapeutic era including eligibility and ineligibility for different anticoagulant therapies, to identify NOAC reversal agents and monitoring strategies and make knowledge regarding their use publicly available, to minimize the duration of dual antiplatelet therapy and concomitant OAC where possible, to improve time in therapeutic range for VKA, to leverage observational data sets to refine understanding of OAC use and outcomes in general practice, and to better align health system incentives.

  19. Self-management of oral anticoagulants with a whole blood prothrombin-time monitor in elderly patients with atrial fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Eldor, Amiram; Schwartz, Joseph

    2002-01-01

    The efficacy of oral anticoagulants (OAC) in reducing the incidence of stroke in elderly patients with atrial fibrillation (AF) has been well documented. The intensity of OAC therapy and deviations in the prothrombin time (PT) are the strongest risk factor for bleeding complications in elderly patients. The aim of this study was to evaluate a more rigorous regulation of OAC by the use of a portable whole blood PT-monitor (CoaguChek) in elderly patients with AF (age 65-80 years). The study group consisted of 20 patients, of whom 17 were evaluable, which were trained to use to CoaguChek monitor and adjust their anticoagulant dose for 12 months. The control group, 20 patients matched for age, gender and the duration of OAC treatment, were tested in an anticoagulant clinic and their OAC dose was adjusted by a physician. To validate the PT-monitor results, the patients performed a total of 129 simultaneous venous blood PT tests at various time points. The correlation coefficient R(2) was 0.707 indicating the accuracy of the CoaguChek results. The self-managed patients perform more frequent measurements 46 +/- 8.9 vs. 15.7 +/- 3.1 PT tests per patient. They demonstrated a within the therapeutic range INR in 80.5% of the tests (95% confidence interval, 76.5-84.1%) as compared to 72.4% (95% confidence interval, 68.5-76.5%) in the control group (p = 0.057). The median value for all CoaguChek International Normalized Ratio (INR) recordings was within therapeutic range in the self-management group as well as in the control group. There were fewer INR results below or above the therapeutic range in the study group. None of the patients had hemorrhagic or thrombotic events during the study. Overall, the study group expressed high satisfaction from using the home monitor. We conclude that home PT monitoring and self-management of OAC are feasible in a motivated population of elderly patients with atrial fibrillation and are probably cost effective.

  20. Supporting patients to self-monitor their oral anticoagulation therapy: recommendations based on a qualitative study of patients’ experiences

    PubMed Central

    Tompson, Alice; Heneghan, Carl; Fitzmaurice, David; Sutton, Stephen; Harrison, Sian; Ward, Alison

    2015-01-01

    Background Clinical trials suggest that oral anticoagulation therapy (OAT) self-monitoring is safe and effective, however little is known about the patient experience of this process. There is a lack of understanding about how best to train and support patients embarking on OAT self-monitoring. Aim To collect in-depth information about patients’ experiences of OAT self-monitoring outside of clinical trial conditions and to produce a set of recommendations on how best to support such patients. Design and setting Semi-structured qualitative interviews with patients who self-monitor and live in England. Method In total, 26 of the 267 (9.7%) who participated in the Cohort study of Anticoagulation Self-Monitoring (CASM) and were still self-monitoring after 12 months’ follow-up were interviewed. Topics discussed included experiences of OAT self-monitoring, healthcare support, training, and decision making. Framework analysis was used. Results Following initial problems using the monitoring device, interviewees described a mostly positive experience. Although less effort was expended attending monitoring appointments with health professionals, effort was required to conduct self-monitoring tests and to interpret and act on the results. Desire to self-manage was variable, especially when dosing advice systems worked promptly and reliably. Interviewees overcame patchy healthcare system knowledge and support of self-monitoring by educating themselves. Family and friends provided support with learning to use the monitor and managing OAT dosage adjustments. Conclusion Better, more-consistent training and health-service support would have alleviated a number of problems encountered by these patients who were self-monitoring. This training and support will become even more important if self-monitoring becomes more accessible to the general population of people on OAT. PMID:26077266

  1. Choosing a particular oral anticoagulant and dose for stroke prevention in individual patients with non-valvular atrial fibrillation: part 2.

    PubMed

    Diener, Hans-Christoph; Aisenberg, James; Ansell, Jack; Atar, Dan; Breithardt, Günter; Eikelboom, John; Ezekowitz, Michael D; Granger, Christopher B; Halperin, Jonathan L; Hohnloser, Stefan H; Hylek, Elaine M; Kirchhof, Paulus; Lane, Deirdre A; Verheugt, Freek W A; Veltkamp, Roland; Lip, Gregory Y H

    2016-02-04

    The choice of oral anticoagulant (OAC) for patients with atrial fibrillation (AF) may be influenced by individual clinical features or by patterns of risk factors and comorbidities. We reviewed analyses of subgroups of patients from trials of vitamin K antagonists vs. non-vitamin K oral anticoagulants (NOACs) for stroke prevention in AF with the aim to identify patient groups who might benefit from a particular OAC more than from another. In addition, we discuss the timing of initiation of anticoagulation. In the second of a two-part review, we discuss the use of NOAC for stroke prevention in the following subgroups of patients with AF: (vii) secondary stroke prevention in patients after stroke or transient ischaemic attack (TIA), (viii) patients with acute stroke requiring thrombolysis or thrombectomy, (ix) those initiating or restarting OAC treatment after stroke or TIA, (x) those with renal impairment on dialysis, (xi) the elderly, (xii) those at high risk of gastrointestinal bleeding, and (xiii) those with hypertension. In addition, we discuss adherence and compliance. Finally, we present a summary of treatment suggestions. In specific subgroups of patients with AF, evidence supports the use of particular NOACs and/or particular doses of anticoagulant. The appropriate choice of treatment for these subgroups will help to promote optimal clinical outcomes.

  2. Minor oral surgery and interference with anticoagulation in patients taking warfarin: a retrospective study.

    PubMed

    Malden, Nicholas J; Santini, Ario; Mather, Craig I; Gardner, Andrew

    2007-12-01

    Fundamental to the surgical treatment of patients taking warfarin is the monitoring of the international normalised ratio (INR) before and after operation. A postoperative rise in INR was observed to be more common than a postoperative fall, so we decided to test the null hypothesis that there is no difference in the INR before and after minor dentoalveolar surgery. Data from the dental records of 71 patients treated consecutively over an 18-month period were examined, and INR before and after operation tested by a Friedman non-parametric test (ANOVA). Six cases were removed from the study because they required perioperative adjustment of their warfarin. There was a significant increase in the postoperative INR for the whole group. Further analysis showed that a significant increase in the postoperative INR for the multiple extraction and surgical removal group was the most likely cause for the rise in the whole group. There was no significant increase between men and women, those taking antibiotics preoperatively, and those not doing so, or in those having a single tooth extracted. We found an association between the degree of surgical intervention and the likelihood of anticoagulation being affected. Postoperative INR in this group should be monitored carefully.

  3. A single-dose of oral nattokinase potentiates thrombolysis and anti-coagulation profiles

    PubMed Central

    Kurosawa, Yuko; Nirengi, Shinsuke; Homma, Toshiyuki; Esaki, Kazuki; Ohta, Mitsuhiro; Clark, Joseph F.; Hamaoka, Takafumi

    2015-01-01

    Our aim was to determine the quantitative effects of a single-dose of Nattokinase (NK) administration on coagulation/fibrinolysis parameters comprehensively in healthy male subjects. A double-blind, placebo-controlled cross-over NK intervention study was carried out in 12 healthy young males. Following the baseline blood draw, each subject was randomized to receive either a single-dose of 2,000 FU NK (NSK-SD, Japan Bio Science Laboratory Co., Ltd) or placebo with subsequent cross-over of the groups. Subjects donated blood samples at 2, 4, 6 and 8 hours following administration for analysis of coagulation/fibrinolysis parameters. As a result, D-dimer concentrations at 6, and 8 hours, and blood fibrin/fibrinogen degradation products at 4 hours after NK administration elevated significantly (p < 0.05, respectively). Factor VIII activity declined at 4 and 6 hours (p < 0.05, respectively), blood antithrombin concentration was higher at 2 and 4 hours (p < 0.05, respectively), and the activated partial thromboplastin time prolonged significantly at 2 and 4 hours following NK administration (p < 0.05 and p < 0.01, respectively). All the changes, however, were within the normal range. In conclusion, thus, a single-dose of NK administration appears enhancing fibrinolysis and anti-coagulation via several different pathways simultaneously. PMID:26109079

  4. A single-dose of oral nattokinase potentiates thrombolysis and anti-coagulation profiles.

    PubMed

    Kurosawa, Yuko; Nirengi, Shinsuke; Homma, Toshiyuki; Esaki, Kazuki; Ohta, Mitsuhiro; Clark, Joseph F; Hamaoka, Takafumi

    2015-06-25

    Our aim was to determine the quantitative effects of a single-dose of Nattokinase (NK) administration on coagulation/fibrinolysis parameters comprehensively in healthy male subjects. A double-blind, placebo-controlled cross-over NK intervention study was carried out in 12 healthy young males. Following the baseline blood draw, each subject was randomized to receive either a single-dose of 2,000 FU NK (NSK-SD, Japan Bio Science Laboratory Co., Ltd) or placebo with subsequent cross-over of the groups. Subjects donated blood samples at 2, 4, 6 and 8 hours following administration for analysis of coagulation/fibrinolysis parameters. As a result, D-dimer concentrations at 6, and 8 hours, and blood fibrin/fibrinogen degradation products at 4 hours after NK administration elevated significantly (p < 0.05, respectively). Factor VIII activity declined at 4 and 6 hours (p < 0.05, respectively), blood antithrombin concentration was higher at 2 and 4 hours (p < 0.05, respectively), and the activated partial thromboplastin time prolonged significantly at 2 and 4 hours following NK administration (p < 0.05 and p < 0.01, respectively). All the changes, however, were within the normal range. In conclusion, thus, a single-dose of NK administration appears enhancing fibrinolysis and anti-coagulation via several different pathways simultaneously.

  5. The evolution of anticoagulant therapy

    PubMed Central

    Franchini, Massimo; Liumbruno, Giancarlo M.; Bonfanti, Carlo; Lippi, Giuseppe

    2016-01-01

    Arterial and venous thromboembolism are leading causes of morbidity and mortality around the world. For almost 70 years, heparins (unfractionated heparin and low molecular weight heparins) and vitamin K antagonists have been the leading therapeutic medical options for the treatment and prevention of thromboembolic disorders. Nevertheless, the many limitations of these traditional anticoagulants have fuelled the search for novel agents over the past 15 years, and a new class of oral anticoagulants that specifically target activated factor X and thrombin has been developed and is now commercially available. In this narrative review, the evolution of anticoagulant therapy is summarised, with a focus on newer oral anticoagulants. PMID:26710352

  6. Upper Digestive Bleeding in Atrial Fibrillation: Evaluation of Gastroscopy Prior to Oral Anticoagulant Therapy (GOAT), Prospective, Randomized, Double Blind Study on a Community Population

    PubMed Central

    Lagi, Alfonso; Spini, Simona; Meucci, Elisa; Cartei, Alessandro; Cencetti, Simone

    2011-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to investigate the incidence of digestive hemorrhages in patients with non-valvular atrial fibrillation (NVAF), scheduled for oral anticoagulant therapy. Methods We conducted, over 24 months, a prospective, randomized, population-based observational study on consecutive patients with recurrent paroxysmal, persistent, or permanent NVAF, scheduled for oral anticoagulant therapy. The study initially included 268 patients with NVAF (162 males and 106 females) with a mean age of 74 years (range 42-86 years). Patients were split into two groups: those undergoing preventive Esophago-Gastro-Duodenoscopy (EGD) (Group A) and those who did not (Group B). All patients positive by EGD underwent medical treatment and subsequent 30-day endoscopic controls showed complete healing. The primary outcome of the study was to determine if previous EGD in patients with NVAF resulted in a low risk of bleeding during oral anticoagulant therapy. The two groups were comparable for most variables. Results Significant differences were found between groups for the incidence of antiarrhythmic drugs and for early hemorrhage (P <0.001). The incidences of early hemorrhages were significantly different between the two groups with 12 in group B (12%) and 2 in group A (1.7%). Conclusions Preventive EGD can identify hidden digestive diseases, which may increase the incidence of early hemorrhages.

  7. Comparative effectiveness and safety of oral anticoagulants for atrial fibrillation in real-world practice: a population-based cohort study protocol

    PubMed Central

    Holbrook, Anne; Dormuth, Colin; Morrow, Richard; Lee, Agnes; Troyan, Sue; Li, Guowei; Pullenyegum, Eleanor

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Anticoagulants are arguably the most important drug family of all, based on the frequency and duration of their use, and the clinical importance and frequency of benefits and harms. Several direct acting oral anticoagulants (DOACs) have recently joined warfarin for the treatment of atrial fibrillation, with a resultant significant expansion in use of oral anticoagulants (OACs). Our objectives are to compare safety and effectiveness of DOACs versus warfarin in a full population where anticoagulation management is good and to identify which types of patients do better with DOACs versus warfarin and vice versa. Methods and analysis This is a retrospective cohort study of all adults living in British Columbia who have a diagnosis of atrial fibrillation in hospital or medical service data, and a first prescription for an OAC. Coprimary outcomes are ischaemic stroke and systemic embolism (benefit) and major bleeding (harm). Secondary outcomes include net clinical benefit (composite of stroke, systemic embolism, major bleeds, myocardial infarction, pulmonary embolism and death), drug discontinuation and individual composite item occurrence. We will estimate the effects of treatment in a 2-year follow-up period, using time-to-event models with propensity score adjustment to control confounding. Secondary analyses will examine ‘as treated’ outcomes. Ethics and dissemination The protocol, data creation plan, privacy impact statement and data sharing agreements have been approved. Dissemination is planned via conferences and publications as well as directly to drug policy leaders. Information on the overall comparative effectiveness and safety of DOACs versus warfarin in a country with high quality anticoagulation management, as well as for vulnerable subgroups, will be an important addition to the literature. PMID:27884850

  8. Rivaroxaban and other novel oral anticoagulants: pharmacokinetics in healthy subjects, specific patient populations and relevance of coagulation monitoring

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Unlike traditional anticoagulants, the more recently developed agents rivaroxaban, dabigatran and apixaban target specific factors in the coagulation cascade to attenuate thrombosis. Rivaroxaban and apixaban directly inhibit Factor Xa, whereas dabigatran directly inhibits thrombin. All three drugs exhibit predictable pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic characteristics that allow for fixed oral doses in a variety of settings. The population pharmacokinetics of rivaroxaban, and also dabigatran, have been evaluated in a series of models using patient data from phase II and III clinical studies. These models point towards a consistent pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic profile, even when extreme demographic factors are taken into account, meaning that doses rarely need to be adjusted. The exception is in certain patients with renal impairment, for whom pharmacokinetic modelling provided the rationale for reduced doses as part of some regimens. Although not routinely required, the ability to measure plasma concentrations of these agents could be advantageous in emergency situations, such as overdose. Specific pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic characteristics must be taken into account when selecting an appropriate assay for monitoring. The anti-Factor Xa chromogenic assays now available are likely to provide the most appropriate means of determining plasma concentrations of rivaroxaban and apixaban, and specific assays for dabigatran are in development. PMID:23809871

  9. Impact of valvular heart disease on oral anticoagulant therapy in non-valvular atrial fibrillation: results from the RAMSES study.

    PubMed

    Başaran, Özcan; Dogan, Volkan; Beton, Osman; Tekinalp, Mehmet; Aykan, Ahmet Çağrı; Kalaycıoğlu, Ezgi; Bolat, Ismail; Taşar, Onur; Şafak, Özgen; Kalçık, Macit; Yaman, Mehmet; İnci, Sinan; Altıntaş, Bernas; Kalkan, Sedat; Kırma, Cevat; Biteker, Murat

    2017-02-01

    The definition of non-valvular atrial fibrillation (NVAF) is controversial. We aimed to assess the impact of valvular heart disease on stroke prevention strategies in NVAF patients. The RAMSES study was a multicenter and cross-sectional study conducted on NVAF patients (ClinicalTrials.gov identifier NCT02344901). The study population was divided into patients with significant valvular disease (SVD) and non-significant valvular disease (NSVD), whether they had at least one moderate valvular disease or not. Patients with a mechanical prosthetic valve and mitral stenosis were excluded. Baseline characteristics and oral anticoagulant (OAC) therapies were compared. In 5987 patients with NVAF, there were 3929 (66%) NSVD and 2058 (34%) SVD patients. The predominant valvular disease was mitral regurgitation (58.1%), followed by aortic regurgitation (24.1%) and aortic stenosis (17.8%). Patients with SVD had higher CHA2DS2VASc [3.0 (2.0; 4.0) vs. 4.0 (2.0; 5.0), p < 0.001] and HAS-BLED [2.0 (1.0; 2.0) vs. 2.0 (1.0; 2.0), p = 0.004] scores compared to patients with NSVD. Overall, 2763 (71.2%) of NSVD and 1515 (73.8%) of SVD patients were on OAC therapy (p = 0.035). When the patients with SVD were analyzed separately, the mean CHA2DS2VASc and HAS-BLED scores were higher in patients with mitral regurgitation compared to patients with aortic regurgitation and aortic stenosis [4.0 (3.0; 5.0), 3.0 (2.0; 4.0), 3.0 (2.0; 4.0) p < 0.001 and 2.0 (1.0; 3.0), 1.0 (1.0; 2.0), 1.0 (0.0; 2.0) p < 0.001, respectively]. In patients with SVD, 65.7% of mitral regurgitation, 82.6% of aortic regurgitation and 88.0% of aortic stenosis patients were on OAC therapy. One out of three NVAF patients had at least one moderate valvular heart disease with the predominance of mitral regurgitation. Patients with SVD were at greater risk of stroke and bleeding compared to patients with NSVD. Although patients with mitral regurgitation should be given more aggressive anticoagulant therapy

  10. Safety of intramuscular influenza vaccine in patients receiving oral anticoagulation therapy: a single blinded multi-centre randomized controlled clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Casajuana, Josep; Iglesias, Begoña; Fàbregas, Mireia; Fina, Francesc; Vallès, Joan-Antoni; Aragonès, Rosa; Benítez, Mència; Zabaleta, Edurne

    2008-01-01

    Background Influenza vaccines are recommended for administration by the intramuscular route. However, many physicians use the subcutaneous route for patients receiving an oral anticoagulant because this route is thought to induce fewer hemorrhagic side effects. Our aim is to assess the safety of intramuscular administration of influenza vaccine in patients on oral anticoagulation therapy. Methods Design: Randomised, controlled, single blinded, multi-centre clinical trial. Setting: 4 primary care practices in Barcelona, Spain. Participants: 229 patients on oral anticoagulation therapy eligible for influenza vaccine during the 2003–2004 season. Interventions: intramuscular administration of influenza vaccine in the experimental group (129 patients) compared to subcutaneous administration in the control group (100 patients). Primary outcome: change in the circumference of the arm at the site of injection at 24 hours. Secondary outcomes: appearance of local reactions and pain at 24 hours and at 10 days; change in INR (International Normalized Ratio) at 24 hours and at 10 days. Analysis was by intention to treat using the 95% confidence intervals of the proportions or mean differences. Results Baseline variables in the two groups were similar. No major side effects or major haemorrhage during the follow-up period were reported. No significant differences were observed in the primary outcome between the two groups. The appearance of local adverse reactions was more frequent in the subcutaneous administration group (37,4% vs. 17,4%, 95% confidence interval of the difference 8,2% to 31,8%). Conclusion This study shows that the intramuscular administration route of influenza vaccine in patients on anticoagulant therapy does not have more side effects than the subcutaneous administration route. Registration number NCT00137579 at clinicaltrials.gov PMID:18507871

  11. Post-operative Bleeding Risk in Dental Surgery for Patients on Oral Anticoagulant Therapy: A Meta-analysis of Observational Studies

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Quan; Xu, Juan; Zhang, Tong; Zhang, Bin; Liu, Hongchen

    2017-01-01

    Background and Objective: Minor dental surgery is invasive and hemorrhagic. Thus, in patients treated with anticoagulants, the bleeding risk related to these invasive procedures is concerning. The aim of this meta-analysis is to evaluate this risk by comparing the post-operative bleeding rates of oral anticoagulation treatment (OAT) patients (without interrupted or altered anticoagulant intake) with non-OAT patients. Methods: PubMed, Embase and the Cochrane Library were searched for eligible studies that compared the post-operative (following minor dental surgery) bleeding rates of OAT patients without interrupted or altered therapy with those of non-OAT patients. Relative risk (RR) and 95% confidence interval (CI) were calculated. Subgroup analyses were used to identify the association between the bleeding rate and different dental surgeries or anticoagulants. Results: Thirty two full text articles were assessed for eligibility and 20 studies were excluded according to the selection criteria. Finally, 12 studies and a total of 2102 OAT patients and 2271 non-OAT patients were included. A pooled analysis indicated that the post-operative bleeding risk in OAT patients is higher than that of non-OAT patients (RR: 2.794, 95% CI: 1.722–4.532, P = 0.000). The pooled RRs in the dental implant surgery and dental extraction subgroups were 2.136 (95% CI: 0.825–5.531, P = 0.118) and 2.003 (95% CI: 0.987–4.063, P = 0.054), respectively. As for the different oral anticoagulants, the pooled RR in the subgroup of new oral anticoagulants (NOACs) was 1.603 (95% CI: 0.430–5.980, P = 0.482), while the pooled RR in the vitamin K antagonists subgroup was 3.067 (95% CI: 1.838–5.118, P = 0.000). Conclusion: Under current evidence, OAT patients were under a higher post-operative bleeding risk than the non-OAT patients following minor dental surgery. For the dental implant surgeries and dental extractions, our study failed to demonstrate a higher risk of bleeding in the OAT

  12. Post-operative Bleeding Risk in Dental Surgery for Patients on Oral Anticoagulant Therapy: A Meta-analysis of Observational Studies.

    PubMed

    Shi, Quan; Xu, Juan; Zhang, Tong; Zhang, Bin; Liu, Hongchen

    2017-01-01

    Background and Objective: Minor dental surgery is invasive and hemorrhagic. Thus, in patients treated with anticoagulants, the bleeding risk related to these invasive procedures is concerning. The aim of this meta-analysis is to evaluate this risk by comparing the post-operative bleeding rates of oral anticoagulation treatment (OAT) patients (without interrupted or altered anticoagulant intake) with non-OAT patients. Methods: PubMed, Embase and the Cochrane Library were searched for eligible studies that compared the post-operative (following minor dental surgery) bleeding rates of OAT patients without interrupted or altered therapy with those of non-OAT patients. Relative risk (RR) and 95% confidence interval (CI) were calculated. Subgroup analyses were used to identify the association between the bleeding rate and different dental surgeries or anticoagulants. Results: Thirty two full text articles were assessed for eligibility and 20 studies were excluded according to the selection criteria. Finally, 12 studies and a total of 2102 OAT patients and 2271 non-OAT patients were included. A pooled analysis indicated that the post-operative bleeding risk in OAT patients is higher than that of non-OAT patients (RR: 2.794, 95% CI: 1.722-4.532, P = 0.000). The pooled RRs in the dental implant surgery and dental extraction subgroups were 2.136 (95% CI: 0.825-5.531, P = 0.118) and 2.003 (95% CI: 0.987-4.063, P = 0.054), respectively. As for the different oral anticoagulants, the pooled RR in the subgroup of new oral anticoagulants (NOACs) was 1.603 (95% CI: 0.430-5.980, P = 0.482), while the pooled RR in the vitamin K antagonists subgroup was 3.067 (95% CI: 1.838-5.118, P = 0.000). Conclusion: Under current evidence, OAT patients were under a higher post-operative bleeding risk than the non-OAT patients following minor dental surgery. For the dental implant surgeries and dental extractions, our study failed to demonstrate a higher risk of bleeding in the OAT patients

  13. Choosing a particular oral anticoagulant and dose for stroke prevention in individual patients with non-valvular atrial fibrillation: part 1.

    PubMed

    Diener, Hans-Christoph; Aisenberg, James; Ansell, Jack; Atar, Dan; Breithardt, Günter; Eikelboom, John; Ezekowitz, Michael D; Granger, Christopher B; Halperin, Jonathan L; Hohnloser, Stefan H; Hylek, Elaine M; Kirchhof, Paulus; Lane, Deirdre A; Verheugt, Freek W A; Veltkamp, Roland; Lip, Gregory Y H

    2016-02-04

    Patients with atrial fibrillation (AF) have a high risk of stroke and mortality, which can be considerably reduced by oral anticoagulants (OAC). Recently, four non-vitamin-K oral anticoagulants (NOACs) were compared with warfarin in large randomized trials for the prevention of stroke and systemic embolism. Today's clinician is faced with the difficult task of selecting a suitable OAC for a patient with a particular clinical profile or a particular pattern of risk factors and concomitant diseases. We reviewed analyses of subgroups of patients from trials of vitamin K antagonists vs. NOACs for stroke prevention in AF with the aim to identify patient groups who might benefit from a particular OAC more than from another. In the first of a two-part review, we discuss the choice of NOAC for stroke prevention in the following subgroups of patients with AF: (i) stable coronary artery disease or peripheral artery disease, including percutaneous coronary intervention with stenting and triple therapy; (ii) cardioversion, ablation and anti-arrhythmic drug therapy; (iii) mechanical valves and rheumatic valve disease, (iv) patients with time in therapeutic range of >70% on warfarin; (v) patients with a single stroke risk factor (CHA2DS2VASc score of 1 in males, 2 in females); and (vi) patients with a single first episode of paroxysmal AF. Although there are no major differences in terms of efficacy and safety between the NOACs for some clinical scenarios, in others we are able to suggest that particular drugs and/or doses be prioritized for anticoagulation.

  14. Hospital-based clinical implications of the novel oral anticoagulant, dabigatran etexilate, in daily practice.

    PubMed

    Wilcox, Ryan; Pendleton, Robert C; Smock, Kristi J; Rodgers, George M

    2011-08-01

    Dabigatran etexilate is an oral direct thrombin inhibitor that has been approved by the US Food and Drug Administration for the prevention of stroke and systemic embolization in patients with nonvalvular atrial fibrillation. It has also been studied for the prevention of venous thromboembolism in patients after hip and knee arthroplasty and for treatment of venous thromboembolism. Although routine laboratory monitoring is not needed, there are clinical scenarios in which physicians will need to have a clear understanding of drug pharmacology, laboratory assessment, and reversibility of this drug to make appropriate clinical decisions. We review the pharmacology of dabigatran etexilate, pertinent clinical trials, and the effects of dabigatran etexilate on prothrombin time, activated partial thromboplastin time, thrombin time, and ecarin clotting time. We also provide an approach to patients on dabigatran etexilate who are bleeding, have a suspected therapeutic failure, or require periprocedural management.

  15. [Giant thrombus in the left atrium after mitral bioprosthesis implantation: is standard oral anticoagulation always sufficient?].

    PubMed

    Tomaszuk-Kazberuk, Anna; Lisowska, Anna; Sobkowicz, Bożena; Młodawska, Elżbieta; Łopatowska, Paulina; Kosacka, Urszula; Krajewska, Agnieszka; Musiał, Włodzimierz J

    2013-01-01

    We present a case of 70-year old male after coronary by-pass surgery and mitral bioprosthesis implantation due to infective endocarditis, with continuous atrial fibrillation, who was admitted to the hospital due to the worsening of the heart failure. He was on oral antivitamine K agents with therapeutic value of INR. On echocardiography we found enlargement of all cavities with extremely big left atrium (9.5 cm) and poor contractile left ventricular function (EF 25%). An enormously big old thrombus was found in the left atrium. The patient was disqualified from surgical treatment. Treatment with unfractionated heparin was unsuccessful. We discuss if standard antithrombotic treatment is always sufficient in such unusual cases.

  16. Safety of dental extraction among consecutive patients on oral anticoagulant treatment managed using a specific dental management protocol.

    PubMed

    Zanon, Ezio; Martinelli, Franco; Bacci, Christian; Cordioli, GianPiero; Girolami, Antonio

    2003-01-01

    We found no prospective studies on dental extraction in anticoagulated patients in the literature, even though most authors suggest that there is no need to change anticoagulant treatment and to utilize a local haemostatic measure after extraction. In the present study, we have verified the incidence of bleeding complications after dental extraction in a group of 250 consecutive anticoagulated patients. Two hundred and fifty non-anticoagulated subjects requiring dental extraction represented the control group. In all patients, anticoagulant treatment was not changed (International Normalized Ratio, 1.8-4) and local haemostatic measures (fibrin sponge, silk suture and a gauze saturated with tranexamic acid) were used. All procedures were performed in an outpatient clinic setting. We registered four bleeding complications in the group of anticoagulated patients and three in the control group. The difference of bleeding complications in the two groups was not statistically different (relative risk, 1.14; 95% confidence interval, 0.29-6.04; P = 0.7). None of the post-operative late bleeding required hospitalization and/or blood transfusions, and further local measures were sufficient to stop the bleeding. The protocol proposed in the present study makes dental extractions in anticoagulated patients possible on an outpatient basis with a cost reduction for the community and minor discomfort for the patients.

  17. Multicentre randomised placebo-controlled trial of oral anticoagulation with apixaban in systemic sclerosis-related pulmonary arterial hypertension: the SPHInX study protocol

    PubMed Central

    Calderone, Alicia; Stevens, Wendy; Prior, David; Nandurkar, Harshal; Gabbay, Eli; Proudman, Susanna M; Williams, Trevor; Celermajer, David; Sahhar, Joanne; Wong, Peter K K; Thakkar, Vivek; Dwyer, Nathan; Wrobel, Jeremy; Chin, Weng; Liew, Danny; Staples, Margaret; Buchbinder, Rachelle; Nikpour, Mandana

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Systemic sclerosis (SSc) is a severe and costly multiorgan autoimmune connective tissue disease characterised by vasculopathy and fibrosis. One of the major causes of SSc-related death is pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH), which develops in 12–15% of patients with SSc and accounts for 30–40% of deaths. In situ thrombosis in the small calibre peripheral pulmonary vessels resulting from endothelial dysfunction and an imbalance of anticoagulant and prothrombotic mediators has been implicated in the complex pathophysiology of SSc-related PAH (SSc-PAH), with international clinical guidelines recommending the use of anticoagulants for some types of PAH, such as idiopathic PAH. However, anticoagulation has not become part of standard clinical care for patients with SSc-PAH as only observational evidence exists to support its use. Therefore, we present the rationale and methodology of a phase III randomised controlled trial (RCT) to evaluate the efficacy, safety and cost-effectiveness of anticoagulation in SSc-PAH. Methods and analysis This Australian multicentre RCT will compare 2.5 mg apixaban with placebo, in parallel treatment groups randomised in a 1:1 ratio, both administered twice daily for 3 years as adjunct therapy to stable oral PAH therapy. The composite primary outcome measure will be the time to death or clinical worsening of PAH. Secondary outcomes will include functional capacity, health-related quality of life measures and adverse events. A cost-effectiveness analysis of anticoagulation versus placebo will also be undertaken. Ethics and dissemination Ethical approval for this RCT has been granted by the Human Research Ethics Committees of all participating centres. An independent data safety monitoring board will review safety and tolerability data for the duration of the trial. The findings of this RCT are to be published in open access journals. Trial registration number ACTRN12614000418673, Pre-results. PMID:27932335

  18. Effectiveness and safety of reduced dose non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants and warfarin in patients with atrial fibrillation: propensity weighted nationwide cohort study.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, Peter Brønnum; Skjøth, Flemming; Søgaard, Mette; Kjældgaard, Jette Nordstrøm; Lip, Gregory Y H; Larsen, Torben Bjerregaard

    2017-02-10

    Objective To examine clinical effectiveness and safety of apixaban 2.5 mg, dabigatran 110 mg, and rivaroxaban 15 mg compared with warfarin among patients with atrial fibrillation who had not previously taken an oral anticoagulant.Design Propensity weighted (inverse probability of treatment weighted) nationwide cohort study.Setting Individual linked data from three nationwide registries in Denmark.Participants Patients with non-valvular atrial fibrillation filling a first prescription for an oral anticoagulant from August 2011 to February 2016. Patients who filled a prescription for a standard dose non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulant (novel oral anticoagulants, NOACs) were excluded. To control for baseline differences in the population, a propensity score for receipt of either of the four treatment alternatives was calculated to apply an inverse probability treatment weight.Intervention Initiated anticoagulant treatment (dabigatran 110 mg, rivaroxaban 15 mg, apixaban 2.5 mg, and warfarin).Main outcome measures Patients were followed in the registries from onset of treatment for the primary effectiveness outcome of ischaemic stroke/systemic embolism and for the principal safety outcome of any bleeding events.Results Among 55 644 patients with atrial fibrillation who met inclusion criteria, the cohort was distributed according to treatment: apixaban n=4400; dabigatran n=8875; rivaroxaban n=3476; warfarin n=38 893. The overall mean age was 73.9 (SD 12.7), ranging from a mean of 71.0 (warfarin) to 83.9 (apixaban). During one year of follow-up, apixaban was associated with higher (weighted) event rate of ischaemic stroke/systemic embolism (4.8%), while dabigatran, rivaroxaban, and warfarin had event rates of 3.3%, 3.5%, and 3.7%, respectively. In the comparison between a non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulant and warfarin in the inverse probability of treatment weighted analyses and investigation of the effectiveness outcome, the hazard ratios

  19. Practical and clinical considerations in assessing patients with atrial fibrillation for switching to non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants in primary care

    PubMed Central

    Guimarães, Patrícia O; Kaatz, Scott; Lopes, Renato D

    2015-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is an important risk factor for thromboembolic events, and anticoagulation therapy can reduce this risk. Vitamin K antagonists (VKAs), such as warfarin, have been used for decades in patients with AF for stroke prevention. Currently, non-VKA oral anticoagulants (NOACs) are approved and available for non-valvular AF patients who are at increased risk of stroke. These agents are safe and effective and have important advantages over VKAs, such as significant reduction in intracranial hemorrhage and no need for routine laboratory monitoring. Thus, should all VKA-treated patients be switched to a NOAC? The aims of this article are: 1) to review the advantages of NOACs over VKAs; 2) to identify the group of patients who most benefit from receiving a NOAC and, therefore, are higher priority to be switched from VKAs; and 3) to provide clinical and practical guidance on how to switch patients safely from VKAs to NOACs. PMID:26379443

  20. Direct oral anticoagulants in the secondary prevention of stroke and transient ischemic attack in patients with atrial fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Arnao, Valentina; Agnelli, Giancarlo; Paciaroni, Maurizio

    2015-08-01

    In patients with non-valvular atrial fibrillation (NVAF) and history of transient ischemic attack (TIA) or stroke, the rate of vascular events is higher in comparison to patients without history of stroke or TIA. A meta-analysis of direct oral anticoagulants (DOACs) studies, including only patients with history of stroke or TIA, report a significant reduction of 15 % in the rates of composite of stroke and systemic embolism in patients treated with DOACs, compared to those treated with warfarin. Furthermore, a reduction of 14 % for major bleeding, as well as a 56 % reduction for hemorrhagic stroke over a median follow-up of 1.8-2.0 years is reported. The combination of DOACs and antiplatelet agents carries the potential of additive benefits in patients with NVAF and other vascular diseases. However, the rate of major bleeding is higher among patients who receive concomitantly antiplatelet agents, compared to those taking only a single drug category. The risk of major bleeding seems to be higher among patients receiving dual antiplatelet agents, compared to those receiving a single antiplatelet drug. When NVAF is associated with an acute coronary syndrome requiring dual antiplatelet therapy (e.g. coronary angioplasty and stenting), DOACs plus this therapy should be considered. However, this therapy has to be administered for the shortest possible time, according to the patient's haemorrhagic and thrombotic risks, and stent type. When NVAF is associated with carotid stenosis, a single antiplatelet therapy should be considered. Regarding carotid revascularization, it seems preferable to treat these patients with endarterectomy, so to avoid dual antiplatelet therapy, which is generally administered after stenting.

  1. In-hospital mortality after pre-treatment with antiplatelet agents or oral anticoagulants and hematoma evacuation of intracerebral hematomas.

    PubMed

    Stein, Marco; Misselwitz, Björn; Hamann, Gerhard F; Kolodziej, Malgorzata; Reinges, Marcus H T; Uhl, Eberhard

    2016-04-01

    Pre-treatment with antiplatelet agents is described to be a risk factor for mortality after spontaneous intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH). However, the impact of antithrombotic agents on mortality in patients who undergo hematoma evacuation compared to conservatively treated patients with ICH remains controversial. This analysis is based on a prospective registry for quality assurance in stroke care in the State of Hesse, Germany. Patients' data were collected between January 2008 and December 2012. Only patients with the diagnosis of spontaneous ICH were included (International Classification of Diseases 10th Revision codes I61.0-I61.9). Predictors of in-hospital mortality were determined by univariate analysis. Predictors with P<0.1 were included in a binary logistic regression model. The binary logistic regression model was adjusted for age, initial Glasgow Coma Score (GCS), the presence of intraventricular hemorrhage (IVH), and pre-ICH disability prior to ictus. In 8,421 patients with spontaneous ICH, pre-treatment with oral anticoagulants or antiplatelet agents was documented in 16.3% and 25.1%, respectively. Overall in-hospital mortality was 23.2%. In-hospital mortality was decreased in operatively treated patients compared to conservatively treated patients (11.6% versus 24.0%; P<0.001). Patients with antiplatelet pre-treatment had a significantly higher risk of death during the hospital stay after hematoma evacuation (odds ratio [OR]: 2.5; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.24-4.97; P=0.010) compared to patients without antiplatelet pre-treatment treatment (OR: 0.9; 95% CI: 0.79-1.09; P=0.376). In conclusion a higher rate of in-hospital mortality after pre-treatment with antiplatelet agents in combination with hematoma evacuation after spontaneous ICH was observed in the presented cohort.

  2. Drug persistence with rivaroxaban therapy in atrial fibrillation patients—results from the Dresden non-interventional oral anticoagulation registry

    PubMed Central

    Beyer-Westendorf, Jan; Förster, Kati; Ebertz, Franziska; Gelbricht, Vera; Schreier, Thomas; Göbelt, Maria; Michalski, Franziska; Endig, Heike; Sahin, Kurtulus; Tittl, Luise; Weiss, Norbert

    2015-01-01

    Aims Worldwide, rivaroxaban is increasingly used for stroke prevention in atrial fibrillation (SPAF) but little is known about the rates of or reasons for rivaroxaban discontinuations in daily care. Using data from a prospective, non-interventional oral anticoagulation (NOAC) registry, we analysed rivaroxaban treatment persistence. Methods and results Persistence with rivaroxaban in SPAF was assessed in an ongoing, prospective, non-interventional registry of >2600 NOAC patients from daily care using the Kaplan–Meier time-to-first-event analysis. Reasons for and management of rivaroxaban discontinuation were assessed. Potential baseline risk factors for treatment discontinuation were evaluated using Cox regression analysis. Between October 2011 and April 2014, 1204 rivaroxaban SPAF patients were enrolled [39.3% switched from vitamin K antagonists (VKAs) and 60.7% newly treated patients]. Of these, 223 patients (18.5%) stopped rivaroxaban during follow-up (median 544 days), which translates into a discontinuation rate of 13.6 (95% CI 11.8–15.4) per 100 patient-years. Most common reasons for treatment discontinuations were bleeding complications (30% of all discontinuations), followed by other side-effects (24.2%) and diagnosis of stable sinus rhythm (9.9%). A history of chronic heart failure (HR 1.43; 95% CI 1.09–1.87; P = 0.009) or diabetes (HR 1.39; 95% CI 1.06–1.82; P = 0.018) were the only statistically significant baseline risk factors for rivaroxaban discontinuation. After discontinuation of rivaroxaban, patients received antiplatelet therapy (31.8%), VKA (24.2%), another NOAC (18.4%), heparin (9.9%), or nothing (15.7%). Conclusion Our data indicate that overall persistence with rivaroxaban therapy is high, with a discontinuation rate of ∼15% in the first year of treatment and few additional discontinuations thereafter. PMID:25694537

  3. Asian Patients with Stroke plus Atrial Fibrillation and the Dose of Non-Vitamin K Oral Anticoagulants

    PubMed Central

    Bang, Oh Young; Hong, Keun-Sik; Heo, Ji Hoe

    2016-01-01

    After recent randomized control trials (RCTs), non-vitamin K oral anticoagulants (NAOAs) are now widely being used in patients with atrial fibrillation (AF) worldwide. However, current guidelines for the use of NOACs in patients with AF are derived mostly using a Caucasian population and non-stroke patients. Relatively few Asian patients with AF and stroke are included in the recent RCTs. As a result, the optimal use of NOACs in this particular group of patients is remains to be settled. The optimal dose of NOACs and response to current dose of NOACs of Asian patients with AF and stroke may differ from those of westerners and patients without stroke. We reviewed available research on NOACs by searching PubMed and ClinicalTrials.gov published in English up to December 2015. In this review, the characteristics of Asian AF patients with prior stroke/transient ischemic attack, which might influence the efficacy and safety profiles of NOACs, are discussed. In addition, we summarize the risk factors for bleeding complications on NOACs, which are related or unrelated with the blood level of NOACs. Lastly, we provide recent data of reduced dose of NOACs from RCTs or large cohorts. The results reviewed herein call for clinical trials to test whether a reduced dose of NOACs is beneficial in Asian patients with AF and stroke. In the meantime, further researches are needed to establish the safety and efficacy of dose-adjusted NOACs considering both blood levels of NOACs and fragility of patients in Asian patients with AF and stroke. PMID:27170995

  4. Agreement Between Stroke Patients and Family Members For Ascertaining Pre-Stroke Risk of Sleep Apnea

    PubMed Central

    Reeves, Sarah L; Brown, Devin L; Chervin, Ronald D; Morgenstern, Lewis B; Smith, Melinda A; Lisabeth, Lynda D

    2014-01-01

    Background Ascertaining self-reported information about pre-stroke obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) risk in the acute stroke period is challenging as many stroke patients have deficits that hinder communication. We examined agreement between stroke patients without communication limitations and family members (proxy) with respect to pre-stroke risk of OSA. Methods Patient-proxy pairs (n = 42) were interviewed independently as part of the Brain Attack Surveillance in Corpus Christi Project from May 2010 - April 2011. The Berlin questionnaire was used to measure a high risk of OSA defined as the presence of at least two of the following conditions: 1) snoring behaviors/witnessed apneas, 2) daytime sleepiness, and 3) hypertension or obesity. Patient-proxy agreement was assessed using a kappa coefficient. Results Forty-three percent of patients self-identified as high risk for sleep apnea, and 45% of proxies identified patients as high risk. Patient-proxy agreement for high risk of pre-stroke OSA was fair (kappa = 0.28) with better agreement for spouses and children proxies (kappa = 0.38) than for other family members. Agreement was also fair for most individual questions. Conclusions Spouse and child proxy use of the Berlin questionnaire may be an option to assess a patient's pre-stroke likelihood of sleep apnea. Whereas prospective studies of incident stroke in patients with and without objectively confirmed sleep apnea would require formidable resources, the present results suggest that an alternative strategy may involve proxy use of the Berlin in a retrospective study design. PMID:24238964

  5. Point-of-Care International Normalized Ratio (INR) Monitoring Devices for Patients on Long-term Oral Anticoagulation Therapy

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Executive Summary Subject of the Evidence-Based Analysis The purpose of this evidence based analysis report is to examine the safety and effectiveness of point-of-care (POC) international normalized ratio (INR) monitoring devices for patients on long-term oral anticoagulation therapy (OAT). Clinical Need: Target Population and Condition Long-term OAT is typically required by patients with mechanical heart valves, chronic atrial fibrillation, venous thromboembolism, myocardial infarction, stroke, and/or peripheral arterial occlusion. It is estimated that approximately 1% of the population receives anticoagulation treatment and, by applying this value to Ontario, there are an estimated 132,000 patients on OAT in the province, a figure that is expected to increase with the aging population. Patients on OAT are regularly monitored and their medications adjusted to ensure that their INR scores remain in the therapeutic range. This can be challenging due to the narrow therapeutic window of warfarin and variation in individual responses. Optimal INR scores depend on the underlying indication for treatment and patient level characteristics, but for most patients the therapeutic range is an INR score of between 2.0 and 3.0. The current standard of care in Ontario for patients on long-term OAT is laboratory-based INR determination with management carried out by primary care physicians or anticoagulation clinics (ACCs). Patients also regularly visit a hospital or community-based facility to provide a venous blood samples (venipuncture) that are then sent to a laboratory for INR analysis. Experts, however, have commented that there may be under-utilization of OAT due to patient factors, physician factors, or regional practice variations and that sub-optimal patient management may also occur. There is currently no population-based Ontario data to permit the assessment of patient care, but recent systematic reviews have estimated that less that 50% of patients receive OAT on a

  6. Anticoagulation-related nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Wheeler, D S; Giugliano, R P; Rangaswami, J

    2016-03-01

    Anticoagulation-related nephropathy (ARN) is a significant but underdiagnosed complication of anticoagulation that is associated with increased renal morbidity and all-cause mortality. Originally described in patients receiving supratherapeutic doses of warfarin who had a distinct pattern of glomerular hemorrhage on kidney biopsy, ARN is currently defined as acute kidney injury (AKI) without obvious etiology in the setting of an International Normalized Ratio (INR) of > 3.0. The underlying molecular mechanism is thought to be warfarin-induced thrombin depletion; however, newer studies have hinted at an alternative mechanism involving reductions in activated protein C and endothelial protein C receptor signaling. Prompt recognition of ARN is critical, as it is associated with accelerated progression of chronic kidney disease, and significant increases in short-term and long-term all-cause mortality. Prior investigations into ARN have almost universally focused on anticoagulation with warfarin; however, recent case reports and animal studies suggest that it can also occur in patients taking novel oral anticoagulants. Differences in the incidence and severity of ARN between patients taking warfarin and those taking novel oral anticoagulants are unknown; a post hoc analysis of routinely reported adverse renal outcomes in clinical trials comparing warfarin and novel oral anticoagulants found no significant difference in the rates of AKI, a prerequisite for ARN. Given the significant impact of ARN on renal function and all-cause mortality, a thorough understanding of the pathophysiology, molecular mechanisms, clinical spectrum and therapeutic interventions for ARN is crucial to balance the risks and benefits of anticoagulation and optimize treatment.

  7. [Treatment of very old patients with non valvular atrial fibrillation. The valuable opportunity offered by new oral anticoagulants, to be cautiously used].

