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  1. Novel teleost CD4-bearing cell populations provide insights into the evolutionary origins and primordial roles of CD4+ lymphocytes and CD4+ macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Takizawa, Fumio; Magadan, Susana; Parra, David; Xu, Zhen; Korytář, Tomáš; Boudinot, Pierre; Sunyer, J. Oriol

    2016-01-01

    Tetrapods contain a single CD4 co-receptor with four immunoglobulin domains that likely arose from a primordial two-domain ancestor. Notably, teleost fish contain two CD4 genes. Like tetrapod CD4, CD4-1 of rainbow trout includes four immunoglobulin domains while CD4-2 contains only two. Since CD4-2 is reminiscent of the prototypic two-domain CD4 co-receptor, we hypothesized that by characterizing the cell types bearing CD4-1 and CD4-2, we would shed light into the evolution and primordial roles of CD4-bearing cells. Using newly established monoclonal antibodies against CD4-1 and CD4-2, we identified two bona fide CD4+ T-cell populations, a predominant lymphocyte population co-expressing surface CD4-1 and CD4-2 (CD4 DP), and a minor subset expressing only CD4-2 (CD4-2 SP). While both subsets produced equivalent levels of Th1, Th17, and Treg cytokines upon bacterial infection, CD4-2 SP lymphocytes were less proliferative and displayed a more restricted TCRβ repertoire. These data suggest that CD4-2 SP cells represent a functionally distinct population and may embody a vestigial CD4+ T cell subset, the roles of which reflect those of primeval CD4+ T cells. Importantly, we also describe the first CD4+ monocyte/macrophage population in a non-mammalian species. Of all myeloid subsets, we found the CD4+ population to be the most phagocytic, while CD4+ lymphocytes lacked this capacity. This study fills in an important gap in the knowledge of teleost CD4-bearing leukocytes thus revealing critical insights into the evolutionary origins and primordial roles of CD4+ lymphocytes and CD4+ monocyte/macrophages. PMID:27183628

  2. CD4 CTL, a Cytotoxic Subset of CD4+ T Cells, Their Differentiation and Function

    PubMed Central

    Takeuchi, Arata; Saito, Takashi

    2017-01-01

    CD4+ T cells with cytotoxic activity (CD4 CTL) have been observed in various immune responses. These cells are characterized by their ability to secrete granzyme B and perforin and to kill the target cells in an MHC class II-restricted fashion. Although CD4 CTLs were once thought to be an in vitro artifact associated with long-term culturing, they have since been identified in vivo and shown to play important roles in antiviral and antitumor immunity, as well as in inflammation. Functional characterization of CD4 CTL suggests their potential significance for therapeutic purposes. However, in order to develop effective CD4 CTL therapy it is necessary to understand the differentiation and generation of these cells. Although the mechanisms regulating development of various CD4+ Th subsets have been clarified in terms of the cytokine and transcription factor requirement, the CD4 CTL differentiation mechanism remains elusive. These cells are thought to be most closely related to Th1 cells secreting IFNγ and regulated by eomesodermin and/or T-bet transcription factors for their differentiation. However, our studies and those of others have identified CD4 CTLs within other CD4+ T cell subsets, including naïve T cells. We have identified class I-restricted T cell-associated molecule as a marker of CD4 CTL and, by using this marker, we detected a subset of naïve T cells that have the potential to differentiate into CD4 CTL. CD4 CTL develops at sites of infections as well as inflammation. In this review, we summarize recent findings about the generation of CD4 CTL and propose a model with several differentiation pathways. PMID:28280496

  3. Immune memory in CD4+ CD45RA+ T cells.

    PubMed Central

    Richards, D; Chapman, M D; Sasama, J; Lee, T H; Kemeny, D M

    1997-01-01

    This study addresses the question of whether human peripheral CD4+ CD45RA+ T cells possess antigen-specific immune memory. CD4+ CD45RA+ T cells were isolated by a combination of positive and negative selection. Putative CD4+ CD45RA+ cells expressed CD45RA (98.9%) and contained < 0.1% CD4+ CD45RO+ and < 0.5% CD4+ CD45RA+ CD45RO+ cells. Putative CD45RO+ cells expressed CD45RO (90%) and contained 9% CD45RA+ CD45RO+ and < 0.1% CD4+ CD45RA+ cells. The responder frequency of Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus-stimulated CD4+ CD45RA+ and CD4+ CD45RO+ T cells was determined in two atopic donors and found to be 1:11,314 and 1:8031 for CD4+ CD45RA+ and 1:1463 and 1:1408 for CD4+ CD45RO+ T cells. The responder frequencies of CD4+ CD45RA+ and CD4+ CD45RO+ T cells from two non-atopic, but exposed, donors were 1:78031 and 1:176,903 for CD4+ CD45RA+ and 1:9136 and 1:13,136 for CD4+ CD45RO+ T cells. T cells specific for D. pteronyssinus were cloned at limiting dilution following 10 days of bulk culture with D. pteronyssinus antigen. Sixty-eight clones were obtained from CD4+ CD45RO+ and 24 from CD4+ CD45RA+ T cells. All clones were CD3+ CD4+ CD45RO+ and proliferated in response to D. pteronyssinus antigens. Of 40 clones tested, none responded to Tubercule bacillus purified protein derivative (PPD). No difference was seen in the pattern of interleukin-4 (IL-4) or interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) producing clones derived from CD4+ CD45RA+ and CD4+ CD45RO+ precursors, although freshly isolated and polyclonally activated CD4+ CD45RA+ T cells produced 20-30-fold lower levels of IL-4 and IFN-gamma than their CD4+ CD45RO+ counterparts. Sixty per cent of the clones used the same pool of V beta genes. These data support the hypothesis that immune memory resides in CD4+ CD45RA+ as well as CD4+ CD45RO+ T cells during the chronic immune response to inhaled antigen. PMID:9301520

  4. Apoptotic depletion of CD4+ T cells in idiopathic CD4+ T lymphocytopenia.

    PubMed Central

    Laurence, J; Mitra, D; Steiner, M; Lynch, D H; Siegal, F P; Staiano-Coico, L

    1996-01-01

    Progressive loss of CD4+ T lymphocytes, accompanied by opportunistic infections characteristic of the acquired immune deficiency syndrome, ahs been reported in the absence of any known etiology. The pathogenesis of this syndrome, a subset of idiopathic CD4+ T lymphocytopenia (ICL), is uncertain. We report that CD4+ T cells from seven of eight ICL patients underwent accelerated programmed cell death, a process facilitated by T cell receptor cross-linking. Apoptosis was associated with enhanced expression of Fas and Fas ligand in unstimulated cell populations, and partially inhibited by soluble anti-Fas mAb. In addition, apoptosis was suppressed by aurintricarboxylic acid, an inhibitor of calcium-dependent endonucleases and proteases, in cells from four of seven patients, The in vivo significance of these findings was supported by three factors: the absence of accelerated apoptosis in persons with stable, physiologic CD4 lymphopenia without clinical immune deficiency; detection of serum antihistone H2B autoantibodies, one consequence of DNA fragmentation, in some patients; and its selectivity, with apoptosis limited to the CD4 population in some, and occurring among CD8+ T cells predominantly in those individuals with marked depletion of both CD4+ T lymphocytes linked to clinical immune suppression have evidence for accelerated T cell apoptosis in vitro that may be pathophysiologic and amenable to therapy with apoptosis inhibitors. PMID:8609222

  5. Long-Term CD4+ Cell Count in Response to Combination Antiretroviral Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Luz, Paula M.; Grinsztejn, Beatriz; Velasque, Luciane; Pacheco, Antonio G.; Veloso, Valdilea G.; Moore, Richard D.; Struchiner, Claudio J.

    2014-01-01

    Objective There is a continuous debate on how to adequately evaluate long-term CD4+ cell count in response to combination antiretroviral therapy (ART) among human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected individuals. Our study evaluated the long-term CD4+ cell count response (up to ten years) after initiation of ART and described the differences in the CD4+ cell count response stratified by pretreatment CD4+ cell count, and other socio-demographic, behavioral, and clinical factors. Methods The study population included patients starting ART in the clinical cohorts of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, and Baltimore, United States. Inverse probability of censoring weighting was used to estimate mean annual CD4+ cell counts while adjusting for choice of initial ART regimen, ART discontinuation and losses-to-follow-up. Results From 1997 to 2011, 3116 individuals started ART; preferred initial regimen was NNRTI-based (63%). The median follow-up time was 5 years, 10% of the individuals had nine or more years of follow-up. Observed CD4+ cell counts increased throughout the ten years of follow-up. Weighted results, in contrast, increased up to year four and plateaued thereafter with 50% of the population reaching CD4+ cell counts of 449/μL or more. Out of all stratification variables considered, only individuals with pre-treatment CD4+ cell counts ≥350/μL showed increasing CD4+ cell counts over time with 76% surpassing the CD4+ cell count >500/μL threshold at year ten. Conclusion The present study corroborates the growing body of knowledge advocating early start of ART by showing that only patients who start ART early fully recover to normal CD4+ cell counts. PMID:24695533

  6. The BD FACSPresto Point of Care CD4 Test Accurately Enumerates CD4+ T Cell Counts

    PubMed Central

    Bwana, Priska; Vojnov, Lara; Adhiambo, Maureen; Akinyi, Catherine; Mwende, Joy; Prescott, Marta; Mwau, Matilu

    2015-01-01

    Objective Currently 50% of ART eligible patients are not yet receiving life-saving antiretroviral therapy (ART). Financial constraints do not allow most developing countries to adopt a universal test and offer ART strategy. Decentralizing CD4+ T cell testing may, therefore, provide greater access to testing, ART, and better patient management. We evaluated the technical performance of a new point-of-care CD4+ T cell technology, the BD FACSPresto, in a field methods comparison study. Methods 264 HIV-positive patients were consecutively enrolled and included in the study. The BD FACSPresto POC CD4+ T cell technology was placed in two rural health care facilities and operated by health care facility staff. We compared paired finger-prick and venous samples using the BD FACSPresto and several existing reference technologies, respectively. Results The BD FACSPresto had a mean bias of 67.29 cells/ul and an r2 of 0.9203 compared to the BD FACSCalibur. At ART eligibility thresholds of 350 and 500 cells/ul, the sensitivity to define treatment eligibility were 81.5% and 77.2% and the specificities were 98.9% and 100%, respectively. Similar results were observed when the BD FACSPresto was compared to the BD FACSCount and Alere Pima. The coefficient of variation (CV) was less than 7% for both the BD FACSCalibur and BD FACSPresto. CD4+ T cell testing by nurses using the BD FACSPresto at rural health care facilities showed high technical similarity to test results generated by laboratory technicians using the BD FACSPresto in a high functioning laboratory. Conclusions The BD FACSPresto performed favorably in the laboratory setting compared to the conventional reference standard technologies; however, the lower sensitivities indicated that up to 20% of patients tested in the field in need of treatment would be missed. The BD FACSPresto is a technology that can allow for greater decentralization and wider access to CD4+ T cell testing and ART. PMID:26720601

  7. CD4 aptamer-RORγt shRNA chimera inhibits IL-17 synthesis by human CD4(+) T cells.

    PubMed

    Song, Pingfang; Chou, Yuan K; Zhang, Xiaowei; Meza-Romero, Roberto; Yomogida, Kentaro; Benedek, Gil; Chu, Cong-Qiu

    2014-10-03

    Cell type specific delivery of RNAi to T cells has remained to be a challenge. Here we describe an aptamer mediated delivery of shRNA to CD4(+) T cells targeting RORγt to suppress Th17 cells. A cDNA encoding CD4 aptamer and RORγt shRNA was constructed and the chimeric CD4 aptamer-RORγt shRNA (CD4-AshR-RORγt) was generated using in vitro T7 RNA transcription. 2'-F-dCTP and 2'-F-dUTP were incorporated into CD4-AshR-RORγt for RNase resistance. CD4-AshR-RORγt was specifically uptaken by CD4(+) Karpas 299 cells and primary human CD4(+) T cells. The RORγt shRNA moiety of CD4-AshR-RORγt chimera was cleaved and released by Dicer. Furthermore, CD4-AshR-RORγt suppressed RORγt gene expression in Karpas 299 cells and CD4(+) T cells and consequently inhibited Th17 cell differentiation and IL-17 production. These results demonstrate that aptamer-facilitated cell specific delivery of shRNA represents a novel approach for efficient RNAi delivery and is potentially to be developed for therapeutics targeting specific T cells subtypes.

  8. Impact of sepsis on CD4 T cell immunity

    PubMed Central

    Cabrera-Perez, Javier; Condotta, Stephanie A.; Badovinac, Vladimir P.; Griffith, Thomas S.

    2014-01-01

    Sepsis remains the primary cause of death from infection in hospital patients, despite improvements in antibiotics and intensive-care practices. Patients who survive severe sepsis can display suppressed immune function, often manifested as an increased susceptibility to (and mortality from) nosocomial infections. Not only is there a significant reduction in the number of various immune cell populations during sepsis, but there is also decreased function in the remaining lymphocytes. Within the immune system, CD4 T cells are important players in the proper development of numerous cellular and humoral immune responses. Despite sufficient clinical evidence of CD4 T cell loss in septic patients of all ages, the impact of sepsis on CD4 T cell responses is not well understood. Recent findings suggest that CD4 T cell impairment is a multipronged problem that results from initial sepsis-induced cell loss. However, the subsequent lymphopenia-induced numerical recovery of the CD4 T cell compartment leads to intrinsic alterations in phenotype and effector function, reduced repertoire diversity, changes in the composition of naive antigen-specific CD4 T cell pools, and changes in the representation of different CD4 T cell subpopulations (e.g., increases in Treg frequency). This review focuses on sepsis-induced alterations within the CD4 T cell compartment that influence the ability of the immune system to control secondary heterologous infections. The understanding of how sepsis affects CD4 T cells through their numerical loss and recovery, as well as function, is important in the development of future treatments designed to restore CD4 T cells to their presepsis state. PMID:24791959

  9. Isolation and Characterization of Salmonid CD4+ T Cells.

    PubMed

    Maisey, Kevin; Montero, Ruth; Corripio-Miyar, Yolanda; Toro-Ascuy, Daniela; Valenzuela, Beatriz; Reyes-Cerpa, Sebastián; Sandino, Ana María; Zou, Jun; Wang, Tiehui; Secombes, Christopher J; Imarai, Mónica

    2016-05-15

    This study reports the isolation and functional characterization of rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) CD4-1(+) T cells and the establishment of an IL-15-dependent CD4-1(+) T cell line. By using Abs specific for CD4-1 and CD3ε it was possible to isolate the double-positive T cells in spleen and head kidney. The morphology and the presence of transcripts for T cell markers in the sorted CD4-1(+)CD3ε(+) cells were studied next. Cells were found to express TCRα, TCRβ, CD152 (CTLA-4), CD154 (CD40L), T-bet, GATA-3, and STAT-1. The sorted CD4-1(+) T cells also had a distinctive functional attribute of mammalian T lymphocytes, namely they could undergo Ag-specific proliferation, using OVA as a model Ag. The OVA-stimulated cells showed increased expression of several cytokines, including IFN-γ1, IL-4/13A, IL-15, IL-17D, IL-10, and TGF-β1, perhaps indicating that T cell proliferation led to differentiation into distinct effector phenotypes. Using IL-15 as a growth factor, we have selected a lymphoid cell line derived from rainbow trout head kidney cells. The morphology, cell surface expression of CD4-1, and the presence of transcripts of T cell cytokines and transcription factors indicated that this is a CD4-1(+) T cell line. To our knowledge, this is the first demonstration of the presence of CD4-1(+)CD3ε(+) T cells in salmonids. As in mammals, CD4-1(+) T cells may be the master regulators of immune responses in fish, and therefore these findings and the new model T cell line developed will contribute to a greater understanding of T cell function and immune responses in teleost fish. Copyright © 2016 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  10. CD4+ T cell activation in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Verselis, S J; Goust, J M

    1987-02-01

    Interleukin-2 (IL-2) production by CD4-enriched T cells from multiple sclerosis (MS) patients and normal individuals stimulated with concanavalin A (conA) and/or autologous and allogeneic B lymphoid cell lines (B-LCL) was evaluated 24, 48 and 96 h after stimulation. ConA-stimulated CD4+ cells from MS patients did not produce significantly more IL-2 than normal CD4+ cells. In contrast, autologous B-LCL-induced IL-2 production by MS CD4+ cells significantly (P = 0.026) exceeded that produced by normal CD4+ cells identically stimulated after 24 h in culture. Differences in IL-2 production by CD4+ cells from MS patients reached highest significance using allogeneic B-LCL, whose stimulatory capacity was similar, whether established from normal individuals or MS patients. This increased IL-2 production in response to B-LCL may represent a supranormal response of CD4+ cells from MS patients to class II major histocompatibility (MHC)-associated stimuli. It suggests that the deficiency of suppressor T cell functions postulated to play a role in MS does not arise from a lack of IL-2 induction and might indicate that bursts of IL-2 production could play a role in MS.

  11. Long-term increase in CD4+ T-cell counts during combination antiretroviral therapy for HIV-1 infection.

    PubMed

    Lok, Judith J; Bosch, Ronald J; Benson, Constance A; Collier, Ann C; Robbins, Gregory K; Shafer, Robert W; Hughes, Michael D

    2010-07-31

    To inform guidelines concerning when to initiate combination antiretroviral therapy (ART), we investigated whether CD4(+) T-cell counts (CD4 cell counts) continue to increase over long periods of time on ART. Losses-to-follow-up and some patients discontinuing ART at higher CD4 cell counts hamper such evaluation, but novel statistical methods can help address these issues. We estimated the long-term CD4 cell count trajectory accounting for losses-to-follow-up and treatment discontinuations. The study population included 898 US patients first initiating ART in a randomized trial (AIDS Clinical Trials Group 384); 575 were subsequently prospectively followed in an observational study (AIDS Clinical Trials Group Longitudinal Linked Randomized Trials). Inverse probability of censoring weighting statistical methods were used to estimate the CD4 cell count trajectory accounting for losses-to-follow-up and ART discontinuations, overall and for pretreatment CD4 cell count categories (500 cells/microl). Median CD4 cell count increased from 270 cells/microl pre-ART to an estimated 556 cells/microl at 3 and 532 cells/microl at 7 years after starting ART in analyses ignoring treatment discontinuations, and to 570 and 640 cells/microl, respectively, had all patients continued ART. However, even had ART been continued, an estimated 25, 9, 3, and 2% of patients with pretreatment CD4 cell counts of 200 or less, 201-350, 351-500, and more than 500 cells/microl would have had CD4 cell counts of 350 cells/microl or less after 7 years. If patients remain on ART, CD4 cell counts increase in most patients for at least 7 years. However, the substantial percentage of patients starting therapy at low CD4 cell counts who still had low CD4 cell counts after 7 years provides support for ART initiation at higher CD4 cell counts.

  12. Administration of interleukin-7 increases CD4 T cells in idiopathic CD4 lymphocytopenia

    PubMed Central

    Porter, Brian O.; DerSimonian, Rebecca; Kovacs, Stephen B.; Thompson, William L.; Perez-Diez, Ainhoa; Freeman, Alexandra F.; Roby, Gregg; Mican, JoAnn; Pau, Alice; Rupert, Adam; Adelsberger, Joseph; Higgins, Jeanette; Bourgeois, Jeffrey S.; Jensen, Stig M. R.; Morcock, David R.; Burbelo, Peter D.; Osnos, Leah; Maric, Irina; Natarajan, Ven; Croughs, Therese; Yao, Michael D.; Estes, Jacob D.; Sereti, Irini

    2016-01-01

    Idiopathic CD4 lymphopenia (ICL) is a rare syndrome defined by low CD4 T-cell counts (<300/µL) without evidence of HIV infection or other known cause of immunodeficiency. ICL confers an increased risk of opportunistic infections and has no established treatment. Interleukin-7 (IL-7) is fundamental for thymopoiesis, T-cell homeostasis, and survival of mature T cells, which provides a rationale for its potential use as an immunotherapeutic agent for ICL. We performed an open-label phase 1/2A dose-escalation trial of 3 subcutaneous doses of recombinant human IL-7 (rhIL-7) per week in patients with ICL who were at risk of disease progression. The primary objectives of the study were to assess safety and the immunomodulatory effects of rhIL-7 in ICL patients. Injection site reactions were the most frequently reported adverse events. One patient experienced a hypersensitivity reaction and developed non-neutralizing anti-IL-7 antibodies. Patients with autoimmune diseases that required systemic therapy at screening were excluded from the study; however, 1 participant developed systemic lupus erythematosus while on study and was excluded from further rhIL-7 dosing. Quantitatively, rhIL-7 led to an increase in the number of circulating CD4 and CD8 T cells and tissue-resident CD3 T cells in the gut mucosa and bone marrow. Functionally, these T cells were capable of producing cytokines after mitogenic stimulation. rhIL-7 was well tolerated at biologically active doses and may represent a promising therapeutic intervention in ICL. This trial was registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov as #NCT00839436. PMID:26675348

  13. Dysregulation of CD4(+) T Cell Subsets in Intracranial Aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hai-Feng; Zhao, Ming-Guang; Liang, Guo-Biao; Yu, Chun-Yong; He, Wenxiu; Li, Zhi-Qing; Gao, Xu

    2016-02-01

    Intracranial aneurysms (IAs) and potential IA rupture are one of the direct causes of permanent brain damage and mortality. Interestingly, the major risk factors of IA development, including hemodynamic stress, hypertension, smoking, and genetic predispositions, are closely associated with a proinflammatory immune status. Therefore, we examined the roles of CD4(+) T cells in IA pathogenesis. IA patients exhibited peripheral CD4(+) T-cell imbalance, with overrepresented T helper 1 (Th1) and Th17 activities and underrepresented Th2 and regulatory T (Treg) activities, including increased IFN-γ, TNF-α, and IL-17 production and decreased IL-10 production from total CD4(+) T cells. Chemokine receptors CXCR3 and CCR6 were used to identify Th1, Th2, and Th17 cell subsets, and CD4(+)CD25(hi) was used to identify Treg cells. Based on these markers, the data then showed altered cytokine production by each cell type and shifted subpopulation frequency. Moreover, this shift in frequency was directly correlated with IA severity. To examine the underlying mechanism of CD4(+) T cell skewing, we cocultured CD4(+) T cells with autologous monocytes and found that coculture with monocytes could significantly increase IFN-γ and IL-17 production through contact-independent mechanisms, demonstrating that monocytes could potentially contribute to the altered CD4(+) T cell composition in IA. Analyzing mRNA transcripts revealed significantly upregulated IL-1β and TNF-α expression by monocytes from IA patients. We found a loss of CD4(+) T cell subset balance that was likely to promote a higher state of inflammation in IA, which may exacerbate the disease through a positive feedback loop.

  14. Characterization and clinical relevance of circulating CD4+CD28- T cells in Graves' disease.

    PubMed

    Wang, Fengming; Chen, Lei; Shen, Qiong; Liu, Tong; Jiang, Lian; Gu, Xinhua; Chen, Lujun; Sun, Jing; Liu, Cuiping

    2015-05-01

    During autoimmune disease the fraction of CD4+CD28- T cells in the peripheral blood of has been found to be elevated. In the present study, peripheral blood was collected from 61 patients with Graves' disease (GD) and 30 healthy control participants. Serum concentrations of thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH), free triiodothyronine (FT3), free thyroxine (FT4) and thyrotropin receptor autoantibody (TRAb) were measured and peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) surface expression of CD4 and CD28 molecules was detected by flow cytometry. CD4+CD28- cells were sorted from six patients undergoing subtotal thyroidectomy and cultured ex vivo. The influence of TSH pretreated thyroid follicular cells on CD4+CD28- cell proliferation was evaluated using the agonist CD40 mAb 5C11, the blocking CD40L mAb 4F1 or B7-1 mAb 4E5 in 3H-TdR assays. Our data showed that the fraction of CD4+CD28- T cells was higher in GD patients than healthy donors (10.21%±8.56% vs. 2.33%±1.94%; P<0.001), and further elevated in 24 of 61 patients with Graves' ophthalmopathy (GO) (7.00±6.57% vs. 15.21±8.96%; P<0.001). A higher proportion of CD4+CD28- cells was detected in patients with degree II or III goiter than those with degree I goiter (11.53±9.18% vs. 6.11±3.97%; P<0.05 and 14.50±10.41% vs. 6.11±3.97%; P<0.01). The percentage of CD4+CD28- T cells correlated positively with serum levels of FT3 (r=0.354, P<0.01) and TRAb (r=0.304, P<0.05), but did not correlate with serum FT4 or TSH. Ex vivo, 5C11 enhanced proliferation of CD4+CD28+ cells (P<0.05), but did not influence the proliferation of CD4+CD28- cells. 4F1 inhibited the proliferation of both CD4+CD28+ (P<0.05) and CD4+CD28- (P<0.01) cells, and 4E5 inhibited proliferation of CD4+CD28+ cells (P<0.05). The elevation in circulating CD4+CD28- cells in GD patients correlates with disease severity and maybe plays an important role in the pathogenesis of GD. Copyright © 2015 European Federation of Immunological Societies. Published by Elsevier

  15. Development of promyelocytic leukemia zinc finger-expressing innate CD4 T cells requires stronger T-cell receptor signals than conventional CD4 T cells.

    PubMed

    Qiao, Yu; Zhu, Lingqiao; Sofi, Hanief; Lapinski, Philip E; Horai, Reiko; Mueller, Kristen; Stritesky, Gretta L; He, Xi; Teh, Hung-Sia; Wiest, David L; Kappes, Dietmar J; King, Philip D; Hogquist, Kristin A; Schwartzberg, Pamela L; Sant'Angelo, Derek B; Chang, Cheong-Hee

    2012-10-02

    MHC class II-expressing thymocytes and thymic epithelial cells can mediate CD4 T-cell selection resulting in functionally distinct thymocyte-selected CD4 (T-CD4) and epithelial-selected CD4 (E-CD4) T cells, respectively. However, little is known about how T-cell receptor (TCR) signaling influences the development of these two CD4 T-cell subsets. To study TCR signaling for T-CD4 T-cell development, we used a GFP reporter system of Nur77 in which GFP intensity directly correlates with TCR signaling strength. T-CD4 T cells expressed higher levels of GFP than E-CD4 T cells, suggesting that T-CD4 T cells received stronger TCR signaling than E-CD4 T cells during selection. Elimination of Ras GTPase-activating protein enhanced E-CD4 but decreased T-CD4 T-cell selection efficiency, suggesting a shift to negative selection. Conversely, the absence of IL-2-inducible T-cell kinase that causes poor E-CD4 T-cell selection due to insufficient TCR signaling improved T-CD4 T-cell generation, consistent with rescue from negative selection. Strong TCR signaling during T-CD4 T-cell development correlates with the expression of the transcription factor promyelocytic leukemia zinc finger protein. However, although modulation of the signaling strength affected the efficiency of T-CD4 T-cell development during positive and negative selection, the signaling strength is not as important for the effector function of T-CD4 T cells. These findings indicate that innate T-CD4 T cells, together with invariant natural killer T cells and γδ T cells, receive strong TCR signals during their development and that signaling requirements for the development and the effector functions are distinct.

  16. Stephanthraniline A suppressed CD4(+) T cell-mediated immunological hepatitis through impairing PKCθ function.

    PubMed

    Chen, Feng-Yang; Zhou, Li-Fei; Li, Xiao-Yu; Zhao, Jia-Wen; Xu, Shi-Fang; Huang, Wen-Hai; Gao, Li-Juan; Hao, Shu-Juan; Ye, Yi-Ping; Sun, Hong-Xiang

    2016-10-15

    Stephanthraniline A (STA), a C21 steroid isolated from Stephanotis mucronata (Blanco) Merr., was previously shown to inhibit T cells activation and proliferation in vitro and in vivo. The purpose of this study was to further evaluate the in vivo immunosuppressive activity of STA and to elucidate its potential mechanisms. The results showed that pretreatment with STA significantly attenuated concanavalin A (Con A)-induced hepatitis and reduced CD4(+) T cells activation and aggregation in hepatic tissue in mice. STA directly suppressed the activation and proliferation of Con A-induced CD4(+) T cells, and inhibited NFAT, NFκB and MAPK signaling cascades in activated CD4(+) T cells in vitro. Moreover, it was proved that STA inhibited T cells activation and proliferation through proximal T cell-receptor (TCR) signaling- and Ca(2+) signaling-independent way. The molecular docking studies predicted that STA could tight bind to PKCθ via five hydrogen. The further findings indicated STA directly inhibited PKCθ kinase activity, and its phosphorylation in activated CD4(+) T cells in vitro. Collectively, the present study indicated that STA could protect against CD4(+) T cell-mediated immunological hepatitis in mice through PKCθ and its downstream NFAT, NFκB and MAPK signaling cascades. These results highlight the potential of STA as an effective leading compound for use in the treatment of CD4(+) T cell-mediated inflammatory and autoimmune diseases.

  17. CD4 cell count and CD4/CD8 ratio increase during rituximab maintenance in granulomatosis with polyangiitis patients

    PubMed Central

    Nossent, Johannes C.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Rituximab (RTX) is a B cell-depleting agent approved for the treatment of granulomatosis with polyangiitis (GPA). RTX reduces antibody producing precursor plasma cells and inhibits B and T cells interaction. Infections related to T cell immunodeficiency are not infrequent during RTX treatment. Our study investigated CD4 cell count and CD4/CD8 ratio in GPA patients during the first two years of long-term RTX treatment. Methods A single centre cohort study of 35 patients who received median total cumulative dose of cyclophosphamide (CYC) of 15 g and were treated with RTX 2 g followed by retreatment with either 2 g once annually or 1 g biannually. Serum levels of total immunoglobulin (Ig) and lymphocytes subsets were recorded at RTX initiation and at 3, 6, 12, 18 and 24 months. Low CD4 count and inverted CD4/CD8 ratio were defined as CD4 < 0.3 × 109/l and ratio < 1. Results The CD4 cell count and CD4/CD8 ratio decreased slightly following the initial RTX treatment and then increased gradually during maintenance treatment. While the proportion of patients with low CD4 cell count decreased from 43% at baseline to 18% at 24 months, the ratio remained inverted in 40%. Oral daily prednisolone dose at baseline, CYC exposure and the maintenance regimen did not influence the CD4 cell count and ratio. Being older (p = 0.012) and having a higher CRP (p = 0.044) and ESR (p = 0.024) at baseline significantly increased the risk of inverted CD4/CD8 ratio at 24 months. Inverted ratio at baseline associated with lower total Ig levels during the study. Conclusions Overall, the CD4 and CD4/CD8 ratio increased during maintenance RTX therapy in GPA with no discernible impact of other immunosuppressive therapy. However the increase in CD4 was not followed by an increase in the CD4/CD8 ratio, especially in older patients. Inverted CD4/CD8 ratio associated with lower Ig levels, suggesting a more profound B cell depleting effect of RTX with a relative increase in CD8

  18. Downregulation of CD4+LAP+ and CD4+CD25+ regulatory T cells in acute coronary syndromes.

    PubMed

    Lin, Ying-zhong; Lu, Shan-he; Lu, Zheng-de; Huang, Ying; Shi, Ying; Liu, Ling; Wang, Xiao-yan; Ji, Qing-wei

    2013-01-01

    Regulatory T (Treg) cells play a protective role in atherosclerosis prone models and are related to the onset of acute coronary syndromes (ACS, including non-ST-elevation ACS (NSTEACS) and ST-elevation acute myocardial infarction (STEAMI)). CD4+LAP+ Treg cells are a novel subset of Tregs that have been found to ameliorate atherosclerosis in ApoE(-/-) mice, and these cells also exist in humans. The present study was designed to investigate whether CD4+LAP+ Treg cells are involved in the onset of ACS. The frequencies of CD4+LAP+ and CD4+CD25+ Treg cells were detected using flow cytometric analysis, and the plasma IL-10 and TGF- β 1 levels were measured using an ELISA in 29 stable angina (SA) patients, 30 NSTEACS patients, 27 STEAMI patients, and a control group (30 cases). The results revealed a significant decrease in the frequencies of CD4+LAP+ and CD4+CD25+ Treg cells and in the levels of IL-10 and TGF- β 1 in patients with ACS compared with those in the SA and control groups. The decrease in the frequencies of CD4+LAP+ and CD4+CD25+ Treg cells may play a role in the onset of ACS.

  19. CD4 T cells: fates, functions, and faults

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    In 1986, Mosmann and Coffman identified 2 subsets of activated CD4 T cells, Th1 and Th2 cells, which differed from each other in their pattern of cytokine production and their functions. Our understanding of the importance of the distinct differentiated forms of CD4 T cells and of the mechanisms through which they achieve their differentiated state has greatly expanded over the past 2 decades. Today at least 4 distinct CD4 T-cell subsets have been shown to exist, Th1, Th2, Th17, and iTreg cells. Here we summarize much of what is known about the 4 subsets, including the history of their discovery, their unique cytokine products and related functions, their distinctive expression of cell surface receptors and their characteristic transcription factors, the regulation of their fate determination, and the consequences of their abnormal activation. PMID:18725574

  20. Normalization of CD4+ T Cell Metabolism Reverses Lupus

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Yiming; Choi, Seung-Chul; Xu, Zhiwei; Perry, Daniel J.; Seay, Howard; Croker, Byron P.; Sobel, Eric S.; Brusko, Todd M.; Morel, Laurence

    2015-01-01

    Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (SLE) is an autoimmune disease in which autoreactive CD4+ T cells play an essential role. CD4+ T cells rely on glycolysis for inflammatory effector functions, but recent studies have shown that mitochondrial metabolism supports their chronic activation. How these processes contribute to lupus is unclear. Here, we show that both glycolysis and mitochondrial oxidative metabolism are elevated in CD4+ T cells from lupus-prone B6.Sle1.Sle2.Sle3 (TC) mice as compared to non-autoimmune controls. In vitro, both the mitochondrial metabolism inhibitor metformin and the glucose metabolism inhibitor 2-Deoxy-D-glucose (2DG) reduced IFNγ production, although at different stages of activation. Metformin also restored the defective IL-2 production by TC CD4+ T cells. In vivo, treatment of TC mice and other lupus models with a combination of metformin and 2DG normalized T cell metabolism and reversed disease biomarkers. Further, CD4+ T cells from SLE patients also exhibited enhanced glycolysis and mitochondrial metabolism that correlated with their activation status, and their excessive IFNγ production was significantly reduced by metformin in vitro. These results suggest that normalization of T cell metabolism through the dual inhibition of glycolysis and mitochondrial metabolism is a promising therapeutic venue for SLE. PMID:25673763

  1. Transcriptional Regulatory Networks for CD4 T Cell Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Jinfang

    2015-01-01

    CD4+ T cells play a central role in controlling the adaptive immune response by secreting cytokines to activate target cells. Naïve CD4+ T cells differentiate into at least four subsets, Th1, Th2, Th17, and inducible regulatory T cells, each with unique functions for pathogen elimination. The differentiation of these subsets is induced in response to cytokine stimulation, which is translated into Stat activation, followed by induction of master regulator transcription factors. In addition to these factors, multiple other transcription factors, both subset specific and shared, are also involved in promoting subset differentiation. This review will focus on the network of transcription factors that control CD4+ T cell differentiation. PMID:24839135

  2. An atlas of mouse CD4(+) T cell transcriptomes.

    PubMed

    Stubbington, Michael Jt; Mahata, Bidesh; Svensson, Valentine; Deonarine, Andrew; Nissen, Jesper K; Betz, Alexander G; Teichmann, Sarah A

    2015-04-03

    CD4(+) T cells are key regulators of the adaptive immune system and can be divided into T helper (Th) cells and regulatory T (Treg) cells. During an immune response Th cells mature from a naive state into one of several effector subtypes that exhibit distinct functions. The transcriptional mechanisms that underlie the specific functional identity of CD4(+) T cells are not fully understood. To assist investigations into the transcriptional identity and regulatory processes of these cells we performed mRNA-sequencing on three murine T helper subtypes (Th1, Th2 and Th17) as well as on splenic Treg cells and induced Treg (iTreg) cells. Our integrated analysis of this dataset revealed the gene expression changes associated with these related but distinct cellular identities. Each cell subtype differentially expresses a wealth of 'subtype upregulated' genes, some of which are well known whilst others promise new insights into signalling processes and transcriptional regulation. We show that hundreds of genes are regulated purely by alternative splicing to extend our knowledge of the role of post-transcriptional regulation in cell differentiation. This CD4(+) transcriptome atlas provides a valuable resource for the study of CD4(+) T cell populations. To facilitate its use by others, we have made the data available in an easily accessible online resource at www.th-express.org.

  3. A novel differentiation pathway from CD4+ T cells to CD4− T cells for maintaining immune system homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, X; Sun, G; Sun, X; Tian, D; Liu, K; Liu, T; Cong, M; Xu, H; Li, X; Shi, W; Tian, Y; Yao, J; Guo, H; Zhang, D

    2016-01-01

    CD4+ T lymphocytes are key players in the adaptive immune system and can differentiate into a variety of effector and regulatory T cells. Here, we provide evidence that a novel differentiation pathway of CD4+ T cells shifts the balance from a destructive T-cell response to one that favors regulation in an immune-mediated liver injury model. Peripheral CD4−CD8−NK1.1− double-negative T cells (DNT) was increased following Concanavalin A administration in mice. Adoptive transfer of DNT led to significant protection from hepatocyte necrosis by direct inhibition on the activation of lymphocytes, a process that occurred primarily through the perforin-granzyme B route. These DNT converted from CD4+ rather than CD8+ T cells, a process primarily regulated by OX40. DNT migrated to the liver through the CXCR3-CXCL9/CXCL10 interaction. In conclusion, we elucidated a novel differentiation pathway from activated CD4+ T cells to regulatory DNT cells for maintaining homeostasis of the immune system in vivo, and provided key evidence that utilizing this novel differentiation pathway has potential application in the prevention and treatment of autoimmune diseases. PMID:27077809

  4. Interleukin-37 Enhances the Suppressive Activity of Naturally Occurring CD4+CD25+ Regulatory T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Da-Wei; Dong, Ning; Wu, Yao; Zhu, Xiao-Mei; Wang, Chun-Ting; Yao, Yong-Ming

    2016-01-01

    Naturally occurring CD4+CD25+ regulatory T cells (Tregs) are essential for the suppression of autoimmunity and can control the immune-mediated pathology during the early phase of sepsis. Our previous data showed that silencing interleukin-37 (IL-37) in human CD4+CD25+ Tregs obviously reduced the suppressive activity of CD4+CD25+ Tregs. Here, we found that rhIL-37 stimulation markedly enhanced the suppressive activity of CD4+CD25+ Tregs isolated from naive C57BL/6 J mice in the absence or presence of lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Treatment with rhIL-37 could significantly upregulate the expression of cytotoxic T-lymphocyte-associated antigen (CTLA)-4 and forkhead/winged helix transcription factor p3 (Foxp3) on CD4+CD25+ Tregs. Also, rhIL-37 stimulation promoted the production of transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1) but not IL-10 in the supernatants of cultured CD4+CD25+ Tregs. Pretreated CD4+CD25+ Tregs with rhIL-37 in the presence or absence of LPS were cocultured with CD4+CD25− T cells, ratio of IL-4/interferon-γ in the supernatants obviously increased in IL-37-stimulated groups. In addition, early administration of IL-37 significantly improved the survival rate of septic mice induced by cecal ligation and puncture. Taken together, we concluded that rhIL-37 enhances the suppressive activity of CD4+CD25+ Tregs and might be a potential immunomodulator for the treatment of septic complications. PMID:27941849

  5. Interleukin-2 Therapy Induces CD4 Downregulation, Which Decreases Circulating CD4 T Cell Counts, in African Green Monkeys

    PubMed Central

    Mudd, Joseph C.; Perkins, Molly R.; DiNapoli, Sarah R.; Hirsch, Vanessa M.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT African green monkeys (AGMs) are natural hosts of simian immunodeficiency virus (SIVAGM). Because these animals do not develop simian AIDS despite maintaining high viral loads, there is considerable interest in determining how these animals have evolved to avoid SIV disease progression. Unlike nonnatural hosts of SIV, adult AGMs maintain low levels of CD4+ T cells at steady states and also have a large population of virus-resistant CD8αα T cells that lack CD4 expression despite maintaining T helper cell functionalities. In recent work, we have shown that homeostatic cytokines can induce CD4 downregulation in AGM T cells in vitro. Through administering therapeutic doses of recombinant human interleukin-2 (IL-2) to AGMs, we show here that this mechanism is operative in vivo. IL-2 therapy induced transient yet robust proliferation in all major T cell subsets. Within the CD4+ T cell population, those that were induced into cycle by IL-2 exhibited characteristics of CD4-to-CD8αα conversion. In all animals receiving IL-2, circulating CD4+ T cell counts and proportions tended to be lower and CD4− CD8αα+ T cell counts tended to be higher. Despite reductions in circulating target cells, the viral load was unaffected over the course of study. IMPORTANCE The data in this study identify that homeostatic cytokines can downregulate CD4 in vivo and, when given therapeutically, can induce AGMs to sustain very low levels of circulating CD4+ T cells without showing signs of immunodeficiency. PMID:27053558

  6. Plasticity of Human CD4 T Cell Subsets

    PubMed Central

    Geginat, Jens; Paroni, Moira; Maglie, Stefano; Alfen, Johanna Sophie; Kastirr, Ilko; Gruarin, Paola; De Simone, Marco; Pagani, Massimiliano; Abrignani, Sergio

    2014-01-01

    Human beings are exposed to a variety of different pathogens, which induce tailored immune responses and consequently generate highly diverse populations of pathogen-specific T cells. CD4+ T cells have a central role in adaptive immunity, since they provide essential help for both cytotoxic T cell- and antibody-mediated responses. In addition, CD4+ regulatory T cells are required to maintain self-tolerance and to inhibit immune responses that could damage the host. Initially, two subsets of CD4+ helper T cells were identified that secrete characteristic effector cytokines and mediate responses against different types of pathogens, i.e., IFN-γ secreting Th1 cells that fight intracellular pathogens, and IL-4 producing Th2 cells that target extracellular parasites. It is now well established that this dichotomy is insufficient to describe the complexity of CD4+ T cell differentiation, and in particular the human CD4 compartment contains a myriad of T cell subsets with characteristic capacities to produce cytokines and to home to involved tissues. Moreover, it has become increasingly clear that these T cell subsets are not all terminally differentiated cells, but that the majority is plastic and that in particular central memory T cells can acquire different properties and functions in secondary immune responses. In addition, there is compelling evidence that helper T cells can acquire regulatory functions upon chronic stimulation in inflamed tissues. The plasticity of antigen-experienced human T cell subsets is highly relevant for translational medicine, since it opens new perspectives for immune-modulatory therapies for chronic infections, autoimmune diseases, and cancer. PMID:25566245

  7. CD4+ T Cells: guardians of the phagosome.

    PubMed

    Tubo, Noah J; Jenkins, Marc K

    2014-04-01

    CD4(+) T cells are key cells of the adaptive immune system that use T cell antigen receptors to recognize peptides that are generated in endosomes or phagosomes and displayed on the host cell surface bound to major histocompatibility complex molecules. These T cells participate in immune responses that protect hosts from microbes such as Mycobacterium tuberculosis, Cryptococcus neoformans, Leishmania major, and Salmonella enterica, which have evolved to live in the phagosomes of macrophages and dendritic cells. Here, we review studies indicating that CD4(+) T cells control phagosomal infections asymptomatically in most individuals by secreting cytokines that activate the microbicidal activities of infected phagocytes but in a way that inhibits the pathogen but does not eliminate it. Indeed, we make the case that localized, controlled, persistent infection is necessary to maintain large numbers of CD4(+) effector T cells in a state of activation needed to eradicate systemic and more pathogenic forms of the infection. Finally, we posit that current vaccines for phagosomal infections fail because they do not produce this "periodic reminder" form of CD4(+) T cell-mediated immune control.

  8. Primary antitumor immune response mediated by CD4+ T cells.

    PubMed

    Corthay, Alexandre; Skovseth, Dag K; Lundin, Katrin U; Røsjø, Egil; Omholt, Hilde; Hofgaard, Peter O; Haraldsen, Guttorm; Bogen, Bjarne

    2005-03-01

    Gene-targeted mice have recently revealed a role for lymphocytes and interferon-gamma (IFNgamma) in conferring protection against cancer, but the mechanisms remain unclear. Here, we have characterized a successful primary antitumor immune response initiated by naive CD4+ T cells. Major histocompatibility complex class II (MHC-II)-negative myeloma cells injected subcutaneously into syngeneic mice were surrounded within 3 days by macrophages that captured tumor antigens. Within 6 days, naive myeloma-specific CD4+ T cells became activated in draining lymph nodes and subsequently migrated to the incipient tumor site. Upon recognition of tumor-derived antigenic peptides presented on MHC-II by macrophages, the myeloma-specific CD4+ T cells were reactivated and started to secrete cytokines. T cell-derived IFNgamma activated macrophages in close proximity to the tumor cells. Tumor cell growth was completely inhibited by such locally activated macrophages. These data indicate a mechanism for immunosurveillance of MHC-II-negative cancer cells by tumor-specific CD4+ T cells through collaboration with macrophages.

  9. Priming of CD4+ T cells and development of CD4+ T cell memory; lessons for malaria.

    PubMed

    Stephens, R; Langhorne, J

    2006-01-01

    CD4 T cells play a central role in the immune response to malaria. They are required to help B cells produce the antibody that is essential for parasite clearance. They also produce cytokines that amplify the phagocytic and parasitocidal response of the innate immune system, as well as dampening this response later on to limit immunopathology. Therefore, understanding the mechanisms by which T helper cells are activated and the requirements for development of specific, and effective, T cell memory and immunity is essential in the quest for a malaria vaccine. In this paper on the CD4 session of the Immunology of Malaria Infections meeting, we summarize discussions of CD4 cell priming and memory in malaria and in vaccination and outline critical future lines of investigation. B. Stockinger and M.K. Jenkins proposed cutting edge experimental systems to study basic T cell biology in malaria. Critical parameters in T cell activation include the cell types involved, the route of infection and the timing and location and cell types involved in antigen presentation. A new generation of vaccines that induce CD4 T cell activation and memory are being developed with new adjuvants. Studies of T cell memory focus on differentiation and factors involved in maintenance of antigen specific T cells and control of the size of that population. To improve detection of T cell memory in the field, efforts will have to be made to distinguish antigen-specific responses from cytokine driven responses.

  10. Cellular Plasticity of CD4+ T Cells in the Intestine

    PubMed Central

    Brucklacher-Waldert, Verena; Carr, Edward J.; Linterman, Michelle A.; Veldhoen, Marc

    2014-01-01

    Barrier sites such as the gastrointestinal tract are in constant contact with the environment, which contains both beneficial and harmful components. The immune system at the epithelia must make the distinction between these components to balance tolerance, protection, and immunopathology. This is achieved via multifaceted immune recognition, highly organized lymphoid structures, and the interaction of many types of immune cells. The adaptive immune response in the gut is orchestrated by CD4+ helper T (Th) cells, which are integral to gut immunity. In recent years, it has become apparent that the functional identity of these Th cells is not as fixed as initially thought. Plasticity in differentiated T cell subsets has now been firmly established, in both health and disease. The gut, in particular, utilizes CD4+ T cell plasticity to mold CD4+ T cell phenotypes to maintain its finely poised balance of tolerance and inflammation and to encourage biodiversity within the enteric microbiome. In this review, we will discuss intestinal helper T cell plasticity and our current understanding of its mechanisms, including our growing knowledge of an evolutionarily ancient symbiosis between microbiota and malleable CD4+ T cell effectors. PMID:25339956

  11. STAT5 and CD4 + T Cell Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Owen, David L.; Farrar, Michael A.

    2017-01-01

    STAT5 plays a critical role in the development and function of many cell types. Here, we review the role of STAT5 in the development of T lymphocytes in the thymus and its subsequent role in the differentiation of distinct CD4 + helper and regulatory T-cell subsets. PMID:28163905

  12. CD4+ T cells memorize obesity and promote weight regain.

    PubMed

    Zou, Jianghuan; Lai, Beibei; Zheng, Mingzhu; Chen, Qin; Jiang, Shujun; Song, Anying; Huang, Zan; Shi, Peiliang; Tu, Xin; Wang, Di; Lu, Linrong; Lin, Zhaoyu; Gao, Xiang

    2017-06-19

    Body weight regain often causes failure of obesity therapies while the underlying mechanism remains largely unknown. In this study, we report that immune cells, especially CD4+ T cells, mediate the 'memory' of previous obese status. In a weight gain-loss-regain model, we found that C57BL/6J mice with an obesity history showed a much faster rate of body weight regain. This obesity memory could last for at least 2 months after previously obese mice were kept at the same body weight as non-obese mice. Surprisingly, such obesity memory was abrogated by dexamethasone treatment, whereas immunodeficient Rag1(-/-) and H2A(-/-) mice failed to establish such memory. Rag1(-/-) mice repossessed the obesity memory when immune cells or CD4+ T cells isolated from previously obese mice were transferred. Furthermore, depletion of CD4+ T cells led to obesity memory ablation. Taken together, we conclude that CD4+ T cells mediate obesity memory and promote weight regain.Cellular &Molecular Immunology advance online publication, 19 June 2017; doi:10.1038/cmi.2017.36.

  13. Biomarkers of CD4+ CTL cell Mediated Immunity to Tuberculosis

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The immune responses mediated by interactions between T-lymphocyte subsets and mycobacteria-infected macrophages are critical for control of tuberculosis. In these studies, the bovine model was used to characterize the cytolytic and mycobactericidal CD4+ T cell response induced by BCG vaccination. ...

  14. Protection conferred by heterologous vaccination against tuberculosis is dependent on the ratio of CD4+/CD4+ Foxp3+ cells

    PubMed Central

    Fedatto, Paola Fernanda; Sérgio, Cássia Alves; Paula, Marina Oliveira e; Gembre, Ana Flávia; Franco, Luís Henrique; Wowk, Pryscilla Fanini; Ramos, Simone Gusmão; Horn, Cynthia; Marchal, Gilles; Turato, Walter Miguel; Silva, Célio Lopes; Fonseca, Denise Morais; Bonato, Vânia Luiza Deperon

    2012-01-01

    CD4+ Foxp3+ regulatory T cells inhibit the production of interferon-γ, which is the major mediator of protection against Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection. In this study, we evaluated whether the protection conferred by three different vaccines against tuberculosis was associated with the number of spleen and lung regulatory T cells. We observed that after homologous immunization with the 65 000 molecular weight heat-shock protein (hsp 65) DNA vaccine, there was a significantly higher number of spleen CD4+ Foxp3+ cells compared with non-immunized mice. Heterologous immunization using bacillus Calmette–Guérin (BCG) to prime and DNA-hsp 65 to boost (BCG/DNA-hsp 65) or BCG to prime and culture filtrate proteins (CFP)-CpG to boost (BCG/CFP-CpG) induced a significantly higher ratio of spleen CD4+/CD4+ Foxp3+ cells compared with non-immunized mice. In addition, the protection conferred by either the BCG/DNA-hsp 65 or the BCG/CFP-CpG vaccines was significant compared with the DNA-hsp 65 vaccine. Despite the higher ratio of spleen CD4+/CD4+ Foxp3+ cells found in BCG/DNA-hsp 65-immunized or BCG/CFP-CpG-immunized mice, the lungs of both groups of mice were better preserved than those of DNA-hsp 65-immunized mice. These results confirm the protective efficacy of BCG/DNA-hsp 65 and BCG/CFP-CpG heterologous prime-boost vaccines and the DNA-hsp 65 homologous vaccine. Additionally, the prime-boost regimens assayed here represent a promising strategy for the development of new vaccines to protect against tuberculosis because they probably induce a proper ratio of CD4+ and regulatory (CD4+ Foxp3+) cells during the immunization regimen. In this study, this ratio was associated with a reduced number of regulatory cells and no injury to the lungs. PMID:22891805

  15. CD4 T-Cell Memory Generation and Maintenance

    PubMed Central

    Gasper, David J.; Tejera, Melba Marie; Suresh, M.

    2014-01-01

    Immunologic memory is the adaptive immune system's powerful ability to remember a previous antigen encounter and react with accelerated vigor upon antigen re-exposure. It provides durable protection against reinfection with pathogens and is the foundation for vaccine-induced immunity. Unlike the relatively restricted immunologic purview of memory B cells and CD8 T cells, the field of CD4 T-cell memory must account for multiple distinct lineages with diverse effector functions, the issue of lineage commitment and plasticity, and the variable distribution of memory cells within each lineage. Here, we discuss the evidence for lineage-specific CD4 T-cell memory and summarize the known factors contributing to memory-cell generation, plasticity, and long-term maintenance. PMID:24940912

  16. CD4 T-cell memory generation and maintenance.

    PubMed

    Gasper, David J; Tejera, Melba Marie; Suresh, M

    2014-01-01

    Immunologic memory is the adaptive immune system's powerful ability to remember a previous antigen encounter and react with accelerated vigor upon antigen re-exposure. It provides durable protection against reinfection with pathogens and is the foundation for vaccine-induced immunity. Unlike the relatively restricted immunologic purview of memory B cells and CD8 T cells, the field of CD4 T-cell memory must account for multiple distinct lineages with diverse effector functions, the issue of lineage commitment and plasticity, and the variable distribution of memory cells within each lineage. Here, we discuss the evidence for lineage-specific CD4 T-cell memory and summarize the known factors contributing to memory-cell generation, plasticity, and long-term maintenance.

  17. Conditions That Induce Tolerance in Mature CD4+ T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lanoue, Astrid; Bona, Constantin; von Boehmer, Harald; Sarukhan, Adelaida

    1997-01-01

    Establishment of antigen-specific tolerance among mature T cells has been a long debated, yet poorly understood issue. In this study we have used transgenic mice bearing a class II–restricted TCR specific for the hemmagglutinin of the influenza virus in order to test the behavior of CD4+ T cells upon exposure to antigen in different forms and doses. We first studied the fate of T cells expressing the transgenic TCR (6.5) in double transgenic mice where HA was expressed as a self antigen by hemapoietic cells. In these mice, we found some mature T cells in periphery that had escaped thymic deletion and that showed signs of activation but which were anergic. Mature CD4+6.5+ cells that were transferred into antigen-containing recipients went through an initial phase of expansion after which most cells were deleted and those remaining became unresponsive, as previously described for CD8+ cells. Inducing tolerance in CD4+6.5+ cells in situ in single transgenic mice proved a difficult task: classical protocols using single doses of soluble or deaggregated antigen as well as feeding antigen all failed to induce antigen-specific unresponsiveness. It was only after decreasing cell numbers by CD4 antibody treatment and by repeatedly reintroducing antigen thereafter that unresponsiveness of 6.5+ cells was achieved and maintained. In no case could we observe the appearance of antigen-specific T cells with a Th2 cytokine profile among the remaining cells and therefore conclude that deletion and anergy represent the major mechanisms of tolerance in our studies. PMID:9053441

  18. Human CD4+ T Cell Response to Human Herpesvirus 6

    PubMed Central

    Nastke, Maria-D.; Becerra, Aniuska; Yin, Liusong; Dominguez-Amorocho, Omar; Gibson, Laura; Calvo-Calle, J. Mauricio

    2012-01-01

    Following primary infection, human herpesvirus 6 (HHV-6) establishes a persistent infection for life. HHV-6 reactivation has been associated with transplant rejection, delayed engraftment, encephalitis, muscular dystrophy, and drug-induced hypersensitivity syndrome. The poor understanding of the targets and outcome of the cellular immune response to HHV-6 makes it difficult to outline the role of HHV-6 in human disease. To fill in this gap, we characterized CD4 T cell responses to HHV-6 using peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) and T cell lines generated from healthy donors. CD4+ T cells responding to HHV-6 in peripheral blood were observed at frequencies below 0.1% of total T cells but could be expanded easily in vitro. Analysis of cytokines in supernatants of PBMC and T cell cultures challenged with HHV-6 preparations indicated that gamma interferon (IFN-γ) and interleukin-10 (IL-10) were appropriate markers of the HHV-6 cellular response. Eleven CD4+ T cell epitopes, all but one derived from abundant virion components, were identified. The response was highly cross-reactive between HHV-6A and HHV-6B variants. Seven of the CD4+ T cell epitopes do not share significant homologies with other known human pathogens, including the closely related human viruses human herpesvirus 7 (HHV-7) and human cytomegalovirus (HCMV). Major histocompatibility complex (MHC) tetramers generated with these epitopes were able to detect HHV-6-specific T cell populations. These findings provide a window into the immune response to HHV-6 and provide a basis for tracking HHV-6 cellular immune responses. PMID:22357271

  19. Macrophages overexpressing Aire induce CD4+Foxp3+ T cells.

    PubMed

    Sun, Jitong; Fu, Haiying; Wu, Jing; Zhu, Wufei; Li, Yi; Yang, Wei

    2013-01-01

    Aire plays an important role in central immune tolerance by regulating the transcription of thousands of genes. However, the role of Aire in the peripheral immune system is poorly understood. Regulatory T (Treg) cells are considered essential for the maintenance of peripheral tolerance, but the effect of Aire on Treg cells in the peripheral immune system is currently unknown. In this study, we investigated the effects of macrophages overexpressing Aire on CD4+Foxp3+ Treg cells by co-culturing Aire-overexpressing RAW264.7 cells or their supernatant with splenocytes. The results show that macrophages overexpressing Aire enhanced the expression of Foxp3 mRNA and induced different subsets of Treg cells in splenocytes through cell-cell contact or a co-culture supernatants. TGF-β is a key molecule in the increases of CD4+CD45RA+Foxp3hi T cell and activating Treg (aTreg) levels observed following cell‑supernatant co-culturing. Subsets of Treg cells were induced by Aire-overexpressing macrophages, and the manipulation of Treg cells by the targeting of Aire may provide a method for the treatment of inflammatory or autoimmune diseases.

  20. Transporters for Antiretroviral Drugs in Colorectal CD4+ T Cells and Circulating α4β7 Integrin CD4+ T Cells: Implications for HIV Microbicides.

    PubMed

    Mukhopadhya, Indrani; Murray, Graeme I; Duncan, Linda; Yuecel, Raif; Shattock, Robin; Kelly, Charles; Iannelli, Francesco; Pozzi, Gianni; El-Omar, Emad M; Hold, Georgina L; Hijazi, Karolin

    2016-09-06

    CD4+ T lymphocytes in the colorectal mucosa are key in HIV-1 transmission and dissemination. As such they are also the primary target for antiretroviral (ARV)-based rectal microbicides for pre-exposure prophylaxis. Drug transporters expressed in mucosal CD4+ T cells determine ARV distribution across the cell membrane and, most likely, efficacy of microbicides. We describe transporters for antiretroviral drugs in colorectal mucosal CD4+ T lymphocytes and compare gene expression with circulating α4β7+CD4+ T cells, which traffic to the intestine and have been shown to be preferentially infected by HIV-1. Purified total CD4+ T cells were obtained from colorectal tissue and blood samples by magnetic separation. CD4+ T cells expressing α4β7 integrin were isolated by fluorescence-activated cell sorting from peripheral blood mononuclear cells of healthy volunteers. Expressions of 15 efflux and uptake drug transporter genes were quantified using Taqman qPCR assays. Expression of efflux transporters MRP3, MRP5, and BCRP and uptake transporter CNT2 were significantly higher in colorectal CD4+ T cells compared to circulating CD4+ T cells (p = 0.01-0.03). Conversely, circulating α4β7+CD4+ T cells demonstrated significantly higher expression of OATPD compared to colorectal CD4+ T cells (p = 0.001). To the best of our knowledge this is the first report of drug transporter gene expression in colorectal CD4+ and peripheral α4β7+CD4+ T cells. The qualitative and quantitative differences in drug transporter gene expression profiles between α4β7+CD4+ T cells and total mucosal CD4+ T cells may have significant implications for the efficacy of rectally delivered ARV-microbicides. Most notably, we have identified efflux drug transporters that could be targeted by selective inhibitors or beneficial drug-drug interactions to enhance intracellular accumulation of antiretroviral drugs.

  1. Early Postseroconversion CD4 Cell Counts Independently Predict CD4 Cell Count Recovery in HIV-1–Postive Subjects Receiving Antiretroviral Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Kulkarni, Hemant; Okulicz, Jason F.; Grandits, Greg; Crum-Cianflone, Nancy F.; Landrum, Michael L.; Hale, Braden; Wortmann, Glenn; Tramont, Edmund; Polis, Michael; Dolan, Matthew; Lifson, Alan R.; Agan, Brian K.; Ahuja, Sunil K.; Marconi, Vincent C.

    2013-01-01

    Background The relationship between CD4+ T-cell counts determined soon after seroconversion with HIV-1 (baseline CD4), nadir CD4, and CD4 levels attained during highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) is unknown. Methods Longitudinal, including baseline (at or soon after HIV diagnosis), intermediate (nadir), and distal (post-HAART) CD4+ T-cell counts were assessed in 1085 seroconverting subjects who achieved viral load suppression from a large well-characterized cohort. The association of baseline with post-HAART CD4+ T-cell count was determined after adjustment for other relevant covariates. Results A higher baseline CD4+ T-cell count predicted a greater post- HAART CD4+ T-cell count, independent of the nadir and other explanatory variables. Together, baseline and nadir strongly predicted the post-HAART CD4+ count such that a high baseline and lower nadir were associated with a maximal immune recovery after HAART. Likelihood of recovery of the baseline count after HAART was significantly higher when the nadir/baseline count ratio was consistently ≥0.6. Conclusions Among viral load suppressing seroconverters, the absolute CD4+ T-cell count attained post-HAART is highly dependent on both baseline and nadir CD4+ T-cell counts. These associations further support the early diagnosis and initiation of HAART among HIV-infected persons. PMID:21546844

  2. Factors associated with discordance between absolute CD4 cell count and CD4 cell percentage in patients coinfected with HIV and hepatitis C virus.

    PubMed

    Hull, Mark W; Rollet, Kathleen; Odueyungbo, Adefowope; Saeed, Sahar; Potter, Martin; Cox, Joseph; Cooper, Curtis; Gill, John; Klein, Marina B

    2012-06-01

    Liver cirrhosis has been associated with decreased absolute CD4 cell counts but preserved CD4 cell percentage in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-negative persons. We evaluated factors associated with discordance between the absolute CD4 cell count and the CD4 cell percentage in a cohort of patients coinfected with HIV and hepatitis C virus (HCV). Baseline data from 908 participants in a prospective, Canadian, multisite cohort of individuals with HIV-HCV coinfection were analyzed. Absolute CD4 cell count and CD4 cell percentage relationships were evaluated. We defined low and high discordance between absolute CD4 cell count/CD4 cell percentage relationships as CD4 cell percentages that differed from the expected CD4 cell percentage, given the observed absolute CD4 cell count, by ±7 percentage points; we defined very low and very high discordance as differences of ±14 percentage points. Factors associated with high or very high discordance, including either end-stage liver disease or aspartate transaminase to platelet ratio index (APRI) of >1.5, were analyzed using multivariate logistic regression models and compared to groups with concordant and low discordant results. High/very high discordance was seen in 31% (n = 286), while 35% (n = 321) had concordant values. Factors associated with very high discordance at baseline included history of end-stage liver disease (adjusted odds ratio [aOR], 6.52; 95% confidence interval [CI], 2.27-18.67) and APRI of >1.5 (aOR 4.69; 95% CI, 1.64-13.35). Compared with those with detectable HCV RNA, those who cleared HCV spontaneously were less likely to have very high discordance. Discordance between absolute CD4 cell count and CD4 cell percentage is common in an HIV/HCV-coinfected population and is associated with advanced liver disease and ongoing HCV replication.

  3. Respiratory Syncytial Virus (RSV) Infects CD4+ T Cells: Frequency of Circulating CD4+ RSV+ T Cells as a Marker of Disease Severity in Young Children.

    PubMed

    Raiden, Silvina; Sananez, Inés; Remes-Lenicov, Federico; Pandolfi, Julieta; Romero, Cecilia; De Lillo, Leonardo; Ceballos, Ana; Geffner, Jorge; Arruvito, Lourdes

    2017-04-01

    Although human airway epithelial cells are the main target of respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), it also infects immune cells, such as macrophages and B cells. Whether T cells are permissive to RSV infection is unknown. We sought to analyze the permissiveness of CD4+ T cells to RSV infection. CD4+ and CD8+ T cells from cord blood, healthy young children, and adults were challenged by RSV or cocultured with infected HEp-2 cells. Infection, phenotype, and cytokine production by T cells were analyzed by flow cytometry or enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Expression of RSV antigens by circulating CD4+ T cells from infected children was analyzed by flow cytometry, and disease severity was defined by standard criteria. CD4+ and CD8+ T cells were productively infected by RSV. Infection decreased interleukin 2 and interferon γ production as well as the expression of CD25 and Ki-67 by activated CD4+ T cells. Respiratory syncytial virus antigens were detected in circulating CD4+ and CD8+ T cells during severe RSV infection of young children. Interestingly, the frequency of CD4+ RSV+ T cells positively correlated with disease severity. Respiratory syncytial virus infects CD4+ and CD8+ T cells and compromises T-cell function. The frequency of circulating CD4+ RSV+ T cells might represent a novel marker of severe infection.

  4. Differential CD4+ cell count increase and CD4+ :CD8+ ratio normalization with maraviroc compared with tenofovir

    PubMed Central

    CHAN, Ellen S.; LANDAY, Alan L.; BROWN, Todd T.; RIBAUDO, Heather J.; MIRMONSEF, Paria; OFOTOKUN, Igho; WEITZMANN, M. Neale; MARTINSON, Jeffrey; KLINGMAN, Karin L.; ERON, Joseph J.; FICHTENBAUM, Carl J.; PLANTS, Jill; TAIWO, Babafemi O.

    2016-01-01

    Objective Studies exploring the immunologic effects of maraviroc (MVC) have produced mixed results; hence it remains unclear whether MVC has unique immunologic effects in comparison to other antiretroviral drugs. We sought to determine whether MVC has differential effects compared to tenofovir disoproxil fumarate (TDF) during initial antiretroviral therapy. Design Prospective study in AIDS Clinical Trials Group A5303, a double-blind, placebo-controlled trial (N=262) of MVC versus TDF, each combined with boosted darunavir and emtricitabine Methods A total of 31 cellular and soluble biomarkers were assayed at weeks 0 and 48. Polychromatic flow cytometry was performed on cryopreserved peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC). Soluble markers were assayed in plasma using ELISA kits. Analyses were as-treated. Results Analyses included 230 participants (119 in MVC arm and 111 in TDF arm). Over 48 weeks of treatment, no significant differences were detected in declines in markers of inflammation and activation with MVC versus TDF. A greater CD4+ T-cell count increase (median +234 cells/μl vs. +188 cells/μl, p=0.036), a smaller CD8+ T-cell count decrease (−6 cells/μl vs. −109 cells/μl, p=0.008) and a smaller CD4+:CD8+ ratio increase (0.26 vs. 0.39, p=0.003) occurred with MVC. Among participants with baseline CD4+:CD8+ ratio<1, smaller proportion of MVC group normalized to ratio >1 at week 48 (15% and 36%, p<0.001). Conclusions MVC resulted in less improvement in CD4+:CD8+ ratio driven by greater increase in CD4+ count but smaller decline in CD8+ count. Changes in soluble or cellular biomarkers of inflammation and immune activation were not different between MVC and TDF. PMID:27281061

  5. The performance of BD FACSPresto™ for CD4 T-cell count, CD4% and hemoglobin concentration test in Ethiopia.

    PubMed

    Gebremicael, Gebremedhin; Belay, Yohanes; Girma, Fitsum; Abreha, Yemane; Gebreegziabxier, Atsbeha; Tesfaye, Simret; Messele, Zelalem; Assefa, Yibeltal; Bellete, Bahrie; Kassa, Desta; Vojnov, Lara

    2017-01-01

    In Ethiopia, CD4+ T-cell counting is still required for all patients at baseline before antiretroviral therapy (ART) and to determine eligibility and follow-up of opportunistic infection prophylaxis. However, access to CD4+ T cell count in rural health facilities remains a major challenge in Ethiopia like other resource-limited settings. Both capillary and venous blood was drawn from each of 325 study participant recruited in Addis Ababa and surroundings. The CD4+ T-cell count, CD4%, and hemoglobin (Hgb) were tested at one of the four study health facilities using capillary blood and BD FACSPresto™ device. These tests were also done at the national HIV reference laboratory, using venous blood with BD FACSCalibur™, Sysmex XT-1800i™, and BD FACSPresto™. BD FACSPresto™ had an absolute mean bias of -13.3 cells/ul (-2.99%) and 28.3 cells/μl (6.4%) using venous and capillary blood, respectively, compared with BD FACSCalibur™. The absolute CD4 assay on the BD FACSPresto™ had a regression coefficient (R2) of 0.87 and 0.92 using capillary blood and venous blood samples, respectively, compared with BD FACSCalibur™. The percentage similarity of the BD FACSPresto™ using capillary and venous blood was 105.2% and 99.3%, respectively. The sensitivity of the FACSPresto™ using threshold of 500 cells/μl for ART eligibility using capillary and venous blood was 87.9 and 94.3%, while the specificity was 91.4 and 83.8%, respectively. Furthermore, the BD FACSPresto™ had an absolute mean bias of -0.2 dl/μl (0.0%) (95% LOA: -1.7, 1.3) and -0.59 dl/μl (0.1%) (95% LOA: -1.49, 0.31) for Hgb using capillary and venous blood compared with the Sysmex XT-1800i™, respectively. Our results showed acceptable agreement between the BD FACSPresto™ and BD FACSCalibur™ for CD4+ T-cell counting and CD4%; and between the BD FACSPresto™ and Sysmex XT-1800i™for measuring Hgb concentration.

