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Sample records for prevalent freshwater chemical

  1. Prevalence of Foodborne Pathogens in Freshwater Fish in Latvia.

    PubMed

    Terentjeva, Margarita; Eizenberga, Inga; Valciņa, Olga; Novoslavskij, Aleksandr; Strazdiņa, Vita; Bērziņš, Aivars

    2015-11-01

    The aim of this study was to detect the prevalence of Salmonella spp., Listeria monocytogenes, and Yersinia enterocolitica in freshwater fish in Latvia. In total, 235 samples, including freshly caught fish from fives lakes (n = 129) and fish from retail markets (n = 106), were collected from April 2014 to December 2014 in Latvia. Samples were tested according to International Organization for Standardization methods. No Salmonella spp. were found in fresh fish from lakes or in commercially available fish. In contrast, the overall prevalence of L. monocytogenes and Y. enterocolitica in freshwater fish was 13% (30 of 235) and 14% (34 of 235), respectively, and no significant difference between the prevalence of L. monocytogenes and Y. enterocolitica was observed (P > 0.05). All Y. enterocolitica isolates belonged to the nonpathogenic 1A biotype. Molecular serotyping of L. monocytogenes revealed that the most distributed serogroup was 1/2a-3a (65%), followed by 1/2c-3c (25%), 1/2b-3b (5%), and 4b, 4d, 4e (5%). The prevalence of L. monocytogenes and Y. enterocolitica in freshwater lake fish was 2% (2 of 129) and 3% (4 of 129), respectively. In contrast, the prevalence of L. monocytogenes and Y. enterocolitica in fish at retail markets was 26% (28 of 106) and 28% (30 of 106), respectively. In retail samples, 9 of 58 positive fish contained both L. monocytogenes and Y. enterocolitica. In general, differences in the prevalences of L. monocytogenes and Y. enterocolitica in retail samples were significantly higher than those in freshly caught fish (P < 0.05). The results of this study indicate that freshwater fish could be an important source of Y. enterocolitica and L. monocytogenes for consumers in Latvia.

  2. Multi proxy chemical properties of freshwater sapropel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stankevica, Karina; Rutina, Liga; Burlakovs, Juris; Klavins, Maris

    2014-05-01

    Freshwater sapropel is organic rich lake sediment firstly named "gyttja" by Hampus van Post in 1862. It is composed of organic remains such as shell detritus, plankton, chitin of insects, spores of higher plants and mineral part formed in eutrophic lake environments. The most appropriate environments for the formation of sapropel are in shallow, overgrown post-glacial lakes and valleys of big rivers in boreal zone, while thick deposits of such kind of organic sediments rarely can be found in lakes on permafrost, mountainous regions or areas with increased aridity. Organic lake sediments are divided in 3 classes according the content of organic matter and mineral part: biogenic, clastic and mixed. The value of sapropel as natural resource increases with the content of organic matter and main applications of sapropel are in agriculture, medicine, cosmetic and chemical industry. The research of sapropel in Latvia has shown that the total amount of this natural resource is close to 2 billion m3 or ~500 million tons. Sapropel has fine, dispersed structure and is plastic, but colour due to the high natural content of phosphorus usually is dark blue, later after drying it becomes light blue. Main research of the sapropel nowadays is turned to investigation of interactions among organic and mineral part of the sapropel with living organisms thus giving the inside look in processes and biological activity of the formation. From the chemical point of view sapropel contains lipids (bitumen), water-soluble substances that are readily hydrolyzed, including humic and fulvic acids, cellulose and the residual part, which does not hydrolyze. In this work we have analyzed the class of organic sapropel: peaty, cyanobacterial and green algal types, as well as siliceous sapropel, in order to determine the presence of biologically active substances, including humic substances, proteins and enzymes as well as to check free radical scavenging activity. Samples were collected from lakes

  3. Activated chemical defenses suppress herbivory on freshwater red algae.

    PubMed

    Goodman, Keri M; Hay, Mark E

    2013-04-01

    The rapid life cycles of freshwater algae are hypothesized to suppress selection for chemical defenses against herbivores, but this notion remains untested. Investigations of chemical defenses are rare for freshwater macrophytes and absent for freshwater red algae. We used crayfish to assess the palatability of five freshwater red algae relative to a palatable green alga and a chemically defended aquatic moss. We then assessed the roles of structural, nutritional, and chemical traits in reducing palatability. Both native and non-native crayfish preferred the green alga Cladophora glomerata to four of the five red algae. Batrachospermum helminthosum, Kumanoa holtonii, and Tuomeya americana employed activated chemical defenses that suppressed feeding by 30-60 % following damage to algal tissues. Paralemanea annulata was defended by its cartilaginous structure, while Boldia erythrosiphon was palatable. Activated defenses are thought to reduce ecological costs by expressing potent defenses only when actually needed; thus, activation might be favored in freshwater red algae whose short-lived gametophytes must grow and reproduce rapidly over a brief growing season. The frequency of activated chemical defenses found here (three of five species) is 3-20× higher than for surveys of marine algae or aquatic vascular plants. If typical for freshwater red algae, this suggests that (1) their chemical defenses may go undetected if chemical activation is not considered and (2) herbivory has been an important selective force in the evolution of freshwater Rhodophyta. Investigations of defenses in freshwater rhodophytes contribute to among-system comparisons and provide insights into the generality of plant-herbivore interactions and their evolution.

  4. Bacterial Dormancy Is More Prevalent in Freshwater than Hypersaline Lakes

    PubMed Central

    Aanderud, Zachary T.; Vert, Joshua C.; Lennon, Jay T.; Magnusson, Tylan W.; Breakwell, Donald P.; Harker, Alan R.

    2016-01-01

    Bacteria employ a diverse array of strategies to survive under extreme environmental conditions but maintaining these adaptations comes at an energetic cost. If energy reserves drop too low, extremophiles may enter a dormant state to persist. We estimated bacterial dormancy and identified the environmental variables influencing our activity proxy in 10 hypersaline and freshwater lakes across the Western United States. Using ribosomal RNA:DNA ratios as an indicator for bacterial activity, we found that the proportion of the community exhibiting dormancy was 16% lower in hypersaline than freshwater lakes. Based on our indicator variable multiple regression results, saltier conditions in both freshwater and hypersaline lakes increased activity, suggesting that salinity was a robust environmental filter structuring bacterial activity in lake ecosystems. To a lesser degree, higher total phosphorus concentrations reduced dormancy in all lakes. Thus, even under extreme conditions, the competition for resources exerted pressure on activity. Within the compositionally distinct and less diverse hypersaline communities, abundant taxa were disproportionately active and localized in families Microbacteriaceae (Actinobacteria), Nitriliruptoraceae (Actinobacteria), and Rhodobacteraceae (Alphaproteobacteria). Our results are consistent with the view that hypersaline communities are able to capitalize on a seemingly more extreme, yet highly selective, set of conditions and finds that extremophiles may need dormancy less often to thrive and survive. PMID:27375575

  5. Prevalence of ingested fish hooks in freshwater turtles from five rivers in the southeastern United States.

    PubMed

    Steen, David A; Hopkins, Brittney C; Van Dyke, James U; Hopkins, William A

    2014-01-01

    Freshwater turtles may ingest baited fish hooks because many are opportunistic scavengers. Although the ingestion of fish hooks is known to be a source of mortality in multiple vertebrate groups, the prevalence of hook ingestion by freshwater turtles has not been well studied. We trapped turtles from five rivers in the southeastern United States and used radiographs to examine over 600 individuals of four species. Depending on the species, sex, and age class, 0-33% of turtles contained ingested fish hooks. For some species, larger turtles were more likely to contain a fish hook than smaller individuals. Freshwater turtle demography suggests that even small increases in adult mortality may lead to population declines. If our study areas are representative of other aquatic systems that receive fishing pressure, this work likely identifies a potential conflict between a widespread, common recreational activity (i.e., fishing) and an imperiled taxonomic group.

  6. Prevalence of Ingested Fish Hooks in Freshwater Turtles from Five Rivers in the Southeastern United States

    PubMed Central

    Steen, David A.; Hopkins, Brittney C.; Van Dyke, James U.; Hopkins, William A.

    2014-01-01

    Freshwater turtles may ingest baited fish hooks because many are opportunistic scavengers. Although the ingestion of fish hooks is known to be a source of mortality in multiple vertebrate groups, the prevalence of hook ingestion by freshwater turtles has not been well studied. We trapped turtles from five rivers in the southeastern United States and used radiographs to examine over 600 individuals of four species. Depending on the species, sex, and age class, 0–33% of turtles contained ingested fish hooks. For some species, larger turtles were more likely to contain a fish hook than smaller individuals. Freshwater turtle demography suggests that even small increases in adult mortality may lead to population declines. If our study areas are representative of other aquatic systems that receive fishing pressure, this work likely identifies a potential conflict between a widespread, common recreational activity (i.e., fishing) and an imperiled taxonomic group. PMID:24621919

  7. Determination of bioactivity of chemical fractions of liquid wastes using freshwater and saltwater algae and crustaceans

    SciTech Connect

    Walsh, G.E.; Garnas, R.L.

    1983-03-01

    Complex wastes from industrial and municipal outfalls were fractionated chemically and tested for toxicity with freshwater and saltwater algae and crustaceans. The organic fraction of each waste was subfractionated into acid-, base-, and neutral-extractable portions, and the inorganic fraction was subfractionated into its anion and cation components. All wastes affected growth of the algae Skeletonema costatum (saltwater) and Monoraphidium capricornutum (freshwater) or survival of Mysidopsis bahia (saltwater) and Daphnia magna (freshwater). Usually, bioactivity was limited to one or two subfractions. In some cases, algal growth was stimulated by a fraction or subfraction, whereas stimulation was not detected in whole waste. It is suggested that fractionation must be done in order to estimate the full potential impact of complex wastes on aquatic systems. The method can also be used to identify toxic factors before application of cost-effective control technology.

  8. Spatial variability versus parameter uncertainty in freshwater fate and exposure factors of chemicals.

    PubMed

    Nijhof, Carl O P; Huijbregts, Mark A J; Golsteijn, Laura; van Zelm, Rosalie

    2016-04-01

    We compared the influence of spatial variability in environmental characteristics and the uncertainty in measured substance properties of seven chemicals on freshwater fate factors (FFs), representing the residence time in the freshwater environment, and on exposure factors (XFs), representing the dissolved fraction of a chemical. The influence of spatial variability was quantified using the SimpleBox model in which Europe was divided in 100 × 100 km regions, nested in a regional (300 × 300 km) and supra-regional (500 × 500 km) scale. Uncertainty in substance properties was quantified by means of probabilistic modelling. Spatial variability and parameter uncertainty were expressed by the ratio k of the 95%ile and 5%ile of the FF and XF. Our analysis shows that spatial variability ranges in FFs of persistent chemicals that partition predominantly into one environmental compartment was up to 2 orders of magnitude larger compared to uncertainty. For the other (less persistent) chemicals, uncertainty in the FF was up to 1 order of magnitude larger than spatial variability. Variability and uncertainty in freshwater XFs of the seven chemicals was negligible (k < 1.5). We found that, depending on the chemical and emission scenario, accounting for region-specific environmental characteristics in multimedia fate modelling, as well as accounting for parameter uncertainty, can have a significant influence on freshwater fate factor predictions. Therefore, we conclude that it is important that fate factors should not only account for parameter uncertainty, but for spatial variability as well, as this further increases the reliability of ecotoxicological impacts in LCA.

  9. Toxicity to freshwater organisms from oils and oil spill chemical treatments in laboratory microcosms.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharyya, S; Klerks, P L; Nyman, J A

    2003-01-01

    Toxicity and temporal changes in toxicity of freshwater-marsh-microcosms containing South Louisiana Crude (SLC) or diesel fuel and treated with a cleaner or dispersant, were investigated using Chironomus tentans, Daphnia pulex, and Oryzias latipes. Bioassays used microcosm water (for D. pulex and O. latipes) or soil slurry (for C. tentans) taken 1,7, 31, and 186 days after treatment. SLC was less toxic than diesel, chemical additives enhanced oil toxicity, the dispersant was more toxic than the cleaner, and toxicities were greatly reduced by day 186. Toxicities were higher in the bioassay with the benthic species than in those with the two water-column species. A separate experiment showed that C. tentans' sensitivity was intermediate to that of Tubifex tubifex and Hyallela azteca. Freshwater organisms, especially benthic invertebrates, thus appear seriously effected by oil under the worst-case-scenario of our microcosms. Moreover, the cleaner and dispersant tested were poor response options under those conditions.

  10. Organic chemicals jeopardize the health of freshwater ecosystems on the continental scale

    PubMed Central

    Malaj, Egina; von der Ohe, Peter C.; Grote, Matthias; Kühne, Ralph; Mondy, Cédric P.; Usseglio-Polatera, Philippe; Brack, Werner; Schäfer, Ralf B.

    2014-01-01

    Organic chemicals can contribute to local and regional losses of freshwater biodiversity and ecosystem services. However, their overall relevance regarding larger spatial scales remains unknown. Here, we present, to our knowledge, the first risk assessment of organic chemicals on the continental scale comprising 4,000 European monitoring sites. Organic chemicals were likely to exert acute lethal and chronic long-term effects on sensitive fish, invertebrate, or algae species in 14% and 42% of the sites, respectively. Of the 223 chemicals monitored, pesticides, tributyltin, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, and brominated flame retardants were the major contributors to the chemical risk. Their presence was related to agricultural and urban areas in the upstream catchment. The risk of potential acute lethal and chronic long-term effects increased with the number of ecotoxicologically relevant chemicals analyzed at each site. As most monitoring programs considered in this study only included a subset of these chemicals, our assessment likely underestimates the actual risk. Increasing chemical risk was associated with deterioration in the quality status of fish and invertebrate communities. Our results clearly indicate that chemical pollution is a large-scale environmental problem and requires far-reaching, holistic mitigation measures to preserve and restore ecosystem health. PMID:24979762

  11. Organic chemicals jeopardize the health of freshwater ecosystems on the continental scale.

    PubMed

    Malaj, Egina; von der Ohe, Peter C; Grote, Matthias; Kühne, Ralph; Mondy, Cédric P; Usseglio-Polatera, Philippe; Brack, Werner; Schäfer, Ralf B

    2014-07-01

    Organic chemicals can contribute to local and regional losses of freshwater biodiversity and ecosystem services. However, their overall relevance regarding larger spatial scales remains unknown. Here, we present, to our knowledge, the first risk assessment of organic chemicals on the continental scale comprising 4,000 European monitoring sites. Organic chemicals were likely to exert acute lethal and chronic long-term effects on sensitive fish, invertebrate, or algae species in 14% and 42% of the sites, respectively. Of the 223 chemicals monitored, pesticides, tributyltin, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, and brominated flame retardants were the major contributors to the chemical risk. Their presence was related to agricultural and urban areas in the upstream catchment. The risk of potential acute lethal and chronic long-term effects increased with the number of ecotoxicologically relevant chemicals analyzed at each site. As most monitoring programs considered in this study only included a subset of these chemicals, our assessment likely underestimates the actual risk. Increasing chemical risk was associated with deterioration in the quality status of fish and invertebrate communities. Our results clearly indicate that chemical pollution is a large-scale environmental problem and requires far-reaching, holistic mitigation measures to preserve and restore ecosystem health.

  12. Prevalence and antimicrobial resistance of Salmonella spp. in raw retail frozen imported freshwater fish to Eastern Province of Saudi Arabia

    PubMed Central

    Elhadi, Nasreldin

    2014-01-01

    Objective To determine the proportion of imported frozen fish contaminated with Salmonella among retail food stores and supermarkets in the Eastern Province of Saudi Arabia. Methods A total of 223 frozen freshwater fish purchased from different supermarkets and grocery stores were analyzed for the presence of foodborne pathogen Salmonella. The isolation of Salmonella was determined and confirmed by using the methods of US Food and Drug Administration's Bacteriological Analytical Manual, CHROMagar Salmonella plus, biochemical tests and API 20E strips. Antimicrobial susceptibilities of Salmonella isolates were determined by the disk diffusion method on Muller-Hinton agar, as described by Kirby-Bauer, in accordance with the guidelines of the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute. Results Out of the total 223 fish samples (20 of catfish, 18 of carfu, 20 of mirgal, 25 of milkfish, 35 of mackerel, 75 of tilapia, and 30 of rohu), 89 (39.9%) were tested positive for Salmonella. The prevalence of positive samples were reported for the freshwater fish of pangas (60.0%, n=12), carfu (27.7%, n=5), mirgal (35.0%, n=7), milkfish (52.0%, n=13), mackerel (31.4 %, n=11), tilapia imported from Thailand (64.0%, n=16), tilapia imported from India (28.0%, n=14), rohu imported from Thailand (26.6%, n=4) and rohu imported from Myanmar (46.6%, n=7). A total of 140 isolates of Salmonella spp. were yielded from at least seven different types of frozen freshwater fish imported from 5 different countries and were tested for their susceptibility to 16 selected antimicrobial agents. The highest antibiotic resistance was observed to tetracycline (90.71%) followed by ampicillin (70%) and amoxicillin-clavulanic acid (45%). Conclusions The obtained results of this study shows that these raw retail imported frozen freshwater fish are contaminated with potentially pathogenic Salmonella spp. And the study recommend and suggest that there is a need for adequate consumer measures. PMID:25182443

  13. Chemical footprint method for improved communication of freshwater ecotoxicity impacts in the context of ecological limits.

    PubMed

    Bjørn, Anders; Diamond, Miriam; Birkved, Morten; Hauschild, Michael Zwicky

    2014-11-18

    The ecological footprint method has been successful in communicating environmental impacts of anthropogenic activities in the context of ecological limits. We introduce a chemical footprint method that expresses ecotoxicity impacts from anthropogenic chemical emissions as the dilution needed to avoid freshwater ecosystem damage. The indicator is based on USEtox characterization factors with a modified toxicity reference point. Chemical footprint results can be compared to the actual dilution capacity within the geographic vicinity receiving the emissions to estimate whether its ecological limit has been exceeded and hence whether emissions can be expected to be environmentally sustainable. The footprint method was illustrated using two case studies. The first was all inventoried emissions from European countries and selected metropolitan areas in 2004, which indicated that the dilution capacity was likely exceeded for most European countries and all landlocked metropolitan areas. The second case study indicated that peak application of pesticides alone was likely to exceed Denmark's freshwater dilution capacity in 1999-2011. The uncertainty assessment showed that better spatially differentiated fate factors would be useful and pointed out other major sources of uncertainty and some opportunities to reduce these.

  14. A probabilistic assessment of the chemical and radiological risks of chronic exposure to uranium in freshwater ecosystems.

    PubMed

    Mathews, Teresa; Beaugelin-Seiller, Karine; Garnier-Laplace, Jacqueline; Gilbin, Rodolphe; Adam, Christelle; Della-Vedova, Claire

    2009-09-01

    Uranium (U) presents a unique challenge for ecological risk assessments (ERA) because it induces both chemical and radiological toxicity, and the relative importance of these two toxicities differs among the various U source terms (i.e., natural, enriched, depleted). We present a method for the conversion between chemical concentrations microg L(-1)) and radiological dose rates (microGy h(-1)) for a defined set of reference organisms, and apply this conversion method to previously derived chemical and radiological benchmarks to determine the extent to which these benchmarks ensure radiological and chemical protection, respectively, for U in freshwater ecosystems. Results show that the percentage of species radiologically protected by the chemical benchmark decreases with increasing degrees of U enrichment and with increasing periods of radioactive decay. In contrast, the freshwater ecosystem is almost never chemically protected by the radiological benchmark, regardless of the source term or decay period considered, confirming that the risks to the environment from uranium's chemical toxicity generally outweigh those of its radiological toxicity. These results are relevant to developing water quality criteria that protect freshwater ecosystems from the various risks associated with the nuclear applications of U exploitation, and highlight the need for (1) further research on the speciation, bioavailability, and toxicity of U-series radionuclides under different environmental conditions, and (2) the adoption of both chemical and radiological benchmarks for coherent ERAs to be conducted in U-contaminated freshwater ecosystems.

  15. Examining predictors of chemical toxicity in freshwater fish using the random forest technique.

    PubMed

    Tuulaikhuu, Baigal-Amar; Guasch, Helena; García-Berthou, Emili

    2017-03-03

    Chemical pollution is one of the main issues globally threatening the enormous biodiversity of freshwater ecosystems. The toxicity of substances depends on many factors such as the chemical itself, the species affected, environmental conditions, exposure duration, and concentration. We used the random forest technique to examine the factors that mediate toxicity in a set of widespread fishes and analyses of covariance to further assess the importance of differential sensitivity among fish species. Among 13 variables, the 5 most important predictors of toxicity with random forests were, by order of importance, the chemical substance itself (i.e., Chemical Abstracts Service number considered as a categorical factor), octanol-water partition coefficient (log P), pollutant prioritization, ecological structure-activity relationship (ECOSAR) classification, and fish species for 50% lethal concentrations (LC50) and the chemical substance, fish species, log P, ECOSAR classification, and water temperature for no observed effect concentrations (NOECs). Fish species was a very important predictor for both endpoints and with the two contrasting statistical techniques used. Different fish species displayed very different relationships with log P, often with different slopes and with as much importance as the partition coefficient. Therefore, caution should be exercised when extrapolating toxicological results or relationships among species. In addition, further research is needed to determine species-specific sensitivities and unravel the mechanisms behind them.

  16. Acute sensitivity of freshwater mollusks and commonly tested invertebrates to select chemicals with different toxic models of action

    EPA Science Inventory

    Previous studies indicate that freshwater mollusks are more sensitive than commonly tested organisms to some chemicals, such as copper and ammonia. Nevertheless, mollusks are generally under-represented in toxicity databases. Studies are needed to generate data with which to comp...

  17. Prevalence of the pathogen Aphanomyces astaci in freshwater crayfish populations in Croatia.

    PubMed

    Maguire, Ivana; Jelić, Mišel; Klobučar, Goran; Delpy, Mylène; Delaunay, Carine; Grandjean, Frederic

    2016-02-11

    The Oomycete Aphanomyces astaci is an obligate crayfish parasite that co-evolved with American crayfish species, and they therefore generally live in a balanced relationship. On the contrary, European native crayfish are highly susceptible to A. astaci, and infestation with it causes development of the lethal disease termed crayfish plague. Until now, 5 A. astaci strains have been described from the freshwater crayfish present in Europe. In this study we aimed to investigate the occurrence of the pathogen A. astaci in Croatian native and non-native crayfish populations, as well as to genotype established strains using microsatellite markers and obtain information on the pathogen's epidemiology. Our results showed that the pathogen is widespread in both native and non-native crayfish populations. Agent level, when positive, in non-native crayfish was generally low; in native species it was higher. Genotyping from microsatellites proved the presence of the B (Ps) strain in non-native species (Pacifastacus leniusculus), while the A (As) strain was detected from viable native species (Astacus astacus and Austropotamobius torrentium) that are distributed in areas lacking non-native crayfish. The genotype from A. torrentium differed from a typical A (As) by 1 allele. Strain B (Ps) was identified in native Astacus leptodactylus from the population that co-occurs with P. leniuscuslus. Interestingly, in 1 A. leptodactylus population both A (As) and B (Ps) strains were present.

  18. Acute toxicity of six freshwater mussel species (Glochidia) to six chemicals: Implications for daphnids and Utterbackia imbecillis as surrogates for protection of freshwater mussels (Unionidae)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Milam, C.D.; Farris, J.L.; Dwyer, F.J.; Hardesty, D.K.

    2005-01-01

    Acute (24-h) toxicity tests were used in this study to compare lethality responses in early life stages (glochidia) of six freshwater mussel species, Leptodea fragilis, U. imbecillis, Lampsilis cardium, Lampsilis siliquoidea, Megalonaias nervosa, and Ligumia subrostrata, and two standard test organisms, Ceriodaphnia dubia and Daphnia magna. Concentrations of carbaryl, copper, 4-nonylphenol, pentachlorophenol, permethrin, and 2,4-D were used in acute exposures to represent different chemical classes and modes of action. The relative sensitivities of species were evaluated by ranking their LC 50 values for each chemical. We used these ranks to determine the extent to which U. imbecillis (one of the most commonly used unionids in toxicity tests) was representative of the tolerances of other mussels. We also calculated geometric mean LC50s for the families Unionidae and Daphnidae. Rankings of these data were used to assess the extent to which Daphnidae can be used as surrogates for freshwater mussels relative to chemical sensitivity. While no single chemical elicited consistently high or low toxicity estimates, carbaryl and 2,4-D were generally the least toxic to all species tested. No species was always the most sensitive, and Daphnidae were generally protective of Unionidae. Utterbackia imbecillis, while often proposed as a standard unionid mussel test species, did not always qualify as a sufficient surrogate (i.e., a substitute organism that often elicits similar sensitivity responses to the same contaminant exposure) for other species of mussels, since it was usually one of the more tolerant species in our rankings. U. imbecillis should be used as a surrogate species only with this caution on its relative insensitivity. ?? 2005 Springer Science+Business Media, Inc.

  19. The myxozoan fauna of Fundulus diaphanus (Cyprinodontidae) from freshwater localities in eastern North America: prevalence, community structure, and geographic distribution.

    PubMed

    Cone, David K; Marcogliese, David J; Barse, Ann M; Burt, Michael D B

    2006-02-01

    Membership and richness of infracommunities and component communities of myxozoan fauna of the banded killifish (Fundulus diaphanus) from freshwater localities in Ontario, Quebec, New York State, New Brunswick, Nova Scotia, and Maryland were studied. Five species of parasites were found: Myxobolus diaphanus (Fantham, Porter, and Richardson, 1940) (connective tissue throughout the body and head), Myxobolus funduli (Kudo, 1918) (interlamellar), Myxobolus neurophilus (Guilford, 1963) (optic tectum of the brain), Myxobolus sp. (connective tissue, typically adjacent to vertebrae), and Sphaerospora sp. (kidney tubules). The most abundant species locally and regionally was M. diaphanus, occurring at prevalences of 14.2 to 93.3% at 6 of 9 localities. Myxobolus funduli and Myxobolus sp. were at 3 and 2 localities respectively, while M. neurophilus and Sphaerospora each occurred at single localities. Four of the 5 myxozoans appear to be specific to fundulids, the exception being M. neurophilus, which is typically a parasite of Perca flavescens. Mean infracommunity richness was 0-1.2. Component community richness was 0-3 species. The fauna is similar in composition to that described from the spottail shiner (Notropis hudsonius) in the Great Lakes in being dominated by histozoic myxobolids and in having maximum prevalence at any single locality correlate positively with geographical distribution. Moreover, mean infracommunity richness was correlated with percentage of hosts infected with any species at a locality, and maximum infracommunity richness was correlated with component community richness. Probably because fewer species of myxozoans of fundulids occur in the regional pool, myxozoan communities encountered in the present study are generally less rich than those described from N. hudsonius. It appears that dispersal of relatively resilient myxospores through such a mechanism as piscivory effectively distributes these parasites over the landscape, while the more delicate

  20. Chemical and optical changes in freshwater dissolved organic matter exposed to solar radiation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Osburn, C.L.; Morris, D.P.; Thorn, K.A.; Moeller, R.E.

    2001-01-01

    We studied the chemical and optical changes in the dissolved organic matter (DOM) from two freshwater lakes and a Sphagnum bog after exposure to solar radiation. Stable carbon isotopes and solid-state 13C-NMR spectra of DOM were used together with optical and chemical data to interpret results from experimental exposures of DOM to sunlight and from seasonal observations of two lakes in northeastern Pennsylvania. Solar photochemical oxidation of humic-rich bog DOM to smaller LMW compounds and to DIC was inferred from losses of UV absorbance, optical indices of molecular weight and changes in DOM chemistry. Experimentally, we observed a 1.2??? enrichment in ??13C and a 47% loss in aromatic C functionality in bog DOM samples exposed to solar UVR. Similar results were observed in the surface waters of both lakes. In late summer hypolimnetic water in humic Lake Lacawac, we observed 3 to 4.5??? enrichments in ??13C and a 30% increase in aromatic C relative to early spring values during spring mixing. These changes coincided with increases in molecular weight and UV absorbance. Anaerobic conditions of the hypolimnion in Lake Lacawac suggest that microbial metabolism may be turning over allochthonous C introduced during spring mixing, as well as autochthonous C. This metabolic activity produces HMW DOM during the summer, which is photochemically labile and isotopically distinct from allochthonous DOM or autochthonous DOM. These results suggest both photooxidation of allochthonous DOM in the epilimnion and autotrophic production of DOM by bacteria in the hypolimnion cause seasonal trends in the UV absorbance of lakes.

  1. Acute lethal toxicity of some reference chemicals to freshwater fishes of Scandinavia

    SciTech Connect

    Oikari, A.O.J.

    1987-07-01

    Relevance of the choice of a test organism intended to be representative for a given environment seems to be under continual debate in aquatic ecotoxicology. For instance, it is commonly argue that acute toxicity tests with rainbow trout, the species most often recommended as a standard cold water teleost, were not representative for Nordic countries because the species is an alien in local faunas. A comparative study with several freshwater species was therefore initiated to clarify the validity of this assumption. As a first approximation, standard LC 50 assays were conducted. The species used were chosen only on the basis of their local availability, i.e, they randomly represented the fish fauna of Nordic inland waters. Furthermore, inter-species variation of toxicity response was compared with certain other, quantitatively more important, intra-species sources of variability affecting the toxicity of chemicals. Use of reference toxicants has been recommended as a means of standardizing bioassays. Compounds, characteristic of effluents from the pulp and paper industry, were selected for the present study. The toxicity of organic acids such a phenols and resin acids, as well as that of pupmill effluents, strongly depends on water pH. Because of the possibility that species differences could exist in this respect, effects of water acidity on toxicity of these types of substances to a randomly selected local species was investigated. Finally, as an example of the biological source of assay variability, the effect of yolk absorption was studied with a subsequent crisis period due to moderate starvation under laboratory conditions.

  2. Effects of chlorine on freshwater fish under various time and chemical conditions: toxicity of chlorine to freshwater fish. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Brooks, A.S.; Bartos, J.M.; Danos, P.T.

    1982-07-01

    Laboratory bioassays to determine the acute toxicity of monochloramine, dichloramine, hypochlorous acid, and hypochlorite ion to emerald shiners, channel catfish, and rainbow trout were conducted. Four exposure regimes typical of chlorination schedules at operating steam electric power plants were used. Fish were exposed to single 15-minute, 30-minute, 120-minute, and quadruple 30-minute periods. No mortality or LC50 values were determined for each species of fish and chemical species of chlorine. Hypochlorous acid was the most toxic form of chlorine studied, followed closely by dichloramine. Monochloramine and hypochlorite ion were three to four times less toxic than hypochlorous acid and dichloramine. On the average, emerald shiners were 1.8 times more sensitive to chlorine than channel catfish and 3.3 times more sensitive than rainbow trout to the four forms of chlorine. The fish were more tolerant of chlorine during short duration exposures and most sensitive during the continuous 120-minute exposures. The significant differences in toxicity noted among the various chlorine species suggest that careful attention should be paid not only to total residual chlorine but to both the chlorine and fish species present and the duration of exposure expected in establishing chlorination regimes.

  3. Use of chemical communication in the management of freshwater aquatic species that are vectors of human diseases or are invasive.

    PubMed

    Corkum, Lynda D; Belanger, Rachelle M

    2007-01-01

    Chemical communication occurs when both originator (signaller) and one or more receiver(s) possess specializations for chemical exchange of information. Chemical information can be used by a wide variety of species to locate food and mates, avoid predators and engage in social interactions. In this review, we focus on chemical signalling between mates or cues from nest sites or hosts by selected aquatic pest species and indicate how chemical information can be used to manage pests. The pests are vectors of disease (blood-sucking insects) or invasive species (crayfishes and fishes) that have exhibited detrimental effects on indigenous species. Pheromones released by females attract and stimulate males in some taxa (insects, crayfish, goldfish, and crucian carp), whereas pheromones released by males attract females in others (round goby, sea lamprey). Other chemicals (e.g., habitat odours or odours given off by developmental stages of conspecifics) can affect oviposition decisions of pest species. In areas of aquatic environments where other cues may be limited (e.g., visual), freshwater organisms may rely solely on chemical signals or in concert with environmental cues for reproduction. Once the chemical structure of odour attractants are identified and shown to lure conspecifics to traps, odorants or their blends can be used to control the aquatic pests. There is promise for the application of pheromone traps to control the malarian vector (Anopheles gambiae) or invasive species such as signal crayfish (Pacifastacus leniusculus), sea lamprey (Petromyzon marinus) and the round goby (Neogobius melanostomus) by disrupting the reproductive behaviours of these species.

  4. Acute sensitivity of a broad range of freshwater mussels to chemicals with different modes of toxic action.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ning; Ivey, Christopher D; Ingersoll, Christopher G; Brumbaugh, William G; Alvarez, David; Hammer, Edward J; Bauer, Candice R; Augspurger, Tom; Raimondo, Sandy; Barnhart, M Christopher

    2017-03-01

    Freshwater mussels, one of the most imperiled groups of animals in the world, are generally underrepresented in toxicity databases used for the development of ambient water quality criteria and other environmental guidance values. Acute 96-h toxicity tests were conducted to evaluate the sensitivity of 5 species of juvenile mussels from 2 families and 4 tribes to 10 chemicals (ammonia, metals, major ions, and organic compounds) and to screen 10 additional chemicals (mainly organic compounds) with a commonly tested mussel species, fatmucket (Lampsilis siliquoidea). In the multi-species study, median effect concentrations (EC50s) among the 5 species differed by a factor of ≤2 for chloride, potassium, sulfate, and zinc; a factor of ≤5 for ammonia, chromium, copper, and nickel; and factors of 6 and 12 for metolachlor and alachlor, respectively, indicating that mussels representing different families or tribes had similar sensitivity to most of the tested chemicals, regardless of modes of action. There was a strong linear relationship between EC50s for fatmucket and the other 4 mussel species across the 10 chemicals (r(2)  = 0.97, slope close to 1.0), indicating that fatmucket was similar to other mussel species; thus, this commonly tested species can be a good surrogate for protecting other mussels in acute exposures. The sensitivity of juvenile fatmucket among different populations or cultured from larvae of wild adults and captive-cultured adults was also similar in acute exposures to copper or chloride, indicating captive-cultured adult mussels can reliably be used to reproduce juveniles for toxicity testing. In compiled databases for all freshwater species, 1 or more mussel species were among the 4 most sensitive species for alachlor, ammonia, chloride, potassium, sulfate, copper, nickel, and zinc; therefore, the development of water quality criteria and other environmental guidance values for these chemicals should reflect the sensitivity of mussels. In

  5. Acute sensitivity of a broad range of freshwater mussels to chemicals with different modes of toxic action

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wang, Ning; Ivey, Chris D.; Ingersoll, Christopher G.; Brumbaugh, William G.; Alvarez, David; Hammer, Edward J.; Bauer, Candice R.; Augspurger, Tom; Raimondo, Sandy; Barnhart, M.Christopher

    2017-01-01

    Freshwater mussels, one of the most imperiled groups of animals in the world, are generally underrepresented in toxicity databases used for the development of ambient water quality criteria and other environmental guidance values. Acute 96-h toxicity tests were conducted to evaluate the sensitivity of 5 species of juvenile mussels from 2 families and 4 tribes to 10 chemicals (ammonia, metals, major ions, and organic compounds) and to screen 10 additional chemicals (mainly organic compounds) with a commonly tested mussel species, fatmucket (Lampsilis siliquoidea). In the multi-species study, median effect concentrations (EC50s) among the 5 species differed by a factor of ≤2 for chloride, potassium, sulfate, and zinc; a factor of ≤5 for ammonia, chromium, copper, and nickel; and factors of 6 and 12 for metolachlor and alachlor, respectively, indicating that mussels representing different families or tribes had similar sensitivity to most of the tested chemicals, regardless of modes of action. There was a strong linear relationship between EC50s for fatmucket and the other 4 mussel species across the 10 chemicals (r2 = 0.97, slope close to 1.0), indicating that fatmucket was similar to other mussel species; thus, this commonly tested species can be a good surrogate for protecting other mussels in acute exposures. The sensitivity of juvenile fatmucket among different populations or cultured from larvae of wild adults and captive-cultured adults was also similar in acute exposures to copper or chloride, indicating captive-cultured adult mussels can reliably be used to reproduce juveniles for toxicity testing. In compiled databases for all freshwater species, 1 or more mussel species were among the 4 most sensitive species for alachlor, ammonia, chloride, potassium, sulfate, copper, nickel, and zinc; therefore, the development of water quality criteria and other environmental guidance values for these chemicals should reflect the sensitivity of mussels. In

  6. Aggregate formation in a freshwater bacterial strain induced by growth state and conspecific chemical cues.

    PubMed

    Blom, Judith F; Horňák, Karel; Simek, Karel; Pernthaler, Jakob

    2010-09-01

    We investigated the induction of aggregate formation in the freshwater bacterium Sphingobium sp. strain Z007 by growth state and protistan grazing. Dialysis bag batch culture experiments were conducted in which these bacteria were grown spatially separated from bacteria or from co-cultures of bacteria and predators. In pure cultures of Sphingobium sp. strain Z007, the concentrations of single cells and aggregates inside and outside the dialysis membranes developed in a similar manner over 3 days of incubation, and the proportions of aggregates were highest during the exponential growth phase. Cell production of Sphingobium sp. strain Z007 was enhanced in the presence of another isolate, Limnohabitans planktonicus, from an abundant freshwater lineage (R-BT065) outside the bags, and even more so if that strain was additionally grazed upon by the bacterivorous flagellate Poterioochromonas sp. However, the ratios of single cells to aggregates of Sphingobium sp. strain Z007 were not affected in either case. By contrast, the feeding of flagellates on Sphingobium sp. strain Z007 outside the dialysis bags led to significantly higher proportions of aggregates inside the bags. This was not paralleled by an increase in growth rates, and all cultures were in a comparable growth state at the end of the experiment. We conclude that two mechanisms, growth state and the possible release of infochemicals by the predator, may induce aggregate formation of Sphingobium sp. strain Z007. Moreover, these infochemicals only appeared to be generated by predation on cells from the same species.

  7. Sorption of hydrophobic organic chemicals to organic colloids in a freshwater wetland system: Temporal and spatial variations

    SciTech Connect

    Backhus, D.A.; Castellanos, E.; Fast, S.; Golini, C.

    1995-12-01

    Despite the fact that organic colloids are often found in wetland systems in greater abundance than in most other aquatic systems, little work has been done to examine their role in the cycling of organic pollutants. Heightened concern for the degradation of valuable wetland habitat and proposals to use constructed wetlands as treatment options for nonpoint sources of pollution provide a need for examination of organic pollutant:mobile organic colloid interactions in wetlands. A study is underway to determine the quantity, quality, and sorptive properties of colloidal organic matter collected from freshwater wetland systems. Surface water and porewater samples from a coastal freshwater wetland on the shores of Lake Erie (Old Woman Creek) were collected, stored, and analyzed using methods which allow for maintenance of in situ conditions. Sorption experiments were conducted. to the extent possible, on unaltered samples (e.g., examining whole water samples under in situ conditions rather than resuspending processed/concentrated/fractionated organic matter in artificial media). Fluorescence quenching methods were implemented to quantify sorption coefficients of appropriate organic chemical probes (e.g., perylene). To date, three locations within the wetland have been sampled at two time points (Summer and Fall). Initial results suggest that organic colloids in this wetland are present in lower quantities and in general exhibit lower sorption potential than humic and fulvic materials reported in the literature. Significant variations in the sorptive properties of organic colloids have been observed both temporally and spatially in this wetland.

  8. Relative sensitivity of one freshwater and two marine acute toxicity tests as determined by testing 30 offshore E & P chemicals.

    PubMed

    Sverdrup, Line E; Fürst, Charlotte S; Weideborg, Mona; Vik, Eilen A; Stenersen, Jørgen

    2002-01-01

    Acute toxicity of 30 offshore E & P (Exploration and Production) chemicals was measured using the three standard test organisms Daphnia magna (freshwater cladoceran), Acartia tonsa (marine copepod) and Skeletonema costatum (marine diatom alga). Test chemicals included 20 water-soluble and 10 (partially) non-soluble products. For 22 out of the 30 chemicals, the difference in sensitivity between the three tests varied within one order of magnitude. A very good correlation was found between the two marine tests (r = 0.96, P < 0.01, n = 30), and a correlation coefficient of r = 0.78 (P < 0.01, n = 30) was found between D. magna and both A. tonsa and S. costatum, individually. When the comparison of D. magna and A. tonsa sensitivity was based only on the water-soluble chemicals, a significantly higher correlation was obtained (r = 0.84, n = 20), indicating that the sample preparation method used for the (partially) non-soluble chemicals (the water accommodated fraction (WAF) method) induces additional variation between tests performed with different test media. (Partially) non-soluble chemicals are characterised by phase separation or precipitation at the concentrations used for testing. In a WAF-based test, each test concentration/exposure level is prepared separately, and following mixing and separation, only the water phase is used for testing. Toxicity is related to the amount of substance originally added to the mixing vessels. For 25 of the 30 chemicals, D. magna was found to be less sensitive than the marine copepod by a factor >2. The generally higher sensitivity of the marine toxicity tests compared to the Daphnia test emphasise the importance of using marine data for environmental hazard classification as well as for environmental risk assessment purposes.

  9. RELATIVE BINDING AFFINITY OF ENDOCRINE DISRUPTING CHEMICALS TO ESTROGEN RECEPTOR IN TWO SPECIES OF FRESHWATER FISH

    EPA Science Inventory

    The US EPA has been mandated to screen industrial chemicals and pesticides for potential endocrine activity. To evaluate the potential for chemicals to cause endocrine disruption in fish we have previously measured the affinity of a number of chemicals for the rainbow trout estr...

  10. Physico-chemical variables determining the invasion risk of freshwater habitats by alien mollusks and crustaceans

    PubMed Central

    Früh, Denise; Stoll, Stefan; Haase, Peter

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the invasion risk of freshwater habitats and determine the environmental variables that are most favorable for the establishment of alien amphipods, isopods, gastropods, and bivalves. A total of 981 sites located in streams and rivers in Germany. Therefore we analyzed presence–absence data of alien and indigenous amphipods, isopods, gastropods, and bivalves from 981 sites located in small to large rivers in Germany with regard to eight environmental variables: chloride, ammonium, nitrate, oxygen, orthophosphate, distance to the next navigable waterway, and maximum and minimum temperature. Degraded sites close to navigable waters were exposed to an increased invasion risk by all major groups of alien species. Moreover, invaded sites by all four groups of alien species were similar, whereas the sites where indigenous members of the four groups occurred were more variable. Increased temperature and chloride concentration as well as decreased oxygen concentration were identified as major factors for the invasibility of a site. Species-specific analyses showed that chloride was among the three most predictive environmental variables determining species assemblage in all four taxonomic groups. Also distance to the next navigable waterways was similarly important. Additionally, the minimum temperature was among the most important variables for amphipods, isopods, and bivalves. The bias in the occurrence patterns of alien species toward similarly degraded habitats suggests that the members of all four major groups of freshwater alien species are a non-random, more tolerant set of species. Their common tolerance to salinity, high temperature, and oxygen depletion may reflect that most alien species were spread in ballast water tanks, where strong selective pressures, particularly temperature fluctuations, oxygen depletion, and increased salinity may create a bottleneck for successful invasion. Knowledge on the major factors that

  11. Accurate prediction of the response of freshwater fish to a mixture of estrogenic chemicals.

    PubMed

    Brian, Jayne V; Harris, Catherine A; Scholze, Martin; Backhaus, Thomas; Booy, Petra; Lamoree, Marja; Pojana, Giulio; Jonkers, Niels; Runnalls, Tamsin; Bonfà, Angela; Marcomini, Antonio; Sumpter, John P

    2005-06-01

    Existing environmental risk assessment procedures are limited in their ability to evaluate the combined effects of chemical mixtures. We investigated the implications of this by analyzing the combined effects of a multicomponent mixture of five estrogenic chemicals using vitellogenin induction in male fathead minnows as an end point. The mixture consisted of estradiol, ethynylestradiol, nonylphenol, octylphenol, and bisphenol A. We determined concentration-response curves for each of the chemicals individually. The chemicals were then combined at equipotent concentrations and the mixture tested using fixed-ratio design. The effects of the mixture were compared with those predicted by the model of concentration addition using biomathematical methods, which revealed that there was no deviation between the observed and predicted effects of the mixture. These findings demonstrate that estrogenic chemicals have the capacity to act together in an additive manner and that their combined effects can be accurately predicted by concentration addition. We also explored the potential for mixture effects at low concentrations by exposing the fish to each chemical at one-fifth of its median effective concentration (EC50). Individually, the chemicals did not induce a significant response, although their combined effects were consistent with the predictions of concentration addition. This demonstrates the potential for estrogenic chemicals to act additively at environmentally relevant concentrations. These findings highlight the potential for existing environmental risk assessment procedures to underestimate the hazard posed by mixtures of chemicals that act via a similar mode of action, thereby leading to erroneous conclusions of absence of risk.

  12. Accurate Prediction of the Response of Freshwater Fish to a Mixture of Estrogenic Chemicals

    PubMed Central

    Brian, Jayne V.; Harris, Catherine A.; Scholze, Martin; Backhaus, Thomas; Booy, Petra; Lamoree, Marja; Pojana, Giulio; Jonkers, Niels; Runnalls, Tamsin; Bonfà, Angela; Marcomini, Antonio; Sumpter, John P.

    2005-01-01

    Existing environmental risk assessment procedures are limited in their ability to evaluate the combined effects of chemical mixtures. We investigated the implications of this by analyzing the combined effects of a multicomponent mixture of five estrogenic chemicals using vitellogenin induction in male fathead minnows as an end point. The mixture consisted of estradiol, ethynylestradiol, nonylphenol, octylphenol, and bisphenol A. We determined concentration–response curves for each of the chemicals individually. The chemicals were then combined at equipotent concentrations and the mixture tested using fixed-ratio design. The effects of the mixture were compared with those predicted by the model of concentration addition using biomathematical methods, which revealed that there was no deviation between the observed and predicted effects of the mixture. These findings demonstrate that estrogenic chemicals have the capacity to act together in an additive manner and that their combined effects can be accurately predicted by concentration addition. We also explored the potential for mixture effects at low concentrations by exposing the fish to each chemical at one-fifth of its median effective concentration (EC50). Individually, the chemicals did not induce a significant response, although their combined effects were consistent with the predictions of concentration addition. This demonstrates the potential for estrogenic chemicals to act additively at environmentally relevant concentrations. These findings highlight the potential for existing environmental risk assessment procedures to underestimate the hazard posed by mixtures of chemicals that act via a similar mode of action, thereby leading to erroneous conclusions of absence of risk. PMID:15929895

  13. Influence of chemical speciation and biofilm composition on mercury accumulation by freshwater biofilms.

    PubMed

    Dranguet, P; Le Faucheur, S; Cosio, C; Slaveykova, V I

    2017-01-25

    Mercury (Hg) is a pollutant of high concern for aquatic systems due to the biomagnification of its methylated form along the food chain. However, in contrast to other metals, gaining knowledge of its bioavailable forms for aquatic microorganisms remains challenging, making Hg risk assessment difficult. Ubiquitous and sessile freshwater biofilms are well known to accumulate and to transform Hg present in their ambient environment. The present study thus aims to evaluate whether non-extractable (proxy of intracellular) Hg accumulated by biofilms could be a good indicator of Hg bioavailability for microorganisms in freshwater. To that end, the link between Hg concentration and speciation, as well as biofilm composition (percentage of abiotic, biotic, chlorophyll and phycocyanin-fractions and abundance of dsrA, gcs, merA and hgcA bacterial genes) and biofilm Hg accumulation was examined. The studied biofilms were grown on artificial substrata in four reservoirs along the Olt River (Romania), which was contaminated by Hg coming from chlor-alkali plant effluents. The 0.45 μm-filterable Hg concentrations in ambient waters were measured and inorganic IHg speciation was modelled. Biofilms were analyzed for their non-extractable IHg and methylmercury (MeHg) contents as well as for their composition. The non-extractable IHg content was related, but not significantly, to the concentration of total IHg (r(2) = 0.88, p = 0.061) whereas a significant correlation was found with the predicted IHg concentration that is not bound to dissolved organic matter (r(2) = 0.95, p = 0.027), despite its extremely low concentrations (10(-25) M), showing a limitation of the thermodynamic Hg modelling to predict Hg bioavailability. The studied biofilms were different in biomass and composition and a principal component analysis showed that the non-extractable IHg content correlated with the abundance of the merA and hgcA genes, while MeHg accumulation was only linked with the abundance of the r

  14. Prevalence and Mechanisms of Dynamic Chemical Defenses in Tropical Sponges

    PubMed Central

    Rohde, Sven; Nietzer, Samuel; Schupp, Peter J.

    2015-01-01

    Sponges and other sessile invertebrates are lacking behavioural escape or defense mechanisms and rely therefore on morphological or chemical defenses. Studies from terrestrial systems and marine algae demonstrated facultative defenses like induction and activation to be common, suggesting that sessile marine organisms also evolved mechanisms to increase the efficiency of their chemical defense. However, inducible defenses in sponges have not been investigated so far and studies on activated defenses are rare. We investigated whether tropical sponge species induce defenses in response to artificial predation and whether wounding triggers defense activation. Additionally, we tested if these mechanisms are also used to boost antimicrobial activity to avoid bacterial infection. Laboratory experiments with eight pacific sponge species showed that 87% of the tested species were chemically defended. Two species, Stylissa massa and Melophlus sarasinorum, induced defenses in response to simulated predation, which is the first demonstration of induced antipredatory defenses in marine sponges. One species, M. sarasinorum, also showed activated defense in response to wounding. Interestingly, 50% of the tested sponge species demonstrated induced antimicrobial defense. Simulated predation increased the antimicrobial defenses in Aplysinella sp., Cacospongia sp., M. sarasinorum, and S. massa. Our results suggest that wounding selects for induced antimicrobial defenses to protect sponges from pathogens that could otherwise invade the sponge tissue via feeding scars. PMID:26154741

  15. The effects of three organic chemicals on the upper thermal tolerances of four freshwater fishes.

    PubMed

    Patra, Ronald W; Chapman, John C; Lim, Richard P; Gehrke, Peter C

    2007-07-01

    The upper temperature tolerance limits of four freshwater fish species, silver perch Bidyanus bidyanus, eastern rainbowfish Melanotaenia duboulayi, western carp gudgeon Hypseleotris klunzingeri, and rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss, were determined using the critical thermal maximum (CTMaximum) method. The CTMaximum tests were carried out with unexposed fish and fish exposed to sublethal concentrations of endosulfan, chlorpyrifos, and phenol to determine whether or not the CTMaximum was affected. The CTMaximum temperature of B. bidyanus decreased by 2.8, 3.8, and 0.3 degrees C on exposure to endosulfan, chlorpyrifos, and phenol, respectively. Similarly, in M. duboulayi, the CTMaximum was decreased by 4.1, 2.5, and 0 degrees C, while in H. klunzingeri it decreased by 3.1, 4.3, and 0.1degrees C, respectively, and in O. mykiss by 4.8, 5.9, and 0.7 degrees C, respectively. Exposure to sublethal test concentrations of endosulfan and chlorpyrifos caused significant (p < or = 0.0001) reductions in CTMaximum values for all fish species compared to that of unexposed fish. However, exposure to phenol did not cause any significant (p > or = 0.05) change of CTMaximum temperatures.

  16. Comparison of tropical and temperate freshwater animal species' acute sensitivities to chemicals: implications for deriving safe extrapolation factors.

    PubMed

    Kwok, Kevin W H; Leung, Kenneth M Y; Lui, Gilbert S G; Chu, S Vincent K H; Lam, Paul K S; Morritt, David; Maltby, Lorraine; Brock, Theo C M; Van den Brink, Paul J; Warne, Michael St J; Crane, Mark

    2007-01-01

    Toxicity data for tropical species are often lacking for ecological risk assessment. Consequently, tropical and subtropical countries use water quality criteria (WQC) derived from temperate species (e.g., United States, Canada, or Europe) to assess ecological risks in their aquatic systems, leaving an unknown margin of uncertainty. To address this issue, we use species sensitivity distributions of freshwater animal species to determine whether temperate datasets are adequately protective of tropical species assemblages for 18 chemical substances. The results indicate that the relative sensitivities of tropical and temperate species are noticeably different for some of these chemicals. For most metals, temperate species tend to be more sensitive than their tropical counterparts. However, for un-ionized ammonia, phenol, and some pesticides (e.g., chlorpyrifos), tropical species are probably more sensitive. On the basis of the results from objective comparisons of the ratio between temperate and tropical hazardous concentration values for 10% of species, or the 90% protection level, we recommend that an extrapolation factor of 10 should be applied when such surrogate temperate WQCs are used for tropical or subtropical regions and a priori knowledge on the sensitivity of tropical species is very limited or not available.

  17. Comparison of two freshwater turtle species as monitors of radionuclide and chemical contamination: DNA damage and residue analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Meyers-Schoene, L. ); Shugart, L.R.; Beauchamp, J.J.; Walton, B.T. )

    1993-08-01

    Two species of turtles that occupy different ecological niches were compared for their usefulness as monitors of freshwater ecosystems where both low-level radioactive and nonradioactive contaminants are present. The pond slider (Trachemys scripta) and common snapping turtle (Chelydra serpentina) were analyzed for the presence of [sup 90]Sr, [sup 137]Cs, [sup 60]Co, and Hg, radionuclides and chemicals known to be present at the contaminated site, and single-strand breaks in liver DNA. The integrity of the DNA was examined by the alkaline unwinding assay, a technique that detects strand breaks as a biological marker of possible exposure to genotoxic agents. This measure of DNA damage was significantly increased in both species of turtles at the contaminated site compared with turtles of the same species at a reference site, and shows that contaminant-exposed populations were under more severe genotoxic stress than those at the reference site. The level of strand breaks observed at the contaminated site was high and in the range reported for other aquatic species exposed to deleterious concentrations of genotoxic agents such as chemicals and ionizing radiation. Statistically significantly higher concentrations of radionuclides and Hg were detected in the turtles from the contaminated area. Mercury concentrations were significantly higher in the more carnivorous snapping turtle compared with the slider; however, both species were effective monitors of the contaminants.

  18. Assessment of kidney stone and prevalence of its chemical compositions.

    PubMed

    Pandeya, A; Prajapati, R; Panta, P; Regmi, A

    2010-09-01

    Kidney stone analysis is the test done on the stone which cause problems when they block the flow of urine through or out of the kidneys. The stones cause severe pain and are also associated with morbidity and renal damage. There is also no clear understanding on the relative metabolic composition of renal calculi. Hence, the study is aimed to find out the chemical composition of it which can guide treatment and give information that may prevent more stones from forming. The study was carried out on the stones that had been sent to the department of Biochemistry (n = 99; M = 61; F = 38; Mean age: 33.6 +/- 14.4 years) Approximately 98.9% of stones were composed of oxalate, 95.9% of Calcium, 85.8% of phosphate, 62.6% of Urate, 46.4% of Ammonium and very few percentages of Carbonate.

  19. Simulation of the chemical fate and bioavailability of liquid elemental mercury drops from gold mining in Amazonian freshwater systems.

    PubMed

    Dominique, Yannick; Muresan, Bogdan; Duran, Robert; Richard, Sandrine; Boudou, Alain

    2007-11-01

    Elemental mercury (Hg(o)) for gold amalgamation is the main process applied by artisanal gold miners in South America, leading to important discharges into freshwater ecosystems. Through a 28-day experimental approach based on indoor microcosms, we simulated the chemical fate and bioavailability of Hg(o) droplets in the presence or absence of sediment collected from a typical forest creek that is unaffected by gold mining activities. Our results clearly showed significant mercury transfers in the water column in both the dissolved gaseous Hg(o) and oxidized (Hg(II)) forms, with a marked effect of the presence of sediment. After 28 days, Hg total (HgT) concentration in the water column was 25 times higher in sediment-free units (108 +/- 17 vs. 4 +/- 0.4 nM). Methylmercury (MeHg) determinations in the dissolved fraction showed a significant increase only in the presence of sediment after 7 and 14 days. Zebrafish (Danio rerio) were used as indicators for mercury bioavailability. The HgT determinations in four organs revealed significant accumulation levels as early as 7 days exposure, with marked differences in favor of fish collected from the sediment-free units. Significant MeHg increases were observed in the four organs only when sediment was present. Genomic tools applied to estimate sulfate-reducing bacteria communities showed mercury impacts on their diversity and distribution in the different compartments (water, sediment, biofilm, fish gut).

  20. National contaminant biomonitoring program: rEesidues of organochlorine chemicals in U.S. Freshwater Fish, 1976–1984

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schmitt, Christopher J.; Zajicek, Jim L.; Peterman, Paul H.

    1990-01-01

    The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service periodically determines concentrations of organochlorine chemicals in freshwater fish collected from a nationwide network of stations as part of the National Contaminant Biomonitoring Program (NCBP, formerly a part of the National Pesticide Monitoring Program). From late 1984 to early 1985, a total of 321 composite fish samples were collected from 112 stations and analyzed for organochlorine chemical residues. The mean concentrations of total DDT did not change from 1980–81 to 1984, following a period of steady decline through the 1970's; however, the mean concentrations ofp,p′-DDT declined significantly. The most persistent DDT homolog (p,p′-DDE) was detected at 98% of the stations sampled in 1984, and constituted 73% of total DDT residues, up from 70% in 1974–79. Collectively, these findings indicate a low rate of influx and continued weathering of DDT in the environment. Residues of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) also remained widespread, but a significant downward trend in total PCBs was evident, and early eluting PCB components were present at fewer stations than in the past. Mean concentrations of dieldrin have not changed since 1978–79; concentrations remained highest in Hawaii and in the Great Lakes. Toxaphene concentrations declined from 1980–81 to 1984, especially in the Great Lakes, and the incidence of toxaphene declined from 88% of the stations sampled in 1980–81 to 69% in 1984. Mean chordane concentrations did not change from 1980–81 to 1984, following a period of decline; however,trans-nonachlor replacedcis-chlordane as the most abundant component, suggesting a lower influx of chlordane to the aquatic environment. Residues of other organochlorines—mirex, pentachloroanisole (PCA), benzene hexachloride (BHC) isomers, endrin, heptachlor, hexachlorobenzene (HCB), and Dacthal® (DCPA)—were either found at relatively few (<25%) of the stations sampled in 1984 or were characterized by relatively low

  1. Prevalence and sequence comparison of Phyllodistomum folium from zebra mussel and from freshwater fish in the Ebro River.

    PubMed

    Peribáñez, Miguel A; Ordovás, Laura; Benito, Josep; Benejam, Lluís; Gracia, María J; Rodellar, Clementina

    2011-01-01

    We utilised DNA analysis to detect the presence of the digenean Phyllodistomum folium in three cyprinid species, Scardinius erythrophthalmus, Cyprinus carpio and Rutilus rutilus. DNA sequencing of the region containing the genes ITS1-5.8S-ITS2 revealed 100% sequence identity between DNA from the sporocysts found in zebra mussels and DNA from adults located in the urinary system of 29 cyprinid fish. A second genetically different (variation=1.6%) sequence was observed in two samples from R. rutilus. In our opinion, the existence of a complex of species reported as P. folium is supported by recent genetic studies, including our own results. The overall prevalence of P. folium in mussels from the Ebro River was 4.67% in 2006, although during the summer months the rates frequently exceeded 10%.

  2. Freshwater Macroinvertebrates.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nalepa, T. F.

    1978-01-01

    Presents a literature review of freshwater biology particularly freshwater macroinvertebrates and their effect on water pollution, covering publications of 1976-77. A list of 158 references is also presented. (HM)

  3. Is an assessment factor of 10 appropriate to account for the variation in chemical toxicity to freshwater ectotherms under different thermal conditions?

    PubMed

    Lau, Edward Tak Chuen; Yung, Mana Man Na; Karraker, Nancy E; Leung, Kenneth Mei Yee

    2014-01-01

    Ecotoxicity tests are often conducted following standard methods, and thus carried out at a fixed water temperature under controlled laboratory conditions. Yet, toxicity of a chemical contaminant may vary in a temperature-dependent manner, depending on the physiology of the test organism and physicochemical properties of the chemical. Although an assessment factor of 10 (AF10) is commonly adopted to account for variability in toxicity data related to temperature in the development of water quality guidelines and/or ecological risk assessment, no one has ever rigorously assessed the appropriateness of AF10 to account for potential variation in temperature-dependent chemical toxicity to aquatic organisms. This study, therefore, aims to address this issue through a meta-analysis by comparing median lethal concentration data for nine chemicals (cadmium, copper, nickel, lead, silver, zinc, arsenic, selenium and DDT) on a range of freshwater ectothermic animal species at different temperatures, and to assess whether AF10 is under- or over-protective for tropical and temperate freshwater ecosystems. Our results reveal varying extents of interaction between temperature and different chemicals on organisms and the complexity of these interactions. Applying AF10 sufficiently protects 90% of the animal species tested over a range of temperatures for cadmium, copper, nickel, silver, zinc and DDT in the tropics, but it is insufficient to adequately encompass a larger temperature variation for most studied chemicals in temperate regions. It is therefore important to set specific AFs for different climatic zones in order to achieve the desired level of ecosystem protection.

  4. Linking the chemical speciation of cerium to its bioavailability in water for a freshwater alga.

    PubMed

    El-Akl, Philippe; Smith, Scott; Wilkinson, Kevin J

    2015-08-01

    Over the past decade, researchers have begun to use metals of the lanthanide family for numerous applications, including liquid crystal display (LCD) screens, optical fibers, and laser technology. Unfortunately, little is presently known about their bioavailability or the mechanisms by which they might cause toxicity. The present study focuses on cerium (Ce), one of the most widely used lanthanides, and on validating the biotic ligand model as a means to predict Ce bioaccumulation. Short-term exposures to Ce were performed using the unicellular alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, to better relate Ce bioavailability to its chemical speciation in solution. Maximum uptake fluxes (Jmax ) and affinity constants for the binding of Ce to the biological uptake sites (KS ) were established at pH 5.0 and pH 7.0. An apparent affinity constant of 1.8 × 10(7) M(-1) was observed at pH 5.0, with a larger value obtained at pH 7.0 (6 × 10(7) M(-1) ), albeit under conditions where equilibrium could not be confirmed. By evaluating Ce speciation using centrifugal ultrafiltration and single-particle inductively coupled plasma spectrometry, it could be concluded that very little (∼30%) Ce was truly dissolved at pH 7.0, with the majority of the metal being present in colloidal species. Speciation was also monitored by fluorescence to evaluate Ce complexation by natural organic matter (NOM). The presence of NOM decreased Ce bioaccumulation in line with free Ce concentrations. Finally, competition with calcium for the metal uptake sites was shown to result in a decrease in Ce uptake by C. reinhardtii.

  5. Test procedures for measuring the (sub)chronic effects of chemicals on the freshwater cyclopoid Eucyclops serrulatus.

    PubMed

    Cifoni, Marco; Galassi, Diana Maria Paola; Faraloni, Cecilia; Di Lorenzo, Tiziana

    2017-04-01

    The purpose of this study has been to describe test procedures for measuring the (sub)chronic effects of chemicals on the freshwater cyclopoid Eucyclops serrulatus. To this end we have adapted the setting of the standard full life-cycle protocol of the marine harpacticoid A. tenuiremis to E. serrulatus. We have tested the effects of 4 different diets, two temperatures and two rearing volumes on the survival, development, reproduction and population growth rates of this species. Our results have highlighted that full life-cycle tests can be run using 2 mL-glass vials, a diet consisting of a mixture of living cells of Chlorella sorokiniana and Scenedesmus quadricauda, at either 25 °C (test duration: 42 days) or 18 °C (test duration: 51 days). However, the best performance in terms of survival, development, reproducibility and population growth rates with this species was obtained at 18 °C, albeit with significantly longer test duration. Subchronic tests in 2 mL-glass vials with the mixture microalgal diet at both temperatures are available options if considered appropriate for the objectives of a given study. In particular, developmental tests from nauplius to copepodid may profitably be performed in about 11 days at 18 °C and in 6 days at 25 °C. Under the same test conditions, subchronic tests from copepodid to adult may be run in 19 days at 18 °C and in 16 days at 25 °C.

  6. An evaluation of surrogate chemical exposure measures and autism prevalence in Texas.

    PubMed

    Lewandowski, T A; Bartell, S M; Yager, J W; Levin, L

    2009-01-01

    There is currently considerable discussion in the scientific community as well as within the general public concerning the role mercury (Hg) exposures may play in the apparent increased incidence of neurodevelopmental disorders (particularly autism) in children. Although the primary focus of this debate has focused on ethylmercury from vaccinations, linkage to other sources of Hg has been proposed. An ecologic association between 2001 Toxic Release Inventory (TRI; www.epa.gov/tri) data for Hg and 2000-2001 school district autism prevalence was previously reported in Texas. Evaluations using industrial release data as surrogate exposure measures may be problematic, particularly for chemicals like Hg that have complex environmental fates. To explore the robustness of TRI-based analyses of the Hg-autism hypothesis in Texas, a detailed analysis was undertaken examining the extent of the ecological relationship during multiple years and examining whether surrogate exposure measures would yield similar conclusions. Using multilevel Poisson regression analysis and data obtained from a number of publicly available databases, it was found that air Hg release data were significantly associated with autism prevalence in Texas school districts when considering data for 2001 and 2002 (2001: RR = 4.45, 95% CI = 1.60-12.36, 2002: RR = 2.70, 95% CI = 1.17-6.15). Significant associations were not found using data from 2003 to 2005. A significant association was not observed when considering air Hg data for 2000 or 2001 and school district autism prevalence data for 2005-2006 or 2006-2007, an analysis allowing for a 5-yr time period between presumed exposure and entry into the public school system (2000: RR = 1.03, 95% CI = 0.59-1.83, 2001: RR = 0.94, 95% CI = 0.59-1.47). Significant associations were not observed for any year nor for the time lagged analyses when censored autism counts were replaced by threes instead of zeros. An evaluation of TRI air emissions data for several

  7. Freshwater Wetlands.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Naturescope, 1986

    1986-01-01

    Provides descriptions about freshwater wetlands, such as marshes, swamps, and bogs. Contains three learning activities which deal with unusual wetland plants, the animals and plants in a typical marsh, and the effects of a draught on a swamp. Included are reproducible handouts and worksheets for two of the activities. (TW)

  8. Acidification of freshwaters

    SciTech Connect

    Cresser, M.S.; Edwards, A.C.

    1987-01-01

    This volume gives an account that draws not only on the main branches of chemistry but also on soil physics, chemistry, hydrology, meteorology, geography, geology, plant physiology, soil microbiology and zoology. The author examine the numerous interacting physical, chemical, and biological, processes that regulate the acidity of freshwaters, a phenomenon that has various causes, including precipitation; acidifying pollutions; and the interaction of plants, soils and water. The relative importance of the different processes is examined.

  9. Temporal assessment of copper speciation, bioavailability and toxicity in UK freshwaters using chemical equilibrium and biotic ligand models: Implications for compliance with copper environmental quality standards.

    PubMed

    Lathouri, Maria; Korre, Anna

    2015-12-15

    Although significant progress has been made in understanding how environmental factors modify the speciation, bioavailability and toxicity of metals such as copper in aquatic environments, the current methods used to establish water quality standards do not necessarily consider the different geological and geochemical characteristics of a given site and the factors that affect copper fate, bioavailability potential and toxicity. In addition, the temporal variation in the concentration and bioavailable metal fraction is also important in freshwater systems. The work presented in this paper illustrates the temporal and seasonal variability of a range of water quality parameters, and Cu speciation, bioavailability and toxicity at four freshwaters sites in the UK. Rivers Coquet, Cree, Lower Clyde and Eden (Kent) were selected to cover a broad range of different geochemical environments and site characteristics. The monitoring data used covered a period of around six years at almost monthly intervals. Chemical equilibrium modelling was used to study temporal variations in Cu speciation and was combined with acute toxicity modelling to assess Cu bioavailability for two aquatic species, Daphnia magna and Daphnia pulex. The estimated copper bioavailability, toxicity levels and the corresponding ecosystem risks were analysed in relation to key water quality parameters (alkalinity, pH and DOC). Although copper concentrations did not vary much during the sampling period or between the seasons at the different sites; copper bioavailability varied markedly. In addition, through the chronic-Cu BLM-based on the voluntary risk assessment approach, the potential environmental risk in terms of the chronic toxicity was assessed. A much higher likelihood of toxicity effects was found during the cold period at all sites. It is suggested that besides the metal (copper) concentration in the surface water environment, the variability and seasonality of other important water quality

  10. Dispersion Of Crude Oil And Petroleum Products In Freshwater

    EPA Science Inventory

    The objective of this research was to investigate the relationship between dispersion effectiveness in freshwater and the surfactant composition for fresh and weathered crude oil. Although limited research on the chemical dispersion of crude oil and petroleum products in freshwat...

  11. Toward refined environmental scenarios for ecological risk assessment of down-the-drain chemicals in freshwater environments.

    PubMed

    Franco, Antonio; Price, Oliver R; Marshall, Stuart; Jolliet, Olivier; Van den Brink, Paul J; Rico, Andreu; Focks, Andreas; De Laender, Frederik; Ashauer, Roman

    2017-03-01

    Current regulatory practice for chemical risk assessment suffers from the lack of realism in conventional frameworks. Despite significant advances in exposure and ecological effect modeling, the implementation of novel approaches as high-tier options for prospective regulatory risk assessment remains limited, particularly among general chemicals such as down-the-drain ingredients. While reviewing the current state of the art in environmental exposure and ecological effect modeling, we propose a scenario-based framework that enables a better integration of exposure and effect assessments in a tiered approach. Global- to catchment-scale spatially explicit exposure models can be used to identify areas of higher exposure and to generate ecologically relevant exposure information for input into effect models. Numerous examples of mechanistic ecological effect models demonstrate that it is technically feasible to extrapolate from individual-level effects to effects at higher levels of biological organization and from laboratory to environmental conditions. However, the data required to parameterize effect models that can embrace the complexity of ecosystems are large and require a targeted approach. Experimental efforts should, therefore, focus on vulnerable species and/or traits and ecological conditions of relevance. We outline key research needs to address the challenges that currently hinder the practical application of advanced model-based approaches to risk assessment of down-the-drain chemicals. Integr Environ Assess Manag 2017;13:233-248. © 2016 SETAC.

  12. Effects of Pollution on Freshwater Fish.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brungs, W. A.; And Others

    1978-01-01

    Presents a literature review of the effects of pollution on freshwater fish, covering publications of 1976-77. This review includes: (1) water quality; (2) pesticide pollutants; (3) chemical pollutants; (4) miscellaneous pollutants; and (5) physical factors of pollution on freshwater fish. A list of 338 references is also presented. (HM)

  13. Speciation and bioavailability of dissolved copper in different freshwaters: comparison of modelling, biological and chemical responses in aquatic mosses and gammarids.

    PubMed

    Bourgeault, Adeline; Ciffroy, Philippe; Garnier, Cédric; Cossu-Leguille, Carole; Masfaraud, Jean-François; Charlatchka, Rayna; Garnier, Jean-Marie

    2013-05-01

    Biological and chemical measurements were performed in mesocosms to investigate the bioavailability of copper, with a greater emphasis on the effects of competing ions and copper speciation. Measurements were achieved in three different natural waters for two aquatic species (Gammarus pulex and Fontinalis antipyretica) along a copper gradient concentration: natural concentration, spiked at 5 and 15 μg L(-1). Aquatic mosses exhibited high enrichment rates that were above the background levels compared to gammarids. The accumulation of copper in F. antipyretica is better correlated to the weakly complexed copper concentrations measured using differential pulse anodic stripping voltammetry (DPASV) and diffusive gradient in thin film (DGT) than to the free copper concentration measured using an ion selective electrode (ISE). In unspiked natural waters, the presence of dissolved organic ligands strongly controls the metal speciation and consequently largely minimised the impact of competing cations on the accumulation of Cu in mosses. Furthermore, the BioMet Biotic Ligand Model (BLM) successfully describes the site-specific copper bioaccumulation for the freshwater mosses studied. However, the comparison of the results with a previous study appears to indicate that the adsorption/desorption of Cu in mosses is impacted by seasons. This highlights a limit of the BioMet model in which the physiological state of aquatic organisms is not considered. No toxic effect of Cu exposure on lipid peroxidation was observed in the mosses and gammarids regardless of the site and the concentration considered. However, the oxidative stress measured in the mosses via their guaiacol peroxidase (GPX) activity increased in the case where internalised Cu reached maximal values, which suggests a threshold effect on the GPX activity.

  14. Influence of blooms of phytoplankton on concentrations of hydrophobic organic chemicals in sediments and snails in a hyper-eutrophic, freshwater lake.

    PubMed

    Shi, Wei; Yu, Nanyang; Jiang, Xia; Han, Zhihua; Wang, Shuhang; Zhang, Xiaowei; Wei, Si; Giesy, John P; Yu, Hongxia

    2017-01-31

    Blooms of phytoplankton, which are common in freshwater ecosystems, might not only affect quality of water but also influence biogeochemical processing of pollutants. Based on three years of field observations in sediments of Tai Lake, China, concentrations of organochlorine (OC) pesticides and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in areas where blooms occurred were 2.4 and 3.4 times greater than concentrations in areas without blooms. Concentrations of octylphenol (OP), nonylphenol (NP) and bisphenol A (BPA) in areas where blooms did not occur were 3.8, 4.4 and 2.6 times greater than concentrations in areas where blooms did occur. To explain the differences, simultaneous, seasonally determinations of the water-sediment-phytoplankton-snails disequilibria were determined empirically. Greater sinking and lesser diffusion were shown to be probable drivers of the burial of δ-HCH, 4-ring and 5-ring PAHs in surface sediments of areas in which blooms occurred, being as much as 0.58, 38 and 45 g month(-1). Large biodegradation and low burial was shown to be the probable reason of the inverse proportion of NP, OP and BPA in both water and sediment to biomass which might be due to the enhanced metabolic capacity of bacterial community associated with algae blooms. These phenomena further influence the persistent hydrophobic organic chemicals in the snail species (Bellamya quadrata) being greater in winter but lesser in summer, which is probably due to the positive relationship with the concentrations in sediment when snails were dormant and with the concentrations in water after dormancy. Thus, in Tai Lake, the fate and distribution of persistent and biodegradable contaminants in sediments and snails is influenced by blooms of phytoplankton, which should be included in models of environmental fates of contaminants.

