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Sample records for prevalent antisense transcription

  1. Strand-specific community RNA-seq reveals prevalent and dynamic antisense transcription in human gut microbiota

    PubMed Central

    Bao, Guanhui; Wang, Mingjie; Doak, Thomas G.; Ye, Yuzhen

    2015-01-01

    Metagenomics and other meta-omics approaches (including metatranscriptomics) provide insights into the composition and function of microbial communities living in different environments or animal hosts. Metatranscriptomics research provides an unprecedented opportunity to examine gene regulation for many microbial species simultaneously, and more importantly, for the majority that are unculturable microbial species, in their natural environments (or hosts). Current analyses of metatranscriptomic datasets focus on the detection of gene expression levels and the study of the relationship between changes of gene expression and changes of environment. As a demonstration of utilizing metatranscriptomics beyond these common analyses, we developed a computational and statistical procedure to analyze the antisense transcripts in strand-specific metatranscriptomic datasets. Antisense RNAs encoded on the DNA strand opposite a gene’s CDS have the potential to form extensive base-pairing interactions with the corresponding sense RNA, and can have important regulatory functions. Most studies of antisense RNAs in bacteria are rather recent, are mostly based on transcriptome analysis, and have been applied mainly to single bacterial species. Application of our approaches to human gut-associated metatranscriptomic datasets allowed us to survey antisense transcription for a large number of bacterial species associated with human beings. The ratio of protein coding genes with antisense transcription ranges from 0 to 35.8% (median = 10.0%) among 47 species. Our results show that antisense transcription is dynamic, varying between human individuals. Functional enrichment analysis revealed a preference of certain gene functions for antisense transcription, and transposase genes are among the most prominent ones (but we also observed antisense transcription in bacterial house-keeping genes). PMID:26388849

  2. Strand-specific community RNA-seq reveals prevalent and dynamic antisense transcription in human gut microbiota.

    PubMed

    Bao, Guanhui; Wang, Mingjie; Doak, Thomas G; Ye, Yuzhen

    2015-01-01

    Metagenomics and other meta-omics approaches (including metatranscriptomics) provide insights into the composition and function of microbial communities living in different environments or animal hosts. Metatranscriptomics research provides an unprecedented opportunity to examine gene regulation for many microbial species simultaneously, and more importantly, for the majority that are unculturable microbial species, in their natural environments (or hosts). Current analyses of metatranscriptomic datasets focus on the detection of gene expression levels and the study of the relationship between changes of gene expression and changes of environment. As a demonstration of utilizing metatranscriptomics beyond these common analyses, we developed a computational and statistical procedure to analyze the antisense transcripts in strand-specific metatranscriptomic datasets. Antisense RNAs encoded on the DNA strand opposite a gene's CDS have the potential to form extensive base-pairing interactions with the corresponding sense RNA, and can have important regulatory functions. Most studies of antisense RNAs in bacteria are rather recent, are mostly based on transcriptome analysis, and have been applied mainly to single bacterial species. Application of our approaches to human gut-associated metatranscriptomic datasets allowed us to survey antisense transcription for a large number of bacterial species associated with human beings. The ratio of protein coding genes with antisense transcription ranges from 0 to 35.8% (median = 10.0%) among 47 species. Our results show that antisense transcription is dynamic, varying between human individuals. Functional enrichment analysis revealed a preference of certain gene functions for antisense transcription, and transposase genes are among the most prominent ones (but we also observed antisense transcription in bacterial house-keeping genes).

  3. Overlapping Antisense Transcription in the Human Genome

    PubMed Central

    Fahey, M. E.; Moore, T. F.

    2002-01-01

    Accumulating evidence indicates an important role for non-coding RNA molecules in eukaryotic cell regulation. A small number of coding and non-coding overlapping antisense transcripts (OATs) in eukaryotes have been reported, some of which regulate expression of the corresponding sense transcript. The prevalence of this phenomenon is unknown, but there may be an enrichment of such transcripts at imprinted gene loci. Taking a bioinformatics approach, we systematically searched a human mRNA database (RefSeq) for complementary regions that might facilitate pairing with other transcripts. We report 56 pairs of overlapping transcripts, in which each member of the pair is transcribed from the same locus. This allows us to make an estimate of 1000 for the minimum number of such transcript pairs in the entire human genome. This is a surprisingly large number of overlapping gene pairs and, clearly, some of the overlaps may not be functionally significant. Nonetheless, this may indicate an important general role for overlapping antisense control in gene regulation. EST databases were also investigated in order to address the prevalence of cases of imprinted genes with associated non-coding overlapping, antisense transcripts. However, EST databases were found to be completely inappropriate for this purpose. PMID:18628857

  4. Antisense transcription as a tool to tune gene expression.

    PubMed

    Brophy, Jennifer A N; Voigt, Christopher A

    2016-01-14

    A surprise that has emerged from transcriptomics is the prevalence of genomic antisense transcription, which occurs counter to gene orientation. While frequent, the roles of antisense transcription in regulation are poorly understood. We built a synthetic system in Escherichia coli to study how antisense transcription can change the expression of a gene and tune the response characteristics of a regulatory circuit. We developed a new genetic part that consists of a unidirectional terminator followed by a constitutive antisense promoter and demonstrate that this part represses gene expression proportionally to the antisense promoter strength. Chip-based oligo synthesis was applied to build a large library of 5,668 terminator-promoter combinations that was used to control the expression of three repressors (PhlF, SrpR, and TarA) in a simple genetic circuit (NOT gate). Using the library, we demonstrate that antisense promoters can be used to tune the threshold of a regulatory circuit without impacting other properties of its response function. Finally, we determined the relative contributions of antisense RNA and transcriptional interference to repressing gene expression and introduce a biophysical model to capture the impact of RNA polymerase collisions on gene repression. This work quantifies the role of antisense transcription in regulatory networks and introduces a new mode to control gene expression that has been previously overlooked in genetic engineering.

  5. Downstream Antisense Transcription Predicts Genomic Features That Define the Specific Chromatin Environment at Mammalian Promoters

    PubMed Central

    Lavender, Christopher A.; Hoffman, Jackson A.; Trotter, Kevin W.; Gilchrist, Daniel A.; Bennett, Brian D.; Burkholder, Adam B.; Fargo, David C.; Archer, Trevor K.

    2016-01-01

    Antisense transcription is a prevalent feature at mammalian promoters. Previous studies have primarily focused on antisense transcription initiating upstream of genes. Here, we characterize promoter-proximal antisense transcription downstream of gene transcription starts sites in human breast cancer cells, investigating the genomic context of downstream antisense transcription. We find extensive correlations between antisense transcription and features associated with the chromatin environment at gene promoters. Antisense transcription downstream of promoters is widespread, with antisense transcription initiation observed within 2 kb of 28% of gene transcription start sites. Antisense transcription initiates between nucleosomes regularly positioned downstream of these promoters. The nucleosomes between gene and downstream antisense transcription start sites carry histone modifications associated with active promoters, such as H3K4me3 and H3K27ac. This region is bound by chromatin remodeling and histone modifying complexes including SWI/SNF subunits and HDACs, suggesting that antisense transcription or resulting RNA transcripts contribute to the creation and maintenance of a promoter-associated chromatin environment. Downstream antisense transcription overlays additional regulatory features, such as transcription factor binding, DNA accessibility, and the downstream edge of promoter-associated CpG islands. These features suggest an important role for antisense transcription in the regulation of gene expression and the maintenance of a promoter-associated chromatin environment. PMID:27487356

  6. Antisense transcription licenses nascent transcripts to mediate transcriptional gene silencing

    PubMed Central

    Dang, Yunkun; Cheng, Jiasen; Sun, Xianyun; Zhou, Zhipeng; Liu, Yi

    2016-01-01

    In eukaryotes, antisense transcription can regulate sense transcription by induction of epigenetic modifications. We showed previously that antisense transcription triggers Dicer-independent siRNA (disiRNA) production and disiRNA locus DNA methylation (DLDM) in Neurospora crassa. Here we show that the conserved exonuclease ERI-1 (enhanced RNAi-1) is a critical component in this process. Antisense transcription and ERI-1 binding to target RNAs are necessary and sufficient to trigger DLDM. Convergent transcription causes stalling of RNA polymerase II during transcription, which permits ERI-1 to bind nascent RNAs in the nucleus and recruit a histone methyltransferase complex that catalyzes chromatin modifications. Furthermore, we show that, in the cytoplasm, ERI-1 targets hundreds of transcripts from loci without antisense transcription to regulate RNA stability. Together, our results demonstrate a critical role for transcription kinetics in long noncoding RNA-mediated epigenetic modifications and identify ERI-1 as an important regulator of cotranscriptional gene silencing and post-transcriptional RNA metabolism. PMID:27856616

  7. Widespread Antisense Transcription in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Dornenburg, James E.; DeVita, Anne M.; Palumbo, Michael J.; Wade, Joseph T.

    2010-01-01

    ABSTRACT The vast majority of annotated transcripts in bacteria are mRNAs. Here we identify ~1,000 antisense transcripts in the model bacterium Escherichia coli. We propose that these transcripts are generated by promiscuous transcription initiation within genes and that many of them regulate expression of the overlapping gene. PMID:20689751

  8. Strategies to identify natural antisense transcripts.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yulong; Li, Dijie; Zhang, Ru; Peng, Shang; Zhang, Ge; Yang, Tuanmin; Qian, Airong

    2017-01-01

    Natural antisense transcripts, originally considered as transcriptional noises arising from so-called "junk DNA″, are recently recognized as important modulators for gene regulation. They are prevalent in nearly all realms of life and have been found to modulate gene expression positively or negatively. By affecting almost all stages of gene expression range from pre-transcriptional, transcriptional and post-transcriptional to translation, NATs are fundamentally involved in various biological processes. However, compared to increasing huge data from transcriptional analysis especially high-throughput sequencing technologies (such as RNA-seq), limited functional NATs (around 70) are so far reported, which hinder our advanced comprehensive understanding for this field. Hence, efficient strategies for identifying NATs are urgently desired. In this review, we discussed the current strategies for identifying NATs, with a focus on the advantages, disadvantages, and applications of methods isolating functional NATs. Moreover, publicly available databases for NATs were also discussed. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. and Société Française de Biochimie et Biologie Moléculaire (SFBBM). All rights reserved.

  9. Using both strands: The fundamental nature of antisense transcription.

    PubMed

    Murray, Struan C; Mellor, Jane

    2016-01-01

    Non-coding transcription across the antisense strands of genes is an abundant, pervasive process in eukaryotes from yeast to humans, however its biological function remains elusive. Here, we provide commentary on a recent study of ours, which demonstrates a genome-wide role for antisense transcription: establishing a unique, dynamic chromatin architecture over genes. Antisense transcription increases the level of nucleosome occupancy and histone acetylation at the promoter and body of genes, without necessarily modulating the level of protein-coding sense transcription. It is also associated with high levels of histone turnover. By allowing genes to sample a wider range of chromatin configurations, antisense transcription could serve to make genes more sensitive to changing signals, priming them for responses to developmental programs or stressful cellular environments. Given the abundance of antisense transcription and the breadth of these chromatin changes, we propose that antisense transcription represents a fundamental, canonical feature of eukaryotic genes.

  10. Natural antisense and noncoding RNA transcripts as potential drug targets.

    PubMed

    Wahlestedt, Claes

    2006-06-01

    Information on the complexity of mammalian RNA transcription has increased greatly in the past few years. Notably, thousands of sense transcripts (conventional protein-coding genes) have antisense transcript partners, most of which are noncoding. Interestingly, a number of antisense transcripts regulate the expression of their sense partners, either in a discordant (antisense knockdown results in sense-transcript elevation) or concordant (antisense knockdown results in concomitant sense-transcript reduction) manner. Two new pharmacological strategies based on the knockdown of antisense RNA transcripts by siRNA (or another RNA targeting principle) are proposed in this review. In the case of discordant regulation, knockdown of antisense transcript elevates the expression of the conventional (sense) gene, thereby conceivably mimicking agonist-activator action. In the case of concordant regulation, knockdown of antisense transcript, or concomitant knockdown of antisense and sense transcripts, results in an additive or even synergistic reduction of the conventional gene expression. Although both strategies have been demonstrated to be valid in cell culture, it remains to be seen whether they provide advantages in other contexts.

  11. Natural Antisense Transcripts and Long Non-Coding RNA in Neurospora crassa

    PubMed Central

    Arthanari, Yamini; Heintzen, Christian; Griffiths-Jones, Sam; Crosthwaite, Susan K.

    2014-01-01

    The prevalence of long non-coding RNAs (lncRNA) and natural antisense transcripts (NATs) has been reported in a variety of organisms. While a consensus has yet to be reached on their global importance, an increasing number of examples have been shown to be functional, regulating gene expression at the transcriptional and post-transcriptional level. Here, we use RNA sequencing data from the ABI SOLiD platform to identify lncRNA and NATs obtained from samples of the filamentous fungus Neurospora crassa grown under different light and temperature conditions. We identify 939 novel lncRNAs, of which 477 are antisense to annotated genes. Across the whole dataset, the extent of overlap between sense and antisense transcripts is large: 371 sense/antisense transcripts are complementary over 500 nts or more and 236 overlap by more than 1000 nts. Most prevalent are 3′ end overlaps between convergently transcribed sense/antisense pairs, but examples of divergently transcribed pairs and nested transcripts are also present. We confirm the expression of a subset of sense/antisense transcript pairs by qPCR. We examine the size, types of overlap and expression levels under the different environmental stimuli of light and temperature, and identify 11 lncRNAs that are up-regulated in response to light. We also find differences in transcript length and the position of introns between protein-coding transcripts that have antisense expression and transcripts with no antisense expression. These results demonstrate the ability of N. crassa lncRNAs and NATs to be regulated by different environmental stimuli and provide the scope for further investigation into the function of NATs. PMID:24621812

  12. Natural antisense transcripts of Alzheimer's disease associated genes.

    PubMed

    Guo, Jin-Hu; Cheng, Hai-Peng; Yu, Long; Zhao, Shouyuan

    2006-04-01

    Natural antisense transcripts (NATs), also named endogenous antisense transcripts, are a class of genes whose role in controlling gene expression is becoming more and more relevant. NATs might play important roles in gene expression and translation regulation. Present work investigated the presence of NATs of Alzheimer's disease associated genes including PRESENILIN1, PRESENILIN2, BACE1, BACE2, APP, APOE, TAU (MAPT), PRION, alpha-SYNUCLEIN (SNCA), NICASTRIN, PEN2, APH1A, APH1B as well as CD147 (BASIGIN), and the results revealed that APP, BACE2, APH1A, TAU, CD147 and alpha-SYNUCLEIN contain natural antisense transcripts. These NATs were characterized according to the sense-antisense overlapping information and potential functional mechanisms were proposed. Present findings provide preliminary but important information about transcription regulation of AD associated genes, which would further our understanding of the gene expression regulation of AD, and also suggest a novel potential strategy for the therapy of AD.

  13. Rho and NusG suppress pervasive antisense transcription in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Peters, Jason M.; Mooney, Rachel A.; Grass, Jeffrey A.; Jessen, Erik D.; Tran, Frances; Landick, Robert

    2012-01-01

    Despite the prevalence of antisense transcripts in bacterial transcriptomes, little is known about how their synthesis is controlled. We report that a major function of the Escherichia coli termination factor Rho and its cofactor, NusG, is suppression of ubiquitous antisense transcription genome-wide. Rho binds C-rich unstructured nascent RNA (high C/G ratio) prior to its ATP-dependent dissociation of transcription complexes. NusG is required for efficient termination at minority subsets (∼20%) of both antisense and sense Rho-dependent terminators with lower C/G ratio sequences. In contrast, a widely studied nusA deletion proposed to compromise Rho-dependent termination had no effect on antisense or sense Rho-dependent terminators in vivo. Global colocalization of the histone-like nucleoid-structuring protein (H-NS) with Rho-dependent terminators and genetic interactions between hns and rho suggest that H-NS aids Rho in suppression of antisense transcription. The combined actions of Rho, NusG, and H-NS appear to be analogous to the Sen1–Nrd1–Nab3 and nucleosome systems that suppress antisense transcription in eukaryotes. PMID:23207917

  14. Gene Isoform Specificity through Enhancer-Associated Antisense Transcription

    PubMed Central

    Onodera, Courtney S.; Underwood, Jason G.; Katzman, Sol; Jacobs, Frank; Greenberg, David; Salama, Sofie R.; Haussler, David

    2012-01-01

    Enhancers and antisense RNAs play key roles in transcriptional regulation through differing mechanisms. Recent studies have demonstrated that enhancers are often associated with non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs), yet the functional role of these enhancer:ncRNA associations is unclear. Using RNA-Sequencing to interrogate the transcriptomes of undifferentiated mouse embryonic stem cells (mESCs) and their derived neural precursor cells (NPs), we identified two novel enhancer-associated antisense transcripts that appear to control isoform-specific expression of their overlapping protein-coding genes. In each case, an enhancer internal to a protein-coding gene drives an antisense RNA in mESCs but not in NPs. Expression of the antisense RNA is correlated with expression of a shorter isoform of the associated sense gene that is not present when the antisense RNA is not expressed. We demonstrate that expression of the antisense transcripts as well as expression of the short sense isoforms correlates with enhancer activity at these two loci. Further, overexpression and knockdown experiments suggest the antisense transcripts regulate expression of their associated sense genes via cis-acting mechanisms. Interestingly, the protein-coding genes involved in these two examples, Zmynd8 and Brd1, share many functional domains, yet their antisense ncRNAs show no homology to each other and are not present in non-murine mammalian lineages, such as the primate lineage. The lack of homology in the antisense ncRNAs indicates they have evolved independently of each other and suggests that this mode of lineage-specific transcriptional regulation may be more widespread in other cell types and organisms. Our findings present a new view of enhancer action wherein enhancers may direct isoform-specific expression of genes through ncRNA intermediates. PMID:22937057

  15. Altered antisense-to-sense transcript ratios in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Maruyama, Reo; Shipitsin, Michail; Choudhury, Sibgat; Wu, Zhenhua; Protopopov, Alexei; Yao, Jun; Lo, Pang-Kuo; Bessarabova, Marina; Ishkin, Alex; Nikolsky, Yuri; Liu, X Shirley; Sukumar, Saraswati; Polyak, Kornelia

    2012-02-21

    Transcriptome profiling studies suggest that a large fraction of the genome is transcribed and many transcripts function independent of their protein coding potential. The relevance of noncoding RNAs (ncRNAs) in normal physiological processes and in tumorigenesis is increasingly recognized. Here, we describe consistent and significant differences in the distribution of sense and antisense transcripts between normal and neoplastic breast tissues. Many of the differentially expressed antisense transcripts likely represent long ncRNAs. A subset of genes that mainly generate antisense transcripts in normal but not cancer cells is involved in essential metabolic processes. These findings suggest fundamental differences in global RNA regulation between normal and cancer cells that might play a role in tumorigenesis.

  16. Natural antisense transcripts associated with salinity response in alfalfa

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Natural antisense transcripts (NATs) are long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) complimentary to the messenger (sense) RNA (Wang et al. 2014). Many of them are involved in regulation of their own sense transcripts thus playing pivotal biological roles in all processes of organismal development and responses...

  17. Bacterial antisense RNAs are mainly the product of transcriptional noise

    PubMed Central

    Lloréns-Rico, Verónica; Cano, Jaime; Kamminga, Tjerko; Gil, Rosario; Latorre, Amparo; Chen, Wei-Hua; Bork, Peer; Glass, John I.; Serrano, Luis; Lluch-Senar, Maria

    2016-01-01

    cis-Encoded antisense RNAs (asRNAs) are widespread along bacterial transcriptomes. However, the role of most of these RNAs remains unknown, and there is an ongoing discussion as to what extent these transcripts are the result of transcriptional noise. We show, by comparative transcriptomics of 20 bacterial species and one chloroplast, that the number of asRNAs is exponentially dependent on the genomic AT content and that expression of asRNA at low levels exerts little impact in terms of energy consumption. A transcription model simulating mRNA and asRNA production indicates that the asRNA regulatory effect is only observed above certain expression thresholds, substantially higher than physiological transcript levels. These predictions were verified experimentally by overexpressing nine different asRNAs in Mycoplasma pneumoniae. Our results suggest that most of the antisense transcripts found in bacteria are the consequence of transcriptional noise, arising at spurious promoters throughout the genome. PMID:26973873

  18. [Antisense transcription within the hns locus of Escherichia coli].

    PubMed

    Tututkina, M N; Shavkunov, K S; Masulis, I S; Ozolin', O N

    2010-01-01

    Scanning the entire genome of E. coli by means of pattern-recognition software PlatProm spotted out more than a thousand of potential start points for antisense transcription. Taking into account possible role of antisense RNAs in the cell regulatory networks, our top-priority interest was focused on the promoter-like sites found within genes of transcription regulators. One of them (hns) encodes a major nucleoid protein affecting expression pattern of many genomic loci. Several potential start points for antisense transcription were found within its coding sequence. Gel-retardation assays, potassium permanganate and DNAse I foot-printings confirmed the ability of the intragenic promoter located approximately 280 bp downstream of ATG to bind RNA polymerase. Primer extension revealed the cDNA of the expected size while Northern blot hybridization assumes the presence of aRNA among cellular RNAs. Relative abundance of antisense RNA and hns-mRNA in vivo exhibited dependence on growth conditions thus assuming existence of regulatory pathways keeping cellular concentration of these two transcripts at the optimal level.

  19. H2A.Z marks antisense promoters and has positive effects on antisense transcript levels in budding yeast.

    PubMed

    Gu, Muxin; Naiyachit, Yanin; Wood, Thomas J; Millar, Catherine B

    2015-02-19

    The histone variant H2A.Z, which has been reported to have both activating and repressive effects on gene expression, is known to occupy nucleosomes at the 5' ends of protein-coding genes. We now find that H2A.Z is also significantly enriched in gene coding regions and at the 3' ends of genes in budding yeast, where it co-localises with histone marks associated with active promoters. By comparing H2A.Z binding to global gene expression in budding yeast strains engineered so that normally unstable transcripts are abundant, we show that H2A.Z is required for normal levels of antisense transcripts as well as sense ones. High levels of H2A.Z at antisense promoters are associated with decreased antisense transcript levels when H2A.Z is deleted, indicating that H2A.Z has an activating effect on antisense transcripts. Decreases in antisense transcripts affected by H2A.Z are accompanied by increased levels of paired sense transcripts. The effect of H2A.Z on protein coding gene expression is a reflection of its importance for normal levels of both sense and antisense transcripts.

  20. Pseudogenes as an alternative source of natural antisense transcripts

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Naturally occurring antisense transcripts (NATs) are non-coding RNAs that may regulate the activity of sense transcripts to which they bind because of complementarity. NATs that are not located in the gene they regulate (trans-NATs) have better chances to evolve than cis-NATs, which is evident when the sense strand of the cis-NAT is part of a protein coding gene. However, the generation of a trans-NAT requires the formation of a relatively large region of complementarity to the gene it regulates. Results Pseudogene formation may be one evolutionary mechanism that generates trans-NATs to the parental gene. For example, this could occur if the parental gene is regulated by a cis-NAT that is copied as a trans-NAT in the pseudogene. To support this we identified human pseudogenes with a trans-NAT to the parental gene in their antisense strand by analysis of the database of expressed sequence tags (ESTs). We found that the mutations that appeared in these trans-NATs after the pseudogene formation do not show the flat distribution that would be expected in a non functional transcript. Instead, we found higher similarity to the parental gene in a region nearby the 3' end of the trans-NATs. Conclusions Our results do not imply a functional relation of the trans-NAT arising from pseudogenes over their respective parental genes but add evidence for it and stress the importance of duplication mechanisms of genetic material in the generation of non-coding RNAs. We also provide a plausible explanation for the large transcripts that can be found in the antisense strand of some pseudogenes. PMID:21047404

  1. Pseudogenes as an alternative source of natural antisense transcripts.

    PubMed

    Muro, Enrique M; Andrade-Navarro, Miguel A

    2010-11-03

    Naturally occurring antisense transcripts (NATs) are non-coding RNAs that may regulate the activity of sense transcripts to which they bind because of complementarity. NATs that are not located in the gene they regulate (trans-NATs) have better chances to evolve than cis-NATs, which is evident when the sense strand of the cis-NAT is part of a protein coding gene. However, the generation of a trans-NAT requires the formation of a relatively large region of complementarity to the gene it regulates. Pseudogene formation may be one evolutionary mechanism that generates trans-NATs to the parental gene. For example, this could occur if the parental gene is regulated by a cis-NAT that is copied as a trans-NAT in the pseudogene. To support this we identified human pseudogenes with a trans-NAT to the parental gene in their antisense strand by analysis of the database of expressed sequence tags (ESTs). We found that the mutations that appeared in these trans-NATs after the pseudogene formation do not show the flat distribution that would be expected in a non functional transcript. Instead, we found higher similarity to the parental gene in a region nearby the 3' end of the trans-NATs. Our results do not imply a functional relation of the trans-NAT arising from pseudogenes over their respective parental genes but add evidence for it and stress the importance of duplication mechanisms of genetic material in the generation of non-coding RNAs. We also provide a plausible explanation for the large transcripts that can be found in the antisense strand of some pseudogenes.

  2. An imprinted antisense transcript at the human GNAS1 locus.

    PubMed

    Hayward, B E; Bonthron, D T

    2000-03-22

    Recent studies of the GNAS1 gene have shown a highly complex imprinted expression pattern, with paternally, maternally and biallelically derived protein products, raising questions regarding how such transcriptional complexity is established and maintained. GNAS1 was originally identified as the gene encoding an important and widely expressed signal transduction protein, the alpha subunit of the stimulatory G protein G(s). Partial G(s)alpha deficiency results in the hormone resistance syndrome, pseudohypoparathyroidism type 1a. G(s)alpha is encoded by exons 1-13 of GNAS1 and, in most tissues at least, expression of this transcript is biallelic. Two large upstream exons, however, have monoallelic expression patterns, and in each case their transcripts splice onto GNAS1 exon 2. The most 5' of these is maternally expressed, and encodes neuroendocrine secretory protein 55 (NESP55), whose coding region does not overlap with that of G(s)alpha. The other exon, 14 kb further 3', is paternally expressed, and encodes XL(alpha)s (extra large alphas-like protein), translated in-frame with G(s)alpha exons 2-13. This close proximity of two oppositely imprinted promoters suggested the likelihood of important regulatory interactions between them, and to investigate this possibility we have performed a search for other transcripts in the region. Here we show that the maternally methylated region upstream of the XL(alpha)s exon gives rise to a spliced polyadenylated antisense transcript, which spans the upstream NESP55 region. This antisense transcript is imprinted, and expressed only from the paternal allele, suggesting that it may have a specific role in suppressing in cis the activity of the paternal NESP55 allele.

  3. Mechanisms of Antisense Transcription Initiation from the 3′ End of the GAL10 Coding Sequence In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Malik, Shivani; Durairaj, Geetha

    2013-01-01

    In spite of the important regulatory functions of antisense transcripts in gene expression, it remains unknown how antisense transcription is initiated. Recent studies implicated RNA polymerase II in initiation of antisense transcription. However, how RNA polymerase II is targeted to initiate antisense transcription has not been elucidated. Here, we have analyzed the association of RNA polymerase II with the antisense initiation site at the 3′ end of the GAL10 coding sequence in dextrose-containing growth medium that induces antisense transcription. We find that RNA polymerase II is targeted to the antisense initiation site at GAL10 by Reb1p activator as well as general transcription factors (e.g., TFIID, TFIIB, and Mediator) for antisense transcription initiation. Intriguingly, while GAL10 antisense transcription is dependent on TFIID, its sense transcription does not require TFIID. Further, the Gal4p activator that promotes GAL10 sense transcription is dispensable for antisense transcription. Moreover, the proteasome that facilitates GAL10 sense transcription does not control its antisense transcription. Taken together, our results reveal that GAL10 sense and antisense transcriptions are regulated differently and shed much light on the mechanisms of antisense transcription initiation. PMID:23836882

  4. Genome-wide characterization of human L1 antisense promoter-driven transcripts.

    PubMed

    Criscione, Steven W; Theodosakis, Nicholas; Micevic, Goran; Cornish, Toby C; Burns, Kathleen H; Neretti, Nicola; Rodić, Nemanja

    2016-06-14

    Long INterspersed Element-1 (LINE-1 or L1) is the only autonomously active, transposable element in the human genome. L1 sequences comprise approximately 17 % of the human genome, but only the evolutionarily recent, human-specific subfamily is retrotransposition competent. The L1 promoter has a bidirectional orientation containing a sense promoter that drives the transcription of two proteins required for retrotransposition and an antisense promoter. The L1 antisense promoter can drive transcription of chimeric transcripts: 5' L1 antisense sequences spliced to the exons of neighboring genes. The impact of L1 antisense promoter activity on cellular transcriptomes is poorly understood. To investigate this, we analyzed GenBank ESTs for messenger RNAs that initiate in the L1 antisense promoter. We identified 988 putative L1 antisense chimeric transcripts, 911 of which have not been previously reported. These appear to be alternative genic transcripts, sense-oriented with respect to gene and initiating near, but typically downstream of, the gene transcriptional start site. In multiple cell lines, L1 antisense promoters display enrichment for YY1 transcription factor and histone modifications associated with active promoters. Global run-on sequencing data support the activity of the L1 antisense promoter. We independently detected 124 L1 antisense chimeric transcripts using long read Pacific Biosciences RNA-seq data. Furthermore, we validated four chimeric transcripts by quantitative RT-PCR and Sanger sequencing and demonstrated that they are readily detectable in many normal human tissues. We present a comprehensive characterization of human L1 antisense promoter-driven transcripts and provide substantial evidence that they are transcribed in a variety of human cell-types. Our findings reveal a new wide-reaching aspect of L1 biology by identifying antisense transcripts affecting as many as 4 % of all human genes.

  5. Antisense-mediated FLC transcriptional repression requires the P-TEFb transcription elongation factor

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhi-Wei; Wu, Zhe; Raitskin, Oleg; Sun, Qianwen; Dean, Caroline

    2014-01-01

    The functional significance of noncoding transcripts is currently a major question in biology. We have been studying the function of a set of antisense transcripts called COOLAIR that encompass the whole transcription unit of the Arabidopsis floral repressor FLOWERING LOCUS C (FLC). Alternative polyadenylation of COOLAIR transcripts correlates with different FLC sense expression states. Suppressor mutagenesis aimed at understanding the importance of this sense–antisense transcriptional circuitry has identified a role for Arabidopsis cyclin-dependent kinase C (CDKC;2) in FLC repression. CDKC;2 functions in an Arabidopsis positive transcription elongation factor b (P-TEFb) complex and influences global RNA polymerase II (Pol II) Ser2 phosphorylation levels. CDKC;2 activity directly promotes COOLAIR transcription but does not affect an FLC transgene missing the COOLAIR promoter. In the endogenous gene context, however, the reduction of COOLAIR transcription by cdkc;2 disrupts a COOLAIR-mediated repression mechanism that increases FLC expression. This disruption then feeds back to indirectly increase COOLAIR expression. This tight interconnection between sense and antisense transcription, together with differential promoter sensitivity to P-TEFb, is central to quantitative regulation of this important floral repressor gene. PMID:24799695

  6. Mutually exclusive sense–antisense transcription at FLC facilitates environmentally induced gene repression

    PubMed Central

    Rosa, Stefanie; Duncan, Susan; Dean, Caroline

    2016-01-01

    Antisense transcription through genic regions is pervasive in most genomes; however, its functional significance is still unclear. We are studying the role of antisense transcripts (COOLAIR) in the cold-induced, epigenetic silencing of Arabidopsis FLOWERING LOCUS C (FLC), a regulator of the transition to reproduction. Here we use single-molecule RNA FISH to address the mechanistic relationship of FLC and COOLAIR transcription at the cellular level. We demonstrate that while sense and antisense transcripts can co-occur in the same cell they are mutually exclusive at individual loci. Cold strongly upregulates COOLAIR transcription in an increased number of cells and through the mutually exclusive relationship facilitates shutdown of sense FLC transcription in cis. COOLAIR transcripts form dense clouds at each locus, acting to influence FLC transcription through changed H3K36me3 dynamics. These results may have general implications for other loci showing both sense and antisense transcription. PMID:27713408

  7. Antisense-mediated exon skipping to reframe transcripts.

    PubMed

    Turczynski, Sandrina; Titeux, Matthias; Pironon, Nathalie; Hovnanian, Alain

    2012-01-01

    Numerous genetic disorders are caused by loss-of-function mutations that disrupt the open reading frame of the gene either by nonsense or by frameshift (insertion, deletion, indel, or splicing) mutations. Most of the time, the result is the absence of functional protein synthesis due to mRNA degradation by nonsense-mediated mRNA decay, or rapid degradation of a truncated protein. Antisense-based splicing modulation is a powerful tool that has the potential to treat genetic disorders by restoring the open reading frame through selective removal of the mutated exon, or by restoring correct splicing.We have developed this approach for a severe genetic skin disorder, recessive dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa, caused by mutations in the COL7A1 gene encoding type VII collagen. This gene is particularly suited for exon-skipping approaches due to its unique genomic structure. It is composed of 118 exons, 83 of which are in frame. Moreover, these exons encode a single repetitive collagenous domain.Using this gene as an example, we describe general methods that demonstrate the feasibility and efficacy of the antisense-mediated exon-skipping strategy to reframe transcripts.

  8. Cis-Antisense Transcription Gives Rise to Tunable Genetic Switch Behavior: A Mathematical Modeling Approach.

    PubMed

    Bordoy, Antoni E; Chatterjee, Anushree

    2015-01-01

    Antisense transcription has been extensively recognized as a regulatory mechanism for gene expression across all kingdoms of life. Despite the broad importance and extensive experimental determination of cis-antisense transcription, relatively little is known about its role in controlling cellular switching responses. Growing evidence suggests the presence of non-coding cis-antisense RNAs that regulate gene expression via antisense interaction. Recent studies also indicate the role of transcriptional interference in regulating expression of neighboring genes due to traffic of RNA polymerases from adjacent promoter regions. Previous models investigate these mechanisms independently, however, little is understood about how cells utilize coupling of these mechanisms in advantageous ways that could also be used to design novel synthetic genetic devices. Here, we present a mathematical modeling framework for antisense transcription that combines the effects of both transcriptional interference and cis-antisense regulation. We demonstrate the tunability of transcriptional interference through various parameters, and that coupling of transcriptional interference with cis-antisense RNA interaction gives rise to hypersensitive switches in expression of both antisense genes. When implementing additional positive and negative feed-back loops from proteins encoded by these genes, the system response acquires a bistable behavior. Our model shows that combining these multiple-levels of regulation allows fine-tuning of system parameters to give rise to a highly tunable output, ranging from a simple-first order response to biologically complex higher-order response such as tunable bistable switch. We identify important parameters affecting the cellular switch response in order to provide the design principles for tunable gene expression using antisense transcription. This presents an important insight into functional role of antisense transcription and its importance towards

  9. Two Distinct Repressive Mechanisms for Histone 3 Lysine 4 Methylation through Promoting 3′-End Antisense Transcription

    PubMed Central

    Margaritis, Thanasis; Oreal, Vincent; Brabers, Nathalie; Maestroni, Laetitia; Vitaliano-Prunier, Adeline; Benschop, Joris J.; van Hooff, Sander; van Leenen, Dik

    2012-01-01

    Histone H3 di- and trimethylation on lysine 4 are major chromatin marks that correlate with active transcription. The influence of these modifications on transcription itself is, however, poorly understood. We have investigated the roles of H3K4 methylation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae by determining genome-wide expression-profiles of mutants in the Set1 complex, COMPASS, that lays down these marks. Loss of H3K4 trimethylation has virtually no effect on steady-state or dynamically-changing mRNA levels. Combined loss of H3K4 tri- and dimethylation results in steady-state mRNA upregulation and delays in the repression kinetics of specific groups of genes. COMPASS-repressed genes have distinct H3K4 methylation patterns, with enrichment of H3K4me3 at the 3′-end, indicating that repression is coupled to 3′-end antisense transcription. Further analyses reveal that repression is mediated by H3K4me3-dependent 3′-end antisense transcription in two ways. For a small group of genes including PHO84, repression is mediated by a previously reported trans-effect that requires the antisense transcript itself. For the majority of COMPASS-repressed genes, however, it is the process of 3′-end antisense transcription itself that is the important factor for repression. Strand-specific qPCR analyses of various mutants indicate that this more prevalent mechanism of COMPASS-mediated repression requires H3K4me3-dependent 3′-end antisense transcription to lay down H3K4me2, which seems to serve as the actual repressive mark. Removal of the 3′-end antisense promoter also results in derepression of sense transcription and renders sense transcription insensitive to the additional loss of SET1. The derepression observed in COMPASS mutants is mimicked by reduction of global histone H3 and H4 levels, suggesting that the H3K4me2 repressive effect is linked to establishment of a repressive chromatin structure. These results indicate that in S. cerevisiae, the non-redundant role of H3K4

  10. Antisense transcript long noncoding RNA (lncRNA) HOTAIR is transcriptionally induced by estradiol.

    PubMed

    Bhan, Arunoday; Hussain, Imran; Ansari, Khairul I; Kasiri, Sahba; Bashyal, Aarti; Mandal, Subhrangsu S

    2013-10-09

    HOTAIR (HOX antisense intergenic RNA) is a long noncoding RNA (lncRNA) that is transcribed from the antisense strand of homeobox C gene locus in chromosome 12. HOTAIR coordinates with chromatin-modifying enzymes and regulates gene silencing. It is overexpressed in various carcinomas including breast cancer. Herein, we demonstrated that HOTAIR is crucial for cell growth and viability and its knockdown induced apoptosis in breast cancer cells. We also demonstrated that HOTAIR is transcriptionally induced by estradiol (E2). Its promoter contains multiple functional estrogen response elements (EREs). Estrogen receptors (ERs) along with various ER coregulators such as histone methylases MLL1 (mixed lineage leukemia 1) and MLL3 and CREB-binding protein/p300 bind to the promoter of HOTAIR in an E2-dependent manner. Level of histone H3 lysine-4 trimethylation, histone acetylation, and RNA polymerase II recruitment is enriched at the HOTAIR promoter in the presence of E2. Knockdown of ERs and MLLs downregulated the E2-induced HOTAIR expression. Thus, similar to protein-coding gene transcription, E2-induced transcription of antisense transcript HOTAIR is coordinated via ERs and ER coregulators, and this mechanism of HOTAIR overexpression potentially contributes towards breast cancer progression. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  11. Transcriptional interference by antisense RNA is required for circadian clock function

    PubMed Central

    Xue, Zhihong; Ye, Qiaohong; Anson, Simon R; Yang, Jichen; Xiao, Guanghua; Kowbel, David; Glass, N. Louise; Crosthwaite, Susan K.; Liu, Yi

    2014-01-01

    Eukaryotic circadian oscillators consist of negative feedback loops that generate endogenous rhythmicities1. Natural antisense RNAs are found in a wide range of eukaryotic organisms2-5. Nevertheless, the physiological importance and mode of action of most antisense RNAs is not clear6-9. frequency (frq) encodes a component of the Neurospora core circadian negative feedback loop which was thought to generate sustained rhythmicity10. Transcription of qrf, the long non-coding frq antisense RNA, is light induced, and its level oscillates in antiphase to frq sense RNA3. Here we show that qrf transcription is regulated by both light-dependent and -independent mechanisms. Light-dependent qrf transcription represses frq expression and regulates clock resetting. qrf expression in the dark, on the other hand, is required for circadian rhythmicity. frq transcription also inhibits qrf expression and surprisingly, drives the antiphasic rhythm of qrf transcripts. The mutual inhibition of frq and qrf transcription thus forms a double negative feedback loop that is interlocked with the core feedback loop. Genetic and mathematical modeling analyses indicate that such an arrangement is required for robust and sustained circadian rhythmicity. Moreover, our results suggest that antisense transcription inhibits sense expression by mediating chromatin modifications and premature transcription termination. Together, our results established antisense transcription as an essential feature in a circadian system and shed light on the importance and mechanism of antisense action. PMID:25132551

  12. Identification of sense and antisense transcripts regulated by drought in sugarcane.

    PubMed

    Lembke, Carolina Gimiliani; Nishiyama, Milton Yutaka; Sato, Paloma Mieko; de Andrade, Rodrigo Fandiño; Souza, Glaucia Mendes

    2012-07-01

    Sugarcane is an important sugar and energy crop that can be used efficiently for biofuels production. The development of sugarcane cultivars tolerant to drought could allow for the expansion of plantations to sub-prime regions. Knowledge on the mechanisms underlying drought responses and its relationship with carbon partition would greatly help to define routes to increase yield. In this work we studied sugarcane responses to drought using a custom designed oligonucleotide array with 21,901 different probes. The oligoarrays were designed to contain probes that detect transcription in both sense and antisense orientation. We validated the results obtained using quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR). A total of 987 genes were differentially expressed in at least one sample of sugarcane plants submitted to drought for 24, 72 and 120 h. Among them, 928 were sense transcripts and 59 were antisense transcripts. Genes related to Carbohydrate Metabolism, RNA Metabolism and Signal Transduction were selected for gene expression validation by qPCR that indicated a validation percentage of 90%. From the probes presented on the array, 75% of the sense probes and 11.9% of the antisense probes have signal above background and can be classified as expressed sequences. Our custom sugarcane oligonucleotide array provides sensitivity and good coverage of sugarcane transcripts for the identification of a representative proportion of natural antisense transcripts (NATs) and sense-antisense transcript pairs (SATs). The antisense transcriptome showed, in most cases, co-expression with respective sense transcripts.

  13. Analysis of sense and naturally occurring antisense transcripts of myosin heavy chain in the human myocardium.

    PubMed

    Luther, H P; Podlowski, S; Hetzer, R; Baumann, G

    2001-01-01

    Naturally occurring antisense RNA has the potential to form a duplex with its complementary sense mRNA, thereby regulating protein expression. Previously, we demonstrated considerable amounts of endogenous antisense RNA for both alpha- and beta-myosin heavy chain (MHC) in rat heart suggesting a role in posttranscriptional MHC-regulation (Luther et al. [1997] J Mol Cell Cardiol 29(1):27-35). To evaluate whether antisense RNA is also involved in MHC regulation in human heart we analyzed ventricular myocardium transcripts in nonfailing hearts (n=3) and hearts from patients undergoing heart transplantation (n=5). Investigation of RNA by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) detected an antisense RNA transcript for beta-MHC but none for alpha-MHC. Northern blot analysis of normal and failing hearts detected sense mRNA for beta-MHC, but not alpha-MHC suggesting no functionally relevant levels of alpha-MHC mRNA exist in the human ventricle. The results describe-for the first time-the existence of endogenous polyadenylated MHC antisense transcripts in the human heart. The potential effect of attenuating translation was shown in an in vitro translation assay using a synthetic antisense-oligonucleotide derived from the sequence of the naturally occurring antisense RNA. Copyright 2001 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  14. Crucial role of antisense transcription across the Xist promoter in Tsix-mediated Xist chromatin modification.

    PubMed

    Ohhata, Tatsuya; Hoki, Yuko; Sasaki, Hiroyuki; Sado, Takashi

    2008-01-01

    Expression of Xist, which triggers X inactivation, is negatively regulated in cis by an antisense gene, Tsix, transcribed along the entire Xist gene. We recently demonstrated that Tsix silences Xist through modification of the chromatin structure in the Xist promoter region. This finding prompted us to investigate the role of antisense transcription across the Xist promoter in Tsix-mediated silencing. Here, we prematurely terminated Tsix transcription before the Xist promoter and addressed its effect on Xist silencing in mouse embryos. We found that although 93% of the region encoding Tsix was transcribed, truncation of Tsix abolished the antisense regulation of Xist. This resulted in a failure to establish the repressive chromatin configuration at the Xist promoter on the mutated X, including DNA methylation and repressive histone modifications, especially in extraembryonic tissues. These results suggest a crucial role for antisense transcription across the Xist promoter in Xist silencing.

  15. Spt4 selectively regulates the expression of C9orf72 sense and antisense mutant transcripts.

    PubMed

    Kramer, Nicholas J; Carlomagno, Yari; Zhang, Yong-Jie; Almeida, Sandra; Cook, Casey N; Gendron, Tania F; Prudencio, Mercedes; Van Blitterswijk, Marka; Belzil, Veronique; Couthouis, Julien; Paul, Joseph West; Goodman, Lindsey D; Daughrity, Lillian; Chew, Jeannie; Garrett, Aliesha; Pregent, Luc; Jansen-West, Karen; Tabassian, Lilia J; Rademakers, Rosa; Boylan, Kevin; Graff-Radford, Neill R; Josephs, Keith A; Parisi, Joseph E; Knopman, David S; Petersen, Ronald C; Boeve, Bradley F; Deng, Ning; Feng, Yanan; Cheng, Tzu-Hao; Dickson, Dennis W; Cohen, Stanley N; Bonini, Nancy M; Link, Christopher D; Gao, Fen-Biao; Petrucelli, Leonard; Gitler, Aaron D

    2016-08-12

    An expanded hexanucleotide repeat in C9orf72 causes amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and frontotemporal dementia (c9FTD/ALS). Therapeutics are being developed to target RNAs containing the expanded repeat sequence (GGGGCC); however, this approach is complicated by the presence of antisense strand transcription of expanded GGCCCC repeats. We found that targeting the transcription elongation factor Spt4 selectively decreased production of both sense and antisense expanded transcripts, as well as their translated dipeptide repeat (DPR) products, and also mitigated degeneration in animal models. Knockdown of SUPT4H1, the human Spt4 ortholog, similarly decreased production of sense and antisense RNA foci, as well as DPR proteins, in patient cells. Therapeutic targeting of a single factor to eliminate c9FTD/ALS pathological features offers advantages over approaches that require targeting sense and antisense repeats separately.

  16. Programmed fluctuations in sense/antisense transcript ratios drive sexual differentiation in S. pombe

    PubMed Central

    Bitton, Danny A; Grallert, Agnes; Scutt, Paul J; Yates, Tim; Li, Yaoyong; Bradford, James R; Hey, Yvonne; Pepper, Stuart D; Hagan, Iain M; Miller, Crispin J

    2011-01-01

    Strand-specific RNA sequencing of S. pombe revealed a highly structured programme of ncRNA expression at over 600 loci. Waves of antisense transcription accompanied sexual differentiation. A substantial proportion of ncRNA arose from mechanisms previously considered to be largely artefactual, including improper 3′ termination and bidirectional transcription. Constitutive induction of the entire spk1+, spo4+, dis1+ and spo6+ antisense transcripts from an integrated, ectopic, locus disrupted their respective meiotic functions. This ability of antisense transcripts to disrupt gene function when expressed in trans suggests that cis production at native loci during sexual differentiation may also control gene function. Consistently, insertion of a marker gene adjacent to the dis1+ antisense start site mimicked ectopic antisense expression in reducing the levels of this microtubule regulator and abolishing the microtubule-dependent ‘horsetail' stage of meiosis. Antisense production had no impact at any of these loci when the RNA interference (RNAi) machinery was removed. Thus, far from being simply ‘genome chatter', this extensive ncRNA landscape constitutes a fundamental component in the controls that drive the complex programme of sexual differentiation in S. pombe. PMID:22186733

  17. Conserved pattern of antisense overlapping transcription in the homologous human ERCC-1 and yeast RAD10 DNA repair gene regions.

    PubMed Central

    van Duin, M; van Den Tol, J; Hoeijmakers, J H; Bootsma, D; Rupp, I P; Reynolds, P; Prakash, L; Prakash, S

    1989-01-01

    We report that the genes for the homologous Saccharomyces cerevisiae RAD10 and human ERCC-1 DNA excision repair proteins harbor overlapping antisense transcription units in their 3' regions. Since naturally occurring antisense transcription is rare in S. cerevisiae and humans (this is the first example in human cells), our findings indicate that antisense transcription in the ERCC-1-RAD10 gene regions represents an evolutionarily conserved feature. Images PMID:2471070

  18. Antisense transcripts from immunoglobulin heavy-chain locus V(D)J and switch regions

    PubMed Central

    Perlot, Thomas; Li, Gang; Alt, Frederick W.

    2008-01-01

    Activation-induced cytosine deaminase (AID) is essential for both somatic hypermutation (SHM) and class switch recombination (CSR), two processes involved in antibody diversification. Previously, various groups showed both in vitro and in vivo that AID initiates SHM and CSR by deaminating cytosines in DNA in a transcription-dependent manner. Although in vivo both DNA strands are equally targeted by AID, many in vitro and bacterial experiments found that AID almost exclusively targets the nontemplate strand of a transcribed substrate. Here, we report the detection of antisense transcripts in assembled Ig heavy chain (IgH) variable region exons and their immediate downstream region, as well as in switch regions, sequences that, respectively, are targets for SHM and CSR in vivo. In contrast, we did not detect antisense transcripts from the Cμ constant region exons, which lie between the IgH variable region exons and downstream S regions and which are not normally an AID target. Expression of the antisense variable region/flanking region and the S-region transcripts were found in all lymphocytes that transcribe these sequences in the sense direction. Steady-state levels of antisense transcripts appeared very low, and start sites potentially appeared heterogeneous. We discuss the potential implications of antisense IgH locus transcription for AID targeting or other processes. PMID:18292225

  19. Upstream Anti-sense Promoters are Hubs of Transcription Factor Binding and Active Histone Modifications

    PubMed Central

    Scruggs, Benjamin S.; Gilchrist, Daniel A.; Nechaev, Sergei; Muse, Ginger W.; Burkholder, Adam; Fargo, David C.; Adelman, Karen

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Anti-sense transcription originating upstream of mammalian protein-coding genes is a well-documented phenomenon, but remarkably little is known about the regulation or function of anti-sense promoters and the non-coding RNAs they generate. Here we define at nucleotide resolution the divergent transcription start sites (TSSs) near mouse mRNA genes. We find that coupled sense and anti-sense TSSs precisely define the boundaries of a nucleosome-depleted region (NDR) that is highly enriched in transcription factor (TF) motifs. Notably, as the distance between sense and anti-sense TSSs increases, so does the size of the NDR, the level of signal-dependent TF binding and gene activation. We further discover a group of anti-sense TSSs in macrophages with an enhancer-like chromatin signature. Interestingly, this signature identifies divergent promoters that are activated during immune challenge. We propose that anti-sense promoters serve as platforms for TF binding and establishment of active chromatin to further regulate or enhance sense-strand mRNA expression. PMID:26028540

  20. Genome-wide antisense transcription drives mRNA processing in bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Lasa, Iñigo; Toledo-Arana, Alejandro; Dobin, Alexander; Villanueva, Maite; de los Mozos, Igor Ruiz; Vergara-Irigaray, Marta; Segura, Víctor; Fagegaltier, Delphine; Penadés, José R.; Valle, Jaione; Solano, Cristina; Gingeras, Thomas R.

    2011-01-01

    RNA deep sequencing technologies are revealing unexpected levels of complexity in bacterial transcriptomes with the discovery of abundant noncoding RNAs, antisense RNAs, long 5′ and 3′ untranslated regions, and alternative operon structures. Here, by applying deep RNA sequencing to both the long and short RNA fractions (<50 nucleotides) obtained from the major human pathogen Staphylococcus aureus, we have detected a collection of short RNAs that is generated genome-wide through the digestion of overlapping sense/antisense transcripts by RNase III endoribonuclease. At least 75% of sense RNAs from annotated genes are subject to this mechanism of antisense processing. Removal of RNase III activity reduces the amount of short RNAs and is accompanied by the accumulation of discrete antisense transcripts. These results suggest the production of pervasive but hidden antisense transcription used to process sense transcripts by means of creating double-stranded substrates. This process of RNase III-mediated digestion of overlapping transcripts can be observed in several evolutionarily diverse Gram-positive bacteria and is capable of providing a unique genome-wide posttranscriptional mechanism to adjust mRNA levels. PMID:22123973

  1. The Role of Transcription Factors at Antisense-Expressing Gene Pairs in Yeast.

    PubMed

    Mostovoy, Yulia; Thiemicke, Alexander; Hsu, Tiffany Y; Brem, Rachel B

    2016-06-27

    Genes encoded close to one another on the chromosome are often coexpressed, by a mechanism and regulatory logic that remain poorly understood. We surveyed the yeast genome for tandem gene pairs oriented tail-to-head at which expression antisense to the upstream gene was conserved across species. The intergenic region at most such tandem pairs is a bidirectional promoter, shared by the downstream gene mRNA and the upstream antisense transcript. Genomic analyses of these intergenic loci revealed distinctive patterns of transcription factor regulation. Mutation of a given transcription factor verified its role as a regulator in trans of tandem gene pair loci, including the proximally initiating upstream antisense transcript and downstream mRNA and the distally initiating upstream mRNA. To investigate cis-regulatory activity at such a locus, we focused on the stress-induced NAD(P)H dehydratase YKL151C and its downstream neighbor, the metabolic enzyme GPM1 Previous work has implicated the region between these genes in regulation of GPM1 expression; our mutation experiments established its function in rich medium as a repressor in cis of the distally initiating YKL151C sense RNA, and an activator of the proximally initiating YKL151C antisense RNA. Wild-type expression of all three transcripts required the transcription factor Gcr2. Thus, at this locus, the intergenic region serves as a focal point of regulatory input, driving antisense expression and mediating the coordinated regulation of YKL151C and GPM1 Together, our findings implicate transcription factors in the joint control of neighboring genes specialized to opposing conditions and the antisense transcripts expressed between them.

  2. The Role of Transcription Factors at Antisense-Expressing Gene Pairs in Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Mostovoy, Yulia; Thiemicke, Alexander; Hsu, Tiffany Y.; Brem, Rachel B.

    2016-01-01

    Genes encoded close to one another on the chromosome are often coexpressed, by a mechanism and regulatory logic that remain poorly understood. We surveyed the yeast genome for tandem gene pairs oriented tail-to-head at which expression antisense to the upstream gene was conserved across species. The intergenic region at most such tandem pairs is a bidirectional promoter, shared by the downstream gene mRNA and the upstream antisense transcript. Genomic analyses of these intergenic loci revealed distinctive patterns of transcription factor regulation. Mutation of a given transcription factor verified its role as a regulator in trans of tandem gene pair loci, including the proximally initiating upstream antisense transcript and downstream mRNA and the distally initiating upstream mRNA. To investigate cis-regulatory activity at such a locus, we focused on the stress-induced NAD(P)H dehydratase YKL151C and its downstream neighbor, the metabolic enzyme GPM1. Previous work has implicated the region between these genes in regulation of GPM1 expression; our mutation experiments established its function in rich medium as a repressor in cis of the distally initiating YKL151C sense RNA, and an activator of the proximally initiating YKL151C antisense RNA. Wild-type expression of all three transcripts required the transcription factor Gcr2. Thus, at this locus, the intergenic region serves as a focal point of regulatory input, driving antisense expression and mediating the coordinated regulation of YKL151C and GPM1. Together, our findings implicate transcription factors in the joint control of neighboring genes specialized to opposing conditions and the antisense transcripts expressed between them. PMID:27190003

  3. Bidirectional transcription is an inherent feature of Giardia lamblia promoters and contributes to an abundance of sterile antisense transcripts throughout the genome.

    PubMed

    Teodorovic, Smilja; Walls, Colleen D; Elmendorf, Heidi G

    2007-01-01

    A prominent feature of transcription in Giardia lamblia is the abundant production of sterile antisense transcripts (Elmendorf et al. The abundance of sterile transcripts in Giardia lamblia. Nucleic Acids., 29, 4674-4683). Here, we use a computational biology analysis of SAGE data to assess the abundance and distribution of sense and antisense messages in the parasite genome. Sterile antisense transcripts are produced at approximately 50% of loci with detectable transcription, yet their abundance at a given locus does not correlate to the abundance of the complementary sense transcripts at that locus or to transcription levels at neighboring loci. These data suggest that sterile antisense transcripts are not simply a local effect of open chromatin structure. Using 5'RACE, we demonstrate that Giardia promoters are a source of antisense transcripts through bidirectional transcription, producing both downstream coding sense and upstream sterile antisense transcripts. We use a dual reporter system to explore roles of specific promoter elements in this bidirectional initiation of transcription and suggest that the degenerate AT-rich nature of TATA and Inr elements in Giardia permits them to function interchangeably. The phenomenon of bidirectional transcription in G. lamblia gives us insight into the interaction between transcriptional machinery and promoter elements, and may be the prominent source of the abundant antisense transcription in this parasite.

  4. Bidirectional transcription is an inherent feature of Giardia lamblia promoters and contributes to an abundance of sterile antisense transcripts throughout the genome

    PubMed Central

    Teodorovic, Smilja; Walls, Colleen D.; Elmendorf, Heidi G.

    2007-01-01

    A prominent feature of transcription in Giardia lamblia is the abundant production of sterile antisense transcripts (Elmendorf et al. The abundance of sterile transcripts in Giardia lamblia. Nucleic Acids., 29, 4674–4683). Here, we use a computational biology analysis of SAGE data to assess the abundance and distribution of sense and antisense messages in the parasite genome. Sterile antisense transcripts are produced at ∼50% of loci with detectable transcription, yet their abundance at a given locus does not correlate to the abundance of the complementary sense transcripts at that locus or to transcription levels at neighboring loci. These data suggest that sterile antisense transcripts are not simply a local effect of open chromatin structure. Using 5′RACE, we demonstrate that Giardia promoters are a source of antisense transcripts through bidirectional transcription, producing both downstream coding sense and upstream sterile antisense transcripts. We use a dual reporter system to explore roles of specific promoter elements in this bidirectional initiation of transcription and suggest that the degenerate AT-rich nature of TATA and Inr elements in Giardia permits them to function interchangeably. The phenomenon of bidirectional transcription in G. lamblia gives us insight into the interaction between transcriptional machinery and promoter elements, and may be the prominent source of the abundant antisense transcription in this parasite. PMID:17403692

  5. The Association Between H3K4me3 and Antisense Transcription

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Peng; Liu, Wanfei; Zhao, Yuhui; Lin, Qiang; Ding, Feng; Xin, Chengqi; Geng, Jianing; Song, Shuhui; Sun, Fanglin; Hu, Songnian; Yu, Jun

    2012-01-01

    Histone H3 lysine 4 trimethylation (H3K4me3) is well known to occur in the promoter region of genes for transcription activation. However, when investigating the H3K4me3 profiles in the mouse cerebrum and testis, we discovered that H3K4me3 also has a significant enrichment at the 3′ end of actively transcribed (sense) genes, named as 3′-H3K4me3. 3′-H3K4me3 is associated with ∼15% of protein-coding genes in both tissues. In addition, we examined the transcriptional initiation signals including RNA polymerase II (RNAPII) binding sites and 5′-CAGE-tag that marks transcriptional start sites. Interestingly, we found that 3′-H3K4me3 is associated with the initiation of antisense transcription. Furthermore, 3′-H3K4me3 modification levels correlate positively with the antisense expression levels of the associated sense genes, implying that 3′-H3K4me3 is involved in the activation of antisense transcription. Taken together, our findings suggest that H3K4me3 may be involved in the regulation of antisense transcription that initiates from the 3′ end of sense genes. In addition, a positive correlation was also observed between the expression of antisense and the associated sense genes with 3′-H3K4me3 modification. More importantly, we observed the 3′-H3K4me3 enrichment among genes in human, fruitfly and Arabidopsis, and found that the sequences of 3′-H3K4me3-marked regions are highly conserved and essentially indistinguishable from known promoters in vertebrate. Therefore, we speculate that these 3′-H3K4me3-marked regions may serve as potential promoters for antisense transcription and 3′-H3K4me3 appear to be a universal epigenetic feature in eukaryotes. Our results provide a novel insight into the epigenetic roles of H3K4me3 and the regulatory mechanism of antisense transcription. PMID:22768981

  6. The association between H3K4me3 and antisense transcription.

    PubMed

    Cui, Peng; Liu, Wanfei; Zhao, Yuhui; Lin, Qiang; Ding, Feng; Xin, Chengqi; Geng, Jianing; Song, Shuhui; Sun, Fanglin; Hu, Songnian; Yu, Jun

    2012-04-01

    Histone H3 lysine 4 trimethylation (H3K4me3) is well known to occur in the promoter region of genes for transcription activation. However, when investigating the H3K4me3 profiles in the mouse cerebrum and testis, we discovered that H3K4me3 also has a significant enrichment at the 3' end of actively transcribed (sense) genes, named as 3'-H3K4me3. 3'-H3K4me3 is associated with ~15% of protein-coding genes in both tissues. In addition, we examined the transcriptional initiation signals including RNA polymerase II (RNAPII) binding sites and 5'-CAGE-tag that marks transcriptional start sites. Interestingly, we found that 3'-H3K4me3 is associated with the initiation of antisense transcription. Furthermore, 3'-H3K4me3 modification levels correlate positively with the antisense expression levels of the associated sense genes, implying that 3'-H3K4me3 is involved in the activation of antisense transcription. Taken together, our findings suggest that H3K4me3 may be involved in the regulation of antisense transcription that initiates from the 3' end of sense genes. In addition, a positive correlation was also observed between the expression of antisense and the associated sense genes with 3'-H3K4me3 modification. More importantly, we observed the 3'-H3K4me3 enrichment among genes in human, fruitfly and Arabidopsis, and found that the sequences of 3'-H3K4me3-marked regions are highly conserved and essentially indistinguishable from known promoters in vertebrate. Therefore, we speculate that these 3'-H3K4me3-marked regions may serve as potential promoters for antisense transcription and 3'-H3K4me3 appear to be a universal epigenetic feature in eukaryotes. Our results provide a novel insight into the epigenetic roles of H3K4me3 and the regulatory mechanism of antisense transcription.

  7. Skipping multiple exons of dystrophin transcripts using cocktail antisense oligonucleotides.

    PubMed

    Echigoya, Yusuke; Yokota, Toshifumi

    2014-02-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is one of the most common and lethal genetic disorders, with 20,000 children per year born with DMD globally. DMD is caused by mutations in the dystrophin (DMD) gene. Antisense-mediated exon skipping therapy is a promising therapeutic approach that uses short DNA-like molecules called antisense oligonucleotides (AOs) to skip over/splice out the mutated part of the gene to produce a shortened but functional dystrophin protein. One major challenge has been its limited applicability. Multiple exon skipping has recently emerged as a potential solution. Indeed, many DMD patients need exon skipping of multiple exons in order to restore the reading frame, depending on how many base pairs the mutated exon(s) and adjacent exons have. Theoretically, multiple exon skipping could be used to treat approximately 90%, 80%, and 98% of DMD patients with deletion, duplication, and nonsense mutations, respectively. In addition, multiple exon skipping could be used to select deletions that optimize the functionality of the truncated dystrophin protein. The proof of concept of systemic multiple exon skipping using a cocktail of AOs has been demonstrated in dystrophic dog and mouse models. Remaining challenges include the insufficient efficacy of systemic treatment, especially for therapies that target the heart, and limited long-term safety data. Here we review recent preclinical developments in AO-mediated multiple exon skipping and discuss the remaining challenges.

  8. Mining SAGE data allows large-scale, sensitive screening of antisense transcript expression.

    PubMed

    Quéré, Ronan; Manchon, Laurent; Lejeune, Mireille; Clément, Oliver; Pierrat, Fabien; Bonafoux, Béatrice; Commes, Thérèse; Piquemal, David; Marti, Jacques

    2004-11-23

    As a growing number of complementary transcripts, susceptible to exert various regulatory functions, are being found in eukaryotes, high throughput analytical methods are needed to investigate their expression in multiple biological samples. Serial Analysis of Gene Expression (SAGE), based on the enumeration of directionally reliable short cDNA sequences (tags), is capable of revealing antisense transcripts. We initially detected them by observing tags that mapped on to the reverse complement of known mRNAs. The presence of such tags in individual SAGE libraries suggested that SAGE datasets contain latent information on antisense transcripts. We raised a collection of virtual tags for mining these data. Tag pairs were assembled by searching for complementarities between 24-nt long sequences centered on the potential SAGE-anchoring sites of well-annotated human expressed sequences. An analysis of their presence in a large collection of published SAGE libraries revealed transcripts expressed at high levels from both strands of two adjacent, oppositely oriented, transcription units. In other cases, the respective transcripts of such cis-oriented genes displayed a mutually exclusive expression pattern or were co-expressed in a small number of libraries. Other tag pairs revealed overlapping transcripts of trans-encoded unique genes. Finally, we isolated a group of tags shared by multiple transcripts. Most of them mapped on to retroelements, essentially represented in humans by Alu sequences inserted in opposite orientations in the 3'UTR of otherwise different mRNAs. Registering these tags in separate files makes possible computational searches focused on unique sense-antisense pairs. The method developed in the present work shows that SAGE datasets constitute a major resource of rapidly investigating with high sensitivity the expression of antisense transcripts, so that a single tag may be detected in one library when screening a large number of biological samples.

  9. Antisense Transcription of Retrotransposons in Drosophila: An Origin of Endogenous Small Interfering RNA Precursors

    PubMed Central

    Russo, Joseph; Harrington, Andrew W.; Steiniger, Mindy

    2016-01-01

    Movement of transposons causes insertions, deletions, and chromosomal rearrangements potentially leading to premature lethality in Drosophila melanogaster. To repress these elements and combat genomic instability, eukaryotes have evolved several small RNA-mediated defense mechanisms. Specifically, in Drosophila somatic cells, endogenous small interfering (esi)RNAs suppress retrotransposon mobility. EsiRNAs are produced by Dicer-2 processing of double-stranded RNA precursors, yet the origins of these precursors are unknown. We show that most transposon families are transcribed in both the sense (S) and antisense (AS) direction in Dmel-2 cells. LTR retrotransposons Dm297, mdg1, and blood, and non-LTR retrotransposons juan and jockey transcripts, are generated from intraelement transcription start sites with canonical RNA polymerase II promoters. We also determined that retrotransposon antisense transcripts are less polyadenylated than sense. RNA-seq and small RNA-seq revealed that Dicer-2 RNA interference (RNAi) depletion causes a decrease in the number of esiRNAs mapping to retrotransposons and an increase in expression of both S and AS retrotransposon transcripts. These data support a model in which double-stranded RNA precursors are derived from convergent transcription and processed by Dicer-2 into esiRNAs that silence both sense and antisense retrotransposon transcripts. Reduction of sense retrotransposon transcripts potentially lowers element-specific protein levels to prevent transposition. This mechanism preserves genomic integrity and is especially important for Drosophila fitness because mobile genetic elements are highly active. PMID:26534950

  10. PlantNATsDB: a comprehensive database of plant natural antisense transcripts

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Dijun; Yuan, Chunhui; Zhang, Jian; Zhang, Zhao; Bai, Lin; Meng, Yijun; Chen, Ling-Ling; Chen, Ming

    2012-01-01

    Natural antisense transcripts (NATs), as one type of regulatory RNAs, occur prevalently in plant genomes and play significant roles in physiological and pathological processes. Although their important biological functions have been reported widely, a comprehensive database is lacking up to now. Consequently, we constructed a plant NAT database (PlantNATsDB) involving approximately 2 million NAT pairs in 69 plant species. GO annotation and high-throughput small RNA sequencing data currently available were integrated to investigate the biological function of NATs. PlantNATsDB provides various user-friendly web interfaces to facilitate the presentation of NATs and an integrated, graphical network browser to display the complex networks formed by different NATs. Moreover, a ‘Gene Set Analysis’ module based on GO annotation was designed to dig out the statistical significantly overrepresented GO categories from the specific NAT network. PlantNATsDB is currently the most comprehensive resource of NATs in the plant kingdom, which can serve as a reference database to investigate the regulatory function of NATs. The PlantNATsDB is freely available at http://bis.zju.edu.cn/pnatdb/. PMID:22058132

  11. Widespread anti-sense transcription in apple is correlated with siRNA production and indicates a large potential for transcriptional and/or post-transcriptional control.

    PubMed

    Celton, Jean-Marc; Gaillard, Sylvain; Bruneau, Maryline; Pelletier, Sandra; Aubourg, Sébastien; Martin-Magniette, Marie-Laure; Navarro, Lionel; Laurens, François; Renou, Jean-Pierre

    2014-07-01

    Characterizing the transcriptome of eukaryotic organisms is essential for studying gene regulation and its impact on phenotype. The realization that anti-sense (AS) and noncoding RNA transcription is pervasive in many genomes has emphasized our limited understanding of gene transcription and post-transcriptional regulation. Numerous mechanisms including convergent transcription, anti-correlated expression of sense and AS transcripts, and RNAi remain ill-defined. Here, we have combined microarray analysis and high-throughput sequencing of small RNAs (sRNAs) to unravel the complexity of transcriptional and potential post-transcriptional regulation in eight organs of apple (Malus × domestica). The percentage of AS transcript expression is higher than that identified in annual plants such as rice and Arabidopsis thaliana. Furthermore, we show that a majority of AS transcripts are transcribed beyond 3'UTR regions, and may cover a significant portion of the predicted sense transcripts. Finally we demonstrate at a genome-wide scale that anti-sense transcript expression is correlated with the presence of both short (21-23 nt) and long (> 30 nt) siRNAs, and that the sRNA coverage depth varies with the level of AS transcript expression. Our study provides a new insight on the functional role of anti-sense transcripts at the genome-wide level, and a new basis for the understanding of sRNA biogenesis in plants.

  12. Natural antisense transcripts in Plasmodium falciparum isolates from patients with complicated malaria.

    PubMed

    Subudhi, Amit Kumar; Boopathi, P A; Garg, Shilpi; Middha, Sheetal; Acharya, Jyoti; Pakalapati, Deepak; Saxena, Vishal; Aiyaz, Mohammed; Orekondy, Harsha B; Mugasimangalam, Raja C; Sirohi, Paramendra; Kochar, Sanjay K; Kochar, Dhanpat K; Das, Ashis

    2014-06-01

    Mechanisms regulating gene expression in malaria parasites are not well understood. Little is known about how the parasite regulates its gene expression during transition from one developmental stage to another and in response to various environmental conditions. Parasites in a diseased host face environments which differ from the static, well adapted in vitro conditions. Parasites thus need to adapt quickly and effectively to these conditions by establishing transcriptional states which are best suited for better survival. With the discovery of natural antisense transcripts (NATs) in this parasite and considering the various proposed mechanisms by which NATs might regulate gene expression, it has been speculated that these might be playing a critical role in gene regulation. We report here the diversity of NATs in this parasite, using isolates taken directly from patients with differing clinical symptoms caused by malaria infection. Using a custom designed strand specific whole genome microarray, a total of 797 NATs targeted against annotated loci have been detected. Out of these, 545 NATs are unique to this study. The majority of NATs were positively correlated with the expression pattern of the sense transcript. However, 96 genes showed a change in sense/antisense ratio on comparison between uncomplicated and complicated disease conditions. The antisense transcripts map to a broad range of biochemical/metabolic pathways, especially pathways pertaining to the central carbon metabolism and stress related pathways. Our data strongly suggests that a large group of NATs detected here are unannotated transcription units antisense to annotated gene models. The results reveal a previously unknown set of NATs that prevails in this parasite, their differential regulation in disease conditions and mapping to functionally well annotated genes. The results detailed here call for studies to deduce the possible mechanism of action of NATs, which would further help in

  13. The zebrafish progranulin gene family and antisense transcripts

    PubMed Central

    Cadieux, Benoît; Chitramuthu, Babykumari P; Baranowski, David; Bennett, Hugh PJ

    2005-01-01

    Background Progranulin is an epithelial tissue growth factor (also known as proepithelin, acrogranin and PC-cell-derived growth factor) that has been implicated in development, wound healing and in the progression of many cancers. The single mammalian progranulin gene encodes a glycoprotein precursor consisting of seven and one half tandemly repeated non-identical copies of the cystine-rich granulin motif. A genome-wide duplication event hypothesized to have occurred at the base of the teleost radiation predicts that mammalian progranulin may be represented by two co-orthologues in zebrafish. Results The cDNAs encoding two zebrafish granulin precursors, progranulins-A and -B, were characterized and found to contain 10 and 9 copies of the granulin motif respectively. The cDNAs and genes encoding the two forms of granulin, progranulins-1 and -2, were also cloned and sequenced. Both latter peptides were found to be encoded by precursors with a simplified architecture consisting of one and one half copies of the granulin motif. A cDNA encoding a chimeric progranulin which likely arises through the mechanism of trans-splicing between grn1 and grn2 was also characterized. A non-coding RNA gene with antisense complementarity to both grn1 and grn2 was identified which may have functional implications with respect to gene dosage, as well as in restricting the formation of the chimeric form of progranulin. Chromosomal localization of the four progranulin (grn) genes reveals syntenic conservation for grna only, suggesting that it is the true orthologue of mammalian grn. RT-PCR and whole-mount in situ hybridization analysis of zebrafish grns during development reveals that combined expression of grna and grnb, but not grn1 and grn2, recapitulate many of the expression patterns observed for the murine counterpart. This includes maternal deposition, widespread central nervous system distribution and specific localization within the epithelial compartments of various organs

  14. Selective suppression of antisense transcription by Set2-mediated H3K36 methylation

    PubMed Central

    Venkatesh, Swaminathan; Li, Hua; Gogol, Madelaine M.; Workman, Jerry L.

    2016-01-01

    Maintenance of a regular chromatin structure over the coding regions of genes occurs co-transcriptionally via the ‘chromatin resetting' pathway. One of the central players in this pathway is the histone methyltransferase Set2. Here we show that the loss of Set2 in yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, results in transcription initiation of antisense RNAs embedded within body of protein-coding genes. These RNAs are distinct from the previously identified non-coding RNAs and cover 11% of the yeast genome. These RNA species have been named Set2-repressed antisense transcripts (SRATs) since the co-transcriptional addition of the H3K36 methyl mark by Set2 over their start sites results in their suppression. Interestingly, loss of chromatin resetting factor Set2 or the subsequent production of SRATs does not affect the abundance of the sense transcripts. This difference in transcriptional outcomes of overlapping transcripts due to a strand-independent addition of H3K36 methylation is a key regulatory feature of interleaved transcriptomes. PMID:27892455

  15. Selective suppression of antisense transcription by Set2-mediated H3K36 methylation.

    PubMed

    Venkatesh, Swaminathan; Li, Hua; Gogol, Madelaine M; Workman, Jerry L

    2016-11-28

    Maintenance of a regular chromatin structure over the coding regions of genes occurs co-transcriptionally via the 'chromatin resetting' pathway. One of the central players in this pathway is the histone methyltransferase Set2. Here we show that the loss of Set2 in yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, results in transcription initiation of antisense RNAs embedded within body of protein-coding genes. These RNAs are distinct from the previously identified non-coding RNAs and cover 11% of the yeast genome. These RNA species have been named Set2-repressed antisense transcripts (SRATs) since the co-transcriptional addition of the H3K36 methyl mark by Set2 over their start sites results in their suppression. Interestingly, loss of chromatin resetting factor Set2 or the subsequent production of SRATs does not affect the abundance of the sense transcripts. This difference in transcriptional outcomes of overlapping transcripts due to a strand-independent addition of H3K36 methylation is a key regulatory feature of interleaved transcriptomes.

  16. Analysis of wheat SAGE tags reveals evidence for widespread antisense transcription

    PubMed Central

    Poole, Rebecca L; Barker, Gary LA; Werner, Kay; Biggi, Gaia F; Coghill, Jane; Gibbings, J George; Berry, Simon; Dunwell, Jim M; Edwards, Keith J

    2008-01-01

    Background Serial Analysis of Gene Expression (SAGE) is a powerful tool for genome-wide transcription studies. Unlike microarrays, it has the ability to detect novel forms of RNA such as alternatively spliced and antisense transcripts, without the need for prior knowledge of their existence. One limitation of using SAGE on an organism with a complex genome and lacking detailed sequence information, such as the hexaploid bread wheat Triticum aestivum, is accurate annotation of the tags generated. Without accurate annotation it is impossible to fully understand the dynamic processes involved in such complex polyploid organisms. Hence we have developed and utilised novel procedures to characterise, in detail, SAGE tags generated from the whole grain transcriptome of hexaploid wheat. Results Examination of 71,930 Long SAGE tags generated from six libraries derived from two wheat genotypes grown under two different conditions suggested that SAGE is a reliable and reproducible technique for use in studying the hexaploid wheat transcriptome. However, our results also showed that in poorly annotated and/or poorly sequenced genomes, such as hexaploid wheat, considerably more information can be extracted from SAGE data by carrying out a systematic analysis of both perfect and "fuzzy" (partially matched) tags. This detailed analysis of the SAGE data shows first that while there is evidence of alternative polyadenylation this appears to occur exclusively within the 3' untranslated regions. Secondly, we found no strong evidence for widespread alternative splicing in the developing wheat grain transcriptome. However, analysis of our SAGE data shows that antisense transcripts are probably widespread within the transcriptome and appear to be derived from numerous locations within the genome. Examination of antisense transcripts showing sequence similarity to the Puroindoline a and Puroindoline b genes suggests that such antisense transcripts might have a role in the regulation of

  17. Computational discovery of sense-antisense transcription in the human and mouse genomes

    PubMed Central

    Shendure, Jay; Church, George M

    2002-01-01

    Background Overlapping but oppositely oriented transcripts have the potential to form sense-antisense perfect double-stranded (ds) RNA duplexes. Over recent years, the number and variety of examples of mammalian gene-regulatory phenomena in which endogenous dsRNA duplexes have been proposed or demonstrated to participate has greatly increased. These include genomic imprinting, RNA interference, translational regulation, alternative splicing, X-inactivation and RNA editing. We computationally mined public mouse and human expressed sequence tag (EST) databases to search for additional examples of bidirectionally transcribed genomic regions. Results Our bioinformatics approach identified over 217 candidate overlapping transcriptional units, almost all of which are novel. From experimental validation of a subset of our predictions by orientation-specific RT-PCR, we estimate that our methodology has a specificity of 84% or greater. In many cases, regions of sense-antisense overlap within the 5'- or 3'-untranslated regions of a given transcript correlate with genomic patterns of mouse-human conservation. Conclusions Our results, in conjunction with the literature, bring the total number of predicted and validated examples of overlapping but oppositely oriented transcripts to over 300. Several of these cases support the hypothesis that a subset of the instances of substantial mouse-human conservation in the 5' and 3' UTRs of transcripts might be explained in part by functionality of an overlapping transcriptional unit. PMID:12225583

  18. Tissue-specific expression of antisense and sense transcripts at the imprinted Gnas locus.

    PubMed

    Li, T; Vu, T H; Zeng, Z L; Nguyen, B T; Hayward, B E; Bonthron, D T; Hu, J F; Hoffman, A R

    2000-11-01

    The mouse Gnas gene encodes an important signal transduction protein, the alpha subunit of the stimulatory G protein, G(s). In humans, partial deficiency of G(s)alpha, the alpha subunit of G(s), results in the hormone-resistance syndrome pseudohypoparathyroidism type 1a. The mouse Gnas (and the human GNAS1) locus is transcribed from three promoter regions. Transcripts from P1, which encode Nesp55, are derived from the maternal allele only. Transcripts from P2 encode Xlalphas and are derived only from the paternal allele, while transcripts from P3 encode the alpha subunit and are from both parental alleles. The close proximity of reciprocal imprinting suggests the presence of important putative imprinting elements in this region. In this report, we demonstrate that the reciprocal imprinting occurs in normal tissues of interspecific (Mus spretus x C57BL/6) mice. Transcripts from P1 are most abundant in CNS (pons and medulla) in contrast to the more ubiquitous expression from P2 and P3. In the P1-P2 genomic region, we have identified an antisense transcript that starts 2.2 kb upstream of the P2 exon and spans the P1 region. While the P1 transcript is derived from the maternal allele, the P1-antisense (Gnas-as) is derived only from the paternal allele in most but not all tissues. Although both the Nesp55 region and the Gnas-as transcripts are present in cerebral cortex, adrenal, and spleen, Gnas-as is abundant in some tissues in which transcription from the Nesp55 region is negligible. Furthermore, the Nesp55 region transcripts remain strictly imprinted in tissues that lack Gnas-as. Our results suggest that multiple imprinting elements, including the unique Gnas-as, regulate the allelic expression of the Nesp55 region sense transcript. Copyright 2000 Academic Press.