  6. Limited CD4+ T cell proliferation leads to preservation of CD4+ T cell counts in SIV-infected sooty mangabeys.

    PubMed

    Chan, Ming Liang; Petravic, Janka; Ortiz, Alexandra M; Engram, Jessica; Paiardini, Mirko; Cromer, Deborah; Silvestri, Guido; Davenport, Miles P

    2010-12-22

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) infections result in chronic virus replication and progressive depletion of CD4+ T cells, leading to immunodeficiency and death. In contrast, 'natural hosts' of SIV experience persistent infection with high virus replication but no severe CD4+ T cell depletion, and remain AIDS-free. One important difference between pathogenic and non-pathogenic infections is the level of activation and proliferation of CD4+ T cells. We analysed the relationship between CD4+ T cell number and proliferation in HIV, pathogenic SIV in macaques, and non-pathogenic SIV in sooty mangabeys (SMs) and mandrills. We found that CD4+ T cell proliferation was negatively correlated with CD4+ T cell number, suggesting that animals respond to the loss of CD4+ T cells by increasing the proliferation of remaining cells. However, the level of proliferation seen in pathogenic infections (SIV in rhesus macaques and HIV) was much greater than in non-pathogenic infections (SMs and mandrills). We then used a modelling approach to understand how the host proliferative response to CD4+ T cell depletion may impact the outcome of infection. This modelling demonstrates that the rapid proliferation of CD4+ T cells in humans and macaques associated with low CD4+ T cell levels can act to 'fuel the fire' of infection by providing more proliferating cells for infection. Natural host species, on the other hand, have limited proliferation of CD4+ T cells at low CD4+ T cell levels, which allows them to restrict the number of proliferating cells susceptible to infection.

  7. Immunoliposome targeting to CD4+ cells in human blood.

    PubMed

    Phillips, N C; Tsoukas, C

    1990-01-01

    Liposomes were prepared from phospholipid formulations recognized or ignored by cells of the reticuloendothelial system (RES+ve or RES-ve, respectively). The ability of these liposomes to interact with CD4+ve cells in purified leukocyte fractions or in whole blood has been determined. RES+ve liposomes bound to monocytes in purified leukocyte fractions or in whole blood, but did not bind to lymphocytes. RES-ve liposomes did not bind to either monocytes or lymphocytes. The attachment of an anti-Leu3A (CD4) monoclonal antibody to the outer surface of RES-ve liposomes resulted in their interaction with both monocytes and lymphocytes. The binding was blocked by prior incubation of the leukocytes with free anti-Leu3A antibody. RES+ve liposomes were rapidly eliminated from the circulation of mice after intravenous injection, whereas RES-ve liposomes remained in the circulation for prolonged periods of time (half-life much greater than 5 h), even after incubation with the opsinizing acute-phase reactant, C-reactive protein. These results suggest that RES-ve liposomes possessing surface-bound anti-Leu3A may provide a means of targeting antiviral agents to those cells at risk from HIV infection.

  8. Delineating CD4 dependency of HIV-1: Adaptation to infect low level CD4 expressing target cells widens cellular tropism but severely impacts on envelope functionality

    PubMed Central

    Beauparlant, David; Rusert, Peter; Magnus, Carsten; Weber, Jacqueline; Uhr, Therese; Clapham, Paul R.; Metzner, Karin J.

    2017-01-01

    A hallmark of HIV-1 infection is the continuously declining number of the virus’ predominant target cells, activated CD4+ T cells. With diminishing CD4+ T cell levels, the capacity to utilize alternate cell types and receptors, including cells that express low CD4 receptor levels such as macrophages, thus becomes crucial. To explore evolutionary paths that allow HIV-1 to acquire a wider host cell range by infecting cells with lower CD4 levels, we dissected the evolution of the envelope-CD4 interaction under in vitro culture conditions that mimicked the decline of CD4high target cells, using a prototypic subtype B, R5-tropic strain. Adaptation to CD4low targets proved to severely alter envelope functions including trimer opening as indicated by a higher affinity to CD4 and loss in shielding against neutralizing antibodies. We observed a strikingly decreased infectivity on CD4high target cells, but sustained infectivity on CD4low targets, including macrophages. Intriguingly, the adaptation to CD4low targets altered the kinetic of the entry process, leading to rapid CD4 engagement and an extended transition time between CD4 and CCR5 binding during entry. This phenotype was also observed for certain central nervous system (CNS) derived macrophage-tropic viruses, highlighting that the functional perturbation we defined upon in vitro adaptation to CD4low targets occurs in vivo. Collectively, our findings suggest that CD4low adapted envelopes may exhibit severe deficiencies in entry fitness and shielding early in their evolution. Considering this, adaptation to CD4low targets may preferentially occur in a sheltered and immune-privileged environment such as the CNS to allow fitness restoring compensatory mutations to occur. PMID:28264054

  9. Control of inflammatory heart disease by CD4+ T cells.

    PubMed

    Barin, Jobert G; Čiháková, Daniela

    2013-05-01

    This review focuses on autoimmune myocarditis and its sequela, inflammatory dilated cardiomyopathy (DCMI), and the inflammatory and immune mechanisms underlying the pathogenesis of these diseases. Several mouse models of myocarditis and DCMI have improved our knowledge of the pathogenesis of these diseases, informing more general problems of cardiac remodeling and heart failure. CD4(+) T cells are critical in driving the pathogenesis of myocarditis. We discuss in detail the role of T helper cell subtypes in the pathogenesis of myocarditis, the biology of T cell-derived effector cytokines, and the participation of other leukocytic effectors in mediating disease pathophysiology. We discuss interactions between these subsets in both suppressive and collaborative fashions. These findings indicate that cardiac inflammatory disease, and autoimmunity in general, may be more diverse in divergent effector mechanisms than has previously been appreciated.

  10. CD4+ regulatory T cells in solid organ transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Issa, Fadi; Wood, Kathryn J.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose of review: Solid organ transplantation is the most effective treatment for end-stage organ failure, but the long-term outcomes remain suboptimal. CD4+ regulatory T cells (Treg) are emerging as a potential therapy to facilitate long-term allograft survival. This review provides a general overview of the biology of CD4+ Treg and then goes on to discuss the most relevant and recent experimental and clinical evidence for their therapeutic use in solid organ transplantation. Recent findings: There have been major advances in our understanding of Treg, including improvements in methods for their isolation and expansion. Experimental models are providing very important data on the in vitro and in vivo behaviour of Treg in transplantation, while recent clinical trials of Treg cellular therapy in graft-versus-host disease are offering a valuable insight into the efficacy of Treg adoptive cellular therapy. Summary: Data in favour of Treg cellular therapy in transplantation are mounting, and we predict that their use in clinical trials is on the horizon. PMID:20881492

  11. CD4+CD25hiFOXP3+ cells in cord blood of neonates born from filaria infected mother are negatively associated with CD4+Tbet+ and CD4+RORγt+ T cells.

    PubMed

    Ateba-Ngoa, Ulysse; Mombo-Ngoma, Ghyslain; Zettlmeissl, Eva; van der Vlugt, Luciën E P M; de Jong, Sanne E; de Jong, Sanne; Matsiegui, Pierre-Blaise; Ramharter, Michael; Kremsner, Peter G; Yazdanbakhsh, Maria; Adegnika, Ayola Akim

    2014-01-01

    Children who have been exposed in utero to maternal filarial infection are immunologically less responsive to filarial antigens, have less pathology, and are more susceptible to acquire infection than offspring of uninfected mothers. Moreover children from filaria infected mothers have been shown to be less responsive to vaccination as a consequence of an impairment of their immune response. However, it is not well known how in utero exposure to parasite antigens affects cellular immune responses. Here, 30 pregnant women were examined for the presence of microfilaria of Loa loa and Mansonella perstans in peripheral blood. At delivery, cord blood mononuclear cells (CBMC) were obtained and the CD4+T cells were phenotyped by expression of the transcription factors Tbet, RORγt, and FOXP3. No significant difference was observed between newborns from infected versus uninfected mothers in the frequencies of total CD4+T cells and CD4+T cells subsets including CD4+Tbet+, CD4+RORγt+ T and CD4+CD25hiFOXP3+ T cells. However, there was a negative association between CD4+CD25hiFOXP3+T cells and CD4+Tbet+ as well as CD4+RORγt+ T cells in the infected group only (B = -0.242, P = 0.002; B = -0.178, P = 0.013 respectively). Our results suggest that filarial infection during pregnancy leads to an expansion of functionally active regulatory T cells that keep TH1 and TH17 in check.

  12. Tyrosine kinase activity of CD4-associated p56lck may not be required for CD4-dependent T-cell activation.

    PubMed Central

    Collins, T L; Burakoff, S J

    1993-01-01

    The lymphoid-specific tyrosine kinase p56lck (Lck) is critical for the development and activation of T lymphocytes, and Lck kinase activity has been implicated in both T-cell antigen receptor/CD3- and CD4-mediated signaling. CD4-dependent T-cell activation has been demonstrated to be dependent upon the association of CD4 with Lck. To examine the role of the kinase activity of Lck in CD4-dependent T-cell activation, we have generated several kinase-deficient mutants of Lck. When transfected into CD4+ murine T-cell hybridoma cells, these mutants cause approximately 90% diminution in CD4-associated Lck kinase activity. Specifically, upon CD4 crosslinking there is decreased Lck autophosphorylation and decreased phosphorylation of an exogenous substrate. When CD4 is crosslinked to the T-cell antigen receptor-CD3 complex, decreased phosphorylation of associated substrates is also observed. In spite of this striking inhibition of Lck kinase function, cells expressing the kinase-deficient mutants demonstrate normal or enhanced CD4-dependent antigen responsiveness. These data demonstrate that the level of Lck kinase activity does not correlate with its CD4-associated function and suggest that the kinase activity of Lck may not be required for CD4-mediated signaling. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 PMID:7505449

  13. Differential T cell receptor-mediated signaling in naive and memory CD4 T cells.

    PubMed

    Farber, D L; Acuto, O; Bottomly, K

    1997-08-01

    Naive and memory CD4 T cells differ in cell surface phenotype, function, activation requirements, and modes of regulation. To investigate the molecular bases for the dichotomies between naive and memory CD4 T cells and to understand how the T cell receptor (TCR) directs diverse functional outcomes, we investigated proximal signaling events triggered through the TCR/CD3 complex in naive and memory CD4 T cell subsets isolated on the basis of CD45 isoform expression. Naive CD4 T cells signal through TCR/CD3 similar to unseparated CD4 T cells, producing multiple tyrosine-phosphorylated protein species overall and phosphorylating the T cell-specific ZAP-70 tyrosine kinase which is recruited to the CD3zeta subunit of the TCR. Memory CD4 T cells, however, exhibit a unique pattern of signaling through TCR/CD3. Following stimulation through TCR/CD3, memory CD4 T cells produce fewer species of tyrosine-phosphorylated substrates and fail to phosphorylate ZAP-70, yet unphosphorylated ZAP-70 can associate with the TCR/CD3 complex. Moreover, a 26/28-kDa phosphorylated doublet is associated with CD3zeta in resting and activated memory but not in naive CD4 T cells. Despite these differences in the phosphorylation of ZAP-70 and CD3-associated proteins, the ZAP-70-related kinase, p72syk, exhibits similar phosphorylation in naive and memory T cell subsets, suggesting that this kinase could function in place of ZAP-70 in memory CD4 T cells. These results indicate that proximal signals are differentially coupled to the TCR in naive versus memory CD4 T cells, potentially leading to distinct downstream signaling events and ultimately to the diverse functions elicited by these two CD4 T cell subsets.

  14. Inhibition of HIV replication by pokeweed antiviral protein targeted to CD4+ cells by monoclonal antibodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zarling, Joyce M.; Moran, Patricia A.; Haffar, Omar; Sias, Joan; Richman, Douglas D.; Spina, Celsa A.; Myers, Dorothea E.; Kuebelbeck, Virginia; Ledbetter, Jeffrey A.; Uckun, Fatih M.

    1990-09-01

    FUNCTIONAL impairment and selective depletion of CD4+ T cells, the hallmark of AIDS, are at least partly caused by human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1) type 1 binding to the CD4 molecule and infecting CD4+ cells1,2. It may, therefore, be of therapeutic value to target an antiviral agent to CD4+ cells to prevent infection and to inhibit HIV-1 production in patients' CD4+ cells which contain proviral DNA3,4. We report here that HIV-1 replication in normal primary CD4+ T cells can be inhibited by pokeweed antiviral protein, a plant protein of relative molecular mass 30,000 (ref. 5), which inhibits replication of certain plant RNA viruses6-8, and of herpes simplex virus, poliovirus and influenza virus9-11. Targeting pokeweed antiviral protein to CD4+ T cells by conjugating it to monoclonal antibodies reactive with CDS, CD7 or CD4 expressed on CD4+ cells, increased its anti-HIV potency up to 1,000-fold. HIV-1 replication is inhibited at picomolar concentrations of conjugates of pokeweed antiviral protein and monoclonal antibodies, which do not inhibit proliferation of normal CD4+ T cells or CD4-dependent responses. These conjugates inhibit HIV-1 protein synthesis and also strongly inhibit HIV-1 production in activated CD4+ T cells from infected patients.

  15. High Cell Surface Expression of CD4 Allows Distinction of CD4+CD25+ Antigen-specific Effector T Cells from CD4+CD25+ Regulatory T Cells in Murine Experimental Autoimmune Encephalomyelitis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jinzhu; Ridgway, William; Fathman, C. Garrison; Tse, Harley Y.; Shaw, Michael K.

    2008-01-01

    Analysis of T regulatory cells (Treg) and T effector cells (Teff) in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis is complicated by the fact that both cell types express CD4 and CD25. We demonstrate that encephalitogenic T cells, following antigen recognition, up regulate cell surface expression of CD4. The CD4high sub-population contains all of the antigen response as shown by proliferation and cytokine secretion, and only these cells are capable of transferring EAE to naive animals. On the other hand, a FACS separable CD25+ sub-population of cells displayed consistent levels of CD4 prior to and after antigen stimulation. These cells displayed characteristics of Treg, such as expressing high levels of the Foxp3 gene and the ability to suppress mitogenic T cell responses. PMID:17920698

  16. Viral persistence redirects CD4 T cell differentiation toward T follicular helper cells

    PubMed Central

    Fahey, Laura M.; Wilson, Elizabeth B.; Elsaesser, Heidi; Fistonich, Chris D.; McGavern, Dorian B.

    2011-01-01

    CD4 T cell responses are crucial to prevent and control viral infection; however, virus-specific CD4 T cell activity is considered to be rapidly lost during many persistent viral infections. This is largely caused by the fact that during viral persistence CD4 T cells do not produce the classical Th1 cytokines associated with control of acute viral infections. Considering that CD4 T cell help is critical for both CD8 T cell and B cell functions, it is unclear how CD4 T cells can lose responsiveness but continue to sustain long-term control of persistent viral replication. We now demonstrate that CD4 T cell function is not extinguished as a result of viral persistence. Instead, viral persistence and prolonged T cell receptor stimulation progressively redirects CD4 T cell development away from the Th1 response induced during an acute infection toward T follicular helper cells. Importantly, this sustained CD4 T cell functionality is critical to maintain immunity and ultimately aid in the control of persistent viral infection. PMID:21536743

  17. CD4+ T-cell deficiency in HIV patients responding to antiretroviral therapy is associated with increased expression of interferon-stimulated genes in CD4+ T cells.

    PubMed

    Fernandez, Sonia; Tanaskovic, Sara; Helbig, Karla; Rajasuriar, Reena; Kramski, Marit; Murray, John M; Beard, Michael; Purcell, Damian; Lewin, Sharon R; Price, Patricia; French, Martyn A

    2011-12-15

    Most patients with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) who remain CD4(+) T-cell deficient on antiretroviral therapy (ART) exhibit marked immune activation. As CD4(+) T-cell activation may be mediated by microbial translocation or interferon-alpha (IFN-α), we examined these factors in HIV patients with good or poor CD4(+) T-cell recovery on long-term ART. Messenger RNA levels for 3 interferon-stimulated genes were increased in CD4(+) T cells of patients with poor CD4(+) T-cell recovery, whereas levels in patients with good recovery did not differ from those in healthy controls. Poor CD4(+) T-cell recovery was also associated with CD4(+) T-cell expression of markers of activation, senescence, and apoptosis, and with increased serum levels of the lipopolysaccharide receptor and soluble CD14, but these were not significantly correlated with expression of the interferon-stimulated genes. Therefore, CD4(+) T-cell recovery may be adversely affected by the effects of IFN-α, which may be amenable to therapeutic intervention.

  18. Human CD4+ central and effector memory T cells produce IL-21: effect on cytokine-driven proliferation of CD4+ T cell subsets.

    PubMed

    Onoda, Tadashi; Rahman, Mizanur; Nara, Hidetoshi; Araki, Akemi; Makabe, Koki; Tsumoto, Kouhei; Kumagai, Izumi; Kudo, Toshio; Ishii, Naoto; Tanaka, Nobuyuki; Sugamura, Kazuo; Hayasaka, Kiyoshi; Asao, Hironobu

    2007-10-01

    IL-21 regulates certain functions of T cells, B cells, NK cells and dendritic cells. Although activated CD4(+) T cells produce IL-21, data identifying the specific CD4(+) T cell subsets that produce IL-21 are conflicting. In a previous study, mouse IL-21 message was detected in T(H)2, whereas human IL-21 (hIL-21) message was found in both T(H)1 and follicular helper T cells. To identify the IL-21-secreting cell populations in human, we established a hybridoma cell line producing an anti-hIL-21 mAb. Intracellular hIL-21-staining experiments showed that hIL-21 was mainly expressed in activated CD4(+) central memory T cells and in activated CD4(+) effector memory T cells, but not in activated CD4(+) naive T cells. Moreover, IL-21 was produced upon activation by some IFN-gamma-producing T(H)1-polarized cells and some IL-17-producing T(H)17-polarized cells, but not by IL-4-producing T(H)2-polarized cells. These results suggest that specific CD4(+) T cell populations produce IL-21. In the functional analysis, we found that IL-21 significantly enhanced the cytokine-driven proliferation of CD4(+) helper T cells synergistically with IL-7 and IL-15 without T cell activation stimuli. Taken together, IL-21 produced from CD4(+) memory T cells may have a supportive role in the maintenance of CD4(+) T cell subsets.

  19. CD4 Variability in Malawi: Implications for Use of a CD4 Threshold of 500 Cells/mm3 Versus Universal Eligibility for Antiretroviral Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Schooley, Alan L.; Kamudumuli, Pocha Samuel; Vangala, Sitaram; Tseng, Chi-hong; Soko, Chifundo; Parent, Julie; Phiri, Khumbo; Jahn, Andreas; Namarika, Dan; Hoffman, Risa M.

    2016-01-01

    Background. Given the uncertainty about the ability of a single CD4 count to accurately classify a patient as antiretroviral therapy (ART) eligible, we sought to understand the extent to which CD4 variability results in misclassification at a CD4 threshold of 500 cells/mm3. Methods. We performed a prospective study of CD4 variability in Malawian human immunodeficiency virus-infected, ART-naive, World Health Organization (WHO) stage 1 or 2, nonpregnant adults. CD4 counts were performed daily for 8 days. We fit a Bayesian linear mixed-effects model of log-transformed CD4 cell counts to the data. We used Monte Carlo approximations to estimate misclassification rates for different observed values of CD4. The misclassification rate was calculated based on the conditional probability of true CD4 given the geometric mean of observed CD4 measurements. Results. Fifty patients were enrolled from 2 sites. The median age was 33.5 years (interquartile range, 27.5–40.0) and 34 (68%) were female. Misclassification rates were <1% when the observed CD4 counts were ≤250 or ≥750 cells/mm3. Rates of misclassification were high at observed CD4 counts between 350 and 650 cells/mm3, particularly when a single measurement was used (up to 46.7%). Conclusions. Our data show that ART eligibility based on a single CD4 count results in highest risk of misclassification when observed CD4 counts are in the range of 350–650 cells/mm3. Given the benefits of early ART, countries should weigh the costs and complexity of CD4 testing using a 500 cell/mm3 threshold against the cost savings and public health benefits of universal eligibility. PMID:27704028

  20. Divergent CD4+ T memory stem cell dynamics in pathogenic and nonpathogenic simian immunodeficiency virus infections.

    PubMed

    Cartwright, Emily K; McGary, Colleen S; Cervasi, Barbara; Micci, Luca; Lawson, Benton; Elliott, Sarah T C; Collman, Ronald G; Bosinger, Steven E; Paiardini, Mirko; Vanderford, Thomas H; Chahroudi, Ann; Silvestri, Guido

    2014-05-15

    Recent studies have identified a subset of memory T cells with stem cell-like properties (T(SCM)) that include increased longevity and proliferative potential. In this study, we examined the dynamics of CD4(+) T(SCM) during pathogenic SIV infection of rhesus macaques (RM) and nonpathogenic SIV infection of sooty mangabeys (SM). Whereas SIV-infected RM show selective numeric preservation of CD4(+) T(SCM), SIV infection induced a complex perturbation of these cells defined by depletion of CD4(+)CCR5(+) T(SCM), increased rates of CD4(+) T(SCM) proliferation, and high levels of direct virus infection. The increased rates of CD4(+) T(SCM) proliferation in SIV-infected RM correlated inversely with the levels of central memory CD4(+) T cells. In contrast, nonpathogenic SIV infection of SM evidenced preservation of both CD4(+) T(SCM) and CD4(+) central memory T cells, with normal levels of CD4(+) T(SCM) proliferation, and lack of selective depletion of CD4(+)CCR5(+) T(SCM). Importantly, SIV DNA was below the detectable limit in CD4(+) T(SCM) from 8 of 10 SIV-infected SM. We propose that increased proliferation and infection of CD4(+) T(SCM) may contribute to the pathogenesis of SIV infection in RM.

  1. Small CD4 Mimetics Prevent HIV-1 Uninfected Bystander CD4 + T Cell Killing Mediated by Antibody-dependent Cell-mediated Cytotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Richard, Jonathan; Veillette, Maxime; Ding, Shilei; Zoubchenok, Daria; Alsahafi, Nirmin; Coutu, Mathieu; Brassard, Nathalie; Park, Jongwoo; Courter, Joel R.; Melillo, Bruno; Smith, Amos B.; Shaw, George M.; Hahn, Beatrice H.; Sodroski, Joseph; Kaufmann, Daniel E.; Finzi, Andrés

    2015-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection causes a progressive depletion of CD4 + T cells. Despite its importance for HIV-1 pathogenesis, the precise mechanisms underlying CD4 + T-cell depletion remain incompletely understood. Here we make the surprising observation that antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC) mediates the death of uninfected bystander CD4 + T cells in cultures of HIV-1-infected cells. While HIV-1-infected cells are protected from ADCC by the action of the viral Vpu and Nef proteins, uninfected bystander CD4 + T cells bind gp120 shed from productively infected cells and are efficiently recognized by ADCC-mediating antibodies. Thus, gp120 shedding represents a viral mechanism to divert ADCC responses towards uninfected bystander CD4 + T cells. Importantly, CD4-mimetic molecules redirect ADCC responses from uninfected bystander cells to HIV-1-infected cells; therefore, CD4-mimetic compounds might have therapeutic utility in new strategies aimed at specifically eliminating HIV-1-infected cells. PMID:26870823

  2. Aryl hydrocarbon receptor controls regulatory CD4+ T cell function.

    PubMed

    Pot, Caroline

    2012-05-31

    The ligand activated transcription factor aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) has been studied for many decades in toxicology as the ligand for the environmental contaminant dioxin. However, AhR has recently emerged as a critical physiological regulator of immune responses affecting both innate and adaptive systems, and several AhR ligands with different pharmacological profiles have recently been studied. The current review discusses new insights into the role of AhR signalling and AhR ligands on the regulation of the immune system, with a focus on regulatory T cells which maintain immune tolerance. Notably, AhR is expressed and modulates the development of two induced regulatory CD4+ T cell subsets, the forkhead box P3-positive (Foxp3+) regulatory T cells (iTreg) and the IL-10-secreting type 1 regulatory T (T(R)1) cells, through different signalling pathways. We will finally discuss how AhR ligands could be exploited to alleviate human autoimmune diseases. Clearly, drugs targeted against AhR should promote the development of new strategies to fight against autoimmune diseases.

  3. Changes in Reactivity In Vitro of CD4(+)CD25(+) and CD4(+)CD25(-) T Cell Subsets in Transplant Tolerance.

    PubMed

    Hall, Bruce M; Robinson, Catherine M; Plain, Karren M; Verma, Nirupama D; Tran, Giang T; Nomura, Masaru; Carter, Nicole; Boyd, Rochelle; Hodgkinson, Suzanne J

    2017-01-01

    Transplant tolerance induced in adult animals is mediated by alloantigen-specific CD4(+)CD25(+) T cells, yet in many models, proliferation of CD4(+) T cells from hosts tolerant to specific-alloantigen in vitro is not impaired. To identify changes that may diagnose tolerance, changes in the patterns of proliferation of CD4(+), CD4(+)CD25(+), and CD4(+)CD25(-) T cells from DA rats tolerant to Piebald Virol Glaxo rat strain (PVG) cardiac allografts and from naïve DA rats were examined. Proliferation of CD4(+) T cells from both naïve and tolerant hosts was similar to both PVG and Lewis stimulator cells. In mixed lymphocyte culture to PVG, proliferation of naïve CD4(+)CD25(-) T cells was greater than naïve CD4(+) T cells. In contrast, proliferation of CD4(+)CD25(-) T cells from tolerant hosts to specific-donor PVG was not greater than CD4(+) T cells, whereas their response to Lewis and self-DA was greater than CD4(+) T cells. Paradoxically, CD4(+)CD25(+) T cells from tolerant hosts did not proliferate to PVG, but did to Lewis, whereas naïve CD4(+)CD25(+) T cells proliferate to both PVG and Lewis but not to self-DA. CD4(+)CD25(+) T cells from tolerant, but not naïve hosts, expressed receptors for interferon (IFN)-γ and IL-5 and these cytokines promoted their proliferation to specific-alloantigen PVG but not to Lewis or self-DA. We identified several differences in the patterns of proliferation to specific-donor alloantigen between cells from tolerant and naïve hosts. Most relevant is that CD4(+)CD25(+) T cells from tolerant hosts failed to proliferate or suppress to specific donor in the absence of either IFN-γ or IL-5. The proliferation to third-party and self of each cell population from tolerant and naïve hosts was similar and not affected by IFN-γ or IL-5. Our findings suggest CD4(+)CD25(+) T cells that mediate transplant tolerance depend on IFN-γ or IL-5 from alloactivated Th1 and Th2 cells.

  4. Regulation of CD4 T cells and their effects on immunopathological inflammation following viral infection.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharyya, Mitra; Madden, Patrick; Henning, Nathan; Gregory, Shana; Aid, Malika; Martinot, Amanda J; Barouch, Dan H; Penaloza-MacMaster, Pablo

    2017-10-01

    CD4 T cells help immune responses, but knowledge of how memory CD4 T cells are regulated and how they regulate adaptive immune responses and induce immunopathology is limited. Using adoptive transfer of virus-specific CD4 T cells, we show that naive CD4 T cells undergo substantial expansion following infection, but can induce lethal T helper type 1-driven inflammation. In contrast, memory CD4 T cells exhibit a biased proliferation of T follicular helper cell subsets and were able to improve adaptive immune responses in the context of minimal tissue damage. Our analyses revealed that type I interferon regulates the expansion of primary CD4 T cells, but does not seem to play a critical role in regulating the expansion of secondary CD4 T cells. Strikingly, blockade of type I interferon abrogated lethal inflammation by primary CD4 T cells following viral infection, despite that this treatment increased the numbers of primary CD4 T-cell responses. Altogether, these data demonstrate important aspects of how primary and secondary CD4 T cells are regulated in vivo, and how they contribute to immune protection and immunopathology. These findings are important for rational vaccine design and for improving adoptive T-cell therapies against persistent antigens. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Human CD4low CD25high regulatory T cells indiscriminately kill autologous activated T cells

    PubMed Central

    Bryl, Ewa; Daca, Agnieszka; Jóźwik, Agnieszka; Witkowski, Jacek M

    2009-01-01

    The interest of the scientific community in regulatory CD4+ T cells has reached an enormously high level. Common agreement is that they inhibit not only the proliferation of CD4 and CD8 lymphocytes, but also the activities of natural killer cells and macrophages. However, very important issues concerning actual mechanism(s) and specificity of the action of regulatory T cells (Tregs) upon responder cells are still unsolved or vague. The best known marker for Tregs is the expression of transcription factor FoxP3, widely used for their enumeration. It is known that FoxP3 inhibits cytokine production so the most probable action of Tregs is direct. However, FoxP3 expression cannot be used for functional studies in humans. Therefore we identified human peripheral blood Tregs as a distinct, very well-defined population of peripheral blood T cells with reduced CD4 and high CD25 expression (CD4low CD25high), which fulfils the current phenotypic criteria identifying the Tregs by simultaneously expressing high amounts of FoxP3. We conclude that the definition of a CD4low CD25high phenotype is enough to unambiguously detect and study the regulatory function of these cells. On the functional level, the CD4low Tregs are able to non-specifically suppress the proliferation of autologous, previously polyclonally activated CD4+ and CD4− lymphocytes and to kill them by direct contact, probably utilizing intracellular granzyme B and perforin. PMID:19016909

  6. Human CD4low CD25high regulatory T cells indiscriminately kill autologous activated T cells.

    PubMed

    Bryl, Ewa; Daca, Agnieszka; Jóźwik, Agnieszka; Witkowski, Jacek M

    2009-09-01

    The interest of the scientific community in regulatory CD4(+) T cells has reached an enormously high level. Common agreement is that they inhibit not only the proliferation of CD4 and CD8 lymphocytes, but also the activities of natural killer cells and macrophages. However, very important issues concerning actual mechanism(s) and specificity of the action of regulatory T cells (Tregs) upon responder cells are still unsolved or vague. The best known marker for Tregs is the expression of transcription factor FoxP3, widely used for their enumeration. It is known that FoxP3 inhibits cytokine production so the most probable action of Tregs is direct. However, FoxP3 expression cannot be used for functional studies in humans. Therefore we identified human peripheral blood Tregs as a distinct, very well-defined population of peripheral blood T cells with reduced CD4 and high CD25 expression (CD4(low) CD25(high)), which fulfils the current phenotypic criteria identifying the Tregs by simultaneously expressing high amounts of FoxP3. We conclude that the definition of a CD4(low) CD25(high) phenotype is enough to unambiguously detect and study the regulatory function of these cells. On the functional level, the CD4(low) Tregs are able to non-specifically suppress the proliferation of autologous, previously polyclonally activated CD4(+) and CD4(-) lymphocytes and to kill them by direct contact, probably utilizing intracellular granzyme B and perforin.

  7. Everolimus and basiliximab permit suppression by human CD4+CD25+ cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Game, David S; Hernandez-Fuentes, Maria P; Lechler, Robert I

    2005-03-01

    Immunosuppressive drugs are essential for the prevention of acute transplant rejection but some may not promote long-term tolerance. Tolerance is dependent on the presence and regulatory function of CD4(+)CD25(+) T cells in a number of animal models. The direct effects of immunosuppressive drugs on CD4(+)CD25(+) cells, particularly those that interfere with IL-2 signaling are uncertain. We studied the effects of the rapamycin derivative everolimus and the anti-CD25 monoclonal antibody basiliximab on the regulatory capacity of human CD4(+)CD25(+) cells in vitro. Both drugs permitted the suppression of proliferation and IFN-gamma secretion by CD4(+)CD25(-) cells responding to allogeneic and other polyclonal stimuli; CTLA-4 expression was abolished on CD4(+)CD25(+) cells without compromising their suppressive ability. Everolimus reduced IFN-gamma secretion by CD4(+)CD25(-) cells before the anti-proliferative effect: this is a novel finding. Exogenous IL-2 and IL-15 could prevent the suppression of proliferation by CD4(+)CD25(+) cells and the drugs could not restore suppression. By contrast, suppression of IFN-gamma secretion was only slightly impeded with the exogenous cytokines. Finally, CD4(+)CD25(+) cells were more resistant than CD4(+)CD25(-) cells to the pro-apoptotic action of the drugs. Together these data suggest that CD4(+)CD25(+) cells may still exert their effects in transplant patients taking immunosuppression that interferes with IL-2 signaling.

  8. TGF-β receptor maintains CD4 T helper cell identity during chronic viral infections

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Gavin M.; Wehrens, Ellen J.; Labarta-Bajo, Lara; Streeck, Hendrik; Zuniga, Elina I.

    2016-01-01

    Suppression of CD8 and CD4 T cells is a hallmark in chronic viral infections, including hepatitis C and HIV. While multiple pathways are known to inhibit CD8 T cells, the host molecules that restrict CD4 T cell responses are less understood. Here, we used inducible and CD4 T cell–specific deletion of the gene encoding the TGF-β receptor during chronic lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus infection in mice, and determined that TGF-β signaling restricted proliferation and terminal differentiation of antiviral CD4 T cells. TGF-β signaling also inhibited a cytotoxic program that includes granzymes and perforin expression at both early and late stages of infection in vivo and repressed the transcription factor eomesodermin. Overexpression of eomesodermin was sufficient to recapitulate in great part the phenotype of TGF-β receptor–deficient CD4 T cells, while SMAD4 was necessary for CD4 T cell accumulation and differentiation. TGF-β signaling also restricted accumulation and differentiation of CD4 T cells and reduced the expression of cytotoxic molecules in mice and humans infected with other persistent viruses. These data uncovered an eomesodermin-driven CD4 T cell program that is continuously suppressed by TGF-β signaling. During chronic viral infection, this program limits CD4 T cell responses while maintaining CD4 T helper cell identity. PMID:27599295

  9. Human Germinal Center CD4+ CD57+ T Cells Act Differently On B Cells Than Do Classical T-Helper Cells

    PubMed Central

    Bouzahzah, Farida; Bosseloir, Alain; Simar, Léon J.

    1995-01-01

    We have isolated two subtypes of helper T cells from human tonsils: CD4+ CD57+ cells, mostly located in the germinal center (GC), and CD4+ CD57- cells, distributed through the interfollicular areas but also present in the GC. In a functional study, we have compared the capacities of these T-cell subtypes to stimulate B cells in cocultures. In order to block T-cell proliferation while maintaining their activation level, we pretreated isolated T cells with mitomycin C prior to culture in the presence of B cells and added polyclonal activators such as PHA and Con A, combined or not with IL-2. Contrary to CD4+ CD57- cells, CD4+ CD57+ cells did not markedly enhance B-cell proliferation. Even when sIgD-B cells typical of germinal center cells were tested, the CD4 CD57 cells had no significant effect. This is in accordance with the location of these cells: They mainly occupy the light zones of the GC where few B cells divide. Even when added to preactivated, actively proliferating cells, CD4+ CD57+ cells failed to modulate B-cell multiplication. On the supernatants of B-cell-T-cell cocultures, we examined by the ELISA technique the effect of T cells on Ig synthesis. Contrary to CD57- T cells, whose effect was strong, CD57+ T cells weakly stimulated Ig synthesis. More IgM than IgG was generally found. Because CD57 antigen is a typical marker of natural killer cells, we tested the cytolytic activity of tonsillar CD4+ CD57+ cells on K562 target cells. Unlike NK cells, neither CD4+CD57+ nor CD4+ CD57- cells exhibit any cytotoxicity. Thus, germinal center CD4+ CD57+ cells are not cytolytic and do not strongly stimulate either B-cell proliferation or Ig secretion. CD4+ CD57- cells, however, enhance B-cell proliferation and differentiation, thus acting like the classical helper cells of the T-dependent areas. PMID:8770558

  10. Successful immunotherapy induces previously unidentified allergen-specific CD4+ T-cell subsets.

    PubMed

    Ryan, John F; Hovde, Rachel; Glanville, Jacob; Lyu, Shu-Chen; Ji, Xuhuai; Gupta, Sheena; Tibshirani, Robert J; Jay, David C; Boyd, Scott D; Chinthrajah, R Sharon; Davis, Mark M; Galli, Stephen J; Maecker, Holden T; Nadeau, Kari C

    2016-03-01

    Allergen immunotherapy can desensitize even subjects with potentially lethal allergies, but the changes induced in T cells that underpin successful immunotherapy remain poorly understood. In a cohort of peanut-allergic participants, we used allergen-specific T-cell sorting and single-cell gene expression to trace the transcriptional "roadmap" of individual CD4+ T cells throughout immunotherapy. We found that successful immunotherapy induces allergen-specific CD4+ T cells to expand and shift toward an "anergic" Th2 T-cell phenotype largely absent in both pretreatment participants and healthy controls. These findings show that sustained success, even after immunotherapy is withdrawn, is associated with the induction, expansion, and maintenance of immunotherapy-specific memory and naive T-cell phenotypes as early as 3 mo into immunotherapy. These results suggest an approach for immune monitoring participants undergoing immunotherapy to predict the success of future treatment and could have implications for immunotherapy targets in other diseases like cancer, autoimmune disease, and transplantation.

  11. Successful immunotherapy induces previously unidentified allergen-specific CD4+ T-cell subsets

    PubMed Central

    Ryan, John F.; Hovde, Rachel; Glanville, Jacob; Lyu, Shu-Chen; Ji, Xuhuai; Gupta, Sheena; Tibshirani, Robert J.; Jay, David C.; Boyd, Scott D.; Chinthrajah, R. Sharon; Davis, Mark M.; Galli, Stephen J.; Maecker, Holden T.; Nadeau, Kari C.

    2016-01-01

    Allergen immunotherapy can desensitize even subjects with potentially lethal allergies, but the changes induced in T cells that underpin successful immunotherapy remain poorly understood. In a cohort of peanut-allergic participants, we used allergen-specific T-cell sorting and single-cell gene expression to trace the transcriptional “roadmap” of individual CD4+ T cells throughout immunotherapy. We found that successful immunotherapy induces allergen-specific CD4+ T cells to expand and shift toward an “anergic” Th2 T-cell phenotype largely absent in both pretreatment participants and healthy controls. These findings show that sustained success, even after immunotherapy is withdrawn, is associated with the induction, expansion, and maintenance of immunotherapy-specific memory and naive T-cell phenotypes as early as 3 mo into immunotherapy. These results suggest an approach for immune monitoring participants undergoing immunotherapy to predict the success of future treatment and could have implications for immunotherapy targets in other diseases like cancer, autoimmune disease, and transplantation. PMID:26811452

  12. Protection from type 1 diabetes by invariant NK T cells requires the activity of CD4+CD25+ regulatory T cells.

    PubMed

    Ly, Dalam; Mi, Qing-Sheng; Hussain, Shabbir; Delovitch, Terry L

    2006-09-15

    Invariant NK T (iNKT) cells regulate immune responses, express NK cell markers and an invariant TCR, and recognize lipid Ags in a CD1d-restricted manner. Previously, we reported that activation of iNKT cells by alpha-galactosylceramide (alpha-GalCer) protects against type 1 diabetes (T1D) in NOD mice via an IL-4-dependent mechanism. To further investigate how iNKT cells protect from T1D, we analyzed whether iNKT cells require the presence of another subset(s) of regulatory T cells (Treg), such as CD4+ CD25+ Treg, for this protection. We found that CD4+ CD25+ T cells from NOD.CD1d(-/-) mice deficient in iNKT cell function similarly in vitro to CD4+ CD25+ T cells from wild-type NOD mice and suppress the proliferation of NOD T responder cells upon alpha-GalCer stimulation. Cotransfer of NOD diabetogenic T cells with CD4+ CD25+ Tregs from NOD mice pretreated with alpha-GalCer demonstrated that activated iNKT cells do not influence the ability of T(regs) to inhibit the transfer of T1D. In contrast, protection from T1D mediated by transfer of activated iNKT cells requires the activity of CD4+ CD25+ T cells, because splenocytes pretreated with alpha-GalCer and then inactivated by anti-CD25 of CD25+ cells did not protect from T1D. Similarly, mice inactivated of CD4+ CD25+ T cells before alpha-GalCer treatment were also not protected from T1D. Our data suggest that CD4+ CD25+ T cells retain their function during iNKT cell activation, and that the activity of CD4+ CD25+ Tregs is required for iNKT cells to transfer protection from T1D.

  13. Myeloid Dendritic Cells Induce HIV-1 Latency in Non-proliferating CD4+ T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Evans, Vanessa A.; Kumar, Nitasha; Filali, Ali; Procopio, Francesco A.; Yegorov, Oleg; Goulet, Jean-Philippe; Saleh, Suha; Haddad, Elias K.; da Fonseca Pereira, Candida; Ellenberg, Paula C.; Sekaly, Rafick-Pierre; Cameron, Paul U.; Lewin, Sharon R.

    2013-01-01

    Latently infected resting CD4+ T cells are a major barrier to HIV cure. Understanding how latency is established, maintained and reversed is critical to identifying novel strategies to eliminate latently infected cells. We demonstrate here that co-culture of resting CD4+ T cells and syngeneic myeloid dendritic cells (mDC) can dramatically increase the frequency of HIV DNA integration and latent HIV infection in non-proliferating memory, but not naïve, CD4+ T cells. Latency was eliminated when cell-to-cell contact was prevented in the mDC-T cell co-cultures and reduced when clustering was minimised in the mDC-T cell co-cultures. Supernatants from infected mDC-T cell co-cultures did not facilitate the establishment of latency, consistent with cell-cell contact and not a soluble factor being critical for mediating latent infection of resting CD4+ T cells. Gene expression in non-proliferating CD4+ T cells, enriched for latent infection, showed significant changes in the expression of genes involved in cellular activation and interferon regulated pathways, including the down-regulation of genes controlling both NF-κB and cell cycle. We conclude that mDC play a key role in the establishment of HIV latency in resting memory CD4+ T cells, which is predominantly mediated through signalling during DC-T cell contact. PMID:24339779

  14. Myeloid dendritic cells induce HIV-1 latency in non-proliferating CD4+ T cells.

    PubMed

    Evans, Vanessa A; Kumar, Nitasha; Filali, Ali; Procopio, Francesco A; Yegorov, Oleg; Goulet, Jean-Philippe; Saleh, Suha; Haddad, Elias K; da Fonseca Pereira, Candida; Ellenberg, Paula C; Sekaly, Rafick-Pierre; Cameron, Paul U; Lewin, Sharon R

    2013-01-01

    Latently infected resting CD4(+) T cells are a major barrier to HIV cure. Understanding how latency is established, maintained and reversed is critical to identifying novel strategies to eliminate latently infected cells. We demonstrate here that co-culture of resting CD4(+) T cells and syngeneic myeloid dendritic cells (mDC) can dramatically increase the frequency of HIV DNA integration and latent HIV infection in non-proliferating memory, but not naïve, CD4(+) T cells. Latency was eliminated when cell-to-cell contact was prevented in the mDC-T cell co-cultures and reduced when clustering was minimised in the mDC-T cell co-cultures. Supernatants from infected mDC-T cell co-cultures did not facilitate the establishment of latency, consistent with cell-cell contact and not a soluble factor being critical for mediating latent infection of resting CD4(+) T cells. Gene expression in non-proliferating CD4(+) T cells, enriched for latent infection, showed significant changes in the expression of genes involved in cellular activation and interferon regulated pathways, including the down-regulation of genes controlling both NF-κB and cell cycle. We conclude that mDC play a key role in the establishment of HIV latency in resting memory CD4(+) T cells, which is predominantly mediated through signalling during DC-T cell contact.

  15. Decreased percentage of CD4+Foxp3+TGF-β+ and increased percentage of CD4+IL-17+ cells in bronchoalveolar lavage of asthmatics

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Asthma is a chronic inflammatory disorder of the airways with the proven role of Th2 cells in its pathogenesis. The role and characteristic of different subsets of CD4+ cells is much less known. Aim The aim of the study was to analyze the incidence of different subsets of CD4+ T cells, in particular different subsets of CD4+ cells with the co-expression of different cytokines. Methods Twenty five stable asthmatic and twelve age-matched control subjects were recruited to the study. Bronchoscopy and bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) were performed in all study subjects. CD4+ T cells were isolated from BAL fluid by positive magnetic selection. After stimulation simultaneous expression of TGF-β, FoxP3, CD25, IFN-γ, IL-4, TNF-α (set 1); IL-10, FoxP3, CD25, IFN-γ, IL-4, MIP-1β (set 2); IL-17A, IL-8, IFN-γ, IL-4, MIP-1β (set 3) were measured by flow cytometry. Results The percentage of CD4+ cells co-expressing Foxp3 and TGF-β (CD4+Foxp3+TGF-β+ cells) was significantly lower (P = 0.03), whereas the percentage of CD4+IL-17+ cells (P = 0.008), CD4+IL-17+ IFN-γ+ cells (P = 0.047) and CD4+IL-4+ cells (P = 0.01) were significantly increased in asthmatics compared with that seen in healthy subjects. A significantly higher percentage of CD4+Foxp3+ cells from asthma patients expressed IFN-γ (P = 0.01), IL-4 (P = 0.004) and CD25 (P = 0.04), whereas the percentage of CD4+IL-10+ cells expressing Foxp3 was significantly decreased in asthmatics (P = 0.03). FEV1% predicted correlated negatively with the percentage of CD4+IL-17+ cells (r = -0.33; P = 0.046) and positively with CD4+Foxp3+TGF-β+ cells (r = 0.43; P = 0.01). Conclusions Our results suggest that in the airways of chronic asthma patients there is an imbalance between increased numbers of CD4+IL-17+ cells and Th2 cells and decreased number of CD4+Foxp3+TGF-β+. PMID:25132806

  16. ESTABLISHING MEAN CD4+ T CELL VALUES AMONG HEALTHY JAVANESE ADULTS IN INDONESIA.

    PubMed

    Prasetyo, Afiono Agung; Zaini, Khilyat Ulin Nur

    2015-07-01

    The objective of this study was to establish mean CD4+ T cell values among healthy Javanese adults in Indonesia. Two hundred forty-one healthy adults (119 women and 122 men), aged 18-65 years, were enrolled in the study. CD4+ T cells were analyzed by immunophenotyping. The mean absolute CD4+ T cell count was 753.3 ± 270.3 cells/µl (median = 725.0 cells/µl) and the mean CD4+ T cell percentage was 32.6 ± 7.7%, (median = 31.0%). Women had a slightly higher mean absolute CD4+ T cell count and CD4+ T cell percentage (779.1 ± 271.0 cells/ µl; 33.4 ± 8.2%) than men (728.2 ± 268.3 cells/µl; 31.8 ± 7.1%), but the differences were not statistically significant (p = 0.126, p = 0.216, respectively). The mean absolute CD4+ T cell varied significantly by age group (p = 0.002). Sixty-one point seven percent of men studied (37/60) had a CD4+ T cell count less than 500 cells/µl (OR 1.8; 95% CI = 1.001-3.300). Absolute CD4+ T cell counts among Javanese Indonesians varied significantly by age.

  17. Perturbations in B cell responsiveness to CD4+ T cell help in HIV-infected individuals

    PubMed Central

    Moir, Susan; Ogwaro, Kisani M.; Malaspina, Angela; Vasquez, Joshua; Donoghue, Eileen T.; Hallahan, Claire W.; Liu, Shuying; Ehler, Linda A.; Planta, Marie A.; Kottilil, Shyamasundaran; Chun, Tae-Wook; Fauci, Anthony S.

    2003-01-01

    HIV infection induces a wide array of B cell dysfunctions. We have characterized the effect of plasma viremia on the responsiveness of B cells to CD4+ T cell help in HIV-infected patients. In HIV-negative donors, B cell proliferation correlated with CD154 expression on activated CD4+ T cells and with the availability of IL-2, whereas in HIV-infected viremic patients, reduced B cell proliferation was observed despite normal CD154 expression on activated CD4+ T cells. Reduced triggering of B cells by activated CD4+ T cells was clearly observed in HIV-infected viremic patients compared with aviremic patients with comparable CD4+ T cell counts, and a dramatic improvement in B cell function was observed in patients whose plasma viremia was controlled by effective antiretroviral therapy. The degree of B cell dysfunction in viremic patients correlated strongly with the inability of B cells to express CD25 in response to activated CD4+ T cells, resulting in an inability to mount a normal proliferative response to IL-2. Similar defects in responsiveness to IL-2 were observed in the B cells of HIV-infected viremic patients in the context of B cell receptor stimulation. These data provide new insight into the mechanisms associated with ineffective humoral responses in HIV disease. PMID:12730375

  18. CD4 T cell activation by B cells in human Leishmania (Viannia) infection

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background An effective adaptive immune response requires activation of specific CD4 T cells. The capacity of B cells to activate CD4 T cells in human cutaneous leishmaniasis caused by Leishmania (Viannia) has not been evaluated. Methods CD4 T cell activation by B cells of cutaneous leishmaniasis patients was evaluated by culture of PBMCs or purified B cells and CD4 T cells with Leishmania panamensis antigens. CD4 T cell and B cell activation markers were evaluated by flow cytometry and 13 cytokines were measured in supernatants with a bead-based capture assay. The effect of Leishmania antigens on BCR-mediated endocytosis of ovalbumin was evaluated in the Ramos human B cell line by targeting the antigen with anti-IgM-biotin and anti-biotin-ovalbumin-FITC. Results Culture of PBMCs from cutaneous leishmaniasis patients with Leishmania antigens resulted in upregulation of the activation markers CD25 and CD69 as well as increased frequency of CD25hiCD127- cells among CD4 T cells. Concomitantly, B cells upregulated the costimulatory molecule CD86. These changes were not observed in PBMCs from healthy subjects, indicating participation of Leishmania-specific lymphocytes expanded in vivo. Purified B cells from these patients, when interacting with purified CD4 T cells and Leishmania antigens, were capable of inducing significant increases in CD25 and CD69 expression and CD25hiCD127- frequency in CD4 T cells. These changes were associated with upregulation of CD86 in B cells. Comparison of changes in CD4 T cell activation parameters between PBMC and B cell/CD4 T cell cultures showed no statistically significant differences; further, significant secretion of IFN-γ, TNF-α, IL-6 and IL-13 was induced in both types of cultures. Additionally, culture with Leishmania antigens enhanced BCR-mediated endocytosis of ovalbumin in Ramos human B cells. Conclusions The capacity of B cells specific for Leishmania antigens in peripheral blood of cutaneous leishmaniasis patients to

  19. CD4+CD25hiFOXP3+ Cells in Cord Blood of Neonates Born from Filaria Infected Mother Are Negatively Associated with CD4+Tbet+ and CD4+RORγt+ T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Zettlmeissl, Eva; van der Vlugt, Luciën E. P. M.; de Jong, Sanne; Matsiegui, Pierre-Blaise; Ramharter, Michael; Kremsner, Peter G.; Yazdanbakhsh, Maria; Adegnika, Ayola Akim

    2014-01-01

    Background Children who have been exposed in utero to maternal filarial infection are immunologically less responsive to filarial antigens, have less pathology, and are more susceptible to acquire infection than offspring of uninfected mothers. Moreover children from filaria infected mothers have been shown to be less responsive to vaccination as a consequence of an impairment of their immune response. However, it is not well known how in utero exposure to parasite antigens affects cellular immune responses. Methodology Here, 30 pregnant women were examined for the presence of microfilaria of Loa loa and Mansonella perstans in peripheral blood. At delivery, cord blood mononuclear cells (CBMC) were obtained and the CD4+T cells were phenotyped by expression of the transcription factors Tbet, RORγt, and FOXP3. Results No significant difference was observed between newborns from infected versus uninfected mothers in the frequencies of total CD4+T cells and CD4+T cells subsets including CD4+Tbet+, CD4+RORγt+ T and CD4+CD25hiFOXP3+ T cells. However, there was a negative association between CD4+CD25hiFOXP3+T cells and CD4+Tbet+ as well as CD4+RORγt+ T cells in the infected group only (B = −0.242, P = 0.002; B = −0.178, P = 0.013 respectively). Conclusion Our results suggest that filarial infection during pregnancy leads to an expansion of functionally active regulatory T cells that keep TH1 and TH17 in check. PMID:25531674

  20. Impact of nicotine on the interplay between human periodontal ligament cells and CD4+ T cells.

    PubMed

    Ge, Xin; Liu, Ying-Feng; Wong, Yong; Wu, Li-Zheng; Tan, Ling; Liu, Fen; Wang, Xiao-Jing

    2016-09-01

    Periodontitis is a common infectious disease associated with destruction of periodontal ligaments and alveolar bones. CD4(+) T cell-mediated immune response is involved in the progression of periodontitis. Tobacco consumption increases the risk of periodontal disease. However, the impact of nicotine on the interaction between human periodontal ligament (PDL) cells and CD4(+) T cells remains unrevealed. Our study aims to investigate the effect of nicotine on PDL cells and the cocultured CD4(+) T cells. The PDL cell cultures were established by explants from healthy individuals, exposed to nicotine or α-bungarotoxin (α-BTX), and incubated solely or in combination with CD4(+) T cells. Afterwards, cell viability, secreted cytokines, and matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) were evaluated. In monoculture of PDL cells, nicotine dramatically repressed cell viability and increased apoptosis. Meanwhile, α-BTX largely reversed the nicotine-induced apoptosis and increased viability of PDL cells. Compared with the monoculture, MMP-1, MMP-3, interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6, IL-17, and IL-21 in supernatant of cocultures were markedly elevated after treatment with nicotine. Moreover, α-BTX significantly attenuated nicotine-triggered production of these components either in mono- or co-cultures. In addition, PDL cell-derived CXCL12 following nicotine treatment recruited CD4(+) T cells. Above all, nicotine deteriorated periodontitis partially by promoting PDL cell-CD4(+) T cell-mediated inflammatory response and matrix degradation. © The Author(s) 2015.

  1. Cell-to-cell transfer of M. tuberculosis antigens optimizes CD4 T cell priming.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, Smita; Ernst, Joel D

    2014-06-11

    During Mycobacterium tuberculosis and other respiratory infections, optimal T cell activation requires pathogen transport from the lung to a local draining lymph node (LN). However, the infected inflammatory monocyte-derived dendritic cells (DCs) that transport M. tuberculosis to the local lymph node are relatively inefficient at activating CD4 T cells, possibly due to bacterial inhibition of antigen presentation. We found that infected migratory DCs release M. tuberculosis antigens as soluble, unprocessed proteins for uptake and presentation by uninfected resident lymph node DCs. This transfer of bacterial proteins from migratory to local DCs results in optimal priming of antigen-specific CD4 T cells, which are essential in controlling tuberculosis. Additionally, this mechanism does not involve transfer of the whole bacterium and is distinct from apoptosis or exosome shedding. These findings reveal a mechanism that bypasses pathogen inhibition of antigen presentation by infected cells and generates CD4 T cell responses that control the infection.

  2. The Transcription Factor Hobit Identifies Human Cytotoxic CD4+ T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Oja, Anna E.; Vieira Braga, Felipe A.; Remmerswaal, Ester B. M.; Kragten, Natasja A. M.; Hertoghs, Kirsten M. L.; Zuo, Jianmin; Moss, Paul A.; van Lier, René A. W.; van Gisbergen, Klaas P. J. M.; Hombrink, Pleun

    2017-01-01

    The T cell lineage is commonly divided into CD4-expressing helper T cells that polarize immune responses through cytokine secretion and CD8-expressing cytotoxic T cells that eliminate infected target cells by virtue of the release of cytotoxic molecules. Recently, a population of CD4+ T cells that conforms to the phenotype of cytotoxic CD8+ T cells has received increased recognition. These cytotoxic CD4+ T cells display constitutive expression of granzyme B and perforin at the protein level and mediate HLA class II-dependent killing of target cells. In humans, this cytotoxic profile is found within the human cytomegalovirus (hCMV)-specific, but not within the influenza- or Epstein–Barr virus-specific CD4+ T cell populations, suggesting that, in particular, hCMV infection induces the formation of cytotoxic CD4+ T cells. We have previously described that the transcription factor Homolog of Blimp-1 in T cells (Hobit) is specifically upregulated in CD45RA+ effector CD8+ T cells that arise after hCMV infection. Here, we describe the expression pattern of Hobit in human CD4+ T cells. We found Hobit expression in cytotoxic CD4+ T cells and accumulation of Hobit+ CD4+ T cells after primary hCMV infection. The Hobit+ CD4+ T cells displayed highly overlapping characteristics with Hobit+ CD8+ T cells, including the expression of cytotoxic molecules, T-bet, and CX3CR1. Interestingly, γδ+ T cells that arise after hCMV infection also upregulate Hobit expression and display a similar effector phenotype as cytotoxic CD4+ and CD8+ T cells. These findings suggest a shared differentiation pathway in CD4+, CD8+, and γδ+ T cells that may involve Hobit-driven acquisition of long-lived cytotoxic effector function. PMID:28392788

  3. Aire-Overexpressing Dendritic Cells Induce Peripheral CD4+ T Cell Tolerance

    PubMed Central

    Li, Dongbei; Li, Haijun; Fu, Haiying; Niu, Kunwei; Guo, Yantong; Guo, Chuan; Sun, Jitong; Li, Yi; Yang, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Autoimmune regulator (Aire) can promote the ectopic expression of peripheral tissue-restricted antigens (TRAs) in thymic medullary epithelial cells (mTECs), which leads to the deletion of autoreactive T cells and consequently prevents autoimmune diseases. However, the functions of Aire in the periphery, such as in dendritic cells (DCs), remain unclear. This study’s aim was to investigate the effect of Aire-overexpressing DCs (Aire cells) on the functions of CD4+ T cells and the treatment of type 1 diabetes (T1D). We demonstrated that Aire cells upregulated the mRNA levels of the tolerance-related molecules CD73, Lag3, and FR4 and the apoptosis of CD4+ T cells in STZ-T1D mouse-derived splenocytes. Furthermore, following insulin stimulation, Aire cells decreased the number of CD4+ IFN-γ+ T cells in both STZ-T1D and WT mouse-derived splenocytes and reduced the expression levels of TCR signaling molecules (Ca2+ and p-ERK) in CD4+ T cells. We observed that Aire cells-induced CD4+ T cells could delay the development of T1D. In summary, Aire-expressing DCs inhibited TCR signaling pathways and decreased the quantity of CD4+IFN-γ+ autoreactive T cells. These data suggest a mechanism for Aire in the maintenance of peripheral immune tolerance and provide a potential method to control autoimmunity by targeting Aire. PMID:26729097

  4. TNF-α blockade induces IL-10 expression in human CD4+ T cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, Hayley G.; Roostalu, Urmas; Walter, Gina J.; Gullick, Nicola J.; Frederiksen, Klaus S.; Roberts, Ceri A.; Sumner, Jonathan; Baeten, Dominique L.; Gerwien, Jens G.; Cope, Andrew P.; Geissmann, Frederic; Kirkham, Bruce W.; Taams, Leonie S.

    2014-02-01

    IL-17+ CD4+ T (Th17) cells contribute to the pathogenesis of several human inflammatory diseases. Here we demonstrate that TNF inhibitor (TNFi) drugs induce the anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10 in CD4+ T cells including IL-17+ CD4+ T cells. TNFi-mediated induction of IL-10 in IL-17+ CD4+ T cells is Treg-/Foxp3-independent, requires IL-10 and is overcome by IL-1β. TNFi-exposed IL-17+ CD4+ T cells are molecularly and functionally distinct, with a unique gene signature characterized by expression of IL10 and IKZF3 (encoding Aiolos). We show that Aiolos binds conserved regions in the IL10 locus in IL-17+ CD4+ T cells. Furthermore, IKZF3 and IL10 expression levels correlate in primary CD4+ T cells and Aiolos overexpression is sufficient to drive IL10 in these cells. Our data demonstrate that TNF-α blockade induces IL-10 in CD4+ T cells including Th17 cells and suggest a role for the transcription factor Aiolos in the regulation of IL-10 in CD4+ T cells.

  5. Comparison of CD4 cell count by a simple enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay using the TRAx CD4 test kit and by flow cytometry and hematology.

    PubMed Central

    Paxton, H; Pins, M; Denton, G; McGonigle, A D; Meisner, P S; Phair, J P

    1995-01-01

    Measurement of CD4 T-lymphocyte levels is clinically useful in monitoring immune status in a number of conditions, including human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection, in which the absolute CD4 count is used to guide therapy. The absolute CD4 count is obtained by multiplying the results of the leukocyte count and the differential with a hematology cell counter and the percentage of CD4+ T lymphocytes determined by flow cytometry. These techniques require expensive, complex instrumentation, and interlaboratory results are difficult to standardize and reproduce. The rapid growth of HIV infection worldwide has increased the need for more-reproducible and cost-effective methods for CD4 T-cell monitoring. The TRAx CD4 test kit is based on a novel adaptation of conventional enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and permits the simple quantitation of total CD4 protein from whole-blood lysates. In this study, the relationship between total CD4 protein measured in units per milliliter (TRAx) and in cells per microliter (flow cytometry and hematology) was defined in a multisite clinical study using linear regression analysis. Data from 230 HIV-seronegative and 321 HIV-seropositive specimens were used to calibrate the TRAx assay recombinant CD4 standards and controls in equivalent CD4 T lymphocytes per microliter (cells per microliter). The calibration of the TRAx CD4 assay in cells per microliter was validated with a second group of specimens from 17 healthy volunteers and 20 HIV-seropositive patients which were collected and tested under strictly controlled conditions intended to minimize the effects of specimen aging on the results of the reference method. These data were also used to estimate the variability of absolute CD4 count by cytometric methods as well as the precision of the TRAx CD4 result after it was calibrated in cells per microliter. Overall, correlations between the two methods ranged from 0.87 to 0.95. Additional studies demonstrated that the

  6. CD4+ primary T cells expressing HCV-core protein upregulate Foxp3 and IL-10, suppressing CD4 and CD8 T cells.

    PubMed

    Fernandez-Ponce, Cecilia; Dominguez-Villar, Margarita; Aguado, Enrique; Garcia-Cozar, Francisco

    2014-01-01

    Adaptive T cell responses are critical for controlling HCV infection. While there is clinical evidence of a relevant role for regulatory T cells in chronic HCV-infected patients, based on their increased number and function; mechanisms underlying such a phenomena are still poorly understood. Accumulating evidence suggests that proteins from Hepatitis C virus can suppress host immune responses. We and others have shown that HCV is present in CD4+ lymphocytes from chronically infected patients and that HCV-core protein induces a state of unresponsiveness in the CD4+ tumor cell line Jurkat. Here we show that CD4+ primary T cells lentivirally transduced with HCV-core, not only acquire an anergic phenotype but also inhibit IL-2 production and proliferation of bystander CD4+ or CD8+ T cells in response to anti-CD3 plus anti-CD28 stimulation. Core-transduced CD4+ T cells show a phenotype characterized by an increased basal secretion of the regulatory cytokine IL-10, a decreased IFN-γ production upon stimulation, as well as expression of regulatory T cell markers, CTLA-4, and Foxp3. A significant induction of CD4+CD25+CD127(low)PD-1(high)TIM-3(high) regulatory T cells with an exhausted phenotype was also observed. Moreover, CCR7 expression decreased in HCV-core expressing CD4+ T cells explaining their sequestration in inflamed tissues such as the infected liver. This work provides a new perspective on de novo generation of regulatory CD4+ T cells in the periphery, induced by the expression of a single viral protein.

  7. CD4+ Primary T Cells Expressing HCV-Core Protein Upregulate Foxp3 and IL-10, Suppressing CD4 and CD8 T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Aguado, Enrique; Garcia-Cozar, Francisco

    2014-01-01

    Adaptive T cell responses are critical for controlling HCV infection. While there is clinical evidence of a relevant role for regulatory T cells in chronic HCV-infected patients, based on their increased number and function; mechanisms underlying such a phenomena are still poorly understood. Accumulating evidence suggests that proteins from Hepatitis C virus can suppress host immune responses. We and others have shown that HCV is present in CD4+ lymphocytes from chronically infected patients and that HCV-core protein induces a state of unresponsiveness in the CD4+ tumor cell line Jurkat. Here we show that CD4+ primary T cells lentivirally transduced with HCV-core, not only acquire an anergic phenotype but also inhibit IL-2 production and proliferation of bystander CD4+ or CD8+ T cells in response to anti-CD3 plus anti-CD28 stimulation. Core-transduced CD4+ T cells show a phenotype characterized by an increased basal secretion of the regulatory cytokine IL-10, a decreased IFN-γ production upon stimulation, as well as expression of regulatory T cell markers, CTLA-4, and Foxp3. A significant induction of CD4+CD25+CD127lowPD-1highTIM-3high regulatory T cells with an exhausted phenotype was also observed. Moreover, CCR7 expression decreased in HCV-core expressing CD4+ T cells explaining their sequestration in inflamed tissues such as the infected liver. This work provides a new perspective on de novo generation of regulatory CD4+ T cells in the periphery, induced by the expression of a single viral protein. PMID:24465502

  8. Generation of CD4+ blastoid T cells in recipients of BP/IFA-sensitized spleen cells.

    PubMed

    Kira, J; Itoyama, Y; Goto, I

    1990-06-01

    While sensitization of Lewis rats with BP/IFA does not induce EAE, recipients given BP/IFA-sensitized cells after culture with BP do develop EAE. To clarify the pathophysiology responsible for this discrepancy, cell dynamics were studied in the recipients. The CD4+ T cells from BP/IFA-sensitized donors showed no proliferative response to BP and no change in cell size or surface molecule expression, even in the presence of BP in culture. On the other hand, the recipient cells proliferated vigorously, regardless of the presence or absence of BP. In this case, a large number of CD4+ blastoid T cells was generated only in the presence of BP in culture. Such cells showed marked upregulation of CD4, CD2, class I and II MHC, and IL2 receptor molecules, a finding we also observed in the case of BP-cultured cells from BP/CFA-sensitized rats with severe EAE. The proportion of CD4+ blastoid T cells generated after culture depended on the number of cells transferred and on the presence of BP in culture, and closely correlated with the severity of EAE in the recipients. These data suggest that BP/IFA-sensitization can also induce BP-reactive cells capable of becoming CD4+ blastoid T cells with marked upregulation of CD4, CD2, class I and II MHC, and IL2 receptor molecules directly related to potent encephalitogenicity, in vivo.

  9. Decision making during the conception and career of CD4+ T cells.

    PubMed

    Reiner, Steven L

    2009-02-01

    The mechanisms by which thymocytes commit to becoming CD4+ T cells and how these cells subsequently can adopt various cell fates are becoming important paradigms of developmental programming. Understanding how such CD4+ T-cell diversity accommodates both immune reaction against various challenges and the suppression of undesirable responses is also revealing new therapeutic options.

  10. Defective circulating CD4+LAP+ regulatory T cells in patients with dilated cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Zheng-Feng; Tang, Ting-Ting; Dong, Wen-Yong; Li, Yuan-Yuan; Xia, Ni; Zhang, Wen-Cai; Zhou, Su-Feng; Yuan, Jing; Liao, Meng-Yang; Li, Jing-Jing; Jiao, Jiao; Nie, Shao-Fang; Wang, Qing; Tu, Xin; Xu, Cheng-Qi; Liao, Yu-Hua; Shi, Guo-Ping; Cheng, Xiang

    2015-04-01

    There has been increasing evidence that chronic immune activation plays critical roles in the pathogenesis of DCM. CD4(+) LAP(+) Tregs are a newly identified T cell subset with suppressive function on the immune response. This study was designed to investigate whether the circulating frequency and function of CD4(+)LAP(+) Tregs would be impaired in patients with DCM. The results demonstrated that DCM patients had a significantly lower frequency of circulating CD4(+)LAP(+) Tregs compared with control donors. CD4(+)LAP(+) Tregs from DCM patients showed compromised function to suppress proliferation of CD4(+) LAP(-)CD25(int/low) T cells and proliferation and IgG production of B cells. Moreover, B cell proliferation and IgG subset production could be directly suppressed by CD4(+) LAP(+) Tregs. TGF-β and contact-dependent mechanisms were involved in CD4(+)LAP(+) Treg-mediated suppression. Correlation analysis suggested that CD4(+)LAP(+) Treg frequency was positively correlated with LVEF and negatively correlated with serum IgG3 and NT-proBNP concentration in patients with DCM. Our results are the first to demonstrate that the frequencies of CD4(+)LAP(+) Tregs in patients with DCM are reduced and that their suppressive function is compromised. Defective CD4(+) LAP(+) Tregs may be an underlying mechanism of immune activation in DCM patients. © Society for Leukocyte Biology.