  15. Microplastics in freshwater systems: a review of the emerging threats, identification of knowledge gaps and prioritisation of research needs.

    PubMed

    Eerkes-Medrano, Dafne; Thompson, Richard C; Aldridge, David C

    2015-05-15

    Plastic contamination is an increasing environmental problem in marine systems where it has spread globally to even the most remote habitats. Plastic pieces in smaller size scales, microplastics (particles <5 mm), have reached high densities (e.g., 100,000 items per m(3)) in waters and sediments, and are interacting with organisms and the environment in a variety of ways. Early investigations of freshwater systems suggest microplastic presence and interactions are equally as far reaching as are being observed in marine systems. Microplastics are being detected in freshwaters of Europe, North America, and Asia, and the first organismal studies are finding that freshwater fauna across a range of feeding guilds ingest microplastics. Drawing from the marine literature and these initial freshwater studies, we review the issue of microplastics in freshwater systems to summarise current understanding, identify knowledge gaps and suggest future research priorities. Evidence suggests that freshwater systems may share similarities to marine systems in the types of forces that transport microplastics (e.g. surface currents); the prevalence of microplastics (e.g. numerically abundant and ubiquitous); the approaches used for detection, identification and quantification (e.g. density separation, filtration, sieving and infrared spectroscopy); and the potential impacts (e.g. physical damage to organisms that ingest them, chemical transfer of toxicants). Differences between freshwater and marine systems include the closer proximity to point sources in freshwaters, the typically smaller sizes of freshwater systems, and spatial and temporal differences in the mixing/transport of particles by physical forces. These differences between marine and freshwater systems may lead to differences in the type of microplastics present. For example, rivers may show a predictable pattern in microplastic characteristics (size, shape, relative abundance) based on waste sources (e.g. household vs

  16. Urolithiasis in northeast Bombay: seasonal prevalence and chemical composition of stones.

    PubMed

    Hussain, F; Billimoria, F R; Singh, P P

    1990-01-01

    The seasonal prevalence of urinary calculus disease from the records of L.T. Municipal General Hospital, Sion, Bombay, which primarily caters services to poor people of Northeast Bombay, especially Dharavi slum area, is reported. The qualitative and quantitative compositions of stones collected from the patients of Dharavi slum area are also described. Interestingly, the prevalence of bladder stones (BSF) was lower than that of upper urinary tract stones (UUTSF) which suggests the possibility of involvement of environmental pollution. As regards total number of stone patients, a sharp fall in male BSF in March and increase in male UUTSF in November were evident. In females the number was maximum in April in both BSF and UUTSF. However, no recognizable pattern of seasonal variation was seen in operated stone patients indicating that metabolically active disease is unrelated to season. Prevalence of bladder stones in children was high and male/female ratio was about 5. All stones were of the mixed type. Infection was not a major contributor of stone growth. Calcium oxalate was the major constituent and ammonium acid urate was present in the majority of stones.

  17. Actinide behavior in a freshwater pond

    SciTech Connect

    Trabalka, J.R.; Bogle, M.A.; Scott, T.G.

    1983-01-01

    Long-term investigations of solution chemistry in an alkaline freshwater pond have revealed that actinide oxidation state behavior, particularly that of plutonium, is complex. The Pu(V,VI) fraction was predominant in solution, but it varied over the entire range reported from other natural aquatic environments, in this case, as a result of intrinsic biological and chemical cycles (redox and pH-dependent phenomena). A strong positive correlation between plutonium (Pu), but not uranium (U), and hydroxyl ion over the observation period, especially when both were known to be in higher oxidation states, was particularly notable. Coupled with other examples of divergent U and Pu behavior, this result suggests that Pu(V), or perhaps a mixture of Pu(V,VI), was the prevalent oxidation state in solution. Observations of trivalent actinide sorption behavior during an algal bloom, coupled with the association with a high-molecular weight (nominally 6000 to 10,000 mol wt) organic fraction in solution, indicate that solution-detritus cycling of organic carbon, in turn, may be the primary mechanism in amercium-curium (Am-Cm) cycling. Sorption by sedimentary materials appears to predominate over other factors controlling effective actinide solubility and may explain, at least partially, the absence of an expected strong positive correlation between carbonate and dissolved U. 49 references, 6 figures, 12 tables.

  18. The Increasing Prevalence in Intersex Variation from Toxicological Dysregulation in Fetal Reproductive Tissue Differentiation and Development by Endocrine-Disrupting Chemicals

    PubMed Central

    Rich, Alisa L.; Phipps, Laura M.; Tiwari, Sweta; Rudraraju, Hemanth; Dokpesi, Philip O.

    2016-01-01

    An increasing number of children are born with intersex variation (IV; ambiguous genitalia/hermaphrodite, pseudohermaphroditism, etc.). Evidence shows that endocrine-disrupting chemicals (EDCs) in the environment can cause reproductive variation through dysregulation of normal reproductive tissue differentiation, growth, and maturation if the fetus is exposed to EDCs during critical developmental times in utero. Animal studies support fish and reptile embryos exhibited IV and sex reversal when exposed to EDCs. Occupational studies verified higher prevalence of offspring with IV in chemically exposed workers (male and female). Chemicals associated with endocrine-disrupting ability in humans include organochlorine pesticides, poly-chlorinated biphenyls, bisphenol A, phthalates, dioxins, and furans. Intersex individuals may have concurrent physical disorders requiring lifelong medical intervention and experience gender dysphoria. An urgent need exists to determine which chemicals possess the greatest risk for IV and the mechanisms by which these chemicals are capable of interfering with normal physiological development in children. PMID:27660460

  19. Macrophytes: Freshwater Forests of Lakes and Rivers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McDermid, Karla J.; Naiman, Robert J.

    1983-01-01

    Physical, chemical, and biological effects on macrophytes (aquatic plants) on the freshwater ecosystem are discussed. Research questions and issues related to these organisms are also discussed, including adaptations for survival in a wet environment, ecological consequences of large-scale macrophyte eradication, seasonal changes in plant…

  20. Distribution and bioaccumulation of endocrine disrupting chemicals in water, sediment and fishes in a shallow Chinese freshwater lake: Implications for ecological and human health risks.

    PubMed

    Dan Liu; Wu, Shengmin; Xu, Huaizhou; Zhang, Qin; Zhang, Shenghu; Shi, Lili; Yao, Cheng; Liu, Yanhua; Cheng, Jie

    2017-06-01

    The occurrence, distribution and bioaccumulation of six endocrine disrupting compounds (EDCs) were investigated in water, sediment and biota samples from Luoma Lake, a shallow Chinese freshwater lake. Total concentrations of ∑phenolic EDCs were much higher than ∑estrogens EDCs in both waters and sediments. There were not obvious differences on the concentrations of target compounds [except nonylphenol (NP)] in upstream, lake and downstream locations, these may be suggested that they were mainly affected by non-point discharges in this area. However, the high concentration of NP in water may be associated with the discharge of rural domestic wastewater without thorough treatment. Furthermore, concentrations of NP were about 2-3 order magnitude higher than those of OP in both water and sediment compartments. Relatively higher bioaccumulation factors (BAF) were obtained for DES and EE2. Ecological risk assessment revealed greater risk of NP in surface water, which may pose a serious threat to aquatic ecosystems. The estrogen equivalent concentration (EEQ) of male were higher than those in female, and occurred in the order of city >rural-urban>countryside.

  1. Prosobranch snails as test organisms for the assessment of endocrine active chemicals--an overview and a guideline proposal for a reproduction test with the freshwater mudsnail Potamopyrgus antipodarum.

    PubMed

    Duft, Martina; Schmitt, Claudia; Bachmann, Jean; Brandelik, Cornelius; Schulte-Oehlmann, Ulrike; Oehlmann, Jörg

    2007-02-01

    Recently, prosobranch snails have been recommended as promising candidates for test organisms for the assessment of endocrine active chemicals. Three prosobranch snail species, the freshwater mudsnail Potamopyrgus antipodarum, the freshwater ramshorn snail Marisa cornuarietis, and the marine netted whelk Nassarius reticulatus are portrayed and their respective biotests are presented together with results of laboratory experiments and biological effect monitoring surveys in the field. All characterized species are highly sensitive toward xeno-androgens [triphenyltin (TPT), tributyltin (TBT), methyltestosterone (MT) and fenarimol (FEN)], and xeno-estrogens [bisphenol A (BPA), octylphenol (OP), ethinylestradiol], and show effects at environmentally relevant, rather low concentrations in laboratory experiments. For exposure to the xeno-androgen TPT, EC(10) values range between 15.9 and 29.0 ng as Sn/L (sediment 0.03 mug as Sn/kg), for TBT, EC(10) values are found between 3.42 and 37.8 ng as Sn/L (sediment 2.98 microg as Sn/kg) and effect concentrations for FEN are calculated as 18.6 ng/L (EC(10)) and 0.19 microg/kg (EC(50) sediment; EC(10) not calculable). Exposure to xeno-estrogens yielded EC(10 )values of 13.9 ng/L (0.19 microg/kg) for BPA, a NOEC of <1 microg/L (EC(10) of 0.004 microg/kg) for OP and a NOEC of 1 ng/l (EC(10) sediment of 2.2 microg/kg) for ethinylestradiol. Responses to androgens comprised the development of imposex and the reduction of fertility or embryo production, effects of estrogens included the stimulation of egg production and embryo production, and the increased weight of glands. Also, biological effect monitoring studies with P. antipodarum and N. reticulatus in several rivers or estuarine areas revealed the capacity of the biotests to detect an androgenic or estrogenic potential of sediment samples. A comparison of the three test species with regard to sensitivity and practical aspects in routine application favors the freshwater mudsnail P

  2. Freshwater mussels of Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Williams, James D.; Butler, Robert S.; Warren, Gary L.; Johnson, Nathan A.

    2014-01-01

    An exhaustive guide to all aspects of the freshwater mussel fauna in Florida,Freshwater Mussels of Florida covers the ecology, biology, distribution, and conservation of the many species of bivalve mollusks in the Sunshine State. In the past three decades, researchers, the public, businesses that depend on wildlife, and policy makers have given more attention to the threatened natural diversity of the Southeast, including freshwater mussels. This compendium meets the increasingly urgent need to catalog this imperiled group of aquatic organisms in the United States.

  3. Freshwater Harmful Algal Blooms

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    EPA is seeking regular and early career applications proposing innovative research on the prediction, prevention, control and mitigation of freshwater HABs as well as the drivers, life cycle patterns, and fate of and effects from from less-common, less

  4. Relevance of the bioavailable fraction of DDT and its metabolites in freshwater sediment toxicity: New insight into the mode of action of these chemicals on Dictyostelium discoideum.

    PubMed

    Sforzini, Susanna; Governa, Daniela; Boeri, Marta; Oliveri, Laura; Oldani, Alessandro; Vago, Fabio; Viarengo, Aldo; Borrelli, Raffaella

    2016-10-01

    In this work, the toxicity of lake sediments contaminated with DDT and its metabolites DDD and DDE (collectively, DDX) was evaluated with widely used toxicity tests (i.e., Vibrio fischeri, Daphnia magna, Pseudokirchneriella subcapitata, and Lumbriculus variegatus) and with the social amoeba Dictyostelium discoideum, a model organism that is also suitable for studying pollutant-induced alterations at the molecular and cellular levels. Although the DDX concentration in the sediments was high (732.5 ppb), the results suggested a minimal environmental risk; in fact, no evidence of harmful effects was found using the different bioassays or when we considered the results of more sensitive sublethal biomarkers in D. discoideum amoebae. In line with the biological results, the chemical data showed that the concentration of DDX in the pore water (in general a highly bioavailable phase) showed a minimal value (0.0071ppb). To confirm the importance of the bioavailability of the toxic chemicals in determining their biological effects and to investigate the mechanisms of DDX toxicity, we exposed D. discoideum amoebae to 732.5ppb DDX in water solution. DDX had no effect on cell viability; however, a strong reduction in amoebae replication rate was observed, which depended mainly on a reduction in endocytosis rate and on lysosomal and mitochondrial alterations. In the presence of a moderate and transient increase in reactive oxygen species, the glutathione level in DDX-exposed amoebae drastically decreased. These results highlight that studies of the bioavailability of pollutants in environmental matrices and their biological effects are essential for site-specific ecological risk assessment. Moreover, glutathione depletion in DDX-exposed organisms is a new finding that could open the possibility of developing new pesticide mixtures that are more effective against DDT-resistant malaria vectors.

  5. EFFECTS OF FRESHWATER RELEASES AND SEASON ON OYSTERS (CRASSOSTREA VIRGINICA) IN CALOOSAHATCHEE ESTUARY, FLORIDA

    EPA Science Inventory

    The influence of freshwater releases and season on disease prevalence and intensity of Perkinsus marinus, condition index, gonadal condition, recruitment potential, and growth of oysters was examined monthly at five locations along the Caloosahatchee estuary, Florida. Temperature...

  6. Toxicity, accumulation, and trophic transfer of chemically and biologically synthesized nano zero valent iron in a two species freshwater food chain.

    PubMed

    Bhuvaneshwari, M; Kumar, Deepak; Roy, Rajdeep; Chakraborty, Susiddharthak; Parashar, Abhinav; Mukherjee, Anita; Chandrasekaran, N; Mukherjee, Amitava

    2017-02-01

    The impact of bio-remediation agent nZVI on environment is still inadequately understood, especially on aquatic food web. The study presented here has therefore considered both chemical (CS) and biological (BS) synthetic origins of nZVI and their effects on both algae and daphnia. The study is unique in its attempt to explore the possibility of trophic transfer from algae to its immediate higher niche (daphnia as the model). An equal weightage of the effects of both CS and BS nZVI on algae and daphnia has been explored here; hence it allows us to compare the capping of nZVI on toxicity. To examine the causes of observed lethality- ROS generation, effects on the activity of oxidative enzymes, membrane damage and biouptake of nZVI was analysed. The overall outcome of CS and BS nZVI on lethality was significantly different in algae and daphnia, where daphnia demonstrated relatively higher sensitivity against CS nZVI. Algae demonstrated considerable differences in CS and BS nZVI toxicity only at higher concentration. This study did not show a probable biomagnification and trophic transfer from algae to daphnia under the experimental conditions even at the highest exposure concentration. The study instigates the importance of trophic transfer to understand the possible biomagnification of nZVI among organisms of different trophic levels and eventually the consequences on environment.

  7. Freshwater Marsh. Habitat Pac.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fish and Wildlife Service (Dept. of Interior), Washington, DC.

    The materials in this educational packet are designed for use with students in grades 4 through 7. They consist of an overview, three lesson plans and student data sheets, and a poster. The overview describes how the freshwater marsh is an important natural resource for plant, animal, and human populations and how the destruction of marshes causes…

  8. Davis Pond Freshwater Prediversion Biomonitoring Study: Freshwater Fisheries and Eagles

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jenkins, Jill A.; Bourgeois, E. Beth; Jeske, Clint W.

    2008-01-01

    In January 2001, the construction of the Davis Pond freshwater diversion structure was completed by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. The diversion of freshwater from the Mississippi River is intended to mitigate saltwater intrusion from the Gulf of Mexico and to lessen the concomitant loss of wetland areas. In addition to the freshwater inflow, Barataria Bay basin would receive nutrients, increased flows of sediments, and water-borne and sediment-bound compounds. The purpose of this biomonitoring study was, therefore, to serve as a baseline for prediversion concentrations of selected contaminants in bald eagle (Haliaeetus leucocephalus) nestlings (hereafter referred to as eaglets), representative freshwater fish, and bivalves. Samples were collected from January through June 2001. Two similarly designed postdiversion studies, as described in the biological monitoring program, are planned. Active bald eagle nests targeted for sampling eaglet blood (n = 6) were generally located southwest and south of the diversion structure. The designated sites for aquatic animal sampling were at Lake Salvador, at Lake Cataouatche, at Bayou Couba, and along the Mississippi River. Aquatic animals representative of eagle prey were collected. Fish were from three different trophic levels and have varying feeding strategies and life histories. These included herbivorous striped mullet (Mugil cephalus), omnivorous blue catfish (Ictalurus furcatus), and carnivorous largemouth bass (Micropterus salmoides). Three individuals per species were collected at each of the four sampling sites. Freshwater Atlantic rangia clams (Rangia cuneata) were collected at the downstream marsh sites, and zebra mussels (Dreissena spp.) were collected on the Mississippi River. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Biomonitoring of Environmental Status and Trends (BEST) protocols served as guides for fish sampling and health assessments. Fish are useful for monitoring aquatic ecosystems because they accumulate

  9. Sensitivity of hypogean and epigean freshwater copepods to agricultural pollutants.

    PubMed

    Di Lorenzo, T; Di Marzio, W D; Sáenz, M E; Baratti, M; Dedonno, A A; Iannucci, A; Cannicci, S; Messana, G; Galassi, D M P

    2014-03-01

    Widespread pollution from agriculture is one of the major causes of the poor freshwater quality currently observed across Europe. Several studies have addressed the direct impact of agricultural pollutants on freshwater biota by means of laboratory bioassays; however, as far as copepod crustaceans are concerned, the ecotoxicological research is scarce for freshwater species and almost nonexistent for the hypogean ones. In this study, we conducted a comparative analysis of the available literature data on the sensitivity of freshwater copepods to agricultural pollutants. We also assessed the acute and chronic sensitivity of a hypogean and an epigean species, both belonging to the Crustacea Copepoda Cyclopoida Cyclopidae, to two N-fertilizers (urea and ammonium nitrate) and two herbicides (ARIANE(TM) II from Dow AgroSciences LLC, and Imazamox), widely used for cereal agriculture in Europe. According to the literature review, freshwater copepods are sensitive to a range of pesticides and N-fertilizers. Ecotoxicological studies on hypogean species of copepods account only one study. There are no standardized protocols available for acute and chronic toxicity tests for freshwater copepods, making comparisons about sensitivity difficult. From our experiments, ionized ammonia proved to be more toxic than the herbicide Imazamox, in both short and chronic bioassays. Urea was the less toxic chemical for both species. The hypogean species was more sensitive than the epigean one to all chemicals. For both species and for all tested chemicals, acute lethality and chronic lethality were induced at concentrations higher than the law limits of good water body quality in Europe, except for ionized ammonia, which provoked the chronic lethality of the hypogean species at a lower concentration. The hazardous concentration (HC) of un-ionized ammonia for 5 % of freshwater copepods, obtained by a species sensitivity distribution, was 92 μg l(-1), significantly lower than the HC computed

  10. Chemical and Physical Characteristics of Sediments from Prevalent Dust Sources in the Central Chihuahuan Desert, Chihuahua, Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dominguez Acosta, M.; Gill, T. E.; Peinado, P.

    2013-05-01

    The Chihuahuan Desert has been recognized as an important contributor of mineral aerosols emplaced into the atmosphere in the Western Hemisphere. Along with the production of these aerosols, growing concern has been stated relating the downwind transport of atmospheric dust particles to increases in human health related impacts such as asthma and bronchitis in the Binational Paso Del Norte, the largest urban area in the region. Efforts have been made to describe the source types (land use/cover) and frequency of emission from the "dust hotspots" or prevalent sources within the region. These studies have outlined specific areas and their related sedimentological environments responsible for the regular dust production. Ephemeral lakes, fluvial and alluvial related environments form the main natural dust producing landforms in the region, modulated by short-term climatic variability and anthropogenic disturbance. Analysis of remote sensing imagery shows that the margins between natural areas and agricultural lands form the main anthropogenic related source areas. Most of the previously published studies focus on these remotely sensed descriptions of the dust sources, while only a few deal with in situ or field characteristics of these sources. A formal and detailed description of the physicochemical properties of many of these areas is presented, providing key data on this component of the overall dust production cycle. Elemental and mineralogical compositions of dust source sediments, soil textural compositions (grain size distributions) and field sedimentological descriptions are presented as an effort to attain a detailed in situ description of the prevalent dust sources in the central part of the Chihuahuan Desert.

  11. Effects of pollution on freshwater organisms

    SciTech Connect

    Phipps, G.L.; Harden, M.J.; Leonard, E.N.; Roush, T.H; Spehar, D.L.; Stephan, C.E.; Pickering, Q.H.; Buikema, A.L. Jr.

    1984-06-01

    This review includes subjects in last year's reviews on effects of pollution on freshwater invertebrates and effects of pollution on freshwater fish and amphibians. This review also includes information on the effects of pollution on freshwater plants. 625 references.

  12. Sperm in "parhenogenetic" freshwater gastrotrichs.

    PubMed

    Weiss, M J; Levy, D P

    1979-07-20

    Freshwater members of the phylum Gastrotricha have been considered obligate parthenogens. In Lepidodermelia squammata, the species for which there is most evidence for parthenogenesis, sperm have been discovered. This finding will necessitate reexamination of the nature of sexuality and life cycles and of the concept of "species" in freshwater gastrotrichs.

  13. Acute toxicity of Roundup® herbicide to three life stages of the freshwater shrimp Caridina nilotica (Decapoda: Atyidae)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mensah, P. K.; Muller, W. J.; Palmer, C. G.

    Glyphosate based herbicides, including Roundup®, are frequently used in the chemical control of weeds and invading alien plant species in South Africa. These herbicides ultimately get into water courses directly or indirectly through processes such as drifting, leaching, surface runoff and foliar spray of aquatic nuisance plants. Despite their widespread use, no water quality guideline exists to protect indigenous South African freshwater organisms from the toxic effects of these herbicides. The toxicity of the herbicide Roundup® was assessed using three different life stages of the freshwater shrimp Caridina nilotica, a prevalent species in South African freshwater ecosystems. Neonate (<7 days post hatching (dph)), juvenile (>7 dph and <20 dph) and adult (>40 dph) shrimps were exposed to varying concentrations (1.5-50 mg/L acid equivalence (a.e.)) of the herbicide in 48 and 96 h acute toxicity tests in order to determine the most sensitive life-stage. The results showed neonates to be more sensitive to Roundup® than both juveniles and adults with mean 96 h LC 50 values of 2.5, 7.0 and 25.3 mg/L a.e. respectively. The estimated 96 h LC 50 of neonates is much lower than the application rate (20-30 mg/L a.e.), although the application’s impact will depend on the dilution rate of the applied concentration in the environment. All three life-stages of unexposed animals exhibited active and coordinated movement but exposed shrimps were erratic and slow in their movements, with neonates showing most of these behavioral irregularities. This study shows that low levels of the herbicide Roundup® may adversely affect C. nilotica health and survival. Thus, the herbicide should be carefully managed to minimize any negative impact on non-target freshwater organisms.

  14. Salting our freshwater lakes.

    PubMed

    Dugan, Hilary A; Bartlett, Sarah L; Burke, Samantha M; Doubek, Jonathan P; Krivak-Tetley, Flora E; Skaff, Nicholas K; Summers, Jamie C; Farrell, Kaitlin J; McCullough, Ian M; Morales-Williams, Ana M; Roberts, Derek C; Ouyang, Zutao; Scordo, Facundo; Hanson, Paul C; Weathers, Kathleen C

    2017-04-10

    The highest densities of lakes on Earth are in north temperate ecosystems, where increasing urbanization and associated chloride runoff can salinize freshwaters and threaten lake water quality and the many ecosystem services lakes provide. However, the extent to which lake salinity may be changing at broad spatial scales remains unknown, leading us to first identify spatial patterns and then investigate the drivers of these patterns. Significant decadal trends in lake salinization were identified using a dataset of long-term chloride concentrations from 371 North American lakes. Landscape and climate metrics calculated for each site demonstrated that impervious land cover was a strong predictor of chloride trends in Northeast and Midwest North American lakes. As little as 1% impervious land cover surrounding a lake increased the likelihood of long-term salinization. Considering that 27% of large lakes in the United States have >1% impervious land cover around their perimeters, the potential for steady and long-term salinization of these aquatic systems is high. This study predicts that many lakes will exceed the aquatic life threshold criterion for chronic chloride exposure (230 mg L(-1)), stipulated by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), in the next 50 y if current trends continue.

  15. Carcinogens and cancers in freshwater fishes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Black, John J.; Baumann, Paul C.

    1991-01-01

    Epizootics of neoplasms in freshwater fish species are considered in relation to circumstantial and experimental evidence that suggest that some epizootics of neoplasia of hepatocellular, cholangiocellular, epidermal, and oral epithelial origin may be causally related to contaminant exposure. Although there is concern for the safety of consuming fish affected with neoplasms, this concern may be misdirected as direct transmission of cancer by ingesting cancerous tissue would seem unlikely. Of greater concern is the matter of toxic and cancer-causin chemicals present in edible fish that exhibit neoplasia as a symptom of past exposure via residence in a polluted waterway. There is ample evidence to suggest that contaminant chemicals ingested via contaminated Great Lakes fish may already be affecting both human and ecosystem health, but these effects are subtle and may require new approaches to the study of the affected systems.

  16. Carcinogens and cancers in freshwater fishes

    SciTech Connect

    Black, J.J. ); Baumann, P.C. )

    1991-01-01

    Epizootics of neoplasms in freshwater fish species are considered in relation to circumstantial and experimental evidence that suggest that some epizootics of neoplasia of hepatocellular, cholangiocellular, epidermal, and oral epithelial origin may be causally related to contaminant exposure. Although there is concern for the safety of consuming fish affected with neoplasms, this concern may be misdirected as direct transmission of cancer by ingesting cancerous tissue would seem unlikely. Of greater concern is the matter of toxic and cancer-causing chemicals present in edible fish that exhibit neoplasia as a symptom of past exposure via residence in a polluted waterway. There is ample evidence to suggest that contaminant chemicals ingested via contaminated Great Lakes fish may already be affecting both human and ecosystem health, but these effects are subtle and may require new approaches to the study of the affected systems.

  17. Carcinogens and cancers in freshwater fishes.

    PubMed Central

    Black, J J; Baumann, P C

    1991-01-01

    Epizootics of neoplasms in freshwater fish species are considered in relation to circumstantial and experimental evidence that suggest that some epizootics of neoplasia of hepatocellular, cholangiocellular, epidermal, and oral epithelial origin may be causally related to contaminant exposure. Although there is concern for the safety of consuming fish affected with neoplasms, this concern may be misdirected as direct transmission of cancer by ingesting cancerous tissue would seem unlikely. Of greater concern is the matter of toxic and cancer-causing chemicals present in edible fish that exhibit neoplasia as a symptom of past exposure via residence in a polluted waterway. There is ample evidence to suggest that contaminant chemicals ingested via contaminated Great Lakes fish may already be affecting both human and ecosystem health, but these effects are subtle and may require new approaches to the study of the affected systems. PMID:2050071

  18. Impacts of Climate and UV Change on Arctic Freshwater Ecosystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wrona, F. J.; Prowse, T. D.; Reist, J. D.

    2004-05-01

    An overview is provided of the key findings of the Arctic Climate Impact Assessment (ACIA), which is an international project of the Arctic Council and the International Arctic Science Committee (IASC), to evaluate and synthesize knowledge on climate variability, climate change, and increased ultraviolet radiation and their consequences. Predicted changes in climate and UV in the Arctic are expected to have far-reaching impacts on the hydrology and ecology of freshwater ecosystems. Key effects include changes in the distribution, abundance and ecology of aquatic species in various trophic levels, dramatic alterations in the physical environment that makes up their habitat, changes to the chemical properties of that environment, and alterations to the processes that act on and within freshwater ecosystems. Interactions of climatic variables, such as temperature and precipitation, with freshwater ecosystems are highly complex and hence can be propagated through ecosystems in ways that are often difficult to predict. This is partly because of our still relatively poor understanding of the structure and function of arctic freshwater systems and their basic interrelationships with climate and other environmental variables, as well as by a paucity of long-term freshwater monitoring sites and integrated hydro-ecological research programs in the Arctic. Predictions of hydro-ecological impacts are further complicated by synergistic and cumulative effects.

  19. Inhabitants of the Fresh-Water Community.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jorgensen, Joseph; Schroeder, Marlene

    This learner's guide is designed to assist middle school students in studying freshwater organisms. Following a brief introduction to freshwater ecology, simple line drawings facilitate the identification of plants and animals common to Florida's freshwater ecosystems. Emphasis of the short text which accompanies each illustration is upon the…

  20. Prevalence of Bimolecular Routes in the Activation of Diatomic Molecules with Strong Chemical Bonds (O2, NO, CO, N2) on Catalytic Surfaces.

    PubMed

    Hibbitts, David; Iglesia, Enrique

    2015-05-19

    Dissociation of the strong bonds in O2, NO, CO, and N2 often involves large activation barriers on low-index planes of metal particles used as catalysts. These kinetic hurdles reflect the noble nature of some metals (O2 activation on Au), the high coverages of co-reactants (O2 activation during CO oxidation on Pt), or the strength of the chemical bonds (NO on Pt, CO and N2 on Ru). High barriers for direct dissociations from density functional theory (DFT) have led to a consensus that "defects", consisting of low-coordination exposed atoms, are required to cleave such bonds, as calculated by theory and experiments for model surfaces at low coverages. Such sites, however, bind intermediates strongly, rendering them unreactive at the high coverages prevalent during catalysis. Such site requirements are also at odds with turnover rates that often depend weakly on cluster size or are actually higher on larger clusters, even though defects, such as corners and edges, are most abundant on small clusters. This Account illustrates how these apparent inconsistencies are resolved through activations of strong bonds assisted by co-adsorbates on crowded low-index surfaces. Catalytic oxidations occur on Au clusters at low temperatures in spite of large activation barriers for O2 dissociation on Au(111) surfaces, leading to proposals that O2 activation requires low-coordination Au atoms or Au-support interfaces. When H2O is present, however, O2 dissociation proceeds with low barriers on Au(111) because chemisorbed peroxides (*OOH* and *HOOH*) form and weaken O-O bonds before cleavage, thus allowing activation on low-index planes. DFT-derived O2 dissociation barriers are much lower on bare Pt surfaces, but such surfaces are nearly saturated with CO* during CO oxidation. A dearth of vacant sites causes O2* to react with CO* to form *OOCO* intermediates that undergo O-O cleavage. NO-H2 reactions occur on Pt clusters saturated with NO* and H*; direct NO* dissociation requires vacant

  1. Freshwater Variability between Ellesmere Island and the North Pole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smethie, W. M.; Schlosser, P.; Newton, R.; Friedrich, R.; Steele, M.

    2013-12-01

    The Switchyard Project has established a time series of CTD and chemical measurements between Ellesmere Island and the North Pole and annual observations have been taken since 2005 to the present. The total freshwater inventory and inventories of the freshwater components (meteoric water [MEW], sea-ice melt water [SIMW] and inflow from the Pacific Ocean [PFW]) are determined from measurements of temperature, salinity, delta O-18, nitrate and phosphate, each year. The total inventory has varied by about 5 m between 2005 and 2013, which is about 50% of the lowest inventory. The total inventory was fairly stable between 2003 - 2007, then increased dramatically between 2007 and 2008 and again between 2008 and 2009. It then decreased between 2009 and 2011 and increased from 2011 to 2013. The increase between 2007 and 2008 resulted primarily from an increase in MEW tempered by decreases in SIMW and PFW. Back tracks of ice flow suggested that these waters came from the Russian continental shelves via the Transpolar Drift along the Lomonosov Ridge. The continued freshening in 2009 corresponded with a change is the large scale circulation of the Canada Basin with a weakening of the Beaufort Gyre and expulsion of freshwater, which included water from the large sea ice melting event of 2007. SIMW accounted for about two-thirds of the freshening. Ice back tracks suggest that water flowed out of the Beaufort Sea in an anticylonic pattern and crossed the Canada Basin along the Mendelev Ridge to reach the Lincoln Sea with a transport time of 2-3 years. The freshwater decrease between 2010 and 2011 was the result of a 70% decrease in SIMW and 30% decrease in MEW and the ice track flow pattern had shifted back to the pattern prior to 2009. The source of freshwater for the increase in freshwater inventory between 2011 and 2013 was MEW. PFW retreated to the continental shelf of Ellesmere Island, decreasing by about 30% and SIMW decreased to more negative values indicating water

  2. Subsurface storage of freshwater in south Florida; a prospectus

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Merritt, M.L.; Meyer, F.W.; Sonntag, W.H.; Fitzpatrick, D.J.

    1983-01-01

    A method of increasing storage capacity for freshwater in south Florida is to use brackish artesian aquifers as reservoirs. In this way, water deficiencies occurring during the annual dry season can be offset by surplus water obtained during the wet season and injected underground. Most of south Florida is underlain by several deep, confined, carbonate waterbearing zones which might be suitable for freshwater storage. These zones are in the Avon Park, Ocala, Suwannee, Tampa, and Hawthorn Formations. Experimental freshwater injection systems have been operated at five locations with promising, but not fully definitive, results. A determination of the feasibility of freshwater injection at a selected site begins with an assessment of the local geologic suitability. Verification of feasibility, however, requires injection and recovery tests to be performed at the site. Recovery efficiency, a measure of the success of the operation, is the amount of potable water, expressed as a percentage of the volume injected, which can be recovered before its salinity, or the concentration of other chemical constituents present in the native aquifer water, increases to the point that the recovered water is no longer useable. (USGS)

  3. Freshwater Biodiversity and Insect Diversification

    PubMed Central

    Dijkstra, Klaas-Douwe B.; Monaghan, Michael T.; Pauls, Steffen U.

    2016-01-01

    Inland waters cover less than one percent of Earth’s surface, but harbor more than six percent of all insect species: nearly 100,000 species from 12 orders spend one or more life stages in freshwater. Little is known about how this remarkable diversity arose, although allopatric speciation and ecological adaptation are thought to be primary mechanisms. Freshwater habitats are exceptionally susceptible to environmental change, and exhibit marked ecological gradients. The amphibiotic lifestyles of aquatic insects result in complex contributions of extinction and allopatric and non-allopatric speciation in species diversification. In contrast to the lack of evolutionary studies, the ecology and habitat preferences of aquatic insects have been intensively studied, in part because of their widespread use as bio-indicators. The combination of phylogenetics with the extensive ecological data provides a promising avenue for future research, making aquatic insects highly suitable models for the study of ecological diversification. PMID:24160433

  4. Water quality for freshwater fish

    SciTech Connect

    Howells, G. )

    1994-01-01

    This timely and up-to-date volume brings together recent critical reviews on water quality requirements for freshwater fish commissioned by the European Inland Fisheries Advisory Commission, an agency of the United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization. It provides a unique and authoritative source of critically evaluated water quality data concerning the effects of chromium, nickel, aluminum and nitrite on freshwater fish and includes an assessment of the toxicity of mixtures. The reports presented in this volume cover all stages of the life cycle and relevant trophic levels, including aquatic invertebrates and plants and potential bioaccumulation through the food chain. An extensive bibliography is provided for each chapter as well as a glossary of terms and a list of fish species mentioned in the text. This compilation of papers is the definitive reference volume for chemists, biologists, ecologists and toxicologists as well as for water resource managers concerned with management and control of pollution in fresh waters.

  5. Toxicity of 33 NCS to freshwater fish and sea lamprey

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Marking, Leif L.; King, Everett L.; Walker, Charles R.; Howell, John H.

    1970-01-01

    The chemical 33NCS (3'-chloro-3-nitrosalicylanilide) was evaluated as a fish control agent and as a larvicide for sea lampreys at the Fish Control Laboratories of the Bureau of Sport Fisheries and Wildlife and the Hammond Bay Biological Station of the Bureau of Commercial Fisheries. The chemical is rapidly toxic to many species. Sea lampreys, bowfin, and channel catfish are the most sensitive species. Carp are more sensitive than trouts or sunfishes. Use of 33NCS in selective control of freshwater fishes or sea lampreys requires precise control because its toxicity is strongly influenced by variations in water quality.

  6. Changing Arctic Ocean freshwater pathways.

    PubMed

    Morison, James; Kwok, Ron; Peralta-Ferriz, Cecilia; Alkire, Matt; Rigor, Ignatius; Andersen, Roger; Steele, Mike

    2012-01-04

    Freshening in the Canada basin of the Arctic Ocean began in the 1990s and continued to at least the end of 2008. By then, the Arctic Ocean might have gained four times as much fresh water as comprised the Great Salinity Anomaly of the 1970s, raising the spectre of slowing global ocean circulation. Freshening has been attributed to increased sea ice melting and contributions from runoff, but a leading explanation has been a strengthening of the Beaufort High--a characteristic peak in sea level atmospheric pressure--which tends to accelerate an anticyclonic (clockwise) wind pattern causing convergence of fresh surface water. Limited observations have made this explanation difficult to verify, and observations of increasing freshwater content under a weakened Beaufort High suggest that other factors must be affecting freshwater content. Here we use observations to show that during a time of record reductions in ice extent from 2005 to 2008, the dominant freshwater content changes were an increase in the Canada basin balanced by a decrease in the Eurasian basin. Observations are drawn from satellite data (sea surface height and ocean-bottom pressure) and in situ data. The freshwater changes were due to a cyclonic (anticlockwise) shift in the ocean pathway of Eurasian runoff forced by strengthening of the west-to-east Northern Hemisphere atmospheric circulation characterized by an increased Arctic Oscillation index. Our results confirm that runoff is an important influence on the Arctic Ocean and establish that the spatial and temporal manifestations of the runoff pathways are modulated by the Arctic Oscillation, rather than the strength of the wind-driven Beaufort Gyre circulation.

  7. Sulfur cycling in freshwater sediments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klug, M. J.

    1985-01-01

    Organic sulfur containing compounds represent greater than 80% of the total sulfur in sediments of eutrophic freshwater lakes. Although sedimentary sulfur is predominantly in the form of organic compounds, more sulfur is transformed by sulfate reduction than by any other process. Rates of sulfate reduction in these sediments average 7 mmol/sq m/day. This rate is 19 times greater than the net rate of production of inorganic sulfur from organic compounds on an annual basis.

  8. Pesticide toxicity index for freshwater aquatic organisms

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Munn, Mark D.; Gilliom, Robert J.

    2001-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey's National Water-Quality Assessment (NAWQA) Program is designed to assess current water-quality conditions, changes in water quality over time, and the effects of natural and human factors on water quality for the Nation's streams and ground-water resources. For streams, one of the most difficult parts of the assessment is to link chemical conditions to effects on aquatic biota, particularly for pesticides, which tend to occur in streams as complex mixtures with strong seasonal patterns. A Pesticide Toxicity Index (PTI) was developed that combines pesticide exposure of aquatic biota (measured concentrations of pesticides in stream water) with toxicity estimates (standard endpoints from laboratory bioassays) to produce a single index value for a sample or site. The development of the PTI was limited to pesticide compounds routinely measured in NAWQA studies and to toxicity data readily available from existing databases. Qualifying toxicity data were found for one or more types of test organisms for 75 of the 83 pesticide compounds measured in NAWQA samples, but with a wide range of bioassays per compound (1 to 65). There were a total of 2,824 bioassays for the 75 compounds, including 287 48-hour EC50 values (concentration at which 50 percent of test organisms exhibit a nonlethal response) for freshwater cladocerans, 585 96-hour LC50 values (concentration lethal to 50 percent of test organisms) for freshwater benthic invertebrates, and 1,952 96-hour LC50 values for freshwater fish. The PTI for a particular sample is the sum of toxicity quotients (measured concentration divided by the median toxicity concentration from bioassays) for each detected pesticide. The PTI can be calculated for specific groups of pesticides and for specific taxonomic groups.While the PTI does not determine whether water in a sample is toxic, its values can be used to rank or compare the toxicity of samples or sites on a relative basis for use in further analysis or

  9. Freshwater bacterial lifestyles inferred from comparative genomics.

    PubMed

    Livermore, Joshua A; Emrich, Scott J; Tan, John; Jones, Stuart E

    2014-03-01

    While micro-organisms actively mediate and participate in freshwater ecosystem services, we know little about freshwater microbial genetic diversity. Genome sequences are available for many bacteria from the human microbiome and the ocean (over 800 and 200, respectively), but only two freshwater genomes are currently available: the streamlined genomes of Polynucleobacter necessarius ssp. asymbioticus and the Actinobacterium AcI-B1. Here, we sequenced and analysed draft genomes of eight phylogentically diverse freshwater bacteria exhibiting a range of lifestyle characteristics. Comparative genomics of these bacteria reveals putative freshwater bacterial lifestyles based on differences in predicted growth rate, capability to respond to environmental stimuli and diversity of useable carbon substrates. Our conceptual model based on these genomic characteristics provides a foundation on which further ecophysiological and genomic studies can be built. In addition, these genomes greatly expand the diversity of existing genomic context for future studies on the ecology and genetics of freshwater bacteria.

  10. Arctic Freshwater Export: Prospects, Impacts, and Challenges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haine, T. W. N.; Stewart, K.

    2012-04-01

    Large freshwater anomalies clearly exist in the Arctic Ocean. They are due to enhanced melting of sea ice, increased runoff, and changes in atmospheric circulation that lead to surface convergence of freshwater. For example, freshwater has accumulated in the Beaufort Sea over the last 30 years, with an extra ≈ 5000 km3-about 25%-being stored. It is likely that this extra freshwater will be released from the Arctic via the Fram Strait and/or the Canadian Archipelago, perhaps as another "Great Salinity Anomaly". The freshwater discharge will likely have impacts on subpolar Atlantic circulation and ecosystems for several years. In light of coupled climate model forecasts, it may herald a new regime for the Arctic/sub-Arctic ocean. An unprecedented opportunity exists to anticipate and observe this discharge process. This contribution will review the state of knowledge about Arctic freshwater anomalies, and outline potential scenarios for future Arctic freshwater export. Key uncertainties in estimating the timing, rates, and pathways of freshwater export will be identified. Challenges for observing systems to monitor the progress of anomalous freshwater will also be discussed.

  11. Ecological speciation in marine v. freshwater fishes.

    PubMed

    Puebla, O

    2009-10-01

    Absolute barriers to dispersal are not common in marine systems, and the prevalence of planktonic larvae in marine taxa provides potential for gene flow across large geographic distances. These observations raise the fundamental question in marine evolutionary biology as to whether geographic and oceanographic barriers alone can account for the high levels of species diversity observed in marine environments such as coral reefs, or whether marine speciation also operates in the presence of gene flow between diverging populations. In this respect, the ecological hypothesis of speciation, in which reproductive isolation results from divergent or disruptive natural selection, is of particular interest because it may operate in the presence of gene flow. Although important insights into the process of ecological speciation in aquatic environments have been provided by the study of freshwater fishes, comparatively little is known about the possibility of ecological speciation in marine teleosts. In this study, the evidence consistent with different aspects of the ecological hypothesis of speciation is evaluated in marine fishes. Molecular approaches have played a critical role in the development of speciation hypotheses in marine fishes, with a role of ecology suggested by the occurrence of sister clades separated by ecological factors, rapid cladogenesis or the persistence of genetically and ecologically differentiated species in the presence of gene flow. Yet, ecological speciation research in marine fishes is still largely at an exploratory stage. Cases where the major ingredients of ecological speciation, namely a source of natural divergent or disruptive selection, a mechanism of reproductive isolation and a link between the two have been explicitly documented are few. Even in these cases, specific predictions of the ecological hypothesis of speciation remain largely untested. Recent developments in the study of freshwater fishes illustrate the potential for

  12. Fasciola hepatica: Infection Status of Freshwater Snails Collected from Gangwon-do (Province), Korea

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jae-Hyung; Quan, Juan-Hua; Choi, In-Wook; Park, Gab-Man; Cha, Guang-Ho; Kim, Hyun-Ju; Yuk, Jae-Min; Lee, Young-Ha

    2017-01-01

    Fasciola hepatica is a trematode that causes zoonosis, mainly in cattle and sheep, and occasionally in humans. Few recent studies have determined the infection status of this fluke in Korea. In August 2015, we collected 402 samples of freshwater snails at Hoenggye-ri (upper stream) and Suha-ri (lower stream) of Song-cheon (stream) in Daegwalnyeong-myeon, Pyeongchang-gun in Gangwon-do (Province) near many large cattle or sheep farms. F. hepatica infection was determined using PCR on the nuclear ribosomal internal transcribed spacer 2 (ITS-2). Among the 402 samples, F. hepatica 1TS-2 marker was detected in 6 freshwater snails; thus, the overall prevalence in freshwater snails was 1.5%. The prevalence varied between collection areas, ranging from 0.0% at Hoenggye-ri to 2.9% at Suha-ri. However, F. gigantica ITS-2 was not detected in the 6 F. hepatica-positive samples by PCR. The nucleotide sequences of the 6 F. hepatica ITS-2 PCR-positive samples were 99.4% identical to the F. hepatica ITS-2 sequences in GenBank, whereas they were 98.4% similar to F. gigantica ITS-2 sequences. These results indicated that the prevalence of F. hepatica in snail intermediate hosts was 1.5% in Gangwon-do, Korea; however the prevalence varied between collection areas. These results may help us to understand F. hepatica infection status in natural environments. PMID:28285514

  13. Fasciola hepatica: Infection Status of Freshwater Snails Collected from Gangwon-do (Province), Korea.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jae-Hyung; Quan, Juan-Hua; Choi, In-Wook; Park, Gab-Man; Cha, Guang-Ho; Kim, Hyun-Ju; Yuk, Jae-Min; Lee, Young-Ha

    2017-02-01

    Fasciola hepatica is a trematode that causes zoonosis, mainly in cattle and sheep, and occasionally in humans. Few recent studies have determined the infection status of this fluke in Korea. In August 2015, we collected 402 samples of freshwater snails at Hoenggye-ri (upper stream) and Suha-ri (lower stream) of Song-cheon (stream) in Daegwalnyeong-myeon, Pyeongchang-gun in Gangwon-do (Province) near many large cattle or sheep farms. F. hepatica infection was determined using PCR on the nuclear ribosomal internal transcribed spacer 2 (ITS-2). Among the 402 samples, F. hepatica 1TS-2 marker was detected in 6 freshwater snails; thus, the overall prevalence in freshwater snails was 1.5%. The prevalence varied between collection areas, ranging from 0.0% at Hoenggye-ri to 2.9% at Suha-ri. However, F. gigantica ITS-2 was not detected in the 6 F. hepatica-positive samples by PCR. The nucleotide sequences of the 6 F. hepatica ITS-2 PCR-positive samples were 99.4% identical to the F. hepatica ITS-2 sequences in GenBank, whereas they were 98.4% similar to F. gigantica ITS-2 sequences. These results indicated that the prevalence of F. hepatica in snail intermediate hosts was 1.5% in Gangwon-do, Korea; however the prevalence varied between collection areas. These results may help us to understand F. hepatica infection status in natural environments.

  14. Freshwater Biological Traits Database (Final Report)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Cover of the <span class=Freshwater Biological Traits Database Final Report"> This final report discusses the development of a database of freshwater biolo...

  15. Freshwater Ecology. LC Science Tracer Bullet.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Niskern, Diana, Comp.

    Freshwater ecosystems include lakes, ponds, streams, rivers, and certain types of wetlands. This literature and resources guide is not intended to be a comprehensive bibliography on freshwater ecology; the guide is designed--as the name of the series implies--to put the reader or student "on target." Other literature guides related to…

  16. Freshwater Biological Traits Database (Final Report)

    EPA Science Inventory

    EPA announced the release of the final report, Freshwater Biological Traits Database. This report discusses the development of a database of freshwater biological traits. The database combines several existing traits databases into an online format. The database is also...

  17. Why are freshwater fish so threatened?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Closs, Gerard P.; Angermeier, Paul; Darwall, William R.T.; Balcombe, Stephen R.

    2015-01-01

    Understanding why so many freshwater fish species are threatened requires some understanding of their biology, diversity, distribution, biogeography and ecology, but also some appreciation of the social, economic and political forces that are causing humans to destroy the natural ecosystems upon which we all ultimately depend. To begin to understand the diversity of freshwater fishes, we first need to consider the processes that generated and continue to sustain the diversity of species we see today. Based on an understanding of how freshwater fish diversity is generated and sustained, we consider how vulnerable or resilient various freshwater fishes are to the range of anthropogenic impacts that impinge on freshwater ecosystems. Finally, we discuss how social, political and economic drivers influence human impacts on natural systems, and the changes needed to current models of development that can lead to a sustainable future for humans and the diverse range of freshwater fish species with which we share our planet. The aim of this chapter is to provide an overview of the key issues and threats driving the declines in freshwater fish diversity identified in Chapter 1; subsequent chapters provide more detail on the key issues and address our options for developing a sustainable future for freshwater fishes.

  18. Reflections in a stock pond: are anthropogenically derived freshwater ecosystems natural, artificial, or something else?

    PubMed

    Crifasi, Robert R

    2005-11-01

    "A skyscraper is as natural as a bird's nest" -Alan Watts. For millennia, people have altered freshwater ecosystems directly through water development and indirectly by global change and surrounding land-use activities. In these altered ecosystems, human impacts can be subtle and are sometimes overlooked by the people who manage them. This article provides two case studies near Boulder, Colorado that demonstrate how perceptions regarding these ecosystems affect their management. These examples are typical of lakes and streams along the Front Range of Colorado that are simultaneously natural and social in origin. Although natural, many of the region's freshwater ecosystems are affected by ongoing ecologic, hydrologic, chemical, and geomorphic modifications produced by human activity. People and nature are both active participants in the production of these freshwater ecosystems. The concept of "hybridity," borrowed from geographers and social scientists, is useful for describing landscapes of natural and social origin. Hybrid freshwater ecosystems are features of the humanized landscape and are derived from deliberate cultural activities, nonhuman physical and biological processes, and incidental anthropogenic disturbance. Our perceptions of "natural" freshwater ecosystems and what definitions we use to describe them influences our view of hybrid systems and, in turn, affects management decisions regarding them. This work stresses the importance of understanding the underlying societal forces and cultural values responsible for the creation of hybrid freshwater ecosystems as a central step in their conservation and management.

  19. Disease prevalence in flounder (Platichthys flesus) from the Dutch Wadden Sea as indicator of environmental quality: A summary of 1988-2005 surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vethaak, A. D.

    2013-09-01

    In 1988, epizootics of ulcer disease in the flatfish flounder in the Dutch Wadden Sea were reported near freshwater drainage sluices of IJsselmeer Lake, locally affecting up to 38.9% of fish. Other diseases such as fin rot and lymphocystis were less frequent, but followed a similar pattern. Results of follow-up surveys in the Wadden Sea in 1994-2005 confirm previous findings and also show significantly elevated ulcer prevalences at other smaller drainage works. The most likely stress factors that contributed to the development of the epizootics at these sites include osmotic stress, adverse water quality conditions including chemical contaminants, nutritional deficiencies, and obstruction to fish migration. It was shown that discharges of IJsselmeer Lake freshwater in 1988-96 had a wide effect on the prevalence and distribution of ulcers and lymphocystis in the western Wadden Sea. A general reduction in disease prevalence in flounder in the entire Dutch Wadden Sea was observed during 1988-2005, which was most likely due to a general improvement in water quality and locally improved habitat conditions for flounder near drainage sluices. Ulcer prevalences outside the two IJsselmeer Lake sluices (Den Oever and Kornwerderzand) declined in this period from approximately 30% to 10% for medium-sized fish. Other skin diseases have also displayed a downward trend at both sites in recent years, with prevalences falling sharply to below 1%. Elsewhere in the Wadden Sea and the Ems-Dollard estuary, disease prevalences have declined towards natural background levels (< 1%). It is concluded that skin diseases, especially ulcers, are useful indicators of environmental quality in the Wadden Sea.

  20. Genotoxicity monitoring of freshwater environments using caged crayfish (Astacus leptodactylus).

    PubMed

    Klobučar, Göran I V; Malev, Olga; Šrut, Maja; Štambuk, Anamaria; Lorenzon, Simonetta; Cvetković, Želimira; Ferrero, Enrico A; Maguire, Ivana

    2012-03-01

    Genotoxicity of freshwater pollution was assessed by measuring DNA damage in haemocytes of caged freshwater crayfish Astacus leptodactylus by the means of Comet assay and micronucleus test, integrated with the measurements of physiological (total protein concentration) and immunological (total haemocyte count) haemolymph parameters as biomarkers of undergone stress. Crayfish were collected at the reference site (River Mrežnica) and exposed in cages for 1 week at three polluted sites along the Sava River (Zagreb, Sisak, Krapje). The long term pollution status of these locations was confirmed by chemical analyses of sediments. Statistically significant increase in DNA damage measured by the Comet assay was observed at all three polluted sites comparing to the crayfish from reference site. In addition, native crayfish from the mildly polluted site (Krapje) cage-exposed on another polluted site (Zagreb) showed lower DNA damage than crayfish from the reference site exposed at the same location indicating adaptation and acclimatisation of crayfish to lower levels of pollution. Micronuclei induction showed similar gradient of DNA damage as Comet assay, but did not reach the statistical significance. Observed increase in total haemocyte count and total protein content in crayfish from polluted environments in the Sava River also confirmed stress caused by exposure to pollution. The results of this study have proved the applicability of caging exposure of freshwater crayfish A. leptodactylus in environmental genotoxicity monitoring using Comet assay and micronucleus test.

  1. Freshwater to seawater transitions in migratory fishes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zydlewski, Joseph; Michael P. Wilkie,

    2012-01-01

    The transition from freshwater to seawater is integral to the life history of many fishes. Diverse migratory fishes express anadromous, catadromous, and amphidromous life histories, while others make incomplete transits between freshwater and seawater. The physiological mechanisms of osmoregulation are widely conserved among phylogenetically diverse species. Diadromous fishes moving between freshwater and seawater develop osmoregulatory mechanisms for different environmental salinities. Freshwater to seawater transition involves hormonally mediated changes in gill ionocytes and the transport proteins associated with hypoosmoregulation, increased seawater ingestion and water absorption in the intestine, and reduced urinary water losses. Fishes attain salinity tolerance through early development, gradual acclimation, or environmentally or developmentally cued adaptations. This chapter describes adaptations in diverse taxa and the effects of salinity on growth. Identifying common strategies in diadromous fishes moving between freshwater and seawater will reveal the ecological and physiological basis for maintaining homeostasis in different salinities, and inform efforts to conserve and manage migratory euryhaline fishes.

  2. Freshwater for resilience: a shift in thinking.

    PubMed Central

    Folke, Carl

    2003-01-01

    Humanity shapes freshwater flows and biosphere dynamics from a local to a global scale. Successful management of target resources in the short term tends to alienate the social and economic development process from its ultimate dependence on the life-supporting environment. Freshwater becomes transformed into a resource for optimal management in development, neglecting the multiple functions of freshwater in dynamic landscapes and its fundamental role as the bloodstream of the biosphere. The current tension of these differences in worldview is exemplified through the recent development of modern aquaculture contrasted with examples of catchment-based stewardship of freshwater flows in dynamic landscapes. In particular, the social and institutional dimension of catchment management is highlighted and features of social-ecological systems for resilience building are presented. It is concluded that this broader view of freshwater provides the foundation for hydrosolidarity. PMID:14728796

  3. Reverse osmosis process successfully converts oil field brine into freshwater

    SciTech Connect

    Tao, F.T.; Curtice, S.; Hobbs, R.D.; Sides, J.L.; Wieser, J.D. ); Dyke, C.A.; Tuohey, D. ); Pilger, P.F. )

    1993-09-20

    A state-of-the-art process in the San Ardo oil field converted produced brine into freshwater. The conversion process used chemical clarification, softening, filtration, and reverse osmosis (RO). After extensive testing resolved RO membrane fouling problems, the pilot plant successfully handled water with about 7,000 mg/l. of total dissolved solids, 250 mg/l. silica, and 170 mg/l. soluble oil. The treated water complies with the stringent California drinking water standard. The paper describes water reclamation, the San Ardo process, stability, reverse osmosis membrane fouling, membranes at high pH, water quality, and costs.

  4. Effects of acidification on olfactory-mediated behaviour in freshwater and marine ecosystems: a synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Leduc, Antoine O. H. C.; Munday, Philip L.; Brown, Grant E.; Ferrari, Maud C. O.

    2013-01-01

    For many aquatic organisms, olfactory-mediated behaviour is essential to the maintenance of numerous fitness-enhancing activities, including foraging, reproduction and predator avoidance. Studies in both freshwater and marine ecosystems have demonstrated significant impacts of anthropogenic acidification on olfactory abilities of fish and macroinvertebrates, leading to impaired behavioural responses, with potentially far-reaching consequences to population dynamics and community structure. Whereas the ecological impacts of impaired olfactory-mediated behaviour may be similar between freshwater and marine ecosystems, the underlying mechanisms are quite distinct. In acidified freshwater, molecular change to chemical cues along with reduced olfaction sensitivity appear to be the primary causes of olfactory-mediated behavioural impairment. By contrast, experiments simulating future ocean acidification suggest that interference of high CO2 with brain neurotransmitter function is the primary cause for olfactory-mediated behavioural impairment in fish. Different physico-chemical characteristics between marine and freshwater systems are probably responsible for these distinct mechanisms of impairment, which, under globally rising CO2 levels, may lead to strikingly different consequences to olfaction. While fluctuations in pH may occur in both freshwater and marine ecosystems, marine habitat will remain alkaline despite future ocean acidification caused by globally rising CO2 levels. In this synthesis, we argue that ecosystem-specific mechanisms affecting olfaction need to be considered for effective management and conservation practices. PMID:23980246

  5. AN ASSESSMENT OF PHTHALATE ESTER TOXICITY TO FRESHWATER BENTHOS: 2. SEDIMENT EXPOSURES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Seven phthalate esters were evaluated for their stability and 10-d acute toxicity to the freshwater invertebrates Hyalella azteca and Chironomus tentans following incorporation into sediment. The chemicals were diethyl (DEP), di-n-butyl (DBP), di-n-hyxyl (DHP), di-[2-ethylhexyl] ...

  6. ANAEROBIC BIODEGRADATION OF VEGETABLE OIL AND ITS METABOLIC INTERMEDIATES IN OIL-ENRICHED FRESHWATER SEDIMENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Anaerobic biodegradation of vegetable oil in freshwater sediments is strongly inhibited by high concentrations of oil, but the presence of ferric hydroxide relieves the inhibition. The effect of ferric hydroxide is not due to physical or chemical interactions with long-chain fatt...

  7. Systemic granuloma observed in Atlantic salmon Salmo salar raised to market size in a freshwater recirculation aquaculture system

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Systemic granuloma was observed in sampled adult Atlantic salmon Salmo salar raised to harvest size in a freshwater recirculation aquaculture system. The prevalence of this condition was estimated at 10-20% of the population, with affected individuals grossly demonstrating pathology in varying degre...

  8. Pathogenic agents in freshwater resources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geldreich, Edwin E.

    1996-02-01

    Numerous pathogenic agents have been found in freshwaters used as sources for water supplies, recreational bathing and irrigation. These agents include bacterial pathogens, enteric viruses, several protozoans and parasitic worms more common to tropical waters. Although infected humans are a major source of pathogens, farm animals (cattle, sheep, pigs), animal pets (dogs, cats) and wildlife serve as significant reservoirs and should not be ignored. The range of infected individuals within a given warm-blooded animal group (humans included) may range from 1 to 25%. Survival times for pathogens in the water environment may range from a few days to as much as a year (Ascaris, Taenia eggs), with infective dose levels varying from one viable cell for several primary pathogenic agents to many thousands of cells for a given opportunistic pathogen.As pathogen detection in water is complex and not readily incorporated into routine monitoring, a surrogate is necessary. In general, indicators of faecal contamination provide a positive correlation with intestinal pathogen occurrences only when appropriate sample volumes are examined by sensitive methodology.Pathways by which pathogens reach susceptible water users include ingestion of contaminated water, body contact with polluted recreational waters and consumption of salad crops irrigated by polluted freshwaters. Major contributors to the spread of various water-borne pathogens are sewage, polluted surface waters and stormwater runoff. All of these contributions are intensified during periods of major floods. Several water-borne case histories are cited as examples of breakdowns in public health protection related to water supply, recreational waters and the consumption of contaminated salad crops. In the long term, water resource management must focus on pollution prevention from point sources of waste discharges and the spread of pathogens in watershed stormwater runoff.

  9. Abbreviation of larval development and extension of brood care as key features of the evolution of freshwater Decapoda.

    PubMed

    Vogt, Günter

    2013-02-01

    The transition from marine to freshwater habitats is one of the major steps in the evolution of life. In the decapod crustaceans, four groups have colonized fresh water at different geological times since the Triassic, the freshwater shrimps, freshwater crayfish, freshwater crabs and freshwater anomurans. Some families have even colonized terrestrial habitats via the freshwater route or directly via the sea shore. Since none of these taxa has ever reinvaded its environment of origin the Decapoda appear particularly suitable to investigate life-history adaptations to fresh water. Evolutionary comparison of marine, freshwater and terrestrial decapods suggests that the reduction of egg number, abbreviation of larval development, extension of brood care and lecithotrophy of the first posthatching life stages are key adaptations to fresh water. Marine decapods usually have high numbers of small eggs and develop through a prolonged planktonic larval cycle, whereas the production of small numbers of large eggs, direct development and extended brood care until the juvenile stage is the rule in freshwater crayfish, primary freshwater crabs and aeglid anomurans. The amphidromous freshwater shrimp and freshwater crab species and all terrestrial decapods that invaded land via the sea shore have retained ocean-type planktonic development. Abbreviation of larval development and extension of brood care are interpreted as adaptations to the particularly strong variations of hydrodynamic parameters, physico-chemical factors and phytoplankton availability in freshwater habitats. These life-history changes increase fitness of the offspring and are obviously favoured by natural selection, explaining their multiple origins in fresh water. There is no evidence for their early evolution in the marine ancestors of the extant freshwater groups and a preadaptive role for the conquest of fresh water. The costs of the shift from relative r- to K-strategy in freshwater decapods are traded

  10. Prevalence of symptoms of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and of fluorescent antinuclear antibodies associated with chronic exposure to trichloroethylene and other chemicals in well water

    SciTech Connect

    Kilburn, K.H.; Warshaw, R.H. )

    1992-02-01

    Criteria for the recognition of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) were applied to 362 subjects exposed to trichloroethylene, trichloroethane, inorganic chromium, and other chemicals in water obtained from wells in an industrially contaminated aquifer in Tucson, Arizona. Their antinuclear autoantibodies were measured by fluorescence (FANA) in serum. Ten patients with clinical SLE and/or other collagen-vascular diseases were considered separately. Results were compared to an Arizona control group, to published series, and to laboratory controls. Frequencies of each of 10 ARA symptoms were higher in exposed subjects than in any comparison group except those with clinical SLE. The number of subjects with 4 or more symptoms was 2.3 times higher compared to referent women and men. FANA titers > 1:80 was approximately 2.3 times higher in women but equally frequent in men as in laboratory controls. ARA score and FANA rank were correlated with a coefficient (cc) of .1251, r{sup 2} = .0205 in women and this correlation was almost statistically significant in men cc = .1282, r{sup 2} = .0253. In control men and women neither correlation was significant. Long-term low-dose exposure to TCE and other chemicals in contaminated well water significantly increased symptoms of lupus erthematosus as perceived by the ARA score and the increased FANA titers.

  11. Modern Freshwater Microbialites, Cuatro Ciénegas, Mexico. II. Detailed Spatial Analysis of Geochemical Signals Linked to Microbial Activity and Carbonate Precipitation/

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hollander, D.; Breitbart, M.; Nitti, A.; van Mooy, B.; Seifert, J.; Souza, V.

    2010-04-01

    This study applies a highly resolved spatial approach using genomic, stable isotopic, and molecular organic geochemical analyses to determine the microorganisms and chemical processes for carbonate precipitation in the freshwater microbialites in Cuatro Ciénegas, MX.

  12. Modern Freshwater Microbialites of Cuatro Ciénegas, Mexico. I: Metagenomic and Stable Isotopic Analyses to Assess Microbial Community Structure and Function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breitbart, M.; Hollander, D.; Nitti, A.; van Mooy, B.; Siefert, J.; Souza, V.

    2010-04-01

    This study utilized metagenomic and stable isotopic analyses to examine the microorganisms and chemical processes leading to carbonate precipitation in the actively-accreting freshwater microbialites from Rio Mesquites in Cuatro Ciénegas, Mexico.

  13. 40 CFR 35.1605-3 - Publicly owned freshwater lake.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Publicly owned freshwater lake. 35.1605... Owned Freshwater Lakes § 35.1605-3 Publicly owned freshwater lake. A freshwater lake that offers public... maintaining the public access and recreational facilities of this lake or other publicly owned...

  14. Water hardness determines (226)Ra uptake in the tropical freshwater mussel.

    PubMed

    Doering, Che; Bollhöfer, Andreas

    2017-03-22

    Chemical data for freshwater mussels (Velesunio spp.) and water from 15 sampling sites in the Alligator Rivers Region and Rum Jungle uranium provinces in tropical Northern Australia were analysed to develop a predictive model of radium-226 ((226)Ra) bioaccumulation for variable water calcium (Ca) and magnesium (Mg) concentrations. Application of the model as a (226)Ra screening approach for freshwater mussels in tropical waterbodies potentially impacted by operational or remediated uranium mine sites is discussed in relation to Mudginberri Billabong, located approximately 12 km downstream of Ranger uranium mine in the Alligator Rivers Region.

  15. Depleting groundwater resources mitigating surface freshwater scarcity - a trend in the recent past

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wada, Y.; Van Beek, L. P.; Bierkens, M. F.

    2011-12-01

    During the past decades, human water use more than doubled, yet available surface freshwater resources are finite. As a result, water scarcity has become prevalent in many (semi-)arid regions of the world (e.g., India, Pakistan, North East China, the MENA region). In such regions, the demand often exceeds the available surface freshwater resources primarily due to heavy irrigation which requires large volumes of water in a certain time of the year, when groundwater is additionally used to supplement the deficiency. Excessive groundwater pumping, however, often leads to overexploitation, i.e. groundwater abstraction exceeding groundwater recharge. Here, we quantified globally the impact of depleting groundwater resources on mitigating surface freshwater scarcity and the trend between 1960 and 2000 at a spatial resolution of 0.5 degree. We downscaled available country statistics of groundwater abstraction to 0.5 degree, while we simulated groundwater recharge with the global hydrological model PCR-GLOBWB at the same spatial resolution considering not only natural groundwater recharge but also artificial recharge, i.e. return flow from irrigation. Water scarcity was estimated by confronting computed water demand for livestock, irrigation, industry and households with simulated surface freshwater availability (PCR-GLOBWB) at 0.5 degree. We thus performed a simulation run with/without groundwater pumping to assess the impact on alleviating surface freshwater scarcity. The results indicated that in many of (semi-)arid regions (e.g., North Wet India, North East Pakistan, North East China, West and Central USA, Central Mexico, North Iran, Central Saudi Arabia) large amounts of groundwater abstraction significantly mitigates the intensity of surface freshwater scarcity, while depleting the resources. Our estimate of global groundwater depletion reached close to 280 km3/yr. In most of the MENA region, the intensity of surface freshwater scarcity was eased by 30% up to 50% as

  16. Native Freshwater Fish and Mussel Species Richness

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    These data represent predicted current distributions of all native freshwater fish and freshwater mussels in the Middle-Atlantic region. The data are available for both 8-digit HUCs and EMAP hexagons and represent total species counts for each spatial unit. More information about these resources, including the variables used in this study, may be found here: https://edg.epa.gov/data/Public/ORD/NERL/ReVA/ReVA_Data.zip.

  17. Estimated freshwater withdrawals in Washington, 2010

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lane, Ron C.; Welch, Wendy B.

    2015-03-18

    The amount of public- and self-supplied water used for domestic, irrigation, livestock, aquaculture, industrial, mining, and thermoelectric power was estimated for state, county, and eastern and western regions of Washington during calendar year 2010. Withdrawals of freshwater for offstream uses were estimated to be about 4,885 million gallons per day. The total estimated freshwater withdrawals for 2010 was approximately 15 percent less than the 2005 estimate because of decreases in irrigation and thermoelectric power withdrawals.

  18. Freshwater harmful algal blooms: toxins and children's health.

    PubMed

    Weirich, Chelsea A; Miller, Todd R

    2014-01-01

    Massive accumulations of cyanobacteria (a.k.a. "blue-green algae"), known as freshwater harmful algal blooms (FHABs), are a common global occurrence in water bodies used for recreational purposes and drinking water purification. Bloom prevalence is increased due to anthropogenic changes in land use, agricultural activity, and climate change. These photosynthetic bacteria produce a range of toxic secondary metabolites that affect animals and humans at both chronic and acute dosages. Children are especially at risk because of their lower body weight, behavior, and toxic effects on development. Here we review common FHAB toxins, related clinical symptoms, acceptable concentrations in drinking water, case studies of children's and young adults' exposures to FHAB toxins through drinking water and food, methods of environmental and clinical detection in potential cases of intoxication, and best practices for FHAB prevention.

  19. Freshwater Commercial Bycatch: an Understated Conservation Problem

    SciTech Connect

    Raby, Graham D.; Colotelo, Alison HA; Blouin-Demers, Gabriel; Cooke, Steven J.

    2011-04-01

    Commercial fisheries bycatch in marine systems has been regarded as a global conservation concern by environmental groups, scientists, government, and the public for decades. Fortunately, some headway has been made to mitigate the negative impacts of bycatch in marine environments. In a survey of the literature, we found that despite freshwater commercial fisheries yields comprising 11% of the global commercial catch, bycatch research focusing on freshwater commercial fisheries represented only {approx}3% of the total bycatch literature. This paucity of research is particularly alarming given that freshwater animals and habitats are some of the world's most imperiled. The limited inland bycatch literature that does exist includes examples of population declines attributed to commercial bycatch (e.g., freshwater dolphins in the Yangtze River in China) and illustrates that in some systems bycatch can be substantial (e.g., lake trout bycatch in the Laurentian Great Lakes). Encouraging results from the marine realm can serve as models for bycatch research in freshwater, and lead to measurable gains in conservation of freshwater ecosystems. We summarize existing work on inland bycatch in an effort to draw attention to this understated and understudied conservation problem.

  20. Evolution of the freshwater eels.

    PubMed

    Aoyama, J; Tsukamoto, K

    1997-01-01

    The freshwater anguillid eels have an unusual life history and world-wide distribution. Questions about the phylogenetic relationships of this group and how their long spawning migrations and larval phase may contribute to their global distribution have not been addressed. This paper is first presentation of molecular phylogeny of Anguilla species, and based on this phylogenetic tree we suggest new aspect of the evolution of this group. Namely, ancestral eels originated during the Eocene or earlier, in the western Pacific Ocean near present-day Indonesia. A group derived from this ancestor dispersed westward, probably by larval transport in the global circum-equatorial current through the northern edge of the Tethys Sea. This group split into the ancestor of the European and American eels, which entered into the Atlantic Ocean, and a second group, which dispersed southward and split into the east African species and Australian species. Thus the world-wide distribution of the eel family can be understood from knowledge of continental drift, ocean currents, a specialized larva and evolutionary forces favoring dispersal and speciation of segregated gene pool.

  1. Commissioned Review. Carbon: freshwater plants

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Keeley, J.E.; Sandquist, D.R.

    1992-01-01

    δ13C values for freshwater aquatic plant matter varies from −11 to −50‰ and is not a clear indicator of photosynthetic pathway as in terrestrial plants. Several factors affect δ13C of aquatic plant matter. These include: (1) The δ13C signature of the source carbon has been observed to range from +1‰ for HCO3− derived from limestone to −30‰ for CO2 derived from respiration. (2) Some plants assimilate HCO3−, which is –7 to –11‰ less negative than CO2. (3) C3, C4, and CAM photosynthetic pathways are present in aquatic plants. (4) Diffusional resistances are orders of magnitude greater in the aquatic environment than in the aerial environment. The greater viscosity of water acts to reduce mixing of the carbon pool in the boundary layer with that of the bulk solution. In effect, many aquatic plants draw from a finite carbon pool, and as in terrestrial plants growing in a closed system, biochemical discrimination is reduced. In standing water, this factor results in most aquatic plants having a δ13C value similar to the source carbon. Using Farquhar's equation and other physiological data, it is possible to use δ13C values to evaluate various parameters affecting photosynthesis, such as limitations imposed by CO2 diffusion and carbon source.

