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Sample records for preventable medical errors

  1. Prevention of medication errors: detection and audit.

    PubMed

    Montesi, Germana; Lechi, Alessandro

    2009-06-01

    1. Medication errors have important implications for patient safety, and their identification is a main target in improving clinical practice errors, in order to prevent adverse events. 2. Error detection is the first crucial step. Approaches to this are likely to be different in research and routine care, and the most suitable must be chosen according to the setting. 3. The major methods for detecting medication errors and associated adverse drug-related events are chart review, computerized monitoring, administrative databases, and claims data, using direct observation, incident reporting, and patient monitoring. All of these methods have both advantages and limitations. 4. Reporting discloses medication errors, can trigger warnings, and encourages the diffusion of a culture of safe practice. Combining and comparing data from various and encourages the diffusion of a culture of safe practice sources increases the reliability of the system. 5. Error prevention can be planned by means of retroactive and proactive tools, such as audit and Failure Mode, Effect, and Criticality Analysis (FMECA). Audit is also an educational activity, which promotes high-quality care; it should be carried out regularly. In an audit cycle we can compare what is actually done against reference standards and put in place corrective actions to improve the performances of individuals and systems. 6. Patient safety must be the first aim in every setting, in order to build safer systems, learning from errors and reducing the human and fiscal costs.

  2. Prevention of medication errors: teaching and training

    PubMed Central

    Likic, Robert; Maxwell, Simon R J

    2009-01-01

    Poor prescribing is probably the most common cause of preventable medication errors in hospitals, and many of these events involve junior doctors who have recently graduated. Prescribing is a complex skill that depends on a sound knowledge of medicines, an understanding of the principles of clinical pharmacology, the ability to make judgements concerning risks and benefits, and ideally experience. It is not surprising that errors occur. The challenge of being a prescriber is probably greater now than ever before. Medical education has changed radically in the last 20 years, reflecting concerns about an overburdened curriculum and lack of focus on social sciences. In the UK, these changes have resulted in less teaching in clinical pharmacology and practical prescribing as guaranteed features of undergraduate training and assessment. There has been growing concern, not least from students, that medical school training is not sufficient to prepare them for the pressures of becoming prescribers. Similar concerns are being expressed in other countries. While irrefutable evidence that these changes are related to medication errors identified in practice, there is circumstantial evidence that this is so. Systems analysis of errors suggests that knowledge and training are relevant factors in causation and that focused education improves prescribing performance. We believe that there is already sufficient evidence to support a careful review of how students are trained to become prescribers and how these skills are fostered in the postgraduate years. We provide a list of guiding principles on which training might be based. PMID:19594534

  3. Reducing medication errors: Teaching strategies that increase nursing students' awareness of medication errors and their prevention.

    PubMed

    Latimer, Sharon; Hewitt, Jayne; Stanbrough, Rebecca; McAndrew, Ron

    2017-02-14

    Medication errors are a patient safety and quality of care issue. There is evidence to suggest many undergraduate nursing curricula do not adequately educate students about the factors that contribute to medication errors and possible strategies to prevent them. We designed and developed a suite of teaching strategies that raise students' awareness of medication error producing situations and their prevention.

  4. Preventing medical errors by designing benign failures.

    PubMed

    Grout, John R

    2003-07-01

    One way to successfully reduce medical errors is to design health care systems that are more resistant to the tendencies of human beings to err. One interdisciplinary approach entails creating design changes, mitigating human errors, and making human error irrelevant to outcomes. This approach is intended to facilitate the creation of benign failures, which have been called mistake-proofing devices and forcing functions elsewhere. USING FAULT TREES TO DESIGN FORCING FUNCTIONS: A fault tree is a graphical tool used to understand the relationships that either directly cause or contribute to the cause of a particular failure. A careful analysis of a fault tree enables the analyst to anticipate how the process will behave after the change. EXAMPLE OF AN APPLICATION: A scenario in which a patient is scalded while bathing can serve as an example of how multiple fault trees can be used to design forcing functions. The first fault tree shows the undesirable event--patient scalded while bathing. The second fault tree has a benign event--no water. Adding a scald valve changes the outcome from the undesirable event ("patient scalded while bathing") to the benign event ("no water") Analysis of fault trees does not ensure or guarantee that changes necessary to eliminate error actually occur. Most mistake-proofing is used to prevent simple errors and to create well-defended processes, but complex errors can also result. The utilization of mistake-proofing or forcing functions can be thought of as changing the logic of a process. Errors that formerly caused undesirable failures can be converted into the causes of benign failures. The use of fault trees can provide a variety of insights into the design of forcing functions that will improve patient safety.

  5. Medication error prevention in the school setting: a closer look.

    PubMed

    Richmond, Sandra L

    2011-09-01

    Empirical evidence has identified that medication errors occur in the school setting; however, there is little research that identifies medication error prevention strategies specific to the school environment. This article reviews common medication errors that occur in the school setting and presents potential medication prevention strategies, such as developing medication error reporting systems, using technology, reviewing systems and processes that support current medication administration practices, and limiting distractions. The Standards of Professional Performance developed by the National Association of School Nurses identifies the need for school nurses to enhance the quality and effectiveness of their practice. Improving the safety of medication administration and preventing medication errors are examples of how nurses can demonstrate meeting this standard.

  6. Medication errors: pharmacovigilance centres in detection and prevention

    PubMed Central

    Bencheikh, Rachida Soulaymani; Benabdallah, Ghita

    2009-01-01

    Detecting medication errors needs collaboration between various organizations, such as patient safety institutions, pharmacovigilance centres, and poison control centres. In order to evaluate the input of pharmacovigilance centres and poison control centres in detecting and evaluating medication errors a pilot project was initiated by the World Alliance for Patient Safety in collaboration with the Uppsala Monitoring Centre; the Moroccan pharmacovigilance centre acted as project coordinator. As part of this project, a questionnaire on detecting medication errors was circulated to pharmacovigilance centres and poison control centres around the world, in order to assess their ability to detect and analyse medication errors. The results showed that through their databases pharmacovigilance centres can detect, identify, analyse, and classify medication errors and carry out root cause analysis, which is an important tool in preventing medication errors. The duties of pharmacovigilance centres in preventing medication errors include informing health-care professionals about the importance of reporting such errors and creating a culture of patient safety. Pharmacovigilance centres aim to prevent medication errors in collaboration with poison control centres. Such collaboration allows improved detection and improved preventive strategies. In addition, collaboration with regulatory authorities is important in finalizing decisions. Collaboration between pharmacovigilance centres and poison control centres should be strengthened and bridges need to be built linking pharmacovigilance centres, poison control centres, and organizations dedicated to patient safety, in order to avoid duplication of workload. PMID:19594539

  7. Medication errors: pharmacovigilance centres in detection and prevention.

    PubMed

    Bencheikh, Rachida Soulaymani; Benabdallah, Ghita

    2009-06-01

    1. Detecting medication errors needs collaboration between various organizations, such as patient safety institutions, pharmacovigilance centres, and poison control centres. In order to evaluate the input of pharmacovigilance centres and poison control centres in detecting and evaluating medication errors a pilot project was initiated by the World Alliance for Patient Safety in collaboration with the Uppsala Monitoring Centre; the Moroccan pharmacovigilance centre acted as project coordinator. As part of this project, a questionnaire on detecting medication errors was circulated to pharmacovigilance centres and poison control centres around the world, in order to assess their ability to detect and analyse medication errors. 2. The results showed that through their databases pharmacovigilance centres can detect, identify, analyse, and classify medication errors and carry out root cause analysis, which is an important tool in preventing medication errors. 3. The duties of pharmacovigilance centres in preventing medication errors include informing health-care professionals about the importance of reporting such errors and creating a culture of patient safety. Pharmacovigilance centres aim to prevent medication errors in collaboration with poison control centres. Such collaboration allows improved detection and improved preventive strategies. In addition, collaboration with regulatory authorities is important in finalizing decisions. 4. Collaboration between pharmacovigilance centres and poison control centres should be strengthened and bridges need to be built linking pharmacovigilance centres, poison control centres, and organizations dedicated to patient safety, in order to avoid duplication of workload.

  8. Preventing medication errors with nimodipine by compounding proper dosage forms.

    PubMed

    McElhiney, Linda F

    2013-01-01

    Pharmacists can play an active role in preventing tragic medication errors by using United States Pharmacopeia standards, as well as other compounding guidelines, by using due diligence, and by following written standard operating procedures. Nimodipine is shown within this article as an example of the importance of proper dosing of a drug because, since the approval of nimodipine capsules in 1988, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration has identified 31 cases of medication errors associated with its use. Pharmacists can compound nimodipine oral suspension and prepare the doses in oral syringes for the nursing and medical staff.

  9. Promoting patient safety and preventing medical error in emergency departments.

    PubMed

    Schenkel, S

    2000-11-01

    An estimated 108,000 people die each year from potentially preventable iatrogenic injury. One in 50 hospitalized patients experiences a preventable adverse event. Up to 3% of these injuries and events take place in emergency departments. With long and detailed training, morbidity and mortality conferences, and an emphasis on practitioner responsibility, medicine has traditionally faced the challenges of medical error and patient safety through an approach focused almost exclusively on individual practitioners. Yet no matter how well trained and how careful health care providers are, individuals will make mistakes because they are human. In general medicine, the study of adverse drug events has led the way to new methods of error detection and error prevention. A combination of chart reviews, incident logs, observation, and peer solicitation has provided a quantitative tool to demonstrate the effectiveness of interventions such as computer order entry and pharmacist order review. In emergency medicine (EM), error detection has focused on subjects of high liability: missed myocardial infarctions, missed appendicitis, and misreading of radiographs. Some system-level efforts in error prevention have focused on teamwork, on strengthening communication between pharmacists and emergency physicians, on automating drug dosing and distribution, and on rationalizing shifts. This article reviews the definitions, detection, and presentation of error in medicine and EM. Based on review of the current literature, recommendations are offered to enhance the likelihood of reduction of error in EM practice.

  10. Role of clinical pharmacists' interventions in detection and prevention of medication errors in a medical ward.

    PubMed

    Khalili, Hossein; Farsaei, Shadi; Rezaee, Haleh; Dashti-Khavidaki, Simin

    2011-04-01

    Frequency and type of medication errors and role of clinical pharmacists in detection and prevention of these errors were evaluated in this study. During this interventional study, clinical pharmacists monitored 861 patients' medical records and detected, reported, and prevented medication errors in the infectious disease ward of a major referral teaching hospital in Tehran, Iran. Error was defined as any preventable events that lead to inappropriate medication use related to the health care professionals or patients regardless of outcomes. Classification of the errors was done based on Pharmaceutical Care Network Europe Foundation drug-related problem coding. During the study period, 112 medication errors (0.13 errors per patient) were detected by clinical pharmacists. Physicians, nurses, and patients were responsible for 55 (49.1%), 54 (48.2%), and 3 (2.7%) of medication errors, respectively. Drug dosing, choice, use and interactions were the most causes of error in medication processes, respectively. All of these errors were detected, reported, and prevented by infectious diseases ward clinical pharmacists. Medication errors occur frequently in medical wards. Clinical pharmacists' interventions can effectively prevent these errors. The types of errors indicate the need for continuous education and implementation of clinical pharmacist's interventions.

  11. Preventing medication errors in community pharmacy: frequency and seriousness of medication errors

    PubMed Central

    Knudsen, P; Herborg, H; Mortensen, A R; Knudsen, M; Hellebek, A

    2007-01-01

    Background Medication errors are a widespread problem which can, in the worst case, cause harm to patients. Errors can be corrected if documented and evaluated as a part of quality improvement. The Danish community pharmacies are committed to recording prescription corrections, dispensing errors and dispensing near misses. This study investigated the frequency and seriousness of these errors. Methods 40 randomly selected Danish community pharmacies collected data for a defined period. The data included four types of written report of incidents, three of which already existed at the pharmacies: prescription correction, dispensing near misses and dispensing errors. Data for the fourth type of report, on adverse drug events, were collected through a web‐based reporting system piloted for the project. Results There were 976 cases of prescription corrections, 229 cases of near misses, 203 cases of dispensing errors and 198 cases of adverse drug events. The error rate was 23/10 000 prescriptions for prescription corrections, 1/10 000 for dispensing errors and 2/10 000 for near misses. The errors that reached the patients were pooled for separate analysis. Most of these errors, and the potentially most serious ones, occurred in the transcription stage of the dispensing process. Conclusion Prescribing errors were the most frequent type of error reported. Errors that reached the patients were not frequent, but most of them were potentially harmful, and the absolute number of medication errors was high, as provision of medicine is a frequent event in primary care in Denmark. Patient safety could be further improved by optimising the opportunity to learn from the incidents described. PMID:17693678

  12. Medication administration in nursing homes: pharmacists' contribution to error prevention.

    PubMed

    Verrue, Charlotte L; Mehuys, Els; Somers, Annemie; Van Maele, Georges; Remon, Jean Paul; Petrovic, Mirko

    2010-05-01

    The elderly use a large number of medications, which exposes them to an increased risk for medication-related errors, especially in nursing homes. The aim of this study was to investigate the impact of an educational session addressing good medication administration practices on the medication administration error rate in 2 nursing homes. A before-after study was performed, comparing outcome measurements 1 month before and 1 month after implementation of a formal training session on "good medication administration principles." Medication administration errors were detected using a direct observation method. Two experts (a geriatrician and a clinical pharmacist) scored the clinical relevance of these errors. The study was carried out between March 2007 and June 2007. In both nursing homes, the overall error rate (preparation errors and administration errors) decreased after the intervention. This decrease was significant both in nursing home 1 (P < .001) and nursing home 2 (P = .049). None of the observed errors was rated highly likely to cause harm according to the experts. An educational session about good medication administration practices provided by a pharmacist is a very simple way to decrease medication administration error rates and to raise awareness on the possible clinical significance of the errors. Copyright (c) 2010 American Medical Directors Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. SIMMEON-Prep study: SIMulation of Medication Errors in ONcology: prevention of antineoplastic preparation errors.

    PubMed

    Sarfati, L; Ranchon, F; Vantard, N; Schwiertz, V; Gauthier, N; He, S; Kiouris, E; Gourc-Berthod, C; Guédat, M G; Alloux, C; Gustin, M-P; You, B; Trillet-Lenoir, V; Freyer, G; Rioufol, C

    2015-02-01

    Medication errors (ME) in oncology are known to cause serious iatrogenic complications. However, MEs still occur at each step in the anticancer chemotherapy process, particularly when injections are prepared in the hospital pharmacy. This study assessed whether a ME simulation program would help prevent ME-associated iatrogenic complications. The 5-month prospective study, consisting of three phases, was undertaken in the centralized pharmaceutical unit of a university hospital of Lyon, France. During the first simulation phase, 25 instruction sheets each containing one simulated error were inserted among various instruction sheets issued to blinded technicians. The second phase consisted of activity aimed at raising pharmacy technicians' awareness of risk of medication errors associated with antineoplastic drugs. The third phase consisted of re-enacting the error simulation process 3 months after the awareness campaign. The rate and severity of undetected medication errors were measured during the two simulation (first and third) phases. The potential seriousness of the ME was assessed using the NCC MERP(®) index. The rate of undetected medication errors decreased from 12 in the first simulation phase (48%) to five in the second simulation phase (20%, P = 0.04). The number of potential deaths due to administration of a faulty preparation decreased from three to zero. Awareness of iatrogenic risk through error simulation allowed pharmacy technicians to improve their ability to identify errors. This study is the first demonstration of the successful application of a simulation-based learning tool for reducing errors in the preparation of injectable anticancer drugs. Such a program should form part of the continuous quality improvement of risk management strategies for cancer patients. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Checklists in Neurosurgery to Decrease Preventable Medical Errors: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Enchev, Yavor

    2015-01-01

    Neurosurgery represents a zero tolerance environment for medical errors, especially preventable ones like all types of wrong site surgery, complications due to the incorrect positioning of patients for neurosurgical interventions and complications due to failure of the devices required for the specific procedure. Following the excellent and encouraging results of the safety checklists in intensive care medicine and in other surgical areas, the checklist was naturally introduced in neurosurgery. To date, the reported world experience with neurosurgical checklists is limited to 15 series with fewer than 20,000 cases in various neurosurgical areas. The purpose of this review was to study the reported neurosurgical checklists according to the following parameters: year of publication; country of origin; area of neurosurgery; type of neurosurgical procedure-elective or emergency; person in charge of the checklist completion; participants involved in completion; whether they prevented incorrect site surgery; whether they prevented complications due to incorrect positioning of the patients for neurosurgical interventions; whether they prevented complications due to failure of the devices required for the specific procedure; their specific aims; educational preparation and training; the time needed for checklist completion; study duration and phases; number of cases included; barriers to implementation; efforts to implementation; team appreciation; and safety outcomes. Based on this analysis, it could be concluded that neurosurgical checklists represent an efficient, reliable, cost-effective and time-saving tool for increasing patient safety and elevating the neurosurgeons’ self-confidence. Every neurosurgical department must develop its own neurosurgical checklist or adopt and modify an existing one according to its specific features and needs in an attempt to establish or develop its safety culture. The world, continental, regional and national neurosurgical societies

  15. [Strategies for prevention of medication errors in emergengy services].

    PubMed

    de Oliveira, Regina Célia; de Camargo, Ana Elisa Bauer; Cassiani, Silvia Helena Bortoli

    2005-01-01

    This study identified situations indicating medication errors or near misses by analyzing medication orders and the nursing staff's performance. It also implemented a cycle of lectures and a course on safety in medication administration for professionals at the emergency room in a hospital in the northeastern region of Brazil. The results showed that of 1,585 orders under analysis, 83,9% did not clearly express the medication presentation and 84.6% did not define the dosage from prescribed medication, in 34.2%, the administration time was unchecked; in 22.5%, the time had been circled. Among the non-administered medication, 26% were antibiotics and anticoagulants and 15% analgesics. The professionals participated in the implemented strategies with good attendance levels.

  16. Medication Errors

    MedlinePlus

    ... address broader product safety issues. FDA Drug Safety Communications for Drug Products Associated with Medication Errors FDA Drug Safety Communication: FDA approves brand name change for antidepressant drug ...

  17. Preventing medication errors in community pharmacy: root‐cause analysis of transcription errors

    PubMed Central

    Knudsen, P; Herborg, H; Mortensen, A R; Knudsen, M; Hellebek, A

    2007-01-01

    Background Medication errors can have serious consequences for patients, and medication safety is essential to pharmaceutical care. Insight is needed into the vulnerability of the working process at community pharmacies to identify what causes error incidents, so that the system can be improved to enhance patient safety. Methods 40 randomly selected Danish community pharmacies collected data on medication errors. Cases that reached patients were analysed, and the most serious cases were selected for root‐cause analyses by an interdisciplinary analysis team. Results 401 cases had reached patients and a substantial number of them had possible clinical significance. Most of these errors were made in the transcription stage, and the most serious were errors in strength and dosage. The analysis team identified four root causes: handwritten prescriptions; “traps” such as similarities in packaging or names, or strength and dosage stated in misleading ways; lack of effective control of prescription label and medicine; and lack of concentration caused by interruptions. Conclusion A substantial number of the medication errors identified at pharmacies that reach patients have possible clinical significance. Root‐cause analysis shows potential for identifying the underlying causes of the incidents and for providing a basis for action to improve patient safety. PMID:17693677

  18. Unit-based clinical pharmacists' prevention of serious medication errors in pediatric inpatients.

    PubMed

    Kaushal, Rainu; Bates, David W; Abramson, Erika L; Soukup, Jane R; Goldmann, Donald A

    2008-07-01

    Rates of serious medication errors in three pediatric inpatient units (intensive care, general medical, and general surgical) were measured before and after introduction of unit-based clinical pharmacists. Error rates on the study units and similar patient care units in the same hospital that served as controls were determined during six- to eight-week baseline periods and three-month periods after the introduction of unit-based clinical pharmacists (full-time in the intensive care unit [ICU] and mornings only on the general units). Nurses trained by the investigators reviewed medication orders, medication administration records, and patient charts daily to detect errors, near misses, and adverse drug events (ADEs) and determine whether near misses were intercepted. Two physicians independently reviewed and rated all data collected by the nurses. Serious medication errors were defined as preventable ADEs and nonintercepted near misses. The baseline rates of serious medication errors per 1000 patient days were 29 for the ICU, 8 for the general medical unit, and 7 for the general surgical unit. With unit-based clinical pharmacists, the ICU rate dropped to 6 per 1000 patient days. In the general care units, there was no reduction from baseline in the rates of serious medication errors. A full-time unit-based clinical pharmacist substantially decreased the rate of serious medication errors in a pediatric ICU, but a part-time pharmacist was not as effective in decreasing errors in pediatric general care units.

  19. The Institute for Safe Medication Practices and Poison Control Centers: Collaborating to Prevent Medication Errors and Unintentional Poisonings.

    PubMed

    Vaida, Allen J

    2015-06-01

    This article provides an overview on the Institute for Safe Medication Practices (ISMP), the only independent nonprofit organization in the USA devoted to the prevention of medication errors. ISMP developed the national Medication Errors Reporting Program (MERP) and investigates and analyzes errors in order to formulate recommendations to prevent further occurrences. ISMP works closely with the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA), drug manufacturers, professional organizations, and others to promote changes in package design, practice standards, and healthcare practitioner and consumer education. By collaborating with ISMP to share and disseminate information, Poison Control centers, emergency departments, and toxicologists can help decrease unintentional and accidental poisonings.

  20. Preventing medication errors in transitions of care: A patient case approach.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Ashley; Guirguis, Erenie; Grace, Yasmin

    2015-01-01

    To discuss common causes of medication errors occurring upon transitions of care and review key interventions that should be implemented to ensure effective communication and accurate completion of medication reconciliation. MEDLINE (1946 to November 2014) using MeSH terms medication errors, medication reconciliation, and nursing homes in addition to conventional text words, including transitions of care and medication safety; Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality Patient Safety Network using search terms transitions of care, medication errors, and medication reconciliation; and relevant websites of national organizations pertaining to transitions of care and medication reconciliation. Limited to English-language journals with no limitation set on the year of publication for clinical trials, meta-analyses, and reviews. At the authors' discretion, preference was given to references focusing on pharmacists' role in transitions of care and medication reconciliation. Most medication errors stem from a lack of effective communication between health care providers during transitions of care. Part of successful communication and correct patient hand-off is completing accurate medication reconciliation. A patient case highlights a life-threatening medication error that occurred during a transition of care due to ineffective communication between a pharmacist and nurse while transferring medication information. To provide patients with accurate medication information, pharmacists should perform medication reconciliation upon transitions of care using The Joint Commission's five-step process. Pharmacists can conduct numerous interventions to prevent medication errors during transitions of care and ensure patient safety. Pharmacists are integral to evaluating the appropriateness of medication use, ensuring information is updated in the health record, and verbally communicating accurate information to other health professionals.

  1. Use of a clinical event monitor to prevent and detect medication errors.

    PubMed Central

    Payne, T. H.; Savarino, J.; Marshall, R.; Hoey, C. T.

    2000-01-01

    Errors in health care facilities are common and often unrecognized. We have used our clinical event monitor to prevent and detect medication errors by scrutinizing electronic messages sent to it when any medication order is written in our facility. A growing collection of medication safety rules covering dose limit errors, laboratory monitoring, and other topics may be applied to each medication order message to provide an additional layer of protection beyond existing order checks, reminders, and alerts available within our computer-based record system. During a typical day the event monitor receives 4802 messages, of which 4719 pertain to medication orders. We have found the clinical event monitor to be a valuable tool for clinicians and quality management groups charged with improving medication safety. PMID:11079962

  2. Preventable Medical Errors Driven Modeling of Medical Best Practice Guidance Systems.

    PubMed

    Ou, Andrew Y-Z; Jiang, Yu; Wu, Po-Liang; Sha, Lui; Berlin, Richard B

    2017-01-01

    In a medical environment such as Intensive Care Unit, there are many possible reasons to cause errors, and one important reason is the effect of human intellectual tasks. When designing an interactive healthcare system such as medical Cyber-Physical-Human Systems (CPHSystems), it is important to consider whether the system design can mitigate the errors caused by these tasks or not. In this paper, we first introduce five categories of generic intellectual tasks of humans, where tasks among each category may lead to potential medical errors. Then, we present an integrated modeling framework to model a medical CPHSystem and use UPPAAL as the foundation to integrate and verify the whole medical CPHSystem design models. With a verified and comprehensive model capturing the human intellectual tasks effects, we can design a more accurate and acceptable system. We use a cardiac arrest resuscitation guidance and navigation system (CAR-GNSystem) for such medical CPHSystem modeling. Experimental results show that the CPHSystem models help determine system design flaws and can mitigate the potential medical errors caused by the human intellectual tasks.

  3. Preventing medical errors in point-of-care testing: security, validation, safeguards, and connectivity..

    PubMed

    Kost, G J

    2001-10-01

    o prevent medical errors, improve user performance, and enhance the quality, safety, and connectivity (bidirectional communication) of point-of-care testing. Group A included 37 multidisciplinary experts in point-of-care testing programs in critical care and other hospital disciplines. Group B included 175 professional point-of-care managers, specialists, clinicians, and researchers. The total number of participants equaled 212. This study followed a systems approach. Expert specifications for prevention of medical errors were incorporated into the designs of security, validation, performance, and emergency systems. Additional safeguards need to be implemented through instrument software options and point-of-care coordinators. Connectivity will be facilitated by standards that eliminate deficiencies in instrument communication and device compatibility. Assessment of control features on handheld, portable, and transportable point-of-care instruments shows that current error reduction features lag behind needs. CONCENSUS PROCESS: Step 1: United States national survey and collation of group A expert requirements for security, validation, and performance. Step 2: Design of parallel systems for these functions. Step 3: Written critique and improvement of the error-prevention systems during 4 successive presentations to group B participants over 9 months until system designs stabilized into final consensus form. The consensus process produced 6 conclusions for preventing medical errors in point-of-care testing: (1) adopt operator certification and validation in point-of-care testing programs; (2) implement security, validation, performance, and emergency systems on existing and new devices; (3) require flexible, user-defined error-prevention system options on instruments as a prerequisite to federal licensing of new diagnostic tests and devices; (4) integrate connectivity standards for bidirectional information exchange; (5) preserve fast therapeutic turnaround time of

  4. The successful application of business coaching to decrease preventable medical errors.

    PubMed

    Cassatly, Michael G; Mitsch, Darelyn

    2011-01-01

    The number and cost of preventable medical injuries and deaths continue to rise in the U.S. healthcare system despite many attempts to avert such occurrences. The Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services has prudently decided to deny claims for the healthcare costs incurred in treating certain preventable injuries. With the passage of a the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act, the list of denied healthcare procedures to correct preventable medical injuries will grow, resulting in a further squeezing of the profit margins of medical institutions and providers. In this article, we show that business coaching of the healthcare team is successful in reversing the alarming growth rate of medical errors, thus ensuring the financial success of healthcare institutions adopting business coaching practices.

  5. Prevention of pediatric medication errors by hospital pharmacists and the potential benefit of computerized physician order entry.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jerome K; Herzog, Nicole S; Kaushal, Rainu; Park, Christine; Mochizuki, Carol; Weingarten, Scott R

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this work was to characterize medication errors and adverse drug events intercepted by a system of pediatric clinical pharmacists and to determine whether the addition of a computerized physician order entry system would improve medication safety. The study included 16,938 medication orders for 678 admissions to the pediatric units of a large academic community hospital. Pediatric clinical pharmacists reviewed medication orders and monitored subsequent medication use. Medication errors and adverse drug events were identified by daily review of documentation, voluntary reporting, and solicitation. Each potentially harmful medication error was judged whether or not it was intercepted and, if not, whether it would have been captured by a computerized physician order entry system. Overall, 865 medication errors occurred, corresponding with a rate of 5.2 per 100 medication orders. A near-miss rate of 0.96% and a preventable adverse drug event rate of 0.09% were observed. Overall, 78% of potentially harmful prescribing errors were intercepted; however, none of the potentially harmful errors occurring at administration was intercepted and accounted for 50% of preventable adverse drug events. A computerized physician order entry system could capture additional potentially harmful prescribing and transcription errors (54%-73%) but not administration errors (0% vs 6%). A system of pediatric clinical pharmacists effectively intercepted inpatient prescribing errors but did not capture potentially harmful medication administration errors. The addition of a computerized physician order entry system to pharmacists is unlikely to prevent administration errors, which pose the highest risk of patient injury.

  6. Paediatric Patient Safety and the Need for Aviation Black Box Thinking to Learn From and Prevent Medication Errors.

    PubMed

    Huynh, Chi; Wong, Ian C K; Correa-West, Jo; Terry, David; McCarthy, Suzanne

    2017-04-01

    Since the publication of To Err Is Human: Building a Safer Health System in 1999, there has been much research conducted into the epidemiology, nature and causes of medication errors in children, from prescribing and supply to administration. It is reassuring to see growing evidence of improving medication safety in children; however, based on media reports, it can be seen that serious and fatal medication errors still occur. This critical opinion article examines the problem of medication errors in children and provides recommendations for research, training of healthcare professionals and a culture shift towards dealing with medication errors. There are three factors that we need to consider to unravel what is missing and why fatal medication errors still occur. (1) Who is involved and affected by the medication error? (2) What factors hinder staff and organisations from learning from mistakes? Does the fear of litigation and criminal charges deter healthcare professionals from voluntarily reporting medication errors? (3) What are the educational needs required to prevent medication errors? It is important to educate future healthcare professionals about medication errors and human factors to prevent these from happening. Further research is required to apply aviation's 'black box' principles in healthcare to record and learn from near misses and errors to prevent future events. There is an urgent need for the black box investigations to be published and made public for the benefit of other organisations that may have similar potential risks for adverse events. International sharing of investigations and learning is also needed.

  7. [Prevention of medication errors in healthcare transition of patients treated with apomorphine].

    PubMed

    Ucha Sanmartin, M; Martín Vila, A; López Vidal, C; Caaamaño Barreiro, M; Piñeiro Corrales, G

    2014-05-01

    The transition of patients between different levels of care process is a particular risk in the production of medication errors. The aim of this paper is to analyze the role of the pharmacist in preventing errors transition care to ensure a safe and cross pharmacotherapy of patients.Transversal, observational and descriptive study in a University Hospital that has a pharmacy service that integrates specialized inpatient care and health centers. Transition of care a patient treated with Apormorfina was analyzed to determine the keypoints of action of the pharmacist. Demographics, disease and medication history, and care transition episodes were collected through the pharmacy program and electronics history.The pharmacist did tasks adapting, reconciliation, management and reporting of medication to the health care team to prevent medication errors in care transition of patients treated with drugs requiring special handling .In conclusion, this work represents perfectly the key role of the pharmacist as coordinator of safe and transverse pharmacotherapy of patients. Copyright AULA MEDICA EDICIONES 2014. Published by AULA MEDICA. All rights reserved.

  8. Deploying information technology and continuous control monitoring systems in hospitals to prevent medication errors.

    PubMed

    Escobar-Rodríguez, Tomás; Monge-Lozano, Pedro; Romero-Alonso, Ma Mercedes; Bolívar-Raya, Ma Antonia

    2012-01-01

    The serious repercussions of healthcare errors on patient safety have led hospitals to deploy information technology and continuous control monitoring systems to prevent them. Hospitals are moving away from traditional paper-based systems and focusing on designing new systems that prevent errors, using information technologies to catalyse the process re-engineering. This paper presents a case study that analyses the effect of computerised physician order entry and automated unit-based medication storage and distribution systems on the drug ordering and delivery process. It is concluded that information technology and continuous control monitoring systems have led to significant process re-engineering in the sequential stages of the drug ordering and delivery system. The new systems have also provided the opportunity to improve information available. This is an exploratory case study and the conclusions drawn from it offer possible routes for future research in this field.

  9. A prospective three-step intervention study to prevent medication errors in drug handling in paediatric care.

    PubMed

    Niemann, Dorothee; Bertsche, Astrid; Meyrath, David; Koepf, Ellen D; Traiser, Carolin; Seebald, Katja; Schmitt, Claus P; Hoffmann, Georg F; Haefeli, Walter E; Bertsche, Thilo

    2015-01-01

    To prevent medication errors in drug handling in a paediatric ward. One in five preventable adverse drug events in hospitalised children is caused by medication errors. Errors in drug prescription have been studied frequently, but data regarding drug handling, including drug preparation and administration, are scarce. A three-step intervention study including monitoring procedure was used to detect and prevent medication errors in drug handling. After approval by the ethics committee, pharmacists monitored drug handling by nurses on an 18-bed paediatric ward in a university hospital prior to and following each intervention step. They also conducted a questionnaire survey aimed at identifying knowledge deficits. Each intervention step targeted different causes of errors. The handout mainly addressed knowledge deficits, the training course addressed errors caused by rule violations and slips, and the reference book addressed knowledge-, memory- and rule-based errors. The number of patients who were subjected to at least one medication error in drug handling decreased from 38/43 (88%) to 25/51 (49%) following the third intervention, and the overall frequency of errors decreased from 527 errors in 581 processes (91%) to 116/441 (26%). The issue of the handout reduced medication errors caused by knowledge deficits regarding, for instance, the correct 'volume of solvent for IV drugs' from 49-25%. Paediatric drug handling is prone to errors. A three-step intervention effectively decreased the high frequency of medication errors by addressing the diversity of their causes. Worldwide, nurses are in charge of drug handling, which constitutes an error-prone but often-neglected step in drug therapy. Detection and prevention of errors in daily routine is necessary for a safe and effective drug therapy. Our three-step intervention reduced errors and is suitable to be tested in other wards and settings. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. No-fault compensation for medical injuries: the prospect for error prevention.

    PubMed

    Studdert, D M; Brennan, T A

    2001-07-11

    Leading patient safety proposals promote the design and implementation of error prevention strategies that target systems used to deliver care and eschew individual blame. They also call for candor among practitioners about the causes and consequences of medical injury. Both goals collide with fundamental tenets of the medical malpractice system. Thus, the challenge of addressing error in medicine demands a thorough reconsideration of the legal mechanisms currently used to deal with harms in health care. In this article, we describe an alternative to litigation that does not predicate compensation on proof of practitioner fault, suggest how it might be operationalized, and argue that there is a pressing need to test its promise. We tackle traditional criticisms of "no-fault" compensation systems for medical injury-specifically, concerns about their cost and the presumption that eliminating liability will dilute incentives to deliver high-quality care. Our recent empirical work suggests that a model designed around avoidable or preventable injuries, as opposed to negligent ones, would not exceed the costs of current malpractice systems in the United States. Implementation of such a model promises to promote quality by harmonizing injury compensation with patient safety objectives, especially if it is linked to reforms that make institutions, rather than individuals, primarily answerable for injuries.

  11. Are bad outcomes from questionable clinical decisions preventable medical errors? A case of cascade iatrogenesis.

    PubMed

    Hofer, Timothy P; Hayward, Rodney A

    2002-09-03

    When a patient with multiple, complicated conditions is admitted to a hospital and risky procedures are performed that result in adverse outcomes, the difficulties inherent in determining whether and when a preventable medical error has occurred must be addressed. This article analyzes the case of a 40-year-old woman with a history of chronic aortic dissection and pericardial effusion who was admitted to a teaching hospital with unilateral swelling of her left breast and arm accompanied by dyspnea. During her hospitalization, the patient developed multiple complications from the diagnostic and therapeutic procedures that were performed. The authors argue that this case illustrates some limitations of routinely undertaking time-consuming and costly reviews, or "root-cause analyses," as a patient safety strategy when they are unlikely to reveal remediable "errors" or to suggest better systems of care that will prevent errors. The ability to establish causality through post hoc reviews is the linchpin in the recommendation for widespread adoption of error reporting and reviews. When causality is not established, it is impossible to know whether any changes adopted as a result of the reviews will be effective. This case, in which the causal pathways to the adverse events are very uncertain, may be much more typical than the egregious errors featured in a classic root-cause analysis. The authors recommend that the relative merits of this approach to patient safety be compared with other proven, cost-effective interventions to improve quality, such as appropriate treatment of myocardial infarction or depression, before scarce resources and enormous human capital are allocated for widespread implementation.

  12. A string of mistakes: the importance of cascade analysis in describing, counting, and preventing medical errors.

    PubMed

    Woolf, Steven H; Kuzel, Anton J; Dovey, Susan M; Phillips, Robert L

    2004-01-01

    Notions about the most common errors in medicine currently rest on conjecture and weak epidemiologic evidence. We sought to determine whether cascade analysis is of value in clarifying the epidemiology and causes of errors and whether physician reports are sensitive to the impact of errors on patients. Eighteen US family physicians participating in a 6-country international study filed 75 anonymous error reports. The narratives were examined to identify the chain of events and the predominant proximal errors. We tabulated the consequences to patients, both reported by physicians and inferred by investigators. A chain of errors was documented in 77% of incidents. Although 83% of the errors that ultimately occurred were mistakes in treatment or diagnosis, 2 of 3 were set in motion by errors in communication. Fully 80% of the errors that initiated cascades involved informational or personal miscommunication. Examples of informational miscommunication included communication breakdowns among colleagues and with patients (44%), misinformation in the medical record (21%), mishandling of patients' requests and messages (18%), inaccessible medical records (12%), and inadequate reminder systems (5%). When asked whether the patient was harmed, physicians answered affirmatively in 43% of cases in which their narratives described harms. Psychological and emotional effects accounted for 17% of physician-reported consequences but 69% of investigator-inferred consequences. Cascade analysis of physicians' error reports is helpful in understanding the precipitant chain of events, but physicians provide incomplete information about how patients are affected. Miscommunication appears to play an important role in propagating diagnostic and treatment mistakes.

  13. Using total quality management approach to improve patient safety by preventing medication error incidences(*).

    PubMed

    Yousef, Nadin; Yousef, Farah

    2017-09-04

    Whereas one of the predominant causes of medication errors is a drug administration error, a previous study related to our investigations and reviews estimated that the incidences of medication errors constituted 6.7 out of 100 administrated medication doses. Therefore, we aimed by using six sigma approach to propose a way that reduces these errors to become less than 1 out of 100 administrated medication doses by improving healthcare professional education and clearer handwritten prescriptions. The study was held in a General Government Hospital. First, we systematically studied the current medication use process. Second, we used six sigma approach by utilizing the five-step DMAIC process (Define, Measure, Analyze, Implement, Control) to find out the real reasons behind such errors. This was to figure out a useful solution to avoid medication error incidences in daily healthcare professional practice. Data sheet was used in Data tool and Pareto diagrams were used in Analyzing tool. In our investigation, we reached out the real cause behind administrated medication errors. As Pareto diagrams used in our study showed that the fault percentage in administrated phase was 24.8%, while the percentage of errors related to prescribing phase was 42.8%, 1.7 folds. This means that the mistakes in prescribing phase, especially because of the poor handwritten prescriptions whose percentage in this phase was 17.6%, are responsible for the consequent) mistakes in this treatment process later on. Therefore, we proposed in this study an effective low cost strategy based on the behavior of healthcare workers as Guideline Recommendations to be followed by the physicians. This method can be a prior caution to decrease errors in prescribing phase which may lead to decrease the administrated medication error incidences to less than 1%. This improvement way of behavior can be efficient to improve hand written prescriptions and decrease the consequent errors related to administrated

  14. The application of crime science to the prevention of medication errors.

    PubMed

    Cox, Karen

    It is now accepted that human error in healthcare is inevitable and that a punitive response does not facilitate patient safety. Reason's (2000) system approach acknowledges that adverse events, such as medication errors, rarely have a single explanation and advocates the review of systemic factors, such as organizational culture, management and strategy. Rational choice theory has much in common with the system approach but the emphasis is on understanding the decision-making process of those who make errors. It could therefore be used in conjunction with the system approach to enhance the ability of healthcare providers to learn from medication errors and other adverse events. The aim of this article is to explore the relationship between rational choice theory and the system approach to error management in nursing.

  15. Implementation of a custom alert to prevent medication-timing errors associated with computerized prescriber order entry.

    PubMed

    Idemoto, Lori M; Williams, Barbara L; Ching, Joan M; Blackmore, C Craig

    2015-09-01

    The implementation of a custom alert to prevent medication-timing errors associated with the use of a computerized prescriber order-entry (CPOE) system is described. In early 2013, Virginia Mason Medical Center began work to modify the CPOE system to make it impossible for a medication-timing error to occur. A visual control, a custom alert that forced prescribers to "self-inspect with pause" (a soft-stop override) before signing an order that may result in a medication-timing error, was developed. The prescriber could choose to modify the order to skip the next dose or change the start date or time of the order, cancel the order, or continue without altering the order. The custom alert was designed to fire only for medications that are administered once or twice daily. The effectiveness of the intervention was evaluated with interrupted time series before-and-after analysis of medication-timing errors. Outcomes measured included the proportion of errors that were corrected by the prescriber before signing the order and the number of medication-timing errors that reached patients. The proportion of orders where a prescriber modified the order as a result of the alert increased from 12% before the intervention to 29% postintervention (p > 0.001), and this percentage continued to increase at five months postintervention (p < 0.001). The percentage of medication-timing errors that reached the patient decreased by 50% in the postintervention period. Medication-timing errors associated with the use of a CPOE system were corrected through implementation of a customized alert. Copyright © 2015 by the American Society of Health-System Pharmacists, Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Investigating the Causes of Medication Errors and Strategies to Prevention of Them from Nurses and Nursing Student Viewpoint

    PubMed Central

    Gorgich, Enam Alhagh Charkhat; Barfroshan, Sanam; Ghoreishi, Gholamreza; Yaghoobi, Maryam

    2016-01-01

    Introduction and Aim: Medication errors as a serious problem in world and one of the most common medical errors that threaten patient safety and may lead to even death of them. The purpose of this study was to investigate the causes of medication errors and strategies to prevention of them from nurses and nursing student viewpoint. Materials & Methods: This cross-sectional descriptive study was conducted on 327 nursing staff of khatam-al-anbia hospital and 62 intern nursing students in nursing and midwifery school of Zahedan, Iran, enrolled through the availability sampling in 2015. The data were collected by the valid and reliable questionnaire. To analyze the data, descriptive statistics, T-test and ANOVA were applied by use of SPSS16 software. Findings: The results showed that the most common causes of medications errors in nursing were tiredness due increased workload (97.8%), and in nursing students were drug calculation, (77.4%). The most important way for prevention in nurses and nursing student opinion, was reducing the work pressure by increasing the personnel, proportional to the number and condition of patients and also creating a unit as medication calculation. Also there was a significant relationship between the type of ward and the mean of medication errors in two groups. Conclusion: Based on the results it is recommended that nurse-managers resolve the human resources problem, provide workshops and in-service education about preparing medications, side-effects of drugs and pharmacological knowledge. Using electronic medications cards is a measure which reduces medications errors. PMID:27045413

  17. A String of Mistakes: The Importance of Cascade Analysis in Describing, Counting, and Preventing Medical Errors

    PubMed Central

    Woolf, Steven H.; Kuzel, Anton J.; Dovey, Susan M.; Phillips, Robert L.

    2004-01-01

    BACKGROUND Notions about the most common errors in medicine currently rest on conjecture and weak epidemiologic evidence. We sought to determine whether cascade analysis is of value in clarifying the epidemiology and causes of errors and whether physician reports are sensitive to the impact of errors on patients. METHODS Eighteen US family physicians participating in a 6-country international study filed 75 anonymous error reports. The narratives were examined to identify the chain of events and the predominant proximal errors. We tabulated the consequences to patients, both reported by physicians and inferred by investigators. RESULTS A chain of errors was documented in 77% of incidents. Although 83% of the errors that ultimately occurred were mistakes in treatment or diagnosis, 2 of 3 were set in motion by errors in communication. Fully 80% of the errors that initiated cascades involved informational or personal miscommunication. Examples of informational miscommunication included communication breakdowns among colleagues and with patients (44%), misinformation in the medical record (21%), mishandling of patients’ requests and messages (18%), inaccessible medical records (12%), and inadequate reminder systems (5%). When asked whether the patient was harmed, physicians answered affirmatively in 43% of cases in which their narratives described harms. Psychological and emotional effects accounted for 17% of physician-reported consequences but 69% of investigator-inferred consequences. CONCLUSIONS Cascade analysis of physicians’ error reports is helpful in understanding the precipitant chain of events, but physicians provide incomplete information about how patients are affected. Miscommunication appears to play an important role in propagating diagnostic and treatment mistakes. PMID:15335130

  18. Analysis of Clinical Interventions and the Impact of Pediatric Pharmacists on Medication Error Prevention in a Teaching Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Cunningham, Kelli J.

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Research has shown that the potential risk for medication errors within the pediatric inpatient population is about 3 times as high as for adults; however, there is limited information regarding the impact of a pediatric pharmacist's contribution to decreasing medication errors and adverse drug events (ADEs). The purpose of this study was to record and analyze all interventions during a 2-month time span in a pediatric teaching hospital to determine the benefit of having a pediatrics-trained clinical pharmacist on the floor. METHODS Pediatric pharmacists prospectively collected data for all interventions and medication errors made between July 1 and August 31, 2010. The pediatric hospital comprises 87 beds, and data were collected during the influx of new pediatric resident interns on the general pediatric ward and pediatric and neonatal intensive care units. RESULTS During the study period, 1315 interventions were recorded, which is an average of 21 interventions per day. Most interventions were made through order entry. Errors made up 24.5% of all interventions, with the most common cause of error being prescribing. Physicians with the least amount of training made the most errors. Of order pages scanned, 5.9% contained an error in the order; however, only 0.2% of all errors reached the patient. CONCLUSIONS This study highlighted the impact a pediatric pharmacist can make on prevention of ADEs and medication errors. Only 0.2% of all errors made during the study period reached the patient owing to interventions made by the pediatric pharmacists, which shows a vast improvement in patient safety. PMID:23413180

  19. Analysis of clinical interventions and the impact of pediatric pharmacists on medication error prevention in a teaching hospital.

    PubMed

    Cunningham, Kelli J

    2012-10-01

    Research has shown that the potential risk for medication errors within the pediatric inpatient population is about 3 times as high as for adults; however, there is limited information regarding the impact of a pediatric pharmacist's contribution to decreasing medication errors and adverse drug events (ADEs). The purpose of this study was to record and analyze all interventions during a 2-month time span in a pediatric teaching hospital to determine the benefit of having a pediatrics-trained clinical pharmacist on the floor. Pediatric pharmacists prospectively collected data for all interventions and medication errors made between July 1 and August 31, 2010. The pediatric hospital comprises 87 beds, and data were collected during the influx of new pediatric resident interns on the general pediatric ward and pediatric and neonatal intensive care units. During the study period, 1315 interventions were recorded, which is an average of 21 interventions per day. Most interventions were made through order entry. Errors made up 24.5% of all interventions, with the most common cause of error being prescribing. Physicians with the least amount of training made the most errors. Of order pages scanned, 5.9% contained an error in the order; however, only 0.2% of all errors reached the patient. This study highlighted the impact a pediatric pharmacist can make on prevention of ADEs and medication errors. Only 0.2% of all errors made during the study period reached the patient owing to interventions made by the pediatric pharmacists, which shows a vast improvement in patient safety.

  20. Impact of a clinical decision support system for high-alert medications on the prevention of prescription errors.

    PubMed

    Lee, JaeHo; Han, Hyewon; Ock, Minsu; Lee, Sang-il; Lee, SunGyo; Jo, Min-Woo

    2014-12-01

    To evaluate the impact of a high-alert medication clinical decision support system called HARMLESS on point-of-order entry errors in a tertiary hospital. HARMLESS was designed to provide three kinds of interventions for five high-alert medications: clinical knowledge support, pop-ups for erroneous orders that block the order or provide a warning, and order recommendations. The impact of this program on prescription order was evaluated by comparing the orders in 6 month periods before and after implementing the program, by analyzing the intervention log data, and by checking for order pattern changes. During the entire evaluation period, there were 357,417 orders and 5233 logs. After HARMLESS deployment, orders that omitted dilution fluids and exceeded the maximum dose dropped from 12,878 and 214 cases to 0 and 9 cases, respectively. The latter nine cases were unexpected, but after the responsible programming error was corrected, there were no further such cases. If all blocking interventions were seen as errors that were prevented, this meant that 4137 errors (3584 of which were 'dilution fluid omitted' errors) were prevented over the 6-month post-deployment period. There were some unexpected order pattern changes after deployment and several unexpected errors emerged, including intramuscular or intravenous push orders for potassium chloride (although a case review revealed that the drug was not actually administered via these methods) and an increase in pro re nata (PRN; administer when required) orders for most drugs. HARMLESS effectively implemented blocking interventions but was associated with the emergence of unexpected errors. After a program is deployed, it must be monitored and subjected to data analysis to fix bugs and prevent the emergence of new error types. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. The Efficacy of Patients’ Wristband Bar-code on Prevention of Medical Errors

    PubMed Central

    Khammarnia, M.; Kassani, A.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Background Patient misidentification, as a major patient safety issue, occurs in any healthcare setting and leads to inappropriate medical procedures, diagnosis or treatment, with serious outcomes. Objectives The study aimed to investigate the effectiveness of wristband bar-code medication scanning to reduce medical errors (ME). Methods A meta-analysis study was conducted. The relevant studies were searched in PubMed, Embase, Cochrane Library, Web of Science and Scopus from 1990 to March 2015. Thereafter, the studies retrieved were screened based on predefined inclusion and exclusion criteria. Data were extracted, and the quality of the included studies was evaluated using the STROBE checklist. Results In total, 14 articles involving 483 cases were included. The meta-analysis indicated that the use of wristband bar-code medication scanning can reduce the ME around 57.5% (OR=0.425, 95% CI: 0.28-0.65, P<0.001). The study results showed a marked heterogeneity in the subgroup analysis (I-squared=98%). This was I2=70.35, P-value=0.018 for the type of samples and I2=99%, P-value<0.001 for years and countries. Conclusion Wristband bar-code medication scanning can decrease the ME in hospital setting. Since the patient’s safety is the main goal of the World Health Organization, it is recommended that a unique patient identification barcode should be used with name, medical record number, and bar-coded financial number. PMID:26767066

  2. The cost-saving effect and prevention of medication errors by clinical pharmacist intervention in a nephrology unit.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chia-Chi; Hsiao, Fei-Yuan; Shen, Li-Jiuan; Wu, Chien-Chih

    2017-08-01

    Medication errors may lead to adverse drug events (ADEs), which endangers patient safety and increases healthcare-related costs. The on-ward deployment of clinical pharmacists has been shown to reduce preventable ADEs, and save costs. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the ADEs prevention and cost-saving effects by clinical pharmacist deployment in a nephrology ward.This was a retrospective study, which compared the number of pharmacist interventions 1 year before and after a clinical pharmacist was deployed in a nephrology ward. The clinical pharmacist attended ward rounds, reviewed and revised all medication orders, and gave active recommendations of medication use. For intervention analysis, the numbers and types of the pharmacist's interventions in medication orders and the active recommendations were compared. For cost analysis, both estimated cost saving and avoidance were calculated and compared.The total numbers of pharmacist interventions in medication orders were 824 in 2012 (preintervention), and 1977 in 2013 (postintervention). The numbers of active recommendation were 40 in 2012, and 253 in 2013. The estimated cost savings in 2012 and 2013 were NT$52,072 and NT$144,138, respectively. The estimated cost avoidances of preventable ADEs in 2012 and 2013 were NT$3,383,700 and NT$7,342,200, respectively. The benefit/cost ratio increased from 4.29 to 9.36, and average admission days decreased by 2 days after the on-ward deployment of a clinical pharmacist.The number of pharmacist's interventions increased dramatically after her on-ward deployment. This service could reduce medication errors, preventable ADEs, and costs of both medications and potential ADEs.

  3. Roles and systems for routine medication administration to prevent medication errors in hospital-based, acute care settings: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Wimpenny, Peter; Kirkpatrick, Pamela

    2010-01-01

    Levels of medication administration error have been reported as accounting for 38% of all adverse drug events and have been calculated as occurring in 3-8% of all administrations. The majority of these will occur as part of "routine" administration. To undertake a systematic review of roles and systems for preventing medication error during routine medication administration in hospital-based acute care settings and of perceptions of causes of error. Types of participants- Participants were nurses, pharmacists, pharmacy technicians, medical and surgical staff and adult patients in hospital-based, acute care settings.Types of intervention/Phenomena of interest- Intervention related to administration systems and related to roles of those who administer medicines were considered. The perceptions of causes of error was the phenomena of interest.Types of outcomes- 1) Number of medication administration errors, and 2) Nurses and patients' perceptions of causes of medication errorTypes of studies- Quantitative studies of medication error rates for differing medication systems and roles of those administering medications. Qualitative and descriptive studies of perceived causes of errors. The review sought studies published in English from 1990 to December 2008. 23 databases, websites and search engines were searched. Critical appraisal tools from Joanna Briggs Institute were used. Two reviewers appraised studies independently. 35 studies out of 1004 identified papers were critically appraised. 19 studies met the inclusion criteria. Data were extracted using standardised extraction forms. It was not possible to undertake meta-analysis due to lack of studies in all categories and lack of similarity between studies. Quantitative results were combined in a narrative summary. Qualitative studies were synthesised accordingly using a meta-aggregative approach. Nurses perceptions of medication administration errors suggest that ineligible prescriptions and distractions

  4. Preventability of Voluntarily Reported or Trigger Tool-Identified Medication Errors in a Pediatric Institution by Information Technology: A Retrospective Cohort Study.

    PubMed

    Stultz, Jeremy S; Nahata, Milap C

    2015-07-01

    Information technology (IT) has the potential to prevent medication errors. While many studies have analyzed specific IT technologies and preventable adverse drug events, no studies have identified risk factors for errors still occurring that are not preventable by IT. The objective of this study was to categorize reported or trigger tool-identified errors and adverse events (AEs) at a pediatric tertiary care institution. Also, we sought to identify medication errors preventable by IT, determine why IT-preventable errors occurred, and to identify risk factors for errors that were not preventable by IT. This was a retrospective analysis of voluntarily reported or trigger tool-identified errors and AEs occurring from 1 July 2011 to 30 June 2012. Medication errors reaching the patients were categorized based on the origin, severity, and location of the error, the month in which they occurred, and the age of the patient involved. Error characteristics were included in a multivariable logistic regression model to determine independent risk factors for errors occurring that were not preventable by IT. A medication error was defined as a medication-related failure of a planned action to be completed as intended or the use of a wrong plan to achieve an aim. An IT-preventable error was defined as having an IT system in place to aid in prevention of the error at the phase and location of its origin. There were 936 medication errors (identified by voluntarily reporting or a trigger tool system) included and analyzed. Drug administration errors were identified most frequently (53.4% ), but prescribing errors most frequently caused harm (47.2 % of harmful errors). There were 470 (50.2 %) errors that were IT preventable at their origin, including 155 due to IT system bypasses, 103 due to insensitivity of IT alerting systems, and 47 with IT alert overrides. Dispensing, administration, and documentation errors had higher odds than prescribing errors for being not preventable by IT

  5. Medication errors: definitions and classification

    PubMed Central

    Aronson, Jeffrey K

    2009-01-01

    To understand medication errors and to identify preventive strategies, we need to classify them and define the terms that describe them. The four main approaches to defining technical terms consider etymology, usage, previous definitions, and the Ramsey–Lewis method (based on an understanding of theory and practice). A medication error is ‘a failure in the treatment process that leads to, or has the potential to lead to, harm to the patient’. Prescribing faults, a subset of medication errors, should be distinguished from prescription errors. A prescribing fault is ‘a failure in the prescribing [decision-making] process that leads to, or has the potential to lead to, harm to the patient’. The converse of this, ‘balanced prescribing’ is ‘the use of a medicine that is appropriate to the patient's condition and, within the limits created by the uncertainty that attends therapeutic decisions, in a dosage regimen that optimizes the balance of benefit to harm’. This excludes all forms of prescribing faults, such as irrational, inappropriate, and ineffective prescribing, underprescribing and overprescribing. A prescription error is ‘a failure in the prescription writing process that results in a wrong instruction about one or more of the normal features of a prescription’. The ‘normal features’ include the identity of the recipient, the identity of the drug, the formulation, dose, route, timing, frequency, and duration of administration. Medication errors can be classified, invoking psychological theory, as knowledge-based mistakes, rule-based mistakes, action-based slips, and memory-based lapses. This classification informs preventive strategies. PMID:19594526

  6. Medication errors: definitions and classification.

    PubMed

    Aronson, Jeffrey K

    2009-06-01

    1. To understand medication errors and to identify preventive strategies, we need to classify them and define the terms that describe them. 2. The four main approaches to defining technical terms consider etymology, usage, previous definitions, and the Ramsey-Lewis method (based on an understanding of theory and practice). 3. A medication error is 'a failure in the treatment process that leads to, or has the potential to lead to, harm to the patient'. 4. Prescribing faults, a subset of medication errors, should be distinguished from prescription errors. A prescribing fault is 'a failure in the prescribing [decision-making] process that leads to, or has the potential to lead to, harm to the patient'. The converse of this, 'balanced prescribing' is 'the use of a medicine that is appropriate to the patient's condition and, within the limits created by the uncertainty that attends therapeutic decisions, in a dosage regimen that optimizes the balance of benefit to harm'. This excludes all forms of prescribing faults, such as irrational, inappropriate, and ineffective prescribing, underprescribing and overprescribing. 5. A prescription error is 'a failure in the prescription writing process that results in a wrong instruction about one or more of the normal features of a prescription'. The 'normal features' include the identity of the recipient, the identity of the drug, the formulation, dose, route, timing, frequency, and duration of administration. 6. Medication errors can be classified, invoking psychological theory, as knowledge-based mistakes, rule-based mistakes, action-based slips, and memory-based lapses. This classification informs preventive strategies.

  7. [Medication errors in anesthesia: unacceptable or unavoidable?

    PubMed

    Dhawan, Ira; Tewari, Anurag; Sehgal, Sankalp; Sinha, Ashish Chandra

    Medication errors are the common causes of patient morbidity and mortality. It adds financial burden to the institution as well. Though the impact varies from no harm to serious adverse effects including death, it needs attention on priority basis since medication errors' are preventable. In today's world where people are aware and medical claims are on the hike, it is of utmost priority that we curb this issue. Individual effort to decrease medication error alone might not be successful until a change in the existing protocols and system is incorporated. Often drug errors that occur cannot be reversed. The best way to 'treat' drug errors is to prevent them. Wrong medication (due to syringe swap), overdose (due to misunderstanding or preconception of the dose, pump misuse and dilution error), incorrect administration route, under dosing and omission are common causes of medication error that occur perioperatively. Drug omission and calculation mistakes occur commonly in ICU. Medication errors can occur perioperatively either during preparation, administration or record keeping. Numerous human and system errors can be blamed for occurrence of medication errors. The need of the hour is to stop the blame - game, accept mistakes and develop a safe and 'just' culture in order to prevent medication errors. The newly devised systems like VEINROM, a fluid delivery system is a novel approach in preventing drug errors due to most commonly used medications in anesthesia. Similar developments along with vigilant doctors, safe workplace culture and organizational support all together can help prevent these errors. Copyright © 2016. Publicado por Elsevier Editora Ltda.

  8. Medication errors in anesthesia: unacceptable or unavoidable?

    PubMed

    Dhawan, Ira; Tewari, Anurag; Sehgal, Sankalp; Sinha, Ashish Chandra

    Medication errors are the common causes of patient morbidity and mortality. It adds financial burden to the institution as well. Though the impact varies from no harm to serious adverse effects including death, it needs attention on priority basis since medication errors' are preventable. In today's world where people are aware and medical claims are on the hike, it is of utmost priority that we curb this issue. Individual effort to decrease medication error alone might not be successful until a change in the existing protocols and system is incorporated. Often drug errors that occur cannot be reversed. The best way to 'treat' drug errors is to prevent them. Wrong medication (due to syringe swap), overdose (due to misunderstanding or preconception of the dose, pump misuse and dilution error), incorrect administration route, under dosing and omission are common causes of medication error that occur perioperatively. Drug omission and calculation mistakes occur commonly in ICU. Medication errors can occur perioperatively either during preparation, administration or record keeping. Numerous human and system errors can be blamed for occurrence of medication errors. The need of the hour is to stop the blame - game, accept mistakes and develop a safe and 'just' culture in order to prevent medication errors. The newly devised systems like VEINROM, a fluid delivery system is a novel approach in preventing drug errors due to most commonly used medications in anesthesia. Similar developments along with vigilant doctors, safe workplace culture and organizational support all together can help prevent these errors. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda.

  9. Antecedents of Severe and Nonsevere Medication Errors

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Yun-Kyung; Mark, Barbara A.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose To investigate if differences in antecedents of severe and nonsevere medication errors exist. Design A longitudinal study of 6 months of data from 279 nursing units in 146 randomly selected hospitals in the United States (US). Methods Antecedents of severe and nonsevere medication errors included work environment factors (work dynamics and RN hours), team factors (communication with physicians and nurses’ expertise), person factors (nurses’ education and experience), patient factors (age, health status, and previous hospitalization), and medication-related support services. Generalized estimating equations with a negative binomial distribution were used with nursing units as the unit of analysis. Findings None of the antecedents allowed predicting both types of medication errors. Nurses’ expertise had a negative and medication-related support services had a positive association with nonsevere medication errors. Nurses’ educational level had a significant nonlinear relationship with severe medication errors only: As the percentage of unit BSN-prepared nurses increased, severe medication errors decreased until the percentage of BSN-prepared nurses reached 54%. In contrast, RN experience had a statistically significant relationship with nonsevere medication errors only and nursing units with more experienced nurses reported more nonsevere medication errors. Conclusions Severe and nonsevere medication errors might have different antecedents. Clinical Relevance Error prevention and management strategies should be targeted to specific types of medication errors for best results. PMID:19335680

  10. Benzodiazepine Use During Hospitalization: Automated Identification of Potential Medication Errors and Systematic Assessment of Preventable Adverse Events

    PubMed Central

    Niedrig, David Franklin; Hoppe, Liesa; Mächler, Sarah; Russmann, Heike; Russmann, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    Objective Benzodiazepines and “Z-drug” GABA-receptor modulators (BDZ) are among the most frequently used drugs in hospitals. Adverse drug events (ADE) associated with BDZ can be the result of preventable medication errors (ME) related to dosing, drug interactions and comorbidities. The present study evaluated inpatient use of BDZ and related ME and ADE. Methods We conducted an observational study within a pharmacoepidemiological database derived from the clinical information system of a tertiary care hospital. We developed algorithms that identified dosing errors and interacting comedication for all administered BDZ. Associated ADE and risk factors were validated in medical records. Results Among 53,081 patients contributing 495,813 patient-days BDZ were administered to 25,626 patients (48.3%) on 115,150 patient-days (23.2%). We identified 3,372 patient-days (2.9%) with comedication that inhibits BDZ metabolism, and 1,197 (1.0%) with lorazepam administration in severe renal impairment. After validation we classified 134, 56, 12, and 3 cases involving lorazepam, zolpidem, midazolam and triazolam, respectively, as clinically relevant ME. Among those there were 23 cases with associated adverse drug events, including severe CNS-depression, falls with subsequent injuries and severe dyspnea. Causality for BDZ was formally assessed as ‘possible’ or ‘probable’ in 20 of those cases. Four cases with ME and associated severe ADE required administration of the BDZ antagonist flumazenil. Conclusions BDZ use was remarkably high in the studied setting, frequently involved potential ME related to dosing, co-medication and comorbidities, and rarely cases with associated ADE. We propose the implementation of automated ME screening and validation for the prevention of BDZ-related ADE. PMID:27711224

  11. Pitfalls of counterfactual thinking in medical practice: preventing errors by using more functional reference points.

