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Sample records for preventing stroke recurrence

  1. Fear of recurrence and beliefs about preventing recurrence in persons who have suffered a stroke.

    PubMed

    Townend, Ellen; Tinson, Deborah; Kwan, Joseph; Sharpe, Michael

    2006-12-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate fear of recurrent stroke and beliefs about its causes and prevention. Eighty-nine patients participated 1 month following stroke and 81 were followed up at 9 months. Interviews addressed fears and beliefs about stroke, causes, recurrence and prevention by using closed and open-ended questions. Responses were subject to quantitative and qualitative analysis, respectively. Fear of recurrence was common. Profound disability was a particularly feared outcome. Participants were knowledgeable about causes. However, causal controllability ratings were low. Some reported concern about preventative strategies (e.g., difficulty stopping smoking). Many reported idiosyncratic beliefs (e.g., avoiding overexertion) or fatalistic ideas about strokes (e.g., 'nothing' can prevent them). Similar quantitative results were obtained at follow-up. Many patients fear stroke recurrence. They lack a sense of control over causes and have fears associated with idiosyncratic and fatalistic beliefs. There is a need to elicit and address individuals' own fears and beliefs about stroke before providing evidence-based secondary prevention recommendations.

  2. Telmisartan to prevent recurrent stroke and cardiovascular events.

    PubMed

    Yusuf, Salim; Diener, Hans-Christoph; Sacco, Ralph L; Cotton, Daniel; Ounpuu, Stephanie; Lawton, William A; Palesch, Yuko; Martin, Reneé H; Albers, Gregory W; Bath, Philip; Bornstein, Natan; Chan, Bernard P L; Chen, Sien-Tsong; Cunha, Luis; Dahlöf, Björn; De Keyser, Jacques; Donnan, Geoffrey A; Estol, Conrado; Gorelick, Philip; Gu, Vivian; Hermansson, Karin; Hilbrich, Lutz; Kaste, Markku; Lu, Chuanzhen; Machnig, Thomas; Pais, Prem; Roberts, Robin; Skvortsova, Veronika; Teal, Philip; Toni, Danilo; VanderMaelen, Cam; Voigt, Thor; Weber, Michael; Yoon, Byung-Woo

    2008-09-18

    Prolonged lowering of blood pressure after a stroke reduces the risk of recurrent stroke. In addition, inhibition of the renin-angiotensin system in high-risk patients reduces the rate of subsequent cardiovascular events, including stroke. However, the effect of lowering of blood pressure with a renin-angiotensin system inhibitor soon after a stroke has not been clearly established. We evaluated the effects of therapy with an angiotensin-receptor blocker, telmisartan, initiated early after a stroke. In a multicenter trial involving 20,332 patients who recently had an ischemic stroke, we randomly assigned 10,146 to receive telmisartan (80 mg daily) and 10,186 to receive placebo. The primary outcome was recurrent stroke. Secondary outcomes were major cardiovascular events (death from cardiovascular causes, recurrent stroke, myocardial infarction, or new or worsening heart failure) and new-onset diabetes. The median interval from stroke to randomization was 15 days. During a mean follow-up of 2.5 years, the mean blood pressure was 3.8/2.0 mm Hg lower in the telmisartan group than in the placebo group. A total of 880 patients (8.7%) in the telmisartan group and 934 patients (9.2%) in the placebo group had a subsequent stroke (hazard ratio in the telmisartan group, 0.95; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.86 to 1.04; P=0.23). Major cardiovascular events occurred in 1367 patients (13.5%) in the telmisartan group and 1463 patients (14.4%) in the placebo group (hazard ratio, 0.94; 95% CI, 0.87 to 1.01; P=0.11). New-onset diabetes occurred in 1.7% of the telmisartan group and 2.1% of the placebo group (hazard ratio, 0.82; 95% CI, 0.65 to 1.04; P=0.10). Therapy with telmisartan initiated soon after an ischemic stroke and continued for 2.5 years did not significantly lower the rate of recurrent stroke, major cardiovascular events, or diabetes. (ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT00153062.) 2008 Massachusetts Medical Society

  3. Telmisartan to Prevent Recurrent Stroke and Cardiovascular Events

    PubMed Central

    Yusuf, Salim; Diener, Hans-Christoph; Sacco, Ralph L.; Cotton, Daniel; Ôunpuu, Stephanie; Lawton, William A.; Palesch, Yuko; Martin, Reneé H.; Albers, Gregory W.; Bath, Philip; Bornstein, Natan; Chan, Bernard P.L.; Chen, Sien-Tsong; Cunha, Luis; Dahlöf, Björn; De Keyser, Jacques; Donnan, Geoffrey A.; Estol, Conrado; Gorelick, Philip; Gu, Vivian; Hermansson, Karin; Hilbrich, Lutz; Kaste, Markku; Lu, Chuanzhen; Machnig, Thomas; Pais, Prem; Roberts, Robin; Skvortsova, Veronika; Teal, Philip; Toni, Danilo; VanderMaelen, Cam; Voigt, Thor; Weber, Michael; Yoon, Byung-Woo

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND Prolonged lowering of blood pressure after a stroke reduces the risk of recurrent stroke. In addition, inhibition of the renin–angiotensin system in high-risk patients reduces the rate of subsequent cardiovascular events, including stroke. However, the effect of lowering of blood pressure with a renin–angiotensin system inhibitor soon after a stroke has not been clearly established. We evaluated the effects of therapy with an angiotensin-receptor blocker, telmisartan, initiated early after a stroke. METHODS In a multicenter trial involving 20,332 patients who recently had an ischemic stroke, we randomly assigned 10,146 to receive telmisartan (80 mg daily) and 10,186 to receive placebo. The primary outcome was recurrent stroke. Secondary outcomes were major cardiovascular events (death from cardiovascular causes, recurrent stroke, myocardial infarction, or new or worsening heart failure) and new-onset diabetes. RESULTS The median interval from stroke to randomization was 15 days. During a mean followup of 2.5 years, the mean blood pressure was 3.8/2.0 mm Hg lower in the telmisartan group than in the placebo group. A total of 880 patients (8.7%) in the telmisartan group and 934 patients (9.2%) in the placebo group had a subsequent stroke (hazard ratio in the telmisartan group, 0.95; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.86 to 1.04; P = 0.23). Major cardiovascular events occurred in 1367 patients (13.5%) in the telmisartan group and 1463 patients (14.4%) in the placebo group (hazard ratio, 0.94; 95% CI, 0.87 to 1.01; P = 0.11). New-onset diabetes occurred in 1.7% of the telmisartan group and 2.1% of the placebo group (hazard ratio, 0.82; 95% CI, 0.65 to 1.04; P = 0.10). CONCLUSIONS Therapy with telmisartan initiated soon after an ischemic stroke and continued for 2.5 years did not significantly lower the rate of recurrent stroke, major cardiovascular events, or diabetes. (ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT00153062.) PMID:18753639

  4. Effects of a Web-Based Stroke Education Program on Recurrence Prevention Behaviors among Stroke Patients: A Pilot Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim, Jae-Il; Lee, Sook; Kim, Jung-Hee

    2013-01-01

    The effectiveness of methods to prevent stroke recurrence and of education focusing on learners' needs has not been fully explored. The aims of this study were to assess the effects of such interventions among stroke patients and their primary caregivers and to evaluate the feasibility of a web-based stroke education program. The participants were…

  5. Effects of a Web-Based Stroke Education Program on Recurrence Prevention Behaviors among Stroke Patients: A Pilot Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim, Jae-Il; Lee, Sook; Kim, Jung-Hee

    2013-01-01

    The effectiveness of methods to prevent stroke recurrence and of education focusing on learners' needs has not been fully explored. The aims of this study were to assess the effects of such interventions among stroke patients and their primary caregivers and to evaluate the feasibility of a web-based stroke education program. The participants were…

  6. Prevention of recurrent stroke in patients with patent foramen ovale.

    PubMed

    Wessler, Benjamin S; Kent, David M

    2015-05-01

    Patent foramen ovale (PFO) is common and only rarely related to stroke. The high PFO prevalence in healthy individuals makes for difficult decision making when a PFO is found in the setting of a cryptogenic stroke, because the PFO may be an incidental finding. Recent clinical trials of device-based PFO closure have had negative overall summary results; these trials have been limited by low recurrence rates. The optimal antithrombotic strategy for these patients is also unknown. Recent work has identified a risk score that estimates PFO-attributable fractions based on individual patient characteristics, although whether this score can help direct therapy is unclear. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Recurrent Ischemic Stroke Characteristics and Assessment of Sufficiency of Secondary Stroke Prevention

    PubMed Central

    KOCAMAN, Gülşen; DÜRÜYEN, Hümeyra; KOÇER, Abdulkadir; ASİL, Talip

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Disabilities due to stroke lead to a serious individual and socioeconomic burden. In this presented hospital-based study, we aimed to evaluate recurrent ischemic stroke (RIS) characteristics and the sufficiency of secondary prevention regarding the most common modifiable risk factors. Methods The records of patients with a diagnosis of ischemic stroke between November 2009 and November 2011 in our unit were retrospectively investigated. Results Ninety-one (18%) out of 500 patients with ischemic stroke had RIS. Hypertension, diabetes mellitus, ischemic heart disease, hyperlipidemia, atrial fibrillation, and smoking were found in 88%, 43%, 36%, 30%, 11%, and 14% of the patients, respectively. Thirty-eight percent of the patients had more than two risk factors. While 14% of the hypertensive patients did not use antihypertensive medications, antihypertensive treatment was insufficient in 39% of those who already used antihypertensive medications. Twenty-three percent of the patients received no prophylactic agents. Sixty percent of the patients with a history of atrial fibrillation were on oral anticoagulant therapy (warfarin), and the international normalized ratio was <2.0 in 73% of them. Of the diabetic patients, 87% had an HgbA1C level above 6%. The LDL level was higher than 100 mg/dL in 72% of the patients. Conclusion The incidence of RIS and risk factors in our retrospective study was compatible with the results of those in literature. Secondary prophylactic treatment and modification of risk factors in the stroke patients were not satisfactory. The improvement of the patients’ adherence to treatment is also very important in addition to the optimal treatment and follow-up strategy for decreasing the incidence of RIS. A multidisciplinary outpatient model of stroke care may be beneficial for decreasing the incidence of RIS.

  8. Filling the gap between science & clinical practice: prevention of stroke recurrence.

    PubMed

    Russolillo, Anna; Di Minno, Matteo Nicola Dario; Tufano, Antonella; Prisco, Domenico; Di Minno, Giovanni

    2012-01-01

    Because of its high recurrence rate, active secondary prevention is mandatory once an episode of stroke has occurred. In non-cardioembolic stroke, in addition to lifestyle changes and to targeted treatments, current guidelines recommend aspirin, clopidogrel or aspirin+extended-release dipyridamole. In cardioembolic stroke (due to atrial fibrillation or flutter [AF]), vitamin K antagonists (VKAs) are recommended in most of patients. A favorable risk/benefit ratio of these treatments has been demonstrated also in elderly patients. However, registry data emphasize that such interventions are often under-used, especially in AF patients. A poor knowledge of current guidelines may play a role in hampering their application in clinical practice. The risk of major bleeding associated with antithrombotic drugs, their inherent limitations, such as socio-demographic (age >80 years, living alone) and clinical (previous or recent bleeding, trauma, cancer, dementia) features, may account for the gap between current guidelines for stroke/TIA prevention and clinical practice. The objective of the present report is to evaluate the gap between current recommendations/guidelines for stroke/TIA prevention and clinical practice (registry findings). In our opinion new antithrombotic drugs and detailed educational programs (especially devoted to general practitioners and to some medical specialists), concerning efficacy, safety and limitations of these strategies, are needed to better manage stroke epidemics in the third millennium.

  9. Design of the stenting and aggressive medical management for preventing recurrent stroke in intracranial stenosis trial.

    PubMed

    Chimowitz, Marc I; Lynn, Michael J; Turan, Tanya N; Fiorella, David; Lane, Bethany F; Janis, Scott; Derdeyn, Colin P

    2011-01-01

    Patients with recent transient ischemic attack (TIA) or stroke caused by 70% to 99% stenosis of a major intracranial artery are at high risk of recurrent stroke on usual medical management, suggesting the need for alternative therapies for this disease. The Stenting and Aggressive Medical Management for Preventing Recurrent stroke in Intracranial Stenosis trial is an ongoing, randomized, multicenter, 2-arm trial that will determine whether intracranial angioplasty and stenting adds benefit to aggressive medical management alone for preventing the primary endpoint (any stroke or death within 30 days after enrollment or after any revascularization procedure of the qualifying lesion during follow-up, or stroke in the territory of the symptomatic intracranial artery beyond 30 days) during a mean follow-up of 2 years in patients with recent TIA or stroke caused by 70% to 99% stenosis of a major intracranial artery. Aggressive medical management in both arms consists of aspirin 325 mg per day, clopidogrel 75 mg per day for 90 days after enrollment, intensive risk factor management primarily targeting systolic blood pressure <140 mm Hg (<130 mm Hg in diabetics) and low density cholesterol <70 mg/dL, and a lifestyle modification program. The sample size required to detect a 35% reduction in the rate of the primary endpoint from angioplasty and stenting based on the log-rank test with an alpha of 0.05, 80% power, and adjusting for a 2% loss to follow-up and 5% crossover from the medical to the stenting arm is 382 patients per group. Enrollment began in November 2008 and 451 patients have been enrolled as of March 31, 2011. This is the first randomized stroke prevention trial to compare angioplasty and stenting with medical therapy in patients with intracranial arterial stenosis and to incorporate intensive management of multiple risk factors and a lifestyle modification program in the study design. Hopefully, the results of the trial will lead to more effective therapy for

  10. Secondary stroke prevention.

    PubMed

    Hankey, Graeme J

    2014-02-01

    Survivors of stroke and transient ischaemic attacks are at risk of a recurrent stroke, which is often more severe and disabling than the index event. Optimum secondary prevention of recurrent stroke needs rapid diagnosis and treatment and prompt identification of the underlying cardiovascular cause. Effective treatments include organised acute assessment and intervention with antithrombotic therapy, carotid revascularisation, and control of causal risk factors, as appropriate. However, effective treatments are not implemented optimally in clinical practice. Recurrent strokes continue to account for 25-30% of all strokes and represent unsuccessful secondary prevention. Immediate and sustained implementation of effective and appropriate secondary prevention strategies in patients with first-ever stroke or transient ischaemic attack has the potential to reduce the burden of stroke by up to a quarter.

  11. Amplatzer PFO occluder device may prevent recurrent stroke in patients with patent foramen ovale and cryptogenic stroke: a meta-analysis of randomised trials.

    PubMed

    Pandit, Anil; Aryal, Madan Raj; Pandit, Aashrayata Aryal; Jalota, Leena; Kantharajpur, Sudheer; Hakim, Fayaz A; Lee, Howard R

    2014-04-01

    To review efficacy of percutaneous closure of patent foramen ovale compared with medical therapy in prevention of recurrent strokes in patients with cryptogenic stroke. Electronic databases; PUBMED, EMBASE, Cochrane registry and web of knowledge were searched for relevant studies. In three randomised clinical trials involving 2303 participants, risk of the recurrent strokes (pooled HR 0.62, 95% CI=0.36-1.07, P=0.09, I(2) =10%) did not show benefit with device closure when compared with medical therapy group on meta-analysis of all three trials. However, on sensitivity analysis in trials using Amplatzer PFO occluder device, the closure of PFO was associated with significantly lower recurrent strokes (pooled HR=0.44, 95% CI=0.21-0.94, P=0.03, I(2)=0%) compared with medical therapy. The closure of PFO with Amplatzer PFO occluder device was associated with significant reduction in recurrent strokes in patients with cryptogenic stroke and patent foramen ovale. The better outcome in prevention of secondary stroke in patients with cryptogenic stroke and PFO may be associated with type of closure device used. Copyright © 2013 Australian and New Zealand Society of Cardiac and Thoracic Surgeons (ANZSCTS) and the Cardiac Society of Australia and New Zealand (CSANZ). Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Effect of peer education on stroke prevention: the prevent recurrence of all inner-city strokes through education randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Kronish, Ian M; Goldfinger, Judith Z; Negron, Rennie; Fei, Kezhen; Tuhrim, Stanley; Arniella, Guedy; Horowitz, Carol R

    2014-11-01

    Efforts to reduce disparities in recurrent stroke among Black and Latino stroke survivors have met with limited success. We aimed to determine the effect of peer education on secondary stroke prevention among predominantly minority stroke survivors. Between 2009 and 2012, we enrolled 600 stroke or transient ischemic attack survivors from diverse, low-income communities in New York City into a 2-arm randomized clinical trial that compared a 6 week (1 session/week), peer-led, community-based, stroke prevention self-management group workshop (N=301) to a wait-list control group (N=299). The primary outcome was the proportion with a composite of controlled blood pressure (<140/90 mm Hg), low-density lipoprotein cholesterol <100 mg/dL, and use of antithrombotic medications at 6 months. Secondary outcomes included control of the individual stroke risk factors. All analyses were by intent-to-treat. There was no difference in the proportion of intervention and control group participants achieving the composite outcome (34% versus 34%; P=0.98). The proportion with controlled blood pressure at 6 months was greater in the intervention group than in the control group (76% versus 67%; P=0.02). This corresponded to a greater change in systolic blood pressure in the intervention versus control group (-3.63 SD, 19.81 mm Hg versus +0.34 SD, 23.76 mm Hg; P=0.04). There were no group differences in the control of cholesterol or use of antithrombotics. A low-cost peer education self-management workshop modestly improved blood pressure, but not low-density lipoprotein cholesterol or antithrombotic use, among stroke and transient ischemic attack survivors from vulnerable, predominantly minority urban communities. http://www.clinicaltrials.gov/show/NCT0102727. Unique identifier: NCT01027273. © 2014 American Heart Association, Inc.

  13. close: Closure of patent foramen ovale, oral anticoagulants or antiplatelet therapy to prevent stroke recurrence: Study design.

    PubMed

    Mas, Jean-Louis; Derumeaux, Geneviève; Amarenco, Pierre; Arquizan, Caroline; Aubry, Pierre; Barthelet, Martine; Bertrand, Bernard; Brochet, Eric; Cabanes, Laure; Donal, Erwan; Dubois-Randé, Jean-Luc; Durand-Zaleski, Isabelle; Ernande, Laura; Finet, Gérard; Fraisse, Alain; Giroud, Maurice; Guérin, Patrice; Habib, Gilbert; Juliard, Jean-Michel; Leys, Didier; Lièvre, Michel; Lusson, Jean-René; Marcon, François; Michel, Patrick; Moulin, Thierry; Mounier-Vehier, François; Pierard, Luc; Piot, Christophe; Rey, Christian; Rodier, Gilles; Roudaut, Raymond; Schleich, Jean-Marc; Teiger, Emmanuel; Turc, Guillaume; Vuillier, Fabrice; Weimar, Christian; Woimant, France; Chatellier, Gilles

    2016-08-01

    Currently available data do not provide definitive evidence on the comparative benefits of closure of patent foramen ovale, oral anticoagulants and antiplatelet therapy in patients with patent foramen ovale-associated cryptogenic stroke To assess whether transcatheter patent foramen ovale closure plus antiplatelet therapy is superior to antiplatelet therapy alone and whether oral anticoagulant therapy is superior to antiplatelet therapy, for secondary stroke prevention in patients aged 16 to 60 years with a large patent foramen ovale or a patent foramen ovale associated with an atrial septal aneurysm, and an otherwise unexplained ischaemic stroke or retinal ischaemia. Six hundred and sixty-four patients were included in the study. CLOSE is an academic-driven, multicentre, randomized, open-label, three-group, superiority trial with blinded adjudication of outcome events. The trial has been registered with Clinical Trials Register (Clinicaltrials.gov, NCT00562289). Patient recruitment started in December 2007. Patient follow-up will continue until December 2016. Expected mean follow-up = 5.6 years. The primary efficacy outcome is the occurrence of fatal or nonfatal stroke. Safety outcomes include fatal, life-threatening or major procedure- or device-related complications and fatal, life-threatening or major haemorrhagic complications. CLOSE is the first specifically designed trial to assess the superiority of patent foramen ovale closure over antiplatelet therapy alone and the superiority of oral anticoagulants over antiplatelet therapy to prevent stroke recurrence in patients with patent foramen ovale-associated cryptogenic stroke. © 2016 World Stroke Organization.

  14. Baseline feature of a randomized trial assessing the effects of disease management programs for the prevention of recurrent ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Fukuoka, Yasuko; Hosomi, Naohisa; Hyakuta, Takeshi; Omori, Toyonori; Ito, Yasuhiro; Uemura, Jyunichi; Kimura, Kazumi; Matsumoto, Masayasu; Moriyama, Michiko

    2015-03-01

    Comprehensive and long-term patient education programs designed to improve self-management can help patients better manage their medical condition. Using disease management programs (DMPs) that were created for each of the risk factor according to clinical practice guidelines, we evaluate their influence on the prevention of stroke recurrence. This is a randomized study conducted with ischemic stroke patients within 1 year from their onset. Subjects in the intervention group received a 6-month DMPs that included self-management education provided by a nurse along with support in collaboration with the primary care physician. Those in the usual care group received ordinary outpatient care. The primary end points are stroke recurrence and stroke death. Patients were enrolled for 2 years with plans for a 2-year follow-up after the 6-month education period (total of 30 months). A total of 321 eligible subjects (average age, 67.3 years; females, 96 [29.9%]), including 21 subjects (6.5%) with transient ischemic attack, were enrolled in this study. Regarding risk factors for stroke, 260 subjects (81.0%) had hypertension, 249 subjects (77.6%) had dyslipidemia, 102 subjects (31.8%) had diabetes mellitus, 47 subjects (14.6%) had atrial fibrillation, and 98 subjects (30.5%) had chronic kidney disease. There were no significant differences between the 2 groups with respect to subject characteristics. This article describes the rationale, design, and baseline features of a randomized controlled trial that aimed to assess the effects of DMPs for the secondary prevention of stroke. Subject follow-up is in progress and will end in 2015. Copyright © 2015 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Effect of patent foramen ovale closure for prevention on recurrent stroke or transient ischemic attack in selected patients with cryptogenic stroke.

    PubMed

    Kim, Minsu; Kim, Sihoon; Moon, Jeonggeun; Oh, Pyung Chun; Park, Yae Min; Shin, Dong Hoon; Lee, Yeong-Bae; Lee, Ji Yeon; Hwang, Hee Young; Kang, Woong Chol

    2017-08-21

    This study was sought to evaluate the effectiveness of patent foramen ovale (PFO) closure in selected patients (PFO shunt grade more than moderate) with cryptogenic stroke (CS). Whether closure of PFO is an effective treatment for prevention of CS is still unclear. Consecutive 158 patients (mean age: 49.9 years old, closure group: 67 patients, medication group: 91 patients) were enrolled. The primary end point was a composite of recurrent stroke and transient ischemic attack. Baseline characteristics were similar between the two groups, except age which was younger in the closure group (47.7 ± 10.8 vs 51.9 ± 9.9, P = 0.013), and the presence of shunt at rest was more common in the closure group (35.8% vs 10.4%, P = 0.000). Procedural success was 94.0%. Over a mean follow-up of 27.8 months, a total of six primary end point, all of which were strokes, occurred only in the medication group (6.6% vs 0%, P = 0.039). Stroke-free survival rate was significantly higher in the closure group (P = 0.026) CONCLUSIONS: Our study showed that PFO closure may be an effective treatment strategy to prevent recurrent stroke or TIA for patients with CS if it is conducted in selective patients who have PFO shunt more than moderate grade. © 2017, Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma agonists for preventing recurrent stroke and other vascular events in patients with stroke or transient ischaemic attack.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jia; Wang, Lu-Ning

    2015-10-29

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPAR-γ) agonists are insulin-sensitising drugs used for the treatment of insulin resistance. In addition to lowering glucose in diabetes, these drugs may also protect against hyperlipidaemia and arteriosclerosis, which are risk factors for stroke. To assess the efficacy and safety of PPAR-γ agonists in the secondary prevention of stroke and related vascular events for people with stroke or transient ischaemic attack (TIA). We searched the Cochrane Stroke Group Trials Register (July 2015), the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL 2015, Issue 6), MEDLINE (1949 to July 2015), EMBASE (1980 to July 2015), CINAHL (1982 to July 2015), AMED (1985 to July 2015) and 11 Chinese databases (July 2015). In an effort to identify further published, unpublished and ongoing trials we searched ongoing trials registers, reference lists and relevant conference proceedings, and contacted authors and pharmaceutical companies. We did not impose any language restrictions. We included randomised controlled trials (RCTs) evaluating PPAR-γ agonists versus placebo for the secondary prevention of stroke and related vascular events in people with stroke or TIA, with the outcomes of recurrent stroke, vascular events and adverse events. Two review authors independently screened the titles and abstracts of identified records, selected studies for inclusion, extracted eligible data, cross-checked the data for accuracy, and assessed methodological quality and risk of bias. We identified four eligible studies with 1163 participants; only one study had a low risk of bias for all domains. Three studies evaluated the drug pioglitazone and one study evaluated rosiglitazone. The participants in different studies were heterogeneous. The number of participants with recurrent stroke was evaluated in two studies, where PPAR-γ agonists reduced the recurrence of stroke compared with placebo (risk ratio (RR) 0.52, 95% confidence interval (CI

  17. Declining stroke and vascular event recurrence rates in secondary prevention trials over the past 50 years and consequences for current trial design.