  11. Peripheral CD4(+)CD8(+) T cells are differentiated effector memory cells with antiviral functions.

    PubMed

    Nascimbeni, Michelina; Shin, Eui-Cheol; Chiriboga, Luis; Kleiner, David E; Rehermann, Barbara

    2004-07-15

    Although an increased frequency of CD4(+)CD8(+) T cells has been observed in the peripheral blood during viral infections, their role, function, and biologic significance are still poorly understood. Here we demonstrate that the circulating CD4(+)CD8(+) T-cell population contains mature effector memory lymphocytes specific for antigens of multiple past, latent, and high-level persistent viral infections. Upon in vitro antigenic challenge, a higher frequency of CD4(+)CD8(+) than single-positive cells displayed a T helper 1/T cytotoxic 1 (Th1/Tc1) cytokine profile and proliferated. Ex vivo, more double-positive than single-positive cells exhibited a differentiated phenotype. Accordingly, their lower T-cell receptor excision circles (TREC) content and shorter telomeres proved they had divided more frequently than single-positive cells. Consistent with expression of the tissue-homing marker CXCR3, CD4(+)CD8(+) T cells were demonstrated in situ at the site of persistent viral infection (ie, in the liver during chronic hepatitis C). Finally, a prospective analysis of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection in a chimpanzee, the only animal model for HCV infection, showed a close correlation between the frequency of activated CD4(+)CD8(+) T cells and viral kinetics. Collectively, these findings demonstrate that peripheral CD4(+)CD8(+) T cells take part in the adaptive immune response against infectious pathogens and broaden the perception of the T-cell populations involved in antiviral immune responses.

  12. Differentiation of naive CD4+ T cells into CD4+CD25+FOXP3+ regulatory T cells by continuous antigen stimulation.

    PubMed

    Mahic, Milada; Yaqub, Sheraz; Bryn, Tone; Henjum, Karen; Eide, Dag M; Torgersen, Knut M; Aandahl, Einar M; Taskén, Kjetil

    2008-05-01

    Human CD4+CD25+ regulatory T (T(R)) cells express the transcription factor forkhead box p3 (FOXP3) and have potent immunosuppressive properties. While naturally occurring T(R) cells develop in the thymus, adaptive T(R) cells develop in the periphery from naive CD4+ T cells. Adaptive T(R) cells may express cyclooxygenase type 2 (COX-2) and suppress effector T cells by a PGE(2)-dependent mechanism, which is reversible with COX inhibitors. In this study we have characterized the differentiation of naive CD4+ T cells into adaptive T(R) cells in detail during 7 days of continuous antigen stimulation. After 2 days of stimulation of CD4+CD25- T cells, the cells expressed FOXP3 and COX-2 and displayed potent immunosuppressive properties. The suppressive phenotype was present at all observed time-points from Day 2, although suppression was merely present at Day 7. The adaptive T(R) cells expressed cell surface markers consistent with an activated phenotype and secreted high levels of TGF-beta, IL-10, and PGE(2). However, the suppressive phenotype was found exclusively in cells that proliferated upon activation. These data support the notion that activation of naive CD4+ T cells leads to concomitant acquisition of effector and suppressive properties.

  13. Selective culling of high avidity antigen-specific CD4+ T cells after virulent Salmonella infection.

    PubMed

    Ertelt, James M; Johanns, Tanner M; Mysz, Margaret A; Nanton, Minelva R; Rowe, Jared H; Aguilera, Marijo N; Way, Sing Sing

    2011-12-01

    Typhoid fever is a persistent infection caused by host-adapted Salmonella strains adept at circumventing immune-mediated host defences. Given the importance of T cells in protection, the culling of activated CD4+ T cells after primary infection has been proposed as a potential immune evasion strategy used by this pathogen. We demonstrate that the purging of activated antigen-specific CD4+ T cells after virulent Salmonella infection requires SPI-2 encoded virulence determinants, and is not restricted only to cells with specificity to Salmonella-expressed antigens, but extends to CD4+ T cells primed to expand by co-infection with recombinant Listeria monocytogenes. Unexpectedly, however, the loss of activated CD4+ T cells during Salmonella infection demonstrated using a monoclonal population of adoptively transferred CD4+ T cells was not reproduced among the endogenous repertoire of antigen-specific CD4+ T cells identified with MHC class II tetramer. Analysis of T-cell receptor variable segment usage revealed the selective loss and reciprocal enrichment of defined CD4+ T-cell subsets after Salmonella co-infection that is associated with the purging of antigen-specific cells with the highest intensity of tetramer staining. Hence, virulent Salmonella triggers the selective culling of high avidity activated CD4+ T-cell subsets, which re-shapes the repertoire of antigen-specific T cells that persist later after infection.

  14. Roscovitine suppresses CD4+ T cells and T cell-mediated experimental uveitis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zili; Liu, Qi; Leskov, Konstantin S; Wu, Xiumei; Duan, Jie; Zhang, Gary L; Hall, Mark; Rosenbaum, James T

    2013-01-01

    T cells are essential for the development of uveitis and other autoimmune diseases. After initial activation, CD4+ lymphocytes express the co-stimulatory molecule OX40 that plays an important role in T cell proliferation. Cyclin dependent kinase 2 (CdK2) plays a pivotal role in the cell cycle transition from G1 to S phase. In addition, recent research has implicated CdK2 in T cell activation. Thus, we sought to test the immunosuppressive effect of roscovitine, a potent CdK2 inhibitor, on CD4+ T cell activation, proliferation, and function. Mouse CD4+ T cells were activated by anti-CD3 and anti-CD28 antibodies. The expression of OX40, CD44, and CdK2 were analyzed by flow cytometry. In addition, cell cycle progression and apoptosis of control and roscovitine-treated T lymphocytes were measured by BrdU incorporation and annexin V assay, respectively. Furthermore, the immunoregulatory effect of roscovitine was evaluated in both ovalbumin-induced uveitis and experimental autoimmune uveitis (EAU) models. In this study, we found that T cell activation induced OX40 expression. Cell cycle analysis showed that more CD4+OX40+ cells entered S phase than OX40- T cells. Concurrently, CD4+OX40+ cells had a higher level of CdK2 expression. Roscovitine treatment blocked activated CD4+ cells from entering S phase. In addition, roscovitine not only reduced the viability of CD4+ lymphocytes but also suppressed T cell activation and cytokine production. Finally, roscovitine significantly attenuated the severity of T cell-dependent, OX40-enhanced uveitis. These results implicate CdK2 in OX40-augmented T cell response and expansion. Furthermore, this study suggests that roscovitine is a novel, promising, therapeutic agent for treating T cell-mediated diseases such as uveitis.

  15. Roscovitine Suppresses CD4+ T Cells and T Cell-Mediated Experimental Uveitis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zili; Liu, Qi; Leskov, Konstantin S.; Wu, Xiumei; Duan, Jie; Zhang, Gary L.; Hall, Mark; Rosenbaum, James T.

    2013-01-01

    Background T cells are essential for the development of uveitis and other autoimmune diseases. After initial activation, CD4+ lymphocytes express the co-stimulatory molecule OX40 that plays an important role in T cell proliferation. Cyclin dependent kinase 2 (CdK2) plays a pivotal role in the cell cycle transition from G1 to S phase. In addition, recent research has implicated CdK2 in T cell activation. Thus, we sought to test the immunosuppressive effect of roscovitine, a potent CdK2 inhibitor, on CD4+ T cell activation, proliferation, and function. Design and Methods Mouse CD4+ T cells were activated by anti-CD3 and anti-CD28 antibodies. The expression of OX40, CD44, and CdK2 were analyzed by flow cytometry. In addition, cell cycle progression and apoptosis of control and roscovitine-treated T lymphocytes were measured by BrdU incorporation and annexin V assay, respectively. Furthermore, the immunoregulatory effect of roscovitine was evaluated in both ovalbumin-induced uveitis and experimental autoimmune uveitis (EAU) models. Results In this study, we found that T cell activation induced OX40 expression. Cell cycle analysis showed that more CD4+OX40+ cells entered S phase than OX40- T cells. Concurrently, CD4+OX40+ cells had a higher level of CdK2 expression. Roscovitine treatment blocked activated CD4+ cells from entering S phase. In addition, roscovitine not only reduced the viability of CD4+ lymphocytes but also suppressed T cell activation and cytokine production. Finally, roscovitine significantly attenuated the severity of T cell-dependent, OX40-enhanced uveitis. Conclusion These results implicate CdK2 in OX40-augmented T cell response and expansion. Furthermore, this study suggests that roscovitine is a novel, promising, therapeutic agent for treating T cell-mediated diseases such as uveitis. PMID:24260551

  16. [Interpretation of the tuberculin test in children with CD4 lymphocyte cell mediated immunity changes].

    PubMed

    Piñeiro Pérez, R; Cilleruelo Ortega, M J; García López-Hortelano, M; García Ascaso, M; Medina Claros, A F; Mellado Peña, M J

    2014-01-01

    Immunosuppression could be a cause of a false negative tuberculin skin test (TST) result. A cross-sectional study was performed on a population of immigrants and internationally adopted children to analyse whether CD4 cell counts could modify the TST results. A total of 1074 children were included between January 2003 and December 2008. CD4 cell counts were performed on 884 children, in whom 5.3% had CD4 values <25%. There were no differences in TST results among children with normal and pathological CD4 cell counts. Several studies, including this one, have shown that there is no direct association between the CD4 value and the TST results. These results should be confirmed with larger series and with a higher percentage of children with CD4 values <25%. Copyright © 2012 Asociación Española de Pediatría. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  17. Cytotoxic activity of CD4+ T cells against autologous tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Konomi, Y; Sekine, T; Takayama, T; Fuji, M; Tanaka, T

    1995-09-01

    The 51Cr-release assay is mostly applied to detecting the cytotoxic activity of CD8+ T cells, and little is known about the activity of CD4+ T cells. Therefore, the correlation between the cytotoxic activity of CD4+ or CD8+ T cells and the incubation period with autologous tumor cells was analyzed by two methods. The incubation periods were 4 and 20 h (4 h and 20 h assay) for the 51Cr-release assay. Eight pairs of tumor cells and T cells were assayed. T cells were fractionated into CD4+ and CD8+ T cells by using magnetic beads and panning methods, and those cells were activated by culture with recombinant interleukin-2 and immobilized anti-CD3 monoclonal antibody. In 6 out of 8 cases, no cytotoxic activity of CD4+ T cells was detected by the 4 h assay, whereas cytotoxic activity was detected in all cases in the 20 h assay. The cytotoxic activities in 20 h assay of CD4+ T cells were increased 67-fold in comparison with the activities in 4 h assay (range: 5-197). In the case of CD8+ T cells, cytotoxic activities were detected in 6 out of 8 cases in the 4 h assay. The lytic unit ratio of CD4+ and CD8+ T cells was calculated as 1.5 in the 20 h assay (range: 0.2- > 7.2) versus 0.4 in the 4 h assay (range: < 0.1-1.3). Cytotoxic activities in colorimetric assay using Crystal Violet with a 24 h incubation were similar to those in the 20 h 51Cr-release assay in all eight cases. These results indicate that CD4+ T cells have cytotoxic activity as strong as that of CD8+ T cells towards autologous tumor cells.

  18. The Interplay Between Monocytes/Macrophages and CD4+ T Cell Subsets in Rheumatoid Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, Ceri A.; Dickinson, Abigail K.; Taams, Leonie S.

    2015-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic inflammatory disease characterized by inflammation of the synovial lining (synovitis). The inflammation in the RA joint is associated with and driven by immune cell infiltration, synovial hyperproliferation, and excessive production of proinflammatory mediators, such as tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα), interferon γ (IFNγ), interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6, and IL-17, eventually resulting in damage to the cartilage and underlying bone. The RA joint harbors a wide range of immune cell types, including monocytes, macrophages, and CD4+ T cells (both proinflammatory and regulatory). The interplay between CD14+ myeloid cells and CD4+ T cells can significantly influence CD4+ T cell function, and conversely, effector vs. regulatory CD4+ T cell subsets can exert profound effects on monocyte/macrophage function. In this review, we will discuss how the interplay between CD4+ T cells and monocytes/macrophages may contribute to the immunopathology of RA. PMID:26635790

  19. ImmunoPET Imaging of Murine CD4(+) T Cells Using Anti-CD4 Cys-Diabody: Effects of Protein Dose on T Cell Function and Imaging.

    PubMed

    Freise, Amanda C; Zettlitz, Kirstin A; Salazar, Felix B; Lu, Xiang; Tavaré, Richard; Wu, Anna M

    2017-08-01

    Molecular imaging of CD4(+) T cells throughout the body has implications for monitoring autoimmune disease and immunotherapy of cancer. Given the key role of these cells in regulating immunity, it is important to develop a biologically inert probe. GK1.5 cys-diabody (cDb), a previously developed anti-mouse CD4 antibody fragment, was tested at different doses to assess its effects on positron emission tomography (PET) imaging and CD4(+) T cell viability, proliferation, CD4 expression, and function. The effect of protein dose on image contrast (lymphoid tissue-to-muscle ratio) was assessed by administering different amounts of (89)Zr-labeled GK1.5 cDb to mice followed by PET imaging and ex vivo biodistribution analysis. To assess impact of GK1.5 cDb on T cell biology, GK1.5 cDb was incubated with T cells in vitro or administered intravenously to C57BL/6 mice at multiple protein doses. CD4 expression and T cell proliferation were analyzed with flow cytometry and cytokines were assayed. For immunoPET imaging, the lowest protein dose of 2 μg of (89)Zr-labeled GK1.5 cDb resulted in significantly higher % injected dose/g in inguinal lymph nodes (ILN) and spleen compared to the 12-μg protein dose. In vivo administration of GK1.5 cDb at the high dose of 40 μg caused a transient decrease in CD4 expression in spleen, blood, lymph nodes, and thymus, which recovered within 3 days postinjection; this effect was reduced, although not abrogated, when 2 μg was administered. Proliferation was inhibited in vivo in ILN but not the spleen by injection of 40 μg GK1.5 cDb. Concentrations of GK1.5 cDb in excess of 25 nM significantly inhibited CD4(+) T cell proliferation and interferon-γ production in vitro. Overall, using low-dose GK1.5 cDb minimized biological effects on CD4(+) T cells. Low-dose GK1.5 cDb yields high-contrast immunoPET images with minimal effects on T cell biology in vitro and in vivo and may be a useful tool for investigating CD4(+) T cells in the context

  20. Human CD4−8− T cells are a distinctive immunoregulatory subset

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Mei-Chuan; Patel, Kalpesh; Taub, Dennis D.; Longo, Dan L.; Goetzl, Edward J.

    2010-01-01

    Human CD4−8− T cells are a minor subset quantitatively but potentially important in immunity because they are predominantly distributed at body surfaces, and their number and activities increase in autoimmune diseases and decrease with aging. Distinguishing characteristics of CD4−8− T cells are found to include a unique profile of cytokines, including Serpin E1, which is not generated by other T cells, MIF, and TGF-β. At 2–5% of the total in mixtures with CD4 + CD8 T cells, CD4−8− T cells enhance the generation of IFN-γ and IL-17 by up to 12- and 5-fold, respectively, without contributing either cytokine or affecting cytokine production by NK/NKT cells. CD4−8− T cell-derived MIF is their major enhancer and TGFβ their principal inhibitor of CD4 and CD8 T cell cytokine production. Decreases in CD4−8− T cell effects may diminish protective immunity in aging, whereas increases may augment the severity of autoimmune diseases.—Huang, M.-C., Patel, K., Taub, D. D., Longo, D. L., Goetzl, E. J. Human CD4−8− T cells are a distinctive immunoregulatory subset. PMID:20154266

  1. Itk Signals Promote Neuroinflammation by Regulating CD4+ T-Cell Activation and Trafficking

    PubMed Central

    Kannan, Arun K.; Kim, Do-Geun

    2015-01-01

    Here we demonstrate that interleukin-2-inducible T-cell kinase (Itk) signaling in cluster of differentiation 4-positive (CD4+) T cells promotes experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), the animal model of multiple sclerosis (MS). We show that Itk−/− mice exhibit reduced disease severity, and transfer of Itk−/− CD4+ T cells into T cell-deficient recipients results in lower disease severity. We observed a significant reduction of CD4+ T cells in the CNS of Itk−/− mice or recipients of Itk−/− CD4+ T cells during EAE, which is consistent with attenuated disease. Itk−/− CD4+ T cells exhibit defective response to myelin antigen stimulation attributable to displacement of filamentous actin from the CD4+ coreceptor. This results in inadequate transmigration of Itk−/− CD4+ T cells into the CNS and across brain endothelial barriers in vitro. Finally, Itk−/− CD4+ T cells show significant reduction in production of T-helper 1 (Th1) and Th17 cytokines and exhibit skewed T effector/T regulatory cell ratios. These results indicate that signaling by Itk promotes autoimmunity and CNS inflammation, suggesting that it may be a viable target for treatment of MS. PMID:25568116

  2. Perforin-dependent CD4+ T-cell cytotoxicity contributes to control a murine poxvirus infection

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Min; Siciliano, Nicholas A.; Hersperger, Adam R.; Roscoe, Felicia; Hu, Angela; Ma, Xueying; Shamsedeen, Ahamed R.; Eisenlohr, Laurence C.; Sigal, Luis J.

    2012-01-01

    CD4+ T cells are generally regarded as helpers and regulators of the immune response. Although cytolytic CD4+ T cells have been described, whether those generated during the course of a viral infection play a role in virus control remains unknown. Here we show that during acute infection with ectromelia virus, the mouse homolog of the human virus of smallpox, large numbers of CD4+ T cells in the draining lymph node and liver of resistant mice have a cytotoxic phenotype. We also show that these cells kill targets in vivo in a perforin-dependent manner and that mice with specific deficiency of perforin in CD4+ T cells have impaired virus control. Thus, perforin-dependent CD4+ T-cell killing of infected cells is an important mechanism of antiviral defense. PMID:22665800

  3. CD137 is a Useful Marker for Identifying CD4(+) T Cell Responses to Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Yan, Z-H; Zheng, X-F; Yi, L; Wang, J; Wang, X-J; Wei, P-J; Jia, H-Y; Zhou, L-J; Zhao, Y-L; Zhang, H-T

    2017-05-01

    Upregulation of CD137 on recently activated CD8(+) T cells has been used to identify rare viral and tumour antigen-specific T cells from the peripheral blood. We aimed to evaluate the accuracy of CD137 for identifying Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb)-reactive CD4(+) T cells in the peripheral blood of infected individuals by flow cytometry and to investigate the characteristics of these CD137(+) CD4(+) T cells. We initially enrolled 31 active tuberculosis (TB) patients, 31 individuals with latent TB infection (LTBI) and 25 healthy donors. The intracellular CD137 and interferon-γ (IFN-γ) production by CD4(+) T cells was simultaneously detected under unstimulated and CFP10-stimulated (culture filtrate protein 10, a Mtb-specific antigen) conditions. In unstimulated CD4(+) T cells, we found that the CD137 expression in the TB group was significantly higher than that in the LTBI group. Stimulation with CFP10 largely increased the CD4(+) T cell CD137 expression in both the TB and LTBI groups. After CFP10 stimulation, the frequency of CD137(+) CD4(+) T cells was higher than that of IFN-γ(+) CD4(+) T cells in both the TB and LTBI groups. Most of the CFP10-activated IFN-γ-secreting cells were CD137-positive, but only a small fraction of the CD137-positive cells expressed IFN-γ. An additional 20 patients with TB were enrolled to characterize the CD45RO(+) CCR7(+) , CD45RO(+) CCR7(-) and CD45RO(-) subsets in the CD137(+) CD4(+) T cell populations. The Mtb-specific CD137(+) CD4(+) T cells were mainly identified as having an effector memory phenotype. In conclusion, CD137 is a useful marker that can be used for identifying Mtb-reactive CD4(+) T cells by flow cytometry. © 2017 The Foundation for the Scandinavian Journal of Immunology.

  4. Role of LAP(+)CD4(+) T cells in the tumor microenvironment of colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Wu; Jiang, Zhi-Yuan; Zhang, Lei; Huang, Jia-Hao; Wang, Shi-Jun; Liao, Cun; Cai, Bin; Chen, Li-Sheng; Zhang, Sen; Guo, Yun; Cao, Yun-Fei; Gao, Feng

    2017-01-21

    To investigate the abundance and potential functions of LAP(+)CD4(+) T cells in colorectal cancer (CRC). Proportions of LAP(+)CD4(+) T cells were examined in peripheral blood and tumor/paratumor tissues of CRC patients and healthy controls using flow cytometry. Expression of phenotypic markers such as forkhead box (Fox)p3, cytotoxic T-lymphocyte-associated protein (CTLA)-4, chemokine CC receptor (CCR)4 and CCR5 was measured using flow cytometry. LAP(-)CD4(+) and LAP(+)CD4(+) T cells were isolated using a magnetic cell-sorting system and cell purity was analyzed by flow cytometry. Real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction was used to measure expression of cytokines interleukin (IL)-10 and transforming growth factor (TGF)-β. The proportion of LAP(+)CD4(+) T cells was significantly higher in peripheral blood from patients (9.44% ± 3.18%) than healthy controls (1.49% ± 1.00%, P < 0.001). Among patients, the proportion of LAP(+)CD4(+) T cells was significantly higher in tumor tissues (11.76% ± 3.74%) compared with paratumor tissues (3.87% ± 1.64%, P < 0.001). We also observed positive correlations between the proportion of LAP(+)CD4(+) T cells and TNM stage (P < 0.001), distant metastasis (P < 0.001) and serum level of carcinoembryonic antigen (P < 0.05). Magnetic-activated cell sorting gave an overall enrichment of LAP(+)CD4(+) T cells (95.02% ± 2.87%), which was similar for LAP(-)CD4(+) T cells (94.75% ± 2.76%). In contrast to LAP(-)CD4(+) T cells, LAP(+)CD4(+) T cells showed lower Foxp3 expression but significantly higher levels of CTLA-4, CCR4 and CCR5 (P < 0.01). LAP(+)CD4(+) T cells expressed significantly larger amounts of IL-10 and TGF-β but lower levels of IL-2, IL-4, IL-17 and interferon-γ, compared with LAP(-)CD4(+) T cells. LAP(+)CD4(+) T cells accumulated in the tumor microenvironment of CRC patients and were involved in immune evasion mediated by IL-10 and TGF-β.

  5. Role of LAP+CD4+ T cells in the tumor microenvironment of colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Wu; Jiang, Zhi-Yuan; Zhang, Lei; Huang, Jia-Hao; Wang, Shi-Jun; Liao, Cun; Cai, Bin; Chen, Li-Sheng; Zhang, Sen; Guo, Yun; Cao, Yun-Fei; Gao, Feng

    2017-01-01

    AIM To investigate the abundance and potential functions of LAP+CD4+ T cells in colorectal cancer (CRC). METHODS Proportions of LAP+CD4+ T cells were examined in peripheral blood and tumor/paratumor tissues of CRC patients and healthy controls using flow cytometry. Expression of phenotypic markers such as forkhead box (Fox)p3, cytotoxic T-lymphocyte-associated protein (CTLA)-4, chemokine CC receptor (CCR)4 and CCR5 was measured using flow cytometry. LAP-CD4+ and LAP+CD4+ T cells were isolated using a magnetic cell-sorting system and cell purity was analyzed by flow cytometry. Real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction was used to measure expression of cytokines interleukin (IL)-10 and transforming growth factor (TGF)-β. RESULTS The proportion of LAP+CD4+ T cells was significantly higher in peripheral blood from patients (9.44% ± 3.18%) than healthy controls (1.49% ± 1.00%, P < 0.001). Among patients, the proportion of LAP+CD4+ T cells was significantly higher in tumor tissues (11.76% ± 3.74%) compared with paratumor tissues (3.87% ± 1.64%, P < 0.001). We also observed positive correlations between the proportion of LAP+CD4+ T cells and TNM stage (P < 0.001), distant metastasis (P < 0.001) and serum level of carcinoembryonic antigen (P < 0.05). Magnetic-activated cell sorting gave an overall enrichment of LAP+CD4+ T cells (95.02% ± 2.87%), which was similar for LAP-CD4+ T cells (94.75% ± 2.76%). In contrast to LAP-CD4+ T cells, LAP+CD4+ T cells showed lower Foxp3 expression but significantly higher levels of CTLA-4, CCR4 and CCR5 (P < 0.01). LAP+CD4+ T cells expressed significantly larger amounts of IL-10 and TGF-β but lower levels of IL-2, IL-4, IL-17 and interferon-γ, compared with LAP-CD4+ T cells. CONCLUSION LAP+CD4+ T cells accumulated in the tumor microenvironment of CRC patients and were involved in immune evasion mediated by IL-10 and TGF-β. PMID:28210081

  6. Development and Function of Protective and Pathologic Memory CD4 T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Jaigirdar, Shafqat Ahrar; MacLeod, Megan K. L.

    2015-01-01

    Immunological memory is one of the defining features of the adaptive immune system. As key orchestrators and mediators of immunity, CD4 T cells are central to the vast majority of adaptive immune responses. Generated following an immune response, memory CD4 T cells retain pertinent information about their activation environment enabling them to make rapid effector responses upon reactivation. These responses can either benefit the host by hastening the control of pathogens or cause damaging immunopathology. Here, we will discuss the diversity of the memory CD4 T cell pool, the signals that influence the transition of activated T cells into that pool, and highlight how activation requirements differ between naïve and memory CD4 T cells. A greater understanding of these factors has the potential to aid the design of more effective vaccines and to improve regulation of pathologic CD4 T cells, such as in the context of autoimmunity and allergy. PMID:26441961

  7. Quantification of cells with specific phenotypes I: determination of CD4+ cell count per microliter in reconstituted lyophilized human PBMC prelabeled with anti-CD4 FITC antibody.

    PubMed

    Stebbings, Richard; Wang, Lili; Sutherland, Janet; Kammel, Martin; Gaigalas, Adolfas K; John, Manuela; Roemer, Bodo; Kuhne, Maren; Schneider, Rudolf J; Braun, Michael; Engel, Andrea; Dikshit, Dinesh K; Abbasi, Fatima; Marti, Gerald E; Sassi, Maria Paola; Revel, Laura; Kim, Sook-Kyung; Baradez, Marc-Olivier; Lekishvili, Tamara; Marshall, Damian; Whitby, Liam; Jing, Wang; Ost, Volker; Vonsky, Maxim; Neukammer, Jörg

    2015-03-01

    A surface-labeled lyophilized lymphocyte (sLL) preparation has been developed using human peripheral blood mononuclear cells prelabeled with a fluorescein isothiocyanate conjugated anti-CD4 monoclonal antibody. The sLL preparation is intended to be used as a reference material for CD4+ cell counting including the development of higher order reference measurement procedures and has been evaluated in the pilot study CCQM-P102. This study was conducted across 16 laboratories from eight countries to assess the ability of participants to quantify the CD4+ cell count of this reference material and to document cross-laboratory variability plus associated measurement uncertainties. Twelve different flow cytometer platforms were evaluated using a standard protocol that included calibration beads used to obtain quantitative measurements of CD4+ T cell counts. There was good overall cross-platform and counting method agreement with a grand mean of the laboratory calculated means of (301.7 ± 4.9) μL(-1) CD4+ cells. Excluding outliers, greater than 90% of participant data agreed within ±15%. A major contribution to variation of sLL CD4+ cell counts was tube to tube variation of the calibration beads, amounting to an uncertainty of 3.6%. Variation due to preparative steps equated to an uncertainty of 2.6%. There was no reduction in variability when data files were centrally reanalyzed. Remaining variation was attributed to instrument specific differences. CD4+ cell counts obtained in CCQM-P102 are in excellent agreement and show the robustness of both the measurements and the data analysis and hence the suitability of sLL as a reference material for interlaboratory comparisons and external quality assessment.

  8. Quantification of Cells with Specific Phenotypes I: Determination of CD4+ Cell Count Per Microliter in Reconstituted Lyophilized Human PBMC Prelabeled with Anti-CD4 FITC Antibody

    PubMed Central

    Stebbings, Richard; Wang, Lili; Sutherland, Janet; Kammel, Martin; Gaigalas, Adolfas K; John, Manuela; Roemer, Bodo; Kuhne, Maren; Schneider, Rudolf J; Braun, Michael; Engel, Andrea; Dikshit, Dinesh K; Abbasi, Fatima; Marti, Gerald E; Paola Sassi, Maria; Revel, Laura; Kim, Sook-Kyung; Baradez, Marc-Olivier; Lekishvili, Tamara; Marshall, Damian; Whitby, Liam; Jing, Wang; Ost, Volker; Vonsky, Maxim; Neukammer, Jörg

    2015-01-01

    A surface-labeled lyophilized lymphocyte (sLL) preparation has been developed using human peripheral blood mononuclear cells prelabeled with a fluorescein isothiocyanate conjugated anti-CD4 monoclonal antibody. The sLL preparation is intended to be used as a reference material for CD4+ cell counting including the development of higher order reference measurement procedures and has been evaluated in the pilot study CCQM-P102. This study was conducted across 16 laboratories from eight countries to assess the ability of participants to quantify the CD4+ cell count of this reference material and to document cross-laboratory variability plus associated measurement uncertainties. Twelve different flow cytometer platforms were evaluated using a standard protocol that included calibration beads used to obtain quantitative measurements of CD4+ T cell counts. There was good overall cross-platform and counting method agreement with a grand mean of the laboratory calculated means of (301.7 ± 4.9) μL−1 CD4+ cells. Excluding outliers, greater than 90% of participant data agreed within ±15%. A major contribution to variation of sLL CD4+ cell counts was tube to tube variation of the calibration beads, amounting to an uncertainty of 3.6%. Variation due to preparative steps equated to an uncertainty of 2.6%. There was no reduction in variability when data files were centrally reanalyzed. Remaining variation was attributed to instrument specific differences. CD4+ cell counts obtained in CCQM-P102 are in excellent agreement and show the robustness of both the measurements and the data analysis and hence the suitability of sLL as a reference material for interlaboratory comparisons and external quality assessment. © 2015 The Authors. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:25655255

  9. The differentiation and protective function of cytolytic CD4 T cells in influenza infection

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    CD4 T cells that recognize peptide antigen in the context of Class II MHC can differentiate into various subsets that are characterized by their helper functions. However, increasing evidence indicates that CD4 cells with direct cytolytic activity play a role in chronic, as well as, acute infections...

  10. Chronic exposure to trichloroethylene increases DNA methylation of the Ifng promoter in CD4(+) T cells.

    PubMed

    Gilbert, Kathleen M; Blossom, Sarah J; Erickson, Stephen W; Broadfoot, Brannon; West, Kirk; Bai, Shasha; Li, Jingyun; Cooney, Craig A

    2016-10-17

    CD4(+) T cells in female MRL+/+ mice exposed to solvent and water pollutant trichloroethylene (TCE) skew toward effector/memory CD4(+) T cells, and demonstrate seemingly non-monotonic alterations in IFN-γ production. In the current study we examined the mechanism for this immunotoxicity using effector/memory and naïve CD4(+) T cells isolated every 6 weeks during a 40 week exposure to TCE (0.5mg/ml in drinking water). A time-dependent effect of TCE exposure on both Ifng gene expression and IFN-γ protein production was observed in effector/memory CD4(+) T cells, with an increase after 22 weeks of exposure and a decrease after 40 weeks of exposure. No such effect of TCE was observed in naïve CD4(+) T cells. A cumulative increase in DNA methylation in the CpG sites of the promoter of the Ifng gene was observed in effector/memory, but not naïve, CD4(+) T cells over time. Also unique to the Ifng promoter was an increase in methylation variance in effector/memory compared to naïve CD4(+) T cells. Taken together, the CpG sites of the Ifng promoter in effector/memory CD4(+) T cells were especially sensitive to the effects of TCE exposure, which may help explain the regulatory effect of the chemical on this gene.

  11. Polyfunctional cytokine responses by central memory CD4*T cells in response to bovine tuberculosis

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    CD4 T cells are crucial in immunity to tuberculosis (TB). Polyfunctional CD4 T cells simultaneously produce interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma), interleukin-2 (IL-2) and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) and play relevant roles in several chronic infections, including human TB. Mycobacterium bovis in...

  12. Polyfunctional CD4 T cells in the response to bovine tuberculosis

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    CD4 T cells are crucial in immunity to tuberculosis (TB). Polyfunctional CD4 T cells simultaneously produce interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma), Interleukin-2 (IL-2) and Tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) and play relevant roles in several chronic infections, including human TB and HIV. However, the a...

  13. Polyfunctional cytokine responses by central memory CD4+T cells in response to bovine tuberculosis

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    CD4 T cells are crucial in immunity to tuberculosis (TB). Polyfunctional CD4 T cells simultaneously produce interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma), interleukin-2 (IL-2) and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) and play relevant roles in several chronic infections, including human TB and HIV. Mycobacterium ...

  14. CD4+ T cell anergy prevents autoimmunity and generates regulatory T cell precursors

    PubMed Central

    Kalekar, Lokesh A.; Schmiel, Shirdi E.; Nandiwada, Sarada L.; Lam, Wing Y.; Barsness, Laura O.; Zhang, Na; Stritesky, Gretta L.; Malhotra, Deepali; Pauken, Kristen E.; Linehan, Jonathan L.; O’Sullivan, M. Gerard; Fife, Brian T.; Hogquist, Kristin A.; Jenkins, Marc K.; Mueller, Daniel L.

    2015-01-01

    The role that anergy, an acquired state of T cell functional unresponsiveness, plays in natural peripheral tolerance remains unclear. In this study, we demonstrate that anergy is selectively induced in fetal antigen-specific maternal CD4+ T cells during pregnancy. A naturally occurring subpopulation of anergic polyclonal CD4+ T cells, enriched in self antigen-specific T cell receptors, is also observed in healthy hosts. Neuropilin-1 expression in anergic conventional CD4+ T cells is associated with thymic regulatory T cell (Treg cell)-related gene hypomethylation, and this correlates with their capacity to differentiate into Foxp3+ Treg cells that suppress immunopathology. Thus, our data suggest that not only is anergy induction important in preventing autoimmunity, but it also generates the precursors for peripheral Treg cell differentiation. PMID:26829766

  15. CD4+ T cell-dependent and CD4+ T cell-independent cytokine-chemokine network changes in the immune responses of HIV-infected individuals.

    PubMed

    Arnold, Kelly B; Szeto, Gregory L; Alter, Galit; Irvine, Darrell J; Lauffenburger, Douglas A

    2015-10-20

    A vital defect in the immune systems of HIV-infected individuals is the loss of CD4(+) T cells, resulting in impaired immune responses. We hypothesized that there were CD4(+) T cell-dependent and CD4(+) T cell-independent alterations in the immune responses of HIV-1(+) individuals. To test this, we analyzed the secretion of cytokines and chemokines from stimulated peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) populations from HIV(+) donors, healthy donors, and healthy donors with CD4(+) T cells experimentally depleted. Multivariate analyses of 16 cytokines and chemokines at 6 and 72 hours after three stimuli (antibody-coated beads to stimulate T cells and R848 or lipopolysaccharide to stimulate innate immune cells) enabled integrative analysis of secreted profiles. Two major effects in HIV(+) PBMCs were not reproduced upon depletion of CD4(+) T cells in healthy PBMCs: (i) HIV(+) PBMCs maintained T cell-associated secreted profiles after T cell stimulation; (ii) HIV(+) PBMCs showed impaired interferon-γ (IFN-γ) secretion early after innate stimulation. These changes arose from hyperactive T cells and debilitated natural killer (NK) cell, respectively. Modeling and experiments showed that early IFN-γ secretion predicted later differences in secreted profiles in vitro. This effect was recapitulated in healthy PBMCs by blocking the IFN-γ receptor. Thus, we identified a critical deficiency in NK cell responses of HIV-infected individuals, independent of CD4(+) T cell depletion, which directs secreted profiles. Our findings illustrate a broad approach for identifying key disease-associated nodes in a multicellular, multivariate signaling network. Copyright © 2015, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  16. A novel differentiation pathway from CD4⁺ T cells to CD4⁻ T cells for maintaining immune system homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Zhao, X; Sun, G; Sun, X; Tian, D; Liu, K; Liu, T; Cong, M; Xu, H; Li, X; Shi, W; Tian, Y; Yao, J; Guo, H; Zhang, D

    2016-04-14

    CD4(+) T lymphocytes are key players in the adaptive immune system and can differentiate into a variety of effector and regulatory T cells. Here, we provide evidence that a novel differentiation pathway of CD4(+) T cells shifts the balance from a destructive T-cell response to one that favors regulation in an immune-mediated liver injury model. Peripheral CD4(-)CD8(-)NK1.1(-) double-negative T cells (DNT) was increased following Concanavalin A administration in mice. Adoptive transfer of DNT led to significant protection from hepatocyte necrosis by direct inhibition on the activation of lymphocytes, a process that occurred primarily through the perforin-granzyme B route. These DNT converted from CD4(+) rather than CD8(+) T cells, a process primarily regulated by OX40. DNT migrated to the liver through the CXCR3-CXCL9/CXCL10 interaction. In conclusion, we elucidated a novel differentiation pathway from activated CD4(+) T cells to regulatory DNT cells for maintaining homeostasis of the immune system in vivo, and provided key evidence that utilizing this novel differentiation pathway has potential application in the prevention and treatment of autoimmune diseases.

  17. Key role for CD4 T cells during mixed antibody mediated rejection of renal allografts

    PubMed Central

    Gaughan, A.; Wang, J.; Pelletier, R.P.; Nadasdy, T.; Brodsky, S.; Roy, S.; Lodder, M.; Bobek, D.; Mofatt-Bruce, S.; Fairchild, R.L.; Henry, M.L.; Hadley, G.A.

    2014-01-01

    We utilized mouse models to elucidate the immunologic mechanisms of functional graft loss during mixed antibody mediated rejection of renal allografts (mixed AMR), in which humoral and cellular responses to the graft occur concomitantly. Although the majority of T cells in the graft at the time of rejection were CD8 T cells with only a minor population of CD4 T cells, depletion of CD4 but not CD8 cells prevented acute graft loss during mixed AMR. CD4 depletion eliminated anti-donor alloantibodies and conferred protection from destruction of renal allografts. ELISPOT revealed that CD4 T effectors responded to donor alloantigens by both the direct and indirect pathways of allorecognition. In transfer studies, CD4 T effectors primed to donor alloantigens were highly effective at promoting acute graft dysfunction, and exhibited the attributes of effector T cells. Laser capture microdissection and confirmatory immunostaining studies revealed that CD4 T cells infiltrating the graft produced effector molecules with graft destructive potential. Bioluminescent imaging confirmed that CD4 T effectors traffic to the graft site in immune replete hosts. These data document that host CD4 T cells can promote acute dysfunction of renal allografts by directly mediating graft injury in addition to facilitating anti-donor alloantibody responses. PMID:24410909

  18. Upregulation of peripheral CD4+CXCR5+ T cells in osteosarcoma.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Hong; Luo, Gang; Son, Haihang; Zhou, Yue; Zheng, Wenjie

    2014-06-01

    Immune dysregulation plays a key role in the development of osteosarcoma (OS). Peripheral blood CD4+CXCR5+ T cells can induce B-cell activation and produce various cytokines and therefore may play critical roles in tumorigenesis. The purpose of the study was to investigate changes of peripheral CD4+CXCR5+ T cells in OS. Peripheral CD4+CXCR5+ T cells and its subtypes were determined by measuring CD3, CD4, CXCR5, CXCR3, and CCR6 in 38 OS patients and 42 healthy controls using flow cytometry. Data demonstrated that percentage of peripheral CD4+CXCR5+ T cells was significantly increased in OS patients (13.9 %) than in controls (8.6 %, p<0.001). Further analysis identified a profound skewing of peripheral CD4+CXCR5+ T cell subsets toward Th2 and Th17 cells in OS patients. Investigating clinical status of the patients showed that prevalence of peripheral CD4+CXCR5+ T cells was significantly elevated in cases with metastasis (17.4 %) than those without metastasis (12.7 %). Similarly, patients with high tumor grade revealed increased percentage of CD4+CXCR5+ T cells compared to those with low tumor grade (15.3 versus 11.0 %). Interestingly, the upregulation of peripheral CD4+CXCR5+ T cells in patients with metastasis or high tumor grade was contributed by Th1 and Th17 subtypes. This study suggests the involvement of peripheral CD4+CXCR5+ T cells in the pathogenesis and progression of OS and provides novel knowledge for understanding this disease.

  19. Frequency of beryllium-specific, central memory CD4+ T cells in blood determines proliferative response

    PubMed Central

    Fontenot, Andrew P.; Palmer, Brent E.; Sullivan, Andrew K.; Joslin, Fenneke G.; Wilson, Cara C.; Maier, Lisa A.; Newman, Lee S.; Kotzin, Brian L.

    2005-01-01

    Beryllium exposure can lead to the development of beryllium-specific CD4+ T cells and chronic beryllium disease (CBD), which is characterized by the presence of lung granulomas and a CD4+ T cell alveolitis. Studies have documented the presence of proliferating and cytokine-secreting CD4+ T cells in blood of CBD patients after beryllium stimulation. However, some patients were noted to have cytokine-secreting CD4+ T cells in blood in the absence of beryllium-induced proliferation, and overall, the correlation between the 2 types of responses was poor. We hypothesized that the relative proportion of memory T cell subsets determined antigen-specific proliferation. In most CBD patients, the majority of beryllium-specific CD4+ T cells in blood expressed an effector memory T cell maturation phenotype. However, the ability of blood cells to proliferate in the presence of beryllium strongly correlated with the fraction expressing a central memory T cell phenotype. In addition, we found a direct correlation between the percentage of beryllium-specific CD4+ TEM cells in blood and T cell lymphocytosis in the lung. Together, these findings indicate that the functional capability of antigen-specific CD4+ T cells is determined by the relative proportion of memory T cell subsets, which may reflect internal organ involvement. PMID:16151531

  20. Orchestration of CD4 T cell epitope preferences after multi-peptide immunization

    PubMed Central

    Tung, Jacqueline; Sant, Andrea J.

    2013-01-01

    A detailed understanding of the molecular and cellular mechanisms that underlie epitope preferences in T cell priming is important for vaccines designed to elicit a broad T cell response. Protein vaccinations generally elicit CD4 T cell responses that are skewed toward a small fraction of epitopes, a phenomenon known as immunodominance. This characteristic of T cell responses, that limits the diversity of CD4 T cell recognition, is generally attributed to intracellular antigen processing. However, we recently discovered that immunodominance hierarchies persist even after vaccination with synthetic peptides. In this study, we probed the regulatory mechanisms that cause diminished CD4 T cell responses to subdominant peptides after such multi-peptide immunization in mice. We have found that the delivery of subdominant and dominant epitopes on separate dendritic cells rescues expansion of less favored CD4 T cells. Furthermore, through the use of genetic models and inhibitors, we have found that selective losses in CD4 T cell responses are mediated by an IFN-γ-induced pathway, involving indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO), and that regulatory T cell (Treg) activities may also regulate preferences in CD4 T cell specificity. We propose that after multi-peptide immunization, the expansion and differentiation of dominant T cells initiate complex regulatory events that determine the final peptide specificity of the elicited CD4 T cell response. PMID:23772029

  1. The CD4+ T cell methylome contributes to a distinct CD4+ T cell transcriptional signature in Mycobacterium bovis-infected cattle

    PubMed Central

    Doherty, Rachael; Whiston, Ronan; Cormican, Paul; Finlay, Emma K.; Couldrey, Christine; Brady, Colm; O’Farrelly, Cliona; Meade, Kieran G.

    2016-01-01

    We hypothesised that epigenetic regulation of CD4+ T lymphocytes contributes to a shift toward a dysfunctional T cell phenotype which may impact on their ability to clear mycobacterial infection. Combined RNA-seq transcriptomic profiling and Reduced Representation Bisulfite Sequencing identified 193 significantly differentially expressed genes and 760 differentially methylated regions (DMRs), between CD4+ T cells from M. bovis infected and healthy cattle. 196 DMRs were located within 10 kb of annotated genes, including GATA3 and RORC, both of which encode transcription factors that promote TH2 and TH17 T helper cell subsets respectively. Gene-specific DNA methylation and gene expression levels for the TNFRSF4 and Interferon-γ genes were significantly negatively correlated suggesting a regulatory relationship. Pathway analysis of DMRs identified enrichment of genes involved in the anti-proliferative TGF-β signaling pathway and TGFB1 expression was significantly increased in peripheral blood leukocytes from TB-infected cattle. This first analysis of the bovine CD4+ T cell methylome suggests that DNA methylation directly contributes to a distinct gene expression signature in CD4+ T cells from cattle infected with M. bovis. Specific methylation changes proximal to key inflammatory gene loci may be critical to the emergence of a non-protective CD4+ T cell response during mycobacterial infection in cattle. PMID:27507428

  2. The investigation of CD4+T-cell functions in primary HIV infection with antiretroviral therapy

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Yu; Fu, Yajing; Zhang, Zining; Tang, Tian; Liu, Jing; Ding, Haibo; Han, Xiaoxu; Xu, Junjie; Chu, Zhenxing; Shang, Hong; Jiang, Yongjun

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection leads to reduced CD4+T-cell counts and immune dysfunction. Initiation of antiretroviral therapy (ART) in HIV primary infection has been recommended to achieve an optimal clinical outcome, but a comprehensive study on restoration of CD4+T-cell function in primary HIV-infected individuals with ART still needs to be eluciated. We investigated longitudinal changes in the CD4+T-cell counts, phenotypes, and functions in HIV-infected individuals with early ART (initiated within 6 months after HIV infection) or later ART (initiated more than 12 months after HIV infection). Patients from early ART and later ART groups had received ART for at least 1 year. Individuals with early ART had more CD4+T cells, a faster rate of CD4+T-cell recovery than those receiving later ART; the levels of CD4+T-cell activation and senescence were lower in early ART compared to those with later ART (P = .031; P = .016), but the activation was higher than normal controls (NC) (P = .001); thymic emigrant function was more upregulated in early ART than in later ART (P = .015), but still lower than NC (P = .027); proliferative capacity and interferon-γ secretion of CD4+T cells were significantly decreased in primary infection (P < .001; P = .029), and early ART restored these CD4+T-cell functions, there is no difference with NC, later ART could partially restore the functions of CD4+T cells, but it remained lower than that of NC (P = .005; P = .019). Early ART could better improve CD4+T-cell function. PMID:28700479

  3. The Degree of CD4+ T Cell Autoreactivity Determines Cellular Pathways Underlying Inflammatory Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Perng, Olivia A.; Aitken, Malinda; Rankin, Andrew L.; Garcia, Victoria; Kropf, Elizabeth; Erikson, Jan; Garlick, David S.; Caton, Andrew J.

    2014-01-01

    Although therapies targeting distinct cellular pathways (e.g. anti-cytokine versus anti-B cell therapy) have been found to be an effective strategy for at least some patients with inflammatory arthritis, the mechanisms that determine which pathways promote arthritis development are poorly understood. We have used a transgenic mouse model to examine how variations in the CD4+ T cell response to a surrogate self-peptide can affect the cellular pathways that are required for arthritis development. CD4+ T cells that are highly reactive with the self-peptide induce inflammatory arthritis that affects male and female mice equally. Arthritis develops by a B cell-independent mechanism, although it can be suppressed by an anti-TNF treatment, which prevented the accumulation of effector CD4+ Th17 cells in the joints of treated mice. By contrast, arthritis develops with a significant female bias in the context of a more weakly autoreactive CD4+ T cell response, and B cells play a prominent role in disease pathogenesis. In this setting of lower CD4+ T cell autoreactivity, B cells promote the formation of autoreactive CD4+ effector T cells (including Th17 cells), and IL-17 is required for arthritis development. These studies show that the degree of CD4+ T cell reactivity for a self-peptide can play a prominent role in determining whether distinct cellular pathways can be targeted to prevent the development of inflammatory arthritis. PMID:24591372

  4. Frequency of CD4+CD161+ T Cell and Interleukin-10 Expression in Inflammatory Bowel Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Tsuchiya, Kazuyo; Ikeda, Takuto; Batmunkh, Baatarsuren; Choijookhuu, Narantsog; Ishizaki, Hidenobu; Hotokezaka, Masayuki; Hishikawa, Yoshitaka; Nanashima, Atsushi

    2017-01-01

    Mucosal immune dysregulation associated with T cells plays a critical role in the development of inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD). However, the definite significances of these cells in IBD still remain unclear. Therefore, we investigated the population and expression of CD4+CD161+ T cells in the colonic lamina propria mononuclear cells (LPMCs) in patients with IBD by analyses using flow cytometry and immunohistochemistry. Interleukin-10 (IL-10) mRNA levels in both LPMCs and CD4+ T cells in lamina propria (LP-CD4+ T cells) were measured using a real-time quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. IL-10 production was investigated with immunohistochemistry. The results revealed that the population of CD4+CD161+ T cells was significantly decreased in active ulcerative colitis (UC) compared with inactive UC (P < 0.05). The CD4+CD161+ T cell population was inversely correlated with disease activity in patients with UC (r = −0.6326, P = 0.0055), but there was no significant correlation in those with Crohn’s disease. Over-expression of IL-10 mRNA in both LPMCs and LP-CD4+ T cells were detected in active UC. Immunohistochemistry revealed decreased frequency of CD161+ cells and increased IL-10 positive cells in active UC. The frequency of CD4+CD161+ T cells and IL-10 expression was supposed to be associated with the pathological status of mucosal immunoregulation in IBD. PMID:28386147

  5. Immunological predictors of CD4+ T cell decline in antiretroviral treatment interruptions

    PubMed Central

    Seoane, Elena; Resino, Salvador; Moreno, Santiago; de Quiros, Juan Carlos Lopez Bernaldo; Moreno, Ana; Rubio, Rafael; Gonzalez-García, Juan; Arribas, José Ramón; Pulido, Federico; Muñoz-Fernández, Ma Ángeles

    2008-01-01

    Background The common response to stopping anti-HIV treatment is an increase of HIV-RNA load and decrease in CD4+, but not all the patients have similar responses to this therapeutic strategy. The aim was to identify predictive markers of CD4+ cell count declines to < 350/μL in CD4-guided antiretroviral treatment interruptions. Methods 27 HIV-infected patients participated in a prospective multicenter study in with a 24 month follow-up. Patients on stable highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART), with CD4+ count > 600/μL, and HIV-RNA < 50 copies/ml for at least 6 months were offered the option to discontinue antiretroviral therapy. The main outcome was a decline in CD4+ cell count to < 350/μL. Results After 24 months of follow-up, 16 of 27 (59%) patients (who discontinued therapy) experienced declines in CD4+ cell count to < 350/μL. Patients with a CD4+ nadir of < 200 cells/μL had a greater risk of restarting therapy during the follow-up (RR (CI95%): 3.37 (1.07; 10.36)). Interestingly, lymphoproliferative responses to Mycobacterium tuberculosis purified protein derivative (PPD) below 10000 c.p.m. at baseline (4.77 (1.07; 21.12)), IL-4 production above 100 pg/mL at baseline (5.95 (1.76; 20.07)) in PBMC cultured with PPD, and increased IL-4 production of PBMC with p24 antigen at baseline (1.25 (1.01; 1.55)) were associated to declines in CD4+ cell count to < 350/μL. Conclusion Both the number (CD4+ nadir) and the functional activity of CD4+ (lymphoproliferative response to PPD) predict the CD4+ decrease associated with discontinuation of ART in patients with controlled viremia. PMID:18302775

  6. Unbalanced expression of aryl hydrocarbon receptor in peripheral blood CCR6(+)CD4(+) and CD4(+)CD25(+)T cells of rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Lin; Qian, Long; Tan, Yue; Wang, Guo-Sheng; Li, Xiao-Mei; Li, Xiang-Pei; Luo, Chao-Yin

    The goal of this study was to analyze the role of aryl hydrocarbon receptor in peripheral blood CCR6(+)CD4(+) and CD4(+)CD25(+)T cells of patients with rheumatoid arthritis. Flow cytometry was applied to determine the proportion of AhR positive cells in CCR6(+)CD4(+)T, CD4(+)CD25(+)T and peripheral blood peripheral mononuclear cells from each subject. AhR mRNA and CYP1A1 mRNA relative expression levels were tested by real-time PCR. The percentage of AhR positive cells in peripheral blood mononuclear cells was higher in RA group than that in healthy cases [(35.23±10.71)% vs. (18.83±7.32)%, p<0.01]. The expression levels of AhR and CYP1A1 were both increased in patients with RA while compared to controls [(3.71±1.63) vs. (2.00±1.27), p=0.002; (2.62±2.08) vs. (0.62±0.29), p<0.01, respectively]. In RA patients, the percentage of AhR positive cells in CD4(+)CD25(+)T cells was significantly lower than that from controls [17.90 (6.10±80.10)% vs. (52.49±19.18)%, p<0.01]; In healthy controls, the percentage of AhR positive cells in CD4(+)CD25(+)T cells was significantly higher than that in CCR6(+)CD4(+)T cells, and was also significantly higher than that in PBMCs [(52.49±19.18)% vs. (23.18±5.62)% vs. (18.06±7.80)%, X(2)=24.03, p<0.01]; in RA patients, the percentage of AhR positive cells in CCR6(+)CD4(+)T cells was significantly increased than that in CD4(+)CD25(+)T cells and PBMCs [(46.02±14.68)% vs. 17.90 (6.10±80.10)% vs. (34.22±10.33)%, X(2)=38.29, p<0.01]; Nevertheless, no statistically significant relationship was found between clinical data and AhR positive cells in CCR6(+)CD4(+)T and CD4(+)CD25(+)T cells. AhR may participate in the pathological progress of RA by controlling the differentiation of Th17 and Treg cells in peripheral blood. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  7. Unbalanced expression of aryl hydrocarbon receptor in peripheral blood CCR6+ CD4+ and CD4+ CD25+T cells of rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Lin; Qian, Long; Tan, Yue; Wang, Guo-Sheng; Li, Xiao-Mei; Li, Xiang-Pei; Luo, Chao-Yin

    2016-07-01

    The goal of this study was to analyze the role of aryl hydrocarbon receptor in peripheral blood CCR6(+) CD4(+) and CD4(+) CD25(+)T cells of patients with rheumatoid arthritis. Flow cytometry was applied to determine the proportion of AhR positive cells in CCR6(+) CD4(+)T, CD4(+) CD25(+)T and peripheral blood peripheral mononuclear cells from each subject. AhR mRNA and CYP1A1 mRNA relative expression levels were tested by real-time PCR. The percentage of AhR positive cells in peripheral blood mononuclear cells was higher in RA group than that in healthy cases [(35.23±10.71) % vs. (18.83±7.32) %, (p<0.01)]. The expression levels of AhR and CYP1A1 were both increased in patients with RA while compared to controls [(3.71±1.63) vs. (2.00±1.27), p=0.002; (2.62±2.08) vs. (0.62±0.29), p<0.01, respectively]. In RA patients, the percentage of AhR positive cells in CD4(+)CD25(+)T cells was significantly lower than that from controls [17.90(6.10±80.10)]% vs. (52.49±19.18)%, p<0.01]; In healthy controls, the percentage of AhR positive cells in CD4(+)CD25(+)T cells was significantly higher than that in CCR6(+)CD4(+)T cells, and was also significantly higher than that in PBMCs [(52.49±19.18)% vs. (23.18±5.62)% vs. (18.06±7.80)%, X(2)=24.03, p<0.01]; in RA patients, the percentage of AhR positive cells in CCR6(+)CD4(+)T cells was significantly increased than that in CD4(+)CD25(+)T cells and PBMCs (46.02±14.68)% vs. [17.90 (6.10±80.10)] %vs. (34.22±10.33)%, X(2)=38.29, p<0.01]; Nevertheless, no statistically significant relationship was found between clinical data and AhR positive cells in CCR6(+)CD4(+)T and CD4(+) CD25(+)T cells. AhR may participate in the pathological progress of RA by controlling the differentiation of Th17 and Treg cells in peripheral blood. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda.

  8. Tissue adaptation of regulatory and intraepithelial CD4+ T cells controls gut inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Sujino, Tomohisa; London, Mariya; Hoytema van Konijnenburg, David P.; Rendon, Tomiko; Buch, Thorsten; Silva, Hernandez M.; Lafaille, Juan J.; Reis, Bernardo S.; Mucida, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Foxp3+ regulatory T cells in peripheral tissues (pTregs) are instrumental in limiting inflammatory responses to non-self antigens. Within the intestine, pTregs are located primarily in the lamina propria, while intraepithelial CD4+ T cells (CD4IELs), which also exhibit anti-inflammatory properties and depend on similar environmental cues, reside in the epithelium. Using intravital microscopy, we show distinct cell dynamics of intestinal Tregs and CD4IELs. Upon migration to the epithelium, Tregs lose Foxp3 and convert to CD4IELs in a microbiota-dependent fashion, an effect attributed to the loss of the transcription factor ThPOK. Finally, we demonstrate that pTregs and CD4IELs perform complementary roles in the regulation of intestinal inflammation. These results reveal intra-tissue specialization of anti-inflammatory T cells shaped by discrete niches of the intestine. PMID:27256884

  9. Low-dose IL-2 selectively activates subsets of CD4+ Tregs and NK cells

    PubMed Central

    Hirakawa, Masahiro; Matos, Tiago; Liu, Hongye; Koreth, John; Kim, Haesook T.; Paul, Nicole E.; Murase, Kazuyuki; Whangbo, Jennifer; Alho, Ana C.; Nikiforow, Sarah; Cutler, Corey; Ho, Vincent T.; Armand, Philippe; Alyea, Edwin P.; Antin, Joseph H.; Blazar, Bruce R.; Lacerda, Joao F.; Soiffer, Robert J.

    2016-01-01

    CD4+ regulatory T cells (CD4Tregs) play a critical role in the maintenance of immune tolerance and prevention of chronic graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. IL-2 supports the proliferation and survival of CD4Tregs and previous studies have demonstrated that IL-2 induces selective expansion of CD4Tregs and improves clinical manifestations of chronic GVHD. However, mechanisms for selective activation of CD4Tregs and the effects of low-dose IL-2 on other immune cells are not well understood. Using mass cytometry, we demonstrate that low concentrations of IL-2 selectively induce STAT5 phosphorylation in Helios+ CD4Tregs and CD56brightCD16– NK cells in vitro. Preferential activation and expansion of Helios+ CD4Tregs and CD56brightCD16– NK cells was also demonstrated in patients with chronic GVHD receiving low-dose IL-2. With prolonged IL-2 treatment for 48 weeks, phenotypic changes were also observed in Helios– CD4Tregs. The effects of low-dose IL-2 therapy on conventional CD4+ T cells and CD8+ T cells were limited to increased expression of PD-1 on effector memory T cells. These studies reveal the selective effects of low-dose IL-2 therapy on Helios+ CD4Tregs and CD56bright NK cells that constitutively express high-affinity IL-2 receptors as well as the indirect effects of prolonged exposure to low concentrations of IL-2 in vivo. PMID:27812545

  10. Transmission of survival signals through Delta-like 1 on activated CD4+ T cells

    PubMed Central

    Furukawa, Takahiro; Ishifune, Chieko; Tsukumo, Shin-ichi; Hozumi, Katsuto; Maekawa, Yoichi; Matsui, Naoko; Kaji, Ryuji; Yasutomo, Koji

    2016-01-01

    Notch expressed on CD4+ T cells transduces signals that mediate their effector functions and survival. Although Notch signaling is known to be cis-inhibited by Notch ligands expressed on the same cells, the role of Notch ligands on T cells remains unclear. In this report we demonstrate that the CD4+ T cell Notch ligand Dll1 transduces signals required for their survival. Co-transfer of CD4+ T cells from Dll1−/− and control mice into recipient mice followed by immunization revealed a rapid decline of CD4+ T cells from Dll1−/− mice compared with control cells. Dll1−/− mice exhibited lower clinical scores of experimental autoimmune encephalitis than control mice. The expression of Notch target genes in CD4+ T cells from Dll1−/− mice was not affected, suggesting that Dll1 deficiency in T cells does not affect cis Notch signaling. Overexpression of the intracellular domain of Dll1 in Dll1-deficient CD4+ T cells partially rescued impaired survival. Our data demonstrate that Dll1 is an independent regulator of Notch-signaling important for the survival of activated CD4+ T cells, and provide new insight into the physiological roles of Notch ligands as well as a regulatory mechanism important for maintaining adaptive immune responses. PMID:27659682

  11. Biomedical nanoparticles modulate specific CD4+ T cell stimulation by inhibition of antigen processing in dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Blank, Fabian; Gerber, Peter; Rothen-Rutishauser, Barbara; Sakulkhu, Usawadee; Salaklang, Jatuporn; De Peyer, Karin; Gehr, Peter; Nicod, Laurent P; Hofmann, Heinrich; Geiser, Thomas; Petri-Fink, Alke; Von Garnier, Christophe

    2011-12-01

    Understanding how nanoparticles may affect immune responses is an essential prerequisite to developing novel clinical applications. To investigate nanoparticle-dependent outcomes on immune responses, dendritic cells (DCs) were treated with model biomedical poly(vinylalcohol)-coated super-paramagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (PVA-SPIONs). PVA-SPIONs uptake by human monocyte-derived DCs (MDDCs) was analyzed by flow cytometry (FACS) and advanced imaging techniques. Viability, activation, function, and stimulatory capacity of MDDCs were assessed by FACS and an in vitro CD4+ T cell assay. PVA-SPION uptake was dose-dependent, decreased by lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced MDDC maturation at higher particle concentrations, and was inhibited by cytochalasin D pre-treatment. PVA-SPIONs did not alter surface marker expression (CD80, CD83, CD86, myeloid/plasmacytoid DC markers) or antigen-uptake, but decreased the capacity of MDDCs to process antigen, stimulate CD4+ T cells, and induce cytokines. The decreased antigen processing and CD4+ T cell stimulation capability of MDDCs following PVA-SPION treatment suggests that MDDCs may revert to a more functionally immature state following particle exposure.

  12. Cell death by pyroptosis drives CD4 T-cell depletion in HIV-1 infection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doitsh, Gilad; Galloway, Nicole L. K.; Geng, Xin; Yang, Zhiyuan; Monroe, Kathryn M.; Zepeda, Orlando; Hunt, Peter W.; Hatano, Hiroyu; Sowinski, Stefanie; Muñoz-Arias, Isa; Greene, Warner C.

    2014-01-01

    The pathway causing CD4 T-cell death in HIV-infected hosts remains poorly understood although apoptosis has been proposed as a key mechanism. We now show that caspase-3-mediated apoptosis accounts for the death of only a small fraction of CD4 T cells corresponding to those that are both activated and productively infected. The remaining over 95% of quiescent lymphoid CD4 T cells die by caspase-1-mediated pyroptosis triggered by abortive viral infection. Pyroptosis corresponds to an intensely inflammatory form of programmed cell death in which cytoplasmic contents and pro-inflammatory cytokines, including IL-1β, are released. This death pathway thus links the two signature events in HIV infection--CD4 T-cell depletion and chronic inflammation--and creates a pathogenic vicious cycle in which dying CD4 T cells release inflammatory signals that attract more cells to die. This cycle can be broken by caspase 1 inhibitors shown to be safe in humans, raising the possibility of a new class of `anti-AIDS' therapeutics targeting the host rather than the virus.

  13. CD4+ regulatory T cell responses induced by T cell vaccination in patients with multiple sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Jian; Zang, Ying C. Q.; Nie, Hong; Zhang, Jingwu Z.

    2006-01-01

    Immunization with irradiated autologous T cells (T cell vaccination) is shown to induce regulatory T cell responses that are poorly understood. In this study, CD4+ regulatory T cell lines were generated from patients with multiple sclerosis that received immunization with irradiated autologous myelin basic protein-reactive T cells. The resulting CD4+ regulatory T cell lines had marked inhibition on autologous myelin basic protein-reactive T cells and displayed two distinctive patterns distinguishable by the expression of transcription factor Foxp3 and cytokine profile. The majority of the T cell lines had high Foxp3 expression and secreted both IFN-γ and IL-10 as compared with the other pattern characteristic of low Foxp3 expression and predominant production of IL-10 but not IFN-γ. CD4+ regulatory T cell lines of both patterns expressed CD25 and reacted with activated autologous T cells but not resting T cells, irrespective of antigen specificity of the target T cells. It was evident that they recognized preferentially a synthetic peptide corresponding to residues 61–73 of the IL-2 receptor α chain. T cell vaccination correlated with increased Foxp3 expression and T cell reactivity to peptide 61–73. The findings have important implications in the understanding of the role of CD4+ regulatory T cell response induced by T cell vaccination. PMID:16547138

  14. In situ depletion of CD4+ T cells in human skin by Zanolimumab.

    PubMed

    Villadsen, L S; Skov, L; Dam, T N; Dagnaes-Hansen, F; Rygaard, J; Schuurman, J; Parren, P W H I; van de Winkel, J G J; Baadsgaard, O

    2007-02-01

    CD4(+) T cells, in activated or malignant form, are involved in a number of diseases including inflammatory skin diseases such as psoriasis, and T cell lymphomas such as the majority of cutaneous T cell lymphomas (CTCL). Targeting CD4 with an antibody that inhibits and/or eliminates disease-driving T cells in situ may therefore be a useful approach in the treatment of inflammatory and malignant skin diseases. Depletion of CD4(+) T cells in intact inflamed human skin tissue by Zanolimumab, a fully human therapeutic monoclonal antibody (IgG1, kappa) against CD4, was studied in a human psoriasis xenograft mouse model. Zanolimumab treatment was shown to induce a significant reduction in the numbers of inflammatory mononuclear cells in upper dermis. This reduction in inflammatory mononuclear cells in situ was primarily due to a significant reduction in the numbers of skin-infiltrating CD4(+), but not CD8(+) CD3(+) T cells. The capacity of Zanolimumab to deplete the CD4(+) T cells in the skin may be of importance in diseases where CD4(+) T cells play a central role. Indeed, in a phase II clinical trial Zanolimumab has shown a dose-dependent clinical response in patients with CTCL and the antibody is currently in a phase III clinical trial for CTCL, a disease for which there is no safe and effective treatment available today.

  15. Aire-Overexpressing Dendritic Cells Induce Peripheral CD4⁺ T Cell Tolerance.

    PubMed

    Li, Dongbei; Li, Haijun; Fu, Haiying; Niu, Kunwei; Guo, Yantong; Guo, Chuan; Sun, Jitong; Li, Yi; Yang, Wei

    2015-12-29

    Autoimmune regulator (Aire) can promote the ectopic expression of peripheral tissue-restricted antigens (TRAs) in thymic medullary epithelial cells (mTECs), which leads to the deletion of autoreactive T cells and consequently prevents autoimmune diseases. However, the functions of Aire in the periphery, such as in dendritic cells (DCs), remain unclear. This study's aim was to investigate the effect of Aire-overexpressing DCs (Aire cells) on the functions of CD4⁺ T cells and the treatment of type 1 diabetes (T1D). We demonstrated that Aire cells upregulated the mRNA levels of the tolerance-related molecules CD73, Lag3, and FR4 and the apoptosis of CD4⁺ T cells in STZ-T1D mouse-derived splenocytes. Furthermore, following insulin stimulation, Aire cells decreased the number of CD4⁺ IFN-γ⁺ T cells in both STZ-T1D and WT mouse-derived splenocytes and reduced the expression levels of TCR signaling molecules (Ca(2+) and p-ERK) in CD4⁺ T cells. We observed that Aire cells-induced CD4⁺ T cells could delay the development of T1D. In summary, Aire-expressing DCs inhibited TCR signaling pathways and decreased the quantity of CD4⁺IFN-γ⁺ autoreactive T cells. These data suggest a mechanism for Aire in the maintenance of peripheral immune tolerance and provide a potential method to control autoimmunity by targeting Aire.

  16. In situ targeting of dendritic cells sets tolerogenic environment and ameliorates CD4(+) T-cell response in the postischemic liver.