    PubMed

    Petrocelli, John V

    2013-12-01

    Counterfactual thinking involves mentally simulating alternatives to reality. The current article reviews literature pertaining to the relevance counterfactual thinking has for the quality of medical decision making. Although earlier counterfactual thought research concluded that counterfactuals have important benefits for the individual, there are reasons to believe that counterfactual thinking is also associated with dysfunctional consequences. Of particular focus is whether or not medical experience, and its influence on counterfactual thinking, actually informs or improves medical practice. It is hypothesized that relatively more probable decision alternatives, followed by undesirable outcomes and counterfactual thought responses, can be abandoned for relatively less probable decision alternatives. Building on earlier research demonstrating that counterfactual thinking can impede memory and learning in a decision paradigm with undergraduate students, the current study examines the extent to which earlier findings can be generalized to practicing physicians (N=10). Participants were asked to complete 60 trials of a computerized Monty Hall Problem simulation. Learning by experience was operationalized as the frequency of switch-decisions. Although some learning was evidenced by a general increase in switch-decision frequency across block trials, the extent of learning demonstrated was not ideal, nor practical. A simple, multiple-trial, decision paradigm demonstrated that doctors fail to learn basic decision-outcome associations through experience. An agenda for future research, which tests the functionality of reference points (other than counterfactual alternatives) for the purposes of medical decision making, is proposed. Significance for public healthThe quality of healthcare depends heavily on the judgments and decisions made by doctors and other medical professionals. Findings from this research indicate that doctors fail to learn basic decision

  12. [Medication errors with concentrated potassium intravenous solutions: Data of the literature, context and prevention].

    PubMed

    Charpiat, B; Magdinier, C; Leboucher, G; Aubrun, F

    2016-01-01

    Accidental direct intravenous injection of a concentrated solution of potassium often leads to patient death. In France, recommendations of healthcare agencies to prevent such accidents cover only preparation and intravenous infusion conditions. Accidents continue to occur in French hospitals. These facts demonstrate that these recommendations are insufficient and ineffective to prevent such deaths, especially those occurring during a catheter flushing. This article reviews the measures able to reduce the number of accidents. Countries which removed concentrated ampoules from ward stocks observed a decrease of the number of accidental deaths. This withdrawal, recommended by the World Health Organization, is now part of standards in studies aimed at determining the safety of care in hospitals. However, removal alone is insufficient to eliminate the risk. The combination with other measures should be considered. These measures are the provision of a combination of diluted intravenous ready to use solutions, the promotion of the oral route with tablets and oral solutions for potassium replenishment and to make available products with safeguards to prevent single shot intravenous injection. Studies aimed at determining the consequences on preventing concentrated potassium accidents of a widespread distribution of isotonic sodium chloride pre-filled ready-to-use syringes for catheter flushing should be performed.

  13. Medication errors: prescribing faults and prescription errors

    PubMed Central

    Velo, Giampaolo P; Minuz, Pietro

    2009-01-01

    Medication errors are common in general practice and in hospitals. Both errors in the act of writing (prescription errors) and prescribing faults due to erroneous medical decisions can result in harm to patients. Any step in the prescribing process can generate errors. Slips, lapses, or mistakes are sources of errors, as in unintended omissions in the transcription of drugs. Faults in dose selection, omitted transcription, and poor handwriting are common. Inadequate knowledge or competence and incomplete information about clinical characteristics and previous treatment of individual patients can result in prescribing faults, including the use of potentially inappropriate medications. An unsafe working environment, complex or undefined procedures, and inadequate communication among health-care personnel, particularly between doctors and nurses, have been identified as important underlying factors that contribute to prescription errors and prescribing faults. Active interventions aimed at reducing prescription errors and prescribing faults are strongly recommended. These should be focused on the education and training of prescribers and the use of on-line aids. The complexity of the prescribing procedure should be reduced by introducing automated systems or uniform prescribing charts, in order to avoid transcription and omission errors. Feedback control systems and immediate review of prescriptions, which can be performed with the assistance of a hospital pharmacist, are also helpful. Audits should be performed periodically. PMID:19594530

  14. Identifying and preventing medical errors in patients with limited English proficiency: key findings and tools for the field.

    PubMed

    Wasserman, Melanie; Renfrew, Megan R; Green, Alexander R; Lopez, Lenny; Tan-McGrory, Aswita; Brach, Cindy; Betancourt, Joseph R

    2014-01-01

    Since the 1999 Institute of Medicine (IOM) report To Err is Human, progress has been made in patient safety, but few efforts have focused on safety in patients with limited English proficiency (LEP). This article describes the development, content, and testing of two new evidence-based Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ) tools for LEP patient safety. In the content development phase, a comprehensive mixed-methods approach was used to identify common causes of errors for LEP patients, high-risk scenarios, and evidence-based strategies to address them. Based on our findings, Improving Patient Safety Systems for Limited English Proficient Patients: A Guide for Hospitals contains recommendations to improve detection and prevention of medical errors across diverse populations, and TeamSTEPPS Enhancing Safety for Patients with Limited English Proficiency Module trains staff to improve safety through team communication and incorporating interpreters in the care process. The Hospital Guide was validated with leaders in quality and safety at diverse hospitals, and the TeamSTEPPS LEP module was field-tested in varied settings within three hospitals. Both tools were found to be implementable, acceptable to their audiences, and conducive to learning. Further research on the impact of the combined use of the guide and module would shed light on their value as a multifaceted intervention. © 2014 National Association for Healthcare Quality.

  15. Error Prevention Aid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1987-01-01

    In a complex computer environment there is ample opportunity for error, a mistake by a programmer, or a software-induced undesirable side effect. In insurance, errors can cost a company heavily, so protection against inadvertent change is a must for the efficient firm. The data processing center at Transport Life Insurance Company has taken a step to guard against accidental changes by adopting a software package called EQNINT (Equations Interpreter Program). EQNINT cross checks the basic formulas in a program against the formulas that make up the major production system. EQNINT assures that formulas are coded correctly and helps catch errors before they affect the customer service or its profitability.

  16. Can Utilizing a Computerized Provider Order Entry (CPOE) System Prevent Hospital Medical Errors and Adverse Drug Events?

    PubMed Central

    Charles, Krista; Cannon, Margaret; Hall, Robert; Coustasse, Alberto

    2014-01-01

    Computerized provider order entry (CPOE) systems allow physicians to prescribe patient services electronically. In hospitals, CPOE essentially eliminates the need for handwritten paper orders and achieves cost savings through increased efficiency. The purpose of this research study was to examine the benefits of and barriers to CPOE adoption in hospitals to determine the effects on medical errors and adverse drug events (ADEs) and examine cost and savings associated with the implementation of this newly mandated technology. This study followed a methodology using the basic principles of a systematic review and referenced 50 sources. CPOE systems in hospitals were found to be capable of reducing medical errors and ADEs, especially when CPOE systems are bundled with clinical decision support systems designed to alert physicians and other healthcare providers of pending lab or medical errors. However, CPOE systems face major barriers associated with adoption in a hospital system, mainly high implementation costs and physicians’ resistance to change. PMID:25593568

  17. Can utilizing a computerized provider order entry (CPOE) system prevent hospital medical errors and adverse drug events?

    PubMed

    Charles, Krista; Cannon, Margaret; Hall, Robert; Coustasse, Alberto

    2014-01-01

    Computerized provider order entry (CPOE) systems allow physicians to prescribe patient services electronically. In hospitals, CPOE essentially eliminates the need for handwritten paper orders and achieves cost savings through increased efficiency. The purpose of this research study was to examine the benefits of and barriers to CPOE adoption in hospitals to determine the effects on medical errors and adverse drug events (ADEs) and examine cost and savings associated with the implementation of this newly mandated technology. This study followed a methodology using the basic principles of a systematic review and referenced 50 sources. CPOE systems in hospitals were found to be capable of reducing medical errors and ADEs, especially when CPOE systems are bundled with clinical decision support systems designed to alert physicians and other healthcare providers of pending lab or medical errors. However, CPOE systems face major barriers associated with adoption in a hospital system, mainly high implementation costs and physicians' resistance to change.

  18. Medical errors: overcoming the challenges.

    PubMed

    Kalra, Jawahar

    2004-12-01

    The issue of medical errors has received substantial attention in recent years. The Institute of Medicine (IOM) report released in 1999 has several implications for health care systems in all disciplines of medicine. Notwithstanding the plethora of available information on the subject, little, by way of substantive action, is done toward medical error reduction. A principal reason for this may be the stigma associated with medical errors. An educational program with a practical, informed, and longitudinal approach offers realistic solutions toward this end. Effective reporting systems need to be developed as a medium of learning from the errors and modifying behaviors appropriately. The presence of a strong leadership supported by organizational commitment is essential in driving these changes. A national, provincial or territorial quality care council dedicated solely for the purpose of enhancing patient safety and medical error reduction may be formed to oversee these efforts. The bioethical and emotional components associated with medical errors also deserve attention and focus.

  19. Medication errors recovered by emergency department pharmacists.

    PubMed

    Rothschild, Jeffrey M; Churchill, William; Erickson, Abbie; Munz, Kristin; Schuur, Jeremiah D; Salzberg, Claudia A; Lewinski, Daniel; Shane, Rita; Aazami, Roshanak; Patka, John; Jaggers, Rondell; Steffenhagen, Aaron; Rough, Steve; Bates, David W

    2010-06-01

    We assess the impact of emergency department (ED) pharmacists on reducing potentially harmful medication errors. We conducted this observational study in 4 academic EDs. Trained pharmacy residents observed a convenience sample of ED pharmacists' activities. The primary outcome was medication errors recovered by pharmacists, including errors intercepted before reaching the patient (near miss or potential adverse drug event), caught after reaching the patient but before causing harm (mitigated adverse drug event), or caught after some harm but before further or worsening harm (ameliorated adverse drug event). Pairs of physician and pharmacist reviewers confirmed recovered medication errors and assessed their potential for harm. Observers were unblinded and clinical outcomes were not evaluated. We conducted 226 observation sessions spanning 787 hours and observed pharmacists reviewing 17,320 medications ordered or administered to 6,471 patients. We identified 504 recovered medication errors, or 7.8 per 100 patients and 2.9 per 100 medications. Most of the recovered medication errors were intercepted potential adverse drug events (90.3%), with fewer mitigated adverse drug events (3.9%) and ameliorated adverse drug events (0.2%). The potential severities of the recovered errors were most often serious (47.8%) or significant (36.2%). The most common medication classes associated with recovered medication errors were antimicrobial agents (32.1%), central nervous system agents (16.2%), and anticoagulant and thrombolytic agents (14.1%). The most common error types were dosing errors, drug omission, and wrong frequency errors. ED pharmacists can identify and prevent potentially harmful medication errors. Controlled trials are necessary to determine the net costs and benefits of ED pharmacist staffing on safety, quality, and costs, especially important considerations for smaller EDs and pharmacy departments. Copyright (c) 2009 American College of Emergency Physicians

  20. Prescribing Errors Involving Medication Dosage Forms

    PubMed Central

    Lesar, Timothy S

    2002-01-01

    CONTEXT Prescribing errors involving medication dose formulations have been reported to occur frequently in hospitals. No systematic evaluations of the characteristics of errors related to medication dosage formulation have been performed. OBJECTIVE To quantify the characteristics, frequency, and potential adverse patient effects of prescribing errors involving medication dosage forms . DESIGN Evaluation of all detected medication prescribing errors involving or related to medication dosage forms in a 631-bed tertiary care teaching hospital. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES Type, frequency, and potential for adverse effects of prescribing errors involving or related to medication dosage forms. RESULTS A total of 1,115 clinically significant prescribing errors involving medication dosage forms were detected during the 60-month study period. The annual number of detected errors increased throughout the study period. Detailed analysis of the 402 errors detected during the last 16 months of the study demonstrated the most common errors to be: failure to specify controlled release formulation (total of 280 cases; 69.7%) both when prescribing using the brand name (148 cases; 36.8%) and when prescribing using the generic name (132 cases; 32.8%); and prescribing controlled delivery formulations to be administered per tube (48 cases; 11.9%). The potential for adverse patient outcome was rated as potentially “fatal or severe” in 3 cases (0.7%), and “serious” in 49 cases (12.2%). Errors most commonly involved cardiovascular agents (208 cases; 51.7%). CONCLUSIONS Hospitalized patients are at risk for adverse outcomes due to prescribing errors related to inappropriate use of medication dosage forms. This information should be considered in the development of strategies to prevent adverse patient outcomes resulting from such errors. PMID:12213138

  1. Medical errors: legal and ethical responses.

    PubMed

    Dickens, B M

    2003-04-01

    Liability to err is a human, often unavoidable, characteristic. Errors can be classified as skill-based, rule-based, knowledge-based and other errors, such as of judgment. In law, a key distinction is between negligent and non-negligent errors. To describe a mistake as an error of clinical judgment is legally ambiguous, since an error that a physician might have made when acting with ordinary care and the professional skill the physician claims, is not deemed negligent in law. If errors prejudice patients' recovery from treatment and/or future care, in physical or psychological ways, it is legally and ethically required that they be informed of them in appropriate time. Senior colleagues, facility administrators and others such as medical licensing authorities should be informed of serious forms of error, so that preventive education and strategies can be designed. Errors for which clinicians may be legally liable may originate in systemically defective institutional administration.

  2. Medication errors: the importance of safe dispensing

    PubMed Central

    Cheung, Ka-Chun; Bouvy, Marcel L; De Smet, Peter A G M

    2009-01-01

    Although rates of dispensing errors are generally low, further improvements in pharmacy distribution systems are still important because pharmacies dispense such high volumes of medications that even a low error rate can translate into a large number of errors. From the perspective of pharmacy organization and quality assurance, pharmacists should intensify their checking of prescriptions, in order to reduce prescription errors, and should implement strategies to communicate adequately with patients, in order to prevent administration errors. More and better studies are still needed in these areas. More research is also required into: dispensing errors in out-patient health-care settings, such as community pharmacies in the USA and Europe; dispensing errors in hospitals and out-patient health-care settings in middle- and low-income countries; and the underlying causes of dispensing errors. PMID:19594537

  3. Reducing medical errors through better documentation.

    PubMed

    Edwards, Marie; Moczygemba, Jackie

    2004-01-01

    Preventable medical errors occur with alarming frequency in US hospitals. Questions to address include what is a medical error, what errors occur most often, and what solutions can health information technologies offer with better documentation. Preventable injuries caused by mismanagement of treatment happen in all areas of care. Some result from human fallibility and some from system failures. Most errors stem from a combination of the two. Examples of combination errors include wrong-site surgeries, scrambled laboratory results, medication mishaps, misidentification of patients, and equipment failures. Unavailable patient information and illegible handwriting lead to diagnosing and ordering errors. Recent technology offers viable solutions to many of these medical errors. Computer-based medical records, integration with the pharmacy, decision support software, Computerized Physician Order Entry Systems, and bar coding all offer ways to avoid tragic treatment outcomes. Persuading and training hospital staff to use the technology poses a problem, as does budgeting for the new equipment. However, the technology would prove its worth in time. The Institute of Medicine and coalition groups such as Leapfrog Group have recognized the problem that permeates the health care industry, manifests in many ways, and requires the many solutions that information technology offer.

  4. The effectiveness of computerized order entry at reducing preventable adverse drug events and medication errors in hospital settings: a systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The Health Information Technology for Economic and Clinical Health (HITECH) Act subsidizes implementation by hospitals of electronic health records with computerized provider order entry (CPOE), which may reduce patient injuries caused by medication errors (preventable adverse drug events, pADEs). Effects on pADEs have not been rigorously quantified, and effects on medication errors have been variable. The objectives of this analysis were to assess the effectiveness of CPOE at reducing pADEs in hospital-related settings, and examine reasons for heterogeneous effects on medication errors. Methods Articles were identified using MEDLINE, Cochrane Library, Econlit, web-based databases, and bibliographies of previous systematic reviews (September 2013). Eligible studies compared CPOE with paper-order entry in acute care hospitals, and examined diverse pADEs or medication errors. Studies on children or with limited event-detection methods were excluded. Two investigators extracted data on events and factors potentially associated with effectiveness. We used random effects models to pool data. Results Sixteen studies addressing medication errors met pooling criteria; six also addressed pADEs. Thirteen studies used pre-post designs. Compared with paper-order entry, CPOE was associated with half as many pADEs (pooled risk ratio (RR) = 0.47, 95% CI 0.31 to 0.71) and medication errors (RR = 0.46, 95% CI 0.35 to 0.60). Regarding reasons for heterogeneous effects on medication errors, five intervention factors and two contextual factors were sufficiently reported to support subgroup analyses or meta-regression. Differences between commercial versus homegrown systems, presence and sophistication of clinical decision support, hospital-wide versus limited implementation, and US versus non-US studies were not significant, nor was timing of publication. Higher baseline rates of medication errors predicted greater reductions (P < 0.001). Other context and

  5. Pediatric antidepressant medication errors in a national error reporting database.

    PubMed

    Rinke, Michael L; Bundy, David G; Shore, Andrew D; Colantuoni, Elizabeth; Morlock, Laura L; Miller, Marlene R

    2010-01-01

    To describe inpatient and outpatient pediatric antidepressant medication errors. We analyzed all error reports from the United States Pharmacopeia MEDMARX database, from 2003 to 2006, involving antidepressant medications and patients younger than 18 years. Of the 451 error reports identified, 95% reached the patient, 6.4% reached the patient and necessitated increased monitoring and/or treatment, and 77% involved medications being used off label. Thirty-three percent of errors cited administering as the macrolevel cause of the error, 30% cited dispensing, 28% cited transcribing, and 7.9% cited prescribing. The most commonly cited medications were sertraline (20%), bupropion (19%), fluoxetine (15%), and trazodone (11%). We found no statistically significant association between medication and reported patient harm; harmful errors involved significantly more administering errors (59% vs 32%, p = .023), errors occurring in inpatient care (93% vs 68%, p = .012) and extra doses of medication (31% vs 10%, p = .025) compared with nonharmful errors. Outpatient errors involved significantly more dispensing errors (p < .001) and more errors due to inaccurate or omitted transcription (p < .001), compared with inpatient errors. Family notification of medication errors was reported in only 12% of errors. Pediatric antidepressant errors often reach patients, frequently involve off-label use of medications, and occur with varying severity and type depending on location and type of medication prescribed. Education and research should be directed toward prompt medication error disclosure and targeted error reduction strategies for specific medication types and settings.

  6. Drug errors and related interventions reported by United States clinical pharmacists: the American College of Clinical Pharmacy practice-based research network medication error detection, amelioration and prevention study.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Grace M; Touchette, Daniel R; Marinac, Jacqueline S

    2013-03-01

    To describe and evaluate drug errors and related clinical pharmacist interventions. Cross-sectional observational study with an online data collection form. American College of Clinical Pharmacy practice-based research network (ACCP PBRN). A total of 62 clinical pharmacists from the ACCP PBRN who provided direct patient care in the inpatient and outpatient practice settings. Clinical pharmacist participants identified drug errors in their usual practices and submitted online error reports over a period of 14 consecutive days during 2010. The 62 clinical pharmacists submitted 924 reports; of these, 779 reports from 53 clinical pharmacists had complete data. Drug errors occurred in both the inpatient (61%) and outpatient (39%) settings. Therapeutic categories most frequently associated with drug errors were systemic antiinfective (25%), hematologic (21%), and cardiovascular (19%) drugs. Approximately 95% of drug errors did not result in patient harm; however, 33 drug errors resulted in treatment or medical intervention, 6 resulted in hospitalization, 2 required treatment to sustain life, and 1 resulted in death. The types of drug errors were categorized as prescribing (53%), administering (13%), monitoring (13%), dispensing (10%), documenting (7%), and miscellaneous (4%). Clinical pharmacist interventions included communication (54%), drug changes (35%), and monitoring (9%). Approximately 89% of clinical pharmacist recommendations were accepted by the prescribers: 5% with drug therapy modifications, 28% due to clinical pharmacist prescriptive authority, and 56% without drug therapy modifications. This study provides insight into the role clinical pharmacists play with regard to drug error interventions using a national practice-based research network. Most drug errors reported by clinical pharmacists in the United States did not result in patient harm; however, severe harm and death due to drug errors were reported. Drug error types, therapeutic categories, and

  7. A Probabilistic Model for Reducing Medication Errors

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Phung Anh; Syed-Abdul, Shabbir; Iqbal, Usman; Hsu, Min-Huei; Huang, Chen-Ling; Li, Hsien-Chang; Clinciu, Daniel Livius; Jian, Wen-Shan; Li, Yu-Chuan Jack

    2013-01-01

    Background Medication errors are common, life threatening, costly but preventable. Information technology and automated systems are highly efficient for preventing medication errors and therefore widely employed in hospital settings. The aim of this study was to construct a probabilistic model that can reduce medication errors by identifying uncommon or rare associations between medications and diseases. Methods and Finding(s) Association rules of mining techniques are utilized for 103.5 million prescriptions from Taiwan’s National Health Insurance database. The dataset included 204.5 million diagnoses with ICD9-CM codes and 347.7 million medications by using ATC codes. Disease-Medication (DM) and Medication-Medication (MM) associations were computed by their co-occurrence and associations’ strength were measured by the interestingness or lift values which were being referred as Q values. The DMQs and MMQs were used to develop the AOP model to predict the appropriateness of a given prescription. Validation of this model was done by comparing the results of evaluation performed by the AOP model and verified by human experts. The results showed 96% accuracy for appropriate and 45% accuracy for inappropriate prescriptions, with a sensitivity and specificity of 75.9% and 89.5%, respectively. Conclusions We successfully developed the AOP model as an efficient tool for automatic identification of uncommon or rare associations between disease-medication and medication-medication in prescriptions. The AOP model helps to reduce medication errors by alerting physicians, improving the patients’ safety and the overall quality of care. PMID:24312659

  8. [Criminal prosecution for medical errors].

    PubMed

    Legemaate, J

    2011-01-01

    A policy document providing instructions on the decision to prosecute in medical errors came into effect on November 1st 2010. In this document the Dutch Public Prosecution Service has attempted to make clear which criteria should be adopted when deciding to prosecute in the case of a medical error. There have also been other recent developments in this context: the public prosecutor can now demand access to medical files in certain, highly exceptional circumstances, such as when patients are themselves suspected of committing a criminal offence; and the Dutch Health Care Inspectorate may only pass on a patient's medical file to the public prosecutor if the prosecutor is already in possession of a copy of it. The new policy document leaves several questions unanswered. It does not consider the criminal liability of health care institutions, for example, and there is too much focus on the responsibilities of individual health care workers.

  9. Analysis of Medication Error Reports

    SciTech Connect

    Whitney, Paul D.; Young, Jonathan; Santell, John; Hicks, Rodney; Posse, Christian; Fecht, Barbara A.

    2004-11-15

    In medicine, as in many areas of research, technological innovation and the shift from paper based information to electronic records has created a climate of ever increasing availability of raw data. There has been, however, a corresponding lag in our abilities to analyze this overwhelming mass of data, and classic forms of statistical analysis may not allow researchers to interact with data in the most productive way. This is true in the emerging area of patient safety improvement. Traditionally, a majority of the analysis of error and incident reports has been carried out based on an approach of data comparison, and starts with a specific question which needs to be answered. Newer data analysis tools have been developed which allow the researcher to not only ask specific questions but also to “mine” data: approach an area of interest without preconceived questions, and explore the information dynamically, allowing questions to be formulated based on patterns brought up by the data itself. Since 1991, United States Pharmacopeia (USP) has been collecting data on medication errors through voluntary reporting programs. USP’s MEDMARXsm reporting program is the largest national medication error database and currently contains well over 600,000 records. Traditionally, USP has conducted an annual quantitative analysis of data derived from “pick-lists” (i.e., items selected from a list of items) without an in-depth analysis of free-text fields. In this paper, the application of text analysis and data analysis tools used by Battelle to analyze the medication error reports already analyzed in the traditional way by USP is described. New insights and findings were revealed including the value of language normalization and the distribution of error incidents by day of the week. The motivation for this effort is to gain additional insight into the nature of medication errors to support improvements in medication safety.

  10. ISMP Medication Error Report Analysis.

    PubMed

    2013-10-01

    These medication errors have occurred in health care facilities at least once. They will happen again-perhaps where you work. Through education and alertness of personnel and procedural safeguards, they can be avoided. You should consider publishing accounts of errors in your newsletters and/or presenting them at your inservice training programs. Your assistance is required to continue this feature. The reports described here were received through the Institute for Safe Medication Practices (ISMP) Medication Errors Reporting Program. Any reports published by ISMP will be anonymous. Comments are also invited; the writers' names will be published if desired. ISMP may be contacted at the address shown below. Errors, close calls, or hazardous conditions may be reported directly to ISMP through the ISMP Web site (www.ismp.org), by calling 800-FAIL-SAFE, or via e-mail at ismpinfo@ismp.org. ISMP guarantees the confidentiality and security of the information received and respects reporters' wishes as to the level of detail included in publications.

  11. ISMP Medication Error Report Analysis.

    PubMed

    2014-01-01

    These medication errors have occurred in health care facilities at least once. They will happen again-perhaps where you work. Through education and alertness of personnel and procedural safeguards, they can be avoided. You should consider publishing accounts of errors in your newsletters and/or presenting them at your inservice training programs. Your assistance is required to continue this feature. The reports described here were received through the Institute for Safe Medication Practices (ISMP) Medication Errors Reporting Program. Any reports published by ISMP will be anonymous. Comments are also invited; the writers' names will be published if desired. ISMP may be contacted at the address shown below. Errors, close calls, or hazardous conditions may be reported directly to ISMP through the ISMP Web site (www.ismp.org), by calling 800-FAIL-SAFE, or via e-mail at ismpinfo@ismp.org. ISMP guarantees the confidentiality and security of the information received and respects reporters' wishes as to the level of detail included in publications.

  12. ISMP Medication Error Report Analysis.

    PubMed

    2013-05-01

    These medication errors have occurred in health care facilities at least once. They will happen again-perhaps where you work. Through education and alertness of personnel and procedural safeguards, they can be avoided. You should consider publishing accounts of errors in your newsletters and/or presenting them at your inservice training programs. Your assistance is required to continue this feature. The reports described here were received through the Institute for Safe Medication Practices (ISMP) Medication Errors Reporting Program. Any reports published by ISMP will be anonymous. Comments are also invited; the writers' names will be published if desired. ISMP may be contacted at the address shown below. Errors, close calls, or hazardous conditions may be reported directly to ISMP through the ISMP Web site (www.ismp.org), by calling 800-FAIL-SAFE, or via e-mail at ismpinfo@ismp.org. ISMP guarantees the confidentiality and security of the information received and respects reporters' wishes as to the level of detail included in publications.

  13. ISMP Medication Error Report Analysis.

    PubMed

    2013-12-01

    These medication errors have occurred in health care facilities at least once. They will happen again-perhaps where you work. Through education and alertness of personnel and procedural safeguards, they can be avoided. You should consider publishing accounts of errors in your newsletters and/or presenting them at your inservice training programs. Your assistance is required to continue this feature. The reports described here were received through the Institute for Safe Medication Practices (ISMP) Medication Errors Reporting Program. Any reports published by ISMP will be anonymous. Comments are also invited; the writers' names will be published if desired. ISMP may be contacted at the address shown below. Errors, close calls, or hazardous conditions may be reported directly to ISMP through the ISMP Web site (www.ismp.org), by calling 800-FAIL-SAFE, or via e-mail at ismpinfo@ismp.org. ISMP guarantees the confidentiality and security of the information received and respects reporters' wishes as to the level of detail included in publications.

  14. ISMP Medication Error Report Analysis.

    PubMed

    2013-11-01

    These medication errors have occurred in health care facilities at least once. They will happen again-perhaps where you work. Through education and alertness of personnel and procedural safeguards, they can be avoided. You should consider publishing accounts of errors in your newsletters and/or presenting them at your inservice training programs. Your assistance is required to continue this feature. The reports described here were received through the Institute for Safe Medication Practices (ISMP) Medication Errors Reporting Program. Any reports published by ISMP will be anonymous. Comments are also invited; the writers' names will be published if desired. ISMP may be contacted at the address shown below. Errors, close calls, or hazardous conditions may be reported directly to ISMP through the ISMP Web site (www.ismp.org), by calling 800-FAIL-SAFE, or via e-mail at ismpinfo@ismp.org. ISMP guarantees the confidentiality and security of the information received and respects reporters' wishes as to the level of detail included in publications.

  15. ISMP Medication error report analysis.

    PubMed

    2013-04-01

    These medication errors have occurred in health care facilities at least once. They will happen again-perhaps where you work. Through education and alertness of personnel and procedural safeguards, they can be avoided. You should consider publishing accounts of errors in your newsletters and/or presenting them at your inservice training programs. Your assistance is required to continue this feature. The reports described here were received through the Institute for Safe Medication Practices (ISMP) Medication Errors Reporting Program. Any reports published by ISMP will be anonymous. Comments are also invited; the writers' names will be published if desired. ISMP may be contacted at the address shown below. Errors, close calls, or hazardous conditions may be reported directly to ISMP through the ISMP Web site (www.ismp.org), by calling 800-FAIL-SAFE, or via e-mail at ismpinfo@ismp.org. ISMP guarantees the confidentiality and security of the information received and respects reporters' wishes as to the level of detail included in publications.

  16. ISMP Medication Error Report Analysis.

    PubMed

    2013-06-01

    These medication errors have occurred in health care facilities at least once. They will happen again-perhaps where you work. Through education and alertness of personnel and procedural safeguards, they can be avoided. You should consider publishing accounts of errors in your newsletters and/or presenting them at your inservice training programs. Your assistance is required to continue this feature. The reports described here were received through the Institute for Safe Medication Practices (ISMP) Medication Errors Reporting Program. Any reports published by ISMP will be anonymous. Comments are also invited; the writers' names will be published if desired. ISMP may be contacted at the address shown below. Errors, close calls, or hazardous conditions may be reported directly to ISMP through the ISMP Web site (www.ismp.org), by calling 800-FAIL-SAFE, or via e-mail at ismpinfo@ismp.org. ISMP guarantees the confidentiality and security of the information received and respects reporters' wishes as to the level of detail included in publications.

  17. ISMP Medication Error Report Analysis.

    PubMed

    2013-01-01

    These medication errors have occurred in health care facilities at least once. They will happen again-perhaps where you work. Through education and alertness of personnel and procedural safeguards, they can be avoided. You should consider publishing accounts of errors in your newsletters and/or presenting them at your inservice training programs. Your assistance is required to continue this feature. The reports described here were received through the Institute for Safe Medication Practices (ISMP) Medication Errors Reporting Program. Any reports published by ISMP will be anonymous. Comments are also invited; the writers' names will be published if desired. ISMP may be contacted at the address shown below. Errors, close calls, or hazardous conditions may be reported directly to ISMP through the ISMP Web site (www.ismp.org), by calling 800-FAIL-SAFE, or via e-mail at ismpinfo@ismp.org. ISMP guarantees the confidentiality and security of the information received and respects reporters' wishes as to the level of detail included in publications.

  18. ISMP Medication Error Report Analysis.

    PubMed

    2013-02-01

    These medication errors have occurred in health care facilities at least once. They will happen again-perhaps where you work. Through education and alertness of personnel and procedural safeguards, they can be avoided. You should consider publishing accounts of errors in your newsletters and/or presenting them at your inservice training programs. Your assistance is required to continue this feature. The reports described here were received through the Institute for Safe Medication Practices (ISMP) Medication Errors Reporting Program. Any reports published by ISMP will be anonymous. Comments are also invited; the writers' names will be published if desired. ISMP may be contacted at the address shown below. Errors, close calls, or hazardous conditions may be reported directly to ISMP through the ISMP Web site (www.ismp.org), by calling 800-FAIL-SAFE, or via e-mail at ismpinfo@ismp.org. ISMP guarantees the confidentiality and security of the information received and respects reporters' wishes as to the level of detail included in publications.

  19. ISMP Medication Error Report Analysis.

    PubMed

    2013-03-01

    These medication errors have occurred in health care facilities at least once. They will happen again-perhaps where you work. Through education and alertness of personnel and procedural safeguards, they can be avoided. You should consider publishing accounts of errors in your newsletters and/or presenting them at your inservice training programs. Your assistance is required to continue this feature. The reports described here were received through the Institute for Safe Medication Practices (ISMP) Medication Errors Reporting Program. Any reports published by ISMP will be anonymous. Comments are also invited; the writers' names will be published if desired. ISMP may be contacted at the address shown below. Errors, close calls, or hazardous conditions may be reported directly to ISMP through the ISMP Web site (www.ismp.org), by calling 800-FAIL-SAFE, or via e-mail at ismpinfo@ismp.org. ISMP guarantees the confidentiality and security of the information received and respects reporters' wishes as to the level of detail included in publications.

  20. ISMP Medication Error Report Analysis.

    PubMed

    2013-09-01

    These medication errors have occurred in health care facilities at least once. They will happen again-perhaps where you work. Through education and alertness of personnel and procedural safeguards, they can be avoided. You should consider publishing accounts of errors in your newsletters and/or presenting them at your inservice training programs. Your assistance is required to continue this feature. The reports described here were received through the Institute for Safe Medication Practices (ISMP) Medication Errors Reporting Program. Any reports published by ISMP will be anonymous. Comments are also invited; the writers' names will be published if desired. ISMP may be contacted at the address shown below. Errors, close calls, or hazardous conditions may be reported directly to ISMP through the ISMP Web site (www.ismp.org), by calling 800-FAIL-SAFE, or via e-mail at ismpinfo@ismp.org. ISMP guarantees the confidentiality and security of the information received and respects reporters' wishes as to the level of detail included in publications.

  1. ISMP Medication Error Report Analysis.

    PubMed

    2013-07-01

    These medication errors have occurred in health care facilities at least once. They will happen again-perhaps where you work. Through education and alertness of personnel and procedural safeguards, they can be avoided. You should consider publishing accounts of errors in your newsletters and/or presenting them at your inservice training programs. Your assistance is required to continue this feature. The reports described here were received through the Institute for Safe Medication Practices (ISMP) Medication Errors Reporting Program. Any reports published by ISMP will be anonymous. Comments are also invited; the writers' names will be published if desired. ISMP may be contacted at the address shown below. Errors, close calls, or hazardous conditions may be reported directly to ISMP through the ISMP Web site (www.ismp.org), by calling 800-FAIL-SAFE, or via e-mail at ismpinfo@ismp.org. ISMP guarantees the confidentiality and security of the information received and respects reporters' wishes as to the level of detail included in publications.

  2. Nurses' perceptions of why medication administration errors occur.

    PubMed

    Wakefield, B J; Wakefield, D S; Uden-Holman, T; Blegen, M A

    1998-02-01

    Nurses play a key role in medication administration in hospital settings. Five categories of reasons for medication errors were identified in a survey of 1,384 nurses. These categories include physician, systems, pharmacy, individual, and knowledge-related factors. In this article, issues surrounding the occurrence and prevention of medication errors are discussed.

  3. Professional liability insurance and medical error disclosure.

    PubMed

    McLennan, Stuart; Shaw, David; Leu, Agnes; Elger, Bernice

    2015-01-01

    To examine medicolegal stakeholders' views about the impact of professional liability insurance in Switzerland on medical error disclosure. Purposive sample of 23 key medicolegal stakeholders in Switzerland from a range of fields between October 2012 and February 2013. Data were collected via individual, face-to-face interviews using a researcher-developed semi-structured interview guide. Interviews were transcribed and analysed using conventional content analysis. Participants, particularly those with a legal or quality background, reported that concerns relating to professional liability insurance often inhibited communication with patients after a medical error. Healthcare providers were reported to be particularly concerned about losing their liability insurance cover for apologising to harmed patients. It was reported that the attempt to limit the exchange of information and communication could lead to a conflict with patient rights law. Participants reported that hospitals could, and in some case are, moving towards self-insurance approaches, which could increase flexibility regarding error communication The reported current practice of at least some liability insurance companies in Switzerland of inhibiting communication with harmed patients after an error is concerning and requires further investigation. With a new ethic of transparency regarding medical errors now prevailing internationally, this approach is increasingly being perceived to be misguided. A move away from hospitals relying solely on liability insurance may allow greater transparency after errors. Legalisation preventing the loss of liability insurance coverage for apologising to harmed patients should also be considered.

  4. Medication errors: hospital pharmacist perspective.

    PubMed

    Guchelaar, Henk-Jan; Colen, Hadewig B B; Kalmeijer, Mathijs D; Hudson, Patrick T W; Teepe-Twiss, Irene M

    2005-01-01

    In recent years medication error has justly received considerable attention, as it causes substantial mortality, morbidity and additional healthcare costs. Risk assessment models, adapted from commercial aviation and the oil and gas industries, are currently being developed for use in clinical pharmacy. The hospital pharmacist is best placed to oversee the quality of the entire drug distribution chain, from prescribing, drug choice, dispensing and preparation to the administration of drugs, and can fulfil a vital role in improving medication safety. Most elements of the drug distribution chain can be optimised; however, because comparative intervention studies are scarce, there is little scientific evidence available demonstrating improvements in medication safety through such interventions. Possible interventions aimed at reducing medication errors, such as developing methods for detection of patients with increased risk of adverse drug events, performing risk assessment in clinical pharmacy and optimising the drug distribution chain are discussed. Moreover, the specific role of the clinical pharmacist in improving medication safety is highlighted, both at an organisational level and in individual patient care.

  5. Overview of medical errors and adverse events

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Safety is a global concept that encompasses efficiency, security of care, reactivity of caregivers, and satisfaction of patients and relatives. Patient safety has emerged as a major target for healthcare improvement. Quality assurance is a complex task, and patients in the intensive care unit (ICU) are more likely than other hospitalized patients to experience medical errors, due to the complexity of their conditions, need for urgent interventions, and considerable workload fluctuation. Medication errors are the most common medical errors and can induce adverse events. Two approaches are available for evaluating and improving quality-of-care: the room-for-improvement model, in which problems are identified, plans are made to resolve them, and the results of the plans are measured; and the monitoring model, in which quality indicators are defined as relevant to potential problems and then monitored periodically. Indicators that reflect structures, processes, or outcomes have been developed by medical societies. Surveillance of these indicators is organized at the hospital or national level. Using a combination of methods improves the results. Errors are caused by combinations of human factors and system factors, and information must be obtained on how people make errors in the ICU environment. Preventive strategies are more likely to be effective if they rely on a system-based approach, in which organizational flaws are remedied, rather than a human-based approach of encouraging people not to make errors. The development of a safety culture in the ICU is crucial to effective prevention and should occur before the evaluation of safety programs, which are more likely to be effective when they involve bundles of measures. PMID:22339769

  6. Effective strategies to increase reporting of medication errors in hospitals.

    PubMed

    Force, Mary VanOyen; Deering, Linda; Hubbe, John; Andersen, Marcy; Hagemann, Barbara; Cooper-Hahn, Michelle; Peters, William

    2006-01-01

    A major concern for patient safety in hospitals is accurate medication administration. To improve the medication administration process, nurses and pharmacists must report system problems. Although staff supported the concept of medication error reporting, they did not report errors. Inherent fear of retribution, punitive actions, and professional humiliation prevented self-reporting of medication errors. Our hospital's quality improvement department developed, implemented, and evaluated a program called LifeSavers. Its purpose was to build a nonpunitive culture and to increase medication error reporting by staff. In one year, the LifeSavers program increased medication error disclosures from 14 to 72 reports per month. The successful development of a nonblame culture of medication error reporting led to identified sources of problems and improvement of the medication administration system.

  7. Errors in fluid therapy in medical wards.

    PubMed

    Mousavi, Maryam; Khalili, Hossein; Dashti-Khavidaki, Simin

    2012-04-01

    occurrence of fluid therapy errors in the patients. Our result showed that intravenous fluid therapy errors occurred commonly in the hospitalized patients especially in the medical wards. Improvement in knowledge and attention of health-care workers about these errors are essential for preventing of medication errors in aspect of fluid therapy.

  8. Nurses' practice environments, error interception practices, and inpatient medication errors.

    PubMed

    Flynn, Linda; Liang, Yulan; Dickson, Geri L; Xie, Minge; Suh, Dong-Churl

    2012-06-01

    Medication errors remain a threat to patient safety. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to determine the relationships among characteristics of the nursing practice environment, nurse staffing levels, nurses' error interception practices, and rates of nonintercepted medication errors in acute care hospitals. This study, using a nonexperimental design, was conducted in a sample of 82 medical-surgical units recruited from 14 U.S. acute care hospitals. Registered nurses (RNs) on the 82 units were surveyed, producing a sample of 686 staff nurses. Data collected for the 8-month study period included the number of medication errors per 1,000 patient days and the number of RN hours per patient day. Nurse survey data included the Practice Environment Scale of the Nursing Work Index as a measure of environmental characteristics; a metric of nurses' interception practices was developed for the study. All survey measures were aggregated to the unit level prior to analysis with hierarchical linear modeling. A supportive practice environment was positively associated with error interception practices among nurses in the sample of medical-surgical units. Importantly, nurses' interception practices were inversely associated with medication error rates. A supportive practice environment enhances nurses' error interception practices. These interception practices play a role in reducing medication errors. When supported by their practice environments, nurses employ practices that can assist in interrupting medication errors before they reach the patients. © 2012 Sigma Theta Tau International.

  9. Bibliometric Analysis of Medication Errors and Adverse Drug Events Studies.

    PubMed

    Huang, Hung-Chi; Wang, Cheng-Hua; Chen, Pi-Ching; Lee, Yen-Der

    2015-07-31

    Medication errors and adverse drug events are a key concern of the health-care industry. The objectives of this study were to map the intellectual structure of the studies of medication errors and adverse drug events and to investigate the developing path of this literature and interrelationships among the main topics. The Web of Science database was searched for documentation of medication errors and adverse drug events from 1961 to 2013. The most cited articles and references were profiled and analyzed using HistCite software to draw a historiograph and Ucinet software to draw a sociogram. The database search revealed 3343 medication errors and 3342 adverse drug event documents. The most cited articles on medication errors focused on 3 key themes from 1961 to 2013, namely, medication errors in adult inpatients, computerized physician order entry in medication error studies, and medication errors in pediatric inpatients. The developing path for the most cited articles about adverse drug events from 1987 to 2013 was as follows: detection, analysis, effect, and prevention from adult inpatient to pediatric inpatient settings and from hospitalized care to ambulatory care. In addition, social network analysis based on the most cited references revealed a close relationship between medication errors and adverse drug events. The mapping results provide a valuable tool for researchers to access the literature in this field and can be used to help identify the direction of medication errors and adverse drug events research.

  10. Reporting of medication errors by pediatric nurses.

    PubMed

    Stratton, Karen M; Blegen, Mary A; Pepper, Ginette; Vaughn, Thomas

    2004-12-01

    Medication administration errors can threaten patient outcomes and are a dimension of patient safety directly linked to nursing care. Children are particularly vulnerable to medication errors because of their unique physiology and developmental needs. This descriptive study surveyed a convenience sample of 57 pediatric and 227 adult hospital nurses regarding their perceptions of the proportion of medication errors reported on their units, why medication errors occur, and why medication errors are not always reported. In this study, which focuses on pediatric data, pediatric nurses indicated that a higher proportion of errors were reported (67%) than adult nurses indicated (56%). The medication error rates per 1,000 patient-days computed from actual occurrence reports were also higher on pediatric (14.80) as compared with adult units (5.66). Pediatric nurses selected distractions/interruptions and RN-to-patient ratios as major reasons medication errors occurred. Nursing administration's focus on the person rather than the system and the fear of adverse consequences (reprimand) were primary reasons selected for not reporting medication errors. Results suggest the need to explore both individual and systematic safeguards to focus on the reported causes and underreporting of medication errors.

  11. Medical errors recovered by critical care nurses.

    PubMed

    Dykes, Patricia C; Rothschild, Jeffrey M; Hurley, Ann C

    2010-05-01

    : The frequency and types of medical errors are well documented, but less is known about potential errors that were intercepted by nurses. We studied the type, frequency, and potential harm of recovered medical errors reported by critical care registered nurses (CCRNs) during the previous year. : Nurses are known to protect patients from harm. Several studies on medical errors found that there would have been more medical errors reaching the patient had not potential errors been caught earlier by nurses. : The Recovered Medical Error Inventory, a 25-item empirically derived and internally consistent (alpha =.90) list of medical errors, was posted on the Internet. Participants were recruited via e-mail and healthcare-related listservs using a nonprobability snowball sampling technique. Investigators e-mailed contacts working in hospitals or who managed healthcare-related listservs and asked the contacts to pass the link on to others with contacts in acute care settings. : During 1 year, 345 CCRNs reported that they recovered 18,578 medical errors, of which they rated 4,183 as potentially lethal. : Surveillance, clinical judgment, and interventions by CCRNs to identify, interrupt, and correct medical errors protected seriously ill patients from harm.

  12. Attitudes to reporting medication error among differing healthcare professionals.

    PubMed

    Sarvadikar, Ajit; Prescott, Gordon; Williams, David

    2010-08-01

    Medication error reporting is an important measure to prevent medication error incidents in a healthcare system and can serve as an important tool for improving patient safety. This study aimed to investigate attitudes of healthcare professionals (doctors, nurses, and pharmacists) in reporting medication errors. Fifty-six healthcare professionals working at a 900-bed tertiary referral hospital were surveyed. A questionnaire using two different clinical scenarios (involving oral and intravenous administration of a drug) and four questions with an ascending order of worsening patient outcome was used. A Likert scale ranging from 1 (unlikely) to 5 (likely) was used to describe the likelihood of reporting a medication error. The overall response rate was 57% (43% for doctors, 68% for nurses, and 64% for pharmacists). Results showed that doctors were unlikely to report less-serious medication errors (median value of 2 on the Likert scale). Nurses and pharmacists (median value of 5) were likely to report less-serious as well as serious medication errors despite their fears of receiving disciplinary action. All healthcare professionals were more likely to report an error as the clinical scenarios had a progressively worsening outcome for the patient. These results suggest that among healthcare professionals, there are differing attitudes to reporting medication errors. Differing approaches are therefore required to encourage medication error reporting among different healthcare professionals. Future study is required to further investigate these findings and improve reporting rates.

  13. Addressing Medical Errors in Hand Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Shepard P.; Adkinson, Joshua M.; Chung, Kevin C.

    2014-01-01

    Influential think-tank such as the Institute of Medicine has raised awareness about the implications of medical errors. In response, organizations, medical societies, and institutions have initiated programs to decrease the incidence and effects of these errors. Surgeons deal with the direct implications of adverse events involving patients. In addition to managing the physical consequences, they are confronted with ethical and social issues when caring for a harmed patient. Although there is considerable effort to implement system-wide changes, there is little guidance for hand surgeons on how to address medical errors. Admitting an error is difficult, but a transparent environment where patients are notified of errors and offered consolation and compensation is essential to maintain trust. Further, equipping hand surgeons with a guide for addressing medical errors will promote compassionate patient interaction, help identify system failures, provide learning points for safety improvement, and demonstrate a commitment to ethically responsible medical care. PMID:25154576

  14. Toward a cognitive taxonomy of medical errors.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jiajie; Patel, Vimla L; Johnson, Todd R; Shortliffe, Edward H

    2002-01-01

    One critical step in addressing and resolving the problems associated with human errors is the development of a cognitive taxonomy of such errors. In the case of errors, such a taxonomy may be developed (1) to categorize all types of errors along cognitive dimensions, (2) to associate each type of error with a specific underlying cognitive mechanism, (3) to explain why, and even predict when and where, a specific error will occur, and (4) to generate intervention strategies for each type of error. Based on Reason's (1992) definition of human errors and Norman's (1986) cognitive theory of human action, we have developed a preliminary action-based cognitive taxonomy of errors that largely satisfies these four criteria in the domain of medicine. We discuss initial steps for applying this taxonomy to develop an online medical error reporting system that not only categorizes errors but also identifies problems and generates solutions.

  15. Medical error and related factors during internship and residency.

    PubMed

    Ahmadipour, Habibeh; Nahid, Mortazavi

    2015-01-01

    It is difficult to determine the real incidence of medical errors due to the lack of a precise definition of errors, as well as the failure to report them under certain circumstances. We carried out a cross- sectional study in Kerman University of Medical Sciences, Iran in 2013. The participants were selected through the census method. The data were collected using a self-administered questionnaire, which consisted of questions on the participants' demographic data and questions on the medical errors committed. The data were analysed by SPSS 19. It was found that 270 participants had committed medical errors. There was no significant difference in the frequency of errors committed by interns and residents. In the case of residents, the most common error was misdiagnosis and in that of interns, errors related to history-taking and physical examination. Considering that medical errors are common in the clinical setting, the education system should train interns and residents to prevent the occurrence of errors. In addition, the system should develop a positive attitude among them so that they can deal better with medical errors.

  16. FMEA: a model for reducing medical errors.

    PubMed

    Chiozza, Maria Laura; Ponzetti, Clemente

    2009-06-01

    Patient safety is a management issue, in view of the fact that clinical risk management has become an important part of hospital management. Failure Mode and Effect Analysis (FMEA) is a proactive technique for error detection and reduction, firstly introduced within the aerospace industry in the 1960s. Early applications in the health care industry dating back to the 1990s included critical systems in the development and manufacture of drugs and in the prevention of medication errors in hospitals. In 2008, the Technical Committee of the International Organization for Standardization (ISO), licensed a technical specification for medical laboratories suggesting FMEA as a method for prospective risk analysis of high-risk processes. Here we describe the main steps of the FMEA process and review data available on the application of this technique to laboratory medicine. A significant reduction of the risk priority number (RPN) was obtained when applying FMEA to blood cross-matching, to clinical chemistry analytes, as well as to point-of-care testing (POCT).

  17. Lost opportunities: how physicians communicate about medical errors.

    PubMed

    Garbutt, Jane; Waterman, Amy D; Kapp, Julie M; Dunagan, William Claiborne; Levinson, Wendy; Fraser, Victoria; Gallagher, Thomas H

    2008-01-01

    Although physicians have been described as "reluctant partners" in reporting medical errors, this survey of 1,082 U.S. physicians found that most were willing to share their knowledge about harmful errors and near misses with their institutions and wanted to hear about innovations to prevent common errors. However, physicians found current systems to report and disseminate this information inadequate and relied on informal discussions with colleagues. Thus, much important information remains invisible to institutions and the health care system. Efforts to promote error reporting might not reach their potential unless physicians become more effectively engaged in reporting errors at their institutions.

  18. Burnout and medical errors among American surgeons.

    PubMed

    Shanafelt, Tait D; Balch, Charles M; Bechamps, Gerald; Russell, Tom; Dyrbye, Lotte; Satele, Daniel; Collicott, Paul; Novotny, Paul J; Sloan, Jeff; Freischlag, Julie

    2010-06-01

    To evaluate the relationship between burnout and perceived major medical errors among American surgeons. Despite efforts to improve patient safety, medical errors by physicians remain a common cause of morbidity and mortality. Members of the American College of Surgeons were sent an anonymous, cross-sectional survey in June 2008. The survey included self-assessment of major medical errors, a validated depression screening tool, and standardized assessments of burnout and quality of life (QOL). Of 7905 participating surgeons, 700 (8.9%) reported concern they had made a major medical error in the last 3 months. Over 70% of surgeons attributed the error to individual rather than system level factors. Reporting an error during the last 3 months had a large, statistically significant adverse relationship with mental QOL, all 3 domains of burnout (emotional exhaustion, depersonalization, and personal accomplishment) and symptoms of depression. Each one point increase in depersonalization (scale range, 0-33) was associated with an 11% increase in the likelihood of reporting an error while each one point increase in emotional exhaustion (scale range, 0-54) was associated with a 5% increase. Burnout and depression remained independent predictors of reporting a recent major medical error on multivariate analysis that controlled for other personal and professional factors. The frequency of overnight call, practice setting, method of compensation, and number of hours worked were not associated with errors on multivariate analysis. Major medical errors reported by surgeons are strongly related to a surgeon's degree of burnout and their mental QOL. Studies are needed to determine how to reduce surgeon distress and how to support surgeons when medical errors occur.

  19. Propylene Glycol Toxicity with Stoss Therapy; State Drug Tracking Database Helps Prevent an Error; Where Did That Medication Come From?; Expiration Date Difficult to Read.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Michael R; Smetzer, Judy L

    2015-04-01

    These medication errors have occurred in health care facilities at least once. They will happen again-perhaps where you work. Through education and alertness of personnel and procedural safeguards, they can be avoided. You should consider publishing accounts of errors in your newsletters and/or presenting them at your inservice training programs. Your assistance is required to continue this feature. The reports described here were received through the Institute for Safe Medication Practices (ISMP) Medication Errors Reporting Program. Any reports published by ISMP will be anonymous. Comments are also invited; the writers' names will be published if desired. ISMP may be contacted at the address shown below. Errors, close calls, or hazardous conditions may be reported directly to ISMP through the ISMP Web site (www.ismp.org), by calling 800-FAIL-SAFE, or via e-mail at ismpinfo@ismp.org. ISMP guarantees the confidentiality and security of the information received and respects reporters' wishes as to the level of detail included in publications.

  20. [Medication errors in two Brazilian hospitals].

    PubMed

    Costa, L A; Loureiro, S; de Oliveira, M G G

    2006-01-01

    To determine medication errors in a public and in a private hospital. Cross-sectional. 638 dosis opportunities for errors (administered dosis + omitted dosis) were assessed in January, 2005. Medication error was defined as any given dose different from a legible prescription on patient chart. The error rate was calculated by the following equation: number of dosis/error opportunities. The errors were classified according to the categories: omission, unordered dose, extra-dose, wrong dose, wrong route, wrong form, wrong time. Out of 638 opportunities of error, 209 (32,9%) were wrong in some way. When wrong time errors were excluded, this rate decreased to 156 (25%). The most frequent types of errors were omission and unordered dosis, 67 (10,5%) and 65 (10,2%), respectively. There was no significant difference on the total error rate according to the type of hospital (public or private). The public hospital showed a double-fold unordered dose error rate as compared to the private hospital. Inversely, the private hospital showed a double-fold wrong time error rate than the public hospital.

  1. Overnight and postcall errors in medication orders.

    PubMed

    Hendey, Gregory W; Barth, Bradley E; Soliz, Tricia

    2005-07-01

    To compare the error rates in medication orders by physicians who were off call, on overnight call, and postcall. This was a retrospective review of inpatient medication orders, pharmacy records, and resident physician work schedules in a university-affiliated community teaching hospital with residency programs in emergency medicine, family practice, internal medicine, obstetrics, pediatrics, and surgery. The authors calculated error rates, odds ratios (ORs), and 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs) for physicians during April 2000. In 8,195 medication orders, there were 177 errors (2.16% overall error rate). There was an increased error rate for overnight and postcall orders (2.71%, OR 1.44, 95% CI = 1.06 to 1.95) in comparison to orders written by off-call physicians (1.90%). Error rates were significantly higher on the medical/surgical wards during the overnight (3.91%, OR 1.89, 95% CI = 1.22 to 2.92) and postcall (3.41%, OR 1.64, 95% CI = 1.10 to 2.43) periods compared with the off-call (2.11%) period, and postgraduate year 1 (PGY1) physicians had a higher overnight error rate (4.23%, OR 2.28, 95% CI = 1.44 to 3.61). Error rates were also higher on the medical/surgical wards compared with critical care units (2.62% vs. 1.22%, OR 2.17, 95% CI = 1.48 to 3.18). The PGY1 physicians had error rates similar to those of the PGY2-5 physicians when off call, but were significantly higher on overnight call (4.23% vs. 0.52%, OR 8.47, 95% CI = 2.00 to 35.82). Medication-ordering error rates were higher for overnight and postcall physicians, particularly on the general medical/surgical wards, and in PGY1 physicians during the overnight period.

  2. [Medication errors in Spanish intensive care units].

    PubMed

    Merino, P; Martín, M C; Alonso, A; Gutiérrez, I; Alvarez, J; Becerril, F

    2013-01-01

    To estimate the incidence of medication errors in Spanish intensive care units. Post hoc study of the SYREC trial. A longitudinal observational study carried out during 24 hours in patients admitted to the ICU. Spanish intensive care units. Patients admitted to the intensive care unit participating in the SYREC during the period of study. Risk, individual risk, and rate of medication errors. The final study sample consisted of 1017 patients from 79 intensive care units; 591 (58%) were affected by one or more incidents. Of these, 253 (43%) had at least one medication-related incident. The total number of incidents reported was 1424, of which 350 (25%) were medication errors. The risk of suffering at least one incident was 22% (IQR: 8-50%) while the individual risk was 21% (IQR: 8-42%). The medication error rate was 1.13 medication errors per 100 patient-days of stay. Most incidents occurred in the prescription (34%) and administration (28%) phases, 16% resulted in patient harm, and 82% were considered "totally avoidable". Medication errors are among the most frequent types of incidents in critically ill patients, and are more common in the prescription and administration stages. Although most such incidents have no clinical consequences, a significant percentage prove harmful for the patient, and a large proportion are avoidable. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier España, S.L. and SEMICYUC. All rights reserved.

  3. Strategies for reducing medication errors in the emergency department

    PubMed Central

    Weant, Kyle A; Bailey, Abby M; Baker, Stephanie N

    2014-01-01

    Medication errors are an all-too-common occurrence in emergency departments across the nation. This is largely secondary to a multitude of factors that create an almost ideal environment for medication errors to thrive. To limit and mitigate these errors, it is necessary to have a thorough knowledge of the medication-use process in the emergency department and develop strategies targeted at each individual step. Some of these strategies include medication-error analysis, computerized provider-order entry systems, automated dispensing cabinets, bar-coding systems, medication reconciliation, standardizing medication-use processes, education, and emergency-medicine clinical pharmacists. Special consideration also needs to be given to the development of strategies for the pediatric population, as they can be at an elevated risk of harm. Regardless of the strategies implemented, the prevention of medication errors begins and ends with the development of a culture that promotes the reporting of medication errors, and a systematic, nonpunitive approach to their elimination. PMID:27147879

  4. Analysis of Australian newspaper coverage of medication errors.

    PubMed

    Hinchcliff, Reece; Westbrook, Johanna; Greenfield, David; Baysari, Melissa; Moldovan, Max; Braithwaite, Jeffrey

    2012-02-01

    To investigate the frequency, style and reliability of newspaper reporting of medication errors. Content analysis of articles discussing medication errors that were published in the 10 most widely read Australian daily newspapers between January 2005 and January 2010. Main outcome measure(s) Newspaper source, article type, article topic, leading news actors, identified causes and solutions of medication errors and cited references. Ninety-two articles included discussion of medication errors, with the one national newspaper, The Australian, the main source of articles (n = 24). News items were the most frequent type of articles (n = 73), with the majority (n = 55) primarily focused on broader hospital problems. Government representatives, advocacy groups, researchers, health service staff and private industry groups were prominent news actors. A shortage of hospital resources was identified as the central cause of medication errors (n = 38), with efficient error reporting systems most frequently identified as a solution (n = 25). Government reports were cited on 39 occasions, with peer-reviewed publications infrequently cited (n = 4). Australian newspaper reporting of medication errors was relatively limited. Given the high prevalence of errors and the potential role consumers can play in identifying and preventing errors, there is a clear argument for increasing public awareness and understanding of issues relating to medication safety. Existing coverage of this issue is unrelated to research evidence. This suggests the need for patient safety researchers and advocacy groups to engage more strongly with the media as a strategy to increase the productive public discourse concerning medication errors and gain support for evidence-based interventions.

  5. Impact of computerized physician order entry on medication errors.

    PubMed

    Menendez, M D; Alonso, J; Rancaño, I; Corte, J J; Herranz, V; Vazquez, F

    2012-01-01

    Information is scarce on the impact of the clinical electronic record on the frequency and severity of medication errors in acute geriatric patients. An analytical and descriptive pre-post study was conducted on the implementation of computerized provider order entry systems (CPOE), over a 6 year period. A voluntary reporting system was used to detect the medication errors using the IR2 report form of the UK National Health Service, the Global Trigger Tool and the walk rounds with the Pharmacy Service. The severity categories were taken from the National Coordinating Council for Medication Error Reporting and Prevention (NCC MERP) Index Categorizing Errors. A total of 1887 medication errors (1553 patients) were detected in the period of study, and represented the first adverse event reported (29.3%). 8.5 adverse events per 100 admissions were found (0.24 in the categories E through I) and the prescription errors represented a 27.6%. By drugs dispensed, adverse events were 2.07 times more frequent in the 3 year period (2007-2009) with electronic clinical record than in the 3 year period with the hand-written system (2004-2006), being more frequent with antibiotics (1.92 times), antipyretic (2.21 times) and opiates (2.72 times). For serious errors and by doses dispensed, there were 5.18 times less frequent serious errors in the period related to the electronic record, drug omission (46.8 times less frequent), wrong dose (10.53 times) and antibiotics (10.84 times). Frequent medication errors were found in acute geriatric patients. An increase in medication errors and a decline in the severity of the detected errors were found in relationship to the electronic clinical record. For these reasons, the implementation of the electronic clinical record should be monitored. Copyright © 2011 SECA. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  6. Recognition of medical errors' reporting system dimensions in educational hospitals.

    PubMed

    Yarmohammadian, Mohammad H; Mohammadinia, Leila; Tavakoli, Nahid; Ghalriz, Parvin; Haghshenas, Abbas

    2014-01-01

    characteristics, and the quality of error experiences' transmission in the health-care system. Although, appropriate achievements have been assured in Shahid Beheshti Hospital, but it seems necessary that in order to immune promotion not only in this hospital, but in the other organizations, necessary infrastructures have been provided for an error reporting system performance. An appropriate medical error reporting system could be educated and prevent the occurrence of repeated errors.

  7. Patient-Controlled Analgesia Basal Infusion Overdose; Life-threatening Errors with Flecainide Suspension in Children; Medical Product Error-Prevention Efforts Need to Be Shared and Harmonized Internationally

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Michael R.; Smetzer, Judy L.

    2015-01-01

    These medication errors have occurred in health care facilities at least once. They will happen again—perhaps where you work. Through education and alertness of personnel and procedural safeguards, they can be avoided. You should consider publishing accounts of errors in your newsletters and/or presenting them at your inservice training programs. Your assistance is required to continue this feature. The reports described here were received through the Institute for Safe Medication Practices (ISMP) Medication Errors Reporting Program. Any reports published by ISMP will be anonymous. Comments are also invited; the writers’ names will be published if desired. ISMP may be contacted at the address shown below. Errors, close calls, or hazardous conditions may be reported directly to ISMP through the ISMP Web site (www.ismp.org), by calling 800-FAIL-SAFE, or via e-mail at ismpinfo@ismp.org. ISMP guarantees the confidentiality and security of the information received and respects reporters’ wishes as to the level of detail included in publications. PMID:26715797

  8. Adverse drug events and medication errors: detection and classification methods.

    PubMed

    Morimoto, T; Gandhi, T K; Seger, A C; Hsieh, T C; Bates, D W

    2004-08-01

    Investigating the incidence, type, and preventability of adverse drug events (ADEs) and medication errors is crucial to improving the quality of health care delivery. ADEs, potential ADEs, and medication errors can be collected by extraction from practice data, solicitation of incidents from health professionals, and patient surveys. Practice data include charts, laboratory, prescription data, and administrative databases, and can be reviewed manually or screened by computer systems to identify signals. Research nurses, pharmacists, or research assistants review these signals, and those that are likely to represent an ADE or medication error are presented to reviewers who independently categorize them into ADEs, potential ADEs, medication errors, or exclusions. These incidents are also classified according to preventability, ameliorability, disability, severity, stage, and responsible person. These classifications, as well as the initial selection of incidents, have been evaluated for agreement between reviewers and the level of agreement found ranged from satisfactory to excellent (kappa = 0.32-0.98). The method of ADE and medication error detection and classification described is feasible and has good reliability. It can be used in various clinical settings to measure and improve medication safety.

