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Sample records for prevalence clinical disease

  1. Prevalence of clinical signs of disease in Danish finisher pigs.

    PubMed

    Petersen, H H; Nielsen, E O; Hassing, A-G; Ersbøll, A K; Nielsen, J P

    2008-03-22

    Between December 1999 and February 2001, two visits, eight weeks apart, were made to 90 herds of Danish finisher pigs. The prevalence of clinical signs was recorded by three veterinary technicians from the Danish Bacon and Meat Council according to a standardised procedure; they had been trained and their observations were monitored and validated before and during the study. A total of 154,347 finisher pigs were examined and 22,136 clinical signs were recorded. Vices accounted for 43 per cent of the signs. The highest mean prevalence was observed for ear necrosis (4.44 per cent), followed by respiratory signs (2.17 per cent), lameness (1.92 per cent), other skin diseases (1.73 per cent), tail bites (1.26 per cent), umbilical hernia (0.78 per cent), flank bites (0.52 per cent), diarrhoea (0.27 per cent), respiratory distress (0.12 per cent), atrophic rhinitis (0.10 per cent), recumbency (0.09 per cent) and central nervous disease (0.05 per cent). The prevalence of atrophic rhinitis was higher in conventional herds than in specific pathogen-free herds. The prevalence of clinical signs of atrophic rhinitis was higher among finishers weighing 51 to 75 kg than among finishers weighing up to 50 kg, and the prevalence of respiratory signs was higher among finishers weighing 51 to 75 kg then among finishers weighing 76 to 100 kg. PMID:18359931

  2. Prevalence and clinical profile of celiac disease in children with type 1 diabetes mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Joshi, Rajesh; Madvariya, Monica

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To determine the prevalence of celiac disease (CD) in children with type 1 diabetes mellitus (TIDM) in follow-up in a Tertiary Care Referral Centre in Western India and to describe the clinical features indicative of CD in screened patients of TIDM. Study Design: In this single center observational cross-sectional study, 71 children who were diagnosed with TIDM were subjected to screening for CD with tissue transglutaminase antibody testing. Those who tested positive were offered intestinal biopsy for the confirmation of diagnosis. Clinical profiles of both groups of patients were compared and manifestations of CD were delineated. Results: The study revealed the prevalence of CD (based on serology) in children with Type 1 diabetes as 15.49%. The prevalence of biopsy-confirmed CD was 7.04%. Of the diagnosed CD patients, one-third were symptomatic at the time of screening while the majority was asymptomatic. The major clinical features indicative of CD were intestinal symptoms, anemia, rickets, and short stature. Autoimmune thyroid disease was prevalent in 29.6% of the patients with TIDM followed by CD. Conclusions: The high prevalence of CD in children with Type 1 diabetes emphasizes the need for routine screening programs to be in place for these high-risk populations. The clinical profile of patients with CD further elaborates the indicators of CD and the need to screen for them. PMID:26693431

  3. Prevalence of Chronic Kidney Disease among Patients Attending a Specialist Diabetes Clinic in Jamaica

    PubMed Central

    Ferguson, TS; Tulloch-Reid, MK; Younger-Coleman, NO; Wright-Pascoe, RA; Boyne, MS; Soyibo, AK; Wilks, RJ

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objectives: To estimate the prevalence of chronic kidney disease (CKD) among patients attending the University Hospital of the West Indies (UHWI) Diabetes Clinic and to determine the proportion of patients at high risk for adverse outcomes. Methods: We conducted a cross-sectional study among patients attending the UHWI Diabetes Clinic between 2009 and 2010. Trained nurses administered a questionnaire, reviewed dockets, and performed urinalyses. Estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) was calculated using the Chronic Kidney Disease Epidemiology Collaboration (CKD-EPI) equation. Albuminuria was assessed using urine test strips for protein and microalbumin. Chronic kidney disease was defined as an eGFR < 60 ml/min/1.73m2 or albuminuria ≥ 30 mg/g creatinine. Risk of adverse outcome (all-cause mortality, cardiovascular disease and kidney failure) was determined using the Kidney Disease: Improving Global Outcome (KDIGO) 2012 prognosis grid. Results: Participants included 100 women and 32 men (mean age, 55.4 ± 12.9 years, mean duration of diabetes, 16.7 ± 11.7 years). Twenty-two per cent of participants had eGFR < 60 ml/min/1.73m2. Moderate albuminuria (30–300 mg/g) was present in 20.5% of participants and severe albuminuria (> 300 mg/g) in 62.1%. Overall prevalence of CKD was 86.3% (95% CI 80.4%, 92.2%). Based on KDIGO risk categories, 50.8% were at high risk and 17.4% at very high risk of adverse outcomes. Conclusion: Most patients at the UHWI Diabetes Clinic had CKD and were at high or very high risk of adverse outcomes. Further studies to determine the burden of CKD in other clinical settings and to identify the best strategies for preventing adverse outcomes in developing countries need to be conducted. PMID:26426170

  4. Prevalence of rheumatic heart disease in Senegalese school children: a clinical and echocardiographic screening

    PubMed Central

    Ngaïdé, Aliou Alassane; Mbaye, Alassane; Kane, Adama; Ndiaye, Mouhamadou Bamba; Jobe, Modou; Bodian, Malick; Dioum, Momar; Sarr, Simon Antoine; Aw, Fatou; Mbakop, Prisca Sede; Ba, Fatimata Gatta; Gaye, Ngoné Diaba; Tabane, Alioune; Bah, Mamadou Bassirou; Coly, Sarah Mouna; Diagne, Dior; Diack, Bouna; Diao, Maboury; Kane, Abdoul

    2015-01-01

    Objective To study the prevalence of rheumatic heart disease (RHD) in schools (locally referred to as ‘daaras’) located in the city of Dakar and its suburbs using both clinical examination and echocardiography. Methods This is a cross-sectional study conducted from 9 August to 24 December 2011 involving 2019 pupils, aged between 5 and 18 years selected from the 16 ‘daaras’ of the Academic Inspectorate (Inspection d'Académie) of the city of Dakar and its suburbs. Anamnestic, clinical and echocardiographic data were collected and entered into a questionnaire designed for the study. The World Heart Federation criteria for echocardiographic diagnosis were used to diagnose RHD. p<0.05 was considered statistically significant in bivariate analysis. Results About 60.1% of the pupils were men and the mean age was 9.7±3.3 years. 10 cases of definite RHD were detected, prevalence being 4.96 per 1000 (95% CI 2.4 to 9.1). This prevalence was five times higher with echocardiographic screening compared with clinical screening. 23 cases (11.4 per 1000) of borderline forms were detected. The populations at risk of definite RHD identified in our study were children over 14 years (p<0.001), those with recurrent sore throat (p=0.003) and those residing in the suburbs of the city of Dakar (p<0.001). Conclusion Our study shows a relatively high prevalence of RHD. Reducing its prevalence should focus on the implementation of appropriate policies, targeting at-risk populations and focusing on raising awareness and early detection. PMID:27326219

  5. Prevalence and clinical associations of anti-Ku antibodies in systemic autoimmune diseases.

    PubMed

    Cavazzana, I; Ceribelli, A; Quinzanini, M; Scarsi, M; Airò, P; Cattaneo, R; Franceschini, F

    2008-08-01

    We retrospectively analysed the prevalence and clinical features associated to anti-Ku antibodies in patients affected by different autoimmune diseases. Anti-Ku antibodies are detected in 147 sera out of 7239 anti-ENA positive sera (2%). They are found in 2% of patients with systemic sclerosis (SSc) (8 out of 379), 1.8% of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) (7 out of 372) and 1.8% of undifferentiated connective tissue disease (UCTD) (9 out of 496) and more rarely in Sjögren Syndrome and rheumatoid arthritis. Most of anti-Ku positive patients were affected by UCTD and overlap syndromes, including polymyositis, SSc and SLE. Interstitial lung disease, myositis, articular symptoms, Raynaud's phenomenon and sicca represents the main clinical features detected in our cohort. The rate and severity of pulmonary disease is similar to those found in other SSc patients. Isolated anti-Ku were detected in about 47% of sera. No clinical differences were observed between these patients and subjects with multiple anti-nuclear specificities. However, anti-Ku are usually detected in association with other serological markers in SLE and Sjögren Syndrome, while they occurred isolated in SSc and polymyositis.

  6. The prevalence and clinical characteristics of anemia in Korean patients with inflammatory bowel disease

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Dae Sung; Bang, Ki Bae; Kim, Ji Yeon; Jung, Yoon Suk; Park, Jung Ho; Kim, Hong Joo; Cho, Yong Kyun; Sohn, Chong Il; Jeon, Woo Kyu; Kim, Byung Ik; Choi, Kyu Young

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims Quality of life is closely related to anemia in patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Several studies have reported on anemia in patients with IBD in Western countries. This study investigated the prevalence and clinical characteristics of anemia in Korean patients with IBD. Methods We reviewed the medical records of 92 patients with ulcerative colitis (UC) and 76 patients with Crohn's disease (CD) who were followed regularly at a single tertiary medical center in Korea between January 2003 and December 2012. Hemoglobin (Hb) thresholds used to define anemia were <13.0 g/dL in men and <12.0 g/dL in women according to the World Health Organization criteria. We chose the lowest Hb level in each year as a representative value because Hb levels changed at each examination and anemia was associated with disease deterioration. The relationship between clinical variables and lowest Hb level was assessed. Results The prevalence of anemia was 36.3% in patients with UC and 41.6% in patients with CD. Anemia in patients with CD was associated with hospital admission, 5-aminosalicylate (5-ASA) and infliximab treatment in men. Anemia in patients with UC was associated with hospital admission, oral steroid use, thiopurine and infliximab treatment in men. Conclusions The prevalence of anemia in Korean patients with IBD was comparable to that of patients in Western countries. Anemia was associated with male patients with CD who were admitted to the hospital and received medications including 5-ASA and infliximab, and men with UC who were admitted to the hospital and received medications including oral steroids, thiopurine and infliximab. PMID:26884734

  7. High Prevalence of Rectal Gonorrhea and Chlamydia Infection in Women Attending a Sexually Transmitted Disease Clinic

    PubMed Central

    Reese, Patricia Carr; Esber, Allahna; Lahey, Samantha; Ervin, Melissa; Davis, John A.; Fields, Karen; Turner, Abigail Norris

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Background: Testing women for urogenital Neisseria gonorrhoeae (GC) and Chlamydia trachomatis (CT) is common in sexually transmitted disease (STD) clinics. However, women may not be routinely tested for rectal GC/CT. This may lead to missed infections in women reporting anal intercourse (AI). Methods: This was a retrospective review of all women who underwent rectal GC/CT testing from August 2012 to June 2013 at an STD clinic in Columbus, Ohio. All women who reported AI in the last year had a rectal swab collected for GC/CT nucleic acid amplification testing (n=331). Using log-binomial regression models, we computed unadjusted and adjusted associations for demographic and behavioral factors associated with rectal GC/CT infection. Results: Participants (n=331) were 47% African-American, with median age of 29 years. Prevalence of rectal GC was 6%, rectal CT was 13%, and either rectal infection was 19%. Prevalence of urogenital GC and CT was 7% and 13% respectively. Among women with rectal GC, 14% tested negative for urogenital GC. Similarly, 14% of women with rectal CT tested negative for urogenital CT. In unadjusted analyses, there was increased rectal GC prevalence among women reporting sex in the last year with an injection drug user, with a person exchanging sex for drugs or money, with anonymous partners, and while intoxicated/high on alcohol or illicit drugs. After multivariable adjustment, no significant associations persisted, but a trend of increased rectal GC prevalence was observed for women <26 years of age (p=0.06) and those reporting sex while intoxicated/high on alcohol or drugs (p=0.05). For rectal CT, only age <26 years was associated with prevalent infection in unadjusted models; this association strengthened after multivariable adjustment (prevalence ratio: 6.03; 95% confidence interval: 2.29–15.90). Conclusion: Nearly one in five women who reported AI in the last year had rectal GC or CT infection. Urogenital testing alone would have

  8. Prevalence and clinical picture of gastroesophageal prolapse in gastroesophageal reflux disease.

    PubMed

    Aramini, B; Mattioli, S; Lugaresi, M; Brusori, S; Di Simone, M P; D'Ovidio, F

    2012-08-01

    The prevalence of gastroesophageal (GE) mucosal prolapse in patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) was investigated as well as the clinical profile and treatment outcome of these patients. Of the patients who were referred to our service between 1980 and 2008, those patients who received a complete diagnostic work-up, and were successively treated and followed up at our center with interviews, radiology studies, endoscopy, and, when indicated, esophageal manometry and pH recording were selected. The prevalence of GE prolapse in GERD patients was 13.5% (70/516) (40 males and 30 females with a median age of 48, interquartile range 38-57). All patients had dysphagia and reflux symptoms, and 98% (69/70) had epigastric or retrosternal pain. Belching decreased the intensity or resolved the pain in 70% (49/70) of the cases, gross esophagitis was documented in 90% (63/70) of the cases, and hiatus hernias were observed in 62% (43/70) of the cases. GE prolapse in GERD patients was accompanied by more severe pain (P < 0.05) usually associated with belching, more severe esophagitis, and dysphagia (P < 0.05). A fundoplication was offered to 100% of the patients and was accepted by 56% (39/70) (median follow up 60 months, interquartile range 54-72), which included two Collis-Nissen techniques for true short esophagus. Patients who did not accept surgery were medically treated (median follow up 60 months, interquartile range 21-72). Persistent pain was reported in 98% (30/31) of medical cases, belching was reported in 45% (14/31), and GERD symptoms and esophagitis were reported in 81% (25/31). After surgery, pain was resolved in 98% (38/39) of the operative cases, and 79% (31/39) of them were free of GERD symptoms and esophagitis. GE prolapse has a relatively low prevalence in GERD patients. It is characterized by epigastric or retrosternal pain, and the need to belch to attenuate or resolve the pain. The pain is allegedly a result of the mechanical consequences of

  9. Prevalence and clinical picture of gastroesophageal prolapse in gastroesophageal reflux disease.

    PubMed

    Aramini, B; Mattioli, S; Lugaresi, M; Brusori, S; Di Simone, M P; D'Ovidio, F

    2012-08-01

    The prevalence of gastroesophageal (GE) mucosal prolapse in patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) was investigated as well as the clinical profile and treatment outcome of these patients. Of the patients who were referred to our service between 1980 and 2008, those patients who received a complete diagnostic work-up, and were successively treated and followed up at our center with interviews, radiology studies, endoscopy, and, when indicated, esophageal manometry and pH recording were selected. The prevalence of GE prolapse in GERD patients was 13.5% (70/516) (40 males and 30 females with a median age of 48, interquartile range 38-57). All patients had dysphagia and reflux symptoms, and 98% (69/70) had epigastric or retrosternal pain. Belching decreased the intensity or resolved the pain in 70% (49/70) of the cases, gross esophagitis was documented in 90% (63/70) of the cases, and hiatus hernias were observed in 62% (43/70) of the cases. GE prolapse in GERD patients was accompanied by more severe pain (P < 0.05) usually associated with belching, more severe esophagitis, and dysphagia (P < 0.05). A fundoplication was offered to 100% of the patients and was accepted by 56% (39/70) (median follow up 60 months, interquartile range 54-72), which included two Collis-Nissen techniques for true short esophagus. Patients who did not accept surgery were medically treated (median follow up 60 months, interquartile range 21-72). Persistent pain was reported in 98% (30/31) of medical cases, belching was reported in 45% (14/31), and GERD symptoms and esophagitis were reported in 81% (25/31). After surgery, pain was resolved in 98% (38/39) of the operative cases, and 79% (31/39) of them were free of GERD symptoms and esophagitis. GE prolapse has a relatively low prevalence in GERD patients. It is characterized by epigastric or retrosternal pain, and the need to belch to attenuate or resolve the pain. The pain is allegedly a result of the mechanical consequences of

  10. Prevalence of genetic muscle disease in Northern England: in-depth analysis of a muscle clinic population

    PubMed Central

    Norwood, Fiona L. M.; Harling, Chris; Chinnery, Patrick F.; Eagle, Michelle; Bushby, Kate; Straub, Volker

    2014-01-01

    We have performed a detailed population study of patients with genetic muscle disease in the northern region of England. Our current clinic population comprises over 1100 patients in whom we have molecularly characterized 31 separate muscle disease entities. Diagnostic clarity achieved through careful delineation of clinical features supported by histological, immunological and genetic analysis has allowed us to reach a definitive diagnosis in 75.7% of our patients. We have compared our case profile with that from Walton and Nattrass’ seminal study from 1954, also of the northern region, together with data from other more recent studies from around the world. Point prevalence figures for each of the five major disease categories are comparable with those from other recent studies. Myotonic dystrophies are the most common, comprising 28.6% of our clinic population with a point prevalence of 10.6/100 000. Next most frequent are the dystrophinopathies and facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy making up 22.9% (8.46/100 000) and 10.7% (3.95/100 000) of the clinic population, respectively. Spinal muscular atrophy patients account for 5.1% or 1.87/100 000 patients. Limb girdle muscular dystrophy, which was described for the first time in the paper by Walton and Nattrass (1954) and comprised 17% of their clinic population, comprises 6.2% of our clinic population at a combined prevalence of 2.27/100 000. The clinic population included patients with 12 other muscle disorders. These disorders ranged from a point prevalence of 0.89/100 000 for the group of congenital muscular dystrophies to conditions with only two affected individuals in a population of three million. For the first time our study provides epidemiological information for X-linked Emery–Dreifuss muscular dystrophy and the collagen VI disorders. Each of the X-linked form of Emery–Dreifuss muscular dystrophy and Ullrich muscular dystrophy has a prevalence of 0.13/100 000, making both very rare. Bethlem

  11. The Prevalence and the Determinants of Musculoskeletal Diseases in Emiratis Attending Primary Health Care Clinics in Dubai

    PubMed Central

    Al Saleh, Jamal; Sayed, Manal EL; Monsef, Nahed; Darwish, Ebtihal

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To estimate the prevalence of rheumatic diseases in the Emiratis attending primary health care (PHC) clinics in Dubai. The secondary objective was to study the relationship between age, gender, and body mass index (BMI) and rheumatic diseases in the general population.  Methods The Prevalence of Rheumatic Diseases and Osteoporosis (PRO) in Dubai study was a cross-sectional study, which randomly enrolled Emiratis’ aged between 18–85 years old who attended one of 13 PHC clinics between 2 January 2009 and 31 December 2009. Demographic and health data for all participants was obtained via a questionnaire. Participants that indicated positive answers had their responses validated by a rheumatologist and underwent a thorough locomotor examination.  Results The study included 3,985 participants with a mean age of 42.1±15.8 years. The majority (77.4%) were female. Lower back pain was the most prevalent problem in our study population (32.9%). Knee osteoarthritis (OA) was the most common form of arthritis seen in our cohort (25.8%). Overall, the prevalence of inflammatory arthritis was 3.1%. Age and BMI were associated with increased risk of knee OA and lower back pain.  Conclusions Rheumatic diseases are quite common in Emirati patients attending PHC clinics. Lower back pain and knee OA were the most common musculoskeletal diseases seen in our cohort. There is a need for more population-based studies in the Middle East to have a better understanding of the epidemiology of rheumatic diseases in this region. PMID:27168922

  12. Prevalence of Peripheral Arterial Disease among Adult Patients Attending Outpatient Clinic at a General Hospital in South Angola.

    PubMed

    Paquissi, Feliciano Chanana; Cuvinje, Arminda Bimbi Paquissi; Cuvinje, Almeida Bailundo

    2016-01-01

    Background. Peripheral arterial disease (PAD) is a common manifestation of atherosclerosis, whose prevalence is increasing worldwide, and is associated with all-cause mortality. However, no study has assessed this disease in Huambo. The aim of this study was to evaluate the prevalence of PAD in patients attending an outpatient clinic at a general hospital in Huambo, South Angola. Methods. A cross-sectional study, including 115 patients aged 40 years and older attending an outpatient service. The evaluation included a basic questionnaire for lifestyle and medical history and ankle-brachial index (ABI) measurement using hand-held Doppler. PAD was defined as an ABI ≤0.9 in either lower limb. Results. Of 115 patients, 62.60% were women with a median age of 52.5 (range of 40 to 91) years. The prevalence of PAD was 42.6% (95% confidence intervals [CI]: 95%: 33.91-52.17%). Among patients with PAD, 95.92% had mild disease and 4.08% moderate to severe disease. The main risk factor for PAD was age (≥60 years) (χ (2) = 3.917, P ≤ 0.05). The prevalence was slightly higher in men and hypertensive subjects, but without statistical significance with ORs of 1.5 (95% CI: 0.69-3.21) and 1.42 (95% CI: 0.64-3.17), respectively. Hypertension was also high in the group (66.95%). Conclusion. The prevalence of PAD was 42.6%, higher in those aged 60 years and older. More studies, with representative samples, are necessary to clarify PAD prevalence and associated risk factors. PMID:27293966

  13. Prevalence of Peripheral Arterial Disease among Adult Patients Attending Outpatient Clinic at a General Hospital in South Angola

    PubMed Central

    Paquissi, Feliciano Chanana; Cuvinje, Arminda Bimbi Paquissi; Cuvinje, Almeida Bailundo

    2016-01-01

    Background. Peripheral arterial disease (PAD) is a common manifestation of atherosclerosis, whose prevalence is increasing worldwide, and is associated with all-cause mortality. However, no study has assessed this disease in Huambo. The aim of this study was to evaluate the prevalence of PAD in patients attending an outpatient clinic at a general hospital in Huambo, South Angola. Methods. A cross-sectional study, including 115 patients aged 40 years and older attending an outpatient service. The evaluation included a basic questionnaire for lifestyle and medical history and ankle-brachial index (ABI) measurement using hand-held Doppler. PAD was defined as an ABI ≤0.9 in either lower limb. Results. Of 115 patients, 62.60% were women with a median age of 52.5 (range of 40 to 91) years. The prevalence of PAD was 42.6% (95% confidence intervals [CI]: 95%: 33.91–52.17%). Among patients with PAD, 95.92% had mild disease and 4.08% moderate to severe disease. The main risk factor for PAD was age (≥60 years) (χ2 = 3.917, P ≤ 0.05). The prevalence was slightly higher in men and hypertensive subjects, but without statistical significance with ORs of 1.5 (95% CI: 0.69–3.21) and 1.42 (95% CI: 0.64–3.17), respectively. Hypertension was also high in the group (66.95%). Conclusion. The prevalence of PAD was 42.6%, higher in those aged 60 years and older. More studies, with representative samples, are necessary to clarify PAD prevalence and associated risk factors. PMID:27293966

  14. Barriers impeding serologic screening for celiac disease in clinically high-prevalence populations

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Celiac disease is present in ~1% of the general population in the United States and Europe. Despite the availability of inexpensive serologic screening tests, ~85% of individuals with celiac disease remain undiagnosed and there is an average delay in diagnosis of symptomatic individuals with celiac disease that ranges from ~5.8-11 years. This delay is often attributed to the use of a case-based approach for detection rather than general population screening for celiac disease, and deficiencies at the level of health care professionals. This study aimed to assess if patient-centered barriers have a role in impeding serologic screening for celiac disease in individuals from populations that are clinically at an increased risk for celiac disease. Methods 119 adults meeting study inclusion criteria for being at a higher risk for celiac disease were recruited from the general population. Participants completed a survey/questionnaire at the William K. Warren Medical Research Center for Celiac Disease that addressed demographic information, celiac disease related symptoms (gastrointestinal and extraintestinal), family history, co-morbid diseases and conditions associated with celiac disease, and patient-centered barriers to screening for celiac disease. All participants underwent serologic screening for celiac disease using the IgA tissue transglutaminase antibody (IgA tTG) and, if positive, testing for IgA anti-endomysial antibody (IgA EMA) as a confirmatory test. Results Two barriers to serologic testing were significant across the participant pool. These were participants not knowing they were at risk for celiac disease before learning of the study, and participants not knowing where to get tested for celiac disease. Among participants with incomes less than $25,000/year and those less than the median age, not having a doctor to order the test was a significant barrier, and this strongly correlated with not having health insurance. Symptoms and co

  15. Prevalence of systemic autoimmune rheumatic diseases and clinical significance of ANA profile: data from a tertiary hospital in Shanghai, China.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zaixing; Ren, Yingpeng; Liu, Donghong; Lin, Feng; Liang, Yan

    2016-09-01

    It is necessary and useful to explore prevalence of various systemic autoimmune rheumatic diseases (SARDs) in patients with suspicion of having SARDs and to characterize antinuclear antibodies (ANA) profile for identifying different populations (SARDs and non-SARDs). A total of 5024 consecutive patients with available medical records were investigated, whose sera had been tested for ANA profile, including ANA, anti-dsDNA and anti-extractable nuclear antigen (ENA) antibodies, between 31 January 2012 and 26 March 2014. Only 594 (11.8%) patients were diagnosed with SARDs of those suspected with SARDs. The prevalence of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) was highest (3.2%), followed by rheumatoid arthritis (RA) (2.5%), primary Sjögren's syndrome (pSS) (1.7%), ankylosing spondylitis (AS) (1.5%), etc. Of females, SLE also showed the highest prevalence (6%), while of males, AS showed the highest prevalence (1.9%). The prevalence of most SARDs was closely associated with age, except mixed connective tissue disease (MCTD), and the variation characteristics among different age groups were different among various SARDs. The prevalence of ANA was significantly increased in most SARD patients [especially in SLE, systemic sclerosis (SSc) and MCTD]. For anti-ENA antibodies, in contrast to some autoantibodies associated with multiple SARDs (e.g. anti-SSA, SSB, nRNP), others were relatively specific for certain diseases, such as anti-dsDNA, Sm, histone, nucleosome and Rib-P for SLE, anti-SCL-70 for SSc and anti-Jo-1 for polymyositis/dermatomyositis (PM/DM). Of note, ANA profile appeared to be of little significance for AS, ANCA-associated vasculitis (AAV), polymyalgia rheumatic (PMR), adult-onset Still's disease (ASD) and Behcet's disease (BD). The younger were more likely to have the presence of anti-dsDNA, Sm, histone or Rib-P for SLE, and anti-SSA for RA or MCTD. No significant differences for frequencies of ANA and anti-ENA autoantibodies were found between sexes in most SARDs

  16. Prevalence and clinical significance of nonorgan specific antibodies in patients with autoimmune thyroiditis as predictor markers for rheumatic diseases.

    PubMed

    Elnady, Basant M; Kamal, Naglaa M; Shaker, Raneyah H M; Soliman, Amal F; Hasan, Waleed A; Alghamdi, Hamed A; Algethami, Mohammed M; Jajah, Mohamed Bilal

    2016-09-01

    Autoimmune diseases are considered the 3rd leading cause of morbidity and mortality in the industrialized countries. Autoimmune thyroid diseases (ATDs) are associated with high prevalence of nonorgan-specific autoantibodies, such as antinuclear antibodies (ANA), antidouble-stranded deoxyribonucleic acid (anti-dsDNA), antiextractable-nuclear antigens (anti-ENAs), rheumatoid factor (RF), and anticyclic-citrullinated peptides (anti-CCP) whose clinical significance is unknown.We aimed to assess the prevalence of various nonorgan-specific autoantibodies in patients with ATD, and to investigate the possible association between these autoantibodies and occurrence of rheumatic diseases and, if these autoantibodies could be considered as predictor markers for autoimmune rheumatic diseases in the future.This study had 2 phases: phase 1; in which 61 ATD patients free from rheumatic manifestations were assessed for the presence of these nonorgan-specific autoantibodies against healthy 61 control group, followed by 2nd phase longitudinal clinical follow-up in which cases are monitored systematically to establish occurrence and progression of any rheumatic disease in association to these autoantibodies with its influences and prognosis.Regarding ATD patients, ANA, anti-dsDNA, Anti-ENA, and RF were present in a percentage of (50.8%), (18%), (21.3%), and (34.4%), respectively, with statistically significance difference (P < 0.5) rather than controls. Nearly one third of the studied group (32.8%) developed the rheumatic diseases, over 2 years follow-up. It was obvious that those with positive anti-dsDNA had higher risk (2.45 times) to develop rheumatic diseases than those without. There was a statistically significant positive linear relationship between occurrence of disease in months and (age, anti-dsDNA, anti-CCP, RF, and duration of thyroiditis). Anti-dsDNA and RF are the most significant predictors (P < 0.0001).ATD is more associated with rheumatic diseases than

  17. Prevalence and clinical significance of nonorgan specific antibodies in patients with autoimmune thyroiditis as predictor markers for rheumatic diseases

    PubMed Central

    Elnady, Basant M.; Kamal, Naglaa M.; Shaker, Raneyah H.M.; Soliman, Amal F.; Hasan, Waleed A.; Alghamdi, Hamed A.; Algethami, Mohammed M.; Jajah, Mohamed Bilal

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Autoimmune diseases are considered the 3rd leading cause of morbidity and mortality in the industrialized countries. Autoimmune thyroid diseases (ATDs) are associated with high prevalence of nonorgan-specific autoantibodies, such as antinuclear antibodies (ANA), antidouble-stranded deoxyribonucleic acid (anti-dsDNA), antiextractable-nuclear antigens (anti-ENAs), rheumatoid factor (RF), and anticyclic-citrullinated peptides (anti-CCP) whose clinical significance is unknown. We aimed to assess the prevalence of various nonorgan-specific autoantibodies in patients with ATD, and to investigate the possible association between these autoantibodies and occurrence of rheumatic diseases and, if these autoantibodies could be considered as predictor markers for autoimmune rheumatic diseases in the future. This study had 2 phases: phase 1; in which 61 ATD patients free from rheumatic manifestations were assessed for the presence of these nonorgan-specific autoantibodies against healthy 61 control group, followed by 2nd phase longitudinal clinical follow-up in which cases are monitored systematically to establish occurrence and progression of any rheumatic disease in association to these autoantibodies with its influences and prognosis. Regarding ATD patients, ANA, anti-dsDNA, Anti-ENA, and RF were present in a percentage of (50.8%), (18%), (21.3%), and (34.4%), respectively, with statistically significance difference (P < 0.5) rather than controls. Nearly one third of the studied group (32.8%) developed the rheumatic diseases, over 2 years follow-up. It was obvious that those with positive anti-dsDNA had higher risk (2.45 times) to develop rheumatic diseases than those without. There was a statistically significant positive linear relationship between occurrence of disease in months and (age, anti-dsDNA, anti-CCP, RF, and duration of thyroiditis). Anti-dsDNA and RF are the most significant predictors (P < 0.0001). ATD is more associated with rheumatic

  18. Prevalence, Clinical Significance, and Management of Peripheral Arterial Disease in Women: Is There a Role for Postmenopausal Hormone Therapy?

    PubMed Central

    Mazhari, Ramesh; Hsia, Judith

    2005-01-01

    Peripheral arterial disease (PAD), like coronary heart disease, is a clinical manifestation of atherosclerosis and is associated with increased mortality. Although atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of death for women as well as for men, PAD in women has received less attention than coronary heart disease or stroke. This paper reviews the prevalence of PAD, its risk factors, clinical significance, and management in women. One gender-specific therapeutic issue of particular interest to practitioners and the lay public is the role of postmenopausal hormone therapy. Prior to completion of the Heart and Estrogen/Progestin Replacement Study and the Women's Health Initiative Hormone Trials, postmenopausal hormone therapy was believed to exert antiatherosclerotic effects and to thereby reduce coronary heart disease risk in women on the basis of case-control and cohort studies. This review particularly focuses on the role, if any, of postmenopausal hormone therapy for prevention or treatment of PAD, which was a pre-specified secondary outcome for these three randomized trials. PMID:17315397

  19. High prevalence of clinically unsuspected dengue disease among children in Ribeirao Preto city, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Poloni, Telma Regina; Dornas, Fabio Pio; Dos Santos, Nilton Nascimento; Soares, Adriana Moreira; Amarilla, Alberto Anastacio; Alfonso, Helda Liz; Trigueiro, Sabrina; Lavrador, Marco Aurélio Sicchiroli; Yamamoto, Aparecida Yulie; Aquino, Victor Hugo

    2016-10-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze the characteristics of Dengue virus (DENV)-infected children and the accuracy of dengue diagnosis based on clinical presentations. The inclusion criteria were children ≥1-year-old presenting febrile illness with 1-7 days of onset. Children (n = 110) aged 2-15 years were included in this study. DENV infection was confirmed with virological tests using serum, salvia, and/or urine samples. The attending pediatricians classified 56/110 (50.91%) of the children as suspected dengue cases. The DENV infection was confirmed by specific laboratory tests in 52/56 (92.9%) of the suspected dengue cases but also in 44/54 (81.5%) of the unsuspected dengue cases; total of 96/110 (87.27%) confirmed dengue cases. The clinical diagnosis gave an overall sensitivity of 54.2% (52/96) and a specificity of 71.4% (10/14). The positive predictive value of the clinical diagnosis was 92.8% and negative predictive value was 18.5%. After the third day of onset of symptoms, the DENV genome detection rate was similar in serum and saliva samples, suggesting that saliva samples represent an alternative to blood samples for early dengue diagnosis. Vaccination against Yellow fever virus did not influence the antibody response against DENV-1, DENV-2, and DENV-3, which circulated during the study period. Although the signs and symptoms were compatible with dengue, the attending pediatricians did not suspect the disease in several children. Therefore, the inclusion of virological tests for early diagnosis in the protocols for dengue surveillance would help in the implementation of prompt treatment of patients and epidemic containment strategies. J. Med. Virol. 88:1711-1719, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27004990

  20. High prevalence of clinically unsuspected dengue disease among children in Ribeirao Preto city, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Poloni, Telma Regina; Dornas, Fabio Pio; Dos Santos, Nilton Nascimento; Soares, Adriana Moreira; Amarilla, Alberto Anastacio; Alfonso, Helda Liz; Trigueiro, Sabrina; Lavrador, Marco Aurélio Sicchiroli; Yamamoto, Aparecida Yulie; Aquino, Victor Hugo

    2016-10-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze the characteristics of Dengue virus (DENV)-infected children and the accuracy of dengue diagnosis based on clinical presentations. The inclusion criteria were children ≥1-year-old presenting febrile illness with 1-7 days of onset. Children (n = 110) aged 2-15 years were included in this study. DENV infection was confirmed with virological tests using serum, salvia, and/or urine samples. The attending pediatricians classified 56/110 (50.91%) of the children as suspected dengue cases. The DENV infection was confirmed by specific laboratory tests in 52/56 (92.9%) of the suspected dengue cases but also in 44/54 (81.5%) of the unsuspected dengue cases; total of 96/110 (87.27%) confirmed dengue cases. The clinical diagnosis gave an overall sensitivity of 54.2% (52/96) and a specificity of 71.4% (10/14). The positive predictive value of the clinical diagnosis was 92.8% and negative predictive value was 18.5%. After the third day of onset of symptoms, the DENV genome detection rate was similar in serum and saliva samples, suggesting that saliva samples represent an alternative to blood samples for early dengue diagnosis. Vaccination against Yellow fever virus did not influence the antibody response against DENV-1, DENV-2, and DENV-3, which circulated during the study period. Although the signs and symptoms were compatible with dengue, the attending pediatricians did not suspect the disease in several children. Therefore, the inclusion of virological tests for early diagnosis in the protocols for dengue surveillance would help in the implementation of prompt treatment of patients and epidemic containment strategies. J. Med. Virol. 88:1711-1719, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Evaluation of clinical parameters to select high prevalence populations for periodontal disease: A cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    Harikishan, G.; Triveni, V. S. S.; Sai Sujay, G. S. Naga

    2015-01-01

    Epidemiological studies have shown strong evidence that periodontal disease does not affect all subjects in the same manner. Objective: There are subjects and sites with higher risk for disease progression. This study tested parameters to select “a priori” sites and subjects potentially at risk. Materials and Methods: The data from periodontal clinical examinations of 2273 subjects was used. The clinical loss of attachment was measured in 6 sites per tooth. Using computer software, the patients were distributed into 14 age groups, with intervals of 5 years, from 11 years to greater than 75 years of age. The measure of each site was compared with the average and the median values of the subject age group, with the results indicating site comparative severity (SCS). Three global parameters were calculated: parameter 1 (PI) - percentage of sites with clinical attachment loss > 4 mm; parameter 2 (P2) - percentage of sites with clinical attachment loss j> 7 mm; parameter 3 (P3) - percentage of sites with clinical attachment loss surpassing the median value for the age group by 100% or more. Results: There were 1466 (65%) females and 807 (35%) males. Most subjects had PI, P2 and P3 values less than 30%. Parameter 3 allowed a division of the sample similar to that of Parameters 1 and 2, with the advantage of analyzing the subject in relation to his/her age group. It was suggested that the methodology of SCS is useful for selecting a population with a high disease prevalence, and that cut-off lines between 10% and 20% would be appropriate for using parameter. PMID:26538931

  2. Toxoplasma gondii infections in chickens (Gallus domesticus): prevalence, clinical disease, diagnosis and public health significance.

    PubMed

    Dubey, J P

    2010-02-01

    Chickens are considered one of the most important hosts in the epidemiology of Toxoplasma gondii infection because they are an efficient source of infection for cats that excrete the environmentally resistant oocysts and because humans may become infected with this parasite after eating undercooked infected chicken meat. The objective of this study is to review worldwide prevalence of T. gondii infection in chickens and to assess the role of infected chickens in the epidemiology of toxoplasmosis in humans. A very high prevalence of the parasite was found in chickens raised in backyards (up to 100%) and free-range organic (30-50%) establishments.

  3. [Prevalence of congenital heart diseases in Koranic schools (daara) in Dakar: a cross-sectional study based on clinical and echocardiographic screening in 2019 school children].

    PubMed

    Bodian, M; Ngaïdé, A A; Mbaye, A; Sarr, S A; Jobe, M; Ndiaye, M B; Kane, A D; Aw, F; Gaye, N D; Ba, F G; Bah, M B; Tabane, A; Dioum, M; Diagne, D; Diao, M; Diack, B; Sarr, M; Kane, A; Bâ, S A

    2015-02-01

    Congenital heart diseases are one of the major cardiovascular diseases in developing countries. Most prevalence studies were based on clinical examination of children with echocardiographic confirmation of suspected cases and underestimate its prevalence. The objective of this study was to investigate the prevalence of congenital heart disease in "daara" (Koranic schools) in the city of Dakar and its suburbs on the basis of clinical examination and Doppler echocardiography in school children. This cross-sectional survey was carried out from 9(th) August to 24(th) December 2011, and included a population of 2019 school children aged 5 to 18 years in 16 selected "daaras" under the Academic Inspectorate of Dakar and its suburbs. Anamnestic, clinical and echocardiographic data were recorded in a validated questionnaire. A p < 0.05 was considered to be statistically significant in bivariate analysis. 2 019 school children were included out of which 60.1% were male (sex-ratio: 0.66). The average age was 9.7 years (± 3.3 years). 18 cases of congenital heart diseases were detected being a prevalence of 8.9 per 1 000 (95 % CI: 1.8 to 7.9). This included 6 cases of inter-atrial septal aneurysm, 5 cases of peri-membranous ventricular septal defects, 4 cases of patent ductusarteriosus and 3 cases of tetralogy of Fallot. Factors correlated with the presence of congenital heart disease were ageless than 8 (p <0.001) and residence in the suburbs of Dakar (p <0.001). We also detected 10 cases of rheumatic valvular disease, a prevalence of 4.9 per 1 000 (95% CI: 2.4 to 9.1). Our study shows a high prevalence of congenital heart diseases, which is almost identical to the WHO estimates and that ultrasound screening is more sensitive than clinical screening. Reducing the prevalence of these diseases requires implementation of appropriate policies, focusing on awareness and early detection.

  4. Salivary Gland Involvement by Chronic Graft-Versus-Host Disease: Prevalence, Clinical Significance and Recommendations for Evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Imanguli, Matin M.; Atkinson, Jane C.; Mitchell, Sandra A.; Avila, Daniele N.; Bishop, Rachel J.; Cowen, Edward W.; Datiles, Manuel B.; Hakim, Frances T.; Kleiner, David E.; Krumlauf, Michael C.; Pavletic, Steven Z.

    2010-01-01

    Although xerostomia is a commonly reported complaint in patients with chronic graft versus host disease (cGVHD), criteria for evaluating the prevalence and characteristics of salivary gland involvement have not been well defined in this patient population. Prior studies also do not make distinction between salivary and mucosal oral cGVHD. We have systematically evaluated sicca symptoms and signs in a large cohort of patients with cGVHD (N=101) using instruments widely used to study Sjogren’s Syndrome. Xerostomia was reported by 77% of the patients and was associated with xerophthalmia in all cases but one. Twenty-seven percent had salivary flow rates of ≤0.2 ml/min, 16% had rates ≤0.1 ml/min. Histopathological changes consisting of mononuclear infiltration and/or fibrosis/atrophy, were present in all patients with salivary dysfunction. Importantly, there was no correlation of salivary and oral mucosal involvement in cGVHD. Patients with cGVHD-associated salivary gland involvement had lower oral cavity-specific quality of life and body mass index. In conclusion, salivary gland involvement is a common and clinically distinct manifestation of cGVHD. Formal evaluation of salivary function using standardized criteria is necessary and may be incorporated as outcome measure in clinical trials of cGVHD. PMID:20353829

  5. Hyper-CK-emia in pediatric celiac disease: prevalence and clinical importance.

    PubMed

    Selimoglu, Mukadder Ayse; Ertekin, Vildan; Altinkaynak, Sevin

    2007-08-01

    Hyper-transaminasemia (HT) is a well-known laboratory sign of celiac disease (CD); however, hyper-creatine phosphokinase (CK)-emia (HCK) is not so familiar. As there are reported cases of myopathy associated CD in the literature, we aimed to investigate serum CK levels of children with CD. Newly diagnosed 126 children were included. Serum aspartate aminotransferase (AST), alanine aminotransferase (ALT), and CK levels were determined. Mean age was 8.7+/-4.4 years (11 mo to 18 y). Of patients, 77 (61.1%) had classic form, 49 (38.9%) had atypical form. Elevated levels of AST, ALT, and CK, respectively, were found in 65 (51.6%), 45 (35.7%), and 50 (39.7%) patients. Isolated HCK was detected in 9 (7.1%) patients. AST, ALT, and CK were all elevated in 29 (23.0%) children. Mean serum AST, ALT, and CK levels were found as 56.1+/-53.7 U/L (11 to 403), 44.7+/-44.0 U/L (7 to 290), and 258.0+/-686.5 U/L (36 to 5956), respectively. In 95 (75.4%) children, AST/ALT value was greater than 1, and in 19 (15.1%) it was greater than 2. We found positive correlations with the level of CK and AST, and ALT (P=0.01). CK level was inversely correlated with hemoglobin and cholesterol levels (P=0.013 and 0.007). In conclusion, this is the first study, which determined elevated serum levels of CK in CD and demonstrated that HCK is as common as HT in children with CD. We emphasize that HT seen in CD is not necessarily a sign of liver injury, but may also be due to myopathy. PMID:17667050

  6. Prevalence and Clinical Significance of Low T3 Syndrome in Non-Dialysis Patients with Chronic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Jingxian; Yan, Peng; Wang, Yingdeng; Shen, Bo; Ding, Feng; Liu, Yingli

    2016-01-01

    Background There are few data on the prevalence of low T3 (triiodothyronine) syndrome in patients with non-dialysis chronic kidney disease (CKD) and it is unclear whether low T3 can be used to predict the progression of CKD. Material/Methods We retrospectively studied 279 patients who had been definitively diagnosed with CKD, without needing maintenance dialysis. Thyroid function was analyzed in all enrolled subjects and the incidence of thyroid dysfunction (low T3 syndrome, low T4 syndrome, and subclinical hypothyroidism) in patients at different stages of CKD was determined. Results Glomerular filtration rate (GFR) of CKD patients was estimated as follows: 145 subjects (52%) had GFR <60 ml/min per 1.73 m2; 47 subjects (16.8%) had GFR between 30 and 59 ml/min per 1.73 m2, and 98 subjects (35.1%) had GFR <30 ml/min per 1.73 m2. Among all enrolled subjects, 4.7% (n=13) had subclinical hypothyroidism, 5.4% (n=15) had low T4 syndrome, and 47% (n=131) had low T3 syndrome. In 114 CKD patients in stages 3–5, serum T3 was positively related to protein metabolism (STP, PA, and ALB) and anemia indicators (Hb and RBC), and negatively related to inflammatory status (CRP and IL-6). Conclusions A high prevalence of low T3 syndrome was observed in CKD patients without dialysis, even in early stages (1 and 2). The increasing prevalence of low T3 as CKD progresses indicates its value as a predictor of worsening CKD. Furthermore, low T3 syndrome is closely associated with both malnutrition-inflammation complex syndrome (MICS) and anemia. PMID:27056188

  7. Prevalence of microscopic tubercular lesions in freshwater ornamental fish exhibiting clinical signs of non-specific chronic disease.

    PubMed

    Gómez, Serafín

    2008-07-01

    A histopathological study of tubercular lesions in ornamental freshwater fish showing clinical signs of chronic sporadic disease was carried out using conventional and acid-fast staining. A total of 200 individuals of 38 species were examined for granulomatous lesions related to the occurrence of acid-fast bacteria. Tubercular lesions were found in 24 species. Systematic histopathological examination was used to assess the incidence of fish tuberculosis in aquaria.

  8. Prevalence and Clinical Characteristics of Mycobacterial Diseases in the Barletta-Andria-Trani Province, Italy (2005–2013)

    PubMed Central

    Brindicci, Gaetano; Santoro, Carmen Rita; Trillo, Giovanna; Volpe, Anna; Loconsole, Daniela; Monno, Laura; Fontana, Tommaso

    2016-01-01

    Tuberculosis remains one of the major worldwide problems regarding public health. This study evaluates the burden of this disease in the BAT Province of the Apulia region (Italy); 12,295 patients were studied, including 310 immigrants. Tubercular disease and mycobacteriosis were found in 129 patients. The number of new TB cases/year ranged from three in 2005 to 12 in 2009. TB was more frequently localized in the lung (70.5%). 14.4% of cases were institutionalized patients for severe neurological and/or psychiatric disease. The database evidenced certain aspects of our study population: the large number of TB patients institutionalized between natives, but no larger presence of TB among HIV-positive patients in immigrants compared to Italians. Our findings should help to redefine the alarm regarding the spread of an epidemical form of TB but also to present certain criticisms regarding patient management (especially immigrants) regarding costs, hospitalization, and difficulty of reinstating the patient in the community. Further our data underscore the importance of prevalence of TB in bedridden, institutionalized patients. PMID:26885522

  9. Hypertension in patients with Alzheimer's disease--prevalence, characteristics, and impact on clinical outcome. Experience of one neurology center in Poland.

    PubMed

    Warchol-Celinska, Ewa; Styczynska, Maria; Prejbisz, Aleksander; Przybylowska, Katarzyna; Chodakowska-Zebrowska, Malgorzata; Kurjata, Pawel; Piotrowski, Walerian; Polakowska, Maria; Kabat, Marek; Zdrojewski, Tomasz; Drygas, Wojciech; Januszewicz, Andrzej; Barcikowska, Maria

    2015-09-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate hypertension (HT) prevalence, characteristics, and impact on clinical outcome in patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD). We evaluated 701 patients with AD (249 males, 452 females, and mean age 74.9 ± 7.5 years). As a group representing general population matched with regard to age, education level, and place of residence, we included 762 subjects (438 males, 324 females, and mean age 74.7 ± 4.4 years) from the Polish National Multicenter Health Survey (WOBASZ) studies. The patients with AD were characterized by lower systolic blood pressure (BP) and diastolic BP values (134 ± 21 vs. 151 ± 23 mm Hg, P < .001 and 77 ± 11 vs. 86 ± 12 mm Hg, P < .001, respectively) as well as lower HT prevalence (66% vs. 78.6%, P < .001) compared with the WOBASZ group. In long-term follow-up of AD group, HT and BP levels were not associated with the decline in cognitive functions nor the increased risk of death. Patients with AD were characterized by lower prevalence of HT and other vascular risk factors. BP levels and HT had no impact on clinical outcome. PMID:26210391

  10. Cat-scratch disease in Northern Italy: atypical clinical manifestations in humans and prevalence of Bartonella infection in cats.

    PubMed

    Brunetti, E; Fabbi, M; Ferraioli, G; Prati, P; Filice, C; Sassera, D; Dalla Valle, C; Bandi, C; Vicari, N; Marone, P

    2013-04-01

    In this paper, we report an investigation on cat-scratch disease (CSD) in Northern Italy. Seventy-four cases of CSD were diagnosed at the San Matteo hospital, Pavia, during the period 2005-2010. Of these 74 patients, 18 (24.3 %) reported atypical clinical manifestations such as ocular papillitis, maculopapular eruptions, vertebral infection, pulmonary infiltrates, and granulomatous hepatitis. Contact with cats was documented for 61 patients (82.4 %), while cat-related trauma was reported for 49 patients (66.2 %). We subsequently investigated the presence of Bartonella infection in cats belonging to the above patients and in other domestic and stray cats from three provinces of Northern Italy. Among the 27 domestic cats tested, nine of the 11 belonging to the CSD patients and two of the remaining 16 were infected by B. henselae (81.8 % vs. 12.5 %). Out of over 1,300 stray cats examined, 23.1 % were seropositive for B. henselae; after culturing and genotyping, 17 % were found to be infected by B. henselae (15.5 %) or B. clarridgeiae (1.5 %).

  11. Obese sedentary patients with dyspnoea on exertion who are at low risk for coronary artery disease by clinical criteria have a very low prevalence of coronary artery disease.

    PubMed

    Bruckel, J T; Larsen, G; Benson, M R

    2014-06-01

    Dyspnoea, a much less specific symptom of ischaemia than chest discomfort, is common among obese patients. Patients with dyspnoea often undergo stress testing as part of their evaluation. We sought to examine the yield of stress testing in non-elderly, obese, sedentary patients with dyspnoea on exertion (DOE) as a chief complaint.We reviewed stress echocardiograms carried out on 203 patients in a stress testing laboratory at a major tertiary care centre. Of these, 81 (40%) fell into a group that was at low risk for coronary artery disease (CAD) by clinical criteria. Ischaemia was detected in two patients in the low-risk group (2.5%), and these results were likely false positives. In the higher risk group, 9.0% of functional tests showed ischaemia; after further testing, 2.5% of the higher risk patients were found to have obstructive coronary lesions. Clinical follow-up was performed for a mean of 815 days. New obstructive coronary disease was detected in 1.6% of all patients, and these patients were from the higher risk group. In obese sedentary patients with DOE but otherwise at low risk of coronary disease stress testing is of very low yield. DOE is generally not an anginal equivalent in this patient population.

  12. Prevalence and clinical profile of fungal rhinosinusitis

    PubMed Central

    Arumugam, Dayanand; Zacharias, George; Palaninathan, Sengottaiah; Vishwanathan, Ravisankar; Venkatraman, Vaidyanathan

    2016-01-01

    Background: There are only a few landmark studies from the Indian subcontinent on fungal rhinosinusitis. The lack of awareness among clinicians regarding the varying clinical presentations of fungal rhinosinusitis prompted us to undertake this study. Objective: To determine the prevalence, etiologic basis, clinical features, radiologic features, and microscopic features of fungal rhinosinusitis, and to evaluate the various treatment modalities available. Methods: This was a prospective study in which evaluation of 100 patients with chronic rhinosinusitis was done. Specimens collected were subjected to both microbiology and pathologic examination; data collected, including clinical and radiologic features, were analyzed by the Pearson χ2 test and Fisher's exact test. Results: The prevalence of fungal rhinosinusitis in our study was 30% (n = 30). Mucor was the most commonly isolated species (n = 15 [50%]) of fungus. Pathologic examination had a higher sensitivity (76.67%) compared with microbiology tests (50%) in the diagnosis of fungal rhinosinusitis. Fungus ball (n = 14 [46.6%]) was the most prevalent entity in the spectrum of fungal rhinosinusitis. Forty percent of cases (n = 12) were of invasive fungal rhinosinusitis. The prevalence of fungal rhinosinusitis was higher among individuals who were immunocompetent (n = 17 [56.6%]). Of patients who were immunocompromised, 84.6% (n = 11) had mucormycosis. Conclusions: Unilateral involvement of paranasal sinuses was more in favor of fungal etiology. Complications were more common in fungal rhinosinusitis caused by Mucor species. Mucormycosis, a rare clinical entity, in subjects who were immunocompetent, had a high prevalence in our study. PMID:27349695

  13. Celiac disease: prevalence, diagnosis, pathogenesis and treatment.

    PubMed

    Gujral, Naiyana; Freeman, Hugh J; Thomson, Alan B R

    2012-11-14

    Celiac disease (CD) is one of the most common diseases, resulting from both environmental (gluten) and genetic factors [human leukocyte antigen (HLA) and non-HLA genes]. The prevalence of CD has been estimated to approximate 0.5%-1% in different parts of the world. However, the population with diabetes, autoimmune disorder or relatives of CD individuals have even higher risk for the development of CD, at least in part, because of shared HLA typing. Gliadin gains access to the basal surface of the epithelium, and interact directly with the immune system, via both trans- and para-cellular routes. From a diagnostic perspective, symptoms may be viewed as either "typical" or "atypical". In both positive serological screening results suggestive of CD, should lead to small bowel biopsy followed by a favourable clinical and serological response to the gluten-free diet (GFD) to confirm the diagnosis. Positive anti-tissue transglutaminase antibody or anti-endomysial antibody during the clinical course helps to confirm the diagnosis of CD because of their over 99% specificities when small bowel villous atrophy is present on biopsy. Currently, the only treatment available for CD individuals is a strict life-long GFD. A greater understanding of the pathogenesis of CD allows alternative future CD treatments to hydrolyse toxic gliadin peptide, prevent toxic gliadin peptide absorption, blockage of selective deamidation of specific glutamine residues by tissue, restore immune tolerance towards gluten, modulation of immune response to dietary gliadin, and restoration of intestinal architecture. PMID:23155333

  14. Celiac disease: Prevalence, diagnosis, pathogenesis and treatment

    PubMed Central

    Gujral, Naiyana; Freeman, Hugh J; Thomson, Alan BR

    2012-01-01

    Celiac disease (CD) is one of the most common diseases, resulting from both environmental (gluten) and genetic factors [human leukocyte antigen (HLA) and non-HLA genes]. The prevalence of CD has been estimated to approximate 0.5%-1% in different parts of the world. However, the population with diabetes, autoimmune disorder or relatives of CD individuals have even higher risk for the development of CD, at least in part, because of shared HLA typing. Gliadin gains access to the basal surface of the epithelium, and interact directly with the immune system, via both trans- and para-cellular routes. From a diagnostic perspective, symptoms may be viewed as either “typical” or “atypical”. In both positive serological screening results suggestive of CD, should lead to small bowel biopsy followed by a favourable clinical and serological response to the gluten-free diet (GFD) to confirm the diagnosis. Positive anti-tissue transglutaminase antibody or anti-endomysial antibody during the clinical course helps to confirm the diagnosis of CD because of their over 99% specificities when small bowel villous atrophy is present on biopsy. Currently, the only treatment available for CD individuals is a strict life-long GFD. A greater understanding of the pathogenesis of CD allows alternative future CD treatments to hydrolyse toxic gliadin peptide, prevent toxic gliadin peptide absorption, blockage of selective deamidation of specific glutamine residues by tissue, restore immune tolerance towards gluten, modulation of immune response to dietary gliadin, and restoration of intestinal architecture. PMID:23155333

  15. Prevalence of celiac disease in multiple sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Celiac disease (CD) is a common systemic disease related to a permanent intolerance to gluten and is often associated with different autoimmune and neurological diseases. Its mean prevalence in the general population is 1-2% worldwide. Our aim was to study the prevalence of celiac disease in a prospective series of Multiple Sclerosis (MS) patients and their first-degree relatives. Methods We analyzed the prevalence of serological, histological and genetic CD markers in a series of 72 MS patients and in their 126 first-degree relatives, compared to 123 healthy controls. Results Tissue IgA-anti-transglutaminase-2 antibodies were positive in 7 MS patients (10%), compared to 3 healthy controls (2.4%) (p < 0.05). OR: 5.33 (CI-95%: 1.074-26.425). No differences were found in HLA-DQ2 markers between MS patients (29%) and controls (26%) (NS). We detected mild or moderate villous atrophy (Marsh III type) in duodenal biopsies, in 8 MS patients (11.1%). We also found a high proportion of CD among first-degree relatives: 23/126 (32%). Several associated diseases were detected, mainly dermatitis 41 (57%) and iron deficiency anemia in 28 (39%) MS patients. We also found in them, an increased frequency of circulating auto-antibodies such as anti-TPO in 19 (26%), ANA in 11 (15%) and AMA in 2 (3%). Conclusions We have found an increased prevalence of CD in 8 of the 72 MS patients (11.1%) and also in their first-degree relatives (23/126 [32%]). Therefore, increased efforts aimed at the early detection and dietary treatment of CD, among antibody-positive MS patients, are advisable. PMID:21385364

  16. Gorham's disease: clinical case.

    PubMed

    Sá, Pedro; Marques, Pedro; Oliveira, Carolina; Rodrigues, André Sá; Amorim, Nelson; Pinto, Rui

    2015-01-01

    Gorham's disease, also known as idiopathic massive osteolysis, is a rare pathological condition characterized by vascular proliferation that results in destruction and reabsorption of the bone matrix, of unknown etiology. It was first described by Jackson in 1838, but it was Gorham and Stout, in 1955, who defined this disease as a specific entity. It has variable clinical presentation and generally has progressive behavior. Controversy continues regarding the treatment and there is no standard treatment. This pathological condition generally presents a favorable prognosis. Here, a case of Gorham's disease with involvement of the left hip is presented, in a male patient without relevant antecedents.

  17. Gorham's disease: clinical case☆

    PubMed Central

    Sá, Pedro; Marques, Pedro; Oliveira, Carolina; Rodrigues, André Sá; Amorim, Nelson; Pinto, Rui

    2015-01-01

    Gorham's disease, also known as idiopathic massive osteolysis, is a rare pathological condition characterized by vascular proliferation that results in destruction and reabsorption of the bone matrix, of unknown etiology. It was first described by Jackson in 1838, but it was Gorham and Stout, in 1955, who defined this disease as a specific entity. It has variable clinical presentation and generally has progressive behavior. Controversy continues regarding the treatment and there is no standard treatment. This pathological condition generally presents a favorable prognosis. Here, a case of Gorham's disease with involvement of the left hip is presented, in a male patient without relevant antecedents. PMID:26229923

  18. Prevalence of Nontuberculous Mycobacterial Pulmonary Disease, Germany, 2009–2014

    PubMed Central

    Wagner, Dirk; de Roux, Andrés; Diel, Roland; Hohmann, David; Hickstein, Lennart; Welte, Tobias; Rademacher, Jessica

    2016-01-01

    We analyzed routine statutory health insurance claim data to determine prevalence of nontuberculous mycobacterial pulmonary disease in Germany. Documented prevalence rates of this nonnotifiable disease increased from 2.3 to 3.3 cases/100,000 population from 2009 to 2014. Prevalence showed a strong association with advanced age and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. PMID:27191473

  19. Suprapelvic phleboliths: prevalence, distribution and clinical associations.

    PubMed

    Curry, N S; Ham, F C; Schabel, S I

    1983-11-01

    The preliminary radiographs of 783 patients undergoing excretory urography were prospectively surveyed for the presence of abdominally located phleboliths. Two per cent demonstrated typical densities in a periureteral distribution flanking the lumbar spine where they could be confused with ureteral calculi. All these patients were multiparous females and three-quarters of them had pelvic masses (11% of all patients with pelvic masses), suggesting a possible association with gonadal vein thrombi. Altered venous flow with dilatation of ovarian veins, consequent valvular incompetence and stasis may account for the gonadal vein distribution in the pelvic mass cases. Other observed clinical conditions included hepatic disease, portal hypertension and varices. Obstruction and stasis of venous flow in hepatic disease states may lead to phlebolith formation in gastric and mesenteric varices. Unlike pelvic phleboliths, suprapelvic phleboliths are infrequent but may be detected by careful inspection of low kilovoltage films, particularly in the regions closely flanking the lumbar spine. Their presence may be associated with pelvic masses or significant chronic hepatic disease and they may be confused on plain film with ureteral calculi. PMID:6673892

  20. Dyspepsia and celiac disease: Prevalence, diagnostic tools and therapy

    PubMed Central

    Petrarca, Laura; Nenna, Raffaella; Mastrogiorgio, Gerarda; Florio, Matteo; Brighi, Manuela; Pontone, Stefano

    2014-01-01

    The prevalence of dyspepsia is up to 40% in population-based study. Functional dyspepsia is an exclusion diagnosis and it is classified as a chronic abdominal pain-related functional disorder, characterized by the presence of persistent or recurrent pain or discomfort centered in the upper abdomen, neither relief by defecation, nor association with the onset of a change in stool frequency or form. Celiac disease (CD) is a common autoimmune enteropathy, with a prevalence around 1% in the general population. Its diagnosis includes a serological screening and an upper gastrointestinal endoscopy with multiple biopsies. Gluten-free diet is the only effective treatment. CD diagnosis is often delayed in asymptomatic patients or in individuals with less clinical gastrointestinal symptoms. Several studies performed coeliac disease screening in patients with symptoms suggestive of dyspepsia, showing a biopsy-proved prevalence that ranged from 0.5% to 2%. The typical endoscopic markers of villous atrophy are not sufficiently sensitive, so some endoscopic techniques, such as “water immersion” and confocal endomicroscopy were proposed to improve the diagnostic sensitivity and target biopsies. A recent meta-analysis estimated that the prevalence of CD was higher in patients with dyspepsia, but not in a statistically significant way. However this assumption should be confirmed further larger studies. PMID:25332916

  1. Dyspepsia and celiac disease: Prevalence, diagnostic tools and therapy.

    PubMed

    Petrarca, Laura; Nenna, Raffaella; Mastrogiorgio, Gerarda; Florio, Matteo; Brighi, Manuela; Pontone, Stefano

    2014-09-26

    The prevalence of dyspepsia is up to 40% in population-based study. Functional dyspepsia is an exclusion diagnosis and it is classified as a chronic abdominal pain-related functional disorder, characterized by the presence of persistent or recurrent pain or discomfort centered in the upper abdomen, neither relief by defecation, nor association with the onset of a change in stool frequency or form. Celiac disease (CD) is a common autoimmune enteropathy, with a prevalence around 1% in the general population. Its diagnosis includes a serological screening and an upper gastrointestinal endoscopy with multiple biopsies. Gluten-free diet is the only effective treatment. CD diagnosis is often delayed in asymptomatic patients or in individuals with less clinical gastrointestinal symptoms. Several studies performed coeliac disease screening in patients with symptoms suggestive of dyspepsia, showing a biopsy-proved prevalence that ranged from 0.5% to 2%. The typical endoscopic markers of villous atrophy are not sufficiently sensitive, so some endoscopic techniques, such as "water immersion" and confocal endomicroscopy were proposed to improve the diagnostic sensitivity and target biopsies. A recent meta-analysis estimated that the prevalence of CD was higher in patients with dyspepsia, but not in a statistically significant way. However this assumption should be confirmed further larger studies. PMID:25332916

  2. Clinical significance and prevalence of Blastocystis hominis in Van, Turkey

    PubMed Central

    Beyhan, Yunus E.; Yilmaz, Hasan; Cengiz, Zeynep T.; Ekici, Abdurrahman

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To determine the associated clinical symptoms and prevalence of Blastocystis hominis (B. hominis). Methods: Stool samples of 50,185 patients (26,784 males and 23,401 females) who were received at the Parasitology Laboratory of Yuzuncu Yil University Faculty of Medicine, Van, Turkey in the last 5 years were inspected microscopically using saline and iodine-stained wet-mount preparations. Age, gender, and symptoms of patients were recorded and their significance was evaluated. Results: The prevalence of B. hominis in the total sample was 0.54% (275/50185). Out of 275 infected patients, 143 (52%) were males, and 132 (48%) were female (χ2=0.884; p=0.348). The distribution of B. hominis infection was high in 7-13 aged children (34.9%) (χ2=306.8; p=0.001). Blastocystis was higher among symptomatic patients (70.2%) compared with asymptomatic patients (29.8%) (χ2=107.13; p=0.001). The most frequent clinical symptoms associated with the disease were abdominal pain (27.3%) and diarrhea (19.6%) followed by anorexia, fever, saliva, anal itching, and nausea. Conclusion: Blastocystis hominis is considered a causative agent of human disease in patients with recurrent symptoms. Due to the significant risk for zoonotic transmission, molecular techniques must be used to determine the route and source of infection. PMID:26318472

  3. Rare Diseases Clinical Research Network

    MedlinePlus

    ... RDCRN? Aims of the Rare Diseases Clinical Research Network Contact Us RDCRN Members Login Accessibility Disclaimer The Rare Diseases Clinical Research Network is an initiative of the Office of Rare ...

  4. Prevalence of Ischemic Heart Disease and Management of Coronary Risk in Daily Clinical Practice: Results from a Mediterranean Cohort of HIV-Infected Patients

    PubMed Central

    Echeverría, Patricia; Domingo, Pere; Llibre, Josep-María; Gutierrez, Mar; Mateo, Gracia; Puig, Jordi; Bonjoch, Anna; Pérez-Alvarez, Nuria; Sirera, Guillem; Clotet, Bonaventura; Negredo, Eugenia

    2014-01-01

    Background. There are conflicting data on the prevalence of coronary events and the quality of the management of modifiable cardiovascular risk factors (CVRF) in HIV-infected patients. Methods. We performed a retrospective descriptive study to determine the prevalence of coronary events and to evaluate the management of CVRF in a Mediterranean cohort of 3760 HIV-1-infected patients from April 1983 through June 2011. Results. We identified 81 patients with a history of a coronary event (prevalence 2.15%); 83% of them suffered an acute myocardial infarction. At the time of the coronary event, CVRF were highly prevalent (60.5% hypertension, 48% dyslipidemia, and 16% diabetes mellitus). Other CVRF, such as smoking, hypertension, lack of exercise, and body mass index, were not routinely assessed. After the coronary event, a significant decrease in total cholesterol (P = 0.025) and LDL-cholesterol (P = 0.004) was observed. However, the percentage of patients who maintained LDL-cholesterol > 100 mg/dL remained stable (from 46% to 41%, P = 0.103). Patients using protease inhibitors associated with a favorable lipid profile increased over time (P = 0.028). Conclusions. The prevalence of coronary events in our cohort is low. CVRF prevalence is high and their management is far from optimal. More aggressive interventions should be implemented to diminish cardiovascular risk in HIV-infected patients. PMID:25170515

  5. Prevalence of medication overuse headache in an interdisciplinary pain clinic

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Medication overuse headache (MOH) has been recognized as an important problem in headache patients although the pathophysiological mechanisms remain unclear. The diagnosis of MOH is based on clinical characteristics defined by the International Headache Society. The aim was the evaluation of the diagnostic criteria of MOH in a mixed population of chronic pain patients to gain information about the prevalence and possible associations with MOH. Methods Data of all patients referred to the interdisciplinary pain clinic at the University Hospital of Zurich between September 2005 and December 2007 were retrospectively analyzed. Demographic data (age, sex, history of migration), as well as data about duration of pain disease, category of pain disease (neurological, psychiatric, rheumatologic, other), use of medication, history of trauma, and comorbidity of depression and anxiety have been collected. Results Totally 178 of 187 consecutive chronic pain patients were included in the study. A total of 138 patients (78%) used analgesics on 15 or more days per month. Chronic headache was more prevalent among patients with analgesic overuse (39.8%) than without analgesic overuse (18%). The prevalence of MOH was 29%. The odds ratio (OR) for a patient with medication overuse to have chronic headache was 13.1 if he had a history of primary headache, compared to a patient without a primary headache syndrome. Furthermore, history of headache (OR 2.5, CI [1.13;5.44]), history of migration (OR 2.9, CI [1.31;6.32]) and comorbid depression (OR 3.5, CI [1.46;8.52]) were associated with overuse of acute medication, in general. Conclusions Primary headaches have a high risk for chronification in patients overusing analgesics for other pain disorders. Whereas history of headache, history of migration and comorbidity of depression are independentely associated with analgesic overuse in this group of patients. PMID:23565761

  6. Prevalence and prognosis of unclassifiable interstitial lung disease.

    PubMed

    Ryerson, Christopher J; Urbania, Thomas H; Richeldi, Luca; Mooney, Joshua J; Lee, Joyce S; Jones, Kirk D; Elicker, Brett M; Koth, Laura L; King, Talmadge E; Wolters, Paul J; Collard, Harold R

    2013-09-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence, characteristics and outcomes of patients with unclassifiable interstitial lung disease (ILD) and to develop a simple method of predicting disease behaviour. Unclassifiable ILD patients were identified from an ongoing longitudinal cohort. Unclassifiable ILD was diagnosed after a multidisciplinary review did not secure a specific ILD diagnosis. Clinical characteristics and outcomes were compared with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) and non-IPF ILDs. Independent predictors of mortality were determined using Cox proportional-hazards analysis to identify subgroups with distinct disease behaviour. Unclassifiable ILD was diagnosed in 10% of the ILD cohort (132 out of 1370 patients). The most common reason for being unclassifiable was missing histopathological assessment due to a high risk of surgical lung biopsy. Demographic and physiological features of unclassifiable ILD were intermediate between IPF and non-IPF disease controls. Unclassifiable ILD had longer survival rates when compared to IPF on adjusted analysis (hazard ratio 0.62, p = 0.04) and similar survival compared to non-IPF ILDs (hazard ratio 1.54, p = 0.12). Independent predictors of survival in unclassifiable ILD included diffusion capacity of the lung for carbon monoxide (p = 0.001) and a radiological fibrosis score (p = 0.02). Unclassifiable ILD represents approximately 10% of ILD cases and has a heterogeneous clinical course, which can be predicted using clinical and radiological variables.

  7. Prevalence of Dyslipidemia in Children with Congenital Heart Disease

    PubMed Central

    Fuenmayor, Gabriela; Redondo, Ana Carolina Costa; Shiraishi, Karen Saori; Souza, Rogerio; Elias, Patrícia Figueiredo; Jatene, Ieda Biscegli

    2013-01-01

    Dyslipidemia is one of the main risk factors associated with cardiovascular diseases. Few data on the impacts of congenital heart diseases are available with regard to the prevalence of dyslipidemia in children. Our study evaluated the lipid profile in children with congenital heart disease at a referral center. From January 2011 to July 2012, 52 pediatric patients had their lipid, metabolic and clinical profiles traced. The mean age was 10.4 ± 2.8 years and male/female rate of 1.38:1. Our population had 53.8% patients with high levels of total cholesterol and 13.4% (CI 95 %, from 6.6 to 25.2%) of them also presenting LDL levels ≥ 130 mg/dL, which characterizes dyslipidemia. The group of dyslipidemic patients presented only two obese individuals. Our data show that the presence of congenital heart disease does not lead to higher risk associated with the prevalence of dyslipidemia. Therefore, the screening of this specific population should follow the regular pediatric guidelines, which are also independent of the nutritional status of the children tested. PMID:24061754

  8. Poikilocytosis in rabbits: prevalence, type, and association with disease.

    PubMed

    Christopher, Mary M; Hawkins, Michelle G; Burton, Andrew G

    2014-01-01

    Rabbits (Oryctolagus cuniculus) are a popular companion animal, food animal, and animal model of human disease. Abnormal red cell shapes (poikilocytes) have been observed in rabbits, but their significance is unknown. The objective of this study was to investigate the prevalence and type of poikilocytosis in pet rabbits and its association with physiologic factors, clinical disease, and laboratory abnormalities. We retrospectively analyzed blood smears from 482 rabbits presented to the University of California-Davis Veterinary Medical Teaching Hospital from 1990 to 2010. Number and type of poikilocytes per 2000 red blood cells (RBCs) were counted and expressed as a percentage. Acanthocytes (>3% of RBCs) were found in 150/482 (31%) rabbits and echinocytes (>3% of RBCs) were found in 127/482 (27%) of rabbits, both healthy and diseased. Thirty-three of 482 (7%) rabbits had >30% acanthocytes and echinocytes combined. Mild to moderate (>0.5% of RBCs) fragmented red cells (schistocytes, microcytes, keratocytes, spherocytes) were found in 25/403 (6%) diseased and 0/79 (0%) healthy rabbits (P = 0.0240). Fragmentation and acanthocytosis were more severe in rabbits with inflammatory disease and malignant neoplasia compared with healthy rabbits (P<0.01). The % fragmented cells correlated with % polychromasia, RDW, and heterophil, monocyte, globulins, and fibrinogen concentrations (P<0.05). Echinocytosis was significantly associated with renal failure, azotemia, and acid-base/electrolyte abnormalities (P<0.05). Serum cholesterol concentration correlated significantly with % acanthocytes (P<0.0001), % echinocytes (P = 0.0069), and % fragmented cells (P = 0.0109), but correlations were weak (Spearman ρ <0.02). These findings provide important insights into underlying pathophysiologic mechanisms that appear to affect the prevalence and type of naturally-occurring poikilocytosis in rabbits. Our findings support the need to carefully document poikilocytes in research

  9. Hallucinations in Parkinson's disease: prevalence, phenomenology and risk factors.

    PubMed

    Fénelon, G; Mahieux, F; Huon, R; Ziégler, M

    2000-04-01

    Hallucinations, mainly of a visual nature, are considered to affect about one-quarter of patients with Parkinson's disease. They are commonly viewed as a side-effect of antiparkinsonian treatment, but other factors may be involved. The aim of this study was to determine the phenomenology, prevalence and risk factors of hallucinations in Parkinson's disease. Two-hundred and sixteen consecutive patients fulfilling clinical criteria for Parkinson's disease were studied. Demographic and clinical variables were recorded, including motor and cognitive status, depressive symptoms and sleep-wake disturbances. Patients with and without hallucinations were compared using non-parametric tests, and logistic regression was applied to significant data. Hallucinations had been present during the previous 3 months in 39.8% of the patients, and fell into three categories: minor forms, consisting of a sensation of a presence (person), a sideways passage (commonly of an animal) or illusions were present in 25.5% of the patients (an isolated occurrence in 14.3%), formed visual hallucinations were present in 22.2% (isolated in 9.3%) and auditory hallucinations were present in 9.7% (isolated in 2.3%). Patients with minor hallucinations had a higher depression score than non-hallucinators but did not differ in other respects. Logistic regression analysis identified three factors independently predictive of formed visual hallucinations: severe cognitive disorders, daytime somnolence and a long duration of Parkinson's disease. These findings indicate that, when minor hallucinations are included, the total prevalence is much higher than previously reported. A simple side-effect of dopaminergic treatment is not sufficient to explain the occurrence of all visual hallucinations. The main risk factor in treated patients is cognitive impairment, although sleep-wake cycle disturbances, and possibly other factors related to the duration of the disease, act as cofactors.

  10. College Students' Perceived Disease Risk versus Actual Prevalence Rates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Matthew Lee; Dickerson, Justin B.; Sosa, Erica T.; McKyer, E. Lisako J.; Ory, Marcia G.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To compare college students' perceived disease risk with disease prevalence rates. Methods: Data were analyzed from 625 college students collected with an Internet-based survey. Paired t-tests were used to separately compare participants' perceived 10-year and lifetime disease risk for 4 diseases: heart disease, cancer, diabetes, and…

  11. Prevalence of Chronic Diseases in Adolescents with Intellectual Disability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oeseburg, B.; Jansen, D. E. M. C.; Dijkstra, G. J.; Groothoff, J. W.; Reijneveld, S. A.

    2010-01-01

    Valid community-based data on the prevalence of chronic diseases in adolescents (12-18 years) with intellectual disability (ID-adolescents) are scarce. The aim of this study was to assess the prevalence rates and the nature of chronic diseases in a population of ID-adolescents and to compare them with the rates among adolescents in the general…

  12. [Wilson's disease: clinical spectrum of liver disease].

    PubMed

    Ochoa Palominos, Alejandra; Ibáñez Samaniego, Luis; Catalina Rodríguez, María-Vega; Pajares Díaz, José; Clemente Ricote, Gerardo

    2013-02-01

    Wilson's disease is a hereditary autosomal recessive disorder of copper metabolism,characterized by copper accumulation in the liver and brain. This rare entity, which has a broad clinical spectrum, is often difficult to diagnose and should therefore always be suspected in patients with liver disease of unclear cause. We describe two types of manifestation of liver disease in two patients; the first developed fulminant hepatic failure requiring urgent liver transplantation and the second showed advanced chronic liver disease and received standard medical treatment. The objective of this clinical observation is to analyze the diagnosis of Wilson's disease in two patients with distinct onset, illustrating the broad clinical spectrum of the disease, and its treatment.

  13. Systemic hypertension in dogs with leishmaniasis: prevalence and clinical consequences.

    PubMed

    Cortadellas, Oscar; del Palacio, María Josefa Fernández; Bayón, Alejandro; Albert, Angel; Talavera, Jesús

    2006-01-01

    A prospective study was performed (November 1998 to December 2003) to determine the prevalence of systemic hypertension (SH) in dogs with glomerular disease secondary to leishmaniasis. One hundred and five dogs with leishmaniasis were screened and staged for the presence of renal disease (RD) and SH. For the purpose of the study, RD was defined as serum creatinine concentration > or = 1.4 mg/dL, a urine protein/creatinine ratio > or = 0.5, or both. SH was defined as a systolic blood pressure (SBP) > or =180 mm Hg or an SBP between 150 and 179 mm Hg in the presence of clinical manifestations of SH. Fifty-two (49.5%) of the dogs had some degree of RD, and 32 (61.5%) of these dogs were diagnosed with SH. Moreover, SH also was diagnosed in 3 dogs without RD. Left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH), estimated by echocardiography, was the most frequently observed systemic consequence of hypertension, being present in 32 (91.4%) of the hypertensive dogs. Echocardiographic abnormalities were not detected in any of the 33 dogs with leishmaniasis without RD, which were used as controls. Ocular consequences of SH were observed in only 2 (5.7%) of the dogs with hypertension. We conclude that SH is prevalent in dogs with RD secondary to leishmaniasis, not only in the more severe stages but also in the early course of the illness before azotemia becomes apparent. Canine leishmaniasis may be a useful natural model to study SH secondary to glomerular disease.