  19. ASBEL, an ANA/BTG3 antisense transcript required for tumorigenicity of ovarian carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Yanagida, Satoshi; Taniue, Kenzui; Sugimasa, Hironobu; Nasu, Emiko; Takeda, Yasuko; Kobayashi, Mana; Yamamoto, Tadashi; Okamoto, Aikou; Akiyama, Tetsu

    2013-01-01

    Mammalian genomes encode numerous antisense non-coding RNAs, which are assumed to be involved in the regulation of the sense gene expression. However, the mechanisms of their action and involvement in the development of diseases have not been well elucidated. The ANA/BTG3 protein is an antiproliferative protein whose expression is downregulated in prostate and lung cancers. Here we show that an antisense transcript of the ANA/BTG3 gene, termed ASBEL, negatively regulates the levels of ANA/BTG3 protein, but not of ANA/BTG3 mRNA and is required for proliferation and tumorigenicity of ovarian clear cell carcinoma. We further show that knockdown of ANA/BTG3 rescues growth inhibition caused by ASBEL knockdown. Moreover, we demonstrate that ASBEL forms duplexes with ANA/BTG3 mRNA in the nucleus and suppresses its cytoplasmic transportation. Our findings illustrate a novel function for an antisense transcript that critically promotes tumorigenesis by suppressing translation of the sense gene by inhibiting its cytoplasmic transportation.

  20. Revealing natural antisense transcripts from Plasmodium vivax isolates: evidence of genome regulation in complicated malaria.

    PubMed

    Boopathi, P A; Subudhi, Amit Kumar; Garg, Shilpi; Middha, Sheetal; Acharya, Jyoti; Pakalapati, Deepak; Saxena, Vishal; Aiyaz, Mohammed; Chand, Bipin; Mugasimangalam, Raja C; Kochar, Sanjay K; Sirohi, Parmendra; Kochar, Dhanpat K; Das, Ashis

    2013-12-01

    Plasmodium vivax is the most geographically widespread human malaria parasite causing approximately 130-435 million infections annually. It is an economic burden in many parts of the world and poses a public health challenge along with the other Plasmodium sp. The biology of this parasite is less studied and poorly understood, in spite of these facts. Emerging evidence of severe complications due to infections by this parasite provides an impetus to focus research on the same. Investigating the parasite directly from infected patients is the best way to study its biology and pathogenic mechanisms. Gene expression studies of this parasite directly obtained from the patients has provided evidence of gene regulation resulting in varying amount of transcript levels in the different blood stages. The mechanisms regulating gene expression in malaria parasites are not well understood. Discovery of Natural Antisense Transcripts (NATs) in Plasmodium falciparum has suggested that these might play an important role in regulating gene expression. We report here the genome-wide occurrence of NATs in P. vivax parasites from patients with differing clinical symptoms. A total of 1348 NATs against annotated gene loci have been detected using a custom designed microarray with strand specific probes. Majority of NATs identified from this study shows positive correlation with the expression pattern of the sense (S) transcript. Our data also shows condition specific expression patterns of varying S and antisense (AS) transcript levels. Genes with AS transcripts enrich to various biological processes. To our knowledge this is the first report on the presence of NATs from P. vivax obtained from infected patients with different disease complications. The data suggests differential regulation of gene expression in diverse clinical conditions, as shown by differing sense/antisense ratios and would lead to future detailed investigations of gene regulation.

  1. Antisense Transcript and RNA Processing Alterations Suppress Instability of Polyadenylated mRNA in Chlamydomonas Chloroplasts

    PubMed Central

    Nishimura, Yoshiki; Kikis, Elise A.; Zimmer, Sara L.; Komine, Yutaka; Stern, David B.

    2004-01-01

    In chloroplasts, the control of mRNA stability is of critical importance for proper regulation of gene expression. The Chlamydomonas reinhardtii strain Δ26pAtE is engineered such that the atpB mRNA terminates with an mRNA destabilizing polyadenylate tract, resulting in this strain being unable to conduct photosynthesis. A collection of photosynthetic revertants was obtained from Δ26pAtE, and gel blot hybridizations revealed RNA processing alterations in the majority of these suppressor of polyadenylation (spa) strains, resulting in a failure to expose the atpB mRNA 3′ poly(A) tail. Two exceptions were spa19 and spa23, which maintained unusual heteroplasmic chloroplast genomes. One genome type, termed PS+, conferred photosynthetic competence by contributing to the stability of atpB mRNA; the other, termed PS−, was required for viability but could not produce stable atpB transcripts. Based on strand-specific RT-PCR, S1 nuclease protection, and RNA gel blots, evidence was obtained that the PS+ genome stabilizes atpB mRNA by generating an atpB antisense transcript, which attenuates the degradation of the polyadenylated form. The accumulation of double-stranded RNA was confirmed by insensitivity of atpB mRNA from PS+ genome-containing cells to S1 nuclease digestion. To obtain additional evidence for antisense RNA function in chloroplasts, we used strain Δ26, in which atpB mRNA is unstable because of the lack of a 3′ stem-loop structure. In this context, when a 121-nucleotide segment of atpB antisense RNA was expressed from an ectopic site, an elevated accumulation of atpB mRNA resulted. Finally, when spa19 was placed in a genetic background in which expression of the chloroplast exoribonuclease polynucleotide phosphorylase was diminished, the PS+ genome and the antisense transcript were no longer required for photosynthesis. Taken together, our results suggest that antisense RNA in chloroplasts can protect otherwise unstable transcripts from 3′→5

  2. Circadian Rhythms of Sense and Antisense Transcription in Sugarcane, a Highly Polyploid Crop

    PubMed Central

    Hotta, Carlos Takeshi; Nishiyama, Milton Yutaka; Souza, Glaucia Mendes

    2013-01-01

    Commercial sugarcane (Saccharum hybrid) is a highly polyploid and aneuploid grass that stores large amounts of sucrose in its stem. We have measured circadian rhythms of sense and antisense transcription in a commercial cultivar (RB855453) using a custom oligoarray with 14,521 probes that hybridize to sense transcripts (SS) and 7,380 probes that hybridize to antisense transcripts (AS).We estimated that 32% of SS probes and 22% AS probes were rhythmic. This is a higher proportion of rhythmic probes than the usually found in similar experiments in other plant species. Orthologs and inparalogs of Arabidopsis thaliana, sugarcane, rice, maize and sorghum were grouped in ortholog clusters. When ortholog clusters were used to compare probes among different datasets, sugarcane also showed a higher proportion of rhythmic elements than the other species. Thus, it is possible that a higher proportion of transcripts are regulated by the sugarcane circadian clock. Thirty-six percent of the identified AS/SS pairs had significant correlated time courses and 64% had uncorrelated expression patterns. The clustering of transcripts with similar function, the anticipation of daily environmental changes and the temporal compartmentation of metabolic processes were some properties identified in the circadian sugarcane transcriptome. During the day, there was a dominance of transcripts associated with photosynthesis and carbohydrate metabolism, including sucrose and starch synthesis. During the night, there was dominance of transcripts associated with genetic processing, such as histone regulation and RNA polymerase, ribosome and protein synthesis. Finally, the circadian clock also regulated hormone signalling pathways: a large proportion of auxin and ABA signalling components were regulated by the circadian clock in an unusual biphasic distribution. PMID:23936527

  3. Circadian rhythms of sense and antisense transcription in sugarcane, a highly polyploid crop.

    PubMed

    Hotta, Carlos Takeshi; Nishiyama, Milton Yutaka; Souza, Glaucia Mendes

    2013-01-01

    Commercial sugarcane (Saccharum hybrid) is a highly polyploid and aneuploid grass that stores large amounts of sucrose in its stem. We have measured circadian rhythms of sense and antisense transcription in a commercial cultivar (RB855453) using a custom oligoarray with 14,521 probes that hybridize to sense transcripts (SS) and 7,380 probes that hybridize to antisense transcripts (AS).We estimated that 32% of SS probes and 22% AS probes were rhythmic. This is a higher proportion of rhythmic probes than the usually found in similar experiments in other plant species. Orthologs and inparalogs of Arabidopsis thaliana, sugarcane, rice, maize and sorghum were grouped in ortholog clusters. When ortholog clusters were used to compare probes among different datasets, sugarcane also showed a higher proportion of rhythmic elements than the other species. Thus, it is possible that a higher proportion of transcripts are regulated by the sugarcane circadian clock. Thirty-six percent of the identified AS/SS pairs had significant correlated time courses and 64% had uncorrelated expression patterns. The clustering of transcripts with similar function, the anticipation of daily environmental changes and the temporal compartmentation of metabolic processes were some properties identified in the circadian sugarcane transcriptome. During the day, there was a dominance of transcripts associated with photosynthesis and carbohydrate metabolism, including sucrose and starch synthesis. During the night, there was dominance of transcripts associated with genetic processing, such as histone regulation and RNA polymerase, ribosome and protein synthesis. Finally, the circadian clock also regulated hormone signalling pathways: a large proportion of auxin and ABA signalling components were regulated by the circadian clock in an unusual biphasic distribution.

  4. Natural antisense transcripts are significantly involved in regulation of drought stress in maize.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jie; Wang, Qi; Freeling, Micheal; Zhang, Xuecai; Xu, Yunbi; Mao, Yan; Tang, Xin; Wu, Fengkai; Lan, Hai; Cao, Moju; Rong, Tingzhao; Lisch, Damon; Lu, Yanli

    2017-05-19

    Natural antisense transcripts (NATs) are a prominent and complex class of regulatory RNAs. Using strand-specific RNA sequencing, we identified 1769 sense and antisense transcript pairs (NAT pairs) in two maize inbreds with different sensitivity to drought, as well as in two derivative recombination inbred lines (RILs). A significantly higher proportion of NATs relative to non-NATs are specifically expressed under water stress (WS). Surprisingly, expression of sense and antisense transcripts produced by NAT pairs is significantly correlated, particularly under WS. We found an unexpected large proportion of NATs with protein coding potential, as estimated by ribosome release scores. Small RNAs significantly accumulate within NAT pairs, with 21 nt smRNA particularly enriched in overlapping regions of these pairs of genes. The abundance of these smRNAs is significantly altered in the leafbladeless1 mutant, suggesting that these genes may be regulated by the tasiRNA pathway. Further, NATs are significantly hypomethylated and include fewer transposable element sequences relative to non-NAT genes. NAT gene regions also exhibit higher levels of H3K36me3, H3K9ac, and H3K4me3, but lower levels of H3K27me3, indicating that NAT gene pairs generally exhibit an open chromatin configuration. Finally, NAT pairs in 368 diverse maize inbreds and 19 segregating populations were specifically enriched for polymorphisms associated with drought tolerance. Taken together, the data highlight the potential impact of that small RNAs and histone modifications have in regulation of NAT expression, and the significance of NATs in response to WS. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  5. Polarized expression of the membrane ASP protein derived from HIV-1 antisense transcription in T cells

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Retroviral gene expression generally depends on a full-length transcript that initiates in the 5' LTR, which is either left unspliced or alternatively spliced. We and others have demonstrated the existence of antisense transcription initiating in the 3' LTR in human lymphotropic retroviruses, including HTLV-1, HTLV-2, and HIV-1. Such transcripts have been postulated to encode antisense proteins important for the establishment of viral infections. The antisense strand of the HIV-1 proviral DNA contains an ORF termed asp, coding for a highly hydrophobic protein. However, although anti-ASP antibodies have been described to be present in HIV-1-infected patients, its in vivo expression requires further support. The objective of this present study was to clearly demonstrate that ASP is effectively expressed in infected T cells and to provide a better characterization of its subcellular localization. Results We first investigated the subcellular localization of ASP by transfecting Jurkat T cells with vectors expressing ASP tagged with the Flag epitope to its N-terminus. Using immunofluorescence microscopy, we found that ASP localized to the plasma membrane in transfected Jurkat T cells, but with different staining patterns. In addition to an entire distribution to the plasma membrane, ASP showed an asymmetric localization and could also be detected in membrane connections between two cells. We then infected Jurkat T cells with NL4.3 virus coding for ASP tagged with the Flag epitope at its C-terminal end. By this approach, we were capable of showing that ASP is effectively expressed from the HIV-1 3' LTR in infected T cells, with an asymmetric localization of the viral protein at the plasma membrane. Conclusion These results demonstrate for the first time that ASP can be detected when expressed from full-length HIV-1 proviral DNA and that its localization is consistent with Jurkat T cells overexpressing ASP. PMID:21929758

  6. Polarized expression of the membrane ASP protein derived from HIV-1 antisense transcription in T cells.

    PubMed

    Clerc, Isabelle; Laverdure, Sylvain; Torresilla, Cynthia; Landry, Sébastien; Borel, Sophie; Vargas, Amandine; Arpin-André, Charlotte; Gay, Bernard; Briant, Laurence; Gross, Antoine; Barbeau, Benoît; Mesnard, Jean-Michel

    2011-09-19

    Retroviral gene expression generally depends on a full-length transcript that initiates in the 5' LTR, which is either left unspliced or alternatively spliced. We and others have demonstrated the existence of antisense transcription initiating in the 3' LTR in human lymphotropic retroviruses, including HTLV-1, HTLV-2, and HIV-1. Such transcripts have been postulated to encode antisense proteins important for the establishment of viral infections. The antisense strand of the HIV-1 proviral DNA contains an ORF termed asp, coding for a highly hydrophobic protein. However, although anti-ASP antibodies have been described to be present in HIV-1-infected patients, its in vivo expression requires further support. The objective of this present study was to clearly demonstrate that ASP is effectively expressed in infected T cells and to provide a better characterization of its subcellular localization. We first investigated the subcellular localization of ASP by transfecting Jurkat T cells with vectors expressing ASP tagged with the Flag epitope to its N-terminus. Using immunofluorescence microscopy, we found that ASP localized to the plasma membrane in transfected Jurkat T cells, but with different staining patterns. In addition to an entire distribution to the plasma membrane, ASP showed an asymmetric localization and could also be detected in membrane connections between two cells. We then infected Jurkat T cells with NL4.3 virus coding for ASP tagged with the Flag epitope at its C-terminal end. By this approach, we were capable of showing that ASP is effectively expressed from the HIV-1 3' LTR in infected T cells, with an asymmetric localization of the viral protein at the plasma membrane. These results demonstrate for the first time that ASP can be detected when expressed from full-length HIV-1 proviral DNA and that its localization is consistent with Jurkat T cells overexpressing ASP.

  7. Antisense suppression of donor splice site mutations in the dystrophin gene transcript

    PubMed Central

    Fletcher, Sue; Meloni, Penny L; Johnsen, Russell D; Wong, Brenda L; Muntoni, Francesco; Wilton, Stephen D

    2013-01-01

    We describe two donor splice site mutations, affecting dystrophin exons 16 and 45 that led to Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), through catastrophic inactivation of the mRNA. These gene lesions unexpectedly resulted in the retention of the downstream introns, thereby increasing the length of the dystrophin mRNA by 20.2 and 36 kb, respectively. Splice-switching antisense oligomers targeted to exon 16 excised this in-frame exon and the following intron from the patient dystrophin transcript very efficiently in vitro, thereby restoring the reading frame and allowing synthesis of near-normal levels of a putatively functional dystrophin isoform. In contrast, targeting splice-switching oligomers to exon 45 in patient cells promoted only modest levels of an out-of-frame dystrophin transcript after transfection at high oligomer concentrations, whereas dual targeting of exons 44 and 45 or 45 and 46 resulted in more efficient exon skipping, with concomitant removal of intron 45. The splice site mutations reported here appear highly amenable to antisense oligomer intervention. We suggest that other splice site mutations may need to be evaluated for oligomer interventions on a case-by-case basis. PMID:24498612

  8. Chicken GHR natural antisense transcript regulates GHR mRNA in LMH cells

    PubMed Central

    An, Lilong; Ma, Jinge; Qiu, Fengfang; Jia, Rumin; Nie, Qinghua; Zhang, Dexiang; Luo, Qingbin; Li, Ting; Wang, Zhang; Zhang, Xiquan

    2016-01-01

    Growth hormone receptor (GHR) played key roles in human and animal growth. Both human laron type dwarfism and sex linked dwarf chicken were caused by the mutation of GHR gene. In this study, we identified an endogenously expressed long non-coding natural antisense transcript, GHR-AS, which overlapped with the GHR mRNA (GHR-S) in a tail to tail manner. Spatial and temporal expression analyses indicated that GHR-AS were highly expressed in chicken liver and displayed ascending with the development of chicken from E10 to 3 w of age. Interfering GHR-AS caused GHR-S decreasing, accompanied with increasing of the inactive gene indicator, H3K9me2, in the GHR-S promoter regions in LMH cells. RNase A experiment exhibited that GHR-AS and GHR-S can form double strand RNAs at the last exon of GHR gene in vivo and in vitro, which hinted they could act on each other via the region. In addition, the levels of GHR-S and GHR-AS can be affected by DNA methylation. Compared the normal chicken with the dwarfs, the negative correlation trends were showed between the GHR-S promoter methylation status and the GHR-AS levels. This is the first report of that GHR gene possessed natural antisense transcript and the results presented here further highlight the fine and complicated regulating mechanism of GHR gene in chicken development. PMID:27713155

  9. Transcription termination within the iron transport-biosynthesis operon of Vibrio anguillarum requires an antisense RNA.

    PubMed

    Stork, Michiel; Di Lorenzo, Manuela; Welch, Timothy J; Crosa, Jorge H

    2007-05-01

    The iron transport-biosynthesis (ITB) operon in Vibrio anguillarum includes four genes for ferric siderophore transport, fatD, -C, -B, and -A, and two genes for siderophore biosynthesis, angR and angT. This cluster plays an important role in the virulence mechanisms of this bacterium. Despite being part of the same polycistronic mRNA, the relative levels of transcription for the fat portion and for the whole ITB message differ profoundly, the levels of the fat transcript being about 17-fold higher. Using S1 nuclease mapping, lacZ transcriptional fusions, and in vitro studies, we were able to show that the differential gene expression within the ITB operon is due to termination of transcription between the fatA and angR genes, although a few transcripts proceeded beyond the termination site to the end of this operon. This termination process requires a 427-nucleotide antisense RNA that spans the intergenic region and acts as a novel transcriptional terminator.

  10. Ustilago maydis natural antisense transcript expression alters mRNA stability and pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Donaldson, Michael E; Saville, Barry J

    2013-01-01

    Ustilago maydis infection of Zea mays leads to the production of thick-walled diploid teliospores that are the dispersal agent for this pathogen. Transcriptome analyses of this model biotrophic basidiomycete fungus identified natural antisense transcripts (NATs) complementary to 247 open reading frames. The U. maydis NAT cDNAs were fully sequenced and annotated. Strand-specific RT-PCR screens confirmed expression and identified NATs preferentially expressed in the teliospore. Targeted screens revealed four U. maydis NATs that are conserved in a related fungus. Expression of NATs in haploid cells, where they are not naturally occurring, resulted in increased steady-state levels of some complementary mRNAs. The expression of one NAT, as-um02151, in haploid cells resulted in a twofold increase in complementary mRNA levels, the formation of sense–antisense double-stranded RNAs, and unchanged Um02151 protein levels. This led to a model for NAT function in the maintenance and expression of stored teliospore mRNAs. In testing this model by deletion of the regulatory region, it was determined that alteration in NAT expression resulted in decreased pathogenesis in both cob and seedling infections. This annotation and functional analysis supports multiple roles for U. maydis NATs in controlling gene expression and influencing pathogenesis. PMID:23650872

  11. Transcriptional regulation of translocator protein (Tspo) via a SINE B2-mediated natural antisense transcript in MA-10 Leydig cells.

    PubMed

    Fan, Jinjiang; Papadopoulos, Vassilios

    2012-05-01

    Translocator protein (18 kDa; TSPO) is a mitochondrial cholesterol- and drug-binding protein involved in cholesterol import into mitochondria, the rate-limiting step in steroidogenesis. TSPO is expressed at high levels in Leydig cells of the testis, and its expression levels dictate the ability of the cells to form androgen. In search of mechanisms that regulate Tspo expression, a number of transcription factors acting on its promoter region have been identified. We report herein the presence of a mechanism of regulation of Tspo expression via complementation with a natural antisense transcript (NAT). At the Tspo locus, a short interspersed repetitive element (SINE) of the SINE B2 family has the potential for high transcriptional activity. The extension of the SINE B2 element-mediated transcript overlapped with exon 3 of the Tspo gene and formed a NAT specific for Tspo (Tspo-NAT) in MA-10 mouse tumor Leydig cells. The identified Tspo-NAT was also found in testis and kidney tissues. Overexpression of the Tspo-NAT regulated Tspo gene expression and its function in steroid formation in MA-10 cells. Time-course studies have indicated that Tspo-NAT expression is regulated by cAMP and could regulate TSPO levels to maintain optimal steroid production by MA-10 Leydig cells. Taken together, these results suggest a new micro-transcriptional mechanism that regulates Tspo expression and thus steroidogenesis via an intron-based SINE B2-driven NAT specific for the Tspo gene.

  12. Genome-wide analysis of expression modes and DNA methylation status at sense-antisense transcript loci in mouse.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Yutaka; Numata, Koji; Murata, Shinya; Osada, Yuko; Saito, Rintaro; Nakaoka, Hajime; Yamamoto, Naoyuki; Watanabe, Kazufumi; Kato, Hidemasa; Abe, Kuniya; Kiyosawa, Hidenori

    2010-12-01

    The functionality of sense-antisense transcripts (SATs), although widespread throughout the mammalian genome, is largely unknown. Here, we analyzed the SATs expression and its associated promoter DNA methylation status by surveying 12 tissues of mice to gain insights into the relationship between expression and DNA methylation of SATs. We have found that sense and antisense expression positively correlate in most tissues. However, in some SATs with tissue-specific expression, the expression level of a transcript from a CpG island-bearing promoter is low when the promoter DNA methylation is present. In these circumstances, the expression level of its opposite-strand transcript, especially when it is poly(A)-negative was coincidentally higher. These observations suggest that, albeit the general tendency of sense-antisense simultaneous expression, some antisense transcripts have coordinated expression with its counterpart sense gene promoter methylation. This cross-strand relationship is not a privilege of imprinted genes but seems to occur widely in SATs.

  13. Hormone-dependent expression of a steroidogenic acute regulatory protein natural antisense transcript in MA-10 mouse tumor Leydig cells.

    PubMed

    Castillo, Ana Fernanda; Fan, Jinjiang; Papadopoulos, Vassilios; Podestá, Ernesto J

    2011-01-01

    Cholesterol transport is essential for many physiological processes, including steroidogenesis. In steroidogenic cells hormone-induced cholesterol transport is controlled by a protein complex that includes steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR). Star is expressed as 3.5-, 2.8-, and 1.6-kb transcripts that differ only in their 3'-untranslated regions. Because these transcripts share the same promoter, mRNA stability may be involved in their differential regulation and expression. Recently, the identification of natural antisense transcripts (NATs) has added another level of regulation to eukaryotic gene expression. Here we identified a new NAT that is complementary to the spliced Star mRNA sequence. Using 5' and 3' RACE, strand-specific RT-PCR, and ribonuclease protection assays, we demonstrated that Star NAT is expressed in MA-10 Leydig cells and steroidogenic murine tissues. Furthermore, we established that human chorionic gonadotropin stimulates Star NAT expression via cAMP. Our results show that sense-antisense Star RNAs may be coordinately regulated since they are co-expressed in MA-10 cells. Overexpression of Star NAT had a differential effect on the expression of the different Star sense transcripts following cAMP stimulation. Meanwhile, the levels of StAR protein and progesterone production were downregulated in the presence of Star NAT. Our data identify antisense transcription as an additional mechanism involved in the regulation of steroid biosynthesis.

  14. Sense-antisense gene pairs: sequence, transcription, and structure are not conserved between human and mouse

    PubMed Central

    Wood, Emily J.; Chin-Inmanu, Kwanrutai; Jia, Hui; Lipovich, Leonard

    2013-01-01

    Previous efforts to characterize conservation between the human and mouse genomes focused largely on sequence comparisons. These studies are inherently limited because they don't account for gene structure differences, which may exist despite genomic sequence conservation. Recent high-throughput transcriptome studies have revealed widespread and extensive overlaps between genes, and transcripts, encoded on both strands of the genomic sequence. This overlapping gene organization, which produces sense-antisense (SAS) gene pairs, is capable of effecting regulatory cascades through established mechanisms. We present an evolutionary conservation assessment of SAS pairs, on three levels: genomic, transcriptomic, and structural. From a genome-wide dataset of human SAS pairs, we first identified orthologous loci in the mouse genome, then assessed their transcription in the mouse, and finally compared the genomic structures of SAS pairs expressed in both species. We found that approximately half of human SAS loci have single orthologous locations in the mouse genome; however, only half of those orthologous locations have SAS transcriptional activity in the mouse. This suggests that high human-mouse gene conservation overlooks widespread distinctions in SAS pair incidence and expression. We compared gene structures at orthologous SAS loci, finding frequent differences in gene structure between human and orthologous mouse SAS pair members. Our categorization of human SAS pairs with respect to mouse conservation of expression as well as structure points to limitations of mouse models. Gene structure differences, including at SAS loci, may account for some of the phenotypic distinctions between primates and rodents. Genes in non-conserved SAS pairs may contribute to evolutionary lineage-specific regulatory outcomes. PMID:24133500

  15. Control of seed dormancy in Arabidopsis by a cis-acting noncoding antisense transcript

    PubMed Central

    Fedak, Halina; Palusinska, Malgorzata; Krzyczmonik, Katarzyna; Brzezniak, Lien; Yatusevich, Ruslan; Pietras, Zbigniew; Kaczanowski, Szymon; Swiezewski, Szymon

    2016-01-01

    Seed dormancy is one of the most crucial process transitions in a plant’s life cycle. Its timing is tightly controlled by the expression level of the Delay of Germination 1 gene (DOG1). DOG1 is the major quantitative trait locus for seed dormancy in Arabidopsis and has been shown to control dormancy in many other plant species. This is reflected by the evolutionary conservation of the functional short alternatively polyadenylated form of the DOG1 mRNA. Notably, the 3′ region of DOG1, including the last exon that is not included in this transcript isoform, shows a high level of conservation at the DNA level, but the encoded polypeptide is poorly conserved. Here, we demonstrate that this region of DOG1 contains a promoter for the transcription of a noncoding antisense RNA, asDOG1, that is 5′ capped, polyadenylated, and relatively stable. This promoter is autonomous and asDOG1 has an expression profile that is different from known DOG1 transcripts. Using several approaches we show that asDOG1 strongly suppresses DOG1 expression during seed maturation in cis, but is unable to do so in trans. Therefore, the negative regulation of seed dormancy by asDOG1 in cis results in allele-specific suppression of DOG1 expression and promotes germination. Given the evolutionary conservation of the asDOG1 promoter, we propose that this cis-constrained noncoding RNA-mediated mechanism limiting the duration of seed dormancy functions across the Brassicaceae. PMID:27856735

  16. Sense and antisense transcripts of the developmentally regulated murine hsp70.2 gene are expressed in distinct and only partially overlapping areas in the adult brain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murashov, A. K.; Wolgemuth, D. J.

    1996-01-01

    We have examined the spatial pattern of expression of a member of the hsp70 gene family, hsp70.2, in the mouse central nervous system. Surprisingly, RNA blot analysis and in situ hybridization revealed abundant expression of an 'antisense' hsp70.2 transcript in several areas of adult mouse brain. Two different transcripts recognized by sense and antisense riboprobes for the hsp70.2 gene were expressed in distinct and only partially overlapping neuronal populations. RNA blot analysis revealed low levels of the 2.7 kb transcript of hsp70.2 in several areas of the brain, with highest signal in the hippocampus. Abundant expression of a slightly larger (approximately 2.8 kb) 'antisense' transcript was detected in several brain regions, notably in the brainstem, cerebellum, mesencephalic tectum, thalamus, cortex, and hippocampus. In situ hybridization revealed that the sense and antisense transcripts were both predominantly neuronal and localized to the same cell types in the granular layer of the cerebellum, trapezoid nucleus of the superior olivary complex, locus coeruleus and hippocampus. The hsp70.2 antisense transcripts were particularly abundant in the frontal cortex, dentate gyrus, subthalamic nucleus, zona incerta, superior and inferior colliculi, central gray, brainstem, and cerebellar Purkinje cells. Our findings have revealed a distinct cellular and spatial localization of both sense and antisense transcripts, demonstrating a new level of complexity in the function of the heat shock genes.

  17. Sense and antisense transcripts of the developmentally regulated murine hsp70.2 gene are expressed in distinct and only partially overlapping areas in the adult brain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murashov, A. K.; Wolgemuth, D. J.

    1996-01-01

    We have examined the spatial pattern of expression of a member of the hsp70 gene family, hsp70.2, in the mouse central nervous system. Surprisingly, RNA blot analysis and in situ hybridization revealed abundant expression of an 'antisense' hsp70.2 transcript in several areas of adult mouse brain. Two different transcripts recognized by sense and antisense riboprobes for the hsp70.2 gene were expressed in distinct and only partially overlapping neuronal populations. RNA blot analysis revealed low levels of the 2.7 kb transcript of hsp70.2 in several areas of the brain, with highest signal in the hippocampus. Abundant expression of a slightly larger (approximately 2.8 kb) 'antisense' transcript was detected in several brain regions, notably in the brainstem, cerebellum, mesencephalic tectum, thalamus, cortex, and hippocampus. In situ hybridization revealed that the sense and antisense transcripts were both predominantly neuronal and localized to the same cell types in the granular layer of the cerebellum, trapezoid nucleus of the superior olivary complex, locus coeruleus and hippocampus. The hsp70.2 antisense transcripts were particularly abundant in the frontal cortex, dentate gyrus, subthalamic nucleus, zona incerta, superior and inferior colliculi, central gray, brainstem, and cerebellar Purkinje cells. Our findings have revealed a distinct cellular and spatial localization of both sense and antisense transcripts, demonstrating a new level of complexity in the function of the heat shock genes.

  18. Differential regulation of sense and antisense promoter activity at the Csf1R locus in B cells by the transcription factor PAX5.

    PubMed

    Ingram, Richard M; Valeaux, Stephanie; Wilson, Nicola; Bouhlel, M Amine; Clarke, Deborah; Krüger, Imme; Kulu, Divine; Suske, Guntram; Philipsen, Sjaak; Tagoh, Hiromi; Bonifer, Constanze

    2011-07-01

    The transcription factor PAX5 is essential for the activation of B-cell-specific genes and for the silencing of myeloid-specific genes. We previously determined the molecular mechanism by which PAX5 silences the myeloid-specific colony-stimulating-factor-receptor (Csf1R) gene and showed that PAX5 directly binds to the Csf1r promoter as well as to an intronic enhancer that generates an antisense transcript in B cells. Here we examine the role of PAX5 in the regulation of sense and antisense transcription in B cells. We performed PAX5-specific chromatin immunoprecipitation analyses across the Csfr1 locus. We investigated the role of PAX5 in regulating Csf1r sense and antisense promoter activity by transient transfections and by employing a Pax5(-/-) pro-B-cell line expressing an inducible PAX5 protein. PAX5 interacting factors were identified by pull-down experiments. The role of the transcription factor Sp3 in driving antisense promoter expression was examined in B cells from Sp3 knockout mice. PAX5 differentially regulates the Csf1r promoter and the promoter of the antisense transcript. PAX5 interferes with PU.1 transactivation at the sense promoter by binding to a PAX5 consensus sequence. At the antisense promoter, PAX5 does not specifically recognize DNA, but interacts with Sp3 to upregulate antisense promoter activity. Antisense promoter activation by PAX5 is dependent on the presence of its partial homeo-domain. We demonstrate that PAX5 regulates Csf1r in B cells by reducing the frequency of binding of the basal transcription machinery to the promoter and by activating antisense RNA expression. Copyright © 2011 ISEH - Society for Hematology and Stem Cells. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Tuning growth cycles of Brassica crops via natural antisense transcripts of BrFLC.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaorong; Zhang, Shaofeng; Bai, Jinjuan; He, Yuke

    2016-03-01

    Several oilseed and vegetable crops of Brassica are biennials that require a prolonged winter cold for flowering, a process called vernalization. FLOWERING LOCUS C (FLC) is a central repressor of flowering. Here, we report that the overexpression of natural antisense transcripts (NATs) of Brassica rapa FLC (BrFLC) greatly shortens plant growth cycles. In rapid-, medium- and slow-cycling crop types, there are four copies of the BrFLC genes, which show extensive variation in sequences and expression levels. In Bre, a biennial crop type that requires vernalization, five NATs derived from the BrFLC2 locus are rapidly induced under cold conditions, while all four BrFLC genes are gradually down-regulated. The transgenic Bre lines overexpressing a long NAT of BrFLC2 do not require vernalization, resulting in a gradient of shortened growth cycles. Among them, a subset of lines both flower and set seeds as early as Yellow sarson, an annual crop type in which all four BrFLC genes have non-sense mutations and are nonfunctional in flowering repression. Our results demonstrate that the growth cycles of biennial crops of Brassica can be altered by changing the expression levels of BrFLC2 NATs. Thus, BrFLC2 NATs and their transgenic lines are useful for the genetic manipulation of crop growth cycles.

  20. Does the linear Sry transcript function as a ceRNA for miR-138? The sense of antisense.

    PubMed

    Granados-Riveron, Javier Tadeo; Aquino-Jarquin, Guillermo

    2014-01-01

    Recently, the sex determining region Y ( Sry) and the cerebellar degeneration-related protein 1 ( CDR1as) RNA transcripts have been described to function as a new class of post-transcriptional regulatory RNAs that behave as circular endogenous RNA sponges for the micro RNAs (miRNAs) miR-138 and miR-7, respectively. A special feature of the Sry gene is its ability to generate linear and circular transcripts, both transcribed in the sense orientation. Here we remark that both sense (e.g. Sry RNA) and antisense (e.g. CDR1as) transcripts could circularize and behave as miRNAs sponges, and importantly, that also protein-coding segments of mRNAs could also assume this role. Thus, it is reasonable to think that the linear Sry sense transcript could additionally act as a miRNA sponge, or as an endogenous competing RNA for miR-138.

  1. Does the linear Sry transcript function as a ceRNA for miR-138? The sense of antisense

    PubMed Central

    Granados-Riveron, Javier Tadeo; Aquino-Jarquin, Guillermo

    2014-01-01

    Recently, the sex determining region Y ( Sry) and the cerebellar degeneration-related protein 1 ( CDR1as) RNA transcripts have been described to function as a new class of post-transcriptional regulatory RNAs that behave as circular endogenous RNA sponges for the micro RNAs (miRNAs) miR-138 and miR-7, respectively. A special feature of the Sry gene is its ability to generate linear and circular transcripts, both transcribed in the sense orientation. Here we remark that both sense (e.g. Sry RNA) and antisense (e.g. CDR1as) transcripts could circularize and behave as miRNAs sponges, and importantly, that also protein-coding segments of mRNAs could also assume this role. Thus, it is reasonable to think that the linear Sry sense transcript could additionally act as a miRNA sponge, or as an endogenous competing RNA for miR-138. PMID:25580223

  2. Characterization of novel Bovine Leukemia Virus (BLV) antisense transcripts by deep sequencing reveals constitutive expression in tumors and transcriptional interaction with viral microRNAs.

    PubMed

    Durkin, Keith; Rosewick, Nicolas; Artesi, Maria; Hahaut, Vincent; Griebel, Philip; Arsic, Natasa; Burny, Arsène; Georges, Michel; Van den Broeke, Anne

    2016-05-03

    Bovine Leukemia Virus (BLV) is a deltaretrovirus closely related to the Human T cell leukemia virus-1 (HTLV-1). Cattle are the natural host of BLV where it integrates into B-cells, producing a lifelong infection. Most infected animals remain asymptomatic but following a protracted latency period about 5 % develop an aggressive leukemia/lymphoma, mirroring the disease trajectory of HTLV-1. The mechanisms by which these viruses provoke cellular transformation remain opaque. In both viruses little or no transcription is observed from the 5'LTR in tumors, however the proviruses are not transcriptionally silent. In the case of BLV a cluster of RNA polymerase III transcribed microRNAs are highly expressed, while the HTLV-1 antisense transcript HBZ is consistently found in all tumors examined. Here, using RNA-seq, we demonstrate that the BLV provirus also constitutively expresses antisense transcripts in all leukemic and asymptomatic samples examined. The first transcript (AS1) can be alternately polyadenylated, generating a transcript of ~600 bp (AS1-S) and a less abundant transcript of ~2200 bp (AS1-L). Alternative splicing creates a second transcript of ~400 bp (AS2). The coding potential of AS1-S/L is ambiguous, with a small open reading frame of 264 bp, however the transcripts are primarily retained in the nucleus, hinting at a lncRNA-like role. The AS1-L transcript overlaps the BLV microRNAs and using high throughput sequencing of RNA-ligase-mediated (RLM) 5'RACE, we show that the RNA-induced silencing complex (RISC) cleaves AS1-L. Furthermore, experiments using altered BLV proviruses with the microRNAs either deleted or inverted point to additional transcriptional interference between the two viral RNA species. The identification of novel viral antisense transcripts shows the BLV provirus to be far from silent in tumors. Furthermore, the consistent expression of these transcripts in both leukemic and nonmalignant clones points to a vital role in the life cycle

  3. Antisense RNA transcripts in the blood may be novel diagnostic markers for colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Kurokawa, Tomohiro; Kohno, Keisuke; Nagai, Kentaro; Chiba, Mitsuru; Pak, Sugiru; Murata, Soichiro; Fukunaga, Kiyoshi; Yasue, Hiroshi; Ohkohchi, Nobuhiro

    2017-09-01

    Numerous genetic studies have been conducted regarding the occurrence of colorectal cancer (CRC) and the prognosis using microarrays. However, adequate investigations into the diagnostic application of microarrays have yet to be performed. The simplicity and accuracy of diagnosis and prognosis tracking are important requirements for its processes, and the use of blood cells for diagnosis is considered to be suitable to meet these requirements. The patients involved in the study were 28 preoperative patients with CRC and 6 healthy individuals who served as controls. RNA was extracted from the blood cells of the patients and analyzed using a sense/antisense RNA custom microarray. In the patients with CRC, the expression levels of 20 sense RNA and 20 antisense RNA species were identified as being significantly altered compared with that of the healthy volunteers (P<0.05; fold-change, >2.0). Cluster analysis of these RNA species revealed that the top 10 antisense RNAs significantly clustered patients with cancer and healthy individuals separately. Patients with stage I or II CRC exhibited significant changes in the expression levels of 33 sense and 39 antisense RNA species, as compared with healthy volunteers (P<0.01; fold-change >2.0). Cluster analysis demonstrated that patients with stage I or II CRC and healthy volunteers formed separate clusters only among the top 20 antisense RNA species. A tracking study of expression levels of haloacid dehalogenase-like hydrolase domain-containing 1 (HDHD1) antisense RNA was performed and a significant difference was identified between the CRC and healthy groups revealing that the levels at one week and three months following surgical removal of the cancerous tissue, decreased to almost same levels of the healthy individuals. The results of the current study indicate that HDHD1 antisense RNA may serve as a potential biomarker for the prognosis of CRC.

  4. H19 Antisense RNA Can Up-Regulate Igf2 Transcription by Activation of a Novel Promoter in Mouse Myoblasts

    PubMed Central

    Duputié, Anne; Antoine, Etienne; Aptel, Nathalie; Milligan, Laura; Carbonell, Françoise; Lelay-Taha, Marie-Noëlle; Piette, Jacques; Weber, Michaël; Montarras, Didier; Pinset, Christian; Dandolo, Luisa; Forné, Thierry; Cathala, Guy

    2012-01-01

    It was recently shown that a long non-coding RNA (lncRNA), that we named the 91H RNA (i.e. antisense H19 transcript), is overexpressed in human breast tumours and contributes in trans to the expression of the Insulin-like Growth Factor 2 (IGF2) gene on the paternal chromosome. Our preliminary experiments suggested that an H19 antisense transcript having a similar function may also be conserved in the mouse. In the present work, we further characterise the mouse 91H RNA and, using a genetic complementation approach in H19 KO myoblast cells, we show that ectopic expression of the mouse 91H RNA can up-regulate Igf2 expression in trans despite almost complete unmethylation of the Imprinting-Control Region (ICR). We then demonstrate that this activation occurs at the transcriptional level by activation of a previously unknown Igf2 promoter which displays, in mouse tissues, a preferential mesodermic expression (Pm promoter). Finally, our experiments indicate that a large excess of the H19 transcript can counteract 91H-mediated Igf2 activation. Our work contributes, in conjunction with other recent findings, to open new horizons to our understanding of Igf2 gene regulation and functions of the 91H/H19 RNAs in normal and pathological conditions. PMID:22662250

  5. Improved Antisense Oligonucleotide Design to Suppress Aberrant SMN2 Gene Transcript Processing: Towards a Treatment for Spinal Muscular Atrophy

    PubMed Central

    Mitrpant, Chalermchai; Porensky, Paul; Zhou, Haiyan; Price, Loren; Muntoni, Francesco; Fletcher, Sue; Wilton, Steve D.; Burghes, Arthur H. M.

    2013-01-01

    Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is caused by loss of the Survival Motor Neuron 1 (SMN1) gene, resulting in reduced SMN protein. Humans possess the additional SMN2 gene (or genes) that does produce low level of full length SMN, but cannot adequately compensate for loss of SMN1 due to aberrant splicing. The majority of SMN2 gene transcripts lack exon 7 and the resultant SMNΔ7 mRNA is translated into an unstable and non-functional protein. Splice intervention therapies to promote exon 7 retention and increase amounts of full-length SMN2 transcript offer great potential as a treatment for SMA patients. Several splice silencing motifs in SMN2 have been identified as potential targets for antisense oligonucleotide mediated splice modification. A strong splice silencer is located downstream of exon 7 in SMN2 intron 7. Antisense oligonucleotides targeting this motif promoted SMN2 exon 7 retention in the mature SMN2 transcripts, with increased SMN expression detected in SMA fibroblasts. We report here systematic optimisation of phosphorodiamidate morpholino oligonucleotides (PMO) that promote exon 7 retention to levels that rescued the phenotype in a severe mouse model of SMA after intracerebroventricular delivery. Furthermore, the PMO gives the longest survival reported to date after a single dosing by ICV. PMID:23630626

  6. Regulation of Nav1.7: A Conserved SCN9A Natural Antisense Transcript Expressed in Dorsal Root Ganglia.

    PubMed

    Koenig, Jennifer; Werdehausen, Robert; Linley, John E; Habib, Abdella M; Vernon, Jeffrey; Lolignier, Stephane; Eijkelkamp, Niels; Zhao, Jing; Okorokov, Andrei L; Woods, C Geoffrey; Wood, John N; Cox, James J

    2015-01-01

    The Nav1.7 voltage-gated sodium channel, encoded by SCN9A, is critical for human pain perception yet the transcriptional and post-transcriptional mechanisms that regulate this gene are still incompletely understood. Here, we describe a novel natural antisense transcript (NAT) for SCN9A that is conserved in humans and mice. The NAT has a similar tissue expression pattern to the sense gene and is alternatively spliced within dorsal root ganglia. The human and mouse NATs exist in cis with the sense gene in a tail-to-tail orientation and both share sequences that are complementary to the terminal exon of SCN9A/Scn9a. Overexpression analyses of the human NAT in human embryonic kidney (HEK293A) and human neuroblastoma (SH-SY5Y) cell lines show that it can function to downregulate Nav1.7 mRNA, protein levels and currents. The NAT may play an important role in regulating human pain thresholds and is a potential candidate gene for individuals with chronic pain disorders that map to the SCN9A locus, such as Inherited Primary Erythromelalgia, Paroxysmal Extreme Pain Disorder and Painful Small Fibre Neuropathy, but who do not contain mutations in the sense gene. Our results strongly suggest the SCN9A NAT as a prime candidate for new therapies based upon augmentation of existing antisense RNAs in the treatment of chronic pain conditions in man.

  7. The Antisense Transcript SMN-AS1 Regulates SMN Expression and Is a Novel Therapeutic Target for Spinal Muscular Atrophy.

    PubMed

    d'Ydewalle, Constantin; Ramos, Daniel M; Pyles, Noah J; Ng, Shi-Yan; Gorz, Mariusz; Pilato, Celeste M; Ling, Karen; Kong, Lingling; Ward, Amanda J; Rubin, Lee L; Rigo, Frank; Bennett, C Frank; Sumner, Charlotte J

    2017-01-04

    The neuromuscular disorder spinal muscular atrophy (SMA), the most common inherited killer of infants, is caused by insufficient expression of survival motor neuron (SMN) protein. SMA therapeutics development efforts have focused on identifying strategies to increase SMN expression. We identified a long non-coding RNA (lncRNA) that arises from the antisense strand of SMN, SMN-AS1, which is enriched in neurons and transcriptionally represses SMN expression by recruiting the epigenetic Polycomb repressive complex-2. Targeted degradation of SMN-AS1 with antisense oligonucleotides (ASOs) increases SMN expression in patient-derived cells, cultured neurons, and the mouse central nervous system. SMN-AS1 ASOs delivered together with SMN2 splice-switching oligonucleotides additively increase SMN expression and improve survival of severe SMA mice. This study is the first proof of concept that targeting a lncRNA to transcriptionally activate SMN2 can be combined with SMN2 splicing modification to ameliorate SMA and demonstrates the promise of combinatorial ASOs for the treatment of neurogenetic disorders. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Tyrosine phosphorylation of RNA polymerase II CTD is associated with antisense promoter transcription and active enhancers in mammalian cells

    PubMed Central

    Descostes, Nicolas; Heidemann, Martin; Spinelli, Lionel; Schüller, Roland; Maqbool, Muhammad Ahmad; Fenouil, Romain; Koch, Frederic; Innocenti, Charlène; Gut, Marta; Gut, Ivo; Eick, Dirk; Andrau, Jean-Christophe

    2014-01-01

    In mammals, the carboxy-terminal domain (CTD) of RNA polymerase (Pol) II consists of 52 conserved heptapeptide repeats containing the consensus sequence Tyr1-Ser2-Pro3-Thr4-Ser5-Pro6-Ser7. Post-translational modifications of the CTD coordinate the transcription cycle and various steps of mRNA maturation. Here we describe Tyr1 phosphorylation (Tyr1P) as a hallmark of promoter (5′ associated) Pol II in mammalian cells, in contrast to what was described in yeast. Tyr1P is predominantly found in antisense orientation at promoters but is also specifically enriched at active enhancers. Mutation of Tyr1 to phenylalanine (Y1F) prevents the formation of the hyper-phosphorylated Pol IIO form, induces degradation of Pol II to the truncated Pol IIB form, and results in a lethal phenotype. Our results suggest that Tyr1P has evolved specialized and essential functions in higher eukaryotes associated with antisense promoter and enhancer transcription, and Pol II stability. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.02105.001 PMID:24842994

  9. Regulation of Peripheral Myelination through Transcriptional Buffering of Egr2 by an Antisense Long Non-coding RNA.

    PubMed

    Martinez-Moreno, Margot; O'Shea, Timothy Mark; Zepecki, John P; Olaru, Alexander; Ness, Jennifer K; Langer, Robert; Tapinos, Nikos

    2017-08-22

    Precise regulation of Egr2 transcription is fundamentally important to the control of peripheral myelination. Here, we describe a long non-coding RNA antisense to the promoter of Egr2 (Egr2-AS-RNA). During peripheral nerve injury, the expression of Egr2-AS-RNA is increased and correlates with decreased Egr2 transcript and protein levels. Ectopic expression of Egr2-AS-RNA in dorsal root ganglion (DRG) cultures inhibits the expression of Egr2 mRNA and induces demyelination. In vivo inhibition of Egr2-AS-RNA using oligonucleotide GapMers released from a biodegradable hydrogel following sciatic nerve injury reverts the EGR2-mediated gene expression profile and significantly delays demyelination. Egr2-AS-RNA gradually recruits H3K27ME3, AGO1, AGO2, and EZH2 on the Egr2 promoter following sciatic nerve injury. Furthermore, expression of Egr2-AS-RNA is regulated through ERK1/2 signaling to YY1, while loss of Ser184 of YY1 regulates binding to Egr2-AS-RNA. In conclusion, we describe functional exploration of an antisense long non-coding RNA in peripheral nervous system (PNS) biology. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Distinct transcripts are recognized by sense and antisense riboprobes for a member of the murine HSP70 gene family, HSP70.2, in various reproductive tissues

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murashov, A. K.; Wolgemuth, D. J.

    1996-01-01

    The expression of hsp70.2, an hsp70 gene family member, originally characterized by its high levels of expression in germ cells in the adult mouse testis, was detected in several other reproductive tissues, including epididymis, prostate, and seminal vesicles, as well as in extraembryonic tissues of mid-gestation fetuses. In addition, hybridization with RNA probes transcribed in the sense orientation surprisingly indicated the presence of slightly larger "antisense" transcripts in several tissues. The levels of antisense transcripts varied among the tissues, with the highest signal detected in the prostate and no signal being detectable in the testis. Consistent with these results, in situ hybridization analysis clearly localized the sense-orientation transcripts to pachytene spermatocytes, while no antisense-orientation transcripts were observed in adjacent sections of the same tubules. Our findings have thus shown that although hsp70.2 was expressed abundantly and in a highly stage-specific manner in the male germ line, it was also expressed in other murine tissues. Furthermore, we have made the surprising observation of antisense transcription of the hsp70.2 gene in several mouse tissues, revealing another level of complexity in the regulation and function of heat shock proteins.

  11. Distinct transcripts are recognized by sense and antisense riboprobes for a member of the murine HSP70 gene family, HSP70.2, in various reproductive tissues

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murashov, A. K.; Wolgemuth, D. J.

    1996-01-01

    The expression of hsp70.2, an hsp70 gene family member, originally characterized by its high levels of expression in germ cells in the adult mouse testis, was detected in several other reproductive tissues, including epididymis, prostate, and seminal vesicles, as well as in extraembryonic tissues of mid-gestation fetuses. In addition, hybridization with RNA probes transcribed in the sense orientation surprisingly indicated the presence of slightly larger "antisense" transcripts in several tissues. The levels of antisense transcripts varied among the tissues, with the highest signal detected in the prostate and no signal being detectable in the testis. Consistent with these results, in situ hybridization analysis clearly localized the sense-orientation transcripts to pachytene spermatocytes, while no antisense-orientation transcripts were observed in adjacent sections of the same tubules. Our findings have thus shown that although hsp70.2 was expressed abundantly and in a highly stage-specific manner in the male germ line, it was also expressed in other murine tissues. Furthermore, we have made the surprising observation of antisense transcription of the hsp70.2 gene in several mouse tissues, revealing another level of complexity in the regulation and function of heat shock proteins.

  12. Natural genetic variation impacts expression levels of coding, non-coding, and antisense transcripts in fission yeast

    PubMed Central

    Clément-Ziza, Mathieu; Marsellach, Francesc X; Codlin, Sandra; Papadakis, Manos A; Reinhardt, Susanne; Rodríguez-López, María; Martin, Stuart; Marguerat, Samuel; Schmidt, Alexander; Lee, Eunhye; Workman, Christopher T; Bähler, Jürg; Beyer, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    Our current understanding of how natural genetic variation affects gene expression beyond well-annotated coding genes is still limited. The use of deep sequencing technologies for the study of expression quantitative trait loci (eQTLs) has the potential to close this gap. Here, we generated the first recombinant strain library for fission yeast and conducted an RNA-seq-based QTL study of the coding, non-coding, and antisense transcriptomes. We show that the frequency of distal effects (trans-eQTLs) greatly exceeds the number of local effects (cis-eQTLs) and that non-coding RNAs are as likely to be affected by eQTLs as protein-coding RNAs. We identified a genetic variation of swc5 that modifies the levels of 871 RNAs, with effects on both sense and antisense transcription, and show that this effect most likely goes through a compromised deposition of the histone variant H2A.Z. The strains, methods, and datasets generated here provide a rich resource for future studies. PMID:25432776

  13. Deletion of the Noncoding GNAS Antisense Transcript Causes Pseudohypoparathyroidism Type Ib and Biparental Defects of GNAS Methylation in cis

    PubMed Central

    Chillambhi, Smitha; Turan, Serap; Hwang, Daw-Yang; Chen, Hung-Chun; Jüppner, Harald; Bastepe, Murat

    2010-01-01

    Context: GNAS encodes the α-subunit of the stimulatory G protein as well as additional imprinted transcripts including the maternally expressed NESP55 and the paternally expressed XLαs, antisense, and A/B transcripts. Most patients with pseudohypoparathyroidism type Ib (PHP-Ib) exhibit imprinting defects affecting the maternal GNAS allele, which are thought to reduce/abolish Gsα expression in renal proximal tubules and thereby cause resistance to PTH. Objective: Our objective was to define the genetic defect in a previously unreported family with autosomal dominant PHP-Ib. Design and Setting: Analyses of serum and urine chemistries and of genomic DNA and lymphoblastoid-derived RNA were conducted at a tertiary hospital and research laboratory. Patients: Affected individuals presented with muscle weakness and/or paresthesia and showed hypocalcemia, hyperphosphatemia, and elevated serum PTH. Obligate carriers were healthy and revealed no obvious abnormality in mineral ion homeostasis. Results: A novel 4.2-kb microdeletion was discovered in the affected individuals and the obligate carriers, ablating two noncoding GNAS antisense exons while preserving the NESP55 exon. On maternal transmission, the deletion causes loss of all maternal GNAS imprints, partial gain of NESP55 methylation, and PTH resistance. Paternal transmission of the mutation leads to epigenetic alterations in cis, including a partial loss of NESP55 methylation and a partial gain of A/B methylation. Conclusions: The identified deletion points to a unique cis-acting element located telomeric of the NESP55 exon that is critical for imprinting both GNAS alleles. These findings provide novel insights into the molecular mechanisms underlying PHP and GNAS imprinting. PMID:20444925

  14. Serial analysis of gene expression in sugarcane (Saccharum spp.) leaves revealed alternative C4 metabolism and putative antisense transcripts.

    PubMed

    Calsa, Tercilio; Figueira, Antonio

    2007-04-01

    Sugarcane (Saccharum spp.) is a highly efficient biomass and sugar producing crop. Leaf reactions have been considered as potential rate-limiting step for sucrose accumulation in sugarcane stalks. To characterize the sugarcane leaf transcriptome, field-grown mature leaves from cultivar "SP80-3280" were analyzed using Serial Analysis of Gene Expression (SAGE). From 480 sequenced clones, 9,482 valid tags were extracted, with 5,227 unique sequences, from which 3,659 (70%) matched at least a sugarcane assembled sequence (SAS) with putative function; while 872 tags (16.7%) matched SAS with unknown function; 523 (10%) matched SAS without a putative annotation; and only 173 (3.3%) did not match any sugarcane ESTs. Based on gene ontology (GO), photosystem (PS) I reaction center was identified as the most frequent gene product location, followed by the remaining sites of PS I, PS II and thylakoid complexes. For metabolic processes, photosynthesis light harvesting complexes; carbon fixation; and chlorophyll biosynthesis were the most enriched GO-terms. Considering the alternative photosynthetic C(4) cycles, tag frequencies related to phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK) and aspartate aminotransferase compared to those for NADP(+)-malic enzyme (NADP-ME) and NADP-malate dehydrogenase, suggested that PEPCK-type decarboxylation appeared to predominate over NADP-ME in mature leaves, although both may occur, opposite to currently assumed in sugarcane. From the unique tag set, 894 tags (17.1%) were assigned as potentially derived from antisense transcripts, while 73 tags (1.4%) were assigned to more than one SAS, suggesting the occurrence of alternative processing. The occurrence of antisense was validated by quantitative reverse transcription amplification. Sugarcane leaf transcriptome provided new insights for functional studies associated with sucrose synthesis and accumulation.

  15. Expression of the Antisense-to-Latency Transcript Long Noncoding RNA in Kaposi's Sarcoma-Associated Herpesvirus.

    PubMed

    Schifano, Jason M; Corcoran, Kathleen; Kelkar, Hemant; Dittmer, Dirk P

    2017-02-15

    The regulation of latency is central to herpesvirus biology. Recent transcriptome-wide surveys have uncovered evidence for promiscuous transcription across the entirety of the Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) genome and postulated the existence of multiple viral long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs). Next-generation sequencing studies are highly dependent on the specific experimental approach and particular algorithms of analysis and therefore benefit from independent confirmation of the results. The antisense-to-latency transcript (ALT) lncRNA was discovered by genome-tiling microarray (Chandriani et al., J Virol 86:7934-7942, 2010, https://doi.org/10.1128/JVI.00645-10). To characterize ALT in detail, we physically isolated this lncRNA by a strand-specific hybrid capture assay and then employed transcriptome sequencing and novel reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PCR) assays to distinguish all RNA species in the KSHV latency region. These methods confirm that ALT initiates at positions 120739/121012 and encodes a single splice site, which is shared with the 3'-coterminal K14-vGPCR/ORF74 mRNA, terminating at 130873 (GenBank accession number GQ994935), resulting in an ∼10,000-nucleotide transcript. No shorter ALT isoforms were identified. This study also identified a novel intron within the LANA 5' untranslated region using a splice acceptor at 127888. In summary, ALT joins PAN/nut1/T1.1 as a bona fide lncRNA of KSHV with potentially important roles in viral gene regulation and pathogenesis. Increasing data support the importance of noncoding RNAs (ncRNAs), including microRNAs (miRNAs) and lncRNAs, which have been shown to exert critical regulatory functions without coding for recognizable proteins. Defining the sequences of these ncRNAs is essential for future studies aiming to functionally characterize a specific ncRNA. Most lncRNA studies are highly dependent on high-throughput sequencing and bioinformatic analyses, few studies follow up on the initial

  16. Dynamics of Co-Transcriptional Pre-mRNA Folding Influences the Induction of Dystrophin Exon Skipping by Antisense Oligonucleotides

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jian Li; MacDorman, Karl F.; Lai, Poh San; Yee, Woon Chee

    2008-01-01

    Antisense oligonucleotides (AONs) mediated exon skipping offers potential therapy for Duchenne muscular dystrophy. However, the identification of effective AON target sites remains unsatisfactory for lack of a precise method to predict their binding accessibility. This study demonstrates the importance of co-transcriptional pre-mRNA folding in determining the accessibility of AON target sites for AON induction of selective exon skipping in DMD. Because transcription and splicing occur in tandem, AONs must bind to their target sites before splicing factors. Furthermore, co-transcriptional pre-mRNA folding forms transient secondary structures, which redistributes accessible binding sites. In our analysis, to approximate transcription elongation, a “window of analysis” that included the entire targeted exon was shifted one nucleotide at a time along the pre-mRNA. Possible co-transcriptional secondary structures were predicted using the sequence in each step of transcriptional analysis. A nucleotide was considered “engaged” if it formed a complementary base pairing in all predicted secondary structures of a particular step. Correlation of frequency and localisation of engaged nucleotides in AON target sites accounted for the performance (efficacy and efficiency) of 94% of 176 previously reported AONs. Four novel insights are inferred: (1) the lowest frequencies of engaged nucleotides are associated with the most efficient AONs; (2) engaged nucleotides at 3′ or 5′ ends of the target site attenuate AON performance more than at other sites; (3) the performance of longer AONs is less attenuated by engaged nucleotides at 3′ or 5′ ends of the target site compared to shorter AONs; (4) engaged nucleotides at 3′ end of a short target site attenuates AON efficiency more than at 5′ end. PMID:18365002

  17. CRISPR-Cas system presents multiple transcriptional units including antisense RNAs that are expressed in minimal medium and upregulated by pH in Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi.

    PubMed

    Medina-Aparicio, Liliana; Rebollar-Flores, Javier E; Beltrán-Luviano, América A; Vázquez, Alejandra; Gutiérrez-Ríos, Rosa M; Olvera, Leticia; Calva, Edmundo; Hernández-Lucas, Ismael

    2017-02-01

    The CRISPR-Cas system is involved in bacterial immunity, virulence, gene regulation, biofilm formation and sporulation. In Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi, this system consists of five transcriptional units including antisense RNAs. It was determined that these genetic elements are expressed in minimal medium and are up-regulated by pH. In addition, a transcriptional characterization of cas3 and ascse2-1 is included herein.

  18. Transcriptional Regulation of Translocator Protein (Tspo) via a SINE B2-Mediated Natural Antisense Transcript in MA-10 Leydig Cells1

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Jinjiang; Papadopoulos, Vassilios

    2012-01-01

    ABSTRACT Translocator protein (18 kDa; TSPO) is a mitochondrial cholesterol- and drug-binding protein involved in cholesterol import into mitochondria, the rate-limiting step in steroidogenesis. TSPO is expressed at high levels in Leydig cells of the testis, and its expression levels dictate the ability of the cells to form androgen. In search of mechanisms that regulate Tspo expression, a number of transcription factors acting on its promoter region have been identified. We report herein the presence of a mechanism of regulation of Tspo expression via complementation with a natural antisense transcript (NAT). At the Tspo locus, a short interspersed repetitive element (SINE) of the SINE B2 family has the potential for high transcriptional activity. The extension of the SINE B2 element-mediated transcript overlapped with exon 3 of the Tspo gene and formed a NAT specific for Tspo (Tspo-NAT) in MA-10 mouse tumor Leydig cells. The identified Tspo-NAT was also found in testis and kidney tissues. Overexpression of the Tspo-NAT regulated Tspo gene expression and its function in steroid formation in MA-10 cells. Time-course studies have indicated that Tspo-NAT expression is regulated by cAMP and could regulate TSPO levels to maintain optimal steroid production by MA-10 Leydig cells. Taken together, these results suggest a new micro-transcriptional mechanism that regulates Tspo expression and thus steroidogenesis via an intron-based SINE B2-driven NAT specific for the Tspo gene. PMID:22378763

  19. The lytic transcriptome of Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus reveals extensive transcription of noncoding regions, including regions antisense to important genes.

    PubMed

    Chandriani, Sanjay; Xu, Yiyang; Ganem, Don

    2010-08-01

    Genomewide analyses of the mammalian transcriptome have revealed that large tracts of sequence previously annotated as noncoding are frequently transcribed and give rise to stable RNA. Although the transcription of individual genes of the Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) has been well studied, little is known of the architecture of the viral transcriptome on a genomewide scale. Here we have employed a genomewide tiling array to examine the lytic transcriptome of the Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus, KSHV. Our results reveal that during lytic growth (but not during latency), there is extensive transcription from noncoding regions, including both intergenic regions and, especially, noncoding regions antisense to known open reading frames (ORFs). Several of these transcripts have been characterized in more detail, including (i) a 10-kb RNA antisense to the major latency locus, including many of its microRNAs as well as its ORFs; (ii) a 17-kb RNA antisense to numerous ORFs at the left-hand end of the genome; and (iii) a 0.7-kb RNA antisense to the viral homolog of interleukin-6 (vIL-6). These studies indicate that the lytic herpesviral transcriptome resembles a microcosm of the host transcriptome and provides a useful system for the study of noncoding RNAs.

  20. Epitope-tagged yeast strains reveal promoter driven changes to 3'-end formation and convergent antisense-transcription from common 3' UTRs.

    PubMed

    Swaminathan, Angavai; Beilharz, Traude H

    2016-01-08

    Epitope-tagging by homologous recombination is ubiquitously used to study gene expression, protein localization and function in yeast. This is generally thought to insulate the regulation of gene expression to that mediated by the promoter and coding regions because native 3' UTR are replaced. Here we show that the 3' UTRs, CYC1 and ADH1, contain cryptic promoters that generate abundant convergent antisense-transcription in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Moreover we show that aberrant, truncating 3' -end formation is often associated with regulated transcription in TAP-tagged strains. Importantly, the steady-state level of both 3' -truncated and antisense transcription products is locus dependent. Using TAP and GFP-tagged strains we show that the transcriptional state of the gene-of-interest induces changes to 3' -end formation by alternative polyadenylation and antisense transcription from a universal 3' UTR. This means that these 3' UTRs contains plastic features that can be molded to reflect the regulatory architecture of the locus rather than bringing their own regulatory paradigm to the gene-fusions as would be expected. Our work holds a cautionary note for studies utilizing tagged strains for quantitative biology, but also provides a new model for the study of promoter driven rewiring of 3' -end formation and regulatory non-coding transcription.

  1. Nucleus-localized antisense small RNAs with 5'-polyphosphate termini regulate long term transcriptional gene silencing in Entamoeba histolytica G3 strain.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hanbang; Alramini, Hussein; Tran, Vy; Singh, Upinder

    2011-12-30

    In the deep-branching eukaryotic parasite Entamoeba histolytica, transcriptional gene silencing (TGS) of the Amoebapore A gene (ap-a) in the G3 strain has been reported with subsequent development of this parasite strain for gene silencing. However, the mechanisms underlying this gene silencing approach are poorly understood. Here we report that antisense small RNAs (sRNAs) specific to the silenced ap-a gene can be identified in G3 parasites. Furthermore, when additional genes are silenced in the G3 strain, antisense sRNAs to the newly silenced genes can also be detected. Characterization of these sRNAs demonstrates that they are ~27 nucleotides in size, have 5'-polyphosphate termini, and persist even after removal of the silencing plasmid. Immunofluorescence analysis (IFA) and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) show that both the Argonaute protein EhAGO2-2 and antisense sRNAs to the silenced genes are localized to the parasite nucleus. Furthermore, α-EhAGO2-2 immunoprecipitation confirmed the direct association of the antisense sRNAs with EhAGO2-2. Finally, chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assays demonstrate that the loci of the silenced genes are enriched for histone H3 and EhAGO2-2, indicating that both chromatin modification and the RNA-induced transcriptional silencing complex are involved in permanent gene silencing in G3 parasites. In conclusion, our data demonstrate that G3-based gene silencing in E. histolytica is mediated by an siRNA pathway, which utilizes antisense 5'-polyphosphate sRNAs. To our knowledge, this is the first study to show that 5'- polyphosphate antisense sRNAs can mediate TGS, and it is the first example of RNAi-mediated TGS in protozoan parasites.

  2. Staphylococcus aureus RNAIII coordinately represses the synthesis of virulence factors and the transcription regulator Rot by an antisense mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Boisset, Sandrine; Geissmann, Thomas; Huntzinger, Eric; Fechter, Pierre; Bendridi, Nadia; Possedko, Maria; Chevalier, Clément; Helfer, Anne Catherine; Benito, Yvonne; Jacquier, Alain; Gaspin, Christine; Vandenesch, François; Romby, Pascale

    2007-01-01

    RNAIII is the intracellular effector of the quorum-sensing system in Staphylococcus aureus. It is one of the largest regulatory RNAs (514 nucleotides long) that are known to control the expression of a large number of virulence genes. Here, we show that the 3′ domain of RNAIII coordinately represses at the post-transcriptional level, the expression of mRNAs that encode a class of virulence factors that act early in the infection process. We demonstrate that the 3′ domain acts primarily as an antisense RNA and rapidly anneals to these mRNAs, forming long RNA duplexes. The interaction between RNAIII and the mRNAs results in repression of translation initiation and triggers endoribonuclease III hydrolysis. These processes are followed by rapid depletion of the mRNA pool. In addition, we show that RNAIII and its 3′ domain mediate translational repression of rot mRNA through a limited number of base pairings involving two loop–loop interactions. Since Rot is a transcriptional regulatory protein, we proposed that RNAIII indirectly acts on many downstream genes, resulting in the activation of the synthesis of several exoproteins. These data emphasize the multitude of regulatory steps affected by RNAIII and its 3′ domain in establishing a network of S. aureus virulence factors. PMID:17545468

  3. Inhibition of adenovirus replication by the E1A antisense transcript initiated from hsp70 and VA-1 promoters.

    PubMed

    Miroshnichenko, O I; Borisenko, A S; Ponomareva, T I; Tikhonenko, T I

    1990-03-01

    The E1A region of the adenoviral genome, important for initiation of virus infection and activation of other viral genes, was chosen as a target for engineering antisense RNA (asRNA) to inhibit adenovirus 5 (Ad5) replication in COS-1 cell culture in vitro. The hsp70 promoter, taken from the appropriate heat-shock-protein gene of Drosophila melanogaster, and the VA-1 RNA promoter, derived from the Ad5 gene coding for low-molecular-mass VA-1 RNA and recognized by RNA polymerase III were used as regulatory elements of transcription. The two types of recombinant constructs contained E1A fragments of 710 bp (hsp70 constructs) or 380 or 740 bp (VA-1 RNA constructs) in reverse orientation relative to the promoter position, as well as a transcription termination signal, the SV40 ori, and the gene controlling Geneticin (antibiotic G418) resistance (G418R). After selection of transfected COS-1 cells in the presence of G418, a number of stable G418R cell lines were raised which expressed engineered asRNAs. Plating of Ad5 suspensions of known titre on monolayers of transfected COS-1 cells clearly showed strong inhibition of adenovirus replication by asRNAs: 75% with the hsp70 promoter and 90% with the VA-1 RNA promoter.

  4. Molecular networks involved in mouse cerebral corticogenesis and spatio-temporal regulation of Sox4 and Sox11 novel antisense transcripts revealed by transcriptome profiling.

    PubMed

    Ling, King-Hwa; Hewitt, Chelsee A; Beissbarth, Tim; Hyde, Lavinia; Banerjee, Kakoli; Cheah, Pike-See; Cannon, Ping Z; Hahn, Christopher N; Thomas, Paul Q; Smyth, Gordon K; Tan, Seong-Seng; Thomas, Tim; Scott, Hamish S

    2009-01-01

    Development of the cerebral cortex requires highly specific spatio-temporal regulation of gene expression. It is proposed that transcriptome profiling of the cerebral cortex at various developmental time points or regions will reveal candidate genes and associated molecular pathways involved in cerebral corticogenesis. Serial analysis of gene expression (SAGE) libraries were constructed from C57BL/6 mouse cerebral cortices of age embryonic day (E) 15.5, E17.5, postnatal day (P) 1.5 and 4 to 6 months. Hierarchical clustering analysis of 561 differentially expressed transcripts showed regionalized, stage-specific and co-regulated expression profiles. SAGE expression profiles of 70 differentially expressed transcripts were validated using quantitative RT-PCR assays. Ingenuity pathway analyses of validated differentially expressed transcripts demonstrated that these transcripts possess distinctive functional properties related to various stages of cerebral corticogenesis and human neurological disorders. Genomic clustering analysis of the differentially expressed transcripts identified two highly transcribed genomic loci, Sox4 and Sox11, during embryonic cerebral corticogenesis. These loci feature unusual overlapping sense and antisense transcripts with alternative polyadenylation sites and differential expression. The Sox4 and Sox11 antisense transcripts were highly expressed in the brain compared to other mouse organs and are differentially expressed in both the proliferating and differentiating neural stem/progenitor cells and P19 (embryonal carcinoma) cells. We report validated gene expression profiles that have implications for understanding the associations between differentially expressed transcripts, novel targets and related disorders pertaining to cerebral corticogenesis. The study reports, for the first time, spatio-temporally regulated Sox4 and Sox11 antisense transcripts in the brain, neural stem/progenitor cells and P19 cells, suggesting they have an

  5. Global analysis of cis-natural antisense transcripts and their heat-responsive nat-siRNAs in Brassica rapa

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Brassica rapa includes several important leaf vegetable crops whose production is often damaged by high temperature. Cis-natural antisense transcripts (cis-NATs) and cis-NATs-derived small interfering RNAs (nat-siRNAs) play important roles in plant development and stress responses. However, genome-wide cis-NATs in B. rapa are not known. The NATs and nat-siRNAs that respond to heat stress have never been well studied in B. rapa. Here, we took advantage of RNA-seq and small RNA (sRNA) deep sequencing technology to identify cis-NATs and heat responsive nat-siRNAs in B. rapa. Results Analyses of four RNA sequencing datasets revealed 1031 cis-NATs B. rapa ssp. chinensis cv Wut and B. rapa ssp. pekinensis cv. Bre. Based on sequence homology between Arabidopsis thaliana and B. rapa, 303 conserved cis-NATs in B. rapa were found to correspond to 280 cis-NATs in Arabidopsis; the remaining 728 novel cis-NATs were identified as Brassica-specific ones. Using six sRNA libraries, 4846 nat-siRNAs derived from 150 cis-NATs were detected. Differential expression analysis revealed that nat-siRNAs derived from 12 cis-NATs were responsive to heat stress, and most of them showed strand bias. Real-time PCR indicated that most of the transcripts generating heat-responsive nat-siRNAs were upregulated under heat stress, while the transcripts from the opposite strands of the same loci were downregulated. Conclusions Our results provide the first subsets of genome-wide cis-NATs and heat-responsive nat-siRNAs in B. rapa; these sRNAs are potentially useful for the genetic improvement of heat tolerance in B. rapa and other crops. PMID:24320882

  6. Global analysis of cis-natural antisense transcripts and their heat-responsive nat-siRNAs in Brassica rapa.

    PubMed

    Yu, Xiang; Yang, Jun; Li, Xiaorong; Liu, Xuxin; Sun, Chuanbao; Wu, Feijie; He, Yuke

    2013-12-10

    Brassica rapa includes several important leaf vegetable crops whose production is often damaged by high temperature. Cis-natural antisense transcripts (cis-NATs) and cis-NATs-derived small interfering RNAs (nat-siRNAs) play important roles in plant development and stress responses. However, genome-wide cis-NATs in B. rapa are not known. The NATs and nat-siRNAs that respond to heat stress have never been well studied in B. rapa. Here, we took advantage of RNA-seq and small RNA (sRNA) deep sequencing technology to identify cis-NATs and heat responsive nat-siRNAs in B. rapa. Analyses of four RNA sequencing datasets revealed 1031 cis-NATs B. rapa ssp. chinensis cv Wut and B. rapa ssp. pekinensis cv. Bre. Based on sequence homology between Arabidopsis thaliana and B. rapa, 303 conserved cis-NATs in B. rapa were found to correspond to 280 cis-NATs in Arabidopsis; the remaining 728 novel cis-NATs were identified as Brassica-specific ones. Using six sRNA libraries, 4846 nat-siRNAs derived from 150 cis-NATs were detected. Differential expression analysis revealed that nat-siRNAs derived from 12 cis-NATs were responsive to heat stress, and most of them showed strand bias. Real-time PCR indicated that most of the transcripts generating heat-responsive nat-siRNAs were upregulated under heat stress, while the transcripts from the opposite strands of the same loci were downregulated. Our results provide the first subsets of genome-wide cis-NATs and heat-responsive nat-siRNAs in B. rapa; these sRNAs are potentially useful for the genetic improvement of heat tolerance in B. rapa and other crops.

  7. A tissue-specific landscape of sense/antisense transcription in the mouse intestine.

    PubMed

    Klostermeier, Ulrich C; Barann, Matthias; Wittig, Michael; Häsler, Robert; Franke, Andre; Gavrilova, Olga; Kreck, Benjamin; Sina, Christian; Schilhabel, Markus B; Schreiber, Stefan; Rosenstiel, Philip

    2011-06-10

    The intestinal mucosa is characterized by complex metabolic and immunological processes driven highly dynamic gene expression programs. With the advent of next generation sequencing and its utilization for the analysis of the RNA sequence space, the level of detail on the global architecture of the transcriptome reached a new order of magnitude compared to microarrays. We report the ultra-deep characterization of the polyadenylated transcriptome in two closely related, yet distinct regions of the mouse intestinal tract (small intestine and colon). We assessed tissue-specific transcriptomal architecture and the presence of novel transcriptionally active regions (nTARs). In the first step, signatures of 20,541 NCBI RefSeq transcripts could be identified in the intestine (74.1% of annotated genes), thereof 16,742 are common in both tissues. Although the majority of reads could be linked to annotated genes, 27,543 nTARs not consistent with current gene annotations in RefSeq or ENSEMBL were identified. By use of a second independent strand-specific RNA-Seq protocol, 20,966 of these nTARs were confirmed, most of them in vicinity of known genes. We further categorized our findings by their relative adjacency to described exonic elements and investigated regional differences of novel transcribed elements in small intestine and colon. The current study demonstrates the complexity of an archetypal mammalian intestinal mRNA transcriptome in high resolution and identifies novel transcriptionally active regions at strand-specific, single base resolution. Our analysis for the first time shows a strand-specific comparative picture of nTARs in two tissues and represents a resource for further investigating the transcriptional processes that contribute to tissue identity.

  8. Making sense of antisense: seemingly noncoding RNAs antisense to the master regulator of Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus lytic replication do not regulate that transcript but serve as mRNAs encoding small peptides.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yiyang; Ganem, Don

    2010-06-01

    The mammalian transcriptome is studded with putative noncoding RNAs, many of which are antisense to known open reading frames (ORFs). Roles in the regulation of their complementary mRNAs are often imputed to these antisense transcripts, but few have been experimentally examined, and such functions remain largely conjectural. Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) encodes two transcripts that lack obvious ORFs and are complementary to the gene (RTA) encoding the master regulator of the latent/lytic switch. Here, we show that, contrary to expectation, these RNAs do not regulate RTA expression. Rather, they are found on polysomes, and genetic analysis indicates that translational initiation occurs at several AUG codons in the RNA, leading to the presumptive synthesis of peptides of 17 to 48 amino acids. These findings underscore the need for circumspection in the computational assessment of coding potential and raise the possibility that the mammalian proteome may contain many previously unsuspected peptides generated from seemingly noncoding RNAs, some of which could have important biological functions. Irrespective of their function, such peptides could also contribute substantially to the repertoire of T cell epitopes generated in both uninfected and infected cells.