    PubMed

    Funken, Dominik; Ishikawa-Ankerhold, Hellen; Uhl, Bernd; Lerchenberger, Maximilian; Rentsch, Markus; Mayr, Doris; Massberg, Steffen; Werner, Jens; Khandoga, Andrej

    2017-07-18

    CD4(+) T cells recruited to the liver play a key role in the pathogenesis of ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury. The mechanism of their activation during alloantigen-independent I/R is not completely understood. We hypothesized that liver-resident dendritic cells (DCs) interact with CD4(+) T cells in the postischemic liver and that modulation of DCs or T-cell-DC interactions attenuates liver inflammation. In mice, warm hepatic I/R (90/120-240 min) was induced. Tolerogenic DCs were generated in situ by pretreatment of animals with the vitamin D analog paricalcitol. A mAb-CD44 was used for blockade of CD4(+) T-cell-DC interactions. As shown by 2-photon in vivo microscopy as well as confocal microscopy, CD4(+) T cells were closely colocalized with DCs in the postischemic liver. Pretreatment with paricalcitol attenuated I/R-induced maturation of DCs (flow cytometry), CD4(+) T-cell recruitment into the liver (intravital microscopy), and hepatocellular/microvascular damage (intravital microscopy, alanine aminotransferase/aspartate aminotransferase, histology). However, interruption of T-cell-DC interaction increased proinflammatory DC maturation and even enhanced tissue damage. Simultaneous treatment with an anti-CD44mAb completely abolished the beneficial effect of paricalcitol on T-cell migration and tissue injury. Our study demonstrates for the first time that hepatic DCs interact with CD4(+) T cells in the postischemic liver in vivo; modulation of DCs and/or generation of tolerogenic DCs attenuates intrahepatic CD4(+) T-cell recruitment and reduces I/R injury; and interruption of CD44-dependent CD4(+) T-cell-DC interactions enhances tissue injury by preventing the modulatory effect of hepatic DCs on T cells, especially type 1 T helper effector cells. Thus, hepatic DCs are strongly involved in the promotion of CD4(+) T-cell-dependent postischemic liver inflammation.-Funken, D., Ishikawa-Ankerhold, H., Uhl, B., Lerchenberger, M., Rentsch, M., Mayr, D., Massberg, S

  17. Defining Features of Protective CD4 T cell responses to Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Sakai, Shunsuke; Mayer-Barber, Katrin D.; Barber, Daniel L.

    2014-01-01

    CD4 T cells are critical for control of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) infection and represent the best hope for vaccine-elicited protection. However, little is understood about the properties of Mtb-specific CD4 T cells that mediate control, and the lack of correlates of protection present a significant barrier to the rational development of new vaccination and therapeutic strategies which are sorely needed. Here we discuss the features of protective CD4 T cells including recent evidence for IFN-γ dependent and independent mechanisms of protection, poor protection by terminally differentiated cells and the importance of T cell migratory capacity for the control of Mtb infection. PMID:25000593

  18. CD4 T-Cell Subsets in Malaria: TH1/TH2 Revisited

    PubMed Central

    Perez-Mazliah, Damian; Langhorne, Jean

    2015-01-01

    CD4+ T-cells have been shown to play a central role in immune control of infection with Plasmodium parasites. At the erythrocytic stage of infection, IFN-γ production by CD4+ T-cells and CD4+ T-cell help for the B-cell response are required for control and elimination of infected red blood cells. CD4+ T-cells are also important for controlling Plasmodium pre-erythrocytic stages through the activation of parasite-specific CD8+ T-cells. However, excessive inflammatory responses triggered by the infection have been shown to drive pathology. Early classical experiments demonstrated a biphasic CD4+ T-cell response against erythrocytic stages in mice, in which T helper (Th)1 and antibody-helper CD4+ T-cells appear sequentially during a primary infection. While IFN-γ-producing Th1 cells do play a role in controlling acute infections, and they contribute to acute erythrocytic-stage pathology, it became apparent that a classical Th2 response producing IL-4 is not a critical feature of the CD4+ T-cell response during the chronic phase of infection. Rather, effective CD4+ T-cell help for B-cells, which can occur in the absence of IL-4, is required to control chronic parasitemia. IL-10, important to counterbalance inflammation and associated with protection from inflammatory-mediated severe malaria in both humans and experimental models, was originally considered be produced by CD4+ Th2 cells during infection. We review the interpretations of CD4+ T-cell responses during Plasmodium infection, proposed under the original Th1/Th2 paradigm, in light of more recent advances, including the identification of multifunctional T-cells such as Th1 cells co-expressing IFN-γ and IL-10, the identification of follicular helper T-cells (Tfh) as the predominant CD4+ T helper subset for B-cells, and the recognition of inherent plasticity in the fates of different CD4+ T-cells. PMID:25628621

  19. Daily subcutaneous injections of peptide induce CD4+ CD25+ T regulatory cells

    PubMed Central

    Dahlberg, P E; Schartner, J M; Timmel, A; Seroogy, C M

    2007-01-01

    Peptide immunotherapy is being explored to modulate varied disease states; however, the mechanism of action remains poorly understood. In this study, we investigated the ability of a subcutaneous peptide immunization schedule to induce of CD4+ CD25+ T regulatory cells. DO11·10 T cell receptor (TCR) transgenic mice on a Rag 2–/– background were injected subcutaneously with varied doses of purified ovalbumin (OVA323−339) peptide daily for 16 days. While these mice have no CD4+ CD25+ T regulatory cells, following this injection schedule up to 30% of the CD4+ cells were found to express CD25. Real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (QPCR) analysis of the induced CD4+ CD25+ T cells revealed increased expression of forkhead box P3 (FoxP3), suggesting that these cells may have a regulatory function. Proliferation and suppression assays in vitro utilizing the induced CD4+ CD25+ T cells revealed a profound anergic phenotype in addition to potent suppressive capability. Importantly, co-injection of the induced CD4+ CD25+ T cells with 5,6-carboxy-succinimidyl-fluorescence-ester (CFSE)-labelled naive CD4+ T cells (responder cells) into BALB/c recipient mice reduced proliferation and differentiation of the responder cells in response to challenge with OVA323−339 peptide plus adjuvant. We conclude that repeated subcutaneous exposure to low-dose peptide leads to de novo induction of CD4+ CD25+ FoxP3+ T regulatory cells with potent in vitro and in vivo suppressive capability, thereby suggesting that one mechanism of peptide immunotherapy appears to be induction of CD4+ CD25+ Foxp3+ T regulatory cells. PMID:17490400

  20. Daily subcutaneous injections of peptide induce CD4+ CD25+ T regulatory cells.

    PubMed

    Dahlberg, P E; Schartner, J M; Timmel, A; Seroogy, C M

    2007-08-01

    Peptide immunotherapy is being explored to modulate varied disease states; however, the mechanism of action remains poorly understood. In this study, we investigated the ability of a subcutaneous peptide immunization schedule to induce of CD4(+) CD25(+) T regulatory cells. DO11.10 T cell receptor (TCR) transgenic mice on a Rag 2(-/-) background were injected subcutaneously with varied doses of purified ovalbumin (OVA(323-339)) peptide daily for 16 days. While these mice have no CD4(+) CD25(+) T regulatory cells, following this injection schedule up to 30% of the CD4(+) cells were found to express CD25. Real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (QPCR) analysis of the induced CD4(+) CD25(+) T cells revealed increased expression of forkhead box P3 (FoxP3), suggesting that these cells may have a regulatory function. Proliferation and suppression assays in vitro utilizing the induced CD4(+) CD25(+) T cells revealed a profound anergic phenotype in addition to potent suppressive capability. Importantly, co-injection of the induced CD4(+) CD25(+) T cells with 5,6-carboxy-succinimidyl-fluorescence-ester (CFSE)-labelled naive CD4(+) T cells (responder cells) into BALB/c recipient mice reduced proliferation and differentiation of the responder cells in response to challenge with OVA(323-339) peptide plus adjuvant. We conclude that repeated subcutaneous exposure to low-dose peptide leads to de novo induction of CD4(+) CD25(+) FoxP3(+) T regulatory cells with potent in vitro and in vivo suppressive capability, thereby suggesting that one mechanism of peptide immunotherapy appears to be induction of CD4(+) CD25(+) Foxp3(+) T regulatory cells.

  1. The Differentiation and Protective Function of Cytolytic CD4 T Cells in Influenza Infection

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Deborah M.; Lampe, Anna T.; Workman, Aspen M.

    2016-01-01

    CD4 T cells that recognize peptide antigen in the context of class II MHC can differentiate into various subsets that are characterized by their helper functions. However, increasing evidence indicates that CD4 cells with direct cytolytic activity (CD4 CTL) play a role in chronic as well as acute infections, such as influenza A virus (IAV) infection. In the last couple of decades, techniques to measure the frequency and activity of these cytolytic cells has demonstrated their abundance in infections, such as human immunodeficiency virus, mouse pox, murine gamma herpes virus, cytomegalovirus, Epstein–Barr virus, and influenza among others. We now appreciate a greater role for CD4 CTL as direct effectors in viral infections and antitumor immunity through their ability to acquire perforin-mediated cytolytic activity and contribution to lysis of virally infected targets or tumors. As early as the 1980s, CD4 T cell clones with cytolytic potential were identified after influenza virus infection, yet much of this early work was dependent on in vitro culture and little was known about the physiological relevance of CD4 CTL. Here, we discuss the direct role CD4 CTL play in protection against lethal IAV infection and the factors that drive the generation of perforin-mediated lytic activity in CD4 cells in vivo during IAV infection. While focusing on CD4 CTL generated during IAV infection, we pull comparisons from the literature in other antiviral and antitumor systems. Further, we highlight what is currently known about CD4 CTL secondary and memory responses, as well as vaccination strategies to induce these potent killer cells that provide an extra layer of cell-mediated immune protection against heterosubtypic IAV infection. PMID:27014272

  2. Human CD4- 8- T cells are a distinctive immunoregulatory subset.

    PubMed

    Huang, Mei-Chuan; Patel, Kalpesh; Taub, Dennis D; Longo, Dan L; Goetzl, Edward J

    2010-07-01

    Human CD4(-)8(-) T cells are a minor subset quantitatively but potentially important in immunity because they are predominantly distributed at body surfaces, and their number and activities increase in autoimmune diseases and decrease with aging. Distinguishing characteristics of CD4(-)8(-) T cells are found to include a unique profile of cytokines, including Serpin E1, which is not generated by other T cells, MIF, and TGF-beta. At 2-5% of the total in mixtures with CD4 + CD8 T cells, CD4(-)8(-) T cells enhance the generation of IFN-gamma and IL-17 by up to 12- and 5-fold, respectively, without contributing either cytokine or affecting cytokine production by NK/NKT cells. CD4(-)8(-) T cell-derived MIF is their major enhancer and TGFbeta their principal inhibitor of CD4 and CD8 T cell cytokine production. Decreases in CD4(-)8(-) T cell effects may diminish protective immunity in aging, whereas increases may augment the severity of autoimmune diseases.

  3. Prolonged CD4 T Cell Lymphopenia Increases Morbidity and Mortality after Renal Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Courivaud, Cécile; Bamoulid, Jamal; Vivet, Bérengère; Chabroux, Aline; Deschamps, Marina; Rebibou, Jean-Michel; Ferrand, Christophe; Chalopin, Jean-Marc; Tiberghien, Pierre; Saas, Philippe

    2010-01-01

    Prolonged CD4 T cell lymphopenia after administration of polyclonal anti-thymocyte globulins increases the rate of posttransplantation morbidity, but whether impaired immune reconstitution affects survival is unknown. We studied the effect of CD4 T cell lymphopenia on survival in 302 consecutive prevalent renal transplant recipients and the role of thymic function in CD4 T cell reconstitution and posttransplantation outcomes in 100 consecutive incident renal transplant recipients. We followed the prevalent cohort for a mean duration of 92 months. Of these 302 patients, 81 (27%) had persistent CD4 T cell counts <300/mm3 and 36 (12%) died during follow-up. We observed a higher death rate in patients with CD4 T cell lymphopenia persisting for >1 year (24.1 versus 7.6%; P < 0.001). Furthermore, in Cox regression analysis, CD4 T cell lymphopenia associated with a nearly five-fold risk for death (adjusted hazard ratio [HR] 4.63; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.91 to 10.65; P = 0.001). In the incident cohort, we estimated thymic function by T cell receptor excision circles (TRECs) per 150,000 CD3+ cells, which predicted efficient CD4 T cell reconstitution. Higher pretransplantation TREC values associated with lower risks for cancer (adjusted HR 0.39; 95% CI 0.15 to 0.97; P = 0.046) and infection (HR 0.29; 95% CI 0.11 to 0.78; P = 0.013). In summary, prolonged polyclonal anti-thymocyte globulin–induced CD4 T cell lymphopenia is an independent risk factor for death. Determination of pretransplantation thymic function may identify patients at higher risk for CD4 T cell lymphopenia and posttransplantation morbidity, including cancer and infections. PMID:20203160

  4. Prolonged CD4 T cell lymphopenia increases morbidity and mortality after renal transplantation.

    PubMed

    Ducloux, Didier; Courivaud, Cécile; Bamoulid, Jamal; Vivet, Bérengère; Chabroux, Aline; Deschamps, Marina; Rebibou, Jean-Michel; Ferrand, Christophe; Chalopin, Jean-Marc; Tiberghien, Pierre; Saas, Philippe

    2010-05-01

    Prolonged CD4 T cell lymphopenia after administration of polyclonal anti-thymocyte globulins increases the rate of posttransplantation morbidity, but whether impaired immune reconstitution affects survival is unknown. We studied the effect of CD4 T cell lymphopenia on survival in 302 consecutive prevalent renal transplant recipients and the role of thymic function in CD4 T cell reconstitution and posttransplantation outcomes in 100 consecutive incident renal transplant recipients. We followed the prevalent cohort for a mean duration of 92 months. Of these 302 patients, 81 (27%) had persistent CD4 T cell counts <300/mm3 and 36 (12%) died during follow-up. We observed a higher death rate in patients with CD4 T cell lymphopenia persisting for >1 year (24.1 versus 7.6%; P < 0.001). Furthermore, in Cox regression analysis, CD4 T cell lymphopenia associated with a nearly five-fold risk for death (adjusted hazard ratio [HR] 4.63; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.91 to 10.65; P = 0.001). In the incident cohort, we estimated thymic function by T cell receptor excision circles (TRECs) per 150,000 CD3+ cells, which predicted efficient CD4 T cell reconstitution. Higher pretransplantation TREC values associated with lower risks for cancer (adjusted HR 0.39; 95% CI 0.15 to 0.97; P = 0.046) and infection (HR 0.29; 95% CI 0.11 to 0.78; P = 0.013). In summary, prolonged polyclonal anti-thymocyte globulin-induced CD4 T cell lymphopenia is an independent risk factor for death. Determination of pretransplantation thymic function may identify patients at higher risk for CD4 T cell lymphopenia and posttransplantation morbidity, including cancer and infections.

  5. Polyfunctional and IFN-γ monofunctional human CD4+ T cell populations are molecularly distinct

    PubMed Central

    Burel, Julie G.; Apte, Simon H.; Groves, Penny L.; McCarthy, James S.; Doolan, Denise L.

    2017-01-01

    Pathogen-specific polyfunctional T cell responses have been associated with favorable clinical outcomes, but it is not known whether molecular differences exist between polyfunctional and monofunctional cytokine-producing T cells. Here, we report that polyfunctional CD4+ T cells induced during Plasmodium falciparum (P. falciparum) blood-stage infection in humans have a unique transcriptomic profile compared with IFN-γ monofunctional CD4+ T cells and, thus, are molecularly distinct. The 14-gene signature revealed in P. falciparum–reactive polyfunctional T cells is associated with cytokine signaling and lymphocyte chemotaxis, and systems biology analysis identified IL-27 as an upstream regulator of the polyfunctional gene signature. Importantly, the polyfunctional gene signature is largely conserved in Influenza-reactive polyfunctional CD4+ T cells, suggesting that polyfunctional T cells have core characteristics independent of pathogen specificity. This study provides the first evidence to our knowledge that consistent molecular differences exist between polyfunctional and monofunctional CD4+ T cells. PMID:28194431

  6. Monoclonal antibody to CD4+ T cells abrogates genetic resistance to Haemonchus contortus in sheep.

    PubMed Central

    Gill, H S; Watson, D L; Brandon, M R

    1993-01-01

    The roles of CD4+ and CD8+ T cells in genetically determined resistance of sheep to Haemonchus contortus (a natural host-parasite relationship) was investigated by selectively depleting genetically resistant merino lambs of their CD4+ or CD8+ T cells by treatment with mouse monoclonal antibody (mAb) specific for the appropriate determinant before and during challenge infection. Administration of anti-CD4 mAb to genetically resistant lambs completely abrogated their expression of genetic resistance as indicated by significantly higher faecal egg output and worm burdens found in the CD4+ T-cell-depleted lambs compared with those of controls. Host responses associated with resistance to H. contortus including mucosal mast cell hyperplasia and tissue eosinophilia were also significantly suppressed in CD4-depleted lambs. The development of anamnestic anti-parasite antibody responses were also significantly inhibited by anti-CD4 mAb. Furthermore, anti-CD4 mAb abolished differences in host responses between genetically resistant and random-bred (susceptible) lambs. In contrast, depletion of CD8+ T cells had no effect on genetic resistance; faecal egg output, worm counts, mast cells and eosinophil responses in CD8-depleted lambs were not significantly different from those in controls. Together, these results suggest that CD4+ T cells play a pivotal role in mediating genetic resistance to H. contortus, and in the generation of mucosal mast cell hyperplasia, tissue eosinophilia and anti-Haemonchus antibody. CD8+ T cells appear to play no protective role. The possible mechanisms by which CD4+ T cells might mediate anti-parasite resistance are discussed. PMID:8094709

  7. DJ-1/Park7 Sensitive Na(+) /H(+) Exchanger 1 (NHE1) in CD4(+) T Cells.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yuetao; Shi, Xiaolong; Chen, Hong; Zhang, Shaqiu; Salker, Madhuri S; Mack, Andreas F; Föller, Michael; Mak, Tak W; Singh, Yogesh; Lang, Florian

    2016-08-10

    DJ-1/Park7 is a redox-sensitive chaperone protein counteracting oxidation and presumably contributing to the control of oxidative stress responses and thus inflammation. DJ-1 gene deletion exacerbates the progression of Parkinson's disease presumably by augmenting oxidative stress. Formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) is paralleled by activation of the Na(+) /H(+) exchanger 1 (NHE1). ROS formation in CD4(+) T cells plays a decisive role in regulating inflammatory responses. In the present study we explored whether DJ-1 is expressed in CD4(+) T cells and affects ROS production as well as NHE1 in those cells. To this end, DJ-1 and NHE1 transcript and protein levels were quantified by qRT-PCR and Western blotting respectively, intracellular pH (pHi) utilizing bis-(2-carboxyethyl)-5-(and-6)-carboxyfluorescein (BCECF) fluorescence, NHE activity from realkalinization after an ammonium pulse, and ROS production utilizing 2',7' -dichlorofluorescin diacetate (DCFDA) fluorescence. As a result DJ-1 was expressed in CD4(+) T cells. ROS formation, NHE1 transcript levels, NHE1 protein, and NHE activity were higher in CD4(+) T cells from DJ-1 deficient mice than in CD4(+) T cells from wild type mice. Antioxidant N-acetyl-cysteine (NAC) and protein tyrosine kinase (PTK) inhibitor staurosporine decreased the NHE activity in DJ-1 deficient CD4(+) T cells, and blunted the difference between DJ-1(-/-) and DJ-1(+/+) CD4(+) T cells, an observation pointing to a role of ROS in the up-regulation of NHE1 in DJ-1(-/-) CD4(+) T cells. In conclusion, DJ-1 is a powerful regulator of ROS production as well as NHE1 expression and activity in CD4(+) T cells. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  8. Activation requirements and responses to TLR ligands in human CD4+ T cells: comparison of two T cell isolation techniques.

    PubMed

    Lancioni, Christina L; Thomas, Jeremy J; Rojas, Roxana E

    2009-05-15

    Direct regulation of T cell function by microbial ligands through Toll-like receptors (TLR) is an emerging area of T cell biology. Currently either immunomagnetic cell sorting (IMACS) or fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS), are utilized to isolate T-cell subsets for such studies. However, it is unknown to what extent differences in T cell purity between these isolation techniques influence T cell functional assays. We compared the purity, response to mitogen, activation requirements, and response to TLR ligands between human CD4(+) T cells isolated either by IMACS (IMACS-CD4(+)) or by IMACS followed by FACS (IMACS/FACS-CD4(+)). As expected, IMACS-CD4(+) were less pure than IMACS/FACS-CD4(+) (92.5%+/-1.4% versus 99.7%+/-0.2%, respectively). Consequently, IMACS-CD4(+) proliferated and produced cytokines in response to mitogen alone and had lower activation requirements compared to IMACS/FACS-CD4(+). In addition IMACS-CD4(+) but not IMACS/FACS-CD4(+) responses were upregulated by the TLR-4 ligand lipopolysaccharide (LPS). On the other hand, TLR-2 and TLR-5 engagement induced costimulation in both IMACS-CD4(+) and highly purified IMACS-/FACS-CD4(+). Altogether these results indicate that small differences in cell purity can significantly alter T cell responses to TLR ligands. This study stresses the importance of a stringent purification method when investigating the role of microbial ligands in T cell function.

  9. A transcriptome-based model of central memory CD4 T cell death in HIV infection.

    PubMed

    Olvera-García, Gustavo; Aguilar-García, Tania; Gutiérrez-Jasso, Fany; Imaz-Rosshandler, Iván; Rangel-Escareño, Claudia; Orozco, Lorena; Aguilar-Delfín, Irma; Vázquez-Pérez, Joel A; Zúñiga, Joaquín; Pérez-Patrigeon, Santiago; Espinosa, Enrique

    2016-11-22

    Human central memory CD4 T cells are characterized by their capacity of proliferation and differentiation into effector memory CD4 T cells. Homeostasis of central memory CD4 T cells is considered a key factor sustaining the asymptomatic stage of Human Immunodeficiency Virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection, while progression to acquired immunodeficiency syndrome is imputed to central memory CD4 T cells homeostatic failure. We investigated if central memory CD4 T cells from patients with HIV-1 infection have a gene expression profile impeding proliferation and survival, despite their activated state. Using gene expression microarrays, we analyzed mRNA expression patterns in naive, central memory, and effector memory CD4 T cells from healthy controls, and naive and central memory CD4 T cells from patients with HIV-1 infection. Differentially expressed genes, defined by Log2 Fold Change (FC) ≥ |0.5| and Log (odds) > 0, were used in pathway enrichment analyses. Central memory CD4 T cells from patients and controls showed comparable expression of differentiation-related genes, ruling out an effector-like differentiation of central memory CD4 T cells in HIV infection. However, 210 genes were differentially expressed in central memory CD4 T cells from patients compared with those from controls. Expression of 75 of these genes was validated by semi quantitative RT-PCR, and independently reproduced enrichment results from this gene expression signature. The results of functional enrichment analysis indicated movement to cell cycle phases G1 and S (increased CCNE1, MKI67, IL12RB2, ADAM9, decreased FGF9, etc.), but also arrest in G2/M (increased CHK1, RBBP8, KIF11, etc.). Unexpectedly, the results also suggested decreased apoptosis (increased CSTA, NFKBIA, decreased RNASEL, etc.). Results also suggested increased IL-1β, IFN-γ, TNF, and RANTES (CCR5) activity upstream of the central memory CD4 T cells signature, consistent with the demonstrated milieu in HIV infection. Our

  10. The generation and antigen-specificity of CD4+CD25+ regulatory T cells.

    PubMed

    Taams, Leonie S; Curnow, S John; Vukmanovic-Stejic, M; Akbar, Arne N

    2006-09-01

    CD4+CD25+ regulatory T cells are essential components of the immune system. They help to maintain immune tolerance by exerting suppressive effects on cells of the adaptive and innate immune system. In the last few years there has been an abundance of papers addressing the suppressive effects of CD4+CD25+ regulatory T cells and their putative role in various experimental disease models and human diseases. Despite the enormous amounts of data on these cells a number of controversial issues still exists. CD4+CD25+ regulatory T cells were originally described as thymus-derived anergic/suppressive T cells. Recent papers however indicate that these cells might also be generated in the periphery. Due to the thymic development of CD4+CD25+ regulatory T cells it was thought that these cells were specific for self-antigens. Indeed it was shown that CD4+CD25+ regulatory T cells could be positively selected upon high affinity interaction with self-antigens. However, evidence is accumulating that these cells might also interact with non-self antigens. Finally, in the literature there is conflicting evidence regarding the role of soluble factors versus cell-contact in the mechanism of suppression. The aim of this review is to summarize the evidence supporting these opposing viewpoints and to combine them into a general model for the origin, function and antigen-specificity of CD4+CD25+ regulatory T cells.

  11. Clonally expanded CD4+ T cells can produce infectious HIV-1 in vivo.

    PubMed

    Simonetti, Francesco R; Sobolewski, Michele D; Fyne, Elizabeth; Shao, Wei; Spindler, Jonathan; Hattori, Junko; Anderson, Elizabeth M; Watters, Sarah A; Hill, Shawn; Wu, Xiaolin; Wells, David; Su, Li; Luke, Brian T; Halvas, Elias K; Besson, Guillaume; Penrose, Kerri J; Yang, Zhiming; Kwan, Richard W; Van Waes, Carter; Uldrick, Thomas; Citrin, Deborah E; Kovacs, Joseph; Polis, Michael A; Rehm, Catherine A; Gorelick, Robert; Piatak, Michael; Keele, Brandon F; Kearney, Mary F; Coffin, John M; Hughes, Stephen H; Mellors, John W; Maldarelli, Frank

    2016-02-16

    Reservoirs of infectious HIV-1 persist despite years of combination antiretroviral therapy and make curing HIV-1 infections a major challenge. Most of the proviral DNA resides in CD4(+)T cells. Some of these CD4(+)T cells are clonally expanded; most of the proviruses are defective. It is not known if any of the clonally expanded cells carry replication-competent proviruses. We report that a highly expanded CD4(+) T-cell clone contains an intact provirus. The highly expanded clone produced infectious virus that was detected as persistent plasma viremia during cART in an HIV-1-infected patient who had squamous cell cancer. Cells containing the intact provirus were widely distributed and significantly enriched in cancer metastases. These results show that clonally expanded CD4(+)T cells can be a reservoir of infectious HIV-1.

  12. Clonally expanded CD4+ T cells can produce infectious HIV-1 in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Simonetti, Francesco R.; Sobolewski, Michele D.; Fyne, Elizabeth; Shao, Wei; Spindler, Jonathan; Hattori, Junko; Anderson, Elizabeth M.; Watters, Sarah A.; Hill, Shawn; Wu, Xiaolin; Wells, David; Su, Li; Luke, Brian T.; Halvas, Elias K.; Besson, Guillaume; Penrose, Kerri J.; Yang, Zhiming; Kwan, Richard W.; Van Waes, Carter; Uldrick, Thomas; Citrin, Deborah E.; Kovacs, Joseph; Polis, Michael A.; Rehm, Catherine A.; Gorelick, Robert; Piatak, Michael; Keele, Brandon F.; Kearney, Mary F.; Coffin, John M.; Hughes, Stephen H.; Mellors, John W.; Maldarelli, Frank

    2016-01-01

    Reservoirs of infectious HIV-1 persist despite years of combination antiretroviral therapy and make curing HIV-1 infections a major challenge. Most of the proviral DNA resides in CD4+T cells. Some of these CD4+T cells are clonally expanded; most of the proviruses are defective. It is not known if any of the clonally expanded cells carry replication-competent proviruses. We report that a highly expanded CD4+ T-cell clone contains an intact provirus. The highly expanded clone produced infectious virus that was detected as persistent plasma viremia during cART in an HIV-1–infected patient who had squamous cell cancer. Cells containing the intact provirus were widely distributed and significantly enriched in cancer metastases. These results show that clonally expanded CD4+T cells can be a reservoir of infectious HIV-1. PMID:26858442

  13. CD4 T cell knockout does not protect against kidney injury and worsens cancer.

    PubMed

    Ravichandran, Kameswaran; Wang, Qian; Ozkok, Abdullah; Jani, Alkesh; Li, Howard; He, Zhibin; Ljubanovic, Danica; Weiser-Evans, Mary C; Nemenoff, Raphael A; Edelstein, Charles L

    2016-04-01

    Most previous studies of cisplatin-induced acute kidney injury (AKI) have been in models of acute, high-dose cisplatin administration that leads to mortality in non-tumor-bearing mice. The aim of the study was to determine whether CD4 T cell knockout protects against AKI and cancer in a clinically relevant model of low-dose cisplatin-induced AKI in mice with cancer. Kidney function, serum neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin (NGAL), acute tubular necrosis (ATN), and tubular apoptosis score were the same in wild-type and CD4 -/- mice with AKI. The lack of protection against AKI in CD4 -/- mice was associated with an increase in extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), p38, CXCL1, and TNF-α, mediators of AKI and fibrosis, in both cisplatin-treated CD4 -/- mice and wild-type mice. The lack of protection was independent of the presence of cancer or not. Tumor size was double, and cisplatin had an impaired therapeutic effect on the tumors in CD4 -/- vs. wild-type mice. Mice depleted of CD4 T cells using the GK1.5 antibody were not protected against AKI and had larger tumors and lesser response to cisplatin. In summary, in a clinically relevant model of cisplatin-induced AKI in mice with cancer, (1) CD4 -/- mice were not protected against AKI; (2) ERK, p38, CXCL1, and TNF-α, known mediators of AKI, and interstitial fibrosis were increased in CD4 -/- kidneys; and (3) CD4 -/- mice had faster tumor growth and an impaired therapeutic effect of cisplatin on the tumors. The data warns against the use of CD4 T cell inhibition to attenuate cisplatin-induced AKI in patients with cancer. A clinically relevant low-dose cisplatin model of AKI in mice with cancer was used. CD4 -/- mice were not functionally or histologically protected against AKI. CD4 -/- mice had faster tumor growth. CD4 -/- mice had an impaired therapeutic effect of cisplatin on the tumors. Mice depleted of CD4 T cells were not protected against AKI and had larger tumors.

  14. In-Depth Analysis of Citrulline Specific CD4 T-Cells in Rheumatoid Arthritis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2017-01-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-15-1-0004 TITLE: In-Depth Analysis of Citrulline-Specific CD4 T-Cells in Rheumatoid Arthritis PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR...2016 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE In-Depth Analysis of Citrulline-Specific CD4 T Cells in Rheumatoid Arthritis 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH...NOTES 14. ABSTRACT The goal of this project is to test the hypothesis that cit-specific CD4 T cells present in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients

  15. In Depth Analysis of Citrulline Specific CD4 T Cells in Rheumatoid Arthritis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2017-01-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-15-1-0003 TITLE: In-Depth Analysis of Citrulline-Specific CD4 T Cells in Rheumatoid Arthritis PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR...TITLE AND SUBTITLE In-Depth Analysis of Citrulline-Specific CD4 T Cells in Rheumatoid Arthritis 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-15-1-0003...NOTES 14. ABSTRACT The goal of this project is to test the hypothesis that cit-specific CD4 T cells present in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients

  16. Molecular control of CD4(+) T cell lineage plasticity and integrity.

    PubMed

    Ellmeier, Wilfried

    2015-10-01

    CD4(+) helper T cells and CD8(+) cytotoxic T cells form the two major subsets of peripheral T lymphocytes. Helper T cells fulfill crucial roles in the activation and coordination of the immune response, while cytotoxic T cells kill virus-infected or tumor cells. Recent data suggest that the lineage identify of helper T cells is not fixed and that CD4(+) T cells under certain physiological conditions can be reprogrammed to express CD8 lineage genes and to develop into intestinal intraepithelial CD4(+) cytotoxic T lymphocytes that lack the expression of the key helper T cell lineage commitment factor ThPOK. Moreover, the analysis of mice with a conditional deletion of the transcription factor ThPOK or the histone deacetylases HDAC1 and HDAC2 indicated that CD8 lineage genes are actively repressed in CD4(+) T cells in order to maintain the lineage integrity of helper T cells. In this review I summarize recent studies that indicate plasticity of CD4(+) T cells towards a CTL program and that demonstrate that ThPOK and HDAC1-HDAC2 are part of a transcriptional regulatory circuit that counteracts the activity of the transcription factor Runx3 to maintain CD4(+) T cell lineage integrity. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Development of a device for selective removal of CD4+ T cells.

    PubMed

    Onodera, Hirokazu; Ninomiya, Kasumi; Yoshida, Makoto; Matsuo, Hidenori; Shibuya, Noritoshi

    2003-06-01

    To control antigen (Ag)-specific immune cells is important in the treatment of autoimmune diseases. In particular, controlling the immune response of autoimmune T cells is effective in the treatment of these diseases. The development of a device that can remove CD4+ T cells specifically by extracorporeal circulation is now in progress, with the aim to deplete autoimmune T cells. We developed a removal material made of polypropylene non-woven fabrics with anti human CD4 monoclonal antibody immobilized on the surface. Using a column packed with the removal material, we succeeded in removing CD4+ T cells specifically from peripheral whole blood by direct perfusion. Moreover, CD4+ T cells can be specifically removed even from blood with lower surface antigen density by in vitro activation.

  18. IL-21 induces IL-22 production in CD4+ T cells.

    PubMed

    Yeste, Ada; Mascanfroni, Ivan D; Nadeau, Meghan; Burns, Evan J; Tukpah, Ann-Marcia; Santiago, Andrezza; Wu, Chuan; Patel, Bonny; Kumar, Deepak; Quintana, Francisco J

    2014-05-06

    Interleukin (IL)-22 produced by innate lymphoid cells (ILCs) and CD4+ T cells plays an important role in host defence and mucosal homeostasis, thus it is important to investigate the mechanisms that regulate IL-22 production. We investigated the regulation IL-22 production by CD4+ T cells. Here we show that IL-21 triggers IL-22, but not IL-17 production by CD4+ T cells. STAT3, activated by IL-21, controls the epigenetic status of the il22 promoter and its interaction with the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR). Moreover, IL-21 and AhR signalling in T cells control IL-22 production and the development of dextran sodium sulphate-induced colitis in ILC-deficient mice. Thus, we have identified IL-21 as an inducer of IL-22 production in CD4+ T cells in vitro and in vivo.

  19. Revealing the role of CD4+ T cells in viral immunity

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Protective immunity to chronic and acute viral infection relies on both the innate and adaptive immune response. Although neutralizing antibody production by B cells and cytotoxic activity of CD8+ T cells are well-accepted components of the adaptive immune response to viruses, identification of the specific role of CD4+ T cells in protection has been more challenging to establish. Delineating the contribution of CD4+ T cells has been complicated by their functional heterogeneity, breadth in antigen specificity, transient appearance in circulation, and sequestration in tissue sites of infection. In this minireview, we discuss recent progress in identifying the multiple roles of CD4+ T cells in orchestrating and mediating the immune responses against viral pathogens. We highlight several recent reports, including one published in this issue, that have employed comprehensive and sophisticated approaches to provide new evidence for CD4+ T cells as direct effectors in antiviral immunity. PMID:22851641

  20. Persistent expansion of CD4+ effector memory T cells in Wegener's granulomatosis.

    PubMed

    Abdulahad, W H; van der Geld, Y M; Stegeman, C A; Kallenberg, C G M

    2006-09-01

    In order to test the hypothesis that Wegener's granulomatosis (WG) is associated with an ongoing immune effector response, even in remission, we examined the distribution of peripheral naive and memory T-lymphocytes in this disease, and analyzed the function-related phenotypes of the memory T-cell population. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) were freshly isolated from WG-patients in remission (R-WG, n=40), active WG-patients (A-WG, n=17), and age-matched healthy controls (HCs, n=21). Expression of CD4, CD8, CD45RO, CCR7, interleukin (IL)-18Ralpha, ST2L, and FoxP3 were determined by four-color flow cytometric analysis. CD45RO and CCR7 were used for distinction between naive and memory T cells, IL-18Ralpha, ST2L, and FoxP3 for the assessment of Type1, Type2, and regulatory T-cells, respectively. In R-WG, the CD4+CD45RO+CCR7- effector memory T-cell subpopulation (TEM) was relatively increased, whereas the CD4+CD45RO-CCR7+ naive T-cell population (TNaive) was decreased as compared to HC. The distribution of naive and memory CD8+T cells did not differ between R-WG, A-WG, and HC, nor did CD4+CD45RO+CCR7+ central memory T cells (TCM). In contrast to HC, the percentage of CD4+TNaive cells in R-WG correlated negatively with age, whereas CD4+TEM cells showed a positive correlation. In R-WG, a skewing towards Type2 T cells was observed in CD4+TEM cells. No differences were detected in FoxP3+CD4+TEM cells between R-WG and A-WG, whereas the FoxP3-CD4+TEM cells were increased in R-WG and decreased in A-WG as compared to HC. Collectively, peripheral blood homeostasis of CD4+T cells is disturbed in R-WG with the persistent expansion of non-regulatory CD4+TEM cells. These cells might be involved in relapse and may constitute a target for therapy.

  1. The transcriptome of HIV-1 infected intestinal CD4+ T cells exposed to enteric bacteria.

    PubMed

    Yoder, Alyson C; Guo, Kejun; Dillon, Stephanie M; Phang, Tzu; Lee, Eric J; Harper, Michael S; Helm, Karen; Kappes, John C; Ochsenbauer, Christina; McCarter, Martin D; Wilson, Cara C; Santiago, Mario L

    2017-02-01

    Global transcriptome studies can help pinpoint key cellular pathways exploited by viruses to replicate and cause pathogenesis. Previous data showed that laboratory-adapted HIV-1 triggers significant gene expression changes in CD4+ T cell lines and mitogen-activated CD4+ T cells from peripheral blood. However, HIV-1 primarily targets mucosal compartments during acute infection in vivo. Moreover, early HIV-1 infection causes extensive depletion of CD4+ T cells in the gastrointestinal tract that herald persistent inflammation due to the translocation of enteric microbes to the systemic circulation. Here, we profiled the transcriptome of primary intestinal CD4+ T cells infected ex vivo with transmitted/founder (TF) HIV-1. Infections were performed in the presence or absence of Prevotella stercorea, a gut microbe enriched in the mucosa of HIV-1-infected individuals that enhanced both TF HIV-1 replication and CD4+ T cell death ex vivo. In the absence of bacteria, HIV-1 triggered a cellular shutdown response involving the downregulation of HIV-1 reactome genes, while perturbing genes linked to OX40, PPAR and FOXO3 signaling. However, in the presence of bacteria, HIV-1 did not perturb these gene sets or pathways. Instead, HIV-1 enhanced granzyme expression and Th17 cell function, inhibited G1/S cell cycle checkpoint genes and triggered downstream cell death pathways in microbe-exposed gut CD4+ T cells. To gain insights on these differential effects, we profiled the gene expression landscape of HIV-1-uninfected gut CD4+ T cells exposed to bacteria. Microbial exposure upregulated genes involved in cellular proliferation, MAPK activation, Th17 cell differentiation and type I interferon signaling. Our findings reveal that microbial exposure influenced how HIV-1 altered the gut CD4+ T cell transcriptome, with potential consequences for HIV-1 susceptibility, cell survival and inflammation. The HIV-1- and microbe-altered pathways unraveled here may serve as a molecular blueprint

  2. The transcriptome of HIV-1 infected intestinal CD4+ T cells exposed to enteric bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Dillon, Stephanie M.; Phang, Tzu; Lee, Eric J.; Helm, Karen; Kappes, John C.; McCarter, Martin D.

    2017-01-01

    Global transcriptome studies can help pinpoint key cellular pathways exploited by viruses to replicate and cause pathogenesis. Previous data showed that laboratory-adapted HIV-1 triggers significant gene expression changes in CD4+ T cell lines and mitogen-activated CD4+ T cells from peripheral blood. However, HIV-1 primarily targets mucosal compartments during acute infection in vivo. Moreover, early HIV-1 infection causes extensive depletion of CD4+ T cells in the gastrointestinal tract that herald persistent inflammation due to the translocation of enteric microbes to the systemic circulation. Here, we profiled the transcriptome of primary intestinal CD4+ T cells infected ex vivo with transmitted/founder (TF) HIV-1. Infections were performed in the presence or absence of Prevotella stercorea, a gut microbe enriched in the mucosa of HIV-1-infected individuals that enhanced both TF HIV-1 replication and CD4+ T cell death ex vivo. In the absence of bacteria, HIV-1 triggered a cellular shutdown response involving the downregulation of HIV-1 reactome genes, while perturbing genes linked to OX40, PPAR and FOXO3 signaling. However, in the presence of bacteria, HIV-1 did not perturb these gene sets or pathways. Instead, HIV-1 enhanced granzyme expression and Th17 cell function, inhibited G1/S cell cycle checkpoint genes and triggered downstream cell death pathways in microbe-exposed gut CD4+ T cells. To gain insights on these differential effects, we profiled the gene expression landscape of HIV-1-uninfected gut CD4+ T cells exposed to bacteria. Microbial exposure upregulated genes involved in cellular proliferation, MAPK activation, Th17 cell differentiation and type I interferon signaling. Our findings reveal that microbial exposure influenced how HIV-1 altered the gut CD4+ T cell transcriptome, with potential consequences for HIV-1 susceptibility, cell survival and inflammation. The HIV-1- and microbe-altered pathways unraveled here may serve as a molecular blueprint

  3. HIV-1 Vpu targets cell surface markers CD4 and BST-2 through distinct mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Andrew, Amy; Strebel, Klaus

    2010-01-01

    Vpu is a small integral membrane protein encoded by HIV-1 and some SIV isolates. The protein is known to induce degradation of the viral receptor molecule CD4 and to enhance the release of newly formed virions from the cell surface. Vpu accomplishes these two functions through two distinct mechanisms. In the case of CD4, Vpu acts as a molecular adaptor to connect CD4 to an E3 ubiquitin ligase complex resulting in CD4 degradation by cellular proteasomes. This requires signals located in Vpu's cytoplasmic domain. Enhancement of virus release on the other hand involves the neutralization of a cellular host factor, BST-2 (also known as CD317, HM1.24, or tetherin) and requires Vpu's TM domain. The current review discusses recent advances on the role of Vpu in controlling degradation of CD4 and in regulating virus release. PMID:20858517

  4. The Story of CD4+CD28− T Cells Revisited: Solved or Still Ongoing?

    PubMed Central

    Maly, Kathrin

    2015-01-01

    CD4+CD28− T cells are a unique type of proinflammatory T cells characterised by blockade of costimulatory CD28 receptor expression at the transcriptional level, which is still reversible by IL-12. In healthy individuals older than 65 years, these cells may accumulate to up to 50% of total CD4+ T lymphocytes as in many immune-mediated diseases, immunodeficiency, and specific infectious diseases. Here we focus on CD4+CD28− T cells in chronic immune-mediated diseases, summarizing various phenotypic and functional characteristics, which vary depending on the underlying disease, disease activity, and concurrent treatment. CD4+CD28− T cells present as effector/memory cells with increased replicative history and oligoclonality but reduced apoptosis. As an alternative costimulatory signal instead of CD28, not only natural killer cell receptors and Toll-like receptors, but also CD47, CTLA-4, OX40, and 4-1BB have to be considered. The proinflammatory and cytotoxic capacities of these cells indicate an involvement in progression and maintenance of chronic immune-mediated disease. So far it has been shown that treatment with TNF-α blockers, abatacept, statins, and polyclonal antilymphocyte globulins (ATG) mediates reduction of the CD4+CD28− T cell level. The clinical relevance of targeting CD4+CD28− T cells as a therapeutic option has not been examined so far. PMID:25834833

  5. CD4⁺ follicular helper T cell infiltration predicts breast cancer survival.

    PubMed

    Gu-Trantien, Chunyan; Loi, Sherene; Garaud, Soizic; Equeter, Carole; Libin, Myriam; de Wind, Alexandre; Ravoet, Marie; Le Buanec, Hélène; Sibille, Catherine; Manfouo-Foutsop, Germain; Veys, Isabelle; Haibe-Kains, Benjamin; Singhal, Sandeep K; Michiels, Stefan; Rothé, Françoise; Salgado, Roberto; Duvillier, Hugues; Ignatiadis, Michail; Desmedt, Christine; Bron, Dominique; Larsimont, Denis; Piccart, Martine; Sotiriou, Christos; Willard-Gallo, Karen

    2013-07-01

    CD4⁺ T cells are critical regulators of immune responses, but their functional role in human breast cancer is relatively unknown. The goal of this study was to produce an image of CD4⁺ T cells infiltrating breast tumors using limited ex vivo manipulation to better understand the in vivo differences associated with patient prognosis. We performed comprehensive molecular profiling of infiltrating CD4⁺ T cells isolated from untreated invasive primary tumors and found that the infiltrating T cell subpopulations included follicular helper T (Tfh) cells, which have not previously been found in solid tumors, as well as Th1, Th2, and Th17 effector memory cells and Tregs. T cell signaling pathway alterations included a mixture of activation and suppression characterized by restricted cytokine/chemokine production, which inversely paralleled lymphoid infiltration levels and could be reproduced in activated donor CD4⁺ T cells treated with primary tumor supernatant. A comparison of extensively versus minimally infiltrated tumors showed that CXCL13-producing CD4⁺ Tfh cells distinguish extensive immune infiltrates, principally located in tertiary lymphoid structure germinal centers. An 8-gene Tfh signature, signifying organized antitumor immunity, robustly predicted survival or preoperative response to chemotherapy. Our identification of CD4⁺ Tfh cells in breast cancer suggests that they are an important immune element whose presence in the tumor is a prognostic factor.

  6. CD4+ follicular helper T cell infiltration predicts breast cancer survival

    PubMed Central

    Gu-Trantien, Chunyan; Loi, Sherene; Garaud, Soizic; Equeter, Carole; Libin, Myriam; de Wind, Alexandre; Ravoet, Marie; Le Buanec, Hélène; Sibille, Catherine; Manfouo-Foutsop, Germain; Veys, Isabelle; Haibe-Kains, Benjamin; Singhal, Sandeep K.; Michiels, Stefan; Rothé, Françoise; Salgado, Roberto; Duvillier, Hugues; Ignatiadis, Michail; Desmedt, Christine; Bron, Dominique; Larsimont, Denis; Piccart, Martine; Sotiriou, Christos; Willard-Gallo, Karen

    2013-01-01

    CD4+ T cells are critical regulators of immune responses, but their functional role in human breast cancer is relatively unknown. The goal of this study was to produce an image of CD4+ T cells infiltrating breast tumors using limited ex vivo manipulation to better understand the in vivo differences associated with patient prognosis. We performed comprehensive molecular profiling of infiltrating CD4+ T cells isolated from untreated invasive primary tumors and found that the infiltrating T cell subpopulations included follicular helper T (Tfh) cells, which have not previously been found in solid tumors, as well as Th1, Th2, and Th17 effector memory cells and Tregs. T cell signaling pathway alterations included a mixture of activation and suppression characterized by restricted cytokine/chemokine production, which inversely paralleled lymphoid infiltration levels and could be reproduced in activated donor CD4+ T cells treated with primary tumor supernatant. A comparison of extensively versus minimally infiltrated tumors showed that CXCL13-producing CD4+ Tfh cells distinguish extensive immune infiltrates, principally located in tertiary lymphoid structure germinal centers. An 8-gene Tfh signature, signifying organized antitumor immunity, robustly predicted survival or preoperative response to chemotherapy. Our identification of CD4+ Tfh cells in breast cancer suggests that they are an important immune element whose presence in the tumor is a prognostic factor. PMID:23778140

  7. Interleukin 4-producing CD4+ T cells in the skin of cats with allergic dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Roosje, P J; Dean, G A; Willemse, T; Rutten, V P M G; Thepen, T

    2002-03-01

    Lesional skin of cats with allergic dermatitis has a cellular infiltrate and a CD4/CD8 ratio comparable to that in humans with atopic dermatitis. CD4+ helper T cells and in particular cells belonging to the Th2 subset play an important role in disease pathogenesis in humans. We investigated the cytokine pattern of CD4+ T cells in situ, with special emphasis on the putative presence of cells producing interleukin 4 (IL4), in cats with allergic dermatitis. Immunohistochemical procedures were used to determine that CD4+ T cells in lesional and nonlesional skin of cats with allergic dermatitis can produce IL4, as occurs in humans. Lesional and nonlesional skin of cats with allergic dermatitis had significantly more IL4+ T cells (P = 0.001) than did skin of healthy control cats. Double staining indicated that all IL4+ cells were positive for pan-T or CD4 markers. Double labeling for mast cell chymase and IL4 stained primarily different cells. Western blotting demonstrated cross-reactivity between the antibody against human IL4 and a feline recombinant IL4. These results indicate that IL4 is primarily produced by CD4+ T cells and is also present in clinically uninvolved skin, indicating a role in the pathogenesis of allergic dermatitis in cats.

  8. CD4+ and CD8+ T cells have opposing roles in breast cancer progression and outcome

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Qunyuan; Ye, Jian; Wang, Fang; Zhang, Yanping; Hunborg, Pamela; Varvares, Mark A.; Hoft, Daniel F.; Hsueh, Eddy C.; Peng, Guangyong

    2015-01-01

    The Cancer Immunoediting concept has provided critical insights suggesting dual functions of immune system during the cancer initiation and development. However, the dynamics and roles of CD4+ and CD8+ T cells in the pathogenesis of breast cancer remain unclear. Here we utilized two murine breast cancer models (4T1 and E0771) and demonstrated that both CD4+ and CD8+ T cells were increased and involved in immune responses, but with distinct dynamic trends in breast cancer development. In addition to cell number increases, CD4+ T cells changed their dominant subsets from Th1 in the early stages to Treg and Th17 cells in the late stages of the cancer progression. We also analyzed CD4+ and CD8+ T cell infiltration in primary breast cancer tissues from cancer patients. We observed that CD8+ T cells are the key effector cell population mediating effective anti-tumor immunity resulting in better clinical outcomes. In contrast, intra-tumoral CD4+ T cells have negative prognostic effects on breast cancer patient outcomes. These studies indicate that CD4+ and CD8+ T cells have opposing roles in breast cancer progression and outcomes, which provides new insights relevant for the development of effective cancer immunotherapeutic approaches. PMID:25968569

  9. CD4+ lymphoid tissue inducer cells promote innate immunity in the gut

    PubMed Central

    Sonnenberg, Gregory F.; Monticelli, Laurel A.; Elloso, M. Merle; Fouser, Lynette A.; Artis, David

    2010-01-01

    SUMMARY Fetal CD4+ lymphoid tissue inducer (LTi) cells play a critical role in the development of lymphoid-tissues. Recent studies identified that LTi cells persist in adults and are related to a heterogeneous population of innate lymphoid cells that have been implicated in inflammatory responses. However, whether LTi cells contribute to protective immunity remains poorly defined. We demonstrate that following infection with Citrobacter rodentium, CD4+ LTi cells were a dominant source of interleukin-22 (IL-22) early during infection. Infection-induced CD4+ LTi cell responses were IL-23-dependent, and ablation of IL-23 impaired innate immunity. Further, depletion of CD4+ LTi cells abrogated infection-induced expression of IL-22 and anti-microbial peptides, resulting in exacerbated host mortality. LTi cells were also found to be essential for host protective immunity in lymphocyte-replete hosts. Collectively these data demonstrate that adult CD4+ LTi cells are a critical source of IL-22 and identify a previously unrecognized function for CD4+ LTi cells in promoting innate immunity in the intestine. PMID:21194981

  10. Activated CD4+ T cells preferentially take up lipid microspheres, but resting cells do not.

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, K

    1995-01-01

    Lipid microspheres (LM) used as drug carriers increase the effectiveness and reduce the toxicity of incorporated drugs. The present study is designed to determine whether or not activated T lymphocytes, which were the cells chosen first from the 'inflammatory cells', can take up LM in vitro. LM were labelled with a fluorescent probe, DiI (DiI-LM), to examine the kinetics. Flow cytometric analysis demonstrated that in freshly isolated peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC), monocytes principally took up DiI-LM, while lymphocytes and granulocytes did not. When PBMC were stimulated with immobilized anti-CD3 MoAb and IL-2, cells expressing CD3, CD4, CD8 and CD16 incorporated DiI-LM. Purified CD4+ T cells, obtained by positive panning selection, were stimulated with this system. They were CD25, CD71, LFA-1-positive, and also showed an ability to take up DiI-LM, which resting cells did not. The findings were confirmed by flow cytometry and quantitative analysis of DiI. Confocal micrographs showed fluorescent granules from the probe in the cytoplasm of stimulated CD4+ T cells after incubation with DiI-LM. These results suggest that immunomodulatory agents incorporated into LM might selectively regulate the function of CD4+ or CD8+ T cells when these are activated. Images Fig. 4 PMID:7882572

  11. EBV Latency II-derived peptides induce a specific CD4+ cytotoxic T-cell activity and not a CD4+ regulatory T-cell response.

    PubMed

    Moralès, Olivier; Depil, Stéphane; Mrizak, Dhafer; Martin, Nathalie; Ndour, Papa Alioune; Dufosse, Françoise; Miroux, Céline; Coll, Jean; de Launoit, Yvan; Auriault, Claude; Pancre, Véronique; Delhem, Nadira

    2012-04-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is associated with several malignant diseases that can be distinguished by their patterns of viral latent gene expression. We developed here an original peptidic approach to favor the induction of a specific CD4+ T-cell response against EBV latency II malignancies (Hodgkin's lymphoma, nasopharyngeal carcinoma, T/NK lymphoma). Previously, we selected 6 peptides derived from EBV nuclear antigen-1, latency membrane proteins (LMP)-1, and LMP-2 highly promiscuous for major histocompatibility complex class II molecules and showed their ability to induce interferon-γ-secreting CD4+ T cells. We confirmed here that all peptides used in cocktail are recognized by human CD4+ memory T cells from healthy donors, inducing a broad T-helper (Th)1 cytokine secretion interferon-γ, interleukin-2. Furthermore, we have generated EBV-specific CD4+ T-cell lines and proved their cytotoxic potential, not only on original models expressing latency II antigens (EBV-transformed T cell or monocyte), but also on lymphoblastoid cell lines expressing latency III antigens (lymphoblastoid cell lines). In addition, granzyme B enzyme-linked immunospot assays suggested that a part of this specific cytotoxic activity could be linked to the granule lytic pathway. Very importantly, we have showed that neither phenotypical changes nor functional activities of CD4+CD25+CD127(low)-regulatory T cells were observed in response to EBV+ peptides, avoiding any risk of aggravation of the preexisting immunosuppressive environment reported in EBV-associated malignancies. In conclusion, our promiscuous peptide cocktail could be used safely in immunotherapeutic approaches against EBV latency II malignancies, mainly to prevent relapse in high-risk patients further to classic treatments.

  12. IL-7 Administration to Humans Leads to Expansion of CD8+ and CD4+ Cells but a Relative Decrease of CD4+ T-Regulatory Cells

    PubMed Central

    Rosenberg, Steven A.; Sportès, Claude; Ahmadzadeh, Mojgan; Fry, Terry J.; Ngo, Lien T.; Schwarz, Susan L.; Stetler-Stevenson, Maryalice; Morton, Kathleen E.; Mavroukakis, Sharon A.; Morre, Michel; Buffet, Renaud; Mackall, Crystal L.; Gress, Ronald E.

    2006-01-01

    Summary Lymphopenia is a serious consequence of HIV infection and the administration of cancer chemotherapeutic agents. Although growth factors can be administered to patients to increase circulating neutrophils, there is no effective method to stimulate CD8+ lymphocyte production in humans, in vivo. This report is the first to describe the administration of recombinant interleukin-7 to humans and demonstrates the ability of this cytokine to mediate selective increases in CD4+ and CD8+ lymphocytes along with a decrease in the percentage of CD4+ T-regulatory cells. These studies suggest an important role for interleukin-7 in the treatment of patients with lymphopenia. PMID:16699374

  13. Fast sorting of CD4+ T cells from whole blood using glass microbubbles.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Chia-Hsien; Chen, Chihchen; Irimia, Daniel; Toner, Mehmet

    2015-03-01

    The isolation of CD4 positive T lymphocyte (CD4+) from peripheral blood is important for monitoring patients after HIV infection. Here, we demonstrate a fast isolation strategy for CD4+ cells that involves mixing blood and glass microbubbles. After the specific binding of target cells to the microbubbles carrying specific antibodies on their surface, target cells will spontaneously float to the top of the blood vial and can be quickly separated. Using this strategy, we demonstrate that the isolation of CD4+ cells in less than 5 minutes and with better than 90% efficiency. This strategy for cell isolation based on buoyancy and glass microbubbles is quick and inexpensive, minimizes blood handling, does not require magnetic fields, or centrifugation equipment, and could lead to new, efficient strategies for AIDS diagnosis in resource-limited areas.

  14. Fighting Viral Infections and Virus-Driven Tumors with Cytotoxic CD4+ T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Muraro, Elena; Merlo, Anna; Martorelli, Debora; Cangemi, Michela; Dalla Santa, Silvia; Dolcetti, Riccardo; Rosato, Antonio

    2017-01-01

    CD4+ T cells have been and are still largely regarded as the orchestrators of immune responses, being able to differentiate into distinct T helper cell populations based on differentiation signals, transcription factor expression, cytokine secretion, and specific functions. Nonetheless, a growing body of evidence indicates that CD4+ T cells can also exert a direct effector activity, which depends on intrinsic cytotoxic properties acquired and carried out along with the evolution of several pathogenic infections. The relevant role of CD4+ T cell lytic features in the control of such infectious conditions also leads to their exploitation as a new immunotherapeutic approach. This review aims at summarizing currently available data about functional and therapeutic relevance of cytotoxic CD4+ T cells in the context of viral infections and virus-driven tumors. PMID:28289418

  15. Interleukin-7 is required for CD4+ T cell activation and autoimmune neuroinflammation

    PubMed Central

    Lawson, Brian R.; Gonzalez-Quintial, Rosana; Eleftheriadis, Theodoros; Farrar, Michael A.; Miller, Stephen D.; Sauer, Karsten; McGavern, Dorian B.; Kono, Dwight H.; Baccala, Roberto; Theofilopoulos, Argyrios N.

    2015-01-01

    IL-7 is known to be vital for T cell homeostasis but has previously been presumed to be dispensable for TCR-induced activation. Here, we show that IL-7 is critical for the initial activation of CD4+ T cells in that it provides some of the necessary early signaling components, such as activated STAT5 and Akt. Accordingly, short-term in vivo IL-7Rα blockade inhibited the activation and expansion of autoantigen-specific CD4+ T cells and, when used to treat experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), prevented and ameliorated disease. Our studies demonstrate that IL-7 signaling is a prerequisite for optimal CD4+ T cell activation and that IL-7R antagonism may be effective in treating CD4+ T cell-mediated neuroinflammation and other autoimmune inflammatory conditions. PMID:26319414

  16. HIV-specific cytolytic CD4 T cell responses during acute HIV infection predict disease outcome

    PubMed Central

    Soghoian, Damien Z.; Jessen, Heiko; Flanders, Michael; Sierra-Davidson, Kailan; Cutler, Sam; Pertel, Thomas; Ranasinghe, Srinika; Lindqvist, Madelene; Davis, Isaiah; Lane, Kimberly; Rychert, Jenna; Rosenberg, Eric S.; Piechocka-Trocha, Alicja; Brass, Abraham L.; Brenchley, Jason M.; Walker, Bruce D.; Streeck, Hendrik

    2013-01-01

    Early immunological events during acute HIV infection are thought to fundamentally influence long-term disease outcome. Whereas the contribution of HIV-specific CD8 T cell responses to early viral control is well established, the role of HIV-specific CD4 T cell responses in the control of viral replication following acute infection is unknown. A growing body of evidence suggests that CD4 T cells - besides their helper function - have the capacity to directly recognize and kill virally infected cells. In a longitudinal study of a cohort of individuals acutely infected with HIV, we observed that subjects able to spontaneously control HIV replication in the absence of antiretroviral therapy showed a significant expansion of HIV-specific CD4 T cell responses—but not CD8 T cell responses–compared to subjects who progressed to a high viral set point (p=0.038). Strikingly, this expansion occurred prior to differences in viral load or CD4 T cell count and was characterized by robust cytolytic activity and expression of a distinct profile of perforin and granzymes at the earliest time point. Kaplan-Meier analysis revealed that the emergence of Granzyme A+ HIV-specific CD4 T cell responses at baseline was highly predictive of slower disease progression and clinical outcome (average days to CD4 T cell count <350/μl was 575 versus 306, p=0.001). These data demonstrate that HIV-specific CD4 T cell responses can be used during the earliest phase of HIV infection as an immunological predictor of subsequent viral set point and disease outcome. Moreover, these data suggest that expansion of Granzyme A+ HIV-specific cytolytic CD4 T cell responses early during acute HIV infection contributes substantially to the control of viral replication. PMID:22378925

  17. Tracking Virus-Specific CD4+ T Cells during and after Acute Hepatitis C Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Pfafferot, Katja; Heeg, Malte H.J.; Gaudieri, Silvana; Grüner, Norbert; Rauch, Andri; Gerlach, J. Tilman; Jung, Maria-Christina; Zachoval, Reinhart; Pape, Gerd R.; Schraut, Winfried; Santantonio, Teresa; Nitschko, Hans; Obermeier, Martin; Phillips, Rodney; Scriba, Thomas J.; Semmo, Nasser; Day, Cheryl; Weber, Jonathan N.; Fidler, Sarah; Thimme, Robert; Haberstroh, Anita; Baumert, Thomas F.; Klenerman, Paul; Diepolder, Helmut M.

    2007-01-01

    Background CD4+ T cell help is critical in maintaining antiviral immune responses and such help has been shown to be sustained in acute resolving hepatitis C. In contrast, in evolving chronic hepatitis C CD4+ T cell helper responses appear to be absent or short-lived, using functional assays. Methodology/Principal Findings Here we used a novel HLA-DR1 tetramer containing a highly targeted CD4+ T cell epitope from the hepatitis C virus non-structural protein 4 to track number and phenotype of hepatitis C virus specific CD4+ T cells in a cohort of seven HLA-DR1 positive patients with acute hepatitis C in comparison to patients with chronic or resolved hepatitis C. We observed peptide-specific T cells in all seven patients with acute hepatitis C regardless of outcome at frequencies up to 0.65% of CD4+ T cells. Among patients who transiently controlled virus replication we observed loss of function, and/or physical deletion of tetramer+ CD4+ T cells before viral recrudescence. In some patients with chronic hepatitis C very low numbers of tetramer+ cells were detectable in peripheral blood, compared to robust responses detected in spontaneous resolvers. Importantly we did not observe escape mutations in this key CD4+ T cell epitope in patients with evolving chronic hepatitis C. Conclusions/Significance During acute hepatitis C a CD4+ T cell response against this epitope is readily induced in most, if not all, HLA-DR1+ patients. This antiviral T cell population becomes functionally impaired or is deleted early in the course of disease in those where viremia persists. PMID:17653276

  18. Cytomegalovirus (CMV) Epitope-Specific CD4(+) T Cells Are Inflated in HIV(+) CMV(+) Subjects.

    PubMed

    Abana, Chike O; Pilkinton, Mark A; Gaudieri, Silvana; Chopra, Abha; McDonnell, Wyatt J; Wanjalla, Celestine; Barnett, Louise; Gangula, Rama; Hager, Cindy; Jung, Dae K; Engelhardt, Brian G; Jagasia, Madan H; Klenerman, Paul; Phillips, Elizabeth J; Koelle, David M; Kalams, Spyros A; Mallal, Simon A

    2017-10-02

    Select CMV epitopes drive life-long CD8(+) T cell memory inflation, but the extent of CD4 memory inflation is poorly studied. CD4(+) T cells specific for human CMV (HCMV) are elevated in HIV(+) HCMV(+) subjects. To determine whether HCMV epitope-specific CD4(+) T cell memory inflation occurs during HIV infection, we used HLA-DR7 (DRB1*07:01) tetramers loaded with the glycoprotein B DYSNTHSTRYV (DYS) epitope to characterize circulating CD4(+) T cells in coinfected HLA-DR7(+) long-term nonprogressor HIV subjects with undetectable HCMV plasma viremia. DYS-specific CD4(+) T cells were inflated among these HIV(+) subjects compared with those from an HIV(-) HCMV(+) HLA-DR7(+) cohort or with HLA-DR7-restricted CD4(+) T cells from the HIV-coinfected cohort that were specific for epitopes of HCMV phosphoprotein-65, tetanus toxoid precursor, EBV nuclear Ag 2, or HIV gag protein. Inflated DYS-specific CD4(+) T cells consisted of effector memory or effector memory-RA(+) subsets with restricted TCRβ usage and nearly monoclonal CDR3 containing novel conserved amino acids. Expression of this near-monoclonal TCR in a Jurkat cell-transfection system validated fine DYS specificity. Inflated cells were polyfunctional, not senescent, and displayed high ex vivo levels of granzyme B, CX3CR1, CD38, or HLA-DR but less often coexpressed CD38(+) and HLA-DR(+) The inflation mechanism did not involve apoptosis suppression, increased proliferation, or HIV gag cross-reactivity. Instead, the findings suggest that intermittent or chronic expression of epitopes, such as DYS, drive inflation of activated CD4(+) T cells that home to endothelial cells and have the potential to mediate cytotoxicity and vascular disease. Copyright © 2017 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  19. A simple theoretical framework for understanding heterogeneous differentiation of CD4+ T cells

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background CD4+ T cells have several subsets of functional phenotypes, which play critical yet diverse roles in the immune system. Pathogen-driven differentiation of these subsets of cells is often heterogeneous in terms of the induced phenotypic diversity. In vitro recapitulation of heterogeneous differentiation under homogeneous experimental conditions indicates some highly regulated mechanisms by which multiple phenotypes of CD4+ T cells can be generated from a single population of naïve CD4+ T cells. Therefore, conceptual understanding of induced heterogeneous differentiation will shed light on the mechanisms controlling the response of populations of CD4+ T cells under physiological conditions. Results We present a simple theoretical framework to show how heterogeneous differentiation in a two-master-regulator paradigm can be governed by a signaling network motif common to all subsets of CD4+ T cells. With this motif, a population of naïve CD4+ T cells can integrate the signals from their environment to generate a functionally diverse population with robust commitment of individual cells. Notably, two positive feedback loops in this network motif govern three bistable switches, which in turn, give rise to three types of heterogeneous differentiated states, depending upon particular combinations of input signals. We provide three prototype models illustrating how to use this framework to explain experimental observations and make specific testable predictions. Conclusions The process in which several types of T helper cells are generated simultaneously to mount complex immune responses upon pathogenic challenges can be highly regulated, and a simple signaling network motif can be responsible for generating all possible types of heterogeneous populations with respect to a pair of master regulators controlling CD4+ T cell differentiation. The framework provides a mathematical basis for understanding the decision-making mechanisms of CD4+ T cells, and it can be

  20. CD4+ T-cell help enhances NK cell function following therapeutic HIV-1 vaccination.

    PubMed

    Jost, Stephanie; Tomezsko, Phillip John; Rands, Keith; Toth, Ildiko; Lichterfeld, Mathias; Gandhi, Rajesh Tim; Altfeld, Marcus

    2014-08-01

    Increasing data suggest that NK cells can mediate antiviral activity in HIV-1-infected humans, and as such, novel approaches harnessing the anti-HIV-1 function of both T cells and NK cells represent attractive options to improve future HIV-1 immunotherapies. Chronic progressive HIV-1 infection has been associated with a loss of CD4(+) T helper cell function and with the accumulation of anergic NK cells. As several studies have suggested that cytokines produced by CD4(+) T cells are required to enhance NK cell function in various infection models, we hypothesized that reconstitution of HIV-1-specific CD4(+) T-cell responses by therapeutic immunization would restore NK cell activity in infected individuals. Using flow cytometry, we examined the function of CD4(+) T cells and NK cells in response to HIV-1 in subjects with treated chronic HIV-1 infection before and after immunization with an adjuvanted HIV-1 Gp120/NefTat subunit protein vaccine candidate provided by GlaxoSmithKline. Vaccination induced an increased expression of interleukin-2 (IL-2) by Gp120-specific CD4(+) T cells in response to HIV-1 peptides ex vivo, which was associated with enhanced production of gamma interferon (IFN-γ) by NK cells. Our data show that reconstitution of HIV-1-specific CD4(+) T-cell function by therapeutic immunization can enhance NK cell activity in HIV-1-infected individuals. NK cells are effector cells of the innate immune system and are important in the control of viral infection. Recent studies have demonstrated the crucial role played by NK cells in controlling and/or limiting acquisition of HIV-1 infection. However, NK cell function is impaired during progressive HIV-1 infection. We recently showed that therapeutic immunization of treated HIV-1-infected individuals reconstituted strong T-cell responses, measured notably by their production of IL-2, a cytokine that can activate NK cells. The current study suggests that reconstitution of T-cell function by therapeutic

  1. Definition of target antigens for naturally occurring CD4(+) CD25(+) regulatory T cells.

    PubMed

    Nishikawa, Hiroyoshi; Kato, Takuma; Tawara, Isao; Saito, Kanako; Ikeda, Hiroaki; Kuribayashi, Kagemasa; Allen, Paul M; Schreiber, Robert D; Sakaguchi, Shimon; Old, Lloyd J; Shiku, Hiroshi

    2005-03-07

    The antigenic targets recognized by naturally occurring CD4(+) CD25(+) regulatory T cells (T reg cells) have been elusive. We have serologically defined a series of broadly expressed self-antigens derived from chemically induced mouse sarcomas by serological identification of antigens by recombinant expression cloning (SEREX). CD4(+) CD25(+) T cells from mice immunized with SEREX-defined self-antigens had strong suppressive activity on peptide-specific proliferation of CD4(+) CD25(-) T cells and CD8(+) T cells. The suppressive effect was observed without in vitro T cell stimulation. Foxp3 expression in these CD4(+) CD25(+) T cells from immunized mice was 5-10 times greater than CD4(+) CD25(+) T cells derived from naive mice. The suppressive effect required cellular contact and was blocked by anti-glucocorticoid-induced tumor necrosis factor receptor family-related gene antibody. In vitro suppressive activity essentially disappeared 8 wk after the last immunization. However, it was regained by in vitro restimulation with cognate self-antigen protein but not with control protein. We propose that SEREX-defined self-antigens such as those used in this study represent self-antigens that elicit naturally occurring CD4(+) CD25(+) T reg cells.