  9. 2010 drug packaging review: identifying problems to prevent errors.

    PubMed

    2011-06-01

    Prescrire's analyses showed that the quality of drug packaging in 2010 still left much to be desired. Potentially dangerous packaging remains a significant problem: unclear labelling is source of medication errors; dosing devices for some psychotropic drugs create a risk of overdose; child-proof caps are often lacking; and too many patient information leaflets are misleading or difficult to understand. Everything that is needed for safe drug packaging is available; it is now up to regulatory agencies and drug companies to act responsibly. In the meantime, health professionals can help their patients by learning to identify the pitfalls of drug packaging and providing safe information to help prevent medication errors.

  10. Preventing and responding to medical identity theft.

    PubMed

    Amori, Geraldine

    2008-01-01

    Medical identity theft is a crime with two victims: patients and providers. It is easy to commit and lucrative because healthcare record keeping and business interactions are complex and mainly electronic. Patients whose identity has been stolen are vulnerable to both medical error and financial loss. Providers may suffer both reputation loss and financial loss. There are steps to help prevent and to respond appropriately to medical identity theft.

  11. Cognitive Errors in Reconciling Complex Medication Lists

    PubMed Central

    Horsky, Jan; Ramelson, Harley Z.

    2016-01-01

    Discrepancies between multiple electronic versions of patient medication records contribute to adverse drug events. Regular reconciliation increases their accuracy but is often inadequately supported by EHRs. We evaluated two systems with conceptually different interface designs for their effectiveness in resolving discrepancies. Eleven clinicians reconciled a complex list of 16 medications using both EHRs in the same standardized scenario. Errors such as omissions to add or discontinue a drug or to update a dose were analyzed. Clinicians made three times as many errors working with an EHR with lists arranged in a single column than when using a system with side-by-side lists. Excessive cognitive effort and reliance on memory was likely a strong contributing factor for lower accuracy of reconciliation. As errors increase with task difficulty, evaluations of reconciliation tools need to focus on complex prescribing scenarios to accurately assess effectiveness, error rate and whether they reduce risk to patient safety. PMID:28269860

  12. Reflection and analysis of how pharmacy students learn to communicate about medication errors.

    PubMed

    Noland, Carey M; Rickles, Nathaniel M

    2009-06-01

    Medication errors are a serious and costly problem. This study focuses on the socialization of pharmacy students regarding medication errors. The qualitative interview protocol contained 28 questions on topics such as communication-related medication errors and training on how to handle medication errors. In-depth interviews were conducted with 44 students enrolled in a 6-year entry-level pharmacy program. Five main themes emerged regarding medication errors and communication: (a) pressure to be perfect, (b) feeling comfortable talking about mistakes, (c) assuming and communicating responsibility for mistakes, (d) learning how processes can contribute to errors and their prevention, and (e) inadequate and inconsistent training on how to handle medication errors. Study results indicate that pharmacy students experience both incomplete and inconsistent socialization to the role of communication in medication errors and in their prevention.

  13. [Communication of medical errors to patients: questions and tools].

    PubMed

    Bascuñán, María Luz; Arriagada, Ana María

    2016-09-01

    For several years and in many different ways, medical errors have been studied. As expected, the majority of efforts have been directed to prevent clinical errors during the different phases of health care. Nevertheless, less attention has been given to what happens when a negative effect has already occurred. The present work describes the doubts and difficulties that doctors deal with when facing an error and to describe the communicational tools that the literature offers to cope with them. The definition of medical error was the starting point that was used to later analyze the evidence about what, why and how to inform medical errors from an ethical and technical point of view. In the light of new legal exigencies, communicational and health protocols are revised, distinguishing those that are used for conveying bad news and medical errors. The importance of the ethical and communicational formation of the professionals is emphasized, identifying certain hindering aspects of the medical culture. This culture promotes an idea of the doctor as a professional who knows everything, does not make mistakes and acts in isolation. These do not reflect personal attributes in the professional and in the health team, required for a good professional practice.

  14. Error begat error: design error analysis and prevention in social infrastructure projects.

    PubMed

    Love, Peter E D; Lopez, Robert; Edwards, David J; Goh, Yang M

    2012-09-01

    Design errors contribute significantly to cost and schedule growth in social infrastructure projects and to engineering failures, which can result in accidents and loss of life. Despite considerable research that has addressed their error causation in construction projects they still remain prevalent. This paper identifies the underlying conditions that contribute to design errors in social infrastructure projects (e.g. hospitals, education, law and order type buildings). A systemic model of error causation is propagated and subsequently used to develop a learning framework for design error prevention. The research suggests that a multitude of strategies should be adopted in congruence to prevent design errors from occurring and so ensure that safety and project performance are ameliorated.

  15. Characteristics associated with postdischarge medication errors.

    PubMed

    Mixon, Amanda S; Myers, Amy P; Leak, Cardella L; Lou Jacobsen, J Mary; Cawthon, Courtney; Goggins, Kathryn M; Nwosu, Samuel; Schildcrout, Jonathan S; Schnelle, John F; Speroff, Theodore; Kripalani, Sunil

    2014-08-01

    To examine the association of patient- and medication-related factors with postdischarge medication errors. The Vanderbilt Inpatient Cohort Study includes adults hospitalized with acute coronary syndromes and/or acute decompensated heart failure. We measured health literacy, subjective numeracy, marital status, cognition, social support, educational attainment, income, depression, global health status, and medication adherence in patients enrolled from October 1, 2011, through August 31, 2012. We used binomial logistic regression to determine predictors of discordance between the discharge medication list and the patient-reported list during postdischarge medication review. Among 471 patients (mean age, 59 years), the mean total number of medications reported was 12, and 79 patients (16.8%) had inadequate or marginal health literacy. A total of 242 patients (51.4%) were taking 1 or more discordant medication (ie, appeared on either the discharge list or patient-reported list but not both), 129 (27.4%) failed to report a medication on their discharge list, and 168 (35.7%) reported a medication not on their discharge list. In addition, 279 participants (59.2%) had a misunderstanding in indication, dose, or frequency in a cardiac medication. In multivariable analyses, higher subjective numeracy (odds ratio [OR], 0.81; 95% CI, 0.67-0.98) was associated with lower odds of having discordant medications. For cardiac medications, participants with higher health literacy (OR, 0.84; 95% CI, 0.74-0.95), with higher subjective numeracy (OR, 0.77; 95% CI, 0.63-0.95), and who were female (OR, 0.60; 95% CI, 0.46-0.78) had lower odds of misunderstandings in indication, dose, or frequency. Medication errors are present in approximately half of patients after hospital discharge and are more common among patients with lower numeracy or health literacy. Copyright © 2014 Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Changes in intern attitudes toward medical error and disclosure.

    PubMed

    Varjavand, Nielufar; Bachegowda, Lohith S; Gracely, Edward; Novack, Dennis H

    2012-07-01

    The 2000 Institute of Medicine report, 'To Err is Human: Building a Safer Health System', focused the medical community on medical error. This focus led to educational initiatives and legislation designed to minimise errors and increase their disclosure. This study aimed to investigate whether increased general awareness about medical error has affected interns' attitudes toward medical error and disclosure by comparing responses to surveys of interns carried out at either end of the last decade. Two cohorts of interns for the academic years 1999, 2000 and 2001 (n = 304) and 2008 and 2009 (n = 206) at a university hospital were presented with two hypothetical scenarios involving errors that resulted in, respectively, no permanent harm and an adverse outcome. The interns were questioned regarding their likely responses to error and disclosure. We collected 510 surveys (100% response rate). For both scenarios, the percentage of interns who would be willing to fully disclose their mistakes increased substantially from 1999-2001 to 2008-2009 ('no permanent harm': 38% and 71%, respectively [p < 0.001]; 'adverse outcome': 29% and 55%, respectively [p < 0.001]). About two thirds of fully disclosing interns in both scenarios believed 'the patient's right to full information' to be the primary reason for their disclosure. Fear of litigation in response to error disclosure decreased (70% and 52%, respectively), the percentage of interns who felt that 'medical mistakes are preventable if doctors know enough' decreased (49% and 31%, respectively), belief that competent doctors keep emotions and uncertainties to themselves decreased (51% and 14%, respectively), and agreement with leaving medicine if one (as an intern) caused harm or death decreased (50% and 3%, respectively). Prior training about medical mistakes increased more than four-fold between the cohorts. This comparison of intern responses to a survey administered at either end of the last decade reveals that there may

  17. Provider error prevention: online total parenteral nutrition calculator.

    PubMed Central

    Lehmann, Christoph U.; Conner, Kim G.; Cox, Jeanne M.

    2002-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: 1. To reduce errors in the ordering of total parenteral nutrition (TPN) in the Newborn Intensive Care Unit (NICU) at the Johns Hopkins Hospital (JHH). 2. To develop a pragmatic low-cost medical information system to achieve this goal. METHODS: We designed an online total parenteral nutrition order entry system (TPNCalculator) using Internet technologies. Total development time was three weeks. Utilization, impact on medical errors and user satisfaction were evaluated. RESULTS: During the control period, 0.39 orders per patient per day (N=557) were received compared to 0.35 orders per patient per day (N=471) in the intervention period (NS). There was no significant difference in the percentage of late (incomplete by order deadline) TPN orders. During the control period, an average of 10.8 errors were detected per 100 TPN orders compared to 4.2 per 100 orders in the intervention period (61% reduction of error rate; p < 0.01). We found a reduction in the following types of problems: Calculation errors (100%), osmolality issues (87%) and other knowledge problems (84%). There was a 35% increase in the number of incomplete forms. Users of the system were enthusiastic and supportive and compared it favorably to the prior paper based system. CONCLUSION: Low-cost, pragmatic approaches utilizing Internet technology in the design of medical information systems can reduce medical errors and might pose a viable option for the prevention of adverse drug events. PMID:12463861

  18. Medication errors reported to the National Medication Error Reporting System in Malaysia: a 4-year retrospective review (2009 to 2012).

    PubMed

    Samsiah, A; Othman, Noordin; Jamshed, Shazia; Hassali, Mohamed Azmi; Wan-Mohaina, W M

    2016-12-01

    Reporting and analysing the data on medication errors (MEs) is important and contributes to a better understanding of the error-prone environment. This study aims to examine the characteristics of errors submitted to the National Medication Error Reporting System (MERS) in Malaysia. A retrospective review of reports received from 1 January 2009 to 31 December 2012 was undertaken. Descriptive statistics method was applied. A total of 17,357 MEs reported were reviewed. The majority of errors were from public-funded hospitals. Near misses were classified in 86.3 % of the errors. The majority of errors (98.1 %) had no harmful effects on the patients. Prescribing contributed to more than three-quarters of the overall errors (76.1 %). Pharmacists detected and reported the majority of errors (92.1 %). Cases of erroneous dosage or strength of medicine (30.75 %) were the leading type of error, whilst cardiovascular (25.4 %) was the most common category of drug found. MERS provides rich information on the characteristics of reported MEs. Low contribution to reporting from healthcare facilities other than government hospitals and non-pharmacists requires further investigation. Thus, a feasible approach to promote MERS among healthcare providers in both public and private sectors needs to be formulated and strengthened. Preventive measures to minimise MEs should be directed to improve prescribing competency among the fallible prescribers identified.

  19. Nursing student medication errors: a retrospective review.

    PubMed

    Harding, Lorill; Petrick, Teresa

    2008-01-01

    This article presents the findings of a retrospective review of medication errors made and reported by nursing students in a 4-year baccalaureate program. Data were examined in relation to the semester of the program, kind of error according to the rights of medication administration, and contributing factors. Three categories of contributing factors were identified: rights violations, system factors, and knowledge and understanding. It became apparent that system factors, or the context in which medication administration takes place, are not fully considered when students are taught about medication administration. Teaching strategies need to account for the dynamic complexity of this process and incorporate experiential knowledge. This review raised several important questions about how this information guides our practice as educators in the clinical and classroom settings and how we can work collaboratively with practice partners to influence change and increase patient safety.

  20. Origins of and solutions for neonatal medication-dispensing errors.

    PubMed

    Sauberan, Jason B; Dean, Linda M; Fiedelak, Jessica; Abraham, Julie A

    2010-01-01

    Five cases of sound-alike, look-alike, neonatal medication-dispensing errors and their resolution are reviewed. In 2008, there were five cases in which look-alike or sound-alike neonatal medication-dispensing errors occurred at our institution. A mix-up between neonatal and adult or pediatric products occurred in four of the five cases. Three of the five errors resulted in near misses with the potential to cause harm. The other two errors reached the patients but did not cause harm. The medication mix-ups involved adult and neonatal phytonadione injectable emulsion, sodium citrate injection and vancomycin-heparin combination injection, adult tetanus-diphtheria-acellular pertussis and infant diphtheria-tetanus-acellular pertussis (DTaP) vaccines, Haemophilus B and DTaP vaccines, and cisatracurium and vecuronium. Each error exposed weaknesses in the system of neonatal medication storage, labeling, delivery, knowledge, and administration documentation at our institution. Resolution of system problems was made possible by a collaborative approach and involved reorganizing shelving used to store neonatal medications; using a differently colored labeling scheme for products whose syringes were nearly identical; implementing changes to the infant vaccine ordering, storage, dispensing, and documentation systems; and instituting centralized and decentralized pharmacist review of pharmacy technician automated dispensing cabinet-filling activities. An institution providing services to both neonatal and adult patients experienced five cases of medication-dispensing errors with look-alike or sound-alike medications. Multidisciplinary collaboration within the system helped the pharmacy identify, resolve, and prevent errors related to medication storage, labeling, delivery, knowledge, and administration documentation.

  1. Differences Between Methods of Detecting Medication Errors: A Secondary Analysis of Medication Administration Errors Using Incident Reports, the Global Trigger Tool Method, and Observations.

    PubMed

    Härkänen, Marja; Turunen, Hannele; Vehviläinen-Julkunen, Katri

    2016-03-24

    This study aimed to compare medication administration errors detected by 3 different methods in terms of severity, type, and contributing factors. The study was performed in one university hospital in Finland. A convenience sample of medication administration errors (n = 451) reported on incident reports or detected by reviewing randomly selected patient records via the Global Trigger Tool method and direct observations of patient record reviews were collected for reanalysis. The severity of the medication administration errors, the types thereof, and factors contributing to such errors were reclassified using the National Coordinating Council for Medication Error Reporting and Prevention's taxonomy of medication errors. The observational method revealed fewer medication errors that were more likely to cause harm to patients than did the incident reports or the Global Trigger Tool method. The incident reports and the Global Trigger Tool method mainly revealed wrong doses, whereas most medication administration errors in the observational data were errors involving the use of the incorrect technique. In addition, each method produced different information regarding the factors contributing to medication administration errors. Based on the study's findings and the limitations of each method, a combination of different methods should be used to discover representative information concerning medication administration errors. To increase medication administration safety, advanced multiprofessional collaboration, effective communication, adequate skills, more systematic medication processes, and distraction-free work environments are needed.

  2. Adverse Drug Events caused by Serious Medication Administration Errors

    PubMed Central

    Sawarkar, Abhivyakti; Keohane, Carol A.; Maviglia, Saverio; Gandhi, Tejal K; Poon, Eric G

    2013-01-01

    medication doses administered, in a hospital where 6 million doses are administered per year, about 4000 preventable ADEs would be attributable to medication administration errors annually. PMID:22791691

  3. [Medication error due to drug packaging: a case report].

    PubMed

    Hélène', Ginestet; David, Breton; Sophie, Spadoni; Vincent, Jandard; Michel, Paillet; Xavier, Bohand

    2009-12-01

    Nowadays, occurrence of medication errors is a public health concern at hospital. Drug packaging represent one of the important causes of medication errors. The authors report a medication error associated with an erroneous interpretation of drug packaging information. This error was detected during the pharmaceutical review of the medical prescription. The nursing staff in charge of drug administering must thus be particularly aware of this risk. The potential clinical significance of this type of medication error may be important.

  4. Frequency, types, and direct related costs of medication errors in an academic nephrology ward in Iran.

    PubMed

    Gharekhani, Afshin; Kanani, Negin; Khalili, Hossein; Dashti-Khavidaki, Simin

    2014-09-01

    Medication errors are ongoing problems among hospitalized patients especially those with multiple co-morbidities and polypharmacy such as patients with renal diseases. This study evaluated the frequency, types and direct related cost of medication errors in nephrology ward and the role played by clinical pharmacists. During this study, clinical pharmacists detected, managed, and recorded the medication errors. Prescribing errors including inappropriate drug, dose, or treatment durations were gathered. To assess transcription errors, the equivalence of nursery charts and physician's orders were evaluated. Administration errors were assessed by observing drugs' preparation, storage, and administration by nurses. The changes in medications costs after implementing clinical pharmacists' interventions were compared with the calculated medications costs if the medication errors were continued up to patients' discharge time. More than 85% of patients experienced medication error. The rate of medication errors was 3.5 errors per patient and 0.18 errors per ordered medication. More than 95% of medication errors occurred at prescription nodes. Most common prescribing errors were omission (26.9%) or unauthorized drugs (18.3%) and low drug dosage or frequency (17.3%). Most of the medication errors happened on cardiovascular drugs (24%) followed by vitamins and electrolytes (22.1%) and antimicrobials (18.5%). The number of medication errors was correlated with the number of ordered medications and length of hospital stay. Clinical pharmacists' interventions decreased patients' direct medication costs by 4.3%. About 22% of medication errors led to patients' harm. In conclusion, clinical pharmacists' contributions in nephrology wards were of value to prevent medication errors and to reduce medications cost.

  5. Risk managers, physicians, and disclosure of harmful medical errors.

    PubMed

    Loren, David J; Garbutt, Jane; Dunagan, W Claiborne; Bommarito, Kerry M; Ebers, Alison G; Levinson, Wendy; Waterman, Amy D; Fraser, Victoria J; Summy, Elizabeth A; Gallagher, Thomas H

    2010-03-01

    Physicians are encouraged to disclose medical errors to patients, which often requires close collaboration between physicians and risk managers. An anonymous national survey of 2,988 healthcare facility-based risk managers was conducted between November 2004 and March 2005, and results were compared with those of a previous survey (conducted between July 2003 and March 2004) of 1,311 medical physicians in Washington and Missouri. Both surveys included an error-disclosure scenario for an obvious and a less obvious error with scripted response options. More risk managers than physicians were aware that an error-reporting system was present at their hospital (81% versus 39%, p < .001) and believed that mechanisms to inform physicians about errors in their hospital were adequate (51% versus 17%, p < .001). More risk managers than physicians strongly agreed that serious errors should be disclosed to patients (70% versus 49%, p < .001). Across both error scenario, risk managers were more likely than physicians to definitely recommend that the error be disclosed (76% versus 50%, p < .001) and to provide full details about how the error would be prevented in the future (62% versus 51%, p < .001). However, physicians were more likely than risk managers to provide a full apology recognizing the harm caused by the error (39% versus 21%, p < .001). Risk managers have more favorable attitudes about disclosing errors to patients compared with physicians but are less supportive of providing a full apology. These differences may create conflicts between risk managers and physicians regarding disclosure. Health care institutions should promote greater collaboration between these two key participants in disclosure conversations.

  6. Strategies to reduce medication errors in ambulatory practice.

    PubMed Central

    Adubofour, Kwabena O. M.; Keenan, Craig R.; Daftary, Ashok; Mensah-Adubofour, Josepha; Dachman, William D.

    2004-01-01

    Medication errors generally refer to mistakes made in the processes of ordering, transcribing, dispensing, administering or monitoring of pharmaceutical agents used in clinical practice. The Institute of Medicine report, To Err Is Human: Building a Safer Health System, has helped raise public awareness surrounding the issue of patient safety within our hospitals. A number of legislative and regulatory steps have resulted in hospital authorities putting in place various systems to allow for error reporting and prevention. Medication errors are being closely scrutinized as part of these hospital-based efforts. Most Americans, however, receive their healthcare in the ambulatory primary care setting. Primary care physicians are involved in the writing of several million prescriptions annually. The steps underway in our hospitals to reduce medication errors should occur concurrently with steps to increase awareness of this problem in the out-patient setting. This article provides an overview of strategies that can be adopted by primary care physicians to decrease medication errors in ambulatory practice. PMID:15622685

  7. Computer automated detection of head orientation for prevention of wrong-side treatment errors.

    PubMed

    Christensen, James D; Hutchins, Gary C; McDonald, Clement J

    2006-01-01

    A medical error can occur when a patient is positioned in a medical imaging device such as an MRI scanner if information regarding their orientation is improperly entered into the device control software. If such an error is not detected and corrected, the erroneous orientation data will be stored in the image header information and will propagate with the images throughout the medical enterprise. Presented here is a fully automated algorithm for computing patient head orientation from the image data and detecting errors in image orientation labeling. This will enable errors in orientation labeling to be corrected at their source when they occur, thus preventing later medical treatment errors related to laterality.

  8. Chemotherapy medication errors in a pediatric cancer treatment center: prospective characterization of error types and frequency and development of a quality improvement initiative to lower the error rate.

    PubMed

    Watts, Raymond G; Parsons, Kerry

    2013-08-01

    Chemotherapy medication errors occur in all cancer treatment programs. Such errors have potential severe consequences: either enhanced toxicity or impaired disease control. Understanding and limiting chemotherapy errors are imperative. A multi-disciplinary team developed and implemented a prospective pharmacy surveillance system of chemotherapy prescribing and administration errors from 2008 to 2011 at a Children's Oncology Group-affiliated, pediatric cancer treatment program. Every chemotherapy order was prospectively reviewed for errors at the time of order submission. All chemotherapy errors were graded using standard error severity codes. Error rates were calculated by number of patient encounters and chemotherapy doses dispensed. Process improvement was utilized to develop techniques to minimize errors with a goal of zero errors reaching the patient. Over the duration of the study, more than 20,000 chemotherapy orders were reviewed. Error rates were low (6/1,000 patient encounters and 3.9/1,000 medications dispensed) at the start of the project and reduced by 50% to 3/1,000 patient encounters and 1.8/1,000 medications dispensed during the initiative. Error types included chemotherapy dosing or prescribing errors (42% of errors), treatment roadmap errors (26%), supportive care errors (15%), timing errors (12%), and pharmacy dispensing errors (4%). Ninety-two percent of errors were intercepted before reaching the patient. No error caused identified patient harm. Efforts to lower rates were successful but have not succeeded in preventing all errors. Chemotherapy medication errors are possibly unavoidable, but can be minimized by thoughtful, multispecialty review of current policies and procedures. Pediatr Blood Cancer 2013;601320-1324. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. [Medication errors and medication reconciliation from a hospital pharmacist's perspective].

    PubMed

    Amann, Steffen; Kantelhardt, Pamela

    2012-01-01

    To reduce medication errors and other drug-related problems, their systematic discovery, documentation and evaluation is essential. The web-based documentation database ADKA-DokuPIK enables both the documentation and the publication of annotated individual cases and, moreover, systematic errors or accumulations of risk drugs may be determined. Medication reconciliation is another important component to increase safety in drug therapy. Hospital pharmacists may support and significantly improve this process. In Germany some initial information from various projects is available. Medication reconciliation performed by hospital pharmacists may significantly increase the completeness and accuracy of medication regimens. Patient counselling together with the necessary drug supply at discharge improves patients' knowledge, closes supply gaps and improves the satisfaction of all parties.

  10. A structural equation modeling of the factors affecting student nurses' medication errors.

    PubMed

    Valdez, Les Paul; de Guzman, Allan; Escolar-Chua, Rowena

    2013-03-01

    Across medication error literature, much attention has been given to incidence, types, causes and prevention of medication errors. Despite these efforts, medication errors continue to occur among registered and student nurses. Considering the numerous studies on medication errors committed by registered nurses, little is known on the nature of student nurses' medication error. This study employed factor analysis and structural equation modeling to explore the factors affecting medication errors by student nurses. With the participation of 329 junior and senior student nurses recruited from a comprehensive university in the Philippines, five factor dimensions of the causes of student nurses' medication error were identified, namely: In-violation, In-writing, In-excess, In-experience and In-tension. Results of path analysis showed an interaction among these variables. Additionally, poor adherence to the "five rights" was identified as an important mediator between In-violation, In-writing, In-excess, In-experience and In-tension and student nurses' medication error. By developing a model to explain how student nurses' medication errors occur, this study sheds light on the nature of student nurses' medication error and provides a basis for error prevention strategies.

  11. Evaluation of Perioperative Medication Errors and Adverse Drug Events

    PubMed Central

    Nanji, Karen C.; Patel, Amit; Shaikh, Sofia; Seger, Diane L.; Bates, David W.

    2015-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study is to assess the rates of perioperative medication errors (MEs) and adverse drug events (ADEs) as percentages of medication administrations, evaluate their root causes, and formulate targeted solutions to prevent them. Methods In this prospective observational study, anesthesia-trained study staff (anesthesiologists/nurse anesthetists) observed randomly selected operations at a 1,046 bed tertiary care academic medical center to identify MEs and ADEs over eight months. Retrospective chart abstraction was performed to flag events that were missed by observation. All events subsequently underwent review by two independent reviewers. Primary outcomes were the incidence of MEs and ADEs. Results A total of 277 operations were observed with 3,671 medication administrations of which 193 (5.3%, 95% CI 4.5 to 6.0) involved a ME and/or ADE. Of these, 153 (79.3%) were preventable and 40 (20.7%) were non-preventable. The events included 153 (79.3%) errors and 91 (47.2%) ADEs. While 32 (20.9%) of the errors had little potential for harm, 51 (33.3%) led to an observed ADE and an additional 70 (45.8%) had the potential for patient harm. Of the 153 errors, 99 (64.7%) were serious, 51 (33.3%) were significant and 3 (2.0%) were life-threatening. Conclusions One in twenty perioperative medication administrations included an ME and/or ADE. More than one third of the MEs led to observed ADEs, and the remaining two thirds had the potential for harm. These rates are markedly higher than those reported by retrospective surveys. Specific solutions exist which have the potential to decrease the incidence of perioperative MEs. PMID:26501385

  12. Economic evaluation of the impact of medication errors reported by U.S. clinical pharmacists.

    PubMed

    Samp, Jennifer C; Touchette, Daniel R; Marinac, Jacqueline S; Kuo, Grace M

    2014-01-01

    Medication errors defined as "any preventable event that may cause or lead to inappropriate medication use or patient harm" have been highlighted as a top national priority in a report issued by the Institute of Medicine. However, little information is available on precise costs of medication errors. This study estimated the cost of medication errors reported by clinical pharmacists using a modified societal perspective. Information on 779 medication errors was collected in the Medication Error Detection, Amelioration and Prevention (MEDAP) study that documented medication errors observed by clinical pharmacists during a consecutive 14-day period. The rate of medication errors, outcomes (number of errors resulting in temporary/permanent patient harm, prolonged hospitalization, or life-sustaining therapy), and interventions (communication, medication changes, patient monitoring, and treatment referrals) were collected. A decision model was developed to estimate the economic impact of medication errors reported by clinical pharmacists. Event probabilities were derived from MEDAP data. Direct costs were obtained through reviews of the literature, hospital charge data, and Medicare and Medicaid reimbursement. One-way and Monte Carlo sensitivity analyses were used to explore uncertainty in the values. In the base case, the mean expected cost of a medication error was $88.57. In the Monte Carlo simulation, the mean cost was $89.35 (± $30.17 SD). One-way sensitivity analysis revealed that changes in the probability of medication errors causing hospitalization and the cost of hospitalization had the greatest variability on the outcome ($50.44-$155.81 [probability of hospitalization], $32.59-$136.40 [cost of hospitalization]). Medication errors are costly to the health care system. A better understanding of medication error costs may be used to justify initiatives to reduce the risk and inefficiency associated with these errors. © 2013 American College of Clinical

  13. Medication dispensing errors at a public pediatric hospital.

    PubMed

    Costa, Lindemberg Assunção; Valli, Cleidenete; Alvarenga, Angra Pimentel

    2008-01-01

    assess the safety of medication dispensing processes through the dispensing error rate. Cross-sectional study carried out at a pharmaceutical service of a pediatric hospital in Espírito Santo, Brazil. Data collection was performed between August and September 2006, totaling 2620 prescribed medication doses. Any deviation from the medical prescription in dispensing medication was considered a dispensing error. THE CATEGORIES OF MEDICATION ERRORS WERE: content, labeling, and documentation errors. The dispensing error rate was computed by dividing the number of errors by the total of dispensed doses. From the 300 identified errors, 262 (87.3 %) were content errors. The rate of errors in the labeling and documentation categories was 33 (11%) and 5 (1.7%), respectively. The total dispensing error rate was higher than rates reported in international studies. The most frequent category was "content error".

  14. Computerised physician order entry-related medication errors: analysis of reported errors and vulnerability testing of current systems

    PubMed Central

    Schiff, G D; Amato, M G; Eguale, T; Boehne, J J; Wright, A; Koppel, R; Rashidee, A H; Elson, R B; Whitney, D L; Thach, T-T; Bates, D W; Seger, A C

    2015-01-01

    Importance Medication computerised provider order entry (CPOE) has been shown to decrease errors and is being widely adopted. However, CPOE also has potential for introducing or contributing to errors. Objectives The objectives of this study are to (a) analyse medication error reports where CPOE was reported as a ‘contributing cause’ and (b) develop ‘use cases’ based on these reports to test vulnerability of current CPOE systems to these errors. Methods A review of medication errors reported to United States Pharmacopeia MEDMARX reporting system was made, and a taxonomy was developed for CPOE-related errors. For each error we evaluated what went wrong and why and identified potential prevention strategies and recurring error scenarios. These scenarios were then used to test vulnerability of leading CPOE systems, asking typical users to enter these erroneous orders to assess the degree to which these problematic orders could be entered. Results Between 2003 and 2010, 1.04 million medication errors were reported to MEDMARX, of which 63 040 were reported as CPOE related. A review of 10 060 CPOE-related cases was used to derive 101 codes describing what went wrong, 67 codes describing reasons why errors occurred, 73 codes describing potential prevention strategies and 21 codes describing recurring error scenarios. Ability to enter these erroneous order scenarios was tested on 13 CPOE systems at 16 sites. Overall, 298 (79.5%) of the erroneous orders were able to be entered including 100 (28.0%) being ‘easily’ placed, another 101 (28.3%) with only minor workarounds and no warnings. Conclusions and relevance Medication error reports provide valuable information for understanding CPOE-related errors. Reports were useful for developing taxonomy and identifying recurring errors to which current CPOE systems are vulnerable. Enhanced monitoring, reporting and testing of CPOE systems are important to improve CPOE safety. PMID:25595599

  15. Prescription Drug Labeling Medication Errors: A Big Deal for Pharmacists

    PubMed Central

    Jeetu, G; Girish, T

    2010-01-01

    Today, in the health care profession, all types of medication errors including missed dose, wrong dosage forms, wrong time interval, wrong route, etc., are a big deal for better patient care. Today, problems related to medications are common in the healthcare profession, and are responsible for significant morbidity, mortality, and cost. Several recent studies have demonstrated that patients frequently have difficulty in reading and understanding medication labels. According to the Institute of Medicine report, “Preventing Medication Errors”, cited poor labeling as a central cause for medication errors in the USA. Evidence suggests that specific content and format of prescription drug labels facilitate communication with and comprehension by patients. Efforts to improve the labels should be guided by such evidence, although an additional study assessing the influence of label design on medication-taking behavior and health outcomes is needed. Several policy options exist to require minimal standards to optimize medical therapy, particularly in light of the new Medicare prescription drug benefit. PMID:21331202

  16. Knowledge of healthcare professionals about medication errors in hospitals.

    PubMed

    Abdel-Latif, Mohamed M M

    2016-06-01

    Medication errors are the most common types of medical errors in hospitals and leading cause of morbidity and mortality among patients. The aim of the present study was to assess the knowledge of healthcare professionals about medication errors in hospitals. A self-administered questionnaire was distributed to randomly selected healthcare professionals in eight hospitals in Madinah, Saudi Arabia. An 18-item survey was designed and comprised questions on demographic data, knowledge of medication errors, availability of reporting systems in hospitals, attitudes toward error reporting, causes of medication errors. Data were analyzed with Statistical Package for the Social Sciences software Version 17. A total of 323 of healthcare professionals completed the questionnaire with 64.6% response rate of 138 (42.72%) physicians, 34 (10.53%) pharmacists, and 151 (46.75%) nurses. A majority of the participants had a good knowledge about medication errors concept and their dangers on patients. Only 68.7% of them were aware of reporting systems in hospitals. Healthcare professionals revealed that there was no clear mechanism available for reporting of errors in most hospitals. Prescribing (46.5%) and administration (29%) errors were the main causes of errors. The most frequently encountered medication errors were anti-hypertensives, antidiabetics, antibiotics, digoxin, and insulin. This study revealed differences in the awareness among healthcare professionals toward medication errors in hospitals. The poor knowledge about medication errors emphasized the urgent necessity to adopt appropriate measures to raise awareness about medication errors in Saudi hospitals.

  17. Medication Errors in Pediatric Anesthesia: A Report From the Wake Up Safe Quality Improvement Initiative.

    PubMed

    Lobaugh, Lauren M Y; Martin, Lizabeth D; Schleelein, Laura E; Tyler, Donald C; Litman, Ronald S

    2017-09-01

    Wake Up Safe is a quality improvement initiative of the Society for Pediatric Anesthesia that contains a deidentified registry of serious adverse events occurring in pediatric anesthesia. The aim of this study was to describe and characterize reported medication errors to find common patterns amenable to preventative strategies. In September 2016, we analyzed approximately 6 years' worth of medication error events reported to Wake Up Safe. Medication errors were classified by: (1) medication category; (2) error type by phase of administration: prescribing, preparation, or administration; (3) bolus or infusion error; (4) provider type and level of training; (5) harm as defined by the National Coordinating Council for Medication Error Reporting and Prevention; and (6) perceived preventability. From 2010 to the time of our data analysis in September 2016, 32 institutions had joined and submitted data on 2087 adverse events during 2,316,635 anesthetics. These reports contained details of 276 medication errors, which comprised the third highest category of events behind cardiac and respiratory related events. Medication errors most commonly involved opioids and sedative/hypnotics. When categorized by phase of handling, 30 events occurred during preparation, 67 during prescribing, and 179 during administration. The most common error type was accidental administration of the wrong dose (N = 84), followed by syringe swap (accidental administration of the wrong syringe, N = 49). Fifty-seven (21%) reported medication errors involved medications prepared as infusions as opposed to 1 time bolus administrations. Medication errors were committed by all types of anesthesia providers, most commonly by attendings. Over 80% of reported medication errors reached the patient and more than half of these events caused patient harm. Fifteen events (5%) required a life sustaining intervention. Nearly all cases (97%) were judged to be either likely or certainly preventable. Our findings

  18. Pediatric Nurses' Perceptions of Medication Safety and Medication Error: A Mixed Methods Study.

    PubMed

    Alomari, Albara; Wilson, Val; Solman, Annette; Bajorek, Beata; Tinsley, Patricia

    2017-05-30

    This study aims to outline the current workplace culture of medication practice in a pediatric medical ward. The objective is to explore the perceptions of nurses in a pediatric clinical setting as to why medication administration errors occur. As nurses have a central role in the medication process, it is essential to explore nurses' perceptions of the factors influencing the medication process. Without this understanding, it is difficult to develop effective prevention strategies aimed at reducing medication administration errors. Previous studies were limited to exploring a single and specific aspect of medication safety. The methods used in these studies were limited to survey designs which may lead to incomplete or inadequate information being provided. This study is phase 1 on an action research project. Data collection included a direct observation of nurses during medication preparation and administration, audit based on the medication policy, and guidelines and focus groups with nursing staff. A thematic analysis was undertaken by each author independently to analyze the observation notes and focus group transcripts. Simple descriptive statistics were used to analyze the audit data. The study was conducted in a specialized pediatric medical ward. Four key themes were identified from the combined quantitative and qualitative data: (1) understanding medication errors, (2) the busy-ness of nurses, (3) the physical environment, and (4) compliance with medication policy and practice guidelines. Workload, frequent interruptions to process, poor physical environment design, lack of preparation space, and impractical medication policies are identified as barriers to safe medication practice. Overcoming these barriers requires organizations to review medication process policies and engage nurses more in medication safety research and in designing clinical guidelines for their own practice.

  19. The Importance of Medication Errors Reporting in Improving the Quality of Clinical Care Services

    PubMed Central

    Elden, Nesreen Mohamed Kamal; Ismail, Amira

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Medication errors have significant implications on patient safety. Error detection through an active management and effective reporting system discloses medication errors and encourages safe practices. Objectives: To improve patient safety through determining and reducing the major causes of medication errors (MEs), after applying tailored preventive strategies. Methodology: A pre-test, post-test study was conducted on all inpatients at a 177 bed hospital where all medication procedures in each ward were monitored by a clinical pharmacist. The patient files were reviewed, as well. Error reports were submitted to a hospital multidisciplinary committee to identify major causes of errors. Accordingly, corrective interventions that consisted of targeted training programs for nurses and physicians were conducted. Results: Medication errors were higher during ordering/prescription stage (38.1%), followed by administration phase (20.9%). About 45% of errors reached the patients: 43.5% were harmless and 1.4% harmful. 7.7% were potential errors and more than 47% could be prevented. After the intervention, error rates decreased from (6.7%) to (3.6%) (P≤0.001). Conclusion: The role of a ward based clinical pharmacist with a hospital multidisciplinary committee was effective in recognizing, designing and implementing tailored interventions for reduction of medication errors. A systematic approach is urgently needed to decrease organizational susceptibility to errors, through providing required resources to monitor, analyze and implement effective interventions. PMID:27045415

  20. Preventable Errors in Organ Transplantation: An Emerging Patient Safety Issue?

    PubMed Central

    Ison, Michael G.; Holl, Jane L.; Ladner, Daniela

    2012-01-01

    Several widely publicized errors in transplantation including a death due ABO incompatibility, two HIV transmissions and two HCV transmissions have raised concerns about medical errors in organ transplantation. The root cause analysis of each of these events revealed preventable failures in the systems and processes of care as the underlying causes. In each event, no standardized system or redundant process was in place to mitigate the failures that led to the error. Additional system and process vulnerabilities such as poor clinician communication, erroneous data transcription and transmission were also identified. Organ transplantation, because it is highly complex, often stresses the systems and processes of care and, therefore, offers a unique opportunity to proactively identify vulnerabilities and potential failures. Initial steps have been taken to understand such issues through the OPTN/UNOS Operations and Safety Committee, the Disease Transmission Advisory Committee (DTAC), and the current A2ALL ancillary Safety Study. However, to effectively improve patient safety in organ transplantation, the development of a process for reporting of preventable errors that affords protection and the support of empiric research are critical. Further, the transplant community needs to embrace the implementation of evidence-based system and process improvements that will mitigate existing safety vulnerabilities. PMID:22703471

  1. Impact of clinical pharmacy interventions on medication error nodes.

    PubMed

    Chamoun, Nibal R; Zeenny, Rony; Mansour, Hanine

    2016-12-01

    Background Pharmacists' involvement in patient care has improved the quality of care and reduced medication errors. However, this has required a lot of work that could not have been accomplished without documentation of interventions. Several means of documenting errors have been proposed in the literature but without a consistent comprehensive process. Recently, the American College of Clinical Pharmacy (ACCP) recognized that pharmacy practice lacks a consistent process for direct patient care and discussed several options for a pharmaceutical care plan, essentially encompassing medication therapy assessment, development and implementation of a pharmaceutical care plan and finally evaluation of the outcome. Therefore, as per the recommendations of ACCP, we sought to retrospectively analyze interventions by grouping them according to medication related problems (MRP) and their nodes such as prescribing; administering; monitoring; documenting and dispensing. Objective The aim of this study is to report interventions according to medication error (ME) nodes and show the impact of pharmacy interventions in reducing MRPs. Setting The study was conducted at the cardiology and infectious diseases services at a teaching hospital located in Beirut, Lebanon. Methods Intervention documentation was completed by pharmacy students on infectious diseases and cardiology rotations then reviewed by clinical pharmacists with respective specialties. Before data analysis, a new pharmacy reporting sheet was developed in order to link interventions according to MRP. Then, MRPs were grouped in the five ME nodes. During the documentation process, whether MRP had reached the patient or not may have not been reported which prevented the classification to the corresponding medication error nodes as ME. Main outcome Reduction in medication related problems across all ME nodes. Results A total of n = 1174 interventions were documented. N = 1091 interventions were classified as MRPs

  2. Medical Services: Preventive Dentistry

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    hygienist b. DENTAC— dental activity c. DFO— dental fitness officer d. DODDS—Department of Defense Dependent Schools e. HSC—U.S. Army Health Services Command f...community health dental hygienist (CHDH) in implementing these programs. (3) Coordinate with the preventive medicine activity and post or installation...aspects of preven- tive dentistry and dental public health programs. j. The community health dental hygienist , where assigned, will assist the DFO as

  3. Outcomes of a Failure Mode and Effects Analysis for medication errors in pediatric anesthesia.

    PubMed

    Martin, Lizabeth D; Grigg, Eliot B; Verma, Shilpa; Latham, Gregory J; Rampersad, Sally E; Martin, Lynn D

    2017-03-28

    The Institute of Medicine has called for development of strategies to prevent medication errors, which are one important cause of preventable harm. Although the field of anesthesiology is considered a leader in patient safety, recent data suggest high medication error rates in anesthesia practice. Unfortunately, few error prevention strategies for anesthesia providers have been implemented. Using Toyota Production System quality improvement methodology, a multidisciplinary team observed 133 h of medication practice in the operating room at a tertiary care freestanding children's hospital. A failure mode and effects analysis was conducted to systematically deconstruct and evaluate each medication handling process step and score possible failure modes to quantify areas of risk. A bundle of five targeted countermeasures were identified and implemented over 12 months. Improvements in syringe labeling (73 to 96%), standardization of medication organization in the anesthesia workspace (0 to 100%), and two-provider infusion checks (23 to 59%) were observed. Medication error reporting improved during the project and was subsequently maintained. After intervention, the median medication error rate decreased from 1.56 to 0.95 per 1000 anesthetics. The frequency of medication error harm events reaching the patient also decreased. Systematic evaluation and standardization of medication handling processes by anesthesia providers in the operating room can decrease medication errors and improve patient safety.

  4. The economics of health care quality and medical errors.

    PubMed

    Andel, Charles; Davidow, Stephen L; Hollander, Mark; Moreno, David A

    2012-01-01

    Hospitals have been looking for ways to improve quality and operational efficiency and cut costs for nearly three decades, using a variety of quality improvement strategies. However, based on recent reports, approximately 200,000 Americans die from preventable medical errors including facility-acquired conditions and millions may experience errors. In 2008, medical errors cost the United States $19.5 billion. About 87 percent or $17 billion were directly associated with additional medical cost, including: ancillary services, prescription drug services, and inpatient and outpatient care, according to a study sponsored by the Society for Actuaries and conducted by Milliman in 2010. Additional costs of $1.4 billion were attributed to increased mortality rates with $1.1 billion or 10 million days of lost productivity from missed work based on short-term disability claims. The authors estimate that the economic impact is much higher, perhaps nearly $1 trillion annually when quality-adjusted life years (QALYs) are applied to those that die. Using the Institute of Medicine's (IOM) estimate of 98,000 deaths due to preventable medical errors annually in its 1998 report, To Err Is Human, and an average of ten lost years of life at $75,000 to $100,000 per year, there is a loss of $73.5 billion to $98 billion in QALYs for those deaths--conservatively. These numbers are much greater than those we cite from studies that explore the direct costs of medical errors. And if the estimate of a recent Health Affairs article is correct-preventable death being ten times the IOM estimate-the cost is $735 billion to $980 billion. Quality care is less expensive care. It is better, more efficient, and by definition, less wasteful. It is the right care, at the right time, every time. It should mean that far fewer patients are harmed or injured. Obviously, quality care is not being delivered consistently throughout U.S. hospitals. Whatever the measure, poor quality is costing payers and

  5. Computer based medication error reporting: insights and implications.

    PubMed

    Miller, M R; Clark, J S; Lehmann, C U

    2006-06-01

    Despite the growing use of error reporting tools, the healthcare industry is inexperienced in receiving, understanding, and analyzing these reports. To assess the accuracy and define the epidemiology of medication error reports. A retrospective cohort study of 581 error reports containing 1010 medication errors reported between July 2001 and January 2003 at a large academic children's institution. Correct classification and types of medication errors. Of the 1010 medication errors reviewed, 298 (30%) were prescribing errors, 245 (24%) were dispensing errors, 410 (41%) were administration errors, and 57 (6%) involved medication administration records (MAR). Following expert review, 208 errors (21%) were deleted because they had been inappropriately coded as errors and 97 (10%) were added as they were not initially coded despite having occurred. In addition, 352 medication error reports needed to have the subtype of error reclassified; 207 (59%) of these involved the reporter choosing the non-descript "other" category on the reporting tool (such as "Prescribing other") which was able to be reclassified by expert review. The overall distribution of error type categories did not change significantly with expert review, although only MAR errors were underreported by the reporters. The most common medications were anti-infectives (17%), pain/sedative agents (15%), nutritional agents (11%), gastrointestinal agents (8%), and cardiovascular agents (7%). Despite clear imperfections in the data captured, medication error reporting tools are effective as a means of collecting reliable information on errors rapidly and in real time. Our data suggest that administration errors are at least as common as prescribing errors in children. Further research is needed, not only in the area of computerized physician order entry (CPOE) for children, but also on ways to make the dispensing and administration of medications safer.

  6. Diagnostic Errors in Ambulatory Care: Dimensions and Preventive Strategies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Singh, Hardeep; Weingart, Saul N.

    2009-01-01

    Despite an increasing focus on patient safety in ambulatory care, progress in understanding and reducing diagnostic errors in this setting lag behind many other safety concerns such as medication errors. To explore the extent and nature of diagnostic errors in ambulatory care, we identified five dimensions of ambulatory care from which errors may…

  7. The frequency of intravenous medication administration errors related to smart infusion pumps: a multihospital observational study.

    PubMed

    Schnock, Kumiko O; Dykes, Patricia C; Albert, Jennifer; Ariosto, Deborah; Call, Rosemary; Cameron, Caitlin; Carroll, Diane L; Drucker, Adrienne G; Fang, Linda; Garcia-Palm, Christine A; Husch, Marla M; Maddox, Ray R; McDonald, Nicole; McGuire, Julie; Rafie, Sally; Robertson, Emilee; Saine, Deb; Sawyer, Melinda D; Smith, Lisa P; Stinger, Kristy Dixon; Vanderveen, Timothy W; Wade, Elizabeth; Yoon, Catherine S; Lipsitz, Stuart; Bates, David W

    2017-02-01

    Intravenous medication errors persist despite the use of smart pumps. This suggests the need for a standardised methodology for measuring errors and highlights the importance of identifying issues around smart pump medication administration in order to improve patient safety. We conducted a multisite study to investigate the types and frequency of intravenous medication errors associated with smart pumps in the USA. 10 hospitals of various sizes using smart pumps from a range of vendors participated. Data were collected using a prospective point prevalence approach to capture errors associated with medications administered via smart pumps and evaluate their potential for harm. A total of 478 patients and 1164 medication administrations were assessed. Of the observed infusions, 699 (60%) had one or more errors associated with their administration. Identified errors such as labelling errors and bypassing the smart pump and the drug library were predominantly associated with violations of hospital policy. These types of errors can result in medication errors. Errors were classified according to the National Coordinating Council for Medication Error Reporting and Prevention (NCC MERP). 1 error of category E (0.1%), 4 of category D (0.3%) and 492 of category C (excluding deviations of hospital policy) (42%) were identified. Of these, unauthorised medication, bypassing the smart pump and wrong rate were the most frequent errors. We identified a high rate of error in the administration of intravenous medications despite the use of smart pumps. However, relatively few errors were potentially harmful. The results of this study will be useful in developing interventions to eliminate errors in the intravenous medication administration process. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  8. Medication errors in a paediatric teaching hospital in the UK: five years operational experience

    PubMed Central

    Ross, L; Wallace, J; Paton, J; STEPHENSON, T.

    2000-01-01

    BACKGROUND—In the past 10 years, medication errors have come to be recognised as an important cause of iatrogenic disease in hospital patients.
AIMS—To determine the incidence and type of medication errors in a large UK paediatric hospital over a five year period, and to ascertain whether any error prevention programmes had influenced error occurrence.
METHODS—Retrospective review of medication errors documented in standard reporting forms completed prospectively from April 1994 to August 1999. Main outcome measure was incidence of error reporting, including pre- and post-interventions.
RESULTS—Medication errors occurred in 0.15% of admissions (195 errors; one per 662 admissions). While the highest rate occurred in neonatal intensive care (0.98%), most errors occurred in medical wards. Nurses were responsible for most reported errors (59%). Errors involving the intravenous route were commonest (56%), with antibiotics being the most frequent drug involved (44%). Fifteen (8%) involved a tenfold medication error. Although 18 (9.2%) required active patient intervention, 96% of errors were classified as minor at the time of reporting. Forty eight per cent of parents were not told an error had occurred. The introduction of a policy of double checking all drugs dispensed by pharmacy staff led to a reduction in errors from 9.8 to 6 per year. Changing the error reporting form to make it less punitive increased the error reporting rate from 32.7 to 38 per year.
CONCLUSION—The overall medication error rate was low. Despite this there are clear opportunities to make system changes to reduce error rates further.
 PMID:11087283

  9. Strategic planning to reduce medical errors: Part I--diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Waldman, J Deane; Smith, Howard L

    2012-01-01

    Despite extensive dialogue and a continuing stream of proposed medical practice revisions, medical errors and adverse impacts persist. Connectivity of vital elements is often underestimated or not fully understood. This paper analyzes medical errors from a systems dynamics viewpoint (Part I). Our analysis suggests in Part II that the most fruitful strategies for dissolving medical errors include facilitating physician learning, educating patients about appropriate expectations surrounding treatment regimens, and creating "systematic" patient protections rather than depending on (nonexistent) perfect providers.

  10. Medication Errors in Ambulatory Paediatric Patient Setting--How Close, or Far, are we from an Error Free Process?

    PubMed

    Elashwah, Mohamed

    2014-01-01

    The medication management pathway (MMP) outlines the medication journey from the decision to prescribe through to monitoring the outcomes. Medication errors (MEs) can occur at any point of the pathway. MEs in children may result in poor health outcomes; and as children are more vulnerable to dose calculation and administration errors especially in the ambulatory setting, this cohort may be at a higher risk of adverse outcomes. This review aimed to identify MEs in children and attribute them to the steps within the MMP for paediatric ambulatory patients. A systematic search of studies related to MEs in children was performed using MEDLINE, EMBASE and International Pharmaceutical Abstracts in the period from Jan 1991 to June 2011, using keywords pertaining to children, medication errors and ambulatory settings. Thirty articles met the review inclusion criteria and the findings of these studies were reported. Based on the MMP, 26 studies reported prescribing errors, 7 dispensing errors, and 12 administration errors. Twelve studies reported errors at more than one time point within the MMP; four studies at 2 stages and 8 studies at 3 stages. The most common types of the errors identified were dose errors which commonly occurred during prescribing, dispensing, or administration. Studies have highlighted that MEs occurring in children, with most of the errors reported at the prescribing stage. This could be a reflection of the studies' focus, and further work is needed to review errors occurring at other time points during the medication management cycle. Identifying where errors occur will contribute to the development of novel strategies to detect and prevent these errors in ambulatory settings.

  11. The spectrum of medical errors: when patients sue

    PubMed Central

    Kels, Barry D; Grant-Kels, Jane M

    2012-01-01

    Inarguably medical errors constitute a serious, dangerous, and expensive problem for the twenty-first-century US health care system. This review examines the incidence, nature, and complexity of alleged medical negligence and medical malpractice. The authors hope this will constitute a road map to medical providers so that they can better understand the present climate and hopefully avoid the “Scylla and Charybdis” of medical errors and medical malpractice. Despite some documented success in reducing medical errors, adverse events and medical errors continue to represent an indelible stain upon the practice, reputation, and success of the US health care industry. In that regard, what may be required to successfully attack the unacceptably high severity and volume of medical errors is a locally directed and organized initiative sponsored by individual health care organizations that is coordinated, supported, and guided by state and federal governmental and nongovernmental agencies. PMID:22924008

  12. Characteristics of pediatric chemotherapy medication errors in a national error reporting database.

    PubMed

    Rinke, Michael L; Shore, Andrew D; Morlock, Laura; Hicks, Rodney W; Miller, Marlene R

    2007-07-01

    Little is known regarding chemotherapy medication errors in pediatrics despite studies suggesting high rates of overall pediatric medication errors. In this study, the authors examined patterns in pediatric chemotherapy errors. The authors queried the United States Pharmacopeia MEDMARX database, a national, voluntary, Internet-accessible error reporting system, for all error reports from 1999 through 2004 that involved chemotherapy medications and patients aged <18 years. Of the 310 pediatric chemotherapy error reports, 85% reached the patient, and 15.6% required additional patient monitoring or therapeutic intervention. Forty-eight percent of errors originated in the administering phase of medication delivery, and 30% originated in the drug-dispensing phase. Of the 387 medications cited, 39.5% were antimetabolites, 14.0% were alkylating agents, 9.3% were anthracyclines, and 9.3% were topoisomerase inhibitors. The most commonly involved chemotherapeutic agents were methotrexate (15.3%), cytarabine (12.1%), and etoposide (8.3%). The most common error types were improper dose/quantity (22.9% of 327 cited error types), wrong time (22.6%), omission error (14.1%), and wrong administration technique/wrong route (12.2%). The most common error causes were performance deficit (41.3% of 547 cited error causes), equipment and medication delivery devices (12.4%), communication (8.8%), knowledge deficit (6.8%), and written order errors (5.5%). Four of the 5 most serious errors occurred at community hospitals. Pediatric chemotherapy errors often reached the patient, potentially were harmful, and differed in quality between outpatient and inpatient areas. This study indicated which chemotherapeutic agents most often were involved in errors and that administering errors were common. Investigation is needed regarding targeted medication administration safeguards for these high-risk medications. Copyright (c) 2007 American Cancer Society.

  13. Reducing medication errors in critical care: a multimodal approach

    PubMed Central

    Kruer, Rachel M; Jarrell, Andrew S; Latif, Asad

    2014-01-01

    The Institute of Medicine has reported that medication errors are the single most common type of error in health care, representing 19% of all adverse events, while accounting for over 7,000 deaths annually. The frequency of medication errors in adult intensive care units can be as high as 947 per 1,000 patient-days, with a median of 105.9 per 1,000 patient-days. The formulation of drugs is a potential contributor to medication errors. Challenges related to drug formulation are specific to the various routes of medication administration, though errors associated with medication appearance and labeling occur among all drug formulations and routes of administration. Addressing these multifaceted challenges requires a multimodal approach. Changes in technology, training, systems, and safety culture are all strategies to potentially reduce medication errors related to drug formulation in the intensive care unit. PMID:25210478

  14. Knowledge of healthcare professionals about medication errors in hospitals

    PubMed Central

    Abdel-Latif, Mohamed M. M.

    2016-01-01

    Context: Medication errors are the most common types of medical errors in hospitals and leading cause of morbidity and mortality among patients. Aims: The aim of the present study was to assess the knowledge of healthcare professionals about medication errors in hospitals. Settings and Design: A self-administered questionnaire was distributed to randomly selected healthcare professionals in eight hospitals in Madinah, Saudi Arabia. Subjects and Methods: An 18-item survey was designed and comprised questions on demographic data, knowledge of medication errors, availability of reporting systems in hospitals, attitudes toward error reporting, causes of medication errors. Statistical Analysis Used: Data were analyzed with Statistical Package for the Social Sciences software Version 17. Results: A total of 323 of healthcare professionals completed the questionnaire with 64.6% response rate of 138 (42.72%) physicians, 34 (10.53%) pharmacists, and 151 (46.75%) nurses. A majority of the participants had a good knowledge about medication errors concept and their dangers on patients. Only 68.7% of them were aware of reporting systems in hospitals. Healthcare professionals revealed that there was no clear mechanism available for reporting of errors in most hospitals. Prescribing (46.5%) and administration (29%) errors were the main causes of errors. The most frequently encountered medication errors were anti-hypertensives, antidiabetics, antibiotics, digoxin, and insulin. Conclusions: This study revealed differences in the awareness among healthcare professionals toward medication errors in hospitals. The poor knowledge about medication errors emphasized the urgent necessity to adopt appropriate measures to raise awareness about medication errors in Saudi hospitals. PMID:27330261

  15. Detecting medication errors in the New Zealand pharmacovigilance database: a retrospective analysis.

    PubMed

    Kunac, Desireé L; Tatley, Michael V

    2011-01-01

    Despite the traditional focus being adverse drug reactions (ADRs), pharmacovigilance centres have recently been identified as a potentially rich and important source of medication error data. To identify medication errors in the New Zealand Pharmacovigilance database (Centre for Adverse Reactions Monitoring [CARM]), and to describe the frequency and characteristics of these events. A retrospective analysis of the CARM pharmacovigilance database operated by the New Zealand Pharmacovigilance Centre was undertaken for the year 1 January-31 December 2007. All reports, excluding those relating to vaccines, clinical trials and pharmaceutical company reports, underwent a preventability assessment using predetermined criteria. Those events deemed preventable were subsequently classified to identify the degree of patient harm, type of error, stage of medication use process where the error occurred and origin of the error. A total of 1412 reports met the inclusion criteria and were reviewed, of which 4.3% (61/1412) were deemed preventable. Not all errors resulted in patient harm: 29.5% (18/61) were 'no harm' errors but 65.5% (40/61) of errors were deemed to have been associated with some degree of patient harm (preventable adverse drug events [ADEs]). For 5.0% (3/61) of events, the degree of patient harm was unable to be determined as the patient outcome was unknown. The majority of preventable ADEs (62.5% [25/40]) occurred in adults aged 65 years and older. The medication classes most involved in preventable ADEs were antibacterials for systemic use and anti-inflammatory agents, with gastrointestinal and respiratory system disorders the most common adverse events reported. For both preventable ADEs and 'no harm' events, most errors were incorrect dose and drug therapy monitoring problems consisting of failures in detection of significant drug interactions, past allergies or lack of necessary clinical monitoring. Preventable events were mostly related to the prescribing and

  16. The relationship between incidence and report of medication errors and working conditions.

    PubMed

    Joolaee, S; Hajibabaee, F; Peyrovi, H; Haghani, H; Bahrani, N

    2011-03-01

    Medication errors are considered to be a serious threat to patients' safety. Efforts to detect and prevent these errors have increased considerably in recent years. To determine the incidence and reporting rate of medication errors as reported by Iranian nurses and their relationship with work conditions in hospitals under the authority of Iran University of Medical Sciences. This descriptive-analytical study was carried out in six hospitals. Through a stratified multiple stage sampling, 300 nurses were selected. A researcher-constructed, three-part, self-report questionnaire was used to collect data regarding the nurses' medication errors, medication error reports and their perceived working conditions during the previous 3 months. The data were processed using descriptive statistics and Kruskal-Wallis one-way analysis of variance. The mean of medication errors that nurses recalled was 19.5, and the mean of error reporting was 1.3 cases during the previous 3 months. The relationship between error incidence and work conditions as perceived by nurses was statistically significant (df = 3, P ≤ 0.0001); however, there was no significant relationship between reporting the occurred error and nurses' perceived work conditions (df = 3, P ≤ 0.255). The establishment of an efficient reporting system, documentation of errors and removal of obstacles to reporting may result in reduced frequency of medication errors. Considering the relationship between medication error incidence and working conditions, it seems that creating a work condition in which nurses feel more comfortable and decreasing work tensions may pave the way to preventing nursing errors. © 2011 The Authors. International Nursing Review © 2011 International Council of Nurses.

  17. Medication dispensing errors in a French military hospital pharmacy.

    PubMed

    Bohand, Xavier; Aupée, Olivier; Le Garlantezec, Patrick; Mullot, Hélène; Lefeuvre, Leslie; Simon, Laurent

    2009-08-01

    To determine the rate and the primary types of medication dispensing errors detected by pharmacists during implementation of a unit dose drug dispensing system. The central pharmacy at the Percy French military hospital (France). The check of the unit dose medication cassettes was performed by pharmacists to identify dispensing errors before delivering to the care units. From April 2006 to December 2006, detected errors were corrected and recorded into seven categories: unauthorized drug, wrong dosage-form, improper dose, omission, wrong time, deteriorated drug, and wrong patient errors. Dispensing error rate, calculated by dividing the total of detected errors by the total of filled and omitted doses; classification of recorded dispensing errors. During the study, 9,719 unit dose medication cassettes were filled by pharmacy technicians. Pharmacists detected 706 errors for a total of 88,609 filled and omitted unit doses. An overall error rate of 0.80% was found. There were approximately 0.07 detected dispensing errors per medication cassette. The most common error types were improper dose errors (n = 265, 37.5%) and omission errors (n = 186, 26.3%). Many causes may probably explain the occurrence of dispensing errors, including communication failures, problems related to drug labeling or packaging, distractions, interruptions, heavy workload, and difficulties in reading handwriting prescriptions. The results showed that a wide range of errors occurred during the dispensing process. A check performed after the initial medication selection is also necessary to detect and correct dispensing errors. In order to decrease the occurrence of dispensing errors, some practical measures have been implemented in the central pharmacy. But because some dispensing errors may remain undetected, there is a requirement to develop other strategies that reduce or eliminate these errors. The pharmacy staff is widely involved in this duty.

  18. Toward efficient medication error reduction: error-reducing information management systems.

    PubMed

    Chung, Kyusuk; Choi, Young B; Moon, Sangho

    2003-12-01

    Hospitals and other health-care providers today are being pressed more than ever to use technologies for reducing medical errors. Particularly, medication errors are likely to increase fast as Americans age. This paper intends to provide a starting point for understanding information technologies and database systems supporting such technologies as Computerized Physician Order Entry (CPOE), Automated Dispensing System (ADS), and Bar Coding System designed to reduce medication errors in hospitals. Although vendors provide the necessary communication software and applications, actions involving governments, technology vendors, pharmaceutical companies, and clinical researchers are needed to put to actual use the applications with a massive potential to significantly reduce medication-related errors.

  19. Types and causes of medication errors from nurse's viewpoint.

    PubMed

    Cheragi, Mohammad Ali; Manoocheri, Human; Mohammadnejad, Esmaeil; Ehsani, Syyedeh R

    2013-05-01

    The main professional goal of nurses is to provide and improve human health. Medication errors are among the most common health threatening mistakes that affect patient care. Such mistakes are considered as a global problem which increases mortality rates, length of hospital stay, and related costs. This study was conducted to evaluate the types and causes of nursing medication errors. This cross-sectional study was conducted in 2009. A total number of 237 nurses were randomly selected from nurses working in Imam Khomeini Hospital (Tehran, Iran). They filled out a questionnaire including 10 items on demographic characteristics and 7 items about medication errors. Data were analyzed using descriptive and inferential statistics in SPSS for Windows 16.0. Medication errors had been made by 64.55% of the nurses. In addition, 31.37% of the participants reported medication errors on the verge of occurrence. The most common types of reported errors were wrong dosage and infusion rate. The most common causes were using abbreviations instead of full names of drugs and similar names of drugs. Therefore, the most important cause of medication errors was lack of pharmacological knowledge. There were no statistically significant relationships between medication errors and years of working experience, age, and working shifts. However, a significant relationship was found between errors in intravenous injections and gender. Likewise, errors in oral administration were significantly related with number of patients. Medication errors are a major problem in nursing. Since most cases of medication errors are not reported by nurses, nursing managers must demonstrate positive responses to nurses who report medication errors in order to improve patient safety.