  9. Spatiotemporal regulation of multiple overlapping sense and novel natural antisense transcripts at the Nrgn and Camk2n1 gene loci during mouse cerebral corticogenesis.

    PubMed

    Ling, King-Hwa; Hewitt, Chelsee A; Beissbarth, Tim; Hyde, Lavinia; Cheah, Pike-See; Smyth, Gordon K; Tan, Seong-Seng; Hahn, Christopher N; Thomas, Tim; Thomas, Paul Q; Scott, Hamish S

    2011-03-01

    Nrgn and Camk2n1 are highly expressed in the brain and play an important role in synaptic long-term potentiation via regulation of Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II. We have shown that the gene loci for these 2 proteins are actively transcribed in the adult cerebral cortex and feature multiple overlapping transcripts in both the sense and antisense orientations with alternative polyadenylation. These transcripts were upregulated in the adult compared with embryonic and P1.5 mouse cerebral cortices, and transcripts with different 3' untranslated region lengths showed differing expression profiles. In situ hybridization (ISH) analysis revealed spatiotemporal regulation of the Nrgn and Camk2n1 sense and natural antisense transcripts (NATs) throughout cerebral corticogenesis. In addition, we also demonstrated that the expression of these transcripts was organ-specific. Both Nrgn and Camk2n1 sense and NATs were also upregulated in differentiating P19 teratocarcinoma cells. RNA fluorescent ISH analysis confirmed the capability of these NATs to form double-stranded RNA aggregates with the sense transcripts in the cytoplasm of cells obtained from the brain. We propose that the differential regulation of multiple sense and novel overlapping NATs at the Nrgn and Camk2n1 loci will increase the diversity of posttranscriptional regulation, resulting in cell- and time-specific regulation of their gene products during cerebral corticogenesis and function.

  10. Murine Spam1 mRNA: involvement of AU-rich elements in the 3'UTR and antisense RNA in its tight post-transcriptional regulation in spermatids.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hong; Barnoski, Barry L; Sol-Church, Katia; Stabley, Deborah L; Martin-Deleon, Patricia A

    2006-02-01

    Sperm adhesion molecule1 (SPAM1), the best characterized hyaluronidase gene, is abundantly expressed in the testis. We attempted to overexpress mouse Spam1 via transgenesis using either the endogenous promoter in a BAC or a heterologous Protamine1 promoter for a Spam1 cDNA transgene. Although transgene-copy numbers ranged from 2 to 15 and transgenic transcripts were expressed, there was a general failure of overexpression of the RNA and protein in the testis of all seven founders. Also, three transgenic lines showed a modest downregulation or co-suppression of the RNA for Spam1 and Hyal5, present on the BAC. We provide evidence for the potential involvement of two co-ordinating post-transcriptional regulatory processes in the failure of overexpression: abundant endogenous antisense RNA and adenosine-uridine (AU)-rich element-mediated regulation of RNA turnover. We demonstrate that AU-rich elements (AREs) in the 3'UTR of mRNAs, well-known to interact with trans-acting proteins to target the RNA for (in)stability, are present in Spam1 RNA and specifically bind to six testicular cytoplasmic proteins. These AU-binding proteins (AUBPs) were virtually absent from the kidney where transcripts are rare, and were shown to interact with the cytoskeleton, which modulates mRNA turnover. In addition to a role in the RNAi pathway, antisense RNA can also modulate ARE-mediated regulation of mRNA by hybridizing to the AREs and specifically silencing their function. This potentially links the two processes in the regulation of Spam1 expression. We hypothesize that testicular Spam1 RNA is regulated post-transcriptionally by cis-acting ARE(s) in the 3'UTR which recognize AUBPs and which are modulated by antisense transcripts.

  11. Antisense oligonucleotide-mediated correction of transcriptional dysregulation is correlated with behavioral benefits in the YAC128 mouse model of Huntington's disease.

    PubMed

    Stanek, Lisa M; Yang, Wendy; Angus, Stuart; Sardi, Pablo S; Hayden, Michael R; Hung, Gene H; Bennett, C Frank; Cheng, Seng H; Shihabuddin, Lamya S

    2013-01-01

    Huntington's disease (HD) is a neurological disorder caused by mutations in the huntingtin (HTT) gene, the product of which leads to selective and progressive neuronal cell death in the striatum and cortex. Transcriptional dysregulation has emerged as a core pathologic feature in the CNS of human and animal models of HD. It is still unclear whether perturbations in gene expression are a consequence of the disease or importantly, contribute to the pathogenesis of HD. To examine if transcriptional dysregulation can be ameliorated with antisense oligonucleotides that reduce levels of mutant Htt and provide therapeutic benefit in the YAC128 mouse model of HD. Quantitative real-time PCR analysis was used to evaluate dysregulation of a subset of striatal genes in the YAC128 mouse model. Transcripts were then evaluated following ICV delivery of antisense oligonucleotides (ASO). Rota rod and Porsolt swim tests were used to evaluate phenotypic deficits in these mice following ASO treatment. Transcriptional dysregulation was detected in the YAC128 mouse model and appears to progress with age. ICV delivery of ASOs directed against mutant Htt resulted in reduction in mutant Htt levels and amelioration in behavioral deficits in the YAC128 mouse model. These improvements were correlated with improvements in the levels of several dysregulated striatal transcripts. The role of transcriptional dysregulation in the pathogenesis of Huntington's disease is not well understood, however, a wealth of evidence now strongly suggests that changes in transcriptional signatures are a prominent feature in the brains of both HD patients and animal models of the disease. Our study is the first to show that a therapeutic agent capable of improving an HD disease phenotype is concomitantly correlated with normalization of a subset of dysregulated striatal transcripts. Our data suggests that correction of these disease-altered transcripts may underlie, at least in part, the therapeutic efficacy

  12. An antisense promoter in mouse L1 retrotransposon open reading frame-1 initiates expression of diverse fusion transcripts and limits retrotransposition

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jingfeng; Kannan, Manoj; Trivett, Anna L.; Liao, Hongling; Wu, Xiaolin; Akagi, Keiko; Symer, David E.

    2014-01-01

    Between 6 and 30% of human and mouse transcripts are initiated from transposable elements. However, the promoters driving such transcriptional activity are mostly unknown. We experimentally characterized an antisense (AS) promoter in mouse L1 retrotransposons for the first time, oriented antiparallel to the coding strand of L1 open reading frame-1. We found that AS transcription is mediated by RNA polymerase II. Rapid amplification of cDNA ends cloning mapped transcription start sites adjacent to the AS promoter. We identified >100 novel fusion transcripts, of which many were conserved across divergent mouse lineages, suggesting conservation of potential functions. To evaluate whether AS L1 transcription could regulate L1 retrotransposition, we replaced portions of native open reading frame-1 in donor elements by synonymously recoded sequences. The resulting L1 elements lacked AS promoter activity and retrotransposed more frequently than endogenous L1s. Overexpression of AS L1 transcripts also reduced L1 retrotransposition. This suppression of retrotransposition was largely independent of Dicer. Our experiments shed new light on how AS fusion transcripts are initiated from endogenous L1 elements across the mouse genome. Such AS transcription can contribute substantially both to natural transcriptional variation and to endogenous regulation of L1 retrotransposition. PMID:24493738

  13. Hepatotoxicity of high affinity gapmer antisense oligonucleotides is mediated by RNase H1 dependent promiscuous reduction of very long pre-mRNA transcripts

    PubMed Central

    Burel, Sebastien A.; Hart, Christopher E.; Cauntay, Patrick; Hsiao, Jill; Machemer, Todd; Katz, Melanie; Watt, Andy; Bui, Huynh-hoa; Younis, Husam; Sabripour, Mahyar; Freier, Susan M.; Hung, Gene; Dan, Amy; Prakash, T.P.; Seth, Punit P.; Swayze, Eric E.; Bennett, C. Frank; Crooke, Stanley T.; Henry, Scott P.

    2016-01-01

    High affinity antisense oligonucleotides (ASOs) containing bicylic modifications (BNA) such as locked nucleic acid (LNA) designed to induce target RNA cleavage have been shown to have enhanced potency along with a higher propensity to cause hepatotoxicity. In order to understand the mechanism of this hepatotoxicity, transcriptional profiles were collected from the livers of mice treated with a panel of highly efficacious hepatotoxic or non-hepatotoxic LNA ASOs. We observed highly selective transcript knockdown in mice treated with non-hepatotoxic LNA ASOs, while the levels of many unintended transcripts were reduced in mice treated with hepatotoxic LNA ASOs. This transcriptional signature was concurrent with on-target RNA reduction and preceded transaminitis. Remarkably, the mRNA transcripts commonly reduced by toxic LNA ASOs were generally not strongly associated with any particular biological process, cellular component or functional group. However, they tended to have much longer pre-mRNA transcripts. We also demonstrate that the off-target RNA knockdown and hepatotoxicity is attenuated by RNase H1 knockdown, and that this effect can be generalized to high affinity modifications beyond LNA. This suggests that for a certain set of ASOs containing high affinity modifications such as LNA, hepatotoxicity can occur as a result of unintended off-target RNase H1 dependent RNA degradation. PMID:26553810

  14. Genome-wide analysis of rice cis-natural antisense transcription under cadmium exposure using strand-specific RNA-Seq.

    PubMed

    Oono, Youko; Yazawa, Takayuki; Kanamori, Hiroyuki; Sasaki, Harumi; Mori, Satomi; Matsumoto, Takashi

    2017-10-06

    The elucidation of novel transcripts and their expression in response to various stress conditions is necessary to understand the transcriptional network of plants as an adaptation to biotic and abiotic stresses. We performed strand-specific RNA-Seq (ssRNA-Seq) on rice exposed to cadmium (Cd) for 24 h and investigated the expression of cis-natural antisense transcripts (cis-NATs), a class of endogenous coding or non-protein-coding RNAs with sequence complementarity to the opposite strands of RAP transcripts. Many RAP transcripts possessed cis-NATs and these cis-NATs were responsive to some extent. Cis-NATs were upregulated from 26, 266 and 409 RAP gene loci, while 2054, 2501 and 2825 RAP transcripts were upregulated from 38,123 RAP loci under high Cd exposure in roots at 1, 12 and 24 h, respectively. In addition, most of the upregulated cis-NATs showed little upregulation under ABA or cold treatment. A number of cis-NATs were upregulated from less than 35 RAP gene loci in different tissue and time-point combinations under low Cd exposure, suggesting that cis-NATs respond to environmental stress. Furthermore, 409 RAP transcripts with upregulated cis-NATs were classified into three groups based on the expression of the RAP transcripts from the opposite DNA strand, including 138 upregulated, 128 invariable, and 143 downregulated transcripts, although the responses of cis-NATs and RAP transcripts were not always correlated. We have shown that the cis-NATs identified by ssRNA-Seq analysis are novel genes and that some of them are stress-specific and show different responses depending on the degree of stress and tissue. These results improve our understanding of the complete molecular mechanism of plant adaptation to Cd exposure.

  15. Prevalence of transcription promoters within archaeal operons and coding sequences

    PubMed Central

    Koide, Tie; Reiss, David J; Bare, J Christopher; Pang, Wyming Lee; Facciotti, Marc T; Schmid, Amy K; Pan, Min; Marzolf, Bruz; Van, Phu T; Lo, Fang-Yin; Pratap, Abhishek; Deutsch, Eric W; Peterson, Amelia; Martin, Dan; Baliga, Nitin S

    2009-01-01

    Despite the knowledge of complex prokaryotic-transcription mechanisms, generalized rules, such as the simplified organization of genes into operons with well-defined promoters and terminators, have had a significant role in systems analysis of regulatory logic in both bacteria and archaea. Here, we have investigated the prevalence of alternate regulatory mechanisms through genome-wide characterization of transcript structures of ∼64% of all genes, including putative non-coding RNAs in Halobacterium salinarum NRC-1. Our integrative analysis of transcriptome dynamics and protein–DNA interaction data sets showed widespread environment-dependent modulation of operon architectures, transcription initiation and termination inside coding sequences, and extensive overlap in 3′ ends of transcripts for many convergently transcribed genes. A significant fraction of these alternate transcriptional events correlate to binding locations of 11 transcription factors and regulators (TFs) inside operons and annotated genes—events usually considered spurious or non-functional. Using experimental validation, we illustrate the prevalence of overlapping genomic signals in archaeal transcription, casting doubt on the general perception of rigid boundaries between coding sequences and regulatory elements. PMID:19536208

  16. A Novel Antisense CAG Repeat Transcript at JPH3 Locus Mediating Expanded Polyglutamine Protein Toxicity in Huntington’s Disease-Like 2 (HDL2) Mice

    PubMed Central

    Wilburn, Brian; Rudnicki, Dobrila D.; Zhao, Jing; Weitz, Tara Murphy; Cheng, Yin; Gu, Xiaofeng; Greiner, Erin; Park, Chang Sin; Wang, Nan; Sopher, Bryce L.; La Spada, Albert R.; Osmand, Alex; Margolis, Russell L.; Sun, Yi E.; Yang, X. William

    2011-01-01

    SUMMARY Huntington’s disease like-2 (HDL2) is a phenocopy of Huntington’s disease caused by CTG/CAG repeat expansion at the Junctophilin-3 (JPH3) locus. The mechanisms underlying HDL2 pathogenesis remain unclear. Here we developed a BAC transgenic mouse model of HDL2 (BAC-HDL2) that exhibits progressive motor deficits, selective neurodegenerative pathology and ubiquitin-positive nuclear inclusions (NIs). Molecular analyses reveal a novel promoter at the transgene locus driving the expression of a CAG repeat transcript (HDL2-CAG) from the strand antisense to JPH3, which encodes an expanded polyglutamine (polyQ) protein. Importantly, BAC-HDL2 but not control BAC mice accumulate polyQ-containing NIs in a pattern strikingly similar to those in the patients. Furthermore, BAC mice with genetic silencing of the expanded CUG transcript still express HDL2-CAG transcript and manifest polyQ pathogenesis. Finally, studies of HDL2 mice and patients revealed CBP sequestration into NIs and evidence for interference of CBP-mediated transcriptional activation. These results suggest overlapping polyQ-mediated pathogenic mechanisms in HD and HDL2 PMID:21555070

  17. Duplications on human chromosome 22 reveal a novel Ret Finger Protein-like gene family with sense and endogenous antisense transcripts.

    PubMed

    Seroussi, E; Kedra, D; Pan, H Q; Peyrard, M; Schwartz, C; Scambler, P; Donnai, D; Roe, B A; Dumanski, J P

    1999-09-01

    Analysis of 600 kb of sequence encompassing the beta-prime adaptin (BAM22) gene on human chromosome 22 revealed intrachromosomal duplications within 22q12-13 resulting in three active RFPL genes, two RFPL pseudogenes, and two pseudogenes of BAM22. The genomic sequence of BAM22vartheta1 shows a remarkable similarity to that of BAM22. The cDNA sequence comparison of RFPL1, RFPL2, and RFPL3 showed 95%-96% identity between the genes, which were most similar to the Ret Finger Protein gene from human chromosome 6. The sense RFPL transcripts encode proteins with the tripartite structure, composed of RING finger, coiled-coil, and B30-2 domains, which are characteristic of the RING-B30 family. Each of these domains are thought to mediate protein-protein interactions by promoting homo- or heterodimerization. The MID1 gene on Xp22 is also a member of the RING-B30 family and is mutated in Opitz syndrome (OS). The autosomal dominant form of OS shows linkage to 22q11-q12. We detected a polymorphic protein-truncating allele of RFPL1 in 8% of the population, which was not associated with the OS phenotype. We identified 6-kb and 1.2-kb noncoding antisense mRNAs of RFPL1S and RFPL3S antisense genes, respectively. The RFPL1S and RFPL3S genes cover substantial portions of their sense counterparts, which suggests that the function of RFPL1S and RFPL3S is a post-transcriptional regulation of the sense RFPL genes. We illustrate the role of intrachromosomal duplications in the generation of RFPL genes, which were created by a series of duplications and share an ancestor with the RING-B30 domain containing genes from the major histocompatibility complex region on human chromosome 6.

  18. Detection of Very Long Antisense Transcripts by Whole Transcriptome RNA-Seq Analysis of Listeria monocytogenes by Semiconductor Sequencing Technology

    PubMed Central

    Wehner, Stefanie; Mannala, Gopala K.; Qing, Xiaoxing; Madhugiri, Ramakanth; Chakraborty, Trinad; Mraheil, Mobarak A.; Hain, Torsten; Marz, Manja

    2014-01-01

    The Gram-positive bacterium Listeria monocytogenes is the causative agent of listeriosis, a severe food-borne infection characterised by abortion, septicaemia, or meningoencephalitis. L. monocytogenes causes outbreaks of febrile gastroenteritis and accounts for community-acquired bacterial meningitis in humans. Listeriosis has one of the highest mortality rates (up to 30%) of all food-borne infections. This human pathogenic bacterium is an important model organism for biomedical research to investigate cell-mediated immunity. L. monocytogenes is also one of the best characterised bacterial systems for the molecular analysis of intracellular parasitism. Recently several transcriptomic studies have also made the ubiquitous distributed bacterium as a model to understand mechanisms of gene regulation from the environment to the infected host on the level of mRNA and non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs). We have used semiconductor sequencing technology for RNA-seq to investigate the repertoire of listerial ncRNAs under extra- and intracellular growth conditions. Furthermore, we applied a new bioinformatic analysis pipeline for detection, comparative genomics and structural conservation to identify ncRNAs. With this work, in total, 741 ncRNA locations of potential ncRNA candidates are now known for L. monocytogenes, of which 611 ncRNA candidates were identified by RNA-seq. 441 transcribed ncRNAs have never been described before. Among these, we identified novel long non-coding antisense RNAs with a length of up to 5,400 nt e.g. opposite to genes coding for internalins, methylases or a high-affinity potassium uptake system, namely the kdpABC operon, which were confirmed by qRT-PCR analysis. RNA-seq, comparative genomics and structural conservation of L. monocytogenes ncRNAs illustrate that this human pathogen uses a large number and repertoire of ncRNA including novel long antisense RNAs, which could be important for intracellular survival within the infected eukaryotic host. PMID

  19. Antisense LOX expression increases herbivore performance by decreasing defense responses and inhibiting growth-related transcriptional reorganization in Nicotiana attenuata.

    PubMed

    Halitschke, Rayko; Baldwin, Ian T

    2003-12-01

    Inhibition of jasmonic acid (JA) signaling has been shown to decrease herbivore resistance, but the responsible mechanisms are largely unknown because insect resistance is poorly understood in most model plant systems. We characterize three members of the lipoxygenase (LOX) gene family in the native tobacco plant Nicotiana attenuata and manipulate, by antisense expression, a specific, wound- and herbivory-induced isoform (LOX3) involved in JA biosynthesis. In three independent lines, antisense expression reduced wound-induced JA accumulation but not the release of green leaf volatiles (GLVs). The impaired JA signaling reduced two herbivore-induced direct defenses, nicotine and trypsin protease inhibitors (TPI), as well as the potent indirect defense, the release of volatile terpenes that attract generalist predators to feeding herbivores. All these defenses could be fully restored by methyl-JA (MeJA) treatment, with the exception of the increase in TPI activity, which was partially restored, suggesting the involvement of additional signals. The impaired ability to produce chemical defenses resulted in lower resistance to Manduca sexta attack, which could also be restored by MeJA treatment. Expression analysis using a cDNA microarray, specifically designed to analyze M. sexta-induced gene expression in N. attenuata, revealed a pivotal role for LOX3-produced oxylipins in upregulating defense genes (protease inhibitor, PI; xyloglucan endotransglucosylase/hydrolase, XTH; threonine deaminase, TD; hydroperoxide lyase, HPL), suppressing both downregulated growth genes (RUBISCO and photosystem II, PSII) and upregulated oxylipin genes (alpha-dioxygenase, alpha-DOX). By genetically manipulating signaling in a plant with a well-characterized ecology, we demonstrate that the complex phenotypic changes that mediate herbivore resistance are controlled by a specific part of the oxylipin cascade.

  20. Detection of very long antisense transcripts by whole transcriptome RNA-Seq analysis of Listeria monocytogenes by semiconductor sequencing technology.

    PubMed

    Wehner, Stefanie; Mannala, Gopala K; Qing, Xiaoxing; Madhugiri, Ramakanth; Chakraborty, Trinad; Mraheil, Mobarak A; Hain, Torsten; Marz, Manja

    2014-01-01

    The Gram-positive bacterium Listeria monocytogenes is the causative agent of listeriosis, a severe food-borne infection characterised by abortion, septicaemia, or meningoencephalitis. L. monocytogenes causes outbreaks of febrile gastroenteritis and accounts for community-acquired bacterial meningitis in humans. Listeriosis has one of the highest mortality rates (up to 30%) of all food-borne infections. This human pathogenic bacterium is an important model organism for biomedical research to investigate cell-mediated immunity. L. monocytogenes is also one of the best characterised bacterial systems for the molecular analysis of intracellular parasitism. Recently several transcriptomic studies have also made the ubiquitous distributed bacterium as a model to understand mechanisms of gene regulation from the environment to the infected host on the level of mRNA and non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs). We have used semiconductor sequencing technology for RNA-seq to investigate the repertoire of listerial ncRNAs under extra- and intracellular growth conditions. Furthermore, we applied a new bioinformatic analysis pipeline for detection, comparative genomics and structural conservation to identify ncRNAs. With this work, in total, 741 ncRNA locations of potential ncRNA candidates are now known for L. monocytogenes, of which 611 ncRNA candidates were identified by RNA-seq. 441 transcribed ncRNAs have never been described before. Among these, we identified novel long non-coding antisense RNAs with a length of up to 5,400 nt e.g. opposite to genes coding for internalins, methylases or a high-affinity potassium uptake system, namely the kdpABC operon, which were confirmed by qRT-PCR analysis. RNA-seq, comparative genomics and structural conservation of L. monocytogenes ncRNAs illustrate that this human pathogen uses a large number and repertoire of ncRNA including novel long antisense RNAs, which could be important for intracellular survival within the infected eukaryotic host.

  1. Expression of long noncoding RNA-HOX transcript antisense intergenic RNA in oral squamous cell carcinoma and effect on cell growth.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jie; Xie, Hongjun

    2015-11-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze the correlation between long noncoding RNA-HOX transcript antisense intergenic RNA (HOTAIR) and the clinical pathological characteristics and prognosis of oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) and to evaluate the effect on cell growth. HOTAIR expressions in 50 surgically resected samples (including tumor and paracancerous tissues) collected from OSCC patients treated in our hospital from January 2009 to December 2010 were detected by real-time quantitative reverse transcription-PCR, and the relationship with clinical pathological characteristics and prognosis was analyzed. The effect of small interfering RNA treatment on cell growth (Tca8113, UM-1, and CAL-27 cells) was evaluated by MTT assay, and those on apoptosis and cell cycle were assessed by flow cytometry. HOTAIR was positively expressed in 45 samples (90 %). The expression level in tumor tissues was significantly higher than that in paracancerous tissues (t = 5.459, P < 0.01). Relative expression level of HOTAIR was correlated with tumor size and clinical stage (P < 0.05). More HOTAIR was expressed in OSCC cell lines than in normal oral epithelial cells. Interfering with HOTAIR expression in Tca8113 cells significantly decelerated cell growth, arrested cell cycle, and promoted apoptosis (P < 0.01). HOTAIR was highly expressed in OSCC tissues and facilitated the growth of OSCC cells, thus probably being an eligible molecular marker for OSCC diagnosis and prognosis determination.

  2. Reverse serial analysis of gene expression (SAGE) characterization of orphan SAGE tags from human embryonic stem cells identifies the presence of novel transcripts and antisense transcription of key pluripotency genes.

    PubMed

    Richards, Mark; Tan, Siew-Peng; Chan, Woon-Khiong; Bongso, Ariff

    2006-05-01

    Serial analysis of gene expression (SAGE) is a powerful technique for the analysis of gene expression. A significant portion of SAGE tags, designated as orphan tags, however, cannot be reliably assigned to known transcripts. We used an improved reverse SAGE (rSAGE) strategy to convert human embryonic stem cell (hESC)-specific orphan SAGE tags into longer 3' cDNAs. We show that the systematic analysis of these 3' cDNAs permitted the discovery of hESC-specific novel transcripts and cis-natural antisense transcripts (cis-NATs) and improved the assignment of SAGE tags that resulted from splice variants, insertion/deletion, and single-nucleotide polymorphisms. More importantly, this is the first description of cis-NATs for several key pluripotency markers in hESCs and mouse embryonic stem cells, suggesting that the formation of short interfering RNA could be an important regulatory mechanism. A systematic large-scale analysis of the remaining orphan SAGE tags in the hESC SAGE libraries by rSAGE or other 3' cDNA extension strategies should unravel additional novel transcripts and cis-NATs that are specifically expressed in hESCs. Besides contributing to the complete catalog of human transcripts, many of them should prove to be a valuable resource for the elucidation of the molecular pathways involved in the self-renewal and lineage commitment of hESCs.

  3. Murine transcription factor alpha A-crystallin binding protein I. Complete sequence, gene structure, expression, and functional inhibition via antisense RNA.

    PubMed

    Brady, J P; Kantorow, M; Sax, C M; Donovan, D M; Piatigorsky, J

    1995-01-20

    alpha A-crystallin binding protein I (alpha A-CRYBP1) is a ubiquitously expressed DNA binding protein that was previously identified by its ability to interact with a functionally important sequence in the mouse alpha A-crystallin gene promoter. Here, we have cloned a single copy gene with 10 exons spanning greater than 70 kb of genomic DNA that encodes alpha A-CRYBP1. The mouse alpha A-CRYBP1 gene specifies a 2,688-amino acid protein with 72% amino acid identity to its human homologue, PRDII-BF1. Both the human and the mouse proteins contain two sets of consensus C2H2 zinc fingers at each end as well a central nonconsensus zinc finger. The alpha A-CRYBP1 gene produces a 9.5-kb transcript in 11 different tissues as well as a testis-specific, 7.7-kb transcript. alpha A-CRYBP1 cDNA clones were isolated from adult mouse brain and testis as well as from cell lines derived from mouse lens (alpha TN4-1) and muscle (C2C12). A single clone isolated from the muscle C2C12 library contains an additional exon near the 5'-end that would prevent production of a functional protein if the normal translation start site were utilized; however, there is another potential initiation codon located downstream that is in frame with the rest of the coding region. In addition, we identified multiple cDNAs from the testis in which the final intron is still present. Finally, we used an antisense expression construct derived from an alpha A-CRYBP1 cDNA clone to provide the first functional evidence that alpha A-CRYBP1 regulates gene expression. When introduced into the alpha TN4-1 mouse lens cell line, the antisense construct significantly inhibited expression from a heterologous promoter that utilized the alpha A-CRYBP1 binding site as an enhancer.

  4. Structure and Function of AmtR in Mycobacterium smegmatis: Implications for Post-Transcriptional Regulation of Urea Metabolism through a Small Antisense RNA.

    PubMed

    Petridis, Michael; Vickers, Chelsea; Robson, Jennifer; McKenzie, Joanna L; Bereza, Magdalena; Sharrock, Abigail; Aung, Htin Lin; Arcus, Vickery L; Cook, Gregory M

    2016-10-23

    Soil-dwelling bacteria of the phylum actinomycetes generally harbor either GlnR or AmtR as a global regulator of nitrogen metabolism. Mycobacterium smegmatis harbors both of these canonical regulators; GlnR regulates the expression of key genes involved in nitrogen metabolism, while the function and signal transduction pathway of AmtR in M. smegmatis remains largely unknown. Here, we report the structure and function of the M. smegmatis AmtR and describe the role of AmtR in the regulation of nitrogen metabolism in response to nitrogen availability. To determine the function of AmtR in M. smegmatis, we performed genome-wide expression profiling comparing the wild-type versus an ∆amtR mutant and identified significant changes in the expression of 11 genes, including an operon involved in urea degradation. An AmtR consensus-binding motif (CTGTC-N4-GACAG) was identified in the promoter region of this operon, and ligand-independent, high-affinity AmtR binding was validated by both electrophoretic mobility shift assays and surface plasmon resonance measurements. We confirmed the transcription of a cis-encoded small RNA complementary to the gene encoding AmtR under nitrogen excess, and we propose a post-transcriptional regulatory mechanism for AmtR. The three-dimensional X-ray structure of AmtR at 2.0Å revealed an overall TetR-like dimeric structure, and the alignment of the M. smegmatis AmtR and Corynebacterium glutamicum AmtR regulatory domains showed poor structural conservation, providing a potential explanation for the lack of M. smegmatis AmtR interaction with the adenylylated PII protein. Taken together, our data suggest an AmtR (repressor)/GlnR (activator) competitive binding mechanism for transcriptional regulation of urea metabolism that is controlled by a cis-encoded small antisense RNA. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. ADAR2-mediated editing of miR-214 and miR-122 precursor and antisense RNA transcripts in liver cancers.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wan-Hsin; Chen, Chao-Hung; Yeh, Kun-Huei; Li, Chiao-Ling; Wu, Yi-Jinn; Chen, Ding-Shinn; Chen, Pei-Jer; Yeh, Shiou-Hwei

    2013-01-01

    A growing list of microRNAs (miRNAs) show aberrant expression patterns in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), but the regulatory mechanisms largely remain unclear. RNA editing catalyzed by members of the adenosine deaminase acting on the RNA (ADAR) family could target the miRNA precursors and affect the biogenesis process. Therefore, we investigate whether RNA editing could be one mechanism contributing to the deregulation of specific miRNAs in HCC. By overexpression of individual ADARs in hepatoma cells, RNA editing on the precursors of 16 miRNAs frequently deregulated in HCC was screened by a sensitive high-resolution melting platform. The results identified RNA precursors of miR-214 and miR-122 as potential targets edited by ADAR2. A subset of HCC showing elevated ADAR2 verified the major editings identified in ARAR2 overexpressed hepatoma cells, either with A-to-I or U-to-C changes. The unusual U-to-C editing at specific residues was demonstrated as being attributed to the A-to-I editing on the RNA transcripts complementary to the pri-miRNAs. The editing event caused a decrease of the RNA transcript complementary to pri-miR-214, which led to the decrease of pri-miR-214 and miR-214 and resulted in the increased protein level of its novel target gene Rab15. In conclusion, the current study discovered ADAR2-mediated editing of the complementary antisense transcripts as a novel mechanism for regulating the biogenesis of specific miRNAs during hepatocarcinogenesis.

  6. High expression of long non-coding HOX antisense transcript RNA and its clinical significance in cancer tissues: A meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lei; Zhao, Yandong; Qin, Yi; Xuan, Yunpeng; Qiu, Tong; Fu, Bo; Ren, Xiaoyang; Jiao, Wenjie

    2017-09-01

    HOX antisense transcript RNA (HOTAIR) is a 2148 nt long, intergenic, non-coding RNA molecule, which is reported to be highly expressed in many types of cancers. This meta-analysis summarizes its expression in cancer. We searched all eligible papers on the prognostic impact of HOTAIR in cancer from inception to 30 September 2015 in PubMed, CBMdisc, and the CNKI database. Only full texts were included. Revman 5.3 was used for meta-analysis. A total of 11 studies of 1010 cases were included in the meta-analysis. HOTAIR expression was higher in: cancer tissues in than adjacent or normal tissues (odds ratio [OR] 37.52, 95% confidence interval [CI] 18.94-74.31; P  < 0.00001); in cancer tissues with lymph node metastasis than in those without lymph node metastasis (OR 3.37, 95% CI 2.36-4.82; P  < 0.00001); and in histological grades II-III than in histological gradeI(OR 0.47, 95% CI 0.29-0.75; P  = 0.002). This study shows that HOTAIR may play an important role in cancer occurrence and development, but whether it is a marker of cancer diagnosis and reliable prognosis remains to be confirmed. More rigorous design and meticulous quality epidemiological studies are required. © 2017 The Authors. Thoracic Cancer published by China Lung Oncology Group and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  7. Quantitative Proteomics Analysis Reveals Novel Insights into Mechanisms of Action of Long Noncoding RNA Hox Transcript Antisense Intergenic RNA (HOTAIR) in HeLa Cells*

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Peng; Xiong, Qian; Wu, Ying; Chen, Ying; Chen, Zhuo; Fleming, Joy; Gao, Ding; Bi, Lijun; Ge, Feng

    2015-01-01

    Long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs), which have emerged in recent years as a new and crucial layer of gene regulators, regulate various biological processes such as carcinogenesis and metastasis. HOTAIR (Hox transcript antisense intergenic RNA), a lncRNA overexpressed in most human cancers, has been shown to be an oncogenic lncRNA. Here, we explored the role of HOTAIR in HeLa cells and searched for proteins regulated by HOTAIR. To understand the mechanism of action of HOTAIR from a systems perspective, we employed a quantitative proteomic strategy to systematically identify potential targets of HOTAIR. The expression of 170 proteins was significantly dys-regulated after inhibition of HOTAIR, implying that they could be potential targets of HOTAIR. Analysis of this data at the systems level revealed major changes in proteins involved in diverse cellular components, including the cytoskeleton and the respiratory chain. Further functional studies on vimentin (VIM), a key protein involved in the cytoskeleton, revealed that HOTAIR exerts its effects on migration and invasion of HeLa cells, at least in part, through the regulation of VIM expression. Inhibition of HOTAIR leads to mitochondrial dysfunction and ultrastructural alterations, suggesting a novel role of HOTAIR in maintaining mitochondrial function in cancer cells. Our results provide novel insights into the mechanisms underlying the function of HOTAIR in cancer cells. We expect that the methods used in this study will become an integral part of functional studies of lncRNAs. PMID:25762744

  8. Exploring Differentially Expressed Genes and Natural Antisense Transcripts in Sheep (Ovis aries) Skin with Different Wool Fiber Diameters by Digital Gene Expression Profiling.

    PubMed

    Yue, Yaojing; Guo, Tingting; Liu, Jianbin; Guo, Jian; Yuan, Chao; Feng, Ruilin; Niu, Chune; Sun, Xiaoping; Yang, Bohui

    2015-01-01

    Wool fiber diameter (WFD) is the most important economic trait of wool. However, the genes specifically controlling WFD remain elusive. In this study, the expression profiles of skin from two groups of Gansu Alpine merino sheep with different WFD (a super-fine wool group [FD = 18.0 ± 0.5 μm, n=3] and a fine wool group [FD=23.0 ± 0.5 μm, n=3]) were analyzed using next-generation sequencing-based digital gene expression profiling. A total of 40 significant differentially expressed genes (DEGs) were detected, including 9 up-regulated genes and 31 down-regulated genes. Further expression profile analysis of natural antisense transcripts (NATs) showed that more than 30% of the genes presented in sheep skin expression profiles had NATs. A total of 7 NATs with significant differential expression were detected, and all were down-regulated. Among of 40 DEGs, 3 DEGs (AQP8, Bos d2, and SPRR) had significant NATs which were all significantly down-regulated in the super-fine wool group. In total of DEGs and NATs were summarized as 3 main GO categories and 38 subcategories. Among the molecular functions, cellular components and biological processes categories, binding, cell part and metabolic process were the most dominant subcategories, respectively. However, no significant enrichment of GO terms was found (corrected P-value >0.05). The pathways that were significantly enriched with significant DEGs and NATs were mainly the lipoic acid metabolism, bile secretion, salivary secretion and ribosome and phenylalanine metabolism pathways (P < 0.05). The results indicated that expression of NATs and gene transcripts were correlated, suggesting a role in gene regulation. The discovery of these DEGs and NATs could facilitate enhanced selection for super-fine wool sheep through gene-assisted selection or targeted gene manipulation in the future.

  9. Prevalence of transcription factors in ascomycete and basidiomycete fungi

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Gene regulation underlies fungal physiology and therefore is a major factor in fungal biodiversity. Analysis of genome sequences has revealed a large number of putative transcription factors in most fungal genomes. The presence of fungal orthologs for individual regulators has been analysed and appears to be highly variable with some regulators widely conserved and others showing narrow distribution. Although genome-scale transcription factor surveys have been performed before, no global study into the prevalence of specific regulators across the fungal kingdom has been presented. Results In this study we have analysed the number of members for 37 regulator classes in 77 ascomycete and 31 basidiomycete fungal genomes and revealed significant differences between ascomycetes and basidiomycetes. In addition, we determined the presence of 64 regulators characterised in ascomycetes across these 108 genomes. This demonstrated that overall the highest presence of orthologs is in the filamentous ascomycetes. A significant number of regulators lacked orthologs in the ascomycete yeasts and the basidiomycetes. Conversely, of seven basidiomycete regulators included in the study, only one had orthologs in ascomycetes. Conclusions This study demonstrates a significant difference in the regulatory repertoire of ascomycete and basidiomycete fungi, at the level of both regulator class and individual regulator. This suggests that the current regulatory systems of these fungi have been mainly developed after the two phyla diverged. Most regulators detected in both phyla are involved in central functions of fungal physiology and therefore were likely already present in the ancestor of the two phyla. PMID:24650355

  10. Simian varicella virus expresses a latency-associated transcript that is antisense to open reading frame 61 (ICP0) mRNA in neural ganglia of latently infected monkeys.

    PubMed

    Ou, Yang; Davis, Kara A; Traina-Dorge, Vicki; Gray, Wayne L

    2007-08-01

    Simian varicella virus (SVV) and varicella-zoster virus (VZV) are closely related alphaherpesviruses that cause varicella (chickenpox) in nonhuman primates and humans, respectively. After resolution of the primary disease, SVV and VZV establish latent infection of neural ganglia and may later reactivate to cause a secondary disease (herpes zoster). This study investigated SVV gene expression in neural ganglia derived from latently infected vervet monkeys. SVV transcripts were detected in neural ganglia, but not in liver or lung tissues, of latently infected animals. A transcript mapping to open reading frame (ORF) 61 (herpes simplex virus type 1 [HSV-1] ICP0 homolog) was consistently detected in latently infected trigeminal, cervical, and lumbar ganglia by reverse transcriptase PCR. Further analysis confirmed that this SVV latency-associated transcript (LAT) was oriented antisense to the gene 61 mRNA. SVV ORF 21 transcripts were also detected in 42% of neural ganglia during latency. In contrast, SVV ORF 28, 29, 31, 62, and 63 transcripts were not detected in ganglia, liver, or lung tissues of latently infected animals. The results demonstrate that viral gene expression is limited during SVV latency and that a LAT antisense to an ICP0 homolog is expressed. In this regard, SVV gene expression during latency is similar to that of HSV-1 and other neurotropic animal alphaherpesviruses but differs from that reported for VZV.

  11. Down-regulation of the long noncoding RNA-HOX transcript antisense intergenic RNA inhibits the occurrence and progression of glioma.

    PubMed

    Yang, Bin; Wei, Zhen-Yu; Wang, Bang-Qing; Yang, Hua-Chao; Wang, Jun-Yi; Bu, Xing-Yao

    2017-08-31

    This study aims to explore the role of long noncoding RNA (lncRNA)-HOX transcript antisense intergenic RNA (HOTAIR) in the occurrence and progression of glioma. Fresh glioma and normal brain tissues were classified into a glioma group (n = 67) and a normal group (n = 64) respectively. U87 cells were assigned into the blank, sh-NC and sh-HOTAIR groups. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) was utilized to determine HOTAIR expression. Cell proliferation, cell cycle and cell apoptosis rates were detected by cell counting kit-8 (CCK-8) and flow cytometry (FCM). Scratch test and transwell assay were conducted for cell migration and invasion. Orthotopic glioma tumor model in nude mice was established by inoculating tumor cell suspension. Hematoxylin-Eosin (HE) staining was used to observe the growth and invasion of orthotopic glioma tumors. The expression of HOTAIR and cell viability was found to be lowest in the sh-HOTAIR group among the three groups. The sh-HOTAIR group exhibited a higher apoptotic rate and lower number of cell migration compared with the blank and sh-NC groups. Additionally, the speed of wound healing was slower, the migration distance decreased and the survival time of nude mice was extended in the sh-HOTAIR compared to the other groups. Moreover, the sh-HOTAIR group demonstrated reduced lesion sizes and inflammation, no convulsions or hemiplegia and lesser number of satellite metastases. Our findings support that down-regulation of HOTAIR could inhibit cell proliferation, promote cell apoptosis as well as suppress cell invasion and migration in the progression of glioma. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  12. Constrained transcription factor spacing is prevalent and important for transcriptional control of mouse blood cells.

    PubMed

    Ng, Felicia S L; Schütte, Judith; Ruau, David; Diamanti, Evangelia; Hannah, Rebecca; Kinston, Sarah J; Göttgens, Berthold

    2014-12-16

    Combinatorial transcription factor (TF) binding is essential for cell-type-specific gene regulation. However, much remains to be learned about the mechanisms of TF interactions, including to what extent constrained spacing and orientation of interacting TFs are critical for regulatory element activity. To examine the relative prevalence of the 'enhanceosome' versus the 'TF collective' model of combinatorial TF binding, a comprehensive analysis of TF binding site sequences in large scale datasets is necessary. We developed a motif-pair discovery pipeline to identify motif co-occurrences with preferential distance(s) between motifs in TF-bound regions. Utilizing a compendium of 289 mouse haematopoietic TF ChIP-seq datasets, we demonstrate that haematopoietic-related motif-pairs commonly occur with highly conserved constrained spacing and orientation between motifs. Furthermore, motif clustering revealed specific associations for both heterotypic and homotypic motif-pairs with particular haematopoietic cell types. We also showed that disrupting the spacing between motif-pairs significantly affects transcriptional activity in a well-known motif-pair-E-box and GATA, and in two previously unknown motif-pairs with constrained spacing-Ets and Homeobox as well as Ets and E-box. In this study, we provide evidence for widespread sequence-specific TF pair interaction with DNA that conforms to the 'enhanceosome' model, and furthermore identify associations between specific haematopoietic cell-types and motif-pairs. © The Author(s) 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  13. The expression and significance of HOX transcript antisense RNA and epithelial-mesenchymal transition-related factors in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Da, Chunli; Zhan, Yiyi; Li, Yu; Tan, Yao; Li, Ruiguang; Wang, Ruozheng

    2017-04-01

    The present study investigated the correlation and significance of HOX transcript antisense RNA (HOTAIR) and epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT)-related factors in the occurrence and metastasis of esophageal squamous cell cancer (ESCC) progression. The mRNA and protein expression levels of HOTAIR and EMT‑related factors were detected in 96 ESCC and para‑carcinoma tissues using reverse transcription‑quantitative polymerase chain reaction and western blot analysis. The expression levels of these factors, and the correlation between these factors and clinicopathological characteristics were subsequently analyzed. HOTAIR mRNA expression levels were significantly higher in ESCC compared with in para-carcinoma tissues, and HOTAIR mRNA expression levels were significantly higher in the groups with lymph node involvement or organ metastasis compared with the group without. Furthermore, HOTAIR expression levels demonstrated a significant increasing trend from well‑differentiated cancer to poorly differentiated cancer. The mRNA and protein expression levels of zinc finger protein SNAI1 (Snail) and β‑catenin in ESCC were significantly higher compared with para-carcinoma tissues, whereas E‑cadherin mRNA and protein expression levels were lower in ESCC tissues compared with in para-carcinoma tissues. Snail mRNA and protein expression levels were also significantly higher in groups with lymph node involvement or organ metastasis compared with those without, and β‑catenin protein expression levels were significantly higher in the groups with lymph node involvement or organ metastasis compared with the group without. In the 96 ESCC tissues, HOTAIR mRNA expression levels were positively correlated with Snail mRNA and protein expression levels, and were negatively correlated with E‑cadherin expression levels. HOTAIR mRNA expression levels were also positively correlated with β‑catenin mRNA expression levels. In conclusion, HOTAIR may be involved in

  14. Antisense oligonucleotide against GSK-3β in brain of SAMP8 mice improves learning and memory and decreases oxidative stress: Involvement of transcription factor Nrf2 and implications for Alzheimer disease.

    PubMed

    Farr, Susan A; Ripley, Jessica L; Sultana, Rukhsana; Zhang, Zhaoshu; Niehoff, Michael L; Platt, Thomas L; Murphy, M Paul; Morley, John E; Kumar, Vijaya; Butterfield, D Allan

    2014-02-01

    Glycogen synthase kinase (GSK)-3β is a multifunctional protein that has been implicated in the pathological characteristics of Alzheimer's disease (AD), including the heightened levels of neurofibrillary tangles, amyloid-beta (Aβ), and neurodegeneration. In this study we used 12-month-old SAMP8 mice, an AD model, to examine the effects GSK-3β may cause regarding the cognitive impairment and oxidative stress associated with AD. To suppress the level of GSK-3β, SAMP8 mice were treated with an antisense oligonucleotide (GAO) directed at this kinase. We measured a decreased level of GSK-3β in the cortex of the mice, indicating the success of the antisense treatment. Learning and memory assessments of the SAMP8 mice were tested post-antisense treatment using an aversive T-maze and object recognition test, both of which observably improved. In cortex samples of the SAMP8 mice, decreased levels of protein carbonyl and protein-bound HNE were measured, indicating decreased oxidative stress. Nuclear factor erythroid-2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) is a transcription factor known to increase the level of many antioxidants, including glutathione-S transferase (GST), and is negatively regulated by the activity of GSK-3β. Our results indicated the increased nuclear localization of Nrf2 and level of GST, suggesting the increased activity of the transcription factor as a result of GSK-3β suppression, consistent with the decreased oxidative stress observed. Consistent with the improved learning and memory, and consistent with GSK-3b being a tau kinase, we observed decreased tau phosphorylation in brain of GAO-treated SAMP8 mice compared to that of RAO-treated SAMP8 mice. Lastly, we examined the ability of GAO to cross the blood-brain barrier and determined it to be possible. The results presented in this study demonstrate that reducing GSK-3 with a phosphorothionated antisense against GSK-3 improves learning and memory, reduces oxidative stress, possibly coincident with increased

  15. Antisense Oligonucleotide Against GSK-3β in Brain of SAMP8 Mice Improves Learning and Memory and Decreases Oxidative Stress: Involvement of Transcription Factor Nrf2 and Implications for Alzheimer Disease

    PubMed Central

    Farr, Susan A.; Ripley, Jessica L.; Sultana, Rukhsana; Zhang, Zhaoshu; Niehoff, Michael L.; Platt, Thomas L.; Murphy, M. Paul; Morley, John E.; Kumar, Vijaya; Butterfield, D. Allan

    2014-01-01

    Glycogen synthase kinase (GSK) -3β is a multifunctional protein that has been implicated in the pathological characteristics of Alzheimer’s disease (AD), including the heightened levels of neurofibrillary tangles, amyloid-beta (Aβ) and neurodegeneration. In this study we used 12 month old SAMP8 mice, an AD model, to examine the effects GSK-3β may cause regarding the cognitive impairment and oxidative stress associated with AD. To suppress the level of GSK-3β, SAMP8 mice were treated with an antisense oligonucleotide (GAO) directed at this kinase. We measured a decreased level of GSK-3β in the cortex of the mice, indicating the success of the antisense treatment. Learning and memory assessments of the SAMP8 mice were tested post-antisense treatment using an aversive T-maze and object recognition test, both of which observably improved. In cortex samples of the SAMP8 mice, decreased levels of protein carbonyl and protein-bound HNE were measured indicating decreased oxidative stress. Nuclear factor erythroid -2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) is a transcription factor known to increase the level of many antioxidants, including glutathione-S transferase (GST), and is negatively regulated by the activity of GSK-3β. Our results indicated the increased nuclear localization of Nrf2 and level of GST, suggesting the increased activity of the transcription factor as a result of GSK-3β suppression, consistent with the decreased oxidative stress observed. Consistent with the improved learning and memory, and consistent with GSK-3b being a tau kinase, we observed decreased tau phosphorylation in brain of GAO-treated SAMP8 mice compared to that of RAO-treated SAMP8 mice. Lastly, we examined the ability of GAO to cross the blood-brain barrier and determined it to be possible. The results presented in this study demonstrate that reducing GSK-3 with a phosphorothionated antisense against GSK-3 improves learning and memory, reduces oxidative stress, possibly coincident with

  16. JACALIN-LECTIN LIKE1 Regulates the Nuclear Accumulation of GLYCINE-RICH RNA-BINDING PROTEIN7, Influencing the RNA Processing of FLOWERING LOCUS C Antisense Transcripts and Flowering Time in Arabidopsis1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Jun; Li, Chunhua; Xu, Shujuan; Xing, Lijing; Xu, Yunyuan; Chong, Kang

    2015-01-01

    Lectins selectively recognize sugars or glycans for defense in living cells, but less is known about their roles in the development process and the functional network with other factors. Here, we show that Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) JACALIN-LECTIN LIKE1 (AtJAC1) functions in flowering time control. Loss of function of AtJAC1 leads to precocious flowering, whereas overexpression of AtJAC1 causes delayed flowering. AtJAC1 influences flowering through regulation of the key flowering repressor gene FLOWERING LOCUS C (FLC). Genetic analysis revealed that AtJAC1’s function is mostly dependent on GLYCINE-RICH RNA-BINDING PROTEIN7 (GRP7), an upstream regulator of FLC. Biochemical and cell biological data indicated that AtJAC1 interacted physically with GRP7 specifically in the cytoplasm. AtJAC1 influences the nucleocytoplasmic distribution of GRP7, with predominant nuclear localization of GRP7 when AtJAC1 function is lost but retention of GRP7 in the cytoplasm when AtJAC1 is overexpressed. A temporal inducible assay suggested that AtJAC1’s regulation of flowering could be compromised by the nuclear accumulation of GRP7. In addition, GRP7 binds to the antisense precursor messenger RNA of FLC through a conserved RNA motif. Loss of GRP7 function leads to the elevation of total FLC antisense transcripts and reduced proximal-distal polyadenylation ratio, as well as histone methylation changes in the FLC gene body region and increased total functional sense FLC transcript. Attenuating the direct binding of GRP7 with competing artificial RNAs leads to changes of FLC antisense precursor messenger RNA processing and flowering transition. Taken together, our study indicates that AtJAC1 coordinates with GRP7 in shaping plant development through the regulation of RNA processing in Arabidopsis. PMID:26392261

  17. Development of Antisense Drugs for Dyslipidemia

    PubMed Central

    Wada, Fumito; Harada-Shiba, Mariko

    2016-01-01

    Abnormal elevation of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) and triglyceride-rich lipoproteins in plasma as well as dysfunction of anti-atherogenic high-density lipoprotein (HDL) have both been recognized as essential components of the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis and are classified as dyslipidemia. This review describes the arc of development of antisense oligonucleotides for the treatment of dyslipidemia. Chemically-armed antisense candidates can act on various kinds of transcripts, including mRNA and miRNA, via several different endogenous antisense mechanisms, and have exhibited potent systemic anti-dyslipidemic effects. Here, we present specific cutting-edge technologies have recently been brought into antisense strategies, and describe how they have improved the potency of antisense drugs in regard to pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics. In addition, we discuss perspectives for the use of armed antisense oligonucleotides as new clinical options for dyslipidemia, in the light of outcomes of recent clinical trials and safety concerns indicated by several clinical and preclinical studies. PMID:27466159

  18. Pharmacology of Antisense Drugs.

    PubMed

    Bennett, C Frank; Baker, Brenda F; Pham, Nguyen; Swayze, Eric; Geary, Richard S

    2017-01-06

    Recent studies have led to a greater appreciation of the diverse roles RNAs play in maintaining normal cellular function and how they contribute to disease pathology, broadening the number of potential therapeutic targets. Antisense oligonucleotides are the most direct means to target RNA in a selective manner and have become an established platform technology for drug discovery. There are multiple molecular mechanisms by which antisense oligonucleotides can be used to modulate RNAs in cells, including promoting the degradation of the targeted RNA or modulating RNA function without degradation. Antisense drugs utilizing various antisense mechanisms are demonstrating therapeutic potential for the treatment of a broad variety of diseases. This review focuses on some of the advances that have taken place in translating antisense technology from the bench to the clinic.

  19. Antisense Therapy in Neurology

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Joshua J.A.; Yokota, Toshifumi

    2013-01-01

    Antisense therapy is an approach to fighting diseases using short DNA-like molecules called antisense oligonucleotides. Recently, antisense therapy has emerged as an exciting and promising strategy for the treatment of various neurodegenerative and neuromuscular disorders. Previous and ongoing pre-clinical and clinical trials have provided encouraging early results. Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA), Huntington’s disease (HD), amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), Fukuyama congenital muscular dystrophy (FCMD), dysferlinopathy (including limb-girdle muscular dystrophy 2B; LGMD2B, Miyoshi myopathy; MM, and distal myopathy with anterior tibial onset; DMAT), and myotonic dystrophy (DM) are all reported to be promising targets for antisense therapy. This paper focuses on the current progress of antisense therapies in neurology. PMID:25562650

  20. Plasmid Replication Control by Antisense RNAs.

    PubMed

    Brantl, Sabine

    2014-08-01

    Plasmids are selfish genetic elements that normally constitute a burden for the bacterial host cell. This burden is expected to favor plasmid loss. Therefore, plasmids have evolved mechanisms to control their replication and ensure their stable maintenance. Replication control can be either mediated by iterons or by antisense RNAs. Antisense RNAs work through a negative control circuit. They are constitutively synthesized and metabolically unstable. They act both as a measuring device and a regulator, and regulation occurs by inhibition. Increased plasmid copy numbers lead to increasing antisense-RNA concentrations, which, in turn, result in the inhibition of a function essential for replication. On the other hand, decreased plasmid copy numbers entail decreasing concentrations of the inhibiting antisense RNA, thereby increasing the replication frequency. Inhibition is achieved by a variety of mechanisms, which are discussed in detail. The most trivial case is the inhibition of translation of an essential replication initiator protein (Rep) by blockage of the rep-ribosome binding site. Alternatively, ribosome binding to a leader peptide mRNA whose translation is required for efficient Rep translation can be prevented by antisense-RNA binding. In 2004, translational attenuation was discovered. Antisense-RNA-mediated transcriptional attenuation is another mechanism that has, so far, only been detected in plasmids of Gram-positive bacteria. ColE1, a plasmid that does not need a plasmid-encoded replication initiator protein, uses the inhibition of primer formation. In other cases, antisense RNAs inhibit the formation of an activator pseudoknot that is required for efficient Rep translation.

  1. Antisense oligonucleotides as therapeutics for malignant diseases.

    PubMed

    Ho, P T; Parkinson, D R

    1997-04-01

    The continued progress in our understanding of the biology of neoplasia and in the identification, cloning, and sequencing of genes critical to tumor cell function permits the exploitation of this information to develop specific agents that may directly modulate the function of these genes or their protein products. Antisense oligonucleotides are being investigated as a potential therapeutic modality that takes direct advantage of molecular sequencing. The antisense approach uses short oligonucleotides designed to hybridize to a target mRNA transcript through Watson-Crick base pairing. The formation of this oligonucleotide: RNA heteroduplex results in mRNA inactivation and consequent inhibition of synthesis of the protein product. A fundamental attraction of the antisense approach is that this method potentially may be applied to any gene product, in theory, for the treatment of malignant and non-malignant diseases. However, this simple and attractive model has proven to be much more complex in practice. A number of important challenges in the preclinical development of antisense oligonucleotides have been identified, including stability, sequence length, cellular uptake, target sequence selection, appropriate negative controls, oligonucleotide: protein interactions, and cost of manufacture. Although the biological activity of an oligonucleotide against its molecular target is theoretically sequence-dependent, the animal pharmacokinetics and toxicology of phosphorothioate analogues directed against vastly disparate gene products appear relatively non-sequence-specific. In oncology, a number of clinical trials have been initiated with antisense oligonucleotides directed against molecular targets including: p53; bcl-2; raf kinase; protein kinase C-alpha; c-myb. The experience gained from these early clinical trials will be applicable to the next generation of antisense agents in development. These may include molecules with novel backbones or other structural

  2. Upping the Antisense Ante.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weiss, Rick

    1991-01-01

    Discussed is a designer-drug technology called antisense which blocks messenger RNA's ability to carry information to protein producing sites in the cell. The applications of this drug to AIDS research, cancer therapy, and other diseases are discussed. (KR)

  3. Upping the Antisense Ante.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weiss, Rick

    1991-01-01

    Discussed is a designer-drug technology called antisense which blocks messenger RNA's ability to carry information to protein producing sites in the cell. The applications of this drug to AIDS research, cancer therapy, and other diseases are discussed. (KR)

  4. New methods as alternative or corrective measures for the pitfalls and artifacts of reverse transcription and polymerase chain reactions (RT-PCR) in cloning chimeric or antisense-accompanied RNA

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Chengfu; Liu, Yongming; Yang, Min; Liao, D. Joshua

    2013-01-01

    We established new methods for cloning cDNA ends that start with reverse transcription (RT) and soon proceed with the synthesis of the second cDNA strand, avoiding manipulations of fragile RNA. Our 3′-end cloning method does not involve poly-dT primers and polymerase chain reactions (PCR), is low in efficiency but high in fidelity and can clone those RNAs without a poly-A tail. We also established a cDNA protection assay to supersede RNA protection assay. The protected cDNA can be amplified, cloned and sequenced, enhancing sensitivity and fidelity. We report that RT product using gene-specific primer (GSP) cannot be gene- or strand-specific because RNA sample contains endogenous random primers (ERP). The gene-specificity may be improved by adding a linker sequence at the 5′-end of the GSP to prime RT and using the linker as a primer in the ensuing PCR. The strand-specificity may be improved by using strand-specific DNA oligos in our protection assay. The CDK4 mRNA and TSPAN31 mRNA are transcribed from the opposite DNA strands and overlap at their 3′ ends. Using this relationship as a model, we found that the overlapped sequence might serve as a primer with its antisense as the template to create a wrong-template extension in RT or PCR. We infer that two unrelated RNAs or cDNAs overlapping at the 5′- or 3′-end might create a spurious chimera in this way, and many chimeras with a homologous sequence may be such artifacts. The ERP and overlapping antisense together set complex pitfalls, which one should be aware of. PMID:23618925

  5. Histone H3 Lysine 36 Trimethylation Is Established over the Xist Promoter by Antisense Tsix Transcription and Contributes to Repressing Xist Expression

    PubMed Central

    Ohhata, Tatsuya; Matsumoto, Mika; Leeb, Martin; Shibata, Shinwa; Sakai, Satoshi; Kitagawa, Kyoko; Niida, Hiroyuki

    2015-01-01

    One of the two X chromosomes in female mammals is inactivated by the noncoding Xist RNA. In mice, X chromosome inactivation (XCI) is regulated by the antisense RNA Tsix, which represses Xist on the active X chromosome. In the absence of Tsix, PRC2-mediated histone H3 lysine 27 trimethylation (H3K27me3) is established over the Xist promoter. Simultaneous disruption of Tsix and PRC2 leads to derepression of Xist and in turn silencing of the single X chromosome in male embryonic stem cells. Here, we identified histone H3 lysine 36 trimethylation (H3K36me3) as a modification that is recruited by Tsix cotranscriptionally and extends over the Xist promoter. Reduction of H3K36me3 by expression of a mutated histone H3.3 with a substitution of methionine for lysine at position 36 causes a significant derepression of Xist. Moreover, depletion of the H3K36 methylase Setd2 leads to upregulation of Xist, suggesting H3K36me3 as a modification that contributes to the mechanism of Tsix function in regulating XCI. Furthermore, we found that reduction of H3K36me3 does not facilitate an increase in H3K27me3 over the Xist promoter, indicating that additional mechanisms exist by which Tsix blocks PRC2 recruitment to the Xist promoter. PMID:26370508

  6. Natural antisense transcript TPM1-AS regulates the alternative splicing of tropomyosin I through an interaction with RNA-binding motif protein 4.

    PubMed

    Huang, Guo-Wei; Zhang, Ying-Li; Liao, Lian-Di; Li, En-Min; Xu, Li-Yan

    2017-09-01

    LncRNAs play a vital role in alternative splicing of target genes. However, the mechanisms underlying lncRNAs involvement in splicing are poorly understood. In the present study, we identified a previously uncharacterized lncRNA, which is denoted as TPM1-AS, is reverse-transcribed from the fourth intronic region of the tropomyosin I (TPM1). In situ hybridization and RNA immunoprecipitation assays demonstrated that TPM1-AS was located in the nucleus and interacted with RNA-binding motif protein 4 (RBM4) in human esophageal cancer cells. TPM1-AS overexpression or RBM4 knockdown decreased endogenous exon 2a expression of TPM1, resulting in specifically down-regulation of TPM1variant V2 and V7 in human esophageal cancer cells. Mechanismly, the interaction of TPM1-AS with RBM4 hindered binding of RBM4 to TPM1 pre-mRNA and inhibited RBM4 to promote endogenous exon 2a inclusion of TPM1. Importantly, overexpression of TPM1-AS inhibited migration and filopodium formation, whereas TPM1variant V2 and V7 promoted these behaviors of human esophageal cancer cells. Taken together, the results suggest that a natural antisense TPM1-AS regulates the alternative splicing of TPM1 through an interaction with RBM4 and involves in TPM1-mediated filopodium formation and migration of cancer cells. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Expression of a natural antisense transcript of Cg-Foxl2 during the gonadic differentiation of the oyster Crassostrea gigas: first demonstration in the gonads of a lophotrochozoa species.

    PubMed

    Santerre, C; Sourdaine, P; Martinez, A-S

    2012-01-01

    In the oyster Crassostrea gigas, a successive hermaphrodite, Cg-Foxl2, an ortholog of Foxl2, is suspected to be involved in vitellogenesis or female sex determination. The existence of a natural antisense transcript (NAT) of this factor has been suspected in gonads but needs to be confirmed to better understand the early events of the gonadic differentiation. The occurrence of this NAT was studied by orientation-specific RT-PCR. The NAT and its mRNA expressions were investigated during the development and in adults by real-time PCR and in situ hybridization. The presence of stable in vivo RNA-RNA duplexes was also explored by RNase protection-based approach. This work is the first evidence of characterization of a NAT in the gonads of mollusks and Lophotrochozoa. This NAT named Cg-Foxl2os is supposed to be polyadenylated and forms RNA-RNA duplexes with its mRNA. Cg-Foxl2os is significantly more expressed than Cg-Foxl2 in 2-month-old spats and in mature males. It is co-localized with the mRNA in the cytoplasm of spermatogonia and spermatocytes. The results of this study demonstrate the existence of a NAT of Cg-Foxl2 in the gonads of C. gigas. It may regulate its mRNA expression through formation of cytoplasmic RNA-RNA duplexes during the oyster gonadic differentiation.

  8. rasiRNA pathway controls antisense expression of Drosophila telomeric retrotransposons in the nucleus

    PubMed Central

    Shpiz, Sergey; Kwon, Dmitry; Rozovsky, Yakov; Kalmykova, Alla

    2009-01-01

    Telomeres in Drosophila are maintained by the specialized telomeric retrotransposons HeT-A, TART and TAHRE. Sense transcripts of telomeric retroelements were shown to be the targets of a specialized RNA-interference mechanism, a repeat-associated short interfering (rasi)RNA-mediated system. Antisense rasiRNAs play a key role in this mechanism, highlighting the importance of antisense expression in retrotransposon silencing. Previously, bidirectional transcription was reported for the telomeric element TART. Here, we show that HeT-A is also bidirectionally transcribed, and HeT-A antisense transcription in ovaries is regulated by a promoter localized within its 3′ untranslated region. A remarkable feature of noncoding HeT-A antisense transcripts is the presence of multiple introns. We demonstrate that sense and antisense HeT-A-specific rasiRNAs are present in the same tissue, indicating that transcripts of both directions may be considered as natural targets of the rasiRNA pathway. We found that the expression of antisense transcripts of telomeric elements is regulated by the RNA silencing machinery, suggesting rasiRNA-mediated interplay between sense and antisense transcripts in the cell. Finally, this regulation occurs in the nucleus since disruption of the rasiRNA pathway leads to an accumulation of TART and HeT-A transcripts in germ cell nuclei. PMID:19036789

  9. Making sense of antisense

    SciTech Connect

    Moffat, A.S.

    1991-08-02

    Out in the San Joaquin Valley of California grows a field of tomato plants that look like ordinary tomato plants. But these tomatoes are special - one of the first fruits of a new technology that may revolutionize not just commercial plant development but human medicine as well. The new technology uses novel RNAs, called antisense RNAs, to block the activity of specific genes. At first, researchers were mainly interested in antisense RNA as a tool for probing gene function. In the late 1970s, when the technology was first developed, molecular biologists didn't have a good way of mutating genes in the cells of higher organisms so that they could see what happens when the gene activity is lost. Antisense technology, in effect, provided a way of doing that. But the biotechnology industry soon recognized the immense practical potential of a technique that could be used to knock out the activity of bad genes. To make the tomato plants, for example, plant scientists used antisense RNAs to shut off the expression of the gene encoding an enzyme that makes tomatoes mushy, thereby yielding a product that may travel better and last longer on grocery shelves. Recent work by various labs suggests that it may be possible to design antisense compounds that inhibit the activity of viral genes or of the oncogenes thought to contribute to cancer development, without affecting normal cellular genes. That raises the possibility that the technology might aid in producing better, more selective drugs to treat viral diseases, including AIDS, and cancer.

  10. Neighboring gene regulation by antisense long non-coding RNAs.

    PubMed

    Villegas, Victoria E; Zaphiropoulos, Peter G

    2015-02-03

    Antisense transcription, considered until recently as transcriptional noise, is a very common phenomenon in human and eukaryotic transcriptomes, operating in two ways based on whether the antisense RNA acts in cis or in trans. This process can generate long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs), one of the most diverse classes of cellular transcripts, which have demonstrated multifunctional roles in fundamental biological processes, including embryonic pluripotency, differentiation and development. Antisense lncRNAs have been shown to control nearly every level of gene regulation--pretranscriptional, transcriptional and posttranscriptional--through DNA-RNA, RNA-RNA or protein-RNA interactions. This review is centered on functional studies of antisense lncRNA-mediated regulation of neighboring gene expression. Specifically, it addresses how these transcripts interact with other biological molecules, nucleic acids and proteins, to regulate gene expression through chromatin remodeling at the pretranscriptional level and modulation of transcriptional and post-transcriptional processes by altering the sense mRNA structure or the cellular compartmental distribution, either in the nucleus or the cytoplasm.

  11. MiR-101-3p Suppresses HOX Transcript Antisense RNA (HOTAIR)-induced Proliferation and Invasion Through Directly Targeting SRF in Gastric Carcinoma Cells.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xiaoyu; Zhou, Jin; Wu, Zhenfeng; Chen, Che; Liu, Jiayun; Wu, Guannan; Zhai, Jing; Liu, Fukun; Li, Gang

    2017-03-02

    MiR-101-3p was identified as a tumor suppressor in several cancers, but its exact role in gastric adenocarcinoma is still largely unknown. In this study, we found that, compared with the RGM-1 human normal gastric epithelial cells, miR-101-3p was significantly downregulated in all the 6 human gastric adenocarcinoma cell lines, including BGC-823, MNK-45, MGC-803, SGC-7901, AGS and HGC-27. Overexpression miR-101-3p suppressed both the proliferation and invasion of AGS gastric adenocarcinoma cells and knockdown of miR-101-3p displayed an opposite effect. In addition, miR-101-3p could directly target and suppress the expression SRF gene, which is a transcription factor of HOTAIR, a well-characterized tumor promoter lncRNA. MiR-101-3p negatively regulated SRF-mediated transcription of HOTAIR. Moreover, either silence of SRF or silence of HOTAIR could counteract the promotion of gastric adenocarcinoma cell proliferation and invasion by miR-101-3p inhibition. Our findings indicate that miR-101-3p suppresses HOTAIR-induced proliferation and invasion through directly targeting SRF in gastric carcinoma cells.

  12. Antisense oligonucleotides in therapy for neurodegenerative disorders.

    PubMed

    Evers, Melvin M; Toonen, Lodewijk J A; van Roon-Mom, Willeke M C

    2015-06-29

    Antisense oligonucleotides are synthetic single stranded strings of nucleic acids that bind to RNA and thereby alter or reduce expression of the target RNA. They can not only reduce expression of mutant proteins by breakdown of the targeted transcript, but also restore protein expression or modify proteins through interference with pre-mRNA splicing. There has been a recent revival of interest in the use of antisense oligonucleotides to treat several neurodegenerative disorders using different approaches to prevent disease onset or halt disease progression and the first clinical trials for spinal muscular atrophy and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis showing promising results. For these trials, intrathecal delivery is being used but direct infusion into the brain ventricles and several methods of passing the blood brain barrier after peripheral administration are also under investigation.

  13. Intra-Amygdala Injections of CREB Antisense Impair Inhibitory Avoidance Memory: Role of Norepinephrine and Acetylcholine

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Canal, Clinton E.; Chang, Qing; Gold, Paul E.

    2008-01-01

    Infusions of CREB antisense into the amygdala prior to training impair memory for aversive tasks, suggesting that the antisense may interfere with CRE-mediated gene transcription and protein synthesis important for the formation of new memories within the amygdala. However, the amygdala also appears to modulate memory formation in distributed…

  14. Intra-Amygdala Injections of CREB Antisense Impair Inhibitory Avoidance Memory: Role of Norepinephrine and Acetylcholine

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Canal, Clinton E.; Chang, Qing; Gold, Paul E.

    2008-01-01

    Infusions of CREB antisense into the amygdala prior to training impair memory for aversive tasks, suggesting that the antisense may interfere with CRE-mediated gene transcription and protein synthesis important for the formation of new memories within the amygdala. However, the amygdala also appears to modulate memory formation in distributed…

  15. Radiolabeled oligonucleotides for antisense imaging

    PubMed Central

    Iyer, Arun K; He, Jiang

    2011-01-01

    Oligonucleotides radiolabeled with isotopes emitting γ-rays (for SPECT imaging) or positrons (for PET imaging) can be useful for targeting messenger RNA (mRNA) thereby serving as non-invasive imaging tools for detection of gene expression in vivo (antisense imaging). Radiolabeled oligonucleotides may also be used for monitoring their in vivo fate, thereby helping us better understand the barriers to its delivery for antisense targeting. These developments have led to a new area of molecular imaging and targeting, utilizing radiolabeled antisense oligonucleotides. However, the success of antisense imaging relies heavily on overcoming the barriers for its targeted delivery in vivo. Furthermore, the low ability of the radiolabeled antisense oligonucleotide to subsequently internalize into the cell and hybridize with its target mRNA poses additional challenges in realizing its potentials. This review covers the advances in the antisense imaging probe development for PET and SPECT, with an emphasis on radiolabeling strategies, stability, delivery and in vivo targeting. PMID:21822406

  16. The Mouse Murr1 Gene Is Imprinted in the Adult Brain, Presumably Due to Transcriptional Interference by the Antisense-Oriented U2af1-rs1 Gene

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Youdong; Joh, Keiichiro; Masuko, Sadahiko; Yatsuki, Hitomi; Soejima, Hidenobu; Nabetani, Akira; Beechey, Colin V.; Okinami, Satoshi; Mukai, Tsunehiro

    2004-01-01

    The mouse Murr1 gene contains an imprinted gene, U2af1-rs1, in its first intron. U2af1-rs1 shows paternal allele-specific expression and is transcribed in the direction opposite to that of the Murr1 gene. In contrast to a previous report of biallelic expression of Murr1 in neonatal mice, we have found that the maternal allele is expressed predominantly in the adult brain and also preferentially in other adult tissues. This maternal-predominant expression is not observed in embryonic and neonatal brains. In situ hybridization experiments that used the adult brain indicated that Murr1 gene was maternally expressed in neuronal cells in all regions of the brain. We analyzed the developmental change in the expression levels of both Murr1 and U2af1-rs1 in the brain and liver, and we propose that the maternal-predominant expression of Murr1 results from transcriptional interference of the gene by U2af1-rs1 through the Murr1 promoter region. PMID:14673161

  17. Use of an Antisense RNA Strategy To Investigate the Functional Significance of Mn-Catalase in the Extreme Thermophile Thermus thermophilus

    PubMed Central

    Moreno, Renata; Hidalgo, Aurelio; Cava, Felipe; Fernández-Lafuente, Roberto; Guisán, José Manuel; Berenguer, José

    2004-01-01

    The expression of an antisense RNA revealed that an Mn-catalase was required in Thermus thermophilus for aerobic but not for anaerobic growth. The antisense system is based on the constitutive expression of a “bicistronic” transcript consisting of the kanamycin resistance gene mRNA followed by the antisense RNA against the selected target. PMID:15516595

  18. Regulation of naturally occurring antisense RNA of myosin heavy chain (MyHC) in neonatal cardiomyocytes.

    PubMed

    Luther, H P; Bartsch, H; Morano, I; Podlowski, S; Baumann, G

    2005-03-01

    Naturally occurring antisense RNA has been detected for a range of eukaryotic genes. Its abundance compared to levels of its complementary sense mRNA appears to be a factor indicating its possible regulatory function. In previous studies, we detected appreciable levels of antisense RNA against the two isoforms (alpha and beta) of the heavy myosin-chain (MyHC) in the myocardium of rats. If this is to play a significant role in gene expression antisense levels should vary in response to external and internal cellular influences. Recently, a bidirectional promoter located in the alpha/beta MyHC intergenic region was described, which was proposed to regulate coordinated transcription of alpha-MyHC sense and beta-MyHC antisense. To study MyHC antisense regulation in neonatal heart, we investigated cultivated myocytes stimulated with either trijodthyronin (T3) as an inductor of alpha-MyHC or phenylephrine with stimulation of beta-MyHC. RNA-quantification of sense and antisense transcripts of both isoforms was performed by real-time RT-PCR. Stimulation by T3 led to an induction of both sense and antisense of alpha-MyHC and to a decrease of beta-MyHC sense and antisense. Phenylephrine increased sense and antisense beta-MyHC but reduced antisense alpha-MyHC. The sense/antisense of alpha- and beta-MyHC ratio was unchanged compared to control. Results indicate a coregulation of sense and antisense MyHC RNA under stimulation of T3 and phenylephrine in neonatal cardiomyocytes.

  19. Antisense oligodeoxynucleotide to the cystic fibrosis gene inhibits anion transport in normal cultured sweat duct cells

    SciTech Connect

    Sorscher, E.J.; Kirk, K.L.; Weaver, M.L.; Jilling, T.; Blalock, J.E.; LeBoeuf, R.D. )

    1991-09-01

    The authors have tested the hypothesis that the cystic fibrosis (CF) gene product, called the CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR), mediates anion transport in normal human sweat duct cells. Sweat duct cells in primary culture were treated with oligodeoxynucleotides that were antisense to the CFTR gene transcript in order to block the expression of the wild-type CFTR. Anion transport in CFTR transcript antisense-treated cells was then assessed with a halide-specific dye, 6-methoxy-N-(3-sulfopropryl)quinolinium, and fluorescent digital imaging microscopy to monitor halide influx and efflux from single sweat duct cells. Antisense oligodeoxynucleotide treatment for 24 hr virtually abolished Cl{sup {minus}} transport in sweat duct cells compared with untreated cells or control cells treated with sense oligodeoxynucleotides. Br{sup {minus}} uptake into sweat duct cells was also blocked after a 24-hr CFTR transcript antisense treatments, but not after treatments for only 4 hr. Lower concentrations of antisense oligodeoxynucleotides were less effective at inhibiting Cl{sup {minus}} transport. These results indicate that oligodeoxynucleotides that are antisense to CFTR transcript inhibit sweat duct Cl{sup {minus}} permeability in both a time-dependent and dose-dependent manner. This approach provides evidence that inhibition of the expression of the wild-type CFTR gene in a normal, untransfected epithelial cell results in an inhibition of Cl{sup {minus}} permeability.

  20. Targeting Cancer with Antisense Oligomers

    SciTech Connect

    Hnatowich, DJ

    2008-10-28

    With financial assistance from the Department of Energy, we have shown definitively that radiolabeled antisense DNAs and other oligomers will accumulate in target cancer cells in vitro and in vivo by an antisense mechanism. We have also shown that the number of mRNA targets for our antisense oligomers in the cancer cell types that we have investigated so far is sufficient to provide and antisense image and/or radiotherapy of cancer in mice. These studies have been reported in about 10 publications. However our observation over the past several years has shown that radiolabeled antisense oligomers administered intravenously in their native and naked form will accumulate and be retained in target xenografts by an antisense mechanism but will also accumulate at high levels in normal organs such as liver, spleen and kidneys. We have investigated unsuccessfully several commercially available vectors. Thus the use of radiolabeled antisense oligomers for the imaging of cancer must await novel approaches to delivery. This laboratory has therefore pursued two new paths, optical imaging of tumor and Auger radiotherapy. We are developing a novel method of optical imaging tumor using antisense oligomers with a fluorophore is administered while hybridized with a shorter complementary oligomer with an inhibitor. In culture and in tumored mice that the duplex remains intact and thus nonfluorescent until it encounters its target mRNA at which time it dissociates and the antisense oligomer binds along with its fluorophore to the target. Simultaneous with the above, we have also observed, as have others, that antisense oligomers migrate rapidly and quantitatively to the nucleus upon crossing cell membranes. The Auger electron radiotherapy path results from this observation since the nuclear migration properties could be used effectively to bring and to retain in the nucleus an Auger emitting radionuclide such as 111In or 125I bound to the antisense oligomer. Since the object becomes

  1. A potential suppressive effect of natural antisense IL-1β RNA on lipopolysaccharide-induced IL-1β expression

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Jiawei; Wu, Xiurong; Hong, Mao; Tobias, Peter; Han, Jiahuai

    2013-01-01

    Although more than half of genomic loci are believed to have antisense transcription, whether antisense transcription is involved in cytokine expression has not been studied. Here we show that some loci of innate immunity related genes do have antisense transcripts. We investigated the effect of several antisense RNAs, including anti-4-1BBL, anti-p100 and anti-IL-1β, on their cognate sense gene’s expression in macrophages. We found that overexpression of antisense IL-1β transcript suppressed IL-1β expression. Anti-IL-1β is complementary to the sequence in the 5′ upstream region of the IL-1β promoter. Its mediated inhibition of IL-1β production occurred at the transcriptional level. Anti-IL-1β did not alter the methylation status of the IL-1β promoter. However, chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assays revealed that the anti-IL-1β transcript can change the chromatin structure of the IL-1β promoter by decreasing H3K4 trimethylation on the promoter, which is at least part of the mechanism underlying the reduced binding of RNA polymerase II to the IL-1β promoter upon anti-IL-1β expression. Our data suggest that some antisense-transcripts of innate immunity related genes play a role by regulating cytokine expression. PMID:23677478

  2. Reduction of polygalacturonase activity in tomato fruit by antisense RNA.

    PubMed

    Sheehy, R E; Kramer, M; Hiatt, W R

    1988-12-01

    Polygalacturonase [PG; poly(1,4-alpha-D-galacturonide) glycanhydrolase; EC 3.2.1.15] is expressed in tomato only during the ripening stage of fruit development. PG becomes abundant during ripening and has a major role in cell wall degradation and fruit softening. Tomato plants were transformed to produce antisense RNA from a gene construct containing the cauliflower mosaic virus 35S promoter and a full-length PG cDNA in reverse orientation. The construct was integrated into the tomato genome by Agrobacterium-mediated transformation. The constitutive synthesis of PG antisense RNA in transgenic plants resulted in a substantial reduction in the levels of PG mRNA and enzymatic activity in ripening fruit. The steady-state levels of PG antisense RNA in green fruit of transgenic plants were lower than the levels of PG mRNA normally attained during ripening. However, analysis of transcription in isolated nuclei demonstrated that the antisense RNA construct was transcribed at a higher rate than the tomato PG gene(s). Analysis of fruit from transgenic plants demonstrated a reduction in PG mRNA and enzymatic activity of 70-90%. The reduction in PG activity did not prevent the accumulation of the red pigment lycopene.