  2. Functional Exhaustion Limits CD4+ and CD8+ T-Cell Responses to Congenital Cytomegalovirus Infection.

    PubMed

    Huygens, Ariane; Lecomte, Sandra; Tackoen, Marie; Olislagers, Véronique; Delmarcelle, Yves; Burny, Wivine; Van Rysselberge, Michel; Liesnard, Corinne; Larsen, Martin; Appay, Victor; Donner, Catherine; Marchant, Arnaud

    2015-08-01

    Cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection during fetal life causes severe symptoms and is associated with prolonged viral excretion. Previous studies reported low CD4(+) T-cell responses to CMV infection in early life, contrasting with large responses of effector CD8(+) T cells. The mechanisms underlying the defective CD4(+) T-cell responses and the possible dissociation with CD8(+) T-cell responses have not been clarified. The magnitude and the quality of the fetal CD8(+) and CD4(+) T-cell responses to CMV infection were compared to those of adults with primary or chronic infection. In utero CMV infection induced oligoclonal expansions of fetal CD4(+) and CD8(+) T lymphocytes expressing a T-helper type 1 or Tc1 effector phenotype similar to that of adult CMV-specific cells. However, the effector cytokine responses and the polyfunctionality of newborn CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells were markedly lower than those of adult cells. This reduced functionality was associated with a higher expression of the programmed death 1 inhibitory receptor, and blockade of this receptor increased newborn T-cell responses. Functional exhaustion limits effector CD4(+) and CD8(+) T-lymphocyte responses to CMV during fetal life. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  3. Innate-like CD4 T cells selected by thymocytes suppress adaptive immune responses against bacterial infections

    PubMed Central

    Qiao, Yu; Gray, Brian M.; Sofi, Mohammed H.; Bauler, Laura D.; Eaton, Kathryn A.; O'Riordan, Mary X. D.; Chang, Cheong-Hee

    2012-01-01

    We have reported a new innate-like CD4 T cell population that expresses cell surface makers of effector/memory cells and produce Th1 and Th2 cytokines immediately upon activation. Unlike conventional CD4 T cells that are selected by thymic epithelial cells, these CD4 T cells, named T-CD4 T cells, are selected by MHC class II expressing thymocytes. Previously, we showed that the presence of T-CD4 T cells protected mice from airway inflammation suggesting an immune regulatory role of T-CD4 T cells. To further understand the function of T-CD4 T cells, we investigated immune responses mediated by T-CD4 T cells during bacterial infection because the generation of antigen specific CD4 T cells contributes to clearance of infection and for the development of immune memory. The current study shows a suppressive effect of T-CD4 T cells on both CD8 and CD4 T cell-mediated immune responses during Listeria and Helicobacter infections. In the mouse model of Listeria monocytogenes infection, T-CD4 T cells resulted in decreasedfrequency of Listeria-specific CD8 T cells and the killing activity of them. Furthermore, mice with T-CD4 T cells developed poor immune memory, demonstrated by reduced expansion of antigen-specific T cells and high bacterial burden upon re-infection. Similarly, the presence of T-CD4 T cells suppressed the generation of antigen-specific CD4 T cells in Helicobacter pylori infected mice. Thus, our studies reveal a novel function of T-CD4 T cells in suppressing anti-bacterial immunity. PMID:23264931

  4. Studies on the T cell receptor (TCR) revision of autoantibody-inducing CD4 T (aiCD4 T) cell.

    PubMed

    Shiozawa, Shunichi; Uto, Kenichi

    2014-01-01

    Our recent studies into the role of autoantibody-inducing CD4 T cells in autoimmune disease have necessitated studies on the mechanism of TCR revision, a phenomenon that has been difficult to approach experimentally. Here we describe a detailed experimental technique to investigate the molecular events involved in TCR revision.

  5. Unrecognised tuberculosis at antiretroviral therapy initiation is associated with lower CD4+ T cell recovery.

    PubMed

    Hermans, Sabine M; van Leth, Frank; Kiragga, Agnes N; Hoepelman, Andy I M; Lange, Joep M A; Manabe, Yukari C

    2012-12-01

    To investigate whether an unrecognised diagnosis of tuberculosis (TB) at the start of antiretroviral therapy (ART) influences subsequent CD4+ T cell (CD4) count recovery in an urban HIV clinic in Uganda. In a retrospective cohort study, a multivariable polynomial mixed effects model was used to estimate CD4 recovery in the first 96 weeks of ART in two groups of patients: prevalent TB (started ART while on TB treatment), unrecognised TB (developed TB within 6 months after start ART). Included were 511 patients with a median baseline CD4 count of 57 cells/mm(3) (interquartile range: 22-130), of whom 368 (72%) had prevalent TB and 143 (28%) had unrecognised TB. Compared with prevalent TB, unrecognised TB was associated with lower CD4 count recovery at 96 weeks: -22.3 cells/mm(3) (95% confidence interval -43.2 to -1.5, P = 0.036). These estimates were adjusted for gender, age, baseline CD4 count and the use of zidovudine-based regimen. Unrecognised TB at the time of ART initiation resulted in impaired CD4 recovery compared with TB treated before ART initiation. More vigilant screening with more sensitive and rapid TB diagnostics prior to ART initiation is needed to decrease the risk of ART-associated TB and sub-optimal immune reconstitution. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  6. IL-15 amplifies the pathogenic properties of CD4+CD28- T cells in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Broux, Bieke; Mizee, Mark R; Vanheusden, Marjan; van der Pol, Susanne; van Horssen, Jack; Van Wijmeersch, Bart; Somers, Veerle; de Vries, Helga E; Stinissen, Piet; Hellings, Niels

    2015-03-01

    CD4(+)CD28(-) T cells arise through repeated antigenic stimulation and are present in diseased tissues of patients with various autoimmune disorders, including multiple sclerosis (MS). These cells are believed to have cytotoxic properties that contribute to the pathogenic damaging of the target organ. Endogenous cues that are increased in the diseased tissue may amplify the activity of CD4(+)CD28(-) T cells. In this study, we focused on IL-15, a cytotoxicity-promoting cytokine that is increased in the serum and cerebrospinal fluid of MS patients. Using immunohistochemistry, we demonstrate that IL-15 is mainly produced by astrocytes and infiltrating macrophages in inflammatory lesions of MS patients. Moreover, in vitro transmigration studies reveal that IL-15 selectively attracts CD4(+)CD28(-) T cells of MS patients, but not of healthy individuals. IL-15 further induces the expression of chemokine receptors and adhesion molecules on CD4(+)CD28(-) T cells, as investigated using flow cytometry, resulting in enhanced migration over a monolayer of human brain endothelial cells. Finally, flow cytometric analyses revealed that IL-15 increases the proliferation and production of GM-CSF, expression of cytotoxic molecules (NKG2D, perforin, and granzyme B), and degranulation capacity of CD4(+)CD28(-) T cells. Taken together, these findings indicate that increased peripheral and local levels of IL-15 amplify the pathogenic potential of CD4(+)CD28(-) T cells, thus contributing to tissue damage in MS brain lesions. Copyright © 2015 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  7. Altered Intracellular ATP Production by Activated CD4+ T-Cells in Very Preterm Infants

    PubMed Central

    Corvaglia, Luigi; Gabrielli, Liliana; Chiereghin, Angela; Lazzarotto, Tiziana

    2016-01-01

    Background. The neonatal immune system is not fully developed at birth; newborns have adequate lymphocytes counts but these cells lack function. Objective. To assess the activity of T-cells and the influence of the main perinatal factors in very preterm infants (birth weight < 1500 g). Design. Blood samples from 59 preterm infants (21/59 were dizygotic twins) were collected at birth and at 30 days of life to measure CD4+ T-cell activity using the ImmuKnow™ assay. Fifteen healthy adults were included as a control group. Results. CD4+ T-cell activity was lower in VLBW infants compared with adults (p < 0.001). Twins showed lower immune activity compared to singletons (p = 0.005). Infants born vaginally showed higher CD4+ T-cell activity compared to those born by C-section (p = 0.031); infants born after prolonged Premature Rupture of Membranes (pPROM) showed higher CD4+ T-cell activity at birth (p = 0.002) compared to infants born without pPROM. Low CD4+ T-cell activity at birth is associated with necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC) in the first week of life (p = 0.049). Conclusions. Preterm infants show a lack in CD4+ T-cell activity at birth. Perinatal factors such as intrauterine inflammation, mode of delivery, and zygosity can influence the adaptive immune activation capacity at birth and can contribute to exposing these infants to serious complications such as NEC. PMID:28070527

  8. Role of CD4 molecule in the induction of interleukin 2 and interleukin 2 receptor in class II major histocompatibility complex-restricted antigen-specific T helper clones. T cell receptor/CD3 complex transmits CD4-dependent and CD4-independent signals.

    PubMed Central

    Oyaizu, N; Chirmule, N; Pahwa, S

    1992-01-01

    The CD4 molecule plays an essential role in antigen-induced activation of T helper (Th) cells, but its contribution to signal transduction events resulting in physiologic T cell function is ill defined. By utilizing anti-CD4 monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) that recognize distinct epitopes of CD4, we have investigated the role of CD4 molecule in antigen-induced interleukin 2 (IL-2) and IL-2 receptor (IL-2R) alpha chain expression in class II major histocompatibility complex-restricted antigen-specific human Th clones. Pretreatment of the Th clones with Leu3a resulted in a dose-dependent suppression of antigen-induced proliferative responses, inositol phosphate accumulation, increase in free cytoplasmic calcium ions ([Ca2+]i), IL-2 mRNA accumulation, IL-2 secretion, and membrane IL-2R expression. IL-2R mRNA accumulation, however, was unaffected even at highest Leu3a concentrations. Leu3a treatment did not affect bypass activation of T cells with PMA plus ionomycin or activation via CD2 molecule. The MAb OKT4, which binds another domain of CD4, was not inhibitory. These results suggest that after T cell antigen receptor-CD3 activation, IL-2 gene induction, IL-2 secretion, and membrane IL-2R expression are absolutely dependent upon participation of CD4 molecules, phosphatidylinositol (PI) hydrolysis, and increase in [Ca2+]i. The requirement for IL-2R gene induction, however, occurs independently of CD4 molecule participation and PI hydrolysis. Images PMID:1534818

  9. TNFAIP3 promotes survival of CD4 T cells by restricting MTOR and promoting autophagy.

    PubMed

    Matsuzawa, Yu; Oshima, Shigeru; Takahara, Masahiro; Maeyashiki, Chiaki; Nemoto, Yasuhiro; Kobayashi, Masanori; Nibe, Yoichi; Nozaki, Kengo; Nagaishi, Takashi; Okamoto, Ryuichi; Tsuchiya, Kiichiro; Nakamura, Tetsuya; Ma, Averil; Watanabe, Mamoru

    2015-01-01

    Autophagy plays important roles in metabolism, differentiation, and survival in T cells. TNFAIP3/A20 is a ubiquitin-editing enzyme that is thought to be a negative regulator of autophagy in cell lines. However, the role of TNFAIP3 in autophagy remains unclear. To determine whether TNFAIP3 regulates autophagy in CD4 T cells, we first analyzed Tnfaip3-deficient naïve CD4 T cells in vitro. We demonstrated that Tnfaip3-deficient CD4 T cells exhibited reduced MAP1LC3/LC3 (microtubule-associated protein 1 light chain 3) puncta formation, increased mitochondrial content, and exaggerated reactive oxygen species (ROS) production. These results indicate that TNFAIP3 promotes autophagy after T cell receptor (TCR) stimulation in CD4 T cells. We then investigated the mechanism by which TNFAIP3 promotes autophagy signaling. We found that TNFAIP3 bound to the MTOR (mechanistic target of rapamycin) complex and that Tnfaip3-deficient cells displayed enhanced ubiquitination of the MTOR complex and MTOR activity. To confirm the effects of enhanced MTOR activity in Tnfaip3-deficient cells, we analyzed cell survival following treatment with Torin1, an MTOR inhibitor. Tnfaip3-deficient CD4 T cells exhibited fewer cell numbers than the control cells in vitro and in vivo. In addition, the impaired survival of Tnfaip3-deficient cells was ameliorated with Torin1 treatment in vitro and in vivo. The effect of Torin1 was abolished by Atg5 deficiency. Thus, enhanced MTOR activity regulates the survival of Tnfaip3-deficient CD4 T cells. Taken together, our findings illustrate that TNFAIP3 restricts MTOR signaling and promotes autophagy, providing new insight into the manner in which MTOR and autophagy regulate survival in CD4 T cells.

  10. A novel role for CD4+ T cells in the control of cachexia.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhuangzhi; Zhao, Chunfang; Moya, Rosa; Davies, Joanna D

    2008-10-01

    Cachexia is the dramatic weight loss and muscle atrophy seen in chronic disease states, including autoimmunity, cancer, and infection, and is often associated with lymphopenia. We have previously shown that CD4(+) T cells that express the lowest density of CD44 (CD4(+)CD44(v.low)) are significantly reduced in diabetic NOD mice that are cachexic compared with diabetic mice that are not cachexic. Using this model, and a model of cancer cachexia, we test the hypothesis that CD4(+)CD44(v.low) cells play an active role in protecting the host from cachexia. CD4(+)CD44(v.low) cells, but not CD4(+) cells depleted of CD44(v.low) cells, delay the onset of wasting when infused into either diabetic or prediabetic NOD recipients. However, no significant effect on the severity of diabetes was detected. In a model of cancer cachexia, they significantly reduce muscle atrophy, and inhibit muscle protein loss and DNA loss, even when given after the onset of cachexia. Protection from wasting and muscle atrophy by CD4(+)CD44(v.low) cells is associated with protection from lymphopenia. These data suggest, for the first time, a role for an immune cell subset in protection from cachexia, and further suggest that the mechanism of protection is independent of protection from autoimmunity.

  11. Notch Signaling Regulates Antigen Sensitivity of Naive CD4+ T Cells by Tuning Co-stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Laky, Karen; Evans, Sharron; Perez-Diez, Ainhoa

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Adaptive immune responses begin when naive CD4+ T cells engage peptide+major histocompatibility complex class II and co-stimulatory molecules on antigen-presenting cells (APCs). Notch signaling can influence effector functions in differentiated CD4+ T helper and T regulatory cells. Whether and how ligand-induced Notch signaling influences the initial priming of CD4+ T cells has not been addressed. We have found that Delta Like Ligand 4 (DLL4)-induced Notch signaling potentiates phosphatidylinositol 3-OH kinase (PI3K)-dependent signaling downstream of the T cell receptor+CD28, allowing naive CD4+ T cells to respond to lower doses of antigen. In vitro, DLL4-deficient APCs were less efficient stimulators of CD4+ T cell activation, metabolism, proliferation, and cytokine secretion. With deletion of DLL4 from CD11c+ APCs in vivo, these deficits translated to an impaired ability to mount an effective CD4+-dependent anti-tumor response. These data implicate Notch signaling as an important regulator of adaptive immune responses. PMID:25607460

  12. A colitogenic memory CD4+ T cell population mediates gastrointestinal graft-versus-host disease

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Vivian; Agle, Kimberle; Chen, Xiao; Beres, Amy; Komorowski, Richard; Belle, Ludovic; Taylor, Carolyn; Zhu, Fenlu; Haribhai, Dipica; Williams, Calvin B.; Verbsky, James; Blumenschein, Wendy; Sadekova, Svetlana; Bowman, Eddie; Ballantyne, Christie; Weaver, Casey; Serody, David A.; Vincent, Benjamin; Serody, Jonathan; Cua, Daniel J.; Drobyski, William R.

    2016-01-01

    Damage to the gastrointestinal tract is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) and is attributable to T cell–mediated inflammation. In this work, we identified a unique CD4+ T cell population that constitutively expresses the β2 integrin CD11c and displays a biased central memory phenotype and memory T cell transcriptional profile, innate-like properties, and increased expression of the gut-homing molecules α4β7 and CCR9. Using several complementary murine GVHD models, we determined that adoptive transfer and early accumulation of β2 integrin–expressing CD4+ T cells in the gastrointestinal tract initiated Th1-mediated proinflammatory cytokine production, augmented pathological damage in the colon, and increased mortality. The pathogenic effect of this CD4+ T cell population critically depended on coexpression of the IL-23 receptor, which was required for maximal inflammatory effects. Non–Foxp3-expressing CD4+ T cells produced IL-10, which regulated colonic inflammation and attenuated lethality in the absence of functional CD4+Foxp3+ T cells. Thus, the coordinate expression of CD11c and the IL-23 receptor defines an IL-10–regulated, colitogenic memory CD4+ T cell subset that is poised to initiate inflammation when there is loss of tolerance and breakdown of mucosal barriers. PMID:27500496

  13. HIV viral load levels and CD4+ cell counts of youth in 14 cities.

    PubMed

    Ellen, Jonathan M; Kapogiannis, Bill; Fortenberry, J Dennis; Xu, Jiahong; Willard, Nancy; Duval, Anna; Pace, Jill; Loeb, Jackie; Monte, Dina; Bethel, James

    2014-05-15

    To describe the HIV viral load and CD4 cell counts of youth (12-24 years) in 14 cities from March 2010 through November 2011. Baseline HIV viral load and CD4 cell count data were electronically abstracted in a central location and in an anonymous manner through a random computer-generated coding system without any ability to link codes to individual cases. Among 1409 HIV reported cases, 852 participants had data on both viral load and CD4 cell counts. Of these youth, 34% had CD4 cell counts of 350 or less, 27% had cell counts from 351 to 500, and 39% had CD4 cell counts greater than 500. Youth whose transmission risk was male-to-male sexual contact had higher viral loads compared with youth whose transmission risk was perinatal or heterosexual contact. Greater than 30% of those who reported male-to-male sexual contact had viral loads greater than 50 000 copies, whereas less than 20% of heterosexual contact youth had viral loads greater than 50 000 copies. There were no differences noted in viral load by type of testing site. Most HIV-infected youth have CD4 cell counts and viral load levels associated with high rates of sexual transmission. Untreated, these youth may directly contribute to high rates of ongoing transmission. It is essential that any public health test and treat strategy place a strong emphasis on youth, particularly young MSM.

  14. Cocaine Enhances HIV-1–Induced CD4+ T-Cell Apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Pandhare, Jui; Addai, Amma B.; Mantri, Chinmay K.; Hager, Cynthia; Smith, Rita M.; Barnett, Louis; Villalta, Fernando; Kalams, Spyros A.; Dash, Chandravanu

    2015-01-01

    Substance abuse is a major barrier in eradication of the HIV epidemic because it serves as a powerful cofactor for viral transmission, disease progression, and AIDS-related mortality. Cocaine, one of the commonly abused drugs among HIV-1 patients, has been suggested to accelerate HIV disease progression. However, the underlying mechanism remains largely unknown. Therefore, we tested whether cocaine augments HIV-1–associated CD4+ T-cell decline, a predictor of HIV disease progression. We examined apoptosis of resting CD4+ T cells from HIV-1–negative and HIV-1–positive donors in our study, because decline of uninfected cells plays a major role in HIV-1 disease progression. Treatment of resting CD4+ T cells with cocaine (up to 100 μmol/L concentrations) did not induce apoptosis, but 200 to 1000 μmol/L cocaine induced apoptosis in a dose-dependent manner. Notably, treatment of CD4+ T cells isolated from healthy donors with both HIV-1 virions and cocaine significantly increased apoptosis compared with the apoptosis induced by cocaine or virions alone. Most important, our biochemical data suggest that cocaine induces CD4+ T-cell apoptosis by increasing intracellular reactive oxygen species levels and inducing mitochondrial depolarization. Collectively, our results provide evidence of a synergy between cocaine and HIV-1 on CD4+ T-cell apoptosis that may, in part, explain the accelerated disease observed in HIV-1–infected drug abusers. PMID:24486327

  15. CD4+ T cells disarm or delete cytotoxic T lymphocytes under IL-17-polarizing conditions.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Jy-Ping; Lee, Meng-Hua; Hsu, Shu-Ching; Chen, Mei-Yu; Liu, Shih-Jen; Chang, Joseph T; Liao, Chun-Ta; Cheng, Ann-Joy; Chong, Pele; Chu, Ching-Liang; Shen, Chia-Rui; Chen, Hsin-Wei

    2012-08-15

    Previous studies have shown that TGF-β acts cooperatively with IL-6 to elicit a high frequency of IL-17-secreting CD4(+) T cells (termed Th17) and an elevated CD8(+)IL-17(+) T cell population (termed Tc17). These CD8(+) cells fail to behave like most cytotoxic T lymphocytes that express IFN-γ and granzyme B, but they exhibit a noncytotoxic phenotype. Although a significant increase in the number of these Tc17 cells was found in tumors, their role and interaction with other cell types remain unclear. In this study, we demonstrate that the presence of CD4(+)CD25(-) T cells, but not the CD4(+)CD25(+) (regulatory T [Treg]) cell population, significantly reduced the elicitation of Tc17 cells, possibly as a result of the induction of apoptotic signals. Importantly, these signals may be derived from soluble mediators, and the addition of anti-IL-2 restored the reduction of Tc17 cells in the presence of CD4(+)CD25(-) T cells. Finally, the elicited Tc17 and Treg cells exhibited a close association in patients with head and neck cancer, indicating that the surrounding Treg cells might maintain the survival of the Tc17 cells. Taken together, these results reveal an intriguing mechanism in which Tc17 cells are controlled by a finely tuned collaboration between the different types of CD4(+) T cells in distinct tumor microenvironments.

  16. [Th17 cells, a novel proinflammatory effector CD4 T cell population].

    PubMed

    Leung-Theung-Long, Stéphane; Guerder, Sylvie

    2008-11-01

    After more than 20 years of hegemony, the Th1-Th2 paradigm was recently shaken by the discovery of a novel population of CD4 effector T cells, the Th17 cells. Th17 effector cells produce IL-17 and IL-22 and thus have pro-inflammatory properties notably favoring neutrophils recruitment and thus control of extracellular bacteria mainly at the epithelium surface. Th17 cells appear also as the major inducer of organ specific autoimmune pathologies such as EAE or rheumatoid arthritis, a function previously attributed to Th1 effector cells. The discovery of Th17 cells further supports the notion that effector CD4 T cells responses are diverse in vivo and that fine tuning of these different effector cells is critical to maintain tissue integrity.

  17. CD4+CD25+ Treg cells in patients with toenail onychomycosis.

    PubMed

    Kaya, Tamer Irfan; Eskandari, Gulcin; Guvenc, Ulas; Gunes, Gulcan; Tursen, Umit; Burak Cimen, M Y; Ikizoglu, Guliz

    2009-10-01

    The essential role played by CD25+CD4+ regulatory T (Treg) cells in the control of immunity against some pathogens such as Helicobacter pylori is now well established. But their role in cutaneous fungal infections is still unknown. Onychomycosis is the chronic fungal infection of the nails, which is very common. The aim of this study was to evaluate possible relationship of CD4+CD25+ Treg cells and onychomycosis. Peripheral blood samples were investigated for CD4+CD25+ Treg cells using flow cytometry analysis in 43 toenail onychomycosis patients and in 30 healthy controls. We have found that onychomycosis patients had a higher expression of CD25+CD4+ Treg cells than controls, with values of 8.45 +/- 4.47% versus 4.64 +/- 1.59%, respectively (P = 0.001). The results of this study suggests that increased numbers of CD4+CD25+ Treg cells may play a role in failure of clearance of dermatophytes from skin by preventing the protective inflammation which is leading to development of onychomycosis. Accordingly, we address the possibility that CD4+CD25+ Treg cells may play a role in immune pathogenesis of other superficial fungal infections.

  18. Piecewise HIV virus dynamic model with CD4+ T cell count-guided therapy: I

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Sanyi; Xiao, Yanni; Wang, Ning; Wu, Hulin

    2012-01-01

    The strategies of structured treatment interruptions (STIs) of antiretroviral therapies have been proposed for clinical management of HIV infected patients, but clinical studies on STIs failed to achieve a consistent conclusion for this strategy. To evaluate the STI strategies, in particular, CD4+ T cell count-guided STIs, and explain these controversial conclusions from different clinical studies, in this paper we propose to use piecewise HIV virus dynamic models to quantitatively explore the STI strategies and investigate their dynamic behaviors. Our analysis results indicate that CD4+ T cell counts can be maintained above a safe level using the STI with a single threshold or a threshold window. Numerical simulations show that the CD4+ T cell counts either fluctuate or approach a stable level for a patient, depending on the prescribed upper or lower threshold values. In particular, the CD4+ T cell counts can be stabilized at a desired level if the threshold policy control is applied. The durations of drug-on and drug-off are very sensitive to the prescribed upper or lower threshold levels, which possibly explains why the on-off strategy with fixed schedule or a STI strategy with frequent switches is associated with the high rate of failure. Our findings suggest that it is critical to carefully choose the thresholds of CD4+ T cell count and individualize the STIs for each individual patient based on initial CD4+ T cell counts. PMID:22659043

  19. A rapid manual method for CD4+ T-cell quantitation for use in developing countries.

    PubMed

    Landay, A; Ho, J L; Hom, D; Russell, T; Zwerner, R; Minuty, J G; Kataaha, P; Mmiro, F; Jackson, B

    1993-12-01

    Clinicians took blood samples from 294 HIV-1 seropositive patients and 88 HIV-1 seronegative patients at Cornell University Medical College and The New York Hospital in New York City, Rush-Presbyterian-St. Luke's Medical Center in Chicago, and Makerere University Medical school in Kampala, Uganda, to assess a manual method's (Cytosphere) ability to accurately determine the CD4+ T-cell count. The Cytosphere assay uses latex beads coated with CD4 antibody which are combined with anticoagulated whole blood followed by red cell lysis. A hemacytometer then counts the bead-coated cells. The average technologist only needs 1-3 days of training (20 CD4 practice assays/days) in the Cytosphere assay. The minimal equipment required for the assay are a pipette, a hemacytometer, and a light microscope. The lysing agent inactivates HIV-1. The overall correlation between the standard flow cytometry method and the Cytosphere assay stood at 0.912 and was significant (p .001). When the researchers stratified the samples based on CD4+ T-cell counts defined by flow cytometry, the predictive values of the Cytosphere assay for correctly identifying patients with CD4 T-cell counts greater or less than 200 x 1 million/1 were 96% and 92%, respectively. These findings suggested that the Cytosphere assay has the potential to quantify CD4 cells in the limited laboratories in developing countries. Larger longitudinal studies of HIV seropositive people in developing countries are needed to test the reliability and reproducibility of the assay.

  20. Distinct and Overlapping Effector Functions of Expanded Human CD4+, CD8α+ and CD4-CD8α- Invariant Natural Killer T Cells

    PubMed Central

    O'Reilly, Vincent; Zeng, Shijuan G.; Bricard, Gabriel; Atzberger, Ann; Hogan, Andrew E.; Jackson, John; Feighery, Conleth; Porcelli, Steven A.; Doherty, Derek G.

    2011-01-01

    CD1d-restricted invariant natural killer T (iNKT) cells have diverse immune stimulatory/regulatory activities through their ability to release cytokines and to kill or transactivate other cells. Activation of iNKT cells can protect against multiple diseases in mice but clinical trials in humans have had limited impact. Clinical studies to date have targeted polyclonal mixtures of iNKT cells and we proposed that their subset compositions will influence therapeutic outcomes. We sorted and expanded iNKT cells from healthy donors and compared the phenotypes, cytotoxic activities and cytokine profiles of the CD4+, CD8α+ and CD4−CD8α− double-negative (DN) subsets. CD4+ iNKT cells expanded more readily than CD8α+ and DN iNKT cells upon mitogen stimulation. CD8α+ and DN iNKT cells most frequently expressed CD56, CD161 and NKG2D and most potently killed CD1d+ cell lines and primary leukemia cells. All iNKT subsets released Th1 (IFN-γ and TNF-α) and Th2 (IL-4, IL-5 and IL-13) cytokines. Relative amounts followed a CD8α>DN>CD4 pattern for Th1 and CD4>DN>CD8α for Th2. All iNKT subsets could simultaneously produce IFN-γ and IL-4, but single-positivity for IFN-γ or IL-4 was strikingly rare in CD4+ and CD8α+ fractions, respectively. Only CD4+ iNKT cells produced IL-9 and IL-10; DN cells released IL-17; and none produced IL-22. All iNKT subsets upregulated CD40L upon glycolipid stimulation and induced IL-10 and IL-12 secretion by dendritic cells. Thus, subset composition of iNKT cells is a major determinant of function. Use of enriched CD8α+, DN or CD4+ iNKT cells may optimally harness the immunoregulatory properties of iNKT cells for treatment of disease. PMID:22174854

  1. Identification of melanoma-reactive CD4+ T cell subsets from Human Melanoma Draining Lymph Nodes

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Mei; Graor, Hallie; Yan, Lu; Kim, Julian

    2015-01-01

    Our laboratory has previously demonstrated that melanoma draining lymph node (MDLN) samples from stage III patients contained both CD4+ and CD8+ T cells that can be readily expanded to mediate tumor cell apoptosis in vitro and improve survival in mice bearing human melanoma xenografts. In this study, we investigated whether MDLN T cells contain melanoma-reactive CD4+ T cell compartment and what they are. In order to test this, we performed multi-parametric (11-color and 6-color) FACS analyses to monitor phenotypic and functional property of CD4+ T cells in response to melanoma cell antigen re-exposure. Our results have demonstrated that the antigen re-exposure could result in a generation of CD4+CCR7+CD62L+CD27− T cell subsets with various effector cell-like properties. Within the CD4+CCR7+CD62L+CD27− T cell compartment, in response to antigen re-exposure, some of the cells expressed significantly up-regulated CD40L and/or CXCR5, and some of them expressed significantly up-regulated IL-2 and/or TNF-α. This may suggest the existence of melanoma reactive CD4+ “effector-precursor” cells within the expanded MDLN cells and their differentiation into various effector lineages in response to antigen re-stimulation. Recent clinical trials have demonstrated that effective adoptive cellular immunotherapy (ACI) maybe enhanced by antigen specific CD4+ T cells. Therefore, results of this study may significantly benefit innovative design of ACI that can potentially mediate enhanced and durable clinical responses. PMID:26641258

  2. CD4+CD25+ T-Cells Control Autoimmunity in the Absence of B-Cells

    PubMed Central

    Mariño, Eliana; Villanueva, Jeanette; Walters, Stacey; Liuwantara, David; Mackay, Fabienne; Grey, Shane T.

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Tumor necrosis factor ligand family members B-cell–activating factor (BAFF) and a proliferation-inducing ligand (APRIL) can exert powerful effects on B-cell activation and development, type 1 T-helper cell (Th1) immune responses, and autoimmunity. We examined the effect of blocking BAFF and APRIL on the development of autoimmune diabetes. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Female NOD mice were administered B-cell maturation antigen (BCMA)-Fc from 9 to 15 weeks of age. Diabetes incidence, islet pathology, and T- and B-cell populations were examined. RESULTS BCMA-Fc treatment reduced the severity of insulitis and prevented diabetes development in NOD mice. BCMA-Fc–treated mice showed reduced follicular, marginal-zone, and T2MZ B-cells. B-cell reduction was accompanied by decreased frequencies of pathogenic CD4+CD40+ T-cells and reduced Th1 cytokines IL-7, IL-15, and IL-17. Thus, T-cell activation was blunted with reduced B-cells. However, BCMA-Fc–treated mice still harbored detectable diabetogenic T-cells, suggesting that regulatory mechanisms contributed to diabetes prevention. Indeed, BCMA-Fc–treated mice accumulated increased CD4+CD25+ regulatory T-cells (Tregs) with age. CD4+CD25+ cells were essential for maintaining euglycemia because their depletion abrogated BCMA-Fc–mediated protection. BCMA-Fc did not directly affect Treg homeostasis given that CD4+CD25+Foxp3+ T-cells did not express TACI or BR3 receptors and that CD4+CD25+Foxp3+ T-cell frequencies were equivalent in wild-type, BAFF−/−, TACI−/−, BCMA−/−, and BR3−/− mice. Rather, B-cell depletion resulted in CD4+CD25+ T-cell–mediated protection from diabetes because anti-CD25 monoclonal antibody treatment precipitated diabetes in both diabetes-resistant NOD.μMT−/− and BCMA-Fc–treated mice. CONCLUSIONS BAFF/APRIL blockade prevents diabetes. BCMA-Fc reduces B-cells, subsequently blunting autoimmune activity and allowing endogenous regulatory mechanisms to preserve a

  3. Chronic Human Infection with Trypanosoma cruzi Drives CD4+ T Cells to Immune Senescence1

    PubMed Central

    Albareda, María Cecilia; Olivera, Gabriela Carina; Laucella, Susana A.; Alvarez, María Gabriela; Fernandez, Esteban Rodrigo; Lococo, Bruno; Viotti, Rodolfo; Tarleton, Rick L.; Postan, Miriam

    2011-01-01

    Previously we found that the frequency of IFN-γ-producing CD8+ T cells specific for Trypanosoma cruzi inversely correlates with disease severity in chronic human Chagas disease along with low levels of IL-2-secreting CD8+ T cells in all clinical stages. This impairment of the parasite-specific T cell responses was associated with phenotypic features of immune senescence of the CD8+ T cell compartment. These data prompted us to address the question of whether the CD4+ T cell compartment also experiences signs of exhaustion. Thus, we performed a functional and phenotypical characterization of T. cruzi-specific and overall CD4+ T cells in chronically infected subjects with different degrees of cardiac dysfunction. The results show an inverse association between disease severity and the frequency of T. cruzi-specific IFN-γ-producing CD4+ T cells. The high expression of CD27 and CD28 with a relative low expression of CD57 found on CD4+IFN-γ + T cells suggests that the effector T cell pool in chronic T. cruzi infection includes a high proportion of newly recruited T cells, but a low frequency of long-term memory cells. The total CD4+ T cell compartment shows signs of senescence and later stages of differentiation associated with more severe stages of the disease. These findings support the hypothesis that long-term T. cruzi infection in humans might exhaust long-lived memory T cells. PMID:19692645

  4. CD4 T cells promote CD8 T cell immunity at the priming and effector site during viral encephalitis.

    PubMed

    Phares, Timothy W; Stohlman, Stephen A; Hwang, Mihyun; Min, Booki; Hinton, David R; Bergmann, Cornelia C

    2012-03-01

    CD4 T cell activation during peripheral infections not only is essential in inducing protective CD8 T cell memory but also promotes CD8 T cell function and survival. However, the contributions of CD4 T cell help to antiviral CD8 T cell immunity during central nervous system (CNS) infection are not well established. Encephalitis induced by the sublethal coronavirus JHMV was used to identify when CD4 T cells regulate CD8 T cell responses following CNS infection. Peripheral expansion of virus-specific CD8 T cells was impaired when CD4 T cells were ablated prior to infection but not at 4 days postinfection. Delayed CD4 T cell depletion abrogated CD4 T cell recruitment to the CNS but only slightly diminished CD8 T cell recruitment. Nevertheless, the absence of CNS CD4 T cells was associated with reduced gamma interferon (IFN-γ) and granzyme B expression by infiltrating CD8 T cells, increased CD8 T cell apoptosis, and impaired control of infectious virus. CD4 T cell depletion subsequent to CD4 T cell CNS migration restored CD8 T cell activity and virus control. Analysis of γc-dependent cytokine expression indicated interleukin-21 (IL-21) as a primary candidate optimizing CD8 T cell activity within the CNS. These results demonstrate that CD4 T cells play critical roles in both enhancing peripheral activation of CD8 T cells and prolonging their antiviral function within the CNS. The data highlight the necessity for temporally and spatially distinct CD4 T cell helper functions in sustaining CD8 T cell activity during CNS infection.

  5. Blockade of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Production in CD4^+ T Cells by an Intracellular CD4 Expressed Under Control of the Viral Long Terminal Repeat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buonocore, Linda; Rose, John K.

    1993-04-01

    A retroviral vector was constructed in which a gene encoding a mutated soluble CD4 protein that is retained in the endoplasmic reticulum (sCD4-KDEL) is expressed under control of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) regulatory elements. HIV-1 infection of a human T-cell line transduced with this vector led to induction of sCD4-KDEL synthesis and a block in transport of the HIV envelope protein to the cell surface. There was a complete block to maturation of infectious HIV-1 in the transduced cells, no viral spread, and little or no syncytium formation. Infected cells gradually disappeared from the culture over a period of 2 months. This intracellular trap for HIV has potential application in gene therapy for AIDS.

  6. Quorum-Sensing in CD4+ T Cell Homeostasis: A Hypothesis and a Model

    PubMed Central

    Almeida, Afonso R. M.; Amado, Inês F.; Reynolds, Joseph; Berges, Julien; Lythe, Grant; Molina-París, Carmen; Freitas, Antonio A.

    2012-01-01

    Homeostasis of lymphocyte numbers is believed to be due to competition between cellular populations for a common niche of restricted size, defined by the combination of interactions and trophic factors required for cell survival. Here we propose a new mechanism: homeostasis of lymphocyte numbers could also be achieved by the ability of lymphocytes to perceive the density of their own populations. Such a mechanism would be reminiscent of the primordial quorum-sensing systems used by bacteria, in which some bacteria sense the accumulation of bacterial metabolites secreted by other elements of the population, allowing them to “count” the number of cells present and adapt their growth accordingly. We propose that homeostasis of CD4+ T cell numbers may occur via a quorum-sensing-like mechanism, where IL-2 is produced by activated CD4+ T cells and sensed by a population of CD4+ Treg cells that expresses the high-affinity IL-2Rα-chain and can regulate the number of activated IL-2-producing CD4+ T cells and the total CD4+ T cell population. In other words, CD4+ T cell populations can restrain their growth by monitoring the number of activated cells, thus preventing uncontrolled lymphocyte proliferation during immune responses. We hypothesize that malfunction of this quorum-sensing mechanism may lead to uncontrolled T cell activation and autoimmunity. Finally, we present a mathematical model that describes the key role of IL-2 and quorum-sensing mechanisms in CD4+ T cell homeostasis during an immune response. PMID:22654881

  7. The ion channel TRPV1 regulates the activation and proinflammatory properties of CD4+ T cells

    PubMed Central

    Bertin, Samuel; Aoki-Nonaka, Yukari; de Jong, Petrus Rudolf; Stanwood, Shawna R.; Srikanth, Sonal; Lee, Jihyung; To, Keith; Abramson, Lior; Yu, Timothy; Han, Tiffany; Touma, Ranim; Li, Xiangli; González-Navajas, José M.; Herdman, Scott; Corr, Maripat; Fu, Guo; Dong, Hui; Gwack, Yousang; Franco, Alessandra; Jefferies, Wilfred A.; Raz, Eyal

    2016-01-01

    TRPV1 is a Ca2+-permeable channel mostly studied as a pain receptor in sensory neurons. However, its role in other cell types is poorly understood. Here, we demonstrate that TRPV1 is functionally expressed in CD4+ T cells where it acts as a non-store-operated Ca2+ channel and contributes to T cell receptor (TCR)-induced Ca2+ influx, TCR signaling and T cell activation. In models of T cell-mediated colitis, TRPV1 promotes colitogenic T cell responses and intestinal inflammation. Furthermore, genetic and pharmacological inhibition of TRPV1 in human CD4+ T cells recapitulates the phenotype of murine Trpv1−/− CD4+ T cells. These findings suggest that TRPV1 inhibition could represent a new therapeutic strategy to restrain proinflammatory T cell responses. PMID:25282159

  8. Th17 cells and CD4(+) multifunctional T cells in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Araújo, Júlio Antônio Pereira; Mesquita, Danilo; de Melo Cruvinel, Wilson; Salmazi, Karina Inácio; Kallás, Esper Georges; Andrade, Luis Eduardo Coelho

    2016-01-01

    Recent evidence suggests that abnormalities involving Th17 lymphocytes are associated with the pathophysiology of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). In addition, multifunctional T cells (MFT), i.e., those producing multiple cytokines simultaneously, are present in the inflammatory milieu and may be implicated in the autoimmune process observed in SLE. In the present study, we aimed to characterize the functional status of CD4(+) T cells in SLE by simultaneously determining the concentration of IL-2, IFN-γ and IL-17 in lymphocyte cultures under exogenous and self-antigenic stimuli. Eighteen patients with active disease, 18 with inactive disease, and 14 healthy controls had functional status of CD4(+) T cells analyzed. We found that SLE patients presented a decreased number of total CD4(+) cells, an increased number of activated T cells, and an increased frequency of Th17 cells compared to healthy controls (HC). MFT cells had increased frequency in SLE patients and there was an increased frequency of tri-functional MFT in patients with active SLE compared with those with inactive SLE. Interestingly, MTF cells produced larger amounts of IFNγ than mono-functional T cells in patients and controls. Taken together these data indicate the participation of recently activated Th17 cells and MTF cells in the SLE pathophysiology. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  9. Innate lymphoid cells regulate CD4+ T-cell responses to intestinal commensal bacteria.

    PubMed

    Hepworth, Matthew R; Monticelli, Laurel A; Fung, Thomas C; Ziegler, Carly G K; Grunberg, Stephanie; Sinha, Rohini; Mantegazza, Adriana R; Ma, Hak-Ling; Crawford, Alison; Angelosanto, Jill M; Wherry, E John; Koni, Pandelakis A; Bushman, Frederic D; Elson, Charles O; Eberl, Gérard; Artis, David; Sonnenberg, Gregory F

    2013-06-06

    Innate lymphoid cells (ILCs) are a recently characterized family of immune cells that have critical roles in cytokine-mediated regulation of intestinal epithelial cell barrier integrity. Alterations in ILC responses are associated with multiple chronic human diseases, including inflammatory bowel disease, implicating a role for ILCs in disease pathogenesis. Owing to an inability to target ILCs selectively, experimental studies assessing ILC function have predominantly used mice lacking adaptive immune cells. However, in lymphocyte-sufficient hosts ILCs are vastly outnumbered by CD4(+) T cells, which express similar profiles of effector cytokines. Therefore, the function of ILCs in the presence of adaptive immunity and their potential to influence adaptive immune cell responses remain unknown. To test this, we used genetic or antibody-mediated depletion strategies to target murine ILCs in the presence of an adaptive immune system. We show that loss of retinoic-acid-receptor-related orphan receptor-γt-positive (RORγt(+)) ILCs was associated with dysregulated adaptive immune cell responses against commensal bacteria and low-grade systemic inflammation. Remarkably, ILC-mediated regulation of adaptive immune cells occurred independently of interleukin (IL)-17A, IL-22 or IL-23. Genome-wide transcriptional profiling and functional analyses revealed that RORγt(+) ILCs express major histocompatibility complex class II (MHCII) and can process and present antigen. However, rather than inducing T-cell proliferation, ILCs acted to limit commensal bacteria-specific CD4(+) T-cell responses. Consistent with this, selective deletion of MHCII in murine RORγt(+) ILCs resulted in dysregulated commensal bacteria-dependent CD4(+) T-cell responses that promoted spontaneous intestinal inflammation. These data identify that ILCs maintain intestinal homeostasis through MHCII-dependent interactions with CD4(+) T cells that limit pathological adaptive immune cell responses to commensal

  10. Establishment of mouse leukemia cell lines expressing human CD4/CCR5 using lentiviral vectors.

    PubMed

    Li, Ya-Jing; ZhuGe, Fu-Yan; Zeng, Chang-Chun; He, Jin-Yang; Tan, Ning; Liang, Juan

    2017-04-01

    A low-cost rodent model of HIV infection and which presents high application value is an effective tool to investigate HIV infection and pathogenesis. However, development of such a small animal model has been hampered by the unsuitability of rodent cells for HIV-1 replication given that the retrovirus HIV-1 has high selectivity to its host cell. Our study used the mouse leukemia cell lines L615 and L1210 that were induced by murine leukemia virus and transfected with hCD4/CCR5 loaded-lentiviral vector. Lentiviral vectors containing the genes hCD4/CCR5 under the transcriptional control of cytomegalovirus promoter were designed. Transfection efficiencies of human CD4 and CCR5 in L615 and L1210 cells were analyzed by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and Western blot assay. Results showed that hCD4 and CCR5 proteins were expressed on the cell surface, demonstrating that the L615 and L1210 cells were humanized and that they possess the characteristics necessary for HIV infection of human host cells. Moreover, the sensitivity of human CD4/CCR5 transgenic mouse cells to HIV infection was confirmed by RT-PCR and ELISA. Mouse leukemia cell lines that could express hCD4 and CCR5 were thus established to facilitate normal entry of HIV-1 so that a human CD4/CCR5 transgenic mice cell model can be used to investigate the transmission and pathogenesis of HIV/AIDS and potential antiviral drugs against this disease.

  11. Production of CD4+ and CD8+ T Cell Hybridomas

    PubMed Central

    Canaday, David H.

    2015-01-01

    T cell hybridomas are very useful tools to investigate antigen presenting cell (APC) function. They were developed based on the fusion technology that led to monoclonal antibody section. Antigen-specific primary T cells are generated and fused to an immortal thymoma line. Unfused thymoma cells are eliminated by engineered metabolic selection. Antigen-specific hybridomas are identified and may be characterized in detail. Primary T cells are preferable for studies of the regulatory mechanisms intrinsic to T cells, but for study of antigen presentation T cell hybridomas have advantages over primary T cell clones, including their relative uniformity, stability over time, and ready availability in large numbers for extensive antigen presentation experiments. PMID:23329495

  12. Target organ localization of memory CD4+ T cells in patients with chronic beryllium disease

    PubMed Central

    Fontenot, Andrew P.; Canavera, Scott J.; Gharavi, Laia; Newman, Lee S.; Kotzin, Brian L.

    2002-01-01

    Chronic beryllium disease (CBD) is caused by exposure to beryllium in the workplace, and it remains an important public health concern. Evidence suggests that CD4+ T cells play a critical role in the development of this disease. Using intracellular cytokine staining, we found that the frequency of beryllium-specific CD4+ T cells in the lungs (bronchoalveolar lavage) of 12 CBD patients ranged from 1.4% to 29% (mean 17.8%), and these T cells expressed a Th1-type phenotype in response to beryllium sulfate (BeSO4). Few, if any, beryllium-specific CD8+ T cells were identified. In contrast, the frequency of beryllium-responsive CD4+ T cells in the blood of these subjects ranged from undetectable to 1 in 500. No correlation was observed between the frequency of beryllium-responsive bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) CD4+ T cells as detected by intracellular staining and lymphocyte proliferation in culture after BeSO4 exposure. Staining for surface marker expression showed that nearly all BAL T cells exhibit an effector memory cell phenotype. These results demonstrate a dramatically high frequency and compartmentalization of antigen-specific effector memory CD4+ cells in the lungs of CBD patients. These studies provide insight into the phenotypic and functional characteristics of antigen-specific T cells invading other inaccessible target organs in human disease. PMID:12438445

  13. Immune activation induces immortalization of HTLV-1 LTR-Tax transgenic CD4+ T cells

    PubMed Central

    Swaims, Alison Y.; Khani, Francesca; Zhang, Yingyu; Roberts, Arthur I.; Devadas, Satish

    2010-01-01

    Infection with the human T-cell leukemia virus-1 (HTLV-1) results in a variety of diseases including adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATL). Although the pathogenesis of these disorders is poorly understood, it involves complex interactions with the host immune system. Activation of infected T cells may play an important role in disease pathogenesis through induction of the oncogenic HTLV-1 Tax transactivator protein. To test this hypothesis, we employed transgenic mice in which Tax is regulated by the HTLV-1 LTR. T-cell receptor stimulation of LTR-Tax CD4+ T cells induced Tax expression, hyper-proliferation, and immortalization in culture. The transition to cellular immortalization was accompanied by markedly increased expression of the antiapoptotic gene, mcl-1, previously implicated as important in T-cell survival. Immortalized cells exhibited a CD4+CD25+CD3− phenotype commonly observed in ATL. Engraftment of activated LTR-Tax CD4+ T cells into NOD/Shi-scid/IL-2Rγ null mice resulted in a leukemia-like phenotype with expansion and tissue infiltration of Tax+, CD4+ lymphocytes. We suggest that immune activation of infected CD4+ T cells plays an important role in the induction of Tax expression, T-cell proliferation, and pathogenesis of ATL in HTLV-1–infected individuals. PMID:20634377

  14. Human Plasmacytoid Dendritic Cells Efficiently Capture HIV-1 Envelope Glycoproteins via CD4 for Antigen Presentation

    PubMed Central

    Sandgren, Kerrie J; Smed-Sörensen, Anna; Forsell, Mattias N; Soldemo, Martina; Adams, William C; Liang, Frank; Perbeck, Leif; Koup, Richard A; Wyatt, Richard T; Hedestam, Gunilla B Karlsson; Loré, Karin

    2013-01-01

    Advances in HIV-1 vaccine clinical trials and preclinical research indicate that the virus envelope glycoproteins (Env) are likely to be an essential component of a prophylactic vaccine. Efficient antigen uptake and presentation by dendritic cells (DCs) is important for strong CD4+ T helper cell responses and the development of effective humoral immune responses. Here, we examined the capacity of distinct primary human DC subsets to internalise and present recombinant Env to CD4+ T cells. Consistent with their specific receptor expression, skin DCs bound and internalised Env via C-type lectin receptors (CLRs) while blood DC subsets, including CD1c+ myeloid DCs (MDCs), CD123+ plasmacytoid DCs (PDCs) and CD141+ DCs exhibited a restricted repertoire of CLRs and relied on CD4 for uptake of Env. Despite a generally poor capacity for antigen uptake compared to MDCs, the high expression of CD4 on PDCs allowed them to bind and internalise Env very efficiently. CD4-mediated uptake delivered Env to EEA1+ endosomes that progressed to Lamp1+ and MHC class II+ lysosomes where internalised Env was degraded rapidly. Finally, all three blood DC subsets were able to internalise an Env-CMV pp65 fusion protein via CD4 and stimulate pp65-specific CD4+ T cells. Thus, in the in vitro systems described here, CD4-mediated uptake of Env is a functional pathway leading to antigen presentation and this may therefore be a mechanism utilised by blood DCs, including PDCs, for generating immune responses to Env-based vaccines. PMID:23729440

  15. Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Nef-Induced CD4 Cell Surface Downregulation Is Inhibited by Ikarugamycin

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Tianci; Fredericksen, Brenda L.; Hasumi, Keiji; Endo, Akira; Garcia, J. Victor

    2001-01-01

    One well-characterized in vitro function of Nef is its ability to remove CD4, the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) receptor, from the cell surface. Nef accomplishes this by accelerating the internalization and degradation of CD4. Current models propose that Nef promotes CD4 internalization via an increased association of CD4 with clathrin-coated pits (CCP). Here, we investigated the effect of a naturally occurring antiprotozoan antibiotic, ikarugamycin (IKA), on CD4 cell surface expression in human monocytic cells stably expressing HIV type 1 SF2 Nef. IKA was able to efficiently restore CD4 cell surface expression in Nef-expressing cells without affecting either CD4 synthesis or Nef expression. In addition, we demonstrate that IKA is also capable of efficiently blocking CD4 down-modulation in response to phorbol myristate acetate. Our data suggest that IKA may be an efficient and useful inhibitor of CCP-dependent endocytosis. PMID:11160755

  16. Antibody induced CD4 down-modulation of T cells is site-specifically mediated by CD64+ cells

    PubMed Central

    Vogel, Stephanie; Grabski, Elena; Buschjäger, Daniela; Klawonn, Frank; Döring, Marius; Wang, Junxi; Fletcher, Erika; Bechmann, Ingo; Witte, Torsten; Durisin, Martin; Schraven, Burkhart; Mangsbo, Sara M.; Schönfeld, Kurt; Czeloth, Niklas; Kalinke, Ulrich

    2015-01-01

    Treatment of PBMC with the CD4-specific mAb BT-061 induces CD4 down-modulation of T cells. Here we report that addition of BT-061 to purified T cells did not confer this effect, whereas incubation of T cells in BT-061 coated wells restored CD4 down-modulation. These results implied that Fcγ receptor mediated cell-cell interactions played a role. In consistence with this hypothesis PBMC depleted of CD64+ monocytes did not confer CD4 down-modulation of BT-061 decorated T cells. Strikingly, CD4 down-modulation was observed in BT-061 treated synovial fluid punctuated from patients’ inflamed joints that comprised enhanced numbers of CD64+ cells. In contrast, in a circulating whole blood system injection of BT-061 did not induce CD4 down-modulation, due to CD64 saturation by serum IgG. Similarly, tonsil derived mononuclear cells devoid of CD64+ cells did not show CD4 down-modulation, whereas addition of blood derived monocytes restored the effect. Thus, the interaction of BT-061 decorated T cells with CD64+ cells is needed for CD4 down-modulation, implying that in patients BT-061 would primarily induce CD4 down-modulation at inflammatory sites. These results highlight the need not only to examine the interaction of a given mAb with single FcγR, but also the immunological environment that is appropriate to support such interactions. PMID:26670584

  17. Nocardia rubra cell-wall skeleton promotes CD4(+) T cell activation and drives Th1 immune response.

    PubMed

    Wang, Guangchuan; Wu, Jie; Miao, Miao; Dou, Heng; Nan, Ning; Shi, Mingsheng; Yu, Guang; Shan, Fengping

    2017-03-15

    Several lines of evidences have shown that Nocardia rubra cell wall skeleton (Nr-CWS) has immunoregulatory and anti-tumor activities. However, there is no information about the effect of Nr-CWS on CD4(+) T cells. The aim of this study was to explore the effect of Nr-CWS on the phenotype and function of CD4(+) T cells. Our results of in vitro experiments showed that Nr-CWS could significantly up-regulate the expression of CD69 and CD25 on CD4(+) T cells, promote the proliferation of CD4(+) T cells, increase the production of IFN-γ, TNF-α and IL-2 in the supernatants, but has no significant effect on the apoptosis and death of CD4(+) T cells. Results of in vivo experiments showed that Nr-CWS could promote the proliferation of CD4(+) T cells, and increase the production of IL-2, IFN-γ and TNF-α (Th1 type cytokines). These data suggest that Nr-CWS can enhance the activation of CD4(+) T cells, promote the proliferation of CD4(+) T cells and the differentiation of CD4(+) T cells to Th1 cells.

  18. Antibody induced CD4 down-modulation of T cells is site-specifically mediated by CD64(+) cells.

    PubMed

    Vogel, Stephanie; Grabski, Elena; Buschjäger, Daniela; Klawonn, Frank; Döring, Marius; Wang, Junxi; Fletcher, Erika; Bechmann, Ingo; Witte, Torsten; Durisin, Martin; Schraven, Burkhart; Mangsbo, Sara M; Schönfeld, Kurt; Czeloth, Niklas; Kalinke, Ulrich

    2015-12-16

    Treatment of PBMC with the CD4-specific mAb BT-061 induces CD4 down-modulation of T cells. Here we report that addition of BT-061 to purified T cells did not confer this effect, whereas incubation of T cells in BT-061 coated wells restored CD4 down-modulation. These results implied that Fcγ receptor mediated cell-cell interactions played a role. In consistence with this hypothesis PBMC depleted of CD64(+) monocytes did not confer CD4 down-modulation of BT-061 decorated T cells. Strikingly, CD4 down-modulation was observed in BT-061 treated synovial fluid punctuated from patients' inflamed joints that comprised enhanced numbers of CD64(+) cells. In contrast, in a circulating whole blood system injection of BT-061 did not induce CD4 down-modulation, due to CD64 saturation by serum IgG. Similarly, tonsil derived mononuclear cells devoid of CD64(+) cells did not show CD4 down-modulation, whereas addition of blood derived monocytes restored the effect. Thus, the interaction of BT-061 decorated T cells with CD64(+) cells is needed for CD4 down-modulation, implying that in patients BT-061 would primarily induce CD4 down-modulation at inflammatory sites. These results highlight the need not only to examine the interaction of a given mAb with single FcγR, but also the immunological environment that is appropriate to support such interactions.

  19. Therapeutic Potential of Hyporesponsive CD4+ T Cells in Autoimmunity

    PubMed Central

    Maggi, Jaxaira; Schafer, Carolina; Ubilla-Olguín, Gabriela; Catalán, Diego; Schinnerling, Katina; Aguillón, Juan C.

    2015-01-01

    The interaction between dendritic cells (DCs) and T cells is crucial on immunity or tolerance induction. In an immature or semi-mature state, DCs induce tolerance through T-cell deletion, generation of regulatory T cells, and/or induction of T-cell anergy. Anergy is defined as an unresponsive state that retains T cells in an “off” mode under conditions in which immune activation is undesirable. This mechanism is crucial for the control of T-cell responses against self-antigens, thereby preventing autoimmunity. Tolerogenic DCs (tDCs), generated in vitro from peripheral blood monocytes of healthy donors or patients with autoimmune pathologies, were shown to modulate immune responses by inducing T-cell hyporesponsiveness. Animal models of autoimmune diseases confirmed the impact of T-cell anergy on disease development and progression in vivo. Thus, the induction of T-cell hyporesponsiveness by tDCs has become a promising immunotherapeutic strategy for the treatment of T-cell-mediated autoimmune disorders. Here, we review recent findings in the area and discuss the potential of anergy induction for clinical purposes. PMID:26441992

  20. CD4+CD25+ Regulatory T Cell Ontogeny and Preferential Migration to the Cecal Tonsils in Chickens

    PubMed Central

    Shanmugasundaram, Revathi; Selvaraj, Ramesh K.

    2012-01-01

    Thymic CD4+CD25+ cells have regulatory-T-cell-like properties in chickens. This study examined the ontogeny of CD4+CD25+ cells in the thymus and in peripheral compartments in chickens. CD4+CD25+ cells started to appear in the thymus at day 15 of incubation (E15), although at low percentages. Expressed as a percentage of CD4+ cells, CD4+CD25+ cells increased (P<0.01) from 1.7% at E20 to 7.3% at 0 d post-hatch (D0). CD4+CD25+ cells did not appear in the spleen or cecal tonsils of embryos. Expressed as a percentage of CD4+ cells, CD4+CD25+ cells increased (P<0.01) from 0% at D0 to 27% at D1 in cecal tonsils and from 0% at D0 to 11% at D1 in the spleen. Expressed as a percentage of all mononuclear cells, cecal tonsils at D1 had approximately 3.5-fold higher percentage of CD4+CD25+ cells than the spleen at D1. CD4+CD25+ cells from cecal tonsils of chicks at D1 were suppressive. CD4+CD25+ cells from D0 thymus, when injected back into MHC-compatible chicks, migrated to cecal tonsils and lungs and were detected until 10 d post-injection. CD4+CD25+ cells from cecal tonsils had a higher (P = 0.01) relative amount of CCR9 mRNA than CD4+CD25+ cells from the thymus. It could be concluded that in chickens CD4+CD25+ cells migrate from the thymus immediately post-hatch and preferentially colonize the gut associated lymphoid tissues. CD4+CD25+ cells' preferential migration to cecal tonsils is likely directed through the CCR9 pathway in chickens. PMID:22479489

  1. Homeostatically Maintained Resting Naive CD4+ T Cells Resist Latent HIV Reactivation

    PubMed Central

    Tsunetsugu-Yokota, Yasuko; Kobayahi-Ishihara, Mie; Wada, Yamato; Terahara, Kazutaka; Takeyama, Haruko; Kawana-Tachikawa, Ai; Tokunaga, Kenzo; Yamagishi, Makoto; Martinez, Javier P.; Meyerhans, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Homeostatic proliferation (HSP) is a major mechanism by which long-lived naïve and memory CD4+ T cells are maintained in vivo and suggested to contribute to the persistence of the latent HIV-1 reservoir. However, while many in vitro latency models rely on CD4+ T cells that were initially differentiated via T-cell receptor (TCR) stimulation into memory/effector cells, latent infection of naïve resting CD4+ T cells maintained under HSP conditions has not been fully addressed. Here, we describe an in vitro HSP culture system utilizing the cytokines IL-7 and IL-15 that allows studying latency in naïve resting CD4+ T cells. CD4+ T cells isolated from several healthy donors were infected with HIV pseudotypes expressing GFP and cultured under HSP conditions or TCR conditions as control. Cell proliferation, phenotype, and GFP expression were analyzed by flow cytometry. RNA expression was quantified by qRT-PCR. Under HSP culture conditions, latently HIV-1 infected naïve cells are in part maintained in the non-dividing (= resting) state. Although a few HIV-1 provirus+ cells were present in these resting GFP negative cells, the estimated level of GFP transcripts per infected cell seems to indicate a block at the post-transcriptional level. Interestingly, neither TCR nor the prototypic HDAC inhibitor SAHA were able to reactivate HIV-1 provirus from these cells. This lack of reactivation was not due to methylation of the HIV LTR. These results point to a mechanism of HIV control in HSP-cultured resting naïve CD4+ T cells that may be distinct from that in TCR-stimulated memory/effector T cells. PMID:27990142

  2. Computational modeling of heterogeneity and function of CD4+ T cells

    PubMed Central

    Carbo, Adria; Hontecillas, Raquel; Andrew, Tricity; Eden, Kristin; Mei, Yongguo; Hoops, Stefan; Bassaganya-Riera, Josep

    2014-01-01

    The immune system is composed of many different cell types and hundreds of intersecting molecular pathways and signals. This large biological complexity requires coordination between distinct pro-inflammatory and regulatory cell subsets to respond to infection while maintaining tissue homeostasis. CD4+ T cells play a central role in orchestrating immune responses and in maintaining a balance between pro- and anti- inflammatory responses. This tight balance between regulatory and effector reactions depends on the ability of CD4+ T cells to modulate distinct pathways within large molecular networks, since dysregulated CD4+ T cell responses may result in chronic inflammatory and autoimmune diseases. The CD4+ T cell differentiation process comprises an intricate interplay between cytokines, their receptors, adaptor molecules, signaling cascades and transcription factors that help delineate cell fate and function. Computational modeling can help to describe, simulate, analyze, and predict some of the behaviors in this complicated differentiation network. This review provides a comprehensive overview of existing computational immunology methods as well as novel strategies used to model immune responses with a particular focus on CD4+ T cell differentiation. PMID:25364738

  3. Short Peptide Vaccine Induces CD4+ T Helper Cells in Patients with Different Solid Cancers.

    PubMed

    Gross, Stefanie; Lennerz, Volker; Gallerani, Elisa; Mach, Nicolas; Böhm, Steffen; Hess, Dagmar; von Boehmer, Lotta; Knuth, Alexander; Ochsenbein, Adrian; Gnad-Vogt, Ulrike; Forssmann, Ulf; Woelfel, Thomas; Kaempgen, Eckhart

    2016-01-01

    Previous cancer vaccination trials often aimed to activate CD8(+) cytotoxic T-cell (CTL) responses with short (8-10mer) peptides and targeted CD4(+) helper T cells (TH) with HLA class II-binding longer peptides (12-16 mer) that were derived from tumor antigens. Accordingly, a study of immunomonitoring focused on the detection of CTL responses to the short, and TH responses to the long, peptides. The possible induction of concurrent TH responses to short peptides was widely neglected. In a recent phase I vaccination trial, 53 patients with different solid cancers were vaccinated with EMD640744, a cocktail of five survivin-derived short (9- or 10-mer) peptides in Montanide ISA 51VG. We monitored 49 patients and found strong CD8(+) T-cell responses in 63% of the patients. In addition, we unexpectedly found CD4(+) TH cell responses against at least two of the five short peptides in 61% (23/38) of the patients analyzed. The two peptides were recognized by HLA-DP4- and HLA-DR-restricted TH1 cells. Some short peptide-reactive (sp)CD4 T cells showed high functional avidity. Here, we show that a short peptide vaccine is able to activate a specific CD4(+) T-cell repertoire in many patients, facilitating a strong combined CD4(+)/CD8(+) T-cell response.

  4. Single wall carbon nanotube electrode system capable of quantitative detection of CD4(+) T cells.

    PubMed

    Kim, Joonhyub; Park, Gayoung; Lee, Seoho; Hwang, Suk-Won; Min, Namki; Lee, Kyung-Mi

    2017-04-15

    Development of CNT-based CD4(+) T cell imunosensors remains in its infancy due to the poor immobilization efficiency, lack of reproducibility, and difficulty in providing linear quantification. Here, we developed a fully-integrated single wall carbon nanotube (SWCNT)-based immunosensor capable of selective capture and linear quantification of CD4(+) T cells with greater dynamic range. By employing repeated two-step oxygen (O2) plasma treatment processes with 35 days of recovery periods, we achieved the enhanced functionalization of the CNT surface and the removal of the byproduct of spray-coated SWCNTs that hinders charge transfer and stable CD4(+) T cell sensing. As a result, a linear electrochemical signal was generated in direct proportion to the bound cells. The slope of a SWCNT electrode in a target concentration range (10(2)~10(6)cells/mL) was 4.55×10(-2)μA per concentration decade, with the lowest detection limit of 1×10(2)cells/mL. Since the reduced number of CD4(+) T cell counts in patients' peripheral blood corresponds to the progression of HIV disease, our CD4(+) T cell-immunosensor provides a simple and low-cost platform which can fulfill the requirement for the development of point-of-care (POC) diagnostic technologies for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) patients in resource-limited countries.

  5. IL-12 is required for anti-OX40-mediated CD4 T cell survival.

    PubMed

    Ruby, Carl E; Montler, Ryan; Zheng, Rongxui; Shu, Suyu; Weinberg, Andrew D

    2008-02-15

    Engagement of OX40 greatly improves CD4 T cell function and survival. Previously, we showed that both OX40 engagement and CTLA-4 blockade led to enhanced CD4 T cell expansion, but only OX40 signaling increased survival. To identify pathways associated with OX40-mediated survival, the gene expression of Ag-activated CD4 T cells isolated from mice treated with anti-OX40 and -CTLA-4 was compared. This comparison revealed a potential role for IL-12 through increased expression of the IL-12R-signaling subunit (IL-12Rbeta2) on T cells activated 3 days previously with Ag and anti-OX40. The temporal expression of IL-12Rbeta2 on OX40-stimulated CD4 T cells was tightly regulated and peaked approximately 4-6 days after initial activation/expansion, but before the beginning of T cell contraction. IL-12 signaling, during this window of IL-12Rbeta2 expression, was required for enhanced T cell survival and survival was associated with STAT4-specific signaling. The findings from these observations were exploited in several different mouse tumor models where we found that the combination of anti-OX40 and IL-12 showed synergistic therapeutic efficacy. These results may lead to the elucidation of the molecular pathways involved with CD4 T cell survival that contribute to improved memory, and understanding of these pathways could lead to greater efficacy of immune stimulatory Abs in tumor-bearing individuals.