  20. Frequency of pediatric medication administration errors and contributing factors.

    PubMed

    Ozkan, Suzan; Kocaman, Gulseren; Ozturk, Candan; Seren, Seyda

    2011-01-01

    This study examined the frequency of pediatric medication administration errors and contributing factors. This research used the undisguised observation method and Critical Incident Technique. Errors and contributing factors were classified through the Organizational Accident Model. Errors were made in 36.5% of the 2344 doses that were observed. The most frequent errors were those associated with administration at the wrong time. According to the results of this study, errors arise from problems within the system.

  1. Medical error and human factors engineering: where are we now?

    PubMed

    Gawron, Valerie J; Drury, Colin G; Fairbanks, Rollin J; Berger, Roseanne C

    2006-01-01

    The goal of human factors engineering is to optimize the relationship between humans and systems by studying human behavior, abilities, and limitations and using this knowledge to design systems for safe and effective human use. With the assumption that the human component of any system will inevitably produce errors, human factors engineers design systems and human/machine interfaces that are robust enough to reduce error rates and the effect of the inevitable error within the system. In this article, we review the extent and nature of medical error and then discuss human factors engineering tools that have potential applicability. These tools include taxonomies of human and system error and error data collection and analysis methods. Finally, we describe studies that have examined medical error, and on the basis of these studies, present conclusions about how human factors engineering can significantly reduce medical errors and their effects.

  2. Hospital medication errors in a pharmacovigilance system in Colombia.

    PubMed

    Machado Alba, Jorge Enrique; Moreno Gutiérrez, Paula Andrea; Moncada Escobar, Juan Carlos

    2015-11-01

    Objetivos: analizar los errores de medicacion reportados en un sistema de farmacovigilancia en 26 hospitales para pacientes del sistema de salud de Colombia. Métodos: estudio retrospectivo que evaluo las bases de datos sistematizadas de reportes de errores de medicacion entre el 1 de enero de 2008 y el 12 de septiembre de 2013 de los medicamentos dispensados por la empresa Audifarma S.A a hospitales de Colombia. Se utilizo la clasificacion taxonomica del National Coordinating Council for Medication Error Reporting and Prevention (NCC MERP). El analisis de los datos se realizo mediante SPSS 22.0 para Windows Se determino como nivel de significacion estadistica una p < 0,05. Resultados: se reportaron 9.062 EM en 45 servicios farmaceuticos hospitalarios. El 51,9% (n = 4.707) de los errores realmente se produjeron, de los cuales el 12,0% (n = 567) afectaron al paciente (categorias C a I) y causaron dano (categorias E a I) a 17 (0,36%). El proceso implicado en los EM ocurridos (categorias B a I) con mayor frecuencia fue la prescripcion (n = 1.758, 37,3%), seguido por la dispensacion (n = 1.737, 36,9%), la transcripcion (n = 970, 20,6%) y, por ultimo, la administracion (n = 242, 5,1%). Los errores relacionados con los procesos de administracion aumentaban 45,2 veces el riesgo de que el medicamento erroneo afectara al paciente (IC 95% 20,2-100,9). Conclusiones: es necesario aumentar la cobertura de los sistemas de reporte de errores de medicacion, y crear estrategias para su prevencion, especialmente en la etapa de administracion del medicamento.

  3. Medical error and decision making: Learning from the past and present in intensive care.

    PubMed

    Bucknall, Tracey K

    2010-08-01

    Human error occurs in every occupation. Medical errors may result in a near miss or an actual injury to a patient that has nothing to do with the underlying medical condition. Intensive care has one of the highest incidences of medical error and patient injury in any specialty medical area; thought to be related to the rapidly changing patient status and complex diagnoses and treatments. The aims of this paper are to: (1) outline the definition, classifications and aetiology of medical error; (2) summarise key findings from the literature with a specific focus on errors arising from intensive care areas; and (3) conclude with an outline of approaches for analysing clinical information to determine adverse events and inform practice change in intensive care. Database searches of articles and textbooks using keywords: medical error, patient safety, decision making and intensive care. Sociology and psychology literature cited therein. Critically ill patients require numerous medications, multiple infusions and procedures. Although medical errors are often detected by clinicians at the bedside, organisational processes and systems may contribute to the problem. A systems approach is thought to provide greater insight into the contributory factors and potential solutions to avoid preventable adverse events. It is recommended that a variety of clinical information and research techniques are used as a priority to prevent hospital acquired injuries and address patient safety concerns in intensive care. 2010 Australian College of Critical Care Nurses Ltd. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. The application of Aronson's taxonomy to medication errors in nursing.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Maree; Young, Helen

    2011-01-01

    Medication administration is a frequent nursing activity that is prone to error. In this study of 318 self-reported medication incidents (including near misses), very few resulted in patient harm-7% required intervention or prolonged hospitalization or caused temporary harm. Aronson's classification system provided an excellent framework for analysis of the incidents with a close connection between the type of error and the change strategy to minimize medication incidents. Taking a behavioral approach to medication error classification has provided helpful strategies for nurses such as nurse-call cards on patient lockers when patients are absent and checking of medication sign-off by outgoing and incoming staff at handover.

  5. Audit of medication errors by anesthetists in North Western Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Nwasor, E O; Sule, S T; Mshelia, D B

    2014-01-01

    Safety issues are an important aspect of anesthesia practice. The relevance of medication and drug administration errors in our everyday practice is an important aspect of medical audit. Although there have been few case reports of drug administration errors by anesthetists, there is paucity of information regarding medication errors in anesthetic practice in Nigeria. We set out to study the incidence of medication errors among anesthesia practitioners in Kaduna State, North Western Nigeria and to suggest ways to minimize such errors. A questionnaire-based study was conducted among physician anesthetists and nurse anesthetists working in the major secondary and tertiary hospitals in Kaduna State, North Western Nigeria. The data obtained was analyzed using SPSS Version 17.0 and the data presented in relevant charts and tables. A total of 43 persons responded to the questionnaire with a high response rate of 86% and a male/female ratio of 2.3:1. Most of the anesthetists (38 or 88%) work in tertiary government hospitals. Twenty-four (56%) of them admitted to ever having a medication error, and 34 (79%) of them attributed the medication error to problems with drug labeling from manufactures using similar labels for different drugs. Untoward sequelae resulted in 44% of the patients that were affected by these medication errors and these ranged from cardiac arrest to delayed recovery from anesthesia. Majority of the respondents recommended vigilance, double checking of drug labels, and color coding of syringes as ways to minimize medication errors. Medication errors do occur in the everyday practice of anesthetists in Nigeria as in other countries and can lead to morbidity and mortality in our patients. Routine audit and reporting of critical incidents including errors in drug administration should be encouraged. Reduction of medication errors is an important aspect of patient safety, and vigilance remains the watchword.

  6. Strategies to reduce medication errors in pediatric ambulatory settings.

    PubMed

    Mehndiratta, S

    2012-01-01

    Worldwide, a large number of children are prescribed drugs on an outpatient basis. Medication errors are fairly common in these settings. Though this matter has been well recognized as a cause of concern, limited data is available from ambulatory settings. Medication errors can be defined as errors that may occur at any step, starting from ordering a medication, to dispensing, administration of the drug and the subsequent monitoring. The outcomes of such errors are variable and may range between those that are clinically insignificant to a life-threatening event. The reasons for these medication errors are multi-factorial. Children are unable to administer medications to themselves and also require a strict weight-based dosing regimen. The risk factors associated with medication errors include complex regimens with multiple medications. Overdosing and under-dosing (10-fold calculation errors), an increased or a decreased frequency of dosing or an inappropriate duration of administration of the medication, are frequently detected errors. The lack of availability of proper formulations adds to the confusion. The low level of literacy among the caregivers can aggravate this problem. There is a lack of proper reporting and monitoring mechanisms in most ambulatory settings, hence these errors remain unrecognized and often go unreported. This article summarizes the current available literature on medication errors in ambulatory settings and the possible strategies that can be adopted to reduce the burden of these errors in order to improve child care and patient safety. Voluntary, anonymous reporting can be introduced in the healthcare institutions to determine the incidence of these errors.

  7. Emergency department discharge prescription errors in an academic medical center

    PubMed Central

    Belanger, April; Devine, Lauren T.; Lane, Aaron; Condren, Michelle E.

    2017-01-01

    This study described discharge prescription medication errors written for emergency department patients. This study used content analysis in a cross-sectional design to systematically categorize prescription errors found in a report of 1000 discharge prescriptions submitted in the electronic medical record in February 2015. Two pharmacy team members reviewed the discharge prescription list for errors. Open-ended data were coded by an additional rater for agreement on coding categories. Coding was based upon majority rule. Descriptive statistics were used to address the study objective. Categories evaluated were patient age, provider type, drug class, and type and time of error. The discharge prescription error rate out of 1000 prescriptions was 13.4%, with “incomplete or inadequate prescription” being the most commonly detected error (58.2%). The adult and pediatric error rates were 11.7% and 22.7%, respectively. The antibiotics reviewed had the highest number of errors. The highest within-class error rates were with antianginal medications, antiparasitic medications, antacids, appetite stimulants, and probiotics. Emergency medicine residents wrote the highest percentage of prescriptions (46.7%) and had an error rate of 9.2%. Residents of other specialties wrote 340 prescriptions and had an error rate of 20.9%. Errors occurred most often between 10:00 am and 6:00 pm. PMID:28405061

  8. Analyzing communication errors in an air medical transport service.

    PubMed

    Dalto, Joseph D; Weir, Charlene; Thomas, Frank

    2013-01-01

    Poor communication can result in adverse events. Presently, no standards exist for classifying and analyzing air medical communication errors. This study sought to determine the frequency and types of communication errors reported within an air medical quality and safety assurance reporting system. Of 825 quality assurance reports submitted in 2009, 278 were randomly selected and analyzed for communication errors. Each communication error was classified and mapped to Clark's communication level hierarchy (ie, levels 1-4). Descriptive statistics were performed, and comparisons were evaluated using chi-square analysis. Sixty-four communication errors were identified in 58 reports (21% of 278). Of the 64 identified communication errors, only 18 (28%) were classified by the staff to be communication errors. Communication errors occurred most often at level 1 (n = 42/64, 66%) followed by level 4 (21/64, 33%). Level 2 and 3 communication failures were rare (, 1%). Communication errors were found in a fifth of quality and safety assurance reports. The reporting staff identified less than a third of these errors. Nearly all communication errors (99%) occurred at either the lowest level of communication (level 1, 66%) or the highest level (level 4, 33%). An air medical communication ontology is necessary to improve the recognition and analysis of communication errors. Copyright © 2013 Air Medical Journal Associates. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. The Environmental Context of Patient Safety and Medical Errors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wholey, Douglas; Moscovice, Ira; Hietpas, Terry; Holtzman, Jeremy

    2004-01-01

    The environmental context of patient safety and medical errors was explored with specific interest in rural settings. Special attention was paid to unique features of rural health care organizations and their environment that relate to the patient safety issue and medical errors (including the distribution of patients, types of adverse events…

  10. The Environmental Context of Patient Safety and Medical Errors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wholey, Douglas; Moscovice, Ira; Hietpas, Terry; Holtzman, Jeremy

    2004-01-01

    The environmental context of patient safety and medical errors was explored with specific interest in rural settings. Special attention was paid to unique features of rural health care organizations and their environment that relate to the patient safety issue and medical errors (including the distribution of patients, types of adverse events…

  11. Clinical Inertia and Outpatient Medical Errors

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-01-01

    having the disease • Believe disease is not serious • Low health literacy • Cost of medication • Too many medicationsMedication side effects • Poor...Scientific Sessions; 1997 Jun 21–24; Boston, MA. 21. Wagner EH, Sandhu N, Newton KM, et al. Effect of improved glycemic control on health care costs and...adverse events, disability, death, and excess medical care costs . This paper addresses three specific objectives: (1) to present a conceptual model of

  12. Implementation of pharmacists' interventions and assessment of medication errors in an intensive care unit of a Chinese tertiary hospital.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Sai-Ping; Chen, Jian; Zhang, Xing-Guo; Lu, Xiao-Yang; Zhao, Qing-Wei

    2014-01-01

    Pharmacist interventions and medication errors potentially differ between the People's Republic of China and other countries. This study aimed to report interventions administered by clinical pharmacists and analyze medication errors in an intensive care unit (ICU) in a tertiary hospital in People's Republic of China. A prospective, noncomparative, 6-month observational study was conducted in a general ICU of a tertiary hospital in the People's Republic of China. Clinical pharmacists performed interventions to prevent or resolve medication errors during daily rounds and documented all of these interventions and medication errors. Such interventions and medication errors were categorized and then analyzed. During the 6-month observation period, a total of 489 pharmacist interventions were reported. Approximately 407 (83.2%) pharmacist interventions were accepted by ICU physicians. The incidence rate of medication errors was 124.7 per 1,000 patient-days. Improper drug frequency or dosing (n=152, 37.3%), drug omission (n=83, 20.4%), and potential or actual occurrence of adverse drug reaction (n=54, 13.3%) were the three most commonly committed medication errors. Approximately 339 (83.4%) medication errors did not pose any risks to the patients. Antimicrobials (n=171, 35.0%) were the most frequent type of medication associated with errors. Medication errors during prescription frequently occurred in an ICU of a tertiary hospital in the People's Republic of China. Pharmacist interventions were also efficient in preventing medication errors.

  13. Reduction in medication errors in hospitals due to adoption of computerized provider order entry systems.

    PubMed

    Radley, David C; Wasserman, Melanie R; Olsho, Lauren Ew; Shoemaker, Sarah J; Spranca, Mark D; Bradshaw, Bethany

    2013-05-01

    Medication errors in hospitals are common, expensive, and sometimes harmful to patients. This study's objective was to derive a nationally representative estimate of medication error reduction in hospitals attributable to electronic prescribing through computerized provider order entry (CPOE) systems. We conducted a systematic literature review and applied random-effects meta-analytic techniques to derive a summary estimate of the effect of CPOE on medication errors. This pooled estimate was combined with data from the 2006 American Society of Health-System Pharmacists Annual Survey, the 2007 American Hospital Association Annual Survey, and the latter's 2008 Electronic Health Record Adoption Database supplement to estimate the percentage and absolute reduction in medication errors attributable to CPOE. Processing a prescription drug order through a CPOE system decreases the likelihood of error on that order by 48% (95% CI 41% to 55%). Given this effect size, and the degree of CPOE adoption and use in hospitals in 2008, we estimate a 12.5% reduction in medication errors, or ∼17.4 million medication errors averted in the USA in 1 year. Our findings suggest that CPOE can substantially reduce the frequency of medication errors in inpatient acute-care settings; however, it is unclear whether this translates into reduced harm for patients. Despite CPOE systems' effectiveness at preventing medication errors, adoption and use in US hospitals remain modest. Current policies to increase CPOE adoption and use will likely prevent millions of additional medication errors each year. Further research is needed to better characterize links to patient harm.

  14. The effect of the fit between organizational culture and structure on medication errors in medical group practices.

    PubMed

    Kaissi, Amer; Kralewski, John; Dowd, Bryan; Heaton, Alan

    2007-01-01

    It is widely acknowledged that many prescription drug errors occur in the ambulatory care setting and that they have serious quality of care implications. Previous research examining this issue has focused on hospitals and on individual-level factors. This study adopts an organizational perspective to assess the effects of organizational culture, organizational structure, and their fit (i.e., their congruence) on medication errors in medical group practices. Variables that measure the organizational culture and structure were taken from two surveys of medical group practices in Minnesota in 2001. Medication errors data were obtained using a computerized drug utilization review system. Seventy-eight medical group practices were included in the analyses. Results revealed that the use of benchmarking and practice guidelines was associated with decreased error rates in group practices that encourage "patient emphasis" and "collegiality." However, the relationship between information processing capacity and the cultural dimensions was not statistically significant. The interaction between specific cultural traits and structural dimensions can help understand some of the relationships between organizational culture, structure, and medication errors. Organizational structures do not exist in a vacuum, but rather their effect on patient safety outcomes is "moderated" by the organizational culture. The implications are that medical group practice administrators and medical directors have alternate ways to prevent or reduce medication errors and that they should be attentive to the cultures of their practices when considering those options.

  15. Medical Errors: Tips to Help Prevent Them

    MedlinePlus

    ... Pro";line-height:20px;font-weight:400;font-style:normal;font-size:14px;}h1,.impact-text,.impact- ... Pro";line-height:34px;font-weight:400;font-style:normal;font-size:24px;}h2,.blog-item .quote- ...

  16. [Preventive vaccinations for medical personnel].

    PubMed

    Kerwat, Klaus; Goedecke, Marcel; Wulf, Hinnerk

    2014-05-01

    Vaccinations are among the most efficient and important preventive medical procedures. Modern vaccines are well tolerated. In Germany there are no longer laws for mandatory vaccinations, either for the general public or for medical personnel. Vaccinations are now merely "officially recommended" by the top health authorities on the basis of recommendations from the Standing Committee on Vaccinations (STIKO) of the Robert Koch Institute (RKI) according to § 20 para 3 of the Protection against Infection law (IfSG). The management of vaccine damage due to officially recommended vaccinations is guaranteed by the Federal States. Whereas vaccinations in childhood are generally considered to be a matter of course, the willingness to accept them decreases markedly with increasing age. In the medical sector vaccinations against, for example, hepatitis B are well accepted while other vaccinations against, for example, whooping cough or influenza are not considered to be so important. The fact that vaccinations, besides offering protection for the medical personnel, may also serve to protect the patients entrusted to medical care from nosocomial infections is often ignored.

  17. Unit of Measurement Used and Parent Medication Dosing Errors

    PubMed Central

    Dreyer, Benard P.; Ugboaja, Donna C.; Sanchez, Dayana C.; Paul, Ian M.; Moreira, Hannah A.; Rodriguez, Luis; Mendelsohn, Alan L.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Adopting the milliliter as the preferred unit of measurement has been suggested as a strategy to improve the clarity of medication instructions; teaspoon and tablespoon units may inadvertently endorse nonstandard kitchen spoon use. We examined the association between unit used and parent medication errors and whether nonstandard instruments mediate this relationship. METHODS: Cross-sectional analysis of baseline data from a larger study of provider communication and medication errors. English- or Spanish-speaking parents (n = 287) whose children were prescribed liquid medications in 2 emergency departments were enrolled. Medication error defined as: error in knowledge of prescribed dose, error in observed dose measurement (compared to intended or prescribed dose); >20% deviation threshold for error. Multiple logistic regression performed adjusting for parent age, language, country, race/ethnicity, socioeconomic status, education, health literacy (Short Test of Functional Health Literacy in Adults); child age, chronic disease; site. RESULTS: Medication errors were common: 39.4% of parents made an error in measurement of the intended dose, 41.1% made an error in the prescribed dose. Furthermore, 16.7% used a nonstandard instrument. Compared with parents who used milliliter-only, parents who used teaspoon or tablespoon units had twice the odds of making an error with the intended (42.5% vs 27.6%, P = .02; adjusted odds ratio=2.3; 95% confidence interval, 1.2–4.4) and prescribed (45.1% vs 31.4%, P = .04; adjusted odds ratio=1.9; 95% confidence interval, 1.03–3.5) dose; associations greater for parents with low health literacy and non–English speakers. Nonstandard instrument use partially mediated teaspoon and tablespoon–associated measurement errors. CONCLUSIONS: Findings support a milliliter-only standard to reduce medication errors. PMID:25022742

  18. Unit of measurement used and parent medication dosing errors.

    PubMed

    Yin, H Shonna; Dreyer, Benard P; Ugboaja, Donna C; Sanchez, Dayana C; Paul, Ian M; Moreira, Hannah A; Rodriguez, Luis; Mendelsohn, Alan L

    2014-08-01

    Adopting the milliliter as the preferred unit of measurement has been suggested as a strategy to improve the clarity of medication instructions; teaspoon and tablespoon units may inadvertently endorse nonstandard kitchen spoon use. We examined the association between unit used and parent medication errors and whether nonstandard instruments mediate this relationship. Cross-sectional analysis of baseline data from a larger study of provider communication and medication errors. English- or Spanish-speaking parents (n = 287) whose children were prescribed liquid medications in 2 emergency departments were enrolled. Medication error defined as: error in knowledge of prescribed dose, error in observed dose measurement (compared to intended or prescribed dose); >20% deviation threshold for error. Multiple logistic regression performed adjusting for parent age, language, country, race/ethnicity, socioeconomic status, education, health literacy (Short Test of Functional Health Literacy in Adults); child age, chronic disease; site. Medication errors were common: 39.4% of parents made an error in measurement of the intended dose, 41.1% made an error in the prescribed dose. Furthermore, 16.7% used a nonstandard instrument. Compared with parents who used milliliter-only, parents who used teaspoon or tablespoon units had twice the odds of making an error with the intended (42.5% vs 27.6%, P = .02; adjusted odds ratio=2.3; 95% confidence interval, 1.2-4.4) and prescribed (45.1% vs 31.4%, P = .04; adjusted odds ratio=1.9; 95% confidence interval, 1.03-3.5) dose; associations greater for parents with low health literacy and non-English speakers. Nonstandard instrument use partially mediated teaspoon and tablespoon-associated measurement errors. Findings support a milliliter-only standard to reduce medication errors. Copyright © 2014 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  19. Building bridges: future directions for medical error disclosure research.

    PubMed

    Hannawa, Annegret F; Beckman, Howard; Mazor, Kathleen M; Paul, Norbert; Ramsey, Joanne V

    2013-09-01

    The disclosure of medical errors has attracted considerable research interest in recent years. However, the research to date has lacked interdisciplinary dialog, making translation of findings into medical practice challenging. This article lays out the disciplinary perspectives of the fields of medicine, ethics, law and communication on medical error disclosure and identifies gaps and tensions that occur at these interdisciplinary boundaries. This article summarizes the discussion of an interdisciplinary error disclosure panel at the 2012 EACH Conference in St. Andrews, Scotland, in light of the current literature across four academic disciplines. Current medical, ethical, legal and communication perspectives on medical error disclosure are presented and discussed with particular emphasis on the interdisciplinary gaps and tensions. The authors encourage interdisciplinary collaborations that strive for a functional approach to understanding and improving the disclosure of medical errors with the ultimate goal to improve quality and promote safer medical care. Interdisciplinary collaborations are needed to reconcile the needs of the stakeholders involved in medical error disclosure. A particular challenge is the effective translation of error disclosure research into practice. Concrete research questions are provided throughout the manuscript to facilitate a resolution of the tensions that currently impede interdisciplinary progress. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Medication errors in critically ill adults: a review of direct observation evidence.

    PubMed

    Kiekkas, Panagiotis; Karga, Mary; Lemonidou, Chrisoula; Aretha, Diamanto; Karanikolas, Menelaos

    2011-01-01

    To systematically review clinical evidence gathered by direct observation of medication errors in adult patients in intensive care units. Articles published between 1985 and 2008 in English-language journals indexed by the Cumulative Index for Nursing and Allied Health Literature and PUBMED were searched for studies on medication errors made by intensive care unit nurses. Studies in which errors were detected via direct observation were included. Six studies met the inclusion criteria, and error incidence varied considerably among them. Wrong dose, wrong administration time and rate, and dose omission were the most common errors. Antibiotics, electrolytes, and cardiovascular drugs were commonly associated with errors, but the evidence about factors contributing to errors was inconclusive. Increased monitoring was the most common consequence of medication errors, whereas life-threatening and fatal adverse events were rare. Identification of patterns and characteristics of medication errors can guide preventive interventions. Factors contributing to errors, as well as drugs and error types associated with severe adverse events, deserve further investigation.

  1. A review article of the reduce errors in medical laboratories.

    PubMed

    Mohammedsaleh, Zuhair M; Mohammedsaleh, Fayez

    2014-07-29

    The current article examines the modern practices of reducing errors in medical laboratories. The paper sought to examine the methods that different countries are applying to reduce errors in medical laboratories. In addition, the paper examines the relationship between inadequate training of laboratory personnel and error causation in medical laboratories. A total of 17 research articles have been reviewed. The paper has done a comparison of pathology laboratory practices in the US, Canada, the UK and Australia, regarding laboratory staff skills and error reduction. The paper finds out that; although some of the developed countries have employed advanced technology to reduce errors, there is still a great need to use sophisticated medical equipment to reduce errors. In addition, the levels of training for the medical technicians are still low. They are not equipped enough to reduce the errors to the required levels. The article recommends application of advanced technology in the reduction of errors, and training of technicians on the best practices to reduce errors.

  2. A Review Article of the Reduce Errors in Medical Laboratories

    PubMed Central

    Mohammedsaleh, Zuhair M.; Mohammedsaleh, Fayez

    2015-01-01

    The current article examines the modern practices of reducing errors in medical laboratories. The paper sought to examine the methods that different countries are applying to reduce errors in medical laboratories. In addition, the paper examines the relationship between inadequate training of laboratory personnel and error causation in medical laboratories. A total of 17 research articles have been reviewed. The paper has done a comparison of pathology laboratory practices in the US, Canada, the UK and Australia, regarding laboratory staff skills and error reduction. The paper finds out that; although some of the developed countries have employed advanced technology to reduce errors, there is still a great need to use sophisticated medical equipment to reduce errors. In addition, the levels of training for the medical technicians are still low. They are not equipped enough to reduce the errors to the required levels. The article recommends application of advanced technology in the reduction of errors, and training of technicians on the best practices to reduce errors. PMID:25560334

  3. Medication errors in pediatric nursing: assessment of nurses' knowledge and analysis of the consequences of errors.

    PubMed

    Lan, Ya-Hui; Wang, Kai-Wei K; Yu, Shu; Chen, I-Ju; Wu, Hsiang-Feng; Tang, Fu-In

    2014-05-01

    The purposes of this study were (i) to evaluate pediatric nurses' knowledge of pharmacology, and (ii) to analyze known pediatric administration errors. Medication errors occur frequently and ubiquitously, but medication errors involving pediatric patients attract special attention for their high incidence and injury rates. A cross-sectional study was conducted. A questionnaire with 20 true-false questions regarding pharmacology was used to evaluate nurses' knowledge, and the known pediatric administration errors were reported by nurses. The overall correct answer rate on the knowledge of pharmacology was 72.9% (n=262). Insufficient knowledge (61.5%) was the leading obstacle nurses encountered when administering medications. Of 141 pediatric medication errors, more than 60% (61.0%) of which were wrong doses, 9.2% of the children involved suffered serious consequences. Evidence-based results demonstrate that pediatric nurses have insufficient knowledge of pharmacology. Such strategies as providing continuing education and double-checking dosages are suggested. © 2013.

  4. Medication Errors in Cardiopulmonary Arrest and Code-Related Situations.

    PubMed

    Flannery, Alexander H; Parli, Sara E

    2016-01-01

    PubMed/MEDLINE (1966-November 2014) was searched to identify relevant published studies on the overall frequency, types, and examples of medication errors during medical emergencies involving cardiopulmonary resuscitation and related situations, and the breakdown by type of error. The overall frequency of medication errors during medical emergencies, specifically situations related to resuscitation, is highly variable. Medication errors during such emergencies, particularly cardiopulmonary resuscitation and surrounding events, are not well characterized in the literature but may be more frequent than previously thought. Depending on whether research methods included database mining, simulation, or prospective observation of clinical practice, reported occurrence of medication errors during cardiopulmonary resuscitation and surrounding events has ranged from less than 1% to 50%. Because of the chaos of the resuscitation environment, errors in prescribing, dosing, preparing, labeling, and administering drugs are prone to occur. System-based strategies, such as infusion pump policies and code cart management, as well as personal strategies exist to minimize medication errors during emergency situations.

  5. Medication Errors Among Geriatrics at the Outpatient Pharmacy in a Teaching Hospital in Kelantan

    PubMed Central

    Abdullah, Dellemin Che; Ibrahim, Noor Shufiza; Ibrahim, Mohamed Izham Mohamed

    2004-01-01

    The main aim of this study was to determine the medication errors among geriatrics at the outpatient pharmacy in a teaching hospital in Kelantan and the strategies to minimize the prevalence. A retrospective study was conducted that involved screening of prescription for a one-month period (March 2001). Only 15.35% (1601 prescription) of a total 10,429 prescriptions were for geriatrics. The prescriptions that were found to have medication errors was 403. Therefore, the prevalence of medication errors per day was approximately 20 cases. Generally, the errors between both genders were found to be comparable and to be the highest for Malays and at the age of 60–64 years old. Administrative errors was recorded to be the highest which included patient’s particulars and validity of the prescriptions (70.22%) and drugs that available in HUSM (16.13%). Whereas the total of prescribing errors were low. Under prescribing errors were pharmaceutical error (0.99%) and clinical error (8.68%). Sixteen cases or 3.98% had more than 1 error. The highest prevalence went to geriatrics who received more than nine drugs (32.16%), geriatrics with more than 3 clinical diagnosis (10.06%), geriatrics who visited specialist clinics (37.52%) and treated by the specialists (31.07%). The estimated cost for the 403 medication errors in March was RM9,327 or RM301 per day that included the cost of drugs and humanistic cost. The projected cost of medication errors per year was RM 111,924. In conclusion, it is very clear that the role of pharmacist is very great in preventing and minimizing the medication errors beside the needs of correct prescription writing and other strategies by all of the heath care components. PMID:22973127

  6. Disclosing medical errors to patients: effects of nonverbal involvement.

    PubMed

    Hannawa, Annegret F

    2014-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to test causal effects of physicians' nonverbal involvement on medical error disclosure outcomes. 216 hospital outpatients were randomly assigned to two experimental treatment groups. The first group watched a video vignette of a verbally effective and nonverbally involved error disclosure. The second group was exposed to a verbally effective but nonverbally uninvolved error disclosure. All patients responded to seven outcome measures. Patients in the nonverbally uninvolved error disclosure treatment group perceived the physician's apology as less sincere and remorseful compared to patients in the involved disclosure group. They also rated the implications of the error as more severe, were more likely to ascribe fault to the physician, and indicated a higher intent to change doctors after the disclosure. The results of this study imply that nonverbal involvement during medical error disclosures facilitates more accurate patient understanding and assessment of the medical error and its consequences on their health and quality of life. In the context of disclosing medical errors, nonverbal involvement increases the likelihood that physicians will be able to continue caring for their patient. Thus, providers are advised to consider adopting this communication skill into their medical practice. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Frequency, Types, and Potential Clinical Significance of Medication-Dispensing Errors

    PubMed Central

    Bohand, Xavier; Simon, Laurent; Perrier, Eric; Mullot, Hélène; Lefeuvre, Leslie; Plotton, Christian

    2009-01-01

    INTRODUCTION AND OBJECTIVES: Many dispensing errors occur in the hospital, and these can endanger patients. The purpose of this study was to assess the rate of dispensing errors by a unit dose drug dispensing system, to categorize the most frequent types of errors, and to evaluate their potential clinical significance. METHODS: A prospective study using a direct observation method to detect medication-dispensing errors was used. From March 2007 to April 2007, “errors detected by pharmacists” and “errors detected by nurses” were recorded under six categories: unauthorized drug, incorrect form of drug, improper dose, omission, incorrect time, and deteriorated drug errors. The potential clinical significance of the “errors detected by nurses” was evaluated. RESULTS: Among the 734 filled medication cassettes, 179 errors were detected corresponding to a total of 7249 correctly fulfilled and omitted unit doses. An overall error rate of 2.5% was found. Errors detected by pharmacists and nurses represented 155 (86.6%) and 24 (13.4%) of the 179 errors, respectively. The most frequent types of errors were improper dose (n = 57, 31.8%) and omission (n = 54, 30.2%). Nearly 45% of the 24 errors detected by nurses had the potential to cause a significant (n = 7, 29.2%) or serious (n = 4, 16.6%) adverse drug event. CONCLUSIONS: Even if none of the errors reached the patients in this study, a 2.5% error rate indicates the need for improving the unit dose drug-dispensing system. Furthermore, it is almost certain that this study failed to detect some medication errors, further arguing for strategies to prevent their recurrence. PMID:19142545

  8. Frequency, types, and potential clinical significance of medication-dispensing errors.

    PubMed

    Bohand, Xavier; Simon, Laurent; Perrier, Eric; Mullot, Hélène; Lefeuvre, Leslie; Plotton, Christian

    2009-01-01

    Many dispensing errors occur in the hospital, and these can endanger patients. The purpose of this study was to assess the rate of dispensing errors by a unit dose drug dispensing system, to categorize the most frequent types of errors, and to evaluate their potential clinical significance. A prospective study using a direct observation method to detect medication-dispensing errors was used. From March 2007 to April 2007, 'errors detected by pharmacists' and 'errors detected by nurses' were recorded under six categories: unauthorized drug, incorrect form of drug, improper dose, omission, incorrect time, and deteriorated drug errors. The potential clinical significance of the 'errors detected by nurses' was evaluated. Among the 734 filled medication cassettes, 179 errors were detected corresponding to a total of 7249 correctly fulfilled and omitted unit doses. An overall error rate of 2.5% was found. Errors detected by pharmacists and nurses represented 155 (86.6%) and 24 (13.4%) of the 179 errors, respectively. The most frequent types of errors were improper dose (n = 57, 31.8%) and omission (n = 54, 30.2%). Nearly 45% of the 24 errors detected by nurses had the potential to cause a significant (n = 7, 29.2%) or serious (n = 4, 16.6%) adverse drug event. Even if none of the errors reached the patients in this study, a 2.5% error rate indicates the need for improving the unit dose drug-dispensing system. Furthermore, it is almost certain that this study failed to detect some medication errors, further arguing for strategies to prevent their recurrence.

  9. Medication errors in ED: Do patient characteristics and the environment influence the nature and frequency of medication errors?

    PubMed

    Mitchell Scott, Belinda; Considine, Julie; Botti, Mari

    2014-11-01

    Medication safety is of increasing importance and understanding the nature and frequency of medication errors in the Emergency Department (ED) will assist in tailoring interventions which will make patient care safer. The challenge with the literature to date is the wide variability in the frequency of errors reported and the reliance on incident reporting practices of busy ED staff. A prospective, exploratory descriptive design using point prevalence surveys was used to establish the frequency of observed medication errors in the ED. In addition, data related to contextual factors such as ED patients, staffing and workload were also collected during the point prevalence surveys to enable the analysis of relationships between the frequency and nature of specific error types and patient and ED characteristics at the time of data collection. A total of 172 patients were included in the study: 125 of whom patients had a medication chart. The prevalence of medication errors in the ED studied was 41.2% for failure to apply patient ID bands, 12.2% for failure to document allergy status and 38.4% for errors of omission. The proportion of older patients in the ED did not affect the frequency of medication errors. There was a relationship between high numbers of ATS 1, 2 and 3 patients (indicating high levels of clinical urgency) and increased rates of failure to document allergy status. Medication errors were affected by ED occupancy, when cubicles in the ED were over 50% occupied, medication errors occurred more frequently. ED staffing affects the frequency of medication errors, there was an increase in failure to apply ID bands and errors of omission when there were unfilled nursing deficits and lower levels of senior medical staff were associated with increased errors of omission. Medication errors related to patient identification, allergy status and medication omissions occur more frequently in the ED when the ED is busy, has sicker patients and when the staffing is

  10. Organizational safety culture and medical error reporting by Israeli nurses.

    PubMed

    Kagan, Ilya; Barnoy, Sivia

    2013-09-01

    To investigate the association between patient safety culture (PSC) and the incidence and reporting rate of medical errors by Israeli nurses. Self-administered structured questionnaires were distributed to a convenience sample of 247 registered nurses enrolled in training programs at Tel Aviv University (response rate = 91%). The questionnaire's three sections examined the incidence of medication mistakes in clinical practice, the reporting rate for these errors, and the participants' views and perceptions of the safety culture in their workplace at three levels (organizational, departmental, and individual performance). Pearson correlation coefficients, t tests, and multiple regression analysis were used to analyze the data. Most nurses encountered medical errors from a daily to a weekly basis. Six percent of the sample never reported their own errors, while half reported their own errors "rarely or sometimes." The level of PSC was positively and significantly correlated with the error reporting rate. PSC, place of birth, error incidence, and not having an academic nursing degree were significant predictors of error reporting, together explaining 28% of variance. This study confirms the influence of an organizational safety climate on readiness to report errors. Senior healthcare executives and managers can make a major impact on safety culture development by creating and promoting a vision and strategy for quality and safety and fostering their employees' motivation to implement improvement programs at the departmental and individual level. A positive, carefully designed organizational safety culture can encourage error reporting by staff and so improve patient safety. © 2013 Sigma Theta Tau International.

  11. Economic impact of medication error: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Walsh, Elaine K; Hansen, Christina Raae; Sahm, Laura J; Kearney, Patricia M; Doherty, Edel; Bradley, Colin P

    2017-05-01

    Medication error is a significant source of morbidity and mortality among patients. Clinical and cost-effectiveness evidence are required for the implementation of quality of care interventions. Reduction of error-related cost is a key potential benefit of interventions addressing medication error. The aim of this review was to describe and quantify the economic burden associated with medication error. PubMed, Cochrane, Embase, CINAHL, EconLit, ABI/INFORM, Business Source Complete were searched. Studies published 2004-2016 assessing the economic impact of medication error were included. Cost values were expressed in Euro 2015. A narrative synthesis was performed. A total of 4572 articles were identified from database searching, and 16 were included in the review. One study met all applicable quality criteria. Fifteen studies expressed economic impact in monetary terms. Mean cost per error per study ranged from €2.58 to €111 727.08. Healthcare costs were used to measure economic impact in 15 of the included studies with one study measuring litigation costs. Four studies included costs incurred in primary care with the remaining 12 measuring hospital costs. Five studies looked at general medication error in a general population with 11 studies reporting the economic impact of an individual type of medication error or error within a specific patient population. Considerable variability existed between studies in terms of financial cost, patients, settings and errors included. Many were of poor quality. Assessment of economic impact was conducted predominantly in the hospital setting with little assessment of primary care impact. Limited parameters were used to establish economic impact. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  12. Impact of an electronic medication administration record on medication administration efficiency and errors.

    PubMed

    McComas, Jeffery; Riingen, Michelle; Chae Kim, Son

    2014-12-01

    The study aims were to evaluate the impact of electronic medication administration record implementation on medication administration efficiency and occurrence of medication errors as well as to identify the predictors of medication administration efficiency in an acute care setting. A prospective, observational study utilizing time-and-motion technique was conducted before and after electronic medication administration record implementation in November 2011. A total of 156 cases of medication administration activities (78 pre- and 78 post-electronic medication administration record) involving 38 nurses were observed at the point of care. A separate retrospective review of the hospital Midas+ medication error database was also performed to collect the rates and origin of medication errors for 6 months before and after electronic medication administration record implementation. The mean medication administration time actually increased from 11.3 to 14.4 minutes post-electronic medication administration record (P = .039). In a multivariate analysis, electronic medication administration record was not a predictor of medication administration time, but the distractions/interruptions during medication administration process were significant predictors. The mean hospital-wide medication errors significantly decreased from 11.0 to 5.3 events per month post-electronic medication administration record (P = .034). Although no improvement in medication administration efficiency was observed, electronic medication administration record improved the quality of care with a significant decrease in medication errors.

  13. Automated drug dispensing system reduces medication errors in an intensive care setting.

    PubMed

    Chapuis, Claire; Roustit, Matthieu; Bal, Gaëlle; Schwebel, Carole; Pansu, Pascal; David-Tchouda, Sandra; Foroni, Luc; Calop, Jean; Timsit, Jean-François; Allenet, Benoît; Bosson, Jean-Luc; Bedouch, Pierrick

    2010-12-01

    We aimed to assess the impact of an automated dispensing system on the incidence of medication errors related to picking, preparation, and administration of drugs in a medical intensive care unit. We also evaluated the clinical significance of such errors and user satisfaction. Preintervention and postintervention study involving a control and an intervention medical intensive care unit. Two medical intensive care units in the same department of a 2,000-bed university hospital. Adult medical intensive care patients. After a 2-month observation period, we implemented an automated dispensing system in one of the units (study unit) chosen randomly, with the other unit being the control. The overall error rate was expressed as a percentage of total opportunities for error. The severity of errors was classified according to National Coordinating Council for Medication Error Reporting and Prevention categories by an expert committee. User satisfaction was assessed through self-administered questionnaires completed by nurses. A total of 1,476 medications for 115 patients were observed. After automated dispensing system implementation, we observed a reduced percentage of total opportunities for error in the study compared to the control unit (13.5% and 18.6%, respectively; p<.05); however, no significant difference was observed before automated dispensing system implementation (20.4% and 19.3%, respectively; not significant). Before-and-after comparisons in the study unit also showed a significantly reduced percentage of total opportunities for error (20.4% and 13.5%; p<.01). An analysis of detailed opportunities for error showed a significant impact of the automated dispensing system in reducing preparation errors (p<.05). Most errors caused no harm (National Coordinating Council for Medication Error Reporting and Prevention category C). The automated dispensing system did not reduce errors causing harm. Finally, the mean for working conditions improved from 1.0±0.8 to 2

  14. Medication errors in elderly acute care--a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Metsälä, Eija; Vaherkoski, Ulla

    2014-03-01

    Medication safety is a part of quality of care and patient safety. Old age brings many challenges for safe use of medication. In order to improve the prerequisites of medication safety in acute care of the elderly, we systematically reviewed studies to find out what kind of medication errors happen in elderly acute care. Cinahl, Medline, Cochrane, JBI Connect+ databases and Finnish healthcare databases Medic and Ohtanen were used in the search. The search was performed using both MeSH terms and keywords by the option 'search all text'. The original keywords were pharmacy or drugs, medical error or deviation and their Finnish synonyms. These keywords were united to the terms elderly, nursing or acute care or intensive care. Studies published between 2001 and 2011 were chosen. Medication errors mentioned in the studies were associated with (i) nursing competence, (ii) prescription- and patient-related factors, (iii) medication work organisation and nursing process and (iv) safety culture. This paper presents several practical implications for improving medication safety in the acute care of the elderly. The grey literature was not included because the authors wanted to limit to the best-quality research. In some studies, elderly acute care was not their exact context or the elderly formed only a part of study population. This may have undermined some types of medication errors typical to elderly acute care. To improve the prerequisites of medication, safety in acute care of the elderly management of the medication process should be improved. Also, cooperation within the medical team in making the medical care plans and checking out the medication of the elderly people should be improved. This is an important topic of lifelong education for nurses and other healthcare staff as well. © 2013 Nordic College of Caring Science. Published by Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  15. MEADERS: Medication Errors and Adverse Drug Event Reporting system.

    PubMed

    Zafar, Atif

    2007-10-11

    The Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ) recently funded the PBRN Resource Center to develop a system for reporting ambulatory medication errors. Our goal was to develop a usable system that practices could use internally to track errors. We initially performed a comprehensive literature review of what is currently available. Then, using a combination of expert panel meetings and iterative development we designed an instrument for ambulatory medication error reporting and createad a reporting system based both in MS Access 2003 and on the web using MS ASP.NET 2.0 technologies.

  16. Medical professional liability insurance and its relation to medical error and healthcare risk management for the practicing physician.

    PubMed

    Abbott, Richard L; Weber, Paul; Kelley, Betsy

    2005-12-01

    To review the history and current issues surrounding medical professional liability insurance and its relationship to medical error and healthcare risk management. Focused literature review and authors' experience. Medical professional liability insurance issues are reviewed in association with the occurrence of medical error and the role of healthcare risk management. The rising frequency and severity of claims and lawsuits incurred by physicians, as well as escalating defense costs, have dramatically increased over the past several years and have resulted in accelerated efforts to reduce medical errors and control practice risk for physicians. Medical error reduction and improved patient outcomes are closely linked to the goals of the medical risk manager by reducing exposure to adverse medical events. Management of professional liability risk by the physician-led malpractice insurance company not only protects the economic viability of physicians, but also addresses patient safety concerns. Physician-owned malpractice liability insurance companies will continue to be the dominant providers of insurance for practicing physicians and will serve as the primary source for loss prevention and risk management services. To succeed in the marketplace, the emergence and importance of the risk manager and incorporation of risk management principles throughout the professional liability company has become crucial to the financial stability and success of the insurance company. The risk manager provides the necessary advice and support requested by physicians to minimize medical liability risk in their daily practice.

  17. [Medication dispensing errors detected in medication cassettes intended for in-hospital patients].

    PubMed

    Bohand, X; Grippi, R; Lefeuvre, L; Le Garlantezec, P; Aupée, O; Simon, L

    2008-09-01

    Many dispensing errors occur in hospital pharmacies and can harm patients if they are not intercepted. The aim of this study was to determine the incidence and the primary types of medication dispensing errors at a French military hospital. The check of unit dose medication cassettes was performed by nurses. From February 2007 to April 2007, detected dispensing errors were systematically recorded and classified into 6 categories: unauthorized drug, wrong dosage-form, improper dose, omission, wrong time, and deteriorated drug errors. The overall error rate was calculated. During the study, 5112 medication cassettes were checked. 106 dispensing errors have been detected by nurses for a total of 45,573 filled (n=45,518) and omitted (n=55) unit doses. An overall error rate of 0.23% was found. There were approximately 0.02 detected dispensing errors per medication cassette. The most common error types were omission errors (n=55, 51.88%) and improper dose errors (n=30, 28.30%). The results of this study showed that a check performed by nurses after the dispensing process is necessary to detect the dispensing errors. Many causes may explain the occurrence of dispensing errors and must be corrected. Because some dispensing errors may remain undetected, there is a requirement to develop strategies in order to reduce or eliminate these errors, such as the implementation of a computerized prescribing system. The pharmacy staff is widely involved in this duty.

  18. Incidence of adverse drug events and medication errors in Japan: the JADE study.

    PubMed

    Morimoto, Takeshi; Sakuma, Mio; Matsui, Kunihiko; Kuramoto, Nobuo; Toshiro, Jinichi; Murakami, Junji; Fukui, Tsuguya; Saito, Mayuko; Hiraide, Atsushi; Bates, David W

    2011-02-01

    The epidemiology of adverse drug events (ADEs) and medication errors has received little evaluation outside the U.S. and Europe, and extrapolating from these data might not be valid, especially regarding selecting and prioritizing solutions. To assess the incidence and preventability of ADEs and medication errors in Japan. The Japan Adverse Drug Events (JADE) study was a prospective cohort study. A cohort of 3,459 adults admitted to a stratified random sample of seven medical and eight surgical wards and three intensive care units in three tertiary care hospitals over 6 months. We measured ADE and medication error rates from daily reviews of charts, laboratories, incident reports, and prescription queries by on-site reviewers; presence of a signal was considered an incident. Two independent physicians reviewed incidents to determine whether they were ADEs or medication errors and to assess severity and preventability. We identified 1,010 ADEs and 514 medication errors (incidence: 17.0 and 8.7 per 1,000 patient-days, respectively) during the study period. Among ADEs, 1.6%, 4.9% and 33% were fatal, life-threatening and serious, respectively. Among ADEs, 14% were preventable. The rate per admission was 29 per 100 admissions, higher than in U.S. studies because associated with of the long length of hospital stay in Japan (mean, 17 days). The epidemiology and nature of ADEs and medication errors in Japan were similar to other countries, although more frequent per admission. Solutions that worked in these countries might thus improve medication safety in Japan, as could shortening hospital length of stay.

  19. Screening for medication errors using an outlier detection system.

    PubMed

    Schiff, Gordon D; Volk, Lynn A; Volodarskaya, Mayya; Williams, Deborah H; Walsh, Lake; Myers, Sara G; Bates, David W; Rozenblum, Ronen

    2017-03-01

    The study objective was to evaluate the accuracy, validity, and clinical usefulness of medication error alerts generated by an alerting system using outlier detection screening. Five years of clinical data were extracted from an electronic health record system for 747 985 patients who had at least one visit during 2012-2013 at practices affiliated with 2 academic medical centers. Data were screened using the system to detect outliers suggestive of potential medication errors. A sample of 300 charts was selected for review from the 15 693 alerts generated. A coding system was developed and codes assigned based on chart review to reflect the accuracy, validity, and clinical value of the alerts. Three-quarters of the chart-reviewed alerts generated by the screening system were found to be valid in which potential medication errors were identified. Of these valid alerts, the majority (75.0%) were found to be clinically useful in flagging potential medication errors or issues. A clinical decision support (CDS) system that used a probabilistic, machine-learning approach based on statistically derived outliers to detect medication errors generated potentially useful alerts with a modest rate of false positives. The performance of such a surveillance and alerting system is critically dependent on the quality and completeness of the underlying data. The screening system was able to generate alerts that might otherwise be missed with existing CDS systems and did so with a reasonably high degree of alert usefulness when subjected to review of patients' clinical contexts and details.

  20. Carers' Medication Administration Errors in the Domiciliary Setting: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Garfield, Sara; Vincent, Charles; Franklin, Bryony Dean

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Medications are mostly taken in patients’ own homes, increasingly administered by carers, yet studies of medication safety have been largely conducted in the hospital setting. We aimed to review studies of how carers cause and/or prevent medication administration errors (MAEs) within the patient’s home; to identify types, prevalence and causes of these MAEs and any interventions to prevent them. Methods A narrative systematic review of literature published between 1 Jan 1946 and 23 Sep 2013 was carried out across the databases EMBASE, MEDLINE, PSYCHINFO, COCHRANE and CINAHL. Empirical studies were included where carers were responsible for preventing/causing MAEs in the home and standardised tools used for data extraction and quality assessment. Results Thirty-six papers met the criteria for narrative review, 33 of which included parents caring for children, two predominantly comprised adult children and spouses caring for older parents/partners, and one focused on paid carers mostly looking after older adults. The carer administration error rate ranged from 1.9 to 33% of medications administered and from 12 to 92.7% of carers administering medication. These included dosage errors, omitted administration, wrong medication and wrong time or route of administration. Contributory factors included individual carer factors (e.g. carer age), environmental factors (e.g. storage), medication factors (e.g. number of medicines), prescription communication factors (e.g. comprehensibility of instructions), psychosocial factors (e.g. carer-to-carer communication), and care-recipient factors (e.g. recipient age). The few interventions effective in preventing MAEs involved carer training and tailored equipment. Conclusion This review shows that home medication administration errors made by carers are a potentially serious patient safety issue. Carers made similar errors to those made by professionals in other contexts and a wide variety of contributory factors were

  1. Effect of a pharmacist intervention on clinically important medication errors after hospital discharge: a randomized trial.

    PubMed

    Kripalani, Sunil; Roumie, Christianne L; Dalal, Anuj K; Cawthon, Courtney; Businger, Alexandra; Eden, Svetlana K; Shintani, Ayumi; Sponsler, Kelly Cunningham; Harris, L Jeff; Theobald, Cecelia; Huang, Robert L; Scheurer, Danielle; Hunt, Susan; Jacobson, Terry A; Rask, Kimberly J; Vaccarino, Viola; Gandhi, Tejal K; Bates, David W; Williams, Mark V; Schnipper, Jeffrey L

    2012-07-03

    Clinically important medication errors are common after hospital discharge. They include preventable or ameliorable adverse drug events (ADEs), as well as medication discrepancies or nonadherence with high potential for future harm (potential ADEs). To determine the effect of a tailored intervention on the occurrence of clinically important medication errors after hospital discharge. Randomized, controlled trial with concealed allocation and blinded outcome assessors. (ClinicalTrials.gov registration number: NCT00632021) Two tertiary care academic hospitals. Adults hospitalized with acute coronary syndromes or acute decompensated heart failure. Pharmacist-assisted medication reconciliation, inpatient pharmacist counseling, low-literacy adherence aids, and individualized telephone follow-up after discharge. The primary outcome was the number of clinically important medication errors per patient during the first 30 days after hospital discharge. Secondary outcomes included preventable or ameliorable ADEs, as well as potential ADEs. Among 851 participants, 432 (50.8%) had 1 or more clinically important medication errors; 22.9% of such errors were judged to be serious and 1.8% life-threatening. Adverse drug events occurred in 258 patients (30.3%) and potential ADEs in 253 patients (29.7%). The intervention did not significantly alter the per-patient number of clinically important medication errors (unadjusted incidence rate ratio, 0.92 [95% CI, 0.77 to 1.10]) or ADEs (unadjusted incidence rate ratio, 1.09 [CI, 0.86 to 1.39]). Patients in the intervention group tended to have fewer potential ADEs (unadjusted incidence rate ratio, 0.80 [CI, 0.61 to 1.04]). The characteristics of the study hospitals and participants may limit generalizability. Clinically important medication errors were present among one half of patients after hospital discharge and were not significantly reduced by a health-literacy-sensitive, pharmacist-delivered intervention. National Heart, Lung, and

  2. Reporting and disclosing medical errors: pediatricians' attitudes and behaviors.

    PubMed

    Garbutt, Jane; Brownstein, Dena R; Klein, Eileen J; Waterman, Amy; Krauss, Melissa J; Marcuse, Edgar K; Hazel, Erik; Dunagan, Wm Claiborne; Fraser, Victoria; Gallagher, Thomas H

    2007-02-01

    To characterize pediatricians' attitudes and experiences regarding communicating about errors with the hospital and patients' families. Cross-sectional survey. St Louis, Mo, and Seattle, Wash. University-affiliated hospital and community pediatricians and pediatric residents. Anonymous 68-item survey (paper or Web-based) administered between July 2003 and March 2004. Physician attitudes and experiences about error communication. Four hundred thirty-nine pediatric attending physicians and 118 residents participated (62% response rate). Most respondents had been involved in an error (39%, serious; 72%, minor; 61%, near miss; 7%, none). Respondents endorsed reporting errors to the hospital (97%, serious; 90%, minor; 82%, near miss), but only 39% thought that current error reporting systems were adequate. Most pediatricians had used a formal error reporting mechanism, such as an incident report (65%), but many also used informal reporting mechanisms, such as telling a supervisor (47%) or senior physician (38%), and discussed errors with colleagues (72%). Respondents endorsed disclosing errors to patients' families (99%, serious; 90%, minor; 39%, near miss), and many had done so (36%, serious; 52%, minor). Residents were more likely than attending physicians to believe that disclosing a serious error would be difficult (96% vs 86%; P = .004) and to want disclosure training (69% vs 56%; P = .03). Pediatricians are willing to report errors to hospitals and disclose errors to patients' families but believe current reporting systems are inadequate and struggle with error disclosure. Improving error reporting systems and encouraging physicians to report near misses, as well as providing training in error disclosure, could help prevent future errors and increase patient trust.

  3. [Tracing the map of medication errors outside the hospital environment in the Madrid Community].

    PubMed

    Taravilla-Cerdán, Belén; Larrubia-Muñoz, Olga; de la Corte-García, María; Cruz-Martos, Encarnación

    2011-12-01

    Preparation of a map of medication errors reported by health professionals outside hospitals within the framework of Medication Errors Reporting for the Community of Madrid during the period 2008-2009. Retrospective observational study. Notification database of medication errors in the Community of Madrid. Notifications sent to the web page: Safe Use of Medicines and Health Products of the Community of Madrid. Information on the originator of the report, date of incident, shift, type of error and causes, outcome, patient characteristics, stage, place where it was produced and detected, if the medication was administered, lot number, expiry date and the general nature of the drug and a brief description of the incident. There were 5470 medication errors analysed, of which 3412 came from outside hospitals (62%), occurring mainly in the prescription stage (56.92%) and being more reported pharmacists. No harm was done in 92.9% of cases, but there was harm in 4.8% and in 2.3% there was an error that could not be followed up. The centralization of information has led to the confirmation that the prescription is a vulnerable point in the chain of drug therapy. Cleaning up prescription databases, preventing the marketing of commercial presentations that give rise to confusion, enhanced information to professionals and patients, and establishing standardised procedures, and avoiding the use of ambiguous prescriptions, illegible, or abbreviations, are useful strategies to try to minimise these errors. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  4. A fair dinkum duty of open disclosure following medical error.

    PubMed

    Parker, Malcolm

    2012-09-01

    Supporting patients and families in circumstances where medical error has caused significant harm is said to be governed by the principles of ordinary treatment: honest, open communication, empathy and respect. By and large, harmed patients look for acknowledgment of the events that occurred including errors, acceptance of responsibility, a sincere apology, and assurance that lessons learned will be put to preventive use. Australia's National Open Disclosure Standard purports to respond to these reasonable expectations, yet it advises health care professionals that while they may express regret for what has occurred, they should take care not to state or agree that they, or other health care professionals, or health care organisations, are liable for the harm caused to the patient. The National Open Disclosure Standard is currently being reviewed, and the Consultation Draft of the Australian Open Disclosure Framework appears to move things closer to its stated finding that ethical practice prioritises organisational and individual learning from error, rather than an organisational risk-management approach. However, it remains the case that the sense of apology in the Consultation Draft is one of stating regret, not of accepting responsibility This dissonance in the Draft Framework wording may represent a continuing disingenuousness on the part of health professionals and their institutions regarding the kind of apologies that patients look for. Following Berlinger, the current author argues that expressions of regret are not apologies, since an apology presupposes the fault that health professionals are advised they avoid admitting. But honest, open communication surely implies both materially relevant disclosure, which would include acknowledgment of fault where that is known, and a genuine apology, as part of the continuing doctor-patient relationship. To the extent that open disclosure policies and practices fudge complete disclosure, admission of fault and

  5. Medical errors and patient safety in the operating room.

    PubMed

    Ugur, Esra; Kara, Sevim; Yildirim, Songul; Akbal, Elif

    2016-05-01

    To investigate medical errors in the operating room, attitudes of healthcare professionals in case of errors and educational needs of professionals. The descriptive study was conducted at a university hospital in Turkey from January 25 to February 14, 2011, and comprised operating room staff, including physicians, nurses, anaesthesia technicians and perfusion technicians. Data was obtained using a questionnaire. Of the 69 respondents, 45(65.2%) had experienced medical errors and 29(42%) had verbally warned the person who caused the error. The main cause of the medical errors was a lack of healthcare professionals and their inadequate qualifications, 51(73.9%); and insufficient communication, 41(59.4%). Coping with stress and communication 45(65.2%) and radiation safety 28(40.6%) were the most common educational needs. Patient safety applications in the operating room can be improved by offering educational programmes, designing an easy reporting system, encouraging reporting of medical errors and active participation of healthcare professionals in decisions that might affect patient safety.

  6. Medical errors and clinical risk management: state of the art.

    PubMed

    La Pietra, L; Calligaris, L; Molendini, L; Quattrin, R; Brusaferro, S

    2005-12-01

    Medical errors represent a serious public health problem and pose a threat to patient safety. All patients are potentially vulnerable, therefore medical errors are costly from a human, economic, and social viewpoint. The present report aims not only to provide an overview of the problem on the basis of the published literature, but also to stress the importance of adopting standard terminology and classifications, fundamental tools for researchers to obtain valid and reliable methods for error identification and reporting. In fact, agreement on standard definitions allows comparison of data in different contexts. Errors can be classified according to their outcome, the setting where they take place (inpatient, outpatient), the kind of procedure involved (medication, surgery, etc.) or the probability of occurring (high, low). Error categories are analysed taking into consideration their prevalence, avoidance and associated factors as well as the different strategies for detecting medical errors. Incident reporting and documentation of near-misses are described as useful sources of information, and Healthcare Failure Mode Effect Analysis (HFMEA) and Root Cause Analysis (RCA) are seen as powerful methods for process analysis. Furthermore, means to increase patient safety are considered in the broader context of clinical risk management. New approaches in the field of medical errors are aimed at minimizing the recurrence of avoidable patterns associated with higher error rate. A system approach and a blame-free environment, aimed at better organizational performances, lead to much better results than focusing on individuals. Furthermore, use of technology, information accessibility, communication, patient collaboration and multi-professional team-work are successful strategies to reach the goal of patient safety within healthcare organizations.

  7. [Experience of preventive maintenance of medical equipment].

    PubMed

    Li, Wei-jia; Quan, Jian-guo

    2009-03-01

    Preventive maintenance of medical equipment can be helpful in improving the efficiency of medical devices, establishing a standardized management and plan, a classification of maintenance of medical devices, inspection tour of devices and operating condition of dynamic monitoring devices. It has benefit in prolonging the useful life of medical devices, reducing maintenance cost and improving management and service quality.

  8. The Impact of Medical Interpretation Method on Time and Errors

    PubMed Central

    Kapelusznik, Luciano; Prakash, Kavitha; Gonzalez, Javier; Orta, Lurmag Y.; Tseng, Chi-Hong; Changrani, Jyotsna

    2007-01-01

    Background Twenty-two million Americans have limited English proficiency. Interpreting for limited English proficient patients is intended to enhance communication and delivery of quality medical care. Objective Little is known about the impact of various interpreting methods on interpreting speed and errors. This investigation addresses this important gap. Design Four scripted clinical encounters were used to enable the comparison of equivalent clinical content. These scripts were run across four interpreting methods, including remote simultaneous, remote consecutive, proximate consecutive, and proximate ad hoc interpreting. The first 3 methods utilized professional, trained interpreters, whereas the ad hoc method utilized untrained staff. Measurements Audiotaped transcripts of the encounters were coded, using a prespecified algorithm to determine medical error and linguistic error, by coders blinded to the interpreting method. Encounters were also timed. Results Remote simultaneous medical interpreting (RSMI) encounters averaged 12.72 vs 18.24 minutes for the next fastest mode (proximate ad hoc) (p = 0.002). There were 12 times more medical errors of moderate or greater clinical significance among utterances in non-RSMI encounters compared to RSMI encounters (p = 0.0002). Conclusions Whereas limited by the small number of interpreters involved, our study found that RSMI resulted in fewer medical errors and was faster than non-RSMI methods of interpreting. PMID:17957418

  9. Liquid Medication Errors and Dosing Tools: A Randomized Controlled Experiment.

    PubMed

    Yin, H Shonna; Parker, Ruth M; Sanders, Lee M; Dreyer, Benard P; Mendelsohn, Alan L; Bailey, Stacy; Patel, Deesha A; Jimenez, Jessica J; Kim, Kwang-Youn A; Jacobson, Kara; Hedlund, Laurie; Smith, Michelle C J; Maness Harris, Leslie; McFadden, Terri; Wolf, Michael S

    2016-10-01

    Poorly designed labels and packaging are key contributors to medication errors. To identify attributes of labels and dosing tools that could be improved, we examined the extent to which dosing error rates are affected by tool characteristics (ie, type, marking complexity) and discordance between units of measurement on labels and dosing tools; along with differences by health literacy and language. Randomized controlled experiment in 3 urban pediatric clinics. English- or Spanish-speaking parents (n = 2110) of children ≤8 years old were randomly assigned to 1 of 5 study arms and given labels and dosing tools that varied in unit pairings. Each parent measured 9 doses of medication (3 amounts [2.5, 5, and 7.5 mL] and 3 tools [1 cup, 2 syringes (0.2- and 0.5-mL increments)]), in random order. Outcome assessed was dosing error (>20% deviation; large error defined as > 2 times the dose). A total of 84.4% of parents made ≥1 dosing error (21.0% ≥1 large error). More errors were seen with cups than syringes (adjusted odds ratio = 4.6; 95% confidence interval, 4.2-5.1) across health literacy and language groups (P < .001 for interactions), especially for smaller doses. No differences in error rates were seen between the 2 syringe types. Use of a teaspoon-only label (with a milliliter and teaspoon tool) was associated with more errors than when milliliter-only labels and tools were used (adjusted odds ratio = 1.2; 95% confidence interval, 1.01-1.4). Recommending oral syringes over cups, particularly for smaller doses, should be part of a comprehensive pediatric labeling and dosing strategy to reduce medication errors. Copyright © 2016 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  10. Medical error and systems of signaling: conceptual and linguistic definition.