  3. Natural antisense RNAs as mRNA regulatory elements in bacteria: a review on function and applications.

    PubMed

    Saberi, Fatemeh; Kamali, Mehdi; Najafi, Ali; Yazdanparast, Alavieh; Moghaddam, Mehrdad Moosazadeh

    2016-01-01

    Naturally occurring antisense RNAs are small, diffusible, untranslated transcripts that pair to target RNAs at specific regions of complementarity to control their biological function by regulating gene expression at the post-transcriptional level. This review focuses on known cases of antisense RNA control in prokaryotes and provides an overview of some natural RNA-based mechanisms that bacteria use to modulate gene expression, such as mRNA sensors, riboswitches and antisense RNAs. We also highlight recent advances in RNA-based technology. The review shows that studies on both natural and synthetic systems are reciprocally beneficial.

  4. Differential modification of flavonoid and isoflavonoid biosynthesis with an antisense chalcone synthase construct in transgenic Lotus corniculatus.

    PubMed

    Colliver, S P; Morris, P; Robbins, M P

    1997-11-01

    Three clonal genotypes of Lotus corniculatus L. (bird's foot trefoil) were transformed with an antisense chalcone synthase (CHS) gene construct made using a stress induced CHS17 cDNA from Phaseolus vulgaris under the control of the constitutive CaMV 35S promoter and Nos terminator via Agrobacterium rhizogenes. After initial screening, ten antisense and five control co-transformation events from each recipient clonal genotype were analysed. After elicitation with glutathione, the level of tannin accumulation was found to be increased in a number of antisense root cultures derived from the low (S33) and moderate (S50) tannin recipient genotypes. Six antisense and four control transformed lines from genotype S50 were selected for more detailed study. The antisense CHS construct was found to be integrated into the genome, with a copy number ranging from 1 to 5 and antisense orientation was confirmed by PCR. In transformed root cultures, increased CHS transcript levels were noted in a number of antisense lines. Biochemical analyses of glutathione-elicited-root cultures indicated a significant increase in tannin accumulation in antisense CHS lines and mean vestitol levels were reduced. These results show that the introduction of a heterologous antisense chalcone synthase construct into L. corniculatus resulted in an unpredicted molecular and biochemical phenotype. Such findings are discussed in relation to manipulation of this complex multigene family.

  5. Molecular Mechanisms of Antisense Oligonucleotides.

    PubMed

    Crooke, Stanley T

    2017-04-01

    In 1987, when I became interested in the notion of antisense technology, I returned to my roots in RNA biochemistry and began work to understand how oligonucleotides behave in biological systems. Since 1989, my research has focused primarily on this topic, although I have been involved in most areas of research in antisense technology. I believe that the art of excellent science is to frame large important questions that are perhaps not immediately answerable with existing knowledge and methods, and then conceive a long-term (multiyear) research strategy that begins by answering the most pressing answerable questions on the path to the long-term goals. Then, a step-by-step research pathway that will address the strategic questions posed must be implemented, adjusting the plan as new things are learned. This is the approach we have taken at Ionis. Obviously, to create antisense technology, we have had to address a wide array of strategic questions, for example, the medicinal chemistry of oligonucleotides, manufacturing and analytical methods, pharmacokinetics and toxicology, as well as questions about the molecular pharmacology of antisense oligonucleotides (ASOs). Each of these endeavors has consumed nearly three decades of scientific effort, is still very much a work-in-progress, and has resulted in hundreds of publications. As a recipient of the Lifetime Achievement Award 2016 granted by the Oligonucleotide Therapeutic Society, in this note, my goal is to summarize the contributions of my group to the efforts to understand the molecular mechanisms of ASOs.

  6. Molecular Mechanisms of Antisense Oligonucleotides

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    In 1987, when I became interested in the notion of antisense technology, I returned to my roots in RNA biochemistry and began work to understand how oligonucleotides behave in biological systems. Since 1989, my research has focused primarily on this topic, although I have been involved in most areas of research in antisense technology. I believe that the art of excellent science is to frame large important questions that are perhaps not immediately answerable with existing knowledge and methods, and then conceive a long-term (multiyear) research strategy that begins by answering the most pressing answerable questions on the path to the long-term goals. Then, a step-by-step research pathway that will address the strategic questions posed must be implemented, adjusting the plan as new things are learned. This is the approach we have taken at Ionis. Obviously, to create antisense technology, we have had to address a wide array of strategic questions, for example, the medicinal chemistry of oligonucleotides, manufacturing and analytical methods, pharmacokinetics and toxicology, as well as questions about the molecular pharmacology of antisense oligonucleotides (ASOs). Each of these endeavors has consumed nearly three decades of scientific effort, is still very much a work-in-progress, and has resulted in hundreds of publications. As a recipient of the Lifetime Achievement Award 2016 granted by the Oligonucleotide Therapeutic Society, in this note, my goal is to summarize the contributions of my group to the efforts to understand the molecular mechanisms of ASOs. PMID:28080221

  7. Genomic Prevalence of Heterochromatic H3K9me2 and Transcription Do Not Discriminate Pluripotent from Terminally Differentiated Cells

    PubMed Central

    Tiwari, Vijay K.; Baubec, Tuncay; Roloff, Tim C.; Gaidatzis, Dimos; Stadler, Michael B.; Schübeler, Dirk

    2011-01-01

    Cellular differentiation entails reprogramming of the transcriptome from a pluripotent to a unipotent fate. This process was suggested to coincide with a global increase of repressive heterochromatin, which results in a reduction of transcriptional plasticity and potential. Here we report the dynamics of the transcriptome and an abundant heterochromatic histone modification, dimethylation of histone H3 at lysine 9 (H3K9me2), during neuronal differentiation of embryonic stem cells. In contrast to the prevailing model, we find H3K9me2 to occupy over 50% of chromosomal regions already in stem cells. Marked are most genomic regions that are devoid of transcription and a subgroup of histone modifications. Importantly, no global increase occurs during differentiation, but discrete local changes of H3K9me2 particularly at genic regions can be detected. Mirroring the cell fate change, many genes show altered expression upon differentiation. Quantitative sequencing of transcripts demonstrates however that the total number of active genes is equal between stem cells and several tested differentiated cell types. Together, these findings reveal high prevalence of a heterochromatic mark in stem cells and challenge the model of low abundance of epigenetic repression and resulting global basal level transcription in stem cells. This suggests that cellular differentiation entails local rather than global changes in epigenetic repression and transcriptional activity. PMID:21655081

  8. Antisense Treatments for Biothreat Agents

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-08-01

    oligomers (ASOs) represent a promising technology to treat viral and bacterial infections, and have already been shown to be successful against a...viral and bacterial agents have a history of state- sponsored ’weaponization’, including Marburg, Ebola, Junin, Machupo, yellow fever viruses and...14. ABSTRACT Antisense oligomers (ASOs) represent a promising technology to treat viral and bacterial infections, and have already been shown to be

  9. RNA Polymerase II Collision Interrupts Convergent Transcription

    PubMed Central

    Hobson, David J.; Wei, Wu; Steinmetz, Lars M.; Svejstrup, Jesper Q.

    2012-01-01

    Summary Antisense noncoding transcripts, genes-within-genes, and convergent gene pairs are prevalent among eukaryotes. The existence of such transcription units raises the question of what happens when RNA polymerase II (RNAPII) molecules collide head-to-head. Here we use a combination of biochemical and genetic approaches in yeast to show that polymerases transcribing opposite DNA strands cannot bypass each other. RNAPII stops but does not dissociate upon head-to-head collision in vitro, suggesting that opposing polymerases represent insurmountable obstacles for each other. Head-to-head collision in vivo also results in RNAPII stopping, and removal of collided RNAPII from the DNA template can be achieved via ubiquitylation-directed proteolysis. Indeed, in cells lacking efficient RNAPII polyubiquitylation, the half-life of collided polymerases increases, so that they can be detected between convergent genes. These results provide insight into fundamental mechanisms of gene traffic control and point to an unexplored effect of antisense transcription on gene regulation via polymerase collision. PMID:23041286

  10. Integration of multi-omics data of a genome-reduced bacterium: Prevalence of post-transcriptional regulation and its correlation with protein abundances.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wei-Hua; van Noort, Vera; Lluch-Senar, Maria; Hennrich, Marco L; Wodke, Judith A H; Yus, Eva; Alibés, Andreu; Roma, Guglielmo; Mende, Daniel R; Pesavento, Christina; Typas, Athanasios; Gavin, Anne-Claude; Serrano, Luis; Bork, Peer

    2016-02-18

    We developed a comprehensive resource for the genome-reduced bacterium Mycoplasma pneumoniae comprising 1748 consistently generated '-omics' data sets, and used it to quantify the power of antisense non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs), lysine acetylation, and protein phosphorylation in predicting protein abundance (11%, 24% and 8%, respectively). These factors taken together are four times more predictive of the proteome abundance than of mRNA abundance. In bacteria, post-translational modifications (PTMs) and ncRNA transcription were both found to increase with decreasing genomic GC-content and genome size. Thus, the evolutionary forces constraining genome size and GC-content modify the relative contributions of the different regulatory layers to proteome homeostasis, and impact more genomic and genetic features than previously appreciated. Indeed, these scaling principles will enable us to develop more informed approaches when engineering minimal synthetic genomes.

  11. An in vivo and in silico approach to study cis-antisense: a short cut to higher order response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Courtney, Colleen; Varanasi, Usha; Chatterjee, Anushree

    2014-03-01

    Antisense interactions are present in all domains of life. Typically sense, antisense RNA pairs originate from overlapping genes with convergent face to face promoters, and are speculated to be involved in gene regulation. Recent studies indicate the role of transcriptional interference (TI) in regulating expression of genes in convergent orientation. Modeling antisense, TI gene regulation mechanisms allows us to understand how organisms control gene expression. We present a modeling and experimental framework to understand convergent transcription that combines the effects of transcriptional interference and cis-antisense regulation. Our model shows that combining transcriptional interference and antisense RNA interaction adds multiple-levels of regulation which affords a highly tunable biological output, ranging from first order response to complex higher-order response. To study this system we created a library of experimental constructs with engineered TI and antisense interaction by using face-to-face inducible promoters separated by carefully tailored overlapping DNA sequences to control expression of a set of fluorescent reporter proteins. Studying this gene expression mechanism allows for an understanding of higher order behavior of gene expression networks.

  12. Divergent transcription is associated with promoters of transcriptional regulators

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Divergent transcription is a wide-spread phenomenon in mammals. For instance, short bidirectional transcripts are a hallmark of active promoters, while longer transcripts can be detected antisense from active genes in conditions where the RNA degradation machinery is inhibited. Moreover, many described long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) are transcribed antisense from coding gene promoters. However, the general significance of divergent lncRNA/mRNA gene pair transcription is still poorly understood. Here, we used strand-specific RNA-seq with high sequencing depth to thoroughly identify antisense transcripts from coding gene promoters in primary mouse tissues. Results We found that a substantial fraction of coding-gene promoters sustain divergent transcription of long non-coding RNA (lncRNA)/mRNA gene pairs. Strikingly, upstream antisense transcription is significantly associated with genes related to transcriptional regulation and development. Their promoters share several characteristics with those of transcriptional developmental genes, including very large CpG islands, high degree of conservation and epigenetic regulation in ES cells. In-depth analysis revealed a unique GC skew profile at these promoter regions, while the associated coding genes were found to have large first exons, two genomic features that might enforce bidirectional transcription. Finally, genes associated with antisense transcription harbor specific H3K79me2 epigenetic marking and RNA polymerase II enrichment profiles linked to an intensified rate of early transcriptional elongation. Conclusions We concluded that promoters of a class of transcription regulators are characterized by a specialized transcriptional control mechanism, which is directly coupled to relaxed bidirectional transcription. PMID:24365181

  13. Prevalence of the EH1 Groucho interaction motif in the metazoan Fox family of transcriptional regulators

    PubMed Central

    Yaklichkin, Sergey; Vekker, Alexander; Stayrook, Steven; Lewis, Mitchell; Kessler, Daniel S

    2007-01-01

    Background The Fox gene family comprises a large and functionally diverse group of forkhead-related transcriptional regulators, many of which are essential for metazoan embryogenesis and physiology. Defining conserved functional domains that mediate the transcriptional activity of Fox proteins will contribute to a comprehensive understanding of the biological function of Fox family genes. Results Systematic analysis of 458 protein sequences of the metazoan Fox family was performed to identify the presence of the engrailed homology-1 motif (eh1), a motif known to mediate physical interaction with transcriptional corepressors of the TLE/Groucho family. Greater than 50% of Fox proteins contain sequences with high similarity to the eh1 motif, including ten of the nineteen Fox subclasses (A, B, C, D, E, G, H, I, L, and Q) and Fox proteins of early divergent species such as marine sponge. The eh1 motif is not detected in Fox proteins of the F, J, K, M, N, O, P, R and S subclasses, or in yeast Fox proteins. The eh1-like motifs are positioned C-terminal to the winged helix DNA-binding domain in all subclasses except for FoxG proteins, which have an N-terminal motif. Two similar eh1-like motifs are found in the zebrafish FoxQ1 and in FoxG proteins of sea urchin and amphioxus. The identification of eh1-like motifs by manual sequence alignment was validated by statistical analyses of the Swiss protein database, confirming a high frequency of occurrence of eh1-like sequences in Fox family proteins. Structural predictions suggest that the majority of identified eh1-like motifs are short α-helices, and wheel modeling revealed an amphipathicity that supports this secondary structure prediction. Conclusion A search for eh1 Groucho interaction motifs in the Fox gene family has identified eh1-like sequences in greater than 50% of Fox proteins. The results predict a physical and functional interaction of TLE/Groucho corepressors with many members of the Fox family of transcriptional

  14. Expression of XIST sense and antisense in bovine fetal organs and cell cultures.

    PubMed

    Farazmand, Ali; Basrur, Parvathi K; Stranzinger, Gerald; Graphodatskaya, Daria; Reyes, Ed R; King, W Allan

    2004-01-01

    Untranslated RNAs transcribed from sense and antisense strands of a gene referred to as X-inactive specific transcript (XIST) play crucial roles in the genetic inactivation and condensation of one of the two X chromosomes in the somatic cells of female mammals. X inactivation is also thought to occur in mammalian male germ cells mainly based on the formation of a condensed structure referred to as a sex body or XY-body, during spermatogenesis. Molecular identity of the sex body, the roles of sense and antisense XIST RNAs in its formation, and the relevance of the sex body to spermatogenesis are not known. Here we report the results of our strand-specific RT-PCR approach to identify the amplicon detected in fetal bovine testes previously referred to as XIST and to test for sense/antisense expression in male and female organs and cell cultures of different sex chromosome constitution. Our results showed that the transcript detected consistently in male gonads and variably in somatic organs represents XIST antisense RNA and that XIST sense and antisense RNAs are co-expressed in female somatic tissues and cultured cells including cells of sex chromosome aneuploids (XXY and XXX). Our results, which differ from those of other investigators in this area, are discussed in the light of the recently reported differences in the expression pattern of murine Xist/Tsix loci and their structural and functional differences in different mammalian species.

  15. Avian Leukosis Virus Activation of an Antisense RNA Upstream of TERT in B-Cell Lymphomas

    PubMed Central

    Nehyba, Jiri; Malhotra, Sanandan; Winans, Shelby; O'Hare, Thomas H.; Justice, James

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Avian leukosis virus (ALV) induces tumors by integrating its proviral DNA into the chicken genome and altering the expression of nearby genes via strong promoter and enhancer elements. Viral integration sites that contribute to oncogenesis are selected in tumor cells. Deep-sequencing analysis of B-cell lymphoma DNA confirmed that the telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT) gene promoter is a common ALV integration target. Twenty-six unique proviral integration sites were mapped between 46 and 3,552 nucleotides (nt) upstream of the TERT transcription start site, predominantly in the opposite transcriptional orientation to TERT. Transcriptome-sequencing (RNA-seq) analysis of normal bursa revealed a transcribed region upstream of TERT in the opposite orientation, suggesting the TERT promoter is bidirectional. This transcript appears to be an uncharacterized antisense RNA. We have previously shown that TERT expression is upregulated in tumors with integrations in the TERT promoter region. We now report that the viral promoter drives the expression of a chimeric transcript containing viral sequences spliced to exons 4 through 7 of this antisense RNA. Clonal expansion of cells with ALV integrations driving overexpression of the TERT antisense RNA suggest it may have a role in tumorigenesis. IMPORTANCE The data suggest that ALV integrations in the TERT promoter region drive the overexpression of a novel antisense RNA and contribute to the development of lymphomas. PMID:27512065

  16. Coexistence of sense and anti-sense mRNAs of variant surface protein in Giardia lamblia trophozoites.

    PubMed

    Guo, Junli; Zheng, Wenyu; Wang, Yuehua; Li, Yao; Lu, Siqi; Feng, Xianmin

    2014-02-14

    A strategy of the parasitic protozoan Giardia lamblia to evade attack from the host immune system is periodic changes of its surface antigen, a member of the variant surface protein (VSP) family. A post-transcriptional gene silencing mechanism has been proposed to explain the presence of only one among many possible VSPs at any time. To investigate this phenomenon further, we extracted total RNA from cultured trophozoites of the G. lamblia C2 isolate, and cDNA was reverse-transcribed from the RNA. Sense and anti-sense VSPs were amplified from the total cDNA using nested PCR with primers designed from the 3'-conserved region and the known 5' or 3' end of the cDNA library. Sequence analyses of the amplified products revealed more than 34 full-length antisense VSPs and a smear of sense VSPs. Sequence alignments and comparisons revealed that these VSPs contained variable N-termini and conserved C-termini, and could be classified into 5 clades based on the sizes and variations of the N-terminal sequence. All antisense VSPs existed in the sense forms, but no corresponding antisense VSP existed for sense RNA (snsRNA) 16. The coexistence of sense and antisense VSP mRNAs in cultured G. lamblia supports the post-transcriptional regulation of VSP expression. We propose that VSPs transcribed simultaneously in the sense and antisense forms form double-stranded RNAs (dsRNAs) which are degraded by the Dicer endonuclease, while a VSP without an antisense transcription (e.g., snsRNA16) will be expressed on the surface of Giardia. In addition, in the course of this investigation VSPs were identified that were previously not known. PCR-based amplification of specific sense and antisense VSP cDNAs can be used to identify the specific VSP on G. lamblia trophozoites, which is easier than using specific monoclonal antibody approaches. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  17. Survey of variation in human transcription factors reveals prevalent DNA binding changes

    PubMed Central

    Barrera, Luis A.; Rogers, Julia M.; Gisselbrecht, Stephen S.; Rossin, Elizabeth J.; Woodard, Jaie; Mariani, Luca; Kock, Kian Hong; Inukai, Sachi; Siggers, Trevor; Shokri, Leila; Gordân, Raluca; Sahni, Nidhi; Cotsapas, Chris; Hao, Tong; Yi, Song; Kellis, Manolis; Daly, Mark J.; Vidal, Marc; Hill, David E.; Bulyk, Martha L.

    2016-01-01

    Sequencing of exomes and genomes has revealed abundant genetic variation affecting the coding sequences of human transcription factors (TFs), but the consequences of such variation remain largely unexplored. We developed a computational, structure-based approach to evaluate TF variants for their impact on DNA-binding activity and used universal protein binding microarrays to assay sequence-specific DNA-binding activity across 41 reference and 117 variant alleles found in individuals of diverse ancestries and families with Mendelian diseases. We found 77 variants in 28 genes that affect DNA-binding affinity or specificity and identified thousands of rare alleles likely to alter the DNA-binding activity of human sequence-specific TFs. Our results suggest that most individuals have unique repertoires of TF DNA-binding activities, which may contribute to phenotypic variation. PMID:27013732

  18. Survey of variation in human transcription factors reveals prevalent DNA binding changes.

    PubMed

    Barrera, Luis A; Vedenko, Anastasia; Kurland, Jesse V; Rogers, Julia M; Gisselbrecht, Stephen S; Rossin, Elizabeth J; Woodard, Jaie; Mariani, Luca; Kock, Kian Hong; Inukai, Sachi; Siggers, Trevor; Shokri, Leila; Gordân, Raluca; Sahni, Nidhi; Cotsapas, Chris; Hao, Tong; Yi, Song; Kellis, Manolis; Daly, Mark J; Vidal, Marc; Hill, David E; Bulyk, Martha L

    2016-03-25

    Sequencing of exomes and genomes has revealed abundant genetic variation affecting the coding sequences of human transcription factors (TFs), but the consequences of such variation remain largely unexplored. We developed a computational, structure-based approach to evaluate TF variants for their impact on DNA binding activity and used universal protein-binding microarrays to assay sequence-specific DNA binding activity across 41 reference and 117 variant alleles found in individuals of diverse ancestries and families with Mendelian diseases. We found 77 variants in 28 genes that affect DNA binding affinity or specificity and identified thousands of rare alleles likely to alter the DNA binding activity of human sequence-specific TFs. Our results suggest that most individuals have unique repertoires of TF DNA binding activities, which may contribute to phenotypic variation. Copyright © 2016, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  19. Functionalization of an Antisense Small RNA.

    PubMed

    Rodrigo, Guillermo; Prakash, Satya; Cordero, Teresa; Kushwaha, Manish; Jaramillo, Alfonso

    2016-02-27

    In order to explore the possibility of adding new functions to preexisting genes, we considered a framework of riboregulation. We created a new riboregulator consisting of the reverse complement of a known riboregulator. Using computational design, we engineered a cis-repressing 5' untranslated region that can be activated by this new riboregulator. As a result, both RNAs can orthogonally trans-activate translation of their cognate, independent targets. The two riboregulators can also repress each other by antisense interaction, although not symmetrically. Our work highlights that antisense small RNAs can work as regulatory agents beyond the antisense paradigm and that, hence, they could be interfaced with other circuits used in synthetic biology.

  20. Bioinformatic analyses of sense and antisense expression from terminal inverted repeat transposons in Drosophila somatic cells.

    PubMed

    Harrington, Andrew W; Steiniger, Mindy

    2016-01-02

    Understanding regulation of transposon movement in somatic cells is important as mobile elements can cause detrimental genomic rearrangements. Generally, transposons move via one of 2 mechanisms; retrotransposons utilize an RNA intermediate, therefore copying themselves and amplifying throughout the genome, while terminal inverted repeat transposons (TIR Tns) excise DNA sequences from the genome and integrate into a new location. Our recently published work indicates that retrotransposons in Drosophila tissue culture cells are actively transcribed in the antisense direction. Our data support a model in which convergent transcription of retrotransposons from intra element transcription start sites results in complementary RNAs that hybridize to form substrates for Dicer-2, the endogenous small interfering (esi)RNA generating enzyme. Here, we extend our previous analysis to TIR Tns. In contrast to retrotransposons, our data show that antisense TIR Tn RNAs result from transcription of intronic TIR Tns oriented antisense to their host genes. Also, disproportionately less esiRNAs are generated from TIR transcripts than from retrotransposons and transcription of very few individual TIR Tns could be confirmed. Collectively, these data support a model in which TIR Tns are regulated at the level of Transposase production while retrotransposons are regulated with esiRNA post-transcriptional mechanisms in Drosophila somatic cells.

  1. The abundance of sterile transcripts in Giardia lamblia

    PubMed Central

    Elmendorf, Heidi G.; Singer, Steven M.; Nash, Theodore E.

    2001-01-01

    The protozoan parasite Giardia lamblia synthesizes a diverse and surprisingly abundant array of sterile transcripts unable to code for proteins. Random sampling of cDNAs from two evolutionarily divergent Giardia strains indicates that ∼20% of cDNAs in the libraries represent polyadenylated sterile transcripts. RNase protection analysis and northern blot hybridization of three sterile transcript loci demonstrated that both the sterile transcript and a complementary mRNA were made in each case, further categorizing these sterile transcripts as antisense transcripts. Investigation of the genomic loci for these same three sterile antisense transcripts showed typical transcription units for the sense transcripts, but still failed to reveal a usable open reading frame for the sterile antisense transcripts. 5′-RACE mapped the transcription start site for one of the sterile antisense transcripts to an AT-rich region, as is typical for Giardia. It is unclear whether these sterile transcripts represent errors in transcription or whether they have regulatory functions within the cell, although preliminary investigations failed to reveal evidence for a role in developmental gene regulation. In either case, the presence of such a large pool of sterile antisense transcripts is dramatic evidence of the unusual molecular machinery of the early diverging protist G.lamblia. PMID:11713317

  2. The abundance of sterile transcripts in Giardia lamblia.

    PubMed

    Elmendorf, H G; Singer, S M; Nash, T E

    2001-11-15

    The protozoan parasite Giardia lamblia synthesizes a diverse and surprisingly abundant array of sterile transcripts unable to code for proteins. Random sampling of cDNAs from two evolutionarily divergent Giardia strains indicates that approximately 20% of cDNAs in the libraries represent polyadenylated sterile transcripts. RNase protection analysis and northern blot hybridization of three sterile transcript loci demonstrated that both the sterile transcript and a complementary mRNA were made in each case, further categorizing these sterile transcripts as antisense transcripts. Investigation of the genomic loci for these same three sterile antisense transcripts showed typical transcription units for the sense transcripts, but still failed to reveal a usable open reading frame for the sterile antisense transcripts. 5'-RACE mapped the transcription start site for one of the sterile antisense transcripts to an AT-rich region, as is typical for GIARDIA: It is unclear whether these sterile transcripts represent errors in transcription or whether they have regulatory functions within the cell, although preliminary investigations failed to reveal evidence for a role in developmental gene regulation. In either case, the presence of such a large pool of sterile antisense transcripts is dramatic evidence of the unusual molecular machinery of the early diverging protist G.lamblia.

  3. Characterization of Antisense Transformed Plants Deficient in the Tobacco Anionic Peroxidase.

    PubMed Central

    Lagrimini, L. M.; Gingas, V.; Finger, F.; Rothstein, S.; Liu, TTY.

    1997-01-01

    On the basis of the biological compounds that they metabolize, plant peroxidases have long been implicated in plant growth, cell wall biogenesis, lignification, and host defenses. Transgenic tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L.) plants that underexpress anionic peroxidase were generated using antisense RNA. The antisense RNA was found to be specific for the anionic isoenzyme and highly effective, reducing endogenous transcript levels and total peroxidase activity by as much as 1600-fold. Antisense-transformed plants appeared normal at initial observation; however, growth studies showed that plants with reduced peroxidase activity grow taller and flower sooner than control plants. In contrast, previously transformed plants overproducing anionic peroxidase were shorter and flowered later than controls. Axillary buds were more developed in antisense-transformed plants and less developed in plants overproducing this enzyme. It was found that the lignin content in leaf, stem, and root was unchanged in antisense-transformed plants, which does not support a role for anionic peroxidase in the lignification of secondary xylem vessels. However, studies of wounded tissue show some reduction in wound-induced deposition of lignin-like polymers. The data support a possible role for tobacco anionic peroxidase in host defenses but not without a reduction in growth potential. PMID:12223765

  4. The conditional inhibition of gene expression in cultured Drosophila cells by antisense RNA.

    PubMed Central

    Bunch, T A; Goldstein, L S

    1989-01-01

    Genes producing antisense RNA are becoming important tools for the selective inhibition of gene expression. Experiments in different biological systems, targeting different mRNAs have yielded diverse results with respect to the success of the technique and its mechanism of action. We have examined the potential of three antisense genes, whose transcription is driven by a Drosophila metallothionein promoter, to inhibit the expression of alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) or a microtubule associated protein (205K MAP) in cultured Drosophila cells. Expression of ADH was significantly reduced upon induction of the anti-ADH genes. The ADH mRNA does not appear to be destabilized by the presence of antisense RNA but rather exists at similar levels in hybrid form. Hybrids are detected with both spliced and unspliced ADH RNA. In contrast to these results, antisense genes producing antisense RNA in great excess to 205K MAP mRNA, which is itself far less abundant than the ADH mRNA, failed to show any inhibition of 205K MAP expression. Images PMID:2481266

  5. Antisense technologies targeting fatty acid synthetic enzymes.

    PubMed

    Lin, Jinshun; Liu, Feng; Jiang, Yuyang

    2012-05-01

    Fatty acid synthesis is a coordinated process involving multiple enzymes. Overexpression of some of these enzymes plays important roles in tumor growth and development. Therefore, these enzymes are attractive targets for cancer therapies. Antisense agents provide highly specific inhibition of the expression of target genes and thus have served as powerful tools for gene functional studies and potential therapeutic agents for cancers. This article reviews different types of antisense agents and their applications in the modulation of fatty acid synthesis. Patents of antisense agents targeting fatty acid synthetic enzymes are introduced. In addition, miR-122 has been shown to regulate the expression of fatty acid synthetic enzymes, and thus antisense agent patents that inhibit miR-122 expression are also discussed.

  6. The role of antisense long noncoding RNA in small RNA-triggered gene activation

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xizhe; Li, Haitang; Rossi, John J.

    2014-01-01

    Long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) are known to regulate neighboring protein-coding genes by directing chromatin remodeling complexes, imprinting, and X-chromosome inactivation. In this study, we explore the function of lncRNAs in small RNA-triggered transcriptional gene activation (TGA), a process in which microRNAs (miRNAs) or small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) associated with Argonaute (Ago) proteins induce chromatin remodeling and gene activation at promoters with sequence complementarity. We designed a model system with different lncRNA and chromatin environments to elucidate the molecular mechanisms required for mammalian TGA. Using RNA-fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) and rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE)-PCR, we demonstrated that small RNA-triggered TGA occurs at sites where antisense lncRNAs are transcribed through the reporter gene and promoter. Small RNA-induced TGA coincided with the enrichment of Ago2 at the promoter region, but Ago2-mediated cleavage of antisense lncRNAs was not observed. Moreover, we examined the allele-specific effects of lncRNAs through a Cre-induced inversion of a poly(A) sequence that was designed to block the transcription of antisense lncRNAs through the reporter gene region in an inducible and reversible manner. Termination of nascent antisense lncRNAs abrogated gene activation triggered by small RNAs, and only allele-specific cis-acting antisense lncRNAs, but not trans-acting lncRNAs, were capable of rescuing TGA. Hence, this model revealed that antisense lncRNAs can mediate TGA in cis and not in trans, serving as a molecular scaffold for a small RNA–Ago2 complex and chromatin remodeling. PMID:25344398

  7. Asymmetric Bidirectional Transcription from the FSHD-Causing D4Z4 Array Modulates DUX4 Production

    PubMed Central

    Block, Gregory J.; Petek, Lisa M.; Narayanan, Divya; Amell, Amanda M.; Moore, James M.; Rabaia, Natalia A.; Tyler, Ashlee; van der Maarel, Silvere M.; Tawil, Rabi; Filippova, Galina N.; Miller, Daniel G.

    2012-01-01

    Facioscapulohumeral Disease (FSHD) is a dominantly inherited progressive myopathy associated with aberrant production of the transcription factor, Double Homeobox Protein 4 (DUX4). The expression of DUX4 depends on an open chromatin conformation of the D4Z4 macrosatellite array and a specific haplotype on chromosome 4. Even when these requirements are met, DUX4 transcripts and protein are only detectable in a subset of cells indicating that additional constraints govern DUX4 production. Since the direction of transcription, along with the production of non-coding antisense transcripts is an important regulatory feature of other macrosatellite repeats, we developed constructs that contain the non-coding region of a single D4Z4 unit flanked by genes that report transcriptional activity in the sense and antisense directions. We found that D4Z4 contains two promoters that initiate sense and antisense transcription within the array, and that antisense transcription predominates. Transcriptional start sites for the antisense transcripts, as well as D4Z4 regions that regulate the balance of sense and antisense transcripts were identified. We show that the choice of transcriptional direction is reversible but not mutually exclusive, since sense and antisense reporter activity was often present in the same cell and simultaneously upregulated during myotube formation. Similarly, levels of endogenous sense and antisense D4Z4 transcripts were upregulated in FSHD myotubes. These studies offer insight into the autonomous distribution of muscle weakness that is characteristic of FSHD. PMID:22536400

  8. Antisense-RNA mediated control of plasmid replication - pIP501 revisited.

    PubMed

    Brantl, Sabine

    2015-03-01

    Over the past decade, a wealth of small noncoding RNAs (sRNAs) have been discovered in the genomes of almost all bacterial species, where they constitute the most abundant class of posttranscriptional regulators. These sRNAs are key-players in prokaryotic metabolism, stress response and virulence. However, the first bona-fide antisense RNAs had been found already in 1981 in plasmids, where they regulate replication or maintenance. Antisense RNAs involved in plasmid replication control - meanwhile investigated in depth for almost 35 years - employ a variety of mechanisms of action: They regulate primer maturation, inhibit translation of essential replication initiator proteins (Rep proteins) as well as leader peptides or the formation of activator pseudoknots required for efficient rep translation. Alternatively they attenuate transcription or translation of rep mRNAs. Some antisense RNAs collaborate with transcriptional repressors to ensure proper copy-number control. Here, I summarize our knowledge on replication control of the broad-host range plasmid pIP501 that was originally isolated from Streptococcus agalactiae. Plasmid pIP501 uses two copy number-control elements, RNAIII, a cis-encoded antisense RNA, and transcriptional repressor CopR. RNA III mediates transcription attenuation, a rather widespread concept that found its culmination in the recent discovery of riboswitches. A peculiarity of pIP501 is the unusual stability of RNA III, which requires a second function of CopR: CopR does not only repress transcription from the essential repR promoter, but also prevents convergent transcription between rep mRNA and RNAIII, thereby indirectly increasing the amount of RNAIII. The concerted action of these two control elements is necessary to prevent plasmid loss at dangerously low copy numbers.

  9. Antisense long noncoding RNAs regulate var gene activation in the malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum.

    PubMed

    Amit-Avraham, Inbar; Pozner, Guy; Eshar, Shiri; Fastman, Yair; Kolevzon, Netanel; Yavin, Eylon; Dzikowski, Ron

    2015-03-03

    The virulence of Plasmodium falciparum, the causative agent of the deadliest form of human malaria, is attributed to its ability to evade human immunity through antigenic variation. These parasites alternate between expression of variable antigens, encoded by members of a multicopy gene family named var. Immune evasion through antigenic variation depends on tight regulation of var gene expression, ensuring that only a single var gene is expressed at a time while the rest of the family is maintained transcriptionally silent. Understanding how a single gene is chosen for activation is critical for understanding mutually exclusive expression but remains a mystery. Here, we show that antisense long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) initiating from var introns are associated with the single active var gene at the time in the cell cycle when the single var upstream promoter is active. We demonstrate that these antisense transcripts are incorporated into chromatin, and that expression of these antisense lncRNAs in trans triggers activation of a silent var gene in a sequence- and dose-dependent manner. On the other hand, interference with these lncRNAs using complement peptide nucleic acid molecules down-regulated the active var gene, erased the epigenetic memory, and induced expression switching. Altogether, our data provide evidence that these antisense lncRNAs play a key role in regulating var gene activation and mutually exclusive expression.

  10. No association of single nucleotide polymorphisms within H19 and HOX transcript antisense RNA (HOTAIR) with genetic susceptibility to systemic lupus erythematosus, rheumatoid arthritis, and primary Sjögren's syndrome in a Chinese Han population.

    PubMed

    Huang, An-Fang; Su, Lin-Chong; Jia, Hong; Liu, Yi; Xu, Wang-Dong

    2017-09-15

    The H19 (rs2839698, rs3741219) and HOTAIR (rs920778) polymorphisms were related to many kinds of cancers. However, these polymorphisms have been scarcely explored in different autoimmune diseases. Here, we aimed to examine the association of the polymorphisms with susceptibility to or protection against systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), rheumatoid arthritis (RA), and primary Sjögren's syndrome (pSS) among Chinese Han patients. We conducted a case-control study including 800 patients (300 with SLE, 350 with RA, and 150 with pSS) and 350 healthy control individuals. The polymorphisms were specified from genomic DNA using TaqMan genotyping assay on a 7300 real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction system. H19 rs2839698 was not associated with SLE susceptibility and was not associated with RA and pSS, respectively (P > 0.05). Similarly, we did not find significant differences of allele or genotype frequencies between SLE, RA, and pSS patients and healthy controls for H19 gene rs3741219 polymorphism (P > 0.05). In addition, no significant evidence was detected for the relationship of HOTAIR rs920778 polymorphism with risk of these diseases. Our results suggested that H19 rs2839698, rs3741219, and HOTAIR rs920778 polymorphisms may not be involved in the genetic background of SLE, RA, and pSS in Chinese.

  11. Transcriptome analysis of antigenic variation in Plasmodium falciparum - var silencing is not dependent on antisense RNA

    PubMed Central

    Ralph, Stuart A; Bischoff, Emmanuel; Mattei, Denise; Sismeiro, Odile; Dillies, Marie-Agnès; Guigon, Ghislaine; Coppee, Jean-Yves; David, Peter H; Scherf, Artur

    2005-01-01

    Background Plasmodium falciparum, the causative agent of the most severe form of malaria, undergoes antigenic variation through successive presentation of a family of antigens on the surface of parasitized erythrocytes. These antigens, known as Plasmodium falciparum erythrocyte membrane protein 1 (PfEMP1) proteins, are subject to a mutually exclusive expression system, and are encoded by the multigene var family. The mechanism whereby inactive var genes are silenced is poorly understood. To investigate transcriptional features of this mechanism, we conducted a microarray analysis of parasites that were selected to express different var genes by adhesion to chondroitin sulfate A (CSA) or CD36. Results In addition to oligonucleotides for all predicted protein-coding genes, oligonucleotide probes specific to each known var gene of the FCR3 background were designed and added to the microarray, as well as tiled sense and antisense probes for a subset of var genes. In parasites selected for adhesion to CSA, one full-length var gene (var2csa) was strongly upregulated, as were sense RNA molecules emanating from the 3' end of a limited subset of other var genes. No global relationship between sense and antisense production of var genes was observed, but notably, some var genes had coincident high levels of both antisense and sense transcript. Conclusion Mutually exclusive expression of PfEMP1 proteins results from transcriptional silencing of non-expressed var genes. The distribution of steady-state sense and antisense RNA at var loci are not consistent with a silencing mechanism based on antisense silencing of inactive var genes. Silencing of var loci is also associated with altered regulation of genes distal to var loci. PMID:16277748

  12. Intracellular distribution of microinjected antisense oligonucleotides.

    PubMed

    Leonetti, J P; Mechti, N; Degols, G; Gagnor, C; Lebleu, B

    1991-04-01

    Antisense oligomers constitute an attractive class of specific tools for genetic analysis and for potential therapeutic applications. Targets with different cellular locations have been described, such as mRNA translation initiation sites, pre-mRNA splicing sites, or the genes themselves. However the mechanism(s) of action and the intracellular distribution of antisense oligomers remain poorly understood. Antisense oligomers conjugated with various fluorochromes or with BrdUrd were microinjected into the cytoplasm of somatic cells, and their cellular distribution was monitored by fluorescence microscopy in fixed and nonfixed cells. A fast translocation in the nuclei and a concentration on nuclear structures were observed whatever probe was used. Nuclear transport occurs by diffusion since it is not affected by depletion of the intracellular ATP pool, temperature, or excess unlabeled oligomer. Accumulation of the oligomers in the nuclei essentially takes place on a set of proteins preferentially extracted between 0.2 M and 0.4 M NaCl as revealed by crosslinking of photosensitive oligomers. The relationship between nuclear location of antisense oligomers and their mechanism of action remains to be ascertained and could be of major interest in the design of more efficient antisense molecules.

  13. Intracellular distribution of microinjected antisense oligonucleotides.

    PubMed Central

    Leonetti, J P; Mechti, N; Degols, G; Gagnor, C; Lebleu, B

    1991-01-01

    Antisense oligomers constitute an attractive class of specific tools for genetic analysis and for potential therapeutic applications. Targets with different cellular locations have been described, such as mRNA translation initiation sites, pre-mRNA splicing sites, or the genes themselves. However the mechanism(s) of action and the intracellular distribution of antisense oligomers remain poorly understood. Antisense oligomers conjugated with various fluorochromes or with BrdUrd were microinjected into the cytoplasm of somatic cells, and their cellular distribution was monitored by fluorescence microscopy in fixed and nonfixed cells. A fast translocation in the nuclei and a concentration on nuclear structures were observed whatever probe was used. Nuclear transport occurs by diffusion since it is not affected by depletion of the intracellular ATP pool, temperature, or excess unlabeled oligomer. Accumulation of the oligomers in the nuclei essentially takes place on a set of proteins preferentially extracted between 0.2 M and 0.4 M NaCl as revealed by crosslinking of photosensitive oligomers. The relationship between nuclear location of antisense oligomers and their mechanism of action remains to be ascertained and could be of major interest in the design of more efficient antisense molecules. Images PMID:1849273

  14. Antisense therapeutics in oncology: current status

    PubMed Central

    Farooqi, Ammad Ahmad; Rehman, Zia ur; Muntane, Jordi

    2014-01-01

    There is increasing progress in translational oncology and tremendous breakthroughs have been made as evidenced by preclinical and clinical trials. Data obtained from high-throughput technologies are deepening our understanding about the molecular and gene network in cancer cells and rapidly emerging in vitro and in vivo evidence is highlighting the role of antisense agents as specific inhibitors of the expression of target genes, thus modulating the response of cancer cells to different therapeutic strategies. Much information is continuously being added into various facets of molecular oncology and it is now understood that overexpression of antiapoptotic proteins, oncogenes, oncogenic microRNAs (miRNA), and fusion proteins make cancer cells difficult to target. Delivery of antisense oligonucleotides has remained a challenge and technological developments have helped in overcoming hurdles by improving the ability to penetrate cells, effective and targeted binding to gene sequences, and downregulation of target gene function. Different delivery systems, including stable nucleic acid lipid particles, have shown potential in enhancing the delivery of cargo to the target site. In this review, we attempt to summarize the current progress in the development of antisense therapeutics and their potential in medical research. We partition this multicomponent review into introductory aspects about recent breakthroughs in antisense therapeutics. We also discuss how antisense therapeutics have shown potential in resensitizing resistant cancer cells to apoptosis by targeted inhibition of antiapoptotic proteins, oncogenic miRNAs, and BCR-ABL. PMID:25395862

  15. Naturally occurring antisense RNA of histone H2a in mouse cultured cell lines

    PubMed Central

    Nishida, Hiromi; Tomaru, Yasuhiro; Oho, Yuko; Hayashizaki, Yoshihide

    2005-01-01

    Background An antisense transcript of histone H2a that has no significant protein-coding region has been cloned from a mouse full-length cDNA library. In the present study, we evaluated this transcript by using RT-PCR and compared the expression patterns of the sense and antisense transcripts by using quantitative RT-PCR (qRT-PCR). Results This antisense RNA was expressed in three mouse cell lines. We call it ASH2a. ASH2a includes not only the complementary sequence of the transcript of Hist2h2aa2 (a replication-dependent histone H2a gene), but also that of the promoter of Hist2h2aa2. The upstream genomic sequence of the transcription start site of the ASH2a-coding gene (ASH2a) lacks both CCAAT and TATA boxes. This absence suggests that the regulation of ASH2a is different from that of the replication-dependent histone H2a genes. Findings from qRT-PCR indicated that the expression pattern of ASH2a was different from that of Hist2h2aa2. Expression of Hist2h2aa2 peaked at 2 to 4 h during S-phase, but that of ASH2a peaked at 1 h. Conclusion We showed the existence of ASH2a, a histone H2a antisense RNA, in mouse cultured cells. The expression pattern of ASH2a is different from that of the sense RNA. PMID:15892893

  16. Novel Stress-Inducible Antisense RNAs of Protein-Coding Loci Are Synthesized by RNA-Dependent RNA Polymerase.

    PubMed

    Matsui, Akihiro; Iida, Kei; Tanaka, Maho; Yamaguchi, Katsushi; Mizuhashi, Kayoko; Kim, Jong-Myong; Takahashi, Satoshi; Kobayashi, Norio; Shigenobu, Shuji; Shinozaki, Kazuo; Seki, Motoaki

    2017-09-01

    Our previous study identified approximately 6,000 abiotic stress-responsive noncoding transcripts existing on the antisense strand of protein-coding genes and implied that a type of antisense RNA was synthesized from a sense RNA template by RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RDR). Expression analyses revealed that the expression of novel abiotic stress-induced antisense RNA on 1,136 gene loci was reduced in the rdr1/2/6 mutants. RNase protection indicated that the RD29A antisense RNA and other RDR1/2/6-dependent antisense RNAs are involved in the formation of dsRNA. The accumulation of stress-inducible antisense RNA was decreased and increased in dcp5 and xrn4, respectively, but not changed in dcl2/3/4, nrpd1a and nrpd1b RNA-seq analyses revealed that the majority of the RDR1/2/6-dependent antisense RNA loci did not overlap with RDR1/2/6-dependent 20-30 nt RNA loci. Additionally, rdr1/2/6 mutants decreased the degradation rate of the sense RNA and exhibited arrested root growth during the recovery stage following a drought stress, whereas dcl2/3/4 mutants did not. Collectively, these results indicate that RDRs have stress-inducible antisense RNA synthesis activity and a novel biological function that is different from the known endogenous small RNA pathways from protein-coding genes. These data reveal a novel mechanism of RNA regulation during abiotic stress response that involves complex RNA degradation pathways. © 2017 American Society of Plant Biologists. All Rights Reserved.

  17. Sense-antisense pairs in mammals: functional and evolutionary considerations.

    PubMed

    Galante, Pedro A F; Vidal, Daniel O; de Souza, Jorge E; Camargo, Anamaria A; de Souza, Sandro J

    2007-01-01

    A significant number of genes in mammalian genomes are being found to have natural antisense transcripts (NATs). These sense-antisense (S-AS) pairs are believed to be involved in several cellular phenomena. Here, we generated a catalog of S-AS pairs occurring in the human and mouse genomes by analyzing different sources of expressed sequences available in the public domain plus 122 massively parallel signature sequencing (MPSS) libraries from a variety of human and mouse tissues. Using this dataset of almost 20,000 S-AS pairs in both genomes we investigated, in a computational and experimental way, several putative roles that have been assigned to NATs, including gene expression regulation. Furthermore, these global analyses allowed us to better dissect and propose new roles for NATs. Surprisingly, we found that a significant fraction of NATs are artifacts produced by genomic priming during cDNA library construction. We propose an evolutionary and functional model in which alternative polyadenylation and retroposition account for the origin of a significant number of functional S-AS pairs in mammalian genomes.

  18. Loop structures in the 5' untranslated region and antisense RNA mediate pilE gene expression in Neisseria gonorrhoeae.

    PubMed

    Masters, Thao L; Wachter, Jenny; Hill, Stuart A

    2016-11-01

    Regulation of the Neisseria gonorrhoeae pilE gene is ill-defined. In this study, post-transcriptional effects on expression were assessed. In silico analysis predicts the formation of three putative stable stem-loop structures with favourable free energies within the 5' untranslated region of the pilE message. Using quantitative reverse transcriptase PCR analyses, we show that each loop structure forms, with introduced destabilizing stem-loop mutations diminishing loop stability. Utilizing a series of pilE translational fusions, deletion of either loop 1 or loop 2 caused a significant reduction of pilE mRNA resulting in reduced expression of the reporter gene. Consequently, the formation of the loops apparently protects the pilE transcript from degradation. Putative loop 3 contains the pilE ribosomal binding site. Consequently, its formation may influence translation. Analysis of a small RNA transcriptome revealed an antisense RNA being produced upstream of the pilE promoter that is predicted to hybridize across the 5' untranslated region loops. Insertional mutants were created where the antisense RNA is not transcribed. In these mutants, pilE transcript levels are greatly diminished, with any residual message apparently not being translated. Complementation of these insertion mutants in trans with the antisense RNA gene facilitates pilE translation yielding a pilus + phenotype. Overall, this study demonstrates a complex relationship between loop-dependent transcript protection and antisense RNA in modulating pilE expression levels.

  19. Analysis of Antisense Expression by Whole Genome Tiling Microarrays and siRNAs Suggests Mis-Annotation of Arabidopsis Orphan Protein-Coding Genes

    PubMed Central

    Richardson, Casey R.; Luo, Qing-Jun; Gontcharova, Viktoria; Jiang, Ying-Wen; Samanta, Manoj; Youn, Eunseog; Rock, Christopher D.

    2010-01-01

    Background MicroRNAs (miRNAs) and trans-acting small-interfering RNAs (tasi-RNAs) are small (20–22 nt long) RNAs (smRNAs) generated from hairpin secondary structures or antisense transcripts, respectively, that regulate gene expression by Watson-Crick pairing to a target mRNA and altering expression by mechanisms related to RNA interference. The high sequence homology of plant miRNAs to their targets has been the mainstay of miRNA prediction algorithms, which are limited in their predictive power for other kingdoms because miRNA complementarity is less conserved yet transitive processes (production of antisense smRNAs) are active in eukaryotes. We hypothesize that antisense transcription and associated smRNAs are biomarkers which can be computationally modeled for gene discovery. Principal Findings We explored rice (Oryza sativa) sense and antisense gene expression in publicly available whole genome tiling array transcriptome data and sequenced smRNA libraries (as well as C. elegans) and found evidence of transitivity of MIRNA genes similar to that found in Arabidopsis. Statistical analysis of antisense transcript abundances, presence of antisense ESTs, and association with smRNAs suggests several hundred Arabidopsis ‘orphan’ hypothetical genes are non-coding RNAs. Consistent with this hypothesis, we found novel Arabidopsis homologues of some MIRNA genes on the antisense strand of previously annotated protein-coding genes. A Support Vector Machine (SVM) was applied using thermodynamic energy of binding plus novel expression features of sense/antisense transcription topology and siRNA abundances to build a prediction model of miRNA targets. The SVM when trained on targets could predict the “ancient” (deeply conserved) class of validated Arabidopsis MIRNA genes with an accuracy of 84%, and 76% for “new” rapidly-evolving MIRNA genes. Conclusions Antisense and smRNA expression features and computational methods may identify novel MIRNA genes and other non

  20. Efficient hammerhead ribozyme and antisense RNA targeting in a slow ribosome Escherichia coli mutant.

    PubMed

    Chen, H; Ferbeyre, G; Cedergren, R

    1997-05-01

    We have evaluated inhibition of the plasmid-born chloramphenicol acetyl transferase gene (CAT) by the hammerhead ribozyme and antisense RNA in Escherichia coli where the translation and transcription rates have been modified. Whereas neither antisense nor the hammerhead had an inhibitory effect on CAT activity in wild-type E. coli, both reduced the level of the messenger RNA and the activity of the CAT gene by almost 60% in a slow ribosome mutant. Streptomycin, which increases the speed of translation in this mutant strain, restored full CAT activity. The level of CAT activity expressed from a T7 RNA polymerase promoter was not affected by the presence of either antisense RNA or the hammerhead ribozyme. When the target gene was expressed from a chromosomal locus in wild-type E. coli, both antisense RNA and the hammerhead ribozyme showed some inhibitory activity, but the level of inhibition was significantly increased in the slow ribosome strain. This bacterial system offers a unique entry to the study of cellular factors which mediate the activity of ribozymes in vivo.

  1. Antisense RNA suppression of peroxidase gene expression

    SciTech Connect

    Lagrimini, L.M.; Bradford, S.; De Leon, F.D. )

    1989-04-01

    The 5{prime} half the anionic peroxidase cDNA of tobacco was inserted into a CaMV 35S promoter/terminator expression cassette in the antisense configuration. This was inserted into the Agrobacterium-mediated plant transformation vector pCIBIO which includes kanamycin selection, transformed into two species of tobacco (N. tabacum and M. sylvestris), and plants were subsequently regenerated on kanamycin. Transgenic plants were analyzed for peroxidase expression and found to have 3-5 fold lower levels of peroxidase than wild-type plants. Isoelectric focusing demonstrated that the antisense RNA only suppressed the anionic peroxidase. Wound-induced peroxidase expression was found not to be affected by the antisense RNA. Northern blots show a greater than 5 fold suppression of anionic peroxidase mRNA in leaf tissue, and the antisense RNA was expressed at a level 2 fold over the endogenous mRNA. Plants were self-pollinated and F1 plants showed normal segregation. N. sylvestris transgenic plants with the lowest level of peroxidase are epinastic, and preliminary results indicate elevated auxin levels. Excised pith tissue from both species of transgenic plants rapidly collapse when exposed to air, while pith tissue from wild-type plants showed little change when exposed to air. Further characterization of these phenotypes is currently being made.

  2. Antisense oligodeoxynucleotide inhibition as a potent diagnostic tool for gene function in plant biology

    SciTech Connect

    Jansson, Christer; Sun, Chuanxin; Ghebramedhin, Haile; Hoglund, Anna-Stina; Jansson, Christer

    2008-01-15

    Antisense oligodeoxynucleotide (ODN) inhibition emerges as an effective means for probing gene function in plant cells. Employing this method we have established the importance of the SUSIBA2 transcription factor for regulation of starch synthesis in barley endosperm, and arrived at a model for the role of the SUSIBAs in sugar signaling and source-sink commutation during cereal endosperm development. In this addendum we provide additional data demonstrating the suitability of the antisense ODN technology in studies on starch branching enzyme activities in barley leaves. We also comment on the mechanism for ODN uptake in plant cells. Antisense ODNs are short (12-25 nt-long) stretches of single-stranded ODNs that hybridize to the cognate mRNA in a sequence-specific manner, thereby inhibiting gene expression. They are naturally occurring in both prokaryotes and eukaryotes where they partake in gene regulation and defense against viral infection. The mechanisms for antisense ODN inhibition are not fully understood but it is generally considered that the ODN either sterically interferes with translation or promotes transcript degradation by RNase H activation. The earliest indication of the usefulness of antisense ODN technology for the purposes of molecular biology and medical therapy was the demonstration in 1978 that synthetic ODNs complementary to Raos sarcoma virus could inhibit virus replication in tissue cultures of chick embryo fibroblasts. Since then the antisense ODN technology has been widely used in animal sciences and as an important emerging therapeutic approach in clinical medicine. However, antisense ODN inhibition has been an under-exploited strategy for plant tissues, although the prospects for plant cells in suspension cultures to take up single-stranded ODNs was reported over a decade ago. In 2001, two reports from Malho and coworker demonstrated the use of cationic-complexed antisense ODNs to suppress expression of genes encoding pollen

  3. α-fur, an antisense RNA gene to fur in the extreme acidophile Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans.

    PubMed

    Lefimil, C; Jedlicki, E; Holmes, D S

    2014-03-01

    A large non-coding RNA, termed α-Fur, of ~1000 nt has been detected in the extreme acidophile Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans encoded on the antisense strand to the iron-responsive master regulator fur (ferric uptake regulator) gene. A promoter for α-fur was predicted bioinformatically and validated using gene fusion experiments. The promoter is situated within the coding region and in the same sense as proB, potentially encoding a glutamate 5-kinase. The 3' termination site of the α-fur transcript was determined by 3' rapid amplification of cDNA ends to lie 7 nt downstream of the start of transcription of fur. Thus, α-fur is antisense to the complete coding region of fur, including its predicted ribosome-binding site. The genetic context of α-fur is conserved in several members of the genus Acidithiobacillus but not in all acidophiles, indicating that it is monophyletic but not niche specific. It is hypothesized that α-Fur regulates the cellular level of Fur. This is the fourth example of an antisense RNA to fur, although it is the first in an extreme acidophile, and underscores the growing importance of cis-encoded non-coding RNAs as potential regulators involved in the microbial iron-responsive stimulon.

  4. Antisense oligonucleotide therapy for the treatment of C9ORF72 ALS/FTD diseases.

    PubMed

    Riboldi, Giulietta; Zanetta, Chiara; Ranieri, Michela; Nizzardo, Monica; Simone, Chiara; Magri, Francesca; Bresolin, Nereo; Comi, Giacomo P; Corti, Stefania

    2014-12-01

    Motor neuron disorders, and particularly amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), are fatal diseases that are due to the loss of motor neurons in the brain and spinal cord, with progressive paralysis and premature death. It has been recently shown that the most frequent genetic cause of ALS, frontotemporal dementia (FTD), and other neurological diseases is the expansion of a hexanucleotide repeat (GGGGCC) in the non-coding region of the C9ORF72 gene. The pathogenic mechanisms that produce cell death in the presence of this expansion are still unclear. One of the most likely hypotheses seems to be the gain-of-function that is achieved through the production of toxic RNA (able to sequester RNA-binding protein) and/or toxic proteins. In recent works, different authors have reported that antisense oligonucleotides complementary to the C9ORF72 RNA transcript sequence were able to significantly reduce RNA foci generated by the expanded RNA, in affected cells. Here, we summarize the recent findings that support the idea that the buildup of "toxic" RNA containing the GGGGCC repeat contributes to the death of motor neurons in ALS and also suggest that the use of antisense oligonucleotides targeting this transcript is a promising strategy for treating ALS/frontotemporal lobe dementia (FTLD) patients with the C9ORF72 repeat expansion. These data are particularly important, given the state of the art antisense technology, and they allow researchers to believe that a clinical application of these discoveries will be possible soon.

  5. Pervasive transcription: detecting functional RNAs in bacteria.

    PubMed

    Lybecker, Meghan; Bilusic, Ivana; Raghavan, Rahul

    2014-01-01

    Pervasive, or genome-wide, transcription has been reported in all domains of life. In bacteria, most pervasive transcription occurs antisense to protein-coding transcripts, although recently a new class of pervasive RNAs was identified that originates from within annotated genes. Initially considered to be non-functional transcriptional noise, pervasive transcription is increasingly being recognized as important in regulating gene expression. The function of pervasive transcription is an extensively debated question in the field of transcriptomics and regulatory RNA biology. Here, we highlight the most recent contributions addressing the purpose of pervasive transcription in bacteria and discuss their implications.

  6. Antisense oligonucleotide-based therapy in human erythropoietic protoporphyria.

    PubMed

    Oustric, Vincent; Manceau, Hana; Ducamp, Sarah; Soaid, Rima; Karim, Zoubida; Schmitt, Caroline; Mirmiran, Arienne; Peoc'h, Katell; Grandchamp, Bernard; Beaumont, Carole; Lyoumi, Said; Moreau-Gaudry, François; Guyonnet-Dupérat, Véronique; de Verneuil, Hubert; Marie, Joëlle; Puy, Herve; Deybach, Jean-Charles; Gouya, Laurent

    2014-04-03

    In 90% of people with erythropoietic protoporphyria (EPP), the disease results from the inheritance of a common hypomorphic FECH allele, encoding ferrochelatase, in trans to a private deleterious FECH mutation. The activity of the resulting FECH enzyme falls below the critical threshold of 35%, leading to the accumulation of free protoporphyrin IX (PPIX) in bone marrow erythroblasts and in red cells. The mechanism of low expression involves a biallelic polymorphism (c.315-48T>C) localized in intron 3. The 315-48C allele increases usage of the 3' cryptic splice site between exons 3 and 4, resulting in the transcription of an unstable mRNA with a premature stop codon, reducing the abundance of wild-type FECH mRNA, and finally reducing FECH activity. Through a candidate-sequence approach and an antisense-oligonucleotide-tiling method, we identified a sequence that, when targeted by an antisense oligonucleotide (ASO-V1), prevented usage of the cryptic splice site. In lymphoblastoid cell lines derived from symptomatic EPP subjects, transfection of ASO-V1 reduced the usage of the cryptic splice site and efficiently redirected the splicing of intron 3 toward the physiological acceptor site, thereby increasing the amount of functional FECH mRNA. Moreover, the administration of ASO-V1 into developing human erythroblasts from an overtly EPP subject markedly increased the production of WT FECH mRNA and reduced the accumulation of PPIX to a level similar to that measured in asymptomatic EPP subjects. Thus, EPP is a paradigmatic Mendelian disease in which the in vivo correction of a common single splicing defect would improve the condition of most affected individuals.

  7. Antisense Oligonucleotide-Based Therapy in Human Erythropoietic Protoporphyria

    PubMed Central

    Oustric, Vincent; Manceau, Hana; Ducamp, Sarah; Soaid, Rima; Karim, Zoubida; Schmitt, Caroline; Mirmiran, Arienne; Peoc’h, Katell; Grandchamp, Bernard; Beaumont, Carole; Lyoumi, Said; Moreau-Gaudry, François; Guyonnet-Dupérat, Véronique; de Verneuil, Hubert; Marie, Joëlle; Puy, Herve; Deybach, Jean-Charles; Gouya, Laurent

    2014-01-01

    In 90% of people with erythropoietic protoporphyria (EPP), the disease results from the inheritance of a common hypomorphic FECH allele, encoding ferrochelatase, in trans to a private deleterious FECH mutation. The activity of the resulting FECH enzyme falls below the critical threshold of 35%, leading to the accumulation of free protoporphyrin IX (PPIX) in bone marrow erythroblasts and in red cells. The mechanism of low expression involves a biallelic polymorphism (c.315−48T>C) localized in intron 3. The 315−48C allele increases usage of the 3′ cryptic splice site between exons 3 and 4, resulting in the transcription of an unstable mRNA with a premature stop codon, reducing the abundance of wild-type FECH mRNA, and finally reducing FECH activity. Through a candidate-sequence approach and an antisense-oligonucleotide-tiling method, we identified a sequence that, when targeted by an antisense oligonucleotide (ASO-V1), prevented usage of the cryptic splice site. In lymphoblastoid cell lines derived from symptomatic EPP subjects, transfection of ASO-V1 reduced the usage of the cryptic splice site and efficiently redirected the splicing of intron 3 toward the physiological acceptor site, thereby increasing the amount of functional FECH mRNA. Moreover, the administration of ASO-V1 into developing human erythroblasts from an overtly EPP subject markedly increased the production of WT FECH mRNA and reduced the accumulation of PPIX to a level similar to that measured in asymptomatic EPP subjects. Thus, EPP is a paradigmatic Mendelian disease in which the in vivo correction of a common single splicing defect would improve the condition of most affected individuals. PMID:24680888

  8. Friedreich's ataxia--a case of aberrant transcription termination?

    PubMed

    Butler, Jill Sergesketter; Napierala, Marek

    2015-01-01

    Reduced expression of the mitochondrial protein Frataxin (FXN) is the underlying cause of Friedreich's ataxia. We propose a model of premature termination of FXN transcription induced by pathogenic expanded GAA repeats that links R-loop structures, antisense transcription, and heterochromatin formation as a novel mechanism of transcriptional repression in Friedreich's ataxia.

  9. An Explosive Antisense RNA Strategy for Inhibition of a Lactococcal Bacteriophage†

    PubMed Central

    Walker, Shirley A.; Klaenhammer, Todd R.

    2000-01-01

    The coding regions of six putative open reading frames (ORFs) identified near the phage φ31 late promoter and the right cohesive end (cos) of lactococcal bacteriophage φ31 were used to develop antisense constructs to inhibit the proliferation of phage φ31. Two middle-expressed ORFs (ORF 1 and ORF 2) and four late-expressed ORFs (ORF 3 through ORF 6) were cloned individually between the strong Lactobacillus P6 promoter and the T7 terminator (TT7) to yield a series of antisense RNA transcripts. When expressed on a high-copy-number vector from a strong promoter, the constructs had no effect on the efficiency of plaquing (EOP) or the plaque size of phage φ31. To increase the ratio of antisense RNA to the targeted sense mRNA appearing during a phage infection, the antisense cassettes containing the late-expressed ORFs (ORF 3 through ORF 6) were subcloned to pTRK360, a low-copy-number vector containing the phage φ31 origin of replication, ori31. ori31 allows for explosive amplification of the low-copy-number vector upon phage infection, thereby increasing levels of antisense RNA transcripts later in the lytic cycle. In addition, the presence of ori31 also lowers the burst size of phage φ31 fourfold, resulting in fewer sense, target mRNAs being expressed from the phage genome. The combination of ori31 and P6::anti-ORF 4H::TT7 resulted in a threefold decrease in the EOP of phage φ31 (EOP = 0.11 ± 0.03 [mean ± standard deviation]) compared to the presence of ori31 alone (EOP = 0.36). One-step growth curves showed that expression of anti-ORF 4H RNA decreased the percentage of successful centers of infection (75 to 80% for ori31 compared to 35 to 45% for ori31 plus anti-ORF 4H), with no further reduction in burst size. Growth curves performed in the presence of varying levels of phage φ31 showed that ori31 plus anti-ORF 4H offered significant protection to Lactococcus lactis, even at multiplicities of infection of 0.01 and 0.1. These results illustrate a successful

  10. A good antisense molecule is hard to find.

    PubMed

    Branch, A D

    1998-02-01

    Antisense molecules and ribozymes capture the imagination with their promise of rational drug design and exquisite specificity. However, they are far more difficult to produce than was originally anticipated, and their ability to eliminate the function of a single gene has never been proven. Furthermore, a wide variety of unexpected non-antisense effects have come to light. Although some of these side effects will almost certainly have clinical value, they make it hard to produce drugs that act primarily through true antisense mechanisms and complicate the use of antisense compounds as research reagents. To minimize unwanted non-antisense effects, investigators are searching for antisense compounds and ribozymes whose target sites are particularly vulnerable to attack. This is a challenging quest.

  11. Optimal antisense target reducing INS intron 1 retention is adjacent to a parallel G quadruplex

    PubMed Central

    Kralovicova, Jana; Lages, Ana; Patel, Alpa; Dhir, Ashish; Buratti, Emanuele; Searle, Mark; Vorechovsky, Igor

    2014-01-01

    Splice-switching oligonucleotides (SSOs) have been widely used to inhibit exon usage but antisense strategies that promote removal of entire introns to increase splicing-mediated gene expression have not been developed. Here we show reduction of INS intron 1 retention by SSOs that bind transcripts derived from a human haplotype expressing low levels of proinsulin. This haplotype is tagged by a polypyrimidine tract variant rs689 that decreases the efficiency of intron 1 splicing and increases the relative abundance of mRNAs with extended 5' untranslated region (5' UTR), which curtails translation. Co-expression of haplotype-specific reporter constructs with SSOs bound to splicing regulatory motifs and decoy splice sites in primary transcripts revealed a motif that significantly reduced intron 1-containing mRNAs. Using an antisense microwalk at a single nucleotide resolution, the optimal target was mapped to a splicing silencer containing two pseudoacceptor sites sandwiched between predicted RNA guanine (G) quadruplex structures. Circular dichroism spectroscopy and nuclear magnetic resonance of synthetic G-rich oligoribonucleotide tracts derived from this region showed formation of a stable parallel 2-quartet G-quadruplex on the 3' side of the antisense retention target and an equilibrium between quadruplexes and stable hairpin-loop structures bound by optimal SSOs. This region interacts with heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoproteins F and H that may interfere with conformational transitions involving the antisense target. The SSO-assisted promotion of weak intron removal from the 5' UTR through competing noncanonical and canonical RNA structures may facilitate development of novel strategies to enhance gene expression. PMID:24944197

  12. Splice-switching antisense oligonucleotides as therapeutic drugs

    PubMed Central

    Havens, Mallory A.; Hastings, Michelle L.

    2016-01-01

    Splice-switching oligonucleotides (SSOs) are short, synthetic, antisense, modified nucleic acids that base-pair with a pre-mRNA and disrupt the normal splicing repertoire of the transcript by blocking the RNA–RNA base-pairing or protein–RNA binding interactions that occur between components of the splicing machinery and the pre-mRNA. Splicing of pre-mRNA is required for the proper expression of the vast majority of protein-coding genes, and thus, targeting the process offers a means to manipulate protein production from a gene. Splicing modulation is particularly valuable in cases of disease caused by mutations that lead to disruption of normal splicing or when interfering with the normal splicing process of a gene transcript may be therapeutic. SSOs offer an effective and specific way to target and alter splicing in a therapeutic manner. Here, we discuss the different approaches used to target and alter pre-mRNA splicing with SSOs. We detail the modifications to the nucleic acids that make them promising therapeutics and discuss the challenges to creating effective SSO drugs. We highlight the development of SSOs designed to treat Duchenne muscular dystrophy and spinal muscular atrophy, which are currently being tested in clinical trials. PMID:27288447

  13. Specific RNP capture with antisense LNA/DNA mixmers

    PubMed Central

    Rogell, Birgit; Fischer, Bernd; Rettel, Mandy; Krijgsveld, Jeroen; Castello, Alfredo; Hentze, Matthias W.

    2017-01-01

    RNA-binding proteins (RBPs) play essential roles in RNA biology, responding to cellular and environmental stimuli to regulate gene expression. Important advances have helped to determine the (near) complete repertoires of cellular RBPs. However, identification of RBPs associated with specific transcripts remains a challenge. Here, we describe “specific ribonucleoprotein (RNP) capture,” a versatile method for the determination of the proteins bound to specific transcripts in vitro and in cellular systems. Specific RNP capture uses UV irradiation to covalently stabilize protein–RNA interactions taking place at “zero distance.” Proteins bound to the target RNA are captured by hybridization with antisense locked nucleic acid (LNA)/DNA oligonucleotides covalently coupled to a magnetic resin. After stringent washing, interacting proteins are identified by quantitative mass spectrometry. Applied to in vitro extracts, specific RNP capture identifies the RBPs bound to a reporter mRNA containing the Sex-lethal (Sxl) binding motifs, revealing that the Sxl homolog sister of Sex lethal (Ssx) displays similar binding preferences. This method also revealed the repertoire of RBPs binding to 18S or 28S rRNAs in HeLa cells, including previously unknown rRNA-binding proteins. PMID:28476952

  14. Small regulatory RNAs in lambdoid bacteriophages and phage-derived plasmids: Not only antisense.

    PubMed

    Nejman-Faleńczyk, Bożena; Bloch, Sylwia; Licznerska, Katarzyna; Felczykowska, Agnieszka; Dydecka, Aleksandra; Węgrzyn, Alicja; Węgrzyn, Grzegorz

    2015-03-01

    Until recently, only two small regulatory RNAs encoded by lambdoid bacteriophages were known. These transcripts are derived from paQ and pO promoters. The former one is supposed to act as an antisense RNA for expression of the Q gene, encoding a transcription antitermination protein. The latter transcript, called oop RNA, was initially proposed to have a double role, in establishing expression of the cI gene and in providing a primer for DNA replication. Although the initially proposed mechanisms by which oop RNA could influence the choice between two alternative developmental pathways of the phage and the initiation of phage DNA replication were found not true, the pO promoter has been demonstrated to be important for both regulation of phage development and control of DNA replication. Namely, the pO-derived transcript is an antisense RNA for expression of the cII gene, and pO is a part of a dual promoter system responsible for regulation of initiation of DNA synthesis from the oriλ region. Very recent studies identified a battery of small RNAs encoded by lambdoid bacteriophages existing as prophages in chromosomes of enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli strains. Some of them have very interesting functions, like anti-small RNAs.

  15. Antisense Oligonucleotides Used to Target the DUX4 mRNA as Therapeutic Approaches in FaciosScapuloHumeral Muscular Dystrophy (FSHD).

    PubMed

    Ansseau, Eugénie; Vanderplanck, Céline; Wauters, Armelle; Harper, Scott Q; Coppée, Frédérique; Belayew, Alexandra

    2017-03-03

    FacioScapuloHumeral muscular Dystrophy (FSHD) is one of the most prevalent hereditary myopathies and is generally characterized by progressive muscle atrophy affecting the face, scapular fixators; upper arms and distal lower legs. The FSHD locus maps to a macrosatellite D4Z4 repeat array on chromosome 4q35. Each D4Z4 unit contains a DUX4 gene; the most distal of which is flanked by a polyadenylation site on FSHD-permissive alleles, which allows for production of stable DUX4 mRNAs. In addition, an open chromatin structure is required for DUX4 gene transcription. FSHD thus results from a gain of function of the toxic DUX4 protein that normally is only expressed in germ line and stem cells. Therapeutic strategies are emerging that aim to decrease DUX4 expression or toxicity in FSHD muscle cells. We review here the heterogeneity of DUX4 mRNAs observed in muscle and stem cells; and the use of antisense oligonucleotides (AOs) targeting the DUX4 mRNA to interfere either with transcript cleavage/polyadenylation or intron splicing. We show in primary cultures that DUX4-targeted AOs suppress the atrophic FSHD myotube phenotype; but do not improve the disorganized FSHD myotube phenotype which could be caused by DUX4c over-expression. Thus; DUX4c might constitute another therapeutic target in FSHD.

  16. Antisense Oligonucleotides Used to Target the DUX4 mRNA as Therapeutic Approaches in FaciosScapuloHumeral Muscular Dystrophy (FSHD)

    PubMed Central

    Ansseau, Eugénie; Vanderplanck, Céline; Wauters, Armelle; Harper, Scott Q.; Coppée, Frédérique; Belayew, Alexandra

    2017-01-01

    FacioScapuloHumeral muscular Dystrophy (FSHD) is one of the most prevalent hereditary myopathies and is generally characterized by progressive muscle atrophy affecting the face, scapular fixators; upper arms and distal lower legs. The FSHD locus maps to a macrosatellite D4Z4 repeat array on chromosome 4q35. Each D4Z4 unit contains a DUX4 gene; the most distal of which is flanked by a polyadenylation site on FSHD-permissive alleles, which allows for production of stable DUX4 mRNAs. In addition, an open chromatin structure is required for DUX4 gene transcription. FSHD thus results from a gain of function of the toxic DUX4 protein that normally is only expressed in germ line and stem cells. Therapeutic strategies are emerging that aim to decrease DUX4 expression or toxicity in FSHD muscle cells. We review here the heterogeneity of DUX4 mRNAs observed in muscle and stem cells; and the use of antisense oligonucleotides (AOs) targeting the DUX4 mRNA to interfere either with transcript cleavage/polyadenylation or intron splicing. We show in primary cultures that DUX4-targeted AOs suppress the atrophic FSHD myotube phenotype; but do not improve the disorganized FSHD myotube phenotype which could be caused by DUX4c over-expression. Thus; DUX4c might constitute another therapeutic target in FSHD. PMID:28273791

  17. Antisense delivery using protamine–oligonucleotide particles

    PubMed Central

    Junghans, Monika; Kreuter, Jörg; Zimmer, Andreas

    2000-01-01

    Protamine, a polycationic peptide (mol. wt 4000–4500), was evaluated as a potential penetration enhancer for phosphodiester antisense oligonucleotides (ODNs). Unique complexes in the form of nanoparticles were spontaneously formed, which we call ‘proticles’. The stability of the particles and the ODNs bound into the proticles was examined in foetal calf serum and cell culture medium. FITC-labelled ODNs bound to protamine showed an increased cellular uptake into human histiocytic lymphoma U 937 cells compared to free ODNs. Proticles significantly decreased cellular growth in a cell proliferation assay using ODNs against the c-myc proto-oncogene. PMID:10773093

  18. An internal antisense RNA regulates expression of the photosynthesis gene isiA.

    PubMed

    Dühring, Ulf; Axmann, Ilka M; Hess, Wolfgang R; Wilde, Annegret

    2006-05-02

    Small regulatory noncoding RNAs exist in both eukaryotic and prokaryotic organisms. Most of these RNA transcripts are trans-encoded RNAs with short and only partial antisense complementarity to their target RNAs, which regulate gene expression by modifying mRNA stability and translation. In contrast, reports on the function of cis-encoded, perfectly complementary antisense RNAs in eubacteria are rare. Cyanobacteria respond to iron deficiency by expressing IsiA (iron stress-induced protein A), which forms a giant ring structure around photosystem I. Here, we show that this process is controlled by IsrR (iron stress-repressed RNA), a cis-encoded antisense RNA transcribed from the isiA noncoding strand. Artificial overexpression of IsrR under iron stress causes a strongly diminished number of IsiA-photosystem I supercomplexes, whereas IsrR depletion results in premature expression of IsiA. The coupled degradation of IsrR/isiA mRNA duplexes appears to be a reversible switch that can respond to environmental changes. IsrR is the only RNA known so far to regulate a photosynthesis component.

  19. A noncoding RNA antisense to moesin at 5p14.1 in autism.

    PubMed

    Kerin, Tara; Ramanathan, Anita; Rivas, Kasey; Grepo, Nicole; Coetzee, Gerhard A; Campbell, Daniel B

    2012-04-04

    People with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) are characterized by deficits in social interaction, language, and behavioral flexibility. Rare mutations and copy number variations have been identified in individuals with ASD, but in most patients, the causal variants remain unknown. A genome-wide association study (GWAS), designed to identify genes and pathways that contribute to ASD, indicated a genome-wide significant association of ASD with the single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) rs4307059 (P = 10⁻¹⁰), which is located in a gene-poor region of chromosome 5p14.1. We describe here a 3.9-kb noncoding RNA that is transcribed from the region of the chromosome 5p14.1 ASD GWAS association SNP. The noncoding RNA was encoded by the opposite (antisense) strand of moesin pseudogene 1 (MSNP1), and we therefore designated it as MSNP1AS (moesin pseudogene 1, antisense). Chromosome 5p14.1 MSNP1AS was 94% identical and antisense to the X chromosome transcript of MSN, which encodes a protein (moesin) that regulates neuronal architecture. Individuals who carry the ASD-associated rs4307059 T allele showed increased expression of MSNP1AS. The MSNP1AS noncoding RNA bound to MSN, was highly overexpressed (12.7-fold) in postmortem cerebral cortex of individuals with ASD, and could regulate levels of moesin protein in human cell lines. These data reveal a biologically functional element that may contribute to ASD risk.