  14. The Prevalence of Disease Clusters in Older Adults with Multiple Chronic Diseases – A Systematic Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Sinnige, Judith; Braspenning, Jozé; Schellevis, François; Stirbu-Wagner, Irina; Westert, Gert; Korevaar, Joke

    2013-01-01

    Background Since most clinical guidelines address single diseases, treatment of patients with multimorbidity, the co-occurrence of multiple (chronic) diseases within one person, can become complicated. Information on highly prevalent combinations of diseases can set the agenda for guideline development on multimorbidity. With this systematic review we aim to describe the prevalence of disease combinations (i.e. disease clusters) in older patients with multimorbidity, as assessed in available studies. In addition, we intend to acquire information that can be supportive in the process of multimorbidity guideline development. Methods We searched MEDLINE, Embase and the Cochrane Library for all types of studies published between January 2000 and September 2012. We included empirical studies focused on multimorbidity or comorbidity that reported prevalence rates of combinations of two or more diseases. Results Our search yielded 3070 potentially eligible articles, of which 19 articles, representing 23 observational studies, turned out to meet all our quality and inclusion criteria after full text review. These studies provided prevalence rates of 165 combinations of two diseases (i.e. disease pairs). Twenty disease pairs, concerning 12 different diseases, were described in at least 3 studies. Depression was found to be the disease that was most commonly clustered, and was paired with 8 different diseases, in the available studies. Hypertension and diabetes mellitus were found to be the second most clustered diseases, both with 6 different diseases. Prevalence rates for each disease combination varied considerably per study, but were highest for the pairs that included hypertension, coronary artery disease, and diabetes mellitus. Conclusions Twenty disease pairs were assessed most frequently in patients with multimorbidity. These disease combinations could serve as a first priority setting towards the development of multimorbidity guidelines, starting with the diseases

  15. Prevalence of chronic kidney disease in adults with metabolic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Emem-Chioma, P C; Siminialayi, I M; Wokoma, F S

    2011-09-01

    The burden of chronic kidney disease (CKD) and other non- communicable diseases continues to rise globally, and recent studies suggest that metabolic syndrome (MS) may add to this burden by contributing to the development of CKD. Given that reports on the prevalence of CKD in patients with MS in this environment are scanty, this study was undertaken with the sole aim of determining the prevalence of CKD in subjects with MS as defined by the International Diabetes Federation (IDF) and the National Cholesterol Education Project Adult Treatment Panel III (NCEP ATP III). A total of 240 consenting adults (18-70 years) attending the general out- patient clinic of the General Hospital Okrika for various ailments were studied. Subjects were screened for MS as per the above- mentioned criteria. Estimated GFR (eGFR) was determined with Modification of Diet for Renal Disease (MDRD) formula and CKD was defined as eGFR less than 60 mL/min/1.73 m2 . Data was analyzed using SPSS version 12.0 and Epi info version 4.06d; P <0.05 was considered as significant. A total of 88 males and 152 females were screened for MS by both criteria. Eighty- four (35.0%) of 240 subjects had MS as defined by NCEP ATP III, while 85 (35.4%) had MS as defined by the IDF. The subjects were predominantly females, and mean age was between 54.74 ± 15.30 and 55.60 ± 14.81 years. Four of the 84 (4.8%) subjects with MS by NCEP ATP III definition had CKD while three of the 85 (3.5%) subjects with MS by IDF definition had CKD. Among subjects without MS by either definition, the prevalence of CKD was four of 140 (2.9%). Although the prevalence of CKD was higher among subjects with MS by ATP III compared with those with MS as defined by IDF and subjects without MS, the differences were not statistically significant (X2 = 0.14; P = 0.710). A comparison of MS subjects without CKD and those with CKD did not show any significant difference in age, waist circumference, body mass index, blood pressure, fasting blood

  16. Prevalence and Severity of Voice and Swallowing Difficulties in Mitochondrial Disease

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Read, Jennifer L.; Whittaker, Roger G.; Miller, Nick; Clark, Sue; Taylor, Robert; McFarland, Robert; Turnbull, Douglass

    2012-01-01

    Background: Mutations of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) cause a broad spectrum of clinical phenotypes. Anecdotal evidence suggests that voice and swallow problems are a common feature of these diseases. Aims: To characterize accurately the prevalence and severity of voice and swallow problems in a large cohort of patients with mitochondrial disease.…

  17. Reliability of clinical diagnosis in identifying infectious trachoma in a low-prevalence area of Nepal.

    PubMed Central

    Baral, K.; Osaki, S.; Shreshta, B.; Panta, C. R.; Boulter, A.; Pang, F.; Cevallos, V.; Schachter, J.; Lietman, T.

    1999-01-01

    The WHO Alliance for Global Elimination of Trachoma by 2020 has increased the need to identify ocular chlamydial infections by clinical examination in areas of both high and low prevalence. The relationship between clinically active trachoma (as defined by clinical examination) and chlamydial infection is known for areas with hyperendemic trachoma, but not for areas with a low prevalence of the clinical disease. In the present study, we examined, photographed, and DNA tested the conjunctivae of children in the Surkhet district of mid-western Nepal, an area known to have a low prevalence of clinically active trachoma. Although 6% of the children aged 10 years and under were found to have clinically active trachoma, none were found to have chlamydia infection by the most sensitive DNA amplification tests available. A very low prevalence of clinically active trachoma is not necessarily evidence of the presence of chlamydial infection. Therefore, the WHO policy of not recommending an intensive trachoma control effort when the prevalence of clinically active trachoma is less than 10% in children is appropriate for this area of Nepal. PMID:10427930

  18. Influence of marine reserves on coral disease prevalence.

    PubMed

    Page, Cathie A; Baker, David M; Harvell, C Drew; Golbuu, Yimnang; Raymundo, Laurie; Neale, Stephen J; Rosell, Kathryn B; Rypien, Krystal L; Andras, Jason P; Willis, Bette L

    2009-11-16

    Predicted increases in disease with climate warming highlight the need for effective management strategies to mitigate disease effects in coral communities. We examined the role of marine protected areas (MPAs) in reducing disease in corals and the hypothesis that the composition of fish communities can influence coral health, by comparing disease prevalence between MPA and non-protected (control) reefs in Palau. Overall, the prevalence of diseases pooled, as well as the prevalence of skeletal eroding band (SEB), brown band disease (BrB) and growth anomalies (GAs) individually in major disease hosts (families Acroporidae and Poritidae), were not significantly reduced within MPAs. In fact, the prevalence of SEB was 2-fold higher within MPAs overall; however, the 4 studied MPAs were ineffective in enhancing coral assemblage or fish stock health. A negative association between the prevalence of SEB and richness of a fish species targeted by fishers in Palau highlights the potential role that well-managed MPAs could play in reducing SEB. The composition of coral communities and their susceptibility to bleaching also influenced the prevalence of disease on the studied reefs. The prevalence of diseases pooled and SEB were positively associated with the cover of major disease hosts (families Acroporidae and Poritidae), and the prevalence of BrB and bleaching were also positively associated. Although our study did not show positive effects of MPAs on coral heath, we did identify the potential for increased fish diversity within MPAs to reduce coral disease. Our study also highlights the complexity of relationships between fish assemblages, coral community composition and coral health on Indo-Pacific reefs. PMID:20095248

  19. Influence of marine reserves on coral disease prevalence.

    PubMed

    Page, Cathie A; Baker, David M; Harvell, C Drew; Golbuu, Yimnang; Raymundo, Laurie; Neale, Stephen J; Rosell, Kathryn B; Rypien, Krystal L; Andras, Jason P; Willis, Bette L

    2009-11-16

    Predicted increases in disease with climate warming highlight the need for effective management strategies to mitigate disease effects in coral communities. We examined the role of marine protected areas (MPAs) in reducing disease in corals and the hypothesis that the composition of fish communities can influence coral health, by comparing disease prevalence between MPA and non-protected (control) reefs in Palau. Overall, the prevalence of diseases pooled, as well as the prevalence of skeletal eroding band (SEB), brown band disease (BrB) and growth anomalies (GAs) individually in major disease hosts (families Acroporidae and Poritidae), were not significantly reduced within MPAs. In fact, the prevalence of SEB was 2-fold higher within MPAs overall; however, the 4 studied MPAs were ineffective in enhancing coral assemblage or fish stock health. A negative association between the prevalence of SEB and richness of a fish species targeted by fishers in Palau highlights the potential role that well-managed MPAs could play in reducing SEB. The composition of coral communities and their susceptibility to bleaching also influenced the prevalence of disease on the studied reefs. The prevalence of diseases pooled and SEB were positively associated with the cover of major disease hosts (families Acroporidae and Poritidae), and the prevalence of BrB and bleaching were also positively associated. Although our study did not show positive effects of MPAs on coral heath, we did identify the potential for increased fish diversity within MPAs to reduce coral disease. Our study also highlights the complexity of relationships between fish assemblages, coral community composition and coral health on Indo-Pacific reefs.

  20. Rare disease clinical trials: Power in numbers.

    PubMed

    Wicklund, Matthew P

    2016-08-01

    The limb-girdle muscular dystrophies (LGMDs) encompass a collection of genetic muscle diseases with proximal-predominant weakness of the limbs. Thirty-two of these disorders are named via the common nomenclature, including 8 autosomal-dominant (LGMD1A-H) and 24 autosomal-recessive (LGMD2A-X) disorders.(1) In addition, numerous other genetic muscle diseases, including Bethlem myopathy, dystrophinopathies, ryanodine receptor-associated myopathies, and many more, may clinically present with similar proximal-predominant weakness.(2) Therefore, current genetic testing panels targeting neuromuscular weakness frequently encompass >75 genes. These disorders are quite rare, each with minimum prevalence estimates of 0.01-0.60 cases per 100,000 persons.(3) LGMD2A (attributable to mutations in the gene for calpain-3) and LGMD2B (attributable to mutations in the gene for dysferlin) consistently are the 2 most prevalent LGMD subtypes in a variety of ethnic cohorts. PMID:27540592

  1. A global systematic review of Chagas disease prevalence among migrants.

    PubMed

    Conners, Erin E; Vinetz, Joseph M; Weeks, John R; Brouwer, Kimberly C

    2016-04-01

    Human migration has been identified as a potential factor for increased Chagas disease risk and has transformed the disease from a Latin American problem to a global one. We conducted a systematic review of the scientific literature between 2004-2014 in order to: summarize recent seroprevalence estimates of Chagas disease among Latin American migrants, in both endemic and non-endemic settings; compare seroprevalence estimates in migrants to countrywide prevalence estimates; and identify risk factors for Chagas disease among migrants. A total of 320 studies were screened and 23 studies were included. We found evidence that the prevalence of Chagas disease is higher than expected in some migrant groups and that reliance on blood donor screening prevalence estimates underestimates the burden of disease. Overall there is a dearth of high quality epidemiologic studies on the prevalence of Chagas disease in migrants, especially among intra-regional migrants within Latin America. Given that this zoonotic disease cannot likely be eradicated, improved surveillance and reporting is vital to continuing control efforts. More accurate health surveillance of both Latin American migrants and the Chagas disease burden will help countries appropriately scale up their response to this chronic disease. Overall, improved estimates of Chagas disease among migrants would likely serve to highlight the real need for better screening, diagnostics, and treatment of individuals living with the disease.

  2. ECOLOGIC STUDY OF MESOSCALE ENVIRONMENTS WITH EXCESS DISEASE PREVALENCE

    EPA Science Inventory

    This work employs an ecologic epidemiological approach to assess the relationship between environmental stressors and excess disease prevalence in small communities. Specifically, the childhood leukemia cluster in Fallon Nevada is used as an example; heavy metals (tungsten and c...

  3. Prevalence of Celiac Disease in Children with Idiopathic Dilated Cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Zahmatkeshan, Mozhgan; Fallahpoor, Mahsa; Amoozgar, Hamid

    2014-01-01

    Objective: This study aimed to evaluate the prevalence of celiac disease (CD) in the patients with dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM). Simultaneous presentation of these two diseases has been recently reported in some studies; however, few researches have been done on children. The sooner CD is diagnosed, the better the prognosis will be, especially in the patients with a chronic disease like DCM. Methods: In this study, 82 cases were screened for CD by measuring the level of anti-body against transglutaminase (anti tTG). These cases included 41 patients with DCM labeled according to clinical evaluation and echocardiography and 41 healthy children who had been referred for routine checkup. All the patients were between 1 and 18 years old. The expired patients and those with previous diagnosis of CD were excluded from the study. Besides, the patients with positive antibody results underwent intestinal biopsy to match the serology findings with histopathology of CD in the intestine. Finally, the data were analyzed by the SPSS statistical software (v. 16) and through t-test and Pearson correlation coefficient. Findings: According to the findings, 1/41 (2.5%) DCM cases had positive tTG antibody level and negative intestinal biopsy which is classified as potential CD in the children with DCM. In addition, 7/41 (17%) patients had borderline anti body level. A direct correlation was observed between age and anti tTG level. Conclusion: It is beneficial to assess CD in DCM children with unknown cause. PMID:25793066

  4. Prevalence and correlates of heart disease among adults in Singapore.

    PubMed

    Picco, Louisa; Subramaniam, Mythily; Abdin, Edimansyah; Vaingankar, Janhavi Ajit; Chong, Siow Ann

    2016-02-01

    Heart disease is one of the leading causes of morbidity and mortality worldwide and it has been well established that it is associated with both mental and physical conditions. This paper describes the prevalence of heart disease with mental disorders and other chronic physical conditions among the Singapore resident population. Data were from the Singapore Mental Health Study which was a representative, cross-sectional epidemiological survey undertaken with 6616 Singapore residents, between December 2009 and December 2010. The Composite International Diagnostic Interview Version 3.0 was used to establish the diagnosis of mental disorders, while a chronic medical conditions checklist was used to gather information on 15 physical conditions, including various forms of heart disease. Health-related quality of life was measured using the Euro-Quality of Life Scale (EQ-5D). The lifetime prevalence of heart disease was 2.8%. Socio-demographic correlates of heart disease included older age, Indian ethnicity, secondary education (vs. tertiary) and being economically inactive. After adjusting for socio-demographic variables and other comorbid physical and mental disorders, the prevalence of major depressive disorder and bipolar disorder were significantly higher among those with heart disease, as were diabetes, arthritis, kidney failure and lung disease. These findings highlight important associations between heart disease and various socio-demographic correlates, mental disorders and physical conditions. Given the high prevalence of mood disorders among heart disease patients, timely and appropriate screening and treatment of mental disorders among this group is essential.

  5. The prevalence of adenoviral conjunctivitis at the Clinical Hospital of the State University of Campinas, Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Pinto, Roberto Damian Pacheco; Lira, Rodrigo Pessoa Cavalcanti; Arieta, Carlos Eduardo Leite; de Castro, Rosane Silvestre; Bonon, Sandra Helena Alves

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Viral conjunctivitis is a common, highly contagious disease that is often caused by an adenovirus. The aim of this study was to evaluate the prevalence of adenoviral conjunctivitis by analyzing data from a prospective clinical study of 122 consecutively enrolled patients who were treated at the Clinical Hospital of the State University of Campinas (UNICAMP) after a clinical diagnosis of infectious conjunctivitis between November 2011 and June 2012. METHODS: Polymerase chain reaction was used to evaluate all cases of clinically diagnosed infectious conjunctivitis and based on the laboratory findings, the prevalence of adenoviral infections was determined. The incidence of subepithelial corneal infiltrates was also investigated. RESULTS: Of the 122 patients with acute infectious conjunctivitis included, 72 had positive polymerase chain reaction results for adenoviruses and 17 patients developed subepithelial corneal infiltrates (13.93%). CONCLUSIONS: The polymerase chain reaction revealed that the prevalence of adenoviral conjunctivitis was 59% in all patients who presented with a clinical diagnosis of infectious conjunctivitis from November 2011 to June 2012. The prevalence of adenoviral conjunctivitis in the study population was similar to its prevalence in other regions of the world. PMID:26602522

  6. Spine and sacroiliac joints on magnetic resonance imaging in patients with early axial spondyloarthritis: prevalence of lesions and association with clinical and disease activity indices from the Italian group of the SPACE study.

    PubMed

    Lorenzin, M; Ortolan, A; Frallonardo, P; Vio, S; Lacognata, C; Oliviero, F; Punzi, L; Ramonda, R

    2016-01-01

    Our aim was to determine the prevalence of spine and sacroiliac joint (SIJ) lesions on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in patients with early axial spondyloarthritis (axSpA) and their correlation with disease activity indices. Sixty patients with low back pain (LBP) (≥3 months, ≤2 years, onset ≤45 years), attending the SpA-clinic of the Unità Operativa Complessa Reumatologia of Padova [SpondyloArthritis-Caught-Early (SPACE) study], were studied following a protocol including physical examination, questionnaires, laboratory tests, X-rays and spine and SIJ MRI. Positive spine and SIJ MRI and X-rays images were scored independently by 2 readers using the SPARCC method, modified Stoke ankylosing spondylitis spine score and New York criteria. The axial pain and localization of MRI-lesions were referred to 4 sites: cervical/thoracic/lumbar spine and SIJ. All patients were classified into three groups: patients with signs of radiographic sacroiliitis (r-axSpA), patients without signs of r-axSpA but with signs of sacroiliitis on MRI (nr-axSpA MRI SIJ+), patients without signs of sacroiliitis on MRI and X-rays (nr-axSpA MRI SIJ-). The median age at LBP onset was 29.05±8.38 years; 51.6% of patients showed bone marrow edema (BME) in spine-MRI and 56.7% of patients in SIJ-MRI. Signs of enthesitis were found in 55% of patients in the thoracic district. Of the 55% of patients with BME on spine-MRI, 15% presented presented a negative SIJMRI. There was a significant difference between these cohorts with regard to the prevalence of radiographic sacroiliitis, active sacroiliitis on MRI and SPARCC SIJ score. The site of pain correlated statistically with BME lesions in thoracic and buttock districts. Since positive spine-MRI images were observed in absence of sacroiliitis, we can hypothesize that this finding could have a diagnostic significance in axSpA suspected axSpA. PMID:27608795

  7. Wildlife disease prevalence in human-modified landscapes.

    PubMed

    Brearley, Grant; Rhodes, Jonathan; Bradley, Adrian; Baxter, Greg; Seabrook, Leonie; Lunney, Daniel; Liu, Yan; McAlpine, Clive

    2013-05-01

    Human-induced landscape change associated with habitat loss and fragmentation places wildlife populations at risk. One issue in these landscapes is a change in the prevalence of disease which may result in increased mortality and reduced fecundity. Our understanding of the influence of habitat loss and fragmentation on the prevalence of wildlife diseases is still in its infancy. What is evident is that changes in disease prevalence as a result of human-induced landscape modification are highly variable. The importance of infectious diseases for the conservation of wildlife will increase as the amount and quality of suitable habitat decreases due to human land-use pressures. We review the experimental and observational literature of the influence of human-induced landscape change on wildlife disease prevalence, and discuss disease transmission types and host responses as mechanisms that are likely to determine the extent of change in disease prevalence. It is likely that transmission dynamics will be the key process in determining a pathogen's impact on a host population, while the host response may ultimately determine the extent of disease prevalence. Finally, we conceptualize mechanisms and identify future research directions to increase our understanding of the relationship between human-modified landscapes and wildlife disease prevalence. This review highlights that there are rarely consistent relationships between wildlife diseases and human-modified landscapes. In addition, variation is evident between transmission types and landscape types, with the greatest positive influence on disease prevalence being in urban landscapes and directly transmitted disease systems. While we have a limited understanding of the potential influence of habitat loss and fragmentation on wildlife disease, there are a number of important areas to address in future research, particularly to account for the variability in increased and decreased disease prevalence. Previous studies

  8. Clinical Genetics of Alzheimer's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Zou, Zhangyu; Liu, Changyun; Che, Chunhui; Huang, Huapin

    2014-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common progressive neurodegenerative disease and the most common form of dementia in the elderly. It is a complex disorder with environmental and genetic components. There are two major types of AD, early onset and the more common late onset. The genetics of early-onset AD are largely understood with mutations in three different genes leading to the disease. In contrast, while susceptibility loci and alleles associated with late-onset AD have been identified using genetic association studies, the genetics of late-onset Alzheimer's disease are not fully understood. Here we review the known genetics of early- and late-onset AD, the clinical features of EOAD according to genotypes, and the clinical implications of the genetics of AD. PMID:24955352

  9. [Hallucinations and dementia. Prevalence, clinical presentation and pathophysiology].

    PubMed

    Fénelon, G; Mahieux, F

    2004-04-01

    Hallucinations are a common feature of certain degenerative diseases with a risk of dementia such as Alzheimer's disease, Lewy body dementia, and Parkinson's disease. Obtaining valid epidemiological data is nevertheless quite difficult because of methodological problems. As a rule, hallucinations are more prevalent in Lewy body disease than Parkinson's disease or Alzheimer's disease. The prevalence in parkinsonian dementia is about the same as in Lewy body disease. Complex visual hallucinations predominate, auditory or tactile hallucinations are more exceptional. Minor forms (illusions, sensation of presence) are also observed. Recurrence is common, mainly in the evening or at night. Patients with advanced mental impairment generally take the hallucinations for reality. The hallucinations can be associated with psychological and behavioral disorders such as delusionnal idea or identification disorders. It is important to search for other causes of hallucinations such as drugs, ocular disorders, or depression, but many of these disorders are common comorbidities in elderly patients with degenerative disease. There is no unique model fitting all the hypothesized pathogenic mechanisms. Complex visual hallucinations most likely arise from abnormal activation of the extra-striat temporal associative regions, but only hypothetical mechanisms have been proposed. Genetic studies and functional imaging have not provided convincing evidence. Current focus is placed on an imbalance between deficient cholinergic transmission and preserved or augmented monoaminergic transmission at the cortical level, but other neurotransmission systems could be involved. The dream dysregulation mechanism proposed in Parkinson's disease cannot be generalized. The link between cognitive disorders and hallucination is also poorly understood: hallucinations are associated with more severe cognitive impairments or more rapid cognitive deline in Parkinson's disease and Alzheimer's disease, but the

  10. Celiac disease in subjects with type 1 diabetes mellitus: a prevalence study in western Sicily (Italy).

    PubMed

    Greco, Domenico; Pisciotta, Maria; Gambina, Francesco; Maggio, Filippo

    2013-02-01

    The association between celiac disease and type 1 diabetes mellitus is well known. Up to now, celiac disease prevalence in children and adults with type 1 diabetes in Sicily has not been reported. The aim of this study was to assess the prevalence of celiac disease in patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus who come from a defined geographical area in western Sicily and to investigate the clinical features of these subjects. The records of 492 consecutive patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus referred in a period of 5 years were analyzed. During the period of the survey, out of 492 patients with type 1 diabetes, 22 (4.5 %) had a previous diagnosis of celiac disease. There were 14 females and 8 males; these patients showed a mean age of 13 years at diabetes onset. Diagnosis of celiac disease was often simultaneous or subsequent to that of diabetes. Autoimmune thyroiditis was coexisting in 8 patients (36 %). Our data confirm, in a Sicilian population, the not unusual association between celiac disease and type 1 diabetes, although prevalence rate is lower than in others Italian studies. Autoimmune thyroiditis is present with high prevalence in these patients. Celiac disease diagnosis often followed onset of type 1 diabetes, particularly in female subjects with a young age at diabetes onset; therefore, in these subjects, an active search for the presence of celiac disease is warranted for many years after appearance of diabetes.

  11. Celiac disease in subjects with type 1 diabetes mellitus: a prevalence study in western Sicily (Italy).

    PubMed

    Greco, Domenico; Pisciotta, Maria; Gambina, Francesco; Maggio, Filippo

    2013-02-01

    The association between celiac disease and type 1 diabetes mellitus is well known. Up to now, celiac disease prevalence in children and adults with type 1 diabetes in Sicily has not been reported. The aim of this study was to assess the prevalence of celiac disease in patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus who come from a defined geographical area in western Sicily and to investigate the clinical features of these subjects. The records of 492 consecutive patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus referred in a period of 5 years were analyzed. During the period of the survey, out of 492 patients with type 1 diabetes, 22 (4.5 %) had a previous diagnosis of celiac disease. There were 14 females and 8 males; these patients showed a mean age of 13 years at diabetes onset. Diagnosis of celiac disease was often simultaneous or subsequent to that of diabetes. Autoimmune thyroiditis was coexisting in 8 patients (36 %). Our data confirm, in a Sicilian population, the not unusual association between celiac disease and type 1 diabetes, although prevalence rate is lower than in others Italian studies. Autoimmune thyroiditis is present with high prevalence in these patients. Celiac disease diagnosis often followed onset of type 1 diabetes, particularly in female subjects with a young age at diabetes onset; therefore, in these subjects, an active search for the presence of celiac disease is warranted for many years after appearance of diabetes. PMID:22707396

  12. Increase in clinical prevalence of AIDS implies increase in unsafe medical injections.

    PubMed

    Reid, S

    2009-05-01

    A mass action model developed by the World Health Organization (WHO) estimates that the re-use of contaminated syringes for medical care accounted for 2.5% of HIV infections in sub-Saharan Africa in 2000. The WHO's model applies the population prevalence of HIV infection rather than the clinical prevalence to calculate patients' frequency of exposure to contaminated injections. This approach underestimates iatrogenic exposure risks when progression to advanced HIV disease is widespread. This sensitivity analysis applies the clinical prevalence of HIV to the model and re-evaluates the transmission efficiency of HIV in injections. These adjustments show that no less than 12-17%, and up to 34-47%, of new HIV infections in sub-Saharan Africa may be attributed to medical injections. The present estimates undermine persistent claims that injection safety improvements would have only a minor impact on HIV incidence in Africa. PMID:19386964

  13. [Features of cardiologic diseases prevalence among individuals engaged into geology].

    PubMed

    Zinenko; Petrichenko, S I; Miroshnikov, M P; Dasaeva, L A; Vermel', A E

    2005-01-01

    The authors studied influence of work and living conditions on geologists' health state. A cohort under study demonstrated paradoxical epidemiologic situation with high mortality risk of arterial hypertension, whereas prevalence of this disease among specialists working on expeditionary shifted mode is nearly equal to that among general population. Unfavorable situation concerning cardiovascular diseases could be caused by high prevalence of cardiovascular risks and some occupational hazards. The situation is deteriorated by insufficient medical observation and psychologic traits of the specialists working on expeditionary shifted mode.

  14. Clinical management of Krabbe disease.

    PubMed

    Escolar, Maria L; West, Tara; Dallavecchia, Alessandra; Poe, Michele D; LaPoint, Kathleen

    2016-11-01

    Krabbe disease (KD) is a rare neurodegenerative disorder caused by mutations in the gene encoding the galactocerebrosidase enzyme. The early- and late-infantile subtypes, which are the most common forms of the disease, are rapidly progressive and lead to early death, whereas the later-onset types are clinically heterogeneous. The only disease-modifying treatment currently available is hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, which is effective only when performed early in the course of the disease. Because most patients with KD are diagnosed too late for treatment, primary care physicians are faced with the challenge of caring for a child with severe neurologic impairment. This Review describes presenting symptoms, diagnosis, and disease manifestations of KD and provides basic guidelines for its management. Symptomatic treatment and supportive care that address the unique requirements of these patients can greatly improve the quality of life of patients and their families. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Clinical management of Krabbe disease.

    PubMed

    Escolar, Maria L; West, Tara; Dallavecchia, Alessandra; Poe, Michele D; LaPoint, Kathleen

    2016-11-01

    Krabbe disease (KD) is a rare neurodegenerative disorder caused by mutations in the gene encoding the galactocerebrosidase enzyme. The early- and late-infantile subtypes, which are the most common forms of the disease, are rapidly progressive and lead to early death, whereas the later-onset types are clinically heterogeneous. The only disease-modifying treatment currently available is hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, which is effective only when performed early in the course of the disease. Because most patients with KD are diagnosed too late for treatment, primary care physicians are faced with the challenge of caring for a child with severe neurologic impairment. This Review describes presenting symptoms, diagnosis, and disease manifestations of KD and provides basic guidelines for its management. Symptomatic treatment and supportive care that address the unique requirements of these patients can greatly improve the quality of life of patients and their families. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27638597

  16. [Clinical symptoms of Alzheimer disease].

    PubMed

    Tariska, P; Urbanics, K; Knolmayer, J; Mészáros, A

    1995-04-23

    Data of patients suffering from Alzheimer's disease and checked out in the special unit named Memory Clinic functioning from 1992 in the National Institute of Psychiatry and Neurology are summarized. Age average of the 60 patients was 63 years, the first symptoms of the disease had appeared in 57 p.c. before the age of 65, so the classical presenile form of the ailment is represented too in the material. Predominance of multifocal cortical function disturbances in the symptomatology is characteristic, association of the depression is outstandingly frequent. The atypical features, or those characteristic in diseases of cerebrovascular origin are not infrequently seen (headache, dizziness, slight symptoms of pyramidal lesions). The absence of epileptic seizures It was interesting even in considering the data of the literature too. The main points of clinical diagnostics and differential diagnostics are demonstrated with the aid of case reports. The author's material is the first Hungarian publication in the topics of clinical symptoms of patients suffering from Alzheimer's disease that had been investigated with up-to-date methods. Occurrence of the disease of very great frequency could be supposed to occur at general practitioners, the importance of differential diagnostics and planning of the complex longlasting therapy is extremely great.

  17. Increased prevalence of regurgitant valvular heart disease in acromegaly.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Alberto M; van Thiel, Sjoerd W; Lindner, Jonathan R; Roelfsema, Ferdinand; van der Wall, Ernst E; Morreau, Hans; Smit, Jan W A; Romijn, Johannes A; Bax, Jeroen J

    2004-01-01

    Cardiac involvement is common in acromegaly, but the prevalence of valvular abnormalities in patients with acromegaly has not been documented and is the topic of this study. In a prospective study design, 40 consecutive patients with acromegaly and 120 control subjects (matched for age, sex, hypertension, and left ventricular systolic function) were studied. All patients and controls were evaluated using conventional two-dimensional and Doppler echocardiography. Significant valve disease was more prevalent in acromegalics compared with controls (22% vs. 6.7%, respectively; P = 0.005). Aortic valve regurgitation (>/=>trace severity) was present in 30% of patients vs. 7% of controls (P < 0.001), and mitral regurgitation (>/=moderate severity) was absent in controls but present in 5% of acromegalics (P = 0.014 vs. controls). Binary logistic regression analysis showed a significant impact only for disease duration on valvular disease, with an odds ratio of 1.19 (95% confidence interval, 1.028-1.376; P = 0.019). Acromegaly is associated with an increased prevalence of regurgitant valvular heart disease. This is dependent on the duration of exposure to increased GH concentrations, with a 19% increase in odds per year. This increased prevalence of occult valvular disease indicates that these patients require appropriate follow-up care and monitoring, especially patients with inadequate control of GH overproduction.

  18. Prevalence and clinical correlates of explosive outbursts in Tourette syndrome.

    PubMed

    Chen, Kevin; Budman, Cathy L; Diego Herrera, Luis; Witkin, Joanna E; Weiss, Nicholas T; Lowe, Thomas L; Freimer, Nelson B; Reus, Victor I; Mathews, Carol A

    2013-02-28

    The aim of this study was to examine the prevalence and clinical correlates of explosive outbursts in two large samples of individuals with Tourette syndrome (TS), including one collected primarily from non-clinical sources. Participants included 218 TS-affected individuals who were part of a genetic study (N=104 from Costa Rica (CR) and N=114 from the US). The relationships between explosive outbursts and comorbid attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), tic severity, and prenatal and perinatal complications were examined using regression analyses. Twenty percent of participants had explosive outbursts, with no significant differences in prevalence between the CR (non-clinical) and the US (primarily clinical) samples. In the overall sample, ADHD, greater tic severity, and lower age of tic onset were strongly associated with explosive outbursts. ADHD, prenatal exposure to tobacco, and male gender were significantly associated with explosive outbursts in the US sample. Lower age of onset and greater severity of tics were significantly associated with explosive outbursts in the CR sample. This study confirms previous studies that suggest that clinically significant explosive outbursts are common in TS and associated with ADHD and tic severity. An additional potential risk factor, prenatal exposure to tobacco, was also identified.

  19. Parkinson's Disease Prevalence and Proximity to Agricultural Cultivated Fields.

    PubMed

    Yitshak Sade, Maayan; Zlotnik, Yair; Kloog, Itai; Novack, Victor; Peretz, Chava; Ifergane, Gal

    2015-01-01

    The risk for developing Parkinson's disease (PD) is a combination of multiple environmental and genetic factors. The Negev (Southern Israel) contains approximately 252.5 km(2) of agricultural cultivated fields (ACF). We aimed to estimate the prevalence and incidence of PD and to examine possible geographical clustering and associations with agricultural exposures. We screened all "Clalit" Health Services members in the Negev (70% of the population) between the years 2000 and 2012. Individual demographic, clinical, and medication prescription data were available. We used a refined medication tracer algorithm to identify PD patients. We used mixed Poisson models to calculate the smoothed standardized incidence rates (SIRs) for each locality. We identified ACF and calculate the size and distance of the fields from each locality. We identified 3,792 cases of PD. SIRs were higher than expected in Jewish rural localities (median SIR [95% CI]: 1.41 [1.28; 1.53] in 2001-2004, 1.62 [1.48; 1.76] in 2005-2008, and 1.57 [1.44; 1.80] in 2009-2012). Highest SIR was observed in localities located in proximity to large ACF (SIR 1.54, 95% CI 1.32; 1.79). In conclusion, in this population based study we found that PD SIRs were higher than expected in rural localities. Furthermore, it appears that proximity to ACF and the field size contribute to PD risk.

  20. The Radiological Prevalence of Incidental Kienböck Disease

    PubMed Central

    Golay, Saroj K.; Rust, Philippa; Ring, David

    2016-01-01

    Background: To determine the prevalence of incidental Kienböck disease. Methods: A retrospective analysis of 150,912 radiological reports or images obtained over a five year period was performed of 76,174 patients who underwent a radiograph or computed tomography scan which included the wrist, in Edinburgh and Lothian, UK. Results: There were 5 cases of incidental Kienböck disease and 13 cases of symptomatic Kienböck disease. There were no significant differences in age, sex, ethnicity, comorbidities, smoking status, excess alcohol use or Lichtman stage between the incidental and symptomatic Kienböck groups. Conclusion: The radiological prevalence of incidental Kienböck disease was 0.0066% or 7 in 100,000 patients. PMID:27517065

  1. Prevalence of Celiac Disease in Turkish Children with Idiopathic Epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Işikay, Sedat; Hizli, Şamil; Yilmaz, Kutluhan

    2014-01-01

    Objective: This study has examined the prevalence of celiac disease in Turkish children with idiopathic epilepsy. Methods: Children with idiopathic epilepsy were screened for celiac disease using the IgA anti-tissue transglutaminase antibody and compared with the healthy control group in order to find the association of celiac disease (CD) with idiopathic epilepsy. Upper gastrointestinal endoscopy and small intestinal biopsies were offered to all antibody-positive patients. Findings : A total of 214 children with the diagnosis of idiopathic epilepsy and 166 healthy children as control group were studied. Of the patients recruited, 55.1% had generalized epilepsy, and 44.9% had partial epilepsy. In 33 patients with partial epilepsy, electroclinical features were consistent with a diagnosis of childhood partial epilepsy with occipital paroxysms (CPEO). Two of 33 patients with CPEO had positive IgA anti-tissue transglutaminase antibodies in serology. Pathological examination of small intestinal biopsy specimens showed total villous atrophy in both of them. The prevalence of celiac disease among children with idiopathic epilepsy and CPEO was 0.9% and 6%, respectively. Conclusion: The results of the present study revealed that prevalence of CD is increased in children with epilepsy. On the other hand, as high as 6% prevalence of CD among patients with CPEO found in this study should be kept in mind and the clinicians should be aware of this association. PMID:25562021

  2. Prevalence of comorbidities according to predominant phenotype and severity of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    PubMed Central

    Camiciottoli, Gianna; Bigazzi, Francesca; Magni, Chiara; Bonti, Viola; Diciotti, Stefano; Bartolucci, Maurizio; Mascalchi, Mario; Pistolesi, Massimo

    2016-01-01

    Background In addition to lung involvement, several other diseases and syndromes coexist in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Our purpose was to investigate the prevalence of idiopathic arterial hypertension (IAH), ischemic heart disease, heart failure, peripheral vascular disease (PVD), diabetes, osteoporosis, and anxious depressive syndrome in a clinical setting of COPD outpatients whose phenotypes (predominant airway disease and predominant emphysema) and severity (mild and severe diseases) were determined by clinical and functional parameters. Methods A total of 412 outpatients with COPD were assigned either a predominant airway disease or a predominant emphysema phenotype of mild or severe degree according to predictive models based on pulmonary functions (forced expiratory volume in 1 second/vital capacity; total lung capacity %; functional residual capacity %; and diffusing capacity of lung for carbon monoxide %) and sputum characteristics. Comorbidities were assessed by objective medical records. Results Eighty-four percent of patients suffered from at least one comorbidity and 75% from at least one cardiovascular comorbidity, with IAH and PVD being the most prevalent ones (62% and 28%, respectively). IAH prevailed significantly in predominant airway disease, osteoporosis prevailed significantly in predominant emphysema, and ischemic heart disease and PVD prevailed in mild COPD. All cardiovascular comorbidities prevailed significantly in predominant airway phenotype of COPD and mild COPD severity. Conclusion Specific comorbidities prevail in different phenotypes of COPD; this fact may be relevant to identify patients at risk for specific, phenotype-related comorbidities. The highest prevalence of comorbidities in patients with mild disease indicates that these patients should be investigated for coexisting diseases or syndromes even in the less severe, pauci-symptomatic stages of COPD. The simple method employed to phenotype and

  3. Prevalence of comorbidities according to predominant phenotype and severity of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    PubMed Central

    Camiciottoli, Gianna; Bigazzi, Francesca; Magni, Chiara; Bonti, Viola; Diciotti, Stefano; Bartolucci, Maurizio; Mascalchi, Mario; Pistolesi, Massimo

    2016-01-01

    Background In addition to lung involvement, several other diseases and syndromes coexist in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Our purpose was to investigate the prevalence of idiopathic arterial hypertension (IAH), ischemic heart disease, heart failure, peripheral vascular disease (PVD), diabetes, osteoporosis, and anxious depressive syndrome in a clinical setting of COPD outpatients whose phenotypes (predominant airway disease and predominant emphysema) and severity (mild and severe diseases) were determined by clinical and functional parameters. Methods A total of 412 outpatients with COPD were assigned either a predominant airway disease or a predominant emphysema phenotype of mild or severe degree according to predictive models based on pulmonary functions (forced expiratory volume in 1 second/vital capacity; total lung capacity %; functional residual capacity %; and diffusing capacity of lung for carbon monoxide %) and sputum characteristics. Comorbidities were assessed by objective medical records. Results Eighty-four percent of patients suffered from at least one comorbidity and 75% from at least one cardiovascular comorbidity, with IAH and PVD being the most prevalent ones (62% and 28%, respectively). IAH prevailed significantly in predominant airway disease, osteoporosis prevailed significantly in predominant emphysema, and ischemic heart disease and PVD prevailed in mild COPD. All cardiovascular comorbidities prevailed significantly in predominant airway phenotype of COPD and mild COPD severity. Conclusion Specific comorbidities prevail in different phenotypes of COPD; this fact may be relevant to identify patients at risk for specific, phenotype-related comorbidities. The highest prevalence of comorbidities in patients with mild disease indicates that these patients should be investigated for coexisting diseases or syndromes even in the less severe, pauci-symptomatic stages of COPD. The simple method employed to phenotype and

  4. 76 FR 63355 - Proposed Information Collection (Prevalence and Clinical course of Depression Among patients with...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-12

    ... AFFAIRS Proposed Information Collection (Prevalence and Clinical course of Depression Among patients with... depression in heart failure patients. DATES: Written comments and recommendations on the proposed collection... information technology. Title: Prevalence and Clinical Course of Depression Among Patients with Heart...

  5. Prevalence and Clinical Characteristics of Intracerebral Hemorrhages Associated with Clopidogrel

    PubMed Central

    Cordina, Steve M; Hassan, Ameer E; Ezzeddine, Mustapha A.

    2009-01-01

    Background: As clopidogrel is being increasingly used, intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) associated with clopidogrel are expected to increase. We assessed the prevalence and clinical characteristics of of ICH with clopidogrel in a consecutive series of patients in two hospitals. Methods: We retrospectively reviewed the medication history of 204 patients (112 in one hospital and 92 in another – both individually consecutive) admitted with ICH. We identified the patients who were using clopidogrel prior to ICH occurrence. The etiology of the ICH was categorized on the basis of clinical history and diagnostic imaging, and outcome was subsequently evaluated. Results: A total of 8 (4%) of the 204 patients were using clopidogrel prior to onset of ICH. Clopidogrel was the only medication in 3 patients and was used with aspirin or warfarin in 3 and 2 patients, respectively. Aspirin or warfarin was the only medication in 23 (%) and 14 (%) patients associated with ICH, respectively. The hematoma was located in the basal ganglia (n=2), lobes (n=2), thalamus (n=1), intraventricular (n=2), and cerebellar (n=2). One patient had secondary intraventricular extension. All patients using a combination of clopidogrel and warfarin prior to ICH died. Conclusion: The prevalence of ICH associated with clopidogrel is approximating the prevalence of aspirin- or warfarin-associated ICH. The mortality with clopidogrel related ICH appears to be high particularly when in combination with another antithrombotic agent. PMID:22518241

  6. Infectious Diseases (ID) Learning Unit: How Rapidly to Evaluate for Active Tuberculosis Disease in Low-Prevalence Settings

    PubMed Central

    Chida, Natasha; Shah, Maunank

    2016-01-01

    With declining tuberculosis (TB) incidence in low-prevalence settings, many clinicians are likely unaware that the approach to diagnosing active TB is evolving with newer technologies. Rapid molecular assays are commercially available, and more are likely to enter the market in the coming years. These tests, such as the Xpert MTB/RIF, which can detect TB and drug-resistance in 2 hours, are increasingly used in settings with higher TB prevalence; however, uptake has been slower in low-prevalence settings. Newer algorithms incorporating rapid TB diagnostics have the ability to alter current clinical and infection control practice patterns. In this learning unit, we review current and newly available tests for the detection of active TB disease and their usage in low-prevalence settings. PMID:27186583

  7. Variations in Incidence and Prevalence of Parkinson's Disease in Taiwan: A Population-Based Nationwide Study

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Chih-Ching; Li, Chung-Yi; Lee, Pei-Chen; Sun, Yu

    2016-01-01

    Demographic, socioeconomic, and urbanization level variations in Parkinson's disease (PD) are rarely investigated, especially in Asia. This study describes an eight-year trend in PD incidence and prevalence in Taiwan as well as assessing the effects of sociodemographics and urbanization on the incidence and prevalence of PD. The data analyzed were acquired from the Taiwan National Health Insurance Research Database (NHIRD) entries between 2002 and 2009. The calendar year, sex, and age-specific rates were standardized, and the effects of the sociodemographics and urbanization on PD were assessed using Poisson regression analysis. PD incidence and prevalence showed a significantly increasing trend, with a greater magnitude noted for prevalence than for incidence (87.3% versus 9.2%). The PD incidence and prevalence increased with age and were slightly higher in men than in women. The people who were not under the labor force (i.e., dependents) or with lower monthly incomes were at significantly increased adjusted incidence rate ratio (1.50–1.56) and adjusted prevalence rate ratio (1.66–1.71) of PD. Moreover, significantly higher PD incidence and prevalence were noted in areas with lesser urbanization. This information emphasizes the need for preventive and clinical care strategies targeting the segment of Taiwanese population that exhibited a greater incidence and prevalence of PD. PMID:26904358

  8. Cataract and Cataract Surgery: Nationwide Prevalence and Clinical Determinants

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the prevalence and clinical determinants of cataract and cataract surgery in Korean population. The 2008–2012 Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey was analyzed, which included 20,419 participants aged ≥ 40 years. The survey is a multistage, probability-cluster survey, which can produce nationally representative estimates. Prevalence of cataract and cataract surgery was estimated. Clinical determinants for those were investigated using logistic regression analyses (LRAs). The prevalence of cataract was 42.28% (95% confidence interval [CI], 40.67–43.89); 40.82% (95% CI, 38.97–42.66) for men and 43.62% (95% CI, 41.91–45.33) for women (P = 0.606). The prevalence of cataract surgery was 7.75% (95% CI, 7.30–8.20); 6.38% (95% CI, 5.80–6.96) for men and 9.01% (95% CI, 8.41–9.61) for women (P < 0.001). Cataract was associated with older age (P < 0.001), men (P = 0.032), lower household income (P = 0.031), lower education (P < 0.001), hypertension (P < 0.001), and diabetes mellitus (DM) (P < 0.001). Cataract surgery was consistently associated with older age, occupation, DM, asthma, and anemia in two LRAs, which compared participants with cataract surgery to those without cataract surgery and those having a cataract but without any cataract surgery, respectively. Hypertension, arthritis, and dyslipidemia were associated with cataract surgery at least in one of these LRAs. These results suggest that there are 9.4 million individuals with cataract and 1.7 million individuals with cataract surgery in Korea. Further studies are warranted to reveal the causality and its possible mechanism of developing/exacerbating cataract in novel determinants (i.e., anemia, asthma, and arthritic conditions) as well as well-known determinants. PMID:27247507

  9. 76 FR 78740 - Agency Information Collection (Prevalence and Clinical Course of Depression Among Patients With...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-19

    ... AFFAIRS Agency Information Collection (Prevalence and Clinical Course of Depression Among Patients With... Control No. 2900- 0719.'' SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Titles: Prevalence and Clinical Course of Depression.... Abstracts: The data collected will be used to evaluate the prevalence of clinical depression and...

  10. Higher Prevalence of Sexual Transmitted Diseases and Correlates of Genital Warts among Heterosexual Males Attending Sexually Transmitted Infection Clinics (MSCs) in Jiangmen, China: Implication for the Up-Taking of STD Related Service

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Zhengjun; Lu, Hekun; Tan, Xueling; Zhang, Baoyuan; Best, John; Yang, Ligang; Zheng, Heping; Jiang, Ning; Yin, Yueping; Yang, Bin; Chen, Xiangsheng

    2015-01-01

    Background Increasing burden of STDs is one of China’s major public health concerns. However, only a limited number of studies have ever investigated the prevalence of these STDs, particular for genital warts and its correlates among heterosexual males attending STD clinics in China. In order to fill this gap, we conducted a cross-sectional study among MSCs in Jiangmen, China, between the years of 2009 and 2010. Method The eligible participants were recruited from several STD-clinics in public hospitals. We collected demographic information and behaviors of the participants. After HIV and syphilis testing, we further checked whether the participants had genital warts and genital herpes. In addition, urine samples were collected from part of the participants for CT and NG testing. Results Of the 533 eligible participants, over three-fifths were aged 35 or below, nearly three quarters had no college degree, over three-fifths were residence of Jiangmen. The prevalence of HIV, syphilis, genital warts, genital herpes, CT and NG were 0.19%, 7.50%, 7.32%, 5.25%, 9.73% and 6.19%, respectively. Living with family members (versus living alone), no STD-related service in past year, experiencing STDs related symptoms in past year, and sex with FSWs in last three months were positively associated with genital warts, with adjusted ORs of 5.54 (95% CI 1.94–15.81), 2.26 (95% CI 1.08–4.74), 1.99 (95% CI 1.00–3.99) and 2.01 (95% CI 1.00–4.04), respectively. Conclusion Our study indicates that the prevalence of STDs among MSCs in Jiangmen was high, which may further spread HIV among MSCs. Targeted interventions that focused on STDs related services uptake should be implemented urgently. PMID:25811185

  11. Prevalence, Clinical Presentation, and Differential Diagnosis of Pediatric Bipolar Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Goldstein, Benjamin I.; Birmaher, Boris

    2016-01-01

    Background Over the past 20 years, the evidence regarding pediatric bipolar disorder (BP) has increased substantially. As a result, recent concerns have focused primarily on prevalence and differential diagnosis. Method Selective review of the literature. Results BP as defined by rigorously applying diagnostic criteria has been observed among children and especially adolescents in numerous countries. In contrast to increasing diagnoses in clinical settings, prevalence in epidemiologic studies has not recently changed. BP-spectrum conditions among youth are highly impairing and confer high risk for conversion to BP-I and BP-II. Compared to adults, youth with BP have more mixed symptoms, more changes in mood polarity, are more often symptomatic and seem to have worse prognosis. The course, clinical characteristics, and comorbidities of BP among children and adolescents are in many ways otherwise similar to those of adults with BP. Nonetheless, many youth with BP receive no treatment and most do not receive BP-specific treatment. Conclusion Despite increased evidence supporting the validity of pediatric BP, discrepancies between clinical and epidemiologic findings suggest that diagnostic misapplication may be common. Simultaneously, low rates of treatment of youth with BP suggest that withholding of BP diagnoses may also be common. Clinicians should apply diagnostic criteria rigorously in order to optimize diagnostic accuracy and ensure appropriate treatment. PMID:22652925

  12. [Comparison and outcome of prevalence of concurrent diseases in patients with urological malignant diseases].

    PubMed

    Yoshinaga, Atsushi; Hayashi, Tetsuo; Yoshida, Soichiro; Ohno, Rena; Ishii, Nobuyuki; Terao, Toshiya; Watanabe, Toru; Yamada, Takumi

    2006-07-01

    We compared the prevalence of concurrent diseases (diabetes mellitus, hypertension, ischemic heart diseases and apoplexy) in patients with renal cell carcinoma, bladder carcinoma and prostatic carcinoma diagnosed in our department with that in all patients in our department analyzed using Mantel-Haenszel regression. In hypertension, there was a significantly high prevalence of patients with renal cell carcinoma (p < 0.05) in males and females, and prostatic carcinoma (p < 0.05). In diabetis mellitus, ischemic heart diseases and apoplexy, no apparent characteristic of prevalence was recognized. The close relationship between renal cell carcinoma, prostatic carcinoma and hypertension in this study corresponded with previous reports.

  13. Prevalence and correlates of vitamin K deficiency in children with inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed

    Nowak, Jan K; Grzybowska-Chlebowczyk, Urszula; Landowski, Piotr; Szaflarska-Poplawska, Anna; Klincewicz, Beata; Adamczak, Daria; Banasiewicz, Tomasz; Plawski, Andrzej; Walkowiak, Jaroslaw

    2014-01-01

    Although vitamin K deficiency has been implicated in adult inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), its prevalence in pediatric IBD remains unknown. We carried out a cross-sectional study in 63 children with Crohn's disease (CD) and 48 with ulcerative colitis (UC) to assess the prevalence of vitamin K deficiency and to search for potential correlation between vitamin K status and pediatric IBD activity. Vitamin K status was assessed using protein induced by vitamin K absence-II (PIVKA-II; ELISA). Prevalence of vitamin K deficiency was 54.0% in CD and 43.7% in UC. Vitamin K deficiency was more common in patients with higher CD activity, in CD patients with higher mass Z-scores, and less common among children with CD treated with infliximab. Relation of vitamin K deficiency to pediatric IBD clinical course and treatment demand further research. PMID:24759680

  14. Prevalence and correlates of vitamin K deficiency in children with inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed

    Nowak, Jan K; Grzybowska-Chlebowczyk, Urszula; Landowski, Piotr; Szaflarska-Poplawska, Anna; Klincewicz, Beata; Adamczak, Daria; Banasiewicz, Tomasz; Plawski, Andrzej; Walkowiak, Jaroslaw

    2014-04-24

    Although vitamin K deficiency has been implicated in adult inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), its prevalence in pediatric IBD remains unknown. We carried out a cross-sectional study in 63 children with Crohn's disease (CD) and 48 with ulcerative colitis (UC) to assess the prevalence of vitamin K deficiency and to search for potential correlation between vitamin K status and pediatric IBD activity. Vitamin K status was assessed using protein induced by vitamin K absence-II (PIVKA-II; ELISA). Prevalence of vitamin K deficiency was 54.0% in CD and 43.7% in UC. Vitamin K deficiency was more common in patients with higher CD activity, in CD patients with higher mass Z-scores, and less common among children with CD treated with infliximab. Relation of vitamin K deficiency to pediatric IBD clinical course and treatment demand further research.

  15. CT of chronic infiltrative lung disease: Prevalence of mediastinal lymphadenopathy

    SciTech Connect

    Niimi, Hiroshi; Kang, Eun-Young; Kwong, S.

    1996-03-01

    Our goal was to determine the prevalence of mediastinal lymph node enlargement at CT in patients with diffuse infiltrative lung disease. The study was retrospective and included 175 consecutive patients with diffuse infiltrative lung diseases. Diagnoses included idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) (n = 61), usual interstitial pneumonia associated with collagen vascular disease (CVD) (n = 20), idiopathic bronchiolitis obliterans organizing pneumonia (BOOP) (n = 22), extrinsic allergic alveolitis (EAA) (n = 17), and sarcoidosis (n = 55). Fifty-eight age-matched patients with CT of the chest performed for unrelated conditions served as controls. The presence, number, and sites of enlarged nodes (short axis {ge}10 mm in diameter) were recorded. Enlarged mediastinal nodes were present in 118 of 175 patients (67%) with infiltrative lung disease and 3 of 58 controls (5%) (p < 0.001). The prevalence of enlarged nodes was 84% (46 of 55) in sarcoidosis, 67% (41 of 61) in IPF, 70% (14 of 20) in CVD, 53% (9 of 17) in EAA, and 36% (8 of 22) in BOOP. The mean number of enlarged nodes was higher in sarcoidosis (mean 3.2) than in the other infiltrative diseases (mean 1.2) (p < 0.001). Enlarged nodes were most commonly present in station 10R, followed by 7, 4R, and 5. Patients with infiltrative lung disease frequently have enlarged mediastinal lymph nodes. However, in diseases other than sarcoid, usually only one or two nodes are enlarged and their maximal short axis diameter is <15 mm. 11 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  16. Clinical manifestations and management of Gaucher disease

    PubMed Central

    Linari, Silvia; Castaman, Giancarlo

    2015-01-01

    Summary Gaucher disease is a rare multi-systemic metabolic disorder caused by the inherited deficiency of the lysosomal enzyme β-glucocerebrosidase, which leads to the accumulation of its normal substrate, glucocerebroside, in tissue macrophages with damage to haematological, visceral and bone systems. Anaemia, thrombocytopenia, enlargement of liver and/or spleen, skeletal abnormalities (osteopenia, lytic lesions, pathological fractures, chronic bone pain, bone crisis, bone infarcts, osteonecrosis and skeletal deformities) are typical manifestations of the most prevalent form of the disease, the so-called non-neuronopathic type 1. However, severity and coexistence of different symptoms are highly variable. The determination of deficient β-glucocerebrosidase activity in leukocytes or fibroblasts by enzymatic assay is the gold standard for the diagnosis of Gaucher disease. Comprehensive and reproducible evaluation and monitoring of all clinically relevant aspects are fundamental for the effective management of Gaucher disease patients. Enzyme replacement therapy has been shown to be effective in reducing glucocerebroside storage burden and diminishing the deleterious effects caused by its accumulation. Tailored treatment plan for each patient should be directed to symptom relief, general improvement of quality of life, and prevention of irreversible damage. PMID:26604942

  17. The Prevalence of Metabolic Syndrome In Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease: A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Cebron Lipovec, Nanca; Beijers, Rosanne J H C G; van den Borst, Bram; Doehner, Wolfram; Lainscak, Mitja; Schols, Annemie M W J

    2016-06-01

    Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus (T2DM) and cardiovascular diseases (CVD) are common in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Prevention of these co-morbidities in COPD requires knowledge on their risk factors. Metabolic syndrome (MetS) predisposes to the development of T2DM and CVD but its prevalence in COPD remains unclear. The aim of this review was to assess the prevalence of MetS and its components in COPD patients compared to controls and to investigate the contribution of clinical characteristics to MetS prevalence. We systematically searched PubMed and EMBASE for original studies in COPD that have investigated the prevalence of MetS and its components. In total, 19 studies involving 4208 COPD patients were included. The pooled MetS prevalence was 34%. Compared to controls, the prevalence was higher in COPD (10 studies, 32% and 30%, p = 0.001). The three most prevalent components in both COPD and controls were arterial hypertension (56% and 51%), abdominal obesity (39% and 38%) and hyperglycemia (44% and 47%). Compared to COPD patients without MetS, those with MetS had higher body mass index (BMI) (29.9 and 24.6 kg/m(2), p < 0.001), higher forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1) % predicted (54 and 51, p < 0.001) and were more frequently female (31% and 25%, p = 0.011). In conclusion, the prevalence of MetS in COPD patients is high and hypertension, abdominal obesity and hyperglycemia are the most prevalent components. Further studies are needed to evaluate the impact of lifestyle factors and medications on MetS in COPD. PMID:26914392

  18. Prevalence of sexually transmitted diseases in female athletes in São Paulo, Brazil

    PubMed Central

    de Araujo, Maíta Poli; Kleine, Henrique Truffa; Parmigiano, Tathiana Rebizzi; Gomes, Natalia Tavares; Caparroz, Graziela Pascom; da Silva, Ismael Dale Cotrim Guerreiro; Girão, Manoel João Batista Castello; Sartori, Marair Gracio Ferreira

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: To determine the prevalence of sexually transmitted diseases in female athletes. Methods: An observational, cross-sectional study was conducted including 50 female athletes with mean age of 20±3 years. Colposcopy, pap smear, and polymerase chain reaction for Chlamydia trachomatis, human papillomavirus and Neisseria gonorrhoeae were performed. Blood samples were collected to test for the human immunodeficiency virus, syphilis, hepatitis B and C. The athletes presenting clinical diseases or conditions identifiable by laboratory tests were treated and followed up in the unit. Results: Forty-six percent of the participants were unaware of sexually transmitted diseases. The prevalence of sexually transmitted diseases among athletes was 48% (24 cases). Human papillomavirus was the most frequent agent (44%). Considering the human papillomavirus genotypes, subtype 16 was the most prevalent (53%), followed by 11-6 (22%) and 18 (13%). Two athletes tested positive for C. trachomatis. There were no cases diagnosed of infection by N. gonorrhoeae, syphilis, hepatitis B, hepatitis C and human immunodeficiency virus. However, only 26 athletes had been vaccinated for hepatitis B. Conclusion: The prevalence of sexually transmitted diseases in female athletes was high. Primary prevention measures (hepatitis B and human papillomavirus vaccination) and secondary (serology, pap smears) must be offered to this specific group of women. The matter should be further approached in sports. PMID:24728243

  19. High prevalence of celiac disease in Italian general population.

    PubMed

    Volta, U; Bellentani, S; Bianchi, F B; Brandi, G; De Franceschi, L; Miglioli, L; Granito, A; Balli, F; Tiribelli, C

    2001-07-01

    The worldwide increase of celiac disease prompted us to assess its prevalence in the Italian general population. The 3483 inhabitants of Campogalliano were tested for immunoglobulin A anti-endomysial antibodies. Twenty subjects showed antibody positivity and duodenal biopsy detected typical mucosal lesions of celiac disease in 17 of them; the remaining three cases had a normal villous architecture, but the finding of increased gamma/delta intraepithelial lymphocytes in all and the heterodimer DQA1*0501, DQB1*0201 in two of them was consistent with potential celiac disease. Only one patient had an overt malabsorption syndrome, characterized by diarrhea, weight loss, and severe weakness. In eight subjects atypical symptoms of celiac disease, such as dyspepsia and depression, were present, whereas the remaining subjects were silent. Celiac disease was more frequent in younger age groups. Our cross-sectional design study demonstrates that celiac disease prevalence in the Italian general population is 4.9 per 1000 (95% CI 2.8-7.8), increasing up to 5.7 per 1000 (95% CI 3.5-8.8) with the inclusion of potential cases. PMID:11478502

  20. Incidence and prevalence of pregnancy-related heart disease.

    PubMed

    Sliwa, Karen; Böhm, Michael

    2014-03-15

    Worldwide, the numbers of women who have a pre-existing cardiovascular disease or develop cardiac problems during pregnancy are increasing and, due to the lack of evidenced-based data, this provides challenges for the treating physician. Cardiovascular disease in pregnancy is a complex topic as women can present either pre- or post-partum, due to a pre-existing heart disease such as operated on or unoperated on congenital heart disease, valvular heart disease, chronic hypertension, or familial dilated cardiomyopathy. Women often present with symptoms and signs of acute heart failure. On the other hand, there are diseases which are directly related to pregnancy, such as hypertensive disorders of pregnancy and peripartum cardiomyopathy, or where pregnancy increases risk of a disease as, for example, the risk of myocardial infarction. These diseases can have long-term implications to the life of the affected women and their families. There is, in particular, a paucity of data from developing countries of this unique disease pattern and its presentations. This review summarizes the current knowledge of the incidence and prevalence of pregnancy-related cardiovascular disease in women presenting pre- or post-partum.

  1. Prevalence and Risk Factors for Thyroid Eye Disease among Korean Dysthyroid Patients

    PubMed Central

    Woo, Kyung In; Kim, Yoon-Duck

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To determine the prevalence of thyroid eye disease among dysthyroid Korean patients and to analyze the relationship between demographic data, lifestyle risk factors, and status of thyroid disease and thyroid eye disease. Methods All dysthyroid patients who visited endocrinology clinics in 24 general hospitals in Korea during a chosen one-week period were enrolled in this cross-sectional study. Data were collected during an interviewer-administered questionnaire and chart review. Demographic data, lifestyle risk factors, and status of thyroid disease variables were analyzed as risk factors using multivariable regression models to identify independent associations with thyroid eye disease. Results A total of 1,632 dysthyroid patients were included (1,301 females [79.7%] and 331 males [20.3%]). Two hundred eighty-three of these patients (17.3%) had thyroid eye disease. Multiple logistic regression analyses revealed that female gender, young age, Graves' disease, dermopathy, anti-thyroid medication treatment, and radioiodine treatment were independent risk factors for thyroid eye disease. Conclusions The lower prevalence of thyroid eye disease in dysthyroid Korean patients and the influence of gender on risk factors in this study are novel findings compared to studies performed involving Europeans. Although the risk factors for thyroid eye disease are understood in part, a more in-depth comparative study of gender and ethnic groups is needed to fully understand the biological significance of the demographic factors. PMID:24311923

  2. Moyamoya Disease: Epidemiology, Clinical Features, and Diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jong S.

    2016-01-01

    Moyamoya disease (MMD) is a chronic, occlusive cerebrovascular disease characterized by progressive stenosis at the terminal portion of the internal carotid artery and an abnormal vascular network at the base of the brain. Although its etiology remains unknown, recent genetic studies identified RNF213 in the 17q25-ter region as an important susceptibility gene of MMD among East Asian populations. Possibly because of genetic differences, MMD is relatively common in people living in East Asian countries such as Korea and Japan, compared to those in the Western Hemisphere. The prevalence of MMD appears to be slightly lower among Chinese, compared to Koreans or Japanese. There are two peaks of incidence with different clinical presentations, at around 10 years and 30-40 years. The peak appears to occur later in women than men. In children, ischemic symptoms, especially transient ischemic attacks, are predominant. Intellectual decline, seizures, and involuntary movements are also more common in this age group. In contrast, adult patients present with intracranial hemorrhage more often than pediatric patients. In patients with MMD, intracerebral hemorrhage is more often accompanied by intraventricular hemorrhage than in patients with hypertensive intracerebral hemorrhage. These different age peaks and different clinical presentations in each age group are also observed in MMD patients in the USA. Catheter angiography is the diagnostic method of choice. Magnetic resonance (MR) angiography and computed tomographic angiography are noninvasive diagnostic methods. High-resolution vessel wall MR imaging also helps diagnose MMD by revealing concentric vessel wall narrowing with basal collaterals. PMID:26846755

  3. Disparities in periodontitis prevalence among chronic kidney disease patients.

    PubMed

    Ioannidou, E; Swede, H

    2011-06-01

    Because of adverse effects of uremia in the innate and adaptive immune systems, we hypothesized that chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients would have higher prevalence of moderate periodontitis compared with individuals without CKD. We examined this hypothesis using the NHANES III dataset, including 12,081 adults stratified by Race-Ethnicity. We followed the American Academy of Periodontology/Centers for Disease Control and Prevention definition for moderate periodontitis. Estimated glomerular filtration rate (GFR) was calculated based on calibrated serum creatinine levels according to the Modification of Diet in Renal Disease Study formula. Analyses incorporated NHANES sampling weights. Overall, 14.6% of individuals with CKD were classified as having moderate periodontitis, compared with 8.7% in the non-CKD group (p = 0.001). A significant dose-response association (p = 0.001) was observed between prevalence of moderate periodontitis and CKD stages among non-Hispanic Blacks and Mexican-Americans, but not so for non-Hispanic Whites. Prevalence of periodontitis among participants with CKD was substantially higher among non-Hispanic Blacks (38.9%) and Mexican-Americans (37.3%) compared with non-Hispanic Whites (12.9%). Multivariate logistic regression models showed that Mexican-Americans and non-Hispanic Blacks with CKD were approximately 30% to 60% more likely to have moderate periodontitis compared with those without CKD, after adjustment for diabetes status and other potential confounders.

  4. The prevalence of periodontal diseases among adult population in Georgia.

    PubMed

    Tsitaishvili, L; Margvelashvili, M; Kalandadze, M; Margvelashvili, V

    2014-09-01

    The present research was conducted to estimate the prevalence of periodontal diseases in the adult population of Georgia, to study the peculiarity of their distribution within population in different regions of the country. The survey was carried out based on cluster- stratified method derived by WHO. 2370 adults including 1289 women and 1081 men distributed in 4 age groups: I - 20-34, II - 35-44, III - 45-64, IV - 65+ the residents of the city, town and village in 9 regions of Georgia and the capital Tbilisi were examined. The assessment of periodontal status and oral hygiene was based on WHO-'s recommendation. (WHO 1997 '˜Oral Health Assessment Form') Examination was done under good natural light using a mouth mirror and a periodontal index (CPI) probe for measurements of periodontal pockets depth. Questionnaires comprised questions for revealing the following risk factors: social status and family income, existence of common diseases, people'S attitude towards oral hygiene(tooth brushing, using dental floss, mouth rinsing) acceptability of dental service, sugar consumption rate, tobacco use, consumption of dairy products. The reliable statistical data received from the study relieved high prevalence of periodontal diseases in all regions: in Achara - 71.7, Mtskheta-Mtianeti - 70.8%, Imereti - 64.9%, Qvemo Qartli - 61.6%, Tbilisi - 61.8% and Shida Qartli - 60.5%, Guria - 55.9%, Samtskhe-Javakheti - 56.0%, Kakheti - 59.1%, Samegrelo - 55.2%. Despite the variability of risk factors high prevalence of inflammatory periodontal diseases in regions of Georgia was related to more extent to the low educational medical background, less dental acceptability due to not very positive attitude towards dental service and oral hygiene skills though financial problems also played substantial role. The study confirmed that periodontal diseases represent an actual problem in Georgia and need caring out serious preventive measures to enhance peoples' referral to dental service and

  5. The prevalence of periodontal diseases among adult population in Georgia.

    PubMed

    Tsitaishvili, L; Margvelashvili, M; Kalandadze, M; Margvelashvili, V

    2014-09-01

    The present research was conducted to estimate the prevalence of periodontal diseases in the adult population of Georgia, to study the peculiarity of their distribution within population in different regions of the country. The survey was carried out based on cluster- stratified method derived by WHO. 2370 adults including 1289 women and 1081 men distributed in 4 age groups: I - 20-34, II - 35-44, III - 45-64, IV - 65+ the residents of the city, town and village in 9 regions of Georgia and the capital Tbilisi were examined. The assessment of periodontal status and oral hygiene was based on WHO-'s recommendation. (WHO 1997 '˜Oral Health Assessment Form') Examination was done under good natural light using a mouth mirror and a periodontal index (CPI) probe for measurements of periodontal pockets depth. Questionnaires comprised questions for revealing the following risk factors: social status and family income, existence of common diseases, people'S attitude towards oral hygiene(tooth brushing, using dental floss, mouth rinsing) acceptability of dental service, sugar consumption rate, tobacco use, consumption of dairy products. The reliable statistical data received from the study relieved high prevalence of periodontal diseases in all regions: in Achara - 71.7, Mtskheta-Mtianeti - 70.8%, Imereti - 64.9%, Qvemo Qartli - 61.6%, Tbilisi - 61.8% and Shida Qartli - 60.5%, Guria - 55.9%, Samtskhe-Javakheti - 56.0%, Kakheti - 59.1%, Samegrelo - 55.2%. Despite the variability of risk factors high prevalence of inflammatory periodontal diseases in regions of Georgia was related to more extent to the low educational medical background, less dental acceptability due to not very positive attitude towards dental service and oral hygiene skills though financial problems also played substantial role. The study confirmed that periodontal diseases represent an actual problem in Georgia and need caring out serious preventive measures to enhance peoples' referral to dental service and

  6. Perceived fatigue is highly prevalent and debilitating in patients with mitochondrial disease

    PubMed Central

    Gorman, Gráinne S.; Elson, Joanna L.; Newman, Jane; Payne, Brendan; McFarland, Robert; Newton, Julia L.; Turnbull, Douglass M.

    2015-01-01

    Perceived fatigue is a prominent symptom in patients with mitochondrial disease but to date its prevalence, impact and aetiology are poorly understood. Our aim was to determine the prevalence and assess for comorbidities associated with clinically relevant fatigue in patients with mitochondrial disease. A cross-sectional postal survey of patients with mitochondrial disease was undertaken using a validated self-completion, patient-reported outcome measures (response rate: 60%; n = 132). The prevalence and perceived functional impact of experienced fatigue were assessed using the Fatigue Impact Scale. Other putative biological mechanisms were evaluated using the Hospital Anxiety Depression scale and Epworth sleepiness scale. Data were compared with those for healthy control subjects and patients with Myalgic Encephalopathy/Chronic Fatigue Syndrome matched for age and gender. Sixty-two per cent of patients with mitochondrial disease reported excessive symptomatic fatigue (Fatigue Impact Scale ≥ 40); whilst 32% reported severe, functionally limiting fatigue symptoms (Fatigue Impact Scale ≥ 80) comparable to perceived fatigue in patients with Myalgic Encephalopathy/Chronic Fatigue Syndrome. Fatigue is common and often severe in patients with mitochondrial disease irrespective of age, gender or genotype. Future evaluation of causal factors in mitochondrial disease-associated fatigue is warranted with the potential to guide future treatment modalities. PMID:26031904

  7. High Prevalence and Clinical Relevance of Genes Affected by Chromosomal Breaks in Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    van den Broek, Evert; Dijkstra, Maurits J. J.; Krijgsman, Oscar; Sie, Daoud; Haan, Josien C.; Traets, Joleen J. H.; van de Wiel, Mark A.; Nagtegaal, Iris D.; Punt, Cornelis J. A.; Carvalho, Beatriz; Ylstra, Bauke; Abeln, Sanne; Meijer, Gerrit A.; Fijneman, Remond J. A.

    2015-01-01

    Background Cancer is caused by somatic DNA alterations such as gene point mutations, DNA copy number aberrations (CNA) and structural variants (SVs). Genome-wide analyses of SVs in large sample series with well-documented clinical information are still scarce. Consequently, the impact of SVs on carcinogenesis and patient outcome remains poorly understood. This study aimed to perform a systematic analysis of genes that are affected by CNA-associated chromosomal breaks in colorectal cancer (CRC) and to determine the clinical relevance of recurrent breakpoint genes. Methods Primary CRC samples of patients with metastatic disease from CAIRO and CAIRO2 clinical trials were previously characterized by array-comparative genomic hybridization. These data were now used to determine the prevalence of CNA-associated chromosomal breaks within genes across 352 CRC samples. In addition, mutation status of the commonly affected APC, TP53, KRAS, PIK3CA, FBXW7, SMAD4, BRAF and NRAS genes was determined for 204 CRC samples by targeted massive parallel sequencing. Clinical relevance was assessed upon stratification of patients based on gene mutations and gene breakpoints that were observed in >3% of CRC cases. Results In total, 748 genes were identified that were recurrently affected by chromosomal breaks (FDR <0.1). MACROD2 was affected in 41% of CRC samples and another 169 genes showed breakpoints in >3% of cases, indicating that prevalence of gene breakpoints is comparable to the prevalence of well-known gene point mutations. Patient stratification based on gene breakpoints and point mutations revealed one CRC subtype with very poor prognosis. Conclusions We conclude that CNA-associated chromosomal breaks within genes represent a highly prevalent and clinically relevant subset of SVs in CRC. PMID:26375816

  8. Gastroesophageal reflux disease: clinical features.

    PubMed

    Pettit, Michael

    2005-12-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is a chronic disease affecting up to 40% of people in the Western world. Risk factors associated with GERD include age and lifestyle habits, although the clinically relevant contribution of many of these factors is unclear. In GERD, refluxed gastric acid damages the oesophageal mucosa, generally when the pH falls below 4. GERD patients present a variety of symptoms, most commonly heartburn and regurgitation. Oesophageal complications associated with GERD include erosions, ulcers, peptic strictures, and Barrett's oesophagus which is implicated in the development of oesophageal adenocarcinoma. Diagnosis of GERD is problematic due to the range of symptoms which may be presented to the physician and symptom severity is frequently unrelated to disease severity. While endoscopic monitoring may be used to assess the presence and severity of GERD, a lack of visible damage does not necessarily indicate an absence of GERD. Techniques used to diagnose GERD include addition of an acid solution into the oesophagus in order to replicate symptoms (Bernstein test) or 24-hour intra-oesophageal pH monitoring. Proton pump inhibitors are effective in the treatment of GERD, acting to reduce the acidity of the gastric juice and hence reduce oesophageal damage and symptoms associated with GERD. Symptoms most indicative of GERD are those associated with erosive oesophagitis, including heartburn and acid regurgitation. Less common GERD-associated symptoms include chest pain, a range of ear, nose and throat conditions, and asthma. In contrast to perceptions of the disease as 'merely' heartburn, the impact on patients' quality of life can be profound. Increasing awareness of GERD by health care professionals has led to improved diagnosis and a greater appreciation of the need for maintenance therapy.

  9. Prevalence of abdominal migraine and recurrent abdominal pain in a Japanese clinic.

    PubMed

    Hikita, Toshiyuki

    2016-07-01

    Prevalence of abdominal migraine (AM) and recurrent abdominal pain (RAP) was evaluated in patients who visited Hikita Pediatric Clinic between May 2010 and April 2015. Patient data were collected prospectively using a questionnaire. Out of a total of 3611 cases, observed prevalence was 2.44% for repeated abdominal pain over a period of ≥3 months, 1.47% for RAP, and 0.19% for AM. Duration of abdominal pain was longer for AM than for non-AM RAP. Certain clinical features were significantly different between AM and non-AM RAP. No correlations were found among age at onset, frequency of attack, and duration of attack for various types of RAP. It was difficult to determine useful diagnostic criteria for distinguishing between AM and non-AM RAP. They did not appear to be separate disease entities but, instead, lie on a disease spectrum. The present prevalence of AM (0.19%) was lower than that in many previous studies from countries other than Japan. PMID:27460403

  10. Disaggregating tropical disease prevalence by climatic and vegetative zones within tropical West Africa

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Tropical infectious disease prevalence is dependent on many socio-cultural determinants. However, rainfall and temperature frequently underlie overall prevalence, particularly for vector-borne diseases. As a result these diseases have increased prevalence in tropical as compared to temperate regions...

  11. Birth prevalence of congenital heart disease: A cross-sectional observational study from North India

    PubMed Central

    Saxena, Anita; Mehta, Anurag; Sharma, Mamta; Salhan, Sudha; Kalaivani, Mani; Ramakrishnan, Sivasubramanian; Juneja, Rajnish

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To assess the birth prevalence and pattern of congenital heart disease (CHD) using echocardiography in babies born in a community hospital of North India. Methods: A cross-sectional observational study conducted over a period of 3 years. Newborns born over a specific 8-h period of the day were recruited in the study. They underwent routine clinical examination and pulse oximetry, followed by screening echocardiography for diagnosing a CHD. Results: A total of 20,307 newborns were screened, among which 874 had abnormal echocardiograms; 687 had insignificant CHDs, 164 had significant CHDs, and 24 had other abnormal cardiac findings. The birth prevalence of significant CHDs was 8.07 per 1000 live births; 131 newborns had an acyanotic CHD (79.9%) and 33 a cyanotic CHD (20.1%). Ventricular septal defect (VSD) was the most common acyanotic CHD, present in 116 newborns, giving a prevalence of 5.7/1000 live births. Among the cyanotic CHD, transposition of great arteries was most common (prevalence 0.34/1000 live births). Conclusion: The CHD birth prevalence in our study is similar to the reported worldwide birth prevalence. Acyanotic CHD (mostly VSD) is seen in about three-fourths of babies born with CHD. The more sinister cyanotic CHD is present in remaining 25%. PMID:27625516

  12. Birth prevalence of congenital heart disease: A cross-sectional observational study from North India

    PubMed Central

    Saxena, Anita; Mehta, Anurag; Sharma, Mamta; Salhan, Sudha; Kalaivani, Mani; Ramakrishnan, Sivasubramanian; Juneja, Rajnish

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To assess the birth prevalence and pattern of congenital heart disease (CHD) using echocardiography in babies born in a community hospital of North India. Methods: A cross-sectional observational study conducted over a period of 3 years. Newborns born over a specific 8-h period of the day were recruited in the study. They underwent routine clinical examination and pulse oximetry, followed by screening echocardiography for diagnosing a CHD. Results: A total of 20,307 newborns were screened, among which 874 had abnormal echocardiograms; 687 had insignificant CHDs, 164 had significant CHDs, and 24 had other abnormal cardiac findings. The birth prevalence of significant CHDs was 8.07 per 1000 live births; 131 newborns had an acyanotic CHD (79.9%) and 33 a cyanotic CHD (20.1%). Ventricular septal defect (VSD) was the most common acyanotic CHD, present in 116 newborns, giving a prevalence of 5.7/1000 live births. Among the cyanotic CHD, transposition of great arteries was most common (prevalence 0.34/1000 live births). Conclusion: The CHD birth prevalence in our study is similar to the reported worldwide birth prevalence. Acyanotic CHD (mostly VSD) is seen in about three-fourths of babies born with CHD. The more sinister cyanotic CHD is present in remaining 25%.

  13. Prevalence of celiac disease in patients with severe food allergy.

    PubMed

    Pillon, R; Ziberna, F; Badina, L; Ventura, A; Longo, G; Quaglia, S; De Leo, L; Vatta, S; Martelossi, S; Patano, G; Not, T; Berti, I

    2015-10-01

    The association between food allergy and celiac disease (CD) is still to be clarified. We screened for CD 319 patients with severe food allergy (IgE > 85 kU/l against food proteins and a history of severe allergic reactions) who underwent specific food oral immunotherapy (OIT), together with 128 children with mild allergy who recovered without OIT, and compared the prevalence data with our historical data regarding healthy schoolchildren. Sixteen patients (5%) with severe allergy and one (0.8%) with mild allergy tested positive for both genetic and serological CD markers, while the prevalence among the schoolchildren was 1%. Intestinal biopsies were obtained in 13/16 patients with severe allergy and in the one with mild allergy, confirming the diagnosis of CD. Sufferers from severe food allergy seem to be at a fivefold increased risk of CD. Our findings suggest that routine screening for CD should be recommended in patients with severe food allergy.