    PubMed

    Hong, Keun-Sik; Yegiaian, Sharon; Lee, Meng; Lee, Juneyoung; Saver, Jeffrey L

    2011-05-17

    It is widely supposed, but not well-demonstrated, that cumulative advances in standard care have reduced recurrent stroke and cardiovascular events in secondary prevention trials. Systematic search identified all randomized, controlled trials of medical secondary stroke prevention therapies published from 1960 to 2009. Randomized, controlled trials narrowly focused on single stroke mechanisms, including atrial fibrillation, cervical carotid stenosis, and intracranial stenosis, were excluded. From control arms of individual trials, we extracted data for baseline characteristics and annual event rates for recurrent stroke, fatal stroke, and major vascular events and analyzed trends over time. Fifty-nine randomized controlled trials were identified, enrolling 66 157 patients in control arms. Over the 5 decade periods, annual event rates declined, per decade, for recurrent stroke by 0.996% (P=0.001), fatal stroke by 0.282% (P=0.003), and major vascular events by 1.331% (P=0.001). Multiple regression analyses identified increasing antithrombotic use and lower blood pressures as major contributors to the decline in recurrent stroke. For recurrent stroke, annual rates fell from 8.71% in trials launched in the 1960s to 6.10% in the 1970s, 5.41% in the 1980s, 4.04% in the 1990s, and 4.98% in the 2000s. The sample size required for a trial to have adequate power to detect a 20% reduction in recurrent stroke increased 2.2-fold during this period. Recurrent stroke and vascular event rates have declined substantially over the last 5 decades, with improved blood pressure control and more frequent use of antiplatelet therapy as the leading causes. Considerably larger sample sizes are now needed to demonstrate incremental improvements in medical secondary prevention.

  18. Peer education for secondary stroke prevention in inner-city minorities: Design and methods of the Prevent Recurrence of All Inner-city Strokes through Education randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Goldfinger, Judith Z.; Kronish, Ian M.; Fei, Kezhen; Graciani, Albert; Rosenfeld, Peri; Lorig, Kate; Horowitz, Carol R.

    2012-01-01

    Background The highest risk for stroke is among survivors of strokes or transient ischemic attacks (TIA). However, use of proven-effective cardiovascular medications to control stroke risk is suboptimal, particularly among the Black and Latino populations disproportionately impacted by stroke. Methods A partnership of Harlem and Bronx community representatives, stroke survivors, researchers, clinicians, outreach workers and patient educators used community-based participatory research to conceive and develop the Prevent Recurrence of All Inner-city Strokes through Education (PRAISE) trial. Using data from focus groups with stroke survivors, they tailored a peer-led, community-based chronic disease self-management program to address stroke risk factors. PRAISE will test, in a randomized controlled trial, whether this stroke education intervention improves blood pressure control and a composite outcome of blood pressure control, lipid control, and use of antithrombotic medications. Results Of the 582 survivors of stroke and TIA enrolled thus far, 81% are Black or Latino and 56% have an annual income less than $15,000. Many (33%) do not have blood pressures in the target range, and most (66%) do not have control of all three major stroke risk factors. Conclusions Rates of stroke recurrence risk factors remain suboptimal in the high risk, urban, predominantly minority communities studied. With a community-partnered approach, PRAISE has recruited a large number of stroke and TIA survivors to date, and may prove successful in engaging those at highest risk for stroke and reducing disparities in stroke outcomes in inner-city communities. PMID:22710563

  19. Recovery After Stroke: Recurrent Stroke

    MedlinePlus

    ... blood pressure  Find out if you have atrial fibrillation (an irregular heartbeat which allows blood to pool ... your stroke risk. One form  known as atrial fibrillation or AF  causes blood to form clots that ...

  20. Preventing stroke

    MedlinePlus

    ... Partially-hydrogenated or hydrogenated fats Medical problems may lead to stroke Control your cholesterol and diabetes with ... increase the chance of blood clots, which can lead to stroke. Clots are more likely in women ...

  1. Advantages of isovolemic hemodilution-red cell exchange therapy to prevent recurrent stroke in sickle cell anemia patients.

    PubMed

    Sarode, Ravi; Matevosyan, Karén; Rogers, Zora R; Burner, James D; Rutherford, Cynthia

    2011-01-01

    Chronic simple hypertransfusion (every 3 to 4 weeks) effectively prevents secondary stroke in children with sickle cell anemia but leads to iron overload despite chelation therapy. Conventional red blood cell exchange (C-RBCx) has advantages over simple transfusion: no net iron gain and less frequent hospital visits. However, C-RBCx requires more red blood cell units, an apheresis instrument and skilled personnel; it is also more expensive. We developed a modified procedure where isovolemic hemodilution precedes RBCx (IHD-RBCx) to decrease RBC units required and to increase the interval between procedures. Twenty patients underwent IHD-RBCx over a period of 7 years. IHD-RBCx required 11% fewer RBC units and increased inter-procedure interval from 37 to 53 days compared to C-RBCx. The median number of annual procedures decreased from 9.8 to 7.0 per patient, resulting in estimated savings of more than $4.5 million over 10 years for 20 patients while providing improved care. Five patients have discontinued chelation therapy; three while on C-RBCx and two while on IHD-RBCx. No adverse events occurred related to the isovolemic hemodilution phase and no patients had recurrent stroke. IHD-RBCx is a safe, efficient, and cost effective therapy for secondary prevention of stroke in patients with sickle cell anemia.

  2. Risk Factors and Treatment at Recurrent Stroke Onset: Results from the Recurrent Stroke Quality and Epidemiology (RESQUE) Study

    PubMed Central

    Leoo, T.; Lindgren, A.; Petersson, J.; von Arbin, M.

    2008-01-01

    Background Much effort has been made to study first-ever stroke patients. However, recurrent stroke has not been investigated as extensively. It is unclear which risk factors dominate, and whether adequate secondary prevention has been provided to patients who suffer from recurrent stroke. Also, the different types of recurrent stroke need further evaluation. Methods The study included patients with recurrent stroke admitted to twenty-three Swedish stroke centers. The type of previous and recurrent stroke was determined, as well as evaluation (when applicable) of recurrent ischemic stroke according to the TOAST classification. Presence of vascular risk factors was registered and compared to the type of stroke. Also assessed was ongoing secondary prevention treatment at recurrent stroke onset. Results A total of 889 patients with recurrent stroke (mean age 77) were included in the study. Of these, 805 (91%) had ischemic stroke, 78 (9%) had intracerebral hemorrhage and 6 (<1%) stroke of unknown origin. The most frequent vascular risk factors were hypertension (75%) and hyperlipidemia (56%). Among the 889 patients, 29% had atrial fibrillation. Of the patients in the ischemic group with cardiac embolism, only 21% were on anticoagulation treatment. The majority of the patients (75%) had their most recent previous stroke >12 months before admission. Conclusions Few patients had a recurrent stroke shortly after the previous stroke in this study. This indicates that it is meaningful to prevent a second event with an adequate long-term treatment strategy for secondary prevention after first-ever stroke. There also seems to be a clear potential for improving secondary prevention after stroke. PMID:18216468

  3. Differences in ischemic and hemorrhagic recurrence rates among race-ethnic groups in the PRoFESS secondary stroke prevention trial.

    PubMed

    Estol, Conrado J; Bath, Philip M W; Gorelick, Philip B; Cotton, Daniel; Martin, Renee Hebert

    2014-10-01

    Epidemiological studies show that vascular risk factors are the same across the world but their effect vary between different race-ethnic groups. However, few studies have evaluated differences in recurrent stroke rates in various race-ethnicities. In >20 000 patients spanning 35 countries encompassing most race-ethnicities, we evaluated the incidence of ischemic and hemorrhagic strokes and myocardial infarction in patients within the context of the largest secondary stroke prevention trial (Prevention Regimen for Effectively Avoiding Secondary Strokes) to identify any significant differences. There were 20 332 patients with a recent ischemic stroke randomized in a factorial design to receive the antiplatelet agent clopidogrel vs. aspirin plus extended-release dipyridamole, and 80 mg of the anthypertensive telmisartan vs. placebo. The primary outcome for the trial was the time to any recurrent stroke. Statistical analysis was used to detect race-ethnic differences in recurrent vascular events. Mean patient age was 66 (±8·6) years and 36% were women. The study included 58% European/Caucasian, 33% Asians, 5% Latin/Hispanic, and 4% Black African. There were 74% of patients that were hypertensive, and average systolic and diastolic blood pressure was 144·1/83·8 mmHg. There was at least one significant difference in the overall test of all race-ethnic groups in myocardial infarction and symptomatic intracerebral hemorrhage occurrence. In the Kaplan-Meier hemorrhage and stroke-free survival curves, Asians showed a significantly higher recurrence of ischemic stroke risk in the 135-150 mmHg and greater than 150 mm Hg blood pressure groups, and a greater risk of hemorrhage recurrence in the greater than 150 mmHg blood pressure group. We found a significant difference in myocardial infarction and symptomatic intracerebral hemorrhage recurrence among different race-ethnic groups. The risk of recurrent ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke was greater in Asians

  4. Cost-effectiveness analysis of antiplatelet therapy in the prevention of recurrent stroke in the UK. Aspirin, dipyridamole and aspirin-dipyridamole.

    PubMed

    Chambers, M; Hutton, J; Gladman, J

    1999-11-01

    To evaluate the cost effectiveness from a UK health and social services perspective of antiplatelet therapies tested in the Second European Stroke Prevention Study (ESPS-2) in preventing recurrent stroke. To demonstrate the value of modelling studies in this area. A decision-analytic model was developed to evaluate health outcomes and associated costs. Sources of data for efficacy, adverse events, background event risks, disability and mortality were ESPS-2, the Oxfordshire Community Stroke Project and UK national statistics. Published national unit costs were applied to clinician panel estimates of resource use for acute stroke, rehabilitation and long term care. Outcome measures were strokes or disabled life-years averted, and disability-free, stroke-free or quality-adjusted life-years gained. 30-day survivors of ischaemic stroke treated with low dose aspirin, modified-release dipyridamole; the coformulation of low dose aspirin plus modified-release dipyridamole, or no antiplatelet therapy. The model predicted that over 5 years the coformulation prevented 29 more strokes than aspirin alone per 1000 patients, at an additional cost of 1900 Pounds per stroke averted (1996 values). Over 5 years, each antiplatelet therapy was cost saving compared with no therapy. Results were sensitive to the cost of acute care, the cost of long term care of disabled stroke survivors, the effectiveness of therapy and the background risk of recurrent stroke. In sensitivity analyses, the cost effectiveness did not exceed 7000 Pounds per stroke averted or 11,000 Pounds per quality-adjusted life-year (QALY) gained, except when varying the effectiveness parameter. Application of a decision-analytic model to the results of ESPS-2 indicated that first-line therapy with the coformulation of modified-release dipyridamole and low dose aspirin to patients with a previous ischaemic stroke is likely to generate significant health benefits at modest extra costs to health and social services. The

  5. Impact of the New American Heart Association/American Stroke Association Definition of Stroke on the Results of the Stenting and Aggressive Medical Management for Preventing Recurrent Stroke in Intracranial Stenosis Trial.

    PubMed

    Al Kasab, Sami; Lynn, Michael J; Turan, Tanya N; Derdeyn, Colin P; Fiorella, David; Lane, Bethany F; Janis, L Scott; Chimowitz, Marc I

    2017-01-01

    An American Heart Association/American Stroke Association (AHA/ASA) writing committee has recently recommended that tissue evidence of cerebral infarction associated with temporary symptoms (CITS) lasting <24 hours should be considered a stroke. We analyzed the impact of considering CITS as equivalent to stroke on the results of the Stenting and Aggressive Medical Management for Preventing Recurrent Stroke in Intracranial Stenosis (SAMMPRIS) trial. We compared outcomes in the medical (n = 227) and stenting (n = 224) groups in SAMMPRIS using the following primary end point (new components in bold): any stroke, CITS, or death within 30 days after enrollment or within 30 days after a revascularization procedure for the qualifying lesion during follow-up; or ischemic stroke or CITS in the territory of the qualifying artery beyond 30 days. We also compared the use of brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) after transient ischemic attacks (TIAs) in both treatment groups. By considering CITS as equivalent to stroke, the number of primary end points increased from 34 to 43 in the medical group and from 52 to 66 in the stenting group of SAMMPRIS. The Kaplan-Meier curves for the primary end points in the 2 groups were significantly different (P = .009). The percentage of patients with reported TIAs who underwent brain MRI was 69% in the medical group and 61% in the stenting group (P = .40). Using the AHA/ASA definition of stroke resulted in a substantially higher primary end point rate in both treatment groups and an even higher benefit from medical therapy over stenting than originally shown in SAMMPRIS. The higher rate of CITS in the stenting group was not due to ascertainment bias. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  6. Intensified secondary prevention intending a reduction of recurrent events in TIA and minor stroke patients (INSPiRE-TMS): a protocol for a randomised controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Leistner, Stefanie; Michelson, Georg; Laumeier, Inga; Ahmadi, Michael; Smyth, Maureen; Nieweler, Gabriele; Doehner, Wolfram; Sobesky, Jan; Fiebach, Jochen B; Marx, Peter; Busse, Otto; Köhler, Friedrich; Poppert, Holger; Wimmer, Martin L J; Knoll, Thomas; Von Weitzel-Mudersbach, Paul; Audebert, Heinrich J

    2013-01-24

    Patients with recent stroke or TIA are at high risk for new vascular events. Several evidence based strategies in secondary prevention of stroke are available but frequently underused. Support programs with multifactorial risk factor modifications after stroke or TIA have not been investigated in large-scale prospective controlled trials so far. INSPiRE-TMS is a prospective, multi-center, randomized open intervention trial for intensified secondary prevention after minor stroke and TIA. Patients with acute TIA or minor stroke admitted to the participating stroke centers are screened and recruited during in-hospital stay. Patients are randomised in a 1:1 ratio to intervention (support program) and control (usual care) arms. Inclusion of 2.082 patients is planned. The support program includes cardiovascular risk factor measurement and feedback, monitoring of medication adherence, coaching in lifestyle modifications, and active involvement of relatives. Standardized motivational interviewing is used to assess and enhance patients' motivation. Primary objective is a reduction of new major vascular events defined as nonfatal stroke and myocardial infarction or vascular death. Recruitment time is planned for 3.5 years, follow up time is at least 2 years for every patient resulting in a total study time of 5 years (first patient in to last patient out). Given the high risk for vascular re-events in acute stroke and the available effective strategies in secondary prevention, the INSPIRE-TMS support program has the potential to lead to a relevant reduction of recurrent events and a prolongation of the event-free survival time. The trial will provide the basis for the decision whether an intensified secondary prevention program after stroke should be implemented into regular care. A cost-effectiveness evaluation will be performed. clinicaltrials.gov: 01586702.

  7. Intensified secondary prevention intending a reduction of recurrent events in TIA and minor stroke patients (INSPiRE-TMS): a protocol for a randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Patients with recent stroke or TIA are at high risk for new vascular events. Several evidence based strategies in secondary prevention of stroke are available but frequently underused. Support programs with multifactorial risk factor modifications after stroke or TIA have not been investigated in large-scale prospective controlled trials so far. INSPiRE-TMS is a prospective, multi-center, randomized open intervention trial for intensified secondary prevention after minor stroke and TIA. Methods/design Patients with acute TIA or minor stroke admitted to the participating stroke centers are screened and recruited during in-hospital stay. Patients are randomised in a 1:1 ratio to intervention (support program) and control (usual care) arms. Inclusion of 2.082 patients is planned. The support program includes cardiovascular risk factor measurement and feedback, monitoring of medication adherence, coaching in lifestyle modifications, and active involvement of relatives. Standardized motivational interviewing is used to assess and enhance patients’ motivation. Primary objective is a reduction of new major vascular events defined as nonfatal stroke and myocardial infarction or vascular death. Recruitment time is planned for 3.5 years, follow up time is at least 2 years for every patient resulting in a total study time of 5 years (first patient in to last patient out). Discussion Given the high risk for vascular re-events in acute stroke and the available effective strategies in secondary prevention, the INSPIRE-TMS support program has the potential to lead to a relevant reduction of recurrent events and a prolongation of the event-free survival time. The trial will provide the basis for the decision whether an intensified secondary prevention program after stroke should be implemented into regular care. A cost-effectiveness evaluation will be performed. Trial registration clinicaltrials.gov: 01586702 PMID:23347503

  8. Heart Disease and Stroke Prevention

    MedlinePlus

    ... Heart disease and stroke prevention Heart Health and Stroke Heart disease and stroke prevention Related information Learn more about healthy eating ... to top More information on Heart disease and stroke prevention Read more from womenshealth.gov A Lifetime ...

  9. Brain Basics: Preventing Stroke

    MedlinePlus

    ... able to prevent 80 percent of all strokes. Score your stroke risk for the next 10 years-MEN Key: SBP = systolic blood pressure (score one line only, untreated or treated); ; Diabetes = history ...

  10. Rationale, design, and baseline features of a randomized controlled trial to assess the effects of statin for the secondary prevention of stroke: the Japan Statin Treatment Against Recurrent Stroke (J-STARS)

    PubMed Central

    Nagai, Yoji; Kohriyama, Tatsuo; Origasa, Hideki; Minematsu, Kazuo; Yokota, Chiaki; Uchiyama, Shinichiro; Ibayashi, Setsuro; Terayama, Yasuo; Takagi, Makoto; Kitagawa, Kazuo; Nomura, Eiichi; Hosomi, Naohisa; Ohtsuki, Toshiho; Yamawaki, Takemori; Matsubara, Yoshihiro; Nakamura, Masakazu; Yamasaki, Yoshimitsu; Mori, Etsuro; Fukushima, Masanori; Kobayashi, Shotai; Shinohara, Yukito; Yamaguchi, Takenori; Matsumoto, Masayasu

    2014-01-01

    Background Although statin therapy is beneficial for preventing first strokes, the benefit for recurrent stroke and its sub-types remains unknown in Asian populations. The aim of this study is to examine the role of pravastatin in the secondary prevention of stroke in Japanese patients. Methods This is a multicenter, randomized, open-label, parallel group study of patients with noncardioembolic ischemic stroke (atherothrombotic infarction, lacunar infarction, and infarction of undetermined etiology). All patients were diagnosed with hyperlipidemia and with a total cholesterol level between 180 and 240 mg/dl at enrollment. Patients in the treatment group receive 10 mg/day of pravastatin, and those in the control group receive no statin treatment. The primary end-point is the recurrence of stroke, including transient ischemic attack. The secondary end-points include the onset of respective stroke sub-types and functional outcomes related to stroke. The patients were enrolled for five-years and will be followed up for five-years. Results A total of 1578 eligible patients (age: 66·2 years, men: 68·8%), including 64·2% with lacunar infarction, 25·4% with atherothrombotic infarction, and 10·4% with infarction of undetermined etiology were included in this study. Lipid levels were generally well controlled (total cholesterol: 210·0 mg/dl, low density lipoprotein cholesterol: 129·5 mg/dl) at baseline. In addition, the disability of patients was relatively mild, and cognitive function was preserved in the majority of patients. Conclusion This article reports the rationale, design, and baseline features of a randomized controlled trial to assess the effects of statin for the secondary prevention of stroke. Follow-ups of patients are in progress and will end in 2014. PMID:24015915

  11. Recurrent stroke: what have we learnt?

    PubMed

    Rabia, K; Khoo, Em

    2007-01-01

    Stroke is the third leading cause of death, a major cause of disability in adults, and is frequently more disabling than fatal. With a decline in mortality from initial cerebral infarction and an increase in the life expectancy of the population, the number of patients with recurrent stroke and ensuing cardiovascular events will become greater. Thus it is important to find out those patients at high risk of stroke recurrence. This case report illustrates the process of recurrent stroke and the resulting disabilities and morbidities in a 42-year- old man. The role of integrated stroke rehabilitation programme is described.

  12. Risk factors for early recurrence after ischemic stroke: the role of stroke syndrome and subtype.

    PubMed

    Moroney, J T; Bagiella, E; Paik, M C; Sacco, R L; Desmond, D W

    1998-10-01

    Information regarding risk factors for early recurrence is limited. Our aim was to identify the clinical predictors of early recurrence after ischemic stroke. We prospectively examined 297 patients (mean age, 72.0+/-8.4 years) hospitalized with ischemic stroke to identify recurrent strokes occurring within 90 days of the index stroke. Survival free of recurrence was estimated using Kaplan-Meier analysis stratified by demographic variables; vascular risk factors; stroke syndrome, subtype, vascular territory, and severity; scores on the Barthel Index and Mini-Mental State Examination during hospitalization; blood pressure on admission; and selected laboratory data. We estimated the relative risk (RR) of early recurrence associated with those variables using proportional hazards analysis. We identified 22 recurrent events in the first 90 days after the index stroke, resulting in an early stroke recurrence rate of 7.4%, and death occurred immediately after recurrence in 6 of the 22 patients. A major hemispheric stroke syndrome (RR=2.9; 95% confidence interval [CI]=1.2 to 7.1), atherothrombotic stroke mechanism (RR=3.3; CI=1.3 to 8.3), and atrial fibrillation (RR=2.2; CI=0.8 to 6.1) were independent predictors of early recurrence, after adjustment for demographic variables. Conclusions-Early recurrence was frequent and resulted in increased mortality. Attention to the clinical features of the index stroke, including the presenting syndrome and the ischemic mechanism, and the recognition of atrial fibrillation may help in the selection of patients for the initiation of targeted interventions to prevent early recurrence and subsequent mortality.

  13. [A case of cerebral autosomal dominant arteriopathy with subcortical infarcts and leukoencephalopathy (CADASIL) in which lomerizine hydrochloride was suggested to prevent recurrent stroke].

    PubMed

    Shimizu, Hisao; Nagami, Shuhei; Takahashi, Nobuyuki

    2014-01-01

    A 60-year-old man visited our hospital because of left hemiparesis in September 2006. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed a high-intensity lesions in the right corona radiata on diffusion-weighted images and a high-intensity lesions in the basal ganglia and deep white matter on T2-weighted images. He recovered with no sequelae. Antithrombotic agents such as aspirin were given to prevent stroke, but stroke recurred three times over the course of 3 years. In February 2009, neurological examination revealed right hemiparalysis and dysarthria. Dysphagia and cognitive decline had been progressing gradually. We suspected cerebral autosomal dominant arteriopathy with subcortical infarcts and leukoencephalopathy (CADASIL) on the basis of the clinical and family history. An Arg75Pro mutation in the Notch3 gene was found, but did not involve a cysteine residue. Antithrombotic agents were ineffective. We tried lomerizine hydrochloride, which was reported to prevent stroke in a patient with CADASIL. In Japan, lomerizine hydrochloride is used to prevent migraine and to selectively inhibit cerebral artery contraction. During treatment with lomerizine hydrochloride (5 mg/day) for more than 3 years, there was no recurrence of cerebral infarction and no further deterioration of cognitive function or MRI findings. There is no evidence supporting the efficacy of antithrombotic agents in CADASIL patients. Moreover, antithrombotic agents have been reported to increase the frequency of clinically silent microbleeds on MRI in CADASIL. Lomerizine hydrochloride might therefore be one option for the treatment of CADASIL.

  14. Reducing recurrent stroke: methodology of the motivational interviewing in stroke (MIST) randomized clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Krishnamurthi, Rita; Witt, Emma; Barker-Collo, Suzanne; McPherson, Kathryn; Davis-Martin, Kelly; Bennett, Derrick; Rush, Elaine; Suh, Flora; Starkey, Nicola; Parag, Varsha; Rathnasabapathy, Yogini; Jones, Amy; Brown, Paul; Te Ao, Braden; Feigin, Valery L

    2014-01-01

    Recurrent stroke is prevalent in both developed and developing countries, contributing significantly to disability and death. Recurrent stroke rates can be reduced by adequate risk factor management. However, adherence to prescribed medications and lifestyle changes recommended by physicians at discharge after stroke is poor, leading to a large number of preventable recurrent strokes. Using behavior change methods such as Motivational Interviewing early after stroke occurrence has the potential to prevent recurrent stroke. The overall aim of the study is to determine the effectiveness of motivational interviewing in improving adherence to medication and lifestyle changes recommended by treating physicians at and after hospital discharge in stroke patients 12 months poststroke to reduce risk factors for recurrent stroke. Recruitment of 430 first-ever stroke participants will occur in the Auckland and Waikato regions. Randomization will be to intervention or usual care groups. Participants randomized to intervention will receive four motivational interviews and five follow-up assessments over 12 months. Nonintervention participants will be assessed at the same time points. Primary outcome measures are changes in systolic blood pressure and low-density lipoprotein levels 12 months poststroke. Secondary outcomes include self-reported adherence and barriers to prescribed medications, new cardiovascular events (including stroke), changes in quality of life, and mood. The results of the motivational interviewing in stroke trial will add to our understanding of whether motivational interviewing may be potentially beneficial in the management of stroke and other diseases where similar lifestyle factors or medication adherence are relevant. © 2013 The Authors. International Journal of Stroke © 2013 World Stroke Organization.