    PubMed

    Orso, Francesco; Barucci, Riccardo; Fracchia, Stefania; Mannarino, Giulio; Pratesi, Alessandra; Fattirolli, Francesco

    2013-12-01

    Atrial Fibrillation (AF) is the most frequent cardiac arrhythmia and its incidence increases with age reaching a 10% prevalence in the oldest old. Patients with AF have a five-fold increase in the risk of stroke. Current guidelines on AF management recommend the prescription of oral anticoagulant therapy in patients at medium and high risk of thromboembolic events. Advanced age is a risk factor for stroke in AF, but despite clear evidences a high rate of OAT under prescription is reported and particularly in the oldest old. Among the main causes of this phenomenon an enhanced risk of bleeding is often reported: this due to several factors: risk of falls, the presence of comorbidity and polifarmacy and a reduction in compliance and adherence that are common in the elderly. In recent years the international scenario in the management of OAT has significantly changed since the introduction of the new oral anticoagulants (NOA): Dabigatran, a direct thrombin inhibitor, and two oral factor Xa inhibitors Rivaroxaban and Apixaban, which have all been tested in randomized clinical trial (RELY, ROCKET-AF e ARISTOTLE) which have demonstrated non inferiority compared to warfarin in the prevention of thromboembolic events with an optimal safety profile. NOA could be an important therapeutic opportunity for stroke prevention in elderly patients with AF even if the substantial differences in mean age, anthropometric measures and comorbidity of the patients enrolled in these trials compared with those of the real world setting, oblige some caution and discussion.

  8. Efficacy and safety of the target-specific oral anticoagulants for stroke prevention in atrial fibrillation: the real-life evidence

    PubMed Central

    Russo, Vincenzo; Rago, Anna; Proietti, Riccardo; Di Meo, Federica; Antonio Papa, Andrea; Calabrò, Paolo; D’Onofrio, Antonio; Nigro, Gerardo; AlTurki, Ahmed

    2016-01-01

    The aim of our article is to provide a concise review for clinicians entailing the main studies that evaluated the efficacy and safety of target-specific oral anticoagulants (TSOAs) for thromboembolic stroke prevention in the real-world setting. Atrial fibrillation (AF) is one of the most common supraventricular arrhythmias that requires anticoagulation therapy to prevent stroke and systemic embolism. TSOAs, dabigatran, apixaban and rivaroxaban have become available as an alternative to warfarin anticoagulation in nonvalvular atrial fibrillation (NVAF). Randomized clinical trials showed non-inferior or superior results in efficacy and safety of the TSOAs compared with warfarin for stroke prevention in NVAF patients. For this reason, the 2012 update to the European Society of Cardiology guidelines for the management of AF recommends TSOAs as broadly preferable to vitamin K antagonists (VKAs) in the vast majority of patients with NVAF [Camm et al. 2012]. Although the clinical trial results and the guideline’s indications, there is a need for safety and efficacy data from unselected patients in everyday clinical practice. Recently, a large number of studies testing the efficacy and the safety of TSOAs in clinical practice have been published. The aim of our article is to provide a concise review for clinicians, outlining the main studies that evaluated the efficacy and safety of TSOAs for thromboembolic stroke prevention in the real-world setting. PMID:28255434

  9. Non-Vitamin K Antagonist Oral Anticoagulants and Antiplatelet Therapy for Stroke Prevention in Patients With Atrial Fibrillation: A Meta-Analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Shashi; Danik, Stephan B; Altman, Robert K; Barrett, Conor D; Lip, Gregory Y H; Chatterjee, Saurav; Roubin, Gary S; Natale, Andrea; Danik, Jacqueline S

    2016-01-01

    Non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants (NOACs) are frequently used to prevent stroke in patients with atrial fibrillation. These patients are often also on aspirin or other antiplatelet agents. It is possible that treatment with both NOACs and aspirin or other antiplatelet drug may be effective in decreasing stroke, but data are sparse regarding the efficacy and safety of using both agents for stroke prevention. To address these issues, data were pooled from the 4 recent randomized, controlled trials of NOACs: apixaban, rivaroxaban, dabigatran, and edoxaban, which included 42,411 patients; 14,148 (33.4%) were also on aspirin or other antiplatelet drug. The number of thromboembolic events among participants on NOAC and aspirin/antiplatelet was compared with the number of events in patients on NOAC alone. Bleeding rates were also compared between those on NOAC + aspirin/antiplatelet and on NOAC alone. These results were compared with thromboembolic and bleeding events in the warfarin + aspirin/antiplatelet versus warfarin alone. No greater risk for thromboembolism was seen in patients on NOACs compared with patients on both NOACs and aspirin/antiplatelet drug. In this nonrandomized comparison, there was initially a signal toward higher thromboembolic rates among NOAC users also on aspirin/antiplatelet drugs (relative risk, 1.16; 95% confidence intervals, 1.05, 1.29) when compared with NOAC alone. This likely reflected the higher CHADS2 scores of those on aspirin/antiplatelet drugs. When the analysis was limited to studies that included aspirin rather than other antiplatelet drugs, no difference was seen for thromboembolic rates comparing dual therapy to NOAC alone (relative risk, 1.02; 95% confidence intervals, 0.90, 1.15). Higher rates of bleeding were seen with aspirin/antiplatelet drug in conjunction with NOAC. In this meta-analysis and nonrandomized comparison of aspirin/antiplatelet users and nonusers also on anticoagulation, there was no additional

  10. Real-world comparison of non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants and warfarin in Asian octogenarian patients with atrial fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Chang Hee; Kim, Minsu; Kim, Jun; Nam, Gi-Byoung; Choi, Kee-Joon; Kim, You-Ho

    2016-01-01

    Background The efficacy and safety of non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants (NOACs) and warfarin in Asian octogenarian atrial fibrillation (AF) patients have not been established in a real-world setting. We aimed to evaluate the efficacy and safety of NOACs and warfarin in Korean octogenarian patients. Methods A total of 293 consecutive patients aged ≥ 80 years with non-valvular AF who had taken either NOACs (148 cases, 50.5%) or warfarin (145 cases, 49.5%) were retrospectively reviewed. The efficacy outcome was the composite of stroke or systemic embolism. The safety outcome was major bleeding. Results The follow-up duration was 375 patient-years (172 patient-years with NOACs and 203 patient-years with warfarin). Patients on NOACs were slightly older (P = 0.006) and had slightly higher HAS-BLED scores (P = 0.034). The efficacy of both anticoagulants was high (1.16% for NOACs vs. 2.98% for warfarin per 100 patient-years, P = 0.46). The safety outcome was relatively high in both NOACs and warfarin groups (8.96% vs. 12.46%, P = 0.29). The efficacy and safety outcomes tended to decrease non-significantly in low dose NOACs than in common dose NOACs or warfarin (0.85% vs. 1.84% vs. 2.98% in efficacy outcome, P = 0.69; and 6.97% vs. 13.29% vs. 12.46% in safety outcome, P = 0.34). Conclusions NOACs were highly effective for prevention of stroke or systemic embolism in Asian octogenarian AF patients. However, major bleeding occurred excessively high in both anticoagulant groups. Further study is required on the optimal anticoagulant regimen in octogenarian population. PMID:27605936

  11. Comparative effectiveness and safety of non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants and warfarin in patients with atrial fibrillation: propensity weighted nationwide cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Skjøth, Flemming; Nielsen, Peter Brønnum; Kjældgaard, Jette Nordstrøm; Lip, Gregory Y H

    2016-01-01

    Objective To study the effectiveness and safety of the non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants (novel oral anticoagulants, NOACs) dabigatran, rivaroxaban, and apixaban compared with warfarin in anticoagulant naïve patients with atrial fibrillation. Design Observational nationwide cohort study. Setting Three Danish nationwide databases, August 2011 to October 2015. Participants 61 678 patients with non-valvular atrial fibrillation who were naïve to oral anticoagulants and had no previous indication for valvular atrial fibrillation or venous thromboembolism. The study population was distributed according to treatment type: warfarin (n=35 436, 57%), dabigatran 150 mg (n=12 701, 21%), rivaroxaban 20 mg (n=7192, 12%), and apixaban 5 mg (n=6349, 10%). Main outcome measures Effectiveness outcomes defined a priori were ischaemic stroke; a composite of ischaemic stroke or systemic embolism; death; and a composite of ischaemic stroke, systemic embolism, or death. Safety outcomes were any bleeding, intracranial bleeding, and major bleeding. Results When the analysis was restricted to ischaemic stroke, NOACs were not significantly different from warfarin. During one year follow-up, rivaroxaban was associated with lower annual rates of ischaemic stroke or systemic embolism (3.0% v 3.3%, respectively) compared with warfarin: hazard ratio 0.83 (95% confidence interval 0.69 to 0.99). The hazard ratios for dabigatran and apixaban (2.8% and 4.9% annually, respectively) were non-significant compared with warfarin. The annual risk of death was significantly lower with apixaban (5.2%) and dabigatran (2.7%) (0.65, 0.56 to 0.75 and 0.63, 0.48 to 0.82, respectively) compared with warfarin (8.5%), but not with rivaroxaban (7.7%). For the combined endpoint of any bleeding, annual rates for apixaban (3.3%) and dabigatran (2.4%) were significantly lower than for warfarin (5.0%) (0.62, 0.51 to 0.74). Warfarin and rivaroxaban had comparable annual bleeding rates (5

  12. Oral anticoagulant therapy for stroke prevention in patients with atrial fibrillation undergoing ablation: results from the First European Snapshot Survey on Procedural Routines for Atrial Fibrillation Ablation (ESS-PRAFA).

    PubMed

    Potpara, Tatjana S; Larsen, Torben B; Deharo, Jean Claude; Rossvoll, Ole; Dagres, Nikolaos; Todd, Derick; Pison, Laurent; Proclemer, Alessandro; Purefellner, Helmut; Blomström-Lundqvist, Carina

    2015-06-01

    The European Snapshot Survey on Procedural Routines in Atrial Fibrillation Ablation (ESS-PRAFA) is a prospective, multicentre snapshot survey of patients undergoing atrial fibrillation (AF) ablation, conducted to collect patient-based data on current clinical practices in AF ablation in context of the latest AF Guidelines and contemporary oral anticoagulant therapies. The EP Research Network Centres were asked to prospectively enrol consecutive patients during a 6-week period (September/October 2014). Data were collected via the web-based case report form. We present the results pertinent to the use of antithrombotic therapies. Thirteen countries prospectively enrolled 455 eligible consecutive patients [mean age 59 ± 10.8 years, 131 (28.8%) females]. The mean CHA2DS2-VASc score was 1.12 ± 1.06 [137 patients (30.1%) had a score of ≥2]. Before ablation, 443 patients (97.4%) were on anticoagulant therapy [143 (31.4%) on non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants (NOACs) and 264 (58.0%) on vitamin K antagonists (VKAs)]. Of the latter, 79.7% underwent ablation without VKA interruption, whilst a variety of strategies were used in patients taking NOAC. After ablation, most patients (89.3%) continued the same anticoagulant as before, and 2 (0.4%) were not prescribed any anticoagulation. At discharge, 280 patients (62.2%) were advised oral anticoagulation for a limited period of mean 3.8 ± 2.2 months. On multivariate analysis, CHA2DS2-VASc, AF duration, prior VKA use, and estimated AF ablation success were significantly associated with the decision on short-term anticoagulation. Our results show the increasing use of NOAC in patients undergoing AF ablation and emphasize the need for more information to guide the periprocedural use of both NOACs and VKAs in real-world setting.

  13. [Dental extractions in patients taking anticoagulants: is alteration of the anticoagulant regime necessary?].

    PubMed

    Madrid, Carlos

    2005-05-25

    A major concern in the management of patients under anticoagulants is the potential for excessive bleeding after dental procedures. Recommendations for the administration of oral anticoagulants in conjunction with oral surgery range from complete withdrawal of anticoagulants to the maintenance of an unchanged therapy. Rising evidences show that the alteration of anticoagulation is not necessary for patients with INR of 4 or less previous to tooth extractions. Topical antifibrinolytics as tranexamic acid control successfully alveolar bleeding. It is time to stop interrupting anticoagulant therapy for oral surgery. A theoretical risk of hemorrhage after dental surgery in patients at therapeutic levels of anticoagulation exists but it is minimal and is greatly overweighed by the risk of thromboembolism after alteration of the anticoagulant therapy.

  14. Coagulation assays and anticoagulant monitoring.

    PubMed

    Funk, Dorothy M Adcock

    2012-01-01

    Anticoagulant therapy, including conventional agents and a variety of new oral, fast-acting drugs, is prescribed for millions of patients annually. Each anticoagulant varies in its effect on routine and specialty coagulation assays and each drug may require distinct laboratory assay(s) to measure drug concentration or activity. This review provides an overview of the assorted assays that can measure anticoagulant drug concentration or activity and includes key assay interferences. The effect of these conventional and new anticoagulant agents on specialty coagulation assays used to evaluate for bleeding or clotting disorders, and whether this impact is physiological or factitious, is included. Also provided is a short review of superwarfarin poisoning and features distinguishing this from warfarin overdose. Knowledge of clinically significant pearls and pitfalls pertinent to coagulation assays in relation to anticoagulant therapy are important to optimize patient care.

  15. Prevalence of pre-stroke sleep apnea risk and short or long sleep duration in a bi-ethnic stroke population

    PubMed Central

    De Lott, Lindsey B.; Lisabeth, Lynda D.; Sanchez, Brisa N.; Morgenstern, Lewis B.; Smith, Melinda A.; Garcia, Nelda M.; Chervin, Ronald; Brown, Devin L.

    2014-01-01

    Background The ethnic disparity in ischemic stroke between Mexican Americans (MAs) and non-Hispanic whites (NHWs) may be partly attributable to disparities in sleep and its disorders. We therefore assessed whether pre-stroke sleep apnea symptoms (SA risk) and pre-stroke sleep duration differed between MAs and NHWs. Methods MA and NHW ischemic stroke survivors in the Brain Attack Surveillance in Corpus Christi (BASIC) project reported sleep duration, and SA symptoms on the validated Berlin questionnaire, both with respect to their pre-stroke baseline. Log binomial and linear regression models were used to test the unadjusted and adjusted (demographics, vascular risk factors) associations of high-risk Berlin scores and sleep duration with ethnicity. Results Among 862 subjects, 549 (63.7%) were MA, and 514 (59.6%) had high risk for pre-stroke SA. The MA and NHW subjects showed no ethnic difference, after adjustment for potential confounders, in pre-stroke SA risk (risk ratio [95% CI]: 1.06 [0.93,1.20]) or in pre-stroke sleep duration (on average MAs slept 2.0 fewer minutes than NHWs, 95%CI: -18.8, 14.9 minutes). Conclusions Pre-stroke SA symptoms are highly prevalent, but ethnic differences in SA risk and sleep duration appear unlikely to explain ethnic stroke disparities. PMID:25454982

  16. Phase III trials of new oral anticoagulants in the acute treatment and secondary prevention of VTE: comparison and critique of study methodology and results.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Alexander T; Imfeld, Stephan; Rider, Thomas

    2014-05-01

    The traditional treatment of venous thromboembolism (VTE) has been use of heparin and vitamin K antagonists (VKA), and although shown to be effective, they have numerous limitations. New oral anticoagulants (NOACs) including direct thrombin (factor IIa) inhibitors (dabigatran) and selective factor Xa inhibitors (rivaroxaban, apixaban and edoxaban) have emerged as promising alternatives with the potential to overcome the limitations of traditional treatments. Clinical trials have been performed with a view to making significant changes to the acute, long-term and extended treatment of VTE. Data are now available on the efficacy and safety, including bleeding rates, of the NOACs in comparison with VKA in the acute treatment and secondary prevention of VTE as well as in comparison with placebo extended VTE treatment. This review compares and contrasts the design and results of the Phase III trials of NOACs in VTE and discusses the implications of the NOACs in terms of treatment strategies in VTE patients.

  17. Anticoagulant rodenticides.

    PubMed

    Watt, Barbara E; Proudfoot, Alex T; Bradberry, Sally M; Vale, J Allister

    2005-01-01

    Anticoagulant pesticides are used widely in agricultural and urban rodent control. The emergence of warfarin-resistant strains of rats led to the introduction of a new group of anticoagulant rodenticides variously referred to as 'superwarfarins', 'single dose' or 'long-acting'. This group includes the second generation 4-hydroxycoumarins brodifacoum, bromadiolone, difenacoum, flocoumafen and the indanedione derivatives chlorophacinone and diphacinone. Most cases of anticoagulant rodenticide exposure involve young children and, as a consequence, the amounts ingested are almost invariably small. In contrast, intentional ingestion of large quantities of long-acting anticoagulant rodenticides may cause anticoagulation for several weeks or months. Occupational exposure has also been reported. Anticoagulant rodenticides inhibit vitamin K(1)-2,3 epoxide reductase and thus the synthesis of vitamin K and subsequently clotting factors II, VII, IX and X. The greater potency and duration of action of long-acting anticoagulant rodenticides is attributed to their: (i) greater affinity for vitamin K(1)-2,3-epoxide reductase; (ii) ability to disrupt the vitamin K(1)-epoxide cycle at more than one point; (iii) hepatic accumulation; and (iv) unusually long biological half-lives due to high lipid solubility and enterohepatic circulation. Substantial ingestion produces epistaxis, gingival bleeding, widespread bruising, haematomas, haematuria with flank pain, menorrhagia, gastrointestinal bleeding, rectal bleeding and haemorrhage into any internal organ; anaemia may result. Spontaneous haemoperitoneum has been described. Severe blood loss may result in hypovolaemic shock, coma and death. The first clinical signs of bleeding may be delayed and patients may remain anticoagulated for several days (warfarin) or days, weeks or months (long-acting anticoagulants) after ingestion of large amounts. There are now sufficient data in young children exposed to anticoagulant rodenticides to

  18. Efficacy and Safety of Direct Oral Anticoagulants Compared to Warfarin in Prevention of Thromboembolic Events Among Elderly Patients with Atrial Fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    Thambuluru, Sirisha Reddy

    2016-01-01

    Direct oral anticoagulants (DOACs), previously also known as novel oral anticoagulants (NOACs), have increased the therapeutic options for stroke prevention in atrial fibrillation (AF). Previous studies comparing their relative efficacy and safety do not address age-related differences, such as comorbidities and physical and social boundaries. This review aimed to summarize and compare the clinical and safety outcomes of DOACs and warfarin for stroke prevention in AF in the elderly population (≥ 65 years). We searched PubMed for randomized controlled trials and meta-analyses that compared DOACs and warfarin in elderly patients with AF. Stroke and systemic embolism (SSE) and major bleeding (MB) were primary outcomes. Secondary outcomes included ischemic stroke, all-cause mortality, intracranial bleeding, and gastrointestinal bleeding. Of 66 studies identified, one randomized control trial (RCT) and one meta-analysis were included. DOACs were at least as effective at reducing the risk of SSE as warfarin. DOACs demonstrated a minimal benefit for ischemic stroke (dabigatran, 110 mg, relative risk (RR) 1.08; edoxaban, 60 mg, RR 1.00; and apixaban, 5 mg, RR 0.99). DOACs associated with decreased risk of MB relative to warfarin include dabigatran, 110 mg; apixaban, 5 mg; and edoxaban, 60 mg (RR 0.80, 0.70, and 0.80, respectively), while dabigatran, 150 mg, and rivaroxaban, 20 mg, increased risk (RR 0.79 - 0.83, respectively). Dabigatran, 110 mg and 150 mg doses, and edoxaban increased the risk of gastrointestinal bleeding (RR 1.04, 1.12, and 1.23, respectively). Lower rates of SSE and intracranial bleeding were seen with DOACs compared to warfarin. Dabigatran, 150 mg, and rivaroxaban, 20 mg, were associated with higher MB in older elderly compared to warfarin. DOACs may be attractive alternatives to warfarin, but further studies are needed to make clinical recommendations. PMID:27900231

  19. Use and Outcomes of Antiarrhythmic Therapy in Patients with Atrial Fibrillation Receiving Oral Anticoagulation: Results from the ROCKET AF Trial

    PubMed Central

    Steinberg, Benjamin A.; Hellkamp, Anne S.; Lokhnygina, Yuliya; Halperin, Jonathan L.; Breithardt, Günter; Passman, Rod; Hankey, Graeme J.; Patel, Manesh R.; Becker, Richard C.; Singer, Daniel E.; Hacke, Werner; Berkowitz, Scott D.; Nessel, Christopher C.; Mahaffey, Kenneth W.; Fox, Keith A.A.; Califf, Robert M.; Piccini, Jonathan P.

    2014-01-01

    Background Antiarrhythmic drugs (AAD) and anticoagulation are mainstays of atrial fibrillation (AF) treatment. Objective We aimed to study the use and outcomes of AAD therapy in anticoagulated AF patients. Methods Patients in the ROCKET AF trial (n=14,264) were grouped by AAD use at baseline: amiodarone, other AAD, or no AAD. Multivariable adjustment was performed to compare stroke, bleeding, and death across groups, as well as across treatment assignment (rivaroxaban or warfarin). Results Of 14,264 patients randomized, 1681 (11.8%) were treated with an AAD (1144 [8%] with amiodarone, 537 [3.8%] with other AADs). Amiodarone-treated patients were less-often female (38% vs. 48%), had more persistent AF (64% vs. 40%), and more concomitant heart failure (71% vs. 41%) than patients receiving other AADs. Patients receiving no AAD more closely-resembled amiodarone-treated patients. Time in therapeutic range was significantly lower in warfarin-treated patients receiving amiodarone versus no AAD (50% vs. 58%, p<0.0001). Compared with no AAD, neither amiodarone (adjusted HR 0.98, 95% CI 0.74–1.31, p=0.9) nor other AADs (adjusted HR 0.66, 95% CI 0.37–1.17, p=0.15) were associated with increased mortality. Similar results were observed for embolic and bleeding outcomes. Rivaroxaban treatment effects in patients not on an AAD were consistent with the overall trial (primary endpoint adjusted HR 0.82, 95% CI 0.68–0.98, pinteraction=0.06; safety endpoint adjusted HR 1.12, 95% CI 0.90–1.24, pinteraction=0.33). Conclusion Treatment with AADs was not associated with increased morbidity or mortality in anticoagulated patients with AF. The influence of amiodarone on outcomes in patients receiving rivaroxaban requires further study. PMID:24833235

  20. Non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants and atrial fibrillation guidelines in practice: barriers to and strategies for optimal implementation.

    PubMed

    Camm, A John; Pinto, Fausto J; Hankey, Graeme J; Andreotti, Felicita; Hobbs, F D Richard

    2015-07-01

    Stroke is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Atrial fibrillation (AF) is an independent risk factor for stroke, increasing the risk five-fold. Strokes in patients with AF are more likely than other embolic strokes to be fatal or cause severe disability and are associated with higher healthcare costs, but they are also preventable. Current guidelines recommend that all patients with AF who are at risk of stroke should receive anticoagulation. However, despite this guidance, registry data indicate that anticoagulation is still widely underused. With a focus on the 2012 update of the European Society of Cardiology (ESC) guidelines for the management of AF, the Action for Stroke Prevention alliance writing group have identified key reasons for the suboptimal implementation of the guidelines at a global, regional, and local level, with an emphasis on access restrictions to guideline-recommended therapies. Following identification of these barriers, the group has developed an expert consensus on strategies to augment the implementation of current guidelines, including practical, educational, and access-related measures. The potential impact of healthcare quality measures for stroke prevention on guideline implementation is also explored. By providing practical guidance on how to improve implementation of the ESC guidelines, or region-specific modifications of these guidelines, the aim is to reduce the potentially devastating impact that stroke can have on patients, their families and their carers.

  1. Non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants and atrial fibrillation guidelines in practice: barriers to and strategies for optimal implementation

    PubMed Central

    Camm, A. John; Pinto, Fausto J.; Hankey, Graeme J.; Andreotti, Felicita; Hobbs, F.D. Richard

    2015-01-01

    Stroke is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Atrial fibrillation (AF) is an independent risk factor for stroke, increasing the risk five-fold. Strokes in patients with AF are more likely than other embolic strokes to be fatal or cause severe disability and are associated with higher healthcare costs, but they are also preventable. Current guidelines recommend that all patients with AF who are at risk of stroke should receive anticoagulation. However, despite this guidance, registry data indicate that anticoagulation is still widely underused. With a focus on the 2012 update of the European Society of Cardiology (ESC) guidelines for the management of AF, the Action for Stroke Prevention alliance writing group have identified key reasons for the suboptimal implementation of the guidelines at a global, regional, and local level, with an emphasis on access restrictions to guideline-recommended therapies. Following identification of these barriers, the group has developed an expert consensus on strategies to augment the implementation of current guidelines, including practical, educational, and access-related measures. The potential impact of healthcare quality measures for stroke prevention on guideline implementation is also explored. By providing practical guidance on how to improve implementation of the ESC guidelines, or region-specific modifications of these guidelines, the aim is to reduce the potentially devastating impact that stroke can have on patients, their families and their carers. PMID:26116685

  2. Differences in attitude, education, and knowledge about oral anticoagulation therapy among patients with atrial fibrillation in Europe: result of a self-assessment patient survey conducted by the European Heart Rhythm Association.

    PubMed

    Hernández Madrid, Antonio; Potpara, Tatjana S; Dagres, Nikolaos; Chen, Jian; Larsen, Torben B; Estner, Heidi; Todd, Derick; Bongiorni, Maria G; Sciaraffia, Elena; Proclemer, Alessandro; Cheggour, Saida; Amara, Walid; Blomstrom-Lundqvist, Carina

    2016-03-01

    The purpose of this patient survey was to analyse the knowledge about blood thinning medications relative to gender, age, education, and region of residence in patients with atrial fibrillation (AF). A total of 1147 patients with AF [mean age 66 ± 13 years, 529 (45%) women] from eight European countries responded to this survey. Most patients understood that the indication for anticoagulation therapy was to 'thin the blood', but 8.1% responded that the purpose of the medication was to treat the arrhythmia. Patients with college or university grades reported less frequent deviations from their target INR range compared with those without schooling (2.8% vs. 5.1%, P < 0.05). The awareness of anticoagulation-related risk of bleedings was lowest in patients without schooling (38.5%) and highest in those with college and university education (57.0%), P < 0.05. The same pattern was also observed regarding patient's awareness of non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants (NOACs): 56.5% of the patients with university education and only 20.5% of those without schooling (P < 0.05) knew about NOACs, indicating that information about new anticoagulation therapies remains well below the target. Bleeding events were statistically less frequent in patients on NOACs compared with vitamin K antagonists. The education level and patients' knowledge have a direct influence on the global management of the anticoagulation.

  3. Triple Antithrombotic Therapy after Percutaneous Coronary Intervention (PCI) in Patients with Indication for Oral Anticoagulation: Data from a Single Center Registry

    PubMed Central

    Staudacher, Dawid L.; Kaiser, Michael; Hehrlein, Christoph; Bode, Christoph; Ahrens, Ingo

    2015-01-01

    Antithrombotic therapy consisting of a dual anti-platelet therapy (DAPT) and oral anti-coagulation (OAC) with a vitamin k antagonist is often referred to as triple therapy. This combined anticoagulation is applied in patients undergoing coronary artery stent implantation while also having an indication for OAC. Triple therapy increases the risk for bleeding events compared to either DAPT or OAC alone and thereby might be associated with adverse outcomes. Clinical data on the frequency of bleeding events in patients on triple therapy from clinical trials derives from pre-selected patients and may differ from the real world patients. We report data on patient characteristics and bleeding incidence of patients dismissed on triple therapy from a single university hospital. Within the time span from January 2000 to December 2012, we identified a total of 213 patients undergoing PCI who were prescribed a triple therapy for at least 4 weeks (representing 0.86% of all patients treated). The usage of triple therapy significantly increased over the observed time period. The average CHA2DS2-VASc Score was 3.1 ± 1.1 with an average HAS-BLED score of 2.5 ± 0.86 representing a high-risk group for thromboembolic events as well as considerable risk for bleeding events. An on-treatment bleeding incidence of 9.4% was detected, with gastrointestinal and airway bleeding being the most frequent (5.1% and 1.4%, respectively). This is consistent with data from clinical trials and confirms the high risk of bleeding in patients on DAPT plus OAC. 29.0% of all patients receiving triple therapy had an indication for OAC other than non-valvular atrial fibrillation. This substantial patient group is underrepresented by clinical trials and needs further attention. PMID:26439131

  4. [Limitations of anticoagulant therapy].

    PubMed

    Martí-Fàbregas, J; Delgado-Mederos, R; Mateo, J

    2012-03-01

    Vitamin K antagonists have been shown to be effective in the primary and secondary prevention of systemic and cerebral emboli in patients with cardiac causes of embolism, especially atrial fibrillation. The reduced risk of stroke is greater in secondary prevention, although this reduction is accompanied by an inherent risk of hemorrhagic complications, among which cerebral hemorrhage is especially serious. The therapeutic window of these agents is limited and the best benefit/risk profile is obtained with an INR of between 2 and 3. The anticoagulant effect obtained shows marked variability, requiring frequent clinical and laboratory monitoring of the treatment. The introduction of oral anticoagulants that would aid the administration of these agents with equal or greater efficacy and lower risk is required.

  5. Management of the anticoagulated dental patient.

    PubMed

    Ball, J H

    1996-11-01

    An understanding of the primary mechanisms of hemostasis, including the coagulation pathways and the intrinsic, extrinsic, and common systems, is the basis for treating the anticoagulated patient. Two major anticoagulants are used for treating those who may be at risk for thromboembolic crisis. These drugs include Coumadin, which is an oral anticoagulant, and heparin, a parenteral anticoagulant, which is often used for acute thromboembolic episodes or for hospitalization protocols that include significant surgical procedures. The practitioner should be familiar with common dental drugs that can interact with anticoagulants and should consult with the patient's physician before administering any such drugs. By placing the patient into one of three dental treatment categories, appropriate anticoagulation therapy can be rendered to each patient according to his or her needs. Low-risk procedures require no change in anticoagulation medication. For moderate-risk procedures, withdrawal of anticoagulation medication 2 days before the procedure and verified with the PT the day of the procedure is indicated. For high-risk dental procedures, using a heparin protocol should be strongly considered. In all instances of dental treatment, the oral tissues should be treated atraumatically using local hemostatic measures for control of hemorrhage. Treating medically compromised patients who are on a variety of medications is becoming more common in dentistry today. Understanding the underlying disease and the appropriate protocol for treatment of anticoagulated patients reduces the risk of thromboembolism and hemorrhagic complications.

  6. Anticoagulant therapy and its impact on dental patients: a review.

    PubMed

    Thean, D; Alberghini, M

    2016-06-01

    Several new oral anticoagulants have been studied in the past decade, and have now started to enter the market. These drugs are reported to be as effective as, or more effective than, warfarin. In Australia, the Therapeutic Goods Administration has approved dabigatran, rivaroxaban and apixaban. The use of these newer anticoagulants is likely to increase in time, and it is important for dentists to have a sound understanding of the mechanisms of action, reversal strategies, and management guidelines for patients taking oral anticoagulants. This article discusses the process of coagulation, available anticoagulants and their monitoring and reversal, and provides clinical advice on the management of patients on anticoagulants who require dental treatment.

  7. Structure-based design of novel guanidine/benzamidine mimics: potent and orally bioavailable factor Xa inhibitors as novel anticoagulants.

    PubMed

    Lam, Patrick Y S; Clark, Charles G; Li, Renhua; Pinto, Donald J P; Orwat, Michael J; Galemmo, Robert A; Fevig, John M; Teleha, Christopher A; Alexander, Richard S; Smallwood, Angela M; Rossi, Karen A; Wright, Matthew R; Bai, Stephen A; He, Kan; Luettgen, Joseph M; Wong, Pancras C; Knabb, Robert M; Wexler, Ruth R

    2003-10-09

    As part of an ongoing effort to prepare orally active factor Xa inhibitors using structure-based drug design techniques and molecular recognition principles, a systematic study has been performed on the pharmacokinetic profile resulting from replacing the benzamidine in the P1 position with less basic benzamidine mimics or neutral residues. It is demonstrated that lowering the pK(a) of the P1 ligand resulted in compounds (3-benzylamine, 15a; 1-aminoisoquinoline, 24a; 3-aminobenzisoxazole, 23a; 3-phenylcarboxamide, 22b; and 4-methoxyphenyl, 22a) with improved pharmacokinetic features mainly as a result of decreased clearance, increased volume of distribution, and enhanced oral absorption. This work resulted in a series of potent and orally bioavailable factor Xa inhibitors that ultimately led to the discovery of SQ311, 24a. SQ311, which utilizes a 1-aminoisoquinoline as the P1 ligand, inhibits factor Xa with a K(i) of 0.33 nM and demonstrates both good in vivo antithrombotic efficacy and oral bioavailability.

  8. Widening the path and window of opportunity for FDA approval of non-vitamin K oral anticoagulant specific antidotes and reversal agents.

    PubMed

    Patel, Sunny; Steen, Dylan

    2016-02-01

    There remains a need for safe, immediately effective, and easy to administer antidotes for patients taking novel oral anticoagulants (NOACs) in the settings of major bleeding, need for emergency surgery, and accidental overdose. We review considerations for the successful safety and effectiveness evaluation of potential antidotes currently under development. These compounds are in expedited regulatory approval programs aimed at accelerating the preclinical and clinical evaluation and approval processes for treatments of serious conditions. We review the features of these expedited programs as well as the FDA's efforts to broadly advance the efficiency of drug development and increase the number of new compounds brought to market. The critical path initiative and regulatory science initiative have resulted in numerous successful programs to address current challenges such as a paucity of validated biomarkers and surrogate endpoints as well as unreliable animal models of toxicity. The FDA has also advocated for increased use of pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic modeling and adaptive trial design. These efforts foster collaboration between academia, industry and the public sector across interdisciplinary sciences and may continue to widen the pathway for NOAC-specific reversal agents and other novel compounds.

  9. Risk-Benefit Profile of Direct-Acting Oral Anticoagulants in Established Therapeutic Indications: An Overview of Systematic Reviews and Observational Studies.

    PubMed

    Raschi, Emanuel; Bianchin, Matteo; Ageno, Walter; De Ponti, Roberto; De Ponti, Fabrizio

    2016-12-01

    Since 2008, the direct-acting oral anticoagulants (DOACs) have expanded the therapeutic options of cardiovascular diseases with recognized clinical and epidemiological impact, such as non-valvular atrial fibrillation (NVAF) and venous thromboembolism (VTE), and also in the preventive setting of orthopedic surgical patients. The large body of evidence, not only from pivotal clinical trials but also from 'real-world' postmarketing observational findings (e.g. analytical epidemiological studies and registry data) gathered to date allow for a first attempt at verifying a posteriori whether or not the pharmacological advantages of the DOACs actually translate into therapeutic innovation, with relevant implications for clinicians, regulators and patients. This review aims to synthesize the risk-benefit profile of DOACs in the aforementioned consolidated indications through an 'evidence summary' approach gathering the existent evidence-based data, particularly systematic reviews with meta-analyses of randomized controlled trials, as well as observational studies, comparing DOACs with vitamin K antagonists. Clinical evidence will be discussed and compared with major international guidelines to identify whether an update is needed. Controversial clinically relevant safety issues will be also examined in order to highlight current challenges and unsettled questions (e.g. actual bleeding risk in susceptible populations). It is anticipated that the large number of publications on NVAF or VTE (44 systematic reviews with meta-analyses and 12 observational studies retained in our analysis) suggests the potential existence of overlapping studies and calls for common criteria to qualitatively and quantitatively assess discordances, thus guiding future research.

  10. Results from the Registry of Atrial Fibrillation (AFABE): Gap between Undiagnosed and Registered Atrial Fibrillation in Adults—Ineffectiveness of Oral Anticoagulation Treatment with VKA

    PubMed Central

    Panisello-Tafalla, Anna; Clua-Espuny, Josep Lluís; Gil-Guillen, Vicente F.; González-Henares, Antonia; Queralt-Tomas, María Lluisa; López-Pablo, Carlos; Lucas-Noll, Jorgina; Lechuga-Duran, Iñigo; Ripolles-Vicente, Rosa; Carot-Domenech, Jesús; López, Miquel Gallofré

    2015-01-01

    Objective. This study aimed to examine the effectiveness of the use of oral anticoagulation (OAC) medication, recommended by national guidelines for stroke prevention but reportedly underused in AF patients with moderate to high stroke risk. Method. A multicentre and cross-sectional study of undiagnosed AF among out-of-hospital patients over 60 years old was carried out, visiting 3,638 patients at primary health centres or at home for AF diagnosis using the IDC-10 classification. The main outcome measures were CHA2DS2VASC, HAS-BLED scores, cardiovascular comorbidity, pharmacological information, TTR, and SAMe-TT2R2 scores. Results. The main findings were undiagnosed AF in 26.44% of cases; 31.04% registered with AF but not using OAC despite 95.6% having a CHA2DS2VASC ≥ 2 score; a risk of bleeding in important subgroups using OAC without indication (37.50% CHA2DS2VASC < 2 score); the use of OAC with TTR < 60% (33.1%), of whom 47.6% had a HAS-BLED score ≥3. Thus, 35.4% of the expected AF prevalence achieved an optimal time in the therapeutic range. Conclusions. The expected AF prevalence was 10.9% (n 5267), but the registered prevalence was 7.5% (n 3638). Only 35.04% (CI = 95%, 33.7–36.3) of AF patients treated with vitamin K antagonists (VKAs) achieve the goal of TTR > 60%. PMID:26229954

  11. Balancing thromboembolic and bleeding risk with non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants (NOACs): A systematic review and meta-analysis on gender differences.

    PubMed

    Proietti, Marco; Cheli, Paola; Basili, Stefania; Mazurek, Michal; Lip, Gregory Y H

    2017-03-01

    Sex and gender differences have been reported in atrial fibrillation (AF), especially in relation to differences in thromboembolic and bleeding risks. More recently, pharmacological treatments have changed following the introduction of non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants (NOACs) progressively replacing vitamin K antagonists (VKAs). The aims of this systematic review are to summarize the available evidence on NOACs and the relationship to major adverse outcomes according to sex. Moreover, we performed a meta-analysis of data from the phase III clinical trials investigating the sex effect on stroke/systemic embolic events (SEE) and major bleeding. Our literature review found small differences in NOACs efficacy and safety between male and female patients, even if so far available literature is limited to post-hoc ancillary analyses from randomized trials and one cohort study. Meta-analysis from NOAC trials found a differential effect of NOACs, with male patients being more protected from stroke/SEE and female patients more protected from major bleeding events. Further data are needed to fully elucidate sex differences in AF patients treated with NOACs.

  12. Acute and sub-chronic oral toxicity profiles of lipopeptides from Bacillus mojavensis A21 and evaluation of their in vitro anticoagulant activity.

    PubMed

    Ben Ayed, Hanen; Nasri, Rim; Jemil, Nawel; Ben Amor, Ikram; Gargouri, Jalel; Hmidet, Noomen; Nasri, Moncef

    2015-07-05

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the acute and sub-chronic toxicity of lipopeptides mixture produced by Bacillus mojavensis A21 as well as their in vitro anticoagulant activity. A21 lipopeptides was given to mice at single dose from 75 mg to 1000 mg/kg body weight (bw). The median lethal dose (LD50) of A21 lipopeptides was about 550 mg/kg bw. Sub-chronic toxicity study for 28 days was done by daily oral administration of A21 lipopeptides at doses of 40 and 400 mg/kg bw in rats. Results showed that A21 lipopeptides did not cause any change in body weights and they did not produce any marked alterations in the hematological blood parameters including hematocrit concentration, hemoglobin level, white and red cells count. However, the platelets level decreased significantly compared to control value. Moreover, no significant differences in the serum biochemical characteristics were observed for rats treated by the lowest dose. In contrast, a little enhancement of alanine-aminotransferase (ALT) activity and decrease in total cholesterol were observed with the highest dose. A21 lipopeptides were also found to cause a prolongation of the thrombin time (TT), the prothrombin time (PT) and the activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT). Overall, A21 lipopeptides may be very promising compounds for therapeutic purposes.

  13. Comparison of the Non-VKA Oral Anticoagulants Apixaban, Dabigatran, and Rivaroxaban in the Extended Treatment and Prevention of Venous Thromboembolism: Systematic Review and Network Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, A. T.; Hamilton, M.; Bird, A.; Mitchell, S. A.; Li, S.; Horblyuk, R.; Batson, S.

    2016-01-01

    Background Historically, warfarin or aspirin have been the recommended therapeutic options for the extended treatment (>3 months) of VTE. Data from Phase III randomised controlled trials (RCTs) are now available for non-VKA oral anticoagulants (NOACs) in this indication. The current systematic review and network meta-analysis (NMA) were conducted to compare the efficacy and safety of anticoagulants for the extended treatment of VTE. Methods Electronic databases (accessed July 2014 and updated April 2016) were systematically searched to identify RCTs evaluating apixaban, aspirin, dabigatran, edoxaban, rivaroxaban, and warfarin for the extended treatment of VTE. Eligible studies included adults with an objectively confirmed deep vein thrombosis, pulmonary embolism or both. A fixed-effect Bayesian NMA was conducted, and results were presented as relative risks (RRs). Sensitivity analyses examining (i) the dataset employed according to the time frame for outcome assessment (ii) the model used for the NMA were conducted. Results Eleven Phase III RCTs (examining apixaban, aspirin, dabigatran, rivaroxaban, warfarin and placebo) were included. The risk of the composite efficacy outcome (VTE and VTE-related death) was statistically significantly lower with the NOACs and warfarin INR 2.0–3.0 compared with aspirin, with no significant differences between the NOACs. Treatment with apixaban (RR 0.23, 95% CrI 0.10, 0.55) or dabigatran (RR 0.55, 95% Crl 0.43, 0.71) was associated with a statistically significantly reduced risk of ‘major or clinically relevant non-major bleed’ compared with warfarin INR 2.0–3.0. Apixaban also showed a significantly reduced risk compared with dabigatran (RR 0.42, 95% Crl 0.18, 0.97) and rivaroxaban (RR 0.23, 95% Crl 0.09, 0.59). Sensitivity analyses indicate that results were dependent on the dataset, but not on the type of NMA model employed. Conclusions Results from the NMA indicate that NOACs are an effective treatment for prevention of

  14. Female gender and oral anticoagulants are associated with wound complications in lower extremity vein bypass: An analysis of 1404 operations for critical limb ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Louis L.; Brahmanandam, Soma; Bandyk, Dennis F.; Belkin, Michael; Clowes, Alexander W.; Moneta, Gregory L.; Conte, Michael S.

    2010-01-01

    patients without WC (all P < .0001). Conclusions WC is a frequent complication of IB for CLI, associated with increased risk for major amputation, mortality, and greater RU. Further detailed investigation into the link between female gender and oral anticoagulation use with WC may help identify causes of WC and perhaps prevent or lessen their occurrence. PMID:18154995

  15. Perioperative management of the chronically anticoagulated patient.

    PubMed

    Heit, J A

    2001-09-01

    Common indications for chronic anticoagulation include mechanical prosthetic heart valve, non-rheumatic atrial fibrillation, and venous thromboembolism. Perioperative management of the chronically anticoagulated patient is a complex medical problem, and includes the following issues: urgency of surgery, risk of thromboembolism in the absence of anticoagulation, bleeding risk, consequences of bleeding, ability to control bleeding physically, and duration of bleeding risk after the procedure. Most patients can be managed safely by stopping oral anticoagulants 4-5 days before surgery and restarting anticoagulation after the procedure at the patient's usual daily dose. In general, dental procedures and cataract extraction can be performed without interrupting anticoagulation. Most other procedures can be safely performed with an INR < or = 1.4. For patients with double-wing prosthetic valves (e.g., St. Jude, Carbomedics) in the aortic position, uncomplicated atrial fibrillation, or a remote (>3 months) history of venous thromboembolism, oral anticoagulants can be stopped 4-5 days before surgery and restarted at the usual daily dose immediately after surgery. For other patients at higher risk of thrombosis, "bridging therapy" with outpatient low molecular weight heparin is safe and effective. For urgent procedures, a small dose of oral vitamin K usually will reduce the INR within 24-36 hours to a level sufficient for surgery and avoids exposure to transfused blood products.