  2. High-throughput single-cell sequencing identifies photoheterotrophs and chemoautotrophs in freshwater bacterioplankton

    PubMed Central

    Martinez-Garcia, Manuel; Swan, Brandon K; Poulton, Nicole J; Gomez, Monica Lluesma; Masland, Dashiell; Sieracki, Michael E; Stepanauskas, Ramunas

    2012-01-01

    Recent discoveries suggest that photoheterotrophs (rhodopsin-containing bacteria (RBs) and aerobic anoxygenic phototrophs (AAPs)) and chemoautotrophs may be significant for marine and freshwater ecosystem productivity. However, their abundance and taxonomic identities remain largely unknown. We used a combination of single-cell and metagenomic DNA sequencing to study the predominant photoheterotrophs and chemoautotrophs inhabiting the euphotic zone of temperate, physicochemically diverse freshwater lakes. Multi-locus sequencing of 712 single amplified genomes, generated by fluorescence-activated cell sorting and whole genome multiple displacement amplification, showed that most of the cosmopolitan freshwater clusters contain photoheterotrophs. These comprised at least 10–23% of bacterioplankton, and RBs were the dominant fraction. Our data demonstrate that Actinobacteria, including clusters acI, Luna and acSTL, are the predominant freshwater RBs. We significantly broaden the known taxonomic range of freshwater RBs, to include Alpha-, Beta-, Gamma- and Deltaproteobacteria, Verrucomicrobia and Sphingobacteria. By sequencing single cells, we found evidence for inter-phyla horizontal gene transfer and recombination of rhodopsin genes and identified specific taxonomic groups involved in these evolutionary processes. Our data suggest that members of the ubiquitous betaproteobacteria Polynucleobacter spp. are the dominant AAPs in temperate freshwater lakes. Furthermore, the RuBisCO (ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase) gene was found in several single cells of Betaproteobacteria, Bacteroidetes and Gammaproteobacteria, suggesting that chemoautotrophs may be more prevalent among aerobic bacterioplankton than previously thought. This study demonstrates the power of single-cell DNA sequencing addressing previously unresolved questions about the metabolic potential and evolutionary histories of uncultured microorganisms, which dominate most natural environments

  3. High-throughput single-cell sequencing identifies photoheterotrophs and chemoautotrophs in freshwater bacterioplankton.

    PubMed

    Martinez-Garcia, Manuel; Swan, Brandon K; Poulton, Nicole J; Gomez, Monica Lluesma; Masland, Dashiell; Sieracki, Michael E; Stepanauskas, Ramunas

    2012-01-01

    Recent discoveries suggest that photoheterotrophs (rhodopsin-containing bacteria (RBs) and aerobic anoxygenic phototrophs (AAPs)) and chemoautotrophs may be significant for marine and freshwater ecosystem productivity. However, their abundance and taxonomic identities remain largely unknown. We used a combination of single-cell and metagenomic DNA sequencing to study the predominant photoheterotrophs and chemoautotrophs inhabiting the euphotic zone of temperate, physicochemically diverse freshwater lakes. Multi-locus sequencing of 712 single amplified genomes, generated by fluorescence-activated cell sorting and whole genome multiple displacement amplification, showed that most of the cosmopolitan freshwater clusters contain photoheterotrophs. These comprised at least 10-23% of bacterioplankton, and RBs were the dominant fraction. Our data demonstrate that Actinobacteria, including clusters acI, Luna and acSTL, are the predominant freshwater RBs. We significantly broaden the known taxonomic range of freshwater RBs, to include Alpha-, Beta-, Gamma- and Deltaproteobacteria, Verrucomicrobia and Sphingobacteria. By sequencing single cells, we found evidence for inter-phyla horizontal gene transfer and recombination of rhodopsin genes and identified specific taxonomic groups involved in these evolutionary processes. Our data suggest that members of the ubiquitous betaproteobacteria Polynucleobacter spp. are the dominant AAPs in temperate freshwater lakes. Furthermore, the RuBisCO (ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase) gene was found in several single cells of Betaproteobacteria, Bacteroidetes and Gammaproteobacteria, suggesting that chemoautotrophs may be more prevalent among aerobic bacterioplankton than previously thought. This study demonstrates the power of single-cell DNA sequencing addressing previously unresolved questions about the metabolic potential and evolutionary histories of uncultured microorganisms, which dominate most natural environments.

  4. Chemical ecology of fungi.

    PubMed

    Spiteller, Peter

    2015-07-01

    Fungi are widespread in nature and have conquered nearly every ecological niche. Fungi occur not only in terrestrial but also in freshwater and marine environments. Moreover, fungi are known as a rich source of secondary metabolites. Despite these facts, the ecological role of many of these metabolites is still unknown and the chemical ecology of fungi has not been investigated systematically so far. This review intends to present examples of the various chemical interactions of fungi with other fungi, plants, bacteria and animals and to give an overview of the current knowledge of fungal chemical ecology.

  5. What is the future fate of estuaries given nutrient over-enrichment, freshwater diversion and low flows?

    PubMed

    Flemer, David A; Champ, Michael A

    2006-03-01

    Freshwater inflow is central to the definition of estuaries and if we lose control of the quantity of freshwater flow or discharge (including seasonal timing) to estuaries, then freshwater water quality has the potential to become a moot issue in estuarine ecosystems (Definition of estuaries: estuaries (aestus = tide) are physico-chemically, geomorphically, and biotically diverse ecosystems. Although numerous definitions of estuaries exist, we prefer the following: an estuary is a partially enclosed coastal water body in which freshwater runoff, often seasonally and episodically pulsed, dilutes salty ocean water and the biotic structure is influenced by dynamic tidal action and associated salinity gradients and reef building organisms and wetlands influence development and evolution of ecological structure and function (see for expanded definition)).

  6. Making fate and exposure models for freshwater ecotoxicity in life cycle assessment suitable for organic acids and bases.

    PubMed

    van Zelm, Rosalie; Stam, Gea; Huijbregts, Mark A J; van de Meent, Dik

    2013-01-01

    Freshwater fate and exposure factors were determined for organic acids and bases, making use of the knowledge on electrical interaction of ionizing chemicals and their sorption to particles. The fate factor represents the residence time in the environment whereas exposure factors equal the dissolved fraction of a chemical. Multimedia fate, exposure, and effect model USES-LCA was updated to take into account the influence of ionization, based upon the acid dissociation constant (pK(a)) of a chemical, and the environmental pH. Freshwater fate (FF) and exposure (XF) factors were determined for 415 acids and 496 bases emitted to freshwater, air, and soil. The relevance of taking account of the degree of ionization of chemicals was tested by determining the ratio (R) of the new vs. fate and exposure factors determined with USES-LCA suitable for neutral chemicals only. Our results show that the majority of freshwater fate and exposure factors of chemicals that are largely ionized in the environment are larger with the ionics model compared to the factors determined with the neutrals model version. R(FF) ranged from 2.4×10(-1) to 1.6×10(1) for freshwater emissions, from 1.2×10(-2) to 2.0×10(4) for soil emissions and from 5.8×10(-2) to 6.0×10(3) for air emissions, and R(XF) from 5.3×10(-1) to 2.2×10(1). Prediction of changed solid-water partitioning, implying a change in runoff and in removal via sedimentation, and prediction of negligible air-water partition coefficient, leading to negligible volatilization were the main contributors to the changes in freshwater fate factors.

  7. [The food legislation evaluation of environmental chemicals in freshwater fish].

    PubMed

    Krüger, K E

    1990-07-01

    During the last 1 1/2 decades different regulatory limits have been given to value pollutants in fish under food-legal aspects. Their requested target, which consists of an effective consumer's protection however has been missed by various reasons: The production and distribution of environmental pollutants cannot be suppressed by limits for food. The selective elimination of limit-exceeding individuals from a lot is impossible. Treating both, natural pollutants like geogenic mercury and anthropogenic ones similar seems to be indefensible with regard to food law. Therefore proposals are made to rule only anthropogenic pollutants by law, when regulatory limits are planned to be supplemented. In case of natural distribution less stringent advisory limits seem to be more suitable.

  8. Global estimation of freshwater fluxes and freshwater oceanic transport from satellite data

    SciTech Connect

    Gautier, C.; Peterson, P.; Jones, C.

    1996-12-01

    The exchange of moisture and heat fluxes across the ocean-atmosphere interface exerts a strong influence on the oceanic and atmospheric circulations, and therefore on the maintenance of the climate system equilibrium. Observational measurements of these fluxes over large areas of the ocean`s surface are limited by the lack of in-situ data. This paper reports research efforts to estimate the freshwater budget and freshwater oceanic transport using remotely sensed data. Six years (1988--1993) of surface evaporation estimated with satellite and in-situ data re combined with satellite-derived precipitation to compute the freshwater budget and freshwater oceanic transport. The interannual variability of the freshwater budget and oceanic transport eliminates are examined for two contrasting events: the La Nina of 1988--89 and the El Nino condition during 1991--92, one of the longest El Nino episodes on record. Possible implications for future climate change are discussed.

  9. Evolutionary history of true crabs (Crustacea: Decapoda: Brachyura) and the origin of freshwater crabs.

    PubMed

    Tsang, Ling Ming; Schubart, Christoph D; Ahyong, Shane T; Lai, Joelle C Y; Au, Eugene Y C; Chan, Tin-Yam; Ng, Peter K L; Chu, Ka Hou

    2014-05-01

    Crabs of the infra-order Brachyura are one of the most diverse groups of crustaceans with approximately 7,000 described species in 98 families, occurring in marine, freshwater, and terrestrial habitats. The relationships among the brachyuran families are poorly understood due to the high morphological complexity of the group. Here, we reconstruct the most comprehensive phylogeny of Brachyura to date using sequence data of six nuclear protein-coding genes and two mitochondrial rRNA genes from more than 140 species belonging to 58 families. The gene tree confirms that the "Podotremata," are paraphyletic. Within the monophyletic Eubrachyura, the reciprocal monophyly of the two subsections, Heterotremata and Thoracotremata, is supported. Monophyly of many superfamilies, however, is not recovered, indicating the prevalence of morphological convergence and the need for further taxonomic studies. Freshwater crabs were derived early in the evolution of Eubrachyura and are shown to have at least two independent origins. Bayesian relaxed molecular methods estimate that freshwater crabs separated from their closest marine sister taxa ~135 Ma, that is, after the break up of Pangaea (∼200 Ma) and that a Gondwanan origin of these freshwater representatives is untenable. Most extant families and superfamilies arose during the late Cretaceous and early Tertiary.

  10. Nematode and mercury content in freshwater fish belonging to different trophic levels.

    PubMed

    Olivero-Verbel, Jesus; Caballero-Gallardo, Karina

    2013-06-01

    Fish are a protein source for many people in Colombia. However, environmental pollution of some aquatic ecosystems may pose health risks to humans. The aim of this study was to assess the levels of total mercury (T-Hg) in muscle and their relationship with nematode infections in fish from Dique Channel, a freshwater ecosystem located Northern Colombia. Eight hundred ninety fish specimens belonging to 13 different species were collected. T-Hg concentration was measured using atomic absorption spectroscopy, previous electrothermal atomization. Nematodes were identified as Contracaecum sp. Species such as Hoplias malabaricus and Sorubim cuspicaudus presented the highest values for Hg and parasite infection (0.09 ± 0.01, 0.12 ± 0.02 μg/g; prevalence 100, 100 %, respectively), whereas the lowest were detected in Prochilodus magdalenae (0.02 ± 0.002 μg/g; 0 %). Pooled data revealed a high correlation between trophic level and parasite abundance (ρ = 0.771; P = 0.002) as well as with T-Hg (ρ = 0.786; P < 0.001). The overall correlation between parasite abundance and T-Hg was moderately to low but positive (ρ = 0.217; P < 0.001). However, when individual species were considered, pair relationships between parasite abundance, morphometric parameters, and Hg concentration, varied between positive and negative values. These data suggest the presence of nematodes is determined by the trophic level of the fish species, similarly to what occurs with Hg. Moreover, the co-occurrence of these two stressors involves different types of interactions with morphometric variables that are species-specific. These observations open new doors to the understanding of the interaction between chemical pollutants and organisms.

  11. Microbial degradation of microcystin in Florida’s freshwaters

    PubMed Central

    Ramani, A.; Rein, K.; Shetty, K. G.

    2012-01-01

    Presence of microcystin (MC), a predominant freshwater algal toxin and a suspected liver carcinogen, in Florida’s freshwaters poses serious health threat to humans and aquatic species. Being recalcitrant to conventional physical and chemical water treatment methods, biological methods of MC removal is widely researched. Water samples collected from five sites of Lake Okeechobee (LO) frequently exposed to toxic Microcystis blooms were used as inoculum for enrichment with microcystin LR (MC-LR) supplied as sole C and N source. After 20 days incubation, MC levels were analyzed using high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). A bacterial consortium consisting of two isolates DC7 and DC8 from the Indian Prairie Canal sample showed over 74% toxin degradation at the end of day 20. Optimal temperature requirement for biodegradation was identified and phosphorus levels did not affect the MC biodegradation. Based on 16S rRNA sequence similarity the isolate DC8 was found to have a match with Microbacterium sp. and the DC7 isolate with Rhizobium gallicum (AY972457). PMID:21611743

  12. Remobilisation of uranium from contaminated freshwater sediments by bioturbation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lagauzère, S.; Motelica-Heino, M.; Viollier, E.; Stora, G.; Bonzom, J. M.

    2014-06-01

    Benthic macro-invertebrate bioturbation can influence the remobilisation of uranium (U) initially associated with freshwater sediments, resulting in a high release of this pollutant through the overlying water column. Given the potential negative effects on aquatic biocenosis and the global ecological risk, it appears crucial to improve our current knowledge concerning the biogeochemical behaviour of U in sediments. The present study aimed to assess the biogeochemical modifications induced by Tubifex tubifex (Annelida, Clitellata, Tubificidae) bioturbation within the sediment in order to explain such a release of U. To reach this goal, U distribution between solid and solute phases of a reconstructed benthic system (i.e. in mesocosms) inhabited or not by T. tubifex worms was assessed in a 12-day laboratory experiment. Thanks notably to fine-resolution (mm-scale) measurements (e.g. "diffusive equilibrium in thin-films" DET gel probes for porewater, bioaccumulation in worms) of U and main chemical species (iron, sulfate, nitrate and nitrite), this work (i) confirmed that the removal of bottom sediment particles to the surface through the digestive tract of worms greatly favoured oxidative loss of U in the water column, and (ii) demonstrated that both U contamination and bioturbation of T. tubifex substantially influenced major microbial-driven biogeochemical reactions in sediments (e.g. stimulation of denitrification, sulfate reduction and iron dissolutive reduction). This study provides the first demonstration of biogeochemical modifications induced by bioturbation in freshwater U-contaminated sediments.

  13. Remobilisation of uranium from contaminated freshwater sediments by bioturbation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lagauzère, S.; Motelica-Heino, M.; Viollier, E.; Stora, G.; Bonzom, J. M.

    2013-10-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that benthic macro-invertebrate bioturbation can influence the remobilization of uranium initially associated with freshwater sediments resulting in a high release of this pollutant through the overlying water column. Giving the potential negative effects on aquatic biocenosis and the global ecological risk, it appeared crucial to improve our current knowledge concerning the uranium biogeochemical behaviour in sediments. The present study aimed to assess the biogeochemical modifications induced by Tubifex tubifex (Annelida, Clitellata, Tubificidae) bioturbation within the sediment permitting to explain such a release of uranium. To reach this goal, uranium distribution between solid and solute phases of a reconstructed benthic system (i.e. in mesocosms) inhabited or not by T. tubifex worms was assessed in a 12 day laboratory experiment. Thanks notably to fine resolution (mm-scale) measurements (e.g. DET gels probes for porewater, bioaccumulation in worms) of uranium and main chemical species (iron, sulfate, nitrate, nitrite), this work permitted (i) to confirm that the removal of bottom sediment particles to the surface through the digestive tract of worms greatly favours the oxidative loss of uranium in the water column, and (ii) to demonstrate that both uranium contamination and bioturbation of T. tubifex substantially influence major microbial-driven biogeochemical reactions in sediments (e.g. stimulation of denitrification, sulfate-reduction and iron dissolutive reduction). This study provides the first demonstration of biogeochemical modifications induced by bioturbation in freshwater uranium-contaminated sediments.

  14. Climate impacts on arctic freshwater ecosystems and fisheries: background, rationale and approach of the Arctic Climate Impact Assessment (ACIA).

    PubMed

    Wrona, Frederick J; Prowse, Terry D; Reist, James D; Hobbie, John E; Lévesque, Lucie M J; Vincent, Warwick F

    2006-11-01

    Changes in climate and ultraviolet radiation levels in the Arctic will have far-reaching impacts, affecting aquatic species at various trophic levels, the physical and chemical environment that makes up their habitat, and the processes that act on and within freshwater ecosystems. Interactions of climatic variables, such as temperature and precipitation, with freshwater ecosystems are highly complex and can propagate through the ecosystem in ways that are difficult to project. This is partly due to a poor understanding of arctic freshwater systems and their basic interrelationships with climate and other environmental variables, and partly due to a paucity of long-term freshwater monitoring sites and integrated hydro-ecological research programs in the Arctic. The papers in this special issue are an abstraction of the analyses performed by 25 international experts and their associated networks on Arctic freshwater hydrology and related aquatic ecosystems that was initially published by the Arctic Climate Impact Assessment (ACIA) in 2005 as "Chapter 8--Freshwater Ecosystems and Fisheries". The papers provide a broad overview of the general hydrological and ecological features of the various freshwater ecosystems in the Arctic, including descriptions of each ACIA region, followed by a review of historical changes in freshwater systems during the Holocene. This is followed by an assessment of the effects of climate change on broad-scale hydro-ecology; aquatic biota and ecosystem structure and function; and arctic fish and fisheries. Potential synergistic and cumulative effects are also discussed, as are the roles of ultraviolet radiation and contaminants. The nature and complexity of many of the effects are illustrated using case studies from around the circumpolar north, together with a discussion of important threshold responses (i.e., those that produce stepwise and/or nonlinear effects). The issue concludes with summary the key findings, a list of gaps in

  15. 40 CFR 35.1605-2 - Freshwater lake.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Freshwater lake. 35.1605-2 Section 35... STATE AND LOCAL ASSISTANCE Cooperative Agreements for Protecting and Restoring Publicly Owned Freshwater Lakes § 35.1605-2 Freshwater lake. Any inland pond, reservoir, impoundment, or other similar body...

  16. Thiaminase activity in native freshwater mussels

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Blakeslee, Carrie J.; Sweet, Stephanie; Galbraith, Heather S.; Honeyfield, Dale C.

    2015-01-01

    Thiamine (vitamin B1) deficiency in the Great Lakes has been attributed to elevated levels of thiaminase I enzyme activity in invasive prey species; however, few studies have investigated thiaminase activity in native prey species. Some of the highest levels of thiaminase activity have been measured in invasive dreissenid mussels with little understanding of background levels contributed by native freshwater mussels (Bivalvia: Unionidae). In this study, thiaminase activity was measured in two freshwater mussel species, Elliptio complanata and Strophitus undulatus, from the Delaware and Susquehanna River drainage basins located in north eastern United States. Thiaminase activity was also measured in gravid and non-gravid S. undulatus. Average thiaminase activity differed significantly between species (7.2 and 42.4 μmol/g/min, for E. complanata and S. undulatus respectively) with no differences observed between drainage basins. Gravid S. undulatus had significantly lower thiaminase activity (28.0 μmol/g/min) than non-gravid mussels (42.4 μmol/g/min). Our results suggest that a suite of factors may regulate thiaminase activity in freshwater mussels and that native freshwater mussel thiaminase activity is within the range observed for invasive dreissenids. These results add to our understanding of the complexities in identifying the ecological conditions that set the stage for thiamine deficiency.

  17. Toxicity of vanadium to different freshwater organisms

    SciTech Connect

    Beusen, J.M.; Neven, B.

    1987-08-01

    The aim of this study is to determine the acute and subchronic toxicity of vanadium for various species of freshwater fish. The long-term toxicity and the effect of vanadium on the reproduction of Daphnia magna is also evaluated and compared with the toxicity of other metals.

  18. Effects of Pollution on Freshwater Invertebrates.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buikema, A. L., Jr.; Herricks, E. E.

    1978-01-01

    Presents a literature review of the effects of pollution on freshwater invertebrates, covering publications of 1976-77. Some of the areas covered are: (1) toxicant effects on invertebrates; (2) microcosm and community effects, and (3) biological control of aquatic life. A list of 123 references is also presented. (HM)

  19. 2008 NWFSC Tidal Freshwater Genetics Results

    SciTech Connect

    David Teel

    2009-05-01

    Genetic Analysis of Juvenile Chinook Salmon for inclusion in 'Ecology of Juvenile Salmon in Shallow Tidal Freshwater Habitats in the Vicinity of the Sandy River Delta, Lower Columbia River, 2008. Annual Report to Bonneville Power Administration, Contract DE-AC05-76RL01830.'

  20. Freshwater savings from marine protein consumption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gephart, Jessica A.; Pace, Michael L.; D'Odorico, Paolo

    2014-01-01

    Marine fisheries provide an essential source of protein for many people around the world. Unlike alternative terrestrial sources of protein, marine fish production requires little to no freshwater inputs. Consuming marine fish protein instead of terrestrial protein therefore represents freshwater savings (equivalent to an avoided water cost) and contributes to a low water footprint diet. These water savings are realized by the producers of alternative protein sources, rather than the consumers of marine protein. This study quantifies freshwater savings from marine fish consumption around the world by estimating the water footprint of replacing marine fish with terrestrial protein based on current consumption patterns. An estimated 7 600 km3 yr-1 of water is used for human food production. Replacing marine protein with terrestrial protein would require an additional 350 km3 yr-1 of water, meaning that marine protein provides current water savings of 4.6%. The importance of these freshwater savings is highly uneven around the globe, with savings ranging from as little as 0 to as much as 50%. The largest savings as a per cent of current water footprints occur in Asia, Oceania, and several coastal African nations. The greatest national water savings from marine fish protein occur in Southeast Asia and the United States. As the human population increases, future water savings from marine fish consumption will be increasingly important to food and water security and depend on sustainable harvest of capture fisheries and low water footprint growth of marine aquaculture.

  1. Mathematical Explorations: Freshwater Scarcity: A Proportional Representation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    King, Alessandra

    2014-01-01

    Middle school students' mathematical understanding benefits from connecting mathematics to other content areas in the curriculum. This month's activity explores the issue of the scarcity of freshwater, a natural resource (activity sheets are included). This activity concentrates on the critical areas mentioned in the Common Core State…

  2. Records of River Variation in the Shells of Freshwater Bivalves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carroll, M.; Romanek, C.

    2005-12-01

    The skeletons of hard-shelled invertebrates such as corals and bivalves are commonly used in marine settings as archives of environmental information. They are less commonly used in freshwater settings where variability in water chemistry makes it more difficult to calibrate chemical proxies such as the Sr:Ca in a shell. Our objective is to evaluate whether trace element concentrations in freshwater bivalve shells contain information on environmental conditions. Multiple elements (Ba, Cu, Mn and Sr) were analyzed within the shells of modern bivalves from four streams on DOE's Savannah River Site in S.C. Laser Ablation ICP-MS was used to measure elemental concentrations across five aragonitic shells from each site. These elements were chosen because they are present in detectable concentrations (ppm) in the shell and they have been suggested as useful proxies for temperature, rainfall, productivity and pollution. Results were compared to historical monthly site records of water chemistry and chemical analyses of water samples collected from the streams where the clams were found. The average shell concentrations of Sr and Mn were significantly different between sites and increased proportionally to water concentration. This was not observed for Ba and Cu. For example, the Ba concentrations of shells collected at a site downstream of a lake were higher than those for shells from stream sites with significantly higher dissolved Ba concentrations. Copper was only detected at dark growth lines with the number of lines and shell material between them varying between shells within the same stream. Intrashell profiles of Ba, Sr and Mn concentrations exhibited cyclical variation. The magnitude of cyclical variation for Mn and Sr within a shell corresponds with the annual variation in monthly water sample concentrations. Again, this pattern was not observed for Ba, especially in shells from the site downstream of a lake. This supports suggestions that particulate organic

  3. Toxicity of arsenic species to three freshwater organisms and biotransformation of inorganic arsenic by freshwater phytoplankton (Chlorella sp. CE-35).

    PubMed

    Rahman, M Azizur; Hogan, Ben; Duncan, Elliott; Doyle, Christopher; Krassoi, Rick; Rahman, Mohammad Mahmudur; Naidu, Ravi; Lim, Richard P; Maher, William; Hassler, Christel

    2014-08-01

    In the environment, arsenic (As) exists in a number of chemical species, and arsenite (As(III)) and arsenate (As(V)) dominate in freshwater systems. Toxicity of As species to aquatic organisms is complicated by their interaction with chemicals in water such as phosphate that can influence the bioavailability and uptake of As(V). In the present study, the toxicities of As(III), As(V) and dimethylarsinic acid (DMA) to three freshwater organisms representing three phylogenetic groups: a phytoplankton (Chlorella sp. strain CE-35), a floating macrophyte (Lemna disperma) and a cladoceran grazer (Ceriodaphnia cf. dubia), were determined using acute and growth inhibition bioassays (EC₅₀) at a range of total phosphate (TP) concentrations in OECD medium. The EC₅₀ values of As(III), As(V) and DMA were 27 ± 10, 1.15 ± 0.04 and 19 ± 3 mg L(-1) for Chlorella sp. CE-35; 0.57 ± 0.16, 2.3 ± 0.2 and 56 ± 15 mg L(-1) for L. disperma, and 1.58 ± 0.05, 1.72 ± 0.01 and 5.9 ± 0.1 mg L(-1) for C. cf. dubia, respectively. The results showed that As(III) was more toxic than As(V) to L. disperma; however, As(V) was more toxic than As(III) to Chlorella sp. CE-35. The toxicities of As(III) and As(V) to C. cf. dubia were statistically similar (p>0.05). DMA was less toxic than iAs species to L. disperma and C. cf. dubia, but more toxic than As(III) to Chlorella sp. CE-35. The toxicity of As(V) to Chlorella sp. CE-35 and L. disperma decreased with increasing TP concentrations in the growth medium. Phosphate concentrations did not influence the toxicity of As(III) to either organism. Chlorella sp. CE-35 showed the ability to reduce As(V) to As(III), indicating a substantial influence of phytoplankton on As biogeochemistry in freshwater aquatic systems.

  4. Mesozooplankton affinities in a recovering freshwater estuary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chambord, Sophie; Maris, Tom; Colas, Fanny; Van Engeland, Tom; Sossou, Akoko-C.; Azémar, Frédéric; Le Coz, Maïwen; Cox, Tom; Buisson, Laetitia; Souissi, Sami; Meire, Patrick; Tackx, Michèle

    2016-08-01

    Water quality of the Scheldt estuary (Belgium/The Netherlands) has considerably improved in recent years, especially in the upstream, freshwater reaches. Within the zooplankton community, the copepod Eurytemora affinis, typically abundant in brackish water and quasi-absent from freshwater before 2007, has since substantially developed in the latter, where it now represents 90% of the crustacean mesozooplankton community. Simultaneously, cyclopoid copepod abundance has greatly decreased, while cladoceran abundance did not change. The study aim was: 1) to verify if the zooplankton community described for the period 2007-2009 by Mialet et al. (2011) has stabilized until present, and 2) to look for the environmental conditions favouring E. affinis development and causing changes in the upstream freshwater zooplankton community. The 2002-2012 temporal evolution of the zooplankton distribution at three stations in the upstream freshwater Scheldt estuary was analyzed. Water quality remained better after 2007 than before, and some factors revealed continuous improvement in annual mean concentrations (e.g. increase in O2, decrease in BOD5 and NH4sbnd N concentration). The increase in oxygen and the decrease in NH4sbnd N concentration, together with low discharge during summer were the main environmental factors explaining the development and timing of E. affinis in the upstream freshwater reach. In this reach, E. affinis maximal abundance is shifted to higher temperatures (summer) compared to its typical maximum spring abundance peak in the brackish zone of the Scheldt estuary and in most temperate estuaries. The changes in zooplankton community followed a temporal and spatial gradient induced by the spatio-temporal evolution of water quality improvement. The most downstream station (3) allowed E. affinis development (oxygen concentration > 4 mg L-1; NH4sbnd N concentration < 2 mg L-1, discharge (Q) < 50 m3 s-1) from 2007 onwards, and this station showed the highest E

  5. Luminescence properties of a nanoporous freshwater diatom.

    PubMed

    Goswami, Bondita; Choudhury, Amarjyoti; Buragohain, Alak K

    2012-01-01

    Freshwater diatom frustules show special optical properties. In this paper we observed luminescence properties of the freshwater diatom Cyclotella meneghiniana. To confirm the morphological properties we present scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images. X-ray diffraction (XRD) studies were carried out to visualize the structural properties of the frustules, confirming that silica present in diatom frustules crystallizes in an α-quartz structure. Study of the optical properties of the silica frustules of diatoms using ultra-violet-visible (UV-vis) spectroscopy and photoluminescence spectroscopy confirmed that the diatom C. meneghiniana shows luminescence in the blue region of the electromagnetic spectrum when irradiated with UV light. This property of diatoms can be exploited to obtain many applications in day-to-day life. Also, using time-resolved photoluminescence spectroscopy (TRPL) it was confirmed that this species of diatom shows bi-exponential decay.

  6. Freshwater biodiversity and aquatic insect diversification.

    PubMed

    Dijkstra, Klaas-Douwe B; Monaghan, Michael T; Pauls, Steffen U

    2014-01-01

    Inland waters cover less than 1% of Earth's surface but harbor more than 6% of all insect species: Nearly 100,000 species from 12 orders spend one or more life stages in freshwater. Little is known about how this remarkable diversity arose, although allopatric speciation and ecological adaptation are thought to be primary mechanisms. Freshwater habitats are highly susceptible to environmental change and exhibit marked ecological gradients. Standing waters appear to harbor more dispersive species than running waters, but there is little understanding of how this fundamental ecological difference has affected diversification. In contrast to the lack of evolutionary studies, the ecology and habitat preferences of aquatic insects have been intensively studied, in part because of their widespread use as bioindicators. The combination of phylogenetics with the extensive ecological data provides a promising avenue for future research, making aquatic insects highly suitable models for the study of ecological diversification.

  7. Freshwater aquatic plant biomass production in Florida

    SciTech Connect

    Reddy, K.R.; Sutton, D.L.; Bowes, G.

    1983-01-01

    About 8% (1.2 million ha) of the total surface area of Florida is occupied by freshwater. Many of these water bodies are eutrophic. Nutrients present in these water bodies can be potentially used to culture aquatic plants as a possible feedstock for methane production. This paper summarizes the results of known research findings on biomass production potential of freshwater aquatic plants in Florida and identifies key research needs to improve the quality and quantity of biomass yields. Among floating aquatic plants, biomass yield potential was in the order of water-hyacinth > water lettuce > pennywort > salvinia > duckweed > azolla. Pennywort, duckweed, and azolla appear to perform well during the cooler months compared to other aquatic plants. Among emergent plants, biomass yield potential was in the order of southern wild rice > cattails > soft rush > bulrush. Cultural techniques, nutrient management, and environmental factors influencing the biomass yields were discussed. 68 references.

  8. Superhydrophobic resistance to dynamic freshwater biofouling inception.

    PubMed

    Krishnan, K Ghokulla; Malm, Peter; Loth, Eric

    2015-01-01

    Superhydrophobic nanotextured surfaces have gained increased usage in various applications due to their non-wetting and self-cleaning abilities. The aim of this study was to investigate nanotextured surfaces with respect to their resistance to the inception of freshwater biofouling at transitional flow conditions. Several coatings were tested including industry standard polyurethane (PUR), polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE), capstone mixed polyurethane (PUR + CAP) and nanocomposite infused polyurethane (PUR + NC). Each surface was exposed to freshwater conditions in a lake at 4 m s(-1) for a duration of 45 min. The polyurethane exhibited the greatest fouling elements, in terms of both height and number of elements, with the superhydrophobic nanocomposite based polyurethane (PUR + NC) showing very little to no fouling. A correlation between the surface characteristics and the degree of fouling inception was observed.

  9. Toxicity of 33NCS (3'-chloro-3-nitrosalicylanilide) to freshwater fish and sea lampreys

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Marking, Leif L.; King, Everett L.; Walker, Charles R.; Howell, John H.

    1970-01-01

    The chemical 33NCS (3'-chloro-3-nitrosalicylanilide) was evaluated as a fish control agent and as a larvicide for sea lampreys at the Fish Control Laboratories of the Bureau of Sport Fisheries and Wildlife and the Hammond Bay Biological Station of the Bureau of Commercial Fisheries. The chemical is rapidly toxic to many species. Sea lampreys, bowfin, and channel catfish are the most sensitive species. Carp are more sensitive than trouts or sunfishes. Use of 33NCS in selective control of freshwater fishes or sea lampreys requires precise control because its toxicity is strongly influenced by variations in water quality.

  10. SCREENING CALIFORNIA SURFACE WATERS FOR ESTROGENIC ENDOCRINE DISRUPTING CHEMICALS (EEDC) WITH A JUVENILE RAINBOW TROUT LIVER VITELLOGENIN MRNA PROCEDURE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Concern regarding the occurrence of chemicals that disrupt endocrine system functions in aquatic species has heightened over the last 15 years. However, little attention has been given to monitoring for estrogenic endocrine disrupting chemicals (EEDCs) in California's freshwater ...

  11. Fatigue Crack Propagation in Freshwater Ice

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-07-01

    Dempsey, J.P., and Wei, Y. (1989). Fracture toughness K,and fractography of SI type freshwater ice. Advances in Fracture Research, (K. Salama , K. Ravi...188-200. Perez , J., Mai, C., Tatibouet, J. and Vassoille, R. (1980). Dynamic Behaviour of Dislocations in HF-Doped Ice Ih. Journal of Glaciology, vol...Denmark, pp. 351-362. Tatibouet, J., Perez , J. and Vassoille, R. (1987). Study of Grain Boundaries in Ice by Internal Friction. J. Phys. Colloq. C1

  12. Estimated freshwater withdrawals in Texas, 1990

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lurry, Dee L.

    1994-01-01

    This report presents 1990 freshwater withdrawal estimates for Texas by source and category. Withdrawal source is either ground water or surface water. Withdrawal categories include: self-supplied irrigation, thermoelectric-power generation, water supply, industrial and mining, and other (domestic, commercial, livestock). Withdrawal data are aggregated by county, major aquifer, and principal river basin. Only the four major categories of irrigation, thermoelectric-power generation, water supply, and industrial and mining are illustrated in this report, although all data are tabulated.

  13. Pesticide toxicity index for freshwater aquatic organisms, 2nd edition

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Munn, Mark D.; Gilliom, Robert J.; Moran, Patrick W.; Nowell, Lisa H.

    2006-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey's National Water-Quality Assessment (NAWQA) Program is designed to assess current water-quality conditions, changes in water quality over time, and the effects of natural and human factors on water quality for the Nation's streams and ground-water resources. For streams, one of the most difficult parts of the assessment is to link chemical conditions to effects on aquatic biota, particularly for pesticides, which tend to occur in streams as complex mixtures with strong seasonal patterns. A Pesticide Toxicity Index (PTI) was developed that combines pesticide exposure of aquatic biota (measured concentrations of pesticides in stream water) with acute toxicity estimates (standard endpoints from laboratory bioassays) to produce a single index value for a sample or site. The development of the PTI was limited to pesticide compounds routinely measured in NAWQA studies and to toxicity data readily available from existing databases. Qualifying toxicity data were found for one or more types of test organisms for 124 of the 185 pesticide compounds measured in NAWQA samples, but with a wide range of available bioassays per compound (1 to 232). In the databases examined, there were a total of 3,669 bioassays for the 124 compounds, including 398 48-hour EC50 values (concentration at which 50 percent of test organisms exhibit a sublethal response) for freshwater cladocerans, 699 96-hour LC50 values (concentration lethal to 50 percent of test organisms) for freshwater benthic invertebrates, and 2,572 96-hour LC50 values for freshwater fish. The PTI for a particular sample is the sum of toxicity quotients (measured concentration divided by the median toxicity concentration from bioassays) for each detected pesticide, and thus, is based on the concentration addition model of pesticide toxicity. The PTI can be calculated for specific groups of pesticides and for specific taxonomic groups. Although the PTI does not determine whether water in a sample is

  14. Urban growth, climate change, and freshwater availability.

    PubMed

    McDonald, Robert I; Green, Pamela; Balk, Deborah; Fekete, Balazs M; Revenga, Carmen; Todd, Megan; Montgomery, Mark

    2011-04-12

    Nearly 3 billion additional urban dwellers are forecasted by 2050, an unprecedented wave of urban growth. While cities struggle to provide water to these new residents, they will also face equally unprecedented hydrologic changes due to global climate change. Here we use a detailed hydrologic model, demographic projections, and climate change scenarios to estimate per-capita water availability for major cities in the developing world, where urban growth is the fastest. We estimate the amount of water physically available near cities and do not account for problems with adequate water delivery or quality. Modeled results show that currently 150 million people live in cities with perennial water shortage, defined as having less than 100 L per person per day of sustainable surface and groundwater flow within their urban extent. By 2050, demographic growth will increase this figure to almost 1 billion people. Climate change will cause water shortage for an additional 100 million urbanites. Freshwater ecosystems in river basins with large populations of urbanites with insufficient water will likely experience flows insufficient to maintain ecological process. Freshwater fish populations will likely be impacted, an issue of special importance in regions such as India's Western Ghats, where there is both rapid urbanization and high levels of fish endemism. Cities in certain regions will struggle to find enough water for the needs of their residents and will need significant investment if they are to secure adequate water supplies and safeguard functioning freshwater ecosystems for future generations.

  15. Monitoring Global Freshwater Resources with GRACE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rodell, Matt; Famiglietti, Jay; Velicogna, Isabella; Swenson, Sean; Chambers, Don

    2011-01-01

    Freshwater resources include surface waters, groundwater, and seasonal snowpack. Given adequate ground based measurements, all of these can be monitored effectively, however, outside of the developed world such measurements often are not systematic and the data not centralized, and as a result reports of freshwater availability may be largely anecdotal. Even in the developed world it can be difficult to quantify changes in groundwater storage over large scales. Owing to its global coverage, satellite remote sensing has become a valuable tool for freshwater resources assessment. In particular, the Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) has demonstrated an unequaled ability to monitor total terrestrial water storage including groundwater at regional to continental scales. In this presentation we will identify apparent trends in terrestrial water storage observed by GRACE over the past nine years and attempt to explain their origins and predict whether they are likely to continue. Trends in certain regions where groundwater extraction has significantly depleted aquifers, including northern India and California, will be discussed in detail.

  16. Urban growth, climate change, and freshwater availability

    PubMed Central

    McDonald, Robert I.; Green, Pamela; Balk, Deborah; Fekete, Balazs M.; Revenga, Carmen; Todd, Megan; Montgomery, Mark

    2011-01-01

    Nearly 3 billion additional urban dwellers are forecasted by 2050, an unprecedented wave of urban growth. While cities struggle to provide water to these new residents, they will also face equally unprecedented hydrologic changes due to global climate change. Here we use a detailed hydrologic model, demographic projections, and climate change scenarios to estimate per-capita water availability for major cities in the developing world, where urban growth is the fastest. We estimate the amount of water physically available near cities and do not account for problems with adequate water delivery or quality. Modeled results show that currently 150 million people live in cities with perennial water shortage, defined as having less than 100 L per person per day of sustainable surface and groundwater flow within their urban extent. By 2050, demographic growth will increase this figure to almost 1 billion people. Climate change will cause water shortage for an additional 100 million urbanites. Freshwater ecosystems in river basins with large populations of urbanites with insufficient water will likely experience flows insufficient to maintain ecological process. Freshwater fish populations will likely be impacted, an issue of special importance in regions such as India's Western Ghats, where there is both rapid urbanization and high levels of fish endemism. Cities in certain regions will struggle to find enough water for the needs of their residents and will need significant investment if they are to secure adequate water supplies and safeguard functioning freshwater ecosystems for future generations. PMID:21444797

  17. Human activities cause distinct dissolved organic matter composition across freshwater ecosystems.

    PubMed

    Williams, Clayton J; Frost, Paul C; Morales-Williams, Ana M; Larson, James H; Richardson, William B; Chiandet, Aisha S; Xenopoulos, Marguerite A

    2016-02-01

    Dissolved organic matter (DOM) composition in freshwater ecosystems is influenced by the interactions among physical, chemical, and biological processes that are controlled, at one level, by watershed landscape, hydrology, and their connections. Against this environmental template, humans may strongly influence DOM composition. Yet, we lack a comprehensive understanding of DOM composition variation across freshwater ecosystems differentially affected by human activity. Using optical properties, we described DOM variation across five ecosystem groups of the Laurentian Great Lakes region: large lakes, Kawartha Lakes, Experimental Lakes Area, urban stormwater ponds, and rivers (n = 184 sites). We determined how between ecosystem variation in DOM composition related to watershed size, land use and cover, water quality measures (conductivity, dissolved organic carbon (DOC), nutrient concentration, chlorophyll a), and human population density. The five freshwater ecosystem groups had distinctive DOM composition from each other. These significant differences were not explained completely through differences in watershed size nor spatial autocorrelation. Instead, multivariate partial least squares regression showed that DOM composition was related to differences in human impact across freshwater ecosystems. In particular, urban/developed watersheds with higher human population densities had a unique DOM composition with a clear anthropogenic influence that was distinct from DOM composition in natural land cover and/or agricultural watersheds. This nonagricultural, human developed impact on aquatic DOM was most evident through increased levels of a microbial, humic-like parallel factor analysis component (C6). Lotic and lentic ecosystems with low human population densities had DOM compositions more typical of clear water to humic-rich freshwater ecosystems but C6 was only present at trace to background levels. Consequently, humans are strongly altering the quality of DOM in

  18. Human activities cause distinct dissolved organic matter composition across freshwater ecosystems

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Williams, Clayton J.; Frost, Paul C.; Morales-Williams, Ana M.; Larson, James H.; Richardson, William B.; Chiandet, Aisha S.; Xenopoulos, Marguerite A.

    2016-01-01

    Dissolved organic matter (DOM) composition in freshwater ecosystems is influenced by interactions between physical, chemical, and biological processes that are controlled, at one level, by watershed landscape, hydrology, and their connections. Against this environmental template, humans may strongly influence DOM composition. Yet, we lack a comprehensive understanding of DOM composition variation across freshwater ecosystems differentially affected by human activity. Using optical properties, we described DOM variation across five ecosystem groups of the Laurentian Great Lakes Region: large lakes, Kawartha Lakes, Experimental Lakes Area, urban stormwater ponds, and rivers (n = 184 sites). We determined how between ecosystem variation in DOM composition related to watershed size, land use and cover, water quality measures (conductivity, dissolved organic carbon (DOC), nutrient concentration, chlorophyll a), and human population density. The five freshwater ecosystem groups had distinctive DOM composition from each other. These significant differences were not explained completely through differences in watershed size nor spatial autocorrelation. Instead, multivariate partial least squares regression showed that DOM composition was related to differences in human impact across freshwater ecosystems. In particular, urban/developed watersheds with higher human population densities had a unique DOM composition with a clear anthropogenic influence that was distinct from DOM composition in natural land cover and/or agricultural watersheds. This nonagricultural, human developed impact on aquatic DOM was most evident through increased levels of a microbial, humic-like parallel factor analysis component (C6). Lotic and lentic ecosystems with low human population densities had DOM compositions more typical of clear water to humic-rich freshwater ecosystems but C6 was only present at trace to background levels. Consequently, humans are strongly altering the quality of DOM in

  19. Sediment quality in freshwater impoundments at Savannah National Wildlife Refuge

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Winger, P.V.; Lasier, P.J.

    2004-01-01

    Freshwater impoundments at Savannah National Wildlife Refuge (NWR), South Carolina, provide an important habitat for wildlife species, but degraded sediment quality in the Savannah River downstream of the discharge from two impoundments have caused concern about potential contaminant problems within the impoundments. The quality of sediments from five impoundments (impoundments no. 1, 2, 6, 7, and 17) on the NWR was evaluated using physical and chemical characterization, contaminant concentrations (metals, organochlorine pesticides, polychlorinated biphenyls, and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons), and toxicity testing. Survival of Hyalella azteca (freshwater amphipod) exposed for 28 days to solid-phase sediments was not significantly different from controls, but growth was significantly decreased at several sites. Survival in 96-hour exposures to sediment pore water was significantly decreased at most sites. Factors contributing to the toxic responses were low pH (3.7 to 4.1), ammonia (20 mg/L), and increased concentrations of cations in the pore water. The excess of simultaneously extracted metals over the acid volatile sulfides in the sediments was also typical of sites displaying decreased sediment quality. Elemental concentrations in pore water were negatively correlated with pH, and the highest concentrations were observed in impoundment no. 7. The acidic nature of the sediment in this impoundment was exacerbated by recent draining, burning, and disking, which allowed oxidation of the previously anoxic wetland sediment. Sediment disturbance and mixing of vegetation into the sediments by disking may also have contributed to the formation of ammonia caused by microbial decomposition of the fragmented organic matter. Contaminants were not detected in sediments from the impoundments, but releases of acidic water with increased levels of sediment cations from the impoundments may have contributed to the degraded sediment conditions previously observed in the river

  20. Toxicity of brominated volatile organics to freshwater biota.

    PubMed

    Binet, Monique T; Stauber, Jenny L; Adams, Merrin S; Rhodes, Stuart; Wech, Janine

    2010-09-01

    As part of a larger study investigating the fate and effects of brominated volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in contaminated groundwaters discharging to surface waters, the toxicity of 1,2 dibromoethene (DBE) and 1,1,2-tribromoethene (TriBE) to freshwater aquatic biota was investigated. Their toxicity to bacteria (Microtox(R)), microalgae (Chlorella sp.), cladocerans (Ceriodaphnia dubia), duckweed (Lemna sp.) and midges (Chironomus tepperi) was determined after careful optimization of the test conditions to minimize chemical losses throughout the tests. In addition, concentrations of DBE and TriBE were carefully monitored throughout the bioassays to ensure accurate calculation of toxicity values. 1,2-Dibromoethene showed low toxicity to most species, with concentrations to cause 50% lethality or effect (LC/EC50 values) ranging from 28 to 420 mg/L, 10% lethality or effect (LC/EC10 values) ranging from 18 to 94 mg/L and no-observed-effect concentrations (NOECs) ranging from 22 to 82 mg/L. 1,1,2-Tribromoethene was more toxic than DBE, with LC/EC50 values of 2.4 to 18 mg/L, LC/EC10 values of 0.94 to 11 mg/L and NOECs of 0.29 to 13 mg/L. Using these limited data, together with data from the only other published study on TriBE, moderate-reliability water quality guidelines (WQGs) were estimated from species sensitivity distributions. The proposed guideline trigger values for 95% species protection with 50% confidence were 2 mg/L for DBE and 0.03 mg/L for TriBE. The maximum concentrations of DBE and TriBE in nearby surface waters (3 and 1 microg /L, respectively) were well below these WQGs, so the risk to the freshwater environment receiving contaminated groundwater inflows was considered to be low, with hazard quotients <1 for both VOCs. Environ.

  1. Diel variations in photoinduced oxidation of Hg0 in freshwater.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Edenise; Poulain, Alexandre J; Amyot, Marc; Ariya, Parisa A

    2005-05-01

    Experiments have been conducted to determine diel variations in photoinduced Hg0 oxidation in lake water under natural Hg0(aq) concentrations. Pseudo-first-order rates of photooxidation (k') were calculated for water freshly collected in a Canadian Shield lake, Lake Croche (45 degrees 56' N, 74 degrees 00' W), at different periods of the day and subsequently incubated in the dark. Hg0 oxidation rates ranged from 0.02 to 0.07 h(-1), increasing from sunrise to noon and then decreasing throughout the remainder of the day. These changes paralleled those in sunlight intensity integrated over 1 h preceding water collection, and suggested that the water freshly collected in daylight was rich in photochemically produced Hg0 oxidants. It was also estimated that under intense solar radiation, even if oxidation rates reached a peak, reduction of Hg(II) was the prevalent redox process. Inversely, Hg0 oxidation overcame DGM production during the night or at periods of weaker light intensity. Overall, these findings explain the decreases in the DGM pool generally observed overnight. They also support previous reports that, during summer days, volatilization of Hg0 from water represent an important step in the Hg cycle in freshwater systems.

  2. Elevated sulfate reduction in metal-contaminated freshwater lake sediments

    SciTech Connect

    Gough, H.L.; Dahl, A.L.; Tribou, E.; Noble, P.A.; Gaillard, J.-F.; Stahl, D.A.

    2009-01-06

    Although sulfate-reducing prokaryotes have long been studied as agents of metals bioremediation, impacts of long-term metals exposure on biologically mediated sulfur cycling in natural systems remains poorly understood. The effects of long-term exposure to metal stress on the freshwater sulfur cycle were studied, with a focus on biologic sulfate reduction using a combination of microbial and chemical methods. To examine the effects after decades of adaptation time, a field-based experiment was conducted using multiple study sites in a natural system historically impacted by a nearby zinc smelter (Lake DePue, Illinois). Rates were highest at the most metals-contaminated sites (-35 {mu}mol/cm{sup 3}/day) and decreased with decreased pore water zinc and arsenic contamination levels, while other environmental characteristics (i.e., pH, nutrient concentrations and physical properties) showed little between-site variation. Correlations were established using an artificial neural network to evaluate potentially non-linear relationships between sulfate reduction rates (SRR) and measured environmental variables. SRR in Lake DePue were up to 50 times higher than rates previously reported for lake sediments and the chemical speciation of Zn was dominated by the presence of ZnS as shown by X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy (XAS). These results suggest that long-term metal stress of natural systems might alter the biogeochemical cycling of sulfur by contributing to higher rates of sulfate reduction.

  3. Vegetative community control of freshwater availability: Phoenix Islands case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engels, M.; Heinse, R.

    2014-12-01

    On small low islands with limited freshwater resources, terrestrial plant communities play a large role in moderating freshwater availability. Freshwater demands of vegetative communities are variable depending on the composition of the community. Hence, changes to community structure from production crop introductions, non-native species invasions, and climate change, may have significant implications for freshwater availability. Understanding how vegetative community changes impact freshwater availability will allow for better management and forecasting of limited freshwater supplies. To better understand these dynamics, we investigated three small tropical atolls in the Phoenix Island Protected Area, Kiribati. Despite their close proximity, these islands receive varying amounts of rainfall, are host to different plant communities and two of the islands have abandoned coconut plantations. Using electromagnetic induction, ground penetrating radar, soil samples, climate and satellite data, we present preliminary estimates of vegetative water demand for different tropical plant communities.

  4. Toxicity of metals to a freshwater tubificid worm Tubifex tubifex (Muller)

    SciTech Connect

    Khangarot, B.S. )

    1991-06-01

    Salts of various metals are being released in ever increasing amounts into the aquatic environment from mining operations, metal processing facilities, chemical industries and other similar sources. Although there has been considerable study of the acute and chronic toxicities of metals to freshwater fishes, crustaceans and snails, little information is available on the effects of metals to tubificid worms which are widely distributed in the aquatic environment. Tubificid worms are useful indicators of varying degrees of aquatic pollution. It is suggested that tubificid worms are an important element in the aquatic environment and therefore their use as a bioassay organism is logical one. The present study was undertaken to determine the acute toxicities of various metals to a fresh-water tubificid worm, Tubifex tubifex (Muller), which form an important link in aquatic food chain(s).

  5. Bacterial Community Composition in Three Freshwater Reservoirs of Different Alkalinity and Trophic Status

    PubMed Central

    Llirós, Marc; Inceoğlu, Özgül; García-Armisen, Tamara; Anzil, Adriana; Leporcq, Bruno; Pigneur, Lise-Marie; Viroux, Laurent; Darchambeau, François; Descy, Jean-Pierre; Servais, Pierre

    2014-01-01

    In order to investigate the factors controlling the bacterial community composition (BCC) in reservoirs, we sampled three freshwater reservoirs with contrasted physical and chemical characteristics and trophic status. The BCC was analysed by 16S rRNA gene amplicon 454 pyrosequencing. In parallel, a complete dataset of environmental parameters and phytoplankton community composition was also collected. BCC in the analysed reservoirs resembled that of epilimnetic waters of natural freshwater lakes with presence of Actinobacteria, Alpha- and Betaproteobacteria, Cytophaga–Flavobacteria–Bacteroidetes (CFB) and Verrucomicrobia groups. Our results evidenced that the retrieved BCC in the analysed reservoirs was strongly influenced by pH, alkalinity and organic carbon content, whereas comparatively little change was observed among layers in stratified conditions. PMID:25541975

  6. Characterization of an Unconventional Rhodopsin from the Freshwater Actinobacterium Rhodoluna lacicola

    PubMed Central

    Keffer, J. L.; Hahn, M. W.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Rhodopsin-encoding microorganisms are common in many environments. However, knowing that rhodopsin genes are present provides little insight into how the host cells utilize light. The genome of the freshwater actinobacterium Rhodoluna lacicola encodes a rhodopsin of the uncharacterized actinorhodopsin family. We hypothesized that actinorhodopsin was a light-activated proton pump and confirmed this by heterologously expressing R. lacicola actinorhodopsin in retinal-producing Escherichia coli. However, cultures of R. lacicola did not pump protons, even though actinorhodopsin mRNA and protein were both detected. Proton pumping in R. lacicola was induced by providing exogenous retinal, suggesting that the cells lacked the retinal cofactor. We used high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and oxidation of accessory pigments to confirm that R. lacicola does not synthesize retinal. These results suggest that in some organisms, the actinorhodopsin gene is constitutively expressed, but rhodopsin-based light capture may require cofactors obtained from the environment. IMPORTANCE Up to 70% of microbial genomes in some environments are predicted to encode rhodopsins. Because most microbial rhodopsins are light-activated proton pumps, the prevalence of this gene suggests that in some environments, most microorganisms respond to or utilize light energy. Actinorhodopsins were discovered in an analysis of freshwater metagenomic data and subsequently identified in freshwater actinobacterial cultures. We hypothesized that actinorhodopsin from the freshwater actinobacterium Rhodoluna lacicola was a light-activated proton pump and confirmed this by expressing actinorhodopsin in retinal-producing Escherichia coli. Proton pumping in R. lacicola was induced only after both light and retinal were provided, suggesting that the cells lacked the retinal cofactor. These results indicate that photoheterotrophy in this organism and others may require cofactors obtained from the

  7. Molluscs for Sale: Assessment of Freshwater Gastropods and Bivalves in the Ornamental Pet Trade

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Siong Kiat; Wong, Wing Hing; Meier, Rudolf; Chan, Sow-Yan; Tan, Heok Hui; Yeo, Darren C. J.

    2016-01-01

    The ornamental pet trade is often considered a key culprit for conservation problems such as the introduction of invasive species (including infectious diseases) and overharvesting of rare species. Here, we present the first assessment of the biodiversity of freshwater molluscs in the ornamental pet trade in Singapore, one of the most important global hubs of the ornamental aquarium trade, and discuss associated conservation concerns. We recorded freshwater molluscs from ornamental pet shops and major exporters including non-ornamental species (e.g., hitchhikers, molluscs sold as fish feed). We recorded an unexpectedly high diversity—59 species—of freshwater bivalves and gastropods, with the majority (38 species or 64%) being from the Oriental region. In addition to morphological examination, we sequenced the DNA barcode region of mitochondrial CO1 and 16S genes to provide molecular data for the confirmation of the identification and for future re-identification. DNA barcodes were obtained for 50 species, and all but four were separated by > 3% uncorrected pairwise distances. The trade has been considered a main introduction pathway for non-native species to Singapore, and we found that out of 15 species in the trade as well as in the wild in Singapore, 12 are either introduced or of unknown origin, representing almost half of the known non-native freshwater molluscs in Singapore. Particularly prevalent are non-ornamental species: six hitchhikers on aquarium plants and six species sold as fish feed. We found that a quarter of the trade species have a history of introduction, which includes 11 known or potentially invasive species. We conclude that potential overharvesting is difficult to assess because only half of the trade species have been treated by IUCN. Of these, 21 species are of Least Concern and three are Data Deficient. Our checklist, with accompanying DNA barcodes, images, and museum vouchers, provides an important reference library for future

  8. Using risk-ranking of metals to identify which poses the greatest threat to freshwater organisms in the UK.

    PubMed

    Donnachie, Rachel L; Johnson, Andrew C; Moeckel, Claudia; Pereira, M Glória; Sumpter, John P

    2014-11-01

    Freshwater aquatic organisms face the challenge of being exposed to a multitude of chemicals discharged by the human population. The objective of this study was to rank metals according to the threat they pose to aquatic organisms. This will contribute to a wider Chemical Strategy for freshwater which will risk-rank all chemicals based on their potential risk to wildlife in a UK setting. The method involved comparing information on ecotoxicological thresholds with measured concentrations in rivers. The bioconcentration factor was also considered as a ranking method. The metals; Ag, Al, As, Cd, Cr, Cu, Fe, Hg, Mn, Ni, Pb and Zn, were analysed using this approach. Triclosan and lindane were used as comparative organic pollutants. Using a range of ranking techniques, Cu, Al and Zn came top of the list of concern, with Cu coming first.

  9. Characterization of CO2 leakage into the freshwater body

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Ashok; Delfs, Jens-Olaf; Shao, Habing; Kolditz, Olaf

    2013-04-01

    Current research into Carbon dioxide Capture and Storage (CCS) is dominated by improving the CO2 storage capacity. However, potential leakage of CO2 can cause environmental problems, particularly if freshwater resources are nearby. In this regards, it is important to understand the chemistry of CO2 and the water system. CO2 leakage across the fluid interface (CO2 and water) is controlled by the difference in the partial pressure of CO2 in the storage and in the freshwater body. Once the CO2 is in solution, it equilibrates with the bicarbonate and carbonate ions. According to Millero (1994)such a system can be characterized by two parameters out of the four: total alkalinity (TA), total carbonate (TCO2), fugacity of CO2(fCO2) and pH. In the present modeling study, we are interested in the (i) CO2 leakage into a freshwater body (while injecting CO2 for storage) through an inclined fracture and (ii) characterization of the system by measuring fugacity of CO2 and pH. According to work presented by Singh et al. (2012), about 31% of injected CO2 leaks into the freshwater body. Solubility of CO2 in water follows Henry's law, while the Henry constant, K0 is calculated by an empirical relation developed by Murray and Riley (1971), which is a function of salinity and temperature. According to our results, pH and fugacity both appear to be a linear function of temperature. To simulate the discussed problem, a corresponding numerical module has been developed for multi-component fluid flow coupled with heat and mass transport processes. Governing equations and Volume Translated Peng-Robinson equations of state are implemented within the object-oriented finite element code OpenGeoSys (Kolditz et al., 2012; www.opengeosys.org). Primary variables are pressure, temperature and salinity which are obtained by solving the governing equations in a monolithic way The governing equations are discretized spatially within the context of a Galerkin approach, whereas the temporal

  10. Interactions of Freshwater Cyanobacteria with Bacterial Antagonists

    PubMed Central

    Beier, Sara; Grabherr, Manfred

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Cyanobacterial and algal mass development, or blooms, have severe effects on freshwater and marine systems around the world. Many of these phototrophs produce a variety of potent toxins, contribute to oxygen depletion, and affect water quality in several ways. Coexisting antagonists, such as cyanolytic bacteria, hold the potential to suppress, or even terminate, such blooms, yet the nature of this interaction is not well studied. We isolated 31 cyanolytic bacteria affiliated with the genera Pseudomonas, Stenotrophomonas, Acinetobacter, and Delftia from three eutrophic freshwater lakes in Sweden and selected four phylogenetically diverse bacterial strains with strong-to-moderate lytic activity. To characterize their functional responses to the presence of cyanobacteria, we performed RNA sequencing (RNA-Seq) experiments on coculture incubations, with an initial predator-prey ratio of 1:1. Genes involved in central cellular pathways, stress-related heat or cold shock proteins, and antitoxin genes were highly expressed in both heterotrophs and cyanobacteria. Heterotrophs in coculture expressed genes involved in cell motility, signal transduction, and putative lytic activity. l,d-Transpeptidase was the only significantly upregulated lytic gene in Stenotrophomonas rhizophila EK20. Heterotrophs also shifted their central metabolism from the tricarboxylic acid cycle to the glyoxylate shunt. Concurrently, cyanobacteria clearly show contrasting antagonistic interactions with the four tested heterotrophic strains, which is also reflected in the physical attachment to their cells. In conclusion, antagonistic interactions with cyanobacteria were initiated within 24 h, and expression profiles suggest varied responses for the different cyanobacteria and studied cyanolytes. IMPORTANCE Here, we present how gene expression profiles can be used to reveal interactions between bloom-forming freshwater cyanobacteria and antagonistic heterotrophic bacteria. Species

  11. Freshwater aspects of anadromous salmonid enhancement

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gould, Rowan W.

    1982-01-01

    Freshwater enhancement of anadromous salmonid populations has been practiced in the United States and Canada since the late 1800's. Reduction of natural spawning habitat and increasing fishing pressure make artificial enhancement a possible alternative to declining populations. Enhancement of anadromous salmonids involved improvement of the natural environment and reducing natural mortality. Methods of enhancement include fishways, spawning and rearing channels, stream rehabilitation, lake fertilization, environmental management, and artificial propagation techniques. Five Pacific salmon species and steelhead trout are commonly enhanced, primarily in watershed entering the Pacific Ocean and Great Lakes. Enhancement efforts contribute heavily to a commercial and sport industry realizing over $1.5 billion.

  12. A bioaccumulation bioassay for freshwater sediments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mac, Michael J.; Noguchi, George E.; Hesselberg, Robert J.; Edsall, Carol C.; Shoesmith, John A.; Bowker, James D.

    1990-01-01

    A laboratory bioassay is described for determining the bioavailability of contaminants from freshwater sediments. The bioassay consists of 10-d exposures to whole sediments under flow-through conditions. After testing five species, the fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas) and the earthworm (Lubricus terrestris) were recommended for use in the test. When the availability of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), Hg and Zn from Great Lakes sediments was examined in laboratory exposures, only the PCBs were accumulated. A field validation study demonstrated that the magnitude of accumulation in laboratory exposures was similar to that in organisms caged in the field. A protocol is recommended for using the test as a standardized bioaccumulation bioassay.

  13. Prevalence of Salmonella in Australian reptiles.

    PubMed

    Scheelings, T Franciscus; Lightfoot, Dianne; Holz, Peter

    2011-01-01

    From January 2007 until June 2008, 504 reptiles of four families and 57 species were examined for Salmonella by using cloacal or intestinal swabs. Salmonella was identified in 139 (28%) of the 504 animals tested. Of the 504 reptiles examined, 210 were captive and 294 were wild. Ninety-eight (47%) of the captive reptiles were shedding Salmonella at the time of sampling. In contrast, only 41 (14%) of the wild reptiles were shedding Salmonella. The higher prevalence of Salmonella in captive reptiles was statistically significant (P<0.0001). No Salmonella was found in 60 wild, freshwater chelonians or 48 wild southern water skinks (Eulamprus heatwolei). Our results suggest that some species of wild reptiles in Australia are not natural carriers of Salmonella and that diet and captivity may influence Salmonella excretion in other species.

  14. Prospects for monitoring freshwater ecosystems towards the 2010 targets

    PubMed Central

    Revenga, C; Campbell, I; Abell, R; de Villiers, P; Bryer, M

    2005-01-01

    Human activities have severely affected the condition of freshwater ecosystems worldwide. Physical alteration, habitat loss, water withdrawal, pollution, overexploitation and the introduction of non-native species all contribute to the decline in freshwater species. Today, freshwater species are, in general, at higher risk of extinction than those in forests, grasslands and coastal ecosystems. For North America alone, the projected extinction rate for freshwater fauna is five times greater than that for terrestrial fauna—a rate comparable to the species loss in tropical rainforest. Because many of these extinctions go unseen, the level of assessment and knowledge of the status and trends of freshwater species are still very poor, with species going extinct before they are even taxonomically classified. Increasing human population growth and achieving the sustainable development targets set forth in 2002 will place even higher demands on the already stressed freshwater ecosystems, unless an integrated approach to managing water for people and ecosystems is implemented by a broad constituency. To inform and implement policies that support an integrated approach to water management, as well as to measure progress in halting the rapid decline in freshwater species, basin-level indicators describing the condition and threats to freshwater ecosystems and species are required. This paper discusses the extent and quality of data available on the number and size of populations of freshwater species, as well as the change in the extent and condition of natural freshwater habitats. The paper presents indicators that can be applied at multiple scales, highlighting the usefulness of using remote sensing and geographical information systems technologies to fill some of the existing information gaps. Finally, the paper includes an analysis of major data gaps and information needs with respect to freshwater species to measure progress towards the 2010 biodiversity targets. PMID

  15. Potential Risks of Freshwater Aquifer Contamination with Geosequestration

    SciTech Connect

    Jackson, Robert

    2013-09-30

    Substantial leakage of CO{sub 2} from deep geological strata to shallow potable aquifers is likely to be rare, but chemical detection of potential leakage nonetheless remains an integral component of any safe carbon capture and storage system. CO{sub 2} that infiltrates an unconfined freshwater aquifer will have an immediate impact on water chemistry by lowering pH in most cases and by altering the concentration of total dissolved solids. Chemical signatures in affected waters provide an important opportunity for early detection of leaks. In the presence of CO{sub 2}, trace elements such as Mn, Fe, and Ca can increase by an order of magnitude or more above control concentrations within 100 days. Therefore, these and other elements should be monitored along with pH as geochemical markers of potential CO{sub 2} leaks. Dissolved inorganic carbon and alkalinity can also be rapidly responsive to CO{sub 2} and are stable indicators of a leak. Importantly, such changes may be detectable long before direct changes in CO{sub 2} are observed. The experimental results also suggest that the relative severity of the impact of leaks on overlying drinking-water aquifers should be considered in the selection of CO{sub 2} sequestration sites. One primary selection criteria should be metal and metalloid availability, such as uranium and arsenic abundance, to carefully monitor chemical species that could trigger changes above maximum contaminant levels (MCLs). Overall, the risks of leakage from underground CO{sub 2} storage are real but appear to be manageable if systems are closely monitored.

  16. Studies on Trichodinid and Chilodonellid Ciliophorans (Protozoa: Ciliophora) in the Indian freshwater and estuarine fishes with description of Trichodinella sunderbanensis sp. nov. and Trichodina nandusi sp. nov.

    PubMed

    Mitra, Amlan Kumar; Bandyopadhyay, Probir K; Gong, Yingchun

    2013-03-01

    A comprehensive icthyoparasotological survey among estuarine and freshwater fishes of West Bengal, India revealed Trichodinella sunderbanensis sp. nov. and Trichodina acuta Lom, 1961 from an estuarine fish Mystus gulio (Hamilton, 1822) from the Vidyadhari river; Trichodina nandusi sp. nov. from a freshwater fish, Nandus nandus (Hamilton-Buchanan); Chilodonella hexasticha (Kiernik, 1909) Kahl, 1931 from freshwater fishes Labeo rohita (Hamilton, 1822); and Cyprinus carpio Linnaeus, 1758 from the Rupnarayan river. Taxonomic description of all the species based on wet silver nitrate impregnation method along with additional comments based on scanning electron microscopic descriptions of T. nandusi sp. nov. are also provided in this paper. Prevalence rate, morphometric parameters and comparisons with closely related species are also discussed.

  17. Climate and local abundance in freshwater fishes

    PubMed Central

    Knouft, Jason H.; Anthony, Melissa M.

    2016-01-01

    Identifying factors regulating variation in numbers of individuals among populations across a species' distribution is a fundamental goal in ecology. A common prediction, often referred to as the abundant-centre hypothesis, suggests that abundance is highest near the centre of a species' range. However, because of the primary focus on the geographical position of a population, this framework provides little insight into the environmental factors regulating local abundance. While range-wide variation in population abundance associated with environmental conditions has been investigated in terrestrial species, the relationship between climate and local abundance in freshwater taxa across species' distributions is not well understood. We used GIS-based temperature and precipitation data to determine the relationships between climatic conditions and range-wide variation in local abundance for 19 species of North American freshwater fishes. Climate predicted a portion of the variation in local abundance among populations for 18 species. In addition, the relationship between climatic conditions and local abundance varied among species, which is expected as lineages partition the environment across geographical space. The influence of local habitat quality on species persistence is well documented; however, our results also indicate the importance of climate in regulating population sizes across a species geographical range, even in aquatic taxa. PMID:27429769

  18. Management and the conservation of freshwater ecosystems

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wipfli, Mark S.; Richardson, John S.

    2015-01-01

    Riparian and freshwater ecosystems are typically tightly coupled, especially in their natural states, and the linkages that couple them frequently exert strong influence on their associated invertebrate and fish fauna (e.g. Gregory et al., 1991; Naiman et al., 2010). Riparian habitats, and the condition of these habitats, further plays a key role in the ecology of these fresh waters, influencing critical processes such as water, nutrient and sediment delivery and dynamics; prey resources for fish and other consumers, and other organic materials exchanged between aquatic and terrestrial habitats (Nakano et al., 1999; Naiman et al., 2010); light and water temperature dynamics that in turn affect food web processes and fish metabolism and growth; aquatic physical habitat (wood); and terrestrial consumers that prey upon fishes (Bisson & Bilby, 1998; Naiman et al., 2010; Wipfli & Baxter, 2010). These processes in turn directly or indirectly influence fishes in freshwater systems (Wang et al., 2001; Pusey & Arthington, 2003; Allan, 2004; Richardson et al., 2010a).

  19. Reclaiming freshwater sustainability in the Cadillac Desert

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sabo, John L.; Sinha, Tushar; Bowling, Laura C.; Schoups, Gerrit H.W.; Wallender, Wesley W.; Campana, Michael E.; Cherkauer, Keith A.; Fuller, Pam L.; Graf, William L.; Hopmans, Jan W.; Kominoski, John S.; Taylor, Carissa; Trimble, Stanley W.; Webb, Robert H.; Wohl, Ellen E.

    2010-01-01

    Increasing human appropriation of freshwater resources presents a tangible limit to the sustainability of cities, agriculture, and ecosystems in the western United States. Marc Reisner tackles this theme in his 1986 classic Cadillac Desert: The American West and Its Disappearing Water. Reisner's analysis paints a portrait of region-wide hydrologic dysfunction in the western United States, suggesting that the storage capacity of reservoirs will be impaired by sediment infilling, croplands will be rendered infertile by salt, and water scarcity will pit growing desert cities against agribusiness in the face of dwindling water resources. Here we evaluate these claims using the best available data and scientific tools. Our analysis provides strong scientific support for many of Reisner's claims, except the notion that reservoir storage is imminently threatened by sediment. More broadly, we estimate that the equivalent of nearly 76% of streamflow in the Cadillac Desert region is currently appropriated by humans, and this figure could rise to nearly 86% under a doubling of the region's population. Thus, Reisner's incisive journalism led him to the same conclusions as those rendered by copious data, modern scientific tools, and the application of a more genuine scientific method. We close with a prospectus for reclaiming freshwater sustainability in the Cadillac Desert, including a suite of recommendations for reducing region-wide human appropriation of streamflow to a target level of 60%.

  20. Climate and local abundance in freshwater fishes.

    PubMed

    Knouft, Jason H; Anthony, Melissa M

    2016-06-01

    Identifying factors regulating variation in numbers of individuals among populations across a species' distribution is a fundamental goal in ecology. A common prediction, often referred to as the abundant-centre hypothesis, suggests that abundance is highest near the centre of a species' range. However, because of the primary focus on the geographical position of a population, this framework provides little insight into the environmental factors regulating local abundance. While range-wide variation in population abundance associated with environmental conditions has been investigated in terrestrial species, the relationship between climate and local abundance in freshwater taxa across species' distributions is not well understood. We used GIS-based temperature and precipitation data to determine the relationships between climatic conditions and range-wide variation in local abundance for 19 species of North American freshwater fishes. Climate predicted a portion of the variation in local abundance among populations for 18 species. In addition, the relationship between climatic conditions and local abundance varied among species, which is expected as lineages partition the environment across geographical space. The influence of local habitat quality on species persistence is well documented; however, our results also indicate the importance of climate in regulating population sizes across a species geographical range, even in aquatic taxa.

  1. Heart Rate Sensor for Freshwater Mussels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Just, C. L.; Vial, D. P.; Kruger, A.; Niemeier, J. J.; Lee, H. W.; Schroer, H. W.

    2014-12-01

    Researchers have long been interested the cardiac activity of mollusks. First, it is important as a basic measure of the animal's metabolism. Further, activities such as feeding and burrowing affect heart rate, as do environmental factors such as water salinity, water temperature, exposure, and predation. We have developed a small, noninvasive sensor for measuring freshwater mussel heart rate. Its working principle is as follows. An infrared (IR) light-emitting diode is placed in contact with the mussel shell. Some of the IR penetrates through the shell, reflects off internal organs, and traverses back. A photodetector detects this IR, and electronics condition the signal. The heartbeat of the animal modulates the IR, allowing one to measure the heart rate. The technique is widely-used in finger heart-rate monitors in humans. The sensors do not have to be positioned above the heart and several locations on the mussel shell work well. The sensor is small (8 mm × 10 mm) and consumes less than 1 mA, and has a simple one-wire interface that allows for easy integration into data acquisition hardware. We present heart rate measurements for the common pocketbook (lampsilis cardium) freshwater mussel.

  2. Reclaiming freshwater sustainability in the Cadillac Desert

    PubMed Central

    Sabo, John L.; Sinha, Tushar; Bowling, Laura C.; Schoups, Gerrit H. W.; Wallender, Wesley W.; Campana, Michael E.; Cherkauer, Keith A.; Fuller, Pam L.; Graf, William L.; Hopmans, Jan W.; Kominoski, John S.; Taylor, Carissa; Trimble, Stanley W.; Webb, Robert H.; Wohl, Ellen E.