  14. Co-prevalance of PMQR and 16S rRNA methylase genes in clinical Escherichia coli isolates with high diversity of CTX-M from diseased farmed pigeons.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ling; Yang, Lei; Lü, Dian-Hong; Zhang, Wen-Hui; Ren, Si-Qi; Liu, Ya-Hong; Zeng, Zhen-Ling; Jiang, Hong-Xia

    2015-08-01

    In the present study, we determined the molecular epidemiology of extended-spectrum β-lactamases (ESBLs) in Escherichia coli isolated from diseased farmed pigeons in China. A total of 71 E. coli isolates were collected from three pigeon farms from 2011 to 2012 and screened for the presence of the ESBL genes. The ESBLs producers were further tested for the presence of PMQR-encoding genes as well as the 16S rRNA methylase gene using PCR and DNA sequence analysis. Co-transfer of plasmids encoding for ESBLs, PMQR determinants and/or 16S rRNA methylase gene was performed by conjugation into E. coli. The genetic relatedness and plasmid replicon type were determined. A total of 41 ESBLs producers were identified. Only CTX-M type ESBLs were detected, with the most common CTX-M types being CTX-M-65 (n=17), CTX-M-27 (n=11), CTX-M-55 (n=10). Thirty-eight CTX-M-positive isolates were found to harbor at least one PMQR gene, with aac(6')-Ib-cr (n=32) and oqxAB (n=21) being the most prevalent. The rmtB was the only prevalent 16S rRNA methylase gene detected in 24 (58.1%) CTX-M-positive isolates. Although most of the CTX-M producers had distinct pulsotypes, clonal transmission in the same farm was observed. blaCTX-M genes were carried by IncF alone or in combination with IncK plasmids with three different sizes, including 76.8Kb (n=20), 194Kb (n=5), 104.5Kb (n=2). PFGE profiles of CTX-M-positive E. coli isolates indicated potential horizontal spread of these multidrug resistant strains along with those CTX-M encoding genes. Our findings highlight the importance of pigeons as a reservoir of multiple antimicrobial resistance genes.

  15. Prevalence of herpesviruses in gingivitis and chronic periodontitis: relationship to clinical parameters and effect of treatment

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Rucha; Mehta, Dhoom Singh

    2016-01-01

    Background: Assess the prevalence of herpesviruses in healthy subjects, gingivitis, and chronic periodontitis patients, to assess the relationship between the prevalence of herpesviruses and periodontal clinical parameters, and to evaluate the effect of phase-I therapy on the level of viral detection. Materials and Methods: Hundred patients consisting of 20 healthy subjects, 40 gingivitis, and 40 chronic periodontitis were included in the study. Clinical parameters recorded included plaque index, gingival index, sulcus bleeding index, probing depth, and clinical attachment level. The gingivitis and chronic periodontitis patients received phase-I periodontal therapy including oral hygiene instructions, full mouth scaling for gingivitis patients and scaling and root planing for chronic periodontitis patients. Gingival crevicular fluid (GCF) was collected, and the presence of herpes simplex virus-1 (HSV-1), HSV-2, cytomegalovirus, and Epstein–Barr virus (EBV) was analyzed using polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Recording of periodontal parameters as well as GCF collection was performed at baseline and 6 weeks postphase-I therapy. Results: At baseline, the levels of HSV-1 and EBV detection were lower in healthy controls as compared to gingivitis (P < 0.05) and chronic periodontitis cases (P < 0.001). Phase-I therapy led to reduction in the amount of HSV-1 and EBV in gingivitis patients (P < 0.05) and for HSV-1, human cytomegalovirus and EBV in chronic periodontitis patients (P < 0.05) in comparison to baseline. The prevalence of EBV in chronic periodontitis patients was positively associated with increased gingival index, probing depth and loss of clinical attachment (P < 0.05). Conclusions: Higher prevalence of HSV-1 and EBV viruses in GCF of gingivitis and chronic periodontitis suggests a strong association between these viruses and periodontal diseases and periodontal therapy can lead to a reduction in herpesviruses at infected sites. PMID:27563201

  16. Clinical and Sociodemographic Aspects of Inflammatory Bowel Disease Patients

    PubMed Central

    Delmondes, Leda Maria; Nunes, Marcelo Oliveira; Azevedo, Arthur Rangel; Oliveira, Murilo Matos de Santana; Coelho, Lorena Eugenia Rosa; Torres-Neto, Juvenal da Rocha

    2015-01-01

    Background In Brazil, there are few epidemiological studies available about the demographic and clinical aspects of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). The aim of this study was to identify epidemiological and clinical characteristics of patients with IBD treated at the University Hospital (HU) of the Sergipe Federal University (UFS). Methods A cross-sectional descriptive study was conducted in HU/UFS from October 2011 to January 2014. The sample consisted of 87 patients with IBD, who registered in the coloproctology clinic. We applied a questionnaire with sociodemographic and clinical variables. Results Of the 87 patients, 40 (46%) had Crohn’s disease (CD) and 47 (54%) had ulcerative colitis (UC). Women had a higher prevalence of IBD. Data obtained were significant (P < 0.05) in the variables: age, origin and level of education. CD patients were younger (< 25 years old), had higher prevalence of smoking habits and were associated with urban origin, conjunctivitis, palpable mass, appendectomy and intestinal complications. UC was more prevalent in older individuals (> 25 years old), with rural origin, bloody diarrhea and rectal bleeding. Location and initial behavior of CD were ileum-colic (L3), inflammatory behavior and penetrating form of the disease. There is higher prevalence of proctitis and mild and severe forms of the UC among women. Osteoarticular and systemic manifestations predominated in both diseases. Conclusions IBD affected more women than men. The age, origin and level of education can interfere with early diagnosis. Demographic and clinical aspects were similar to the literature. Data differ in the time interval between the onset of symptoms and diagnosis, smoking habit, appendectomy and severity of UC for age and gender.

  17. The Effect of Clinical Outbreaks of Salmonellosis on the Prevalence of Fecal Salmonella Shedding Among Dairy Cattle in New York

    PubMed Central

    Warnick, Lorin D.; Elton, Mara; Gröhn, Yrjo T.; McDonough, Patrick L.; Siler, Julie D.

    2010-01-01

    Abstract The objective of this study was to determine if the within-herd prevalence of fecal Salmonella shedding is higher in dairy herds with clinical outbreaks of disease, as compared to herds with subclinical infections only. Data were collected prospectively from dairy herds throughout New York that had at least 150 lactating cows and that received clinical service from participating veterinarians. After enrollment, Salmonella surveillance consisted of both environmental screening and disease monitoring within the herd. Herds positive by either environmental or fecal culture were sampled during three visits to estimate the within-herd prevalence of Salmonella. We characterized isolates by serovar and antimicrobial resistance pattern. Among 57 enrolled herds, 44 (77%) yielded Salmonella-positive samples during the study period; 27 (61%) of the positive herds had Salmonella isolated from environmental samples only, and 17 (39%) had one or more laboratory-confirmed clinical cases. The within-herd prevalence of fecal Salmonella shedding ranged from 0 to 53%. Salmonella Cerro was the predominant serovar, accounting for 56% of all isolates. Antimicrobial resistance ranged from zero to nine drugs, and 14 (32%) of the positive farms generated multidrug-resistant isolates. Herds with laboratory-confirmed clinical cases had a higher prevalence of fecal Salmonella shedding than herds that only generated positive environmental samples, as estimated by a Poisson regression model (prevalence ratio, 2.7; p = 0.01). An association between dairy herd outbreaks of salmonellosis and a higher prevalence of asymptomatic shedding should help guide strategies for reducing the public health threat of Salmonella, as the ability to recognize high-risk herds by clinical laboratory submissions presents an obvious opportunity to maximize food safety at the preharvest level. This is in contrast with other foodborne zoonotic pathogens, such as Campylobacter jejuni and Escherichia coli O

  18. The effect of clinical outbreaks of salmonellosis on the prevalence of fecal Salmonella shedding among dairy cattle in New York.

    PubMed

    Cummings, Kevin J; Warnick, Lorin D; Elton, Mara; Gröhn, Yrjo T; McDonough, Patrick L; Siler, Julie D

    2010-07-01

    The objective of this study was to determine if the within-herd prevalence of fecal Salmonella shedding is higher in dairy herds with clinical outbreaks of disease, as compared to herds with subclinical infections only. Data were collected prospectively from dairy herds throughout New York that had at least 150 lactating cows and that received clinical service from participating veterinarians. After enrollment, Salmonella surveillance consisted of both environmental screening and disease monitoring within the herd. Herds positive by either environmental or fecal culture were sampled during three visits to estimate the within-herd prevalence of Salmonella. We characterized isolates by serovar and antimicrobial resistance pattern. Among 57 enrolled herds, 44 (77%) yielded Salmonella-positive samples during the study period; 27 (61%) of the positive herds had Salmonella isolated from environmental samples only, and 17 (39%) had one or more laboratory-confirmed clinical cases. The within-herd prevalence of fecal Salmonella shedding ranged from 0 to 53%. Salmonella Cerro was the predominant serovar, accounting for 56% of all isolates. Antimicrobial resistance ranged from zero to nine drugs, and 14 (32%) of the positive farms generated multidrug-resistant isolates. Herds with laboratory-confirmed clinical cases had a higher prevalence of fecal Salmonella shedding than herds that only generated positive environmental samples, as estimated by a Poisson regression model (prevalence ratio, 2.7; p = 0.01). An association between dairy herd outbreaks of salmonellosis and a higher prevalence of asymptomatic shedding should help guide strategies for reducing the public health threat of Salmonella, as the ability to recognize high-risk herds by clinical laboratory submissions presents an obvious opportunity to maximize food safety at the preharvest level. This is in contrast with other foodborne zoonotic pathogens, such as Campylobacter jejuni and Escherichia coli O157:H7, which

  19. The prevalence of Chlamydia trachomatis in patients with pelvic inflammatory disease.

    PubMed

    Ravindran, J; Tan, Y I; Ngeow, Y F

    1998-03-01

    Chlamydia trachomatis is recognized as the most prevalent sexually transmitted organism in many parts of the world. Most complications associated with chlamydial infection in women and their infants can be avoided by appropriate treatment. However, treatment is often not initiated because infections are frequently asymptomatic. The identification of at risk patients and treatment of these patients is a practical clinical approach in the reduction of transmission and prevention of complications. The prevalence of chlamydial infection among patients with pelvic inflammatory disease admitted to Seremban General Hospital was 22.7%. The difference in seropositivity between PID patients (20.5%) and antenatal controls (2.3%) was statistically significant. The corresponding cervical antigen detection rates were 6.8% and 2.3% respectively. Chlamydial infection should be screened for in gynaecological patients and antibiotic policies should take cognizance of the aetiological role played by this organism in pelvic inflammatory disease. PMID:10968132

  20. Prevalence of Parkinson's disease and other types of Parkinsonism in Al Kharga district, Egypt.

    PubMed

    El-Tallawy, Hamdy N; Farghaly, Wafaa M; Shehata, Ghaydaa A; Rageh, Tarek A; Hakeem, Nabil M Abdel; Hamed, Mohamed Abd Al; Badry, Reda

    2013-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a common neurodegenerative disorder in older people. The prevalence of PD varies among ethnic and geographic groups around the world. In this study, we aimed to estimate the prevalence of PD and other types of Parkinsonism in persons aged ≥40 years in the Al Kharga district of Egypt. The study was conducted on the total population of Al Kharga district (62,583 persons) between 2005 and 2009 and involved three neurology specialists and 15 female social workers undertaking a door-to-door survey. Suspected cases of Parkinsonism were subjected to meticulous clinical and neurological examination by three neurology staff members from Assiut University hospital who carried out their examinations separately. Of the total population surveyed, 15,482 persons were aged ≥40 years and 49 of these were identified as having Parkinsonism (prevalence: 316.50 per 100,000 people [95% confidence interval {CI} 240.21-404.98]). Of the 49, 33 fulfilled the diagnostic criteria for PD, giving a prevalence rate of 213.15/100,000 (95% CI 150.51-285.80) while 14 fulfilled those for vascular Parkinsonism, with a prevalence rate of 90.43/100,000 (95% CI 49.60-137.78). Postencephalitic and unspecified Parkinsonism each had a prevalence rate of 6.46/100,000. The prevalence of Parkinsonism was found to increase steadily with age, and the prevalence of all types of Parkinsonism was statistically higher in rural compared with urban communities, with no significant difference between men and women. PMID:24379673

  1. Coagulopathy in the prostate cancer patient: prevalence and clinical relevance.

    PubMed Central

    Adamson, A. S.; Francis, J. L.; Witherow, R. O.; Snell, M. E.

    1993-01-01

    Carcinoma of the prostate has historically been associated with the bleeding diathesis which accompanies disseminated intravascular coagulation. We have performed a prospective study into the prevalence of coagulopathy in patients with untreated prostate cancer using matched patients with benign prostatic hypertrophy (BPH) as controls. Haemostatic activation was assessed by measuring fibrinopeptide A (FpA) by an ELISA and D-dimer by a latex agglutination assay. FpA and D-dimer levels were correlated with serum prostate specific antigen (PSA) and bone scan status. Of the cancer patients, 40% had elevated FpA, levels being higher in those with bone scan positive disease (P < 0.05). D-dimer was detectable in 24% of those with prostate cancer but in none with BPH. Neither FpA nor D-dimer were related to serum PSA but D-dimer appeared to be a predictor of bone scan status with a positive predictive value of 91%. It is concluded that changes compatible with subclinical DIC are common in patients presenting with prostate cancer and that measurement of FpA and D-dimer may have roles as tumour markers in this disease. PMID:7682795

  2. Celiac disease prevalence in epileptic children from Serbia.

    PubMed

    Djurić, Zlatko; Nagorni, Aleksandar; Jocić-Jakubi, Bosa; Dimić, Milena; Novak, Martin; Milićević, Radovan; Radenković, Goran

    2012-01-01

    Celiac disease (CD) is a genetically determined autoimmune enteropathy, induced by gluten ingestion. To date, different prevalences of CD in children with epilepsy have been reported. The aim of this study was to determine CD prevalence in our patients with epilepsy, using anti-tissue transglutaminase (tTG) antibodies as a screening test. One hundred twenty-five children (72 girls, 53 boys; age range: 2-18 years, mean age: 10.51 +/- 3.53) with idiopathic epilepsy from South East Serbia were tested for immunoglobulin (IgA) tTG antibodies. All positive patients were offered endoscopic small bowel biopsy. Biopsies were examined histopathologically in order to confirm the CD diagnosis. The control group consisted of 150 healthy children. Three patients with epilepsy were positive for IgA tTG antibodies. In all of them, small bowel biopsy was performed, and only one was proven to have CD by histopathology (Marsh IIIa grade). The prevalence of biopsy-proven CD in children with epilepsy was not significantly higher in the study group compared to controls (0.8% vs.0.6%, p > 0.05). The results of this study indicate that children with idiopathic epilepsy from our region should not be routinely tested for CD. PMID:23094534

  3. Neurocysticercosis in sub-Saharan Africa: a review of prevalence, clinical characteristics, diagnosis, and management

    PubMed Central

    Winkler, Andrea Sylvia

    2012-01-01

    Neurocysticercosis has been recognized as a major cause of secondary epilepsy worldwide. So far, most of the knowledge about the disease comes from Latin America and the Indian subcontinent. Unfortunately, in sub-Saharan Africa the condition was neglected for a long time, mainly owing to the lack of appropriate diagnostic tools. This review therefore focuses on the prevalence of neurocysticercosis in sub-Saharan Africa, the clinical picture with emphasis on epilepsy, as well as the diagnosis and treatment of neurocysticercosis and its related epilepsy/epileptic seizures in African resource-poor settings. PMID:23265550

  4. A network approach to clinical intervention in neurodegenerative diseases.

    PubMed

    Santiago, Jose A; Potashkin, Judith A

    2014-12-01

    Network biology has become a powerful tool to dissect the molecular mechanisms triggering neurodegeneration. Recent developments in network biology have led to the discovery of disease-causing genes, diagnostic biomarkers, and therapeutic targets for several neurodegenerative diseases including Alzheimer's, Parkinson's, and Huntington's diseases. Network-based approaches have provided the molecular rationale for the relationship among cancer, diabetes, and neurodegenerative diseases, and have uncovered unexpected links between apparently unrelated diseases. Here, we summarize the recent advances in network biology to untangle the molecular underpinnings giving rise to the most prevalent neurodegenerative diseases. We propose that network analysis provides a feasible and practical tool for identifying biologically meaningful biomarkers and potential therapeutic targets for clinical intervention in neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:25455073

  5. [Mental disorders in pregnancy and postpartum : Prevalence, course, and clinical diagnostics].

    PubMed

    Kühner, C

    2016-09-01

    The peripartum period represents a critical phase for the onset and course of mental disorders. During this phase, mental disorders occur as first onset or, more often, as recurrent or ongoing chronic conditions with onset and further course of illness in- or outside the peripartal period. No clear risk increase exists for the more prevalent mental disorders such as depressive and anxiety disorders during this period, whereas there is an increased risk for bipolar disorder. Peripartal mental disorders may impact fetal and child development through different mechanisms. The International Statistical Classification of Diseases and Related Health Problems (ICD-10) does not sufficiently take into account particularities of peripartal disorders with possible prognostic relevance. The present article gives an overview on prevalence, course, and clinical diagnostics and presents a proposal for consistent categorization of peripartal mental disorders. PMID:27456195

  6. Prevalence and clinical significance of postpartum endometritis and wound infection.

    PubMed Central

    Chaim, W; Bashiri, A; Bar-David, J; Shoham-Vardi, I; Mazor, M

    2000-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To correlate clinical variables (gestational age, severe pregnancy-induced hypertension, gestational diabetes mellitus, history of previous cesarean sections, fetal distress, perinatal mortality, postpartum anemia, Apgar score < or = 3 at 1 minute and < or = 7 at 5 minutes, and instrumental delivery) with postpartum endometritis (PPE) and wound infection. METHODS: Descriptive cross-sectional study of the outcome of 75,947 term and preterm singleton deliveries; vaginally and by cesarean section from 1989-1997. RESULTS: The prevalence of PPE after vaginal deliveries was 0.17% (120/68,273). Gestational age of less than 37 weeks, severe pregnancy-induced hypertension, fetal distress, instrumental deliveries, neonatal mortality, postpartum anemia, and Apgar scores of < 7 after 5 minutes were significantly associated with PPE. Gestational diabetes and an Apgar score of < 3 after 1 minute showed similar frequency with and without PPE. The prevalence of PPE after cesarean section was 2.63% (202/7,677). Preterm cesarean sections, history of previous cesarean sections, anemia, and low Apgar scores were seen more frequently with PPE than without. The incidence of cesarean delivery with gestational diabetes mellitus, fetal distress, and perinatal mortality was similar in presence and absence of PPE. The rate of wound infection after cesarean section was 3.97% (318/7,995). Gestational diabetes mellitus, history of previous cesarean deliveries, and low Apgar scores were significantly more frequent with than without wound infection. Gestational age, severe pregnancy-induced hypertension, fetal distress, perinatal mortality, and postpartum anemia were not associated with wound infection. CONCLUSIONS: Awareness of the aforementioned associations may prevent and shorten hospital stay by early diagnosis and appropriate treatment. PMID:10805361

  7. Prevalence of gingival biotype and its relationship to clinical parameters

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Rucha; Sowmya, N. K.; Mehta, D. S.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: The dimensions of gingiva and different parts of the masticatory mucosa have a profound impact in periodontics as it governs the way; the gingival tissue reacts to various physical, chemical, or bacterial insults. The purpose of the following study was to assess the gingival thickness (GT) and correlate it to gender, presence of recession, and width of keratinized gingiva (WKG) in a subset of the Indian population. Methods: A total of 400 subjects in the age range of 20–35 years (200 males and 200 females) were included in the study. Clinical parameters such as probing depth, recession depth, WKG, and GT were recorded for all the patients. Results: The prevalence of thin biotype was 43.25%, and that of thick gingival biotype was 56.75%. The mean GT of central incisor, lateral incisor, and canine in Group I was 1.11 ± 0.17, 1.01 ± 0.16, and 0.82 ± 0.17 mm, respectively. No significant association was observed between the gender and the presence of gingival recession to GT. The mean WKG of central incisor, lateral incisor, and canine in Group I was 4.38 ± 1.18, 5.18 ± 1.25, 4.16 ± 1.16 mm, respectively. A positive correlation exists between WKG and the GT (P < 0.05). Conclusion: It was concluded that the prevalence of thick and thin gingival biotype is 56.75% versus 43.25%, respectively, and there is no significant relationship between age, gender, and the presence of recession to gingival biotype. A positive correlation exists between WKG and the GT. PMID:26604569

  8. Prevalence of COPD by disease severity in men and women in northern Vietnam.

    PubMed

    Lâm, Hoàng Th Formula See Text; Ekerljung, Linda; T Formula See Text Ng, Nguy Formula See Text N Văn; Rönmark, Eva; Larsson, Kjell; Lundbäck, Bo

    2014-09-01

    The prevalence of COPD and its risk factor pattern varies between different areas of the world. The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence of COPD by disease severity in men and women and risk factors for COPD in northern Vietnam. From all 5782 responders to a questionnaire survey, a randomly selected sample of 1500 subjects was invited to a clinical follow-up study. The methods included a structured interview using a modified GA2LEN study questionnaire for registration of symptoms and possible determinants of disease. Spirometry was performed before and after bronchodilation. The age distribution of the sample was 23-72 years. Of 684 subjects attending, 565 completed acceptable spirometric measurements. The prevalence of COPD defined by the GOLD criteria was 7.1%; in men 10.9% and in women 3.9% (p = 0.002). Of those 3.4% had a mild disease, 2.8% a moderate and 0.9% a severe disease. In ages >50 years, 23.5% of men and 6.8% of women had COPD. Among smokers aged >60 years (all men), 47.8% had COPD. None of the women with COPD had been smokers. Increasing age, smoking and male sex were the dominating risk factors, although male sex lost its significance in a multivariate setting. The prevalence of COPD among adults in northern Vietnam was 7.1% and was considerably higher among men than women. The prevalence increased considerably with age. Increasing age and smoking, the latter among men only, were the most important determinants of COPD.

  9. Maremar, prevalence of chronic kidney disease, how to avoid over-diagnosis and under-diagnosis.

    PubMed

    De Broe, Marc E; Gharbi, Mohammed Benghanem; Elseviers, Monique

    2016-04-01

    Chronic kidney disease is considered as a major public health problem. Recent studies mention a prevalence rate between 8%-12%. Several editorials, comments, short reviews described the weaknesses (lack of confirmation of proteinuria, and of chronicity of decreased estimated glomerular filtration rate) of a substantial number of studies and the irrational of using a single arbitrary set point, i.e. diagnosis of chronic kidney disease whenever the estimated glomerular filtration rate is less than 60mL/min/1.73m(2). Maremar (Maladies rénales chroniques au Maroc) is a prevalence study of chronic kidney disease, hypertension, diabetes and obesity in a randomized, representative, high response rate (85%), sample of the adult population of Morocco, strictly applying the Kidney Disease: Improving Global Outcomes (KDIGO) criteria. Compared to the vast majority of the available studies, Maremar has a low prevalence of chronic kidney disease (2.9% adjusted to the actual adult population of Morocco). The population pyramid, and particularly the confirmation of proteinuria and "chronicity" of the decreased estimated glomerular filtration rate are the main reasons for this low prevalence of chronic kidney disease. The choice of arbitrary single threshold of estimated glomerular filtration rate for classifying stage 3-5 chronic kidney disease inevitably leads to "over-diagnosis" (false positives) of the disease in the elderly, particularly those without proteinuria, hematuria or hypertension, and to "under-diagnosed" (false negatives) in younger individuals with an estimated glomerular filtration rate above 60mL/min/1.73m(2) and below the 3rd percentile of their age/gender category. There is an urgent need for quality studies using in a correct way the recent KDIGO guidelines when investigating the prevalence of chronic kidney disease, in order to avoid a 50 to 100% overestimation of a disease state with potential dramatic consequences. The combination of the general population

  10. Prevalence of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease in asymptomatic smokers

    PubMed Central

    Sansores, Raúl H; Velázquez-Uncal, Mónica; Pérez-Bautista, Oliver; Villalba-Caloca, Jaime; Falfán-Valencia, Ramcés; Ramírez-Venegas, Alejandra

    2015-01-01

    Background Physicians do not routinely recommend smokers to undergo spirometry unless they are symptomatic. Objective To test the hypothesis that there are a significant number of asymptomatic smokers with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), we estimated the prevalence of COPD in a group of asymptomatic smokers. Methods Two thousand nine hundred and sixty-one smokers with a cumulative consumption history of at least 10 pack-years, either smokers with symptoms or smokers without symptoms (WOS) were invited to perform a spirometry and complete a symptom questionnaire. Results Six hundred and thirty-seven (21.5%) smokers had no symptoms, whereas 2,324 (78.5%) had at least one symptom. The prevalence of COPD in subjects WOS was 1.5% when considering the whole group of smokers (45/2,961) and 7% when considering only the group WOS (45/637). From 329 smokers with COPD, 13.7% were WOS. Subjects WOS were younger, had better lung function and lower cumulative consumption of cigarettes, estimated as both cigarettes per day and pack-years. According to severity of airflow limitation, 69% vs 87% of subjects were classified as Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease stages I–II in the WOS and smokers with symptoms groups, respectively (P<0.001). A multivariate analysis showed that forced expiratory volume in 1 second (mL) was the only predictive factor for COPD in asymptomatic smokers. Conclusion Prevalence of COPD in asymptomatic smokers is 1.5%. This number of asymptomatic smokers may be excluded from the benefit of an “early” intervention, not just pharmacological but also from smoking cessation counseling. The higher forced expiratory volume in 1 second may contribute to prevent early diagnosis. PMID:26586941

  11. Prevalence of Parkinson Disease Among the Navajo; a Preliminary Examination

    PubMed Central

    Gordon, Paul H.; Zhao, Hongwei; Bartley, Denise; Sims, LT James G.; Begay, Mae-Gilene; Richardson, Sarah Pirio; Lewis, Johnnye; Rowland, Andrew S.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND The prevalence of Parkinson disease (PD) varies by geographic location and ethnicity, but has never been studied among the Navajo. METHODS Period prevalence was calculated using the number of people diagnosed with PD in the Shiprock Service Unit Indian Health Service database during 1995–1999, 2000–2004, and 2005–2009 as the numerator, and the number seen for any reason as the denominator. Age-standardized rates were calculated using the 2000 US population. RESULTS During 2005–2009, 126 people were seen with PD (crude prevalence = 203.7/100,000 population). The age-adjusted rate was 335.9 (95% C. I. 277.8–394.0) overall, 438.5 (95% C.I. 336.5–540.5) in men and 259.7 (95% C.I. 192.8–326.7; p=0.004) in women. The adjusted rate increased with age: 788.8 (95% C.I. 652.0–925.7) for age 40 and above to 1964.9 (95% C.I. 1613.7–2316.1) for age 60 and above. Adjusted rates were 246.6 (95% C.I. 187.2–306.0) in 1995–1999 and 284.7 (95% C.I. 227.0–342.4) in 2000–2004. CONCLUSION Parkinson disease appears common among the Navajo. Estimates increased with age and time, and were higher in men. In-person interviews are needed to confirm these estimates, and to determine incidence, quality of care, and risk factors for PD among the Navajo. PMID:23938348

  12. Defining the relationship between infection prevalence and clinical incidence of Plasmodium falciparum malaria.

    PubMed

    Cameron, Ewan; Battle, Katherine E; Bhatt, Samir; Weiss, Daniel J; Bisanzio, Donal; Mappin, Bonnie; Dalrymple, Ursula; Hay, Simon I; Smith, David L; Griffin, Jamie T; Wenger, Edward A; Eckhoff, Philip A; Smith, Thomas A; Penny, Melissa A; Gething, Peter W

    2015-01-01

    In many countries health system data remain too weak to accurately enumerate Plasmodium falciparum malaria cases. In response, cartographic approaches have been developed that link maps of infection prevalence with mathematical relationships to predict the incidence rate of clinical malaria. Microsimulation (or 'agent-based') models represent a powerful new paradigm for defining such relationships; however, differences in model structure and calibration data mean that no consensus yet exists on the optimal form for use in disease-burden estimation. Here we develop a Bayesian statistical procedure combining functional regression-based model emulation with Markov Chain Monte Carlo sampling to calibrate three selected microsimulation models against a purpose-built data set of age-structured prevalence and incidence counts. This allows the generation of ensemble forecasts of the prevalence-incidence relationship stratified by age, transmission seasonality, treatment level and exposure history, from which we predict accelerating returns on investments in large-scale intervention campaigns as transmission and prevalence are progressively reduced. PMID:26348689

  13. Cardiovascular disease in the developing world: prevalences, patterns, and the potential of early disease detection.

    PubMed

    Celermajer, David S; Chow, Clara K; Marijon, Eloi; Anstey, Nicholas M; Woo, Kam S

    2012-10-01

    Over the past decade or more, the prevalence of traditional risk factors for atherosclerotic cardiovascular diseases has been increasing in the major populous countries of the developing world, including China and India, with consequent increases in the rates of coronary and cerebrovascular events. Indeed, by 2020, cardiovascular diseases are predicted to be the major causes of morbidity and mortality in most developing nations around the world. Techniques for the early detection of arterial damage have provided important insights into disease patterns and pathogenesis and especially the effects of progressive urbanization on cardiovascular risk in these populations. Furthermore, certain other diseases affecting the cardiovascular system remain prevalent and important causes of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality in developing countries, including the cardiac effects of rheumatic heart disease and the vascular effects of malaria. Imaging and functional studies of early cardiovascular changes in those disease processes have also recently been published by various groups, allowing consideration of screening and early treatment opportunities. In this report, the authors review the prevalences and patterns of major cardiovascular diseases in the developing world, as well as potential opportunities provided by early disease detection.

  14. The Prevalence of the Celiac Disease Among Urban Bedouin Population in Israel

    PubMed Central

    Inna, Rudoy; Andrew, Korobeinikov; Hanna, Shalev; Ilia, Volkov

    2012-01-01

    Background Celiac disease (CD) is a common, but often under-diagnosed condition with possible serious complications. CD, having a prevalence of about 1% is more common than once thought. Only limited research is available comparing differences between adults and children. A comprehensive Medline search was conducted. No data was found concerning the prevalence of CD among the adult Bedouin population. Methods The research is retrospective and descriptive. The objective of our research was to determine the prevalence of the CD within adult and child Bedouin populations in urban Israel. A report of all of diagnosed CD patients extracted from the medical computerized information system (“Clicks”). Results In our sample we found the prevalence was 0.51% in children and 0.12% in adults. Conclusion In our opinion, one of reasons for the low prevalence level in the Bedouin community might be that typical CD symptoms are less prominent in Bedouin communities than in other communities. But no doubt hypo-diagnosis does exist. We suppose more advanced research about the nature and typical clinical manifestations of CD within the Bedouin population need to be investigated. Medical personnel working within the Bedouin community needs information concerning CD and the characteristics of diagnosis and treatment in the Bedouin community. The Bedouin community itself needs more information concerning CD and the importance of treatment, which could also improve early diagnosis and compliance.

  15. Feline heartworm disease: a clinical review.

    PubMed

    Litster, Annette L; Atwell, Richard B

    2008-04-01

    Feline heartworm disease is caused by the filarial nematode Dirofilaria immitis, and is transmitted by mosquitoes in heartworm-endemic areas worldwide. While dogs are the definitive hosts for this parasite, cats can also be infected, and the overall prevalence in cats is between 5% and 10% of that in dogs in any given area. The spectrum of feline presentations varies from asymptomatic infections to chronic respiratory signs, sometimes accompanied by chronic vomiting to acute death with no premonitory signs. Ante-mortem diagnosis can be challenging and relies on a combination of tests, including antigen and antibody serology, thoracic radiography and echocardiography. As treatment with heartworm adulticidal drugs can be life-threatening and heartworm infection in cats is often self-limiting, infected cats are frequently managed with supportive treatment (corticosteroids, bronchodilators, and anti-emetics). Surgical removal of filariae using extraction devices may be considered in some acute cases where immediate curative treatment is necessary, but filarial breakage during the procedure may result in an acute fatal shock-like reaction. Necropsy findings are mainly pulmonary and include muscular hypertrophy of the pulmonary arteries and arterioles on histopathology. A number of safe and effective macrocytic lactone drugs are available for prophylaxis in cats. These drugs can kill a range of larval and adult life-cycle stage heartworms, which may be advantageous in cases of owner compliance failure or when heartworm infection status is undetermined at the time prophylaxis is commenced. An index of suspicion for feline heartworm disease is warranted in unprotected cats with respiratory signs, and perhaps chronic vomiting, in areas where canine heartworm disease is endemic. Many cats, once diagnosed and with appropriate supportive care and monitoring, will resolve their infection and be free of clinical signs. PMID:18042416

  16. An investigation into the prevalence of thyroid disease on Kwajalein Atoll, Marshall Islands

    SciTech Connect

    Takahashi, T.; Fujimori, K.; Kimura, N.

    1997-07-01

    The objective of the study was to obtain thyroid disease rate statistics on as much of the population as possible that was alive during the years of nuclear testing and to test the hypothesis that described a linearly decreasing prevalence of palpable nodules with increasing distance from the Bikini test site. 1,322 Marshallese born before 1965 were given a thyroid examination using neck palpation, fine needle aspiration biopsy, and high resolution ultrasound imaging. Approximately 40% of the total population living on this island who are at risk from exposure to radioactive fallout during the years 1946-1958 were screened. Of that group, 815 were alive at the time of the BRAVO test on 1 March 1954. Two hundred sixty-six people with thyroid nodules were found (32.6%): 132 were palpable nodules (16.2%), and 134 were nodules that could be diagnosed with ultrasound only (15.7%). Prevalence of palpable nodules was particularly high in men and women older than 60 y, in men who were 6 to 15 y of age at the time of the BRAVO test, and in women 1 to 10 y of age at the time of the BRAVO test. In 22 people, the clinical diagnosis was most likely cancer though histopathological evidence was only available from 11 operated cases. Of the 11 operated cases, 10 were cancer. Cancer prevalence was particularly high in those women born between 1944 and 1953 (7/220 = 3.2%), i.e., who were children during the early years of nuclear testing. The Ebeye data showed a marginally significant correlation between palpable nodule prevalence among women and distance to Bikini (r = -0.44, p = 0.06). This report summarizes the clinical findings of the thyroid examinations, the age distributions for nodular disease and cancer, and examines the relationship between prevalence of nodules and present day levels of {sup 137}Cs in the environment of each atoll. 22 refs., 4 figs., 9 tabs.

  17. Peripheral arterial calcification: Prevalence, mechanism, detection, and clinical implications

    PubMed Central

    Rocha-Singh, Krishna J; Zeller, Thomas; Jaff, Michael R

    2014-01-01

    Vascular calcification (VC), particularly medial (Mönckeberg's medial sclerosis) arterial calcification, is common in patients with diabetes mellitus and chronic kidney disease and is associated with increased cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Although, the underlying pathophysiological mechanisms and genetic pathways of VC are not fully known, hypocalcemia, hyperphosphatemia, and the suppression of parathyroid hormone activity are central to the development of vessel mineralization and, consequently, bone demineralization. In addition to preventive measures, such as the modification of atherosclerotic cardiovascular risk factors, current treatment strategies include the use of calcium-free phosphate binders, vitamin D analogs, and calcium mimetics that have shown promising results, albeit in small patient cohorts. The impact of intimal and medial VC on the safety and effectiveness of endovascular devices to treat symptomatic peripheral arterial disease (PAD) remains poorly defined. The absence of a generally accepted, validated vascular calcium grading scale hampers clinical progress in assessing the safety and utility of various endovascular devices (e.g., atherectomy) in treating calcified vessels. Accordingly, we propose the peripheral arterial calcium scoring system (PACSS) and a method for its clinical validation. A better understanding of the pathogenesis of vascular calcification and the development of optimal medical and endovascular treatment strategies are crucial as the population ages and presents with more chronic comorbidities. PMID:24402839

  18. Prevalence of Sarcopenia and Associated Outcomes in the Clinical Setting.

    PubMed

    Peterson, Sarah J; Braunschweig, Carol A

    2016-02-01

    Sarcopenia refers to age-associated decrease in muscle mass and function. The condition was originally described in the elderly, but emerging evidence suggests that it is also a concern among the chronically ill nonelderly. Currently there are a number of definitions for diagnosing sarcopenia; however, in the clinical setting, abdominal computed tomography (CT) scans completed for diagnostic purposes can be utilized to identify CT-defined sarcopenia. Recent studies suggest that prevalence of CT-defined sarcopenia is high among chronically ill patients, ranging from 15%-50% in patients with cancer, 30%-45% with liver failure, and 60%-70% for critically ill patients in the intensive care unit. Depleted muscle mass is associated with infectious complications, prolonged duration of mechanical ventilation, longer hospitalization, greater need for rehabilitation care after hospital discharge, and higher mortality. In consideration of the growing population of older adults with multiple comorbidities, more research is needed to identify sarcopenia and develop interventions that are directed at attenuating or reversal muscle loss.

  19. Prevalence of subclinical ketosis and relationships with postpartum diseases in European dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Suthar, V S; Canelas-Raposo, J; Deniz, A; Heuwieser, W

    2013-05-01

    Subclinical ketosis (SCK) is defined as concentrations of β-hydroxybutyrate (BHBA) ≥ 1.2 to 1.4 mmol/L and it is considered a gateway condition for other metabolic and infectious disorders such as metritis, mastitis, clinical ketosis, and displaced abomasum. Reported prevalence rates range from 6.9 to 43% in the first 2 mo of lactation. However, there is a dearth of information on prevalence rates considering the diversity of European dairy farms. The objectives of this study were to (1) determine prevalence of SCK, (2) identify thresholds of BHBA, and (3) study their relationships with postpartum metritis, clinical ketosis, displaced abomasum, lameness, and mastitis in European dairy farms. From May to October 2011, a convenience sample of 528 dairy herds from Croatia, Germany, Hungary, Italy, Poland, Portugal, Serbia, Slovenia, Spain, and Turkey was studied. β-Hydroxybutyrate levels were measured in 5,884 cows with a handheld meter within 2 to 15 d in milk (DIM). On average, 11 cows were enrolled per farm and relevant information (e.g., DIM, postpartum diseases, herd size) was recorded. Using receiver operator characteristic curve analyses, blood BHBA thresholds were determined for the occurrence of metritis, mastitis, clinical ketosis, displaced abomasum, and lameness. Multivariate binary logistic regression models were built for each disease, considering cow as the experimental unit and herd as a random effect. Overall prevalence of SCK (i.e., blood BHBA ≥ 1.2 mmol/L) within 10 countries was 21.8%, ranging from 11.2 to 36.6%. Cows with SCK had 1.5, 9.5, and 5.0 times greater odds of developing metritis, clinical ketosis, and displaced abomasum, respectively. Multivariate binary logistic regression models demonstrated that cows with blood BHBA levels of ≥ 1.4, ≥ 1.1 and ≥ 1.7 mmol/L during 2 to 15 DIM had 1.7, 10.5, and 6.9 times greater odds of developing metritis, clinical ketosis, and displaced abomasum, respectively, compared with cows with lower

  20. Anginal pain of esophageal origin: clinical presentation, prevalence, and prognosis.

    PubMed

    Davies, H A

    1992-05-27

    Since 1768, when Heberden recognized a relationship of angina pectoris with eating, the close resemblance between angina-like pain of esophageal and cardiac origin has led to diagnostic confusion, with the role of the esophagus being, in turn, over- and underemphasized as a cause of symptoms. Although the classic features of angina do not distinguish the origin of the pain, certain other symptoms may identify esophageal pain. These include an inconsistent correlation of exercise with pain, periods of prolonged remission, provocation of pain by posture, association with other esophageal symptoms, relief by antacids, radiation of pain down the right arm and into the back, occurrence of pain at night, continuation of pain as a background ache, and relief from nitroglycerine delayed by 10 minutes or longer. However, while certain symptoms may alert the clinician to the possibility that angina-like pain is due to esophageal disease, no single symptom or combination of symptoms is infallible; there is no alternative to careful assessment. Esophageal disease accounts for the greatest number of patients with chest pain of unknown origin. The prevalence of angina-like esophageal pain in unselected emergency admissions with suspected myocardial infarction is 10-20%. Approximately one third or more of patients with angina and normal coronary arteries have esophageal problems. We have followed patients with angina-like esophageal pain for 9 years. Although prognosis remains good, confirming the original noncardiac diagnosis, greater than 80% of patients continue to have chest pain of undiminished intensity, and half are limited in their ability to work. Reassurance appeared to have one beneficial result: Patients were less likely to consult a physician after a positive diagnosis had been made.

  1. Chronic liver disease in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia: a clinical study.

    PubMed

    Kudva, M V; Zawawi, M M

    1990-08-01

    This study was undertaken to analyse the clinical spectrum of chronic liver disease (cirrhosis, and others with portal hypertension) in Kuala Lumpur. Eighty patients were diagnosed over a 6-year period. Twenty-two had biopsy proven cirrhosis while 58 others had portal hypertension with clinical and biochemical evidence of chronic liver disease. The commonest aetiology was alcohol (36%), followed by the idiopathic variety and hepatitis B. The male to female ratio was 4.4:1. Indians had a high prevalence of alcohol-associated chronic liver disease. Overall, ascites was the commonest presentation. Eight patients presented with hepatocellular carcinoma. Spontaneous bacterial peritonitis was diagnosed in 13% of patients undergoing abdominal paracentesis. Gallstones were detected in 37% of patients who underwent ultrasonography. Diabetes mellitus and peptic ulcer disease were noted in 22% and 31% of patients respectively.

  2. Prevalence and Risk Factors of CKD in Chinese Patients with Periodontal Disease

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Wei; Liang, Mengjun; Luo, Wei; Wu, Xianfeng; Ruan, Yiping; Wang, Jie; Xu, Ricong; Zhan, Xiaojiang; Yu, Jianwen; Tan, Jiaqing; Dong, Xiuqing; Zhang, Jincai; Yu, Xueqing

    2013-01-01

    Background Periodontal disease is common among adults and is associated with an increasing risk of chronic kidney disease (CKD). We aimed to investigate the prevalence and risk factors of CKD in patients with periodontal disease in China. Methods In the current cross-sectional study, patients with periodontal disease were included from Guangdong Provincial Stomatological Hospital between March 2011 and August 2011. CKD was defined as estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) <60 mL/min/1.73 m2, the presence of albuminuria, or hematuria. All patients with periodontal disease underwent a periodontal examination, including periodontal probing pocket depth, gingival recession, and clinical attachment level by Florida Probe. They completed a questionnaire and had blood and urine samples taken. The adjusted prevalence of indicators of kidney damage was calculated and risk factors associated with CKD were analyzed. Results A total of 1392 patients with periodontal disease were invited to participate this study and 1268 completed the survey and examination. After adjusting for age and sex, the prevalence of reduced eGFR, albuminuria, and hematuria was 2.7% (95% CI 1.7–3.7), 6.7% (95% CI 5.5–8.1) and 10.9% (95% CI 9.2–12.5), respectively. The adjusted prevalence of CKD was 18.2% (95% CI 16.2–20.3). Age, male, diabetes, hypertension, history of CKD, hyperuricemia, and interleukin-6 levels (≥7.54 ng/L) were independent risk factors for reduced eGFR. Female, diabetes, hypertension, history of CKD, hyperuricemia, high level of cholesterol, and high sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP) (≥1.03 mg/L) and TNF-α levels (≥1.12 ng/L) were independently associated with an increased risk of albuminuria. Female, lower education (disease have proteinuria, hematuria, or reduced eGFR, indicating the presence of kidney damage. Whether

  3. Cardiovascular disease prevalence and relevance in haemophilia: a scoping review.

    PubMed

    Rizwan, I; Minuk, L; Jackson, S; Iorio, A

    2015-05-01

    The prevalence of cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk and events in patients with haemophilia (PWH) is expected to increase as the longevity of this cohort increases due to treatment advances since the 1950s. The aims of this study were to assess publications of CVD and haemophilia for robustness, determine if the increasing longevity of PWH and associated age-related CVD risk factors result in CVD events; assess the need for an extension of the circle of care for ageing PWH due to the shift in comorbidities. A scoping review was conducted, resulting in a final pool of 30 articles which were organized based on publication dates. A matrix was created to illustrate which articles cited articles published prior to its own publication. This led to the identification of the primary articles, receiving the highest number of citations by other publications, which drive the research pertaining to the study of age-related risk factors of CVD in PWH. The scoping review revealed 14 original articles, four of which indicated a protective effect of haemophilia toward CVD. Twelve articles demonstrated a similar prevalence of CVD in PWH compared to the general population while seven articles concluded a difference in the prevalence of CVD in the ageing haemophilia population. The existing literature presented conflicting evidence regarding the possibility of a protective effect of haemophilia against CVD. The scoping review was not able to finalize whether the longevity of PWH and their associated age-related CVD risk factors result in CVD events because the articles assessed reported conflicting results.

  4. Prevalence and prognosis of Alzheimer's disease at the mild cognitive impairment stage.

    PubMed

    Vos, Stephanie J B; Verhey, Frans; Frölich, Lutz; Kornhuber, Johannes; Wiltfang, Jens; Maier, Wolfgang; Peters, Oliver; Rüther, Eckart; Nobili, Flavio; Morbelli, Silvia; Frisoni, Giovanni B; Drzezga, Alexander; Didic, Mira; van Berckel, Bart N M; Simmons, Andrew; Soininen, Hilkka; Kłoszewska, Iwona; Mecocci, Patrizia; Tsolaki, Magda; Vellas, Bruno; Lovestone, Simon; Muscio, Cristina; Herukka, Sanna-Kaisa; Salmon, Eric; Bastin, Christine; Wallin, Anders; Nordlund, Arto; de Mendonça, Alexandre; Silva, Dina; Santana, Isabel; Lemos, Raquel; Engelborghs, Sebastiaan; Van der Mussele, Stefan; Freund-Levi, Yvonne; Wallin, Åsa K; Hampel, Harald; van der Flier, Wiesje; Scheltens, Philip; Visser, Pieter Jelle

    2015-05-01

    Three sets of research criteria are available for diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease in subjects with mild cognitive impairment: the International Working Group-1, International Working Group-2, and National Institute of Aging-Alzheimer Association criteria. We compared the prevalence and prognosis of Alzheimer's disease at the mild cognitive impairment stage according to these criteria. Subjects with mild cognitive impairment (n = 1607), 766 of whom had both amyloid and neuronal injury markers, were recruited from 13 cohorts. We used cognitive test performance and available biomarkers to classify subjects as prodromal Alzheimer's disease according to International Working Group-1 and International Working Group-2 criteria and in the high Alzheimer's disease likelihood group, conflicting biomarker groups (isolated amyloid pathology or suspected non-Alzheimer pathophysiology), and low Alzheimer's disease likelihood group according to the National Institute of Ageing-Alzheimer Association criteria. Outcome measures were the proportion of subjects with Alzheimer's disease at the mild cognitive impairment stage and progression to Alzheimer's disease-type dementia. We performed survival analyses using Cox proportional hazards models. According to the International Working Group-1 criteria, 850 (53%) subjects had prodromal Alzheimer's disease. Their 3-year progression rate to Alzheimer's disease-type dementia was 50% compared to 21% for subjects without prodromal Alzheimer's disease. According to the International Working Group-2 criteria, 308 (40%) subjects had prodromal Alzheimer's disease. Their 3-year progression rate to Alzheimer's disease-type dementia was 61% compared to 22% for subjects without prodromal Alzheimer's disease. According to the National Institute of Ageing-Alzheimer Association criteria, 353 (46%) subjects were in the high Alzheimer's disease likelihood group, 49 (6%) in the isolated amyloid pathology group, 220 (29%) in the suspected non

  5. Prevalence and Subtypes of Mild Cognitive Impairment in Parkinson's Disease.

    PubMed

    Lawrence, Blake J; Gasson, Natalie; Loftus, Andrea M

    2016-09-21

    The current study examined the prevalence and subtypes of Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI) in an Australian sample of people with Parkinson's Disease (PD). Seventy participants with PD completed neuropsychological assessments of their cognitive performance, using MDS Task Force Level II diagnostic criteria for PD-MCI. A cut-off score of less than one standard deviation (SD) below normative data determined impaired performance on a neuropsychological test. Of 70 participants, 45 (64%) met Level II diagnostic criteria for PD-MCI. Among those with PD-MCI, 42 (93%) were identified as having multiple domain impairment (28 as amnestic multiple domain and 14 as nonamnestic multiple domain). Single domain impairment was less frequent (2 amnestic/1 nonamnestic). Significant differences were found between the PD-MCI and Normal Cognition groups, across all cognitive domains. Multiple domain cognitive impairment was more frequent than single domain impairment in an Australian sample of people with PD. However, PD-MCI is heterogeneous and current prevalence and subtyping statistics may be an artifact of variable application methods of the criteria (e.g., cut off scores and number of tests). Future longitudinal studies refining the criteria will assist with subtyping the progression of PD-MCI, while identifying individuals who may benefit from pharmacological and nonpharmacological interventions.

  6. Prevalence and Subtypes of Mild Cognitive Impairment in Parkinson's Disease.

    PubMed

    Lawrence, Blake J; Gasson, Natalie; Loftus, Andrea M

    2016-01-01

    The current study examined the prevalence and subtypes of Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI) in an Australian sample of people with Parkinson's Disease (PD). Seventy participants with PD completed neuropsychological assessments of their cognitive performance, using MDS Task Force Level II diagnostic criteria for PD-MCI. A cut-off score of less than one standard deviation (SD) below normative data determined impaired performance on a neuropsychological test. Of 70 participants, 45 (64%) met Level II diagnostic criteria for PD-MCI. Among those with PD-MCI, 42 (93%) were identified as having multiple domain impairment (28 as amnestic multiple domain and 14 as nonamnestic multiple domain). Single domain impairment was less frequent (2 amnestic/1 nonamnestic). Significant differences were found between the PD-MCI and Normal Cognition groups, across all cognitive domains. Multiple domain cognitive impairment was more frequent than single domain impairment in an Australian sample of people with PD. However, PD-MCI is heterogeneous and current prevalence and subtyping statistics may be an artifact of variable application methods of the criteria (e.g., cut off scores and number of tests). Future longitudinal studies refining the criteria will assist with subtyping the progression of PD-MCI, while identifying individuals who may benefit from pharmacological and nonpharmacological interventions. PMID:27650569

  7. Prevalence of Sjögren's syndrome in autoimmune diseases.

    PubMed Central

    Coll, J; Rives, A; Griñó, M C; Setoain, J; Vivancos, J; Balcells, A

    1987-01-01

    Investigations were carried out in 122 patients in order to identify features of Sjögren's syndrome (keratoconjunctivitis sicca and xerostomia). There were 78 patients with autoimmune diseases (rheumatoid arthritis 21, scleroderma 16, sicca syndrome 16, primary biliary cirrhosis 14, and other autoimmune disorders 11), 11 patients with chronic liver disease other than primary biliary cirrhosis, and 33 patients with a variety of non-autoimmune conditions or no obvious disease. Keratoconjunctivitis sicca was diagnosed by Schirmer's test and rose bengal staining. The oral component was diagnosed by labial biopsy and salivary scintigraphy. Forty nine patients had a definite Sjögren's syndrome, and 77 patients had the syndrome definitely or probably. Definite Sjögren's syndrome occurred in 62% of patients with rheumatoid arthritis, in 69% of patients with scleroderma, and in 71% of patients with primary biliary cirrhosis. Sjögren's syndrome was not present in any of the patients with non-autoimmune conditions. These results show that in an unselected group of patients with Sjögren's syndrome the prevalence of rheumatoid arthritis (26%), scleroderma (22%), sicca syndrome (22%), and primary biliary cirrhosis (20%) is similar. Also the occurrence of Sjögren's syndrome in primary biliary cirrhosis is even higher than that in rheumatoid arthritis. PMID:3592784

  8. Disease-mongering through clinical trials.

    PubMed

    González-Moreno, María; Saborido, Cristian; Teira, David

    2015-06-01

    Our goal in this paper is to articulate a precise concept of at least a certain kind of disease-mongering, showing how pharmaceutical marketing can commercially exploit certain diseases when their best definition is given through the success of a treatment in a clinical trial. We distinguish two types of disease-mongering according to the way they exploit the definition of the trial population for marketing purposes. We argue that behind these two forms of disease-mongering there are two well-known problems in the statistical methodology of clinical trials (the reference class problem and the distinction between statistical and clinical significance). Overcoming them is far from simple.

  9. Prevalence of heart disease demonstrated in 60 years of the Arquivos Brasileiros de Cardiologia.

    PubMed

    Evora, Paulo Roberto Barbosa; Nather, Julio Cesar; Rodrigues, Alfredo José

    2014-01-01

    Considering the historical and academic relevance of the Brazilian Archives of Cardiology (ABC), as its MEDLINE indexing began in 1950, it was assumed as a hypothesis that the analysis of the publications over the last 60 years could reflect the changing trends of heart disease in Brazil. The study data were collected using a program developed for this purpose, allowing the automatic extraction of information from the MEDLINE database. The study information were collected by searching "Brazilian Archives of Cardiology AND selected parameter in English". Four observational groups were determined: (1) major groups of heart diseases (coronary artery disease, valvular heart disease, congenital heart disease and cardiomyopathies); (2) relevant diseases in clinical practice (cardiac arrhythmias, cor pulmonale, myocardial infarction and congestive heart failure); (3) cardiovascular risk factors (hypertension, diabetes, dyslipidemia and atherosclerosis); and (4) group determined due to the growing trend of publications on congestive heart failure seen in previous groups (congestive heart failure, myocardial infarction, rheumatic heart disease and Chagasic heart disease) All publications within the established groups were described, highlighting the increasing importance of heart failure and diabetes as risk factors. A relatively easy search was carried out, using the computer program developed for literature search covering six decades. Emphasizing the limitations of the study, we suggest the existence of an epidemiological link between cardiac diseases that are prevalent in Brazil and the publications of the Brazilian Archives of Cardiology.

  10. Prevalence of Fabry Disease in Familial Mediterranean Fever Patients from Central Anatolia of Turkey.

    PubMed

    Huzmeli, Can; Candan, Ferhan; Alaygut, Demet; Bagci, Gokhan; Akkaya, Lale; Bagci, Binnur; Sozmen, Eser Yıldırım; Kurtulgan, Hande Kucuk; Kayatas, Mansur

    2016-08-01

    Fabry disease (FD) is a progressive, X-linked inherited disorder of glycosphingolipid metabolism due to deficient or absent lysosomal alpha-galactosidase A (AGALA) activity. FD and familial Mediterranean fever (FMF) have typical clinical similarities, and both diseases may progress to end-stage renal diseases. In this study, we aimed to determine the prevalence of FD in patients with FMF from Central Anatolia of Turkey. The study group consisted of 177 FMF patients, followed up by the Adult and Pediatric Nephrology Clinic of Cumhuriyet University Hospital. Screening for AGALA activity was performed by the dry blood spot method. Mutation analysis for GLA gene was carried out for patients having an AGALA enzyme activity value lower than the normal reference value. Low AGALA activity was detected in 23 (13 %) patients. Heterozygous GLA gene mutation c.[937G>T] p.[D313Y] was detected in one female patient (0.56 %). The patient was a 53-year-old female with proteinuria and who had undergone left nephrectomy; her glomerular filtration rate (GFR) by scintigraphy was found to be 70 ml/min. She had M694V mutation and no clinical manifestation of FD. In our study, the prevalence rate of FD was found as 0.56 % in FMF patients. The similarities between the symptoms of FMF and FD might lead to a diagnostic dilemma in physicians at countries where FMF is observed frequently. Although the prevalence of FD is rare, physicians should keep in mind that FD has an ambiguous symptomology pattern of FMF. PMID:27105876

  11. Prevalence of Fabry Disease in Familial Mediterranean Fever Patients from Central Anatolia of Turkey.

    PubMed

    Huzmeli, Can; Candan, Ferhan; Alaygut, Demet; Bagci, Gokhan; Akkaya, Lale; Bagci, Binnur; Sozmen, Eser Yıldırım; Kurtulgan, Hande Kucuk; Kayatas, Mansur

    2016-08-01

    Fabry disease (FD) is a progressive, X-linked inherited disorder of glycosphingolipid metabolism due to deficient or absent lysosomal alpha-galactosidase A (AGALA) activity. FD and familial Mediterranean fever (FMF) have typical clinical similarities, and both diseases may progress to end-stage renal diseases. In this study, we aimed to determine the prevalence of FD in patients with FMF from Central Anatolia of Turkey. The study group consisted of 177 FMF patients, followed up by the Adult and Pediatric Nephrology Clinic of Cumhuriyet University Hospital. Screening for AGALA activity was performed by the dry blood spot method. Mutation analysis for GLA gene was carried out for patients having an AGALA enzyme activity value lower than the normal reference value. Low AGALA activity was detected in 23 (13 %) patients. Heterozygous GLA gene mutation c.[937G>T] p.[D313Y] was detected in one female patient (0.56 %). The patient was a 53-year-old female with proteinuria and who had undergone left nephrectomy; her glomerular filtration rate (GFR) by scintigraphy was found to be 70 ml/min. She had M694V mutation and no clinical manifestation of FD. In our study, the prevalence rate of FD was found as 0.56 % in FMF patients. The similarities between the symptoms of FMF and FD might lead to a diagnostic dilemma in physicians at countries where FMF is observed frequently. Although the prevalence of FD is rare, physicians should keep in mind that FD has an ambiguous symptomology pattern of FMF.

  12. THERAPIES FOR CROHN'S DISEASE: a clinical update.

    PubMed

    Sobrado, Carlos Walter; Leal, Raquel Franco; Sobrado, Lucas Faraco

    2016-01-01

    The main objectives of clinical therapy in Crohn's disease are clinical and endoscopic remission without the use of corticosteroids for long periods of time, prevention of hospitalization and surgery, and improvement of quality of life. The main limitation of drug therapy is the loss of response over the long term, which makes incorporation of new drugs to the therapeutic arsenal necessary. This review analyses the main drugs currently used in clinical treatment of Crohn's disease. PMID:27438429

  13. Clinical presentation of osgood- schlatter disease in the adolescent population.

    PubMed

    Antich, T J; Lombardo, S J

    1985-01-01

    Osgood-Schlatter disease is a condition affecting knees of adolescents. Males are affected more frequently than females, and unilateral involvement is more common than bilateral. In the 75 cases seen in our clinic in 4l/3 years, participation in basketball was twice as common among our patients as was any other sport. With the addition of our clinical cases to those documented in the literature, the left knee is significantly more involved than the right (P < 0.05). Relationship to hand dominance is discussed as a possible explanation for the unusual prevalence for left knee involvement. J Orthop Sports Phys Ther 1985;7(1):1-4.

  14. Prevalence of dry eye diseases in hospital-based population in West Bengal, Eastern India.

    PubMed

    Basak, Samar K; Pal, Partha Pratim; Basak, Soham; Bandyopadhyay, Abhijit; Choudhury, Sumit; Sar, Suchanda

    2012-11-01

    To determine the prevalence of dry eye diseases in general clinical ophthalmic practice in a hospital-based population in West Bengal, Eastern India, a cross-sectional study was undertaken among 3023 subjects with the age of > or = 30 years, attending general ophthalmic clinic in a tertiary eye hospital. Demographics, detailed history and 6-items McMonnies' dry eye questionnaire were asked. Tear film break-up time (TBUT), Schirmer-I test, Rose Bengal (RB) staining, slit lamp examination and Meibomian gland dysfunction (MGD) were studied. Dry eye diseases were significantly higher in women than in men ie, 51.9% versus 48.1% (p < 0.01). Symptom-based dry eye (one or more symptoms present often or most of the time) was diagnosed in 1234 subjects (40.8%). With symptoms and at least one sign [TBUT < 10 seconds, RB staining (van Bjisterveld score: 4 or more) and Schirmer-I test = 5 mm in 5 minutes], the prevalence of dry eye was 786 (26%). Different grades of MeibOmian gland dysfunction (MGD) were detected in 957 cases (31.7%). Primary Sjogren syndrome was found in 21.5%; and 10.9% patients of dry eye had some form of systemic collagen vascular disorders. Using computers was not a risk factor in this geographical area. No significant correlation was seen between significant symptoms and positive signs in the study population. The prevalence of dry eye disease is high in West Bengal, Eastern India in hospital-based population. The risk is higher with age, female gender, systemic collagen diseases and with oral antidepressant/anxiolytic medication. Meibomian gland dysfunction is found to be common among dry eye subjects.

  15. Ledderhose Disease: Clinical, Radiological (Ultrasound and MRI), and Anatomopathological Findings

    PubMed Central

    Omor, Y.; Dhaene, B.; Grijseels, S.; Alard, S.

    2015-01-01

    Plantar fibromatosis, or Ledderhose disease, is a rare hyperproliferative disorder of the plantar aponeurosis. It may occur at any age, with the greatest prevalence at middle age and beyond. This disorder is more common in men than woman and it is sometimes associated with other forms of fibromatosis. Diagnosis is based on clinical examination. Ultrasound (US) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can be useful to confirm the diagnosis. A 44-year-old man with Ledderhose disease who underwent ultrasound and MR is described in this paper. PMID:26425380

  16. Catatonia in depression: prevalence, clinical correlates, and validation of a scale.

    PubMed Central

    Starkstein, S E; Petracca, G; Tesón, A; Chemerinski, E; Merello, M; Migliorelli, R; Leiguarda, R

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVES--To examine the clinical correlates of catatonia in depression, to validate a scale for catatonia, and to assess the validity of the DSM-IV criteria of the catatonic features specifier for mood disorders. METHODS--A series of 79 consecutive patients with depression and 41 patients with Parkinson's disease without depression were examined using the modified Rogers scale (MRS), the unified Parkinson's disease rating scale (UPDRS), and the structured clinical interview for DSM-III-R (SCID). RESULTS--Sixteen of the 79 depressed patients (20%) had catatonia. Depressed patients with catatonia had significantly higher scores on the MRS than non-catatonic depressed patients matched for severity of depression, or non-depressed patients with Parkinson's disease matched for severity of motor impairment. Depressed patients with catatonia were older, had a significantly higher frequency of major depression, more severe cognitive impairments, and more severe deficits in activities of daily living than depressed non-catatonic patients. The DSM-IV criteria of catatonia separated depressed catatonic patients from patients with Parkinson's disease matched for motor impairment, with a specificity of 100%. Catatonic signs did not improve after apomorphine. CONCLUSIONS--catatonia is most prevalent among elderly patients with severe depression. The study showed the validity of the MRS for the diagnosis of catatonia in depressed patients, as well as the specificity of the DSM-IV criteria of the catatonic features specifier. PMID:8609512

  17. Prevalence of vitamin D deficiency in adults with sickle cell disease.

    PubMed

    Goodman, B Mitchell; Artz, Nicole; Radford, Barbera; Chen, Ian A

    2010-04-01

    Vitamin D deficiency has been linked to fracture risk and chronic musculoskeletal pain. Adults with sickle cell disease have a high prevalence of low bone density and chronic pain with poorly defined etiologies. We recognized that vitamin D deficiency may represent a treatable etiology and sought to determine the prevalence of vitamin D deficiency in adults with sickle cell. We measured 25-hydroxy vitamin D levels in adults at 2 university-based sickle cell disease-management programs. Regression was performed in 142 patients to identify predictors of low vitamin D. Mean vitamin D levels were 9.0 ng/mL at Eastern Virginia Medical School and 12.8 ng/mL at University of Chicago; 139 of 142 (98%) had suboptimal levels (<30 ng/mL) and 85/142 (60%) were severely deficient (<10 ng/mL). Vitamin D level was not related to age, sex, hydroxyurea use, sickle cell type, or date of lab draw. Vitamin D deficiency was, therefore, nearly ubiquitous in our patient population, with a majority being severely deficient. Further studies are warranted to evaluate the effects of vitamin D repletion on clinical outcomes such as bone density, chronic musculoskeletal pain, and functional status. Clinicians caring for patients with sickle cell disease should be aware of and screen for this important clinical state.

  18. Prevalence and clinical manifestations of malaria in Aligarh, India.

    PubMed

    Asma, Umm-e; Taufiq, Farha; Khan, Wajihullah

    2014-12-01

    Malaria is one of the most widespread infectious diseases of tropical countries with an estimated 207 million cases globally. In India, there are endemic pockets of this disease, including Aligarh. Hundreds of Plasmodium falciparum and P. vivax cases with severe pathological conditions are recorded every year in this district. The aim of this study is to find out changes in liver enzymes and kidney markers. Specific diagnosis for P. falciparum and P. vivax was made by microscopic examination of Giemsa stained slides. Clinical symptoms were observed in both of these infections. Liver enzymes, such as AST, ALT, and ALP, and kidney function markers, such as creatinine and urea, were estimated by standard biochemical techniques. In Aligarh district, P. vivax, P. falciparum, and mixed infections were 64%, 34%, and 2%, respectively. In case of P. falciparum infection, the incidences of anemia, splenomegaly, renal failure, jaundice, and neurological sequelae were higher compared to those in P. vivax infection. Recrudescence and relapse rates were 18% and 20% in P. falciparum and P. vivax infections, respectively. Liver dysfunctions and renal failures were more common in P. falciparum patients, particularly in elderly patients. Artesunate derivatives must, therefore, be introduced for the treatment of P. falciparum as they resist to chloroquine as well as sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine combinations.

  19. Prevalence and Clinical Manifestations of Malaria in Aligarh, India

    PubMed Central

    Asma, Umm-e; Taufiq, Farha

    2014-01-01

    Malaria is one of the most widespread infectious diseases of tropical countries with an estimated 207 million cases globally. In India, there are endemic pockets of this disease, including Aligarh. Hundreds of Plasmodium falciparum and P. vivax cases with severe pathological conditions are recorded every year in this district. The aim of this study is to find out changes in liver enzymes and kidney markers. Specific diagnosis for P. falciparum and P. vivax was made by microscopic examination of Giemsa stained slides. Clinical symptoms were observed in both of these infections. Liver enzymes, such as AST, ALT, and ALP, and kidney function markers, such as creatinine and urea, were estimated by standard biochemical techniques. In Aligarh district, P. vivax, P. falciparum, and mixed infections were 64%, 34%, and 2%, respectively. In case of P. falciparum infection, the incidences of anemia, splenomegaly, renal failure, jaundice, and neurological sequelae were higher compared to those in P. vivax infection. Recrudescence and relapse rates were 18% and 20% in P. falciparum and P. vivax infections, respectively. Liver dysfunctions and renal failures were more common in P. falciparum patients, particularly in elderly patients. Artesunate derivatives must, therefore, be introduced for the treatment of P. falciparum as they resist to chloroquine as well as sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine combinations. PMID:25548413

  20. Million hearts: prevalence of leading cardiovascular disease risk factors--United States, 2005-2012.

    PubMed

    Ritchey, Matthew D; Wall, Hilary K; Gillespie, Cathleen; George, Mary G; Jamal, Ahmed

    2014-05-30

    Each year, approximately 1.5 million U.S. adults have a heart attack or stroke, resulting in approximately 30 deaths every hour and, for nonfatal events, often leading to long-term disability. Overall, an estimated 14 million survivors of heart attacks and strokes are living in the United States. In 2011, the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, in collaboration with nonprofit and private organizations, launched Million Hearts (http://www.millionhearts.hhs.gov), an initiative focused on implementing clinical and community-level evidence-based strategies to reduce cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors and prevent a total of 1 million heart attacks and strokes during the 5-year period 2012-2016. From 2005-2006 to the period with the most current data, analysis of the Million Hearts four "ABCS" clinical measures (for aspirin, blood pressure, cholesterol, and smoking) showed 1) no statistically significant change in the prevalence of aspirin use for secondary prevention (53.8% in 2009-2010), 2) an increase to 51.9% in the prevalence of blood pressure control (in 2011-2012), 3) an increase to 42.8% in the prevalence of cholesterol management (in 2011-2012), and 4) no statistically significant change in the prevalence of smoking assessment and treatment (22.2% in 2009-2010). In addition, analysis of two community-level indicators found 1) a decrease in current tobacco product smoking (including cigarette, cigar, or pipe use) prevalence to 25.1% in 2011-2012 and 2) minimal change in mean daily sodium intake (3,594 mg/day in 2009-2010). Although trends in some measures are encouraging, further reductions of CVD risk factors will be needed to meet Million Hearts goals by 2017.

  1. Childhood Inflammatory Bowel Disease in Libya: Epidemiological and Clinical features

    PubMed Central

    Ahmaida, AI; Al-Shaikhi, SA

    2009-01-01

    Background & Aims: Inflammatory bowel disease is thought to be rare in Libya. The aim is to determine the prevalence of juvenile onset inflammatory bowel disease in Libya. Setting: Al-Fateh childrens' hospital, Benghazi, Libya. Methods: This is a retrospective study of all cases diagnosed over 10 years (1997–2006) with either ulcerative colitis, Crohn's disease or indeterminate colitis. Inclusion criteria were age <15 years at time of presentation who were resident in the eastern part of the country and who diagnosed with inflammatory bowel disease. Clinical features were outlined using a proforma. Results: Sixteen cases were diagnosed with inflammatory bowel disease, of whom 11 were males (M:F ratio of 1.5:1). The prevalence and incidence rates in the year 2006 were 3.6 and 0.9 per 100,000 children, respectively. The incidence rate increased from 0.2 in 2002 to 0.9 in 2006 (Z score of 39.87, p= 0.00). The age at presentation ranged from 5 months to 14 years. Nine had Crohn's disease (6 males) and 6 had ulcerative colitis (4 males). One patient had indeterminate colitis. The most common clinical features were diarrhea in 10 (62.5%), abdominal pain, anorexia and weight loss in 9 (56.2%), anemia in 7 (43.75%) and vomiting in 6 (37%). Ileopancolitis was found in 3 patients whereas 6 patients had ileocecal disease. Conclusions: Childhood inflammatory bowel disease in this population is not so rare and it is increasing. The clinical pattern is similar to that reported by others. PMID:21483512

  2. Defining the relationship between infection prevalence and clinical incidence of Plasmodium falciparum malaria

    PubMed Central

    Cameron, Ewan; Battle, Katherine E.; Bhatt, Samir; Weiss, Daniel J.; Bisanzio, Donal; Mappin, Bonnie; Dalrymple, Ursula; Hay, Simon I.; Smith, David L.; Griffin, Jamie T.; Wenger, Edward A.; Eckhoff, Philip A.; Smith, Thomas A.; Penny, Melissa A.; Gething, Peter W.

    2015-01-01

    In many countries health system data remain too weak to accurately enumerate Plasmodium falciparum malaria cases. In response, cartographic approaches have been developed that link maps of infection prevalence with mathematical relationships to predict the incidence rate of clinical malaria. Microsimulation (or ‘agent-based') models represent a powerful new paradigm for defining such relationships; however, differences in model structure and calibration data mean that no consensus yet exists on the optimal form for use in disease-burden estimation. Here we develop a Bayesian statistical procedure combining functional regression-based model emulation with Markov Chain Monte Carlo sampling to calibrate three selected microsimulation models against a purpose-built data set of age-structured prevalence and incidence counts. This allows the generation of ensemble forecasts of the prevalence–incidence relationship stratified by age, transmission seasonality, treatment level and exposure history, from which we predict accelerating returns on investments in large-scale intervention campaigns as transmission and prevalence are progressively reduced. PMID:26348689

  3. Prevalence of peripheral arterial disease in patients with diabetes mellitus in a primary care setting.

    PubMed

    Rabia, K; Khoo, E M

    2007-06-01

    The aims of the study were to determine the prevalence of peripheral arterial disease (PAD) in diabetic patients and in different ethnic groups at a primary care setting, and to evaluate risk factors associated with PAD in these diabetic patients. A cross sectional study of 200 diabetic patients over 18 years old who attended a primary care clinic at a teaching hospital in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia was carried out. Face-to-face interviews were conducted using structured questionnaires for demographic characteristics and risk factors evaluation. Blood pressure measurements, assessment of peripheral neuropathy and ankle brachial pressures were performed. PAD was diagnosed by an ankle brachial pressure index (ABPI) of <0.9 on either leg. The overall prevalence of PAD was 16% in this diabetic population. The prevalence of PAD was 5.8% in Malays, 19.4% in Chinese and 19.8% in Indians. The prevalence of peripheral neuropathy was 41%, foot ulcer 9.5%, and gangrene 3.0%. The presence of foot ulcer was weakly associated with PAD (P=0.052). No significant relationships were found between age, gender, smoking status, duration of diabetes mellitus, hypertension, dyslipidaemia, and PAD. PAD is common in the diabetic population of this study. PMID:18705445

  4. [Geriatric particularities of Parkinson's disease: Clinical and therapeutic aspects].