  20. Voltage-gated calcium channel and antisense oligonucleotides thereto

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hruska, Keith A. (Inventor); Friedman, Peter A. (Inventor); Barry, Elizabeth L. R. (Inventor); Duncan, Randall L. (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    An antisense oligonucleotide of 10 to 35 nucleotides in length that can hybridize with a region of the .alpha..sub.1 subunit of the SA-Cat channel gene DNA or mRNA is provided, together with pharmaceutical compositions containing and methods utilizing such antisense oligonucleotide.

  1. Study on the degeneracy of antisense peptides using affinity chromatography.

    PubMed

    Zhao, R; Yu, X; Liu, H; Zhai, L; Xiong, S; Su, T; Liu, G

    2001-04-13

    The degeneracy of antisense peptides was studied by high-performance affinity chromatography. A model sense peptide (AAAA) and its antisense peptides (CGGG, GGGG, RGGG, SGGG) were designed and synthesized according to the degeneracy of genetic codes. An affinity column with AAAA as the ligand was prepared. The affinity chromatographic behaviors of antisense peptides on the column were evaluated. The results indicated that model antisense peptides have clear retention on the immobilized AAAA affinity column. RGGG showed the strongest affinity interaction. Similar result was obtained from another experiment that Arg-substituted antisense peptide of fusion peptide (1-11) of influenza virus A was also shown the highest affinity binding to immobilized fusion peptide.

  2. Antisense Oligonucleotide Therapy in Diabetic Retinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Hnik, Peter; Boyer, David S.; Grillone, Lisa R.; Clement, John G.; Henry, Scott P.; Green, Ellen A.

    2009-01-01

    Diabetic retinopathy is one of the leading causes of blindness in the United States and other parts of the world. Historically, laser photocoagulation and vitrectomy surgery have been used for the treatment of diabetic retinopathy, including diabetic macular edema. Both procedures have proven to be useful under certain conditions but have their limitations. New pathways and processes that promote diabetic retinopathy have been identified, and several new therapeutic approaches are under investigation. These new therapies may be beneficial in the treatment of diabetic retinopathy and include antivascular endothelial growth factor agents, corticosteroids, and therapies that may potentially target a number of additional diabetic retinopathy-related factors and processes, including antisense oligonucleotides. Second-generation antisense oligonucleotides, such as iCo-007, may offer a significant advantage in the treatment of diabetic retinopathy by downregulating the signal pathways of multiple growth factors that seem to play a critical role in the process of ocular angiogenesis and vascular leakage. Benefits of such molecules are expected to include the specificity of the kinase target and an extended half-life, resulting in less frequent intravitreal drug administration, resistance to molecule degradation, and a good safety profile. PMID:20144342

  3. Welcome to the splice age: antisense oligonucleotide–mediated exon skipping gains wider applicability

    PubMed Central

    McNally, Elizabeth M.; Wyatt, Eugene J.

    2016-01-01

    Exon skipping uses antisense oligonucleotides (ASOs) to alter transcript splicing for the purpose of rescuing or modulating protein expression. In this issue of the JCI, Lee and colleagues developed and evaluated an ASO-dependent method for treating certain molecularly defined diseases associated with alterations in lamin A/C (LMNA) splicing. Exon skipping by ASOs is gaining traction as a therapeutic strategy, and the use of ASOs is now being applied to bypass mutations and generate modified but functional proteins for an array of genetic disorders. PMID:26999602

  4. Uncoupling Antisense-Mediated Silencing and DNA Methylation in the Imprinted Gnas Cluster

    PubMed Central

    Williamson, Christine M.; Ball, Simon T.; Dawson, Claire; Mehta, Stuti; Beechey, Colin V.; Fray, Martin; Teboul, Lydia; Dear, T. Neil; Kelsey, Gavin; Peters, Jo

    2011-01-01

    There is increasing evidence that non-coding macroRNAs are major elements for silencing imprinted genes, but their mechanism of action is poorly understood. Within the imprinted Gnas cluster on mouse chromosome 2, Nespas is a paternally expressed macroRNA that arises from an imprinting control region and runs antisense to Nesp, a paternally repressed protein coding transcript. Here we report a knock-in mouse allele that behaves as a Nespas hypomorph. The hypomorph mediates down-regulation of Nesp in cis through chromatin modification at the Nesp promoter but in the absence of somatic DNA methylation. Notably there is reduced demethylation of H3K4me3, sufficient for down-regulation of Nesp, but insufficient for DNA methylation; in addition, there is depletion of the H3K36me3 mark permissive for DNA methylation. We propose an order of events for the regulation of a somatic imprint on the wild-type allele whereby Nespas modulates demethylation of H3K4me3 resulting in repression of Nesp followed by DNA methylation. This study demonstrates that a non-coding antisense transcript or its transcription is associated with silencing an overlapping protein-coding gene by a mechanism independent of DNA methylation. These results have broad implications for understanding the hierarchy of events in epigenetic silencing by macroRNAs. PMID:21455290

  5. Natural antisense RNA promotes 3′ end processing and maturation of MALAT1 lncRNA

    PubMed Central

    Zong, Xinying; Nakagawa, Shinichi; Freier, Susan M.; Fei, Jingyi; Ha, Taekjip; Prasanth, Supriya G.; Prasanth, Kannanganattu V.

    2016-01-01

    The RNase P-mediated endonucleolytic cleavage plays a crucial role in the 3′ end processing and cellular accumulation of MALAT1, a nuclear-retained long noncoding RNA that promotes malignancy. The regulation of this cleavage event is largely undetermined. Here we characterize a broadly expressed natural antisense transcript at the MALAT1 locus, designated as TALAM1, that positively regulates MALAT1 levels by promoting the 3′ end cleavage and maturation of MALAT1 RNA. TALAM1 RNA preferentially localizes at the site of transcription, and also interacts with MALAT1 RNA. Depletion of TALAM1 leads to defects in the 3′ end cleavage reaction and compromises cellular accumulation of MALAT1. Conversely, overexpression of TALAM1 facilitates the cleavage reaction in trans. Interestingly, TALAM1 is also positively regulated by MALAT1 at the level of both transcription and RNA stability. Together, our data demonstrate a novel feed-forward positive regulatory loop that is established to maintain the high cellular levels of MALAT1, and also unravel the existence of sense-antisense mediated regulatory mechanism for cellular lncRNAs that display RNase P-mediated 3′ end processing. PMID:26826711

  6. Improved targeting of miRNA with antisense oligonucleotides.

    PubMed

    Davis, Scott; Lollo, Bridget; Freier, Susan; Esau, Christine

    2006-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are a class of 20-24 nt noncoding RNAs that regulate target mRNAs post-transcriptionally by binding with imperfect complementarity in the 3'-untranslated region (3'-UTR) and inhibiting translation or RNA stability. Current understanding of miRNA biology is limited, and antisense oligonucleotide (ASO) inhibition is a powerful technique for miRNA functionalization in vitro and in vivo, and for therapeutic targeting of miRNAs. Identification of optimal ASO chemistries for targeting miRNAs is therefore of great interest. We evaluated a number of 2'-sugar and backbone ASO modifications for their ability to inhibit miR-21 activity on a luciferase reporter mRNA. ASO modifications that improved target affinity improved miRNA ASO activity, yet the positioning of high-affinity modifications also had dramatically different effects on miRNA activity, suggesting that more than affinity determined the effectiveness of the miRNA ASOs. We present data in which the activity of a modified miRNA ASO was inversely correlated to its tolerability as an siRNA passenger strand, suggesting that a similar mechanism could be involved in the dissociation of miRNA ASOs and siRNA passenger strands. These studies begin to define the factors important for designing improved miRNA ASOs, enabling more effective miRNA functionalization and therapeutic targeting.

  7. Improved targeting of miRNA with antisense oligonucleotides

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Scott; Lollo, Bridget; Freier, Susan; Esau, Christine

    2006-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are a class of 20–24 nt noncoding RNAs that regulate target mRNAs post-transcriptionally by binding with imperfect complementarity in the 3′-untranslated region (3′-UTR) and inhibiting translation or RNA stability. Current understanding of miRNA biology is limited, and antisense oligonucleotide (ASO) inhibition is a powerful technique for miRNA functionalization in vitro and in vivo, and for therapeutic targeting of miRNAs. Identification of optimal ASO chemistries for targeting miRNAs is therefore of great interest. We evaluated a number of 2′-sugar and backbone ASO modifications for their ability to inhibit miR-21 activity on a luciferase reporter mRNA. ASO modifications that improved target affinity improved miRNA ASO activity, yet the positioning of high-affinity modifications also had dramatically different effects on miRNA activity, suggesting that more than affinity determined the effectiveness of the miRNA ASOs. We present data in which the activity of a modified miRNA ASO was inversely correlated to its tolerability as an siRNA passenger strand, suggesting that a similar mechanism could be involved in the dissociation of miRNA ASOs and siRNA passenger strands. These studies begin to define the factors important for designing improved miRNA ASOs, enabling more effective miRNA functionalization and therapeutic targeting. PMID:16690972

  8. Correction of a Cystic Fibrosis Splicing Mutation by Antisense Oligonucleotides.

    PubMed

    Igreja, Susana; Clarke, Luka A; Botelho, Hugo M; Marques, Luís; Amaral, Margarida D

    2016-02-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF), the most common life-threatening genetic disease in Caucasians, is caused by ∼2,000 different mutations in the CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene. A significant fraction of these (∼13%) affect pre-mRNA splicing for which novel therapies have been somewhat neglected. We have previously described the effect of the CFTR splicing mutation c.2657+5G>A in IVS16, showing that it originates transcripts lacking exon 16 as well as wild-type transcripts. Here, we tested an RNA-based antisense oligonucleotide (AON) strategy to correct the aberrant splicing caused by this mutation. Two AONs (AON1/2) complementary to the pre-mRNA IVS16 mutant region were designed and their effect on splicing was assessed at the RNA and protein levels, on intracellular protein localization and function. To this end, we used the 2657+5G>A mutant CFTR minigene stably expressed in HEK293 Flp-In cells that express a single copy of the transgene. RNA data from AON1-treated mutant cells show that exon 16 inclusion was almost completely restored (to 95%), also resulting in increased levels of correctly localized CFTR protein at the plasma membrane (PM) and with increased function. A novel two-color CFTR splicing reporter minigene developed here allowed the quantitative monitoring of splicing by automated microscopy localization of CFTR at the PM. The AON strategy is thus a promising therapeutic approach for the specific correction of alternative splicing.

  9. Cellular uptake and trafficking of antisense oligonucleotides.

    PubMed

    Crooke, Stanley T; Wang, Shiyu; Vickers, Timothy A; Shen, Wen; Liang, Xue-Hai

    2017-03-01

    Antisense oligonucleotides (ASOs) modified with phosphorothioate (PS) linkages and different 2' modifications can be used either as drugs (e.g., to treat homozygous familial hypercholesterolemia and spinal muscular atrophy) or as research tools to alter gene expression. PS-ASOs can enter cells without additional modification or formulation and can be designed to mediate sequence-specific cleavage of different types of RNA (including mRNA and non-coding RNA) targeted by endogenous RNase H1. Although PS-ASOs function in both the cytoplasm and nucleus, localization to different subcellular regions can affect their therapeutic potency. Cellular uptake and intracellular distribution of PS ASOs are mediated by protein interactions. The main proteins involved in these processes have been identified, and intracellular sites in which PS ASOs are active, or inactive, cataloged.

  10. Antisense Oligonucleotides: Treatment Strategies and Cellular Internalization

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Colton M.; Harris, Edward N.

    2016-01-01

    The clinical applicaton of antisense oligonucleotides (ASOs) is becoming more of a reality as several drugs have been approved for the treatment of human disorders and many others are in various phases in development and clinical trials. ASOs are short DNA/RNA oligos which are heavily modified to increase their stability in biological fluids and retain the properties of creating RNA-RNA and DNA-RNA duplexes that knock-down or correct genetic expression. This review outlines several strategies that ASOs utilize for the treatment of various congenital diseases and syndromes that develop with aging. In addition, we discuss some of the mechanisms for specific non-targeted ASO internalization within cells. PMID:28374018

  11. Ribonucleases, antisense RNAs and the control of bacterial plasmids.

    PubMed

    Saramago, Margarida; Bárria, Cátia; Arraiano, Cecília M; Domingues, Susana

    2015-03-01

    In the last decade regulatory RNAs have emerged as powerful tools to regulate the expression of genes both in prokaryotes and in eukaryotes. RNases, by degrading these RNA molecules, control the right amount of regulatory RNAs, which is fundamental for an accurate regulation of gene expression in the cell. Remarkably the first antisense RNAs identified were plasmid-encoded and their detailed study was crucial for the understanding of prokaryotic antisense RNAs. In this review we highlight the role of RNases in the precise modulation of antisense RNAs that control plasmid replication, maintenance and transfer.

  12. Overexpression of HOX genes is prevalent in Ewing sarcoma and is associated with altered epigenetic regulation of developmental transcription programs.

    PubMed

    Svoboda, Laurie K; Harris, Ashley; Bailey, Natashay J; Schwentner, Raphaela; Tomazou, Eleni; von Levetzow, Cornelia; Magnuson, Brian; Ljungman, Mats; Kovar, Heinrich; Lawlor, Elizabeth R

    2014-12-01

    The polycomb proteins BMI-1 and EZH2 are highly overexpressed by Ewing sarcoma (ES), a tumor of stem cell origin that is driven by EWS-ETS fusion oncogenes, most commonly EWS-FLI1. In the current study we analyzed expression of transcription programs that are controlled by polycomb proteins during embryonic development to determine if they are abnormal in ES. Our results show that polycomb target gene expression in ES deviates from normal tissues and stem cells and that, as expected, most targets are relatively repressed. However, we also discovered a paradoxical up regulation of numerous polycomb targets and these were highly enriched for homeobox (HOX) genes. Comparison of HOX profiles between malignant and non-malignant tissues revealed a distinctive HOX profile in ES, which was characterized by overexpression of posterior HOXD genes. In addition, ectopic expression of EWS-FLI1 during stem cell differentiation led to aberrant up regulation of posterior HOXD genes. Mechanistically, this up regulation was associated with altered epigenetic regulation. Specifically, ES and EWS-FLI1+ stem cells displayed a relative loss of polycomb-dependent H3K27me3 and gain of trithorax-dependent H3K4me3 at the promoters of posterior HOXD genes and also at the HOXD11.12 polycomb response element. In addition, a striking correlation was evident between HOXD13 and other genes whose regulation is coordinately regulated during embryonic development by distal enhancer elements. Together, these studies demonstrate that epigenetic regulation of polycomb target genes, in particular HOXD genes, is altered in ES and that these changes are mediated downstream of EWS-FLI1.

  13. Retroposition as a source of antisense long non-coding RNAs with possible regulatory functions.

    PubMed

    Bryzghalov, Oleksii; Szcześniak, Michał Wojciech; Makałowska, Izabela

    2016-01-01

    Long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) are a class of intensely studied, yet enigmatic molecules that make up a substantial portion of the human transcriptome. In this work, we link the origins and functions of some lncRNAs to retroposition, a process resulting in the creation of intronless copies (retrocopies) of the so-called parental genes. We found 35 human retrocopies transcribed in antisense and giving rise to 58 lncRNA transcripts. These lncRNAs share sequence similarity with the corresponding parental genes but in the sense/antisense orientation, meaning they have the potential to interact with each other and to form RNA:RNA duplexes. We took a closer look at these duplexes and found that 10 of the lncRNAs might regulate parental gene expression and processing at the pre-mRNA and mRNA levels. Further analysis of the co-expression and expression correlation provided support for the existence of functional coupling between lncRNAs and their mate parental gene transcripts.

  14. Medial prefrontal cortical injections of c-fos antisense oligonucleotides transiently lower c-Fos protein and mimic amphetamine withdrawal behaviours.

    PubMed

    Persico, A M; Schindler, C W; Davis, S C; Ambrosio, E; Uhl, G R

    1998-02-01

    Prefrontal cerebral cortical areas display decreased expression of several transcription factor/immediate-early genes, including c-fos, during amphetamine withdrawal. Antisense strategies can help to test possible roles for this prefrontal c-fos down-regulation in the behavioural correlates of amphetamine withdrawal. Medial prefrontal cortical injections delivering 1.7 nmoles of anti c-fos oligonucleotides revealed an approximately 3 h half-life for phosphothioate and a 15 min half-life for phosphodiester oligonucleotides. Antisense phosphothioates complementary to the c-fos translational start site reduced levels of c-Fos protein, while exerting modest and variable effects on c-fos messenger RNA levels. Neither missense phosphorothioate nor antisense phosphodiester oligonucleotides significantly reduced levels of either c-fos messenger RNA or protein. Animals injected with anti c-fos phosphothioate oligonucleotides into the medial prefrontal cortex displayed marked reductions in linear locomotor activity and repetitive movements measured in a novel environment, effects not seen when missense oligonucleotides were used or when animals were accustomed to the activity monitor prior to antisense oligonucleotide injection. Behavioural changes produced by prefrontal cortical injections of c-fos antisense oligonucleotides closely mimic alterations recorded during amphetamine withdrawal. Prefrontal c-fos could thus conceivably play roles in the neurobiological underpinnings of psychostimulant withdrawal and of responses to stressors such as exposure to novel environments.

  15. Construction of a directed hammerhead ribozyme library: towards the identification of optimal target sites for antisense-mediated gene inhibition.

    PubMed Central

    Pierce, M L; Ruffner, D E

    1998-01-01

    Antisense-mediated gene inhibition uses short complementary DNA or RNA oligonucleotides to block expression of any mRNA of interest. A key parameter in the success or failure of an antisense therapy is the identification of a suitable target site on the chosen mRNA. Ultimately, the accessibility of the target to the antisense agent determines target suitability. Since accessibility is a function of many complex factors, it is currently beyond our ability to predict. Consequently, identification of the most effective target(s) requires examination of every site. Towards this goal, we describe a method to construct directed ribozyme libraries against any chosen mRNA. The library contains nearly equal amounts of ribozymes targeting every site on the chosen transcript and the library only contains ribozymes capable of binding to that transcript. Expression of the ribozyme library in cultured cells should allow identification of optimal target sites under natural conditions, subject to the complexities of a fully functional cell. Optimal target sites identified in this manner should be the most effective sites for therapeutic intervention. PMID:9801305

  16. Antisense activity detection by inhibition of fluorescence resonance energy transfer.

    PubMed

    Benítez-Hess, M L; DiPaolo, J A; Alvarez-Salas, L M

    2004-01-01

    Use of antisense nucleic acids to modulate expression of particular genes is a promising approach to the therapy of human papillomavirus type 16 (HPV-16)-associated cervical cancer. Understandably, evaluation of the in vivo performance of synthetic antisense oligodeoxynucleotides (AS-ODNs) or ribozymes is of ultimate importance to development of effective antisense tools. Here we report the use of a bacterial reporter system based on the inhibition of fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) to measure the interaction of AS-ODNs with HPV-16 target nt 410-445, using variants of the green fluorescent protein (GFP). An optimal FRET-producing pair was selected with GFP as the donor and yellow fluorescent protein (YFP) as the acceptor molecule. Hybridization of AS-ODNs with a chimaeric mRNA containing the antisense target site flanked by GFP variants resulted in the inhibition of the FRET effect. Use of different linkers suggested that the amino acid content of the linker has no significant effect on FRET effect. Antisense accessibility, tested by RNaseH assays with phosphorothioated target-specific and mutant AS-ODNs, suggested a specific effect on the chimaeric mRNA. FRET inhibition measurements correlated with the presence of truncated proteins confirming true antisense activity over the target. Therefore, FRET inhibition may be used for the direct measurement of AS-ODNs activity in vivo. Copyright 2004 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  17. Antisense lncRNA FOXC2-AS1 promotes doxorubicin resistance in osteosarcoma by increasing the expression of FOXC2.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chun-Lin; Zhu, Kun-Peng; Ma, Xiao-Long

    2017-06-28

    Recent efforts have revealed that numerous natural antisense lncRNAs play a crucial role in the regulation of cancer biology. Here, based on our previous study, we further identified that the lncRNA FOXC2-AS1 and its antisense transcript FOXC2 are positively up-regulated in doxorubicin-resistant osteosarcoma cell lines and tissues, correlate with poor prognosis and promote doxorubicin resistance in osteosarcoma cells in vitro and in vivo. In addition, FOXC2-AS1 and FOXC2 are mainly located in the cytoplasm and form an RNA-RNA double-stranded structure in the overlapping region, which is necessary for FOXC2-AS1 to regulate the expression of FOXC2 at both the transcription and post-transcription levels. In addition, transcription factor FOXC2 also contributes to doxorubicin resistance through inducing the expression of the classical multi-drug resistance-related ABCB1 gene similar to FOXC2-AS1. Thus, we concluded that the lncRNA FOXC2-AS1 may promote doxorubicin resistance in OS by increasing the expression of transcription factor FOXC2, further facilitating ABCB1 expression. These findings demonstrate the potential underlying mechanism of FOXC2-AS1 in the regulation of doxorubicin resistance in OS and possibly provide a novel reversing target. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Down-regulation of specific members of the glutamine synthetase gene family in alfalfa by antisense RNA technology.

    PubMed

    Temple, S J; Bagga, S; Sengupta-Gopalan, C

    1998-06-01

    Glutamine synthetase (GS) catalyzes the ATP-dependent condensation of NH3 with glutamate to produce glutamine. In plants GS is an octameric enzyme and is located either in the cytoplasm (GS1) or in the chloroplast (GS2). Two distinct classes of GS1 genes with unique 3'-untranslated region (3'UTR) have been identified in alfalfa. We have demonstrated that the two classes exhibit differential expression pattern in the different plant organs suggesting different functional roles for the different isozymes. To determine the functional significance of the two classes of GS1 genes in alfalfa, we have utilized antisense gene constructs aimed specifically at the 3'UTR of the two GS1 genes and introduced them individually into alfalfa. Our data show that the gene constructs are effective in lowering the corresponding transcript level very effectively though there were organ-specific differences in the level of reduction. No transcript corresponding to the antisense gene construct was detected in any of the alfalfa transformants though they accumulated to significant levels in transgenic tobacco containing the same construct. This suggests that the antisense transcript was not stable in the presence of the homologous target sequence. Transgenic alfalfa with up to 80% reduction in the transcript level corresponding to each gene class, however, showed no reduction in GS activity or GS1 polypeptide level. The results suggest that GS1 mRNA levels are not rate-limiting for GS1 polypeptide synthesis and that GS levels are controlled both at the transcriptional and translational/post-translational level.

  19. Screening of male patients for Trichomonas vaginalis with transcription-mediated amplification in a community with a high prevalence of sexually transmitted infection.

    PubMed

    Munson, Kimber L; Napierala, Maureen; Munson, Erik; Schell, Ronald F; Kramme, Timothy; Miller, Cheryl; Hryciuk, Jeanne E

    2013-01-01

    Trichomonas vaginalis infection in males has been largely uncharacterized. Past reports indicated increased susceptibility to other sexually transmitted infection (STI) agents such as human immunodeficiency virus and Neisseria gonorrhoeae with concurrent T. vaginalis infection. This warrants a more thorough review of male T. vaginalis incidence. A retrospective 3-year investigation of transcription-mediated amplification (TMA)-based urethral swab and first-void urine screening for T. vaginalis within a regional health care system was performed to address T. vaginalis prevalence in males. Of 622 total samples tested, 6.6% were positive for T. vaginalis. Delineation of all specimens by ZIP code of patient residence revealed 11 predominant ZIP codes with respect to testing volume and detection rates. Within these 11 ZIP codes, representing 78.3% of total testing volume, urine was the preferred specimen source compared to urethral swabs. Seven of these 11 ZIP codes contained majority African American populations. The aggregate T. vaginalis detection rate trended higher than that of the remaining four ZIP codes, which were comprised primarily of Caucasian populations (8.9% versus 5.0%, respectively; P = 0.15). The average age of a T. vaginalis-infected male (39.9 years) was significantly greater than those for Chlamydia trachomatis or N. gonorrhoeae (27.6 and 25.9 years, respectively; P < 0.001). Given the significant rate of T. vaginalis detection, with age distribution analogous to that reported in females, TMA-based detection of T. vaginalis can be a routine constituent within a comprehensive STI screening panel for males in high-prevalence STI communities.

  20. RNA therapeutics: RNAi and antisense mechanisms and clinical applications

    PubMed Central

    Chery, Jessica

    2016-01-01

    RNA therapeutics refers to the use of oligonucleotides to target primarily ribonucleic acids (RNA) for therapeutic efforts or in research studies to elucidate functions of genes. Oligonucleotides are distinct from other pharmacological modalities, such as small molecules and antibodies that target mainly proteins, due to their mechanisms of action and chemical properties. Nucleic acids come in two forms: deoxyribonucleic acids (DNA) and ribonucleic acids (RNA). Although DNA is more stable, RNA offers more structural variety ranging from messenger RNA (mRNA) that codes for protein to non-coding RNAs, microRNA (miRNA), transfer RNA (tRNA), short interfering RNAs (siRNAs), ribosomal RNA (rRNA), and long-noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs). As our understanding of the wide variety of RNAs deepens, researchers have sought to target RNA since >80% of the genome is estimated to be transcribed. These transcripts include non-coding RNAs such as miRNAs and siRNAs that function in gene regulation by playing key roles in the transfer of genetic information from DNA to protein, the final product of the central dogma in biology1. Currently there are two main approaches used to target RNA: double stranded RNA-mediated interference (RNAi) and antisense oligonucleotides (ASO). Both approaches are currently in clinical trials for targeting of RNAs involved in various diseases, such as cancer and neurodegeneration. In fact, ASOs targeting spinal muscular atrophy and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis have shown positive results in clinical trials2. Advantages of ASOs include higher affinity due to the development of chemical modifications that increase affinity, selectivity while decreasing toxicity due to off-target effects. This review will highlight the major therapeutic approaches of RNA medicine currently being applied with a focus on RNAi and ASOs. PMID:27570789

  1. Convergent transcription confers a bistable switch in Enterococcus faecalis conjugation.

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, Anushree; Johnson, Christopher M; Shu, Che-Chi; Kaznessis, Yiannis N; Ramkrishna, Doraiswami; Dunny, Gary M; Hu, Wei-Shou

    2011-06-07

    Convergent gene pairs with head-to-head configurations are widespread in both eukaryotic and prokaryotic genomes and are speculated to be involved in gene regulation. Here we present a unique mechanism of gene regulation due to convergent transcription from the antagonistic prgX/prgQ operon in Enterococcus faecalis controlling conjugative transfer of the antibiotic resistance plasmid pCF10 from donor cells to recipient cells. Using mathematical modeling and experimentation, we demonstrate that convergent transcription in the prgX/prgQ operon endows the system with the properties of a robust genetic switch through premature termination of elongating transcripts due to collisions between RNA polymerases (RNAPs) transcribing from opposite directions and antisense regulation between complementary counter-transcripts. Evidence is provided for the presence of truncated RNAs resulting from convergent transcription from both the promoters that are capable of sense-antisense interactions. A mathematical model predicts that both RNAP collision and antisense regulation are essential for a robust bistable switch behavior in the control of conjugation initiation by prgX/prgQ operons. Moreover, given that convergent transcription is conserved across species, the mechanism of coupling RNAP collision and antisense interaction is likely to have a significant regulatory role in gene expression.

  2. Antisense oligonucleotide therapeutics for human leukemia.

    PubMed

    Gewirtz, A M

    1998-01-01

    The development of reliable gene disruption strategies, and their application in living cells, has proven to be an extraordinary important advance for cell and molecular biologists. Using the various available approaches, the specific functions of any given gene may now be investigated directly in the relevant cell type. Application of similar experimental tools in a clinical setting might prove to be equally valuable and could well form the basis of a monumental advance in the practice of clinical medicine. This seems particularly true at the present time because much progress has been made in understanding the molecular pathogenesis of many diseases, including cancer. For these reasons a tremendous amount of interest has been generated in the use of oligodeoxynucleotides to modify gene expression. However, in spite of some notable successes which are detailed in this review, oligonucleotides have generated controversy in regard to their mechanism of action, reliability, and ultimate therapeutic utility. Nevertheless, the potential power of the "antisense" approach remains undisputed, and its ultimate therapeutic utility is far reaching. Accordingly, the problems associated with the use of these compounds are clearly worth solving. It remains the hope of many laboratories that the day will soon come when these techniques will make an important contribution to the management of chronic myelogenous leukemia and other neoplastic disorders.

  3. Antisense oligonucleotide therapeutics for human leukemia.

    PubMed

    Gewirtz, A M

    1997-01-01

    The development of reliable gene disruption strategies, and their application in living cells, has proven to be an extraordinarily important advance for cell and molecular biologists. Using the various available approaches, the specific functions of any given gene may now be investigated directly in the relevant cell type. Application of similar experimental tools in a clinical setting might prove to be equally valuable and could well form the basis of a monumental advance in the practice of clinical medicine. This seems particularly true at the present time since much progress has been made in understanding the molecular pathogenesis of many diseases, including cancer. For these reasons a tremendous amount of interest has been generated in the use of oligodeoxynucleotides to modify gene expression. However, in spite of some notable successes which are detailed in this review, oligonucleotides have generated controversy in regards to their mechanism of action, reliability, and ultimate therapeutic utility. Nevertheless, the potential power of the "antisense" approach remains undisputed, and its ultimate therapeutic utility is far reaching. Accordingly, the problems associated with the use of these compounds are clearly worth solving. It remains the hope of many laboratories that the day will soon come when these techniques will make an important contribution to the management of CML and other neoplastic disorders.

  4. Antisense Oligonucleotide Therapy for Inherited Retinal Dystrophies.

    PubMed

    Gerard, Xavier; Garanto, Alejandro; Rozet, Jean-Michel; Collin, Rob W J

    2016-01-01

    Inherited retinal dystrophies (IRDs) are an extremely heterogeneous group of genetic diseases for which currently no effective treatment strategies exist. Over the last decade, significant progress has been made utilizing gene augmentation therapy for a few genetic subtypes of IRD, although several technical challenges so far prevent a broad clinical application of this approach for other forms of IRD. Many of the mutations leading to these retinal diseases affect pre-mRNA splicing of the mutated genes . Antisense oligonucleotide (AON)-mediated splice modulation appears to be a powerful approach to correct the consequences of such mutations at the pre-mRNA level , as demonstrated by promising results in clinical trials for several inherited disorders like Duchenne muscular dystrophy, hypercholesterolemia and various types of cancer. In this mini-review, we summarize ongoing pre-clinical research on AON-based therapy for a few genetic subtypes of IRD , speculate on other potential therapeutic targets, and discuss the opportunities and challenges that lie ahead to translate splice modulation therapy for retinal disorders to the clinic.

  5. Expression of a large LINE-1-driven antisense RNA is linked to epigenetic silencing of the metastasis suppressor gene TFPI-2 in cancer

    PubMed Central

    Cruickshanks, Hazel A.; Vafadar-Isfahani, Natasha; Dunican, Donncha S.; Lee, Andy; Sproul, Duncan; Lund, Jonathan N.; Meehan, Richard R.; Tufarelli, Cristina

    2013-01-01

    LINE-1 retrotransposons are abundant repetitive elements of viral origin, which in normal cells are kept quiescent through epigenetic mechanisms. Activation of LINE-1 occurs frequently in cancer and can enable LINE-1 mobilization but also has retrotransposition-independent consequences. We previously reported that in cancer, aberrantly active LINE-1 promoters can drive transcription of flanking unique sequences giving rise to LINE-1 chimeric transcripts (LCTs). Here, we show that one such LCT, LCT13, is a large transcript (>300 kb) running antisense to the metastasis-suppressor gene TFPI-2. We have modelled antisense RNA expression at TFPI-2 in transgenic mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells and demonstrate that antisense RNA induces silencing and deposition of repressive histone modifications implying a causal link. Consistent with this, LCT13 expression in breast and colon cancer cell lines is associated with silencing and repressive chromatin at TFPI-2. Furthermore, we detected LCT13 transcripts in 56% of colorectal tumours exhibiting reduced TFPI-2 expression. Our findings implicate activation of LINE-1 elements in subsequent epigenetic remodelling of surrounding genes, thus hinting a novel retrotransposition-independent role for LINE-1 elements in malignancy. PMID:23703216

  6. Antisense Mediated Splicing Modulation For Inherited Metabolic Diseases: Challenges for Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Pérez, Belen; Vilageliu, Lluisa; Grinberg, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    In the past few years, research in targeted mutation therapies has experienced significant advances, especially in the field of rare diseases. In particular, the efficacy of antisense therapy for suppression of normal, pathogenic, or cryptic splice sites has been demonstrated in cellular and animal models and has already reached the clinical trials phase for Duchenne muscular dystrophy. In different inherited metabolic diseases, splice switching oligonucleotides (SSOs) have been used with success in patients' cells to force pseudoexon skipping or to block cryptic splice sites, in both cases recovering normal transcript and protein and correcting the enzyme deficiency. However, future in vivo studies require individual approaches for delivery depending on the gene defect involved, given the different patterns of tissue and organ expression. Herein we review the state of the art of antisense therapy targeting RNA splicing in metabolic diseases, grouped according to their expression patterns—multisystemic, hepatic, or in central nervous system (CNS)—and summarize the recent progress achieved in the field of in vivo delivery of oligonucleotides to each organ or system. Successful body-wide distribution of SSOs and preferential distribution in the liver after systemic administration have been reported in murine models for different diseases, while for CNS limited data are available, although promising results with intratechal injections have been achieved. PMID:24506780

  7. Antisense-Based Progerin Downregulation in HGPS-Like Patients' Cells.

    PubMed

    Harhouri, Karim; Navarro, Claire; Baquerre, Camille; Da Silva, Nathalie; Bartoli, Catherine; Casey, Frank; Mawuse, Guedenon Koffi; Doubaj, Yassamine; Lévy, Nicolas; De Sandre-Giovannoli, Annachiara

    2016-07-11

    Progeroid laminopathies, including Hutchinson-Gilford Progeria Syndrome (HGPS, OMIM #176670), are premature and accelerated aging diseases caused by defects in nuclear A-type Lamins. Most HGPS patients carry a de novo point mutation within exon 11 of the LMNA gene encoding A-type Lamins. This mutation activates a cryptic splice site leading to the deletion of 50 amino acids at its carboxy-terminal domain, resulting in a truncated and permanently farnesylated Prelamin A called Prelamin A Δ50 or Progerin. Some patients carry other LMNA mutations affecting exon 11 splicing and are named "HGPS-like" patients. They also produce Progerin and/or other truncated Prelamin A isoforms (Δ35 and Δ90) at the transcriptional and/or protein level. The results we present show that morpholino antisense oligonucleotides (AON) prevent pathogenic LMNA splicing, markedly reducing the accumulation of Progerin and/or other truncated Prelamin A isoforms (Prelamin A Δ35, Prelamin A Δ90) in HGPS-like patients' cells. Finally, a patient affected with Mandibuloacral Dysplasia type B (MAD-B, carrying a homozygous mutation in ZMPSTE24, encoding an enzyme involved in Prelamin A maturation, leading to accumulation of wild type farnesylated Prelamin A), was also included in this study. These results provide preclinical proof of principle for the use of a personalized antisense approach in HGPS-like and MAD-B patients, who may therefore be eligible for inclusion in a therapeutic trial based on this approach, together with classical HGPS patients.

  8. Natural antisense RNAs are involved in the regulation of CD45 expression in autoimmune diseases.

    PubMed

    Rong, J; Yin, J; Su, Z

    2015-03-01

    CD45 is a transmembrane protein tyrosine phosphatase that is specifically expressed in hematopoietic cells and can initiate signal transduction via the dephosphorylation of tyrosine. Alternatively spliced transcript variants of this gene encode distinct isoforms, which indicate different functional states of CD45. Among these variants, CD45RO, which contains neither exon 4, 5, or 6, is over-expressed in lymphocytes in autoimmune diseases, including systemic lupus erythematosus, rheumatoid arthritis, multiple sclerosis, and type I diabetes. The CD45 RO serves as a marker of the immune response activity and lymphocyte development. Previous studies have indicated that exon splicing is generally correlated with local hypermethylated DNA and acetylated histone modification, while autoimmune diseases are commonly associated with global hypomethylation and histone deacetylation in lymphocytes. Thus, the question arises of how exons 4, 5, and 6 of CD45RO are excluded under the status of global DNA hypomethylation and histone deacetylation in these autoimmune diseases. On the basis of the analyses of the context sequence of CD45 and its natural antisense RNA in GenBank, we proposed that the long noncoding RNA encoded by the natural antisense gene of CD45 contributes to the expressional regulation of the CD45RO splicing variant via recruitment of DNA methyltransferase and histone modification modulators specific to the sense gene CD45; thus, it is associated with the over-expression of CD45RO and the functional regulation of lymphocytes in the pathogenic development of autoimmune diseases.

  9. NERF encodes a RING E3 ligase important for drought resistance and enhances the expression of its antisense gene NFYA5 in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Wei; Liu, Wenwen; Zhao, Meng; Li, Wen-Xue

    2015-01-01

    NFYA5 is an important drought-stress inducible transcription factor gene that is targeted by miR169 in Arabidopsis. We show here that the cis-natural antisense transcript gene of NFYA5, NFYA5 Enhancing RING FINGER (NERF), can produce siRNAs from their overlapping region (OR) and affect NFYA5 transcripts by functioning together with miR169. The NERF protein functions as an E3 ligase for ubiquitination. Overexpression of NERF or OR cDNA leads to siRNANERF accumulation, miR169 repression, and NFYA5 transcript enhancement; knock-down of NERF transcripts by an artificial miRNA enhances miR169 abundance and reduces NFYA5 transcripts. Overexpression of NFYA5 does not affect the NERF mRNA level. Deep sequencing of the small RNA library from 35S::OR plants identifies 960 sequences representing 323 unique siRNAs that originate from OR; the sequences of some siRNANERF are similar/complementary to those of miR169. Overexpression of the 195- to 280-bp OR cDNA-containing siRNAs similar/complementary to miR169 also leads to the accumulation of NFYA5 transcripts. Analysis of NERF knock-down plants and NERF overexpression lines showed that, like NFYA5, NERF is important for controlling stomatal aperture and drought resistance. This regulatory model might apply to other natural antisense transcripts with positively correlated expression patterns. PMID:25514924

  10. Global effects of the CSR-1 RNA interference pathway on the transcriptional landscape.

    PubMed

    Cecere, Germano; Hoersch, Sebastian; O'Keeffe, Sean; Sachidanandam, Ravi; Grishok, Alla

    2014-04-01

    Argonaute proteins and their small RNA cofactors short interfering RNAs are known to inhibit gene expression at the transcriptional and post-transcriptional levels. In Caenorhabditis elegans, the Argonaute CSR-1 binds thousands of endogenous siRNAs (endo-siRNAs) that are antisense to germline transcripts. However, its role in gene expression regulation remains controversial. Here we used genome-wide profiling of nascent RNA transcripts and found that the CSR-1 RNA interference pathway promoted sense-oriented RNA polymerase II transcription. Moreover, a loss of CSR-1 function resulted in global increase in antisense transcription and ectopic transcription of silent chromatin domains, which led to reduced chromatin incorporation of centromere-specific histone H3. On the basis of these findings, we propose that the CSR-1 pathway helps maintain the directionality of active transcription, thereby propagating the distinction between transcriptionally active and silent genomic regions.

  11. Nanoparticle Delivery of Antisense Oligonucleotides and Their Application in the Exon Skipping Strategy for Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Falzarano, Maria Sofia; Passarelli, Chiara

    2014-01-01

    Antisense therapy is a powerful tool for inducing post-transcriptional modifications and thereby regulating target genes associated with disease. There are several classes of antisense oligonucleotides (AONs) with therapeutic use, such as double-stranded RNAs (interfering RNAs, utilized for gene silencing, and single-stranded AONs with various chemistries, which are useful for antisense targeting of micro-RNAs and mRNAs. In particular, the use of AONs for exon skipping, by targeting pre-mRNA, is proving to be a highly promising therapy for some genetic disorders like Duchenne muscular dystrophy and spinal muscular atrophy. However, AONs are unable to cross the plasma membrane unaided, and several other obstacles still remain to be overcome, in particular their instability due to their nuclease sensitivity and their lack of tissue specificity. Various drug delivery systems have been explored to improve the bioavailability of nucleic acids, and nanoparticles (NPs) have been suggested as potential vectors for DNA/RNA. This review describes the recent progress in AON conjugation with natural and synthetic delivery systems, and provides an overview of the efficacy of NP-AON complexes as an exon-skipping treatment for Duchenne muscular dystrophy. PMID:24506782

  12. Nanoparticle delivery of antisense oligonucleotides and their application in the exon skipping strategy for Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Falzarano, Maria Sofia; Passarelli, Chiara; Ferlini, Alessandra

    2014-02-01

    Antisense therapy is a powerful tool for inducing post-transcriptional modifications and thereby regulating target genes associated with disease. There are several classes of antisense oligonucleotides (AONs) with therapeutic use, such as double-stranded RNAs (interfering RNAs, utilized for gene silencing, and single-stranded AONs with various chemistries, which are useful for antisense targeting of micro-RNAs and mRNAs. In particular, the use of AONs for exon skipping, by targeting pre-mRNA, is proving to be a highly promising therapy for some genetic disorders like Duchenne muscular dystrophy and spinal muscular atrophy. However, AONs are unable to cross the plasma membrane unaided, and several other obstacles still remain to be overcome, in particular their instability due to their nuclease sensitivity and their lack of tissue specificity. Various drug delivery systems have been explored to improve the bioavailability of nucleic acids, and nanoparticles (NPs) have been suggested as potential vectors for DNA/RNA. This review describes the recent progress in AON conjugation with natural and synthetic delivery systems, and provides an overview of the efficacy of NP-AON complexes as an exon-skipping treatment for Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

  13. Antisense Oligonucleotides Modulating Activation of a Nonsense-Mediated RNA Decay Switch Exon in the ATM Gene

    PubMed Central

    Kralovicova, Jana; Moreno, Pedro M.D.; Cross, Nicholas C.P.; Pêgo, Ana Paula

    2016-01-01

    ATM (ataxia-telangiectasia, mutated) is an important cancer susceptibility gene that encodes a key apical kinase in the DNA damage response pathway. ATM mutations in the germ line result in ataxia-telangiectasia (A-T), a rare genetic syndrome associated with hypersensitivity to double-strand DNA breaks and predisposition to lymphoid malignancies. ATM expression is limited by a tightly regulated nonsense-mediated RNA decay (NMD) switch exon (termed NSE) located in intron 28. In this study, we identify antisense oligonucleotides that modulate NSE inclusion in mature transcripts by systematically targeting the entire 3.1-kb-long intron. Their identification was assisted by a segmental deletion analysis of transposed elements, revealing NSE repression upon removal of a distant antisense Alu and NSE activation upon elimination of a long terminal repeat transposon MER51A. Efficient NSE repression was achieved by delivering optimized splice-switching oligonucleotides to embryonic and lymphoblastoid cells using chitosan-based nanoparticles. Together, these results provide a basis for possible sequence-specific radiosensitization of cancer cells, highlight the power of intronic antisense oligonucleotides to modify gene expression, and demonstrate transposon-mediated regulation of NSEs. PMID:27658045

  14. Inhibition of human immunodeficiency virus replication by antisense oligodeoxynucleotides.

    PubMed Central

    Goodchild, J; Agrawal, S; Civeira, M P; Sarin, P S; Sun, D; Zamecnik, P C

    1988-01-01

    Twenty different target sites within human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) RNA were selected for studies of inhibition of HIV replication by antisense oligonucleotides. Target sites were selected based on their potential capacity to block recognition functions during viral replication. Antisense oligomers complementary to sites within or near the sequence repeated at the ends of retrovirus RNA (R region) and to certain splice sites were most effective. The effect of antisense oligomer length on inhibiting virus replication was also investigated, and preliminary toxicity studies in mice show that these compounds are toxic only at high levels. The results indicate potential usefulness for these oligomers in the treatment of patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) and AIDS-related complex either alone or in combination with other drugs. PMID:3041414

  15. Inhibition of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Replication by Antisense Oligodeoxynucleotides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goodchild, John; Agrawal, Sudhir; Civeira, Maria P.; Sarin, Prem S.; Sun, Daisy; Zamecnik, Paul C.

    1988-08-01

    Twenty different target sites within human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) RNA were selected for studies of inhibition of HIV replication by antisense oligonucleotides. Target sites were selected based on their potential capacity to block recognition functions during viral replication. Antisense oligomers complementary to sites within or near the sequence repeated at the ends of retrovirus RNA (R region) and to certain splice sites were most effective. The effect of antisense oligomer length on inhibiting virus replication was also investigated, and preliminary toxicity studies in mice show that these compounds are toxic only at high levels. The results indicate potential usefulness for these oligomers in the treatment of patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) and AIDS-related complex either alone or in combination with other drugs.

  16. Concomitant emergence of the antisense protein gene of HIV-1 and of the pandemic.

    PubMed

    Cassan, Elodie; Arigon-Chifolleau, Anne-Muriel; Mesnard, Jean-Michel; Gross, Antoine; Gascuel, Olivier

    2016-10-11

    Recent experiments provide sound arguments in favor of the in vivo expression of the AntiSense Protein (ASP) of HIV-1. This putative protein is encoded on the antisense strand of the provirus genome and entirely overlapped by the env gene with reading frame -2. The existence of ASP was suggested in 1988, but is still controversial, and its function has yet to be determined. We used a large dataset of ∼23,000 HIV-1 and SIV sequences to study the origin, evolution, and conservation of the asp gene. We found that the ASP ORF is specific to group M of HIV-1, which is responsible for the human pandemic. Moreover, the correlation between the presence of asp and the prevalence of HIV-1 groups and M subtypes appeared to be statistically significant. We then looked for evidence of selection pressure acting on asp Using computer simulations, we showed that the conservation of the ASP ORF in the group M could not be due to chance. Standard methods were ineffective in disentangling the two selection pressures imposed by both the Env and ASP proteins-an expected outcome with overlaps in frame -2. We thus developed a method based on careful evolutionary analysis of the presence/absence of stop codons, revealing that ASP does impose significant selection pressure. All of these results support the idea that asp is the 10th gene of HIV-1 group M and indicate a correlation with the spread of the pandemic.

  17. Concomitant emergence of the antisense protein gene of HIV-1 and of the pandemic

    PubMed Central

    Cassan, Elodie; Arigon-Chifolleau, Anne-Muriel; Mesnard, Jean-Michel; Gross, Antoine; Gascuel, Olivier

    2016-01-01

    Recent experiments provide sound arguments in favor of the in vivo expression of the AntiSense Protein (ASP) of HIV-1. This putative protein is encoded on the antisense strand of the provirus genome and entirely overlapped by the env gene with reading frame −2. The existence of ASP was suggested in 1988, but is still controversial, and its function has yet to be determined. We used a large dataset of ∼23,000 HIV-1 and SIV sequences to study the origin, evolution, and conservation of the asp gene. We found that the ASP ORF is specific to group M of HIV-1, which is responsible for the human pandemic. Moreover, the correlation between the presence of asp and the prevalence of HIV-1 groups and M subtypes appeared to be statistically significant. We then looked for evidence of selection pressure acting on asp. Using computer simulations, we showed that the conservation of the ASP ORF in the group M could not be due to chance. Standard methods were ineffective in disentangling the two selection pressures imposed by both the Env and ASP proteins—an expected outcome with overlaps in frame −2. We thus developed a method based on careful evolutionary analysis of the presence/absence of stop codons, revealing that ASP does impose significant selection pressure. All of these results support the idea that asp is the 10th gene of HIV-1 group M and indicate a correlation with the spread of the pandemic. PMID:27681623

  18. Inhibition of microRNA with antisense oligonucleotides.

    PubMed

    Esau, Christine C

    2008-01-01

    Antisense inhibition of microRNA (miRNA) function has been an important tool for uncovering miRNA biology. Chemical modification of anti-miRNA oligonucleotides (AMOs) is necessary to improve affinity for target miRNA, stabilize the AMO to nuclease degradation, and to promote tissue uptake for in vivo delivery. Here I summarize the work done to evaluate the effectiveness of various chemically modified AMOs for use in cultured cells and rodent models, and outline important issues to consider when inhibiting miRNAs with antisense oligonucleotides.

  19. Antisense downregulation of polyphenol oxidase results in enhanced disease susceptibility.

    PubMed

    Thipyapong, Piyada; Hunt, Michelle D; Steffens, John C

    2004-11-01

    Polyphenol oxidases (PPOs; EC 1.14.18.1 or EC 1.10.3.2) catalyze the oxidation of phenolics to quinones, highly reactive intermediates whose secondary reactions are responsible for much of the oxidative browning that accompanies plant senescence, wounding, and responses to pathogens. To assess the impact of PPO expression on resistance to Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato we introduced a chimeric antisense potato PPO cDNA into tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum L.). Oxidation of caffeic acid, the dominant o-diphenolic aglycone of tomato foliage, was decreased ca. 40-fold by antisense expression of PPO. All members of the PPO gene family were downregulated: neither immunoreactive PPO nor PPO-specific mRNA were detectable in the transgenic plants. In addition, the antisense PPO construct suppressed inducible increases in PPO activity. Downregulation of PPO in antisense plants did not affect growth, development, or reproduction of greenhouse-grown plants. However, antisense PPO expression dramatically increased susceptibility to P. syringae expressing the avirulence gene avrPto in both Pto and pto backgrounds. In a compatible (pto) interaction, plants constitutively expressing an antisense PPO construct exhibited a 55-fold increase in bacterial growth, three times larger lesion area, and ten times more lesions cm(-2) than nontransformed plants. In an incompatible (Pto) interaction, antisense PPO plants exhibited 100-fold increases in bacterial growth and ten times more lesions cm(-2) than nontransformed plants. Although it is not clear whether hypersusceptibility of antisense plants is due to low constitutive PPO levels or failure to induce PPO upon infection, these findings suggest a critical role for PPO-catalyzed phenolic oxidation in limiting disease development. As a preliminary effort to understand the role of induced PPO in limiting disease development, we also examined the response of PPO promoter::beta-glucuronidase constructs when plants are challenged with P

  20. Antisense oligonucleotides from the stage-specific myeloid zinc finger gene MZF-1 inhibit granulopoiesis in vitro

    PubMed Central

    1991-01-01

    Zinc finger proteins are transcriptional regulators of other genes, often controlling developmental cascades of gene expression. A recently cloned zinc finger gene, MZF-1, was found to be preferentially expressed in myeloid cells. Using complementary radiolabeled MZF-1 RNA hybridized to human bone marrow smears in situ, it was discovered that the expression of MZF-1 is essentially limited to the myelocyte and metamyelocyte stages of granulopoiesis. Antisense but not sense oligonucleotides from MZF-1 significantly inhibited granulocyte colony- stimulating factor-driven granulocyte colony formation in vitro. PMID:1719120

  1. Targeting Long Noncoding RNA with Antisense Oligonucleotide Technology as Cancer Therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Tianyuan; Kim, Youngsoo; MacLeod, A Robert

    2016-01-01

    Recent annotation of the human transcriptome revealed that only 2 % of the genome encodes proteins while the majority of human genome is transcribed into noncoding RNAs. Although we are just beginning to understand the diverse roles long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) play in molecular and cellular processes, they have potentially important roles in human development and pathophysiology. However, targeting of RNA by traditional structure-based design of small molecule inhibitors has been difficult, due to a lack of understanding of the dynamic tertiary structures most RNA molecules adopt. Antisense oligonucleotides (ASOs) are capable of targeting specific genes or transcripts directly through Watson-Crick base pairing and thus can be designed based on sequence information alone. These agents have made possible specific targeting of "non-druggable targets" including RNA molecules. Here we describe how ASOs can be applied in preclinical studies to reduce levels of lncRNAs of interest.

  2. Transcriptional interference by RNA polymerase III affects expression of the Polr3e gene

    PubMed Central

    Yeganeh, Meghdad; Praz, Viviane; Cousin, Pascal; Hernandez, Nouria

    2017-01-01

    Overlapping gene arrangements can potentially contribute to gene expression regulation. A mammalian interspersed repeat (MIR) nested in antisense orientation within the first intron of the Polr3e gene, encoding an RNA polymerase III (Pol III) subunit, is conserved in mammals and highly occupied by Pol III. Using a fluorescence assay, CRISPR/Cas9-mediated deletion of the MIR in mouse embryonic stem cells, and chromatin immunoprecipitation assays, we show that the MIR affects Polr3e expression through transcriptional interference. Our study reveals a mechanism by which a Pol II gene can be regulated at the transcription elongation level by transcription of an embedded antisense Pol III gene. PMID:28289142

  3. Transcriptional interference by RNA polymerase III affects expression of the Polr3e gene.

    PubMed

    Yeganeh, Meghdad; Praz, Viviane; Cousin, Pascal; Hernandez, Nouria

    2017-02-15

    Overlapping gene arrangements can potentially contribute to gene expression regulation. A mammalian interspersed repeat (MIR) nested in antisense orientation within the first intron of the Polr3e gene, encoding an RNA polymerase III (Pol III) subunit, is conserved in mammals and highly occupied by Pol III. Using a fluorescence assay, CRISPR/Cas9-mediated deletion of the MIR in mouse embryonic stem cells, and chromatin immunoprecipitation assays, we show that the MIR affects Polr3e expression through transcriptional interference. Our study reveals a mechanism by which a Pol II gene can be regulated at the transcription elongation level by transcription of an embedded antisense Pol III gene.

  4. Detection of the HIV-1 Minus-Strand-Encoded Antisense Protein and Its Association with Autophagy

    PubMed Central

    Torresilla, Cynthia; Larocque, Émilie; Landry, Sébastien; Halin, Marilène; Coulombe, Yan; Masson, Jean-Yves; Mesnard, Jean-Michel

    2013-01-01

    HIV-1 proteins are synthesized from a single transcript in an unspliced form or following splicing, but the existence of an antisense protein (ASP) expressed from an antisense polyadenylated transcript has been suggested. Difficulties linked to the detection of this protein in mammalian cells led us to codon optimize its cDNA. Codon-optimized ASP was indeed efficiently detected in various transfected cell lines following flow cytometry and confocal microscopy analyses. Western blot analyses also led to the detection of optimized ASP in transfected cells but also provided evidence of its instability and high multimerization potential. ASP was mainly distributed in the cytoplasm in a punctate manner, which was reminiscent of autophagosomes. In agreement with this observation, a significant increase in ASP-positive cells and loss of its punctate distribution was observed in transfected cells when autophagy was inhibited at early steps. Induction of autophagy was confirmed by Western blot analyses that showed an ASP-mediated increase in levels of LC3b-II and Beclin 1, as well as colocalization and interaction between ASP and LC3. Interestingly, Myc-tagged ASP was detected in the context of proviral DNA following autophagy inhibition with a concomitant increase in the level and punctate distribution of LC3b-II. Finally, 3-methyladenine treatment of transfected or infected U937 cells decreased extracellular p24 levels in wild-type proviral DNA and to a much lesser extent in ASP-mutated proviral DNA. This study provides the first detection of ASP in mammalian cells by Western blotting. ASP-induced autophagy might explain the inherent difficulty in detecting this viral protein and might justify its presumed low abundance in infected cells. PMID:23427159

  5. Arginine-rich cell-penetrating peptides facilitate delivery of antisense oligomers into murine leukocytes and alter pre-mRNA splicing.

    PubMed

    Marshall, N B; Oda, S K; London, C A; Moulton, H M; Iversen, P L; Kerkvliet, N I; Mourich, D V

    2007-08-31

    Phosphorodiamidate morpholino oligomers (PMO) are synthetic antisense molecules that interfere with translation, pre-mRNA splicing and RNA synthesis. Like other gene-silencing technologies, PMO are poorly taken up by primary leukocytes without the use of physical or chemical delivery techniques. We sought an alternative delivery mechanism of PMO into immune cells that eliminates the need for such manipulations. Here we demonstrate the first use of arginine-rich cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs) to deliver PMO (P-PMO) directly into primary murine leukocytes for inhibition of gene expression and promotion of altered pre-mRNA splicing. We compared the P-PMO delivery efficacy of four arginine-rich CPPs including HIV Tat and penetratin, and one histidine rich CPP, and found that the (RXR)(4) peptide was the most efficacious for PMO delivery and targeted antisense effect. The delivery and antisense effects of P-PMO are time- and dose-dependent and influenced by the activation and maturation states of T cells and dendritic cells, respectively. Targeted expression of several genes using P-PMO is shown including surface signaling proteins (CD45 and OX-40), a cytokine (interleukin-2), and a nuclear transcription factor (Foxp3). Considering the abundance of naturally occurring alternatively spliced gene products involved in immune regulation, P-PMO offer an effective method for modulating gene activity for immunological research and applications beyond traditional antisense approaches.

  6. Impaired Wound Induction of 3-Deoxy-D-arabino-heptulosonate-7-phosphate (DAHP) Synthase and Altered Stem Development in Transgenic Potato Plants Expressing a DAHP Synthase Antisense Construct.

    PubMed Central

    Jones, J. D.; Henstrand, J. M.; Handa, A. K.; Herrmann, K. M.; Weller, S. C.

    1995-01-01

    Potato (Solanum tuberosum L.) cells were transformed with an antisense DNA construct encoding part of 3-deoxy-D-arabino-heptulosonate-7-phosphate (DAHP) synthase (EC 4.1.2.15), the first enzyme of the shikimate pathway, to examine the role(s) of this protein in plant growth and development. Chimeric DNA constructs contained the transcript start site, the first exon, and part of the first intron of the shkA gene in antisense or sense orientations under the control of the cauliflower mosaic virus 35S promoter. Some, but not all, of the transgenic plants expressing antisense DAHP synthase RNA showed reduced levels of wound-induced DAHP synthase enzyme activity, polypeptide, and mRNA 12 and 24 h after wounding. No alteration in the wound induction of DAHP synthase gene expression was observed in transgenic potato tubers containing the chimeric sense construct. Reduced steady-state levels of DAHP synthase mRNA were observed in stem and shoot tip tissue. Some plants with the chimeric antisense construct had reduced stem length, stem diameter, and reduced stem lignification. PMID:12228551

  7. Antisense Reduction of Mutant COMP Reduces Growth Plate Chondrocyte Pathology.

    PubMed

    Posey, Karen L; Coustry, Francoise; Veerisetty, Alka C; Hossain, Mohammad; Gattis, Danielle; Booten, Sheri; Alcorn, Joseph L; Seth, Punit P; Hecht, Jacqueline T

    2017-03-01

    Mutations in cartilage oligomeric matrix protein cause pseudoachondroplasia, a severe disproportionate short stature disorder. Mutant cartilage oligomeric matrix protein produces massive intracellular retention of cartilage oligomeric matrix protein, stimulating ER and oxidative stresses and inflammation, culminating in post-natal loss of growth plate chondrocytes, which compromises linear bone growth. Treatments for pseudoachondroplasia are limited because cartilage is relatively avascular and considered inaccessible. Here we report successful delivery and treatment using antisense oligonucleotide technology in our transgenic pseudoachondroplasia mouse model. We demonstrate delivery of human cartilage oligomeric matrix protein-specific antisense oligonucleotides to cartilage and reduction of cartilage oligomeric matrix protein expression, which largely alleviates pseudoachondroplasia growth plate chondrocyte pathology. One antisense oligonucleotide reduced steady-state levels of cartilage oligomeric matrix protein mRNA and dampened intracellular retention of mutant cartilage oligomeric matrix protein, leading to a reduction of inflammatory markers and cell death and partial restoration of proliferation. This novel and exciting work demonstrates that antisense-based therapy is a viable approach for treating pseudoachondroplasia and other human cartilage disorders. Copyright © 2017 The American Society of Gene and Cell Therapy. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Thermodynamic criteria for high hit rate antisense oligonucleotide design

    PubMed Central

    Matveeva, O. V.; Mathews, D. H.; Tsodikov, A. D.; Shabalina, S. A.; Gesteland, R. F.; Atkins, J. F.; Freier, S. M.

    2003-01-01

    Antisense oligonucleotides are used for therapeutic applications and in functional genomic studies. In practice, however, many of the oligonucleotides complementary to an mRNA have little or no antisense activity. Theoretical strategies to improve the ‘hit rate’ in antisense screens will reduce the cost of discovery and may lead to identification of antisense oligonucleotides with increased potency. Statistical analysis performed on data collected from more than 1000 experiments with phosphorothioate-modified oligonucleotides revealed that the oligo-probes, which form stable duplexes with RNA (ΔGo37 ≤ –30 kcal/mol) and have small self-interaction potential, are more frequently efficient than molecules that form less stable oligonucleotide–RNA hybrids or more stable self-structures. To achieve optimal statistical preference, the values for self-interaction should be (ΔGo37) ≥ –8 kcal/mol for inter-oligonucleotide pairing and (ΔGo37) ≥ –1.1 kcal/mol for intra-molecular pairing. Selection of oligonucleotides with these thermodynamic values in the analyzed experiments would have increased the ‘hit rate’ by as much as 6-fold. PMID:12930948

  9. Engineering Resistance Against Mungbean yellow mosaic India virus Using Antisense RNA.

    PubMed

    Haq, Q M I; Ali, Arif; Malathi, V G

    2010-06-01

    Yellow mosaic disease of cultivated legumes in South-East Asia, is caused by Mungbean yellow mosaic India virus (MYMIV) and Mungbean yellow mosaic virus (MYMV) belonging to the genus Begomovirus of the family Geminiviridae. Efforts to engineer resistance against the genus Begomovirus are focused mainly on silencing of complementary-sense virus genes involved in virus replication. Here we have targeted a complementary-sense gene (ACI) encoding Replication initiation Protein (Rep) to develop resistance against soybean isolate of Mungbean yellow mosaic India virus-[India:New Delhi:Soybean 2:1999], a bipartite begomovirus prevalent throughout the Indian subcontinent. We show that the legume host plants co-agroinoculated with infectious constructs of soybean isolate of Mungbean yellow mosaic India virus [India:New Delhi:Soybean 2:1999] along with this antisense Rep gene construct show resistance to the virus.

  10. The lytic replicon of bacteriophage P1 is controlled by an antisense RNA.

    PubMed Central

    Heinrich, J; Riedel, H D; Rückert, B; Lurz, R; Schuster, H

    1995-01-01

    The lytic replicon of phage P1 is used for DNA replication during the lytic cycle. It comprises about 2% of the P1 genome and contains the P1 C1 repressor-controlled operator-promoter element Op53.P53 and the kilA and the repL genes, in that order. Transcription of the lytic replicon of P53 and synthesis of the product of repL, but not kilA, are required for replicon function. We have identified an additional promoter, termed P53as (antisense), at the 5'-end of the kilA gene from which a 180 base transcript is constitutively synthesized and in the opposite direction to the P53 transcript. By using a promoter probe plasmid we show that transcription from P53 is strongly repressed by the C1 repressor, whereas that of P53as remains unaffected. Accordingly, the C1 repressor inhibits binding of Escherichia coli RNA polymerase to P53, but not to P53as, as shown by electron microscopy. Under non-repressed conditions transcription from P53 appears to be inhibited by P53as activity and vice versa. An inhibitory effect of P53as on the P1 lytic replicon was revealed by the construction and characterization of a P53as promoter-down mutant. Under non-repressed conditions transcription of repL and, as a consequence, replication of the plasmid is strongly enhanced when P53as is inactive. The results suggest a regulatory role for P53as on the P1 lytic replicon. Images PMID:7784198

  11. Transcription mediated insulation and interference direct gene cluster expression switches

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Tania; Brown, David; Murray, Struan C; Haenni, Simon; Halstead, James M; O'Connor, Leigh; Shipkovenska, Gergana; Steinmetz, Lars M; Mellor, Jane

    2014-01-01

    In yeast, many tandemly arranged genes show peak expression in different phases of the metabolic cycle (YMC) or in different carbon sources, indicative of regulation by a bi-modal switch, but it is not clear how these switches are controlled. Using native elongating transcript analysis (NET-seq), we show that transcription itself is a component of bi-modal switches, facilitating reciprocal expression in gene clusters. HMS2, encoding a growth-regulated transcription factor, switches between sense- or antisense-dominant states that also coordinate up- and down-regulation of transcription at neighbouring genes. Engineering HMS2 reveals alternative mono-, di- or tri-cistronic and antisense transcription units (TUs), using different promoter and terminator combinations, that underlie state-switching. Promoters or terminators are excluded from functional TUs by read-through transcriptional interference, while antisense TUs insulate downstream genes from interference. We propose that the balance of transcriptional insulation and interference at gene clusters facilitates gene expression switches during intracellular and extracellular environmental change. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.03635.001 PMID:25407679

  12. Transcription mediated insulation and interference direct gene cluster expression switches.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Tania; Fischl, Harry; Howe, Françoise S; Woloszczuk, Ronja; Serra Barros, Ana; Xu, Zhenyu; Brown, David; Murray, Struan C; Haenni, Simon; Halstead, James M; O'Connor, Leigh; Shipkovenska, Gergana; Steinmetz, Lars M; Mellor, Jane

    2014-11-19

    In yeast, many tandemly arranged genes show peak expression in different phases of the metabolic cycle (YMC) or in different carbon sources, indicative of regulation by a bi-modal switch, but it is not clear how these switches are controlled. Using native elongating transcript analysis (NET-seq), we show that transcription itself is a component of bi-modal switches, facilitating reciprocal expression in gene clusters. HMS2, encoding a growth-regulated transcription factor, switches between sense- or antisense-dominant states that also coordinate up- and down-regulation of transcription at neighbouring genes. Engineering HMS2 reveals alternative mono-, di- or tri-cistronic and antisense transcription units (TUs), using different promoter and terminator combinations, that underlie state-switching. Promoters or terminators are excluded from functional TUs by read-through transcriptional interference, while antisense TUs insulate downstream genes from interference. We propose that the balance of transcriptional insulation and interference at gene clusters facilitates gene expression switches during intracellular and extracellular environmental change.

  13. Cellular Delivery and Photochemical Activation of Antisense Agents through a Nucleobase Caging Strategy

    PubMed Central

    Govan, Jeane M.; Uprety, Rajendra; Thomas, Meryl; Lusic, Hrvoje; Lively, Mark O.; Deiters, Alexander

    2013-01-01

    Antisense oligonucleotides are powerful tools to regulate gene expression in cells and model organisms. However, a transfection or microinjection is needed for efficient delivery of the antisense agent. We report the conjugation of multiple HIV TAT peptides to a hairpin-protected antisense agent through a light-cleavable nucleobase caging group. This conjugation allows for the facile delivery of the antisense agent without a transfection reagent and photochemical activation offers precise control over gene expression. The developed approach is highly modular, as demonstrated by the conjugation of folic acid to the caged antisense agent. This enabled targeted cell delivery through cell-surface folate receptors followed by photochemical triggering of antisense activity. Importantly, the presented strategy delivers native oligonucleotides after light-activation, devoid of any delivery functionalities or modifications that could otherwise impair their antisense activity. PMID:23915424

  14. Identification of three novel antisense RNAs in the fur locus from unicellular cyanobacteria.

    PubMed

    Sevilla, Emma; Martín-Luna, Beatriz; González, Andrés; Gonzalo-Asensio, Jesús A; Peleato, María Luisa; Fillat, María F

    2011-12-01

    The interplay between Fur (ferric uptake regulator) proteins and small, non-coding RNAs has been described as a key regulatory loop in several bacteria. In the filamentous cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. PCC 7120, a large dicistronic transcript encoding the putative membrane protein Alr1690 and an α-furA RNA is involved in the modulation of the global regulator FurA. In this work we report the existence of three novel antisense RNAs in cyanobacteria and show that a cis α-furA RNA is conserved in very different genomic contexts, namely in the unicellular cyanobacteria Microcystis aeruginosa PCC 7806 and Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803. Syα-fur RNA covers only part of the coding sequence of the fur orthologue sll0567, whose flanking genes encode two hypothetical proteins. Transcriptional analysis of fur and its adjacent genes in Microcystis unravels a highly compact organization of this locus involving overlapping transcripts. Maα-fur RNA spans the whole Mafur CDS and part of the flanking dnaJ and sufE sequences. In addition, Mafur seems to be part of a dicistronic operon encoding this regulator and an α-sufE RNA. These results allow new insights into the transcriptomes of two unicellular cyanobacteria and suggest that in M. aeruginosa PCC 7806, the α-fur and α-sufE RNAs might participate in a regulatory connection between the genes of the dnaJ-fur-sufE locus.

  15. Short antisense-locked nucleic acids (all-LNAs) correct alternative splicing abnormalities in myotonic dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Wojtkowiak-Szlachcic, Agnieszka; Taylor, Katarzyna; Stepniak-Konieczna, Ewa; Sznajder, Lukasz J; Mykowska, Agnieszka; Sroka, Joanna; Thornton, Charles A; Sobczak, Krzysztof

    2015-03-31

    Myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1) is an autosomal dominant multisystemic disorder caused by expansion of CTG triplet repeats in 3'-untranslated region of DMPK gene. The pathomechanism of DM1 is driven by accumulation of toxic transcripts containing expanded CUG repeats (CUG(exp)) in nuclear foci which sequester several factors regulating RNA metabolism, such as Muscleblind-like proteins (MBNLs). In this work, we utilized very short chemically modified antisense oligonucleotides composed exclusively of locked nucleic acids (all-LNAs) complementary to CUG repeats, as potential therapeutic agents against DM1. Our in vitro data demonstrated that very short, 8- or 10-unit all-LNAs effectively bound the CUG repeat RNA and prevented the formation of CUG(exp)/MBNL complexes. In proliferating DM1 cells as well as in skeletal muscles of DM1 mouse model the all-LNAs induced the reduction of the number and size of CUG(exp) foci and corrected MBNL-sensitive alternative splicing defects with high efficacy and specificity. The all-LNAs had low impact on the cellular level of CUG(exp)-containing transcripts and did not affect the expression of other transcripts with short CUG repeats. Our data strongly indicate that short all-LNAs complementary to CUG repeats are a promising therapeutic tool against DM1.

  16. RNA Pol II Dynamics Modulate Co-transcriptional Chromatin Modification, CTD Phosphorylation, and Transcriptional Direction.

    PubMed

    Fong, Nova; Saldi, Tassa; Sheridan, Ryan M; Cortazar, Michael A; Bentley, David L

    2017-05-18

    Eukaryotic genes are marked by conserved post-translational modifications on the RNA pol II C-terminal domain (CTD) and the chromatin template. How the 5'-3' profiles of these marks are established is poorly understood. Using pol II mutants in human cells, we found that slow transcription repositioned specific co-transcriptionally deposited chromatin modifications; histone H3 lysine 36 trimethyl (H3K36me3) shifted within genes toward 5' ends, and histone H3 lysine 4 dimethyl (H3K4me2) extended farther upstream of start sites. Slow transcription also evoked a hyperphosphorylation of CTD Ser2 residues at 5' ends of genes that is conserved in yeast. We propose a "dwell time in the target zone" model to explain the effects of transcriptional dynamics on the establishment of co-transcriptionally deposited protein modifications. Promoter-proximal Ser2 phosphorylation is associated with a longer pol II dwell time at start sites and reduced transcriptional polarity because of strongly enhanced divergent antisense transcription at promoters. These results demonstrate that pol II dynamics help govern the decision between sense and divergent antisense transcription. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Enhancement of infectivity and persistence in vivo by HBZ, a natural antisense coded protein of HTLV-1.

    PubMed

    Arnold, Joshua; Yamamoto, Brenda; Li, Min; Phipps, Andrew J; Younis, Ihab; Lairmore, Michael D; Green, Patrick L

    2006-05-15

    Natural antisense viral transcripts have been recognized in retroviruses, including human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1), HIV-1, and feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV), and have been postulated to encode proteins important for the infection cycle and/or pathogenesis of the virus. The antisense strand of the HTLV-1 genome encodes HBZ, a novel nuclear basic region leucine zipper (b-ZIP) protein that in overexpression assays down-regulates Tax oncoprotein-induced viral transcription. Herein, we investigated the contribution of HBZ to HTLV-1-mediated immortalization of primary T lymphocytes in vitro and HTLV-1 infection in a rabbit animal model. HTLV-1 HBZ mutant viruses were generated and evaluated for viral gene expression, protein production, and immortalization capacity. Biologic properties of HBZ mutant viruses in vitro were indistinguishable from wild-type HTLV-1, providing the first direct evidence that HBZ is dispensable for viral replication and cellular immortalization. Rabbits inoculated with irradiated cells expressing HTLV-1 HBZ mutant viruses became persistently infected. However, these rabbits displayed a decreased antibody response to viral gene products and reduced proviral copies in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) as compared with wild-type HTLV-1-infected animals. Our findings indicated that HBZ was not required for in vitro cellular immortalization, but enhanced infectivity and persistence in inoculated rabbits. This study demonstrates that retroviruses use negative-strand-encoded proteins in the establishment of chronic viral infections.

  18. Volatility in mRNA secondary structure as a design principle for antisense.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Erik; Srivastava, Ranjan

    2013-02-01

    Designing effective antisense sequences is a formidable problem. A method for predicting efficacious antisense holds the potential to provide fundamental insight into this biophysical process. More practically, such an understanding increases the chance of successful antisense design as well as saving considerable time, money and labor. The secondary structure of an mRNA molecule is believed to be in a constant state of flux, sampling several different suboptimal states. We hypothesized that particularly volatile regions might provide better accessibility for antisense targeting. A computational framework, GenAVERT was developed to evaluate this hypothesis. GenAVERT used UNAFold and RNAforester to generate and compare the predicted suboptimal structures of mRNA sequences. Subsequent analysis revealed regions that were particularly volatile in terms of intramolecular hydrogen bonding, and thus potentially superior antisense targets due to their high accessibility. Several mRNA sequences with known natural antisense target sites as well as artificial antisense target sites were evaluated. Upon comparison, antisense sequences predicted based upon the volatility hypothesis closely matched those of the naturally occurring antisense, as well as those artificial target sites that provided efficient down-regulation. These results suggest that this strategy may provide a powerful new approach to antisense design.

  19. Two discrete elements are required for the replication of a repABC plasmid: an antisense RNA and a stem-loop structure.

    PubMed

    Venkova-Canova, Tatiana; Soberón, Nora E; Ramírez-Romero, Miguel A; Cevallos, Miguel A

    2004-12-01

    The repABC replicons contain an operon encoding the initiator protein (RepC) and partitioning proteins (RepA and RepB). The latter two proteins negatively regulate the transcription of the operon. In this article we have identified two novel regulatory elements, located within the conserved repB-repC intergenic sequence, which negatively modulate the expression of repC, in plasmid p42d of Rhizobium etli. One of them is a small antisense RNA and the other is a stem-loop structure in the repABC mRNA that occludes the Shine-Dalgarno sequence of repC. According to in vivo and in vitro analyses, the small antisense RNA (57-59 nt) resembles canonical negative regulators of replication because: (i) it is transcribed from a strong constitutive promoter (P2), (ii) the transcript overlaps untranslated region upstream of the RepC coding sequences, (iii) the RNA forms one secondary structure acting as a rho-independent terminator, (iv) the antisense RNA is a strong trans-incompatibility factor and (v) its presence reduces the level of repC expression. Surprisingly, both of these seemingly negative regulators are required for efficient plasmid replication.

  20. Antisense targeting of 3' end elements involved in DUX4 mRNA processing is an efficient therapeutic strategy for facioscapulohumeral dystrophy: a new gene-silencing approach.

    PubMed

    Marsollier, Anne-Charlotte; Ciszewski, Lukasz; Mariot, Virginie; Popplewell, Linda; Voit, Thomas; Dickson, George; Dumonceaux, Julie

    2016-04-15

    Defects in mRNA 3'end formation have been described to alter transcription termination, transport of the mRNA from the nucleus to the cytoplasm, stability of the mRNA and translation efficiency. Therefore, inhibition of polyadenylation may lead to gene silencing. Here, we choose facioscapulohumeral dystrophy (FSHD) as a model to determine whether or not targeting key 3' end elements involved in mRNA processing using antisense oligonucleotide drugs can be used as a strategy for gene silencing within a potentially therapeutic context. FSHD is a gain-of-function disease characterized by the aberrant expression of the Double homeobox 4 (DUX4) transcription factor leading to altered pathogenic deregulation of multiple genes in muscles. Here, we demonstrate that targeting either the mRNA polyadenylation signal and/or cleavage site is an efficient strategy to down-regulate DUX4 expression and to decrease the abnormally high-pathological expression of genes downstream of DUX4. We conclude that targeting key functional 3' end elements involved in pre-mRNA to mRNA maturation with antisense drugs can lead to efficient gene silencing and is thus a potentially effective therapeutic strategy for at least FSHD. Moreover, polyadenylation is a crucial step in the maturation of almost all eukaryotic mRNAs, and thus all mRNAs are virtually eligible for this antisense-mediated knockdown strategy.

  1. Inhibition of dendrite formation in mouse melanocytes transiently transfected with antisense DNA to myosin Va

    PubMed Central

    EDGAR, ALASDAIR J.; BENNETT, JONATHAN P.

    1999-01-01

    In mice a molecular motor of the myosin V class (designated myosin Va) is known to be the product of the dilute locus, where a mutation prevents melanosome transport in melanocytes. There is conflicting evidence about whether it has a role in dendrite outgrowth. We investigated its role by transiently transfecting antisense oligonucleotides to inhibit its expression in a melanocyte cell line. We demonstrated mRNA and protein expression of myosin Va in 3 mouse melanocyte lines and 1 human melanoma cell line, using RT-PCR and immunoblotting. Two splice variants were found in human cells whilst only the longer transcript, containing an additional exon, was present in mouse melanocyte lines. The shorter variant was detected in other mouse tissues. Myosin Va protein levels were similar in 3 melanocyte lines with differing amounts of pigmentation, indicating that expression of myosin Va is not tightly coupled to expression of melanin. Immunocytochemistry showed 2 types of myosin Va localisation. A punctate pattern of staining concentrated in the perinuclear region was indicative of organelle association, and the observation of occasional linear punctate staining aligned with F-actin bundles supported the idea that myosin Va has a role in transporting melanosomes along actin filaments. Staining was also intense at tips of dendrites and at sites of dendrite-cell contact, consistent with a possible role in dendrite growth. Transient transfection of antisense phosphorothioate oligodeoxynucleotides targeted against myosin Va mRNA reduced expression of myosin Va protein in cultured mouse melan-a melanocytes by over 70% 20 h after transfection whereas a control (shuffled sequence) oligonucleotide did not. Upon trypsinisation and replating these cells the capacity of the transfected cells to extend new dendrites was reduced in the cells containing the specific antisense oligonucleotides but unaffected by the control oligonucleotide. Image analysis confirmed that the effect of

  2. Therapeutic potentialities of EWS-Fli-1 mRNA-targeted vectorized antisense oligonucleotides.

    PubMed

    Maksimenko, A; Lambert, G; Bertrand, J R; Fattal, E; Couvreur, P; Malvy, C

    2003-12-01

    We have used structured antisense oligonucleotides (AON), which are protected against extra and intracellular degradation by their internal structure. We have shown that if correctly designed this structure does not prevent them from hybridizing to the mRNA target. This concept allows reducing the number of thioate groups in the oligonucleotide and therefore the potential toxicity. Junction oncogenes are found in cancers such as certain leukemias, Ewing sarcoma, and thyroid papillary carcinomas. Ewing sarcoma is a cancer of children and young adults with bone metastasis. It is caused by a chromosomic translocation t(11;22) (q24;q12) creating a fusion gene between the genes EWS and Fli-1 giving rise to a chimeric protein which is an unnatural transcription factor. Immortalized NIH/3T3 cells transfected by the EWS-Fli-1 cDNA under the control of the LTR retroviral promoter--which do not undergo apoptosis and which became tumoral--were used for this study. As a model of Ewing sarcoma in nude mice, we have used permanently expressing human EWS-Fli-1 cells grafted to nude mice. The nanospheres or nanocapsules have been used to deliver two different AON: a phosphorothioate, and a structured chimeric AON, both targeted toward the junction area of EWS-Fli-1. Both types of AON-loaded nanoparticles inhibited the growth of the xenografted tumor after intratumoral injections into nude mice, whereas similar nanoparticles with control oligonucleotides had no effect. With AON in nanospheres, we have shown after 24 hours that the mRNA of EWS-Fli-1 was specifically down-regulated, confirming the antisense activity of the targeted AON.