    2010-01-01

    Increasing human appropriation of freshwater resources presents a tangible limit to the sustainability of cities, agriculture, and ecosystems in the western United States. Marc Reisner tackles this theme in his 1986 classic Cadillac Desert: The American West and Its Disappearing Water. Reisner's analysis paints a portrait of region-wide hydrologic dysfunction in the western United States, suggesting that the storage capacity of reservoirs will be impaired by sediment infilling, croplands will be rendered infertile by salt, and water scarcity will pit growing desert cities against agribusiness in the face of dwindling water resources. Here we evaluate these claims using the best available data and scientific tools. Our analysis provides strong scientific support for many of Reisner's claims, except the notion that reservoir storage is imminently threatened by sediment. More broadly, we estimate that the equivalent of nearly 76% of streamflow in the Cadillac Desert region is currently appropriated by humans, and this figure could rise to nearly 86% under a doubling of the region's population. Thus, Reisner's incisive journalism led him to the same conclusions as those rendered by copious data, modern scientific tools, and the application of a more genuine scientific method. We close with a prospectus for reclaiming freshwater sustainability in the Cadillac Desert, including a suite of recommendations for reducing region-wide human appropriation of streamflow to a target level of 60%. PMID:21149727

  3. A subtropical fate awaited freshwater discharged from glacial Lake Agassiz

    SciTech Connect

    Condron, Alan; Winsor, Peter

    2011-02-10

    The 8.2 kyr event is the largest abrupt climatic change recorded in the last 10,000 years, and is widely hypothesized to have been triggered by the release of thousands of kilometers cubed of freshwater into the North Atlantic Ocean. Using a high-resolution (1/6°) global, ocean-ice circulation model we present an alternative view that freshwater discharged from glacial Lake Agassiz would have remained on the continental shelf as a narrow, buoyant, coastal current, and would have been transported south into the subtropical North Atlantic. The pathway we describe is in contrast to the conceptual idea that freshwater from this lake outburst spread over most of the sub-polar North Atlantic, and covered the deep, open-ocean, convection regions. This coastally confined freshwater pathway is consistent with the present-day routing of freshwater from Hudson Bay, as well as paleoceanographic evidence of this event. In this study, using a coarse-resolution (2.6°) version of the same model, we demonstrate that the previously reported spreading of freshwater across the sub-polar North Atlantic results from the inability of numerical models of this resolution to accurately resolve narrow coastal flows, producing instead a diffuse circulation that advects freshwater away from the boundaries. To understand the climatic impact of freshwater released in the past or future (e.g. Greenland and Antarctica), the ocean needs to be modeled at a resolution sufficient to resolve the dynamics of narrow, coastal buoyant flows.

  4. The toxicity of molybdate to freshwater and marine organisms. II. Effects assessment of molybdate in the aquatic environment under REACH.

    PubMed

    Heijerick, D G; Regoli, L; Carey, S

    2012-10-01

    The REACH Molybdenum Consortium initiated an extensive research program in order to generate robust PNECs, based on the SSD approach, for both the freshwater and marine environments. This activity was part of the REACH dossier preparation and to form the basis for scientific dialogues with other national and international regulatory authorities. Chronic ecotoxicity data sets for the freshwater and marine environments served as starting point for the derivation of PNECs for both compartments, in accordance with the recommended derivation procedures established by the European Chemicals Agency (ECHA). The HC(5,50%)s that were derived from the generated Species Sensitivity Distributions were 38.2 mg Mo/L and 5.75 mg Mo/L for the freshwater and marine water compartment, respectively. Uncertainty analysis on both data sets and available data on bioaccumulation at high exposure levels justified an assessment factor of 3 on both HC(5,50%) leading to a PNEC(freshwater) of 12.7 mg Mo/L and a PNEC(marine) of 1.92 mg Mo/L. As there are currently insufficient ecotoxicological data available for the derivation of PNECs in the sediment compartment, the equilibrium partitioning method was applied; typical K(D)-values for both the freshwater and marine compartments were identified and combined with the respective PNEC, leading to a PNEC(sediment) of 22,600 mg/kg dry weight and 1980 mg/kg dry weight for freshwater and marine sediments, respectively. The chronic data sets were also used for the derivation of final chronic values using the procedures that are outlined by the US Environmental Protection Agency for deriving such water benchmarks. Comparing PNECs with FCVs showed that both methodologies result in comparable protective concentration levels for molybdenum in the environment.

  5. Incipient toxicity of lithium to freshwater organisms representing a salmonid habitat

    SciTech Connect

    Emery, R.; Klopfer, D.C.; Skalski, J.R.

    1981-07-01

    Because the eventual development of fusion power reactors could increase the mining, use and disposal of lithium five-fold by the year 2000, potential effects from unusual amounts of lithium in aquatic environments were investigated. Freshwater oganisms representing a Pacific Northwest salmonid habitat were exposed to elevated conentrations of lithium. Nine parameters were used to determine the incipient toxicity of lithium to rainbow trout (Salmo gairdneri), insect larvae (Chironomus sp.), and Columbia River periphyton. All three groups of biota were incipiently sensitive to lithium at concentrations ranging between 0.1 and 1 mg/L. These results correspond with the incipient toxicity of beryllium, a chemically similar component of fusion reactor cores. A maximum lithium concentration of 0.01 mg/L occurs naturally in most freshwater environments (beryllium is rarer). Therefore, a concentration range of 0.01 to 0.1 mg/L may be regarded as approaching toxic concentrations when assessing the hazards of lithium in freshwaters.

  6. Escape and survival of Corophium volutator and Ilyanassa obsoleta exposed to freshwater and chlorothalonil.

    PubMed

    Hellou, J; Cook, A; Lalonde, B; Walker, P; Dunphy, K; MacLeod, S

    2009-07-01

    The behavioural response and survival of marine mud snails and mud shrimp exposed to freshwater and the fungicide chlorothalonil (tetrachloroisophthalonitrile) was investigated. Amphipods were less tolerant of lower salinity than snails, with 50 and 76% survival associated with 5 and 0% seawater in freshwater, respectively. However, 50% of snails displayed a defence mechanism by retracting within their shell when exposed to 70% freshwater. Both species displayed an avoidance to chlorothalonil spiked at >100 ng/g and/or >100 ng/mL in sediments and seawater, respectively. The avoidance response of amphipods was observed along with a reduced swimming ability and increased lipid content. Snails displayed a higher susceptibility to physical stress, with an increased number unable to twist from being on their shell to their foot, and with longer righting time. Behaviour was affected at chlorothalonil concentrations of 0.001-0.01 ng/g and/or ng/mL, with a variability that could be due to degradation by the microbial community. Ascertaining the latter observations requires state-of-the-art chemical analyses.

  7. Optimal conditions for three brood chronic toxicity test method using a freshwater macroinvertebrate Moina macrocopa.

    PubMed

    Oh, Sorin; Choi, Kyungho

    2012-06-01

    Freshwater cladocera such as Daphnia magna and Ceriodaphnia dubia have been used extensively for freshwater toxicity test worldwide. However, these species may not be indigenous in certain geographical regions, which restrict the utility of these organisms as test species. In the present study, we investigated optimal culture and test conditions for an indigenous freshwater macroinvertebrate of Korea, Moina macrocopa. The culture conditions that were evaluated included water temperature (20°C and 25°C), rearing media (moderately hard water or MHW, with or without selenium supplementation, or Elendt M4), and food density (2.5 × 10(7) and 5 × 10(7) cells/mL of Selenastrum capricornutum), and their effects on the life history characteristics of M. macrocopa were determined. Population growth rate of M. macrocopa was maximized at 25°C with 5 × 10(7) cells/mL of algal food density in MHW. A series of chronic three brood reference toxicant tests were conducted under the ideal culture conditions that were identified here, and the results of the tests indicated reliable reproducibility of the test protocol. Optimal culture and test conditions that were identified for M. macrocopa in the present study are suggested for evaluation of chronic toxicity of chemicals and industrial or municipal discharge.

  8. Exploitation and destabilization of a warm, freshwater ecosystem through engineered hydrological change.

    PubMed

    Hambright, K David; Zohary, Tamar; Eckert, Werner; Schwartz, Steven S; Schelske, Claire L; Laird, Kathleen R; Leavitt, Peter R

    2008-10-01

    Exploitation of freshwater resources is having catastrophic effects on the ecological dynamics, stability, and quality of those water resources on a global scale, especially in arid and semiarid regions. Lake Kinneret, Israel (the Biblical Sea of Galilee), the only major natural freshwater lake in the Middle East, has been transformed functionally into a reservoir over the course of approximately 70 years of hydrological alterations aimed mostly at producing electrical power and increasing domestic and agricultural water supply. Historical changes in lake chemistry and biology were reconstructed using analysis of sedimentary nutrient content, stable and radioisotope composition, biochemical and morphological fossils from algae, remains of aquatic invertebrates, and chemical indices of past light regimes. Together, these paleolimnological analyses of the lake's bottom sediments revealed that this transformation has been accompanied by acceleration in the rate of eutrophication, as indicated by increased accumulation rates of phosphorus, nitrogen, organic matter, phytoplankton and bacterial pigments, and remains of phytoplankton and zooplankton. Substantial increases in these indices of eutrophication coincide with periods of increased water-level fluctuations and drainage of a major upstream wetland in the early to middle 20th century and suggest that management of the lake for increased water supply has degraded water quality to the point that ecosystem stability and sustainability are threatened. Such destabilization may be a model for eutrophication of freshwater lakes in other arid regions of the world in which management emphasizes water quantity over quality.

  9. Screening of parasitic and IHHNV infections in wild giant freshwater prawn Macrobrachium rosenbergii from Rejang River at Kuching, Sarawak.

    PubMed

    Kua, Beng Chu; Choong, F C; Hazreen Nita, M K; Muhd Faizul H, A H; Bhassu, S; Imelda, R R; Mohammed, M

    2011-04-01

    A preliminary survey of parasitic and infectious hypodermal and haematopoietic necrosis virus (IHHNV) infections in giant freshwater prawn from the Damak Sea of Rejang River, Kuching, Sarawak was conducted. Symptoms of black spots/patches on the rostrum, carapace, pleopods or telson were observed in most of the 107 samples collected. Parasitic examination revealed sessiline peritrichs such as (Zoothamnium sp.), nematode larvae, gregarine stage and cocoon of leech with prevalences of 1.2%, 1.2%, 5% and 17% respectively. Under histopathological examination, changes like accumulation of hemocytes around hepatopancreatic tubules due to vibriosis, basophilic intranuclear inclusions in the epithelium and E-cell of hepatopancreatic tubules as a result of HPV were seen through the section. No positive infection of IHHNV was detected in 78 samples. As such, the wild giant freshwater prawns in Damak Sea of Rejang River in Kuching are IHHNV-free though infections of parvo-like virus and bacteria were seen in histopathology.

  10. Aquatic sports dermatoses: part 1. In the water: freshwater dermatoses.

    PubMed

    Tlougan, Brook E; Podjasek, Joshua O; Adams, Brian B

    2010-08-01

    The first of this three-part series on water-related dermatoses involving the athlete will include sports occurring with the majority of time spent in the water. These sports include swimming, diving, scuba, snorkeling and water polo. Numerous authors have described dermatologic conditions commonly seen in swimmers. This series provides an updated and comprehensive review of these water dermatoses. In order to organize the vast number of skin conditions related to water exposure, we divided the skin conditions into groupings of infectious and organism-related dermatoses, irritant and allergic dermatoses and miscellaneous dermatoses. The vast majority of skin conditions involving the water athlete result from chemicals and microbes inhabiting each environment. When considering the effects of swimming on one's skin, it is also useful to differentiate between exposure to freshwater (lakes, ponds and swimming pools) and exposure to saltwater. This review will serve as a guide for dermatologists, sports medicine physicians and other medical practitioners in recognition and treatment of these conditions.

  11. Fate and transport of titania nanoparticles in freshwater mesocosms

    SciTech Connect

    Miracle, Ann L.; Bunn, Amoret L.; Brandenberger, Jill M.; Gaspar, Daniel J.; Ward, Jeffrey A.

    2008-10-01

    Titania nanoparticles are currently associated with air, soil, and water and with numerous products directed at human use and consumption (e.g., sunscreen, cosmetics, and food coatings). The environmental fate and transport of TiO2, or any nanomaterials entering dynamic aquatic environments are largely unknown. Because the physical and chemical properties of TiO2 are variable (size, surface chemistry, and composition), the movement, bioaccumulation, and toxicity of these materials are difficult to study in a complex ecosystem. Many metal oxide materials are durable and recalcitrant, and the accumulation of TiO2 in the environment could be significant over time and cause unforeseen impacts on ecosystems. Fate and transport of TiO2 nanomaterials in a bench-scale mesocosm system was assessed through nanomaterial partitioning and complexation in water, sediment, and tissue media characterized using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry and scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, respectively. Research data sets like these will build the foundation for future use in fate and transport of other nanomaterials in different water systems (fresh, estuarine, and marine) and in building empirical and process models that investigate environmental fate and transport and relevant freshwater ecological impacts of nanomaterials.

  12. Identifying Canadian Freshwater Fishes through DNA Barcodes

    PubMed Central

    Hubert, Nicolas; Hanner, Robert; Holm, Erling; Mandrak, Nicholas E.; Taylor, Eric; Burridge, Mary; Watkinson, Douglas; Dumont, Pierre; Curry, Allen; Bentzen, Paul; Zhang, Junbin; April, Julien; Bernatchez, Louis

    2008-01-01

    Background DNA barcoding aims to provide an efficient method for species-level identifications using an array of species specific molecular tags derived from the 5′ region of the mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase I (COI) gene. The efficiency of the method hinges on the degree of sequence divergence among species and species-level identifications are relatively straightforward when the average genetic distance among individuals within a species does not exceed the average genetic distance between sister species. Fishes constitute a highly diverse group of vertebrates that exhibit deep phenotypic changes during development. In this context, the identification of fish species is challenging and DNA barcoding provide new perspectives in ecology and systematics of fishes. Here we examined the degree to which DNA barcoding discriminate freshwater fish species from the well-known Canadian fauna, which currently encompasses nearly 200 species, some which are of high economic value like salmons and sturgeons. Methodology/Principal Findings We bi-directionally sequenced the standard 652 bp “barcode” region of COI for 1360 individuals belonging to 190 of the 203 Canadian freshwater fish species (95%). Most species were represented by multiple individuals (7.6 on average), the majority of which were retained as voucher specimens. The average genetic distance was 27 fold higher between species than within species, as K2P distance estimates averaged 8.3% among congeners and only 0.3% among concpecifics. However, shared polymorphism between sister-species was detected in 15 species (8% of the cases). The distribution of K2P distance between individuals and species overlapped and identifications were only possible to species group using DNA barcodes in these cases. Conversely, deep hidden genetic divergence was revealed within two species, suggesting the presence of cryptic species. Conclusions/Significance The present study evidenced that freshwater fish species can be

  13. Relationship between water solubility of chlorobenzenes and their effects on a freshwater green alga

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, P.T.S.; Chau, Y.K.; Rhamey, J.S.; Docker, M.

    1984-01-01

    The effective concentrations of benzene and 12 chlorobenzenes that reduced 50% of the primary productivity (EC/sub 50/) of a freshwater green alga, Ankistrodesmus falcatus, were determined. Benzene was the least toxic chemical and the toxicity increased as the degree of chlorine substitution in the aromatic ring increased. No EC/sub 50/ value could be obtained for HCB. A quantitative relationship was found to exist between water solubility, lipophilicity and the EC/sub 50/. A good correlation was also observed between the EC/sub 50/ for this alga and other toxicity data for various aquatic biota.

  14. Modelling Oyster Population Response to Variation in Freshwater Input

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Livingston, R. J.; Lewis, F. G.; Woodsum, G. C.; Niu, X.-F.; Galperin, B.; Huang, W.; Christensen, J. D.; Monaco, M. E.; Battista, T. A.; Klein, C. J.; Howell, R. L.; Ray, G. L.

    2000-05-01

    This paper describes the linkage of a three-dimensional hydrodynamic circulation model with descriptive and experimental biological data concerning oyster (Crassostrea virginica) population dynamics in the Apalachicola Estuary (Florida, U.S.A.). Our intent was to determine the direct and indirect role of Apalachicola River flow in the maintenance of oyster production. Results of a monthly field sampling programme conducted on the oyster reefs in the Apalachicola system during 1985-1986 were used to develop statistical models relating several life-history characteristics of oysters to physical-chemical aspects of water quality. The same life-history characteristics were related statistically to output from a circulation model of Apalachicola Bay. Highest oyster densities and overall bar growth were found in the vicinity of the confluence of high salinity water moving westwards from St George Sound and river-dominated (low salinity) water moving south and eastwards from East Bay. With the exception of models for oyster mortality, the predictive capability of results from the parallel modelling efforts was low. A time-averaged model was developed for oyster mortality during the summer of 1985 by running a regression analysis with averaged predictors derived from the hydrodynamic model and observed (experimental) mortality rates throughout the estuary. A geographic information system was then used to depict the results spatially and to compare the extent of expected mortality in 1985 and 1986. High salinity, relatively low-velocity current patterns, and the proximity of a given oyster bar to entry points of saline Gulf water into the bay were important factors that contribute to increased oyster mortality. Mortality was a major determinant of oyster production in the Apalachicola Estuary with predation as a significant aspect of such mortality. By influencing salinity levels and current patterns throughout the bay, the Apalachicola River was important in controlling

  15. Trait-based modelling of bioaccumulation by freshwater benthic invertebrates.

    PubMed

    Sidney, Livia Alvarenga; Diepens, Noël J; Guo, Xiaoying; Koelmans, Albert A

    2016-07-01

    Understanding the role of species traits in chemical exposure is crucial for bioaccumulation and toxicity assessment of chemicals. We measured and modelled bioaccumulation of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) in Chironomus riparius, Hyalella azteca, Lumbriculus variegatus and Sphaerium corneum. We used a battery test procedure with multiple enclosures in one aquarium, which maximized uniformity of exposure for the different species, such that the remaining variability was due mostly to species traits. The relative importance of uptake from either pore water or sediment ingestion was manipulated by using 28 d aged standard OECD sediment with low (1%) and medium (5%) OM content and 13 months aged sediment with medium OM (5%) content. Survival was ≥76% and wet weight increased for all species. Reproduction of H. azteca and weight gain of H. azteca and S. corneum were significantly higher in the medium OM aged sediments than in other sediments, perhaps due to a more developed microbial community (i.e., increase in food resources). Biota-sediment accumulation factors (BSAF) ranged from 3 to 114, depending on species and PCB congener, with C. riparius (3-10)freshwater taxonomic groups were compared with their marine counterparts and showed overlapping values. The dynamic bioaccumulation model with species-specific bioaccumulation parameters fitted well to the experimental data and showed that bioaccumulation parameters were depended on species traits. Enclosure-based battery tests and mechanistic BSAF models are expected to improve the quality of the exposure assessment in whole sediment toxicity tests.

  16. Gastric cryptosporidiosis in freshwater angelfish (Pterophyllum scalare)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Murphy, B.G.; Bradway, D.; Walsh, T.; Sanders, G.E.; Snekvik, K.

    2009-01-01

    A freshwater angelfish (Pterophyllum scalare) hatchery experienced variable levels of emaciation, poor growth rates, swollen coelomic cavities, anorexia, listlessness, and increased mortality within their fish. Multiple chemotherapeutic trials had been attempted without success. In affected fish, large numbers of protozoa were identified both histologically and ultrastructurally associated with the gastric mucosa. The youngest cohort of parasitized fish was the most severely affected and demonstrated the greatest morbidity and mortality. The protozoa were morphologically most consistent with Cryptosporidium. All of the protozoan life stages were identified ultrastructurally and protozoal genomic DNA was isolated from parasitized tissue viscera and sequenced. Histological, ultrastructural, genetic, and phylogenetic analyses confirmed this protozoal organism to be a novel species of Cryptosporidium.

  17. The decline of North American freshwater fishes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Walsh, Stephen J.; Jelks, Howard L.; Burkhead, Noel M.

    2009-01-01

    North America has a broad array of freshwater ecosystems because of the continent's complex geography and geological history. Within a multitude of habitats—that include streams, large rivers, natural lakes, springs, and wetlands—rich assemblages of fishes reside, representing diverse taxonomic groups with unique ecological requirements. They face an unprecedented conservation crisis.1 In the last few decades, the proportion of inland fishes of North America, which are considered imperiled or extinct, increased from 20 to 40%.2 Although extinctions have occurred, many species and populations are declining in range size and abundance. The fish biota of the continent as a whole remains diverse; however, we can take action to stem any further declines.

  18. Eutrophication of freshwater and marine ecosystems

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Smith, Val H.; Joye, Samantha B.; Howarth, Robert W.

    2006-01-01

    Initial understanding of the links between nutrients and aquatic productivity originated in Europe in the early 1900s, and our knowledge base has expanded greatly during the past 40 yr. This explosion of eutrophication-related research has made it unequivocally clear that a comprehensive strategy to prevent excessive amounts of nitrogen and phosphorus from entering our waterways is needed to protect our lakes, rivers, and coasts from water quality deterioration. However, despite these very significant advances, cultural eutrophication remains one of the foremost problems for protecting our valuable surface water resources. The papers in this special issue provide a valuable cross section and synthesis of our current understanding of both freshwater and marine eutrophication science. They also serve to identify gaps in our knowledge and will help to guide future research.

  19. Freshwater bryozoa of Tonle Sap, Cambodia.

    PubMed

    Hirose, Masato; Mawatari, Shunsuke F

    2007-06-01

    We identified a collection of freshwater bryozoans from Tonle Sap (meaning Tonle Lake), Cambodia, a body of water fed by the Mekong River and characterized by extreme fluctuations in water level between the wet and dry seasons. The collection also included specimens from the moat of Angkor Wat, located at the north end of the lake. We found four phylactolaemate species (Plumatella bombayensis, Plumatella casmiana, Plumatella vorstmani, Hyalinella lendenfeldi) and one ctenostome species (Hislopia cambodgiensis) from the lake, and only a single, additional phylactolaemate species (Plumatella javanica) from the moat. We provide brief descriptions of these species, photographs of colonies for some, and photomicrographs by light and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) of statoblasts. None of the species encountered in this study is endemic to Cambodia, and the wide distributions of the species are possibly related to the dispersability of floatoblasts by birds. We briefly discuss some of the taxonomic problems surrounding Hislopia cambodgiensis.

  20. Toxicities of selected substances to freshwater biota

    SciTech Connect

    Hohreiter, D.W.

    1980-05-01

    The amount of data available concerning the toxicity of various substances to freshwater biota is so large that it is difficult to use in a practical situation, such as environmental impact assessment. In this document, summary tables are presented showing acute and/or chronic toxicity of selected substances for various groups of aquatic biota. Each entry is referenced to its original source so that details concerning experimental conditions may be consulted. In addition, general information concerning factors modifying toxicity, synergisms, evidence of bioaccumulation, and water quality standards and criteria for the selected substances is given. The final table is a general toxicity table designed to provide an easily accessible and general indication of toxicity of selected substances in aquatic systems.

  1. Estimated Freshwater Withdrawals in Oklahoma, 1990

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lurry, Dee L.; Tortorelli, Robert L.

    1996-01-01

    This report presents 1990 freshwater withdrawal estimates for Oklahoma by source and category. Withdrawal source is either ground water or surface water. Withdrawal categories include: irrigation, water supply, livestock, thermoelectric-power generation, domestic and commercial, and industrial and mining. Withdrawal data are aggregated by county, major aquifer, and principal river basin. Only the four major categories of irrigation, water supply, livestock, and thermoelectric-power generation are illustrated in this report, although data for all categories are tabulated. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) established the National Water-Use Information Program in 1977 to collect uniform, current, and reliable information on water use. The Oklahoma District of the USGS and the Oklahoma Water Resources Board participate in a cooperative program to collect and publish water-use information for Oklahoma. Data contained in this report were made available through the cooperative program.

  2. Terrestrial and freshwater Tardigrada of the Americas.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Harry A

    2013-12-16

    This paper provides a comprehensive list of the freshwater and terrestrial tardigrade fauna reported from the Americas (North America, South America, Central America and the West Indies), their distribution in the Americas, and the substrates from which they have been reported. Data were obtained from 316 published references. Authors' identifications were accepted at face value unless subsequently amended. Taxa were assigned to sub-national units (states, provinces, etc.). Many areas, in particular large portions of Central America and the West Indies, have no reported tardigrade fauna.        The presence of 54 genera and 380 species has been reported for the Americas; 245 species have been collected in the Nearctic ecozone and 251 in the Neotropical ecozone. Among the tardigrade species found in the Americas, 52 are currently considered cosmopolitan, while 153 species have known distributions restricted to the Americas. Based on recent taxonomic revision of the genus Milnesium, the vast majority of records of M. tardigradum in the Americas should now be reassigned to Milnesium tardigradum sensu lato, either because the provided description differs from M. tardigradum sensu stricto or because insufficient description is provided to make a determination; the remainder should be considered Milnesium cf. tardigradum.        Most terrestrial tardigrade sampling in the Americas has focused on cryptogams (mosses, lichens and liverworts); 90% of the species have been collected in such substrates. The proportion of species collected in other habitats is lower: 14% in leaf litter, 20% in soil, and 24% in aquatic samples (in other terrestrial substrates the proportion never exceeds 5%). Most freshwater tardigrades have been collected from aquatic vegetation and sediment. For nine species in the Americas no substrates have been reported. 

  3. New haptophyte lineages and multiple independent colonizations of freshwater ecosystems.

    PubMed

    Simon, Marianne; López-García, Purificación; Moreira, David; Jardillier, Ludwig

    2013-04-01

    The diversity and ecological relevance of small haptophytes in marine systems is increasingly recognized. Similar investigations in freshwater remain scarce, despite some recent studies showing the existence of divergent haptophyte lineages and indicating that these microalgae can occur at high abundance in lakes. We studied the diversity of haptophytes in a wide variety of marine, salty continental and, most particularly, freshwater environments by amplifying, cloning and sequencing 18S rRNA genes. For this purpose, we designed two sets of primers specific for the two recognized haptophyte classes, Prymnesiophyceae and Pavlovophyceae. We detected pavlovophyte sequences only in freshwater systems as well as several novel prymnesiophyte phylotypes in both freshwater and marine environments. In addition, we retrieved a cluster of sequences (HAP-3) from the Marmara Sea branching deeply in the haptophyte tree with no clear affiliation to either of the two recognized classes. Five of the freshwater prymnesiophyte phylotypes detected formed a divergent monophyletic group (EV) without close described representatives that branched within the Isochrysidales, a group of generally marine and most often calcifying coccolithophorids. The presence of several sequences of freshwater haptophytes scattered among marine taxa in phylogenetic trees confirms the occurrence of several independent haptophyte transitions between marine and freshwater environments.

  4. Freshwater biota and rising pCO2?

    PubMed

    Hasler, Caleb T; Butman, David; Jeffrey, Jennifer D; Suski, Cory D

    2016-01-01

    Rising atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) has caused a suite of environmental issues, however, little is known about how the partial pressure of CO2 (pCO2) in freshwater will be affected by climate change. Freshwater pCO2 varies across systems and is controlled by a diverse array of factors, making it difficult to make predictions about future levels of pCO2. Recent evidence suggests that increasing levels of atmospheric CO2 may directly increase freshwater pCO2 levels in lakes, but rising atmospheric CO2 may also indirectly impact freshwater pCO2 levels in a variety of systems by affecting other contributing factors such as soil respiration, terrestrial productivity and climate regimes. Although future freshwater pCO2 levels remain uncertain, studies have considered the potential impacts of changes to pCO2 levels on freshwater biota. Studies to date have focused on impacts of elevated pCO2 on plankton and macrophytes, and have shown that phytoplankton nutritional quality is reduced, plankton community structure is altered, photosynthesis rates increase and macrophyte distribution shifts with increasing pCO2. However, a number of key knowledge gaps remain and gaining a better understanding of how freshwater pCO2 levels are regulated and how these levels may impact biota, will be important for predicting future responses to climate change.

  5. Arctic Ocean basin liquid freshwater storage trend 1992-2012

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rabe, B.; Karcher, M.; Kauker, F.; Schauer, U.; Toole, J. M.; Krishfield, R. A.; Pisarev, S.; Kikuchi, T.; Su, J.

    2014-02-01

    Freshwater in the Arctic Ocean plays an important role in the regional ocean circulation, sea ice, and global climate. From salinity observed by a variety of platforms, we are able, for the first time, to estimate a statistically reliable liquid freshwater trend from monthly gridded fields over all upper Arctic Ocean basins. From 1992 to 2012 this trend was 600±300 km3 yr-1. A numerical model agrees very well with the observed freshwater changes. A decrease in salinity made up about two thirds of the freshwater trend and a thickening of the upper layer up to one third. The Arctic Ocean Oscillation index, a measure for the regional wind stress curl, correlated well with our freshwater time series. No clear relation to Arctic Oscillation or Arctic Dipole indices could be found. Following other observational studies, an increased Bering Strait freshwater import to the Arctic Ocean, a decreased Davis Strait export, and enhanced net sea ice melt could have played an important role in the freshwater trend we observed.

  6. Response of the Arctic Freshwater Budget to Extreme NAO Forcing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Condron, A.; Winsor, P.

    2007-12-01

    Freshwater release from the Arctic to the deepwater convective regions of the Labrador and Nordic Seas is understood to play an important role in steering decadal global climate variability. An observed freshening of the North Atlantic since the mid-1960s appears to be related to changes in the export of freshwater from the Arctic, and the persistence of a high North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO) during this period. However, the specific response of the Arctic freshwater budget to the NAO is unclear. To investigate this response we use a high resolution (1/3 degree) regional version of the ocean-only MITgcm forced for 12 years with daily NCEP reanalysis data from 1992-2001. At this resolution the model resolves the major Arctic transport pathways, including the Bering Strait and Canadian Archipelago. We ran the model twice, keeping all reanalysis fields the same in both cases, but repeat the wind field of two contrasting NAO years in each run for the extreme negative and positive NAO phases of 1969 and 1989, respectively. Our results highlight a clear response in the Arctic freshwater budget to NAO forcing. Repeat NAO negative wind forcing results in virtually all freshwater being retained in the Arctic. In contrast, repeat NAO positive forcing increases the freshwater export out of the Arctic, primarily via the Fram Strait (54%) and Canadian Archipelago (29%), and results in a total loss in freshwater storage of 14000 km3. We find that the freshwater export via these two pathways increases by virtually the same amount (approx 700 km3 per yr) between the two forcing scenarios, highlighting the important role that the Canadian Archipelago plays in redistributing the freshwater of the Arctic.

  7. Global patterns of freshwater species diversity, threat and endemism

    PubMed Central

    Collen, Ben; Whitton, Felix; Dyer, Ellie E; Baillie, Jonathan E M; Cumberlidge, Neil; Darwall, William R T; Pollock, Caroline; Richman, Nadia I; Soulsby, Anne-Marie; Böhm, Monika

    2014-01-01

    Aim Global-scale studies are required to identify broad-scale patterns in the distributions of species, to evaluate the processes that determine diversity and to determine how similar or different these patterns and processes are among different groups of freshwater species. Broad-scale patterns of spatial variation in species distribution are central to many fundamental questions in macroecology and conservation biology. We aimed to evaluate how congruent three commonly used metrics of diversity were among taxa for six groups of freshwater species. Location Global. Methods We compiled geographical range data on 7083 freshwater species of mammals, amphibians, reptiles, fishes, crabs and crayfish to evaluate how species richness, richness of threatened species and endemism are distributed across freshwater ecosystems. We evaluated how congruent these measures of diversity were among taxa at a global level for a grid cell size of just under 1°. Results We showed that although the risk of extinction faced by freshwater decapods is quite similar to that of freshwater vertebrates, there is a distinct lack of spatial congruence in geographical range between different taxonomic groups at this spatial scale, and a lack of congruence among three commonly used metrics of biodiversity. The risk of extinction for freshwater species was consistently higher than for their terrestrial counterparts. Main conclusions We demonstrate that broad-scale patterns of species richness, threatened-species richness and endemism lack congruence among the six freshwater taxonomic groups examined. Invertebrate species are seldom taken into account in conservation planning. Our study suggests that both the metric of biodiversity and the identity of the taxa on which conservation decisions are based require careful consideration. As geographical range information becomes available for further sets of species, further testing will be warranted into the extent to which geographical variation in

  8. The effect of Hurricane Katrina on nekton communities in the tidal freshwater marshes of Breton Sound, Louisiana, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Piazza, Bryan P.; La Peyre, M.K.

    2009-01-01

    Hurricanes are climatically-induced resource pulses that affect community structure through the combination of physical and chemical habitat change. Estuaries are susceptible to hurricane pulses and are thought to be resilient to habitat change, because biotic communities often return quickly to pre-hurricane conditions. Although several examples provide evidence of quick recovery of estuarine nekton communities following a hurricane, few studies take place in tidal freshwater habitat where physical habitat effects can be extensive and may not be readily mitigated. We examined nekton communities (density, biomass, ?? and ?? diversity, % occurrence by residence status) in tidal freshwater marshes in Breton Sound, Louisiana, before and after a direct hit by Hurricane Katrina (2005). Vegetative marsh loss in the study area was extensive, and elevated salinity persisted for almost 6 months. Post-Katrina nekton density and biomass increased significantly, and the nekton community shifted from one of tidal freshwater/resident species to one containing brackish/migrant species, many of which are characterized by pelagic and benthic life history strategies. By spring 2007, the nekton community had shifted back to tidal freshwater/resident species, despite the enduring loss of vegetated marsh habitat. ?? 2009 Elsevier Ltd.

  9. The effect of Hurricane Katrina on nekton communities in the tidal freshwater marshes of Breton Sound, Louisiana, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piazza, Bryan P.; La Peyre, Megan K.

    2009-06-01

    Hurricanes are climatically-induced resource pulses that affect community structure through the combination of physical and chemical habitat change. Estuaries are susceptible to hurricane pulses and are thought to be resilient to habitat change, because biotic communities often return quickly to pre-hurricane conditions. Although several examples provide evidence of quick recovery of estuarine nekton communities following a hurricane, few studies take place in tidal freshwater habitat where physical habitat effects can be extensive and may not be readily mitigated. We examined nekton communities (density, biomass, α and β diversity, % occurrence by residence status) in tidal freshwater marshes in Breton Sound, Louisiana, before and after a direct hit by Hurricane Katrina (2005). Vegetative marsh loss in the study area was extensive, and elevated salinity persisted for almost 6 months. Post-Katrina nekton density and biomass increased significantly, and the nekton community shifted from one of tidal freshwater/resident species to one containing brackish/migrant species, many of which are characterized by pelagic and benthic life history strategies. By spring 2007, the nekton community had shifted back to tidal freshwater/resident species, despite the enduring loss of vegetated marsh habitat.

  10. Prevalence of Sexual Dysfunctions

    PubMed Central

    Simons, Jeffrey; Carey, Michael P.

    2008-01-01

    Ten years of research that has provided data regarding the prevalence of sexual dysfunctions is reviewed. A thorough review of the literature identified 52 studies that have been published in the 10 years since an earlier review by Spector and Carey (1990). Community samples indicate a current prevalence of 0 - 3% for male orgasmic disorder, 0 - 5% for erectile disorder, and 0 - 3% for male hypoactive sexual desire disorder. Pooling current and 1-year figures provides community prevalence estimates of 7 - 10% for female orgasmic disorder and 4 - 5% for premature ejaculation. Stable community estimates of the current prevalence for the other sexual dysfunctions remain unavailable. Prevalence estimates obtained from primary care and sexuality clinic samples are characteristically higher. Although a relatively large number of studies have been conducted since Spector and Carey’s (1990) review, the lack of methodological rigor of many studies limits the confidence that can be placed in these findings. PMID:11329727

  11. Net effects of multiple stressors in freshwater ecosystems: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Michelle C; Loewen, Charlie J G; Vinebrooke, Rolf D; Chimimba, Christian T

    2016-01-01

    The accelerating rate of global change has focused attention on the cumulative impacts of novel and extreme environmental changes (i.e. stressors), especially in marine ecosystems. As integrators of local catchment and regional processes, freshwater ecosystems are also ranked highly sensitive to the net effects of multiple stressors, yet there has not been a large-scale quantitative synthesis. We analysed data from 88 papers including 286 responses of freshwater ecosystems to paired stressors and discovered that overall, their cumulative mean effect size was less than the sum of their single effects (i.e. an antagonistic interaction). Net effects of dual stressors on diversity and functional performance response metrics were additive and antagonistic, respectively. Across individual studies, a simple vote-counting method revealed that the net effects of stressor pairs were frequently more antagonistic (41%) than synergistic (28%), additive (16%) or reversed (15%). Here, we define a reversal as occurring when the net impact of two stressors is in the opposite direction (negative or positive) from that of the sum of their single effects. While warming paired with nutrification resulted in additive net effects, the overall mean net effect of warming combined with a second stressor was antagonistic. Most importantly, the mean net effects across all stressor pairs and response metrics were consistently antagonistic or additive, contrasting the greater prevalence of reported synergies in marine systems. Here, a possible explanation for more antagonistic responses by freshwater biota to stressors is that the inherent greater environmental variability of smaller aquatic ecosystems fosters greater potential for acclimation and co-adaptation to multiple stressors.

  12. Misidentification of freshwater mussel species (Bivalvia:Unionidae): contributing factors, management implications, and potential solutions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Shea, Colin P.; Peterson, James T.; Wisniewski, Jason M.; Johnson, Nathan A.

    2011-01-01

    Surveys of freshwater mussel populations are used frequently to inform conservation decisions by providing information about the status and distribution of species. It is generally accepted that not all mussels or species are collected during surveys, and incomplete detection of individuals and species can bias data and can affect inferences. However, considerably less attention has been given to the potential effects of species misidentification. To evaluate the prevalence of and potential reasons for species misidentification, we conducted a laboratory-based identification exercise and quantified the relationships between mussel species characteristics, observer experience, and misidentification rate. We estimated that misidentification was fairly common, with rates averaging 27% across all species and ranging from 0 to 56%, and was related to mussel shell characteristics and observer experience. Most notably, species with shell texturing were 6.09× less likely than smooth-shelled species to be misidentified. Misidentification rates declined with observer experience, but for many species the risk of misidentification averaged >10% even for observers with moderate levels of experience (5–6 y). In addition, misidentification rates among observers showed substantial variability after controlling for experience. Our results suggest that species misidentification may be common in field surveys of freshwater mussels and could potentially bias estimates of population status and trends. Misidentification rates possibly could be reduced through use of regional workshops, testing and certification programs, and the availability of archived specimens and tissue samples in museum collections.

  13. High-resolution sequencing reveals unexplored archaeal diversity in freshwater wetland soils.

    PubMed

    Narrowe, Adrienne B; Angle, Jordan C; Daly, Rebecca A; Stefanik, Kay C; Wrighton, Kelly C; Miller, Christopher S

    2017-02-20

    Despite being key contributors to biogeochemical processes, archaea are frequently outnumbered by bacteria, and consequently are underrepresented in combined molecular surveys. Here, we demonstrate an approach to concurrently survey the archaea alongside the bacteria with high-resolution 16S rRNA gene sequencing, linking these community data to geochemical parameters. We applied this integrated analysis to hydric soils sampled across a model methane-emitting freshwater wetland. Geochemical profiles, archaeal communities, and bacterial communities were independently correlated with soil depth and water cover. Centimeters of soil depth and corresponding geochemical shifts consistently affected microbial community structure more than hundreds of meters of lateral distance. Methanogens with diverse metabolisms were detected across the wetland, but displayed surprising OTU-level partitioning by depth. Candidatus Methanoperedens spp. archaea thought to perform anaerobic oxidation of methane linked to iron reduction were abundant. Domain-specific sequencing also revealed unexpectedly diverse non-methane-cycling archaeal members. OTUs within the underexplored Woesearchaeota and Bathyarchaeota were prevalent across the wetland, with subgroups and individual OTUs exhibiting distinct occupancy and abundance distributions aligned with environmental gradients. This study adds to our understanding of ecological range for key archaeal taxa in a model freshwater wetland, and links these taxa and individual OTUs to hypotheses about processes governing biogeochemical cycling. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  14. A new numerical benchmark of a freshwater lens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoeckl, L.; Walther, M.; Graf, T.

    2016-04-01

    A numerical benchmark for 2-D variable-density flow and solute transport in a freshwater lens is presented. The benchmark is based on results of laboratory experiments conducted by Stoeckl and Houben (2012) using a sand tank on the meter scale. This benchmark describes the formation and degradation of a freshwater lens over time as it can be found under real-world islands. An error analysis gave the appropriate spatial and temporal discretization of 1 mm and 8.64 s, respectively. The calibrated parameter set was obtained using the parameter estimation tool PEST. Comparing density-coupled and density-uncoupled results showed that the freshwater-saltwater interface position is strongly dependent on density differences. A benchmark that adequately represents saltwater intrusion and that includes realistic features of coastal aquifers or freshwater lenses was lacking. This new benchmark was thus developed and is demonstrated to be suitable to test variable-density groundwater models applied to saltwater intrusion investigations.

  15. Biology and ecology of higher Diptera from freshwater wetlands.

    PubMed

    Keiper, Joe B; Walton, William E; Foote, Benjamin A

    2002-01-01

    Although studies of freshwater entomofauna frequently do not include the biodiversity and ecological roles of higher Diptera, cyclorraphous flies are often numerous and species rich in wetlands. Seventeen families are commonly found in freshwater wetlands, with Ephydridae, Chloropidae, Sciomyzidae, Sphaeroceridae, and Scathophagidae being among the most important in terms of population size and species richness. Difficulty with sampling cryptic larval habitats and species identification challenges may account for the exclusion of acalyptrate and other dipterans from wetlands ecology studies. Large populations are facilitated by the high productivity of freshwater wetlands and the high intrinsic rate of increase characteristic of many species. Higher dipterans exist in all freshwater wetland types, are microhabitat selective, and play significant roles in food webs. The varied strategies for food acquisition and patterns of spatial and temporal distribution limit ecological overlap among the higher Diptera.

  16. AN INTEGRATED WATERSHED APPROACH LINKING SALMONID PRODUCTIVITY TO FRESHWATER HABITAT

    EPA Science Inventory

    EPA's Western Ecology Division is undertaking research addressing catchment-scale dynamics of freshwater habitat productivity for native fishes. Through partnerships with state and federal agencies and private landowners, current field efforts focus on linkages among stream chemi...

  17. Extinction rates in North American freshwater fishes, 1900-2010

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Burkhead, Noel M.

    2012-01-01

    Widespread evidence shows that the modern rates of extinction in many plants and animals exceed background rates in the fossil record. In the present article, I investigate this issue with regard to North American freshwater fishes. From 1898 to 2006, 57 taxa became extinct, and three distinct populations were extirpated from the continent. Since 1989, the numbers of extinct North American fishes have increased by 25%. From the end of the nineteenth century to the present, modern extinctions varied by decade but significantly increased after 1950 (post-1950s mean = 7.5 extinct taxa per decade). In the twentieth century, freshwater fishes had the highest extinction rate worldwide among vertebrates. The modern extinction rate for North American freshwater fishes is conservatively estimated to be 877 times greater than the background extinction rate for freshwater fishes (one extinction every 3 million years). Reasonable estimates project that future increases in extinctions will range from 53 to 86 species by 2050.

  18. [Latin American malacology. Freshwater mollusks from Argentina].

    PubMed

    Rumi, Alejandra; Gregoric, Diego E Gutiérrez; Núñez, Verónica; Darrigran, Gustavo A

    2008-03-01

    A report and an updated list with comments on the species of freshwater molluscs of Argentina which covers an area of 2 777 815 km2 is presented. Distributions of Gastropoda and Bivalvia families, endemic, exotic, invasive as well as entities of sanitary importance are also studied and recommendations on their conservation are provided. Molluscs related to the Del Plata Basin have been thoroughly studied in comparison to others areas of the country. This fauna exhibits relatively the biggest specific richness and keeps its affinity with the fauna of other regions of the basin in areas of Paraguay and Brasil. The 4 500 records of molluscs considered in this paper arise from the study of the collections of Museo Argentino de Ciencias Naturales "Bernardino Rivadavia", Buenos Aires; Museo de La Plata, La Plata and Fundación "Miguel Lillo", Tucumán. These institutions keep very important collections of molluscs in southern South America. Field information has recently been obtained and localities cited by other authors are also included in the data base. Until today, 166 species have been described, 101 belonging to 10 families of Gastropoda and 65 to 7 of Bivalvia. Families with highest specific richness are Lithoglyphidae (22) and Sphaeriidae (25), respectively. The number of endemic species (those present only in Argentina) by family is: Gastropoda: Ampullariidae (1), Cochliopidae (10), Lithoglyphidae (11), Thiariidae (3), Chilinidae (11), Lymnaeidae (2) and Physidae (2?); Bivalvia: Hyriidae (1?); Etheriidae (1?) and Sphaeriidae (10). Families with a distribution that comprise almost the whole country are: the Sphaeriidae and the gastropods Cochliopidae, Chilinidae and Lymnaeidae. Families Erodonidae and Solecurtidae (Bivalvia) were registered in mixohaline environments from Buenos Aires province. Gastropod families Thiaridae and Glacidorbiidae show a very restricted distribution. The rest of the families are present mainly in the center and north of the country

  19. Threatened and Endangered Freshwater Fish and Mussel Species Richness

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    These data represent predicted current distributions of all US listed Threatened and Endangered freshwater fish and freshwater mussels in the Middle-Atlantic region. The data are available for both 8-digit HUCs and EMAP hexagons and represent total species counts for each spatial unit. More information about these resources, including the variables used in this study, may be found here: https://edg.epa.gov/data/Public/ORD/NERL/ReVA/ReVA_Data.zip.

  20. Restricted-Range Fishes and the Conservation of Brazilian Freshwaters

    PubMed Central

    Nogueira, Cristiano; Buckup, Paulo A.; Menezes, Naercio A.; Oyakawa, Osvaldo T.; Kasecker, Thais P.; Ramos Neto, Mario B.; da Silva, José Maria C.

    2010-01-01

    Background Freshwaters are the most threatened ecosystems on earth. Although recent assessments provide data on global priority regions for freshwater conservation, local scale priorities remain unknown. Refining the scale of global biodiversity assessments (both at terrestrial and freshwater realms) and translating these into conservation priorities on the ground remains a major challenge to biodiversity science, and depends directly on species occurrence data of high taxonomic and geographic resolution. Brazil harbors the richest freshwater ichthyofauna in the world, but knowledge on endemic areas and conservation in Brazilian rivers is still scarce. Methodology/Principal Findings Using data on environmental threats and revised species distribution data we detect and delineate 540 small watershed areas harboring 819 restricted-range fishes in Brazil. Many of these areas are already highly threatened, as 159 (29%) watersheds have lost more than 70% of their original vegetation cover, and only 141 (26%) show significant overlap with formally protected areas or indigenous lands. We detected 220 (40%) critical watersheds overlapping hydroelectric dams or showing both poor formal protection and widespread habitat loss; these sites harbor 344 endemic fish species that may face extinction if no conservation action is in place in the near future. Conclusions/Significance We provide the first analysis of site-scale conservation priorities in the richest freshwater ecosystems of the globe. Our results corroborate the hypothesis that freshwater biodiversity has been neglected in former conservation assessments. The study provides a simple and straightforward method for detecting freshwater priority areas based on endemism and threat, and represents a starting point for integrating freshwater and terrestrial conservation in representative and biogeographically consistent site-scale conservation strategies, that may be scaled-up following naturally linked drainage systems

  1. A subtropical fate awaited freshwater discharged from glacial Lake Agassiz

    DOE PAGES

    Condron, Alan; Winsor, Peter

    2011-02-10

    The 8.2 kyr event is the largest abrupt climatic change recorded in the last 10,000 years, and is widely hypothesized to have been triggered by the release of thousands of kilometers cubed of freshwater into the North Atlantic Ocean. Using a high-resolution (1/6°) global, ocean-ice circulation model we present an alternative view that freshwater discharged from glacial Lake Agassiz would have remained on the continental shelf as a narrow, buoyant, coastal current, and would have been transported south into the subtropical North Atlantic. The pathway we describe is in contrast to the conceptual idea that freshwater from this lake outburstmore » spread over most of the sub-polar North Atlantic, and covered the deep, open-ocean, convection regions. This coastally confined freshwater pathway is consistent with the present-day routing of freshwater from Hudson Bay, as well as paleoceanographic evidence of this event. In this study, using a coarse-resolution (2.6°) version of the same model, we demonstrate that the previously reported spreading of freshwater across the sub-polar North Atlantic results from the inability of numerical models of this resolution to accurately resolve narrow coastal flows, producing instead a diffuse circulation that advects freshwater away from the boundaries. To understand the climatic impact of freshwater released in the past or future (e.g. Greenland and Antarctica), the ocean needs to be modeled at a resolution sufficient to resolve the dynamics of narrow, coastal buoyant flows.« less

  2. Freshwater Cyanobacteria (Blue-Green Algae) Toxins: Isolation and Characterization

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-05-01

    division Cyanophyta , commonly called blue -green algae cr cyanobacteria . Although cyanobacteria are found in almost any environment ranging from hot...p ecst Available Copy ~’ COPy Ni AD FRESHWATER CYANOBACTERIA ( BLUE -GREEN ALGAE ) TOXINS:’ I ISOLATION AND CHARACTERIZATION < DTIC ANNUAL/FINAL...AA I 78 11. TITLE (In•.ju . ’,curry Ci.si fication) Freshwater Cyanobacteria ( blue -green algae ) Toxins: Isolatior and CharacteriZation 12. PERSONAL

  3. Freshwater Cyanobacteria (Blue-Green Algae) Toxins: Isolation and Characterization

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-01-15

    exclusively caused by strains of species that are members of the L division Cyanophyta , commonly called blue -green algae or cyanobacteria . Although...0 0 Lfl (NAD FRESHWATER CYANOBACTERIA ( BLUE -GREEN ALGAE ) TOXINS: ISOLATION AND CHARACTERIZATION ANNCUAL REPORT Wayne W. Carmichael Sarojini Bose...Frederick, Maryland 21701-5012 62770A 6277GA871 AA 378 11 TITLE &who* Secwn~y C11mrfaon) Freshwater Cyanobacteria ( blue -green algae ) Toxins: Isolation

  4. Freshwater Plants Synthesize Sulfated Polysaccharides: Heterogalactans from Water Hyacinth (Eicchornia crassipes)

    PubMed Central

    Dantas-Santos, Nednaldo; Gomes, Dayanne Lopes; Costa, Leandro Silva; Cordeiro, Sara Lima; Costa, Mariana Santos Santana Pereira; Trindade, Edvaldo Silva; Franco, Célia Regina Chavichiolo; Scortecci, Kátia Castanho; Leite, Edda Lisboa; Rocha, Hugo Alexandre Oliveira

    2012-01-01

    Sulfated polysaccharides (SP) are found mainly in seaweeds and animals. To date, they have only been found in six plants and all inhabit saline environments. Furthermore, there are no reports of SP in freshwater or terrestrial plants. As such, this study investigated the presence of SP in freshwaters Eichhornia crassipes, Egeria densa, Egeria naja, Cabomba caroliniana, Hydrocotyle bonariensis and Nymphaea ampla. Chemical analysis identified sulfate in N. ampla, H. bonariensis and, more specifically, E. crassipes. In addition, chemical analysis, FT-IR spectroscopy, histological analysis, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy-dispersive X-ray analysis (EDXA), as well as agarose gel electrophoresis detected SP in all parts of E. crassipes, primarily in the root (epidermis and vascular bundle). Galactose, glucose and arabinose are the main monosaccharides found in the sulfated polysaccharides from E. crassipes. In activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT) test, to evaluate the intrinsic coagulation pathway, SP from the root and rhizome prolonged the coagulation time to double the baseline value, with 0.1 mg/mL and 0.15 mg/mL, respectively. However, SP from the leaf and petiole showed no anticoagulant activity. Eichornia SP demonstrated promising anticoagulant potential and have been selected for further studies on bioguided fractionation; isolation and characterization of pure polysaccharides from this species. Additionally in vivo experiments are needed and are already underway. PMID:22312297

  5. Freshwater plants synthesize sulfated polysaccharides: heterogalactans from Water Hyacinth (Eicchornia crassipes).

    PubMed

    Dantas-Santos, Nednaldo; Gomes, Dayanne Lopes; Costa, Leandro Silva; Cordeiro, Sara Lima; Costa, Mariana Santos Santana Pereira; Trindade, Edvaldo Silva; Franco, Célia Regina Chavichiolo; Scortecci, Kátia Castanho; Leite, Edda Lisboa; Rocha, Hugo Alexandre Oliveira

    2012-01-01

    Sulfated polysaccharides (SP) are found mainly in seaweeds and animals. To date, they have only been found in six plants and all inhabit saline environments. Furthermore, there are no reports of SP in freshwater or terrestrial plants. As such, this study investigated the presence of SP in freshwaters Eichhornia crassipes, Egeria densa, Egeria naja, Cabomba caroliniana, Hydrocotyle bonariensis and Nymphaea ampla. Chemical analysis identified sulfate in N. ampla, H. bonariensis and, more specifically, E. crassipes. In addition, chemical analysis, FT-IR spectroscopy, histological analysis, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy-dispersive X-ray analysis (EDXA), as well as agarose gel electrophoresis detected SP in all parts of E. crassipes, primarily in the root (epidermis and vascular bundle). Galactose, glucose and arabinose are the main monosaccharides found in the sulfated polysaccharides from E. crassipes. In activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT) test, to evaluate the intrinsic coagulation pathway, SP from the root and rhizome prolonged the coagulation time to double the baseline value, with 0.1 mg/mL and 0.15 mg/mL, respectively. However, SP from the leaf and petiole showed no anticoagulant activity. Eichornia SP demonstrated promising anticoagulant potential and have been selected for further studies on bioguided fractionation; isolation and characterization of pure polysaccharides from this species. Additionally in vivo experiments are needed and are already underway.

  6. A preliminary evaluation of sediment quality assessment values for freshwater ecosystems

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Smith, Sherri L.; MacDonald, Donald D.; Keenleyside, Karen A.; Ingersoll, Christopher G.; Field, L. Jay

    1996-01-01

    Sediment quality assessment values were developed using a weight of evidence approach in which matching biological and chemical data from numerous modelling, laboratory, and field studies performed on freshwater sediments were compiled and analyzed. Two assessment values (a threshold effect level (TEL) and a probable effect level(PEL)) were derived for 23 substances, including eight trace metals, six individual polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), total polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), and eight pesticides. The two values defined three ranges of chemical concentrations; those that were (1) rarely, (2) occasionally, and (3) frequently associated with adverse biological effects. An evaluation of the percent incidence of adverse biological effects within the three concentration ranges indicated that the reliability of the TELs (i.e., the degree to which the TELs represent concentrations within the data set below which adverse effects rarely occur) was consistently good. However, this preliminary evaluation indicated that most of the PELs were less reliable (i.e., they did not adequately represent concentrations within the data set above which adverse effects frequently occur). Nonetheless, these values were often comparable to other biological effects-based assessment values (which were themselves reliable), which increased the level of confidence that could be placed in our values. This method is being used as a basis for developing national sediment quality guidelines for freshwater systems in Canada and sediment effect concentrations as part of the Assessment and Remediation of Contaminated Sediments (ARCS) program in the Great Lakes.

  7. Electromagnetic methods for mapping freshwater lenses on Micronesian atoll islands

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Anthony, S.S.

    1992-01-01

    The overall shape of freshwater lenses can be determined by applying electromagnetic methods and inverse layered-earth modeling to the mapping of atoll island freshwater lenses. Conductivity profiles were run across the width of the inhabited islands at Mwoakilloa, Pingelap, and Sapwuahfik atolls of the Pohnpei State, Federated States of Micronesia using a dual-loop, frequency-domain, electromagnetic profiling system. Six values of apparent conductivity were recorded at each sounding station and were used to interpret layer conductivities and/or thicknesses. A three-layer model that includes the unsaturated, freshwater, and saltwater zones was used to simulate apparent-conductivity data measured in the field. Interpreted results were compared with chloride-concentration data from monitoring wells and indicate that the interface between freshwater and saltwater layers, defined from electromagnetic data, is located in the upper part of the transition zone, where the chloride-concentration profile shows a rapid increase with depth. The electromagnetic method can be used to interpret the thickness of the freshwater between monitoring wells, but can not be used to interpret the thickness of freshwater from monitoring wells to the margin of an island. ?? 1992.

  8. Electromagnetic methods for mapping freshwater lenses on Micronesian atoll islands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anthony, Stephen S.

    1992-08-01

    The overall shape of freshwater lenses can be determined by applying electromagnetic methods and inverse layered-earth modeling to the mapping of atoll island freshwater lenses. Conductivity profiles were run across the width of the inhabited islands at Mwoakilloa, Pingelap, and Sapwuahfik atolls of the Pohnpei State, Federated States of Micronesia using a dual-loop, frequency-domain, electromagnetic profiling system. Six values of apparent conductivity were recorded at each sounding station and were used to interpret layer conductivities and/or thicknesses. A three-layer model that includes the unsaturated, freshwater, and saltwater zones was used to simulate apparent-conductivity data measured in the field. Interpreted results were compared with chloride-concentration data from monitoring wells and indicate that the interface between freshwater and saltwater layers, defined from electromagnetic data, is located in the upper part of the transition zone, where the chloride-concentration profile shows a rapid increase with depth. The electromagnetic method can be used to interpret the thickness of the freshwater between monitoring wells, but can not be used to interpret the thickness of freshwater from monitoring wells to the margin of an island.

  9. Evaluation of Freshwater Resources and Sustainability on Small Islands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hancock, K. H.

    2003-12-01

    Small island states are especially vulnerable to climate change and the associated impacts to freshwater resources. A methodology is proposed to evaluate freshwater resources and the related sustainability issues on small islands. Tools that can be used to evaluate freshwater resources include return period analysis for wet and dry cycles of precipitation and historical long-term analysis of temperature, precipitation, and sea level rise over the record of available data. Additionally, focused analysis on time periods of concern can be performed. This includes development of a water budget to identify critical shortfalls in water supply. Sea-level rise is a particular area of concern to small island states because for some, much of the land area is only 3-4 meters above the present mean sea level. Sea level rise projections, along with critical tidal level evaluation and historical shoreline erosion rates, can help small islands examine how these factors will affect freshwater resources. Finally, an examination of the combined effects of climate change and other stressors to the future status of freshwater resources can be performed. This will help small island states adapt strategies and respond to the projected future status of their freshwater resources.

  10. Stormwater runoff drives viral community composition changes in inland freshwaters

    PubMed Central

    Williamson, Kurt E.; Harris, Jamie V.; Green, Jasmin C.; Rahman, Faraz; Chambers, Randolph M.

    2014-01-01

    Storm events impact freshwater microbial communities by transporting terrestrial viruses and other microbes to freshwater systems, and by potentially resuspending microbes from bottom sediments. The magnitude of these impacts on freshwater ecosystems is unknown and largely unexplored. Field studies carried out at two discrete sites in coastal Virginia (USA) were used to characterize the viral load carried by runoff and to test the hypothesis that terrestrial viruses introduced through stormwater runoff change the composition of freshwater microbial communities. Field data gathered from an agricultural watershed indicated that primary runoff can contain viral densities approximating those of receiving waters. Furthermore, viruses attached to suspended colloids made up a large fraction of the total load, particularly in early stages of the storm. At a second field site (stormwater retention pond), RAPD-PCR profiling showed that the viral community of the pond changed dramatically over the course of two intense storms while relatively little change was observed over similar time scales in the absence of disturbance. Comparisons of planktonic and particle-associated viral communities revealed two completely distinct communities, suggesting that particle-associated viruses represent a potentially large and overlooked portion of aquatic viral abundance and diversity. Our findings show that stormwater runoff can quickly change the composition of freshwater microbial communities. Based on these findings, increased storms in the coastal mid-Atlantic region predicted by most climate change models will likely have important impacts on the structure and function of local freshwater microbial communities. PMID:24672520

  11. Abundant iron and sulfur oxidizers in the stratified sediment of a eutrophic freshwater reservoir with annual cyanobacterial blooms

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Long; Lee, Chang Soo; Ahn, Chi-Yong; Lee, Hyung-Gwan; Lee, Sanghyup; Shin, Hyeon Ho; Lim, Dhongil; Oh, Hee-Mock

    2017-01-01

    The microbial community in eutrophic freshwater sediment was investigated from a 67-cm-deep sediment core collected from the Daechung Reservoir in South Korea, where cyanobacterial blooms have occurred annually for the past 30 years. The majority of core sediments were characterized by dark-grayish, fine-grained mud with abundant gas-escaped and thinly laminated layers. Intervals of summer and winter seasons were represented by periodic peaks of geochemical profiles of parameters such as grain size and relative carbon mass ratios to various nutrients such as nitrogen, sulfur, and phosphorus. In bacteria, Proteobacteria (66.6%) was the most prevalent phylum, followed by Chloroflexi (8.9%), Bacteroidetes (5.1%), and Spirochaetes (2.6%). Archaea were also abundant, representing approximately half of the total prokaryotes in the sediments. Notably, three Bacteria (Sulfuricurvum, Sideroxydans, and Gallionella) and one Archaea (Thermoplasmata) accounted for 43.4% and 38.4% of the total bacteria and archaea, respectively, implying that iron and sulfur oxidizing microorganisms dominate in this eutrophic freshwater sediment. These results indicate that 1) eutrophic freshwater lakes in monsoon climates undergo a stratified sedimentary process with seasonal and annual variations in geochemical and microbial profiles, and 2) the microbial oxidative metabolism of iron and sulfur is notably active in sediments from a eutrophic lake. PMID:28266642

  12. Abundant iron and sulfur oxidizers in the stratified sediment of a eutrophic freshwater reservoir with annual cyanobacterial blooms.

    PubMed

    Jin, Long; Lee, Chang Soo; Ahn, Chi-Yong; Lee, Hyung-Gwan; Lee, Sanghyup; Shin, Hyeon Ho; Lim, Dhongil; Oh, Hee-Mock

    2017-03-07

    The microbial community in eutrophic freshwater sediment was investigated from a 67-cm-deep sediment core collected from the Daechung Reservoir in South Korea, where cyanobacterial blooms have occurred annually for the past 30 years. The majority of core sediments were characterized by dark-grayish, fine-grained mud with abundant gas-escaped and thinly laminated layers. Intervals of summer and winter seasons were represented by periodic peaks of geochemical profiles of parameters such as grain size and relative carbon mass ratios to various nutrients such as nitrogen, sulfur, and phosphorus. In bacteria, Proteobacteria (66.6%) was the most prevalent phylum, followed by Chloroflexi (8.9%), Bacteroidetes (5.1%), and Spirochaetes (2.6%). Archaea were also abundant, representing approximately half of the total prokaryotes in the sediments. Notably, three Bacteria (Sulfuricurvum, Sideroxydans, and Gallionella) and one Archaea (Thermoplasmata) accounted for 43.4% and 38.4% of the total bacteria and archaea, respectively, implying that iron and sulfur oxidizing microorganisms dominate in this eutrophic freshwater sediment. These results indicate that 1) eutrophic freshwater lakes in monsoon climates undergo a stratified sedimentary process with seasonal and annual variations in geochemical and microbial profiles, and 2) the microbial oxidative metabolism of iron and sulfur is notably active in sediments from a eutrophic lake.

  13. Abundant iron and sulfur oxidizers in the stratified sediment of a eutrophic freshwater reservoir with annual cyanobacterial blooms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Long; Lee, Chang Soo; Ahn, Chi-Yong; Lee, Hyung-Gwan; Lee, Sanghyup; Shin, Hyeon Ho; Lim, Dhongil; Oh, Hee-Mock

    2017-03-01

    The microbial community in eutrophic freshwater sediment was investigated from a 67-cm-deep sediment core collected from the Daechung Reservoir in South Korea, where cyanobacterial blooms have occurred annually for the past 30 years. The majority of core sediments were characterized by dark-grayish, fine-grained mud with abundant gas-escaped and thinly laminated layers. Intervals of summer and winter seasons were represented by periodic peaks of geochemical profiles of parameters such as grain size and relative carbon mass ratios to various nutrients such as nitrogen, sulfur, and phosphorus. In bacteria, Proteobacteria (66.6%) was the most prevalent phylum, followed by Chloroflexi (8.9%), Bacteroidetes (5.1%), and Spirochaetes (2.6%). Archaea were also abundant, representing approximately half of the total prokaryotes in the sediments. Notably, three Bacteria (Sulfuricurvum, Sideroxydans, and Gallionella) and one Archaea (Thermoplasmata) accounted for 43.4% and 38.4% of the total bacteria and archaea, respectively, implying that iron and sulfur oxidizing microorganisms dominate in this eutrophic freshwater sediment. These results indicate that 1) eutrophic freshwater lakes in monsoon climates undergo a stratified sedimentary process with seasonal and annual variations in geochemical and microbial profiles, and 2) the microbial oxidative metabolism of iron and sulfur is notably active in sediments from a eutrophic lake.

  14. Diverse migration strategy between freshwater and seawater habitats in the freshwater eel genus Anguilla.

    PubMed

    Arai, T; Chino, N

    2012-07-01

    The freshwater eels of the genus Anguilla, which are catadromous, migrate between freshwater growth habitats and offshore spawning areas. A number of recent studies, however, found examples of the temperate species Anguilla anguilla, Anguilla rostrata, Anguilla japonica, Anguilla australis and Anguilla dieffenbachii that have never migrated into fresh water, spending their entire life history in the ocean. Furthermore, those studies found an intermediate type between marine and freshwater residents, which appear to frequently move between different environments during their growth phase. The discovery of marine and brackish-water residents Anguilla spp. suggests that they do not all have to be catadromous, and it calls into question the generalized classification of diadromous fishes. There has been little available information, however, concerning migration in tropical Anguilla spp. Anguilla marmorata, shows three fluctuation patterns: (1) continuous residence in fresh water, (2) continuous residence in brackish water and (3) residence in fresh water after recruitment, while returning to brackish water. Such migratory patterns were found in other tropical species, Anguilla bicolor bicolor and Anguilla bicolor pacifica. In A. b. bicolor collected in a coastal lagoon of Indonesia, two further patterns of habitat use were found: (1) constantly living in either brackish water or sea water with no freshwater life and (2) habitat shift from fresh water to brackish water or sea water. The wide range of environmental habitat use indicates that migratory behaviour of tropical Anguilla spp. is facultative among fresh, brackish and marine waters during their growth phases after recruitment to the coastal areas. Further, the migratory behaviours of tropical Anguilla spp. appear to differ in each habitat in response to inter and intra-specific competition. The results suggest that tropical Anguilla spp. have a flexible pattern of migration, with an ability to adapt to various

  15. 2007 NWFSC Tidal Freshwater Genetics Results

    SciTech Connect

    David Teel

    2008-03-18

    Genetic Analysis of Juvenile Chinook Salmon for inclusion in 'Ecology of Juvenile Salmonids in Shallow Tidal Freshwater Habitats in the Vicinity of the Sandy River Delta, lower Columbia River, 2007. Final report submitted to the Bonneville Power Administration, Contract DE-AC05-76RLO1830.' Genotypic data were collected for 108 Chinook salmon and used in the genetic stock identification analysis. Results of the mixture analysis are presented in Table 1. Percentage estimates for four genetic stock groups (West Cascade Tributary Fall, Willamette River Spring, Deschutes River Fall, and Upper Columbia River Summer/Fall) ranged from 11% to 43%, all with non-zero lower 95% confidence intervals. Small contributions were also estimated for the West Cascade Tributary Spring (3%) and Snake River Fall (6%) stock groups. Results of individual fish probability assignments were summed by collection date (Figure 1) and site (Figure 2). Assignment probabilities for the most likely stock group for each individual ranged from 0.51 to 1.00 with approximately 60% of the assignments greater than 0.90 (data not shown). Nearly all of the low probability assignments were fish with assignments split between the Deschutes River Fall and Upper Columbia River Summer/Fall groups.

  16. Two new freshwater eutardigrade species from Sicily.

    PubMed

    Pilato, Giovanni; Sabella, Giorgio; Lisi, Oscar

    2015-02-11

    Two new species of freshwater Eutardigrada are described from Sicily: Isohypsibius rusticus sp. nov. and Isohypsibius zappalai sp. nov. The former species has eye spots, ornamented body surface with many, variously sized tubercles; bucco-pharyngeal apparatus of the Isohypsibius type; pharyngeal bulb with apophyses and two rod-shaped macroplacoids; microplacoid absent; claws, of the Isohypsibius type, well developed, with long and thin common basal portion; main branches of all claws without free accessory points; very thin lunules present; cuticular bars on the legs absent. Isohypsibius zappalai sp. nov. has eye spots; entire body surface with small tubercles rounded in shape, fairly uniformly sized and tending to form transverse lines; bucco-pharyngeal apparatus of the Isohypsibius type, pharyngeal bulb with apophyses and two macroplacoids; microplacoid absent; claws of the Isohypsibius type, well developed, with long common basal portion and both main and secondary branches with a wide proximal portion. Main branches of all claws with accessory points; small, flexible lunules present; cuticular bars on the legs absent.

  17. Biomass of freshwater turtles: a geographic comparison

    SciTech Connect

    Congdon, J.D.; Greene, J.L.; Gibbons, J.W.

    1986-01-01

    Standing crop biomass of freshwater turtles and minimum annual biomass of egg production were calculated for marsh and farm pond habitats in South Caroling and in Michigan. The species in South Carolina included Chelydra serpentina, Deirochelys reticularia, Kinosternon subrubrum, Pseudemys floridana, P. scripta and Sternotherus odoratus. The species in Michigan were Chelydra serpentina, Chrysemys picta and Emydoidea blandingi. Biomass was also determined for a single species population of P. scripta on a barrier island near Charleston, South Carolina. Population density and biomass of Pseudemys scripta in Green Pond on Capers Island were higher than densities and biomass of the entire six-species community studied on the mainland. In both the farm pond and marsh habitat in South Carolina P. scripta was the numerically dominant species and had the highest biomass. In Michigan, Chrysemys picta was the numerically dominant species; however, the biomass of Chelydra serpentina was higher. The three-species community in Michigan in two marshes (58 kg ha/sup -1/ and 46 kg ha/sup -1/) and farm ponds (23 kg ha/sup -1/) had lower biomasses than did the six-species community in a South Carolina marsh (73 kg/sup -1/). Minimum annual egg production by all species in South Carolina averaged 1.93 kg ha/sup -1/ and in Michigan averaged 2.89 kg ha/sup -1/ of marsh.

  18. Cadmium neurotoxicity to a freshwater planarian.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jui-Pin; Lee, Hui-Ling; Li, Mei-Hui

    2014-11-01

    Although freshwater planarians are evolutionarily primitive, they are some of the simplest bilateral animals possessing integrated neural networks similar to those in vertebrates. We attempted to develop planarian Dugesia japonica as a model for investigating the neurotoxicity of environmental pollutants such as cadmium (Cd). This study was therefore designed to study the effects of Cd on the locomotor activity, neurobehavior, and neurological enzymes of D. japonica. After planarians were exposed to Cd at high concentrations, altered neurobehavior was observed that exhibited concentration-dependent patterns. Morphological alterations in Cd-treated planarians included irregular shape, body elongation, screw-like hyperkinesia, and bridge-like position. To study the direct effects of Cd on neurological enzymes, tissue homogenates of planarians were incubated in vitro with Cd before their activity was measured. Results showed that acetylcholinesterase (AChE), adenosine triphosphatase (ATPase), and monoamine oxidase A (MAO-A) activities were inhibited in a concentration-dependent manner. MAO-B activity was significantly induced by Cd at low concentrations and inhibited at high concentrations. Changes in the in vivo activity of AChE and ATPase were also found after planarians were treated with Cd at a sublethal concentration (5.56 μM). These observations indicate that neurotransmission systems in planarians are disturbed after Cd exposure.

  19. Forests fuel fish growth in freshwater deltas

    PubMed Central

    Tanentzap, Andrew J.; Szkokan-Emilson, Erik J.; Kielstra, Brian W.; Arts, Michael T.; Yan, Norman D.; Gunn, John M.

    2014-01-01

    Aquatic ecosystems are fuelled by biogeochemical inputs from surrounding lands and within-lake primary production. Disturbances that change these inputs may affect how aquatic ecosystems function and deliver services vital to humans. Here we test, using a forest cover gradient across eight separate catchments, whether disturbances that remove terrestrial biomass lower organic matter inputs into freshwater lakes, thereby reducing food web productivity. We focus on deltas formed at the stream-lake interface where terrestrial-derived particulate material is deposited. We find that organic matter export increases from more forested catchments, enhancing bacterial biomass. This transfers energy upwards through communities of heavier zooplankton, leading to a fourfold increase in weights of planktivorous young-of-the-year fish. At least 34% of fish biomass is supported by terrestrial primary production, increasing to 66% with greater forest cover. Habitat tracers confirm fish were closely associated with individual catchments, demonstrating that watershed protection and restoration increase biomass in critical life-stages of fish. PMID:24915965

  20. Predicting spatial similarity of freshwater fish biodiversity

    PubMed Central

    Azaele, Sandro; Muneepeerakul, Rachata; Maritan, Amos; Rinaldo, Andrea; Rodriguez-Iturbe, Ignacio

    2009-01-01

    A major issue in modern ecology is to understand how ecological complexity at broad scales is regulated by mechanisms operating at the organismic level. What specific underlying processes are essential for a macroecological pattern to emerge? Here, we analyze the analytical predictions of a general model suitable for describing the spatial biodiversity similarity in river ecosystems, and benchmark them against the empirical occurrence data of freshwater fish species collected in the Mississippi–Missouri river system. Encapsulating immigration, emigration, and stochastic noise, and without resorting to species abundance data, the model is able to reproduce the observed probability distribution of the Jaccard similarity index at any given distance. In addition to providing an excellent agreement with the empirical data, this approach accounts for heterogeneities of different subbasins, suggesting a strong dependence of biodiversity similarity on their respective climates. Strikingly, the model can also predict the actual probability distribution of the Jaccard similarity index for any distance when considering just a relatively small sample. The proposed framework supports the notion that simplified macroecological models are capable of predicting fundamental patterns—a theme at the heart of modern community ecology. PMID:19359481

  1. Title: Freshwater phytoplankton responses to global warming.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Heiko; Fanesi, Andrea; Wilhelm, Christian

    2016-09-20

    Global warming alters species composition and function of freshwater ecosystems. However, the impact of temperature on primary productivity is not sufficiently understood and water quality models need to be improved in order to assess the quantitative and qualitative changes of aquatic communities. On the basis of experimental data, we demonstrate that the commonly used photosynthetic and water chemistry parameters alone are not sufficient for modeling phytoplankton growth under changing temperature regimes. We present some new aspects of the acclimation process with respect to temperature and how contrasting responses may be explained by a more complete physiological knowledge of the energy flow from photons to new biomass. We further suggest including additional bio-markers/traits for algal growth such as carbon allocation patterns to increase the explanatory power of such models. Although carbon allocation patterns are promising and functional cellular traits for growth prediction under different nutrient and light conditions, their predictive power still waits to be tested with respect to temperature. A great challenge for the near future will be the prediction of primary production efficiencies under the global change scenario using a uniform model for phytoplankton assemblages.