    PubMed

    Belin, J; Houéto, J L; Constans, T; Hommet, C; de Toffol, B; Mondon, K

    2015-12-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a frequent and complex progressive neurological disorder that increases in incidence with age. Although historically PD has been characterized by the presence of progressive dopaminergic neuronal loss of the substantia nigra, the disease process also involves neurotransmitters other that dopamine and regions of the nervous system outside the basal ganglia. Its clinical presentation in elderly subjects differs from that in younger subjects, with more rapid progression, less frequent tremor, more pronounced axial signs, more frequent non-motor signs linked to concomitant degeneration of non-dopaminergic systems, and more frequent associated lesions. Despite the high prevalence of PD in elderly subjects, few therapeutic trials have been conducted in geriatric patients. Nevertheless, to improve functional disability while ensuring drug tolerance, the principles of optimized and multidisciplinary clinical management have to be known. The aim of this review is to provide an update on clinical and therapeutic features of PD specifically observed in elderly subjects. PMID:26573332

  5. Celiac disease prevalence in Brazilian dilated cardiomyopathy patients.

    PubMed

    De Bem, Ricardo Schmit T; Da Ro Sa Utiyama, Shirley Ramos; Nisihara, Renato Mitsunori; Fortunato, Jerônimo Antônio; Tondo, Josué Augusto; Carmes, Eliane Ribeiro; Souza, Raquel Almada E; Pisani, Julio César; Amarante, Heda Maria Barska Dos Santos

    2006-05-01

    Celiac disease (CD) is a permanent condition of gluten intolerance and a number of autoimmune diseases have been associated with it. In the past few years, a relation between CD and dilated cardiomyopathy (CM) was described in Europe and United States. The aim of this study was to evaluate the prevalence of CD among south Brazilian precardiac transplant patients with advanced CM. A total of 74 patients on a list for heart transplantation were evaluated for the presence CD. The presence of anti-endomisial antibody (IgA-EmA) was determined by indirect immunofluorescence and for the anti-transglutaminase antibody (IgA anti-h-tTG) by ELISA. Serologically positive patients were submitted to upper endoscopy with intestinal biopsy. Two individuals (2.63%) were positive for IgA-EmA and 5 (6.75%) for IgA anti-h-tTG; 1 (1.35%) had both tests positive. Histologic confirmation of CD occurred only in the IgA-EmA positive patients. In conclusion, data from the present study allows recommend the screening for CD in patients with CM using IgA-EmA test as the method of choice. PMID:16758314

  6. Prevalence of psychiatric comorbidities in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease patients

    PubMed Central

    Chaudhary, Shyam Chand; Nanda, Satyan; Tripathi, Adarsh; Sawlani, Kamal Kumar; Gupta, Kamlesh Kumar; Himanshu, D; Verma, Ajay Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Psychiatric disorders, especially anxiety and depression have been reported to have an increased prevalence in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) patients, but there is a paucity of data from India. Aims and Objectives: Aim of our study is to study the frequency of psychiatric comorbidities in COPD patients and their correlation with severity of COPD, as per global initiative for obstructive lung disease guidelines. Materials and Methods: This study was conducted in outpatient department of a tertiary care hospital (King George's Medical University). A total of 74 COPD patients were included in this study and compared with 74 controls. The diagnosis and severity of COPD were assessed by spirometry. Psychiatric comorbidities were assessed using the Mini International Neuropsychiatric Interview questionnaire. Results: The frequency of psychiatric comorbidities was significantly higher (P < 0.05) in COPD patients (28.4%) as compared to controls (2.7%). As regards to severity, the frequency was significantly increased in severe and very severe COPD. The frequency of psychiatric comorbidities in COPD patients increased significantly with the increase in duration of symptoms being present in 67% of patients with duration of symptoms more than 10 years and only 23% of patients with duration of symptoms ≤5 years. Conclusion: The frequency of psychiatric comorbidities is increased in COPD patients as compared to controls. We recommend that all patients with COPD should be screened for psychiatric comorbidity, if any. PMID:27051106

  7. Toxoplasmosis in humans and animals in Brazil: high prevalence, high burden of disease, and epidemiology.

    PubMed

    Dubey, J P; Lago, E G; Gennari, S M; Su, C; Jones, J L

    2012-09-01

    Infections by the protozoan parasite Toxoplasma gondii are widely prevalent in humans and animals in Brazil. The burden of clinical toxoplasmosis in humans is considered to be very high. The high prevalence and encouragement of the Brazilian Government provides a unique opportunity for international groups to study the epidemiology and control of toxoplasmosis in Brazil. Many early papers on toxoplasmosis in Brazil were published in Portuguese and often not available to scientists in English-speaking countries. In the present paper we review prevalence, clinical spectrum, molecular epidemiology, and control of T. gondii in humans and animals in Brazil. This knowledge should be useful to biologists, public health workers, veterinarians, and physicians. Brazil has a very high rate of T. gondii infection in humans. Up to 50% of elementary school children and 50-80% of women of child-bearing age have antibodies to T. gondii. The risks for uninfected women to acquire toxoplasmosis during pregnancy and fetal transmission are high because the environment is highly contaminated with oocysts. The burden of toxoplasmosis in congenitally infected children is also very high. From limited data on screening of infants for T. gondii IgM at birth, 5-23 children are born infected per 10 000 live births in Brazil. Based on an estimate of 1 infected child per 1000 births, 2649 children with congenital toxoplasmosis are likely to be born annually in Brazil. Most of these infected children are likely to develop symptoms or signs of clinical toxoplasmosis. Among the congenitally infected children whose clinical data are described in this review, several died soon after birth, 35% had neurological disease including hydrocephalus, microcephaly and mental retardation, 80% had ocular lesions, and in one report 40% of children had hearing loss. The severity of clinical toxoplasmosis in Brazilian children may be associated with the genetic characteristics of T. gondii isolates prevailing in

  8. Prevalence and Association of Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis with Disease Course in Patients with Ulcero-Constrictive Ileocolonic Disease

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Imteyaz Ahmad; Pilli, Sucharita; A, Surendranath; Rampal, Ritika; Chauhan, Sudhir Kumar; Tiwari, Veena; Mouli, Venigalla Pratap; Kedia, Saurabh; Nayak, Baibaswata; Das, Prasenjit; Makharia, Govind K.; Ahuja, Vineet

    2016-01-01

    Background Association of Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis (MAP) and Crohn’s disease (CD) has been controversial due to contradictory reports. Therefore, we determined the prevalence of MAP in patients with CD and intestinal tuberculosis (ITB) and its association with clinical course. Methodology Blood and intestinal biopsies were taken from 69 CD, 32 ITB patients and 41 patients with haemorrhoidal bleed who served as controls. qPCR targeting of MAP-specific IS900 gene was used to detect the presence of MAP DNA. qPCR results were further validated by sequencing. Immunohistochemistry (IHC) was used to detect the presence of MAP antigen in biopsy specimens. CD and ITB patients were followed-up for disease course and response to therapy. Principal Findings The frequency of MAP-specific DNA in biopsies by qPCR was significantly higher in CD patients (23.2%, p = 0.03) as compared to controls (7.3%). No significant difference in intestinal MAP presence was observed between ITB patients (12.5%, p = 0.6) and controls (7.3%). MAP presence in blood of CD patients was 10.1% as compared to 4.9% in controls while no patients with ITB were found to be positive (p = 0.1). Using IHC for detection of MAP antigen, the prevalence of MAP in CD was 2.9%, 12.5% in ITB patients and 2.4% in controls. However, long-term follow-up of the patients revealed no significant associations between clinical characteristics and treatment outcomes with MAP positivity. Conclusion We report significantly high prevalence of MAP in intestinal biopsies of CD patients. However, the presence of MAP does not affect the disease course and treatment outcomes in either CD or ITB patients. PMID:27019109

  9. Prevalence and correlates of valvular heart diseases in the elderly population in Hubei, China

    PubMed Central

    Shu, Chang; Chen, Si; Qin, Tingting; Fu, Zhen; Sun, Tucheng; Xie, Mingxing; Zhang, Li; Dong, Nianguo; Yin, Ping

    2016-01-01

    We sought to determine the prevalence and correlates of valvular heart diseases (VHD) in the elderly population. The participants’ personal information, medical history, behavioral habits and clinical status were assessed by questionnaire, while the left ventricular dimensions, function and the presence and severity of VHD were evaluated by transthoracic echocardiography. This study analyzed the data of 3948 participants who were older than 60 years. Significant VHD was present in 1.93% of participants; the standardized prevalence of VHD among the elderly population in Hubei was 2.05% (95% CI: 1.61–2.49). The most frequent VHD was aortic regurgitation, followed by tricuspid regurgitation, mitral regurgitation and multiple valve diseases. Univariate analysis results indicated that compared with participants without VHD, those with VHD were older (p < 0.001), with a higher body mass index (BMI) (p < 0.001), were more likely to smoke (p = 0.04), and had higher rates of coronary artery disease (CAD) (p < 0.001) and arrhythmia (p < 0.001). The results of multinomial regression analysis of complex sampling indicated that combined mitral and aortic valve diseases were related to older age, male sex and smoking; CAD was associated with single left-sided VHD. PMID:27250873

  10. Increased prevalence of peripheral arterial disease in osteoporotic postmenopausal women.

    PubMed

    Mangiafico, Roberto Antonio; Russo, Enzo; Riccobene, Stefania; Pennisi, Pietra; Mangiafico, Marco; D'Amico, Ferdinando; Fiore, Carmelo Erio

    2006-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence and correlates of peripheral arterial disease (PAD) in a population of osteoporotic postmenopausal women. The presence of PAD was assessed by ankle brachial index (ABI) in 345 ambulatory osteoporotic postmenopausal women, and in 360 community-based, age- and race-matched postmenopausal women with normal bone mineral density (BMD) (control group). PAD was detected in 63/345 (18.2%) osteoporotic women and in 14/360 (3.8%) control subjects (P < 0.0001). The mean ABI values were significantly lower in the osteoporosis group than in the control group (0.98 +/- 0.09 vs. 1.04 +/- 0.06, P < 0.0001). No difference in cardiovascular risk factors was observed between osteoporotic patients and controls, or between osteoporotic patients with and without PAD. Osteoporotic patients with PAD had lower femoral neck BMD T scores than those without PAD (-4.2 +/- 0.7 vs. -2.3 +/- 0.7, P < 0.0001). Only 4 PAD patients (5.1%) had intermittent claudication. In multivariate logistic regression analysis, factors independently associated with PAD within osteoporotic patients were lower femoral neck BMD T score (odds ratio (OR) = 0.20, 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.05-0.70, P = 0.01) and systolic blood pressure (OR = 1.02, 95% CI, 1.00-1.03, P = 0.01). This study shows for the first time an increased prevalence of PAD among osteoporotic postmenopausal women, with a lower femoral neck BMD T score being a significant independent predictor. The findings suggest that vascular status evaluation should be done in osteoporotic postmenopausal women in order to identify candidate patients for preventive and therapeutic cardiovascular interventions. PMID:16502119

  11. High Prevalence of Acute Exacerbation of Interstitial Lung Disease in Japanese Patients with Systemic Sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Tomiyama, Fumiko; Watanabe, Ryu; Ishii, Tomonori; Kamogawa, Yukiko; Fujita, Yoko; Shirota, Yuko; Sugimura, Koichiro; Fujii, Hiroshi; Harigae, Hideo

    2016-01-01

    Systemic sclerosis (SSc) is a systemic autoimmune disease characterized by extensive fibrosis and autoantibodies. Its clinical manifestations are diverse and include Raynaud's phenomenon, gastrointestinal dysmotility, interstitial lung disease (ILD), pulmonary hypertension, and renal crisis. Among these, ILD is the primary cause of SSc-related death. It has been considered that acute exacerbation of ILD (AE-ILD) is not common in patients with SSc; however, little is known about the prevalence of AE-ILD in Japanese patients with SSc. In this study, we aimed to clarify the prevalence, clinical characteristics, and prognosis of patients with SSc who developed AE-ILD and to identify predictive factors for AE-ILD in our Japanese cohorts. Clinical data of patients who visited our department from 1990 to 2014 and fulfilled the 2013 classification criteria for SSc were retrospectively reviewed. A total of 139 patients were enrolled. The mean age of onset was 49.1 years, and 113 (81.3%) patients were female; 116 (83.5%) had limited cutaneous involvement, and the overall 10-year survival rate was 92.0%. Among 66 (47.5%) patients with ILD, 13 (9.4%) developed AE-ILD. Patients with AE-ILD had a significantly higher incidence of overlap with polymyositis (PM) or dermatomyositis (DM) and lower prevalence of anticentromere antibodies with higher mortality rate compared with those without AE-ILD. Multivariate Cox regression analysis identified that an overlap with PM or DM was the most significant predictive factor for AE-ILD. Our study results suggest that Japanese patients with SSc, particularly patients overlapped with PM or DM, have a high risk of AE-ILD. PMID:27487743

  12. An investigation into the prevalence of thyroid disease on Kwajalein Atoll, Marshall Islands.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, T; Trott, K R; Fujimori, K; Simon, S L; Ohtomo, H; Nakashima, N; Takaya, K; Kimura, N; Satomi, S; Schoemaker, M J

    1997-07-01

    The prevalence of thyroid nodules and thyroid cancer was studied in the indigenous population residing on Ebeye Island, Kwajalein Atoll, in the Republic of the Marshall Islands. This island, centrally located in the nation, is home to about 25% of the nation's population, many who have migrated there from other atolls. The objective of the study was to obtain thyroid disease rate statistics on as much of the population as possible that was alive during the years of nuclear testing and to test the hypothesis that described a linearly decreasing prevalence of palpable nodules with increasing distance from the Bikini test site. 1,322 Marshallese born before 1965 were given a thyroid examination using neck palpation, fine needle aspiration biopsy, and high resolution ultrasound imaging. Approximately 40% of the total population living on this island who are at risk from exposure to radioactive fallout during the years 1946-1958 were screened. Of that group, 815 were alive at the time of the BRAVO test on 1 March 1954. Two hundred sixty-six people with thyroid nodules were found (32.6%): 132 were palpable nodules (16.2%), and 134 were nodules that could be diagnosed with ultrasound only (15.7%). Prevalence of palpable nodules was particularly high in men and women older than 60 y, in men who were 6 to 15 y of age at the time of the BRAVO test, and in women 1 to 10 y of age at the time of the BRAVO test. In 22 people, the clinical diagnosis was most likely cancer though histopathological evidence was only available from 11 operated cases. Of the 11 operated cases, 10 were cancer. Cancer prevalence was particularly high in those women born between 1944 and 1953 (7/220 = 3.2%), i.e., who were children during the early years of nuclear testing. The Ebeye data showed a marginally significant correlation between palpable nodule prevalence among women and distance to Bikini (r = -0.44, p = 0.06). This report summarizes the clinical findings of the thyroid examinations, the age

  13. The Prevalence of Chagas Heart Disease in a Central Bolivian Community Endemic for Trypanosoma Cruzi

    PubMed Central

    Yager, Jessica E.; Lozano Beltran, Daniel F.; Torrico, Faustino; Gilman, Robert H.; Bern, Caryn

    2015-01-01

    Background Though the incidence of new Trypanosoma cruzi infections has decreased significantly in endemic regions in the Americas, medical professionals continue to encounter a high burden of resulting Chagas disease among infected adults. The current prevalence of Chagas heart disease in a community setting is not known; nor is it known how recent insecticide vector control measures may have impacted the progression of cardiac disease in an infected population. Objectives and Methods Nested within a community serosurvey in rural and periurban communities in central Bolivia, we performed a cross-sectional cardiac substudy to evaluate adults for historical, clinical, and electrocardiographic evidence of cardiac disease. All adults between the ages of 20 and 60 years old with T. cruzi infection and those with a clinical history, physical exam, or ECG consistent with cardiac abnormalities were also scheduled for echocardiography. Results and conclusions Of the 604 cardiac substudy participants with definitive serology results, 183 were seropositive for infection with T. cruzi (30.3%). Participants who were seropositive for T. cruzi infection were more likely to have conduction system defects (1.6% versus 0 for complete right bundle branch block and 10.4% versus 1.9% for any bundle branch block; p=0.008 and p<0.001, respectively). However, there was no statistically significant difference in the prevalence of bradycardia among seropositive versus seronegative participants. Echocardiogram findings were not consistent with a high burden of Chagas cardiomyopathy: valvulopathies were the most common abnormality, and few participants were found to have low ejection fraction or left ventricular dilatation. No participants had significant heart failure. Though almost one third of adults in the community were seropositive for T. cruzi infection, few had evidence of Chagas heart disease. PMID:26407509

  14. Clinical Scenarios in Chronic Kidney Disease: Cystic Renal Diseases.

    PubMed

    Meola, Mario; Samoni, Sara; Petrucci, Ilaria

    2016-01-01

    Cysts are frequently found in chronic kidney disease (CKD) and they have a different prognostic significance depending on the clinical context. Simple solitary parenchymal cysts and peripelvic cysts are very common and they have no clinical significance. At US, simple cyst appears as a round anechoic pouch with regular and thin profiles. On the other hand, hereditary polycystic disease is a frequent cause of CKD in children and adults. Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) and autosomal recessive polycystic kidney disease (ARPKD) are the best known cystic hereditary diseases. ADPKD and ARPKD show a diffused cystic degeneration with cysts of different diameters derived from tubular epithelium. Medullary cystic disease may be associated with tubular defects, acidosis and lithiasis and can lead to CKD. Acquired cystic kidney disease, finally, is secondary to progressive structural end-stage kidney remodelling and may be associated with renal cell carcinoma. PMID:27169740

  15. Depression as a disease of modernity: explanations for increasing prevalence

    PubMed Central

    Hidaka, Brandon H

    2012-01-01

    There has been much speculation about modern environments causing an epidemic of depression. This review aims to (1) determine whether depression rates have increased and (2) review evidence for possible explanations. While available data indicate rising prevalence and an increased lifetime risk for younger cohorts, strong conclusions cannot be drawn due to conflicting results and methodological flaws. There are numerous potential explanations for changing rates of depression. Cross-cultural studies can be useful for identifying likely culprits. General and specific characteristics of modernization correlate with higher risk. A positive correlation between a country’s GDP per capita, as quantitative measure of modernization, and lifetime risk of a mood disorder trended toward significance (p=0.06). Mental and physical well-being are intimately related. The growing burden of chronic diseases, which arise from an evolutionary mismatch between past human environments and modern-day living, may be central to rising rates of depression. Declining social capital and greater inequality and loneliness are candidate mediators of a depressiogenic social milieu. Modern populations are increasingly overfed, malnourished, sedentary, sunlight-deficient, sleep-deprived, and socially-isolated. These changes in lifestyle each contribute to poor physical health and affect the incidence and treatment of depression. The review ends with a call for future research and policy interventions to address this public health crisis. PMID:22244375

  16. The temporal patterns of disease severity and prevalence in schistosomiasis

    SciTech Connect

    Ciddio, Manuela; Gatto, Marino Casagrandi, Renato

    2015-03-15

    Schistosomiasis is one of the most widespread public health problems in the world. In this work, we introduce an eco-epidemiological model for its transmission and dynamics with the purpose of explaining both intra- and inter-annual fluctuations of disease severity and prevalence. The model takes the form of a system of nonlinear differential equations that incorporate biological complexity associated with schistosome's life cycle, including a prepatent period in snails (i.e., the time between initial infection and onset of infectiousness). Nonlinear analysis is used to explore the parametric conditions that produce different temporal patterns (stationary, endemic, periodic, and chaotic). For the time-invariant model, we identify a transcritical and a Hopf bifurcation in the space of the human and snail infection parameters. The first corresponds to the occurrence of an endemic equilibrium, while the latter marks the transition to interannual periodic oscillations. We then investigate a more realistic time-varying model in which fertility of the intermediate host population is assumed to seasonally vary. We show that seasonality can give rise to a cascade of period-doubling bifurcations leading to chaos for larger, though realistic, values of the amplitude of the seasonal variation of fertility.

  17. Prevalence of Eating Disorders in Adults with Celiac Disease

    PubMed Central

    Passananti, V.; Siniscalchi, M.; Zingone, F.; Bucci, C.; Tortora, R.; Iovino, P.; Ciacci, C.

    2013-01-01

    Background. Symptoms of celiac disease negatively impact social activities and emotional state. Aim was to investigate the prevalence of altered eating behaviour in celiac patients. Methods. Celiac patients and controls completed a dietary interview and the Binge Eating Staircases, Eating Disorder Inventory (EDI-2), Eating Attitudes Test, Zung Self-Rating Depression Scale, State Trait Anxiety Inventory Forma Y (STAI-Y1 and STAI-Y2), and Symptom Check List (SCL-90). Results. One hundred celiac adults and 100 controls were not statistically different for gender, age, and physical activity. STAI-Y1 and STAI-Y2, Somatization, Interpersonal, Sensitivity, and Anxiety scores of the SLC-90 were higher in CD patients than controls. EDI-2 was different in pulse thinness, social insecurity, perfectionism, inadequacy, ascetisms, and interpersonal diffidence between CD and HC women, whilst only in interceptive awareness between CD and HC men. A higher EAT-26 score was associated with the CD group dependently with gastrointestinal symptoms. The EAT26 demonstrated association between indices of diet-related disorders in both CD and the feminine gender after controlling for anxiety and depression. Conclusion. CD itself and not gastrointestinal related symptoms or psychological factors may contribute pathological eating behavior in celiac adults. Eating disorders appear to be more frequent in young celiac women than in CD men and in HC. PMID:24369457

  18. The temporal patterns of disease severity and prevalence in schistosomiasis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciddio, Manuela; Mari, Lorenzo; Gatto, Marino; Rinaldo, Andrea; Casagrandi, Renato

    2015-03-01

    Schistosomiasis is one of the most widespread public health problems in the world. In this work, we introduce an eco-epidemiological model for its transmission and dynamics with the purpose of explaining both intra- and inter-annual fluctuations of disease severity and prevalence. The model takes the form of a system of nonlinear differential equations that incorporate biological complexity associated with schistosome's life cycle, including a prepatent period in snails (i.e., the time between initial infection and onset of infectiousness). Nonlinear analysis is used to explore the parametric conditions that produce different temporal patterns (stationary, endemic, periodic, and chaotic). For the time-invariant model, we identify a transcritical and a Hopf bifurcation in the space of the human and snail infection parameters. The first corresponds to the occurrence of an endemic equilibrium, while the latter marks the transition to interannual periodic oscillations. We then investigate a more realistic time-varying model in which fertility of the intermediate host population is assumed to seasonally vary. We show that seasonality can give rise to a cascade of period-doubling bifurcations leading to chaos for larger, though realistic, values of the amplitude of the seasonal variation of fertility.

  19. Alzheimer's disease comorbidity in normal pressure hydrocephalus: prevalence and shunt response.

    PubMed

    Golomb, J; Wisoff, J; Miller, D C; Boksay, I; Kluger, A; Weiner, H; Salton, J; Graves, W

    2000-06-01

    The clinical impact of Alzheimer's disease pathology at biopsy was investigated in 56 cognitively impaired patients undergoing shunt surgery for idiopathic normal pressure hydrocephalus (NPH). Cognition was measured by means of the global deterioration scale (GDS), the mini mental status examination (MMSE) and a battery of six psychometric tests. Gait was assessed using objective measurements of velocity and the ambulatory index (AI). The prevalence of cases exhibiting neuritic plaques (positive biopsies) increased in parallel with dementia severity from 18% for patients with GDS 3 to 75% for patients with GDS scores > or =6. Patients with positive biopsies were more cognitively impaired (higher GDS and lower MMSE scores) as well as more gait impaired (higher AI scores and slower velocities) than patients with negative biopsies. After surgery, gait velocity and AI scores improved significantly and to a comparable degree for patients with and without positive biopsies. Similar proportions of positive and negative biopsy patients also had improved gait as assessed by means of subjective video tape comparisons. There were no significant differences between the biopsy groups in the magnitude of postoperative psychometric change or in the proportion of cases exhibiting improved urinary control. Alzheimer's disease pathology is a common source of comorbidity in older patients with idiopathic NPH where it contributes to the clinical impairment associated with this disorder. For patients accurately diagnosed with NPH, concomitant Alzheimer's disease pathology does not strongly influence the clinical response to shunt surgery.

  20. The clinical spectrum of hexosaminidase deficiency diseases.

    PubMed

    Johnson, W G

    1981-11-01

    Hexosaminidase deficiency diseases or GM2-gangliosidoses were originally described as infantile encephalopathies. Recently, hexosaminidase deficiencies have been found with different phenotypes, including juvenile and adult encephalopathies, cerebellar ataxias, and motor neuron diseases. Individual cases have resembled Ramsey-Hunt syndrome, olivopontocerebellar ataxia, Friedreich ataxia, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, Kugelberg-Welander disease, Fazio-Londe disease, and Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease. Tremor, dystonia, spastic paresis, and psychosis have been seen. Since few diagnosable causes for these system atrophies are known, these patients should be tested for hexosaminidase deficiency. These recessive disorders fit a multiple loci/multiple alleles genetic scheme, and a clinical genetic classification is presented.

  1. [Prevalence of peripheral artery disease among diabetics in Parakou in 2013].

    PubMed

    Codjo, H L; Adoukonou, T A; Wanvoegbe, A; Dohou, H; Bankolé, C; Alassani, A; Dovonou, C A; Houénassi, D M

    2016-09-01

    We aimed to determine the prevalence of peripheral artery disease and its associated factors among diabetics. The cross-sectional study was conducted and included all diabetics admitted to the diabetic clinic at the Parakou University hospital during the period of 1st February and 31st July 2013. The diagnosis of peripheral artery disease was based on the Ankle Brachial Index (ABI)<0.9. The socio-demographics data, the data concerning the diabetes and its complications were recorded in each patient. They were 401 diabetics and 59.5 % were females. The mean age was 53.7±11.5 years. Among the diabetics, 168 fulfilled the criteria of PAD, the overall prevalence was 41.9 %. In total, 31.5 % were symptomatics according to Leriche and Fontaine classification. The main associated factors were the increase of age (P=0.01), the absence of activity with high income (P=0.004), the absence of physical activity (P=0.023), the duration of diabetes (P=0.007), the presence of peripheral neuropathy (P=0.003), the glycosylated hemoglobin≥7 % (P<0.001). After a multivariate analysis, only diabetes control was independently associated with arteriopathy (P=0,004). The PAD was more frequent among diabetics in Parakou. The associated factors must be taken into account in order to improve the management of the disease and to reduce the burden of the PAD.

  2. Prevalence and patterns of comorbid cognitive impairment in low vision rehabilitation (LVR) for macular disease

    PubMed Central

    Whitson, Heather E.; Ansah, Deidra; Whitaker, Diane; Potter, Guy; Cousins, Scott W.; MacDonald, Heather; Pieper, Carl F.; Landerman, Lawrence; Steffens, David C.; Cohen, Harvey J.

    2009-01-01

    The prevalence of comorbid cognitive impairment among older adults referred to LVR for macular disease is unknown. We performed cognitive testing on 101 adults aged 65 years or older with macular disease who were referred to The Duke LVR Clinic between September 2007 and March 2008. Scores on the telephone interview for cognitive status-modified (TICS-m) ranged from 7 to 44, with 18.8% of scores below an established cutoff for cognitive impairment (≤ 27) and an additional 27.7% of scores considered marginal (28-30). On letter fluency, 46% of participants scored at least 1 × S.D. below the mean for their age, gender, race, and education level, and 18% of participants scored at least 2 × S.D. below their demographic mean. On logical memory, 26% of participants scored at least 1 × S.D. below the mean for their age group and race and 6% scored at least 2 × S.D. below their demographic mean. High prevalence of cognitive impairment, with particular difficulty in verbal fluency and verbal memory, may compromise the success of low vision rehabilitation interventions among macular disease patients. Additional work is needed to develop strategies to maximize function in older adults with this common comorbidity. PMID:19427045

  3. Deer density and disease prevalence influence transmission of Chronic Wasting Disease in White-tailed Deer

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Samuel, Michael D.; Richards, Bryan J.; Storm, Daniel J.; Rolley, Robert E.; Shelton, Paul; Nicholas S. Keuler,; Timothy R. Van Deelen,

    2013-01-01

    Host-parasite dynamics and strategies for managing infectious diseases of wildlife depend on the functional relationship between disease transmission rates and host density. However, the disease transmission function is rarely known for free-living wildlife, leading to uncertainty regarding the impacts of diseases on host populations and effective control actions. We evaluated the influence of deer density, landscape features, and soil clay content on transmission of chronic wasting disease (CWD) in young (<2-year-old) white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) in south-central Wisconsin, USA. We evaluated how frequency-dependent, density-dependent, and intermediate transmission models predicted CWD incidence rates in harvested yearling deer. An intermediate transmission model, incorporating both disease prevalence and density of infected deer, performed better than simple density- and frequency-dependent models. Our results indicate a combination of social structure, non-linear relationships between infectious contact and deer density, and distribution of disease among groups are important factors driving CWD infection in young deer. The landscape covariates % deciduous forest cover and forest edge density also were positively associated with infection rates, but soil clay content had no measurable influences on CWD transmission. Lack of strong density-dependent transmission rates indicates that controlling CWD by reducing deer density will be difficult. The consequences of non-linear disease transmission and aggregation of disease on cervid populations deserves further consideration.

  4. Clinical presentation of metabolic liver disease.

    PubMed

    Odievre, M

    1991-01-01

    Some clinical clues should alert paediatricians to the possibility of metabolic liver diseases. They can be classified into three categories: (i) Manifestations due to hepatocellular necrosis, acute or subacute, which can reveal galactosaemia, hereditary fructose intolerance, tyrosinaemia type I, Wilson disease and alpha 1-antitrypsin deficiency. Symptoms and signs suggestive of Reye syndrome should lead to a study of fatty acid oxidation and urea cycle enzymes. All these manifestations may necessitate a rapid diagnosis and treatment when liver dysfunction is severe. (ii) Cholestatic jaundice can reveal alpha 1-antitrypsin deficiency, Byler's disease, cystic fibrosis, Niemann-Pick disease and some disorders of peroxisome biogenesis. (iii) Hepatomegaly can reveal disorders with liver damage but also storage diseases such as glycogen storage diseases, cholesteryl ester storage disease and, when associated with splenomegaly, lysosomal storage diseases. Appropriate investigations for recognizing all these entities are proposed.

  5. [Incidence and prevalence of asbestos-related diseases in Croatia].

    PubMed

    Decković-Vukres, Vlasta; Corić, Tanja; Tomić, Branimir; Erceg, Marijan; Mihel, Sandra; Ivicević Uhernik, Ana; Pristas, Ivan

    2009-11-01

    The aim of this study was to identify the incidence and prevalence of asbestos-related diseases in Croatia, based on the Hospital Morbidity Database and General Mortality Database of the Croatian National Institute of Public Health. Both databases cover a period from 2002 to 2007), and include information from the Register of Occupational Diseases. Diagnoses in focus were mesothelioma (C45), asbestosis, and pleural plaque (J61 and J92). Yearly rates of inpatients treated for mesothelioma, asbestosis, or pleural plaque that were higher than the Croatian average (2.1) were recorded in the Counties of Split-Dalmatia (5.0), Dubrovnik-Neretva (3.9), Istria (3.7), and Primorje-Gorski kotar (3.1 per 100,000 people). From 2002 to 2007, 649 occupational diseases were reported, out of which 11.7% were asbestos-related. The most frequent were pleural plaque with asbestosis (38 cases, 50.0%), pleural plaque (23 cases, 30.3%), and mesothelioma (6 cases, 7.9%). Mortality attributable to asbestos was assessed using official Croatian National Statistics Bureau reports for 2002 to 2007 at the county and national level. During that period, Croatia recorded 312 deaths with the average yearly rate of 1.2 per 100.000 people. Four counties had higher rates than the national average: Primorje-Gorski kotar (3.4), Split-Dalmatia (2.8), Istria (2.8), and S1. Brod-Posavina (1.5). The number of inpatients treated for asbestos-related diseases was higher than the national average in the counties of Split-Dalmatia, Dubrovnik-Neretva, and Primorje-Gorski Kotar. Mesothelioma incidence was above the national average in the counties of Split-Dalmatia, Primorje-Gorski Kotar, and Istria. The rates of occupational, asbestos-related diseases were higher than the national average in the counties of Split-Dalmatia and Primorje-Gorski Kotar. We were aware that the interpretation of data is somewhat limited by the relatively small absolute number of treated persons and deaths for the observed period, by

  6. Prevalence and characteristics of ophthalmological extra-intestinal manifestations in Chinese patients with inflammatory bowel disease

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ying-Chao; Li, Wei-Zhi; Wu, Chang-Rui; Feng, Yun; Ren, Li; Mi, Chen; Li, Yang

    2016-01-01

    AIM To investigate the prevalence of ophthalmological extra-intestinal manifestations (O-EIMs) in Chinese patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and to identify risk factors for the development of O-EIMs. METHODS The study population consisted of Chinese patients with a definite diagnosis of Crohn's disease (CD) or ulcerative colitis (UC) in a large teaching hospital between January 1995 and December 2014. Demographic and clinical characteristics of patients were extracted retrospectively. RESULTS In this twenty-year cohort, 645 IBD patients (517 with UC, 128 with CD) were registered. Among them 122 (18.9%) exhibited at least one EIM. Of 13 patients (2.0%) developed O-EIMs, 7 of CD (5.5%) and 6 of UC (1.2%). Clinical ophthalmological manifestations included redness (76.9%), burning (61.5%), pain (38.5%), itching (15.4%) of eyes and vision change (7.7%). O-EIMs included episcleritis (7), uveitis (5) and dry eye (1). O-EIMs were more prevalent in female (odds ratio for male 0.61, 95% confidence interval 0.52-0.73, P<0.0001), and patients who had IBD diagnosis at young age (odds ratio for patients aged >30 years 0.76, 95% confidence interval 0.65-0.88, P<0.0001). CONCLUSION The frequency of O-EIMs in Chinese patients with IBD is lower than the rates reported in the studies of European and American countries. Episcleritis and uveitis are the most common O-EIMs. O-EIMs are more frequent in patients with CD and more prevalent in female and patients who have IBD diagnosis at young age. PMID:27803867

  7. Prevalence of sexually transmitted infections in female clinic attendees in Honiara, Solomon Islands

    PubMed Central

    Kako, H; Butcher, R; Lauri, B; Puiahi, E; Pitakaka, R; Sokana, O; Kilua, G; Roth, A; Solomon, A W; Mabey, D C

    2015-01-01

    Objectives This study sought to determine the prevalence of common bacterial sexually transmitted infections, including Chlamydia trachomatis and Neisseria gonorrhoeae, in women attending clinics in the Solomon Islands. Methods We conducted a sexual health survey among women attending three nurse-led community outpatient clinics in August 2014, to establish the prevalence of bacterial sexually transmitted infections in female clinic attenders in Honiara, Solomon Islands. Vaginal swab samples were tested for infection with C. trachomatis and N. gonorrhoeae using a commercial strand displacement amplification assay. Serum samples were tested for syphilis. Results We enrolled 296 women, aged 16–49, attending three clinics. Knowledge of safe sexual practices was high but reported condom usage was low. The prevalence of infection with C. trachomatis was 20%. The prevalence of infection with N. gonorrhoeae and syphilis were 5.1% and 4.1%, respectively. Conclusions Bacterial sexually transmitted infections are a major health problem in the Solomon Islands. Interventions are urgently needed. PMID:25922103

  8. Sickle cell disease: clinical management.

    PubMed

    Ballas, S K

    1998-03-01

    Sickle cell syndromes are a group of inherited disorders of haemoglobin structure that have no cure in adults at the present time. Bone marrow transplantation in children has been shown to be curative in selected patients. The phenotypic expression of these disorders and their clinical severity vary greatly among patients and longitudinally in the same patient. They are multisystem disorders and influence all aspects of the life of affected individuals including social interactions, family relations, peer interaction, intimate relationships, education, employment, spiritual attitudes and navigating the complexities of the health care system, providers and their ancillary functions. The clinical manifestations of these syndromes are protean. In this review emphasis is placed on four sets of major complications of these syndromes and their management. The first set pertains to the management of anaemia and its sequelae; the second set addresses painful syndromes both acute and chronic; the third set discusses infections; the fourth section deals with organ failure. New experimental therapies for these disorders are briefly mentioned at the end. Efforts were made to include several tables and figures to clarify the message of this review.

  9. Comparison of chronic analgesic drugs prevalence in Parkinson's disease, other chronic diseases and the general population.

    PubMed

    Brefel-Courbon, Christine; Grolleau, Sabrina; Thalamas, Claire; Bourrel, Robert; Allaria-Lapierre, Valérie; Loï, Robert; Micallef-Roll, Joelle; Lapeyre-Mestre, Maryse

    2009-01-01

    Patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) frequently experienced pain. Nevertheless, there are no epidemiological data about frequency of pain in PD. We compare pain prevalence using analgesic prescription in PD patients, in the general population and in two samples of painful patients: diabetics and osteoarthritis patients in France. Data were obtained from the French System of Health Insurance for the year 2005. Medications (antiparkinsonian, antidiabetics drugs and osteoarthritis drugs) were used for identification of PD, diabetic and osteoarthritis patients. We estimated the prevalence of analgesic drugs prescription (at least one analgesic drug) and the prevalence of chronic analgesic drugs prescription (more than 90 DDD of analgesic drug). The study included 11,466 PD patients. PD patients significantly received more prescription of analgesics than the general population (82% versus 77%,) and fewer than patients with osteoarthritis (82% versus 90%). No significant difference was found between PD and diabetic patients. The chronic prescription of analgesic drugs was more prevalent in PD patients (33%) than in the general population (20%) and in diabetic patients (26%) and similar to that in osteoarthritis patients. PD patients were more exposed than the general population and diabetics to opiates, acetaminophen, and adjuvant analgesics chronic use.

  10. [Prevalence and risk factors of gastroduodenal and biliary system diseases in infants and preschool children].

    PubMed

    Malanicheva, T G; Ziatdinova, N V; Denisova, S N

    2012-01-01

    Gastroduodenal pathology, functional disorders and inflammatory diseases of the biliary tract take leading position among the diseases of the digestive system in children. Precisely these clinical forms are more intensive then other nosology. Continuous screening questionnaire of 786 children aged 1.5 to 7 years was carried out to study the prevalence and risk factors for diseases of the digestive system in children. Based on retrieved data was determined that 47,1 +/- 3,5% of children had symptoms of gastro-intestinal tract and biliary system diseases. They met 2.3 times more often in children aged 4 to 7 years, than in children from 1.5 to 3 years old. Immerced examination revealed that the incidence of dyskinesia of the biliary tract was 33 +/- 3,3%, chronic gastritis (CG) and gastroduodenitis (GDD)--6,2 +/- 1,8%, chronic cholecystitis--4,2 +/- 1,4%, functional disorders of the stomach (FGD)--2,8 +/- 1,2% and duodenal ulcer (DU)--0,3 +/- 0,4% of cases. In the structure of digestive diseases in children from 1.5 to 7 years in the first place were DBT--70%, the second--CGD and CG--14.7%--the third chronic cholecystitis--8.9%, the fourth--FGD--5.9% and in fifth place--DU-0.5% of cases. At the care record in the pediatric clinic with diseases of the digestive system were registered only 7,9 +/- 1,9% of children, which is 5.9 times lower accordinig to data of active diagnostic. The leading medical and social risk factors and their complex influence on the formation of digestive diseases in infants and preschool children. PMID:22808780

  11. Epidemiology and clinical management of Legionnaires' disease.

    PubMed

    Phin, Nick; Parry-Ford, Frances; Harrison, Timothy; Stagg, Helen R; Zhang, Natalie; Kumar, Kartik; Lortholary, Olivier; Zumla, Alimuddin; Abubakar, Ibrahim

    2014-10-01

    Legionnaires' disease is an important cause of community-acquired and hospital-acquired pneumonia. Although uncommon, Legionnaires' disease continues to cause disease outbreaks of public health significance. The disease is caused by any species of the Gram-negative aerobic bacteria belonging to the genus Legionella; Legionella pneumophila serogroup 1 is the causative agent of most cases in Europe. In this Review we outline the global epidemiology of Legionnaires' disease, summarise its diagnosis and management, and identify research gaps and priorities. Early clinical diagnosis and prompt initiation of appropriate antibiotics for Legionella spp in all patients with community-acquired or hospital-acquired pneumonias is a crucial measure for management of the disease. Progress in typing and sequencing technologies might additionally contribute to understanding the distribution and natural history of Legionnaires' disease, and inform outbreak investigations. Control of Legionnaires' disease outbreaks relies on rapid ascertainment of descriptive epidemiological data, combined with microbiological information to identify the source and implement control measures. Further research is required to define the actual burden of disease, factors that influence susceptibility, key sources of infection, and differences in virulence between strains of Legionella species. Other requirements are improved, specific, sensitive, and rapid diagnostic tests to accurately inform management of Legionnaires' disease, and controlled clinical trials to ascertain the optimum antibiotics for treatment.

  12. Spatiotemporal patterns of coral disease prevalence on Heron Island, Great Barrier Reef, Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haapkylä, J.; Melbourne-Thomas, J.; Flavell, M.; Willis, B. L.

    2010-12-01

    Despite increasing research effort on coral diseases, little is known about factors driving disease dynamics on the Great Barrier Reef (GBR). This is the first study to investigate the temporal patterns of coral disease prevalence and potential drivers of disease around Heron Island, in the southern Capricorn Bunker sector of the GBR. Surveys were conducted in two austral summers and three winters between November 2007 and August 2009 on six sites around the island. Six diseases were detected: brown band syndrome (BrB), growth anomalies (GA), ulcerative white spots (UWS), white syndrome (WS), skeletal eroding band disease (SEB) and black band disease (BBD). The lowest overall mean disease prevalence was 1.87 ± 0.75% (mean ± SE) in November 2007 and the highest 4.22 ± 1.72% in August 2008. There was evidence of seasonality for two diseases: BrB and UWS. This is the first study to report a higher prevalence of BrB in the winter. BrB had a prevalence of 3.29 ± 0.58% in August 2008 and 1.53 ± 0.28% in August 2009, while UWS was the most common syndrome in the summer with a prevalence of 1.12 ± 0.31% in November 2007 and 2.67 ± 0.52% prevalence in January 2008. The prevalence of GAs and SEB did not depend on the season, although the prevalence of GAs increased throughout the study period. WS had a slightly higher prevalence in the summer, but its overall prevalence was low (<0.5%). Sites with high abundance of staghorn Acropora and Montipora were characterised by the highest disease prevalence (12% of Acropora and 3.3% of Montipora species were diseased respectively). These results highlight the correlations between coral disease prevalence, seasonally varying environmental parameters and coral community composition. Given that diseases are likely to reduce the resilience of corals, seasonal patterns in disease prevalence deserve further research.

  13. A Comprehensive Prospective Clinical Study of Hydatid Disease

    PubMed Central

    Kayal, Ankit; Hussain, Akhlak

    2014-01-01

    The actual prevalence of hydatid disease in northern part of India is found more than usually interpreted. The present study has been done on 25 patients suffering from hydatid disease of various sites and treated during June 2009 to November 2011 at JLN Medical College and Hospital, Ajmer, with the aim of studying the clinical manifestations of hydatid disease of different sites and/or organ system and of analysing the morbidity and mortality of hydatid disease. The age, sex, h/o dog contact, duration of hospital stay, clinical presentation, treatment advised, findings and difficulties encountered during operation, and postoperative management of patients as well as morbidity and mortality were recorded and analysed. We observed that the mean age was 40 years. The sex incidence revealed female preponderance in the study (M : F: 1 : 2). Duration of illness in the present study varied from 1 month to 6 years in case of liver hydatid disease. Majority of patients were from rural areas (21) and the remaining (4) from urban areas. Swelling was the most common presenting feature. Incidence of hydatid disease at unusual sites in India is higher than in other parts of the world. PMID:24734188

  14. The spectrum of celiac disease: epidemiology, clinical aspects and treatment.

    PubMed

    Tack, Greetje J; Verbeek, Wieke H M; Schreurs, Marco W J; Mulder, Chris J J

    2010-04-01

    Celiac disease is a gluten-sensitive enteropathy that affects people of all ages worldwide. This disease has emerged as a major health-care problem, as advances in diagnostic and screening methods have revealed its global prevalence. Environmental factors such as gluten introduction at childhood, infectious agents and socioeconomic features, as well as the presence of HLA-DQ2 and/or HLA-DQ8 haplotypes or genetic variations in several non-HLA genes contribute to the development of celiac disease. Growing insight into the variable clinical and histopathological presentation features of this disease has opened new perspectives for future research. A strict life-long gluten-free diet is the only safe and efficient available treatment, yet it results in a social burden. Alternative treatment modalities focus on modification of dietary components, enzymatic degradation of gluten, inhibition of intestinal permeability and modulation of the immune response. A small group of patients with celiac disease (2-5%), however, fail to improve clinically and histologically upon elimination of dietary gluten. This complication is referred to as refractory celiac disease, and imposes a serious risk of developing a virtually lethal enteropathy-associated T-cell lymphoma.

  15. [Clinical condition and therapy of bone diseases].

    PubMed

    Miura, Kohji; Oznono, Keiichi

    2013-12-01

    Skeletal dysplasia is the term which represents disorders including growth and differentiation of bone, cartilage and ligament. A lot of diseases are included, and new disorders have been added. However, the therapy of most bone diseases is less well-established. Achondroplasia, hypochondroplasia, and osteogenesis imperfecta are most frequent bone diseases. There is no curative treatment for these diseases, however, supportive therapies are available ; for example, growth-hormone therapy for achondroplasia and hypochondroplasia, and bisphosphonate therapy for osteogenesis imperfecta. In addition, enzyme replacement therapy for hypophosphatasia is now on clinical trial.

  16. Prevalence and Demographic and Clinical Associations of Health Literacy in Patients on Maintenance Hemodialysis

    PubMed Central

    Mor, Maria K.; Shields, Anne Marie; Sevick, Mary Ann; Palevsky, Paul M.; Fine, Michael J.; Arnold, Robert M.; Weisbord, Steven D.

    2011-01-01

    Summary Background and objectives Although limited health literacy is estimated to affect over 90 million Americans and is recognized as an important public health concern, there have been few studies examining this issue in patients with chronic kidney disease. We sought to characterize the prevalence of and associations of demographic and clinical characteristics with limited health literacy in patients receiving maintenance hemodialysis. Design, setting, participants, & measurements As part of a prospective clinical trial of symptom management strategies in 288 patients treated with chronic hemodialysis, we assessed health literacy using the Rapid Estimate of Adult Literacy in Medicine (REALM). We defined limited health literacy as a REALM score ≤60 and evaluated independent associations of demographic and baseline clinical characteristics with limited health literacy using multivariable logistic regression. Results Of the 260 patients who completed the REALM, 41 demonstrated limited health literacy. African-American race, lower educational level, and veteran status were independently associated with limited health literacy. There was no association of limited health literacy with age, gender, serologic values, dialysis adequacy, overall symptom burden, quality of life, or depression. Conclusions Limited health literacy is common among patients receiving chronic hemodialysis. African-American race and socioeconomic factors are strong independent predictors of limited health literacy. These findings can help inform the design and implementation of interventions to improve health literacy in the hemodialysis population. PMID:21551025

  17. Disaggregating Tropical Disease Prevalence by Climatic and Vegetative Zones within Tropical West Africa

    PubMed Central

    Beckley, Carl S.; Shaban, Salisu; Palmer, Guy H.; Hudak, Andrew T.; Noh, Susan M.; Futse, James E.

    2016-01-01

    Tropical infectious disease prevalence is dependent on many socio-cultural determinants. However, rainfall and temperature frequently underlie overall prevalence, particularly for vector-borne diseases. As a result these diseases have increased prevalence in tropical as compared to temperate regions. Specific to tropical Africa, the tendency to incorrectly infer that tropical diseases are uniformly prevalent has been partially overcome with solid epidemiologic data. This finer resolution data is important in multiple contexts, including understanding risk, predictive value in disease diagnosis, and population immunity. We hypothesized that within the context of a tropical climate, vector-borne pathogen prevalence would significantly differ according to zonal differences in rainfall, temperature, relative humidity and vegetation condition. We then determined if these environmental data were predictive of pathogen prevalence. First we determined the prevalence of three major pathogens of cattle, Anaplasma marginale, Babesia bigemina and Theileria spp, in the three vegetation zones where cattle are predominantly raised in Ghana: Guinea savannah, semi-deciduous forest, and coastal savannah. The prevalence of A. marginale was 63%, 26% for Theileria spp and 2% for B. bigemina. A. marginale and Theileria spp. were significantly more prevalent in the coastal savannah as compared to either the Guinea savanna or the semi-deciduous forest, supporting acceptance of the first hypothesis. To test the predictive power of environmental variables, the data over a three year period were considered in best subsets multiple linear regression models predicting prevalence of each pathogen. Corrected Akaike Information Criteria (AICc) were assigned to the alternative models to compare their utility. Competitive models for each response were averaged using AICc weights. Rainfall was most predictive of pathogen prevalence, and EVI also contributed to A. marginale and B. bigemina prevalence

  18. Disaggregating Tropical Disease Prevalence by Climatic and Vegetative Zones within Tropical West Africa.

    PubMed

    Beckley, Carl S; Shaban, Salisu; Palmer, Guy H; Hudak, Andrew T; Noh, Susan M; Futse, James E

    2016-01-01

    Tropical infectious disease prevalence is dependent on many socio-cultural determinants. However, rainfall and temperature frequently underlie overall prevalence, particularly for vector-borne diseases. As a result these diseases have increased prevalence in tropical as compared to temperate regions. Specific to tropical Africa, the tendency to incorrectly infer that tropical diseases are uniformly prevalent has been partially overcome with solid epidemiologic data. This finer resolution data is important in multiple contexts, including understanding risk, predictive value in disease diagnosis, and population immunity. We hypothesized that within the context of a tropical climate, vector-borne pathogen prevalence would significantly differ according to zonal differences in rainfall, temperature, relative humidity and vegetation condition. We then determined if these environmental data were predictive of pathogen prevalence. First we determined the prevalence of three major pathogens of cattle, Anaplasma marginale, Babesia bigemina and Theileria spp, in the three vegetation zones where cattle are predominantly raised in Ghana: Guinea savannah, semi-deciduous forest, and coastal savannah. The prevalence of A. marginale was 63%, 26% for Theileria spp and 2% for B. bigemina. A. marginale and Theileria spp. were significantly more prevalent in the coastal savannah as compared to either the Guinea savanna or the semi-deciduous forest, supporting acceptance of the first hypothesis. To test the predictive power of environmental variables, the data over a three year period were considered in best subsets multiple linear regression models predicting prevalence of each pathogen. Corrected Akaike Information Criteria (AICc) were assigned to the alternative models to compare their utility. Competitive models for each response were averaged using AICc weights. Rainfall was most predictive of pathogen prevalence, and EVI also contributed to A. marginale and B. bigemina prevalence

  19. Disaggregating Tropical Disease Prevalence by Climatic and Vegetative Zones within Tropical West Africa.

    PubMed

    Beckley, Carl S; Shaban, Salisu; Palmer, Guy H; Hudak, Andrew T; Noh, Susan M; Futse, James E

    2016-01-01

    Tropical infectious disease prevalence is dependent on many socio-cultural determinants. However, rainfall and temperature frequently underlie overall prevalence, particularly for vector-borne diseases. As a result these diseases have increased prevalence in tropical as compared to temperate regions. Specific to tropical Africa, the tendency to incorrectly infer that tropical diseases are uniformly prevalent has been partially overcome with solid epidemiologic data. This finer resolution data is important in multiple contexts, including understanding risk, predictive value in disease diagnosis, and population immunity. We hypothesized that within the context of a tropical climate, vector-borne pathogen prevalence would significantly differ according to zonal differences in rainfall, temperature, relative humidity and vegetation condition. We then determined if these environmental data were predictive of pathogen prevalence. First we determined the prevalence of three major pathogens of cattle, Anaplasma marginale, Babesia bigemina and Theileria spp, in the three vegetation zones where cattle are predominantly raised in Ghana: Guinea savannah, semi-deciduous forest, and coastal savannah. The prevalence of A. marginale was 63%, 26% for Theileria spp and 2% for B. bigemina. A. marginale and Theileria spp. were significantly more prevalent in the coastal savannah as compared to either the Guinea savanna or the semi-deciduous forest, supporting acceptance of the first hypothesis. To test the predictive power of environmental variables, the data over a three year period were considered in best subsets multiple linear regression models predicting prevalence of each pathogen. Corrected Akaike Information Criteria (AICc) were assigned to the alternative models to compare their utility. Competitive models for each response were averaged using AICc weights. Rainfall was most predictive of pathogen prevalence, and EVI also contributed to A. marginale and B. bigemina prevalence

  20. Prevalence of Trichomonas vaginalis in Women Visiting 2 Obstetrics and Gynecology Clinics in Daegu, South Korea.

    PubMed

    Goo, Youn-Kyoung; Shin, Won-Sik; Yang, Hye-Won; Joo, So-Young; Song, Su-Min; Ryu, Jae-Sook; Lee, Won-Myung; Kong, Hyun-Hee; Lee, Won-Ki; Lee, Sang-Eun; Lee, Won-Ja; Chung, Dong-Il; Hong, Yeonchul

    2016-02-01

    This study explored epidemiological trends in trichomoniasis in Daegu, South Korea. Wet mount microscopy, PCR, and multiplex PCR were used to test for Trichomonas vaginalis in vaginal swab samples obtained from 621 women visiting 2 clinics in Daegu. Of the 621 women tested, microscopy detected T. vaginalis in 4 (0.6%) patients, PCR detected T. vaginalis in 19 (3.0%) patients, and multiplex PCR detected T. vaginalis in 12 (1.9%) patients. Testing via PCR demonstrated high sensitivity and high negative predictive value for T. vaginalis. Among the 19 women who tested positive for T. vaginalis according to PCR, 94.7% (18/19) reported vaginal signs and symptoms. Notably, more than 50% of T. vaginalis infections occurred in females younger than 30 years old, and 58% were unmarried. Multiplex PCR, which simultaneously detects pathogens from various sexually transmitted infections, revealed that 91.7% (11/12) of patients were infected with 2 or more pathogens. Mycoplasma hominis was the most prevalent co-infection pathogen with T. vaginalis, followed by Ureaplasma urealyticum and Chlamydia trachomatis. Our results indicate that PCR and multiplex PCR are the most sensitive tools for T. vaginalis diagnosis, rather than microscopy which has been routinely used to detect T. vaginalis infections in South Korea. Therefore, clinicians should take note of the high prevalence of T. vaginalis infections among adolescent and young women in order to prevent persistent infection and transmission of this disease. PMID:26951983

  1. Nontypable Haemophilus influenzae Displays a Prevalent Surface Structure Molecular Pattern in Clinical Isolates

    PubMed Central

    Mauro, Silvia; Hood, Derek W.; Viadas, Cristina; Calatayud, Laura; Morey, Pau; Servin, Alain; Liñares, Josefina; Oliver, Antonio; Bengoechea, José Antonio; Garmendia, Junkal

    2011-01-01

    Non-typable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi) is a Gram negative pathogen that causes acute respiratory infections and is associated with the progression of chronic respiratory diseases. Previous studies have established the existence of a remarkable genetic variability among NTHi strains. In this study we show that, in spite of a high level of genetic heterogeneity, NTHi clinical isolates display a prevalent molecular feature, which could confer fitness during infectious processes. A total of 111 non-isogenic NTHi strains from an identical number of patients, isolated in two distinct geographical locations in the same period of time, were used to analyse nine genes encoding bacterial surface molecules, and revealed the existence of one highly prevalent molecular pattern (lgtF+, lic2A+, lic1D+, lic3A+, lic3B+, siaA−, lic2C+, ompP5+, oapA+) displayed by 94.6% of isolates. Such a genetic profile was associated with a higher bacterial resistance to serum mediated killing and enhanced adherence to human respiratory epithelial cells. PMID:21698169

  2. Prevalence of Trichomonas vaginalis in Women Visiting 2 Obstetrics and Gynecology Clinics in Daegu, South Korea

    PubMed Central

    Goo, Youn-Kyoung; Shin, Won-Sik; Yang, Hye-Won; Joo, So-Young; Song, Su-Min; Ryu, Jae-Sook; Lee, Won-Myung; Kong, Hyun-Hee; Lee, Won-Ki; Lee, Sang-Eun; Lee, Won-Ja; Chung, Dong-Il; Hong, Yeonchul

    2016-01-01

    This study explored epidemiological trends in trichomoniasis in Daegu, South Korea. Wet mount microscopy, PCR, and multiplex PCR were used to test for Trichomonas vaginalis in vaginal swab samples obtained from 621 women visiting 2 clinics in Daegu. Of the 621 women tested, microscopy detected T. vaginalis in 4 (0.6%) patients, PCR detected T. vaginalis in 19 (3.0%) patients, and multiplex PCR detected T. vaginalis in 12 (1.9%) patients. Testing via PCR demonstrated high sensitivity and high negative predictive value for T. vaginalis. Among the 19 women who tested positive for T. vaginalis according to PCR, 94.7% (18/19) reported vaginal signs and symptoms. Notably, more than 50% of T. vaginalis infections occurred in females younger than 30 years old, and 58% were unmarried. Multiplex PCR, which simultaneously detects pathogens from various sexually transmitted infections, revealed that 91.7% (11/12) of patients were infected with 2 or more pathogens. Mycoplasma hominis was the most prevalent co-infection pathogen with T. vaginalis, followed by Ureaplasma urealyticum and Chlamydia trachomatis. Our results indicate that PCR and multiplex PCR are the most sensitive tools for T. vaginalis diagnosis, rather than microscopy which has been routinely used to detect T. vaginalis infections in South Korea. Therefore, clinicians should take note of the high prevalence of T. vaginalis infections among adolescent and young women in order to prevent persistent infection and transmission of this disease. PMID:26951983

  3. Incidence, Prevalence and Clinical Manifestations of Systemic Sclerosis in Dukagjini Plain

    PubMed Central

    Bajraktari, Ismet H.; Berisha, Idriz; Berisha, Merita; Saiti, Valton; Bajraktari, Halit

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Progressive systemic sclerosis (PSS) is an inflammatory disease of connective tissue, with onset as edema that continues with fibrosis, induration, and skin atrophy, followed by attacks on the joints, internal organs, and secondary proliferation of connective tissue. Purpose: To research in which residence locations and among which group age is the most frequent incidence, prevalence and clinical manifestations of systemic sclerosis in Dukagjini Plain which is inhabited by 698450 resident citizens. Material and methods: 51 patients with progressive systemic sclerosis were studied, out them 44 were females (86.3%) and 7 males (13.7%) respectively, during the period from 2005 to 2010. Their illness was active from 18 to 60 months in accordance with EUSTAR criteria. They are of different age, median age is 44.2 ±10.1. Their diagnose is determined based on revised ACR criteria. Prevalence of patients with PSS was 14.61/100.000, while the incidence was 2.8/100.000, whereas CI (Confidence interval) or limit of accuracy was 95%. Results: Largest number of patients per 100.000 citizens has Istog municipality which has the largest number of patients with PSS. It is followed by Mamusha and Rahovec municipalities. The largest examined group age is 35-44 year old, 41.2% respectively. Conclusion: Additional studies are necessary to carry out in order to find the reasons of asymmetrical distribution of patients with systemic sclerosis in the municipalities of Dukagjini Plain. PMID:23678335

  4. Body Dysmorphic Disorder and Other Clinically Significant Body Image Concerns in Adolescent Psychiatric Inpatients: Prevalence and Clinical Characteristics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dyl, Jennifer; Kittler, Jennifer; Phillips, Katharine A.; Hunt, Jeffrey I.

    2006-01-01

    Background: This study assessed prevalence and clinical correlates of body dysmorphic disorder (BDD), eating disorders (ED), and other clinically significant body image concerns in 208 consecutively admitted adolescent inpatients. It was hypothesized that adolescents with BDD would have higher levels of depression, anxiety, and suicidality.…

  5. Prevalence, clinical and biochemical profile of subclinical hypothyroidism in normal population in Mumbai

    PubMed Central

    Deshmukh, Vaishali; Behl, Anish; Iyer, Vagesh; Joshi, Harish; Dholye, Jayashree P.; Varthakavi, Prema K.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Subclinical Hypothyroidism (ScHt) affects 3–15% of the adult population. It's clinical and biochemical profile is not well defined, especially in Indian scenario. Our study aimed at screening normal population to define normative ranges of thyroid hormones and Serum thyroid stimulating hormone (S.TSH) and prevalence of ScHt and thyroid autoimmunity. Materials and Methods: Two-hundred thirty-seven normal subjects without family history of thyroid disease were evaluated for symptoms and laboratory tests for thyroid dysfunction and autoimmunity. Results: The thyroid function tests were as follows: Euthyroid Group: Mean values were: T3: 1.79 ± 0.42 ng/mL, T4: 10.23 ± 2.25 μg/dL, FT3: 1.88 ± 0.19 pg/mL, FT4: 1.12 ± 0.21 ng/dL, S.TSH: 2.22 ± 1.06 μlu/mL. 10.2% of euthyroid subjects had antimicrosomal antibodies (AMA) +ve (mean titer 1:918) and 23.6% were anti-thyroid peroxidase autoantibody (anti-TPO) +ve (mean titer 15.06 Au/mL). The euthyroid outlier range for S.TSH was 0.3–4.6 μlu/mL. The values were comparable in both the sexes. Those with S.TSH ≥ 5 μlu/mL were defined to have ScHt. ScHt Group: Prevalence of ScHt was 11.3% (M:F ratio 1:3.7). 74% belonged to 35–54 years age group and prevalence increased with age (post-menopausal females: prevalence 20%). S.TSH was 9.8 ± 7.22 μlu/mL, mean S.AMA was 1:5079 (40.7% positivity) and mean S.anti-TPO was 260 Au/mL (47.6% positivity). Majority were agoitrous (74%), and stage I goiter was seen in 26% of this population. Symptom score of 5–8 was seen in 55% ScHt subjects versus 35% normal subjects. Conclusion: Mean S.TSH in our population was 2.22 μlu/mL (euthyroid outliers: 0.3–4.6 μlu/mL); hence, S.TSH above 4.6 μlu/mL should be considered as abnormal. The prevalence of thyroid autoimmunity increases after age of 35 years. ScHt presents mainly in agoitrous form and with positive antibodies, suggesting autoimmunity as the cause. PMID:23869302

  6. Disease, parasite, and commensal prevalences for blue crab Callinectes sapidus at shedding facilities in Louisiana, USA.

    PubMed

    Rogers, Holly A; Taylor, Sabrina S; Hawke, John P; Schott, Eric J; Anderson Lively, Julie A

    2015-01-15

    Blue crab diseases, parasites, and commensals are not well studied in the Gulf of Mexico, and their prevalence rates have only been sporadically determined. Commercial soft shell shedding facilities in Louisiana experience high mortality rates of pre-molt crabs, and some of these deaths may be attributable to diseases or parasites. During the active shedding season in 2013, we determined the prevalence of shell disease, Vibrio spp., Lagenophrys callinectes, and Hematodinium perezi at 4 commercial shedding facilities along the Louisiana coast. We also detected Ameson michaelis and reo-like virus infections. Shell disease was moderately prevalent at rates above 50% and varied by shedding facility, collection month, and crab size. Vibrio spp. bacteria were prevalent in the hemolymph of 37% of the pre-molt crabs. Lagenophrys callinectes was highly prevalent in the pre-molt crabs, but because it is a commensal species, it may not cause high mortality rates. Hematodinium perezi was absent in all pre-molt crabs.

  7. Neglected tropical diseases in sub-saharan Africa: review of their prevalence, distribution, and disease burden.

    PubMed

    Hotez, Peter J; Kamath, Aruna

    2009-01-01

    The neglected tropical diseases (NTDs) are the most common conditions affecting the poorest 500 million people living in sub-Saharan Africa (SSA), and together produce a burden of disease that may be equivalent to up to one-half of SSA's malaria disease burden and more than double that caused by tuberculosis. Approximately 85% of the NTD disease burden results from helminth infections. Hookworm infection occurs in almost half of SSA's poorest people, including 40-50 million school-aged children and 7 million pregnant women in whom it is a leading cause of anemia. Schistosomiasis is the second most prevalent NTD after hookworm (192 million cases), accounting for 93% of the world's number of cases and possibly associated with increased horizontal transmission of HIV/AIDS. Lymphatic filariasis (46-51 million cases) and onchocerciasis (37 million cases) are also widespread in SSA, each disease representing a significant cause of disability and reduction in the region's agricultural productivity. There is a dearth of information on Africa's non-helminth NTDs. The protozoan infections, human African trypanosomiasis and visceral leishmaniasis, affect almost 100,000 people, primarily in areas of conflict in SSA where they cause high mortality, and where trachoma is the most prevalent bacterial NTD (30 million cases). However, there are little or no data on some very important protozoan infections, e.g., amebiasis and toxoplasmosis; bacterial infections, e.g., typhoid fever and non-typhoidal salmonellosis, the tick-borne bacterial zoonoses, and non-tuberculosis mycobaterial infections; and arboviral infections. Thus, the overall burden of Africa's NTDs may be severely underestimated. A full assessment is an important step for disease control priorities, particularly in Nigeria and the Democratic Republic of Congo, where the greatest number of NTDs may occur. PMID:19707588

  8. Neglected Tropical Diseases in Sub-Saharan Africa: Review of Their Prevalence, Distribution, and Disease Burden

    PubMed Central

    Hotez, Peter J.; Kamath, Aruna

    2009-01-01

    The neglected tropical diseases (NTDs) are the most common conditions affecting the poorest 500 million people living in sub-Saharan Africa (SSA), and together produce a burden of disease that may be equivalent to up to one-half of SSA's malaria disease burden and more than double that caused by tuberculosis. Approximately 85% of the NTD disease burden results from helminth infections. Hookworm infection occurs in almost half of SSA's poorest people, including 40–50 million school-aged children and 7 million pregnant women in whom it is a leading cause of anemia. Schistosomiasis is the second most prevalent NTD after hookworm (192 million cases), accounting for 93% of the world's number of cases and possibly associated with increased horizontal transmission of HIV/AIDS. Lymphatic filariasis (46–51 million cases) and onchocerciasis (37 million cases) are also widespread in SSA, each disease representing a significant cause of disability and reduction in the region's agricultural productivity. There is a dearth of information on Africa's non-helminth NTDs. The protozoan infections, human African trypanosomiasis and visceral leishmaniasis, affect almost 100,000 people, primarily in areas of conflict in SSA where they cause high mortality, and where trachoma is the most prevalent bacterial NTD (30 million cases). However, there are little or no data on some very important protozoan infections, e.g., amebiasis and toxoplasmosis; bacterial infections, e.g., typhoid fever and non-typhoidal salmonellosis, the tick-borne bacterial zoonoses, and non-tuberculosis mycobaterial infections; and arboviral infections. Thus, the overall burden of Africa's NTDs may be severely underestimated. A full assessment is an important step for disease control priorities, particularly in Nigeria and the Democratic Republic of Congo, where the greatest number of NTDs may occur. PMID:19707588

  9. Prevalence and Correlates of Post-traumatic Stress Disorder in Adults With Congenital Heart Disease.

    PubMed

    Deng, Lisa X; Khan, Abigail May; Drajpuch, David; Fuller, Stephanie; Ludmir, Jonathan; Mascio, Christopher E; Partington, Sara L; Qadeer, Ayesha; Tobin, Lynda; Kovacs, Adrienne H; Kim, Yuli Y

    2016-03-01

    Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is associated with adverse outcomes and increased mortality in cardiac patients. No studies have examined PTSD in the adult congenital heart disease (ACHD) population. The objectives of this study were to assess the prevalence of self-reported symptoms of PTSD in patients with ACHD and explore potential associated factors. Patients were enrolled from an outpatient ACHD clinic and completed several validated measures including the Impact of Event Scale-Revised, PTSD Checklist-Civilian Version, and the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale. Clinical data were abstracted through medical data review. A total of 134 participants (mean age 34.6 ± 10.6; 46% men) were enrolled. Of the 127 participants who completed the Impact of Event Scale-Revised, 14 (11%) met criteria for elevated PTSD symptoms specifically related to their congenital heart disease or treatment. Of the 134 patients who completed PTSD Checklist-Civilian Version, 27 (21%) met criteria for global PTSD symptoms. In univariate analyses, patients with congenital heart disease-specific PTSD had their most recent cardiac surgery at an earlier year (p = 0.008), were less likely to have attended college (p = 0.04), had higher rates of stroke or transient ischemic attack (p = 0.03), and reported greater depressive symptoms on the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (7 vs 2, p <0.001). In multivariable analysis, the 2 factors most strongly associated with PTSD were depressive symptoms (p <0.001) and year of most recent cardiac surgery (p <0.03). In conclusion, PTSD is present in 11% to 21% of subjects seen at a tertiary referral center for ACHD. The high prevalence of PTSD in this complex group of patients has important implications for the medical and psychosocial management of this growing population.

  10. Prevalence of mental health disorders in inflammatory bowel disease: an Australian outpatient cohort

    PubMed Central

    Tribbick, Davina; Salzberg, Michael; Ftanou, Maria; Connell, William R; Macrae, Finlay; Kamm, Michael A; Bates, Glen W; Cunningham, Georgina; Austin, David W; Knowles, Simon R

    2015-01-01

    Background This study aimed to characterize prevalence of anxiety and depressive conditions and uptake of mental health services in an Australian inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) outpatient setting. Methods Eighty-one IBD patients (39 males, mean age 35 years) attending a tertiary hospital IBD outpatient clinic participated in this study. Disease severity was evaluated according to the Manitoba Index. Diagnosis of an anxiety or depressive condition was based upon the Mini-International Neuropsychiatric Interview and the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale. Results Based on Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale subscale scores >8 and meeting Mini-International Neuropsychiatric Interview criteria, 16 (19.8%) participants had at least one anxiety condition, while nine (11.1%) had a depressive disorder present. Active IBD status was associated with higher prevalence rates across all anxiety and depressive conditions. Generalized anxiety was the most common (12 participants, 14.8%) anxiety condition, and major depressive disorder (recurrent) was the most common depressive condition reported (five participants, 6.2%). Seventeen participants (21%) reported currently seeking help for mental health issues while 12.4% were identified has having at least one psychological condition but not seeking treatment. Conclusion We conclude that rates of anxiety and depression are high in this cohort, and that IBD-focused psychological services should be a key component of any holistic IBD service, especially for those identified as having active IBD. PMID:26213474

  11. Prevalence and Factors Associated with Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease in a Nonobese Korean Population

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Hyun Chin

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is an emerging problem in Asia, but little is known about the disease in the nonobese population. The aims of this study were to investigate the prevalence of NAFLD and the factors associated with it in a nonobese Korean population and to compare the clinical characteristics of nonobese and obese subjects with NAFLD. Methods This cross-sectional study used data from 2,058 subjects who participated in a medical checkup program. Results The prevalence of NAFLD was 12.4% (213/1,711) in the nonobese population. A higher body mass index (BMI), higher homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) values, higher alanine aminotransferase (ALT) levels, triglyceride concentrations 150 mg/dL, and hyperuricemia were independently associated with the presence of NAFLD in the nonobese subjects. Compared with the obese subjects with NAFLD, the nonobese subjects with NAFLD were composed of a higher proportion of females and had lower BMIs, smaller waist circumferences, lower HOMA-IR values, and fewer metabolic irregularities. Conclusions Higher BMIs, HOMA-IR values, ALT levels, hypertriglyceridemia, and hyperuricemia were associated with NAFLD in the nonobese subjects. Clinicians should be particularly aware of the possibility of NAFLD in nonobese Asian people. PMID:26260755

  12. Systematic review and meta-analysis to estimate the birth prevalence of five inherited metabolic diseases.

    PubMed

    Moorthie, Sowmiya; Cameron, Louise; Sagoo, Gurdeep S; Bonham, Jim R; Burton, Hilary

    2014-11-01

    Many newborn screening programmes now use tandem mass spectrometry in order to screen for a variety of diseases. However, countries have embraced this technology with a differing pace of change and for different conditions. This has been facilitated by the ability of this diagnostic method to limit analysis to specific metabolites of interest, enabling targeted screening for particular conditions. MS/MS was introduced in 2009 in England to implement newborn bloodspot screening for medium chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency (MCADD) raising the possibility of screening for other inherited metabolic disorders. Recently, a pilot screening programme was conducted in order to evaluate the health and economic consequences of screening for five additional inherited metabolic disorders in England. As part of this study we conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis to estimate the birth prevalence of these conditions: maple syrup urine disease, homocystinuria (pyridoxine unresponsive), glutaric aciduria type I, isovaleric acidaemia and long-chain 3-hydroxyacyl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency including trifunctional protein deficiency. We identified a total of 99 studies that were able to provide information on the prevalence of one or more of the disorders. The vast majority of studies were of screening programmes with some reporting on clinically detected cases. PMID:25022222

  13. Estrogens and Coronary Artery Disease: New Clinical Perspectives.

    PubMed

    Meyer, M R; Barton, M

    2016-01-01

    In premenopausal women, endogenous estrogens are associated with reduced prevalence of arterial hypertension, coronary artery disease, myocardial infarction, and stroke. Clinical trials conducted in the 1990s such as HERS, WHI, and WISDOM have shown that postmenopausal treatment with horse hormone mixtures (so-called conjugated equine estrogens) and synthetic progestins adversely affects female cardiovascular health. Our understanding of rapid (nongenomic) and chronic (genomic) estrogen signaling has since advanced considerably, including identification of a new G protein-coupled estrogen receptor (GPER), which like the "classical" receptors ERα and ERβ is highly abundant in the cardiovascular system. Here, we discuss the role of estrogen receptors in the pathogenesis of coronary artery disease and review natural and synthetic ligands of estrogen receptors as well as their effects in physiology, on cardiovascular risk factors, and atherosclerotic vascular disease. Data from preclinical and clinical studies using nonselective compounds activating GPER, which include selective estrogen receptor modulators such as tamoxifen or raloxifene, selective estrogen receptor downregulators such as Faslodex™ (fulvestrant/ICI 182,780), vitamin B3 (niacin), green tea catechins, and soy flavonoids such as genistein or resveratrol, strongly suggest that activation of GPER may afford therapeutic benefit for primary and secondary prevention in patients with or at risk for coronary artery disease. Evidence from preclinical studies suggest similar efficacy profiles for selective small molecule GPER agonists such as G-1 which are devoid of uterotrophic activity. Further clinical research in this area is warranted to provide opportunities for future cardiovascular drug development.

  14. Estrogens and Coronary Artery Disease: New Clinical Perspectives.

    PubMed

    Meyer, M R; Barton, M

    2016-01-01

    In premenopausal women, endogenous estrogens are associated with reduced prevalence of arterial hypertension, coronary artery disease, myocardial infarction, and stroke. Clinical trials conducted in the 1990s such as HERS, WHI, and WISDOM have shown that postmenopausal treatment with horse hormone mixtures (so-called conjugated equine estrogens) and synthetic progestins adversely affects female cardiovascular health. Our understanding of rapid (nongenomic) and chronic (genomic) estrogen signaling has since advanced considerably, including identification of a new G protein-coupled estrogen receptor (GPER), which like the "classical" receptors ERα and ERβ is highly abundant in the cardiovascular system. Here, we discuss the role of estrogen receptors in the pathogenesis of coronary artery disease and review natural and synthetic ligands of estrogen receptors as well as their effects in physiology, on cardiovascular risk factors, and atherosclerotic vascular disease. Data from preclinical and clinical studies using nonselective compounds activating GPER, which include selective estrogen receptor modulators such as tamoxifen or raloxifene, selective estrogen receptor downregulators such as Faslodex™ (fulvestrant/ICI 182,780), vitamin B3 (niacin), green tea catechins, and soy flavonoids such as genistein or resveratrol, strongly suggest that activation of GPER may afford therapeutic benefit for primary and secondary prevention in patients with or at risk for coronary artery disease. Evidence from preclinical studies suggest similar efficacy profiles for selective small molecule GPER agonists such as G-1 which are devoid of uterotrophic activity. Further clinical research in this area is warranted to provide opportunities for future cardiovascular drug development. PMID:27451102

  15. Clinical, anthropometric and laboratory nutritional markers of pancreatic exocrine insufficiency: Prevalence and diagnostic use.

    PubMed

    Lindkvist, Björn; Phillips, Mary E; Domínguez-Muñoz, J Enrique

    2015-01-01

    Pancreatic exocrine insufficiency (PEI) frequently occurs secondary to exocrine pancreatic disease (e.g. chronic pancreatitis, cystic fibrosis, cancer) or pancreatic/gastrointestinal surgery, resulting in the maldigestion of nutrients and consequently malnutrition. Pancreatic enzyme replacement therapy (PERT) is the cornerstone of PEI management. Despite its clinical relevance, the diagnosis of PEI in clinical practice is challenging, as the current gold standard test is cumbersome, and alternatives have limited availability or accuracy. There is a need for accurate and easily applicable diagnostic modalities. We review the prevalence of clinical symptoms and changes in anthropometric measurements and laboratory nutritional markers indicative of malnutrition in patients with PEI, and the relevance of these findings in diagnosing PEI and monitoring PERT efficacy. Based on limited available evidence, assessment of clinical symptoms, body weight, body mass index and other anthropometric parameters are not sensitive methods for PEI diagnosis, owing to high variability and multiple confounding factors, but appear useful in monitoring PERT efficacy. Limited evidence precludes strong recommendations but suggests that serum levels of vitamin E, magnesium, and plasma proteins, notably retinol binding protein, albumin, and prealbumin, may have diagnostic utility in PEI. Studies show that assessment of changes in these and other nutritional parameters is helpful in monitoring PERT efficacy. Further research is needed to confirm the diagnostic accuracy of these parameters for PEI. Until such data are available, a nutritional evaluation including circulating vitamin E, magnesium, retinol binding protein, albumin, and prealbumin may be used to evaluate the probability of PEI in clinical practice when reliable pancreatic function tests are not available. PMID:26243045

  16. Clostridium difficile: clinical disease and diagnosis.

    PubMed Central

    Knoop, F C; Owens, M; Crocker, I C

    1993-01-01

    Clostridium difficile is an opportunistic pathogen that causes a spectrum of disease ranging from antibiotic-associated diarrhea to pseudomembranous colitis. Although the disease was first described in 1893, the etiologic agent was not isolated and identified until 1978. Since clinical and pathological features of C. difficile-associated disease are not easily distinguished from those of other gastrointestinal diseases, including ulcerative colitis, chronic inflammatory bowel disease, and Crohn's disease, diagnostic methods have relied on either isolation and identification of the microorganism or direct detection of bacterial antigens or toxins in stool specimens. The current review focuses on the sensitivity, specificity, and practical use of several diagnostic tests, including methods for culture of the etiologic agent, cellular cytotoxicity assays, latex agglutination tests, enzyme immunoassay systems, counterimmunoelectrophoresis, fluorescent-antibody assays, and polymerase chain reactions. PMID:8358706

  17. [Lyme disease--clinical manifestations and treatment].

    PubMed

    Stock, Ingo

    2016-05-01

    Lyme disease (Lyme borreliosis) is a systemic infectious disease that can present in a variety of clinical manifestations. The disease is caused by a group of spirochaetes--Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato or Lyme borrelia--that are transmitted to humans by the bite of Ixodes ticks. Lyme disease is the most common arthropode-borne infectious disease in many European countries including Germany. Early localized infection is typically manifested by an erythema migrans skin lesion, in rarer cases as a borrelial lymphocytoma. The most common early disseminated manifestation is (early) neuroborreliosis. In adults, neuroborreliosis appears typically as meningoradiculoneuritis. Neuroborreliosis in children, however, is typically manifested by meningitis. In addition, multiple erythema migrans lesions and Lyme carditis occur relatively frequently. The most common manifestation oflate Lyme disease is Lyme arthritis. Early manifestations (and usually also late manifestations) of Lyme disease can be treated successfully by application of suitable antibacterial agents. For the treatment of Lyme disease, doxycycline, certain penicillins such as amoxicillin and some cephalosporins (ceftriaxone, cefotaxime, cefuroxime axetil) are recommended in current guidelines. A major challenge is the treatment of chronic, non-specific disorders, i. e., posttreatment Lyme disease syndrome and "chronic Lyme disease". Prevention of Lyme disease is mainly accomplished by protecting against tick bites. Prophylactic administration of doxycycline after tick bites is generally not recommended in Germany. There is no vaccine available for human beings.

  18. [Lyme disease--clinical manifestations and treatment].

    PubMed

    Stock, Ingo

    2016-05-01

    Lyme disease (Lyme borreliosis) is a systemic infectious disease that can present in a variety of clinical manifestations. The disease is caused by a group of spirochaetes--Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato or Lyme borrelia--that are transmitted to humans by the bite of Ixodes ticks. Lyme disease is the most common arthropode-borne infectious disease in many European countries including Germany. Early localized infection is typically manifested by an erythema migrans skin lesion, in rarer cases as a borrelial lymphocytoma. The most common early disseminated manifestation is (early) neuroborreliosis. In adults, neuroborreliosis appears typically as meningoradiculoneuritis. Neuroborreliosis in children, however, is typically manifested by meningitis. In addition, multiple erythema migrans lesions and Lyme carditis occur relatively frequently. The most common manifestation oflate Lyme disease is Lyme arthritis. Early manifestations (and usually also late manifestations) of Lyme disease can be treated successfully by application of suitable antibacterial agents. For the treatment of Lyme disease, doxycycline, certain penicillins such as amoxicillin and some cephalosporins (ceftriaxone, cefotaxime, cefuroxime axetil) are recommended in current guidelines. A major challenge is the treatment of chronic, non-specific disorders, i. e., posttreatment Lyme disease syndrome and "chronic Lyme disease". Prevention of Lyme disease is mainly accomplished by protecting against tick bites. Prophylactic administration of doxycycline after tick bites is generally not recommended in Germany. There is no vaccine available for human beings. PMID:27348896

  19. Aging with HIV: a cross-sectional study of comorbidity prevalence and clinical characteristics across decades of life.