  6. Role of miRNAs in CD4 T cell plasticity during inflammation and tolerance

    PubMed Central

    Sethi, Apoorva; Kulkarni, Neeraja; Sonar, Sandip; Lal, Girdhari

    2013-01-01

    Gene expression is tightly regulated in a tuneable, cell-specific and time-dependent manner. Recent advancement in epigenetics and non-coding RNA (ncRNA) revolutionized the concept of gene regulation. In order to regulate the transcription, ncRNA can promptly response to the extracellular signals as compared to transcription factors present in the cells. microRNAs (miRNAs) are ncRNA (~22 bp) encoded in the genome, and present as intergenic or oriented antisense to neighboring genes. The strategic location of miRNA in coding genes helps in the coupled regulation of its expression with host genes. miRNA together with complex machinery called RNA-induced silencing complex (RISC) interacts with target mRNA and degrade the mRNA or inhibits the translation. CD4 T cells play an important role in the generation and maintenance of inflammation and tolerance. Cytokines and chemokines present in the inflamed microenvironment controls the differentiation and function of various subsets of CD4 T cells [Th1, Th2, Th17, and regulatory CD4 T cells (Tregs)]. Recent studies suggest that miRNAs play an important role in the development and function of all subsets of CD4 T cells. In current review, we focused on how various miRNAs are regulated by cell's extrinsic and intrinsic signaling, and how miRNAs affect the transdifferentiation of subsets of CD4 T cell and controls their plasticity during inflammation and tolerance. PMID:23386861

  7. BST-2 Expression Modulates Small CD4 Mimetic Sensitization of HIV-1-infected cells to ADCC.

    PubMed

    Richard, Jonathan; Prévost, Jérémie; von Bredow, Benjamin; Ding, Shilei; Brassard, Nathalie; Medjahed, Halima; Coutu, Mathieu; Melillo, Bruno; Bibollet-Ruche, Frédéric; Hahn, Beatrice H; Kaufmann, Daniel E; Smith, Amos B; Sodroski, Joseph; Sauter, Daniel; Kirchhoff, Frank; Gee, Katrina; Neil, Stuart J; Evans, David T; Finzi, Andrés

    2017-03-22

    Antibodies recognizing conserved CD4-induced (CD4i) epitopes on HIV-1 Env and able to mediate antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) have been shown to be present in sera from most HIV-1-infected individuals. These antibodies preferentially recognize Env in its CD4-bound conformation. CD4 downregulation by Nef and Vpu dramatically reduces exposure of CD4i HIV-1 Env epitopes and therefore reduce the susceptibility of HIV-1-infected cells to ADCC mediated by HIV+ sera. Importantly, this mechanism of immune evasion can be circumvented with small-molecule CD4-mimetics (CD4mc) which are able to transition Env into the CD4-bound conformation and sensitize HIV-1-infected cells to ADCC mediated by HIV+ sera. However, HIV-1 developed additional mechanisms to avoid ADCC including Vpu-mediated BST-2 antagonism, which decreases the overall amount of Env present at the cell surface. Accordingly, BST-2 up-regulation in response to IFN-α was shown to increase the susceptibility of HIV-1-infected cells to ADCC despite the activity of Vpu. Here we show that BST-2 upregulation by IFN-β and IL-27 also increases the surface expression of Env and thus boosts the ability of CD4mc to sensitize HIV-1-infected cells to ADCC by sera from HIV-1-infected individuals.IMPORTANCE HIV-1 evolved sophisticated strategies to conceal Env epitopes from ADCC-mediating antibodies present in HIV+ sera. Vpu-mediated BST-2 downregulation was shown to decrease ADCC responses by limiting the amount of Env present at the cell surface. This effect of Vpu was shown to be attenuated by IFN-α treatment. Here we show that in addition to IFN-α, IFN-β and IL-27 also affect Vpu-mediated BST-2 downregulation and greatly enhance ADCC responses against HIV-1-infected cells in the presence of CD4mc. These findings may inform strategies aimed at HIV prevention and eradication.

  8. Human CD4+ T cell recent thymic emigrants are identified by protein tyrosine kinase 7 and have reduced immune function

    PubMed Central

    Haines, Christopher J.; Giffon, Thierry D.; Lu, Li-Sheng; Lu, Xiaowei; Tessier-Lavigne, Marc; Ross, Douglas T.

    2009-01-01

    CD4+ recent thymic emigrants (RTEs) comprise a clinically and immunologically important T cell population that indicates thymic output and that is essential for maintaining a diverse αβ–T cell receptor (TCR) repertoire of the naive CD4+ T cell compartment. However, their frequency and function are poorly understood because no known surface markers distinguish them from older non-RTE naive CD4+ T cells. We demonstrate that protein tyrosine kinase 7 (PTK7) is a novel marker for human CD4+ RTEs. Consistent with their recent thymic origin, human PTK7+ RTEs contained higher levels of signal joint TCR gene excision circles and were more responsive to interleukin (IL)-7 compared with PTK7− naive CD4+ T cells, and rapidly decreased after complete thymectomy. Importantly, CD4+ RTEs proliferated less and produced less IL-2 and interferon-γ than PTK7− naive CD4+ T cells after αβ-TCR/CD3 and CD28 engagement. This immaturity in CD4+ RTE effector function may contribute to the reduced CD4+ T cell immunity observed in contexts in which CD4+ RTEs predominate, such as in the fetus and neonate or after immune reconstitution. The ability to identify viable CD4+ RTEs by PTK7 staining should be useful for monitoring thymic output in both healthy individuals and in patients with genetic or acquired CD4+ T cell immunodeficiencies. PMID:19171767

  9. CD4-independent, productive human immunodeficiency virus type 1 infection of hepatoma cell lines in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Y Z; Friedman-Kien, A E; Huang, Y X; Li, X L; Mirabile, M; Moudgil, T; Zucker-Franklin, D; Ho, D D

    1990-01-01

    Five hepatoma cell lines, including CZHC/8571, PLC/PRF/5, Hep3B, HepG2, and HUH7, were inoculated with three diverse isolates of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1). Productive infection was noted in all hepatoma cell lines, and expression of viral p24 antigen lasted for over 3 months, but its level decreased in proportion to the number of viable cells. HIV-1 antigens were also found in the cells by immunohistochemical staining and radioimmunoprecipitation assay, as were viral RNA by in situ hybridization and HIV-1-like particles by electron microscopy. Virus yield assays were also positive on supernatant fluids collected from hepatoma cultures inoculated with HIV-1. Despite their susceptibility to infection, all five hepatoma cell lines were negative for CD4 by immunofluorescence and for CD4 mRNA by slot-blot hybridization. In addition, HIV-1 infection of hepatoma cell lines was not blocked by anti-CD4 monoclonal antibody or soluble CD4. Together, these findings clearly demonstrate that all five hepatoma cell lines were susceptible to productive infection by HIV-1 in vitro via a CD4-independent mechanism. Images PMID:2159530

  10. Exogenous and endogenous hyaluronic acid reduces HIV infection of CD4(+) T cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Peilin; Fujimoto, Katsuya; Bourguingnon, Lilly; Yukl, Steven; Deeks, Steven; Wong, Joseph K

    2014-10-01

    Preventing mucosal transmission of HIV is critical to halting the HIV epidemic. Novel approaches to preventing mucosal transmission are needed. Hyaluronic acid (HA) is a major extracellular component of mucosa and the primary ligand for the cell surface receptor CD44. CD44 enhances HIV infection of CD4(+) T cells, but the role of HA in this process is not clear. To study this, virions were generated with CD44 (HIVCD44) or without CD44 (HIVmock). Exogenous HA reduced HIV infection of unstimulated CD4(+) T cells in a CD44-dependent manner. Conversely, hyaluronidase-mediated reduction of endogenous HA on the cell surface enhanced HIV binding to and infection of unstimulated CD4(+) T cells. Exogenous HA treatment reduced activation of protein kinase C alpha via CD44 on CD4(+) T cells during infection with HIVCD44. These results reveal new roles for HA during the interaction of HIV with CD4(+) T cells that may be relevant to mucosal HIV transmission and could be exploitable as a future strategy to prevent HIV infection.

  11. Imaging CD4+ T cell interstitial migration in the inflamed dermis

    PubMed Central

    Gaylo, Alison; Overstreet, Michael G.; Fowell, Deborah J.

    2017-01-01

    The ability of CD4+ T cells to carry out effector functions is dependent upon the rapid and efficient migration of these cells in inflamed peripheral tissues through an as-yet undefined mechanism. The application of multiphoton microscopy to the study of the immune system provides a tool to measure the dynamics of immune responses within intact tissues. Here we present a protocol for non-invasive intravital multiphoton imaging of CD4+ T cells in the inflamed mouse ear dermis. Use of a custom imaging platform and a venous catheter allows for the visualization of CD4+ T cell dynamics in the dermal interstitium, with the ability to interrogate these cells in real-time via the addition of blocking antibodies to key molecular components involved in motility. This system provides advantages over both in vitro models and surgically invasive imaging procedures. Understanding the pathways used by CD4+ T cells for motility may ultimately provide insight into the basic function of CD4+ T cells as well as the pathogenesis of both autoimmune diseases and pathology from chronic infections. PMID:27078264

  12. Migratory and lymphoid-resident dendritic cells cooperate to efficiently prime naive CD4 T cells.

    PubMed

    Allenspach, Eric J; Lemos, Maria P; Porrett, Paige M; Turka, Laurence A; Laufer, Terri M

    2008-11-14

    To initiate an adaptive immune response, rare antigen-specific naive CD4(+) T cells must interact with equally rare dendritic cells (DCs) bearing cognate peptide-major histocompatibility complex (MHC) complexes. Lymph nodes (LNs) draining the site of antigen entry are populated by lymphoid-resident DCs as well as DCs that have immigrated from tissues, although the requirement for each population in initiating the T cell response remains unclear. Here, we show that antigen processing and presentation by both lymphoid-resident and migratory DCs was required for clonal selection and expansion of CD4(+) T cells after subcutaneous immunization. Early antigen presentation by lymphoid-resident DCs initiated activation and trapping of antigen-specific T cells in the draining LN, without sufficing for clonal expansion. Migratory DCs, however, interacted with the CD4(+) T cells retained in the LN to induce proliferation. Therefore, distinct DC subsets cooperate to alert and trap the appropriate cell and then license its expansion and differentiation.

  13. Protection conferred by heterologous vaccination against tuberculosis is dependent on the ratio of CD4(+) /CD4(+)  Foxp3(+) cells.

    PubMed

    Fedatto, Paola Fernanda; Sérgio, Cássia Alves; Paula, Marina Oliveira e; Gembre, Ana Flávia; Franco, Luís Henrique; Wowk, Pryscilla Fanini; Ramos, Simone Gusmão; Horn, Cynthia; Marchal, Gilles; Turato, Walter Miguel; Silva, Célio Lopes; da Fonseca, Denise Morais; Bonato, Vânia Luiza Deperon

    2012-11-01

    CD4(+) Foxp3(+) regulatory T cells inhibit the production of interferon-γ, which is the major mediator of protection against Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection. In this study, we evaluated whether the protection conferred by three different vaccines against tuberculosis was associated with the number of spleen and lung regulatory T cells. We observed that after homologous immunization with the 65 000 molecular weight heat-shock protein (hsp 65) DNA vaccine, there was a significantly higher number of spleen CD4(+) Foxp3(+) cells compared with non-immunized mice. Heterologous immunization using bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) to prime and DNA-hsp 65 to boost (BCG/DNA-hsp 65) or BCG to prime and culture filtrate proteins (CFP)-CpG to boost (BCG/CFP-CpG) induced a significantly higher ratio of spleen CD4(+) /CD4(+) Foxp3(+) cells compared with non-immunized mice. In addition, the protection conferred by either the BCG/DNA-hsp 65 or the BCG/CFP-CpG vaccines was significant compared with the DNA-hsp 65 vaccine. Despite the higher ratio of spleen CD4(+) /CD4(+) Foxp3(+) cells found in BCG/DNA-hsp 65-immunized or BCG/CFP-CpG-immunized mice, the lungs of both groups of mice were better preserved than those of DNA-hsp 65-immunized mice. These results confirm the protective efficacy of BCG/DNA-hsp 65 and BCG/CFP-CpG heterologous prime-boost vaccines and the DNA-hsp 65 homologous vaccine. Additionally, the prime-boost regimens assayed here represent a promising strategy for the development of new vaccines to protect against tuberculosis because they probably induce a proper ratio of CD4(+) and regulatory (CD4(+) Foxp3(+) ) cells during the immunization regimen. In this study, this ratio was associated with a reduced number of regulatory cells and no injury to the lungs. © 2012 The Authors. Immunology © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  14. CD4+CD25+ T Regulatory Cells in Transplantation Tolerance: 25 Years On.

    PubMed

    Hall, Bruce M

    2016-12-01

    In the 1970s, the capacity of T cells to inhibit immunity and those from transplant tolerant hosts to transfer alloantigen-specific suppression to lymphopenic recipients was described. CD4 T suppressor cells that ex vivo reverted to effector cells were described in the 1980s. Their antigen-specific suppressor function could be preserved by stimulation by specific donor alloantigen and cytokines from activated lymphocytes. This led to the finding that alloantigen-specific T suppressor cells express IL-2 receptor (CD25) and that IL-2 in part promotes their survival.Whether these alloantigen-specific CD4CD25FOXP3 regulatory T (Treg) cells are progeny of thymic-derived CD4CD25FOXP3 Treg (tTreg) cells or are induced from peripheral effector CD4CD25FOXP3T cells (iTreg) cells is still debated.In vitro studies of antigen specific Treg has been difficult as they die in the absence of cytokines produced by immune activated cells. The antigen-specific CD4CD25 T cells that control rejection in tolerant hosts differ from the naive tTreg. Thymic-derived Treg cells are not antigen-specific, and very high ratios are required to suppress rejection. Thymic-derived Treg cells can be expanded ex vivo and are currently being tested in trials to control allograft rejection and graft versus host disease.Thymic-derived Treg cells with specific receptors for alloantigen are activated by either IL-2 or IL-4 but rapidly become dependent on other cytokines, respectively, IFN-γ or IL-12 if activated by IL-2, or IL-5 if activated by IL-4. The Th1 and Th2 pathways for activation of tTreg produce more potent antigen-specific Treg that only suppress specific donor rejection. After 25 years, much remains unknown about antigen-specific CD4CD25FOXP3 Treg-mediating transplant tolerance.

  15. Role of ROCK2 in CD4(+) cells in allergic airways responses in mice.

    PubMed

    Kasahara, D I; Mathews, J A; Ninin, F M C; Wurmbrand, A P; Liao, J K; Shore, S A

    2017-02-01

    Rho kinases (ROCKs) contribute to allergic airways disease. ROCKs also play a role in lymphocyte proliferation and migration. To determine the role of ROCK2 acting within CD4(+) cells in allergic airways responses. ROCK2-haploinsufficient (ROCK2(+/-) ) and wild-type mice were sensitized with ovalbumin (OVA). ROCK2(+/-) mice then received either CD4(+) cells from ROCK2-sufficient OVA TCR transgenic (OT-II) mice or saline i.v. 48 h before challenge with aerosolized OVA. Wild-type mice received saline before challenge. Allergic airways responses were measured 48 h after the last challenge. Allergic airways responses were also assessed in mice lacking ROCK2 only in CD4(+) cells (ROCK2(CD)(4Cre) mice) vs. control (CD4-Cre and ROCK2(flox/flox) ) mice. OVA-induced increases in bronchoalveolar lavage lymphocytes, eosinophils, IL-13, IL-5, and eotaxin were reduced in ROCK2(+/-) vs. wild-type mice, as were airway hyperresponsiveness and mucous hypersecretion. In ROCK2(+/-) mice, adoptive transfer with CD4(+) cells from OT-II mice restored effects of OVA on lymphocytes, eosinophils, IL-13, IL-5, and mucous hypersecretion to wild-type levels, whereas eotaxin and airway hyperresponsiveness were not affected. ROCK2 inhibitors reduced IL-13-induced release of eotaxin from airway smooth muscle (ASM), similar to effects of these inhibitors on ASM contractility. Despite the ability of adoptive transfer to restore allergic airways inflammation in ROCK2-insufficient mice, allergic inflammation was not different in ROCK2(CD)(4Cre) vs. control mice. ROCK2 contributes to allergic airways responses likely via effects within ASM cells and within non-lymphocyte cells involved in lymphocyte activation and migration into the airways. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Memory CD4+ T cells are suppressed by CD8+ regulatory T cells in vitro and in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Long, Xin; Cheng, Qi; Liang, Huifang; Zhao, Jianping; Wang, Jian; Wang, Wei; Tomlinson, Stephen; Chen, Lin; Atkinson, Carl; Zhang, Bixiang; Chen, Xiaoping; Zhu, Peng

    2017-01-01

    Background: Acute graft rejection mediated by alloreactive memory CD4+ T cells is a major obstacle to transplantation tolerance. It has been reported that CD8+ T regulatory cells (Tregs) have the ability to induce graft tolerance by restraining the function of activated CD4+ T cells, but not including memory T cells. The aim of this study is to elucidate the effect of CD8+ Tregs on alloreactive memory CD4+ T cells. Methods: We detected Qa-1 expression and performed proliferative assay on memory CD4+ T cells. All memory CD4+ T cells were purified from mice receiving skin allografts. We performed inhibitory and cytotoxic assays on CD8+ Tregs, which were isolated from a T cell vaccination mouse model, and IL-2, IL-4, IL-10 and IFN-γ levels were measured in co-culture supernatants by ELISA. To confirm CD8+ Tregs inhibition of memory CD4+ T cells in-vivo, we utilized a murine model of cardiac allograft transplantation. Results: Memory CD4+ T cells mediated acute allograft rejection, and CD8+ Tregs suppressed the proliferation of memory CD4+ T cells. In vitro, memory CD4+ T cells were inhibited and lysed by CD8+ Tregs. There was a positive correlation between IFN-γ levels, and cell lysis rate induced by CD8+ Tregs. In-vivo studies demonstrated CD8+ Tregs prolonged graft survival times, by inhibiting CD4+ memory T cells, through a Qa-1-peptide-TCR pathway. Conclusions: CD8+ Tregs inhibit CD4+ memory T cell-mediated acute murine cardiac allograft rejection, and further prolong graft survival times. These results provide new insights into immune regulation of organ rejection. PMID:28123634

  17. Toll like Receptor 2 engagement on CD4(+) T cells promotes TH9 differentiation and function.

    PubMed

    Karim, Ahmad Faisal; Reba, Scott M; Li, Qing; Boom, W Henry; Rojas, Roxana E

    2017-09-01

    We have recently demonstrated that mycobacterial ligands engage Toll like receptor 2 (TLR2) on CD4(+) T cells and up-regulate T-cell receptor (TCR) triggered Th1 responses in vitro and in vivo. To better understand the role of T-cell expressed TLR2 on CD4(+) T-cell differentiation and function, we conducted a gene expression analysis of murine naïve CD4(+) T-cells stimulated in the presence or absence of TLR2 co-stimulation. Unexpectedly, naïve CD4(+) T-cells co-stimulated via TLR2 showed a significant up-regulation of Il9 mRNA compared to cells co-stimulated via CD28. Under TH9 differentiation, we observed up-regulation of TH9 differentiation, evidenced by increases in both percent of IL-9 secreting cells and IL-9 in culture supernatants in the presence of TLR2 agonist both in polyclonal and Ag85B cognate peptide specific stimulations. Under non-polarizing conditions, TLR2 engagement on CD4(+) T-cells had minimal effect on IL-9 secretion and TH9 differentiation, likely due to a prominent effect of TLR2 signaling on IFN-γ secretion and TH1 differentiation. We also report that, TLR2 signaling in CD4(+) T cells increased expression of transcription factors BATF and PU.1, known to positively regulate TH9 differentiation. These results reveal a novel role of T-cell expressed TLR2 in enhancing the differentiation and function of TH9 T cells. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  18. Ultrasensitive detection and phenotyping of CD4+ T cells with optimized HLA class II tetramer staining.

    PubMed

    Scriba, Thomas J; Purbhoo, Marco; Day, Cheryl L; Robinson, Nicola; Fidler, Sarah; Fox, Julie; Weber, Jonathan N; Klenerman, Paul; Sewell, Andrew K; Phillips, Rodney E

    2005-11-15

    HLA class I tetramers have revolutionized the study of Ag-specific CD8+ T cell responses. Technical problems and the rarity of Ag-specific CD4+ Th cells have not allowed the potential of HLA class II tetramers to be fully realized. Here, we optimize HLA class II tetramer staining methods through the use of a comprehensive panel of HIV-, influenza-, CMV-, and tetanus toxoid-specific tetramers. We find rapid and efficient staining of DR1- and DR4-restricted CD4+ cell lines and clones and show that TCR internalization is not a requirement for immunological staining. We combine tetramer staining with magnetic bead enrichment to detect rare Ag-specific CD4+ T cells with frequencies as low as 1 in 250,000 (0.0004% of CD4+ cells) in human PBLs analyzed directly ex vivo. This ultrasensitive detection allowed phenotypic analysis of rare CD4+ T lymphocytes that had experienced diverse exposure to Ag during the course of viral infections. These cells would not be detectable with normal flow-cytometric techniques.

  19. Vaccination Produces CD4 T Cells with a Novel CD154-CD40-Dependent Cytolytic Mechanism.

    PubMed

    Coler, Rhea N; Hudson, Thomas; Hughes, Sean; Huang, Po-Wei D; Beebe, Elyse A; Orr, Mark T

    2015-10-01

    The discovery of new vaccines against infectious diseases and cancer requires the development of novel adjuvants with well-defined activities. The TLR4 agonist adjuvant GLA-SE elicits robust Th1 responses to a variety of vaccine Ags and is in clinical development for both infectious diseases and cancer. We demonstrate that immunization with a recombinant protein Ag and GLA-SE also induces granzyme A expression in CD4 T cells and produces cytolytic cells that can be detected in vivo. Surprisingly, these in vivo CTLs were CD4 T cells, not CD8 T cells, and this cytolytic activity was not dependent on granzyme A/B or perforin. Unlike previously reported CD4 CTLs, the transcription factors Tbet and Eomes were not necessary for their development. CTL activity was also independent of the Fas ligand-Fas, TRAIL-DR5, and canonical death pathways, indicating a novel mechanism of CTL activity. Rather, the in vivo CD4 CTL activity induced by vaccination required T cell expression of CD154 (CD40L) and target cell expression of CD40. Thus, vaccination with a TLR4 agonist adjuvant induces CD4 CTLs, which kill through a previously unknown CD154-dependent mechanism. Copyright © 2015 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  20. CD4 T cell recovery is slower in patients experiencing viral load rebounds during HAART

    PubMed Central

    Scott-Algara, D; Aboulker, J-P; Durier, C; Badell, E; Marcellin, F; Prud'homme, M; Jouanne, C; Meiffredy, V; Brun-Vezinet, F; Pialoux, G; Raffi, F

    2001-01-01

    To determine whether viral load rebounds during HAART impact on CD4+ T cell recovery and immune reconstitution, we studied a prospective cohort of 355 antiretroviral naive patients enrolled to be randomized in a trial of three strategies of induction/maintenance HAART. The extent of immune reconstitution in blood through 72 weeks of antiretroviral treatment was evaluated. Lymphocyte subset markers (CD4, CD8, CD45RA, CD62L, CD16, CD19), activation markers (HLA-DR, CD38, CD25) were performed by cytometry analysis. Our results showed that plasma HIV-1 RNA was suppressed to below 500 copies per ml through week 72 in 240 patients (group 1) while the remaining 115 patients experienced at least one viral rebound (group 2). At baseline, CD4 cell count was higher and HIV-1 RNA was lower in group 1 than in group 2. Over 72 weeks, mean increase in CD4+ T cell count was 0·32 cell/mm3/day in group 1 and only 0·14 cell/mm3/day in group 2 (P < 0·0001). However, the patterns of changes in CD4+ and CD8+ T cell subsets during therapy were very similar across the two groups with only subtle and very limited differences. We conclude that permanent control of HIV replication could be necessary for faster immune reconstitution. PMID:11703374

  1. Proportions of CD4+ memory T cells are altered in individuals chronically infected with Schistosoma haematobium

    PubMed Central

    Nausch, Norman; Bourke, Claire D.; Appleby, Laura J.; Rujeni, Nadine; Lantz, Olivier; Trottein, François; Midzi, Nicholas; Mduluza, Takafira; Mutapi, Francisca

    2012-01-01

    Characterisation of protective helminth acquired immunity in humans or experimental models has focused on effector responses with little work conducted on memory responses. Here we show for the first time, that human helminth infection is associated with altered proportions of the CD4+ memory T cells, with an associated alteration of TH1 responses. The reduced CD4+ memory T cell proportions are associated with a significantly lower ratio of schistosome-specific IgE/IgG4 (marker for resistance to infection/re-infection) in uninfected older people. Helminth infection does not affect the CD8+ memory T cell pool. Furthermore, we show for the first time in a helminth infection that the CD4+ memory T cell proportions decline following curative anti-helminthic treatment despite increased CD4+ memory cell replication. Reduced accumulation of the CD4+ memory T cells in schistosome-infected people has implications for the development of natural or vaccine induced schistosome-specific protective immunity as well as for unrelated pathogens. PMID:22737405

  2. Intestinal Epithelial Cells Modulate CD4 T Cell Responses via the Thymus Leukemia Antigen

    PubMed Central

    Olivares-Villagómez, Danyvid; Algood, Holly M. Scott; Singh, Kshipra; Parekh, Vrajesh V.; Ryan, Kaitlyn E.; Piazuelo, M. Blanca; Wilson, Keith T.; Van Kaer, Luc

    2011-01-01

    The intestinal epithelium is comprised of a monolayer of intestinal epithelial cells (IEC) which provide, among other functions, a physical barrier between the high antigen content of the intestinal lumen and the sterile environment beyond the epithelium. IEC express a non-classical MHC class I molecule known as the thymus leukemia (TL) antigen. TL is known to interact with CD8αα-expressing cells, which are abundant in the intestinal intraepithelial lymphocyte compartment. In this report we provide evidence indicating that expression of TL by IEC modulates the cytokine profile of CD4+ T cells favoring IL-17 production. We show in an adoptive transfer model of colitis that donor-derived cells become more pathogenic when TL is expressed on IEC in recipient animals. Moreover, TL+IEC promote development of IL-17-mediated responses capable of protecting mice from Citrobacter rodentium infection. We also show that modulation of IL-17-mediated responses by TL+IEC is controlled by the expression of CD8α on CD4+ T cells. Overall, our results provide evidence for an important interaction between IEC and CD4+ T cells via TL, which modulates mucosal immune responses. PMID:21900182

  3. Blimp-1–mediated CD4 T cell exhaustion causes CD8 T cell dysfunction during chronic toxoplasmosis

    PubMed Central

    Cobb, Dustin A.; Bhadra, Rajarshi

    2016-01-01

    CD8, but not CD4, T cells are considered critical for control of chronic toxoplasmosis. Although CD8 exhaustion has been previously reported in Toxoplasma encephalitis (TE)–susceptible model, our current work demonstrates that CD4 not only become exhausted during chronic toxoplasmosis but this dysfunction is more pronounced than CD8 T cells. Exhausted CD4 population expressed elevated levels of multiple inhibitory receptors concomitant with the reduced functionality and up-regulation of Blimp-1, a transcription factor. Our data demonstrates for the first time that Blimp-1 is a critical regulator for CD4 T cell exhaustion especially in the CD4 central memory cell subset. Using a tamoxifen-dependent conditional Blimp-1 knockout mixed bone marrow chimera as well as an adoptive transfer approach, we show that CD4 T cell–intrinsic deletion of Blimp-1 reversed CD8 T cell dysfunction and resulted in improved pathogen control. To the best of our knowledge, this is a novel finding, which demonstrates the role of Blimp-1 as a critical regulator of CD4 dysfunction and links it to the CD8 T cell dysfunctionality observed in infected mice. The critical role of CD4-intrinsic Blimp-1 expression in mediating CD4 and CD8 T cell exhaustion may provide a rational basis for designing novel therapeutic approaches. PMID:27481131

  4. HIV-2 infects resting CD4+ T cells but not monocyte-derived dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Chauveau, Lise; Puigdomenech, Isabel; Ayinde, Diana; Roesch, Ferdinand; Porrot, Françoise; Bruni, Daniela; Visseaux, Benoit; Descamps, Diane; Schwartz, Olivier

    2015-01-13

    Human Immunodeficiency Virus-type 2 (HIV-2) encodes Vpx that degrades SAMHD1, a cellular restriction factor active in non-dividing cells. HIV-2 replicates in lymphocytes but the susceptibility of monocyte-derived dendritic cells (MDDCs) to in vitro infection remains partly characterized. Here, we investigated HIV-2 replication in primary CD4+ T lymphocytes, both activated and non-activated, as well as in MDDCs. We focused on the requirement of Vpx for productive HIV-2 infection, using the reference HIV-2 ROD strain, the proviral clone GL-AN, as well as two primary HIV-2 isolates. All HIV-2 strains tested replicated in activated CD4+ T cells. Unstimulated CD4+ T cells were not productively infected by HIV-2, but viral replication was triggered upon lymphocyte activation in a Vpx-dependent manner. In contrast, MDDCs were poorly infected when exposed to HIV-2. HIV-2 particles did not potently fuse with MDDCs and did not lead to efficient viral DNA synthesis, even in the presence of Vpx. Moreover, the HIV-2 strains tested were not efficiently sensed by MDDCs, as evidenced by a lack of MxA induction upon viral exposure. Virion pseudotyping with VSV-G rescued fusion, productive infection and HIV-2 sensing by MDDCs. Vpx allows the non-productive infection of resting CD4+ T cells, but does not confer HIV-2 with the ability to efficiently infect MDDCs. In these cells, an entry defect prevents viral fusion and reverse transcription independently of SAMHD1. We propose that HIV-2, like HIV-1, does not productively infect MDDCs, possibly to avoid triggering an immune response mediated by these cells.

  5. Exhaustion of bacteria-specific CD4 T cells and microbial translocation in common variable immunodeficiency disorders

    PubMed Central

    Vigano, Selena; Bellanger, Florence; Pellaton, Céline; Buss, Guillaume; Comte, Denis; Roger, Thierry; Lacabaratz, Christine; Bart, Pierre-Alexandre; Levy, Yves

    2014-01-01

    In the present study, we have investigated the functional profile of CD4 T cells from patients with common variable immunodeficiency (CVID), including production of cytokines and proliferation in response to bacteria and virus-derived antigens. We show that the functional impairment of CD4 T cells, including the reduced capacity to proliferate and to produce IFN-γ and IL-2, was restricted to bacteria-specific and not virus-specific CD4 T cells. High levels of endotoxins were found in the plasma of patients with CVID, suggesting that CD4 T cell dysfunction might be caused by bacterial translocation. Of note, endotoxemia was associated with significantly higher expression of programmed death 1 (PD-1) on CD4 T cells. The blockade of the PD-1–PD-L1/2 axis in vitro restored CD4 T cell proliferation capacity, thus indicating that PD-1 signaling negatively regulates CD4 T cell functions. Finally, we showed that intravenous immunoglobulin G (IVIG) treatment significantly reduced endotoxemia and the percentage of PD-1+ CD4 T cells, and restored bacteria-specific CD4 T cell cytokine production and proliferation. In conclusion, the present study demonstrates that the CD4 T cell exhaustion and functional impairment observed in CVID patients is associated with bacterial translocation and that IVIG treatment resolves bacterial translocation and restores CD4 T cell functions. PMID:25225461

  6. Complementary Dendritic Cell–activating Function of CD8+ and CD4+ T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Mailliard, Robbie B.; Egawa, Shinichi; Cai, Quan; Kalinska, Anna; Bykovskaya, Svetlana N.; Lotze, Michael T.; Kapsenberg, Martien L.; Storkus, Walter J.; Kalinski, Pawel

    2002-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) activated by CD40L-expressing CD4+ T cells act as mediators of “T helper (Th)” signals for CD8+ T lymphocytes, inducing their cytotoxic function and supporting their long-term activity. Here, we show that the optimal activation of DCs, their ability to produce high levels of bioactive interleukin (IL)-12p70 and to induce Th1-type CD4+ T cells, is supported by the complementary DC-activating signals from both CD4+ and CD8+ T cells. Cord blood– or peripheral blood–isolated naive CD8+ T cells do not express CD40L, but, in contrast to naive CD4+ T cells, they are efficient producers of IFN-γ at the earliest stages of the interaction with DCs. Naive CD8+ T cells cooperate with CD40L-expressing naive CD4+ T cells in the induction of IL-12p70 in DCs, promoting the development of primary Th1-type CD4+ T cell responses. Moreover, the recognition of major histocompatibility complex class I–presented epitopes by antigen-specific CD8+ T cells results in the TNF-α– and IFN-γ–dependent increase in the activation level of DCs and in the induction of type-1 polarized mature DCs capable of producing high levels of IL-12p70 upon a subsequent CD40 ligation. The ability of class I–restricted CD8+ T cells to coactivate and polarize DCs may support the induction of Th1-type responses against class I–presented epitopes of intracellular pathogens and contact allergens, and may have therapeutical implications in cancer and chronic infections. PMID:11854360

  7. Lenalidomide potentiates CD4(+)CD25(+)Treg-related suppression of lymphoma B-cell proliferation.

    PubMed

    Grygorowicz, Monika Anna; Borycka, Ilona Sara; Nowak, Eliza; Paszkiewicz-Kozik, Ewa; Rymkiewicz, Grzegorz; Błachnio, Katarzyna; Biernacka, Marzena; Bujko, Mateusz; Walewski, Jan; Markowicz, Sergiusz

    2016-03-10

    We have previously found that ex vivo expanded human CD4(+)CD25(+)Treg cells suppress proliferation of lymphoma B-cell lines. Here we demonstrate that the immunomodulatory drug lenalidomide potentiates suppression of lymphoma B-cell proliferation by freshly isolated CD4(+)CD25(+)Tregs, as well as suppression by Tregs expanded polyclonally in the presence of rapamycin from CD4(+)CD25(+)T cells or CD4(+)CD25(+)CD127(lo)T cells. The regulation of lymphoma cell proliferation by Tregs pre-expanded with "third-party" allogeneic MoDCs in the presence of rapamycin was also potentiated by lenalidomide. Lenalidomide contributed to the suppression exerted by Tregs despite concomitant downregulation of Treg proliferation. Lenalidomide did not reduce the suppression of conventional T cells by expanded Tregs. The exposure of polyclonally expanded Tregs to lenalidomide did not significantly alter their phenotype. There was no uniform pattern of lenalidomide effect on Treg-mediated regulation of lymphoma B cells freshly isolated from patients. Freshly isolated lymphoma cells activated with multimeric CD40L and IL-4 to support their survival in vitro varied in their sensitivity to lenalidomide, and the regulatory effect of Tregs on such lymphoma cells ranged from suppression to help in individual patients. Lenalidomide potentiated or attenuated Treg effects on the survival of freshly isolated lymphoma cells. A combination of lenalidomide treatment with adoptive transfer of CD4(+)CD25(+)Tregs or CD4(+)CD25(+)CD127(lo)Tregs expanded ex vivo could be used to suppress proliferation of residual lymphoma in select patients with lymphoma responsive to the regulation by Tregs and sensitive to lenalidomide.

  8. Cofactor requirement for human immunodeficiency virus type 1 entry into a CD4-expressing human cell line.

    PubMed Central

    Harrington, R D; Geballe, A P

    1993-01-01

    Expression of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) receptor CD4 on many nonhuman and some human cell lines is not sufficient to permit HIV-1 infection. We describe a human glioblastoma cell line (U373-MG) which remains resistant to HIV-1 despite the added expression of an authentic CD4 molecule. The block to HIV-1 infection of these cells is strain independent and appears to be at viral entry. Heterokaryons of CD4-expressing U373-MG (U373-CD4) cells fused to HeLa cells allow HIV-1 entry. A U373-CD4/HeLa hybrid clone allows efficient HIV-1 replication. These results suggest that HeLa cells express a factor(s) that can complement the viral entry defect of U373-CD4 cells and is necessary for efficient CD4-mediated HIV-1 infection. Images PMID:7690415

  9. Expression of fas protein on CD4+T cells irradiated by low level He-Ne

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nie, Fan; Zhu, Jing; Zhang, Hui-Guo

    2005-07-01

    Objective: To investigate the influence on the Expression of Fas protein on CD4+ T cells irradiated by low level He-Ne laser in the cases of psoriasis. Methods:the expression of CD4+ T Fas protein was determined in the casee of psoriasis(n=5) pre and post-low level laser irradiation(30 min、60min and 120min)by flow cytometry as compared withthe control(n=5). Results:In the cases of psoriasis,the expression of CD4+T FAS protein 21.4+/-3.1% was increased significantly than that of control group 16.8+/-2.1% pre-irradiation, p<0.05in the control,there is no difference between pre and post- irradiation,p>0.05in the cases , the expression of CD4+T Fas protein wae positively corelated to the irradiation times, when the energy density arrived to 22.92J/cm2(60 minutes)and 45.84J/cm2(120minutes), the expression of CD4+ T Fas protein was increased significantly as compared with pre-irradiation,p<0.05.Conclusion: The expression of CD4+T Fas protein may be increased by low level He-Ne laser irradiation ,the uncontrolled status of apoptosis could be corrected.

  10. Green tea epigallocatechin-3-gallate modulates differentiation of naive CD4+ T cells into specific lineage effector cells

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    CD4+ T helper (Th) subsets Th1, Th9, and Th17 cells are implicated in inducing autoimmunity whereas regulatory T cells (Treg) have a protective effect. We previously showed that epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG) attenuated experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) and altered CD4+ T cell subpo...

  11. Cytotoxic CD4 T Cells-Friend or Foe during Viral Infection?

    PubMed

    Juno, Jennifer A; van Bockel, David; Kent, Stephen J; Kelleher, Anthony D; Zaunders, John J; Munier, C Mee Ling

    2017-01-01

    CD4 T cells with cytotoxic function were once thought to be an artifact due to long-term in vitro cultures but have in more recent years become accepted and reported in the literature in response to a number of viral infections. In this review, we focus on cytotoxic CD4 T cells in the context of human viral infections and in some infections that affect mice and non-human primates. We examine the effector mechanisms used by cytotoxic CD4 cells, the phenotypes that describe this population, and the transcription factors and pathways that lead to their induction following infection. We further consider the cells that are the predominant targets of this effector subset and describe the viral infections in which CD4 cytotoxic T lymphocytes have been shown to play a protective or pathologic role. Cytotoxic CD4 T cells are detected in the circulation at much higher levels than previously realized and are now recognized to have an important role in the immune response to viral infections.

  12. Gene Editing of CCR5 in Autologous CD4 T Cells of Persons Infected with HIV

    PubMed Central

    Tebas, Pablo; Stein, David; Tang, Winson W.; Frank, Ian; Wang, Shelley Q.; Lee, Gary; Spratt, S. Kaye; Surosky, Richard T.; Giedlin, Martin A.; Nichol, Geoff; Holmes, Michael C.; Gregory, Philip D.; Ando, Dale G.; Kalos, Michael; Collman, Ronald G.; Binder-Scholl, Gwendolyn; Plesa, Gabriela; Hwang, Wei-Ting; Levine, Bruce L.; June, Carl H.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND CCR5 is the major coreceptor for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). We investigated whether site-specific modification of the gene (“gene editing”) — in this case, the infusion of autologous CD4 T cells in which the CCR5 gene was rendered permanently dysfunctional by a zinc-finger nuclease (ZFN) — is safe. METHODS We enrolled 12 patients in an open-label, nonrandomized, uncontrolled study of a single dose of ZFN-modified autologous CD4 T cells. The patients had chronic aviremic HIV infection while they were receiving highly active antiretroviral therapy. Six of them underwent an interruption in antiretroviral treatment 4 weeks after the infusion of 10 billion autologous CD4 T cells, 11 to 28% of which were genetically modified with the ZFN. The primary outcome was safety as assessed by treatment-related adverse events. Secondary outcomes included measures of immune reconstitution and HIV resistance. RESULTS One serious adverse event was associated with infusion of the ZFN-modified autologous CD4 T cells and was attributed to a transfusion reaction. The median CD4 T-cell count was 1517 per cubic millimeter at week 1, a significant increase from the preinfusion count of 448 per cubic millimeter (P<0.001). The median concentration of CCR5-modified CD4 T cells at 1 week was 250 cells per cubic millimeter. This constituted 8.8% of circulating peripheral-blood mononuclear cells and 13.9% of circulating CD4 T cells. Modified cells had an estimated mean half-life of 48 weeks. During treatment interruption and the resultant viremia, the decline in circulating CCR5-modified cells (−1.81 cells per day) was significantly less than the decline in unmodified cells (−7.25 cells per day) (P = 0.02). HIV RNA became undetectable in one of four patients who could be evaluated. The blood level of HIV DNA decreased in most patients. CONCLUSIONS CCR5-modified autologous CD4 T-cell infusions are safe within the limits of this study. (Funded by the National

  13. Gene editing of CCR5 in autologous CD4 T cells of persons infected with HIV.

    PubMed

    Tebas, Pablo; Stein, David; Tang, Winson W; Frank, Ian; Wang, Shelley Q; Lee, Gary; Spratt, S Kaye; Surosky, Richard T; Giedlin, Martin A; Nichol, Geoff; Holmes, Michael C; Gregory, Philip D; Ando, Dale G; Kalos, Michael; Collman, Ronald G; Binder-Scholl, Gwendolyn; Plesa, Gabriela; Hwang, Wei-Ting; Levine, Bruce L; June, Carl H

    2014-03-06

    CCR5 is the major coreceptor for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). We investigated whether site-specific modification of the gene ("gene editing")--in this case, the infusion of autologous CD4 T cells in which the CCR5 gene was rendered permanently dysfunctional by a zinc-finger nuclease (ZFN)--is safe. We enrolled 12 patients in an open-label, nonrandomized, uncontrolled study of a single dose of ZFN-modified autologous CD4 T cells. The patients had chronic aviremic HIV infection while they were receiving highly active antiretroviral therapy. Six of them underwent an interruption in antiretroviral treatment 4 weeks after the infusion of 10 billion autologous CD4 T cells, 11 to 28% of which were genetically modified with the ZFN. The primary outcome was safety as assessed by treatment-related adverse events. Secondary outcomes included measures of immune reconstitution and HIV resistance. One serious adverse event was associated with infusion of the ZFN-modified autologous CD4 T cells and was attributed to a transfusion reaction. The median CD4 T-cell count was 1517 per cubic millimeter at week 1, a significant increase from the preinfusion count of 448 per cubic millimeter (P<0.001). The median concentration of CCR5-modified CD4 T cells at 1 week was 250 cells per cubic millimeter. This constituted 8.8% of circulating peripheral-blood mononuclear cells and 13.9% of circulating CD4 T cells. Modified cells had an estimated mean half-life of 48 weeks. During treatment interruption and the resultant viremia, the decline in circulating CCR5-modified cells (-1.81 cells per day) was significantly less than the decline in unmodified cells (-7.25 cells per day) (P=0.02). HIV RNA became undetectable in one of four patients who could be evaluated. The blood level of HIV DNA decreased in most patients. CCR5-modified autologous CD4 T-cell infusions are safe within the limits of this study. (Funded by the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases and others

  14. Increased Mucosal CD4+ T Cell Activation in Rhesus Macaques following Vaccination with an Adenoviral Vector

    PubMed Central

    Bukh, Irene; Calcedo, Roberto; Roy, Soumitra; Carnathan, Diane G.; Grant, Rebecca; Qin, Qiuyue; Boyd, Surina; Ratcliffe, Sarah J.; Veeder, Christin L.; Bellamy, Scarlett L.; Betts, Michael R.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT The possibility that vaccination with adenovirus (AdV) vectors increased mucosal T cell activation remains a central hypothesis to explain the potential enhancement of HIV acquisition within the Step trial. Modeling this within rhesus macaques is complicated because human adenoviruses, including human adenovirus type 5 (HAdV-5), are not endogenous to macaques. Here, we tested whether vaccination with a rhesus macaque-derived adenoviral vector (simian adenovirus 7 [SAdV-7]) enhances mucosal T cell activation within rhesus macaques. Following intramuscular SAdV-7 vaccination, we observed a pronounced increase in SAdV-7-specific CD4+ T cell responses in peripheral blood and, more dramatically, in rectal mucosa tissue. Vaccination also induced a significant increase in the frequency of activated memory CD4+ T cells in SAdV-7- and HAdV-5-vaccinated animals in the rectal mucosa but not in peripheral blood. These fluctuations within the rectal mucosa were also associated with a pronounced decrease in the relative frequency of naive resting CD4+ T cells. Together, these results indicate that peripheral vaccination with an AdV vector can increase the activation of mucosal CD4+ T cells, potentially providing an experimental model to further evaluate the role of host-vector interactions in increased HIV acquisition after AdV vector vaccination. IMPORTANCE The possibility that vaccination with a human adenovirus 5 vector increased mucosal T cell activation remains a central hypothesis to explain the potential enhancement of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) acquisition within the Step trial. In this study, we tested whether vaccination with a rhesus macaque-derived adenoviral vector in rhesus macaques enhances mucosal CD4+ T cell activation, the main cell target of simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV)/HIV. The results showed that vaccination with an adenoviral vector indeed increases activation of mucosal CD4+ T cells and potentially increases susceptibility to SIV

  15. AFP-specific CD4+ Helper T-cell Responses in Healthy Donors and HCC Patients

    PubMed Central

    Evdokimova, Viktoria N.; Liu, Yang; Potter, Douglas M.; Butterfield, Lisa H.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is one of the most common cancers worldwide, and is often diagnosed at an advanced stage. We have investigated α-fetoprotein (AFP) as a tumor-associated antigen for HCC. We identified major histocompatibility complex class I-restricted peptide epitopes derived from AFP and studied CD8+ T-cell responses in vivo and in vitro in ongoing immunotherapy studies. Helper T cells are of critical importance in shaping the immune response; therefore, we investigated the frequency and function of AFP-specific CD4+ T cells in the general population and among HCC patients. CD4+ T-cell responses were assessed by direct ex vivo multicytokine enzyme-linked immunospot assay and by measurement of cytokine levels using a multicytokine assay. Our analysis indicates that healthy donors have very low frequencies of AFP-specific CD4+ T-cell responses, which are of TH1 type, detectable ex vivo. In contrast, these T cells were either reduced or eliminated in HCC patients at advanced stages of disease. To better activate these cells, we compared the stimulatory capacity of both AFP protein-fed and AdVhAFP-engineered dendritic cells (DC). Healthy donors have CD4+ T-cell responses, which were activated in response to AFP protein-fed DC whereas HCC patients do not demonstrate significant responses to AFP protein. AdVhAFP-transduced DC were capable of activating higher frequency TH1 CD4+ responses to AFP in both healthy donors and AFP-positive HCC patients. Importantly, CD4+ T-cell cytokine expression profiles were skewed towards interleukin-2 and interferon-γ production when activated by adenovirally engineered DC, which has therapeutic implications for vaccination efforts. PMID:17457217

  16. The Induction and Maintenance of Transplant Tolerance Engages Both Regulatory and Anergic CD4(+) T cells.

    PubMed

    Besançon, Alix; Baas, Marije; Goncalves, Tania; Valette, Fabrice; Waldmann, Herman; Chatenoud, Lucienne; You, Sylvaine

    2017-01-01

    Therapeutic tolerance to self-antigens or foreign antigens is thought to depend on constant vigilance by Foxp3(+) regulatory T cells (Tregs). Previous work using a pancreatic islet allograft model and a short pulse of CD3 antibody therapy has shown that CD8(+) T cells become anergic and use TGFβ and coinhibitory signaling as their contribution to the tolerance process. Here, we examine the role of CD4(+) T cells in tolerization by CD3 antibodies. We show that both Foxp3(+) Tregs and CD4(+) T cell anergy play a role in the induction of tolerance and its maintenance. Foxp3(+) Tregs resisted CD3 antibody-mediated depletion, unlike intragraft Th1 CD4(+) lymphocytes coexpressing granzyme B and Tbx21, which were selectively eliminated. Tregs were mandatory for induction of tolerance as their depletion at the time of CD3 antibody therapy or for a short time thereafter, by an antibody to CD25 (PC61), led to graft rejection. Early treatment with CTLA-4 antibody gave the same outcome. In contrast, neither PC61 nor anti-CTLA-4 given late, at day 100 posttransplant, reversed tolerance once established. Ablation of Foxp3 T cells after diphtheria toxin injection in tolerant Foxp3(DTR) recipient mice provided the same outcome. Alloreactive T cells had been rendered intrinsically unresponsive as total CD4(+) or Treg-deprived CD4(+) T cells from tolerant recipients were unable to mount donor-specific IFN-γ responses. In addition, intragraft Treg-deprived CD4(+) T cells lacked proliferative capacities, expressed high levels of the inhibitory receptor PD-1, and exhibited a CD73(hi)FR4(hi) phenotype, thus reflecting a state of T cell anergy. We conclude that Tregs play a substantive and critical role in guiding the immune system toward tolerance of the allograft, when induced by CD3 antibody, but are less important for maintenance of the tolerant state, where T cell anergy appears sufficient.

  17. Cytotoxic CD4 T Cells: Differentiation, Function, and Application to Dengue Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Yuan; Sette, Alessandro; Weiskopf, Daniela

    2016-01-01

    Dengue virus (DENV) has spread through most tropical and subtropical areas of the world and represents a serious public health problem. The control of DENV infection has not yet been fully successful due to lack of effective therapeutics or vaccines. Nevertheless, a better understanding of the immune responses against DENV infection may reveal new strategies for eliciting and improving antiviral immunity. T cells provide protective immunity against various viral infections by generating effector cells that cooperate to eliminate antigens and memory cells that can survive for long periods with enhanced abilities to control recurring pathogens. Following activation, CD8 T cells can migrate to sites of infection and kill infected cells, whereas CD4 T cells contribute to the elimination of pathogens by trafficking to infected tissues and providing help to innate immune responses, B cells, as well as CD8 T cells. However, it is now evident that CD4 T cells can also perform cytotoxic functions and induce the apoptosis of target cells. Importantly, accumulating studies demonstrate that cytotoxic CD4 T cells develop following DENV infections and may play a crucial role in protecting the host from severe dengue disease. We review our current understanding of the differentiation and function of cytotoxic CD4 T cells, with a focus on DENV infection, and discuss the potential of harnessing these cells for the prevention and treatment of DENV infection and disease. PMID:28003809

  18. Cytotoxic CD4 T Cells: Differentiation, Function, and Application to Dengue Virus Infection.

    PubMed

    Tian, Yuan; Sette, Alessandro; Weiskopf, Daniela

    2016-01-01

    Dengue virus (DENV) has spread through most tropical and subtropical areas of the world and represents a serious public health problem. The control of DENV infection has not yet been fully successful due to lack of effective therapeutics or vaccines. Nevertheless, a better understanding of the immune responses against DENV infection may reveal new strategies for eliciting and improving antiviral immunity. T cells provide protective immunity against various viral infections by generating effector cells that cooperate to eliminate antigens and memory cells that can survive for long periods with enhanced abilities to control recurring pathogens. Following activation, CD8 T cells can migrate to sites of infection and kill infected cells, whereas CD4 T cells contribute to the elimination of pathogens by trafficking to infected tissues and providing help to innate immune responses, B cells, as well as CD8 T cells. However, it is now evident that CD4 T cells can also perform cytotoxic functions and induce the apoptosis of target cells. Importantly, accumulating studies demonstrate that cytotoxic CD4 T cells develop following DENV infections and may play a crucial role in protecting the host from severe dengue disease. We review our current understanding of the differentiation and function of cytotoxic CD4 T cells, with a focus on DENV infection, and discuss the potential of harnessing these cells for the prevention and treatment of DENV infection and disease.

  19. Reconstitution of CD4 T Cells in Bronchoalveolar Lavage Fluid after Initiation of Highly Active Antiretroviral Therapy▿

    PubMed Central

    Knox, Kenneth S.; Vinton, Carol; Hage, Chadi A.; Kohli, Lisa M.; Twigg, Homer L.; Klatt, Nichole R.; Zwickl, Beth; Waltz, Jeffrey; Goldman, Mitchell; Douek, Daniel C.; Brenchley, Jason M.

    2010-01-01

    The massive depletion of gastrointestinal-tract CD4 T cells is a hallmark of the acute phase of HIV infection. In contrast, the depletion of the lower-respiratory-tract mucosal CD4 T cells as measured in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid is more moderate and similar to the depletion of CD4 T cells observed in peripheral blood (PB). To understand better the dynamics of disease pathogenesis and the potential for the reconstitution of CD4 T cells in the lung and PB following the administration of effective antiretroviral therapy, we studied cell-associated viral loads, CD4 T-cell frequencies, and phenotypic and functional profiles of antigen-specific CD4 T cells from BAL fluid and blood before and after the initiation of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART). The major findings to emerge were the following: (i) BAL CD4 T cells are not massively depleted or preferentially infected by HIV compared to levels for PB; (ii) BAL CD4 T cells reconstitute after the initiation of HAART, and their infection frequencies decrease; (iii) BAL CD4 T-cell reconstitution appears to occur via the local proliferation of resident BAL CD4 T cells rather than redistribution; and (iv) BAL CD4 T cells are more polyfunctional than CD4 T cells in blood, and their functional profile is relatively unchanged after the initiation of HAART. Taken together, these data suggest mechanisms for mucosal CD4 T-cell depletion and interventions that might aid in the reconstitution of mucosal CD4 T cells. PMID:20610726

  20. Imbalance of circulating CD4(+)CXCR5(+)FOXP3(+) Tfr-like cells and CD4(+)CXCR5(+)FOXP3(-) Tfh-like cells in myasthenia gravis.

    PubMed

    Wen, Yanbin; Yang, Baifeng; Lu, Jiayin; Zhang, Junmei; Yang, Huan; Li, Jing

    2016-09-06

    Follicular regulatory T (Tfr) cells are defined as a specialized subset of regulatory T cells (Tregs) that act to control the overactivation of follicular helper T (Tfh) cells and B cells in germinal centers. Accumulating evidence has demonstrated that the dysregulation of either Tfr cells or Tfh cells results in abnormal germinal center responses that contribute to the pathogenesis of autoimmune diseases. However, the role that Tfr cells and Tfh cells play in myasthenia gravis (MG) remains unclear. This study revealed a significantly decreased frequency of CD4(+)CXCR5(+)FOXP3(+) Tfr-like cells and an increased frequency of CD4(+)CXCR5(+)FOXP3(-) Tfh-like cells in the peripheral blood of MG patients compared with healthy controls. Moreover, the Tfr-like/Tfh-like ratio was inversely correlated with the clinical severity of the MG patients. Interestingly, glucocorticoid (GC) treatment can restore the imbalance of circulating Tfr-like/Tfh-like cells, and this restoration is accompanied by reduced clinical symptoms. These results suggested, for the first time, that an imbalance of circulating Tfr-like and Tfh-like cells may be involved in the immunopathogenesis of MG and may provide novel insight for the development of MG therapies.

  1. Platelets modulate the immune response following trauma by interaction with CD4+ T regulatory cells in a mouse model.

    PubMed

    Bergmann, Christian B; Hefele, Friederike; Unger, Marina; Huber-Wagner, Stefan; Biberthaler, Peter; van Griensven, Martijn; Hanschen, Marc

    2016-04-01

    CD4+ T regulatory cells (Tregs) play a pivotal role in the anti-inflammatory immune response following trauma. The mechanisms of CD4+ Treg activation are mostly unknown. Here, we hypothesize that platelets regulate CD4+ Treg activation following trauma. In a murine burn injury model (male C57Bl/6N mice), depletion of platelets or CD4+ Tregs was conducted. Draining lymph nodes, blood and spleen were harvested 2 h and 7 days after trauma. CD4+ Treg activation was measured using phospho- and conventional flow cytometry. Platelet activation was analyzed using thromboelastometry and flow cytometry. Trauma differentially activates CD4+ T cells, early after trauma only CD4+ Tregs are activated. Following burn injury, platelets augment the activation of CD4+ Tregs. This effect could only be seen early after trauma. While CD4+ Tregs influence hemostasis early following trauma, platelet activation markers were unchanged. Beyond their role in hemostasis, platelets are able to modulate the immunologic host response to trauma-induced injury by augmenting the activation of CD4+ Tregs. CD4+ Treg activation following trauma is considered protective. In addition, CD4+ Tregs are capable of modulating the hemostatic function of platelets. For the first time, we could show reciprocal activation of platelets and CD4+ Tregs as part of the protective immune response following trauma.

  2. HLA-DPB1 mismatch alleles represent powerful leukemia rejection antigens in CD4 T-cell immunotherapy after allogeneic stem-cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Herr, W; Eichinger, Y; Beshay, J; Bloetz, A; Vatter, S; Mirbeth, C; Distler, E; Hartwig, U F; Thomas, S

    2017-02-01

    Refractory or relapsed acute myeloid leukemia (AML) represents a frequent complication after allogeneic hematopoietic stem-cell transplantation (HSCT). We show herein that primary in vitro stimulation of CD45RA-selected CD4 T cells of stem-cell donors with 10/10 HLA-matched AML blasts results in expansion of cytolytic T-lymphocytes (CTL) that almost all recognize HLA-DPB1 mismatch alleles, which clinically occur in up to 80% of donor-patient pairs. Primary AML blasts were found to strongly express HLA-DPB1, whereas fibroblasts and keratinocytes used as surrogate target cells for graft-versus-host disease did express HLA-DPB1 only upon IFN-γ pre-treatment. Since patients' AML blasts are rarely available in clinical routine, we developed a protocol based on stimulation of donor-derived CD45RA-selected CD4 T cells with autologous dendritic cells electroporated with RNA encoding patients' HLA-DPB1 mismatch alleles. Short-term stimulated T cell-lines specifically lysed HLA-DPB1 mismatch-expressing AML blasts, but not fibroblasts and keratinocytes without IFN-γ pre-treatment. Notably, these CD4 CTL efficiently eliminated AML blasts upon adoptive transfer into leukemia-engrafted NSG mice. In conclusion, we show strong immunogenicity of HLA-DPB1 mismatch alleles in CD45RA-selected CD4 T cells of stem-cell donors and introduce a novel strategy to reliably generate HLA-DPB1-specific CD4 CTL that might be powerful cellular therapeutics in relapsed or refractory AML after HSCT.

  3. [In vitro amplification of CD4(+) CD25(+) regulatory T cells and identification of amplified T cell immunosuppressive function].

    PubMed

    Weng, Wen-Jun; Pan, Li; Fang, Jian-Pei; Xu, Lv-Hong

    2013-10-01

    This study was purposed to compare the effect of 3 different cell components for expanding CD4(+) CD25(+) Treg in vitro, and identify their immunosuppressive function. CD4(+) T cells, CD4(+) CD25(-)T cells and CD4(+) CD25(+)T cells were isolated from mouse splenocytes by MACS and then expanded in vitro. Phenotype of the T cell lines and expression of the FOXP3 was determined by flow cytometry. The inhibitory effect of expanded CD4(+) CD25(+) T cells on CD4(+) CD25(-)T cells was tested by MLR method. The results showed that the Treg cells from all the three groups were expanded significantly after culture for 2 weeks. In the CD4(+) T cells group, the proliferation rate was (77.8 ± 5.32) folds with a percentage of Treg cells increasing from (6.61 ± 1.00)% to (15.33 ± 1.31)%. The proliferation rate in the CD4(+) CD25(-) T cells group was (95.20 ± 7.67) folds, with the percentage of CD4(+) CD25(+) T cells raising from (0.37 ± 0.13)% to (9.84 ± 0.98)%. The proliferation rate in the CD4(+) CD25(+) T cells group was (41.20 ± 6.92) folds, the proportion of Treg cells decreased from (86.75 ± 1.25)% to (85.32 ± 1.62)%, and the expression of Foxp3 decreased from (76.92 ± 1.72)% to (75.33 ± 2.11)% during the culture, there were not significant differences in the cell purity and the expression of Foxp3, compared with pre-amplification. The inhibitory test showed that the expanded CD4(+) CD25(+) T cells could inhibit the proliferation of CD4(+) CD25(-) T cells in vitro in a cell dose-dependent manner. It is concluded that the amplification of CD4(+) CD25(+) Treg cells is successful in vitro, especially in the CD4(+) CD25(+) T cells group, the cell purity and Foxp3 gene is not obviously changes after amplification.

  4. Memory CD4+ T cells induce innate responses independently of pathogen.

    PubMed

    Strutt, Tara M; McKinstry, K Kai; Dibble, John P; Winchell, Caylin; Kuang, Yi; Curtis, Jonathan D; Huston, Gail; Dutton, Richard W; Swain, Susan L

    2010-05-01

    Inflammation induced by recognition of pathogen-associated molecular patterns markedly affects subsequent adaptive responses. We asked whether the adaptive immune system can also affect the character and magnitude of innate inflammatory responses. We found that the response of memory, but not naive, CD4(+) T cells enhances production of multiple innate inflammatory cytokines and chemokines (IICs) in the lung and that, during influenza infection, this leads to early control of virus. Memory CD4(+) T cell-induced IICs and viral control require cognate antigen recognition and are optimal when memory cells are either T helper type 1 (T(H)1) or T(H)17 polarized but are independent of interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) production and do not require activation of conserved pathogen recognition pathways. This represents a previously undescribed mechanism by which memory CD4(+) T cells induce an early innate response that enhances immune protection against pathogens.

  5. HIV-1 outcompetes HIV-2 in dually infected Senegalese individuals with low CD4+ cell counts

    PubMed Central

    Raugi, Dana N.; Gottlieb, Geoffrey S.; Sow, Papa S.; Toure, Macoumba; Sall, Fatima; Gaye, Awa; N’doye, Ibra; Kiviat, Nancy B.; Hawes, Stephen E.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Dual infection with HIV-1 and HIV-2, which is not uncommon in West Africa, has implications for transmission, progression, and antiretroviral therapy (ART). Few studies have examined viral dynamics in this setting. Our objective was to directly compare HIV-1 and HIV-2 viral loads and to examine whether this relationship is associated with CD4+ cell count. Study design This is a retrospective analysis of data from observational cohort studies. Methods We compared HIV-1 and HIV-2 viral loads from 65 dually infected, ART-naive Senegalese individuals. Participants provided blood, oral fluid, and cervicovaginal lavage (CVL) or semen samples for virologic and immunologic testing. We assessed relationships between HIV-1 and HIV-2 levels using linear regression with generalized estimating equations to account for multiple study visits. Results After adjusting for CD4+ cell count, age, sex, and commercial sex work, HIV-1 RNA levels were significantly higher than HIV-2 levels in semen, CVL, and oral fluids. Despite similar peripheral blood mononuclear cell DNA levels among individuals with CD4+ cell counts above 500 cells/µl, individuals with CD4+ cell counts below 500 cells/µl had higher HIV-1 and lower HIV-2 DNA levels. Individuals with high CD4+ cell counts had higher mean HIV-1 plasma RNA viral loads than HIV-2, with HIV-1 levels significantly higher and HIV-2 levels trending toward lower mean viral loads among individuals with low CD4+ cell counts. Conclusion Our data are consistent with the hypothesis that with disease progression, HIV-1 outcompetes HIV-2 in dually infected individuals. This finding helps explain differences in prevalence and outcomes between HIV-1, HIV-2, and HIV-dual infection. PMID:23665777

  6. HTLV-1-infected thymic epithelial cells convey the virus to CD4(+) T lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Carvalho Barros, Luciana Rodrigues; Linhares-Lacerda, Leandra; Moreira-Ramos, Klaysa; Ribeiro-Alves, Marcelo; Machado Motta, Maria Cristina; Bou-Habib, Dumith Chequer; Savino, Wilson

    2017-08-14

    The human T-lymphotropic virus type-1 (HTLV-1) is the causative agent of adult T cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATL) and HTLV-1 associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis (HAM/TSP). CD4(+)T cells are the main target of HTLV-1, but other cell types are known to be infected, including immature lymphocytes. Developing T cells undergo differentiation in the thymus, through migration and interaction with the thymic microenvironment, in particular with thymic epithelial cells (TEC) the major component of this three dimensional meshwork of non-lymphoid cells. Herein, we show that TEC express the receptors for HTLV-1 and can be infected by this virus through cell-cell contact and by cell-free virus suspensions. The expression of anti-apoptosis, chemokine and adhesion molecules genes are altered in HTLV-1-infected TEC, although gene expression of antigen presentation molecules remained unchanged. Furthermore, HTLV-1-infected TEC transmitted the virus to a CD4(+) T cell line and to CD4(+) T cells from healthy donors, during in vitro cellular co-cultures. Altogether, our data point to the possibility that the human thymic epithelial cells play a role in the establishment and progression of HTLV-1 infection, functioning as a reservoir and transmitting the virus to maturing CD4(+) T lymphocytes, which in turn will cause disease in the periphery. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier GmbH.

  7. The BMP Pathway Participates in Human Naive CD4+ T Cell Activation and Homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Martínez, Víctor G.; Sacedón, Rosa; Hidalgo, Laura; Valencia, Jaris; Fernández-Sevilla, Lidia M.; Hernández-López, Carmen

    2015-01-01

    Bone Morphogenetic Proteins (BMPs) form a group of secreted factors that belongs to the TGF-β superfamily. Among different roles in a number of immune cell types, BMPs are known to regulate T cell development within the thymus, although the role of BMP signaling in human mature T cells remains elusive. In this study, we demonstrate that canonical BMP signaling is necessary during two critical events that regulate the size and function of human naive CD4+ T cell population: activation and homeostasis. Upon stimulation via TCR, naive CD4+ T cells upregulate the expression of BMP ligands triggering canonical BMP signaling in CD25+ cells. Blockade of BMP signaling severely impairs CD4+ T cell proliferation after activation mainly through regulation of IL-2, since the addition of this cytokine recuperates normal T cell expansion after inhibition of BMP signaling. Similarly, activation of canonical BMP pathway is required for both the maintenance of cell survival and the homeostatic proliferation induced by IL-7, a key factor for T cell homeostasis. Moreover, upregulation of two critical receptors for T cell homeostasis, CXCR4 and CCR9, triggered by IL-7 is also abrogated in the absence of BMP signaling. Collectively, we describe important roles of the canonical BMP signaling in human naive CD4+ T cell activation and homeostasis that could be valuable for clinical application. PMID:26110906

  8. Th40 cells (CD4+CD40+ Tcells) drive a more severe form of Experimental Autoimmune Encephalomyelitis than conventional CD4 T cells

    PubMed Central

    Vaitaitis, Gisela M.; Yussman, Martin G.; Waid, Dan M.; Wagner, David H.

    2017-01-01

    CD40-CD154 interaction is critically involved in autoimmune diseases, and CD4 T cells play a dominant role in the Experimental Autoimmune Encephalomyelitis (EAE) model of Multiple Sclerosis (MS). CD4 T cells expressing CD40 (Th40) are pathogenic in type I diabetes but have not been evaluated in EAE. We demonstrate here that Th40 cells drive a rapid, more severe EAE disease course than conventional CD4 T cells. Adoptively transferred Th40 cells are present in lesions in the CNS and are associated with wide spread demyelination. Primary Th40 cells from EAE-induced donors adoptively transfer EAE without further in-vitro expansion and without requiring the administration of the EAE induction regimen to the recipient animals. This has not been accomplished with primary, non-TCR-transgenic donor cells previously. If co-injection of Th40 donor cells with Freund’s adjuvant (CFA) in the recipient animals is done, the disease course is more severe. The CFA component of the EAE induction regimen causes generalized inflammation, promoting expansion of Th40 cells and infiltration of the CNS, while MOG-antigen shapes the antigen-specific TCR repertoire. Those events are both necessary to precipitate disease. In MS, viral infections or trauma may induce generalized inflammation in susceptible individuals with subsequent disease onset. It will be important to further understand the events leading up to disease onset and to elucidate the contributions of the Th40 T cell subset. Also, evaluating Th40 levels as predictors of disease onset would be highly useful because if either the generalized inflammation event or the TCR-honing can be interrupted, disease onset may be prevented. PMID:28192476

  9. Heritable Gene Regulation in the CD4:CD8 T Cell Lineage Choice

    PubMed Central

    Issuree, Priya D. A.; Ng, Charles P.; Littman, Dan R.

    2017-01-01

    The adaptive immune system is dependent on functionally distinct lineages of T cell antigen receptor αβ-expressing T cells that differentiate from a common progenitor in the thymus. CD4+CD8+ progenitor thymocytes undergo selection following interaction with MHC class I and class II molecules bearing peptide self-antigens, giving rise to CD8+ cytotoxic and CD4+ helper or regulatory T cell lineages, respectively. The strict correspondence of CD4 and CD8 expression with distinct cellular phenotypes has made their genes useful surrogates for investigating molecular mechanisms of lineage commitment. Studies of Cd4 and Cd8 transcriptional regulation have uncovered cis-regulatory elements that are critical for mediating epigenetic modifications at distinct stages of development to establish heritable transcriptional programs. In this review, we examine the epigenetic mechanisms involved in Cd4 and Cd8 gene regulation during T cell lineage specification and highlight the features that make this an attractive system for uncovering molecular mechanisms of heritability. PMID:28382035

  10. Specific interaction of aurintricarboxylic acid with the human immunodeficiency virus/CD4 cell receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Schols, D.; Baba, M.; Pauwels, R.; Desmyter, J.; De Clercq, E. )

    1989-05-01

    The triphenylmethane derivative aurintricarboxylic acid (ATA), but not aurin, selectively prevented the binding of OKT4A/Leu-3a monoclonal antibody (mAb) and, to a lesser extent, OKT4 mAb to the CD4 cell receptor for human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1). The effect was seen within 1 min at an ATA concentration of 10 {mu}M in various T4{sup +} cells (MT-4, U-937, peripheral blood lymphocytes, and monocytes). It was dose-dependent and reversible. ATA prevented the attachment of radiolabeled HIV-1 particles to MT-4 cells, which could be expected as the result of its specific binding to the HIV/CD4 receptor. Other HIV inhibitors such as suramin, fuchsin acid, azidothymidine, dextran sulfate, heparin, and pentosan polysulfate did not affect OKT4A/Leu-3a mAb binding to the CD4 receptor, although the sulfated polysaccharides suppressed HIV-1 adsorption to the cells at concentrations required for complete protection against HIV-1 cytopathogenicity. Thus, ATA is a selective marker molecule for the CD4 receptor. ATA also interfered with the staining of membrane-associated HIV-1 glycoprotein gp120 by a mAb against it. These unusual properties of a small molecule of nonimmunological origin may have important implications for the study of CD4/HIV/AIDS pathogenesis and possibly treatment.