    PubMed

    Smorti, Andrea; Cappelli, Francesco; Zarantonello, Roberta; Tani, Franca; Gensini, Gian Franco

    2014-09-01

    In recent years the issue of patient safety has been the subject of detailed investigations, particularly as a result of the increasing attention from the patients and the public on the problem of medical error. The purpose of this work is firstly to define the classification of medical errors, which are distinguished between two perspectives: those that are personal, and those that are caused by the system. Furthermore we will briefly review some of the main methods used by healthcare organizations to identify and analyze errors. During this discussion it has been determined that, in order to constitute a practical, coordinated and shared action to counteract the error, it is necessary to promote an analysis that considers all elements (human, technological and organizational) that contribute to the occurrence of a critical event. Therefore, it is essential to create a culture of constructive confrontation that encourages an open and non-punitive debate about the causes that led to error. In conclusion we have thus underlined that in health it is essential to affirm a system discussion that considers the error as a learning source, and as a result of the interaction between the individual and the organization. In this way, one should encourage a non-guilt bearing discussion on evident errors and on those which are not immediately identifiable, in order to create the conditions that recognize and corrects the error even before it produces negative consequences.

  11. A classification of errors in lay comprehension of medical documents

    PubMed Central

    Keselman, Alla; Smith, Catherine Arnott

    2012-01-01

    Emphasis on participatory medicine requires that patients and consumers participate in tasks traditionally reserved for healthcare providers. This includes reading and comprehending medical documents, often but not necessarily in the context of interacting with Personal Health Records (PHRs). Research suggests that while giving patients access to medical documents has many benefits (e.g., improved patient-provider communication), lay people often have difficulty understanding medical information. Informatics can address the problem by developing tools that support comprehension; this requires in-depth understanding of the nature and causes of errors that lay people make when comprehending clinical documents. The objective of this study was to develop a classification scheme of comprehension errors, based on lay individuals’ retellings of two documents containing clinical text: a description of a clinical trial and a typical office visit note. While not comprehensive, the scheme can serve as a foundation of further development of a taxonomy of patients’ comprehension errors. Eighty participants, all healthy volunteers, read and retold two medical documents. A data-driven content analysis procedure was used to extract and classify retelling errors. The resulting hierarchical classification scheme contains nine categories and twenty-three subcategories. The most common error made by the participants involved incorrectly recalling brand names of medications. Other common errors included misunderstanding clinical concepts, misreporting the objective of a clinical research study and physician’s findings during a patient’s visit, and confusing and misspelling clinical terms. A combination of informatics support and health education is likely to improve the accuracy of lay comprehension of medical documents. PMID:22925723

  12. Potential causes of medication errors: perceptions of Serbian nurses.

    PubMed

    Svitlica, B B; Simin, D; Milutinović, D

    2017-09-01

    The aim of this study was to identify the most common contributing factors to medication errors in everyday practice of Serbian nurses. Nurses have the key role in medication, and it is very important that they understand why errors occur. This research study was a cross-sectional study in five healthcare institutions. The sample was 965 nurses. A specially designed questionnaire was used as the research instrument. The most dominant contributing factor of medication errors was insufficient number of nurses. Interestingly other dominant factors given in literature were not recognized in this research study. The study results confirm that the recommendations we find in literature cannot be simply copied and implemented into the existing system, but can be used as a starting point for further research. The obtained data were compared with the studies of the countries with different healthcare systems and different educational structures of nurses. The results of the study imply that healthcare institutions have to take the initiative and the responsibility for teaching safe medication use during formal education, as well as in clearly planned programmes of continuous education for nurses. To reduce errors to the least possible level, it is important that nurses clearly define what an error is and recognize the causes and the importance of reporting and analysing them. Systemic practices are required in the health system in Serbia and the culture of patients' safety accepted as the common goal and imperative of everyday practice. © 2017 International Council of Nurses.

  13. The Impact of Bar Code Medication Administration Technology on Reported Medication Errors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holecek, Andrea

    2011-01-01

    The use of bar-code medication administration technology is on the rise in acute care facilities in the United States. The technology is purported to decrease medication errors that occur at the point of administration. How significantly this technology affects actual rate and severity of error is unknown. This descriptive, longitudinal research…

  14. Developing control charts to review and monitor medication errors.

    PubMed

    Ciminera, J L; Lease, M P

    1992-03-01

    There is a need to monitor reported medication errors in a hospital setting. Because the quantity of errors vary due to external reporting, quantifying the data is extremely difficult. Typically, these errors are reviewed using classification systems that often have wide variations in the numbers per class per month. The authors recommend the use of control charts to review historical data and to monitor future data. The procedure they have adopted is a modification of schemes using absolute (i.e., positive) values of successive differences to estimate the standard deviation when only single incidence values are available in time rather than sample averages, and when many successive differences may be zero.

  15. Errors in medical literature: not a question of impact.

    PubMed

    Costantino, Giorgio; Casazza, Giovanni; Cernuschi, Giulia; Solbiati, Monica; Birocchi, Simone; Ceriani, Elisa; Duca, Piergiorgio; Montano, Nicola

    2013-03-01

    The editorial and peer-review processes should guarantee readers as to the reliability of published data. The first step of these processes is to check for errors. The aim of our study was to look for the presence of objective errors in consecutive articles published on three of the most authoritative clinical journals. Two reviewers evaluated the presence of any error in 200 consecutive original articles containing at least two tables, allowing a reanalysis of the data, published between October 2010 and April 2011. Error was considered any action different from what was planned. Errors were listed as: methodological, numerical and slips. They were considered as severe if numbers in the abstract were completely different from numbers reported in the full text. Among the 125 articles included in the study, 102 (82 %, 95 % CI 74-88 %) contained some kind of error, even multiple. Nine articles (7 %, 95 % CI 3-13 %) contained one slip, 92 articles (74 %, 95 % CI 65-81 %) contained at least one numerical error, and 22 articles (18 %, 95 % CI 11-25 %) contained one methodological error. Five articles (4 %, 95 % CI 1-9 %) contained one serious error. None of the errors retrieved (0 %, 95 % CI 0-2 %) would have changed the results of the studies. Most of the articles published in the most important medical journals present mistakes. Our results could be a clue to editorial and peer review systems system weaknesses. A debate within the scientific medical community about these systems, and possible alternative adjustments are needed.

  16. Medication errors and penalties in assisted living facilities.

    PubMed

    Charboneau, Aubri L; Shelton, Penny S; Brickley, Jan B; Rich, Wesley

    2011-08-01

    To determine the percentage of medication-related proposed penalties for licensed assisted living facilities in North Carolina. This retrospective, cross-sectional study examined all proposed penalties and related case-file narratives stemming from annual surveys of licensed assisted living facilities conducted by the state between July 2007 and December 2008. The percentage of medication-related deficiencies and proposed penalties were calculated. Associations between the medication-related proposed penalties and facility size, location, and penalty type were explored using chi-square tests. Assisted living facilities in North Carolina. Percentage of medication- and non-medication-related penalties. A total of 1,256 licensed assisted living facilities (51% adult care homes, 59% metropolitan) were surveyed during the study period. There were 88 proposed penalties (51% medication-related) among 60 facilities. No association between medication-related proposed penalties and facility size or location was detected. However, an association (P = 0.002) was found between type of penalty (A or B) and whether the proposed penalty was medication- or non-medication-related (37.3% and 70.3% of Type A and B penalties, respectively, were medication related). Medications commonly cited were insulin, cardiovascular agents, supplements, anticonvulsants, and antipsychotics. Common categories of medication errors were drug not administered and wrong dose administered. Medication errors, regardless of facility size or location, were contributing factors in approximately one-half of violations sufficient enough to warrant a penalty proposal among the licensed assisted living facilities in North Carolina. These findings demonstrate a need for continued regulation and increased pharmacist involvement to improve medication safety.

  17. Medication safety in neonatal care: a review of medication errors among neonates

    PubMed Central

    Krzyzaniak, Natalia; Bajorek, Beata

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The objective of this study was to describe the medication errors in hospitalized patients, comparing those in neonates with medication errors across the age spectrum. Method: In tier 1, PubMed, Embase and Google Scholar were searched, using selected MeSH terms relating to hospitalized paediatric, adult and elderly populations. Tier 2 involved a search of the same electronic databases for literature relating to hospitalized neonatal patients. Results: A total of 58 articles were reviewed. Medication errors were well documented in each patient group. Overall, prescribing and administration errors were most commonly identified across each population, and mostly related to errors in dosing. Errors due to patient misidentification and overdosing were particularly prevalent in neonates, with 47% of administration errors involving at least tenfold overdoses. Unique errors were identified in elderly patients, comprising duplication of therapy and unnecessary prescribing of medicines. Overall, the medicines most frequently identified with error across each patient group included: heparin, antibiotics, insulin, morphine and parenteral nutrition. While neonatal patients experience the same types of medication errors as other hospitalized patients, the medication-use process within this group is more complex and has greater consequences resulting from error. Suggested strategies to help overcome medication error most commonly involved the integration of a clinical pharmacist into the treating team. Conclusion: This review highlights that each step of the medication-use process is prone to error across the age spectrum. Further research is required to develop targeted strategies relevant to specific patient groups that integrate key pharmacy services into wards. PMID:27298721

  18. Medication Errors: A Characterisation of Spontaneously Reported Cases in EudraVigilance.

    PubMed

    Newbould, Victoria; Le Meur, Steven; Goedecke, Thomas; Kurz, Xavier

    2017-07-11

    Medication errors recently became the focus of regulatory guidance in pharmacovigilance to support reporting, evaluation and prevention of medication errors. This study aims to characterise spontaneously reported cases of medication errors in EudraVigilance over the period 2002-2015 before the release of EU good practice guidance. Case reports were identified through the adverse reaction section where a Medical Dictionary for Regulatory Activities (MedDRA(®)) term is reported and included in the Standardised MedDRA(®) Query (SMQ) for medication errors. These case reports were further categorised by MedDRA(®) terms, geographical region, patient age group and Anatomical Therapeutic Chemical classification system of suspect medicinal product(s). A total of 147,824 case reports were retrieved, 41,355 of which were from the European Economic Area (EEA). Approximately 60% of these case reports were retrieved with the narrow SMQ. The absolute number of medication error case reports and the proportion to the total number of reports in EudraVigilance increased during the study period, with peaks seen around 2005 and 2012 for cases with EEA origin. Fifty-two percent of case reports in which age was provided occurred in adults, 30% in the elderly and 18% in children, with almost half of these in children aged 2 months to 2 years. Case reports of medication errors in EudraVigilance steadily increased between 2005 and 2015, the reasons for which may be multifactorial, including increased awareness, changes to the MedDRA(®) terminology and the 2012 EU pharmacovigilance legislation and associated guidance for stakeholders, or a generally increased risk for errors as more medications become available.

  19. The alarming reality of medication error: a patient case and review of Pennsylvania and National data

    PubMed Central

    da Silva, Brianna A.; Krishnamurthy, Mahesh

    2016-01-01

    Case description A 71-year-old female accidentally received thiothixene (Navane), an antipsychotic, instead of her anti-hypertensive medication amlodipine (Norvasc) for 3 months. She sustained physical and psychological harm including ambulatory dysfunction, tremors, mood swings, and personality changes. Despite the many opportunities for intervention, multiple health care providers overlooked her symptoms. Discussion Errors occurred at multiple care levels, including prescribing, initial pharmacy dispensation, hospitalization, and subsequent outpatient follow-up. This exemplifies the Swiss Cheese Model of how errors can occur within a system. Adverse drug events (ADEs) account for more than 3.5 million physician office visits and 1 million emergency department visits each year. It is believed that preventable medication errors impact more than 7 million patients and cost almost $21 billion annually across all care settings. About 30% of hospitalized patients have at least one discrepancy on discharge medication reconciliation. Medication errors and ADEs are an underreported burden that adversely affects patients, providers, and the economy. Conclusion Medication reconciliation including an ‘indication review’ for each prescription is an important aspect of patient safety. The decreasing frequency of pill bottle reviews, suboptimal patient education, and poor communication between healthcare providers are factors that threaten patient safety. Medication error and ADEs cost billions of health care dollars and are detrimental to the provider–patient relationship. PMID:27609720

  20. Pediatric medication administration errors and workflow following implementation of a bar code medication administration system.

    PubMed

    Hardmeier, Anna; Tsourounis, Candy; Moore, Mary; Abbott, Wendy E; Guglielmo, B Joseph

    2014-01-01

    Direct observation was used to detect medication errors and Bar Code Medication Administration (BCMA) workarounds on two pediatric units and one neonatal unit at UCSF Benioff Children's Hospital. The study (1) measured the frequency of nursing medication administration-related errors, (2) characterized the types of medication errors, (3) assessed compliance with the institution's six medication administration safety processes, and (4) identified observed workarounds following BCMA implementation. The results of the direct observation were compared to medication administration-related incident reports (IRs) for the same period. The frequency of medication errors was 5% for the three units. Compliance with the process measures was achieved 86% of the time (range 23-100%). Seven medication administration-related IRs were submitted during the same observation period. Three BCMA workarounds were identified; (1) failure to visually confirm patient's identification, (2) failure to compare the medication to the electronic medication administration record at least twice before administration, and (3) charting administration of medication before actual administration. The direct observation methodology identified a low frequency of medication administration errors (MAEs) consistent with post-BCMA implementation. The incident reporting system identified different MAEs than direct observation suggesting that both methods should be used to better characterize the scope of MAEs. © 2014 National Association for Healthcare Quality.

  1. Characteristics associated with post-discharge medication errors

    PubMed Central

    Mixon, Amanda S.; Myers, Amy P.; Leak, Cardella L.; Mary Lou Jacobsen, J.; Cawthon, Courtney; Goggins, Kathryn M.; Nwosu, Samuel; Schildcrout, Jonathan S.; Schnelle, John F.; Speroff, Theodore; Kripalani, Sunil

    2014-01-01

    Objective To examine the association of patient- and medication-related factors with post-discharge medication errors. Patients and Methods The Vanderbilt Inpatient Cohort Study (VICS) includes adults hospitalized with acute coronary syndromes (ACS) and/or acute decompensated heart failure (ADHF). We measured health literacy, subjective numeracy, marital status, cognition, social support, education, income, depression, global health status, and medication adherence in patients enrolled between October 2011 and August 2012. We used binomial logistic regression to determine predictors of discordance between the discharge medication list and patient-reported list during post-discharge medication review. Results Among 471 patients, mean age was 59 years; mean total number of medications reported was 12; and 17% had inadequate or marginal health literacy. Half (51%) of patients had ≥1 one discordant medication (i.e., appeared either on the discharge or patient-reported list but not both); 27% failed to report a medication on their discharge list; and 36% reported a medication not on their discharge list. Additionally, 59% had a misunderstanding in indication, dose, or frequency in a cardiac medication. In multivariable analyses, higher subjective numeracy (Odds Ratio (OR)=0.81, 95% Confidence Interval (CI) 0.67-0.98) was associated with lower odds of having discordant medications. For cardiac medications, participants with higher health literacy (OR=0.84, CI 0.74-0.95), higher subjective numeracy (OR=0.77, CI 0.63-0.95), and who were female (OR=0.60, CI 0.46-0.78) had lower odds of misunderstandings in indication, dose, or frequency. Conclusion Medication errors are present in approximately half of patients following hospital discharge and are more common among patients with lower numeracy or health literacy. PMID:24998906

  2. The impact of sound speed errors on medical ultrasound imaging.

    PubMed

    Anderson, M E; McKeag, M S; Trahey, G E

    2000-06-01

    The results of a quantitative study of the impact of sound speed errors on the spatial resolution and amplitude sensitivity of a commercial medical ultrasound scanner are presented in the context of their clinical significance. The beamforming parameters of the scanner were manipulated to produce sound speed errors ranging over +/-8% while imaging a wire target and an attenuating, speckle-generating phantom. For the wire target, these errors produced increases in lateral beam width of up to 320% and reductions in peak echo amplitude of up to 10.5 dB. In the speckle-generating phantom, these errors produced increases in speckle intensity correlation cell area of up to 92% and reductions in mean speckle brightness of up to 5.6 dB. These results are applied in statistical analyses of two detection tasks of clinical relevance. The first is of low contrast lesion detectability, predicting the changes in the correct decision probability as a function of lesion size, contrast, and sound speed error. The second is of point target detectability, predicting the changes in the correct decision probability as function of point target reflectivity and sound speed error. Representative results of these analyses are presented and their implications for clinical imaging are discussed. In general, sound speed errors have a more significant impact on point target detectability over lesion detectability by these analyses, producing up to a 22% reduction in correct decisions for a typical error.

  3. Medication Errors in the Southeast Asian Countries: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Salmasi, Shahrzad; Khan, Tahir Mehmood; Hong, Yet Hoi; Ming, Long Chiau; Wong, Tin Wui

    2015-01-01

    Background Medication error (ME) is a worldwide issue, but most studies on ME have been undertaken in developed countries and very little is known about ME in Southeast Asian countries. This study aimed systematically to identify and review research done on ME in Southeast Asian countries in order to identify common types of ME and estimate its prevalence in this region. Methods The literature relating to MEs in Southeast Asian countries was systematically reviewed in December 2014 by using; Embase, Medline, Pubmed, ProQuest Central and the CINAHL. Inclusion criteria were studies (in any languages) that investigated the incidence and the contributing factors of ME in patients of all ages. Results The 17 included studies reported data from six of the eleven Southeast Asian countries: five studies in Singapore, four in Malaysia, three in Thailand, three in Vietnam, one in the Philippines and one in Indonesia. There was no data on MEs in Brunei, Laos, Cambodia, Myanmar and Timor. Of the seventeen included studies, eleven measured administration errors, four focused on prescribing errors, three were done on preparation errors, three on dispensing errors and two on transcribing errors. There was only one study of reconciliation error. Three studies were interventional. Discussion The most frequently reported types of administration error were incorrect time, omission error and incorrect dose. Staff shortages, and hence heavy workload for nurses, doctor/nurse distraction, and misinterpretation of the prescription/medication chart, were identified as contributing factors of ME. There is a serious lack of studies on this topic in this region which needs to be addressed if the issue of ME is to be fully understood and addressed. PMID:26340679

  4. Effectiveness of an electronic inpatient medication record in reducing medication errors in Singapore.

    PubMed

    Choo, Janet; Johnston, Linda; Manias, Elizabeth

    2014-06-01

    This study examined the effectiveness of an inpatient electronic medication record system in reducing medication errors in Singaporean hospitals. This pre- and post-intervention study involving a control group was undertaken in two Singaporean acute care hospitals. In one hospital the inpatient electronic medication record system was implemented while in another hospital the paper-based medication record system was used. The mean incidence difference in medication errors of 0.06 between pre-intervention (0.72 per 1000 patient days) and post-intervention (0.78 per 1000 patient days) for the two hospitals was not statistically significant (95%, CI: [0.26, 0.20]). The mean incidence differences in medication errors relating to prescription, dispensing, and administration were also not statistically different. Common system failures involved a lack of medication knowledge by health professionals and a lack of a systematic approach in identifying correct dosages. There was no difference in the incidence of medication errors following the introduction of the electronic medication record system. More work is needed on how this system can reduce medication error rates and improve medication safety. © 2013 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  5. Reducing medication errors and increasing patient safety: case studies in clinical pharmacology.

    PubMed

    Benjamin, David M

    2003-07-01

    Today, reducing medication errors and improving patient safety have become common topics of discussion for the president of the United States, federal and state legislators, the insurance industry, pharmaceutical companies, health care professionals, and patients. But this is not news to clinical pharmacologists. Improving the judicious use of medications and minimizing adverse drug reactions have always been key areas of research and study for those working in clinical pharmacology. However, added to the older terms of adverse drug reactions and rational therapeutics, the now politically correct expression of medication error has emerged. Focusing on the word error has drawn attention to "prevention" and what can be done to minimize mistakes and improve patient safety. Webster's New Collegiate Dictionary has several definitions of error, but the one that seems to be most appropriate in the context of medication errors is "an act that through ingnorance, deficiency, or accident departs from or fails to achieve what should be done." What should be done is generally known as "the five rights": the right drug, right dose, right route, right time, and right patient. One can make an error of omission (failure to act correctly) or an error of commission (acted incorrectly). This article now summarizes what is currently known about medication errors and translates the information into case studies illustrating common scenarios leading to medication errors. Each case is analyzed to provide insight into how the medication error could have been prevented. "System errors" are described, and the application of failure mode effect analysis (FMEA) is presented to determine the part of the "safety net" that failed. Examples of reengineering the system to make it more "error proof" are presented. An error can be prevented. However, the practice of medicine, pharmacy, and nursing in the hospital setting is very complicated, and so many steps occur from "pen to patient" that there

  6. Detection and management of medication errors in internal wards of a teaching hospital by clinical pharmacists.

    PubMed

    Abbasinazari, Mohammad; Hajhossein Talasaz, Azita; Eshraghi, Azadeh; Sahraei, Zahra

    2013-08-07

    Any suboptimum treatment in the management of patients can lead to medication errors (MEs) that may increase morbidity and mortality in hospitalized individuals. By establishing well-designed patient care activities within the managed care setting, clinical pharmacists can cooperate with other health care professionals to provide quality care and maximize safety. The aim of this study was to evaluate the frequency and prevention of MEs by clinical pharmacists. This was a cross-sectional interventional study conducted in internal wards of a teaching hospital during a two-month period. During this period, patient records, and physician orders were reviewed by clinical pharmacists. Any prescription error identified was documented. Incorrect drug selection, dose, dosage form, frequency, or route of administration all were considered as medication errors. Then, the clinical pharmacist discuss about findings with the clinical fellows to change faulty orders. The frequency and types of MEs in different wards that were detected and prevented by clinical pharmacists was documented. During the study period, in 132 patients, 262 errors were detected (1.98 per each). Wrong frequency 71 (27%), forget to order 37 (14.1%), wrong selection 33 (12.5%), drug interactions 26 (9.9%), forget to discontinue 25 (9.5%) and inappropriate dose adjustment in renal impairment 25 (9.5%) were the most types of errors. Cardiovascular medications were the class with the highest detected errors (31.6%) followed by gastrointestinal agents (15.6%). Medication errors are common problems in medical wards that their frequency can be restricted by the intervention of clinical pharmacists.

  7. Effects of a pharmacist-led pediatrics medication safety team on medication-error reporting.

    PubMed

    Costello, Jennifer L; Torowicz, Deborah Lloyd; Yeh, Timothy S

    2007-07-01

    The effects of a pharmacist-led pediatrics medication safety team (PMST) on the frequency and severity of medication errors reported were studied. This study was conducted in a pediatric critical care center (PCCC) in three phases. Phase 1 consisted of retrospective collection of medication-error reports before any interventions were made. Phases 2 and 3 included prospective collection of medication-error reports after several interventions. Phase 2 introduced a pediatrics clinical pharmacist to the PCCC. A pediatrics clinical pharmacist-led PMST (including a pediatrics critical care nurse and pediatrics intensivist), a new reporting form, and educational forums were added during phase 3 of the study. In addition, education focus groups were held for all intensive care unit staff. Outcomes for all phases were measured by the number of medication-error reports processed, the number of incidents, error severity, and the specialty of the reporter. Medication-error reporting increased twofold, threefold, and sixfold between phases 1 and 2, phases 2 and 3, and phases 1 and 3, respectively. Error severity decreased over the three time periods. In phases 1, 2, and 3, 46%, 8%, and 0% of the errors were classified as category D or E, respectively. Conversely, the reporting of near-miss errors increased from 9% in phase 1 to 38% in phase 2 and to 51% in phase 3. An increase in the number of medication errors reported and a decrease in the severity of errors reported were observed in a PCCC after implementation of a PMST, provision of education to health care providers, and addition of a clinical pharmacist.

  8. Interventions for reducing medication errors in children in hospital.

    PubMed

    Maaskant, Jolanda M; Vermeulen, Hester; Apampa, Bugewa; Fernando, Bernard; Ghaleb, Maisoon A; Neubert, Antje; Thayyil, Sudhin; Soe, Aung

    2015-03-10

    Many hospitalised patients are affected by medication errors (MEs) that may cause discomfort, harm and even death. Children are at especially high risk of harm as the result of MEs because such errors are potentially more hazardous to them than to adults. Until now, interventions to reduce MEs have led to only limited improvements. To determine the effectiveness of interventions aimed at reducing MEs and related harm in hospitalised children. The Effective Practice and Organisation of Care Group (EPOC) Trials Search Co-ordinator searched the following sources for primary studies: The Cochrane Library, including the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), the Economic Evaluation Database (EED) and the Health Technology Assessments (HTA) database; MEDLINE, EMBASE, the Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL), PsycINFO, Proquest Dissertations & Theses, Web of Science (citation indexes and conference proceedings) and the EPOC Register of Studies. Related reviews were identified by searching the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews and the Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE). Review authors searched grey literature sources and trial registries. They handsearched selected journals, contacted researchers in the field and scanned reference lists of relevant reviews. They conducted searches in November 2013 and November 2014. They applied neither language nor date limits. Randomised controlled trials, controlled before-after studies and interrupted time series investigating interventions to improve medication safety in hospitalised children (≤ 18 years). Participants were healthcare professionals authorised to prescribe, dispense or administer medications. Outcome measures included MEs, (potential) patient harm, resource utilisation and unintended consequences of the interventions. Two review authors independently selected studies, extracted data and assessed study quality using the EPOC data collection

  9. A study on nurses' perception on the medication error at one of the hospitals in East Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Hassan, H; Das, S; Se, H; Damika, K; Letchimi, S; Mat, S; Packiavathy, R; Zulkifli, S Z S

    2009-01-01

    Medication error is defined as any preventable event that might cause or lead to an inappropriate use or harming of the patient. Such events could be due to compounding, dispensing, distribution, administration and monitoring. The aim of the present study was to determine the nurses' perception on medication error that were related directly or indirectly to the process of administration of drugs. MATERIALS AND METHODS. This was a descriptive cross sectional study conducted on 92 staff nurses working in the selected wards in one of the hospitals in East Malaysia. Data was obtained through structured questionnaires. RESULTS. Analysis of data was done through SPSS program for descriptive inferential statistics. Out of a total of 92 subjects, sixty-eight (73.9%) indicated medication error occurred because the nurses were tired and exhausted. Seventy nine subjects (85.9%) believed that any medication error should be reported to the doctors; another 74 (80.2%) knew that their colleagues committed medication error and 52 (56.5%) did not report the case. Forty eight (52.17%) subjects committed medication error at least once throughout their life. Of the 48 committed medication, 45 (93.75%) nurses believed that the error committed was not serious; while 39 (81.25%) believed the error occurred during the 1st 5 years of their working experience. The findings showed that the incidence of medication error was due to the defect in the organizational system itself and not solely due to the mistakes on the part of any individual.

  10. Sensitivity analysis of geometric errors in additive manufacturing medical models.

    PubMed

    Pinto, Jose Miguel; Arrieta, Cristobal; Andia, Marcelo E; Uribe, Sergio; Ramos-Grez, Jorge; Vargas, Alex; Irarrazaval, Pablo; Tejos, Cristian

    2015-03-01

    Additive manufacturing (AM) models are used in medical applications for surgical planning, prosthesis design and teaching. For these applications, the accuracy of the AM models is essential. Unfortunately, this accuracy is compromised due to errors introduced by each of the building steps: image acquisition, segmentation, triangulation, printing and infiltration. However, the contribution of each step to the final error remains unclear. We performed a sensitivity analysis comparing errors obtained from a reference with those obtained modifying parameters of each building step. Our analysis considered global indexes to evaluate the overall error, and local indexes to show how this error is distributed along the surface of the AM models. Our results show that the standard building process tends to overestimate the AM models, i.e. models are larger than the original structures. They also show that the triangulation resolution and the segmentation threshold are critical factors, and that the errors are concentrated at regions with high curvatures. Errors could be reduced choosing better triangulation and printing resolutions, but there is an important need for modifying some of the standard building processes, particularly the segmentation algorithms. Copyright © 2015 IPEM. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. [Medication errors in emergency rooms, intensive care units and pediatric wards].

    PubMed

    Wu, Hsiang-Feng; Yu, Shu; Lan, Ya-Hui; Tang, Fu-In

    2012-04-01

    Medication safety is a major concern worldwide that directly relates to patient care quality and safety. Reducing medication error incidents is a critical medication safety issue. This literature review article summarizes medication error issues related specifically to three hospital units, namely emergency rooms (ERs), intensive care units (ICUs), and pediatric wards. Time constrains, lack of patient history details and the frequent need to use rapid response life-saving medications are key factors behind high ER medication error rates. Patient hypo-responsiveness, complex medication administration and frequent need to use high-alert medications are key factors behind high ICU medication error rates. Medication error in pediatric wards are often linked to errors made by nurses in calculating dosage based on patient body weight. This article summarizes the major types of medication errors reported by these three units in order to increase nurse awareness of medication errors and further encourage nurses to apply proper standard operational procedures to medication administration.

  12. [The approaches to factors which cause medication error--from the analyses of many near-miss cases related to intravenous medication which nurses experienced].

    PubMed

    Kawamura, H

    2001-03-01

    Given the complexity of the intravenous medication process, systematic thinking is essential to reduce medication errors. Two thousand eight hundred cases of 'Hiyari-Hatto' were analyzed. Eight important factors which cause intravenous medication error were clarified as a result. In the following I summarize the systematic approach for each factor. 1. Failed communication of information: illegible handwritten orders, and inaccurate verbal orders and copying cause medication error. Rules must be established to prevent miscommunication. 2. Error-prone design of the hardware: Look-alike packaging and labeling of drugs and the poor design of infusion pumps cause errors. The human-hardware interface should be improved by error-resistant design by manufacturers. 3. Patient names similar to simultaneously operating surgical procedures and interventions: This factor causes patient misidentification. Automated identification devices should be introduced into health care settings. 4. Interruption in the middle of tasks: The efficient assignment of medical work and business work should be made. 5. Inaccurate mixing procedure and insufficient mixing space: Mixing procedures must be standardized and the layout of the working space must be examined. 6. Time pressure: Mismatch between workload and manpower should be improved by reconsidering the work to be done. 7. Lack of information about high alert medications: The pharmacist should play a greater role in the medication process overall. 8. Poor knowledge and skill of recent graduates: Training methods and tools to prevent medication errors must be developed.

  13. [Medical reviews of claims for damages and errors in urology].

    PubMed

    Lent, V; Smentkowski, U; Weber, B; Brummeisl, W

    2013-09-01

    In liability law, a medical review is considered to be an expert opinion that is provided at the request of those involved (patient or physician) of a course of treatment. It must be carried out according to defined criteria with the aim of providing a plausible basis for arbitration. This is achieved by means of an objective determination of the facts, a reasonable assessment of the error(s) and (where appropriate) a realistic description of the injury involved. The following fields should be covered in a concise review: conditions and procedures applied to the review, criteria to be used in the review, types of error that are possible during the treatment, assessment of the treatment errors committed, possible treatment errors that can occur in urology, conclusions to be drawn from the review. In summary, a medical assessment carried out in the course of claims for damages should provide a balanced assessment that takes into account the confidential relationship between the physician and patient. This means that the review procedure must be performed under the best possible conditions for professional standards and care.

  14. Medication administration errors in nursing homes using an automated medication dispensing system.

    PubMed

    van den Bemt, Patricia M L A; Idzinga, Jetske C; Robertz, Hans; Kormelink, Dennis Groot; Pels, Neske

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To identify the frequency of medication administration errors as well as their potential risk factors in nursing homes using a distribution robot. DESIGN The study was a prospective, observational study conducted within three nursing homes in the Netherlands caring for 180 individuals. MEASUREMENTS Medication errors were measured using the disguised observation technique. Types of medication errors were described. The correlation between several potential risk factors and the occurrence of medication errors was studied to identify potential causes for the errors. RESULTS In total 2,025 medication administrations to 127 clients were observed. In these administrations 428 errors were observed (21.2%). The most frequently occurring types of errors were use of wrong administration techniques (especially incorrect crushing of medication and not supervising the intake of medication) and wrong time errors (administering the medication at least 1 h early or late).The potential risk factors female gender (odds ratio (OR) 1.39; 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.05-1.83), ATC medication class antibiotics (OR 11.11; 95% CI 2.66-46.50), medication crushed (OR 7.83; 95% CI 5.40-11.36), number of dosages/day/client (OR 1.03; 95% CI 1.01-1.05), nursing home 2 (OR 3.97; 95% CI 2.86-5.50), medication not supplied by distribution robot (OR 2.92; 95% CI 2.04-4.18), time classes "7-10 am" (OR 2.28; 95% CI 1.50-3.47) and "10 am-2 pm" (OR 1.96; 1.18-3.27) and day of the week "Wednesday" (OR 1.46; 95% CI 1.03-2.07) are associated with a higher risk of administration errors. CONCLUSIONS Medication administration in nursing homes is prone to many errors. This study indicates that the handling of the medication after removing it from the robot packaging may contribute to this high error frequency, which may be reduced by training of nurse attendants, by automated clinical decision support and by measures to reduce workload.

  15. Medication Administration Errors in Nursing Homes Using an Automated Medication Dispensing System

    PubMed Central

    van den Bemt, Patricia M.L.A.; Idzinga, Jetske C.; Robertz, Hans; Kormelink, Dennis Groot; Pels, Neske

    2009-01-01

    Objective To identify the frequency of medication administration errors as well as their potential risk factors in nursing homes using a distribution robot. Design The study was a prospective, observational study conducted within three nursing homes in the Netherlands caring for 180 individuals. Measurements Medication errors were measured using the disguised observation technique. Types of medication errors were described. The correlation between several potential risk factors and the occurrence of medication errors was studied to identify potential causes for the errors. Results In total 2,025 medication administrations to 127 clients were observed. In these administrations 428 errors were observed (21.2%). The most frequently occurring types of errors were use of wrong administration techniques (especially incorrect crushing of medication and not supervising the intake of medication) and wrong time errors (administering the medication at least 1 h early or late).The potential risk factors female gender (odds ratio (OR) 1.39; 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.05–1.83), ATC medication class antibiotics (OR 11.11; 95% CI 2.66–46.50), medication crushed (OR 7.83; 95% CI 5.40–11.36), number of dosages/day/client (OR 1.03; 95% CI 1.01–1.05), nursing home 2 (OR 3.97; 95% CI 2.86–5.50), medication not supplied by distribution robot (OR 2.92; 95% CI 2.04–4.18), time classes “7–10 am” (OR 2.28; 95% CI 1.50–3.47) and “10 am-2 pm” (OR 1.96; 1.18–3.27) and day of the week “Wednesday” (OR 1.46; 95% CI 1.03–2.07) are associated with a higher risk of administration errors. Conclusions Medication administration in nursing homes is prone to many errors. This study indicates that the handling of the medication after removing it from the robot packaging may contribute to this high error frequency, which may be reduced by training of nurse attendants, by automated clinical decision support and by measures to reduce workload. PMID:19390109

  16. Descriptive analysis of medication errors reported to the Egyptian national online reporting system during six months.

    PubMed

    Shehata, Zahraa Hassan Abdelrahman; Sabri, Nagwa Ali; Elmelegy, Ahmed Abdelsalam

    2016-03-01

    This study analyzes reports to the Egyptian medication error (ME) reporting system from June to December 2014. Fifty hospital pharmacists received training on ME reporting using the national reporting system. All received reports were reviewed and analyzed. The pieces of data analyzed were patient age, gender, clinical setting, stage, type, medication(s), outcome, cause(s), and recommendation(s). Over the course of 6 months, 12,000 valid reports were gathered and included in this analysis. The majority (66%) came from inpatient settings, while 23% came from intensive care units, and 11% came from outpatient departments. Prescribing errors were the most common type of MEs (54%), followed by monitoring (25%) and administration errors (16%). The most frequent error was incorrect dose (20%) followed by drug interactions, incorrect drug, and incorrect frequency. Most reports were potential (25%), prevented (11%), or harmless (51%) errors; only 13% of reported errors lead to patient harm. The top three medication classes involved in reported MEs were antibiotics, drugs acting on the central nervous system, and drugs acting on the cardiovascular system. Causes of MEs were mostly lack of knowledge, environmental factors, lack of drug information sources, and incomplete prescribing. Recommendations for addressing MEs were mainly staff training, local ME reporting, and improving work environment. There are common problems among different healthcare systems, so that sharing experiences on the national level is essential to enable learning from MEs. Internationally, there is a great need for standardizing ME terminology, to facilitate knowledge transfer. Underreporting, inaccurate reporting, and a lack of reporter diversity are some limitations of this study. Egypt now has a national database of MEs that allows researchers and decision makers to assess the problem, identify its root causes, and develop preventive strategies. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University

  17. Influence of computerised medication charts on medication errors in a hospital.

    PubMed

    van Gijssel-Wiersma, Dieuwke G; van den Bemt, Patricia M L A; Walenbergh-van Veen, Monique C M

    2005-01-01

    In hospitals where computerised physician order entry systems will not be available in the near future, there is a need to explore other ways of reducing medication errors that occur in the drug ordering and delivery system. One of these ways is the use of a computerised medication chart that is updated daily. The aim of this study was to evaluate the frequency, types and potential clinical significance of drug prescription and administration errors by comparing a traditional medication distribution system (where the transcription of handwritten into printed medication orders takes 3-5 days and the transfer of medication orders was not complete) with the use of a computerised medication chart (which was updated daily by pharmacy assistants on the ward). Data were collected during two 3-week periods, from a 32-bed internal medicine unit, before and after the introduction of the computerised medication charts. Prescribing errors were observed by evaluation of all new and changed medication orders and administration errors were detected by using the disguised-observation technique. For prescribing errors, a total of 611 prescriptions before and 598 prescriptions after the intervention were evaluated. The total prescription error rate (of medication orders with >or=1 error) was found to be significantly higher with the computerised charts when compared with the old system (50.0% [299 of 598] vs 20.3% [124 of 611], odds ratio [OR] 3.80 [95% CI 2.94, 4.90]). This increase was caused by an increase in administrative prescription errors with a low potential clinical significance (mainly omission of the prescriber's name and the prescription date). The error rate for errors with a potential clinical significance was found to be significantly lower because the prescription error 'duplicate therapy' was eliminated (3.4% with the traditional medication chart vs 0% with the computerised chart). For administration errors, a total of 1122 drugs before the intervention and 1175

  18. The epidemiology of adverse drug events and medication errors among psychiatric inpatients in Japan: the JADE study.

    PubMed

    Ayani, Nobutaka; Sakuma, Mio; Morimoto, Takeshi; Kikuchi, Toshiaki; Watanabe, Koichiro; Narumoto, Jin; Fukui, Kenji

    2016-08-30

    Knowledge of the epidemiology of adverse drug events (ADEs) and medication errors in psychiatric inpatients is limited outside Western countries. The nature of ADEs and medication errors are important for improving the quality of care worldwide; therefore, we conducted the Japan Adverse Drug Events Study, a series of cohort studies at several settings in Japan. This report included 448 inpatients with 22,733 patient-days in a psychiatric hospital and psychiatric units at a tertiary care teaching hospital over 1 year. Four psychiatrists and two other physicians reviewed all medical charts and related documents to identify suspected incidents. The physicians later classified those incidents into ADEs, potential ADEs, medication errors, or exclusions and evaluated the severity and preventability if the incidents were events. During the study period, we identified 955 ADEs and 398 medication errors (incidence: 42.0 and 17.5 per 1000 patient-days, respectively). Among ADEs, 1.4 %, 28 %, and 71 % were life-threatening, serious, and significant, respectively. Antipsychotics were associated with half of all ADEs. The incidence of medication errors was higher in medical care units than in acute and nursing care units (40.9, 15.6, and 17.4 per 1000 patient-days, respectively). The monitoring and ordering stages were the most common error stages (39 % and 34 % of all medication errors, respectively), and 76 % of medication errors with ADEs were found at the monitoring stage. Non-psychiatric drugs were three times as likely to cause ADEs with errors compared to psychiatric drugs. Antipsychotic use, inadequate monitoring, and treatment of physical ailments by psychiatrists may contribute to the high incidence of medication errors and ADEs among psychiatric inpatients in Japan. Psychiatrists should be cautious in prescribing antipsychotics or unfamiliar medications for physical problems in their psychiatric patients, and should monitor patients after medication

  19. Medical errors arising from outsourcing laboratory and radiology services.

    PubMed

    Chasin, Brian S; Elliott, Sean P; Klotz, Stephen A

    2007-09-01

    Document errors and the nuisance factor inherent in the informational exchange that occurs with the outsourcing of laboratory and radiology examinations. Three infectious diseases physicians at a tertiary care hospital recorded problems involving data transmitted by telephone or fax from outsource providers for 4 months. This included in- and outpatients, and those in transition from one status to another. Outsourcing laboratory and radiology examinations of insured outpatients is a common practice. Insurance companies determine which healthcare facility performs these tests based on contractual agreements with outsource providers. This leads to confusion and frustration for the doctor and patient alike, and occasionally, to medical error. The exchange of patient data involved in outsourcing is subject to systemic errors that do not allow of easy solution.

  20. Medication errors in hospitals: a literature review of disruptions to nursing practice during medication administration.

    PubMed

    Hayes, Carolyn; Jackson, Debra; Davidson, Patricia M; Power, Tamara

    2015-11-01

    The purpose of this review was to explore what is known about interruptions and distractions on medication administration in the context of undergraduate nurse education. Incidents and errors during the process of medication administration continue to be a substantial patient safety issue in health care settings internationally. Interruptions to the medication administration process have been identified as a leading cause of medication error. Literature recognises that some interruptions are unavoidable; therefore in an effort to reduce errors, it is essential understand how undergraduate nurses learn to manage interruptions to the medication administration process. Systematic, critical literature review. Utilising the electronic databases, of Medline, Scopus, PubMed and CINAHL, and recognised quality assessment guidelines, 19 articles met the inclusion criteria. Search terms included: nurses, medication incidents or errors, interruptions, disruption, distractions and multitasking. Researchers have responded to the impact of interruptions and distractions on the medication administration by attempting to eliminate them. Despite the introduction of quality improvements, little is known about how nurses manage interruptions and distractions during medication administration or how they learn to do so. A significant gap in the literature exists in relation to innovative sustainable strategies that assist undergraduate nurses to learn how to safely and confidently manage interruptions in the clinical environment. Study findings highlight the need for further exploration into the way nurses learn to manage interruptions and distractions during medication administration. This is essential given the critical relationship between interruptions and medication error rates. Better preparing nurses to safely fulfil the task of medication administration in the clinical environment, with increased confidence in the face of interruptions, could lead to a reduction in errors and

  1. Using medical-error reporting to drive patient safety efforts.

    PubMed

    Stow, Joanne

    2006-09-01

    IMPROVING PATIENT SAFETY has become one of the driving forces in health care delivery. Honest, accurate disclosure of medical errors and close calls is crucial to gain a better grasp of problems, make effective changes, and evaluate progress. ALTHOUGH FEAR OF MALPRACTICE litigation remains a major deterrent to medical-error reporting, disclosure allows organizations to benefit from one another's experiences. Accountability necessitates mandatory reporting to external organizations, but a wide variety of reporting systems exist, each with its own advantages and shortcomings. National standardized reporting is a major objective for the patient safety movement. STAFF MEMBER INVESTMENT is a key factor in the safety process and needs to extend beyond the reporting procedure.

  2. Interventions to reduce medication errors in pediatric intensive care.

    PubMed

    Manias, Elizabeth; Kinney, Sharon; Cranswick, Noel; Williams, Allison; Borrott, Narelle

    2014-10-01

    To systematically examine the research literature to identify which interventions reduce medication errors in pediatric intensive care units. Databases were searched from inception to April 2014. Studies were included if they involved the conduct of an intervention with the intent of reducing medication errors. In all, 34 relevant articles were identified. Apart from 1 study, all involved single-arm, before-and-after designs without a comparative, concurrent control group. A total of 6 types of interventions were utilized: computerized physician order entry (CPOE), intravenous systems (ISs), modes of education (MEs), protocols and guidelines (PGs), pharmacist involvement (PI), and support systems for clinical decision making (SSCDs). Statistically significant reductions in medication errors were achieved in 7/8 studies for CPOE, 2/5 studies for ISs, 9/11 studies for MEs, 1/2 studies for PGs, 2/3 studies for PI, and 3/5 studies for SSCDs. The test for subgroup differences showed that there was no statistically significant difference among the 6 subgroups of interventions, χ(2)(5) = 1.88, P = 0.87. The following risk ratio results for meta-analysis were obtained: CPOE: 0.47 (95% CI = 0.28, 0.79); IS: 0.37 (95% CI = 0.19, 0.73); ME: 0.36 (95% CI = 0.22, 0.58); PG: 0.82 (95% CI = 0.21, 3.25); PI: 0.39 (95% CI = 0.10, 1.51), and SSCD: 0.49 (95% CI = 0.23, 1.03). Available evidence suggests some aspects of CPOE with decision support, ME, and IS may help in reducing medication errors. Good quality, prospective, observational studies are needed for institutions to determine the most effective interventions. © The Author(s) 2014.

  3. Development and Validation of the Medication Administration Error Reporting Survey

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-01-01

    failing to comply with a collection of information if it does not display a currently valid OMB control number. 1. REPORT DATE 2005 2. REPORT TYPE N...Safety: From Research to Implementation. Volumes 1-4, AHRQ Publication Nos. 050021 (1-4). February 2005 . Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality...medication administration error rates. Am J Med Qual 1999 Mar–Apr;14(2):73–80. 44. Wakefield B, Blegen M, Uden-Holman T, et al. Organizational

  4. [Ethics and prevention of medicalization].

    PubMed

    Tovar-Bobo, M; Cerecedo-Pérez, M J; Rozadilla-Arias, A

    2013-10-01

    Society has shifted issues of subjective and social reality of the population into the medical field, with the obsession with perfect health becoming a predominant pathogenic factor in the increase in the number of diseases and patients, while the level of health in the population is improving. The power of medicine has made the idea of «medicalising» various aspects of life that can be perceived as medical problems as attractive even when it is not the case. Living entails times of unhappiness and anguish but, should we treat these episodes? We are in the health culture of «everything, here and now». In this article, the ethical implications of unnecessary interventions are analysed, along with the different alternatives that the professionals involved may perform to redirect this situation. It is reflected if we want a world where we all risk wearing labels for this or that disease.

  5. Ethics in the Pediatric Emergency Department: When Mistakes Happen: An Approach to the Process, Evaluation, and Response to Medical Errors.

    PubMed

    Dreisinger, Naomi; Zapolsky, Nathan

    2017-02-01

    The emergency department (ED) is an environment that is conducive to medical errors. The ED is a time-pressured environment where physicians aim to rapidly evaluate and treat patients. Quick thinking and problem-based solutions are often used to assist in evaluation and diagnosis. Error analysis leads to an understanding of the cause of a medical error and is important to prevent future errors. Research suggests mechanisms to prevent medical errors in the pediatric ED, but prevention is not always possible. Transparency about errors is necessary to assure a trusting doctor-patient relationship. Patients want to be informed about all errors, and apologies are hard. Apologizing for a significant medical error that may have caused a complication is even harder. Having a systematic way to go about apologizing makes the process easier, and helps assure that the right information is relayed to the patient and his or her family. This creates an environment of autonomy and shared decision making that is ultimately beneficial to all aspects of patient care.

  6. An organizational approach to understanding patient safety and medical errors.

    PubMed

    Kaissi, Amer

    2006-01-01

    Progress in patient safety, or lack thereof, is a cause for great concern. In this article, we argue that the patient safety movement has failed to reach its goals of eradicating or, at least, significantly reducing errors because of an inappropriate focus on provider and patient-level factors with no real attention to the organizational factors that affect patient safety. We describe an organizational approach to patient safety using different organizational theory perspectives and make several propositions to push patient safety research and practice in a direction that is more likely to improve care processes and outcomes. From a Contingency Theory perspective, we suggest that health care organizations, in general, operate under a misfit between contingencies and structures. This misfit is mainly due to lack of flexibility, cost containment, and lack of regulations, thus explaining the high level of errors committed in these organizations. From an organizational culture perspective, we argue that health care organizations must change their assumptions, beliefs, values, and artifacts to change their culture from a culture of blame to a culture of safety and thus reduce medical errors. From an organizational learning perspective, we discuss how reporting, analyzing, and acting on error information can result in reduced errors in health care organizations.

  7. Usability Validation of Medical Devices: Issues in Identifying Potential Use Errors.

    PubMed

    Schiro, Jessica; Pelayo, Sylvia; Weinhold, Thomas; Del Zotto, Marzia; Marcilly, Romaric

    2017-01-01

    In order to prevent use errors with their medical devices, manufacturers have to integrate a safety-oriented usability engineering process in their product development lifecycle. A critical step of this process is the identification of potential use-errors. Standards and guidelines recommend to triangulate several sources of information e.g. scientific literature, incident reports, manufacturer's files and user's feedbacks. This paper presents lessons learned from applying these recommendations during an international project. We identify issues with (i) searching literature and databases, and (ii) interpreting collected data. Nevertheless triangulation of information sources allows to identify different types of use errors therefore providing valuable lists of potential use errors. Issuing recommendations aim at making easier this critical task.

  8. Benefits and risks of using smart pumps to reduce medication error rates: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Ohashi, Kumiko; Dalleur, Olivia; Dykes, Patricia C; Bates, David W

    2014-12-01

    Smart infusion pumps have been introduced to prevent medication errors and have been widely adopted nationally in the USA, though they are not always used in Europe or other regions. Despite widespread usage of smart pumps, intravenous medication errors have not been fully eliminated. Through a systematic review of recent studies and reports regarding smart pump implementation and use, we aimed to identify the impact of smart pumps on error reduction and on the complex process of medication administration, and strategies to maximize the benefits of smart pumps. The medical literature related to the effects of smart pumps for improving patient safety was searched in PUBMED, EMBASE, and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (2000-2014) and relevant papers were selected by two researchers. After the literature search, 231 papers were identified and the full texts of 138 articles were assessed for eligibility. Of these, 22 were included after removal of papers that did not meet the inclusion criteria. We assessed both the benefits and negative effects of smart pumps from these studies. One of the benefits of using smart pumps was intercepting errors such as the wrong rate, wrong dose, and pump setting errors. Other benefits include reduction of adverse drug event rates, practice improvements, and cost effectiveness. Meanwhile, the current issues or negative effects related to using smart pumps were lower compliance rates of using smart pumps, the overriding of soft alerts, non-intercepted errors, or the possibility of using the wrong drug library. The literature suggests that smart pumps reduce but do not eliminate programming errors. Although the hard limits of a drug library play a main role in intercepting medication errors, soft limits were still not as effective as hard limits because of high override rates. Compliance in using smart pumps is key towards effectively preventing errors. Opportunities for improvement include upgrading drug

  9. Impact of Extended-Duration Shifts on Medical Errors, Adverse Events, and Attentional Failures

    PubMed Central

    Barger, Laura K; Ayas, Najib T; Cade, Brian E; Cronin, John W; Rosner, Bernard; Speizer, Frank E; Czeisler, Charles A

    2006-01-01

    Background A recent randomized controlled trial in critical-care units revealed that the elimination of extended-duration work shifts (≥24 h) reduces the rates of significant medical errors and polysomnographically recorded attentional failures. This raised the concern that the extended-duration shifts commonly worked by interns may contribute to the risk of medical errors being made, and perhaps to the risk of adverse events more generally. Our current study assessed whether extended-duration shifts worked by interns are associated with significant medical errors, adverse events, and attentional failures in a diverse population of interns across the United States. Methods and Findings We conducted a Web-based survey, across the United States, in which 2,737 residents in their first postgraduate year (interns) completed 17,003 monthly reports. The association between the number of extended-duration shifts worked in the month and the reporting of significant medical errors, preventable adverse events, and attentional failures was assessed using a case-crossover analysis in which each intern acted as his/her own control. Compared to months in which no extended-duration shifts were worked, during months in which between one and four extended-duration shifts and five or more extended-duration shifts were worked, the odds ratios of reporting at least one fatigue-related significant medical error were 3.5 (95% confidence interval [CI], 3.3–3.7) and 7.5 (95% CI, 7.2–7.8), respectively. The respective odds ratios for fatigue-related preventable adverse events, 8.7 (95% CI, 3.4–22) and 7.0 (95% CI, 4.3–11), were also increased. Interns working five or more extended-duration shifts per month reported more attentional failures during lectures, rounds, and clinical activities, including surgery and reported 300% more fatigue-related preventable adverse events resulting in a fatality. Conclusions In our survey, extended-duration work shifts were associated with an

  10. Medical errors: Disclosure styles, interpersonal forgiveness, and outcomes.

    PubMed

    Hannawa, Annegret F; Shigemoto, Yuki; Little, Todd D

    2016-05-01

    This study investigates the intrapersonal and interpersonal factors and processes that are associated with patient forgiveness of a provider in the aftermath of a harmful medical error. This study aims to examine what antecedents are most predictive of patient forgiveness and non-forgiveness, and the extent to which social-cognitive factors (i.e., fault attributions, empathy, rumination) influence the forgiveness process. Furthermore, the study evaluates the role of different disclosure styles in two different forgiveness models, and measures their respective causal outcomes. In January 2011, 318 outpatients at Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center in the United States were randomly assigned to three hypothetical error disclosure vignettes that operationalized verbally effective disclosures with different nonverbal disclosure styles (i.e., high nonverbal involvement, low nonverbal involvement, written disclosure vignette without nonverbal information). All patients responded to the same forgiveness-related self-report measures after having been exposed to one of the vignettes. The results favored the proximity model of interpersonal forgiveness, which implies that factors more proximal in time to the act of forgiving (i.e., patient rumination and empathy for the offender) are more predictive of forgiveness and non-forgiveness than less proximal factors (e.g., relationship variables and offense-related factors such as the presence or absence of an apology). Patients' fault attributions had no effect on their forgiveness across conditions. The results evidenced sizeable effects of physician nonverbal involvement-patients in the low nonverbal involvement condition perceived the error as more severe, experienced the physician's apology as less sincere, were more likely to blame the physician, felt less empathy, ruminated more about the error, were less likely to forgive and more likely to avoid the physician, reported less closeness, trust, and satisfaction but higher

  11. National Burden of Preventable Adverse Drug Events Associated with Inpatient Injectable Medications: Healthcare and Medical Professional Liability Costs

    PubMed Central

    Lahue, Betsy J.; Pyenson, Bruce; Iwasaki, Kosuke; Blumen, Helen E.; Forray, Susan; Rothschild, Jeffrey M.

    2012-01-01

    Background Harmful medication errors, or preventable adverse drug events (ADEs), are a prominent quality and cost issue in healthcare. Injectable medications are important therapeutic agents, but they are associated with a greater potential for serious harm than oral medications. The national burden of preventable ADEs associated with inpatient injectable medications and the associated medical professional liability (MPL) costs have not been previously described in the literature. Objective To quantify the economic burden of preventable ADEs related to inpatient injectable medications in the United States. Methods Medical error data (MedMarx 2009–2011) were utilized to derive the distribution of errors by injectable medication types. Hospital data (Premier 2010–2011) identified the numbers and the types of injections per hospitalization. US payer claims (2009–2010 MarketScan Commercial and Medicare 5% Sample) were used to calculate the incremental cost of ADEs by payer and by diagnosis-related group (DRG). The incremental cost of ADEs was defined as inclusive of the time of inpatient admission and the following 4 months. Actuarial calculations, assumptions based on published literature, and DRG proportions from 17 state discharge databases were used to derive the probability of preventable ADEs per hospitalization and their annual costs. MPL costs were assessed from state- and national-level industry reports, premium rates, and from closed claims databases between 1990 and 2011. The 2010 American Hospital Association database was used for hospital-level statistics. All costs were adjusted to 2013 dollars. Results Based on this medication-level analysis of reported harmful errors and the frequency of inpatient administrations with actuarial projections, we estimate that preventable ADEs associated with injectable medications impact 1.2 million hospitalizations annually. Using a matched cohort analysis of healthcare claims as a basis for evaluating incremental

  12. National burden of preventable adverse drug events associated with inpatient injectable medications: healthcare and medical professional liability costs.

    PubMed

    Lahue, Betsy J; Pyenson, Bruce; Iwasaki, Kosuke; Blumen, Helen E; Forray, Susan; Rothschild, Jeffrey M

    2012-11-01

    Harmful medication errors, or preventable adverse drug events (ADEs), are a prominent quality and cost issue in healthcare. Injectable medications are important therapeutic agents, but they are associated with a greater potential for serious harm than oral medications. The national burden of preventable ADEs associated with inpatient injectable medications and the associated medical professional liability (MPL) costs have not been previously described in the literature. To quantify the economic burden of preventable ADEs related to inpatient injectable medications in the United States. Medical error data (MedMarx 2009-2011) were utilized to derive the distribution of errors by injectable medication types. Hospital data (Premier 2010-2011) identified the numbers and the types of injections per hospitalization. US payer claims (2009-2010 MarketScan Commercial and Medicare 5% Sample) were used to calculate the incremental cost of ADEs by payer and by diagnosis-related group (DRG). The incremental cost of ADEs was defined as inclusive of the time of inpatient admission and the following 4 months. Actuarial calculations, assumptions based on published literature, and DRG proportions from 17 state discharge databases were used to derive the probability of preventable ADEs per hospitalization and their annual costs. MPL costs were assessed from state- and national-level industry reports, premium rates, and from closed claims databases between 1990 and 2011. The 2010 American Hospital Association database was used for hospital-level statistics. All costs were adjusted to 2013 dollars. Based on this medication-level analysis of reported harmful errors and the frequency of inpatient administrations with actuarial projections, we estimate that preventable ADEs associated with injectable medications impact 1.2 million hospitalizations annually. Using a matched cohort analysis of healthcare claims as a basis for evaluating incremental costs, we estimate that inpatient

  13. A study of medication errors in a tertiary care hospital

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Nrupal; Desai, Mira; Shah, Samdih; Patel, Prakruti; Gandhi, Anuradha

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To determine the nature and types of medication errors (MEs), to evaluate occurrence of drug-drug interactions (DDIs), and assess rationality of prescription orders in a tertiary care teaching hospital. Materials and Methods: A prospective, observational study was conducted in General Medicine and Pediatric ward of Civil Hospital, Ahmedabad during October 2012 to January 2014. MEs were categorized as prescription error, dispensing error, and administration error (AE). The case records and treatment charts were reviewed. The investigator also accompanied the staff nurse during the ward rounds and interviewed patients or care taker to gather information, if necessary. DDIs were assessed by Medscape Drug Interaction Checker software (version 4.4). Rationality of prescriptions was assessed using Phadke's criteria. Results: A total of 1109 patients (511 in Medicine and 598 in Pediatric ward) were included during the study period. Total number of MEs was 403 (36%) of which, 195 (38%) were in Medicine and 208 (35%) were in Pediatric wards. The most common ME was PEs 262 (65%) followed by AEs 126 (31%). A potential significant DDIs were observed in 191 (17%) and serious DDIs in 48 (4%) prescriptions. Majority of prescriptions were semirational 555 (53%) followed by irrational 317 (30%), while 170 (17%) prescriptions were rational. Conclusion: There is a need to establish ME reporting system to reduce its incidence and improve patient care and safety. PMID:27843792

  14. Corpus-based error detection in a multilingual medical thesaurus.

    PubMed

    Andrade, Roosewelt L; Pacheco, Edson; Cancian, Pindaro S; Nohama, Percy; Schulz, Stefan

    2007-01-01

    Cross-language document retrieval systems require support by some kind of multilingual thesaurus for semantically indexing documents in different languages. The peculiarities of the medical sublanguage, together with the subjectivism of lexicographers' choices, complicates the thesaurus construction process. It furthermore requires a high degree of communication and interaction between the lexicographers involved. In order to detect errors, a systematic procedure is therefore necessary. We here describe a method which supports the maintenance of the multilingual medical subword repository of the MorphoSaurus system which assigns language-independent semantic identifiers to medical texts. Based on the assumption that the distribution of these semantic identifiers should be similar whenever comparing closely related texts in different languages, our approach identifies those semantic identifiers that vary most in distribution comparing language pairs. The revision of these identifiers and the lexical items related to them revealed multiple errors which were subsequently classified and fixed by the lexicographers. The overall quality improvement of the thesaurus was finally measured using the OHSUMED IR benchmark, resulting in a significant improvement of the retrieval quality for one of the languages tested.

  15. The epidemiology and type of medication errors reported to the National Poisons Information Centre of Ireland.

    PubMed

    Cassidy, Nicola; Duggan, Edel; Williams, David J P; Tracey, Joseph A

    2011-07-01

    Medication errors are widely reported for hospitalised patients, but limited data are available for medication errors that occur in community-based and clinical settings. Epidemiological data from poisons information centres enable characterisation of trends in medication errors occurring across the healthcare spectrum. The objective of this study was to characterise the epidemiology and type of medication errors reported to the National Poisons Information Centre (NPIC) of Ireland. A 3-year prospective study on medication errors reported to the NPIC was conducted from 1 January 2007 to 31 December 2009 inclusive. Data on patient demographics, enquiry source, location, pharmaceutical agent(s), type of medication error, and treatment advice were collated from standardised call report forms. Medication errors were categorised as (i) prescribing error (i.e. physician error), (ii) dispensing error (i.e. pharmacy error), and (iii) administration error involving the wrong medication, the wrong dose, wrong route, or the wrong time. Medication errors were reported for 2348 individuals, representing 9.56% of total enquiries to the NPIC over 3 years. In total, 1220 children and adolescents under 18 years of age and 1128 adults (≥ 18 years old) experienced a medication error. The majority of enquiries were received from healthcare professionals, but members of the public accounted for 31.3% (n = 736) of enquiries. Most medication errors occurred in a domestic setting (n = 2135), but a small number occurred in healthcare facilities: nursing homes (n = 110, 4.68%), hospitals (n = 53, 2.26%), and general practitioner surgeries (n = 32, 1.36%). In children, medication errors with non-prescription pharmaceuticals predominated (n = 722) and anti-pyretics and non-opioid analgesics, anti-bacterials, and cough and cold preparations were the main pharmaceutical classes involved. Medication errors with prescription medication predominated for adults (n = 866) and the major medication

  16. Systematic evaluation of errors occurring during the preparation of intravenous medication

    PubMed Central

    Parshuram, Christopher S.; To, Teresa; Seto, Winnie; Trope, Angela; Koren, Gideon; Laupacis, Andreas

    2008-01-01

    Introduction Errors in the concentration of intravenous medications are not uncommon. We evaluated steps in the infusion-preparation process to identify factors associated with preventable medication errors. Methods We included 118 health care professionals who would be involved in the preparation of intravenous medication infusions as part of their regular clinical activities. Participants performed 5 infusion-preparation tasks (drug-volume calculation, rounding, volume measurement, dose-volume calculation, mixing) and prepared 4 morphine infusions to specified concentrations. The primary outcome was the occurrence of error (deviation of > 5% for volume measurement and > 10% for other measures). The secondary outcome was the magnitude of error. Results Participants performed 1180 drug-volume calculations, 1180 rounding calculations and made 1767 syringe-volume measurements, and they prepared 464 morphine infusions. We detected errors in 58 (4.9%, 95% confidence interval [CI] 3.7% to 6.2%) drug-volume calculations, 30 (2.5%, 95% CI 1.6% to 3.4%) rounding calculations and 29 (1.6%, 95% CI 1.1% to 2.2%) volume measurements. We found 7 errors (1.6%, 95% CI 0.4% to 2.7%) in drug mixing. Of the 464 infusion preparations, 161 (34.7%, 95% CI 30.4% to 39%) contained concentration errors. Calculator use was associated with fewer errors in dose-volume calculations (4% v. 10%, p = 0.001). Four factors were positively associated with the occurence of a concentration error: fewer infusions prepared in the previous week (p = 0.007), increased number of years of professional experience (p = 0.01), the use of the more concentrated stock solution (p < 0.001) and the preparation of smaller dose volumes (p < 0.001). Larger magnitude errors were associated with fewer hours of sleep in the previous 24 hours (p = 0.02), the use of more concentrated solutions (p < 0.001) and preparation of smaller infusion doses (p < 0.001). Interpretation Our data suggest that the reduction of provider

  17. A comparison of medication administration errors from original medication packaging and multi-compartment compliance aids in care homes: A prospective observational study.