  16. Efficacy and harms of direct oral anticoagulants in the elderly for stroke prevention in atrial fibrillation and secondary prevention of venous thromboembolism: systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Manuj; Cornelius, Victoria R; Patel, Jignesh P; Davies, J Graham; Molokhia, Mariam

    2016-01-01

    Background Evidence regarding use of direct oral anticoagulants (DOACs) in the elderly, particularly bleeding risks, is unclear despite the presence of greater comorbidities, polypharmacy and altered pharmacokinetics in this age group. Methods and Results We performed a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomised trials of DOACs (dabigatran, apixaban, rivaroxaban, edoxaban) for efficacy and bleeding outcomes compared to VKA (vitamin k antagonists) in elderly participants (aged ≥75 years) treated for acute venous thromboembolism or stroke prevention in atrial fibrillation. Nineteen studies were eligible for inclusion but only 11 reported data specifically for elderly participants. Efficacy in managing thrombotic risks for each DOAC was similar or superior to VKA in the elderly. A non-significantly, higher risk of major bleeding than VKA was observed with dabigatran 150mg (Odds Ratio 1.18, 95% confidence interval 0.97-1.44) but not with the 110mg dose. Significantly higher gastrointestinal bleeding risks with dabigatran 150mg (1.78, 1.35-2.35) and 110mg (1.40, 1.04-1.90) and lower intracranial bleeding risks than VKA for dabigatran 150mg (0.43, 0.26-0.72) and dabigatran 110mg (0.36, 0.22-0.61) were also observed. A significantly lower major bleeding risk compared to VKA was observed for apixaban (0.63, 0.51-0.77), edoxaban 60mg (0.81, 0.67-0.98) and 30mg (0.46, 0.38-0.57) while rivaroxaban showed similar risk. Conclusion DOACs demonstrated at least equal efficacy to VKA in managing thrombotic risks in the elderly however bleeding patterns were distinct. In particular, dabigatran was associated with a higher risk of gastrointestinal bleeding than VKA. Insufficient published data for apixaban, edoxaban and rivaroxaban indicates further work is needed to clarify their bleeding risks in the elderly. PMID:25995317

  17. Non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulation usage according to age among patients with atrial fibrillation: Temporal trends 2011–2015 in Denmark

    PubMed Central

    Staerk, Laila; Fosbøl, Emil Loldrup; Gadsbøll, Kasper; Sindet-Pedersen, Caroline; Pallisgaard, Jannik Langtved; Lamberts, Morten; Lip, Gregory Y. H.; Torp-Pedersen, Christian; Gislason, Gunnar Hilmar; Olesen, Jonas Bjerring

    2016-01-01

    Among atrial fibrillation (AF) patients, Danish nationwide registries (2011–2015) were used to examine temporal trends of initiation patterns of oral anticoagulation (OAC) treatment according to age. Overall, 43,299 AF patients initiating vitamin K antagonists (VKA) (42%), dabigatran (29%), rivaroxaban (13%), or apixaban (16%) were included with mean age (SD) 72.1 (11.3), 71.5 (11.0), 74.3 (11.1), and 75.3 (11.1) years, respectively. Patients aged ≥85 years comprised 15%. Trend tests showed increase in patients ≥85 years initiating OAC (p < 0.0001). VKA usage decreased from 92% to 24% (p < 0.0001). This decrease was independent of age. Dabigatran was the most common non-VKA OAC (NOAC) (40% users), but usage decreased from 2014 until study end (6%) (p < 0.0001). Apixaban was the most used OAC at study end (41%), in particular among those ≥85 years (44%). Compared with patients aged <65 years, the odds ratios associated with initiating VKA, dabigatran, rivaroxaban, or apixaban for patients aged ≥85 years were 0.81 (95% CI 0.75–0.86), 0.65 (95% CI 0.60–0.70), 1.52 (95% CI 1.38–1.67), and 2.09 (95% CI 1.89–2.30), respectively. In conclusion, substantial increase in NOAC usage has occurred. Increasing age was associated with upstart of rivaroxaban or apixaban with reference to age <65 within the specific agent. PMID:27510920

  18. Values and preferences in oral anticoagulation in patients with atrial fibrillation, physicians' and patients' perspectives: protocol for a two-phase study

    PubMed Central

    Alonso-Coello, Pablo; Montori, Victor M; Solà, Ivan; Schünemann, Holger J; Devereaux, Philip J; Charles, Cathy; Roura, Mercè; Díaz, M Gloria; Souto, Juan Carlos; Alonso, Rafael; Oliver, Sven; Ruiz, Rafael; Coll-Vinent, Blanca; Diez, Ana Isabel; Gich, Ignasi; Guyatt, Gordon

    2008-01-01

    Background Oral anticoagulation prevents strokes in patients with atrial fibrillation but, for reasons that remain unclear, less than 40% of all patients with atrial fibrillation receive warfarin. The literature postulates that patient and clinician preferences may explain this low utilization. Design The proposed research seeks to answer the following questions: i) When assessed systematically, do patients' and clinicians' preferences explain the utilization of warfarin to prevent strokes associated with atrial fibrillation? ii) To what extent do patients' and clinicians' treatment preferences differ? iii) What factors explain any differences that exist in treatment preferences between patients and clinicians? To answer these questions we will conduct a two-phase study of patient and clinician preferences for health states and treatments. In the first phase of this study we will conduct structured interviews to determine their treatment preferences for warfarin vs. aspirin to prevent strokes associated with atrial fibrillation using the probability trade-off technique. In the same interview, we will conduct preference-elicitation exercises using the feeling thermometer to identify the utilities that patients place on taking medication (warfarin and aspirin), and on having a mild stroke, a severe stroke, and a major bleed. In the second phase of the study we will convene focus groups of clinicians and patients to explore their answers to the exercises in the first phase. Discussion This is a study of patient and clinician preferences for health states and treatments. Because of its clinical importance and our previous work in this area, we will conduct our study in the clinical context of the decision to use antithrombotic agents to reduce the risk of stroke in patients with non-valvular chronic atrial fibrillation PMID:18954427

  19. Meta-analysis of gender differences in residual stroke risk and major bleeding in patients with nonvalvular atrial fibrillation treated with oral anticoagulants.

    PubMed

    Pancholy, Samir B; Sharma, Parikshit S; Pancholy, Dipti S; Patel, Tejas M; Callans, David J; Marchlinski, Francis E

    2014-02-01

    Studies comparing gender-specific outcomes in patients with atrial fibrillation (AF) have reported conflicting results. Gender differences in cerebrovascular accident/systemic embolism (CVA/SE) or major bleeding outcomes with novel oral anticoagulant (NOAC) use are not known. The goal of this analysis was to perform a systematic review and meta-analysis evaluating gender differences in residual risk of CVA/SE and major bleeding outcomes in patients with nonvalvular AF treated with either warfarin or NOAC. Sixty-four randomized studies were identified using keywords "gender," "AF," and "CVA." Using the Preferred Reporting Items for Systemic Reviews and Meta-analysis method, 6 studies met criteria for inclusion in this meta-analysis. CVA/SE and major bleeding outcomes were separately analyzed in cohorts receiving warfarin and NOAC agents, comparing men with women. Women with AF taking warfarin were at a significantly greater residual risk of CVA/SE compared with men (odds ratio 1.279, 95% confidence interval 1.111 to 1.473, Z = -3.428, p = 0.001). No gender difference in residual risk of CVA/SE was noted in patients with AF receiving NOAC agents (odds ratio 1.146, 95% confidence interval 0.97 to 1.354, p = 0.109). Major bleeding was less frequent in women with AF treated with NOAC. In conclusion, women with AF treated with warfarin have a greater residual risk of CVA/SE and an equivalent major bleeding risk, whereas those treated with NOAC agents deemed superior to warfarin are at equivalent residual risk of CVA/SE and less major bleeding risk compared with men. These results suggest an increased net clinical benefit of NOAC agents compared with warfarin in treating women with AF.

  20. Determination of the International Sensitivity Index of a new near-patient testing device to monitor oral anticoagulant therapy--overview of the assessment of conformity to the calibration model.

    PubMed

    Tripodi, A; Chantarangkul, V; Clerici, M; Negri, B; Mannucci, P M

    1997-08-01

    A key issue for the reliable use of new devices for the laboratory control of oral anticoagulant therapy with the INR is their conformity to the calibration model. In the past, their adequacy has mostly been assessed empirically without reference to the calibration model and the use of International Reference Preparations (IRP) for thromboplastin. In this study we reviewed the requirements to be fulfilled and applied them to the calibration of a new near-patient testing device (TAS, Cardiovascular Diagnostics) which uses thromboplastin-containing test cards for determination of the INR. On each of 10 working days citrated whole blood and plasma samples were obtained from 2 healthy subjects and 6 patients on oral anticoagulants. PT testing on whole blood and plasma was done with the TAS and parallel testing for plasma by the manual technique with the IRP CRM 149S. Conformity to the calibration model was judged satisfactory if the following requirements were met: (i) there was a linear relationship between paired log-PTs (TAS vs CRM 149S); (ii) the regression line drawn through patients data points, passed through those of normals; (iii) the precision of the calibration expressed as the CV of the slope was <3%. A good linear relationship was observed for calibration plots for plasma and whole blood (r = 0.98). Regression lines drawn through patients data points, passed through those of normals. The CVs of the slope were in both cases 2.2% and the ISIs were 0.965 and 1.000 for whole blood and plasma. In conclusion, our study shows that near-patient testing devices can be considered reliable tools to measure INR in patients on oral anticoagulants and provides guidelines for their evaluation.

  1. Engaging with quality improvement in anticoagulation management.

    PubMed

    Barnes, Geoffrey D; Kline-Rogers, Eva

    2015-04-01

    Anticoagulants are highly effective at preventing thrombosis across a variety of clinical indications. However, their use can also lead to devastating effects, including major bleeding and death. Anticoagulation providers strive to balance the benefits of anticoagulant therapy with the risks of major bleeding. A measure of quality care can be used to assess the strengths and potential weaknesses in any system of coordinated care delivery. Quality measures in anticoagulation include patient-centered outcomes (e.g. major bleeding, time in the therapeutic range) and provider- or process-focused outcomes (e.g. compliance with guideline recommendations and response times to out-of-range laboratory values). Engaging in quality improvement activities allows anticoagulation providers to assess their own performance and identify areas for targeted interventions. This review summarizes the justification for engaging in quality improvement for anticoagulation management and describes a number of example programs. Interventions benefiting the management of both warfarin and the direct oral anticoagulants are included. The review also details potential quality measures and resources for any anticoagulation provider looking to begin a quality improvement process.

  2. Engaging with quality improvement in anticoagulation management

    PubMed Central

    Barnes, Geoffrey D.; Kline-Rogers, Eva

    2016-01-01

    Anticoagulants are highly effective at preventing thrombosis across a variety of clinical indications. However, their use can also lead to devastating effects, including major bleeding and death. Anticoagulation providers strive to balance the benefits of anticoagulant therapy with the risks of major bleeding. A measure of quality care can be used to assess the strengths and potential weaknesses in any system of coordinated care delivery. Quality measures in anticoagulation include patient-centered outcomes (e.g. major bleeding, time in the therapeutic range) and provider- or process-focused outcomes (e.g. compliance with guideline recommendations and response times to out-of-range laboratory values). Engaging in quality improvement activities allows anticoagulation providers to assess their own performance and identify areas for targeted interventions. This review summarizes the justification for engaging in quality improvement for anticoagulation management and describes a number of example programs. Interventions benefiting the management of both warfarin and the direct oral anticoagulants are included. The review also details potential quality measures and resources for any anticoagulation provider looking to begin a quality improvement process. PMID:25772116

  3. Efficiency and effectiveness of the use of an acenocoumarol pharmacogenetic dosing algorithm versus usual care in patients with venous thromboembolic disease initiating oral anticoagulation: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Hemorrhagic events are frequent in patients on treatment with antivitamin-K oral anticoagulants due to their narrow therapeutic margin. Studies performed with acenocoumarol have shown the relationship between demographic, clinical and genotypic variants and the response to these drugs. Once the influence of these genetic and clinical factors on the dose of acenocoumarol needed to maintain a stable international normalized ratio (INR) has been demonstrated, new strategies need to be developed to predict the appropriate doses of this drug. Several pharmacogenetic algorithms have been developed for warfarin, but only three have been developed for acenocoumarol. After the development of a pharmacogenetic algorithm, the obvious next step is to demonstrate its effectiveness and utility by means of a randomized controlled trial. The aim of this study is to evaluate the effectiveness and efficiency of an acenocoumarol dosing algorithm developed by our group which includes demographic, clinical and pharmacogenetic variables (VKORC1, CYP2C9, CYP4F2 and ApoE) in patients with venous thromboembolism (VTE). Methods and design This is a multicenter, single blind, randomized controlled clinical trial. The protocol has been approved by La Paz University Hospital Research Ethics Committee and by the Spanish Drug Agency. Two hundred and forty patients with VTE in which oral anticoagulant therapy is indicated will be included. Randomization (case/control 1:1) will be stratified by center. Acenocoumarol dose in the control group will be scheduled and adjusted following common clinical practice; in the experimental arm dosing will be following an individualized algorithm developed and validated by our group. Patients will be followed for three months. The main endpoints are: 1) Percentage of patients with INR within the therapeutic range on day seven after initiation of oral anticoagulant therapy; 2) Time from the start of oral anticoagulant treatment to achievement of a

  4. Dental management of anticoagulated patients.

    PubMed

    Carr, M M; Mason, R B

    1992-10-01

    Today's trend toward ambulatory medical care will bring more pharmacological problems into the dental office. While the dental management of patients taking oral anticoagulants is controversial, current research supports the contention that they can be safely treated on an outpatient basis. The use of the International Normalized Ratio (INR) has made better estimates of prothrombin time possible, and patients can be maintained in a narrow therapeutic range. Postoperative hemorrhage can be avoided or controlled with local hemostatic agents.

  5. Management of major bleeding complications and emergency surgery in patients on long-term treatment with direct oral anticoagulants, thrombin or factor-Xa inhibitors: proposals of the working group on perioperative haemostasis (GIHP) - March 2013.

    PubMed

    Pernod, Gilles; Albaladejo, Pierre; Godier, Anne; Samama, Charles M; Susen, Sophie; Gruel, Yves; Blais, Normand; Fontana, Pierre; Cohen, Ariel; Llau, Juan V; Rosencher, Nadia; Schved, Jean-François; de Maistre, Emmanuel; Samama, Meyer M; Mismetti, Patrick; Sié, Pierre

    2013-01-01

    Direct new oral anticoagulants (NOACs) - inhibitors of thrombin or factor Xa - are intended to be used largely in the treatment of venous thromboembolic disease or the prevention of systematic embolism in atrial fibrillation, instead of vitamin K antagonists. Like any anticoagulant treatment, they are associated with spontaneous or provoked haemorrhagic risk. Furthermore, a significant proportion of treated patients are likely to be exposed to emergency surgery or invasive procedures. Given the absence of a specific antidote, the action to be taken in these situations must be defined. The lack of data means that it is only possible to issue proposals rather than recommendations, which will evolve according to accumulated experience. The proposals presented here apply to dabigatran (Pradaxa(®)) and rivaroxaban (Xarelto(®)); data for apixaban and edoxaban are still scarce. For urgent surgery with haemorrhagic risk, the drug plasma concentration should be less or equal to 30ng/mL for dabigatran and rivaroxaban should enable surgery associated with a high bleeding risk. Beyond that, if possible, the intervention should be postponed by monitoring the drug concentration. The course to follow is then defined according to the NOAC and its concentration. If the anticoagulant dosage is not immediately available, worse propositions, based on the usual tests (prothrombin time and activated partial thromboplastin time), are presented. However, these tests do not really assess drug concentration or the risk of bleeding that depends on it. In case of serious bleeding in a critical organ, the effect of anticoagulant therapy should be reduced using a non-specific procoagulant drug as a first-line approach: activated prothrombin complex concentrate (aPCC) (FEIBA(®) 30-50U/kg) or non-activated PCC (50U/kg). In addition, for any other type of severe haemorrhage, the administration of a procoagulant drug, which is potentially thrombogenic in these patients, is discussed according

  6. Point-of-care monitoring of oral anticoagulation therapy in children. Comparison of the CoaguChek XS system with venous INR and venous INR using an International Reference Thromboplastin preparation (rTF/95).

    PubMed

    Greenway, Anthea; Ignjatovic, Vera; Summerhayes, Robyn; Newall, Fiona; Burgess, Janet; DeRosa, Lydia; Monagle, Paul

    2009-07-01

    Point-of-care (POC) monitoring of oral anticoagulation has been widely adopted in both paediatric and adult patients. A new POC system, the CoaguChek XS has recently been developed to measure the international normalised ratio (INR) and may offer significant advantages. The CoaguChek XS utilises a new method of electrochemical clot detection based on thrombin generation. This system has not been previously evaluated in children with reference to the laboratory gold standard, the prothrombin time using reference thromboplastin. It was the objective to compare values obtained by the CoaguChek XS system with both the venous INR and the gold standard for anticoagulant monitoring, prothrombin time with reference thromboplastin (rTF/95). To evaluate the impact of testing using the CoaguChek XS on clinical anticoagulant dosing decisions. Fifty paired venous INR and capillary CoaguChek XS results were obtained from 31 children (aged up to 16 years). The laboratory gold standard, a manual prothrombin time with reference thromboplastin (rTF/95) was additionally performed on 26 samples. Correlation between the CoaguChek XS result and the venous INR was r = 0.810. Agreement between the CoaguChek XS result and the reference INR was shown to be higher (r=0.95), in the subset analysed by this method. Correlation between the venous INR and reference INR was r=0.90. Despite changes to the methodology of testing with the CoaguChek XS POC monitoring system, the accuracy of this method when compared with both the venous INR and gold standard reference INR was satisfactory. This resulted in infrequent changes to clinical decision making regarding anticoagulation.

  7. Direct oral anticoagulants in the treatment of venous thromboembolism, with a focus on patients with pulmonary embolism: an evidence-based review.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Outes, Antonio; Suárez-Gea, M Luisa; Lecumberri, Ramón; Terleira-Fernández, Ana Isabel; Vargas-Castrillón, Emilio

    2014-01-01

    Pulmonary embolism (PE) is a relatively common cardiovascular emergency. PE and deep vein thrombosis (DVT) are considered expressions of the same disease, termed as venous thromboembolism (VTE). In the present review, we describe and meta-analyze the efficacy and safety data available with the direct oral anticoagulants (DOAC; dabigatran, rivaroxaban, apixaban, edoxaban) in clinical trials testing these new compounds in the acute/long-term and extended therapy of VTE, providing subgroup analyses in patients with index PE. We analyzed ten studies in 35,019 randomized patients. A total of 14,364 patients (41%) had index PE. In the acute/long-term treatment of VTE, the DOAC showed comparable efficacy in preventing recurrent VTE to standard treatment in patients with index PE (risk ratio [RR]: 0.88; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.70-1.11) and index DVT (RR: 0.93; 95% CI: 0.75-1.16) (P for subgroup differences =0.76). VTE recurrence depending on PE anatomical extension and presence/absence of right ventricular dysfunction was only reported in two trials, with results being consistent with those obtained in the overall study populations. In the single trial comparing extended therapy of VTE with DOAC versus warfarin, the point estimate for recurrent VTE tended to disfavor the DOAC in patients with index PE (RR: 2.05; 95% CI: 0.83-5.03) and in patients with index DVT (RR: 1.11; 95% CI: 0.49-2.50) (P for subgroup differences =0.32). In trials that compared DOAC versus placebo for extended therapy, the reduction in recurrent VTE was consistent in patients with PE (RR: 0.15; 95% CI: 0.01-1.82) and in patients with DVT (RR: 0.25; 95% CI: 0.10-0.61) (P for subgroup differences =0.71). The DOAC were associated with a consistently lower risk of clinically relevant bleeding (CRB) than standard treatment of acute VTE and higher risk of CRB than placebo for extended therapy of VTE regardless of index event. In summary, the DOAC were as effective as, and safer than, standard

  8. Direct oral anticoagulants in the treatment of venous thromboembolism, with a focus on patients with pulmonary embolism: an evidence-based review

    PubMed Central

    Gómez-Outes, Antonio; Suárez-Gea, Mª Luisa; Lecumberri, Ramón; Terleira-Fernández, Ana Isabel; Vargas-Castrillón, Emilio

    2014-01-01

    Pulmonary embolism (PE) is a relatively common cardiovascular emergency. PE and deep vein thrombosis (DVT) are considered expressions of the same disease, termed as venous thromboembolism (VTE). In the present review, we describe and meta-analyze the efficacy and safety data available with the direct oral anticoagulants (DOAC; dabigatran, rivaroxaban, apixaban, edoxaban) in clinical trials testing these new compounds in the acute/long-term and extended therapy of VTE, providing subgroup analyses in patients with index PE. We analyzed ten studies in 35,019 randomized patients. A total of 14,364 patients (41%) had index PE. In the acute/long-term treatment of VTE, the DOAC showed comparable efficacy in preventing recurrent VTE to standard treatment in patients with index PE (risk ratio [RR]: 0.88; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.70–1.11) and index DVT (RR: 0.93; 95% CI: 0.75–1.16) (P for subgroup differences =0.76). VTE recurrence depending on PE anatomical extension and presence/absence of right ventricular dysfunction was only reported in two trials, with results being consistent with those obtained in the overall study populations. In the single trial comparing extended therapy of VTE with DOAC versus warfarin, the point estimate for recurrent VTE tended to disfavor the DOAC in patients with index PE (RR: 2.05; 95% CI: 0.83–5.03) and in patients with index DVT (RR: 1.11; 95% CI: 0.49–2.50) (P for subgroup differences =0.32). In trials that compared DOAC versus placebo for extended therapy, the reduction in recurrent VTE was consistent in patients with PE (RR: 0.15; 95% CI: 0.01–1.82) and in patients with DVT (RR: 0.25; 95% CI: 0.10–0.61) (P for subgroup differences =0.71). The DOAC were associated with a consistently lower risk of clinically relevant bleeding (CRB) than standard treatment of acute VTE and higher risk of CRB than placebo for extended therapy of VTE regardless of index event. In summary, the DOAC were as effective as, and safer than

  9. Practice nursed-based, individual and video-assisted patient education in oral anticoagulation - Protocol of a cluster-randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Managing oral anticoagulant treatment (OAT) is a challenge for patients and primary care providers. It requires a high level of patient knowledge and adherence. Studies have shown that insufficient adherence and a low level of patient knowledge about OAT are primary causes for complications. This trial is the first to evaluate the long-term effects of a complex practice nurse-based patient education program in comparison to a patient brochure only. Methods and design This trial will be a cluster-randomized controlled trial in 22 general practices (GPs) recruiting 360 patients with OAT. GPs will be randomized into an intervention group or a control group. A baseline questionnaire will assess pre-existing knowledge about OAT. The patients in the intervention group will be educated by a complex education program which consists of a video, a brochure and individual training by a practice nurse. The video gives information about OAT, nutrition, and instructions about how to manage critical situations. The brochure repeats the content of the video. After 4 to 6 weeks, the intervention will be recapitulated. The control group will receive the brochure only. After 6 months, questionnaires will be used in both groups to assess patient knowledge about OAT as well as patients' subjective feelings of safety. Separately, we will evaluate patient records, looking for documented complications and the time spent in the therapeutic range. Discussion This trial will start in January 2011. This trial will evaluate the long-term effectiveness of a video-assisted education program on patients with OAT in comparison to a patient information brochure. Most previous studies have evaluated knowledge directly after an educational intervention. Our trial will look for long-term differences in basic knowledge of OAT. We expect that our complex patient education program effectively increases long-term basic knowledge about OAT. Although the population of our study is too small to

  10. The Active Metabolite of Warfarin (3'-Hydroxywarfarin) and Correlation with INR, Warfarin and Drug Weekly Dosage in Patients under Oral Anticoagulant Therapy: A Pharmacogenetics Study

    PubMed Central

    Talarico, Anna; Fabbri, Matteo; Bertocco, Cesare; Vigliano, Marco; Moratelli, Stefano; Cuneo, Antonio; Serino, Maria Luisa; Avato, Francesco Maria

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Warfarin oral anticoagulant therapy (OAT) requires regular and frequent drug adjustment monitored by INR. Interindividual variability, drug and diet interferences, and genetics (VKORC1 and CYP2C9) make the maintenance/reaching of stable INR a not so easy task. HPLC assessment of warfarin/enantiomers was suggested as a valid monitoring-tool along with INR, but definite results are still lacking. We evaluated possible correlations between INR, warfarin/3’-hydroxywarfarin, and drug weekly dosage aimed at searching novel alternatives to OAT monitoring. VKORC1/CYP2C9 pharmacogenetics investigation was performed to account for the known influence on warfarin homeostasis. Methods 133 OAT patients were recruited and assessed for warfarin/3’-hydroxywarfarin serum levels (HPLC), INR, and VKORC1 and CYP2C9 genotypes. A subgroup of 52 patients were monitored in detail (5 consecutive controls; c0-c4) till the target INR was reached. Correlation analyses were performed in both groups Results In the whole OAT group both warfarin and 3’-hydroxywarfarin correlate with INR at comparable degree (r2 = 0.0388 and 0.0362 respectively). Conversely, warfarin weekly dosage better correlates with warfarin than with 3’-hydroxywarfarin (r2 = 0.0975 and r2 = 0.0381 respectively), but considering together warfarin plus 3’-hydroxywarfarin the correlation strongly increased (r2 = 0.1114; p<0.0001). Interestingly, 3’-hydroxywarfarin reached a strong correlation at c4 respect to warfarin (r2 = 0.2157 and r2 = 0.0549; p = 0.0005 and p = 0.0944 respectively) seeming less affected by drug adjustments in the subgroup of 52 patients who started OAT. The multivariate analyses aimed at estimating the true contribution of 3’-hydroxywarfarin on INR value ascribed it the unique significant value (p = 0.0021) in spite of warfarin who lost association. The pharmacogenetics studies confirmed that patients carrying the VKORC1 variant-allele required lower warfarin maintenance dosage and

  11. Antithrombotic therapy use in patients with atrial fibrillation before the era of non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants: the Global Registry on Long-Term Oral Antithrombotic Treatment in Patients with Atrial Fibrillation (GLORIA-AF) Phase I cohort

    PubMed Central

    Huisman, Menno V.; Ma, Chang Sheng; Diener, Hans-Christoph; Dubner, Sergio J.; Halperin, Jonathan L.; Rothman, Kenneth J.; Teutsch, Christine; Schoof, Nils; Kleine, Eva; Bartels, Dorothee B.; Lip, Gregory Y.H.

    2016-01-01

    Aims The introduction of non-VKA oral anticoagulants (NOACs), which differ from the earlier vitamin K antagonist (VKA) treatments, has changed the approach to stroke prevention in atrial fibrillation (AF). GLORIA-AF is a prospective, global registry programme describing the selection of antithrombotic treatment in newly diagnosed AF patients at risk of stroke. It comprises three phases: Phase I, before the introduction of NOACs; Phase II, during the time of the introduction of dabigatran, the first NOAC; and Phase III, once NOACs have been established in clinical practice. Methods and results In Phase I, 1063 patients were eligible from the 1100 enrolled (54.3% male; median age 70 years); patients were from China (67.1%), Europe (EU; 27.4%), and the Middle East (ME; 5.6%). The majority of patients using VKAs had high stroke risk (CHA2DS2-VASc ≥ 2; 86.5%); 13.5% had moderate risk (CHA2DS2-VASc = 1). Vitamin K antagonist use was higher for persistent/permanent AF (47.7%) than that for paroxysmal (23.9%). Most patients in China were treated with antiplatelet agents (53.7%) vs. 27.1% in EU and 28.8% in ME. In China, 25.9% of patients had no antithrombotic therapy, vs. 8.6% in EU and 8.5% in ME. Conclusion Phase I of GLORIA-AF shows that VKAs were mostly used in patients with persistent/permanent (vs. paroxysmal) AF and in those with high stroke risk. Furthermore, there were meaningful geographical differences in the use of VKA therapy in the era before the availability of NOACs, including a much lower use of VKAs in China, where most patients either received antiplatelet agents or no antithrombotic treatment. PMID:27335063

  12. Budd-Chiari syndrome in a young patient with anticardiolipin antibodies: need for prolonged anticoagulant treatment.

    PubMed Central

    Ouwendijk, R J; Koster, J C; Wilson, J H; Stibbe, J; Lameris, J S; Visser, W; Benhamou, J P

    1994-01-01

    The case of a 20 year old woman is reported with Budd-Chiari syndrome in whom lupus anticoagulant and anticardiolipin antibodies were shown; treatment with oral anticoagulants induced a considerable improvement. This treatment was interrupted after one year; interruption was followed by redevelopment of ascites. Further treatment with anticoagulants was continued for five years with noticeable improvement. When treatment with oral anticoagulants was stopped because of pregnancy, the patient redeveloped ascites and had a spontaneous miscarriage. Subsequently, treatment with oral anticoagulants was reintroduced and again resulted in noticeable improvement. In conclusion patients with Budd-Chiari syndrome should be tested for lupus anticoagulants and anticardiolipin antibodies, Budd-Chiari syndrome resulting from this cause may have a good response to treatment with oral anticoagulants; this treatment should be maintained permanently, and pregnancy in such patients may initiate serious difficulties. Images p1004-a PMID:8063206

  13. Current perspectives on dental patients receiving coumarin anticoagulant therapy.

    PubMed

    Herman, W W; Konzelman, J L; Sutley, S H

    1997-03-01

    Despite approximately 40 years of experience with oral anticoagulant drugs, controversy still exists about the safety of dental treatment in a patient receiving this therapy. The authors review the topic in depth and offer detailed recommendations for the dental management of patients receiving coumarin anticoagulant therapy.

  14. Early real-world evidence of persistence on oral anticoagulants for stroke prevention in non-valvular atrial fibrillation: a cohort study in UK primary care

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Michelle E; Lefèvre, Cinira; Collings, Shuk-Li; Evans, David; Kloss, Sebastian; Ridha, Essra; Maguire, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To examine the characteristics and persistence in patients newly initiated with oral anticoagulants (OACs) for stroke prevention in non-valvular atrial fibrillation (NVAF). Design Cohort study in Clinical Practice Research Datalink. Setting UK primary care. Participants 15 242 patients with NVAF newly prescribed apixaban, rivaroxaban, dabigatran or vitamin K antagonists (VKAs) between 1 December 2012 and 31 October 2014. 13 089 patients were OAC naïve. Outcome measures Patient characteristics and risk of non-persistence compared to apixaban using Cox regression models over the entire follow-up and using a time-partitioned approach to handle non-proportional hazards. Results Among the OAC naïve patients, VKAs were most common (78.1%, n=10 218), followed by rivaroxaban (12.1%, n=1589), dabigatran (5.7%, n=741) and apixaban (4.1%, n=541). High baseline stroke risk (CHA2DS2VASc ≥2) ranged from 80.2% (dabigatran) to 88.4% (apixaban and rivaroxaban). History of stroke and bleeding was the highest among apixaban (23.7% and 31.6%) and lowest among VKA patients (15.9% and 27.5%). Across the entire follow-up period, adjusting for differences in characteristics, there was no evidence of a difference in non-persistence between VKA and apixaban (HR 0.92 (95% CI 0.68 to 1.23)). Non-persistence was higher with dabigatran (HR 1.67 (1.20 to 2.32)) and rivaroxaban (HR 1.41 (1.02 to 1.93)) than apixaban. Using the partitioned approach, non-persistence was lower with VKA (HR 0.33 (0.22 to 0.48)), and higher with dabigatran (HR 1.65 (1.08 to 2.52)) compared to apixaban in the first 2 months of follow-up. After 2 months, non-persistence was higher with VKA (HR 1.70 (1.08 to 2.66)) and dabigatran (HR 2.10 (1.30 to 3.41)). Pooling OAC naïve and experienced patients, non-persistence was also higher with rivaroxaban compared to apixaban after 2 months of follow-up (HR 1.69 (1.19 to 2.39)). Conclusions Observed differential prescribing of OACs can result in

  15. Optical profiling of anticoagulation status (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tshikudi, Diane M.; Tripathi, Markandey M.; Hajjarian, Zeinab; Nadkarni, Seemantini K.

    2016-02-01

    Defective blood coagulation resulting from excessive procoagulant activity often leads to thrombotic disorders such as stroke and myocardial infarction. A variety of oral and injectable anticoagulant drugs are prescribed to prevent or treat life-threatening thrombosis. However, due to bleeding complications often associated with anticoagulant treatment, routine monitoring and accurate dosing of anticoagulant therapy is imperative. We have developed Optical thromboelastography (OTEG), a non-contact approach that utilizes a drop of whole blood to measure blood coagulation status in patients. Here, we demonstrate the capability of OTEG for rapidly monitoring anticoagulation in whole blood samples. OTEG monitors coagulation status by assessing changes in blood viscosity from temporal intensity fluctuations of laser speckle patterns during clotting. In OTEG a blood drop is illuminated with coherent light and the blood viscosity is measured from the speckle intensity autocorrelation curve, g2 (t). The metrics, clotting time (R+k), clot progression (angle) and maximum clot stiffness (MA) are then extracted. The aim of the current study was to evaluate the accuracy of OTEG in assessing anticoagulation status of common anticoagulants including heparin, argatroban and rivaroxaban status. A dose-dependent prolongation of R+k was observed in anticoagulated blood, which closely corresponded with standard-reference Thromboelastography (TEG) (r 0.87-0.99, P>0.01 for all cases). OTEG angle was unaltered by anticoagulation whereas TEG angle presented a dose-dependent diminution probably linked to clot rupture. In both OTEG and TEG, MA was unaffected by heparin, argatroban or rivaroxaban. We conclude that OTEG can accurately monitor anticoagulation status following treatment, potentially providing a powerful tool for routine monitoring of patients in the doctor's office or in the home setting.

  16. [Management of major bleeding complications and emergency surgery in patients on long-term treatment with direct oral anticoagulants, thrombin or factor-Xa inhibitors. Proposals of the Working Group on Perioperative Haemostasis (GIHP) - March 2013].

    PubMed

    Pernod, G; Albaladejo, P; Godier, A; Samama, C M; Susen, S; Gruel, Y; Blais, N; Fontana, P; Cohen, A; Llau, J V; Rosencher, N; Schved, J F; de Maistre, E; Samama, M M; Mismetti, P; Sié, P

    2013-10-01

    New direct oral anticoagulants (NOAC), inhibitors of factor IIa or Xa, are expected to be widely used for the treatment of venous thromboembolic disease, or in case of atrial fibrillation. Such anticoagulant treatments are known to be associated with haemorrhagic complications. Moreover, it is likely that such patients on long-term treatment with NOAC will be exposed to emergency surgery or invasive procedures. Due to the present lack of experience in such conditions, we cannot make recommendations, but only propose management for optimal safety as regards the risk of bleeding in such emergency conditions. In this article, only dabigatran and rivaroxaban were discussed. For emergency surgery at risk of bleeding, we propose to dose the plasmatic concentration of drug. Levels inferior or equal to 30ng/mL for both dabigatran and rivaroxaban, should enable the realization of a high bleeding risk surgery. For higher concentration, it was proposed to postpone surgery by monitoring the evolution of the drug concentration. Action is then defined by the kind of NOAC and its concentration. If the dosage of the drug is not immediately available, proposals only based on the usual tests, PT and aPTT, also are presented. However, these tests do not really assess drug concentration or bleeding risk. In case of severe haemorrhage in a critical organ, it is proposed to reduce the effect of anticoagulant therapy using a nonspecific procoagulant drug (activated prothrombin concentrate, FEIBA, 30-50U/kg, or non-activated 4-factors prothrombin concentrates 50U/kg). For any other type of severe haemorrhage, the administration of such a procoagulant drug, potentially thrombogenic in these patients, will be discussed regarding concentration of NACO and possibilities for mechanical haemostasis.

  17. Dilute Russell's viper venom and activated partial thromboplastin time in lupus anticoagulant diagnosis: is mixing essential?

    PubMed

    Chandrashekar, Vani

    2016-06-01

    Dilute Russell's viper venom (DRVV) testing and activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT) have been effectively used in combination for lupus anticoagulant testing. The purpose of our study was to evaluate the role of mixing in activated partial thromboplastin and dilute Russell's viper venom testing for evaluation of lupus anticoagulants. Citrated blood from patients who were not on oral anticoagulant therapy was studied. Mixing study with 1 : 1 normal plasma for elevated APTT and also few samples with elevated screen time was carried out. Elevated APTT was seen in only 48.1% of patients with lupus anticoagulant. Correction of APTT was seen in 27.8% of lupus anticoagulant-positive patients. DRVV test on mixing resulted in 83.8% false-negative values. Integrated DRVV test could be a standalone test for testing lupus anticoagulant. Mixing study may be restricted for patients on oral anticoagulants or patients with strong lupus anticoagulant.

  18. Perioperative Considerations and Management of Patients Receiving Anticoagulants

    PubMed Central

    Shaikh, Safiya Imtiaz; Kumari, R. Vasantha; Hegade, Ganapati; Marutheesh, M.

    2017-01-01

    Anticoagulants remain the primary strategy for the prevention and treatment of thrombosis. Unfractionated heparin, low molecular weight heparin (LMWH), fondaparinux, and warfarin have been studied and employed extensively with direct thrombin inhibitors typically reserved for patients with complications or those requiring interventions. Novel oral anticoagulants have emerged from clinical development and are expected to replace older agents with their ease to use and more favorable pharmacodynamic profiles. Increasingly, anesthesiologists are being requested to anesthetize patients who are on some form of anticoagulants and hence it is important to have sound understanding of pharmacology, dosing, monitoring, and toxicity of anticoagulants. We searched the online databases including PubMed Central, Cochrane, and Google Scholar using anticoagulants, perioperative management, anesthetic considerations, and LMWH as keywords for the articles published between 1994 and 2015 while writing this review. In this article, we will review the different classes of anticoagulants and how to manage them in the perioperative settings. PMID:28298749

  19. New anticoagulants and antiplatelet agents: a primer for the clinical gastroenterologist.

    PubMed

    Parekh, Parth J; Merrell, Jonathan; Clary, Meredith; Brush, John E; Johnson, David A

    2014-01-01

    The discovery of the first oral anticoagulant, warfarin, was a milestone in anticoagulation. Warfarin's well-known limitations, however, have led to the recent development of more effective anticoagulants. The rapidly growing list of these drugs, however, presents a challenge to endoscopists who must treat patients on these sundry medications. This review is intended to summarize the pharmacological highlights of new anticoagulants, with particular attention to suggested "best-practice" recommendations for the withholding of these drugs before endoscopic procedures.

  20. Adherence to oral anticoagulants in patients with atrial fibrillation—a population-based retrospective cohort study linking health information systems in the Valencia region, Spain: a study protocol

    PubMed Central

    Sanfélix-Gimeno, G; Rodríguez-Bernal, C L; Hurtado, I; Baixáuli-Pérez, C; Librero, J; Peiró, S

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Adherence to oral anticoagulation (OAC) treatment, vitamin K antagonists or new oral anticoagulants, is an essential element for effectiveness. Information on adherence to OAC in atrial fibrillation (AF) and the impact of adherence on clinical outcomes using real-world data barely exists. We aim to describe the patterns of adherence to OAC over time in patients with AF, estimate the associated factors and their impact on clinical events, and assess the same issues with conventional measures of primary and secondary adherence—proportion of days covered (PDC) and persistence—in routine clinical practice. Methods and analysis This is a population-based retrospective cohort study including all patients with AF treated with OAC from 2010 to date in Valencia, Spain; data will be obtained from diverse electronic records of the Valencia Health Agency. Primary outcome measure: adherence trajectories. Secondary outcomes: (1) primary non-adherence; (2) secondary adherence: (a) PDC, (b) persistence. Clinical outcomes: hospitalisation for haemorrhagic or thromboembolic events and death during follow-up. Analysis: (1) description of baseline characteristics, adherence patterns (trajectory models or latent class growth analysis models) and conventional adherence measures; (2) logistic or Cox multivariate regression models, to assess the associations between adherence measures and the covariates, and logistic multinomial regression models, to identify characteristics associated with each trajectory; (3) Cox proportional hazard models, to assess the relationship between adherence and clinical outcomes, with propensity score adjustment applied to further control for potential confounders; (4) to estimate the importance of different healthcare levels in the variations of adherence, logistic or Cox multilevel regression models. Ethics and dissemination This study has been approved by the corresponding Clinical Research Ethics Committee. We plan to disseminate the

  1. Discovery of anticoagulant drugs: a historical perspective.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Outes, Antonio; Suárez-Gea, Ma Luisa; Calvo-Rojas, Gonzalo; Lecumberri, Ramón; Rocha, Eduardo; Pozo-Hernández, Carmen; Terleira-Fernández, Ana Isabel; Vargas-Castrillón, Emilio

    2012-06-01

    The history of the traditional anticoagulants is marked by both perseverance and serendipity. The anticoagulant effect of heparin was discovered by McLean in 1915, while he was searching for a procoagulant in dog liver. Link identified dicumarol from spoiled sweet clover hay in 1939 as the causal agent of the sweet clover disease, a hemorrhagic disorder in cattle. Hirudin extracts from the medicinal leech were first used for parenteral anticoagulation in the clinic in 1909, but their use was limited due to adverse effects and difficulties in achieving highly purified extracts. Heparins and coumarins (i.e.: warfarin, phenprocoumon, acenocoumarol) have been the mainstay of anticoagulant therapy for more than 60 years. Over the past decades, the drug discovery paradigm has shifted toward rational design following a target-based approach, in which specific proteins, or "targets", are chosen on current understandings of pathophysiology, small molecules that inhibit the target's activity may be identified by high-throughput screening and, in selected cases, these new molecules can be developed further as drugs. Despite the application of rational design, serendipity has still played a significant role in some of the new discoveries. This review will focus on the discovery of the main anticoagulant drugs in current clinical use, like unfractionated heparin, low-molecular-weight heparins, fondaparinux, coumarins (i.e.: warfarin, acenocoumarol, phenprocoumon), parenteral direct thrombin inhibitors (DTIs) (i.e.: argatroban, recombinant hirudins, bivalirudin), oral DTIs (i.e.: dabigatran) and oral direct factor Xa inhibitors (i.e.: rivaroxaban, apixaban).

  2. Anticoagulant and Antiplatelet Therapy in Patients with Atrial Fibrillation and Coronary Artery Disease

    PubMed Central

    Mischke, Karl; Knackstedt, Christian; Marx, Nikolaus

    2012-01-01

    Anticoagulation represents the mainstay of therapy for most patients with atrial fibrillation. Patients on oral anticoagulation often require concomitant antiplatelet therapy, mostly because of coronary artery disease. After coronary stent implantation, dual antiplatelet therapy is necessary. However, the combination of oral anticoagulation and antiplatelet therapy increases the bleeding risk. Risk scores such as the CHA2DS2-Vasc score and the HAS-BLED score help to identify both bleeding and stroke risk in individual patients. The guidelines of the European Society of Cardiology provide a rather detailed recommendation for patients on oral anticoagulation after coronary stent implantation. However, robust evidence is lacking for some of the recommendations, and especially for new oral anticoagulants and new antiplatelets few or no data are available. This review addresses some of the critical points of the guidelines and discusses potential advantages of new anticoagulants in patients with atrial fibrillation after stent implantation. PMID:22577538

  3. Oral anticoagulants for primary prevention, treatment and secondary prevention of venous thromboembolic disease, and for prevention of stroke in atrial fibrillation: systematic review, network meta-analysis and cost-effectiveness analysis.

    PubMed Central

    Sterne, Jonathan Ac; Bodalia, Pritesh N; Bryden, Peter A; Davies, Philippa A; López-López, Jose A; Okoli, George N; Thom, Howard Hz; Caldwell, Deborah M; Dias, Sofia; Eaton, Diane; Higgins, Julian Pt; Hollingworth, Will; Salisbury, Chris; Savović, Jelena; Sofat, Reecha; Stephens-Boal, Annya; Welton, Nicky J; Hingorani, Aroon D

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND Warfarin is effective for stroke prevention in atrial fibrillation (AF), but anticoagulation is underused in clinical care. The risk of venous thromboembolic disease during hospitalisation can be reduced by low-molecular-weight heparin (LMWH): warfarin is the most frequently prescribed anticoagulant for treatment and secondary prevention of venous thromboembolism (VTE). Warfarin-related bleeding is a major reason for hospitalisation for adverse drug effects. Warfarin is cheap but therapeutic monitoring increases treatment costs. Novel oral anticoagulants (NOACs) have more rapid onset and offset of action than warfarin, and more predictable dosing requirements. OBJECTIVE To determine the best oral anticoagulant/s for prevention of stroke in AF and for primary prevention, treatment and secondary prevention of VTE. DESIGN Four systematic reviews, network meta-analyses (NMAs) and cost-effectiveness analyses (CEAs) of randomised controlled trials. SETTING Hospital (VTE primary prevention and acute treatment) and primary care/anticoagulation clinics (AF and VTE secondary prevention). PARTICIPANTS Patients eligible for anticoagulation with warfarin (stroke prevention in AF, acute treatment or secondary prevention of VTE) or LMWH (primary prevention of VTE). INTERVENTIONS NOACs, warfarin and LMWH, together with other interventions (antiplatelet therapy, placebo) evaluated in the evidence network. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES Efficacy Stroke, symptomatic VTE, symptomatic deep-vein thrombosis and symptomatic pulmonary embolism. Safety Major bleeding, clinically relevant bleeding and intracranial haemorrhage. We also considered myocardial infarction and all-cause mortality and evaluated cost-effectiveness. DATA SOURCES MEDLINE and PREMEDLINE In-Process & Other Non-Indexed Citations, EMBASE and The Cochrane Library, reference lists of published NMAs and trial registries. We searched MEDLINE and PREMEDLINE In-Process & Other Non-Indexed Citations, EMBASE and The

  4. Evidence-Based Management of Anticoagulant Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Schulman, Sam; Witt, Daniel M.; Vandvik, Per Olav; Fish, Jason; Kovacs, Michael J.; Svensson, Peter J.; Veenstra, David L.; Crowther, Mark; Guyatt, Gordon H.

    2012-01-01

    Background: High-quality anticoagulation management is required to keep these narrow therapeutic index medications as effective and safe as possible. This article focuses on the common important management questions for which, at a minimum, low-quality published evidence is available to guide best practices. Methods: The methods of this guideline follow those described in Methodology for the Development of Antithrombotic Therapy and Prevention of Thrombosis Guidelines: Antithrombotic Therapy and Prevention of Thrombosis, 9th ed: American College of Chest Physicians Evidence-Based Clinical Practice Guidelines in this supplement. Results: Most practical clinical questions regarding the management of anticoagulation, both oral and parenteral, have not been adequately addressed by randomized trials. We found sufficient evidence for summaries of recommendations for 23 questions, of which only two are strong rather than weak recommendations. Strong recommendations include targeting an international normalized ratio of 2.0 to 3.0 for patients on vitamin K antagonist therapy (Grade 1B) and not routinely using pharmacogenetic testing for guiding doses of vitamin K antagonist (Grade 1B). Weak recommendations deal with such issues as loading doses, initiation overlap, monitoring frequency, vitamin K supplementation, patient self-management, weight and renal function adjustment of doses, dosing decision support, drug interactions to avoid, and prevention and management of bleeding complications. We also address anticoagulation management services and intensive patient education. Conclusions: We offer guidance for many common anticoagulation-related management problems. Most anticoagulation management questions have not been adequately studied. PMID:22315259

  5. [Management of intracranial hemorrhage during anticoagulant therapy with warfarin or novel anticoagulants].

    PubMed

    Yasaka, Masahiro; Okada, Yasushi

    2012-01-01

    Novel anticoagulants including dabigatran and rivaroxaban have lower incidence of intracranial hemorrhage compared to warfarin. Therefore, in patients with high risks for intracranial hemorrhage, such as past history of brain infarction, brain hemorrhage, microbleeds on MRI, or concomitant use of antiplatelet, novel anticoagulant may be appropriate. Irrespective of any anticoagulants, it is essential to manage controllable risk factors, such as hypertension, diabetes mellitus, smoking habit, and excessive alcohol drinking. Combination therapy of other antithrombotic agents had better be avoided as long as possible. In emergency of hemorrhage complications, discontinuation of anticoagulants, procedure to stop bleeding, and appropriate intravenous infusion is quite important and lowering blood pressure is also important when intracranial hemorrhage happens. There is no antidote to novel anticoagulants. However, oral activated charcoal may be effective if early after taking medicine. The dabigatran can be dialysed. Some experimental evidences support the role of prothrombin complex concentrate to stop bleeding. However, their usefulness in clinical setting has not been established. Collecting and analyzing data regarding immediate reversal of novel anticoagulants is required in near future.

  6. Home management of INR in the public health system: feasibility of self-management of oral anticoagulation and long-term performance of individual POC devices in determining INR.