  2. Flavobacterium procerum sp. nov., isolated from freshwater.

    PubMed

    Feng, Qingqing; Han, Lu; Yuan, Xin; Tan, Xu; Gao, Yuan; Lv, Jie

    2015-08-01

    A Gram-reaction-negative, strictly aerobic, yellow-pigmented, rod-shaped bacterium, designated strain T3T, was isolated from freshwater of Chishui River flowing through Maotai town, Guizhou, south-west China. Analysis of the16S rRNA gene sequence indicated that strain T3T was a member of the genus Flavobacterium and closely related to Flavobacterium resistens DSM 19382T (96.8 %). The novel strain was able to grow at 10-34 °C (optimum 28 °C), pH 6.0-11.0 (optimum pH 8.0-9.0) and with 0-2.0 % (w/v) NaCl (optimum 0 %). The major polar lipids were phosphatidylethanolamine, two unknown glycolipids, five unknown aminolipids and four unidentified lipids, and the major respiratory quinone was MK-6. The predominant fatty acids were C16  :  1ω7c and/or C16  :  1ω6c and iso-C15  :  0. The DNA G+C content of the strain was 36 mol  %. Based on these data, strain T3T represents a novel species of the genus Flavobacterium, for which the name Flavobacterium procerum sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is T3T ( = CGMCC 1.12926T = JCM 30113T).

  3. Flavobacterium fontis sp. nov., isolated from freshwater.

    PubMed

    Chun, Jeesun; Kang, Ji Young; Jahng, Kwang Yeop

    2013-05-01

    A taxonomic study was carried out on a novel bacterial strain, designated MIC3010(T), which was isolated from a freshwater pond in Jeonju, Republic of Korea. Cells of the isolate were Gram-stain-negative, rod-shaped and non-motile. Comparison of the 16S rRNA gene sequences indicated that the isolate belonged to the family Flavobacteriaceae, with Flavobacterium haoranii LQY-7(T) as its closest relative, with a similarity of 94.2 %. The predominant fatty acids of strain MIC3010(T) were iso-C15 : 1 G, iso-C15 : 0 and iso-C17 : 0 3-OH. The polar lipid profile of strain MIC3010(T) revealed the presence of phosphatidylethanolamine (PE) and one unidentified lipid (L1) as major components. In addition, two aminolipids (AL1, AL2) and one glycolipid were present in small amounts. The DNA G+C content of the strain was 41.0 mol%. The strain contained MK-6 as the major quinone and sym-homospermidine as the predominant polyamine. On the basis of the evidence presented, it is concluded that strain MIC3010(T) represents a novel species of the genus Flavobacterium, for which the name Flavobacterium fontis sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is MIC3010(T) ( = KACC 16593(T) = JCM 18212(T)).

  4. Methane cycling in a tidal freshwater swamp

    SciTech Connect

    Megonigal, J.P.; Schlesinger, W.H. )

    1993-06-01

    Previous studies of methanogenesis in a tidal freshwater swamp on the North Carolina coast have found that potential rates of methane production overestimate observed rates of methane flux, especially during summer months. This research investigates three possibilities for the unexplained losses: methane oxidation, lateral export of dissolved methane to the adjacent river, and ebullition. It is possible that each of these sinks increase during the summer. The potential for methane oxidation was demonstrated in intact soil cores incubated for 21 hours under a 0.5% CH[sub 3]F atmosphere. Methane flux increased from 10+/-27 (mean+/-sd) to 60+/-3 mg m[sup [minus]2] d[sup [minus]1] in treated cores; control core fluxes were 15+/-3 and 19+/-3 mg m[sup [minus]2] d[sup [minus]1] over the same periods. Incubations of slightly unsaturated soils with [sup 14]CH[sub 4] confirmed rapid potential rates of methane oxidation.

  5. Derivation and selection of freshwater sediment quality values in Washington state

    SciTech Connect

    Cubbage, J.; Breidenbach, S.; Batts, D.

    1995-12-31

    To derive chemical-based Freshwater Sediment Quality Values (FSQV), bioassay data (Hyalella azteca, Microtox, Chironomus tentans, Daphnia magna, Ceriodaphnia dubia, and Hexagenia limbata) and chemistry data (metals, PAH, pesticide/PCBs, and phenols) were merged from 33 studies and 245 sites in Washington and Oregon into a single database. Apparent Effects Thresholds (AET) and Probable AETs (PAET: 95th percentile of no effects sites) were calculated for Hyalella azteca (n = 228) and Microtox. The efficiency and sensitivity of these values in predicting biological response from chemical concentrations were compared with Ontario`s Severe Effects Level (SEL), Environment Canada`s Probable Effects Level (PEL) and Threshold Effects Level (TEL), EPA`s Equilibrium Partitioning (EQP), and Washington`s marine Sediment management Standards (SMS). For PAH, dry weight normalized values for AETs and PAETs were significantly more sensitive and efficient than organic carbon normalized values. TEL was always the most sensitive and least efficient.

  6. Freshwater Planarians as an Alternative Animal Model for Neurotoxicology.

    PubMed

    Hagstrom, Danielle; Cochet-Escartin, Olivier; Zhang, Siqi; Khuu, Cindy; Collins, Eva-Maria S

    2015-09-01

    Traditional toxicology testing has relied on low-throughput, expensive mammalian studies; however, timely testing of the large number of environmental toxicants requires new in vitro and in vivo platforms for inexpensive medium- to high-throughput screening. Herein, we describe the suitability of the asexual freshwater planarian Dugesia japonica as a new animal model for the study of developmental neurotoxicology. As these asexual animals reproduce by binary fission, followed by regeneration of missing body structures within approximately 1 week, development and regeneration occur through similar processes allowing us to induce neurodevelopment "at will" through amputation. This short time scale and the comparable sizes of full and regenerating animals enable parallel experiments in adults and developing worms to determine development-specific aspects of toxicity. Because the planarian brain, despite its simplicity, is structurally and molecularly similar to the mammalian brain, we are able to ascertain neurodevelopmental toxicity that is relevant to humans. As a proof of concept, we developed a 5-step semiautomatic screening platform to characterize the toxicity of 9 known neurotoxicants (consisting of common solvents, pesticides, and detergents) and a neutral agent, glucose, and quantified effects on viability, stimulated and unstimulated behavior, regeneration, and brain structure. Comparisons of our findings with other alternative toxicology animal models, such as zebrafish larvae and nematodes, demonstrated that planarians are comparably sensitive to the tested chemicals. In addition, we found that certain compounds induced adverse effects specifically in developing animals. We thus conclude that planarians offer new complementary opportunities for developmental neurotoxicology animal models.

  7. Freshwater Planarians as an Alternative Animal Model for Neurotoxicology

    PubMed Central

    Hagstrom, Danielle; Cochet-Escartin, Olivier; Zhang, Siqi; Khuu, Cindy; Collins, Eva-Maria S.

    2015-01-01

    Traditional toxicology testing has relied on low-throughput, expensive mammalian studies; however, timely testing of the large number of environmental toxicants requires new in vitro and in vivo platforms for inexpensive medium- to high-throughput screening. Herein, we describe the suitability of the asexual freshwater planarian Dugesia japonica as a new animal model for the study of developmental neurotoxicology. As these asexual animals reproduce by binary fission, followed by regeneration of missing body structures within approximately 1 week, development and regeneration occur through similar processes allowing us to induce neurodevelopment “at will” through amputation. This short time scale and the comparable sizes of full and regenerating animals enable parallel experiments in adults and developing worms to determine development-specific aspects of toxicity. Because the planarian brain, despite its simplicity, is structurally and molecularly similar to the mammalian brain, we are able to ascertain neurodevelopmental toxicity that is relevant to humans. As a proof of concept, we developed a 5-step semiautomatic screening platform to characterize the toxicity of 9 known neurotoxicants (consisting of common solvents, pesticides, and detergents) and a neutral agent, glucose, and quantified effects on viability, stimulated and unstimulated behavior, regeneration, and brain structure. Comparisons of our findings with other alternative toxicology animal models, such as zebrafish larvae and nematodes, demonstrated that planarians are comparably sensitive to the tested chemicals. In addition, we found that certain compounds induced adverse effects specifically in developing animals. We thus conclude that planarians offer new complementary opportunities for developmental neurotoxicology animal models. PMID:26116028

  8. Alternative substrates for culturing the freshwater oligochaete Lumbriculus variegatus

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lasier, P.J.

    2009-01-01

    The freshwater oligochaete Lumbriculus variegatus is tank cultured to provide organisms for aquatic habitat assessments and regeneration research and to produce a clean source of live food for aquarium fishes. Shredded paper is the typical substrate in small-scale culture of L variegants, however, the effort needed to separate large numbers of individuals from decomposing paper can be prohibitive. Burlap and nylon mesh materials were compared with paper as potential alternatives for reducing this effort. Production and the time needed to separate L. variegatus from substrate were compared for 8 weeks among cultures with burlap, mesh, and paper substrates. Cultures with paper increased in number and weight faster than those with burlap or mesh, but cultures using the alternative substrates also expanded their populations quickly. The time required to separate oligochaetes from substrate was initially longer with paper and became significantly longer at 6 weeks as the paper decomposed. Burlap frayed, but mesh exhibited no degradation. Elevated ammonia and nitrite concentrations may have suppressed production in mesh treatments throughout the study, and ammonia was lethal in paper treatments during the final 2 weeks. Slow initial production in burlap treatments may have been due 10 chemical applications to the fabric, which may limit the utility of burlap as a substrate. Culture systems that maintain adequate water quality could increase production from burlap and mesh substrates to levels observed with paper substrate. Mesh is recommended because it is nontoxic and nonbiodegradable and can significantly reduce the effort required to obtain oligochaetes and to maintain and monitor the cultures.

  9. Endocrine disruption, parasites and pollutants in wild freshwater fish.

    PubMed

    Jobling, S; Tyler, C R

    2003-01-01

    Disruption of the endocrine system has been shown to occur in wild freshwater fish populations across the globe. Effects range from subtle changes in the physiology and sexual behaviour of fish to permanently altered sexual differentiation, impairment of gonad development and/or altered fertility. A wide variety of adverse environmental conditions may induce endocrine disruption, including sub-optimal temperatures, restricted food supply, low pH, environmental pollutants, and/or parasites. Furthermore, it is conceivable that any/all of these factors could act simultaneously to cause a range of disparate or inter-related effects. Some of the strongest evidence for a link between an adverse health effect, as a consequence of endocrine disruption, and a causative agent(s) is between the condition of intersex in wild roach (Rutlius rutilus) in UK rivers and exposure to effluents from sewage treatment works. The evidence to indicate that intersex in roach (and other cyprinid fish living in these rivers) is caused by chemicals that mimic and/or disrupt hormone function/balance in treated sewage effluent is substantial. There are a few parasites that affect the endocrine system directly in fish, including the tape worm Ligula intestinalis and a few parasites from the micropsora phylum. L. intestinalis acts at the level of the hypothalamus restricting GnRH secretion (resulting in poorly developed gonads) and is one of the very few examples where an endocrine disrupting event has been shown to result in a population-level effect (reducing it). It is well established that many parasites affect the immune system and thus the most common effect of parasites on the endocrine system in fish is likely to be an indirect one.

  10. Hydrogeology in the area of a freshwater lens in the Floridan aquifer system, northeast Seminole County, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Phelps, G.G.; Rohrer, K.P.

    1987-01-01

    Northeast Seminole County, Florida, contains an isolated recharge area of the Floridan aquifer system that forms a freshwater lens completely surrounded by saline water. The freshwater lens covers an area of about 22 sq mi surrounding the town of Geneva, and generally is enclosed by the 25 ft land surface altitude contour. Thickness of the lens is about 350 ft in the center of the recharge area. The geohydrologic units in descending order consist of the post-Miocene sand and shell of the surficial aquifer; Miocene clay, sand, clay, and shell that form a leaky confining bed; and permeable Eocene limestones of the Floridan aquifer system. The freshwater lens is the result of local rainfall flushing ancient seawater from the Floridan aquifer system. Sufficient quantities of water for domestic and small public supply systems are available from the Floridan aquifer system in the Geneva area. The limiting factor for water supply in the area is the chemical quality of the water. Chloride concentrations range from < 20 mg/L in the center of the recharge area to about 5,100 mg/L near the St. Johns River southeast of Geneva. Constituents analyzed included sulfate (range 1 to 800 mg/L), hardness (range 89 to 2,076 mg/L), and iron (range 34 to 6,600 mg/L). Because the freshwater lens results entirely from local recharge, the long-term sustained freshwater yield of the aquifer in the Geneva area depends on the local recharge rate. In 1982, recharge was about 13 inches (13.8 million gal/day). Average recharge for 1941 through 1970 was estimated to be about 11 inches (11.3 million gal/day). Freshwater that recharges the aquifer in the Geneva area is either pumped out or flows north and northeast to discharge near or in the St. Johns River. Average annual outflow from the lens is about 10 in/yr. No measurable change in the size or location of the freshwater lens has occurred since studies in the early 1950's. (Lantz-PTT)

  11. Identification of teratogenic polymethoxy-1-alkenes from Cylindrospermopsis raciborskii, and taxonomically diverse freshwater cyanobacteria and green algae

    PubMed Central

    Jaja-Chimedza, Asha; Saez, Christopher; Sanchez, Kristel; Gantar, Miroslav; Berry, John P.

    2015-01-01

    Cylindrospermopsis raciborskii is among the most commonly recognized toxigenic cyanobacteria associated with harmful algal blooms (HAB) in freshwater systems, and specifically associated with multiple water-soluble toxins. Lipophilic metabolites from C. raciborskii, however, were previously shown to exert teratogenicity (i.e. inhibition of vertebrate development) in the zebrafish (Danio rerio) embryo model, specifically suggesting the presence of additional bioactive compounds unrelated to the currently known toxins. In the present study, a series of known teratogenic polymethoxy-1-alkenes (PMA) were identified, purified and chemically characterized from an otherwise well-characterized strain of toxigenic C. raciborskii. Although PMA have been previously identified in other cyanobacteria, this is the first time they have been identified from this recognized HAB species. Following their identification from C. raciborskii, the taxonomic distribution of the PMA was additionally investigated by chemical screening of a freshwater algal (i.e. cyanobacteria, green algal) culture collection. Screening suggests that these compounds are distributed among phylogenetically diverse taxa. Furthermore, parallel screening of the algal culture collection, using the zebrafish embryo model of teratogenicity, the presence of PMA was found to closely correlate with developmental toxicity of these diverse algal isolates. Taken together, the data suggest PMA contribute to the toxicity of C. raciborskii, as well as apparently several other taxonomically disparate cyanobacterial and green algal genera, and may, accordingly, contribute to the toxicity of diverse freshwater HAB. PMID:26770179

  12. Potential nanotechnology applications for reducing freshwater consumption at coal fired power plants : an early view.

    SciTech Connect

    Elcock, D.

    2010-09-17

    This report was funded by the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) Existing Plants Research Program, which has an energy-water research effort that focuses on water use at power plants. This study complements the overall research effort of the Existing Plants Research Program by evaluating water issues that could impact power plants. A growing challenge to the economic production of electricity from coal-fired power plants is the demand for freshwater, particularly in light of the projected trends for increasing demands and decreasing supplies of freshwater. Nanotechnology uses the unique chemical, physical, and biological properties that are associated with materials at the nanoscale to create and use materials, devices, and systems with new functions and properties. It is possible that nanotechnology may open the door to a variety of potentially interesting ways to reduce freshwater consumption at power plants. This report provides an overview of how applications of nanotechnology could potentially help reduce freshwater use at coal-fired power plants. It was developed by (1) identifying areas within a coal-fired power plant's operations where freshwater use occurs and could possibly be reduced, (2) conducting a literature review to identify potential applications of nanotechnology for facilitating such reductions, and (3) collecting additional information on potential applications from researchers and companies to clarify or expand on information obtained from the literature. Opportunities, areas, and processes for reducing freshwater use in coal-fired power plants considered in this report include the use of nontraditional waters in process and cooling water systems, carbon capture alternatives, more efficient processes for removing sulfur dioxide and nitrogen oxides, coolants that have higher thermal conductivities than water alone, energy storage options, and a variety of plant inefficiencies, which, if improved

  13. Molecular phylogeny of land and freshwater planarians (Tricladida, Platyhelminthes): from freshwater to land and back.

    PubMed

    Alvarez-Presas, Marta; Baguñà, Jaume; Riutort, Marta

    2008-05-01

    The suborder Tricladida (phylum Platyhelminthes) comprises the well-known free-living flatworms, taxonomically grouped into three infraorders according to their ecology: Maricola (marine planarians), Paludicola (freshwater planarians), and Terricola (land planarians). Molecular analyses have demonstrated that the Paludicola are paraphyletic, the Terricola being the sister group of one of the three paludicolan families, the Dugesiidae. However, neither 18S rDNA nor COI based trees have been able to resolve the relationships among species of Terricola and Dugesiidae, particularly the monophyly of Terricola. Here, we present new molecular data including sequences of nuclear genes (18S rDNA, 28S rDNA) and a mitochondrial gene (COI) of a wider sample of dugesiid and terricolan species. The new sequences have been analyzed, together with those previously obtained, in independent and concatenated analyses using maximum likelihood and bayesian methods. The results show that, although some parts of the trees remain poorly resolved, they support a monophyletic origin for Terricola followed by a likely return of some species to freshwater habitats. Relationships within the monophyletic group of Dugesiidae are clearly resolved, and relationships among some terricolan subfamilies are also clearly established and point to the need for a thorough revision of Terricola taxonomy.

  14. Functional morphology of the gill in amazonian freshwater stingrays (chondrichthyes: potamotrygonidae): implications for adaptation to freshwater.

    PubMed

    Duncan, Wallice Paxiúba; da Costa, Oscar Tadeu Ferreira; Sakuragui, Marise Margareth; Fernandes, Marisa Narciso

    2010-01-01

    The gill morphologies of six species of potamotrygonid freshwater stingrays from the Amazon basin were investigated using light and electron microscopy. Some unique features were found in the potamotrygonid gill: (1) fingerlike protuberances on the gill filament, (2) an Alcian blue/periodic acid-Schiff-positive histochemical reaction for several cell layers in the gill epithelium (except the basal ones), (3) pavement cells with numerous subapical mucous vesicles, (4) very large mucous cells, and (5) follicular Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase-rich (NKA-rich) mitochondria-rich cells (MRCs) in Potamotrygon sp. (known as the cururu ray). The fingerlike protuberances may constitute an additional resistance to water flow, helping to drive water through the lamellae. The secretion of a mucous substance by the pavement cells and mucous cells may help to protect the gills against mechanical injury and pathogens and aid in osmoregulation in the dilute water of the Amazon basin. All MRCs possess enfolded basolateral membranes and have poorly developed or absent tubular systems. NKA-rich MRCs are located high in the basolateral membrane. The cururu ray, which is endemic to the Rio Negro, has follicular NKA-rich MRCs (8-12 cells in cross section) that share the same apical pit in the filament; this may be considered to be an autapomorphy. The combination of these branchial characteristics may have favored tolerance to the freshwater environment during the evolution and diversification of potamotrygonids throughout the Amazon basin.

  15. Cultivation of macroscopic marine algae and freshwater aquatic needs. Progress report, May 1, 1979-December 15, 1979

    SciTech Connect

    Ryther, J H

    1980-01-01

    Progress for the period May 1979 to December 1979 is reported in the following subject areas: (1) the ORCA clone of the red seaweed Gracilaria tikvakiae has now been grown continuously in tank culture for two years; (2) studies were continued on the culture of freshwater plants such as water hyacinth, pennywort, water lettuce, and duckweed; (3) the loss of water from evapotranspiration of freshwater plants was measured and compared with water loss from evaporation from open water; and (4) experiments were conducted to investigate the possibility of recycling the chemicals left in the solid and liquid residues following anaerobic digestion and methane production as a source of nutrients for new plant production. (ACR)

  16. Large-scale degradation of Amazonian freshwater ecosystems.

    PubMed

    Castello, Leandro; Macedo, Marcia N

    2016-03-01

    Hydrological connectivity regulates the structure and function of Amazonian freshwater ecosystems and the provisioning of services that sustain local populations. This connectivity is increasingly being disrupted by the construction of dams, mining, land-cover changes, and global climate change. This review analyzes these drivers of degradation, evaluates their impacts on hydrological connectivity, and identifies policy deficiencies that hinder freshwater ecosystem protection. There are 154 large hydroelectric dams in operation today, and 21 dams under construction. The current trajectory of dam construction will leave only three free-flowing tributaries in the next few decades if all 277 planned dams are completed. Land-cover changes driven by mining, dam and road construction, agriculture and cattle ranching have already affected ~20% of the Basin and up to ~50% of riparian forests in some regions. Global climate change will likely exacerbate these impacts by creating warmer and dryer conditions, with less predictable rainfall and more extreme events (e.g., droughts and floods). The resulting hydrological alterations are rapidly degrading freshwater ecosystems, both independently and via complex feedbacks and synergistic interactions. The ecosystem impacts include biodiversity loss, warmer stream temperatures, stronger and more frequent floodplain fires, and changes to biogeochemical cycles, transport of organic and inorganic materials, and freshwater community structure and function. The impacts also include reductions in water quality, fish yields, and availability of water for navigation, power generation, and human use. This degradation of Amazonian freshwater ecosystems cannot be curbed presently because existing policies are inconsistent across the Basin, ignore cumulative effects, and overlook the hydrological connectivity of freshwater ecosystems. Maintaining the integrity of these freshwater ecosystems requires a basinwide research and policy framework

  17. Mechanical challenges to freshwater residency in sharks and rays.

    PubMed

    Gleiss, Adrian C; Potvin, Jean; Keleher, James J; Whitty, Jeff M; Morgan, David L; Goldbogen, Jeremy A

    2015-04-01

    Major transitions between marine and freshwater habitats are relatively infrequent, primarily as a result of major physiological and ecological challenges. Few species of cartilaginous fish have evolved to occupy freshwater habitats. Current thought suggests that the metabolic physiology of sharks has remained a barrier to the diversification of this taxon in freshwater ecosystems. Here, we demonstrate that the physical properties of water provide an additional constraint for this species-rich group to occupy freshwater systems. Using hydromechanical modeling, we show that occurrence in fresh water results in a two- to three-fold increase in negative buoyancy for sharks and rays. This carries the energetic cost of lift production and results in increased buoyancy-dependent mechanical power requirements for swimming and increased optimal swim speeds. The primary source of buoyancy, the lipid-rich liver, offers only limited compensation for increased negative buoyancy as a result of decreasing water density; maintaining the same submerged weight would involve increasing the liver volume by very large amounts: 3- to 4-fold in scenarios where liver density is also reduced to currently observed minimal levels and 8-fold without any changes in liver density. The first data on body density from two species of elasmobranch occurring in freshwater (the bull shark Carcharhinus leucas, Müller and Henle 1839, and the largetooth sawfish Pristis pristis, Linnaeus 1758) support this hypothesis, showing similar liver sizes as marine forms but lower liver densities, but the greatest negative buoyancies of any elasmobranch studied to date. Our data suggest that the mechanical challenges associated with buoyancy control may have hampered the invasion of freshwater habitats in elasmobranchs, highlighting an additional key factor that may govern the predisposition of marine organisms to successfully establish in freshwater habitats.

  18. Microplastics ingestion by a common tropical freshwater fishing resource.

    PubMed

    Silva-Cavalcanti, Jacqueline Santos; Silva, José Diego B; França, Elton José de; Araújo, Maria Christina Barbosa de; Gusmão, Felipe

    2017-02-01

    Microplastics pollution is widespread in marine ecosystems and a major threat to biodiversity. Nevertheless, our knowledge of the impacts of microplastics in freshwater environments and biota is still very limited. The interaction of microplastics with freshwater organisms and the risks associated with the human consumption of organisms that ingested microplastics remain major knowledge gaps. In this study, we assessed the ingestion of microplastics by Hoplosternum littorale, a common freshwater fish heavily consumed by humans in semi-arid regions of South America. We assessed the abundance and diversity of both plastic debris and other food items found in the gut of fishes caught by local fishermen. We observed that 83% of the fish had plastic debris inside the gut, the highest frequency reported for a fish species so far. Most of the plastic debris (88.6%) recovered from the guts of fish were microplastics (<5 mm), fibres being the most frequent type (46.6%). We observed that fish consumed more microplastics at the urbanized sections of the river, and that the ingestion of microplastics was negatively correlated with the diversity of other food items in the gut of individual fish. Nevertheless, microplastics ingestion appears to have a limited impact on H. littorale, and the consequences of human consumption of this fish were not assessed. Our results suggest freshwater biota are vulnerable to microplastics pollution and that urbanization is a major factor contributing to the pollution of freshwater environments with microplastics. We suggest the gut content of fish could be used as a tool for the qualitative assessment of microplastics pollution in freshwater ecosystems. Further research is needed to determine the processes responsible for the high incidence of microplastics ingestion by H. littorale, and to evaluate the risk posed to humans by the consumption of freshwater fish that ingested microplastics.

  19. Anthropogenic Litter in Urban Freshwater Ecosystems: Distribution and Microbial Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Hoellein, Timothy; Rojas, Miguel; Pink, Adam; Gasior, Joseph; Kelly, John

    2014-01-01

    Accumulation of anthropogenic litter (i.e. garbage; AL) and its ecosystem effects in marine environments are well documented. Rivers receive AL from terrestrial habitats and represent a major source of AL to marine environments, but AL is rarely studied within freshwater ecosystems. Our objectives were to 1) quantify AL density in urban freshwaters, 2) compare AL abundance among freshwater, terrestrial, and marine ecosystems, and 3) characterize the activity and composition of AL biofilms in freshwater habitats. We quantified AL from the Chicago River and Chicago's Lake Michigan shoreline, and found that AL abundance in Chicago freshwater ecosystems was comparable to previously reported data for marine and terrestrial ecosystems, although AL density and composition differed among habitats. To assess microbial interactions with AL, we incubated AL and natural substrates in 3 freshwater ecosystems, quantified biofilm metabolism as gross primary production (GPP) and community respiration (CR), and characterized biofilm bacterial community composition via high-throughput sequencing of 16S rRNA genes. The main driver of biofilm community composition was incubation location (e.g., river vs pond), but there were some significant differences in biofilm composition and metabolism among substrates. For example, biofilms on organic substrates (cardboard and leaves) had lower GPP than hard substrates (glass, plastic, aluminum and tiles). In addition, bacterial communities on organic substrates were distinct in composition from those on hard substrates, with higher relative abundances of bacteria associated with cellulose decomposition. Finally, we used our results to develop a conceptual diagram designed to unite the study of AL in terrestrial and freshwater environments with the well-established field of marine debris research. We suggest this broad perspective will be useful for future studies which synthesize AL sources, ecosystem effects, and fate across multiple ecosystem

  20. Heterogeneity of Alkane Chain Length in Freshwater and Marine Cyanobacteria

    PubMed Central

    Shakeel, Tabinda; Fatma, Zia; Fatma, Tasneem; Yazdani, Syed Shams

    2015-01-01

    The potential utilization of cyanobacteria for the biological production of alkanes represents an exceptional system for the next generation of biofuels. Here, we analyzed a diverse group of freshwater and marine cyanobacterial isolates from Indian culture collections for their ability to produce both alkanes and alkenes. Among the 50 cyanobacterial isolates screened, 32 isolates; 14 freshwater and 18 marine isolates; produced predominantly alkanes. The GC-MS/MS profiles revealed a higher percentage of pentadecane and heptadecane production for marine and freshwater strains, respectively. Oscillatoria species were found to be the highest producers of alkanes. Among the freshwater isolates, Oscillatoria CCC305 produced the maximum alkane level with 0.43 μg/mg dry cell weight, while Oscillatoria formosa BDU30603 was the highest producer among the marine isolates with 0.13 μg/mg dry cell weight. Culturing these strains under different media compositions showed that the alkane chain length was not influenced by the growth medium but was rather an inherent property of the strains. Analysis of the cellular fatty acid content indicated the presence of predominantly C16 chain length fatty acids in marine strains, while the proportion of C18 chain length fatty acids increased in the majority of freshwater strains. These results correlated with alkane chain length specificity of marine and freshwater isolates indicating that alkane chain lengths may be primarily determined by the fatty acid synthesis pathway. Moreover, the phylogenetic analysis showed clustering of pentadecane-producing marine strains that was distinct from heptadecane-producing freshwater strains strongly suggesting a close association between alkane chain length and the cyanobacteria habitat. PMID:25853127

  1. Anthropogenic litter in urban freshwater ecosystems: distribution and microbial interactions.

    PubMed

    Hoellein, Timothy; Rojas, Miguel; Pink, Adam; Gasior, Joseph; Kelly, John

    2014-01-01

    Accumulation of anthropogenic litter (i.e. garbage; AL) and its ecosystem effects in marine environments are well documented. Rivers receive AL from terrestrial habitats and represent a major source of AL to marine environments, but AL is rarely studied within freshwater ecosystems. Our objectives were to 1) quantify AL density in urban freshwaters, 2) compare AL abundance among freshwater, terrestrial, and marine ecosystems, and 3) characterize the activity and composition of AL biofilms in freshwater habitats. We quantified AL from the Chicago River and Chicago's Lake Michigan shoreline, and found that AL abundance in Chicago freshwater ecosystems was comparable to previously reported data for marine and terrestrial ecosystems, although AL density and composition differed among habitats. To assess microbial interactions with AL, we incubated AL and natural substrates in 3 freshwater ecosystems, quantified biofilm metabolism as gross primary production (GPP) and community respiration (CR), and characterized biofilm bacterial community composition via high-throughput sequencing of 16S rRNA genes. The main driver of biofilm community composition was incubation location (e.g., river vs pond), but there were some significant differences in biofilm composition and metabolism among substrates. For example, biofilms on organic substrates (cardboard and leaves) had lower GPP than hard substrates (glass, plastic, aluminum and tiles). In addition, bacterial communities on organic substrates were distinct in composition from those on hard substrates, with higher relative abundances of bacteria associated with cellulose decomposition. Finally, we used our results to develop a conceptual diagram designed to unite the study of AL in terrestrial and freshwater environments with the well-established field of marine debris research. We suggest this broad perspective will be useful for future studies which synthesize AL sources, ecosystem effects, and fate across multiple ecosystem

  2. Vulnerability of European freshwater catchments to climate change.

    PubMed

    Markovic, Danijela; Carrizo, Savrina F; Kärcher, Oskar; Walz, Ariane; David, Jonathan N W

    2017-02-10

    Climate change is expected to exacerbate the current threats to freshwater ecosystems, yet multifaceted studies on the potential impacts of climate change on freshwater biodiversity at scales that inform management planning are lacking. The aim of this study was to fill this void through the development of a novel framework for assessing climate change vulnerability tailored to freshwater ecosystems. The three dimensions of climate change vulnerability are as follows: (i) exposure to climate change, (ii) sensitivity to altered environmental conditions and (iii) resilience potential. Our vulnerability framework includes 1685 freshwater species of plants, fishes, molluscs, odonates, amphibians, crayfish and turtles alongside key features within and between catchments, such as topography and connectivity. Several methodologies were used to combine these dimensions across a variety of future climate change models and scenarios. The resulting indices were overlaid to assess the vulnerability of European freshwater ecosystems at the catchment scale (18 783 catchments). The Balkan Lakes Ohrid and Prespa and Mediterranean islands emerge as most vulnerable to climate change. For the 2030s, we showed a consensus among the applied methods whereby up to 573 lake and river catchments are highly vulnerable to climate change. The anthropogenic disruption of hydrological habitat connectivity by dams is the major factor reducing climate change resilience. A gap analysis demonstrated that the current European protected area network covers <25% of the most vulnerable catchments. Practical steps need to be taken to ensure the persistence of freshwater biodiversity under climate change. Priority should be placed on enhancing stakeholder cooperation at the major basin scale towards preventing further degradation of freshwater ecosystems and maintaining connectivity among catchments. The catchments identified as most vulnerable to climate change provide preliminary targets for

  3. New Zealand Freshwater Management: Changing Policy for a Changing World

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rouse, H. L.; Norton, N.

    2014-12-01

    Fresh water is essential to New Zealand's economic, environmental, cultural and social well-being. In line with global trends, New Zealand's freshwater resources are under pressure from increased abstraction and changes in land-use which contribute contaminants to our freshwater systems. Recent central government policy reform introduces greater national direction and guidance, to bring about a step-change in freshwater management. An existing national policy for freshwater management introduced in 2011 requires regional authorities to produce freshwater management plans containing clear freshwater objectives (measurable statements about the desired environmental state for water bodies) and associated limits to resource use (such as environmental flows and quantity allocation limits, and loads of contaminants to be discharged). These plans must integrate water quantity and quality management, consider climate change, and incorporate tangata whenua (New Zealand māori) roles and interests. In recent (2014) national policy amendments, the regional authorities are also required to implement national 'bottom-line' standards for certain attributes of the system to be managed; undertake accounting for all water takes and all sources of contaminants; and to develop and implement their plans in a collaborative way with communities. This rapid change in national policy has necessitated a new way of working for authorities tasked with implementation; many obstacles lie in their path. The scientific methods required to help set water quantity limits are well established, but water quality methods are less so. Collaborative processes have well documented benefits but also raise many challenges, particularly for the communication of complex and often uncertain scientific information. This paper provides background on the national policy changes and offers some early lessons learned by the regional authorities implementing collaborative freshwater management in New Zealand.

  4. Water-rock interactions and seawater-freshwater mixing effects in the coastal dunes aquifer, Coos Bay, Oregon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magaritz, Mordeckai; Luzier, James E.

    1985-12-01

    Groundwater from the seawater-freshwater interface in sandy sediments was sampled using a unique profile well designed in which separate PVC tube screens were installed at various depths. All major ions (except chloride) showed non-conservative behavior in the mixing zone; SO 4-, Mg 2+ and K + are depleted and HCO 3- is enriched, relative to Cl -. Na + is enriched in solutions containing less than 20% seawater and depleted in solutions containing higher percentages of seawater. The behavior of Ca 2+ is the mirror image ofthat of Na +. The chemical data on the stratification of groundwater above and within the interface zone were obtained using a unique profile well design in which separate PVC tube screens were installed at various depths, thus making it possible to extract water samples at close vertical intervals. The chemical changes in the groundwater reflect the following processes: (a) Ca 2+-Na + and Ca 2+-Mg 2+ base-exchange reactions; (b) oxidation of organic matter in the sediment; (c) reduction of sulfate, probably due to bacterial processes; (d) reaction of HCO 3- and S 2- with Fe 2+ to produce mineral coatings and cements of pyrite and siderite; (e) K-feldspar formation producing lower of K + concentrations. The authigenic phases were identified using scanning electron microscopy. Thermodynamic calculations suggest that all solutions are saturated with respect to quartz and chalcedony and many are saturated with respect to calcite, dolomite, siderite and hematite. Kaolinite is the stable clay mineral in the top of the freshwater column, whereas smectite is the stable clay mineral in the lower part of the freshwater column and in the seawater-freshwater mixing zone.

  5. Spatial analysis of toxic emissions in LCA: a sub-continental nested USEtox model with freshwater archetypes.

    PubMed

    Kounina, Anna; Margni, Manuele; Shaked, Shanna; Bulle, Cécile; Jolliet, Olivier

    2014-08-01

    This paper develops continent-specific factors for the USEtox model and analyses the accuracy of different model architectures, spatial scales and archetypes in evaluating toxic impacts, with a focus on freshwater pathways. Inter-continental variation is analysed by comparing chemical fate and intake fractions between sub-continental zones of two life cycle impact assessment models: (1) the nested USEtox model parameterized with sub-continental zones and (2) the spatially differentiated IMPACTWorld model with 17 interconnected sub-continental regions. Substance residence time in water varies by up to two orders of magnitude among the 17 zones assessed with IMPACTWorld and USEtox, and intake fraction varies by up to three orders of magnitude. Despite this variation, the nested USEtox model succeeds in mimicking the results of the spatially differentiated model, with the exception of very persistent volatile pollutants that can be transported to polar regions. Intra-continental variation is analysed by comparing fate and intake fractions modelled with the a-spatial (one box) IMPACT Europe continental model vs. the spatially differentiated version of the same model. Results show that the one box model might overestimate chemical fate and characterisation factors for freshwater eco-toxicity of persistent pollutants by up to three orders of magnitude for point source emissions. Subdividing Europe into three archetypes, based on freshwater residence time (how long it takes water to reach the sea), improves the prediction of fate and intake fractions for point source emissions, bringing them within a factor five compared to the spatial model. We demonstrated that a sub-continental nested model such as USEtox, with continent-specific parameterization complemented with freshwater archetypes, can thus represent inter- and intra-continental spatial variations, whilst minimizing model complexity.

  6. Behavior of technetium in freshwater environments

    SciTech Connect

    Blaylock, B.G.; Frank, M.L.; Hoffman, F.O.; DeAngelis, D.L.

    1984-01-01

    In a previous study, /sup 95m/Tc, as a pertechnetate, was released to a small, experimental, freshwater pond, and the concentrations were determined in biotic and abiotic components of the pond ecosystem. A simple mathematical model was developed to predict the concentration of /sup 95m/Tc in fish and snails. Results from this study indicated that uptake through the food chain was an important source of technetium to the higher trophic levels (i.e., fish). In the current study, an experimental pond was spiked with /sup 95m/Tc in the pertechnetate form, and the concentrations of /sup 95m/Tc were measured in the lower trophic levels. Emphasis was placed on measuring the concentration of /sup 95m/Tc in zooplankton, benthic invertebrates, and the aquatic macrophyte Elodea canadensis. Fish were excluded from the pond to allow the development of a large zooplankton population. The concentration of /sup 95m/Tc in water decreased from 0.75 Bq/mL 1 h after the pond was spiked, to 0.21 Bq/mL at 20 d. Throughout the experiment, at least 98% of the /sup 95m/Tc in the water was in the dissolved fraction (0.4 ..mu..m). Zooplankton accumulated /sup 95m/Tc rapidly, having concentration factors (Bq/g sample wet wt. divided by Bq/g water) ranging from 3 at 4 h to 36 at 20 d. Concentration factors ranged from 3 to 8 for benthic insects and from 1 to 62 for the aquatic macrophyte.

  7. Flavobacterium buctense sp. nov., isolated from freshwater.

    PubMed

    Feng, Xiao-Min; Tan, Xu; Jia, Li; Long, Ping-Ping; Han, Lu; Lv, Jie

    2015-11-01

    A gram-negative, non-gliding motile, aerobic bacterium, designated as strain T7(T), was isolated from freshwater of Chishui River flowing through Maotai town, Guizhou Province, southwest of China. Based on the 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis, the isolate was identified as a member of the genus Flavobacterium and that shared less than 97 % sequence similarities with recognized Flavobacterium species. Its closest phylogenetic relative was Flavobacterium dankookense (96.9 %), followed by Flavobacterium cheonhonense (96.8 %) and Flavobacterium macrobrachii (96.7 %). The strain formed smooth yellow colonies on R2A plates, and cells were observed to be short rods. Strain T7(T) was found to be able to grow at 15-30 °C (optimum 25 °C), at NaCl concentration of 0-0.5 % (optimum 0 %) and at pH 6.5-9.5 (optimum pH 7.5). Catalase and oxidase tests were positive. Polar lipids of strain T7(T) included phosphatidylethanolamine, four unidentified polar lipids, one unidentified phospholipid and one unidentified aminolipid. Chemotaxonomic analysis revealed menaquinone-6 as the dominant respiratory quinone and C(15:0), iso-C(15:0) and iso-C(15:1) as the major fatty acids. The DNA G+C content of strain T7(T) was determined to be 38.2 mol%. On the basis of phylogenetic, phenotypic and genetic data obtained in this study, strain T7(T) represents a novel species of the genus Flavobacterium, for which the name Flavobacterium buctense sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is T7(T) (=JCM 30750=CGMCC 1.15216).

  8. Low-latitude ice cores and freshwater availability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kehrwald, Natalie Marie

    2009-12-01

    Recent retreat of Tibetan Plateau glaciers affects at least half a billion people. Himalayan glaciers seasonally release meltwater into tributaries of the Indus, Ganges, and Brahmaputra Rivers and supply freshwater necessary to support agricultural and economic practices. Tibetan Plateau glaciers are retreating more rapidly than mountain glaciers elsewhere in the world, and this retreat is accelerating. The Naimona'nyi (30°27'N; 81°91'E, 6050 m a.s.l), Guliya (35°17'N; 81°29'E, 6710 m a.s.l.) and Dasuopu (28°23'N; 85°43'E, 7200 m a.s.l.) ice cores place this recent retreat into a longer time perspective through quantifying climate parameters such as past temperature, aridity, and atmospheric chemistry. Naimona'nyi has not accumulated mass since at least 1950, as evidenced by the virtual lack of radiogenic isotopes (36Cl, 3 H, and beta radioactivity) present in the ice core. These isotopes were produced by U.S. and Soviet atmospheric thermonuclear bomb tests conducted in the 1950s and 1960s and provide independent dating horizons for the ice cores. Lead-210 dates imply that the uppermost preserved glacial ice on Naimona'nyi formed during the 1940s. While this is the highest documented glacial thinning in the world other glaciers at elevations similar to that of Naimona'nyi, such as Kilimanjaro (3°4'S; 37°21'E, 5893 m a.s.l.), are also losing mass at their summits. The global scope of high-elevation glacial thinning suggests that ablation on the Earth's highest ice fields may be more prevalent as global mean temperatures continue to increase. Glacial thinning has not been taken into account in future projections of regional freshwater availability, and the net mass loss indicates that Himalayan glaciers currently store less freshwater than assumed in models. The acceleration of Tibetan Plateau glacial retreat has been hypothesized to be due in part to deposition of black carbon (BC) from biomass burning on to ice fields, thereby lowering the reflectivity of

  9. Sulfidization of Organic Freshwater Flocs from a Minerotrophic Peatland: Speciation Changes of Iron, Sulfur, and Arsenic.

    PubMed

    ThomasArrigo, Laurel K; Mikutta, Christian; Lohmayer, Regina; Planer-Friedrich, Britta; Kretzschmar, Ruben

    2016-04-05

    Iron-rich organic flocs are frequently observed in surface waters of wetlands and show a high affinity for trace metal(loid)s. Under low-flow stream conditions, flocs may settle, become buried, and eventually be subjected to reducing conditions facilitating trace metal(loid) release. In this study, we reacted freshwater flocs (704-1280 mg As/kg) from a minerotrophic peatland (Gola di Lago, Switzerland) with sulfide (5.2 mM, S(-II)spike/Fe = 0.75-1.62 mol/mol) at neutral pH and studied the speciation changes of Fe, S, and As at 25 ± 1 °C over 1 week through a combination of synchrotron X-ray techniques and wet-chemical analyses. Sulfidization of floc ferrihydrite and nanocrystalline lepidocrocite caused the rapid formation of mackinawite (52-81% of Fesolid at day 7) as well as solid-phase associated S(0) and polysulfides. Ferrihydrite was preferentially reduced over lepidocrocite, although neoformation of lepidocrocite from ferrihydrite could not be excluded. Sulfide-reacted flocs contained primarily arsenate (47-72%) which preferentially adsorbed to Fe(III)-(oxyhydr)oxides, despite abundant mackinawite precipitation. At higher S(-II)spike/Fe molar ratios (≥1.0), the formation of an orpiment-like phase accounted for up to 35% of solid-phase As. Despite Fe and As sulfide precipitation and the presence of residual Fe(III)-(oxyhydr)oxides, mobilization of As was recorded in all samples (Asaq = 0.45-7.0 μM at 7 days). Aqueous As speciation analyses documented the formation of thioarsenates contributing up to 33% of Asaq. Our findings show that freshwater flocs from the Gola di Lago peatland may become a source of As under sulfate-reducing conditions and emphasize the pivotal role Fe-rich organic freshwater flocs play in trace metal(loid) cycling in S-rich wetlands characterized by oscillating redox conditions.

  10. Response of freshwater algae to water quality in Qinshan Lake within Taihu Watershed, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jianying; Ni, Wanmin; Luo, Yang; Jan Stevenson, R.; Qi, Jiaguo

    Although frequent algal blooms in Taihu Lake in China have become major environmental problems and have drawn national and international attention, little is understood about the relationship between algal blooms and water quality. The goal of this study was to assess the growth and species responses of freshwater algae to variation in water quality in Qinshan Lake, located in headwaters of the Taihu watershed. Water samples were collected monthly from ten study sites in the Qinshan Lake and were analyzed for species distribution of freshwater algae and physiochemical parameters such as total nitrogen (TN), NH4+-N, NO3--N, total phosphorus (TP), chemical oxygen demand (COD Mn) and Chl-a. The results showed that average TN was 4.47 mg/L, with 92.2% of values greater than the TN standard set by the Chinese Environmental Protection Agency; average TP was 0.051 mg/L, with 37.9% of values above the TP national standard; and average trophic level index (TLI) was 53, the lower end of eutrophic condition. Average Chl-a concentration was 12.83 mg/m 3. Green algae and diatom far outweighed other freshwater algae and were dominant most time of the year, with the highest relative abundances of 96% and 99%, respectively. Blue-green algae, composed mainly toxic strains like Microcystis sp ., Nostoc sp. and Oscillatoria sp., became most dominant in the summer with the maximum relative abundance of 69%. The blue-green algae sank to the lake bottom to overwinter, and then dinoflagellates became the dominant species in the winter, with highest relative abundance of 89%. Analysis indicated that nutrients, especially control of ammonia and co-varying nutrients were the major restrictive factor of population growth of blue-green algae, suggesting that control in nutrient enrichments is the major preventive measure of algal blooms in Qinshan Lake.

  11. Combining Remote Temperature Sensing with in-Situ Sensing to Track Marine/Freshwater Mixing Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    McCaul, Margaret; Barland, Jack; Cleary, John; Cahalane, Conor; McCarthy, Tim; Diamond, Dermot

    2016-01-01

    The ability to track the dynamics of processes in natural water bodies on a global scale, and at a resolution that enables highly localised behaviour to be visualized, is an ideal scenario for understanding how local events can influence the global environment. While advances in in-situ chem/bio-sensing continue to be reported, costs and reliability issues still inhibit the implementation of large-scale deployments. In contrast, physical parameters like surface temperature can be tracked on a global scale using satellite remote sensing, and locally at high resolution via flyovers and drones using multi-spectral imaging. In this study, we show how a much more complete picture of submarine and intertidal groundwater discharge patterns in Kinvara Bay, Galway can be achieved using a fusion of data collected from the Earth Observation satellite (Landsat 8), small aircraft and in-situ sensors. Over the course of the four-day field campaign, over 65,000 in-situ temperatures, salinity and nutrient measurements were collected in parallel with high-resolution thermal imaging from aircraft flyovers. The processed in-situ data show highly correlated patterns between temperature and salinity at the southern end of the bay where freshwater springs can be identified at low tide. Salinity values range from 1 to 2 ppt at the southern end of the bay to 30 ppt at the mouth of the bay, indicating the presence of a freshwater wedge. The data clearly show that temperature differences can be used to track the dynamics of freshwater and seawater mixing in the inner bay region. This outcome suggests that combining the tremendous spatial density and wide geographical reach of remote temperature sensing (using drones, flyovers and satellites) with ground-truthing via appropriately located in-situ sensors (temperature, salinity, chemical, and biological) can produce a much more complete and accurate picture of the water dynamics than each modality used in isolation. PMID:27589770

  12. Electrical Resistivity Tomography to characterize localized freshwater discharge in coastal environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumm, Max; Scheuermann, Alexander; Hauck, Christian; Welti, Nina

    2014-05-01

    North Stradbroke Island, located in the Pacific Ocean about 40 km east of Brisbane in Queensland, Australia, is formed by massive sand dunes of heights up to 229 m. The Island represents a reservoir for vast amounts of groundwater and plays an important role for the regional water supply. Therefore a detailed understanding of its hydrogeological features is of particular interest. In the intertidal zone on the western shores of the island, two localized freshwater springs with 4 m and 6 m in diameter were found. Hydrochemical investigations could not unequivocally identify the source of the freshwater by comparing its chemical properties to adjacent surface water and groundwater features. This case study presents the application of electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) in order to identify the source of the discharged freshwater and to delineate preferential flow paths in the saturated sand sediments. Several measurements with in-line arrays switching 48 electrodes as well as square arrays with 96 electrodes were conducted. The results of two- and three-dimensional data inversion were refined and verified implementing additional information. In-lab resistivity measurements on undisturbed samples of the sand sediments from the area under investigation as well as data from drill cores were considered for the refinement of the inversion model. The field work was impeded by the tides and allowed only for short periods for set up and measurement. A semi-confined aquifer formed by a layer of cemented sand at 7 m to 8 m depth perforated at the location of the springs could be identified. The interpretation of ERT data without considering additional geological and in lab resistivity data did not unambiguously indicate the real geological structure of the subsurface. High conductivities in the saturated sandy sediments lead to low investigation depths. Porosity-conductivity relationships for the loose sediments as well as for the cemented sand layer had to be modified to

  13. Combining Remote Temperature Sensing with in-Situ Sensing to Track Marine/Freshwater Mixing Dynamics.

    PubMed

    McCaul, Margaret; Barland, Jack; Cleary, John; Cahalane, Conor; McCarthy, Tim; Diamond, Dermot

    2016-08-31

    The ability to track the dynamics of processes in natural water bodies on a global scale, and at a resolution that enables highly localised behaviour to be visualized, is an ideal scenario for understanding how local events can influence the global environment. While advances in in-situ chem/bio-sensing continue to be reported, costs and reliability issues still inhibit the implementation of large-scale deployments. In contrast, physical parameters like surface temperature can be tracked on a global scale using satellite remote sensing, and locally at high resolution via flyovers and drones using multi-spectral imaging. In this study, we show how a much more complete picture of submarine and intertidal groundwater discharge patterns in Kinvara Bay, Galway can be achieved using a fusion of data collected from the Earth Observation satellite (Landsat 8), small aircraft and in-situ sensors. Over the course of the four-day field campaign, over 65,000 in-situ temperatures, salinity and nutrient measurements were collected in parallel with high-resolution thermal imaging from aircraft flyovers. The processed in-situ data show highly correlated patterns between temperature and salinity at the southern end of the bay where freshwater springs can be identified at low tide. Salinity values range from 1 to 2 ppt at the southern end of the bay to 30 ppt at the mouth of the bay, indicating the presence of a freshwater wedge. The data clearly show that temperature differences can be used to track the dynamics of freshwater and seawater mixing in the inner bay region. This outcome suggests that combining the tremendous spatial density and wide geographical reach of remote temperature sensing (using drones, flyovers and satellites) with ground-truthing via appropriately located in-situ sensors (temperature, salinity, chemical, and biological) can produce a much more complete and accurate picture of the water dynamics than each modality used in isolation.

  14. Magnitude and regulation of bacterioplankton respiratory quotient across freshwater environmental gradients.

    PubMed

    Berggren, Martin; Lapierre, Jean-François; del Giorgio, Paul A

    2012-05-01

    Bacterioplankton respiration (BR) may represent the largest single sink of organic carbon in the biosphere and constitutes an important driver of atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO(2)) emissions from freshwaters. Complete understanding of BR is precluded by the fact that most studies need to assume a respiratory quotient (RQ; mole of CO(2) produced per mole of O(2) consumed) to calculate rates of BR. Many studies have, without clear support, assumed a fixed RQ around 1. Here we present 72 direct measurements of bacterioplankton RQ that we carried out in epilimnetic samples of 52 freshwater sites in Québec (Canada), using O(2) and CO(2) optic sensors. The RQs tended to converge around 1.2, but showed large variability (s.d.=0.45) and significant correlations with major gradients of ecosystem-level, substrate-level and bacterial community-level characteristics. Experiments with natural bacterioplankton using different single substrates suggested that RQ is intimately linked to the elemental composition of the respired compounds. RQs were on average low in net autotrophic systems, where bacteria likely were utilizing mainly reduced substrates, whereas we found evidence that the dominance of highly oxidized substrates, for example, organic acids formed by photo-chemical processes, led to high RQ in the more heterotrophic systems. Further, we suggest that BR contributes to a substantially larger share of freshwater CO(2) emissions than presently believed based on the assumption that RQ is ∼1. Our study demonstrates that bacterioplankton RQ is not only a practical aspect of BR determination, but also a major ecosystem state variable that provides unique information about aquatic ecosystem functioning.

  15. Magnitude and regulation of bacterioplankton respiratory quotient across freshwater environmental gradients

    PubMed Central

    Berggren, Martin; Lapierre, Jean-François; del Giorgio, Paul A

    2012-01-01

    Bacterioplankton respiration (BR) may represent the largest single sink of organic carbon in the biosphere and constitutes an important driver of atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions from freshwaters. Complete understanding of BR is precluded by the fact that most studies need to assume a respiratory quotient (RQ; mole of CO2 produced per mole of O2 consumed) to calculate rates of BR. Many studies have, without clear support, assumed a fixed RQ around 1. Here we present 72 direct measurements of bacterioplankton RQ that we carried out in epilimnetic samples of 52 freshwater sites in Québec (Canada), using O2 and CO2 optic sensors. The RQs tended to converge around 1.2, but showed large variability (s.d.=0.45) and significant correlations with major gradients of ecosystem-level, substrate-level and bacterial community-level characteristics. Experiments with natural bacterioplankton using different single substrates suggested that RQ is intimately linked to the elemental composition of the respired compounds. RQs were on average low in net autotrophic systems, where bacteria likely were utilizing mainly reduced substrates, whereas we found evidence that the dominance of highly oxidized substrates, for example, organic acids formed by photo-chemical processes, led to high RQ in the more heterotrophic systems. Further, we suggest that BR contributes to a substantially larger share of freshwater CO2 emissions than presently believed based on the assumption that RQ is ∼1. Our study demonstrates that bacterioplankton RQ is not only a practical aspect of BR determination, but also a major ecosystem state variable that provides unique information about aquatic ecosystem functioning. PMID:22094347

  16. Chemical Emergencies

    MedlinePlus

    When a hazardous chemical has been released, it may harm people's health. Chemical releases can be unintentional, as in the case of an ... the case of a terrorist attack with a chemical weapon. Some hazardous chemicals have been developed by ...

  17. Groundwater Exploration in Freshwater/Saline Layered Aquifers - Southern Bangladesh.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKelvey, P. A.; Rahman, M.

    2001-05-01

    A major urban water supply and sanitation project is being implemented in the southern coastal districts of Bangladesh, by the Governments of Bangladesh and Denmark (DPHE/DANIDA). Due to the poor quality and reliability of surface water in the coastal districts, the source for these schemes will be groundwater. However, the abstraction of large quantities of water is complicated by the fact that the shallow aquifers are thin and of poor hydraulic quality. In addition, there is saline water underlying the shallow aquifer and, in recent years, arsenic has been discovered in many shallow wells throughout Bangladesh. Over the majority of the coastal districts, a thick freshwater sand underlies the saline aquifers, at depths below 200 m. This freshwater unit is bounded by thick clays which protect it from overlying and underlying saline water. The deep aquifer has been exploited in some of the project towns but in a few areas no freshwater aquifers had been located. An exploration programme was undertaken in each of these towns to prove the location of the freshwater sands and to help plan the location and depth of production well drilling. The first exploration stage was to locate any existing deep hand pumped wells and to carry out a water quality survey. Generally, this was sufficient to prove the existence of a thick freshwater aquifer. However, exact well depths and geological data were usually lacking and an exploration well was usually required. In three of the project towns, no deep aquifers had been exploited by existing hand pumped wells and geophysical surveys were undertaken to identify the locations of freshwater aquifers. These surveys comprised resistivity sounding both within the towns and in outlying areas within a feasible pumping distance. In two cases, freshwater aquifers were inferred from the geophysical surveys and exploration drilling was undertaken to prove the resource. Exploration drilling was undertaken by local contractors using hand

  18. Key roles for freshwater Actinobacteria revealed by deep metagenomic sequencing.

    PubMed

    Ghai, Rohit; Mizuno, Carolina Megumi; Picazo, Antonio; Camacho, Antonio; Rodriguez-Valera, Francisco

    2014-12-01

    Freshwater ecosystems are critical but fragile environments directly affecting society and its welfare. However, our understanding of genuinely freshwater microbial communities, constrained by our capacity to manipulate its prokaryotic participants in axenic cultures, remains very rudimentary. Even the most abundant components, freshwater Actinobacteria, remain largely unknown. Here, applying deep metagenomic sequencing to the microbial community of a freshwater reservoir, we were able to circumvent this traditional bottleneck and reconstruct de novo seven distinct streamlined actinobacterial genomes. These genomes represent three new groups of photoheterotrophic, planktonic Actinobacteria. We describe for the first time genomes of two novel clades, acMicro (Micrococcineae, related to Luna2,) and acAMD (Actinomycetales, related to acTH1). Besides, an aggregate of contigs belonged to a new branch of the Acidimicrobiales. All are estimated to have small genomes (approximately 1.2 Mb), and their GC content varied from 40 to 61%. One of the Micrococcineae genomes encodes a proteorhodopsin, a rhodopsin type reported for the first time in Actinobacteria. The remarkable potential capacity of some of these genomes to transform recalcitrant plant detrital material, particularly lignin-derived compounds, suggests close linkages between the terrestrial and aquatic realms. Moreover, abundances of Actinobacteria correlate inversely to those of Cyanobacteria that are responsible for prolonged and frequently irretrievable damage to freshwater ecosystems. This suggests that they might serve as sentinels of impending ecological catastrophes.

  19. Bistability of mangrove forests and competition with freshwater plants

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jiang, Jiang; Fuller, Douglas O; Teh, Su Yean; Zhai, Lu; Koh, Hock Lye; DeAngelis, Donald L.; Sternberg, L.D.S.L.

    2015-01-01

    Halophytic communities such as mangrove forests and buttonwood hammocks tend to border freshwater plant communities as sharp ecotones. Most studies attribute this purely to underlying physical templates, such as groundwater salinity gradients caused by tidal flux and topography. However, a few recent studies hypothesize that self-reinforcing feedback between vegetation and vadose zone salinity are also involved and create a bistable situation in which either halophytic dominated habitat or freshwater plant communities may dominate as alternative stable states. Here, we revisit the bistability hypothesis and demonstrate the mechanisms that result in bistability. We demonstrate with remote sensing imagery the sharp boundaries between freshwater hardwood hammock communities in southern Florida and halophytic communities such as buttonwood hammocks and mangroves. We further document from the literature how transpiration of mangroves and freshwater plants respond differently to vadose zone salinity, thus altering the salinity through feedback. Using mathematical models, we show how the self-reinforcing feedback, together with physical template, controls the ecotones between halophytic and freshwater communities. Regions of bistability along environmental gradients of salinity have the potential for large-scale vegetation shifts following pulse disturbances such as hurricane tidal surges in Florida, or tsunamis in other regions. The size of the region of bistability can be large for low-lying coastal habitat due to the saline water table, which extends inland due to salinity intrusion. We suggest coupling ecological and hydrologic processes as a framework for future studies.

  20. Taking high conservation value from forests to freshwaters.

    PubMed

    Abell, Robin; Morgan, Siân K; Morgan, Alexis J

    2015-07-01

    The high conservation value (HCV) concept, originally developed by the Forest Stewardship Council, has been widely incorporated outside the forestry sector into companies' supply chain assessments and responsible purchasing policies, financial institutions' investment policies, and numerous voluntary commodity standards. Many, if not most, of these newer applications relate to production practices that are likely to affect freshwater systems directly or indirectly, yet there is little guidance as to whether or how HCV can be applied to water bodies. We focus this paper on commodity standards and begin by exploring how prominent standards currently address both HCVs and freshwaters. We then highlight freshwater features of high conservation importance and examine how well those features are captured by the existing HCV framework. We propose a new set of freshwater 'elements' for each of the six values and suggest an approach for identifying HCV Areas that takes out-of-fence line impacts into account, thereby spatially extending the scope of existing methods to define HCVs. We argue that virtually any non-marine HCV assessment, regardless of the production sector, should be expanded to include freshwater values, and we suggest how to put those recommendations into practice.

  1. Taking High Conservation Value from Forests to Freshwaters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abell, Robin; Morgan, Siân K.; Morgan, Alexis J.

    2015-07-01

    The high conservation value (HCV) concept, originally developed by the Forest Stewardship Council, has been widely incorporated outside the forestry sector into companies' supply chain assessments and responsible purchasing policies, financial institutions' investment policies, and numerous voluntary commodity standards. Many, if not most, of these newer applications relate to production practices that are likely to affect freshwater systems directly or indirectly, yet there is little guidance as to whether or how HCV can be applied to water bodies. We focus this paper on commodity standards and begin by exploring how prominent standards currently address both HCVs and freshwaters. We then highlight freshwater features of high conservation importance and examine how well those features are captured by the existing HCV framework. We propose a new set of freshwater `elements' for each of the six values and suggest an approach for identifying HCV Areas that takes out-of-fence line impacts into account, thereby spatially extending the scope of existing methods to define HCVs. We argue that virtually any non-marine HCV assessment, regardless of the production sector, should be expanded to include freshwater values, and we suggest how to put those recommendations into practice.

  2. Trajectory Shifts in the Arctic and Subarctic Freshwater Cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peterson, Bruce J.; McClelland, James; Curry, Ruth; Holmes, Robert M.; Walsh, John E.; Aagaard, Knut

    2006-08-01

    Manifold changes in the freshwater cycle of high-latitude lands and oceans have been reported in the past few years. A synthesis of these changes in freshwater sources and in ocean freshwater storage illustrates the complementary and synoptic temporal pattern and magnitude of these changes over the past 50 years. Increasing river discharge anomalies and excess net precipitation on the ocean contributed ~20,000 cubic kilometers of fresh water to the Arctic and high-latitude North Atlantic oceans from lows in the 1960s to highs in the 1990s. Sea ice attrition provided another ~15,000 cubic kilometers, and glacial melt added ~2000 cubic kilometers. The sum of anomalous inputs from these freshwater sources matched the amount and rate at which fresh water accumulated in the North Atlantic during much of the period from 1965 through 1995. The changes in freshwater inputs and ocean storage occurred in conjunction with the amplifying North Atlantic Oscillation and rising air temperatures. Fresh water may now be accumulating in the Arctic Ocean and will likely be exported southward if and when the North Atlantic Oscillation enters into a new high phase.

  3. Impact of freshwater diversion projects on diversity and activity of methanotrophic communities in freshwater wetlands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isaac, J.; Schulz, C. J.; Childers, G. W.

    2009-12-01

    Methanotrophic bacteria are key players in the carbon cycle capable of using methane as a sole carbon and energy source. Methanotrophs are ubiquitous in soil environments and play a key role in decreasing methane flux from anaerobic environments to the atmosphere, reducing the concentration of this greenhouse gas. Wetlands are a particularly important source of methane to the atmosphere, even though methanotrophs can consume the majority of the methane produced. Decreases in methanotrophic activity in wetland environments due to disturbance can have negative impacts with regard to greenhouse gas emissions, especially if the impact is widespread. Currently, several freshwater diversion projects are active and/or scheduled to come online in south Louisiana, delivering freshwater, sediments, and nutrients to coastal wetlands en masse to help combat subsidence and coastal erosion. Along with freshwater, these diversions also deliver other components of the Mississippi River including substantial bicarbonate alkalinity, reactive nitrogen, and sulfate. Analogous to the large scale diversion projects are smaller restoration projects that deliver treated wastewater effluent to wetlands. In particular, the Joyce Wildlife Management Area (JWMA) in southeast Louisiana has been the recipient of ~5 million gallons of treated domestic effluent per day since 2006. Both the composition of the marsh receiving the effluent and the effluent itself have similarities to Mississippi River diversions. We collected pre and post JWMA sediment microbial community DNA and created cloned libraries of genes encoding particulate methane monooxygenase (pmoA) as a proxy for methanotrophic community composition. Water chemistry data was also collected. Shifts in methanotrophic community composition were apparent as well as shifts in water chemistry. The most notable shift in water chemistry was pH, which changed from mildly acidic to slightly alkaline conditions, due to the increased alkalinity of

  4. Tidal freshwater wetland herbivory in Anacostia Park

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Krafft, Cairn; Hatfield, Jeff S.; Hammerschlag, Richard S.

    2010-01-01

    Herbivory has played a major role in dictating vegetation abundance and species composition at Kingman Marsh in Anacostia Park, Washington, D.C., since restoration of this tidal freshwater wetland was initiated in 2000. In June 2009 an herbivory study was established to document the impacts of resident Canada goose (Branta canadensis maxima) herbivory to vegetation at Kingman Marsh. Sixteen modules consisting of paired exclosed plots and unfenced control plots were constructed. Eight of the modules were installed in vegetated portions of the restoration site that had been protected over time by fencing, while the remaining eight modules were placed in portions of the site that had not been protected over time and were basically unvegetated at the start of the experiment. Since the experiment was designed to determine the impacts of herbivory by resident Canada geese as opposed to other herbivores, exclosure fencing was elevated 0.2 m to permit access by herbivores such as fish and turtles while excluding mature Canada geese. Repeated measures analysis of variance (ANOVA) was used to analyze the differences between paired exclosure and control plots for a number of variables including total vegetative cover. Differences in total vegetative cover were not significant for the baseline data collected in June. By contrast, two months after the old protective fencing was removed from the initially-vegetated areas to allow Canada geese access to the control plots, total vegetative cover had declined dramatically in the initially-vegetated control plots, and differences between paired exclosed and control plots were significant (P = 0.0026). No herbivory by Canada geese or other herbivores such as fish or turtles was observed in the exclosures. These results show that Canada goose herbivory has inflicted significant damage to the native wetland vegetation in the portions of Kingman Marsh that had been refenced and replanted. Significant differences in total vegetative

  5. Estimating freshwater flows from tidally affected hydrographic data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pagendam, D. E.; Percival, D. B.

    2015-03-01

    Detiding end-of-catchment flow data are an important step in determining the total volumes of freshwater (and associated pollutant loads) entering the ocean. We examine three approaches for separating freshwater and tidal flows from tidally affected data: (i) a simple low-pass Butterworth filter (BWF); (ii) a robust, harmonic analysis with Kalman smoothing (RoHAKS) which is a novel approach introduced in this paper; and (iii) dynamic harmonic regression (DHR). Using hydrographic data collected in the Logan River, Australia, over a period of 452 days, we judge the accuracy of the three methods based on three criteria: consistency of freshwater flows with upstream gauges; consistency of total discharge volumes with the raw data over the event; and minimal upstream flow. A simulation experiment shows that RoHAKS outperforms both BWF and DHR on a number of criteria. In addition, RoHAKS enjoys a computational advantage over DHR in speed and use of freely available software.

  6. Assessing and managing freshwater ecosystems vulnerable to global change

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Angeler, David G.; Allen, Craig R.; Birge, Hannah E.; Drakare, Stina; McKie, Brendan G.; Johnson, Richard K.

    2014-01-01

    Freshwater ecosystems are important for global biodiversity and provide essential ecosystem services. There is consensus in the scientific literature that freshwater ecosystems are vulnerable to the impacts of environmental change, which may trigger irreversible regime shifts upon which biodiversity and ecosystem services may be lost. There are profound uncertainties regarding the management and assessment of the vulnerability of freshwater ecosystems to environmental change. Quantitative approaches are needed to reduce this uncertainty. We describe available statistical and modeling approaches along with case studies that demonstrate how resilience theory can be applied to aid decision-making in natural resources management. We highlight especially how long-term monitoring efforts combined with ecological theory can provide a novel nexus between ecological impact assessment and management, and the quantification of systemic vulnerability and thus the resilience of ecosystems to environmental change.

  7. Successful enrichment of the ubiquitous freshwater acI Actinobacteria.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Sarahi L; McMahon, Katherine D; Grossart, Hans-Peter; Warnecke, Falk

    2014-02-01

    Actinobacteria of the acI lineage are often the numerically dominant bacterial phylum in surface freshwaters, where they can account for > 50% of total bacteria. Despite their abundance, there are no described isolates. In an effort to obtain enrichment of these ubiquitous freshwater Actinobacteria, diluted freshwater samples from Lake Grosse Fuchskuhle, Germany, were incubated in 96-well culture plates. With this method, a successful enrichment containing high abundances of a member of the lineage acI was established. Phylogenetic classification showed that the acI Actinobacteria of the enrichment belonged to the acI-B2 tribe, which seems to prefer acidic lakes. This enrichment grows to low cell densities and thus the oligotrophic nature of acI-B2 was confirmed.

  8. New data on freshwater psammic Gastrotricha from Brazil.

    PubMed

    Garraffoni, André R S; Araujo, Thiago Q; Lourenço, Anete P; Balsamo, Maria

    2010-10-07

    Current knowledge of freshwater gastrotrich fauna from Brazil is underestimated as only two studies are available. The present communication is a taxonomic account of the first-ever survey of freshwater Gastrotricha in Minas Gerais State. Samplings were carried out yielding six species of three Chaetonotidae genera: Aspidiophorus cf. pleustonicus, Ichthydium cf. chaetiferum, Chaetonotus acanthocephalus, Chaetonotus heideri, Chaetonotus cf. succinctus, Chaetonotus sp., and also an undescribed species belonging to the genus Redudasys (incertae sedis): this is the first finding of specimens of Redudasys outside of original type locality. These preliminary observations suggest that the knowledge of the biodiversity of Gastrotricha in the Minas Gerais State, as well as in the whole Brazil, will certainly increase as further investigations are undertaken, and that freshwater Macrodasyida may be more common than previously thought.

  9. New data on freshwater psammic Gastrotricha from Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Garraffoni, André R. S.; Araujo, Thiago Q.; Lourenço, Anete P.; Balsamo, Maria

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Current knowledge of freshwater gastrotrich fauna from Brazil is underestimated as only two studies are available. The present communication is a taxonomic account of the first-ever survey of freshwater Gastrotricha in Minas Gerais State. Samplings were carried out yielding six species of three Chaetonotidae genera: Aspidiophorus cf. pleustonicus, Ichthydium cf. chaetiferum, Chaetonotus acanthocephalus, Chaetonotus heideri, Chaetonotus cf. succinctus, Chaetonotus sp., and also an undescribed species belonging to the genus Redudasys (incertae sedis): this is the first finding of specimens of Redudasys outside of original type locality. These preliminary observations suggest that the knowledge of the biodiversity of Gastrotricha in the Minas Gerais State, as well as in the whole Brazil, will certainly increase as further investigations are undertaken, and that freshwater Macrodasyida may be more common than previously thought. PMID:21594197

  10. Extinction rates in North American freshwater fishes, 1900-2010

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Burkhead, Noel M.

    2012-01-01

    Widespread evidence shows that the modern rates of extinction in many plants and animals exceed background rates in the fossil record. In the present article, I investigate this issue with regard to North American freshwater fishes. From 1898 to 2006, 57 taxa became extinct, and three distinct populations were extirpated from the continent. Since 1989, the numbers of extinct North American fishes have increased by 25%. From the end of the nineteenth century to the present, modern extinctions varied by decade but significantly increased after 1950 (post-1950s mean = 7.5 extinct taxa per decade). The modern extinction rate for North American freshwater fishes is conservatively estimated to be 877 times greater than the background extinction rate for freshwater fishes (one extinction every 3 million years). Reasonable estimates project that future increases in extinctions will range from 53 to 86 species by 2050.

  11. Rapid reaction of nanomolar Mn(II) with superoxide radical in seawater and simulated freshwater

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hansard, S.P.; Easter, H.D.; Voelker, B.M.

    2011-01-01

    Superoxide radical (O2-) has been proposed to be an important participant in oxidation-reduction reactions of metal ions in natural waters. Here, we studied the reaction of nanomolar Mn(II) with O 2- in seawater and simulated freshwater, using chemiluminescence detection of O2- to quantify the effect of Mn(II) on the decay kinetics of O2-. With 3-24 nM added [Mn(II)] and <0.7 nM [O2-], we observed effective second-order rate constants for the reaction of Mn(II) with O2- of 6 ?? 106 to 1 ?? 107 M -1???s-1 in various seawater samples. In simulated freshwater (pH 8.6), the effective rate constant of Mn(II) reaction with O 2- was somewhat lower, 1.6 ?? 106 M -1???s-1. With higher initial [O2-], in excess of added [Mn(II)], catalytic decay of O 2- by Mn was observed, implying that a Mn(II/III) redox cycle occurred. Our results show that reactions with nanomolar Mn(II) could be an important sink of O2- in natural waters. In addition, reaction of Mn(II) with superoxide could maintain a significant fraction of dissolved Mn in the +III oxidation state. ?? 2011 American Chemical Society.

  12. Effect of ultraviolet light on toxicity of the PAH fluoranthene to freshwater organisms

    SciTech Connect

    Brooke, L.T.; Cox, D.; Kahl, M.; Spehar, R.L.