    PubMed

    Gilmartin-Thomas, Julia Fiona-Maree; Smith, Felicity; Wolfe, Rory; Jani, Yogini

    2017-07-01

    and multi-compartment compliance aids within care homes that used a combination of both medication administration systems (RR=4.3, 95%CI 2.7 to 6.8, p<0.001). A significant difference in error rate was not observed between use of a single or combination medication administration system (p=0.44). The significant difference in, and high overall, medication administration error rate between original medication packaging and multi-compartment compliance aids supports the use of the latter in care homes, as well as local investigation of tablet and capsule impact on medication administration errors and staff training to prevent errors occurring. As a significant difference in error rate was not observed between use of a single or combination medication administration system, common practice of using both multi-compartment compliance aids (for most medications) and original packaging (for medications with stability issues) is supported. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Systems factors in the reporting of serious medication errors in hospitals.

    PubMed

    Crawford, Stephanie Y; Cohen, Michael R; Tafesse, Eskinder

    2003-12-01

    Underreporting of medication errors poses a threat to quality improvement initiatives. Hospital risk management programs encourage medication error reporting for effective management of systems failures. This study involved a survey of 156 medical-surgical hospitals in the United States to evaluate systems factors associated with the reporting of serious medication errors. Prior to controlling for bed size, a multivariate logistic regression model showed increased reporting of medication errors in hospitals with 24-h pharmacy services, presumably because of better error reporting systems. When number of occupied beds was included, the final model demonstrated bed size to be the only statistically significant factor. Increased reporting rates for serious medication errors warrant further evaluation, but higher error reporting may paradoxically indicate improved error surveillance. Results suggest that increased availability of pharmacist services results in opportunities for more diligent systematic efforts in detecting and reporting medication errors, which should lead to improved patient safety.

  19. Medication errors: an analysis comparing PHICO's closed claims data and PHICO's Event Reporting Trending System (PERTS).

    PubMed

    Benjamin, David M; Pendrak, Robert F

    2003-07-01

    Clinical pharmacologists are all dedicated to improving the use of medications and decreasing medication errors and adverse drug reactions. However, quality improvement requires that some significant parameters of quality be categorized, measured, and tracked to provide benchmarks to which future data (performance) can be compared. One of the best ways to accumulate data on medication errors and adverse drug reactions is to look at medical malpractice data compiled by the insurance industry. Using data from PHICO insurance company, PHICO's Closed Claims Data, and PHICO's Event Reporting Trending System (PERTS), this article examines the significance and trends of the claims and events reported between 1996 and 1998. Those who misread history are doomed to repeat the mistakes of the past. From a quality improvement perspective, the categorization of the claims and events is useful for reengineering integrated medication delivery, particularly in a hospital setting, and for redesigning drug administration protocols on low therapeutic index medications and "high-risk" drugs. Demonstrable evidence of quality improvement is being required by state laws and by accreditation agencies. The state of Florida requires that quality improvement data be posted quarterly on the Web sites of the health care facilities. Other states have followed suit. The insurance industry is concerned with costs, and medication errors cost money. Even excluding costs of litigation, an adverse drug reaction may cost up to $2500 in hospital resources, and a preventable medication error may cost almost $4700. To monitor costs and assess risk, insurance companies want to know what errors are made and where the system has broken down, permitting the error to occur. Recording and evaluating reliable data on adverse drug events is the first step in improving the quality of pharmacotherapy and increasing patient safety. Cost savings and quality improvement evolve on parallel paths. The PHICO data

  20. Reducing Medication Administration Errors in Acute and Critical Care: Multifaceted Pilot Program Targeting RN Awareness and Behaviors.

    PubMed

    Durham, Marianne L; Suhayda, Rosemarie; Normand, Patricia; Jankiewicz, Ann; Fogg, Louis

    2016-02-01

    The aim of this medication safety pilot program was to increase RN sensitivity to potential error risk, improve behaviors, and reduce observed medication administration errors (MAEs). MAEs are common and preventable and may lead to adverse drug events, costing the patient and organization. MAEs are low visibility, rarely intercepted, and underreported. An interprofessional team used process improvement methodology to develop a human factors-based medication safety pilot program to address identified issues. An observational time-series design study monitored the effect of the program. After the program, error interception practices during administration increased, and some nurses reported using a mindfulness strategy to gain situational awareness before administration. Process behaviors were performed more consistently, and the risk of MAE decreased. Familiarity and complexity were identified as additional variables affecting MAE outcome. Strategies to support safe medication administration may reduce error and be of interest to nurse leaders.

  1. Clinical relevance of and risk factors associated with medication administration time errors.

    PubMed

    Teunissen, Rick; Bos, Jacqueline; Pot, Hans; Pluim, Marien; Kramers, Cornelis

    2013-06-15

    The clinical relevance of and risk factors associated with errors related to medication administration time were studied. In this explorative study, 66 medication administration rounds were studied on two wards (surgery and neurology) of a hospital. Data on medication errors were collected using the blister collection method. The emptied packaging material of medication was collected after each round and compared with each patient's medication orders. Administration time errors were defined as medication administration (actual intake) occurring more than one hour before or after the prescribed time. Generalized estimating equations analysis was performed to study the correlation between medication administration errors and risk factors. Data from 129 patients were included in the study. Among these 129 patients, 2874 opportunities for error were recorded. The majority of opportunities for error occurred during the 7 a.m. round. Within the 2874 opportunities for errors, 10 administration time errors occurred for medications that might interact with food or another medication. Time of administration (noon and 3 p.m.), route of administration (injection or infusion), and frequency of administration (if necessary) had significant protective effects against the occurrence of administration time errors. The rectal route of administration was associated with a significant increase in the frequency of administration time errors compared with the oral route. A clinically relevant administration time error occurred in 2 cases (0.07%). Analysis of medication administration rounds found time errors to be the most common medication error.

  2. Impact of Interruptions, Distractions, and Cognitive Load on Procedure Failures and Medication Administration Errors.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Lily; Donohue-Porter, Patricia; Stein Fishbein, Joanna

    Medication administration errors are difficult to intercept since they occur at the end of the process. The study describes interruptions, distractions, and cognitive load experienced by registered nurses during medication administration and explores their impact on procedure failures and medication administration errors. The focus of this study was unique as it investigated how known individual and environmental factors interacted and culminated in errors.

  3. Medication errors room: a simulation to assess the medical, nursing and pharmacy staffs' ability to identify errors related to the medication-use system.

    PubMed

    Daupin, Johanne; Atkinson, Suzanne; Bédard, Pascal; Pelchat, Véronique; Lebel, Denis; Bussières, Jean-François

    2016-12-01

    The medication-use system in hospitals is very complex. To improve the health professionals' awareness of the risks of errors related to the medication-use system, a simulation of medication errors was created. The main objective was to assess the medical, nursing and pharmacy staffs' ability to identify errors related to the medication-use system using a simulation. The secondary objective was to assess their level of satisfaction. This descriptive cross-sectional study was conducted in a 500-bed mother-and-child university hospital. A multidisciplinary group set up 30 situations and replicated a patient room and a care unit pharmacy. All hospital staff, including nurses, physicians, pharmacists and pharmacy technicians, was invited. Participants had to detect if a situation contained an error and fill out a response grid. They also answered a satisfaction survey. The simulation was held during 100 hours. A total of 230 professionals visited the simulation, 207 handed in a response grid and 136 answered the satisfaction survey. The participants' overall rate of correct answers was 67.5% ± 13.3% (4073/6036). Among the least detected errors were situations involving a Y-site infusion incompatibility, an oral syringe preparation and the patient's identification. Participants mainly considered the simulation as effective in identifying incorrect practices (132/136, 97.8%) and relevant to their practice (129/136, 95.6%). Most of them (114/136; 84.4%) intended to change their practices in view of their exposure to the simulation. We implemented a realistic medication-use system errors simulation in a mother-child hospital, with a wide audience. This simulation was an effective, relevant and innovative tool to raise the health care professionals' awareness of critical processes. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  4. Medication review and transitions of care: a case report of a decade-old medication error.

    PubMed

    Comer, Rachel; Lizer, Mitsi

    2015-03-01

    A 69-year-old Caucasian male with a 25-year history of paranoid schizophrenia was brought to the emergency department because of violence toward the staff in his nursing facility. He was diagnosed with a urinary tract infection and was admitted to the behavioral health unit for medication stabilization. History included a five-year state psychiatric hospital admission and nursing facility placement. Because of poor cognitive function, the patient was unable to corroborate medication history, so the pharmacy student on rotation performed an in-depth chart review. The review revealed a transcription error in 2003 deleting amantadine 100 mg twice daily and adding amiodarone 100 mg twice daily. Subsequent hospitalization resulted in another transcription error increasing the amiodarone to 200 mg twice daily. All electrocardiograms conducted were negative for atrial fibrillation. Once detected, the consulted cardiologist discontinued the amiodarone, and the primary care provider was notified via letter and discharge papers. An admission four months later revealed that the nursing facility restarted the amiodarone. Amiodarone was discontinued and the facility was again notified. This case reviews how a 10-year-old medication error went undetected in the electronic medical records through numerous medication reconciliations, but was uncovered when a single comprehensive medication review was conducted.

  5. Effect of bar-code-assisted medication administration on medication administration errors and accuracy in multiple patient care areas.

    PubMed

    Helmons, Pieter J; Wargel, Lindsay N; Daniels, Charles E

    2009-07-01

    The effect of a commercially available bar-code-assisted medication administration (BCMA) technology on six indicators of medication administration accuracy and nine types of medication administration errors in distinct patient care areas were studied. This prospective, before-and-after, observational study was conducted in two medical-surgical units, one medical intensive care unit (ICU), and one surgical ICU of a 386-bed academic teaching hospital. Nursing staff were observed administering medications one month before and three months after implementation of BCMA technology. Observations were conducted by two pharmacists and four pharmacy students on weekdays and weekends. Medication administration accuracy was measured using the accuracy indicator of the California Nursing Outcomes Coalition. The majority of medication administrations occurred during the 9 a.m. medication round. After BCMA implementation in the medical-surgical units, improved adherence to patient identification policies was observed, but more distractions of the nursing staff occurred and the medications administered were less frequently explained to the patient. Although an increase in wrong-time errors was observed in the medical-surgical units, the total number of medication errors did not change. When wrong-time errors were excluded, the rate of medication errors decreased by 58%. In the ICUs, the charting of medication administration improved after BCMA implementation, but total medication errors and wrong-time errors did not change. Implementing BCMA technology decreased medication administration errors in medical-surgical units but not in ICUs when time errors were excluded. BCMA technology affected different types of medication administration errors in different patient care areas.

  6. Preventing Errors in Clinical Practice: A Call for Self-Awareness

    PubMed Central

    Borrell-Carrió, Francesc; Epstein, Ronald M.

    2004-01-01

    While ascribing medical errors primarily to systems factors can free clinicians from individual blame, there are elements of medical errors that can and should be attributed to individual factors. These factors are related less commonly to lack of knowledge and skill than to the inability to apply the clinician’s abilities to situations under certain circumstances. In concert with efforts to improve health care systems, refining physicians’ emotional and cognitive capacities might also prevent many errors. In general, physicians have the sensation of making a mistake because of the interference of emotional elements. We propose a so-called rational-emotive model that emphasizes 2 factors in error causation: (1) difficulty in reframing the first hypothesis that goes to the physician’s mind in an automatic way, and (2) premature closure of the clinical act to avoid confronting inconsistencies, low-level decision rules, and emotions. We propose a teaching strategy based on developing the physician’s insight and self-awareness to detect the inappropriate use of low-level decision rules, as well as detecting the factors that limit a physician’s capacity to tolerate the tension of uncertainty and ambiguity. Emotional self-awareness and self-regulation of attention can be consciously cultivated as habits to help physicians function better in clinical situations. PMID:15335129

  7. Prevalence and cost of hospital medical errors in the general and elderly United States populations.

    PubMed

    Mallow, Peter J; Pandya, Bhavik; Horblyuk, Ruslan; Kaplan, Harold S

    2013-12-01

    The primary objective of this study was to quantify the differences in the prevalence rate and costs of hospital medical errors between the general population and an elderly population aged ≥65 years. Methods from an actuarial study of medical errors were modified to identify medical errors in the Premier Hospital Database using data from 2009. Visits with more than four medical errors were removed from the population to avoid over-estimation of cost. Prevalence rates were calculated based on the total number of inpatient visits. There were 3,466,596 total inpatient visits in 2009. Of these, 1,230,836 (36%) occurred in people aged ≥ 65. The prevalence rate was 49 medical errors per 1000 inpatient visits in the general cohort and 79 medical errors per 1000 inpatient visits for the elderly cohort. The top 10 medical errors accounted for more than 80% of the total in the general cohort and the 65+ cohort. The most costly medical error for the general population was postoperative infection ($569,287,000). Pressure ulcers were most costly ($347,166,257) in the elderly population. This study was conducted with a hospital administrative database, and assumptions were necessary to identify medical errors in the database. Further, there was no method to identify errors of omission or misdiagnoses within the database. This study indicates that prevalence of hospital medical errors for the elderly is greater than the general population and the associated cost of medical errors in the elderly population is quite substantial. Hospitals which further focus their attention on medical errors in the elderly population may see a significant reduction in costs due to medical errors as a disproportionate percentage of medical errors occur in this age group.

  8. Can teaching medical students to investigate medication errors change their attitudes towards patient safety?

    PubMed

    Dudas, Robert A; Bundy, David G; Miller, Marlene R; Barone, Michael

    2011-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the impact of a patient-safety curriculum administered during a paediatric clerkship on medical students' attitudes towards patient safety. Medical students viewed an online video introducing them to systems-based analyses of medical errors. Faculty presented an example of a medication administration error and demonstrated use of the Learning From Defects tool to investigate the defect. Student groups identified and then analysed medication errors during their clinical rotation using the Learning From Defects framework to organise and present their findings. Outcomes included patient safety attitudinal changes, as measured by questions derived from the Safety Attitudes Questionnaire. 108 students completed the curriculum between July 2008 and July 2009. All student groups (25 total) identified, analysed and presented patient safety concerns. Curriculum effectiveness was demonstrated by significant changes on questionnaire items related to patient safety attitudes. The majority of students felt that the curriculum was relevant to their clinical rotation and should remain part of the clerkship. An active learning curriculum integrated into a clinical clerkship can change learners' attitudes towards patient safety. Students found the curriculum relevant and recommended its continuation.

  9. Voluntary Electronic Reporting of Medical Errors and Adverse Events

    PubMed Central

    Milch, Catherine E; Salem, Deeb N; Pauker, Stephen G; Lundquist, Thomas G; Kumar, Sanjaya; Chen, Jack

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To describe the rate and types of events reported in acute care hospitals using an electronic error reporting system (e-ERS). DESIGN Descriptive study of reported events using the same e-ERS between January 1, 2001 and September 30, 2003. SETTING Twenty-six acute care nonfederal hospitals throughout the U.S. that voluntarily implemented a web-based e-ERS for at least 3 months. PARTICIPANTS Hospital employees and staff. INTERVENTION A secure, standardized, commercially available web-based reporting system. RESULTS Median duration of e-ERS use was 21 months (range 3 to 33 months). A total of 92,547 reports were obtained during 2,547,154 patient-days. Reporting rates varied widely across hospitals (9 to 95 reports per 1,000 inpatient-days; median=35). Registered nurses provided nearly half of the reports; physicians contributed less than 2%. Thirty-four percent of reports were classified as nonmedication-related clinical events, 33% as medication/infusion related, 13% were falls, 13% as administrative, and 6% other. Among 80% of reports that identified level of impact, 53% were events that reached a patient (“patient events”), 13% were near misses that did not reach the patient, and 14% were hospital environment problems. Among 49,341 patient events, 67% caused no harm, 32% temporary harm, 0.8% life threatening or permanent harm, and 0.4% contributed to patient deaths. CONCLUSIONS An e-ERS provides an accessible venue for reporting medical errors, adverse events, and near misses. The wide variation in reporting rates among hospitals, and very low reporting rates by physicians, requires investigation. PMID:16390502

  10. Prevention of wrong-site and wrong-patient surgical errors.

    PubMed

    2013-01-01

    Surgical errors recorded between 2002 and 2008 in a US medical liability insurance database have been analysed. Twenty-five wrong-patient procedures were recorded, resulting in 5 serious adverse events: three unnecessary prostatectomies were performed after prostate biopsy samples were mislabelled; vitrectomy was performed on the wrong patient in an ophthalmology department after confusion between two patients with identical names; and a child scheduled for adenoidectomy received a tympanic drain. There were also 107 wrong-site procedures, with one death resulting from implantation of a pleural drain on the wrong side. Another 38 patients experienced significant harm: 5 patients had surgery on the wrong vertebrae; 4 had chest tubes placed on the wrong side; 4 underwent vascular surgery at the wrong site; and 4 underwent resection of the wrong segment of the intestine. In addition, there were: 4 organ resection errors; 6 wrong-site or wrong-sided limb surgeries; 2 wrong-sided ovariectomies; 2 wrong-sided eye operations; 2 wrong-sided craniotomies; 2 wrong-sided ureteric procedures; 1 wrong-sided maxillofacial operation; and 2 radiation therapy field errors. Most errors were due to poor communication, incorrect diagnosis, or failure to implement a final set of preoperative checks. Other studies conducted in the United Kingdom and the United States have provided similar results, while data are lacking in France. The World Health Organization Surgical Safety Checklist is an effective way of preventing such errors but its adoption by healthcare professionals is variable. In practice, surgical errors involving the wrong patient or wrong body site are preventable. Final pre-operative checks must be applied methodically and systematically.This includes asking the patient to confirm his/her identity and the intended site of the operation. Healthcare staff must be aware of these measures.

  11. Medication errors in the Middle East countries: a systematic review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Alsulami, Zayed; Conroy, Sharon; Choonara, Imti

    2013-04-01

    Medication errors are a significant global concern and can cause serious medical consequences for patients. Little is known about medication errors in Middle Eastern countries. The objectives of this systematic review were to review studies of the incidence and types of medication errors in Middle Eastern countries and to identify the main contributory factors involved. A systematic review of the literature related to medication errors in Middle Eastern countries was conducted in October 2011 using the following databases: Embase, Medline, Pubmed, the British Nursing Index and the Cumulative Index to Nursing & Allied Health Literature. The search strategy included all ages and languages. Inclusion criteria were that the studies assessed or discussed the incidence of medication errors and contributory factors to medication errors during the medication treatment process in adults or in children. Forty-five studies from 10 of the 15 Middle Eastern countries met the inclusion criteria. Nine (20 %) studies focused on medication errors in paediatric patients. Twenty-one focused on prescribing errors, 11 measured administration errors, 12 were interventional studies and one assessed transcribing errors. Dispensing and documentation errors were inadequately evaluated. Error rates varied from 7.1 % to 90.5 % for prescribing and from 9.4 % to 80 % for administration. The most common types of prescribing errors reported were incorrect dose (with an incidence rate from 0.15 % to 34.8 % of prescriptions), wrong frequency and wrong strength. Computerised physician rder entry and clinical pharmacist input were the main interventions evaluated. Poor knowledge of medicines was identified as a contributory factor for errors by both doctors (prescribers) and nurses (when administering drugs). Most studies did not assess the clinical severity of the medication errors. Studies related to medication errors in the Middle Eastern countries were relatively few in number and of poor quality

  12. Linking nurse characteristics, team member effectiveness, practice environment, and medication error incidence.

    PubMed

    Fasolino, Tracy; Snyder, Rita

    2012-01-01

    Clinical unit nurse characteristics, practice environment, and team member effectiveness are assumed to play a critical role in medication safety. This study used a multimethod approach to examine the association of these factors with medication errors. Findings suggested that older, more experienced registered nurses made less medication errors. Environment and team member effectiveness were not strongly associated with medication error incidence. Numerous system factors limited implementation and outcomes of this safety study and are discussed.

  13. Bullying among nursing staff: relationship with psychological/behavioral responses of nurses and medical errors.

    PubMed

    Wright, Whitney; Khatri, Naresh

    2015-01-01

    that bullying behaviors exist and affect psychological/behavioral responses of nurses such as stress and anxiety and medical errors. Health care organizations should identify bullying behaviors and implement bullying prevention strategies to reduce those behaviors and the adverse effects that they may have on psychological/behavioral responses of nurses and medical errors.

  14. Barriers to nurses' reporting of medication administration errors in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Chiang, Hui-Ying; Pepper, Ginette A

    2006-01-01

    To describe nurses' perceptions of reporting barriers to reporting medication administration errors (MAE) and to examine the relationship between the barriers to MAE reporting and cultural factors and nursing work environment in Taiwan. A cross-sectional, descriptive correlational design with self-administered questionnaires was conducted in one large medical center hospital in southern Taiwan. The measurement tools included the Chinese versions of the Work Environment Questionnaire, Barriers to MAE Reporting, Index of Hierarchy of Authority, and Face-Concern scale. A mail survey of 807 nurses using the Total Design Method was implemented for data collection with 597 questionnaires used in data analyses. The major perceived barrier was fear. Regression analysis showed that power hierarchy, face-saving concern, and work environment factors (e.g., quality management and peer relations) accounted for 54.6% variance in the barriers. Age, educational background, working experience, experience of having made MAEs, and failure to report MAEs were not associated with the barriers. Taiwanese nurses perceived similar barriers to MAE reporting. The more power hierarchy and face-saving concern the nurses agreed on, the more barriers they perceived. The association between the barriers and nursing work environment was negative and weak.

  15. Low cost RFID real lightweight binding proof protocol for medication errors and patient safety.

    PubMed

    Yu, Yao-Chang; Hou, Ting-Wei; Chiang, Tzu-Chiang

    2012-04-01

    An Institute of Medicine Report stated there are 98,000 people annually who die due to medication related errors in the United States, and hospitals and other medical institutions are thus being pressed to use technologies to reduce such errors. One approach is to provide a suitable protocol that can cooperate with low cost RFID tags in order to identify patients. However, existing low cost RFID tags lack computational power and it is almost impossible to equip them with security functions, such as keyed hash function. To address this issue, a so a real lightweight binding proof protocol is proposed in this paper. The proposed protocol uses only logic gates (e.g. AND, XOR, ADD) to achieve the goal of proving that two tags exist in the field simultaneously, without the need for any complicated security algorithms. In addition, various scenarios are provider to explain the process of adopting this binding proof protocol with regard to guarding patient safety and preventing medication errors.

  16. Nursing students' medication errors and their opinions on the reasons of errors: A cross-sectional survey.

    PubMed

    Cebeci, Fatma; Karazeybek, Ebru; Sucu, Gulten; Kahveci, Rabia

    2015-05-01

    To determine number and type of medication administration errors made by nursing students, and to explore the rate of reportings, emotions after the errors and the causes of errors. The cross-sectional study was conducted at the two schools of nursing, Akdeniz University, Antalya, Turkey, in February 2009, and comprised students having worked in hospital settings for a minimum of one semester and who had been involved in administering medications. SPSS 13 was used for statistical analysis. Of the 324 subjects in the study, 124(38.3%) had made an error in clinical/field applications. Overall, 402 medication administration errors had been reported of which 155 (38.6%) were detected and corrected by academic nurses. The most common error reported was deviation from aseptic technique in 96(23.8%) cases. Most common emotions resulting from errors were fear in 45(28.8%) and anxiety in 37(23.5%). Most common cause was performance deficit in 141(43.4%) cases and the most common contributing factor was workload declared by 179(55.2%). The error rate among nursing students was high whereas reporting of errors was low.

  17. Medical Error Disclosure and Patient Safety: Legal Aspects

    PubMed Central

    Guillod, Olivier

    2013-01-01

    Reducing the number of preventable adverse events has become a public health issue. The paper discusses in which ways the law can contribute to that goal, especially by encouraging a culture of safety among healthcare professionals. It assesses the need or the usefulness to pass so-called disclosure laws and apology laws, to adopt mandatory but strictly confidential Critical Incidents Reporting Systems in hospitals, to change the fault-based system of medical liability or to amend the rules on criminal liability. The paper eventually calls for adding the law to the present agenda of patient safety. Significance for public health The extent of preventable adverse events and the correlative need to improve patient safety are recognized today as a public health issue. In order to lower the toll associated with preventable adverse events, the former culture of professionalism (based on the premise that a good physician doesn’t make mistakes) must be replaced by a culture of safety, which requires a multi-pronged approach that includes all the main stakeholders within the healthcare system. A number of legal reforms could help in prompting such a change. This contribution stresses the need to include legal aspects when trying to find appropriate responses to public health issues. PMID:25170502

  18. Identifying, understanding and overcoming barriers to medication error reporting in hospitals: a focus group study.

    PubMed

    Hartnell, Nicole; MacKinnon, Neil; Sketris, Ingrid; Fleming, Mark

    2012-05-01

    The under-reporting of medication errors can compromise patient safety. A qualitative study was conducted to enhance the understanding of barriers to medication error reporting in healthcare organisations. Focus groups (with physicians, pharmacists and nurses) and in-depth interviews (with risk managers) were used to identify medication error reporting beliefs and practices at four community hospitals in Nova Scotia, Canada. Audio tapes were transcribed verbatim and analysed for thematic content using the template style of analysis. The development and analysis of this study were guided by Safety Culture Theory. Incentives for medication error reporting were thematised into three categories: patient protection, provider protection and professional compliance. Barriers to medication error reporting were thematised into five categories: reporter burden, professional identity, information gap, organisational factors and fear. Facilitators to encourage medication error reporting were classified into three categories: reducing reporter burden, closing the communication gap and educating for success. Participants indicated they would report medication errors more frequently if reporting were made easier, if they were adequately educated about reporting, and if they received timely feedback. Study results may lead to a better understanding of the barriers to medication error reporting, why these barriers exist and what can be done to successfully overcome them. These results could be used by hospitals to encourage reporting of medication errors and ultimately make organisational changes leading to a reduction in the incidence of medication errors and an improvement in patient safety.

  19. Near field communications technology and the potential to reduce medication errors through multidisciplinary application

    PubMed Central

    Pegler, Joe; Lehane, Elaine; Livingstone, Vicki; McCarthy, Nora; Sahm, Laura J.; Tabirca, Sabin; O’Driscoll, Aoife; Corrigan, Mark

    2016-01-01

    Background Patient safety requires optimal management of medications. Electronic systems are encouraged to reduce medication errors. Near field communications (NFC) is an emerging technology that may be used to develop novel medication management systems. Methods An NFC-based system was designed to facilitate prescribing, administration and review of medications commonly used on surgical wards. Final year medical, nursing, and pharmacy students were recruited to test the electronic system in a cross-over observational setting on a simulated ward. Medication errors were compared against errors recorded using a paper-based system. Results A significant difference in the commission of medication errors was seen when NFC and paper-based medication systems were compared. Paper use resulted in a mean of 4.09 errors per prescribing round while NFC prescribing resulted in a mean of 0.22 errors per simulated prescribing round (P=0.000). Likewise, medication administration errors were reduced from a mean of 2.30 per drug round with a Paper system to a mean of 0.80 errors per round using NFC (P<0.015). A mean satisfaction score of 2.30 was reported by users, (rated on seven-point scale with 1 denoting total satisfaction with system use and 7 denoting total dissatisfaction). Conclusions An NFC based medication system may be used to effectively reduce medication errors in a simulated ward environment. PMID:28293602

  20. Near field communications technology and the potential to reduce medication errors through multidisciplinary application.

    PubMed

    O'Connell, Emer; Pegler, Joe; Lehane, Elaine; Livingstone, Vicki; McCarthy, Nora; Sahm, Laura J; Tabirca, Sabin; O'Driscoll, Aoife; Corrigan, Mark

    2016-01-01

    Patient safety requires optimal management of medications. Electronic systems are encouraged to reduce medication errors. Near field communications (NFC) is an emerging technology that may be used to develop novel medication management systems. An NFC-based system was designed to facilitate prescribing, administration and review of medications commonly used on surgical wards. Final year medical, nursing, and pharmacy students were recruited to test the electronic system in a cross-over observational setting on a simulated ward. Medication errors were compared against errors recorded using a paper-based system. A significant difference in the commission of medication errors was seen when NFC and paper-based medication systems were compared. Paper use resulted in a mean of 4.09 errors per prescribing round while NFC prescribing resulted in a mean of 0.22 errors per simulated prescribing round (P=0.000). Likewise, medication administration errors were reduced from a mean of 2.30 per drug round with a Paper system to a mean of 0.80 errors per round using NFC (P<0.015). A mean satisfaction score of 2.30 was reported by users, (rated on seven-point scale with 1 denoting total satisfaction with system use and 7 denoting total dissatisfaction). An NFC based medication system may be used to effectively reduce medication errors in a simulated ward environment.

  1. A prospective, multicenter study of pharmacist activities resulting in medication error interception in the emergency department.

    PubMed

    Patanwala, Asad E; Sanders, Arthur B; Thomas, Michael C; Acquisto, Nicole M; Weant, Kyle A; Baker, Stephanie N; Merritt, Erica M; Erstad, Brian L

    2012-05-01

    The primary objective of this study is to determine the activities of pharmacists that lead to medication error interception in the emergency department (ED). This was a prospective, multicenter cohort study conducted in 4 geographically diverse academic and community EDs in the United States. Each site had clinical pharmacy services. Pharmacists at each site recorded their medication error interceptions for 250 hours of cumulative time when present in the ED (1,000 hours total for all 4 sites). Items recorded included the activities of the pharmacist that led to medication error interception, type of orders, phase of medication use process, and type of error. Independent evaluators reviewed all medication errors. Descriptive analyses were performed for all variables. A total of 16,446 patients presented to the EDs during the study, resulting in 364 confirmed medication error interceptions by pharmacists. The pharmacists' activities that led to medication error interception were as follows: involvement in consultative activities (n=187; 51.4%), review of medication orders (n=127; 34.9%), and other (n=50; 13.7%). The types of orders resulting in medication error interceptions were written or computerized orders (n=198; 54.4%), verbal orders (n=119; 32.7%), and other (n=47; 12.9%). Most medication error interceptions occurred during the prescribing phase of the medication use process (n=300; 82.4%) and the most common type of error was wrong dose (n=161; 44.2%). Pharmacists' review of written or computerized medication orders accounts for only a third of medication error interceptions. Most medication error interceptions occur during consultative activities. Copyright © 2011. Published by Mosby, Inc.

  2. Economic impact of prescribing error prevention with computerized physician order entry of injectable antineoplastic drugs.

    PubMed

    Nerich, V; Borg, C; Villanueva, C; Thiery-Vuillemin, A; Helias, P; Rohrlich, P-S; Demarchi, M; Pivot, X; Limat, S

    2013-03-01

    A cost-benefit analysis was carried out to determine the potential economic costs and benefits of pharmaceutical analysis in preventing prescribing errors for full standardized injectable antineoplastic drugs computerized physician order entry, in a pharmaceutical unit (University teaching hospital), compared with theoretical setting with no pharmaceutical analysis. The viewpoint is that of the payer or the French national Public Health Insurance system, and is limited to hospital cost (only direct medical costs related to net cost and net benefit. A decision analysis model was performed to compare two strategies: with pharmaceutical analysis (± pharmacy intervention) and without pharmaceutical analysis. are expressed in terms of benefit-to-cost ratio and total benefit. The robustness of the results was assessed through a series of one-way sensitivity analyses. Over 1 year, prescribing error incidence was estimated at 1.5% [1.3-1.7], i.e. 218 avoided prescribing errors. Potential avoidance of hospital stay was estimated at 419 days or 1.9 ± 0.3 days per prescribing error. Cost-benefit analysis could estimate a net benefit-to-cost ratio of 33.3 (€17.34/€0.52) and a total benefit at €16.82 per pharmaceutical analysis or €249,844 per year. The sensitivity analysis showed robustness of results. Our study shows a substantial economic benefit of pharmaceutical analysis and intervention in the prevention of prescribing errors. The clinical pharmacist adds both value and economic benefit, making it possible to avoid additional use of expensive antineoplastic drugs and hospitalization. Computerized physician order entry of antineoplastic drugs improves the relevance of clinical pharmacist interventions, expanding pharmaceutical analysis and also the role of the pharmacist.

  3. Learning from mistakes. Factors that influence how students and residents learn from medical errors.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Melissa A; Mazor, Kathleen M; Baril, Joann; Alper, Eric; DeMarco, Deborah; Pugnaire, Michele

    2006-05-01

    Trainees are exposed to medical errors throughout medical school and residency. Little is known about what facilitates and limits learning from these experiences. To identify major factors and areas of tension in trainees' learning from medical errors. Structured telephone interviews with 59 trainees (medical students and residents) from 1 academic medical center. Five authors reviewed transcripts of audiotaped interviews using content analysis. Trainees were aware that medical errors occur from early in medical school. Many had an intense emotional response to the idea of committing errors in patient care. Students and residents noted variation and conflict in institutional recommendations and individual actions. Many expressed role confusion regarding whether and how to initiate discussion after errors occurred. Some noted the conflict between reporting errors to seniors who were responsible for their evaluation. Learners requested more open discussion of actual errors and faculty disclosure. No students or residents felt that they learned better from near misses than from actual errors, and many believed that they learned the most when harm was caused. Trainees are aware of medical errors, but remaining tensions may limit learning. Institutions can immediately address variability in faculty response and local culture by disseminating clear, accessible algorithms to guide behavior when errors occur. Educators should develop longitudinal curricula that integrate actual cases and faculty disclosure. Future multi-institutional work should focus on identified themes such as teaching and learning in emotionally charged situations, learning from errors and near misses and balance between individual and systems responsibility.

  4. A description of medication errors reported by pharmacists in a neonatal intensive care unit.

    PubMed

    Pawluk, Shane; Jaam, Myriam; Hazi, Fatima; Al Hail, Moza Sulaiman; El Kassem, Wessam; Khalifa, Hanan; Thomas, Binny; Abdul Rouf, Pallivalappila

    2017-02-01

    Background Patients in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU) are at an increased risk for medication errors. Objective The objective of this study is to describe the nature and setting of medication errors occurring in patients admitted to an NICU in Qatar based on a standard electronic system reported by pharmacists. Setting Neonatal intensive care unit, Doha, Qatar. Method This was a retrospective cross-sectional study on medication errors reported electronically by pharmacists in the NICU between January 1, 2014 and April 30, 2015. Main outcome measure Data collected included patient information, and incident details including error category, medications involved, and follow-up completed. Results A total of 201 NICU pharmacists-reported medication errors were submitted during the study period. All reported errors did not reach the patient and did not cause harm. Of the errors reported, 98.5% occurred in the prescribing phase of the medication process with 58.7% being due to calculation errors. Overall, 53 different medications were documented in error reports with the anti-infective agents being the most frequently cited. The majority of incidents indicated that the primary prescriber was contacted and the error was resolved before reaching the next phase of the medication process. Conclusion Medication errors reported by pharmacists occur most frequently in the prescribing phase of the medication process. Our data suggest that error reporting systems need to be specific to the population involved. Special attention should be paid to frequently used medications in the NICU as these were responsible for the greatest numbers of medication errors.

  5. 75 FR 33629 - Developing Guidance on Naming, Labeling, and Packaging Practices to Reduce Medication Errors...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-14

    ... Practices to Reduce Medication Errors; Public Workshop; Change of Meeting Location AGENCY: Food and Drug... Practices to Reduce Medication Errors.'' A new address is given for those attending the workshop. DATES: The... on describing practices for naming, labeling, and packaging drugs and biologics to reduce medication...

  6. Medical errors in neonatal intensive care unit at Benha University Hospital, Egypt.

    PubMed

    El-Shazly, Ahmed N; Al-Azzouny, Mahmoud A; Soliman, Doaa R; Abed, Neveen T; Attia, Sameh S

    2017-02-21

    This study was conducted in the neonatal intensive care unit of Benha University Hospital, Egypt from 1 August 2012 to the 31 January 2013 to identify medical errors and to determine the risk factors and consequences of these errors. Errors were detected by follow-up of neonates and review of reports including nursing followup sheets, resident progression notes and investigation reports. We detected 3819 errors that affected 97% of neonates. Types of errors included 403 medication errors (10.55% of total errors), 652 errors in daily routine procedures (17.07%), 1042 errors in invasive procedures (27.28%), 68 errors in nutrition (1.78%), 63 equipment errors (1.64%), 260 administration errors (6.8%), 656 staffing errors (17.18%), 107 environmental errors (2.8%), 448 infection control errors (11.73%) and 120 nosocomial infection errors (3.14%). Medical errors were high in low birth weight, low gestational age neonates and increased with duration of admission.

  7. Searching for the Final Answer: Factors Contributing to Medication Administration Errors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pape, Tess M.

    2001-01-01

    Causal factors contributing to errors in medication administration should be thoroughly investigated, focusing on systems rather than individual nurses. Unless systemic causes are addressed, many errors will go unreported for fear of reprisal. (Contains 42 references.) (SK)

  8. [Longer working hours of pharmacists in the ward resulted in lower medication-related errors--survey of national university hospitals in Japan].

    PubMed

    Matsubara, Kazuo; Toyama, Akira; Satoh, Hiroshi; Suzuki, Hiroshi; Awaya, Toshio; Tasaki, Yoshikazu; Yasuoka, Toshiaki; Horiuchi, Ryuya

    2011-04-01

    It is obvious that pharmacists play a critical role as risk managers in the healthcare system, especially in medication treatment. Hitherto, there is not a single multicenter-survey report describing the effectiveness of clinical pharmacists in preventing medical errors from occurring in the wards in Japan. Thus, we conducted a 1-month survey to elucidate the relationship between the number of errors and working hours of pharmacists in the ward, and verified whether the assignment of clinical pharmacists to the ward would prevent medical errors between October 1-31, 2009. Questionnaire items for the pharmacists at 42 national university hospitals and a medical institute included the total and the respective numbers of medication-related errors, beds and working hours of pharmacist in 2 internal medicine and 2 surgical departments in each hospital. Regardless of severity, errors were consecutively reported to the Medical Security and Safety Management Section in each hospital. The analysis of errors revealed that longer working hours of pharmacists in the ward resulted in less medication-related errors; this was especially significant in the internal medicine ward (where a variety of drugs were used) compared with the surgical ward. However, the nurse assignment mode (nurse/inpatients ratio: 1 : 7-10) did not influence the error frequency. The results of this survey strongly indicate that assignment of clinical pharmacists to the ward is critically essential in promoting medication safety and efficacy.

  9. Medication error reporting by community pharmacists in Vermont.

    PubMed

    Kennedy, Amanda G; Littenberg, Benjamin

    2004-01-01

    To document community pharmacists' awareness and use of the United States Pharmacopeia Medication Errors Reporting (USP MER) program. Telephone survey. Community pharmacies in Vermont. One self-identified community pharmacist from each community pharmacy. Each operating community pharmacy in Vermont was contacted by telephone between June 2002 and February 2003. The first individual to self-identify himself or herself as a pharmacist was asked to participate. The telephone surveys were conducted using a standard script. Survey responses to questions about awareness and use of USP MER. A pharmacist was contacted in 98% (122/124) of all operating community pharmacies in Vermont. Nine (7%) pharmacists refused to participate, leaving 113 pharmacists who responded to the survey. Although more than one half of all respondents (70/113; 62%) had heard of USP MER, less than one quarter (24/113; 21%) had ever submitted a report. Significantly more pharmacists employed by independent pharmacies had submitted a report, compared with pharmacists from other pharmacy types (chain, supermarket, mass merchandiser; P = .03). Submitting reports through a corporate hierarchy or to a corporate program was the reason most frequently cited by pharmacists for not submitting reports directly to USP MER (37%). Whether corporate reports were forwarded to USP MER is unknown. The majority of Vermont community pharmacists were aware of USP MER. However, use was low. Barriers to reporting to a common system such as USP MER may differ depending on pharmacy type. Further research to document the barriers to submitting reports is warranted.

  10. Diagnostic Error in Medical Education: Where Wrongs Can Make Rights

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eva, Kevin W.

    2009-01-01

    This paper examines diagnostic error from an educational perspective. Rather than addressing the question of how educators in the health professions can help learners avoid error, however, the literature reviewed leads to the conclusion that educators should be working to induce error in learners, leading them to short term pain for long term…

  11. Technology-related medication errors in a tertiary hospital: a 5-year analysis of reported medication incidents.

    PubMed

    Samaranayake, N R; Cheung, S T D; Chui, W C M; Cheung, B M Y

    2012-12-01

    Healthcare technology is meant to reduce medication errors. The objective of this study was to assess unintended errors related to technologies in the medication use process. Medication incidents reported from 2006 to 2010 in a main tertiary care hospital were analysed by a pharmacist and technology-related errors were identified. Technology-related errors were further classified as socio-technical errors and device errors. This analysis was conducted using data from medication incident reports which may represent only a small proportion of medication errors that actually takes place in a hospital. Hence, interpretation of results must be tentative. 1538 medication incidents were reported. 17.1% of all incidents were technology-related, of which only 1.9% were device errors, whereas most were socio-technical errors (98.1%). Of these, 61.2% were linked to computerised prescription order entry, 23.2% to bar-coded patient identification labels, 7.2% to infusion pumps, 6.8% to computer-aided dispensing label generation and 1.5% to other technologies. The immediate causes for technology-related errors included, poor interface between user and computer (68.1%), improper procedures or rule violations (22.1%), poor interface between user and infusion pump (4.9%), technical defects (1.9%) and others (3.0%). In 11.4% of the technology-related incidents, the error was detected after the drug had been administered. A considerable proportion of all incidents were technology-related. Most errors were due to socio-technical issues. Unintended and unanticipated errors may happen when using technologies. Therefore, when using technologies, system improvement, awareness, training and monitoring are needed to minimise medication errors. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Frequency of and risk factors for medication errors by pharmacists during order verification in a tertiary care medical center.

    PubMed

    Gorbach, Christy; Blanton, Linda; Lukawski, Beverly A; Varkey, Alex C; Pitman, E Paige; Garey, Kevin W

    2015-09-01

    The frequency of and risk factors for medication errors by pharmacists during order verification in a tertiary care medical center were reviewed. This retrospective, secondary database study was conducted at a large tertiary care medical center in Houston, Texas. Inpatient and outpatient medication orders and medication errors recorded between July 1, 2011, and June 30, 2012, were reviewed. Independent variables assessed as risk factors for medication errors included workload (mean number of orders verified per pharmacist per shift), work environment (type of day, type of shift, and mean number of pharmacists per shift), and nonmodifiable characteristics of the pharmacist (type of pharmacy degree obtained, age, number of years practicing, and number of years at the institution). A total of 1,887,751 medication orders, 92 medication error events, and 50 pharmacists were included in the study. The overall error rate was 4.87 errors per 100,000 verified orders. An increasing medication error rate was associated with an increased number of orders verified per pharmacist (p = 0.007), the type of shift (p = 0.021), the type of day (p = 0.002), and the mean number of pharmacists per shift (p = 0.001). Pharmacist demographic variables were not associated with risk of error. The number of orders per shift was identified as a significant independent risk factor for medication errors (p = 0.019). An increase in the number of orders verified per shift was associated with an increased rate of pharmacist errors during order verification in a tertiary care medical center. Copyright © 2015 by the American Society of Health-System Pharmacists, Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Global Medical Device Nomenclature: The Concept for Reducing Device-Related Medical Errors

    PubMed Central

    Anand, K; Saini, SK; Singh, BK; Veermaram, C

    2010-01-01

    In the medical device field, there are a number of players, having quite different responsibilities and levels of understanding of the processes, but all with one common interest, that of ensuring the availability of sound medical devices to the general public. To assist in this very important process, there is a need for a common method for describing and identifying these medical devices in an unambiguous manner. The Global Medical Device Nomenclature (GMDN) now provides, for the first time, an international tool for identifying all medical devices, at the generic level, in a meaningful manner that can be understood by all users. Prior to the GMDN, many nomenclature systems existed, all built upon different structures, and used locally or nationally for special purposes, with unusual approaches. These diverse systems, although often workable in their own right, have had no impact on improving the overall situation of providing a common platform, whereby, medical devices could be correctly identified and the related data safely exchanged between the involved parties. Work by standard organizations such as, CEN (European Committee for Standardization) and ISO (International Organization for Standardization), from 1993 to 1996, resulted in a standard that specified a structure for a new nomenclature, for medical devices. In this article we are trying to explain GMDN as the prime method to reduce medical device errors, and to understand the concept of GMDN, to regulate the medical device throughout the globe. Here we also make an attempt to explain various aspects of the GMDN system, such as, the process of development of the GMDN-CEN report, purpose, benefits, and their structural considerations. In addition, there will be an explanation of the coding system, role of the GMDN agency, and their utilization in the unique device identification (UDI) System. Finally, the current area of focus and vision for the future are also mentioned. PMID:21264103

  14. Being a Victim of Medical Error in Brazil: An (Un)Real Dilemma.

    PubMed

    Mendonça, Vitor Silva; Custódio, Eda Marconi

    2016-06-23

    Medical error stems from inadequate professional conduct that is capable of producing harm to life or exacerbating the health of another, whether through act or omission. This situation has become increasingly common in Brazil and worldwide. In this study, the aim was to understand what being the victim of medical error is like and to investigate the circumstances imposed on this condition of victims in Brazil. A semi-structured interview was conducted with twelve people who had gone through situations of medical error in their lives, creating a space for narratives of their experiences and deep reflection on the phenomenon. The concept of medical error has a negative connotation, often being associated with the incompetence of a medical professional. Medical error in Brazil is demonstrated by low-quality professional performance and represents the current reality of the country because of the common lack of respect and consideration for patients. Victims often remark on their loss of identity, as their social functions have been interrupted and they do not expect to regain such. It was found, however, little assumption of error in the involved doctors' discourses and attitudes, which felt a need to judge the medical conduct in an attempt to assert their rights. Medical error in Brazil presents a punitive character and is little discussed in medical and scientific circles. The stigma of medical error is closely connected to the value and cultural judgments of the country, making it difficult to accept, both by victims and professionals.

  15. Being a Victim of Medical Error in Brazil: An (Un)Real Dilemma

    PubMed Central

    Mendonça, Vitor Silva; Custódio, Eda Marconi

    2016-01-01

    Medical error stems from inadequate professional conduct that is capable of producing harm to life or exacerbating the health of another, whether through act or omission. This situation has become increasingly common in Brazil and worldwide. In this study, the aim was to understand what being the victim of medical error is like and to investigate the circumstances imposed on this condition of victims in Brazil. A semi-structured interview was conducted with twelve people who had gone through situations of medical error in their lives, creating a space for narratives of their experiences and deep reflection on the phenomenon. The concept of medical error has a negative connotation, often being associated with the incompetence of a medical professional. Medical error in Brazil is demonstrated by low-quality professional performance and represents the current reality of the country because of the common lack of respect and consideration for patients. Victims often remark on their loss of identity, as their social functions have been interrupted and they do not expect to regain such. It was found, however, little assumption of error in the involved doctors’ discourses and attitudes, which felt a need to judge the medical conduct in an attempt to assert their rights. Medical error in Brazil presents a punitive character and is little discussed in medical and scientific circles. The stigma of medical error is closely connected to the value and cultural judgments of the country, making it difficult to accept, both by victims and professionals. PMID:27403461

  16. Prevalence and risk factors for medication reconciliation errors during hospital admission in elderly patients.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez Vargas, Blanca; Delgado Silveira, Eva; Iglesias Peinado, Irene; Bermejo Vicedo, Teresa

    2016-10-01

    Background Care transitions are risk points for medication discrepancies, especially in the elderly. Objective This study was undertaken to assess prevalence and describe medication reconciliation errors during admission in elderly patients and to analyze associated risk factors. We also evaluate the effect of these errors on the length of hospital stay. Setting General surgery, orthopedics, internal medicines and infectious diseases departments of a 1070-bed Spanish teaching hospital. Method This is a prospective observational study. Patients >65 years and taking ≥5 medications were randomly selected from those admitted to hospital. The pharmacist obtained the best possible medication history based on medical records, medical notes from patients' previous admissions to hospital, "brown bag" review, community care prescriptions, and comprehensive patient interviews. It was compared to current inpatient prescription to detect unintentional discrepancies (discrepancy with no apparent clinical explanation), which were reported to the physician. When the physician accepted the discrepancy by changing the medication order, it was recorded as a medication reconciliation error and classified by type of error. Several variables were analyzed as possible risk/protective factors. Main outcome measure Is prevalence of medication reconciliation errors at admission. Results Reconciliation was performed on 206 patients. Medication reconciliation errors occurred in 49.5 % (102/206) of patients. 1996 medications were recorded, and 359 had unintentional discrepancies (56.0 % (201/359) medication reconciliation errors). The most common was omission (65.1 %). Identified risk factors were as follows: physician experience, number of pre-admission prescribed medications, and previous surgeries. Computerized order entry system was a protective factor. Conclusion Medication reconciliation errors occur in almost half of the elderly patients at admission, especially omissions. Risk

  17. Unintentional Pharmaceutical-Related Medication Errors Caused by Laypersons Reported to the Toxicological Information Centre in the Czech Republic.

    PubMed

    Urban, Michal; Leššo, Roman; Pelclová, Daniela

    2016-07-01

    The purpose of the article was to study unintentional pharmaceutical-related poisonings committed by laypersons that were reported to the Toxicological Information Centre in the Czech Republic. Identifying frequency, sources, reasons and consequences of the medication errors in laypersons could help to reduce the overall rate of medication errors. Records of medication error enquiries from 2013 to 2014 were extracted from the electronic database, and the following variables were reviewed: drug class, dosage form, dose, age of the subject, cause of the error, time interval from ingestion to the call, symptoms, prognosis at the time of the call and first aid recommended. Of the calls, 1354 met the inclusion criteria. Among them, central nervous system-affecting drugs (23.6%), respiratory drugs (18.5%) and alimentary drugs (16.2%) were the most common drug classes involved in the medication errors. The highest proportion of the patients was in the youngest age subgroup 0-5 year-old (46%). The reasons for the medication errors involved the leaflet misinterpretation and mistaken dose (53.6%), mixing up medications (19.2%), attempting to reduce pain with repeated doses (6.4%), erroneous routes of administration (2.2%), psychiatric/elderly patients (2.7%), others (9.0%) or unknown (6.9%). A high proportion of children among the patients may be due to the fact that children's dosages for many drugs vary by their weight, and more medications come in a variety of concentrations. Most overdoses could be prevented by safer labelling, proper cap closure systems for liquid products and medication reconciliation by both physicians and pharmacists. © 2016 Nordic Association for the Publication of BCPT (former Nordic Pharmacological Society).

  18. Toward a theoretical approach to medical error reporting system research and design

    PubMed Central

    Karsh, Ben-Tzion; Escoto, Kamisha Hamilton; Beasley, John W.; Holden, Richard J.

    2014-01-01

    The release of the Institute of Medicine (Kohn et al., 2000) report “To Err is Human”, brought attention to the problem of medical errors, which led to a concerted effort to study and design medical error reporting systems for the purpose of capturing and analyzing error data so that safety interventions could be designed. However, to make real gains in the efficacy of medical error or event reporting systems, it is necessary to begin developing a theory of reporting systems adoption and use and to understand how existing theories may play a role in explaining adoption and use. This paper presents the results of a 9-month study exploring the barriers and facilitators for the design of a statewide medical error reporting system and discusses how several existing theories of technology acceptance, adoption and implementation fit with many of the results. In addition we present an integrated theoretical model of medical error reporting system design and implementation. PMID:16182233

  19. [Validation of a method for notifying and monitoring medication errors in pediatrics].

    PubMed

    Guerrero-Aznar, M D; Jiménez-Mesa, E; Cotrina-Luque, J; Villalba-Moreno, A; Cumplido-Corbacho, R; Fernández-Fernández, L

    2014-12-01

    To analyze the impact of a multidisciplinary and decentralized safety committee in the pediatric management unit, and the joint implementation of a computing network application for reporting medication errors, monitoring the follow-up of the errors, and an analysis of the improvements introduced. An observational, descriptive, cross-sectional, pre-post intervention study was performed. An analysis was made of medication errors reported to the central safety committee in the twelve months prior to introduction, and those reported to the decentralized safety committee in the management unit in the nine months after implementation, using the computer application, and the strategies generated by the analysis of reported errors. Number of reported errors/10,000 days of stay, number of reported errors with harm per 10,000 days of stay, types of error, categories based on severity, stage of the process, and groups involved in the notification of medication errors. Reported medication errors increased 4.6 -fold, from 7.6 notifications of medication errors per 10,000 days of stay in the pre-intervention period to 36 in the post-intervention, rate ratio 0.21 (95% CI; 0.11-0.39) (P<.001). The medication errors with harm or requiring monitoring reported per 10,000 days of stay, was virtually unchanged from one period to the other ratio rate 0,77 (95% IC; 0,31-1,91) (P>.05). The notification of potential errors or errors without harm per 10,000 days of stay increased 17.4-fold (rate ratio 0.005., 95% CI; 0.001-0.026, P<.001). The increase in medication errors notified in the post-intervention period is a reflection of an increase in the motivation of health professionals to report errors through this new method. Copyright © 2013 Asociación Española de Pediatría. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  20. Impact of a clinical pharmacy admission medication reconciliation program on medication errors in "high-risk" patients.

    PubMed

    Buckley, Mitchell S; Harinstein, Lisa M; Clark, Kimberly B; Smithburger, Pamela L; Eckhardt, Doug J; Alexander, Earnest; Devabhakthuni, Sandeep; Westley, Craig A; David, Butch; Kane-Gill, Sandra L

    2013-12-01

    Medication errors are common upon hospital admission. Clinical pharmacist involvement in medication reconciliation is effective in identifying and rectifying medication errors. However, data is lacking on the economic impact, time requirements, and severity of errors resolved by clinical pharmacists. To determine the incidence of unintended admission medication discrepancies resolved by clinical pharmacists. Secondary objectives were to determine the type of discrepancies, potential severity, proximal cause, and economic impact of this clinical pharmacy program. This was a single-center, prospective, observational study conducted at a major teaching medical institution. Following institutional review board approval, data collection was conducted over a 4-week period (August 22, 2011, to September 16, 2011). Descriptive statistical methods were performed for all data analyses. A total of 517 patients involving 5006 medications were included in this study. More than 25% (n = 132) of patients had at least 1 error associated with a medication ordered on hospital admission. Pharmacists resolved a total of 467 admission medication errors (3.5 ± 2.3 errors/patient). The most common type of medication error resolved was medication omission (79.6%). In regard to severity, 46% of medication errors were considered significant or serious. Overall, the mean total time was 44.4 ± 21.8 minutes per medication reconciliation. This clinical pharmacy program was estimated to carry a net present value of $5.7 million over 5 years. Clinical pharmacist involvement within a multidisciplinary health care team during the admission medication reconciliation process demonstrated a significant improvement in patient safety and an economic benefit.

  1. Sleep Loss in Resident Physicians: The Cause of Medical Errors?

    PubMed Central

    Kramer, Milton

    2010-01-01

    This review begins with the history of the events starting with the death of Libby Zion that lead to the Bell Commission, that the studied her death and made recommendations for improvement that were codified into law in New York state as the 405 law that the ACGME essentially adopted in putting a cap on work hours and establishing the level of staff supervision that must be available to residents in clinical situations particularly the emergency room and acute care units. A summary is then provided of the findings of the laboratory effects of total sleep deprivation including acute total sleep loss and the consequent widespread physiologic alterations, and of the effects of selective and chronic sleep loss. Generally the sequence of responses to increasing sleep loss goes from mood changes to cognitive effects to performance deficits. In the laboratory situation, deficits resulting from sleep deprivation are clearly and definitively demonstrable. Sleep loss in the clinical situation is usually sleep deprivation superimposed on chronic sleep loss. An examination of questionnaire studies, the literature on reports of sleep loss, studies of the reduction of work hours on performance as well as observational and a few interventional studies have yielded contradictory and often equivocal results. The residents generally find they feel better working fewer hours but improvements in patient care are often not reported or do not occur. A change in the attitude of the resident toward his role and his patient has not been salutary. Decreasing sleep loss should have had a positive effect on patient care in reducing medical error, but this remains to be unequivocally demonstrated. PMID:21188260

  2. Voluntary Medication Error Reporting by ED Nurses: Examining the Association With Work Environment and Social Capital.

    PubMed

    Farag, Amany; Blegen, Mary; Gedney-Lose, Amalia; Lose, Daniel; Perkhounkova, Yelena

    2017-05-01

    Medication errors are one of the most frequently occurring errors in health care settings. The complexity of the ED work environment places patients at risk for medication errors. Most hospitals rely on nurses' voluntary medication error reporting, but these errors are under-reported. The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship among work environment (nurse manager leadership style and safety climate), social capital (warmth and belonging relationships and organizational trust), and nurses' willingness to report medication errors. A cross-sectional descriptive design using a questionnaire with a convenience sample of emergency nurses was used. Data were analyzed using descriptive, correlation, Mann-Whitney U, and Kruskal-Wallis statistics. A total of 71 emergency nurses were included in the study. Emergency nurses' willingness to report errors decreased as the nurses' years of experience increased (r = -0.25, P = .03). Their willingness to report errors increased when they received more feedback about errors (r = 0.25, P = .03) and when their managers used a transactional leadership style (r = 0.28, P = .01). ED nurse managers can modify their leadership style to encourage error reporting. Timely feedback after an error report is particularly important. Engaging experienced nurses to understand error root causes could increase voluntary error reporting. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  3. [Medical error--professional liability for malpractice in Bosnia and Herzegovina].

    PubMed

    Pranjić, Nurka

    2009-01-01

    Medical care is frequently compared to aviation, as many of the factors which lead to errors in both fields are similar. In this article we review the literature on such events and discuss the ethical, legal and practical aspects of civil liability in the case of medical error. Ethics, professional policy and the law, as well as the relevant empirical literature, suggest that timely and candid disclosure should be standard practice. In harmonization to ethical codex, the physician is obliged to inform the patient about the origin of medical error. Civil liability is one of the most important parts of law that regulates health care service. Medical chambers could be having a very important role in alternative methods of medical error disciplinary screening proceedings. Guidelines for disclosure of medical error to patients, and their families if necessary, are proposed.

  4. Speak Up: Help Prevent Errors in Your Care: Behavioral Health Care

    MedlinePlus

    ... TM Help Prevent Errors in Your Care Behavioral Health Care To prevent health care errors, patients are urged to... SpeakUP TM Service ... individuals should be involved in their own behavioral health care. These efforts to increase consumer awareness and involvement ...

  5. Medical error reduction and tort reform through private, contractually-based quality medicine societies.

    PubMed

    MacCourt, Duncan; Bernstein, Joseph

    2009-01-01

    physicians cede their implicit "right to remain silent", even if some injured patients will receive less than they do today. Likewise, physicians will be happier with a system that avoids blame-even if this system placed strict requirements for high quality care and disclosure of error. We therefore conceive of de facto trade between patients and physicians, a Pareto improvement, taking form via the establishment of "Societies of Quality Medicine." Physicians working within these societies would consent to onerous processes for disclosing, rectifying and preventing medical error. Patients would in turn contractually agree to assert their claims in arbitration and with limits on recovery. The role of plaintiffs' lawyers would be unchanged, but due to increased disclosure, discovery costs would diminish and the likelihood of prevailing will more than triple. This article examines the legal and policy issues surrounding the establishment of Societies of Quality Medicine, particularly the issues of contracting over liability, and outlines a means of overcoming the theoretical and practical difficulties with enterprise liability, alternative dispute resolution and the imposition of limits on recovery for non-pecuniary damages. We aim to build a welfare enhancing system that rebuffs the culture of silence and promotes error reduction, a system that is at the same time legally sound, fiscally prudent and politically possible.