  15. Non-traditional Serum Lipid Variables and Recurrent Stroke Risk

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jong-Ho; Lee, Juneyoung; Ovbiagele, Bruce

    2014-01-01

    Background and Purpose Expert consensus guidelines recommend low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) as the primary serum lipid target for recurrent stroke risk reduction. However, mounting evidence suggests that other lipid parameters might be additional therapeutic targets or at least also predict cardiovascular risk. Little is known about the effects of non-traditional lipid variables on recurrent stroke risk. Methods We analyzed the Vitamin Intervention for Stroke Prevention study database comprising 3680 recent (<120 days) ischemic stroke patients followed up for 2 years. Independent associations of baseline serum lipid variables with recurrent ischemic stroke (primary outcome) and the composite endpoint of ischemic stroke/coronary heart disease (CHD)/vascular death (secondary outcomes) were assessed. Results Of all variables evaluated, only triglycerides (TG)/high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) ratio was consistently and independently related to both outcomes: compared with the lowest quintile, the highest TG/HDL-C ratio quintile was associated with stroke (adjusted hazard ratio, 1.56; 95% CI, 1.05−2.32) and stroke/CHD/vascular death (1.39; 1.05−1.83), including adjustment for lipid modifier use. Compared with the lowest quintile, the highest total cholesterol/HDL-C ratio quintile was associated with stroke/CHD/vascular death (1.45; 1.03−2.03). LDL-C/HDL-C ratio, non-HDL-C, elevated TG alone, and low HDL-C alone were not independently linked to either outcome. Conclusions Of various non-traditional lipid variables, elevated baseline TG/HDL-C and TC/HDL-C ratios predict future vascular risk after a stroke, but only elevated TG/HDL-C ratio is related to risk of recurrent stroke. Future studies should assess the role of TG/HDL as a potential therapeutic target for global vascular risk reduction after stroke. PMID:25236873

  16. Recurrent ischaemic stroke unveils polycythaemia vera

    PubMed Central

    Abdel-Rahman, Islam; Murphy, Christie

    2015-01-01

    Polycythaemia vera is a recognised cause of ischaemic stroke. If not treated, this condition may result in recurrent strokes. This is a case of a 61-year-old Caucasian man presenting with the inability to ambulate for 3 days. Brain imaging revealed acute and chronic infarctions in the brain stem and the cerebrum. Polycythaemia vera was diagnosed and treated during the admission. The unique mechanisms and management issues of ischaemic stroke associated with polycythaemia vera are discussed. PMID:25754163

  17. Aortic Arch Plaques and Risk of Recurrent Stroke and Death

    PubMed Central

    Di Tullio, Marco R.; Russo, Cesare; Jin, Zhezhen; Sacco, Ralph L.; Mohr, J.P.; Homma, Shunichi

    2010-01-01

    Background Aortic arch plaques are a risk factor for ischemic stroke. Although the stroke mechanism is conceivably thromboembolic, no randomized studies have evaluated the efficacy of antithrombotic therapies in preventing recurrent events. Methods and Results The relationship between arch plaques and recurrent events was studied in 516 patients with ischemic stroke, double–blindly randomized to treatment with warfarin or aspirin as part of the Patent Foramen Ovale in Cryptogenic Stroke Study (PICSS), based on the Warfarin-Aspirin Recurrent Stroke Study (WARSS). Plaque thickness and morphology was evaluated by transesophageal echocardiography. End-points were recurrent ischemic stroke or death over a 2-year follow-up. Large plaques (≥4mm) were present in 19.6% of patients, large complex plaques (those with ulcerations or mobile components) in 8.5 %. During follow-up, large plaques were associated with a significantly increased risk of events (adjusted Hazard Ratio 2.12, 95% Confidence Interval 1.04-4.32), especially those with complex morphology (HR 2.55, CI 1.10-5.89). The risk was highest among cryptogenic stroke patients, both for large plaques (HR 6.42, CI 1.62-25.46) and large-complex plaques (HR 9.50, CI 1.92-47.10). Event rates were similar in the warfarin and aspirin groups in the overall study population (16.4% vs. 15.8%; p=0.43). Conclusions In patients with stroke, and especially cryptogenic stroke, large aortic plaques remain associated with an increased risk of recurrent stroke and death at two years despite treatment with warfarin or aspirin. Complex plaque morphology confers a slight additional increase in risk. PMID:19380621

  18. Effects of aspirin plus extended-release dipyridamole versus clopidogrel and telmisartan on disability and cognitive function after recurrent stroke in patients with ischaemic stroke in the Prevention Regimen for Effectively Avoiding Second Strokes (PRoFESS) trial: a double-blind, active and placebo-controlled study.

    PubMed

    Diener, Hans-Christoph; Sacco, Ralph L; Yusuf, Salim; Cotton, Daniel; Ounpuu, Stephanie; Lawton, William A; Palesch, Yuko; Martin, Reneé H; Albers, Gregory W; Bath, Philip; Bornstein, Natan; Chan, Bernard P L; Chen, Sien-Tsong; Cunha, Luis; Dahlöf, Björn; De Keyser, Jacques; Donnan, Geoffrey A; Estol, Conrado; Gorelick, Philip; Gu, Vivian; Hermansson, Karin; Hilbrich, Lutz; Kaste, Markku; Lu, Chuanzhen; Machnig, Thomas; Pais, Prem; Roberts, Robin; Skvortsova, Veronika; Teal, Philip; Toni, Danilo; VanderMaelen, Cam; Voigt, Thor; Weber, Michael; Yoon, Byung-Woo

    2008-10-01

    The treatment of ischaemic stroke with neuroprotective drugs has been unsuccessful, and whether these compounds can be used to reduce disability after recurrent stroke is unknown. The putative neuroprotective effects of antiplatelet compounds and the angiotensin II receptor antagonist telmisartan were investigated in the Prevention Regimen for Effectively Avoiding Second Strokes (PRoFESS) trial. Patients who had had an ischaemic stroke were randomly assigned in a two by two factorial design to receive either 25 mg aspirin (ASA) and 200 mg extended-release dipyridamole (ER-DP) twice a day or 75 mg clopidogrel once a day, and either 80 mg telmisartan or placebo once per day. The predefined endpoints for this substudy were disability after a recurrent stroke, assessed with the modified Rankin scale (mRS) and Barthel index at 3 months, and cognitive function, assessed with the mini-mental state examination (MMSE) score at 4 weeks after randomisation and at the penultimate visit. Analysis was by intention to treat. The study was registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT00153062. 20,332 patients (mean age 66 years) were randomised and followed-up for a median of 2.4 years. Recurrent strokes occurred in 916 (9%) patients randomly assigned to ASA with ER-DP and 898 (9%) patients randomly assigned to clopidogrel; 880 (9%) patients randomly assigned to telmisartan and 934 (9%) patients given placebo had recurrent strokes. mRS scores were not statistically different in patients with recurrent stroke who were treated with ASA and ER-DP versus clopidogrel (p=0.38), or with telmisartan versus placebo (p=0.61). There was no significant difference in the proportion of patients with recurrent stroke with a good outcome, as measured with the Barthel index, across all treatment groups. Additionally, there was no significant difference in the median MMSE scores, the percentage of patients with an MMSE score of 24 points or less, the percentage of patients with a drop in MMSE

  19. Effects of aspirin plus extended-release dipyridamole versus clopidogrel and telmisartan on disability and cognitive function after recurrent stroke in patients with ischaemic stroke in the Prevention Regimen for Effectively Avoiding Second Strokes (PRoFESS) trial: a double-blind, active and placebo-controlled study

    PubMed Central

    Diener, Hans-Christoph; Sacco, Ralph L; Yusuf, Salim; Cotton, Daniel; Ôunpuu, Stephanie; Lawton, William A; Palesch, Yuko; Martin, Reneé H; Albers, Gregory W; Bath, Philip; Bornstein, Natan; Chan, Bernard P L; Chen, Sien-Tsong; Cunha, Luis; Dahlöf, Björn; Keyser, Jacques De; Donnan, Geoffrey A; Estol, Conrado; Gorelick, Philip; Gu, Vivian; Hermansson, Karin; Hilbrich, Lutz; Kaste, Markku; Lu, Chuanzhen; Machnig, Thomas; Pais, Prem; Roberts, Robin; Skvortsova, Veronika; Teal, Philip; Toni, Danilo; VanderMaelen, Cam; Voigt, Thor; Weber, Michael; Yoon, Byung-Woo

    2009-01-01

    Summary Background The treatment of ischaemic stroke with neuroprotective drugs has been unsuccessful, and whether these compounds can be used to reduce disability after recurrent stroke is unknown. The putative neuroprotective effects of antiplatelet compounds and the angiotensin II receptor antagonist telmisartan were investigated in the Prevention Regimen for Effectively Avoiding Second Strokes (PRoFESS) trial. Methods Patients who had had an ischaemic stroke were randomly assigned in a two by two factorial design to receive either 25 mg aspirin (ASA) and 200 mg extended-release dipyridamole (ER-DP) twice a day or 75 mg clopidogrel once a day, and either 80 mg telmisartan or placebo once per day. The predefined endpoints for this substudy were disability after a recurrent stroke, assessed with the modified Rankin scale (mRS) and Barthel index at 3 months, and cognitive function, assessed with the mini-mental state examination (MMSE) score at 4 weeks after randomisation and at the penultimate visit. Analysis was by intention to treat. The study was registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NTC00153062. Findings 20 332 patients (mean age 66 years) were randomised and followed-up for a median of 2·4 years. Recurrent strokes occurred in 916 (9%) patients randomly assigned to ASA with ER-DP and 898 (9%) patients randomly assigned to clopidogrel; 880 (9%) patients randomly assigned to telmisartan and 934 (9%) patients given placebo had recurrent strokes. mRS scores were not statistically different in patients with recurrent stroke who were treated with ASA and ER-DP versus clopidogrel (p=0·38), or with telmisartan versus placebo (p=0·61). There was no significant difference in the proportion of patients with recurrent stroke with a good outcome, as measured with the Barthel index, across all treatment groups. Additionally, there was no significant difference in the median MMSE scores, the percentage of patients with an MMSE score of 24 points or less, the

  20. Antithrombotic therapy for secondary stroke prevention.

    PubMed

    Alberts, Mark J

    2011-12-01

    : Antithrombotic therapy is a key component of any strategy for the secondary prevention of ischemic stroke. A better understanding of the various therapeutic options will lead to improved stroke prevention, better medication adherence, and fewer complications. : Antiplatelet agents and anticoagulants are the two major classes of antithrombotic therapy used for stroke prevention. The etiology and mechanism of the stroke must be considered in order to make the best decision regarding which agent(s) to use for secondary stroke prevention. The recent Prevention Regimen for Effectively Avoiding Second Strokes (PRoFESS) study showed that clopidogrel and aspirin plus extended-release dipyridamole had similar event rates in terms of recurrent stroke, but clopidogrel was better tolerated, with fewer bleeding events. Several new anticoagulants are poised to replace warfarin for stroke prevention in the setting of atrial fibrillation. These include dabigatran (a new oral direct thrombin inhibitor) and possibly apixaban (a new oral factor Xa inhibitor). These new medications are much easier to use than warfarin and may be more effective and safer, with fewer drug and food interactions and no need for routine blood monitoring. Thus, these new medications may improve adherence as well as clinicians' inclination to treat with anticoagulation. : Because each antiplatelet agent or anticoagulant has certain advantages and disadvantages, clinicians must choose an agent that the patient can afford and tolerate in terms of side effects and adherence. The hope and expectation is that the proper use of these medications in accordance with current guidelines will reduce the risk of a recurrent stroke.

  1. ICARUSS, the Integrated Care for the Reduction of Secondary Stroke trial: rationale and design of a randomized controlled trial of a multimodal intervention to prevent recurrent stroke in patients with a recent cerebrovascular event, ACTRN = 12611000264987.

    PubMed

    Joubert, J; Davis, S M; Hankey, G J; Levi, C; Olver, J; Gonzales, G; Donnan, G A

    2015-07-01

    The majority of strokes, both ischaemic and haemorrhagic, are attributable to a relatively small number of risk factors which are readily manageable in primary care setting. Implementation of best-practice recommendations for risk factor management is calculated to reduce stroke recurrence by around 80%. However, risk factor management in stroke survivors has generally been poor at primary care level. A model of care that supports long-term effective risk factor management is needed. To determine whether the model of Integrated Care for the Reduction of Recurrent Stroke (ICARUSS) will, through promotion of implementation of best-practice recommendations for risk factor management reduce the combined incidence of stroke, myocardial infarction and vascular death in patients with recent stroke or transient ischaemic attack (TIA) of the brain or eye. A prospective, Australian, multicentre, randomized controlled trial. Academic stroke units in Melbourne, Perth and the John Hunter Hospital, New South Wales. 1000 stroke survivors recruited as from March 2007 with a recent (<3 months) stroke (ischaemic or haemorrhagic) or a TIA (brain or eye). Randomization and data collection are performed by means of a central computer generated telephone system (IVRS). Exposure to the ICARUSS model of integrated care or usual care. The composite of stroke, MI or death from any vascular cause, whichever occurs first. Risk factor management in the community, depression, quality of life, disability and dementia. With 1000 patients followed up for a median of one-year, with a recurrence rate of 7-10% per year in patients exposed to usual care, the study will have at least 80% power to detect a significant reduction in primary end-points The ICARUSS study aims to recruit and follow up patients between 2007 and 2013 and demonstrate the effectiveness of exposure to the ICARUSS model in stroke survivors to reduce recurrent stroke or vascular events and promote the implementation of best

  2. [Secondary prevention of ischemic non cardioembolic stroke].

    PubMed

    Armario, Pedro; Pinto, Xavier; Soler, Cristina; Cardona, Pere

    2015-01-01

    Stroke patients are at high risk for recurrence or new occurrence of other cardiovascular events or cardiovascular mortality. It is estimated that a high percentage of non-cardioembolic ischemic stroke can be prevented by a suitable modification of lifestyle (diet and exercise), reducing blood pressure (BP) with antihypertensive medication, platelet aggregation inhibitors, statins and high intake reducing consumption of. Unfortunately the degree of control of the different risk factors in secondary prevention of stroke is low. The clinical practice guidelines show clear recommendations with corresponding levels of evidence, but only if implemented in a general way they will get a better primary and secondary stroke prevention. Copyright © 2014 Sociedad Española de Arteriosclerosis. Published by Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  3. Recurrent Stroke, Myocardial Infarction, and Major Vascular Events during the First Year after Acute Ischemic Stroke: The Multicenter Prospective Observational Study about Recurrence and Its Determinants after Acute Ischemic Stroke I.

    PubMed

    Kang, Kyusik; Park, Tai Hwan; Kim, Nayoung; Jang, Min Uk; Park, Sang-Soon; Park, Jong-Moo; Ko, Youngchai; Lee, SooJoo; Lee, Kyung Bok; Lee, Jun; Kim, Dong-Eog; Cho, Yong-Jin; Kim, Joon-Tae; Kim, Dae-Hyun; Cha, Jae-Kwan; Han, Moon-Ku; Lee, Ji Sung; Lee, Juneyoung; Oh, Mi Sun; Choi, Jay Chol; Lee, Byung-Chul; Hong, Keun-Sik; Bae, Hee-Joon

    2016-03-01

    Patients with acute ischemic stroke (AIS) are at high risk of subsequent vascular events. The aim of this study was to estimate rates of recurrent stroke, myocardial infarction (MI), and major vascular events during the first year after AIS in Korea. Through a multicenter stroke registry in Korea, 12,227 consecutive cases of AIS were identified between November 2010 and May 2013 and were followed up for recurrent stroke, MI, and major vascular events up to 1 year after stroke. Cumulative 30-day, 90-day and 1-year rates were 2.7%, 3.9%, and 5.7% for recurrent stroke; .1%, .3%, and .5% for MI; and 8.1%, 10.6%, and 13.7% for major vascular events, indicating that the early period is at high risk of recurrent stroke and major vascular events. The risk of recurrent stroke was substantially higher than the risk of MI: 13.0 times at 90 days and 11.4 times at 1 year. Compared to those with small-vessel occlusion (SVO), those with ischemic stroke subtypes other than SVO had a higher risk of recurrent stroke as well as major vascular events. Other common independent predictors for recurrent stroke and major vascular events were diabetes and prior stroke history. During the first year after AIS, one in 18 had recurrent stroke and one in 7 major vascular events. More than two thirds of recurrent stroke and three quarters of major vascular events developed within 90 days in a Korean cohort of stroke patients. Better prevention strategies are required for high-risk patients during this high-risk period. Copyright © 2016 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Prediction of Early Recurrence After Acute Ischemic Stroke.

    PubMed

    Arsava, E Murat; Kim, Gyeong-Moon; Oliveira-Filho, Jamary; Gungor, Levent; Noh, Hyun Jin; Lordelo, Morgana de Jesus; Avery, Ross; Maier, Ilko L; Ay, Hakan

    2016-04-01

    .0-1.1) in patients without. The risk of recurrence increased with a higher RRE score (log-rank test, P < .001). The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve for discrimination was 0.76 (95% CI, 0.70-0.82). The RRE identified 710 patients (48.4%) in the study population as high risk (>10%) or low risk (<1%). The sensitivity and specificity were 38% and 93% for identifying low-risk subsets and 41% and 90% for identifying high-risk subsets, respectively. This study confirms the validity of the RRE score in a multicenter cohort of patients with diverse characteristics. Our findings suggest that the RRE could be useful in identifying high- and low-risk patients for targeted stroke prevention.

  5. Incidence of Recurrence in Posterior Circulation Childhood Arterial Ischemic Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Uohara, Michael Y.; Beslow, Lauren A.; Billinghurst, Lori; Jones, Brianna M.; Kessler, Sudha K.; Licht, Daniel J.; Ichord, Rebecca N.

    2017-01-01

    stroke may account for this difference. Children with PCAIS may warrant increased monitoring. This study highlights the necessity for further research focused on recurrence prevention. PMID:28114639

  6. Fungus Infections: Preventing Recurrence

    MedlinePlus

    ... Osteopathic Medicine Disease Database Contributors Doctor Derm App Skin Facts Aging and Sun Damage Beauty Myths Preventing Sun Damage Skin Cancer Detection Skin Disease Links Sun Safety Document ...

  7. Inflammatory Biomarkers in Childhood Arterial Ischemic Stroke: Correlates of Stroke Cause and Recurrence.

    PubMed

    Fullerton, Heather J; deVeber, Gabrielle A; Hills, Nancy K; Dowling, Michael M; Fox, Christine K; Mackay, Mark T; Kirton, Adam; Yager, Jerome Y; Bernard, Timothy J; Hod, Eldad A; Wintermark, Max; Elkind, Mitchell S V

    2016-09-01

    Among children with arterial ischemic stroke (AIS), those with arteriopathy have the highest recurrence risk. We hypothesized that arteriopathy progression is an inflammatory process and that inflammatory biomarkers would predict recurrent AIS. In an international study of childhood AIS, we selected cases classified into 1 of the 3 most common childhood AIS causes: definite arteriopathic (n=103), cardioembolic (n=55), or idiopathic (n=78). We measured serum concentrations of high-sensitivity C-reactive protein, serum amyloid A, myeloperoxidase, and tumor necrosis factor-α. We used linear regression to compare analyte concentrations across the subtypes and Cox proportional hazards models to determine predictors of recurrent AIS. Median age at index stroke was 8.2 years (interquartile range, 3.6-14.3); serum samples were collected at median 5.5 days post stroke (interquartile range, 3-10 days). In adjusted models (including age, infarct volume, and time to sample collection) with idiopathic as the reference, the cardioembolic (but not arteriopathic) group had higher concentrations of high-sensitivity C-reactive protein and myeloperoxidase, whereas both cardioembolic and arteriopathic groups had higher serum amyloid A. In the arteriopathic (but not cardioembolic) group, higher high-sensitivity C-reactive protein and serum amyloid A predicted recurrent AIS. Children with progressive arteriopathies on follow-up imaging had higher recurrence rates, and a trend toward higher high-sensitivity C-reactive protein and serum amyloid A, compared with children with stable or improved arteriopathies. Among children with AIS, specific inflammatory biomarkers correlate with cause and-in the arteriopathy group-risk of stroke recurrence. Interventions targeting inflammation should be considered for pediatric secondary stroke prevention trials. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  8. Secondary prevention of stroke--results from the Southern Africa Stroke Prevention Initiative (SASPI) study.

    PubMed Central

    Thorogood, M.; Connor, M. D.; Lewando-Hundt, G.; Tollman, S.; Ngoma, B.

    2004-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To describe the prevalence of risk factors and experience of preventive interventions in stroke survivors, and identilfy barriers to secondary prevention in rural South Africa. METHODS: A clinician visited individuals in the Agincourt field site (in South Africa's rural north east) who were identified in a census as possible stroke victims to confirm the diagnosis of stroke. We explored the impact of stroke on the individual's family, and health-seeking behaviour following stroke by conducting in-depth interviews in the households of 35 stroke survivors. We held two workshops to understand the knowledge, experience, and views of primary care nurses, who provide the bulk of professional health care. FINDINGS :We identified 103 stroke survivors (37 men), 73 (71%) of whom had hypertension, but only 8 (8%) were taking anti-hypertensive treatment. Smoking was uncommon; 8 men and 1 woman smoked a maximum of ten cigarettes daily. 94 (91%) stroke survivors had sought help, which involved allopathic health care for most of them (81; 79%). 42 had also sought help from traditional healers and churches, while another 13 people had sought help only from those sources. Of the 35 survivors who were interviewed, 29 reported having been prescribed anti-hypertensive pills after their stroke. Barriers to secondary prevention included cost of treatment, reluctance to use pills, difficulties with access to drugs, and lack of equipment to measure blood pressure. A negative attitude to allopathic care was not an important factor. CONCLUSION: In this rural area hypertension is the most important modifiable risk factor in stroke survivors. Effective secondary prevention may reduce the incidence of recurrent strokes, but there is no system to deliver such care. New strategies for care are needed involving both allopathic and non-allopathic-health care providers. PMID:15500283

  9. Prediction of Recurrent Stroke or Transient Ischemic Attack After Noncardiogenic Posterior Circulation Ischemic Stroke.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Changqing; Wang, Yilong; Zhao, Xingquan; Liu, Liping; Wang, ChunXue; Pu, Yuehua; Zou, Xinying; Pan, Yuesong; Wong, Ka Sing; Wang, Yongjun

    2017-07-01

    Posterior circulation ischemic stroke (IS) is generally considered an illness with a poor prognosis. However, there are no effective rating scales to predict recurrent stroke following it. Therefore, our aim was to identify clinical or radiological measures that could assist in predicting recurrent cerebral ischemic episodes. We prospectively enrolled 723 noncardiogenic posterior circulation IS patients with onset of symptoms <7 days. Stroke risk factors, admission symptoms and signs, topographical distribution and responsible cerebral artery of acute infarcts, and any recurrent IS or transient ischemic attack (TIA) within 1 year were assessed. Cox regression was used to identify risk factors associated with recurrent IS or TIA within the year after posterior circulation IS. A total of 40 patients (5.5%) had recurrent IS or TIA within 1 year of posterior circulation IS. Multivariate Cox regression identified chief complaint with dysphagia (hazard ratio [HR], 4.16; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.69-10.2; P=0.002), repeated TIAs within 3 months before the stroke (HR, 15.4; 95% CI, 5.55-42.5; P<0.0001), responsible artery stenosis ≥70% (HR, 7.91; 95% CI, 1.00-62.6; P=0.05), multisector infarcts (HR, 5.38; 95% CI, 1.25-23.3; P=0.02), and not on antithrombotics treatment at discharge (HR, 3.06; 95% CI, 1.09-8.58; P=0.03) as independent predictors of recurrent IS or TIA. Some posterior circulation IS patients are at higher risk for recurrent IS or TIA. Urgent assessment and preventive treatment should be offered to these patients as soon as possible. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  10. Long-term risk of recurrent stroke in young cryptogenic stroke patients with and without patent foramen ovale.

    PubMed

    Arauz, Antonio; Murillo, Luis; Márquez, Juan Manuel; Tamayo, Arturo; Cantú, Carlos; Roldan, Francisco-Javier; Vargas-Barrón, Jesús; Barinagarrementeria, Fernando

    2012-12-01

    Among patients with a patent foramen ovale and cryptogenic ischemic stroke, the long-term prognosis is unclear. This study aims to estimate the recurrence rate in young cryptogenic stroke patients with and without patent foramen ovale. One hundred eighty-six cryptogenic stroke patients (aged 18-45 years) were prospectively followed for up to five-years. They were divided into two groups according to the echocardiographic presence of patent foramen ovale. All patients received aspirin (100 mg/day) for secondary prevention. Mean age was 32·3 (standard deviation 7·9) years. During the mean follow-up of 66 months five patients with patent foramen ovale had recurrent strokes compared with 11 patients without patent foramen ovale. The average annual rate of recurrent cerebral ischemia was 1·1% and 1·6% for patients with and without patent foramen ovale, respectively. The recurrence rate did not increase with the presence of patent foramen ovale, atrial septal aneurysm or other variables. More than 60% of the reported cases achieved a good functional outcome. Young patients with cryptogenic ischemic stroke with and without patent foramen ovale have a low recurrence rate in a long-term follow-up and most present a favorable outcome. Patent foramen ovale with or without atrial septal aneurysm did not increase the risk of recurrence. © 2011 The Authors. International Journal of Stroke © 2011 World Stroke Organization.