    PubMed

    da Silva Saraiva, Sabrina; Orsi, Fernanda Andrade; Santos, Marcos Pereira; Machado, Tania; Montalvão, Silmara; Costa-Lima, Carolina; de Paula, Erich Vinícius; Colella, Marina Pereira; Annichino-Bizzacchi, Joyce

    2016-07-01

    The home prothrombin time/international normalized ratio (PT/INR) self-management could be convenient for patients, enhancing treatment compliance and improving the quality of the oral anticoagulation. However, patient self-management (PSM) of oral anticoagulation may not be feasible for up to half of the patients due to cognitive or educational issues. In the present study, we aimed to evaluate the feasibility of a PSM program in a public health medical center that provides care for low-income patients. We also aimed to determine the accuracy of individual point-of-care devices (CoaguChek XS(®)) during long-term of home manipulation. Patients' time-in-therapeutic range (TTR) and perception of quality of life, were evaluated at scheduled study-visits to the center. Additionally, the accuracy of individual CoaguChek XS(®) was evaluated in comparison to the standard automated coagulometer at scheduled study-visits to the center. Twenty-five patients were included in the PSM program. The median TTR of patients was 75 % before inclusion, 72 % at 3 months, 75 % at 6 months and 100 % at 12 months after the beginning of self-management (P = 0.14).The median DASS scores were 64, 63, 61.5 and 71.5 before inclusion and at 3, 6 and 12 months, respectively (P = 0.09). One hundred paired INR values were obtained. Correlation between INR values delivered by individual CoaguChek XS(®) and the automated coagulometer was 94 % and the mean result bias was 0.07 INR units. The coefficient of correlation and the mean bias between methods was stable during 24 months of follow-up. The present study suggests that PSM is feasible for patients treated in the public health system and that the results delivered by CoaguChek XS(®) have long-term reliability.

  7. Management of the dental patient on anticoagulant medication: a review.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, Manoj; Mittal, Sankalp; Vijay, Sharmistha; Yadav, Pooja; Panwar, Vasim Raja; Gupta, Neha

    2014-01-01

    Patients taking anticoagulant medication pose a challenge for the clinician. Dentists are often required to manage bleeding as part of routine oral surgery or dental procedures, and altered hemostasis can lead to complications. Nevertheless, use of these medications is generally important for the patient's health and any alteration in the anticoagulant regimen may have untoward sequelae. In addition, several medications can affect the clotting mechanism, potentially compromising hemostasis. This article will review a variety of anticoagulant medications and the medical conditions that necessitate their use.

  8. [Bridging: Perioperative management of chronic anticoagulation or antiplatelet therapy].

    PubMed

    Nowak-Göttl, U; Langer, F; Limperger, V; Mesters, R; Trappe, R U

    2014-06-01

    Oral anticoagulants [Vitamin-K-Antagonists, Dabigatran, Rivaroxaban, Apixaban] or antiplatelet agents [Aspirin, Clopidogrel, Prasugrel, Ticagrelor] are effective in preventing thromboembolic diseases. In case of interventional of surgical procedures patients with indications for chronic anticoagulation [atrial fibrillation, valve prosthesis, venous thromboembolism] or use of antiplatelet agents [cerebrovascular events, cardiovascular events] will require interruption of antithrombotic/antiplatelet therapy with the need of replacement with a short-acting agent. Due to limited data available from randomized studies and meta-analyses the evidence level is low in the majority of recommendations. Therefore for each patient the bleeding and thrombosis risk depending on the individual patient constitution and the planned intervention must be weighted. In patients with an intermediate risk for thrombosis the bleeding risk of the scheduled intervention will influence the bridging recommendation: In patients with a low bleeding risk oral anticoagulation/antiplatelet therapy can be continued or reduced in intensity. In patients with an intermediate or high bleeding risk along with a low thrombosis risk a temporary interruption of the anticoagulation/antiplatelet therapy is feasible. In patients with a high thrombosis and bleeding risk anticoagulation should be bridged with unfractionated heparin [renal insufficiency] or low molecular weight heparin. In the latter risk situation, inhibition of platelet function can be achieved with short-lasting GPIIb-IIIa inhibitors [Eptifibatide, Tirofiban]. Prior to intervention patients treated with the new oral anticoagulants [Dabigatran; Rivaroxaban; Apixaban] are requested to temporary interrupt the anticoagulation depending on the individual drug half-life and their renal function. Bridging therapy with heparin prior to intervention is not necessary with the new oral anticoagulants.

  9. Non-Vitamin K Antagonist Oral Anticoagulants and the Treatment of Venous Thromboembolism in Cancer Patients: A Semi Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Safety and Efficacy Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Larsen, Torben Bjerregaard; Nielsen, Peter Brønnum; Skjøth, Flemming; Rasmussen, Lars Hvilsted; Lip, Gregory Y. H.

    2014-01-01

    Background This study sought to investigate the relative efficacy and safety of non-vitamin K oral anticoagulants (NOACs) for the treatment of venous thromboembolism (VTE) in cancer patients. Methods A systematic search of the PubMed, EMBASE, and ClinicalTrials.gov databases identified all multicentre, randomised phase III trials investigating the initial use of NOAC against a vitamin K antagonist (VKA) together with subcutaneous heparin or low molecular weight heparin (upstart) for treatment of VTE. Outcomes of interest were recurrent VTE (deep venous thrombosis or pulmonary embolism), and clinically relevant bleeding. Results Four randomised controlled phase III trials were included, comprising a total of 19,060 patients randomised to either NOAC or VKA. For patients with active cancer (N = 759), the analysis on the efficacy outcomes demonstrated a trend in favour of NOAC (OR 0.56, 95% CI 0.28–1.13). Similar, analyses on the safety outcomes comparing NOAC to VKA and enoxaparin demonstrated a trend in favour of NOAC (OR 0.88, 95% CI 0.57–1.35). Conclusion Point estimates of the effect size suggest an important estimated beneficial effect of NOAC in the treatment of VTE in cancer, in terms of efficacy and safety, but given the small numbers of patients with cancer in the randomised trials, statistical significance was not achieved. PMID:25479007

  10. The role of prothrombin complex concentrates in reversal of target specific anticoagulants.

    PubMed

    Babilonia, Katrina; Trujillo, Toby

    2014-01-01

    Over the past several years a new era for patients requiring anticoagulation has arrived. The approval of new target specific oral anticoagulants offers practitioners several advantages over traditionally used vitamin K antagonist agents including predictable pharmacokinetics, rapid onset of action, comparable efficacy and safety, all without the need for routine monitoring. Despite these benefits, hemorrhagic complicates are inevitable with any anticoagulation treatment. One of the major disadvantages of the new oral anticoagulants is lack of specific antidotes or reversal agents for patients with serious bleeding or need for urgent surgery. As use of the new target specific oral anticoagulants continues to increase, practitioners will need to understand both the pharmacodynamics and pharmacokinetic properties of the agents, as well as, the available literature with use of non-specific therapies to reverse anticoagulation. Four factor prothrombin complex concentrates have been available for several years in Europe, and recently became available in the United States with approval of Kcentra. These products have shown efficacy in reversing anticoagulation from vitamin K antagonists, however their usefulness with the new target specific oral anticoagulants is poorly understood. This article will review the properties of dabigatran, rivaroxaban and apixaban, as well as the limited literature available on the effectiveness of prothrombin complex concentrates in reversal of their anticoagulant effects. Additional studies are needed to more accurately define the role of prothrombin complex concentrates in patients with life threatening bleeding or who require emergent surgery, as current data is both limited and conflicting.

  11. The role of prothrombin complex concentrates in reversal of target specific anticoagulants

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Over the past several years a new era for patients requiring anticoagulation has arrived. The approval of new target specific oral anticoagulants offers practitioners several advantages over traditionally used vitamin K antagonist agents including predictable pharmacokinetics, rapid onset of action, comparable efficacy and safety, all without the need for routine monitoring. Despite these benefits, hemorrhagic complicates are inevitable with any anticoagulation treatment. One of the major disadvantages of the new oral anticoagulants is lack of specific antidotes or reversal agents for patients with serious bleeding or need for urgent surgery. As use of the new target specific oral anticoagulants continues to increase, practitioners will need to understand both the pharmacodynamics and pharmacokinetic properties of the agents, as well as, the available literature with use of non-specific therapies to reverse anticoagulation. Four factor prothrombin complex concentrates have been available for several years in Europe, and recently became available in the United States with approval of Kcentra. These products have shown efficacy in reversing anticoagulation from vitamin K antagonists, however their usefulness with the new target specific oral anticoagulants is poorly understood. This article will review the properties of dabigatran, rivaroxaban and apixaban, as well as the limited literature available on the effectiveness of prothrombin complex concentrates in reversal of their anticoagulant effects. Additional studies are needed to more accurately define the role of prothrombin complex concentrates in patients with life threatening bleeding or who require emergent surgery, as current data is both limited and conflicting. PMID:24742134

  12. Developments of Anticoagulants and New Agents with Anti-Coagulant Effects in Deep Vein Thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Dang, Yi-Ping; Chen, Yun-Fei; Li, Yi-Qing; Zhao, Lei

    2017-01-01

    Deep Vein Thrombosis (DVT) has been known as a common medical problem all over the world. Thrombus traveling in blood vessels may lead to pulmonary embolism (PE), associated with high rates of mortality. Anticoagulant therapy is the mainstay treatment of DVT. Common anticoagulants, Vitamin K antagonists (VKAs), unfractionated heparin (UFH) and Low-molecular-weight heparin (LMWH) have been used in clinical application over decades, but can increase the risk of hemorrhage. Thereby, several new oral anticoagulants (NOACs) have been developed, which includes direct thrombin inhibitors (DTI) and direct factor Xa inhibitors. To be contrast with VKAs and UFH, NOACs have many advantages such as rapid offset action, few drug/food interactions and no need for routine coagulation monitoring, etc. Many NOACs are still being evaluated in Phase III clinical trials such as Betrixaban and Darexaban (YM150). However, NOACs still have problems to be solved such as lack of antidotes and laboratory monitoring, high drug costs, etc. Besides, several agents have already shown the potential to be new anticoagulants. Factor Xa play an important role in thrombin generation and coagulation pathway. Thus, the new compounds directly targeting on factor Xa for prevention DVT are highly anticipated. DPC423, a new series of 6-substituted coumarin derivatives and Phenyltriazolinones as potent factor Xa inhibitors have been recently reported. Recent studies revealed that agents extracted from botanicals not only have anti-coagulant effects but also possess other pharmacological activities such as anti-inflammation to alleviate the post-thrombotic syndromes. All the evidence above suggests that many new compounds might have great potential to be more effective and safe oral anticoagulants.

  13. Lupus anticoagulants and antiphospholipid antibodies

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000547.htm Lupus anticoagulants and antiphospholipid antibodies To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Lupus anticoagulants are antibodies against substances in the lining ...

  14. Management of anticoagulants and antiplatelet agents during colonoscopy.

    PubMed

    Feagins, Linda Anne

    2017-03-23

    Colonoscopy frequently is performed for patients who are taking aspirin, NSAIDs, antiplatelet agents and other anticoagulants. These colonoscopies often involve polypectomy, which can be complicated by bleeding. The risks of precipitating thromboembolic complications if anticoagulants are stopped must be weighed against the risk of postpolypectomy bleeding if these agents are continued. This article systematically reviews the management of anticoagulation during elective and emergency colonoscopy. For patients undergoing colonoscopic polypectomy, the overall of risk of postpolypectomy bleeding is less than 0.5%. Risk factors for postpolypectomy bleeding include large polyp size and anticoagulant use, especially warfarin and thienopyridines. For patients who do not stop aspirin or other NSAIDs prior to colonoscopy, the rate of postpolypectomy bleeding is not significantly different than that for patients who do not take those medications. For patients who continue thienopyridines and undergo polypectomy, the risk of delayed postpolypectomy bleeding is approximately 2.4%. Even for patients who interrupt warfarin, the risk of postpolypectomy bleeding is increased. The direct oral anticoagulants (direct thrombin inhibitors and factor Xa inhibitors) have a rapid onset and offset of action, and periprocedural bridging generally is not necessary. For the thienopyridines, warfarin and the direct oral anticoagulants, the decision to interrupt or continue these agents for endoscopy will involve considerable exercise of clinical judgment.

  15. Management of anticoagulation in patients with acute gastrointestinal bleeding.

    PubMed

    Radaelli, Franco; Dentali, Francesco; Repici, Alessandro; Amato, Arnaldo; Paggi, Silvia; Rondonotti, Emanuele; Dumonceau, Jean Marc

    2015-08-01

    Acute gastrointestinal bleeding represents the most common adverse event associated with the use of oral anticoagulant therapy. Due to increasing prescription of anticoagulants worldwide, gastroenterologists are more and more called to deal with bleeding patients taking these medications. Their management is challenging because several issues have to be taken into account, such as the severity of bleeding, the intensity of anticoagulation, the patient's thrombotic risk and endoscopy findings. The recent introduction into the marketplace of new direct oral anticoagulants, for whom specific reversal agents are still lacking, further contributes to make the decision-making process even more demanding. Available evidence on this topic is limited and practice guidelines by gastroenterology societies only marginally address key issues for clinicians, including when and how to reverse coagulopathy, the optimal timing of endoscopy and when and how to resume anticoagulation thereafter. The present paper reviews the evidence in the literature and provides practical algorithms to support clinicians in the management of patients on anticoagulants who present with acute gastrointestinal bleeding.

  16. [Anticoagulant treatment of thrombo-embolic venous disease].

    PubMed

    Pinède, Laurent; Ninet, Jacques

    2003-01-01

    The curative anticoagulant treatment of venous thromboembolism is non fractionated heparin or low molecular weight heparin, secondly substituted by oral anticoagulant therapy. Early mobilisation and elastic contention should be systematically prescribed. Low molecular weight heparin once or twice a day and early substitution by vitamin K antagonist allow an ambulatory treatment for deep vein thrombosis. It is still recommended a hospital management for patients with symptomatic pulmonary embolism. It is necessary to tailor the duration of anticoagulation individually according to the extension of venous thromboembolism and the presence (or absence) of risk or triggering factors. Bleeding is the major risk of anticoagulant therapy, particularly the vitamin K antagonists, justifying patient's education, adapted and regular biological surveillance, co-ordinated care approach with practical recommendations, patient's self-monitoring.

  17. [Comparison of the cost-utility of direct oral anticoagulants for the prevention of stroke in patients with atrial fibrillation in Spain].

    PubMed

    Monreal-Bosch, M; Soulard, S; Crespo, C; Brand, S; Kansal, A

    2017-03-16

    Introduccion. El apixaban, el dabigatran y el rivaroxaban son tres anticoagulantes orales de accion directa (ACOD) indicados para la prevencion del ictus y la embolia sistemica en pacientes con fibrilacion auricular no valvular (FANV) en España. Objetivo. Comparar el coste-utilidad de los tres ACOD frente a los antivitamina K. Pacientes y metodos. Se utilizo un modelo Markov con ciclos trimestrales para simular pacientes con FANV desde que inician su tratamiento hasta el resto de su vida desde la perspectiva del Sistema Nacional de Salud. El modelo incorporo 36 estados de salud, incluyendo combinaciones de tratamientos, discapacidad y antecedentes de eventos, y considero una cohorte hipotetica de 10.000 pacientes con FANV. La eficacia relativa se calculo a partir de una comparacion indirecta formal de los tratamientos segun los datos de los ensayos pivotales de cada ACOD. Resultados. El dabigatran se asocio al valor maximo de años de vida ajustados por calidad (AVAC) (8,40 AVAC), seguido del apixaban (8,33 AVAC), el rivaroxaban (8,15 AVAC) y el acenocumarol (8,03 AVAC). Los costes totales fueron menores con el acenocumarol (22.230 €), seguido del dabigatran (24.564 €), el apixaban (24.655 €) y el rivaroxaban (25.900 €). La ratio coste-utilidad incremental frente a los antivitamina K fue de 6.397, 8.039 y 29.957 €/AVAC para el dabigatran, el apixaban y el rivaroxaban, respectivamente. Comparados entre ellos, el dabigatran domino al apixaban y al rivaroxaban. Los analisis de sensibilidad confirmaron la robustez del caso base. Conclusiones. Los tres ACOD son coste-efectivos frente al acenocumarol. El dabigatran es economicamente dominante frente al rivaroxaban y al apixaban en España, al ser mas efectivo y menos costoso.

  18. Factors XI and XII as Targets for New Anticoagulants

    PubMed Central

    Weitz, Jeffrey I.; Fredenburgh, James C.

    2017-01-01

    Compared with vitamin K antagonists, the direct oral anticoagulants (DOACs) are simpler to administer and are associated with less intracranial bleeding. Nonetheless, even with the DOACs, bleeding still occurs and many patients with atrial fibrillation fail to receive anticoagulant thromboprophylaxis because of the fear of bleeding. Therefore, there is an urgent need for safer anticoagulants. Recent investigations into the biochemistry of hemostasis and thrombosis have identified new targets for development of novel anticoagulants. Using data from complementary sources, including epidemiological studies and investigations in various animal models, the contact pathway has emerged as a potential mediator of thrombosis that plays a minor part in hemostasis. Consequently, factor (F) XII of the contact system and FXI in the intrinsic pathway have been identified as potentially safer targets of anticoagulation than thrombin or FXa. However, further studies are needed to identify which is the better target for the appropriate indication. This review highlights the evidence for focusing on FXI and FXII and examines the novel approaches directed at these new targets. These emerging strategies should address current unmet medical needs and provide new avenues by which to improve anticoagulant therapy by reducing the risk of bleeding. PMID:28286749

  19. Response to anticoagulant drug withdrawal.

    PubMed

    Mulligan, R

    1987-09-01

    This study evaluated 44 separate medication withdrawal periods in 17 subjects who were attending a hospital anticoagulation clinic for management of anticoagulation medication. The data suggest that when anticoagulant withdrawal is needed for particular dental procedures, a 2-day hold is an effective period of medication withdrawal. No thromboembolic events were observed after any of the withdrawal periods. Further, no posttreatment hemorrhagic episodes were observed when the anticoagulant medication was reinstituted after dental treatment. Prothrombin time blood levels should be determined in the immediate pretreatment period, however, because the prothrombin time can fluctuate even in the best maintained patients.

  20. Left atrial appendage occlusion: A better alternative to anticoagulation?

    PubMed Central

    Akin, Ibrahim; Nienaber, Christoph A

    2017-01-01

    Non-valvular atrial fibrillation is associated with a significantly increased risk of embolic stroke due to blood clot forming predominantly in the left atrial appendage (LAA). Preventive measures to avoid embolic events are permanent administration of anticoagulants or surgical closure of the LAA. Various clinical trials provide evidence about safety, effectiveness and therapeutic success of LAA occlusion using various cardiac occluder devices. The use of such implants for interventional closure of the LAA is likely to become a valuable alternative for stroke prevention, especially in patients with contraindication for oral anticoagulation as safety, clinical benefit and cost-effectiveness of LAA occlusion has recently been demonstrated. PMID:28289527

  1. Regulatory Impact on Thrombosis Treatment, Prevention, and Anticoagulant Use.

    PubMed

    Dannemiller, Robert; Ward, Tucker; Fanikos, John

    2016-10-01

    Thromboembolism afflicts millions of patients annually in the United States and is associated with a significant cost burden. Oral anticoagulants provide clinicians with options for management of these diseases and their use continues to grow. Accordingly, regulatory, legislative, and nonprofit organizations have set performance standards with the goal of improving patient outcomes, ensuring patient safety, and reducing costs. Recent efforts in quality improvement have introduced changes surrounding regulatory requirements, surveillance, litigation, and oversight that clinicians should be familiar with. This article summarizes key updates related to the management of anticoagulant therapy as it relates to thrombosis prevention and treatment.

  2. Anticoagulant therapy in patients undergoing dental interventions: a critical review of the literature and current perspectives.

    PubMed

    Isola, G; Matarese, G; Cordasco, G; Rotondo, F; Crupi, A; Ramaglia, L

    2015-02-01

    Patients treated with oral anticoagulant therapy (OAT) represent an issue to the dentist, as an increasing number of people are using anticoagulant drugs for cardiovascular disease. The choice of an eventual suspension or continuation of anticoagulant therapy is important when considering an efficient management of the patient. Patients in anticoagulant therapy and requiring dental procedures sometimes represent therapeutic concerns especially concerning the suspension of the anticoagulant treatment. At the moment there is no consensus among international experts of a possible discontinuation of therapy before invasive dental procedures. In this paper, the authors try to focus on this topic through a critical review of the literature. Most of the studies suggest the continuation of the anticoagulant treatment with heparin before invasive oral surgical interventions. Based on the data of the literature, two rules must be adopted in clinical practice: 1) maintenance of anticoagulation related to the international normalized ratio (INR); 2) local application of antifibrinolytic agents to ensure a proper hemostatic process. Given the widespread use of anticoagulant drugs in cardiovascular disease, dentists must often face the problem of the therapy and, since there is no consensus on the management of these patients, the authors propose, after a thorough critical review of the literature, the implementation of a multiphase protocol of surgical approach to be implemented with safety in daily clinical practice.

  3. Combined aspirin and anticoagulant therapy in patients with atrial fibrillation.

    PubMed

    So, Charlotte H; Eckman, Mark H

    2017-01-01

    The combined use of aspirin and oral anticoagulant therapy in patients with atrial fibrillation (AF) and stable coronary artery disease (CAD) has been questioned due to an increased risk of major bleeding with little to no benefit in preventing ischemic events. (1) To better understand patterns and indications for combined antiplatelet and anticoagulant therapy and identify patients who might reasonably be treated with oral anticoagulant (OAC) therapy alone. (2) To perform an updated literature review regarding the use of combined antiplatelet and OAC therapy in patients with AF and stable CAD. Retrospective review. Patients within the University of Cincinnati Health System with a diagnosis of non-valvular AF, excluding those with acute coronary syndrome or revascularization within the last 12 months. Numbers and indications for combined antiplatelet and anticoagulant therapy and sequence of events leading to the initiation of each. Of 948 patients receiving OAC, 430 (45 %) were receiving concomitant OAC and aspirin. Among patients receiving combined antiplatelet and anticoagulant therapy, 49 and 42 % of patients respectively, had CAD or DM. In a more detailed analysis including chart review of 219 patients receiving combined OAC and aspirin, 27 % had a diagnosis of CAD and 14 % had a diagnosis of DM prior to the development of AF. These patients were initially treated with aspirin. Warfarin was added when they subsequently developed AF but aspirin wasn't discontinued. A surprisingly large proportion of patients (22.8 %) had no obvious indication for dual therapy. Prior myocardial infarction, CAD, vascular disease and DM (among others) increase the likelihood of receiving combined antiplatelet and anticoagulant therapy among patients with AF. A literature review suggests this may lead to increased major bleeding with little benefit in decreasing either AF-related stroke or cardiovascular events.

  4. Comparing new anticoagulants.

    PubMed

    Wooten, James M

    2012-12-01

    For years, the pharmaceutical industry has been trying to find a safe and effective drug to replace warfarin. Although warfarin is an effective anticoagulant, its pharmacology, adverse effects, and risk profiles dictate that patients taking this medication must be monitored judiciously. The US Food and Drug Administration has approved two drugs for commercial use, dabigatran and rivaroxaban, that will compete directly with warfarin for use in specific indications. Because of direct marketing to patients, physicians are being asked to comment on these new medications. This brief review illustrates the data available for the two new drugs when compared to warfarin for the specified indications. For some patients, these drugs may be highly beneficial and offer an excellent alternative to warfarin. For others, warfarin may still be the preferred drug.

  5. Synthesis and biological activity of the novel indanedione anticoagulant rodenticides containing fluorine.

    PubMed

    Chen, Feng; Liu, Liping; Bai, Zengguo; Zhang, Tianhua; Zhao, Keke

    2017-01-02

    Here, 3 fluorinated intermediates of drug were synthesized: (M1), (M2), (M3). Three new anticoagulant rodenticides were designed which were based on 4-hydroxycoumarin or 1,3-indandione, added acute toxicity groups containing fluorine. The structures of synthesized compounds were analyzed and proved by FT-IR spectroscopy and (1)H nuclear magnetic resonance ((1)H-NMR). The compounds were also evaluated for their anticoagulant and acute biologic activity. In addition, both the acute orally toxicity and the feeding indexes of R1 and R2 were tested. The result of the experiment proved that the new synthesis of 1, 3 - indan diketone for maternal new anticoagulant rodenticide can replace the current 4 - hydroxyl coumarin as the mother of the second generation anticoagulant rodenticide and 1, 3 - indan diketone for maternal new anticoagulant rodenticides will have a good development prospect.

  6. Anticoagulation Therapy for Venous Thromboembolism

    PubMed Central

    Cundiff, David K

    2004-01-01

    Context On the basis of theoretical rationale, heparoids and vitamin K antagonists are prescribed to prevent complications of venous thromboembolism (VTE, including pulmonary emboli [PE] and deep vein thrombosis [DVT]). They have been employed as the standard of care for treatment of VTE for over 40 years. Objective Critique the evidence supporting the efficacy of anticoagulants for the treatment of VTE in reducing morbidity and/or mortality. Data Sources This includes a search of reference lists and Medline. Study Selection This includes studies concerning the diagnosis and incidence of PE and DVT, efficacy of anticoagulants in preventing complications, risks of anticoagulant therapy, and the costs of diagnosis and the treatment of VTE. Data Extraction I analyzed references cited in reviews and meta-analyses of VTE, and from Medline searches concerning diagnosis and treatment. The data quality and validity of studies depended on the consistency of findings and statistical significance of the data. Data Synthesis No placebo-controlled trials of anticoagulants as treatment of PE with objective criteria for diagnosis have been published. Three randomized trials of anticoagulants vs no anticoagulants in DVT showed no benefit with heparin and vitamin K antagonists (combined all-cause mortality: anticoagulants = 6/66, un-anticoagulated controls = 1/60, P = .07). No placebo-controlled trials of low-molecular-weight heparins or thrombolytic drugs have been done; therefore, their efficacy in VTE depends entirely on randomized comparisons with unfractionated heparin. They have not been proven safer or more efficacious than unfractionated heparin. Thrombolysis causes more major and fatal bleeds than heparin and is no more effective in preventing PE. Diagnosing and treating VTE patients in the United States with anticoagulants costs $3.2 to $15.5 billion per year (1992 dollars). Bleeding and complications of angiography cause 1017-3525 deaths annually. Conclusion

  7. [New anticoagulants for stroke prevention in atrial fibrillation].

    PubMed

    Diener, H C; Hajjar, K; Frank, B; Perrey, M

    2012-06-01

    Oral anticoagulation with vitamin K antagonists (warfarin, phenprocoumon) is successful in both primary and secondary stroke prevention for patients with atrial fibrillation (AF), yielding a 60-70% relative reduction in stroke risk compared with placebo and a mortality reduction of 26%. However, these agents have a number of well documented shortcomings. This review describes the current landscape and developments in stroke prevention in patients with AF with special reference to secondary prevention. A number of new drugs for oral anticoagulation that do not exhibit the limitations of vitamin K antagonists are under investigation. These include direct factor Xa inhibitors and direct thrombin inhibitors. Recent studies (RE-LY, ROCKET-AF, AVERROES, ARISTOTLE) provide promising results for these new agents including higher efficacy and significantly lower incidences of intracranial bleeding compared with warfarin. The new substances show similar results in secondary as well as in primary stroke prevention in patients with AF. The new anticoagulants add to the therapeutic options for patients with AF and offer a number of advantages over warfarin for both clinician and patient, including a favorable bleeding profile and convenience of use. Consideration of these new anticoagulants will improve clinical decision-making.

  8. 'Sailing in troubled waters': a review of the use of anticoagulation in adult cancer patients with thrombocytopenia.

    PubMed

    Ibrahim, Rami B; Skewes, Michelle D; Kuriakose, Philip

    2016-09-01

    Simply providing anticoagulation therapy is not as straightforward of a solution in cancer patients who have concurrent thrombocytopenia owing to the increased risk of bleeding complications. Currently, few guidelines are in place to assist clinicians in safely managing thrombocytopenic cancer patients on anticoagulation. The purpose of this review is to critically examine the available body of biomedical literature surrounding anticoagulant use against the backdrop of cancer-related thrombocytopenia in adult patients. Available evidence for the use of parenteral anticoagulants (low molecular weight heparins, unfractionated heparin, pentasaccharides, and direct thrombin inhibitors) and oral anticoagulants (vitamin K antagonists and novel oral anticoagulants) in thrombocytopenic cancer patients is described. The review revealed many inconsistencies between reports on this topic, which made it difficult to draw firm conclusions as to, for example, the ideal well tolerated anticoagulant dose in thrombocytopenic cancer patients? Intriguingly, critical clinical information including (but not limited) patient platelet nadirs, platelet counts during bleeding episodes, and platelet transfusion support was absent from a not-so-insignificant number of publications. Despite these shortcomings, the review sets out to formulate recommendations on the management of anticoagulation, at prophylactic or treatment doses, in adult cancer patients who also have concurrent thrombocytopenia. It also enlists a call for the medical community, by mapping select clinical guideposts, for further research in this setting. With the inclusion of these criteria in future studies, only then formal recommendations on the ideal safe dosage of anticoagulants in cancer patients, based on solid evidence, are conceived.

  9. Dental management of patients receiving anticoagulation or antiplatelet treatment.

    PubMed

    Pototski, Mariele; Amenábar, José M

    2007-12-01

    Antiplatelet and anticoagulant agents have been extensively researched and developed as potential therapies in the prevention and management of arterial and venous thrombosis. On the other hand, antiplatelet and anticoagulant drugs have also been associated with an increase in the bleeding time and risk of postoperative hemorrhage. Because of this, some dentists still recommend the patient to stop the therapy for at least 3 days before any oral surgical procedure. However, stopping the use of these drugs exposes the patient to vascular problems, with the potential for significant morbidity. This article reviews the main antiplatelet and anticoagulant drugs in use today and explains the dental management of patients on these drugs, when subjected to minor oral surgery procedures. It can be concluded that the optimal INR value for dental surgical procedures is 2.5 because it minimizes the risk of either hemorrhage or thromboembolism. Nevertheless, minor oral surgical procedures, such as biopsies, tooth extraction and periodontal surgery, can safely be done with an INR lower than 4.0.

  10. Thromboembolism and anticoagulation after Fontan surgery

    PubMed Central

    Viswanathan, Sangeetha

    2016-01-01

    This review attempts to answer the common questions faced by a clinician regarding thromboembolism and thromboprophylaxis in patients following Fontan surgery. The review is in an easy to understand question and answer format and discusses the currently available literature on the subject in an attempt to arrive at practical clinically relevant solutions. Patients who have undergone the Fontan operation are at a high risk for thromboembolism. Based on available evidence, there is a strong rationale for thromboprophylaxis. However, it is not clear as to which agent should be administered to prevent thromboembolic events. While the available evidence suggests that antiplatelet agents alone may be as good as oral anticoagulants, there is a need for a large multicenter randomized control trial comparing these two common strategies to deliver a clear verdict. PMID:27625521

  11. Individualising Anticoagulant Therapy in Atrial Fibrillation Patients

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Non-vitamin K antagonist (VKA) oral anticoagulants (NOACs) have emerged as alternatives to VKAs for the prevention of stroke in patients with non-valvular atrial fibrillation. Four NOACS: dabigatran, apixaban, rivaroxaban and edoxaban, have received regulatory approval in Europe from the European Medicines Agency. Numerous factors can influence the decision to prescribe a NOAC, the most important of which are assessment of stroke and bleeding risks. Given the variation in design of the pivotal phase III clinical trials investigating the efficacy and safety of NOACs, and in the absence of head-to-head comparative data, it is impossible to recommend one NOAC over the other. However, NOACS offer the opportunity for individualised therapy based on factors such as renal function, age or patient/doctor preference for once- or twice-daily dosing regimens. Dose reduction of some NOACS should be considered in at-risk patient populations. PMID:27617088

  12. [Progress of anticoagulation therapy in atrial fibrillation].

    PubMed

    Hernández Olmedo, Miguel; Suárez Fernández, Carmen

    2015-08-07

    Atrial fibrillation is currently a very prevalent disease and it represents one of the most common causes of disabling stroke. Antithrombotic therapies have reduced the incidence of this complication although they pose many limitations and difficulties. As a result, a large number of high risk patients do not receive an appropriate treatment. In recent years, four new oral anticoagulants (NOAC) with relevant advantages in comparison to vitaminK antagonists have been released. Four large phaseiii clinical trials have demonstrated that NOAC are at least as safe and efficacious as warfarin in stroke prevention in non-valve atrial fibrillation patients with moderate-high thrombotic risk, being their main advantage the reduction in intracranial hemorrhage. The arrival of these drugs has caused great expectations in the management of these patients but also new doubts. Lacking data in some subgroups of frail patients, the absence of specific antidotes available and specially their high cost represent nowadays the main limitations for their generalization.

  13. Apixaban and oral implications

    PubMed Central

    Bagán, Jose V.

    2015-01-01

    Background Thrombotic disorders remain a leading cause of death in the Western world, and in this regard a number of anticoagulation treatment have been used, including heparins, fondaparinux, vitamin K antagonists (warfarin, acenocoumarol), and new oral anticoagulants such as apixaban. For years there has been great controversy regarding the use of anticoagulants in planning dental treatments that imply bleeding. The main concerns about using new oral anticoagulants in invasive dental procedures are bleeding due to the lack of an antidote, and the thrombotic risk of the disease for which anticoagulation was indicated in the first place. Material and Methods A literature search was conducted through May 2014 using the keyword “apixaban” for publications in the ISI Web of Knowledge. The search was extended to other databases (PubMed, Scopus and the Cochrane Library). Results Based on the results of the different studies, apixaban seems to be a good alternative to conventional anticoagulation and a reasonable treatment option, though its main and most common adverse effect is bleeding. Dose adjustment is needed in some patients, though regular laboratory monitoring is not required. The use of the drug in different patient populations will define its final indications and doses. Conclusions Regarding the use of apixaban in the dental setting, there is a compelling need for further clinical studies in order to establish more evidence-based guidelines for patients requiring antithrombotic treatment. Key words:Apixaban, dental treatment, dental implications. PMID:26535102

  14. Anticoagulation in Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Jeffrey C; Pugliese, Steven C; Fox, Daniel L; Badesch, David B

    2016-06-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is characterized by molecular and pathologic alteration to the pulmonary circulation, resulting in increased pulmonary vascular resistance, right ventricular failure, and eventual death. Pharmacologic treatment of PAH consists of use of a multitude of pulmonary vasodilators, sometimes in combination. PAH has been associated with increased thrombosis and disrupted coagulation and fibrinolysis, making anticoagulation an attractive and frequently employed therapeutic modality. Observational studies have provided some insight into the therapeutic potential of anticoagulation in idiopathic PAH, but there is a distinct lack of well-controlled prospective trials. Due to the conflicting evidence, there is a large amount of heterogeneity in the application of therapeutic anticoagulation in PAH and further well-controlled prospective trials are needed to clarify its role in treating PAH.

  15. Preoperative management of anticoagulation and antiplatelet agents.

    PubMed

    Gleason, Lauren Jan; Friedman, Susan M

    2014-05-01

    This article describes current literature and treatment plans for managing anticoagulation and antiplatelet agents in patients presenting with hip fractures. Indications for anticoagulation and antiplatelet agents are discussed, and management techniques for when patients present with hip fractures are reviewed.

  16. What Are Anticoagulants and Antiplatelet Agents?

    MedlinePlus

    ... by heart Treatments + Tests What Are Anticoagulants and Antiplatelet Agents? Anticoagulants and antiplatelet agents are medicines that reduce blood clotting in an artery, a vein or the heart. Blood clots can block the ...

  17. New parenteral anticoagulants in development.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Outes, Antonio; Suárez-Gea, Maria Luisa; Lecumberri, Ramón; Rocha, Eduardo; Pozo-Hernández, Carmen; Vargas-Castrillón, Emilio

    2011-02-01

    The therapeutic armamentarium of parenteral anticoagulants available to clinicians is mainly composed by unfractionated heparin (UFH), low-molecular-weight heparin (LMWH), fondaparinux, recombinant hirudins (i.e. bivalirudin, desirudin, lepirudin) and argatroban. These drugs are effective and safe for prevention and/or treatment of thromboembolic diseases but they have some drawbacks. Among other inconveniences, UFH requires regular anticoagulant monitoring as a result of variability in the anticoagulant response and there is a risk of serious heparin-induced thrombocytopaenia (HIT). LMWH, fondaparinux and recombinant hirudins are mainly cleared through the kidneys and their use in patients with severe renal insufficiency may be problematic. LMWH is only partially neutralized by protamine while fondaparinux and recombinant hirudins have no specific antidote. Novel anticoagulants in development for parenteral administration include new indirect activated factor Xa (FXa) inhibitors (idrabiotaparinux, ultra-low-molecular-weight heparins [semuloparin, RO-14], new LMWH [M118]), direct FXa inhibitors (otamixaban), direct FIIa inhibitors (flovagatran sodium, pegmusirudin, NU172, HD1-22), direct FXIa inhibitors (BMS-262084, antisense oligonucleotides targeting FXIa, clavatadine), direct FIXa inhibitors (RB-006), FVIIIa inhibitors (TB-402), FVIIa/tissue factor inhibitors (tifacogin, NAPc2, PCI-27483, BMS-593214), FVa inhibitors (drotrecogin alpha activated, ART-123) and dual thrombin/FXa inhibitors (EP217609, tanogitran). These new compounds have the potential to complement established parenteral anticoagulants. In the present review, we discuss the pharmacology of new parenteral anticoagulants, the results of clinical studies, the newly planned or ongoing clinical trials with these compounds, and their potential advantages and drawbacks over existing therapies.

  18. [Anticoagulation in atrial fibrillation - an update].

    PubMed

    Antz, Matthias; Hullmann, Bettina; Neufert, Christian; Vocke, Wolfgang

    2008-12-01

    The correct anticoagulation regimen for prevention of thromboembolic events is essential in patients with atrial fibrillation. However, only a minority of patients receives anticoagulation according to the guidelines. The current guidelines are intended to make the indication for anticoagulation more simple and are summarized in the present article. This includes recommendations for chronic anticoagulation, prevention of thromboembolic events after cardioversion and in ablation of atrial fibrillation.

  19. Assessing patients' anticoagulation preferences for the treatment of cancer-associated thrombosis using conjoint methodology.

    PubMed

    Noble, Simon; Matzdorff, Axel; Maraveyas, Anthony; Holm, Majbrit V; Pisa, Giovanni

    2015-11-01

    Low molecular weight heparins have demonstrated superiority over coumarins in the extended treatment of cancer-associated thrombosis and are recommended as first-line therapy in clinical guidelines. Non-vitamin K oral antagonists are yet to be evaluated against low molecular weight heparin for this indication. Nevertheless, a perception that patients favor oral anticoagulants over injections may lead to an increased prescribing of warfarin or non-vitamin K oral antagonists despite the evidence gap. There has been no evaluation of cancer patient preferences for anticoagulants and whether such an evidence gap is an acceptable trade-off for patients prescribed orals. We conducted a study to assess what features are most important to CAT patients regarding their choice of anticoagulant. Two modules were applied: Initial in-depth interviews with 9 patients diagnosed with cancer-associated thrombosis, and thereafter quantitative research, where a further 100 patients completed a choice-based-conjoint exercise, where 15 different scenarios were presented to identify the most important attributes of an anticoagulant. Seventy percent of the patients were treated with injected medication (low molecular weight heparin) and 30% with oral medications. Patients most valued an anticoagulant with minimal interference with their cancer treatment (39%), low thrombosis recurrence rate (24%), and low risk of major bleed (19%). Preference for oral administration over injection had moderate importance (13%). The results show that patients prefer an anticoagulant that does not interfere with their cancer treatment, suggesting the primacy of the cancer disease over venous thromboembolism in these patients. Patients also favor efficacy and safety over convenience of route of administration.

  20. Anticoagulation in Atrial Fibrillation – Current Concepts

    PubMed Central

    Katritsis, Demosthenes G; Gersh, Bernard J; Camm, A John

    2015-01-01

    This article presents the current status of the use of anticoagulation for the treatment of AF, particularly with the use of non-vitamin K-dependent anticoagulants. Comparisons between these agents and warfarin are made and methods for assessment of anticoagulant activity and reversal are discussed. PMID:26835109

  1. Longest Event-Free Survival without Anticoagulation in a Mechanical Aortic Valve Replacement

    PubMed Central

    Salmane, Chadi; Pandya, Bhavi; Lafferty, Kristen; Patel, Nileshkumar J; McCord, Donald

    2016-01-01

    Sixty percent of the patients going for valve replacement opt for mechanical valves and the remaining 40% choose bioprosthetics. Mechanical valves are known to have a higher risk of thrombosis; this risk further varies depending on the type of valve, its position, and certain individual factors. According to current guidelines, long-term anticoagulation is indicated in patients with metallic prosthetic valve disease. We report two unique cases of patients who survived 27 and 37 years event free, respectively, after mechanical aortic valve replacement (AVR) without being on any form of anticoagulation. The latter case described the longest survival in a human with a prosthetic aortic valve without anticoagulation. A review of literature demonstrated few cases of prosthetic valves with no anticoagulation in the long term without significant embolic events reported as case reports. These cases have been summarized in this article. Some cases of long-term survival (in the absence of anticoagulation) were attributed to good luck, and others as the result of genetic variations. New mechanical prosthetic valves can be promising, such as microporus-surfaced valves that may be used without full anticoagulation. The use of dual antiplatelet agents alone can be currently recommended only when a patient cannot take oral anticoagulation after AVR, and it should be followed with measuring and monitoring of platelet reactivity. PMID:27053922

  2. How to effectively manage the event of bleeding complications when using anticoagulants.

    PubMed

    Sartori, Maria Teresa; Prandoni, Paolo

    2016-01-01

    Since affecting hemostasis, all the anticoagulant drugs carry a risk of bleeding. Minor bleeds may be managed without the need to reverse the anticoagulant effect, which is instead a key step to ensure efficacious hemostasis in major and life-threatening bleeding. Drug withdrawal applies to all anticoagulants. Unfractionated heparin can be neutralized by protamine, which may partly neutralize low-molecular-weight heparins. There is no antidote for fondaparinux, and recombinant factor VIIa (rFVIIa) may be considered for critical bleeding. For vitamin K antagonists-induced major bleeding, rapid reversal with prothrombin complex concentrates (PCC) or plasma and intravenous vitamin K to confer lasting correction are recommended. PCC, activated PCC and rFVIIa are suggested for major bleeding related to new direct oral anticoagulants (DOAC), despite proper studies are lacking. Premarketing studies are ongoing on new antidotes (idarucizumab, andexanet, aripazine), which appear to be suitable for the treatment of DOAC-induced life-threatening hemorrhage.

  3. Anticoagulant therapy in pregnant patients with metabolic syndrome: a review.

    PubMed

    Mierzynski, Radzisław; Poniedzialek-Czajkowska, Elzbieta; Kimber-Trojnar, Zaneta; Leszczynska-Gorzelak, Bozena; Oleszczuk, Jan

    2014-01-01

    Pregnancy is a specific state of heightened coagulability related to the increase in procoagulant agents and to the reduced fibrinolysis. Pregnancy is associated with a 4-fold increased risk of developing venous thromboembolism (VTE) and this risk still increases to 14-fold during puerperium. A correlation between the metabolic syndrome and development of cardiovascular events and cerebrovascular incidents has been described. Such a relationship is referred to a hypercoagulable state due to increased serum levels of the plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1), fibrinogen, factor (F) VII and VIII, von Willebrand factor and from endothelial activation, caused by increased circulating adhesion molecules. As to the risk of VTE, the probability for its association with cardiovascular incidents is increased by common underlying mechanisms such as the activation of platelets and the blood coagulation. A correlation between idiopathic VTE and the metabolic syndrome has been reported. The anticoagulant therapy may be recommended during the pregnancy for the treatment or the prophylaxis of VTE and, in women with artificial heart valves, for the prevention of the valve thrombosis and systemic embolisation. There are also specific conditions during pregnancy which benefit from anticoagulant use, such as recurrent fetal loss, thrombophilia and assisted reproductive technology. There are no published specific data about using of anticoagulant agents in pregnant patients with the metabolic syndrome except for a few articles addressing reproductive problems. The mechanisms of anticoagulant action were studied with the focus on heparinoids, because of their safety not only for the patient but also for the fetus. The new oral anticoagulants were also shortly described although they have been contraindicated during the pregnancy.

  4. The Rate of Epistaxis Incidence in New-Generation Anticoagulants and Perioperative Approach in Otorhinolaryngological Practices.

    PubMed

    Gökdoğan, Ozan; Akyildiz, Ilker; Sayin, Begum Yetis; Okutucu, Sercan; Tanalp, Ali Cevat; Arslan, Necmi

    2017-03-01

    Nose bleeding is a common situation seen in otorhinolaryngological practices. One of the greatest risk factors in nose bleeding is the use of anticoagulant medicine. With the medicine developed in recent years, the risk of nose bleeding due to the frequent use of anticoagulant and antiagregant is gradually increasing.The purpose of this study is to determine the effects of especially new-generation anticoagulants on nose bleeding. In addition, the use and complications of new-generation anticoagulants and antiagregants have been compiled in light of information obtained from the literature.Three hundred forty patients whose follow-up is conducted by the cardiology department and who use oral antithrombocytic medicine have been included in the study. It has been determined that 15% of these patients use new-generation oral anticoagulants (Rivaroksaban, apiksaban, dabigatran, danaparoid) and the other patients are treated with conventional antithrombocytic treatment (Aspirin, Warfarin, Enoksaparin sodium). The rate of nose bleeding in patients who use classical anticoagulants has been observed to be 28%. In 30 of these patients who had nose bleeding, while cauterization and buffering by otorhinolaryngology specialists, major intervention has not been necessary for any of the patients. While bleeding has been observed in 26% of the patients who use new-generation anticoagulants, bleeding that required operational intervention has taken place in 2 patients. Bleedings have been stopped surgically through a large number of cauterization and buffering.While the new-generation anticoagulants cause lower rate of bleeding, it has been observed that controlling these bleedings is more difficult.

  5. [Anticoagulant therapy clinic: moving towards Advanced Nursing Practice].