  6. Use of incident reports by physicians and nurses to document medical errors in pediatric patients.

    PubMed

    Taylor, James A; Brownstein, Dena; Christakis, Dimitri A; Blackburn, Susan; Strandjord, Thomas P; Klein, Eileen J; Shafii, Jaleh

    2004-09-01

    To describe the proportion and types of medical errors that are stated to be reported via incident report systems by physicians and nurses who care for pediatric patients and to determine attitudes about potential interventions for increasing error reports. A survey on use of incident reports to document medical errors was sent to a random sample of 200 physicians and nurses at a large children's hospital. Items on the survey included proportion of medical errors that were reported, reasons for underreporting medical errors, and attitudes about potential interventions for increasing error reports. In addition, the survey contained scenarios about hypothetical medical errors; the physicians and nurses were asked how likely they were to report each of the events described. Differences in use of incident reports for documenting medical errors between nurses and physicians were assessed with chi(2) tests. Logistic regression was used to determine the association between health care profession type and likelihood of reporting medical errors. A total of 140 surveys were returned, including 74 from physicians and 66 by nurses. Overall, 34.8% of respondents indicated that they had reported <20% of their perceived medical errors in the previous 12 months, and 32.6% had reported <40% of perceived errors committed by colleagues. After controlling for potentially confounding variables, nurses were significantly more likely to report >or=80% of their own medical errors than physicians (odds ratio: 2.8; 95% confidence interval: 1.3-6.0). Commonly listed reasons for underreporting included lack of certainty about what is considered an error (indicated by 40.7% of respondents) and concerns about implicating others (37%). Potential interventions that would lead to increased reporting included education about which errors should be reported (listed by 65.4% of respondents), feedback on a regular basis about the errors reported (63.8%) and about individual events (51.2%), evidence of

  7. Errors in medication history at hospital admission: prevalence and predicting factors.

    PubMed

    Hellström, Lina M; Bondesson, Åsa; Höglund, Peter; Eriksson, Tommy

    2012-04-03

    An accurate medication list at hospital admission is essential for the evaluation and further treatment of patients. The objective of this study was to describe the frequency, type and predictors of errors in medication history, and to evaluate the extent to which standard care corrects these errors. A descriptive study was carried out in two medical wards in a Swedish hospital using Lund Integrated Medicines Management (LIMM)-based medication reconciliation. A clinical pharmacist identified each patient's most accurate pre-admission medication list by conducting a medication reconciliation process shortly after admission. This list was then compared with the patient's medication list in the hospital medical records. Addition or withdrawal of a drug or changes to the dose or dosage form in the hospital medication list were considered medication discrepancies. Medication discrepancies for which no clinical reason could be identified (unintentional changes) were considered medication history errors. The final study population comprised 670 of 818 eligible patients. At least one medication history error was identified by pharmacists conducting medication reconciliations for 313 of these patients (47%; 95% CI 43-51%). The most common medication error was an omitted drug, followed by a wrong dose. Multivariate logistic regression analysis showed that a higher number of drugs at admission (odds ratio [OR] per 1 drug increase = 1.10; 95% CI 1.06-1.14; p < 0.0001) and the patient living in their own home without any care services (OR = 1.58; 95% CI 1.02-2.45; p = 0.042) were predictors for medication history errors at admission. The results further indicated that standard care by non-pharmacist ward staff had partly corrected the errors in affected patients by four days after admission, but a considerable proportion of the errors made in the initial medication history at admission remained undetected by standard care (OR for medication errors detected by pharmacists

  8. Errors in medication history at hospital admission: prevalence and predicting factors

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background An accurate medication list at hospital admission is essential for the evaluation and further treatment of patients. The objective of this study was to describe the frequency, type and predictors of errors in medication history, and to evaluate the extent to which standard care corrects these errors. Methods A descriptive study was carried out in two medical wards in a Swedish hospital using Lund Integrated Medicines Management (LIMM)-based medication reconciliation. A clinical pharmacist identified each patient's most accurate pre-admission medication list by conducting a medication reconciliation process shortly after admission. This list was then compared with the patient's medication list in the hospital medical records. Addition or withdrawal of a drug or changes to the dose or dosage form in the hospital medication list were considered medication discrepancies. Medication discrepancies for which no clinical reason could be identified (unintentional changes) were considered medication history errors. Results The final study population comprised 670 of 818 eligible patients. At least one medication history error was identified by pharmacists conducting medication reconciliations for 313 of these patients (47%; 95% CI 43-51%). The most common medication error was an omitted drug, followed by a wrong dose. Multivariate logistic regression analysis showed that a higher number of drugs at admission (odds ratio [OR] per 1 drug increase = 1.10; 95% CI 1.06-1.14; p < 0.0001) and the patient living in their own home without any care services (OR = 1.58; 95% CI 1.02-2.45; p = 0.042) were predictors for medication history errors at admission. The results further indicated that standard care by non-pharmacist ward staff had partly corrected the errors in affected patients by four days after admission, but a considerable proportion of the errors made in the initial medication history at admission remained undetected by standard care (OR for medication errors

  9. Frequency of medication errors in an emergency department of a large teaching hospital in southern Iran

    PubMed Central

    Vazin, Afsaneh; Zamani, Zahra; Hatam, Nahid

    2014-01-01

    This study was conducted with the purpose of determining the frequency of medication errors (MEs) occurring in tertiary care emergency department (ED) of a large academic hospital in Iran. The incidence of MEs was determined through the disguised direct observation method conducted by a trained observer. A total of 1,031 medication doses administered to 202 patients admitted to the tertiary care ED were observed over a course of 54 6-hour shifts. Following collection of the data and analysis of the errors with the assistance of a clinical pharmacist, frequency of errors in the different stages was reported and analyzed in SPSS-21 software. For the 202 patients and the 1,031 medication doses evaluated in the present study, 707 (68.5%) MEs were recorded in total. In other words, 3.5 errors per patient and almost 0.69 errors per medication are reported to have occurred, with the highest frequency of errors pertaining to cardiovascular (27.2%) and antimicrobial (23.6%) medications. The highest rate of errors occurred during the administration phase of the medication use process with a share of 37.6%, followed by errors of prescription and transcription with a share of 21.1% and 10% of errors, respectively. Omission (7.6%) and wrong time error (4.4%) were the most frequent administration errors. The less-experienced nurses (P=0.04), higher patient-to-nurse ratio (P=0.017), and the morning shifts (P=0.035) were positively related to administration errors. Administration errors marked the highest share of MEs occurring in the different medication use processes. Increasing the number of nurses and employing the more experienced of them in EDs can help reduce nursing errors. Addressing the shortcomings with further research should result in reduction of MEs in EDs. PMID:25525391

  10. Effect of emergency medicine pharmacists on medication-error reporting in an emergency department.

    PubMed

    Weant, Kyle A; Humphries, Roger L; Hite, Kimberly; Armitstead, John A

    2010-11-01

    The effect of an emergency medicine (EM) clinical pharmacist on medication-error reporting in an emergency department (ED) was studied. The medication-error reports for patients seen at a university's ED between September 1, 2005, and February 28, 2009, were retrospectively reviewed. Errors reported before the addition of an EM pharmacist (from September 1, 2005, through February 28, 2006) were compared with those reported after the addition of two EM pharmacists (from September 1, 2008, through February 28, 2009). The severity of errors and the provider who reported the errors were characterized. A total of 402 medication errors were reported over the two time periods. Pharmacy personnel captured significantly more errors than did other health care personnel (94.5% versus 5.7%, p < 0.001). The addition of two EM pharmacists resulted in 14.8 times as many medication-error reports as were made when no EM pharmacist was in the ED. More errors that actually occurred were captured with two pharmacists providing care (95.7% versus 4.3%, p < 0.001). A majority of the errors documented were ordering errors (79.8%). Of these, 73.7% were captured after the addition of two EM pharmacists. Performance (40.0%) and knowledge (27.9%) deficits were the most common contributing factors to medication errors. During the study period after the addition of two EM pharmacists in the ED, 371 medication-error reports were completed, compared with 31 reports during the study period before the addition of the pharmacists. Pharmacy personnel reported the majority of medication errors during both study periods.

  11. Nurses' attitudes and perceived barriers to the reporting of medication administration errors.

    PubMed

    Yung, Hai-Peng; Yu, Shu; Chu, Chi; Hou, I-Ching; Tang, Fu-In

    2016-07-01

    (1) To explore the attitudes and perceived barriers to reporting medication administration errors and (2) to understand the characteristics of - and nurses' feelings - about error reports. Under-reporting of medication administration errors is a global concern related to the safety of patient care. Understanding nurses' attitudes and perceived barriers to error reporting is the initial step to increasing the reporting rate. A cross-sectional, descriptive survey with a self-administered questionnaire was completed by the nurses of a medical centre hospital in Taiwan. A total of 306 nurses participated in the study. Nurses' attitudes towards medication administration error reporting were inclined towards positive. The major perceived barrier was fear of the consequences after reporting. The results demonstrated that 88.9% of medication administration errors were reported orally, whereas 19.0% were reported through the hospital internet system. Self-recrimination was the common feeling of nurses after the commission of an medication administration error. Even if hospital management encourages errors to be reported without recrimination, nurses' attitudes toward medication administration error reporting are not very positive and fear is the most prominent barrier contributing to underreporting. Nursing managers should establish anonymous reporting systems and counselling classes to create a secure atmosphere to reduce nurses' fear and provide incentives to encourage reporting. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. [Medication errors in a neonatal unit: One of the main adverse events].

    PubMed

    Esqué Ruiz, M T; Moretones Suñol, M G; Rodríguez Miguélez, J M; Sánchez Ortiz, E; Izco Urroz, M; de Lamo Camino, M; Figueras Aloy, J

    2016-04-01

    Neonatal units are one of the hospital areas most exposed to the committing of treatment errors. A medication error (ME) is defined as the avoidable incident secondary to drug misuse that causes or may cause harm to the patient. The aim of this paper is to present the incidence of ME (including feeding) reported in our neonatal unit and its characteristics and possible causal factors. A list of the strategies implemented for prevention is presented. An analysis was performed on the ME declared in a neonatal unit. A total of 511 MEs have been reported over a period of seven years in the neonatal unit. The incidence in the critical care unit was 32.2 per 1000 hospital days or 20 per 100 patients, of which 0.22 per 1000 days had serious repercussions. The ME reported were, 39.5% prescribing errors, 68.1% administration errors, 0.6% were adverse drug reactions. Around two-thirds (65.4%) were produced by drugs, with 17% being intercepted. The large majority (89.4%) had no impact on the patient, but 0.6% caused permanent damage or death. Nurses reported 65.4% of MEs. The most commonly implicated causal factor was distraction (59%). Simple corrective action (alerts), and intermediate (protocols, clinical sessions and courses) and complex actions (causal analysis, monograph) were performed. It is essential to determine the current state of ME, in order to establish preventive measures and, together with teamwork and good practices, promote a climate of safety. Copyright © 2015 Asociación Española de Pediatría. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  13. Characteristics of medication errors made by students during the administration phase: a descriptive study.

    PubMed

    Wolf, Zane Robinson; Hicks, Rodney; Serembus, Joanne Farley

    2006-01-01

    Faculty concentrate on teaching nursing students about safe medication administration practices and on challenging them to develop skills for calculating drug dose and intravenous flow rate problems. In spite of these efforts, students make medication errors and little is known about the attributes of these errors. Therefore, this descriptive, retrospective, secondary analysis study examined the characteristics of medication errors made by nursing students during the administration phase of the medication use process as reported to the MEDMARX, a database operated by the United States Pharmacopeia through the Patient Safety Program. Fewer than 3% of 1,305 student-made medication errors occurring in the administration process resulted in patient harm. Most were omission errors, followed by errors of giving the wrong dose (amount) of a drug. The most prevalent cause of the errors was students' performance deficits, whereas inexperience and distractions were leading contributing factors. The antimicrobial therapeutic class of drugs and the 10 subcategories within this class were the most commonly reported medications involved. Insulin was the highest-frequency single medication reported. Overall, this study shows that students' administration errors may be more frequent than suspected. Faculty might consider curriculum revisions that incorporate medication use safety throughout each course in nursing major courses.

  14. Strategies for identifying and minimizing medication errors in health care settings.

    PubMed

    Skiba, Michaeline

    2006-01-01

    For many years, medication errors have been a source of serious concern within the health care community. This article examines the definition and assessment of medication errors and some of the emerging technologies used to alleviate them. In addition, recommendations are proposed to improve the drug placement and promotion dimension of the marketing function in the pharmaceuticals industry.

  15. Reflection of medical error highlighted on media in Turkey: A retrospective study

    PubMed Central

    Isik, Oguz; Bayin, Gamze; Ugurluoglu, Ozgur

    2016-01-01

    Objective: This study was performed with the aim of identifying how news on medical errors have be transmitted, and how the types, reasons, and conclusions of medical errors have been reflected to by the media in Turkey. Methods: A content analysis method was used in the study, and in this context, the data for the study was acquired by scanning five newspapers with the top editions on the national basis between the years 2012 and 2015 for the news about medical errors. Some specific selection criteria was used for the scanning of resulted news, and 116 news items acquired as a result of all the eliminations. Results: According to the results of the study; the vast majority of medical errors (40.5%) transmitted by the news resulted from the negligence of the medical staff. The medical errors were caused by physicians in the ratio of 74.1%, they most commonly occurred in state hospitals (31.9%). Another important result of the research was that medical errors resulted in either patient death to a large extent (51.7%), or permanent damage and disability to patients (25.0%). Conclusion: The news concerning medical errors provided information about the types, causes, and the results of these medical errors. It also reflected the media point of view on the issue. The examination of the content of the medical errors reported by the media were important which calls for appropriate interventions to avoid and minimize the occurrence of medical errors by improving the healthcare delivery system. PMID:27882026

  16. Reduced error signalling in medication-naive children with ADHD: associations with behavioural variability and post-error adaptations

    PubMed Central

    Plessen, Kerstin J.; Allen, Elena A.; Eichele, Heike; van Wageningen, Heidi; Høvik, Marie Farstad; Sørensen, Lin; Worren, Marius Kalsås; Hugdahl, Kenneth; Eichele, Tom

    2016-01-01

    Background We examined the blood-oxygen level–dependent (BOLD) activation in brain regions that signal errors and their association with intraindividual behavioural variability and adaptation to errors in children with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Methods We acquired functional MRI data during a Flanker task in medication-naive children with ADHD and healthy controls aged 8–12 years and analyzed the data using independent component analysis. For components corresponding to performance monitoring networks, we compared activations across groups and conditions and correlated them with reaction times (RT). Additionally, we analyzed post-error adaptations in behaviour and motor component activations. Results We included 25 children with ADHD and 29 controls in our analysis. Children with ADHD displayed reduced activation to errors in cingulo-opercular regions and higher RT variability, but no differences of interference control. Larger BOLD amplitude to error trials significantly predicted reduced RT variability across all participants. Neither group showed evidence of post-error response slowing; however, post-error adaptation in motor networks was significantly reduced in children with ADHD. This adaptation was inversely related to activation of the right-lateralized ventral attention network (VAN) on error trials and to task-driven connectivity between the cingulo-opercular system and the VAN. Limitations Our study was limited by the modest sample size and imperfect matching across groups. Conclusion Our findings show a deficit in cingulo-opercular activation in children with ADHD that could relate to reduced signalling for errors. Moreover, the reduced orienting of the VAN signal may mediate deficient post-error motor adaptions. Pinpointing general performance monitoring problems to specific brain regions and operations in error processing may help to guide the targets of future treatments for ADHD. PMID:26441332

  17. Medication Errors in Vietnamese Hospitals: Prevalence, Potential Outcome and Associated Factors.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Huong-Thao; Nguyen, Tuan-Dung; van den Heuvel, Edwin R; Haaijer-Ruskamp, Flora M; Taxis, Katja

    2015-01-01

    Evidence from developed countries showed that medication errors are common and harmful. Little is known about medication errors in resource-restricted settings, including Vietnam. To determine the prevalence and potential clinical outcome of medication preparation and administration errors, and to identify factors associated with errors. This was a prospective study conducted on six wards in two urban public hospitals in Vietnam. Data of preparation and administration errors of oral and intravenous medications was collected by direct observation, 12 hours per day on 7 consecutive days, on each ward. Multivariable logistic regression was applied to identify factors contributing to errors. In total, 2060 out of 5271 doses had at least one error. The error rate was 39.1% (95% confidence interval 37.8%- 40.4%). Experts judged potential clinical outcomes as minor, moderate, and severe in 72 (1.4%), 1806 (34.2%) and 182 (3.5%) doses. Factors associated with errors were drug characteristics (administration route, complexity of preparation, drug class; all p values < 0.001), and administration time (drug round, p = 0.023; day of the week, p = 0.024). Several interactions between these factors were also significant. Nurse experience was not significant. Higher error rates were observed for intravenous medications involving complex preparation procedures and for anti-infective drugs. Slightly lower medication error rates were observed during afternoon rounds compared to other rounds. Potentially clinically relevant errors occurred in more than a third of all medications in this large study conducted in a resource-restricted setting. Educational interventions, focusing on intravenous medications with complex preparation procedure, particularly antibiotics, are likely to improve patient safety.

  18. Medication Errors in Vietnamese Hospitals: Prevalence, Potential Outcome and Associated Factors

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Huong-Thao; Nguyen, Tuan-Dung; van den Heuvel, Edwin R.; Haaijer-Ruskamp, Flora M.; Taxis, Katja

    2015-01-01

    Background Evidence from developed countries showed that medication errors are common and harmful. Little is known about medication errors in resource-restricted settings, including Vietnam. Objectives To determine the prevalence and potential clinical outcome of medication preparation and administration errors, and to identify factors associated with errors. Methods This was a prospective study conducted on six wards in two urban public hospitals in Vietnam. Data of preparation and administration errors of oral and intravenous medications was collected by direct observation, 12 hours per day on 7 consecutive days, on each ward. Multivariable logistic regression was applied to identify factors contributing to errors. Results In total, 2060 out of 5271 doses had at least one error. The error rate was 39.1% (95% confidence interval 37.8%- 40.4%). Experts judged potential clinical outcomes as minor, moderate, and severe in 72 (1.4%), 1806 (34.2%) and 182 (3.5%) doses. Factors associated with errors were drug characteristics (administration route, complexity of preparation, drug class; all p values < 0.001), and administration time (drug round, p = 0.023; day of the week, p = 0.024). Several interactions between these factors were also significant. Nurse experience was not significant. Higher error rates were observed for intravenous medications involving complex preparation procedures and for anti-infective drugs. Slightly lower medication error rates were observed during afternoon rounds compared to other rounds. Conclusions Potentially clinically relevant errors occurred in more than a third of all medications in this large study conducted in a resource-restricted setting. Educational interventions, focusing on intravenous medications with complex preparation procedure, particularly antibiotics, are likely to improve patient safety. PMID:26383873

  19. Medication reconciliation errors in a tertiary care hospital in Saudi Arabia: admission discrepancies and risk factors.

    PubMed

    Mazhar, Faizan; Akram, Shahzad; Al-Osaimi, Yousif A; Haider, Nafis

    2017-01-01

    Medication reconciliation is a major component of safe patient care. One of the main problems in the implementation of a medication reconciliation process is the lack of human resources. With limited resources, it is better to target medication reconciliation resources to patients who will derive the most benefit from it. The primary objective of this study was to determine the frequency and types of medication reconciliation errors identified by pharmacists performing medication reconciliation at admission. Each medication error was rated for its potential to cause patient harm during hospitalization. A secondary objective was to determine risk factors associated with medication reconciliation errors. This was a prospective, single-center pilot study conducted in the internal medicine and surgical wards of a tertiary care teaching hospital in the Eastern province of Saudi Arabia. A clinical pharmacist took the best possible medication history of patients admitted to medical and surgical services and compared with the medication orders at hospital admission; any identified discrepancies were noted and analyzed for reconciliation errors. Multivariate logistic regression was performed to determine the risk factors related to reconciliation errors. A total of 328 patients (138 in surgical and 198 in medical) were included in the study. For the 1419 medications recorded, 1091 discrepancies were discovered out of which 491 (41.6%) were reconciliation errors. The errors affected 177 patients (54%). The incidence of reconciliation errors in the medical patient group was 25.1% and 32.0% in the surgical group (p<0.001). In both groups, the most frequent reconciliation error was the omission (43.5% and 51.2%). Lipid-lowering (12.4%) and antihypertensive agents were most commonly involved. If undetected, 43.6% of order errors were rated as potentially requiring increased monitoring or intervention to preclude harm; 17.7% were rated as potentially harmful. A multivariate

  20. Medical prevention and treatment of urinary stones.

    PubMed

    Colussi, G; De Ferrari, M E; Brunati, C; Civati, G

    2000-01-01

    Despite revolutionary developments in minimally invasive methods for the removal of stones in the last 15 years, the medical prevention of urinary stones remains very rewarding, due to the continual increase in the prevalence of nephrolithiasis in western countries, the high recurrence rate of the disease, its complications, discomfort and the costs of lithotripsy. Medical prevention is highly effective (50-95% efficacy in different series) and cost-convenient; its basic elements are appropriate metabolic evaluation, adequate hydration, "common sense" diet, and, in selected cases, drugs of proven efficacy. Clinical-metabolic evaluation should aim at the recognition of specific types of nephrolithiasis, and sort out secondary and/or remediable cases, define urinary risk factors, assess patients' compliance and the side effects of any therapy during follow-up. Hydration has proved effective in clinical trials and population-based observational studies; "fluids" may consist of water (any kind), coffee (caffeinated or decaffeinated), tea, beer and wine; grapefruit juice appears to have an unexplained ill effect. Despite the lack of clinical demonstration that dietary manipulations reduce the recurrences of stones, biochemical and epidemiological data suggest that high sodium, animal protein and sucrose intake increase the risk. Undue reductions in Ca intake also appear to be detrimental both for stone recurrences and bone mineralisation: "adequate" Ca intake (800-1000 mg/day) should be encouraged, but only in food since supplemental Ca, as drugs, appears to increase the risk of stones. Effective drugs are available for cystine, uric acid, infected stones and several secondary causes of Ca nephrolithiasis; in "idiopathic" Ca nephrolithiasis, thiazides, allopurinol, K and K-Mg citrate and possibly neutral K phosphate have been shown to be effective, at least in specific metabolic contexts.

  1. Professional, structural and organisational interventions in primary care for reducing medication errors.

    PubMed

    Khalil, Hanan; Bell, Brian; Chambers, Helen; Sheikh, Aziz; Avery, Anthony J

    2017-10-04

    Medication-related adverse events in primary care represent an important cause of hospital admissions and mortality. Adverse events could result from people experiencing adverse drug reactions (not usually preventable) or could be due to medication errors (usually preventable). To determine the effectiveness of professional, organisational and structural interventions compared to standard care to reduce preventable medication errors by primary healthcare professionals that lead to hospital admissions, emergency department visits, and mortality in adults. We searched CENTRAL, MEDLINE, Embase, three other databases, and two trial registries on 4 October 2016, together with reference checking, citation searching and contact with study authors to identify additional studies. We also searched several sources of grey literature. We included randomised trials in which healthcare professionals provided community-based medical services. We also included interventions in outpatient clinics attached to a hospital where people are seen by healthcare professionals but are not admitted to hospital. We only included interventions that aimed to reduce medication errors leading to hospital admissions, emergency department visits, or mortality. We included all participants, irrespective of age, who were prescribed medication by a primary healthcare professional. Three review authors independently extracted data. Each of the outcomes (hospital admissions, emergency department visits, and mortality), are reported in natural units (i.e. number of participants with an event per total number of participants at follow-up). We presented all outcomes as risk ratios (RRs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs). We used the GRADE tool to assess the certainty of evidence. We included 30 studies (169,969 participants) in the review addressing various interventions to prevent medication errors; four studies addressed professional interventions (8266 participants) and 26 studies described

  2. Obligation towards medical errors disclosure at a tertiary care hospital in Dubai, UAE

    PubMed Central

    Zaghloul, Ashraf Ahmad; Rahman, Syed Azizur; Abou El-Enein, Nagwa Younes

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The study aimed to identify healthcare providers’ obligation towards medical errors disclosure as well as to study the association between the severity of the medical error and the intention to disclose the error to the patients and their families. DESIGN: A cross-sectional study design was followed to identify the magnitude of disclosure among healthcare providers in different departments at a randomly selected tertiary care hospital in Dubai. SETTING AND PARTICIPANTS: The total sample size accounted for 106 respondents. Data were collected using a questionnaire composed of two sections namely; demographic variables of the respondents and a section which included variables relevant to medical error disclosure. RESULTS: Statistical analysis yielded significant association between the obligation to disclose medical errors with male healthcare providers (X2 = 5.1), and being a physician (X2 = 19.3). Obligation towards medical errors disclosure was significantly associated with those healthcare providers who had not committed any medical errors during the past year (X2 = 9.8), and any type of medical error regardless the cause, extent of harm (X2 = 8.7). Variables included in the binary logistic regression model were; status (Exp β (Physician) = 0.39, 95% CI 0.16–0.97), gender (Exp β (Male) = 4.81, 95% CI 1.84–12.54), and medical errors during the last year (Exp β (None) = 2.11, 95% CI 0.6–2.3). CONCLUSION: Education and training of physicians about disclosure conversations needs to start as early as medical school. Like the training in other competencies required of physicians, education in communicating about medical errors could help reduce physicians’ apprehension and make them more comfortable with disclosure conversations. PMID:27567766

  3. Obligation towards medical errors disclosure at a tertiary care hospital in Dubai, UAE.

    PubMed

    Zaghloul, Ashraf Ahmad; Rahman, Syed Azizur; Abou El-Enein, Nagwa Younes

    2016-08-22

    The study aimed to identify healthcare providers' obligation towards medical errors disclosure as well as to study the association between the severity of the medical error and the intention to disclose the error to the patients and their families. A cross-sectional study design was followed to identify the magnitude of disclosure among healthcare providers in different departments at a randomly selected tertiary care hospital in Dubai. The total sample size accounted for 106 respondents. Data were collected using a questionnaire composed of two sections namely; demographic variables of the respondents and a section which included variables relevant to medical error disclosure. Statistical analysis yielded significant association between the obligation to disclose medical errors with male healthcare providers (X2 = 5.1), and being a physician (X2 = 19.3). Obligation towards medical errors disclosure was significantly associated with those healthcare providers who had not committed any medical errors during the past year (X2 = 9.8), and any type of medical error regardless the cause, extent of harm (X2 = 8.7). Variables included in the binary logistic regression model were; status (Exp β (Physician) = 0.39, 95% CI 0.16-0.97), gender (Exp β (Male) = 4.81, 95% CI 1.84-12.54), and medical errors during the last year (Exp β (None) = 2.11, 95% CI 0.6-2.3). Education and training of physicians about disclosure conversations needs to start as early as medical school. Like the training in other competencies required of physicians, education in communicating about medical errors could help reduce physicians' apprehension and make them more comfortable with disclosure conversations.

  4. Voluntary Medical Incident Reporting Tool to Improve Physician Reporting of Medical Errors in an Emergency Department.

    PubMed

    Okafor, Nnaemeka G; Doshi, Pratik B; Miller, Sara K; McCarthy, James J; Hoot, Nathan R; Darger, Bryan F; Benitez, Roberto C; Chathampally, Yashwant G

    2015-12-01

    Medical errors are frequently under-reported, yet their appropriate analysis, coupled with remediation, is essential for continuous quality improvement. The emergency department (ED) is recognized as a complex and chaotic environment prone to errors. In this paper, we describe the design and implementation of a web-based ED-specific incident reporting system using an iterative process. A web-based, password-protected tool was developed by members of a quality assurance committee for ED providers to report incidents that they believe could impact patient safety. The utilization of this system in one residency program with two academic sites resulted in an increase from 81 reported incidents in 2009, the first year of use, to 561 reported incidents in 2012. This is an increase in rate of reported events from 0.07% of all ED visits to 0.44% of all ED visits. In 2012, faculty reported 60% of all incidents, while residents and midlevel providers reported 24% and 16% respectively. The most commonly reported incidents were delays in care and management concerns. Error reporting frequency can be dramatically improved by using a web-based, user-friendly, voluntary, and non-punitive reporting system.

  5. Voluntary Medical Incident Reporting Tool to Improve Physician Reporting of Medical Errors in an Emergency Department

    PubMed Central

    Okafor, Nnaemeka G.; Doshi, Pratik B.; Miller, Sara K.; McCarthy, James J.; Hoot, Nathan R.; Darger, Bryan F.; Benitez, Roberto C.; Chathampally, Yashwant G.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Medical errors are frequently under-reported, yet their appropriate analysis, coupled with remediation, is essential for continuous quality improvement. The emergency department (ED) is recognized as a complex and chaotic environment prone to errors. In this paper, we describe the design and implementation of a web-based ED-specific incident reporting system using an iterative process. Methods A web-based, password-protected tool was developed by members of a quality assurance committee for ED providers to report incidents that they believe could impact patient safety. Results The utilization of this system in one residency program with two academic sites resulted in an increase from 81 reported incidents in 2009, the first year of use, to 561 reported incidents in 2012. This is an increase in rate of reported events from 0.07% of all ED visits to 0.44% of all ED visits. In 2012, faculty reported 60% of all incidents, while residents and midlevel providers reported 24% and 16% respectively. The most commonly reported incidents were delays in care and management concerns. Conclusion Error reporting frequency can be dramatically improved by using a web-based, user-friendly, voluntary, and non-punitive reporting system. PMID:26759657

  6. [Preventive medical effects of nature therapy].

    PubMed

    Miyazaki, Yoshifumi; Lee, Juyoung; Park, Bum-Jin; Tsunetsugu, Yuko; Matsunaga, Keiko

    2011-09-01

    Five million years has passed since a subset of primates recognizably became human. Because we have already spent more than 99.99% of our evolutionary history in natural environments, it is thought that we are essentially adaptive to nature. However, we live in a society characterized by urbanization and artificiality, despite our physiological functions still being adapted to nature. We conducted experiments involving 420 subjects at 35 different forests throughout Japan. As a result, these subjects sitting in natural surroundings showed decreases in the following physiological indices compared with the urban control group: 12.4% decrease in cortisol level, 7.0% decrease in sympathetic nervous activity, 1.4% decrease in systolic blood pressure, and 5.8% decrease in heart rate. This shows that stressful states can be relieved by forest therapy. It should also be noted that parasympathetic nerve activity increased by 55.0%, indicating a relaxed state. The results of walking experiments were also similar. Li et al. demonstrated that immune functions are enhanced by forest therapy. Middle-aged employees volunteered to participate in these experiments. NK (natural killer cells) activity, as an indicator of immune function, increased by 56% on the second day and returned to normal levels. A significant increase of 23% was maintained for 1 month even after these subjects returned to urban life, clearly illustrating the preventive medical effects of nature therapy. We expect nature therapy to play an increasingly important role in preventive medicine in the future.

  7. The approach of Bayesian model indicates media awareness of medical errors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ravichandran, K.; Arulchelvan, S.

    2016-06-01

    This research study brings out the factors behind the increase in medical malpractices in the Indian subcontinent in the present day environment and impacts of television media awareness towards it. Increased media reporting of medical malpractices and errors lead to hospitals taking corrective action and improve the quality of medical services that they provide. The model of Cultivation Theory can be used to measure the influence of media in creating awareness of medical errors. The patient's perceptions of various errors rendered by the medical industry from different parts of India were taken up for this study. Bayesian method was used for data analysis and it gives absolute values to indicate satisfaction of the recommended values. To find out the impact of maintaining medical records of a family online by the family doctor in reducing medical malpractices which creates the importance of service quality in medical industry through the ICT.

  8. Interventions to reduce nurses' medication administration errors in inpatient settings: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Berdot, Sarah; Roudot, Marjorie; Schramm, Catherine; Katsahian, Sandrine; Durieux, Pierre; Sabatier, Brigitte

    2016-01-01

    Serious medication administration errors are common in hospitals. Various interventions, including barcode-based technologies, have been developed to help prevent such errors. This systematic review and this meta-analysis focus on the efficacy of interventions for reducing medication administration errors. The types of error and their gravity were also studied. MEDLINE, EMBASE, the Cochrane Library and reference lists of relevant articles published between January 1975 and August 2014 were searched, without language restriction. Randomized controlled trials, interrupted time-series studies, non-randomized controlled trials and controlled before-and-after studies were included. Studies evaluating interventions for decreasing administration errors based on total opportunity for error method were included. Nurses administering medications to adult or child inpatients were considered eligible as participants. Two reviewers independently assessed studies for eligibility, extracted data and assessed the risk of bias. The main outcome was the error rate without wrong-time errors measured at study level. A random effects model was used to evaluate the effects of interventions on administration errors. 5312 records from electronic database searches were identified. Seven studies were included: five were randomized controlled trials (including one crossover trial) and two were non-randomized controlled trials. Interventions were training-related (n=4; dedicated medication nurses, interactive CD-ROM program, simulation-based learning, pharmacist-led training program), and technology-related (n=3; computerized prescribing and automated medication dispensing systems). All studies were subject to a high risk of bias, mostly due to a lack of blinding to outcome assessment and a risk of contamination. No difference between the control group and the intervention group was found (OR=0.72 [0.39; 1.34], p=0.3). No fatal error was observed in the three studies evaluating the gravity of

  9. Implementation of an audit with feedback knowledge translation intervention to promote medication error reporting in health care: a protocol.

    PubMed

    Hutchinson, Alison M; Sales, Anne E; Brotto, Vanessa; Bucknall, Tracey K

    2015-05-19

    Health professionals strive to deliver high-quality care in an inherently complex and error-prone environment. Underreporting of medical errors challenges attempts to understand causative factors and impedes efforts to implement preventive strategies. Audit with feedback is a knowledge translation strategy that has potential to modify health professionals' medical error reporting behaviour. However, evidence regarding which aspects of this complex, multi-dimensional intervention work best is lacking. The aims of the Safe Medication Audit Reporting Translation (SMART) study are to: 1. Implement and refine a reporting mechanism to feed audit data on medication errors back to nurses 2. Test the feedback reporting mechanism to determine its utility and effect 3. Identify characteristics of organisational context associated with error reporting in response to feedback A quasi-experimental design, incorporating two pairs of matched wards at an acute care hospital, is used. Randomisation occurs at the ward level; one ward from each pair is randomised to receive the intervention. A key stakeholder reference group informs the design and delivery of the feedback intervention. Nurses on the intervention wards receive the feedback intervention (feedback of analysed audit data) on a quarterly basis for 12 months. Data for the feedback intervention come from medication documentation point-prevalence audits and weekly reports on routinely collected medication error data. Weekly reports on these data are obtained for the control wards. A controlled interrupted time series analysis is used to evaluate the effect of the feedback intervention. Self-report data are also collected from nurses on all four wards at baseline and at completion of the intervention to elicit their perceptions of the work context. Additionally, following each feedback cycle, nurses on the intervention wards are invited to complete a survey to evaluate the feedback and to establish their intentions to change

  10. Medication errors in the obstetrics emergency ward in a low resource setting.

    PubMed

    Kandil, Mohamed; Sayyed, Tarek; Emarh, Mohamed; Ellakwa, Hamed; Masood, Alaa

    2012-08-01

    To investigate the patterns of medication errors in the obstetric emergency ward in a low resource setting. This prospective observational study included 10,000 women who presented at the obstetric emergency ward, department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Menofyia University Hospital, Egypt between March and December 2010. All medications prescribed in the emergency ward were monitored for different types of errors. The head nurse in each shift was asked to monitor each pharmacologic order from the moment of prescribing till its administration. Retrospective review of the patients' charts and nurses' notes was carried out by the authors of this paper. Results were tabulated and statistically analyzed. A total of 1976 medication errors were detected. Administration errors were the commonest error reported. Omitted errors ranked second followed by unauthorized and prescription errors. Three administration errors resulted in three Cesareans were performed for fetal distress because of wrong doses of oxytocin infusion. The rest of errors did not cause patients harm but may have lead to an increase in monitoring. Most errors occurred during night shifts. The availability of automated infusion pumps will probably decrease administration errors significantly. There is a need for more obstetricians and nurses during the nightshifts to minimize errors resulting from working under stressful conditions.

  11. Speak Up: Help Prevent Errors in Your Care: Laboratory Services

    MedlinePlus

    ... and the health care professional calls it a “chemistry panel,” speak up. Ask your doctor for a ... information or brochures— are from your doctor and pharmacy. • Read all medical forms. Make sure you understand ...

  12. [The alliance of the parent, child and the nurse to challenge medical error].

    PubMed

    Davous, D; Seigneur, E; Auvrignon, A; Kerjosse, B; Asselain, B; Brugières, L; Cerny, C; Corroyez, F; Desdouits, F; Heard, M; Souyri, V; Vialle, G; Velter, N; Bourdeaut, F

    2010-12-01

    A group composed of parents, nurses, and physicians involved in pediatric cancerology has reflected on medical errors within the Espace Éthique de l'Assistance publique-Hôpitaux de Paris. Based on narratives and qualitative analysis of histories and testimonies, this discussion aimed at exploring the causes, circumstances, and impacts of medical errors on the relations between these individuals. The study demonstrated that some circumstances actually promote medical errors, such as hard working conditions, mistrust, unreliable control procedures, not listening to parents, and caring for children in extreme situations of pain and suffering. Errors almost always result from the accumulation of several shortcomings. The tensions raised by a medical error can be overcome, provided that parents and caregivers trust each other from the onset of disease and that the medical errors are disclosed in a sincere way, whatever the medical consequences. The feelings raised by the painful experience of a medical error do not solely depend on the severity of the consequences, since seemingly benign errors may lead to long-term trauma, whereas severe errors, even those leading to death, do not necessarily breach trust. The keyword here is permanent vigilance. The capacity of caregivers to question their practice, from both a technical and ethical point of view, will determine their ability to learn from an error for the future. The depth and quality of this questioning, in the best of times encouraged by the institution, may also help children affected by a medical error and their family to move forward in their personal history, beyond such painful experiences. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  13. Factors contributing to an increase in duplicate medication order errors after CPOE implementation.

    PubMed

    Wetterneck, Tosha B; Walker, James M; Blosky, Mary Ann; Cartmill, Randi S; Hoonakker, Peter; Johnson, Mark A; Norfolk, Evan; Carayon, Pascale

    2011-01-01

    To evaluate the incidence of duplicate medication orders before and after computerized provider order entry (CPOE) with clinical decision support (CDS) implementation and identify contributing factors. CPOE with duplicate medication order alerts was implemented in a 400-bed Northeastern US community tertiary care teaching hospital. In a pre-implementation post-implementation design, trained nurses used chart review, computer-generated reports of medication orders, provider alerts, and staff reports to identify medication errors in two intensive care units (ICUs). Medication error data were adjudicated by a physician and a human factors engineer for error stage and type. A qualitative analysis of duplicate medication ordering errors was performed to identify contributing factors. Data were collected for 4147 patient-days pre-implementation and 4013 patient-days post-implementation. Duplicate medication ordering errors increased after CPOE implementation (pre: 48 errors, 2.6% total; post: 167 errors, 8.1% total; p<0.0001). Most post-implementation duplicate orders were either for the identical order or the same medication. Contributing factors included: (1) provider ordering practices and computer availability, for example, two orders placed within minutes by different providers on rounds; (2) communication and hand-offs, for example, duplicate orders around shift change; (3) CDS and medication database design, for example confusing alert content, high false-positive alert rate, and CDS algorithms missing true duplicates; (4) CPOE data display, for example, difficulty reviewing existing orders; and (5) local CDS design, for example, medications in order sets defaulted as ordered. Duplicate medication order errors increased with CPOE and CDS implementation. Many work system factors, including the CPOE, CDS, and medication database design, contributed to their occurrence.

  14. Understanding the Nature of Medication Errors in an ICU with a Computerized Physician Order Entry System

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Insook; Park, Hyeok; Choi, Youn Jeong; Hwang, Mi Heui; Bates, David W.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives We investigated incidence rates to understand the nature of medication errors potentially introduced by utilizing a computerized physician order entry (CPOE) system in the three clinical phases of the medication process: prescription, administration, and documentation. Methods Overt observations and chart reviews were employed at two surgical intensive care units of a 950-bed tertiary teaching hospital. Ten categories of high-risk drugs prescribed over a four-month period were noted and reviewed. Error definition and classifications were adapted from previous studies for use in the present research. Incidences of medication errors in the three phases of the medication process were analyzed. In addition, nurses' responses to prescription errors were also assessed. Results Of the 534 prescriptions issued, 286 (53.6%) included at least one error. The proportion of errors was 19.0% (58) of the 306 drug administrations, of which two-thirds were verbal orders classified as errors due to incorrectly entered prescriptions. Documentation errors occurred in 205 (82.7%) of 248 correctly performed administrations. When tracking incorrectly entered prescriptions, 93% of the errors were intercepted by nurses, but two-thirds of them were recorded as prescribed rather than administered. Conclusion The number of errors occurring at each phase of the medication process was relatively high, despite long experience with a CPOE system. The main causes of administration errors and documentation errors were prescription errors and verbal order processes. To reduce these errors, hospital-level and unit-level efforts toward a better system are needed. PMID:25526059

  15. Normal accidents: human error and medical equipment design.

    PubMed

    Dain, Steven

    2002-01-01

    High-risk systems, which are typical of our technologically complex era, include not just nuclear power plants but also hospitals, anesthesia systems, and the practice of medicine and perfusion. In high-risk systems, no matter how effective safety devices are, some types of accidents are inevitable because the system's complexity leads to multiple and unexpected interactions. It is important for healthcare providers to apply a risk assessment and management process to decisions involving new equipment and procedures or staffing matters in order to minimize the residual risks of latent errors, which are amenable to correction because of the large window of opportunity for their detection. This article provides an introduction to basic risk management and error theory principles and examines ways in which they can be applied to reduce and mitigate the inevitable human errors that accompany high-risk systems. The article also discusses "human factor engineering" (HFE), the process which is used to design equipment/ human interfaces in order to mitigate design errors. The HFE process involves interaction between designers and endusers to produce a series of continuous refinements that are incorporated into the final product. The article also examines common design problems encountered in the operating room that may predispose operators to commit errors resulting in harm to the patient. While recognizing that errors and accidents are unavoidable, organizations that function within a high-risk system must adopt a "safety culture" that anticipates problems and acts aggressively through an anonymous, "blameless" reporting mechanism to resolve them. We must continuously examine and improve the design of equipment and procedures, personnel, supplies and materials, and the environment in which we work to reduce error and minimize its effects. Healthcare providers must take a leading role in the day-to-day management of the "Perioperative System" and be a role model in

  16. The incidence and severity of errors in pharmacist-written discharge medication orders.

    PubMed

    Onatade, Raliat; Sawieres, Sara; Veck, Alexandra; Smith, Lindsay; Gore, Shivani; Al-Azeib, Sumiah

    2017-08-01

    Background Errors in discharge prescriptions are problematic. When hospital pharmacists write discharge prescriptions improvements are seen in the quality and efficiency of discharge. There is limited information on the incidence of errors in pharmacists' medication orders. Objective To investigate the extent and clinical significance of errors in pharmacist-written discharge medication orders. Setting 1000-bed teaching hospital in London, UK. Method Pharmacists in this London hospital routinely write discharge medication orders as part of the clinical pharmacy service. Convenient days, based on researcher availability, between October 2013 and January 2014 were selected. Pre-registration pharmacists reviewed all discharge medication orders written by pharmacists on these days and identified discrepancies between the medication history, inpatient chart, patient records and discharge summary. A senior clinical pharmacist confirmed the presence of an error. Each error was assigned a potential clinical significance rating (based on the NCCMERP scale) by a physician and an independent senior clinical pharmacist, working separately. Main outcome measure Incidence of errors in pharmacist-written discharge medication orders. Results 509 prescriptions, written by 51 pharmacists, containing 4258 discharge medication orders were assessed (8.4 orders per prescription). Ten prescriptions (2%), contained a total of ten erroneous orders (order error rate-0.2%). The pharmacist considered that one error had the potential to cause temporary harm (0.02% of all orders). The physician did not rate any of the errors with the potential to cause harm. Conclusion The incidence of errors in pharmacists' discharge medication orders was low. The quality, safety and policy implications of pharmacists routinely writing discharge medication orders should be further explored.

  17. Medication administration errors from a nursing viewpoint: a formal consensus of definition and scenarios using a Delphi technique.

    PubMed

    Shawahna, Ramzi; Masri, Dina; Al-Gharabeh, Rawan; Deek, Rawan; Al-Thayba, Lama; Halaweh, Masa

    2016-02-01

    To develop and achieve formal consensus on a definition of medication administration errors and scenarios that should or should not be considered as medication administration errors in hospitalised patient settings. Medication administration errors occur frequently in hospitalised patient settings. Currently, there is no formal consensus on a definition of medication administration errors or scenarios that should or should not be considered as medication administration errors. This was a descriptive study using Delphi technique. A panel of experts (n = 50) recruited from major hospitals, nursing schools and universities in Palestine took part in the study. Three Delphi rounds were followed to achieve consensus on a proposed definition of medication administration errors and a series of 61 scenarios representing potential medication administration error situations formulated into a questionnaire. In the first Delphi round, key contact nurses' views on medication administration errors were explored. In the second Delphi round, consensus was achieved to accept the proposed definition of medication administration errors and to include 36 (59%) scenarios and exclude 1 (1·6%) as medication administration errors. In the third Delphi round, consensus was achieved to consider further 14 (23%) and exclude 2 (3·3%) as medication administration errors while the remaining eight (13·1%) were considered equivocal. Of the 61 scenarios included in the Delphi process, experts decided to include 50 scenarios as medication administration errors, exclude three scenarios and include or exclude eight scenarios depending on the individual clinical situation. Consensus on a definition and scenarios representing medication administration errors can be achieved using formal consensus techniques. Researchers should be aware that using different definitions of medication administration errors, inclusion or exclusion of medication administration error situations could significantly affect

  18. Provider risk factors for medication administration error alerts: analyses of a large-scale closed-loop medication administration system using RFID and barcode.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Yeonsoo; Yoon, Dukyong; Ahn, Eun Kyoung; Hwang, Hee; Park, Rae Woong

    2016-12-01

    To determine the risk factors and rate of medication administration error (MAE) alerts by analyzing large-scale medication administration data and related error logs automatically recorded in a closed-loop medication administration system using radio-frequency identification and barcodes. The subject hospital adopted a closed-loop medication administration system. All medication administrations in the general wards were automatically recorded in real-time using radio-frequency identification, barcodes, and hand-held point-of-care devices. MAE alert logs recorded during a full 1 year of 2012. We evaluated risk factors for MAE alerts including administration time, order type, medication route, the number of medication doses administered, and factors associated with nurse practices by logistic regression analysis. A total of 2 874 539 medication dose records from 30 232 patients (882.6 patient-years) were included in 2012. We identified 35 082 MAE alerts (1.22% of total medication doses). The MAE alerts were significantly related to administration at non-standard time [odds ratio (OR) 1.559, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.515-1.604], emergency order (OR 1.527, 95%CI 1.464-1.594), and the number of medication doses administered (OR 0.993, 95%CI 0.992-0.993). Medication route, nurse's employment duration, and working schedule were also significantly related. The MAE alert rate was 1.22% over the 1-year observation period in the hospital examined in this study. The MAE alerts were significantly related to administration time, order type, medication route, the number of medication doses administered, nurse's employment duration, and working schedule. The real-time closed-loop medication administration system contributed to improving patient safety by preventing potential MAEs. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  19. Database design to ensure anonymous study of medical errors: a report from the ASIPS Collaborative.

    PubMed

    Pace, Wilson D; Staton, Elizabeth W; Higgins, Gregory S; Main, Deborah S; West, David R; Harris, Daniel M

    2003-01-01

    Medical error reporting systems are important information sources for designing strategies to improve the safety of health care. Applied Strategies for Improving Patient Safety (ASIPS) is a multi-institutional, practice-based research project that collects and analyzes data on primary care medical errors and develops interventions to reduce error. The voluntary ASIPS Patient Safety Reporting System captures anonymous and confidential reports of medical errors. Confidential reports, which are quickly de-identified, provide better detail than do anonymous reports; however, concerns exist about the confidentiality of those reports should the database be subject to legal discovery or other security breaches. Standard database elements, for example, serial ID numbers, date/time stamps, and backups, could enable an outsider to link an ASIPS report to a specific medical error. The authors present the design and implementation of a database and administrative system that reduce this risk, facilitate research, and maintain near anonymity of the events, practices, and clinicians.

  20. Database Design to Ensure Anonymous Study of Medical Errors: A Report from the ASIPS collaborative

    PubMed Central

    Pace, Wilson D.; Staton, Elizabeth W.; Higgins, Gregory S.; Main, Deborah S.; West, David R.; Harris, Daniel M.

    2003-01-01

    Medical error reporting systems are important information sources for designing strategies to improve the safety of health care. Applied Strategies for Improving Patient Safety (ASIPS) is a multi-institutional, practice-based research project that collects and analyzes data on primary care medical errors and develops interventions to reduce error. The voluntary ASIPS Patient Safety Reporting System captures anonymous and confidential reports of medical errors. Confidential reports, which are quickly de-identified, provide better detail than do anonymous reports; however, concerns exist about the confidentiality of those reports should the database be subject to legal discovery or other security breaches. Standard database elements, for example, serial ID numbers, date/time stamps, and backups, could enable an outsider to link an ASIPS report to a specific medical error. The authors present the design and implementation of a database and administrative system that reduce this risk, facilitate research, and maintain near anonymity of the events, practices, and clinicians. PMID:12925548

  1. Medication errors in residential aged care facilities: a distributed cognition analysis of the information exchange process.

    PubMed

    Tariq, Amina; Georgiou, Andrew; Westbrook, Johanna

    2013-05-01

    Medication safety is a pressing concern for residential aged care facilities (RACFs). Retrospective studies in RACF settings identify inadequate communication between RACFs, doctors, hospitals and community pharmacies as the major cause of medication errors. Existing literature offers limited insight about the gaps in the existing information exchange process that may lead to medication errors. The aim of this research was to explicate the cognitive distribution that underlies RACF medication ordering and delivery to identify gaps in medication-related information exchange which lead to medication errors in RACFs. The study was undertaken in three RACFs in Sydney, Australia. Data were generated through ethnographic field work over a period of five months (May-September 2011). Triangulated analysis of data primarily focused on examining the transformation and exchange of information between different media across the process. The findings of this study highlight the extensive scope and intense nature of information exchange in RACF medication ordering and delivery. Rather than attributing error to individual care providers, the explication of distributed cognition processes enabled the identification of gaps in three information exchange dimensions which potentially contribute to the occurrence of medication errors namely: (1) design of medication charts which complicates order processing and record keeping (2) lack of coordination mechanisms between participants which results in misalignment of local practices (3) reliance on restricted communication bandwidth channels mainly telephone and fax which complicates the information processing requirements. The study demonstrates how the identification of these gaps enhances understanding of medication errors in RACFs. Application of the theoretical lens of distributed cognition can assist in enhancing our understanding of medication errors in RACFs through identification of gaps in information exchange. Understanding

  2. A survey and multilevel analysis of nursing unit tenure diversity and medication errors.

    PubMed

    Kim, Min Young; Kim, Young Mee; Kang, Seung-Wan

    2016-07-01

    This empirical research aimed to identify relationships between nurses' unit tenure, nursing unit tenure diversity and medication errors. Research examining medication errors has paid little attention to the effects of multilevel precursors. In total, 567 registered nurses (from 36 nursing units) completed a survey questionnaire at a university hospital during September 2012. Of these, 334 (completed by nurses from 22 nursing units) were eligible for multilevel analysis. The average frequency of self-reported medication errors per registered nurse in the preceding 6 months was 0.98. Multilevel analysis showed that medication errors were significantly negatively associated with nurses' unit tenure at individual level (B = -0.64, P = 0.002) and nursing unit tenure diversity at unit level (B = -0.69, P < 0.001). Furthermore, nursing unit tenure diversity moderated the relationship between nurses' unit tenure and medication errors (B = 0.48, P = 0.012). This study provided evidence indicating that novice nurses made a higher number of medication errors relative to experienced nurses, and that including a mixture of novice and experienced nurses in a nursing unit attenuated novice nurses' medication errors. The development of staffing strategies that enhance nursing unit tenure diversity is required. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Current approaches to punitive action for medication errors by boards of pharmacy.

    PubMed

    Holdsworth, Mark; Wittstrom, Kristina; Yeitrakis, Tiffany

    2013-04-01

    To increase disclosure of errors and lead to system improvements, publications recommend a nonpunitive approach to medication errors. To our knowledge there is no published information regarding the extent or bases on which boards of pharmacy invoke punitive action against pharmacists involved in medication errors. To determine how often and on what bases boards of pharmacy determine punitive action to be taken against pharmacists involved in medication error events. The policies, procedures, and practices regarding medication errors by pharmacists for 49 of the 50 US boards of pharmacy were reviewed by pharmacy students at the University of New Mexico as a Safe Medication Practices class assignment. Most boards of pharmacy invoke punitive action against pharmacists involved in medication errors. Most states do not have specific rules or regulations that stipulate errors as actual violations and most determinations are made on a case-by-case basis. The major determinants of punitive action were error severity, actual patient injury, patient complaints, and factors related to the pharmacist. The most common types of punitive action include license suspension, probation, or revocation, and fines. In at least 17 states, incarceration was also a possible punitive action. The most common bases for punitive action were to address public safety/health and public complaints. Despite the fact that punitive action is not recommended as best practice for addressing medication errors made by health care practitioners, most state boards of pharmacy use punitive measures against pharmacists involved in medication errors. Based on current recommendations, such actions would not be expected to lead to improvements in the health care system.

  4. What do hospital staff in the UK think are the causes of penicillin medication errors?

    PubMed

    Wilcock, Michael; Harding, Geoff; Moore, Lorraine; Nicholls, Ian; Powell, Neil; Stratton, Jon

    2013-02-01

    Medication errors are a potential major threat to patient's health, and allergic reactions occurring in patients with known allergies are an important preventable form of adverse drug event. The use of penicillin antibiotics in patients who are allergic to penicillin, in particular, is a major concern. To survey staff attitudes and beliefs to incidents involving penicillin allergic patients who are prescribed and administered penicillin antibiotics. A 650 bed teaching hospital in England. Using individual and (focus) group interview proceedings with a purposive sample of doctors, nurses and pharmacists, an electronic questionnaire was administered hospital wide to all clinical staff. No reminders were issued. Clinical staff's views on the causes of penicillin medication errors. The electronic survey was completed by 235 members of the clinical staff. Half the respondents definitely considered themselves knowledgeable about which antibiotics contain penicillin medicines, though approximately 90 % of respondents considered that misinformation or lack of knowledge on which antibiotics contain penicillin medicines was an issue for some or most colleagues. Various organisational issues such as the use of red wrist bands, the wearing of red tabards by the nurse during the medicines round, and a busy work environment were recurrently highlighted as systems factors that could be improved upon. Our study elucidated concerns amongst clinical staff relating to the scenario of a penicillin allergic patient receiving a penicillin antibiotic. The resulting local learning and feedback about staff beliefs pertaining to this one specific type of error will be used to consider the nature and type of local action to be taken to help improve patient safety.

  5. A retrospective review of medical errors adjudicated in court between 2002 and 2012 in Spain.

    PubMed

    Giraldo, Priscila; Sato, Luke; Sala, María; Comas, Merce; Dywer, Kathy; Castells, Xavier

    2016-02-01

    This paper describes verdicts in court involving injury-producing medical errors in Spain. A descriptive analysis of 1041 closed court verdicts from Spain between January 2002 and December 2012. It was determined whether a medical error had occurred, and among those with medical error (n = 270), characteristics and results of litigation were analyzed. Data on litigation were obtained from the Thomson Reuters Aranzadi Westlaw databases. All verdicts involving health system were reviewed and classified according to the presence of medical error. Among those, contributory factors, medical specialty involved, health impact (death, disability and severity) and results of litigation (resolution, time to verdict and economic compensations) were described. Medical errors were involved in 25.9% of court verdicts. The cause of medical error was a diagnosis-related problem in 25.1% and surgical treatment in 22.2%, and Obstetrics-Gynecology was the most frequent involved specialty (21%). Most of them were of high severity (59.4%), one-third (32%) caused death. The average time interval between the occurrence of the error and the verdict was 7.8 years. The average indemnity payment was €239 505.24; the highest was psychiatry (€7 585 075.86) and the lowest was Emergency Medicine (€69 871.19). This study indicates that in Spain medical errors are common among verdicts involving the health system, most of them causing high-severity adverse outcomes. The interval between the medical error and the verdict is excessive, and there is a wide range of economic compensation. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press in association with the International Society for Quality in Health Care; all rights reserved.

  6. Medicalization as a moral problem for preventative medicine.

    PubMed

    Verweij, Marcel

    1999-04-01

    Preventive medicine is sometimes criticised as it contributes to medicalization of normal life. The concept 'medicalization' has been introduced by Zola to refer to processes in which the labels 'health' and 'ill' are made relevant for more and more aspects of human life. If preventive medicine contributes to medicalization, would that be morally problematic? My thesis is that such a contribution is indeed morally problematic. The concept is sometimes used to express moral intuitions regarding the practice of prevention and health promotion. Through analysis of these intuitions as well as some other moral concerns, I give an explication of the moral problems of medicalization within the context of preventive medicine.

  7. Preventable deaths following emergency medical dispatch--an audit study.

    PubMed

    Andersen, Mikkel S; Johnsen, Søren Paaske; Hansen, Andreas Ernst; Skjaerseth, Eivinn; Hansen, Christian Muff; Sørensen, Jan Nørtved; Jepsen, Søren Bruun; Hansen, Jesper Bjerring; Christensen, Erika Frischknecht

    2014-12-19

    Call taker triage of calls to the 112 emergency number, can be error prone because rapid decisions must be made based on limited information. Here we investigated the preventability and common characteristics of same-day deaths among patients who called 112 and were not assigned an ambulance with lights and sirens by the Emergency Medical Communication Centre (EMCC). An audit was performed by an external panel of experienced prehospital consultant anaesthesiologists. The panel focused exclusively on the role of the EMCC, assessing whether same-day deaths among 112 callers could have been prevented if the EMCC had assessed the situations as highly urgent. The panels' assessments were based on review of patient charts and voice-log recordings of 112 calls. All patient related material was reviewed by the audit panel and all cases where then scored as preventable, potentially preventable or non-preventable during a two day meeting. The study setting was three of five regions in Denmark with a combined population of 4,182,613 inhabitants, which equals 75% of the Danish population. The study period was 18 months, from mid-2011 to the end of 2012. Linkage of prospectively collected EMCC data with population-based registries resulted in the identification of 94,488 non-high-acuity 112 callers. Among these callers, 152 (0.16% of all) died on the same day as the corresponding 112 call, and were included in this study. The mean age of included patients was 74.4 years (range, 31-100 years) and 45.4% were female. The audit panel found no definitively preventable deaths; however, 18 (11.8%) of the analysed same-day deaths (0.02% of all non-high-acuity callers) were found to be potentially preventable. In 13 of these 18 cases, the dispatch protocol was either not used or not used correctly. Same-day death rarely occurred among 112 callers whose situations were assessed as not highly urgent. No same-day deaths were found to be definitively preventable by a different EMCC call

  8. Eleven-year descriptive analysis of closed court verdicts on medical errors in Spain and Massachusetts.

    PubMed

    Giraldo, Priscila; Sato, Luke; Martínez-Sánchez, Jose M; Comas, Mercè; Dwyer, Kathy; Sala, Maria; Castells, Xavier

    2016-08-30

    To evaluate and compare the characteristics of court verdicts on medical errors allegedly harming patients in Spain and Massachusetts from 2002 to 2012. We reviewed 1041 closed court verdicts obtained from data on litigation in the Thomson Reuters Aranzadi Westlaw databases in Spain (Europe), and 370 closed court verdicts obtained from the Controlled Risk and Risk Management Foundation of Harvard Medical Institutions (CRICO/RMF) in Massachusetts (USA). We included closed court verdicts on medical errors. The definition of medical errors was based on that of the Institute of Medicine (USA). We excluded any agreements between parties before a judgement. Medical errors were involved in 25.9% of court verdicts in Spain and in 74% of those in Massachusetts. The most frequent cause of medical errors was a diagnosis-related problem (25.1%; 95% CI 20.7% to 31.1% in Spain; 35%; 95% CI 29.4% to 40.7% in Massachusetts). The proportion of medical errors classified as high severity was 34% higher in Spain than in Massachusetts (p=0.001). The most frequent factors contributing to medical errors in Spain were surgical and medical treatment (p=0.001). In Spain, 98.5% of medical errors resulted in compensation awards compared with only 6.9% in Massachusetts. This study reveals wide differences in litigation rates and the award of indemnity payments in Spain and Massachusetts; however, common features of both locations are the high rates of diagnosis-related problems and the long time interval until resolution. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  9. Eleven-year descriptive analysis of closed court verdicts on medical errors in Spain and Massachusetts

    PubMed Central

    Giraldo, Priscila; Sato, Luke; Martínez-Sánchez, Jose M; Comas, Mercè; Dwyer, Kathy; Sala, Maria; Castells, Xavier

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To evaluate and compare the characteristics of court verdicts on medical errors allegedly harming patients in Spain and Massachusetts from 2002 to 2012. Design, setting and participants We reviewed 1041 closed court verdicts obtained from data on litigation in the Thomson Reuters Aranzadi Westlaw databases in Spain (Europe), and 370 closed court verdicts obtained from the Controlled Risk and Risk Management Foundation of Harvard Medical Institutions (CRICO/RMF) in Massachusetts (USA). We included closed court verdicts on medical errors. The definition of medical errors was based on that of the Institute of Medicine (USA). We excluded any agreements between parties before a judgement. Results Medical errors were involved in 25.9% of court verdicts in Spain and in 74% of those in Massachusetts. The most frequent cause of medical errors was a diagnosis-related problem (25.1%; 95% CI 20.7% to 31.1% in Spain; 35%; 95% CI 29.4% to 40.7% in Massachusetts). The proportion of medical errors classified as high severity was 34% higher in Spain than in Massachusetts (p=0.001). The most frequent factors contributing to medical errors in Spain were surgical and medical treatment (p=0.001). In Spain, 98.5% of medical errors resulted in compensation awards compared with only 6.9% in Massachusetts. Conclusions This study reveals wide differences in litigation rates and the award of indemnity payments in Spain and Massachusetts; however, common features of both locations are the high rates of diagnosis-related problems and the long time interval until resolution. PMID:27577585

  10. Patient disclosure of medical errors in paediatrics: A systematic literature review.

    PubMed

    Koller, Donna; Rummens, Anneke; Le Pouesard, Morgane; Espin, Sherry; Friedman, Jeremy; Coffey, Maitreya; Kenneally, Noah

    2016-05-01

    Medical errors are common within paediatrics; however, little research has examined the process of disclosing medical errors in paediatric settings. The present systematic review of current research and policy initiatives examined evidence regarding the disclosure of medical errors involving paediatric patients. Peer-reviewed research from a range of scientific journals from the past 10 years is presented, and an overview of Canadian and international policies regarding disclosure in paediatric settings are provided. The purpose of the present review was to scope the existing literature and policy, and to synthesize findings into an integrated and accessible report. Future research priorities and policy implications are then identified.

  11. Patient disclosure of medical errors in paediatrics: A systematic literature review

    PubMed Central

    Koller, Donna; Rummens, Anneke; Le Pouesard, Morgane; Espin, Sherry; Friedman, Jeremy; Coffey, Maitreya; Kenneally, Noah

    2016-01-01

    Medical errors are common within paediatrics; however, little research has examined the process of disclosing medical errors in paediatric settings. The present systematic review of current research and policy initiatives examined evidence regarding the disclosure of medical errors involving paediatric patients. Peer-reviewed research from a range of scientific journals from the past 10 years is presented, and an overview of Canadian and international policies regarding disclosure in paediatric settings are provided. The purpose of the present review was to scope the existing literature and policy, and to synthesize findings into an integrated and accessible report. Future research priorities and policy implications are then identified. PMID:27429578

  12. An internal quality improvement collaborative significantly reduces hospital-wide medication error related adverse drug events.

    PubMed

    McClead, Richard E; Catt, Charline; Davis, J Terrance; Morvay, Shelly; Merandi, Jenna; Lewe, Dorcas; Stewart, Barbara; Brilli, Richard J

    2014-12-01

    To reduce the rate of harmful adverse drug events (ADEs) of severity level D-I from a baseline peak of 0.24 ADE/1000 doses to 0.08 ADE/1000 doses. A hospital-wide, quasi-experimental time series quality improvement (QI) initiative to reduce ADEs was implemented. High-reliability concepts, microsystem-based multidisciplinary teams, and QI science methods were used. ADEs were detected through a combination of voluntary reporting, trigger tool analysis, reversal agent review, and pharmacy interventions. A multidisciplinary ADE Quality Collaborative focused on medication use processes, not on specific classes of medications. Effective interventions included huddles and an ADE prevention bundle. The rate of harmful ADEs initially increased by >65% because of increased error reporting, temporally associated with the implementation of a program focused on high reliability and an improved safety culture. The quarterly rate was 0.17 ADE/1000 dispensed doses in Q1 2010. By the end of Q2 2013, the rate had decreased by 76.5%, to 0.04 ADE/1000 dispensed doses (P < .001). Using an internal collaborative model and QI methodologies focused on medication use processes, harmful ADEs were reduced hospital-wide by 76.5%. The concurrent implementation of a high-reliability, safety-focused program was important as well. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Human factors and error prevention in emergency medicine.

    PubMed

    Bleetman, Anthony; Sanusi, Seliat; Dale, Trevor; Brace, Samantha

    2012-05-01

    Emergency departments are one of the highest risk areas in health care. Emergency physicians have to assemble and manage unrehearsed multidisciplinary teams with little notice and manage critically ill patients. With greater emphasis on management and leadership skills, there is an increasing awareness of the importance of human factors in making changes to improve patient safety. Non-clinical skills are required to achieve this in an information-poor environment and to minimise the risk of errors. Training in these non-clinical skills is a mandatory component in other high-risk industries, such as aviation and, needs to be part of an emergency physician's skill set. Therefore, there remains an educational gap that we need to fill before an emergency physician is equipped to function as a team leader and manager. This review will examine the lessons from aviation and how these are applicable to emergency medicine. Solutions to averting errors are discussed and the need for formal human factors training in emergency medicine.

  14. Medication Errors: Cut Your Risk with These Tips

    MedlinePlus

    ... medication, make sure you know the answers to these questions: What is the brand or generic name ... have happened to some people. Don't make these same mistakes: Confusing eardrops and eyedrops. Always double- ...