  11. Twenty four hour pulse pressure predicts long term recurrence in acute stroke patients

    PubMed Central

    Tsivgoulis, G; Spengos, K; Zakopoulos, N; Manios, E; Xinos, K; Vassilopoulos, D; Vemmos, K

    2005-01-01

    Objectives: The impact of different blood pressure (BP) components during the acute stage of stroke on the risk of recurrent stroke is controversial. The present study aimed to investigate by 24 hour BP monitoring a possible association between acute BP values and long term recurrence. Methods: A total of 339 consecutive patients with first ever acute stroke underwent 24 hour BP monitoring within 24 hours of ictus. Known stroke risk factors and clinical findings on admission were documented. Patients given antihypertensive medication during BP monitoring were excluded. The outcome of interest during the one year follow up was recurrent stroke. The Cox proportional hazard model was used to analyse association of casual and 24 hour BP recordings with one year recurrence after adjusting for stroke risk factors, baseline clinical characteristics, and secondary prevention therapies. Results: The cumulative one year recurrence rate was 9.2% (95% CI 5.9% to 12.3%). Multivariate Cox regression analyses revealed age, diabetes mellitus, and 24 hour pulse pressure (PP) as the only significant predictors for stroke recurrence. The relative risk for one year recurrence associated with every 10 mm Hg increase in 24 hour PP was 1.323 (95% CI 1.019 to 1.718, p = 0.036). Higher casual PP levels were significantly related to an increased risk of one year recurrence on univariate analysis, but not in the multivariate Cox regression model. Conclusions: Elevated 24 hour PP levels in patients with acute stroke are independently associated with higher risk of long term recurrence. Further research is required to investigate whether the risk of recurrent stroke can be reduced to a greater extent by decreasing the pulsatile component of BP in patients with acute stroke. PMID:16170077

  12. Neurosarcoidosis Presenting With Recurrent Strokes: A Case Report and Literature Review.

    PubMed

    Raza, Naheed; Schreck, Karisa C

    2017-04-01

    Neurosarcoidosis is a rare but important cause of stroke as it is treatable. Cases reported thus far have primarily been in young people who are relatively healthy. Here we report the case of a 73-year-old woman presenting with recurrent strokes and high-grade intracranial stenosis caused by probable neurosarcoidosis. This is unique as neurosarcoidosis is not usually considered as an etiology for recurrent strokes in our patient's age-group. We review and categorize published cases of neurosarcoidosis causing stroke and describe a classification scheme for certainty of diagnosis. Given the implications of this diagnosis for secondary stroke prevention, we recommend that neurosarcoidosis be considered in the differential for patients with few vascular risk factors, recurrent strokes refractory to medical treatment, or possible vasculitis even in the elderly patients.

  13. Mexican Americans with Atrial Fibrillation have More Recurrent Strokes than Non-Hispanic Whites

    PubMed Central

    Simpson, J.R.; Zahuranec, D.B.; Lisabeth, L.D.; Sánchez, B.N.; Skolarus, L.E.; Mendizabal, J.E.; Smith, M.A.; Garcia, N.M.; Morgenstern, L.B.

    2010-01-01

    Background and Purpose Atrial fibrillation is a common cause of stroke with a known preventative treatment. We compared post-stroke recurrence and survival in Mexican Americans (MAs) and non-Hispanic whites (NHWs) with atrial fibrillation in a population-based study. Methods Using surveillance methods from the Brain Attack Surveillance in Corpus Christi (BASIC) Project, cases of ischemic stroke/TIA with atrial fibrillation were prospectively identified January 2000-June 2008. Recurrent stroke and all-cause mortality were compared by ethnicity with survival analysis methods. Results A total of 236 patients were available (88 MA, 148 NHW). MAs were younger than NHWs, with no ethnic differences in severity of the first stroke or proportion discharged on warfarin. MAs had a higher risk of stroke recurrence than NHWs (Kaplan Meier estimates of survival free of stroke recurrence risk at 28-days and 1-year were 0.99 and 0.85 in MAs and 0.98 and 0.96 in NHWs; p=0.01, log-rank test), which persisted despite adjustment for age and gender (hazard ratio 2.46, 95% CI: 1.19, 5.11). Severity of the recurrent stroke was higher in MAs than in NHWs (p=0.02). There was no ethnic difference in survival after stroke in unadjusted analysis or after adjusting for demographics and clinical factors (hazard ratio 1.03, 95% CI: 0.63–1.67). Conclusions MAs with atrial fibrillation have a higher stroke recurrence risk and more severe recurrences than NHWs, but no difference in all-cause mortality. Aggressive stroke prevention measures focused on MAs are warranted. PMID:20829515

  14. Prevention of recurrent cryptogenic stroke with percutaneous closure of patent foramen ovale; one year follow-up study with magnetic resonance imaging and Holter monitoring.

    PubMed

    Ateş, Ahmet Hakan; Sunman, Hamza; Aytemir, Kudret; Yorgun, Hikmet; Canpolat, Uğur; Topcuoğlu, Mehmet Akif; Karlı Oğuz, Kader; Şahiner, Levent; Kaya, Ergün Barış; Tokgözoğlu, Lale; Kabakçı, Giray; Oto, Ali

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we aimed to evaluate the effect of percutaneous closure of patent foramen ovale (PFO) on the recurrence of stroke and new cardiac arrhythmia using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and Holter monitoring. Patients with PFO had >1 previous stroke or transient ischemic attack documented with MRI in the first event. PFO with right to left shunt was detected by transesophageal echocardiography (TEE) and transcranial Doppler ultrasound. MRI examinations were performed on patients before and one year after PFO closure was applied. A twenty-four hour Holter monitoring was performed in all patients within 1 month before and 6 months after the procedure. Percutaneous PFO closure was performed on 47 patients (25 female, mean age: 38.7 years) who had cerebral ischemic events detected by MRI. A year after the procedure, TEE showed that there was no residual interatrial right-to-left shunting. After a 14 month follow-up, no new cerebrovascular event and no new lesion on MRI were recorded. The incidence of arrhythmia did not increase significantly after the procedure on Holter monitoring (p=0.917). One-year clinical and MRI follow-up study of patients with cerebral ischemic events and percutaneous closure of PFO showed no recurrent event and no significant complication associated with the procedure. In addition, Holter monitorization demonstrated that the procedure did not increase the incidence of arrhythmias compared with pre-procedural monitoring.

  15. Blood pressure control versus atrial fibrillation management in stroke prevention.

    PubMed

    Savoia, Carmine; Sada, Lidia; Volpe, Massimo

    2015-06-01

    Hypertension is one of the major risk factors for atrial fibrillation which in turn is the most prevalent concomitant condition in hypertensive patients. While both these pathological conditions are independent risk factors for stroke, the association of hypertension and atrial fibrillation increases the incidence of disabling strokes. Moreover, documented or silent atrial fibrillation doubles the rate of cardiovascular death. Lowering blood pressure is strongly recommended, particularly for primary stroke prevention. However, a relatively small percentage of hypertensive patients still achieve the recommended blood pressure goals. The management of atrial fibrillation with respect to stroke prevention is changing. New oral anticoagulants represent a major advancement in long-term anticoagulation therapy in non valvular atrial fibrillation. They have several benefits over warfarin, including improved adherence to the anticoagulation therapy. This is an important issue since non-adherence to stroke prevention medications is a risk factor for first and recurrent strokes.

  16. Left atrial enlargement and stroke recurrence: the Northern Manhattan Stroke Study.

    PubMed

    Yaghi, Shadi; Moon, Yeseon P; Mora-McLaughlin, Consuelo; Willey, Joshua Z; Cheung, Ken; Di Tullio, Marco R; Homma, Shunichi; Kamel, Hooman; Sacco, Ralph L; Elkind, Mitchell S V

    2015-06-01

    Although left atrial enlargement (LAE) increases incident stroke risk, the association with recurrent stroke is less clear. Our aim was to determine the association of LAE with recurrent stroke most likely related to embolism (cryptogenic and cardioembolic) and all ischemic stroke recurrences. We followed 655 first ischemic stroke patients in the Northern Manhattan Stroke Study for ≤5 years. LA size from 2D echocardiography was categorized as normal LAE (52.7%), mild LAE (31.6%), and moderate-severe LAE (15.7%). We used Cox proportional hazard models to calculate the hazard ratios and 95% confidence intervals for the association of LA size and LAE with recurrent cryptogenic/cardioembolic and total recurrent ischemic stroke. LA size was available in 529 (81%) patients. Mean age at enrollment was 69±13 years; 45.8% were male, 54.0% Hispanic, and 18.5% had atrial fibrillation. Over a median of 4 years, there were 65 recurrent ischemic strokes (29 were cardioembolic or cryptogenic). In multivariable models adjusted for confounders, including atrial fibrillation and heart failure, moderate-severe LAE compared with normal LA size was associated with greater risk of recurrent cardioembolic/cryptogenic stroke (adjusted hazard ratio 2.83, 95% confidence interval 1.03-7.81), but not total ischemic stroke (adjusted hazard ratio 1.06, 95% confidence interval, 0.48-2.30). Mild LAE was not associated with recurrent stroke. Moderate to severe LAE was an independent marker of recurrent cardioembolic or cryptogenic stroke in a multiethnic cohort of ischemic stroke patients. Further research is needed to determine whether anticoagulant use may reduce risk of recurrence in ischemic stroke patients with moderate to severe LAE. © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.

  17. Plasma desmoplakin I biomarker of vascular recurrence after ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    López-Farré, Antonio J; Zamorano-León, José J; Segura, Antonio; Mateos-Cáceres, Petra J; Modrego, Javier; Rodríguez-Sierra, Pablo; Calatrava, Laura; Tamargo, Juan; Macaya, Carlos

    2012-04-01

    Stroke patients have a high risk of vascular recurrence. Biomarkers related to vascular recurrence, however, remain to be identified. The aim of the study was to identify, through proteomic analysis, plasma biomarkers associated with vascular recurrence within one year after the first ischemic stroke. This is a substudy (n = 134) of a large prospective multicenter study of post-stroke patients with an ischemic stroke. Plasma samples were obtained at inclusion. Among the identified proteins, only plasma levels of desmoplakin I were associated with protection against a new vascular event (Odds ratio: 0.64; 95% CI: 0.46-0.89; p = 0.009) after adjustment for hypercholesterolemia, statins and previous atherothrombotic stroke subtype. A greater number of patients without vascular recurrence had been treated with statins within three months of the recent ischemic stroke. Only patients who had been taking statins for 3 months after the ischemic stroke and did not suffer vascular recurrence over a follow-up year, have higher levels of desmoplakin I at the time of inclusion (Odds ratio 0.49; 95% CI: 0.28-0.86; p = 0.013). Increased desmoplakin I levels, determined within 1-3 months of the first ischemic stroke, could be a biomarker for statin responsiveness against a new vascular event in post-ischemic stroke patients taking statins early (1-3 months) after the ischemic stroke.

  18. Risk Stratification for Recurrence and Mortality in Embolic Stroke of Undetermined Source.

    PubMed

    Ntaios, George; Vemmos, Konstantinos; Lip, Gregory Y H; Koroboki, Eleni; Manios, Efstathios; Vemmou, Anastasia; Rodríguez-Campello, Ana; Cuadrado-Godia, Elisa; Giralt-Steinhauer, Eva; Arnao, Valentina; Caso, Valeria; Paciaroni, Maurizio; Diez-Tejedor, Exuperio; Fuentes, Blanca; Pérez Lucas, Josefa; Arauz, Antonio; Ameriso, Sebastian F; Hawkes, Maximiliano A; Pertierra, Lucía; Gómez-Schneider, Maia; Bandini, Fabio; Chavarria Cano, Beatriz; Iglesias Mohedano, Ana Maria; García Pastor, Andrés; Gil-Núñez, Antonio; Putaala, Jukka; Tatlisumak, Turgut; Barboza, Miguel A; Athanasakis, George; Makaritsis, Konstantinos; Papavasileiou, Vasileios

    2016-09-01

    The risk of stroke recurrence in patients with Embolic Stroke of Undetermined Source (ESUS) is high, and the optimal antithrombotic strategy for secondary prevention is unclear. We investigated whether congestive heart failure, hypertension, age ≥75 years, diabetes mellitus, and stroke or transient ischemic attack (TIA; CHADS2) and CHA2DS2-VASc scores can stratify the long-term risk of ischemic stroke/TIA recurrence and death in ESUS. We pooled data sets of 11 stroke registries from Europe and America. ESUS was defined according to the Cryptogenic Stroke/ESUS International Working Group. Cox regression analyses were performed to investigate if prestroke CHADS2 and congestive heart failure, hypertension, age ≥75 years, diabetes mellitus, stroke or TIA, vascular disease, age 65-74 years, sex category (CHA2DS2-VASc) scores were independently associated with the risk of ischemic stroke/TIA recurrence or death. The Kaplan-Meier product limit method was used to estimate the cumulative probability of ischemic stroke/TIA recurrence and death in different strata of the CHADS2 and CHA2DS2-VASc scores. One hundred fifty-nine (5.6% per year) ischemic stroke/TIA recurrences and 148 (5.2% per year) deaths occurred in 1095 patients (median age, 68 years) followed-up for a median of 31 months. Compared with CHADS2 score 0, patients with CHADS2 score 1 and CHADS2 score >1 had higher risk of ischemic stroke/TIA recurrence (hazard ratio [HR], 2.38; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.41-4.00 and HR, 2.72; 95% CI, 1.68-4.40, respectively) and death (HR, 3.58; 95% CI, 1.80-7.12, and HR, 5.45; 95% CI, 2.86-10.40, respectively). Compared with low-risk CHA2DS2-VASc score, patients with high-risk CHA2DS2-VASc score had higher risk of ischemic stroke/TIA recurrence (HR, 3.35; 95% CI, 1.94-5.80) and death (HR, 13.0; 95% CI, 4.7-35.4). The risk of recurrent ischemic stroke/TIA and death in ESUS is reliably stratified by CHADS2 and CHA2DS2-VASc scores. Compared with the low-risk group

  19. Perception of Recurrent Stroke Risk among Black, White and Hispanic Ischemic Stroke and Transient Ischemic Attack Survivors: The SWIFT Study

    PubMed Central

    Boden-Albala, Bernadette; Carman, Heather; Moran, Megan; Doyle, Margaret; Paik, Myunghee C.

    2011-01-01

    Objectives Risk modification through behavior change is critical for primary and secondary stroke prevention. Theories of health behavior identify perceived risk as an important component to facilitate behavior change; however, little is known about perceived risk of vascular events among stroke survivors. Methods The SWIFT (Stroke Warning Information and Faster Treatment) study includes a prospective population-based ethnically diverse cohort of ischemic stroke and transient ischemic attack survivors. We investigate the baseline relationship between demographics, health beliefs, and knowledge on risk perception. Regression models examined predictors of inaccurate perception. Results Only 20% accurately estimated risk, 10% of the participants underestimated risk, and 70% of the 817 study participants significantly overestimated their risk for a recurrent stroke. The mean perceived likelihood of recurrent ischemic stroke in the next 10 years was 51 ± 7%. We found no significant differences by race-ethnicity with regard to accurate estimation of risk. Inaccurate estimation of risk was associated with attitudes and beliefs [worry (p < 0.04), fatalism (p < 0.07)] and memory problems (p < 0.01), but not history or knowledge of vascular risk factors. Conclusion This paper provides a unique perspective on how factors such as belief systems influence risk perception in a diverse population at high stroke risk. There is a need for future research on how risk perception can inform primary and secondary stroke prevention. Copyright © 2011 S. Karger AG, Basel PMID:21894045

  20. Perception of recurrent stroke risk among black, white and Hispanic ischemic stroke and transient ischemic attack survivors: the SWIFT study.

    PubMed

    Boden-Albala, Bernadette; Carman, Heather; Moran, Megan; Doyle, Margaret; Paik, Myunghee C

    2011-01-01

    Risk modification through behavior change is critical for primary and secondary stroke prevention. Theories of health behavior identify perceived risk as an important component to facilitate behavior change; however, little is known about perceived risk of vascular events among stroke survivors. The SWIFT (Stroke Warning Information and Faster Treatment) study includes a prospective population-based ethnically diverse cohort of ischemic stroke and transient ischemic attack survivors. We investigate the baseline relationship between demographics, health beliefs, and knowledge on risk perception. Regression models examined predictors of inaccurate perception. Only 20% accurately estimated risk, 10% of the participants underestimated risk, and 70% of the 817 study participants significantly overestimated their risk for a recurrent stroke. The mean perceived likelihood of recurrent ischemic stroke in the next 10 years was 51 ± 7%. We found no significant differences by race-ethnicity with regard to accurate estimation of risk. Inaccurate estimation of risk was associated with attitudes and beliefs [worry (p < 0.04), fatalism (p < 0.07)] and memory problems (p < 0.01), but not history or knowledge of vascular risk factors. This paper provides a unique perspective on how factors such as belief systems influence risk perception in a diverse population at high stroke risk. There is a need for future research on how risk perception can inform primary and secondary stroke prevention. Copyright © 2011 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  1. Workup for Perinatal Stroke Does Not Predict Recurrence.

    PubMed

    Lehman, Laura L; Beaute, Jeanette; Kapur, Kush; Danehy, Amy R; Bernson-Leung, Miya E; Malkin, Hayley; Rivkin, Michael J; Trenor, Cameron C

    2017-08-01

    Perinatal stroke, including neonatal and presumed perinatal presentation, represents the age in childhood in which stroke occurs most frequently. The roles of thrombophilia, arteriopathy, and cardiac anomalies in perinatal ischemic stroke are currently unclear. We took a uniform approach to perinatal ischemic stroke evaluation to study these risk factors and their association with recurrent stroke. We reviewed records of perinatal stroke patients evaluated from August 2008 to February 2016 at a single referral center. Demographics, echocardiography, arterial imaging, and thrombophilia testing were collected. Statistical analysis was performed using Fisher exact test. Across 215 cases, the median follow-up was 3.17 years (1.49, 6.46). Females comprised 42.8% of cases. Age of presentation was neonatal (110, 51.2%) or presumed perinatal (105, 48.8%). The median age at diagnosis was 2.9 days (interquartile range, 2.0-9.9) for neonatal stroke and 12.9 months (interquartile range, 8.7-32.8) for presumed perinatal stroke. Strokes were classified as arterial (149, 69.3%), venous (60, 27.9%), both (4, 1.9%), or uncertain (2, 0.9%) by consensus imaging review. Of the 215 cases, there were 6 (2.8%) recurrent ischemic cerebrovascular events. Abnormal thrombophilia testing was not associated with recurrent stroke, except for a single patient with combined antithrombin deficiency and protein C deficiency. After excluding venous events, 155 patients were evaluated for arteriopathy and cardioembolic risk factors; neither was associated with recurrent stroke. Positive family history of thrombosis was not predictive of abnormal thrombophilia testing. Thrombophilia, arteriopathy, or cardioembolic risk factors were not predictive of recurrent events after perinatal stroke. Thrombophilia evaluation in perinatal stroke should only rarely be considered. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  2. Preventing Stroke Deaths

    MedlinePlus

    ... Safety Obesity Prescription Drug Overdoses Teen Pregnancy Tobacco Digital Media Tools About Vital Signs Subscribe to RSS ... Links Download this factsheet [PDF – 2.03MB] CDC Digital Press Kit Read the MMWR Science Clips Preventing ...

  3. Dementia after stroke increases the risk of long-term stroke recurrence.

    PubMed

    Moroney, J T; Bagiella, E; Tatemichi, T K; Paik, M C; Stern, Y; Desmond, D W

    1997-05-01

    Although risk factors for first stroke have been identified, the predictors of long-term stroke recurrence are less well understood. We performed the present study to determine whether dementia diagnosed three months after stroke onset is an independent risk factor for long-term stroke recurrence. We examined 242 patients (age = 72.0 +/- 8.7 years) hospitalized with acute ischemic stroke who had survived the first three months without recurrence and followed them to identify predictors of long-term stroke recurrence. We diagnosed dementia three months after stroke using modified DSM-III-R criteria based on neuropsychological and functional assessments. The effects of conventional stroke risk factors and dementia status on survival free of recurrence were estimated using Kaplan-Meier analyses, and the relative risks (RR) of recurrence were calculated using Cox proportional hazards models. Dementia (RR = 2.71, 95% CI = 1.36 to 5.42); cardiac disease (RR = 2.18, CI = 1.15 to 4.12); and sex, with women at higher risk (RR = 2.03, CI = 1.01 to 4.10), were significant independent predictors of recurrence, while education (RR = 1.90, CI = 0.77 to 4.68), admission systolic blood pressure >160 mm Hg (RR = 1.80, CI = 0.94 to 3.44) and alcohol intake exceeding 160 grams per week (RR = 1.86, CI = 0.79 to 4.38) were weakly related. Our results suggest that dementia significantly increases the risk of long-term stroke recurrence, with additional independent contributions by cardiac disease and sex. Cognitive impairment may be a surrogate marker for multiple vascular risk factors and larger infarct volume that may serve to increase the risk of recurrence. Alternatively, less aggressive medical management of stroke patients with cognitive impairment or noncompliance of such patients with medical therapy may be bases for an increased rate of stroke recurrence.

  4. Frequency, Risk Factors, and Outcome of Coexistent Small Vessel Disease and Intracranial Arterial Stenosis: Results From the Stenting and Aggressive Medical Management for Preventing Recurrent Stroke in Intracranial Stenosis (SAMMPRIS) Trial.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Hyung-Min; Lynn, Michael J; Turan, Tanya N; Derdeyn, Colin P; Fiorella, David; Lane, Bethany F; Montgomery, Jean; Janis, L Scott; Rumboldt, Zoran; Chimowitz, Marc I

    2016-01-01

    Intracranial arterial stenosis (ICAS) and small vessel disease (SVD) may coexist. There are limited data on the frequency and risk factors for coexistent SVD and the effect of SVD on stroke recurrence in patients receiving medical treatment for ICAS. To investigate the frequency and risk factors for SVD and the effect of SVD on stroke recurrence in patients with ICAS. A post hoc analysis of the Stenting and Aggressive Medical Management for Preventing Recurrent Stroke in Intracranial Stenosis (SAMMPRIS) study, a prospective, multicenter clinical trial. Among 451 participants, 313 (69.4%) had baseline brain magnetic resonance imaging scans read centrally for SVD that was defined by any of the following: old lacunar infarction, grade 2 to 3 on the Fazekas scale (for high-grade white matter hyperintensities), or microbleeds. Patient enrollment in SAMMPRIS began November 25, 2008, and follow-up ended on April 30, 2013. Data analysis for the present study was performed from May 13, 2014, to July 29, 2015. Risk factors in patients with vs without SVD and the association between SVD and other baseline risk factors with any ischemic stroke and ischemic stroke in the territory of the stenotic artery determined using proportional hazards regression. Of 313 patients, 155 individuals (49.5%) had SVD noted on baseline magnetic resonance imaging. Variables that were significantly higher in patients with SVD, reported as mean (SD), included age, 63.5 (10.5) years (P < .001), systolic blood pressure, 149 (22) mm Hg (P < .001), glucose level, 130 (50) mg/dL (P = .03), and lower Montreal Cognitive Assessment scores (median, ≥24 [interquartile range, 20-26]; P = .02).Other significant variables were the number of patients with diabetes mellitus (88 of 155 [56.8%]; P = .003), coronary artery disease (46 [29.7%]; P = .004), stroke before the qualifying event (59 [38.1%]; P < .001), old infarct in the territory of the stenotic intracranial artery (88 [56

  5. One-year outcomes and secondary prevention in patients after acute minor stroke: results from the China National Stroke Registry.

    PubMed

    Tan, Ying; Pan, Yuesong; Liu, Liping; Wang, Yilong; Zhao, Xingquan; Wang, Yongjun

    2017-06-01

    Limited data are available on secondary preventive therapy use and patient outcomes after acute minor ischemic stroke in China. This study investigated secondary prevention strategies and outcomes up to 1 year after minor ischemic stroke. Patients from the China National Stroke Registry experienced a minor ischemic stroke (National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale [NIHSS] score ≤5) and admitted to hospital within 24 hours of symptom onset were included. One-year rates of recurrent stroke, stroke-related disability, and all-cause death were evaluated. Risk factors associated with 1-year stroke recurrence were examined in a multivariate model. The secondary prevention strategies in the acute phase were evaluated as combination of secondary prevention medication classes and the medications used in 1 year follow-up were examined. The study included 1913 patients who had experienced acute minor ischemic stroke (mean age: 65.1 years; 67.3% men; mean NIHSS score: 2.5). Rates of recurrent stroke, disability, and death were 13.2, 17.0, and 6.3% at 1 year, respectively. History of hypertension, ischemic stroke, transient ischemic attack, and atrial fibrillation were independent predictors of one-year stroke recurrence. Rate of 1 year all-cause death in patients with triple combined therapy in acute phase was 4.1%, whereas in patients with none was 14.5%. At 1 year, only half patients continued the secondary prevention medications. Outcomes in individuals in China who had experienced acute minor stroke were unfavorable, underscoring the importance of early, sustained preventive therapy in this patient population. Combination of secondary prevention medication classes was associated with a lower risk of death.

  6. Genetic Drivers of von Willebrand Factor Levels in an Ischemic Stroke Population and Association With Risk for Recurrent Stroke.

    PubMed

    Williams, Stephen R; Hsu, Fang-Chi; Keene, Keith L; Chen, Wei-Min; Dzhivhuho, Godfrey; Rowles, Joe L; Southerland, Andrew M; Furie, Karen L; Rich, Stephen S; Worrall, Bradford B; Sale, Michèle M

    2017-06-01

    von Willebrand factor (vWF) plays an important role in thrombus formation during cerebrovascular damage. We sought to investigate the potential role of circulating vWF in recurrent cerebrovascular events and identify genetic contributors to variation in vWF level in an ischemic stroke population. We analyzed the effect of circulating vWF on risk of recurrent stroke using survival models in the VISP trial (Vitamin Intervention for Stroke Prevention) and the use of vWF in reclassification over traditional factors. We conducted a genome-wide association study) with imputation, based on 1000 Genomes Project data, for circulating vWF levels and then interrogated loci previously associated with vWF levels. We performed expression quantitative trait locus analysis for vWF across different tissues. Elevated vWF levels were associated with increased risk for recurrent stroke in VISP. Adding vWF to traditional clinical parameters also improved recurrent stroke risk prediction. We identified single-nucleotide polymorphisms significantly associated with circulating vWF at the ABO locus (P<5×10(-8)) and replicated findings from previous genetic associations of vWF levels in humans. Expression quantitative trait locus analyses demonstrate that most associated ABO single-nucleotide polymorphisms were also associated with vWF gene expression. Elevated vWF levels are associated with recurrent stroke in VISP. In the VISP population, genetic determinants of vWF levels that impact vWF gene expression were identified. These data add to our knowledge of the pathophysiologic and genetic basis for recurrent stroke risk and may have implications for clinical care decision making. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  7. Stroke recurrence within the time window recommended for carotid endarterectomy.