    1994-12-31

    Certain polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) can be activated by irradiation with ultraviolet light in the near UV waveband to increase their biocidal qualities. Fluoranthene is one of the PAHs that has this capacity. Ten species of freshwater animals and one species of freshwater plant were acutely exposed to several concentrations of fluoranthene in the presence of additional UV light and to standard light conditions. Tests were conducted using flow-through static or renewal techniques. Fluoranthene concentrations were measured using high pressure liquid chromatography. UV light was produced by UV-emitting fluorescent lamps. UV-C was removed from the spectrum by cellulose triacetate filters. Separate measurements were made of spectral ranges 310 to 390, 265 to 328 and < 320 nm. All species tested except for a dragonfly, Ophiogomphus sp. were more sensitive to fluoranthene in the presence of UV light ranging from 449 to 926 {mu}W/CM{sup 2} than the same species exposed to this chemical in tests using standard light conditions. Sensitivity increased by factors of {<=}32 times in these tests. Two species were tested for effects of UV light during chronic exposure. The cladoceran, Daphnia magna, showed a 17.1 fold increase in sensitivity to fluoranthene due to UV light and the fathead minnow showed a 5.77 fold increase. Results show that water quality criteria for fluoranthene should be adjusted for UV light effects.

  13. Antibacterial metabolites synthesized by psychrotrophic bacteria isolated from cold-freshwater environments.

    PubMed

    Barros, Javier; Becerra, José; González, Carlos; Martínez, Miguel

    2013-03-01

    The ability of three psychrotrophic Gram-negative bacilli isolated from Chilean Patagonian cold freshwater rivers to produce bioactive metabolites was evaluated. The strains were isolated from cold waters rivers and identified by their biochemical properties and 16S rRNA gene analysis. The metabolites fractions showing antibacterial activity were obtained by solvent extraction and partially characterized by gas-mass chromatography (GC-MS). Antibacterial activity of the fractions was evaluated by an agar-well diffusion test upon 14 bacterial strains, both Gram positive and Gram negative. Thermal and proteolytic resistances of the antibacterial metabolites fractions were also evaluated. Molecular analysis allows the identification of the three Patagonian strains as Pseudomonas sp. RG-6 (Pseudomonas brenneri 99.6 % identity), Pseudomonas sp. RG-8 (Pseudomonas trivialis 99.6 % identity) and Yersinia sp. RP-3 (Yersinia aldovae 99.5 % identity). These extracts were able to inhibit both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria but not Listeria monocytogenes. The antibacterial activity of the filtrated supernatants was lost at temperatures ≥60 °C, and was not affected by proteinase K treatment. The chemical structure of the active molecule remains to be elucidated, although the GC-MS analysis of the filtrates suggests that compounds like sesquiterpenes derivatives from β-maaliene or δ-selinene could be responsible of this antibacterial activity. Pristine cold freshwater streams showed to be interesting sources of metabolites-producing microorganisms with antibacterial activity.

  14. PROFILE: Risk Assessment as an Environmental Management Tool:Considerations for Freshwater Wetlands

    PubMed

    Lemly

    1997-05-01

    / This paper presents a foundation for improving the risk assessmentprocess for freshwater wetlands. Integrating wetland science, i.e., use of anecosystem-based approach, is the key concept. Each biotic and abiotic wetlandcomponent should be identified and its contribution to ecosystem functionsand societal values determined when deciding whether a stressor poses anunreasonable risk to the sustainability of a particular wetland.Understanding the major external and internal factors that regulate theoperational conditions of wetlands is critical to risk characterization.Determining the linkages between these factors, and how they influence theway stressors affect wetlands, is the basis for an ecosystem approach.Adequate consideration of wetland ecology, hydrology, geomorphology, andsoils can greatly reduce the level of uncertainty associated with riskassessment and lead to more effective risk management. In order to formulateeffective solutions, wetland problems must be considered at watershed,landscape, and ecosystem scales. Application of an ecosystem approach can begreatly facilitated if wetland scientists and risk assessors work together todevelop a common understanding of the principles of both disciplines.KEY WORDS: Ecological risk assessment; Freshwater wetlands;Environmental pollution; Chemical stressors; Physical stressors; Biologicalstressors

  15. Implications of climate change for northern Canada: freshwater, marine, and terrestrial ecosystems.

    PubMed

    Prowse, Terry D; Furgal, Chris; Wrona, Fred J; Reist, James D

    2009-07-01

    Climate variability and change is projected to have significant effects on the physical, chemical, and biological components of northern Canadian marine, terrestrial, and freshwater systems. As the climate continues to change, there will be consequences for biodiversity shifts and for the ranges and distribution of many species with resulting effects on availability, accessibility, and quality of resources upon which human populations rely. This will have implications for the protection and management of wildlife, fish, and fisheries resources; protected areas; and forests. The northward migration of species and the disruption and competition from invading species are already occurring and will continue to affect marine, terrestrial, and freshwater communities. Shifting environmental conditions will likely introduce new animal-transmitted diseases and redistribute some existing diseases, affecting key economic resources and some human populations. Stress on populations of iconic wildlife species, such as the polar bear, ringed seals, and whales, will continue as a result of changes in critical sea-ice habitat interactions. Where these stresses affect economically and culturally important species, they will have significant effects on people and regional economies. Further integrated, field-based monitoring and research programs, and the development of predictive models are required to allow for more detailed and comprehensive projections of change to be made, and to inform the development and implementation of appropriate adaptation, wildlife, and habitat conservation and protection strategies.

  16. Morphological Characteristics and Phylogenetic Trends of Trematode Cercariae in Freshwater Snails from Nakhon Nayok Province, Thailand

    PubMed Central

    Chontananarth, Thapana; Tejangkura, Thanawan; Wetchasart, Napat; Chimburut, Cherdchay

    2017-01-01

    The prevalence of cercarial infection in freshwater snails and their evolutionary trends were studied in Nakhon Nayok province, Thailand. A total of 2,869 individual snails were examined for parasitic infections. The results showed that 12 snail species were found to host larval stages of trematodes with an overall prevalence of 4.7%. The infected specimens included 7 types at the cercarial stage; cercariae, megalurous cercariae, echinostome cercariae, furcocercous cercariae, parapleurolophocercous cercariae, virgulate cercariae, and xiphidiocercariae. Regarding molecular identification, ITS2 sequence data of each larval trematode were analyzed, and a dendrogram was constructed using the neighbor-joining method with 10,000 replicates. The dendrogram was separated into 6 clades (order/family), including Echinostomatida/Echinostomatidae, Echinostomatida/Philophthalmidae, Opisthorchiida/Heterophyidae, Plagiorchiida/Prosthogonimidae, Plagiorchiida/Lecithodendriidae, and Strigeatida/Cyathocotylidae. These findings were used to confirm morphological characteristics and evolutionary trends of each type of cercariae discovered in Nakhon Nayok province. Furthermore, this investigation confirmed that the ITS2 data of cercariae could be used to study on phylogenetic relationships or to determine classification of this species at order and/or family level when possible. PMID:28285506

  17. Morphological Characteristics and Phylogenetic Trends of Trematode Cercariae in Freshwater Snails from Nakhon Nayok Province, Thailand.

    PubMed

    Chontananarth, Thapana; Tejangkura, Thanawan; Wetchasart, Napat; Chimburut, Cherdchay

    2017-02-01

    The prevalence of cercarial infection in freshwater snails and their evolutionary trends were studied in Nakhon Nayok province, Thailand. A total of 2,869 individual snails were examined for parasitic infections. The results showed that 12 snail species were found to host larval stages of trematodes with an overall prevalence of 4.7%. The infected specimens included 7 types at the cercarial stage; cercariae, megalurous cercariae, echinostome cercariae, furcocercous cercariae, parapleurolophocercous cercariae, virgulate cercariae, and xiphidiocercariae. Regarding molecular identification, ITS2 sequence data of each larval trematode were analyzed, and a dendrogram was constructed using the neighbor-joining method with 10,000 replicates. The dendrogram was separated into 6 clades (order/family), including Echinostomatida/Echinostomatidae, Echinostomatida/Philophthalmidae, Opisthorchiida/Heterophyidae, Plagiorchiida/Prosthogonimidae, Plagiorchiida/Lecithodendriidae, and Strigeatida/Cyathocotylidae. These findings were used to confirm morphological characteristics and evolutionary trends of each type of cercariae discovered in Nakhon Nayok province. Furthermore, this investigation confirmed that the ITS2 data of cercariae could be used to study on phylogenetic relationships or to determine classification of this species at order and/or family level when possible.

  18. Horizontal and vertical distribution of freshwater in the Arctic Ocean deduced from historical hydrochemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawai, M. Y.; Tanaka, N.; Pivovarov, S.; Timokhov, L.

    2004-12-01

    Historical data (1935-2002) of two chemical tracers, oxygen isotope ratio and alkalinity, are combined and freshwater sources of sea ice meltwater (SIM), and other freshwater (OF) are distinguished from each pair of two conservative elements, salinity-oxygen isotope and salinity-alkalinity. The OF consists of mainly river runoff, with addition of precipitation and salinity deficit of inflowing Pacific water. Results give at first startling pictures of both horizontal and vertical distributions of freshwaters from the two designated sources almost throughout the Arctic Ocean. River water sources in Canada Basin: Distribution of OF at the 10 depth shows that river water from the Russian shelf seas flows out of the shelf between the Mendeleyev and the Lomonosov Ridges and exits thorough western part of the Fram Strait. Part of this freshwater enters into the Canadian Basin, where water contains large amount of OF but small fraction of American river water. This may suggest that river water from American continent should exit from the basin relatively fast though the Canadian Archipelago. Vertical mixing of fresh water: The atmospheric cooling and brine rejection during winter converts fresh surface water into denser water with high OF and negative SIM signals. High inventories of both OF and negative SIM, which implies mixing with brine, are found in the Canadian Basin, Baffin Bay and east of Novaya Zemlya in the Kara Sea. These signals in the Kara Sea and the Baffin Bay show occurrence of deep convection in winter, whereas those in the Canadian Basin come from adjacent shallow shelves. In the Canadian Basin, negative SIM distribution is well corresponding to the low temperature layer between surface and Atlantic origin waters. This layer characterized by nutrient maximum with a salinity of about 33.1 and is found to form from the water having salinity of 31-32. Our analysis advocates the importance of shelf water from the East Siberian Sea on formation of water mass

  19. Patterns of Freshwater Species Richness, Endemism, and Vulnerability in California.

    PubMed

    Howard, Jeanette K; Klausmeyer, Kirk R; Fesenmyer, Kurt A; Furnish, Joseph; Gardali, Thomas; Grantham, Ted; Katz, Jacob V E; Kupferberg, Sarah; McIntyre, Patrick; Moyle, Peter B; Ode, Peter R; Peek, Ryan; Quiñones, Rebecca M; Rehn, Andrew C; Santos, Nick; Schoenig, Steve; Serpa, Larry; Shedd, Jackson D; Slusark, Joe; Viers, Joshua H; Wright, Amber; Morrison, Scott A

    2015-01-01

    The ranges and abundances of species that depend on freshwater habitats are declining worldwide. Efforts to counteract those trends are often hampered by a lack of information about species distribution and conservation status and are often strongly biased toward a few well-studied groups. We identified the 3,906 vascular plants, macroinvertebrates, and vertebrates native to California, USA, that depend on fresh water for at least one stage of their life history. We evaluated the conservation status for these taxa using existing government and non-governmental organization assessments (e.g., endangered species act, NatureServe), created a spatial database of locality observations or distribution information from ~400 data sources, and mapped patterns of richness, endemism, and vulnerability. Although nearly half of all taxa with conservation status (n = 1,939) are vulnerable to extinction, only 114 (6%) of those vulnerable taxa have a legal mandate for protection in the form of formal inclusion on a state or federal endangered species list. Endemic taxa are at greater risk than non-endemics, with 90% of the 927 endemic taxa vulnerable to extinction. Records with spatial data were available for a total of 2,276 species (61%). The patterns of species richness differ depending on the taxonomic group analyzed, but are similar across taxonomic level. No particular taxonomic group represents an umbrella for all species, but hotspots of high richness for listed species cover 40% of the hotspots for all other species and 58% of the hotspots for vulnerable freshwater species. By mapping freshwater species hotspots we show locations that represent the top priority for conservation action in the state. This study identifies opportunities to fill gaps in the evaluation of conservation status for freshwater taxa in California, to address the lack of occurrence information for nearly 40% of freshwater taxa and nearly 40% of watersheds in the state, and to implement adequate

  20. Spatial covariation between freshwater and terrestrial ecosystem services.

    PubMed

    Holland, Robert A; Eigenbrod, Felix; Armsworth, Paul R; Anderson, Barbara J; Thomas, Chris D; Heinemeyer, Andreas; Gillings, Simon; Roy, David B; Gaston, Kevin J

    2011-09-01

    To inform the design and implementation of land-use policies that consider the variety of goods and services people derive from ecosystems, it is essential to understand spatial patterns of individual services, how multiple services relate to each other, and how these relationships vary across spatial scales and localities. Despite the importance of freshwater as a determinant of regional economic and human demographic patterns, there are surprisingly few studies that map the provision of a range of services associated with the quality of the aquatic environment. Here we examine relationships between indicators of riverine water and associated habitat quality, freshwater biodiversity, three terrestrial ecosystem services, and terrestrial biodiversity across England and Wales. The results indicate strong associations between our indicators of freshwater services. However, a comparison of these indicators of freshwater services with other ecosystem services (carbon storage, agricultural production, recreation) and biodiversity of species of conservation concern in the surrounding terrestrial landscape shows no clear relationships. While there are potential policy "win-wins" for the protection of multiple services shown by associations between indicators of freshwater services and carbon storage in upland areas of Britain, the other ecosystem services showed either negative or no relationships with the indicators of freshwater services. We also consider the influence that spatial scale has on these relationships using River Basin Districts. Our results indicate that relationships between indicators of services can change dramatically depending on the societal pressures and other regional conditions. Thus, the delivery of multiple ecosystem services requires the development of regional strategies, or of national strategies that take account of regional variation.

  1. 2H and 18O Freshwater Isoscapes of Scotland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meier-Augenstein, Wolfram; Hoogewerff, Jurian; Kemp, Helen; Frew, Danny

    2013-04-01

    Scotland's freshwater lochs and reservoirs provide a vital resource for sustaining biodiversity, agriculture, food production as well as for human consumption. Regular monitoring of freshwaters by the Scottish Environment Protection Agency (SEPA) fulfils legislative requirements with regards to water quality but new scientific methods involving stable isotope analysis present an opportunity combining these mandatory monitoring schemes with fundamental research to inform and deliver on current and nascent government policies [1] through gaining a greater understanding of Scottish waters and their importance in the context of climate change, environmental sustainability and food security. For example, 2H and 18O isoscapes of Scottish freshwater could be used to underpin research and its applications in: • Climate change - Using longitudinal changes in the characteristic isotope composition of freshwater lochs and reservoirs as proxy, isoscapes will provide a means to assess if and how changes in temperature and weather patterns might impact on precipitation patterns and amount. • Scottish branding - Location specific stable isotope signatures of Scottish freshwater have the potential to be used as a tool for provenancing and thus protecting premium Scottish produce such as Scottish beef, Scottish soft fruit and Scottish Whisky. During 2011 and 2012, with the support of SEPA more than 110 samples from freshwater lochs and reservoirs were collected from 127 different locations across Scotland including the Highlands and Islands. Here we present the results of this sampling and analysis exercise isotope analyses in form of 2H and 18O isoscapes with an unprecedented grid resolution of 26.5 × 26.5 km (or 16.4 × 16.4 miles). [1] Adaptation Framework - Adapting Our Ways: Managing Scotland's Climate Risk (2009): Scotland's Biodiversity: It's in Your Hands - A strategy for the conservation and enhancement of biodiversity in Scotland (2005); Recipe For Success - Scotland

  2. Patterns of Freshwater Species Richness, Endemism, and Vulnerability in California

    PubMed Central

    Furnish, Joseph; Gardali, Thomas; Grantham, Ted; Katz, Jacob V. E.; Kupferberg, Sarah; McIntyre, Patrick; Moyle, Peter B.; Ode, Peter R.; Peek, Ryan; Quiñones, Rebecca M.; Rehn, Andrew C.; Santos, Nick; Schoenig, Steve; Serpa, Larry; Shedd, Jackson D.; Slusark, Joe; Viers, Joshua H.; Wright, Amber; Morrison, Scott A.

    2015-01-01

    The ranges and abundances of species that depend on freshwater habitats are declining worldwide. Efforts to counteract those trends are often hampered by a lack of information about species distribution and conservation status and are often strongly biased toward a few well-studied groups. We identified the 3,906 vascular plants, macroinvertebrates, and vertebrates native to California, USA, that depend on fresh water for at least one stage of their life history. We evaluated the conservation status for these taxa using existing government and non-governmental organization assessments (e.g., endangered species act, NatureServe), created a spatial database of locality observations or distribution information from ~400 data sources, and mapped patterns of richness, endemism, and vulnerability. Although nearly half of all taxa with conservation status (n = 1,939) are vulnerable to extinction, only 114 (6%) of those vulnerable taxa have a legal mandate for protection in the form of formal inclusion on a state or federal endangered species list. Endemic taxa are at greater risk than non-endemics, with 90% of the 927 endemic taxa vulnerable to extinction. Records with spatial data were available for a total of 2,276 species (61%). The patterns of species richness differ depending on the taxonomic group analyzed, but are similar across taxonomic level. No particular taxonomic group represents an umbrella for all species, but hotspots of high richness for listed species cover 40% of the hotspots for all other species and 58% of the hotspots for vulnerable freshwater species. By mapping freshwater species hotspots we show locations that represent the top priority for conservation action in the state. This study identifies opportunities to fill gaps in the evaluation of conservation status for freshwater taxa in California, to address the lack of occurrence information for nearly 40% of freshwater taxa and nearly 40% of watersheds in the state, and to implement adequate

  3. Evaluating Alternative Strategies for Investments in Freshwater Conservation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheruvelil, K. S.; Kramer, D. B.; Zhang, T.; Ligmann-Zielinska, A.; Soranno, P.; Bremigan, M. T.

    2012-12-01

    Efforts towards systematic conservation planning for freshwaters have progressed far less than similar efforts in the terrestrial and marine environments. Although there are differences in the coupled human and natural systems that distinguish freshwater, terrestrial, and marine environments, many of the tools that have been used in terrestrial and marine systems can also be used for conservation planning for freshwater resources. In this paper, we used one such tool, return on investment (ROI), to identify optimal conservation portfolios. Our overarching research question is: how do different strategies for evaluating ROI benefits influence the resulting portfolio and the outcome of interest - in our case, water quality? Specifically, we examined investments to convert farmed agricultural land to fallow land to improve water quality in 55 inland lakes in southwestern Michigan. We simulated investments and compared the ROIs for the following strategies: 1) economic; 2) ecological; 3) environmental policy and 4) agricultural policy. We also tested the well-established assumption that riparian lands, those abutting and within 30 m of freshwater shorelines, have the greatest potential to influence water quality. We found that 1) investments in freshwater resources through the conservation of riparian land are more effective than the conservation of randomly selected parcels of similar land area in the catchment; 2) the costs and benefits of riparian land conservation vary considerably among lakes; 3) the choice of investment strategies results in very different conservation portfolios; 4) the resulting conservation portfolios have very different distributional and policy implications. These analyses and results provide a foundation on which to improve systematic conservation planning for freshwaters.

  4. What makes a healthy environment for native freshwater mussels?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ,

    2000-01-01

    Freshwater mussels are sensitive to contamination of sediment that they inhabit and to the water that they filter, making the presence of live, adult mussels an excellent indicator of ecosystem health and stability. Freshwater mussels are relatively immobile, imbedded in the streambed with part of the shell sticking up into the water so that they can filter water to obtain oxygen and food. This lack of mobility makes them particularly vulnerable to water and sediment contamination, changes in sedimentation, or prolonged drought. Thus, ecosystem health and stability are critical for their reproduction and survival.

  5. Why freshwater organisms survived the asteroid that killed the dinosaurs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schultz, Colin

    2013-08-01

    Roughly 65.5 million years ago, a massive asteroid smashed into present-day Chicxulub, Mexico. The impact set fire to Earth's surface. Dust and ash darkened the sky, sending the planet into an "impact winter" that lasted months to years and caused the extinction of nonavian dinosaurs and half of ocean-dwelling species. However, life in inland freshwater ecosystems largely escaped this fate. To try to understand why freshwater organisms held on while ocean life failed, Robertson et al. surveyed relevant research to understand how the mechanisms of extinction would have operated differently in the two environments.

  6. Potential Impacts of Food Production on Freshwater Availability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yano, Shinjiro; Hanasaki, Naota; Itsubo, Norihiro; Kim, Hyungjun; Oki, Taikan

    2014-05-01

    The sustainability of freshwater use is often evaluated based on the total volume of water consumption or withdrawal. However, the renewable freshwater resource and potential impacts of water depletion differ with location and water source. In addition, most estimates of the environmental impacts of water use have focused on depletion from a single-source perspective without separating geographically different water sources. Therefore, comprehensive potential impacts from multiple water sources remain unclear. In this study, we quantified the potential impacts of the global food production on freshwater availability (water availability footprint), applying the Water Availability Factor (fwa). Each water source including rainfall, surface water, and groundwater had individual fwa, which is calculated based on the geophysical hydrological cycle, to reflect the differences among renewable freshwater resources by place and source. The fwa for each water source was estimated based on land area or time period required to obtain the reference volume of freshwater. The reference volume was regarded as 1 m3 of rainfall over an area of 1.0 m2 (1,000 mm/year), based on the global mean annual precipitation. This concept is consistent with the Ecological Footprint (EF), which measures how much biologically productive land area is required to provide the resources consumed. The EF concept is measured in global hectares, a standardized unit equal to one hectare with global average bioproductivity. We found that the current agriculture consumes freshwater resources at 1.3 times the rapid rate than sustainable water use. This rate can also indicate environmental water scarcity. Among environmentally water-scarce countries, well-financed countries tend to import cereal products as virtual water to compensate for their domestic water resources. Among water-abundant countries, well-financed countries tend to export cereal products by exploiting their freshwater availability. The fwa

  7. National Action Plan: Priorities for Managing Freshwater Resources in a Changing Climate

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The National Action Plan is based on the latest science on climate risks to freshwater resources. The Plan establishes a national goal to have government agencies and citizens collaboratively manage freshwater resources in response to a changing climate.

  8. THE EFFECT OF FRESHWATER INFLOW ON NET ECOSYSTEM METABOLISM IN LAVACA BAY, TEXAS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Estuaries and other coastal ecosystems depend on freshwater inflow to maintain the gradients in environmental characteristics that define these transitional water bodies. Freshwater inflow (FWI) rates in many estuaries are changing due to changing land use patterns, water divers...

  9. Assessing macroinvertebrate biodiversity in freshwater ecosystems: advances and challenges in DNA-based approaches

    EPA Science Inventory

    Assessing the biodiversity of macroinvertebrate faunas in freshwater ecosystems is an essential component of both basic ecological inquiry and applied ecological assessments. Aspects of taxonomic diversity and composition in freshwater communities are widely used to quantify wate...

  10. Quality assessment of freshwater and coastal seawater in the Ionian area of N.E. Sicily, Italy.

    PubMed

    Cimino, G; Puleio, M C; Toscano, G

    2002-07-01

    This work was conducted to analyse pressing and competing demands of water in Northeast Sicily, Italy. In this area, looking at the Ionian Sea, freshwaters and coastal seawaters have been studied on the quality and on the transport processes of pollutants. Attention has been focused on chemical and microbial parameters proposed by European Directives for drinking freshwaters and bathing seawaters. The findings show that the ground freshwaters are of good quality but the surface ones, particularly torrents and correlated under-river aquifers, are clearly polluted. The characteristics of the coastal seawaters are according with those of the closely bound up estuarine waters. Contamination is due essentially to discharge of raw sewage in the watercourses by public and private pipes. The impact is usually less evident during the wet season because rain and seastorms dilute the polluting load, but in dry periods this pollution causes loss of habitat and deleterious effects on environment. A database has been developed to provide a graphic and mapping display interface of the area studied and to assist the management of the studied fluvial basins.

  11. Morphological alteration, lysosomal membrane fragility and apoptosis of the cells of Indian freshwater sponge exposed to washing soda (sodium carbonate).

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, Soumalya; Ray, Mitali; Dutta, Manab Kumar; Acharya, Avanti; Mukhopadhyay, Sandip Kumar; Ray, Sajal

    2015-12-01

    Washing soda is chemically known as sodium carbonate and is a component of laundry detergent. Domestic effluent, drain water and various anthropogenic activities have been identified as major routes of sodium carbonate contamination of the freshwater ecosystem. The freshwater sponge, Eunapius carteri, bears ecological and evolutionary significance and is considered as a bioresource in aquatic ecosystems. The present study involves estimation of morphological damage, lysosomal membrane integrity, activity of phosphatases and apoptosis in the cells of E. carteri under the environmentally realistic concentrations of washing soda. Exposure to washing soda resulted in severe morphological alterations and damages in cells of E. carteri. Fragility and destabilization of lysosomal membranes of E. carteri under the sublethal exposure was indicative to toxin induced physiological stress in sponge. Prolonged exposure to sodium carbonate resulted a reduction in the activity of acid and alkaline phosphatases in the cells of E. carteri. Experimental concentration of 8 mg/l of washing soda for 192 h yielded an increase in the physiological level of cellular apoptosis among the semigranulocytes and granulocytes of E. carteri, which was suggestive to possible shift in apoptosis mediated immunoprotection. The results were indicative of an undesirable shift in the immune status of sponge. Contamination of the freshwater aquifers by washing soda thus poses an alarming ecotoxicological threat to sponges.

  12. Occurrence of triclosan, triclocarban, and Its Lesser Chlorinated Congeners in Minnesota Freshwater Sediments Collected Near Wastewater Treatment Plants

    PubMed Central

    Venkatesan, Arjun K.; Pycke, Benny F.G.; Barber, Larry B.; Lee, Kathy E.; Halden, Rolf U.

    2012-01-01

    The antimicrobial agents triclosan (TCS), triclocarban (TCC) and their associated transformation products are of increasing concern as environmental pollutants due to their potential adverse effects on humans and wildlife, including bioaccumulation and endocrine-disrupting activity. Analysis by tandem mass spectrometry of 24 paired freshwater bed sediment samples (top 10 cm) collected by the U.S. Geological Survey near 12 wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) in Minnesota revealed TCS and TCC concentrations of up to 85 and 822 ng/g dry weight (dw), respectively. Concentrations of TCS and TCC in bed sediments collected downstream of WWTPs were significantly greater than upstream concentrations in 58% and 42% of the sites, respectively. Dichloro- and non-chlorinated carbanilides (DCC and NCC) were detected in sediments collected at all sites at concentrations of up to 160 and 1.1 ng/g dw, respectively. Overall, antimicrobial concentrations were significantly higher in lakes than in rivers and creeks, with relative abundances decreasing from TCC > TCS > DCC > NCC. This is the first statewide report on the occurrence of TCS, TCC and TCC transformation products in freshwater sediments. Moreover, the results suggest biological or chemical TCC dechlorination products to be ubiquitous in freshwater environments of Minnesota, but whether this transformation occurs in the WWTP or bed sediment remains to be determined. PMID:22742731

  13. Occurrence of triclosan, triclocarban, and its lesser chlorinated congeners in Minnesota freshwater sediments collected near wastewater treatment plants

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Venkatesan, Arjun K.; Pycke, Benny F.G.; Barber, Larry B.; Lee, Kathy E.; Halden, Rolf U.

    2012-01-01

    The antimicrobial agents triclosan (TCS), triclocarban (TCC) and their associated transformation products are of increasing concern as environmental pollutants due to their potential adverse effects on humans and wildlife, including bioaccumulation and endocrine-disrupting activity. Analysis by tandem mass spectrometry of 24 paired freshwater bed sediment samples (top 10 cm) collected by the U.S. Geological Survey near 12 wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) in Minnesota revealed TCS and TCC concentrations of up to 85 and 822 ng/g dry weight (dw), respectively. Concentrations of TCS and TCC in bed sediments collected downstream of WWTPs were significantly greater than upstream concentrations in 58% and 42% of the sites, respectively. Dichloro- and non-chlorinated carbanilides (DCC and NCC) were detected in sediments collected at all sites at concentrations of up to 160 and 1.1 ng/g dw, respectively. Overall, antimicrobial concentrations were significantly higher in lakes than in rivers and creeks, with relative abundances decreasing from TCC > TCS > DCC > NCC. This is the first statewide report on the occurrence of TCS, TCC and TCC transformation products in freshwater sediments. Moreover, the results suggest biological or chemical TCC dechlorination products to be ubiquitous in freshwater environments of Minnesota, but whether this transformation occurs in the WWTP or bed sediment remains to be determined.

  14. Evidence for Freshwater Discharge at a Gas Hydrate-Bearing Seafloor Mound on the Beaufort Sea Continental Slope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pohlman, J.; Lorenson, T. D.; Hart, P. E.; Ruppel, C. D.; Joseph, C.; Torres, M. E.; Edwards, B. D.

    2011-12-01

    . Strontium concentrations in the fresher waters are depleted with respect to chloride and the 87Sr/86Sr isotopic composition is slightly more radiogenic than seawater, which indicates the freshwater fluids originated from and interacted with continental crust. Thus, the most likely origins for fluids emanating from this deep, offshore mound originated from low salinity water trapped within deeply buried Cenozoic sedimentary sequences on the North Slope extending into the Beaufort Sea. While the observation of freshwater origins for an offshore seep is unusual, widespread occurrences of landward verging compressional folds, and other mounds in the region suggest deep submarine fresh water discharging seeps are likely to be prevalent along the Eastern Alaskan Beaufort Sea margin.

  15. Seasonal comparison of aquatic macroinvertebrate assemblages in a flooded coastal freshwater marsh

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kang, Sung-Ryong; King, Sammy L.

    2013-01-01

    Marsh flooding and drying may be important factors affecting aquatic macroinvertebrate density and distribution in coastal freshwater marshes. Limited availability of water as a result of drying in emergent marsh may decrease density, taxonomic diversity, and taxa richness. The principal objectives of this study are to characterize the seasonal aquatic macroinvertebrate assemblage in a freshwater emergent marsh and compare aquatic macroinvertebrate species composition, density, and taxonomic diversity to that of freshwater marsh ponds. We hypothesize that 1) freshwater emergent marsh has lower seasonal density and taxonomic diversity compared to that of freshwater marsh ponds; and 2) freshwater emergent marsh has lower taxa richness than freshwater marsh ponds. Seasonal aquatic macroinvertebrate density in freshwater emergent marsh ranged from 0 organisms/m2 (summer 2009) to 91.1 ± 20.53 organisms/m2 (mean ± SE; spring 2009). Density in spring was higher than in all other seasons. Taxonomic diversity did not differ and there were no unique species in the freshwater emergent marsh. Our data only partially support our first hypothesis as aquatic macroinvertebrate density and taxonomic diversity between freshwater emergent marsh and ponds did not differ in spring, fall, and winter but ponds supported higher macroinvertebrate densities than freshwater emergent marsh during summer. However, our data did not support our second hypothesis as taxa richness between freshwater emergent marsh and ponds did not statistically differ.

  16. "Key to Freshwater Algae": A Web-Based Tool to Enhance Understanding of Microscopic Biodiversity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shayler, Hannah A.; Siver, Peter A.

    2006-01-01

    The Freshwater Ecology Laboratory at Connecticut College has developed an interactive, Web-based identification key to freshwater algal genera using the Lucid Professional and Lucid 3 software developed by the Centre for Biological Information Technology at the University of Queensland, Brisbane, Australia. The "Key to Freshwater Algae"…

  17. 76 FR 17962 - Strengthening the Scientific Understanding of Climate Change Impacts on Freshwater Resources of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-31

    ... Geological Survey Strengthening the Scientific Understanding of Climate Change Impacts on Freshwater... titled ``Strengthening the Scientific Understanding of Climate Change Impacts on Freshwater Resources of... freshwater resources that are likely to result from a changing climate. DATES: We must receive any...

  18. 78 FR 61331 - Freshwater Crawfish Tail Meat From the People's Republic of China: Preliminary Results of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-03

    ... International Trade Administration Freshwater Crawfish Tail Meat From the People's Republic of China... order on freshwater crawfish tail meat from the People's Republic of China (PRC). The period of review...: Scope of the Order The merchandise subject to the antidumping duty order is freshwater crawfish...

  19. 77 FR 61383 - Freshwater Crawfish Tail Meat From the People's Republic of China: Antidumping Duty...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-09

    ... International Trade Administration Freshwater Crawfish Tail Meat From the People's Republic of China... administrative review of the antidumping duty order on freshwater crawfish tail meat from the People's Republic... order is freshwater crawfish tail meat. The product is currently classified in the Harmonized...

  20. 50 CFR 80.23 - Allocation of funds between marine and freshwater fishery projects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... freshwater fishery projects. 80.23 Section 80.23 Wildlife and Fisheries UNITED STATES FISH AND WILDLIFE... RESTORATION ACTS § 80.23 Allocation of funds between marine and freshwater fishery projects. (a) Each coastal... for marine fisheries and projects having recreational benefits for freshwater fisheries. (1)...

  1. 78 FR 52192 - Final Aquatic Life Ambient Water Quality Criteria For Ammonia-Freshwater 2013

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-22

    ... AGENCY Final Aquatic Life Ambient Water Quality Criteria For Ammonia-- Freshwater 2013 AGENCY... from effects of ammonia in freshwater (EPA 822-R-13-001). The final criteria incorporate the latest scientific knowledge on the toxicity of ammonia to freshwater aquatic life. On December 30, 2009,...

  2. Prevalence Incidence Mixture Models

    Cancer.gov

    The R package and webtool fits Prevalence Incidence Mixture models to left-censored and irregularly interval-censored time to event data that is commonly found in screening cohorts assembled from electronic health records. Absolute and relative risk can be estimated for simple random sampling, stratified sampling, and two-phase stratified sampling. Non-parametric (absolute risks only), semi-parametric, weakly-parametric (using B-splines), and some fully parametric (such as the logistic-Weibull) models are supported.

  3. Microplastics in freshwater and terrestrial environments: Evaluating the current understanding to identify the knowledge gaps and future research priorities.

    PubMed

    Horton, Alice A; Walton, Alexander; Spurgeon, David J; Lahive, Elma; Svendsen, Claus

    2017-05-15

    Plastic debris is an environmentally persistent and complex contaminant of increasing concern. Understanding the sources, abundance and composition of microplastics present in the environment is a huge challenge due to the fact that hundreds of millions of tonnes of plastic material is manufactured for societal use annually, some of which is released to the environment. The majority of microplastics research to date has focussed on the marine environment. Although freshwater and terrestrial environments are recognised as origins and transport pathways of plastics to the oceans, there is still a comparative lack of knowledge about these environmental compartments. It is highly likely that microplastics will accumulate within continental environments, especially in areas of high anthropogenic influence such as agricultural or urban areas. This review critically evaluates the current literature on the presence, behaviour and fate of microplastics in freshwater and terrestrial environments and, where appropriate, also draws on relevant studies from other fields including nanotechnology, agriculture and waste management. Furthermore, we evaluate the relevant biological and chemical information from the substantial body of marine microplastic literature, determining the applicability and comparability of this data to freshwater and terrestrial systems. With the evidence presented, the authors have set out the current state of the knowledge, and identified the key gaps. These include the volume and composition of microplastics entering the environment, behaviour and fate of microplastics under a variety of environmental conditions and how characteristics of microplastics influence their toxicity. Given the technical challenges surrounding microplastics research, it is especially important that future studies develop standardised techniques to allow for comparability of data. The identification of these research needs will help inform the design of future studies, to

  4. Comparison of two freshwater turtle species as monitors of environmental contamination

    SciTech Connect

    Meyers-Schoene, L. ); Walton, B.T. )

    1990-04-01

    Two species of turtles that occupy different ecological niches were compared for their usefulness as monitors of contamination in freshwater ecosystems. Trachemys scripta (Agassiz) and Chelydra serpentina (Linnaeus) were selected for comparison based on species abundance and differences in food habits and sediment contact. A review of the literature on contaminants in turtles and results of preliminary surveys conducted at the field sites, which are included in this study, were used to direct and focus this research project. White Oak Lake, a settling basin for low-level radioactive and nonradioactive contaminants, and Bearden Creek Embayment, an uncontaminated reference site upriver, were used as study sites in the investigation of turtles as indicators of chemical contamination. Turtles were analyzed for concentrations of strontium-90, cesium-137, cobalt 60, and mercury in specific target tissues, and for single-stranded DNA breaks, a non-specific indicator of possible exposure to genotoxic agents in the environment. 133 refs., 2 figs., 15 tabs.

  5. Harvesting freshwater Chlorella vulgaris with flocculant derived from spent brewer's yeast.

    PubMed

    Prochazkova, Gita; Kastanek, Petr; Branyik, Tomas

    2015-02-01

    One of the key bottlenecks of the economically viable production of low added value microalgal products (food supplements, feed, biofuels) is the harvesting of cells from diluted culture medium. The main goals of this work were to prepare a novel flocculation agent based on spent brewer's yeast, a brewery by-product, and to test its harvesting efficiency on freshwater Chlorella vulgaris in different environments. The yeast was first autolyzed/hydrolyzed and subsequently chemically modified with 2-chloro-N,N-diethylethylamine hydrochloride (DEAE). Second, optimal dosage of modified spent yeast (MSY) flocculant for harvesting C. vulgaris was determined in culture media of various compositions. It was found that the absence of phosphorus ions decreased (0.4 mg MSY/g biomass), while the presence of algogenic organic matter (AOM) increased (51 mg MSY/g biomass) the required dosage of flocculant as compared to complete mineral medium with phosphorus and without AOM (12 mg MSY/g biomass).

  6. Ionic strength and DOC determinations from various freshwater sources to the San Francisco Bay

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hunter, Y.R.; Kuwabara, J.S.

    1994-01-01

    An exact estimation of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) within the salinity gradient of zinc and copper metals is significant in understanding the limit to which DOC could influence metal speciation. A low-temperature persulfate/oxygen/ultraviolet wet oxidation procedure was utilized for analyzing DOC samples adapted for ionic strength from major freshwater sources of the northern and southern regions of San Francisco Bay. The ionic strength of samples was modified with a chemically defined seawater medium up to 0.7M. Based on the results, a minimum effect of ionic strength on oxidation proficiency for DOC sources to the Bay over an ionic strength gradient of 0.0 to 0.7 M was observed. There was no major impacts of ionic strength on two Suwanee River fulvic acids. In general, the noted effects associated with ionic strength were smaller than the variances seen in the aquatic environment between high- and low-temperature methods.

  7. Dinoflagellates associated with freshwater sponges from the ancient lake baikal.

    PubMed

    Annenkova, Natalia V; Lavrov, Dennis V; Belikov, Sergey I

    2011-04-01

    Dinoflagellates are a diverse group of protists that are common in both marine and freshwater environments. While the biology of marine dinoflagellates has been the focus of several recent studies, their freshwater relatives remain little-investigated. In the present study we explore the diversity of dinoflagellates in Lake Baikal by identifying and analyzing dinoflagellate sequences for 18S rDNA and ITS-2 from total DNA extracted from three species of endemic Baikalian sponges (Baikalospongia intermedia,Baikalospongia rectaand Lubomirskia incrustans). Phylogenetic analyses of these sequences revealed extensive dinoflagellate diversity in Lake Baikal. We found two groups of sequences clustering within the order Suessiales, known for its symbiotic relationships with various invertebrates. Thus they may be regarded as potential symbionts of Baikalian sponges. In addition,Gyrodinium helveticum, representatives from the genus Gymnodinium, dinoflagellates close to the family Pfiesteriaceae, and a few dinoflagellates without definite affiliation were detected. No pronounced difference in the distribution of dinoflagellates among the studied sponges was found, except for the absence of the Piscinoodinium-like dinoflagellates inL. incrustans. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study of the diversity of dinoflagellates in freshwater sponges, the first systematic investigation of dinoflagellate molecular diversity in Lake Baikal and the first finding of members of the order Suessiales as symbionts of freshwater invertebrates.

  8. Freshwater Fish Assemblage Patterns in Rhode Island Streams and Rivers

    EPA Science Inventory

    Patterns in fish assemblages in streams and rivers can inform watershed and water management, yet these patterns are not well characterized for the U.S. state of Rhode Island. Here we relate freshwater fish data collected by the Rhode Island Department of Environmental Managemen...

  9. Genetic calibration of species diversity among North America's freshwater fishes

    PubMed Central

    April, Julien; Mayden, Richard L.; Hanner, Robert H.; Bernatchez, Louis

    2011-01-01

    Freshwater ecosystems are being heavily exploited and degraded by human activities all over the world, including in North America, where fishes and fisheries are strongly affected. Despite centuries of taxonomic inquiry, problems inherent to species identification continue to hamper the conservation of North American freshwater fishes. Indeed, nearly 10% of species diversity is thought to remain undescribed. To provide an independent calibration of taxonomic uncertainty and to establish a more accessible molecular identification key for its application, we generated a standard reference library of mtDNA sequences (DNA barcodes) derived from expert-identified museum specimens for 752 North American freshwater fish species. This study demonstrates that 90% of known species can be delineated using barcodes. Moreover, it reveals numerous genetic discontinuities indicative of independently evolving lineages within described species, which points to the presence of morphologically cryptic diversity. From the 752 species analyzed, our survey flagged 138 named species that represent as many as 347 candidate species, which suggests a 28% increase in species diversity. In contrast, several species of parasitic and nonparasitic lampreys lack such discontinuity and may represent alternative life history strategies within single species. Therefore, it appears that the current North American freshwater fish taxonomy at the species level significantly conceals diversity in some groups, although artificially creating diversity in others. In addition to providing an easily accessible digital identification system, this study identifies 151 fish species for which taxonomic revision is required. PMID:21670289

  10. Fatty acid amides from freshwater green alga Rhizoclonium hieroglyphicum.

    PubMed

    Dembitsky, V M; Shkrob, I; Rozentsvet, O A

    2000-08-01

    Freshwater green algae Rhizoclonium hieroglyphicum growing in the Ural Mountains were examined for their fatty acid amides using capillary gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Eight fatty acid amides were identified by GC-MS. (Z)-9-octadecenamide was found to be the major component (2.26%).

  11. A Guide to the Natural History of Freshwater Lake Bacteria†

    PubMed Central

    Newton, Ryan J.; Jones, Stuart E.; Eiler, Alexander; McMahon, Katherine D.; Bertilsson, Stefan

    2011-01-01

    Summary: Freshwater bacteria are at the hub of biogeochemical cycles and control water quality in lakes. Despite this, little is known about the identity and ecology of functionally significant lake bacteria. Molecular studies have identified many abundant lake bacteria, but there is a large variation in the taxonomic or phylogenetic breadths among the methods used for this exploration. Because of this, an inconsistent and overlapping naming structure has developed for freshwater bacteria, creating a significant obstacle to identifying coherent ecological traits among these groups. A discourse that unites the field is sorely needed. Here we present a new freshwater lake phylogeny constructed from all published 16S rRNA gene sequences from lake epilimnia and propose a unifying vocabulary to discuss freshwater taxa. With this new vocabulary in place, we review the current information on the ecology, ecophysiology, and distribution of lake bacteria and highlight newly identified phylotypes. In the second part of our review, we conduct meta-analyses on the compiled data, identifying distribution patterns for bacterial phylotypes among biomes and across environmental gradients in lakes. We conclude by emphasizing the role that this review can play in providing a coherent framework for future studies. PMID:21372319

  12. Genetic calibration of species diversity among North America's freshwater fishes.

    PubMed

    April, Julien; Mayden, Richard L; Hanner, Robert H; Bernatchez, Louis

    2011-06-28

    Freshwater ecosystems are being heavily exploited and degraded by human activities all over the world, including in North America, where fishes and fisheries are strongly affected. Despite centuries of taxonomic inquiry, problems inherent to species identification continue to hamper the conservation of North American freshwater fishes. Indeed, nearly 10% of species diversity is thought to remain undescribed. To provide an independent calibration of taxonomic uncertainty and to establish a more accessible molecular identification key for its application, we generated a standard reference library of mtDNA sequences (DNA barcodes) derived from expert-identified museum specimens for 752 North American freshwater fish species. This study demonstrates that 90% of known species can be delineated using barcodes. Moreover, it reveals numerous genetic discontinuities indicative of independently evolving lineages within described species, which points to the presence of morphologically cryptic diversity. From the 752 species analyzed, our survey flagged 138 named species that represent as many as 347 candidate species, which suggests a 28% increase in species diversity. In contrast, several species of parasitic and nonparasitic lampreys lack such discontinuity and may represent alternative life history strategies within single species. Therefore, it appears that the current North American freshwater fish taxonomy at the species level significantly conceals diversity in some groups, although artificially creating diversity in others. In addition to providing an easily accessible digital identification system, this study identifies 151 fish species for which taxonomic revision is required.

  13. A guide to the natural history of freshwater lake bacteria.

    PubMed

    Newton, Ryan J; Jones, Stuart E; Eiler, Alexander; McMahon, Katherine D; Bertilsson, Stefan

    2011-03-01

    Freshwater bacteria are at the hub of biogeochemical cycles and control water quality in lakes. Despite this, little is known about the identity and ecology of functionally significant lake bacteria. Molecular studies have identified many abundant lake bacteria, but there is a large variation in the taxonomic or phylogenetic breadths among the methods used for this exploration. Because of this, an inconsistent and overlapping naming structure has developed for freshwater bacteria, creating a significant obstacle to identifying coherent ecological traits among these groups. A discourse that unites the field is sorely needed. Here we present a new freshwater lake phylogeny constructed from all published 16S rRNA gene sequences from lake epilimnia and propose a unifying vocabulary to discuss freshwater taxa. With this new vocabulary in place, we review the current information on the ecology, ecophysiology, and distribution of lake bacteria and highlight newly identified phylotypes. In the second part of our review, we conduct meta-analyses on the compiled data, identifying distribution patterns for bacterial phylotypes among biomes and across environmental gradients in lakes. We conclude by emphasizing the role that this review can play in providing a coherent framework for future studies.

  14. Establishing a database of radionuclide transfer parameters for freshwater wildlife.

    PubMed

    Yankovich, T; Beresford, N A; Fesenko, S; Fesenko, J; Phaneuf, M; Dagher, E; Outola, I; Andersson, P; Thiessen, K; Ryan, J; Wood, M D; Bollhöfer, A; Barnett, C L; Copplestone, D

    2013-12-01

    Environmental assessments to evaluate potentials risks to humans and wildlife often involve modelling to predict contaminant exposure through key pathways. Such models require input of parameter values, including concentration ratios, to estimate contaminant concentrations in biota based on measurements or estimates of concentrations in environmental media, such as water. Due to the diversity of species and the range in physicochemical conditions in natural ecosystems, concentration ratios can vary by orders of magnitude, even within similar species. Therefore, to improve model input parameter values for application in aquatic systems, freshwater concentration ratios were collated or calculated from national grey literature, Russian language publications, and refereed papers. Collated data were then input into an international database that is being established by the International Atomic Energy Agency. The freshwater database enables entry of information for all radionuclides listed in ICRP (1983), in addition to the corresponding stable elements, and comprises a total of more than 16,500 concentration ratio (CRwo-water) values. Although data were available for all broad wildlife groups (with the exception of birds), data were sparse for many organism types. For example, zooplankton, crustaceans, insects and insect larvae, amphibians, and mammals, for which there were CRwo-water values for less than eight elements. Coverage was most comprehensive for fish, vascular plants, and molluscs. To our knowledge, the freshwater database that has now been established represents the most comprehensive set of CRwo-water values for freshwater species currently available for use in radiological environmental assessments.

  15. Effects of pollution on freshwater fish and amphibians

    SciTech Connect

    Pickering, Q.H.; Hunt, E.P.; Phipps, G.L.; Roush, T.H.; Smith, W.E.; Spehar, D.L.; Stephan, C.E.; Tanner, D.K.

    1983-06-01

    A literature review is presented dealing with studies on the effects of pollution on freshwater fish and amphibians. The pollutants studied included acid mine drainage, PCBs, cadmium, lead, naphthalene, plutonium, in addition to several studies dealing with pH effects. (JMT)

  16. PROSPECTS ON BEHAVIORAL STUDIES OF MARINE AND FRESHWATER TOXINS.

    EPA Science Inventory

    This manuscript is based in large part on an invited presentation. The manuscript provides a brief overview of the growing issue of the human-health and environmental impact of a variety of toxins of marine and freshwater origin, the current (generally crude) state of behavioral...

  17. UV radiation and freshwater zooplankton: damage, protection and recovery.

    PubMed

    Rautio, Milla; Tartarotti, Barbara

    2010-12-01

    While many laboratory and field studies show that zooplankton are negatively affected when exposed to high intensities of ultraviolet radiation (UVR), most studies also indicate that zooplankton are well adapted to cope with large variations in their UVR exposure in the pelagic zone of lakes. The response mechanisms of zooplankton are diverse and efficient and may explain the success and richness of freshwater zooplankton in optically variable waters. While no single behavioural or physiological protection mechanism seems to be superior, and while several unexplained and contradictory patterns exist in zooplankton UVR ecology, recent increases in our understanding are consistent with UVR playing an important role for zooplankton. This review examines the variability in freshwater zooplankton responses to UVR, with a focus on crustacean zooplankton (Cladocera and Copepoda). We present an overview of UVR-induced damages, and the protection and recovery mechanisms freshwater zooplankton use when exposed to UVR. We review the current knowledge of UVR impact on freshwater zooplankton at species and community levels, and discuss briefly how global change over the last three decades has influenced the UVR milieu in lakes.

  18. Comments on the Manuscript, "Biodiesel Production from Freshwater Algae"

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A recent publication (Vijayaragahavan, K.; Hemanathan, K., Biodiesel from freshwater algae, Energy Fuels, 2009, 23(11):5448-5453) on fuel production from algae is evaluated. It is discussed herein that the fuel discussed in that paper is not biodiesel, rather it probably consists of hydrocarbons. ...

  19. Toxicity of rotenone to giant river freshwater prawn Macrobrachium rosenbergii

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Aquaculturists have often suffered predation losses in the production of freshwater giant river prawn Macrobrachium rosenbergii due to the presence of wild fish species in culture ponds. The piscicide rotenone is widely used to remove undesirable fish species from ponds. Although evidence in the t...

  20. Vectors of invasions in freshwater invertebrates and fishes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fuller, Pam L.; Canning-Clode, João

    2015-01-01

    Without human assistance, the terrestrial environment and oceans represent barriers to the dispersal of freshwater aquatic organisms. The ability to overcome such barriers depends on the existence of anthropogenic vectors that can transport live organisms to new areas, and the species’ biology to survive the transportation and transplantation into the new environment (Johnson et al., 2006).

  1. Field Study Manual to Freshwater and Estuarine Habitats.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Georgia State Dept. of Education, Atlanta.

    This field studies manual, developed by biology students in the 1971 Georgia Governor's Honors Program, was designed for collection of data pertinent to freshwater and estuarine habitats. In addition to the various methods of sampling the ecosystem and for quantification of the data, instructions for dividing the field study into three logical…

  2. Freshwater Education: The Need, The Tools, and The "Vital Link."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shroeder, Linda

    1984-01-01

    Freshwater education programs are beginning to instill in young people a sense of awareness and a sense of responsibility regarding the future of water resources. Several of these programs are discussed, including Project COAST (Coastal, Oceanic, and Aquatic Studies) and "Acid Precipitation Learning Materials, Grades 7-12." (JN)

  3. Large-scale biodiversity patterns in freshwater phytoplankton.

    PubMed

    Stomp, Maayke; Huisman, Jef; Mittelbach, Gary G; Litchman, Elena; Klausmeier, Christopher A

    2011-11-01

    Our planet shows striking gradients in the species richness of plants and animals, from high biodiversity in the tropics to low biodiversity in polar and high-mountain regions. Recently, similar patterns have been described for some groups of microorganisms, but the large-scale biogeographical distribution of freshwater phytoplankton diversity is still largely unknown. We examined the species diversity of freshwater phytoplankton sampled from 540 lakes and reservoirs distributed across the continental United States and found strong latitudinal, longitudinal, and altitudinal gradients in phytoplankton biodiversity, demonstrating that microorganisms can show substantial geographic variation in biodiversity. Detailed analysis using structural equation models indicated that these large-scale biodiversity gradients in freshwater phytoplankton diversity were mainly driven by local environmental factors, although there were residual direct effects of latitude, longitude, and altitude as well. Specifically, we found that phytoplankton species richness was an increasing saturating function of lake chlorophyll a concentration, increased with lake surface area and possibly increased with water temperature, resembling effects of productivity, habitat area, and temperature on diversity patterns commonly observed for macroorganisms. In turn, these local environmental factors varied along latitudinal, longitudinal, and altitudinal gradients. These results imply that changes in land use or climate that affect these local environmental factors are likely to have major impacts on large-scale biodiversity patterns of freshwater phytoplankton.

  4. BIOREMEDIATION OF OIL-CONTAMINATED COASTAL FRESHWATER AND SALTWATER WETLANDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Two field studies involving intentional releases of crude oil onto a freshwater wetland and a salt marsh were conducted in Canada in the summers of 1999 and 2000, respectively. The objective of both studies was to determine the role of nutrients in enhancing wetland restoration ...

  5. BIOREMEDIATION OF OIL-CONTAMINATED COASTAL FRESHWATER AND SALTWATER WETLANDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Two field studies involving intentional releases of crude oil onto a freshwater wetland and a salt marsh were conducted in Canada in the summers of 1999 and 2000, respectively. The objective of both studies was to determine the role of nutrients in enhancing wetland restoration i...

  6. Escherichia coli and fecal coliforms in freshwater and estuarine sediments

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    It has been known for some time that substantial populations of fecal coliforms and E. coli are harbored in freshwater bottom sediments, bank soils, and beach sands. However, the relative importance of sediments as bacterial habitats and as a source of water-borne fecal coliforms and E. coli has not...

  7. UV radiation and freshwater zooplankton: damage, protection and recovery

    PubMed Central

    Rautio, Milla; Tartarotti, Barbara

    2011-01-01

    While many laboratory and field studies show that zooplankton are negatively affected when exposed to high intensities of ultraviolet radiation (UVR), most studies also indicate that zooplankton are well adapted to cope with large variations in their UVR exposure in the pelagic zone of lakes. The response mechanisms of zooplankton are diverse and efficient and may explain the success and richness of freshwater zooplankton in optically variable waters. While no single behavioural or physiological protection mechanism seems to be superior, and while several unexplained and contradictory patterns exist in zooplankton UVR ecology, recent increases in our understanding are consistent with UVR playing an important role for zooplankton. This review examines the variability in freshwater zooplankton responses to UVR, with a focus on crustacean zooplankton (Cladocera and Copepoda). We present an overview of UVR-induced damages, and the protection and recovery mechanisms freshwater zooplankton use when exposed to UVR. We review the current knowledge of UVR impact on freshwater zooplankton at species and community levels, and discuss briefly how global change over the last three decades has influenced the UVR milieu in lakes. PMID:21516254

  8. Nematodes from terrestrial and freshwater habitats in the Arctic.

    PubMed

    Holovachov, Oleksandr

    2014-01-01

    WE PRESENT AN UPDATED LIST OF TERRESTRIAL AND FRESHWATER NEMATODES FROM ALL REGIONS OF THE ARCTIC, FOR WHICH RECORDS OF PROPERLY IDENTIFIED NEMATODE SPECIES ARE AVAILABLE: Svalbard, Jan Mayen, Iceland, Greenland, Nunavut, Northwest territories, Alaska, Lena River estuary, Taymyr and Severnaya Zemlya and Novaya Zemlya. The list includes 391 species belonging to 146 genera, 54 families and 10 orders of the phylum Nematoda.

  9. Chemical Peel

    MedlinePlus

    ... be done at different depths — light, medium or deep — depending on your desired results. Each type of ... chemical peel after 12 months to maintain results. Deep chemical peel. A deep chemical peel removes skin ...

  10. Transitioning to Zero Freshwater Withdrawal for Thermoelectric Generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macknick, J.; Tidwell, V. C.; Zemlick, K. M.; Sanchez, J.; Woldeyesus, T.

    2013-12-01

    The electricity sector is the largest withdrawer of freshwater in the United States. The primary demand for water from the electricity sector is for cooling thermoelectric power plants. Droughts and potential changes in water resources resulting from climate change pose important risks to thermoelectric power production in the United States. Power plants can minimize risk in a variety of ways. One method of reducing risk is to move away from dependency on freshwater resources. Here a scoping level analysis is performed to identify the technical tradeoffs and initial cost estimates for retrofitting all existing steam-powered generation to achieve zero freshwater withdrawal. Specifically, the conversion of existing freshwater-cooled plants to dry cooling or a wet cooling system utilizing non-potable water is considered. The least cost alternative is determined for each of the 1,178 freshwater using power plants in the United States. The use of non-potable water resources, such as municipal wastewater and shallow brackish groundwater, is considered based on the availability and proximity of those resources to the power plant, as well as the costs to transport and treat those resources to an acceptable level. The projected increase in levelized cost of electricity due to power plant retrofits ranges roughly from 0.20 to 20/MWh with a median value of 3.53/MWh. With a wholesale price of electricity running about 35/MWh, many retrofits could be accomplished at levels that would add less than 10% to current power plant generation expenses. Such retrofits could alleviate power plant vulnerabilities to thermal discharge limits in times of drought (particularly in the East) and would save 3.2 Mm3/d of freshwater consumption in watersheds with limited water availability (principally in the West). The estimated impact of retrofits on wastewater and brackish water supply is minimal requiring only a fraction of the available resource. Total parasitic energy requirements to

  11. Selecting Reliable and Robust Freshwater Macroalgae for Biomass Applications

    PubMed Central

    Lawton, Rebecca J.; de Nys, Rocky; Paul, Nicholas A.

    2013-01-01

    Intensive cultivation of freshwater macroalgae is likely to increase with the development of an algal biofuels industry and algal bioremediation. However, target freshwater macroalgae species suitable for large-scale intensive cultivation have not yet been identified. Therefore, as a first step to identifying target species, we compared the productivity, growth and biochemical composition of three species representative of key freshwater macroalgae genera across a range of cultivation conditions. We then selected a primary target species and assessed its competitive ability against other species over a range of stocking densities. Oedogonium had the highest productivity (8.0 g ash free dry weight m−2 day−1), lowest ash content (3–8%), lowest water content (fresh weigh: dry weight ratio of 3.4), highest carbon content (45%) and highest bioenergy potential (higher heating value 20 MJ/kg) compared to Cladophora and Spirogyra. The higher productivity of Oedogonium relative to Cladophora and Spirogyra was consistent when algae were cultured with and without the addition of CO2 across three aeration treatments. Therefore, Oedogonium was selected as our primary target species. The competitive ability of Oedogonium was assessed by growing it in bi-cultures and polycultures with Cladophora and Spirogyra over a range of stocking densities. Cultures were initially stocked with equal proportions of each species, but after three weeks of growth the proportion of Oedogonium had increased to at least 96% (±7 S.E.) in Oedogonium-Spirogyra bi-cultures, 86% (±16 S.E.) in Oedogonium-Cladophora bi-cultures and 82% (±18 S.E.) in polycultures. The high productivity, bioenergy potential and competitive dominance of Oedogonium make this species an ideal freshwater macroalgal target for large-scale production and a valuable biomass source for bioenergy applications. These results demonstrate that freshwater macroalgae are thus far an under-utilised feedstock with much potential

  12. Selecting reliable and robust freshwater macroalgae for biomass applications.

    PubMed

    Lawton, Rebecca J; de Nys, Rocky; Paul, Nicholas A

    2013-01-01

    Intensive cultivation of freshwater macroalgae is likely to increase with the development of an algal biofuels industry and algal bioremediation. However, target freshwater macroalgae species suitable for large-scale intensive cultivation have not yet been identified. Therefore, as a first step to identifying target species, we compared the productivity, growth and biochemical composition of three species representative of key freshwater macroalgae genera across a range of cultivation conditions. We then selected a primary target species and assessed its competitive ability against other species over a range of stocking densities. Oedogonium had the highest productivity (8.0 g ash free dry weight m⁻² day⁻¹), lowest ash content (3-8%), lowest water content (fresh weigh: dry weight ratio of 3.4), highest carbon content (45%) and highest bioenergy potential (higher heating value 20 MJ/kg) compared to Cladophora and Spirogyra. The higher productivity of Oedogonium relative to Cladophora and Spirogyra was consistent when algae were cultured with and without the addition of CO₂ across three aeration treatments. Therefore, Oedogonium was selected as our primary target species. The competitive ability of Oedogonium was assessed by growing it in bi-cultures and polycultures with Cladophora and Spirogyra over a range of stocking densities. Cultures were initially stocked with equal proportions of each species, but after three weeks of growth the proportion of Oedogonium had increased to at least 96% (±7 S.E.) in Oedogonium-Spirogyra bi-cultures, 86% (±16 S.E.) in Oedogonium-Cladophora bi-cultures and 82% (±18 S.E.) in polycultures. The high productivity, bioenergy potential and competitive dominance of Oedogonium make this species an ideal freshwater macroalgal target for large-scale production and a valuable biomass source for bioenergy applications. These results demonstrate that freshwater macroalgae are thus far an under-utilised feedstock with much potential

  13. Comparison of the respiratory metabolism of juvenile Litopenaeus vannamei cultured in seawater and freshwater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Sen; Wang, Fang; Dong, Shuanglin; Li, Ying

    2013-11-01

    Litopenaeus vannamei, a euryhaline species, can be cultured at a wide range of salinities. The emergence of freshwater pond-culture of L. vannamei is an important prelude to the continued development of shrimp culture in China. In this study, we compared the respiratory metabolism of juvenile L. vannamei cultured in freshwater and saltwater by measuring their oxygen consumption rate (OCR), ammonium-type nitrogen excretion rate (AER) and pyruvate kinase (PK) and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) activities at different molting stages in order to physiecologically characterize juvenile L. vannamei under freshwater conditions. The results showed that OCR was significantly higher in saltwater than in freshwater at all stages of molting cycle. However, variation of OCR among molting stages in saltwater was similar with that in freshwater, and the highest OCR was observed at post-molting stage. At all stages of molting cycle, AER was significantly higher in freshwater than in saltwater, and the highest was observed at post-molting stage. The activity of PK was significantly higher in saltwater than in freshwater. Conversely, the activity of LDH was higher in freshwater than in saltwater in general. Significant variation of PK and LDH activities in molting cycle was observed in saltwater and freshwater. The results indicated that aerobic metabolism of juvenile L. vannamei was more active in saltwater than in freshwater; while its protein metabolism was more active in freshwater than in saltwater.

  14. Development of formulated reference sediments for freshwater and estuarine sediment testing

    SciTech Connect

    Suedel, B.C.; Rodgers, J.H. Jr. . Dept. of Biology)

    1994-07-01

    Sediments collected at various field locations may have chemical and physical constituents that influence test results and may contain organisms that cannot be readily removed. Thus, reference sediments are needed that can be formulated to match diverse freshwater and estuarine sediments encountered in comprehensive testing programs. This research evaluated formulated reference sediments in terms of (a) their ability to match field-collected sediments both chemically and physically; (b) their suitability as habitant (survival and reproduction) for typical invertebrate toxicity testing species (Hyalella azteca Saussure, Chironomus tentans Fabricius, and Daphnia magna Straus) during chronic exposures; and (c) their suitability as a substrate for Hyalella azteca, Chironomus tentans, Daphnia magna, Ceriodaphnia dubia Richard, and Pimephales promelas Rafinesque in 14-d whole-sediment exposures. Formulated reference sediments were prepared to match naturally occurring sediments with respect to particle-size distribution, organic matter, organic carbon, pH, solids, CEC, but not redox potential. After preparation, a conditioning period of at least 7 d was required for pH stabilization of formulated reference sediments. In culture experiments, formulated reference sediments was suitable for Hyalella azteca, Chironomus tentans, and Daphnia magna survival and reproduction for 56,40, and 28 d, respectively. Hyalella azteca, Chironomus tentans, Daphnia magna, Ceriodaphnia dubia and Pimephales promelas survival was [>=] 88% in 14-d exposures to formulated reference sediment. Formulated reference sediments may reduce some unexplained physical, chemical, or biological toxicity'' of field-collected sediments (e.g., organic matter) that may influence toxicity testing results.

  15. A monotonically declining elevational pattern of bacterial diversity in freshwater lake sediments.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Jin; Zhao, Dayong; Li, Huabing; Huang, Rui; Wang, Jianjun; Wu, Qinglong L

    2016-12-01

    The distribution patterns of bacterial communities along elevational gradients remain unexplored in aquatic ecosystems. This study investigated the diversity and community composition of bacteria in the sediments of lakes along a mountainside elevational gradient from 525 to 4 490 m in western China. The bacterial alpha diversity (taxonomic richness and phylogenetic diversity) at different sediment depths decreased monotonically with the increasing elevation, and the beta diversity (dissimilarity between lakes) increased significantly with the increasing elevation distance. Both elevation and chemical variables including pH and carbon/nitrogen ratio were identified as major factors affecting the bacterial diversity. Especially, bacterial alpha/beta diversity was significantly related to both chemical and elevational gradients in the surface sediments, whereas elevation overwhelmed chemical factors in influencing the bacterial alpha/beta diversity in the subsurface sediments. Phylogenetic structure analysis demonstrated that environmental filtering was the most important process affecting the bacterial community assembly along the elevational gradient, and the strength of environmental filtering increased towards high elevations. In summary, we observed for the first time a monotonically decreasing elevational pattern in bacterial diversity of freshwater lake sediments, which is mainly driven by elevation associated environmental factors.

  16. Temporal Variation in Viral Hemorrhagic Septicemia Virus Antibodies in Freshwater Drum (Aplodinotus grunniens) Indicates Cyclic Transmission in Lake Winnebago, Wisconsin

    PubMed Central

    Wilson-Rothering, Anna; Marcquenski, Susan; Koenigs, Ryan; Bruch, Ronald; Kamke, Kendall; Isermann, Daniel; Thurman, Andrew; Toohey-Kurth, Kathy

    2015-01-01

    Viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus (VHSV) is an emerging pathogen that causes mass mortality in multiple fish species. In 2007, the Great Lakes freshwater strain, type IVb, caused a large die-off of freshwater drum (Aplodinotus grunniens) in Lake Winnebago, Wisconsin, USA. To evaluate the persistence and transmission of VHSV, freshwater drum from Lake Winnebago were tested for antibodies to the virus using recently developed virus neutralization (VN) and enzyme-linked immunosorbent (ELISA) assays. Samples were also tested by real-time reverse transcription-PCR (rRT-PCR) to detect viral RNA. Of 548 serum samples tested, 44 (8.03%) were positive by VN (titers ranging from 1:16 to 1:1,024) and 45 (8.21%) were positive by ELISA, including 7 fish positive by both assays. Antibody prevalence increased with age and was higher in one northwestern area of Lake Winnebago than in other areas. Of 3,864 tissues sampled from 551 fish, 1 spleen and 1 kidney sample from a single adult female fish collected in the spring of 2012 tested positive for VHSV by rRT-PCR, and serum from the same fish tested positive by VN and ELISA. These results suggest that VHSV persists and viral transmission may be active in Lake Winnebago even in years following outbreaks and that wild fish may survive VHSV infection and maintain detectable antibody titers while harboring viral RNA. Influxes of immunologically naive juvenile fish through recruitment may reduce herd immunity, allow VHSV to persist, and drive superannual cycles of transmission that may sporadically manifest as fish kills. PMID:26135873

  17. Direct and indirect effects of silver nanoparticles on freshwater and marine microalgae (Chlamydomonas reinhardtii and Phaeodactylum tricornutum).

    PubMed

    Sendra, M; Yeste, M P; Gatica, J M; Moreno-Garrido, I; Blasco, J

    2017-03-30

    The last decade has seen a considerable increase in the use of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs), which are found in many every-day consumer products including textiles, plastics, cosmetics, household sprays and paints. The release of those AgNPs into aquatic environments could be causing ecological damage. In this study we assess the toxicity of AgNPs of different sizes to two species of microalgae, from freshwater and marine environment (Chlamydomonas reinhardtii and Phaeodactylum tricornutum respectively). Dissolution processes affect the form and concentration of AgNPs in both environments. Dissolution of Ag from AgNPs was around 25 times higher in marine water. Nevertheless, dissolution of AgNPs in both culture media seems to be related to the small size and higher surface area of NPs. In marine water, the main chemical species were AgCl2(-) (53.7%) and AgCl3(-2) (45.2%). In contrast, for freshwater, the main chemical species were Ag(+) (26.7%) and AgCl(-) (4.3%). The assessment of toxicological responses, specifically growth, cell size, cell complexity, chlorophyll a, reactive oxygen species, cell membrane damage and effective quantum yield of PSII, corroborated the existence of different toxicity mechanisms for microalgae. Indirect effects, notably dissolved Ag ions, seem to control toxicity to freshwater microalgae, whereas direct effects, notably attachment onto the cell surface and the internalization of AgNPs inside cells, seem to determine toxicity to the marine species studied. This research contributes to knowledge on the role of intrinsic and extrinsic factors in determining the behavior of NPs in different aquatic environments and the interaction with microalgae.

  18. Dynamic scaling in chemical ecology.

    PubMed

    Zimmer, Richard K; Zimmer, Cheryl Ann

    2008-07-01

    Natural rates of chemical production, release, and transport of fluid-borne molecules drive fundamental biological responses to these stimuli. The scaling of the field signaling environment to laboratory conditions recreates essential features of the dynamics and establishes ecological relevance. If appropriately scaled, laboratory simulations of physical regimes, coupled with natural rates of chemical cue/signal emission, facilitate interpretation of field results. From a meta-analysis of papers published in 11 journals over the last 22 years (1984-1986, 1994-1996, 2004-2006), complete dynamic scaling was rare in both field and laboratory studies. Studies in terrestrial systems often involved chemical determinations, but rarely simulated natural aerodynamics in laboratory wind tunnels. Research in aquatic (marine and freshwater) systems seldom scaled either the chemical or physical environments. Moreover, nearly all research, in all environments, focused on organism-level processes without incorporating the effects of individual-based behavior on populations, communities, and ecosystems. As a result, relationships between chemosensory-mediated behavior and ecological function largely remain unexplored. Outstanding exceptions serve as useful examples for guiding future research. Advanced conceptual frameworks and refined techniques offer exciting opportunities for identifying the ecological significance of chemical cues/signals in behavioral interactions and for incorporating individual effects at higher levels of biological organization.

  19. The potential of freshwater macroalgae as a biofuels feedstock and the influence of nutrient availability on freshwater macroalgal biomass production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yun, Jin-Ho

    Extensive efforts have been made to evaluate the potential of microalgae as a biofuel feedstock during the past 4-5 decades. However, filamentous freshwater macroalgae have numerous characteristics that favor their potential use as an alternative algal feedstock for biofuels production. Freshwater macroalgae exhibit high rates of areal productivity, and their tendency to form dense floating mats on the water surface imply significant reductions in harvesting and dewater costs compared to microalgae. In Chapter 1, I reviewed the published literature on the elemental composition and energy content of five genera of freshwater macroalgae. This review suggested that freshwater macroalgae compare favorably with traditional bio-based energy sources, including terrestrial residues, wood, and coal. In addition, I performed a semi-continuous culture experiment using the common Chlorophyte genus Oedogonium to investigate whether nutrient availability can influence its higher heating value (HHV), productivity, and proximate analysis. The experimental study suggested that the most nutrient-limited growth conditions resulted in a significant increase in the HHV of the Oedogonium biomass (14.4 MJ/kg to 16.1 MJ/kg). Although there was no significant difference in productivity between the treatments, the average dry weight productivity of Oedogonium (3.37 g/m2/day) was found to be much higher than is achievable with common terrestrial plant crops. Although filamentous freshwater macroalgae, therefore, have significant potential as a renewable source of bioenergy, the ultimate success of freshwater macroalgae as a biofuel feedstock will depend upon the ability to produce biomass at the commercial-scale in a cost-effective and sustainable manner. Aquatic ecology can play an important role to achieve the scale-up of algal crop production by informing the supply rates of nutrients to the cultivation systems, and by helping to create adaptive production systems that are resilient to

  20. Warming modifies trophic cascades and eutrophication in experimental freshwater communities.

    PubMed

    Kratina, Pavel; Greig, Hamish S; Thompson, Patrick L; Carvalho-Pereira, Ticiana S A; Shurin, Jonathan B

    2012-06-01

    Climate warming is occurring in concert with other anthropogenic changes to ecosystems. However, it is unknown whether and how warming alters the importance of top-down vs. bottom-up control over community productivity and variability. We performed a 16-month factorial experimental manipulation of warming, nutrient enrichment, and predator presence in replicated freshwater pond mesocosms to test their independent and interactive impacts. Warming strengthened trophic cascades from fish to primary producers, and it decreased the impact of eutrophication on the mean and temporal variation of phytoplankton biomass. These impacts varied seasonally, with higher temperatures leading to stronger trophic cascades in winter and weaker algae blooms under eutrophication in summer. Our results suggest that higher temperatures may shift the control of primary production in freshwater ponds toward stronger top-down and weaker bottom-up effects. The dampened temporal variability of algal biomass under eutrophication at higher temperatures suggests that warming may stabilize some ecosystem processes.

  1. Production of phthalate esters by nuisance freshwater algae and cyanobacteria.

    PubMed

    Babu, Bakthavachalam; Wu, Jiunn-Tzong

    2010-10-01

    Phthalate esters are widely distributed pollutants which originate from synthetic plasticizer and are known to act as toxicants as well as environmental pheromones in the aquatic ecosystems. From investigating sixteen species of freshwater algae and cyanobacteria we revealed that some of them were capable of producing either di(n-butyl)phthalate (DBP) or mono(2-ethylhexyl)phthalate (MEHP) or both. These phthalate esters would be released into the environment under stress conditions. The incubation of the cells in culture medium containing NaH(13)CO(3) confirmed that both phthalates were de novo synthesized by the studied cells. This study suggested that the nuisance freshwater micro-algae and cyanobacteria growing in eutrophic waters might affect the aquatic ecosystem via the production of these phthalate esters.