    PubMed

    Vance, David E; Mugavero, Michael; Willig, James; Raper, James L; Saag, Michael S

    2011-01-01

    Nurses and nurse practitioners require information on the health problems faced by aging HIV-infected adults. In this descriptive, cross-sectional study, we reviewed the electronic medical records of 1,478 adult patients seen in an HIV clinic between May 2006 and August 2007 to examine patterns of comorbidities, and immunological and clinical characteristics across each decade of life. With increasing age, patients were found to have lower HIV viral loads, more prescribed medications, and a higher prevalence of comorbid conditions, including coronary artery disease, hypertension, hypercholesterolemia, hypogonadism, erectile dysfunction, diabetes, peripheral neuropathy, hepatitis C, esophageal gastric reflux disease, and renal disease. Fortunately, with increasing age, patients were also more likely to have public or private health insurance and tended to be more compliant to medical appointments. With growing interest in aging with HIV, this study highlights the vastly different comorbidity profiles across decades of life, calling into question what constitutes "older" with HIV. PMID:20471864

  20. Prevalence and prognosis of Alzheimer’s disease at the mild cognitive impairment stage

    PubMed Central

    Verhey, Frans; Frölich, Lutz; Kornhuber, Johannes; Wiltfang, Jens; Maier, Wolfgang; Peters, Oliver; Rüther, Eckart; Nobili, Flavio; Morbelli, Silvia; Frisoni, Giovanni B.; Drzezga, Alexander; Didic, Mira; van Berckel, Bart N. M.; Simmons, Andrew; Soininen, Hilkka; Kłoszewska, Iwona; Mecocci, Patrizia; Tsolaki, Magda; Vellas, Bruno; Lovestone, Simon; Muscio, Cristina; Herukka, Sanna-Kaisa; Salmon, Eric; Bastin, Christine; Wallin, Anders; Nordlund, Arto; de Mendonça, Alexandre; Silva, Dina; Santana, Isabel; Lemos, Raquel; Engelborghs, Sebastiaan; Van der Mussele, Stefan; Freund-Levi, Yvonne; Wallin, Åsa K.; Hampel, Harald; van der Flier, Wiesje; Scheltens, Philip; Visser, Pieter Jelle

    2015-01-01

    Three sets of research criteria are available for diagnosis of Alzheimer’s disease in subjects with mild cognitive impairment: the International Working Group-1, International Working Group-2, and National Institute of Aging-Alzheimer Association criteria. We compared the prevalence and prognosis of Alzheimer’s disease at the mild cognitive impairment stage according to these criteria. Subjects with mild cognitive impairment (n = 1607), 766 of whom had both amyloid and neuronal injury markers, were recruited from 13 cohorts. We used cognitive test performance and available biomarkers to classify subjects as prodromal Alzheimer’s disease according to International Working Group-1 and International Working Group-2 criteria and in the high Alzheimer’s disease likelihood group, conflicting biomarker groups (isolated amyloid pathology or suspected non-Alzheimer pathophysiology), and low Alzheimer’s disease likelihood group according to the National Institute of Ageing-Alzheimer Association criteria. Outcome measures were the proportion of subjects with Alzheimer’s disease at the mild cognitive impairment stage and progression to Alzheimer’s disease-type dementia. We performed survival analyses using Cox proportional hazards models. According to the International Working Group-1 criteria, 850 (53%) subjects had prodromal Alzheimer’s disease. Their 3-year progression rate to Alzheimer’s disease-type dementia was 50% compared to 21% for subjects without prodromal Alzheimer’s disease. According to the International Working Group-2 criteria, 308 (40%) subjects had prodromal Alzheimer’s disease. Their 3-year progression rate to Alzheimer’s disease-type dementia was 61% compared to 22% for subjects without prodromal Alzheimer’s disease. According to the National Institute of Ageing-Alzheimer Association criteria, 353 (46%) subjects were in the high Alzheimer’s disease likelihood group, 49 (6%) in the isolated amyloid pathology group, 220 (29%) in

  1. Prevalence of Traumatic Brain Injury in Early Versus Late-Onset Alzheimer’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Mendez, Mario F.; Paholpak, Pongsatorn; Lin, Andrew; Zhang, Jeannie Y.; Teng, Edmond

    2016-01-01

    Background Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is the most established environmental risk factor for Alzheimer’s disease (AD), but it is unclear if TBI is specifically associated with early-onset AD (EOAD). Objective To evaluate the relationship between TBI and EOAD (<65 years). Methods We identified 1,449 EOAD, 4,337 late-onset AD (LOAD), and corresponding EOAD-matched and LOAD-matched normal controls (NC) in the National Alzheimer’s Coordinating Center Uniform (NACC) database and compared the prevalence of any history of TBI as well as measures of cognition, function, behavior, and neuropathology. For validation, we determined TBI prevalence among 115 well-characterized clinic patients with EOAD. Results Part A: The prevalence of any TBI in the NACC-database EOAD participants (13.3%) was comparable to that observed in the clinic EOAD patients (13.9%) but significantly higher than in the NACC-database LOAD participants (7.7%; p < 0.0001) and trended to higher compared to EOAD-matched NC (11.1%; logistic regression p = 0.053). Part B: When we compared EOAD patients with documented non-acute and non-residually impairing TBI to EOAD without a documented history of prior TBI, those with TBI had significantly more disinhibition. Part C: Autopsies did not reveal differences in AD neuropathology based on a history of TBI. Conclusions These findings suggest, but do not establish, that TBI is a specific risk factor for EOAD and may lead to disinhibition, a feature that often results from the frontal effects of head injury. This study recommends further research on the effects of TBI in EOAD in larger numbers of participants. PMID:26401777

  2. High Prevalence of Isolated Nocturnal Hypertension in Chinese Patients With Chronic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Cheng; Deng, Wen-Jie; Gong, Wen-Yu; Zhang, Jun; Tang, Hua; Peng, Hui; Zhang, Qun-Zi; Ye, Zeng-Chun; Lou, Tanqi

    2015-01-01

    Background Isolated nocturnal hypertension (INH) has been studied among the general population and hypertensive patients. However, little insight is available on the prevalence of INH and its role in target-organ damage among patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). Methods and Results We recruited 1282 CKD patients admitted to our hospital division. Patients were divided into 4 groups: INH; isolated daytime hypertension; day–night sustained; and ambulatory normotension. Multiple linear regression analyses were used to evaluate the correlation between INH and renal/cardiovascular parameters. A total of 262 (20.44%) CKD patients had isolated nocturnal hypertension and 651 (50.78%) had day–night sustained hypertension, whereas only 350 (27.30%) patients showed normotension and 19 (1.48%) had isolated daytime hypertension. Multivariate logistic regression analysis showed that INH was associated mainly with age, estimated glomerular filtration rate, clinic diastolic blood pressure, and that INH was determined only by age, estimated glomerular filtration rate, and clinic diastolic blood pressure. The prevalence of impaired renal function, left ventricular hypertrophy, and carotid intima-media thickness in patients with INH were higher than in normotensive patients (P<0.05), whereas impaired renal function and left ventricular hypertrophy in these patients were lower than patients in the day–night sustained hypertension group (P<0.05). INH was correlated with estimated glomerular filtration rate, left ventricular mass index, and carotid intima-media thickness according to multiple linear regression analyses. Conclusions The prevalence of INH in CKD patients was high, and INH was correlated with target-organ damage in CKD patients. PMID:26089178

  3. Prevalence and resistance patterns of canine uropathogens in regard to concurrent diseases.

    PubMed

    Brložnik, Maja; Šterk, Karmen; Zdovc, Irena

    2016-01-01

    Predisposing factors for different types of urinary tract infections (UTI) were evaluated and prevalence of causative agents and their resistance were identified. A prospective epidemiologic study (2007 to 2012) included 191 dogs with signs of urinary tract disease. Anamnestic data were collected and clinical examination, abdominal ultrasonography, urinalysis and aerobic bacteriologic urine culture were performed in all dogs. Other diagnostic procedures were conducted when indicated. UTI was more common in neutered female dogs, older dogs and dogs with concurrent diseases. Using culture as the gold standard, sensitivity of urine sediment examination to detect bacteriuria increased from 89.9% to 98.1% with staining and specificity increased from 69.8% to 96.4%. A single species of microorganism was isolated in 90.7%. Most common causative agents of UTI were E. coli (39.0% of isolates), staphylococci (27.3% of isolates), Proteus sp. (13.5% of isolates), and enterococci (8.5% of isolates). Prevalence of the causative agents varied in regard to sex and concurrent diseases. The causative agents were in 29.4% susceptible to all tested antimicrobials and were multi-drug resistant in 27.7%. All methicillin resistant Staphylococcus pseudintermedius (MRSP) strains were isolated in 2010-2012. Resistant bacteria were more common in dogs previously treated with antimicrobials. Due to increased specificity and sensitivity of urine sediment examination, staining the sediment in practice is mandatory. Data on uropathogens and their resistance in regard to concurrent diseases is of crucial importance for diagnosis, treatment and prevention of complications in dogs with UT. Wide intercountry variability in bacterial susceptibility has been confirmed. Also, the onset of MRSP urinary strains in the country has been identified. PMID:27529997

  4. Prevalence of CADASIL and Fabry Disease in a Cohort of MRI Defined Younger Onset Lacunar Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Kilarski, Laura L.; Rutten-Jacobs, Loes C. A.; Bevan, Steve; Baker, Rob; Hassan, Ahamad; Hughes, Derralynn A.; Markus, Hugh S.

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose Cerebral autosomal dominant arteriopathy with subcortical infarcts and leukoencephalopathy (CADASIL), caused by mutations in the NOTCH3 gene, is the most common monogenic disorder causing lacunar stroke and cerebral small vessel disease (SVD). Fabry disease (FD) due to mutations in the GLA gene has been suggested as an underdiagnosed cause of stroke, and one feature is SVD. Previous studies reported varying prevalence of CADASIL and FD in stroke, likely due to varying subtypes studied; no studies have looked at a large cohort of younger onset SVD. We determined the prevalence in a well-defined, MRI-verified cohort of apparently sporadic patients with lacunar infarct. Methods Caucasian patients with lacunar infarction, aged ≤70 years (mean age 56.7 (SD8.6)), were recruited from 72 specialist stroke centres throughout the UK as part of the Young Lacunar Stroke DNA Resource. Patients with a previously confirmed monogenic cause of stroke were excluded. All MRI’s and clinical histories were reviewed centrally. Screening was performed for NOTCH3 and GLA mutations. Results Of 994 subjects five had pathogenic NOTCH3 mutations (R169C, R207C, R587C, C1222G and C323S) all resulting in loss or gain of a cysteine in the NOTCH3 protein. All five patients had confluent leukoaraiosis (Fazekas grade ≥2). CADASIL prevalence overall was 0.5% (95% CI 0.2%-1.1%) and among cases with confluent leukoaraiosis 1.5% (95% CI 0.6%-3.3%). No classic pathogenic FD mutations were found; one patient had a missense mutation (R118C), associated with late-onset FD. Conclusion CADASIL cases are rare and only detected in SVD patients with confluent leukoaraiosis. No definite FD cases were detected. PMID:26305465

  5. Bone Disease in Thalassemia: A Molecular and Clinical Overview.

    PubMed

    Wong, Phillip; Fuller, Peter J; Gillespie, Matthew T; Milat, Frances

    2016-08-01

    Thalassemia bone disease is a common and severe complication of thalassemia-an inherited blood disorder due to mutations in the α or β hemoglobin gene. In its more severe form, severe anemia is present, and treatment with frequent red blood cell transfusion is necessary. Because the body has limited capacity to excrete iron, concomitant iron chelation is required to prevent the complications of iron overload. The effects of chronic anemia and iron overload can lead to multiple end-organ complications such as cardiomyopathy, increased risks of blood-borne diseases, and liver, pituitary, and bone disease. However, our understanding of thalassemia bone disease is incomplete and is composed of a complex piecemeal of risk factors that include genetic factors, hormonal deficiency, marrow expansion, skeletal dysmorphism, iron toxicity, chelators, and increased bone turnover. The high prevalence of bone disease in transfusion-dependent thalassemia is seen in both younger and older patients as life expectancy continues to improve. Indeed, hypogonadism and GH deficiency contribute to a failure to achieve peak bone mass in this group. The contribution of kidney dysfunction to bone disease in thalassemia is a new and significant complication. This coincides with studies confirming an increase in kidney stones and associated accelerated bone loss in the thalassemia cohort. However, multiple factors are also associated with reduced bone mineral density and include marrow expansion, iron toxicity, iron chelators, increased bone turnover, GH deficiency, and hypogonadism. Thalassemia bone disease is a composite of not only multiple hormonal deficiencies but also multiorgan diseases. This review will address the molecular mechanisms and clinical risk factors associated with thalassemia bone disease and the clinical implications for monitoring and treating this disorder. PMID:27309522

  6. Point prevalence survey on antibiotic use in a Croatian Infectious Disease Hospital.

    PubMed

    Pristaš, Irina; Baršić, Bruno; Butić, Iva; Zarb, Peter; Goossens, Herman; Andrašević, Arjana Tambić

    2013-08-01

    Antibiotic use is the driving force for increasing antibiotic resistance. A large proportion of antibiotics in hospitals are used inadequately. The objective of this study was to evaluate antibiotic use at the Hospital for Infectious Diseases through point-prevalence surveys conducted in 2006, 2008, and 2009. Point prevalence surveys were part of the European Surveillance on Antimicrobial Consumption (ESAC) Hospital Care Subproject and patients' data were collected following ESAC protocol. Additionally, the adequacy of antimicrobial therapy and administration of the first line antibiotic according to the local guidelines were assessed by an infectious disease doctor and a clinical microbiologist. In the study period among the 599 patients admitted to hospital, 352 (58·8%) received antibiotics. Out of 448 antimicrobial treatments, 313 (69·9%) were administered parenterally and 135 (30·1%) orally. Altogether in years 2006, 2008, and 2009 the most commonly prescribed antibiotics were ceftriaxone (19·9%), co-amoxiclav (15·4%), ciprofloxacin (12·3%), narrow spectrum penicillins (6·5%), and penicillinase resistant penicillins (5·6%). Most (82·6%) of the treated infections were community acquired infections. The predominating diagnoses were urinary tract infections and infections with no primary site defined, followed by skin, soft tissue and bone and joint infections. The overall adequacy of antimicrobial therapy was 82% and the first line antibiotic according to the local guidelines was administered with high frequency for central nervous system and cardiovascular infections (100%), and low for ear, nose, and throat infections, urinary tract infections, lower respiratory tract and bone and joint infections (23·0%, 51·6%, 52·5%, 65·0%, respectively) which indicates a significant overuse of antibiotics for diagnoses listed. The results of an individual point prevalence survey provided reliable and representative data for the hospital. Point-prevalence surveys

  7. Nail involvement in adult patients with plaque-type psoriasis: prevalence and clinical features*

    PubMed Central

    Schons, Karen Regina Rosso; Beber, André Avelino Costa; Beck, Maristela de Oliveira; Monticielo, Odirlei André

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Psoriasis is a disease of worldwide distribution with a prevalence of 1 to 3%. Nail psoriasis is estimated in 50% of patients with psoriasis, and in the presence of joint involvement, it can reach 80%. OBJECTIVE: To study the nail changes - and their clinical implications - presented by patients with psoriasis vulgaris under surveillance in a university hospital from the south of Brazil. METHODS: his cross-sectional study evaluated 65 adult patients from January 2012 to March 2013. Cutaneous severity was assessed according to the Psoriasis Area and Severity Index (PASI). The Nail Psoriasis Severity Index (NAPSI) was used to evaluate patient's nails. The diagnosis of psoriatic arthritis was established according to the Classification Criteria for Psoriatic Arthritis (CASPAR). RESULTS: The prevalence of NP was 46.1%. These patients had a median [interquartilic range (IQR)] NAPSI of 1 (0-15). A total of 63.3% of patients reported aesthetic discomfort or functional impairment related to their nails. Onycholysis was the most common feature (80%). When compared with patients without nail involvement, patients with NP had lower mean age at psoriasis onset [21 (18-41) vs. 43 (30-56) years, p=0,001]; longer disease duration [15.5 (10-24) vs. 6 (2-12) years, p=0.001]; higher PASI [9.2 (5-17) vs. 3.7 (2-10), p=0.044], higher frequency of psoriatic arthritis (43.3 vs. 3.7, p = 0.002) and more often reported family history of psoriasis (40% vs. 7.4%, p = 0.011). CONCLUSION: Onycholysis was the most frequent finding and most patients feel uncomfortable with the psoriatic nail changes that they experience. PMID:26131859

  8. Prevalence of Dental Fear and Anxiety amongst Patients in Selected Dental Clinics in Ghana

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ofori, Marian A.; Adu-Ababio, F.; Nyako, E. A.; Ndanu, Tom A.

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To find out the prevalence of dental anxiety and fear amongst patients in various selected dental clinics in Accra, Ghana. Study design: Dental patients (n = 279) who had either been exposed to dental treatments or had no prior dental exposure, attending four selected dental clinics in Accra were randomly sampled. They were interviewed…

  9. [Prevalence and risk factors of gastroduodenal and biliary system diseases in infants and preschool children].

    PubMed

    Malanicheva, T G; Ziatdinova, N V; Denisova, S N

    2013-01-01

    To study the prevalence and risk factors of digestive diseases in children performed continuous screening questionnaire 786 children from 1.5 to 7 years. Were Revealed that 47.1 +/- 3.5% of children have symptoms of diseases of the gastrointestinal tract and biliary system. This symptoms occur in children aged 4 to 7 years in 2.3 times more frequently than in children from 1.5 to 3 years. In-depth study was revealed that the frequency of biliary dyskinesia (BD) was 33 +/- 3.3%, chronic gastritis (CG) and gastroduodenitis (CGD)--6.2 +/- 1.8%, chronic cholecystitis--4.2 +/- 1.4%, functional disorders of the stomach (FSD)--2.8 +/- 1.2%, and peptic duodenal ulcer (DU)--0.3 + 0.4%. In the structure of digestive diseases in children from 1.5 to 7 years on the 1st place are BD--70% on the 2nd--CG and CGD--14.7% on the 3rd chronic cholecystitis--8.9%, on the 4th FSD-5.9% and 5th place DU-0.5%. For dispensary observation in the children's clinic with digestive diseases consist of only 7.9 +/- 1.9% of children, which is 5.9 times lower than according to the active diagnostics data. The leading medical and social risk factors and their complex influence on the formation of digestive disorders in infants and preschool children. PMID:24933954

  10. Changes in Caribbean coral disease prevalence after the 2005 bleaching event.

    PubMed

    Cróquer, Aldo; Weil, Ernesto

    2009-11-16

    Bleaching events and disease epizootics have increased during the past decades, suggesting a positive link between these 2 causes in producing coral mortality. However, studies to test this hypothesis, integrating a broad range of hierarchical spatial scales from habitats to distant localities, have not been conducted in the Caribbean. In this study, we examined links between bleaching intensity and disease prevalence collected from 6 countries, 2 reef sites for each country, and 3 habitats within each reef site (N = 6 x 2 x 3 = 36 site-habitat combinations) during the peak of bleaching in 2005 and a year after, in 2006. Patterns of disease prevalence and bleaching were significantly correlated (Rho = 0.58, p = 0.04). Higher variability in disease prevalence after bleaching occurred among habitats at each particular reef site, with a significant increase in prevalence recorded in 4 of the 10 site-habitats where bleaching was intense and a non-significant increase in disease prevalence in 18 out of the 26 site-habitats where bleaching was low to moderate. A significant linear correlation was found (r = 0.89, p = 0.008) between bleaching and the prevalence of 2 virulent diseases (yellow band disease and white plague) affecting the Montastraea species complex. Results of this study suggest that if bleaching events become more intense and frequent, disease-related mortality of Caribbean coral reef builders could increase, with uncertain effects on coral reef resilience.

  11. The High Prevalence of Diabetes in a Large Cohort of Patients Drawn From Safety Net Clinics

    PubMed Central

    McBurnie, MaryAnn; Paul, Ludmilla; Potter, Jennifer E.; McCann, Sheila; Mayer, Kenneth; Melgar, Gerardo; D’Amato, Sele; DeVoe, Jennifer E.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Underserved populations have been overlooked or underrepresented in research based on data from diabetes registries. We estimated diabetes prevalence using a cohort developed from the electronic health records of 3 networks of safety net clinics that provide care to underserved populations. Methods ADVANCE (Accelerating Data Value Across a National Community Health Center Network) is a partnership of the OCHIN Community Health Information Network (OCHIN), the Health Choice Network (HCN), and the Fenway Health Institute (FHI), representing 97 federally qualified health centers (FQHCs) and 744 clinic sites in 22 US states. Among 952,316 adults with a body mass index (BMI) measurement and at least 2 outpatient visits in 2012 to 2014, we calculated diabetes prevalence using outpatient diagnoses, diagnostic laboratory results, or dispenses of anti-hyperglycemic agents no more than 730 days apart. We calculated prevalence by age, sex, race, Hispanic ethnicity, and BMI class. Results The crude prevalence of diabetes was 14.4%. Men had a higher prevalence than women (16.5% vs 13.2%); diabetes prevalence increased across age categories. White patients had the lowest prevalence (11.4%) and Hawaiian/Pacific Islanders, the highest prevalence (21.9%), with prevalence ranging from 15.2% to 16.5% for other race/ethnicities. The association between BMI class and diabetes prevalence was similar across all racial/ethnic groups. Conclusion The ADVANCE diabetes cohort offers an opportunity to conduct epidemiologic and comparative effectiveness research on underserved and underrepresented individuals, who have a higher prevalence of diabetes than the general US population. PMID:27309415

  12. Disease dynamics of Porites bleaching with tissue loss: prevalence, virulence, transmission, and environmental drivers.

    PubMed

    Sudek, M; Williams, G J; Runyon, C; Aeby, G S; Davy, S K

    2015-02-10

    The prevalence, number of species affected, and geographical extent of coral diseases have been increasing worldwide. We present ecological data on the coral disease Porites bleaching with tissue loss (PBTL) from Kaneohe Bay, Oahu (Hawaii, USA), affecting P. compressa. This disease is prevalent throughout the year, although it shows spatio-temporal variability with peak prevalence during the warmer summer months. Temporal variability in disease prevalence showed a strong positive relationship with elevated water temperature. Spatially, PBTL prevalence peaked in clearer waters (lower turbidity) with higher water flow and higher densities of parrotfish, together explaining approximately 26% of the spatial variability in PBTL prevalence. However, the relatively poor performance of the spatial model suggests that other, unmeasured factors may be more important in driving spatial prevalence. PBTL was not transmissible through direct contact or the water column in controlled aquaria experiments, suggesting that this disease may not be caused by a pathogen, is not highly infectious, or perhaps requires a vector for transmission. In general, PBTL results in partial tissue mortality of affected colonies; on average, one-third of the tissue is lost. This disease can affect the same colonies repeatedly, suggesting a potential for progressive damage which could cause increased tissue loss over time. P. compressa is the main framework-building species in Kaneohe Bay; PBTL therefore has the potential to negatively impact the structure of the reefs at this location.

  13. Human land use influences chronic wasting disease prevalence in mule deer

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Farnsworth, Matthew L.; Wolfe, L.L.; Hobbs, N.T.; Burnham, K.P.; Williams, E.S.; Theobald, D.M.; Conner, M.M.; Miller, M.W.

    2005-01-01

    Human alteration of landscapes can affect the distribution, abundance, and behavior of wildlife. We explored the effects of human land use on the prevalence of chronic wasting disease (CWD) in mule deer (Odocoileus hemionus) populations residing in north-central Colorado. We chose best approximating models estimating CWD prevalence in relation to differences in human land use, sex, and geographic location. Prevalence was higher in developed areas and among male deer, suggesting anthropogenic influences on the occurrence of disease. We also found a relatively high degree of variation in prevalence across the three study sites, suggesting that spatial patterns in disease may be influenced by other factors operating at a broader, landscape scale. Our results suggest that multiple factors, including changes in land use, differences in exposure risk between sexes, and landscape-scaled heterogeneity, are associated with CWD prevalence in north-central Colorado.

  14. Clinical Experiences of Uncommon Motor Neuron Disease: Hirayama Disease

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Kyoung Hee; Choi, Dae Seob; Lee, Young Suk

    2016-01-01

    Hirayama disease, juvenile muscular atrophy of the distal upper limb, is a rare disease predominantly affecting the anterior horn cells of the cervical spinal cord in young men. This cervical myelopathy is associated with neck flexion. It should be suspected in young male patients with a chronic history of weakness and atrophy involving the upper extremities followed by clinical stability in few years. Herein, we report 2 cases of Hirayama disease on emphasis of diagnostic approach and describe the pathognomonic findings at flexion magnetic resonance imaging. PMID:27800001

  15. The prevalence of obesity-related hypertension and risk for new vascular events in patients with vascular diseases.

    PubMed

    Vernooij, Joris W P; van der Graaf, Yolanda; Visseren, Frank L J; Spiering, Wilko

    2012-10-01

    Higher body weight is associated with an increased prevalence of vascular risk factors. Obesity leads to hypertension by various mechanisms, often referred to as obesity-related hypertension. Aim of the present study was to evaluate the prevalence and the vascular risk of the combination of obesity and hypertension in patients with vascular diseases. A cohort of patients with various clinical manifest vascular diseases (n = 4,868) was screened for vascular risk factors and followed (median follow-up 4.2 years) for the occurrence of vascular events (stroke, myocardial infarction, and vascular death). The prevalence of obesity was 18% (95% confidence interval (CI) 17-19%) and the prevalence of hypertension was 83% (95% CI 82-84%). The prevalence of the combination of obesity and hypertension was 16% (95% CI 15-17%). Patients with high blood pressure (BP) combined with a high weight (highest tertile systolic BP (SBP) in the highest tertile BMI) were not at higher risk for new vascular events (hazard ratios (HR) 1.29; 95% CI 0.89-1.88) or mortality (HR 1.18; 95% CI 0.81-1.73) compared to patients without high BP and high weight (patients in the lowest tertile of SBP in the lowest tertile of BMI). Patients with only high weight did not have an elevated risk either for vascular events (HR 1.34; 95% CI 0.91-1.98) or mortality (HR 1.22; 95% CI 0.81-1.83) compared to patients without high BP and high weight. The prevalence of the combination of hypertension and obesity is low in patients with vascular diseases and does not confer a higher risk for recurrent vascular diseases and mortality than each risk factor alone.

  16. [Celiac disease : Pathogenesis, clinics, epidemiology, diagnostics, therapy].

    PubMed

    Schuppan, Detlef

    2016-07-01

    Celiac disease is induced by the consumption of gluten containing cereals (wheat, spelt, barley, rye). With a prevalence of ~ 1 %, it is the most common non-infectious chronic inflammatory intestinal disease worldwide. It manifests in all age groups, either classically with abdominal pain, diarrhoea and growth failure or weight loss, more commonly with indirect consequences of malabsorption, such as anaemia and osteoporosis, or with associated autoimmune diseases like type 1 diabetes, autoimmune thyroiditis or dermatitis herpetiformis. The pathogenesis of celiac disease is well explored. Gluten, the cereal storage protein, is not completely digested and reaches the intestinal mucosa where it activates inflammatory T cells, which cause atrophy of the resorptive villi. This T‑cell activation requires a genetic predisposition (the molecules HLA-DQ2 or -DQ8 on antigen-presenting immune cells). Moreover, the enzyme tissue transglutaminase (TG2) which is released in the mucosa increases the immunogenicity of the gluten peptides by a deamidation reaction. The test for serum antibodies to the autoantigen TG2 is one of the best diagnostic markers in medicine, which in combination with endoscopically obtained biopsies, secures the diagnosis of celiac disease. Despite these tools celiac disease is severely underdiagnosed, with 80-90 % of those affected being undetected. The untreated condition can lead to grave complications. These include the consequences of malabsorption, cancers (especially intestinal T‑cell lymphoma), and likely also the promotion of autoimmune diseases. The therapy of celiac disease, a strict gluten-free diet, is difficult to maintain and not always effective. Alternative, supporting pharmacological therapies are urgently needed and are currently in development. PMID:27273303

  17. [Celiac disease : Pathogenesis, clinics, epidemiology, diagnostics, therapy].

    PubMed

    Schuppan, Detlef

    2016-07-01

    Celiac disease is induced by the consumption of gluten containing cereals (wheat, spelt, barley, rye). With a prevalence of ~ 1 %, it is the most common non-infectious chronic inflammatory intestinal disease worldwide. It manifests in all age groups, either classically with abdominal pain, diarrhoea and growth failure or weight loss, more commonly with indirect consequences of malabsorption, such as anaemia and osteoporosis, or with associated autoimmune diseases like type 1 diabetes, autoimmune thyroiditis or dermatitis herpetiformis. The pathogenesis of celiac disease is well explored. Gluten, the cereal storage protein, is not completely digested and reaches the intestinal mucosa where it activates inflammatory T cells, which cause atrophy of the resorptive villi. This T‑cell activation requires a genetic predisposition (the molecules HLA-DQ2 or -DQ8 on antigen-presenting immune cells). Moreover, the enzyme tissue transglutaminase (TG2) which is released in the mucosa increases the immunogenicity of the gluten peptides by a deamidation reaction. The test for serum antibodies to the autoantigen TG2 is one of the best diagnostic markers in medicine, which in combination with endoscopically obtained biopsies, secures the diagnosis of celiac disease. Despite these tools celiac disease is severely underdiagnosed, with 80-90 % of those affected being undetected. The untreated condition can lead to grave complications. These include the consequences of malabsorption, cancers (especially intestinal T‑cell lymphoma), and likely also the promotion of autoimmune diseases. The therapy of celiac disease, a strict gluten-free diet, is difficult to maintain and not always effective. Alternative, supporting pharmacological therapies are urgently needed and are currently in development.

  18. Prevalence of Trichomonas vaginalis by PCR in men attending a primary care urology clinic in South Korea.

    PubMed

    Seo, Jun-Hyeok; Yang, Hye-Won; Joo, So-Young; Song, Su-Min; Lee, Yu-Ran; Ryu, Jae-Sook; Yoo, Eun Sang; Lee, Won Kee; Kong, Hyun-Hee; Lee, Sang-Eun; Lee, Won-Ja; Goo, Youn-Kyoung; Chung, Dong-Il; Hong, Yeonchul

    2014-10-01

    Trichomonas vaginalis, a causative agent of trichomoniasis, may trigger symptomatic or asymptomatic nongonococcal urethritis and chronic prostatitis in men. Despite the availability of highly sensitive diagnostic tests, such as nucleic acid amplification tests, including PCR, few prospective studies present data on male T. vaginalis infection in South Korea. In the present study, the prevalence of T. vaginalis and associated clinical conditions were evaluated in 201 male patients from a primary care urology clinic in South Korea. The prevalence of T. vaginalis infection in our cohort was 4% (8/201) by PCR. T. vaginalis infection was common in men older than 40 years (median age, 52 years). Among the 8 Trichomonas-positive patients, 87.5% (7/8) had prostatic diseases, such as prostatitis and benign prostatic hyperplasia, and 25.0% (2/8) and 12.5% (1/8) were coinfected with Chlamydia trachomatis and Mycoplasma genitalium, respectively. Our results suggest that T. vaginalis infection is not rare in men attending primary care urology clinics in South Korea, especially in those older than 40 years, in whom it may explain the presence of prostatic disease. The possibility of T. vaginalis infection should be routinely considered in older male patients with prostatic diseases in South Korea.

  19. Prevalence and clinical management of cytomegalovirus retinitis in AIDS patients in shanghai, china

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Cytomegalovirus retinitis is a common AIDS-associated illness, leading to blindness in up to 30% of patients. This study was to investigate the prevalence and clinical management of the cytomegalovirus retinitis associated with AIDS in a large municipality of China. Methods Clinical and laboratory data from 23 cytomegalovirus retinitis patients (35 eyes) out of 303 hospitalized AIDS individuals in a single medical center were analyzed retrospectively. Two of 23 patients were diagnosed cytomegalovirus retinitis just before hospitalization without anti-CMV therapy. Ganciclovir combined with the high active anti-retroviral therapy was installed for treatment of cytomegalovirus retinitis after diagnosis was confirmed. The data were analyzed by specialists and statistics was also applied. Results The prevalence of cytomegalovirus retinitis in hospitalized AIDS patients was 7.6% in this study. The level of CD4+ T lymphocytes was correlated well with the occurrence of cytomegalovirus retinitis, showing 16.8% (19/113) (95% confidence interval: 10.4,25.0), 5.4% (3/56) (95% confidence interval: 1.1,14.9), and 1.4% (1/69) (95% confidence interval: 0.0,7.8) occurrence in the patients with CD4+ T lymphocyte counts < 50, 50~99, and 100~199 cells/μl, respectively. The mean CD4+ T lymphocyte counts was 31.7 ± 38.6 cells/μl in 23 AIDS patients with cytomegalovirus retinitis. Median CD4+ T lymphocyte count is 20 cells/μl with inter-quartile range as (5, 36). Seven patients died (11 eyes) and 16 patients (24 eyes) survived. The proportion of blindness and low vision in eyes infected with cytomegalovirus retinitis respectively was 20.8% (5/24) and 29.2% (7/24) when they were diagnosed in survivors. The ganciclovir therapy was effective in 16 patients (24 eyes). Clinical recovery of cytomegalovirus retinitis was 41.7% (10/24) and clinical improvement 58.3% (14/24). After anti-CMV treatment, the proportion of blindness or low vision was 16.7% (4/24). Conclusions The AIDS

  20. Clinical and genetic characteristics of Mexican Huntington's disease patients.

    PubMed

    Alonso, María Elisa; Ochoa, Adriana; Boll, Marie-Catherine; Sosa, Ana Luisa; Yescas, Petra; López, Marisol; Macias, Rosario; Familiar, Itziar; Rasmussen, Astrid

    2009-10-15

    We report the characteristics of 691 Mexican patients with Huntington's disease (HD). These patients, representing 401 families, constitute the largest series of Mexican HD cases as yet described in the literature. We found the clinical characteristics of these patients to be similar to those of other populations, but we observed a higher frequency of infantile cases, a shorter disease duration and a lower suicide rate. In 626 cases, for which molecular analyses were available, CAG-trinucleotide expansion size ranged from 37-106 repeats. The large number of CAG repeats (19.04 +/- 3.02) in normal alleles and the presence of new mutations suggest that the overall prevalence of HD in the Mexican population could be expected to be within range of, or higher than, that reported for Europeans.

  1. Prevalence, host range, and spatial distribution of black band disease in the Maldivian Archipelago.

    PubMed

    Montano, Simone; Strona, Giovanni; Seveso, Davide; Galli, Paolo

    2013-07-01

    Little research has been conducted on diseases affecting reef-building corals in the central Indian Ocean. During 2010 and 2011, we performed a quantitative assessment of black band disease (BBD) in the central Republic of Maldives. Distribution, host range, and prevalence of BBD were investigated at 6 coral islands (Magoodhoo, Adanga, Ihuru, Vabbinfaru, Thudufushi, and Athuruga) belonging to 3 different atolls. BBD was found to be widespread among the atolls. All the islands showed a prevalence lower than 0.5%. Magoodhoo Island showed the highest mean disease prevalence. In the whole surveyed area, shallow sites showed higher overall mean BBD prevalence than deep ones. BBD was recorded from 6 scleractinian families (Acroporidae, Faviidae, Poritidae, Siderastreidae, Agariciidae, Fungiidae) and 13 scleractinian genera. Two of them, Gardineroseris and Sandalolitha, constitute new records for the disease. The siderastreid Psammocora (BBD prevalence: 5.33 ± 1.41%, mean ± SE) was the most affected genus, followed by Goniopora (2.7 ± 1.3%). BBD prevalence was positively correlated to the respective host density in both genera. Favites and Acropora were the less affected genera (both <0.1%). Although we observed an extremely low overall disease prevalence in the surveyed area (<1%), the large number of different scleractinian genera affected and the widespread distribution of BBD indicate a need for further investigation. PMID:23836771

  2. Prevalence, host range, and spatial distribution of black band disease in the Maldivian Archipelago.

    PubMed

    Montano, Simone; Strona, Giovanni; Seveso, Davide; Galli, Paolo

    2013-07-01

    Little research has been conducted on diseases affecting reef-building corals in the central Indian Ocean. During 2010 and 2011, we performed a quantitative assessment of black band disease (BBD) in the central Republic of Maldives. Distribution, host range, and prevalence of BBD were investigated at 6 coral islands (Magoodhoo, Adanga, Ihuru, Vabbinfaru, Thudufushi, and Athuruga) belonging to 3 different atolls. BBD was found to be widespread among the atolls. All the islands showed a prevalence lower than 0.5%. Magoodhoo Island showed the highest mean disease prevalence. In the whole surveyed area, shallow sites showed higher overall mean BBD prevalence than deep ones. BBD was recorded from 6 scleractinian families (Acroporidae, Faviidae, Poritidae, Siderastreidae, Agariciidae, Fungiidae) and 13 scleractinian genera. Two of them, Gardineroseris and Sandalolitha, constitute new records for the disease. The siderastreid Psammocora (BBD prevalence: 5.33 ± 1.41%, mean ± SE) was the most affected genus, followed by Goniopora (2.7 ± 1.3%). BBD prevalence was positively correlated to the respective host density in both genera. Favites and Acropora were the less affected genera (both <0.1%). Although we observed an extremely low overall disease prevalence in the surveyed area (<1%), the large number of different scleractinian genera affected and the widespread distribution of BBD indicate a need for further investigation.

  3. [Diagnosing Alzheimer's disease: from research to clinical practice and ethics].

    PubMed

    Tarquini, Daniela; Pucci, Eugenio; Gasparini, Maddalena; Zullo, Silvia; Tiraboschi, Pietro; Bonito, Virginio; Defanti, Carlo Alberto

    2014-01-01

    In 2011, the so-called Dubois criteria introduced the use of biomarkers in research (in particular, brain amyloid positron emission tomography imaging and the cerebrospinal fluid levels of tau/fosfo-tau and beta-amyloid 1-42) for the early or preclinical diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease. Even so, we are looking at an increased use of these markers in clinical practice. In the 1960s, Alzheimer's disease was considered a rare form of presenile dementia, but gradually it has been recognized as the prevalent form of old-age dementia. As a consequence, what was once regarded as an inevitable outcome of old age is now recognized as a true disease. Several factors contributed to this paradigm shift, in particular a longer lifespan, new techniques of in vivo study of the central nervous system, and the pressure exerted by the pharmaceutical industry and patient groups. The current lack of disease-modifying therapies and the high incidence of mild cognitive impairment, which is a risk factor for dementia, raise a series of clinical ethical problems ranging from how diagnosis is communicated to how resources are used. This article offers a conceptual scheme through which these issues can be addressed.

  4. [The prevalence of respiratory diseases in the bioclimatic zones of the Primorye Territory].

    PubMed

    Kiku, P F; Gorborukova, T V; Iarygina, M V

    2006-01-01

    The paper estimates the prevalence of respiratory diseases in different bioclimatic zones of the Primorye Territory. The prevalence of environment-induced respiratory diseases in the dwellers of different areas of the Primorye Teritory was found to depend on the specific features of bioclimatic zones and the combinations of environment parameters forming these zones, which should be taken into account when medical and preventive measures are implemented.

  5. Rural-urban differences in the prevalence of chronic disease in northeast China.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shibin; Kou, Changgui; Liu, Yawen; Li, Bo; Tao, Yuchun; D'Arcy, Carl; Shi, Jieping; Wu, Yanhua; Liu, Jianwei; Zhu, Yingli; Yu, Yaqin

    2015-05-01

    Rural-urban differences in the prevalence of chronic diseases in the adult population of northeast China are examined. The Jilin Provincial Chronic Disease Survey used personal interviews and physical measures to research the presence of a range of chronic diseases among a large sample of rural and urban provincial residents aged 18 to 79 years (N = 21 435). Logistic regression analyses were used. After adjusting for age and gender, rural residents had higher prevalence of hypertension, chronic ischemic heart disease, cerebrovascular disease, chronic low back pain, arthritis, chronic gastroenteritis/peptic ulcer, chronic cholecystitis/gallstones, and chronic lower respiratory disease. Low education, low income, and smoking increased the risk of chronic diseases in rural areas. Reducing rural-urban differences in chronic disease presents a formidable public health challenge for China. The solution requires focusing attention on issues endemic to rural areas such as poverty, lack of chronic disease knowledge, and the inequality in access to primary care.

  6. Smart Technology in Lung Disease Clinical Trials.

    PubMed

    Geller, Nancy L; Kim, Dong-Yun; Tian, Xin

    2016-01-01

    This article describes the use of smart technology by investigators and patients to facilitate lung disease clinical trials and make them less costly and more efficient. By "smart technology" we include various electronic media, such as computer databases, the Internet, and mobile devices. We first describe the use of electronic health records for identifying potential subjects and then discuss electronic informed consent. We give several examples of using the Internet and mobile technology in clinical trials. Interventions have been delivered via the World Wide Web or via mobile devices, and both have been used to collect outcome data. We discuss examples of new electronic devices that recently have been introduced to collect health data. While use of smart technology in clinical trials is an exciting development, comparison with similar interventions applied in a conventional manner is still in its infancy. We discuss advantages and disadvantages of using this omnipresent, powerful tool in clinical trials, as well as directions for future research. PMID:26135330

  7. Smart Technology in Lung Disease Clinical Trials.

    PubMed

    Geller, Nancy L; Kim, Dong-Yun; Tian, Xin

    2016-01-01

    This article describes the use of smart technology by investigators and patients to facilitate lung disease clinical trials and make them less costly and more efficient. By "smart technology" we include various electronic media, such as computer databases, the Internet, and mobile devices. We first describe the use of electronic health records for identifying potential subjects and then discuss electronic informed consent. We give several examples of using the Internet and mobile technology in clinical trials. Interventions have been delivered via the World Wide Web or via mobile devices, and both have been used to collect outcome data. We discuss examples of new electronic devices that recently have been introduced to collect health data. While use of smart technology in clinical trials is an exciting development, comparison with similar interventions applied in a conventional manner is still in its infancy. We discuss advantages and disadvantages of using this omnipresent, powerful tool in clinical trials, as well as directions for future research.

  8. The Prevalence of Sickle Cell Disease and Its Implication for Newborn Screening in Germany (Hamburg Metropolitan Area).

    PubMed

    Grosse, Regine; Lukacs, Zoltan; Cobos, Paulina Nieves; Oyen, Florian; Ehmen, Christa; Muntau, Birgit; Timmann, Christian; Noack, Bernd

    2016-01-01

    Sickle cell disease is among hereditary diseases with evidence that early diagnoses and treatment improves the clinical outcome. So far sickle cell disease has not been included in the German newborn screening program despite immigration from countries with populations at risk. To determine the birth prevalence we tested 17,018 newborns. High pressure liquid chromatography and subsequent molecular-genetic testing were used for the detection and confirmation of hemoglobin variants. The frequency of sickle cell disease-consistent genotypes was one in 2,385 newborns. Duffy-blood group typing showed evidence that affected children were likely of Sub-Saharan ancestry. An inclusion of sickle cell disease into the German newborn screening seems reasonable. PMID:26275168

  9. The Prevalence of Sickle Cell Disease and Its Implication for Newborn Screening in Germany (Hamburg Metropolitan Area).

    PubMed

    Grosse, Regine; Lukacs, Zoltan; Cobos, Paulina Nieves; Oyen, Florian; Ehmen, Christa; Muntau, Birgit; Timmann, Christian; Noack, Bernd

    2016-01-01

    Sickle cell disease is among hereditary diseases with evidence that early diagnoses and treatment improves the clinical outcome. So far sickle cell disease has not been included in the German newborn screening program despite immigration from countries with populations at risk. To determine the birth prevalence we tested 17,018 newborns. High pressure liquid chromatography and subsequent molecular-genetic testing were used for the detection and confirmation of hemoglobin variants. The frequency of sickle cell disease-consistent genotypes was one in 2,385 newborns. Duffy-blood group typing showed evidence that affected children were likely of Sub-Saharan ancestry. An inclusion of sickle cell disease into the German newborn screening seems reasonable.

  10. Prevalence of celiac disease in adult patients with refractory functional dyspepsia: Value of routine duodenal biopsy

    PubMed Central

    Giangreco, Emiliano; D’agate, Cinzia; Barbera, Carmelo; Puzzo, Lidia; Aprile, Giuseppe; Naso, Pietro; Bonanno, Giacomo; Russo, Francesco Paolo; Nicoletti, Alessandra; Incarbone, Salvatore; Trama, Giuseppe; Russo, Antonio

    2008-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the prevalence of celiac disease (CD) in adult patients referred to an open access gastroenterology clinic in the south of Italy and submitted to esophago-gastro-duodenoscopy (EGD) for evaluation of refractory functional dyspepsia. METHODS: Seven hundred and twenty six consecutive dyspeptic patients (282 male, 444 female; mean age 39.6 years, range 18-75 years) with unexplained prolonged dyspepsia were prospectively enrolled. Duodenal biopsies were taken and processed by standard staining. Histological evaluation was carried out according to the Marsh-Oberhuber criteria. RESULTS: The endoscopic findings were: normal in 61.2%, peptic lesions in 20.5%, malignancies in 0.5%, miscellaneous in 16.7%. CD was endoscopically diagnosed in 8 patients (1.1%), histologically in 15 patients (2%). The endoscopic features alone showed a sensitivity of 34.8% and specificity of 100%, with a positive predictive value (PPV) of 100% and a negative predictive value (NPP) of 97.9%. CONCLUSION: This prospective study showed that CD has a high prevalence (1:48) in adult dyspeptic patients and suggests the routine use of duodenal biopsy in this type of patient undergoing EGD. PMID:19058330

  11. Prevalence of Major Eye Diseases Among US Civil War Veterans, 1890–1910

    PubMed Central

    Sloan, Frank A.; Belsky, Daniel W.; Boly, Idrissa A.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives To estimate the prevalence of major eye diseases and low vision or blindness in a national sample of male US Union Army veterans from 1890 to 1910 and to compare these prevalence rates with contemporary rates for the same diseases and visual status. Design Longitudinal histories of 16 022 white Union Army veterans receiving disability pensions from 1890 to 1910 were developed from pension board examination records. Prevalence rates of trachoma, corneal opacities, cataract, diseases of the retina and optic nerve, and low vision or blindness were calculated in 1895 and 1910. Changes in prevalence by age were examined. Results By 1910, 11.9% of veterans had low vision or were blind in both eyes. Prevalence of cataract increased with age, resulting in 13.1% of veterans having had cataract in one or both eyes. Rates of trachoma were 3.2% in 1895 and 4.8% in 1910. Rates of corneal opacity were 3.0% and 5.1%, respectively. Glaucoma was rarely diagnosed from 1890 to 1910, but diseases of the optic nerve were reported in 2.0% of veterans in 1895 and 3.6% in 1910. Conclusions This study documents substantial reductions in the prevalence of low vision or blindness and changes in the composition of eye diseases from an era in which there were few effective therapies for eye diseases to the present. PMID:18268217

  12. The prevalence of overweight and obesity among Croatian hospitalized coronary heart disease patients.

    PubMed

    Vrazić, Hrvoje; Sikić, Jozica; Lucijanić, Tomo; Starcević, Boris; Samardzić, Pejo; Trsinski, Dubravko; Sutalo, Kresimir; Mirat, Jure; Zaputović, Luka; Bergovec, Mijo

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this article was to investigate the prevalence of overweight and obesity using selected anthropometric variables in a sample of hospitalized coronary heart disease (CHD) patients in Croatia (N = 1,298). Prevalence of overweight and obesity in surveyed patient population was high: 48.2% of participants were overweight and 28.6% were obese according to their body mass index; measured through waist-to-hip ratio 54.5% of participants were centrally obese. These data on prevalences of overweight, obesity and central obesity show that although there are some reassuring trends, there is still considerable amount of work to be done if the prevalence of this cardiovascular risk factor is to be reduced further among Croatian CHD patients. While the prevalence of obesity seems to be on the decline, the prevalence of overweight is rising, which may be just an early warning sign of an incoming wave of obesity epidemic in future years.

  13. Prevalence of periodontal diseases among rural population of Mustabad, Krishna District

    PubMed Central

    Ramoji Rao, Mulpuri V.; Katari, Pavan Kumar; Vegi, Lokesh; Bypureddy, Tarun Teja; Prabhakara Rao, Koneru Samyuktha; Tejaswi, Kanikanti Siva

    2016-01-01

    Aims and Objectives: People in rural areas neglect oral health as they lack awareness on dental diseases and also due to inadequate availability of dental services. The prevalence of illiteracy is also a reason which can be attributed to a poor oral health. This epidemiological study is undertaken to assess the prevalence of periodontal diseases in the rural population of Mustabad – in Krishna, Andhra Pradesh. Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional study based on randomized sampling method was carried out using the WHO assessment form (1997) on a population of 470. The data were subjected to statistical analysis using Statistical Package for Social Sciences Version 15.0. Results: The subjects were 220 males and 250 females. Maximum numbers of subjects were in the age group of 35-44 years (21.91%). Prevalence of periodontal disease was found to be 73.62%. The periodontal status deteriorated with aging. Prevalence of periodontitis was higher in females (56.35%) compared to males (43.65%). Males had a higher prevalence of deep pockets (3.18%), whereas females had a higher prevalence of shallow pockets (3.20%). Females had twice the bleeding tendency (18.80%) compared to males (8.64%). Conclusion: The increasing prevalence of periodontal diseases is an impending problem which needs immediate intervention, if not it would have a serious negative impact on the future oral health. The need of the hour is more epidemiological studies with a bigger sample are required. PMID:27195229

  14. Prevalence and risk factors associated with peripheral artery disease in elderly patients undergoing peritoneal dialysis

    PubMed Central

    Kuang, Ding-Wei; Li, Chiu-Leong; Kuok, Un-I; Cheung, Kin; Lio, Weng-In; Xin, Jing

    2012-01-01

    Background Rapid growth of the elderly peritoneal dialysis (PD) population is posing a special challenge for renal teams. Peripheral artery disease (PAD) has been reported to be an independent predictor of cardiovascular and all-cause mortality in hemodialysis patients. However, the prevalence and associated risk factors for PAD in elderly PD patients have not yet been fully investigated. Methods A total of 69 elderly PD patients were included in the present study. PAD was defined as either an ankle-brachial index < 0.9 or a history of intermittent claudication, lower-limb amputation, foot ulcers, or gangrene. On enrollment, clinical and biochemical characteristics were collected. Results The overall prevalence of PAD was 31.9%. Compared with non-PAD patients, PAD patients were significantly older and more likely to be female and have longer PD duration and lower diastolic blood pressure (P < 0.001, = 0.002, 0.018, and 0.007, respectively). Serum albumin level (P < 0.001) and residual renal Kt/V value (P < 0.001) were significantly lower, but the serum C-reactive protein level (P = 0.005) was significantly higher, in PAD patients compared with non-PAD patients. Logistic regression analysis showed that serum albumin level (odds ratio = 1.485, P = 0.040) and residual renal Kt/V value (odds ratio = 1.725, P = 0.016) were independently associated with PAD. Conclusion A high prevalence of PAD appeared among elderly PD patients in Macao. Serum albumin level and residual renal Kt/V value were independently related to PAD. PMID:23112578

  15. Apolipoprotein L1 gene variants associate with prevalent kidney but not prevalent cardiovascular disease in the Systolic Blood Pressure Intervention Trial

    PubMed Central

    Langefeld, Carl D.; Divers, Jasmin; Pajewski, Nicholas M.; Hawfield, Amret T.; Reboussin, David M.; Bild, Diane E.; Kaysen, George A.; Kimmel, Paul L.; Raj, Dominic; Ricardo, Ana C.; Wright, Jackson T.; Sedor, John R.; Rocco, Michael V.; Freedman, Barry I.

    2014-01-01

    Apolipoprotein L1 gene (APOL1) G1 and G2 coding variants are strongly associated with chronic kidney disease (CKD) in African Americans. Here APOL1 association was tested with baseline estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR), urine albumin:creatinine ratio (UACR), and prevalent cardiovascular disease (CVD) in 2,571 African Americans from the Systolic Blood Pressure Intervention Trial (SPRINT), a trial assessing effects of systolic blood pressure reduction on renal and CVD outcomes. Logistic regression models that adjusted for potentially important confounders tested for association between APOL1 risk variants and baseline clinical CVD (myocardial infarction, coronary or carotid artery revascularization) and CKD (eGFR under 60 ml/min/1.73m2 and/or UACR over 30 mg/g). African American SPRINT participants were 45.3% female with mean (median) age of 64.3 (63) years, mean arterial pressure 100.7 (100) mmHg, eGFR 76.3 (77.1) ml/min/1.73m2, UACR 49.9 (9.2) mg/g, and 8.2% had clinical CVD. APOL1 (recessive inheritance) was positively associated with CKD (odds ratio 1.37, 95% confidence interval 1.08–1.73) and log UACR estimated slope [β] 0.33) and negatively associated with eGFR (β −3.58), all significant. APOL1 risk variants were not significantly associated with prevalent CVD (1.02, 0.82–1.27). Thus, SPRINT data show that APOL1 risk variants are associated with mild CKD but not prevalent CVD in African American with a UACR under 1000 mg/g. PMID:25029429

  16. Prevalence of Toxin Genes among the Clinical Isolates of Staphylococcus aureus and its Clinical Impact

    PubMed Central

    Deodhar, Divya; Varghese, George; Balaji, Veeraraghavan; John, James; Rebekah, Grace; Janardhanan, Jeshina; Jeyaraman, Ranjith; Jasmine, Sudha; Mathews, Prasad

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) causes a variety of infections, ranging from a mild skin infection to blood stream infections and deep seated infections. As Stapylococcus aureus bacteremia (SAB) has the tendency to cause endovascular and metastatic infections, complications can occur at almost all sites of the body. Hence, SAB is associated with increased morbidity and mortality in spite of appropriate antimicrobial treatment. The virulence in S. aureus is determined by the presence of adhesins and toxins, which behave like superantigens (SAgs) and leads to a massive release of proinflammatory cytokines causing overwhelming inflammatory response leading to endothelial leakage, hemodynamic shock, multiorgan failure, and possibly death. Materials and Methods: One year prospective study conducted in a tertiary care hospital in southern part of India included all patients with SAB. Clinical details were filled according to. All isolates were subjected to polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for enterotoxin profiling. Results: A total of 101 patients of SAB were identified which comprises of 61 (60.4%) patients with methicillin-susceptible S. aureus (MSSA) and 40 (39.6%) patients with methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA). Most common predictors of mortality were prior hospitalization and antibiotic intake, severe organ dysfunction, shock, tachycardia, and leukocytosis. Two-third of the isolates had at least one enterotoxin, most prevalent was sea; 28% and 27% (P - value = 0.001) MSSA isolates had seg and sei; whereas, 38.6% (P - value < 0.001) of MRSA isolates were found to have sea. The most common enterotoxin associated with mortality was sei, which comprised of 38% of all mortality. Conclusion: In SAB, the significant predictors of mortality were prior hospitalization and antibiotic intake, presence of multiorgan dysfunction, and shock. Although overall significance between the enterotoxin and shock could not be demonstrated, it successfully demonstrated

  17. [The prevalence of gastroesophageal reflux disease in agricultural workers].

    PubMed

    Komleva, N E; Spirin, V F; Trubetskov, A D; Zaikina, I V

    2012-01-01

    Among agricultural workers is common gastroesophageal reflux disease. On a professional factors affecting agricultural labor (physical activity, weight lifting, carrying heavy loads, frequent and/or long slopes). These factors contribute to the development of gastroesophageal reflux disease and severe course.

  18. Prevalence and clinical correlates of bronchoreversibility in severe emphysema.

    PubMed

    Han, M K; Wise, R; Mumford, J; Sciurba, F; Criner, G J; Curtis, J L; Murray, S; Sternberg, A; Weinman, G; Kazerooni, E; Fishman, A P; Make, B; Hoffman, E A; Mosenifar, Z; Martinez, F J

    2010-05-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) exhibits airflow obstruction that is not fully reversible. The importance of bronchoreversibility remains controversial. We hypothesised that an emphysematous phenotype of COPD would be associated with decreased bronchoreversibility. 544 patients randomised to the medical arm of the National Emphysema Treatment Trial formed the study group. Participants underwent multiple measurements of bronchoreversibility on a mean of four sessions over 1.91 yrs. They were also characterised by measures of symptoms, quality of life and quantitative measures of emphysema by computed tomography. Mean baseline forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV(1)) in this patient population is 24% predicted. 22.2% of patients demonstrated bronchoreversibility on one or more occasions using American Thoracic Society/European Respiratory Society criteria. Few patients (0.37%) had bronchoreversibility on all completed tests. Patients who demonstrated bronchoreversibility were more likely to be male, and have better lung function and less emphysema. 64% of patients demonstrated large (> or =400 mL) changes in forced vital capacity (FVC). In a severe emphysema population, bronchoreversibility as defined by change in FEV(1) is infrequent, varies over time, and is more common in males and those with less severe emphysema. Improvements in FVC, however, were demonstrated in the majority of patients.

  19. Buruli ulcer disease prevalence in Benin, West Africa: Associations with land use/cover and the identification of disease clusters

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wagner, T.; Benbow, M.E.; Brenden, T.O.; Qi, J.; Johnson, R.C.

    2008-01-01

    Background: Buruli ulcer (BU) disease, caused by infection with the environmental mycobacterium M. ulcerans, is an emerging infectious disease in many tropical and sub-tropical countries. Although vectors and modes of transmission remain unknown, it is hypothesized that the transmission of BU disease is associated with human activities in or around aquatic environments, and that characteristics of the landscape (e.g., land use/cover) play a role in mediating BU disease. Several studies performed at relatively small spatial scales (e.g., within a single village or region of a country) support these hypotheses; however, if BU disease is associated with land use/cover characteristics, either through spatial constraints on vector-host dynamics or by mediating human activities, then large-scale (i.e., country-wide) associations should also emerge. The objectives of this study were to (1) investigate associations between BU disease prevalence in villages in Benin, West Africa and surrounding land use/cover patterns and other map-based characteristics, and (2) identify areas with greater and lower than expected prevalence rates (i.e., disease clusters) to assist with the development of prevention and control programs. Results: Our landscape-based models identified low elevation, rural villages surrounded by forest land cover, and located in drainage basins with variable wetness patterns as being associated with higher BU disease prevalence rates. We also identified five spatial disease clusters. Three of the five clusters contained villages with greater than expected prevalence rates and two clusters contained villages with lower than expected prevalence rates. Those villages with greater than expected BU disease prevalence rates spanned a fairly narrow region of south-central Benin. Conclusion: Our analyses suggest that interactions between natural land cover and human alterations to the landscape likely play a role in the dynamics of BU disease. For example

  20. A Systematic Review of the Prevalence and Pattern of Imaging Defined Post-TB Lung Disease

    PubMed Central

    Meghji, Jamilah; Simpson, Hope; Squire, S. Bertel; Mortimer, Kevin

    2016-01-01

    Background Tuberculosis is an important risk factor for chronic respiratory disease in resource poor settings. The persistence of abnormal spirometry and symptoms after treatment are well described, but the structural abnormalities underlying these changes remain poorly defined, limiting our ability to phenotype post-TB lung disease in to meaningful categories for clinical management, prognostication, and ongoing research. The relationship between post-TB lung damage and patient-centred outcomes including functional impairment, respiratory symptoms, and health related quality of life also remains unclear. Methods We performed a systematic literature review to determine the prevalence and pattern of imaging-defined lung pathology in adults after medical treatment for pleural, miliary, or pulmonary TB disease. Data were collected on study characteristics, and the modality, timing, and findings of thoracic imaging. The proportion of studies relating imaging findings to spirometry results and patient morbidity was recorded. Study quality was assessed using a modified Newcastle-Ottowa score. (Prospero Registration number CRD42015027958) Results We identified 37 eligible studies. The principle features seen on CXR were cavitation (8.3–83.7%), bronchiectasis (4.3–11.2%), and fibrosis (25.0–70.4%), but prevalence was highly variable. CT imaging identified a wider range of residual abnormalities than CXR, including nodules (25.0–55.8%), consolidation (3.7–19.2%), and emphysema (15.0–45.0%). The prevalence of cavitation was generally lower (7.4–34.6%) and bronchiectasis higher (35.0–86.0%) on CT vs. CXR imaging. A paucity of prospective data, and data from HIV-infected adults and sub-Saharan Africa (sSA) was noted. Few studies related structural damage to physiological impairment, respiratory symptoms, or patient morbidity. Conclusions Post-TB structural lung pathology is common. Prospective data are required to determine the evolution of this lung damage and

  1. Prevalence and Clinical Relevance of Schmorl’s Nodes on Magnetic Resonance Imaging in a Tertiary Hospital in Southern India

    PubMed Central

    Indiran, Venkatraman; Hithaya, Fouzal

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Schmorl’s Nodes (SN), which appear as defects in superior and inferior endplates of vertebrae, are commonly seen around the thoracolumbar junction. They may be asymptomatic or symptomatic. Their prevalence varies with respect to age, gender, regions involved and other associated disc or vertebral findings. Aim SN is quite a common finding on the Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) of the spine. The purpose of the study was to evaluate the prevalence of SN in the patients who underwent MRI whole spine in the radiology department, ascertain its clinical relevance and to compare the prevalence of SN in the study population with the prevalence in rest of the Indian and global population described already in the literature. Materials and Methods Clinical history and MRI images of the patients who underwent whole spine MRI study in the Radiology Department during the period of 6 months from June to December 2015 were retrospectively reviewed. The prevalence of SN, their location and associated imaging findings were studied. Results Of the 509 patients in the study, 47 had SN at one or more levels with prevalence of 9.2%. Maximum cases were seen in the 4th decade with least cases in the extremes of age. Twenty five patients had SN at thoracic levels. Twenty five patients had SN at lumbar levels. Twenty eight patients had SN at one intervertebral disc level. Other 19 patients had SN at multiple levels. Of the total 103 SN found, 57 were seen in the superior endplates and 46 in the inferior endplates. All SNs were in central position, except for one. Twelve of the 47 patients had disc degeneration at the same level as SN. Forty two of the 47 patients (89%) with Schmorl’s nodes had associated spinal disc degenerative disease at the same or different levels. Modic type II endplate changes were demonstrated at the same level in 10 of the 47 patients with SN. Thirty eight of the 47 patients presented with history of backache. Only 9 of these patients had come with

  2. Prevalence of hypermutators among clinical Acinetobacter baumannii isolates

    PubMed Central

    Komp Lindgren, Patricia; Higgins, Paul G.; Seifert, Harald; Cars, Otto

    2016-01-01

    Objectives The objectives of this study were to study the presence of mutators in a set of Acinetobacter baumannii isolates and to explore whether there is a correlation between mutation rates and antibiotic resistance. Methods The variation in mutation rate was evaluated for 237 clinical A. baumannii isolates by determining the frequency of their mutation to rifampicin resistance. For each isolate, the antibiotic resistance profile was determined by disc diffusion and/or Etest. Isolates were divided into susceptible, resistant and MDR groups according to their resistance to five groups of different antibiotics. A comparison between differences in mutation frequency (f) and strain-specific factors was performed. Results Of the 237 isolates 32%, 18% and 50% were classified as susceptible, resistant and MDR, respectively. The f of rifampicin resistance varied between 2.2 × 10−10 and 1.2 × 10−6. Of the strains under investigation, 16% had an ≥2.5- to 166-fold higher f. The presence of mutators (definition ≥2.5-fold increase in f compared with ATCC 19606) in the MDR group (22%) was significantly higher (P < 0.05) than that in the susceptible and resistant groups (11% and 7%, respectively). Furthermore, f was significantly higher in the MDR group compared with that in the susceptible and resistant groups. Conclusions The facts that 26 of 37 mutator isolates (70%) in the population were MDR and that there was a significantly higher general f in isolates exhibiting an MDR profile suggest that hypermutability can be of advantage for the organism in a selective environment with extensive exposure to antimicrobials. PMID:26660878

  3. [Helicobacter pylori prevalence among patients with gastroduodenal diseases in Kiev].

    PubMed

    Perederiĭ, V G; Perederiĭ, O V; Tkach, S M; Shvets, O V; Kuzenko, Iu G; Danik, L M; Parunian, L M; Saltanova, S D; Sitnikov, A S; Tishchenko, V V

    1999-06-01

    It is for the first time in Ukraine that a study has been made on the epidemiology of H. pylori infection among patients with disorders of the stomach and duodenum. The diagnosis of the infection was done with the aid of various invasive and noninvasive tests, 13C-urea breathing test, a unique for Ukraine and countries of the Western Europe method of examination included. Ascertained among the above category of patients was wide prevalence of H. pylori, which fact confirms its leading etiological role in disorders of the stomach and duodenum once again. PMID:10476645

  4. Hydroxyurea is associated with lower prevalence of albuminuria in adults with sickle cell disease

    PubMed Central

    Laurin, Louis-Philippe; Nachman, Patrick H.; Desai, Payal C.; Ataga, Kenneth I.; Derebail, Vimal K.

    2014-01-01

    Background Albuminuria is an early manifestation of sickle cell nephropathy. Prior small case series suggests benefit of hydroxyurea in reducing albuminuria, with a similar trend noted in pediatric studies. We aimed to comprehensively evaluate hydroxyurea use and prevalence of albuminuria in adult sickle cell patients. Methods We performed a cross-sectional study of 149 adult patients followed between 2000 and 2011 in a comprehensive sickle cell clinic. All patients were assessed for albuminuria either by direct measurement or by urinary chemical strip (dipstick) testing. Urinary albumin-to-creatinine ratios (UACRs) were available for 112 patients. Hydroxyurea exposure was defined as ≥3 months of therapy before the assessment of albuminuria. Albuminuria was defined as either UACR ≥30 mg/g or ≥1+ proteinuria on two separate dipsticks. We constructed a multivariate logistic regression model to assess the association between hydroxyurea and albuminuria. Results The prevalence of albuminuria was lower among patients on hydroxyurea (34.7 versus 55.4%; P = 0.01) as was median albumin excretion (17.9 versus 40.5 mg/g; P = 0.04). In multivariate analysis, hydroxyurea was associated with a lower likelihood of albuminuria (odds ratio 0.28, 95% CI: 0.11–0.75, P = 0.01), adjusting for age, angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor/angiotensin receptor blocker use, tricuspid regurgitant jet velocity, hypertension and acute chest syndrome. Conclusions In our population of sickle cell patients, those using hydroxyurea were less than one-third as likely to exhibit albuminuria. Hydroxyurea use may prevent development of overt nephropathy or the progression of sickle cell disease nephropathy to end-stage renal disease, and its use for this indication merits further investigation. PMID:24084325

  5. High prevalence of turkey parvovirus in turkey flocks from Hungary experiencing enteric disease syndromes.

    PubMed

    Palade, Elena Alina; Demeter, Zoltán; Hornyák, Akos; Nemes, Csaba; Kisary, János; Rusvai, Miklós

    2011-09-01

    Samples collected in 2008 and 2009, from 49 turkey flocks of 6 to 43 days in age and presenting clinical signs of enteric disease and high mortality, were tested by polymerase chain reaction and reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction for the presence of viruses currently associated with enteric disease (ED) syndromes: astrovirus, reovirus, rotavirus, coronavirus, adenovirus, and parvovirus. Turkey astroviruses were found in 83.67% of the cases and turkey astrovirus 2 (TAst-2) in 26.53%. The investigations directly demonstrated the high prevalence of turkey parvovirus (TuPV) in 23 flocks (46.9%) experiencing signs of ED, making this pathogen the second most identified after astroviruses. Phylogenetic analysis on a 527 base pair-long region from the NS1 gene revealed two main clusters, a chicken parvovirus (ChPV) and a TuPV group, but also the presence of a divergent branch of tentatively named "TuPV-like ChPV" strains. The 23 Hungarian TuPV strains were separately positioned in two groups from the American origin sequences in the TuPV cluster. An Avail-based restriction fragment length polymorphism assay has also been developed for the quick differentiation of TuPV, ChPV, and divergent TuPV-like ChPV strains. As most detected enteric viruses have been directly demonstrated in healthy turkey flocks as well, the epidemiology of this disease complex remains unclear, suggesting that a certain combination of pathogens, environmental factors, or both are necessary for the development of clinical signs.

  6. Morgellons disease: Analysis of a population with clinically confirmed microscopic subcutaneous fibers of unknown etiology

    PubMed Central

    Savely, Virginia R; Stricker, Raphael B

    2010-01-01

    Background: Morgellons disease is a controversial illness in which patients complain of stinging, burning, and biting sensations under the skin. Unusual subcutaneous fibers are the unique objective finding. The etiology of Morgellons disease is unknown, and diagnostic criteria have yet to be established. Our goal was to identify prevalent symptoms in patients with clinically confirmed subcutaneous fibers in order to develop a case definition for Morgellons disease. Methods: Patients with subcutaneous fibers observed on physical examination (designated as the fiber group) were evaluated using a data extraction tool that measured clinical and demographic characteristics. The prevalence of symptoms common to the fiber group was then compared with the prevalence of these symptoms in patients with Lyme disease and no complaints of skin fibers. Results: The fiber group consisted of 122 patients. Significant findings in this group were an association with tick-borne diseases and hypothyroidism, high numbers from two states (Texas and California), high prevalence in middle-aged Caucasian women, and an increased prevalence of smoking and substance abuse. Although depression was noted in 29% of the fiber patients, pre-existing delusional disease was not reported. After adjusting for nonspecific symptoms, the most common symptoms reported in the fiber group were: crawling sensations under the skin; spontaneously appearing, slow-healing lesions; hyperpigmented scars when lesions heal; intense pruritus; seed-like objects, black specks, or “fuzz balls” in lesions or on intact skin; fine, thread-like fibers of varying colors in lesions and intact skin; lesions containing thick, tough, translucent fibers that are highly resistant to extraction; and a sensation of something trying to penetrate the skin from the inside out. Conclusions: This study of the largest clinical cohort reported to date provides the basis for an accurate and clinically useful case definition for

  7. Is the burden of oral diseases higher in urban disadvantaged community compared to the national prevalence?

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The urban low income has often been assumed to have the greatest dental treatment needs compared to the general population. However, no studies have been carried out to verify these assumptions. This study was conducted to assess whether there was any difference between the treatment needs of an urban poor population as compared to the general population in order to design an intervention programme for this community. Methods A random sampling of living quarters (households) in the selected areas was done. 586 adults over 19 years old living in these households were clinically examined using World Health Organization (WHO) Oral Health Survey criteria 4th edition (1997). Results The overall prevalence of dental caries, periodontal disease, denture wearers and temporomandibular joint problems were 70.5%, 97.1%, 16.7% and 26%, respectively. The majority (80.5%) needed some form of dental treatment. The highest treatment needs were found in the oldest age group while the lowest were in the youngest group (19-29 years) (p = 0.000). The most prevalent periodontal problem was calculus; regardless of gender, ethnicity and age. Significantly more females (20.5%) wore prosthesis than males (11.1%) (p = 0.003). Prosthetic status and need significantly increased with age (p = 0.000). About one in four adults had Temporo-Mandibular Joint (TMJ) problems. Overall, it was surprising to note that the oral disease burden related to caries, prosthetic status and treatment need were lower in this population as compared to the national average (NOHSA, 2010). However, their periodontal disease status and treatment needs were higher compared to the national average indicating a poor oral hygiene standard. Conclusions The evidence does not show that the overall oral disease burden and treatment needs in this urban disadvantaged adult population as higher than the national average, except for periodontal disease. The older age groups and elderly were identified as the most in

  8. Monogenic Autoinflammatory Diseases: Concept And Clinical Manifestations

    PubMed Central

    De Jesus, Adriana Almeida; Goldbach-Mansky, Raphaela

    2013-01-01

    The objectives of this review are to describe the clinical manifestations of the growing spectrum of monogenic autoinflammatory diseases including recently described syndromes. The autoinflammatory diseases can be grouped based on clinical findings: 1. the three classic hereditary “periodic fever syndromes”, familial Mediterranean Fever (FMF); TNF receptor associated periodic syndrome (TRAPS); and mevalonate kinase deficiency/hyperimmunoglobulinemia D and periodic fever syndrome (HIDS); 2. the cryopyrin associated periodic syndromes (CAPS), comprising familial cold autoinflammatory syndrome (FCAS), Muckle-Wells syndrome (MWS) and neonatal-onset multisystem inflammatory disease (NOMID) or CINCA, and; 3. pediatric granulomatous arthritis (PGA); 4. disorders presenting with skin pustules, including deficiency of interleukin 1 receptor antagonist (DIRA); Majeed syndrome; pyogenic arthritis, pyoderma gangrenosum and acne (PAPA) syndrome; deficiency of interleukin 36 receptor antagonist (DITRA); CARD14 mediated psoriasis (CAMPS), and early-onset inflammatory bowel diseases (EO-IBD); 5. inflammatory disorders caused by mutations in proteasome components, the proteasome associated autoinflammatory syndromes (PRAAS) 6. very rare conditions presenting with autoinflammation and immunodeficiency. PMID:23711932

  9. The fitting of general force-of-infection models to wildlife disease prevalence data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Heisey, D.M.; Joly, D.O.; Messier, F.

    2006-01-01

    Researchers and wildlife managers increasingly find themselves in situations where they must deal with infectious wildlife diseases such as chronic wasting disease, brucellosis, tuberculosis, and West Nile virus. Managers are often charged with designing and implementing control strategies, and researchers often seek to determine factors that influence and control the disease process. All of these activities require the ability to measure some indication of a disease's foothold in a population and evaluate factors affecting that foothold. The most common type of data available to managers and researchers is apparent prevalence data. Apparent disease prevalence, the proportion of animals in a sample that are positive for the disease, might seem like a natural measure of disease's foothold, but several properties, in particular, its dependency on age structure and the biasing effects of disease-associated mortality, make it less than ideal. In quantitative epidemiology, the a??force of infection,a?? or infection hazard, is generally the preferred parameter for measuring a disease's foothold, and it can be viewed as the most appropriate way to a??adjusta?? apparent prevalence for age structure. The typical ecology curriculum includes little exposure to quantitative epidemiological concepts such as cumulative incidence, apparent prevalence, and the force of infection. The goal of this paper is to present these basic epidemiological concepts and resulting models in an ecological context and to illustrate how they can be applied to understand and address basic epidemiological questions. We demonstrate a practical approach to solving the heretofore intractable problem of fitting general force-of-infection models to wildlife prevalence data using a generalized regression approach. We apply the procedures to Mycobacterium bovis (bovine tuberculosis) prevalence in bison (Bison bison) in Wood Buffalo National Park, Canada, and demonstrate strong age dependency in the force of

  10. The fitting of general force-of-infection models to wildlife disease prevalence data.

    PubMed

    Heisey, Dennis M; Joly, Damien O; Messier, François

    2006-09-01

    Researchers and wildlife managers increasingly find themselves in situations where they must deal with infectious wildlife diseases such as chronic wasting disease, brucellosis, tuberculosis, and West Nile virus. Managers are often charged with designing and implementing control strategies, and researchers often seek to determine factors that influence and control the disease process. All of these activities require the ability to measure some indication of a disease's foothold in a population and evaluate factors affecting that foothold. The most common type of data available to managers and researchers is apparent prevalence data. Apparent disease prevalence, the proportion of animals in a sample that are positive for the disease, might seem like a natural measure of disease's foothold, but several properties, in particular, its dependency on age structure and the biasing effects of disease-associated mortality, make it less than ideal. In quantitative epidemiology, the "force of infection," or infection hazard, is generally the preferred parameter for measuring a disease's foothold, and it can be viewed as the most appropriate way to "adjust" apparent prevalence for age structure. The typical ecology curriculum includes little exposure to quantitative epidemiological concepts such as cumulative incidence, apparent prevalence, and the force of infection. The goal of this paper is to present these basic epidemiological concepts and resulting models in an ecological context and to illustrate how they can be applied to understand and address basic epidemiological questions. We demonstrate a practical approach to solving the heretofore intractable problem of fitting general force-of-infection models to wildlife prevalence data using a generalized regression approach. We apply the procedures to Mycobacterium bovis (bovine tuberculosis) prevalence in bison (Bison bison) in Wood Buffalo National Park, Canada, and demonstrate strong age dependency in the force of

  11. Time trends of the prevalence of asthma and allergic disease in Austrian children.

    PubMed

    Schernhammer, E S; Vutuc, C; Waldhör, T; Haidinger, G

    2008-03-01

    After a substantial increase in the prevalence of atopic disease in Europe, recent studies indicate that a plateau has been reached. However, variation across countries and age groups exists. We studied the prevalence and time trends of asthma and allergic disease among schoolchildren in Austria, a country with traditionally low rates of asthma, hay fever, and eczema. As part of the International Study of Asthma and Allergies in Childhood (ISAAC), symptoms and physician diagnoses of asthma and allergic disease of 13,399 Austrian children aged 6-7 yr and 1516 children aged 12-14 yr were surveyed between 1995 and 1997. A similar survey was conducted between 2001 and 2003. Among children aged 6-7 yr, significant increases were seen in the prevalence of physician-diagnosed asthma (+16%; p = 0.013), hay fever (+22%; p < 0.001), and eczema (+37%; p < 0.001) between 1995 and 2003. These changes were paralleled by an increase in the prevalence of symptoms typical for hay fever (itchy eyes and runny nose), but not by an increase in wheeze. Among children aged 12-14 yr, the lifetime prevalence of diagnosed asthma increased by 32%, of hay fever by 19%, and of eczema by 28% (all, p < 0.001). These changes were paralleled by increases in the prevalence of wheezing as documented by both questions before and after a video showing wheezing children but not by symptoms typical for hay fever such as itchy eyes and runny nose. In conclusion, in Austria, contrary to other European countries, the prevalence of asthma and allergic disease increased among schoolchildren. Additional studies are needed to continue monitoring the dynamics of the prevalence of asthma and allergic disease in Austria and to explore trends in their risk factors. PMID:18086231

  12. Epidemiology of Autism Spectrum Disorder in Portugal: Prevalence, Clinical Characterization, and Medical Conditions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oliveira, Guiomar; Ataide, Assuncao; Marques, Carla; Miguel, Teresa S.; Coutinho, Ana Margarida; Mota-Vieira, Luisa; Goncalves, Esmeralda; Lopes, Nazare Mendes; Rodrigues, Vitor; Carmona da Mota, Henrique; Vicente, Astrid Moura

    2007-01-01

    The objective of this study was to estimate the prevalence of autistic spectrum disorder (ASD) and identify its clinical characterization, and medical conditions in a paediatric population in Portugal. A school survey was conducted in elementary schools, targeting 332 808 school-aged children in the mainland and 10 910 in the Azores islands.…

  13. MDS clinical diagnostic criteria for Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Postuma, Ronald B; Berg, Daniela; Stern, Matthew; Poewe, Werner; Olanow, C Warren; Oertel, Wolfgang; Obeso, José; Marek, Kenneth; Litvan, Irene; Lang, Anthony E; Halliday, Glenda; Goetz, Christopher G; Gasser, Thomas; Dubois, Bruno; Chan, Piu; Bloem, Bastiaan R; Adler, Charles H; Deuschl, Günther

    2015-10-01

    This document presents the Movement Disorder Society Clinical Diagnostic Criteria for Parkinson's disease (PD). The Movement Disorder Society PD Criteria are intended for use in clinical research but also may be used to guide clinical diagnosis. The benchmark for these criteria is expert clinical diagnosis; the criteria aim to systematize the diagnostic process, to make it reproducible across centers and applicable by clinicians with less expertise in PD diagnosis. Although motor abnormalities remain central, increasing recognition has been given to nonmotor manifestations; these are incorporated into both the current criteria and particularly into separate criteria for prodromal PD. Similar to previous criteria, the Movement Disorder Society PD Criteria retain motor parkinsonism as the core feature of the disease, defined as bradykinesia plus rest tremor or rigidity. Explicit instructions for defining these cardinal features are included. After documentation of parkinsonism, determination of PD as the cause of parkinsonism relies on three categories of diagnostic features: absolute exclusion criteria (which rule out PD), red flags (which must be counterbalanced by additional supportive criteria to allow diagnosis of PD), and supportive criteria (positive features that increase confidence of the PD diagnosis). Two levels of certainty are delineated: clinically established PD (maximizing specificity at the expense of reduced sensitivity) and probable PD (which balances sensitivity and specificity). The Movement Disorder Society criteria retain elements proven valuable in previous criteria and omit aspects that are no longer justified, thereby encapsulating diagnosis according to current knowledge. As understanding of PD expands, the Movement Disorder Society criteria will need continuous revision to accommodate these advances.

  14. Prevalence of antibodies to HTLV in antenatal clinic attenders in south east London.

    PubMed

    Hale, A; Leung, T; Sivasubramaniam, S; Kenny, J; Sutherland, S

    1997-07-01

    The prevalence of antibodies to HTLV in women attending a south east London antenatal clinic between October 1990 and July 1992 was determined using sera referred for routine rubella antibody testing. Samples were screened for HTLV antibody using a modified Fujirebio gel particle agglutination test and reactive sera confirmed by ELISA (Abbott Laboratories, North Chicago, IL) and two commercial Western blots (Cambridge Biotech Inc., Rockville, MD, and Diagnostic Biotechnology, Genelab Diagnostics, Louvaine, Belgium). This strategy confirmed the presence of HTLV-1 antibodies in 12 out of 6,289 sera (0.19%, 95% confidence limits 0.083% to 0.30%) and HTLV-2 antibodies in 2 (0.03%) sera. Specimens from 8 of 821 (0.97%, 95% confidence limits 0.42% to 1.9%) Afro-Caribbean women, three of 1,136 (0.26%, 95% confidence limits 0.055% to 0.78%) African women, and one of 3,049 (0.033%, 95% confidence limits 0.006% to 0.18%) Caucasian women were positive for HTLV-1 antibodies. Sera from Afro-Caribbean women born in the Caribbean were 7.6 times more likely to be HTLV-1 antibody positive than sera from Afro-Caribbean women born in the UK (P = 0.012). Selective testing of Afro-Caribbean and African antenatal clinic attenders, in this setting, would have identified 11 of the 12 HTLV-1 infections at an estimated cost of prevention of HTLV-1 associated disease of 100,000 pounds per case which is considerably less than the 1.3 million pounds which has been estimated to prevent a case by universal screening of UK blood donors.