  11. In vivo evidence for CD4+ and CD8+ suppressor T cells in vaccination-induced suppression of murine experimental autoimmune thyroiditis

    SciTech Connect

    Flynn, J.C.; Kong, Y.C. )

    1991-09-01

    In several experimental autoimmune diseases, including experimental autoimmune thyroiditis (EAT), vaccination with attenuated autoantigen-specific T cells has provided protection against subsequent induction of disease. However, the mechanism(s) of vaccination-induced suppression remains to be clarified. Since the authors have previously shown that suppression generated by pretreatment with mouse thyroglobulin (MTg) or thyroid-stimulating hormone in EAT is mediated by CD4+, not CD8+, suppressor T cells, they examined the role of T cell subsets in vaccination-induced suppression of EAT. Mice were vaccinated with irradiated, MTg-primed, and MTg-activated spleen cells and then challenged. Pretreatment with these cells suppressed EAT induced by immunization with MTg and adjuvant, but not by adoptive transfer of thyroiditogenic cells, suggesting a mechanism of afferent suppression. The activation of suppressor mechanisms did not require CD8+ cells, since mice depleted of CD8+ cells before vaccination showed reduced EAT comparable to control vaccinated mice. Furthermore, depletion of either the CD4+ or the CD8+ subset after vaccination did not significantly abrogate suppression. However, suppression was eliminated by the depletion of both CD4+ and CD8+ cells in vaccinated mice. These results provide evidence for the cooperative effects of CD4+ and CD8+ T cells in vaccination-induced suppression of EAT.

  12. Tumor-infiltrating HLA-matched CD4(+) T cells retargeted against Hodgkin and Reed-Sternberg cells.

    PubMed

    Rengstl, Benjamin; Schmid, Frederike; Weiser, Christian; Döring, Claudia; Heinrich, Tim; Warner, Kathrin; Becker, Petra S A; Wistinghausen, Robin; Kameh-Var, Sima; Werling, Eva; Billmeier, Arne; Seidl, Christian; Hartmann, Sylvia; Abken, Hinrich; Küppers, Ralf; Hansmann, Martin-Leo; Newrzela, Sebastian

    2016-06-01

    Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) presents with a unique histologic pattern. Pathognomonic Hodgkin and Reed-Sternberg (HRS) cells usually account for less than 1% of the tumor and are embedded in a reactive infiltrate mainly comprised of CD4(+) T cells. HRS cells induce an immunosuppressive microenvironment and thereby escape antitumor immunity. To investigate the impact of interactions between HRS cells and T cells, we performed long-term co-culture studies that were further translated into a xenograft model. Surprisingly, we revealed a strong antitumor potential of allogeneic CD4(+) T cells against HL cell lines. HRS and CD4(+) T cells interact by adhesion complexes similar to immunological synapses. Tumor-cell killing was likely based on the recognition of allogeneic major histocompatibility complex class II (MHC-II) receptor, while CD4(+) T cells from MHC-II compatible donors did not develop any antitumor potential in case of HL cell line L428. However, gene expression profiling (GEP) of co-cultured HRS cells as well as tumor infiltration of matched CD4(+) T cells indicated cellular interactions. Moreover, matched CD4(+) T cells could be activated to kill CD30(+) HRS cells when redirected with a CD30-specific chimeric antigen receptor. Our work gives novel insights into the crosstalk between HRS and CD4(+) T cells, suggesting the latter as potent effector cells in the adoptive cell therapy of HL.

  13. Tumor-infiltrating HLA-matched CD4+ T cells retargeted against Hodgkin and Reed–Sternberg cells

    PubMed Central

    Rengstl, Benjamin; Schmid, Frederike; Weiser, Christian; Döring, Claudia; Heinrich, Tim; Warner, Kathrin; Becker, Petra S. A.; Wistinghausen, Robin; Kameh-Var, Sima; Werling, Eva; Billmeier, Arne; Seidl, Christian; Hartmann, Sylvia; Abken, Hinrich; Küppers, Ralf; Hansmann, Martin-Leo; Newrzela, Sebastian

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) presents with a unique histologic pattern. Pathognomonic Hodgkin and Reed–Sternberg (HRS) cells usually account for less than 1% of the tumor and are embedded in a reactive infiltrate mainly comprised of CD4+ T cells. HRS cells induce an immunosuppressive microenvironment and thereby escape antitumor immunity. To investigate the impact of interactions between HRS cells and T cells, we performed long-term co-culture studies that were further translated into a xenograft model. Surprisingly, we revealed a strong antitumor potential of allogeneic CD4+ T cells against HL cell lines. HRS and CD4+ T cells interact by adhesion complexes similar to immunological synapses. Tumor-cell killing was likely based on the recognition of allogeneic major histocompatibility complex class II (MHC-II) receptor, while CD4+ T cells from MHC-II compatible donors did not develop any antitumor potential in case of HL cell line L428. However, gene expression profiling (GEP) of co-cultured HRS cells as well as tumor infiltration of matched CD4+ T cells indicated cellular interactions. Moreover, matched CD4+ T cells could be activated to kill CD30+ HRS cells when redirected with a CD30-specific chimeric antigen receptor. Our work gives novel insights into the crosstalk between HRS and CD4+ T cells, suggesting the latter as potent effector cells in the adoptive cell therapy of HL. PMID:27471632

  14. Intrahepatic CD4+ cell depletion in hepatitis C virus/HIV-coinfected patients.

    PubMed

    Canchis, P Wilfredo; Yee, Herman T; Fiel, M Isabel; Dieterich, Douglas T; Liu, Ruei-Che; Chiriboga, Luis; Jacobson, Ira M; Edlin, Brian R; Talal, Andrew H

    2004-09-01

    Coinfection with HIV and hepatitis C virus (HCV)-specific immune responses, increases hepatic inflammation, accelerates hepatic fibrosis, and is associated with deceased treatment responses. We quantified intrahepatic lymphocyte and hepatocyte phenotypes in HCV-infected patients with (n = 38) and without (n = 41) HIV infection. A single pathologist counted positive cells in 5 portal and 5 lobular areas. Coinfected patients had 6.81 +/- 1.9 fewer CD4 cells per portal field (10.58 +/- 1.12 vs. 4.97 +/- 1.09 cells/high-power field [HPF]; P < 0.001) and 0.48 +/- 0.15 more apoptotic lymphocytes per lobular field (0.16 +/- 0.06 vs. 0.64 +/- 0.15 cell/HPF; P = 0.002) than monoinfected patients. The number of portal CD4 cells was not associated with the peripheral CD4 cell number. Portal and lobular CD8 cells did not differ between the 2 groups. Portal proliferative hepatocytes were increased in coinfected patients with HIV RNA levels of >400 copies/mL (1.13 +/- 0.32 cells/HPF; P = 0.01) compared with those with undetectable HIV RNA (0.46 +/- 0.09 cell/HPF) and monoinfected patients (0.45 +/- 0.08 cell/HPF). In conclusion, HIV coinfection is associated with fewer portal CD4 cells and increased lobular lymphocyte apoptosis that may impact on the natural history of HCV infection.

  15. 2-Gy whole-body irradiation significantly alters the balance of CD4+CD25− T effector cells and CD4+CD25+Foxp3+ T regulatory cells in mice

    PubMed Central

    Qu, Yanyan; Zhang, Baojun; Liu, Shuchun; Zhang, Aijun; Wu, Tingting; Zhao, Yong

    2010-01-01

    CD4+CD25+ T regulatory (Treg) cells are critical in inducing and maintaining immunological self-tolerance as well as transplant tolerance. The effect of low doses of whole-body irradiation (WBI) on CD4+CD25+Foxp3+ Treg cells has not been determined. The proportion, phenotypes and function of CD4+CD25+ Treg cells were investigated 0.5, 5 and 15 days after euthymic, thymectomized or allogeneic bone marrow transplanted C57BL/6 mice received 2-Gy γ-rays of WBI. The 2-Gy WBI significantly enhanced the ratios of CD4+CD25+ Treg cells and CD4+CD25+Foxp3+ Treg cells to CD4+ T cells in peripheral blood, lymph nodes, spleens and thymi of mice. The CD4+CD25+ Treg cells of the WBI-treated mice showed immunosuppressive activities on the immune response of CD4+CD25− T effector cells to alloantigens or mitogens as efficiently as the control mice. Furthermore, 2-Gy γ-ray WBI significantly increased the percentage of CD4+CD25+Foxp3+ Treg cells in the periphery of either thymectomized mice or allogeneic bone marrow transplanted mice. The in vitro assay showed that ionizing irradiation induced less cell death in CD4+CD25+Foxp3+ Treg cells than in CD4+CD25− T cells. Thus, a low dose of WBI could significantly enhance the level of functional CD4+CD25+Foxp3+ Treg cells in the periphery of naive or immunized mice. The enhanced proportion of CD4+CD25+Foxp3+ Treg cells in the periphery by a low dose of WBI may make hosts more susceptible to immune tolerance induction. PMID:20871628

  16. High CD4+ T cell density is associated with poor prognosis in patients with non-muscle-invasive bladder cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Qinglei; Hao, Chongli; Cheng, Guangzhou; Wang, Lei; Wang, Xiang; Li, Chang; Qiu, Juhui; Ding, Kejia

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to investigate the clinical significance of CD4+ T cells in non-muscle-invasive bladder cancer (NMIBC) tissues in situ. Methods: Immunohistochemistry was used to examine the distribution of CD4+ T cells in 131 NMIBC tissues. Kaplan-Meier analysis and Cox proportional hazards regression models were applied to estimate overall survival (OS) and recurrence-free survival (RFS). Results: NMIBC patients were divided into two groups based on the median frequency of CD4+ T cells (median, 1/×400 high resolution). On univariate analysis, CD4+ T cell density was inversely associated with overall survival (P = 0.01). In those patients with high CD4+ T density, 5-year OS rates was only 77%, compared with 86% in those with low density, respectively. Although CD4+ T cell density showed no prognostic significance for RFS (P = 0.36), 5-year RFS rates of patients with high CD4+ T density (58%) was lower than those of patients with low CD4+ T density (65%, respectively). By multivariate analysis, tumor infiltrating CD4+ T cell density emerged as an independent prognostic factor for OS (HR, 2.75; P = 0.004). In addition, no association was found between CD4+ T cell density and any clinicopathological variables (P > 0.05). Conclusion: Our findings suggest that CD4+ T cells could potentially serve as a poor prognostic marker for patients with NMIBC. PMID:26617883

  17. Suppression of CD4+ Effector Responses by Naturally Occurring CD4+ CD25+ Foxp3+ Regulatory T Cells Contributes to Experimental Cerebral Malaria

    PubMed Central

    Blanc, Anne-Laurence; Keswani, Tarun; Gorgette, Olivier; Bandeira, Antonio; Malissen, Bernard; Cazenave, Pierre-André

    2015-01-01

    The role of naturally occurring CD4+ CD25+ Foxp3+ regulatory T cells (nTreg) in the pathogenesis of cerebral malaria (CM), which involves both pathogenic T cell responses and parasite sequestration in the brain, is still unclear. To assess the contribution and dynamics of nTreg during the neuropathogenesis, we unbalanced the ratio between nTreg and naive CD4+ T cells in an attenuated model of Plasmodium berghei ANKA-induced experimental CM (ECM) by using a selective cell enrichment strategy. We found that nTreg adoptive transfer accelerated the onset and increased the severity of CM in syngeneic C57BL/6 (B6) P. berghei ANKA-infected mice without affecting the level of parasitemia. In contrast, naive CD4+ T cell enrichment prevented CM and promoted parasite clearance. Furthermore, early during the infection nTreg expanded in the spleen but did not efficiently migrate to the site of neuroinflammation, suggesting that nTreg exert their pathogenic action early in the spleen by suppressing the protective naive CD4+ T cell response to P. berghei ANKA infection in vivo in both CM-susceptible (B6) and CM-resistant (B6-CD4−/−) mice. However, their sole transfer was not sufficient to restore CM susceptibility in two CM-resistant congenic strains tested. Altogether, these results demonstrate that nTreg are activated and functional during P. berghei ANKA infection and that they contribute to the pathogenesis of CM. They further suggest that nTreg may represent an early target for the modulation of the immune response to malaria. PMID:26553468

  18. Suppression of CD4+ Effector Responses by Naturally Occurring CD4+ CD25+ Foxp3+ Regulatory T Cells Contributes to Experimental Cerebral Malaria.

    PubMed

    Blanc, Anne-Laurence; Keswani, Tarun; Gorgette, Olivier; Bandeira, Antonio; Malissen, Bernard; Cazenave, Pierre-André; Pied, Sylviane

    2015-11-09

    The role of naturally occurring CD4(+) CD25(+) Foxp3(+) regulatory T cells (nTreg) in the pathogenesis of cerebral malaria (CM), which involves both pathogenic T cell responses and parasite sequestration in the brain, is still unclear. To assess the contribution and dynamics of nTreg during the neuropathogenesis, we unbalanced the ratio between nTreg and naive CD4(+) T cells in an attenuated model of Plasmodium berghei ANKA-induced experimental CM (ECM) by using a selective cell enrichment strategy. We found that nTreg adoptive transfer accelerated the onset and increased the severity of CM in syngeneic C57BL/6 (B6) P. berghei ANKA-infected mice without affecting the level of parasitemia. In contrast, naive CD4(+) T cell enrichment prevented CM and promoted parasite clearance. Furthermore, early during the infection nTreg expanded in the spleen but did not efficiently migrate to the site of neuroinflammation, suggesting that nTreg exert their pathogenic action early in the spleen by suppressing the protective naive CD4(+) T cell response to P. berghei ANKA infection in vivo in both CM-susceptible (B6) and CM-resistant (B6-CD4(-/-)) mice. However, their sole transfer was not sufficient to restore CM susceptibility in two CM-resistant congenic strains tested. Altogether, these results demonstrate that nTreg are activated and functional during P. berghei ANKA infection and that they contribute to the pathogenesis of CM. They further suggest that nTreg may represent an early target for the modulation of the immune response to malaria. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  19. Abrogation of Rbpj Attenuates Experimental Autoimmune Uveoretinitis by Inhibiting IL-22-Producing CD4+ T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Ishifune, Chieko; Maekawa, Yoichi; Shimada, Mitsuo; Yasutomo, Koji

    2014-01-01

    Experimental autoimmune uveoretinitis (EAU) is an organ-specific T cell-mediated disease induced by immunizing mice with interphotoreceptor retinoid binding protein (IRBP). Autoaggressive CD4+ T cells are the major pathogenic population for EAU. We investigated the contribution of Notch signaling in T cells to EAU pathogenesis because Notch signaling regulates various aspects of CD4+ T cell functions. Rbpj is required for Notch signaling, and Rbpj deficiency in T cells inhibited EAU disease severity. The amelioration of EAU in T cell-specific Rbpj-deficient mice correlated with low levels of IL-22 production from CD4+ T cells, although IRBP-specific CD4+ T cell proliferation and Th17 differentiation were unaffected. Administration of recombinant IL-22 during the late phase, but not the early phase, of EAU increased EAU clinical scores in T cell-specific Rbpj-deficient mice. Notch inhibition in mice immunized with IRBP with a γ-secretase inhibitor (GSI) suppressed EAU progression, even when GSI was administered as late as 13 days after IRBP immunization. Our data demonstrate that Rbpj/Notch-mediated IL-22 production in T cells has a key pathological role in the late phase of EAU, and suggest that Notch blockade might be a useful therapeutic approach for treating EAU. PMID:24586644

  20. Abdominal visceral adiposity influences CD4+ T cell cytokine production in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Ozias, Marlies K; Li, Shengqi; Hull, Holly R; Brooks, William M; Petroff, Margaret G; Carlson, Susan E

    2015-02-01

    Women with pre-gravid obesity are at risk for pregnancy complications. While the macrophage response of obese pregnant women categorized by body mass index (BMI) has been documented, the relationship between the peripheral CD4(+) T cell cytokine profile and body fat compartments during pregnancy is unknown. In this study, third trimester peripheral CD4(+) T cell cytokine profiles were measured in healthy pregnant women [n=35; pre-pregnancy BMI: 18.5-40]. CD4(+) T cells were isolated from peripheral blood mononuclear cells and stimulated to examine their capacity to generate cytokines. Between 1 and 3weeks postpartum, total body fat was determined by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry and abdominal subcutaneous and visceral fat masses were determined by magnetic resonance imaging. Pearson's correlation was performed to assess relationships between cytokines and fat mass. Results showed that greater abdominal visceral fat mass was associated with a decrease in stimulated CD4(+) T cell cytokine expression. IFN-gamma, TNF-alpha, IL-12p70, IL-10 and IL-17A were inversely related to visceral fat mass. Chemokines CCL3 and IL-8 and growth factors G-CSF and FLT-3L were also inversely correlated. Additionally, total body fat mass was inversely correlated with FGF-2 while abdominal subcutaneous fat mass and BMI were unrelated to any CD4(+) T cell cytokine. In conclusion, lower responsiveness of CD4(+) T cell cytokines associated with abdominal visceral fat mass is a novel finding late in gestation. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Epigenetic Alterations May Regulate Temporary Reversal of CD4+ T Cell Activation Caused by Trichloroethylene Exposure

    PubMed Central

    Gilbert, Kathleen M.; Nelson, Ashley R.; Cooney, Craig A.; Reisfeld, Brad; Blossom, Sarah J.

    2012-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that short-term (4 weeks) or chronic (32 weeks) exposure to trichloroethylene (TCE) in drinking water of female MRL+/+ mice generated CD4+ T cells that secreted increased levels of interferon (IFN)-γ and expressed an activated (CD44hiCD62Llo) phenotype. In contrast, the current study of subchronic TCE exposure showed that midway in the disease process both of these parameters of CD4+ T cell activation were reversed. This phase of the disease process may represent an attempt by the body to counteract the inflammatory effects of TCE. The decrease in CD4+ T cell production of IFN-γ following subchronic TCE exposure could not be attributed to skewing toward a Th2 or Th17 phenotype or to an increase in Treg cells. Instead, the suppression corresponded to alterations in markers used to assess DNA methylation, namely increased expression of retrotransposons Iap (intracisternal A particle) and Muerv (murine endogenous retrovirus). Also observed was an increase in the expression of Dnmt1 (DNA methyltransferase-1) and decreased expression of several genes known to be downregulated by DNA methylation, namely Ifng, Il2, and Cdkn1a. CD4+ T cells from a second study in which MRL+/+ mice were treated for 17 weeks with TCE showed a similar increase in Iap and decrease in Cdkn1a. In addition, DNA collected from the CD4+ T cells in the second study showed TCE-decreased global DNA methylation. Thus, these results described the biphasic nature of TCE-induced alterations in CD4+ T cell function and suggested that these changes represented potentially reversible alterations in epigenetic processes. PMID:22407948

  2. Distinct CD4 T-cell effects on primary versus recall CD8 T-cell responses during viral encephalomyelitis.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Mihyun; Phares, Timothy W; Hinton, David R; Stohlman, Stephen A; Bergmann, Cornelia C; Min, Booki

    2015-03-01

    CD4 T-cell help is not a universal requirement for effective primary CD8 T cells but is essential to generate memory CD8 T cells capable of recall responses. This study examined how CD4 T cells affect primary and secondary anti-viral CD8 T-cell responses within the central nervous system (CNS) during encephalomyelitis induced by sublethal gliatropic coronavirus. CD4 T-cell depletion before infection did not impair peripheral expansion, interferon-γ production, CNS recruitment or initial CNS effector capacity of virus-specific CD8 T cells ex vivo. Nevertheless, impaired virus control in the absence of CD4 T cells was associated with gradually diminished CNS CD8 T-cell interferon-γ production. Furthermore, within the CD8 T-cell population short-lived effector cells were increased and memory precursor effector cells were significantly decreased, consistent with higher T-cell turnover. Transfer of memory CD8 T cells to reduce viral load in CD4-depleted mice reverted the recipient CNS CD8 T-cell phenotype to that in wild-type control mice. However, memory CD8 T cells primed without CD4 T cells and transferred into infected CD4-sufficient recipients expanded less efficiently and were not sustained in the CNS, contrasting with their helped counterparts. These data suggest that CD4 T cells are dispensable for initial expansion, CNS recruitment and differentiation of primary resident memory CD8 T cells as long as the duration of antigen exposure is limited. By contrast, CD4 T cells are essential to prolong primary CD8 T-cell function in the CNS and imprint memory CD8 T cells for recall responses. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Distinct CD4 T-cell effects on primary versus recall CD8 T-cell responses during viral encephalomyelitis

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Mihyun; Phares, Timothy W; Hinton, David R; Stohlman, Stephen A; Bergmann, Cornelia C; Min, Booki

    2015-01-01

    CD4 T-cell help is not a universal requirement for effective primary CD8 T cells but is essential to generate memory CD8 T cells capable of recall responses. This study examined how CD4 T cells affect primary and secondary anti-viral CD8 T-cell responses within the central nervous system (CNS) during encephalomyelitis induced by sublethal gliatropic coronavirus. CD4 T-cell depletion before infection did not impair peripheral expansion, interferon-γ production, CNS recruitment or initial CNS effector capacity of virus-specific CD8 T cells ex vivo. Nevertheless, impaired virus control in the absence of CD4 T cells was associated with gradually diminished CNS CD8 T-cell interferon-γ production. Furthermore, within the CD8 T-cell population short-lived effector cells were increased and memory precursor effector cells were significantly decreased, consistent with higher T-cell turnover. Transfer of memory CD8 T cells to reduce viral load in CD4-depleted mice reverted the recipient CNS CD8 T-cell phenotype to that in wild-type control mice. However, memory CD8 T cells primed without CD4 T cells and transferred into infected CD4-sufficient recipients expanded less efficiently and were not sustained in the CNS, contrasting with their helped counterparts. These data suggest that CD4 T cells are dispensable for initial expansion, CNS recruitment and differentiation of primary resident memory CD8 T cells as long as the duration of antigen exposure is limited. By contrast, CD4 T cells are essential to prolong primary CD8 T-cell function in the CNS and imprint memory CD8 T cells for recall responses. PMID:25187405

  4. IL-6 promotes CD4(+) T-cell and B-cell activation during Plasmodium infection.

    PubMed

    Sebina, I; Fogg, L G; James, K R; Soon, M S F; Akter, J; Thomas, B S; Hill, G R; Engwerda, C R; Haque, A

    2017-10-01

    Humoral immunity develops in the spleen during blood-stage Plasmodium infection. This elicits parasite-specific IgM and IgG, which control parasites and protect against malaria. Studies in mice have elucidated cells and molecules driving humoral immunity to Plasmodium, including CD4(+) T cells, B cells, interleukin (IL)-21 and ICOS. IL-6, a cytokine readily detected in Plasmodium-infected mice and humans, is recognized in other systems as a driver of humoral immunity. Here, we examined the effect of infection-induced IL-6 on humoral immunity to Plasmodium. Using P. chabaudi chabaudi AS (PcAS) infection of wild-type and IL-6(-/-) mice, we found that IL-6 helped to control parasites during primary infection. IL-6 promoted early production of parasite-specific IgM but not IgG. Notably, splenic CD138(+) plasmablast development was more dependent on IL-6 than germinal centre (GC) B-cell differentiation. IL-6 also promoted ICOS expression by CD4(+) T cells, as well as their localization close to splenic B cells, but was not required for early Tfh-cell development. Finally, IL-6 promoted parasite control, IgM and IgG production, GC B-cell development and ICOS expression by Tfh cells in a second model, Py17XNL infection. IL-6 promotes CD4(+) T-cell activation and B-cell responses during blood-stage Plasmodium infection, which encourages parasite-specific antibody production. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Communication between Human Dendritic Cell Subsets in Tuberculosis: Requirements for Naive CD4+ T Cell Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Lozza, Laura; Farinacci, Maura; Bechtle, Marina; Stäber, Manuela; Zedler, Ulrike; Baiocchini, Andrea; del Nonno, Franca; Kaufmann, Stefan H. E.

    2014-01-01

    Human primary dendritic cells (DCs) are heterogeneous by phenotype, function, and tissue localization and distinct from inflammatory monocyte-derived DCs. Current information regarding the susceptibility and functional role of primary human DC subsets to Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) infection is limited. Here, we dissect the response of different primary DC subsets to Mtb infection. Myeloid CD11c+ cells and pDCs (C-type lectin 4C+ cells) were located in human lymph nodes (LNs) of tuberculosis (TB) patients by histochemistry. Rare CD141hi DCs (C-type lectin 9A+ cells) were also identified. Infection with live Mtb revealed a higher responsiveness of myeloid CD1c+ DCs compared to CD141hi DCs and pDCs. CD1c+ DCs produced interleukin (IL)-6, tumor necrosis factor α, and IL-1β but not IL-12p70, a cytokine important for Th1 activation and host defenses against Mtb. Yet, CD1c+ DCs were able to activate autologous naïve CD4+ T cells. By combining cell purification with fluorescence-activated cell sorting and gene expression profiling on rare cell populations, we detected in responding CD4+ T cells, genes related to effector-cytolytic functions and transcription factors associated with Th1, Th17, and Treg polarization, suggesting multifunctional properties in our experimental conditions. Finally, immunohistologic analyses revealed contact between CD11c+ cells and pDCs in LNs of TB patients and in vitro data suggest that cooperation between Mtb-infected CD1c+ DCs and pDCs favors stimulation of CD4+ T cells. PMID:25071784

  6. Longitudinal changes in CD4(+) T-cell memory responses induced by BCG vaccination of newborns.

    PubMed

    Soares, Andreia P; Kwong Chung, Cheong K C; Choice, Terry; Hughes, E Jane; Jacobs, Gail; van Rensburg, Esme Janse; Khomba, Gloria; de Kock, Marwou; Lerumo, Lesedi; Makhethe, Lebohang; Maneli, Mbulelo H; Pienaar, Bernadette; Smit, Erica; Tena-Coki, Nontobeko G; van Wyk, Leandre; Boom, W Henry; Kaplan, Gilla; Scriba, Thomas J; Hanekom, Willem A

    2013-04-01

    Improved vaccination strategies against tuberculosis are needed, such as approaches to boost immunity induced by the current vaccine, BCG. Design of these strategies has been hampered by a lack of knowledge of the kinetics of the human host response induced by neonatal BCG vaccination. Furthermore, the functional and phenotypic attributes of BCG-induced long-lived memory T-cell responses remain unclear. We assessed the longitudinal CD4 T-cell response following BCG vaccination of human newborns. The kinetics, function, and phenotype of these cells were measured using flow cytometric whole-blood assays. We showed that the BCG-specific CD4 T-cell response peaked 6-10 weeks after vaccination and gradually waned over the first year of life. Highly activated T-helper 1 cells, predominantly expressing interferon γ, tumor necrosis factor α, and/or interleukin 2, were present at the peak response. Following contraction, BCG-specific CD4 T cells expressed high levels of Bcl-2 and displayed a predominant CD45RACCR7 central memory phenotype. However, cytokine and cytotoxic marker expression by these cells was more characteristic of effector memory cells. Our findings suggest that boosting of BCG-primed CD4 T cells with heterologous tuberculosis vaccines may be best after 14 weeks of age, once an established memory response has developed.

  7. Longitudinal Changes in CD4+ T-Cell Memory Responses Induced by BCG Vaccination of Newborns

    PubMed Central

    Soares, Andreia P.; Kwong Chung, Cheong K. C.; Choice, Terry; Hughes, E. Jane; Jacobs, Gail; van Rensburg, Esme Janse; Khomba, Gloria; de Kock, Marwou; Lerumo, Lesedi; Makhethe, Lebohang; Maneli, Mbulelo H.; Pienaar, Bernadette; Smit, Erica; Tena-Coki, Nontobeko G.; van Wyk, Leandre; Boom, W. Henry; Kaplan, Gilla; Scriba, Thomas J.; Hanekom, Willem A.

    2013-01-01

    Background. Improved vaccination strategies against tuberculosis are needed, such as approaches to boost immunity induced by the current vaccine, BCG. Design of these strategies has been hampered by a lack of knowledge of the kinetics of the human host response induced by neonatal BCG vaccination. Furthermore, the functional and phenotypic attributes of BCG-induced long-lived memory T-cell responses remain unclear. Methods. We assessed the longitudinal CD4+ T-cell response following BCG vaccination of human newborns. The kinetics, function, and phenotype of these cells were measured using flow cytometric whole-blood assays. Results. We showed that the BCG-specific CD4+ T-cell response peaked 6–10 weeks after vaccination and gradually waned over the first year of life. Highly activated T-helper 1 cells, predominantly expressing interferon γ, tumor necrosis factor α, and/or interleukin 2, were present at the peak response. Following contraction, BCG-specific CD4+ T cells expressed high levels of Bcl-2 and displayed a predominant CD45RA–CCR7+ central memory phenotype. However, cytokine and cytotoxic marker expression by these cells was more characteristic of effector memory cells. Conclusions. Our findings suggest that boosting of BCG-primed CD4+ T cells with heterologous tuberculosis vaccines may be best after 14 weeks of age, once an established memory response has developed. PMID:23293360

  8. HIV-1 gp120 induces NFAT nuclear translocation in resting CD4+ T-cells

    SciTech Connect

    Cicala, Claudia . E-mail: ccicala@nih.gov; Arthos, James; Censoplano, Nina; Cruz, Catherine; Chung, Eva; Martinelli, Elena; Lempicki, Richard A.; Natarajan, Ven; VanRyk, Donald; Daucher, Marybeth; Fauci, Anthony S.

    2006-02-05

    The replication of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) in CD4+ T-cells is strongly dependent upon the state of activation of infected cells. Infection of sub-optimally activated cells is believed to play a critical role in both the transmission of virus and the persistence of CD4+ T-cell reservoirs. There is accumulating evidence that HIV can modulate signal-transduction pathways in a manner that may facilitate replication in such cells. We previously demonstrated that HIV gp120 induces virus replication in resting CD4+ T cells isolated from HIV-infected individuals. Here, we show that in resting CD4+ T-cells, gp120 activates NFATs and induces their translocation into the nucleus. The HIV LTR encodes NFAT recognition sites, and NFATs may play a critical role in promoting viral replication in sub-optimally activated cells. These observations provide insight into a potential mechanism by which HIV is able to establish infection in resting cells, which may have implications for both transmission of HIV and the persistence of viral reservoirs.

  9. Abnormal T cell receptor signal transduction of CD4 Th cells in X-linked lymphoproliferative syndrome.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, H; Zarycki, J; Sullivan, J L; Jung, J U

    2001-09-01

    The molecular basis of X-linked lymphoproliferative (XLP) disease has been attributed to mutations in the signaling lymphocytic activation molecule-associated protein (SAP), an src homology 2 domain-containing intracellular signaling molecule known to interact with the lymphocyte-activating surface receptors signaling lymphocytic activation molecule and 2B4. To investigate the effect of SAP defects on TCR signal transduction, herpesvirus saimiri-immortalized CD4 Th cells from XLP patients and normal healthy individuals were examined for their response to TCR stimulation. CD4 T cells of XLP patients displayed elevated levels of tyrosine phosphorylation compared with CD4 T cells from healthy individuals. In addition, downstream serine/threonine kinases are constitutively active in CD4 T cells of XLP patients. In contrast, TCR-mediated activation of Akt, c-Jun-NH(2)-terminal kinases, and extracellular signal-regulated kinases in XLP CD4 T cells was transient and rapidly diminished when compared with that in control CD4 T cells. Consequently, XLP CD4 T cells exhibited severe defects in up-regulation of IL-2 and IFN-gamma cytokine production upon TCR stimulation and in MLRs. Finally, SAP specifically interacted with a 75-kDa tyrosine-phosphorylated protein upon TCR stimulation. These results demonstrate that CD4 T cells from XLP patients exhibit aberrant TCR signal transduction and that the defect in SAP function is likely responsible for this phenotype.

  10. [The expression of CD(4+) T cells in different bacteria strain-induced mice periodontitis].

    PubMed

    Wang, Lin-yuan; Jin, Ying; Lin, Xiao-ping

    2014-02-01

    To compare the expression of CD(4+) T cells in mice periodontitis induced by two periodontal pathogen strains, and evaluate the role of CD(4+) T cells in periodontitis. Twelve C57BL/6 mice were divided into 3 groups at random including sham-infected, Porphyromonas gingivalis (P. gingivalis) W83-infected and P. gingivalis ATCC 33277-infected groups. All mice were sacrificed at the 4th week after the last infection. The analysis of alveolar bone resorption and the examination of histological staining were performed. The population of CD(4+) T cells in the gingivae and the cervical lymph nodes (CLNs) were analyzed by flow cytometry. SPSS 11.0 software package was used for statistical analysis. The levels of alveolar bone resorption were significantly high in both P. gingivalis W83-infected and P. gingivalis ATCC 33277-infected mice compared to sham-infected mice. Histological staining showed that the loss of periodontal attachment and osteoclasts-mediated alveolar bone resorption were found in both P. gingivalis W83-infected and P. gingivalis ATCC 33277-infected mice. Moreover, the periodontal destruction was severer in P. gingivalis W83-infected mice than in P. gingivalis ATCC 33277-infected mice. Flow cytometry showed that the percentage of CD(4+) T cells in the gingivae and CLNs in both P. gingivalis W83-infected and P. gingivalis ATCC 33277-infected mice were significantly higher than that in sham mice, and P. gingivalis W83-infected mice had a higher percentage of CD(4+) T cells compared to P. gingivalis ATCC 33277-infected mice. The population of CD(4+) T cells participates in the pathogenesis of periodontitis, and closely correlates with the periodontal destruction induced by periodontal pathogen infection. Supported by Higher School Specialized Research Fund for Doctoral Program(20112104110013) and Science and Technology Plan of Liaoning Province(2012225015).

  11. Function and regulation of LAG3 on CD4(+)CD25(-) T cells in non-small cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Ma, Qin-Yun; Huang, Da-Yu; Zhang, Hui-Jun; Wang, Shaohua; Chen, Xiao-Feng

    2017-09-19

    LAG3 is a surface molecule found on a subset of immune cells. The precise function of LAG3 appears to be context-dependent. In this study, we investigated the effect of LAG3 on CD4(+)CD25(-) T cells from non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients. We found that in the peripheral blood mononuclear cells of NSCLC patients, LAG3 was significantly increased in CD4(+) T cells directly ex vivo and primarily in the CD4(+)CD25(-) fraction, which was regulated by prolonged TCR stimulation and the presence of IL-27. TCR stimulation also increased CD25 expression, but not Foxp3 expression, in LAG3-expressing CD4(+)CD25(-) cells Compared to LAG3-nonexpressing CD4(+)CD25(-) cells, LAG3-expressing CD4(+)CD25(-) cells presented significantly higher levels of PD1 and TIM3, two inhibitory receptors best described in exhausted CD8(+) T effector cells. LAG3-expressing CD4(+)CD25(-) cells also presented impaired proliferation compared with LAG3-nonexpressing CD4(+)CD25(-) cells but could be partially rescued by inhibiting both PD1 and TIM3. Interestingly, CD8(+) T cells co-incubated with LAG3-expressing CD4(+)CD25(-) cells at equal cell numbers demonstrated significantly lower proliferation than CD8(+) T cells incubated alone. Co-culture with CD8(+) T cell and LAG3-expressing CD4(+)CD25(-) T cell also upregulated soluble IL-10 level in the supernatant, of which the concentration was positively correlated with the number of LAG3-expressing CD4(+)CD25(-) T cells. In addition, we found that LAG3-expressing CD4(+)CD25(-) T cells infiltrated the resected tumors and were present at higher frequencies of in metastases than in primary tumors. Taken together, these data suggest that LAG3-expressing CD4(+)CD25(-) T cells represent another regulatory immune cell type with potential to interfere with anti-tumor immunity. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Selective Expansion of Memory CD4+ T cells By Mitogenic Human CD28 Generates Inflammatory Cytokines and Regulatory T cells

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Manisha; Basu, Sreemanti; Camell, Christina; Couturier, Jacob; Nudelman, Rodolfo J.; Medina, Miguel A.; Rodgers, John R.; Lewis, Dorothy E.

    2009-01-01

    Co-stimulatory signals are important for development of effector and regulatory T cells. In this case, CD28 signaling is usually considered inert in the absence of signaling through the TCR. By contrast, mitogenic rat CD28 mAbs reportedly expand regulatory T cells without TCR stimulation. We found that a commercially available human CD28 mAb (ANC28) stimulated PBMCs without TCR co-ligation or cross-linking; ANC28 selectively expanded CD4+CD25+FoxP3−(T effector) and CD4+CD25+FoxP3+ (Treg) cells. ANC28 stimulated the CD45RO+ CD4+ (memory) population whereas CD45RA+CD4+ (naïve) cells did not respond. ANC28 also induced inflammatory cytokines. Treg induced by ANC28 retain the Treg phenotype longer than did co-stimulated Treg. Treg induced by ANC28 suppressed CD25− T cells through a contact-dependent mechanism. Purity influenced the response of CD4+CD25+ cells because bead-purified CD4+CD25+ cells (85–90% pure) responded strongly to ANC28, whereas 98% pure FACS-sorted CD4+CD25 bright (T-reg) did not respond. Purified CD4+CD25int cells responded similarly to the bead-purified CD4+CD25+ cells. Thus, pre-activated CD4+ T cells (CD25int) respond to ANC28 rather than Treg (CD25bright). The ability of ANC28 to expand both effectors producing inflammatory cytokines as well as suppressive regulatory T cells might be useful for ex vivo expansion of therapeutic T cells. PMID:18446791

  13. Increased TTS abrogates IDO-mediated CD4(+) T cells suppression in patients with Graves' disease.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shu; Mao, Chaoming; Zhao, Zefei; Gu, Qiaoli; Jin, Min; Xiao, Yichuan; Jiang, Xiaohua; Zhao, Yongju; Zhang, Yanyun; Ning, Guang

    2009-08-01

    Indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO)-expression in antigen-presenting cells (APCs) may control autoimmune responses by depleting the available tryptophan, whereas tryptophanyl-tRNA synthetase (TTS) may counteract this effect. The study aims to determine whether abnormal IDO and TTS activities in autoreactive T, B and dendritic cells (DCs) lead to tryptophan metabolism disorder, inducing the immune imbalance in patients with Graves' disease (GD). The concentrations of serum kynurenine and tryptophan and the mRNA expressions of IDO and TTS were analyzed, and the mixed leukocyte reaction (MLR) was employed to assess the interaction of IDO-expressing DCs and TTS-expressing CD4(+) T cells. Compared with healthy donors (HD), the ratio of serum kynurenine to tryptophan (P < 0.0001) was increased in GD patients, which was associated with the increased IDO expression in B cells (P < 0.01) and DCs (P < 0.01). GD-derived CD4(+) T cells enhanced TTS expression (P < 0.01), and its proliferation was not inhibited in the presence of IDO-expressing DCs from the GD patients. In contrast, the proliferation of HD-derived CD4(+) T cells with low TTS expression was inhibited. Increased TTS expression from CD4(+) T cells resists IDO-mediated immunosuppression from DCs, which might link to a pathogenic mechanism involved in autoreactive T cells being sustained in vivo in GD patients.

  14. Inflammatory Monocytes Facilitate Adaptive CD4 T Cell Responses during Respiratory Fungal Infection

    PubMed Central

    Hohl, Tobias M.; Rivera, Amariliz; Lipuma, Lauren; Gallegos, Alena; Shi, Chao; Mack, Mathias; Pamer, Eric G.

    2009-01-01

    SUMMARY Aspergillus fumigatus, a ubiquitous fungus, causes invasive disease in immunocompromised humans. Although monocytes and antigen-specific CD4 T cells contribute to defense against inhaled fungal spores, how these cells interact during infection remains undefined. Investigating the role of inflammatory monocytes and monocyte-derived dendritic cells during fungal infection, we find that A. fumigatus infection induces an influx of chemokine receptor CCR2- and Ly6C-expressing inflammatory monocytes into lungs and draining lymph nodes. Depletion of CCR2+ cells reduced A. fumigatus conidial transport from lungs to draining lymph nodes, abolished CD4 T cell priming following respiratory challenge, and impaired pulmonary fungal clearance. In contrast, depletion of CCR2+Ly6Chi monocytes during systemic fungal infection did not prevent CD4 T cell priming in the spleen. Our findings demonstrate that pulmonary CD4 T cell responses to inhaled spores require CCR2+Ly6Chi monocytes and their derivatives, revealing a compartmentally restricted function for these cells in adaptive respiratory immune responses. PMID:19917501

  15. Dominance of the CD4+ T helper cell response during acute resolving hepatitis A virus infection

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Yan; Callendret, Benoît; Xu, Dan; Brasky, Kathleen M.; Feng, Zongdi; Hensley, Lucinda L.; Guedj, Jeremie; Perelson, Alan S.; Lemon, Stanley M.; Lanford, Robert E.

    2012-01-01

    Hepatitis A virus (HAV) infection typically resolves within 4–7 wk but symptomatic relapse occurs in up to 20% of cases. Immune mechanisms that terminate acute HAV infection, and prevent a relapse of virus replication and liver disease, are unknown. Here, patterns of T cell immunity, virus replication, and hepatocellular injury were studied in two HAV-infected chimpanzees. HAV-specific CD8+ T cells were either not detected in the blood or failed to display effector function until after viremia and hepatitis began to subside. The function of CD8+ T cells improved slowly as the cells acquired a memory phenotype but was largely restricted to production of IFN-γ. In contrast, CD4+ T cells produced multiple cytokines when viremia first declined. Moreover, only CD4+ T cells responded during a transient resurgence of fecal HAV shedding. This helper response then contracted slowly over several months as HAV genomes were eliminated from liver. The findings indicate a dominant role for CD4+ T cells in the termination of HAV infection and, possibly, surveillance of an intrahepatic reservoir of HAV genomes that decays slowly. Rapid contraction or failure to sustain such a CD4+ T cell response after resolution of symptoms could increase the risk of relapsing hepatitis A. PMID:22753925

  16. High avidity autoreactive CD4+ T cells induce host CTL, overcome Tregs and mediate tumor destruction

    PubMed Central

    Brandmaier, Andrew G.; Leitner, Wolfgang W.; Ha, Sung P.; Sidney, John; Restifo, Nicholas P.; Touloukian, Christopher E.

    2009-01-01

    Despite progress made over the past 25 years, existing immunotherapies have limited clinical effectiveness in patients with cancer. Immune tolerance consistently blunts the generated immune response, and the largely solitary focus on CD8+ T cell immunity has proven ineffective in the absence of CD4+ T cell help. To address these twin-tier deficiencies, we developed a translational model of melanoma immunotherapy focused on the exploitation of high avidity CD4+ T cells that become generated in germline antigen deficient mice. We had previously identified a TRP-1 specific HLA-DRB1*0401-restricted epitope. Using this epitope in conjunction with a newly described TRP-1 germline-knockout, we demonstrate that endogenous TRP-1 expression alters the functionality of the auto-reactive T cell repertoire. More importantly, we show, by using MHC-mismatched combinations, that CD4+ T cells derived from the self-antigen deficient host indirectly triggers the eradication of established B16 lung metastases. We demonstrate that the treatment effect is mediated entirely by endogenous CD8+ T cells and is not affected by the depletion of host Tregs. These findings suggest that high avidity CD4+ T cells can overcome endogenous conditions and mediate their anti-tumor effects exclusively through the elicitation of CD8+ T cell immunity. PMID:19561540

  17. Restoring homeostasis of CD4+ T cells in hepatitis-B-virus-related liver fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Li-Sha; Liu, Yun; Jiang, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Immune-mediated liver injury is widely seen during hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection. Unsuccessful immune clearance of HBV results in chronic hepatitis and increases the risk of liver cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. HBV-related liver fibrosis (HBVLF), occurring as a result of HBV-induced chronic hepatitis, is a reversible, intermediate stage of chronic hepatitis B (CHB) and liver cirrhosis. Therefore, defining the pathogenesis of HBVLF is of practical significance for achieving better clinical outcomes. Recently, the homeostasis of CD4+ T cells was considered to be pivotal in the process of HBVLF. To better uncover the underlying mechanisms, in this review, we systematically retrospect the impacts of different CD4+ T-cell subsets on CHB and HBVLF. We emphasize CD4+ T-cell homeostasis and the important balance between regulatory T (Treg) and T helper 17 (Th17) cells. We discuss some cytokines associated with Treg and Th17 cells such as interleukin (IL)-17, IL-22, IL-21, IL-23, IL-10, IL-35 and IL-33, as well as surface molecules such as programmed cell death protein 1, cytotoxic T lymphocyte-associated antigen 4, T cell immunoglobulin domain and mucin domain-containing molecule 3 and cannabinoid receptor 2 that have potential therapeutic implications for the homeostasis of CD4+ T cells in CHB and HBVLF. PMID:26478664

  18. Central memory CD4+ T cells are preferential targets of double infection by HIV-1.

    PubMed

    Haqqani, Aiman A; Marek, Samantha L; Kumar, Jagadish; Davenport, Miles; Wang, Heng; Tilton, John C

    2015-11-11

    Template switching between two distinct HIV-1 RNA genomes during reverse transcription gives rise to recombinant viruses that greatly expand the genetic diversity of HIV-1 and have adverse implications for drug resistance, immune escape, and vaccine design. Virions with two distinct genomes are produced exclusively from cells infected with two or more viruses, or 'doubly infected' cells. Previous studies have revealed higher than expected frequencies of doubly infected cells compared to frequencies based on chance alone, suggesting non-random enhancement of double infection. We investigated double infection of unstimulated primary CD4+ T cells using reporter viruses carrying genes for different fluorescent proteins, EGFP and mCherry, combined with sophisticated modeling techniques based on Poisson distribution. Additionally, through the use of multiparameter flow cytometry we examined the susceptibility of naïve and memory subsets of CD4+ T cells to double infection by HIV. Using our double infection system, we confirm non-random enhancement of multiple infection events. Double infection of CD4+ T cells was not found to be a consequence of suboptimal provirus expression rescued by Tat in trans-as has been reported in cell lines-but rather due to a heterogeneous cell population in which only a fraction of primary peripheral blood CD4+ T cells are susceptible to HIV infection regardless of viral titer. Intriguingly, double infection of CD4+ T cells occurred preferentially in memory CD4+ T cells-particularly the central memory (TCM) subset-but was not a consequence of SAMHD1-mediated restriction of HIV infection in naïve cells. These findings reveal that double infection in primary CD4+ T cells is primarily a consequences of cellular heterogeneity and not rescue of suboptimal provirus expression by Tat in trans. Additionally, we report a previously unappreciated phenomenon of enhanced double infection within primary TCM cells and suggest that these long-lived cells

  19. Quantification of cells with specific phenotypes II: determination of CD4 expression level on reconstituted lyophilized human PBMC labelled with anti-CD4 FITC antibody.

    PubMed

    Wang, L; Stebbings, R; Gaigalas, A K; Sutherland, J; Kammel, M; John, M; Roemer, B; Kuhne, M; Schneider, R J; Braun, M; Engel, A; Dikshit, D; Abbasi, F; Marti, G E; Sassi, M; Revel, L; Kim, S K; Baradez, M; Lekishvili, T; Marshall, D; Whitby, L; Jing, W; Ost, V; Vonsky, M; Neukammer, J

    2015-03-01

    This report focuses on the characterization of CD4 expression level in terms of equivalent number of reference fluorophores (ERF). Twelve different flow cytometer platforms across sixteen laboratories were utilized in this study. As a first step the participants were asked to calibrate the fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) channel of each flow cytometer using commercially available calibration standard consisting of five populations of microspheres. Each population had an assigned value of equivalent fluorescein fluorophores (EFF denotes a special case of the generic term ERF with FITC as the reference fluorophore). The EFF values were assigned at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST). A surface-labelled lyophilized cell preparation was provided by the National Institute of Biological Standards and Control (NIBSC), using human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) pre-labeled with a FITC conjugated anti-CD4 monoclonal antibody. Three PBMC sample vials, provided to each participant, were used for the CD4 expression analysis. The PBMC are purported to have a fixed number of surface CD4 receptors. On the basis of the microsphere calibration, the EFF value of the PBMC samples was measured to characterize the population average CD4 expression level of the PBMC preparations. Both the results of data analysis performed by each participant and the results of centralized analysis of all participants' raw data are reported. Centralized analysis gave a mean EFF value of 22,300 and an uncertainty of 750, corresponding to 3.3% (level of confidence 68%) of the mean EFF value. The next step will entail the measurement of the ERF values of the lyophilized PBMC stained with labels for other fluorescence channels. The ultimate goal is to show that lyophilized PBMC is a suitable biological reference cell material for multicolor flow cytometry and that it can be used to present multicolor flow cytometry measurements in terms of ABC (antibodies bound per cell

  20. Viral Load and CD4+ T-Cell Dynamics in Primary HIV-1 Subtype C Infection

    PubMed Central

    Novitsky, Vladimir; Woldegabriel, Elias; Kebaabetswe, Lemme; Rossenkhan, Raabya; Mlotshwa, Busisiwe; Bonney, Caitlin; Finucane, Mariel; Musonda, Rosemary; Moyo, Sikhulile; Wester, Carolyn; van Widenfelt, Erik; Makhema, Joseph; Lagakos, Stephen; Essex, M.

    2009-01-01

    Background Most knowledge of primary HIV-1 infection is based on subtype B studies, whereas the evolution of viral parameters in the early phase of HIV-1 subtype C infection is not well characterized. Methods The kinetics of viral RNA, proviral DNA, CD4+ T-cell count, and subsets of CD4+ T cells expressing CCR5 or CXCR4 were characterized in 8 acute and 62 recent subtype C infections over the first year postseroconversion. Results The viral RNA peak was 6.25 ± 0.92 log10 copies per milliliter. After seroconversion, heterogeneity among acute cases was evident by patterns of change in viral load and CD4+ T-cell count over time. The patterns were supported by the rate of viral RNA decline from peak (P = 0.022), viral RNA means (P = 0.005), CD4 levels (P <0.001), and CD4 decline to 350 (P = 0.011) or 200 (P = 0.046). Proviral DNA had no apparent peak and its mean was 2.59 ± 0.69 log10 per 106 peripheral blood mononuclear cell. In recent infections, viral RNA set point was 4.00 ± 0.97 log10 and viral RNA correlated inversely with CD4+ T cells (P <0.001) and directly with proviral DNA (P <0.001). Conclusions Distinct patterns of viral RNA evolution may exist shortly after seroconversion in HIV-1 subtype C infection. The study provides better understanding of the early phase of subtype C infection. PMID:19295336

  1. Antiretroviral therapy suppressed participants with low CD4+ T-cell counts segregate according to opposite immunological phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Pérez-Santiago, Josué; Ouchi, Dan; Urrea, Victor; Carrillo, Jorge; Cabrera, Cecilia; Villà-Freixa, Jordi; Puig, Jordi; Paredes, Roger; Negredo, Eugènia; Clotet, Bonaventura; Massanella, Marta; Blanco, Julià

    2016-01-01

    Background: The failure to increase CD4+ T-cell counts in some antiretroviral therapy suppressed participants (immunodiscordance) has been related to perturbed CD4+ T-cell homeostasis and impacts clinical evolution. Methods: We evaluated different definitions of immunodiscordance based on CD4+ T-cell counts (cutoff) or CD4+ T-cell increases from nadir value (ΔCD4) using supervised random forest classification of 74 immunological and clinical variables from 196 antiretroviral therapy suppressed individuals. Unsupervised clustering was performed using relevant variables identified in the supervised approach from 191 individuals. Results: Cutoff definition of CD4+ cell count 400 cells/μl performed better than any other definition in segregating immunoconcordant and immunodiscordant individuals (85% accuracy), using markers of activation, nadir and death of CD4+ T cells. Unsupervised clustering of relevant variables using this definition revealed large heterogeneity between immunodiscordant individuals and segregated participants into three distinct subgroups with distinct production, programmed cell-death protein-1 (PD-1) expression, activation and death of T cells. Surprisingly, a nonnegligible number of immunodiscordant participants (22%) showed high frequency of recent thymic emigrants and low CD4+ T-cell activation and death, very similar to immunoconcordant participants. Notably, human leukocyte antigen - antigen D related (HLA-DR) PD-1 and CD45RA expression in CD4+ T cells allowed reproducing subgroup segregation (81.4% accuracy). Despite sharp immunological differences, similar and persistently low CD4+ values were maintained in these participants over time. Conclusion: A cutoff value of CD4+ T-cell count 400 cells/μl classified better immunodiscordant and immunoconcordant individuals than any ΔCD4 classification. Immunodiscordance may present several, even opposite, immunological patterns that are identified by a simple immunological follow-up. Subgroup

  2. Baseline CD4 Cell Counts of Newly Diagnosed HIV Cases in China: 2006–2012

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Houlin; Mao, Yurong; Shi, Cynthia X.; Han, Jing; Wang, Liyan; Xu, Juan; Qin, Qianqian; Detels, Roger; Wu, Zunyou

    2014-01-01

    Background Late diagnosis of HIV infection is common. We aim to assess the proportion of newly diagnosed HIV cases receiving timely baseline CD4 count testing and the associated factors in China. Methods Data were extracted from the Chinese HIV/AIDS Comprehensive Response Information Management System. Adult patients over 15 years old who had been newly diagnosed with HIV infection in China between 2006 and 2012 were identified. The study cohort comprised individuals who had a measured baseline CD4 count. Results Among 388,496 newly identified HIV cases, the median baseline CD4 count was 294 cells/µl (IQR: 130–454), and over half (N = 130,442, 58.8%) were less than 350 cells/µl. The median baseline CD4 count increased from 221 (IQR: 63–410) in 2006 to 314 (IQR: 159–460) in 2012. A slight majority of patients (N = 221,980, 57.1%) received baseline CD4 count testing within 6 months of diagnosis. The proportion of individuals who received timely baseline CD4 count testing increased significantly from 20.0% in 2006 to 76.9% in 2012. Factors associated with failing to receiving timely CD4 count testing were: being male (OR: 1.17, 95% CI: 1.15–1.19), age 55 years or older (OR:1.03, 95% CI: 1.00–1.06), educational attainment of primary school education or below (OR: 1.30, 95% CI: 1.28–1.32), infection with HIV through injection drug use (OR: 2.07, 95% CI: 2.02–2.12) or sexual contact and injection drug use (OR: 1.87, 95% CI: 1.76–1.99), diagnosis in a hospital (OR: 1.91, 95% CI: 1.88–1.95) or in a detention center (OR: 1.75, 95% CI: 1.70–1.80), and employment as a migrant worker (OR:1.55, 95% CI:1.53–1.58). Conclusion The proportion of newly identified HIV patients receiving timely baseline CD4 testing has increased significantly in China from 2006–2012. Continued effort is needed for further promotion of early HIV diagnosis and timely baseline CD4 cell count testing. PMID:24901790

  3. Phenotypic differences of CD4(+) T cells in response to red blood cell immunization in transfused sickle cell disease patients.

    PubMed

    Vingert, Benoît; Tamagne, Marie; Habibi, Anoosha; Pakdaman, Sadaf; Ripa, Julie; Elayeb, Rahma; Galacteros, Frédéric; Bierling, Philippe; Ansart-Pirenne, Hélène; Bartolucci, Pablo; Noizat-Pirenne, France

    2015-06-01

    Alloimmunization against red blood cells (RBCs) is the main immunological risk associated with transfusion in patients with sickle cell disease (SCD). However, about 50-70% of SCD patients never get immunized despite frequent transfusion. In murine models, CD4(+) T cells play a key role in RBC alloimmunization. We therefore explored and compared the CD4(+) T-cell phenotypes and functions between a group of SCD patients (n = 11) who never became immunized despite a high transfusion regimen and a group of SCD patients (n = 10) who had become immunized (at least against Kidd antigen b) after a low transfusion regimen. We studied markers of CD4(+) T-cell function, including TLR, that directly control lymphocyte function, and their spontaneous cytokine production. We also tested responders for the cytokine profile in response to Kidd antigen b peptides. Low TLR2/TLR3 expression and, unexpectedly, strong expression of CD40 on CD4(+) T cells were associated with the nonresponder status, whereas spontaneous expression of IL-10 by CD4(+) T cells and weak Tbet expression were associated with the responder status. A Th17 profile was predominant in responders when stimulated by Jb(k) . These findings implicate CD4(+) T cells in alloimmunization in humans and suggest that they may be exploited to differentiate responders from nonresponders. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  4. CD4+CD8- T cells are the effector cells in disease pathogenesis in the scurfy (sf) mouse.

    PubMed

    Blair, P J; Bultman, S J; Haas, J C; Rouse, B T; Wilkinson, J E; Godfrey, V L

    1994-10-15

    Mice hemizygous for the X-linked mutation, scurfy (sf), exhibit a fatal lymphoreticular disease that is mediated by T lymphocytes. To evaluate the respective roles of CD4 or CD8 single positive T cells in scurfy disease, neonates were treated with mAbs directed against the CD4 or CD8 molecules. Whereas mice treated with an anti-CD8 Ab developed lesions and succumbed to disease at the same time (17 days) as their untreated scurfy littermates, mice treated with an anti-CD4 Ab lived up to 11 wk before developing scurfy disease. To insure a more complete elimination of the T cell subsets, the scurfy mutation was bred onto beta 2-microglobulin (beta 2m)-deficient (CD8-less) and CD4-deficient transgenic mouse lines. Whereas there was little moderation of disease in beta 2m-deficient scurfy mice, CD4-deficient scurfy mice had markedly decreased scurfy lesions and a prolonged life span, similar to that of anti-CD4-treated sf/Y mice. Additionally, scurfy disease was transplanted into H-2-compatible nude mice through the adoptive transfer of CD4+CD8- T cells, but not CD4-CD8+ T cells. Flow-cytometric analysis revealed that sf/Y mice have an increased percentage of activated CD4+ T cells in their lymph nodes. In addition, there is an increase in the in vitro production of cytokines in the cultured splenocytes of CD8-less, but not CD4-less, scurfy mice. These data suggest that CD4+ T cells are critical mediators of disease in the scurfy mouse.

  5. Anti-HIV-1 activity of propolis in CD4(+) lymphocyte and microglial cell cultures.

    PubMed

    Gekker, Genya; Hu, Shuxian; Spivak, Marla; Lokensgard, James R; Peterson, Phillip K

    2005-11-14

    An urgent need for additional agents to treat human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection led us to assess the anti-HIV-1 activity of the natural product propolis in CD4(+) lymphocytes and microglial cell cultures. Propolis inhibited viral expression in a concentration-dependent manner (maximal suppression of 85 and 98% was observed at 66.6 microg/ml propolis in CD4(+) and microglial cell cultures, respectively). Similar anti-HIV-1 activity was observed with propolis samples from several geographic regions. The mechanism of propolis antiviral property in CD4(+) lymphocytes appeared to involve, in part, inhibition of viral entry. While propolis had an additive antiviral effect on the reverse transcriptase inhibitor zidovudine, it had no noticeable effect on the protease inhibitor indinavir. The results of this in vitro study support the need for clinical trials of propolis or one or more of its components in the treatment of HIV-1 infection.

  6. Differentiation of distinct long-lived memory CD4 T cells in intestinal tissues after oral Listeria monocytogenes infection.

    PubMed

    Romagnoli, P A; Fu, H H; Qiu, Z; Khairallah, C; Pham, Q M; Puddington, L; Khanna, K M; Lefrançois, L; Sheridan, B S

    2017-03-01

    Mucosal antigen-specific CD4 T-cell responses to intestinal pathogens remain incompletely understood. Here we examined the CD4 T-cell response after oral infection with an internalin A 'murinized' Listeria monocytogenes (Lm). Oral Lm infection induced a robust endogenous listeriolysin O (LLO)-specific CD4 T-cell response with distinct phenotypic and functional characteristics in the intestine. Circulating LLO-specific CD4 T cells transiently expressed the 'gut-homing' integrin α4β7 and accumulated in the intestinal lamina propria and epithelium where they were maintained independent of interleukin (IL)-15. The majority of intestinal LLO-specific CD4 T cells were CD27(-) Ly6C(-) and CD69(+) CD103(-) while the lymphoid LLO-specific CD4 T cells were heterogeneous based on CD27 and Ly6C expression and predominately CD69(-). LLO-specific effector CD4 T cells transitioned into a long-lived memory population that phenotypically resembled their parent effectors and displayed hallmarks of residency. In addition, intestinal effector and memory CD4 T cells showed a predominant polyfunctional Th1 profile producing IFNγ, TNFα, and IL-2 at high levels with minimal but detectable levels of IL-17A. Depletion of CD4 T cells in immunized mice led to elevated bacterial burden after challenge infection highlighting a critical role for memory CD4 T cells in controlling intestinal intracellular pathogens.

  7. Differentiation of distinct long-lived memory CD4 T cells in intestinal tissues after oral Listeria monocytogenes infection

    PubMed Central

    Romagnoli, PA; Fu, HH; Qiu, Z; Khairallah, C; Pham, QM; Puddington, L; Khanna, KM; Lefrançois, L; Sheridan, BS

    2016-01-01

    Mucosal antigen-specific CD4 T cell responses to intestinal pathogens remain incompletely understood. Here we examined the CD4 T cell response after oral infection with an internalin A ‘murinized’ Listeria monocytogenes (Lm). Oral Lm infection induced a robust endogenous listeriolysin O (LLO)-specific CD4 T cell response with distinct phenotypic and functional characteristics in the intestine. Circulating LLO-specific CD4 T cells transiently expressed the ‘gut-homing’ integrin α4β7 and accumulated in the intestinal lamina propria and epithelium where they were maintained independent of IL-15. The majority of intestinal LLO-specific CD4 T cells were CD27− Ly6C− and CD69+ CD103− while the lymphoid LLO-specific CD4 T cells were heterogeneous based on CD27 and Ly6C expression and predominately CD69−. LLO-specific effector CD4 T cells transitioned into a long-lived memory population that phenotypically resembled their parent effectors and displayed hallmarks of residency. In addition, intestinal effector and memory CD4 T cells showed a predominant polyfunctional Th1 profile producing IFNγ, TNFα and IL-2 at high levels with minimal but detectable levels of IL-17A. Depletion of CD4 T cells in immunized mice led to elevated bacterial burden after challenge infection highlighting a critical role for memory CD4 T cells in controlling intestinal intracellular pathogens. PMID:27461178

  8. Elevated expression of T-bet in mycobacterial antigen-specific CD4(+) T cells from patients with tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Yang, Bingfen; Zhai, Fei; Jiang, Jing; Wang, Xinjing; Cao, Zhihong; Cheng, Xiaoxing

    2015-01-01

    T-bet is a T-box transcriptional factor that controls the differentiation and effector functions of CD4 T cells. In this study, we studied the role of T-bet in regulating CD4(+) T cell immunity against tuberculosis (TB). T-bet expression in Mycobacterium tuberculosis antigen-specific CD4(+) T cells was significantly higher in patients with active TB than in individuals with latent TB infection (p<0.0001). Comparison of T-bet expression in TCM and TEM subsets showed that CD4(+)T-bet(+)M. tuberculosis antigen-specific CD4(+) T cells had significantly lower frequency of TCM (p=0.003) and higher frequency of TEM (p=0.003) than CD4(+)T-bet(-) cells. The expression of PD-1 in antigen-specific CD4(+) T cells was significantly higher in patients with TB than in individuals with latent TB infection (p=0.006). CD4(+)CD154(+)T-bet(+) T cells had significantly higher expression of PD-1 than CD4(+)CD154(+)T-bet(-) T cells (p=0.0028). It is concluded that T-bet expression might be associated with differentiation into effector memory cells and PD-1 expression in mycobacterial antigen-specific CD4(+) T cells. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Human memory, but not naive, CD4+ T cells expressing transcription factor T-bet might drive rapid cytokine production.

    PubMed

    Yu, Si-fei; Zhang, Yan-nan; Yang, Bin-yan; Wu, Chang-you

    2014-12-19

    We found that after stimulation for a few hours, memory but not naive CD4(+) T cells produced a large amount of IFN-γ; however, the mechanism of rapid response of memory CD4(+) T cells remains undefined. We compared the expression of transcription factors in resting or activated naive and memory CD4(+) T cells and found that T-bet, but not pSTAT-1 or pSTAT-4, was highly expressed in resting memory CD4(+) T cells and that phenotypic characteristics of T-bet(+)CD4(+) T cells were CD45RA(low)CD62L(low) CCR7(low). After short-term stimulation, purified memory CD4(+) T cells rapidly produced effector cytokines that were closely associated with the pre-existence of T-bet. By contrast, resting naive CD4(+) T cells did not express T-bet, and they produced cytokines only after sustained stimulation. Our further studies indicated that T-bet was expressed in the nuclei of resting memory CD4(+) T cells, which might have important implications for rapid IFN-γ production. Our results indicate that the pre-existence and nuclear mobilization of T-bet in resting memory CD4(+) T cells might be a possible transcriptional mechanism for rapid production of cytokines by human memory CD4(+) T cells.

  10. Hematopoietic progenitor cell regulation by CD4+CD25+ T cells.

    PubMed

    Urbieta, Maite; Barao, Isabel; Jones, Monica; Jurecic, Roland; Panoskaltsis-Mortari, Angela; Blazar, Bruce R; Murphy, William J; Levy, Robert B

    2010-06-10

    CD4(+)CD25(+)FoxP3(+) regulatory T cells (Tregs) possess the capacity to modulate both adaptive and innate immune responses. We hypothesized that Tregs could regulate hematopoiesis based on cytokine effector molecules they can produce. The studies here demonstrate that Tregs can affect the differentiation of myeloid progenitor cells. In vitro findings demonstrated the ability of Tregs to inhibit the differentiation of interleukin-3 (IL-3)/stem cell factor (colony-forming unit [CFU]-IL3)-driven progenitor cells. Inhibitory effects were mediated by a pathway requiring cell-cell contact, major histocompatibility complex class II expression on marrow cells, and transforming growth factor-beta. Importantly, depletion of Tregs in situ resulted in enhanced CFU-IL3 levels after bone marrow transplantation. Cotransplantation of CD4(+)FoxP3(+)(gfp) Tregs together with bone marrow was found to diminish CFU-IL3 responses after transplantation. To address the consequence of transplanted Tregs on differentiated progeny from these CFU 2 weeks after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, peripheral blood complete blood counts were performed and examined for polymorphonuclear leukocyte content. Recipients of cotransplanted Tregs exhibited diminished neutrophil counts. Together, these findings illustrate that both recipient and donor Tregs can influence hematopoietic progenitor cell activity after transplantation and that these cells can alter responses outside the adaptive and innate immune systems.

  11. Identification of two regulatory elements controlling Fucosyltransferase 7 transcription in murine CD4+ T cells.

    PubMed

    Pink, Matthias; Ratsch, Boris A; Mardahl, Maibritt; Schröter, Micha F; Engelbert, Dirk; Triebus, Julia; Hamann, Alf; Syrbe, Uta

    2014-11-01

    Fucosyltransferase VII encoded by the gene Fut7 is essential in CD4(+) T cells for the generation of E- and P-selectin ligands (E- and P-lig) which facilitate recruitment of lymphocytes into inflamed tissues and into the skin. This study aimed to identify regulatory elements controlling the inducible Fut7 expression in CD4(+) T cells that occurs upon activation and differentiation of naive T cells into effector cells. Comparative analysis of the histone modification pattern in non-hematopoetic cells and CD4(+) T cell subsets revealed a differential histone modification pattern within the Fut7 locus including a conserved non-coding sequence (CNS) identified by cross-species conservation comparison suggesting that regulatory elements are confined to this region. Cloning of the CNS located about 500 bp upstream of the Fut7 locus, into a luciferase reporter vector elicited reporter activity after transfection of the αβ-WT T cell line, but not after transfection of primary murine CD4(+) Th1 cells. As quantification of different Fut7 transcripts revealed a predominance of transcripts lacking the first exons in primary Th1 cells we searched for an alternative promoter. Cloning of an intragenic region spanning a 1kb region upstream of exon 4 into an enhancer-containing vector indeed elicited promoter activity. Interestingly, also the CNS enhanced activity of this intragenic minimal promoter in reporter assays in primary Th1 cells suggesting that both elements interact in primary CD4(+) T cells to induce Fut7 transcription.