  3. Antisense-Based Progerin Downregulation in HGPS-Like Patients’ Cells

    PubMed Central

    Harhouri, Karim; Navarro, Claire; Baquerre, Camille; Da Silva, Nathalie; Bartoli, Catherine; Casey, Frank; Mawuse, Guedenon Koffi; Doubaj, Yassamine; Lévy, Nicolas; De Sandre-Giovannoli, Annachiara

    2016-01-01

    Progeroid laminopathies, including Hutchinson-Gilford Progeria Syndrome (HGPS, OMIM #176670), are premature and accelerated aging diseases caused by defects in nuclear A-type Lamins. Most HGPS patients carry a de novo point mutation within exon 11 of the LMNA gene encoding A-type Lamins. This mutation activates a cryptic splice site leading to the deletion of 50 amino acids at its carboxy-terminal domain, resulting in a truncated and permanently farnesylated Prelamin A called Prelamin A Δ50 or Progerin. Some patients carry other LMNA mutations affecting exon 11 splicing and are named “HGPS-like” patients. They also produce Progerin and/or other truncated Prelamin A isoforms (Δ35 and Δ90) at the transcriptional and/or protein level. The results we present show that morpholino antisense oligonucleotides (AON) prevent pathogenic LMNA splicing, markedly reducing the accumulation of Progerin and/or other truncated Prelamin A isoforms (Prelamin A Δ35, Prelamin A Δ90) in HGPS-like patients’ cells. Finally, a patient affected with Mandibuloacral Dysplasia type B (MAD-B, carrying a homozygous mutation in ZMPSTE24, encoding an enzyme involved in Prelamin A maturation, leading to accumulation of wild type farnesylated Prelamin A), was also included in this study. These results provide preclinical proof of principle for the use of a personalized antisense approach in HGPS-like and MAD-B patients, who may therefore be eligible for inclusion in a therapeutic trial based on this approach, together with classical HGPS patients. PMID:27409638

  4. Antisense inhibition of mitochondrial pyruvate dehydrogenase E1alpha subunit in anther tapetum causes male sterility.

    PubMed

    Yui, Rika; Iketani, Satoru; Mikami, Tetsuo; Kubo, Tomohiko

    2003-04-01

    We hypothesized that cytoplasmic male sterility (CMS) in sugar beet may be the consequence of mitochondrial dysfunctions affecting normal anther development. To test the hypothesis, we attempted to mimic the sugar beet CMS phenotype by inhibiting the expression of mitochondrial pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH), which is essential for the operation of the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle. Screening with a cDNA library of sugar beet flower buds allowed the identification of two PDH E1alpha subunit genes (bvPDH_E1alpha-1 and bvPDH_E1alpha-2). bvPDH_E1alpha-1 was found to be highly expressed in tap roots, whereas bvPDH_E1alpha-2 was expressed most abundantly in flower buds. Green fluorescent protein (GFP) fusion of bvPDH_E1alpha revealed mitochondrial targeting properties. A 300-bp bvPDH_E1alpha-1 cDNA sequence (from +620 to +926) was connected to a tapetum-specific promoter in the antisense orientation and then introduced into tobacco. Antisense expression of bvPDH_E1alpha-1 resulted in conspicuously decreased endogenous bvPDH_E1alpha-1 transcripts and male sterility. The tapetum in the male-sterile anthers showed swelling or abnormal vacuolation. It is also worth noting that in the sterile anthers, cell organelles, such as elaioplasts, tapetosomes and orbicules were poorly formed and microspores exhibited aberrant exine development. These features are shared by sugar beet CMS. The results thus clearly indicate that inhibition of PDH activity in anther tapetum is sufficient to cause male sterility, a phenocopy of the sugar beet CMS.

  5. Reversible cardiac fibrosis and heart failure induced by conditional expression of an antisense mRNA of the mineralocorticoid receptor in cardiomyocytes

    PubMed Central

    Beggah, Ahmed T.; Escoubet, Brigitte; Puttini, Stefania; Cailmail, Stephane; Delage, Vanessa; Ouvrard-Pascaud, Antoine; Bocchi, Brigitte; Peuchmaur, Michel; Delcayre, Claude; Farman, Nicolette; Jaisser, Frederic

    2002-01-01

    Cardiac failure is a common feature in the evolution of cardiac disease. Among the determinants of cardiac failure, the renin–angiotensin–aldosterone system has a central role, and antagonism of the mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) has been proposed as a therapeutic strategy. In this study, we questioned the role of the MR, not of aldosterone, on heart function, using an inducible and cardiac-specific transgenic mouse model. We have generated a conditional knock-down model by expressing solely in the heart an antisense mRNA directed against the murine MR, a transcription factor with unknown targets in cardiomyocytes. Within 2–3 mo, mice developed severe heart failure and cardiac fibrosis in the absence of hypertension or chronic hyperaldosteronism. Moreover, cardiac failure and fibrosis were fully reversible when MR antisense mRNA expression was subsequently suppressed. PMID:11997477

  6. Antisense-mediated reduction in ADC activity causes minor alterations in the alkaloid profile of cultured hairy roots and regenerated transgenic plants of Nicotiana tabacum.

    PubMed

    Chintapakorn, Yupyn; Hamill, John D

    2007-10-01

    In species of the genus Nicotiana, as in most plants, the important polyamine precursor putrescine can be derived from the amino acids ornithine and/or arginine via the activity of ornithine decarboxylase (ODC) and/or arginine decarboxylase (ADC), respectively. Nicotiana species also utilize putrescine to provide the pyrollidine ring of the defensive alkaloid nicotine and its derivatives. Previous biochemical studies, involving callus tissues cultured in vitro, suggested that the ADC-mediated route to putrescine is used preferentially to provide the putrescine that is utilized for nicotine synthesis in N. tabacum. To ascertain if this is the case in N. tabacum plants, where nicotine synthesis takes place exclusively in roots, we used an antisense approach to diminish ADC activity in transformed roots which were cultured in vitro. Several independent lines were recovered possessing markedly reduced levels of ADC transcript and ADC activity compared to controls. Transcript levels of other genes in this general area of metabolism, including ODC, were not altered as a result of the antisense-mediated downregulation of ADC. Concentrations of nicotine were comparable in antisense-ADC and control hairy root lines throughout most of their respective culture cycles, except at the latter stages of growth when the nicotine content of antisense-ADC hairy root lines was observed to be approximately 20% lower than in controls. Levels of anatabine, the second most abundant alkaloid typically found in N. tabacum, which is not derived from putrescine, were slightly elevated in two antisense-ADC hairy root lines at the latter stages of their culture cycles compared to controls. Comparison of alkaloid levels in leaves of transgenic plants that were regenerated from separate antisense-ADC and control transformed root lines indicated that the former possessed slightly elevated levels of anatabine but did not contain average levels of leaf nicotine that were different from that of

  7. Intravesical NGF Antisense Therapy using Lipid Nanoparticle for Interstitial Cystitis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-10-01

    disease of the urinary bladder . The goal of this project is to advance key preclinical experiments towards the development of a new drug. Specific...factor (NGF) bladder drug delivery system targeting Interstitial Cystitis/Painful Bladder Syndrome (IC/PBS), IC/PBS is a chronic, severely debilitating...interstitial cystitis, painful bladder syndrome, liposome, nerve growth factor, afferent hyper-excitability, antisense 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF

  8. Intravesical NGF Antisense Therapy Using Lipid Nanoparticle for Interstitial Cystitis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-12-01

    INVESTIGATOR: Michael Chancellor CONTRACTING ORGANIZATION: Lipella Pharmaceuticals , Inc. Pittsburgh, PA 15208 REPORT DATE: December 2016 TYPE OF REPORT...Contact E-Mail: David.chancellor@lipella.com 5f. WORK UNIT NUMBER 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) Lipella Pharmaceuticals , Inc...local NGF antisense therapies for the IC/BPS indication. Lipella Pharmaceuticals Inc collaborated with investigators located at the University Of

  9. ISIS 301012 gene therapy for hypercholesterolemia: sense, antisense, or nonsense?

    PubMed

    Ito, Matthew K

    2007-10-01

    To present an overview of antisense technology and to review and assess available literature on the chemistry, pharmacology, pharmacokinetics, drug interactions, preclinical and clinical studies, dosing, and adverse events of ISIS 301012 in the treatment of hyperlipidemia. PubMed database searches were conducted from 1966 to May 2007 using the search terms ISIS 301012, antisense, oligonucleotide, hypercholesterolemia, hyperlipidemia, and apolipoprotein B. Bibliographies of relevant review articles and information from the manufacturer were reviewed for additional references. Available English-language literature, including abstracts, preclinical, and clinical trials, review articles, and scientific presentations were examined. Apolipoprotein B is an important structural protein on the surface of atherogenic lipoproteins such as remnant very-low-density lipoprotein and low-density lipoprotein and facilitates the clearance of these particles from the circulation by binding to the low-density lipoprotein receptor. Overproduction of apolipoprotein B or reduced receptor-mediated clearance of lipoproteins leads to elevated serum cholesterol levels and premature atherosclerosis. ISIS 301012 is an antisense oligonucleotide that inhibits apolipoprotein B production by binding directly to and reducing the expression of apolipoprotein B messenger RNA. In a clinical trial, ISIS 301012 50-400 mg administered weekly via subcutaneous injection for 4 weeks reduced apolipoprotein B by 14.3-47.4% and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol by 5.9-40% at 55 days. The most frequent adverse event was injection-site erythema that resolved spontaneously. Studies are ongoing to further define the safety, efficacy, and pharmacokinetics of ISIS 301012 as add-on therapy in patients with heterozygous and homozygous familial hypercholesterolemia. No pharmacokinetic interactions have been demonstrated with ezetimibe and simvastatin. ISIS 301012 is the first agent to enter clinical trials utilizing

  10. Viral Vector-Mediated Antisense Therapy for Genetic Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Imbert, Marine; Dias-Florencio, Gabriella; Goyenvalle, Aurélie

    2017-01-01

    RNA plays complex roles in normal health and disease and is becoming an important target for therapeutic intervention; accordingly, therapeutic strategies that modulate RNA function have gained great interest over the past decade. Antisense oligonucleotides (AOs) are perhaps the most promising strategy to modulate RNA expression through a variety of post binding events such as gene silencing through degradative or non-degradative mechanisms, or splicing modulation which has recently demonstrated promising results. However, AO technology still faces issues like poor cellular-uptake, low efficacy in target tissues and relatively rapid clearance from the circulation which means repeated injections are essential to complete therapeutic efficacy. To overcome these limitations, viral vectors encoding small nuclear RNAs have been engineered to shuttle antisense sequences into cells, allowing appropriate subcellular localization with pre-mRNAs and permanent correction. In this review, we outline the different strategies for antisense therapy mediated by viral vectors and provide examples of each approach. We also address the advantages and limitations of viral vector use, with an emphasis on their clinical application. PMID:28134780

  11. Targeting DMPK with Antisense Oligonucleotide Improves Muscle Strength in Myotonic Dystrophy Type 1 Mice.

    PubMed

    Jauvin, Dominic; Chrétien, Jessina; Pandey, Sanjay K; Martineau, Laurie; Revillod, Lucille; Bassez, Guillaume; Lachon, Aline; MacLeod, A Robert; Gourdon, Geneviève; Wheeler, Thurman M; Thornton, Charles A; Bennett, C Frank; Puymirat, Jack

    2017-06-16

    Myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1), a dominant hereditary muscular dystrophy, is caused by an abnormal expansion of a (CTG)n trinucleotide repeat in the 3' UTR of the human dystrophia myotonica protein kinase (DMPK) gene. As a consequence, mutant transcripts containing expanded CUG repeats are retained in nuclear foci and alter the function of splicing regulatory factors members of the MBNL and CELF families, resulting in alternative splicing misregulation of specific transcripts in affected DM1 tissues. In the present study, we treated DMSXL mice systemically with a 2'-4'-constrained, ethyl-modified (ISIS 486178) antisense oligonucleotide (ASO) targeted to the 3' UTR of the DMPK gene, which led to a 70% reduction in CUG(exp) RNA abundance and foci in different skeletal muscles and a 30% reduction in the heart. Furthermore, treatment with ISIS 486178 ASO improved body weight, muscle strength, and muscle histology, whereas no overt toxicity was detected. This is evidence that the reduction of CUG(exp) RNA improves muscle strength in DM1, suggesting that muscle weakness in DM1 patients may be improved following elimination of toxic RNAs. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Suppressing transthyretin production in mice, monkeys and humans using 2nd-Generation antisense oligonucleotides.

    PubMed

    Ackermann, Elizabeth J; Guo, Shuling; Benson, Merrill D; Booten, Sheri; Freier, Sue; Hughes, Steven G; Kim, Tae-Won; Jesse Kwoh, T; Matson, John; Norris, Dan; Yu, Rosie; Watt, Andy; Monia, Brett P

    2016-09-01

    Transthyretin amyloidosis (ATTR amyloidosis) is a rare disease that results from the deposition of misfolded transthyretin (TTR) protein from the plasma into tissues as amyloid fibrils, leading to polyneuropathy and cardiomyopathy. IONIS-TTRRx (ISIS 420915) is a 2nd-Generation 2'-O-(2-methoxyethyl) modified "2'-MOE" antisense oligonucleotide (ASO) that targets the TTR RNA transcript and reduces the levels of the TTR transcript through an RNaseH1 mechanism of action, leading to reductions in both mutant and wild-type TTR protein. The activity of IONIS-TTRRx to decrease TTR protein levels was studied in transgenic mice bearing the Ile84Ser human TTR mutant, in cynomolgus monkeys and in healthy human volunteers. Robust (>80%) reductions of plasma TTR protein were obtained in all three species treated with IONIS-TTRRx, which in mice and monkeys was associated with substantial reductions in hepatic TTR RNA levels. These effects were dose-dependent and lasted for weeks post-dosing. In a Phase 1 healthy volunteer study, treatment with IONIS-TTRRx for four weeks was well tolerated without any remarkable safety issues. TTR protein reductions up to 96% in plasma were observed. These nonclinical and clinical results support the ongoing Phase 3 development of IONIS-TTRRx in patients with ATTR amyloidosis.

  13. Dmpk gene deletion or antisense knockdown does not compromise cardiac or skeletal muscle function in mice

    PubMed Central

    Carrell, Samuel T.; Carrell, Ellie M.; Auerbach, David; Pandey, Sanjay K.; Bennett, C. Frank; Dirksen, Robert T.; Thornton, Charles A.

    2016-01-01

    Myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1) is a genetic disorder in which dominant-active DM protein kinase (DMPK) transcripts accumulate in nuclear foci, leading to abnormal regulation of RNA processing. A leading approach to treat DM1 uses DMPK-targeting antisense oligonucleotides (ASOs) to reduce levels of toxic RNA. However, basal levels of DMPK protein are reduced by half in DM1 patients. This raises concern that intolerance for further DMPK loss may limit ASO therapy, especially since mice with Dmpk gene deletion reportedly show cardiac defects and skeletal myopathy. We re-examined cardiac and muscle function in mice with Dmpk gene deletion, and studied post-maturity knockdown using Dmpk-targeting ASOs in mice with heterozygous deletion. Contrary to previous reports, we found no effect of Dmpk gene deletion on cardiac or muscle function, when studied on two genetic backgrounds. In heterozygous knockouts, the administration of ASOs reduced Dmpk expression in cardiac and skeletal muscle by > 90%, yet survival, electrocardiogram intervals, cardiac ejection fraction and muscle strength remained normal. The imposition of cardiac stress by pressure overload, or muscle stress by myotonia, did not unmask a requirement for DMPK. Our results support the feasibility and safety of using ASOs for post-transcriptional silencing of DMPK in muscle and heart. PMID:27522499

  14. Antisense COOLAIR mediates the coordinated switching of chromatin states at FLC during vernalization

    PubMed Central

    Csorba, Tibor; Questa, Julia I.; Sun, Qianwen; Dean, Caroline

    2014-01-01

    Long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) have been proposed to play important roles in gene regulation. However, their importance in epigenetic silencing and how specificity is determined remain controversial. We have investigated the cold-induced epigenetic switching mechanism involved in the silencing of Arabidopsis thaliana FLOWERING LOCUS C (FLC), which occurs during vernalization. Antisense transcripts, collectively named COOLAIR, are induced by prolonged cold before the major accumulation of histone 3 lysine 27 trimethylation (H3K27me3), characteristic of Polycomb silencing. We have found that COOLAIR is physically associated with the FLC locus and accelerates transcriptional shutdown of FLC during cold exposure. Removal of COOLAIR disrupted the synchronized replacement of H3K36 methylation with H3K27me3 at the intragenic FLC nucleation site during the cold. Consistently, genetic analysis showed COOLAIR and Polycomb complexes work independently in the cold-dependent silencing of FLC. Our data reveal a role for lncRNA in the coordinated switching of chromatin states that occurs during epigenetic regulation. PMID:25349421

  15. Artemis splice defects cause atypical SCID and can be restored in vitro by an antisense oligonucleotide.

    PubMed

    Ijspeert, H; Lankester, A C; van den Berg, J M; Wiegant, W; van Zelm, M C; Weemaes, C M R; Warris, A; Pan-Hammarström, Q; Pastink, A; van Tol, M J D; van Dongen, J J M; van Gent, D C; van der Burg, M

    2011-09-01

    Artemis deficiency is known to result in classical T-B- severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) in case of Artemis null mutations, or Omenn's syndrome in case of hypomorphic mutations in the Artemis gene. We describe two unrelated patients with a relatively mild clinical T-B- SCID phenotype, caused by different homozygous Artemis splice-site mutations. The splice-site mutations concern either dysfunction of a 5' splice-site or an intronic point mutation creating a novel 3' splice-site, resulting in mutated Artemis protein with residual activity or low levels of wild type (WT) Artemis transcripts. During the first 10 years of life, the patients suffered from recurrent infections necessitating antibiotic prophylaxis and intravenous immunoglobulins. Both mutations resulted in increased ionizing radiation sensitivity and insufficient variable, diversity and joining (V(D)J) recombination, causing B-lymphopenia and exhaustion of the naive T-cell compartment. The patient with the novel 3' splice-site had progressive granulomatous skin lesions, which disappeared after stem cell transplantation (SCT). We showed that an alternative approach to SCT can, in principle, be used in this case; an antisense oligonucleotide (AON) covering the intronic mutation restored WT Artemis transcript levels and non-homologous end-joining pathway activity in the patient fibroblasts.

  16. Long antisense non-coding RNAs and the epigenetic regulation of gene expression.

    PubMed

    Vadaie, Nadia; Morris, Kevin V

    2013-08-01

    Shortly after the completion of the human genome project in 2003, the Encode project was launched. The project was set out to identify the functional elements in the human genome, and unexpectedly it was found that >80% of the genome is transcribed. The Encode project identified those transcribed regions of the genome to be encoded by non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs). With only 2% of the genome carrying gene-encoding proteins, the conundrum was then, what is the function, if any, of these non-coding regions of the genome? These ncRNAs included both short and long RNAs. The focus of this review will be on antisense long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs), as these transcripts have been observed to play a role in gene expression of protein-coding genes. Some lncRNAs have been found to regulate protein-coding gene transcription at the epigenetic level, whereby they suppress transcription through the recruitment of protein complexes to target loci in the genome. Conversely, there are lncRNAs that have a positive role in gene expression with less known about mechanism, and some lncRNAs have been shown to be involved in post-transcriptional processes. Additionally, lncRNAs have been observed to regulate their own expression in a positive feedback loop by functioning as a decoy. The biological significance of lncRNAs is only just now becoming evident, with many lncRNAs found to play a significant role in several human diseases.

  17. Synthesis and properties of double-stranded antisense oligonucleotides connected with a pentaerythritol linker.

    PubMed

    Shibata, Aya; Ueno, Yoshihito; Matsuda, Akira; Kitade, Yukio

    2006-01-01

    This paper describes the synthesis and properties of double-stranded antisense oligonucleotides connected with a pentaerythritol linker. We found that double-stranded antisense oligonucleotides with aminomethyl residues have high affinity for single-stranded DNA or RNA in buffer solutions both with and without MgCl(2). Thus, these oligonucleotides would be useful as antisense oligonucleotides for targeting single-stranded RNA through triplex formation.

  18. Hfq restructures RNA-IN and RNA-OUT and facilitates antisense pairing in the Tn10/IS10 system

    PubMed Central

    Ross, Joseph A.; Ellis, Michael J.; Hossain, Shahan; Haniford, David B.

    2013-01-01

    Hfq functions in post-transcriptional gene regulation in a wide range of bacteria, usually by promoting base-pairing of mRNAs and trans-encoded sRNAs that share partial sequence complementarity. It is less clear if Hfq is required for pairing of cis-encoded RNAs (i.e., antisense RNAs) with their target mRNAs. In the current work, we have characterized the interactions between Escherichia coli Hfq and the components of the Tn10/IS10 antisense system, RNA-IN and RNA-OUT. We show that Hfq interacts with RNA-OUT through its proximal RNA-binding surface, as is typical for Hfq and trans-encoded sRNAs. In contrast, RNA-IN binds both proximal and distal RNA-binding surfaces in Hfq with a higher affinity for the latter, as is typical for mRNA interactions in canonical sRNA-mRNA pairs. Importantly, an amino acid substitution in Hfq that interferes with RNA binding to the proximal site negatively impacts RNA-IN:OUT pairing in vitro and suppresses the ability of Hfq to negatively regulate IS10 transposition in vivo. We also show that Hfq binding to RNA-IN and RNA-OUT alters secondary structure elements in both of these RNAs and speculate that this could be important in how Hfq facilitates RNA-IN:OUT pairing. Based on the results presented here, we suggest that Hfq could be involved in regulating RNA pairing in other antisense systems, including systems encoded by other transposable elements. PMID:23510801

  19. Gene Silencing by Gold Nanoshell-Mediated Delivery and Laser-Triggered Release of Antisense Oligonucleotide and siRNA

    PubMed Central

    Huschka, Ryan; Barhoumi, Aoune; Liu, Qing; Roth, Jack A.; Ji, Lin; Halas, Naomi J.

    2013-01-01

    The approach of RNA interference (RNAi)- using antisense DNA or RNA oligonucleotides to silence activity of a specific pathogenic gene transcript and reduce expression of the encoded protein- is very useful in dissecting genetic function and holds significant promise as a molecular therapeutic. A major obstacle in achieving gene silencing with RNAi technology is the systemic delivery of therapeutic oligonucleotides. Here we demonstrate an engineered gold nanoshell (NS)-based therapeutic oligonucleotide delivery vehicle, designed to release its cargo on demand upon illumination with a near-infrared (NIR) laser. A poly(L)lysine peptide (PLL) epilayer covalently attached to the NS surface (NS-PLL) is used to capture intact, single-stranded antisense DNA oligonucleotides, or alternatively, double-stranded short-interfering RNA (siRNA) molecules. Controlled release of the captured therapeutic oligonucleotides in each case is accomplished by continuous wave NIR laser irradiation at 800 nm, near the resonance wavelength of the nanoshell. Fluorescently tagged oligonucleotides were used to monitor the time-dependent release process and light-triggered endosomal release. A green fluorescent protein (GFP)-expressing human lung cancer H1299 cell line was used to determine cellular uptake and gene silencing mediated by the NS-PLL carrying GFP gene-specific single-stranded DNA antisense oligonucleotide (AON-GFP), or a double-stranded siRNA (siRNA-GFP), in vitro. Light-triggered delivery resulted in ∼ 47% and ∼49% downregulation of the targeted GFP expression by AON-GFP and siRNA-GFP, respectively. Cytotoxicity induced by both the NS-PLL delivery vector and by laser irradiation is minimal, as demonstrated by a XTT cell proliferation assay. PMID:22862291

  20. Putative mitochondrial polypeptides coded by expanded quadruplet codons, decoded by antisense tRNAs with unusual anticodons.

    PubMed

    Seligmann, Hervé

    2012-11-01

    Weak triplet codon-anticodon interactions render ribosome-free translation unlikely. Some modern tRNAs read quadruplet codons (tetracodons), suggesting vestigial ribosome-free translation. Here, mitochondrial genomes are explored for tetracoded overlapping protein coding (tetra)genes. Occasional single tetracodons within regular mitochondrial genes coevolve positively/negatively with antisense tRNAs with predicted reduced/expanded anticodons (depending on taxon), suggesting complex tetra-decoding mechanisms. Transcripts of antisense tRNAs with unusual anticodons are more abundant than of homologues with regular anticodons. Assuming overlapping tetracoding with silent 4th tetracodon position, BLAST aligns 10 putative tetragenes spanning 17% of regular human mitochondrial protein coding tricodons with 14 GenBank proteins. Various tests including predicted peptide secondary structures, 3rd codon position (of the regular main frame of the protein coding gene) conservation against replicational deamination mutation gradients, and circular code usage (overlapping genes avoid using circular code codons) confirm tetracoding in these overlapping tetragenes with silent 4th position, but not for BLAST-predicted tetragenes assuming silent 2nd or 3rd positions. This converges with tetradecoding mechanisms that are more compatible with silent 4th, than at other, tetracodon positions. Tetracoding increases with (a) GC-contents, perhaps conserved or switched on in high temperature conditions; (b) usage of theoretically predicted 'tessera' tetracodons; (c) 12s rRNA stability; and d) antisense tRNA numbers with predicted expanded anticodons. Most detected tetragenes are not evolutionarily conserved, apparently reflect specific, transient adaptations. Tetracoding increases with mammal longevity.

  1. Hfq restructures RNA-IN and RNA-OUT and facilitates antisense pairing in the Tn10/IS10 system.

    PubMed

    Ross, Joseph A; Ellis, Michael J; Hossain, Shahan; Haniford, David B

    2013-05-01

    Hfq functions in post-transcriptional gene regulation in a wide range of bacteria, usually by promoting base-pairing of mRNAs and trans-encoded sRNAs that share partial sequence complementarity. It is less clear if Hfq is required for pairing of cis-encoded RNAs (i.e., antisense RNAs) with their target mRNAs. In the current work, we have characterized the interactions between Escherichia coli Hfq and the components of the Tn10/IS10 antisense system, RNA-IN and RNA-OUT. We show that Hfq interacts with RNA-OUT through its proximal RNA-binding surface, as is typical for Hfq and trans-encoded sRNAs. In contrast, RNA-IN binds both proximal and distal RNA-binding surfaces in Hfq with a higher affinity for the latter, as is typical for mRNA interactions in canonical sRNA-mRNA pairs. Importantly, an amino acid substitution in Hfq that interferes with RNA binding to the proximal site negatively impacts RNA-IN:OUT pairing in vitro and suppresses the ability of Hfq to negatively regulate IS10 transposition in vivo. We also show that Hfq binding to RNA-IN and RNA-OUT alters secondary structure elements in both of these RNAs and speculate that this could be important in how Hfq facilitates RNA-IN:OUT pairing. Based on the results presented here, we suggest that Hfq could be involved in regulating RNA pairing in other antisense systems, including systems encoded by other transposable elements.

  2. Janus--a comprehensive tool investigating the two faces of transcription.

    PubMed

    Barann, Matthias; Esser, Daniela; Klostermeier, Ulrich C; Lappalainen, Tuuli; Luzius, Anne; Kuiper, Jan W P; Ammerpohl, Ole; Vater, Inga; Siebert, Reiner; Amstislavskiy, Vyacheslav; Sudbrak, Ralf; Lehrach, Hans; Schreiber, Stefan; Rosenstiel, Philip

    2013-07-01

    Protocols to generate strand-specific transcriptomes with next-generation sequencing platforms have been used by the scientific community roughly since 2008. Strand-specific reads allow for detection of antisense events and a higher resolution of expression profiles enabling extension of current transcript annotations. However, applications making use of this strandedness information are still scarce. Here we present a tool (Janus), which focuses on the identification of transcriptional active regions in antisense orientation to known and novel transcribed elements of the genome. Janus can compare the antisense events of multiple samples and assigns scores to identify mutual expression of either transcript in a sense/antisense pair, which could hint to regulatory mechanisms. Janus is able to make use of single-nucleotide variant (SNV) and methylation data, if available, and reports the sense to antisense ratio of regions in the vicinity of the identified genetic and epigenetic variation. Janus interrogates positions of heterozygous SNVs to identify strand-specific allelic imbalance. Janus is written in C/C++ and freely available at http://www.ikmb.uni-kiel.de/janus/janus.html under terms of GNU General Public License, for both, Linux and Windows 64×. Although the binaries will work without additional downloads, the software depends on bamtools (https://github.com/pezmaster31/bamtools) for compilation. A detailed tutorial section is included in the first section of the supplemental material and included as brief readme.txt in the tutorial archive. Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online.

  3. Transcriptional profiling of mouse uterus at pre-implantation stage under VEGF repression.

    PubMed

    Ji, Yan; Lu, Xiaodan; Zhong, Qingping; Liu, Peng; An, Yao; Zhang, Yuntao; Zhang, Shujie; Jia, Ruirui; Tesfamariam, Isaias G; Kahsay, Abraha G; Zhang, Luqing; Zhu, Wensheng; Zheng, Yaowu

    2013-01-01

    Uterus development during pre-implantation stage affects implantation process and embryo growth. Aberrant uterus development is associated with many human reproductive diseases. Among the factors regulating uterus development, vascular remodeling promoters are critical for uterus function and fertility. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), as one of the major members, has been found to be important in endothelial cell growth and blood vessel development, as well as in non-endothelial cells. VEGF mediation in reproduction has been broadly studied, but VEGF-induced transcriptional machinery during implantation window has not been systematically studied. In this study, a genetically repressed VEGF mouse model was used to analyze uterus transcriptome at gestation 2.5 (G2.5) by Solexa/Illumina's digital gene expression (DGE) system. A number of 831 uterus-specific and 2398 VEGF-regulated genes were identified. Gene ontology (GO) analysis indicated that genes actively involved in uterus development were members of collagen biosynthesis, cell proliferation and cell apoptosis. Uterus-specific genes were enriched in activities of phosphatidyl inositol phosphate kinase, histone H3-K36 demethylation and protein acetylation. Among VEGF-regulated genes, up-regulated were associated with RNA polymerase III activity while down-regulated were strongly related with muscle development. Comparable numbers of antisense transcripts were identified. Expression levels of the antisense transcripts were found tightly correlated with their sense expression levels, an indication of possibly non-specific transcripts generated around the active promoters and enhancers. The antisense transcripts with exceptionally high or low expression levels and the antisense transcripts under VEGF regulation were also identified. These transcripts may be important candidates in regulation of uterus development. This study provides a global survey on genes and antisense transcripts regulated by VEGF in

  4. Transcriptional Profiling of Mouse Uterus at Pre-Implantation Stage under VEGF Repression

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Yan; Lu, Xiaodan; Zhong, Qingping; Liu, Peng; An, Yao; Zhang, Yuntao; Zhang, Shujie; Jia, Ruirui; Tesfamariam, Isaias G.; Kahsay, Abraha G.; Zhang, Luqing; Zhu, Wensheng; Zheng, Yaowu

    2013-01-01

    Uterus development during pre-implantation stage affects implantation process and embryo growth. Aberrant uterus development is associated with many human reproductive diseases. Among the factors regulating uterus development, vascular remodeling promoters are critical for uterus function and fertility. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), as one of the major members, has been found to be important in endothelial cell growth and blood vessel development, as well as in non-endothelial cells. VEGF mediation in reproduction has been broadly studied, but VEGF-induced transcriptional machinery during implantation window has not been systematically studied. In this study, a genetically repressed VEGF mouse model was used to analyze uterus transcriptome at gestation 2.5 (G2.5) by Solexa/Illumina’s digital gene expression (DGE) system. A number of 831 uterus-specific and 2398 VEGF-regulated genes were identified. Gene ontology (GO) analysis indicated that genes actively involved in uterus development were members of collagen biosynthesis, cell proliferation and cell apoptosis. Uterus-specific genes were enriched in activities of phosphatidyl inositol phosphate kinase, histone H3-K36 demethylation and protein acetylation. Among VEGF-regulated genes, up-regulated were associated with RNA polymerase III activity while down-regulated were strongly related with muscle development. Comparable numbers of antisense transcripts were identified. Expression levels of the antisense transcripts were found tightly correlated with their sense expression levels, an indication of possibly non-specific transcripts generated around the active promoters and enhancers. The antisense transcripts with exceptionally high or low expression levels and the antisense transcripts under VEGF regulation were also identified. These transcripts may be important candidates in regulation of uterus development. This study provides a global survey on genes and antisense transcripts regulated by VEGF

  5. The antiphasic regulatory module comprising CDF5 and its antisense RNA FLORE links the circadian clock to photoperiodic flowering.

    PubMed

    Henriques, Rossana; Wang, Huan; Liu, Jun; Boix, Marc; Huang, Li-Fang; Chua, Nam-Hai

    2017-07-31

    Circadian rhythms of gene expression are generated by the combinatorial action of transcriptional and translational feedback loops as well as chromatin remodelling events. Recently, long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) that are natural antisense transcripts (NATs) to transcripts encoding central oscillator components were proposed as modulators of core clock function in mammals (Per) and fungi (frq/qrf). Although oscillating lncRNAs exist in plants, their functional characterization is at an initial stage. By screening an Arabidopsis thaliana lncRNA custom-made array we identified CDF5 LONG NONCODING RNA (FLORE), a circadian-regulated lncRNA that is a NAT of CDF5. Quantitative real-time RT-PCR confirmed the circadian regulation of FLORE, whereas GUS-staining and flowering time evaluation were used to determine its biological function. FLORE and CDF5 antiphasic expression reflects mutual inhibition in a similar way to frq/qrf. Moreover, whereas the CDF5 protein delays flowering by directly repressing FT transcription, FLORE promotes it by repressing several CDFs (CDF1, CDF3, CDF5) and increasing FT transcript levels, indicating both cis and trans function. We propose that the CDF5/FLORE NAT pair constitutes an additional circadian regulatory module with conserved (mutual inhibition) and unique (function in trans) features, able to fine-tune its own circadian oscillation, and consequently, adjust the onset of flowering to favourable environmental conditions. © 2017 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2017 New Phytologist Trust.

  6. Antisense-mediated down-regulation of putrescine N-methyltransferase activity in transgenic Nicotiana tabacum L. can lead to elevated levels of anatabine at the expense of nicotine.

    PubMed

    Chintapakorn, Yupynn; Hamill, John D

    2003-09-01

    Nicotiana tabacum L. produces a number of pyridine alkaloids, with nicotine representing the major component and anatabine comprising most of the remainder of the alkaloid fraction. An antisense approach was used here to down-regulate activity of the important enzyme putrescine N-methyltransferase (PMT) in transformed roots of this species to determine effects upon alkaloid metabolism. Transformed root lines were produced that contained markedly reduced PMT activity, with a concomitant reduction in nicotine content compared to controls. No negative effects upon growth were observed. Several antisense-PMT transformed root lines, and also leaf tissues of regenerated transformed plants, showed a substantial increase in anatabine content relative to controls. Northern hybridization experiments indicated that the antisense-PMT manipulation had little or no effect upon the transcript levels of other genes encoding enzymes involved in alkaloid metabolism, including quinolinate acid phosphoribosyltransferase (QPT). The latter enzyme plays a key role in regulating the synthesis of nicotinic acid which supplies the pyridine ring necessary for both nicotine and anatabine synthesis. We suggest that elevated anatabine levels in antisense-PMT lines are a direct consequence of a relative oversupply of nicotinic acid which, in the absence of adequate levels of 1-methyl-delta(1)-pyrrolinium cation (the ultimate product of PMT activity), is used to synthesise anatabine directly. As is discussed, no naturally occurring species or varieties of Nicotiana are known that typically produce high levels of anatabine in root or leaf tissues, meaning that the antisense PMT transgenics produced in this study have no natural counterpart. These experiments thus represent an example of metabolic engineering of plant pyridine metabolism, via antisense down-regulation of gene expression in a contributing pathway leading to secondary metabolite biosynthesis.

  7. SINEUPs: A new class of natural and synthetic antisense long non-coding RNAs that activate translation

    PubMed Central

    Zucchelli, S; Cotella, D; Takahashi, H; Carrieri, C; Cimatti, L; Fasolo, F; Jones, MH; Sblattero, D; Sanges, R; Santoro, C; Persichetti, F; Carninci, P; Gustincich, S

    2015-01-01

    Over the past 10 years, it has emerged that pervasive transcription in mammalian genomes has a tremendous impact on several biological functions. Most of transcribed RNAs are lncRNAs and repetitive elements. In this review, we will detail the discovery of a new functional class of natural and synthetic antisense lncRNAs that stimulate translation of sense mRNAs. These molecules have been named SINEUPs since their function requires the activity of an embedded inverted SINEB2 sequence to UP-regulate translation. Natural SINEUPs suggest that embedded Transposable Elements may represent functional domains in long non-coding RNAs. Synthetic SINEUPs may be designed by targeting the antisense sequence to the mRNA of choice representing the first scalable tool to increase protein synthesis of potentially any gene of interest. We will discuss potential applications of SINEUP technology in the field of molecular biology experiments, in protein manufacturing as well as in therapy of haploinsufficiencies. PMID:26259533

  8. RNA toxicity from the ALS/FTD C9ORF72 expansion is mitigated by antisense intervention.

    PubMed

    Donnelly, Christopher J; Zhang, Ping-Wu; Pham, Jacqueline T; Haeusler, Aaron R; Heusler, Aaron R; Mistry, Nipun A; Vidensky, Svetlana; Daley, Elizabeth L; Poth, Erin M; Hoover, Benjamin; Fines, Daniel M; Maragakis, Nicholas; Tienari, Pentti J; Petrucelli, Leonard; Traynor, Bryan J; Wang, Jiou; Rigo, Frank; Bennett, C Frank; Blackshaw, Seth; Sattler, Rita; Rothstein, Jeffrey D

    2013-10-16

    A hexanucleotide GGGGCC repeat expansion in the noncoding region of the C9ORF72 gene is the most common genetic abnormality in familial and sporadic amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and frontotemporal dementia (FTD). The function of the C9ORF72 protein is unknown, as is the mechanism by which the repeat expansion could cause disease. Induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC)-differentiated neurons from C9ORF72 ALS patients revealed disease-specific (1) intranuclear GGGGCCexp RNA foci, (2) dysregulated gene expression, (3) sequestration of GGGGCCexp RNA binding protein ADARB2, and (4) susceptibility to excitotoxicity. These pathological and pathogenic characteristics were confirmed in ALS brain and were mitigated with antisense oligonucleotide (ASO) therapeutics to the C9ORF72 transcript or repeat expansion despite the presence of repeat-associated non-ATG translation (RAN) products. These data indicate a toxic RNA gain-of-function mechanism as a cause of C9ORF72 ALS and provide candidate antisense therapeutics and candidate human pharmacodynamic markers for therapy.

  9. Discrimination of heterogenous mRNAs encoding strychnine-sensitive glycine receptors in Xenopus oocytes by antisense oligonucleotides.

    PubMed Central

    Akagi, H; Patton, D E; Miledi, R

    1989-01-01

    Three synthetic oligodeoxynucleotides complementary to different parts of an RNA encoding a glycine receptor subunit were used to discriminate heterogenous mRNAs coding for glycine receptors in adult and neonatal rat spinal cord. Injection of the three antisense oligonucleotides into Xenopus oocytes specifically inhibited the expression of glycine receptors by adult spinal cord mRNA. In contrast, the antisense oligonucleotides were much less potent in inhibiting the expression of glycine receptors encoded by neonatal spinal cord mRNA. Northern blot analysis revealed that the oligonucleotides hybridized mostly to an adult cord transcript of approximately 10 kilobases in size. This band was also present in neonatal spinal cord mRNA but its density was about one-fourth of the adult cord message. There was no intense band in the low molecular weight position (approximately 2 kilobases), the existence of which was expected from electrophysiological studies with size-fractionated mRNA of neonatal spinal cord. Our results suggest that in the rat spinal cord there are at least three different types of mRNAs encoding functional strychnine-sensitive glycine receptors. Images PMID:2479016

  10. Binding of the transcription factor Atf1 to promoters serves as a barrier to phase nucleosome arrays and avoid cryptic transcription

    PubMed Central

    García, Patricia; Paulo, Esther; Gao, Jun; Wahls, Wayne P.; Ayté, José; Lowy, Ernesto; Hidalgo, Elena

    2014-01-01

    Schizosaccharomyces pombe displays a large transcriptional response common to several stress conditions, regulated primarily by the transcription factor Atf1. Atf1-dependent promoters contain especially broad nucleosome depleted regions (NDRs) prior to stress imposition. We show here that basal binding of Atf1 to these promoters competes with histones to create wider NDRs at stress genes. Moreover, deletion of atf1 results in nucleosome disorganization specifically at stress coding regions and derepresses antisense transcription. Our data indicate that the transcription factor binding to promoters acts as an effective barrier to fix the +1 nucleosome and phase downstream nucleosome arrays to prevent cryptic transcription. PMID:25122751

  11. A single administration of morpholino antisense oligomer rescues spinal muscular atrophy in mouse.

    PubMed

    Porensky, Paul N; Mitrpant, Chalermchai; McGovern, Vicki L; Bevan, Adam K; Foust, Kevin D; Kaspar, Brain K; Wilton, Stephen D; Burghes, Arthur H M

    2012-04-01

    Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is an autosomal-recessive disorder characterized by α-motor neuron loss in the spinal cord anterior horn. SMA results from deletion or mutation of the Survival Motor Neuron 1 gene (SMN1) and retention of SMN2. A single nucleotide difference between SMN1 and SMN2 results in exclusion of exon 7 from the majority of SMN2 transcripts, leading to decreased SMN protein levels and development of SMA. A series of splice enhancers and silencers regulate incorporation of SMN2 exon 7; these splice motifs can be blocked with antisense oligomers (ASOs) to alter SMN2 transcript splicing. We have evaluated a morpholino (MO) oligomer against ISS-N1 [HSMN2Ex7D(-10,-29)], and delivered this MO to postnatal day 0 (P0) SMA pups (Smn-/-, SMN2+/+, SMNΔ7+/+) by intracerebroventricular (ICV) injection. Survival was increased markedly from 15 days to >100 days. Delayed CNS MO injection has moderate efficacy, and delayed peripheral injection has mild survival advantage, suggesting that early CNS ASO administration is essential for SMA therapy consideration. ICV treatment increased full-length SMN2 transcript as well as SMN protein in neural tissue, but only minimally in peripheral tissue. Interval analysis shows a decrease in alternative splice modification over time. We suggest that CNS increases of SMN will have a major impact on SMA, and an early increase of the SMN level results in correction of motor phenotypes. Finally, the early introduction by intrathecal delivery of MO oligomers is a potential treatment for SMA patients.

  12. Design, assembly, and activity of antisense DNA nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Keum, Jung-Won; Ahn, Jin-Ho; Bermudez, Harry

    2011-12-16

    Discrete DNA nanostructures allow simultaneous features not possible with traditional DNA forms: encapsulation of cargo, display of multiple ligands, and resistance to enzymatic digestion. These properties suggested using DNA nanostructures as a delivery platform. Here, DNA pyramids displaying antisense motifs are shown to be able to specifically degrade mRNA and inhibit protein expression in vitro, and they show improved cell uptake and gene silencing when compared to linear DNA. Furthermore, the activity of these pyramids can be regulated by the introduction of an appropriate complementary strand. These results highlight the versatility of DNA nanostructures as functional devices.

  13. In vitro correction of a pseudoexon-generating deep intronic mutation in LGMD2A by antisense oligonucleotides and modified small nuclear RNAs.

    PubMed

    Blázquez, Lorea; Aiastui, Ana; Goicoechea, Maria; Martins de Araujo, Mafalda; Avril, Aurélie; Beley, Cyriaque; García, Luis; Valcárcel, Juan; Fortes, Puri; López de Munain, Adolfo

    2013-10-01

    Limb-girdle muscular dystrophy type 2A (LGMD2A) is the most frequent autosomal recessive muscular dystrophy. It is caused by mutations in the calpain-3 (CAPN3) gene. The majority of the mutations described to date are located in the coding sequence of the gene. However, it is estimated that 25% of the mutations are present at exon-intron boundaries and modify the pre-mRNA splicing of the CAPN3 transcript. We have previously described the first deep intronic mutation in the CAPN3 gene: c.1782+1072G>C mutation. This mutation causes the pseudoexonization of an intronic sequence of the CAPN3 gene in the mature mRNA. In the present work, we show that the point mutation generates the inclusion of the pseudoexon in the mRNA using a minigene assay. In search of a treatment that restores normal splicing, splicing modulation was induced by RNA-based strategies, which included antisense oligonucleotides and modified small-nuclear RNAs. The best effect was observed with antisense sequences, which induced pseudoexon skipping in both HeLa cells cotransfected with mutant minigene and in fibroblasts from patients. Finally, transfection of antisense sequences and siRNA downregulation of serine/arginine-rich splicing factor 1 (SRSF1) indicate that binding of this factor to splicing enhancer sequences is involved in pseudoexon activation.

  14. A Universal Positive-Negative Selection System for Gene Targeting in Plants Combining an Antibiotic Resistance Gene and Its Antisense RNA.

    PubMed

    Nishizawa-Yokoi, Ayako; Nonaka, Satoko; Osakabe, Keishi; Saika, Hiroaki; Toki, Seiichi

    2015-09-01

    Gene targeting (GT) is a useful technology for accurate genome engineering in plants. A reproducible approach based on a positive-negative selection system using hygromycin resistance and the diphtheria toxin A subunit gene as positive and negative selection markers, respectively, is now available. However, to date, this selection system has been applied exclusively in rice (Oryza sativa). To establish a universally applicable positive-negative GT system in plants, we designed a selection system using a combination of neomycin phosphotransferaseII (nptII) and an antisense nptII construct. The concomitant transcription of both sense and antisense nptII suppresses significantly the level of expression of the sense nptII gene, and transgenic calli and plants become sensitive to the antibiotic geneticin. In addition, we were able to utilize the sense nptII gene as a positive selection marker and the antisense nptII construct as a negative selection marker for knockout of the endogenous rice genes Waxy and 33-kD globulin through GT, although negative selection with this system is relatively less efficient compared with diphtheria toxin A subunit. The approach developed here, with some additional improvements, could be applied as a universal selection system for the enrichment of GT cells in several plant species.

  15. [Computer aid design of antisense oligonucleotide in gene therapy--review].

    PubMed

    Wu, Qi-Wei; Wu, Jia-Jin

    2004-06-01

    In this paper, the situation on antisense oligonucleotide as a means of gene therapy was outlined, and the main factors impeding its progress at present was summarized. The one of main factors is the efficiency of antisense oligonucleotide as a drug and the other is the side-effect in clinical use. At the level of cell and gene, these influential factors were analyzed in detail. The main factor that makes side-effect in using antisense oligonucleotide is the difficulty to distinguish effectively homologous-gene from target gene. The another factor is the secondary structure and three-dimensional structure of target gene that seriously affect antisense oligonucleotide to arrive at target position. The third problem is what can affect antisense oligonucleotide transmission and quick annealing. How use computer technique to analyze fully the target gene of antisense oligonucleotide including the secondary structure and homology of target gene, and to design effective antisense oligonucleotide, in order to reduce its side-effect in clinical use of antisense oligonucleotide as a drug of gene therapy, and the computer-aid design method were described.

  16. Silencing of the Aspergillopepsin B (pepB) Gene of Aspergillus awamori by Antisense RNA Expression or Protease Removal by Gene Disruption Results in a Large Increase in Thaumatin Production

    PubMed Central

    Moralejo, Francisco J.; Cardoza, Rosa Elena; Gutierrez, Santiago; Lombraña, Marta; Fierro, Francisco; Martín, Juan F.

    2002-01-01

    Aspergillopepsin B was identified in culture broths of Aspergillus awamori by in situ detection of its proteolytic activity and by immunodetection with anti-aspergillopepsin B antibodies. Severe thaumatin degradation was observed after in vitro treatment of thaumatin with purified aspergillopepsin B. The pepB gene encoding aspergillopepsin B of A. awamori was cloned and characterized. It is located in chromosome IV of A. awamori, as shown by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis, and encodes a protein of 282 amino acids with high similarity to the aspergillopepsin B of Aspergillus niger var. macrosporus. The pepB gene is expressed at high rates as a monocistronic 1.0-kb transcript in media with casein at acidic pH values. An antisense cassette constructed by inserting the pepB gene in the antisense orientation downstream from the gpdA promoter resulted in a good level of antisense mRNA, as shown by reverse transcription-PCR. Partial silencing of the pepB gene by the antisense mRNA resulted in a 31% increase in thaumatin yield. However, significant residual degradation of thaumatin still occurred. To completely remove aspergillopepsin B, the pepB gene was deleted by double crossover. Two of the selected transformants lacked the endogenous pepB gene and did not form aspergillopepsin B. Thaumatin yields increased by between 45% in transformant APB 7/25 and 125% in transformant 7/36 with respect to the parental strain. Reduction of proteolytic degradation by gene silencing with antisense mRNA or total removal of the aspergillopepsin B by directed gene deletion was a very useful method for improving thaumatin production in A. awamori. PMID:12089041

  17. Silencing of the aspergillopepsin B (pepB) gene of Aspergillus awamori by antisense RNA expression or protease removal by gene disruption results in a large increase in thaumatin production.

    PubMed

    Moralejo, Francisco J; Cardoza, Rosa Elena; Gutierrez, Santiago; Lombraña, Marta; Fierro, Francisco; Martín, Juan F

    2002-07-01

    Aspergillopepsin B was identified in culture broths of Aspergillus awamori by in situ detection of its proteolytic activity and by immunodetection with anti-aspergillopepsin B antibodies. Severe thaumatin degradation was observed after in vitro treatment of thaumatin with purified aspergillopepsin B. The pepB gene encoding aspergillopepsin B of A. awamori was cloned and characterized. It is located in chromosome IV of A. awamori, as shown by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis, and encodes a protein of 282 amino acids with high similarity to the aspergillopepsin B of Aspergillus niger var. macrosporus. The pepB gene is expressed at high rates as a monocistronic 1.0-kb transcript in media with casein at acidic pH values. An antisense cassette constructed by inserting the pepB gene in the antisense orientation downstream from the gpdA promoter resulted in a good level of antisense mRNA, as shown by reverse transcription-PCR. Partial silencing of the pepB gene by the antisense mRNA resulted in a 31% increase in thaumatin yield. However, significant residual degradation of thaumatin still occurred. To completely remove aspergillopepsin B, the pepB gene was deleted by double crossover. Two of the selected transformants lacked the endogenous pepB gene and did not form aspergillopepsin B. Thaumatin yields increased by between 45% in transformant APB 7/25 and 125% in transformant 7/36 with respect to the parental strain. Reduction of proteolytic degradation by gene silencing with antisense mRNA or total removal of the aspergillopepsin B by directed gene deletion was a very useful method for improving thaumatin production in A. awamori.

  18. Functional analysis of splicing mutations in the IDS gene and the use of antisense oligonucleotides to exploit an alternative therapy for MPS II.

    PubMed

    Matos, Liliana; Gonçalves, Vânia; Pinto, Eugénia; Laranjeira, Francisco; Prata, Maria João; Jordan, Peter; Desviat, Lourdes R; Pérez, Belén; Alves, Sandra

    2015-12-01

    Mucopolysaccharidosis II is a lysosomal storage disorder caused by mutations in the IDS gene, including exonic alterations associated with aberrant splicing. In the present work, cell-based splicing assays were performed to study the effects of two splicing mutations in exon 3 of IDS, i.e., c.241C>T and c.257C>T, whose presence activates a cryptic splice site in exon 3 and one in exon 8, i.e., c.1122C>T that despite being a synonymous mutation is responsible for the creation of a new splice site in exon 8 leading to a transcript shorter than usual. Mutant minigene analysis and overexpression assays revealed that SRSF2 and hnRNP E1 might be involved in the use and repression of the constitutive 3' splice site of exon 3 respectively. For the c.1122C>T the use of antisense therapy to correct the splicing defect was explored, but transfection of patient fibroblasts with antisense morpholino oligonucleotides (n=3) and a locked nucleic acid failed to abolish the abnormal transcript; indeed, it resulted in the appearance of yet another aberrant splicing product. Interestingly, the oligonucleotides transfection in control fibroblasts led to the appearance of the aberrant transcript observed in patients' cells after treatment, which shows that the oligonucleotides are masking an important cis-acting element for 5' splice site regulation of exon 8. These results highlight the importance of functional studies for understanding the pathogenic consequences of mis-splicing and highlight the difficulty in developing antisense therapies involving gene regions under complex splicing regulation.

  19. Enhanced translation of a chloroplast-expressed RbcS gene restores small subunit levels and photosynthesis in nuclear RbcS antisense plants

    PubMed Central

    Dhingra, Amit; Portis, Archie R.; Daniell, Henry

    2004-01-01

    Ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco) is a key enzyme that converts atmospheric carbon to food and supports life on this planet. Its low catalytic activity and specificity for oxygen leads to photorespiration, severely limiting photosynthesis and crop productivity. Consequently, Rubisco is a primary target for genetic engineering. Separate localization of the genes in the nuclear and chloroplast genomes and a complex assembly process resulting in a very low catalytic activity of hybrid Rubisco enzymes have rendered several earlier attempts of Rubisco engineering unsuccessful. Here we demonstrate that the RbcS gene, when integrated at a transcriptionally active spacer region of the chloroplast genome, in a nuclear RbcS antisense line and expressed under the regulation of heterologous (gene 10) or native (psbA) UTRs, results in the assembly of a functional holoenzyme and normal plant growth under ambient CO2 conditions, fully shortcircuiting nuclear control of gene regulation. There was ≈150-fold more RbcS transcript in chloroplast transgenic lines when compared with the nuclear RbcS antisense line, whereas the wild type has 7-fold more transcript. The small subunit protein levels in the gene 10/RbcS and psbA/RbcS plants were 60% and 106%, respectively, of the wild type. Photosynthesis of gene 10/RbcS plants was approximately double that of the antisense plants, whereas that of psbA/RbcS plants was restored almost completely to the wild-type rates. These results have opened an avenue for using chloroplast engineering for the evaluation of foreign Rubisco genes in planta that eventually can result in achieving efficient photosynthesis and increased crop productivity. PMID:15067115

  20. Lysine metabolism in antisense C-hordein barley grains.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Daiana; Rizzi, Vanessa; Gaziola, Salete A; Medici, Leonardo O; Vincze, Eva; Kozak, Marcin; Lea, Peter J; Azevedo, Ricardo A

    2015-02-01

    The grain proteins of barley are deficient in lysine and threonine due to their low concentrations in the major storage protein class, the hordeins, especially in the C-hordein subgroup. Previously produced antisense C-hordein transgenic barley lines have an improved amino acid composition, with increased lysine, methionine and threonine contents. The objective of the study was to investigate the possible changes in the regulation of key enzymes of the aspartate metabolic pathway and the contents of aspartate-derived amino acids in the nontransgenic line (Hordeum vulgare L. cv. Golden Promise) and five antisense C-hordein transgenic barley lines. Considering the amounts of soluble and protein-bound aspartate-derived amino acids together with the analysis of key enzymes of aspartate metabolic pathway, we suggest that the C-hordein suppression did not only alter the metabolism of at least one aspartate-derived amino acid (threonine), but major changes were also detected in the metabolism of lysine and methionine. Modifications in the activities and regulation of aspartate kinase, dihydrodipicolinate synthase and homoserine dehydrogenase were observed in most transgenic lines. Furthermore the activities of lysine α-ketoglutarate reductase and saccharopine dehydrogenase were also altered, although the extent varied among the transgenic lines.

  1. Does Active Learning through an Antisense Jigsaw Make Sense?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seetharaman, Mahadevan; Musier-Forsyth, Karin

    2003-12-01

    Three journal articles on nucleic acid antisense modification strategies were assigned to 12 students as part of an active learning "jigsaw" exercise for a graduate-level chemistry course on nucleic acids. Each student was required to read one of the three articles. This assignment was preceded by an hour-long lecture on the basic concepts in antisense antigene technology. On the day of the jigsaw, the students with the same article (three groups of four students) discussed their article briefly, and then formed four new groups where no one had read the same article. Each student spent about five minutes teaching his or her article to the other group members, using specific questions provided to guide the discussion. This exercise laid the foundation for bringing the discussion to the entire class, where most of the students actively participated. To test the students' comprehension of the reading materials, a problem set was designed that required not only an understanding of the three articles, but also application of the concepts learned. The effectiveness of this active learning strategy and its applicability to other topics are discussed in this article.

  2. Antisense Reduction of Tau in Adult Mice Protects against Seizures

    PubMed Central

    DeVos, Sarah L.; Goncharoff, Dustin K.; Chen, Guo; Kebodeaux, Carey S.; Yamada, Kaoru; Stewart, Floy R.; Schuler, Dorothy R.; Maloney, Susan E.; Wozniak, David F.; Rigo, Frank; Bennett, C. Frank; Cirrito, John R.; Holtzman, David M.

    2013-01-01

    Tau, a microtubule-associated protein, is implicated in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's Disease (AD) in regard to both neurofibrillary tangle formation and neuronal network hyperexcitability. The genetic ablation of tau substantially reduces hyperexcitability in AD mouse lines, induced seizure models, and genetic in vivo models of epilepsy. These data demonstrate that tau is an important regulator of network excitability. However, developmental compensation in the genetic tau knock-out line may account for the protective effect against seizures. To test the efficacy of a tau reducing therapy for disorders with a detrimental hyperexcitability profile in adult animals, we identified antisense oligonucleotides that selectively decrease endogenous tau expression throughout the entire mouse CNS—brain and spinal cord tissue, interstitial fluid, and CSF—while having no effect on baseline motor or cognitive behavior. In two chemically induced seizure models, mice with reduced tau protein had less severe seizures than control mice. Total tau protein levels and seizure severity were highly correlated, such that those mice with the most severe seizures also had the highest levels of tau. Our results demonstrate that endogenous tau is integral for regulating neuronal hyperexcitability in adult animals and suggest that an antisense oligonucleotide reduction of tau could benefit those with epilepsy and perhaps other disorders associated with tau-mediated neuronal hyperexcitability. PMID:23904623

  3. The antisense RNA As1_flv4 in the Cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 prevents premature expression of the flv4-2 operon upon shift in inorganic carbon supply.

    PubMed

    Eisenhut, Marion; Georg, Jens; Klähn, Stephan; Sakurai, Isamu; Mustila, Henna; Zhang, Pengpeng; Hess, Wolfgang R; Aro, Eva-Mari

    2012-09-28

    The functional relevance of natural cis-antisense transcripts is mostly unknown. Here we have characterized the association of three antisense RNAs and one intergenically encoded noncoding RNA with an operon that plays a crucial role in photoprotection of photosystem II under low carbon conditions in the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803. Cyanobacteria show strong gene expression dynamics in response to a shift of cells from high carbon to low levels of inorganic carbon (C(i)), but the regulatory mechanisms are poorly understood. Among the most up-regulated genes in Synechocystis are flv4, sll0218, and flv2, which are organized in the flv4-2 operon. The flavodiiron proteins encoded by this operon open up an alternative electron transfer route, likely starting from the Q(B) site in photosystem II, under photooxidative stress conditions. Our expression analysis of cells shifted from high carbon to low carbon demonstrated an inversely correlated transcript accumulation of the flv4-2 operon mRNA and one antisense RNA to flv4, designated as As1_flv4. Overexpression of As1_flv4 led to a decrease in flv4-2 mRNA. The promoter activity of as1_flv4 was transiently stimulated by C(i) limitation and negatively regulated by the AbrB-like transcription regulator Sll0822, whereas the flv4-2 operon was positively regulated by the transcription factor NdhR. The results indicate that the tightly regulated antisense RNA As1_flv4 establishes a transient threshold for flv4-2 expression in the early phase after a change in C(i) conditions. Thus, it prevents unfavorable synthesis of the proteins from the flv4-2 operon.

  4. Additional compensatory mechanisms altering antisense oligonucleotide suppression of BCL2: effects upon AKT1 and STAT3.

    PubMed

    Rubenstein, Marvin; Hollowell, Courtney M P; Guinan, Patrick

    2014-01-01

    Antisense oligonucleotides have targeted regulatory proteins in both in vivo and in vitro prostate cancer models. We evaluated mono- and bispecific oligonucleotides which targeted and comparably suppressed B-cell lymphoma-2 BCL-2 (an apoptosis-inhibitory protein) expression in LNCaP cells. These oligonucleotides were administered with lipofectin as part of a nanoparticle delivery system. Treated cells compensated by suppressing caspase-3 (an apoptosis promoter) and enhancing expression of the androgen receptor and its co-activating p300 and IL-6 proteins. This suggests a progression to increased androgen sensitivity (in LNCaP) accompanies BCL-2 suppression and a gene activation pattern associated with more advanced prostate tumors. To further evaluate compensatory mechanisms related to tumor resistance in the present study we evaluate the expressed levels of the AKT1 oncogene and STAT3 transcription factor, finding both to be enhanced.

  5. The Use of Antisense Oligonucleotides in Evaluating Survivin as a Therapeutic Target for Radiation Sensitization in Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Shinohara, Eric T.; Hallahan, Dennis E.

    2004-01-01

    Elucidating the mechanism of over and under expression of proteins is critical in developing a better understanding of cancer. Multiple techniques are used to examine differential expression of proteins in cells and assess changes in protein expression in response to therapies such as radiation. Reduced expression can be caused by protein inactivation, mRNA instability, or reduced transcription. The following protocol was used to determine the mechanism for the reduced expression of an antiapoptotic factor, survivin, in normal tissues in response to radiation and the defect in cancer cells that prevents this reduction. We also examined ways to overcome survivin over expression in cancer cells in order to sensitize them to radiation. We will focus on the use of antisense oligonucleotides, cell cycle analysis, and luciferase reporter genes. PMID:15514699

  6. The Effects of Aerosolized STAT1 Antisense Oligodeoxynucleotides on Rat Pulmonary Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wenjun; Liao, Bin; Zeng, Ming; Zhu, Chen; Fan, Xianming

    2009-01-01

    Previous study showed that aerosolized signal transducer and activator of transcription-1 (STAT1) antisense oligodeoxynucleotide (ASON) inhibited the expression of STAT1 and ICAM-1 mRNA and protein in alveolar macrophages (AMs) and decreased the concentrations of TGF-β, PDGF and TNF-α in bronchioalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) in bleomycin (BLM)-induced rat pulmonary fibrosis. Administration of STAT1 ASON ameliorated alveolitis in rat pulmonary fibrosis. However, further investigations are needed to determine whether there is an effect from administration of STAT1 ASON on fibrosis. This study investigated the effect of aerosolized STAT1 ASON on the expressions of inflammatory mediators, hydroxyproline and type I and type III collagen mRNA in BLM-induced rat pulmonary fibrosis. The results showed that STAT1 ASON applied by aerosolization could ameliorate alveolitis and fibrosis, inhibit the expressions of inflammatory mediators, decrease the content of hydroxyproline, and suppress the expressions of type I and type III collagen mRNA in lung tissue in BLM-induced rat pulmonary fibrosis. These results suggest that aerosolized STAT1 ASON might be considered as a promising new strategy in the treatment of pulmonary fibrosis. PMID:19254480

  7. Antisense-mediated exon skipping: a therapeutic strategy for titin-based dilated cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Gramlich, Michael; Pane, Luna Simona; Zhou, Qifeng; Chen, Zhifen; Murgia, Marta; Schötterl, Sonja; Goedel, Alexander; Metzger, Katja; Brade, Thomas; Parrotta, Elvira; Schaller, Martin; Gerull, Brenda; Thierfelder, Ludwig; Aartsma-Rus, Annemieke; Labeit, Siegfried; Atherton, John J; McGaughran, Julie; Harvey, Richard P; Sinnecker, Daniel; Mann, Matthias; Laugwitz, Karl-Ludwig; Gawaz, Meinrad Paul; Moretti, Alessandra

    2015-01-01

    Frameshift mutations in the TTN gene encoding titin are a major cause for inherited forms of dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM), a heart disease characterized by ventricular dilatation, systolic dysfunction, and progressive heart failure. To date, there are no specific treatment options for DCM patients but heart transplantation. Here, we show the beneficial potential of reframing titin transcripts by antisense oligonucleotide (AON)-mediated exon skipping in human and murine models of DCM carrying a previously identified autosomal-dominant frameshift mutation in titin exon 326. Correction of TTN reading frame in patient-specific cardiomyocytes derived from induced pluripotent stem cells rescued defective myofibril assembly and stability and normalized the sarcomeric protein expression. AON treatment in Ttn knock-in mice improved sarcomere formation and contractile performance in homozygous embryos and prevented the development of the DCM phenotype in heterozygous animals. These results demonstrate that disruption of the titin reading frame due to a truncating DCM mutation can be restored by exon skipping in both patient cardiomyocytes in vitro and mouse heart in vivo, indicating RNA-based strategies as a potential treatment option for DCM. PMID:25759365

  8. Antisense-induced exon skipping restores dystrophin expression in DMD patient derived muscle cells.

    PubMed

    van Deutekom, J C; Bremmer-Bout, M; Janson, A A; Ginjaar, I B; Baas, F; den Dunnen, J T; van Ommen, G J

    2001-07-15

    Due to frame-shifting mutations in the DMD gene that cause dystrophin deficiency, Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) patients suffer from lethal muscle degeneration. In contrast, mutations in the allelic Becker muscular dystrophy (BMD) do not disrupt the translational reading frame, resulting in a less severe phenotype. In this study, we explored a genetic therapy aimed at restoring the reading frame in muscle cells from DMD patients through targeted modulation of dystrophin pre-mRNA splicing. Considering that exon 45 is the single most frequently deleted exon in DMD, whereas exon (45+46) deletions cause only a mild form of BMD, we set up an antisense-based system to induce exon 46 skipping from the transcript in cultured myotubes of both mouse and human origin. In myotube cultures from two unrelated DMD patients carrying an exon 45 deletion, the induced skipping of exon 46 in only approximately 15% of the mRNA led to normal amounts of properly localized dystrophin in at least 75% of myotubes. Our results provide first evidence of highly effective restoration of dystrophin expression from the endogenous gene in DMD patient-derived muscle cells. This strategy may be applicable to not only >65% of DMD mutations, but also many other genetic diseases.

  9. Rescue of hearing and vestibular function by antisense oligonucleotides in a mouse model of human deafness.

    PubMed

    Lentz, Jennifer J; Jodelka, Francine M; Hinrich, Anthony J; McCaffrey, Kate E; Farris, Hamilton E; Spalitta, Matthew J; Bazan, Nicolas G; Duelli, Dominik M; Rigo, Frank; Hastings, Michelle L

    2013-03-01

    Hearing impairment is the most common sensory disorder, with congenital hearing impairment present in approximately 1 in 1,000 newborns. Hereditary deafness is often mediated by the improper development or degeneration of cochlear hair cells. Until now, it was not known whether such congenital failures could be mitigated by therapeutic intervention. Here we show that hearing and vestibular function can be rescued in a mouse model of human hereditary deafness. An antisense oligonucleotide (ASO) was used to correct defective pre-mRNA splicing of transcripts from the USH1C gene with the c.216G>A mutation, which causes human Usher syndrome, the leading genetic cause of combined deafness and blindness. Treatment of neonatal mice with a single systemic dose of ASO partially corrects Ush1c c.216G>A splicing, increases protein expression, improves stereocilia organization in the cochlea, and rescues cochlear hair cells, vestibular function and low-frequency hearing in mice. These effects were sustained for several months, providing evidence that congenital deafness can be effectively overcome by treatment early in development to correct gene expression and demonstrating the therapeutic potential of ASOs in the treatment of deafness.

  10. In vivo correction of a Menkes disease model using antisense oligonucleotides.

    PubMed

    Madsen, Erik C; Morcos, Paul A; Mendelsohn, Bryce A; Gitlin, Jonathan D

    2008-03-11

    Although the molecular basis of many inherited metabolic diseases has been defined, the availability of effective therapies in such disorders remains problematic. Menkes disease is a fatal neurodegenerative disorder due to loss-of-function mutations in the ATP7A gene encoding a copper-transporting P-type Atpase. To develop therapeutic approaches in affected patients, we have identified a zebrafish model of Menkes disease termed calamity that results from splicing defects in the zebrafish orthologue of the ATP7A gene. Embryonic-recessive lethal mutants have impaired copper homeostasis that results in absent melanin pigmentation, impaired notochord formation, and hindbrain neurodegeneration. In this current study, we have attempted to rescue these striking phenotypic alterations by using a series of antisense morpholino oligonucleotides directed against the splice-site junctions of two mutant calamity alleles. Our findings reveal a robust and complete correction of the copper-deficient defects of calamity in association with the generation of the WT Menkes protein in all rescued mutants. Interestingly, a quantitative analysis of atp7a-specific transcripts suggests that competitive translational regulation may account for the synthesis of WT protein in these embryos. This in vivo correction of Menkes disease through the rescue of aberrant splicing may provide therapeutic options in this fatal disease and illustrates the potential for zebrafish models of human genetic disease in the development of treatments based on the principles of interactions of synthetic oligonucleotide analogues with mRNA.

  11. Antitumor Effects of EGFR Antisense Guanidine-Based Peptide Nucleic Acids in Cancer Models

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Sufi M.; Sahu, Bichismita; Rapireddy, Srinivas; Bahal, Raman; Wheeler, Sarah E.; Procopio, Eva M.; Kim, Joseph; Joyce, Sonali C.; Contrucci, Sarah; Wang, Yun; Chiosea, Simion I.; Lathrop, Kira L.; Watkins, Simon; Grandis, Jennifer R.; Armitage, Bruce A.; Ly, Danith H.

    2013-01-01

    Peptide nucleic acids have emerged over the past two decades as a promising class of nucleic acid mimics because of their strong binding affinity and sequence selectivity toward DNA and RNA, and resistance to enzymatic degradation by proteases and nucleases. While they have been shown to be effective in regulation of gene expression in vitro, and to a small extent in vivo, their full potential for molecular therapy has not yet been fully realized due to poor cellular uptake. Herein, we report the development of cell-permeable, guanidine-based peptide nucleic acids targeting the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) in preclinical models as therapeutic modality for head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) and nonsmall cell lung cancer (NSCLC). A GPNA oligomer, 16 nucleotides in length, designed to bind to EGFR gene transcript elicited potent antisense effects in HNSCC and NSCLC cells in preclinical models. When administered intraperitoneally in mice, EGFRAS-GPNA was taken-up by several tissues including the xenograft tumor. Systemic administration of EGFRAS-GPNA induced antitumor effects in HNSCC xenografts, with similar efficacies as the FDA-approved EGFR inhibitors: cetuximab and erlotinib. In addition to targeting wild-type EGFR, EGFRAS-GPNA is effective against the constitutively active EGFR vIII mutant implicated in cetuximab resistance. Our data reveals that GPNA is just as effective as a molecular platform for treating cetuximab resistant cells, demonstrating its utility in the treatment of cancer. PMID:23113581

  12. Antisense Oligonucleotide Mediated Splice Correction of a Deep Intronic Mutation in OPA1

    PubMed Central

    Bonifert, Tobias; Gonzalez Menendez, Irene; Battke, Florian; Theurer, Yvonne; Synofzik, Matthis; Schöls, Ludger; Wissinger, Bernd

    2016-01-01

    Inherited optic neuropathies (ION) present an important cause of blindness in the European working-age population. Recently we reported the discovery of four independent families with deep intronic mutations in the main inherited optic neuropathies gene OPA1. These deep intronic mutations cause mis-splicing of the OPA1 pre-messenger-RNA transcripts by creating cryptic acceptor splice sites. As a rescue strategy we sought to prevent mis-splicing of the mutant pre-messenger-RNA by applying 2′O-methyl-antisense oligonucleotides (AONs) with a full-length phosphorothioate backbone that target the cryptic acceptor splice sites and the predicted novel branch point created by the deep intronic mutations, respectively. Transfection of patient-derived primary fibroblasts with these AONs induced correct splicing of the mutant pre-messenger-RNA in a time and concentration dependent mode of action, as detected by pyrosequencing of informative heterozygous variants. The treatment showed strong rescue effects (~55%) using the cryptic acceptor splice sites targeting AON and moderate rescue (~16%) using the branch point targeting AON. The highest efficacy of Splice correction could be observed 4 days after treatment however, significant effects were still seen 14 days post-transfection. Western blot analysis revealed increased amounts of OPA1 protein with maximum amounts at ~3 days post-treatment. In summary, we provide the first mutation-specific in vitro rescue strategy for OPA1 deficiency using synthetic AONs. PMID:27874857

  13. Robust gene silencing mediated by antisense small RNAs in the pathogenic protist Entamoeba histolytica

    PubMed Central

    Morf, Laura; Pearson, Richard J.; Wang, Angelia S.; Singh, Upinder

    2013-01-01

    RNA interference uses small RNAs (sRNA), which target genes for sequence-specific silencing. The parasite Entamoeba histolytica contains an abundant repertoire of 27 nt antisense (AS) sRNA with 5′-polyphosphate termini, but their roles in regulating gene expression have not been well established. We demonstrate that a gene-coding region to which large numbers of AS sRNAs map can serve as a ‘trigger’ and silence the gene fused to it. Silencing is mediated by generation of AS sRNAs with 5′-polyphosphate termini that have sequence specificity to the fused gene. The mechanism of silencing is independent of the placement of the trigger relative to the silenced gene but is dependent on the sRNA concentration to the trigger. Silencing requires transcription of the trigger-gene fusion and is maintained despite loss of the trigger plasmid. We used this approach to silence multiple amebic genes, including an E. histolytica Myb gene, which is upregulated during oxidative stress response. Silencing of the EhMyb gene decreased parasite viability under oxidative stress conditions. Thus, we have developed a new tool for genetic manipulation in E. histolytica with many advantages over currently available technologies. Additionally, these data shed mechanistic insights into a eukaryotic RNA interference pathway with many novel aspects. PMID:23935116

  14. Effect of combined antisense oligodeoxynucleotides directed against the human papillomavirus type 16 on cervical carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Márquez-Gutiérrez, Miguel A; Benítez-Hess, María L; DiPaolo, Joseph A; Alvarez-Salas, Luis M

    2007-10-01

    Cervical cancer is highly associated with human papillomavirus (HPV) E6 and E7 gene expression. We have previously reported two antisense oligodeoxynucleotides (AS-ODNs) directed against adjacent targets within the HPV-16 E6/E7 mRNA (419 and 434), each able to downregulate HPV-16 E6/E7 mRNA in vitro and in vivo and to specifically inhibit tumor cell growth in culture and animal models. Towards potential clinical application and improved in vivo performance, we analyzed the effect of the combined treatment of 419-434 AS-ODNs on the anchorage independent growth (AIG) of HPV-16-positive cervical carcinoma cell lines. We found similar responses between combined 419-434 and individual AS-ODNs treatments in RNaseH assays, cell uptake, and in vivo degradation of HPV-16 E6/E7 transcripts. Moreover, the combined use of 419-434 AS-ODNs resulted in additive AIG inhibition of CaSki and SiHa cells, similar to that obtained with equivalent doses of the individual AS-ODNs. By using a combined treatment, it may be possible to overcome the potential mutations frequently reported within HPV-16 genome, thus improving the potential application of 419 and 434 AS-ODNs as a therapeutic alternative for cervical cancer.

  15. Optimization of Morpholino Antisense Oligonucleotides Targeting the Intronic Repressor Element1 in Spinal Muscular Atrophy.

    PubMed

    Osman, Erkan Y; Washington, Charles W; Kaifer, Kevin A; Mazzasette, Chiara; Patitucci, Teresa N; Florea, Kyra M; Simon, Madeline E; Ko, Chien-Ping; Ebert, Allison D; Lorson, Christian L

    2016-09-01

    Loss of Survival Motor Neuron-1 (SMN1) causes Spinal Muscular Atrophy, a devastating neurodegenerative disease. SMN2 is a nearly identical copy gene; however SMN2 cannot prevent disease development in the absence of SMN1 since the majority of SMN2-derived transcripts are alternatively spliced, encoding a truncated, unstable protein lacking exon 7. Nevertheless, SMN2 retains the ability to produce low levels of functional protein. Previously we have described a splice-switching Morpholino antisense oligonucleotide (ASO) sequence that targets a potent intronic repressor, Element1 (E1), located upstream of SMN2 exon 7. In this study, we have assessed a novel panel of Morpholino ASOs with the goal of optimizing E1 ASO activity. Screening for efficacy in the SMNΔ7 mouse model, a single ASO variant was more active in vivo compared with the original E1(MO)-ASO. Sequence variant eleven (E1(MOv11)) consistently showed greater efficacy by increasing the lifespan of severe Spinal Muscular Atrophy mice after a single intracerebroventricular injection in the central nervous system, exhibited a strong dose-response across an order of magnitude, and demonstrated excellent target engagement by partially reversing the pathogenic SMN2 splicing event. We conclude that Morpholino modified ASOs are effective in modifying SMN2 splicing and have the potential for future Spinal Muscular Atrophy clinical applications.

  16. Evidence-based annotation of transcripts and proteins in the sulfate-reducing bacterium Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough.