  15. Prevalence of and risk factors for hepatitis C virus infection among STD clinic clientele in Miami, Florida

    PubMed Central

    Weisbord, J; Trepka, M; Zhang, G; Smith, I; Brewer, T

    2003-01-01

    Objectives: Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is the most common chronic blood borne viral infection in the United States. We assessed the HCV prevalence, risk factors, and sensitivity of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's (CDC) routine screening criteria among clients of a large urban sexually transmitted disease (STD) clinic. Methods: Participants were recruited from a public STD clinic in Miami, Florida, and were interviewed regarding known and potential risk factors. The survey assessed CDC screening criteria, as well as other risk factors (for example, intranasal drug use, history of incarceration, exchanging sex for money, number of lifetime sex partners, and history of an STD). Testing was done by enzyme immunoassay (EIA) and confirmed by recombinant immunoblot assay (RIBA). Results: The prevalence of anti-HCV positivity was 4.7%. Four variables were significantly associated with being anti-HCV positive, independent of confounding factors. These included injection drug use (odds ratio (OR) = 31.6; 95% confidence intervals (CI) 11.0 to 90.5); history of incarceration (OR = 3.0; 95% CI 1.1 to 8.1); sexual contact with an HCV positive person (OR 12.7; 95% CI 2.5 to 64.7); and older age (OR 1.4; 95% CI 1.2, 1.6). The sensitivity of CDC's routine screening criteria was 69% and specificity was 91%. Conclusions: The prevalence of anti-HCV in this clinic was similar to that determined in studies of comparable populations. Having sexual contact with an HCV positive person and history of incarceration were independently associated with being anti-HCV positive. CDC's screening criteria identified approximately two thirds of the anti-HCV positive participants. PMID:12576631

  16. A single-center, cross-sectional prevalence study of impulse control disorders in Parkinson disease: association with dopaminergic drugs.

    PubMed

    Poletti, Michele; Logi, Chiara; Lucetti, Claudio; Del Dotto, Paolo; Baldacci, Filippo; Vergallo, Andrea; Ulivi, Martina; Del Sarto, Simone; Rossi, Giuseppe; Ceravolo, Roberto; Bonuccelli, Ubaldo

    2013-10-01

    The current study aimed at establishing the prevalence of impulse control disorders (ICDs) in patients with Parkinson disease (PD) and their association with demographic, drug-related, and disease-related characteristics. We performed a single-center cross-sectional study of 805 PD patients. Impulse control disorders were investigated with the Questionnaire for Impulsive Compulsive Disorders in Parkinson's Disease; also comorbid neuropsychiatric complications (dementia, delusions, visual hallucinations) were investigated with clinical interviews and ad hoc instruments (Parkinson Psychosis Questionnaire and Neuropsychiatry Inventory). Impulse control disorders were identified in 65 patients (prevalence, 8.1%), with pathological gambling and hypersexuality the most frequent. Impulse control disorders were present in 57 of 593 cognitively preserved patients (prevalence, 9.6%) and in 8 of 212 demented patients (prevalence, 3.8%). Impulse control disorders were significantly associated with dopamine agonists (odds ratio [OR], 5.50; 95% confidence interval [CI], 2.60-12.46; P < 0.0001) and levodopa (OR, 2.43; 95% CI, 1.06-6.35; P = 0.034). Impulse control disorders frequency was similar for pramipexole and ropinirole (16.6% vs 12.5%; OR, 1.45; 95% CI, 0.79-2.74; P = 0.227). Additional variables associated with ICDs were male sex and younger age. These findings suggested that dopaminergic treatments in PD are associated with increased odds of having an ICD, but also other demographic and clinical variables are associated with ICDs, suggesting the multifactorial nature of the ICD phenomenon in PD.

  17. Clinical and Epidemiological Characteristics of Kawasaki Disease

    PubMed Central

    Shamsizadeh, Ahmad; Ziaei Kajbaf, Tahereh; Razavi, Maryam; Cheraghian, Bahman

    2014-01-01

    Background: Kawasaki disease (KD) is an acute multisystem vascular syndrome of unknown etiology that is the leading cause of acquired heart disease in children of developed counties. Objectives: We aimed to evaluate the epidemiological characteristics and clinical manifestations of KD in children residing in the southwest of Iran. Patients and Methods: In this retrospective study, we reviewed the medical records of all children with KD who had been admitted to the main children’s hospital of Ahvaz, southwest Iran, from March 2000 to March 2010. Data regarding clinical and epidemiological characteristics, management, and the outcome of disease for each patient were obtained. The patients were divided into cardiac and non-cardiac groups based on echocardiographic results. Results: In total, 104 patients with KD (66 boys and 38 girls) were enrolled in this study. The male to female ratio was 1.7:1. The mean ± SD age of the patients was 33.6 ± 24.2 months. Most (87.2%) cases were from urban areas. The disease occurred more frequently during winter and spring. Furthermore, 61.5% of the children had the criteria of classic KD, and 38.5% were labeled as incomplete KD. The mean ± SD of the duration of hospital stay was 6.9 ± 2.4 days. The mean time between illness and admission to the hospital was 6.47 ± 2.6 days. The most common sign was fever, followed by conjunctivitis and oral changes. In total, 20% of the patients had cardiac abnormalities. There was no significant statistical difference between the cardiac and non-cardiac groups according to age, sex, clinical manifestations, laboratory findings, and cessation of fever. The duration of hospital stay and the time between onset of illness and diagnosis were longer in the cardiac group. All patients received intravenous immunoglobulin and aspirin. Only one patient continued to have cardiac abnormalities after 6 months of follow-up. Conclusions: Kawasaki disease is not rare in southwest of Iran. The age, gender

  18. Epidemiology and prevalence of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Diaz-Guzman, Enrique; Mannino, David M

    2014-03-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) represents one of the main causes of morbidity and mortality worldwide. According to the World Health Organization, approximately 3 million people in the world die as a consequence of COPD every year. Tobacco use remains the main factor associated with development of disease in the industrialized world, but other risk factors are important and preventable causes of COPD, particularly in the developing world. The purpose of this review is to summarize the literature on the subject and to provide an update of the most recent advances in the field. PMID:24507833

  19. Spatially interpolated disease prevalence estimation using collateral indicators of morbidity and ecological risk.

    PubMed

    Congdon, Peter

    2013-10-01

    This paper considers estimation of disease prevalence for small areas (neighbourhoods) when the available observations on prevalence are for an alternative partition of a region, such as service areas. Interpolation to neighbourhoods uses a kernel method extended to take account of two types of collateral information. The first is morbidity and service use data, such as hospital admissions, observed for neighbourhoods. Variations in morbidity and service use are expected to reflect prevalence. The second type of collateral information is ecological risk factors (e.g., pollution indices) that are expected to explain variability in prevalence in service areas, but are typically observed only for neighbourhoods. An application involves estimating neighbourhood asthma prevalence in a London health region involving 562 neighbourhoods and 189 service (primary care) areas. PMID:24129116

  20. Identification and prevalence of coral diseases on three Western Indian Ocean coral reefs.

    PubMed

    Séré, Mathieu G; Chabanet, Pascale; Turquet, Jean; Quod, Jean-Pascal; Schleyer, Michael H

    2015-06-01

    Coral diseases have caused a substantial decline in the biodiversity and abundance of reef-building corals. To date, more than 30 distinct diseases of scleractinian corals have been reported, which cause progressive tissue loss and/or affect coral growth, reproductive capacity, recruitment, species diversity and the abundance of reef-associated organisms. While coral disease research has increased over the last 4 decades, very little is known about coral diseases in the Western Indian Ocean. Surveys conducted at multiple sites in Reunion, South Africa and Mayotte between August 2010 and June 2012 revealed the presence of 6 main coral diseases: black band disease (BBD), white syndrome (WS), pink line syndrome (PLS), growth anomalies (GA), skeleton eroding band (SEB) and Porites white patch syndrome (PWPS). Overall, disease prevalence was higher in Reunion (7.5 ± 2.2%; mean ± SE) compared to South Africa (3.9 ± 0.8%) and Mayotte (2.7 ± 0.3%). Across locations, Acropora and Porites were the genera most susceptible to disease. Spatial variability was detected in both Reunion and South Africa, with BBD and WS more prevalent on shallow than deep reefs. There was also evidence of seasonality in 2 diseases: the prevalence of BBD and WS was higher in summer than winter. This was the first study to investigate the ecology of coral diseases, providing both qualitative and quantitative data, on Western Indian Ocean reefs, and surveys should be expanded to confirm these patterns. PMID:26036832

  1. Identification and prevalence of coral diseases on three Western Indian Ocean coral reefs.

    PubMed

    Séré, Mathieu G; Chabanet, Pascale; Turquet, Jean; Quod, Jean-Pascal; Schleyer, Michael H

    2015-06-01

    Coral diseases have caused a substantial decline in the biodiversity and abundance of reef-building corals. To date, more than 30 distinct diseases of scleractinian corals have been reported, which cause progressive tissue loss and/or affect coral growth, reproductive capacity, recruitment, species diversity and the abundance of reef-associated organisms. While coral disease research has increased over the last 4 decades, very little is known about coral diseases in the Western Indian Ocean. Surveys conducted at multiple sites in Reunion, South Africa and Mayotte between August 2010 and June 2012 revealed the presence of 6 main coral diseases: black band disease (BBD), white syndrome (WS), pink line syndrome (PLS), growth anomalies (GA), skeleton eroding band (SEB) and Porites white patch syndrome (PWPS). Overall, disease prevalence was higher in Reunion (7.5 ± 2.2%; mean ± SE) compared to South Africa (3.9 ± 0.8%) and Mayotte (2.7 ± 0.3%). Across locations, Acropora and Porites were the genera most susceptible to disease. Spatial variability was detected in both Reunion and South Africa, with BBD and WS more prevalent on shallow than deep reefs. There was also evidence of seasonality in 2 diseases: the prevalence of BBD and WS was higher in summer than winter. This was the first study to investigate the ecology of coral diseases, providing both qualitative and quantitative data, on Western Indian Ocean reefs, and surveys should be expanded to confirm these patterns.

  2. Recent Insights in the Epidemiology of Autoimmune Diseases: Improved Prevalence Estimates and Understanding of Clustering of Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Cooper, Glinda S.; Bynum, Milele L.K.; Somers, Emily C.

    2009-01-01

    Previous studies have estimated a prevalence of a broad grouping of autoimmune diseases of 3.2%, based on literature review of studies published between 1965 and 1995, and 5.3%, based on national hospitalization registry data in Denmark. We examine more recent studies pertaining to the prevalence of 29 autoimmune diseases, and use these data to correct for the underascertainment of some diseases in the hospitalization registry data. This analysis results in an estimated prevalence of 7.6–9.4%, depending on the size of the correction factor used. The rates for most diseases for which data are available from many geographic regions span overlapping ranges. We also review studies of the co-occurrence of diseases within individuals and within families, focusing on specific pairs of diseases to better distinguish patterns that may result in insights pertaining to shared etiological pathways. Overall, data support a tendency for autoimmune diseases to co-occur at greater than expected rates within proband patients and their families, but this does not appear to be a uniform phenomenon across all diseases. Multiple sclerosis and rheumatoid arthritis is one disease pair that appears to have a decreased chance of coexistence. PMID:19819109

  3. Interdisciplinary care clinics in chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Johns, Tanya S; Yee, Jerry; Smith-Jules, Terrian; Campbell, Ruth C; Bauer, Carolyn

    2015-01-01

    The burden of chronic kidney disease (CKD) is substantial, and is associated with high hospitalization rates, premature deaths, and considerable health care costs. These factors provide strong rationale for quality improvement initiatives in CKD care. The interdisciplinary care clinic (IDC) has emerged as one solution to improving CKD care. The IDC team may include other physicians, advanced practice providers, nurses, dietitians, pharmacists, and social workers--all working together to provide effective care to patients with chronic kidney disease. Studies suggest that IDCs may improve patient education and preparedness prior to kidney failure, both of which have been associated with improved health outcomes. Interdisciplinary care may also delay the progression to end-stage renal disease and reduce mortality. While most studies suggest that IDC services are likely cost-effective, financing IDCs is challenging and many insurance providers do not pay for all of the services. There are also no robust long-term studies demonstrating the cost-effectiveness of IDCs. This review discusses IDC models and its potential impact on CKD care as well as some of the challenges that may be associated with implementing these clinics. PMID:26458811

  4. Clinical Utility of Serologic Testing for Celiac Disease in Ontario

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    -free diet. Economic Analysis A decision analysis was constructed to compare costs and outcomes between the tests based on the sensitivity, specificity and prevalence summary estimates from the MAS Evidence-Based Analysis (EBA). A budget impact was then calculated by multiplying the expected costs and volumes in Ontario. The outcome of the analysis was expected costs and false negatives (FN). Costs were reported in 2010 CAD$. All analyses were performed using TreeAge Pro Suite 2009. Four strategies made up the efficiency frontier; IgG tTG, IgA tTG, EMA and small bowel biopsy. All other strategies were dominated. IgG tTG was the least costly and least effective strategy ($178.95, FN avoided=0). Small bowel biopsy was the most costly and most effective strategy ($396.60, FN avoided =0.1553). The cost per FN avoided were $293, $369, $1,401 for EMA, IgATTG and small bowel biopsy respectively. One-way sensitivity analyses did not change the ranking of strategies. All testing strategies with small bowel biopsy are cheaper than biopsy alone however they also result in more FNs. The most cost-effective strategy will depend on the decision makers’ willingness to pay. Findings suggest that IgA tTG was the most cost-effective and feasible strategy based on its Incremental Cost-Effectiveness Ratio (ICER) and convenience to conduct the test. The potential impact of IgA tTG test in the province of Ontario would be $10.4M, $11.0M and $11.7M respectively in the following three years based on past volumes and trends in the province and basecase expected costs. The panel of tests is the commonly used strategy in the province of Ontario therefore the impact to the system would be $13.6M, $14.5M and $15.3M respectively in the next three years based on past volumes and trends in the province and basecase expected costs. Conclusions The clinical validity and clinical utility of serologic tests for celiac disease was considered high in subjects with symptoms consistent with this disease as they

  5. Gaucher disease: clinical profile and therapeutic developments

    PubMed Central

    Cox, Timothy M

    2010-01-01

    Gaucher disease is a rare inborn error of glycosphingolipid metabolism due to deficiency of lysosomal acid β-glucocerebrosidase; the condition has totemic significance for the development of orphan drugs. A designer therapy, which harnesses the mannose receptor to complement the functional defect in macrophages, ameliorates the principal clinical manifestations in hematopoietic bone marrow and viscera. While several aspects of Gaucher disease (particularly those affecting the skeleton and brain) are refractory to treatment, enzyme (replacement) therapy has become a pharmaceutical blockbuster. Human β-glucocerebrosidase was originally obtained from placenta and the Genzyme Corporation (Allston, MA) subsequently developed a recombinant product. After purification, the enzyme is modified to reveal terminal mannose residues which facilitate selective uptake of the protein, imiglucerase (Cerezyme®), in macrophage-rich tissues. The unprecedented success of Cerezyme has attracted fierce competition: two biosimilar agents, velaglucerase-alfa, VPRIV® (Shire Human Genetic Therapies, Dublin, Ireland) and taliglucerase-alfa (Protalix, Carmiel, Israel), are now approved or in late-phase clinical development as potential ‘niche busters’. Oral treatments have advantages over biological agents for disorders requiring lifelong therapy and additional stratagems which utilize small, orally active molecules have been introduced; these include two chemically distinct compounds which inhibit uridine diphosphate glucose: N-acylsphingosine glucosyltransferase, the first step in the biosynthesis of glucosylceramide – a key molecular target in Gaucher disease and other glycosphingolipidoses. Academic and commercial enterprises in biotechnology have combined strategically to expand the therapeutic repertoire in Gaucher disease. The innovative potential of orphan drug legislation has been realized – with prodigious rewards for companies embracing its humanitarian precepts. In the

  6. Reactions of Sweet Corn Hybrids to Prevalent Diseases and Herbicides

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This 27-year summary is of University of Illinois sweet corn nurseries from 1984 to 2010, and includes the reactions of 800 hybrids to eight diseases and three herbicides. Commercially-available and pre-commercial hybrids included 547 shrunken-2 hybrids (317 yellow, 152 bi-color, and 78 white), 117 ...

  7. Prevalence of herpes simplex virus disease in a professional population.

    PubMed

    Brooks, S L; Rowe, N H; Drach, J C; Shipman, C; Young, S K

    1981-01-01

    By virtue of occupation, dentists are frequently exposed to the herpes simplex virus. The risk of infection by the virus was evaluated by assessing disease experience as shown by history compared with the results of complement fixing or antibody titration tests, or both.

  8. Prevalence of syphilis among antenatal clinic attendees in Karachi: Imperative to begin universal screening in Pakistan

    PubMed Central

    Shah, SA; Kristensen, S; Memon, MA; Usman, G; Ghazi, A; John, R; Sathiakumar, N; Vermund, SH

    2013-01-01

    Objectives Sexually transmitted infections are thought by some to be rare in socially conservative Muslim countries. Little is known about prevalence of syphilis in Pakistani women from the general population. We determined syphilis prevalence in a multi-center cross-sectional study of low risk pregnant women in Karachi, Pakistan. Methods We administered a structured questionnaire and obtained a blood sample for syphilis serology (rapid plasma reagin test with Treponema pallidum hemagglutination assay confirmation) from all women giving informed consent over six weeks in 2007. Results The prevalence of confirmed syphilis was less than one percent (0.9%; 95%CI: 0.4, 1.8) in a sample size of 800 women recruited from three urban sites (≈1% refusal rate). Women who lived in an area where male drug use is prevalent (Ibrahim Hyderi Hospital) had 1% (1.5%) higher prevalence rates than women from the other two sites 0.5%. Conclusions We documented higher-than-expected syphilis seroprevalence rates in a low risk population of antenatal clinic attendees in Pakistan. Bridge populations for syphilis may include drug users, who are usually married, and Hijras or their clients. Hijras are transgender and/or transvestite men who may provide sex for money to men. In accordance with our results, the national policy for syphilis control in Pakistan should be modified to include universal syphilis screening in antenatal clinics with subsequent partner notification. PMID:22356034

  9. Prevalence and Characteristics of Interventional Trials Conducted Exclusively in Elderly Persons: A Cross-Sectional Analysis of Registered Clinical Trials

    PubMed Central

    Bourgeois, Florence T.; Olson, Karen L.; Tse, Tony; Ioannidis, John P. A.; Mandl, Kenneth D.

    2016-01-01

    Background Elderly patients represent the greatest consumers of healthcare per capita but have historically been underrepresented in clinical trials. It is unknown how many trials are designed to focus exclusively on elderly patients. Objective To define the prevalence of interventional trials that study exclusively elderly persons and describe the characteristics of these trials, including their distribution across conditions most prevalent in the elderly. Design All interventional clinical trials enrolling exclusively elderly patients (≥65 years), conducted primarily in high-income countries, and initiated between 2006 and 2014, identified through ClincialTrials.gov. Main Measures Trials were identified and characterized according to design features and disease categories studied. Across disease categories we examined the burden of disease in the elderly in high-income countries (measured in disability-adjusted life years [DALYs]) and compared to the number of trials conducted exclusively in the elderly. Results Among 80,965 interventional trials, 1,112 (1.4%) focused on elderly patients. Diverse types of interventions were studied in these trials (medications 33%, behavioral interventions 18%, and dietary supplements 10%) and the majority was funded by non-profit organizations (81%). Studies tended to be small (median sample size 122 participants [IQR 58, 305]), single-center studies (67%). Only 43% of 126 disease categories affecting elderly persons were studied in trials focused on the elderly. Among these disease categories, there was a 5162-fold range in the ratio of DALYs per trial. Across 5 conditions where over 80% of DALYs are in the elderly, there were a total of only 117 trials done exclusively in the elderly. Conclusions Very few and mostly small studies are conducted exclusively in elderly persons, even for conditions that affect almost exclusively the elderly. PMID:27196289

  10. Prevalence of Thyroid Autoimmunity in Children with Celiac Disease Compared to Healthy 12-Year Olds

    PubMed Central

    Ivarsson, Anneli; Högberg, Lotta; Svensson, Johan; Carlsson, Annelie

    2014-01-01

    Objectives. Studies have suggested a correlation between untreated celiac disease and risk for other autoimmune diseases. We investigated the prevalence of thyroid autoimmunity in 12-year-old children (i) with symptomatic celiac disease diagnosed and treated with a gluten-free diet, (ii) with screening-detected untreated celiac disease, and (iii) without celiac disease. Methods. Blood samples from 12632 children were collected. All celiac disease cases, previously diagnosed and newly screening-detected, were identified. Per case, 4 referents were matched. Blood samples were analyzed for autoantibodies against thyroid peroxidase (TPOAb). The cut-off value for TPO positivity was set to 100 U/mL. Results. Altogether, 335 celiac disease cases were found. In the entire celiac disease group, 7.2% (24/335) had elevated titers of TPOAb compared to 2.8% (48/1695) of the referents. Among the previously diagnosed celiac disease cases, 7.5% (7/93, OR 2.8, 95% CI 1.2–6.4) was TPOAb positive and among screening-detected cases, 7.0% (17/242, OR 2.6, 95% CI 1.5–4.6) was TPOAb positive. Conclusion. Children with celiac disease showed a higher prevalence of thyroid autoimmunity. We could not confirm the hypothesis that untreated celiac disease is associated with increased risk of developing thyroid autoimmunity. Early initiation of celiac disease treatment might not lower the risk for other autoimmune diseases. PMID:24592326

  11. Gastroesophageal reflux disease symptoms in the Greek general population: prevalence and risk factors

    PubMed Central

    Spantideas, Nikolaos; Drosou, Eirini; Bougea, Anastasia; Assimakopoulos, Dimitrios

    2016-01-01

    Background and aims Population-based data regarding the prevalence of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) in Greece are very poor. This study estimated the prevalence of GERD symptoms and their risk factors in the Greek adult population. Methods A self-administered questionnaire was answered by a randomly selected population of 340 subjects. The question regarding “heartburn, chest pain, indigestion, or stomach acid coming up” as included in the Reflux Symptom Index was used for prevalence assessment. Results The monthly prevalence of GERD symptoms was found to be 52.0% in the Greek general population, with no statistically significant difference between the two sexes (P>0.05). The age group of 65–79 years showed a higher prevalence rate of GERD. Symptom severity was found to be mild (59.3%) or moderate (27.1%). The number of cigarettes smoked daily (but not smoking duration) as well as the number of alcoholic drinks consumed daily (but not the duration of alcohol drinking) were found to be related to GERD symptoms. No reported concomitant disease or medication was found to be related with GERD symptoms. Conclusion The prevalence of GERD symptoms in the Greek general population was found to be 52.0%. Tobacco smoking and alcohol drinking but not concomitant disease or medications were found to be related with GERD symptoms. PMID:27382324

  12. Prevalence and clinical characteristics of oral tori among outpatients in Northern Malaysia

    PubMed Central

    Sathya, K; Kanneppady, Sham Kishor; Arishiya, T

    2012-01-01

    Objectives The objectives of this study were to determine the prevalence and clinical characteristics of torus palatinus (TP) and torus mandibularis (TM) in Malaysian dental patients. Methods Thousand five hundred and thirty-two dental patients were examined for the presence of oral tori at the Faculty of Dentistry outpatient clinic, AIMST University. Factors such as race, age, sex, size, and shape of tori were studied. Results The prevalence rates were 12% for TP and 2.8% for TM. A variation in the presence of tori among the three races in Malaysia–Chinese, Malays, and Indians–was noted, where the Chinese significantly had a higher prevalence of TP (17.9%) and TM (4.6%). Predominantly, tori were observed >40 years and older age group, and further both TP and TM were seen more commonly in women. Most TP were of smooth type (52.2%) and >2 cm (67.4%), while all TM were bilateral and nodular, plus most were <2 cm (67.4%). Conclusion Presence of tori (TP and TM) was detected in 12.5% of the participants. The variations noted in the prevalence and clinical characteristics of tori among people of different races living in the same country reflect its multifactorial etiology. Both genetic and environmental factors are responsible for its occurrence, and particular races are more prone genetically where its expression is enhanced by environmental factors. PMID:25756026

  13. Prevalence and clinical correlates of obsessive-compulsive disorder in schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Devi, Sugnyani; Rao, Naren P; Badamath, Suresh; Chandrashekhar, C R; Janardhan Reddy, Y C

    2015-01-01

    Obsessive compulsive symptoms frequently occur in a substantial proportion of patients with schizophrenia. The term schizoobsessive has been proposed to delineate this subgroup of schizophrenia patients who present with obsessive-compulsive symptoms/disorder. However, whether this co-occurrence is more than just co-morbidity and represents a distinct subgroup remains controversial. A striking variation is noted across studies examining prevalence of obsessive-compulsive symptoms/disorder in schizophrenia patients and their impact on clinical profile of schizophrenia. Hence, in this study, we examined the prevalence of obsessive-compulsive symptoms/disorder in a large sample of consecutively hospitalized schizophrenia patients and compared the clinical and functional characteristics of schizophrenia patients with and without obsessive-compulsive symptoms/disorder. We evaluated 200 consecutive subjects with the DSM-IV diagnosis of schizophrenia using the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV Axis I disorders, Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale, Yale-Brown Obsessive-Compulsive Scale, Brown Assessment of Beliefs Scale, Clinical Global Impression-Severity scale, Global Assessment of Functioning Scale, Family Interview for Genetic Studies and World Health Organization Quality of Life scale. The prevalence of obsessive-compulsive symptoms in patients with schizophrenia was 24% (n=48); 37 of them had obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) and 11 had obsessive-compulsive symptoms not amounting to a clinical diagnosis of OCD (OCS). Schizophrenia patients with OCS/OCD had an earlier age at onset of schizophrenia symptoms, lower positive symptoms score, higher co-morbidity with Axis II disorders, higher occurrence of OCD in family and better quality of life. Findings of the study indicate a higher prevalence of OCS/OCD in schizophrenia. Schizophrenia patients with and without OCS/OCD have comparable clinical profile with few exceptions. High rates of OCD in first degree

  14. Prevalence of metabolic syndrome in the clinical practice of general medicine in Italy

    PubMed Central

    Ferrucci, Andrea; Bruno, Graziella; Mannarino, Elmo; Nati, Giulio; Trimarco, Bruno; Volpe, Massimo

    2015-01-01

    Background Prevalence of metabolic syndrome (MS) in the clinical practice is still debated, due to different diagnostic criteria, target populations and clinical settings. Thus, the main purposes of the study were: (I) to evaluate prevalence of MS; (II) to estimate prevalence of additional cardiovascular (CV) risk factors and concomitant conditions in patients with MS followed by general practitioners (GPs) in Italy. Methods GPs from three different macro-areas were asked to evaluate the first and the last three outpatients, consecutively seen during 20 consecutive weeks in 2007, whatever the reason for clinical consultation. MS was defined according to Adult Treatment Panel (ATP) III definition. Clinical data were collected locally and centrally analysed. Results The overall population sample included 4,513 outpatients, among which 1,574 (34.9%) from Regione Lazio, 1,498 (33.2%) from Regione Piemonte, and 1,441 (31.9%) from Regione Umbria. The population analysis included 4,418 (97.9%) adult outpatients [52.1% females, (mean age, 58.0±11.8 years); mean body mass index (BMI), 26.7±4.7 kg/m2]. MS was diagnosed in 1,456 (33.0%) outpatients. High-normal blood pressure (BP) was the most common risk factor for MS (n=1,382; 94.9%), followed by abdominal obesity (n=1,229; 84.4%), hypertriglyceridemia (n=1,032; 70.9%), abnormal fasting glucose (n=819; 56.3%) and low high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol levels (n=730; 50.1%). Conclusions Using this sample of outpatients followed by GPs in Italy, our study reports a relatively high prevalence of MS and a high prevalence of associated CV and metabolic risk factors in patients with than in those without MS. PMID:26331111

  15. Increased Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae Disease Prevalence in Domestic Hybrids Among Free-Living Wild Boar.

    PubMed

    Goedbloed, Daniel J; van Hooft, Pim; Lutz, Walburga; Megens, Hendrik-Jan; van Wieren, Sip E; Ydenberg, Ron C; Prins, Herbert H T

    2015-12-01

    Wildlife immune genes are subject to natural selection exerted by pathogens. In contrast, domestic immune genes are largely protected from pathogen selection by veterinary care. Introgression of domestic alleles into the wild could lead to increased disease susceptibility, but observations are scarce due to low introgression rates, low disease prevalence and reduced survival of domestic hybrids. Here we report the first observation of a deleterious effect of domestic introgression on disease prevalence in a free-living large mammal. A fraction of 462 randomly sampled free-living European wild boar (Sus scrofa) was genetically identified as recent wild boar-domestic pig hybrids based on 351 SNP data. Analysis of antibody prevalence against the bacterial pathogen Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae (Mhyo) showed an increased Mhyo prevalence in wild-domestic hybrids. We argue that the most likely mechanism explaining the observed association between domestic hybrid status and Mhyo antibody prevalence would be introgression of deleterious domestic alleles. We hypothesise that large-scale use of antibiotics in the swine breeding sector may have played a role in shaping the relatively deleterious properties of domestic swine immune genes and that domestic introgression may also lead to increased wildlife disease susceptibility in the case of other species.

  16. Prevalence of congenital heart disease in patients undergoing surgery for major gastrointestinal malformations: an Indian study

    PubMed Central

    Gokhroo, Rajendra K; Gupta, Sajal; Arora, Garima; Bisht, Devendra S; Padmanabhan, Deepak; Soni, Varsha

    2015-01-01

    Background The association of congenital heart disease (CHD) with malformations of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract/abdominal wall is known. The rates of cardiac malformations reported in previous studies of these anomalies are highly variable. Objective To find the prevalence and pattern of CHD in patients with major gastrointestinal malformations (anorectal malformations, oesophageal atresia/tracheo-oesophageal fistula, and omphalocoele) undergoing surgery at a tertiary care hospital in India. Methods From July 2012 to December 2013, 43 patients (34 (79%) male, 9 (21%) female) were evaluated by clinical examination, ECG, chest radiography, and colour Doppler echocardiography. Results Of the 43 patients, 26 (60.46%) had CHD. The most common GI malformation was anorectal malformation: 32 cases (74.41%), of whom 16 (50%) had CHD. The second most common malformation was oesophageal atresia/tracheo-oesophageal fistula: 5 cases (11.62%), all (100%) with CHD. The third group comprised patients with omphalocoele: 4 cases (9.3%), 3 of whom (75%) had CHD. The fourth group comprised patients with VACTERAL (vertebral anomalies, anal atresia, cardiovascular malformations, tracheo-oesophageal fistula, renal and limb anomalies) association—2 cases (4.6%), all (100%) with CHD. The most common CHD was isolated atrial septal defect (ASD) (73%), followed by ASD + ventricular septal defect (VSD) + patent ductus arteriosus (PDA) (7.6%), ASD + VSD (3.8%), ASD + PDA (3.8%), VSD (3.8%), PDA (3.8%), and coarctation of the aorta (3.8%). Conclusions We found the frequency of CHD in patients with GI malformations was very high, the most common presentation being ASD. Our study indicates the need for larger scale studies to determine the prevalence of CHD in patients with GI malformations in the Indian population. PMID:27326210

  17. Undiagnosed connective tissue diseases: High prevalence in pulmonary arterial hypertension patients.

    PubMed

    Cavagna, Lorenzo; Codullo, Veronica; Ghio, Stefano; Scirè, Carlo Alberto; Guzzafame, Eleonora; Scelsi, Laura; Rossi, Silvia; Montecucco, Carlomaurizio; Caporali, Roberto

    2016-09-01

    Among different subgroups of pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH), those associated with connective tissue diseases (CTDs) have distinct hemodynamic and prognostic features; a correct etiologic diagnosis is thus mandatory.To estimate frequency and prognosis of previously undiagnosed CTDs in a suspect idiopathic (i) PAH cohort.Consecutive patients with PAH confirmed by right heart catheterization referred at the Cardiology Division of our Hospital without a previous rheumatological assessment or the occurrence of other conditions explaining PAH were checked for CTD by a clinical, laboratory, and instrumental evaluation. Survival in each group has also been analyzed.In our study 17 of 49 patients were classified as CTD-PAH, corresponding to a prevalence (95% CI) of 34.7% (21.7-49.6%). ANA positivity had 94% (71.3-99.9%) sensitivity and 78.1% (60-90.7%) specificity for a diagnosis of CTD-PAH; Raynaud phenomenon (RP) showed 83.3% (51.6-97.9%) sensitivity and 100% (90.5-100%) specificity for the diagnosis of Systemic Sclerosis (SSc)-PAH. At diagnosis, SSc patients were older and had a lower creatinine clearance compared with iPAH and other CTD-PAH. After a median follow-up of 44 (2-132) months, 18 of 49 (36.7%) patients died: 31.2% in the iPAH group, 20% in the CTD-, and 58.3% in the SSc-PAH group. Mortality was significantly higher in SSc-PAH (HR 3.32, 1.11-9.95, P <0.05) versus iPAH.We show a high prevalence of undiagnosed CTDs in patients with iPAH without a previous rheumatological assessment. All patients with RP were diagnosed with SSc. Our data stress the importance of a rheumatological assessment in PAH, especially because of the unfavorable prognostic impact of an associated SSc. PMID:27684814

  18. Accuracy of Herdsmen Reporting versus Serologic Testing for Estimating Foot-and-Mouth Disease Prevalence

    PubMed Central

    Handel, Ian G.; Tanya, Vincent N.; Hamman, Saidou M.; Nfon, Charles; Bergman, Ingrid E.; Malirat, Viviana; Sorensen, Karl J.; Bronsvoort, Barend M. de C.

    2014-01-01

    Herdsman-reported disease prevalence is widely used in veterinary epidemiologic studies, especially for diseases with visible external lesions; however, the accuracy of such reports is rarely validated. Thus, we used latent class analysis in a Bayesian framework to compare sensitivity and specificity of herdsman reporting with virus neutralization testing and use of 3 nonstructural protein ELISAs for estimates of foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) prevalence on the Adamawa plateau of Cameroon in 2000. Herdsman-reported estimates in this FMD-endemic area were comparable to those obtained from serologic testing. To harness to this cost-effective resource of monitoring emerging infectious diseases, we suggest that estimates of the sensitivity and specificity of herdsmen reporting should be done in parallel with serologic surveys of other animal diseases. PMID:25417556

  19. Prevalence of Non-alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease and Its Related Factors in Iran

    PubMed Central

    Moghaddasifar, I.; Lankarani, K. B.; Moosazadeh, M.; Afshari, M.; Ghaemi, A.; Aliramezany, M.; Afsar Gharebagh, R.; Malary, M.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is the most prevalent chronic liver disease in developing and developed countries. Estimating the total prevalence of NAFLD by means of appropriate statistical methods can provide reliable evidence for health policy makers. Objective: To determine the prevalence of NAFLD in Iran using a systematic review and meta-analysis. Methods: We identified relevant studies by searching national and international databases. Standard error of the prevalence reported in each study was calculated assuming a binomial distribution. The heterogeneity between the results of the studies was determined using Cochran’s Q and I square indices. We used a random effect model to combine the prevalence rates reported in the studies. Results: We entered 23 eligible studies in this systematic review investigated NAFLD among 25,865 Iranian people. The total prevalence of NAFLD, prevalence of mild, moderate and severe fatty liver disease were estimated at 33.9% (95% CI 26.4%–41.5%), 26.7% (95% CI 21.7%–31.7%), 7.6% (95% CI 5.7%–9.4%), and 0.5% (95% CI 0.1%–0.9%), respectively. The majority of studies reported that NAFLD was more common among men (seven of eight studies), obese person (15 of 15 studies), older people (10 of 10 studies), patients with systolic hypertension (5 of 8 studies), patients with diastolic hypertension (7 of 9 studies), patients with hypertriglyceridemia (14 of 16 studies), patients with high HOMA level (4 of 4 studies), patients with metabolic syndrome (4 of 4 studies), and those with elevated serum ALT (8 of 12 studies). Conclusion: Our study showed that the prevalence of NAFLD in Iran was relatively high and male gender, old age, diabetes, metabolic syndrome, systolic/diastolic hypertension, high serum ALT, and hypertriglyceridemia may be determinants of NAFLD. PMID:27721961

  20. Choosing Alzheimer's disease prevention clinical trial populations.

    PubMed

    Grill, Joshua D; Monsell, Sarah E

    2014-03-01

    To assist investigators in making design choices, we modeled Alzheimer's disease prevention clinical trials. We used longitudinal Clinical Dementia Rating Scale Sum of Boxes data, retention rates, and the proportions of trial-eligible cognitively normal participants age 65 and older in the National Alzheimer's Coordinating Center Uniform Data Set to model trial sample sizes, the numbers needed to enroll to account for drop out, and the numbers needed to screen to successfully complete enrollment. We examined how enrichment strategies affected each component of the model. Relative to trials enrolling 65-year-old individuals, trials enriching for older (minimum 70 or 75) age required reduced sample sizes, numbers needed to enroll, and numbers needed to screen. Enriching for subjective memory complaints reduced sample sizes and numbers needed to enroll more than age enrichment, but increased the number needed to screen. We conclude that Alzheimer's disease prevention trials can enroll elderly participants with minimal effect on trial retention and that enriching for older individuals with memory complaints might afford efficient trial designs.

  1. Secondary Care Clinic for Chronic Disease: Protocol

    PubMed Central

    St-Pierre, Michèle; Juneau, Lucille; Legault-Mercier, Samuel; Bernardino, Elizabeth

    2015-01-01

    Background The complexity of chronic disease management activities and the associated financial burden have prompted the development of organizational models, based on the integration of care and services, which rely on primary care services. However, since the institutions providing these services are continually undergoing reorganization, the Centre hospitalier affilié universitaire de Québec wanted to innovate by adapting the Chronic Care Model to create a clinic for the integrated follow-up of chronic disease that relies on hospital-based specialty care. Objective The aim of the study is to follow the project in order to contribute to knowledge about the way in which professional and management practices are organized to ensure better care coordination and the successful integration of the various follow-ups implemented. Methods The research strategy adopted is based on the longitudinal comparative case study with embedded units of analysis. The case study uses a mixed research method. Results We are currently in the analysis phase of the project. The results will be available in 2015. Conclusions The project’s originality lies in its consideration of the macro, meso, and micro contexts structuring the creation of the clinic in order to ensure the integration process is successful and to allow a theoretical generalization of the reorganization of practices to be developed. PMID:25689840

  2. The Prevalence of Headache in Crohn's Disease: Single-Center Experience.

    PubMed

    Anadol Kelleci, Ulker; Calhan, Turan; Sahin, Abdurrahman; Kahraman, Resul; Ozdil, Kamil; Sokmen, Haci Mehmet; Yalcin, Destina

    2016-01-01

    Objectives. This study is aimed at studying the prevalence and characteristics of different types of headaches in patients with Crohn's disease. Materials and Methods. 51 patients in Crohn's disease group (F/M: 26/25) and 51 patients in control group (F/M: 27/24) were involved. Patients in Crohn's disease group were diagnosed and monitored according to European Crohn's and Colitis Organization diagnostic criteria. The control group composed of healthy subjects with similar age and sex to Crohn's disease group. Headache was classified using the International Headache Society II criteria. Results. Headache was reported by 35/51 (68.6%) patients in Crohn's disease group and 21/51 (41.2%) patients in the control group. The prevalence of headache was statistically high in the group with Crohn's disease (OR: 3.125 (95% CI: 1.38-7.04); p = 0.01). Comparing two groups with respect to their subtypes of headaches resulted in that the tension-type headache was statistically (p = 0.008) higher in Crohn's disease group (26/51) than in the control group (12/51). However, no significant difference was found in the migraine-type headache (p = 1). Conclusions. This study indicates that the prevalence of headache is high in patients with Crohn's disease and most commonly associated with the tension-type headache.

  3. The Prevalence of Headache in Crohn's Disease: Single-Center Experience.

    PubMed

    Anadol Kelleci, Ulker; Calhan, Turan; Sahin, Abdurrahman; Kahraman, Resul; Ozdil, Kamil; Sokmen, Haci Mehmet; Yalcin, Destina

    2016-01-01

    Objectives. This study is aimed at studying the prevalence and characteristics of different types of headaches in patients with Crohn's disease. Materials and Methods. 51 patients in Crohn's disease group (F/M: 26/25) and 51 patients in control group (F/M: 27/24) were involved. Patients in Crohn's disease group were diagnosed and monitored according to European Crohn's and Colitis Organization diagnostic criteria. The control group composed of healthy subjects with similar age and sex to Crohn's disease group. Headache was classified using the International Headache Society II criteria. Results. Headache was reported by 35/51 (68.6%) patients in Crohn's disease group and 21/51 (41.2%) patients in the control group. The prevalence of headache was statistically high in the group with Crohn's disease (OR: 3.125 (95% CI: 1.38-7.04); p = 0.01). Comparing two groups with respect to their subtypes of headaches resulted in that the tension-type headache was statistically (p = 0.008) higher in Crohn's disease group (26/51) than in the control group (12/51). However, no significant difference was found in the migraine-type headache (p = 1). Conclusions. This study indicates that the prevalence of headache is high in patients with Crohn's disease and most commonly associated with the tension-type headache. PMID:26904110

  4. Updates on chikungunya epidemiology, clinical disease, and diagnostics.

    PubMed

    Sam, I-Ching; Kümmerer, Beate M; Chan, Yoke-Fun; Roques, Pierre; Drosten, Christian; AbuBakar, Sazaly

    2015-04-01

    Chikungunya virus (CHIKV) is an Aedes-borne alphavirus, historically found in Africa and Asia, where it caused sporadic outbreaks. In 2004, CHIKV reemerged in East Africa and spread globally to cause epidemics, including, for the first time, autochthonous transmission in Europe, the Middle East, and Oceania. The epidemic strains were of the East/Central/South African genotype. Strains of the Asian genotype of CHIKV continued to cause outbreaks in Asia and spread to Oceania and, in 2013, to the Americas. Acute disease, mainly comprising fever, rash, and arthralgia, was previously regarded as self-limiting; however, there is growing evidence of severe but rare manifestations, such as neurological disease. Furthermore, CHIKV appears to cause a significant burden of long-term morbidity due to persistent arthralgia. Diagnostic assays have advanced greatly in recent years, although there remains a need for simple, accurate, and affordable tests for the developing countries where CHIKV is most prevalent. This review focuses on recent important work on the epidemiology, clinical disease and diagnostics of CHIKV.

  5. Prevalence and clinical signs of avipoxvirus infection in falcons from the Middle East.

    PubMed

    Tarello, Walter

    2008-04-01

    The prevalence, cutaneous manifestations and concurrent clinical signs of avipoxvirus infection in 3706 falcons in two Middle Eastern countries are reported. Diagnosis was based on evidence of typical 'dry' skin lesions on featherless parts of the body and microscopic detection of Bollinger bodies in epithelial cells. Avipoxvirus was isolated from one representative case. Overall prevalence of cutaneous changes due to avipoxvirus infection did not differ significantly between Kuwait (2.7%) and Dubai (2.3%), although pox lesions were more prevalent on the feet of birds from Kuwait (67.4% vs. 50%) and more common on the eyelids of birds from Dubai (45.6% vs. 30.4%). Foot lesions were always present in birds with multiple infection sites. Some birds from Dubai had severe infection associated with weight loss, anorexia, lethargy, vomiting, central nervous system involvement and ultimately death.

  6. Nursing Diagnosis Risk for falls: prevalence and clinical profile of hospitalized patients1

    PubMed Central

    Luzia, Melissa de Freitas; Victor, Marco Antonio de Goes; Lucena, Amália de Fátima

    2014-01-01

    Objectives to identify the prevalence of the Nursing Diagnosis (ND) Risk for falls in the hospitalizations of adult patients in clinical and surgical units, to characterize the clinical profile and to identify the risk factors of the patients with this ND. Method a cross-sectional study with 174 patients. The data was collected from the computerized nursing care prescriptions system and on-line hospital records, and analyzed statistically. Results the prevalence of the ND Risk for falls was 4%. The patients' profile indicated older adults, males (57%), those hospitalized in the clinical units (63.2%), with a median length of hospitalization of 20 (10-24) days, with neurological illnesses (26%), cardio-vascular illnesses (74.1%) and various co-morbidities (3±1.8). The prevalent risk factors were neurological alterations (43.1%), impaired mobility (35.6%) and extremes of age (10.3%). Conclusion the findings contributed to evidencing the profile of the patients with a risk of falling hospitalized in clinical and surgical wards, which favors the planning of interventions for preventing this adverse event. PMID:26107834

  7. Epidemiology of asthma: prevalence and burden of disease.

    PubMed

    Croisant, Sharon

    2014-01-01

    While clinical guidelines clearly define mechanisms for asthma diagnosis based upon history, lung function testing, symptoms, and physical examination, surveillance for asthma is much less straightforward. Epidemiologists have long debated the best means of assessing the scope and burden of asthma, seeking to reduce the potential for confounding introduced by differential means of diagnosis and even slight differences in surveillance questions, both of which can bias surveillance results such that we over- or undercount cases. This chapter will provide an overview of asthma epidemiology in the USA and internationally, as well as review of the data and findings from the major surveillance systems, a discussion of a networked approach to the science and evaluation of therapeutic treatments using the exemplar of the Inner-City Asthma Network, and assessment of public health implications.

  8. The prevalence of hepatobiliary disease with normal gallbladder visualization

    SciTech Connect

    Silberstein, E.B.; Vasavada, P.J.

    1985-05-01

    The upper limit of normal time for gallbladder visualization employing Tc-99m disofenin has been set at 60 minutes by the manufacturer. In the authors' experience the great majority of normal gallbladders are seen by 30 minutes so the authors investigated the clinical correlates of gallbladder visualization between 30 and 60 minutes. Three hundred twenty-three consecutive patients were studied, with 133 showing no gallbladder visualization, 155 with visualization under 30 minutes (14 of these with cholelithiasis), 26 with visualization between 30-60 minutes, and 9 with more delayed visualization. Of the 26 with gallbladder seen between 30-60 minutes only 35% had a normal hepatobiliary system. Only the scans with elevated bilirubin or filling defects were read as abnormal. It is concluded that almost two-thirds of patients with gallbladder visualization first occurring between 30-60 minutes still have some hepatobiliary disorder.

  9. Prevalence of polycystic kidney disease in Persian and Persian related cats in France.

    PubMed

    Barthez, P Y; Rivier, P; Begon, D

    2003-12-01

    The prevalence of polycystic kidney disease (PKD) has been estimated in the USA, Australia, UK, and Germany, but no data are available to date in France. The purpose of this study was to determine prevalence of PKD in Persian and Persian related breeds of cats in France. Medical records of all healthy cats presented for ultrasonographic screening of PKD between December 2000 and April 2002 were analysed from two centres (ENVL and ENVA). Cats were classified as positive when at least one anechoic cavity was found in at least one kidney. Prevalence of PKD was compared between the two screening centres, between different breeds evaluated, and between male and female using Chi-square test. A total of 310 cats were examined, including 92 at ENVL (57 Persians, 22 Exotic Shorthairs, 7 Chartreux, 4 Norwegian Forest Cats, and 2 Abyssins) and 218 at ENVA (163 Persians, 42 Exotic Shorthairs, 4 Chartreux, 4 British Shorthairs, 2 American Whirehairs, 2 Norwegian Forest Cats, and 1 American Shorthair). Prevalence of PKD was 41.8% in Persian cats and 39.1% in Exotic Shorthair. No PKD was detected in cats from other breeds. There was no significant difference between prevalence of PKD found in ENVL and ENVA, between prevalence of PKD in Persians and in Exotic Shorthairs, and prevalence of PKD in male and in female. Prevalence of PKD in Persians and Exotic Shorthair cats in France is currently high but is similar to prevalence in other parts of the world. Selection based on ultrasonographic detection of cysts should decrease prevalence of PKD in the future. PMID:14623204

  10. Pain in chronic kidney disease: prevalence, cause and management.

    PubMed

    Kafkia, Theodora; Chamney, Melissa; Drinkwater, Anna; Pegoraro, Marisa; Sedgewick, John

    2011-06-01

    Pain is an unpleasant sensory and emotional experience and is the most common symptom experienced by renal patients. It can be caused by primary co-morbid diseases, renal replacement therapies, medication or treatment side effects, and its intensity varies from moderate to severe. Pain management in renal patients is difficult, since the distance between pain relief and toxicity is very small. This paper will provide an algorithm for pain management proposed using paracetamol, nonsteroid anti-inflamatory drugs (NSAIDs), mild and stronger opioids as well as complementary techniques. Quality of Life (QoL) and overall enhancement of the patient experience through better pain management are also discussed. To improve pain management it is essential that nurses recognise that they have direct responsibilities related to pain assessment and tailoring of opioid analgesics and better and more detailed education.

  11. [Diverticular disease - clinical patterns and treatment].

    PubMed

    Lembcke, Bernhard; Kruis, Wolfgang

    2015-09-01

    Diverticulosis, diverticular disease and diverticulitis have come into focus again because new aspects concerning diagnosis, risk factors and treatment arose only recently which prompted a new Guideline released by the DGVS and DGAV summarising the current evidence. Along with the guideline's essentials for medical practice a diagnosis of diverticulitis is considered unsatisfactory unless a cross-sectional imaging method (either ultrasonography [US] or computed tomography [CT] ) has proven that the clinical findings and inflammation (CRP considered superior to WBC and temperature) are due to diverticular inflammation. For reasons of practicability and considering relevant legislation for radiation exposure protection, US is the primary - and usually effectual - diagnostic method of choice as it is equipotent to CT. While US offers better resolution and enables precise imaging exactly at the location of pain as well as reiterative application, the latter implies advantages in the case of a deep abscess or diverticulitis in difficult locations (e. g. the small pelvis). Clinical evidence and laboratory and imaging findings allow for distinguishing a large number of differential diagnoses and also form the basis of a new classification (classification of diverticular disease, CDD) which comprises all forms of diverticular disease, from diverticulosis to bleeding and to the different facettes of diverticulitis. This classification -which should be applied in any patient with the diagnosis of diverticular disease- is independent of specific diagnostic preferences and applicable both to conservative and operative treatment options. While the number of recurrent episodes is no longer a significant indicator for surgery in diverticulitis, severity and / or complications determine treatment options along with the patients preferences. According to first data, conservative treatment may waive antibiotics under certain circumstances, however they are indispensible in

  12. A systematic review on screening for Fabry disease: prevalence of individuals with genetic variants of unknown significance.

    PubMed

    van der Tol, L; Smid, B E; Poorthuis, B J H M; Biegstraaten, M; Deprez, R H Lekanne; Linthorst, G E; Hollak, C E M

    2014-01-01

    Screening for Fabry disease (FD) reveals a high prevalence of individuals with α-galactosidase A (GLA) genetic variants of unknown significance (GVUS). These individuals often do not express characteristic features of FD. A systematic review on FD screening studies was performed to interpret the significance of GLA gene variants and to calculate the prevalence of definite classical and uncertain cases. We searched PubMed and Embase for screening studies on FD. We collected data on screening methods, clinical, biochemical and genetic assessments. The pooled prevalence of identified subjects and those with a definite diagnosis of classical FD were calculated. As criteria for a definite diagnosis, we used the presence of a GLA variant, absent or near-absent leukocyte enzyme activity and characteristic features of FD. Fifty-one studies were selected, 45 in high-risk and 6 in newborn populations. The most often used screening method was an enzyme activity assay. Cut-off values comprised 10-55% of the mean reference value for men and up to 80% for women. Prevalence of GLA variants in newborns was 0.04%. In high-risk populations the overall prevalence of individuals with GLA variants was 0.62%, while the prevalence of a definite diagnosis of FD was 0.12%. The majority of identified individuals in high-risk and newborn populations harbour GVUS or neutral variants in the GLA gene. To determine the pathogenicity of a GVUS in an individual, improved diagnostic criteria are needed. We propose a diagnostic algorithm to approach the individual with an uncertain diagnosis. PMID:23922385

  13. CDKD: a clinical database of kidney diseases

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The main function of the kidneys is to remove waste products and excess water from the blood. Loss of kidney function leads to various health issues, such as anemia, high blood pressure, bone disease, disorders of cholesterol. The main objective of this database system is to store the personal and laboratory investigatory details of patients with kidney disease. The emphasis is on experimental results relevant to quantitative renal physiology, with a particular focus on data relevant for evaluation of parameters in statistical models of renal function. Description Clinical database of kidney diseases (CDKD) has been developed with patient confidentiality and data security as a top priority. It can make comparative analysis of one or more parameters of patient’s record and includes the information of about whole range of data including demographics, medical history, laboratory test results, vital signs, personal statistics like age and weight. Conclusions The goal of this database is to make kidney-related physiological data easily available to the scientific community and to maintain & retain patient’s record. As a Web based application it permits physician to see, edit and annotate a patient record from anywhere and anytime while maintaining the confidentiality of the personal record. It also allows statistical analysis of all data. PMID:22540288

  14. Low prevalence of coeliac disease in patients with systemic sclerosis: a cross-sectional study of a registry cohort

    PubMed Central

    Gordon, Jessica K.; Doobay, Kamini; Bosworth, Brian P.; Lyman, Stephen; Davids, Morgana L.; Spiera, Robert F.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives. Two prior studies suggested that coeliac disease (CD) has a higher prevalence rate (8%) in SSc than in the general population (1%), but these studies were limited by small numbers and the use of traditional coeliac screening antibody tests, where newer ones with improved accuracy have since emerged. Our aim was to determine the prevalence of CD in a larger SSc population using a more modern serological approach to coeliac testing and to correlate coeliac antibody status with gastrointestinal symptoms. Methods. Stored sera from 72 SSc patients in the Scleroderma Registry at the Hospital for Special Surgery were tested for anti-tissue transglutaminase (traditional) and anti-deamidated gliadin peptide (novel) antibodies. If any of these antibodies were positive, anti-endomysial antibodies were tested and confirmatory small-bowel endoscopy and biopsy were obtained. Registry clinical data were used to determine whether antibody status correlated with gastrointestinal symptoms. Results. The prevalence of coeliac antibodies in our SSc population was 3/72 (4%). No significant differences with respect to gastrointestinal symptoms were seen in the coeliac antibody-positive compared with -negative SSc patients. No cases of confirmed CD were seen in our cohort. Conclusion. Contrary to the only two previously published studies, the low prevalence of CD that we found does not suggest that concurrent CD is a common cause of gastrointestinal complaints in SSc patients. PMID:23335635

  15. The prevalence of periodontal disease in a Romano-British population c. 200-400 AD

    PubMed Central

    Raitapuro-Murray, T.; Molleson, T. I.; Hughes, F. J.

    2014-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence of moderate to severe periodontitis in an ancient British cohort c. 200-400 AD. Design Observational study to assess periodontal and other oral disease parameters. Setting Natural History Museum, London. Subjects and methods 303 skulls from a Romano-British burial site in Poundbury, Dorset were examined for evidence of dental disease. Main outcome measures The primary outcome measure was presence of moderate to severe periodontitis. Secondary outcomes included: amount of horizontal bone loss; prevalence of ante-mortem tooth loss; and presence of other dental pathologies. Results The overall prevalence of moderate to severe periodontitis was just greater than 5%. The prevalence rate remained nearly constant between ages 20 to 60, after which it rose to around 10%. The number of affected teeth increased with age. Horizontal bone loss was generally minor. Caries was seen in around 50% of the cohort, and evidence of pulpal and apical pathology was seen in around 25%. Conclusions The prevalence of moderate to severe periodontitis was markedly decreased when compared to the prevalence in modern populations, underlining the potential importance of risk factors such as smoking and diabetes in determining susceptibility to progressive periodontitis in modern populations. PMID:25342357

  16. Prevalence of Parkinson's disease in Baskale, Turkey: a population based study.

    PubMed

    Durmus, Hacer; Gokalp, Mehmet A; Hanagasi, Hasmet A

    2015-03-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is the second most common neurodegenerative disease, and its prevalence rate varies between 15 and 250/100.000. The data on the prevalence of PD in Turkey are limited. In this study, we aimed to estimate the prevalence of PD in Baskale, Turkey. The study area is a rural small area in the eastern part Turkey, with a population of 26.991 inhabitants. The first stage of the study was undertaken between February and October 2011. Field workers performed a door to door population screening for the cardinal symptoms of PD and identified cases were reevaluated by an experienced movement disorders specialist. In this population based study, 19 PD patients were identified in the screened population, indicating that the estimated age standardized prevalence of PD in Turkey was 202/100.000. This study is the first large population based study for identifying prevalence of PD in Turkey. Our prevalence rate is slightly lower than those of European countries, which may be caused by ethnical differences or environmental factors.

  17. Prevalence of Periodontal Disease in the General Population of India-A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Gattani, Deepti R; Bhatia, Nidhi; Mahajan, Rupali; Saravanan, SP

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Periodontal disease is a chronic inflammatory disease resulting in destruction of tissues and structures surrounding the teeth thus, if left untreated causes loss of teeth and ultimately results in edentulism, posing a great negative impact on individuals’ quality of life. Hence the global epidemiological data suggests periodontal disease to be one of a major burden on oral diseases. To reduce this burden it is necessary to know the true prevalence of the disease according to which proper initiatives can be formulated. India being home to nearly 1.2 billion people and one amongst the rapidly developing country, its population requires being systemically as well as orally healthy to lead a good quality of life. However due to large heterogenecity amongst its residing population in terms of geographical area, culture, education, socioeconomic status, a variety of oral diseases like periodontal diseases are prevalent here. Even though the early studies suggested that the population is highly susceptible to the disease, the true prevalence of periodontal disease has not been found yet due to paucity in literature available. Aim To systematically review the available literature taken from various parts of India and find the prevalence rate of periodontal disease amongst the general population of India. Materials and Methods A literature search was performed using PUB MED, COCHRANE and EMBASE databases on August 6, 2015. Following full text assessment a thorough references search was made and potential studies were included. A Quality assessment of retrieved articles from 2nd round was done using a self designed questionnaire and only field survey studies were included in the systematic review. Results The literature search yielded six studies which had performed field surveys to find the prevalence of periodontal disease in their respective areas. These studies have observed different sets of age groups and the same has been accomplished by using

  18. Prevalence of celiac disease in Germany: A prospective follow-up study

    PubMed Central

    Kratzer, Wolfgang; Kibele, Monika; Akinli, Atilla; Porzner, Marc; Boehm, Bernhard O; Koenig, Wolfgang; Oeztuerk, Suemeyra; Mason, Richard A; Mao, Ren; Haenle, Mark H

    2013-01-01

    AIM: To determine the prevalence of celiac disease in a randomly selected population sample. METHODS: A total of 2157 subjects (1036 males; 1121 females) participating in a population-based cross-sectional study underwent laboratory testing for tissue transglutaminase and antibodies to immunoglobulin A, endomysium and antigliadin. In a second step, all subjects who had been examined serologically were surveyed using a questionnaire that included questions specific to celiac disease. Subjects with positive antibody titers and those with histories positive for celiac disease then underwent biopsy. At the first follow up, antibody titers were again determined in these subjects and subjects were questioned regarding symptoms specific for celiac disease and disorders associated with celiac disease. The second follow up consisted of a telephone interview with subjects positive for celiac disease. RESULTS: Antibody tests consistent with celiac disease were reported in eight subjects, corresponding to an overall prevalence of 1:270 (8/2157). The prevalence among women was 1:224 and 1:518 in men. Classical symptoms were observed in 62.5% of subjects. Atypical celiac disease was present in 25.0%, and transient celiac disease in 12.5%. False-negative test results were returned in three subjects. This yields a sensitivity and specificity of 62.5% and 50.0%, respectively, for tissue transglutaminase immunoglobulin-A antibody; of 62.5% and 71.4% respectively, for endomysium antibody; and of 62.5% and 71.4%, respectively, for antigliadin antibody. CONCLUSION: The prevalence rate in our collective lies within the middle tertile of comparable studies in Europe. The use of a single antibody test for screening purposes must be called into question. PMID:23674868

  19. Prevalence and Morbidity of Primary Immunodeficiency Diseases, United States 2001–2007

    PubMed Central

    Kobrynski, Lisa; Powell, Rachel Waltenburg; Bowen, Scott

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Few studies have estimated population prevalence and morbidity of primary immunodeficiency diseases (PIDD). We used administrative healthcare databases to estimate the prevalence of PIDD diagnoses in the United States from 2001 to 2007. Methods MarketScan databases compile claims from commercial health insurance plans and Medicaid, recording individual diagnoses for outpatient encounters and hospital stays. We used a cross sectional survey to estimate prevalence of PIDD using related ICD-9 codes (279.0, 279.1, 279.2, 279.8, 279.9, 288.1 and 288.2). Persons with secondary immunodeficiency diagnoses were excluded from analysis. Results Between 2001 and 2007, prevalence of any PIDD diagnosis increased from 38.9 to 50.5 per 100,000 among privately insured and from 29.1 to 41.1 per 100,000 among publicly insured persons. B cell defects predominated. Prevalence was more than twice as high among Whites as among Blacks or Hispanics. Conclusion In this large database, we found a higher prevalence of diagnosed PIDD than has been reported previously from registries. Increased awareness may have contributed to the increasing prevalence. PMID:25257253

  20. Non-random biodiversity loss underlies predictable increases in viral disease prevalence.

    PubMed

    Lacroix, Christelle; Jolles, Anna; Seabloom, Eric W; Power, Alison G; Mitchell, Charles E; Borer, Elizabeth T

    2014-03-01

    Disease dilution (reduced disease prevalence with increasing biodiversity) has been described for many different pathogens. Although the mechanisms causing this phenomenon remain unclear, the disassembly of communities to predictable subsets of species, which can be caused by changing climate, land use or invasive species, underlies one important hypothesis. In this case, infection prevalence could reflect the competence of the remaining hosts. To test this hypothesis, we measured local host species abundance and prevalence of four generalist aphid-vectored pathogens (barley and cereal yellow dwarf viruses) in a ubiquitous annual grass host at 10 sites spanning 2000 km along the North American West Coast. In laboratory and field trials, we measured viral infection as well as aphid fecundity and feeding preference on several host species. Virus prevalence increased as local host richness declined. Community disassembly was non-random: ubiquitous hosts dominating species-poor assemblages were among the most competent for vector production and virus transmission. This suggests that non-random biodiversity loss led to increased virus prevalence. Because diversity loss is occurring globally in response to anthropogenic changes, such work can inform medical, agricultural and veterinary disease research by providing insights into the dynamics of pathogens nested within a complex web of environmental forces.

  1. Non-random biodiversity loss underlies predictable increases in viral disease prevalence.

    PubMed

    Lacroix, Christelle; Jolles, Anna; Seabloom, Eric W; Power, Alison G; Mitchell, Charles E; Borer, Elizabeth T

    2014-03-01

    Disease dilution (reduced disease prevalence with increasing biodiversity) has been described for many different pathogens. Although the mechanisms causing this phenomenon remain unclear, the disassembly of communities to predictable subsets of species, which can be caused by changing climate, land use or invasive species, underlies one important hypothesis. In this case, infection prevalence could reflect the competence of the remaining hosts. To test this hypothesis, we measured local host species abundance and prevalence of four generalist aphid-vectored pathogens (barley and cereal yellow dwarf viruses) in a ubiquitous annual grass host at 10 sites spanning 2000 km along the North American West Coast. In laboratory and field trials, we measured viral infection as well as aphid fecundity and feeding preference on several host species. Virus prevalence increased as local host richness declined. Community disassembly was non-random: ubiquitous hosts dominating species-poor assemblages were among the most competent for vector production and virus transmission. This suggests that non-random biodiversity loss led to increased virus prevalence. Because diversity loss is occurring globally in response to anthropogenic changes, such work can inform medical, agricultural and veterinary disease research by providing insights into the dynamics of pathogens nested within a complex web of environmental forces. PMID:24352672

  2. Anti-cofactor autoantibodies in systemic lupus erythematosus: prevalence, clinical and HLA class II associations.

    PubMed

    Sebastiani, Gian Domenico; Morozzi, Gabriella; Bellisai, Francesca; Fineschi, Irene; Bacarelli, Maria Romana; Simpatico, Antonella; Font, Josep; Cervera, Ricard; Houssiau, Frederic; Fernandez-Nebro, Antonio; De Ramon Garrido, Enrique; De Pità, Ornella; Smolen, Josef; Galeazzi, Mauro

    2008-01-01

    The aim of our study was to evaluate the clinical and HLA-class II allele associations of some anti-cofactor antibodies in a homogeneous group of European patients with SLE. One hundred thirty-six patients with SLE, fulfilling four or more of the ACR 1997 revised criteria for the classification of the disease, coming from 7 European countries, were enrolled consecutively. Anti-prothrombin (anti-PT), anti-annexin V (anti-AnnV), anti-protein C (anti-Cprot) and anti-protein S (anti-Sprot) were determined by using commercial ELISA kits. Molecular typing of HLA-DRB1, DRB3, DRB4, DRB5, DQA1, DQB1 and DPB1 loci was performed by using PCR-SSOP method, carried out using digoxygenin (DIG) labeled probes. The prevalence of anti-AnnV, anti-PT, anti-Cprot and anti-Sprot was 19%, 10.4%, 4.4% and 8.1%, respectively. Twenty-seven % of anti-AnnV positive patients reported migraine vs 5.5% of anti-AnnV negatives (p = 0.003, but p not significant, odds ratio (OR) = 6.4, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 2-21). Anti-PT, anti-AnnV and anti-Sprot were positively associated with some HLA alleles, but pc was not significant. In this study we have shown that some HLA alleles carry the risk to produce antibodies against phospholipid-binding proteins, but these association need confirmation in other studies, because they have never been reported and appear to be weak associations.

  3. Prevalence of newcastle disease virus in broiler chickens (Gallus gallus) in Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Orsi, M.A.; Doretto Jr, L.; Camillo, S.C.A.; Reischak, D.; Ribeiro, S.A.M.; Ramazzoti, A.; Mendonça, A.O.; Spilki, F.R.; Buzinaro, M.G.; Ferreira, H.L.; Arns, C.W.

    2010-01-01

    This study was carried out during 2002/2003, aiming to determine the prevalence of virulent Newcastle disease virus strains (NDV) in Brazilian commercial poultry farms. Clinical samples were obtained from the Southeastern, Southern and Central-Western regions, which comprise the main area of the Brazilian poultry production. Serum samples and tracheal and cloacal swabs of 23,745 broiler chickens from 1,583 flocks, including both vaccinated chickens and those with no vaccination information, were tested for NDV using a diagnostic ELISA kit. The seropositivity was 39.1%, and the isolation percentage by flock varied from 1.0 to 7.6%, and by region from 6.5 to 58.4%. Higher isolation rates (74.3-83.3%) were obtained after three passages in embryonated chicken eggs. All isolates preliminarily identified as NDV were characterized as nonpathogenic strains, as their Intracerebral Pathogenicity Index (ICPI) was below 0.7. Based on results of this study, Brazil can claim a virulent NDV-free status for commercial flocks. PMID:24031503

  4. Genetic basis of glycogen storage disease type 1a: Prevalent mutations at the glucose-6-phosphatase locus

    SciTech Connect

    Ke-Jian Lei; Hungwen Chen; Ji-Lan Liu

    1995-10-01

    Diagnosis of glycogen storage disease (GSD) type 1a currently is established by demonstrating the lack of glucose-6-phosphatase (G6Pase) activity in the patient`s biopsied liver specimen. Recent cloning of the G6Pase gene and identification of mutations within the gene that causes GSD type 1a allow for the development of a DNA-based diagnostic method. Using SSCP analysis and DNA sequencing, we characterized the G6Pase gene of 70 unrelated patients with enzymatically confirmed diagnosis of GSD type 1a and detected mutations in all except 17 alleles (88%). Sixteen mutations were uncovered that were shown by expression to abolish or greatly reduce G6Pase activity and that therefore are responsible for the GSD type la disorder. R83C and Q347X are the most prevalent mutations found in Caucasians, 130X and R83C are most prevalent in Hispanics, and R83H is most prevalent in Chinese. The Q347X mutation has thus far been identified only in Caucasian patients, and the 130X mutation has been identified only in Hispanic patients. Our results demonstrate that the DNA-based analysis can accurately, rapidly, and noninvasively detect the majority of mutations in GSD type 1a. This DNA-based diagnosis now permits prenatal diagnosis among at-risk patients and serves as a database in screening and counseling patients clinically suspected of having this disease. 22 refs., 2 figs., 4 tabs.

  5. Bayesian estimation of prevalence of paratuberculosis in dairy herds enrolled in a voluntary Johne's Disease Control Programme in Ireland.

    PubMed

    McAloon, Conor G; Doherty, Michael L; Whyte, Paul; O'Grady, Luke; More, Simon J; Messam, Locksley L McV; Good, Margaret; Mullowney, Peter; Strain, Sam; Green, Martin J

    2016-06-01

    Bovine paratuberculosis is a disease characterised by chronic granulomatous enteritis which manifests clinically as a protein-losing enteropathy causing diarrhoea, hypoproteinaemia, emaciation and, eventually death. Some evidence exists to suggest a possible zoonotic link and a national voluntary Johne's Disease Control Programme was initiated by Animal Health Ireland in 2013. The objective of this study was to estimate herd-level true prevalence (HTP) and animal-level true prevalence (ATP) of paratuberculosis in Irish herds enrolled in the national voluntary JD control programme during 2013-14. Two datasets were used in this study. The first dataset had been collected in Ireland during 2005 (5822 animals from 119 herds), and was used to construct model priors. Model priors were updated with a primary (2013-14) dataset which included test records from 99,101 animals in 1039 dairy herds and was generated as part of the national voluntary JD control programme. The posterior estimate of HTP from the final Bayesian model was 0.23-0.34 with a 95% probability. Across all herds, the median ATP was found to be 0.032 (0.009, 0.145). This study represents the first use of Bayesian methodology to estimate the prevalence of paratuberculosis in Irish dairy herds. The HTP estimate was higher than previous Irish estimates but still lower than estimates from other major dairy producing countries. PMID:27237395

  6. Genetic basis of glycogen storage disease type 1a: prevalent mutations at the glucose-6-phosphatase locus.

    PubMed

    Lei, K J; Chen, Y T; Chen, H; Wong, L J; Liu, J L; McConkie-Rosell, A; Van Hove, J L; Ou, H C; Yeh, N J; Pan, L Y

    1995-10-01

    Diagnosis of glycogen storage disease (GSD) type 1a currently is established by demonstrating the lack of glucose-6-phosphatase (G6Pase) activity in the patient's biopsied liver specimen. Recent cloning of the G6Pase gene and identification of mutations within the gene that causes GSD type 1a allow for the development of a DNA-based diagnostic method. Using SSCP analysis and DNA sequencing, we characterized the G6Pase gene of 70 unrelated patients with enzymatically confirmed diagnosis of GSD type 1a and detected mutations in all except 17 alleles (88%). Sixteen mutations were uncovered that were shown by expression to abolish or greatly reduce G6Pase activity and that therefore are responsible for the GSD type 1a disorder. R83C and Q347X are the most prevalent mutations found in Caucasians, 130X and R83C are most prevalent in Hispanics, and R83H is most prevalent in Chinese. The Q347X mutation has thus far been identified only in Caucasian patients, and the 130X mutation has been identified only in Hispanic patients. Our results demonstrate that the DNA-based analysis can accurately, rapidly, and noninvasively detect the majority of mutations in GSD type 1a. This DNA-based diagnosis now permits prenatal diagnosis among at-risk patients and serves as a database in screening and counseling patients clinically suspected of having this disease.

  7. Globalization of Alzheimer's disease clinical trials

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) therapies are increasingly being tested in global clinical trials. A search of ClincalTrials.gov revealed that of 269 currently active trials, 28% are currently being conducted in the United States; the majority of trials and the majority of trial sites are ex-US. The US has the largest number of trial sites of any single country; cumulatively, nearly half of all sites are outside the US. The US conducts more trials in all phases of drug development but has a greater proportion of phase 3 trials. The increasing importance of global participants in clinical trials emphasizes the importance of considering the ethnic and international factors that may influence trial outcome. The International Conference on Harmonization guidelines divide ethnic factors that may affect drug development into intrinsic and extrinsic influences. These include language, cultural factors, educational levels, the general level of health and standard of care, as well as nutrition and diet. Ethnic influences on pharmacokinetics are known for some metabolic pathways. The biology of AD may also differ among the world's populations. The frequency of the apolipoprotein e4 allele, a major risk factor for AD, differs internationally. Genetic variations might also affect inflammatory, excitotoxic, and oxidative components of AD. Diagnostic standards and experience vary from country to country. Levels of practitioner training and experience, diagnostic approaches to AD, and attitudes regarding aging and AD may differ. Experience and sophistication with regard to clinical trial conduct also vary within and between countries. Experience with conducting the necessary examinations, as well as the linguistic and cultural validity of instrument translations, may affect trial outcomes. Operational and regulatory aspects of clinical trials vary and provide important barriers to seamless conduct of multiregional clinical trials. Collection and testing of biological samples, continuous

  8. Bayesian comparison of cost-effectiveness of different clinical approaches to diagnose coronary artery disease

    SciTech Connect

    Patterson, R.E.; Eng, C.; Horowitz, S.F.; Gorlin, R.; Goldstein, S.R.

    1984-08-01

    The objective of this study was to compare the cost-effectiveness of four clinical policies (policies I to IV) in the diagnosis of the presence or absence of coronary artery disease. A model based on Bayes theorem and published clinical data was constructed to make these comparisons. Effectiveness was defined as either the number of patients with coronary disease diagnosed or as the number of quality-adjusted life years extended by therapy after the diagnosis of coronary disease. The following conclusions arise strictly from analysis of the model and may not necessarily be applicable to all situations. As prevalence of coronary disease in the population increased, it caused a linear increase in cost per patient tested, but a hyperbolic decrease in cost per effect, that is, increased cost-effectiveness. Thus, cost-effectiveness of all policies (I to IV) was poor in populations with a prevalence of disease below 10%. Analysis of the model also indicates that at prevalences less than 80%, exercise thallium scintigraphy alone as a first test (policy II) is a more cost-effective initial test than is exercise electrocardiography alone as a first test (policy I) or exercise electrocardiography first combined with thallium imaging as a second test (policy IV). Exercise electrocardiography before thallium imaging (policy IV) is more cost-effective than exercise electrocardiography alone (policy I) at prevalences less than 80%. 4) Noninvasive exercise testing before angiography (policies I, II and IV) is more cost-effective than using coronary angiography as the first and only test (policy III) at prevalences less than 80%. 5) Above a threshold value of prevalence of 80% (for example patients with typical angina), proceeding to angiography as the first test (policy III) was more cost-effective than initial noninvasive exercise tests (policies I, II and IV).

  9. Clinical Utility of Serologic Testing for Celiac Disease in Asymptomatic Patients

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Executive Summary Objective The objective of this evidence-based analysis was to evaluate the clinical utility of serologic testing for celiac disease in asymptomatic individuals presenting with one of the non-gastrointestinal conditions evaluated in this report. The clinical utility was based on the effects of a gluten-free diet (GFD) on outcomes specific to each of these conditions. The prevalence of celiac disease in asymptomatic individuals and one of these non-gastrointestinal conditions was also evaluated. Clinical Need and Target Population Celiac Disease Celiac disease is an autoimmune disease characterized by a chronic inflammatory state of the proximal small bowel mucosa accompanied by structural and functional changes. Technology Under Evaluation Serologic Tests for Celiac Disease There are a number of serologic tests for celiac disease available. Serologic tests are automated with the exception of the anti-endomysial antibody test, which is more time-consuming and operator-dependent than the other tests. Research Questions What is the prevalence of asymptomatic celiac disease in patients presenting with one of the non-gastrointestinal conditions evaluated? What is the effect of the gluten-free diet on condition-specific outcomes in patients with asymptomatic celiac disease presenting with one of the non-gastrointestinal conditions evaluated? What is the clinical utility of serologic testing for celiac disease in asymptomatic patients presenting with one of the non-gastrointestinal conditions evaluated? The clinical utility was defined as the impact of the GFD on disease specific outcomes. What is the risk of all-cause mortality and lymphoma in individuals with asymptomatic celiac disease? What is the budget impact of serologic testing for celiac disease in asymptomatic subjects presenting with one of the non-gastrointestinal conditions evaluated? Research Methods Study Population The study population consisted of individuals with newly diagnosed celiac

  10. Mycobacterial Prevalence and Antibiotic Resistance Frequency Trends in Taiwan of Mycobacterial Clinical Isolates From 2002 to 2014.