  2. Metagenomic recovery of phage genomes of uncultured freshwater actinobacteria.

    PubMed

    Ghai, Rohit; Mehrshad, Maliheh; Megumi Mizuno, Carolina; Rodriguez-Valera, Francisco

    2017-01-01

    Low-GC Actinobacteria are among the most abundant and widespread microbes in freshwaters and have largely resisted all cultivation efforts. Consequently, their phages have remained totally unknown. In this work, we have used deep metagenomic sequencing to assemble eight complete genomes of the first tailed phages that infect freshwater Actinobacteria. Their genomes encode the actinobacterial-specific transcription factor whiB, frequently found in mycobacteriophages and also in phages infecting marine pelagic Actinobacteria. Its presence suggests a common and widespread strategy of modulation of host transcriptional machinery upon infection via this transcriptional switch. We present evidence that some whiB-carrying phages infect the acI lineage of Actinobacteria. At least one of them encodes the ADP-ribosylating component of the widespread bacterial AB toxins family (for example, clostridial toxin). We posit that the presence of this toxin reflects a 'trojan horse' strategy, providing protection at the population level to the abundant host microbes against eukaryotic predators.

  3. Climate change effects on hydroecology of arctic freshwater ecosystems.

    PubMed

    Prowse, Terry D; Wrona, Frederick J; Reist, James D; Gibson, John J; Hobbie, John E; Lévesque, Lucie M J; Vincent, Warwick F

    2006-11-01

    In general, the arctic freshwater-terrestrial system will warm more rapidly than the global average, particularly during the autumn and winter season. The decline or loss of many cryospheric components and a shift from a nival to an increasingly pluvial system will produce numerous physical effects on freshwater ecosystems. Of particular note will be reductions in the dominance of the spring freshet and changes in the intensity of river-ice breakup. Increased evaporation/evapotranspiration due to longer ice-free seasons, higher air/water temperatures and greater transpiring vegetation along with increase infiltration because of permafrost thaw will decrease surface water levels and coverage. Loss of ice and permafrost, increased water temperatures and vegetation shifts will alter water chemistry, the general result being an increase in lotic and lentic productivity. Changes in ice and water flow/levels will lead to regime-specific increases and decreases in habitat availability/quality across the circumpolar Arctic.

  4. Molecular evidence that Reticulomyxa filosa is a freshwater naked foraminifer.

    PubMed

    Pawlowski, J; Bolivar, I; Fahrni, J F; De Vargas, C; Bowser, S S

    1999-01-01

    Reticulomyxa filosa is a freshwater protist possessing fine granular, branching and anastomosing pseudopodia and therefore traditionally placed in the class Granuloreticulosea, order Athalamida, as a sister group to the order Foraminiferida. Recent studies have revealed remarkable similarities in pseudopodial motility and ultrastructure between R. filosa and foraminifera (e.g. Allogromia laticollaris), prompting us to conduct a molecular phylogenetic analysis of these seemingly disparate organisms. We sequenced the complete small-subunit of the ribosomal DNA of the cultured strain of R. filosa and compared it to the corresponding sequences of other protists including 12 species of foraminifera. We also sequenced and analyzed the actin coding genes from R. filosa and two species of foraminifera, Allogromia sp. and Ammonia sp. The analysis of both data sets clearly shows that R. filosa branches within the clade of foraminifera, suggesting that R. filosa is in fact a freshwater naked foraminiferan.

  5. Invasive crayfish and freshwater fishes of the world.

    PubMed

    Gherardi, F

    2010-08-01

    After habitat destruction, invasive alien species are the second leading cause of biodiversity loss, particularly in freshwater ecosystems. They also alter the structure and functioning of ecosystems, lead to biotic homogenisation, and eventually threaten human economies and health. This review aims to synthesise some of the existing information about the world distribution, vectors of spread, and impacts of two important components of freshwater ecosystems, crayfish and fishes. Analysis of the available literature shows that crayfish and fish species, once moved outside their native range, are likely to establish self-reproducing populations, spread from the point of introduction and become invasive. Efforts to manage these populations are difficult and expensive, which warrants the provision of effective preventative measures. Unfortunately, the state of our knowledge of the mechanisms in play in crayfish and fish invasions is still limited, which suggests that much greater attention and investment should be directed to studies in this field.

  6. Screening of freshwater fungi for decolorizing multiple synthetic dyes.

    PubMed

    Yang, Panpan; Shi, Wenxiao; Wang, Hongkai; Liu, Hongmei

    The biodegradation of synthetic dyes by fungi is emerging as an effective and promising approach. In the present study, freshwater fungal strains isolated from submerged woods were screened for the decolorization of 7 synthetic dyes. Subsequently, 13 isolates with high decolorization capability were assessed in a liquid system; they belonged to 9 different fungal species. Several strains exhibited a highly effective decolorization of multiple types of dyes. New absorbance peaks appeared after the treatment with 3 fungal strains, which suggests that a biotransformation process occurred through fungal biodegradation. These results showed the unexploited and valuable capability of freshwater fungi for the treatment of dye-containing effluents. The ability of certain fungi to decolorize dyes is reported here for the first time.

  7. Colonization, extinction, and phylogeographic patterning in a freshwater crustacean.

    PubMed

    Cox, A J; Hebert, P D

    2001-02-01

    Phylogeographic analyses have revealed the importance of Pleistocene vicariance events in shaping the distribution of genetic diversity in freshwater fishes. However, few studies have examined the patterning of variation in freshwater organisms with differing dispersal syndromes and life histories. The present investigation addresses this gap, examining the phylogeography of Sida crystallina, a species whose production of diapausing eggs capable of passive dispersal was thought to constrain its regional genetic differentiation. By contrast, the present analysis has revealed deep allozyme and cytochrome oxidase I mitochondrial DNA divergence between populations from North America and Europe. Moreover, North American populations are separated into four allopatric assemblages, whose distribution suggests their derivation from different Pleistocene refugia. These lineages show higher haplotype diversity and deeper sequence divergence than those of any fish from temperate North America. Its distinctive life history traits have evidently sheltered lineages of Sida from extinction, contributing to a remarkably comprehensive and high resolution phylogeographic record.

  8. Freshwater ecosystems and aquatic insects: a paradox in biological invasions.

    PubMed

    Fenoglio, Stefano; Bonada, Núria; Guareschi, Simone; López-Rodríguez, Manuel J; Millán, Andrés; Tierno de Figueroa, J Manuel

    2016-04-01

    Biological invasions have increased significantly in response to global change and constitute one of the major causes of biodiversity loss. Insects make up a large fraction of invasive species, in general, and freshwaters are among the most invaded ecosystems on our planet. However, even though aquatic insects dominate most inland waters, have unparalleled taxonomic diversity and occupy nearly all trophic niches, there are almost no invasive insects in freshwaters. We present some hypotheses regarding why aquatic insects are not common among aquatic invasive organisms, suggesting that it may be the result of a suite of biological, ecological and anthropogenic factors. Such specific knowledge introduces a paradox in the current scientific discussion on invasive species; therefore, a more in-depth understanding could be an invaluable aid to disentangling how and why biological invasions occur.

  9. Coaggregation between freshwater bacteria within biofilm and planktonic communities.

    PubMed

    Rickard, A H; McBain, A J; Ledder, R G; Handley, P S; Gilbert, P

    2003-03-14

    The coaggregation ability of bacteria isolated from a freshwater biofilm was compared to those derived from the coexisting planktonic population. Twenty-nine morphologically distinct bacterial strains were isolated from a 6-month-old biofilm, established in a glass tank under high-shear conditions, and 15 distinct strains were isolated from the associated re-circulating water. All 44 strains were identified to genus or species level by 16S rDNA sequencing. The 29 biofilm strains belonged to 14 genera and 23.4% of all the possible pair-wise combinations coaggregated. The 15 planktonic strains belonged to seven genera and only 5.8% of all the possible pair-wise combinations coaggregated. Therefore, compared to the planktonic population, a greater proportion of the biofilm strains coaggregated. It is proposed that coaggregation influences biofilm formation and species diversity in freshwater under high shear.

  10. Occupational health issues in marine and freshwater research

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Marine and freshwater scientists are potentially exposed to a wide variety of occupational hazards. Depending on the focus of their research, risks may include animal attacks, physiological stresses, exposure to toxins and carcinogens, and dangerous environmental conditions. Many of these hazards have been investigated amongst the general population in their recreational use of the environment; however, very few studies have specifically related potential hazards to occupational exposure. For example, while the incidence of shark and crocodile attacks may invoke strong emotions and the occupational risk of working with these animals is certainly real, many more people are stung by jellyfish or bitten by snakes or dogs each year. Furthermore, a large proportion of SCUBA-related injuries and deaths are incurred by novice or uncertified divers, rather than professional divers using aquatic environments. Nonetheless, marine and freshwater research remains a potentially risky occupation, and the likelihood of death, injury and long-term health impacts still needs to be seriously considered. PMID:22429712

  11. Combined ecological risks of nitrogen and phosphorus in European freshwaters.

    PubMed

    Azevedo, Ligia B; van Zelm, Rosalie; Leuven, Rob S E W; Hendriks, A Jan; Huijbregts, Mark A J

    2015-05-01

    Eutrophication is a key water quality issue triggered by increasing nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) levels and potentially posing risks to freshwater biota. We predicted the probability that an invertebrate species within a community assemblage becomes absent due to nutrient stress as the ecological risk (ER) for European lakes and streams subjected to N and P pollution from 1985 to 2011. The ER was calculated as a function of species-specific tolerances to NO3(-) and total P concentrations and water quality monitoring data. Lake and stream ER averaged 50% in the last monitored year (i.e. 2011) and we observed a decrease by 22% and 38% in lake and stream ER (respectively) of river basins since 1985. Additionally, the ER from N stress surpassed that of P in both freshwater systems. The ER can be applied to identify river basins most subjected to eutrophication risks and the main drivers of impacts.

  12. [Occurrence and health aspects of PCB congeners in freshwater fish].

    PubMed

    Kruse, R

    1990-07-01

    6 PCB-Congeners, being ruled by the regulatory limits from 23. 3. 1988, are considered to be representative under analytical aspects. The additional consideration of the two further congeners 77 and 118 is recommended under toxicological aspects. A widespread survey is given over the pollution status of marine fish, freshwater fish, and belonging to products. In the years between 1986 to 1988 2229 specimens were analysed for their contents of 8 PCB-Congeners and 6 important chlorinated hydrocarbons. Contents in marine fish were at least 10 times, mostly 100 times lower than regulatory limits. In this area contamination is more influenced by species than by catching grounds. Regulatory limits can however be exceeded in freshwater fish from severely polluted main rivers, where contents are more influenced by catching grounds than by species.

  13. Evidence of local short-distance spawning migration of tropical freshwater eels, and implications for the evolution of freshwater eel migration.

    PubMed

    Arai, Takaomi

    2014-10-01

    Freshwater eels have fascinated biologists for centuries due to the spectacular long-distance migrations between the eels' freshwater habitats and their spawning areas far out in the ocean and the mysteries of their ecology. The spawning areas of Atlantic eels and Japanese eel were located far offshore in the Atlantic Ocean and the Pacific Ocean, respectively, and their reproduction took place thousands of kilometers away from their growth habitats. Phylogenetic studies have revealed that freshwater eels originated in the Indonesian region. However, remarkably little is known about the life histories of tropical freshwater eels despite the fact that tropical eels are key to understanding the nature of primitive forms of catadromous migration. This study found spawning-condition tropical freshwater eels in Lake Poso, central Sulawesi, Indonesia, with considerably high gonadosomatic index values and with histologically fully developed gonads. This study provides the first evidence that under certain conditions, freshwater eels have conditions that are immediately able to spawn even in river downstream. The results suggest that, in contrast to the migrations made by the Atlantic and Japanese eels, freshwater eels originally migrated only short distances of <100 kilometers to local spawning areas adjacent to their freshwater growth habitats. Ancestral eels most likely underwent a catadromous migration from local short-distance movements in tropical coastal waters to the long-distance migrations characteristic of present-day temperate eels, which has been well established as occurring in subtropical gyres in both hemispheres.

  14. Influence of net freshwater supply on salinity in Florida Bay

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nuttle, W.K.; Fourqurean, J.W.; Cosby, B.J.; Zieman, J.C.; Robblee, M.B.

    2000-01-01

    An annual water budget for Florida Bay, the large, seasonally hypersaline estuary in the Everglades National Park, was constructed using physically based models and long-term (31 years) data on salinity, hydrology, and climate. Effects of seasonal and interannual variations of the net freshwater supply (runoff plus rainfall minus evaporation) on salinity variation within the bay were also examined. Particular attention was paid to the effects of runoff, which are the focus of ambitious plans to restore and conserve the Florida Bay ecosystem. From 1965 to 1995 the annual runoff from the Everglades into the bay was less than one tenth of the annual direct rainfall onto the bay, while estimated annual evaporation slightly exceeded annual rainfall. The average net freshwater supply to the bay over a year was thus approximately zero, and interannual variations in salinity appeared to be affected primarily by interannual fluctuations in rainfall. At the annual scale, runoff apparently had little effect on the bay as a whole during this period. On a seasonal basis, variations in rainfall, evaporation, and runoff were not in phase, and the net freshwater supply to the bay varied between positive and negative values, contributing to a strong seasonal pattern in salinity, especially in regions of the bay relatively isolated from exchanges with the Gulf of Mexico and Atlantic Ocean. Changes in runoff could have a greater effect on salinity in the bay if the seasonal patterns of rainfall and evaporation and the timing of the runoff are considered. One model was also used to simulate spatial and temporal patterns of salinity responses expected to result from changes in net freshwater supply. Simulations in which runoff was increased by a factor of 2 (but with no change in spatial pattern) indicated that increased runoff will lower salinity values in eastern Florida Bay, increase the variability of salinity in the South Region, but have little effect on salinity in the Central

  15. Phylogenetic Relationships and Coaggregation Ability of Freshwater Biofilm Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Rickard, Alex H.; Leach, Stephen A.; Hall, Laurence S.; Buswell, Clive M.; High, Nicola J.; Handley, Pauline S.

    2002-01-01

    Nineteen numerically dominant heterotrophic bacteria from a freshwater biofilm were identified by 16S ribosomal DNA gene sequencing, and their coaggregation partnerships were determined. Phylogenetic trees showed that both distantly related and closely related strains coaggregated at intergeneric, intrageneric, and intraspecies levels. One strain, Blastomonas natatoria 2.1, coaggregated with all 18 other strains and may function as a bridging organism in biofilm development. PMID:12089055

  16. Serum antileptospiral agglutinins in freshwater turtles from Southern Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Éverton F; Seyffert, Núbia; Cerqueira, Gustavo M.; Leihs, Karl P.; Athanazio, Daniel A.; Valente, Ana L. S.; Dellagostin, Odir A.; Brod, Claudiomar S.

    2009-01-01

    In this study, we observed the presence of antileptospiral agglutinins in freshwater turtles of two urban lakes of Pelotas, Southern Brazil. Forty animals (29 Trachemys dorbigny and 11 Phrynops hilarii) were captured and studied. Attempts to isolate leptospires from blood and urine samples were unsuccessful. Serum samples (titer > 100) reactive to pathogenic strains were observed in 11 animals. These data encourage surveys of pet turtles to evaluate the risk of transmission of pathogenic leptospires to humans. PMID:24031348

  17. The effects of the herbicide atrazine on freshwater snails.

    PubMed

    Gustafson, Kyle D; Belden, Jason B; Bolek, Matthew G

    2015-07-01

    Atrazine has been shown to affect freshwater snails from the subcellular to community level. However, most studies have used different snail species, methods, endpoints, and atrazine exposure concentrations, resulting in some conflicting results and limiting our understanding. The goal of this study was to address these concerns by (1) investigating the acute and chronic effects of atrazine on four species of freshwater snails (Biomphalaria glabrata, Helisoma trivolvis, Physa acuta, and Stagnicola elodes) using the same methods, endpoints, and concentrations, and (2) summarizing the current literature pertaining to the effects of atrazine on freshwater snails. We conducted a 48 h acute toxicity test with an atrazine concentration higher than what typically occurs in aquatic environments (1000 µg/L). Additionally, we exposed snails to environmentally relevant atrazine concentrations (0, 0.3, 3, and 30 µg/L) for 28 days and assessed snail survival, growth, and reproduction. We also summarized all known literature pertaining to atrazine effects on freshwater snails. The literature summary suggests snails are often affected by environmentally relevant atrazine concentrations at the subcellular and cellular levels. These effects are typically not transitive to effects on survival, growth, or reproduction at the same concentrations. Our acute exposures corroborate the general trend of no direct effect on snail populations as atrazine did not directly affect the survival of any of the four snail species. Similarly, environmentally relevant concentrations did not significantly affect the survival, growth, or reproduction of any snail species. These results indicate that, in the absence of other possible stressors, the direct effects of environmentally relevant atrazine concentrations may not be realized at the snail population level.

  18. Chesapeake Bay Low Freshwater Inflow Study. Appendix E. Biota.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-09-01

    condition of water containing conspicuous amounts of suspended material. upland: all areas of land above the depressions occupied by lakes , rivers...species is widespread in temperate rivers and lakes . In Chesapeake Bay, it is restricted to freshwater and oligohaline ... reaches of tributary rivers and...Newfoundland to Georgia , in areas of reduced salinity. In Chesapeake Bay, it is confined to the oligohaline through mesohaline regions, chiefly in

  19. Is asthma prevalence still increasing?

    PubMed

    Lundbäck, Bo; Backman, Helena; Lötvall, Jan; Rönmark, Eva

    2016-01-01

    Increased awareness of asthma in society and altered diagnostic practices makes evaluation of data on prevalence change difficult. In most parts of the world the asthma prevalence seems to still be increasing. The increase is associated with urbanization and has been documented particularly among children and teenagers in urban areas of middle- and low-level income countries. Use of validated questionnaires has enabled comparisons of studies. Among adults there are few studies based on representative samples of the general population which allow evaluation of time trends of prevalence. This review focuses mainly on studies of asthma prevalence and symptoms among adults. Parallel with increased urbanization, we can assume that the increase in asthma prevalence in most areas of the world will continue. However, in Australia and North-West Europe studies performed, particularly among children and adolescents, indicate that the increase in asthma prevalence may now be leveling off.

  20. Ammonia excretion in the freshwater planarian Schmidtea mediterranea.

    PubMed

    Weihrauch, Dirk; Chan, Ainsely C; Meyer, Heiko; Döring, Carmen; Sourial, Mary; O'Donnell, Michael J

    2012-09-15

    In aquatic invertebrates, metabolic nitrogenous waste is excreted predominately as ammonia. Very little is known, however, of the underlying mechanisms of ammonia excretion, particularly in freshwater species. Our results indicate that in the non-parasitic freshwater planarian Schmidtea mediterranea, ammonia excretion depends on acidification of the apical unstirred layer of the body surface and consequent ammonia trapping. Buffering of the environment to a pH of 7 or higher decreased the excretion rate. Inhibitor experiments suggested further that the excretion mechanism involves the participation of the V-type H(+)-ATPase and carbonic anhydrase and possibly also the Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase and Na(+)/H(+) exchangers. Alkalinization (pH 8.5, 2 days) of the environment led to a 1.9-fold increase in body ammonia levels and to a downregulation of V-ATPase (subunit A) and Rh-protein mRNA. Further, a 2 day exposure to non-lethal ammonia concentrations (1 mmol l(-1)) caused a doubling of body ammonia levels and led to an increase in Rh-protein and Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase (α-subunit) mRNA expression levels. In situ hybridization studies indicated a strong mRNA expression of the Rh-protein in the epidermal epithelium. The ammonia excretion mechanism proposed for S. mediterranea reveals striking similarities to the current model suggested to function in the gills of freshwater fish.

  1. A synthetic phylogeny of freshwater crayfish: insights for conservation.

    PubMed

    Owen, Christopher L; Bracken-Grissom, Heather; Stern, David; Crandall, Keith A

    2015-02-19

    Phylogenetic systematics is heading for a renaissance where we shift from considering our phylogenetic estimates as a static image in a published paper and taxonomies as a hardcopy checklist to treating both the phylogenetic estimate and dynamic taxonomies as metadata for further analyses. The Open Tree of Life project (opentreeoflife.org) is developing synthesis tools for harnessing the power of phylogenetic inference and robust taxonomy to develop a synthetic tree of life. We capitalize on this approach to estimate a synthesis tree for the freshwater crayfish. The crayfish make an exceptional group to demonstrate the utility of the synthesis approach, as there recently have been a number of phylogenetic studies on the crayfishes along with a robust underlying taxonomic framework. Importantly, the crayfish have also been extensively assessed by an IUCN Red List team and therefore have accurate and up-to-date area and conservation status data available for analysis within a phylogenetic context. Here, we develop a synthesis phylogeny for the world's freshwater crayfish and examine the phylogenetic distribution of threat. We also estimate a molecular phylogeny based on all available GenBank crayfish sequences and use this tree to estimate divergence times and test for divergence rate variation. Finally, we conduct EDGE and HEDGE analyses and identify a number of species of freshwater crayfish of highest priority in conservation efforts.

  2. Identifying and validating freshwater ecoregions in Jinan City, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Songyan; Xu, Zongxue; Liu, Xingcai; Dou, Tongwen; Xu, Chen

    2015-09-01

    Freshwater ecoregion is currently widely used by biologists, conservators and resource managers. Most of ecoregion delineations are developed at the basin scale and are not fully adapted in a practical manner because operational water resources management is primarily conducted by political administrative departments. In this study, an ecoregion delineation framework was proposed to classify three-level ecoregions in Jinan City with geographic information systems and cluster analysis. The first level ecoregion was composed of three watersheds (a part of the Yellow River, Xiaoqing River and Tuhaimajia River) plus the urban area, which was primarily determined on the basis of the city administrative divisions and river watersheds. The classification of the second level ecoregion is primarily based on the spatial heterogeneity of land use. The third level ecoregion was delineated for each second level ecoregion by using the cluster analysis on water quality. At the same time, administrative boundaries were used to rectify the boundaries of each ecoregion in this study to facilitate the administration of each ecoregion. Furthermore, ecological health assessment (IBI) based on fish communities were employed to validate the freshwater ecoregion. The results demonstrated that 73.3% of ecoregions were in line with the distribution of fish IBI, indicating that the freshwater ecoregions are acceptable for future water resources management.

  3. Tree-grass coexistence in the Everglades freshwater system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Odorico, P.; Carr, J. A.; Engel, V.

    2009-12-01

    The Everglades freshwater system exhibits a heterogeneous landscape with marshes punctuated by patches of woody vegetation (tree islands) that are typically more elevated than the surrounding marshes. Despite the diversity and spatial organization of vegetation within the tree and grass plant communities, the landscape of the Everglades exhibits the features of a two-phase system with a distinct contrast between tree islands and marshes: tree islands are more elevated, dominated by woody vegetation and relatively phosphorus rich, while marshes are grass dominated and phosphorus-poor. A parallel can be drawn between these tree-grass mosaics and the patchy vegetation typical of dryland ecosystems, particularly savannas. The coexistence of trees and grasses in patchy freshwater landscapes calls for an explanation of the underlying processes and of their susceptibility to changes in environmental conditions. We argue that the stable coexistence of sawgrass meadows and tree islands in the Everglades is the result of positive feedback mechanisms, which induce bistability in landscape dynamics. We develop a process-based zero-dimensional model to explain the coexistence of the alternative stable states of “marsh” and “tree island” in the Everglades’ freshwater landscape. This zero-dimensional model shows how alternative stable states may arise as an effect of the positive feedbacks.

  4. A synthetic phylogeny of freshwater crayfish: insights for conservation

    PubMed Central

    Owen, Christopher L.; Bracken-Grissom, Heather; Stern, David; Crandall, Keith A.

    2015-01-01

    Phylogenetic systematics is heading for a renaissance where we shift from considering our phylogenetic estimates as a static image in a published paper and taxonomies as a hardcopy checklist to treating both the phylogenetic estimate and dynamic taxonomies as metadata for further analyses. The Open Tree of Life project (opentreeoflife.org) is developing synthesis tools for harnessing the power of phylogenetic inference and robust taxonomy to develop a synthetic tree of life. We capitalize on this approach to estimate a synthesis tree for the freshwater crayfish. The crayfish make an exceptional group to demonstrate the utility of the synthesis approach, as there recently have been a number of phylogenetic studies on the crayfishes along with a robust underlying taxonomic framework. Importantly, the crayfish have also been extensively assessed by an IUCN Red List team and therefore have accurate and up-to-date area and conservation status data available for analysis within a phylogenetic context. Here, we develop a synthesis phylogeny for the world's freshwater crayfish and examine the phylogenetic distribution of threat. We also estimate a molecular phylogeny based on all available GenBank crayfish sequences and use this tree to estimate divergence times and test for divergence rate variation. Finally, we conduct EDGE and HEDGE analyses and identify a number of species of freshwater crayfish of highest priority in conservation efforts. PMID:25561670

  5. Evolution of growth by genetic accommodation in Icelandic freshwater stickleback

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, Beren W.

    2013-01-01

    Classical Darwinian adaptation to a change in environment can ensue when selection favours beneficial genetic variation. How plastic trait responses to new conditions affect this process depends on how plasticity reveals to selection the influence of genotype on phenotype. Genetic accommodation theory predicts that evolutionary rate may sharply increase when a new environment induces plastic responses and selects on sufficient genetic variation in those responses to produce an immediate evolutionary response, but natural examples are rare. In Iceland, marine threespine stickleback that have colonized freshwater habitats have evolved more rapid individual growth. Heritable variation in growth is greater for marine full-siblings reared at low versus high salinity, and genetic variation exists in plastic growth responses to low salinity. In fish from recently founded freshwater populations reared at low salinity, the plastic response was strongly correlated with growth. Plasticity and growth were not correlated in full-siblings reared at high salinity nor in marine fish at either salinity. In well-adapted lake populations, rapid growth evolved jointly with stronger plastic responses to low salinity and the persistence of strong plastic responses indicates that growth is not genetically assimilated. Thus, beneficial plastic growth responses to low salinity have both guided and evolved along with rapid growth as stickleback adapted to freshwater. PMID:24132309

  6. Magnetic resonance imaging of live freshwater mussels (Unionidae)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Michael, Holliman F.; Davis, D.; Bogan, A.E.; Kwak, T.J.; Gregory, Cope W.; Levine, J.F.

    2008-01-01

    We examined the soft tissues of live freshwater mussels, Eastern elliptio Elliptio complanata, via magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), acquiring data with a widely available human whole-body MRI system. Anatomical features depicted in the profile images included the foot, stomach, intestine, anterior and posterior adductor muscles, and pericardial cavity. Noteworthy observations on soft tissue morphology included a concentration of lipids at the most posterior aspect of the foot, the presence of hemolymph-filled fissures in the posterior adductor muscle, the presence of a relatively large hemolymph-filled sinus adjacent to the posterior adductor muscle (at the ventral-anterior aspect), and segmentation of the intestine (a diagnostic description not reported previously in Unionidae). Relatively little is known about the basic biology and ecological physiology of freshwater mussels. Traditional approaches for studying anatomy and tissue processes, and for measuring sub-lethal physiological stress, are destructive or invasive. Our study, the first to evaluate freshwater mussel soft tissues by MRI, clarifies the body plan of unionid mussels and demonstrates the efficacy of this technology for in vivo evaluation of the structure, function, and integrity of mussel soft tissues. ?? 2008, The American Microscopical Society, Inc.

  7. Predator-induced reduction of freshwater carbon dioxide emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atwood, Trisha B.; Hammill, Edd; Greig, Hamish S.; Kratina, Pavel; Shurin, Jonathan B.; Srivastava, Diane S.; Richardson, John S.

    2013-03-01

    Predators can influence the exchange of carbon dioxide between ecosystems and the atmosphere by altering ecosystem processes such as decomposition and primary production, according to food web theory. Empirical knowledge of such an effect in freshwater systems is limited, but it has been suggested that predators in odd-numbered food chains suppress freshwater carbon dioxide emissions, and predators in even-numbered food chains enhance emissions. Here, we report experiments in three-tier food chains in experimental ponds, streams and bromeliads in Canada and Costa Rica in the presence or absence of fish (Gasterosteus aculeatus) and invertebrate (Hesperoperla pacifica and Mecistogaster modesta) predators. We monitored carbon dioxide fluxes along with prey and primary producer biomass. We found substantially reduced carbon dioxide emissions in the presence of predators in all systems, despite differences in predator type, hydrology, climatic region, ecological zone and level of in situ primary production. We also observed lower amounts of prey biomass and higher amounts of algal and detrital biomass in the presence of predators. We conclude that predators have the potential to markedly influence carbon dioxide dynamics in freshwater systems.

  8. Theoretical considerations underlying Na(+) uptake mechanisms in freshwater fishes.

    PubMed

    Parks, Scott K; Tresguerres, Martin; Goss, Greg G

    2008-11-01

    Ion and acid-base regulating mechanisms have been studied at the fish gill for almost a century. Original models proposed for Na(+) and Cl(-) uptake, and their linkage with H(+) and HCO(3)(-) secretion have changed substantially with the development of more sophisticated physiological techniques. At the freshwater fish gill, two dominant mechanisms for Na(+) uptake from dilute environments have persisted in the literature. The use of an apical Na(+)/H(+) exchanger driven by a basolateral Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase versus an apical Na(+) channel electrogenically coupled to an apical H(+)-ATPase have been the source of debate for a number of years. Advances in molecular biology have greatly enhanced our understanding of the basic ion transport mechanisms at the fish gill. However, it is imperative to ensure that thermodynamic principles are followed in the development of new models for gill ion transport. This review will focus on the recent molecular advances for Na(+) uptake in freshwater fish. Emphasis will be placed on thermodynamic constraints that prevent electroneutral apical NHE function in most freshwater environments. By combining recent advances in molecular and functional physiology of fish gills with thermodynamic considerations of ion transport, our knowledge in the field should continue to grow in a logical manner.

  9. Anaerobic methane oxidation in two tropical freshwater systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roland, Fleur; Darchambeau, François; Crowe, Sean A.; Borges, Alberto V.

    2014-05-01

    Lake Kivu is one of the East African Great Lakes. It is located at the border between Rwanda and the Democratic Republic of the Congo. It is a deep meromictic lake characterized by huge amounts of methane (CH4) (60 km3 at 0° C and 1 atm) dissolved in its deep waters. Two thirds of the CH4 originates from anoxic bacterial reduction of dissolved carbon dioxide and one third from anaerobic degradation of settling organic material. CH4 then diffuses slowly from the monimolimnion to surface waters where many is oxidised by methanotrophic microorganisms. In Lake Kivu, this biological oxidation of CH4 could occur with different final electron acceptors: oxygen (aerobic oxidation) but also nitrate (NO3-), nitrite, sulfate (SO42-), iron (Fe) or manganese (Mn) in anaerobic conditions. If the anaerobic oxidation of CH4 (AOM) is generally coupled to SO42- reduction in marine waters, electron acceptors of the AOM were rarely investigated in freshwater systems. Five field campaigns were conducted from 2011 to 2013 during periods with contrasted ventilations of the upper water column. The dry season is characterized by a deeper mixing of surface waters ended by a steep gradient of physico-chemical conditions at the redox interface, while during the rainy season the mixed layer is shallower and ended at its deeper part by a NO3- accumulation zone. Sampling was conducted in the main basin of Lake Kivu but also in a particular sub-basin located northeast of the lake, the Kabuno Bay. Both systems are meromictic but differ in terms of morphometry and geochemistry with a shallower permanent chemocline and higher concentrations of CH4, Fe and Mn in the anoxic waters in Kabuno Bay compared to the main lake. Samples were collected for the measurements of CH4 concentrations and the various potential electron acceptors of the AOM. CH4 oxidation rates were measured along vertical profiles at 5 m and 0.5 m depth intervals respectively in the main basin and Kabuno bay water columns. Results

  10. Salinization triggers a trophic cascade in experimental freshwater communities with varying food-chain length.

    PubMed

    Hintz, William D; Mattes, Brian M; Schuler, Matthew S; Jones, Devin K; Stoler, Aaron B; Lind, Lovisa; Relyea, Rick A

    2017-04-01

    The application of road deicing salts in northern regions worldwide is changing the chemical environment of freshwater ecosystems. Chloride levels in many lakes, streams, and wetlands exceed the chronic and acute thresholds established by the United States and Canada for the protection of freshwater biota. Few studies have identified the impacts of deicing salts in stream and wetland communities and none have examined impacts in lake communities. We tested how relevant concentrations of road salt (15, 100, 250, 500, and 1000 mg Cl(-) /L) interacted with experimental communities containing two or three trophic levels (i.e., no fish vs. predatory fish). We hypothesized that road salt and fish would have a negative synergistic effect on zooplankton, which would then induce a trophic cascade. We tested this hypothesis in outdoor mesocosms containing filamentous algae, periphyton, phytoplankton, zooplankton, several macroinvertebrate species, and fish. We found that the presence of fish and high salt had a negative synergistic effect on the zooplankton community, which in turn caused an increase in phytoplankton. Contributing to the magnitude of this trophic cascade was a direct positive effect of high salinity on phytoplankton abundance. Cascading effects were limited with respect to impacts on the benthic food web. Periphyton and snail grazers were unaffected by the salt-induced trophic cascade, but the biomass of filamentous algae decreased as a result of competition with phytoplankton for light or nutrients. We also found direct negative effects of high salinity on the biomass of filamentous algae and amphipods (Hyalella azteca) and the mortality of banded mystery snails (Viviparus georgianus) and fingernail clams (Sphaerium simile). Clam mortality was dependent on the presence of fish, suggesting a non-consumptive interactive effect with salt. Our results indicate that globally increasing concentrations of road salt can alter community structure via both direct

  11. DOM along the Continuum from River to Reservoir: a Comparison of Freshwater and Saline Transects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minor, E. C.; Stephens, B.

    2009-04-01

    Dissolved organic matter (DOM) plays key roles in aquatic ecosystems: as an organic carbon (energy) link between terrestrial and aquatic systems, a food source for biota, a reactant in photochemical reactions, and a sunscreen/competitor for light for aquatic organisms. The composition as well as the concentration of aquatic DOM is believed to determine DOM's efficacy in these roles. The transport and alteration of DOM in river/estuarine systems are significant processes in determining the concentration and composition of DOM in the receiving lake or ocean system (especially in productive and economically important coastal regions). Therefore this study provides a preliminary comparison of the dissolved organic carbon (DOC) concentration, DOM optical properties, and chemical composition of high molecular weight DOM (HMW DOM) on two river-to-receiving-basin transects, one freshwater (St. Louis River/Lake Superior, Minnesota, USA) and the other with a salinity gradient (Elizabeth River/lower Chesapeake Bay/coastal Atlantic, Virginia, USA). Both transects share optical property ranges and general downstream trends toward lower DOC concentrations, less aromaticity, and lower molecular weight DOM, however, there is a stronger downstream decrease in DOC concentration in the saline transect. In HMW DOM, there is more retention of carboxylic signals downstream in the freshwater transect, relative to a downstream shift toward more proteinaceous material in the saline transect. These observed DOM differences most likely result from variations in biological activity, photochemistry, and ionic strength in the two transects. Ionic strength effects include in situ processes (e.g. flocculation) and interactions affecting DOM isolation and analysis.

  12. Stratified distribution of nutrients and extremophile biota within freshwater ice covering the surface of Lake Baikal.

    PubMed

    Bondarenko, Nina A; Belykh, Olga I; Golobokova, Ludmila P; Artemyeva, Olga V; Logacheva, Natalia F; Tikhonova, Irina V; Lipko, Irina A; Kostornova, Tatyana Ya; Parfenova, Valentina V; Khodzher, Tamara V; Ahn, Tae-Seok; Zo, Young-Gun

    2012-02-01

    Biological entities and gradients of selected chemicals within the seemingly barren ice layers covering Lake Baikal were investigated. Ice cores 40-68 cm long were obtained from in shore and offshore sites of Southern Lake Baikal during the cold period of a year (March-April) in 2007 and 2008. In microscopic observations of the melted ice, both algae and bacteria were found in considerable numbers (>10(3) cells/L and >10(4) cells/ml, respectively). Among all organisms found, diatom was generally the most predominant taxon in the ice. Interestingly, both planktonic and benthic algae were present in considerable numbers (2-4×10(4) cells/L). Dominant phototrophic picoplankton were comprised of small green algae of various taxa and cyanobacteria of Synechococcus and Cyanobium. The bacterial community consisted mostly of short rod and cocci cells, either free-living or aggregated. Large numbers of yeast-like cells and actinomycete mycelium were also observed. Concentrations of silica, phosphorus, and nitrate were low by an order of magnitude where biota was abundant. The profile of the ice could be interpreted as vertical stratification of nutrients and biomass due to biological activities. Therefore, the organisms in the ice were regarded to maintain high activity while thriving under freezing conditions. Based on the results, it was concluded that the freshwater ice covering the surface of Lake Baikal is considerably populated by extremophilic microorganisms that actively metabolize and form a detritus food chain in the unique large freshwater ecosystem of Lake Baikal.

  13. Key Contributors to Variations in Fish Mercury Within and Among Freshwater Reservoirs in Oklahoma, USA

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Zhao; Lynch, Robert A.; Schaider, Laurel A.

    2017-01-01

    Elevated fish mercury (Hg) concentrations in freshwater ecosystems worldwide are a significant human and ecological health concern. Mercury bioaccumulation and biomagnification in lakes and reservoirs are controlled by numerous biogeochemical and ecological factors, contributing to variability in fish Hg concentrations both within and among systems. We measured total mercury concentrations ([THg]) and stable isotopes (δ15N, δ13C) in over 30 fish species in two connected subtropical freshwater reservoirs (Grand Lake and Lake Hudson, Oklahoma, USA), their tributaries, and local farm ponds, all of which are potentially impacted by nearby atmospheric Hg sources. We also conducted an inter-system analysis among 61 reservoirs in Oklahoma to explore biological, chemical and physical factors associated with fish [THg] across systems. We found that [THg] for most species in Grand Lake and Lake Hudson were relatively low compared to other reservoirs in Oklahoma. There were significant spatial variations in many species within and between Grand Lake and Lake Hudson, even after accounting for length and/or trophic position (based on δ15N). Fish in local farm ponds, commonly used in the agricultural regions for raising game fish, had 2–17 times higher [THg] than fish of similar length in nearby reservoirs. The inter-system analysis revealed that pH, water color, rainfall, and nutrients are the best predictors of fish [THg] across systems. Our results provide insight into the key factors associated with fish [THg] variations both within and across systems, and may be useful for exposure assessment and for identifying sites and water bodies prone to high fish [THg] as monitoring priorities. PMID:26729635

  14. Development And Application of Functional Assays For Freshwater Dissolved Organic Matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thacker, S.; Tipping, E.; Gondar, D.; Baker, A.

    2006-12-01

    Dissolved organic matter (DOM) in natural waters participates in many important ecological and geochemical reactions, including acid-base buffering, light absorption, proton binding, binding of heavy metals, organic contaminants, aluminium and radionuclides, adsorption at surfaces, aggregation and photochemical reactivity. We are studying DOM in order to understand and quantify these functional properties, so we can use the knowledge to predict the influence of DOM on the natural freshwater environment. As DOM has no readily identifiable structure, our approach is to measure what it does, rather than what it is. Thus, we have developed a series of 12 standardised, reproducible assays of physico-chemical functions of dissolved organic matter (DOM) in freshwaters. The assays provide quantitative information on light absorption, fluorescence, photochemical fading, pH buffering, copper binding, benzo(a)pyrene binding, hydrophilicity and adsorption to alumina. We have collected twenty DOM samples in total, ten samples from a eutrophic lake (Esthwaite Water) and ten samples from three stream waters. A mild isolation method was then used to concentrate the DOM samples for the assay work. When assaying the concentrates, parallel assays were also preformed with Suwannee River Fulvic Acid (SRFA), as a quality control standard. Our results showed that; (i) for eleven of the assays, the variability among the twenty DOM samples was significantly (p<0.001) greater than can be explained by analytical error, i.e. by comparison with results from the SRFA quality control; (ii) the functional properties of the DOM from Esthwaite Water are strongly influenced by the seasonally-dependent input of autochthonous DOM, derived from phytoplankton. The autochthonous DOM is less fluorescent, light absorbing, hydrophobic and has a lower acid group content and capacity to be adsorbed onto alumina than terrestrially derived allochthonous DOM; (iii) significant correlations were found between

  15. Effect of flow velocity on phytoplankton biomass and composition in a freshwater lake.

    PubMed

    Li, Feipeng; Zhang, Haiping; Zhu, Yiping; Xiao, Yihua; Chen, Ling

    2013-03-01

    Water flow has been widely accepted as a target to suppress algae blooms. However, the effectiveness of the flow regulation is unclear due to lack of hard evidences to illuminate the direct cause-effect relationship between hydrodynamic forces and algae growth. In this study, a field observation at a freshwater lake was conducted weekly or biweekly from July 2007 to December 2009. Phytoplankton biomass and composition were investigated at flow velocities of 0.03m/s, 0.06m/s, 0.10m/s, 0.15m/s and 0.30m/s in field enclosure experiments. The results from the field observation indicated that phytoplankton biomass and spatial distribution largely depend on the flow condition. A strong negative correlation (R(2)=-0.618, n=222, P<0.001) was found between Chl-a concentration and flow velocity. The results of enclosure experiments showed that turbulent flow has the inhibition effect on phytoplankton biomass, but less impact on composition. The average Chl-a concentrations in the flowing enclosures were 20.3%-37.5% lower than that in their corresponding still water enclosures during the entire experiment period. Shear stress within pumps might have caused up to 10% of cell damage. The present study highlights that a universal critical velocity for suppressing algae growth probably does not exist in freshwater bodies, for each has its unique physical, chemical and ecological characteristics. It is therefore suggested that sufficient experiments should be conducted for each water body before a critical flow condition is applied to reduce the algae bloom occurrence.

  16. In situ cage experiments with Potamopyrgus antipodarum--a novel tool for real life exposure assessment in freshwater ecosystems.

    PubMed

    Schmitt, Claudia; Vogt, Christian; Van Ballaer, Bram; Brix, Rikke; Suetens, Annelies; Schmitt-Jansen, Mechthild; de Deckere, Eric

    2010-10-01

    In situ experiments are an important tool within ecotoxicological research but there is a lack of suitable methodologies especially for freshwater invertebrate species. Within this study, a novel in situ methodology with Potamopyrgus antipodarum was developed. Snails were inserted into cages, made of Plexiglas measuring 7 × 9 × 7 cm(3) and fixed with stainless steel pins into the sediment at the relevant sampling sites. During the experiment physico-chemical properties of the water and concentrations of metals, PAHs and PCBs were measured in the sediment. The growth and survival of the snails was not affected, but the reproduction increased significantly at one of the most polluted sites. The increase in reproduction was neither correlated with physico-chemical parameters, nor with the concentrations of the different compounds, but maybe related to certain groups of estrogenic compounds. The study demonstrates the excellent applicability of this novel in situ test.

  17. Microbial community structures in anoxic freshwater lake sediment along a metal contamination gradient.

    PubMed

    Gough, Heidi L; Stahl, David A

    2011-03-01

    Contamination, such as by heavy metals, has frequently been implicated in altering microbial community structure. However, this association has not been extensively studied for anaerobic communities, or in freshwater lake sediments. We investigated microbial community structure in the metal-contaminated anoxic sediments of a eutrophic lake that were impacted over the course of 80 years by nearby zinc-smelting activities. Microbial community structure was inferred for bacterial, archaeal and eukaryotic populations by evaluating terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (TRFLP) patterns in near-surface sediments collected in triplicate from five areas of the lake that had differing levels of metal contamination. The majority of the fragments in the bacterial and eukaryotic profiles showed no evidence of variation in association with metal contamination levels, and diversity revealed by these profiles remained consistent even as metal concentrations varied from 3000 to 27,000 mg kg(-1) total Zn, 0.125 to 11.2 μ pore water Zn and 0.023 to 5.40 μM pore water As. Although most archaeal fragments also showed no evidence of variation, the prevalence of a fragment associated with mesophilic Crenarchaeota showed significant positive correlation with total Zn concentrations. This Crenarchaeota fragment dominated the archaeal TRFLP profiles, representing between 35% and 79% of the total measured peak areas. Lake DePue 16S rRNA gene sequences corresponding to this TRFLP fragment clustered with anaerobic and soil mesophilic Crenarchaeota sequences. Although Crenarchaeota have been associated with metal-contaminated groundwater and soils, this is a first report (to our knowledge) documenting potential increased prevalence of Crenarchaeota associated with elevated levels of metal contamination.

  18. Risk factors for Toxoplasma gondii exposure in semiaquatic mammals in a freshwater ecosystem.

    PubMed

    Ahlers, Adam A; Mitchell, Mark A; Dubey, Jitender P; Schooley, Robert L; Heske, Edward J

    2015-04-01

    We assessed risk factors for Toxoplasma gondii exposure in semiaquatic mammals in east-central Illinois, US. This agricultural region has extensive drainage systems that could potentially transport T. gondii oocysts into the watershed. We used muskrats (Ondatra zibethicus) and American mink (Neovison vison) as sentinels of watershed contamination. We predicted individuals from larger subwatersheds would more likely be antibody-positive for T. gondii, as they were exposed to drainage from larger areas. We also evaluated amount of urban land cover within the subwatershed, proximity to farmsteads, and age of individuals in competing models of T. gondii infection. Antibodies to T. gondii were assayed in animal sera by modified agglutination tests (titer 25 or higher) and detected in 18 (60%) of 30 muskrats and 20 (77%) of 26 mink. Infection rates were ≥1.7 times higher than those typical for mammals in upland habitats in this region. Subwatershed size and age class were important predictors of T. gondii infection in muskrats (R(2) = 0.35). Models incorporating urban land cover and proximity to farmsteads had little support. None of our models of antibody prevalence in mink were well supported, possibly because mink are less strictly associated with riparian habitats. Because ~91% of our study area is devoted to agricultural production and urbanization, transport of T. gondii into freshwater ecosystems is likely facilitated by modified drainage practices common in these areas.

  19. Detection of various freshwater cyanobacterial toxins using ultra-performance liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Oehrle, Stuart A; Southwell, Ben; Westrick, Judy

    2010-05-01

    Several freshwater cyanobacteria species have the capability to produce toxic compounds, frequently referred to as cyanotoxins. The most prevalent of these cyanotoxins is microcystin LR. Recognizing the potential health risk, France, Italy, Poland, Australia, Canada, and Brazil have set either standards or guidelines for the amount of microcystin LR permissible in drinking water based on the World Health Organization guideline of one microg/L of microcystin LR. Recently, the United States Environmental Protection Agency has begun to evaluate the occurrence and health effects of cyanotoxins and their susceptibility to water treatment under the Safe Drinking Water Act through the Contaminant Candidate List (CCL). A recent update of the Contaminant Candidate List focuses research and data collection on the cyanotoxins microcystin LR, anatoxin-a, and cylindrospermopsin. Liquid Chromatography/Tandem-Mass Spectrometry (LC/MS/MS) is a powerful tool for the analysis of various analytes in a wide variety of matrices because of its sensitivity and selectivity. The use of smaller column media (sub 2 microm particles) was investigated to both improve the speed, sensitivity and resolution, and to quantify the CCL cyanotoxins, in a single analysis, using Ultra-Performance Liquid Chromatography (UPLC) combined with tandem mass spectrometry. Natural waters and spiked samples were analyzed to show proof-of-performance. The presented method was able to clearly resolve each of the cyanotoxins in less than eight minutes with specificity and high spike recoveries.

  20. Beta-thymosin gene polymorphism associated with freshwater invasiveness of alewife (Alosa pseudoharengus)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Michalak, Katarzyna; Czesny, Sergiusz J.; Epifanio, John; Snyder, Randal J.; Schultz, Eric T.; Velotta, Jonathan P.; McCormick, Stephen D.; Brown, Bonnie L.; Santopietro, Graciela; Michalak, Pawel

    2014-01-01

    Predicting the success of a species’ colonization into a novel environment is routinely considered to be predicated on niche-space similarity and vacancy, as well as propagule pressure. The role genomic variation plays in colonization success (and the interaction with environment) may be suggested, but has not rigorously been documented. To test an hypothesis that previously observed ecotype-specific polymorphisms between anadromous and landlocked alewife (Alosa pseudoharengus) populations are an adaptive response to osmoregulatory challenges rather than a result of allele sampling at founding, we examined multiple anadromous and landlocked (colonized) populations for their allelic profiles at a conserved region (3’-UTR end) of a β-thymosin gene whose protein product plays a central role in the organization of cytoskeleton. The putatively ancestral β-thymosin allele was prevalent in anadromous populations, whereas a newly derived allele was overrepresented in landlocked populations; a third allele was exclusive to the anadromous populations. We also conducted a complementary set of salinity exposure experiments to test osmoregulatory performance of the alewife ecotypes in contrasting saline environments. The pattern of variation and results from these challenges indicate a strong association of β-thymosin with colonization success and a transition for species with an anadromous life-history to one with only a freshwater component.

  1. Arsenic Speciation in Organisms from two Large Shallow Freshwater Lakes in China.

    PubMed

    Yang, Fen; Zhang, Nan; Wei, Chaoyang; Liu, Jinxin; Xie, Shaowen

    2017-02-01

    This study measured the elemental and species concentrations of arsenic (As) in the water, sediments and food webs of two shallow Chinese freshwater lakes. Organic As species were widely detected in various organisms from the two lakes (60%-100% of the total). Among these organisms, dimethylarsinic acid (DMA) was predominant in most of the samples. The average concentrations and corresponding proportions were 0.59 mg/kg, 81% in fish; 3.24 mg/kg, 70.63% in zoobenthos; and 1.34 mg/kg, 79% in plants. The average concentrations and corresponding proportions of monomethylarsonic acid (MMA) and inorganic As were much lower, ranging from n.d. (not detected) to 1.94 mg/kg and from n.d. to 1.54 mg/kg, with an average proportion of 14 and 7.4%, respectively. In Lake Taihu, the mean As concentrations in different fish tissues were generally low and in the following order: eggs (0.47) < skin (0.62) < muscles (0.91) < gills (1.65) < livers (5.47) mg/kg. DMA occupied 75%-100% of the total As species, while MMA and inorganic As were much less prevalent.

  2. Local and Regional Determinants of an Uncommon Functional Group in Freshwater Lakes and Ponds

    PubMed Central

    McCann, Michael James

    2015-01-01

    A combination of local and regional factors and stochastic forces is expected to determine the occurrence of species and the structure of communities. However, in most cases, our understanding is incomplete, with large amounts of unexplained variation. Using functional groups rather than individual species may help explain the relationship between community composition and conditions. In this study, I used survey data from freshwater lakes and ponds to understand factors that determine the presence of the floating plant functional group in the northeast United States. Of the 176 water bodies surveyed, 104 (59.1%) did not contain any floating plant species. The occurrence of this functional group was largely determined by local abiotic conditions, which were spatially autocorrelated across the region. A model predicting the presence of the floating plant functional group performed similarly to the best species-specific models. Using a permutation test, I also found that the observed prevalence of floating plants is no different than expected by random assembly from a species pool of its size. These results suggest that the size of the species pool interacts with local conditions in determining the presence of a functional group. Nevertheless, a large amount of unexplained variation remains, attributable to either stochastic species occurrence or incomplete predictive models. The simple permutation approach in this study can be extended to test alternative models of community assembly. PMID:26121636

  3. The Microbiota of Freshwater Fish and Freshwater Niches Contain Omega-3 Fatty Acid-Producing Shewanella Species

    PubMed Central

    McGraw, Joseph E.; Jensen, Brittany J.; Bishop, Sydney S.; Lokken, James P.; Dorff, Kellen J.; Ripley, Michael P.; Munro, James B.

    2015-01-01

    Approximately 30 years ago, it was discovered that free-living bacteria isolated from cold ocean depths could produce polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) such as eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) (20:5n-3) or docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) (22:6n-3), two PUFA essential for human health. Numerous laboratories have also discovered that EPA- and/or DHA-producing bacteria, many of them members of the Shewanella genus, could be isolated from the intestinal tracts of omega-3 fatty acid-rich marine fish. If bacteria contribute omega-3 fatty acids to the host fish in general or if they assist some bacterial species in adaptation to cold, then cold freshwater fish or habitats should also harbor these producers. Thus, we undertook a study to see if these niches also contained omega-3 fatty acid producers. We were successful in isolating and characterizing unique EPA-producing strains of Shewanella from three strictly freshwater native fish species, i.e., lake whitefish (Coregonus clupeaformis), lean lake trout (Salvelinus namaycush), and walleye (Sander vitreus), and from two other freshwater nonnative fish, i.e., coho salmon (Oncorhynchus kisutch) and seeforellen brown trout (Salmo trutta). We were also able to isolate four unique free-living strains of EPA-producing Shewanella from freshwater habitats. Phylogenetic and phenotypic analyses suggest that one producer is clearly a member of the Shewanella morhuae species and another is sister to members of the marine PUFA-producing Shewanella baltica species. However, the remaining isolates have more ambiguous relationships, sharing a common ancestor with non-PUFA-producing Shewanella putrefaciens isolates rather than marine S. baltica isolates despite having a phenotype more consistent with S. baltica strains. PMID:26497452

  4. The Microbiota of Freshwater Fish and Freshwater Niches Contain Omega-3 Fatty Acid-Producing Shewanella Species.

    PubMed

    Dailey, Frank E; McGraw, Joseph E; Jensen, Brittany J; Bishop, Sydney S; Lokken, James P; Dorff, Kellen J; Ripley, Michael P; Munro, James B

    2015-10-23

    Approximately 30 years ago, it was discovered that free-living bacteria isolated from cold ocean depths could produce polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) such as eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) (20:5n-3) or docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) (22:6n-3), two PUFA essential for human health. Numerous laboratories have also discovered that EPA- and/or DHA-producing bacteria, many of them members of the Shewanella genus, could be isolated from the intestinal tracts of omega-3 fatty acid-rich marine fish. If bacteria contribute omega-3 fatty acids to the host fish in general or if they assist some bacterial species in adaptation to cold, then cold freshwater fish or habitats should also harbor these producers. Thus, we undertook a study to see if these niches also contained omega-3 fatty acid producers. We were successful in isolating and characterizing unique EPA-producing strains of Shewanella from three strictly freshwater native fish species, i.e., lake whitefish (Coregonus clupeaformis), lean lake trout (Salvelinus namaycush), and walleye (Sander vitreus), and from two other freshwater nonnative fish, i.e., coho salmon (Oncorhynchus kisutch) and seeforellen brown trout (Salmo trutta). We were also able to isolate four unique free-living strains of EPA-producing Shewanella from freshwater habitats. Phylogenetic and phenotypic analyses suggest that one producer is clearly a member of the Shewanella morhuae species and another is sister to members of the marine PUFA-producing Shewanella baltica species. However, the remaining isolates have more ambiguous relationships, sharing a common ancestor with non-PUFA-producing Shewanella putrefaciens isolates rather than marine S. baltica isolates despite having a phenotype more consistent with S. baltica strains.

  5. A physically based model of global freshwater surface temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beek, Ludovicus P. H.; Eikelboom, Tessa; Vliet, Michelle T. H.; Bierkens, Marc F. P.

    2012-09-01

    Temperature determines a range of physical properties of water and exerts a strong control on surface water biogeochemistry. Thus, in freshwater ecosystems the thermal regime directly affects the geographical distribution of aquatic species through their growth and metabolism and indirectly through their tolerance to parasites and diseases. Models used to predict surface water temperature range between physically based deterministic models and statistical approaches. Here we present the initial results of a physically based deterministic model of global freshwater surface temperature. The model adds a surface water energy balance to river discharge modeled by the global hydrological model PCR-GLOBWB. In addition to advection of energy from direct precipitation, runoff, and lateral exchange along the drainage network, energy is exchanged between the water body and the atmosphere by shortwave and longwave radiation and sensible and latent heat fluxes. Also included are ice formation and its effect on heat storage and river hydraulics. We use the coupled surface water and energy balance model to simulate global freshwater surface temperature at daily time steps with a spatial resolution of 0.5° on a regular grid for the period 1976-2000. We opt to parameterize the model with globally available data and apply it without calibration in order to preserve its physical basis with the outlook of evaluating the effects of atmospheric warming on freshwater surface temperature. We validate our simulation results with daily temperature data from rivers and lakes (U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), limited to the USA) and compare mean monthly temperatures with those recorded in the Global Environment Monitoring System (GEMS) data set. Results show that the model is able to capture the mean monthly surface temperature for the majority of the GEMS stations, while the interannual variability as derived from the USGS and NOAA data was captured reasonably well. Results are poorest for

  6. Changes in the Composition of the Fram Strait Freshwater Outflow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dodd, Paul; Granskog, Mats; Fransson, Agneta; Chierici, Melissa; Stedmon, Colin

    2016-04-01

    Fram Strait is the largest gateway and only deep connection between the Arctic Ocean and the subpolar oceans. Monitoring the exchanges through Fram Strait allows us to detect and understand current changes occurring in the Arctic Ocean and to predict the effects of those changes on the Arctic and Subarctic climate and ecosystems. Polar water, recirculating Atlantic Water and deeper water masses exported from the Arctic Ocean through western Fram Strait are monitored year-round by an array of moored instruments along 78°50'N, continuously maintained by the Norwegian Polar Institute since the 1990s. Complimentary annual hydrographic sections have been repeated along the same latitude every September. This presentation will focus on biogeochemical tracer measurements collected along repeated sections from 1997-2015, which can be used to identify freshwater from different sources and reveal the causes of variations in total volume of freshwater exported e. g.: pulses of freshwater from the Pacific. Repeated tracer sections across Fram Strait reveal significant changes in the composition of the outflow in recent years, with recent sections showing positive fractions of sea ice meltwater at the surface near the core of the EGC, suggesting that more sea ice melts back into the surface than previously. The 1997-2015 time series of measurements reveals a strong anti-correlation between run-off and net sea ice meltwater inventories, suggesting that run-off and brine may be delivered to Fram Strait together from a common source. While the freshwater outflow at Fram Strait typically exhibits a similar run-off to net sea ice meltwater ratio to the central Arctic Ocean and Siberian shelves, we find that the ratio of run-off to sea ice meltwater at Fram Strait is decreasing with time, suggesting an increased surface input of sea ice meltwater in recent years. In 2014 and 2015 measurements of salinity, δ18O and total alkalinity were collected from sea ice cores as well as the

  7. Chemical sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rauh, R. David (Inventor)

    1990-01-01

    A sensor for detecting a chemical substance includes an insertion element having a structure which enables insertion of the chemical substance with a resulting change in the bulk electrical characteristics of the insertion element under conditions sufficient to permit effective insertion; the change in the bulk electrical characteristics of the insertion element is detected as an indication of the presence of the chemical substance.

  8. [Poisonous chemicals and urolithiasis].

    PubMed

    Tynaliev, M T

    1993-01-01

    For the last 30 years urolithiasis incidence in Kirghizia has been growing. Its prevalence is the highest in Chu and Osh rural areas (89%) where farmers widely use toxic insecticides. Urban population develop the disease more often (63%), especially employees (57.7%) versus workers (27.7%). Urolithiasis occurs in workers 8 times more frequently than in farmers. Food products contain insecticides in quantities much higher than MAC. The contamination concerns fruit and vegetables in a lesser and meat, milk products in greater degrees. In renal tissue, blood, urine of urolithiasis patients concentrations of the chemicals were increased 4 times against the control samples. In renal tissue and fat of urolithiasis animals nephrotoxic insecticides levels surpassed those in the controls 2-3 times. Uroliths contain chemicals in great concentrations also. Basing on the conformity of geography of insecticides us a ge with urolithiasis epidemiological data, high concentrations of the chemicals in food and biological objects, frequent occurrence of recurrent urolithiasis in patients known to acquire high chemicals levels in renal tissue and urine, it is inferred that toxic chemicals are involved in nephrolithiasis genesis by tubular impairment.

  9. Assessing invasive plant infestation in freshwater wetlands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torbick, Nathan M.

    Recent shifts in wetland ecosystem management goals have directed efforts toward measuring ecological integrity, rather than only using physical and chemical measures of ecosystems as health indicators. Invasive species pose one of the largest threats to wetlands integrity. Resource managers can benefit from improved methods for identifying invasive plant species, assessing infestation, and monitoring control measures. The utilization of advanced remote sensing tools for species-level mapping has been increasing and techniques need to be explored for identifying species of interest and characterizing infestation. The overarching goal of this research was to develop monitoring technologies to map invasive plants and quantify wetland infestation. The first field-level objective was to characterize absorption and reflectance features and assess processing techniques for separating wetland species. The second field-level objective was to evaluate the abilities of a shape filter to identify wetland invasive plant species. The first landscape-level objective was to classify hyperspectral imagery in order to identify invasives of interest. The second landscape-level objective was to quantify infestation within the study area. Field-level hyperspectral data (350-2500nm) were collected for twenty-two wetland plant species in a wetland located in the lower Muskegon River watershed in Michigan, USA. The Jeffries-Matusita distance measure, continuum removal, and a shape-filter were applied to hyperspectral species reflectance data to characterize spectral features. Generally, continuum removal decreased separation distance for the invasive species of interest. Using the shape-filter, Lythrum salicaria, Phragmites australis, and Typha latifolia possessed maximum separation (distinguished from other species) at the near-infrared edge (700nm) and water absorption region (1350nm), the near-infrared down slope (1000 and 1100nm), and the visible/chlorophyll absorption region (500nm

  10. Freshwater flow from estuarine creeks into northeastern Florida Bay

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hittle, Clinton; Patino, Eduardo; Zucker, Mark A.

    2001-01-01

    Water-level, water-velocity, salinity, and temperature data were collected from selected estuarine creeks to compute freshwater flow into northeastern Florida Bay. Calibrated equations for determining mean velocity from acoustic velocity were obtained by developing velocity relations based on direct acoustic measurements, acoustic line velocity, and water level. Three formulas were necessary to describe flow patterns for all monitoring sites, with R2 (coefficient of determination) values ranging from 0.957 to 0.995. Cross-sectional area calculations were limited to the main channel of the creeks and did not include potential areas of overbank flow. Techniques also were used to estimate discharge at noninstrumented sites by establishing discharge relations to nearby instrumented sites. Results of the relation between flows at instrumented and noninstrumented sites varied with R2 values ranging from 0.865 to 0.99. West Highway Creek was used to estimate noninstrumented sites in Long Sound, and Mud Creek was used to estimate East Creek in Little Madeira Bay. Mean monthly flows were used to describe flow patterns and to calculate net flow along the northeastern coastline. Data used in the study were collected from October 1995 through September 1999, which includes the El Nino event of 1998. During this period, about 80 percent of the freshwater flowing into the bay occurred during the wet season (May-October). The mean freshwater discharge for all five instrumented sites during the wet season from 1996 to 1999 is 106 cubic feet per second. The El Nino event caused a substantial increase (654 percent) in mean flows during the dry season (November-April) at the instrumented sites, ranging from 8.5 cubic feet per second in 1996-97 to 55.6 cubic feet per second in 1997-98. Three main flow signatures were identified when comparing flows at all monitoring stations. The most significant was the magnitude of discharges at Trout Creek, which carries about 50 percent of the

  11. Nematode species at risk--a metric to assess pollution in soft sediments of freshwaters.

    PubMed

    Höss, S; Claus, E; Von der Ohe, P C; Brinke, M; Güde, H; Heininger, P; Traunspurger, W

    2011-07-01

    Soft sediments are often highly polluted as many of the toxic chemicals introduced into surface waters bind to settling particles. The resulting accumulation of pollutants in the sediments poses a risk for benthic communities. However, pollution induced changes in benthic communities have been difficult to determine when using macro-invertebrates as bioindicators, as these organisms are often absent in soft sediment. The present study therefore examined the ability of meiofaunal organisms, specifically, nematodes, to assess the ecological status of soft sediments. Over a 9-year period, nematode communities present in sediments collected from large rivers and lake Constance in Germany were studied. These sediments showed a large range of physico-chemical properties and anthropogenic contamination. After the degree of metal and organic contamination was translated into ecotoxicologically more relevant toxic units (TUs), multivariate methods were used to classify nematode taxa in species at risk (NemaSPEAR) or not at risk (NemaSPE(not)AR). This approach clearly distinguished the influence of sediment texture from that of the toxic potential of the samples and thus allowed classification of the nematode species according to their sensitivity to or tolerance of toxic stress. Two indices, expressing the proportion of species at risk within a sample (NemaSPEAR[%](metal), NemaSPEAR[%](organic)), were calculated from independent data sets obtained in field and experimental studies and showed good correlations with the toxic potential (field data) or chemical concentrations (microcosm data). NemaSPEAR[%] indices for metal and organic pollution were therefore judged to be suitable for assessing the impact of chemical contamination of freshwater soft sediments.

  12. In vivo indirect measurement of cytochrome P450-associated activities in freshwater gastropod molluscs.

    PubMed

    Gagnaire, Beatrice; Geffard, Olivier; Noury, Patrice; Garric, Jeanne

    2010-12-01

    The cytochrome P450 (CYP) system is widely distributed across phyla and plays a key role in the metabolism of xenobiotic compounds. However, most studies on CYP system were developed on vertebrates and among invertebrates, gastropod molluscs are rarely used. In this context, ethoxycoumarin-O-deethylase (ECOD), ethoxyresorufin-O-deethylase (EROD), and pentoxyresorufin-O-dealkylase (PROD) activities, which are indirect measurements of CYP system, were characterized in two freshwater gastropod molluscs, Potamopyrgus antipodarum, and Valvata piscinalis, to ascertain their potential interest as biomarkers of exposure to chemicals. Activities were measured using an in vivo non lethal method based on the measurement of formed product (resorufin or hydroxycoumarin). This in vivo assay allowed to measure the three activities in P. antipodarum and two of them (ECOD and PROD) in V. piscinalis. The detection of activities and the optimization of experimental design were carried out first and allowed to measure the selected activities for one individual. The modulation of the detected activities was secondly assessed using a polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (Benzo(a)pyrene). Based on this non destructive measurement, effect of BaP exposure could be detected on ECOD and EROD activity in P. antipodarum, as well on PROD activity of V. piscinalis after 96 h of exposure. Such an in vivo assay must be further developed to be valuably used to screen the exposure of gastropod species to CYP inducer chemicals and its consequences in terms of fitness of the organisms and of the population.

  13. Relationship between solubility and toxicity of coal liquefaction materials to the freshwater crustacean, Daphnia magna

    SciTech Connect

    Dauble, D.D.; Gray, R.H.; Scott, A.J.; Thomas, B.L.

    1985-11-01

    The potential ecological risk from complex coal liquids that may be released to freshwater ecosystems is ultimately dependent on both the degree of solubility of parent material and the toxic properties of constitutent compounds that an organism is exposed to. Thus, highly water-soluble components that remain bioavailable and are present in the water column at acutely toxic concentrations pose a problem for many aquatic organisms. We screened coal liquids derived from several processes and under different process designs to evaluate the acute toxicity of their water-soluble fractions (WSFs) to Daphnia magna. The solubility of materials treated varied and WSFs ranged from 44 to 2260 mg/L total carbon (TC). The most soluble materials in water exhibited greater toxicity based on percent dilution of the WSF. However, toxicity was similar for all materials tested when based on soluble components (TC in solution). Chemical characterization of the WSFs indicated that phenols comprised the majority of the TC in solution. Because toxicity based on total phenols was generally greater than that for individual phenolics tested separately, other soluble chemical classes in the complex mixtures likely contribute to observed toxicity.

  14. Toxicity tests based on predator-prey and competitive interactions between freshwater macroinvertebrates

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, E.J.; Blockwell, S.J.; Pascoe, D.

    1994-12-31

    Simple multi-species toxicity tests based on the predation of Daphnia magna Straus by Hydra oligactis (Pallas) and competition between Gammarus pulex (L.) and Asellus aquaticus (L.) were used to determine the effects of three reference chemicals. Criteria examined included functional responses; time to first captures; handling times (predator/prey systems) and co-existence and growth. The tests which proved most practicable and sensitive (lowest observed effects 0.1, 21, and 80 {micro}g/l for lindane, copper and 3,4 dichloroaniline, respectively) were: (1) predator-prey tests: determining changes in the size-structure of predated D. magna populations and (2) competition tests: measuring the feeding rate of G. pulex competing with A. aquaticus, using a bioassay based on the time-response analysis of the consumption of Artemia salina eggs. The concentration of a chemical which affected particular response criteria was fond to depend on the test system employed. Results of the tests indicated that effects were often not dose-related and that a given criterion could be variously affected by different test concentrations. The complex pattern of responses may be explained in terms of the differential sensitivity of the interacting species and perhaps subtle alteration in strategies. The sensitivity of the bioassay endpoints is compared to those of a range of single species tests, and their value for predicting the impact pollutants may have upon natural freshwater ecosystems is discussed.

  15. Chemoreception of hunger levels alters the following behaviour of a freshwater snail.

    PubMed

    Larcher, Marie; Crane, Adam L

    2015-12-01

    Chemically-mediated orientation is essential for many animals that must locate sites containing resources such as mates or food. One way to find these areas is by using publically-available information from other individuals. We tested a freshwater snail, Physa gyrina, for chemoreception of conspecific cues and predicted they could discriminate between cues based on information regarding hunger levels. We placed 'tracker' snails into a 2-arm arena where they could either follow or avoid an area previously used by a 'marker' snail. The hunger levels of both trackers and markers was manipulated, being either starved or fed. Starved and fed trackers did not differ in their following response when markers were hungry, but starved trackers were significantly more likely to follow fed markers, compared to fed trackers that tended to avoid areas used by fed markers. This outcome suggests that P. gyrina uses conspecific chemical cues to find food and potentially in some situations to avoid intra-specific food competition.

  16. Freshwater runoff and salinity distribution in the Loxahatchee River estuary, southeastern Florida, 1980-1982

    SciTech Connect

    Russell, G.M.; McPherson, B.F.

    1984-01-01

    During a recent study, freshwater mixed with seawater over a distance of 5 to 10 river miles in the Loxahatchee River estuary. Large freshwater inflows vertically stratified the estuary and shifted the mixing zone seaward. In the northwest fork of the estuary, the saltwater-freshwater interface moved daily about 0.5 to 1.5 river miles as a result of tides and annually about 3 to 5 miles as a result of seasonal changes in freshwater inflow. In the southwest fork, saltwater movement upstream was blocked by a gate and dam structure in Canal-18, 4.7 miles upstream from the Atlantic Ocean. Although Canal-18 discharged about one-third of the total freshwater tributary inflow to the estuary, the effects of canal discharge on salinity were limited to relatively brief periods. Much of the time, no freshwater was discharged. 15 refs., 21 figs., 4 tabs.

  17. Terrestrial freshwater lenses in stable riverine settings: Occurrence and controlling factors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Werner, Adrian D.; Laattoe, Tariq

    2016-05-01

    Rivers in arid and semiarid regions often traverse saline aquifers, creating buoyant freshwater lenses in the adjoining riparian and floodplain zones. The occurrence of freshwater lenses where the river is otherwise gaining saline groundwater appears counterintuitive, given that both hydraulic and density forces act toward the river. In this paper, an analytical solution is presented that defines the extent of a stable, sharp-interface terrestrial freshwater lens (in cross section) in a riverine environment that otherwise contains saline groundwater moving toward the river. The method is analogous to the situation of an island freshwater lens, except in the riverine setting, the saltwater is mobile and the lens is assumed to be stagnant. The solution characterizes the primary controlling factors of riverine freshwater lenses, which are larger for situations involving lower hydraulic conductivities and rates of saltwater discharge to the river. Deeper aquifers, more transmissive riverbeds, and larger freshwater-saltwater density differences produce more extensive lenses. The analytical solution predicts the parameter combinations that preclude the occurrence of freshwater lenses. The utility of the solution as a screening method to predict the occurrence of terrestrial freshwater lenses is demonstrated by application to parameter ranges typical of the South Australian portion of the River Murray, where freshwater lenses occur in only a portion of the neighboring floodplains. Despite assumptions of equilibrium conditions and a sharp freshwater-saltwater interface, the solution for predicting the occurrence of riverine freshwater lenses presented in this study has immediate relevance to the management of floodplains in which freshwater lenses are integral to biophysical conditions.

  18. Alkaline Phosphatase Assay for Freshwater Sediments: Application to Perturbed Sediment Systems

    PubMed Central

    Sayler, Gary S.; Puziss, Marla; Silver, Martin

    1979-01-01

    The p-nitrophenyl phosphate hydrolysis-phosphatase assay was modified for use in freshwater sediment. Laboratory studies indicated that the recovery of purified alkaline phosphatase activity was 100% efficient in sterile freshwater sediments when optimized incubation and sonication conditions were used. Field studies of diverse freshwater sediments demonstrated the potential use of this assay for determining stream perturbation. Significant correlations between phosphatase and total viable cell counts, as well as adenosine triphosphate biomass, suggested that alkaline phosphatase activity has utility as an indicator of microbial population density and biomass in freshwater sediments. PMID:16345464

  19. Fish communities in coastal freshwater ecosystems: the role of the physical and chemical setting

    PubMed Central

    Arend, Kristin K; Bain, Mark B

    2008-01-01

    Background We explored how embayment watershed inputs, morphometry, and hydrology influence fish community structure among eight embayments located along the southeastern shoreline of Lake Ontario, New York, USA. Embayments differed in surface area and depth, varied in their connections to Lake Ontario and their watersheds, and drained watersheds representing a gradient of agricultural to forested land use. Results We related various physicochemical factors, including total phosphorus load, embayment area, and submerged vegetation, to differences in fish species diversity and community relative abundance, biomass, and size structure both among and within embayments. Yellow perch (Perca flavescens) and centrarchids numerically dominated most embayment fish communities. Biomass was dominated by piscivorous fishes including brown bullhead (Ameiurus nebulosus), bowfin (Amia calva), and northern pike (Esox lucius). Phosphorus loading influenced relative biomass, but not species diversity or relative abundance. Fish relative abundance differed among embayments; within embayments, fish abundance at individual sampling stations increased significantly with submerged vegetative cover. Relative biomass differed among embayments and was positively related to total phophorus loading and embayment area. Fish community size structure, based on size spectra analysis, differed among embayments, with the frequency of smaller-bodied fishes positively related to percent vegetation. Conclusion The importance of total phosphorus loading and vegetation in structuring fish communities has implications for anthropogenic impacts to embayment fish communities through activities such as farming and residential development, reduction of cultural eutrophication, and shoreline development and maintenance. PMID:19114002

  20. Acute sensitivity of freshwater mollusks to select chemicals with various toxic modes of action

    EPA Science Inventory

    Nearly 70% of the 300 unionid mussel species in North America are endangered, threatened, of special concern, or already extinct. Environmental contamination has been identified as a causal or contributing factor to these declines of mussel populations. Previous studies indicate ...