    PubMed

    Romero Ruiz, Adolfo; Parrado Borrego, Gema; Rodríguez González, José; Caparrós Miranda, Isabel S; Vargas Lirio, M Isabel; Ortiz Fernández, Primitiva

    2014-01-01

    There is currently around one million people receiving oral anticoagulants in Spain. The drug most used is acenocoumarol, which requires coagulation monitoring to ensure that the patient is within its normal therapeutic range. Patients usually start this treatment in a hospital clinic and, when they are stabilised, they are referred to primary care, where they are followed-up by their community nurses. The usual practice is that nurses are responsible for changes in the dose when the patients are outside the range. This practice is not performed by hospital nurses, despite having sufficient experience and knowledge to adequately manage these types of patients. An Advanced Nursing Practice model has been introduced into the Haematology management unit of the Hospital Universitario Virgen de la Victoria, Málaga. This involves various aspects of attention and care of patients on anticoagulant therapy, and includes adjusting the doses of their treatment following a catalogue of therapeutic and diagnostic ranges.

  6. [Antiplatelet agents and anticoagulants: management of the anticoagulated surgical patient].

    PubMed

    Llau, Juan V; Ferrandis, Raquel; López Forte, Cristina

    2009-06-01

    Among the drugs most widely consumed by patients are both antiplatelet agents (aspirin, clopidogrel, ticlopidine) and anticoagulants (acenocoumarol, warfarin, low molecular weight heparin, fondaparinux). The use of these drugs in the perioperative period is an essential concern in patient care due to the need to balance the risk of bleeding against thrombotic risk (arterial or venous), which is increased in surgical patients. The present review highlights three main aspects. Firstly, withdrawal of antiplatelet agents is recommended between 1 week and 10 days before surgery to minimize perioperative bleeding. However, this practice has been questioned because patients without the required antiplatelet coverage may be at greater risk of developing cardiac, cerebral or peripheral vascular complications. Therefore, the recommendation of systematic antiplatelet withdrawal for a specific period should be rejected. Currently, risks should be evaluated on an individual basis to minimize the time during which the patient remains without adequate antiplatelet protection. Secondly, thromboprophylaxis is required in most surgical patients due to the high prevalence of venous thromboembolic disease. This implies the use of anticoagulants and the practice of regional anesthesia has been questioned in these patients. However, with the safety recommendations established by the various scientific societies, this practice has been demonstrated to be safe. Finally, "bridge therapy" in patients anticoagulated with acenocoumarol should be performed on an individual basis rather than systematically without taking into account the thrombotic risks of each patient. The perioperative period involves high arterial and venous thrombotic risk and the optimal use of antiplatelet agents and anticoagulants should be a priority to minimize this risk without increasing hemorrhagic risk. Multidisciplinary consensus is essential on this matter.

  7. Use and Outcomes Associated With Bridging During Anticoagulation Interruptions in Patients With Atrial Fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    Peterson, Eric D.; Kim, Sunghee; Thomas, Laine; Gersh, Bernard J.; Fonarow, Gregg C.; Kowey, Peter R.; Mahaffey, Kenneth W.; Sherwood, Matthew W.; Chang, Paul; Piccini, Jonathan P.; Ansell, Jack

    2015-01-01

    Background— Temporary interruption of oral anticoagulation for procedures is often required, and some propose using bridging anticoagulation. However, the use and outcomes of bridging during oral anticoagulation interruptions in clinical practice are unknown. Methods and Results— The Outcomes Registry for Better Informed Treatment of Atrial Fibrillation (ORBIT-AF) registry is a prospective, observational registry study of US outpatients with atrial fibrillation. We recorded incident temporary interruptions of oral anticoagulation for a procedure, including the use and type of bridging therapy. Outcomes included multivariable-adjusted rates of myocardial infarction, stroke or systemic embolism, major bleeding, cause-specific hospitalization, and death within 30 days. Of 7372 patients treated with oral anticoagulation, 2803 overall interruption events occurred in 2200 patients (30%) at a median follow-up of 2 years. Bridging anticoagulants were used in 24% (n=665), predominantly low-molecular-weight heparin (73%, n=487) and unfractionated heparin (15%, n=97). Bridged patients were more likely to have had prior cerebrovascular events (22% versus 15%; P=0.0003) and mechanical valve replacements (9.6% versus 2.4%; P<0.0001); however, there was no difference in CHA2DS2-VASc scores (scores ≥2 in 94% versus 95%; P=0.5). Bleeding events were more common in bridged than nonbridged patients (5.0% versus 1.3%; adjusted odds ratio, 3.84; P<0.0001). The incidence of myocardial infarction, stroke or systemic embolism, major bleeding, hospitalization, or death within 30 days was also significantly higher in patients receiving bridging (13% versus 6.3%; adjusted odds ratio, 1.94; P=0.0001). Conclusions— Bridging anticoagulation is used in one quarter of anticoagulation interruptions and is associated with higher risk for bleeding and adverse events. These data do not support the use of routine bridging, and additional data are needed to identify best practices concerning

  8. Guidance for the practical management of the heparin anticoagulants in the treatment of venous thromboembolism.

    PubMed

    Smythe, Maureen A; Priziola, Jennifer; Dobesh, Paul P; Wirth, Diane; Cuker, Adam; Wittkowsky, Ann K

    2016-01-01

    Venous thromboembolism (VTE) is a serious and often fatal medical condition with an increasing incidence. Despite the changing landscape of VTE treatment with the introduction of the new direct oral anticoagulants many uncertainties remain regarding the optimal use of traditional parenteral agents. This manuscript, initiated by the Anticoagulation Forum, provides clinical guidance based on existing guidelines and consensus expert opinion where guidelines are lacking. This specific chapter addresses the practical management of heparins including low molecular weight heparins and fondaparinux. For each anticoagulant a list of the most common practice related questions were created. Each question was addressed using a brief focused literature review followed by a multidisciplinary consensus guidance recommendation. Issues addressed included initial anticoagulant dosing recommendations, recommended baseline laboratory monitoring, managing dose adjustments, evidence to support a relationship between laboratory tests and meaningful clinical outcomes, special patient populations including extremes of weight and renal impairment, duration of necessary parenteral therapy during the transition to oral therapy, candidates for outpatient treatment where appropriate and management of over-anticoagulation and adverse effects including bleeding and heparin induced thrombocytopenia. This article concludes with a concise table of clinical management questions and guidance recommendations to provide a quick reference for the practical management of heparin, low molecular weight heparin and fondaparinux.

  9. Venous thromboembolism: Predicting recurrence and the need for extended anticoagulation

    PubMed Central

    Barnes, Geoffrey D; Kanthi, Yogendra; Froehlich, James B

    2016-01-01

    Initial treatment for venous thromboembolism (VTE) includes the acute and intermediate phases, usually lasting for 3 months. The choice to extend therapy beyond the initial 3-month window involves assessing a combination of risk factors for VTE recurrence and bleeding, along with weighing patient preferences. In some cases, such as VTE provoked by a reversible surgical risk factor, the recurrence risk is sufficiently low that most patients should not receive extended therapy. In other cases, such as VTE associated with malignancy, the recurrence risk is sufficiently high that treatment should be extended beyond the initial 3 months. However, a large number of patients fall into a grey zone where the decision on extended therapy is less clear-cut. In this review, we summarize the evidence for VTE recurrence risk and the role for extended anticoagulation given a variety of patient-specific factors and laboratory results. We also review the role of VTE risk prediction tools and provide a recommended algorithm for approaching the decision of extended anticoagulation therapy. Various agents available for extended VTE therapy, including warfarin, aspirin and the direct oral anticoagulant agents, are discussed. PMID:25832602

  10. [From old to new anticoagulants: the role of the biologist].

    PubMed

    Samama, Mm; Depasse, F

    2009-01-01

    Anticoagulant drugs are of great interest to patients and clinical physicians, as well as research scientists. The latter two groups combine their efforts to unravel the related mechanisms of action, as well as means of monitoring and proper dosing. Unfractionated heparin and low molecular weight heparins and vitamin K antagonists have been on board for several decades by now. They act on several clotting factors in certain sequences. Newer drugs, produced by chemical synthesis, act on a more specific target, often factor Xa or factor IIa. These newer anticoagulants have a great convenience in being orally administered and not needing routing laboratory monitoring - which is their main advantage. Hirudine and fondaparinux have been registered for a few years. This year, that is 2008 + 2009, two of these new anticoagulants have been registered and approved for use in Europe and Canada - these are dabigatran etexilate (Pradaxa) and rivaroxaban (Xarelto). Both do not require routine laboratory monitoring. However, coagulation assays for measuring their activity have been studied. A small number of standardized tests should be perfected.

  11. Efficacy and safety of novel anticoagulants in the elderly

    PubMed Central

    Karamichalakis, Nikolaos; Georgopoulos, Stamatis; Vlachos, Konstantinos; Liatakis, Ioannis; Efremidis, Michael; Sideris, Antonios; Letsas, Konstantinos P

    2016-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation and venous thromboembolism (VTE) are common disorders associated with maleficent thrombotic events, particularly in the elderly patients. Polypharmacy, co-morbidities, and altered pharmacokinetics, often present in these patients, render the use of anticoagulants quite challenging. Novel oral anticoagulants (NOACs) have recently emerged as alternatives to Vitamin K Antagonists (VKAs) and are gradually increasing their popularity mainly because of their fewer drug and food interactions and ease of use. Their effectiveness and safety has been well-established in the general population but the balance between benefit and harm in the elderly is still unclear. Routine use in these patients is uncommon. Accumulating data have shown that the benefit of NOACs is consistent among all age groups, featuring equal or greater efficacy in preventing thrombotic events. Excess bleedings were lower with NOACs in comparison to VKAs, but bleeding patterns were disparate among them and head to head comparison is not available. The present review highlights on the efficacy and safety of novel anticoagulants in the elderly population. PMID:27781063

  12. Secondary poisoning of owls by anticoagulant rodenticides

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mendenhall, V.M.; Pank, L.F.

    1980-01-01

    Anticoagulants-compounds that prevent clotting of the blood-are extensively used for control of small mammal pests. The potential secondary hazards of 6 anticoagulant rodenticides to birds of prey were examined in this study. Whole rats or mice were killed with each anticoagulant and were fed to 1-3 species of owls. Owls died of hemorrhaging after feeding on rats killed with bromadiolone, brodifacoum, or diphacinone; sublethal hemorrhaging occurred in owls fed rats killed with difenacoum. These results demonstrate potential secondary hazards of 4 anticoagulants to avian predators. No abnormalities were observed in owls fed rats killed with fumarin and chlorophacinone

  13. [Anticoagulation therapy in pulmonary arterial hypertension].

    PubMed

    Akagi, Satoshi; Kusano, Kengo Fukushima

    2008-11-01

    Vascular thrombosis implicates in the pathogenesis of pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH). Anticoagulation therapy (warfarin) has been recommended by many experts in the treatment of PAH. However, the long-term effectiveness of anticoagulation therapy remains controversial. Because of the various drugs, such as epoprostenol, bosentan, and sildenafil, for the treatment of PAH recently, warfarin alone is not a realistic therapy for PAH. Accordingly we reviewed the previous manuscript regarding anticoagulation therapy for PAH, and looked at the current role of anticoagulation therapy in Japan.

  14. Anticoagulation control among patients with nonvalvular atrial fibrillation: A single tertiary cardiac center experience

    PubMed Central

    Mohammed, Shaban; Aljundi, Amer H. S.; Kasem, Mohamed; Alhashemi, Mohammed; El-Menyar, Ayman

    2017-01-01

    There is a limited knowledge about the predictors of anticoagulation control in patients with nonvalvular atrial fibrillation (NVAF). Furthermore, few reports addressed the role of time in therapeutic range (TTR) that could reflect the safety and efficacy of anticoagulation therapy. We aimed to assess factors that affect the quality of anticoagulation therapy utilizing TTR in patients with NVAF. A retrospective observational study was conducted for patients with NVAF who were maintained on warfarin >6 months at a tertiary cardiac care hospital. Patients were categorized according to the TTR status (≥65% vs. <65%). A total of 241 eligible patients were identified. A high-quality anticoagulation based on TTR values ≥65% was found in 157 (65.1%) patients; the remaining (34.9%) patients represented the low-quality anticoagulation group (TTR <65%). Demographics and clinical characteristics were comparable in the two TTR groups. Both groups were comparable in terms of warfarin dose and medications use. When compared to patients with high-quality anticoagulation, patients in the low-quality anticoagulation group were more likely to seek outpatient warfarin clinic visits more frequently (22.3 ± 5.5 vs. 18 ± 4.4, P = 0.001) and to have higher rate of polypharmacy (57.1% vs. 42%, P = 0.03). Of note, patients in both groups had similar major bleeding events (P = 0.41). After adjusting for age and sex, polypharmacy use was a predictor of poor coagulation control (odds ratio = 1.89, 95% confidence interval: 1.03–3.33; P = 0.03). In NVAF patients, TTR is generally high in our cohort. Patients with polypharmacy and frequent clinic visits have lower TTR. High-quality oral anticoagulation could be achieved through optimizing TTR without a significant risk of major bleeding. PMID:28217549

  15. Anticoagulant Medicine: Potential for Drug-Food Interactions

    MedlinePlus

    ... Medications Anticoagulants and Drug-Food Interactions Anticoagulants and Drug-Food Interactions Make an Appointment Ask a Question ... care provider before making the change. Anticoagulants and Medicine There are many medicines that can interact with ...

  16. Specific antidotes in development for reversal of novel anticoagulants: a review.

    PubMed

    Gomez-Outes, Antonio; Suarez-Gea, M L; Lecumberri, Ramon; Terleira-Fernandez, Ana I; Vargas-Castrillon, Emilio

    2014-01-01

    In the last decade, several direct oral anticoagulants (DOAC; dabigatran, rivaroxaban, apixaban, edoxaban) have been marketed for prophylaxis and/or treatment of thromboembolism without having specific antidotes available for their reversal. Current management of bleeding associated to DOAC includes the removal of all antithrombotic medications and supportive care. Non-specific procoagulant agents (prothrombin complex concentrates and activated factor VIIa) have been used in case of serious bleeding. Currently, some specific antidotes for the DOAC are under development. Idarucizumab (BI 655075; Boehringer Ingelheim) is a fragment of an antibody (Fab), which is a specific antidote to the oral direct thrombin inhibitor dabigatran. Andexanet alfa (r-Antidote, PRT064445; Portola Pharmaceuticals) is a truncated form of enzymatically inactive factor Xa, which binds and reverses the anticoagulant action of the factor Xa inhibitors (e.g.: rivaroxaban, apixaban and edoxaban). Aripazine (PER-977, ciraparantag; Perosphere Inc.) is a synthetic small molecule (~500 Da) that reverses oral dabigatran, apixaban, rivaroxaban, as well as subcutaneous fondaparinux and LMWH in vivo. These antidotes could provide an alternative for management of life-threatening bleeding events occurring with the above-mentioned anticoagulants. In addition, the specific antidote anivamersen (RB007; Regado Biosciences Inc.) is an RNA aptamer in clinical development to reverse the anticoagulant effect of the parenteral factor IXa inhibitor pegnivacogin, which is also in development. This anticoagulant-antidote pair may provide an alternative in situations in which a fast onset and offset of anticoagulation is needed, like in patients undergoing cardiac surgery with extracorporeal circulation, as an alternative to the heparin/protamine pair. This patent review includes a description of the pharmacological characteristics of the novel specific antidotes, the available results from completed non

  17. A new instrument for measuring anticoagulation-related quality of life: development and preliminary validation

    PubMed Central

    Samsa, Greg; Matchar, David B; Dolor, Rowena J; Wiklund, Ingela; Hedner, Ewa; Wygant, Gail; Hauch, Ole; Marple, Cheryl Beadle; Edwards, Roger

    2004-01-01

    Background Anticoagulation can reduce quality of life, and different models of anticoagulation management might have different impacts on satisfaction with this component of medical care. Yet, to our knowledge, there are no scales measuring quality of life and satisfaction with anticoagulation that can be generalized across different models of anticoagulation management. We describe the development and preliminary validation of such an instrument – the Duke Anticoagulation Satisfaction Scale (DASS). Methods The DASS is a 25-item scale addressing the (a) negative impacts of anticoagulation (limitations, hassles and burdens); and (b) positive impacts of anticoagulation (confidence, reassurance, satisfaction). Each item has 7 possible responses. The DASS was administered to 262 patients currently receiving oral anticoagulation. Scales measuring generic quality of life, satisfaction with medical care, and tendency to provide socially desirable responses were also administered. Statistical analysis included assessment of item variability, internal consistency (Cronbach's alpha), scale structure (factor analysis), and correlations between the DASS and demographic variables, clinical characteristics, and scores on the above scales. A follow-up study of 105 additional patients assessed test-retest reliability. Results 220 subjects answered all items. Ceiling and floor effects were modest, and 25 of the 27 proposed items grouped into 2 factors (positive impacts, negative impacts, this latter factor being potentially subdivided into limitations versus hassles and burdens). Each factor had a high degree of internal consistency (Cronbach's alpha 0.78–0.91). The limitations and hassles factors consistently correlated with the SF-36 scales measuring generic quality of life, while the positive psychological impact scale correlated with age and time on anticoagulation. The intra-class correlation coefficient for test-retest reliability was 0.80. Conclusions The DASS has

  18. The role of anticoagulants, antiplatelet agents, and their reversal strategies in the management of intracerebral hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    James, Robert F; Palys, Viktoras; Lomboy, Jason R; Lamm, J Richard; Simon, Scott D

    2013-05-01

    New anticoagulant and antiplatelet medications have been approved and are prescribed with increased frequency. Intracranial hemorrhage is associated with the use of these medications. Therefore, neurosurgeons need to be aware of these new medications, how they are different from their predecessors, and the strategies for the urgent reversal of their effects. Utilization of intraluminal stents by endovascular neurosurgeons has resulted in the need to have a thorough understanding of antiplatelet agents. Increased use of dabigatran, rivaroxaban, and apixaban as oral anticoagulants for the treatment of atrial fibrillation and acute deep venous thrombosis has increased despite the lack of known antidotes to these medications.

  19. Anticoagulation management in the ambulatory surgical setting.

    PubMed

    Eisenstein, Diana Hill

    2012-04-01

    Many people receiving maintenance anticoagulation therapy require surgery each year in ambulatory surgery centers. National safety organizations focus attention toward improving anticoagulation management, and the American College of Chest Physicians has established guidelines for appropriate anticoagulation management to balance the risk of thromboembolism when warfarin is discontinued with the risk of bleeding when anticoagulation therapy is maintained. The guidelines recommend that patients at high or moderate risk for thromboembolism should be bridged with subcutaneous low-molecular-weight heparin or IV unfractionated heparin with the interruption of warfarin, and low-risk patients may require subcutaneous low-molecular-weight heparin or no bridging with the interruption of warfarin. The guidelines recommend the continuation of warfarin for patients who are undergoing minor dermatologic or dental procedures or cataract removal. The literature reveals, however, that there is not adequate adherence to these recommendations and guidelines. Management of anticoagulation therapy by a nurse practitioner may improve compliance and safety in ambulatory surgery centers.

  20. Anticoagulants

    MedlinePlus

    ... or interactions with other medicines and vitamin or herbal supplements. This information should not be used as medical ... your doctor about every medicine and vitamin or herbal supplement that you are taking, so he or she ...

  1. Anticoagulation

    MedlinePlus

    ... Search By Zipcode Search by State SELECT YOUR LANGUAGE Español (Spanish) 简体中文 (Traditional Chinese) 繁体中文 (Simplified Chinese) ... pregnancy) and eliminates the need for an intravenous line long-term. Your cardiologist will determine which type ...

  2. Spontaneous retroperitoneal hematoma in a patient under anticoagulant agents presenting as upper gastrointestinal bleeding.

    PubMed

    Carrilero Zaragoza, Gabriel; Egea Valenzuela, Juan; Moya Arnao, María; Muñoz Tornero, María; Jijón Crespín, Roxanna; Tomas Pujante, Paula; Iglesias Jorquera, Elena; Parra García, Josefa; Sánchez Velasco, Eduardo; Pereñíguez López, Ana; Miras López, Manuel; Fuster Quiñonero, Matilde; Carballo Álvarez, Fernando

    2016-12-01

    We present the case of a 44-year-old woman with past history of repeated miscarriage and Budd-Chiari syndrome secondary to primary myelofibrosis. Because of this she was under treatment with oral anticoagulant agents. The patient was admitted in hospital as she presented with gastrointestinal bleeding (melena), asthenia and progressive anemia. In an initial upper endoscopy an extrinsic duodenal compression associated with an ulcer on the posterior face of the first portion of duodenum and upper duodenal knee was observed. In the following days a huge spontaneous retroperitoneal hematoma due to anticoagulation was diagnosed by computed tomography. This was treated with a percutaneous drainage and withdrawal of the antithrombotic drugs. The evolution of the patient was initially satisfactory but she suffered subclavian and jugular vein thrombosis, and reintroduction of anticoagulant agents at the lowest therapeutic doses was required.

  3. Anticoagulation therapy prevents portal-splenic vein thrombosis after splenectomy with gastroesophageal devascularization

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Wei; Lu, Shi-Chun; Li, Guan-Yin; Li, Chuan-Yun; Wu, Ju-Shan; Guo, Qing-Liang; Wang, Meng-Long; Li, Ning

    2012-01-01

    AIM: To compare the incidence of early portal or splenic vein thrombosis (PSVT) in patients treated with irregular and regular anticoagulantion after splenectomy with gastroesophageal devascularization. METHODS: We retrospectively analyzed 301 patients who underwent splenectomy with gastroesophageal devascularization for portal hypertension due to cirrhosis between April 2004 and July 2010. Patients were categorized into group A with irregular anticoagulation and group B with regular anticoagulation, respectively. Group A (153 patients) received anticoagulant monotherapy for an undesignated time period or with aspirin or warfarin without low-molecular-weight heparin (LMWH) irregularly. Group B (148 patients) received subcutaneous injection of LMWH routinely within the first 5 d after surgery, followed by oral warfarin and aspirin for one month regularly. The target prothrombin time/international normalized ratio (PT/INR) was 1.25-1.50. Platelet and PT/INR were monitored. Color Doppler imaging was performed to monitor PSVT as well as the effectiveness of thrombolytic therapy. RESULTS: The patients’ data were collected and analyzed retrospectively. Among the patients, 94 developed early postoperative mural PSVT, including 63 patients in group A (63/153, 41.17%) and 31 patients in group B (31/148, 20.94%). There were 50 (32.67%) patients in group A and 27 (18.24%) in group B with mural PSVT in the main trunk of portal vein. After the administration of thrombolytic, anticoagulant and anti-aggregation therapy, complete or partial thrombus dissolution achieved in 50 (79.37%) in group A and 26 (83.87%) in group B. CONCLUSION: Regular anticoagulation therapy can reduce the incidence of PSVT in patients who undergo splenectomy with gastroesophageal devascularization, and regular anticoagulant therapy is safer and more effective than irregular anticoagulant therapy. Early and timely thrombolytic therapy is imperative and feasible for the prevention of PSVT. PMID:22807615

  4. Factors driving anticoagulant selection in patients with atrial fibrillation in the United States.

    PubMed

    Lauffenburger, Julie C; Farley, Joel F; Gehi, Anil K; Rhoney, Denise H; Brookhart, M Alan; Fang, Gang

    2015-04-15

    With the introduction of novel oral anticoagulants (NOACs), the factors driving anticoagulant selection in atrial fibrillation (AF) in real-world practice are unclear. The goal was to examine whether and to what extent utilization has been driven by predictions of stroke risk (treatment benefit), bleeding risk (treatment harm), or prescription benefits' coverage. We extracted a cohort of patients with nonvalvular AF initiating anticoagulation from October 2010 to December 2012 from a large US database of commercial and Medicare supplement claims. Multivariable regression examined associations between ischemic stroke (CHA2DS2-VASc) and bleeding (Anticoagulation and Risk Factors in Atrial Fibrillation [ATRIA]) risk scores and benefits' generosity (proportion of costs covered by patients relative to total) with warfarin and novel oral anticoagulant (NOAC) selection and also between dabigatran and rivaroxaban. C-statistics and partial chi-square statistics were used to assess the variation explained. Of 70,498 patients initiating anticoagulation, 29.9% and 7.9% used dabigatran and rivaroxaban, respectively. Compared with warfarin, patients were less likely to receive an NOAC with high ischemic stroke risk (CHA2DS2-VASc ≥2; adjusted relative risk [aRR] 0.75, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.72 to 0.77) and high bleeding risk (ATRIA ≥5; aRR 0.66, 95% CI 0.64 to 0.69) but more likely with good benefits' generosity (≤20% of costs borne by patient; aRR 2.03, 95% CI 1.92 to 2.16). Prescription generosity explained almost twice the model variation as either risk score. Compared with dabigatran, patients were more likely to fill rivaroxaban with high bleeding risk (aRR 1.16, 95% CI 1.09 to 1.24). In conclusion, patients with greater bleeding and ischemic stroke risk were more likely to initiate warfarin, but generous benefits more strongly predicted NOAC usage and drove more selection.

  5. Estimation of the impact of warfarin's time-in-therapeutic range on stroke and major bleeding rates and its influence on the medical cost avoidance associated with novel oral anticoagulant use-learnings from ARISTOTLE, ROCKET-AF, and RE-LY trials.

    PubMed

    Amin, Alpesh; Deitelzweig, Steve; Jing, Yonghua; Makenbaeva, Dinara; Wiederkehr, Daniel; Lin, Jay; Graham, John

    2014-01-01

    Warfarin's time-in-therapeutic range (TTR) is highly variable among patients with nonvalvular atrial fibrillation (NVAF). The objective of this study was to estimate the impact of variations in wafarin's TTR on rates of stroke/systemic embolism (SSE) and major bleedings among NVAF patients in the ARISTOTLE, ROCKET-AF, and RE-LY trials. Additionally, differences in medical costs for clinical endpoints when novel oral anticoagulants (NOACs) were used instead of warfarin at different TTR values were estimated. Quartile ranges of TTR values and corresponding event rates (%/patient - year = %/py) of SSE and major bleedings among NVAF patients treated with warfarin were estimated from published literature and FDA documents. The associations of SSE and major bleeding rates with TTR values were evaluated by regression analysis and then the calculated regression coefficients were used in analysis of medical cost differences associated with use of each NOAC versus warfarin (2010 costs; US payer perspective) at different TTRs. Each 10 % increase in warfarin's TTR correlated with a -0.32%/py decrease in SSE rate (R(2) = 0.61; p < 0.001). Although, the rate of major bleedings decreased as TTR increased, it was not significant (-0.035%/py, p = 0.63). As warfarin's TTR increased from 30 to 90% the estimated medical cost decreased from -$902 to -$83 for apixaban, from -$506 to +$314 for rivaroxaban, and from -$596 to +$223 for dabigatran. Among NVAF patients there is a significant negative correlation between warfarin's TTR and SSE rate, but not major bleedings. The variations in warfarin's TTR impacted the economic comparison of use of individual NOACs versus warfarin.

  6. A Systematic Review of Cochrane Anticoagulation Reviews

    PubMed Central

    Cundiff, David Keith

    2009-01-01

    Context I coauthored a published review of anticoagulation for venous thromboembolism in the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews and published a review on the same topic in MedGenMed (now the Medscape Journal of Medicine). In contrast to the article in Medscape, the discussion and conclusions in the Cochrane review were altered appreciably during the review process. Consequently, I decided to critique all anticoagulation drug-related reviews and protocols in the Cochrane database with feedback letters concerning any issues of potential controversy. Evidence Acquisition Using key words in the search engine of the Cochrane Reviews, I located reviews and protocols involving anticoagulant drugs. I critiqued each anticoagulation review and protocol and sent a total of 57 feedback letters to Cochrane concerning each publication to elicit a response/rebuttal from the authors. Evidence Synthesis Cochrane anticoagulation review editors acknowledged receipt of all letters. As of 12 months after receipt of my last letter, the Cochrane authors have replied to 13 of the 57 and agreed with many of my points. Two protocols were withdrawn after my feedback letters were acknowledged. The 58 Cochrane anticoagulation drug reviews, including mine, contained 9 categories of methodological errors (207 total instances) and 4 types of biases (18 total instances). This review of those Cochrane reviews suggests that the effectiveness of anticoagulants for 30 medical indications is questionable. Conclusions The efficacy of anticoagulants for treatment and prophylaxis for 30 current medical indications should be reconsidered by the scientific community and medical regulatory agencies. At least 50,000 people per year worldwide have fatal bleeding due to anticoagulant treatment or prophylaxis for these indications. PMID:19295926

  7. Quality of anticoagulation therapy in neurological patients in a tertiary care hospital in north India

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Prabhat; Kalita, J.; Misra, U.K.

    2016-01-01

    Background & objectives: There is paucity of studies on the quality of anticoagulation in neurological patients from India. This study evaluates the quality of oral anticoagulation therapy in neurology patients. Methods: Consecutive patients attending a tertiary care neurology service in north India who were prescribed oral anticoagulant (OAC), were included. Their international normalized ratio (INR) values were prospectively monitored and the earlier INR values of the patients who were already on OAC were retrospectively analyzed. The patients with multi-organ dysfunction, pregnancy and those below 18 yr of age were excluded. The therapeutic INR range was defined as per standard recommendations. The level of anticoagulation, factors interfering with OAC and complications were noted. Results: The results were based on 77 patients with median age 40 yr. Fifty one patients received OAC for secondary stroke prevention, 23 for cerebral venous sinus thrombosis (CVST) and three for deep vein thrombosis (DVT). A total 167.9 person-years of follow up was done with a median of 1.2 (0.3-9.3) years. Of the 1287 INR reports, 505 (39.3%) reports were in the therapeutic range, 496 (38.5%) were below and 282 (21.91%) were above the therapeutic level. Stable INR was obtained in 33 (42.86%) patients only. INR level was improved by dose adjustment in 20 (26%), drug modification in two (2.6%), and dietary adjustment in six (7.8%) patients. Three patients were sensitive and five were resistant to OAC. Complications were noted in 28 instances; thromboembolic in 16 and haemorrhagic stroke in 12. The overall complication rate was 16.7 per 100 person-years. Interpretation & conclusions: It may be concluded that stable therapeutic INR is difficult to maintain in neurological patients. Optimal modification of diet, drug and dose of oral anticoagulant may help in stabilization of INR. PMID:27377498

  8. Stop the nonsense not the anticoagulants: a matter of life and death.

    PubMed

    Alexander, Ricardo; Ferretti, Alan C; Sorensen, Jason R

    2002-11-01

    Many dental patients have medical problems that require the administration of oral anticoagulants to prevent catastrophic or life-threatening thromboembolic events. Examples include patients with medical conditions such as atrial fibrillation, mechanical heart valves, recent pulmonary embolism, stroke, deep vein thrombosis, anticardiolipin syndrome and coronary artery disease. The oral anticoagulant used most commonly in these instances is Coumadin. Stopping the administration of Coumadin to perform routine dental procedures can be life threatening. Many physicians and dentists believe these patients may not have routine dental procedures, including cleanings and uncomplicated extractions, while on Coumadin for fear of serious postoperative bleeding. No scientific evidence exists to support removing these patients from Coumadin to perform routine dental procedures and uncomplicated extractions, provided the patient's level of anticoagulation is within therapeutic range. Science clearly indicates that in the case of routine dental work, including uncomplicated extractions, the risk of a patient on Coumadin having a life-threatening thromboembolic event if the anticoagulant therapy is stopped is three- to five-times greater than the risk of the patient having postoperative bleeding that cannot be controlled with local measures.

  9. Treatment of venous thromboembolism - effects of different therapeutic strategies on bleeding and recurrence rates and considerations for future anticoagulant management.

    PubMed

    Hass, Bastian; Pooley, Jayne; Harrington, Adrian E; Clemens, Andreas; Feuring, Martin

    2012-12-31

    Effective treatment of venous thromboembolism (VTE) strikes a balance between prevention of recurrence and bleeding complications. The current standard of care is heparin followed by a vitamin K antagonist such as warfarin. However, this option is not without its limitations, as the anticoagulant effect of warfarin is associated with high inter- and intra-patient variability and patients must be regularly monitored to ensure that anticoagulation is within the narrow target therapeutic range. Several novel oral anticoagulant agents are in the advanced stages of development for VTE treatment, some of which are given after an initial period of heparin treatment, in line with current practice, while others switch from high to low doses after the initial phase of treatment. In this review we assess the critical considerations for treating VTE in light of emerging clinical data for new oral agents and discuss the merits of novel treatment regimens for patients who have experienced an episode of deep vein thrombosis or pulmonary embolism.

  10. Dental management of the anticoagulated patient.

    PubMed

    Purcell, C A

    1997-09-01

    Most anticoagulated patients can be safely managed for routine dental treatment in the outpatient setting by following appropriate guidelines. Management should be based on the present level of anticoagulation as assessed by tests, in particular the international normalised ratio (INR), which should be carried out as close to the intervention as possible. A philosophy of minimal, if any, alteration to the level of anticoagulation should be adopted. This is particularly true for procedures producing minimal bleeding such as scaling and cleaning which, in the past, have resulted in patients having their INR lowered, with its attendant risks. The patient's anticoagulation is potentially life-saving and, where at all possible, should be maintained at therapeutic levels when therapy for non-threatening conditions is planned.

  11. Anticoagulation-related intracranial extracerebral haemorrhage.

    PubMed Central

    Mattle, H; Kohler, S; Huber, P; Rohner, M; Steinsiepe, K F

    1989-01-01

    From January 1981 to June 1986 116 patients with anticoagulation-related intracranial haemorrhage were referred to hospital. Seventy six of these haemorrhages were extracerebral, 69 were in the subdural and seven in the subarachnoid space. No epidural haemorrhages were identified. Compared with non-anticoagulation-related haematomas, the risk of haemorrhage was calculated to be increased fourfold in men and thirteenfold in women. An acute subdural haematoma, mostly due to contusion, was more frequently accompanied by an additional intracerebral haematoma than a chronic subdural haematoma. Trauma was a more important factor in acute subdural haematomas than in chronic. Almost half of the patients (48%) had a history of hypertension, more than a third (35%) had heart disease and about one fifth (18%) were diabetic. Headache was the most frequent initial symptom. Later decreased level of consciousness and focal neurological signs exceeded the frequency of headache. Three patients with subarachnoid haemorrhage and nine patients with acute subdural haematomas died, while those with chronic subdural haematomas all survived and had at the most mild, non-disabling sequelae. Myocardial infarction (22%), pulmonary embolism (20%), and arterial disease (20%) were the most frequent reasons for anticoagulant treatment. Critical review based on established criteria for anticoagulation treatment suggests there was no medical reason to treat a third of these patients. The single most useful measure that could be taken to reduce the risk of anticoagulation-induced intracranial haemorrhage would be to identify patients who are being unnecessarily treated and to discontinue anticoagulants. PMID:2769275

  12. Controversies in timing of the first dose of anticoagulant prophylaxis against venous thromboembolism after major orthopedic surgery.

    PubMed

    Raskob, Gary E; Hirsh, Jack

    2003-12-01

    Adjusted doses of oral warfarin sodium or fixed doses of subcutaneous low-molecular-weight heparin (LMWH) are the standard approaches for preventing venous thromboembolism following major orthopedic surgery of the legs. In recent years, new anticoagulants have been compared with either LMWH or warfarin. The optimal timing for the first dose of LMWH prophylaxis and of the new anticoagulants is controversial. Recent clinical trials of LMWH and of newer anticoagulants have provided new information on the relationship between the timing of the first anticoagulant dose and the efficacy and safety of thromboprophylaxis after major orthopedic surgery. These data on the optimal timing of initiating prophylaxis come from limited direct randomized comparisons of different timing with the same anticoagulant, subgroup analysis of large studies with a single anticoagulant, indirect comparisons across studies in systematic reviews, and single randomized trials comparing different anticoagulants. In the direct comparison of the same anticoagulant, preoperative initiation of the same regimen of LMWH (dalteparin) increased major bleeding, without improved antithrombotic efficacy compared to the early postoperative regimen. Fondaparinux, 2.5 mg, begun 6 h postoperatively is more effective and as safe as the currently approved regimens of enoxaparin begun either 12 h preoperatively, or 12 to 24 h postoperatively, in patients undergoing major orthopedic surgery. In a subgroup analysis of several large randomized trials, fondaparinux, 2.5 mg, begun < 6 h postoperatively was associated with increased major bleeding, without improved efficacy. The results of indirect comparisons also favor the use of a 6-h postoperative starting time for the first dose, while the single randomized trials comparing different anticoagulants performed to date are not helpful in establishing an optimal time for the first dose. The aggregate clinical research evidence supports the following general

  13. [Oral anticogulation for non-valvular atrial fibrilation in the elderly].

    PubMed

    Veiga Fernández, Fernando; Malfeito Jiménez, María del Rocío; Barros Cerviño, Sonia María; Magariños Losada, María del Mar

    2015-01-01

    Anticoagulation in elderly people with non-valvular atrial afibrillation (AF) is a challenge, due to the thromboembolic, as well as the haemorrhagic risks. The correct use of anticoagulants in these patients has shown a higher net clinical benefit when comparing it with a younger population. Non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants (NOACs) have been compared to oral vitamin K antagonists in several studies that included a sufficient number of elderly people. Favourable results for non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants were obtained in these studies, making them the preferred treatment for this group of patients. Basing the estimations on indirect comparisons, the ideal anticoagulant and the specific dose for each particular case has been determined. Finally, a new algorithm has been developed that relates these parameters. Geriatric assessment is the key to the indication for an anticoagulation, the type of anticoagulant needed, and also the best way to optimise all the factors for a safe anticoagulation. The arrival of non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants will enhance the efficient thromboembolic prophylaxis rate in elderly people with AF. This new treatment will remove different controversial prophylaxis, such as antiaggregants.

  14. Citrate anticoagulation and adverse events.

    PubMed

    De Vos, J; Hombrouckx, R

    2003-01-01

    Several patients with heparin intolerance were dialysed with tri-sodium citrate as anticoagulant without acute clinical problems (good tolerance). After some weeks however problems arose. In all patients an alkalosis developed: the pre dialysis bicarbonate level rose progressively from 27 mmol/l to 40 mmol/l. This could be tempered by lowering the dialysis fluid bicarbonate concentration from 37 mmol/l to 25 mmol/l. A second problem was a progressive rise in pre dialysis sodium level from a mean of 136 mmol/l to 150 mmol/l. Adapting the dialysis fluid sodium concentration from 140 mmol/l towards 132 mmol/l could solve this. The third problem was a progressive rise in serum aluminium level in patients from 3 microg/l to 38 microg/l. After excluding water, concentrate, dialysis fluid, drug intake, etc... as possible sources, we controlled the aluminium level in the glass bottle containing tri-sodium citrate. We noted the very high value of 35,300 microg/l. After replacing the glass bottles with polyvinylchloride bags with a negligible aluminium content, the serum aluminium levels returned back to normal. It is known that citrate chelates the aluminium present in the glass of bottles or vials.

  15. [Anticoagulation and antiaggregation during pregnancy].

    PubMed

    Biasiutti, F Demarmels; Strebel, J Kremer Hovinga

    2003-01-01

    For haemostatic and circulatory reasons pregnancy is associated with an about 6-fold relative increase of thrombotic risk which is further raised by additional risk factors, such as history of thrombosis or acquired and hereditary thrombophilia, respectively. Recently, the thrombophilias have been revealed as risk factors for severe preeclampsia, abruptio placentae, fetal growth retardation, abortion and still birth as well. Thus, there are several situations in which the question for the need of antithrombotic medication is raised in a pregnant woman, either for therapy of acute thromboembolism or for prophylaxis of thrombosis and obstetrical complications, respectively. While acute thromboembolism has to be treated in every case, indication for prophylaxis has to be weighed in the light of the individual risk profile of the pregnant woman and the potential side effects and inconvenience of the medication. The first part of this article deals with the pregnancy related problems of coumarins, heparins and aspirin and demonstrates that the low molecular weight heparins are the anticoagulants of choice for most indications in pregnancy. The second part of this overview shows in which specific situations and how the antithrombotic medications mentioned above are used in pregnancy.

  16. Novel anticoagulants and antiplatelet agents; a guide for the urologist.

    PubMed

    Ellis, Gidon; John Camm, Alan; Datta, Soumendra N

    2015-11-01

    Novel oral anti-coagulants (NOACs) are increasingly being used in clinical practice and are set to almost entirely replace the vitamin K antagonists, such as warfarin, in the near future. Similarly, new antiplatelet agents are now regularly used in place of older agents, such as aspirin and clopidogrel. In an ageing population, with an increasing burden of complex comorbidities, urologists will frequently encounter patients who will be using such agents. Some background knowledge, and an understanding, of these drugs and the issues that surround their usage, is essential. The present article will provide readers with an understanding of these new drugs, including their mechanisms of action, the up-to-date evidence justifying their recent introduction into clinical practice and the appropriate interval for stopping them before surgery. It will also consider the risks of perioperative bleeding for patients taking these drugs and the risks of venous thromboembolism in those in whom they are stopped. Strategies to manage anticoagulant-associated bleeding are discussed.

  17. Novel anticoagulants: general overview and practical considerations for dental practitioners.

    PubMed

    Elad, S; Marshall, J; Meyerowitz, C; Connolly, G

    2016-01-01

    Currently, 4 novel Direct Oral Anticoagulants (DOACs) were approved by the FDA. This review focuses on these agents and proposes a matrix for the general dentists to assess bleeding risk in dental management of patient on DOACs. The outline covers the pharmacology of DOACs (rivaroxaban, apixaban, edoxaban and dabigatran), bleeding complications, risk associated with discontinuation, monitoring/reversal, and implications for the dental practitioners. A total of 18 randomized controlled trials were identified with mixed results in regards to the risk for bleeding. Considering the pharmacology of DOACs and challenges in monitoring and reversing their effect, the dentist should consider carefully the management of patients on DOACs as it may differ from patients on conventional anticoagulants. Based on the type of dental procedure and the medical risk assessment, several general treatment approaches can be considered: continue DOACs, time dental treatment as late as possible after the last DOACs dose, discontinue DOACs for 24hrs, or discontinue DOACs for 48hrs. Based on the current reported dental literature, limited dental surgery may benefit from the first 2 conservative options. However, this needs to be proven in comparative clinical trials.

  18. Anticoagulants versus antiplatelet drugs for cervical artery dissection: case for anticoagulants.

    PubMed

    Norris, John W

    2013-02-01

    There are no reliable data from randomised trials to decide whether anticoagulants or antiplatelet agents are better to prevent further thromboembolic events after cervical arterial dissection. Most neurologists favour anticoagulants based on the underlying pathology and the likely course of acute post-dissection thromboembolism.

  19. [Perioperative Management of Lung Cancer Patients with atrial fibrillation being treated by antiplatelet or anticoagulant therapy].

    PubMed

    Ishikawa, Shinya; Kasai, Yoshitaka; Matsuura, Natsumi; Tarumi, Shintaro; Nakano, Jun; Okuda, Masaya; Goto, Masashi; Ryu, Dagu; Go, Tetsuhiko; Yokomise, Hiroyasu

    2015-04-01

    In an aging society, the high incidence of surgery for the patients with ischemic heart disease(IHD)or atrial fibrillation(Af) under antiplatelet or anticoagulant therapy is a great problem. Interruption of antiplatelet or anticoagulant oral agents in the perioperative period may increase the risk of coronary or cerebral events. We retrospectively reviewed the surgical outcomes for lung cancer patients with IHD or Af. We reviewed 135 patients with lung cancer(41~88 years;97 men) who had preoperative oral administration of antiplatelet or anticoagulant drugs for IHD or Af between 2005 and 2012 at 2 centers, and analyzed retrospectively the perioperative medications and complications. IHD, Af and vasospastic angina(VSA) were complicated in 94, 33 and 8 patients, respectively. Drugeluted and bare-metal stents had been placed in 18 and 19 patients. Oral agents were aspirin in 68 patients, ticlopidine in 10 patients, clopidogrel in 15 patients and warfarin in 25 patients. These agents were stopped 2 to 60 days before surgery. Perioperative heparinization was performed in 22 patients. Oral agents were restarted after confirmation of hemostasis and no need for further invasive treatment. The surgical procedures were lobectomy in 88 patients, segmentectomy in 19 and partial resection in 25. There were no hemorrhagic or thromboembolic complications in a perioperative period except 1 case of pulmonary hemorrhage and 1 case of cerebral infarction. No perioperative hospital death was documented. Short-term interruption of antiplatelet or anticoagulant drugs before lung cancer surgery and heparinization was acceptable from the view of perioperative outcomes.

  20. Management of dental extraction in patients undergoing anticoagulant treatment. Results from a large, multicentre, prospective, case-control study.

    PubMed

    Bacci, Christian; Maglione, Michele; Favero, Lorenzo; Perini, Alessandro; Di Lenarda, Roberto; Berengo, Mario; Zanon, Ezio

    2010-11-01

    Following favourable results from a previous study, a large, multicentre, prospective, case-control study was performed to further assess the incidence of bleeding complications after dental extraction in patients taking oral anticoagulant therapy (OAT). Four hundred fifty-one patients being treated with warfarin who required dental extraction were compared with a control group of 449 non-anticoagulated subjects undergoing the same procedure. In the warfarin-treated group, the oral anticoagulant regimen was maintained unchanged, such that the patients had an International Normalised Ratio ranging between 1.8 and 4, and local haemostatic measures (i.e. fibrin sponges, silk sutures and gauzes saturated with tranexamic acid) were adopted. All the procedures were performed in an outpatient setting. Seven bleeding complications occurred in the OAT group and four in the control group; the difference in the number of bleeding events between the two groups was not statistically significant (OR=1.754; 95% CI 0.510 - 6.034; p=0.3727). No post-operative late bleeds requiring hospitalisation and/or blood transfusions were recorded, and the adjunctive local haemostatic measures were adequate to stop the bleeding. The results of our protocol applied in this large, multicenter study show that dental extractions can be performed easily and safely in anticoagulated outpatients without any modification of the ongoing anticoagulant therapy, thus minimising costs and reducing discomfort for patients.