  12. Identification of beryllium-dependent peptides recognized by CD4+ T cells in chronic beryllium disease

    PubMed Central

    Falta, Michael T.; Mack, Douglas G.; Tinega, Alex N.; Crawford, Frances; Giulianotti, Marc; Santos, Radleigh; Clayton, Gina M.; Wang, Yuxiao; Zhang, Xuewu; Maier, Lisa A.; Marrack, Philippa; Kappler, John W.

    2013-01-01

    Chronic beryllium disease (CBD) is a granulomatous disorder characterized by an influx of beryllium (Be)-specific CD4+ T cells into the lung. The vast majority of these T cells recognize Be in an HLA-DP–restricted manner, and peptide is required for T cell recognition. However, the peptides that stimulate Be-specific T cells are unknown. Using positional scanning libraries and fibroblasts expressing HLA-DP2, the most prevalent HLA-DP molecule linked to disease, we identified mimotopes and endogenous self-peptides that bind to MHCII and Be, forming a complex recognized by pathogenic CD4+ T cells in CBD. These peptides possess aspartic and glutamic acid residues at p4 and p7, respectively, that surround the putative Be-binding site and cooperate with HLA-DP2 in Be coordination. Endogenous plexin A peptides and proteins, which share the core motif and are expressed in lung, also stimulate these TCRs. Be-loaded HLA-DP2–mimotope and HLA-DP2–plexin A4 tetramers detected high frequencies of CD4+ T cells specific for these ligands in all HLA-DP2+ CBD patients tested. Thus, our findings identify the first ligand for a CD4+ T cell involved in metal-induced hypersensitivity and suggest a unique role of these peptides in metal ion coordination and the generation of a common antigen specificity in CBD. PMID:23797096

  13. Identification of beryllium-dependent peptides recognized by CD4+ T cells in chronic beryllium disease.

    PubMed

    Falta, Michael T; Pinilla, Clemencia; Mack, Douglas G; Tinega, Alex N; Crawford, Frances; Giulianotti, Marc; Santos, Radleigh; Clayton, Gina M; Wang, Yuxiao; Zhang, Xuewu; Maier, Lisa A; Marrack, Philippa; Kappler, John W; Fontenot, Andrew P

    2013-07-01

    Chronic beryllium disease (CBD) is a granulomatous disorder characterized by an influx of beryllium (Be)-specific CD4⁺ T cells into the lung. The vast majority of these T cells recognize Be in an HLA-DP–restricted manner, and peptide is required for T cell recognition. However, the peptides that stimulate Be-specific T cells are unknown. Using positional scanning libraries and fibroblasts expressing HLA-DP2, the most prevalent HLA-DP molecule linked to disease, we identified mimotopes and endogenous self-peptides that bind to MHCII and Be, forming a complex recognized by pathogenic CD4⁺ T cells in CBD. These peptides possess aspartic and glutamic acid residues at p4 and p7, respectively, that surround the putative Be-binding site and cooperate with HLA-DP2 in Be coordination. Endogenous plexin A peptides and proteins, which share the core motif and are expressed in lung, also stimulate these TCRs. Be-loaded HLA-DP2–mimotope and HLA-DP2–plexin A4 tetramers detected high frequencies of CD4⁺ T cells specific for these ligands in all HLADP2+ CBD patients tested. Thus, our findings identify the first ligand for a CD4⁺ T cell involved in metal-induced hypersensitivity and suggest a unique role of these peptides in metal ion coordination and the generation of a common antigen specificity in CBD.

  14. Abortive HIV Infection Mediates CD4 T-Cell Depletion and Inflammation in Human Lymphoid Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Doitsh, Gilad; Cavrois, Marielle; Lassen, Kara G.; Zepeda, Orlando; Yang, Zhiyuan; Santiago, Mario L.; Hebbeler, Andrew M.; Greene, Warner C.

    2010-01-01

    Summary The mechanism by which CD4 T-cells are depleted in HIV-infected hosts remains poorly understood. In ex vivo cultures of human tonsil tissue, CD4 T cells undergo a pronounced cytopathic response following HIV infection. Strikingly, >95% of these dying cells are not productively infected but instead correspond to bystander cells. We now show that the death of these “bystander” cells involves abortive HIV infection. Inhibitors blocking HIV entry or early steps of reverse transcription prevent CD4 T-cell death while inhibition of later events in viral life cycle does not. We propose that the nonpermissive state exhibited by the majority of resting CD4 tonsil T-cells leads to accumulation of incomplete reverse transcripts. These cytoplasmic nucleic acids activate a host defense program that elicits a coordinated proapoptotic and proinflammatory response involving caspase-3 and caspase-1 activation. While this response likely evolved to protect the host, it centrally contributes to the immunopathogenic effects of HIV. PMID:21111238

  15. Abortive HIV infection mediates CD4 T cell depletion and inflammation in human lymphoid tissue.

    PubMed

    Doitsh, Gilad; Cavrois, Marielle; Lassen, Kara G; Zepeda, Orlando; Yang, Zhiyuan; Santiago, Mario L; Hebbeler, Andrew M; Greene, Warner C

    2010-11-24

    The mechanism by which CD4 T cells are depleted in HIV-infected hosts remains poorly understood. In ex vivo cultures of human tonsil tissue, CD4 T cells undergo a pronounced cytopathic response following HIV infection. Strikingly, >95% of these dying cells are not productively infected but instead correspond to bystander cells. We now show that the death of these "bystander" cells involves abortive HIV infection. Inhibitors blocking HIV entry or early steps of reverse transcription prevent CD4 T cell death while inhibition of later events in the viral life cycle does not. We demonstrate that the nonpermissive state exhibited by the majority of resting CD4 tonsil T cells leads to accumulation of incomplete reverse transcripts. These cytoplasmic nucleic acids activate a host defense program that elicits a coordinated proapoptotic and proinflammatory response involving caspase-3 and caspase-1 activation. While this response likely evolved to protect the host, it centrally contributes to the immunopathogenic effects of HIV. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Bromelain treatment reduces CD25 expression on activated CD4+ T cells in vitro✩

    PubMed Central

    Secor, Eric R.; Singh, Anurag; Guernsey, Linda A.; McNamara, Jeff T.; Zhan, Lijun; Maulik, Nilanjana; Thrall, Roger S.

    2009-01-01

    Bromelain (Br), an extract from pineapple stem with cysteine protease activity, exerts anti-inflammatory effects in a number of inflammatory models. We have previously shown that Br treatment decreased activated CD4+ T cells and has a therapeutic role in an ovalbumin-induced murine model of allergic airway disease. The current study was designed to determine the effect of Br on CD4+ T cell activation, specifically the expression of CD25 in vitro. CD25 is up regulated upon T cell activation, found as a soluble fraction (sCD25) and is a therapeutic target in inflammation, autoimmunity and allergy. Br treatment of anti-CD3 stimulated CD4+ T cells reduced CD25 expression in a dose and time dependent manner. This reduction of CD25 was dependent on the proteolytic action of Br as the addition of E64 (a cysteine protease inhibitor) abrogated this response. The concentration of sCD25 was increased in supernatants of Br treated activated CD4+ T cells as compared to control cells, suggesting that Br proteolytically cleaved cell-surface CD25. This novel mechanism of action identifies how Br may exert its therapeutic benefits in inflammatory conditions. PMID:19162239

  17. Bromelain treatment reduces CD25 expression on activated CD4+ T cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Secor, Eric R; Singh, Anurag; Guernsey, Linda A; McNamara, Jeff T; Zhan, Lijun; Maulik, Nilanjana; Thrall, Roger S

    2009-03-01

    Bromelain (Br), an extract from pineapple stem with cysteine protease activity, exerts anti-inflammatory effects in a number of inflammatory models. We have previously shown that Br treatment decreased activated CD4(+) T cells and has a therapeutic role in an ovalbumin-induced murine model of allergic airway disease. The current study was designed to determine the effect of Br on CD4(+) T cell activation, specifically the expression of CD25 in vitro. CD25 is up regulated upon T cell activation, found as a soluble fraction (sCD25) and is a therapeutic target in inflammation, autoimmunity and allergy. Br treatment of anti-CD3 stimulated CD4(+) T cells reduced CD25 expression in a dose and time dependent manner. This reduction of CD25 was dependent on the proteolytic action of Br as the addition of E64 (a cysteine protease inhibitor) abrogated this response. The concentration of sCD25 was increased in supernatants of Br treated activated CD4(+) T cells as compared to control cells, suggesting that Br proteolytically cleaved cell-surface CD25. This novel mechanism of action identifies how Br may exert its therapeutic benefits in inflammatory conditions.

  18. Factors associated with the elevated percentage of CD4CD69 T cells in maintained hemodialysis patients.

    PubMed

    Chen, Rongyi; Xiang, Fangfang; Hu, Jiachang; Cao, Xuesen; Tan, Xiao; Jia, Ping; Zhang, Ting; Song, Nana; Fang, Yi; Ding, Xiaoqiang; Zou, Jianzhou

    2017-11-01

    CD4 T-cell abnormality, influencing the outcome of the maintained hemodialysis (MHD), is common in patients on dialysis. We try to find out factors associated with the activated CD4 T cells, CD4CD69 T cells, to improve the dialysis quality. A cross-sectional study was conducted to evaluate the change of CD4CD69 in MHD patients and healthy controls in our hospital from September 2015 to May 2016. A total of 164 MHD patients and 24 healthy controls were included according to the criteria. Univariate and multivariate logistic regression models after correlation analysis were executed to discover the related factors of CD4CD69 T-cell posterior to the division of the CD4CD69 T cell according to its median. The lymphocytes were lower, but the percentage of CD4CD69 T cells was higher in MHD patients compared with healthy controls, even after the propensity score matching based on age and sex. The percentage of CD4 T cells showed no significant difference between the two groups. Further multivariate logistic regression models revealed that CD4CD69 T cell was independently associated with serum total protein (OR 95%CI: 0.830[0.696, 0.990], p = .038), transferrin (OR 95%CI: 3.072[1.131, 8.342], p = .028) and magnesium (OR 95%CI: 16.960[1.030, 279.275], p = .048). The percentage of CD4CD69 T cells, activated CD4 T cells, elevated in hemodialysis patients despite the decrease in lymphocytes. The elevated CD4CD69 T cells were independently associated with serum total protein negatively, but transferrin and magnesium positively. Strengthening nutrition, reducing the concentration of transferrin and magnesium might be beneficial to reduce the activation of CD4 T cells and improve the outcome of MHD patients.

  19. Jug r 2-reactive CD4(+) T cells have a dominant immune role in walnut allergy.

    PubMed

    Archila, Luis Diego; Jeong, David; Pascal, Mariona; Bartra, Joan; Juan, Manel; Robinson, David; Farrington, Mary L; Kwok, William W

    2015-10-01

    Allergic reactions to walnut can be life-threatening. Although IgE epitopes of walnut have been studied, CD4(+) T cell-specific epitopes for walnut remain uncharacterized. In particular, the relationship of both phenotype and frequency of walnut-specific T cells to the disease have not been examined. We sought to provide a thorough phenotypic analysis for walnut-reactive T cells in allergic and nonallergic subjects, particularly the relationship of phenotypes and frequencies of walnut-specific T cells with the disease. The CD154 upregulation assay was used to examine CD4(+) T-cell reactivity toward the walnut allergens Jug r 1, Jug r 2, and Jug r 3. A tetramer-guided epitope mapping approach was used to identify HLA-restricted CD4(+) T-cell epitopes in Jug r 2. Direct ex vivo staining with peptide-major histocompatibility complex class II tetramers enabled comparison of the frequency and phenotype of Jug r 2-specific CD4(+) T cells between allergic and nonallergic subjects. Jug r 2-specific T-cell clones were also generated, and mRNA transcription factor levels were assessed by using quantitative RT-PCR. Intracellular cytokine staining assays were performed for further phenotypic analyses. Jug r 2 was identified as the major allergen that elicited CD4(+) T-cell responses. Multiple Jug r 2 T-cell epitopes were identified. The majority of these T cells in allergic subjects have a CCR4(+) phenotype. A subset of these T cells express CCR4(+)CCR6(+) irrespective of the asthmatic status of the allergic subjects. Intracellular cytokine staining confirmed these TH2-, TH2/TH17-, and TH17-like heterogenic profiles. Jug r 2-specific T-cell clones from allergic subjects mainly expressed GATA3, nonetheless, a portion of T-cell clones both GATA3 and RAR-related orphan receptor C (RORC) or RORC alone, confirming the presence of TH2, TH2/TH17, and TH17 cells. Jug r 2-specific responses dominate walnut T-cell responses in patients with walnut allergy. Jug r 2 central memory CD4

  20. Conventional and Regulatory CD4+ T Cells That Share Identical TCRs Are Derived from Common Clones.

    PubMed

    Wolf, Kyle J; Emerson, Ryan O; Pingel, Jeanette; Buller, R Mark; DiPaolo, Richard J

    2016-01-01

    Results from studies comparing the diversity and specificity of the TCR repertoires expressed by conventional (Tconv) and regulatory (Treg) CD4+ T cell have varied depending on the experimental system employed. We developed a new model in which T cells express a single fixed TCRα chain, randomly rearranged endogenous TCRβ chains, and a Foxp3-GFP reporter. We purified CD4+Foxp3- and CD4+Foxp3+ cells, then performed biased controlled multiplex PCR and high throughput sequencing of endogenous TCRβ chains. We identified >7,000 different TCRβ sequences in the periphery of 5 individual mice. On average, ~12% of TCR sequences were expressed by both conventional and regulatory populations within individual mice. The CD4+ T cells that expressed shared TCR sequences were present at higher frequencies compared to T cells expressing non-shared TCRs. Furthermore, nearly all (>90%) of the TCR sequences that were shared within mice were identical at the DNA sequence level, indicating that conventional and regulatory T cells that express shared TCRs are derived from common clones. Analysis of TCR repertoire overlap in the thymus reveals that a large proportion of Tconv and Treg sharing observed in the periphery is due to clonal expansion in the thymus. Together these data show that there are a limited number of TCR sequences shared between Tconv and Tregs. Also, Tconv and Tregs sharing identical TCRs are found at relatively high frequencies and are derived from common progenitors, of which a large portion are generated in the thymus.

  1. Bacterial translocation aggravates CCl4-induced liver cirrhosis by regulating CD4+ T cells in rats

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Haiyan; Lv, Longxian; Cao, Hongcui; Lu, Haifeng; Zhou, Ning; Yang, Jiezuan; Jiang, Haiyin; Dong, Huihui; Hu, Xinjun; Yu, Wei; Jiang, Xiawei; Zheng, Beiwen; Li, Lanjuan

    2017-01-01

    Bacterial translocation (BT) is thought to play an important role in the development of liver cirrhosis, but the mechanisms have not been fully explored. This study aims to investigate the distribution of Treg (CD3+CD4+CD25+Foxp3+), Th17 (CD3+CD4+IL-17+), and Th1 (CD3+CD4+IFN-γ+) cells in the intestinal lamina propria, liver and blood and to explore their relationships with BT. Cirrhotic rats with ascites were induced by CCl4. We found that there were lower levels of total protein and albumin, lower albumin/globulin ratio, lower body weight and higher spleen weight and ascites volume in cirrhotic rats with than without BT. We found that BT may cause increase of Treg cells in the proximal small intestine and decrease of Th17 cells in the whole intestine and blood in cirrhotic rats. It may also aggravate the CCl4-induced decrease in Th1 cells in the whole intestine, liver, caecum, and blood and the CCl4-induced increase in Th17 cells in the liver and Tregs in the distal small intestine, colon, and liver. Our data suggest that BT may aggravate liver injury and decrease liver function via an interaction with CD4+ T Cells. The results of this study may be helpful for the development of new treatments for liver cirrhosis. PMID:28134306

  2. Restoring Cytokine Balance in HIV-Positive Individuals with Low CD4 T Cell Counts

    PubMed Central

    Valdivia, Anddre; Ly, Judy; Gonzalez, Leslie; Hussain, Parveen; Saing, Tommy; Islamoglu, Hicret; Pearce, Daniel; Ochoa, Cesar

    2017-01-01

    Abstract HIV infects and destroys CD4+ T cells leading to a compromised immune system. In a double-blinded study, a group of HIV-infected individuals with CD4+ T cell counts below 350 cells/mm3 were given either an empty liposomal supplement or a liposomal glutathione (L-GSH) supplement to take over a 3-month period. Baseline measurements in HIV-positive subjects show a significant decrease in levels of interleukin (IL)-12, IL-2, and interferon (IFN)-γ, along with a substantial increase in the levels of IL-6, IL-10, transforming growth factor (TGF)-β, and free radicals, compared to healthy individuals. Supplementation of HIV-positive subjects with L-GSH for 3 months resulted in a notable increase in the levels of IL-12, IL-2, and IFN-γ, with a concomitant decrease in the levels of IL-6, IL-10, and free radicals, and stabilization in the levels of TGF-β, IL-1, and IL-17, compared to their placebo counterparts. Levels of free radicals in CD4+ T cells stabilized, while GSH levels increased in the treatment group. Those in the placebo group showed no significant difference throughout the study. In summary, supplementation with L-GSH in HIV-infected individuals with CD4+ T cell counts below 350 cells/mm3 can help restore redox homeostasis and cytokine balance, therefore aiding the immune system to control opportunistic infections. PMID:28398068

  3. The Control of the Specificity of CD4 T Cell Responses: Thresholds, Breakpoints, and Ceilings

    PubMed Central

    Sant, Andrea J.; Chaves, Francisco A.; Leddon, Scott A.; Tung, Jacqueline

    2013-01-01

    It has been known for over 25 years that CD4 T cell responses are restricted to a finite number of peptide epitopes within pathogens or protein vaccines. These selected peptide epitopes are termed “immunodominant.” Other peptides within the antigen that can bind to host MHC molecules and recruit CD4 T cells as single peptides are termed “cryptic” because they fail to induce responses when expressed in complex proteins or when in competition with other peptides during the immune response. In the last decade, our laboratory has evaluated the mechanisms that underlie the preferential specificity of CD4 T cells and have discovered that both intracellular events within antigen presenting cells, particular selective DM editing, and intercellular regulatory pathways, involving IFN-γ, indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase, and regulatory T cells, play a role in selecting the final peptide specificity of CD4 T cells. In this review, we summarize our findings, discuss the implications of this work on responses to pathogens and vaccines and speculate on the logic of these regulatory events. PMID:24167504

  4. Addition of maraviroc to antiretroviral therapy decreased interferon-γ mRNA in the CD4+ T cells of patients with suboptimal CD4+ T-cell recovery.

    PubMed

    Minami, Rumi; Takahama, Soichiro; Kaku, Yu; Yamamoto, Masahiro

    2017-01-01

    The CCR5 antagonist, maraviroc (MVC), is associated with an enhanced CD4+ T-cell response independent of virological suppression; however, its mechanism of action has not been elucidated. In this study, we confirmed the effect of MVC on CD4+ T-cell count recovery in immunological non-responders, and compared the conventional combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) with MVC-intensified cART. We also investigated the effect of MVC on interferon-γ (IFN-γ) production in CD4+ T cells in vitro and in vivo, and evaluated the relationship between the mRNA level of IFN-γ and the degree of CD4+ T-cell count recovery. In vitro analysis indicated that MVC significantly decreased mRNA levels of IFN-γ in HIV-Tat stimulated CD4+ T cells from healthy donor peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Of the 18 HIV-infected patients treated with MVC-intensified cART, 12 had a significantly increased CD4+ T-cell count after 24 weeks of additional treatment with MVC. In patients exhibiting a response in CD4+ T-cell counts, mRNA levels of IFN-γ in CD4+ T cells were lower than those in patients showing a non-response at baseline and at week 24, while mRNA levels of IFN-γ decreased in both groups at 24 weeks. In conclusion, MVC decreased the mRNA level of IFN-γ in CD4+ T cells in vitro and in vivo, especially in patients whose CD4+ T-cell count increased significantly. We also found that the lower baseline IFN-γ mRNA level and the larger decreased rate of IFN-γ mRNA in CD4+ T cells were associated with a good response to MVC regarding CD4+ T-cell recovery.

  5. Defective response of CD4+ T cells to retinoic acid and TGFβ in systemic lupus erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Introduction CD25+ FOXP3+ CD4+ regulatory T cells (Tregs) are induced by transforming growth factor β (TGFβ) and further expanded by retinoic acid (RA). We have previously shown that this process was defective in T cells from lupus-prone mice expressing the novel isoform of the Pbx1 gene, Pbx1-d. This study tested the hypothesis that CD4+ T cells from systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) patients exhibited similar defects in Treg induction in response to TGFβ and RA, and that PBX1-d expression is associated with this defect. Methods Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) were collected from 142 SLE patients and 83 healthy controls (HCs). The frequency of total, memory and naïve CD4+ T cells was measured by flow cytometry on fresh cells. PBX1 isoform expression in purified CD4+ T cells was determined by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). PBMCs were stimulated for three days with anti-CD3 and anti-CD28 in the presence or absence of TGFβ and RA. The expression of CD25 and FOXP3 on CD4+ T cells was then determined by flow cytometry. In vitro suppression assays were performed with sorted CD25+ and CD25- FOXP3+ T cells. CD4+ T cell subsets or their expansion were compared between patients and HCs with two-tailed Mann-Whitney tests and correlations between the frequencies of two subsets were tested with Spearman tests. Results The percentage of CD25- FOXP3+ CD4+ (CD25- Tregs) T cells was greater in SLE patients than in HCs, but these cells, contrary to their matched CD25+ counterparts, did not show a suppressive activity. RA-expansion of TGFβ-induced CD25+ Tregs was significantly lower in SLE patients than in HCs, although SLE Tregs expanded significantly more than HCs in response to either RA or TGFβ alone. Defective responses were also observed for the SLE CD25- Tregs and CD25+ FOXP3- activated CD4+ T cells as compared to controls. PBX1-d expression did not affect Treg induction, but it significantly reduced the expansion of CD25- Tregs

  6. Incomplete peripheral CD4+ cell count restoration in HIV-infected patients receiving long-term antiretroviral treatment.

    PubMed

    Kelley, Colleen F; Kitchen, Christina M R; Hunt, Peter W; Rodriguez, Benigno; Hecht, Frederick M; Kitahata, Mari; Crane, Heide M; Willig, James; Mugavero, Michael; Saag, Michael; Martin, Jeffrey N; Deeks, Steven G

    2009-03-15

    Although antiretroviral therapy has the ability to fully restore a normal CD4(+) cell count (>500 cells/mm(3)) in most patients, it is not yet clear whether all patients can achieve normalization of their CD4(+) cell count, in part because no study has followed up patients for >7 years. Three hundred sixty-six patients from 5 clinical cohorts who maintained a plasma human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) RNA level 1000 copies/mL for at least 4 years after initiation of antiretroviral therapy were included. Changes in CD4(+) cell count were evaluated using mixed-effects modeling, spline-smoothing regression, and Kaplan-Meier techniques. The majority (83%) of the patients were men. The median CD4(+) cell count at the time of therapy initiation was 201 cells/mm(3) (interquartile range, 72-344 cells/mm(3)), and the median age was 47 years. The median follow-up period was 7.5 years (interquartile range, 5.5-9.7 years). CD4(+) cell counts continued to increase throughout the follow-up period, albeit slowly after year 4. Although almost all patients (95%) who started therapy with a CD4(+) cell count 300 cells/mm(3) were able to attain a CD4(+) cell count 500 cells/mm(3), 44% of patients who started therapy with a CD4(+) cell count <100 cells/mm(3) and 25% of patients who started therapy with a CD4(+) cell count of 100-200 cells/mm(3) were unable to achieve a CD4(+) cell count >500 cells/mm(3) over a mean duration of follow-up of 7.5 years; many did not reach this threshold by year 10. Twenty-four percent of individuals with a CD4(+) cell count <500 cells/mm(3) at year 4 had evidence of a CD4(+) cell count plateau after year 4. The frequency of detectable viremia ("blips") after year 4 was not associated with the magnitude of the CD4(+) cell count change. A substantial proportion of patients who delay therapy until their CD4(+) cell count decreases to <200 cells/mm(3) do not achieve a normal CD4(+) cell count, even after a decade of otherwise effective antiretroviral therapy

  7. Incomplete Peripheral CD4+ Cell Count Restoration in HIV-Infected Patients Receiving Long-Term Antiretroviral Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Kelley, Colleen F.; Kitchen, Christina M. R.; Hunt, Peter W.; Rodriguez, Benigno; Hecht, Frederick M.; Kitahata, Mari; Crane, Heide M.; Willig, James; Mugavero, Michael; Saag, Michael; Martin, Jeffrey N.; Deeks, Steven G.

    2009-01-01

    Background Although antiretroviral therapy has the ability to fully restore a normal CD4+ cell count (>500 cells/mm3) in most patients, it is not yet clear whether all patients can achieve normalization of their CD4+ cell count, in part because no study has followed up patients for >7 years. Methods Three hundred sixty-six patients from 5 clinical cohorts who maintained a plasma human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) RNA level ≤1000 copies/mL for at least 4 years after initiation of antiretroviral therapy were included. Changes in CD4+ cell count were evaluated using mixed-effects modeling, spline-smoothing regression, and Kaplan-Meier techniques. Results The majority (83%) of the patients were men. The median CD4+ cell count at the time of therapy initiation was 201 cells/mm3 (interquartile range, 72−344 cells/mm3), and the median age was 47 years. The median follow-up period was 7.5 years (interquartile range, 5.5−9.7 years). CD4+ cell counts continued to increase throughout the follow-up period, albeit slowly after year 4. Although almost all patients (95%) who started therapy with a CD4+ cell count ≥300 cells/mm3 were able to attain a CD4+ cell count ≥500 cells/mm3, 44% of patients who started therapy with a CD4+ cell count <100 cells/mm3 and 25% of patients who started therapy with a CD4+ cell count of 100−200 cells/mm3 were unable to achieve a CD4+ cell count >500 cells/mm3 over a mean duration of follow-up of 7.5 years; many did not reach this threshold by year 10. Twenty-four percent of individuals with a CD4+ cell count <500 cells/mm3 at year 4 had evidence of a CD4+ cell count plateau after year 4. The frequency of detectable viremia (“blips”) after year 4 was not associated with the magnitude of the CD4+ cell count change. Conclusions A substantial proportion of patients who delay therapy until their CD4+ cell count decreases to <200 cells/mm3 do not achieve a normal CD4+ cell count, even after a decade of otherwise effective antiretroviral

  8. Tumor-specific CD4+ T cells eradicate myeloma cells genetically deficient in MHC class II display

    PubMed Central

    Tveita, Anders; Fauskanger, Marte; Bogen, Bjarne; Haabeth, Ole Audun Werner

    2016-01-01

    CD4+ T cells have been shown to reject tumor cells with no detectable expression of major histocompatibility complex class II (MHC II). However, under certain circumstances, induction of ectopic MHC II expression on tumor cells has been reported. To confirm that CD4+ T cell-mediated anti-tumor immunity can be successful in the complete absence of antigen display on the tumor cells themselves, we eliminated MHC II on tumor cells using CRISPR/Cas9. Our results demonstrate that ablation of the relevant MHC II (I-Ed) in multiple myeloma cells (MOPC315) does not hinder rejection by tumor-specific CD4+ T cells. These findings provide conclusive evidence that CD4+ T cells specific for tumor antigens can eliminate malignant cells in the absence of endogenous MHC class II expression on the tumor cells. This occurs through antigen uptake and indirect presentation on tumor-infiltrating macrophages. PMID:27626487

  9. The Fc and not CD4 Receptor Mediates Antibody Enhancement of HIV Infection in Human Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Homsy, Jacques; Meyer, Mia; Tateno, Masatoshi; Clarkson, Sarah; Levy, Jay A.

    1989-06-01

    Antibodies that enhance human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infectivity have been found in the blood of infected individuals and in infected or immunized animals. These findings raise serious concern for the development of a safe vaccine against acquired immunodeficiency syndrome. To address the in vivo relevance and mechanism of this phenomenon, antibody-dependent enhancement of HIV infectivity in peripheral blood macrophages, lymphocytes, and human fibroblastoid cells was studied. Neither Leu3a, a monoclonal antibody directed against the CD4 receptor, nor soluble recombinant CD4 even at high concentrations prevented this enhancement. The addition of monoclonal antibody to the Fc receptor III (anti-FcRIII), but not of antibodies that react with FcRI or FcRII, inhibited HIV type 1 and HIV type 2 enhancement in peripheral blood macrophages. Although enhancement of HIV infection in CD4+ lymphocytes could not be blocked by anti-FcRIII, it was inhibited by the addition of human immunoglobulin G aggregates. The results indicate that the FcRIII receptor on human macrophages and possibly another Fc receptor on human CD4+ lymphocytes mediate antibody-dependent enhancement of HIV infectivity and that this phenomenon proceeds through a mechanism independent of the CD4 protein.

  10. Estradiol Reduces Susceptibility of CD4+ T Cells and Macrophages to HIV-Infection

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez-Garcia, Marta; Biswas, Nabanita; Patel, Mickey V.; Barr, Fiona D.; Crist, Sarah G.; Ochsenbauer, Christina; Fahey, John V.; Wira, Charles R.

    2013-01-01

    The magnitude of the HIV epidemic in women requires urgent efforts to find effective preventive methods. Even though sex hormones have been described to influence HIV infection in epidemiological studies and regulate different immune responses that may affect HIV infection, the direct role that female sex hormones play in altering the susceptibility of target cells to HIV-infection is largely unknown. Here we evaluated the direct effect of 17-β-estradiol (E2) and ethinyl estradiol (EE) in HIV-infection of CD4+ T-cells and macrophages. Purified CD4+ T-cells and monocyte-derived macrophages were generated in vitro from peripheral blood and infected with R5 and X4 viruses. Treatment of CD4+ T-cells and macrophages with E2 prior to viral challenge reduced their susceptibility to HIV infection in a dose-dependent manner. Addition of E2 2 h after viral challenge however did not result in reduced infection. In contrast, EE reduced infection in macrophages to a lesser extent than E2 and had no effect on CD4+ T-cell infection. Reduction of HIV-infection induced by E2 in CD4+ T-cells was not due to CCR5 down-regulation, but was an entry-mediated mechanism since infection with VSV-G pseudotyped HIV was not modified by E2. In macrophages, despite the lack of an effect of E2 on CCR5 expression, E2–treatment reduced viral entry 2 h after challenge and increased MIP-1β secretion. These results demonstrate the direct effect of E2 on susceptibility of HIV-target cells to infection and indicate that inhibition of target cell infection involves cell-entry related mechanisms. PMID:23614015

  11. Estradiol reduces susceptibility of CD4+ T cells and macrophages to HIV-infection.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez-Garcia, Marta; Biswas, Nabanita; Patel, Mickey V; Barr, Fiona D; Crist, Sarah G; Ochsenbauer, Christina; Fahey, John V; Wira, Charles R

    2013-01-01

    The magnitude of the HIV epidemic in women requires urgent efforts to find effective preventive methods. Even though sex hormones have been described to influence HIV infection in epidemiological studies and regulate different immune responses that may affect HIV infection, the direct role that female sex hormones play in altering the susceptibility of target cells to HIV-infection is largely unknown. Here we evaluated the direct effect of 17-β-estradiol (E2) and ethinyl estradiol (EE) in HIV-infection of CD4(+) T-cells and macrophages. Purified CD4(+) T-cells and monocyte-derived macrophages were generated in vitro from peripheral blood and infected with R5 and X4 viruses. Treatment of CD4(+) T-cells and macrophages with E2 prior to viral challenge reduced their susceptibility to HIV infection in a dose-dependent manner. Addition of E2 2 h after viral challenge however did not result in reduced infection. In contrast, EE reduced infection in macrophages to a lesser extent than E2 and had no effect on CD4(+) T-cell infection. Reduction of HIV-infection induced by E2 in CD4(+) T-cells was not due to CCR5 down-regulation, but was an entry-mediated mechanism since infection with VSV-G pseudotyped HIV was not modified by E2. In macrophages, despite the lack of an effect of E2 on CCR5 expression, E2-treatment reduced viral entry 2 h after challenge and increased MIP-1β secretion. These results demonstrate the direct effect of E2 on susceptibility of HIV-target cells to infection and indicate that inhibition of target cell infection involves cell-entry related mechanisms.

  12. Crystal structure of a complete ternary complex of T-cell receptor, peptide-MHC, and CD4

    SciTech Connect

    Yin, Yiyuan; Wang, Xin Xiang; Mariuzza, Roy A

    2012-07-11

    Adaptive immunity depends on specific recognition by a T-cell receptor (TCR) of an antigenic peptide bound to a major histocompatibility complex (pMHC) molecule on an antigen-presenting cell (APC). In addition, T-cell activation generally requires binding of this same pMHC to a CD4 or CD8 coreceptor. Here, we report the structure of a complete TCR-pMHC-CD4 ternary complex involving a human autoimmune TCR, a myelin-derived self-peptide bound to HLA-DR4, and CD4. The complex resembles a pointed arch in which TCR and CD4 are each tilted ~65° relative to the T-cell membrane. By precluding direct contacts between TCR and CD4, the structure explains how TCR and CD4 on the T cell can simultaneously, yet independently, engage the same pMHC on the APC. The structure, in conjunction with previous mutagenesis data, places TCR-associated CD3εγ and CD3εδ subunits, which transmit activation signals to the T cell, inside the TCR-pMHC-CD4 arch, facing CD4. By establishing anchor points for TCR and CD4 on the T-cell membrane, the complex provides a basis for understanding how the CD4 coreceptor focuses TCR on MHC to guide TCR docking on pMHC during thymic T-cell selection.

  13. Comparative Impact of Suppressive Antiretroviral Regimens on the CD4/CD8 T-Cell Ratio

    PubMed Central

    Masiá, Mar; Padilla, Sergio; Barber, Xavier; Sanchis, Marina; Terol, Gertrudis; Lidón, Fernando; Gutiérrez, Félix

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Although different factors have been implicated in the CD4/CD8 T-cell ratio recovery in HIV-infected patients who receive effective antiretroviral therapy (ART), limited information exists on the influence of the regimen composition. A longitudinal study carried out in a prospective, single-center cohort of HIV-infected patients. ART regimens including non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTI), protease inhibitors (PI), or integrase strand transfer inhibitors (INSTI) from patients who achieved long-term (≥6-month duration) virological suppression (HIV-RNA < 400 copies/mL) from January 1998 to June 2014 were analyzed. The impact of ART composition on the changes of the CD4/CD8 T-cell ratio was modeled using a mixed linear approach with adjustment for possible confounders. A total of 1068 ART regimens from 570 patients were analyzed. Mean (SD) age of the patients was 42.15 (10.68) years and 276 (48.42%) had hepatitis C virus (HCV) coinfection. Five hundred fifty-eight (52.25%) regimens were PI-based, 439 (40.10%) NNRTI-based, and 71 (6.65%) INSTI-based; 487 (45.60%) were initial regimens, 476 (44.57%) simplification, and 105 (9.83%) salvage regimens. Median (IQR) number of regimens was 1 (1–2) per patient, of 29 (14–58) months duration, and 4 (3–7) CD4/CD8 measurements per regimen. The median baseline CD4/CD8 ratio was 0.42, 0.50, and 0.54, respectively, with the PI-, NNRTI-, and INSTI-based regimens (P = 0.0073). Overall median (IQR) increase of CD4/CD8 ratio was 0.0245 (−0.0352–0.0690) per year, and a CD4/CD8 ratio ≥1 was achieved in 19.35% of the cases with PI-based, 25.97% with NNRTI-based, and 22.54% with INSTI-based regimens (P = 0.1406). In the adjusted model, the mean CD4/CD8 T-cell ratio increase was higher with NNRTI-based regimens compared for PI-based (estimated coefficient for PI [95% CI], −0.0912 [−0.1604 to −0.0219], P = 0.009). Also, a higher CD4/CD8 baseline ratio was associated with higher

  14. Characterisation of CD4 T cells in healthy and diseased koalas (Phascolarctos cinereus) using cell-type-specific monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Mangar, Chandan; Armitage, Charles W; Timms, Peter; Corcoran, Lynn M; Beagley, Kenneth W

    2016-07-01

    The koala (Phascolarctos cinereus) is an arboreal herbivorous marsupial that is an Australian icon. Koalas in many parts of Australia are under multiple threats including habitat destruction, dog attacks, vehicular accidents, and infectious diseases such as Chlamydia spp. and the koala retrovirus (KoRV), which may contribute to the incidence of lymphoma and leukaemia in this species. Due to a lack of koala-specific immune reagents and assays there is currently no way to adequately analyse the immune response in healthy, diseased or vaccinated animals. This paper reports the production and characterisation of the first anti-koala CD4 monoclonal antibody (mAb). The koala CD4 gene was identified and used to develop recombinant proteins for mAb production. Fluorochrome-conjugated anti-CD4 mAb was used to measure the levels of CD4(+) lymphocytes collected from koala spleens (41.1%, range 20-45.1%) lymph nodes (36.3%, range 19-55.9%) and peripheral blood (23.8%, range 17.3-35%) by flow cytometry. Biotin-conjugated anti-CD4 mAb was used for western blot to determine an approximate size of 52 kDa for the koala CD4 molecule and used in immunohistochemistry to identify CD4(+) cells in the paracortical region and germinal centres of spleen and lymph nodes. Using the anti-CD4 mab we showed that CD4 cells from vaccinated, but not control, koalas proliferated following in vitro stimulation with UV-inactivated Chlamydia pecorum and recombinant chlamydial antigens. Since CD4(+) T cells have been shown to play a pivotal role in clearing chlamydial infection in both human and mouse infections, using this novel antibody will help determine the role CD4(+) T cells play in protection against chlamydial infection in koalas and also enhance our knowledge of how KoRV affects the koala immune system.

  15. Exposure of Human CD4 T Cells to IL-12 Results in Enhanced TCR-Induced Cytokine Production, Altered TCR Signaling, and Increased Oxidative Metabolism.

    PubMed

    Vacaflores, Aldo; Chapman, Nicole M; Harty, John T; Richer, Martin J; Houtman, Jon C D

    2016-01-01

    Human CD4 T cells are constantly exposed to IL-12 during infections and certain autoimmune disorders. The current paradigm is that IL-12 promotes the differentiation of naïve CD4 T cells into Th1 cells, but recent studies suggest IL-12 may play a more complex role in T cell biology. We examined if exposure to IL-12 alters human CD4 T cell responses to subsequent TCR stimulation. We found that IL-12 pretreatment increased TCR-induced IFN-γ, TNF-α, IL-13, IL-4 and IL-10 production. This suggests that prior exposure to IL-12 potentiates the TCR-induced release of a range of cytokines. We observed that IL-12 mediated its effects through both transcriptional and post-transcriptional mechanisms. IL-12 pretreatment increased the phosphorylation of AKT, p38 and LCK following TCR stimulation without altering other TCR signaling molecules, potentially mediating the increase in transcription of cytokines. In addition, the IL-12-mediated enhancement of cytokines that are not transcriptionally regulated was partially driven by increased oxidative metabolism. Our data uncover a novel function of IL-12 in human CD4 T cells; specifically, it enhances the release of a range of cytokines potentially by altering TCR signaling pathways and by enhancing oxidative metabolism.

  16. ADAR1 Facilitates HIV-1 Replication in Primary CD4+ T Cells

    PubMed Central

    van Hamme, John L.; Jansen, Machiel H.; van Dort, Karel A.; Vanderver, Adeline; Rice, Gillian I.; Crow, Yanick J.; Kootstra, Neeltje A.; Kuijpers, Taco W.

    2015-01-01

    Unlike resting CD4+ T cells, activated CD4+T cells are highly susceptible to infection of human immunodeficiency virus 1 (HIV-1). HIV-1 infects T cells and macrophages without activating the nucleic acid sensors and the anti-viral type I interferon response. Adenosine deaminase acting on RNA 1 (ADAR1) is an RNA editing enzyme that displays antiviral activity against several RNA viruses. Mutations in ADAR1 cause the autoimmune disorder Aicardi-Goutieères syndrome (AGS). This disease is characterized by an inappropriate activation of the interferon-stimulated gene response. Here we show that HIV-1 replication, in ADAR1-deficient CD4+T lymphocytes from AGS patients, is blocked at the level of protein translation. Furthermore, viral protein synthesis block is accompanied by an activation of interferon-stimulated genes. RNA silencing of ADAR1 in Jurkat cells also inhibited HIV-1 protein synthesis. Our data support that HIV-1 requires ADAR1 for efficient replication in human CD4+T cells. PMID:26629815

  17. Environmental peer pressure: CD4+ T cell help in tolerance and transplantation.

    PubMed

    Tedesco, Dana; Grakoui, Arash

    2017-09-19

    The liver participates in a multitude of metabolic functions that are critical for sustaining human life. Despite constant encounters with antigenic-rich intestinal blood, oxidative stress and metabolic intermediates, there is no appreciable immune response. Interestingly, patients undergoing orthotopic liver transplantation benefit from a high rate of graft acceptance in comparison to other solid organ transplant recipients. In fact, co-transplantation of a donor liver in tandem with a rejection-prone graft increases the likelihood of graft acceptance. A variety of players may account for this phenomenon including the interaction of intrahepatic antigen presenting cells with CD4+ T cells and the preferential induction of Foxp3 expression on CD4+ T cells following injurious stimuli. Ineffective insult management can cause chronic liver disease, which manifests systemically as: antibody mediated disorders, ineffective antiviral and antibacterial immunity, and gastrointestinal disorders. These sequelae share the requirement of CD4+ T cell help to coordinate aberrant immune responses. In this review, we will focus on CD4+ T cell help due to the shared requirements in hepatic tolerance and coordination of extrahepatic immune responses. Overall, intrahepatic deviations from steady state can have deleterious systemic immune outcomes, and highlight the liver's remarkable capacity to maintain a balance between tolerance and inflammatory response while simultaneously being inundated with a panoply of antigenic stimuli. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. © 2017 by the American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases.

  18. Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi impairs CD4 T cell responses by reducing antigen availability.

    PubMed

    Atif, Shaikh M; Winter, Sebastian E; Winter, Maria G; McSorley, Stephen J; Bäumler, Andreas J

    2014-06-01

    Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi is associated with a disseminated febrile illness in humans, termed typhoid fever, while Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium causes localized gastroenteritis in immunocompetent individuals. One of the genetic differences between both pathogens is the presence in S. Typhi of TviA, a regulatory protein that shuts down flagellin (FliC) expression when bacteria transit from the intestinal lumen into the intestinal mucosa. Here we investigated the consequences of TviA-mediated flagellum gene regulation on flagellin-specific CD4 T cell responses in a mouse model of S. Typhimurium infection. Introduction of the S. Typhi tviA gene into S. Typhimurium suppressed antigen presentation of dendritic cells to flagellin-specific CD4 T cells in vitro. Furthermore, TviA-mediated repression of flagellin expression impaired the activation and proliferation of naive flagellin-specific CD4 T cells in Peyer's patches and mesenteric lymph nodes, which was accompanied by increased bacterial dissemination to the spleen. We conclude that TviA-mediated repression of flagellin expression reduces antigen availability, thereby weakening flagellin-specific CD4 T cell responses.

  19. The Chronic Stages of Bovine Fasciola hepatica Are Dominated by CD4 T-Cell Exhaustion.

    PubMed

    Sachdev, Divya; Gough, Kevin C; Flynn, Robin J

    2017-01-01

    Fasciola hepatica infection of ruminants leads to non-resolving chronic infection, as patency develops, there is switching to a TGF-β and IL-10 led response. Here, we explore the responses of CD4 T-cells within the major draining lymph nodes. We found minimal expression of Foxp3 within CD4 cells but elevated levels within the γδ (WC1(+)) population. There is a strong T-cell-intrinsic exhaustion phenotype within the hepatic lymph node (HLN) characterized by a lack of antigen-specific proliferation and cytokine secretion. CD4 T-cells recovered from the HLN had high levels of PD-1 expression and low levels of IL-2 secretion. Exogenous IL-2 partially rescued this defect; when combined with neutralization of IL-10 and TGF-β, full restoration of proliferation, and cytokine production was achieved. Moreover, there is a clear uncoupling of the mechanisms that facilitate this regulation with parasite-specific proliferation and cytokine secretion being governed by independent means. These data would suggest that there is a CD4 T-cell-intrinsic regulation in place early in chronic infection, potentially leading to failure in resistance to reinfection.

  20. The Chronic Stages of Bovine Fasciola hepatica Are Dominated by CD4 T-Cell Exhaustion

    PubMed Central

    Sachdev, Divya; Gough, Kevin C.; Flynn, Robin J.

    2017-01-01

    Fasciola hepatica infection of ruminants leads to non-resolving chronic infection, as patency develops, there is switching to a TGF-β and IL-10 led response. Here, we explore the responses of CD4 T-cells within the major draining lymph nodes. We found minimal expression of Foxp3 within CD4 cells but elevated levels within the γδ (WC1+) population. There is a strong T-cell-intrinsic exhaustion phenotype within the hepatic lymph node (HLN) characterized by a lack of antigen-specific proliferation and cytokine secretion. CD4 T-cells recovered from the HLN had high levels of PD-1 expression and low levels of IL-2 secretion. Exogenous IL-2 partially rescued this defect; when combined with neutralization of IL-10 and TGF-β, full restoration of proliferation, and cytokine production was achieved. Moreover, there is a clear uncoupling of the mechanisms that facilitate this regulation with parasite-specific proliferation and cytokine secretion being governed by independent means. These data would suggest that there is a CD4 T-cell-intrinsic regulation in place early in chronic infection, potentially leading to failure in resistance to reinfection. PMID:28871261

  1. Extensive CD4 and CD8 T-cell cross-reactivity between alphaherpesviruses1

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Lichun; Russell, Ronnie M.; Barlow, Russell S.; Haas, Juergen G.; Ramchandani, Meena S.; Johnston, Christine; Buus, Soren; Redwood, Alec J.; White, Katie D.; Mallal, Simon A.; Phillips, Elizabeth J.; Posavad, Christine M.; Wald, Anna; Koelle, David M.

    2015-01-01

    The alphaherpesvirinae subfamily includes HSV types 1 and 2 and the sequence-divergent pathogen varicella zoster virus (VZV). T cells, controlled by TCR and HLA molecules that tolerate limited epitope amino acid variation, might cross-react between these microbes. We show that memory PBMC expansion with either HSV or VZV enriches for CD4 T cell lines that recognize the other agent at the whole virus, protein, and peptide levels, consistent with bi-directional cross-reactivity. HSV-specific CD4 T cells recovered from HSV seronegative persons can be partially explained by such VZV cross-reactivity. HSV-1-reactive CD8 T cells also cross-react with VZV-infected cells, full-length VZV proteins, and VZV peptides, and kill VZV-infected dermal fibroblasts. Mono- and cross-reactive CD8 T cells use distinct TCRB CDR3 sequences. Cross-reactivity to VZV is reconstituted by cloning and expressing TCRA/TCRB receptors from T-cells that are initially isolated using HSV reagents. Overall, we define 13 novel CD4 and CD8 HSV-VZV cross-reactive epitopes and strongly imply additional cross-reactive peptide sets. Viral proteins can harbor both CD4 and CD8 HSV/VZV cross-reactive epitopes. Quantitative estimates of HSV/VZV cross-reactivity for both CD4 and CD8 T cells vary from 10-50%. Based on these findings, we hypothesize host herpesvirus immune history may influence the pathogenesis and clinical outcome of subsequent infections or vaccinations for related pathogens, and that cross-reactive epitopes and TCRs may be useful for multi-alphaherpesvirus vaccine design and adoptive cellular therapy. PMID:26810224

  2. Human Memory CD4+ T Cell Immune Responses against Giardia lamblia

    PubMed Central

    Sørnes, Steinar; Peirasmaki, Dimitra; Svärd, Staffan; Langeland, Nina

    2015-01-01

    The intestinal protozoan parasite Giardia lamblia may cause severe prolonged diarrheal disease or pass unnoticed as an asymptomatic infection. T cells seem to play an important role in the immune response to Giardia infection, and memory responses may last years. Recently, TH17 responses have been found in three animal studies of Giardia infection. The aim of this study was to characterize the human CD4+ T cell responses to Giardia. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) were obtained from 21 returning travelers with recent or ongoing giardiasis and 12 low-risk healthy controls and stimulated in vitro with Giardia lamblia proteins. Production of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), gamma interferon, interleukin-17A (IL-17A), IL-10, and IL-4 was measured in CD4+ effector memory (EM) T cells after 24 h by flow cytometry. After 6 days of culture, activation and proliferation were measured by flow cytometry, while an array of inflammatory cytokine levels in supernatants were measured with multiplex assays. We found the number of IL-17A-producing CD4+ EM T cells, as well as that of cells simultaneously producing both IL-17A and TNF-α, to be significantly elevated in the Giardia-exposed individuals after 24 h of antigen stimulation. In supernatants of PBMCs stimulated with Giardia antigens for 6 days, we found inflammation-associated cytokines, including 1L-17A, as well as CD4+ T cell activation and proliferation, to be significantly elevated in the Giardia-exposed individuals. We conclude that symptomatic Giardia infection in humans induces a CD4+ EM T cell response of which IL-17A production seems to be an important component. PMID:26376930

  3. Human Memory CD4+ T Cell Immune Responses against Giardia lamblia.

    PubMed

    Saghaug, Christina Skår; Sørnes, Steinar; Peirasmaki, Dimitra; Svärd, Staffan; Langeland, Nina; Hanevik, Kurt

    2015-09-16

    The intestinal protozoan parasite Giardia lamblia may cause severe prolonged diarrheal disease or pass unnoticed as an asymptomatic infection. T cells seem to play an important role in the immune response to Giardia infection, and memory responses may last years. Recently, TH17 responses have been found in three animal studies of Giardia infection. The aim of this study was to characterize the human CD4(+) T cell responses to Giardia. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) were obtained from 21 returning travelers with recent or ongoing giardiasis and 12 low-risk healthy controls and stimulated in vitro with Giardia lamblia proteins. Production of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), gamma interferon, interleukin-17A (IL-17A), IL-10, and IL-4 was measured in CD4(+) effector memory (EM) T cells after 24 h by flow cytometry. After 6 days of culture, activation and proliferation were measured by flow cytometry, while an array of inflammatory cytokine levels in supernatants were measured with multiplex assays. We found the number of IL-17A-producing CD4(+) EM T cells, as well as that of cells simultaneously producing both IL-17A and TNF-α, to be significantly elevated in the Giardia-exposed individuals after 24 h of antigen stimulation. In supernatants of PBMCs stimulated with Giardia antigens for 6 days, we found inflammation-associated cytokines, including 1L-17A, as well as CD4(+) T cell activation and proliferation, to be significantly elevated in the Giardia-exposed individuals. We conclude that symptomatic Giardia infection in humans induces a CD4(+) EM T cell response of which IL-17A production seems to be an important component. Copyright © 2016, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  4. Vitamin D Actions on CD4(+) T Cells in Autoimmune Disease.

    PubMed

    Hayes, Colleen Elizabeth; Hubler, Shane L; Moore, Jerott R; Barta, Lauren E; Praska, Corinne E; Nashold, Faye E

    2015-01-01

    This review summarizes and integrates research on vitamin D and CD4(+) T-lymphocyte biology to develop new mechanistic insights into the molecular etiology of autoimmune disease. A deep understanding of molecular mechanisms relevant to gene-environment interactions is needed to deliver etiology-based autoimmune disease prevention and treatment strategies. Evidence linking sunlight, vitamin D, and the risk of multiple sclerosis and type 1 diabetes is summarized to develop the thesis that vitamin D is the environmental factor that most strongly influences autoimmune disease development. Evidence for CD4(+) T-cell involvement in autoimmune disease pathogenesis and for paracrine calcitriol signaling to CD4(+) T lymphocytes is summarized to support the thesis that calcitriol is sunlight's main protective signal transducer in autoimmune disease risk. Animal modeling and human mechanistic data are summarized to support the view that vitamin D probably influences thymic negative selection, effector Th1 and Th17 pathogenesis and responsiveness to extrinsic cell death signals, FoxP3(+)CD4(+) T-regulatory cell and CD4(+) T-regulatory cell type 1 (Tr1) cell functions, and a Th1-Tr1 switch. The proposed Th1-Tr1 switch appears to bridge two stable, self-reinforcing immune states, pro- and anti-inflammatory, each with a characteristic gene regulatory network. The bi-stable switch would enable T cells to integrate signals from pathogens, hormones, cell-cell interactions, and soluble mediators and respond in a biologically appropriate manner. Finally, unanswered questions and potentially informative future research directions are highlighted to speed delivery of etiology-based strategies to reduce autoimmune disease.

  5. Coordinated Changes in DNA Methylation in Antigen-Specific Memory CD4 T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Ogoshi, Katsumi; Sasaki, Atsushi; Abe, Jun; Qu, Wei; Nakatani, Yoichiro; Ahsan, Budrul; Oshima, Kenshiro; Shand, Francis H. W.; Ametani, Akio; Suzuki, Yutaka; Kaneko, Shuichi; Wada, Takashi; Hattori, Masahira; Sugano, Sumio; Morishita, Shinichi; Matsushima, Kouji

    2013-01-01

    Memory CD4+ T cells are central regulators of both humoral and cellular immune responses. T cell differentiation results in specific changes in chromatin structure and DNA methylation of cytokine genes. Although the methylation status of a limited number of gene loci in T cells has been examined, the genome-wide DNA methylation status of memory CD4+ T cells remains unexplored. To further elucidate the molecular signature of memory T cells, we conducted methylome and transcriptome analyses of memory CD4+ T cells generated using T cells from TCR-transgenic mice. The resulting genome-wide DNA methylation profile revealed 1144 differentially methylated regions (DMRs) across the murine genome during the process of T cell differentiation, 552 of which were associated with gene loci. Interestingly, the majority of these DMRs were located in introns. These DMRs included genes such as CXCR6, Tbox21, Chsy1, and Cish, which are associated with cytokine production, homing to bone marrow, and immune responses. Methylation changes in memory T cells exposed to specific Ag appeared to regulate enhancer activity rather than promoter activity of immunologically relevant genes. In addition, methylation profiles differed between memory T cell subsets, demonstrating a link between T cell methylation status and T cell differentiation. By comparing DMRs between naive and Ag-specific memory T cells, this study provides new insights into the functional status of memory T cells. PMID:23509353

  6. Peripheral and site-specific CD4(+) CD28(null) T cells from rheumatoid arthritis patients show distinct characteristics.

    PubMed

    Pieper, J; Johansson, S; Snir, O; Linton, L; Rieck, M; Buckner, J H; Winqvist, O; van Vollenhoven, R; Malmström, V

    2014-02-01

    Proinflammatory CD4(+) CD28(null) T cells are frequently found in the circulation of patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), but are less common in the rheumatic joint. In the present study, we sought to identify functional differences between CD4(+) CD28(null) T cells from blood and synovial fluid in comparison with conventional CD28-expressing CD4(+) T cells. Forty-four patients with RA, displaying a distinct CD4(+) CD28(null) T cell population in blood, were recruited for this study; the methylation status of the IFNG locus was examined in isolated T cell subsets, and intracellular cytokine production (IFN-γ, TNF, IL-17) and chemokine receptor expression (CXCR3, CCR6 and CCR7) were assessed by flow cytometry on T cells from the two compartments. Circulating CD4(+) CD28(null) T cells were significantly more hypomethylated in the CNS-1 region of the IFNG locus than conventional CD4(+) CD28(+) T cells and produced higher levels of both IFN-γ and TNF after TCR cross-linking. CD4(+) CD28(null) T cells from the site of inflammation expressed significantly more CXCR3 and CCR6 compared to their counterparts in blood. While IL-17A production could hardly be detected in CD4(+) CD28(null) cells from the blood, a significant production was observed in CD4(+) CD28(null) T cells from synovial fluid. CD4(+) CD28(null) T cells were not only found to differ from conventional CD4(+) CD28(+) T cells in the circulation, but we could also demonstrate that synovial CD4(+) CD28(null) T cells showed additional effector functions (IL-17 coproduction) as compared to the same subset in peripheral blood, suggesting an active role for these cells in the perpetuation of inflammation in the subset of patients having a CD28(null) population.

  7. Critical role of CD4 T cells in maintaining lymphoid tissue structure for immune cell homeostasis and reconstitution.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Ming; Paiardini, Mirko; Engram, Jessica C; Beilman, Greg J; Chipman, Jeffrey G; Schacker, Timothy W; Silvestri, Guido; Haase, Ashley T

    2012-08-30

    Loss of the fibroblastic reticular cell (FRC) network in lymphoid tissues during HIV-1 infection has been shown to impair the survival of naive T cells and limit immune reconstitution after antiretroviral therapy. What causes this FRC loss is unknown. Because FRC loss correlates with loss of both naive CD4 and CD8 T-cell subsets and decreased lymphotoxin-β, a key factor for maintenance of FRC network, we hypothesized that loss of naive T cells is responsible for loss of the FRC network. To test this hypothesis, we assessed the consequences of antibody-mediated depletion of CD4 and CD8 T cells in rhesus macaques and sooty mangabeys. We found that only CD4 T-cell depletion resulted in FRC loss in both species and that this loss was caused by decreased lymphotoxin-β mainly produced by the CD4 T cells. We further found the same dependence of the FRC network on CD4 T cells in HIV-1-infected patients before and after antiretroviral therapy and in other immunodeficiency conditions, such as CD4 depletion in cancer patients induced by chemotherapy and irradiation. CD4 T cells thus play a central role in the maintenance of lymphoid tissue structure necessary for their own homeostasis and reconstitution.

  8. Vitamin D Actions on CD4+ T Cells in Autoimmune Disease

    PubMed Central

    Hayes, Colleen Elizabeth; Hubler, Shane L.; Moore, Jerott R.; Barta, Lauren E.; Praska, Corinne E.; Nashold, Faye E.

    2015-01-01

    This review summarizes and integrates research on vitamin D and CD4+ T-lymphocyte biology to develop new mechanistic insights into the molecular etiology of autoimmune disease. A deep understanding of molecular mechanisms relevant to gene–environment interactions is needed to deliver etiology-based autoimmune disease prevention and treatment strategies. Evidence linking sunlight, vitamin D, and the risk of multiple sclerosis and type 1 diabetes is summarized to develop the thesis that vitamin D is the environmental factor that most strongly influences autoimmune disease development. Evidence for CD4+ T-cell involvement in autoimmune disease pathogenesis and for paracrine calcitriol signaling to CD4+ T lymphocytes is summarized to support the thesis that calcitriol is sunlight’s main protective signal transducer in autoimmune disease risk. Animal modeling and human mechanistic data are summarized to support the view that vitamin D probably influences thymic negative selection, effector Th1 and Th17 pathogenesis and responsiveness to extrinsic cell death signals, FoxP3+CD4+ T-regulatory cell and CD4+ T-regulatory cell type 1 (Tr1) cell functions, and a Th1–Tr1 switch. The proposed Th1–Tr1 switch appears to bridge two stable, self-reinforcing immune states, pro- and anti-inflammatory, each with a characteristic gene regulatory network. The bi-stable switch would enable T cells to integrate signals from pathogens, hormones, cell–cell interactions, and soluble mediators and respond in a biologically appropriate manner. Finally, unanswered questions and potentially informative future research directions are highlighted to speed delivery of etiology-based strategies to reduce autoimmune disease. PMID:25852682

  9. Long-Lived CD4+IFN-γ+ T Cells rather than Short-Lived CD4+IFN-γ+IL-10+ T Cells Initiate Rapid IL-10 Production To Suppress Anamnestic T Cell Responses during Secondary Malaria Infection

    PubMed Central

    Villegas-Mendez, Ana; Inkson, Colette A.; Shaw, Tovah N.; Strangward, Patrick

    2016-01-01

    CD4+ T cells that produce IFN-γ are the source of host-protective IL-10 during primary infection with a number of different pathogens, including Plasmodium spp. The fate of these CD4+IFN-γ+IL-10+ T cells following clearance of primary infection and their subsequent influence on the course of repeated infections is, however, presently unknown. In this study, utilizing IFN-γ–yellow fluorescent protein (YFP) and IL-10–GFP dual reporter mice, we show that primary malaria infection–induced CD4+YFP+GFP+ T cells have limited memory potential, do not stably express IL-10, and are disproportionately lost from the Ag-experienced CD4+ T cell memory population during the maintenance phase postinfection. CD4+YFP+GFP+ T cells generally exhibited a short-lived effector rather than effector memory T cell phenotype postinfection and expressed high levels of PD-1, Lag-3, and TIGIT, indicative of cellular exhaustion. Consistently, the surviving CD4+YFP+GFP+ T cell–derived cells were unresponsive and failed to proliferate during the early phase of secondary infection. In contrast, CD4+YFP+GFP− T cell–derived cells expanded rapidly and upregulated IL-10 expression during secondary infection. Correspondingly, CD4+ T cells were the major producers within an accelerated and amplified IL-10 response during the early stage of secondary malaria infection. Notably, IL-10 exerted quantitatively stronger regulatory effects on innate and CD4+ T cell responses during primary and secondary infections, respectively. The results in this study significantly improve our understanding of the durability of IL-10–producing CD4+ T cells postinfection and provide information on how IL-10 may contribute to optimized parasite control and prevention of immune-mediated pathology during repeated malaria infections. PMID:27630165

  10. Inducible CD4+LAP+ Foxp3 negative Regulatory T cells Suppress Allergic Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Duan, Wei; So, Takanori; Mehta, Amit K.; Choi, Heonsik; Croft, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Regulatory T cells (Treg cells) play a critical role in the maintenance of airway tolerance. We report here that inhaled soluble antigen induces not only adaptive Foxp3+ Treg but also a regulatory population of CD4+ T cells in the lungs and lung-draining lymph nodes that express latency-associated peptide (LAP) on their cell surface but do not express Foxp3. Blocking the cytokines IL-10 or transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) prevented the generation of the LAP+ Treg and Foxp3+ Treg cells in vivo, and the LAP+ Treg could also be generated concomitantly with Foxp3+ Treg in vitro by culturing naïve CD4+ T cells with antigen and exogenous TGF-β. The LAP+ Treg cells strongly suppressed naïve CD4+ T cell proliferation, and transfer of sorted OVA-specific LAP+ Treg cells in vivo inhibited allergic eosinophilia and Th2 cytokine expression in the lung, either when present at the time of Th2 sensitization or when injected after Th2 cells were formed. Furthermore, inflammatory innate stimuli from house dust mite (HDM) extract, nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain containing 2 (Nod2) ligand, and lipopolysacchride (LPS), that are sufficient for blocking airway tolerance, strongly decreased the induction of LAP+ Treg cells. Taken together, we conclude that inducible antigen-specific LAP+ Treg cells can suppress asthmatic lung inflammation and constitute a mediator of airway tolerance together with Foxp3+ Treg cells. PMID:22079987

  11. IL-2 contributes to maintaining a balance between CD4+Foxp3+ regulatory T cells and effector CD4+ T cells required for immune control of blood-stage malaria infection.

    PubMed

    Berretta, Floriana; St-Pierre, Jessica; Piccirillo, Ciriaco A; Stevenson, Mary M

    2011-04-15

    To investigate the role of CD4(+)CD25(+)Foxp3(+) regulatory T (Treg) cells in blood-stage malaria, we compared Plasmodium chabaudi AS infection in wild-type (WT) C57BL/6 and transgenic mice overexpressing the transcription factor Foxp3 (Foxp3Tg) and observed that Foxp3Tg mice experienced lethal infection and deficient malaria-specific immune responses. Adoptive transfer of total CD4(+) T cells from Foxp3Tg mice or CD4(+)CD25(+) T cells from WT mice to naive WT recipients confirmed that high numbers of Treg cells compromised immune control of malaria. Transfer of GFP(+)CD4(+)CD25(+) T cells to naive WT recipients together with immunohistochemical staining of spleens from infected WT mice demonstrated that Foxp3(+) Treg cells localized in the T cell area of the spleen. Determination of CD4(+)Foxp3(+) Treg cell responses in the spleen of infected WT mice revealed a significant but transient increase in CD4(+)Foxp3(+) Treg cells early in infection. This was followed by a significant and sustained decrease due to reduced proliferation and apoptosis of CD4(+)Foxp3(+) Treg cells. Importantly, the kinetics of IL-2 secretion by effector CD4(+)Foxp3(-) T cells coincided with changes in CD4(+)Foxp3(+) cells and the differentiation of CD4(+)T-bet(+)IFN-γ(+) cells required for immune control of infection. Administration of the IL-2/anti-IL-2 mAb (clone JES6-1) complex to infected WT mice increased the severity of P. chabaudi AS infection and promoted expansion of Foxp3(+) Treg cells. Collectively, these data demonstrate that the ability to control and eliminate P. chabaudi AS infection is due to a tight balance between natural Treg cells and effector CD4(+) Th1 cells, a balance regulated in part by IL-2.

  12. Depression and CD4 cell count among patients with HIV in a Nigerian University Teaching Hospital.

    PubMed

    Olisah, Victor Obiajulu; Adekeye, Oluwatosin; Sheikh, Taiwo Lateef

    2015-01-01

    Depression is common in people living with HIV/AIDS and there is some evidence that depressive symptoms may have adverse effects on immune functioning. The purpose of this study was to determine the prevalence of current depressive disorder in patients with HIV/AIDS and its association with CD4 cell count. A consecutive sample of 310 patients with HIV/AIDS attending Out-patient clinic in Ahmadu Bello University Teaching Hospital (A.B.U.T.H.), Zaria, Nigeria was assessed. The Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale (CES-D) was used to screen for depressive symptoms, and the Schedule for Clinical Assessment in Neuropsychiatry (SCAN) was used to confirm the diagnosis of current depressive disorder. The CD4 cell counts of participants with depressive disorder were compared with those of participants without depressive disorder. Multiple regression analysis was conducted to identify socio-demographic and disease-related factors associated with depression. Among the 310 HIV-infected participants assessed for depression, 14.2% had current depressive disorder. Adjusting for age, gender, education, occupation, and marital status, patients with CD4 counts < 150 cells/μl were more likely to be depressed. Depression is common among HIV-infected persons in Nigeria and is associated with low CD4 cell counts. The screening and treatment of mental health problems such as depression should be considered an integral component of HIV care and support. © 2015, The Author(s).

  13. GITR ligand-costimulation activates effector and regulatory functions of CD4{sup +} T cells

    SciTech Connect

    Igarashi, Hanna; Cao, Yujia; Iwai, Hideyuki; Piao, Jinhua; Kamimura, Yosuke; Hashiguchi, Masaaki; Amagasa, Teruo; Azuma, Miyuki

    2008-05-16

    Engagement of glucocorticoid-induced TNFR-related protein (GITR) enables the costimulation of both CD25{sup -}CD4{sup +} effector (Teff) and CD25{sup +}CD4{sup +} regulatory (Treg) cells; however, the effects of GITR-costimulation on Treg function remain controversial. In this study, we examined the effects of GITR ligand (GITRL) binding on the respective functions of CD4{sup +} T cells. GITRL-P815 transfectants efficiently augmented anti-CD3-induced proliferation and cytokine production by Teff cells. Proliferation and IL-10 production in Treg were also enhanced by GITRL transfectants when exogenous IL-2 and stronger CD3 stimulation was provided. Concomitant GITRL-costimulation of Teff and Treg converted the anergic state of Treg into a proliferating state, maintaining and augmenting their function. Thus, GITRL-costimulation augments both effector and regulatory functions of CD4{sup +} T cells. Our results suggest that highly activated and increased ratios of Treg reverse the immune-enhancing effects of GITRL-costimulation in Teff, which may be problematic for therapeutic applications using strong GITR agonists.

  14. Getting the Skinny on CD4(+) T Cell Survival in Fatty Livers.

    PubMed

    Walker, Christopher M; Lemon, Stanley M

    2016-04-19

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease is associated with hepatocellular carcinoma. In the March 10 issue of Nature, Greten and colleagues report that this metabolic disruption affects tumor surveillance by depleting CD4+ T helper cells through lipotoxic mechanisms associated with NAFLD. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Polyfunctional CD4 T cells in the response to bovine tuberculosis

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Polyfunctional CD4 T cells simultaneously produce interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma), interleukin-2 (IL-2) and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) and play relevant roles in several chronic infections, including human TB and HIV. However, the assessment of this response in bovine infections was not fe...

  16. Getting the Skinny on CD4+ T Cell Survival in Fatty Livers

    PubMed Central

    Walker, Christopher M.; Lemon, Stanley M.

    2016-01-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease is associated with hepatocellular carcinoma. In the March 10 issue of Nature, Greten and colleagues report that this metabolic disruption affects tumor surveillance by depleting CD4+ T helper cells through lipotoxic mechanisms associated with NAFLD. PMID:27096315

  17. CD4+V beta 8+ T cells mediate herpes stromal keratitis.

    PubMed

    Heiligenhaus, A; Berra, A; Foster, C S

    1994-10-01

    T lymphocytes are critical in mediating herpes simplex stromal keratitis (HSK). Using immunohistologic methods, we studied the T cell subsets and the T cell receptor variable region (TCR V beta) repertoire of T