  1. Effects of chemical additives on hydrocarbon disappearance and biodegradation in freshwater marsh microcosms.

    PubMed

    Nyman, J A; Klerks, P L; Bhattacharyya, S

    2007-09-01

    We determined how a cleaner and a dispersant affected hydrocarbon biodegradation in wetland soils dominated by the plant Panicum hemitomon, which occurs throughout North and South America. Microcosms received no hydrocarbons, South Louisiana crude, or diesel; and no additive, a dispersant, or a cleaner. We determined the concentration of four total petroleum hydrocarbon (TPH) measures and 43 target hydrocarbons in water and sediment fractions 1, 7, 31, and 186 days later. Disappearance was distinguished from biodegradation via hopane-normalization. After 186 days, TPH disappearance ranged from 24% to 97%. There was poor correlation among the four TPH measures, which indicated that each quantified a different suite of hydrocarbons. Hydrocarbon disappearance and biodegradation were unaltered by these additives under worse-case scenarios. Any use of these additives must generate benefits that outweigh the lack of effect on biodegradation demonstrated in this report, and the increase in toxicity that we reported earlier.

  2. Chemical burns

    PubMed Central

    Cartotto, Robert C.; Peters, Walter J.; Neligan, Peter C.; Douglas, Leith G.; Beeston, Jeff

    1996-01-01

    Objectives To report a burn unit’s experience with chemical burns and to discuss the fundamental principles in managing chemical burns. Design A chart review. Setting A burn centre at a major university-affiliated hospital. Patients Twenty-four patients with chemical burns, representing 2.6% of all burn admissions over an 8-year period at the Ross Tilley Regional Adult Burn Centre. Seventy-five percent of the burn injuries were work-related accidents. Chemicals involved included hydrofluoric acid, sulfuric acid, black liquor, various lyes, potassium permanganate and phenol. Results Fourteen patients required excision and skin grafting. Complications were frequent and included ocular chemical contacts, wound infections, tendon exposures, toe amputation and systemic reactions from absorption of chemical. One patient died from a chemical scald burn to 98% of the body surface area. Conclusions The key principles in the management of chemical burns include removal of the chemical, copious irrigation, limited use of antidotes, correct estimation of the extent of injury, identification of systemic toxicity, treatment of ocular contacts and management of chemical inhalation injury. Individualized treatment is emphasized. PMID:8640619

  3. Using growth measures in the freshwater shrimp Caridina nilotica as biomarkers of Roundup® pollution of South African freshwater systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mensah, P. K.; Muller, W. J.; Palmer, C. G.

    There has been global concern about the effect of toxic chemicals on aquatic biota due to the upsurge in contamination of aquatic ecosystems by these chemicals, which includes pesticides. Roundup® and other glyphosate-based herbicides are frequently used in the chemical control of weeds and invading alien plant species in South Africa. These bio-active chemicals ultimately get into water courses directly or indirectly through processes such as drifting, leaching, surface runoff and foliar spray of aquatic nuisance plants. However, there is no South African water quality guideline to protect indigenous freshwater non-target organisms from the toxic effects of glyphosate-based herbicides. This study evaluated the possible use of growth measures in Caridina nilotica as biomarkers of Roundup® pollution as part of developing glyphosate water quality guideline for the protection of aquatic life in South Africa. Using static-renewal methods in a 25-day growth toxicity test, 40 days post hatch shrimps were exposed to different sub-lethal Roundup® concentrations of 0.0 (control), 2.2, 2.8, 3.4, 4.3 and 5.4 mg/L. Shrimps were fed daily with TetraMin® flake food and test solutions changed every third day. Shrimp total lengths and wet weights were measured every fifth day. These data were used to determine the shrimp’s growth performance and feed utilization in terms of percent weight gain (PWG), percent length gain (PLG), specific growth rate (SGR), condition factor (CF), feed intake (FI), feed conversion ratio (FCR) and feed conversion efficiency (FCE). Moulting was observed for 14 days and the data used to determine the daily moult rate for each concentration. Results of growth performance and food utilization indices showed that growth was significantly impaired in all exposed groups compared to control (p < 0.05). Moulting frequency was also higher in all exposed groups than in control (p < 0.05). Although all the tested growth measures proved to be possible

  4. [Chemical weapons and chemical terrorism].

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Katsumi

    2005-10-01

    Chemical Weapons are kind of Weapons of Mass Destruction (WMD). They were used large quantities in WWI. Historically, large quantities usage like WWI was not recorded, but small usage has appeared now and then. Chemical weapons are so called "Nuclear weapon for poor countrys" because it's very easy to produce/possession being possible. They are categorized (1) Nerve Agents, (2) Blister Agents, (3) Cyanide (blood) Agents, (4) Pulmonary Agents, (5) Incapacitating Agents (6) Tear Agents from the viewpoint of human body interaction. In 1997 the Chemical Weapons Convention has taken effect. It prohibits chemical weapons development/production, and Organization for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons (OPCW) verification regime contributes to the chemical weapons disposal. But possibility of possession/use of weapons of mass destruction by terrorist group represented in one by Matsumoto and Tokyo Subway Sarin Attack, So new chemical terrorism countermeasures are necessary.

  5. A comparative analysis of metacommunity types in the freshwater realm.

    PubMed

    Heino, Jani; Soininen, Janne; Alahuhta, Janne; Lappalainen, Jyrki; Virtanen, Risto

    2015-04-01

    Most metacommunity studies have taken a direct mechanistic approach, aiming to model the effects of local and regional processes on local communities within a metacommunity. An alternative approach is to focus on emergent patterns at the metacommunity level through applying the elements of metacommunity structure (EMS; Oikos, 97, 2002, 237) analysis. The EMS approach has very rarely been applied in the context of a comparative analysis of metacommunity types of main microbial, plant, and animal groups. Furthermore, to our knowledge, no study has associated metacommunity types with their potential ecological correlates in the freshwater realm. We assembled data for 45 freshwater metacommunities, incorporating biologically highly disparate organismal groups (i.e., bacteria, algae, macrophytes, invertebrates, and fish). We first examined ecological correlates (e.g., matrix properties, beta diversity, and average characteristics of a metacommunity, including body size, trophic group, ecosystem type, life form, and dispersal mode) of the three elements of metacommunity structure (i.e., coherence, turnover, and boundary clumping). Second, based on those three elements, we determined which metacommunity types prevailed in freshwater systems and which ecological correlates best discriminated among the observed metacommunity types. We found that the three elements of metacommunity structure were not strongly related to the ecological correlates, except that turnover was positively related to beta diversity. We observed six metacommunity types. The most common were Clementsian and quasi-nested metacommunity types, whereas Random, quasi-Clementsian, Gleasonian, and quasi-Gleasonian types were less common. These six metacommunity types were best discriminated by beta diversity and the first axis of metacommunity ecological traits, ranging from metacommunities of producer organisms occurring in streams to those of large predatory organisms occurring in lakes. Our results showed

  6. Cryosat-2 thickness retrievals of freshwater lake ice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beckers, J. F.; Casey, J. A.; Haas, C.

    2014-12-01

    The European Space Agency's (ESA) Cryosat mission was launched to improve our knowledge of the trends in the thickness of sea ice and glaciers. The new Synthetic Aperture processing method allows for significantly enhanced along-track resolution compared to traditional pulse-limited radar altimeters. Satellite observations have revealed rapid changes in the duration of the seasonal snow and ice cover of subarctic lakes. The often smooth, homogeneous ice cover of lakes is an excellent target for detailed studies of radar altimeter and imaging radar backscatter behavior. Furthermore, there is only limited information available regarding the changes in ice thickness of these lakes. Here we present and validate a method to retrieve the thickness of lake ice using CryoSat L1B data. In contrast to sea ice measurements where ice thickness is derived from isostatic freeboard retrievals, we obtain ice thickness from radar returns from both the ice surface and bottom, assuming that CryoSat's Ku-band radar pulses can penetrate through freshwater ice. The seasonal evolution of ice thickness of Great Bear Lake and Great Slave Lake, two large lakes in northern Canada, thus observed is compared to in-situ measurements, SAR imagery, scatterometer data, the results of a freezing-degree-day model, and previous studies. These confirm that the Ku-band signal often penetrates through the low-loss freshwater ice and is scattered from both the snow/ice and the ice/water interfaces. We examine the data for scattering from within the snow pack and the ice as this introduces uncertainty in the retrieval of ice thickness by masking the signal from snow/ice or ice/water interfaces. Although not designed for freshwater lake ice studies, CryoSat-2 and future SAR/SARIN mode satellite altimeter missions offer new possibilities to monitor Arctic and sub-Arctic lakes.

  7. In-Depth Tanscriptomic Analysis on Giant Freshwater Prawns

    PubMed Central

    Mohd-Shamsudin, Maizatul Izzah; Kang, Yi; Lili, Zhao; Tan, Tian Tian; Kwong, Qi Bin; Liu, Hang; Zhang, Guojie; Othman, Rofina Yasmin; Bhassu, Subha

    2013-01-01

    Gene discovery in the Malaysian giant freshwater prawn (Macrobrachium rosenbergii) has been limited to small scale data collection, despite great interest in various research fields related to the commercial significance of this species. Next generation sequencing technologies that have been developed recently and enabled whole transcriptome sequencing (RNA-seq), have allowed generation of large scale functional genomics data sets in a shorter time than was previously possible. Using this technology, transcriptome sequencing of three tissue types: hepatopancreas, gill and muscle, has been undertaken to generate functional genomics data for M. rosenbergii at a massive scale. De novo assembly of 75-bp paired end Ilumina reads has generated 102,230 unigenes. Sequence homology search and in silico prediction have identified known and novel protein coding candidate genes (∼24%), non-coding RNA, and repetitive elements in the transcriptome. Potential markers consisting of simple sequence repeats associated with known protein coding genes have been successfully identified. Using KEGG pathway enrichment, differentially expressed genes in different tissues were systematically represented. The functions of gill and hepatopancreas in the context of neuroactive regulation, metabolism, reproduction, environmental stress and disease responses are described and support relevant experimental studies conducted previously in M. rosenbergii and other crustaceans. This large scale gene discovery represents the most extensive transcriptome data for freshwater prawn. Comparison with model organisms has paved the path to address the possible conserved biological entities shared between vertebrates and crustaceans. The functional genomics resources generated from this study provide the basis for constructing hypotheses for future molecular research in the freshwater shrimp. PMID:23734171

  8. Urban microbial ecology of a freshwater estuary of Lake Michigan

    PubMed Central

    Fisher, Jenny C.; Newton, Ryan J.; Dila, Deborah K.

    2015-01-01

    Freshwater estuaries throughout the Great Lakes region receive stormwater runoff and riverine inputs from heavily urbanized population centers. While human and animal feces contained in this runoff are often the focus of source tracking investigations, non-fecal bacterial loads from soil, aerosols, urban infrastructure, and other sources are also transported to estuaries and lakes. We quantified and characterized this non-fecal urban microbial component using bacterial 16S rRNA gene sequences from sewage, stormwater, rivers, harbor/estuary, and the lake surrounding Milwaukee, WI, USA. Bacterial communities from each of these environments had a distinctive composition, but some community members were shared among environments. We used a statistical biomarker discovery tool to identify the components of the microbial community that were most strongly associated with stormwater and sewage to describe an “urban microbial signature,” and measured the presence and relative abundance of these organisms in the rivers, estuary, and lake. This urban signature increased in magnitude in the estuary and harbor with increasing rainfall levels, and was more apparent in lake samples with closest proximity to the Milwaukee estuary. The dominant bacterial taxa in the urban signature were Acinetobacter, Aeromonas, and Pseudomonas, which are organisms associated with pipe infrastructure and soil and not typically found in pelagic freshwater environments. These taxa were highly abundant in stormwater and sewage, but sewage also contained a high abundance of Arcobacter and Trichococcus that appeared in lower abundance in stormwater outfalls and in trace amounts in aquatic environments. Urban signature organisms comprised 1.7% of estuary and harbor communities under baseflow conditions, 3.5% after rain, and >10% after a combined sewer overflow. With predicted increases in urbanization across the Great Lakes, further alteration of freshwater communities is likely to occur with

  9. Upper thermal tolerances of early life stages of freshwater mussels

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pandolfo, Tamara J.; Cope, W. Gregory; Arellano, Consuelo; Bringolf, Robert B.; Barnhart, M. Christopher; Hammer, E

    2010-01-01

    Freshwater mussels (order Unioniformes) fulfill an essential role in benthic aquatic communities, but also are among the most sensitive and rapidly declining faunal groups in North America. Rising water temperatures, caused by global climate change, industrial discharges, drought, or land development, could further challenge imperiled unionid communities. The aim of our study was to determine the upper thermal tolerances of the larval (glochidia) and juvenile life stages of freshwater mussels. Glochidia of 8 species of mussels were tested: Lampsilis siliquoidea, Potamilus alatus, Ligumia recta, Ellipsaria lineolata,Lasmigona complanata, Megalonaias nervosa, Alasmidonta varicosa, and Villosa delumbis. Seven of these species also were tested as juveniles. Survival trends were monitored while mussels held at 3 acclimation temperatures (17, 22, and 27°C) were exposed to a range of common and extreme water temperatures (20–42°C) in standard acute laboratory tests. The average median lethal temperature (LT50) among species in 24-h tests with glochidia was 31.6°C and ranged from 21.4 to 42.7°C. The mean LT50 in 96-h juvenile tests was 34.7°C and ranged from 32.5 to 38.8°C. Based on comparisons of LT50s, thermal tolerances differed among species for glochidia, but not for juveniles. Acclimation temperature did not affect thermal tolerance for either life stage. Our results indicate that freshwater mussels already might be living close to their upper thermal tolerances in some systems and, thus, might be at risk from rising environmental temperatures.

  10. Urban microbial ecology of a freshwater estuary of Lake Michigan.

    PubMed

    Fisher, Jenny C; Newton, Ryan J; Dila, Deborah K; McLellan, Sandra L

    Freshwater estuaries throughout the Great Lakes region receive stormwater runoff and riverine inputs from heavily urbanized population centers. While human and animal feces contained in this runoff are often the focus of source tracking investigations, non-fecal bacterial loads from soil, aerosols, urban infrastructure, and other sources are also transported to estuaries and lakes. We quantified and characterized this non-fecal urban microbial component using bacterial 16S rRNA gene sequences from sewage, stormwater, rivers, harbor/estuary, and the lake surrounding Milwaukee, WI, USA. Bacterial communities from each of these environments had a distinctive composition, but some community members were shared among environments. We used a statistical biomarker discovery tool to identify the components of the microbial community that were most strongly associated with stormwater and sewage to describe an "urban microbial signature," and measured the presence and relative abundance of these organisms in the rivers, estuary, and lake. This urban signature increased in magnitude in the estuary and harbor with increasing rainfall levels, and was more apparent in lake samples with closest proximity to the Milwaukee estuary. The dominant bacterial taxa in the urban signature were Acinetobacter, Aeromonas, and Pseudomonas, which are organisms associated with pipe infrastructure and soil and not typically found in pelagic freshwater environments. These taxa were highly abundant in stormwater and sewage, but sewage also contained a high abundance of Arcobacter and Trichococcus that appeared in lower abundance in stormwater outfalls and in trace amounts in aquatic environments. Urban signature organisms comprised 1.7% of estuary and harbor communities under baseflow conditions, 3.5% after rain, and >10% after a combined sewer overflow. With predicted increases in urbanization across the Great Lakes, further alteration of freshwater communities is likely to occur with potential

  11. Growth dynamic of Naegleria fowleri in a microbial freshwater biofilm.

    PubMed

    Goudot, Sébastien; Herbelin, Pascaline; Mathieu, Laurence; Soreau, Sylvie; Banas, Sandrine; Jorand, Frédéric

    2012-09-01

    The presence of pathogenic free-living amoebae (FLA) such as Naegleria fowleri in freshwater environments is a potential public health risk. Although its occurrence in various water sources has been well reported, its presence and associated factors in biofilm remain unknown. In this study, the density of N. fowleri in biofilms spontaneously growing on glass slides fed by raw freshwater were followed at 32 °C and 42 °C for 45 days. The biofilms were collected with their substrata and characterized for their structure, numbered for their bacterial density, thermophilic free-living amoebae, and pathogenic N. fowleri. The cell density of N. fowleri within the biofilms was significantly affected both by the temperature and the nutrient level (bacteria/amoeba ratio). At 32 °C, the density remained constantly low (1-10 N. fowleri/cm(2)) indicating that the amoebae were in a survival state, whereas at 42 °C the density reached 30-900 N. fowleri/cm(2) indicating an active growth phase. The nutrient level, as well, strongly affected the apparent specific growth rate (μ) of N. fowleri in the range of 0.03-0.23 h(-1). At 42 °C a hyperbolic relationship was found between μ and the bacteria/amoeba ratio. A ratio of 10(6) to 10(7) bacteria/amoeba was needed to approach the apparent μ(max) value (0.23 h(-1)). Data analysis also showed that a threshold for the nutrient level of close to 10(4) bacteria/amoeba is needed to detect the growth of N. fowleri in freshwater biofilm. This study emphasizes the important role of the temperature and bacteria as prey to promote not only the growth of N. fowleri, but also its survival.

  12. Walking the tightrope: trends in African freshwater systematic ichthyology.

    PubMed

    Skelton, P H; Swartz, E R

    2011-12-01

    Africa is blessed with an abundance and rich diversity of freshwater fishes, reflecting its Gondwanan history and geographical position astride the equator. Africa is, however, relatively poorly serviced scientifically, in this respect presenting a challenge to the tension between conserving biodiversity and sustainable development. Biosystematics has experienced several paradigm shifts in the past half century, including the rise of cladistics and more recently the adoption of molecular DNA applications to taxonomy and phylogeny and the assembly and manipulation of large data sets in an era of major development of bioinformatics. The richness of African biodiversity is a magnet to the global systematic community that, to a degree, offsets the disadvantage of an impoverished indigenous scientific capacity. Conservation biology, however, is rooted more closely to the local situation and therefore requires indigenous taxonomic services that are inevitably scarce. Balancing this network of tensions between scientific knowledge generation and application is like walking a tightrope for existing African scientific resources, and to cope it is essential to embrace modern innovative approaches such as barcoding to identify organisms. This paper considers the historical development of African freshwater ichthyology, presents a suite of recent examples illustrating trends in systematic ichthyology in Africa and draws conclusions to suggest that both traditional and new-age approaches to taxonomy are necessary for a complete understanding and appreciation of African freshwater fish diversity and its conservation. The chosen examples also suggest that the tensions between the approaches can be effectively managed provided exponents work collaboratively. The emerging evidence indicates that the combined skills and insight of complex scientific teams including systematists, ecologists, molecular biologists and earth scientists are needed to resolve the deep complexity of

  13. Critically evaluating best management practices for preventing freshwater turtle extinctions.

    PubMed

    Spencer, R J; Van Dyke, J U; Thompson, Michael B

    2017-03-20

    Ex situ conservation tools, such as captive breeding for reintroduction, are considered last resort to help recover threatened or endangered species. However, they may also provide alternative strategies where reducing threats directly is difficult or ineffective. Headstarting, or captive rearing of eggs or neonate animals and subsequent release into the wild, has been controversial for decades. A major criticism is that headstarting is a symptomatic treatment of conservation problems (halfway technology), however, it may provide a mechanism to address multiple threats, particularly in close proximity of population centres. Here we conduct Population Viability Analyses (PVA) to assess the risk of extinction of Australia's most widespread freshwater turtle, Chelodina longicollis, to increasing adult road mortality and reduced recruitment through nest predation from introduced foxes. We also model a range of management scenarios to test the effectiveness of headstarting, fox management, and measures that reduce adult road mortality. We show that headstarting should be a primary tool for managing freshwater turtles under threats that affect multiple life history stages. Headstarting from harvest populations were the only scenarios that eliminated all risks of extinction, while also maintaining population growth. Small increments in adult mortality have greatest effect on population growth and extinction risk, however, where threats simultaneously affect other life history stages (e.g.. recruitment), eliminating harvest pressures on adult females alone will not eliminate the risk of population extinction. In our models, one harvest population could supply enough hatchlings to supplement 25 other similar sized populations at an annual rate to maintain population growth and eliminate the risk of population extinction. We advocate the creation of harvest populations for managing freshwater turtles facing significant threats to multiple life history stages. This article is

  14. Formation of dimethyl sulfide and methanethiol in anoxic freshwater sediments.

    PubMed

    Lomans, B P; Smolders, A; Intven, L M; Pol, A; Op, D; Van Der Drift, C

    1997-12-01

    Concentrations of volatile organic sulfur compounds (VOSC) were measured in water and sediment columns of ditches in a minerotrophic peatland in The Netherlands. VOSC, with methanethiol (4 to 40 nM) as the major compound, appeared to be mainly of sediment origin. Both VOSC and hydrogen sulfide concentrations decreased dramatically towards the water surface. High methanethiol and high dimethyl sulfide concentrations in the sediment and just above the sediment surface coincided with high concentrations of hydrogen sulfide (correlation factors, r = 0.91 and r = 0.81, respectively). Production and degradation of VOSC were studied in 32 sediment slurries collected from various freshwater systems in The Netherlands. Maximal endogenous methanethiol production rates of the sediments tested (up to 1.44 (mu)mol per liter of sediment slurry (middot) day(sup-1)) were determined after inhibition of methanogenic and sulfate-reducing populations in order to stop VOSC degradation. These experiments showed that the production and degradation of VOSC in sediments are well balanced. Statistical analysis revealed multiple relationships of methanethiol production rates with the combination of methane production rates (indicative of total anaerobic mineralization) and hydrogen sulfide concentrations (r = 0.90) or with the combination of methane production rates and the sulfate/iron ratios in the sediment (r = 0.82). These findings and the observed stimulation of methanethiol formation in sediment slurry incubations in which the hydrogen sulfide concentrations were artificially increased provided strong evidence that the anaerobic methylation of hydrogen sulfide is the main mechanism for VOSC formation in most freshwater systems. Methoxylated aromatic compounds are likely a major source of methyl groups for this methylation of hydrogen sulfide, since they are important degradation products of the abundant biopolymer lignin. Increased sulfate concentrations in several freshwater

  15. Chemical microsensors

    SciTech Connect

    Li, DeQuan; Swanson, Basil I.

    1995-01-01

    An article of manufacture is provided including a substrate having an oxide surface layer and a selective thin film of a cyclodextrin derivative chemically bound upon said substrate, said film is adapted for the inclusion of a selected organic compound therewith. Such an article can be either a chemical sensor capable of detecting a resultant mass change from inclusion of the selected organic compound or a chemical separator capable of reversibly selectively separating a selected organic compound.

  16. Collecting and Preserving Marine and Freshwater Isopoda (Crustacea: Peracarida)

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Background Isopoda are the most diverse Crustacea. In order to encourage the study of isopod crustaceans and their use in biodiversity studies, systematics, ecology, physiology and more, one needs to know who the isopods are and where to find them. New information This is a short “how to” guide focusing on the free-living marine and freshwater isopods: where they live and how to collect and preserve them. The tools and techniques described here are simple, but invaluable in accessing the natural history of these remarkable creatures. PMID:26023284

  17. Variation in freshwater input to the Eastern US coastal ecosystem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, D.; Yoon, Y.; Beighley, E., II; Hughes, R.; Kimbro, D.

    2014-12-01

    Phragmites is one of the most invasive plants in North American wetlands. Although its spread in coastal marshes has been linked by independent studies to urbanization, eutrophication, and salinity change, there is good evidence that these factors may interactively determine invasion success and in turn, the ecosystem services provided by marshes. We hypothesize that the invasion of Phragmites is linked to changes in freshwater inputs due to climate and/or land use change. El Nino/Southern Oscillation (ENSO), originating in the sea surface temperature anomalies (warm or cold) in the eastern tropical Pacific Ocean, is a notable and prominent signal in inter-annual climatic variation. Recent studies shows that the probability of strong El Nino events may increase in the future. In this study, we will investigate the teleconnections between freshwater inputs to the coastal zone along the eastern U.S. and ENSO indices, and attempt to explore the predictability of temporal and spatial variation of freshwater inputs based on ENSO conditions. To quantify changes in freshwater input in this region, hydrologic modeling, remote sensing and field measurements are combined. The Hillslope River Routing (HRR) model is used to simulate hourly streamflow from all watersheds from southern Florida to northern Maine draining into the Atlantic Ocean. The modeling effort utilizes satellite precipitation (Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission Product 3B42v7: 2001-current with a 3-hr temporal resolution and 0.25 degree spatial resolution), land surface temperature and vegetation measures (Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer, MODIS, products: 2001-current with a monthly temporal resolution and 0.05 degree spatial resolution). To account for land cover change, annual MODIS land cover data and time varying population statics are merged to estimate annual land cover characteristics for each sub-catchment within the study region. Static datasets for soils and ground elevations are

  18. Selective and universal primers for trematode barcoding in freshwater snails.

    PubMed

    Routtu, J; Grunberg, D; Izhar, R; Dagan, Y; Guttel, Y; Ucko, M; Ben-Ami, F

    2014-07-01

    Trematodes are significant pathogens of high medical, veterinary, and environmental importance. They are hard to isolate from their intermediate hosts, and their early life stages are difficult to identify morphologically. Therefore, primers were developed for trematodes to create a species barcoding system and allow selective PCR amplification in mixed samples. The specific oligonucleotide primer was universal for trematodes that infected several freshwater snail species in Israel. The diagnostic tool is based on the 18S rDNA gene. In contrast to morphological identification, trematode barcoding is rapid as it is based on a sequence of only 800 bp, and it classifies species accurately due to high polymorphism between conserved areas.

  19. A Freshwater Starvation Mechanism for Dansgaard-Oeschger Cycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolff, E. W.; Hewitt, I.; Fowler, A.; Clark, C.; Evatt, G. W.; Munday, D. R.; Stokes, C.

    2014-12-01

    Many northern hemisphere climate records, particularly those from around the North Atlantic, show a series of rapid climate changes that recurred on centennial to millennial timescales throughout most of the last glacial period. These Dansgaard-Oeschger (D-O) sequences are observed most prominently in Greenland ice cores, although they have a global signature, including an out of phase Antarctic signal. They consist of warming jumps of order 10°C, occurring in typically 40 years, followed generally by a slow cooling (Greenland Interstadial, GI) lasting between a few centuries and a few millennia, and then a final rapid temperature drop into a cold Greenland Stadial (GS) that lasts for a similar period. The most distinctive feature of D-O cycles is the rapid warming event, often attributed to a sudden change in the strength of the Atlantic meridional overturning circulation (AMOC). Recent work has suggested that AMOC is most easily disrupted by freshwater delivered through the Arctic. We suggest that the proposed AMOC changes may have occurred as part of a natural oscillation, in which runoff from the Laurentide ice sheet into the Arctic is controlled by temperature around the North Atlantic. The Arctic buffers the salinity changes, but under warm conditions, high runoff eventually leads to water entering the North Atlantic with low enough salinity to switch AMOC into its weaker state. Under the colder conditions now prevailing, the Arctic is starved of runoff, and the salinity rises until a further switch occurs. Contrary to many previous studies, this mechanism does not require large freshwater pulses to the North Atlantic. Instead, steady changes in ice-sheet runoff, driven by the AMOC, lead to a naturally arising oscillator, in which the rapid warmings come about because the Arctic Ocean is starved of freshwater. The changing size of the ice sheets would have affected the magnitude and extent of runoff, and we suggest that this may provide a simple explanation

  20. Effects of freshwater petroleum contamination on amphibian hatching and metamorphosis

    SciTech Connect

    Mahaney, P.A. . Dept. of Zoology)

    1994-02-01

    This study examined the effects of freshwater petroleum contamination on amphibian reproduction. The primary objectives were to assess the potential environmental and physiological impacts of runoff petroleum products on amphibians, using the green tree frog (Hyla cinerea) as a target species and engine crankcase oil as a contaminant. Egg hatching success, tadpole growth, and successful metamorphosis were measured in four concentrations of oil. The effects of oil on food source was also studied. Hatching success was not measurably influenced by the presence of oil. Tadpole and alga growth were negatively associated with the presence of oil. No tadpoles from the high concentration of oil treatments successfully metamorphosed.

  1. Standard methods for sampling North American freshwater fishes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bonar, Scott A.; Hubert, Wayne A.; Willis, David W.

    2009-01-01

    This important reference book provides standard sampling methods recommended by the American Fisheries Society for assessing and monitoring freshwater fish populations in North America. Methods apply to ponds, reservoirs, natural lakes, and streams and rivers containing cold and warmwater fishes. Range-wide and eco-regional averages for indices of abundance, population structure, and condition for individual species are supplied to facilitate comparisons of standard data among populations. Provides information on converting nonstandard to standard data, statistical and database procedures for analyzing and storing standard data, and methods to prevent transfer of invasive species while sampling.

  2. Book review: Ecology of North American freshwater fishes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bonar, Scott A.

    2014-01-01

    This book will be important in courses for upper undergraduates studying fish ecology or for graduate students. However, it will also be an excellent reference for the fishery manager who asks ‘Why does this fish do that?’. With the wealth of great information contained in Ross’ book, chances are an answer will be found. Review info: Ecology of North American freshwater fishes. Edited by Stephen T. Ross, 2013. ISBN: 978-0520249455, 408 pp.

  3. Freshwater diatomite deposits in the western United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wallace, Alan R.; Frank, David G.; Founie, Alan

    2006-01-01

    Freshwater diatomite deposits in the Western United States are found in lake beds that formed millions of years ago. These diatom-rich sediments are among the Nation's largest commercial diatomite deposits. Each deposit contains billions of tiny diatom skeletons, which are widely used for filtration, absorption, and abrasives. New studies by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) are revealing how ancient lakes in the Western States produced such large numbers of diatoms. These findings can be used by both land-use managers and mining companies to better evaluate diatomite resources in the region.

  4. Seawater intrusion vulnerability indicators for freshwater lenses in strip islands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morgan, L.; Werner, A. D.

    2014-12-01

    Freshwater lenses on small islands have been described as some of the most vulnerable aquifer systems in the world. Yet, little guidance is available regarding methods for rapidly assessing the vulnerability of freshwater lenses to the potential effects of climate change. To address this gap we employ a steady-state analytic modelling approach to develop seawater intrusion (SWI) vulnerability indicator equations. The vulnerability indicator equations quantify the propensity for SWI to occur in strip islands due to both recharge change and sea-level rise (SLR) (incorporating the effect of land surface inundation (LSI)). This work extends that of Werner et al. (2012) who developed SWI vulnerability indicator equations for unconfined and confined continental aquifers, and did not consider LSI. Flux-controlled and head-controlled conceptualisations of freshwater lenses are adopted. Under flux-controlled conditions the water table is able to rise unencumbered by land surface effects. Under head-controlled conditions the head is fixed at the centre of the lens due to, for example, centrally located topographic controls, surface water features or pumping. A number of inferences about SWI vulnerability in freshwater lenses can be made from the analysis: (1) SWI vulnerability indicators for SLR (under flux-controlled conditions) are proportional to lens thickness (or volume) and the rate of LSI and inversely proportional to island width; (2) SWI vulnerability indicators for recharge change (under flux-controlled conditions) are proportional to lens thickness (or volume) and inversely proportional to recharge; (3) SLR has greater impact under head-controlled conditions rather than flux-controlled conditions, whereas the opposite is the case for LSI and recharge change. Example applications to several case studies illustrate use of the method for rapidly ranking lenses according to vulnerability, thereby allowing for prioritisation of areas where further and more detailed SWI

  5. Determination whether the causal agent for mussel die-offs in the Mississippi River is of chemical or biological origin. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Sparks, R.E.; Blodgett, K.D.; Durham, L.; Horner, R.

    1990-04-01

    Unexplained die-offs of freshwater mussels have occurred in the Mississippi River, including the water of Illinois, from 1982 to 1986. The research was directed at determining the cause, biological or chemical, of these massive die-offs. During the project, over 600 freshwater mussels were collected from the Illinois and Mississippi rivers. Sampling methodologies were developed to collect bacteria associated with various mussel organs and tissues, and the bacterial flora were characterized. This characterization of the bacterial flora of freshwater mussels provides a baseline for comparisons should mussel die-offs resume in the future.

  6. Prevalence effect in haptic search

    PubMed Central

    Ishibashi, Kazuya; Watanabe, Ken; Takaoka, Yutaka; Watanabe, Tetsuya; Kita, Shinichi

    2012-01-01

    In visual search tasks, the ratio of target-present to target-absent trials has important effects on miss rates. In this study, we examined whether the target prevalence effect occurs in a haptic search task by using artificial tactile maps. The results indicated that target prevalence has effects on miss rates, sensitivity, and criterion. Moreover, an increase in miss rates in the low-prevalence condition (10%) was strongly correlated with a decrease in search termination times (target-absent reaction times). These results suggest that the prevalence effect on haptic search is caused by a decrease in the search termination time and a shift in decision criterion and a decrease in sensitivity. PMID:23145300

  7. Pomphorhynchidae and quadrigyridae (Acanthocephala), including a new genus and species (Pallisentinae), from freshwater fishes, Cobitidae and Cyprinodontidae, in Turkey.

    PubMed

    Smales, Lesley R; Aydogdu, Ali; Emre, Yilmaz

    2012-09-01

    During a survey of freshwater fishes from Turkey two species of Acanthocephala, one of them new, were found. Pomphorhynchus tereticollis (Pomphorhynchidae) is reported at 24% prevalence in 37 Cobitis bilseli (Cobitidae) from Lake Beysehir, Konya, for the first time. The eoacanthoacaphalan Triaspiron aphanii gen. n. et sp. n. (Quadrigyridae), at a prevalence of 90%, is described from 29 Aphanius mento (Cyprinodontidae), from Kirkgöz Springs, Antalya. The new genus most closely resembles Raosentis Datta, 1947, both having a small spindle shaped trunk, and Acanthogyrus Thapar, 1927, both having a proboscis armature of three circles of hooks. Triaspiron differs from Raosentis in proboscis shape, cylindrical not globular, proboscis armature, three circles, a total of 16 hooks in all, not four circles, a total of 26-30 hooks in all, and trunk spination, two fields of spines in the anterior field with spines arranged in up to 40 circular rows, not a single field with 9-17 rows of spines. Triaspiron differs from Acanthogyrus in having fewer proboscis hooks, 16 compared with 18-24, arranged in three circles, one anterior and two posteriorly placed, with an unarmed region between, not three circles of hooks evenly spaced, and two fields of trunk spines, not one.

  8. Removing constraints on the biomass production of freshwater macroalgae by manipulating water exchange to manage nutrient flux.

    PubMed

    Cole, Andrew J; de Nys, Rocky; Paul, Nicholas A

    2014-01-01

    Freshwater macroalgae represent a largely overlooked group of phototrophic organisms that could play an important role within an industrial ecology context in both utilising waste nutrients and water and supplying biomass for animal feeds and renewable chemicals and fuels. This study used water from the intensive aquaculture of freshwater fish (Barramundi) to examine how the biomass production rate and protein content of the freshwater macroalga Oedogonium responds to increasing the flux of nutrients and carbon, by either increasing water exchange rates or through the addition of supplementary nitrogen and CO2. Biomass production rates were highest at low flow rates (0.1-1 vol.day-1) using raw pond water. The addition of CO2 to cultures increased biomass production rates by between 2 and 25% with this effect strongest at low water exchange rates. Paradoxically, the addition of nitrogen to cultures decreased productivity, especially at low water exchange rates. The optimal culture of Oedogonium occurred at flow rates of between 0.5-1 vol.day-1, where uptake rates peaked at 1.09 g.m-2.day-1 for nitrogen and 0.13 g.m-2.day-1 for phosphorous. At these flow rates Oedogonium biomass had uptake efficiencies of 75.2% for nitrogen and 22.1% for phosphorous. In this study a nitrogen flux of 1.45 g.m-2.day-1 and a phosphorous flux of 0.6 g.m-2.day-1 was the minimum required to maintain the growth of Oedogonium at 16-17 g DW.m-2.day-1 and a crude protein content of 25%. A simple model of minimum inputs shows that for every gram of dry weight biomass production (g DW.m-2.day-1), Oedogonium requires 0.09 g.m-2.day-1 of nitrogen and 0.04 g.m-2.day-1 of phosphorous to maintain growth without nutrient limitation whilst simultaneously maintaining a high-nutrient uptake rate and efficiency. As such the integrated culture of freshwater macroalgae with aquaculture for the purposes of nutrient recovery is a feasible solution for the bioremediation of wastewater and the supply of a

  9. Removing Constraints on the Biomass Production of Freshwater Macroalgae by Manipulating Water Exchange to Manage Nutrient Flux

    PubMed Central

    Cole, Andrew J.; de Nys, Rocky; Paul, Nicholas A.

    2014-01-01

    Freshwater macroalgae represent a largely overlooked group of phototrophic organisms that could play an important role within an industrial ecology context in both utilising waste nutrients and water and supplying biomass for animal feeds and renewable chemicals and fuels. This study used water from the intensive aquaculture of freshwater fish (Barramundi) to examine how the biomass production rate and protein content of the freshwater macroalga Oedogonium responds to increasing the flux of nutrients and carbon, by either increasing water exchange rates or through the addition of supplementary nitrogen and CO2. Biomass production rates were highest at low flow rates (0.1–1 vol.day−1) using raw pond water. The addition of CO2 to cultures increased biomass production rates by between 2 and 25% with this effect strongest at low water exchange rates. Paradoxically, the addition of nitrogen to cultures decreased productivity, especially at low water exchange rates. The optimal culture of Oedogonium occurred at flow rates of between 0.5–1 vol.day−1, where uptake rates peaked at 1.09 g.m−2.day−1 for nitrogen and 0.13 g.m−2.day−1 for phosphorous. At these flow rates Oedogonium biomass had uptake efficiencies of 75.2% for nitrogen and 22.1% for phosphorous. In this study a nitrogen flux of 1.45 g.m−2.day−1 and a phosphorous flux of 0.6 g.m−2.day−1 was the minimum required to maintain the growth of Oedogonium at 16–17 g DW.m−2.day−1 and a crude protein content of 25%. A simple model of minimum inputs shows that for every gram of dry weight biomass production (g DW.m−2.day−1), Oedogonium requires 0.09 g.m−2.day−1 of nitrogen and 0.04 g.m−2.day−1 of phosphorous to maintain growth without nutrient limitation whilst simultaneously maintaining a high-nutrient uptake rate and efficiency. As such the integrated culture of freshwater macroalgae with aquaculture for the purposes of nutrient recovery is a feasible solution for the

  10. Chemical sensors

    DOEpatents

    Lowell, Jr., James R.; Edlund, David J.; Friesen, Dwayne T.; Rayfield, George W.

    1991-01-01

    Sensors responsive to small changes in the concentration of chemical species are disclosed, comprising (a) a mechanochemically responsive polymeric film capable of expansion or contraction in response to a change in its chemical environment, operatively coupled to (b) a transducer capable of directly converting said expansion or contraction to a measurable electrical response.

  11. Chemical preconcentrator

    DOEpatents

    Manginell, Ronald P.; Frye-Mason, Gregory C.

    2001-01-01

    A chemical preconcentrator is disclosed with applications to chemical sensing and analysis. The preconcentrator can be formed by depositing a resistive heating element (e.g. platinum) over a membrane (e.g. silicon nitride) suspended above a substrate. A coating of a sorptive material (e.g. a microporous hydrophobic sol-gel coating or a polymer coating) is formed on the suspended membrane proximate to the heating element to selective sorb one or more chemical species of interest over a time period, thereby concentrating the chemical species in the sorptive material. Upon heating the sorptive material with the resistive heating element, the sorbed chemical species are released for detection and analysis in a relatively high concentration and over a relatively short time period. The sorptive material can be made to selectively sorb particular chemical species of interest while not substantially sorbing other chemical species not of interest. The present invention has applications for use in forming high-sensitivity, rapid-response miniaturized chemical analysis systems (e.g. a "chem lab on a chip").

  12. Chemical pneumonitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... chemicals. Alternative Names Aspiration pneumonia - chemical Images Lungs Respiratory system References Blanc PD. Acute responses to toxic exposures. In: Broaddus VC, Mason RJ, Ernst JD, et al, eds. Murray and Nadel's Textbook of Respiratory Medicine . 6th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2016: ...

  13. Prevalence of obesity in Malta

    PubMed Central

    Vassallo, J.; Calleja, N.; Camilleri, R.; Borg, A.; Bonnici, G.; Zhang, Y.; Pace, N.; Mamo, J.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Background Obesity is a global epidemic with the Mediterranean island of Malta being no exception. The World Health Organization (WHO) has identified Malta as one of the European countries with the highest obesity prevalence. Method A cross‐sectional study was conducted (2014–2016) under the auspices of the University of Malta. The prevalence of overweight‐obesity in Malta was calculated and then age stratified for comparisons with previous studies. Results The study identified 69.75% (95% CI: 68.32–71.18) of the Maltese population to be either overweight or obese. The men overweight/obese prevalence (76.28% 95% CI: 74.41–78.14) was statistically higher than that for women (63.06% 95% CI: 60.92–65.20) (p = 0.0001). Age stratification revealed that both genders had the highest overweight prevalence rates between 55 and 64 years (Men = 23.25% 95% CI: 20.43–26.33; Women = 24.68% 95% CI: 21.44–28.22). Men obesity prevalence rates were highest in the 35 to 44 years group (22.52% 95% CI: 19.65–25.68) while for women it was highest in the 55 to 64 years group (28.90%, 95% CI: 25.44–30.63). Conclusion Over a 35‐year period, an overall decrease in the normal and overweight BMI categories occurred with an increase in the prevalence of obesity. An exception was observed in the women, where the prevalence of normal BMI increased over this time period. Also, it appears that while the total population obesity prevalence increased (for 2016), a percentage of the women have shifted from an obese to an overweight status. PMID:28090352

  14. Contribution of conservation genetics in assessing neotropical freshwater fish biodiversity.

    PubMed

    Piorski, N M; Sanches, A; Carvalho-Costa, L F; Hatanaka, T; Carrillo-Avila, M; Freitas, P D; Galetti, P M

    2008-11-01

    Human activities have a considerable impact on hydrographic systems and fish fauna. The present review on conservation genetics of neotropical freshwater fish reveals that DNA analyses have been promoting increased knowledge on the genetic structure of fish species and their response to environmental changes. This knowledge is fundamental to the management of wild fish populations and the establishment of Evolutionary Significant Units capable of conserving genetic integrity. While population structuring can occur even in long-distance migratory fish, isolated populations can show reduced genetic variation and be at greater risk of extinction. Phylogeography and phylogeny have been powerful tools in understanding the evolution of fish populations, species and communities in distinct neotropic environments. Captive fish can be used to introduce new individuals and genes into the wild and their benefits and disadvantages can be monitored through genetic analysis. Understanding how fish biodiversity in neotropical freshwaters is generated and maintained is highly important, as these habitats are transformed by human development and fish communities are increasingly exploited as food sources to sustain a growing human population.

  15. Quantifying Greenland freshwater flux underestimates in climate models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Little, Christopher M.; Piecuch, Christopher G.; Chaudhuri, Ayan H.

    2016-05-01

    Key processes regulating the mass balance of the Greenland Ice Sheet (GIS) are not represented in current-generation climate models. Here using output from 19 different climate models forced with a high-end business-as-usual emissions pathway, we compare modeled freshwater fluxes (FWF) to a parameterization based on midtropospheric temperature. By the mid 21st century, parameterized GIS FWF is 478 ± 215 km3 yr-1 larger than modeled—over 3 times the 1992-2011 rate of GIS mass loss. By the late 21st century, ensemble mean parameterized GIS FWF anomalies are comparable to FWF anomalies over the northern North Atlantic Ocean, equivalent to approximately 11 cm of global mean sea level rise. The magnitude and spread of these underestimates underscores the need for assessments of the coupled response of the ocean to increased FWF that recognize: (1) the widely varying freshwater budgets of each model and (2) uncertainty in the relationship between GIS FWF and atmospheric temperature.

  16. Arctic freshwater forcing of the Younger Dryas cold reversal.

    PubMed

    Tarasov, Lev; Peltier, W R

    2005-06-02

    The last deglaciation was abruptly interrupted by a millennial-scale reversal to glacial conditions, the Younger Dryas cold event. This cold interval has been connected to a decrease in the rate of North Atlantic Deep Water formation and to a resulting weakening of the meridional overturning circulation owing to surface water freshening. In contrast, an earlier input of fresh water (meltwater pulse 1a), whose origin is disputed, apparently did not lead to a reduction of the meridional overturning circulation. Here we analyse an ensemble of simulations of the drainage chronology of the North American ice sheet in order to identify the geographical release points of freshwater forcing during deglaciation. According to the simulations with our calibrated glacial systems model, the North American ice sheet contributed about half the fresh water of meltwater pulse 1a. During the onset of the Younger Dryas, we find that the largest combined meltwater/iceberg discharge was directed into the Arctic Ocean. Given that the only drainage outlet from the Arctic Ocean was via the Fram Strait into the Greenland-Iceland-Norwegian seas, where North Atlantic Deep Water is formed today, we hypothesize that it was this Arctic freshwater flux that triggered the Younger Dryas cold reversal.

  17. Peak water limits to freshwater withdrawal and use.

    PubMed

    Gleick, Peter H; Palaniappan, Meena

    2010-06-22

    Freshwater resources are fundamental for maintaining human health, agricultural production, economic activity as well as critical ecosystem functions. As populations and economies grow, new constraints on water resources are appearing, raising questions about limits to water availability. Such resource questions are not new. The specter of "peak oil"--a peaking and then decline in oil production--has long been predicted and debated. We present here a detailed assessment and definition of three concepts of "peak water": peak renewable water, peak nonrenewable water, and peak ecological water. These concepts can help hydrologists, water managers, policy makers, and the public understand and manage different water systems more effectively and sustainably. Peak renewable water applies where flow constraints limit total water availability over time. Peak nonrenewable water is observable in groundwater systems where production rates substantially exceed natural recharge rates and where overpumping or contamination leads to a peak of production followed by a decline, similar to more traditional peak-oil curves. Peak "ecological" water is defined as the point beyond which the total costs of ecological disruptions and damages exceed the total value provided by human use of that water. Despite uncertainties in quantifying many of these costs and benefits in consistent ways, more and more watersheds appear to have already passed the point of peak water. Applying these concepts can help shift the way freshwater resources are managed toward more productive, equitable, efficient, and sustainable use.

  18. Assessment of toxicity test endpoints for freshwater mussel larvae (glochidia).

    PubMed

    Fritts, Andrea K; Barnhart, M Christopher; Bradley, Megan; Liu, Na; Cope, W Gregory; Hammer, Edward; Bringolf, Robert B

    2014-01-01

    The objectives of the present study were to determine if the viability of freshwater mussel larvae (glochidia) is an ecologically relevant endpoint for toxicity tests and to define the appropriate duration of those tests. The authors assessed 1) how viability (the shell closure response to sodium chloride) compares with infectivity (ability to attach to a host fish and successfully metamorphose to the juvenile stage), and 2) the decline of viability and infectivity over time after glochidia were released from female mussels. Glochidia of 7 mussel species were isolated from females, placed in water, and subsampled daily for 2 d to 5 d. Viability, when ≥90%, was generally a good predictor of infectivity; however, when viability was <90%, infectivity was often disproportionately low, especially for glochidia collected near the end of the brooding period. Viability and infectivity declined more rapidly in natural water and sediment compared to reconstituted water. Following 24-h exposure to a toxicant (sodium chloride or copper), infectivity of the viable glochidia did not differ among concentrations of toxicants. The results indicate that viability is a valid proxy for infectivity and an ecologically relevant endpoint for standard toxicity tests with freshwater mussels for any test duration with control viability >90%.

  19. Peak water limits to freshwater withdrawal and use

    PubMed Central

    Gleick, Peter H.; Palaniappan, Meena

    2010-01-01

    Freshwater resources are fundamental for maintaining human health, agricultural production, economic activity as well as critical ecosystem functions. As populations and economies grow, new constraints on water resources are appearing, raising questions about limits to water availability. Such resource questions are not new. The specter of “peak oil”—a peaking and then decline in oil production—has long been predicted and debated. We present here a detailed assessment and definition of three concepts of “peak water”: peak renewable water, peak nonrenewable water, and peak ecological water. These concepts can help hydrologists, water managers, policy makers, and the public understand and manage different water systems more effectively and sustainably. Peak renewable water applies where flow constraints limit total water availability over time. Peak nonrenewable water is observable in groundwater systems where production rates substantially exceed natural recharge rates and where overpumping or contamination leads to a peak of production followed by a decline, similar to more traditional peak-oil curves. Peak “ecological” water is defined as the point beyond which the total costs of ecological disruptions and damages exceed the total value provided by human use of that water. Despite uncertainties in quantifying many of these costs and benefits in consistent ways, more and more watersheds appear to have already passed the point of peak water. Applying these concepts can help shift the way freshwater resources are managed toward more productive, equitable, efficient, and sustainable use. PMID:20498082

  20. Structure and function of ionocytes in the freshwater fish gill.

    PubMed

    Dymowska, Agnieszka K; Hwang, Pung-Pung; Goss, Greg G

    2012-12-01

    Freshwater fishes lose ions to the external medium owing to the steep concentration gradients between the body fluids and the water. To maintain homeostasis, they use ionocytes to actively extract Na(+), Cl(-), and Ca(2+) from the dilute external medium and excrete acidic (H(+)) or basic (HCO(3)(-)) equivalents by specialized cells termed ionocytes that are responsible for transport of ions. Freshwater fishes have evolved diverse approaches to solving these similar ionic and acid-base problems. In the few well-studied species, there are clearly different patterns in the physiology and morphology for ionocytes in the gill. In this review, we describe the varying nomenclature of ionocytes that have been used in the past 80 years to allow direct comparison of ionocytes and their common functions in different species. We focus on the recent advancement in our understanding of the molecular mechanisms of ion and acid-base regulation as represented by ionocyte subtypes found in rainbow trout, killifish, tilapia and zebrafish gill.

  1. PIT tags increase effectiveness of freshwater mussel recaptures

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kurth, J.; Loftin, C.; Zydlewski, J.; Rhymer, J.

    2007-01-01

    Translocations are used increasingly to conserve populations of rare freshwater mussels. Recovery of translocated mussels is essential to accurate assessment of translocation success. We designed an experiment to evaluate the use of passive integrated transponder (PIT) tags to mark and track individual freshwater mussels. We used eastern lampmussels (Lampsilis radiata radiata) as a surrogate for 2 rare mussel species. We assessed internal and external PIT-tag retention in the laboratory and field. Internal tag retention was high (75-100%), and tag rejection occurred primarily during the first 3 wk after tagging. A thin layer of nacre coated internal tags 3 to 4 mo after insertion, suggesting that long-term retention is likely. We released mussels with external PIT tags at 3 field study sites and recaptured them with a PIT pack (mobile interrogation unit) 8 to 10 mo and 21 to 23 mo after release. Numbers of recaptured mussels differed among study sites; however, we found more tagged mussels with the PIT-pack searches with visual confirmation (72-80%) than with visual searches alone (30-47%) at all sites. PIT tags offer improved recapture of translocated mussels and increased accuracy of posttranslocation monitoring. ?? 2007 by The North American Benthological Society.

  2. The impacts of modern warfare on freshwater ecosystems.

    PubMed

    Francis, Robert A

    2011-11-01

    There is increasing recognition and concern regarding the impacts of modern industrial warfare on the environment. Freshwater ecosystems are perhaps the most vulnerable to warfare-related impacts, which is of concern given that they provide so many essential environmental resources and services to society. Despite this, there has been little work to establish and quantify the types of impacts (both negative and positive) that warfare may have on such systems. This paper firstly highlights why rivers and lakes may be susceptible to warfare-related impacts, before synthesizing the available literature to explore the following main themes: intensification of wartime resource acquisition, use of water as an offensive or defensive weapon, direct and indirect effects of explosive ordnance, increased pollution, introduction of invasive alien species, and positive ecological impacts. This is then followed by a discussion of the implications of such impacts in relation to future warfare, including a consideration of the efficacy of existing legal instruments to protect the environment during conflict, and the trend for war to become more localized and 'informal', and therefore less regulated. Finally, the paper identifies key research foci for understanding and mitigating the effects of warfare on freshwater ecosystems.

  3. Development of intermediate foodstuff derived from freshwater fish in China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xichang; Fukuda, Yutaka; Chen, Shunsheng; Yokoyama, Masahito; Cheng, Yudong; Yuan, Chunhong; Qu, Yinghong; Sakaguchi, Morihiko

    2005-07-01

    According to the three-dimensional contour maps showing the gel-forming properties of surimi derived from freshwater fish, 8 species of surimi were classified into two types. The V-valley type surimi (silver carp, big-head carp, Chinese snake head and blunt snout bream) shows easy setting, low resistance to gel collapse, high enhancement ability with two-step heating, and narrow optimum heating temperature and time area, which are of the same characteristics as the wall-eye pollack surimi. In contrast, the Plateau type surimi (tilapia, grass carp, mud carp and common carp) exhibits difficult setting, high resistance to gel collapse, no enhancement ability with two-step heating, and wide optimum heating temperature and time area. There are seasonal changes of gelling properties of silver carp surimi, and the setting ability of surimi gel is higher in winter and lower in summer. The marine fish meat gels and the freshwater fish meat gels have the same acceptability for inland Chinese according to the sensory evaluation results. A slight increase in sensory scorings of kamaboko gels occurred when the extract from walleye pollack muscle was added, especially in the odor scoring of silver carp kamaboko gels.

  4. Novel Virophages Discovered in a Freshwater Lake in China.

    PubMed

    Gong, Chaowen; Zhang, Weijia; Zhou, Xuewen; Wang, Hongming; Sun, Guowei; Xiao, Jinzhou; Pan, Yingjie; Yan, Shuling; Wang, Yongjie

    2016-01-01

    Virophages are small double-stranded DNA viruses that are parasites of giant DNA viruses that infect unicellular eukaryotes. Here we identify a novel group of virophages, named Dishui Lake virophages (DSLVs) that were discovered in Dishui Lake (DSL): an artificial freshwater lake in Shanghai, China. Based on PCR and metagenomic analysis, the complete genome of DSLV1 was found to be circular and 28,788 base pairs in length, with a G+C content 43.2%, and 28 predicted open reading frames (ORFs). Fifteen of the DSLV1 ORFs have sequence similarity to known virophages. Two DSLV1 ORFs exhibited sequence similarity to that of prasinoviruses (Phycodnaviridae) and chloroviruses (Phycodnaviridae), respectively, suggesting horizontal gene transfer occurred between these large algal DNA viruses and DSLV1. 46 other virophages-related contigs were also obtained, including six homologous major capsid protein (MCP) gene. Phylogenetic analysis of these MCPs showed that DSLVs are closely related to OLV (Organic Lake virophage) and YSLVs (Yellowstone Lake virophages), especially to YSLV3, except for YSLV7. These results indicate that freshwater ecotopes are the hotbed for discovering novel virophages as well as understanding their diversity and properties.

  5. Novel Virophages Discovered in a Freshwater Lake in China

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Chaowen; Zhang, Weijia; Zhou, Xuewen; Wang, Hongming; Sun, Guowei; Xiao, Jinzhou; Pan, Yingjie; Yan, Shuling; Wang, Yongjie

    2016-01-01

    Virophages are small double-stranded DNA viruses that are parasites of giant DNA viruses that infect unicellular eukaryotes. Here we identify a novel group of virophages, named Dishui Lake virophages (DSLVs) that were discovered in Dishui Lake (DSL): an artificial freshwater lake in Shanghai, China. Based on PCR and metagenomic analysis, the complete genome of DSLV1 was found to be circular and 28,788 base pairs in length, with a G+C content 43.2%, and 28 predicted open reading frames (ORFs). Fifteen of the DSLV1 ORFs have sequence similarity to known virophages. Two DSLV1 ORFs exhibited sequence similarity to that of prasinoviruses (Phycodnaviridae) and chloroviruses (Phycodnaviridae), respectively, suggesting horizontal gene transfer occurred between these large algal DNA viruses and DSLV1. 46 other virophages-related contigs were also obtained, including six homologous major capsid protein (MCP) gene. Phylogenetic analysis of these MCPs showed that DSLVs are closely related to OLV (Organic Lake virophage) and YSLVs (Yellowstone Lake virophages), especially to YSLV3, except for YSLV7. These results indicate that freshwater ecotopes are the hotbed for discovering novel virophages as well as understanding their diversity and properties. PMID:26834726

  6. Toxicity of Metals to a Freshwater Ostracod: Stenocypris major.

    PubMed

    Shuhaimi-Othman, Mohammad; Yakub, Nadzifah; Ramle, Nur-Amalina; Abas, Ahmad

    2011-01-01

    Adults of freshwater ostracod Stenocypris major (Crustacea, Candonidae) were exposed for a four-day period in laboratory conditions to a range of copper (Cu), cadmium (Cd), zinc (Zn), lead (Pb), nickel (Ni), iron (Fe), aluminium (Al), and manganese (Mn) concentrations. Mortality was assessed, and median lethal times (LT(50)) and concentrations (LC(50)) were calculated. LT(50) and LC(50) increased with the decrease in mean exposure concentrations and times, respectively, for all metals. LC(50)s for 96 hours for Cu, Cd, Zn, Pb, Ni, Fe, Al, and Mn were 25.2, 13.1, 1189.8, 526.2, 19743.7, 278.9, 3101.9, and 510.2 μg/L, respectively. Metals bioconcentration in S. major increases with exposure to increasing concentrations, and Cd was the most toxic to S. major, followed by Cu, Fe, Mn, Pb, Zn, Al, and Ni (Cd>Cu>Fe>Mn>Pb>Zn>Al>Ni). Comparison of LC(50) values for metals for this species with those for other freshwater crustacean reveals that S. major is equally or more sensitive to metals than most other tested crustacean.

  7. Toxicity of tributyltin (TBT) to the freshwater planarian Schmidtea mediterranea.

    PubMed

    Ofoegbu, Pearl U; Simão, Fátima C P; Cruz, Andreia; Mendo, Sónia; Soares, Amadeu M V M; Pestana, João L T

    2016-04-01

    The freshwater planarian Schmidtea mediterranea, one of the best characterized animal models for regeneration research and developmental biology, is being recognised as a useful species for ecotoxicological studies. Sensitive endpoints related to planarians' behaviour and regeneration can be easily evaluated after exposure to environmental stressors. In this work the sensitivity of S. mediterranea to a gradient of environmentally relevant concentrations of TBT was studied using multiple endpoints like survival, locomotion, head regeneration and DNA damage. In addition, a feeding assay based on planarian's predatory behaviour was performed. Results indicated that TBT is toxic to planarians with LC50's of 1.87 μg L(-1) Sn and 1.31 μg L(-1) Sn at 48 h and 96 h of exposure respectively. Sub-lethal exposures to TBT significantly reduced locomotion and feeding, delayed head regeneration and caused DNA damage in planarians. The behavioural endpoints (feeding and locomotion) and head regeneration were the most sensitive parameters followed by DNA damage. Similar to other aquatic model organisms, S. mediterranea showed high sensitivity towards TBT exposure. Based on our results, and though further research is required concerning their sensitivity to other pollutants, the use of freshwater planarians as a model species in ecotoxicology is discussed.

  8. Wave-Induced Groundwater Flows in a Freshwater Beach Aquifer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malott, S. S.; Robinson, C. E.; O'Carroll, D. M.

    2014-12-01

    Wave-induced recirculation across the sediment-water interface can impact the transport of pollutants through a beach aquifer and their ultimate flux into coastal waters. The fate of nutrients (e.g. from septic and agricultural sources) and fecal indicator bacteria (e.g. E. coil) near the sediment-water interface are of particular concern as these pollutants often lead to degradation of recreational water quality and nearshore ecosystems. This paper presents detailed field measurements of groundwater flows in a freshwater beach aquifer on Lake Huron over periods of intensified wave conditions. Quantifying wave-driven processes in a freshwater beach aquifer enables wave effects to be studied in isolation from density and tidal effects that complicate groundwater flows in marine beaches. Water exchange across the sediment-water interface and groundwater flow patterns were measured using groundwater wells, arrays of vertically nested pressure transducers and manometers. Results show that wave action induces rapid infiltration/exfiltration across the sediment-water interface and a larger recirculation cell through the beach aquifer. Field data is used to validate a numerical groundwater model of wave-induced groundwater flows. While prior studies have simulated the effects of waves on beach groundwater flows, this study is the first attempt to validate these sophisticated modeling approaches. Finally, field data illustrating the impact of wave-induced groundwater flows on nutrient and bacteria fate and transport in beach aquifers will also be presented.

  9. Source, Use, and Disposition of Freshwater in Puerto Rico, 2005

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Molina-Rivera, Wanda L.

    2010-01-01

    Water diverted from streams and pumped from wells constitutes the main sources of water for the 78 municipios of the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico. A better understanding is needed about water-use patterns, particularly about the amount of water used, where and how this water is used and disposed, and how human activities impact water resources. Irrigation practices, indoor and outdoor household uses, industrial uses, and commercial and mining withdrawals affect reservoirs, streams, and aquifers. Accurate and accessible water information for Puerto Rico is critical to ensure that water managers have the ability to protect and conserve this natural resource. The population of Puerto Rico increased 15 percent, from 3.4 million in 1985 to 3.9 million people 2005 and resulted in an increased demand for freshwater, mostly for the public-supply water use category. Almost 99 percent of the residents in Puerto Rico were served by public-supply water systems in 2005. One of the major challenges that water managers confront is the need to provide sufficient freshwater availability in the densely populated areas. Public-supply water is provided by the Puerto Rico Aqueducts and Sewers Authority (PRASA) and by non-PRASA systems. Non-PRASA systems refer to community-operated water systems (water systems that serve a rural or suburban housing area).

  10. Contrasting "Fish" Diversity Dynamics between Marine and Freshwater Environments.

    PubMed

    Guinot, Guillaume; Cavin, Lionel

    2015-08-31

    Two theoretical models have been proposed to describe long-term dynamics of diversification: the equilibrium model considers the Earth as a closed system with a fixed maximum biological carrying capacity, whereas the expansion model hypothesizes a continuously increasing diversification of life. Based on the analysis of the fossil record of all organisms, Benton suggested contrasting models of diversity dynamics between marine and continental realms. Diversity in marine environments is characterized by phases of rapid diversification followed by plateaux, i.e., an equilibrium model directly derived from insular biogeography theories, whereas diversity in continental environments is characterized by exponential growth. Previous studies that aimed at testing these models with empirical data were based on datasets extracted directly from the reading of the vagaries of the raw fossil record, without correcting for common fossil record biases (preservation and sampling). Although correction of datasets for the incompleteness of the fossil record is now commonly performed for addressing long-term biodiversity variations, only a few attempts have been made to produce diversity curves corrected by phylogenetic data from extant and extinct taxa. Here we show that phylogenetically corrected diversity curves for "fish" (actinopterygians and elasmobranchs) during the last 200 million years fit an equilibrium model in the marine realm and an expansion model in the freshwater realm. These findings demonstrate that the rate of diversification has decreased for marine fish over the Cenozoic but is in sharp expansion for freshwater fish.

  11. Behavioral responses of freshwater mussels to experimental dewatering

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Galbraith, Heather S.; Blakeslee, Carrie J.; Lellis, William A.

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the effects of flow alteration on freshwater ecosystems is critical for predicting species responses and restoring appropriate flow regimes. We experimentally evaluated the effects of 3 dewatering rates on behavior of 6 freshwater mussel species in the context of water-removal rates observed in 21 Atlantic Coast rivers. Horizontal movement differed significantly among species and dewatering rates, but a significant species × dewatering interaction suggested that these factors influence movement in complex ways. Species differences in movement were evident only in controls and under slow dewatering rates, but these differences disappeared at moderate and fast dewatering rates. Burrowing behavior did not differ with respect to species identity or dewatering rate. The proportion of individuals that became stranded did not differ among species, but most individuals became stranded under low and moderate dewatering, and all individuals became stranded under fast dewatering. Mortality after stranding differed strongly among species along a gradient from 25% inPyganodon cataracta to 92% in Alasmidonta marginata. Together, these results suggest that species behavior may differ under gradual dewatering, but all species in our study are poorly adapted for rapid dewatering. Most of the 21 rivers we assessed experienced dewatering events comparable to our moderate rate, and several experienced events comparable to our fast rate. Dewatering events that exceed the movement or survival capability of most mussel species can be expected to result in assemblage-wide impacts. Consequently, the rate of water level change may be important in refining target flow conditions for restoration.

  12. Freshwater Sediment Characterization Factors of Copper Oxide Nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pu, Yubing; Laratte, Bertrand; Ionescu, Rodica Elena

    2017-01-01

    Wide use of engineered nanoparticles (ENPs) is likely to result in the eventually accumulation of ENPs in sediment. The benthic organisms living in sediments may suffer relatively high toxic effects of ENPs. This study has selected copper oxide nanoparticles (nano-CuO) as a research object. To consider the impacts of spatial heterogeneity on ENPs toxicity, the characterization factor (CF) derived from life cycle assessment (LCA) methodology is used as an indicator in this study. A nano-specific fate model has been used to calculate the freshwater sediment fate factor (FF) of nano-CuO. A literature survey of the nano-CuO toxicology values has been performed to calculate the effect factor (EF). Seventeen freshwater sediment CFs of nano-CuO are proposed as recommended values for subcontinental regions. The region most likely to be affected by nano-CuO is northern Australia (CF of 21.01·103 CTUe, comparative toxic units) and the least likely is northern Europe and northern Canada (CF of 8.55·103 CTUe). These sediment CFs for nano-CuO could be used in the future when evaluating the ecosystem impacts of products containing nano-CuO by LCA method.

  13. Molecular diversity of avian schistosomes in Danish freshwater snails.

    PubMed

    Christiansen, Anne Ø; Olsen, Annette; Buchmann, Kurt; Kania, Per W; Nejsum, Peter; Vennervald, Birgitte J

    2016-03-01

    Avian schistosomes are widespread parasites of snails and waterfowl and may cause cercarial dermatitis (swimmer's itch) in humans, a disease that is frequently reported in European countries. These parasites are known to occur in Denmark, but here, we applied a new approach using molecular tools to identify the parasites at species level. In order to do that, 499 pulmonate freshwater snails (Radix sp., Lymnaea stagnalis, Stagnicola sp. and Planorbarius corneus) were sampled from 12 lakes, ponds, and marshes in the greater Copenhagen area. Avian schistosome cercariae were identified by microscopy and subjected to molecular investigation by sequencing and phylogenetic analysis of the 5.8S and ITS2 ribosomal DNA for species identification. Additionally, snail hosts belonging to the genus Radix were identified by sequencing and phylogenetic analysis of partial ITS2 ribosomal DNA. Three out of 499 snails shed different species of Trichobilharzia cercariae: Trichobilharzia szidati was isolated from L. stagnalis, Trichobilharzia franki from Radix auricularia and Trichobilharzia regenti from Radix peregra. In the light of the public health risk represented by bird schistosomes, these findings are of concern and, particularly, the presence of the potentially neuro-pathogenic species, T. regenti, in Danish freshwaters calls for attention.

  14. Biodiversity and distribution of polar freshwater DNA viruses

    PubMed Central

    Aguirre de Cárcer, Daniel; López-Bueno, Alberto; Pearce, David A.; Alcamí, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Viruses constitute the most abundant biological entities and a large reservoir of genetic diversity on Earth. Despite the recent surge in their study, our knowledge on their actual biodiversity and distribution remains sparse. We report the first metagenomic analysis of Arctic freshwater viral DNA communities and a comparative analysis with other freshwater environments. Arctic viromes are dominated by unknown and single-stranded DNA viruses with no close relatives in the database. These unique viral DNA communities mostly relate to each other and present some minor genetic overlap with other environments studied, including an Arctic Ocean virome. Despite common environmental conditions in polar ecosystems, the Arctic and Antarctic DNA viromes differ at the fine-grain genetic level while sharing a similar taxonomic composition. The study uncovers some viral lineages with a bipolar distribution, suggesting a global dispersal capacity for viruses, and seemingly indicates that viruses do not follow the latitudinal diversity gradient known for macroorganisms. Our study sheds light into the global biogeography and connectivity of viral communities. PMID:26601189

  15. Enumeration, Isolation, and Characterization of Beggiatoa from Freshwater Sediments †

    PubMed Central

    Strohl, William R.; Larkin, John M.

    1978-01-01

    An accurate most-probable-number enumeration method was developed for counting the number of Beggiatoa trichomes from various freshwater sediments. The medium consisted of extracted hay, diluted soil extract, 0.05% acetate, and 15 to 35 U of catalase per ml. The same enrichment medium, but without the acetate, was the best enrichment medium from which to obtain pure cultures because it supported good growth of the beggiatoas without allowing them to be overgrown by other bacteria. A total of 32 strains of Beggiatoa were isolated from seven different freshwater habitats and partially characterized. The strains were separated into five groups based on several preliminary characteristics. Four of the groups contained cells with trichomes of approximately the same diameter (1.5 to 2.7 μm) and may be Beggiatoa leptomitiformis or an unnamed species. The fifth group appeared to be Beggiatoa alba. With the exception of three strains, all of the strains deposited sulfur in the presence of hydrogen sulfide, and all strains grew heterotrophically and deposited poly-β-hydroxybutyrate and volutin when grown on acetate supplemented with low concentrations of other organic nutrients. Thin sections of sulfur-bearing trichomes indicated that the sulfur granules were external to the cytoplasmic membrane and that they were surrounded by an additional membrane. Images PMID:16345330

  16. Effects of ammonia on freshwater mussels in the St. Croix River

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Newton, Teresa J.

    2004-01-01

    The St. Croix River contains a diverse and abundant group of freshwater mussels. The St. Croix is one of the few rivers in the Midwest not substantially affected by the invasion of the exotic zebra mussel, which encrusts and kills native freshwater mussels. Increased concentrations of ammonia in river sediments, however, poses a significant threat to mussels.

  17. TRANSLOCATION OF NUTRIENTS BY FRESHWATER MUSSELS – ALTERATION OF ECOSYSTEM AND COMMUNITY PROCESSES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Nutrient demand and availability is a major driver of ecosystem processes. We examined the impact of freshwater mussels, a highly imperiled faunal group, on nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) cycling and storage in three Oklahoma streams. We found that filter-feeding by freshwater m...

  18. SPATIAL VARIABILITY IN MUSSELS USED TO ASSESS BASE LEVEL NITROGEN ISOTOPE RATIO IN FRESHWATER ECOSYSTEMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Freshwater mussels have been used to establish base level nitrogen isotope ratio values ( 15N) used in trophic position and food web studies in freshwater ecosystems. In this study, we assess the variability introduced when using unionid mussels in this manner by investigating th...

  19. Changes of freshwater-lens thickness in basaltic island aquifers overlain by thick coastal sediments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rotzoll, Kolja; Oki, Delwyn S.; El-Kadi, Aly I.

    2010-01-01

    Freshwater-lens thickness and long-term changes in freshwater volume in coastal aquifers are commonly assessed through repeated measurement of salinity profiles from monitor wells that penetrate into underlying salt water. In Hawaii, the thickest measured freshwater lens is currently 262 m in dike-free, volcanic-rock aquifers that are overlain by thick coastal sediments. The midpoint depth (depth where salinity is 50% salt water) between freshwater and salt water can serve as an indicator for freshwater thickness. Most measured midpoints have risen over the past 40 years, indicating a shrinking lens. The mean rate of rise of the midpoint from 1999–2009 varied locally, with faster rates in highly developed areas (1.0 m/year) and slower rates in less developed areas (0.5 m/year). The thinning of the freshwater lenses is the result of long-term groundwater withdrawal and reduced recharge. Freshwater/salt-water interface locations predicted from measured water levels and the Ghyben-Herzberg principle may be deeper than measured midpoints during some periods and shallower during other periods, although depths may differ up to 100 m in some cases. Moreover, changes in the midpoint are slower than changes in water level. Thus, water levels may not be a reliable indicator of the amount of freshwater in a coastal aquifer.

  20. Global impacts of energy demand on the freshwater resources of nations.

    PubMed

    Holland, Robert Alan; Scott, Kate A; Flörke, Martina; Brown, Gareth; Ewers, Robert M; Farmer, Elizabeth; Kapos, Valerie; Muggeridge, Ann; Scharlemann, Jörn P W; Taylor, Gail; Barrett, John; Eigenbrod, Felix

    2015-12-01

    The growing geographic disconnect between consumption of goods, the extraction and processing of resources, and the environmental impacts associated with production activities makes it crucial to factor global tra