    PubMed

    Marnane, M; Ni Chroinin, D; Callaly, E; Sheehan, O C; Merwick, A; Hannon, N; Horgan, G; Kyne, L; Moroney, J; McCormack, P M E; Dolan, E; Duggan, J; Williams, D; Crispino-O'Connell, G; Kelly, P J

    2011-08-23

    In the North Dublin Population Stroke Study, we investigated the risk of recurrent stroke within the 14-day time window recommended for endarterectomy. In a population-based prospective cohort study, all ischemic stroke patients were identified over 1 year and categorized into those with (CS-positive) and without (CS-negative) ipsilateral carotid stenosis (CS) (≥50% lumen narrowing). Nonprocedural stroke recurrence was determined at 72 hours and 7 and 14 days. Of 365 ischemic stroke patients with carotid imaging, 51 were excluded due to posterior circulation or nonlateralizing stroke, ipsilateral carotid occlusion, or intracranial stenosis, leaving 314 included for analysis (36 CS-positive and 278 CS-negative). Recurrent stroke occurred in 5.6% (2/36) CS-positive and 0.4% (1/278) CS-negative patients by 72 hours of symptom onset (p =0.003), 5.6% (2/36) CS-positive and 0.7% (2/278) CS-negative patients (p =0.01) by 7 days, and in 8.3% (3/36) CS-positive and 1.8% (5/278) CS-negative patients by 14 days (p =0.02). On multivariable Cox regression analysis, CS was the only independent predictor of recurrence at 72 hours (adjusted hazard ratio [HR] 36.1, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.6-837.5, p =0.03), and 7 days (HR 9.1, 1.1-79.2, p =0.05), with a trend at 14 days (HR 4.6, 0.9-22.8, p =0.06). Although only a minority of patients with symptomatic CS had a recurrent stroke within 14 days, early recurrent stroke risk was high, particularly within the first 72 hours. Earlier carotid revascularization or improved acute medical treatment may reduce recurrence in this high-risk group.

  8. Stroke

    MedlinePlus

    ... version of this page please turn Javascript on. Stroke About Stroke Stroke -- A Serious Event A stroke is serious, just ... lifestyle can help you prevent stroke. What Is Stroke? A stroke is sometimes called a "brain attack." ...

  9. The Secondary Prevention of Small Subcortical Strokes (SPS3) study

    PubMed Central

    Benavente, Oscar R.; White, Carole L.; Pearce, Lesly; Pergola, Pablo; Roldan, Ana; Benavente, Marie-France; Coffey, Christopher; McClure, Leslie A.; Szychowski, Jeff M.; Conwit, Robin; Heberling, Patricia A.; Howard, George; Bazan, Carlos; Vidal-Pergola, Gabriela; Talbert, Robert; Hart, Robert G.

    2014-01-01

    Background Small subcortical strokes, also known as lacunar strokes, comprise more than 25% of brain infarcts, and the underlying vasculopathy is the most common cause of vascular cognitive impairment. How to optimally prevent stroke recurrence and cognitive decline in S3 patients is unclear. The aim of the Secondary Prevention of Small Subcortical Strokes study (Trial registration: NCT00059306) is to define strategies for reducing stroke recurrence, cognitive decline, and major vascular events. Methods Secondary Prevention of Small Subcortical Strokes is a randomised, multicentre clinical trial (n = 3000) being conducted in seven countries, and sponsored by the US NINDS/NIH. Patients with symptomatic small subcortical strokes in the six-months before and an eligible lesion on magnetic resonance imaging are simultaneously randomised, in a 2 × 2 factorial design, to antiplatelet therapy – 325 mg aspirin daily plus 75 mg clopidogrel daily, vs. 325 mg aspirin daily plus placebo, double-blind – and to one of two levels of systolic blood pressure targets –‘intensive’ (<130 mmHg) vs. ‘usual’ (130–149 mmHg). Participants are followed for an average of four-years. Time to recurrent stroke (ischaemic or haemorrhagic) is the primary outcome and will be analysed separately for each intervention. The secondary outcomes are the rate of cognitive decline and major vascular events. The primary and most secondary outcomes are adjudicated centrally by those unaware of treatment assignment. Conclusions Secondary Prevention of Small Subcortical Strokes will address several important clinical and scientific questions by testing two interventions in patients with recent magnetic resonance imaging-defined lacunar infarcts, which are likely due to small vessel disease. The results will inform the management of millions of patients with this common vascular disorder. PMID:21371282

  10. Definition and Implications of the Preventable Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Fisher, Mark; Moores, Lisa; Alsharif, Mohamad N.; Paganini-Hill, Annlia

    2016-01-01

    IMPORTANCE Although patients with acute stroke are routinely evaluated for potential treatment (ie, treatability of the stroke), preventability of the presenting stroke is generally not seriously considered. OBJECTIVE To systematically analyze stroke preventability. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS We evaluated medical records of 274 consecutive patients discharged with a diagnosis of ischemic stroke between December 2, 2010, and June 11, 2012, at the University of California Irvine Medical Center. Mean (SE) patient age was 67.2 (0.8) years. Data analysis was conducted from July 3, 2014, to August 4, 2015. EXPOSURES Medical records were systematically examined for demographic information, stroke risk factors, stroke severity, and acute stroke treatment. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES We defined stroke preventability as the degree to which the patient’s presenting stroke was preventable. Using variables easily determined at onset of stroke, we developed a 10-point scale (0, not preventable; 10, most preventable) to classify the degree of stroke preventability. Our focus was effectiveness of treatment of hypertension (0–2 points), hyperlipidemia (0–2 points), and atrial fibrillation (0–4 points), as well as use of antithrombotic treatment for known prior cerebrovascular and cardiovascular disease (0–2 points). RESULTS Total risk scores ranged from 0 to 8 (mean [SE], 2.2 [0.1]), with 207 patients (75.5%) exhibiting some degree of preventability (score of 1 or higher). Seventy-one patients (25.9%) had scores of 4 or higher, indicating that the stroke was highly preventable. Severity of stroke as determined by the National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale score was not related to preventability of stroke. However, 21 of 71 patients (29.6%) whose stroke was highly preventable were treated with intravenous or intra-arterial acute stroke therapy while these treatments were provided for only 13 of 67 patients (19.4%) with scores of 0 (no preventability) and 19 of

  11. Recurrent thromboembolic events after ischemic stroke in patients with cancer

    PubMed Central

    Singer, Samuel; Merkler, Alexander E.; Cheng, Natalie T.; Stone, Jacqueline B.; Kamel, Hooman; Iadecola, Costantino; Elkind, Mitchell S.V.; DeAngelis, Lisa M.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To determine the cumulative rate and characteristics of recurrent thromboembolic events after acute ischemic stroke in patients with cancer. Methods: We retrospectively identified consecutive adult patients with active systemic cancer diagnosed with acute ischemic stroke at a tertiary-care cancer center from 2005 through 2009. Two neurologists independently reviewed all electronic records to ascertain the composite outcome of recurrent ischemic stroke, myocardial infarction, systemic embolism, TIA, or venous thromboembolism. Kaplan-Meier statistics were used to determine cumulative outcome rates. In exploratory analyses, Cox proportional hazard analysis was used to evaluate potential independent associations between a priori selected clinical factors and recurrent thromboembolic events. Results: Among 263 study patients, complete follow-up until death was available in 230 (87%). Most patients had an adenocarcinoma as their underlying cancer (60%) and had systemic metastases (69%). Despite a median survival of 84 days (interquartile range 24–419 days), 90 patients (34%; 95% confidence interval 28%–40%) had 117 recurrent thromboembolic events, consisting of 57 cases of venous thromboembolism, 36 recurrent ischemic strokes, 13 myocardial infarctions, 10 cases of systemic embolism, and one TIA. Kaplan-Meier rates of recurrent thromboembolism were 21%, 31%, and 37% at 1, 3, and 6 months, respectively; cumulative rates of recurrent ischemic stroke were 7%, 13%, and 16%. Adenocarcinoma histology (hazard ratio 1.65, 95% confidence interval 1.02–2.68) was independently associated with recurrent thromboembolism. Conclusions: Patients with acute ischemic stroke in the setting of active cancer (especially adenocarcinoma) face a substantial short-term risk of recurrent ischemic stroke and other types of thromboembolism. PMID:24850486

  12. Shared genetic susceptibility of vascular-related biomarkers with ischemic and recurrent stroke

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Stephen R.; Hsu, Fang-Chi; Keene, Keith L.; Chen, Wei-Min; Nelson, Sarah; Southerland, Andrew M.; Madden, Ebony B.; Coull, Bruce; Gogarten, Stephanie M.; Furie, Karen L.; Dzhivhuho, Godfrey; Rowles, Joe L.; Mehndiratta, Prachi; Malik, Rainer; Dupuis, Josée; Lin, Honghuang; Seshadri, Sudha; Rich, Stephen S.; Sale, Michèle M.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the genetic contributors to cerebrovascular disease and variation in biomarkers of ischemic stroke. Methods: The Vitamin Intervention for Stroke Prevention Trial (VISP) was a randomized, controlled clinical trial of B vitamin supplementation to prevent recurrent stroke, myocardial infarction, or death. VISP collected baseline measures of C-reactive protein (CRP), fibrinogen, creatinine, prothrombin fragments F1+2, thrombin-antithrombin complex, and thrombomodulin prior to treatment initiation. Genome-wide association scans were conducted for these traits and follow-up replication analyses were performed. Results: We detected an association between CRP single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and circulating CRP levels (most associated SNP, rs2592902, p = 1.14 × 10−9) in 2,100 VISP participants. We discovered a novel association for CRP level in the AKR1D1 locus (rs2589998, p = 7.3 × 10−8, approaching genome-wide significance) that also is an expression quantitative trait locus for CRP gene expression. We replicated previously identified associations of fibrinogen with SNPs in the FGB and LEPR loci. CRP-associated SNPs and CRP levels were significantly associated with risk of ischemic stroke and recurrent stroke in VISP as well as specific stroke subtypes in METASTROKE. Fibrinogen levels but not fibrinogen-associated SNPs were also found to be associated with recurrent stroke in VISP. Conclusions: Our data identify a genetic contribution to inflammatory and hemostatic biomarkers in a stroke population. Additionally, our results suggest shared genetic contributions to circulating CRP levels measured poststroke and risk for incident and recurrent ischemic stroke. These data broaden our understanding of genetic contributors to biomarker variation and ischemic stroke risk, which should be useful in clinical risk evaluation. PMID:26718567

  13. The risk of recurrent stroke after intracerebral haemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Hanger, H C; Wilkinson, T J; Fayez‐Iskander, N; Sainsbury, R

    2007-01-01

    Background and aim The risks of recurrent intracerebral haemorrhage (ICH) vary widely (0–24%). Patients with ICH also have risk factors for ischaemic stroke (IS) and a proportion of ICH survivors re‐present with an IS. This dilemma has implications for prophylactic treatment. This study aims to determine the risk of recurrent stroke events (both ICH and IS) following an index bleed and whether ICH recurrence risk varies according to location of index bleed. Patients and methods All patients diagnosed with an acute ICH presenting over an 8.5 year period were identified. Each ICH was confirmed by reviewing all of the radiology results and, where necessary, the clinical case notes or post‐mortem data. Recurrent stroke events (ICH and IS) were identified by reappearance of these patients in our stroke database. Coronial post‐mortem results for the same period were also reviewed. Each recurrent event was reviewed to confirm the diagnosis and location of the stroke. Results Of the 7686 stroke events recorded, 768 (10%) were ICH. In the follow‐up period, there were 19 recurrent ICH and 17 new IS in the 464 patients who survived beyond the index hospital stay. Recurrence rate for ICH was 2.1/100 in the first year but 1.2/100/year overall. This compares with 1.3/100/year overall for IS. Most recurrences were “lobar–lobar” type. Conclusion The cumulative risk of recurrent ICH in this population is similar to that of IS after the first year. PMID:17220294

  14. Strokes in young adults: epidemiology and prevention.

    PubMed

    Smajlović, Dževdet

    2015-01-01

    Strokes in young adults are reported as being uncommon, comprising 10%-15% of all stroke patients. However, compared with stroke in older adults, stroke in the young has a disproportionately large economic impact by leaving victims disabled before their most productive years. Recent publications report an increased incidence of stroke in young adults. This is important given the fact that younger stroke patients have a clearly increased risk of death compared with the general population. The prevalence of standard modifiable vascular risk factors in young stroke patients is different from that in older patients. Modifiable risk factors for stroke, such as dyslipidemia, smoking, and hypertension, are highly prevalent in the young stroke population, with no significant difference in geographic, climatic, nutritional, lifestyle, or genetic diversity. The list of potential stroke etiologies among young adults is extensive. Strokes of undetermined and of other determined etiology are the most common types among young patients according to TOAST (Trial of Org 10172 in Acute Stroke Treatment) criteria. Prevention is the primary treatment strategy aimed at reducing morbidity and mortality related to stroke. Therefore, primary prevention is very important with regard to stroke in young adults, and aggressive treatment of risk factors for stroke, such as hypertension, smoking, and dyslipidemia, is essential. The best form of secondary stroke prevention is directed toward stroke etiology as well as treatment of additional risk factors. However, there is a lack of specific recommendations and guidelines for stroke management in young adults. In conclusion, strokes in young adults are a major public health problem and further research, with standardized methodology, is needed in order to give us more precise epidemiologic data. Given the increasing incidence of stroke in the young, there is an objective need for more research in order to reduce this burden.

  15. Streptococcus Mutans: A Potential Risk Factor in Recurrent Hemorrhagic Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Alam, Yasaman; Dahbour, Layth; Alnemari, Ahmed; Jumaa, Mouhammad; Schroeder, Jason L

    2017-01-01

    Stroke is the fifth leading cause of death and is responsible for approximately nine percent of all deaths worldwide. Cases of Streptococcus mutans (S. mutans)-induced intracerebral hemorrhage as a result of bloodstream infections have seldom been reported. New reports show that bacteria with specific collagen binding proteins (CBPs), such as the Cnm type produced by S. mutans, may inhibit platelet aggregation and cause bleeding. In this article, we report on a 62-year-old man with a recent history of left frontal intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) who presented to the emergency department after a fall due to suspected seizure while in rehabilitation. Computed tomography (CT) scan of the brain showed a right cerebellar hemorrhage with surrounding edema and mass effect on the fourth ventricle. A suboccipital craniotomy to evacuate the cerebellar ICH was completed without complication. Radiologic and angiographic assessments regarding the etiology of this patient’s stroke did not reveal any evidence of vascular pathology or mycotic aneurysms to explain his recurrent intracranial hemorrhages. Through persistent patient and family interviews, it came to light that a few weeks prior to the patient’s first ICH, he was diagnosed with a bloodstream infection by S. mutans. Bacteremia is known to be associated with embolic stroke, but only recently has it been shown that bacteremia can also be implicated in hemorrhagic stroke. S. mutans of the k serotype have specific CBPs that are attracted to exposed collagen in previously damaged small vessel walls. These bacterial proteins can interrupt the blood clotting cascade through the prevention of platelet aggregation, increasing the risk of intracerebral hemorrhage. PMID:28652948

  16. Cilostazol may prevent cardioembolic stroke in patients undergoing antiplatelet therapy.

    PubMed

    Horie, Nobutaka; Kaminogo, Makio; Izumo, Tsuyoshi; Hayashi, Kentaro; Tsujino, Akira; Nagata, Izumi

    2015-07-01

    Randomised trials have shown the efficacy of antiplatelet therapy with cilostazol to prevent secondary ischaemic stroke. Recently, cilostazol has been reported to prevent the development and/or recurrence of atrial fibrillation (AF), which can potentially prevent cardioembolic stroke in patients undergoing antiplatelet therapy. Herein, we examined the impact of prior antiplatelet therapy with cilostazol on the incidence of cardioembolic stroke, which had not been fully investigated. Using the multicenter retrospective study of stroke risk in antithrombotic therapy (RESTATE) database, we analysed consecutive patients with primary or secondary stroke under single antiplatelet therapy. We evaluated the characteristics of ischaemic stroke based on the type of antiplatelet agent used: aspirin, ticlopidine/clopidogrel or cilostazol. Of 1069 consecutive patients with primary or secondary stroke during antithrombotic therapy from January to December 2012, 615 patients received single antiplatelet therapy (293 and 322 cases of primary and secondary strokes, respectively). Interestingly, the percentage of cardioembolic infarction was significantly lower in patients taking cilostazol compared with other agents. Multivariate regression analysis found that age (OR: 1.03, 95% CI: 1.01-1.06, P = 0.0029), serum creatinine (OR: 1.17, 95% CI: 1.03-1.34, P = 0.0198), aspirin (OR: 1.75, 95% CI: 1.00-3.22, P = 0.0486), cilostazol (OR: 0.19, 95% CI: 0.03-0.73, P = 0.0125), and smoking (OR: 1.86, 95% CI: 1.16-2.94, P = 0.0102) were independently associated with cardioembolic stroke. Cilostazol may prevent cardioembolic stroke in patients undergoing antiplatelet therapy. This could be a novel strategy for cardioembolic stroke prevention potentially by affecting cardiac remodelling, in contrast to secondary anticoagulant therapy.

  17. Association of reversed Robin Hood syndrome with risk of stroke recurrence.

    PubMed

    Palazzo, P; Balucani, C; Barlinn, K; Tsivgoulis, G; Zhang, Y; Zhao, L; Dewolfe, J; Toaldo, B; Stamboulis, E; Vernieri, F; Rossini, P M; Alexandrov, A V

    2010-11-30

    Reversed Robin Hood syndrome (RRHS) has recently been identified as one of the mechanisms of early neurologic deterioration in acute ischemic stroke (AIS) patients related to arterial blood flow steal from ischemic to nonaffected brain. We sought to investigate the association of RRHS with risk of stroke recurrence in a single-center cohort study. Consecutive patients with AIS or TIA affecting the anterior circulation were prospectively evaluated with serial NIH Stroke Scale assessments and bilateral transcranial Doppler monitoring with breath-holding test. RRHS was defined according to previously validated criteria. A total of 360 patients (51% women, mean age 62 ± 15 years) had an ischemic stroke (81%) or TIA (19%) in the anterior circulation, and 30 (8%) of them had RRHS. During a mean follow-up period of 6 months (range 1-24), a total of 16 (4%) recurrent strokes (15 ischemic and 1 hemorrhagic) were documented. The cumulative recurrence rate was higher in patients with RRHS (19%; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1-37) compared to the rest (15%; 95% CI 0-30; p = 0.022 by log-rank test). All recurrent strokes in patients with RRHS were cerebral infarcts that occurred in the ipsilateral to the index event anterior circulation vascular territory. After adjusting for demographic characteristics, vascular risk factors, and secondary prevention therapies, RRHS was independently associated with a higher stroke recurrence risk (hazard ratio 7.31; 95% CI 2.12-25.22; p = 0.002). Patients with AIS and RRHS appear to have a higher risk of recurrent strokes that are of ischemic origin and occur in the same arterial territory distribution to the index event. Further independent validation of this association is required in a multicenter setting.

  18. Aspirin resistance are associated with long-term recurrent stroke events after ischaemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ning; Wang, Zhenhua; Zhou, Lihong

    2017-09-01

    To investigate the prevalent of aspirin resistance (AR) in stroke and its association with recurrent stroke in 214 patients with ischemic stroke who were receiving aspirin before the stroke onset. Two hundreds and fourteen acute stroke patients who previously received aspirin therapy (100mg/day for ≥7days) were enrolled. Whole blood samples were collected for platelet aggregation testing. The result is expressed in aspirin reaction units (ARU). A cutoff of 550 ARU was used to determine the presence of AR. A follow-up period of 1year was performed to record stroke recurrence events. In this study, the median age was 68 years (IQR, 60-77 years), and 118 (55.1%) were men. A total of 43 of 214 enrolled patients (20.1%) were AR. ARU levels were significantly higher in patients with recurrence than those without (514[IQR: 466-592] vs. 454[IQR: 411-499]; P <0.001). The stroke recurrence distribution across the ARU quartiles ranged between 7.41% (first quartile) to 40.74% (fourth quartile). In multivariate analyses, the 3th and 4th quartile of ARU was significantly associated with stroke recurrence during the observation period compared to the 1st quartile group, and the adjusted risk increased by 215% (OR=3.15 [95% CI 1.96-4.33], P=0.007) and 322% (4.22[2.56-7.16], P<0.001). In multivariate logistic regression analysis, AR was associated with a higher risk of stroke recurrence, and the adjusted risk increased by 365% (OR=4.65; 95% CI=2.99-8.16; P<0.001). In conclusion, AR is not uncommon in Chinese stroke patients who receive anti-platelet medications. Patients with AR may have a greater risk of suffering stroke recurrence events. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Risk of First and Recurrent Stroke in Childhood Cancer Survivors treated with Cranial and Cervical Radiation Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Mueller, Sabine; Sear, Katherine; Hills, Nancy K; Chettout, Nassim; Afghani, Shervin; Gastelum, Erica; Haas-Kogan, Daphne; Fullerton, Heather J

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Radiation therapy increases stroke risk in pediatric cancer patients, but risk of stroke recurrence in this population remains unknown. In a retrospective cohort study, we assessed rates and predictors of first and recurrent stroke in patients treated with cranial irradiation (CRT) and/or cervical irradiation ≤ 18 years of age. Methods We performed chart abstraction (n=383) and phone interviews (n=104) to measure first and recurrent stroke in 383 patients who received CRT and/or cervical radiation at a single institution between1980–2009. Stroke was defined as a physician diagnosis and symptoms consistent with stroke. Incidence of first-stroke was number of first-strokes per person-years of observation after radiation. We used survival analysis techniques to determine cumulative incidence of first and recurrent stroke. Results Among 325 subjects with sufficient follow-up data, we identified 19 first-strokes (13 ischemic, 4 hemorrhagic, 2 unknown sub-type) occurring at a median age of 24 years (Interquartile range (IQR) 17–33 years) in patients treated with CRT. Imaging was reviewed when available (n=13) and the stroke was confirmed in 12. Overall rate of first-stroke was 625 (95% CI 378–977) per 100,000 person-years. The cumulative incidence of first stroke was 2% (95% CI 0.01–5.3%) at 5 years and 4% (95% C.I. 2.0–8.4%) at 10 years post irradiation. With each 100cGy increase in the radiation dose, the stroke hazard increased by 5% (Hazard ratio = 1.05; 95% CI 1.01–1.09; p=0.02). We identified 6 recurrent strokes; 5 had available imaging that confirmed the stroke. Median time to recurrence was 15 months (IQR 6 months–3.2 years) after first-stroke. The cumulative incidence of recurrent stroke was 38% (95% CI 17–69%) at 5 years and 59% (95% CI 27–92%) at 10 years post first-stroke. Conclusion CRT puts childhood cancer survivors at high risk of both first and recurrent stroke. Stroke prevention strategies for these survivors are needed. PMID

  20. Stroke Risk Factors, Genetics, and Prevention.

    PubMed

    Boehme, Amelia K; Esenwa, Charles; Elkind, Mitchell S V

    2017-02-03

    Stroke is a heterogeneous syndrome, and determining risk factors and treatment depends on the specific pathogenesis of stroke. Risk factors for stroke can be categorized as modifiable and nonmodifiable. Age, sex, and race/ethnicity are nonmodifiable risk factors for both ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke, while hypertension, smoking, diet, and physical inactivity are among some of the more commonly reported modifiable risk factors. More recently described risk factors and triggers of stroke include inflammatory disorders, infection, pollution, and cardiac atrial disorders independent of atrial fibrillation. Single-gene disorders may cause rare, hereditary disorders for which stroke is a primary manifestation. Recent research also suggests that common and rare genetic polymorphisms can influence risk of more common causes of stroke, due to both other risk factors and specific stroke mechanisms, such as atrial fibrillation. Genetic factors, particularly those with environmental interactions, may be more modifiable than previously recognized. Stroke prevention has generally focused on modifiable risk factors. Lifestyle and behavioral modification, such as dietary changes or smoking cessation, not only reduces stroke risk, but also reduces the risk of other cardiovascular diseases. Other prevention strategies include identifying and treating medical conditions, such as hypertension and diabetes, that increase stroke risk. Recent research into risk factors and genetics of stroke has not only identified those at risk for stroke but also identified ways to target at-risk populations for stroke prevention. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  1. Efficacy of antiplatelet therapy in secondary prevention following lacunar stroke: pooled analysis of randomized trials.

    PubMed

    Kwok, Chun Shing; Shoamanesh, Ashkan; Copley, Hannah Charlotte; Myint, Phyo Kyaw; Loke, Yoon K; Benavente, Oscar R

    2015-04-01

    Lacunar stroke accounts for ≈25% of ischemic stroke, but optimal antiplatelet regimen to prevent stroke recurrence remains unclear. We aimed to evaluate the efficacy of antiplatelet agents in secondary stroke prevention after a lacunar stroke. We searched MEDLINE, Embase, and the Cochrane library for randomized controlled trials that reported risk of recurrent stroke or death with antiplatelet therapy in patients with lacunar stroke. We used random effects meta-analysis and evaluated heterogeneity with I(2). We included 17 trials with 42,234 participants (mean age 64.4 years, 65% male) and follow up ranging from 4 weeks to 3.5 years. Compared with placebo, any single antiplatelet agent was associated with a significant reduction in recurrence of any stroke (risk ratio [RR] 0.77, 0.62-0.97, 2 studies) and ischemic stroke (RR 0.48, 0.30-0.78, 2 studies), but not for the composite outcome of any stroke, myocardial infarction, or death (RR 0.89, 0.75-1.05, 2 studies). When other antiplatelet agents (ticlodipine, cilostazol, and dipyridamole) were compared with aspirin, there was no consistent reduction in stroke recurrence (RR 0.91, 0.75-1.10, 3 studies). Dual antiplatelet therapy did not confer clear benefit over monotherapy (any stroke RR 0.83, 0.68-1.00, 3 studies; ischemic stroke RR 0.80, 0.62-1.02, 3 studies; composite outcome RR 0.90, 0.80-1.02, 3 studies). Our results suggest that any of the single antiplatelet agents compared with placebo in the included trials is adequate for secondary stroke prevention after lacunar stroke. Dual antiplatelet therapy should not be used for long-term stroke prevention in this stroke subtype. © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.