    PubMed

    Price, Morgan N; Deutschbauer, Adam M; Kuehl, Jennifer V; Liu, Haichuan; Witkowska, H Ewa; Arkin, Adam P

    2011-10-01

    We used high-resolution tiling microarrays and 5' RNA sequencing to identify transcripts in Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough, a model sulfate-reducing bacterium. We identified the first nucleotide position for 1,124 transcripts, including 54 proteins with leaderless transcripts and another 72 genes for which a major transcript initiates within the upstream protein-coding gene, which confounds measurements of the upstream gene's expression. Sequence analysis of these promoters showed that D. vulgaris prefers -10 and -35 boxes different from those preferred by Escherichia coli. A total of 549 transcripts ended at intrinsic (rho-independent) terminators, but most of the other transcripts seemed to have variable ends. We found low-level antisense expression of most genes, and the 5' ends of these transcripts mapped to promoter-like sequences. Because antisense expression was reduced for highly expressed genes, we suspect that elongation of nonspecific antisense transcripts is suppressed by transcription of the sense strand. Finally, we combined the transcript results with comparative analysis and proteomics data to make 505 revisions to the original annotation of 3,531 proteins: we removed 255 (7.5%) proteins, changed 123 (3.6%) start codons, and added 127 (3.7%) proteins that had been missed. Tiling data had higher coverage than shotgun proteomics and hence led to most of the corrections, but many errors probably remain. Our data are available at http://genomics.lbl.gov/supplemental/DvHtranscripts2011/.

  17. Evidence-Based Annotation of Transcripts and Proteins in the Sulfate-Reducing Bacterium Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough ▿ † ‡

    PubMed Central

    Price, Morgan N.; Deutschbauer, Adam M.; Kuehl, Jennifer V.; Liu, Haichuan; Witkowska, H. Ewa; Arkin, Adam P.

    2011-01-01

    We used high-resolution tiling microarrays and 5′ RNA sequencing to identify transcripts in Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough, a model sulfate-reducing bacterium. We identified the first nucleotide position for 1,124 transcripts, including 54 proteins with leaderless transcripts and another 72 genes for which a major transcript initiates within the upstream protein-coding gene, which confounds measurements of the upstream gene's expression. Sequence analysis of these promoters showed that D. vulgaris prefers −10 and −35 boxes different from those preferred by Escherichia coli. A total of 549 transcripts ended at intrinsic (rho-independent) terminators, but most of the other transcripts seemed to have variable ends. We found low-level antisense expression of most genes, and the 5′ ends of these transcripts mapped to promoter-like sequences. Because antisense expression was reduced for highly expressed genes, we suspect that elongation of nonspecific antisense transcripts is suppressed by transcription of the sense strand. Finally, we combined the transcript results with comparative analysis and proteomics data to make 505 revisions to the original annotation of 3,531 proteins: we removed 255 (7.5%) proteins, changed 123 (3.6%) start codons, and added 127 (3.7%) proteins that had been missed. Tiling data had higher coverage than shotgun proteomics and hence led to most of the corrections, but many errors probably remain. Our data are available at http://genomics.lbl.gov/supplemental/DvHtranscripts2011/. PMID:21840973

  18. Depleting Mycobacterium tuberculosis of the transcription termination factor Rho causes pervasive transcription and rapid death

    PubMed Central

    Botella, Laure; Vaubourgeix, Julien; Livny, Jonathan; Schnappinger, Dirk

    2017-01-01

    Rifampicin, which inhibits bacterial RNA polymerase, provides one of the most effective treatments for tuberculosis. Inhibition of the transcription termination factor Rho is used to treat some bacterial infections, but its importance varies across bacteria. Here we show that Rho of Mycobacterium tuberculosis functions to both define the 3′ ends of mRNAs and silence substantial fragments of the genome. Brief inactivation of Rho affects over 500 transcripts enriched for genes of foreign DNA elements and bacterial virulence factors. Prolonged inactivation of Rho causes extensive pervasive transcription, a genome-wide increase in antisense transcripts, and a rapid loss of viability of replicating and non-replicating M. tuberculosis in vitro and during acute and chronic infection in mice. Collectively, these data suggest that inhibition of Rho may provide an alternative strategy to treat tuberculosis with an efficacy similar to inhibition of RNA polymerase. PMID:28348398

  19. Depleting Mycobacterium tuberculosis of the transcription termination factor Rho causes pervasive transcription and rapid death.

    PubMed

    Botella, Laure; Vaubourgeix, Julien; Livny, Jonathan; Schnappinger, Dirk

    2017-03-28

    Rifampicin, which inhibits bacterial RNA polymerase, provides one of the most effective treatments for tuberculosis. Inhibition of the transcription termination factor Rho is used to treat some bacterial infections, but its importance varies across bacteria. Here we show that Rho of Mycobacterium tuberculosis functions to both define the 3' ends of mRNAs and silence substantial fragments of the genome. Brief inactivation of Rho affects over 500 transcripts enriched for genes of foreign DNA elements and bacterial virulence factors. Prolonged inactivation of Rho causes extensive pervasive transcription, a genome-wide increase in antisense transcripts, and a rapid loss of viability of replicating and non-replicating M. tuberculosis in vitro and during acute and chronic infection in mice. Collectively, these data suggest that inhibition of Rho may provide an alternative strategy to treat tuberculosis with an efficacy similar to inhibition of RNA polymerase.

  20. Characterization of a Novel Antisense RNA in the Major Pilin Locus of Neisseria meningitidis Influencing Antigenic Variation

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Felicia Y. Y.; Wörmann, Mirka E.; Tang, Christoph M.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Expression of type four pili (Tfp) is essential for virulence in Neisseria meningitidis. Pili mediate adhesion, bacterial aggregation, and DNA uptake. In N. meningitidis, the major pilin subunit is encoded by the pilE gene. In some strains, PilE is subject to phase and antigenic variation, which can alter Tfp properties and together offer a possible mechanism of immune escape. Pilin expression and antigenic variation can be modulated in response to environmental cues; however, the precise mechanisms of such regulation remain unclear. We identified a promoter in the pilE locus, 3′ of the pilE coding sequence, on the antisense (AS) strand which is conserved in meningococci. We show that this promoter directs transcription of an AS RNA that is expressed during specific growth phases and in response to salt stress. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the transcript encompasses sequences complementary to the entire pilE coding sequence and 5′ untranslated region. AS RNAs can regulate the gene on the sense strand by altering transcript stability or translation. However, by using Northern blotting, quantitative reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PCR), and Western blotting, we found no significant AS RNA-dependent changes in pilE transcript or protein level. Instead, our data indicate that the AS RNA influences pilin antigenic variation. This work provides further insights into the complex regulation of pilin expression and variation in pathogenic Neisseria. IMPORTANCE Pathogenic Neisseria spp. express type four pili (Tfp) which are important for adhesion, aggregation and transformation. Some strains of N. meningitidis are able to vary the sequence of the major subunit (PilE) of the Tfp. The mechanisms underlying this variation are not fully defined, but the process requires several noncoding elements that are found adjacent to the pilE gene. In this work, we identified a cis-encoded RNA antisense to pilE in N. meningitidis. By using Northern blotting and RT

  1. Source-Related Effects of Wastewater on Transcription Factor (AhR, CAR and PXR)-Mediated Induction of Gene Expression in Cultured Rat Hepatocytes and Their Association with the Prevalence of Antimicrobial-Resistant Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Guruge, Keerthi S.; Yamanaka, Noriko; Sonobe, Miyuki; Fujizono, Wataru; Yoshioka, Miyako; Akiba, Masato; Yamamoto, Takehisa; Joshua, Derrick I.; Balakrishna, Keshava; Yamashita, Nobuyoshi; Kannan, Kurunthachalam; Tsutsui, Toshiyuki

    2015-01-01

    Extracts of wastewater collected from 4 sewage treatment plants (STPs) receiving effluents from different sources in South India were investigated for their levels of transcription factor-mediated gene induction in primary cultured rat hepatocytes. In addition, the relation between gene induction levels and the prevalence of antimicrobial-resistant Escherichia coli (E. coli) in wastewater was examined. STP-3, which treats only hospital wastewater, exhibited significantly greater induction potency of all 6 drug metabolizing cytochrome P450 (CYP) genes examined, CYP1A1, 1A2, 1B1, 2B15, 3A1, and 3A2, whereas the wastewater at STP-1, which exclusively receives domestic sewage, showed significantly diminished levels of induction of 3 CYP genes when compared to the levels of CYP induction at STP-2, which receives mixed wastewater. Samples collected during the monsoon season showed a significantly altered gene induction capacity compared to that of samples from the pre-monsoon period. The data suggest that the toxicity of wastewater in STPs was not significantly diminished during the treatment process. The chemical-gene interaction data predicted that a vast number of chemicals present in the wastewater would stimulate the genes studied in the rat hepatocytes. The multivariable logistic regression analysis demonstrated that the prevalence of isolates resistant to cefotaxime, imipenem and streptomycin was significantly correlated with the levels of induction of at least three CYP-isozymes in STP wastewater. In addition, the resistance of isolates in treatment plants was not altered by the treatment steps, whereas the sampling season did have an impact on the resistance to specific antimicrobials. The identification of receptor-mediated gene regulation capacities offers important data not limited to the (synergistic) physiological role of chemicals in biological systems but may provide new insight into the link between the effects of known/unknown drugs and prevalence of

  2. Source-Related Effects of Wastewater on Transcription Factor (AhR, CAR and PXR)-Mediated Induction of Gene Expression in Cultured Rat Hepatocytes and Their Association with the Prevalence of Antimicrobial-Resistant Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Guruge, Keerthi S; Yamanaka, Noriko; Sonobe, Miyuki; Fujizono, Wataru; Yoshioka, Miyako; Akiba, Masato; Yamamoto, Takehisa; Joshua, Derrick I; Balakrishna, Keshava; Yamashita, Nobuyoshi; Kannan, Kurunthachalam; Tsutsui, Toshiyuki

    2015-01-01

    Extracts of wastewater collected from 4 sewage treatment plants (STPs) receiving effluents from different sources in South India were investigated for their levels of transcription factor-mediated gene induction in primary cultured rat hepatocytes. In addition, the relation between gene induction levels and the prevalence of antimicrobial-resistant Escherichia coli (E. coli) in wastewater was examined. STP-3, which treats only hospital wastewater, exhibited significantly greater induction potency of all 6 drug metabolizing cytochrome P450 (CYP) genes examined, CYP1A1, 1A2, 1B1, 2B15, 3A1, and 3A2, whereas the wastewater at STP-1, which exclusively receives domestic sewage, showed significantly diminished levels of induction of 3 CYP genes when compared to the levels of CYP induction at STP-2, which receives mixed wastewater. Samples collected during the monsoon season showed a significantly altered gene induction capacity compared to that of samples from the pre-monsoon period. The data suggest that the toxicity of wastewater in STPs was not significantly diminished during the treatment process. The chemical-gene interaction data predicted that a vast number of chemicals present in the wastewater would stimulate the genes studied in the rat hepatocytes. The multivariable logistic regression analysis demonstrated that the prevalence of isolates resistant to cefotaxime, imipenem and streptomycin was significantly correlated with the levels of induction of at least three CYP-isozymes in STP wastewater. In addition, the resistance of isolates in treatment plants was not altered by the treatment steps, whereas the sampling season did have an impact on the resistance to specific antimicrobials. The identification of receptor-mediated gene regulation capacities offers important data not limited to the (synergistic) physiological role of chemicals in biological systems but may provide new insight into the link between the effects of known/unknown drugs and prevalence of

  3. Transcription termination Within the iron transport-biosynthesis operon of Vibrio anguillarum requires an antisense RNA

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The iron transport-biosynthesis (ITB) operon in Vibrio anguillarum includes four genes for ferric-siderophore transport, fatD,C,B,A, and two genes for siderophorebiosynthesis, angR and angT and plays an important role in the virulence mechanism of this bacterium. Despite being part of the same polyc...

  4. Cardiovascular and Metabolic Effects of ANGPTL3 Antisense Oligonucleotides.

    PubMed

    Graham, Mark J; Lee, Richard G; Brandt, Teresa A; Tai, Li-Jung; Fu, Wuxia; Peralta, Raechel; Yu, Rosie; Hurh, Eunju; Paz, Erika; McEvoy, Bradley W; Baker, Brenda F; Pham, Nguyen C; Digenio, Andres; Hughes, Steven G; Geary, Richard S; Witztum, Joseph L; Crooke, Rosanne M; Tsimikas, Sotirios

    2017-07-20

    Epidemiologic and genomewide association studies have linked loss-of-function variants in ANGPTL3, encoding angiopoietin-like 3, with low levels of plasma lipoproteins. We evaluated antisense oligonucleotides (ASOs) targeting Angptl3 messenger RNA (mRNA) for effects on plasma lipid levels, triglyceride clearance, liver triglyceride content, insulin sensitivity, and atherosclerosis in mice. Subsequently, 44 human participants (with triglyceride levels of either 90 to 150 mg per deciliter [1.0 to 1.7 mmol per liter] or >150 mg per deciliter, depending on the dose group) were randomly assigned to receive subcutaneous injections of placebo or an antisense oligonucleotide targeting ANGPTL3 mRNA in a single dose (20, 40, or 80 mg) or multiple doses (10, 20, 40, or 60 mg per week for 6 weeks). The main end points were safety, side-effect profile, pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic measures, and changes in levels of lipids and lipoproteins. The treated mice had dose-dependent reductions in levels of hepatic Angptl3 mRNA, Angptl3 protein, triglycerides, and low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol, as well as reductions in liver triglyceride content and atherosclerosis progression and increases in insulin sensitivity. After 6 weeks of treatment, persons in the multiple-dose groups had reductions in levels of ANGPTL3 protein (reductions of 46.6 to 84.5% from baseline, P<0.01 for all doses vs. placebo) and in levels of triglycerides (reductions of 33.2 to 63.1%), LDL cholesterol (1.3 to 32.9%), very-low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (27.9 to 60.0%), non-high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (10.0 to 36.6%), apolipoprotein B (3.4 to 25.7%), and apolipoprotein C-III (18.9 to 58.8%). Three participants who received the antisense oligonucleotide and three who received placebo reported dizziness or headache. There were no serious adverse events. Oligonucleotides targeting mouse Angptl3 retarded the progression of atherosclerosis and reduced levels of atherogenic lipoproteins in

  5. Functional analysis of polyphenol oxidases by antisense/sense technology.

    PubMed

    Thipyapong, Piyada; Stout, Michael J; Attajarusit, Jutharat

    2007-07-27

    Polyphenol oxidases (PPOs) catalyze the oxidation of phenolics to quinones, the secondary reactions of which lead to oxidative browning and postharvest losses of many fruits and vegetables. PPOs are ubiquitous in angiosperms, are inducible by both biotic and abiotic stresses, and have been implicated in several physiological processes including plant defense against pathogens and insects, the Mehler reaction, photoreduction of molecular oxygen by PSI, regulation of plastidic oxygen levels, aurone biosynthesis and the phenylpropanoid pathway. Here we review experiments in which the roles of PPO in disease and insect resistance as well as in the Mehler reaction were investigated using transgenic tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum) plants with modified PPO expression levels (suppressed PPO and overexpressing PPO). These transgenic plants showed normal growth, development and reproduction under laboratory, growth chamber and greenhouse conditions. Antisense PPO expression dramatically increased susceptibility while PPO overexpression increased resistance of tomato plants to Pseudomonas syringae. Similarly, PPO-overexpressing transgenic plants showed an increase in resistance to various insects, including common cutworm (Spodoptera litura (F.)), cotton bollworm (Helicoverpa armigera (Hübner)) and beet army worm (Spodoptera exigua (Hübner)), whereas larvae feeding on plants with suppressed PPO activity had higher larval growth rates and consumed more foliage. Similar increases in weight gain, foliage consumption, and survival were also observed with Colorado potato beetles (Leptinotarsa decemlineata (Say)) feeding on antisense PPO transgenic tomatoes. The putative defensive mechanisms conferred by PPO and its interaction with other defense proteins are discussed. In addition, transgenic plants with suppressed PPO exhibited more favorable water relations and decreased photoinhibition compared to nontransformed controls and transgenic plants overexpressing PPO, suggesting

  6. Photosynthetic Performance and Fertility Are Repressed in GmAOX2b Antisense Soybean1[OA

    PubMed Central

    Chai, Tsun-Thai; Simmonds, Daina; Day, David A.; Colmer, Timothy D.; Finnegan, Patrick M.

    2010-01-01

    The alternative oxidase (AOX) is a cyanide-resistant oxidase that provides an alternative outlet for electrons from the respiratory electron transport chain embedded in the inner membrane of plant mitochondria. Examination of soybean (Glycine max) plants carrying a GmAOX2b antisense gene showed AOX to have a central role in reproductive development and fecundity. In three independently transformed antisense lines, seed set was reduced by 16% to 43%, whereas ovule abortion increased by 1.2- to 1.7-fold when compared with nontransgenic transformation control plants. Reduced fecundity was associated with reductions in whole leaf cyanide-resistant, salicylhydroxamic acid-sensitive respiration and net photosynthesis, but there was no change in total respiration in the dark. The frequency of potential fertilization events was reduced by at least one-third in the antisense plants as a likely consequence of prefertilization defects. Pistils of the antisense plants contained a higher proportion of immature-sized, nonfertile embryo sacs compared with nontransgenic control plants. Increased rates of pollen abortion in vivo and reduced rates of pollen germination in vitro suggested that the antisense gene compromised pollen development and function. Reciprocal crosses between antisense and nontransgenic plants revealed that pollen produced by antisense plants was less active in fertilization. Taken together, the results presented here indicate that AOX expression has an important role in determining normal gametophyte development and function. PMID:20097793

  7. Anticubilin antisense RNA ameliorates adriamycin-induced tubulointerstitial injury in experimental rats.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jun; Li, Kailong; He, Yani; Zhang, Jianguo; Wang, Huiming; Yang, Jurong; Zhan, Jun; Liang, Haijun

    2011-12-01

    This study was designed to determine the effects of in vivo anticubilin antisense RNA on the uptake of albumin in tubules and on the tubulointerstitial injury in adriamycin-induced proteinuric rats. Adriamycin-treated rats were subjected to intrarenal delivery of adenoviral vectors encoding empty plasmid, cubilin sense RNA expression vector pAd-CUB or anticubilin antisense RNA expression vector pAd-ACUB on day 3. On days 14 and 28, half of the rats in each group were randomly selected to be killed, and blood samples, kidney tissues and 24-hour urine were collected. The diseased rats treated with pAdEasy-ACUB showed a 60% decrease in serum creatinine and glomerular filtration rate. Interestingly, the anticubilin antisense treatment led to a marked increase in albuminuria. Antisense treatment attenuated the histologic changes on both day 14 and day 28. The antisense treatment induced more than 60% recovery of adriamycin-induced injury, accompanied with 85% knockdown in the expression of cubilin protein and markedly decreased albumin deposition. Adriamycin induced an increase in the expression of monocyte chemoattractant protein-1, transforming growth factor-β and regulated on activation in normal T-cell expressed and secreted and the number of infiltrating cells, which was reversed by the antisense treatment. Anticubilin antisense RNA delivered by an adenoviral vector ameliorates albuminuria-induced glomerulosclerosis and tubulointerstitial damage in adriamycin nephrotic rats, indicating that cubilin could be a potential therapeutic target in proteinuric nephropathy.

  8. Safety of antisense oligonucleotide and siRNA-based therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Chi, Xuan; Gatti, Philip; Papoian, Thomas

    2017-01-31

    Oligonucleotide-based therapy is an active area of drug development designed to treat a variety of gene-specific diseases. Two of the more promising platforms are the antisense oligonucleotides (ASOs) and short interfering RNAs (siRNAs), both of which are often directed against similar targets. In light of recent reports on clinical trials of severe thrombocytopenia with two different ASO drugs and increased peripheral neuropathy with an siRNA drug, we compared and contrasted the specific safety characteristics of these two classes of oligonucleotide therapeutic. The objectives were to assess factors that could contribute to the specific toxicities observed with these two classes of promising drugs, and get a better understanding of the potential mechanism(s) responsible for these rare, but serious, adverse events.

  9. Intracerebral Infusion of Antisense Oligonucleotides Into Prion-infected Mice

    PubMed Central

    Nazor Friberg, Karah; Hung, Gene; Wancewicz, Ed; Giles, Kurt; Black, Chris; Freier, Sue; Bennett, Frank; DeArmond, Stephen J; Freyman, Yevgeniy; Lessard, Pierre; Ghaemmaghami, Sina; Prusiner, Stanley B

    2012-01-01

    Mice deficient for the cellular prion protein (PrPC) do not develop prion disease; accordingly, gene-based strategies to diminish PrPC expression are of interest. We synthesized a series of chemically modified antisense oligonucleotides (ASOs) targeted against mouse Prnp messenger RNA (mRNA) and identified those that were most effective in decreasing PrPC expression. Those ASOs were also evaluated in scrapie-infected cultured cells (ScN2a) for their efficacy in diminishing the levels of the disease-causing prion protein (PrPSc). When the optimal ASO was infused intracerebrally into FVB mice over a 14-day period beginning 1 day after infection with the Rocky Mountain Laboratory (RML) strain of mouse prions, a prolongation of the incubation period of almost 2 months was observed. Whether ASOs can be used to develop an effective therapy for patients dying of Creutzfeldt–Jakob disease remains to be established. PMID:23344724

  10. Antisense oligonucleotide for tissue factor inhibits hepatic ischemic reperfusion injury.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Kenji; Kadotani, Yayoi; Ushigome, Hidetaka; Akioka, Kiyokazu; Okamoto, Masahiko; Ohmori, Yoshihiro; Yaoi, Takeshi; Fushiki, Shinji; Yoshimura, Rikio; Yoshimura, Norio

    2002-09-27

    Tissue factor (TF) is an initiation factor for blood coagulation and its expression is induced on endothelial cells during inflammatory or immune responses. We designed an antisense oligodeoxynucleotide (AS-1/TF) for rat TF and studied its effect on hepatic ischemic reperfusion injury. AS-1/TF was delivered intravenously to Lewis rats. After 10 h, hepatic artery and portal vein were partially clamped. Livers were reperfused after 180 min and harvested. TF expression was studied using immunohistochemical staining. One of 10 rats survived in a 5-day survival rate and TF was strongly stained on endothelial cells in non-treatment group. However, by treatment with AS-1/TF, six of seven survived and TF staining was significantly reduced. Furthermore, we observed that fluorescein-labeled AS-1/TF was absorbed into endothelial cells. These results suggest that AS-1/TF can strongly suppress the expression of TF and thereby inhibit ischemic reperfusion injury to the rat liver.

  11. Antisense oligonucleotide targeting midkine suppresses in vivo angiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Dai, Li-Cheng; Wang, Xiang; Yao, Xing; Lu, Yong-Liang; Ping, Jin-Liang; He, Jian-Fang

    2007-02-28

    To evaluate the effect of antisense oligonucleotide targeting midkine (MK-AS) on angiogenesis in chick chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) and in situ human hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). An in situ human hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) model and CAM assay were used in this experiment. The effect of MK-AS on angiogenesis was evaluated by cell proliferation assay and hematoxylin-eosin (HE) staining. MK-AS significantly inhibited human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) and in situ human HCC growth. At the same time, MK-AS suppressed the angiogenesis both in human hepatocellular carcinoma cell line (HEPG2)-induced CAM and in situ human HCC tissues. MK-AS is an effective antiangiogenesis agent in vivo.

  12. Antisense oligonucleotide targeting midkine suppresses in vivo angiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Li-Cheng; Wang, Xiang; Yao, Xing; Lu, Yong-Liang; Ping, Jin-Liang; He, Jian-Fang

    2007-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the effect of antisense oligonucleotide targeting midkine (MK-AS) on angiogenesis in chick chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) and in situ human hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). METHODS: An in situ human hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) model and CAM assay were used in this experiment. The effect of MK-AS on angiogenesis was evaluated by cell proliferation assay and hematoxylin-eosin (HE) staining. RESULTS: MK-AS significantly inhibited human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) and in situ human HCC growth. At the same time, MK-AS suppressed the angiogenesis both in human hepatocellular carcinoma cell line (HEPG2)-induced CAM and in situ human HCC tissues. CONCLUSION: MK-AS is an effective antiangiogenesis agent in vivo. PMID:17451201

  13. Expression of ACC oxidase antisense gene inhibits ripening of cantaloupe melon fruits.

    PubMed

    Ayub, R; Guis, M; Ben Amor, M; Gillot, L; Roustan, J P; Latché, A; Bouzayen, M; Pech, J C

    1996-07-01

    The plant hormone ethylene plays a major role in the ripening of climacteric fruit. We have generated transgenic cantaloupe Charentais melons expressing an antisense ACC oxidase gene; ACC oxidase catalyzes the last step of ethylene biosynthesis. Ethylene production of transgenic fruit was < 1% of control untransformed fruit, and the ripening process was blocked both on and off the vine. The antisense phenotype could be reversed by exogenous ethylene treatment. Analysis of antisense ACC oxidase melons indicated that the ripening process includes ethylene-dependent and ethylene-independent pathways. Because the transgenic line we generated displays extended storage life and improved quality, it has a promising potential for commercial development.

  14. Human T-cell leukemia virus type 2 antisense viral protein 2 is dispensable for in vitro immortalization but functions to repress early virus replication in vivo.

    PubMed

    Yin, Han; Kannian, Priya; Dissinger, Nathan; Haines, Robyn; Niewiesk, Stefan; Green, Patrick L

    2012-08-01

    Human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) and HTLV-2 are closely related but pathogenically distinct human retroviruses. The antisense strand of the HTLV-1 genome encodes HTLV-1 basic leucine zipper (b-ZIP) protein (HBZ), a protein that inhibits Tax-mediated viral transcription, enhances T-cell proliferation, and promotes viral persistence. Recently, an HTLV-2 antisense viral protein (APH-2) was identified. Despite its lack of a typical b-ZIP domain, APH-2, like HBZ, interacts with cyclic AMP response element binding protein (CREB) and downregulates Tax-mediated viral transcription. Here, we provide evidence that the APH-2 C-terminal LXXLL motif is important for CREB binding and Tax repression. In order to investigate the functional role of APH-2 in the HTLV-2-mediated immortalization of primary T lymphocytes in vitro and in HTLV-2 infection in vivo, we generated APH-2 mutant viruses. In cell cultures, the immortalization capacities of APH-2 mutant viruses were indistinguishable from that of wild-type HTLV-2 (wtHTLV-2), indicating that, like HBZ, APH-2 is dispensable for viral infection and cellular transformation. In vivo, rabbits inoculated with either wtHTLV-2 or APH-2 mutant viruses established a persistent infection. However, the APH-2 knockout virus displayed an increased replication rate, as measured by an increased viral antibody response and a higher proviral load. In contrast to HTLV-1 HBZ, we show that APH-2 is dispensable for the establishment of an efficient infection and persistence in a rabbit animal model. Therefore, antisense proteins of HTLV-1 and HTLV-2 have evolved different functions in vivo, and further comparative studies will provide fundamental insights into the distinct pathobiologies of these two viruses.

  15. Identification and analysis of antisense RNA target regions of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1.

    PubMed Central

    Rittner, K; Sczakiel, G

    1991-01-01

    Antisense RNA, transcribed intracellularly from constitutive expression cassettes, inhibits the replication of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) as demonstrated by a quantitative microinjection assay in human SW480 cells. Infectious proviral HIV-1 DNA was co-microinjected together with a fivefold molar excess of plasmids expressing antisense RNA complementary to a set of ten different HIV-1 target regions. The most inhibitory antisense RNA expression plasmids were targeted against a 1 kb region within the gag open reading frame and against a 562 base region containing the coding sequences for the regulatory viral proteins tat and rev. Experimental evidence is presented that the antisense principle is the inhibitory mechanism in this assay system. PMID:2027749

  16. Combined sense-antisense Alu elements activate the EGFP reporter gene when stable transfection.

    PubMed

    Ma, Zhihong; Kong, Xianglong; Liu, Shufeng; Yin, Shuxian; Zhao, Yuehua; Liu, Chao; Lv, Zhanjun; Wang, Xiufang

    2017-08-01

    Alu elements in the human genome are present in more than one million copies, accounting for 10% of the genome. However, the biological functions of most Alu repeats are unknown. In this present study, we detected the effects of Alu elements on EGFP gene expression using a plasmid system to find the roles of Alu elements in human genome. We inserted 5'-4TMI-Alus-CMV promoter-4TMI-Alus (or antisense Alus)-3' sequences into the pEGFP-C1 vector to construct expression vectors. We altered the copy number of Alus, the orientation of the Alus, and the presence of an enhancer (4TMI) in the inserted 5'-4TMI-Alus-CMV promoter-4TMI-Alus (or antisense Alus)-3' sequences. These expression vectors were stably transfected into HeLa cells, and EGFP reporter gene expression was determined. Our results showed that combined sense-antisense Alu elements activated the EGFP reporter gene in the presence of enhancers and stable transfection. The combined sense-antisense Alu vectors carrying four copies of Alus downstream of inserted CMV induced much stronger EGFP gene expression than two copies. Alus downstream of inserted CMV were replaced to AluJBs (having 76% homology with Alu) to construct expression vectors. We found that combined sense-antisense Alu (or antisense AluJB) vectors induced strong EGFP gene expression after stable transfection and heat shock. To further explore combined sense-antisense Alus activating EGFP gene expression, we constructed Tet-on system vectors, mini-C1-Alu-sense-sense and mini-C1-Alu-sense-antisense (EGFP gene was driven by mini-CMV). We found that combined sense-antisense Alus activated EGFP gene in the presence of reverse tetracycline repressor (rTetR) and doxycycline (Dox). Clone experiments showed that Mini-C1-Alu-sense-antisense vector had more positive cells than that of Mini-C1-Alu-sense-sense vector. The results in this paper proved that Alu repetitive sequences inhibited gene expression and combined sense-antisense Alus activated EGFP reporter

  17. Bolaamphiphile-based nanocomplex delivery of phosphorothioate gapmer antisense oligonucleotides as a treatment for Clostridium difficile

    PubMed Central

    Hegarty, John P; Krzeminski, Jacek; Sharma, Arun K; Guzman-Villanueva, Diana; Weissig, Volkmar; Stewart, David B

    2016-01-01

    Despite being a conceptually appealing alternative to conventional antibiotics, a major challenge toward the successful implementation of antisense treatments for bacterial infections is the development of efficient oligonucleotide delivery systems. Cationic vesicles (bolasomes) composed of dequalinium chloride (“DQAsomes”) have been used to deliver plasmid DNA across the cardiolipin-rich inner membrane of mitochondria. As cardiolipin is also a component of many bacterial membranes, we investigated the application of cationic bolasomes to bacteria as an oligonucleotide delivery system. Antisense sequences designed in silico to target the expression of essential genes of the bacterial pathogen, Clostridium difficile, were synthesized as 2′-O-methyl phosphorothioate gapmer antisense oligonucleotides (ASO). These antisense gapmers were quantitatively assessed for their ability to block mRNA translation using luciferase reporter and C. difficile protein expression plasmid constructs in a coupled transcription–translation system. Cationic bolaamphiphile compounds (dequalinium derivatives) of varying alkyl chain length were synthesized and bolasomes were prepared via probe sonication of an aqueous suspension. Bolasomes were characterized by particle size distribution, zeta potential, and binding capacities for anionic oligonucleotide. Bolasomes and antisense gapmers were combined to form antisense nanocomplexes. Anaerobic C. difficile log phase cultures were treated with serial doses of gapmer nanocomplexes or equivalent amounts of empty bolasomes for 24 hours. Antisense gapmers for four gene targets achieved nanomolar minimum inhibitory concentrations for C. difficile, with the lowest values observed for oligonucleotides targeting polymerase genes rpoB and dnaE. No inhibition of bacterial growth was observed from treatments at matched dosages of scrambled gapmer nanocomplexes or plain, oligonucleotide-free bolasomes compared to untreated control cultures. We

  18. Effects of different target sites on antisense RNA-mediated regulation of gene expression.

    PubMed

    Park, Hongmarn; Yoon, Yeongseong; Suk, Shinae; Lee, Ji Young; Lee, Younghoon

    2014-11-01

    Antisense RNA is a type of noncoding RNA (ncRNA) that binds to complementary mRNA sequences and induces gene repression by inhibiting translation or degrading mRNA. Recently, several small ncRNAs (sRNAs) have been identified in Escherichia coli that act as antisense RNA mainly via base pairing with mRNA. The base pairing predominantly leads to gene repression, and in some cases, gene activation. In the current study, we examined how the location of target sites affects sRNA-mediated gene regulation. An efficient antisense RNA expression system was developed, and the effects of antisense RNAs on various target sites in a model mRNA were examined. The target sites of antisense RNAs suppressing gene expression were identified, not only in the translation initiation region (TIR) of mRNA, but also at the junction between the coding region and 3' untranslated region. Surprisingly, an antisense RNA recognizing the upstream region of TIR enhanced gene expression through increasing mRNA stability.

  19. Shock waves: a novel method for cytoplasmic delivery of antisense oligonucleotides.

    PubMed

    Tschoep, K; Hartmann, G; Jox, R; Thompson, S; Eigler, A; Krug, A; Erhardt, S; Adams, G; Endres, S; Delius, M

    2001-06-01

    Intracytoplasmic delivery of oligonucleotides (ODN) can improve ODN-based strategies such as the antisense approach and the use of immunostimulatory CpG dinucleotide containing ODN. Shock waves are established for the treatment of nephrolithiasis and other diseases. Here we describe the use of shock waves as a new physical method for the direct transport of antisense ODN into the cytoplasm and the nucleus of cells. Human peripheral blood mononuclear cells together with antisense ODN were exposed to shock waves generated by an electrohydraulic lithotripter. ODN uptake was examined by flow cytometry and fluorescence microscopy. By optimization of physical parameters we achieved the transfer of high amounts of ODN which were detected within less than 5 min after shock wave exposure, with viability of cells higher than 95%. Transfection of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells with an antisense ODN directed against tumor necrosis factor (TNF) alpha resulted in a reduction in lipopolysaccharide-induced TNF production by 62% (n=5, P=0.006). Specificity of TNF suppression was confirmed with a four-mismatch oligonucleotide. Positive atmospheric pressure abolished antisense-mediated inhibition of TNF synthesis by blocking shock wave-induced cavitation and formation of oscillating air bubbles. Electroporation was less effective. The use of shock waves is thus an efficient physical tool for ODN delivery to cells. Shock waves may allow the evaluation of target proteins in cell types difficult to transfect with other methods and thus may improve the antisense technique for the analysis of unknown genes.

  20. [Exon skipping therapy for Duchenne muscular dystrophy by using antisense Morpholino].

    PubMed

    Takeda, Shin'ichi

    2009-11-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is caused by the lack of dystrophin protein at the sarcolemma. Exon skipping by antisense oligonucleotides is a novel method to restore the reading frame of the mutated DMD gene, and rescue dystrophin production. We recently reported that systemic delivery of Morpholino antisense oligonucleotides targeting exon 6 and 8 of the canine DMD gene, efficiently recovered functional dystrophin proteins at the sarcolamma of dystrophic dogs, and improved performance of affected dogs without serious side effects (Yokota et al., Ann Neurol. 65 (6): 667-676, 2009). To optimize therapeutic antisense Morpholinos for more frequent mutations of the DMD gene, we designed antisense Morpholinos targeting exon 51 of the mouse DMD gene, and injected them separately or in combination into the muscles of mdx52 mice, in which exon 52 has been deleted by a gene targeting technique (Araki et al., 1997). We also tried systemic delivery of antisense Morpholino to skip exon 51 in mdx52 mice. It is important to verify the effectiveness and side effects of antisense Morpholino in experimental animal models such as dystrophic dogs or mdx52 mice, before clinical trials in DMD patients.

  1. Dantrolene enhances antisense-mediated exon skipping in human and mouse models of Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Kendall, Genevieve C; Mokhonova, Ekaterina I; Moran, Miriana; Sejbuk, Natalia E; Wang, Derek W; Silva, Oscar; Wang, Richard T; Martinez, Leonel; Lu, Qi L; Damoiseaux, Robert; Spencer, Melissa J; Nelson, Stanley F; Miceli, M Carrie

    2012-12-12

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) causes profound and progressive muscle weakness and loss, resulting in early death. DMD is usually caused by frameshifting deletions in the gene DMD, which leads to absence of dystrophin protein. Dystrophin binds to F-actin and components of the dystrophin-associated glycoprotein complex and protects the sarcolemma from contraction-induced injury. Antisense oligonucleotide-mediated exon skipping is a promising therapeutic approach aimed at restoring the DMD reading frame and allowing expression of an intact dystrophin glycoprotein complex. To date, low levels of dystrophin protein have been produced in humans by this method. We performed a small-molecule screen to identify existing drugs that enhance antisense-directed exon skipping. We found that dantrolene, currently used to treat malignant hyperthermia, potentiates antisense oligomer-guided exon skipping to increase exon skipping to restore the mRNA reading frame, the sarcolemmal dystrophin protein, and the dystrophin glycoprotein complex in skeletal muscles of mdx mice when delivered intramuscularly or intravenously. Further, dantrolene synergized with multiple weekly injections of antisense to increase muscle strength and reduce serum creatine kinase in mdx mice. Dantrolene similarly promoted antisense-mediated exon skipping in reprogrammed myotubes from DMD patients. Ryanodine and Rycal S107, which, like dantrolene, targets the ryanodine receptor, also promoted antisense-driven exon skipping, implicating the ryanodine receptor as the critical molecular target.

  2. CEA and AFP expression in human hepatoma cells transfected with antisense IGF-I gene

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Li; Li, Shu-Nong; Wang, Xiao-Ning

    1998-01-01

    AIM: To determine whether antisense insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) gene can modulate CEA and AFP expression in human hepatoma cells (HepG2). METHODS: Transfection of HepG2 cells was accomplished using Lipofectin reagent. Northern blot analysis confirmed the antisense IGF-I RNA of the transfected cells. CEA and AFP levels were measured using radioimmunoassay. RESULTS: Human hepatoma cell lines (HepG2) were transfected with antisense IGF-I gene. Northern blot analysis confirmed that antisense IGF-I RNA was expressed in the transfected cells. The effect of antisense IGF-I gene on CEA and AFP expression was demonstrated by the fact that the CEA and AFP levels in the supernatant of transfected cell culture were significantly lower as compared with the parent cells, [CEA 7.0 μg/L ± 0.76 μg/L and 3.29 μg/L ± 1.80 μg/L (P < 0.05) and AFP 53.63 μg/L ± 6.02 μg/L and 9.0 μg/L ± 5.26 μg/L (P < 0.01), respectively]. CONCLUSION: The malignant potentiality of the transfected cells was partially suppressed.Antisense IGF-I gene can modulate the expression of CEA and AFP in human hepatoma cell lines (HepG2) PMID:11819225

  3. Identification of antisense long noncoding RNAs that function as SINEUPs in human cells.

    PubMed

    Schein, Aleks; Zucchelli, Silvia; Kauppinen, Sakari; Gustincich, Stefano; Carninci, Piero

    2016-09-20

    Mammalian genomes encode numerous natural antisense long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) that regulate gene expression. Recently, an antisense lncRNA to mouse Ubiquitin carboxyl-terminal hydrolase L1 (Uchl1) was reported to increase UCHL1 protein synthesis, representing a new functional class of lncRNAs, designated as SINEUPs, for SINE element-containing translation UP-regulators. Here, we show that an antisense lncRNA to the human protein phosphatase 1 regulatory subunit 12A (PPP1R12A), named as R12A-AS1, which overlaps with the 5' UTR and first coding exon of the PPP1R12A mRNA, functions as a SINEUP, increasing PPP1R12A protein translation in human cells. The SINEUP activity depends on the aforementioned sense-antisense interaction and a free right Alu monomer repeat element at the 3' end of R12A-AS1. In addition, we identify another human antisense lncRNA with SINEUP activity. Our results demonstrate for the first time that human natural antisense lncRNAs can up-regulate protein translation, suggesting that endogenous SINEUPs may be widespread and present in many mammalian species.

  4. Expression of fur and its antisense α-fur from Microcystis aeruginosa PCC7806 as response to light and oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Martin-Luna, Beatriz; Sevilla, Emma; Gonzalez, Andres; Bes, M Teresa; Fillat, Maria F; Peleato, M Luisa

    2011-12-15

    Ferric uptake regulation (Fur) proteins are prokaryotic transcriptional regulators that integrate signaling of iron metabolism and oxidative stress responses with several environmental stresses. In photosynthetic organisms, Fur proteins regulate many genes involved in photosynthesis, nitrogen metabolism and other key processes. Also, Fur triggers the expression of virulence factors in many bacterial pathogens, and Fur from Microcystis aeruginosa has been shown to bind promoter regions of the microcystin synthesis gene cluster. In this work, we studied transcriptional responses of fur genes under different light intensities and oxidative stress. An antisense of fur, the α-fur RNA, plays an important role in regulating fur expression under oxidative stress, affecting levels of Fur protein in cells. Importantly, an active photosynthetic electron chain is required for the expression of the fur gene.

  5. Antisense oligonucleotide inhibition of acetylcholinesterase gene expression induces progenitor cell expansion and suppresses hematopoietic apoptosis ex vivo.

    PubMed Central

    Soreq, H; Patinkin, D; Lev-Lehman, E; Grifman, M; Ginzberg, D; Eckstein, F; Zakut, H

    1994-01-01

    To examine the role of acetylcholinesterase (EC 3.1.1.7) in hematopoietic cell proliferation and differentiation, we administered a 15-mer phosphorothioate oligonucleotide, antisense to the corresponding ACHE gene (AS-ACHE), to primary mouse bone marrow cultures. Within 2 hr of AS-ACHE addition to the culture, ACHE mRNA levels dropped by approximately 90%, as compared with those in cells treated with the "sense" oligomer, S-ACHE. Four days after AS-ACHE treatment, ACHE mRNA increased to levels 10-fold higher than in S-ACHE cultures or in fresh bone marrow. At this later time point, differential PCR display revealed significant differences between cellular mRNA transcripts in bone marrow and those in AS-ACHE- or S-ACHE-treated cultures. These oligonucleotide-triggered effects underlay considerable alterations at the cellular level: AS-ACHE but not S-ACHE increased cell counts, reflecting enhanced proliferation. In the presence of erythropoietin it also enhanced colony counts, reflecting expansion of progenitors. AS-ACHE further suppressed apoptosis-related fragmentation of cellular DNA in the progeny cells, and it diverted hematopoiesis toward production of primitive blasts and macrophages in a dose-dependent manner promoted by erythropoietin. These findings suggest that the hematopoietic role of acetylcholinesterase, anticipated to be inverse to the observed antisense effects, is to reduce proliferation of the multipotent stem cells committed to erythropoiesis and megakaryocytopoiesis and macrophage production and to promote apoptosis in their progeny. Moreover, these findings may explain the tumorigenic association of perturbations in ACHE gene expression with leukemia. Images PMID:8058733

  6. Antisense oligonucleotide inhibition of acetylcholinesterase gene expression induces progenitor cell expansion and suppresses hematopoietic apoptosis ex vivo.

    PubMed

    Soreq, H; Patinkin, D; Lev-Lehman, E; Grifman, M; Ginzberg, D; Eckstein, F; Zakut, H

    1994-08-16

    To examine the role of acetylcholinesterase (EC 3.1.1.7) in hematopoietic cell proliferation and differentiation, we administered a 15-mer phosphorothioate oligonucleotide, antisense to the corresponding ACHE gene (AS-ACHE), to primary mouse bone marrow cultures. Within 2 hr of AS-ACHE addition to the culture, ACHE mRNA levels dropped by approximately 90%, as compared with those in cells treated with the "sense" oligomer, S-ACHE. Four days after AS-ACHE treatment, ACHE mRNA increased to levels 10-fold higher than in S-ACHE cultures or in fresh bone marrow. At this later time point, differential PCR display revealed significant differences between cellular mRNA transcripts in bone marrow and those in AS-ACHE- or S-ACHE-treated cultures. These oligonucleotide-triggered effects underlay considerable alterations at the cellular level: AS-ACHE but not S-ACHE increased cell counts, reflecting enhanced proliferation. In the presence of erythropoietin it also enhanced colony counts, reflecting expansion of progenitors. AS-ACHE further suppressed apoptosis-related fragmentation of cellular DNA in the progeny cells, and it diverted hematopoiesis toward production of primitive blasts and macrophages in a dose-dependent manner promoted by erythropoietin. These findings suggest that the hematopoietic role of acetylcholinesterase, anticipated to be inverse to the observed antisense effects, is to reduce proliferation of the multipotent stem cells committed to erythropoiesis and megakaryocytopoiesis and macrophage production and to promote apoptosis in their progeny. Moreover, these findings may explain the tumorigenic association of perturbations in ACHE gene expression with leukemia.

  7. Antisense glutaminase inhibition modifies the O-GlcNAc pattern and flux through the hexosamine pathway in breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Donadio, Ana C; Lobo, Carolina; Tosina, Marta; de la Rosa, Vanessa; Martín-Rufián, Mercedes; Campos-Sandoval, José A; Matés, José M; Márquez, Javier; Alonso, Francisco J; Segura, Juan A

    2008-02-15

    Glutamine behaves as a key nutrient for tumors and rapidly dividing cells. Glutaminase is the main glutamine-utilizing enzyme in these cells, and its activity correlates with glutamine consumption and growth rate. We have carried out the antisense L-type glutaminase inhibition in human MCF7 breast cancer cells, in order to study its effect on the hexosamine pathway and the pattern of protein O-glycosylation. The antisense mRNA glutaminase expressing cells, named ORF19, presented a 50% lower proliferation rate than parental cells, showing a more differentiated phenotype. ORF19 cells had an 80% reduction in glutamine:fructose-6-P amidotransferase activity, which is the rate-limiting step of the hexosamine pathway. Although the overall cellular protein O-glycosylation did not change, the O-glycosylation status of several key proteins was altered. O-glycosylation of O-GlcNAc transferase (OGT), the enzyme that links N-acetylglucosamine to proteins, was fivefold lower in ORF19 than in wild type cells. Inhibition of glutaminase also provoked a 10-fold increase in Sp1 expression, and a significant decrease in the ratio of O-glycosylated to total protein for both Sp1 and the Rpt2 proteasome component. These changes were accompanied by a higher Sp1 transcriptional activity. Proteome analysis of O-glycosylated proteins permitted the detection of two new OGT target proteins: the chaperonin TCP-1 theta and the oncogene Ets-related protein isoform 7. Taken together, our results support the hexosamine pathway and the O-glycosylation of proteins being a sensor mechanism of the nutritional and energetic states of the cell. Copyright 2007 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  8. Genome wide transcription start sites analysis of Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris B100 with insights into the gum gene cluster directing the biosynthesis of the exopolysaccharide xanthan.

    PubMed

    Alkhateeb, Rabeaa S; Vorhölter, Frank-Jörg; Rückert, Christian; Mentz, Almut; Wibberg, Daniel; Hublik, Gerd; Niehaus, Karsten; Pühler, Alfred

    2016-05-10

    Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris (Xcc) is the major producer of the exopolysaccharide xanthan, the commercially most important natural polysaccharide of microbial origin. The current work provides deeper insights into the yet uncharacterized transcriptomic features of the xanthan producing strain Xcc-B100. Towards this goal, RNA sequencing of a library based on the selective enrichment of the 5' ends of native transcripts was performed. This approach resulted in the genome wide identification of 3067 transcription start sites (TSSs) that were further classified based on their genomic positions. Among them, 1545 mapped upstream of an actively transcribed CDS and 1363 were classified as novel TSSs representing antisense, internal, and TSSs belonging to previously unidentified genomic features. Analyzing the transcriptional strength of primary and antisense TSSs revealed that in some instances antisense transcription seemed to be initiated at a higher level than its sense counterpart. Mapping the exact positions of TSSs aided in the identification of promoter consensus motifs, ribosomal binding sites, and enhanced the genome annotation of 159 in silico predicted translational start (TLS) sites. The global view on length distribution of the 5' untranslated regions (5'-UTRs) deduced from the data pointed to the occurrence of leaderless transcripts and transcripts with unusually long 5'-UTRs, in addition to identifying seven putative riboswitch elements for Xcc-B100. Concerning the biosynthesis of xanthan, we focused on the transcriptional organization of the gum gene cluster. Under the conditions tested, we present evidence for a complex transcription pattern of the gum genes with multiple TSSs and an obvious considerable role of antisense transcription. The gene gumB, encoding an outer membrane xanthan exporter, is presented here as an example for genes that possessed a strong antisense TSS.

  9. The reduction in small ribosomal subunit abundance in ethanol-stressed cells of Bacillus subtilis is mediated by a SigB-dependent antisense RNA.

    PubMed

    Mars, Ruben A T; Mendonça, Karoline; Denham, Emma L; van Dijl, Jan Maarten

    2015-10-01

    One of the best-characterized general stress responses in bacteria is the σB-mediated stress response of the Gram-positive soil bacterium Bacillus subtilis. The σB regulon contains approximately 200 protein-encoding genes and 136 putative regulatory RNAs. One of these σB-dependent RNAs, named S1136-S1134, was recently mapped as being transcribed from the S1136 promoter on the opposite strand of the essential rpsD gene, which encodes the ribosomal primary-binding protein S4. Accordingly, S1136-S1134 transcription results in an rpsD-overlapping antisense RNA (asRNA). Upon exposure of B. subtilis to ethanol, the S1136 promoter was found to be induced, while rpsD transcription was downregulated. By quantitative PCR, we show that the activation of transcription from the S1136 promoter is directly responsible for the downregulation of rpsD upon ethanol exposure. We also show that this downregulation of rpsD leads to a reduced level of the small (30S) ribosomal subunit upon ethanol stress. The activation of the S1136 promoter thus represents the first example of antisense transcription-mediated regulation in the general stress response of B. subtilis and implicates the reduction of ribosomal protein abundance as a new aspect in the σB-dependent stress response. We propose that the observed reduction in the level of the small ribosomal subunit, which contains the ribosome-decoding center, may protect B. subtilis cells against misreading and spurious translation of possibly toxic aberrant peptides under conditions of ethanol stress.

  10. Antisense suppression of potassium channel expression demonstrates its role in maturation of the action potential.

    PubMed

    Vincent, A; Lautermilch, N J; Spitzer, N C

    2000-08-15

    A developmental increase in delayed rectifier potassium current (I(Kv)) in embryonic Xenopus spinal neurons is critical for the maturation of excitability and action potential waveform. Identifying potassium channel genes that generate I(Kv) is essential to understanding the mechanisms by which they are controlled. Several Kv genes are upregulated during embryogenesis in parallel with increases in I(Kv) and produce delayed rectifier current when heterologously expressed, indicating that they could encode channels underlying this current. We used antisense (AS) cRNA to test the contribution of xKv3.1 to the maturation of I(Kv), because xKv3.1 AS appears to suppress specifically heterologous expression of potassium current by xKv3.1 mRNA. The injection of xKv3.1 AS into embryos reduces endogenous levels of xKv3.1 mRNA in the developing spinal cord and reduces the amplitude and rate of activation of I(Kv) in 40% of cultured neurons, similar to the percentage of neurons in which endogenous xKv3.1 transcripts are detected. The current in these mature neurons resembles that at an earlier stage of differentiation before the appearance of xKv3.1 mRNA. Furthermore, AS expression increases the duration of the action potential in 40% of the neurons. No change in voltage-dependent calcium current is observed, suggesting that the decrease in I(Kv) is sufficient to account for lengthening of the action potential. Computer-simulated action potentials incorporating observed reductions in amplitude and rate of activation of I(Kv) exhibit an increase in duration similar to that observed experimentally. Thus xKv3.1 contributes to the maturation of I(Kv) in a substantial percentage of these developing spinal neurons.

  11. Inducible antisense suppression of glycolate oxidase reveals its strong regulation over photosynthesis in rice.

    PubMed

    Xu, Huawei; Zhang, Jianjun; Zeng, Jiwu; Jiang, Linrong; Liu, Ee; Peng, Changlian; He, Zhenghui; Peng, Xinxiang

    2009-01-01

    Photorespiration is one of the most intensively studied topics in plant biology. While a number of mutants deficient in photorespiratory enzymes have been identified and characterized for their physiological functions, efforts on glycolate oxidase (GLO; EC 1.1.3.15) have not been so successful. This is a report about the generation of transgenic rice (Oryza sativa L.) plants carrying a GLO antisense gene driven by an estradiol-inducible promoter, which allowed for controllable suppressions of GLO and its detailed functional analyses. The GLO-suppressed plants showed typical photorespiration-deficient phenotypes. More intriguingly, it was found that a positive and linear correlation existed between GLO activities and the net photosynthetic rates (P(N)), and photoinhibition subsequently occurred once P(N) reduction surpassed 60%, indicating GLO can exert a strong regulation over photosynthesis. Various expression analyses identified that Rubisco activase was transcriptionally suppressed in the GLO-suppressed plants, consistent with the decreased Rubisco activation states. While the substrate glycolate accumulated substantially, few changes were observed for the product glyoxylate, and for some other downstream metabolites or genes as well in the transgenic plants. Further analyses revealed that isocitrate lyase and malate synthase, two key enzymes in the glyoxylate cycle, were highly up-regulated under GLO deficiency. Taken together, the results suggest that GLO is a typical photorespiratory enzyme and that it can exert a strong regulation over photosynthesis, possibly through a feed-back inhibition on Rubisco activase, and that the glyoxylate cycle may be partially activated to compensate for the photorespiratory glyoxylate when GLO is suppressed in rice.

  12. A modular strategy for engineering orthogonal chimeric RNA transcription regulators

    PubMed Central

    Takahashi, Melissa K.; Lucks, Julius B.

    2013-01-01

    Antisense RNA transcription attenuators are a key component of the synthetic biology toolbox, with their ability to serve as building blocks for both signal integration logic circuits and transcriptional cascades. However, a central challenge to building more sophisticated RNA genetic circuitry is creating larger families of orthogonal attenuators that function independently of each other. Here, we overcome this challenge by developing a modular strategy to create chimeric fusions between the engineered transcriptional attenuator from plasmid pT181 and natural antisense RNA translational regulators. Using in vivo gene expression assays in Escherichia coli, we demonstrate our ability to create chimeric attenuators by fusing sequences from five different translational regulators. Mutagenesis of these functional attenuators allowed us to create a total of 11 new chimeric attenutaors. A comprehensive orthogonality test of these culminated in a 7 × 7 matrix of mutually orthogonal regulators. A comparison between all chimeras tested led to design principles that will facilitate further engineering of orthogonal RNA transcription regulators, and may help elucidate general principles of non-coding RNA regulation. We anticipate that our strategy will accelerate the development of even larger families of orthogonal RNA transcription regulators, and thus create breakthroughs in our ability to construct increasingly sophisticated RNA genetic circuitry. PMID:23761434

  13. Role of CTCF Protein in Regulating FMR1 Locus Transcription

    PubMed Central

    Lanni, Stella; Goracci, Martina; Borrelli, Loredana; Mancano, Giorgia; Chiurazzi, Pietro; Moscato, Umberto; Ferrè, Fabrizio; Helmer-Citterich, Manuela; Tabolacci, Elisabetta; Neri, Giovanni

    2013-01-01

    Fragile X syndrome (FXS), the leading cause of inherited intellectual disability, is caused by epigenetic silencing of the FMR1 gene, through expansion and methylation of a CGG triplet repeat (methylated full mutation). An antisense transcript (FMR1-AS1), starting from both promoter and intron 2 of the FMR1 gene, was demonstrated in transcriptionally active alleles, but not in silent FXS alleles. Moreover, a DNA methylation boundary, which is lost in FXS, was recently identified upstream of the FMR1 gene. Several nuclear proteins bind to this region, like the insulator protein CTCF. Here we demonstrate for the first time that rare unmethylated full mutation (UFM) alleles present the same boundary described in wild type (WT) alleles and that CTCF binds to this region, as well as to the FMR1 gene promoter, exon 1 and intron 2 binding sites. Contrariwise, DNA methylation prevents CTCF binding to FXS alleles. Drug-induced CpGs demethylation does not restore this binding. CTCF knock-down experiments clearly established that CTCF does not act as insulator at the active FMR1 locus, despite the presence of a CGG expansion. CTCF depletion induces heterochromatinic histone configuration of the FMR1 locus and results in reduction of FMR1 transcription, which however is not accompanied by spreading of DNA methylation towards the FMR1 promoter. CTCF depletion is also associated with FMR1-AS1 mRNA reduction. Antisense RNA, like sense transcript, is upregulated in UFM and absent in FXS cells and its splicing is correlated to that of the FMR1-mRNA. We conclude that CTCF has a complex role in regulating FMR1 expression, probably through the organization of chromatin loops between sense/antisense transcriptional regulatory regions, as suggested by bioinformatics analysis. PMID:23874213

  14. Role of CTCF protein in regulating FMR1 locus transcription.

    PubMed

    Lanni, Stella; Goracci, Martina; Borrelli, Loredana; Mancano, Giorgia; Chiurazzi, Pietro; Moscato, Umberto; Ferrè, Fabrizio; Helmer-Citterich, Manuela; Tabolacci, Elisabetta; Neri, Giovanni

    2013-01-01

    Fragile X syndrome (FXS), the leading cause of inherited intellectual disability, is caused by epigenetic silencing of the FMR1 gene, through expansion and methylation of a CGG triplet repeat (methylated full mutation). An antisense transcript (FMR1-AS1), starting from both promoter and intron 2 of the FMR1 gene, was demonstrated in transcriptionally active alleles, but not in silent FXS alleles. Moreover, a DNA methylation boundary, which is lost in FXS, was recently identified upstream of the FMR1 gene. Several nuclear proteins bind to this region, like the insulator protein CTCF. Here we demonstrate for the first time that rare unmethylated full mutation (UFM) alleles present the same boundary described in wild type (WT) alleles and that CTCF binds to this region, as well as to the FMR1 gene promoter, exon 1 and intron 2 binding sites. Contrariwise, DNA methylation prevents CTCF binding to FXS alleles. Drug-induced CpGs demethylation does not restore this binding. CTCF knock-down experiments clearly established that CTCF does not act as insulator at the active FMR1 locus, despite the presence of a CGG expansion. CTCF depletion induces heterochromatinic histone configuration of the FMR1 locus and results in reduction of FMR1 transcription, which however is not accompanied by spreading of DNA methylation towards the FMR1 promoter. CTCF depletion is also associated with FMR1-AS1 mRNA reduction. Antisense RNA, like sense transcript, is upregulated in UFM and absent in FXS cells and its splicing is correlated to that of the FMR1-mRNA. We conclude that CTCF has a complex role in regulating FMR1 expression, probably through the organization of chromatin loops between sense/antisense transcriptional regulatory regions, as suggested by bioinformatics analysis.

  15. Transcription factor CP2 is crucial in hemoglobin synthesis during erythroid terminal differentiation in vitro.

    PubMed

    Chae, J H; Lee, Y H; Kim, C G

    1999-09-24

    The transcription factor CP2 was initially identified to bind to the promoter region of the murine alpha-globin gene and known to stimulate the expression of alpha-globin by increasing CP2 transcripts 3- to 5-fold during induced differentiation of mouse erythroleukemic (MEL) cells in vitro. Here, we report that this increment of CP2 expression is crucial in erythroid-specific globin gene expression and hemoglobin synthesis. When antisense CP2 was overexpressed in MEL cells, production of endogenous CP2 protein was reduced 70-80%, and significant loss of its promoter binding activity was observed. During HMBA-induced terminal differentiation of antisense CP2 expressing MEL cells, the transcription of endogenous alpha-globin gene was suppressed as expected. Moreover, both beta-globin gene expression and hemoglobin synthesis were also severely impaired, without affecting the expression of key heme enzyme genes or HMBA-induced proliferation and viability.

  16. DMD transcript imbalance determines dystrophin levels.

    PubMed

    Spitali, Pietro; van den Bergen, Janneke C; Verhaart, Ingrid E C; Wokke, Beatrijs; Janson, Anneke A M; van den Eijnde, Rani; den Dunnen, Johan T; Laros, Jeroen F J; Verschuuren, Jan J G M; 't Hoen, Peter A C; Aartsma-Rus, Annemieke

    2013-12-01

    Duchenne and Becker muscular dystrophies are caused by out-of-frame and in-frame mutations, respectively, in the dystrophin encoding DMD gene. Molecular therapies targeting the precursor-mRNA are in clinical trials and show promising results. These approaches will depend on the stability and expression levels of dystrophin mRNA in skeletal muscles and heart. We report that the DMD gene is more highly expressed in heart than in skeletal muscles, in mice and humans. The transcript mutated in the mdx mouse model shows a 5' to 3' imbalance compared with that of its wild-type counterpart and reading frame restoration via antisense-mediated exon skipping does not correct this event. We also report significant transcript instability in 22 patients with Becker dystrophy, clarifying the fact that transcript imbalance is not caused by premature nonsense mutations. Finally, we demonstrate that transcript stability, rather than transcriptional rate, is an important determinant of dystrophin protein levels in patients with Becker dystrophy. We suggest that the availability of the complete transcript is a key factor to determine protein abundance and thus will influence the outcome of mRNA-targeting therapies.

  17. Antisense DNA parameters derived from next-nearest-neighbor analysis of experimental data

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The enumeration of tetrameric and other sequence motifs that are positively or negatively correlated with in vivo antisense DNA effects has been a useful addition to the arsenal of information needed to predict effective targets for antisense DNA control of gene expression. Such retrospective information derived from in vivo cellular experiments characterizes aspects of the sequence dependence of antisense inhibition that are not predicted by nearest-neighbor (NN) thermodynamic parameters derived from in vitro experiments. However, quantitation of the antisense contributions of motifs is problematic, since individual motifs are not isolated from the effects of neighboring nucleotides, and motifs may be overlapping. These problems are circumvented by a next-nearest-neighbor (NNN) analysis of antisense DNA effects in which the overlapping nature of nearest-neighbors is taken into account. Results Next-nearest-neighbor triplet combinations of nucleotides are the simplest that include overlapping sequence effects and therefore can encompass interactions beyond those of nearest neighbors. We used singular value decomposition (SVD) to fit experimental data from our laboratory in which phosphorothioate-modified antisense DNAs (S-DNAs) 20 nucleotides long were used to inhibit cellular protein expression in 112 experiments involving four gene targets and two cell lines. Data were fitted using a NNN model, neglecting end effects, to derive NNN inhibition parameters that could be combined to give parameters for a set of 49 sequences that represents the inhibitory effects of all possible overlapping triplet interactions in the cellular targets of these antisense S-DNAs. We also show that parameters to describe subsets of the data, such as the mRNAs being targeted and the cell lines used, can be included in such a derivation. While NNN triplet parameters provided an adequate model to fit our data, NN doublet parameters did not. Conclusions The methodology presented

  18. Activating the synthesis of progerin, the mutant prelamin A in Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome, with antisense oligonucleotides.

    PubMed

    Fong, Loren G; Vickers, Timothy A; Farber, Emily A; Choi, Christine; Yun, Ui Jeong; Hu, Yan; Yang, Shao H; Coffinier, Catherine; Lee, Roger; Yin, Liya; Davies, Brandon S J; Andres, Douglas A; Spielmann, H Peter; Bennett, C Frank; Young, Stephen G

    2009-07-01

    Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS) is caused by point mutations that increase utilization of an alternate splice donor site in exon 11 of LMNA (the gene encoding lamin C and prelamin A). The alternate splicing reduces transcripts for wild-type prelamin A and increases transcripts for a truncated prelamin A (progerin). Here, we show that antisense oligonucleotides (ASOs) against exon 11 sequences downstream from the exon 11 splice donor site promote alternate splicing in both wild-type and HGPS fibroblasts, increasing the synthesis of progerin. Indeed, wild-type fibroblasts transfected with these ASOs exhibit progerin levels similar to (or greater than) those in fibroblasts from HGPS patients. This progerin was farnesylated, as judged by metabolic labeling studies. The synthesis of progerin in wild-type fibroblasts was accompanied by the same nuclear shape and gene-expression perturbations observed in HGPS fibroblasts. An ASO corresponding to the 5' portion of intron 11 also promoted alternate splicing. In contrast, an ASO against exon 11 sequences 5' to the alternate splice site reduced alternate splicing in HGPS cells and modestly lowered progerin levels. Thus, different ASOs can be used to increase or decrease 'HGPS splicing'. ASOs represent a new and powerful tool for recreating HGPS pathophysiology in wild-type cells.

  19. High-resolution transcription atlas of the mitotic cell cycle in budding yeast

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Extensive transcription of non-coding RNAs has been detected in eukaryotic genomes and is thought to constitute an additional layer in the regulation of gene expression. Despite this role, their transcription through the cell cycle has not been studied; genome-wide approaches have only focused on protein-coding genes. To explore the complex transcriptome architecture underlying the budding yeast cell cycle, we used 8 bp tiling arrays to generate a 5 minute-resolution, strand-specific expression atlas of the whole genome. Results We discovered 523 antisense transcripts, of which 80 cycle or are located opposite periodically expressed mRNAs, 135 unannotated intergenic non-coding RNAs, of which 11 cycle, and 109 cell-cycle-regulated protein-coding genes that had not previously been shown to cycle. We detected periodic expression coupling of sense and antisense transcript pairs, including antisense transcripts opposite of key cell-cycle regulators, like FAR1 and TAF2. Conclusions Our dataset presents the most comprehensive resource to date on gene expression during the budding yeast cell cycle. It reveals periodic expression of both protein-coding and non-coding RNA and profiles the expression of non-annotated RNAs throughout the cell cycle for the first time. This data enables hypothesis-driven mechanistic studies concerning the functions of non-coding RNAs. PMID:20193063

  20. Periostin antisense oligonucleotide prevents adhesion formation after surgery in mice.

    PubMed

    Takai, Shinji; Yoshino, Masafumi; Takao, Kazumasa; Yoshikawa, Kazunori; Jin, Denan

    2017-02-01

    To study the role of periostin in adhesion formation, the effect of periostin antisense oligonucleotide (PAO) on adhesion formation was evaluated in mice. Under anesthesia, the serous membrane of the cecum was abraded, and the adhesion score and mRNA levels of periostin and its related factors were determined after surgery. Saline, 40 mg/kg of negative sense oligonucleotide (NSO), or 40 mg/kg of PAO were injected into the abdomen after surgery, and the adhesion score and mRNA levels were evaluated 14 days later. Filmy adhesion formation was observed 1 day after surgery, and the adhesion score increased gradually to 14 days. The mRNA levels of periostin, transforming growth factor (TGF)-β, and collagen I increased gradually from 3 days to 14 days. The adhesion score of PAO was significantly lower than of saline or NSO 14 days after surgery. The mRNA levels of periostin, TGF-β, and collagen I were also significantly attenuated by treatment with PAO compared with saline or NSO. Thus, these results demonstrated that the periostin mRNA level increased in the abraded cecum, and PAO prevented adhesion formation along with attenuation of the periostin mRNA level. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Production and hosting by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Annexin A2 facilitates endocytic trafficking of antisense oligonucleotides

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shiyu; Sun, Hong; Tanowitz, Michael; Liang, Xue-hai; Crooke, Stanley T.

    2016-01-01

    Chemically modified antisense oligonucleotides (ASOs) designed to mediate site-specific cleavage of RNA by RNase H1 are used as research tools and as therapeutics. ASOs modified with phosphorothioate (PS) linkages enter cells via endocytotic pathways. The mechanisms by which PS-ASOs are released from membrane-enclosed endocytotic organelles to reach target RNAs remain largely unknown. We recently found that annexin A2 (ANXA2) co-localizes with PS-ASOs in late endosomes (LEs) and enhances ASO activity. Here, we show that co-localization of ANXA2 with PS-ASO is not dependent on their direct interactions or mediated by ANXA2 partner protein S100A10. Instead, ANXA2 accompanies the transport of PS-ASOs to LEs, as ANXA2/PS-ASO co-localization was observed inside LEs. Although ANXA2 appears not to affect levels of PS-ASO internalization, ANXA2 reduction caused significant accumulation of ASOs in early endosomes (EEs) and reduced localization in LEs and decreased PS-ASO activity. Importantly, the kinetics of PS-ASO activity upon free uptake show that target mRNA reduction occurs at least 4 hrs after PS-ASOs exit from EEs and is coincident with release from LEs. Taken together, our results indicate that ANXA2 facilitates PS-ASO trafficking from early to late endosomes where it may also contribute to PS-ASO release. PMID:27378781

  2. Antitumor Activity of a Novel Antisense Oligonucleotide Against Akt1

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Heejeong; Kim, Deog Joong; Ahn, Eun Hyun; Gellert, Ginelle C.; Shay, Jerry W.; Ahn, Chang-Ho; Lee, Young Bok

    2010-01-01

    The AKT pathway is an important therapeutic target for cancer drug discovery as it functions as a main point for transducing extracellular and intracellular oncogenic signals. Moreover, alternations of the AKT pathway have been found in a wide range of cancers. In the present study, we found that an Akt1 antisense oligonucleotide (Akt1 AO) significantly downregulated the expression of AKT1 at both the mRNA and protein levels and inhibited cellular growth at nanomolar concentrations in various types of human cancer cells. Combined treatment of Akt1 AO with several cytotoxic drugs resulted in an additive growth inhibition of Caki-1 cells. The in vivo effectiveness of Akt1 AO was determined using two different xenograft nude mouse models. Akt1 AO (30 mg/kg, i.v. every 48 h) significantly inhibited the tumor growth of nude mouse subcutaneously implanted with U251 human glioblastoma cells after 27 days treatment. Akt1 AO (30 mg/kg, i.p continuously via osmotic pump) also significantly inhibited the tumor formation in nude mice implanted with luciferase-expressing MIA human pancreatic cancer cells (MIA-Luc) after 14 days of treatment. The luciferase signals from MIA-Luc cells were reduced or completely abolished after 2 weeks of treatment and the implanted tumors were barely detectable. Our findings suggest that Akt1 AO alone or in combination with other clinically approved anticancer agents should be further explored and progressed into clinical studies as a potential novel therapeutic agent. PMID:19693774

  3. Chimeric Antisense Oligonucleotide Conjugated to α-Tocopherol

    PubMed Central

    Nishina, Tomoko; Numata, Junna; Nishina, Kazutaka; Yoshida-Tanaka, Kie; Nitta, Keiko; Piao, Wenying; Iwata, Rintaro; Ito, Shingo; Kuwahara, Hiroya; Wada, Takeshi; Mizusawa, Hidehiro; Yokota, Takanori

    2015-01-01

    We developed an efficient system for delivering short interfering RNA (siRNA) to the liver by using α-tocopherol conjugation. The α-tocopherol–conjugated siRNA was effective and safe for RNA interference–mediated gene silencing in vivo. In contrast, when the 13-mer LNA (locked nucleic acid)-DNA gapmer antisense oligonucleotide (ASO) was directly conjugated with α-tocopherol it showed markedly reduced silencing activity in mouse liver. Here, therefore, we tried to extend the 5′-end of the ASO sequence by using 5′-α-tocopherol–conjugated 4- to 7-mers of unlocked nucleic acid (UNA) as a “second wing.” Intravenous injection of mice with this α-tocopherol–conjugated chimeric ASO achieved more potent silencing than ASO alone in the liver, suggesting increased delivery of the ASO to the liver. Within the cells, the UNA wing was cleaved or degraded and α-tocopherol was released from the 13-mer gapmer ASO, resulting in activation of the gapmer. The α-tocopherol–conjugated chimeric ASO showed high efficacy, with hepatic tropism, and was effective and safe for gene silencing in vivo. We have thus identified a new, effective LNA-DNA gapmer structure in which drug delivery system (DDS) molecules are bound to ASO with UNA sequences. PMID:25584900

  4. Antisense inhibition of apolipoprotein (a) to lower plasma lipoprotein (a) levels in humans

    PubMed Central

    Graham, Mark J.; Viney, Nick; Crooke, Rosanne M.; Tsimikas, Sotirios

    2016-01-01

    Epidemiological, genetic association, and Mendelian randomization studies have provided strong evidence that lipoprotein (a) [Lp(a)] is an independent causal risk factor for CVD, including myocardial infarction, stroke, peripheral arterial disease, and calcific aortic valve stenosis. Lp(a) levels >50 mg/dl are highly prevalent (20% of the general population) and are overrepresented in patients with CVD and aortic stenosis. These data support the notion that Lp(a) should be a target of therapy for CVD event reduction and to reduce progression of aortic stenosis. However, effective therapies to specifically reduce plasma Lp(a) levels are lacking. Recent animal and human studies have shown that Lp(a) can be specifically targeted with second generation antisense oligonucleotides (ASOs) that inhibit apo(a) mRNA translation. In apo(a) transgenic mice, an apo(a) ASO reduced plasma apo(a)/Lp(a) levels and their associated oxidized phospholipid (OxPL) levels by 86 and 93%, respectively. In cynomolgus monkeys, a second generation apo(a) ASO, ISIS-APO(a)Rx, significantly reduced hepatic apo(a) mRNA expression and plasma Lp(a) levels by >80%. Finally, in a phase I study in normal volunteers, ISIS-APO(a)Rx ASO reduced Lp(a) levels and their associated OxPL levels up to 89 and 93%, respectively, with minimal effects on other lipoproteins. ISIS-APO(a)Rx represents the first specific and potent drug in clinical development to lower Lp(a) levels and may be beneficial in reducing CVD events and progression of calcific aortic valve stenosis. PMID:26538546

  5. A cis-Encoded Antisense Small RNA Regulated by the HP0165-HP0166 Two-Component System Controls Expression of ureB in Helicobacter pylori▿

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Yi; Feng, Jing; Scott, David R.; Marcus, Elizabeth A.; Sachs, George

    2011-01-01

    Expression of urease is essential for gastric colonization by Helicobacter pylori. The increased level of urease in gastric acidity is due, in part, to acid activation of the two-component system (TCS) consisting of the membrane sensor HP0165 and its response regulator, HP0166, which regulates transcription of the seven genes of the urease gene cluster. We now find that there are two major ureAB transcripts: a 2.7-kb full-length ureAB transcript and a 1.4-kb truncated transcript lacking 3′ ureB. Acidic pH (pH 4.5) results in a significant increase in transcription of ureAB, while neutral pH (pH 7.4) increases the truncated 1.4-kb transcript. Northern blot analysis with sense RNA and strand-specific oligonucleotide probes followed by 5′ rapid amplification of cDNA ends detects an antisense small RNA (sRNA) encoded by the 5′ ureB noncoding strand consisting of ∼290 nucleotides (5′ureB-sRNA). Deletion of HP0165 elevates the level of the truncated 1.4-kb transcript along with that of the 5′ureB-sRNA at both pH 7.4 and pH 4.5. Overexpression of 5′ureB-sRNA increases the 1.4-kb transcript, decreases the 2.7-kb transcript, and decreases urease activity. Electrophoretic mobility shift assay shows that unphosphorylated HP0166 binds specifically to the 5′ureB-sRNA promoter. The ability of the HP0165-HP0166 TCS to both increase and decrease ureB expression at low and high pHs, respectively, facilitates gastric habitation and colonization over the wide range of intragastric pHs experienced by the organism. PMID:20971914

  6. Translational Inhibition of CTX-M Extended Spectrum β-Lactamase in Clinical Strains of Escherichia coli by Synthetic Antisense Oligonucleotides Partially Restores Sensitivity to Cefotaxime

    PubMed Central

    Readman, John B.; Dickson, George; Coldham, Nick G.

    2016-01-01

    Synthetic antisense oligomers are DNA mimics that can specifically inhibit gene expression at the translational level by ribosomal steric hindrance. They bind to their mRNA targets by Watson-Crick base pairing and are resistant to degradation by both nucleases and proteases. A 25-mer phosphorodiamidate morpholino oligomer (PMO) and a 13-mer polyamide (peptide) nucleic acid (PNA) were designed to target mRNA (positions -4 to +21, and –17 to –5, respectively) close to the translational initiation site of the extended-spectrum β-lactamase resistance genes of CTX-M group 1. These antisense oligonucleotides were found to inhibit β-lactamase activity by up to 96% in a cell-free translation-transcription coupled system using an expression vector carrying a blaCTX-M-15 gene cloned from a clinical isolate. Despite evidence for up-regulation of CTX-M gene expression, they were both found to significantly restore sensitivity to cefotaxime (CTX) in E. coli AS19, an atypical cell wall permeable mutant, in a dose dependant manner (0-40 nM). The PMO and PNA were covalently bound to the cell penetrating peptide (CPP; (KFF)3K) and both significantly (P < 0.05) increased sensitivity to CTX in a dose dependent manner (0-40 nM) in field and clinical isolates harboring CTX-M group 1 β-lactamases. Antisense oligonucleotides targeted to the translational initiation site and Shine-Dalgarno region of blaCTX-M-15 inhibited gene expression, and when conjugated to a cell penetrating delivery vehicle, partially restored antibiotic sensitivity to both field and clinical isolates. PMID:27047482

  7. Superior Silencing by 2',4'-BNA(NC)-Based Short Antisense Oligonucleotides Compared to 2',4'-BNA/LNA-Based Apolipoprotein B Antisense Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Tsuyoshi; Yasuhara, Hidenori; Wada, Fumito; Harada-Shiba, Mariko; Imanishi, Takeshi; Obika, Satoshi

    2012-01-01

    The duplex stability with target mRNA and the gene silencing potential of a novel bridged nucleic acid analogue are described. The analogue, 2',4'-BNA(NC) antisense oligonucleotides (AONs) ranging from 10- to 20-nt-long, targeted apolipoprotein B. 2',4'-BNA(NC) was directly compared to its conventional bridged (or locked) nucleic acid (2',4'-BNA/LNA)-based counterparts. Melting temperatures of duplexes formed between 2',4'-BNA(NC)-based antisense oligonucleotides and the target mRNA surpassed those of 2',4'-BNA/LNA-based counterparts at all lengths. An in vitro transfection study revealed that when compared to the identical length 2',4'-BNA/LNA-based counterpart, the corresponding 2',4'-BNA(NC)-based antisense oligonucleotide showed significantly stronger inhibitory activity. This inhibitory activity was more pronounced in shorter (13-, 14-, and 16-mer) oligonucleotides. On the other hand, the 2',4'-BNA(NC)-based 20-mer AON exhibited the highest affinity but the worst IC(50) value, indicating that very high affinity may undermine antisense potency. These results suggest that the potency of AONs requires a balance between reward term and penalty term. Balance of these two parameters would depend on affinity, length, and the specific chemistry of the AON, and fine-tuning of this balance could lead to improved potency. We demonstrate that 2',4'-BNA(NC) may be a better alternative to conventional 2',4'-BNA/LNA, even for "short" antisense oligonucleotides, which are attractive in terms of drug-likeness and cost-effective bulk production.