  15. Methodological Challenges in Describing Medication Dosing Errors in Children

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-01-01

    completed and FDA labeling is provided for a medication, it is unclear which dose is most appropriate for children. For example, olanzapine is an...antipsychotic medication that is not currently licensed for use in children under age 18 years. Table 2 represents different pediatric doses for olanzapine ...recommended in several selected sources. Table 2. Dosing information for olanzapine Source Recommended pediatric dose* Harriet Lane Handbook19

  16. Improving decision quality in healthcare with an Error Prevention Model (EPM).

    PubMed

    Chio, David T S; Kushniruk, Andre; Borycki, Elizabeth

    2013-01-01

    Human factors involved in decision quality are critical issues in healthcare. In this paper, issues related to the impact of human factors on decision quality in healthcare are considered. Specifically, the focus is on the issue of reducing human error as well as improving decision quality. An Error Prevention Model (EPM) is presented for considering tools and techniques that can be used to analyze complex errors that may be considered latent.

  17. Use of Electronic Medication Administration Records to Reduce Perceived Stress and Risk of Medication Errors in Nursing Homes.

    PubMed

    Alenius, Malin; Graf, Peter

    2016-07-01

    Concerns have been raised about the effects of current medication administration processes on the safety of many of the aspects of medication administration. Keeping electronic medication administration records could decrease many of these problems. Unfortunately, there has not been much research on this topic, especially in nursing homes. A prospective case-control survey was consequently performed at two nursing homes; the electronic record system was introduced in one, whereas the other continued to use paper records. The personnel were asked to fill in a questionnaire of their perceptions of stress and risk of medication errors at baseline (n = 66) and 20 weeks after the intervention group had started recording medication administration electronically (n = 59). There were statistically significant decreases in the perceived risk of omitting a medication, of medication errors occurring because of communication problems, and of medication errors occurring because of inaccurate medication administration records in the intervention group (all P < .01 vs the control group). The perceived overall daily stress levels were also reduced in the intervention group (P < .05). These results indicate that the utilization of electronic medication administration records will reduce many of the concerns regarding the medication administration process.

  18. Association of perceived medical errors with resident distress and empathy: a prospective longitudinal study.

    PubMed

    West, Colin P; Huschka, Mashele M; Novotny, Paul J; Sloan, Jeff A; Kolars, Joseph C; Habermann, Thomas M; Shanafelt, Tait D

    2006-09-06

    Medical errors are associated with feelings of distress in physicians, but little is known about the magnitude and direction of these associations. To assess the frequency of self-perceived medical errors among resident physicians and to determine the association of self-perceived medical errors with resident quality of life, burnout, depression, and empathy using validated metrics. Prospective longitudinal cohort study of categorical and preliminary internal medicine residents at Mayo Clinic Rochester. Data were provided by 184 (84%) of 219 eligible residents. Participants began training in the 2003-2004, 2004-2005, and 2005-2006 academic years and completed surveys quarterly through May 2006. Surveys included self-assessment of medical errors and linear analog scale assessment of quality of life every 3 months, and the Maslach Burnout Inventory (depersonalization, emotional exhaustion, and personal accomplishment), Interpersonal Reactivity Index, and a validated depression screening tool every 6 months. Frequency of self-perceived medical errors was recorded. Associations of an error with quality of life, burnout, empathy, and symptoms of depression were determined using generalized estimating equations for repeated measures. Thirty-four percent of participants reported making at least 1 major medical error during the study period. Making a medical error in the previous 3 months was reported by a mean of 14.7% of participants at each quarter. Self-perceived medical errors were associated with a subsequent decrease in quality of life (P = .02) and worsened measures in all domains of burnout (P = .002 for each). Self-perceived errors were associated with an odds ratio of screening positive for depression at the subsequent time point of 3.29 (95% confidence interval, 1.90-5.64). In addition, increased burnout in all domains and reduced empathy were associated with increased odds of self-perceived error in the following 3 months (P=.001, P<.001, and P=.02 for

  19. Changes to Hospital Inpatient Volume After Newspaper Reporting of Medical Errors.

    PubMed

    Fukuda, Haruhisa

    2017-06-30

    The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of medical error case reporting by national newspapers on inpatient volume at acute care hospitals. A case-control study was conducted using the article databases of 3 major Japanese newspapers with nationwide circulation between fiscal years 2012 and 2013. Data on inpatient volume at acute care hospitals were obtained from a Japanese government survey between fiscal years 2011 and 2014. Panel data were constructed and analyzed using a difference-in-differences design. Acute care hospitals in Japan. Hospitals named in articles that included the terms "medical error" and "hospital" were designated case hospitals, which were matched with control hospitals using corresponding locations, nurse-to-patient ratios, and bed numbers. Medical error case reporting in newspapers. Changes to hospital inpatient volume after error reports. The sample comprised 40 case hospitals and 40 control hospitals. Difference-in-differences analyses indicated that newspaper reporting of medical errors was not significantly associated (P = 0.122) with overall inpatient volume. Medical error case reporting by newspapers showed no influence on inpatient volume. Hospitals therefore have little incentive to respond adequately and proactively to medical errors. There may be a need for government intervention to improve the posterror response and encourage better health care safety.

  20. Medication error reporting in rural critical access hospitals in the North Dakota Telepharmacy Project.

    PubMed

    Scott, David M; Friesner, Daniel L; Rathke, Ann M; Doherty-Johnsen, Shelly

    2014-01-01

    Results of a study of medication "quality-related events" (QREs) at critical access hospitals (CAHs) participating in a telepharmacy project are reported. Rates and types of medication QREs (i.e., all types of drug therapy problems requiring pharmacist intervention) were evaluated at 17 CAHs receiving telepharmacy services from a central order-entry site in the North Dakota Telepharmacy Project (NDTP). During the 17-month study, remote pharmacists used telepharmacy technology to review medication orders prepared at the CAH sites, identify and address QREs, and code clinical interventions. The collected data were analyzed via chi-square testing. Cumulative monthly medication orders at the CAH study sites ranged from a low of 12,535 in the first month of the study to a high of 18,257. Monthly rates of visual medication verification and clinical intervention ranged from 8.0% to 14.2% and from 1.3% to 3.1%, respectively. Overall, the most frequently identified QREs were transcription errors, which accounted for 2,389 interventions (43.3%); 2,078 interventions (37.7%) targeted prescribing-related QREs. The most frequently cited intervention codes were for dosage adjustments (n = 547), deep venous thrombosis prophylaxis (n = 437), pharmacokinetic consultation (n = 268), renal dosing (n = 182), and the prevention of minor (n = 148) and major (n = 94) adverse drug events. The study results indicate that the NDTP telepharmacy model is effective in identifying and resolving QREs in CAHs. The use of the telepharmacy services increased over the study period, suggesting that CAH practitioners became more comfortable using the technology on a regular basis to enhance patient safety.

  1. Safety culture and care: a program to prevent surgical errors.

    PubMed

    Hemingway, Maureen White; O'Malley, Catherine; Silvestri, Sandra

    2015-04-01

    Surgical errors are under scrutiny in health care as part of ensuring a culture of safety in which patients receive quality care. Hospitals use safety measures to compare their performance against industry benchmarks. To understand patient safety issues, health care providers must have processes in place to analyze and evaluate the quality of the care they provide. At one facility, efforts made to improve its quality and safety led to the development of a robust safety program with resources devoted to enhancing the culture of safety in the Perioperative Services department. Improvement initiatives included changing processes for safety reporting and performance improvement plans, adding resources and nurse roles, and creating communication strategies around adverse safety events and how to improve care. One key outcome included a 54% increase in the percentage of personnel who indicated in a survey that they would speak up if they saw something negatively affecting patient care. Copyright © 2015 AORN, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. [Evaluation of the efficacy of a medicine bag printed with a photograph of the medicine for the prevention of drug-dispensing errors].

    PubMed

    Kutsuma, Nobuaki; Yamaura, Katsunori; Hosaka, Shigeru; Kasuga, Kazuo; Koresawa, Taketoshi; Nagamura, Miho; Takayanagi, Masayuki; Nemoto, Eiichi; Ohshima, Shigeru; Kobayashi, Daisuke; Saito, Yukiya

    2007-09-01

    In this study, a survey was conducted to determine the rate of drug-dispensing errors with the use of medicine bags printed with photographs of prescribed medicines (hereafter "medicine bag") for a 6-week period from June 20 to July 31, 2005. During this period, 393928 prescriptions were filled in 127 medical facilities that use the medicine bag. The efficacy of the medicine bag in the prevention of drug-dispensing errors was investigated. A total of 6550 (1.66%) drug-dispensing errors were identified: 70.6% were identified at the inspecting stage; 27.4% at the providing medicine and information stage; and 2% after the medication was dispensed. The drug-dispensing errors identified in the inspecting and providing stages included a) using the wrong contents, b) dispensing the wrong drugs, c) missing drugs, d) calculation errors, e) weighing/measuring errors, and f) others. No significant difference was observed in the error rates; thus it was assumed that the type of error was not dependent on the stage at which dispensing errors was discovered. However, it was found that approximately 25% of errors at the providing stage were discovered as a result of the medicine bag. Errors of types a), b), and c) were often discovered because the photograph was printed on the medicine bag. Therefore it was assumed that the photographs contributed to the discovery of drug-dispensing errors.

  3. Medication errors--an enduring problem for children and elderly patients.

    PubMed

    Zakharov, Sergey; Tomas, Navratil; Pelclova, Daniela

    2012-08-01

    To analyze the types and reasons of medication errors, committed by health care professionals, which led to toxicological consultations at the Czech Toxicological Information Centre (TIC). Inquiries arising from medication errors for 2000-2010 were extracted and evaluated from the database of the TIC, recording the consultations of poisonings due to drugs, household products, plants, and mushrooms. From a total of 44,344 calls concerning pharmaceuticals, 215 (0.5%) were denoted by the caller as medication errors; 130 involved children (90 below 5 years of age) and 85 involved adults (30-60 years of age). The most common errors were: improper dosage (60.9%), wrong medication (19.3%), or erroneous route of administration (12.9%). The most frequent medication errors appeared using drugs affecting the nervous system (psycholeptics and antiepileptics), antibiotics, and drugs affecting the respiratory system. Nurses administering the drugs were responsible for 43.0%, physicians prescribing the drugs for 36.8%, and pharmacists dispensing the drugs for 20.2% of the errors. Of 25 patients with severe drug intoxications, 60.0% were children under 5 years of age treated with pharmaceuticals affecting the CNS, and 28.0% patients over 60 years of age with chronic application of theophylline, digoxin, or lithium. The trend in medication errors has remained relatively stable over the past 11 years. The analysis of medication errors shows two high-risk categories: children of less than 5 years of age, in whom the dose was not correctly adjusted, and elderly people with chronic medication and insufficient control of their medication level. Therefore, the measures for risk reduction should focus primarily on them.

  4. Medication errors in HIV-infected hospitalized patients: a pharmacist's impact.

    PubMed

    Eginger, Kristin H; Yarborough, Laura L; Inge, Lisa DeVito; Basile, Sharon A; Floresca, Donald; Aaronson, Patrick M

    2013-01-01

    Treatment with highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) decreases morbidity and mortality associated with HIV infection. Unfortunately, HAART medication errors are prevalent in hospitalized patients with HIV infection. Appropriate regimen administration and adherence are essential for treatment success. To assess the impact of pharmacist interventions on the rate of medication errors in HIV-infected hospitalized patients who had been prescribed HAART in the outpatient setting. Hospitalized patients aged 18 years or older receiving HAART and/or opportunistic infection (OI) prophylaxis were screened for inclusion. Data collection for each enrolled patient included demographic information, pertinent laboratory results, and inpatient and outpatient medication regimens. Patient medication profiles were reviewed within 72 hours of admission. HAART and/or OI prophylaxis errors were classified by type and frequency. Following the pharmacist intervention, prescribers' responses to each recommendation and the estimated time per intervention were recorded. Eighty-six patients were included in this investigation and 210 HAART and OI prophylaxis errors were documented. Of patients receiving HAART and/or OI prophylaxis, 54.7% had at least 1 medication error on admission. An average of 2.4 errors per patient was identified. Dose omission (45.5%) was the most common error type among combined HAART and OI prophylaxis regimens, followed by incorrect regimen (17.1%) and incorrect dose (15.1%). Prescribers accepted 90% of pharmacist recommendations. A pharmacist was able to amend 94.7% of correctable HAART errors, as well as 89.9% of correctable combined HAART and OI prophylaxis errors. An estimated 18.5 minutes of pharmacist time were spent per patient requiring an intervention. A clinical pharmacist's targeted review of outpatient-prescribed HAART and/or OI primary prophylaxis regimens of hospitalized HIV-infected patients can reduce most medication errors during hospitalization.

  5. Perspective of midwives working at hospitals affiliated to the Isfahan University of Medical Sciences regarding medical errors.

    PubMed

    Valiani, Mahboubeh; Majidi, Jamileh; Beigi, Marjan

    2015-01-01

    Committing an error is part of the human nature. No health care provider, despite the mastery of their skills, is immune from committing it. Medical error in the labor and obstetrics wards as well as other health units is inevitable and reduces the quality of health care, leading to accident. Sometimes these events, like the death of mother, fetus, and newborn, would be beyond repair. The purpose of this study was to investigate the perspective of gynecological ward providers about medical errors. This was a descriptive-analytical study. Sample size was 94 participants selected using census sampling. The study population included all midwives of four hospitals (Al-Zahra, Beheshti, Isa Ben Maryam, and Amin). Data were collected by a self-administered questionnaire and analyzed using SPSS software. This study shows that three factors (human, structural, and managerial) have affected medical errors in the labor and obstetrics wards. From the midwifery perspective, human factors were the most important factors with an average score of 73.26% and the lowest score was related to structural factors with an average score of 65.36%. Intervention strategies to reduce errors, service training program tailored to the needs of the service provider, distribution of the tasks at different levels, and attempts to reform the system instead of punishing the wrongdoer were set in priority list. Based on the results of this study on the perspectives of participants, among the three factors of medical errors (human factors, structural factors, and management factors), human factors are the biggest threat in committing medical errors. Modification in the pattern of teaching by the midwifery professors and their presence in the hospitals, creating a no-blame culture, and sharing of alerts in medical errors are among appropriate actions in the dimensions of human, structural, and managerial factors.

  6. Reducing Medical Errors in Primary Care Using a Pragmatic Complex Intervention.

    PubMed

    Khoo, Ee Ming; Sararaks, Sondi; Lee, Wai Khew; Liew, Su May; Cheong, Ai Theng; Abdul Samad, Azah; Maskon, Kalsom; Hamid, Maimunah A

    2015-09-01

    This study aimed to develop an intervention to reduce medical errors and to determine if the intervention can reduce medical errors in public funded primary care clinics. A controlled interventional trial was conducted in 12 conveniently selected primary care clinics. Random samples of outpatient medical records were selected and reviewed by family physicians for documentation, diagnostic, and management errors at baseline and 3 months post intervention. The intervention package comprised educational training, structured process change, review methods, and patient education. A significant reduction was found in overall documentation error rates between intervention (Pre 98.3% [CI 97.1-99.6]; Post 76.1% [CI 68.1-84.1]) and control groups (Pre 97.4% [CI 95.1-99.8]; Post 89.5% [85.3-93.6]). Within the intervention group, overall management errors reduced from 54.0% (CI 49.9-58.0) to 36.6% (CI 30.2-43.1) and medication error from 43.2% (CI 39.2-47.1) to 25.2% (CI 19.9-30.5). This low-cost intervention was useful to reduce medical errors in resource-constrained settings. © 2015 APJPH.

  7. Detecting and preventing error propagation via competitive learning.

    PubMed

    Silva, Thiago Christiano; Zhao, Liang

    2013-05-01

    Semisupervised learning is a machine learning approach which is able to employ both labeled and unlabeled samples in the training process. It is an important mechanism for autonomous systems due to the ability of exploiting the already acquired information and for exploring the new knowledge in the learning space at the same time. In these cases, the reliability of the labels is a crucial factor, because mislabeled samples may propagate wrong labels to a portion of or even the entire data set. This paper has the objective of addressing the error propagation problem originated by these mislabeled samples by presenting a mechanism embedded in a network-based (graph-based) semisupervised learning method. Such a procedure is based on a combined random-preferential walk of particles in a network constructed from the input data set. The particles of the same class cooperate among them, while the particles of different classes compete with each other to propagate class labels to the whole network. Computer simulations conducted on synthetic and real-world data sets reveal the effectiveness of the model.

  8. How the brain prevents a second error in a perceptual decision-making task

    PubMed Central

    Perri, Rinaldo Livio; Berchicci, Marika; Lucci, Giuliana; Spinelli, Donatella; Di Russo, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    In cognitive tasks, error commission is usually followed by a performance characterized by post-error slowing (PES) and post-error improvement of accuracy (PIA). Three theoretical accounts were hypothesized to support these post-error adjustments: the cognitive, the inhibitory, and the orienting account. The aim of the present ERP study was to investigate the neural processes associated with the second error prevention. To this aim, we focused on the preparatory brain activities in a large sample of subjects performing a Go/No-go task. The main results were the enhancement of the prefrontal negativity (pN) component -especially on the right hemisphere- and the reduction of the Bereitschaftspotential (BP) -especially on the left hemisphere- in the post-error trials. The ERP data suggested an increased top-down and inhibitory control, such as the reduced excitability of the premotor areas in the preparation of the trials following error commission. The results were discussed in light of the three theoretical accounts of the post-error adjustments. Additional control analyses supported the view that the adjustments-oriented components (the post-error pN and BP) are separated by the error-related potentials (Ne and Pe), even if all these activities represent a cascade of processes triggered by error-commission. PMID:27534593

  9. SIMulation of Medication Error induced by Clinical Trial drug labeling: the SIMME-CT study.

    PubMed

    Dollinger, Cecile; Schwiertz, Vérane; Sarfati, Laura; Gourc-Berthod, Chloé; Guédat, Marie-Gabrielle; Alloux, Céline; Vantard, Nicolas; Gauthier, Noémie; He, Sophie; Kiouris, Elena; Caffin, Anne-Gaelle; Bernard, Delphine; Ranchon, Florence; Rioufol, Catherine

    2016-06-01

    To assess the impact of investigational drug labels on the risk of medication error in drug dispensing. A simulation-based learning program focusing on investigational drug dispensing was conducted. The study was undertaken in an Investigational Drugs Dispensing Unit of a University Hospital of Lyon, France. Sixty-three pharmacy workers (pharmacists, residents, technicians or students) were enrolled. Ten risk factors were selected concerning label information or the risk of confusion with another clinical trial. Each risk factor was scored independently out of 5: the higher the score, the greater the risk of error. From 400 labels analyzed, two groups were selected for the dispensing simulation: 27 labels with high risk (score ≥3) and 27 with low risk (score ≤2). Each question in the learning program was displayed as a simulated clinical trial prescription. Medication error was defined as at least one erroneous answer (i.e. error in drug dispensing). For each question, response times were collected. High-risk investigational drug labels correlated with medication error and slower response time. Error rates were significantly 5.5-fold higher for high-risk series. Error frequency was not significantly affected by occupational category or experience in clinical trials. SIMME-CT is the first simulation-based learning tool to focus on investigational drug labels as a risk factor for medication error. SIMME-CT was also used as a training tool for staff involved in clinical research, to develop medication error risk awareness and to validate competence in continuing medical education. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press in association with the International Society for Quality in Health Care; all rights reserved.

  10. An acetaminophen icon helps reduce medication decision errors in an experimental setting.

    PubMed

    Shiffman, Saul; Cotton, Helene; Jessurun, Christina; Rohay, Jeffrey M; Sembower, Mark A

    2016-01-01

    To assess the effect of adding an acetaminophen ingredient icon to acetaminophen medication labels on consumer decision making about concomitant use of acetaminophen medications to avoid overdose, which is associated with liver injury. Parallel-group randomized study. Consumer research facilities in Indianapolis, Baltimore, and Los Angeles. A total of 517 adults (30% with limited health literacy) recruited at 3 consumer research sites. Participants were randomized to a non-icon condition in which medications carried current labeling or an icon condition in which all acetaminophen medications were additionally marked with an icon. Participants were presented with a medicine cabinet containing 12 diverse prescription and non-prescription medications, one-half containing acetaminophen, and made decisions about which medications were appropriate to take after an acetaminophen medication had already been taken. Outcome measures were errors in medication decisions and response time. The icon reduced the odds of participants making medication-decision errors by 53% (CI 31%-68%), with effects evident across medication categories. The icon eliminated a trend for those with lower health literacy or less education to have a greater likelihood of making errors. The icon also reduced response times, indicating reduced cognitive load for decisions. An icon can improve decision making regarding acetaminophen-containing medications, particularly among individuals with limited health literacy or education. Copyright © 2016 American Pharmacists Association®. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Warfarin and Rivaroxaban Duplication: A Case Report and Medication Error Analysis.

    PubMed

    Fusco, Julie A; Paulus, Eric J; Shubat, Alexandra R; Miah, Sharminara

    2015-12-01

    A 62-year-old African American man received unintentional duplicate anticoagulation therapy with warfarin 5 mg and rivaroxaban 20 mg daily for the treatment of recurrent pulmonary embolism. The patient presented to the anticoagulation clinic 6 days after hospital discharge with an International Normalized Ratio (INR) of 2.3 and he was instructed to continue warfarin 5 mg daily. Seven days later, he returned to the clinic with an INR >8.0 using a point-of-care device. He denied any signs or symptoms of bleeding. During the interview, he reported starting a new medication for neuropathy 5 days earlier. The clinical pharmacist contacted the dispensing pharmacy and determined rivaroxaban 20 mg was the new medication. The patient denied receiving new prescription counseling at the dispensing pharmacy. Because rivaroxaban can falsely elevate INR results, the actual INR value was unknown. To minimize the risk for recurrent venous thromboembolism, vitamin K was not administered and no warfarin doses were held. Rather, the patient was instructed to stop rivaroxaban and reduce the warfarin dose. Five days later, the patient returned with an INR of 4.3. He still had not experienced any signs or symptoms of bleeding. The patient was quickly stabilized on a warfarin maintenance dose of 22.5 mg weekly. The anticoagulation clinic pharmacist notified management at the clinic and at the dispensing pharmacy in an effort to identify process errors and prevent additional incidents.

  12. Certified pharmacy technicians' views on their medication preparation errors and educational needs.

    PubMed

    Desselle, Shane P

    2005-10-01

    The perceptions of certified pharmacy technicians about their medication preparation errors and educational needs were studied. A nationwide random sample of 3200 certified pharmacy technicians was mailed a survey with open-ended questions soliciting information about how pharmacists have handled and should handle technicians' medication preparation errors. The participants were also asked about their training needs and continuing-education preferences. A total of 1004 responses (31.4%) were obtained, of which 835 were analyzed. Of the respondents, 44% reported working in chain community pharmacies and 27% in hospital pharmacies. The factors perceived to contribute most to technicians' medication preparation errors were interruptions and inadequate staffing. Pharmacists' most frequent response to an error was to make the technician aware of it and require him or her to correct it. Only about 17% of the respondents indicated that the pharmacist used the error as an opportunity to provide instruction on how to avoid future errors. A nationwide sample of certified pharmacy technicians ranked interruptions and inadequate staffing as the factors contributing most to their medication preparation errors.

  13. Proficiency in identifying, managing and communicating medical errors: feasibility and validity study assessing two core competencies.

    PubMed

    Abu Dabrh, Abd Moain; Murad, Mohammad Hassan; Newcomb, Richard D; Buchta, William G; Steffen, Mark W; Wang, Zhen; Lovett, Amanda K; Steinkraus, Lawrence W

    2016-09-02

    Communication skills and professionalism are two competencies in graduate medical education that are challenging to evaluate. We aimed to develop, test and validate a de novo instrument to evaluate these two competencies. Using an Objective Standardized Clinical Examination (OSCE) based on a medication error scenario, we developed an assessment instrument that focuses on distinctive domains [context of discussion, communication and detection of error, management of error, empathy, use of electronic medical record (EMR) and electronic medical information resources (EMIR), and global rating]. The aim was to test feasibility, acceptability, and reliability of the method. Faculty and standardized patients (SPs) evaluated 56 trainees using the instrument. The inter-rater reliability of agreement between faculty was substantial (Fleiss k = 0.71) and intraclass correlation efficient was excellent (ICC = 0.80). The measured agreement between faculty and SPs evaluation of resident was lower (Fleiss k = 0.36). The instrument showed good conformity (ICC = 0.74). The majority of the trainees (75 %) had satisfactory or higher performance in all six assessed domains and 86 % found the OSCE to be realistic. Sixty percent reported not receiving feedback on EMR use and asked for subsequent training. An OSCE-based instrument using a medical error scenario can be used to assess competency in professionalism, communication, using EMRs and managing medical errors.

  14. Errors of oral medication administration in a patient with enteral feeding tube

    PubMed Central

    Emami, Shahram; Hamishehkar, Hadi; Mahmoodpoor, Ata; Mashayekhi, Simin; Asgharian, Parina

    2012-01-01

    Enteral feeding tube is employed for feeding of critically ill patients who are unable to eat. In the cases of oral medication administration to enterally fed patients, some potential errors could happen. We report a 53-year-old man who was admitted to intensive care unit (ICU) of a teaching hospital due to the post-CPR hypoxemic encephalopathy. The patient was intubated and underwent mechanical ventilation. A nasogastric (NG) tube was used as the enteral route for nutrition and administration of oral medications. Oral medications were crushed then dissolved in tap water and were given to the patient through NG tube. In present article we report several medication errors occurred during enterally drug administration, including errors in dosage form selection, methods of oral medication administration and drug interactions and incompatibility with nutrition formula. These errors could reduce the effects of drugs and lead to unsuccessful treatment of patient and also could increase the risk of potential adverse drug reactions. Potential leading causes of these errors include lack of drug knowledge among physicians, inadequate training of nurses and lack of pharmacists participation in medical settings. PMID:24991587

  15. The effect of a safe zone on nurse interruptions, distractions, and medication administration errors.

    PubMed

    Yoder, Mindy; Schadewald, Diane; Dietrich, Kim

    2015-01-01

    Patient safety is a health care priority. Yet medical errors are ranked the eighth leading cause of death. Medication administration errors (MAEs) often result from multiple environmental and individual factors. This quality improvement initiative adapted a protocol based on airline industry safety measures to decrease nurse distractions and interruptions during medication administration, with the goal of decreasing MAEs. Sources of distractions, interruptions, and MAEs were measured pre and post intervention. Patient satisfaction scores were measured concurrently. Results of this initiative differ from previous studies in which similar interventions reduced both distractions and MAEs. An unexpected finding was dramatically increased patient satisfaction.

  16. [New technologies applied to the medication-dispensing process, error analysis and contributing factors].

    PubMed

    Alvarez Díaz, A M; Delgado Silveira, E; Pérez Menéndez-Conde, C; Pintor Recuenco, R; Gómez de Salazar López de Silanes, E; Serna Pérez, J; Mendoza Jiménez, T; Bermejo Vicedo, T

    2010-01-01

    Calculate error prevalence occurred in different medication-dispensing systems, the stages of occurrence, and contributing factors. Prospective observational study. The staging of the dispensing process were reviewed in five dispensing systems: Stock, Unitary-Dose dispensing systems (UDDS) without Computerized Prescription Order Entry (CPOE), CPOE-UDDS, Automated Dispensing Systems (ADS) without CPOE and CPOE-ADS. Dispensing errors were identified, together with the stages of occurrence of such errors and their contributing factors. 2,181 errors were detected among 54,169 opportunities of error. Error-rate: Stock, 10.7%; no-CPOE-UDDS, 3.7%, CPOE-UDDS, 2.2%, no-CPOE-ADS, 20.7%; CPOE-ADS, 2.9%. Most frequent stage when error occurs: Stock, preparation of order; no-CPOE-UDDS and CPOE-UDDS, filling of the unit dose cart; no-CPOE-ADS and CPOE-ADS, filling of the ADS. Most frequent error: Stock, no-CPOE-ADS and CPOE-ADS, omission; CPOE-UDDS, different amount of drug and no-CPOE-UDDS, extra medication. Contributing factor: Stock, CPOE-ADS and no-CPOE-ADS, stock out/supply problems; CPOE-UDDS, inexperienced personnel and deficient communication system between professionals; no-CPOE-UDDS, deficient communication system between professionals. Applying new technologies to the dispensing process has increased its safety, particularly, implementation of CPOE has enabled to reduce dispensing errors. Copyright © 2009 SEFH. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  17. Interprofessional communication and medical error: a reframing of research questions and approaches.

    PubMed

    Varpio, Lara; Hall, Pippa; Lingard, Lorelei; Schryer, Catherine F

    2008-10-01

    Progress toward understanding the links between interprofessional communication and issues of medical error has been slow. Recent research proposes that this delay may result from overlooking the complexities involved in interprofessional care. Medical education initiatives in this domain tend to simplify the complexities of team membership fluidity, rotation, and use of communication tools. A new theoretically informed research approach is required to take into account these complexities. To generate such an approach, we review two theories from the social sciences: Activity Theory and Knotworking. Using these perspectives, we propose that research into interprofessional communication and medical error can develop better understandings of (1) how and why medical errors are generated and (2) how and why gaps in team defenses occur. Such complexities will have to be investigated if students and practicing clinicians are to be adequately prepared to work safely in interprofessional teams.

  18. Teaching picture-to-object relations in picture-based requesting by children with autism: a comparison between error prevention and error correction teaching procedures.

    PubMed

    Carr, D; Felce, J

    2008-04-01

    Children who have a combination of language and developmental disabilities with autism often experience major difficulties in learning relations between objects and their graphic representations. Therefore, they would benefit from teaching procedures that minimize their difficulties in acquiring these relations. This study compared two teaching procedures, an error prevention procedure and an error correction procedure, for teaching relations between objects and pictures. Participants were two groups of children with autism, aged between 3 and 7 years. In the context of picture-to-object requesting, one group was taught using an error correction method and the other group with an error prevention method. The measures for each child were accuracy of correspondences between taught picture and object pairs and accuracy of delayed correspondences in learning outcome tests with all combinations of object and picture pairs presented to them throughout the study. The group receiving the error prevention-based teaching made significantly fewer errors during the teaching phases and in their learning outcome test for correspondences between all combinations of pictures and objects. The error prevention teaching procedure would seem to provide a more efficient and ecologically valid method than the error correction procedure for teaching relations between objects and their graphic-based referents. Improvements in the methodology were suggested for providing a stronger basis for comparison between error correction and error prevention teaching methods.

  19. Designing an Algorithm to Preserve Privacy for Medical Record Linkage With Error-Prone Data

    PubMed Central

    Pal, Doyel; Chen, Tingting; Khethavath, Praveen

    2014-01-01

    Background Linking medical records across different medical service providers is important to the enhancement of health care quality and public health surveillance. In records linkage, protecting the patients’ privacy is a primary requirement. In real-world health care databases, records may well contain errors due to various reasons such as typos. Linking the error-prone data and preserving data privacy at the same time are very difficult. Existing privacy preserving solutions for this problem are only restricted to textual data. Objective To enable different medical service providers to link their error-prone data in a private way, our aim was to provide a holistic solution by designing and developing a medical record linkage system for medical service providers. Methods To initiate a record linkage, one provider selects one of its collaborators in the Connection Management Module, chooses some attributes of the database to be matched, and establishes the connection with the collaborator after the negotiation. In the Data Matching Module, for error-free data, our solution offered two different choices for cryptographic schemes. For error-prone numerical data, we proposed a newly designed privacy preserving linking algorithm named the Error-Tolerant Linking Algorithm, that allows the error-prone data to be correctly matched if the distance between the two records is below a threshold. Results We designed and developed a comprehensive and user-friendly software system that provides privacy preserving record linkage functions for medical service providers, which meets the regulation of Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act. It does not require a third party and it is secure in that neither entity can learn the records in the other’s database. Moreover, our novel Error-Tolerant Linking Algorithm implemented in this software can work well with error-prone numerical data. We theoretically proved the correctness and security of our Error

  20. Accuracy of medication documentation in hospital discharge summaries: A retrospective analysis of medication transcription errors in manual and electronic discharge summaries.

    PubMed

    Callen, Joanne; McIntosh, Jean; Li, Julie

    2010-01-01

    Medication errors in hospital discharge summaries have the potential to cause serious harm to patients. These errors are generally associated with manual transcription of medications between medication charts and discharge summaries. Studies also show junior doctors are more likely to contribute to discharge medication error rates. Electronic discharge summaries have the potential to reduce discharge medication errors to ensure the safe handover of care to the primary care provider. (1) Quantify and compare the medication transcription error rate from handwritten medications on manual discharge summaries to typed medications on electronic discharge summaries, and (2) examine the quality of medication documentation according to the level of medical training of the doctors who created the discharge summaries. A retrospective examination of 966 handwritten and 842 electronically generated discharge summaries was conducted in an Australian metropolitan hospital. The electronic discharge summaries at the study site were not integrated with an electronic medication management system and hence discharge medications were typed into the electronic discharge summary by the doctor. The discharge medication documentation in both types of summaries was transcribed, either handwritten or typed, from inpatient medication charts in paper-based medical records. Documentation differences between medications in discharge summaries and inpatient medication charts constituted medication errors. 12.1% of handwritten and 13.3% of electronic summaries contained medication errors. The highest number of errors occurred with cardiovascular drugs. Medication omission was the commonest error. The confidence intervals of all odds ratios indicate handwritten and electronic summaries were similar for all areas of medication error. Error rates regarding all 13,566 individual medications for the 1808 summaries were similar by doctor medical training level (intern, resident, and registrar). Similar

  1. [Current status of medical accident prevention in our pathology section].

    PubMed

    Uehara, Takeshi; Kobayashi, Yukihiro; Honda, Takayuki

    2010-08-01

    Preventive measures against medical accident should be addressed in the pathology section. Medical accidents occur while preparing tissue specimens and making pathological diagnoses. For the preparation of tissue specimens, we have developed a work manual in consultation with past incident reports and update this manual regularly. We can reduce medical accidents by including a check system for each task. For pathological diagnosis, we perform some of the same checks as for tissue specimen preparation and can make more correct diagnoses by conferring with other departments. It is also important to check each other's work to prevent medical accidents.

  2. Identifying and quantifying medication errors: evaluation of rapidly discontinued medication orders submitted to a computerized physician order entry system.

    PubMed

    Koppel, Ross; Leonard, Charles E; Localio, A Russell; Cohen, Abigail; Auten, Ruthann; Strom, Brian L

    2008-01-01

    All methods of identifying medication prescribing errors are fraught with inaccuracies and systematic bias. A systematic, efficient, and inexpensive way of measuring and quantifying prescribing errors would be a useful step for reducing them. We ask if rapid discontinuations of prescription-orders--where physicians stop their orders within 2 hours--would be an expedient proxy for prescribing errors? To study this we analyzed CPOE-system medication orders entered and then discontinued within 2 hours. We investigated these phenomena in real time via interviews with corresponding ordering physicians. Each order was also independently reviewed by a clinical pharmacist or physicians. We found that of 114 rapidly discontinued orders by 75 physicians, two-thirds (35 of 53, PPV = 66; 95% CI = 53-77) of medication orders discontinued within 45 minutes were deemed inappropriate (overdose, underdose, etc.). Overall, 55% (63 of 114; 95% CI = 46-64%) of medication orders discontinued within 2 hours were deemed inappropriate. This measure offers a rapid, constant, inexpensive, and objective method to identify medication orders with a high probability of error. It may also serve as a screening and teaching mechanism for physicians-in-training.

  3. Medication-related errors: a literature review of incidence and antecedents.

    PubMed

    Carlton, Gaya; Blegen, Mary A

    2006-01-01

    Patient safety has become a major concern for both society and policymakers. Since nurses are intimately involved in the delivery of medications and are ultimately responsible during the medication administration phase, it is important for nursing to understand factors contributing to medication administration errors. The purpose of this chapter is to identify the incidence of these errors and the associated factors in an attempt to better understand the problem and lessen future error occurrence. Literature review revealed both active failures and latent conditions established in Reason's theory remain prevalent in current literature where active failures often display themselves in the form of incorrect drug calculations, lack of individual knowledge, and failure to follow established protocol. Latent conditions are evidenced as time pressures, fatigue, understaffing, inexperience, design deficiencies, and inadequate equipment and may lie dormant within a system until combined with active failures to create opportunity for error. Although medication error research has shifted in emphasis toward identification of system problems inherent in error occurrence, no one force emerges as a clear antecedent, reinforcing the need for further research and replication of existing studies with emphasis placed on more dependable reporting measures through which nurses are not threatened by reprisal.

  4. Evaluation of Interprofessional Team Disclosure of a Medical Error to a Simulated Patient

    PubMed Central

    Kern, Donna H.; Shrader, Sarah P.

    2016-01-01

    Objective. To evaluate the impact of an Interprofessional Communication Skills Workshop on pharmacy student confidence and proficiency in disclosing medical errors to patients. Pharmacy student behavior was also compared to that of other health professions’ students on the team. Design. Students from up to four different health professions participated in a simulation as part of an interprofessional team. Teams were evaluated with a validated rubric postsimulation on how well they handled the disclosure of an error to the patient. Individually, each student provided anonymous feedback and self-reflected on their abilities via a Likert-scale evaluation tool. A comparison of pharmacy students who completed the workshop (active group) vs all others who did not (control group) was completed and analyzed. Assessment. The majority of students felt they had adequate training related to communication issues that cause medication errors. However, fewer students believed that they knew how to report such an error to a patient or within a health system. Pharmacy students who completed the workshop were significantly more comfortable explicitly stating the error disclosure to a patient and/or caregiver and were more likely to apologize and respond to questions forthrightly (p<0.05). Conclusions. This data affirms the need to devote more time to training students on communicating with patients about the occurrence of medical errors and how to report these errors. Educators should be encouraged to incorporate such training within interprofessional education curricula. PMID:27899834

  5. Safety climate reduces medication and dislodgement errors in routine intensive care practice.

    PubMed

    Valentin, Andreas; Schiffinger, Michael; Steyrer, Johannes; Huber, Clemens; Strunk, Guido

    2013-03-01

    To assess the frequency and contributing factors of medication and dislodgement errors attributable to common routine processes in a cohort of intensive care units, with a special focus on the potential impact of safety climate. A prospective, observational, 48 h cross sectional study in 57 intensive care units (ICUs) in Austria, Germany, and Switzerland, with self-reporting of medical errors by ICU staff and concurrent assessment of safety climate, workload and level of care. For 795 observed patients, a total of 641 errors affecting 269 patients were reported. This corresponds to a rate of 49.8 errors per 100 patient days related to the administration of medication, loss of artificial airways, and unplanned dislodgement of lines, catheters and drains. In a multilevel model predicting error occurrence at the patient level, odds ratios (OR) per unit increase for the occurrence of at least one medical error were raised for a higher Nine Equivalents of Nursing Manpower Use Score (NEMS) (OR 1.04, 95 % CI 1.02-1.05, p < 0.01) and a higher number of tubes/lines/catheters/drains (OR 1.02, 95 % CI 1.01-1.03, p < 0.01) at the patient level and lowered by a better safety climate at the ICU level (OR per standard deviation 0.67, 95 % CI 0.51-0.89, p < 0.01). Safety climate apparently contributes to a reduction of medical errors that represent a particularly error-prone aspect of frontline staff performance during typical routine processes in intensive care.

  6. Drug Errors in Anaesthesiology

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Rajnish Kumar; Katiyar, Sarika

    2009-01-01

    Summary Medication errors are a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in hospitalized patients. The incidence of these drug errors during anaesthesia is not certain. They impose a considerable financial burden to health care systems apart from the patient losses. Common causes of these errors and their prevention is discussed. PMID:20640103

  7. Adverse drug events and medication errors in psychiatry: methodological issues regarding identification and classification.

    PubMed

    Mann, Klaus; Rothschild, Jeffrey M; Keohane, Carol A; Chu, James A; Bates, David W

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Adverse drug events and medication errors have received extensive study recently in a variety of clinical populations, though compared to many other areas relatively little work has focused on this area in psychiatry, especially with respect to the contribution of error to harm. The goal of this paper is to discuss methodological issues around measurement of medication safety in psychiatric patients. Against the background of a systems approach, a modern perspective of error management is discussed, and a multidimensional procedure for detection and classification of incidents related to the medication process is presented. This method has proven successful in non-psychiatric settings yielding the current best estimate of error rates and providing insight into the underlying causes. While this general approach can be adapted to the psychiatric setting, a number of issues make measurement especially challenging in psychiatry. These include the fluctuating course of psychiatric disorders, reduced patient adherence to the medication process, adverse effects which are often similar to symptoms of the underlying disorder, the frequent use of wide dose intervals depending on the clinical situation, and the presence of many drug-drug interactions. Data collected by means of the presented approach provide a basis for the development of effective strategies to reduce the risk of medication errors and thus improve patient safety in psychiatric care.

  8. Board of Pharmacy Practices Related to Medication Errors and Their Potential Impact on Patient Safety.

    PubMed

    Degnan, Daniel D; Hertig, John B; Peters, Michael J; Stevenson, James G

    2017-01-01

    State boards of pharmacy are generally responsible for the governance of the practice of pharmacy. While the regulatory process and methods for accomplishing this task may vary by state, all boards of pharmacy must address medication errors committed by pharmacists. The National Association of Boards of Pharmacy (NABP) has recommended that state boards of pharmacy implement best practices and enforcement actions that are aimed to promote patient safety and reduce medication errors. The current study was designed to identify and compare current corrective action practices among boards of pharmacy in response to medication errors. An electronic survey regarding board policies and anticipated board actions in response to hypothetical medication error scenarios was sent to boards of pharmacy for completion. Approximately 45% of pharmacy boards responded. Survey responses demonstrated that corrective actions and consequences were levied against pharmacists inconsistently among state boards. Corrective action plans and process improvement components were lacking in a majority of state board of pharmacy practices. Medication safety education for pharmacists and for members on boards of pharmacy was insufficient in many states. Responses to hypothetical error scenarios indicated that most board actions are educational and punitive in nature, rather than focusing on systems improvement.

  9. Controlling your impulses: electrical stimulation of the human supplementary motor complex prevents impulsive errors.

    PubMed

    Spieser, Laure; van den Wildenberg, Wery; Hasbroucq, Thierry; Ridderinkhof, K Richard; Burle, Borís

    2015-02-18

    To err is human. However, an inappropriate urge does not always result in error. Impulsive errors thus entail both a motor system capture by an urge to act and a failed inhibition of that impulse. Here we show that neuromodulatory electrical stimulation of the supplementary motor complex in healthy humans leaves action urges unchanged but prevents them from turning into overt errors. Subjects performed a choice reaction-time task known to trigger impulsive responses, leading to fast errors that can be revealed by analyzing accuracy as a function of poststimulus time. Yet, such fast errors are only the tip of the iceberg: electromyography (EMG) revealed fast subthreshold muscle activation in the incorrect response hand in an even larger proportion of overtly correct trials, revealing covert response impulses not discernible in overt behavior. Analyzing both overt and covert response tendencies enables to gauge the ability to prevent these incorrect impulses from turning into overt action errors. Hyperpolarizing the supplementary motor complex using transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) preserves action impulses but prevents their behavioral expression. This new combination of detailed behavioral, EMG, and tDCS techniques clarifies the neurophysiology of impulse control, and may point to avenues for improving impulse control deficits in various neurologic and psychiatric disorders.

  10. The relationship of usability to medical error: an evaluation of errors associated with usability problems in the use of a handheld application for prescribing medications.

    PubMed

    Kushniruk, Andre; Triola, Mark; Stein, Ben; Borycki, Elizabeth; Kannry, Joseph

    2004-01-01

    This paper describes an innovative approach to the evaluation of a handheld prescription writing application. Participants (10 physicians) were asked to perform a series of tasks involving entering prescriptions into the application from a medication list. The study procedure involved the collection of data consisting of transcripts of the subjects who were asked to "think aloud" while interacting with the prescription writing program to enter medications. All user interactions with the device were video and audio recorded. Analysis of the protocols was conducted in two phases: (1) usability problems were identified from coding of the transcripts and video data (2) actual errors in entering prescription data were also identified. The results indicated that there were a variety of usability problems, with most related to issues of ease of use. In addition, other problems were identified which were related to limitations of the content of the program. In examining the relationship between usability problems and errors, it was found that certain types of usability problems were closely associated with the occurrence of specific types of errors in prescription of medications. Implications for the improvement of safety of health care information systems are discussed.

  11. Transparency When Things Go Wrong: Physician Attitudes About Reporting Medical Errors to Patients, Peers, and Institutions.

    PubMed

    Bell, Sigall K; White, Andrew A; Yi, Jean C; Yi-Frazier, Joyce P; Gallagher, Thomas H

    2015-02-24

    Transparent communication after medical error includes disclosing the mistake to the patient, discussing the event with colleagues, and reporting to the institution. Little is known about whether attitudes about these transparency practices are related. Understanding these relationships could inform educational and organizational strategies to promote transparency. We analyzed responses of 3038 US and Canadian physicians to a medical error communication survey. We used bivariate correlations, principal components analysis, and linear regression to determine whether and how physician attitudes about transparent communication with patients, peers, and the institution after error were related. Physician attitudes about disclosing errors to patients, peers, and institutions were correlated (all P's < 0.001) and represented 2 principal components analysis factors, namely, communication with patients and communication with peers/institution. Predictors of attitudes supporting transparent communication with patients and peers/institution included female sex, US (vs Canadian) doctors, academic (vs private) practice, the belief that disclosure decreased likelihood of litigation, and the belief that system changes occur after error reporting. In addition, younger physicians, surgeons, and those with previous experience disclosing a serious error were more likely to agree with disclosure to patients. In comparison, doctors who believed that disclosure would decrease patient trust were less likely to agree with error disclosure to patients. Previous disclosure education was associated with attitudes supporting greater transparency with peers/institution. Physician attitudes about discussing errors with patients, colleagues, and institutions are related. Several predictors of transparency affect all 3 practices and are potentially modifiable by educational and institutional strategies.

  12. Are interventions to reduce interruptions and errors during medication administration effective?: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Raban, Magdalena Z; Westbrook, Johanna I

    2014-01-01

    Background Medication administration errors are frequent and lead to patient harm. Interruptions during medication administration have been implicated as a potential contributory factor. Objective To assess evidence of the effectiveness of interventions aimed at reducing interruptions during medication administration on interruption and medication administration error rates. Methods In September 2012 we searched MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, PsycINFO, Cochrane Effective Practice and Organisation of Care Group reviews, Google and Google Scholar, and hand searched references of included articles. Intervention studies reporting quantitative data based on direct observations of at least one outcome (interruptions, or medication administration errors) were included. Results Ten studies, eight from North America and two from Europe, met the inclusion criteria. Five measured significant changes in interruption rates pre and post interventions. Four found a significant reduction and one an increase. Three studies measured changes in medication administration error rates and showed reductions, but all implemented multiple interventions beyond those targeted at reducing interruptions. No study used a controlled design pre and post. Definitions for key outcome indicators were reported in only four studies. Only one study reported κ scores for inter-rater reliability and none of the multi-ward studies accounted for clustering in their analyses. Conclusions There is weak evidence of the effectiveness of interventions to significantly reduce interruption rates and very limited evidence of their effectiveness to reduce medication administration errors. Policy makers should proceed with great caution in implementing such interventions until controlled trials confirm their value. Research is also required to better understand the complex relationship between interruptions and error to support intervention design. PMID:23980188

  13. Mitigating errors caused by interruptions during medication verification and administration: interventions in a simulated ambulatory chemotherapy setting

    PubMed Central

    Prakash, Varuna; Koczmara, Christine; Savage, Pamela; Trip, Katherine; Stewart, Janice; McCurdie, Tara; Cafazzo, Joseph A; Trbovich, Patricia

    2014-01-01

    Background Nurses are frequently interrupted during medication verification and administration; however, few interventions exist to mitigate resulting errors, and the impact of these interventions on medication safety is poorly understood. Objective The study objectives were to (A) assess the effects of interruptions on medication verification and administration errors, and (B) design and test the effectiveness of targeted interventions at reducing these errors. Methods The study focused on medication verification and administration in an ambulatory chemotherapy setting. A simulation laboratory experiment was conducted to determine interruption-related error rates during specific medication verification and administration tasks. Interventions to reduce these errors were developed through a participatory design process, and their error reduction effectiveness was assessed through a postintervention experiment. Results Significantly more nurses committed medication errors when interrupted than when uninterrupted. With use of interventions when interrupted, significantly fewer nurses made errors in verifying medication volumes contained in syringes (16/18; 89% preintervention error rate vs 11/19; 58% postintervention error rate; p=0.038; Fisher's exact test) and programmed in ambulatory pumps (17/18; 94% preintervention vs 11/19; 58% postintervention; p=0.012). The rate of error commission significantly decreased with use of interventions when interrupted during intravenous push (16/18; 89% preintervention vs 6/19; 32% postintervention; p=0.017) and pump programming (7/18; 39% preintervention vs 1/19; 5% postintervention; p=0.017). No statistically significant differences were observed for other medication verification tasks. Conclusions Interruptions can lead to medication verification and administration errors. Interventions were highly effective at reducing unanticipated errors of commission in medication administration tasks, but showed mixed effectiveness at

  14. The use of failure mode effect and criticality analysis in a medication error subcommittee.

    PubMed

    Williams, E; Talley, R

    1994-04-01

    Failure Mode Effect and Criticality Analysis (FMECA) is the systematic assessment of a process or product that enables one to determine the location and mechanism of potential failures. It has been used by engineers, particularly in the aerospace industry, to identify and prioritize potential failures during product development when there is a lack of data but an abundance of expertise. The Institute for Safe Medication Practices has recommended its use in analyzing the medication administration process in hospitals and in drug product development in the pharamceutical industry. A medication error subcommittee adopted and modified FMECA to identify and prioritize significant failure modes in its specific medication administration process. Based on this analysis, the subcommittee implemented solutions to four of the five highest ranked failure modes. FMECA provided a method for a multidisciplinary group to address the most important medication error concerns based upon the expertise of the group members. It also facilitated consensus building in a group with varied perceptions.

  15. [Plagiarism in medical schools, and its prevention].

    PubMed

    Annane, Djillali; Annane, Frédérique

    2012-09-01

    The plagiarism has become very common in universities and medical school. Undoubtedly, the easy access to a huge amount of electronic documents is one explanation for the increasing prevalence of plagiarism among students. While most of universities and medical school have clear statements and rules about plagiarism, available tools for the detection of plagiarism remain inefficient and dedicate training program for students and teachers too scarce. As lack of time is one reason for students to choose plagiarism, it should be one main target for educational programs. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  16. Errors Related to Medication Reconciliation: A Prospective Study in Patients Admitted to the Post CCU.

    PubMed

    Haji Aghajani, Mohammad; Ghazaeian, Monireh; Mehrazin, Hamid Reza; Sistanizad, Mohammad; Miri, Mirmohammad

    2016-01-01

    Medication errors are one of the important factors that increase fatal injuries to the patients and burden significant economic costs to the health care. An appropriate medical history could reduce errors related to omission of the previous drugs at the time of hospitalization. The aim of this study, as first one in Iran, was evaluating the discrepancies between medication histories obtained by pharmacists and physicians/nurses and first order of physician. From September 2012 until March 2013, patients admitted to the post CCU of a 550 bed university hospital, were recruited in the study. As a part of medication reconciliation on admission, the physicians/nurses obtained medication history from all admitted patients. For patients included in the study, medication history was obtained by both physician/nurse and a pharmacy student (after training by a faculty clinical pharmacist) during the first 24 h of admission. 250 patients met inclusion criteria. The mean age of patients was 61.19 ± 14.41 years. Comparing pharmacy student drug history with medication lists obtained by nurses/physicians revealed 3036 discrepancies. On average, 12.14 discrepancies, ranged from 0 to 68, were identified per patient. Only in 20 patients (8%) there was 100 % agreement among medication lists obtained by pharmacist and physician/nurse. Comparing the medications by list of drugs ordered by physician at first visit showed 12.1 discrepancies on average ranging 0 to 72. According to the results, omission errors in our setting are higher than other countries. Pharmacy-based medication reconciliation could be recommended to decrease this type of error.

  17. Comprehensive framework for preventive maintenance priority of medical equipment.

    PubMed

    Saleh, Neven; Balestra, Gabriella

    2015-08-01

    Throughout the medical equipment life cycle, preventive maintenance is considered one of the most important stages that should be managed properly. However, the need for better management and control by giving a reasonable prioritization for preventive maintenance becomes essential. The purpose of this study is to develop a comprehensive framework for preventive maintenance priority of medical equipment using Quality Function Deployment (QFD) and Fuzzy Logic (FL). The quality function deployment is proposed in order to identify the most important criteria that could impact preventive maintenance priority decision; meanwhile the role of the fuzzy logic is to generate a priority index of the list of equipment considering those criteria. The model validation was carried out on 140 pieces of medical equipment belonging to two hospitals. In application, we propose to classify the priority index into five classes. The results indicate that the strong correlation existence between risk-based criteria and preventive maintenance priority decision.

  18. Infection Prevention and Control in Deployed Military Medical Treatment Facilities

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-08-01

    REVIEW ARTICLE Infection Prevention and Control in Deployed Military Medical Treatment Facilities Duane R. Hospenthal, MD, PhD, FACP, FIDSA, Andrew D...Heather C. Yun, MD, FACP, Clinton K. Murray, MD, FACP, FIDSA, and the Prevention of Combat-Related Infections Guidelines Panel Abstract: Infections have...survived to reach medical care were expected to develop and possibly succumb to infections during their care in military hospitals. Initial care of

  19. Medical Amnesty: Professional Enabling or Indicated Prevention?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chapman, Robert J.

    2009-01-01

    The intent of this brochure is to review the pros and cons of employing what has come to be known as a Good Samaritan Policy or what some refer to as Medical Amnesty. Such policies are designed to address dangerous student drinking off campus. These policies differ in their details but have a common focus in an attempt to protect the inebriate…

  20. The Relationship Between Nursing Experience and Education and the Occurrence of Reported Pediatric Medication Administration Errors.

    PubMed

    Sears, Kim; O'Brien-Pallas, Linda; Stevens, Bonnie; Murphy, Gail Tomblin

    2016-01-01

    Medication errors are one of the most common incidents in the hospitals. They can be harmful, and they are even more detrimental for pediatric patients. This study explored the relationship between nursing experience, education, the frequency and severity of reported pediatric medication administration errors (PMAEs). The data for this study were collected from a larger pan Canadian study. A survey tool was developed to collect self-reported data from nurses. In addition to descriptive statistics, a Poisson regression or a multiple linear regression was completed to address the research questions, and a Boneferrai correction was conducted to adjust for the small sample size. Results demonstrated that on units with more nurses with a higher level of current experience, more PMAEs were reported (p=.001), however; the PMAEs reported by these nurses were not as severe (p=.003). Implications to advance both safe medication delivery in the pediatric setting and safe culture of reporting for both actual and potential errors are identified.

  1. Iatrogenic disease management: moderating medication errors and risks in a pharmacy benefit management environment.

    PubMed

    Nair, Vinit; Salmon, J Warren; Kaul, Alan F

    2007-12-01

    Disease Management (DM) programs have advanced to address costly chronic disease patterns in populations. This is in part due to the programs' significant clinical and economical value, coupled with interest by pharmaceutical manufacturers, managed care organizations, and pharmacy benefit management firms. While cost containment realizations for many such interventions have been less than anticipated, this article explores potentials in marrying Medication Error Risk Reduction into DM programs within managed care environments. Medication errors are an emergent serious problem now gaining attention in US health policy. They represent a failure within population-based health programs because they remain significant cost drivers. Therefore, medication errors should be addressed in an organized fashion, with DM being a worthy candidate for piggybacking such programs to achieve the best synergistic effects.

  2. Liquid medication dosing errors in children: role of provider counseling strategies.

    PubMed

    Yin, H Shonna; Dreyer, Benard P; Moreira, Hannah A; van Schaick, Linda; Rodriguez, Luis; Boettger, Susanne; Mendelsohn, Alan L

    2014-01-01

    To examine the degree to which recommended provider counseling strategies, including advanced communication techniques and dosing instrument provision, are associated with reductions in parent liquid medication dosing errors. Cross-sectional analysis of baseline data on provider communication and dosing instrument provision from a study of a health literacy intervention to reduce medication errors. Parents whose children (<9 years) were seen in 2 urban public hospital pediatric emergency departments (EDs) and were prescribed daily dose liquid medications self-reported whether they received counseling about their child's medication, including advanced strategies (teachback, drawings/pictures, demonstration, showback) and receipt of a dosing instrument. The primary dependent variable was observed dosing error (>20% deviation from prescribed). Multivariate logistic regression analyses were performed, controlling for parent age, language, country, ethnicity, socioeconomic status, education, health literacy (Short Test of Functional Health Literacy in Adults); child age, chronic disease status; and site. Of 287 parents, 41.1% made dosing errors. Advanced counseling and instrument provision in the ED were reported by 33.1% and 19.2%, respectively; 15.0% reported both. Advanced counseling and instrument provision in the ED were associated with decreased errors (30.5 vs. 46.4%, P = .01; 21.8 vs. 45.7%, P = .001). In adjusted analyses, ED advanced counseling in combination with instrument provision was associated with a decreased odds of error compared to receiving neither (adjusted odds ratio 0.3; 95% confidence interval 0.1-0.7); advanced counseling alone and instrument alone were not significantly associated with odds of error. Provider use of advanced counseling strategies and dosing instrument provision may be especially effective in reducing errors when used together. Copyright © 2014 Academic Pediatric Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Liquid Medication Dosing Errors in Children: Role of Provider Counseling Strategies

    PubMed Central

    Yin, H. Shonna; Dreyer, Benard P.; Moreira, Hannah A.; van Schaick, Linda; Rodriguez, Luis; Boettger, Susanne; Mendelsohn, Alan L.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To examine the degree to which recommended provider counseling strategies, including advanced communication techniques and dosing instrument provision, are associated with reductions in parent liquid medication dosing errors. Methods Cross-sectional analysis of baseline data on provider communication and dosing instrument provision from a study of a health literacy intervention to reduce medication errors. Parents whose children (<9 years) were seen in two urban public hospital pediatric emergency departments (EDs) and were prescribed daily dose liquid medications self-reported whether they received counseling about their child’s medication, including advanced strategies (teachback, drawings/pictures, demonstration, showback) and receipt of a dosing instrument. Primary dependent variable: observed dosing error (>20% deviation from prescribed). Multivariate logistic regression analyses performed, controlling for: parent age, language, country, ethnicity, socioeconomic status, education, health literacy (Short Test of Functional Health Literacy in Adults); child age, chronic disease status; site. Results Of 287 parents, 41.1% made dosing errors. Advanced counseling and instrument provision in the ED were reported by 33.1% and 19.2%, respectively; 15.0% reported both. Advanced counseling and instrument provision in the ED were associated with decreased errors (30.5 vs. 46.4%, p=0.01; 21.8 vs. 45.7%, p=0.001). In adjusted analyses, ED advanced counseling in combination with instrument provision was associated with a decreased odds of error compared to receiving neither (AOR 0.3; 95% CI 0.1–0.7); advanced counseling alone and instrument alone were not significantly associated with odds of error. Conclusion Provider use of advanced counseling strategies and dosing instrument provision may be especially effective in reducing errors when used together. PMID:24767779

  4. Disclosure of medical errors involving gametes and embryos: an Ethics Committee opinion.

    PubMed

    2016-07-01

    Medical providers have an ethical duty to disclose clinically significant errors involving gametes and embryos as soon as they are discovered. Clinics also should have written policies in place for reducing and disclosing errors. This document was reviewed and affirmed in 2015 and replaces the earlier document of the same name (Fertil Steril 2011;96:1312-4). Copyright © 2016 American Society for Reproductive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. [Preliminary Study on Error Control of Medical Devices Test Reports Based on the Analytic Hierarchy Process].

    PubMed

    Huang, Yanhong; Xu, Honglei; Tu, Rong; Zhang, Xu; Huang, Min

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, the common errors in medical devices test reports are classified and analyzed. And then the main 11 influence factors for these inspection report errors are summarized. The hierarchy model was also developed and verified by presentation data using MATLAB. The feasibility of comprehensive weights quantitative comparison has been analyzed by using the analytic hierarchy process. In the end, this paper porspects the further research direction.

  6. Incidence of medication error associated with the use of beta-blockers in Pakistan.

    PubMed

    Nesar, Shagufta; Shoaib, Muhammad Harris; Yousuf, Rabia Ismail; Rahim, Najia; Muhammad, Iyad Naeem

    2014-05-01

    Medication errors (ME) are human errors, which are very frequent in cardiovascular patients and result in patient morbidity and mortality. This study was focused to evaluate the quality of prescriptions and to emphasize the placement of clinical pharmacist in health care team. This study was carried out in different outpatient settings of (in) Karachi, Pakistan. The study period was June 2011 till June 2012. Retrospective data was analyzed for the outpatients' prescription of beta blocker drugs. During the study, prescriptions (n=450) were collected from different outpatient settings of (in) Karachi, Pakistan. Prescription containing beta-blockers were analyzed for the essential elements to be mentioned in prescription. Drug-drug interactions were identified by the Micromedex.2.0 Drug-Reax database and severity of medication error was determined by NCCMERP Index. A total of 1627 medication errors were identified in 450 prescriptions. The most frequent error was not mentioning the patient's weight (95%), followed by missing diagnosis (79.4%) and drug-drug interactions (69.5%). Twenty-two prescriptions were placed in the most severe category I (4.88%). Average number of drugs per prescription was 4.76. Significant difference was observed (χ(2)=52.418, p<0.05) using SPSS 19 for those prescription orders having more than 5 drugs with Beta-blockers. This indicates that the errors in prescription such as drug-drug interactions, wrong dose etc. was significantly increased with the number of drugs per prescription. Results showed that medication errors are very frequent in prescription written in outpatient setting of various hospitals and clinics in Karachi. This shows that the irrational prescribing is a common practice in developing countries. Placement of skilled pharmacist in the health care system is the only solution for avoidance of these medication related problems.

  7. Patient safety during medication administration: the influence of organizational and individual variables on unsafe work practices and medication errors.

    PubMed

    Fogarty, G J; McKeon, C M

    Medication errors are a leading cause of unintended harm to patients, both in Australia and internationally, and there is now a concerted attempt to identify and correct individual and workplace factors that encourage medication errors. The current study used structural equation modelling to measure organizational climate and to test a model with hypothesized links between climate and unsafe medication administration behaviours. The study also examined the possible mediating role of stress and morale. Data were collected from 176 nurses working in rural areas in Australia. The model provided a reasonable fit to the data with organizational climate accounting for 39% of the variance in individual distress, which in turn explained 7% of the variance in self-reported violations. The only variable that made a direct contribution to errors was violations, which accounted for 24% of the variance in medication errors. These findings highlight the importance of monitoring the state of the whole health system. Deficiencies at the organizational level affect the psychological well-being of hospital employees, and distressed employees are more likely to engage in substandard work practices that ultimately endanger the patients under their care.

  8. Impact of a standard medication chart on prescribing errors: a before-and-after audit.

    PubMed

    Coombes, I D; Stowasser, D A; Reid, C; Mitchell, C A

    2009-12-01

    (1) To develop and implement a standard medication chart, for recording prescribing (medication orders) and administration of medication in public hospitals in Queensland. (2) To assess the chart's impact on the frequency and type of prescribing errors, adverse drug reaction (ADR) documentation and safety of warfarin prescribing. (3) To use the chart to facilitate safe medication management training. The medication chart was developed through a process of incident analysis and work practice mapping by a multidisciplinary collaborative. Observational audits by nurse and pharmacist pairs, of all available prescriptions before and after introduction of the standard medication chart, were undertaken in five sites. Similar numbers of both patients (730 pre-implementation and 751 post-implementation; orders, 9772 before and 10 352 after) were observed. The prescribing error rate decreased from 20.0% of orders pe