  1. Reduced Anticoagulant Effect of Dabigatran in a Patient Receiving Concomitant Phenytoin.

    PubMed

    Wiggins, Barbara S; Northup, Amanda; Johnson, Dominic; Senfield, Jeffrey

    2016-02-01

    Dabigatran, a direct thrombin inhibitor, is an oral anticoagulant indicated for the prevention of stroke in patients with atrial fibrillation (AF) and for the treatment and prevention of deep vein thrombosis and pulmonary embolism. Dabigatran, as well as the other new anticoagulants-rivaroxaban, apixaban, and edoxaban-are substrates for P-glycoprotein (P-gp). Although the U.S. labeling for rivaroxaban and apixaban states to avoid concomitant use with phenytoin, a known P-gp inducer, the U.S. labeling for dabigatran and edoxaban are less clear. We describe the first case report, to our knowledge, documenting a drug interaction between phenytoin and dabigatran by using laboratory measurements of dabigatran serum concentrations. A 45-year-old African-American man was admitted to the inpatient cardiology service following defibrillations from his implantable cardioverter defibrillator. The patient was evaluated and received appropriate antitachycardia pacing for atrial tachyarrhythmias for an episode of ventricular tachycardia (VT), and antiarrhythmic therapy with sotalol was initiated to reduce both his AF and VT burden. On review of the patient's medications for potential interactions, it was discovered that the patient was taking both dabigatran and phenytoin. To determine the magnitude of this drug interaction prior to making a change in his anticoagulation regimen, a dabigatran serum concentration was measured. This concentration was undetectable, indicating that phenytoin had a significant influence on dabigatran's metabolism and that this patient was at high risk for stroke. Clinicians should be aware of this interaction between phenytoin and dabigatran as well as with all other new oral anticoagulants. In patients taking phenytoin who require an anticoagulant, only warfarin should be prescribed to minimize the risk of stroke. In addition, the prescribing information for dabigatran should be updated to include other medications that result in a significant

  2. Primary Care Atrial Fibrillation Service: outcomes from consultant-led anticoagulation assessment clinics in the primary care setting in the UK

    PubMed Central

    Das, Moloy; Panter, Lee; Wynn, Gareth J; Taylor, Rob M; Connor, Neil; Mills, Joseph D; Kirchhof, Paulus; Gupta, Dhiraj

    2015-01-01

    Objective Stroke-risk in atrial fibrillation (AF) can be significantly reduced by appropriate thromboembolic prophylaxis. However, National Institute for Health and Care Excellence estimates suggest that up to half of eligible patients with AF are not anticoagulated, with severe consequences for stroke prevention. We aimed to determine the outcome of an innovative Primary Care AF (PCAF) service on anticoagulation uptake in a cohort of high-risk patients with AF in the UK. Methods The PCAF service is a novel cooperative pathway providing specialist resources within general practitioner (GP) practices. It utilises a four-phase protocol to identify high-risk patients with AF (CHA2DS2-VASc ≥1) who are suboptimally anticoagulated, and delivers Consultant-led anticoagulation assessment within the local GP practice. We assessed rates of anticoagulation in high-risk patients before and after PCAF service intervention, and determined compliance with newly-initiated anticoagulation at follow-up. Results The PCAF service was delivered in 56 GP practices (population 386 624; AF prevalence 2.1%) between June 2012 and June 2014. 1579 high-risk patients with AF with suboptimal anticoagulation (either not taking any anticoagulation or taking warfarin but with a low time-in-therapeutic-range) were invited for review, with 86% attending. Of 1063 eligible patients on no anticoagulation, 1020 (96%) agreed to start warfarin (459 (43%)) or a non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulant (NOAC, 561 (53%)). The overall proportion of eligible patients receiving anticoagulation improved from 77% to 95% (p<0.0001). Additionally, 111/121 (92%) patients suboptimally treated with warfarin agreed to switch to a NOAC. Audit of eight practices after 195 (185–606) days showed that 90% of patients started on a new anticoagulant therapy had continued treatment. Based on data extrapolated from previous studies, around 30–35 strokes per year may have been prevented in these previously under

  3. Percutaneous tracheostomy in patients on anticoagulants

    PubMed Central

    Pasin, Laura; Frati, Elena; Cabrini, Luca; Landoni, Giovanni; Nardelli, Pasquale; Bove, Tiziana; Calabrò, Maria Grazia; Scandroglio, Anna Mara; Pappalardo, Federico; Zangrillo, Alberto

    2015-01-01

    Aims: To determine if percutaneous tracheostomy is safe in critically ill patients treated with anticoagulant therapies. Settings and Design: Single-center retrospective study including all the patients who underwent percutaneous dilatational tracheostomy (PDT) placement over a 1-year period in a 14-bed, cardiothoracic and vascular Intensive Care Unit (ICU). Materials and Methods: Patients demographics and characteristics, anticoagulant and antiplatelet therapies, coagulation profile, performed technique and use of bronchoscopic guidance were retrieved. Results: Thirty-six patients (2.7% of the overall ICU population) underwent PDT over the study period. Twenty-six (72%) patients were on anticoagulation therapy, 1 patient was on antiplatelet therapy and 2 further patients received prophylactic doses of low molecular weight heparin. Only 4 patients had normal coagulation profile and were not receiving anticoagulant or antiplatelet therapies. Overall, bleeding of any severity complicated 19% of PDT. No procedure-related deaths occurred. Conclusions: PDT was proved to be safe even in critically ill-patients treated with anticoagulant therapies. Larger prospective studies are needed to confirm our findings. PMID:26139737

  4. Antiplatelet agents and anticoagulants in patients with chronic kidney disease - from pathophysiology to clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Lutz, Jens; Jurk, Kerstin

    2016-12-05

    Progressive impairment of renal function can lead to uremia, which is associated with thus increasing the risk of bleeding as well as thrombosis. Furthermore, many patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) have an indication for an anticoagulation or antiplatelet therapy due to atrial fibrillation, coronary artery disease, thromboembolic disease, or peripheral artery disease. The treatment usually includes vitamin-K antagonists (VKAs) and/or platelet aggregation inhibitors. The direct oral anticoagulants (DOACs) inhibiting factor Xa or thrombin activity represent an alternative for heparins and VKAs. However, DOACs can further aggravate the bleeding risk in CKD patients. This is related to a combination of an accumulation of the substance due to the reduced renal clearance, an inhibition of thrombin-mediated platelet activation, and uremia associated factors such as impaired coagulation, platelet function, and platelet-vessel wall. Furthermore, platelet aggregation inhibitors can also influence the bleeding risk, particularly if they are administered in combination with anticoagulants in patients with advanced CKD. In this review we discuss the different mechanisms leading to the increased risk of bleeding and thrombosis as well as the different options and problems related to an antiplatelet or anticoagulation therapy in CKD patients.

  5. An update on the management of anticoagulated patients programmed for dental extractions and surgery.

    PubMed

    Jiménez, Yolanda; Poveda, Rafael; Gavaldá, Carmen; Margaix, María; Sarrión, Gracia

    2008-03-01

    Oral anticoagulants (OACs) antagonizing vitamin K - fundamentally sodium warfarin and acenocoumarol - are widely used for preventing arterial thromboembolism in patients with atrial fibrillation and/or heart valve prostheses, and for the treatment and prevention of deep venous thrombosis and pulmonary embolism. The handling of these drugs requires correct monitorization and dose adjustment to obtain the desired therapeutic effect while minimizing the adverse effects associated both with excessive anticoagulation (which leads to bleeding) and with insufficient antithrombotic action (which can produce thrombosis). This is particularly important when patients must be subjected to surgical procedures such as tooth extractions. In this context, a number of management recommendations are available. The present study offers an update on the recommendations for the management of anticoagulated patients programmed for tooth extractions. In recent years, most studies do not recommend reducing or interrupting anticoagulation, or replacing it with heparin, prior to tooth extraction - provided therapeutic international normalized ration (INR) levels are maintained, with emphasis on the application of local measures such as antifibrinolytic agents, for the control of hemostasia.

  6. Compression stockings to prevent post-thrombotic syndrome: a role for anticoagulation clinics?

    PubMed

    Wittkowsky, Ann K; Nutescu, Edith A; Devine, Emily Beth

    2008-12-01

    Anticoagulation clinics are increasingly used to manage oral anticoagulant therapy in patients with venous thromboembolic disease (VTE). Such clinics may be in a position to assume greater responsibility for other aspects of the long-term management of VTE, including prevention of post-thrombotic syndrome (PTS). Current guidelines suggest use of graduated elastic compression stockings with a pressure of 30-40 mm Hg at the ankle for 2 years following the diagnosis of deep vein thrombosis (DVT) to prevent PTS. A survey of anticoagulation clinic providers was conducted to determine to what extent patients with DVT are prescribed compression stockings and by whom, and the degree of compression and duration of therapy prescribed. Survey results show a very low rate of use of compression stockings in patients with DVT, and limited adherence to current recommendations for strength and duration of use. We believe that healthcare providers practicing in anticoagulation clinics should be encouraged to expand their scope of practice into a more comprehensive model of antithrombosis care, including prevention of PTS. By doing so, the extent of use of compression stockings might be increased, and adherence to current guidelines for strength and duration of compression might be improved.

  7. Anticoagulation beyond direct thrombin and factor Xa inhibitors: indications for targeting the intrinsic pathway?

    PubMed

    van Montfoort, Maurits L; Meijers, Joost C M

    2013-08-01

    Antithrombotic drugs like vitamin K antagonists and heparin have been the gold standard for the treatment and prevention of thromboembolic disease for many years. Unfortunately, there are several disadvantages of these antithrombotic drugs: they are accompanied by serious bleeding problems, it is necessary to monitor the therapeutic window, and there are various interactions with food and other drugs. This has led to the development of new oral anticoagulants, specifically inhibiting either thrombin or factor Xa. In terms of effectiveness, these drugs are comparable to the currently available anticoagulants; however, they are still associated with issues such as bleeding, reversal of the drug and complicated laboratory monitoring. Vitamin K antagonists, heparin, direct thrombin and factor Xa inhibitors have in common that they target key proteins of the haemostatic system. In an attempt to overcome these difficulties we investigated whether the intrinsic coagulation factors (VIII, IX, XI, XII, prekallikrein and high-molecular-weight kininogen) are superior targets for anticoagulation. We analysed epidemiological data concerning thrombosis and bleeding in patients deficient in one of the intrinsic pathway proteins. Furthermore, we discuss several thrombotic models in intrinsic coagulation factor-deficient animals. The combined results suggest that intrinsic coagulation factors could be suitable targets for anticoagulant drugs.

  8. Cost of vitamin K antagonist anticoagulant treatment in patients with metallic prosthetic valve in mitral position

    PubMed Central

    Ene, Gabriela; Garcia Raso, Aránzazu; Gonzalez-Dominguez Weber, Almudena; Hidalgo-Vega, Álvaro; Llamas, Pilar

    2016-01-01

    Background: The initiation of oral anticoagulation therapy after valve replacement surgery requires strict monitoring because these patients are at high risk for the development of thrombotic complications and present an increased risk of bleeding. Objectives: The aim of this study was to examine the total healthcare costs of oral anticoagulant treatment with vitamin K antagonists in patients with metallic prosthetic valves in the mitral position. Methods: Data from clinical records were used in the study including international normalized ratio results, number of medical visits, type of anticoagulant, use of rescue medication and hospital admissions from related complications. The drug cost was calculated based on the official Spanish Ministry of Health price list. Monitoring expenses were included in the cost of the medical supplies used in the procedures. Hospitalization costs were calculated using the diagnosis-related group price for each case. Results: We collected data from 151 patients receiving oral anticoagulation therapy with vitamin K antagonist who were diagnosed with mitral prosthesis (n = 90), mitro-aortic prosthesis (n = 57), and mitral and tricuspid prosthesis (n = 4). The total direct healthcare cost was €15302.59, with a mean total cost per patient per year of €1558.15 (±2774.58) consisting of 44.38 (±42.30) for drug cost, €71.41 (±21.43) for international normalized ratio monitoring, €429.52 (±126.87) for medical visits, €26.31 (±28.38) for rescue medication and €986.53 (±2735.68) for related complications. Conclusion: Most direct healthcare costs associated with the sampled patients arose from the specialist-care monitoring required for treatment. Good monitoring is inversely related to direct healthcare costs. PMID:27579168

  9. Pseudothrombocytopenia with multiple anticoagulant sample collection tubes

    PubMed Central

    Kovacs, Ferenc; Varga, Marina; Pataki, Zsolt; Rigo, Erzsebet

    2016-01-01

    The knowledge of pseudothrombocytopenia (PTCP) is important for the accuracy of a clinical assessment and for avoiding unnecessary treatment. An elderly patient was hospitalized with left lung pneumonia. Severe thrombocytopenia [platelet (PLT) number: 18 × 109/L] without any clinical bleeding was found in ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid blood collection tube. PLT measurement was repeated in various anticoagulant [sodium citrate, lithium heparin, disodium oxalate, hirudin, and magnesium sulfate (Mg-sulfate)] sample collection tubes and all of them showed thrombocytopenia except with Mg-sulfate. To the best of our knowledge, PTCP with five anticoagulant sample collection tubes has not been reported earlier. PMID:28180009

  10. Fatal pulmonary hemorrhage after taking anticoagulation medication.

    PubMed

    Hammar, Samuel P

    2015-01-01

    We describe a 64-year-old man with extensive diffuse acute lung hemorrhage, presumably as a result of anticoagulation therapy. We evaluated reports in the literature concerning acute exacerbation (acute lung injury of unknown cause) in UIP and other forms of fibrotic interstitial pneumonias. We also evaluated autopsy tissue in this case in order to determine the cause of death in this 64-year-old man, who was initially thought to have an asbestos-related disease. Based on the autopsy findings, this man died as a result of anticoagulation therapy; specifically, the use of Xarelto(®) (rivaroxaban).

  11. Fatal pulmonary hemorrhage after taking anticoagulation medication

    PubMed Central

    Hammar, Samuel P.

    2015-01-01

    We describe a 64-year-old man with extensive diffuse acute lung hemorrhage, presumably as a result of anticoagulation therapy. We evaluated reports in the literature concerning acute exacerbation (acute lung injury of unknown cause) in UIP and other forms of fibrotic interstitial pneumonias. We also evaluated autopsy tissue in this case in order to determine the cause of death in this 64-year-old man, who was initially thought to have an asbestos-related disease. Based on the autopsy findings, this man died as a result of anticoagulation therapy; specifically, the use of Xarelto® (rivaroxaban). PMID:26236607

  12. Possible unaware intoxication by anticoagulant rodenticide

    PubMed Central

    Dashti-Khavidaki, Simin; Ghaffari, Saba; Nassiri-Toossi, Mohsen; Amini, Mohsen; Edalatifard, Maryam

    2014-01-01

    Superwarfarin toxicity may be a serious problem. It needs high clinical suspicious in patients with bleeding diathesis without hematologic or liver diseases even in patients with apparent negative history of warfarin or other anticoagulant accessibility. Here we reported a patient with a negative history of any medical diseases or drug administration who was referred with generalized ecchymosis. Increased international normalized ratio and decreased vitamin K-dependent coagulation factors were detected in this patient. His hematologic and liver evaluations were normal. Clinical pharmacist emphasis in taking history revealed using anticoagulant rodenticide all over the farm the patient lived in that might result in unaware intoxication in this patient who suffered dementia. PMID:25535623

  13. Anticoagulant and Antiplatelet Prescribing Patterns for Patients with Atrial Fibrillation after Percutaneous Coronary Intervention

    PubMed Central

    Woods, Erin A; Ackman, Margaret L; Graham, Michelle M; Koshman, Sheri L; Boswell, Rosaleen M; Barry, Arden R

    2016-01-01

    Background: Current guidelines recommend triple antithrombotic therapy (TAT), defined as acetylsalicylic acid (ASA), clopidogrel, and warfarin, for patients with nonvalvular atrial fibrillation who have undergone percutaneous coronary intervention with stent implantation. The choice of anticoagulant/antiplatelet therapy in this population is ambiguous and complex, and prescribing patterns are not well documented. Objective: To characterize local prescribing patterns for anticoagulant/antiplatelet therapy after percutaneous coronary intervention in patients with nonvalvular atrial fibrillation. Methods: A chart review was conducted at a single quaternary cardiology centre. Patients with nonvalvular atrial fibrillation were identified via medical records, and those who underwent percutaneous coronary intervention were identified using a local clinical patient registry. Adult inpatients with nonvalvular atrial fibrillation and a CHADS2 score (based on congestive heart failure, hypertension, age ≥ 75 years, diabetes mellitus, prior stroke) of 1 or higher who underwent percutaneous coronary intervention from 2011 to 2013 were included. Patients undergoing cardiovascular surgery or transcatheter aortic valve replacement, those with mechanical devices requiring anticoagulation, and those with an allergy to any component of TAT were excluded. Results: Seventy patients were included. The median age was 75 years, and 52 (74%) were men. At discharge, 30 (43%) were receiving TAT and 27 (39%) were receiving dual antiplatelet therapy (clopidogrel and ASA). No patients received the combination of warfarin and clopidogrel. Among those who received TAT, 90% (19 of 21) who received a bare metal stent had a recommended duration of 1 month, and 75% (6 of 8) who received a drug-eluting stent had a recommended duration of 1 year. Direct-acting oral anticoagulants with 2 antiplatelet drugs were prescribed for 9% (6 of 70) of the patients, and 10% (7 of 70) received ticagrelor and ASA

  14. Use of Anticoagulants and Antiplatelet Agents in Stable Outpatients with Coronary Artery Disease and Atrial Fibrillation. International CLARIFY Registry

    PubMed Central

    Fauchier, Laurent; Greenlaw, Nicola; Ferrari, Roberto; Ford, Ian; Fox, Kim M.; Tardif, Jean-Claude; Tendera, Michal; Steg, Ph. Gabriel

    2015-01-01

    Background Few data are available regarding the use of antithrombotic strategies in coronary artery disease patients with atrial fibrillation (AF) in everyday practice. We sought to describe the prevalence of AF and its antithrombotic management in a contemporary population of patients with stable coronary artery disease. Methods and Findings CLARIFY is an international, prospective, longitudinal registry of outpatients with stable coronary artery disease, defined as prior (≥12 months) myocardial infarction, revascularization procedure, coronary stenosis >50%, or chest pain associated with evidence of myocardial ischemia. Overall, 33,428 patients were screened, of whom 32,954 had data available for analysis at baseline; of these 2,229 (6.7%) had a history of AF. Median (interquartile range) CHA2DS2-VASc score was 4 (3, 5). Oral anticoagulation alone was used in 25.7%, antiplatelet therapy alone in 52.8% (single 41.8%, dual 11.0%), and both in 21.5%. OAC use was independently associated with permanent AF (p<0.001), CHA2DS2-VASc score (p=0.006), pacemaker (p<0.001), stroke (p=0.04), absence of angina (p=0.004), decreased left ventricular ejection fraction (p<0.001), increased waist circumference (p=0.005), and longer history of coronary artery disease (p=0.008). History of percutaneous coronary intervention (p=0.004) and no/partial reimbursement for cardiovascular medication (p=0.01, p<0.001, respectively) were associated with reduced oral anticoagulant use. Conclusions In this contemporary cohort of patients with stable coronary artery disease and AF, most of whom are theoretical candidates for anticoagulation, oral anticoagulants were used in only 47.2%. Half of the patients received antiplatelet therapy alone and one-fifth received both antiplatelets and oral anticoagulants. Efforts are needed to improve adherence to guidelines in these patients. Trial Registration ISRCTN registry of clinical trials: ISRCTN43070564. PMID:25915904

  15. [New anticoagulants - direct thrombin inhibitors].

    PubMed

    Brand, B; Graf, L

    2012-11-01

    Direct thrombin-inhibitors inactivate not only free but also fibrin-bound thrombin. The group of parenteral direct thrombin-inhibitors includes the recombinant hirudins lepirudin and desirudin, the synthetic hirudin bivalirudin, and the small molecule argatroban. All these compounds do not interact with PF4/heparin-antibodies. Therefore, argatroban as well as bivalirudin are currently used to treat heparin-induced thrombocytopenia (HIT). The oral direct thrombin-inhibitor dabigatran etexilate is already licensed in many countries for the treatment of non-valvular atrial fibrillation. Dabigatran etexilate reveals a stable and predictable effect that allows a medication without dose adjustment or monitoring. The substance shows only few interactions with other drugs but strong inhibitors of p-glycoprotein can increase plasma levels of dabigatran substantially. After oral intake, the prodrug dabigatran etexilate is cleaved by esterase-mediated hydrolyses to the active compound dabigatran. Elimination of dabigatran is predominantly renal. Safety and efficacy of dabigatran etexilate were tested in an extensive clinical study program. Non-inferiority compared to current standard treatments was shown for prophylaxis of venous thromboembolic events after total knee and hip replacement, for stroke prevention in atrial fibrillation, and for treatment of acute venous thromboembolism. In daily practice, Dabigatran etexilate competes against the new direct factor Xa-inhibitors. In the absence of direct comparative clinical trials, it is not yet clear if one class of substances has distinct advantages over the other.

  16. Anticoagulant prophylaxis for placenta mediated pregnancy complications.

    PubMed

    Rodger, Marc A

    2011-02-01

    Thrombophilias are not yet established as a cause of the placenta-mediated pregnancy complications (pregnancy loss, pre-eclampsia, small for gestational age and placental abruption). A thrombophilia may be only one of many factors that lead to development of these complications. Our recent large systematic review of prospective cohort studies highlight that the association between thrombophilia and placenta mediated pregnancy complications is far from proven. The small step of previously describing an association in case control studies has led a large number of clinicians and opinion leaders to take the large leap of accepting this relationship as being causal and potentially treatable with anticoagulant interventions. Furthermore, while data in women with prior severe pre-eclpamsia, abruption and small for gestational age births without thrombophilia suggests some promise for anticoagulant prophylaxis to prevent complications in subsequent pregnancies in these women, in the absence of large well done and generalisable "no intervention" controlled studies adopting anticoagulant prophylaxis to prevent these complications is premature. The absence of strong evidence, coupled with the small potential for harm from anticoagulant prophylaxis suggests that these drugs should be considered experimental in thrombophilic and non-thrombophilic women with prior placenta mediated pregnancy complications.

  17. Anticoagulant activities of persicarin and isorhamnetin.

    PubMed

    Ku, Sae-Kwang; Kim, Tae Hoon; Bae, Jong-Sup

    2013-04-01

    Persicarin and isorhamnetin were isolated from Oenanthe javanica and their anticoagulant activities were examined by monitoring activated partial thromboplastin time (aPTT), prothrombin time (PT), and the activities of cell-based thrombin and activated factor X (FXa). In addition, the effects of persicarin and isorhamnetin on the expressions of plasminogen activator inhibitor type 1 (PAI-1) and tissue-type plasminogen activator (t-PA) were tested in tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) activated human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). The data obtained showed that persicarin and isorhamnetin both prolonged aPTT and PT significantly and inhibited the activities of thrombin and FXa. In addition, they both inhibited the generations of thrombin and FXa in HUVECs. In accordance with these anticoagulant activities, persicarin and isorhamnetin prolonged in vivo bleeding time and inhibited TNF-α induced PAI-1 production. Furthermore, PAI-1/t-PA ratio was significantly decreased by persicarin. Interestingly, the anticoagulant and profibrinolytic effects of persicarin were greater than those of isorhamnetin, which suggest that the sulfonate group of persicarin positively regulates its anticoagulatory function. Accordingly, our results suggest that persicarin and isorhamnetin possess antithrombotic activities and that they could provide bases for the development of new anticoagulant agents.

  18. VKORC1 and CYP2C9 polymorphisms related to adverse events in case-control cohort of anticoagulated patients

    PubMed Central

    Misasi, Silvia; Martini, Giuliana; Paoletti, Oriana; Calza, Stefano; Scovoli, Giovanni; Marengoni, Alessandra; Testa, Sophie; Caimi, Luigi; Marchina, Eleonora

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Vitamin K antagonists (VKAs) are highly effective but have a narrow therapeutic index and require routine monitoring of the INR. The primary aim of pharmacogenetics (PGx) is to optimize patient care, achieving drug treatments that are personalized according to the genetic profile of each patient. The best-characterized genes involved in VKA PGx involve pharmacokinetics (VKORC1) and pharmacodynamics (CYP2C9) of VKA metabolism. The role of these genes in clinical outcomes (bleeding and thrombosis) during oral anticoagulant (OAC) therapy is controversial. The aim of the present study was to evaluate any potential association between genotype VKORC1 and CYP2C9 and adverse events (hemorrhagic and/or thrombotic), during initiation and long-term VKA treatment, in Caucasian patients. Furthermore, we aimed to determine if the concomitant prescription of other selected drugs affected the association between genotype and adverse events. We performed a retrospective, matched case-control study to determine associations between multiple gene variants, drug intake, and any major adverse effects in anticoagulated patients, monitored in 2 Italian anticoagulation clinics. Our results show that anticoagulated patients have a high risk of adverse events if they are carriers of 1 or more genetic polymorphisms in the VKORC1 (rs9923231) and CYP2C9 (rs1799853 and rs1057910) genes. Information on CYP2C9 and VKORC1 variants may be useful to identify individualized oral anticoagulant treatment for each patient, improve management and quality of VKA anticoagulation control, and monitor drug surveillance in pharmacovigilance programs. PMID:28033245

  19. Potential role of new anticoagulants for prevention and treatment of venous thromboembolism in cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Gómez-Outes, Antonio; Suárez-Gea, M Luisa; Lecumberri, Ramón; Terleira-Fernández, Ana Isabel; Vargas-Castrillón, Emilio; Rocha, Eduardo

    2013-01-01

    Venous thromboembolism (VTE), encompassing deep vein thrombosis and pulmonary embolism, represents a major cause of morbidity and mortality in patients with cancer. Low molecular weight heparins are the preferred option for anticoagulation in cancer patients according to current clinical practice guidelines. Fondaparinux may also have a place in prevention of VTE in hospitalized cancer patients with additional risk factors and for initial treatment of VTE. Although low molecular weight heparins and fondaparinux are effective and safe, they require daily subcutaneous administration, which may be problematic for many patients, particularly if long-term treatment is needed. Studying anticoagulant therapy in oncology patients is challenging because this patient group has an increased risk of VTE and bleeding during anticoagulant therapy compared with the population without cancer. Risk factors for increased VTE and bleeding risk in these patients include concomitant treatments (surgery, chemotherapy, placement of central venous catheters, radiotherapy, hormonal therapy, angiogenesis inhibitors, antiplatelet drugs), supportive therapies (ie, steroids, blood transfusion, white blood cell growth factors, and erythropoiesis-stimulating agents), and tumor-related factors (local vessel damage and invasion, abnormalities in platelet function, and number). New anticoagulants in development for prophylaxis and treatment of VTE include parenteral compounds for once-daily administration (ie, semuloparin) or once-weekly dosing (ie, idraparinux and idrabiotaparinux), as well as orally active compounds (ie, dabigatran, rivaroxaban, apixaban, edoxaban, betrixaban). In the present review, we discuss the pharmacology of the new anticoagulants, the results of clinical trials testing these new compounds in VTE, with special emphasis on studies that included cancer patients, and their potential advantages and drawbacks compared with existing therapies. PMID:23674896

  20. Potential role of new anticoagulants for prevention and treatment of venous thromboembolism in cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Outes, Antonio; Suárez-Gea, M Luisa; Lecumberri, Ramón; Terleira-Fernández, Ana Isabel; Vargas-Castrillón, Emilio; Rocha, Eduardo

    2013-01-01

    Venous thromboembolism (VTE), encompassing deep vein thrombosis and pulmonary embolism, represents a major cause of morbidity and mortality in patients with cancer. Low molecular weight heparins are the preferred option for anticoagulation in cancer patients according to current clinical practice guidelines. Fondaparinux may also have a place in prevention of VTE in hospitalized cancer patients with additional risk factors and for initial treatment of VTE. Although low molecular weight heparins and fondaparinux are effective and safe, they require daily subcutaneous administration, which may be problematic for many patients, particularly if long-term treatment is needed. Studying anticoagulant therapy in oncology patients is challenging because this patient group has an increased risk of VTE and bleeding during anticoagulant therapy compared with the population without cancer. Risk factors for increased VTE and bleeding risk in these patients include concomitant treatments (surgery, chemotherapy, placement of central venous catheters, radiotherapy, hormonal therapy, angiogenesis inhibitors, antiplatelet drugs), supportive therapies (ie, steroids, blood transfusion, white blood cell growth factors, and erythropoiesis-stimulating agents), and tumor-related factors (local vessel damage and invasion, abnormalities in platelet function, and number). New anticoagulants in development for prophylaxis and treatment of VTE include parenteral compounds for once-daily administration (ie, semuloparin) or once-weekly dosing (ie, idraparinux and idrabiotaparinux), as well as orally active compounds (ie, dabigatran, rivaroxaban, apixaban, edoxaban, betrixaban). In the present review, we discuss the pharmacology of the new anticoagulants, the results of clinical trials testing these new compounds in VTE, with special emphasis on studies that included cancer patients, and their potential advantages and drawbacks compared with existing therapies.

  1. Spotlight on idarucizumab and its potential for the reversal of anticoagulant effects of dabigatran.

    PubMed

    Sié, Pierre

    2016-01-01

    Idarucizumab is the first targeted antidote of dabigatran, a direct oral anticoagulant used for prevention and treatment of venous thromboembolism and prevention of stroke in atrial fibrillation. Idarucizumab is a humanized fragment of a monoclonal antibody, which binds dabigatran reversibly with high affinity and, when administered intravenously, immediately neutralizes its anticoagulant effect. It is rapidly cleared by the kidney with captured dabigatran. In Phase I and II trials, no significant adverse events have been reported. Specifically, idarucizumab has no anticoagulant or procoagulant effect by itself. Idarucizumab is currently being evaluated in an ongoing Phase III trial, in patients treated with dabigatran presenting with severe active bleeding or requiring emergency surgery or an invasive procedure and are at high risk of bleeding. The results of the interim analysis confirm the ability of idarucizumab to neutralize dabigatran instantaneously, without rebound effect, except in rare patients with very high baseline levels of anticoagulant. Although not definitely proving clinical efficacy, due to the noncontrolled design of the trial and the heterogeneity of patient conditions, these promising results on an intermediate criterion with strong rationale have led to the approval of idarucizumab for these indications. However, several questions are unresolved. First, activity measurement of dabigatran in blood, useless in current practice, could be useful to guide the treatment and avoid over- or underutilization of the antidote; but so far, it has not been largely available in real time. Second, the translation of anticoagulant neutralization to an effect on mortality and better outcome is highly dependent on the global management of these patients, especially rapid diagnosis, supportive care, and easy access to antidote administration. Although idarucizumab represents a remarkable achievement in drug design and development, whether it will be an

  2. Comparative Assessment of the Anticoagulant Activity of Rivaroxaban and Dabigatran in Patients With Nonvalvular Atrial Fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    Tsantes, Argirios E.; Kyriakou, Elias; Ikonomidis, Ignatios; Katogiannis, Konstantinos; Papadakis, Ioannis; Douramani, Panagiota; Kopterides, Petros; Kapsimali, Violetta; Lekakis, John; Tsangaris, Iraklis; Bonovas, Stefanos

    2016-01-01

    Abstract There is a shortage of data in everyday clinical practice about the anticoagulant effects caused by the new oral anticoagulants (NOAs). Our aim was to estimate the intensity of anticoagulant activity induced by rivaroxaban 20 mg qd and dabigatran 110 mg bid among patients with nonvalvular atrial fibrillation (NV-AF). We studied 20 patients with NV-AF treated with dabigatran, and 20 patients treated with rivaroxaban. We performed conventional coagulation tests, thrombin generation (TG) test, thromboelastometry (ROTEM), and epinephrine-induced light transmission aggregometry (LTA) in all 40 patients and 20 controls. Hemoclot Thrombin Inhibitors (HTI) and Factor Xa Direct Inhibitor (DiXaI) assay were used to measure dabigatran and rivaroxaban plasma levels, respectively. Measurements of all assays estimating anticoagulant activity across the 2 patient groups were similar, except for aPTT. Patients on dabigatran exhibited statistically significantly prolonged aPTT values (P < 0.001). In LTA, patients on dabigatran also showed decreased aggregation compared to those on rivaroxaban (P = 0.045). Regarding the TG test, there was no association between endogenous thrombin potential (ETP) and rivaroxaban plasma levels (P = 0.33) as opposed to dabigatran levels (P < 0.001), but significant correlations were observed between rivaroxaban plasma concentrations and kinetic parameters of TG assay (Tlag, P = 0.045; Tmax, P = 0.016; and Cmax, P = 0.003). Based on ROTEM and TG assays, the anticoagulant effects induced by the 2 drugs given in the specific dose regimens in real-world patients were comparable. Only platelet aggregation was found to be more affected by dabigatran as compared to rivaroxaban. PMID:27057830

  3. Spotlight on idarucizumab and its potential for the reversal of anticoagulant effects of dabigatran

    PubMed Central

    Sié, Pierre

    2016-01-01

    Idarucizumab is the first targeted antidote of dabigatran, a direct oral anticoagulant used for prevention and treatment of venous thromboembolism and prevention of stroke in atrial fibrillation. Idarucizumab is a humanized fragment of a monoclonal antibody, which binds dabigatran reversibly with high affinity and, when administered intravenously, immediately neutralizes its anticoagulant effect. It is rapidly cleared by the kidney with captured dabigatran. In Phase I and II trials, no significant adverse events have been reported. Specifically, idarucizumab has no anticoagulant or procoagulant effect by itself. Idarucizumab is currently being evaluated in an ongoing Phase III trial, in patients treated with dabigatran presenting with severe active bleeding or requiring emergency surgery or an invasive procedure and are at high risk of bleeding. The results of the interim analysis confirm the ability of idarucizumab to neutralize dabigatran instantaneously, without rebound effect, except in rare patients with very high baseline levels of anticoagulant. Although not definitely proving clinical efficacy, due to the noncontrolled design of the trial and the heterogeneity of patient conditions, these promising results on an intermediate criterion with strong rationale have led to the approval of idarucizumab for these indications. However, several questions are unresolved. First, activity measurement of dabigatran in blood, useless in current practice, could be useful to guide the treatment and avoid over- or underutilization of the antidote; but so far, it has not been largely available in real time. Second, the translation of anticoagulant neutralization to an effect on mortality and better outcome is highly dependent on the global management of these patients, especially rapid diagnosis, supportive care, and easy access to antidote administration. Although idarucizumab represents a remarkable achievement in drug design and development, whether it will be an

  4. Is percutaneous closure of the left atrial appendage comparable to anticoagulants for atrial fibrillation?

    PubMed

    Uslar, Thomas; Anabalón, Jaime

    2015-08-17

    For most atrial fibrillation patients oral anticoagulation constitutes the standard treatment to prevent stroke. However, they carry a risk of bleeding, which is why alternative treatments have been put into practice, such as percutaneous closure of the left atrial appendage. It is not clear whether this is as effective as the conventional treatment with anticoagulants. Searching in Epistemonikos database, which is maintained by screening 30 databases, we identified three systematic reviews including only one pertinent randomized controlled trial. We combined the evidence and generated a summary of findings following the GRADE approach. We concluded that percutaneous left atrial appendage occlusion may decrease stroke and mortality, but the certainty of the evidence is low. The effect on other outcomes is not clear because the certainty of the evidence is very low.

  5. A New Generation of Antiplatelet, and Anticoagulant Medication and the Implications for the Dental Surgeon.

    PubMed

    Johnston, Steven

    2015-11-01

    The management of dental patients taking either antiplatelet medication, anticoagulant medication or both has been well established in the previous literature. Recently, new generations of drugs have emerged which are becoming increasingly common, including direct thrombin inhibitors, factor X inhibitors and a new class of oral thienopyridines. The implications of these drugs for the dental surgeon are not yet fully known. Awareness remains low and there is very little information available within the literature on safe use during surgery. This review paper aims to provide some guidance for dental practitioners performing invasive procedures. CPD/CLINICAL RELEVANCE: A new generation of anticoagulant and antiplatelet drugs have serious implications for patients undergoing surgery and their use is increasing.

  6. Gastrointestinal endoscopy in patients on anticoagulant therapy and antiplatelet agents

    PubMed Central

    Zullo, Angelo; Hassan, Cesare; Radaelli, Franco

    2017-01-01

    Periprocedural management of antithrombotics for gastrointestinal endoscopy is a common clinical issue, given the widespread use of these drugs for primary and secondary cardiovascular prevention. For diagnostic procedures, with or without biopsy, no adjustments in antithrombotics are usually needed. For operative procedures, balancing the risk of periprocedural hemorrhage with the continuation of antithrombotics against the chance of recurrent thromboembolic events with their discontinuation may be challenging. Oral anticoagulants need to be temporarily withheld, and consideration must be given to whether a periendoscopic “bridge” therapy, typically a low-molecular-weight heparin, should be used in order to minimize the risk of thromboembolic events. Although some emerging evidence has shown that patients receiving heparin bridging appear to be at increased risk of overall and major bleeding and at similar risk of thromboembolic events compared to controls, bridging therapy is still recommended for patients on vitamin K antagonists who are at high thrombotic risk. Conversely, bridging therapy is usually not needed for patients taking new oral agents, which are characterized by shorter half-lives, and a rapid offset and onset of action. Management of antiplatelet therapy requires special care in patients on secondary prevention, especially those with coronary stents. This review is intended to summarize the recommendations of updated International Guidelines designed to help the decision-making process in such an intricate field. PMID:28042233

  7. The Global Anticoagulant Registry in the FIELD-Atrial Fibrillation (GARFIELD-AF) : Exploring the changes in anticoagulant practice in patients with non-valvular atrial fibrillation in the Netherlands.

    PubMed

    Ten Cate, V; Ten Cate, H; Verheugt, F W A

    2016-10-01

    There are over 385,000 cases of atrial fibrillation (AF) in the Netherlands, with over 45,000 new cases each year. Among other things, AF patients are at high risk of stroke. Patients are often prescribed oral anticoagulation, such as vitamin K antagonists (VKA), to mitigate these risks. A recently introduced class of oral anticoagulants, non-vitamin K antagonists (NOAC), is quickly gaining currency in global clinical practice. This study provides insight into the changes these new drugs will bring about in Dutch clinical practice.GARFIELD-AF is a large-scale observational AF patient registry initiated in 2009 to track the evolution of global anticoagulation practice, and to study the impact of NOAC therapy in AF in particular. The registry includes a wide array of baseline characteristics and has a particular focus on: (1) bleeding and thromboembolic events; (2) international normalised ratio fluctuations; and (3) therapy compliance and persistence patterns. The results in this paper provide the baseline characteristics of the first cohorts of Dutch participants in this registry and discuss some of the consequences of the changes in anticoagulation practice.Although VKA therapy remains overwhelmingly favoured by Dutch practitioners, NOACs are clearly gaining in popularity. Between 2011 and 2014, NOACs constituted an increasingly large proportion of prescriptions for oral anticoagulants.The insights provided by the GARFIELD-AF registry can be used by healthcare systems to inform better budgetary strategies, by practitioners to better tailor treatment pathways to patients, and finally to promote awareness of the various available treatment options and their associated risks and benefits for patients.

  8. New anticoagulants for the prevention of stroke in atrial fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Höchtl, Thomas; Huber, Kurt

    2012-02-01

    Oral anticoagulation in atrial fibrillation is obligatory to lower the risk of spontaneous cerebrovascular and systemic thromboembolism. For this purpose, vitamin K antagonists (coumarins) have been recommended as the most effective drugs for a long time. However, problems with the practical use of these agents, e.g. the need for frequent and regular coagulation controls, the inter-individual differences in maintaining a stable therapeutic range, as well as drug or food interactions, have led to the search and investigation of alternative compounds characterized by a more simple use (e.g. without regular controls of therapeutic levels), high efficacy, as well as low risk of bleeding. The direct thrombin inhibitor dabigatran and the direct factor Xa inhibitors rivaroxaban and apixaban have recently been investigated to prove whether they fulfill the high expectancy of an ideal anticoagulant with respect to a more favorable efficacy/safety profile and without the need for coagulation controls, thereby improving quality of life. Dabigatran (RE-LY) achieved an impressive reduction in stroke and non-central nervous system (non-CNS) embolism (110 mg: 1.5%/year; 150 mg: 1.1%/year) in contrast to warfarin (1.7%/year; P = 0.34 and P < 0.001) with a favorable action on bleeding hazards. The results of rivaroxaban which were obtained in the ROCKET AF study (on treatment analysis: stroke and non-CNS embolism: 1.7%/year vs. 2.15%/year with warfarin; P = 0.015; primary safety endpoint major and minor bleeding: 14.91 vs. 14.52%; P = 0.442) point in the same direction. And finally, compared to aspirin, apixaban reduced the combined primary efficacy endpoint by 52% with comparable rates of bleeding (AVERROES). This review gives a summary of the current knowledge about these agents and their potential future importance.

  9. Dental management of patients receiving anticoagulant and/or antiplatelet treatment

    PubMed Central

    Chaveli-López, Begonya; Gavaldá-Esteve, Carmen

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Adequate hemostasis is crucial for the success of invasive dental treatment, since bleeding problems can give rise to complications associated with important morbidity-mortality. The dental treatment of patients who tend to an increased risk of bleeding due to the use of anticoagulant and/or antiplatelet drugs raises a challenge in the daily practice of dental professionals. Adequate knowledge of the mechanisms underlying hemostasis, and the optimized management of such patients, are therefore very important issues. Objectives: A study is made of the anticoagulant / antiplatelet drugs currently available on the market, with evaluation of the risks and benefits of suspending such drugs prior to invasive dental treatment. In addition, a review is made of the current management protocols used in these patients. Material and Methods: A literature search was made in the PubMed, Cochrane Library and Scopus databases, covering all studies published in the last 5 years in English and Spanish. Studies conducted in humans and with scientific evidence levels 1 and 2 (metaanalyses, systematic reviews, randomized phase 1 and 2 trials, cohort studies and case-control studies) were considered. The keywords used for the search were: tooth extraction, oral surgery, hemostasis, platelet aggregation inhibitors, antiplatelet drugs, anticoagulants, warfarin, acenocoumarol. Results and Conclusions: Many management protocols have been developed, though in all cases a full clinical history is required, together with complementary hemostatic tests to minimize any risks derived from dental treatment. Many authors consider that patient medication indicated for the treatment of background disease should not be altered or suspended unless so indicated by the prescribing physician. Local hemostatic measures have been shown to suffice for controlling possible bleeding problems resulting from dental treatment. Key words:Tooth extraction, oral surgery, hemostasis, platelet

  10. Patient preferences and willingness to pay for different options of anticoagulant therapy.

    PubMed

    Moia, Marco; Mantovani, Lorenzo Giovanni; Carpenedo, Monica; Scalone, Luciana; Monzini, Mara Silvia; Cesana, Giancarlo; Mannucci, Pier Mannuccio

    2013-04-01

    New anticoagulant drugs alternative to vitamin K antagonists are currently under clinical evaluation. Patient's preferences should be considered in the development of new therapeutic strategies. Our study aim was to elicit patient preferences, and estimate their willingness to pay for the different treatment options. A Discrete Choice Experiment was administered to patients consecutively attending an anticoagulation clinic, either on stable oral anticoagulant therapy, or during their first visit at the time of starting therapy. Six treatment characteristics were analysed: route and number of medication administrations, frequency of monitoring, risk of some minor bleeding, the amount of attention required for drug/food interactions, requirement for dose adjustment, and out-of-pocket treatment cost. Relationships between patient's preferences and their characteristics were analysed. 255 patients participated (55 % men, with a mean age 64 years; 35.7 % on stable therapy). A statistically significant importance was attributed to all but two characteristics (the amount of attention required for interaction with other drugs/food and for dose adjustment.) Monthly patient willingness to pay was 79 for tablets versus injections; 41 for once-daily versus twice-daily tablets, 25 for drugs without risk of minor bleeding events and 20 for once-monthly versus twice-monthly monitoring. Patients on stable therapy considered more important the amount of attention required for drug/food interactions than did the starters. Younger or working patients considered the reduction of monitoring frequency more important than did the older or not working patients (retired, housewives). This study elicited preferences from patients on oral anticoagulant therapy with a simple and well established method, which allows to obtain information warranted for planning optimal healthcare.

  11. Correlation between International Normalized Ratio values and sufficiency of two different local hemostatic measures in anticoagulated patients

    PubMed Central

    Amer, Mohamed Zaghlool; Mourad, Samah I.; Salem, Ahmed S.; Abdelfadil, Ehab

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: The management of patients receiving oral anticoagulant therapy (OAT) undergoing minor oral surgeries is controversial. This study was designed to evaluate the correlation between International Normalized Ratio (INR) values and the sufficiency of two different local hemostatic measures in controlling postextraction bleeding in anticoagulated patients. Materials and Methods: One hundred and sixty patients receiving Warfarin OAT were included in this study. Patients were selected so that 80 patients have INR values of ≤2, whereas the remaining patients have the INR values ranging from 2 to 3. Forty patients were then randomly selected from each category to form two equal groups. Forty-five patients who had never been on OAT were selected as a negative control group (group 1). Failure to achieve hemostasis using a pressure pack was managed using either tranexamic acid (group 2) or Ankaferd Blood Stopper (ABS) (group 3). Results: The INR values of patients included in group 2 and 3 ranged from 1.5 to 3, with a mean of 2.2. No significant difference was recorded between the use of either tranexamic acid or ABS in achieving hemostasis in anticoagulated patients with INR values ranging between 2 and 3 (P = 0.93). Conclusion: Based on our findings, ABS is a hemostatic agent of good efficacy. The effect of ABS in controlling post-extraction bleeding in anticoagulated patients with INR values ≤3 is comparable to tranexamic acid with no evidence to support the superiority of tranexamic acid over ABS. PMID:25512727

  12. [Analysis of the Cochrane review: Anticoagulation versus placebo for heart failure in sinus rhythm. Cochrane Database Syst Rev. 2014;3:CD003336].

    PubMed

    Caldeira, Daniel; Vaz-Carneiro, António; Costa, João

    2014-01-01

    Thrombotic and embolic events contribute to the morbidity and mortality associated to Chronic Heart Failure (HF). Differently from patients with atrial fibrillation (AF) and HF, in which the benefit of anticoagulation is well documented, the use of these drugs in those with HF in sinus rhythm (without AF history) is controversial. In this systematic review from the Cochrane Collaboration, the authors evaluated the benefits and risks associated with oral anticoagulation (versus placebo) in this population. Only 2 randomized controlled trials were published (one with open-label design) enrolling a total of 324 patients. The results of the meta-analysis based on the best available evidence do not support the systematic use of oral anticoagulants in patients with HF and sinus rhythm for preventing death (overall or cardiovascular) or non-fatal cardiovascular events. Furthermore the major bleeding risk was significantly increased.

  13. Potential blood clotting factors and anticoagulants.

    PubMed

    Jin, Ng Zhang; Gopinath, Subash C B

    2016-12-01

    Hemostasis initiates a wound healing process and stops bleeding of blood within a damaged tissue, an important process in human and animal systems. However, this process needs to revert temporarily during surgery and analyze the clotting mechanism. In the past decade, heparin has been used widely as an anticoagulant in surgery to prevent unwanted blood clotting as it is not expensive, not difficult to control, lack of suitable replacement as well as less harmful to the human. However, heparin has several disadvantages, which include thrombocytopenia and non-specific plasma binding. Moreover, using heparin it may lead dysfunction and platelet aggregation. In this overview, potential clotting factors and anticoagulants are reviewed and special focus was given to get more insights.