  2. [Secondary prevention of ischemic stroke in children].

    PubMed

    Zykov, V P; Komarova, I B

    2012-01-01

    Pediatric arterial ischemic stroke (IS) is an important cause of lifelong disability. Arteriopathies due to trauma and infection are an important underlying cause of childhood arterial ischemic stroke. The secondary prevention of IS should be conducted taking into account the main pathogenetic mechanisms and vascular risk factors. For secondary stroke prevention, the majority of children are treated with either anticoagulation or antiplatelet therapies. This review focuses on the recent international clinical recommendations in secondary stroke prevention based on the results of randomized multicenter clinical studies published by the USA. cardiology association. Experience of anticoagulation or antiplatelet therapies for secondary stroke prevention is insufficient in Russia. Taking into account the available international recommendations is expedient for creation and practical application of the Russian standards for secondary arterial ischemic stroke prevention.

  3. Underestimation of the early risk of recurrent stroke: evidence of the need for a standard definition.

    PubMed

    Coull, Andrew J; Rothwell, Peter M

    2004-08-01

    There is considerable variation in the definitions used for recurrent stroke. Most epidemiological studies exclude events within the first 28 days (eg, Monitoring Trends and Determinants in Cardiovascular Disease [MONICA]) or events within 21 days in the same territory as the presenting event (eg, most stroke incidence studies). However, recurrence is most common during this early period and these restrictive definitions could underestimate the benefits of early prevention. We determined the 90-day risk of recurrence after incident ischemic stroke in 2 population-based cohorts (Oxford Vascular Study [OXVASC] and Oxfordshire Community Stroke Project [OCSP]) with the 3 most common definitions: any stroke > or =24 hours after the incident event excluding early deterioration not caused by a stroke (definition A); as above, but excluding any stroke within 21 days in the same territory as the incident event (definition B); and any stroke > or =28 days after the incident event (definition C). 657 patients had 93 recurrent strokes between 24 hours and 90 days after the incident event. The 90-day recurrence risks (95% CI) using definition A were 14.5% (11.5 to 17.5) in the OCSP and 18.3% (10.8 to 25.8) in the OXVASC. The equivalent risks using definitions B and C were 8.3% (5.9 to 10.8) and 4.8% (2.8 to 6.7), respectively, in the OCSP and 7.0% (1.6 to 12.4) and 5.9% (1.0 to 10.9) in the OXVASC. The definition A risk of recurrence was particularly high after partial anterior (22.9%,17.5 to 28.2) and posterior (19.5%,13.0 to 25.9) circulation strokes. The 3 most widely used definitions of recurrent stroke yield markedly different 90-day risks. We suggest that, where possible, definition A be adopted as the standard to avoid underestimation of risk and to allow valid comparison of different studies.

  4. Statin Adherence Is Associated With Reduced Recurrent Stroke Risk in Patients With or Without Atrial Fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Flint, Alexander C; Conell, Carol; Ren, Xiushui; Kamel, Hooman; Chan, Sheila L; Rao, Vivek A; Johnston, S Claiborne

    2017-07-01

    Outpatient statin use reduces the risk of recurrent ischemic stroke among patients with stroke of atherothrombotic cause. It is not known whether statins have similar effects in ischemic stroke caused by atrial fibrillation (AFib). We studied outpatient statin adherence, measured by percentage of days covered, and the risk of recurrent ischemic stroke in patients with or without AFib in a 21-hospital integrated healthcare delivery system. Among 6116 patients with ischemic stroke discharged on a statin over a 5-year period, 1446 (23.6%) had a diagnosis of AFib at discharge. The mean statin adherence rate (percentage of days covered) was 85, and higher levels of percentage of days covered correlated with greater degrees of low-density lipoprotein suppression. In multivariable survival models of recurrent ischemic stroke over 3 years, after controlling for age, sex, race/ethnicity, medical comorbidities, and hospital center, higher statin adherence predicted reduced stroke risk both in patients without AFib (hazard ratio, 0.78; 95% confidence interval, 0.63-0.97) and in patients with AFib (hazard ratio, 0.59; 95% confidence interval, 0.43-0.81). This association was robust to adjustment for the time in the therapeutic range for international normalized ratio among AFib subjects taking warfarin (hazard ratio, 0.61; 95% confidence interval, 0.41-0.89). The relationship between statin adherence and reduced recurrent stroke risk is as strong among patients with AFib as it is among patients without AFib, suggesting that AFib status should not be a reason to exclude patients from secondary stroke prevention with a statin. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  5. Vertebrobasilar ectasia in patients with lacunar stroke: the secondary prevention of small subcortical strokes trial.

    PubMed

    Nakajima, Makoto; Pearce, Lesly A; Ohara, Nobuyuki; Field, Thalia S; Bazan, Carlos; Anderson, David C; Hart, Robert G; Benavente, Oscar R

    2015-05-01

    The clinical implications of vertebrobasilar ectasia (VBE) in patients with cerebral small-artery disease are not well defined. We investigated whether VBE is associated with recurrent stroke, major hemorrhage, and death in a large cohort of patients with recent lacunar stroke. Maximum diameters of the vertebral and basilar arteries were measured by magnetic resonance angiography and computed tomographic angiography in 2621 participants in the Secondary Prevention of Small Subcortical Strokes trial. VBE was defined a priori as basilar artery greater than 4.5 mm and/or vertebral artery greater than 4.0 mm. Patient characteristics and risks of stroke recurrence and mortality during follow-up (median, 3.5 years) were compared between patients with and without VBE. VBE affecting 1 or more arteries was present in 200 (7.6%) patients. Patient features independently associated with VBE were increasing age, male sex, white race ethnicity, hypertension, and higher baseline diastolic blood pressure. Baseline systolic blood pressure was inversely associated with VBE. After adjustment for other risk factors, VBE was not predictive of recurrent stroke (hazard ratio [HR], 1.3; 95% confidence interval [CI], .85-1.9) or major hemorrhage (HR, 1.5; CI, .94-2.6), but was of death (HR, 1.7; CI, 1.1-2.7). In this large well-characterized cohort of patients with recent lacunar stroke, VBE was predictive of death but not of recurrent stroke or major hemorrhage. In these exploratory analyses, the frequency of VBE was directly related to diastolic blood pressure but inversely related to systolic blood pressure. Copyright © 2015 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Guidelines for the Primary Prevention of Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Meschia, James F.; Bushnell, Cheryl; Boden-Albala, Bernadette; Braun, Lynne T.; Bravata, Dawn M.; Chaturvedi, Seemant; Creager, Mark A.; Eckel, Robert H.; Elkind, Mitchell S.V.; Fornage, Myriam; Goldstein, Larry B.; Greenberg, Steven M.; Horvath, Susanna E.; Iadecola, Costantino; Jauch, Edward C.; Moore, Wesley S.; Wilson, John A.

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this updated statement is to provide comprehensive and timely evidence-based recommendations on the prevention of stroke among individuals who have not previously experienced a stroke or transient ischemic attack. Evidence-based recommendations are included for the control of risk factors, interventional approaches to atherosclerotic disease of the cervicocephalic circulation, and antithrombotic treatments for preventing thrombotic and thromboembolic stroke. Further recommendations are provided for genetic and pharmacogenetic testing and for the prevention of stroke in a variety of other specific circumstances, including sickle cell disease and patent foramen ovale. PMID:25355838

  7. Risk of First and Recurrent Stroke in Childhood Cancer Survivors Treated With Cranial and Cervical Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Mueller, Sabine; Sear, Katherine; Hills, Nancy K.; Chettout, Nassim; Afghani, Shervin; Gastelum, Erica; Haas-Kogan, Daphne; Fullerton, Heather J.

    2013-07-15

    Purpose: To assess, in a retrospective cohort study, rates and predictors of first and recurrent stroke in patients treated with cranial irradiation (CRT) and/or cervical irradiation at ≤18 years of age. Methods and Materials: We performed chart abstraction (n=383) and phone interviews (n=104) to measure first and recurrent stroke in 383 patients who received CRT and/or cervical radiation at a single institution between 1980 and 2009. Stroke was defined as a physician diagnosis and symptoms consistent with stroke. Incidence of first stroke was number of first strokes per person-years of observation after radiation. We used survival analysis techniques to determine cumulative incidence of first and recurrent stroke. Results: Among 325 subjects with sufficient follow-up data, we identified 19 first strokes (13 ischemic, 4 hemorrhagic, 2 unknown subtype) occurring at a median age of 24 years (interquartile range 17-33 years) in patients treated with CRT. Imaging was reviewed when available (n=13), and the stroke was confirmed in 12. Overall rate of first stroke was 625 (95% confidence interval [CI] 378-977) per 100,000 person-years. The cumulative incidence of first stroke was 2% (95% CI 0.01%-5.3%) at 5 years and 4% (95% CI 2.0%-8.4%) at 10 years after irradiation. With each 100-cGy increase in the radiation dose, the stroke hazard increased by 5% (hazard ratio 1.05; 95% CI 1.01-1.09; P=.02). We identified 6 recurrent strokes; 5 had available imaging that confirmed the stroke. Median time to recurrence was 15 months (interquartile range 6 months-3.2 years) after first stroke. The cumulative incidence of recurrent stroke was 38% (95% CI 17%-69%) at 5 years and 59% (95% CI 27%-92%) at 10 years after first stroke. Conclusion: Cranial irradiation puts childhood cancer survivors at high risk of both first and recurrent stroke. Stroke prevention strategies for these survivors are needed.

  8. Intrapulmonary arteriovenous malformation causing recurrent strokes

    PubMed Central

    Abed, Kareem; Premachandra, Lalith; Vankawala, Viren; Sun, Qi

    2015-01-01

    This case reveals a left pulmonary arteriovenous malformation (PAVM) as a cause of recurrent cerebral and cerebellar emboli. Extensive workup excluded other etiologies of emboli formation, and the patient was transferred to a tertiary care center for percutaneous embolotherapy. In the absence of a clear etiology, PAVM should be considered as a potential cause of recurrent cerebral emboli, especially in the absence of carotid disease, intracardiac thrombus, atrial septal defect, and patent foramen ovale. Diagnostic work-up for the PAVM can be cost effective and expedited by utilization of agitated saline contrast echocardiography, as noted in our case. PMID:26486114

  9. USE OF STROKE SECONDARY PREVENTION SERVICES

    PubMed Central

    Ross, Joseph S.; Halm, Ethan A.; Bravata, Dawn M.

    2009-01-01

    Objective To examine whether there are disparities in use of stroke secondary prevention services because disparities in stroke outcomes have been found among older adults, women, racial minorities, and within Stroke Belt states. Methods Using the nationally-representative 2005 Behavior Risk Factor Surveillance System, we examined self-reported use of 11 stroke secondary prevention services queried in the survey. We used multivariable logistic regression to examine the association between service use and age, sex, race, and Stroke Belt state residence, controlling for other socio-demographic and health care access characteristics. Results Among 11,862 adults with a history of stroke, 16% were 80 or older, 54% were women, 13% were non-Hispanic black, and 23% lived within a Stroke Belt state. Overall service use varied: 31% reported post-stroke outpatient rehabilitation, 57% regular exercise, 66% smoking cessation counseling, and 91% current use of anti-hypertensive medications. Age 80 or older was not associated with lower use of any of the 11 services. Women were less likely to report post-stroke outpatient rehabilitation and regular exercise when compared with men (P values ≤ 0.005); there were no sex-based differences in use of the 9 other services. Blacks were less likely to report pneumococcal vaccination when compared with whites, but were more likely to report post-stroke outpatient rehabilitation (P values ≤ 0.005); there were no race-based differences in use of the 9 other services. Stroke Belt state residence was not associated with lower use of any of the 11 services. Conclusions Use of many stroke secondary prevention services was suboptimal. We did not find consistent age, sex, racial, or Stroke Belt state residence disparities in care. CONDENSED ABSTRACT We examined the association between stroke secondary prevention service use and age, sex, race, and Stroke Belt state residence using nationally-representative data. Although use of many stroke

  10. Prevention of stroke: a strategic global imperative.

    PubMed

    Feigin, Valery L; Norrving, Bo; George, Mary G; Foltz, Jennifer L; Roth, Gregory A; Mensah, George A

    2016-09-01

    The increasing global stroke burden strongly suggests that currently implemented primary stroke prevention strategies are not sufficiently effective, and new primary prevention strategies with larger effect sizes are needed. Here, we review the latest stroke epidemiology literature, with an emphasis on the recently published Global Burden of Disease 2013 Study estimates; highlight the problems with current primary stroke and cardiovascular disease (CVD) prevention strategies; and outline new developments in primary stroke and CVD prevention. We also suggest key priorities for the future, including comprehensive prevention strategies that target people at all levels of CVD risk; implementation of an integrated approach to promote healthy behaviours and reduce health disparities; capitalizing on information technology to advance prevention approaches and techniques; and incorporation of culturally appropriate education about healthy lifestyles into standard education curricula early in life. Given the already immense and fast-increasing burden of stroke and other major noncommunicable diseases (NCDs), which threatens worldwide sustainability, governments of all countries should develop and implement an emergency action plan addressing the primary prevention of NCDs, possibly including taxation strategies to tackle unhealthy behaviours that increase the risk of stroke and other NCDs.

  11. Risk of recurrent stroke in patients with silent brain infarction in the PRoFESS Imaging Substudy

    PubMed Central

    Weber, Ralph; Weimar, Christian; Wanke, Isabel; Möller-Hartmann, Claudia; Gizewski, Elke R.; Blatchford, Jon; Hermansson, Karin; Demchuk, Andrew M.; Forsting, Michael; Sacco, Ralph L.; Saver, Jeffrey L.; Warach, Steven; Diener, Hans Christoph; Diehl, Anke

    2012-01-01

    Background and Purpose Silent brain infarctions are associated with an increased risk of stroke in healthy individuals. Risk of recurrent stroke in patients with both symptomatic and silent brain infarction (SBI) has only been investigated in patients with cardioembolic stroke in the European Atrial Fibrillation Trial. We assessed whether patients with recent non-cardioembolic stroke and SBI detected on MRI are at increased risk for recurrent stroke, other cardiovascular events, and mortality. Methods The prevalence of SBI detected on MRI was assessed in 1014 patients enrolled in the imaging substudy of the Prevention Regimen for Effectively Avoiding Second Strokes (PRoFESS) trial. The primary outcome was first recurrence of stroke in patients with both symptomatic stroke and SBI in comparison with age and sex matched stroke patients without SBI. Secondary outcomes were a combined vascular endpoint, other vascular events and mortality. The two groups were compared using conditional logistic regression. Results Silent brain infarction was detected in 207 (20.4%) patients of the 1014 patients. Twenty-seven (13.0%) patients with SBI and 19 (9.2%) without SBI had a recurrent stroke (odds ratio 1.42, 95% confidence interval 0.79 to 2.56; p=0.24) during a mean follow-op of 2.5 years. Similarly, there was no statistically significant difference for all secondary outcome parameters between patients with SBI and matched patients without SBI. Conclusion The presence of SBI in patients with recent mild non-cardioembolic ischemic stroke could not be shown to be an independent risk factor for recurrent stroke, other vascular events, or a higher mortality. PMID:22267825

  12. Capsular warning syndrome and crescendo lacunar strokes after atherosclerotic stenosis of the recurrent artery of Heubner.

    PubMed

    Cohen, José E; Rabinstein, Alejandro; Gomori, John M; Leker, Ronen R

    2012-12-01

    The stereotype of repetitive transient cerebral ischemia causing unilateral motor, sensory, or sensorimotor deficits that simultaneously affect the face, arm, and leg, clinically localized to the internal capsule, fits with the description of capsular warning syndrome (CWS). A high proportion of individuals with these symptoms develop subsequent capsular stroke, despite various proposed preventative measures. It has been postulated that the mechanism for such strokes is that of small-vessel single-penetrator disease. We present a patient with repetitive CWS intermingled with crescendo capsular strokes secondary to recurrent artery of Heubner disease. This report causally links CWS-crescendo lacunar strokes and Heubner artery atherosclerotic disease (intracranial branch atheromatous disease). Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. GRECOS Project (Genotyping Recurrence Risk of Stroke): The Use of Genetics to Predict the Vascular Recurrence After Stroke.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Cadenas, Israel; Mendióroz, Maite; Giralt, Dolors; Nafria, Cristina; Garcia, Elena; Carrera, Caty; Gallego-Fabrega, Cristina; Domingues-Montanari, Sophie; Delgado, Pilar; Ribó, Marc; Castellanos, Mar; Martínez, Sergi; Freijo, Marimar; Jiménez-Conde, Jordi; Rubiera, Marta; Alvarez-Sabín, José; Molina, Carlos A; Font, Maria Angels; Grau Olivares, Marta; Palomeras, Ernest; Perez de la Ossa, Natalia; Martinez-Zabaleta, Maite; Masjuan, Jaime; Moniche, Francisco; Canovas, David; Piñana, Carlos; Purroy, Francisco; Cocho, Dolores; Navas, Inma; Tejero, Carlos; Aymerich, Nuria; Cullell, Natalia; Muiño, Elena; Serena, Joaquín; Rubio, Francisco; Davalos, Antoni; Roquer, Jaume; Arenillas, Juan Francisco; Martí-Fábregas, Joan; Keene, Keith; Chen, Wei-Min; Worrall, Bradford; Sale, Michele; Arboix, Adrià; Krupinski, Jerzy; Montaner, Joan

    2017-05-01

    Vascular recurrence occurs in 11% of patients during the first year after ischemic stroke (IS) or transient ischemic attack. Clinical scores do not predict the whole vascular recurrence risk; therefore, we aimed to find genetic variants associated with recurrence that might improve the clinical predictive models in IS. We analyzed 256 polymorphisms from 115 candidate genes in 3 patient cohorts comprising 4482 IS or transient ischemic attack patients. The discovery cohort was prospectively recruited and included 1494 patients, 6.2% of them developed a new IS during the first year of follow-up. Replication analysis was performed in 2988 patients using SNPlex or HumanOmni1-Quad technology. We generated a predictive model using Cox regression (GRECOS score [Genotyping Reurrence Risk of Stroke]) and generated risk groups using a classification tree method. The analyses revealed that rs1800801 in the MGP gene (hazard ratio, 1.33; P=9×10(-)(03)), a gene related to artery calcification, was associated with new IS during the first year of follow-up. This polymorphism was replicated in a Spanish cohort (n=1.305); however, it was not significantly associated in a North American cohort (n=1.683). The GRECOS score predicted new IS (P=3.2×10(-)(09)) and could classify patients, from low risk of stroke recurrence (1.9%) to high risk (12.6%). Moreover, the addition of genetic risk factors to the GRECOS score improves the prediction compared with previous Stroke Prognosis Instrument-II score (P=0.03). The use of genetics could be useful to estimate vascular recurrence risk after IS. Genetic variability in the MGP gene was associated with vascular recurrence in the Spanish population. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  14. Recurrent stroke after transient ischaemic attack or minor ischaemic stroke: does the distinction between small and large vessel disease remain true to type? Dutch TIA Trial Study Group.

    PubMed Central

    Kappelle, L J; van Latum, J C; van Swieten, J C; Algra, A; Koudstaal, P J; van Gijn, J

    1995-01-01

    The incidence and vascular type of recurrent ischaemic stroke was studied in patients with supratentorial transient ischaemic attacks or non-disabling ischaemic strokes, who were treated with aspirin (30 or 283 mg). Patients were divided into groups with small vessel disease (SVD) (n = 1216) or large vessel disease (LVD) (n = 1221) on the grounds of their clinical features and CT at baseline. Patients with evidence of both SVD and LVD (n = 180) were excluded from further analyses. During follow up (mean 2.6 years) annual stroke rate was 3.6% in both groups. Of the 107 patients with SVD at baseline who had recurrent strokes, 83 proved to have an identifiable infarct: 30 (28%) again had a small vessel infarct, 39 (36%) had a large vessel ischaemic stroke and in 14 (13%) the recurrent ischaemic stroke was in the posterior fossa. Of the 110 patients with LVD at baseline and recurrent stroke, 91 had an identifiable infarct: 67 (61%) again had a large vessel ischaemic stroke, 16 (15%) had a small vessel ischaemic stroke, and eight (7%) had the recurrent ischaemic stroke in the posterior fossa. Thus patients with a transient ischaemic attack or non-disabling ischaemic stroke caused by LVD were more likely to have an ischaemic stroke of the same vessel type during follow up than patients with SVD (relative risk 2.2; 95% confidence interval 1.5-3.4). Possible explanations for this difference are: (1) patients with a small vessel ischaemic stroke at baseline had both SVD and LVD or were misdiagnosed; (2) recurrent small vessel ischaemic stroke may have occurred more often than reported, because they were silent or only minimally disabling; (3) recurring large vessel ischaemic strokes occurring in patients initially diagnosed as having SVD might have been related to potential cardiac sources of emboli that had not been previously recognized; (4) the antiplatelet drug aspirin (30 or 283 mg) prescribed in this patient group may have prevented thrombosis in small vessels better

  15. [Recurrent ischemic strokes revealing Lyme meningovascularitis].

    PubMed

    Sparsa, L; Blanc, F; Lauer, V; Cretin, B; Marescaux, C; Wolff, V

    2009-03-01

    Infectious vascularitis is an unusual cause of ischemic stroke (IS). We report a case of Lyme meningovascularitis complicated with multiple IS. A 64-year-old man, without any cardiovascular risk factor, was admitted for a right hemiparesia with a left thalamic hypodensity on the initial cerebral CT scan. No cause for this presumed IS could be identified. Later, the patient developed cognitive impairment and a bilateral cerebellar syndrome. Multiple infarcts and multiple intracranial stenosis were seen on cerebral MRI with magnetic resonance angiography (MRA). Cerebrospinal fluid tests showed meningitis and positive Lyme serology with an intrathecal specific anti-Borrelia antibody index. Antibiotic treatment was followed by good biological and partial clinicoradiological outcome. The diagnosis of Lyme neuroborreliosis should be entertained as a possible cause of IS in highly endemic zones.