    PubMed

    Shiau, Ming-Yuh; Lee, Ming-Shih; Huang, Tian-Lin; Tsai, Jen-Ning; Chang, Yih-Hsin

    2016-03-01

    Tuberculosis, caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTBC) infections, is one of the most widespread infectious diseases worldwide. Nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) also cause chronic pulmonary infections, however, NTM infection is generally overlooked.This study analyzed the frequencies of MTBC and NTM clinical isolates from 181,132 specimens obtained from patients in Taiwan suspected of having a pulmonary mycobacterial infection from 2002 to 2014. The resistant rates to 4 first-line antibiotics (isoniazid, ethambutol, rifampicin, and streptomycin) of 9079 clinical MTBC isolates were also examined by the modified agar proportion method.Overall, the mycobacterial isolation rate was 8.65%, and this consisted of MTBC isolation rate of 5.01% and NTM isolation rate of 3.63%. The prevalence of MTBC isolates among the identified mycobacterial strains could be seen to decrease significantly from 82.5% in 2002 to 41.18% in 2014. Notably, the corresponding NTM prevalence increased 3.36 fold from 17.54% in 2002 to 58.82% in 2014. The frequencies of MTBC and NTM isolates showed a reciprocal trend with the crossing over occurring in the years 2010 and 2011. Although the resistance rates of the MTBC isolates to isoniazid and streptomycin were relatively stable over the study period, resistance rates of the MTBC isolates against rifampicin and ethambutol fluctuated across the study period. Overall, the incidence of multidrug resistance was relatively consistent at about 1.74%.The diagnosis, identification, and susceptibility tests for NTM should be standardized and integrated into appropriate clinical settings to cope with the increase in NTM infections. In addition, the documentation of the antibiotic resistance rates of MTBC clinical isolates to the antibiotic treatments most often clinically prescribed over a decade provides valuable clues and reference points for effective mycobacterial control. PMID:27015168

  11. Global Prevalence of Chronic Kidney Disease – A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Fatoba, Samuel T.; Oke, Jason L.; Hirst, Jennifer A.; O’Callaghan, Christopher A.; Lasserson, Daniel S.; Hobbs, F. D. Richard

    2016-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is a global health burden with a high economic cost to health systems and is an independent risk factor for cardiovascular disease (CVD). All stages of CKD are associated with increased risks of cardiovascular morbidity, premature mortality, and/or decreased quality of life. CKD is usually asymptomatic until later stages and accurate prevalence data are lacking. Thus we sought to determine the prevalence of CKD globally, by stage, geographical location, gender and age. A systematic review and meta-analysis of observational studies estimating CKD prevalence in general populations was conducted through literature searches in 8 databases. We assessed pooled data using a random effects model. Of 5,842 potential articles, 100 studies of diverse quality were included, comprising 6,908,440 patients. Global mean(95%CI) CKD prevalence of 5 stages 13·4%(11·7–15·1%), and stages 3–5 was 10·6%(9·2–12·2%). Weighting by study quality did not affect prevalence estimates. CKD prevalence by stage was Stage-1 (eGFR>90+ACR>30): 3·5% (2·8–4·2%); Stage-2 (eGFR 60–89+ACR>30): 3·9% (2·7–5·3%); Stage-3 (eGFR 30–59): 7·6% (6·4–8·9%); Stage-4 = (eGFR 29–15): 0·4% (0·3–0·5%); and Stage-5 (eGFR<15): 0·1% (0·1–0·1%). CKD has a high global prevalence with a consistent estimated global CKD prevalence of between 11 to 13% with the majority stage 3. Future research should evaluate intervention strategies deliverable at scale to delay the progression of CKD and improve CVD outcomes. PMID:27383068

  12. Prevalence of and risk factors for chronic kidney disease in rural Nicaragua

    PubMed Central

    O'Donnell, Julie K.; Tobey, Matthew; Stevens, Lesley A.; Johnson, Sarah; Stringham, Peter; Cohen, Bruce; Brooks, Daniel R.

    2011-01-01

    Background. Mostly anecdotal reports describe a high prevalence of chronic kidney disease in northwestern Nicaragua, predominantly among younger men, resulting in substantial morbidity and mortality. The true prevalence, nature and aetiology of kidney disease in this region remain unknown. Methods. We performed a population-based prevalence study in Quezalguaque, Nicaragua to assess the frequency of estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) <60 mL/min/1.73 m2, and compared the prevalence of reduced eGFR in Quezalguaque with the USA using the NHANES 1999–2006 data. We also conducted an embedded case–control study in a subset of participants to assess kidney disease risk factors. Results. From 1882 eligible households, 771 individuals from 300 households participated in the prevalence study, 98 (13%) of whom had reduced eGFR. Reduced eGFR was more common among older participants, men and participants living at lower altitudes. Among 18–29-year-old participants, 2.6% had reduced eGFR, and among 30–41-year-old participants, 7.4% had reduced eGFR; this compares with 0.2% and 0.8%, respectively, in NHANES. No individuals in these age groups were diabetic. Among cases, only 27% had dipstick proteinuria of 1+ or greater, compared with 7% of controls. Haematuria did not significantly differ between cases and controls (24% versus 18%). In age- and sex-adjusted models, hypertension and residence at lower altitude were independently associated with reduced eGFR, while occupational history was not associated with reduced eGFR. Conclusions. Kidney disease appears common in residents of Quezalguaque, Nicaragua, particularly in younger men, with features most consistent with tubulointerstitial disease. Further research is needed to elucidate the causes of kidney disease in this region. PMID:20615905

  13. Prevalence of Skin and Skin-Related Diseases in the Rochester Epidemiology Project and a Comparison with Other Published Prevalence Studies.

    PubMed

    Andersen, Louise K; Davis, Mark D P

    2016-01-01

    In Olmsted County, Minn., USA, reliable, population-based epidemiologic research studies can be performed because of a unique medical records linkage system, the Rochester Epidemiology Project (REP). Our objective was to summarize the epidemiologic data describing the prevalence of skin and skin-related diseases derived from the REP and to compare the findings with those from other studies worldwide. Retrospectively, we reviewed the results of population-based REP studies reporting the prevalence of skin and skin-related diseases over more than 4 decades and compared them to other published prevalences globally. Prevalences from the REP reported per 100,000 persons were as follows: hidradenitis suppurativa, 130.0; psoriasis, 700.0; psoriatic arthritis in 1992, 100.0, and in 2000, 160.0; Behçet disease, 5.2; scleroderma, 13.8; dermatomyositis, 21.42; systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), from 30.5 to 122.0 suspected SLE, 32.8; combined SLE, 41.8; discoid lupus erythematosus, 27.6, and cutaneous lupus erythematosus, 70.4 and 73.2 (from 2 studies). Many of the population-based prevalences of specific skin and skin-related diseases derived from the REP are different from those estimated globally. Suggested reasons for disparity in the prevalences globally may include differences in the type of reported prevalence, study methodology, geographic areas, ethnic groups, age distribution, and socioeconomic status. PMID:27011206

  14. Prevalence of chronic kidney disease in persons with undiagnosed or prehypertension in the United States.

    PubMed

    Crews, Deidra C; Plantinga, Laura C; Miller, Edgar R; Saran, Rajiv; Hedgeman, Elizabeth; Saydah, Sharon H; Williams, Desmond E; Powe, Neil R

    2010-05-01

    Hypertension is both a cause and a consequence of chronic kidney disease, but the prevalence of chronic kidney disease throughout the diagnostic spectrum of blood pressure has not been established. We determined the prevalence of chronic kidney disease within blood pressure categories in 17 794 adults surveyed by the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey during 1999-2006. Diagnosed hypertension was defined as self-reported provider diagnosis (n=5832); undiagnosed hypertension was defined as systolic blood pressure > or = 140 mm Hg or diastolic blood pressure > or = 90 mm Hg, without report of provider diagnosis (n=3046); prehypertension was defined as systolic blood pressure > or = 120 and <140 mm Hg or diastolic blood pressure > or = 80 and <90 mm Hg (n=3719); and normal was defined as systolic blood pressure <120 mm Hg and diastolic blood pressure <80 mm Hg (n=5197). Chronic kidney disease was defined as estimated glomerular filtration rate <60 mL/min per 1.73 m(2) or urinary albumin:creatinine ratio >30 mg/g. Prevalences of chronic kidney disease among those with prehypertension and undiagnosed hypertension were 17.3% and 22.0%, respectively, compared with 27.5% with diagnosed hypertension and 13.4% with normal blood pressure, after adjustment for age, sex, and race in multivariable logistic regression. This pattern persisted with varying definitions of kidney disease; macroalbuminuria (urinary albumin:creatinine ratio >300 mg/g) had the strongest association with increasing blood pressure category (odds ratio: 2.37 [95% CI: 2.00 to 2.81]). Chronic kidney disease is prevalent in undiagnosed and prehypertension. Earlier identification and treatment of both these conditions may prevent or delay morbidity and mortality from chronic kidney disease.

  15. Prevalence of sickle cell disease and sickle cell trait in national neonatal screening studies

    PubMed Central

    Lervolino, Luciana Garcia; Baldin, Paulo Eduardo Almeida; Picado, Silvia Miguéis; Calil, Karina Barreto; Viel, Ana Amélia; Campos, Luiz Alexandre Freixo

    2011-01-01

    Sickle cell anemia is the best known hereditary blood disorder; there are serious complications associated with the condition. Diagnosis and early intervention reduce morbidity and mortality. These benefits have resulted in the widespread use of newborn screening education programs. In Brazil, the National Neonatal Screening Program established by decree 822/01 included sickle cell disease in the list of diseases tested in the so called "heel prick test". Since then, national studies of the results of this program have been periodically published. To review the literature in order to assess the prevalence of sickle cell trait and sickle cell anemia from data of national neonatal screening studies on hemoglobin S (Hb S). A bibliographic review was carried out using the key words: sickle cell anemia & hemoglobinopathies & neonatal screening & Brazil in the Bireme and SciELO databases. Original Brazilian studies presenting data on prevalence of the sickle cell trait (Hb AS) and sickle cell anemia (Hb SS) based on neonatal screening for Hb S were analysed. Twelve original national studies were identified with prevalences varying from 1.1% to 9.8% for the sickle cell trait and from 0.8 to 60 per 100,000 live births for sickle cell disease in different Brazilian regions. Conclusion: Neonatal screening for Hb S is a very useful method to assess the prevalence of sickle cell trait (Hb AS) and sickle cell anemia (Hb SS) in Brazil. There is a heterogeneous distribution of this disease with the highest prevalence in the northeastern region and the lowest prevalence in the south. PMID:23284244

  16. Cardiovascular Disease Prevalence and Risk Factors of Persons with Mental Retardation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Draheim, Christopher C.

    2006-01-01

    This paper reviews the recent literature on cardiovascular disease (CVD) prevalence, CVD-related mortality, physiological CVD risk factors, and behavioral CVD risk factors in adults with mental retardation (MR). The literature on the potential influences of modifiable behavioral CVD risk factors and the physiological CVD risk factors are also…

  17. The Occurrence and Prevalence of Giraffe Skin Disease in Protected Areas of Northern Tanzania.

    PubMed

    Lee, Derek E; Bond, Monica L

    2016-07-01

    Giraffe skin disease (GSD) is a disorder of undetermined etiology that causes lesions on the forelimbs of Masai giraffe ( Giraffa camelopardalis tippelskirchi). We estimated occurrence and prevalence of GSD in six wildlife conservation areas of Tanzania. The disjunct spatial pattern of occurrence implies that environmental factors may influence GSD. PMID:27310168

  18. Prevalence of inter-arm blood pressure difference among clinical out-patients

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Balkishan; Ramawat, Pramila

    2016-01-01

    Objectives An increased inter-arm blood pressure difference is an easily determined physical finding, may use as an indicator of cardio vascular event and other sever diseases. Authors evaluated 477 patients to determine the prevalence and significance of inter-arm blood pressure difference. Methodology 477 routine outdoor patients selected to observe the inter-arm blood pressure difference. Age, height, weight, body mass index, history of disease and blood pressure recorded. Results The prevalence of ≥10 mmHg systolic inter-arm blood pressure difference was 5.0% was more as compared to 3.8% had diastolic inter-arm blood pressure difference. The prevalence of systolic and diastolic inter-arm difference between 6 to 10 mmHg was 31.4% and 27.9% respectively. Mean systolic inter-arm blood pressure difference was significantly higher among those patients had a multisystem disorder (10.57±0.98 mmHg) and followed by patients with cardiovascular disease (10.22±0.67 mmHg) as compared to healthy patients (2.71±0.96 mmHg). Various diseases highly influenced the increase in blood pressure irrespective of systolic or diastolic was confirmed strongly significant (p<0.001) at different inter arm blood pressure difference levels. Conclusion This study supports the view of inter-arm blood pressure difference as an alarming stage of increased disease risk that incorporated to investigate potential problems at an early diagnostic stage. A significant mean difference between left and right arm blood pressure recorded for many diseases. PMID:27103905

  19. Prevalence and frequency of microembolic signals in 105 patients with extracranial carotid artery occlusive disease

    PubMed Central

    Droste, D.; Dittrich, R.; Kemeny, V.; Schulte-Altedorne..., G.; Ringelstein, E

    1999-01-01

    Besides the established factors "presence of symptoms" and "degree of stenosis", plaque echolucency is considered to be associated with increased risk of stroke in patients with carotid artery disease. An evaluation was carried out as to whether the prevalence and number of microembolic signals (MES) detected by transcranial Doppler ultrasound were higher in patients with echolucent carotid plaques. One hundred and five patients with carotid artery stenosis from 20%-99% or occlusion underwent clinical investigations, duplex ultrasound of the carotid arteries, and a 1 hour recording from the middle cerebral artery downstream to the carotid artery pathology using the four gate technique. The presence of MES was more frequent and the number greater in symptomatic patients (21 out of 64 patients (33%); mean number of MES in all 64 patients 3.1) than in asymptomatic patients (four out of 41 patients (10%); mean number of MES in all 41 patients 0.3) (p=0.007, and p=0.006, respectively). Echogenicity of the lesions did not affect either number or presence of MES. Positivity for MES and the number of MES increased with increasing degree of stenosis (both p=0.002). Four out of 12 patients with carotid artery occlusion showed MES. No MES could be detected in carotid artery stenosis below 80%. There was a decline in positivity of MES and of the number of MES with the time after the ischaemic event. After 80 days or more after the index event, only one patient showed MES. In conclusion, increasing degree of stenosis and presence of symptoms similarly affect macroembolic and microembolic risk. Thus MES may be a surrogate parameter for risk of stroke. The presence of MES in a few asymptomatic patients suggests that clinically silent circulating microemboli may give additional information on the pending embolic potential of carotid artery stenoses. Echolucency of the plaque was not related to an increased number of MES.

 PMID:10486404

  20. Observer agreement on pen level prevalence of clinical signs in finishing pigs.

    PubMed

    Petersen, Henrik Hagbard; Enøe, Claes; Nielsen, Elisabeth Okholm

    2004-07-16

    Four observers performed a standard clinical examination of finisher pigs in two commercial finisher herds. In herd 1,600 finisher pigs in 44 pens were examined. The observers assessed clinical signs of lameness, umbilical hernia and tail bite according to a standardized procedure. The prevalence of the clinical signs was estimated at the pen level. The procedure was repeated after 3 months in another herd, where 730 finisher pigs in 69 pens were examined. The agreement between observer pairs was assessed using prevalence-adjusted bias-adjusted kappa (PABAK) and proportionate-agreement estimates (Ppo) and Pneg). Observer bias was present despite training and standardization of the participating observers. The highest pen level agreement for the observer pairs was found for pens that had one or more pigs with tail bite (PABAK = 0.82-1.00) and umbilical hernia (PABAK = 0.77-1.00). The agreement was fair-to-moderate for identification of pens holding one or more lame pigs (PABAK = 0.27-0.7). In general, the average agreement of observer pairs on absence of clinical signs (Pneg) was higher than for presence (Ppos). The observer bias varied between observer pairs and with the clinical signs. PMID:15325769

  1. Bayesian comparison of cost-effectiveness of different clinical approaches to diagnose coronary artery disease.

    PubMed

    Patterson, R E; Eng, C; Horowitz, S F; Gorlin, R; Goldstein, S R

    1984-08-01

    The objective of this study was to compare the cost-effectiveness of four clinical policies (policies I to IV) in the diagnosis of the presence or absence of coronary artery disease. A model based on Bayes' theorem and published clinical data was constructed to make these comparisons. Effectiveness was defined as either the number of patients with coronary disease diagnosed or as the number of quality-adjusted life years extended by therapy after the diagnosis of coronary disease. The following conclusions arise strictly from analysis of the model and may not necessarily be applicable to all situations. As prevalence of coronary disease in the population increased, it caused a linear increase in cost per patient tested, but a hyperbolic decrease in cost per effect, that is, increased cost-effectiveness. Thus, cost-effectiveness of all policies (I to IV) was poor in populations with a prevalence of disease below 10%, for example, asymptomatic people with no risk factors. Analysis of the model also indicates that at prevalences less than 80%, exercise thallium scintigraphy alone as a first test (policy II) is a more cost-effective initial test than is exercise electrocardiography alone as a first test (policy I) or exercise electrocardiography first combined with thallium imaging as a second test (policy IV). Exercise electrocardiography before thallium imaging (policy IV) is more cost-effective than exercise electrocardiography alone (policy I) at prevalences less than 80%. 4) Noninvasive exercise testing before angiography (policies I, II and IV) is more cost-effective than using coronary angiography as the first and only test (policy III) at prevalences less than 80%. 5) Above a threshold value of prevalence of 80% (for example patients with typical angina), proceeding to angiography as the first test (policy III) was more cost-effective than initial noninvasive exercise tests (policies I, II and IV). One advantage of this quantitative model is that it estimates a

  2. Genetic typing and prevalence of Border disease virus (BDV) in small ruminant flocks in Spain.

    PubMed

    Valdazo-González, B; Alvarez-Martínez, M; Greiser-Wilke, I

    2006-10-31

    Between 2001 and 2002, samples from 1,413 animals in 21 Spanish small ruminant flocks, most of them with animals showing clinical signs compatible with Border disease (BD), were screened for the presence of Pestivirus antigen and antibodies by an indirect peroxidase monolayer assay (IPMA) and the virus neutralization test (VNT), respectively. Although all flocks harboured seropositive animals, virus could only be isolated from animals in five of the flocks. Between 4 and 11 months later all animals older than 6 months in three of the flocks were resampled. At this time, 51-83% of them had neutralizing antibodies. The prevalence of persistently infected (PI) animals within two of the flocks was 0.3 and 0.6%, respectively. The third flock presumably had eliminated all the PI animals. Fourteen virus isolates were obtained. The 5' untranslated region (5'UTR) was amplified by RT-PCR and directly sequenced. Phylogenetic analyses classified them as a group of Border disease viruses (BDV), separated from BDV-1, but showing a relatively low bootstrap value. Three of the 14 isolates were in the same subgroup as a set of formerly characterised Spanish isolates from the Basque Country, which were allocated to subgroup BDV-C. In addition, they were in the group with an isolate from chamois, which is currently allocated in group BDV-4. Because of its close relation to the chamois isolate, these isolates were tentatively reallocated in a subgroup BDV-4a. The remaining isolates generated a new subgroup, related but not in the same cluster as the chamois isolate, and was therefore tentatively assigned to a new subgroup BDV-4b. Our results show that classification and nomenclature of BDV needs to be harmonised.

  3. Prevalence of delirium among patients at a cancer ward: Clinical risk factors and prediction by bedside cognitive tests.

    PubMed

    Grandahl, Mia Gall; Nielsen, Svend Erik; Koerner, Ejnar Alex; Schultz, Helga Holm; Arnfred, Sidse Marie

    2016-08-01

    Background Delirium is a frequent psychiatric complication to cancer, but rarely recognized by oncologists. Aims 1. To estimate the prevalence of delirium among inpatients admitted at an oncological cancer ward 2. To investigate whether simple clinical factors predict delirium 3. To examine the value of cognitive testing in the assessment of delirium. Methods On five different days, we interviewed and assessed patients admitted to a Danish cancer ward. The World Health Organization International Classification of Diseases Version 10, WHO ICD-10 Diagnostic System and the Confusion Assessment Method (CAM) were used for diagnostic categorization. Clinical information was gathered from medical records and all patients were tested with Mini Cognitive Test, The Clock Drawing Test, and the Digit Span Test. Results 81 cancer patients were assessed and 33% were diagnosed with delirium. All delirious participants were CAM positive. Poor performance on the cognitive tests was associated with delirium. Medical records describing CNS metastases, benzodiazepine or morphine treatment were associated with delirium. Conclusions Delirium is prevalent among cancer inpatients. The Mini Cognitive Test, The Clock Drawing Test, and the Digit Span Test can be used as screening tools for delirium among inpatients with cancer, but even in synergy, they lack specificity. Combining cognitive testing and attention to nurses' records might improve detection, yet further studies are needed to create a more detailed patient profile for the detection of delirium.

  4. The prevalence and risk factors of cytomegalovirus infection in inflammatory bowel disease in Wuhan, Central China

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The etiology of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is not clear and cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection is often associated with IBD patients. The etiologic link between IBD and CMV infection needs to be studied. The objective of the present study is to investigate the prevalence and risk factors of CMV in a cohort of IBD patients from Central China. Methods Two hundred and twenty six IBD patients (189 ulcerative colitis (UC) and 37 patients with Crohn’s disease (CD)), and 290 age and sex matched healthy controls were recruited. CMV DNA was detected by nested PCR, while serum anti-CMV IgG and anti-CMV IgM was determined by ELISAs. Colonoscopy/enteroscopy with biopsy of diseased tissues and subsequent H&E stain were then conducted in IBD patients with positive anti-CMV IgM. Finally, we analyzed the prevalence and clinical risk factors of CMV infection in IBD patients. Results The prevalence of CMV DNA and anti-CMV IgG positive rate in IBD patients were 84.07% and 76.11%, respectively, higher than those in healthy controls (59.66% and 50.69%, respectively, P < 0.05), However, anti-CMV IgM positive rate was no different with healthy controls (1.77% vs 0.34%, P = 0.235). In univariate analysis of risk factors, the recent use of corticosteroid was associated with increase of CMV DNA and IgM positive rate in UC (P = 0.035 and P = 0.015, respectively), aminosalicylic acid drug therapy was correlated with positivity of CMV DNA and IgG in UC and CMV DNA in CD (P = 0.041, P < 0.001 and P = 0.014, respectively), the treatment of immunosuppresent was correlated with CMV IgM (P < 0.001). Furthermore, patients with severe UC were significantly associated with CMV DNA and IgM (P = 0.048 and P = 0.031, respectively). Malnutrition (albumin < 35 G/L) was also found to be related with CMV recent infection (P = 0.031). In multivariate analysis of risk factors in UC, pancolitis was significantly associated with CMV DNA positivity

  5. The Prevalence of Diabetes Mellitus in COPD Patients with Severe and Very Severe Stage of the Disease

    PubMed Central

    Stojkovikj, Jagoda; Zafirova-Ivanovska, Beti; Kaeva, Biserka; Anastasova, Sasha; Angelovska, Irena; Jovanovski, Smiljko; Stojkovikj, Dragana

    2016-01-01

    AIM: The aim of the study was to investigate the prevalence of diabetes mellitus in privies diagnosed chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) patients with severe and very severe disease, which ware stable. METHODS: We investigated 100 subjects, all of them smokers, with smoking status >10 years. They were stratified in two groups. It was clinical, randomized, cross sectional study. Besides demographic parameters, functional parameters, BMI, cholesterol, LDL and HDL, and the level of blood sugar was measured. RESULTS: The prevalence of diabetes mellitus in our survey in total number of COPD patients with severe and very severe stage was 21%. In the very severe group were recorded significantly higher average values of glycaemia compared with severe group (7.67 ± 3.7 vs. 5.62 ± 0.9, p = 0.018). In the group with severe COPD, it was not confirmed any factor with significant predictive effect on the values of glycaemia. As independent significant factors that affect blood glucose in a group of very severe COPD were confirmed cholesterol (p <0.0001) and HDL (p = 0.018). CONCLUSION: These results suggest that the presence of the COPD in patients itself is a factor that results in the clinical presentation of diabetes mellitus Type 2. PMID:27335596

  6. Prevalence and causes of visual impairment in patients seen at Nkhensani Hospital Eye Clinic, South Africa

    PubMed Central

    Oduntan, Olalekan A.

    2015-01-01

    Background Knowledge of the prevalence and causes of visual impairment (VI) amongst hospital patients is useful in planning preventive programmes and provision of eye-care services for residents in the surrounding communities. Aim The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence and causes of VI amongst eye clinic patients at Nkhensani Hospital. The relationship between VI and age was also investigated. Setting Nkhensani Hospital in the Greater Giyani subdistrict municipality, Mopani district, Limpopo Province, South Africa. Methods Four hundred participants aged 6–92 years were selected for the study using a convenient sampling method. Presenting and best corrected visual acuities (VA) were measured with a LogMAR E chart. Presenting VA (PVA) in the right and left eyes and in the better eye of the patients was used to determine the prevalence of VI, low vision (LV) and blindness. Ophthalmoscope was used to diagnose the eye conditions causing VI amongst participants. Results The prevalence of VI based on the PVA in the right eye was 34.8% and in the left eye, the prevalence was 35.8%. There was a significant association between age of the participants and VI in the right and left eyes (p = 0.00) in each case, respectively. Based on the vision in the better eye of each patient, the prevalence of VI was 28.0% and there was a significant association between VI and age of the participants (p = 0.00). The main causes of VI were uncorrected refractive errors, cataract and glaucoma. Conclusion Findings in this study indicate that a large proportion of VI is preventable. Focusing on refractive error correction and surgical intervention for cataract would significantly reduce the burden of VI amongst patients utilising this hospital. PMID:26842521

  7. Sediment and turbidity associated with offshore dredging increase coral disease prevalence on nearby reefs.

    PubMed

    Pollock, F Joseph; Lamb, Joleah B; Field, Stuart N; Heron, Scott F; Schaffelke, Britta; Shedrawi, George; Bourne, David G; Willis, Bette L

    2014-01-01

    In recent decades, coral reef ecosystems have declined to the extent that reefs are now threatened globally. While many water quality parameters have been proposed to contribute to reef declines, little evidence exists conclusively linking specific water quality parameters with increased disease prevalence in situ. Here we report evidence from in situ coral health surveys confirming that chronic exposure to dredging-associated sediment plumes significantly increase the prevalence of white syndromes, a devastating group of globally important coral diseases. Coral health surveys were conducted along a dredging-associated sediment plume gradient to assess the relationship between sedimentation, turbidity and coral health. Reefs exposed to the highest number of days under the sediment plume (296 to 347 days) had two-fold higher levels of disease, largely driven by a 2.5-fold increase in white syndromes, and a six-fold increase in other signs of compromised coral health relative to reefs with little or no plume exposure (0 to 9 days). Multivariate modeling and ordination incorporating sediment exposure level, coral community composition and cover, predation and multiple thermal stress indices provided further confirmation that sediment plume exposure level was the main driver of elevated disease and other compromised coral health indicators. This study provides the first evidence linking dredging-associated sedimentation and turbidity with elevated coral disease prevalence in situ. Our results may help to explain observed increases in global coral disease prevalence in recent decades and suggest that minimizing sedimentation and turbidity associated with coastal development will provide an important management tool for controlling coral disease epizootics.

  8. Pulmonary function abnormalities and asthma are prevalent in children with sickle cell disease and are associated with acute chest syndrome.

    PubMed

    Intzes, Stefanos; Kalpatthi, Ram V; Short, Robert; Imran, Hamayun

    2013-11-01

    Pulmonary diseases form major sources of morbidity and mortality in children with sickle cell disease (SCD). The objective of the study was to determine the prevalence of lung function abnormalities and asthma and their association with acute chest syndrome (ACS) in children with SCD. This was a cross-sectional retrospective study of 127 children with SCD; we collected information regarding ACS and asthma and pulmonary function test (PFT) data. Based on PFT results, the patients were assigned to one pattern of lung function [normal, obstructive lung disease (OLD), restrictive lung disease (RLD)]. Statistical analyses included Pearson correlation, prevalence odds ratio (POR), cross-tabulation, and multiple binary logistic regression. OLD was noted in 35% and RLD in 23% of the patients, with the remainder exhibiting a normal PFT pattern. Forty-six percent of patients had asthma, 64% of whom had a history of ACS. OLD (r = .244, P = .008, POR = 2.8) and asthma (r = .395, P < .001, POR = 5.4) were significantly associated with a history of ACS. There was a negative correlation between having normal PFT data and a history of ACS (r = -.289, P = .002, POR = .3). Asthma and pulmonary function abnormalities are prevalent in children with SCD, with OLD being more common than RLD. There is an association between asthma, OLD, and ACS, however causality cannot be proven due to the study design. We stress the importance of actively investigating for a clinical diagnosis of asthma in all patients with SCD and suggest that PFT data may help detect patients at lower risk for ACS.

  9. Prevalence of burnout syndrome in clinical nurses at a hospital of excellence

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Burnout syndrome can be defined as long-term work stress resulting from the interaction between constant emotional pressure associated with intense interpersonal involvement for long periods of time and personal characteristics. We investigated the prevalence/propensity of Burnout syndrome in clinical nurses, and the factors related to Burnout syndrome-associated such as socio-demographic characteristics, work load, social and family life, leisure activities, extra work activities, physical activities, and work-related health problems. Method We conducted a cross-sectional, quantitative, prospective epidemiological study with 188 surgical clinic nurses. We used the Maslach Burnout Inventory (MBI), which is a socio-demographic questionnaire and the most widely used instrument to assess Burnout syndrome (three basic dimensions: emotional exhaustion, despersonalization and professional underachievement). The socio-demographic profile questionnaire wascomposed of questions regarding identification, training, time at work, work characteristics and personal circumstances. Results The prevalence of Burnout syndrome was higher (10.1%) and 55, 4% of subjects had a propensity to develop this syndrome. The analysis of the socio-demographic profile of the nurse sample studied showed that most nurses were childless married women, over 35 years of age, working the day shift for 36 hours weekly on average, with 2-6 years of post-graduation experience, and without extra employments. Factors such as marital status, work load, emotion and work related stress aggravated the onset of the syndrome. Conclusion The prevalence and propensity of Burnout syndrome were high. Some factors identified can be useful for the adoption of preventive actions in order to decrease the prevalence of the clinical nurses Burnout syndrome. PMID:24860618

  10. Prevalence of Celiac Disease in Latin America: A Systematic Review and Meta-Regression

    PubMed Central

    Parra-Medina, Rafael; Molano-Gonzalez, Nicolás; Rojas-Villarraga, Adriana; Agmon-Levin, Nancy; Arango, Maria-Teresa; Shoenfeld, Yehuda; Anaya, Juan-Manuel

    2015-01-01

    Background Celiac disease (CD) is an immune-mediated enteropathy triggered by the ingestion of gluten in susceptible individuals, and its prevalence varies depending on the studied population. Given that information on CD in Latin America is scarce, we aimed to investigate the prevalence of CD in this region of the world through a systematic review and meta-analysis. Methods and Findings This was a two-phase study. First, a cross-sectional analysis from 981 individuals of the Colombian population was made. Second, a systematic review and meta-regression analysis were performed following the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Meta- Analyses (PRISMA) guidelines. Our results disclosed a lack of celiac autoimmunity in the studied Colombian population (i.e., anti-tissue transglutaminase (tTG) and IgA anti-endomysium (EMA)). In the systematic review, 72 studies were considered. The estimated prevalence of CD in Latin Americans ranged between 0.46% and 0.64%. The prevalence of CD in first-degree relatives of CD probands was 5.5%. The coexistence of CD and type 1 diabetes mellitus varied from 4.6% to 8.7%, depending on the diagnosis methods (i.e., autoantibodies and/or biopsies). Conclusions Although CD seems to be a rare condition in Colombians; the general prevalence of the disease in Latin Americans seemingly corresponds to a similar scenario observed in Europeans. PMID:25942408

  11. Clinical Implications of Pneumococcal Serotypes: Invasive Disease Potential, Clinical Presentations, and Antibiotic Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Nahm, Moon H.; Moseley, M. Allen

    2013-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae can asymptomatically colonize the nasopharynx and cause a diverse range of illnesses. This clinical spectrum from colonization to invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD) appears to depend on the pneumococcal capsular serotype rather than the genetic background. According to a literature review, serotypes 1, 4, 5, 7F, 8, 12F, 14, 18C, and 19A are more likely to cause IPD. Although serotypes 1 and 19A are the predominant causes of invasive pneumococcal pneumonia, serotype 14 remains one of the most common etiologic agents of non-bacteremic pneumonia in adults, even after 7-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV7) introduction. Serotypes 1, 3, and 19A pneumococci are likely to cause empyema and hemolytic uremic syndrome. Serotype 1 pneumococcal meningitis is prevalent in the African meningitis belt, with a high fatality rate. In contrast to the capsule type, genotype is more closely associated with antibiotic resistance. CC320/271 strains expressing serotype 19A are multidrug-resistant (MDR) and prevalent worldwide in the era of PCV7. Several clones of MDR serotype 6C pneumococci emerged, and a MDR 6D clone (ST282) has been identified in Korea. Since the pneumococcal epidemiology of capsule types varies geographically and temporally, a nationwide serosurveillance system is vital to establishing appropriate vaccination strategies for each country. PMID:23341706

  12. Distress Screening in a Multidisciplinary Lung Cancer Clinic: Prevalence and Predictors of Clinically-Significant Distress

    PubMed Central

    Graves, Kristi D.; Arnold, Susanne M.; Love, Celia L.; Kirsh, Kenneth L.; Moore, Pamela G.; Passik, Steven D.

    2007-01-01

    Summary Screening for distress in cancer patients is recommended by the National Comprehensive Cancer Network, and a Distress Thermometer has previously been developed and empirically-validated for this purpose. The present study sought to determine the rates and predictors of distress in a sample of patients being seen in a multidisciplinary lung cancer clinic. Consecutive patients (N = 333) were recruited from an outpatient multidisciplinary lung cancer clinic to complete the Distress Thermometer, an associated Problem Symptom List, and two questions about interest in receiving help for symptoms. Over half (61.6%) of patients reported distress at a clinically significant level, and 22.5% of patients indicated interest in receiving help with their distress and/or symptoms. Problems in the areas of family relationships, emotional functioning, lack of information about diagnosis/treatment, physical functioning, and cognitive functioning were associated with higher reports of distress. Specific symptoms of depression, anxiety, pain and fatigue were most predictive of distress. Younger age was also associated with higher levels of distress. Distress was not associated with other clinical variables, including stage of illness or medical treatment approach. Similar results were obtained when individuals who had not yet received a definitive diagnosis of lung cancer (n = 134) were excluded from analyses; however, family problems and anxiety were no longer predictive of distress. Screening for distress in a multidisciplinary lung cancer clinic is feasible and a significant number of patients can be expected to meet clinical criteria for distress. Results also highlight younger age and specific physical and psychosocial symptoms as predictive of clinically-significant distress. Identification of the presence and predictors of distress are the first steps toward appropriate referral and treatment of symptoms and problems that contribute to cancer patients’ distress. PMID

  13. Prevalence and Severity of Oral Diseases in the Africa and Middle East Region.

    PubMed

    Abid, A; Maatouk, F; Berrezouga, L; Azodo, C; Uti, O; El-Shamy, H; Oginni, A

    2015-07-01

    This review aims to determine the prevalence and severity of oral health diseases in the Africa and Middle East region (AMER). The profile of oral diseases is not homogeneous across the AMER. There are large disparities between groups. Reliable data are scarce. The prevalence and severity of oral diseases appear to be increasing in the African region, as does associated morbidity. There are substantial differences in inequalities in oral health. Dental caries prevalence is less severe in most African countries than in developed countries, but the high rate of untreated caries reflects the limited resources available and difficulties of access and affordability to essential oral health care services. The prevalence of gingival inflammation is very high in all age groups in several African countries. The prevalence of maxillofacial trauma has increased in many countries, with a wide variation of the incidence and high prevalence of traumatic dental injuries in primary and permanent teeth. Orofacial clefts are among the most common birth defects. Annual incidence of oral cancer is estimated as 25 cases per 100,000 people in Africa. Noma is a major public health problem for the Middle East and North African (MENA) region. Data about human immunodeficiency virus/AIDS are limited, particularly in the MENA region. According to the World Health Organization Regional Committee for Africa report, some fundamental key basic knowledge gaps need to be underlined. They include inequalities in oral health, low priority for oral health, lack of adequate funding, inadequate dental student training, obstacles to medical and dental research, and poor databases. There are very few effective public prevention and oral health promotion programs in the AMER. Universal health coverage is not achievable without scientific research on the effectiveness of health promotion interventions.

  14. Compulsive sexual behavior among male military veterans: Prevalence and associated clinical factors

    PubMed Central

    SMITH, PHILIP H.; POTENZA, MARC N.; MAZURE, CAROLYN M.; MCKEE, SHERRY A.; PARK, CRYSTAL L.; HOFF, RANI A.

    2014-01-01

    Background and aims: Compulsive sexual behavior (CSB) is highly prevalent among men, often co-occurring with psychiatric disorders and traumatic experiences. Psychiatric disorders and trauma are highly prevalent among military veterans, yet there is a paucity of research on CSB among military samples. The aim of this study was to examine the prevalence of and factors associated with CSB among male military veterans. Methods: Surveys were administered to veterans of Operations Iraqi Freedom, Enduring Freedom, or New Dawn at baseline (n = 258), 3 months (n = 194), and 6 months (n = 136). Bivariate analyses and Generalized Estimating Equations were utilized to estimate associations between CSB and the following variables: psychiatric co-morbidity, childhood physical or sexual trauma, pre- and post-deployment experiences, TV/ Internet usage, and sociodemographics. Associations between CSB and specific PTSD symptom clusters were also examined. Results: CSB was reported by 16.7% of the sample at baseline. Several variables were associated with CSB in bivariate analyses; however, only PTSD severity, childhood sexual trauma, and age remained significant in multivariable GEE models. The PTSD symptom cluster re-experiencing was most strongly associated with CSB. Discussion: This exploratory study suggests that CSB is prevalent amongst veterans returning from combat and is associated with childhood trauma and PTSD, particularly re-experiencing. Conclusions: Further study is needed to identify the mechanisms linking PTSD and CSB, define the context and severity of CSB in veterans, and examine the best ways to assess and treat CSB in VA clinical settings. PMID:25592306

  15. Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli strains are highly prevalent in Ugandan piggeries but disease outbreaks are masked by antibiotic prophylaxis.

    PubMed

    Okello, Emmanuel; Moonens, Kristof; Erume, Joseph; De Greve, Henri

    2015-01-01

    Post-weaning diarrhea (PWD) caused by enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) is an important disease of newly weaned piglets. ETEC strains commonly express F4 and/or F18 fimbriae that attach to carbohydrate receptors present on the intestinal epithelium during colonization. The disease status in the Ugandan piggeries had previously not been studied. In this cross-sectional sero-survey and clinical outbreak monitoring, we found very high sero-prevalence levels of both anti-F4 (70.5%) and anti-F18 (73.7%) antibodies, despite limited cases of clinical outbreaks. Strains isolated from these cases were typically F18(+) ETEC. High antibiotic resistance and multi-drug resistance were characteristics of the isolates, with highest resistance level of over 95% to commonly used antibiotics such as penicillin and tetracycline. We conclude that ETEC infections are widely spread on farms in Central Uganda but clinical disease outbreaks were masked by the management practices on these farms, like the use of extensive antibiotic prophylaxis. PMID:25311441

  16. A systematic review of the incidence and prevalence of autoimmune disease in multiple sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Reider, Nadia; Cohen, Jeffrey; Stuve, Olaf; Sorensen, Per S; Cutter, Gary; Reingold, Stephen C; Trojano, Maria

    2015-01-01

    Background: As new therapies emerge which increase the risk of autoimmune disease it is increasingly important to understand the incidence of autoimmune disease in multiple sclerosis (MS). Objective: The purpose of this review is to estimate the incidence and prevalence of comorbid autoimmune disease in MS. Methods: The PUBMED, EMBASE, SCOPUS and Web of Knowledge databases, conference proceedings, and reference lists of retrieved articles were searched, and abstracts were independently screened by two reviewers. The data were abstracted by one reviewer using a standardized data collection form, and the findings were verified by a second reviewer. We assessed quality of the included studies using a standardized approach and conducted meta-analyses of population-based studies. Results: Sixty-one articles met the inclusion criteria. We observed substantial heterogeneity with respect to the populations studied, methods of ascertaining comorbidity, and reporting of findings. Based solely on population-based studies, the most prevalent autoimmune comorbidities were psoriasis (7.74%) and thyroid disease (6.44%). Our findings also suggest an increased risk of inflammatory bowel disease, likely uveitis and possibly pemphigoid. Conclusion: Fewer than half of the studies identified were of high quality. Population-based studies that report age, sex and ethnicity-specific estimates of incidence and prevalence are needed in jurisdictions worldwide. PMID:25533299

  17. Cardiovascular disease in spinal cord injury: an overview of prevalence, risk, evaluation, and management.

    PubMed

    Myers, Jonathan; Lee, Matthew; Kiratli, Jenny

    2007-02-01

    Cardiovascular disease is a growing concern for the spinal cord-injured (SCI) population. For long-term SCI, morbidity and mortality from cardiovascular causes now exceeds that caused by renal and pulmonary conditions, the primary causes of mortality in previous decades. Although risk estimates commonly used for ambulatory individuals have not been established from follow-up studies in SCI, nearly all risk factors tend to be more prevalent in SCI subjects compared with ambulatory subjects. These risks include a greater prevalence of obesity, lipid disorders, metabolic syndrome, and diabetes. Daily energy expenditure is significantly lower in SCI individuals, not only because of a lack of motor function, but also because of a lack of accessibility and fewer opportunities to engage in physical activity. Autonomic dysfunction caused by SCI is also associated with several conditions that contribute to heightened cardiovascular risk, including abnormalities in blood pressure, heart rate variability, arrhythmias, and a blunted cardiovascular response to exercise that can limit the capacity to perform physical activity. Thus, screening, recognition, and treatment of cardiovascular disease should be an essential component of managing individuals with SCI, and judicious treatment of risk factors can play an important role in minimizing the incidence of cardiovascular disease in these individuals. This article reviews the cardiovascular consequences of chronic SCI, including the prevalence of cardiovascular disease and risk factors unique to these individuals, and provides a synopsis of management of cardiovascular disease in this population.

  18. Prevalence of clinical findings at examinations of young Swedish warmblood riding horses

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Soundness of an individual horse is important for animal welfare and owner economy. However, knowledge of health status in normal horse populations is limited due to lack of systematic health recordings. The aim of the investigation was to study the prevalence of veterinary clinical findings in 4-5-year-old Swedish warmblood riding horses, and their influence on overall health scores, where associations to future longevity has been indicated. Results The prevalence of clinical findings in 8,281 horses examined during 1983–2005 was studied according to a standardised protocol and related to overall health scores in linear statistical models. Effects of sex, age, examination event and changes over time were included. In total, 49% of the horses had clinical findings of medical health (MED), 42% in hooves (HOOF) and 74% of palpatory orthopaedic health (PALP). However, only 6%, 3% and 24% had moderate or severe findings, of MED, HOOF and PALP, respectively. Flexion test reactions were reported in 21% of the horses (5% moderate/severe), heavily influencing the overall score (H2). One fifth of these horses also had findings of unprovoked lameness while 83% had PALP findings (44% with moderate/severe findings). Acute clinical signs, i.e. heat or soreness, had a large influence on the H2 score but were rare, whereas more common clinical findings had smaller effects on overall health. Large variations in recorded health results were observed among events. A decrease in findings has occurred since 1983, in particular for PALP findings. Conclusions Results of occurrence and relevance of evaluated clinical findings could be used for advice on preventive actions to keep horses sound, and possibly for benchmarking, and genetic evaluation of health traits. The distinct effect of event on recorded clinical findings emphasises that further harmonisation of veterinary examinations are desirable. PMID:23597257

  19. The Prevalence of Clinical and Electrocardiographic Risk Factors of Cardiovascular Death among On-Duty Professional Firefighters

    PubMed Central

    Al-Zaiti, Salah S.; Carey, Mary G.

    2014-01-01

    Background Firefighters have twice as many cardiovascular deaths as police officers and four times as many as emergency medical responders. The etiology for this high prevalence remains unknown. The electrocardiogram (ECG) is a widely used tool to screen populations at risk, but yet there are no available on-duty, high-resolution electrocardiographic (ECG) recordings. Objective We sought to evaluate the prevalence of clinical and ECG risk factors among on-duty professional firefighters during 12-lead ECG holter monitoring and exercise stress testing. Methods Firefighters were recruited from Surveying and Assessing Firefighters Fitness and ECG (SAFFE) study. This descriptive study recruited firefighters from 7 firehouses across Western New York area, who all completed on-duty, 24-hour Holter ECG monitoring and a standard exercise stress test. All analyses were completed by a reviewer blinded to all clinical data. Results 112 firefighters (age 44±8 years, mostly white males) completed the study. Even though all firefighters were in normal sinus rhythm, over half of them had at least one high risk ECG risk factor present, including abnormal sympathetic tone (elevated heart rate, 54%), abnormal repolarization (wide QRS-T angle, 25%), myocardial scaring (fragmented QRS, 24%), and myocardial ischemia (ST depression, 24%). In addition, most firefighters tolerated the treadmill exercise stress test well (metabolic equivalent tasks 11.8+2.5), however, almost one third had abnormal stress tests that require further evaluation to rule out subclinical coronary artery disease. Conclusion Among on-duty professional firefighters, high risk ECG markers of fatal cardiac events and abnormal stress test results that warrant further evaluation are prevalent. Annual physical checkups with routine 12-lead ECG can identify those who might benefit from preventive cardiovascular services. PMID:24874885

  20. Asymptomatic pulmonary embolism in lung cancer: prevalence and analysis of clinical and radiological characteristics in 141 outpatients.

    PubMed

    Tiseo, Marcello; Bersanelli, Melissa; Pesenti Barili, Matteo; Bartolotti, Marco; De Luca, Giovanni; Gelsomino, Francesco; Camisa, Roberta; Cademartiri, Filippo; Ardizzoni, Andrea

    2012-01-01

    Aims and background. The incidence of asymptomatic pulmonary embolism in cancer patients is unknown and strictly related to the imaging used for tumor assessment. Recent findings suggest a similar clinical outcome of asymptomatic pulmonary embolism events compared to symptomatic events with a significant impact on survival. The aim of the present study was to determine the prevalence of asymptomatic pulmonary embolism in a population of lung cancer outpatients and to investigate its clinical features. Methods. Outpatients with a diagnosis of lung carcinoma undergoing chemotherapy were selected from October 2006 to June 2009. Disease and patient characteristics, risk factors and treatment modalities were collected. All the computed tomography images performed for each patient during the study period were retrospectively reviewed to identify pulmonary embolism. Results. A total of 141 consecutive patients were included and 657 computed tomography scans were completely reviewed (from two to six consecutive scans for each patient). Asymptomatic pulmonary embolism in the study population had a prevalence of 14.9% (21 patients). Most of the events occurred in patients with adenocarcinoma, advanced stage and poor performance status, during the early phases of first-line chemotherapy or at the same time of the cancer diagnosis. Compared with the symptomatic pulmonary embolism events (5 patients), asymptomatic events occurred earlier (time from cancer diagnosis to pulmonary embolism of 3.5 [95% CI, 2.0-4.9] versus 12.1 months [95% CI, 6.3-17.9; P = 0.02]) and had a better prognosis (survival from PE of 7.5 [95% CI, 3.4-11.6] versus 1.9 months [95% CI, 0-3.9; P = 0.04]). Conclusions. Our findings indicate an underestimation of embolic events among lung cancer outpatients due to their frequent asymptomatic natur. Such a high prevalence suggests the importance to pay more attention to pulmonary embolism prevention in this population. PMID:23235754

  1. Prevalence of Metabolic Syndrome in Psoriasis Patients and its Relation to Disease Duration: A Hospital Based Case-Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Praveenkumar, Udayakumar; Ganguly, Satyaki; Nanda, Sunil Kumar; Kuruvila, Sheela

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Previous studies indicate a higher prevalence of metabolic syndrome in psoriatic patients. This study aimed to investigate the association of metabolic syndrome and its components with psoriasis. It also studied the relation between presence of metabolic syndrome and disease duration in psoriasis patients. Materials and Methods This was a hospital-based, case-control study conducted with 30 clinically diagnosed patients of chronic plaque psoriasis and 30 age- and sex-matched control subjects. Height, weight, BMI, blood pressure and waist circumference were assessed in all the subjects. Fasting levels of serum glucose, serum triglycerides and serum HDL were estimated by automated clinical chemistry analyser. Metabolic syndrome was diagnosed by the presence of at least 3 criteria of NCEP ATP III with Asian modification for waist circumference. Results Metabolic syndrome was more common in psoriatic patients than in controls but the difference was statistically insignificant (60% vs. 40%, p-value=0.12). The psoriasis group had a higher prevalence of elevated blood glucose levels and higher waist circumference compared to controls. Psoriasis patients had a higher prevalence of high triglyceride levels than controls, the difference being statistically insignificant (40% vs. 30%, p-value = 0.41). The prevalence of low HDL levels was significantly higher in cases compared to controls (86.7% vs. 60%, p-value = 0.02). There was no relation between presence of metabolic syndrome and duration of psoriasis. Conclusion Our findings suggest that metabolic syndrome as well as dyslipidaemia is commoner in psoriasis patients. This underlines the need for screening of all psoriasis patients for early diagnosis and treatment of associated metabolic syndrome to reduce the high burden of morbidity and mortality. PMID:27042565

  2. Lung hyperinflation in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: mechanisms, clinical implications and treatment.

    PubMed

    Langer, Daniel; Ciavaglia, Casey E; Neder, J Alberto; Webb, Katherine A; O'Donnell, Denis E

    2014-12-01

    Lung hyperinflation is highly prevalent in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and occurs across the continuum of the disease. A growing body of evidence suggests that lung hyperinflation contributes to dyspnea and activity limitation in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and is an important independent risk factor for mortality. In this review, we will summarize the recent literature on pathogenesis and clinical implications of lung hyperinflation. We will outline the contribution of lung hyperinflation to exercise limitation and discuss its impact on symptoms and physical activity. Finally, we will examine the physiological rationale and efficacy of selected pharmacological and non-pharmacological 'lung deflating' interventions aimed at improving symptoms and physical functioning.

  3. Diabetes mellitus increases the prevalence of anemia in patients with chronic kidney disease: A nested case-control study

    PubMed Central

    Loutradis, Charalampos; Skodra, Alexandra; Georgianos, Panagiotis; Tolika, Panagiota; Alexandrou, Dimitris; Avdelidou, Afroditi; Sarafidis, Pantelis A

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To compare anemia prevalence between matched chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients with and without diabetes mellitus (DM) and to assess factors associated with anemia development. METHODS: This is a nested case-control study of 184 type-2 diabetic and 184 non-diabetic CKD patients from a prospectively assembled database of a Nephrology outpatient clinic, matched for gender, age and estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR). Prevalence of anemia (hemoglobin: Men: < 13 g/dL, women: < 12 g/dL and/or use of recombinant erythropoietin) was examined in comparison, in the total population and by CKD Stage. Univariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses were conducted to identify factors associated with anemia. RESULTS: The total prevalence of anemia was higher in diabetics (47.8% vs 33.2%, P = 0.004). Accordingly, prevalence was higher in diabetics in CKD Stage 3 (53.5% vs 33.1%, P < 0.001) and particularly in Stage 3a (60.4% vs 26.4%, P < 0.001), whereas it was non-significantly higher in Stage 4 (61.3% vs 48.4%; P = 0.307). Serum ferritin was higher in diabetics in total and in CKD stages, while serum iron was similar between groups. In multivariate analyses, DM (OR = 2.206, 95%CI: 1.196-4.069), CKD Stages 3a, 3b, 4 (Stage 4: OR = 12.169, 95%CI: 3.783-39.147) and serum iron (OR = 0.976, 95%CI: 0.968-0.985 per mg/dL increase) were independently associated with anemia. CONCLUSION: Prevalence of anemia progressively increases with advancing stages of CKD and is higher in diabetic than matched non-diabetic CKD patients and diabetes is independently associated with anemia occurrence. Detection and treatment of anemia in diabetic CKD patients should be performed earlier than non-diabetic counterparts. PMID:27458564

  4. Prevalence of neuropathic features of back pain in clinical populations: implications for the diagnostic triage paradigm.

    PubMed

    Hush, Julia M; Marcuzzi, Anna

    2012-07-01

    SUMMARY Contemporary clinical assessment of back pain is based on the diagnostic triage paradigm. The most common diagnostic classification is nonspecific back pain, considered to be of nociceptive etiology. A small proportion are diagnosed with radicular pain, of neuropathic origin. In this study we review the body of literature on the prevalence of neuropathic features of back pain, revealing that the point prevalence is 17% in primary care, 34% in mixed clinical settings and 53% in tertiary care. There is evidence that neuropathic features of back pain are not restricted to typical clinical radicular pain phenotypes and may be under-recognized, particularly in primary care. The consequence of this is that in the clinic, diagnostic triage may erroneously classify patients with nonspecific back pain or radicular pain. A promising alternative is the development of mechanism-based pain phenotyping in patients with back pain. Timely identification of contributory pain mechanisms may enable greater opportunity to select appropriate therapeutic targets and improve patient outcomes.

  5. Prevalence and correlates of cannabis use in an outpatient VA posttraumatic stress disorder clinic.

    PubMed

    Gentes, Emily L; Schry, Amie R; Hicks, Terrell A; Clancy, Carolina P; Collie, Claire F; Kirby, Angela C; Dennis, Michelle F; Hertzberg, Michael A; Beckham, Jean C; Calhoun, Patrick S

    2016-05-01

    Recent research has documented high rates of comorbidity between cannabis use disorders and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) in veterans. However, despite possible links between PTSD and cannabis use, relatively little is known about cannabis use in veterans who present for PTSD treatment, particularly among samples not diagnosed with a substance use disorder. This study examined the prevalence of cannabis use and the psychological and functional correlates of cannabis use among a large sample of veterans seeking treatment at a Veterans Affairs (VA) PTSD specialty clinic. Male veterans (N = 719) who presented at a VA specialty outpatient PTSD clinic completed measures of demographic variables, combat exposure, alcohol, cannabis and other drug use, and PTSD and depressive symptoms. The associations among demographic, psychological, and functional variables were estimated using logistic regressions. Overall, 14.6% of participants reported using cannabis in the past 6 months. After controlling for age, race, service era, and combat exposure, past 6-month cannabis use was associated with unmarried status, use of tobacco products, other drug use, hazardous alcohol use, PTSD severity, depressive symptom severity, and suicidality. The present findings show that cannabis use is quite prevalent among veterans seeking PTSD specialty treatment and is associated with poorer mental health and use of other substances. It may be possible to identify and treat individuals who use cannabis in specialty clinics (e.g., PTSD clinics) where they are likely to present for treatment of associated mental health issues. (PsycINFO Database Record PMID:27214172

  6. Prevalence and correlates of cannabis use in an outpatient VA posttraumatic stress disorder clinic.

    PubMed

    Gentes, Emily L; Schry, Amie R; Hicks, Terrell A; Clancy, Carolina P; Collie, Claire F; Kirby, Angela C; Dennis, Michelle F; Hertzberg, Michael A; Beckham, Jean C; Calhoun, Patrick S

    2016-05-01

    Recent research has documented high rates of comorbidity between cannabis use disorders and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) in veterans. However, despite possible links between PTSD and cannabis use, relatively little is known about cannabis use in veterans who present for PTSD treatment, particularly among samples not diagnosed with a substance use disorder. This study examined the prevalence of cannabis use and the psychological and functional correlates of cannabis use among a large sample of veterans seeking treatment at a Veterans Affairs (VA) PTSD specialty clinic. Male veterans (N = 719) who presented at a VA specialty outpatient PTSD clinic completed measures of demographic variables, combat exposure, alcohol, cannabis and other drug use, and PTSD and depressive symptoms. The associations among demographic, psychological, and functional variables were estimated using logistic regressions. Overall, 14.6% of participants reported using cannabis in the past 6 months. After controlling for age, race, service era, and combat exposure, past 6-month cannabis use was associated with unmarried status, use of tobacco products, other drug use, hazardous alcohol use, PTSD severity, depressive symptom severity, and suicidality. The present findings show that cannabis use is quite prevalent among veterans seeking PTSD specialty treatment and is associated with poorer mental health and use of other substances. It may be possible to identify and treat individuals who use cannabis in specialty clinics (e.g., PTSD clinics) where they are likely to present for treatment of associated mental health issues. (PsycINFO Database Record

  7. Methodology used in studies reporting chronic kidney disease prevalence: a systematic literature review

    PubMed Central

    Brück, Katharina; Jager, Kitty J.; Dounousi, Evangelia; Kainz, Alexander; Nitsch, Dorothea; Ärnlöv, Johan; Rothenbacher, Dietrich; Browne, Gemma; Capuano, Vincenzo; Ferraro, Pietro Manuel; Ferrieres, Jean; Gambaro, Giovanni; Guessous, Idris; Hallan, Stein; Kastarinen, Mika; Navis, Gerjan; Gonzalez, Alfonso Otero; Palmieri, Luigi; Romundstad, Solfrid; Spoto, Belinda; Stengel, Benedicte; Tomson, Charles; Tripepi, Giovanni; Völzke, Henry; Wiȩcek, Andrzej; Gansevoort, Ron; Schöttker, Ben; Wanner, Christoph; Vinhas, Jose; Zoccali, Carmine; Van Biesen, Wim; Stel, Vianda S.

    2015-01-01

    Background Many publications report the prevalence of chronic kidney disease (CKD) in the general population. Comparisons across studies are hampered as CKD prevalence estimations are influenced by study population characteristics and laboratory methods. Methods For this systematic review, two researchers independently searched PubMed, MEDLINE and EMBASE to identify all original research articles that were published between 1 January 2003 and 1 November 2014 reporting the prevalence of CKD in the European adult general population. Data on study methodology and reporting of CKD prevalence results were independently extracted by two researchers. Results We identified 82 eligible publications and included 48 publications of individual studies for the data extraction. There was considerable variation in population sample selection. The majority of studies did not report the sampling frame used, and the response ranged from 10 to 87%. With regard to the assessment of kidney function, 67% used a Jaffe assay, whereas 13% used the enzymatic assay for creatinine determination. Isotope dilution mass spectrometry calibration was used in 29%. The CKD-EPI (52%) and MDRD (75%) equations were most often used to estimate glomerular filtration rate (GFR). CKD was defined as estimated GFR (eGFR) <60 mL/min/1.73 m2 in 92% of studies. Urinary markers of CKD were assessed in 60% of the studies. CKD prevalence was reported by sex and age strata in 54 and 50% of the studies, respectively. In publications with a primary objective of reporting CKD prevalence, 39% reported a 95% confidence interval. Conclusions The findings from this systematic review showed considerable variation in methods for sampling the general population and assessment of kidney function across studies reporting CKD prevalence. These results are utilized to provide recommendations to help optimize both the design and the reporting of future CKD prevalence studies, which will enhance comparability of study results

  8. Prevalence of human hydatid disease in northwestern Libya: a cross-sectional ultrasound study.

    PubMed

    Shambesh, M K; Macpherson, C N; Beesley, W N; Gusbi, A; Elsonosi, T

    1992-08-01

    A total of 4103 people were screened in an ultrasound survey of the prevalence of hydatid disease (Echinococcus granulosus) in five areas of northwestern Libya; hydatid cysts were seen in 57 (1.4%), an overall prevalence of approximately 2.0% when adjusted for the likelihood of the occurrence of cysts in other sites in the body. All ultrasound-positive cases were confirmed by dot-blot ELISA. The prevalence of hydatid cysts increased with age, and differed between the sexes except in the five to 14 age group. All diagnosed cases, even those with large cysts, were asymptomatic. This study demonstrates the value of ultrasonography for screening field populations for hydatid disease. The technique was well received locally, facilitating the rapid collection of prevalence data from all ages and both sexes. Libyan people keep guard dogs, but there is little direct human:dog contact. Many people own a single dog, invariably kept outside and often chained up. Stray dogs are common, roaming the countryside to scavenge sheep carcases etc., and such dogs could be the main reservoir of E. granulosus in Libya. Because of the minimal direct human:dog contact, transmission of hydatid disease in Libya is probably indirect by ingestion of eggs from contaminated vegetables or drinking water.

  9. Self-reported dysphagia and its correlates within a prevalent population of people with Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Walker, Richard W; Dunn, Janet R; Gray, William K

    2011-03-01

    Many people with Parkinson's disease (PD) experience dysphagia; however, the prevalence of dysphagia in people with PD is unknown. We studied a prevalent population of PD cases. All of those who consented to participate were assessed for anxiety, depression, cognitive function, and quality of life using standard rating scales. Anyone who answered "yes" to either one of the two questions: Do you have difficulty swallowing food/liquid or tablets? and Do you cough after eating/drinking? was considered to have dysphagia. Question 7 of the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS) was also used to identify dysphagia. Of 106 prevalent PD cases, 75 (38 males) patients consented to examination and assessment. The prevalence of dysphagia was 32.0% (n=24; 11 males). Using the response to UPDRS Question 7 as an indicator of the impact of swallowing problems on the patient, there were significant correlations with cognitive function, anxiety, depression, quality of life, and UPDRS-reported gait disturbance, postural instability and problems with falling. There was no correlation with disease duration, age, or gender. Almost one third of the participants reported dysphagia. There was a strong correlation between dysphagia and gross motor skills; patients reporting such problems should be screened for swallowing problems.

  10. Is the Prevalence of Celiac Disease Higher than the General Population in Inflammatory Bowel Diseaese?

    PubMed Central

    Jandaghi, Elahe; Hojatnia, Mona; Vahedi, Homayoon; Shahbaz-Khani, Bijan; Kolahdoozan, Shadi; Ansari, Reza

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND In some studies inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and celiac disease were considered to be associated and some belive that this association may influence the prognosis of IBD. However, there is a cosiderable controversy regarding this association. Therefore ,we aimed to assess the association of these two common digestive diseases and evaluate the complications of this association. METHODS In this comparative study, 200 patients with ulceritive colitis (UC) and 206 patients with Crohn’s disease (CD) were evaluated for celiac disease using relevant diagnostic tests and pathologic studies. Total IgA, IgA tissue transgulaminase antibody and specific IgA anti endomysial antibody were asseyed. In cases of IgA deficiency, total IgG and IgG tissue TG and IgG anti endomyseal Ab were measured. Patients with increased specific IgA and IgG antibodies for celiac disease, underwent endoscopy and 4 standard samples were obtained. Our results were compared with the results of the prevalence study of celiac disease in the general population. Data were analyzed using analytic and descriptive statistics at a significance level of 5%. RESULTS Among the studied patients, 1 patient with UC had elevated IgA anti tTG antibody and IgA anti-endomysial antibody who underwent endoscopy and celiac was confirmed on pathology. Hence, of the 200 patientswith UC, the diagnosis of celiac disease was confirmed in 1 patient (1:200) with no significant difference with the prevalence of celiac disease in the general population (1:166). However, none of our patients with Crohn’s disease had celiac disease (0:206). CONCLUSION We found no significant difference in the prevalence of celiac disease between patients with UC and the general population. Since most of our participants had a mild level of Crohn’s activation, none of those with Crohn’s disease had celiac disease. Complications of IBD including sclerosing cholangitis, may be more common in patients with concurrent celiac disease

  11. Is the Prevalence of Celiac Disease Higher than the General Population in Inflammatory Bowel Diseaese?

    PubMed

    Jandaghi, Elahe; Hojatnia, Mona; Vahedi, Homayoon; Shahbaz-Khani, Bijan; Kolahdoozan, Shadi; Ansari, Reza

    2015-04-01

    BACKGROUND In some studies inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and celiac disease were considered to be associated and some belive that this association may influence the prognosis of IBD. However, there is a cosiderable controversy regarding this association. Therefore ,we aimed to assess the association of these two common digestive diseases and evaluate the complications of this association. METHODS In this comparative study, 200 patients with ulceritive colitis (UC) and 206 patients with Crohn's disease (CD) were evaluated for celiac disease using relevant diagnostic tests and pathologic studies. Total IgA, IgA tissue transgulaminase antibody and specific IgA anti endomysial antibody were asseyed. In cases of IgA deficiency, total IgG and IgG tissue TG and IgG anti endomyseal Ab were measured. Patients with increased specific IgA and IgG antibodies for celiac disease, underwent endoscopy and 4 standard samples were obtained. Our results were compared with the results of the prevalence study of celiac disease in the general population. Data were analyzed using analytic and descriptive statistics at a significance level of 5%. RESULTS Among the studied patients, 1 patient with UC had elevated IgA anti tTG antibody and IgA anti-endomysial antibody who underwent endoscopy and celiac was confirmed on pathology. Hence, of the 200 patientswith UC, the diagnosis of celiac disease was confirmed in 1 patient (1:200) with no significant difference with the prevalence of celiac disease in the general population (1:166). However, none of our patients with Crohn's disease had celiac disease (0:206). CONCLUSION We found no significant difference in the prevalence of celiac disease between patients with UC and the general population. Since most of our participants had a mild level of Crohn's activation, none of those with Crohn's disease had celiac disease. Complications of IBD including sclerosing cholangitis, may be more common in patients with concurrent celiac disease

  12. The prevalence and clinical significance of Chlamydia infection in island and mainland populations of Victorian koalas (Phascolarctos cinereus).

    PubMed

    Patterson, Jade L S; Lynch, Michael; Anderson, Garry A; Noormohammadi, Amir H; Legione, Alistair; Gilkerson, James R; Devlin, Joanne M

    2015-04-01

    Chlamydia infection is known to impact the health of koalas (Phascolarctos cinereus) in New South Wales (NSW) and Queensland, but the clinical significance of Chlamydia infections in Victorian koalas is not well described. We examined the prevalence of Chlamydia infection and assessed associated health parameters in two Victorian koala populations known to be Chlamydia positive. The same testing regimen was applied to a third Victorian population in which Chlamydia had not been detected. We examined 288 koalas and collected samples from the urogenital sinus and conjunctival sacs. Detection and differentiation of Chlamydia species utilized real-time PCR and high-resolution melting curve analysis. Chlamydia pecorum was detected in two populations (prevalences: 25% and 41%, respectively) but only from urogenital sinus swabs. Chlamydia was not detected in the third population. Chlamydia pneumoniae was not detected. Chlamydia pecorum infection was positively associated with wet bottom (indicating chronic urinary tract disease) in one Chlamydia-positive population and with abnormal urogenital ultrasound findings in the other Chlamydia-positive population. The prevalence of wet bottom was similar in all populations (including the Chlamydia-free population), suggesting there is another significant cause (or causes) of wet bottom in Victorian koalas. Ocular disease was not observed. This is the largest study of Chlamydia infection in Victorian koalas, and the results suggest the potential for epidemiologic differences related to Chlamydia infections between Victorian koalas and koalas in Queensland and NSW and also between geographically distinct Victorian populations. Further studies to investigate the genotypes of C. pecorum present in Victorian koalas and to identify additional causes of wet bottom in koalas are indicated. PMID:25588005

  13. The prevalence and clinical significance of Chlamydia infection in island and mainland populations of Victorian koalas (Phascolarctos cinereus).

    PubMed

    Patterson, Jade L S; Lynch, Michael; Anderson, Garry A; Noormohammadi, Amir H; Legione, Alistair; Gilkerson, James R; Devlin, Joanne M

    2015-04-01

    Chlamydia infection is known to impact the health of koalas (Phascolarctos cinereus) in New South Wales (NSW) and Queensland, but the clinical significance of Chlamydia infections in Victorian koalas is not well described. We examined the prevalence of Chlamydia infection and assessed associated health parameters in two Victorian koala populations known to be Chlamydia positive. The same testing regimen was applied to a third Victorian population in which Chlamydia had not been detected. We examined 288 koalas and collected samples from the urogenital sinus and conjunctival sacs. Detection and differentiation of Chlamydia species utilized real-time PCR and high-resolution melting curve analysis. Chlamydia pecorum was detected in two populations (prevalences: 25% and 41%, respectively) but only from urogenital sinus swabs. Chlamydia was not detected in the third population. Chlamydia pneumoniae was not detected. Chlamydia pecorum infection was positively associated with wet bottom (indicating chronic urinary tract disease) in one Chlamydia-positive population and with abnormal urogenital ultrasound findings in the other Chlamydia-positive population. The prevalence of wet bottom was similar in all populations (including the Chlamydia-free population), suggesting there is another significant cause (or causes) of wet bottom in Victorian koalas. Ocular disease was not observed. This is the largest study of Chlamydia infection in Victorian koalas, and the results suggest the potential for epidemiologic differences related to Chlamydia infections between Victorian koalas and koalas in Queensland and NSW and also between geographically distinct Victorian populations. Further studies to investigate the genotypes of C. pecorum present in Victorian koalas and to identify additional causes of wet bottom in koalas are indicated.

  14. Phenobarbitone-induced haematological abnormalities in idiopathic epileptic dogs: prevalence, risk factors, clinical presentation and outcome.

    PubMed

    Bersan, E; Volk, H A; Ros, C; De Risio, L

    2014-09-13

    The aim of this retrospective study was to assess prevalence, risk factors, clinical presentation and outcome of phenobarbitone induced haematological abnormalities (PBIHA) in dogs. The medical records of two veterinary referral institutions were searched for dogs diagnosed with idiopathic epilepsy and treated with PB as monotherapy or polytherapy between March 2003 and September 2010. Sixteen dogs had PBIHA; the median age at diagnosis was 69.5 months. Phenobarbitone was administered at a median dose of 3 mg/kg twice a day for a median period of 100.5 days and the median serum phenobarbitone level was 19 μg/ml. Two dogs had neutropenia, three had anaemia and thrombocytopenia, two had anaemia and neutropenia; the remaining nine had pancytopenia. All dogs were referred for non-specific clinical signs. Phenobarbitone was discontinued after diagnosis, and the median time to resolution of PBIHA was 17 days. The prevalence and risk factors for PBIHA were evaluated from a questionnaire survey of referring practices to obtain more detailed follow-up on cases diagnosed with idiopathic epilepsy. The prevalence rate of PBIHA was 4.2%, and the condition occurred in dogs treated with standard therapeutic doses often within the first three months after starting treatment. Serial haematological evaluations should be therefore considered from the beginning of phenobarbitone therapy to allow early diagnosis and treatment of PBIHA.

  15. Prevalence of Traumatic Dental Injuries in Patients Attending University of Alberta Emergency Clinic

    PubMed Central

    Alkhadra, Thamer; Preshing, William; El-Bialy, Tarek

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: This study evaluated the prevalence of dental trauma for patients attending the emergency dental clinic at the University of Alberta Hospital between 2006-2009. Patients’ examination and treatment charts were reviewed. Methods: Total number of patients’ charts was 1893.The prevalence of different types of trauma was 6.4 % of the total cases (117 patients). Trauma cases were identified according to Ellis classification and as modified by Holland et al., 1988. Results: Logistic statistical model showed that 21.7% were Ellis class I trauma, 16.7% were Ellis class II trauma, and 6.7% were Ellis class III. In addition, 11.7 % presented with avulsion, 7.5 % presented with dentoalveolar fracture and 7.5% presented with sublaxation. Also, 17.55 % presented with tooth displacement within the alveolar bone, 3.3 % presented with crown fracture with no pulp involvement, 4.16 % presented with crown fracture with pulp involvement and 3.3 % presented with root fracture. In conclusion, the general prevalence of dentoalveolar trauma in patients attending the emergency clinic at the University of Alberta is less than other reported percentages in Canada or other countries. PMID:27398104

  16. Research misconduct and data fraud in clinical trials: prevalence and causal factors.

    PubMed

    George, Stephen L

    2016-02-01

    The disclosure of cases of research misconduct in clinical trials, conventionally defined as fabrication, falsification or plagiarism, has been a disturbingly common phenomenon in recent years. Such cases can potentially harm patients enrolled on the trials in question or patients treated based on the results of those trials and can seriously undermine the scientific and public trust in the validity of clinical trial results. Here, I review what is known about the prevalence of research misconduct in general and the contributing or causal factors leading to the misconduct. The evidence on prevalence is unreliable and fraught with definitional problems and with study design issues. Nevertheless, the evidence taken as a whole seems to suggest that cases of the most serious types of misconduct, fabrication and falsification (i.e., data fraud), are relatively rare but that other types of questionable research practices are quite common. There have been many individual, institutional and scientific factors proposed for misconduct but, as is the case with estimates of prevalence, reliable empirical evidence on the strength and relative importance of these factors is lacking. However, it seems clear that the view of misconduct as being simply the result of aberrant or self-delusional personalities likely underestimates the effect of other important factors and inhibits the development of effective prevention strategies. PMID:26289019

  17. Research misconduct and data fraud in clinical trials: prevalence and causal factors.

    PubMed

    George, Stephen L

    2016-02-01

    The disclosure of cases of research misconduct in clinical trials, conventionally defined as fabrication, falsification or plagiarism, has been a disturbingly common phenomenon in recent years. Such cases can potentially harm patients enrolled on the trials in question or patients treated based on the results of those trials and can seriously undermine the scientific and public trust in the validity of clinical trial results. Here, I review what is known about the prevalence of research misconduct in general and the contributing or causal factors leading to the misconduct. The evidence on prevalence is unreliable and fraught with definitional problems and with study design issues. Nevertheless, the evidence taken as a whole seems to suggest that cases of the most serious types of misconduct, fabrication and falsification (i.e., data fraud), are relatively rare but that other types of questionable research practices are quite common. There have been many individual, institutional and scientific factors proposed for misconduct but, as is the case with estimates of prevalence, reliable empirical evidence on the strength and relative importance of these factors is lacking. However, it seems clear that the view of misconduct as being simply the result of aberrant or self-delusional personalities likely underestimates the effect of other important factors and inhibits the development of effective prevention strategies.

  18. Lifetime Obesity in Patients with Eating Disorders: Increasing Prevalence, Clinical and Personality Correlates

    PubMed Central

    Villarejo, Cynthia; Fernández-Aranda, Fernando; Jiménez-Murcia, Susana; Peñas-Lledó, Eva; Granero, Roser; Penelo, Eva; Tinahones, Francisco J; Sancho, Carolina; Vilarrasa, Nuria; Montserrat-Gil de Bernabé, Mónica; Casanueva, Felipe F; Fernández-Real, Jose Manuel; Frühbeck, Gema; De la Torre, Rafael; Treasure, Janet; Botella, Cristina; Menchón, José Manuel

    2012-01-01

    Objectives : The aims of our study were to examine the lifetime prevalence of obesity rate in eating disorders (ED) subtypes and to examine whether there have been temporal changes among the last 10 years and to explore clinical differences between ED with and without lifetime obesity. Methods : Participants were 1383 ED female patients (DSM-IV criteria) consecutively admitted, between 2001 and 2010, to Bellvitge University Hospital. They were assessed by means of the Eating Disorders Inventory-2, the Symptom Checklist-90—Revised, the Bulimic Investigatory Test Edinburgh and the Temperament and Character Inventory—Revised. Results : The prevalence of lifetime obesity in ED cases was 28.8% (ranging from 5% in anorexia nervosa to 87% in binge-eating disorders). Over the last 10 years, there has been a threefold increase in lifetime obesity in ED patients (p < .001). People with an ED and obesity had higher levels of childhood and family obesity (p < .001), a later age of onset and longer ED duration; and had higher levels of eating, general and personality symptomatology. Conclusions : Over the last 10 years, the prevalence of obesity associated with disorders characterized by the presence of binge episodes, namely bulimic disorders, is increasing, and this is linked with greater clinical severity and a poorer prognosis. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd and Eating Disorders Association. PMID:22383308

  19. Prevalence of coronary artery disease in patients with isolated aortic valve stenosis.

    PubMed Central

    Exadactylos, N; Sugrue, D D; Oakley, C M

    1984-01-01

    The prevalence of significant coronary artery disease (reduction in luminal diameter by more than 50%) among 88 consecutive patients with aortic stenosis requiring aortic valve replacement at Hammersmith Hospital was examined. Twenty two (34%) patients had significant coronary disease. Nineteen of 42 (45%) patients with typical angina had coronary disease; three of 20 (15%) patients with atypical chest pain had coronary disease, while none of 26 patients free of chest pain had significant coronary disease. Risk factors for coronary disease were equally distributed among patients with and without significant luminal obstruction. Because of the small, but definite, hazard of coronary arteriography and in the interest of cost containment it is suggested that patients with aortic stenosis who are free of chest pain do not require routine coronary arteriography. This applies particularly to patients requiring urgent aortic valve replacement. PMID:6691863

  20. Prevalence of chronic kidney disease in diabetic adult out-patients in Tanzania.

    PubMed

    Mpondo, Bonaventura C T; Neilson, Eric; Ernest, Alex

    2016-01-01

    Despite the increasing number of patients with Diabetes Mellitus in sub-Saharan Africa, the magnitude of chronic kidney disease among diabetics has not been well established. A study done by Janmohamed et al. found chronic kidney disease in 83.7 % of diabetics which is relatively higher than the prevalence reported elsewhere. However this study was conducted in schistosoma endemic area along the shores of Lake Victoria. Schistosomiasis has been reported to cause a range of renal diseases. Interpretation of these findings should therefore take into account the possibility of schistosomiasis as a possible confounder. PMID:27391318

  1. Declines in large wildlife increase landscape-level prevalence of rodent-borne disease in Africa.

    PubMed

    Young, Hillary S; Dirzo, Rodolfo; Helgen, Kristofer M; McCauley, Douglas J; Billeter, Sarah A; Kosoy, Michael Y; Osikowicz, Lynn M; Salkeld, Daniel J; Young, Truman P; Dittmar, Katharina

    2014-05-13

    Populations of large wildlife are declining on local and global scales. The impacts of this pulse of size-selective defaunation include cascading changes to smaller animals, particularly rodents, and alteration of many ecosystem processes and services, potentially involving changes to prevalence and transmission of zoonotic disease. Understanding linkages between biodiversity loss and zoonotic disease is important for both public health and nature conservation programs, and has been a source of much recent scientific debate. In the case of rodent-borne zoonoses, there is strong conceptual support, but limited empirical evidence, for the hypothesis that defaunation, the loss of large wildlife, increases zoonotic disease risk by directly or indirectly releasing controls on rodent density. We tested this hypothesis by experimentally excluding large wildlife from a savanna ecosystem in East Africa, and examining changes in prevalence and abundance of Bartonella spp. infection in rodents and their flea vectors. We found no effect of wildlife removal on per capita prevalence of Bartonella infection in either rodents or fleas. However, because rodent and, consequently, flea abundance doubled following experimental defaunation, the density of infected hosts and infected fleas was roughly twofold higher in sites where large wildlife was absent. Thus, defaunation represents an elevated risk in Bartonella transmission to humans (bartonellosis). Our results (i) provide experimental evidence of large wildlife defaunation increasing landscape-level disease prevalence, (ii) highlight the importance of susceptible host regulation pathways and host/vector density responses in biodiversity-disease relationships, and (iii) suggest that rodent-borne disease responses to large wildlife loss may represent an important context where this relationship is largely negative.

  2. Declines in large wildlife increase landscape-level prevalence of rodent-borne disease in Africa

    PubMed Central

    Young, Hillary S.; Dirzo, Rodolfo; Helgen, Kristofer M.; McCauley, Douglas J.; Kosoy, Michael Y.; Osikowicz, Lynn M.; Salkeld, Daniel J.; Young, Truman P.; Dittmar, Katharina

    2014-01-01

    Populations of large wildlife are declining on local and global scales. The impacts of this pulse of size-selective defaunation include cascading changes to smaller animals, particularly rodents, and alteration of many ecosystem processes and services, potentially involving changes to prevalence and transmission of zoonotic disease. Understanding linkages between biodiversity loss and zoonotic disease is important for both public health and nature conservation programs, and has been a source of much recent scientific debate. In the case of rodent-borne zoonoses, there is strong conceptual support, but limited empirical evidence, for the hypothesis that defaunation, the loss of large wildlife, increases zoonotic disease risk by directly or indirectly releasing controls on rodent density. We tested this hypothesis by experimentally excluding large wildlife from a savanna ecosystem in East Africa, and examining changes in prevalence and abundance of Bartonella spp. infection in rodents and their flea vectors. We found no effect of wildlife removal on per capita prevalence of Bartonella infection in either rodents or fleas. However, because rodent and, consequently, flea abundance doubled following experimental defaunation, the density of infected hosts and infected fleas was roughly twofold higher in sites where large wildlife was absent. Thus, defaunation represents an elevated risk in Bartonella transmission to humans (bartonellosis). Our results (i) provide experimental evidence of large wildlife defaunation increasing landscape-level disease prevalence, (ii) highlight the importance of susceptible host regulation pathways and host/vector density responses in biodiversity–disease relationships, and (iii) suggest that rodent-borne disease responses to large wildlife loss may represent an important context where this relationship is largely negative. PMID:24778215

  3. A clinical survey on the prevalence and types of cheek teeth disorders present in 400 Zamorano-Leonés and 400 Mirandês donkeys (Equus asinus).