  14. Citrate anticoagulation: Are blood donors donating bone?

    PubMed

    Bialkowski, Walter; Bruhn, Roberta; Edgren, Gustaf; Papanek, Paula

    2016-10-01

    An estimated 2.4 million volunteer apheresis blood donation procedures were performed in the United States in 2010, and increases in the proportion of transfused blood products derived from apheresis blood collections have been consistently reported. Anticoagulation is required during apheresis and is achieved with citrate. Donor exposure to citrate causes an acute physiological response to maintain serum mineral homeostasis. Some data are available on the sequelae of this acute response in the days and weeks following exposure, raising questions about bone mineral density in regular apheresis donors. New research is emerging that addresses the potential long-term health outcomes of repeated citrate exposure. This article reviews the acute physiological response to citrate anticoagulation in volunteer blood donors, presents contrasting perspectives on the potential effects of citrate exposure on bone density, and identifies key knowledge gaps in our understanding of long-term health outcomes in apheresis donors. J. Clin. Apheresis 31:459-463, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Anticoagulation manager: development of a clinical decision support mobile application for management of anticoagulants.

    PubMed

    Chih-Wen Cheng; Hang Wu; Thompson, Pamela J; Taylor, Julie R; Zehnbauer, Barbara A; Wilson, Karlyn K; Wang, May D

    2016-08-01

    Patients with certain clotting disorders or conditions have a greater risk of developing arterial or venous clots and downstream embolisms, strokes, and arterial insufficiency. These patients need prescription anticoagulant drugs to reduce the possibility of clot formation. However, historically, the clinical decision making workflow in determining the correct type and dosage of anticoagulant(s) is part science and part art. To address this problem, we developed Anticoagulation Manager, an intelligent clinical decision workflow management system on iOS-based mobile devices to help clinicians effectively choose the most appropriate and helpful follow-up clotting tests for patients with a common clotting profile. The app can provide physicians guidance to prescribe the most appropriate medication for patients in need of anticoagulant drugs. This intelligent app was jointly designed and developed by medical professionals in CDC and engineers at Georgia Tech, and will be evaluated by physicians for ease-of-use, robustness, flexibility, and scalability. Eventually, it will be deployed and shared in both physician community and developer community.

  16. Anticoagulant repertoire of the hookworm Ancylostoma caninum.

    PubMed

    Stassens, P; Bergum, P W; Gansemans, Y; Jespers, L; Laroche, Y; Huang, S; Maki, S; Messens, J; Lauwereys, M; Cappello, M; Hotez, P J; Lasters, I; Vlasuk, G P

    1996-03-05

    Hookworms are hematophagous nematodes that infect a wide range of mammalian hosts, including humans. There has been speculation for nearly a century as to the identity of the anticoagulant substances) used by these organisms to subvert host hemostasis. Using molecular cloning, we describe a family of potent small protein (75-84 amino acids) anticoagulants from the hookworm Ancylostoma caninum termed AcAP (A. caninum anticoagulant protein). Two recombinant AcAP members (AcAP5 and AcAP6) directly inhibited the catalytic activity of blood coagulation factor Xa (fXa), while a third form (AcAPc2) predominantly inhibited the catalytic activity of a complex composed of blood coagulation factor VIIa and tissue factor (fVIIa/TF). The inhibition of fVIIa/TF was by a unique mechanism that required the initial formation of a binary complex of the inhibitor with fXa at a site on the enzyme that is distinct from the catalytic center (exo-site). The sequence of AcAPc2 as well as the utilization of an exo-site on fXa distinguishes this inhibitor from the mammalian anticoagulant TFPI (tissue factor pathway inhibitor), which is functionally equivalent with respect to fXa-dependent inhibition of fIIa/TF. The relative sequence positions of the reactive site residues determined for AcAP5 with the homologous regions in AcAP6 and AcAPc2 as well as the pattern of 10 cysteine residues present in each of the inhibitors suggest that the AcAPs are distantly related to the family of small protein serine protease inhibitors found in the nonhematophagous nematode Ascaris lumbricoides var. suum.

  17. Strategies to Overcome Heparins’ Low Oral Bioavailability

    PubMed Central

    Neves, Ana Rita; Correia-da-Silva, Marta; Sousa, Emília; Pinto, Madalena

    2016-01-01

    Even after a century, heparin is still the most effective anticoagulant available with few side effects. The poor oral absorption of heparins triggered the search for strategies to achieve oral bioavailability since this route has evident advantages over parenteral administration. Several approaches emerged, such as conjugation of heparins with bile acids and lipids, formulation with penetration enhancers, and encapsulation of heparins in micro and nanoparticles. Some of these strategies appear to have potential as good delivery systems to overcome heparin’s low oral bioavailability. Nevertheless, none have reached the market yet. Overall, this review aims to provide insights regarding the oral bioavailability of heparin. PMID:27367704

  18. Antiplatelet and Anticoagulant Drugs in Interventional Radiology

    SciTech Connect

    Altenburg, Alexander; Haage, Patrick

    2012-02-15

    In treating peripheral arterial disease, a profound knowledge of antiplatelet and anticoagulative drug therapy is helpful to assure a positive clinical outcome and to anticipate and avoid complications. Side effects and drug interactions may have fatal consequences for the patient, so interventionalists should be aware of these risks and able to control them. Aspirin remains the first-line agent for antiplatelet monotherapy, with clopidogrel added where dual antiplatelet therapy is required. In case of suspected antiplatelet drug resistance, the dose of clopidogrel may be doubled; prasugrel or ticagrelor may be used alternatively. Glycoprotein IIb/IIIa inhibitors (abciximab or eptifibatide) may help in cases of hypercoagulability or acute embolic complications. Desmopressin, tranexamic acid, or platelet infusions may be used to decrease antiplatelet drug effects in case of bleeding. Intraprocedurally, anticoagulant therapy treatment with unfractionated heparin (UFH) still is the means of choice, although low molecular-weight heparins (LMWH) are suitable, particularly for postinterventional treatment. Adaption of LMWH dose is often required in renal insufficiency, which is frequently found in elderly patients. Protamine sulphate is an effective antagonist for UFH; however, this effect is less for LMWH. Newer antithrombotic drugs, such as direct thrombin inhibitors or factor X inhibitors, have limited importance in periprocedural treatment, with the exception of treating patients with heparin-induced thrombocytopenia (HIT). Nevertheless, knowing pharmacologic properties of the newer drugs facilitate correct bridging of patients treated with such drugs. This article provides a comprehensive overview of antiplatelet and anticoagulant drugs for use before, during, and after interventional radiological procedures.

  19. Antiplatelet and anticoagulant therapy for atherothrombotic disease: the role of current and emerging agents.

    PubMed

    Angiolillo, Dominick J; Ferreiro, José Luis

    2013-08-01

    Coronary atherothrombotic disease, including chronic stable angina and acute coronary syndromes (ACS), is associated with significant global burden. The acute clinical manifestations of atherothrombotic disease are mediated by occlusive arterial thrombi that impair tissue perfusion and are composed of a core of aggregated platelets, generated by platelet activation, and a superimposed fibrin mesh produced by the coagulation cascade. Long-term antithrombotic therapies, namely oral antiplatelet agents and anticoagulants, have demonstrated variable clinical effects. Aspirin and P2Y12 adenosine diphosphate (ADP) receptor antagonists have been shown to reduce the risk for thrombosis and ischaemic events by blocking the thromboxane (Tx) A2 and platelet P2Y12 activation pathways, respectively, whereas the benefits of oral anticoagulants have not been consistently documented. However, even in the presence of aspirin and a P2Y12 receptor antagonist, the risk for ischaemic events remains substantial because platelet activation continues via pathways independent of TxA2 and ADP, most notably the protease-activated receptor (PAR)-1 platelet activation pathway stimulated by thrombin. Emerging antithrombotic therapies include those targeting the platelet, such as the new P2Y12 antagonists and a novel class of oral PAR-1 antagonists, and those inhibiting the coagulation cascade, such as the new direct factor Xa antagonists, the direct thrombin inhibitors, and a novel class of factor IX inhibitors. The role of emerging antiplatelet agents and anticoagulants in the long-term management of patients with atherothrombotic disease will be determined by the balance of efficacy and safety in large ongoing clinical trials.

  20. The use status of anticoagulation drugs for inpatients with nonvalvular atrial fibrillation in Southwest China

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Huan Jie; Ouyang, Shu Kun; Zhao, Yue; Lu, Kai; Luo, Su Xin; Xiao, Hua

    2017-01-01

    Background Oral anticoagulants (OACs) are effective for the prophylaxis of stroke in patients with atrial fibrillation (AF). This cross-sectional study aimed to investigate the status of anticoagulation treatment for hospitalized AF patients in Southwest China. Methods A total of 4760 hospitalized patients with AF were enrolled from 21 hospitals in Chongqing city from January 1 to December 31, 2013. Results Among the enrolled patients, 3785 were diagnosed with nonvalvular AF. These patients had a mean age of 74.4±10.1 years. The mean CHADS2 score of all subjects was 2.60±1.34, and 80.7% of the patients had CHADS2 ≥2. The use rate of OACs was only 11.5% for patients with a high risk for stroke (CHADS2 ≥2) and was much lower in patients from the second-level hospitals than in patients from the third-level hospitals (5.8% vs. 16.9%, P<0.001). The leading reason for the underuse of OACs in high-risk patients was physician’s nonfeasance. Conclusion This study demonstrated that the underuse of anticoagulation therapy in hospitalized patients with nonvalvular AF was particularly serious in Southwest China, especially in the second-level hospitals. Urgent and effective measures are desperately needed to improve this alarming situation in China. PMID:28293117

  1. Optimal duration of anticoagulation. Provoked versus unprovoked VTE and role of adjunctive thrombophilia and imaging tests.

    PubMed

    Prandoni, Paolo; Barbar, Sofia; Milan, Marta; Campello, Elena; Spiezia, Luca; Piovella, Chiara; Pesavento, Raffaele

    2015-06-01

    Once anticoagulation is stopped, the risk of recurrent venous thromboembolism (VTE) over years after a first episode is consistently around 30%. This risk is higher in patients with unprovoked than in those with (transient) provoked VTE, and among the latter in patients with medical than in those with surgical risk factors. Baseline parameters that have been found to be related to the risk of recurrent VTE are the proximal location of deep-vein thrombosis, obesity, old age, male sex and non-0 blood group, whereas the role of inherited thrombophilia is controversial. The persistence of residual vein thrombosis at ultrasound assessment has consistently been shown to increase the risk, as do persistently high values of D-dimer and the early development of the post-thrombotic syndrome. Although the latest international guidelines suggest indefinite anticoagulation for most patients with the first episode of unprovoked VTE, strategies that incorporate the assessment of residual vein thrombosis and D-dimer have the potential to identify subjects in whom anticoagulation can be safely discontinued. Moreover, new opportunities are offered by a few emerging anti-Xa and anti-IIa oral compounds, which are likely to induce fewer haemorrhagic complications than vitamin K antagonists while preserving the same effectiveness; and by low-dose aspirin, which has the potential to prevent the occurrence of both venous and arterial thrombotic events.

  2. Anticoagulant Treatment of Deep Vein Thrombosis and Pulmonary Embolism: The Present State of the Art.

    PubMed

    Thaler, Johannes; Pabinger, Ingrid; Ay, Cihan

    2015-01-01

    Venous thromboembolism (VTE), a disease entity comprising deep vein thrombosis (DVT) and pulmonary embolism (PE), is a frequent and potentially life-threatening event. To date different agents are available for the effective treatment of acute VTE and the prevention of recurrence. For several years, the standard of care was the subcutaneous application of a low molecular weight heparin (LMWH) or fondaparinux, followed by a vitamin K antagonist (VKA). The so-called direct oral anticoagulants (DOAC) were introduced rather recently in clinical practice for the treatment of VTE. DOAC seem to have a favorable risk-benefit profile compared to VKA. Moreover, DOAC significantly simplify VTE treatment because they are administered in fixed doses and no routine monitoring is needed. Patients with objectively diagnosed DVT or PE should receive therapeutic anticoagulation for a minimum of 3 months. Whether a patient ought to receive extended treatment needs to be evaluated on an individual basis, depending mainly on risk factors determined by characteristics of the thrombotic event and patient-related factors. In specific patient groups (e.g., pregnant women, cancer patients, and elderly patients), treatment of VTE is more challenging than that in the general population and additional issues need to be considered in those patients. The aim of this review is to give an overview of the currently available treatment modalities of acute VTE and secondary prophylaxis. In particular, specific aspects regarding the initiation of VTE treatment, duration of anticoagulation, and specific patient groups will be discussed.

  3. Anticoagulant treatment and survival in cancer patients. The evidence from clinical studies.

    PubMed

    Lecumberri, Ramón; Páramo, José A; Rocha, Eduardo

    2005-09-01

    The association between cancer and an increased incidence of venous thromboembolism (Trousseau syndrome) is well characterized and recent studies have shown that the hemostatic system plays a key role at different stages in the process of tumorigenesis. Anticoagulant drugs therefore appear to be an attractive strategy in cancer therapy, with an effect that would surpass the benefit of preventing thrombosis. This hypothesis was initially supported by the post-hoc analysis of clinical trials not primarily designed to evaluate the effect of anticoagulants, mainly low molecular weight heparins (LMWH), on cancer survival. Other studies regarding the addition of unfractionated heparin or oral anticoagulants to standard cancer treatment offered controversial results. However, recent investigations among cancer patients without deep venous thrombosis, with cancer-related mortality as the primary end point, suggest that at least in some patients LMWH may exert an antineoplastic effect in vivo and alter the natural history of malignant disease by increasing the response rates and, therefore, improving survival. Additional research on this field is needed to clarify the biological mechanisms involved and to answer yet unsolved questions such as the types of tumor and stages of disease most suitable for this treatment as well as how to optimize treatment regimens.

  4. Real-world characteristics of hospitalized frail elderly patients with atrial fibrillation: can we improve the current prescription of anticoagulants?

    PubMed Central

    Annoni, Giorgio; Mazzola, Paolo

    2016-01-01

    Background In elderly patients, especially those older than 80 years, atrial fibrillation (AF) is associated with an almost 25% increased risk of stroke. Stroke prophylaxis with anticoagulants is therefore highly recommended. The prevalence of factors that have been associated with a lower rate of prescription and adherence to anticoagulant therapy in these patients is little known. The objective of this study was to explore the clinical characteristics of elderly subjects, with and without AF, consecutively admitted to an acute geriatric unit, discussing factors that may decrease the persistence on stroke prophylaxis therapy. We also highlight possible strategies to overcome the barriers conditioning the current underuse of oral anticoagulants in this segment of the population. Methods A retrospective observational study was performed on a cohort of elderly patients with and without AF admitted to the Acute Geriatric Unit of San Gerardo Hospital (Monza, Italy). Results Compared to patients without AF (n = 1216), those with AF (n = 403) had a higher Charlson Comorbidity Index (3 vs. 2, P < 0.001), number of administered drugs (4 vs. 3, P < 0.001), rate of heart failure (36.5% vs. 12%, P < 0.001) and chronic kidney disease (20.6 vs. 13.2, P < 0.001). Many patients with AF were frail (54%) or pre-frail (29%). Conclusions Elderly patients with AF have higher rates of conditions that affect adherence to traditional anticoagulant therapy (vitamin K antagonists, VKA). New direct oral anticoagulants (DOAs) can help overcome this problem. In order to prescribe the most appropriate VKA or DOAs, with the best efficacy/safety profile and the highest compliance, a comprehensive geriatric assessment should always accompany the scores for thrombotic and hemorrhagic risk stratification. PMID:27103917

  5. The Italian START-Register on Anticoagulation with Focus on Atrial Fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Antonucci, Emilia; Poli, Daniela; Tosetto, Alberto; Pengo, Vittorio; Tripodi, Armando; Magrini, Nicola; Marongiu, Francesco; Palareti, Gualtiero

    2015-01-01

    START-Register--Survey on anTicoagulated pAtients RegisTer--is an independent, inception-cohort, observational, collaborative database aimed at recording prospectively the clinical history of adult patients starting anticoagulant treatment for any reason and using whatever drug. In this article we present the START-Register and give cross section baseline data focusing on non valvular atrial fibrillation (NVAF). Participants are asked to insert prospectively consecutive patients recorded as electronic file on the web-site of the registry. Required data are: demographic and clinical characteristics of patients, associated risk factors for stroke and bleeding, laboratory routine data, clinical indication for treatment, expected therapeutic range (in cases of treatment with vitamin K antagonists -VKAs). The follow-up is carried out to record: quality of treatment (for patients on VKAs), bleeding complications, thrombotic events, and the onset of any type of associated disease. To date 5252 patients have been enrolled; 97.6% were on VKAs because direct oral anticoagulants (DOAC) have been available in Italy only recently. The median age was 74 years [interquartile range (IQR) 64-80]; males 53.7%. This analysis is focused on the 3209 (61.1%) NVAF patients. Mean CHADS2 score was 2.1 ± 1.1, CHADSVASc score was 3.1 ± 1.3;median age was 76 years (IQR 70-81); 168 patients (5.3%) had severe renal failure [Creatinine clearance (CrCl) <30 ml/min]. Moderate renal failure (CrCl 30-59 ml/min) was found in 1265 patients (39.5%). The analysis of the START-Register data shows that two-third of patients who started chronic anticoagulant treatment had NVAF, one-third of them was > 80 years with high prevalence of renal failure.

  6. The Italian START-Register on Anticoagulation with Focus on Atrial Fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    START-Register – Survey on anTicoagulated pAtients RegisTer – is an independent, inception-cohort, observational, collaborative database aimed at recording prospectively the clinical history of adult patients starting anticoagulant treatment for any reason and using whatever drug. In this article we present the START-Register and give cross section baseline data focusing on non valvular atrial fibrillation (NVAF). Participants are asked to insert prospectively consecutive patients recorded as electronic file on the web-site of the registry. Required data are: demographic and clinical characteristics of patients, associated risk factors for stroke and bleeding, laboratory routine data, clinical indication for treatment, expected therapeutic range (in cases of treatment with vitamin K antagonists -VKAs). The follow-up is carried out to record: quality of treatment (for patients on VKAs), bleeding complications, thrombotic events, and the onset of any type of associated disease. To date 5252 patients have been enrolled; 97.6% were on VKAs because direct oral anticoagulants (DOAC) have been available in Italy only recently. The median age was 74 years [interquartile range (IQR) 64-80]; males 53.7%. This analysis is focused on the 3209 (61.1%) NVAF patients. Mean CHADS2 score was 2.1±1.1, CHADSVASc score was 3.1±1.3;median age was 76 years (IQR 70-81); 168 patients (5.3%) had severe renal failure [Creatinine clearance (CrCl) <30 ml/min]. Moderate renal failure (CrCl 30-59 ml/min) was found in 1265 patients (39.5%). The analysis of the START-Register data shows that two-third of patients who started chronic anticoagulant treatment had NVAF, one-third of them was > 80 years with high prevalence of renal failure. PMID:26001109

  7. Factors Driving Anticoagulant Selection in Patients with Atrial Fibrillation in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Lauffenburger, Julie C.; Farley, Joel F.; Gehi, Anil K.; Rhoney, Denise H.; Brookhart, M. Alan; Fang, Gang

    2015-01-01

    With the introduction of novel oral anticoagulants (NOACs), the factors driving anticoagulant selection in atrial fibrillation (AF) in real-world practice are unclear. The goal was to examine whether and to what extent utilization has been driven by predictions of stroke risk (treatment benefit), bleeding risk (treatment harm), or prescription benefits’ coverage. We extracted a cohort of non-valvular AF patients initiating anticoagulation from Oct 2010-Dec 2012 from a large US database of commercial and Medicare supplement claims. Multivariable regression examined associations between ischemic stroke (CHA2DS2-VASc) and bleeding (ATRIA) risk scores and benefits’ generosity (proportion of costs covered by patients relative to total) with warfarin and NOAC selection and also between dabigatran and rivaroxaban. C-statistics and partial chi-square statistics were used to assess the variation explained. Of 70,498 patients initiating anticoagulation, 29.9% and 7.9% used dabigatran and rivaroxaban, respectively. Compared with warfarin, patients were less likely to receive a NOAC with high ischemic stroke risk (CHA2DS2-VASc ≥2) (Adjusted Relative Risk [aRR]: 0.75, 95% CI: 0.72-0.77) and high bleeding risk (ATRIA≥5) (aRR: 0.66, 95% CI: 0.64-0.69) but more likely with good benefits’ generosity (≤20% of costs borne by patient) (aRR: 2.03, 95% CI: 1.92-2.16). Prescription generosity explained almost twice the model variation as either risk score. Compared with dabigatran, patients were more likely to fill rivaroxaban with high bleeding risk (aRR: 1.16, 95% CI: 1.09-1.24). In conclusion, patients with higher bleeding and ischemic stroke risk were more likely to initiate warfarin, but generous benefits more strongly predicted NOAC usage and drove more selection. PMID:25724781

  8. The paradox of the lupus anticoagulant: history and perspectives.

    PubMed

    Pengo, Vittorio; Bison, Elisa; Denas, Gentian; Jose, Seena Padayattil; Bracco, Alessia; Banzato, Alessandra

    2014-11-01

    A unique coagulation inhibitor prolonging whole-blood clotting time was described more than 50 years ago in two patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). The immunoglobulin nature of the inhibitor and its interaction with antiphospholipid antibodies was later demonstrated and the term "lupus anticoagulant (LA)" was coined to describe this laboratory finding. It soon became apparent that LA was a misnomer as it is often found in plasma from patients with clinical conditions other than SLE and is associated with thromboembolic events that may occur in otherwise healthy individuals. Individuals with LA have circulating autoantibodies that inhibits blood coagulation. These are mostly of IgG or IgM class and mainly directed against a phospholipid (PL)-binding plasma protein, β2-glycoprotein I (β2GPI). The presence of β2GPI-dependent LA represents a well-recognized risk factor for venous and arterial thromboembolism, as well as pregnancy loss and morbidity. β2GPI-dependent LA in the presence of documented previous thromboembolism, or history of pregnancy loss/morbidity, identifies definite anti-PL syndrome. Laboratory diagnosis of LA is thus of particular importance, as it may assign patients with a common event (thrombosis) to a group with a high risk for recurrence, which is a prerequisite for long-term oral antithrombotic treatment.

  9. Anticoagulation Management in Patients with Pacemaker-Detected Atrial Fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    Poposka, Lidija; Boskov, Vladimir; Risteski, Dejan; Taleski, Jane; Georgievska-Ismail, Ljubica

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: In patients with an implanted pacemaker, asymptomatic atrial fibrillation (AF) is associated with an increased risk of thrombo-embolic complications. There is still no consensus which duration of episodes of atrial fibrillation should be taken as an indicator for inclusion of oral anticoagulation therapy (OAC). MATERIAL AND METHODS: A total of 104 patients who had no AF episodes in the past and have an indication for permanent pacing were included in the study. RESULTS: During an average follow-up of 18 months, 33 of the patients developed episodes of AF. Inclusion of OAC was performed in 17 patients, in whom AF was recorded, although in all patients CHA2DS2-VASc score was ≥ 1. The inclusion of OAC showed a statistically significant correlation with increasing duration of episodes of AF (r = 0.502, p = 0.003). During the follow-up period none of the patients developed thrombo-embolic complication. CONCLUSION: Considering that our group of patients had no thrombo-embolic events, we could conclude that dividing the AF episodes in less than 1% in 24 hours and longer than 1% within 24 hours could be an indicator for decision-making to include OAK if the CHA2DS2-VASc score is ≥ 1. PMID:27335594

  10. Anticoagulation in atrial fibrillation: NOAC prescribing in primary health care.

    PubMed

    Bastida, Carla; Corominas, Núria; Sotoca, José Miguel; Rovira, Marina

    2017-02-10

    Background Few studies assess the use of non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants (NOACs) in daily practice for the prevention of thromboembolic complications associated to nonvalvular atrial fibrillation (AF). Objectives Describe NOACs' use and analyze its prescribing pattern. Evaluate possible factors associated to adverse events (AEs) and the applicability of prescription support forms. Methods We included patients with AF treated with a NOAC during 2014 in three primary healthcare centers in Barcelona, Spain. Demographic and clinical data was collected, as well as embolic and bleeding risk and reported AEs. Results A total of 101 patients were included, with a median age of 75 years. The NOACs most frequently prescribed were dabigatran and rivaroxaban. An 87.2% of the patients were receiving the recommended dosage. A potential bleeding risk was present in 47% of the subjects. Ten AEs were reported, of which eight hemorrhages. Patients who presented an AE were >65 years and had a higher proportion of concomitant treatment and/or co-morbidities that could prompt to bleeding (p < 0.001). Conclusions Current treatment practice is according to regulatory agencies' recommendations. Close monitoring is especially needed in patients >65 years and at higher risk of bleeding. Prescription support forms help good prescribing and identifying potential individuals at high risk of AEs.

  11. [THE IMPORTANCE OF ANTICOAGULANT THERAPY IN PATIENTS WITH ARTIAL FIBRILLATION IN STROKE PREVENTION--SUMMARY OF INTERNATIONAL DATA AND NOVEL THERAPEUTIC MODALITIES].

    PubMed

    Mirolovics, Ágnes; Papp, Csaba; Zsuga, Judit; Bereczki, Dániel

    2016-03-30

    The most common cardiogenic cause of ischaemic stroke is atrial fibrillation which increases the probability of stroke five-fold and doubles case fatality. Based on international data the incidence of atrial fibrillation is approx. 2% however this rapidly increases with age. The necessity of using oral anticoagulants in the prevention of non-valvular atrial fibrillation related stroke is decided based on estimated stroke risk. The CHADS2 and the more predictive CHA2DS2-VASc scales are used for this purpose while the bleeding risk of patients treated with anticoagulant may be estimated by the HAS-BLED scoring scale. For decades oral anticoagulation meant using vitamin-K antagonists. Based on international data we can see that rate of anticoagulation is unacceptably low, furthermore most of the anticoagulated patients aren't within the therapeutic range of INR (INR: 2-3). A lot of disadvantages of vitamin-K antagonists are known (e.g. food-drug interaction, need for regular coagulation monitoring, increased risk of bleeding), therefore compounds with new therapeutic target have been developed. The novel oral anticoagulants (NOAC) can be divided in two major subgroups: direct thrombin inhibitors (dabigatran etexilate) and Xa-factor inhibitors (rivaroxaban, apixaban, edoxaban). These products are administered in fix doses, they less frequently interact with other medications or food, and regular coagulation monitoring is not needed when using these drugs. Moreover several studies have shown that they are at least as effective in the prevention of ischaemic stroke than the vitamin-K antagonists, with no more haemorrhagic complications.

  12. Tutorial in oral antithrombotic therapy: Biology and dental implications

    PubMed Central

    Fakhri, Hamid R.; Janket, Sok J.; Baird, Alison E.; Dinnocenzo, Richard; Meurman, Jukka H.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: Recent developments of new direct oral anticoagulants that target specific clotting factors necessitate understanding of coagulation biology. The objective of this tutorial is to offer dental professionals a review of coagulation mechanisms and the pharmacodynamics of the conventional and new oral anticoagulants. Also, we summarized the dental implications of the conventional and new anticoagulants. Method: We searched Medline using search terms “antithrombotic”, “antihemostasis” or “anticoagulation” and combined them with the search results of “dental”, “oral surgery” or “periodontal”. We restricted the results to “human” and “English”. Results: The early coagulation cascade, the new cell-based coagulation model, the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of conventional antithrombotics, and new oral anticoagulants were reviewed. The new direct factor Xa inhibitors and the direct thrombin inhibitor (s), called direct oral anticoagulants (DOAs) have rapid onset of action, fast elimination on cessation, and fewer drug-drug or drug-food interactions than warfarin. However, the lack of antidotes raises concerns that some dental procedures may trigger serious hemorrhagic events. Additionally, careful perioperative withdrawal and resumption protocols for the DOAs are reviewed, because DOAs’ blood levels are dependent on renal function. Also, various reversal strategies in the event of excessive bleedings are summarized. Perioperative management of dental patients taking new DOAs and conventional oral anticoagulants are also discussed. However, the perioperative strategies for DOAs are yet to be validated in randomized trials. Key words:Coagulation cascade, cell-based coagulation model, factor Xa inhibitors, direct thrombin inhibitors, prothrombin complex concentrates. PMID:23524440

  13. Shortfalls using second-generation anticoagulant rodenticides.

    PubMed

    Borst, G H A; Counotte, G H M

    2002-03-01

    Second-generation anticoagulant rodenticides can give rise to unexpected casualties in nontarget species in zoos. The first two offspring of a pair of turkey vultures (Cathartes aura) died of brodifacoum toxicosis. The adult birds fed rodenticide-killed mice to their offspring. There are previous case reports of small carnivorous birds (Dacelo novae-guinae and Tockus deckeni) killed eating poisoned (difenacoum and brodifacoum) mice. Even a granivorous species (Rollulus roulroul) died, probably by contamination of its food by cockroaches that transported the rodenticide.

  14. Reversal of Anticoagulation With Dabigatran in an 82-Year-Old Patient With Traumatic Retroperitoneal Arterial Bleeding Using the New Antidote Idarucizumab: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Hofer, Stefan; Philipsenburg, Christoph; Weigand, Markus A; Brenner, Thorsten

    2016-12-01

    Dabigatran etexilate is a direct oral anticoagulant used for the prevention of stroke in atrial fibrillation. Idarucizumab is a recently approved specific antidote that reverses the effect of dabigatran within minutes. We report the case of an 82-year-old patient with traumatic retroperitoneal arterial bleeding under anticoagulation with dabigatran etexilate. By administration of idarucizumab, we successfully normalized coagulation and saved the patient from an operation. In the course of the disease, a slight reincrease in dabigatran etexilate plasma levels was observed 2 days after the reversal, which could lead to a new onset of bleeding.

  15. Antiplatelet and anticoagulation agents in acute coronary syndromes: what is the current status and what does the future hold?

    PubMed

    Huber, Kurt; Bates, Eric R; Valgimigli, Marco; Wallentin, Lars; Kristensen, Steen Dalby; Anderson, Jeffrey L; Lopez Sendon, Jose Luis; Tubaro, Marco; Granger, Christopher B; Bode, Christoph; Ohman, Erik Magnus; Steg, Philippe Gabriel

    2014-11-01

    Mortality and morbidity in acute coronary syndromes (ACSs), caused principally by plaque erosion or rupture leading to thrombus formation and myocardial ischemia, have been reduced by a combination of antithrombotic agents (antiplatelet drugs and anticoagulants) and early revascularization. Aspirin is the foundation antiplatelet agent. New P2Y12 receptor inhibitors (prasugrel and ticagrelor) have clear benefits compared with clopidogrel for dual antiplatelet therapy, and cangrelor or vorapaxar, a thrombin receptor inhibitor, may be of value in specific settings. Anticoagulation uses 1 of 4 choices: bivalirudin, unfractionated heparin, enoxaparin, and fondaparinux. Moreover, some patients (such as those who have chronic atrial fibrillation) require triple therapy with aspirin, clopidogrel, plus an anticoagulant, frequently a vitamin K antagonist. New oral anticoagulants have been shown to be at least as effective as vitamin K antagonists in atrial fibrillation and led to fewer bleeding complications. Finally, the combination of aspirin, clopidogrel, and low-dose rivaroxaban has recently been approved by the European Medicines Agency (but not the Food and Drug Administration) for secondary prevention after ACS. Several strategies have been developed to balance the potential benefit of antithrombotic therapy against the risk of bleeding complications, for example, radial access in coronary angiography or restricted use of combination therapy, and others are under investigation, such as discontinuation of aspirin. This overview summarizes the current status of antithrombotic therapy in ACS and describes strategies currently explored to optimize its benefit/risk ratio.

  16. New anticoagulants for the treatment of venous thromboembolism

    PubMed Central

    Fernandes, Caio Julio Cesar dos Santos; Júnior, José Leonidas Alves; Gavilanes, Francisca; Prada, Luis Felipe; Morinaga, Luciana Kato; Souza, Rogerio

    2016-01-01

    Worldwide, venous thromboembolism (VTE) is among the leading causes of death from cardiovascular disease, surpassed only by acute myocardial infarction and stroke. The spectrum of VTE presentations ranges, by degree of severity, from deep vein thrombosis to acute pulmonary thromboembolism. Treatment is based on full anticoagulation of the patients. For many decades, it has been known that anticoagulation directly affects the mortality associated with VTE. Until the beginning of this century, anticoagulant therapy was based on the use of unfractionated or low-molecular-weight heparin and vitamin K antagonists, warfarin in particular. Over the past decades, new classes of anticoagulants have been developed, such as factor Xa inhibitors and direct thrombin inhibitors, which significantly changed the therapeutic arsenal against VTE, due to their efficacy and safety when compared with the conventional treatment. The focus of this review was on evaluating the role of these new anticoagulants in this clinical context. PMID:27167437

  17. Physician's Fear of Anticoagulant Therapy in Nonvalvular Atrial Fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    Dahlberg, Katherine Willett

    2014-01-01

    Abstract: Despite the availability of predictive tools and treatment guidelines, anticoagulant therapies are underprescribed and many patients are undertreated for conditions that predispose to thromboembolic complications, including stroke. This review explores reasons for which physicians fear that the risks of anticoagulation may be greater than the potential benefit. The results of numerous clinical trials confirm that patients benefit from judiciously managed anticoagulation and that physicians can take various approaches to minimize risk. Use of stratification scores for patient selection and accurate estimation of stroke risk may improve outcomes; bleeding risk is less important than stroke risk. Adoption of newer anticoagulants with simpler regimens may help physicians allay their fears of anticoagulant use in patients with atrial fibrillation. These fears, although not groundless, should not overtake caution and hinder the delivery of appropriate evidence-based care. PMID:25285512

  18. Anticoagulant rodenticide poisoning in animals of Apulia and Basilicata, Italy.

    PubMed

    Muscarella, Marilena; Armentano, Antonio; Iammarino, Marco; Palermo, Carmen; Amorena, Michele

    2016-06-30

    This study evaluates the presence of anticoagulant rodenticides in animals with a diagnosis of suspected poisoning and in bait samples. The survey was carried out from 2010 to 2012, in 2 regions of South Italy (Puglia and Basilicata) on 300 organs of animals and 90 suspected bait samples. The qualitative and quantitative analyses were conducted using an analytical method based on high‑performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) with fluorimetric detection (FLD) for the simultaneous determination of 8 anticoagulant rodenticides (bromadiolone, brodifacoum, coumachlor, coumafuryl, coumatetralyl, difenacoum, flocoumafen, and warfarin). The presence of anticoagulant rodenticides was detected in 33 organs of animals (11% of the total) and 6 bait samples (7% of the total). The most commonly detected compound was coumachlor (47% of 39 positive samples) followed by bromadiolone (24%), and brodifacoum (11%). The species mostly involved in anticoagulant rodenticide poisoning were dogs and cats. This study emphasizes the relevance of the determinations of anticoagulant rodenticides in cases of suspected poisoning in veterinary practice.

  19. Percutaneous toxicity of anticoagulant warfarin in rats.

    PubMed

    Kataranovski, Milena; Mirkov, Ivana; Vrankovic, Jelena; Kataranovski, Dragan; Subota, Vesna

    2008-01-01

    Percutaneous toxicity of anticoagulant rodenticides is usually manifested by coagulopathy and/or fatal outcome. There are, however, virtually no data on other biological effects of this class of pesticides that gain access into the organism via skin. In this study, percutaneous toxicity of epicutaneously applied warfarin was evaluated by measuring changes in peripheral blood granulocytes in rats. Application of 10 mug (0.05 mg/kg) or 100 mug (0.5 mg/kg) of warfarin (WF) for 3 consecutive days resulted in an increase in prothrombin time, documenting the access of warfarin to systemic circulation. Application of warfarin led to an increase in relative numbers of granulocytes at higher dose, whereas both doses resulted in increased metabolical viability, evaluated by 3-(4, 5-dimethyl-2-thiazolyl)-2, 5-diphenyl-2H-tetrazolium bromide (MTT) reduction assay. Higher warfarin dose resulted in both granulocyte activation and priming (evaluated by cytochemical nitroblue tetrazolium, NBT, reduction assay of respiratory burst), whereas only a tendency toward activation was noted at lower WF dose. Soluble mediators from the circulation seem responsible for the observed effects, as exogenous plasma from WF-treated animals stimulated NBT reduction by isologous or naïve granulocytes. Data presented in this study are relevant for the recognition of biological effects, other than those affecting hemostasis, of anticoagulant rodenticides that gain access to systemic circulation through the skin.

  20. Anticoagulant treatment of pulmonary embolism: impact and implications of the EINSTEIN PE study.

    PubMed

    Prandoni, Paolo

    2012-10-01

    Pulmonary embolism (PE), which can develop as a consequence of deep vein thrombosis (DVT), is a serious and potentially fatal venous thromboembolic event. Patients with PE are at increased risk of venous thromboembolism (VTE) recurrence and serious complications such as chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension. Anticoagulants, namely heparins and vitamin K antagonists (VKAs), have been the main treatments for PE in patients who are haemodynamically stable. However, use of these agents can be complex and is associated with an increased risk of bleeding (a characteristic that is common to all anticoagulants). Simplified, effective treatment regimens for PE would be very beneficial for patients, physicians and payers. Compared with DVT, PE is a different clinical manifestation of VTE; phase III trials have now started to focus specifically on patients with PE. Trials in patients with PE can provide further information on the optimal management of these patients. Results of the phase III EINSTEIN PE study demonstrated non-inferiority in the efficacy and safety of oral rivaroxaban compared with standard of care (enoxaparin/VKA) for the treatment of patients with acute symptomatic PE (with or without symptomatic DVT). Rates of major bleeding were significantly lower in patients receiving rivaroxaban. This review will discuss the findings of recent trials, particularly the potential impact of single, oral agents for both the initial and long-term treatment of a range of patients with PE, and how these results may influence the clinical management of PE.

  1. Comparative risk assessment of the first-generation anticoagulant rodenticide diphacinone to raptors

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rattner, Barnett A.; Lazarus, Rebecca S.; Eisenreich, Karen M.; Horak, Katherine E.; Volker, Steven F.; Campton, Christopher M.; Eisemann, John D.; Meteyer, Carol U.; Johnson, John J.

    2012-01-01

    New regulatory restrictions have been placed on the use of some second-generation anticoagulant rodenticides in the United States, and in some situations this action may be offset by expanded use of first-generation compounds. We have recently conducted several studies with captive adult American kestrels and eastern screech-owls examining the toxicity of diphacinone (DPN) using both acute oral and short-term dietary exposure regimens. Diphacinone evoked overt signs of intoxication and lethality in these raptors at exposure doses that were 20 to 30 times lower than reported for traditionally used wildlife test species (mallard and northern bobwhite). Sublethal exposure of kestrels and owls resulted in prolonged clotting time, reduced hematocrit, and/or gross and histological evidence of hemorrhage at daily doses as low as 0.16 mg DPN/kg body weight. Findings also demonstrated that DPN was far more potent in short-term 7-day dietary studies than in single-day acute oral exposure studies. Incorporating these kestrel and owl data into deterministic and probabilistic risk assessments indicated that the risks associated with DPN exposure for raptors are far greater than predicted in analyses using data from mallards and bobwhite. These findings can assist natural resource managers in weighing the costs and benefits of anticoagulant rodenticide use in pest control and eradication programs.

  2. Incremental parameter evaluation from incomplete data with application to the population pharmacology of anticoagulants

    PubMed Central

    Vlad, Marcel O.; Dan Corlan, Alexandru; Morán, Federico; Oefner, Peter; Ross, John

    2008-01-01

    We develop a method for parameter evaluation from incomplete data. Improved estimates of the desired parameters are evaluated step by step, from experiment to experiment by using both Bayesian and informational methods. We make dynamical, improved predictions while the experiments are still going on and keep and interpret information about local fluctuations, which is lost on applying global techniques. The input of information in small packets leads to semi-analytic methods for data processing. An evolution criterion for parameter evaluation, similar to Fisher's theorem of population selection, is derived. We develop direct processing methods, which can be applied to low dimensional systems, semi-analytic methods based on direct or double logarithmic phase expansions, steepest descent approaches, variation and perturbation methods. The techniques are illustrated by developing a method of long-term planning of treatments with oral anticoagulants based on limited clinical data. The efficiency of treatment by oral anticoagulants depends strongly on various anthropometric and genotypic factors, which lead to large variations of the clinical response. We use the clinical data, which accumulates from medical consultations, for extracting improved, incremental information about the statistical properties of the kinetic and anthropometric parameters for a given patient, which in turn is used for making repeated, improved clinical predictions as the treatment proceeds. PMID:18353988

  3. Effectiveness and Safety Assessment of Citrate Anticoagulation During Albumin Dialysis in Comparison to Other Methods of Anticoagulation.

    PubMed

    Dyla, Agnieszka; Mielnicki, Wojciech; Bartczak, Joanna; Zawada, Tomasz; Garba, Piotr

    2017-03-23

    Liver failure is a serious and often deadly disease often requiring MARS (Molecular Adsorbent Recirculating System) therapy. Choosing the safe and effective method of anticoagulation during artificial liver support systems seems to be very difficult and extremely important. The aim of this study was to assess effectiveness and safety of regional anticoagulation with citrate in liver failure patients during MARS. We used a single center observational study. We analyzed 158 MARS sessions performed in 65 patients: 105 (66.5%) sessions in 41 patients with heparin anticoagulation, 40 (25.3%) sessions in 19 patients with citrate, and 13 (8%) sessions in only five patients without anticoagulation, that were excluded from part of the analysis. To determine the effectiveness of regional anticoagulation with citrate, probability of filter survival and changes in laboratory parameters were analyzed according to the applied method of anticoagulation. The safety of citrate was determined by Ca/Ca(2+) ratio, acid-base balance, bleeding complications, and the need for blood product transfusions. The probability of filter survival in the citrate group was 94% and in the heparin group 82% (P = 0.204). There was no relationship between the method of anticoagulation and effectiveness of MARS therapy in lowering the levels of the analyzed parameters. Only one patient had a Ca/Ca(2+) ratio higher than he safety margin. There were no statistically significant changes in pH and lactate level irrespective of anticoagulation; bicarbonate dropped significantly only in the heparin group (P = 0.03). The frequency of bleeding complications and the need for transfusions did not differ significantly between groups. Regional anticoagulation with citrate can be an effective and safe method of anticoagulation during MARS therapy, but requires attentive monitoring and further studies in liver failure patients.

  4. Is stopping of anticoagulant therapy really required in a minor dental surgery? - How about in an endodontic microsurgery?

    PubMed

    Cho, Yong-Wook; Kim, Euiseong

    2013-08-01

    Nowadays, oral anticoagulants are commonly prescribed to numerous patients for preventing cardiovascular accident such as thromboembolism. An important side effect of anticoagulant is anti-hemostasis. In a major surgery, the oral anticoagulant therapy (OAT) regimen must be changed before the surgery for proper post-operative bleeding control. However, in a minor dental surgery and endodontic surgery, the necessity for changing or discontinuing the OAT is open to debate. In this study, risks of the consequences were weighed and analyzed. In patients who stop the OAT, the occurrence of thromboembolic complication is rare but the result is fatal. In patients who continuing the OAT, post-operative bleeding can be controlled well with the local hemostatic measures. In the endodontic surgery, there are almost no studies about this issue. The intra-operative bleeding control is particularly important in the endodontic surgery because of its delicate and sensitive procedures such as inspection of resected root surface using dental microscope and retrograde filling. Further studies are necessary about this issue in the viewpoint of endodontic surgery.

  5. Is stopping of anticoagulant therapy really required in a minor dental surgery? - How about in an endodontic microsurgery?

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Yong-Wook

    2013-01-01

    Nowadays, oral anticoagulants are commonly prescribed to numerous patients for preventing cardiovascular accident such as thromboembolism. An important side effect of anticoagulant is anti-hemostasis. In a major surgery, the oral anticoagulant therapy (OAT) regimen must be changed before the surgery for proper post-operative bleeding control. However, in a minor dental surgery and endodontic surgery, the necessity for changing or discontinuing the OAT is open to debate. In this study, risks of the consequences were weighed and analyzed. In patients who stop the OAT, the occurrence of thromboembolic complication is rare but the result is fatal. In patients who continuing the OAT, post-operative bleeding can be controlled well with the local hemostatic measures. In the endodontic surgery, there are almost no studies about this issue. The intra-operative bleeding control is particularly important in the endodontic surgery because of its delicate and sensitive procedures such as inspection of resected root surface using dental microscope and retrograde filling. Further studies are necessary about this issue in the viewpoint of endodontic surgery. PMID:24010076

  6. Clinical effects of anticoagulant therapy in suspected acute myocardial infarction: systematic overview of randomised trials.

    PubMed Central

    Collins, R.; MacMahon, S.; Flather, M.; Baigent, C.; Remvig, L.; Mortensen, S.; Appleby, P.; Godwin, J.; Yusuf, S.; Peto, R.