  16. Aspirin for secondary prevention after stroke of unknown etiology in resource-limited settings

    PubMed Central

    Westover, M. Brandon; Bianchi, Matt T.; Chou, Sherry H-Y.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To analyze the potential impact of aspirin therapy for long-term secondary prevention after stroke of undetermined etiology in resource-limited settings without access to neuroimaging to distinguish ischemic stroke from intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH). Methods: We conducted a decision analysis using a Markov state transition model. Sensitivity analyses were performed across the worldwide reported range of the proportion of strokes due to ICH and the 95% confidence intervals (CIs) of aspirin-associated relative risks in patients with ICH. Results: For patients with stroke of undetermined etiology, long-term aspirin was the preferred treatment strategy across the worldwide reported range of the proportion of strokes due to ICH. At 34% of strokes due to ICH (the highest proportion reported in a large epidemiologic study), the benefit of aspirin remained beyond the upper bounds of the 95% CIs of aspirin-associated post-ICH relative risks most concerning to clinicians (ICH recurrence risk and mortality risk if ICH recurs on aspirin). Based on the estimated 11,590,204 strokes in low- and middle-income countries in 2010, our model predicts that aspirin therapy for secondary stroke prevention in all patients with stroke in these countries could lead to an estimated yearly decrease of 84,492 recurrent strokes and 4,056 stroke-related mortalities. Conclusions: The concern that the risks of aspirin in patients with stroke of unknown etiology could outweigh the benefits is not supported by our model, which predicts that aspirin for secondary prevention in patients with stroke of undetermined etiology in resource-limited settings could lead to decreased stroke-related mortality and stroke recurrence. PMID:25122202

  17. Aspirin and extended-release dipyridamole versus clopidogrel for recurrent stroke.

    PubMed

    Sacco, Ralph L; Diener, Hans-Christoph; Yusuf, Salim; Cotton, Daniel; Ounpuu, Stephanie; Lawton, William A; Palesch, Yuko; Martin, Reneé H; Albers, Gregory W; Bath, Philip; Bornstein, Natan; Chan, Bernard P L; Chen, Sien-Tsong; Cunha, Luis; Dahlöf, Björn; De Keyser, Jacques; Donnan, Geoffrey A; Estol, Conrado; Gorelick, Philip; Gu, Vivian; Hermansson, Karin; Hilbrich, Lutz; Kaste, Markku; Lu, Chuanzhen; Machnig, Thomas; Pais, Prem; Roberts, Robin; Skvortsova, Veronika; Teal, Philip; Toni, Danilo; Vandermaelen, Cam; Voigt, Thor; Weber, Michael; Yoon, Byung-Woo

    2008-09-18

    Recurrent stroke is a frequent, disabling event after ischemic stroke. This study compared the efficacy and safety of two antiplatelet regimens--aspirin plus extended-release dipyridamole (ASA-ERDP) versus clopidogrel. In this double-blind, 2-by-2 factorial trial, we randomly assigned patients to receive 25 mg of aspirin plus 200 mg of extended-release dipyridamole twice daily or to receive 75 mg of clopidogrel daily. The primary outcome was first recurrence of stroke. The secondary outcome was a composite of stroke, myocardial infarction, or death from vascular causes. Sequential statistical testing of noninferiority (margin of 1.075), followed by superiority testing, was planned. A total of 20,332 patients were followed for a mean of 2.5 years. Recurrent stroke occurred in 916 patients (9.0%) receiving ASA-ERDP and in 898 patients (8.8%) receiving clopidogrel (hazard ratio, 1.01; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.92 to 1.11). The secondary outcome occurred in 1333 patients (13.1%) in each group (hazard ratio for ASA-ERDP, 0.99; 95% CI, 0.92 to 1.07). There were more major hemorrhagic events among ASA-ERDP recipients (419 [4.1%]) than among clopidogrel recipients (365 [3.6%]) (hazard ratio, 1.15; 95% CI, 1.00 to 1.32), including intracranial hemorrhage (hazard ratio, 1.42; 95% CI, 1.11 to 1.83). The net risk of recurrent stroke or major hemorrhagic event was similar in the two groups (1194 ASA-ERDP recipients [11.7%], vs. 1156 clopidogrel recipients [11.4%]; hazard ratio, 1.03; 95% CI, 0.95 to 1.11). The trial did not meet the predefined criteria for noninferiority but showed similar rates of recurrent stroke with ASA-ERDP and with clopidogrel. There is no evidence that either of the two treatments was superior to the other in the prevention of recurrent stroke. (ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT00153062.) 2008 Massachusetts Medical Society

  18. Aspirin and Extended-Release Dipyridamole versus Clopidogrel for Recurrent Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Sacco, Ralph L.; Diener, Hans-Christoph; Yusuf, Salim; Cotton, Daniel; Ôunpuu, Stephanie; Lawton, William A.; Palesch, Yuko; Martin, Reneé H.; Albers, Gregory W.; Bath, Philip; Bornstein, Natan; Chan, Bernard P.L.; Chen, Sien-Tsong; Cunha, Luis; Dahlöf, Björn; De Keyser, Jacques; Donnan, Geoffrey A.; Estol, Conrado; Gorelick, Philip; Gu, Vivian; Hermansson, Karin; Hilbrich, Lutz; Kaste, Markku; Lu, Chuanzhen; Machnig, Thomas; Pais, Prem; Roberts, Robin; Skvortsova, Veronika; Teal, Philip; Toni, Danilo; VanderMaelen, Cam; Voigt, Thor; Weber, Michael; Yoon, Byung-Woo

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND Recurrent stroke is a frequent, disabling event after ischemic stroke. This study compared the efficacy and safety of two antiplatelet regimens — aspirin plus extendedrelease dipyridamole (ASA–ERDP) versus clopidogrel. METHODS In this double-blind, 2-by-2 factorial trial, we randomly assigned patients to receive 25 mg of aspirin plus 200 mg of extended-release dipyridamole twice daily or to receive 75 mg of clopidogrel daily. The primary outcome was first recurrence of stroke. The secondary outcome was a composite of stroke, myocardial infarction, or death from vascular causes. Sequential statistical testing of noninferiority (margin of 1.075), followed by superiority testing, was planned. RESULTS A total of 20,332 patients were followed for a mean of 2.5 years. Recurrent stroke occurred in 916 patients (9.0%) receiving ASA–ERDP and in 898 patients (8.8%) receiving clopidogrel (hazard ratio, 1.01; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.92 to 1.11). The secondary outcome occurred in 1333 patients (13.1%) in each group (hazard ratio for ASA–ERDP, 0.99; 95% CI, 0.92 to 1.07). There were more major hemorrhagic events among ASA–ERDP recipients (419 [4.1%]) than among clopidogrel recipients (365 [3.6%]) (hazard ratio, 1.15; 95% CI, 1.00 to 1.32), including intracranial hemorrhage (hazard ratio, 1.42; 95% CI, 1.11 to 1.83). The net risk of recurrent stroke or major hemorrhagic event was similar in the two groups (1194 ASA–ERDP recipients [11.7%], vs. 1156 clopidogrel recipients [11.4%]; hazard ratio, 1.03; 95% CI, 0.95 to 1.11). CONCLUSIONS The trial did not meet the predefined criteria for noninferiority but showed similar rates of recurrent stroke with ASA–ERDP and with clopidogrel. There is no evidence that either of the two treatments was superior to the other in the prevention of recurrent stroke. PMID:18753638

  19. The PRoFESS trial: future impact on secondary stroke prevention.

    PubMed

    Diener, Hans-Christoph

    2007-09-01

    Patients with transient ischemic attack and ischemic stroke have a high risk of recurrent stroke and death. While aspirin is accepted as standard therapy in these patients, recent trials demonstrate that a combination of aspirin and extended-release dipyridamole or clopidogrel is superior to aspirin monotherapy. Blockade of the renin-angiotensin system with angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors or angiotensin-receptor blockers may also reduce recurrent stroke. The ongoing Prevention Regimen for Effectively Avoiding Second Strokes (PRoFESS) trial is designed to evaluate whether extended-release dipyridamole plus aspirin compared with clopidogrel, and whether telmisartan in addition to usual care, in individuals after a stroke, will reduce the risk of further strokes. PRoFESS is a multicenter, randomized, double-blind trial involving 695 sites from 35 countries or regions. The primary outcome for the trial is recurrent stroke, using a time-to-event analysis. Safety is evaluated by assessing the risk of major hemorrhagic and other serious adverse events. With over 20,000 patients randomized, and utilizing a 2 x 2 factorial design, PRoFESS is the largest stroke trial to investigate the prevention of recurrent stroke.

  20. Prevention of Recurrent Staphylococcal Skin Infections.

    PubMed

    Creech, C Buddy; Al-Zubeidi, Duha N; Fritz, Stephanie A

    2015-09-01

    Staphylococcus aureus infections pose a significant health burden. The emergence of community-associated methicillin-resistant S aureus has resulted in an epidemic of skin and soft tissue infections (SSTI), and many patients experience recurrent SSTI. As S aureus colonization is associated with subsequent infection, decolonization is recommended for patients with recurrent SSTI or in settings of ongoing transmission. S aureus infections often cluster within households, and asymptomatic carriers serve as reservoirs for transmission; therefore, a household approach to decolonization is more effective than measures performed by individuals alone. Novel strategies for the prevention of recurrent SSTI are needed. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Recurrent Ischemic Lesions After Acute Atherothrombotic Stroke: Clopidogrel Plus Aspirin Versus Aspirin Alone.

    PubMed

    Hong, Keun-Sik; Lee, Seung-Hoon; Kim, Eung Gyu; Cho, Ki-Hyun; Chang, Dae Il; Rha, Joung-Ho; Bae, Hee-Joon; Lee, Kyung Bok; Kim, Dong Eog; Park, Jong-Moo; Kim, Hahn-Young; Cha, Jae-Kwan; Yu, Kyung-Ho; Lee, Yong-Seok; Lee, Soo Joo; Choi, Jay Chol; Cho, Yong-Jin; Kwon, Sun U; Kim, Gyeong-Moon; Sohn, Sung-Il; Park, Kwang-Yeol; Kang, Dong-Wha; Sohn, Chul-Ho; Lee, Jun; Yoon, Byung-Woo

    2016-09-01

    In patients with acute ischemic stroke caused by large artery atherosclerosis, clopidogrel plus aspirin versus aspirin alone might be more effective to prevent recurrent cerebral ischemia. However, there is no clear evidence. In this multicenter, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial, we randomized 358 patients with acute ischemic stroke of presumed large artery atherosclerosis origin within 48 hours of onset to clopidogrel (75 mg/d without loading dose) plus aspirin (300-mg loading followed by 100 mg/d) or to aspirin alone (300-mg loading followed by 100 mg/d) for 30 days. The primary outcome was new symptomatic or asymptomatic ischemic lesion on magnetic resonance imaging within 30 days. Secondary outcomes were 30-day functional disability, clinical stroke recurrence, and composite of major vascular events. Safety outcome was any bleeding. Of 358 patients enrolled, 334 (167 in each group) completed follow-up magnetic resonance imaging. The 30-day new ischemic lesion recurrence rate was comparable between the clopidogrel plus aspirin and the aspirin monotherapy groups (36.5% versus 35.9%; relative risk, 1.02; 95% confidence interval, 0.77-1.35; P=0.91). Of the recurrent ischemic lesions, 94.2% were clinically asymptomatic. There were no differences in secondary outcomes between the 2 groups. Any bleeding were more frequent in the combination group than in the aspirin monotherapy group, but the difference was not significant (16.7% versus 10.7%; P=0.11). One hemorrhagic stroke occurred in the clopidogrel plus aspirin group. Clopidogrel plus aspirin might not be superior to aspirin alone for preventing new ischemic lesion and clinical vascular events in patients with acute ischemic stroke caused by large artery atherosclerosis. URL: http://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier: NCT00814268. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  2. Comparison of Functional Outcome and Stroke Recurrence in Patients with Embolic Stroke of Undetermined Source (ESUS) vs. Cardioembolic Stroke Patients

    PubMed Central

    Arauz, Antonio; Morelos, Eugenia; Colín, Jonathan; Roldán, Javier

    2016-01-01

    Background Embolic stroke of undetermined source (ESUS) recurrence and functional outcome from long-term follow-up is not well delineated. The purpose of this study is to compare these functional variables between ESUS vs. cardioembolic stroke (CS) patients. Methods We analyzed data of consecutive ESUS and CS patients from our institutional database, from January 2003 until April 2015. The endpoints were stroke recurrence, mortality and poor clinical outcome (Modified Rankin Score 3–6), at discharge, 6 months and final follow-up. Adjusted multivariate Cox analysis and Kaplan-Meier curves were used to estimate the probability of recurrence and death. Results 149 ESUS (median age 44 years) and 235 CS (median age 66 years) consecutive patients were included in the study. Median follow-up period for the entire sample was 19 months (interquartile range 6.0–45.0 months). Stroke recurrence was similar between ESUS and CS patients (5.4% vs. 9.8% respectively, p = 0.12). Death occurred in 30 CS cases (12.8%), with a cumulative probability of survival of 77%. Poor functional outcome was present in 58.3%, 54.0% and 54.9% at discharge, 6 months and final follow-up respectively in CS patients, significantly worst compared to ESUS cases (HR 3.1; CI 95% 1.96–4.68). Oral anticoagulation presents with a HR 8.01 for recurrence, and antiplatelet therapy had the highest risk for recurrence for both groups (HR 24.3). Conclusion ESUS patients are substantially younger than CS patients but have a stroke recurrence rate similar to CS patients, with a lower mortality rate, and better functional outcome on long-term follow-up. PMID:27832136

  3. Incidence, recurrence, and long-term survival of ischemic stroke subtypes: A population-based study in the Middle East.

    PubMed

    Saber, Hamidreza; Thrift, Amanda G; Kapral, Moira K; Shoamanesh, Ashkan; Amiri, Amin; Farzadfard, Mohammad T; Behrouz, Réza; Azarpazhooh, Mahmoud Reza

    2017-10-01

    Background Incidence, risk factors, case fatality and survival rates of ischemic stroke subtypes are unknown in the Middle East due to the lack of community-based incidence stroke studies in this region. Aim To characterize ischemic stroke subtypes in a Middle Eastern population. Methods The Mashad Stroke Incidence Study is a community-based study that prospectively ascertained all cases of stroke among the 450,229 inhabitants of Mashhad, Iran between 2006 and 2007. We identified 512 cases of first-ever ischemic stroke [264 men (mean age 65.5 ± 14.4) and 248 women (mean age 64.14 ± 14.5)]. Subtypes of ischemic stroke were classified according to the TOAST criteria. Incidence rates were age standardized to the WHO and European populations. Results The proportion of stroke subtypes was distributed as follows: 14.1% large artery disease, 15% cardioembolic, 22.5% small artery disease, 43.9% undetermined and 4.5% other. The greatest overall incidence rates were attributed to undetermined infarction (49.97/100,000) followed by small artery disease (25.54/100,000). Prevalence of hypertension, diabetes and atrial fibrillation differed among ischemic stroke subtypes. Overall, there were 268 (52.34%) deaths and 73 (14.25%) recurrent strokes at five years after incident ischemic stroke, with the greatest risk of recurrence seen in the large artery disease (35.6%) and cardioembolic (35.5%) subgroups. Survival was similar in men and women for each stroke subtype. Conclusions We observed markedly greater incidence rates of ischemic stroke subtypes than in other countries within the Mashad Stroke Incidence Study after age standardization. Our findings should be considered when planning prevention and stroke care services in this region.

  4. Preventing venous ulcer recurrence: a review.

    PubMed

    Vowden, Kathryn R; Vowden, Peter

    2006-03-01

    This review article examines the available evidence on both the primary and secondary prevention of venous ulceration, exploring both the individual, social and financial implications of system failures that allow patients to remain at increased risk of recurrent ulceration. The role of both venous disease assessment and corrective superficial venous surgery are discussed in the light of recently published randomised controlled studies on the role of superficial venous surgery as both an adjunct to ulcer healing and ulcer prevention.

  5. Recurrent Cellulitis: How Can I Prevent It?

    MedlinePlus

    ... M.D. To help prevent recurrent episodes of cellulitis — a bacterial infection in the deepest layer of skin — keep skin ... www.merckmanuals.com/professional/dermatologic_disorders/bacterial_skin_infections/cellulitis.html?qt=cellulitis&alt=sh. Accessed Dec. 20, ...

  6. Cost of a recurrent vs. cost of first-ever stroke over an 18-month period.

    PubMed

    Spieler, J-F; De Pouvourville, G; Amarenco, P

    2003-11-01

    When assessing the cost-effectiveness of the secondary prevention of stroke, it is not well known whether the cost of a recurrent brain infarction (BI) is different from a first-ever BI. In a cohort of 435 consecutive prevalent cases of BI (including both recurrent and first-ever BI) we collected medical and socio-economic variables. Handicap was measured with the Rankin scale. Only the direct medical costs were considered over an 18-month period from a societal perspective. We compared first-ever to recurrent BI. Of the 435 patients 20.5% had a recurrent BI. The length of the initial hospitalization and the distribution of the patients into the three classes of handicap (Rankin 0-2, 3, and 4-5) were similar in the first-ever and recurrent BI groups. The average total cost of a first-ever BI was euro 19 725 (95% CI, 17 950-21 501) and euro 18 560 (95% CI, 15 798-21 322) for a recurrent BI (P = 0.48). There were no differences between the two groups when the costs were compared by handicap levels (P = 0.17) or when the costs were compared for each type of expenditure (initial hospitalization, rehabilitation, ambulatory services) except for long-term care, because of the small number of cases. This study suggests that the costs of recurrent BI are roughly similar to the costs of first-ever BI, which may be helpful when studying the cost-effectiveness of secondary stroke prevention trials.

  7. Guidelines for the prevention of stroke in patients with stroke or transient ischemic attack: a guideline for healthcare professionals from the american heart association/american stroke association.

    PubMed

    Furie, Karen L; Kasner, Scott E; Adams, Robert J; Albers, Gregory W; Bush, Ruth L; Fagan, Susan C; Halperin, Jonathan L; Johnston, S Claiborne; Katzan, Irene; Kernan, Walter N; Mitchell, Pamela H; Ovbiagele, Bruce; Palesch, Yuko Y; Sacco, Ralph L; Schwamm, Lee H; Wassertheil-Smoller, Sylvia; Turan, Tanya N; Wentworth, Deidre

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this updated statement is to provide comprehensive and timely evidence-based recommendations on the prevention of ischemic stroke among survivors of ischemic stroke or transient ischemic attack. Evidence-based recommendations are included for the control of risk factors, interventional approaches for atherosclerotic disease, antithrombotic treatments for cardioembolism, and the use of antiplatelet agents for noncardioembolic stroke. Further recommendations are provided for the prevention of recurrent stroke in a variety of other specific circumstances, including arterial dissections; patent foramen ovale; hyperhomocysteinemia; hypercoagulable states; sickle cell disease; cerebral venous sinus thrombosis; stroke among women, particularly with regard to pregnancy and the use of postmenopausal hormones; the use of anticoagulation after cerebral hemorrhage; and special approaches to the implementation of guidelines and their use in high-risk populations.

  8. Blood pressure and LDL-cholesterol targets for prevention of recurrent strokes and cognitive decline in the hypertensive patient: design of the European Society of Hypertension-Chinese Hypertension League Stroke in Hypertension Optimal Treatment randomized trial.

    PubMed

    Zanchetti, Alberto; Liu, Lisheng; Mancia, Giuseppe; Parati, Gianfranco; Grassi, Guido; Stramba-Badiale, Marco; Silani, Vincenzo; Bilo, Grzegorz; Corrao, Giovanni; Zambon, Antonella; Scotti, Lorenza; Zhang, Xinhua; Wang, HayYan; Zhang, Yuqing; Zhang, Xuezhong; Guan, Ting Rui; Berge, Eivind; Redon, Josep; Narkiewicz, Krzysztof; Dominiczak, Anna; Nilsson, Peter; Viigimaa, Margus; Laurent, Stéphane; Agabiti-Rosei, Enrico; Wu, Zhaosu; Zhu, Dingliang; Rodicio, José Luis; Ruilope, Luis Miguel; Martell-Claros, Nieves; Pinto, Fernando; Schmieder, Roland E; Burnier, Michel; Banach, Maciej; Cifkova, Renata; Farsang, Csaba; Konradi, Alexandra; Lazareva, Irina; Sirenko, Yuriy; Dorobantu, Maria; Postadzhiyan, Arman; Accetto, Rok; Jelakovic, Bojan; Lovic, Dragan; Manolis, Athanasios J; Stylianou, Philippos; Erdine, Serap; Dicker, Dror; Wei, Gangzhi; Xu, Chengbin; Xie, Hengge; Coca, Antonio; O'Brien, John; Ford, Gary

    2014-09-01

    The SBP values to be achieved by antihypertensive therapy in order to maximize reduction of cardiovascular outcomes are unknown; neither is it clear whether in patients with a previous cardiovascular event, the optimal values are lower than in the low-to-moderate risk hypertensive patients, or a more cautious blood pressure (BP) reduction should be obtained. Because of the uncertainty whether 'the lower the better' or the 'J-curve' hypothesis is correct, the European Society of Hypertension and the Chinese Hypertension League have promoted a randomized trial comparing antihypertensive treatment strategies aiming at three different SBP targets in hypertensive patients with a recent stroke or transient ischaemic attack. As the optimal level of low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) level is also unknown in these patients, LDL-C-lowering has been included in the design. The European Society of Hypertension-Chinese Hypertension League Stroke in Hypertension Optimal Treatment trial is a prospective multinational, randomized trial with a 3 × 2 factorial design comparing: three different SBP targets (1, <145-135; 2, <135-125; 3, <125  mmHg); two different LDL-C targets (target A, 2.8-1.8; target B, <1.8  mmol/l). The trial is to be conducted on 7500 patients aged at least 65 years (2500 in Europe, 5000 in China) with hypertension and a stroke or transient ischaemic attack 1-6 months before randomization. Antihypertensive and statin treatments will be initiated or modified using suitable registered agents chosen by the investigators, in order to maintain patients within the randomized SBP and LDL-C windows. All patients will be followed up every 3 months for BP and every 6 months for LDL-C. Ambulatory BP will be measured yearly. Primary outcome is time to stroke (fatal and non-fatal). Important secondary outcomes are: time to first major cardiovascular event; cognitive decline (Montreal Cognitive Assessment) and dementia. All major outcomes will be

  9. Intensive risk factor control in stroke prevention

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Stroke prevention is an urgent priority because of the aging of the population and the steep association of age and risk of stroke. Direct costs of stroke are expected to more than double in the US between 2012 and 2030. By getting everything right, patients can reduce the risk of stroke by 80% or more; however, getting everything right is a tall order. Roughly in order of importance, this requires smoking cessation, maintenance of a healthy weight, a Cretan Mediterranean diet, blood pressure control, lipid-lowering drugs, appropriate use of antiplatelet agents and anticoagulants, and appropriate carotid endarterectomy and stenting. A new approach called “treating arteries instead of targeting risk factors” appears promising but requires validation in randomized trials. PMID:24167723

  10. Prevention of Recurrent Staphylococcal Skin Infections

    PubMed Central

    Creech, C. Buddy; Al-Zubeidi, Duha N.; Fritz, Stephanie A.

    2015-01-01

    Synopsis Staphylococcus aureus infections pose a significant health burden. The emergence of community-associated methicillin-resistant S. aureus has resulted in an epidemic of skin and soft tissue infections (SSTI), and many patients experience recurrent SSTI. As S. aureus colonization is associated with subsequent infection, decolonization is recommended for patients with recurrent SSTI or in settings of ongoing transmission. S. aureus infections often cluster within households and asymptomatic carriers serve as reservoirs for transmission; therefore, a household approach to decolonization is more effective than measures performed by individuals alone. Other factors, such as environmental surface contamination, may also be considered. Novel strategies for the prevention of recurrent SSTI are needed. PMID:26311356

  11. Penicillin to prevent recurrent leg cellulitis.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Kim S; Crook, Angela M; Nunn, Andrew J; Foster, Katharine A; Mason, James M; Chalmers, Joanne R; Nasr, Ibrahim S; Brindle, Richard J; English, John; Meredith, Sarah K; Reynolds, Nicholas J; de Berker, David; Mortimer, Peter S; Williams, Hywel C

    2013-05-02

    Cellulitis of the leg is a common bacterial infection of the skin and underlying tissue. We compared prophylactic low-dose penicillin with placebo for the prevention of recurrent cellulitis. We conducted a double-blind, randomized, controlled trial involving patients with two or more episodes of cellulitis of the leg who were recruited in 28 hospitals in the United Kingdom and Ireland. Randomization was performed according to a computer-generated code, and study medications (penicillin [250 mg twice a day] or placebo for 12 months) were dispensed by a central pharmacy. The primary outcome was the time to a first recurrence. Participants were followed for up to 3 years. Because the risk of recurrence was not constant over the 3-year period, the primary hypothesis was tested during prophylaxis only. A total of 274 patients were recruited. Baseline characteristics were similar in the two groups. The median time to a first recurrence of cellulitis was 626 days in the penicillin group and 532 days in the placebo group. During the prophylaxis phase, 30 of 136 participants in the penicillin group (22%) had a recurrence, as compared with 51 of 138 participants in the placebo group (37%) (hazard ratio, 0.55; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.35 to 0.86; P=0.01), yielding a number needed to treat to prevent one recurrent cellulitis episode of 5 (95% CI, 4 to 9). During the no-intervention follow-up period, there was no difference between groups in the rate of a first recurrence (27% in both groups). Overall, participants in the penicillin group had fewer repeat episodes than those in the placebo group (119 vs. 164, P=0.02 for trend). There was no significant between-group difference in the number of participants with adverse events (37 in the penicillin group and 48 in the placebo group, P=0.50). In patients with recurrent cellulitis of the leg, penicillin was effective in preventing subsequent attacks during prophylaxis, but the protective effect diminished progressively once

  12. Newer Oral Anticoagulants: Stroke Prevention and Pitfalls

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Anand; Goddeau Jr, Richard P.; Henninger, Nils

    2016-01-01

    Warfarin is very effective in preventing stroke in patients with atrial fibrillation. However, its use is limited due to fear of hemorrhagic complications, unpredictable anticoagulant effects related to multiple drug interactions and dietary restrictions, a narrow therapeutic window, frequent difficulty maintaining the anticoagulant effect within a narrow therapeutic window, and the need for inconvenient monitoring. Several newer oral anticoagulants have been approved for primary and secondary prevention of stroke in patients with non-valvular atrial fibrillation. These agents have several advantages relative to warfarin therapy. As a group, these direct oral anticoagulants (DOAC), which include the direct thrombin inhibitor, dabigatran, and the factor Xa inhibitors (rivaroxaban, apixaban, and edoxaban), are more effective than dose adjusted warfarin for prevention of all-cause stroke (including both ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke), and have an overall more favorable safety profile. Nevertheless, an increased risk of gastrointestinal bleeding (with the exception of apixaban), increased risk for thrombotic complication with sudden discontinuation, and inability to accurately assess and reverse anticoagulant effect require consideration prior to therapy initiation, and pose a challenge for decision making in acute stroke therapy. PMID:27347226

  13. Recurrent stroke as a presenting feature of acquired partial lipodystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Prasad, Namburi R.; Reddy, Ponnala A.; Menon, Bindu; Karthik, T. S.; Ahmed, Faizal; Chakravarthy, Mithun

    2012-01-01

    Acquired partial lipodystrophy (PL) (Barraquer–Simons syndrome) is a rare condition with onset in childhood, and it is characterized by progressive loss of subcutaneous fat in a cephalocaudal fashion. This report describes a case of acquired PL in a 16-year-old girl, who had progressive loss of facial fat since 3 years. Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), anticardiolipin antibody, primary hypothyroidism, diabetes, and dyslipidemia may antedate the development of complications such as cerebrovascular stroke and cardiovascular disease. The girl had developed recurrent left hemiparesis, and withdrawn from school due to poor performance. PMID:23565465

  14. Stroke prevention in atrial fibrillation--an Asian stroke perspective.

    PubMed

    Tse, Hung-Fat; Wang, Yong-Jun; Ahmed Ai-Abdullah, Moheeb; Pizarro-Borromeo, Annette B; Chiang, Chern-En; Krittayaphong, Rungroj; Singh, Balbir; Vora, Amit; Wang, Chun-Xue; Zubaid, Mohammad; Clemens, Andreas; Lim, Paul; Hu, Dayi

    2013-07-01

    Despite relatively lower prevalence of atrial fibrillation (AF) in Asians (~1%) than in Caucasians (~2%), Asia has a much higher overall disease burden because of its proportionally larger aged population. For example, on the basis of reported age-adjusted prevalence rates and projected population figures in China, there will be an estimated 5.2 million men and 3.1 million women with AF older than 60 years by year 2050. Stroke is a disabling complication of AF that is of increasing cause for concern in Asians patients. Implementing consensus expert recommendations for managing stroke risk in patients with AF can considerably reduce stroke rates. However, caution is necessary when aligning management of Asian patients with AF to that of their Caucasian counterparts. Current international guidelines and risk stratification tools for AF management are based on findings in predominantly Caucasian populations and may therefore have limited relevance, in certain respects, to Asian patients. Oral anticoagulants play an important role in preventing AF-related stroke. The vitamin K antagonist warfarin is recommended for reducing the risk of stroke and thromboembolism in high-risk patients with nonvalvular AF; however, warfarin interacts with many drugs and food ingredients, which may pose significant challenges in administration and monitoring among Asian patients. Further research is needed to inform specific guidance on the implications of different stroke and bleeding profiles in Asians vs Caucasians. Moreover, there is scope to improve physician perceptions and patient knowledge, as well as considering alternative new oral anticoagulants, for example, direct thrombin inhibitors or factor Xa inhibitors. Copyright © 2013 Heart Rhythm Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Guidelines for the prevention of stroke in patients with stroke and transient ischemic attack: a guideline for healthcare professionals from the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association.