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, J B; Dixon, P M; Bastos, E; San Roman, F; Viegas, C

    2013-12-14

    Dental disease is now recognised as a major but often unrecognised disorder of equids, including horses and donkeys. However, very few large clinical studies have documented the prevalence and type of dental disease present in different equid populations and no dental studies have been reported in Zamorano-Leonés or Mirandês donkeys, two endangered donkey breeds. Clinical and detailed oral examinations were performed in 400 Mirandês and 400 Zamorano-Leonés donkeys in Portugal and Spain. It was found that just 4.5 per cent had ever received any previous dental care. Cheek teeth (CT) disorders were present in 82.8 per cent of these donkeys, ranging from a prevalence of 29.6 per cent in the <2.5-year-old group to 100 per cent in the >25-year-old group. These CT disorders included enamel overgrowths (73.1 per cent prevalence but with just 6.3 per cent having associated soft tissue injuries), focal overgrowths (37.3 per cent), periodontal disease (23.5 per cent) and diastemata (19.9 per cent). Peripheral caries was present in 5.9 per cent of cases, but inexplicably, infundibular caries was very rare (1.3 per cent prevalence); this may have been due to their almost fully foraged diet. The high prevalence of enamel overgrowths in these donkeys, most which never received concentrates, also raises questions about the aetiology of this disorder. This very high prevalence of CT disorders, especially in older donkeys, was of great welfare concern in some cases and emphasises the need for routine dental care in these cases on welfare grounds and in order to help preserve these unique breeds.

  4. Prevalence and Phylogenetic Analysis of Human Bocaviruses 1-4 in Pediatric Patients with Various Infectious Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Min; Zhu, Runan; Qian, Yuan; Deng, Jie; Wang, Fang; Sun, Yu; Dong, Huijin; Liu, Liying; Jia, Liping; Zhao, Linqing

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Viral infections caused by human bocaviruses 1–4 (HBoV1-4) are more complicated than previously believed. A retrospective, large-scale study was undertaken to explore the prevalence of HBoV1-4 in pediatric patients with various infectious diseases and delineate their phylogenetic characteristics. Methods Clinical samples from four specimen types, including 4,941 respiratory, 2,239 cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), 2,619 serum, and 1,121 fecal specimens, collected from pediatric patients with various infectious diseases were screened for HBoV1-4. A 690-nt fragment in each specimen was then amplified and sequenced for phylogenetic analysis. Clinical characteristics of HBoV-positive patients with different specimen types available were evaluated. Results Approximately 1.2% of patients were confirmed as HBoV-positive, with the highest positive rate in patients with gastrointestinal infection (2.2%), followed by respiratory (1.65%), central nervous system (0.8%), and hematological infections (0.2%). A single genetic lineage of HBoV1 circulated among children over the 8-year period, while a new cluster of HBoV2, via intra-genotype recombination between HBoV2A and HBoV2B, was prevalent. Some patients had HBoV1-positive respiratory and serum specimens or fecal specimens. Several cases became HBoV1-positive following the appearance of respiratory infection, while several cases were positive for HBoV2 only in CSF and serum specimens, rather than respiratory specimens. Conclusions A single genetic lineage of HBoV1 is speculated as a viral pathogen of respiratory infection and causes both comorbid infection and acute gastroenteritis. Additionally, a new cluster of HBoV2 is prevalent in China, which may infect the host through sites other than the respiratory tract. PMID:27490242

  5. Gut Microbiota and Clinical Disease: Obesity and Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease

    PubMed Central

    Seo, Ji Hyun; Youn, Hee-Shang

    2013-01-01

    The prevalence of obesity is increasing worldwide. Obesity can cause hyperlipidemia, hypertension, cardiovascular diseases, metabolic syndrome and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). Many environmental or genetic factors have been suggested to contribute to the development of obesity, but there is no satisfactory explanation for its increased prevalence. This review discusses the latest updates on the role of the gut microbiota in obesity and NAFLD. PMID:24010102

  6. Prevalence and clinical features associated with bipolar disorder polypharmacy: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Fornaro, Michele; De Berardis, Domenico; Koshy, Ann Sarah; Perna, Giampaolo; Valchera, Alessandro; Vancampfort, Davy; Stubbs, Brendon

    2016-01-01

    Background Uncertainty exists regarding the prevalence and clinical features associated with the practice of polypharmacy in bipolar disorder (BD), warranting a systematic review on the matter. Methods Three authors independently searched major electronic databases from inception till September 2015. Articles were included that reported either qualitative or quantitative data about the prevalence and clinical features associated with polypharmacy in adult cases of BD. Results The operative definitions of polypharmacy adopted across varying studies varied, with concomitant use of two or more psychotropic medications or use of four or more psychotropic medications at once being the most common and the most reliable, respectively. Regardless of type or current mood episode polarity of BD, prevalence rates up to 85% and 36% were found using the most permissive (two or more medications at once) and the most conservative (four or more) operative definitions for polypharmacy, respectively. Point prevalence prescription rates of one or more antidepressant or antipsychotic as part of a polypharmacy regimen occurred in up to 45% or 80% of the cases, respectively, according to the most permissive definition of polypharmacy. In contrast, lithium prescription rates ranged from 13% to 33% in BD patients receiving polypharmacy according to conservative and permissive definitions, possibly suggesting a reduced need for augmentation of combination strategies for those cases of BD with a favorable lifetime lithium response and/or long-lasting treatment as well as less likelihood of lithium response over the time most severe cases possibly exposed to a more complex polypharmacy overall. Limitations “Apples and oranges” bias; publication bias for most recently introduced compounds. Conclusion Polypharmacy is common among people with BD across varying type and mood episode phases of illness. Special population, including BD patients at high risk of familial load for suicidal

  7. [The prevalence of behavioral risk factors and diseases of blood circulation system].

    PubMed

    Maximova, T M; Belov, V B; Lushkina, N P

    2014-01-01

    The article is based on the data of "The study on global aging and adult health" (SAGE), a WHO international project carried out in 2007-2010. The sampling included respondents aged from 50 to 79 years old. The analysis covered such behavioral risk factors as tobacco smoking, physical activity, fruits consumption, etc. The results of measurement of blood pressure, body weight and body height were included into analysis. The prevalence of hypertension, angina pectoris and stroke was estimated The characteristics of prevalence of behavioral risk factors and types of their combination were established. The conclusion is made that in conditions of different status area and various degrees of physical exercises there is no possibility to make definite conclusion about real level of prevalence of diseases of blood circulation system in aged population.

  8. Farming behaviour of reef fishes increases the prevalence of coral disease associated microbes and black band disease

    PubMed Central

    Casey, Jordan M.; Ainsworth, Tracy D.; Choat, J. Howard; Connolly, Sean R.

    2014-01-01

    Microbial community structure on coral reefs is strongly influenced by coral–algae interactions; however, the extent to which this influence is mediated by fishes is unknown. By excluding fleshy macroalgae, cultivating palatable filamentous algae and engaging in frequent aggression to protect resources, territorial damselfish (f. Pomacentridae), such as Stegastes, mediate macro-benthic dynamics on coral reefs and may significantly influence microbial communities. To elucidate how Stegastes apicalis and Stegastes nigricans may alter benthic microbial assemblages and coral health, we determined the benthic community composition (epilithic algal matrix and prokaryotes) and coral disease prevalence inside and outside of damselfish territories in the Great Barrier Reef, Australia. 16S rDNA sequencing revealed distinct bacterial communities associated with turf algae and a two to three times greater relative abundance of phylotypes with high sequence similarity to potential coral pathogens inside Stegastes's territories. These potentially pathogenic phylotypes (totalling 30.04% of the community) were found to have high sequence similarity to those amplified from black band disease (BBD) and disease affected corals worldwide. Disease surveys further revealed a significantly higher occurrence of BBD inside S. nigricans's territories. These findings demonstrate the first link between fish behaviour, reservoirs of potential coral disease pathogens and the prevalence of coral disease. PMID:24966320

  9. Farming behaviour of reef fishes increases the prevalence of coral disease associated microbes and black band disease.

    PubMed

    Casey, Jordan M; Ainsworth, Tracy D; Choat, J Howard; Connolly, Sean R

    2014-08-01

    Microbial community structure on coral reefs is strongly influenced by coral-algae interactions; however, the extent to which this influence is mediated by fishes is unknown. By excluding fleshy macroalgae, cultivating palatable filamentous algae and engaging in frequent aggression to protect resources, territorial damselfish (f. Pomacentridae), such as Stegastes, mediate macro-benthic dynamics on coral reefs and may significantly influence microbial communities. To elucidate how Stegastes apicalis and Stegastes nigricans may alter benthic microbial assemblages and coral health, we determined the benthic community composition (epilithic algal matrix and prokaryotes) and coral disease prevalence inside and outside of damselfish territories in the Great Barrier Reef, Australia. 16S rDNA sequencing revealed distinct bacterial communities associated with turf algae and a two to three times greater relative abundance of phylotypes with high sequence similarity to potential coral pathogens inside Stegastes's territories. These potentially pathogenic phylotypes (totalling 30.04% of the community) were found to have high sequence similarity to those amplified from black band disease (BBD) and disease affected corals worldwide. Disease surveys further revealed a significantly higher occurrence of BBD inside S. nigricans's territories. These findings demonstrate the first link between fish behaviour, reservoirs of potential coral disease pathogens and the prevalence of coral disease.

  10. The behavioural/dysexecutive variant of Alzheimer's disease: clinical, neuroimaging and pathological features.

    PubMed

    Ossenkoppele, Rik; Pijnenburg, Yolande A L; Perry, David C; Cohn-Sheehy, Brendan I; Scheltens, Nienke M E; Vogel, Jacob W; Kramer, Joel H; van der Vlies, Annelies E; La Joie, Renaud; Rosen, Howard J; van der Flier, Wiesje M; Grinberg, Lea T; Rozemuller, Annemieke J; Huang, Eric J; van Berckel, Bart N M; Miller, Bruce L; Barkhof, Frederik; Jagust, William J; Scheltens, Philip; Seeley, William W; Rabinovici, Gil D

    2015-09-01

    A 'frontal variant of Alzheimer's disease' has been described in patients with predominant behavioural or dysexecutive deficits caused by Alzheimer's disease pathology. The description of this rare Alzheimer's disease phenotype has been limited to case reports and small series, and many clinical, neuroimaging and neuropathological characteristics are not well understood. In this retrospective study, we included 55 patients with Alzheimer's disease with a behavioural-predominant presentation (behavioural Alzheimer's disease) and a neuropathological diagnosis of high-likelihood Alzheimer's disease (n = 17) and/or biomarker evidence of Alzheimer's disease pathology (n = 44). In addition, we included 29 patients with autopsy/biomarker-defined Alzheimer's disease with a dysexecutive-predominant syndrome (dysexecutive Alzheimer's disease). We performed structured chart reviews to ascertain clinical features. First symptoms were more often cognitive (behavioural Alzheimer's disease: 53%; dysexecutive Alzheimer's disease: 83%) than behavioural (behavioural Alzheimer's disease: 25%; dysexecutive Alzheimer's disease: 3%). Apathy was the most common behavioural feature, while hyperorality and perseverative/compulsive behaviours were less prevalent. Fifty-two per cent of patients with behavioural Alzheimer's disease met diagnostic criteria for possible behavioural-variant frontotemporal dementia. Overlap between behavioural and dysexecutive Alzheimer's disease was modest (9/75 patients). Sixty per cent of patients with behavioural Alzheimer's disease and 40% of those with the dysexecutive syndrome carried at least one APOE ε4 allele. We also compared neuropsychological test performance and brain atrophy (applying voxel-based morphometry) with matched autopsy/biomarker-defined typical (amnestic-predominant) Alzheimer's disease (typical Alzheimer's disease, n = 58), autopsy-confirmed/Alzheimer's disease biomarker-negative behavioural variant frontotemporal dementia (n = 59

  11. [Malabsorption is a leading clinical sign of small bowel disease].

    PubMed

    Parfenov, A I; Krums, L M

    2016-01-01

    The paper presents a variety of clinical manifestations of malabsorption syndrome (MAS) in celiac disease, collagenous sprue, Whipple's disease, Crohn's disease, intestinal lymphangiectasia, amyloidosis, common variable immune deficiency, and treatment of short bowel syndrome. It shows the specific features of the pathophysiology, diagnosis, and treatment of MAS in small bowel diseases.

  12. [Malabsorption is a leading clinical sign of small bowel disease].

    PubMed

    Parfenov, A I; Krums, L M

    2016-01-01

    The paper presents a variety of clinical manifestations of malabsorption syndrome (MAS) in celiac disease, collagenous sprue, Whipple's disease, Crohn's disease, intestinal lymphangiectasia, amyloidosis, common variable immune deficiency, and treatment of short bowel syndrome. It shows the specific features of the pathophysiology, diagnosis, and treatment of MAS in small bowel diseases. PMID:27636919

  13. Risk factors for HIV infection in people attending clinics for sexually transmitted diseases in India.

    PubMed Central

    Rodrigues, J. J.; Mehendale, S. M.; Shepherd, M. E.; Divekar, A. D.; Gangakhedkar, R. R.; Quinn, T. C.; Paranjape, R. S.; Risbud, A. R.; Brookmeyer, R. S.; Gadkari, D. A.

    1995-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To investigate the risk factors for HIV infection in patients attending clinics for sexually transmitted diseases in India. DESIGN--Descriptive study of HIV serology, risk behaviour, and findings on physical examination. SUBJECTS--2800 patients presenting to outpatient clinics between 13 May 1993 and 15 July 1994. SETTING--Two clinics and the National AIDS Research Institute, in Pune, Maharashtra State, India. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE--HIV status, presence of sexually transmitted diseases, and sexual behaviour. RESULTS--The overall proportion of patients infected with HIV was 23.4% (655/2800); 34% (184) of the women and 21% (459) of the men were positive for HIV infection. Of the 560 women screened, 338 (60%) had a reported history of sex working, of whom 153 (45%) were infected with HIV-1. The prevalence of HIV-1 infection in the 222 women who were not sex workers was 14%. The significant independent characteristics associated with HIV infection based on a logistic regression analysis included being a female sex worker, sexual contact with a sex worker, lack of formal education, receptive anal sex in the previous three months, lack of condom use in the previous three months, current or previous genital ulcer or genital discharge, and a positive result of a Venereal Disease Research Laboratory test. CONCLUSIONS--In India the prevalence of HIV infection is alarmingly high among female sex workers and men attending clinics for sexually transmitted diseases, particularly in those who had recently had contact with sex workers. A high prevalence of HIV infection was also found in monogamous, married women presenting to the clinics who denied any history of sex working. The HIV epidemic in India is primarily due to heterosexual transmission of HIV-1 and, as in other countries, HIV infection is associated with ulcerative and non-ulcerative sexually transmitted diseases. PMID:7633230

  14. Prevalence of chronic diseases among older patients in German general practices

    PubMed Central

    Jacob, Louis; Breuer, Jessica; Kostev, Karel

    2016-01-01

    Aims: To evaluate the prevalence of chronic diseases (CDs) among older patients in German general practices (GPs). Methods: A total of 840,319 patients older than 65 years (359,289 male and 481,030 female) who consulted a GP between January and December 2014 were selected. Ten different CDs were considered: hypertension, lipid metabolism, diabetes, coronary heart disease, cancer, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, heart failure, stroke, chronic kidney disease and osteoporosis. The prevalence, defined as the proportion of patients diagnosed with these disorders, was estimated. Results: All CDs were very common in older subjects. Hypertension was the most common CD, affecting 65.7% of men and 66.1% of women. Stroke was the least frequent CD, with 6.6% of men and 5.1% of women displaying this condition. More than one out of two subjects had between one and three CDs (men: 57.7% and women: 59.3%). Approximately 25% of subjects had four or more CDs (men: 26.6% and women: 23.6%). Conclusions: Our study showed that the prevalence of CDs is high in the German elderly population. Hypertension was the most frequent chronic condition and around 25% of patients displayed at least four CDs. PMID:26977142

  15. Prevalence of Risk Factors for Cardiovascular Diseases in Bangladesh: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Fatema, Kaniz; Zwar, Nicholas Arnold; Milton, Abul Hasnat; Ali, Liaquat; Rahman, Bayzidur

    2016-01-01

    Background Given the rising incidence of cardiovascular diseases (CVDs) in Bangladesh, an improved understanding of the epidemiology of CVD risk factors is needed. Therefore, we reviewed published studies on CVD modifiable risk factors e.g., Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus (T2DM), hypertension (HTN), dyslipidemia and smoking as well as studies on CVDs and conducted a meta-analysis of risk factors and disease prevalence. Methods We searched the GLOBAL HEALTH, MEDLINE, EMBASE ‘BanglaJol’ databases for all studies in English on CVDs and its associated modifiable risk factors. Random effects meta-analysis methods were used to estimate pooled prevalence. Results There were 74 eligible studies (outcome: T2DM = 32, HTN = 24, dyslipidaemia = 8 and smoking = 25; CVDs = 10). Due to high between study heterogeneity (p<0.001, I2> 95%) in the prevalence of CVD risk factors, we presented median and interquartile range (IQR) instead of the pooled estimates as the summary measures. Median (IQR) prevalence of T2DM, HTN, dyslipidemia and smoking were 5.9% (1.97%-8.25%); 15.1% (10.52%-17.60%); 34.35% (10.66%-48.50%) and 40.56% (0.80%-55.95%), respectively. The prevalence of T2DM and dyslipidemia were significantly higher in urban compared to rural populations (13.5 vs 6%, p<0.001; 41.5 vs 30%, p = 0.007, respectively). Conclusions The prevalence of risk factors for CVDs is high in Bangladesh, more so in urban areas. Ageing of the population may be a factor but urbanization seems to have an influence, possibly related to changes in dietary and physical activity patterns. Further research, in particular longitudinal studies, is needed to explore the complex interaction of these factors and to inform policies and programs for the prevention and management of CVDs in Bangladesh. PMID:27494706

  16. Prevalence of clinically captured and confirmed malaria among HIV seropositve clinic attendants in five hospitals in Ghana

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Malaria is associated with an increase in HIV viral load and a fall in CD4-cell count. Conversely, HIV infection disrupts the acquired immune responses to malaria and the efficacy of antimalarial drugs. This study was carried out in five Ghanaian hospitals to estimate the prevalence of clinically confirmed malaria among HIV patients by evaluating their hospital records. Methods This retrospective descriptive cross sectional study reviewed and collected data on malaria, using Case Record Forms from HIV patients’ folders in five hospitals in Ghana. Results There were 933 patients records made up of 272 (29.2%) males and 661 (70.8%) females. Majority of the patients were aged between 21–40 (63.6%) years and the rest were between the ages 1–20 (2.8%) years, 41–60 (31.6%) years and 61–80 (2.1%) years of age. A total of 38.1% (355/933) of the patients were clinically suspected of having clinical malaria. Of these 339 (95.5%) were referred to the laboratory for confirmation of the diagnosis of malaria. Only 4.4% (15/339) of patients tested were confirmed as cases of malaria among the patients that were clinically suspected of having malaria and subsequently confirmed. Fever, was not significantly associated with a confirmed diagnosis of malaria [OR = 3.11, 95% CI: (0.63, 15.37), P = 0.142]. Conclusions There was a 4.4% prevalence of confirmed malaria and 38.1% of presumptively diagnosed malaria from the case records of HIV patients from the selected hospitals in Ghana. PMID:24172232

  17. Short communication: prevalence and antibiotic resistance of Staphylococcus aureus isolated from bovine clinical mastitis.

    PubMed

    Jamali, Hossein; Radmehr, Behrad; Ismail, Salmah

    2014-01-01

    The aims of this study were to determine the prevalence and antibiotic resistance of Staphylococcus aureus isolated from bovine clinical mastitis in Varamin, Tehran Province, Iran. All of the isolated Staph. aureus were identified by morphology and culture and confirmed using the API Staph identification system (bioMérieux, Marcy-l'Étoile, France). Antibiotic resistance genes were detected by PCR with oligonucleotide primers specific for each gene. Staphylococcus aureus was recovered from 43 of 207 (20.1%) bovine clinical milk samples. Using disk diffusion, methicillin-resistant Staph. aureus was detected in 5 of 43 (11.6%) samples. The pathogen showed high resistance against penicillin G (86%) and tetracycline (76.7%). The blaZ (penicillin) (86%), tetM (tetracycline), and ermC (erythromycin) genes (39.5% each) were the most prevalent antibiotic resistance genes. The findings of this study are useful for designing specific control programs for bovine clinical mastitis caused by Staph. aureus in this region of Iran.

  18. Short communication: prevalence and antibiotic resistance of Staphylococcus aureus isolated from bovine clinical mastitis.

    PubMed

    Jamali, Hossein; Radmehr, Behrad; Ismail, Salmah

    2014-01-01

    The aims of this study were to determine the prevalence and antibiotic resistance of Staphylococcus aureus isolated from bovine clinical mastitis in Varamin, Tehran Province, Iran. All of the isolated Staph. aureus were identified by morphology and culture and confirmed using the API Staph identification system (bioMérieux, Marcy-l'Étoile, France). Antibiotic resistance genes were detected by PCR with oligonucleotide primers specific for each gene. Staphylococcus aureus was recovered from 43 of 207 (20.1%) bovine clinical milk samples. Using disk diffusion, methicillin-resistant Staph. aureus was detected in 5 of 43 (11.6%) samples. The pathogen showed high resistance against penicillin G (86%) and tetracycline (76.7%). The blaZ (penicillin) (86%), tetM (tetracycline), and ermC (erythromycin) genes (39.5% each) were the most prevalent antibiotic resistance genes. The findings of this study are useful for designing specific control programs for bovine clinical mastitis caused by Staph. aureus in this region of Iran. PMID:24534509

  19. Prevalence of fatty liver disease and the economy in China: A systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Jin-Zhou; Zhou, Qin-Yi; Wang, Yu-Ming; Dai, Yi-Ning; Zhu, Jiang; Yu, Chao-Hui; Li, You-Ming

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the relationship between the economy and the adult prevalence of fatty liver disease (FLD) in mainland China. METHODS: Literature searches on the PubMed and Chinese National Knowledge Infrastructure databases were performed to identify eligible studies published before July 2014. Records were limited to cross-sectional surveys or baseline surveys of longitudinal studies that reported the adult prevalence of FLD and recruited subjects from the general population or community. The gross domestic product (GDP) per capita was chosen to assess the economic status. Multiple linear regression and Loess regression were chosen to fit the data and calculate the 95%CIs. Fitting and overfitting of the models were considered in choosing the appropriate models. RESULTS: There were 27 population-based surveys from 26 articles included in this study. The pooled mean prevalence of FLD in China was 16.73% (95%CI: 13.92%-19.53%). The prevalence of FLD was correlated with the GDP per capita and survey years in the country (adjusted R2 = 0.8736, PGDP per capita = 0.00426, Pyears = 0.0000394), as well as in coastal areas (R2 = 0.9196, PGDP per capita = 0.00241, Pyears = 0.00281). Furthermore, males [19.28% (95%CI: 15.68%-22.88%)] presented a higher prevalence than females [14.1% (95%CI: 11.42%-16.61%), P = 0.0071], especially in coastal areas [21.82 (95%CI: 17.94%-25.71%) vs 17.01% (95%CI: 14.30%-19.89%), P = 0.0157]. Finally, the prevalence was predicted to reach 20.21% in 2020, increasing at a rate of 0.594% per year. CONCLUSION: This study reveals a correlation between the economy and the prevalence of FLD in mainland China. PMID:25987797

  20. Multidrug-resistant (MDR) Aeromonas recovered from the metropolitan area of Valencia (Spain): diseases spectrum and prevalence in the environment.

    PubMed

    Esteve, C; Alcaide, E; Giménez, M J

    2015-01-01

    Aeromonas infections are rare in Europe and often related to traveller's diarrhoea. A total of 185 Aeromonas isolates from river water, fish and clinical sources, recovered during a 1-year period, were used to investigate the disease spectrum and impact of multidrug-resistant (MDR) strains. They were all identified by biochemical tests and 25% of them were also identified by sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene. The minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) of 21 antimicrobials were determined for all isolates by broth microdilution/E-strips methods, and susceptibility was assessed according to the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI). Strains pathogenicity was determined by using Swiss Webster mice as the animal model. Aeromonas diseases had an incidence of around 20 cases/million inhabitants in the metropolitan area of Valencia (Spain). Acute gastroenteritis in children with no history of travel abroad was the main pathology. These cases were related to A. caviae, A. veronii biovar sobria, A. hydrophila and A. dhakensis. A significant incidence of A. caviae in humans was found, while the other species were equally present in clinical and environmental origins. A. jandaei, A. bestiarum and A. media had mainly an environmental distribution. The prevalence of MDR Aeromonas was maximal in clinical samples, and resistance phenotypes were significantly related to this source. 7.2% of environmental Aeromonas was resistant to at least five drugs; most of them were moderately virulent for mice and, in addition, belonged to clinically significant species. The present study demonstrates a diseases spectrum similar to that reported in tropical countries, and also that pathogenic and heavily MDR Aeromonas are present in environmental reservoirs. MDR Aeromonas from any source analysed were susceptible to aztreonam, netilmicin, cefotaxime, ceftazidime, cefepime and fluoroquinolones.

  1. Prevalence of genetic variants associated with inflammatory bowel disease in a healthy First Nations cohort

    PubMed Central

    Murdoch, Travis B.; Bernstein, Charles N.; El-Gabalawy, Hani; Stempak, Joanne M.; Sargent, Michael; Elias, Brenda; Xu, Wei; Pathan, Saad; Silverberg, Mark S.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Inflammatory bowel disease is the result of both genes and environment. Canadian First Nations people, despite living in a region with a high prevalence of inflammatory bowel disease, are relatively protected from this disease. We aimed to compare the carriage of genetic variants associated with inflammatory bowel disease in healthy First Nations and white people. Methods: DNA was extracted from the venous blood of healthy First Nations (n = 340) and white (n = 285) participants from Manitoba. Genotyping was performed for 69 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) with known or suspected associations with inflammatory bowel disease. We compared the genotypes between groups by logistic regression, adjusting for multiple testing. We calculated a risk score for the NOD2 gene by adding the number of risk alleles at three important NOD2 SNPs (G908R, R702W and 3020insC). Results: We found genetic variation between white and First Nations participants at 45 of 69 SNPs. Notably, carriage of the ATG16L1 T300A mutation was lower in First Nations participants (p = 4.1 × 10−30). Cumulative carriage of important NOD2 variants was significantly lower among First Nations participants (3.9% v. 15.2%; p < 0.0001 for risk score) than among white participants. Risk variants in IL23R (p = 0.014) and IL12B (p = 1.2 × 10−16), among others, were more prevalent among First Nations participants than among white participants. Interpretation: The low prevalence of variants associated with bacterial processing and handling in First Nations people may explain their relative protection from inflammatory bowel disease. Increased carriage of a number of risk variants, for example in the interleukin-23/Th17 pathway, is especially intriguing given their importance in other inflammatory diseases of high incidence in First Nations populations. PMID:22496383

  2. Chronic nutrient enrichment increases prevalence and severity of coral disease and bleaching.

    PubMed

    Vega Thurber, Rebecca L; Burkepile, Deron E; Fuchs, Corinne; Shantz, Andrew A; McMinds, Ryan; Zaneveld, Jesse R

    2014-02-01

    Nutrient loading is one of the strongest drivers of marine habitat degradation. Yet, the link between nutrients and disease epizootics in marine organisms is often tenuous and supported only by correlative data. Here, we present experimental evidence that chronic nutrient exposure leads to increases in both disease prevalence and severity and coral bleaching in scleractinian corals, the major habitat-forming organisms in tropical reefs. Over 3 years, from June 2009 to June 2012, we continuously exposed areas of a coral reef to elevated levels of nitrogen and phosphorus. At the termination of the enrichment, we surveyed over 1200 scleractinian corals for signs of disease or bleaching. Siderastrea siderea corals within enrichment plots had a twofold increase in both the prevalence and severity of disease compared with corals in unenriched control plots. In addition, elevated nutrient loading increased coral bleaching; Agaricia spp. of corals exposed to nutrients suffered a 3.5-fold increase in bleaching frequency relative to control corals, providing empirical support for a hypothesized link between nutrient loading and bleaching-induced coral declines. However, 1 year later, after nutrient enrichment had been terminated for 10 months, there were no differences in coral disease or coral bleaching prevalence between the previously enriched and control treatments. Given that our experimental enrichments were well within the ranges of ambient nutrient concentrations found on many degraded reefs worldwide, these data provide strong empirical support to the idea that coastal nutrient loading is one of the major factors contributing to the increasing levels of both coral disease and coral bleaching. Yet, these data also suggest that simple improvements to water quality may be an effective way to mitigate some coral disease epizootics and the corresponding loss of coral cover in the future.

  3. High prevalence of gastroesophageal reflux disease with minimal mucosal change in asthmatic patients.

    PubMed

    Shimizu, Yasuo; Dobashi, Kunio; Kobayashi, Setsuo; Ohki, Ichiro; Tokushima, Masahiko; Kusano, Motoyasu; Kawamura, Osamu; Shimoyama, Yasuyuki; Utsugi, Mitsuyoshi; Mori, Masatomo

    2006-08-01

    It is known that the prevalence of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) in asthmatic patients is high. Although an endoscopic diagnosis of GERD based on the established Los Angeles (LA) classification requires the detection of erosive mucosal breaks, there are patients with GERD who have prominent erythema of the esophageal membrane without erosive mucosal breaks. Non-erosive mucosal change denotes the minimal change of the discoloring type of reflux esophagitis. This study was undertaken to determine the prevalence of GERD in asthmatic patients using the LA classification with the inclusion of minimal change, compared to the prevalence determined using the established LA classification without minimal change. The presence of GERD in asthmatic patients (n = 78), non-asthmatic disease control patients (n = 56), and healthy subjects (n = 150) was evaluated by endoscopic examination. The frequency of GERD in asthmatic patients based on the LA classification with minimal change was higher (54/78, 69.2%) than in asthmatic patients based on the LA classification without minimal change (37/78, 47.4%) (p < 0.05). The prevalence of GERD in asthmatic patients (69.2%) was higher than that in disease control patients (17/56, 30.4%) and healthy subjects (27/150, 18.0%) based on the LA classification with minimum change. These data indicate that asthmatic patients have a high frequency of GERD. In addition, without the inclusion of minimum change to the diagnosis of GERD, the prevalence of GERD appears to be underestimated in asthmatic patients. Therefore, physicians should carefully observe asthmatic patients with minimal change on endoscopy.

  4. Prevalence and incidence of chronic kidney disease stage G5 in Japan.

    PubMed

    Yamagata, Kunihiro; Yagisawa, Takashi; Nakai, Shigeru; Nakayama, Masaaki; Imai, Enyu; Hattori, Motoshi; Iseki, Kunitoshi; Akiba, Takashi

    2015-02-01

    The prevalence and incidence of end-stage kidney disease (ESKD) have continued to increase worldwide. Japan was known as having the highest prevalence of ESKD in the world; however, Taiwan took this place in 2001, with the USA still in third position. However, the prevalence data from Japan and Taiwan consisted of dialysis patients only. The prevalence and incidence of Kidney Transplantation (KT) in Japan were quite low, and the number of KT patients among those with ESKD was regarded as negligibly small. However, the number of KT recipients has increased recently. Furthermore, there are no reports about nationwide surveys on the prevalence and incidence of predialysis chronic kidney failure patients in Japan. This review describes our recent study on the estimated number of chronic kidney disease (CKD) stage G5 patients and the number of ESKD patients living in Japan, obtained via the cooperation of five related medical societies. From the results, as of Dec 31, 2007, 275,242 patients had received dialysis therapy and 10,013 patients had a functional transplanted kidney, and as of Dec 31, 2008, 286,406 patients had received dialysis therapy and 11,157 patients had a functional transplanted kidney. Consequently, there were 285,255 patients with CKD who reached ESKD and were living in Japan in 2008 and 297,563 in 2009. We also estimated that there were 67,000 predialysis CKD stage G5 patients in 2009, 37,365 patients introduced to dialysis therapy, and 101 patients who received pre-emptive renal transplantation in this year. In total, there were 37,466 patients who newly required renal replacement therapy (RRT) in 2009. Not only the average ages, but also the primary renal diseases of the new ESKD patients in each RRT modality were different.

  5. The prevalence of refractive conditions in Puerto Rican adults attending an eye clinic system

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez, Neisha M.; Romero, Angel. F.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To determine the prevalence of refractive conditions in the adult population that visited primary care optometry clinics in Puerto Rico. Methods A retrospective cross-sectional study of patients examined at the Inter American University of Puerto Rico School of Optometry Eye Institute Clinics between 2004 and 2010. Subjects considered had best corrected visual acuity by standardized subjective refraction of 20/40 or better. The refractive errors were classified by the spherical equivalent (SE): sphere+½ cylinder. Myopia was classified as a SE>−0.50 D, hyperopia as a SE>+0.50  D, and emmetropia as a SE between −0.50 and +0.50, both included. Astigmatism equal or higher than 0.25 D in minus cylinder form was used. Patients with documented history of cataract extraction (pseudophakia or aphakia), amblyopia, refractive surgery or other corneal/ocular surgery were excluded from the study. Results A total of 784 randomly selected subjects older than 40 years of age were selected. The estimated prevalence (95%, confidence interval) among all subjects was hyperopia 51.5% (48.0–55.0), emmetropia 33.8% (30.5–37.2), myopia 14.7% (12.1–17.2) and astigmatism 69.6% (68.8–73.3). Hyperopia was more common in females than males although the difference was not statistically significant. The mean spherical equivalent values was hyperopic until 70 y/o and decreased slightly as the population ages. Conclusion Hyperopia is the most common refractive error and its prevalence and seems to increase among the aging population who visited the clinics. Further programs and studies must be developed to address the refractive errors needs of the adult Puerto Rican population. PMID:25000872

  6. Clinical and corneal microbial profile of infectious keratitis in a high HIV prevalence setting in rural South Africa.

    PubMed

    Schaftenaar, E; Peters, R P H; Baarsma, G S; Meenken, C; Khosa, N S; Getu, S; McIntyre, J A; Osterhaus, A D M E; Verjans, G M G M

    2016-09-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to determine the clinical and corneal microbial profile of infectious keratitis in a high human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) prevalence setting in rural South Africa. Data in this cross-sectional study were collected from patients presenting with symptoms of infectious keratitis (n = 46) at the ophthalmology outpatient department of three hospitals in rural South Africa. Corneal swabs were tested for herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) and 2 (HSV-2), varicella zoster virus (VZV) and adenovirus DNA by real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and for bacteria and fungi by culture. Based on clinical history, disease characteristics and laboratory results, 29 (63 %) patients were diagnosed as viral keratitis, including 14 (48 %) viral keratitis cases complicated by bacterial superinfection, and 17 (37 %) as bacterial keratitis. VZV and HSV-1 DNA was detected in 11 (24 %) and 5 (11 %) corneal swabs, respectively. Among clinically defined viral keratitis cases, a negative viral swab was predominantly (93 %) observed in cases with subepithelial inflammation and was significantly associated with an increased duration of symptoms (p = 0.003). The majority of bacteria cultured were Gram-positive (24/35), including Staphylococcus epidermidis and S. aureus. Viral aetiology was significantly associated with a history of herpes zoster ophthalmicus (p < 0.001) and a trend was observed between viral aetiology and HIV infection (p = 0.06). Twenty-one (47 %) keratitis cases were complicated by anterior uveitis, of which 18 (86 %) were HIV-infected cases with viral keratitis. The data implicate a high prevalence of herpetic keratitis, in part complicated by bacterial superinfection and/or uveitis, in HIV-infected individuals presenting with infectious keratitis in rural South Africa. PMID:27236644

  7. Prevalence and correlates of coronary heart disease: first population-based study in Lebanon

    PubMed Central

    Zeidan, Rouba Karen; Farah, Rita; Chahine, Mirna N; Asmar, Roland; Hosseini, Hassan; Salameh, Pascale; Pathak, Atul

    2016-01-01

    Background Lebanon is experiencing a growing epidemic of coronary heart diseases (CHDs), as most low- and middle-income countries currently are. However, this growth can be attenuated if effective preventive strategies are adopted. Purpose To provide the first national population-based prevalence of CHD and to describe the profile of Lebanese adults with prevalent CHD. Methods We carried out a cross-sectional study using a multistage cluster sample across Lebanon. We interviewed residents aged 40 years and older using a questionnaire that captured the presence of CHDs and their risk factors (RFs). Results Our study showed that 13.4% of the Lebanese population aged ≥40 years suffer from a prevalent CHD. CHD seemed to appear more prematurely than in developed countries, and males seemed to be more subject to CHD than females until a certain age. CHD was associated with older age, male sex, a lower economic situation, hypercholesterolemia, hypertension, having a family history of premature cardiovascular diseases, and suffering from diabetes. However, smoking and waist circumference did not seem to have an independent effect on CHD, but rather an effect mediated by biological RFs. Conclusion This is the first nationwide endeavor conducted in Lebanon to assess the prevalence of CHD. This study also confirms the relevance of the classic RFs of CHD and their applicability to the Lebanese population, thus allowing for prevention strategies. PMID:27051290

  8. The prevalence of hematologic and metabolic abnormalities during chronic kidney disease stages in different ethnic groups.

    PubMed

    Barbour, S J; Er, L; Djurdjev, O; Karim, M A; Levin, A

    2008-07-01

    We conducted an observational cross-sectional study to determine if the prevalence of hematologic and metabolic abnormalities in chronic kidney disease (CKD) varied in different ethnic groups. We used a CKD provincial database where a complete data set at the time of registration was available as well as an estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR), which showed using the abbreviated MDRD formula that the patients had CKD of stages 3-5. We included patients with self-reported race of Caucasian, Oriental Asian, or South Asian. Primary outcomes were the prevalence of at least one of the following: anemia, hypocalcemia, hyperphosphatemia, hyperparathyroidism, hypoalbuminemia, and three or more laboratory abnormalities. All definitions were consistent with K/DOQI guidelines. When compared with Caucasians, Oriental Asians and South Asians had a higher prevalence of many of the metabolic abnormalities during most stages of CKD and were more likely to have any abnormality at all levels of eGFR. The prevalence of three or more laboratory abnormalities was higher in Oriental Asians at all stages and in South Asians at some levels of eGFR. These results were unchanged or exaggerated when controlled for age, gender, diabetes, and a primary diagnosis of renal disease. Hence, it appears that South Asians and Oriental Asians have more laboratory abnormalities compared with Caucasians at most levels of eGFR.

  9. Peripheral artery disease in korean patients undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention: prevalence and association with coronary artery disease severity.

    PubMed

    Kim, Eun Kyoung; Song, Pil Sang; Yang, Jeong Hoon; Song, Young Bin; Hahn, Joo-Yong; Choi, Jin-Ho; Gwon, Hyeon-Cheol; Lee, Sang Hoon; Hong, Kyung Pyo; Park, Jeong Euy; Kim, Duk-kyung; Choi, Seung-Hyuk

    2013-01-01

    Peripheral artery disease (PAD) is an important marker for the risk stratification of patients with coronary artery disease (CAD). We investigated the prevalence of PAD in patients undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) with CAD and the relationship between ankle-brachial pressure index (ABPI) and CAD severity. A total of 711 patients undergoing PCI for CAD from August 2009 to August 2011 were enrolled. PAD diagnosis was made using the ABPI. The prevalence of PAD was 12.8%. In PAD patients, mean values of right and left ABPI were 0.71 ± 0.15 and 0.73 ± 0.15. Patients with PAD had a higher prevalence of left main coronary disease (14.3% vs 5.8%, P = 0.003), more frequently had multivessel lesions (74.9% vs 52.1%, P < 0.001) and had higher SYNTAX score (18.2 ± 12.3 vs 13.1 ± 8.26, P = 0.002). Using multivariate analysis, we determined that left main CAD (OR, 2.954; 95% CI, 1.418-6.152, P = 0.004) and multivessel CAD (OR, 2.321; 95% CI, 1.363-3.953, P = 0.002) were both independently associated with PAD. We recommend that ABPI-based PAD screening should be implemented in all patients undergoing PCI with CAD, especially in severe cases. PMID:23341717

  10. Host demography influences the prevalence and severity of eelgrass wasting disease.

    PubMed

    Groner, Maya L; Burge, Colleen A; Couch, Courtney S; Kim, Catherine J S; Siegmund, Gregor-Fausto; Singhal, Sonia; Smoot, Samantha C; Jarrell, Ann; Gaydos, Joseph K; Harvell, C Drew; Wyllie-Echeverria, Sandy

    2014-02-19

    Many marine pathogens are opportunists, present in the environment, but causing disease only under certain conditions such as immunosuppression due to environmental stress or host factors such as age. In the temperate eelgrass Zostera marina, the opportunistic labyrinthulomycete pathogen Labyrinthula zosterae is present in many populations and occasionally causes severe epidemics of wasting disease; however, risk factors associated with these epidemics are unknown. We conducted both field surveys and experimental manipulations to examine the effect of leaf age (inferred from leaf size) on wasting disease prevalence and severity in Z. marina across sites in the San Juan Archipelago, Washington, USA. We confirmed that lesions observed in the field were caused by active Labyrinthula infections both by identifying the etiologic agent through histology and by performing inoculations with cultures of Labyrinthula spp. isolated from observed lesions. We found that disease prevalence increased at shallower depths and with greater leaf size at all sites, and this effect was more pronounced at declining sites. Experimental inoculations with 2 strains of L. zosterae confirmed an increased susceptibility of older leaves to infection. Overall, this pattern suggests that mature beds and shallow beds of eelgrass may be especially susceptible to outbreaks of wasting disease. The study highlights the importance of considering host and environmental factors when evaluating risk of disease from opportunistic pathogens.

  11. Dietary intake and the prevalence of gallbladder disease in Mexican Americans.

    PubMed

    Diehl, A K; Haffner, S M; Knapp, J A; Hazuda, H P; Stern, M P

    1989-12-01

    Mexican Americans have a high prevalence of gallbladder disease. We examined the contribution of ethnic preferences in food intake to the risk of gallbladder disease in Mexican Americans and non-Hispanic whites. Participants in a population-based health survey were questioned about any history of gallbladder disease, and were interviewed to determine their dietary intake. After adjusting for age, body mass index, and ethnic group, we found that women with the highest intake of total fat and linoleic acid had reduced risks of gallbladder disease, although an opposite trend was observed in men. High levels of sucrose intake and low levels of cholesterol intake were associated with an increased risk for both sexes, but the odds ratios were not statistically significant. Although Mexican Americans and non-Hispanics differed in their intake of several nutrients, the elevated risk of gallbladder disease in Mexican American women was unchanged after ethnic differences in food intake were taken into account. Although the dietary preferences of Mexican Americans as reflected in 24-h diet recall interviews do not appear to explain their high prevalence of gallbladder disease, this finding should be interpreted with caution because of methodologic limitations in measuring habitual food intake.

  12. Prevalence of Chagas disease in Brazil: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Martins-Melo, Francisco Rogerlândio; Ramos, Alberto Novaes; Alencar, Carlos Henrique; Heukelbach, Jorg

    2014-02-01

    Chagas disease is a major public health problem in Brazil and Latin America. During the last years, it has become an emerging problem in North America and Europe due to increasing international migration. Here we describe the prevalence of Chagas disease in Brazil through a systematic review. We searched national and international electronic databases, grey literature and reference lists of selected articles for population-based studies on Chagas disease prevalence in Brazil, performed from 1980 until September 2012. Forty-two articles with relevant prevalence data were identified from a total of 4985 references. Prevalence ranged from 0% to 25.1%. Most surveys were performed in the Northeast region, especially in the state of Piauí. We observed a high degree of heterogeneity in most pooled estimates (I(2)>75%; p<0.001). The pooled estimate of Chagas disease prevalence across studies for the entire period was 4.2% (95% CI: 3.1-5.7), ranging from 4.4% (95% CI: 2.3-8.3) in the 1980s to 2.4% (95% CI: 1.5-3.8) after 2000. Females (4.2%; 95% CI: 2.6-6.8), >60 year-olds (17.7%; 95% CI: 11.4-26.5), Northeast (5.0%; 95% CI: 3.1-8.1) and Southeast (5.0%; CI: 2.4-9.9) regions and mixed (urban/rural) areas (6.4%; 95% CI: 4.2-9.4) had the highest pooled prevalence. About 4.6 million (95% CI: 2.9-7.2 million) of people are estimated to be infected with Trypanosoma cruzi. The small number of studies and small-scale samples of the general population in some areas limit interpretation, and findings of this review do not necessarily reflect the situation of the entire country. Systematic population-based studies at regional and national level are recommended to provide more accurate estimates and better define the epidemiology and risk areas of Chagas disease in Brazil.

  13. Prevalence and Clinical Correlates of a Short Onset REM Period (SOREMP) during Routine PSG

    PubMed Central

    Cairns, Alyssa; Bogan, Richard

    2015-01-01

    Study Objectives: The objectives of this study were to quantify the (1) sensitivity and specificity of nocturnal PSG SOREMP (REM latency ≤ 15 min) for narcolepsy in those being evaluated for hypersomnolence and (2) prevalence and predictors of SOREMP during baseline PSG for patients being evaluated for various sleep disorders. Design: This was a retrospective analysis of a large repository of de-identified PSG and MSLT test results from 2007 to 2013. Setting and Patients: Patient records were retrieved from a repository of studies completed at a variety of sleep laboratories across the USA. Included in the analyses were 79,651 general sleep clinic patients (without an MSLT; 48% male; 72% Caucasian) and an additional 3,059 patients (31.3% male; 72% Caucasian) being evaluated for hypersomnolence (with a consecutive MSLT). Interventions: NA. Measurements and Results: For patients being evaluated for hypersomnolence, the prevalence of PSG SOREMP increased in a dose-response fashion with the number of REM onsets that occurred on a consecutive MSLT (0.5% for no MSLT SOREMPs to > 33.0% for those with 5 MSLT SOREMPs). Overall, having a PSG SOREMP was highly specific (99.5%; 95% CI: 99.1–99.7%) but not sensitive (6.7%; 95% CI: 4.7–9.2%) for narcolepsy. The prevalence of PSG SOREMP for patients in the general sleep clinic sample (i.e., not being evaluated by a consecutive MSLT) was 0.8% and was much higher in those that work night/swing shift. In adjusted models, African American race contributed to the most variance in PSG SOREMP. Conclusions: A short onset rapid eye movement (REM) latency occurs rarely in general sleep clinic samples (< 1.0%), but is highly specific for the diagnosis of narcolepsy. Although rare, the prevalence of the phenomenon is much higher than the estimated prevalence of narcolepsy and may provide a critical opportunity for practitioners to identify narcolepsy in sleep clinic patients. These data also suggest that the utility of polysomnography

  14. Prevalence and risk factors associated with nutrition-related noncommunicable diseases in the Eastern Mediterranean region

    PubMed Central

    Musaiger, Abdulrahman O; Al-Hazzaa, Hazzaa M

    2012-01-01

    This paper reviews the current situation concerning nutrition-related noncommunicable diseases (N-NCDs) and the risk factors associated with these diseases in the Eastern Mediterranean region (EMR). A systematic literature review of studies and reports published between January 1, 1990 and September 15, 2011 was conducted using the PubMed and Google Scholar databases. Cardiovascular disease, type 2 diabetes, metabolic syndrome, obesity, cancer, and osteoporosis have become the main causes of morbidity and mortality, especially with progressive aging of the population. The estimated mortality rate due to cardiovascular disease and diabetes ranged from 179.8 to 765.2 per 100,000 population, with the highest rates in poor countries. The prevalence of metabolic syndrome was very high, ranging from 19% to 45%. The prevalence of overweight and obesity (body mass index ≥25 kg/m2) has reached an alarming level in most countries of the region, ranging from 25% to 82%, with a higher prevalence among women. The estimated mortality rate for cancer ranged from 61.9 to 151 per 100,000 population. Osteoporosis has become a critical problem, particularly among women. Several risk factors may be contributing to the high prevalence of N-NCDs in EMR, including nutrition transition, low intake of fruit and vegetables, demographic transition, urbanization, physical inactivity, hypertension, tobacco smoking, stunting of growth of preschool children, and lack of nutrition and health awareness. Intervention programs to prevent and control N-NCDs are urgently needed, with special focus on promotion of healthy eating and physical activity. PMID:22399864

  15. Epidermal growth factor receptor mutation in adenocarcinoma lung in a North Indian population: Prevalence and relation with different clinical variables

    PubMed Central

    Kasana, Basharat Ahmad; Dar, Waseem Raja; Aziz, Sheikh Aijaz; Lone, Abdul Rashid; Sofi, Najeeb Ullah; Dar, Imtiyaz Ahmad; Latief, Muzamil; Arshad, Faheem; Hussain, Moomin; Hussain, Mir

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Lung cancer is one of the most common causes of cancer deaths worldwide. Adenocarcinoma is taking over squamous cell lung cancer as the predominant histological subtype. Several cytotoxic drugs are available for the treatment of lung cancer, but side effects limit their use. Recently, targeted therapies for cancers have come into clinical practice. Aims and Objectives: To determine the prevalence of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutation in adenocarcinoma lung in a North Indian population and its relation with different clinical variables. Materials and Methods: A total of 57 patients who met inclusion criteria were recruited into the study. Relevant history, clinical examination and investigations were done. EGFR mutation was done in all patients. Results: A total of twenty patients tested positive for EGFR mutation. EGFR was more frequently detected in female patients (53.8%), while as only 19.4% of the male patients expressed EGFR mutation, which was statistically very significant (P = 0.007). EGFR mutation was more frequently detected in nonsmokers (52%) as compared to smokers (21.9%) which also was statistically significant (P value of 0.018). EGFR mutation was more common in Stage III and IV adenocarcinomas (48%) as compared to Stage I and II (21.4%) which was statistically significant (P value 0.034). Conclusion: EGFR mutation should be routinely done in all patients of adenocarcinoma lung particularly non-smoker females with Stage III and IV disease. PMID:27688613

  16. [Clinical analysis of cat scratch disease].

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Hiroshi; Kusaba, Nobuhide; Sata, Michio

    2010-05-01

    We analyzed the clinical background of 63 patients with serologically confirmed cat scratch disease (CSD), Age range of the patients was 0 to 83 years old and mean age was 35.0 years old. Seasonal patterns of cases was observed. A number of patients with CSD was increased during the summer and fall. The peak incidence of CSD occurred in October. Infection followed direct cat or dog contact. Cat contact occurred in 61 cases (96.8%) and dog contact in 2 cases (3.2%). A specific contact with kittens occurred in 39 cases (61.9%). About 49.2% of patients had a cat scratch, 3.2% had a cat bite, 3.2% had a cat flea bite, 41.2% had no history of animal bite. The papule of inoculation site were seen in 27 cases (42.9%) of CSD. The upper extremities were the most likely locations for scratches. Sixty cases (95.2%) of CSD developed lymphadenopathy, 51.7% of the involved nodes were in the axillary, 31.7% were in the inguinal, 21.7% were in the cervical, 16.7% were in the elbow. The mean incubation period of patients with CSD was 18.9 days. The mean duration of lymphadenopathy after the treatment of antibiotics was 44.2 days. The mean value of white blood cell counts was 8130/microL. The mean value of C-reactive protein level was 2.83 mg/dL.

  17. Indirect Genetic Effects and the Spread of Infectious Disease: Are We Capturing the Full Heritable Variation Underlying Disease Prevalence?

    PubMed Central

    Lipschutz-Powell, Debby; Woolliams, John A.; Bijma, Piter; Doeschl-Wilson, Andrea B.

    2012-01-01

    Reducing disease prevalence through selection for host resistance offers a desirable alternative to chemical treatment. Selection for host resistance has proven difficult, however, due to low heritability estimates. These low estimates may be caused by a failure to capture all the relevant genetic variance in disease resistance, as genetic analysis currently is not taylored to estimate genetic variation in infectivity. Host infectivity is the propensity of transmitting infection upon contact with a susceptible individual, and can be regarded as an indirect effect to disease status. It may be caused by a combination of physiological and behavioural traits. Though genetic variation in infectivity is difficult to measure directly, Indirect Genetic Effect (IGE) models, also referred to as associative effects or social interaction models, allow the estimation of this variance from more readily available binary disease data (infected/non-infected). We therefore generated binary disease data from simulated populations with known amounts of variation in susceptibility and infectivity to test the adequacy of traditional and IGE models. Our results show that a conventional model fails to capture the genetic variation in infectivity inherent in populations with simulated infectivity. An IGE model, on the other hand, does capture some of the variation in infectivity. Comparison with expected genetic variance suggests that there is scope for further methodological improvement, and that potential responses to selection may be greater than values presented here. Nonetheless, selection using an index of estimated direct and indirect breeding values was shown to have a greater genetic selection differential and reduced future disease risk than traditional selection for resistance only. These findings suggest that if genetic variation in infectivity substantially contributes to disease transmission, then breeding designs which explicitly incorporate IGEs might help reduce disease

  18. Prevalence of overweight and self-reported chronic diseases among residents in Pulau Kundur, Kelantan, Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Nazri, S Mohd; Imran, M Kamarul; Ismail, I Mohd; Faris, A Ahmad

    2008-01-01

    This cross-sectional study was designed to determine the socio-demographic characteristics and prevalence of overweight/obesity and self-reported diabetes mellitus, hypertension and heart disease among the population in Pulau Kundur, Kota Bharu, Kelantan, Malaysia. This study was conducted in September 2005. We randomly selected 120 of 240 households in Pulau Kundur, Kota Bharu, Kelantan. Fifteen interviewers were trained to use a structured questionnaire to interview 348 adult respondents age 18 years and older in the selected houses. The mean age was 40.7 years; 52.7% were females and 99.4% were Malay. Sixty-two point seven percent were married and 50.9% of them had Ujian Penilaian Sekolah Rendah (UPSR) or less education. The mean head of family income was RM 532.4. The mean body mass index was 25.3. The overall prevalence of overweight/obesity, known hypertension, diabetes mellitus and heart disease were 49.1, 12.6, 7.8 and 2.0% respectively. Adults in this village had a high prevalence of overweight and obesity and self-reported chronic diseases. Health education and lifestyle modification are needed for those adults. PMID:18567457

  19. Prevalence of overweight and self-reported chronic diseases among residents in Pulau Kundur, Kelantan, Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Nazri, S Mohd; Imran, M Kamarul; Ismail, I Mohd; Faris, A Ahmad

    2008-01-01

    This cross-sectional study was designed to determine the socio-demographic characteristics and prevalence of overweight/obesity and self-reported diabetes mellitus, hypertension and heart disease among the population in Pulau Kundur, Kota Bharu, Kelantan, Malaysia. This study was conducted in September 2005. We randomly selected 120 of 240 households in Pulau Kundur, Kota Bharu, Kelantan. Fifteen interviewers were trained to use a structured questionnaire to interview 348 adult respondents age 18 years and older in the selected houses. The mean age was 40.7 years; 52.7% were females and 99.4% were Malay. Sixty-two point seven percent were married and 50.9% of them had Ujian Penilaian Sekolah Rendah (UPSR) or less education. The mean head of family income was RM 532.4. The mean body mass index was 25.3. The overall prevalence of overweight/obesity, known hypertension, diabetes mellitus and heart disease were 49.1, 12.6, 7.8 and 2.0% respectively. Adults in this village had a high prevalence of overweight and obesity and self-reported chronic diseases. Health education and lifestyle modification are needed for those adults.

  20. Prevalence of canine heartworm (Dirofilaria immitis) disease in dogs of central Portugal

    PubMed Central

    Vieira, Ana Luísa; Vieira, Maria João; Oliveira, João Manuel; Simões, Ana Rita; Diez-Baños, Pablo; Gestal, Juan

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to determine the prevalence and risk factors concerning Dirofilaria immitis infection in dogs from Figueira da Foz, located in the central region of Portugal. In the period between November 2009 and January 2011, 304 blood samples were obtained from dogs over 1 year of age, with no previous history of heartworm prevention or diagnosis. Every blood sample was analyzed using varied laboratory techniques (direct microscopic evaluation of a fresh blood sample, the modified Knott technique, and the ELISA antigen detection test – IDEXX Snapp®). In the samples in which microfilaremia was detected, a histochemical technique using acid phosphatase staining was applied to identify the species of microfilariae. A total prevalence of 27.3% (83 out of 304) was found. We also found that 73.5% of all positive cases (61 out of 83) were microfilaremic, and 26.5% were occult infections (22 out of 83). By means of a histochemical technique Dirofilaria immitis was identified in 96.7% of microfilaremic samples. A multivariate model allowed us to identify the following risk factors for the presence of heartworm disease: age between 4 and 9 years, dogs living in a rural environment, large breed dogs, and living outdoors. This study shows for the first time the high prevalence of heartworm disease in a central area of Portugal and emphasizes the importance of systematic screening for this disease, as well as the need to prevent it in dogs in this area. PMID:24534524

  1. Prevalence, predictors and clinical significance of Blastocystis sp. in Sebha, Libya

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Blastocystis sp. has a worldwide distribution and is often the most common human intestinal protozoan reported in children and adults in developing countries. The clinical relevance of Blastocystis sp. remains controversial. This study was undertaken to determine the prevalence of Blastocystis infection and its association with gastrointestinal symptoms among outpatients in Sebha city, Libya. Methods A total of 380 stool samples were collected from outpatients attending the Central Laboratory in Sebha, Libya for routine stool examination. The presence of Blastocystis sp. was screened comparing light microscopy of direct smears against in vitro cultivation. Demographic and socioeconomic information were collected with a standardized questionnaire. Results The overall prevalence of Blastocystis infection was 22.1%. The prevalence was significantly higher among patients aged ≥18 years compared to those aged < 18 years (29.4% vs 9.9%; x2 = 19.746; P < 0.001), and in males compared to females (26.4% vs 17.5%; x2 = 4.374; P = 0.036). Univariate analysis showed significant associations between Blastocystis infection and the occupational status (P = 0.017), family size (P = 0.023) and educational level (P = 0.042) of the participants. Multiple logistic regression analysis confirmed that the age of ≥ 18 years (OR = 5.7; 95% CI = 2.21; 9.86) and occupational status (OR = 2.2; 95% CI = 1.02, 4.70) as significant predictors of Blastocystis infection among this population. In those who had only Blastocystis infection but no other gastrointestinal parasitic infections, the prevalence of gastrointestinal symptoms was higher compared to those without Blastocystis infection (35.3% vs 13.2%; x2 = 25.8; P < 0.001). The most common symptoms among these patients were abdominal pain (76.4%), flatulence (41.1%) and diarrhoea (21.5%). Conclusions Blastocystis sp. is prevalent and associated with

  2. Gestational diabetes mellitus prevalence in Maela refugee camp on the Thai–Myanmar Border: a clinical report

    PubMed Central

    Gilder, Mary Ellen; Zin, Thet Wai; Wai, Nan San; Ner, Ma; Say, Paw Si; Htoo, Myint; Say, Say; Htay, Win Win; Simpson, Julie A.; Pukrittayakamee, Sasithon; Nosten, Francois; McGready, Rose

    2014-01-01

    Background Individuals in conflict-affected areas rarely get appropriate care for chronic or non-infectious diseases. The prevalence of gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) is increasing worldwide, and new evidence shows conclusively that the negative effects of hyperglycemia occur even at mild glucose elevations and that these negative effects can be attenuated by treatment. Scientific literature on gestational diabetes in refugee camp settings is critically limited. Methods A 75 g 2-hour glucose tolerance test was administered to 228 women attending the antenatal care (ANC) clinic in Maela refugee camp on the Thai–Myanmar border. Prevalence of GDM was determined using the HAPO trial cut-offs [≥92 mg/dL (fasting),≥180 (1 hour), and≥153 (2 hour)] and the WHO criteria [≥126 mg/dL (fasting), and 140 mg/dL (2 hour)]. Results From July 2011 to March 2012, the prevalence of GDM was 10.1% [95% confidence interval (CI): 6.2–14.0] when the cut-off determined by the HAPO trial was applied. Applying the older WHO criteria yielded a prevalence of 6.6% (95% CI 3.3–9.8). Age, parity, and BMI emerged as characteristics that may be significantly associated with GDM in this population. Other risk factors that are commonly used in screening guidelines were not applicable in this diabetes-naïve population. Discussion The prevalence of GDM is lower in this population compared with other populations, but still complicates 10% of pregnancies. New evidence regarding gestational diabetes raises new dilemmas for healthcare providers in resource-poor settings. Efforts to identify and treat patients at risk for adverse outcomes need to be balanced with awareness of the risks and burdens associated with over diagnosis and unnecessary interventions. Screening approaches based on risk factors or using higher cut-off values may help minimize this burden and identify those most likely to benefit from intervention. PMID:24824580

  3. PREVALENCE OF CHAGAS DISEASE IN A RURAL AREA IN THE STATE OF CEARA, BRAZIL

    PubMed Central

    FREITAS, Erlane Chaves; OLIVEIRA, Maria de Fátima; ANDRADE, Mônica Coelho; VASCONCELOS, Arduina Sofia Ortet de Barros; da SILVA, José Damião; CÂNDIDO, Darlan da Silva; PEREIRA, Laíse dos Santos; CORREIA, João Paulo Ramalho; da CRUZ, José Napoleão Monte; CAVALCANTI, Luciano Pamplona de Góes

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Chagas disease is caused by Trypanosoma cruzi and affects about two to three million people in Brazil, still figuring as an important public health problem. A study was conducted in a rural area of the municipality of Limoeiro do Norte - CE, northeastern Brazil, aiming to determine the prevalence of T. cruzi infection. Of the inhabitants, 52% were examined, among whom 2.6% (4/154) were seropositive in at least two serological tests. All seropositive individuals were older than 50 years, farmers, with a low education and a family income of less than three minimum wages. Active surveillance may be an alternative for early detection of this disease. PMID:26603232

  4. Prevalence and histopathology of shell disease in turtles from Lake Blackshear, Georgia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lovich, J.E.; Gotte, S.W.; Ernst, C.H.; Harshbarger, J.; Laemmerzahl, A.F.

    1996-01-01

    Turtles in Lake Blackshear, Crisp County, Georgia (USA) were evaluated for shell disease during intensive trapping efforts on 8 and 9 May 1990. The disease was most prevalent in Pseudemys concinna (74%) and Trachemys scripta (35%). The degree of necrosis on the carapace was significantly positively correlated with the degree of necrosis on the plastron in T. scripta (rs = 0.50), but not in P. concinna (rs=0.06). Female T. scripta with lesions were significantly larger than females without lesions. Lesions were not detected on six other species of turtles. Some areas contained multicarinate osteoclasts that were destroying bone. No tumors were detected in soft tissue samples.

  5. Vitamin D Deficiency in Egyptian Systemic Lupus Erythematosus Patients: How Prevalent and Does It Impact Disease Activity?

    PubMed Central

    Abaza, Nouran M.; El-Mallah, Reem M.; Shaaban, Asmaa; Mobasher, Sameh A.; Al-hassanein, Khaled F.; Abdel Zaher, Amr A.; El-kabarity, Rania H.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND The emerging role of vitamin D in immunology and autoimmune disorders has been a worldwide interest in the last decade. Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) patients are particularly at a delicate position predisposing them to suffer from vitamin D deficiency due to the multiple risk factors accompanying the disease. Whether vitamin D deficiency is also involved as a risk factor for developing SLE and affecting its course is a considerable concern. OBJECTIVES The objective of this study was to estimate the prevalence of vitamin D deficiency in SLE patients and its relation to disease. MATERIALS AND METHODS In our observational cross-sectional study, serum levels of vitamin D [25(OH)D] in 60 SLE patients and 30 age- and sex-matched healthy controls were assessed and estimated for deficiency and insufficiency at 10 and 30 ng/mL, respectively. Disease activity was evaluated by SLE disease activity index (SLEDAI), irreversible organ damage by Systemic Lupus International Collaborating Clinics/American College of Rheumatology Damage Index (SLICC/ACR DI), and severity by Severity of Disease Index. Fatigue was measured by visual analog scale. RESULTS Significantly lower levels of 25(OH)D were found in SLE patients (17.6 ± 6.9 ng/mL) in comparison to controls (79.0 ± 28.7 ng/mL), with a statistically high significant difference (t = −11.2, P < 0.001). High prevalence of vitamin D insufficiency and deficiency was detected as 73.3% and 23.3%, respectively. Vitamin D had a highly significant negative correlation with SLEDAI (r = −0.495, P < 0.001), SLICC (r = −0.431, P < 0.05), and fatigue (r = −0.436, P < 0.05). CONCLUSION Vitamin D deficiency and insufficiency were found to be prevalent in SLE patients in our study and related to disease activity and fatigue. If needed, routine screening and consequent repletion of vitamin D are recommended in SLE patients. Restoring adequate vitamin D levels in SLE patients should be more explored as a potential yet

  6. Vitamin D Deficiency in Egyptian Systemic Lupus Erythematosus Patients: How Prevalent and Does It Impact Disease Activity?

    PubMed Central

    Abaza, Nouran M.; El-Mallah, Reem M.; Shaaban, Asmaa; Mobasher, Sameh A.; Al-hassanein, Khaled F.; Abdel Zaher, Amr A.; El-kabarity, Rania H.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND The emerging role of vitamin D in immunology and autoimmune disorders has been a worldwide interest in the last decade. Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) patients are particularly at a delicate position predisposing them to suffer from vitamin D deficiency due to the multiple risk factors accompanying the disease. Whether vitamin D deficiency is also involved as a risk factor for developing SLE and affecting its course is a considerable concern. OBJECTIVES The objective of this study was to estimate the prevalence of vitamin D deficiency in SLE patients and its relation to disease. MATERIALS AND METHODS In our observational cross-sectional study, serum levels of vitamin D [25(OH)D] in 60 SLE patients and 30 age- and sex-matched healthy controls were assessed and estimated for deficiency and insufficiency at 10 and 30 ng/mL, respectively. Disease activity was evaluated by SLE disease activity index (SLEDAI), irreversible organ damage by Systemic Lupus International Collaborating Clinics/American College of Rheumatology Damage Index (SLICC/ACR DI), and severity by Severity of Disease Index. Fatigue was measured by visual analog scale. RESULTS Significantly lower levels of 25(OH)D were found in SLE patients (17.6 ± 6.9 ng/mL) in comparison to controls (79.0 ± 28.7 ng/mL), with a statistically high significant difference (t = −11.2, P < 0.001). High prevalence of vitamin D insufficiency and deficiency was detected as 73.3% and 23.3%, respectively. Vitamin D had a highly significant negative correlation with SLEDAI (r = −0.495, P < 0.001), SLICC (r = −0.431, P < 0.05), and fatigue (r = −0.436, P < 0.05). CONCLUSION Vitamin D deficiency and insufficiency were found to be prevalent in SLE patients in our study and related to disease activity and fatigue. If needed, routine screening and consequent repletion of vitamin D are recommended in SLE patients. Restoring adequate vitamin D levels in SLE patients should be more explored as a potential yet

  7. Assessing the Comorbidity Gap between Clinical Studies and Prevalence in Elderly Patient Populations

    PubMed Central

    He, Zhe; Charness, Neil; Bian, Jiang; Hogan, William R.

    2016-01-01

    Well-designed and well-conducted clinical studies represent gold standard approaches for generating medical evidence. However, elderly populations are systematically underrepresented in studies across major chronic medical conditions, which has hampered the generalizability (external validity) of studies to the real-world patient population. It is the norm that intervention studies often require a homogeneous cohort to test their hypotheses; therefore older adults with co-medications and comorbidities are often excluded. The purpose of this study is to assess the gap between clinical studies on comorbidities and prevalence in elderly populations derived from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) and the Multiparameter Intelligent Monitoring in Intensive Care II (MIMIC-II) dataset. A comorbidity gap between them was observed and reported in this work.

  8. HBV and HIV co-infection: Prevalence and clinical outcomes in tertiary care hospital Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Akhtar, Ali; Khan, Amer Hayat; Sulaiman, Syed Azhar Syed; Soo, Chow Ting; Khan, Kashifullah

    2016-03-01

    According to WHO, Malaysia has been classified as a concentrated epidemic country due to progression of HIV infection in the population of injecting drug users. The main objectives of current study are to determine the prevalence of HBV among HIV-positive individuals in a tertiary care hospital of Malaysia and to assess the predictors involved in the outcomes of HIV-HBV co-infected patients. A retrospective, cross-sectional study is conducted at Hospital Palau Pinang, Malaysia. The collection of socio-demographic data as well as clinical data is done with the help of data collection form. Data were analyzed after putting the collected values of required data by using statistical software SPSS version 20.0 and P > 0.05 is considered as significant. Results show that the overall prevalence of HBV was 86 (13%) including 495 (74.5%) males and 169 (25.5%) females among a total of 664 HIV-infected patients. It was observed that there is a high prevalence of HIV-HBV co-infection in males 76 (11.4%) as compared to females 10 (1.5%) (P = 0.002). The median age of the study population was 39 years. The statistical significant risk factors involved in the outcomes of HIV-HBV co-infected patients were observed in the variables of gender, age groups, and injecting drug users. The findings of the present study shows that the prevalence of HBV infection among HIV-positive patients was 13% and the risk factors involved in the outcomes of HIV-HBV co-infected patients were gender, age, and intravenous drug users.

  9. Enigmatic Ectopic Fat: Prevalence of Nonalcoholic Fatty Pancreas Disease and Its Associated Factors in a Chinese Population

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Chih‐Yuan; Ou, Horng‐Yih; Chen, Ming‐Fong; Chang, Tien‐Chun; Chang, Chih‐Jen

    2014-01-01

    Background Fatty infiltration of the pancreas is an enigmatic manifestation of ectopic fat deposition in obesity. Studies have shown that pancreatic lipid accumulation interferes with insulin secretion in humans. However, the prevalence of fatty pancreas and its associated factors in the general population remain unclear. The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence of fatty pancreas and its association with diabetes, nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), and cardiometabolic risk factors in a Chinese population. Methods and Results This was a cross‐sectional study. A total of 8097 subjects with or without fatty pancreas (n=1297 and 6800, respectively) were recruited. Each subject was assessed by using abdominal sonography to diagnose NAFLD and fatty pancreas. Clinical and metabolic parameters were compared between groups, and their associations with fatty pancreas were examined. The prevalence of fatty pancreas was 16%. The fatty pancreas group had a significantly greater proportion of subjects with diabetes (12.6% versus 5.2%) and NAFLD (67.2% versus 35.1%) than did the non–fatty pancreas group (P<0.001). In the logistic regression analysis, age (P<0.001), general or central obesity (P<0.001), diabetes (P<0.001), and NAFLD (P<0.001) were independently associated with fatty pancreas after adjustment for sex, lipid profile, alanine transaminase/aspartate transaminase ratio, hypertension, smoking, alcohol drinking, and exercise. Conclusions The prevalence of fatty pancreas is high in the general population. Both diabetes and NAFLD are important associated factors of fatty pancreas, independent of age, sex, adiposity, and other cardiometabolic risk factors. PMID:24572250

  10. Trends in prevalence, incidence and mortality of diagnosed and silent coronary heart disease in Quebec

    PubMed Central

    Blais, C.; Rochette, L.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Introduction: Of all cardiovascular causes of mortality, coronary heart disease (CHD) remains the leading cause of death. Our objectives were to establish trends in the prevalence and incidence of CHD in the province of Quebec, and to determine the proportion of CHD mortality that had no previous CHD diagnosis. Methods: Trends in prevalence, incidence and mortality were examined with a population-based study using the Quebec Integrated Chronic Disease Surveillance System, which links several health administrative databases. Data are presented using two case definitions for Quebecers aged 20 years and over: 1) a validated definition, and 2) CHD causes of death codes added to estimate the proportion of deaths that occurred without any previous CHD diagnosis as a proxy for sudden cardiac death (SCD). Results: In 2012/2013, the crude prevalence of CHD was 9.4% with the first definition (593 000 people). Between 2000/2001 and 2012/2013, the age-standardized prevalence increased by 14%, although it has been decreasing slightly since 2009/2010. Age-standardized incidence and mortality rates decreased by 46% and 26% respectively, and represented a crude rate of 6.9 per 1000 and 5.2% in 2012/2013. The proportion identified only by CHD mortality, our SCD proxy, was only significant for the incident cases (0.38 per 1000 in 2009/2010) and declined over the study period. Conclusion: The prevalence of CHD has tended to decrease in recent years, and incidence and mortality have been declining in Quebec. Most CHD mortality occurs in previously diagnosed patients and only a small proportion of incident cases were not previously identified. PMID:26674188

  11. Impact of farm modernity on the prevalence of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease in dairy farmers.

    PubMed

    Marescaux, Alexia; Degano, Bruno; Soumagne, Thibaud; Thaon, Isabelle; Laplante, Jean-Jacques; Dalphin, Jean-Charles

    2016-02-01

    Dairy farming is associated with an excess of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). The dairy industry has been changing for the past three decades with larger, more efficient farms and potentially less exposure to agents involved in COPD development. However, the impact of farm modernisation on COPD prevalence is unknown. We studied respiratory symptoms, respiratory function by spirometry and tobacco smoking in 575 male dairy farmers working either in traditional or in modern farms in the French Doubs region. COPD was defined by the Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease (GOLD) criterion (forced expiratory volume in 1 s/forced vital capacity (FEV1/FVC) <0.70) and by the Quanjer reference equation (FEV1/FVCprevalence of COPD in dairy farmers was 12.0 ± 2.7% (GOLD), and 5.6 ± 4.1% (LLN definition). By multivariate analysis using the LLN definition, tobacco smoking (OR (95% CI) 3.96 (1.53 to 10.3) and 3.42 (1.32 to 8.84) for models 1 and 2, respectively) and characteristics of traditional farms (1.97 (1.02 to 4.47) and 5.20 (1.73 to 15.64) for models 1 and 2, respectively) were associated with higher COPD prevalence. Working in a traditional farm plus current smoking had an additive effect on COPD prevalence in model 1 and a synergistic effect in model 2. These findings support a positive impact of farm modernity on COPD prevalence in dairy farmers. Occupational and smoking-related risk factors are of nearly the same magnitude.

  12. Impact of farm modernity on the prevalence of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease in dairy farmers.

    PubMed

    Marescaux, Alexia; Degano, Bruno; Soumagne, Thibaud; Thaon, Isabelle; Laplante, Jean-Jacques; Dalphin, Jean-Charles

    2016-02-01

    Dairy farming is associated with an excess of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). The dairy industry has been changing for the past three decades with larger, more efficient farms and potentially less exposure to agents involved in COPD development. However, the impact of farm modernisation on COPD prevalence is unknown. We studied respiratory symptoms, respiratory function by spirometry and tobacco smoking in 575 male dairy farmers working either in traditional or in modern farms in the French Doubs region. COPD was defined by the Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease (GOLD) criterion (forced expiratory volume in 1 s/forced vital capacity (FEV1/FVC) <0.70) and by the Quanjer reference equation (FEV1/FVCprevalence of COPD in dairy farmers was 12.0 ± 2.7% (GOLD), and 5.6 ± 4.1% (LLN definition). By multivariate analysis using the LLN definition, tobacco smoking (OR (95% CI) 3.96 (1.53 to 10.3) and 3.42 (1.32 to 8.84) for models 1 and 2, respectively) and characteristics of traditional farms (1.97 (1.02 to 4.47) and 5.20 (1.73 to 15.64) for models 1 and 2, respectively) were associated with higher COPD prevalence. Working in a traditional farm plus current smoking had an additive effect on COPD prevalence in model 1 and a synergistic effect in model 2. These findings support a positive impact of farm modernity on COPD prevalence in dairy farmers. Occupational and smoking-related risk factors are of nearly the same magnitude. PMID:26675204

  13. Urinary incontinence in women: its prevalence and its management in a health promotion clinic.

    PubMed Central

    Harrison, G L; Memel, D S

    1994-01-01

    BACKGROUND. It has been suggested that regular clinics might improve the management of urinary incontinence in general practice. AIM. A study was undertaken to determine the prevalence of urinary incontinence among women in one general practice and the feasibility of using a health promotion clinic in its management. METHOD. Questionnaires were sent to a 10% sample of women aged 20 years and over on the practice register. Pregnant women were excluded. RESULTS. Of 384 questionnaires sent to eligible women, 314 were completed correctly (82%). The overall reported prevalence of urinary incontinence was 53%; 8% of these women had urge incontinence, 46% had stress incontinence and 43% had mixed incontinence. Incontinence was positively correlated with parity and with gynaecological operation other than hysterectomy and repair of prolapse but not with perineal suturing after childbirth, delivery of a baby weighing 9 lb (4.1 kg) or more or mode of delivery. Twenty seven out of 78 incontinent women (35%) who completed a second questionnaire admitted to worrying about their incontinence but only 10 (13%) had consulted their doctor about the problem. The main reason given for not consulting was that incontinence was a minor inconvenience only. The 167 incontinent women were offered an appointment at a women's clinic but only 13 attended. Of these, 10 were entered into a 12 week treatment trial. Various treatments were offered, such as the women being taught bladder training and pelvic floor exercises. One woman was lost to follow up, and for eight out of nine women their continence had improved, both subjectively and objectively. CONCLUSION. Urinary incontinence in women is a common problem. It can be successfully diagnosed and treated in general practice but low attendance makes the health promotion clinic setting an inefficient means of achieving this. PMID:8185987

  14. Prevalence and Determinants of Physician Participation in Conducting Pharmaceutical-sponsored Clinical Trials and Lectures

    PubMed Central

    Ashar, Bimal H; Miller, Redonda G; Getz, Kelly J; Powe, Nell R

    2004-01-01

    BACKGROUND The relationship between physicians and the pharmaceutical industry is controversial because of the potential for conflicts of interest. However, little empirical evidence exists on the extent of physician participation in activities sponsored by pharmaceutical companies. OBJECTIVES To determine the prevalence of participation of internal medicine physicians in clinical trials and lectures sponsored by pharmaceutical companies and to describe factors that are associated with such participation. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS We conducted a cross-sectional regional survey of 1,000 Maryland internal medicine physicians between February 2000 and January 2001 in order to measure the prevalence of physician participation in pharmaceutical-sponsored