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Most randomised trials of anticoagulant therapy for suspected acute myocardial infarction have been small and, in some, aspirin and fibrinolytic therapy were not used routinely. A systematic overview (meta-analysis) of their results is needed, in particular to assess the clinical effects of adding heparin to aspirin. DESIGN: Computer aided searches, scrutiny of reference lists, and inquiry of investigators and companies were used to identify potentially eligible studies. On central review, 26 studies were found to involve unconfounded randomised comparisons of anticoagulant therapy versus control in suspected acute myocardial infarction. Additional information on study design and outcome was sought by correspondence with study investigators. SUBJECTS: Patients with suspected acute myocardial infarction. INTERVENTIONS: No routine aspirin was used among about 5000 patients in 21 trials (including half of one small trial) that assessed heparin alone or heparin plus oral anticoagulants, and aspirin was used routinely among 68,000 patients in six trials (including the other half of one small trial) that assessed the addition of intravenous or high dose subcutaneous heparin. MAIN OUTCOME MEASUREMENTS: Death, reinfarction, stroke, pulmonary embolism, and major bleeds (average follow up of about 10 days). RESULTS: In the absence of aspirin, anticoagulant therapy reduced mortality by 25% (SD 8%; 95% confidence interval 10% to 38%; 2P = 0.002), representing 35 (11) fewer deaths per 1000. There were also 10 (4) fewer strokes per 1000 (2P = 0.01), 19 (5) fewer pulmonary emboli per 1000 (2P < 0.001), and non-significantly fewer reinfarctions, with about 13 (5) extra major bleeds per 1000 (2P = 0.01). Similar sized effects were seen with the different anticoagulant regimens studied. In the presence of aspirin, however, heparin reduced mortality by only 6% (SD 3%; 0% to 10%; 2P = 0.03), representing just 5 (2) fewer deaths per 1000. There were 3 (1.3) fewer

  7. Oral contraceptives and the prothrombin time.

    PubMed

    Pangrazzi, J; Roncaglioni, M C; Donati, M B

    1980-02-02

    Dr. De Teresa and others reported that mean prothrombin time ratio of 12 patients on long-term anticoagulation with warfarin was significantly higher when they were also taking oral contraceptives (OCs). A study of prothrombin complex activity was recently conducted in female rats treated with an estrogen-progestogen combination (lynestrenol 5 mg; mestranol 0.3 mg/kg body weight) which resulted in a 100% infertility in this species. After 1 treatment for only 1 estral cycle, OC-treated rats had a significantly longer Normotest clotting time (37.7+ or-0.5 sec) than control rats (31.0+or-0.4); the difference was even more notable after 10 cycles. Although this finding has not been reported in women on OCs, it may be that the estrogen-induced "lability" of the prothrombin complex occurs in humans only in special conditions, such as anticoagulation. Alternatively, liver dysfunction occurring among women on OCs may be responsible for reduced metabolism of warfarin, contributing to the effectiveness of the anticoagulation. Further pharmacology studies should be done to clarify the interaction between OCs and oral anticoagulants.

  8. Risk factors for the effect of anticoagulant and antiplatelet agents on perioperative blood loss following proximal femoral fractures.

    PubMed

    Akaoka, Yusuke; Yamazaki, Hiroshi; Kodaira, Hiroyuki; Kato, Hiroyuki

    2016-07-01

    To examine the effect of oral anticoagulant and antiplatelet agents on perioperative blood loss following proximal femoral fractures and to identify the risk factors associated with perioperative blood loss.Retrospective cross-sectional study.In a retrospective cross-sectional study, we treated 334 consecutive patients with proximal femoral fractures (100 who received anticoagulant or antiplatelet drugs and 234 who did not) and an overall mean age of 85.5 years (standard deviation 8.2 years). We performed retrospective multivariate analysis to determine the independent factors related to perioperative decreases in the hemoglobin (Hb) level, a proxy for blood loss.Multivariate analysis confirmed that anticoagulant or antiplatelet drugs significantly affected decreases in the Hb level (regression coefficient [RC], 0.61; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.14-1.08; P = 0.01). In addition to anticoagulant or antiplatelet drugs, multivariate analysis confirmed that the fracture type (Orthopedic Trauma Association classification A2: RC, 1.19; 95% CI, 0.71-1.67; P < 0.01; A3: RC, 2.47; 95% CI, 1.41-3.53; P < 0.01), platelet count (RC, -0.08; 95% CI, -0.12 to -0.04; P < 0.01), and operative time (RC, 0.02; 95% CI, 0.004-0.03; P = 0.01) affected the decreases in Hb level.The use of anticoagulants and antiplatelet agents is an independent risk factor for perioperative blood loss following proximal femoral fractures. Fracture type, platelet count, and operative time also affect perioperative blood loss. The fracture type was the greatest contributing factor to perioperative blood loss.Level of evidence grade: Prognostic level III.

  9. Risk factors for the effect of anticoagulant and antiplatelet agents on perioperative blood loss following proximal femoral fractures

    PubMed Central

    Akaoka, Yusuke; Yamazaki, Hiroshi; Kodaira, Hiroyuki; Kato, Hiroyuki

    2016-01-01

    Abstract To examine the effect of oral anticoagulant and antiplatelet agents on perioperative blood loss following proximal femoral fractures and to identify the risk factors associated with perioperative blood loss. Retrospective cross-sectional study. In a retrospective cross-sectional study, we treated 334 consecutive patients with proximal femoral fractures (100 who received anticoagulant or antiplatelet drugs and 234 who did not) and an overall mean age of 85.5 years (standard deviation 8.2 years). We performed retrospective multivariate analysis to determine the independent factors related to perioperative decreases in the hemoglobin (Hb) level, a proxy for blood loss. Multivariate analysis confirmed that anticoagulant or antiplatelet drugs significantly affected decreases in the Hb level (regression coefficient [RC], 0.61; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.14–1.08; P = 0.01). In addition to anticoagulant or antiplatelet drugs, multivariate analysis confirmed that the fracture type (Orthopedic Trauma Association classification A2: RC, 1.19; 95% CI, 0.71–1.67; P < 0.01; A3: RC, 2.47; 95% CI, 1.41–3.53; P < 0.01), platelet count (RC, −0.08; 95% CI, −0.12 to −0.04; P < 0.01), and operative time (RC, 0.02; 95% CI, 0.004–0.03; P = 0.01) affected the decreases in Hb level. The use of anticoagulants and antiplatelet agents is an independent risk factor for perioperative blood loss following proximal femoral fractures. Fracture type, platelet count, and operative time also affect perioperative blood loss. The fracture type was the greatest contributing factor to perioperative blood loss. Level of evidence grade: Prognostic level III. PMID:27399119

  10. Management of Rodent Populations by Anticoagulant Rodenticides: Toward Third-Generation Anticoagulant Rodenticides.

    PubMed

    Damin-Pernik, Marlène; Espana, Bernadette; Lefebvre, Sebastien; Fourel, Isabelle; Caruel, Hervé; Benoit, Etienne; Lattard, Virginie

    2017-02-01

    Second-generation anticoagulant rodenticides (SGARs) have been used since the 1980s for pest management. They are highly efficient even in warfarin-resistant rodents. Nevertheless, because of their tissue persistence, nontarget poisoning by SGARs is commonly described in wildlife. Due to this major problem, a new generation of anticoagulants must be developed to limit this risk. This study proposes a method of developing a new generation of anticoagulant rodenticides by revisiting the old SGARs based on the concept of stereochemistry. Each current SGAR is a mixture of diastereomers. Diastereomers of each compound were purified, and their biologic properties were compared by determining their ability to inhibit vitamin K epoxide reductase (VKOR) activity involved in the activation of vitamin K-dependent clotting factors and their toxicokinetic properties. Systematically, for each SGAR, both diastereomers are as effective in inhibiting VKOR activity. However, their toxicokinetic properties are very different, with one of the two diastereomers always more rapidly cleared than the other one. For all SGARs except flocoumafen, the less persistent diastereomer is always the less predominant isomer present in the current mixture. Therefore, the development of baits containing only the less persistent diastereomer would avoid the ecotoxicological risk associated with their use without decreasing their efficacy.

  11. Spontaneous Thyroid Hemorrhage on Chronic Anticoagulation Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Gunasekaran, Kulothungan; Rudd, Kelly M.; Murthi, Swetha; Kaatz, Scott; Lone, Nazir

    2017-01-01

    Even though highly vascularized, the thyroid gland rarely has spontaneous bleeding. Bleeding into the thyroid gland can result in potentially lethal acute airway compromise. This case report describes an elderly patient on warfarin for atrial fibrillation, who presented with swelling on the right side of her neck causing acute airway obstruction. An urgent computed tomography of the neck showed an enlarging hemorrhage into the right lobe of the thyroid gland. She was initially intubated for airway protection and her anticoagulation was reversed to stop the bleeding. She was closely monitored in the intensive care unit. After an uncomplicated tracheal extubation and recovery, she was discharged and scheduled for an elective total thyroidectomy. We desire that physicians be aware of this rare, potentially lethal bleeding complication. PMID:28243434

  12. [Laboratory evaluation of lupus anticoagulant in Israel].

    PubMed

    Sarig, Galit; Garach-Jehoshua, Osnat; Deutch, Varda; Winder, Asher; Hyam, Esti; Katz, Ben Zion; Lahav, Judith; Cassel, Aliza; Zivelin, Ariella; Souroujon, Moshe; Shimron, Orit

    2010-05-01

    Lupus anticoagulants (LAC) are antibodies which are detected by a prolongation of phospholipid-dependent coagulation assays, and are associated with thrombotic events and pregnancy complications in patients with the antiphospholipid syndrome. The antiphospholipid syndrome is defined by arterial or venous thrombosis and/or pregnancy morbidity and by laboratory diagnosis of antiphospholipid antibodies. The laboratory diagnosis is based on LAC and/or anticardiolipin and/or anti-beta2-glycoprotein I antibodies present in plasma, on two or more occasions at least 12 weeks apart. ALthough the presence of LAC correlates best with thrombosis, the Laboratory testing of LAC is not well standardized. In this article, the Laboratory evaluation of LAC will be explained, including the different tests that are recommended by the Israeli Sub-committee of Thrombosis and Hemostasis Laboratories, the possibility to evaluate LAC in patients treated with antithrombotic therapy, and how to report and interpret the results.

  13. [Cardiovascular diseases, antiplatelet agents, anticoagulants and hemorrhagic risk].

    PubMed

    Eusébio, Jorge; Reny, Jean-Luc; Fontana, Pierr; Nendaz, Mathieu

    2010-10-20

    If the benefits of antiplatelet and anticoagulant therapies are well established, bleeding complications appear underestimated in trials in comparison to their real-life incidence. Also, a large number of patients receive various associations of antiplatelet or anticoagulant treatments, while the benefit of some associations is not firmly established and data about their safety are missing. Identifying patients at high risk of bleeding is essential to define appropriate strategies. In this article we discuss the risk-benefit of various antiplatelet and anticoagulant molecules taken individually or in combination. An overview of the main clinical scores available to stratify the risk of bleeding is presented.

  14. Anticoagulation therapy for a LVAD patient with acquired warfarin resistance.

    PubMed

    Yoshioka, Daisuke; Toda, Koichi; Hidaka, Takayuki; Yasuda, Soichiro; Saito, Shunsuke; Domae, Keitaro; Sawa, Yoshiki

    2017-03-27

    Anticoagulation therapy with warfarin is essential for postoperative management in patients with left ventricular assist device (LVAD). In this manuscript, we report the case of a patient who developed warfarin resistance after LVAD implantation. Although we administered a novel anticoagulant drug in addition to warfarin and aspirin therapy, the patient developed a major stroke. The patient needed continuous intravenous heparinization until heart transplantation for approximately 2 years. Meticulous management of anticoagulation therapy is essential for a LVAD with warfarin resistance. To our best knowledge, our case is the first case of warfarin resistance in a patient with LVAD.

  15. Anticoagulation for the prevention of stroke in non-valvular AF in general practice: room for improvement

    PubMed Central

    Ioannou, Adam; Metaxa, Sofia; Kassianos, George; Missouris, Constantinos G.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Our aim was to assess whether the recommendations and guidelines for thromboprophylaxis in patients with atrial fibrillation (AF) have been adopted in general practice (GP). Methods: We conducted a retrospective study using the GP computer database (Hatfield, UK) on all 9400 patients to assess the quality of anticoagulation in patients with a recorded diagnosis of AF. Results: Of the 180 patients with a diagnosis of AF, 107 (59.4%) were treated with warfarin, 19 (10.6%) with a novel oral anticoagulant (NOAC), 31 (17.2%) with aspirin or clopidogrel, and 23 (12.8%) received none. Thirty-seven patients (34.6%) who were taking warfarin had a time in the therapeutic range (TTR) of less than 65%. Forty-five (27.6%) of the 163 patients who had a CHA2DS2VASc score of two or more were not prescribed a vitamin K antagonist (VKA) or a NOAC. None had a HAS-BLED greater than the CHA2DS2VASc score. Conclusion: Our study demonstrates that one in four patients with non-valvular AF, at risk of a stroke, is not being adequately treated with an oral anticoagulant in primary care. The majority were treated with warfarin, a third of which had a low TTR. A high proportion of patients are prescribed antiplatelet therapy instead. This is despite overwhelming evidence that VKAs and NOACs, and not aspirin or clopidogrel, improve outcome in patients with non-valvular AF. We suggest that a review of GP practice databases should be considered to identify patients with non-valvular AF, at risk of a disabling or fatal event, and measures taken to initiate anticoagulant therapy. PMID:27403193

  16. [New pharmaceuticals in cardiology. Heart failure, anticoagulation, dyslipidemia].

    PubMed

    Czepluch, F S; Hasenfuß, G; Jacobshagen, C

    2014-04-01

    Three innovative pharmaceuticals which might play an important role in the field of cardiology in the near future were recently tested in large clinical studies. Serelaxin, a vasoactive hormone peptide that is produced during pregnancy, reduces vessel resistance, increases cardiac output, and improves renal function. Lately, it was demonstrated that serelaxin significantly reduces congestion symptoms in patients with acute heart failure. As a secondary endpoint the mortality at day 180 was reduced. Therefore, serelaxin seems to be a promising new drug for the treatment of acute heart failure which might have a prognostic impact. Edoxaban is a selective factor Xa inhibitor, which inhibits thrombin production and thrombus formation. Two recently published studies reported that edoxaban is at least as effective as the vitamin K antagonist warfarin in prevention and treatment of venous thromboembolism and in the prevention of stroke and systemic embolism due to nonvalvular atrial fibrillation. Compared to warfarin, edoxaban significantly exhibited less frequent severe bleeding complications. Edoxaban will probably soon be the fourth new oral anticoagulant available for patients. The serine protease proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin 9 (PCSK9) reduces the ability of the liver to bind low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) and to remove it from the circulation. Recently, a monoclonal antibody for PCSK9 was developed which induces a LDL-C plasma level reduction up to 73 % and also decreases lipoprotein(a) and apolipoprotein B. PCSK9 inhibition is a promising new mechanism for LDL-C reduction and the corresponding drug will be presumably approved soon by the regulatory authorities.

  17. Anticoagulation in patients with atrial fibrillation undergoing coronary stent implantation.

    PubMed

    Bernard, A; Fauchier, L; Pellegrin, C; Clementy, N; Saint Etienne, C; Banerjee, A; Naudin, D; Angoulvant, D

    2013-09-01

    In patients with atrial fibrillation (AF) undergoing coronary stent implantation, the optimal antithrombotic strategy is unclear. We evaluated whether use of oral anticoagulation (OAC) was associated with any benefit in morbidity or mortality in patients with AF, high risk of thromboembolism (TE) (CHA2DS2-VASC score ≥ 2) and coronary stent implantation. Among 8,962 unselected patients with AF seen between 2000 and 2010, a total of 2,709 (30%) had coronary artery disease and 417/2,709 (15%) underwent stent implantation while having CHA2DS2-VASC score ≥ 2. During follow-up (median=650 days), all TE, bleeding episodes, and major adverse cardiac events (i.e. death, acute myocardial infarction, target lesion revascularisation) were recorded. At discharge, 97/417 patients (23%) received OAC, which was more likely to be prescribed in patients with permanent AF and in those treated for elective stent implantation. The incidence of outcome event rates was not significantly different in patients treated and those not treated with OAC. However, in multivariate analysis, the lack of OAC at discharge was independently associated with increased risk of death/stroke/systemic TE (relative risk [RR] =2.18, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.02-4.67, p=0.04), with older age (RR =1.12, 1.04-1.20, p=0.003), heart failure (RR =3.26, 1.18-9.01, p=0.02), and history of stroke (RR =18.87, 3.11-111.11, p=0.001). In conclusion, in patients with AF and high thromboembolic risk after stent implantation, use of OAC was independently associated with decreased risk of subsequent death/stroke/systemic TE, suggesting that OAC should be systematically used in this patient population.

  18. Thrombolytic-plus-Anticoagulant Therapy versus Anticoagulant-Alone Therapy in Submassive Pulmonary Thromboembolism (TVASPE Study): A Randomized Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Taherkhani, Maryam; Taherkhani, Adineh; Hashemi, Seyed Reza; Faghihi Langroodi, Taraneh; Sadeghi, Roxana; Beyranvand, Mohammadreza

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Background: The use of thrombolytic agents in the treatment of hemodynamically stable patients with acute submassive pulmonary embolism (PTE) remains controversial. We, therefore, conducted this study to compare the effect of thrombolytic plus anticoagulation versus anticoagulation alone on early death and adverse outcome following submassive PTE. Methods: We conducted a study of patients with acute pulmonary embolism and pulmonary hypertension or right ventricular dilatation/dysfunction but without arterial hypotension or shock. The patients were randomly assigned in a single-blind fashion to receive an anticoagulant [Enoxaparin (1 mg/kg twice a day)] plus a thrombolytic [Alteplase (100 mg) or Streptokinase (1500000 u/2 hours)] or an anticoagulant [Enoxaparin (1 mg/kg twice a day)] alone. The primary endpoint was in-hospital death or clinical deterioration requiring an escalation of treatment. The secondary endpoints of the study were major bleeding, pulmonary hypertension, right ventricular dilatation at the end of the first week, and exertional dyspnea at the end of the first month. Results: Of 50 patients enrolled, 25 patients were randomly assigned to receive an anticoagulant plus a thrombolytic and the other 25 patients were given an anticoagulant alone. The incidence of the primary endpoints was significantly higher in the anticoagulant-alone group than in the thrombolytic-plus-anticoagulant group (p value = 0.022). At the time of discharge, pulmonary artery pressure was significantly higher in the anticoagulant-alone group than in the thrombolytic-plus-anticoagulant group (p value = 0.018); however, reduction in the right ventricular size or normalization of the right ventricle showed non-significant differences between the two groups. There was no significant difference regarding the New York Heat Association (NYHA) functional class between the two groups at the end of the first month (p value = 0.213). No fatal bleeding or cerebral bleeding

  19. Oral Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    Oral Cancer Basic description Cancer can affect any part of the oral cavity, including the lips, tongue, mouth, and throat. There are 2 kinds of oral cancer: oral cavity cancer and oropharyngeal cancer. The most ...

  20. Direct vitamin k antagonist anticoagulant treatment health care costs in patients with non-valvular atrial fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background There is evidence suggesting that most thromboembolic complications could be prevented with adequate pharmacological anticoagulation. We estimated the direct health care costs of anticoagulant treatment with oral vitamin K antagonists in patients diagnosed with non-valvular atrial fibrillation. Methods This observational study examined the clinical records of patients diagnosed with non-valvular atrial fibrillation who received anticoagulant treatment with oral vitamin K antagonists. Data from clinical records were used in the study: international normalized ratio, number of monitoring visits, type of anticoagulant, hospital admissions from complications, and concomitant medication. Drug cost was calculated based on the official Spanish Ministry of Health price list. Monitoring expenses were included the cost of the medical supplies used in the procedures. Hospitalization costs were calculated using the Diagnosis Related Group price for each case. Hospital visits costs were calculated by one of four different scenarios, using either the invoice rates for the regional health care authority or cost per visit as established by analytical accounting methods. Results We collected data from 1,257 patients diagnosed with non-valvular atrial fibrillation who were receiving oral anticoagulant therapy. Depending on the scheme used, the direct health care costs for these patients ranged from €423,695 - €1,436,038 per annum. The average cost per patient varied between €392 - €1,341, depending on the approach used. Patients with international normalized ratio values within the therapeutic range on 25% of their visits represented an average cost between €441.70 - €1,592. Those within the therapeutic range on 25%–50% of visits had associated costs of €512.37 - €1,703.91. When international normalized ratio values were within the therapeutic range on 50% - 75% of the visits, the costs ranged between €400.80- €1,375.74. The

  1. New and emerging anticoagulant therapy for atrial fibrillation and acute coronary syndrome.

    PubMed

    Davis, Estella M; Packard, Kathleen A; Knezevich, Jon T; Campbell, Jennifer A

    2011-10-01

    Abstract Thrombosis is an underlying cause of many cardiovascular disorders, and generation of thrombi in the arterial circulation can lead to unstable angina, myocardial infarction, or ischemic stroke. Antithrombotic therapy is widely used, with proven benefit to prevent ischemic stroke and thromboembolic events in patients with atrial fibrillation (AF) or to prevent further ischemic complications in patients with acute coronary syndrome (ACS). Traditional anticoagulants (including unfractionated heparin, low-molecular-weight heparin, and warfarin) and antiplatelet agents (including aspirin, clopidogrel, and prasugrel) are typically used for these indications. Limitations to their use include variable pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic profiles, inability to inhibit fibrin-bound thrombin, risk of heparin-induced thrombocytopenia, delayed onset of action, numerous drug interactions, need for substantial laboratory monitoring and dosage titrations, hyporesponsiveness or resistance, hypersensitivity, adverse events, and bleeding. To overcome some of the limitations of traditional agents, new antithrombotic agents under development are highly selective for specific coagulation factors blocking the synthesis of thrombin. Clinicians must have an understanding of the new anticoagulants to aid in the selection of appropriate therapies for patients. We describe the most relevant phases II and III clinical trials that evaluated several recent emerging anticoagulant drugs for use in patients with AF or ACS. The advantages of many new agents include predictable pharmaco-dynamic response and pharmacokinetic parameters, allowing for fixed oral dosing with no need for laboratory monitoring. For patients with AF, dabigatran is already approved for the prevention of stroke and systemic embolism, rivaroxaban appears to be an effective alternative to warfarin in high-risk patients, and apixaban may also be an effective alternative to aspirin in patients unable to take warfarin

  2. High D-dimer levels after stopping anticoagulants in pulmonary embolism with sleep apnoea.

    PubMed

    García Suquia, Angela; Alonso-Fernández, Alberto; de la Peña, Mónica; Romero, David; Piérola, Javier; Carrera, Miguel; Barceló, Antonia; Soriano, Joan B; Arque, Meritxell; Fernández-Capitán, Carmen; Lorenzo, Alicia; García-Río, Francisco

    2015-12-01

    Obstructive sleep apnoea is a risk factor for pulmonary embolism. Elevated D-dimer levels and other biomarkers are associated with recurrent pulmonary embolism. The objectives were to compare the frequency of elevated D-dimer levels (>500 ng·mL(-1)) and further coagulation biomarkers after oral anticoagulation withdrawal in pulmonary embolism patients, with and without obstructive sleep apnoea, including two control groups without pulmonary embolism.We performed home respiratory polygraphy. We also measured basic biochemical profile and haemogram, and coagulation biomarkers (D-dimer, prothrombin fragment 1+2, thrombin-antithrombin complex, plasminogen activator inhibitor 1, and soluble P-selectin).64 (74.4%) of the pulmonary embolism cases and 41 (46.11%) of the controls without pulmonary embolism had obstructive sleep apnoea. Plasmatic D-dimer was higher in PE patients with OSA than in those without obstructive sleep apnoea. D-dimer levels were significantly correlated with apnoea-hypopnoea index, and nocturnal hypoxia. There were more patients with high D-dimer after stopping anticoagulants in those with pulmonary embolism and obstructive sleep apnoea compared with PE without obstructive sleep apnoea (35.4% versus 19.0%, p=0.003). Apnoea-hypopnoea index was independently associated with high D-dimer.Pulmonary embolism patients with obstructive sleep apnoea had higher rates of elevated D-dimer levels after anticoagulation discontinuation for pulmonary embolism than in patients without obstructive sleep apnoea and, therefore, higher procoagulant state that might increase the risk of pulmonary embolism recurrence.

  3. Influence of Clinical Parameters and Anticoagulation on Intraprocedural Cerebral Microembolic Signals during Pulmonary Vein Isolation

    PubMed Central

    Leitz, Patrick; Guener, Fatih; Korsukewitz, Catharina; Dechering, Dirk; Pott, Christian; Wasmer, Kristina; Schmitges, Jan; Kerckhoff, Monika; Eckardt, Lars; Moennig, Gerold

    2016-01-01

    Objective We had the objective to determine the impact of clinical parameters and anticoagulation status on cerebral microembolic signals (MES) during pulmonary vein isolation (PVI) for atrial fibrillation (AF). Background Thromboembolism and stroke are the most feared complications of PVI. MES can help to evaluate embolic burden. It is unknown whether clinical parameters have an impact on embolic risk during PVI. Methods In this retrospective analysis we investigated the impact of clinical parameters, including the CHADS2- and CHA2DS2-VASc-score, pulmonary vein variants and echocardiographic parameters on MES rates in patients that underwent PVI using three different ablation approaches (radiofrequency ablation (iRF), pulmonary vein ablation catheter (PVAC) with deactivated electrode pair 1 or 5 (PVAC-red) or PVAC without deactivation (PVAC-all). Results 118 AF patients (61±12 years) were included between 2011 and 2013 (Median: 489 MES during PVI). Patients were more likely to have more MES (within 4th quartile) with the PVAC-all approach (60.7% vs. 25.0% (iRF) vs. 14.3% (PVAC-red) respectively (p<0.001). Patients with oral anticoagulation (OAC) pre-ablation were more likely to have lower MES-counts (1st-3rd quartile); (65.6% vs. 35.7%; p = 0.005). Additionally, patients with lower MES counts (1st-3rd quartile) had significantly higher INR values than those in the 4th quartile (1.78 vs. 1.09; p = 0.029). 2 patients developed a potentially thromboembolic event during the procedure. Conclusion Clinical predictors of cerebral emboli and stroke do not correlate with cerebral embolic burden during PVI. Pre-ablation OAC and increased INR values correlate with decreased MES-rates. Therefore, it might be beneficial to perform PVI with pre-ablation anticoagulation even in low risk patients. PMID:27327662

  4. Dental surgery in anticoagulated patients--stop the interruption.

    PubMed

    Wahl, Michael J; Pinto, Andres; Kilham, Jessica; Lalla, Rajesh V

    2015-02-01

    In a literature review, the incidence and morbidity of bleeding complications after dental surgery in anticoagulated patients was compared with embolic complications when anticoagulation was interrupted. Over 99% of anticoagulated patients had no postoperative bleeding that required more than local hemostatic measures. Of more than 5431 patients undergoing more than 11,381 surgical procedures, with many patients at higher than present therapeutic intenational normalized ratio (INR) levels, only 31 (∼0.6% of patients) required more than local hemostasis to control the hemorrhage; none died due to hemorrhage. Among at least 2673 patients whose warfarin dose was reduced or withdrawn for at least 2775 visits for dental procedures, there were 22 embolic complications (0.8% of cessations), including 6 fatal events (0.2% of cessations). The embolic morbidity risk in patients whose anticoagulation is interrupted for dental surgery exceeds that of significant bleeding complications in patients whose anticoagulation is continued, even when surgery is extensive. Warfarin anticoagulation, therefore, should not be interrupted for most dental surgery.

  5. Anticoagulation in cirrhosis: a new paradigm?

    PubMed Central

    Leonardi, Filippo; Maria, Nicola De; Villa, Erica

    2017-01-01

    The liver plays a crucial role in coagulation cascade. Global hemostatic process is profoundly influenced by the presence of liver disease and its complications. Patients with cirrhosis have impaired synthesis of most of the factors involved in coagulation and fibrinolysis process due to a reduced liver function and altered platelet count secondary to portal hypertension. Altered routine tests and thrombocytopenia were considered in the past as associated with increased risk of bleeding. These concepts explain both the routine use of plasma and/or platelets transfusion in patients with liver cirrhosis, especially before invasive procedures, and why these patients were considered “auto-anticoagulated”. New recent evidences show that patients with liver cirrhosis have a more complex hemostatic alteration. Despite the presence of altered levels of factors involved in primary hemostasis, coagulation and fibrinolysis, patients with stable cirrhosis have a rebalanced hemostatic, which however can easily be altered by decompensation or infection, both in hemorrhagic or thrombotic direction. Patients with cirrhosis have an increased risk of venous thrombotic events (namely portal vein thrombosis) while bleeding seems to be related to the grade of portal hypertension rather than to a hemostatic imbalance. The use of anticoagulants both as treatment or prophylaxis is safe, reduces the rate of portal vein thrombosis and decompensation, and improves survival. Standard laboratory coagulation tests are unable to predict bleeding and are inadequate for the assessment of hemostatic status in these patients, hence more comprehensive tests are required to guide the management of thrombotic and bleeding complications. PMID:28288507

  6. Peri-operative management of anticoagulation and antiplatelet therapy in gastrointestinal surgery.

    PubMed

    Degirmenci, S-E; Steib, A

    2014-04-01

    Peri-operative management of the risks of hemorrhage and thrombosis related to gastrointestinal surgery tailored to patient characteristics are part of daily multidisciplinary practice tasks. The goal of this update is to discuss current practices concerning antithrombosis prophylaxis and the management of recently developed anticoagulants and antiplatelet agents. The duration of prophylaxis is 1 month for oncological surgery. The recommended doses in bariatric surgery are twice daily injections of low-molecular weight heparin without exceeding a total dose of 10,000 IU/day. Dual antiplatelet therapy is necessary for 6 weeks after placement of bare-metal stents, from 6-12 months for drug-eluting stents, and 12 months after an acute coronary artery syndrome. Abrupt discontinuation of antiplatelet therapy exposes the patient to an increased risk of thrombosis. Data are insufficient to make specific recommendations for antiplatelet therapy in gastrointestinal surgery. For major digestive surgery, prescription of daily aspirin should be discussed case by case. If discontinuation of treatment is absolutely necessary, this should be as short as possible (aspirin: 3 days, ticagrelor and clopidogrel: 5 days, prasugrel: 7 days). The modalities for elective management of new oral anticoagulants are similar to those for classical vitamin K antagonists (VKA) therapy, except that any overlapping with heparin administration must be avoided. In the emergency setting, an algorithm can be proposed depending on the drug, the available coagulation tests and the interval before performing surgery.

  7. Anticoagulation for non-valvular atrial aibrillation – towards a new beginning with ximelagatran

    PubMed Central

    Boos, Christopher J; More, Ranjit S

    2004-01-01

    Objectives Ximelagatran is a novel oral direct thrombin inhibitor. It has favorable pharmacodynamic properties, with a broad therapeutic range without the need for anticoagulation monitoring. We aimed to discover whether ximelagatran offers a genuine future replacement to warfarin for patients in persistent atrial fibrillation (AF). Materials and methods We provide an evidence-based review of the relative merits and disadvantages of warfarin and aspirin. We subsequently present an overview of the evidence for the utility of ximelagatran in the treatment of AF. Results Adjusted dose warfarin is recommended over aspirin for patients in AF at high risk of future stroke. Some of this benefit is partially offset by the higher bleeding risks associated with warfarin therapy. The SPORTIF III and V studies have shown that ximelagatran is not inferior to warfarin in the prevention of all strokes in patients with AF (both persistent and paroxysmal). This benefit was partially offset by the finding of a significant elevation of liver transaminases (>3 × normal) in 6% of patients. Conclusions Current data would suggest that ximelagatran might represent a future alternative to warfarin. The lack of need for anticoagulant monitoring has been partially offset by a need for regular monitoring of liver function. Further data from randomized clinical trials is clearly needed. PMID:15104801

  8. Intracranial hemorrhage and novel anticoagulants for atrial fibrillation: what have we learned?

    PubMed

    Hankey, Graeme J

    2014-05-01

    Intracranial hemorrhage (ICH) affects 0.2-0.5 % of atrial fibrillation (AF) patients taking a novel oral anticoagulant (NOAC) each year. About two thirds of ICHs are intracerebral and one quarter subdural. The 30-day case fatality of NOAC-associated ICH was similar to that of warfarin-associated ICH in two trials. Consistent predictors of ICH are increasing age, a history of prior stroke or TIA, and concomitant use of an antiplatelet drug. Compared to warfarin, the NOACs significantly reduce the risk of ICH by half (risk ratio = 0.44; 95 % CI: 0.37 to 0.51). Compared to aspirin, apixaban has a similar risk of ICH (risk ratio = 0.84; 95 % CI, 0.38 to 1.87). Current treatments for NOAC-associated ICH include nonactivated and activated prothrombin complex concentrate, which reverse the anticoagulant effects of the NOACs, but their effects on bleeding and patient outcome are not known. Future treatments for NOAC-associated ICH promise to include specific antidotes to dabigatran (e.g., aDabi-Fab, PER977) and factor Xa inhibitors (e.g., r-Antidote PRT064445, PER977).

  9. Simplified citrate anticoagulation for high-flux hemodialysis.

    PubMed

    Apsner, R; Buchmayer, H; Lang, T; Unver, B; Speiser, W; Sunder-Plassmann, G; Hörl, W H

    2001-11-01

    In a randomized crossover trial, we compared a simple citrate anticoagulation protocol for high-flux hemodialysis with standard anticoagulation by low-molecular-weight heparin (dalteparin). Primary end points were urea reduction rate (URR), Kt/V, and control of electrolyte and acid-base homeostasis. Secondary end points were bleeding time at vascular puncture sites and markers of activation of platelets, coagulation, and fibrinolysis. Solute removal during citrate dialysis was excellent (URR, 0.71 +/- 0.06; Kt/V, 1.55 +/- 0.3) and similar to results of conventional bicarbonate hemodialysis anticoagulation with dalteparin (URR, 0.72 +/- 0.04; Kt/V, 1.56 +/- 0.2). Electrolyte control was effective with both anticoagulation regimens, and total and ionized calcium, sodium, potassium, and phosphate concentrations at the end of dialysis did not differ. Alkalemia was less frequent after citrate than conventional dialysis (pH 7.5 in 25% versus 62% of patients; mean pH at end of dialysis, 7.46 +/- 0.06 versus 7.51 +/- 0.07; P < 0.01). Bleeding time at puncture sites was shorter by 30% after citrate compared with dalteparin anticoagulation (5.43 +/- 2.80 versus 7.86 +/- 2.93 minutes; P < 0.001). Activation of platelets, coagulation, and fibrinolysis was modest for both treatments and occurred mainly within the dialyzer during dalteparin treatment and in the vascular-access region during citrate anticoagulation. Citrate-related adverse events were not observed. We conclude that citrate anticoagulation for high-flux hemodialysis is feasible and safe using a simple infusion protocol.

  10. Atrial fibrillation anticoagulation care in a large urban family medicine practice

    PubMed Central

    Valentinis, Alissia; Ivers, Noah; Bhatia, Sacha; Meshkat, Nazanin; Leblanc, Kori; Ha, Andrew; Morra, Dante

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Objective To determine the proportion of patients with atrial fibrillation (AF) in primary care achieving guideline-concordant stroke prevention treatment based on both the previous (2010) and the updated (2012) Canadian guideline recommendations. Design Retrospective chart review. Participants Primary care patients (N = 204) with AF. The mean age was 71.3 years and 53.4% were women. Setting Large urban community family practice in Toronto, Ont. Main outcome measures Patient demographic characteristics such as sex and age; a list of current cardiac medications including anticoagulants and antiplatelets; the total number of medications; relevant current and past medical history including presence of diabetes, stroke or transient ischemic attack, hypertension, and vascular disease; number of visits to the family physician and cardiologist in the past year and past 5 years, and how many of these were for AF; the number of visits to the emergency department or hospitalizations for AF, congestive heart failure, or stroke; if patients were taking warfarin, how often their international normalized ratios were recorded, and how many times they were in the reference range; CHADS2 (congestive heart failure, hypertension, age ≥ 75, diabetes mellitus, and stroke or transient ischemic attack) score, if recorded; and reason for not taking oral anticoagulants when they should have been, if recorded. Results Among those who had CHADS2 scores of 0, 64 patients (97.0%) were receiving appropriate stroke prevention in AF (SPAF) treatment according to the 2010 guidelines. When the 2012 guidelines were applied, 39 patients (59.1%) were receiving appropriate SPAF treatment (P < .001). For those with CHADS2 scores of 1, 88.4% of patients had appropriate SPAF treatment according to the 2010 guidelines, but only 55.1% were adequately treated according to the 2012 guidelines (P < .001). Of the patients at the highest risk (CHADS2 score > 1), 68.1% were adequately treated with

  11. Detecting nonvalvular atrial fibrillation and anticoagulant therapy in cardioembolic ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Min, Jiangyong; Farooq, Muhammad Umar

    2016-08-01

    Nonvalvular Atrial fibrillation (NVAF) is the most common cardiac arrhythmia associated with an increase in risk of stroke and systemic thromboembolism. Strokes related to AF are associated with higher mortality, greater disability, longer hospital stays, and lower chance of being discharged home. The present review will focus on the current status of detecting NVAF and stroke prevention when there is AF. The CHA2DS2-VASc risk stratification scheme is discussed for the identification of patients who are at risk for thromboembolic stroke related to NVAF. Patient with a CHA2DS2-VASc score of 2 or greater are candidates for warfarin or a novel oral anticoagulant, irrespective of whether the strategy is for rate or rhythm control. Finally, guidelines and landmark clinical trials in NVAF patients with primary or secondary stroke prevention are discussed.

  12. Spontaneous iliopsoas muscle haematoma as a complication of anticoagulation in acute cerebral venous thrombosis: to stop or not to stop (the anticoagulation)?

    PubMed Central

    Fernandes, Carina; Pereira, Pedro; Rodrigues, Miguel

    2015-01-01

    Spontaneous iliopsoas muscle haematoma is an infrequent complication of anticoagulation, potentially causing neurological dysfunction through compression of the femoral nerve or lumbar plexus. The authors report the case of a puerperal woman admitted for an extensive cerebral venous thrombosis. Anticoagulation was started, with clinical improvement. The patient later reported low back pain irradiating to the right thigh and developed neurological impairment consistent with lumbar plexus dysfunction. A pelvic CT scan revealed a right iliopsoas muscle haematoma. Considering the risk of anticoagulation suspension, a conservative approach was chosen, with maintenance of anticoagulation. Clinical and functional improvement occurred, with mild right hip and knee flexion paresis as sequelae. Anticoagulation complications are challenging, especially when interruption of anticoagulation may threaten vital and functional outcomes. Therefore, a careful evaluation is essential, since no clinical guidelines are available. In this case, continuing anticoagulation provided a good functional outcome. PMID:25750219

  13. Spontaneous iliopsoas muscle haematoma as a complication of anticoagulation in acute cerebral venous thrombosis: to stop or not to stop (the anticoagulation)?

    PubMed

    Fernandes, Carina; Pereira, Pedro; Rodrigues, Miguel

    2015-03-06

    Spontaneous iliopsoas muscle haematoma is an infrequent complication of anticoagulation, potentially causing neurological dysfunction through compression of the femoral nerve or lumbar plexus. The authors report the case of a puerperal woman admitted for an extensive cerebral venous thrombosis. Anticoagulation was started, with clinical improvement. The patient later reported low back pain irradiating to the right thigh and developed neurological impairment consistent with lumbar plexus dysfunction. A pelvic CT scan revealed a right iliopsoas muscle haematoma. Considering the risk of anticoagulation suspension, a conservative approach was chosen, with maintenance of anticoagulation. Clinical and functional improvement occurred, with mild right hip and knee flexion paresis as sequelae. Anticoagulation complications are challenging, especially when interruption of anticoagulation may threaten vital and functional outcomes. Therefore, a careful evaluation is essential, since no clinical guidelines are available. In this case, continuing anticoagulation provided a good functional outcome.

  14. Risk of bleeding after dentoalveolar surgery in patients taking anticoagulants.

    PubMed

    Broekema, Ferdinand I; van Minnen, Baucke; Jansma, Johan; Bos, Rudolf R M

    2014-03-01

    To avoid increasing the risk of thromboembolic events, it is recommended that treatment with anticoagulants should be continued during dentoalveolar operations. We have evaluated the incidence of bleeding after dentoalveolar operations in a prospective study of 206 patients, 103 who were, and 103 who were not, taking anticoagulants. Seventy-one were taking thrombocyte aggregation inhibitors and 32 vitamin K antagonists. Patients were treated according to guidelines developed at the Academic Centre for Dentistry Amsterdam (ACTA), The Netherlands. The operations studied included surgical extraction (when the surgeon had to incise the gingiva before extraction), non-surgical extraction, apicectomy, and placement of implants. Patients were given standard postoperative care and those taking vitamin K antagonists used tranexamic acid mouthwash postoperatively. No patient developed a severe bleed that required intervention. Seven patients (7%) taking anticoagulants developed mild postoperative bleeds. Patients taking vitamin K antagonists reported 3 episodes (9%) compared with 4 (6%) in the group taking thrombocyte aggregation inhibitors. Among patients not taking anticoagulants, two (2%) developed mild bleeding. The differences between the groups were not significant. All bleeding was controlled by the patients themselves with compression with gauze. We conclude that dentoalveolar surgery is safe in patients being treated with anticoagulants provided that the conditions described in the ACTA guidelines are met.

  15. Controversies in Anticoagulant Therapy in Vitreo-Retinal Surgery.

    PubMed

    Grzybowski, Andrzej; Kupidura-Majewski, Konrad; Kupidura, Paulina

    2015-01-01

    The number of elderly patients using anticoagulant and antiplatelet treatment in prevention of thromboembolism has significantly increased in recent years. It was believed for many years that those patients may be at higher risk for hemorhages during ocular surgery. Different strategies were proposed to prevent these complications, including discontinuation of anticoagulants, dose reduction, or substitution with low molecular weight heparin. The objective of this work was to evaluate the results of studies presenting the results of vitreoretinal surgeries in patients continuing antiplatelet and/or anticoagulant treatment. We performed a PubMed search of possible intraoperative and postoperative hemorrhages in patients receiving anticoagulant and/or antiplatelet therapy during vitreoretinal surgery in 2007-2014. In most of the studies reviewed there was no substantial increase in intraoperative and postoperative hemorrhages risks during vitreoretinal surgery. However, in some studies, a substantially increased risk has been identified. We conclude that the available data is insufficient to decide whether to continue or discontinue anticoagulant and/or antiplatelet therapy during vitreoretinal surgery and we recommend an individualized approach in consultation with the patient's medical doctors and anesthesiologists.

  16. Marine sulfated glycans with serpin-unrelated anticoagulant properties.

    PubMed

    Glauser, Bianca F; Mourão, Paulo A S; Pomin, Vitor H

    2013-01-01

    Marine organisms are a rich source of sulfated polysaccharides with unique structures. Fucosylated chondroitin sulfate (FucCS) from the sea cucumber Ludwigothurea grisea and sulfated galactan from the red alga Botryocladia occidentalis are one of these unusual molecules. Besides their uncommon structures, they also exhibit high anticoagulant and antithrombotic effects. Earlier, it was considered that the anticoagulant activities of these two marine glycans were driven mainly by a catalytic serpin-dependent mechanism likewise the mammalian heparins. Its serpin-dependent anticoagulant action relies on promoting thrombin and/or factor Xa inhibition by their specific natural inhibitors (the serpins antithrombin and heparin cofactor II). However, as opposed to heparins, these two previously mentioned marine glycans were proved still capable in promoting coagulation inhibition using serpin-free plasmas. This puzzle observation was further investigated and clearly demonstrated that the cucumber FucCS and the red algal sulfated galactan have an unusual serpin-independent anticoagulant effect by inhibiting the formation of factor Xa and/or thrombin through the procoagulants tenase and prothrombinase complexes, respectively. These marine polysaccharides with unusual anticoagulant effects open clearly new perspectives for the development of new antithrombotic drugs as well as push the glycomics project.

  17. Personalized antiplatelet and anticoagulation therapy: applications and significance of pharmacogenomics

    PubMed Central

    Beitelshees, Amber L; Voora, Deepak; Lewis, Joshua P

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, substantial effort has been made to better understand the influence of genetic factors on the efficacy and safety of numerous medications. These investigations suggest that the use of pharmacogenetic data to inform physician decision-making has great potential to enhance patient care by reducing on-treatment clinical events, adverse drug reactions, and health care-related costs. In fact, integration of such information into the clinical setting may be particularly applicable for antiplatelet and anticoagulation therapeutics, given the increasing body of evidence implicating genetic variation in variable drug response. In this review, we summarize currently available pharmacogenetic information for the most commonly used antiplatelet (ie, clopidogrel and aspirin) and anticoagulation (ie, warfarin) medications. Furthermore, we highlight the currently known role of genetic variability in response to next-generation antiplatelet (prasugrel and ticagrelor) and anticoagulant (dabigatran) agents. While compelling evidence suggests that genetic variants are important determinants of antiplatelet and anticoagulation therapy response, significant barriers to clinical implementation of pharmacogenetic testing exist and are described herein. In addition, we briefly discuss development of new diagnostic targets and therapeutic strategies as well as implications for enhanced patient care. In conclusion, pharmacogenetic testing can provide important information to assist clinicians with prescribing the most personalized and effective antiplatelet and anticoagulation therapy. However, several factors may limit its usefulness and should be considered. PMID:25897256

  18. A Proposal for an Individualized Pharmacogenetic-Guided Warfarin Dosage Regimen for Puerto Rican Patients Commencing Anticoagulation Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Bosch, Luis Ángel Bermúdez

    2014-01-01

    Warfarin is the current standard of care in oral anticoagulation therapy. It is commonly prescribed to treat venous thromboembolism, pulmonary embolism, acute myocardial infarction, and to decrease the risk of stroke in atrial fibrillation. Warfarin therapy is challenging because of marked and often unpredictable inter-individual dosing variations that effectively reach and maintain adequate anticoagulation. Several researchers have developed pharmacogenetic-guided maintenance dose algorithms that incorporate genetics and individual patient characteristics. However, there is limited information available concerning dosing during warfarin initiation. This is considered the most clinically challenging therapeutic phase. In such, the risk of recurrent thromboembolism and hemorrhage are elevated. The objective of this retrospective study is to predict the individual initial doses for Puerto Rican patients (n=175) commencing anticoagulation therapy at Veterans Affairs Caribbean Healthcare System (VACHS) using pharmacogenetic/pharmacokinetic-driven model. A pharmacogenetic driven model (R2=0.4809) was developed in Puerto Rican patients and combined with pharmacokinetic formulas that enabled us to predict the individual initial doses for patients (n=121) commencing anticoagulation therapy. WinNonlin® pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic simulations were carried out to determine the predictability of this model. This model demonstrated promising results with few (n=10) simulations outside of their respective therapy range. A customized pharmacogenetic-based warfarin maintenance dose algorithm (R2=0.7659) was developed in a derivation cohort of 131 patients. The predictability of this developed pharmacogenetic algorithm was compared with the International Warfarin Pharmacogenomics Consortium (IWPC) algorithm and it demonstrated superior predictability within our study population. PMID:25285240

  19. Rivaroxaban for Periprocedural Anticoagulation Therapy in Japanese Patients Undergoing Catheter Ablation of Paroxysmal Non-Valvular Atrial Fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Kawabata, Mihoko; Sasaki, Takeshi; Maeda, Shingo; Shirai, Yasuhiro; Yamauchi, Yasuteru; Nitta, Junichi; Goya, Masahiko; Hirao, Kenzo

    2016-12-02

    Direct oral anticoagulants (DOACs) have been shown to be safe and effective for the prevention of stroke