  8. Effects of L1 retrotransposon insertion on transcript processing, localization and accumulation: lessons from the retinal degeneration 7 mouse and implications for the genomic ecology of L1 elements.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jichao; Rattner, Amir; Nathans, Jeremy

    2006-07-01

    The retinal degeneration 7 (rd7) mouse is a naturally occurring model of enhanced S-cone syndrome, Goldman-Favre syndrome and clumped pigmentary retinopathy in humans, allelic disorders caused by inactivation of a photoreceptor-specific nuclear hormone receptor, NR2E3. We show here that the rd7 mutation arose from the antisense insertion of a long interspersed nuclear element (LINE-1) (or L1) into exon 5 of the mouse Nr2e3 gene. L1 insertion blocks splicing of Nr2e3 intron 5 by separating an inefficient splice donor from essential splicing enhancers within exon 5, with the result that incompletely spliced transcripts accumulate to high levels at the mutant Nr2e3 locus in photoreceptor nuclei. The high efficiency of transcription through the 7 kb L1 was unexpected and led us to compare the effect on transcript abundance of sense or antisense L1 insertions in transfected cells. In a variety of sequence contexts antisense L1 insertions had little or no effect on transcript levels or the production of full-length transcripts, whereas sense L1 insertions reduced transcript levels from several-fold to more than 10-fold. A bioinformatic analysis of all mouse L1s shows a approximately 2-fold under-representation of L1s in introns when compared with bulk genomic DNA, and, within introns, a further approximately 2-fold under-representation of sense when compared with antisense L1s. Interestingly, there is no evidence for orientation-specific positive or negative selection within any subregions of the L1 element. These data suggest that L1s have evolved to present the host transcriptional machinery with a minimally disruptive profile in the antisense orientation such that antisense intronic L1s often escape purifying negative selection.

  9. The use of antisense mRNA to inhibit the tonoplast H+ ATPase in carrot.

    PubMed Central

    Gogarten, J P; Fichmann, J; Braun, Y; Morgan, L; Styles, P; Taiz, S L; DeLapp, K; Taiz, L

    1992-01-01

    Carrot root cells were transformed with the coding or 5' noncoding regions of the carrot vacuolar H+ ATPase A subunit cDNA cloned in the antisense orientation behind the cauliflower mosaic virus 35S promoter. Bafilomycin-sensitive ATPase, H(+)-pumping, and 14C-O-methyl-glucose uptake activities were specifically inhibited in the tonoplast fractions of mutant cell lines. Protein gel blotting confirmed that the expression of the A subunit was inhibited in the tonoplast fraction, but not in the Golgi fraction. Two-dimensional protein gel blots of total microsomes of wild-type and control transformant cell lines revealed two major immunoreactive polypeptides in the acidic pI range. In contrast, highly purified tonoplast membranes contained only the less acidic polypeptide. Because the less acidic polypeptide was preferentially diminished in the two antisense cell lines, we infer that the antisense constructs specifically blocked expression of a tonoplast-specific isoform of the V-ATPase A subunit in carrot. Regenerated plants containing the antisense constructs exhibited altered leaf morphologies and reduced cell expansion. The altered phenotype was correlated with the presence of the antisense construct. PMID:1392599

  10. Administration of antisense DNA for hepatocyte growth factor causes an depressive and anxiogenic response in rats.

    PubMed

    Wakatsuki, Masatoshi; Akiyoshi, Jotaro; Ichioka, Shugo; Tanaka, Yoshihiro; Tsuru, Jusen; Matsushita, Hirotaka; Hanada, Hiroaki; Isogawa, Koichi

    2007-12-01

    Hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) is induced in neurons during ischemia and is neuroprotective against post-ischemic delayed neuronal death in the hippocampus. HGF might play an important role in the maturation and functioning of these neurons in the hippocampus. Our aim was to determine what effect HGF antisense has on depression and anxiety in rats. HGF antisense was infused at a constant rate into cerebral lateral ventricles and its effect on anxiety in rats was monitored. In forced swimming test, rats that received antisense DNA increased the length of time that they were immobile in the water. In the elevated plus maze test, the black and white box test and conditioned fear test, HGF antisense administration caused all indicators of anxiety to increase. Number of HGF-positive cells in C1 of hippocampus was significantly decreased in the HGF antisense-infused group compared to the vehicle- and scrambled oligonucleotide-treated group. No significant effect on general locomotor activity was seen. These results indicate that inhibition of HGF induces an increase in depression and anxiety-related behaviors suggesting a depressive and anxiogenic-like effect.

  11. Systemic administration of antisense p75(NTR) oligodeoxynucleotides rescues axotomised spinal motor neurons.

    PubMed

    Lowry, K S; Murray, S S; Coulson, E J; Epa, R; Bartlett, P F; Barrett, G; Cheema, S S

    2001-04-01

    The 75 kD low-affinity neurotrophin receptor (p75(NTR)) is expressed in developing and axotomised spinal motor neurons. There is now convincing evidence that p75(NTR) can, under some circumstances, become cytotoxic and promote neuronal cell death. We report here that a single application of antisense p75(NTR) oligodeoxynucleotides to the proximal nerve stumps of neonatal rats significantly reduces the loss of axotomised motor neurons compared to controls treated with nonsense oligodeoxynucleotides or phosphate-buffered saline. Our investigations also show that daily systemic intraperitoneal injections of antisense p75(NTR) oligodeoxynucleotides for 14 days significantly reduce the loss of axotomised motor neurons compared to controls. Furthermore, we found that systemic delivery over a similar period continues to be effective following axotomy when intraperitoneal injections were 1) administered after a delay of 24 hr, 2) limited to the first 7 days, or 3) administered every third day. In addition, p75(NTR) protein levels were reduced in spinal motor neurons following treatment with antisense p75(NTR) oligodeoxynucleotides. There were also no obvious side effects associated with antisense p75(NTR) oligodeoxynucleotide treatments as determined by behavioural observations and postnatal weight gain. Our findings indicate that antisense-based strategies could be a novel approach for the prevention of motor neuron degeneration associated with injuries or disease.

  12. The production of an inducible antisense alternative oxidase (Aox1a) plant.

    PubMed

    Potter, F J; Wiskich, J T; Dry, I B

    2001-01-01

    Plant mitochondria contain an alternative oxidase (AOX) acting as a terminal electron acceptor of the alternative pathway in the electron transport chain. Here we describe the production of inducible antisense Aox1a plants of Arabidopsis thaliana (L.) Heynh. and the procedures used to determine the resulting alternative pathway activity. The Arabidopsis Aox1a cDNA sequence was cloned behind a copper-inducible promoter system in the antisense orientation. Arabidopsis thaliana (Columbia) plants were transformed by in-planta vacuum infiltration with Agrobacterium containing the antisense construct. Whole-leaf ethanol production was used as a measure to investigate alternative pathway activity in the presence of antimycin A. After 24 h, leaves from the copper-induced, antisense line F1.1 produced up to 8.8 times more ethanol (via aerobic fermentation) than the non-induced and wild-type leaves, indicating effective cytochrome pathway inhibition by antimycin A and a decreased alternative pathway activity in induced F1.1 leaves. Transgene expression studies also revealed no expression in non-induced leaves and up until 24 h post-induction. Copper-induced transgenic leaves were less susceptible to alternative pathway inhibition than non-induced transgenic leaves, as seen via tissue-slice respiratory studies, and mitochondrial respiration, using F1.1 cell cultures, also supported this. These results demonstrate the successful production of a transgenic line of Arabidopsis in which the alternative pathway activity can be genetically manipulated with an inducible antisense system.

  13. Antisense oligonucleotides targeted to the p53 gene modulate liver regeneration in vivo.

    PubMed

    Arora, V; Iversen, P L

    2000-02-01

    The rapidly proliferating cells of the regenerating liver after partial hepatectomy (PH) present a reproducible in vivo model to study the functional role of the tumor suppressor gene p53. The present study uses the rat 70% PH model along with systemic administration of three different structural types of antisense oligonucleotides (ODNs) designed to suppress p53 expression. We tested the hypothesis that antisense ODNs can inhibit the expression of p53, resulting in the loss of the G(1)-S cell cycle checkpoint and an altered pattern of liver regeneration. Intraperitoneal administration of 5 mg/kg/day antisense phosphorothioate ODN after 70% PH resulted in reduced expression of the p53 protein in the regenerating liver. There were concomitant increases in weight gain of remnant-regenerating liver and expression of proliferating cell nuclear antigen and p21(waf-1) compared with either saline or 5 mg/kg/day mispaired phosphorothioate ODN treatment. Flow cytometric analysis of DNA content of isolated hepatocytes revealed a reduction in the G(0)/G(1) cell population and accumulation of cells with more than 4n DNA in antisense-treated rats. The regenerating livers had significantly diminished cytochrome P-450 (CYP) enzyme activities. Rats treated with p53 antisense ODNs, but not saline or mispair ODN controls, had significantly elevated CYP activities. These observations functionally link the expression of p53 with diminished expression of several CYP isoforms in the liver regeneration model.

  14. SupraMolecular BioVectors (SMBV) improve antisense inhibition of erbB-2 expression.

    PubMed Central

    Allal, C.; Sixou, S.; Kravtzoff, R.; Soulet, N.; Soula, G.; Favre, G.

    1998-01-01

    New therapeutic strategies are now being developed against adenocarcinoma associated with erbB-2 amplification, particularly by inhibiting p185erbB-2 expression. Antisense oligodeoxynucleotides seem promising for this purpose as long as they are efficiently protected against degradation and targeted into the cells. We present antisense oligonucleotide carriers, the supramolecular biovectors (SMBVs), for which we have already demonstrated the ability to improve both cellular uptake and protection of oligodeoxynucleotide. The present work demonstrates that SMBVs elicit a specific and non-toxic action of antisense compounds in a cell model, irrespective of their sensitivity to nucleases. This is a major point, considering the specificity problems associated with the use of nuclease-resistant phosphorothioate oligodeoxynucleotide. SMBVs improve antisense efficiency of oligodeoxynucleotide designed against p185erbB-2, with a complete growth arrest of SK-Br-3, human adenocarcinoma mammary cells that overexpress p185erbB-2 and no effect on MCF-7 cells that normally express p185erbB-2. The comparison of SMBVs with DOTAP reveals the statistically higher efficiency of SMBVs, which allows the antisense inhibition of p185erbB-2 expression in 65-75% of SK-Br-3 cells (P < 0.05). The efficiency and controlled synthesis of SMBVs underline their potentialities as oligodeoxynucleotide carriers for in vivo experiments. PMID:9652760

  15. Modification of antisense phosphodiester oligodeoxynucleotides by a 5' cholesteryl moiety increases cellular association and improves efficacy.

    PubMed Central

    Krieg, A M; Tonkinson, J; Matson, S; Zhao, Q; Saxon, M; Zhang, L M; Bhanja, U; Yakubov, L; Stein, C A

    1993-01-01

    Phosphodiester oligodeoxynucleotides bearing a 5' cholesteryl (chol) modification bind to low density lipoprotein (LDL), apparently by partitioning the chol-modified oligonucleotides into the lipid layer. Both HL60 cells and primary mouse spleen T and B cells incubated with fluorescently labeled chol-modified oligonucleotide showed substantially increased cellular association by flow cytometry and increased internalization by confocal microscopy compared to an identical molecule not bearing the chol group. Cellular internalization of chol-modified oligonucleotide occurred at least partially through the LDL receptor; it was increased in mouse spleen cells by cell culture in lipoprotein-deficient medium and/or lovastatin, and it was decreased by culture in high serum medium. To determine whether chol-modified oligonucleotides are more potent antisense agents, we titered antisense unmodified phosphodiester and chol-modified oligonucleotides targeted against a mouse immunosuppressive protein. Murine spleen cells cultured with 20 microM phosphodiester antisense oligonucleotides had a 2-fold increase in RNA synthesis, indicating the expected lymphocyte activation. Antisense chol-modified oligonucleotides showed an 8-fold increase in relative potency: they caused a 2-fold increase in RNA synthesis at just 2.5 microM. The increased efficacy was blocked by heparin and was further increased by cell culture in 1% (vs. 10%) fetal bovine serum, suggesting that the effect may, at least in part, be mediated via the LDL receptor. Antisense chol-modified oligonucleotides are sequence specific and have increased potency as compared to unmodified oligonucleotides. Images PMID:8430072

  16. Antisense oligonucleotide therapy for spinocerebellar ataxia type 2.

    PubMed

    Scoles, Daniel R; Meera, Pratap; Schneider, Matthew D; Paul, Sharan; Dansithong, Warunee; Figueroa, Karla P; Hung, Gene; Rigo, Frank; Bennett, C Frank; Otis, Thomas S; Pulst, Stefan M

    2017-04-20

    There are no disease-modifying treatments for adult human neurodegenerative diseases. Here we test RNA-targeted therapies in two mouse models of spinocerebellar ataxia type 2 (SCA2), an autosomal dominant polyglutamine disease. Both models recreate the progressive adult-onset dysfunction and degeneration of a neuronal network that are seen in patients, including decreased firing frequency of cerebellar Purkinje cells and a decline in motor function. We developed a potential therapy directed at the ATXN2 gene by screening 152 antisense oligonucleotides (ASOs). The most promising oligonucleotide, ASO7, downregulated ATXN2 mRNA and protein, which resulted in delayed onset of the SCA2 phenotype. After delivery by intracerebroventricular injection to ATXN2-Q127 mice, ASO7 localized to Purkinje cells, reduced cerebellar ATXN2 expression below 75% for more than 10 weeks without microglial activation, and reduced the levels of cerebellar ATXN2. Treatment of symptomatic mice with ASO7 improved motor function compared to saline-treated mice. ASO7 had a similar effect in the BAC-Q72 SCA2 mouse model, and in both mouse models it normalized protein levels of several SCA2-related proteins expressed in Purkinje cells, including Rgs8, Pcp2, Pcp4, Homer3, Cep76 and Fam107b. Notably, the firing frequency of Purkinje cells returned to normal even when treatment was initiated more than 12 weeks after the onset of the motor phenotype in BAC-Q72 mice. These findings support ASOs as a promising approach for treating some human neurodegenerative diseases.

  17. Antisense RNA Strategies for Metabolic Engineering of Clostridium acetobutylicum

    PubMed Central

    Desai, Ruchir P.; Papoutsakis, Eleftherios T.

    1999-01-01

    We examined the effectiveness of antisense RNA (as RNA) strategies for metabolic engineering of Clostridium acetobutylicum. Strain ATCC 824(pRD4) was developed to produce a 102-nucleotide asRNA with 87% complementarity to the butyrate kinase (BK) gene. Strain ATCC 824(pRD4) exhibited 85 to 90% lower BK and acetate kinase specific activities than the control strain. Strain ATCC 824(pRD4) also exhibited 45 to 50% lower phosphotransbutyrylase (PTB) and phosphotransacetylase specific activities than the control strain. This strain exhibited earlier induction of solventogenesis, which resulted in 50 and 35% higher final concentrations of acetone and butanol, respectively, than the concentrations in the control. Strain ATCC 824(pRD1) was developed to putatively produce a 698-nucleotide asRNA with 96% complementarity to the PTB gene. Strain ATCC 824(pRD1) exhibited 70 and 80% lower PTB and BK activities, respectively, than the control exhibited. It also exhibited 300% higher levels of a lactate dehydrogenase activity than the control exhibited. The growth yields of ATCC 824(pRD1) were 28% less than the growth yields of the control. While the levels of acids were not affected in ATCC 824(pRD1) fermentations, the acetone and butanol concentrations were 96 and 75% lower, respectively, than the concentrations in the control fermentations. The lower level of solvent production by ATCC 824(pRD1) was compensated for by ∼100-fold higher levels of lactate production. The lack of any significant impact on butyrate formation fluxes by the lower PTB and BK levels suggests that butyrate formation fluxes are not controlled by the levels of the butyrate formation enzymes. PMID:10049845

  18. The effect of pegylated antisense acetylcholinesterase on hematopoiesis.

    PubMed

    Patinkin, Deborah; Hidmi, Adel; Weiss, Lola; Slavin, Shimon; Katzhendler, Joshua

    2003-01-01

    To determine whether the efficacy of entry and action of antisense oligonucleotides (AS-ODN) on hematopoietic stem cells in vitro could be improved by the addition of polyethylene glycol (PEG), a molecule of PEG was bound to AS- or sense-acetylcholinesterase (AS-ACHE or S-ACHE). The introduction of 0.1-0.5 microM PEG-AS-ACHE or 0.5 microM AS-ACHE into methylcellulose bone marrow (BM) cultures produced a doubling in number of colony-forming unit-granulocyte-erythrocyte-macrophage-megakaryocyte (CFU-GEMM) and a 5-fold increase in cell number of the PEG-ODN. Further increase in concentration of the PEG-ODN reduced colony numbers. PEG-AS-ACHE induced higher colony numbers and greatly increased megakaryocyte (MK) formation when compared with PEG and AS-ACHE added separately to the culture. In addition, differentials of the CFU-GEMMs indicated there was a direct relationship between MK number and PEG-AS-ACHE concentration. Under these culture conditions, 5 microM PEG alone gave control values of CFU-GEMM. On addition of FITC-PEG-AS-ACHE to the cell cultures, using confocal microscopy, the nuclei of both early and mature MKs were labeled specifically, whereas all other cellular nuclei were negative to the stain. The use of PEG-AS-ODN, affording specific delivery of AS-ODN to target cells, increased cell proliferation, and enhanced ODN uptake, may be of potential importance in stem cell expansion for BM transplantation and gene therapy.

  19. AZD9150, a Next-Generation Antisense Oligonucleotide Inhibitor of STAT3 with Early Evidence of Clinical Activity in Lymphoma and Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Hong, David; Kurzrock, Razelle; Kim, Youngsoo; Woessner, Richard; Younes, Anas; Nemunaitis, John; Fowler, Nathan; Zhou, Tianyuan; Schmidt, Joanna; Jo, Minji; Lee, Samantha J.; Yamashita, Mason; Hughes, Steven G.; Fayad, Luis; Piha-Paul, Sarina; Nadella, Murali VP; Mohseni, Morvarid; Lawson, Deborah; Reimer, Corinne; Blakey, David C.; Xiao, Xiaokun; Hsu, Jeff; Revenko, Alexey; Monia, Brett P.; MacLeod, A. Robert

    2017-01-01

    Next-generation sequencing technologies have greatly expanded our understanding of cancer genetics. Antisense technology is an attractive platform with the potential to translate these advances into improved cancer therapeutics, because antisense oligonucleotide (ASO) inhibitors can be designed on the basis of gene sequence information alone. Recent human clinical data have demonstrated the potent activity of systemically administered ASOs targeted to genes expressed in the liver. Here, we describe the preclinical activity and initial clinical evaluation of a class of ASOs containing constrained ethyl modifications for targeting the gene encoding the transcription factor STAT3, a notoriously difficult protein to inhibit therapeutically. Systemic delivery of the unformulated ASO, AZD9150, decreased STAT3 expression in a broad range of preclinical cancer models and showed antitumor activity in lymphoma and lung cancer models. AZD9150 preclinical activity translated into single-agent antitumor activity in patients with highly treatment-refractory lymphoma and non-small cell lung cancer in a phase I dose escalation study. PMID:26582900

  20. Analysis of the Mechanism of Action of the Antisense RNA That Controls the Replication of the repABC Plasmid p42d ▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Cervantes-Rivera, Ramón; Romero-López, Cristina; Berzal-Herranz, Alfredo; Cevallos, Miguel A.

    2010-01-01

    Replication and segregation of the Rhizobium etli symbiotic plasmid (pRetCFN42d) depend on the presence of a repABC operon, which carries all the plasmid-encoded elements required for these functions. All repABC operons share three protein-encoding genes (repA, repB, and repC), an antisense RNA (ctRNA) coding gene, and at least one centromere-like region (parS). The products of repA and repB, in conjunction with the parS region, make up the segregation system, and they negatively regulate operon transcription. The last gene of the operon, repC, encodes the initiator protein. The ctRNA is a negative posttranscriptional regulator of repC. In this work, we analyzed the secondary structures of the ctRNA and its target and mapped the motifs involved in the complex formed between them. Essential residues for the effective interaction localize at the unpaired 5′ end of the antisense molecule and the loop of the target mRNA. In light of our results, we propose a model explaining the mechanism of action of this ctRNA in the regulation of plasmid replication in R. etli. PMID:20435728

  1. Achieving large dynamic range control of gene expression with a compact RNA transcription-translation regulator.

    PubMed

    Westbrook, Alexandra M; Lucks, Julius B

    2017-04-06

    RNA transcriptional regulators are emerging as versatile components for genetic network construction. However, these regulators suffer from incomplete repression in their OFF state, making their dynamic range less than that of their protein counterparts. This incomplete repression causes expression leak, which impedes the construction of larger synthetic regulatory networks as leak propagation can interfere with desired network function. To address this, we demonstrate how naturally derived antisense RNA-mediated transcriptional regulators can be configured to regulate both transcription and translation in a single compact RNA mechanism that functions in Escherichia coli. Using in vivo gene expression assays, we show that a combination of transcriptional termination and ribosome binding site sequestration increases repression from 85% to 98%, or activation from 10-fold to over 900-fold, in response to cognate antisense RNAs. We also show that orthogonal repressive versions of this mechanism can be created through engineering minimal antisense RNAs. Finally, to demonstrate the utility of this mechanism, we use it to reduce network leak in an RNA-only cascade. We anticipate these regulators will find broad use as synthetic biology moves beyond parts engineering to the design and construction of more sophisticated regulatory networks.

  2. Development of Antisense Therapeutic and Imaging Agents to Detect and Suppress Inducible Nitric Oxide Synthase (iNOS) Expression in Acute Lung Injury (ALI)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Yuefei

    This dissertation focuses on the development and investigation of antisense imaging and therapeutic agents, combined with nanotechnology, to detect and suppress inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) expression for the diagnosis and treatment of acute lung injury (ALI). To achieve this goal, several efforts were made. The first effort was the identification and characterization of high binding affinity antisense peptide nucleic acids (PNAs) and shell-crosslinked knedel-like nanoparticle (SCK)-PNA conjugates to the iNOS mRNA. Antisense binding sites on the iNOS mRNA were first mapped by a procedure for rapidly generating a library of antisense accessible sites on native mRNAs (MASL) which involves reverse transcription of whole cell mRNA extracts with a random oligodeoxynucleotide primer followed by mRNA-specific PCR. Antisense PNAs against the antisense accessible sites were accordingly synthesized and characterized. The second effort was the investigation of cationic shell crosslinked knedel-like nanoparticle (cSCK)-mediated siRNA delivery to suppress iNOS expression for the treatment of ALI. siRNA with its unique gene-specific properties could serve as a promising therapeutic agent, however success in this area has been challenged by a lack of efficient biocompatible transfection agents. cSCK with its nanometer size and positive charge previously showed efficient cellular delivery of phosphorothioate ODNs (oligodeoxynucleotides), plasmid DNA and PNA. Herein, cSCK showed good siRNA binding and facilitated efficient siRNA transfection in HeLa, a mouse macrophage cell line and other human cell lines. cSCK led to greater silencing efficiency than Lipofectamine 2000 in HeLa cells as determined by the viability following transfection with cytotoxic and non-cytotoxic siRNAs, as well in 293T and HEK cells, and was comparable in BEAS-2B and MCF10a cells. The third effort was the preparation of an iNOS imaging probe through electrostatic complexation between a radiolabeled

  3. The novel cis-encoded antisense RNA AsrC positively regulates the expression of rpoE-rseABC operon and thus enhances the motility of Salmonella enterica serovar typhi

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Qi; Zhang, Ying; Zhang, Xiaolei; Zhan, Lifang; Zhao, Xin; Xu, Shungao; Sheng, Xiumei; Huang, Xinxiang

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial non-coding RNAs are essential in many cellular processes, including response to environmental stress, and virulence. Deep sequencing analysis of the Salmonella enterica serovar typhi (S. typhi) transcriptome revealed a novel antisense RNA transcribed in cis on the strand complementary to rseC, an activator gene of sigma factor RpoE. In this study, expression of this antisense RNA was confirmed in S. typhi by Northern hybridization. Rapid amplification of cDNA ends and sequence analysis identified an 893 bp sequence from the antisense RNA coding region that covered all of the rseC coding region in the reverse direction of transcription. This sequence of RNA was named as AsrC. After overexpression of AsrC with recombinantant plasmid in S. typhi, the bacterial motility was increased obviously. To explore the mechanism of AsrC function, regulation of rseC and rpoE expression by AsrC was investigated. We found that AsrC increased the levels of rseC mRNA and protein. The expression of rpoE was also increased in S. typhi after overexpression of AsrC, which was dependent on rseC. Thus, we propose that AsrC increased RseC level and indirectly activating RpoE which can initiate fliA expression and promote the motility of S. typhi. PMID:26441919

  4. Delivery is key: lessons learnt from developing splice-switching antisense therapies.

    PubMed

    Godfrey, Caroline; Desviat, Lourdes R; Smedsrød, Bård; Piétri-Rouxel, France; Denti, Michela A; Disterer, Petra; Lorain, Stéphanie; Nogales-Gadea, Gisela; Sardone, Valentina; Anwar, Rayan; El Andaloussi, Samir; Lehto, Taavi; Khoo, Bernard; Brolin, Camilla; van Roon-Mom, Willeke Mc; Goyenvalle, Aurélie; Aartsma-Rus, Annemieke; Arechavala-Gomeza, Virginia

    2017-03-13

    The use of splice-switching antisense therapy is highly promising, with a wealth of pre-clinical data and numerous clinical trials ongoing. Nevertheless, its potential to treat a variety of disorders has yet to be realized. The main obstacle impeding the clinical translation of this approach is the relatively poor delivery of antisense oligonucleotides to target tissues after systemic delivery. We are a group of researchers closely involved in the development of these therapies and would like to communicate our discussions concerning the validity of standard methodologies currently used in their pre-clinical development, the gaps in current knowledge and the pertinent challenges facing the field. We therefore make recommendations in order to focus future research efforts and facilitate a wider application of therapeutic antisense oligonucleotides.

  5. Repair of Thalassemic Human β -globin mRNA in Mammalian Cells by Antisense Oligonucleotides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sierakowska, Halina; Sambade, Maria J.; Agrawal, Sudhir; Kole, Ryszard

    1996-11-01

    In one form of β -thalassemia, a genetic blood disorder, a mutation in intron 2 of the β -globin gene (IVS2-654) causes aberrant splicing of β -globin pre-mRNA and, consequently, β -globin deficiency. Treatment of mammalian cells stably expressing the IVS2-654 human β -globin gene with antisense oligonucleotides targeted at the aberrant splice sites restored correct splicing in a dose-dependent fashion, generating correct human β -globin mRNA and polypeptide. Both products persisted for up to 72 hr posttreatment. The oligonucleotides modified splicing by a true antisense mechanism without overt unspecific effects on cell growth and splicing of other pre-mRNAs. This novel approach in which antisense oligonucleotides are used to restore rather than to down-regulate the activity of the target gene is applicable to other splicing mutants and is of potential clinical interest.

  6. Single base discrimination for ribonuclease H-dependent antisense effects within intact human leukaemia cells.

    PubMed Central

    Giles, R V; Ruddell, C J; Spiller, D G; Green, J A; Tidd, D M

    1995-01-01

    We have previously demonstrated, in vitro, that phosphodiester and phosphorothioate antisense oligodeoxynucleotides could direct ribonuclease H to cleave non-target RNA sites and that chimeric methylphosphonodiester/phosphodiester analogue structures were substantially more specific. In this report we show that such chimeric molecules can promote point mutation-specific scission of target mRNA by both Escherichia coli and human RNases H in vitro. Intact human leukaemia cells 'biochemically microinjected' with antisense effectors demonstrated efficient suppression of target mRNA expression. It was noted that the chimeric methylphosphonodiester/phosphodiester structures showed single base discrimination, whereas neither the phosphodiester nor phosphorothioate compounds were as stringent. Finally, we show that the antisense effects obtained in intact cells were due to endogenous RNase H activity. Images PMID:7731809

  7. Antisense peptide nucleic acid–peptide conjugates for functional analyses of genes in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Maekawa, Kazuhiko; Azuma, Motoki; Okuno, Yousuke; Tsukamoto, Tasuku; Nishiguchi, Kenzo; Setsukinai, Ken-ichi; Maki, Hideki; Numata, Yoshito; Takemoto, Hiroshi; Rokushima, Masatomo

    2015-11-15

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is one of the most common and clinically important pathogens because of its resistance to a wide variety of antibiotics. A number of treatments of P. aeruginosa have been developed, but there is still no definitive one. Antisense drugs have a great potential to treat multidrug-resistant P. aeruginosa because this technology, in principle, can inhibit the expression of any essential genes. Nucleic Acid Ther.2012, 22, 323 reported that peptide nucleic acid (PNA) antisenses conjugated to the carrier peptide (RXR)4 and targeted to ftsZ and acpP (essential genes) had antibacterial activity in P. aeruginosa. However, growth inhibition was also found with peptide-PNA antisense conjugates of mismatched sequences (negative controls), and hence there remains a possibility for considerable enhancement of basal level activity due to the general toxicity. To assess the true potential of peptide-PNA conjugates, we measured sequence-dependent knockdown of the (RXR)4-PNA conjugates by using a scrambled sequence as a negative control. In addition, we evaluated (RXR)4-PNA antisenses against three other essential genes (lepB, lptD and mraY) and a non-essential gene (PA1303), and confirmed that multiple sequences targeting only the essential genes showed antimicrobial activity in P. aeruginosa PAO1 cells. We also conducted a rescue experiment and confirmed that the antimicrobial activity of anti-mraY antisenses was an on-target effect, not due to general toxicity. These findings indicate that the (RXR)4–PNA antisense should be a useful tool for target validation of a specific gene and could be a therapeutic platform capable of targeting a variety of genes in P. aeruginosa.

  8. Transcription factories

    PubMed Central

    Rieder, Dietmar; Trajanoski, Zlatko; McNally, James G.

    2012-01-01

    There is considerable evidence that transcription does not occur homogeneously or diffusely throughout the nucleus, but rather at a number of specialized, discrete sites termed transcription factories. The factories are composed of ~4–30 RNA polymerase molecules, and are associated with many other molecules involved in transcriptional activation and mRNA processing. Some data suggest that the polymerase molecules within a factory remain stationary relative to the transcribed DNA, which is thought to be reeled through the factory site. There is also some evidence that transcription factories could help organize chromatin and nuclear structure, contributing to both the formation of chromatin loops and the clustering of active and co-regulated genes. PMID:23109938

  9. Identification of sequence motifs in oligonucleotides whose presence is correlated with antisense activity.

    PubMed

    Matveeva, O V; Tsodikov, A D; Giddings, M; Freier, S M; Wyatt, J R; Spiridonov, A N; Shabalina, S A; Gesteland, R F; Atkins, J F

    2000-08-01

    Design of antisense oligonucleotides targeting any mRNA can be much more efficient when several activity-enhancing motifs are included and activity-decreasing motifs are avoided. This conclusion was made after statistical analysis of data collected from >1000 experiments with phosphorothioate-modified oligonucleotides. Highly significant positive correlation between the presence of motifs CCAC, TCCC, ACTC, GCCA and CTCT in the oligonucleotide and its antisense efficiency was demonstrated. In addition, negative correlation was revealed for the motifs GGGG, ACTG, AAA and TAA. It was found that the likelihood of activity of an oligonucleotide against a desired mRNA target is sequence motif content dependent.

  10. Identification of sequence motifs in oligonucleotides whose presence is correlated with antisense activity

    PubMed Central

    Matveeva, O. V.; Tsodikov, A. D.; Giddings, M.; Freier, S. M.; Wyatt, J. R.; Spiridonov, A. N.; Shabalina, S. A.; Gesteland, R. F.; Atkins, J. F.

    2000-01-01

    Design of antisense oligonucleotides targeting any mRNA can be much more efficient when several activity-enhancing motifs are included and activity-decreasing motifs are avoided. This conclusion was made after statistical analysis of data collected from >1000 experiments with phosphorothioate-modified oligonucleotides. Highly significant positive correlation between the presence of motifs CCAC, TCCC, ACTC, GCCA and CTCT in the oligonucleotide and its antisense efficiency was demonstrated. In addition, negative correlation was revealed for the motifs GGGG, ACTG, AAA and TAA. It was found that the likelihood of activity of an oligonucleotide against a desired mRNA target is sequence motif content dependent. PMID:10908347

  11. Method of Peptide Nucleic Acid (PNA)-Mediated Antisense Inhibition of Gene Expression in Campylobacter jejuni.

    PubMed

    Oh, Euna; Jeon, Byeonghwa

    2017-01-01

    Peptide nucleic acid (PNA) is an oligonucleotide mimic that recognizes and binds to nucleic acids. The strong binding affinity of PNA to mRNA coupled with its high sequence specificity enable antisense PNA to selectively inhibit (i.e., knockdown) the protein synthesis of a target gene. This novel technology provides a powerful tool for Campylobacter studies because molecular techniques have been relatively less well-developed for this bacterium as compared to other pathogens, such as Escherichia coli and Salmonella. This chapter describes a protocol for PNA-mediated antisense inhibition of gene expression in Campylobacter jejuni.

  12. The 5′-tail of antisense RNAII of pMV158 plays a critical role in binding to the target mRNA and in translation inhibition of repB

    PubMed Central

    López-Aguilar, Celeste; Romero-López, Cristina; Espinosa, Manuel; Berzal-Herranz, Alfredo; del Solar, Gloria

    2015-01-01

    Rolling-circle replication of streptococcal plasmid pMV158 is controlled by the concerted action of two trans-acting elements, namely transcriptional repressor CopG and antisense RNAII, which inhibit expression of the repB gene encoding the replication initiator protein. The pMV158-encoded antisense RNAII exerts its activity of replication control by inhibiting translation of the essential repB gene. RNAII is the smallest and simplest among the characterized antisense RNAs involved in control of plasmid replication. Structure analysis of RNAII revealed that it folds into an 8-bp-long stem containing a 1-nt bulge and closed by a 6-nt apical loop. This hairpin is flanked by a 17-nt-long single-stranded 5′-tail and an 8-nt-long 3′-terminal U-rich stretch. Here, the 3′ and 5′ regions of the 5′-tail of RNAII are shown to play a critical role in the binding to the target mRNA and in the inhibition of repB translation, respectively. In contrast, the apical loop of the single hairpin of RNAII plays a rather secondary role and the upper stem region hardly contributes to the binding or inhibition processes. The entire 5′-tail is required for efficient inhibition of repB translation, though only the 8-nt-long region adjacent to the hairpin seems to be essential for rapid binding to the mRNA. These results show that a “kissing” interaction involving base-pairing between complementary hairpin loops in RNAII and mRNA is not critical for efficient RNA/RNA binding or repB translation inhibition. A singular binding mechanism is envisaged whereby initial pairing between complementary single-stranded regions in the antisense and sense RNAs progresses upwards into the corresponding hairpin stems to form the intermolecular duplex. PMID:26175752

  13. Factor XI antisense oligonucleotide for prevention of venous thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Büller, Harry R; Bethune, Claudette; Bhanot, Sanjay; Gailani, David; Monia, Brett P; Raskob, Gary E; Segers, Annelise; Verhamme, Peter; Weitz, Jeffrey I

    2015-01-15

    Experimental data indicate that reducing factor XI levels attenuates thrombosis without causing bleeding, but the role of factor XI in the prevention of postoperative venous thrombosis in humans is unknown. FXI-ASO (ISIS 416858) is a second-generation antisense oligonucleotide that specifically reduces factor XI levels. We compared the efficacy and safety of FXI-ASO with those of enoxaparin in patients undergoing total knee arthroplasty. In this open-label, parallel-group study, we randomly assigned 300 patients who were undergoing elective primary unilateral total knee arthroplasty to receive one of two doses of FXI-ASO (200 mg or 300 mg) or 40 mg of enoxaparin once daily. The primary efficacy outcome was the incidence of venous thromboembolism (assessed by mandatory bilateral venography or report of symptomatic events). The principal safety outcome was major or clinically relevant nonmajor bleeding. Around the time of surgery, the mean (±SE) factor XI levels were 0.38±0.01 units per milliliter in the 200-mg FXI-ASO group, 0.20±0.01 units per milliliter in the 300-mg FXI-ASO group, and 0.93±0.02 units per milliliter in the enoxaparin group. The primary efficacy outcome occurred in 36 of 134 patients (27%) who received the 200-mg dose of FXI-ASO and in 3 of 71 patients (4%) who received the 300-mg dose of FXI-ASO, as compared with 21 of 69 patients (30%) who received enoxaparin. The 200-mg regimen was noninferior, and the 300-mg regimen was superior, to enoxaparin (P<0.001). Bleeding occurred in 3%, 3%, and 8% of the patients in the three study groups, respectively. This study showed that factor XI contributes to postoperative venous thromboembolism; reducing factor XI levels in patients undergoing elective primary unilateral total knee arthroplasty was an effective method for its prevention and appeared to be safe with respect to the risk of bleeding. (Funded by Isis Pharmaceuticals; FXI-ASO TKA ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT01713361.).

  14. Factor XI Antisense Oligonucleotide for Prevention of Venous Thrombosis

    PubMed Central

    Büller, Harry R.; Bethune, Claudette; Bhanot, Sanjay; Gailani, David; Monia, Brett P.; Raskob, Gary E.; Segers, Annelise; Verhamme, Peter; Weitz, Jeffrey I.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Experimental data indicate that reducing factor XI levels attenuates thrombosis without causing bleeding, but the role of factor XI in the prevention of postoperative venous thrombosis in humans is unknown. FXI-ASO (ISIS 416858) is a second-generation antisense oligonucleotide that specifically reduces factor XI levels. We compared the efficacy and safety of FXI-ASO with those of enoxaparin in patients undergoing total knee arthroplasty. METHODS In this open-label, parallel-group study, we randomly assigned 300 patients who were undergoing elective primary unilateral total knee arthroplasty to receive one of two doses of FXI-ASO (200 mg or 300 mg) or 40 mg of enoxaparin once daily. The primary efficacy outcome was the incidence of venous thromboembolism (assessed by mandatory bilateral venography or report of symptomatic events). The principal safety outcome was major or clinically relevant nonmajor bleeding. RESULTS Around the time of surgery, the mean (±SE) factor XI levels were 0.38±0.01 units per milliliter in the 200-mg FXI-ASO group, 0.20±0.01 units per milliliter in the 300-mg FXI-ASO group, and 0.93±0.02 units per milliliter in the enoxaparin group. The primary efficacy outcome occurred in 36 of 134 patients (27%) who received the 200-mg dose of FXI-ASO and in 3 of 71 patients (4%) who received the 300-mg dose of FXI-ASO, as compared with 21 of 69 patients (30%) who received enoxaparin. The 200-mg regimen was noninferior, and the 300-mg regimen was superior, to enoxaparin (P<0.001). Bleeding occurred in 3%, 3%, and 8% of the patients in the three study groups, respectively. CONCLUSIONS This study showed that factor XI contributes to postoperative venous thromboembolism; reducing factor XI levels in patients undergoing elective primary unilateral total knee arthroplasty was an effective method for its prevention and appeared to be safe with respect to the risk of bleeding. (Funded by Isis Pharmaceuticals; FXI-ASO TKA ClinicalTrials.gov number

  15. Increased cell survival by inhibition of BRCA1 using an antisense approach in an estrogen responsive ovarian carcinoma cell line

    PubMed Central

    Annab, Lois A; Hawkins, Rebecca E; Solomon, Greg; Barrett, J Carl; Afshari, Cynthia A

    2000-01-01

    both in vitro and in vivo. Aims: To test the hypothesis that BRCA1 may play a role in the regulation of ovarian tumor cell death as well as in the inhibition of ovarian cell proliferation. Materials and methods: The estrogen receptor-positive, BG-1 cell line [13], which contains an abundant amount of estrogen receptors (600 fmoles/100 μg DNA), was infected using a pLXSN retroviral vector (provided by AD Miller) containing an inverted partial human cDNA 900-base-pair sequence of BRCA1 (from nucleotide 121 in exon 1 to nucleotide 1025 in exon 11, accession #U14680). After 2 weeks of selection in 800 μg/ml of geneticin-G418 (Gibco/Life Technologies, Gaithersburg, MD, USA), BG-1 G418-resistant colonies were pooled, or individually isolated, and assayed for growth in the presence or absence of supplemented estrogen. Virally infected pooled populations of BG-1 cells were examined for BRCA1 message levels by ribonuclease protection assay (Fig. 1a). BRCA1 ribonuclease protection probe was made using an in vitro transcription kit (Ambion, Inc, Austin, TX, USA) as previously described [10] and derived clones were tested for protein levels by Western blot analysis using an anti-BRCA1 (Oncogene Research, Ab-1, Cambridge, MA, USA) antibody. Growth curve analysis of Infected populations and were pretreated for 5 days in phenol red-free, Dulbecco's modified eagle medium (DMEM)/F-12 medium (Gibco/Life Technologies) supplemented with 10% charcoal/dextran treated serum (Hyclone, Logan, UT, USA), then plated at 2.5 × 106 cells per 100mm dish in triplicate in the absence or presence of estrogen (10-8 mol/l; 17β-Estradiol; 1,3,5 (10) - Estratriene 3,17β-diol; Sigma, St Louis, MO, USA). For soft agar assay, clones were plated into 10 60-mm dishes at 1 × 105 cells/dish containing 0.3% bactopeptone agar with or without added estrogen (10-8 mol/l) in phenol red-free medium with 10% stripped serum in order to test for anchorage independent growth. BG-1 infected clones were tested for

  16. Optimization of peptide nucleic acid antisense oligonucleotides for local and systemic dystrophin splice correction in the mdx mouse.

    PubMed

    Yin, HaiFang; Betts, Corinne; Saleh, Amer F; Ivanova, Gabriela D; Lee, Hyunil; Seow, Yiqi; Kim, Dalsoo; Gait, Michael J; Wood, Matthew J A

    2010-04-01

    Antisense oligonucleotides (AOs) have the capacity to alter the processing of pre-mRNA transcripts in order to correct the function of aberrant disease-related genes. Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a fatal X-linked muscle degenerative disease that arises from mutations in the DMD gene leading to an absence of dystrophin protein. AOs have been shown to restore the expression of functional dystrophin via splice correction by intramuscular and systemic delivery in animal models of DMD and in DMD patients via intramuscular administration. Major challenges in developing this splice correction therapy are to optimize AO chemistry and to develop more effective systemic AO delivery. Peptide nucleic acid (PNA) AOs are an alternative AO chemistry with favorable in vivo biochemical properties and splice correcting abilities. Here, we show long-term splice correction of the DMD gene in mdx mice following intramuscular PNA delivery and effective splice correction in aged mdx mice. Further, we report detailed optimization of systemic PNA delivery dose regimens and PNA AO lengths to yield splice correction, with 25-mer PNA AOs providing the greatest splice correcting efficacy, restoring dystrophin protein in multiple peripheral muscle groups. PNA AOs therefore provide an attractive candidate AO chemistry for DMD exon skipping therapy.

  17. A novel antisense long noncoding RNA within the IGF1R gene locus is imprinted in hematopoietic malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Jingnan; Li, Wei; Sun, Yunpeng; Yu, Dehai; Wen, Xue; Wang, Hong; Cui, Jiuwei; Wang, Guanjun; Hoffman, Andrew R.; Hu, Ji-Fan

    2014-01-01

    Dysregulation of the insulin-like growth factor type I receptor (IGF1R) has been implicated in the progression and therapeutic resistance of malignancies. In acute myeloid leukemia (AML) cells, IGF1R is one of the most abundantly phosphorylated receptor tyrosine kinases, promoting cell growth through the PI3K/Akt signaling pathway. However, little is known regarding the molecular mechanisms underlying IGF1R gene dysregulation in cancer. We discovered a novel intragenic long noncoding RNA (lncRNA) within the IGF1R locus, named IRAIN, which is transcribed in an antisense direction from an intronic promoter. The IRAIN lncRNA was expressed exclusively from the paternal allele, with the maternal counterpart being silenced. Using both reverse transcription-associated trap and chromatin conformation capture assays, we demonstrate that this lncRNA interacts with chromatin DNA and is involved in the formation of an intrachromosomal enhancer/promoter loop. Knockdown of IRAIN lncRNA with shRNA abolishes this intrachromosomal interaction. In addition, IRAIN was downregulated both in leukemia cell lines and in blood obtained from high-risk AML patients. These data identify IRAIN as a new imprinted lncRNA that is involved in long-range DNA interactions. PMID:25092925

  18. Regulated Expression of PTPRJ/CD148 and an Antisense Long Noncoding RNA in Macrophages by Proinflammatory Stimuli

    PubMed Central

    Dave, Richa K.; Dinger, Marcel E.; Andrew, Megan; Askarian-Amiri, Marjan; Hume, David A.; Kellie, Stuart

    2013-01-01

    PTPRJ/CD148 is a tyrosine phosphatase that has tumour suppressor-like activity. Quantitative PCR of various cells and tissues revealed that it is preferentially expressed in macrophage-enriched tissues. Within lymphoid tissues immunohistochemistry revealed that PTPRJ/CD148 co-localised with F4/80, indicating that macrophages most strongly express the protein. Macrophages express the highest basal level of ptprj, and this is elevated further by treatment with LPS and other Toll-like receptor ligands. In contrast, CSF-1 treatment reduced basal and stimulated Ptprj expression in human and mouse cells, and interferon also repressed Ptprj expression. We identified a 1006 nucleotide long noncoding RNA species, Ptprj-as1 that is transcribed antisense to Ptprj. Ptprj-as1 was highly expressed in macrophage-enriched tissue and was transiently induced by Toll-like receptor ligands with a similar time course to Ptprj. Finally, putative transcription factor binding sites in the promoter region of Ptprj were identified. PMID:23840844

  19. Transgenic Gladiolus plants transformed with the bean yellow mosaic virus coat-protein gene in either sense or antisense orientation.

    PubMed

    Kamo, Kathryn; Gera, Abed; Cohen, Jacob; Hammond, John; Blowers, Alan; Smith, Franzine; Van Eck, Joyce

    2005-02-01

    Transgenic Gladiolus plants transformed with the bean yellow mosaic virus (BYMV) coat-protein (CP) gene in either sense or antisense (AS) orientation were developed using biolistics. Four of the plants were confirmed to carry the CP gene in the sense orientation of the gene and seven plants in the AS orientation. Two of the CP plant lines and all of the AS lines showed DNA rearrangements of the transgene in addition to an intact copy of the transgene. The copy number ranged from one to nine. Of the 11 lines, eight had only one to four copies of the transgene. Transcription of the transgene occurred for three of the CP lines and five of the AS lines as determined by Northern hybridization. All 11 plant lines were challenged with BYMV using controlled aphid transmission. One month following aphid transmission, the transgenic plants were examined by immunoelectron microscopy for presence of the virus. Several transgenic plant lines containing either antiviral transgene showed a lower incidence of infection (percentage of plants infected as detected by immunoelectron microscopy) than the non-transformed plants. Most of the CP- and AS-transgenic plants that did not contain BYMV 1 month after challenge were found to contain BYMV the next season. It appeared that BYMV infection was delayed in the CP- and AS-transgenic lines but that the transgenes did not prevent eventual infection of BYMV. This is the first report of developing a floral bulb crop with antiviral genes to BYMV.

  20. Antisense inhibition of a pectate lyase gene supports a role for pectin depolymerization in strawberry fruit softening.

    PubMed

    Santiago-Doménech, Nieves; Jiménez-Bemúdez, Silvia; Matas, Antonio J; Rose, Jocelyn K C; Muñoz-Blanco, Juan; Mercado, José A; Quesada, Miguel A

    2008-01-01

    Cell wall disassembly in softening fruits is a complex process involving the cumulative action of many families of wall-modifying proteins on interconnected polysaccharide matrices. One strategy to elucidate the in vivo substrates of specific enzymes and their relative importance and contribution to wall modification is to suppress their expression in transgenic fruit. It has been reported previously that inhibiting the expression of pectate lyase genes by antisense technology in strawberry (Fragaria x ananassa Duch.) fruit resulted in prolonged fruit firmness. This suggested that pectin depolymerization might make a more important contribution to strawberry fruit softening than is often stated. In this present study, three independent transgenic lines were identified exhibiting a greater than 90% reduction in pectate lyase transcript abundance. Analyses of sequential cell wall extracts from the transgenic and control fruit collectively showed clear quantitative and qualitative differences in the extractability and molecular masses of populations of pectin polymers. Wall extracts from transgenic fruits showed a reduction in pectin solubility and decreased depolymerization of more tightly bound polyuronides. Additional patterns of differential extraction of other wall-associated pectin subclasses were apparent, particularly in the sodium carbonate- and chelator-soluble polymers. In addition, microscopic studies revealed that the typical ripening-associated loss of cell-cell adhesion was substantially reduced in the transgenic fruits. These results indicate that pectate lyase plays an important degradative role in the primary wall and middle lamella in ripening strawberry fruit, and should be included in synergistic models of cell wall disassembly.

  1. Antisense inhibition of a pectate lyase gene supports a role for pectin depolymerization in strawberry fruit softening

    PubMed Central

    Santiago-Doménech, Nieves; Jiménez-Bemúdez, Silvia; Matas, Antonio J.; Rose, Jocelyn K. C.; Muñoz-Blanco, Juan; Mercado, José A.; Quesada, Miguel A.

    2008-01-01

    Cell wall disassembly in softening fruits is a complex process involving the cumulative action of many families of wall-modifying proteins on interconnected polysaccharide matrices. One strategy to elucidate the in vivo substrates of specific enzymes and their relative importance and contribution to wall modification is to suppress their expression in transgenic fruit. It has been reported previously that inhibiting the expression of pectate lyase genes by antisense technology in strawberry (Fragaria×ananassa Duch.) fruit resulted in prolonged fruit firmness. This suggested that pectin depolymerization might make a more important contribution to strawberry fruit softening than is often stated. In this present study, three independent transgenic lines were identified exhibiting a greater than 90% reduction in pectate lyase transcript abundance. Analyses of sequential cell wall extracts from the transgenic and control fruit collectively showed clear quantitative and qualitative differences in the extractability and molecular masses of populations of pectin polymers. Wall extracts from transgenic fruits showed a reduction in pectin solubility and decreased depolymerization of more tightly bound polyuronides. Additional patterns of differential extraction of other wall-associated pectin subclasses were apparent, particularly in the sodium carbonate- and chelator-soluble polymers. In addition, microscopic studies revealed that the typical ripening-associated loss of cell–cell adhesion was substantially reduced in the transgenic fruits. These results indicate that pectate lyase plays an important degradative role in the primary wall and middle lamella in ripening strawberry fruit, and should be included in synergistic models of cell wall disassembly. PMID:18522930

  2. Antisense Oligonucleotide (AON)-based Therapy for Leber Congenital Amaurosis Caused by a Frequent Mutation in CEP290

    PubMed Central

    Collin, Rob WJ; den Hollander, Anneke I; van der Velde-Visser, Saskia D; Bennicelli, Jeannette; Bennett, Jean; Cremers, Frans PM

    2012-01-01

    Leber congenital amaurosis (LCA) is the most severe form of inherited retinal degeneration, with an onset in the first year of life. The most frequent mutation that causes LCA, present in at least 10% of individuals with LCA from North-American and Northern-European descent, is an intronic mutation in CEP290 that results in the inclusion of an aberrant exon in the CEP290 mRNA. Here, we describe a genetic therapy approach that is based on antisense oligonucleotides (AONs), small RNA molecules that are able to redirect normal splicing of aberrantly processed pre-mRNA. Immortalized lymphoblastoid cells of individuals with LCA homozygously carrying the intronic CEP290 mutation were transfected with several AONs that target the aberrant exon that is incorporated in the mutant CEP290 mRNA. Subsequent RNA isolation and reverse transcription-PCR analysis revealed that a number of AONs were capable of almost fully redirecting normal CEP290 splicing, in a dose-dependent manner. Other AONs however, displayed no effect on CEP290 splicing at all, indicating that the rescue of aberrant CEP290 splicing shows a high degree of sequence specificity. Together, our data show that AON-based therapy is a promising therapeutic approach for CEP290-associated LCA that warrants future research in animal models to develop a cure for this blinding disease. PMID:23343883

  3. In vitro and in vivo rescue of aberrant splicing in CEP290-associated LCA by antisense oligonucleotide delivery.

    PubMed

    Garanto, Alejandro; Chung, Daniel C; Duijkers, Lonneke; Corral-Serrano, Julio C; Messchaert, Muriël; Xiao, Ru; Bennett, Jean; Vandenberghe, Luk H; Collin, Rob W J

    2016-06-15

    Leber congenital amaurosis (LCA) is a severe disorder resulting in visual impairment usually starting in the first year of life. The most frequent genetic cause of LCA is an intronic mutation in CEP290 (c.2991 + 1655A > G) that creates a cryptic splice donor site resulting in the insertion of a pseudoexon (exon X) into CEP290 mRNA. Previously, we showed that naked antisense oligonucleotides (AONs) effectively restored normal CEP290 splicing in patient-derived lymphoblastoid cells. We here explore the therapeutic potential of naked and adeno-associated virus (AAV)-packaged AONs in vitro and in vivo In both cases, AON delivery fully restored CEP290 pre-mRNA splicing, significantly increased CEP290 protein levels and rescued a ciliary phenotype present in patient-derived fibroblast cells. Moreover, administration of naked and AAV-packaged AONs to the retina of a humanized mutant Cep290 mouse model, carrying the intronic mutation, showed a statistically significant reduction of exon X-containing Cep290 transcripts, without compromising the retinal structure. Together, our data highlight the tremendous therapeutic prospective of AONs for the treatment of not only CEP290-associated LCA but potentially many other subtypes of retinal dystrophy caused by splicing mutations.

  4. The novel antisense Bcl-2 inhibitor SPC2996 causes rapid leukemic cell clearance and immune activation in chronic lymphocytic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Dürig, J; Dührsen, U; Klein-Hitpass, L; Worm, J; Hansen, J B Rode; Ørum, H; Wissenbach, M

    2011-04-01

    SPC2996 is a novel locked nucleic acid phosphorothioate antisense molecule targeting the mRNA of the Bcl-2 oncoprotein. We investigated the mechanism of action of SPC2996 and the basis for its clinically observed immunostimulatory effects in chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL). Patients with relapsed CLL were treated with a maximum of six doses of SPC2996 (0.2-6 mg/kg) in a multicenter phase I trial. Microarray-based transcriptional profiling of circulating CLL cells was carried out before and after the first infusion of SPC2996 in 18 patients. Statistically significant transcriptomic changes were observed at doses 4 mg/kg and occurred as early as 24 h after the first infusion of the oligonucleotide. SPC2996 induced the upregulation of 466 genes including a large number of immune response and apoptotic regulator molecules, which were enriched for Toll-like receptor response genes. Serum measurements confirmed the release of pro-inflammatory cytokines including chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 3 (macrophage inflammatory protein 1α) and tumor necrosis factor-α, thereby validating the in vivo transcriptomic data at the protein level. SPC2996 caused a 50% reduction of circulating lymphocytes in five of 18 (28%) patients, which was found to be independent of its immunostimulatory and anti-Bcl-2 effects.

  5. CD40 Generation 2.5 Antisense Oligonucleotide Treatment Attenuates Doxorubicin-induced Nephropathy and Kidney Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Donner, Aaron J; Yeh, Steve T; Hung, Gene; Graham, Mark J; Crooke, Rosanne M; Mullick, Adam E

    2015-01-01

    Preclinical and clinical data suggest CD40 activation contributes to renal inflammation and injury. We sought to test whether upregulation of CD40 in the kidney is a causative factor of renal pathology and if reduction of renal CD40 expression, using antisense oligonucleotides (ASOs) targeting CD40, would be beneficial in mouse models of glomerular injury and unilateral ureter obstruction. Administration of a Generation 2.5 CD40 ASO reduced CD40 mRNA and protein levels 75–90% in the kidney. CD40 ASO treatment mitigated functional, transcriptional, and pathological endpoints of doxorubicin-induced nephropathy. Experiments using an activating CD40 antibody revealed CD40 is primed in kidneys following doxorubicin injury or unilateral ureter obstruction and CD40 ASO treatment blunted CD40-dependent renal inflammation. Suborgan fractionation and imaging studies demonstrated CD40 in glomeruli before and after doxorubicin administration that becomes highly enriched within interstitial and glomerular foci following CD40 activation. Such foci were also sites of ASO distribution and activity and may be predominately comprised from myeloid cells as bone marrow CD40 deficiency sharply attenuated CD40 antibody responses. These studies suggest an important role of interstitial renal and/or glomerular CD40 to augment kidney injury and inflammation and demonstrate that ASO treatment could be an effective therapy in such disorders. PMID:26623936

  6. Isolation and antisense suppression of flavonoid 3', 5'-hydroxylase modifies flower pigments and colour in cyclamen

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Cyclamen is a popular and economically significant pot plant crop in several countries. Molecular breeding technologies provide opportunities to metabolically engineer the well-characterized flavonoid biosynthetic pathway for altered anthocyanin profile and hence the colour of the flower. Previously we reported on a genetic transformation system for cyclamen. Our aim in this study was to change pigment profiles and flower colours in cyclamen through the suppression of flavonoid 3', 5'-hydroxylase, an enzyme in the flavonoid pathway that plays a determining role in the colour of anthocyanin pigments. Results A full-length cDNA putatively identified as a F3'5'H (CpF3'5'H) was isolated from cyclamen flower tissue. Amino acid and phylogeny analyses indicated the CpF3'5'H encodes a F3'5'H enzyme. Two cultivars of minicyclamen were transformed via Agrobacterium tumefaciens with an antisense CpF3'5'H construct. Flowers of the transgenic lines showed modified colour and this correlated positively with the loss of endogenous F3'5'H transcript. Changes in observed colour were confirmed by colorimeter measurements, with an overall loss in intensity of colour (C) in the transgenic lines and a shift in hue from purple to red/pink in one cultivar. HPLC analysis showed that delphinidin-derived pigment levels were reduced in transgenic lines relative to control lines while the percentage of cyanidin-derived pigments increased. Total anthocyanin concentration was reduced up to 80% in some transgenic lines and a smaller increase in flavonol concentration was recorded. Differences were also seen in the ratio of flavonol types that accumulated. Conclusion To our knowledge this is the first report of genetic modification of the anthocyanin pathway in the commercially important species cyclamen. The effects of suppressing a key enzyme, F3'5'H, were wide ranging, extending from anthocyanins to other branches of the flavonoid pathway. The results illustrate the complexity

  7. A c-myc antisense oligonucleotide inhibits human retinal pigment epithelial cell proliferation.

    PubMed

    Capeáns, C; Piñeiro, A; Domínguez, F; Loidi, L; Buceta, M; Carneiro, C; Garcia-Caballero, T; Sanchez-Salorio, M

    1998-05-01

    The purpose of this work was to investigate if MYC-dependent intracellular mitogenic pathway is active in cultures of human retinal pigment epithelial (hRPE) cells and whether myc antisense phosphorotioate oligonucleotides (c-myc-AS-ODN) are useful tools for inhibiting the proliferation of hRPE cells. Cultures of hRPE cells were established from adult human corneal donors. These cells were positively stained for cytokeratins and vimentin. Myc mRNA expression was determined by Northern blot analysis and it was determined by means of immunofluorescence if MYC was expressed. C-myc-AS-ODN effect on cell proliferation was estimated by evaluating the incorporation of 5-bromo-2'-deoxy-uridine into cellular DNA. Cell number was estimated by using a tetrazolium bromide based colorimetric method. Human RPE cells in culture expressed MYC and myc mRNA as well as prothymosin alpha mRNA--a gene whose transcription is under MYC control--indicating that MYC-dependent intracellular mitogenic pathway is active in these cells. In accordance with this, we found that blocking the expression of myc by the addition of c-myc-AS-ODN to the culture medium inhibited hRPE cell proliferation. The effect of the c-myc-AS-ODN was found to be sequence specific (the use of a control oligonucleotide with the same sequence but in an opposite direction had no effect) and dose-dependent (4 microM was the lowest effective dose tested). By using RT-PCR we found that the c-myc-AS-ODN inhibition of cell proliferation was related to a diminution in c-myc mRNA expression, and by immunofluorescence we detected a diminution in c-MYC protein staining in RPE cells after 48 hr of treatment with c-myc-AS-ODN. Furthermore, growth inhibition remained for at least 5 days after addition of a single dose of the c-myc-AS-ODN to the culture. We conclude that hRPE cell proliferation is under MYC control. Blocking the expression of myc by c-myc-AS-ODN inhibited hRPE cell proliferation. These findings establish a rationale

  8. Kcnq1ot1/Lit1 Noncoding RNA Mediates Transcriptional Silencing by Targeting to the Perinucleolar Region ▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Mohammad, Faizaan; Pandey, Radha Raman; Nagano, Takashi; Chakalova, Lyubomira; Mondal, Tanmoy; Fraser, Peter; Kanduri, Chandrasekhar

    2008-01-01

    The Kcnq1ot1 antisense noncoding RNA has been implicated in long-range bidirectional silencing, but the underlying mechanisms remain enigmatic. Here we characterize a domain at the 5′ end of the Kcnq1ot1 RNA that carries out transcriptional silencing of linked genes using an episomal vector system. The bidirectional silencing property of Kcnq1ot1 maps to a highly conserved repeat motif within the silencing domain, which directs transcriptional silencing by interaction with chromatin, resulting in histone H3 lysine 9 trimethylation. Intriguingly, the silencing domain is also required to target the episomal vector to the perinucleolar compartment during mid-S phase. Collectively, our data unfold a novel mechanism by which an antisense RNA mediates transcriptional gene silencing of chromosomal domains by targeting them to distinct nuclear compartments known to be rich in heterochromatic machinery. PMID:18299392

  9. Modification of tobacco plant development by sense and antisense expression of the tomato viroid-induced AGC VIIIa protein kinase PKV suggests involvement in gibberellin signaling.

    PubMed

    Hammond, Rosemarie W; Zhao, Yan

    2009-08-18

    The serine-threonine protein kinase gene, designated pkv (protein kinase- viroid induced) was previously found to be transcriptionally activated in tomato plants infected with the plant pathogen Potato spindle tuber viroid (PSTVd). These plants exhibited symptoms of stunting, and abnormal development of leaf, root, and vascular tissues. The encoded protein, PKV, is a novel member of the AGC VIIIa group of signal-transducing protein kinases; however, the role of PKV in plant development is unknown. In this communication, we report the phenotypic results of over expression and silencing of pkv in transgenic tobacco. Over expression of pkv in Nicotiana tabacum cv. Xanthi (tobacco) resulted in stunting, reduced root formation, and delay in flowering, phenotypes similar to symptoms of PSTVd infection of tomato. In addition, homozygous T2 tobacco plants over expressing PKV were male sterile. Antisense expression of pkv, on the other hand, resulted in plants that were taller than non-transformed plants, produced an increased number of flowers, and were fertile. Exogenous application of GA3 stimulated stem elongation in the stunted, sense-expressing plants. PKV sense and antisense expression altered transcript levels of GA biosynthetic genes and genes involved in developmental and signaling pathways, but not genes involved in salicylic acid- or jasmonic acid-dependent pathways. Our data provide evidence suggesting that PKV plays an important role in a GA signaling pathway that controls plant height and fertility. We have found that the over expression of the tomato protein kinase PKV resulted in stunting, modified vascular tissue development, reduced root formation, and male sterility in tobacco, and we propose that PKV regulates plant development by functioning in critical signaling pathways involved in gibberellic acid metabolism.

  10. Cloning of human Ca2+ homoeostasis endoplasmic reticulum protein (CHERP): regulated expression of antisense cDNA depletes CHERP, inhibits intracellular Ca2+ mobilization and decreases cell proliferation.

    PubMed Central

    Laplante, J M; O'Rourke, F; Lu, X; Fein, A; Olsen, A; Feinstein, M B

    2000-01-01

    A monoclonal antibody which blocks InsP(3)-induced Ca(2+) release from isolated endoplasmic reticulum was used to isolate a novel 4.0 kb cDNA from a human erythroleukaemia (HEL) cell cDNA expression library. A corresponding mRNA transcript of approx. 4.2 kb was present in all human cell lines and tissues examined, but cardiac and skeletal muscle had an additional transcript of 6.4 kb. The identification in GenBank(R) of homologous expressed sequence tags from many tissues and organisms suggests that the gene is ubiquitously expressed in higher eukaryotes. The gene was mapped to human chromosome 19p13.1. The cDNA predicts a 100 kDa protein, designated Ca(2+) homoeostasis endoplasmic reticulum protein (CHERP), with two putative transmembrane domains, multiple consensus phosphorylation sites, a polyglutamine tract of 12 repeats and regions of imperfect tryptophan and histadine octa- and nona-peptide repeats. In vitro translation of the full-length cDNA produced proteins of M(r) 128000 and 100000, corresponding to protein bands detected by Western blotting of many cell types. CHERP was co-localized in HEL cells with the InsP(3) receptor by two-colour immunofluorescence. Transfection of HEL cells with antisense cDNA led to an 80% decline in CHERP within 5 days of antisense induction, with markedly decreased intracellular Ca(2+) mobilization by thrombin, decreased DNA synthesis and growth arrest, indicating that the protein has an important function in Ca(2+) homoeostasis, growth and proliferation. PMID:10794731

  11. A compendium of nucleosome and transcript profiles reveals determinants of chromatin architecture and transcription.

    PubMed

    van Bakel, Harm; Tsui, Kyle; Gebbia, Marinella; Mnaimneh, Sanie; Hughes, Timothy R; Nislow, Corey

    2013-05-01

    Nucleosomes in all eukaryotes examined to date adopt a characteristic architecture within genes and play fundamental roles in regulating transcription, yet the identity and precise roles of many of the trans-acting factors responsible for the establishment and maintenance of this organization remain to be identified. We profiled a compendium of 50 yeast strains carrying conditional alleles or complete deletions of genes involved in transcriptional regulation, histone biology, and chromatin remodeling, as well as compounds that target transcription and histone deacetylases, to assess their respective roles in nucleosome positioning and transcription. We find that nucleosome patterning in genes is affected by many factors, including the CAF-1 complex, Spt10, and Spt21, in addition to previously reported remodeler ATPases and histone chaperones. Disruption of these factors or reductions in histone levels led genic nucleosomes to assume positions more consistent with their intrinsic sequence preferences, with pronounced and specific shifts of the +1 nucleosome relative to the transcription start site. These shifts of +1 nucleosomes appear to have functional consequences, as several affected genes in Ino80 mutants exhibited altered expression responses. Our parallel expression profiling compendium revealed extensive transcription changes in intergenic and antisense regions, most of which occur in regions with altered nucleosome occupancy and positioning. We show that the nucleosome-excluding transcription factors Reb1, Abf1, Tbf1, and Rsc3 suppress cryptic transcripts at their target promoters, while a combined analysis of nucleosome and expression profiles identified 36 novel transcripts that are normally repressed by Tup1/Cyc8. Our data confirm and extend the roles of chromatin remodelers and chaperones as major determinants of genic nucleosome positioning, and these data provide a valuable resource for future studies.

  12. A Compendium of Nucleosome and Transcript Profiles Reveals Determinants of Chromatin Architecture and Transcription

    PubMed Central

    van Bakel, Harm; Tsui, Kyle; Gebbia, Marinella; Mnaimneh, Sanie; Hughes, Timothy R.; Nislow, Corey

    2013-01-01

    Nucleosomes in all eukaryotes examined to date adopt a characteristic architecture within genes and play fundamental roles in regulating transcription, yet the identity and precise roles of many of the trans-acting factors responsible for the establishment and maintenance of this organization remain to be identified. We profiled a compendium of 50 yeast strains carrying conditional alleles or complete deletions of genes involved in transcriptional regulation, histone biology, and chromatin remodeling, as well as compounds that target transcription and histone deacetylases, to assess their respective roles in nucleosome positioning and transcription. We find that nucleosome patterning in genes is affected by many factors, including the CAF-1 complex, Spt10, and Spt21, in addition to previously reported remodeler ATPases and histone chaperones. Disruption of these factors or reductions in histone levels led genic nucleosomes to assume positions more consistent with their intrinsic sequence preferences, with pronounced and specific shifts of the +1 nucleosome relative to the transcription start site. These shifts of +1 nucleosomes appear to have functional consequences, as several affected genes in Ino80 mutants exhibited altered expression responses. Our parallel expression profiling compendium revealed extensive transcription changes in intergenic and antisense regions, most of which occur in regions with altered nucleosome occupancy and positioning. We show that the nucleosome-excluding transcription factors Reb1, Abf1, Tbf1, and Rsc3 suppress cryptic transcripts at their target promoters, while a combined analysis of nucleosome and expression profiles identified 36 novel transcripts that are normally repressed by Tup1/Cyc8. Our data confirm and extend the roles of chromatin remodelers and chaperones as major determinants of genic nucleosome positioning, and these data provide a valuable resource for future studies. PMID:23658529

  13. Telomeric Retrotransposon HeT-A Contains a Bidirectional Promoter that Initiates Divergent Transcription of piRNA Precursors in Drosophila Germline.

    PubMed

    Radion, Elizaveta; Ryazansky, Sergei; Akulenko, Natalia; Rozovsky, Yakov; Kwon, Dmitry; Morgunova, Valeriya; Olovnikov, Ivan; Kalmykova, Alla

    2016-12-07

    PIWI-interacting RNAs (piRNAs) provide the silencing of transposable elements in the germline. Drosophila telomeres are maintained by transpositions of specialized telomeric retroelements. piRNAs generated from sense and antisense transcripts of telomeric elements provide telomere length control in the germline. Previously, we have found that antisense transcription of the major telomeric retroelement HeT-A is initiated upstream of the HeT-A sense transcription start site. Here, we performed a deletion analysis of the HeT-A promoter and show that common regulatory elements are shared by sense and antisense promoters of HeT-A. Therefore, the HeT-A promoter is a bidirectional promoter capable of processive sense and antisense transcription. Ovarian small RNA data show that a solo HeT-A promoter within an euchromatic transgene initiates the divergent transcription of transgenic reporter genes and subsequent processing of these transcripts into piRNAs. These events lead to the formation of a divergent unistrand piRNA cluster at solo HeT-A promoters, in contrast to endogenous telomeres that represent strong dual-strand piRNA clusters. Solo HeT-A promoters are not immunoprecipitated with heterochromatin protein 1 (HP1) homolog Rhino, a marker of the dual-strand piRNA clusters, but are associated with HP1 itself, which provides piRNA-mediated transcriptional repression of the reporter genes. Unlike endogenous dual-strand piRNA clusters, the solo HeT-A promoter does not produce overlapping transcripts. In a telomeric context, however, bidirectional promoters of tandem HeT-A repeats provide a read-through transcription of both genomic strands, followed by Rhi binding. These data indicate that Drosophila telomeres share properties of unistrand and dual-strand piRNA clusters. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Versatile RNA-sensing transcriptional regulators for engineering genetic networks.

    PubMed

    Lucks, Julius B; Qi, Lei; Mutalik, Vivek K; Wang, Denise; Arkin, Adam P

    2011-05-24

    The widespread natural ability of RNA to sense small molecules and regulate genes has become an important tool for synthetic biology in applications as diverse as environmental sensing and metabolic engineering. Previous work in RNA synthetic biology has engineered RNA mechanisms that independently regulate multiple targets and integrate regulatory signals. However, intracellular regulatory networks built with these systems have required proteins to propagate regulatory signals. In this work, we remove this requirement and expand the RNA synthetic biology toolkit by engineering three unique features of the plasmid pT181 antisense-RNA-mediated transcription attenuation mechanism. First, because the antisense RNA mechanism relies on RNA-RNA interactions, we show how the specificity of the natural system can be engineered to create variants that independently regulate multiple targets in the same cell. Second, because the pT181 mechanism controls transcription, we show how independently acting variants can be configured in tandem to integrate regulatory signals and perform genetic logic. Finally, because both the input and output of the attenuator is RNA, we show how these variants can be configured to directly propagate RNA regulatory signals by constructing an RNA-meditated transcriptional cascade. The combination of these three features within a single RNA-based regulatory mechanism has the potential to simplify the design and construction of genetic networks by directly propagating signals as RNA molecules.

  15. The transcriptionally active regions in the genome of Bacillus subtilis

    PubMed Central

    Rasmussen, Simon; Nielsen, Henrik Bjørn; Jarmer, Hanne

    2009-01-01

    The majority of all genes have so far been identified and annotated systematically through in silico gene finding. Here we report the finding of 3662 strand-specific transcriptionally active regions (TARs) in the genome of Bacillus subtilis by the use of tiling arrays. We have measured the genome-wide expression during mid-exponential growth on rich (LB) and minimal (M9) medium. The identified TARs account for 77.3% of the genes as they are currently annotated and additionally we find 84 putative non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) and 127 antisense transcripts. One ncRNA, ncr22, is predicted to act as a translational control on cstA and an antisense transcript was observed opposite the housekeeping sigma factor sigA. Through this work we have discovered a long conserved 3′ untranslated region (UTR) in a group of membrane-associated genes that is predicted to fold into a large and highly stable secondary structure. One of the genes having this tail is efeN, which encodes a target of the twin-arginine translocase (Tat) protein translocation system. PMID:19682248

  16. Versatile RNA-sensing transcriptional regulators for engineering genetic networks

    PubMed Central

    Lucks, Julius B.; Qi, Lei; Mutalik, Vivek K.; Wang, Denise; Arkin, Adam P.

    2011-01-01

    The widespread natural ability of RNA to sense small molecules and regulate genes has become an important tool for synthetic biology in applications as diverse as environmental sensing and metabolic engineering. Previous work in RNA synthetic biology has engineered RNA mechanisms that independently regulate multiple targets and integrate regulatory signals. However, intracellular regulatory networks built with these systems have required proteins to propagate regulatory signals. In this work, we remove this requirement and expand the RNA synthetic biology toolkit by engineering three unique features of the plasmid pT181 antisense-RNA-mediated transcription attenuation mechanism. First, because the antisense RNA mechanism relies on RNA-RNA interactions, we show how the specificity of the natural system can be engineered to create variants that independently regulate multiple targets in the same cell. Second, because the pT181 mechanism controls transcription, we show how independently acting variants can be configured in tandem to integrate regulatory signals and perform genetic logic. Finally, because both the input and output of the attenuator is RNA, we show how these variants can be configured to directly propagate RNA regulatory signals by constructing an RNA-meditated transcriptional cascade. The combination of these three features within a single RNA-based regulatory mechanism has the potential to simplify the design and construction of genetic networks by directly propagating signals as RNA molecules. PMID:21555549

  17. In vivo potentialities of EWS-Fli-1 targeted antisense oligonucleotides-nanospheres complexes.

    PubMed

    Maksimenko, Andrei; Polard, Valerie; Villemeur, Marie; Elhamess, Hind; Couvreur, Patrick; Bertrand, Jean-Remi; Aboubakar, Malam; Gottikh, Marina; Malvy, Claude

    2005-11-01

    The EWS/FLI-1 fusion gene, resulting from a t(11;22) translocation, plays a key role in the pathogenesis of Ewing sarcoma. Previously, we have shown that antisense oligonucleotides designed against EWS-Fli-1 inhibited tumor growth in nude mice provided they were delivered intratumorally by nanocapsules or by CTAB-coated nanospheres. In this study, we have used two types of nanospheres (designated as type 1 and type 2 nanospheres) stabilized with chitosan for both intratumoral and systemic administration of oligonucleotides. Inhibition of the tumor growth in vivo was found to be dependent on the carrier type as well as on antisense oligonucleotide modification. Indeed, whereas both types of nanospheres were efficient in reducing tumor growth after intratumoral injection, we have obtained only with type 2 nanospheres an antitumoral effect after intravenous injection in a preliminary experiment. Additionally, the anticancer efficacy of a localized modification of the EWS-Fli-1 phosphodiester/phosphorothioate chimeric antisense oligonucleotide was demonstrated. In cell culture the oligonucleotides inhibit cell growth by their antisense activity. Further investigations are needed in vivo to learn the mechanism of action of the complexes.

  18. Effects of an antisense napin gene on seed storage compounds in transgenic Brassica napus seeds.

    PubMed

    Kohno-Murase, J; Murase, M; Ichikawa, H; Imamura, J

    1994-11-01

    To manipulate the quantity and quality of storage components in Brassica napus seeds, we have constructed an antisense gene for the storage protein napin. The antisense gene was driven by the 5'-flanking region of the B. napus napin gene to express antisense RNA in a seed-specific manner. Seeds of transgenic plants with antisense genes often contained reduced amounts of napin. In some transgenic plants, no accumulation of napin was observed. However, the total protein content of transgenic and wild-type seeds did not differ significantly. Seeds lacking napin accumulated 1.4 to 1.5 times more cruciferin than untransformed seeds, although the oleosin content was not affected. Fatty acid content and composition in the seeds of transgenic plants were also analyzed by gas chromatography. Though the total fatty acid content of the transformants was the same as that of non-transformants, there was a reduction in 18:1 contents and a concomitant increase of 18:2 in seeds with reduced napin levels. This observed change in fatty acid composition was inherited in the next generation.

  19. Antisense Oligonucleotide-Mediated Removal of the Polyglutamine Repeat in Spinocerebellar Ataxia Type 3 Mice.

    PubMed

    Toonen, Lodewijk J A; Rigo, Frank; van Attikum, Haico; van Roon-Mom, Willeke M C

    2017-09-15

    Spinocerebellar ataxia type 3 (SCA3) is a currently incurable neurodegenerative disorder caused by a CAG triplet expansion in exon 10 of the ATXN3 gene. The resultant expanded polyglutamine stretch in the mutant ataxin-3 protein causes a gain of toxic function, which eventually leads to neurodegeneration. One important function of ataxin-3 is its involvement in the proteasomal protein degradation pathway, and long-term downregulation of the protein may therefore not be desirable. In the current study, we made use of antisense oligonucleotides to mask predicted exonic splicing signals, resulting in exon 10 skipping from ATXN3 pre-mRNA. This led to formation of a truncated ataxin-3 protein lacking the toxic polyglutamine expansion, but retaining its ubiquitin binding and cleavage function. Repeated intracerebroventricular injections of the antisense oligonucleotides in a SCA3 mouse model led to exon skipping and formation of the modified ataxin-3 protein throughout the mouse brain. Exon skipping was long lasting, with the modified protein being detectable for at least 2.5 months after antisense oligonucleotide injection. A reduction in insoluble ataxin-3 and nuclear accumulation was observed following antisense oligonucleotide treatment, indicating a beneficial effect on pathogenicity. Together, these data suggest that exon 10 skipping is a promising therapeutic approach for SCA3. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Sustained Release of Cx43 Antisense Oligodeoxynucleotides from Coated Collagen Scaffolds Promotes Wound Healing.

    PubMed

    Gilmartin, Daniel J; Soon, Allyson; Thrasivoulou, Christopher; Phillips, Ant