    PubMed

    Kernan, Walter N; Ovbiagele, Bruce; Black, Henry R; Bravata, Dawn M; Chimowitz, Marc I; Ezekowitz, Michael D; Fang, Margaret C; Fisher, Marc; Furie, Karen L; Heck, Donald V; Johnston, S Claiborne Clay; Kasner, Scott E; Kittner, Steven J; Mitchell, Pamela H; Rich, Michael W; Richardson, DeJuran; Schwamm, Lee H; Wilson, John A

    2014-07-01

    The aim of this updated guideline is to provide comprehensive and timely evidence-based recommendations on the prevention of future stroke among survivors of ischemic stroke or transient ischemic attack. The guideline is addressed to all clinicians who manage secondary prevention for these patients. Evidence-based recommendations are provided for control of risk factors, intervention for vascular obstruction, antithrombotic therapy for cardioembolism, and antiplatelet therapy for noncardioembolic stroke. Recommendations are also provided for the prevention of recurrent stroke in a variety of specific circumstances, including aortic arch atherosclerosis, arterial dissection, patent foramen ovale, hyperhomocysteinemia, hypercoagulable states, antiphospholipid antibody syndrome, sickle cell disease, cerebral venous sinus thrombosis, and pregnancy. Special sections address use of antithrombotic and anticoagulation therapy after an intracranial hemorrhage and implementation of guidelines.

  16. Prediction factors of recurrent ischemic events in one year after minor stroke.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Changqing; Zhao, Xingquan; Wang, Chunxue; Liu, Liping; Ding, Yuchuan; Akbary, Fauzia; Pu, Yuehua; Zou, Xinying; Du, Wanliang; Jing, Jing; Pan, Yuesong; Wong, Ka Sing; Wang, Yongjun; Wang, Yilong

    2015-01-01

    The risk of a subsequent stroke following a minor stroke is high. However, there are no effective rating scales to predict recurrent stroke following a minor one. Therefore, we assessed the risk factors associated with recurrent ischemic stroke or transient ischemic attack (TIA) within one year of minor stroke onset in order to identify possible risk factors. Eight hundred and sixty-three non-cardioembolic ischemic stroke patients in the Chinese IntraCranial AtheroSclerosis Study that presented with minor stroke, defined as an admission National Institutes of Health stroke scale (NIHSS) score of ≤3, were consecutively enrolled in our study. Clinical information and imaging features upon admission, and any recurrent ischemic stroke or TIA within one year was recorded. Cox regression was used to identify risk factors associated with recurrent ischemic stroke or TIA within the year following stroke onset. A total of 50 patients (6.1%) experienced recurrent ischemic stroke or TIA within one year of minor stroke onset. Multivariate Cox regression model identified lower admission NIHSS score (HR, 1.75; 95% CI, 1.32 to 2.33; P<0.0001), history of coronary heart disease (HR, 2.62; 95% CI, 1.17 to 5.86; P = 0.02), severe stenosis or occlusion of large cerebral artery (HR, 4.68; 95% CI, 1.87 to 11.7; P = 0.001), and multiple acute cerebral infarcts (HR, 2.61; 95% CI, 1.01 to 6.80; P = 0.05) as independent risk factors for recurrent ischemic stroke or TIA within one year. Some minor stroke patients are at higher risk for recurrent ischemic stroke or TIA. Urgent and intensified therapy may be reasonable in these patients.

  17. Preventing recurrence of severe morning sickness

    PubMed Central

    Koren, Gideon; Maltepe, Caroline

    2006-01-01

    QUESTION A recent Motherisk article showed that initiating antinauseants even before symptoms start could prevent recurrence of severe morning sickness. In the study described, however, different physicians used different drugs. How can one be sure which drugs work? ANSWER The study of 26 women who had had severe morning sickness during previous pregnancies showed that using antiemetics before symptoms of morning sickness started appeared to prevent recurrence of severe morning sickness in subsequent pregnancies. Physicians in the United States used various antinauseant drugs. Physicians in Canada administered only one drug, the combination of doxylamine-pyridoxine (Diclectin®), to 12 women. Subanalysis of these 12 women revealed that pre-emptive use of doxylamine-pyridoxine significantly decreased the likelihood that severe morning sickness would recur. PMID:17279232

  18. Daily Aspirin May Help Prevent Some Recurrent Miscarriages

    MedlinePlus

    ... https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_163515.html Daily Aspirin May Help Prevent Some Recurrent Miscarriages Approach seemed ... as simple as taking a daily low-dose aspirin could help prevent a recurrence. The intervention appears ...

  19. Aspirin to Prevent a First Heart Attack or Stroke

    MedlinePlus

    ... Share this page from the NHLBI on Twitter. Aspirin to Prevent a First Heart Attack or Stroke ... immediate medical attention. What if I’m taking aspirin to prevent another heart attack or stroke? The ...

  20. Intracranial plaque enhancement from high resolution vessel wall magnetic resonance imaging predicts stroke recurrence.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jeong-Min; Jung, Keun-Hwa; Sohn, Chul-Ho; Moon, Jangsup; Shin, Jung-Hwan; Park, Jaeseok; Lee, Seung-Hoon; Han, Moon Hee; Roh, Jae-Kyu

    2016-02-01

    Intracranial atherosclerosis is associated with frequent stroke recurrence. High resolution vessel wall magnetic resonance imaging (HRMRI) can provide atheroma information related to its vulnerability. We performed HRMRI in stroke patients with intracranial atherosclerosis to determine whether plaque characteristics from vessel wall imaging can predict future stroke recurrence. Between July 2011 and June 2013, acute stroke patients with symptomatic intracranial atherosclerosis were prospectively enrolled and 3-tesla HRMRI was performed on the relevant artery. The plaque enhancement was visually determined from T1 post-gadolinium enhancement image. Stroke recurrence was monitored after index event and multivariate Cox proportional hazards model was constructed to identify factors related to future stroke recurrence. A total of 138 patients were included with a median follow-up of 18 months. There were 39 stroke recurrences. Plaque enhancement was detected in 108 patients (78.3%), and 37 of them experienced stroke recurrence. Among 30 stroke patients without plaque enhancement, two patients experienced stroke recurrence. Kaplan-Meier curves demonstrated a significant difference in event free survival between the patients with plaque enhancement and those patients without plaque enhancement (event rates at year 1: 30.3% vs. 6.8%, log-rank test, p = 0.004). Multivariate Cox-regression analysis showed that the plaque enhancement from HRMRI was independently associated with stroke recurrence (hazard ratio: 7.42, 95% confidence interval: 1.74-31.75, p = 0.007). Intracranial plaque enhancement from HRMRI is associated with stroke recurrence among the patients with symptomatic intracranial atherosclerosis. © 2016 World Stroke Organization.

  1. The influence of fluid intake on stroke recurrence--a prospective study.

    PubMed

    Mücke, Sabine; Grotemeyer, Karl-Heinz; Stahlhut, Leandra; Husstedt, Ingo W; Evers, Stefan

    2012-04-15

    Recommended fluid intake is regarded as an important factor for stroke prevention. In mass media, drinking of at least 2000 ml water per day is recommended for any condition. However, no prospective trials are available which examined the impact of the amount of daily fluid intake on primary stroke prevention or on stroke recurrence. We performed a prospective study evaluating the daily fluid intake over a period of two years in stroke patients. Patients (n=465) with a complete stroke (i.e., proven ischaemic cerebral infarction) were followed for two years with a regular visit every three months. At every visit the average daily amount of fluid intake was evaluated by a drinking diary. Patients had to protocol all kinds of fluid they were drinking during the day for a whole week. They were divided into two groups: daily intake of more and of less than 2000 ml. The rate of primary endpoint (stroke including transient ischaemic attack, myocardial infarction, or death from any cause) and of secondary endpoint (stroke) was calculated for the two groups. In addition, haemorheological parameters such as platelet reactivity, erythrocyte aggregation, and osmolarity were measured at every visit. The mean observation period was 17 months. In this period, the patients with recommended fluid intake (mean amount 2427 ml) had a primary event rate of 12.3% whereas the patients with the low fluid intake (mean amount 1625 ml) had a primary event rate of 16.8%. The Kaplan-Meier analysis revealed a significantly better outcome of the patient group with recommended fluid intake with respect to the primary endpoint (p<0.013) and to the secondary endpoint (p<0.007). We observed a lower platelet reactivity in the patient group with recommended fluid intake as the only significant haemorheological factor influenced by the fluid intake. We observed no association between the amount of fluid intake and conventional vascular risk factors except a higher fluid intake in smokers. Our data

  2. High rate of magnetic resonance imaging stroke recurrence in cryptogenic transient ischemic attack and minor stroke patients.

    PubMed

    Bal, Simerpreet; Patel, Shiel K; Almekhlafi, Mohammed; Modi, Jayesh; Demchuk, Andrew M; Coutts, Shelagh B

    2012-12-01

    Cryptogenic stroke is common in patients with transient ischemic attack (TIA) and minor stroke. It is likely that the imaging recurrence risk is higher than the clinical recurrence rate. We sought to determine the rate of clinical and radiographic stroke recurrence in a population of cryptogenic TIA and minor stroke. Patients with TIA/minor stroke (National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale score≤3) were prospectively enrolled and imaged within 24 hours of symptom onset as part of 2 cohorts. Patients were assessed at 3 months to document any clinical recurrence and underwent repeat magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) at either 30 or 90 days. Stroke mechanism was categorized as cryptogenic after standard etiologic work-up was completed and was negative. Follow-up MRI was assessed for any new lesions in comparison with baseline imaging. Three hundred thirty-three of 693 (48%) patients had cryptogenic stroke. Of these cryptogenic patients, 207 (62%) had follow-up imaging. At 30-day MRI follow-up, 6.6% (5/76) had new lesions (3 in a remote arterial territory). At 90-day MRI follow-up, 14.5% (19/131) had new lesions (9 in a remote arterial territory). Clinical recurrent stroke was seen in 1.2% (4/333) of patients within 90 days. Cryptogenic etiology is common in a TIA/minor stroke population. This population shows a high rate of silent radiographic recurrence, suggesting active disease. Use of MRI as a surrogate marker of disease activity is 1 potential way of assessing efficacy of new treatments in this population with reduced sample size.

  3. Acute-Phase Blood Pressure Levels Correlate With a High Risk of Recurrent Strokes in Young-Onset Ischemic Stroke.

    PubMed

    Mustanoja, Satu; Putaala, Jukka; Gordin, Daniel; Tulkki, Lauri; Aarnio, Karoliina; Pirinen, Jani; Surakka, Ida; Sinisalo, Juha; Lehto, Mika; Tatlisumak, Turgut

    2016-06-01

    High blood pressure (BP) in acute stroke has been associated with a poor outcome; however, this has not been evaluated in young adults. The relationship between BP and long-term outcome was assessed in 1004 consecutive young, first-ever ischemic stroke patients aged 15 to 49 years enrolled in the Helsinki Young Stroke Registry. BP parameters included systolic (SBP) and diastolic BP, pulse pressure, and mean arterial pressure at admission and 24 hours. The primary outcome measure was recurrent stroke in the long-term follow-up. Adjusted for demographics and preexisting comorbidities, Cox regression models were used to assess independent BP parameters associated with outcome. Of our patients (63% male), 393 patients (39%) had prestroke hypertension and 358 (36%) used antihypertensive treatment. The median follow-up period was 8.9 years (interquartile range 5.7-13.2). Patients with a recurrent stroke (n=142, 14%) had significantly higher admission SBP, diastolic BP, pulse pressure, and mean arterial pressure (P<0.001) and 24-h SBP, diastolic BP, and mean arterial pressure compared with patients without the recurrent stroke. Patients with SBP ≥160 mm Hg compared with those with SBP <160 mm Hg had significantly more recurrent strokes (hazard ratio 3.3 [95% confidence interval, 2.05-4.55]; P<0.001) occurring earlier (13.9 years [13.0-14.6] versus 16.2 [15.8-16.6]; P<0.001) within the follow-up period. In multivariable analyses, higher admission SBP, diastolic BP, pulse pressure, and mean arterial pressure were independently associated with the risk of recurrent stroke, while the 24-hour BP levels were not. In young ischemic stroke patients, high acute phase BP levels are independently associated with a high risk of recurrent strokes. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  4. Microbleeds in the Secondary Prevention of Small Subcortical Strokes Trial: Stroke, mortality, and treatment interactions.

    PubMed

    Shoamanesh, Ashkan; Pearce, Lesly A; Bazan, Carlos; Catanese, Luciana; McClure, Leslie A; Sharma, Mukul; Marti-Fabregas, Joan; Anderson, David C; Kase, Carlos S; Hart, Robert G; Benavente, Oscar R

    2017-08-01

    To characterize cerebral microbleeds (CMBs) in lacunar stroke patients in the Secondary Prevention of Small Subcortical Strokes (SPS3) trial and to assess their relationship with recurrent stroke and death, and response to assigned treatment. SPS3 is a randomized, clinical trial conducted between 2003 and 2011. Patients with recent magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-documented lacunar infarcts were randomly assigned in a factorial design to target levels of systolic blood pressure (130-149mmHg vs <130mmHg; open label) and to antiplatelet treatment (aspirin/clopidogrel vs aspirin/placebo; double-blinded). The current analysis involves 1,278 trial participants who had a baseline axial T2*-weighted gradient echo MRI sequence allowing for CMB detection. CMBs were present in 30% of 1,278 patients (mean age = 63 years). Male gender (odds ratio [OR] = 1.7, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.3-2.3), history of hypertension (OR = 1.6, 95% CI = 1.2-2.3), increased systolic blood pressure (1.2 per 20mmHg, 95% CI = 1.1-1.4), nondiabetic status (OR = 1.4, 95% CI = 1.1-1.9), multiple old lacunar infarcts (OR = 1.9, 95% CI = 1.5-2.5), and moderate (OR = 1.7, 95% CI = 1.2-2.3) or severe (OR = 4.2, 95% CI = 3.0-5.9) white matter hyperintensities on MRI were independently associated with CMBs. During a mean follow-up of 3.3 years, overall stroke recurrence was 2.5% per patient-year. Patients with CMBs had an adjusted 2-fold increased risk of recurrent stroke (hazard ratio = 2.1, 95% CI = 1.4-3.1). CMBs were not a risk factor for death. There were no statistically significant interactions between CMBs and treatment assignments. Patients with lacunar stroke and CMBs likely harbor a more advanced form of cerebral small vessel disease in need of efficacious therapeutic strategies. Ann Neurol 2017;82:196-207. © 2017 American Neurological Association.

  5. Blood Pressure After Recent Stroke: Baseline Findings From the Secondary Prevention of Small Subcortical Strokes Trial

    PubMed Central

    White, Carole L.; Pergola, Pablo E.; Szychowski, Jeff M.; Talbert, Robert; Benavente, Oscar R.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND Hypertension is the most powerful risk factor for stroke. The aim of this study was to characterize baseline blood pressure in participants in the Secondary Prevention of Small Subcortical Strokes trial. METHODS For this cross-sectional analysis, participants were categorized by baseline systolic blood pressure (SBP) < 120, 120–139, 140–159, 160–179, and ≥ 180mm Hg and compared on demographic and clinical characteristics. Predictors of SBP < 140mm Hg were examined. RESULTS Mean SBP was 143±19mm Hg while receiving an average of 1.7 antihypertensive medications; SBP ≥ 140mm Hg for 53% and ≥ 160 mm Hg for 18% of the 3,020 participants. Higher SBP was associated with a history of hypertension and hypertension for longer duration (both P < 0.0001). Higher SBPs were associated with more extensive white matter disease on magnetic resonance imaging (P < 0.0001). There were significant differences in entry-level SBP when participants were categorized by race and region (both P < 0.0001). Black participants were more likely to have SBP ≥ 140mm Hg. Multivariable logistic regression showed an independent effect for region with those from Canada more likely (odds ratio = 1.7; 95% confidence interval, 1.29, 2.32) to have SBP < 140mm Hg compared with participants from United States. CONCLUSIONS In this cohort with symptomatic lacunar stroke, more than half had uncontrolled hypertension at approximately 2.5 months after stroke. Regional, racial, and clinical differences should be considered to improve control and prevent recurrent stroke. CLINICAL TRIALS REGISTRATION Trial Number NCT00059306 PMID:23736109

  6. The Japan Statin Treatment Against Recurrent Stroke (J-STARS): A Multicenter, Randomized, Open-label, Parallel-group Study.

    PubMed

    Hosomi, Naohisa; Nagai, Yoji; Kohriyama, Tatsuo; Ohtsuki, Toshiho; Aoki, Shiro; Nezu, Tomohisa; Maruyama, Hirofumi; Sunami, Norio; Yokota, Chiaki; Kitagawa, Kazuo; Terayama, Yasuo; Takagi, Makoto; Ibayashi, Setsuro; Nakamura, Masakazu; Origasa, Hideki; Fukushima, Masanori; Mori, Etsuro; Minematsu, Kazuo; Uchiyama, Shinichiro; Shinohara, Yukito; Yamaguchi, Takenori; Matsumoto, Masayasu

    2015-09-01

    Although statin therapy is beneficial for the prevention of initial stroke, the benefit for recurrent stroke and its subtypes remains to be determined in Asian, in whom stroke profiles are different from Caucasian. This study examined whether treatment with low-dose pravastatin prevents stroke recurrence in ischemic stroke patients. This is a multicenter, randomized, open-label, blinded-endpoint, parallel-group study of patients who experienced non-cardioembolic ischemic stroke. All patients had a total cholesterol level between 4.65 and 6.21 mmol/L at enrollment, without the use of statins. The pravastatin group patients received 10 mg of pravastatin/day; the control group patients received no statins. The primary endpoint was the occurrence of stroke and transient ischemic attack (TIA), with the onset of each stroke subtype set to be one of the secondary endpoints. Although 3000 patients were targeted, 1578 patients (491 female, age 66.2 years) were recruited and randomly assigned to pravastatin group or control group. During the follow-up of 4.9 ± 1.4 years, although total stroke and TIA similarly occurred in both groups (2.56 vs. 2.65%/year), onset of atherothrombotic infarction was less frequent in pravastatin group (0.21 vs. 0.64%/year, p = 0.0047, adjusted hazard ratio 0.33 [95%CI 0.15 to 0.74]). No significant intergroup difference was found for the onset of other stroke subtypes, and for the occurrence of adverse events. Although whether low-dose pravastatin prevents recurrence of total stroke or TIA still needs to be examined in Asian, this study has generated a hypothesis that it may reduce occurrence of stroke due to larger artery atherosclerosis. This study was initially supported by a grant from the Ministry of Health, Labour and Welfare, Japan. After the governmental support expired, it was conducted in collaboration between Hiroshima University and the Foundation for Biomedical Research and Innovation.

  7. Bilateral atherosclerotic internal carotid artery occlusion and recurrent ischaemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Amin, Osama S M

    2015-06-08

    Bilateral internal carotid artery occlusion (BICAO) is a rare disease that carries a gloomy prognosis. We report a case of a 52-year-old man who developed ischaemic infarction at the region of the right middle cerebral artery; he was found to have atherosclerotic occlusion of both internal carotid arteries on Doppler-duplex examination. He received medical treatment only. After 1 year, he developed a new infarction at the region of the left middle cerebral artery. Conventional angiography revealed bilateral occlusion of internal carotid arteries at their origin, approximately 50% stenosis of the common carotid bulbs and mild stenosis of the origin of external carotid arteries. The patient did not undergo any form of surgical revascularisation procedures and died of severe aspiration pneumonia approximately 2 months after the second stroke. BICAO portends a poor outcome and carries a risk of recurrent ischaemic events. The best management strategy for this vascular occlusion remains unclear.

  8. Clinically Confirmed Stroke With Negative Diffusion-Weighted Imaging Magnetic Resonance Imaging: Longitudinal Study of Clinical Outcomes, Stroke Recurrence, and Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Makin, Stephen D J; Doubal, Fergus N; Dennis, Martin S; Wardlaw, Joanna M

    2015-11-01

    We sought to establish whether the presence (versus absence) of a lesion on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with diffusion weighting (DWI-MRI) at presentation with acute stroke is associated with worse clinical outcomes at 1 year. We recruited consecutive patients with a nondisabling ischemic stroke and performed DWI-MRI. Patients were followed up at 1 year to establish stroke recurrence (clinical or on MRI), cognitive impairment (Addenbrooke Cognitive Assessment Revised,<88) and modified Rankin Scale. A median of 4 days post stroke, one third (76/264; 29%) of patients did not have a DWI lesion (95% confidence interval, 23%-35%). There was no statistically significant difference between those with and without a DWI lesion with respect to age or vascular risk factors. Patients without a lesion were more likely to be women or have previous stroke. At 1 year, 11 of 76 (14%) patients with a DWI-negative index stroke had a clinical diagnosis of recurrent stroke or transient ischemic attack, 33% had cognitive impairment (Addenbrooke Cognitive Assessment Revised<88), and 40% still had modified Rankin Scale>1, no different from DWI-positive patients; DWI-positive patients were more likely to have a new lesion on MRI (14%), symptomatic or asymptomatic, than DWI-negative patients (2%; P=0.02). Our data were consistent with 6 other studies (total n=976), pooled proportion of DWI-negative patients was 21% (95% confidence interval, 12%-32%). Nearly one third of patients with nondisabling stroke do not have a relevant lesion on acute DWI-MRI. Patients with negative DWI-MRI had no better prognosis than patients with a lesion. DWI-negative stroke patients should receive secondary prevention. © 2015 The Authors.

  9. The Prevention of Hemorrhagic Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Raymond, J.; Mohr, JP; the TEAM-ARUBA collaborative groups

    2008-01-01

    Summary There is currently no evidence that preventive treatment of unruptured aneurysms or AVMs is beneficial and randomized trials have been proposed to address this clinical uncertainty. Participation in a trial may necessitate a shift of point of view compared to a certain habitual clinical mentality. A review of the ethical and rational principles governing the design and realization of a trial may help integrate clinical research into expert clinical practices. The treatment of unruptured aneurysms and AVMs remains controversial, and data from observational studies cannot provide a normative basis for clinical decisions. Prevention targets healthy individuals and hence has an obligation of results. There is no opposition between the search for objective facts using scientific methods and the ethics of medical practice since a good practice cannot forbid physicians the means to define what could be beneficial to patients. Perhaps the most difficult task is to recognize the uncertainty that is crucial to allow resorting to trial methodology. The reasoning that is used in research and analysis differs from the casuistic methods typical of clinical work, but clinical judgement remains the dominant factor that decides both who enters the trial and to whom the results of the trial will apply. Randomization is still perceived as a difficult and strange method to integrate into normal practice, but in the face of uncertainty it assures the best chances for the best outcome to each participant. Some tension exists between scientific methods and normal practice, but they need to coexist if we are to progress at the same time we care for patients. PMID:20557736

  10. Low ankle-brachial index predicts early risk of recurrent stroke in patients with acute cerebral ischemia.

    PubMed

    Tsivgoulis, Georgios; Bogiatzi, Chrysi; Heliopoulos, Ioannis; Vadikolias, Konstantinos; Boutati, Eleni; Tsakaldimi, Soultana; Al-Attas, Omar S; Charalampidis, Paris; Piperidou, Charitomeni; Maltezos, Efstratios; Papanas, Nikolaos

    2012-02-01

    Low ankle-brachial blood pressure index (ABI) identifies patients with symptomatic and asymptomatic peripheral arterial disease (PAD). We sought to investigate the association of low ABI with early risk of stroke recurrence in patients with acute cerebral ischemia (ACI) and without history of symptomatic PAD. Consecutive patients with acute ischemic stroke (AIS) or transient ischemic attack (TIA) and no previous history of PAD were prospectively evaluated with ABI measurements. Demographic characteristics, vascular risk factors and secondary prevention therapies were documented. An ABI ≤0.90 in either leg was considered as evidence of asymptomatic PAD, and an ABI >0.90 was considered as normal. Patients with elevated ABI (>1.30) were excluded. The outcome of interest was recurrent stroke during 30-day follow-up. A total of 176 patients with acute cerebral ischemia (mean age 64±14 years, 59.1% men, 76.7% AIS) were evaluated. Asymptomatic PAD was detected in 14.8% (95%CI: 10.2-20.8%) of the studied population. The following factors were independently associated with low ABI on multivariate logistic regression models, after adjustment for potential confounders: coronary artery disease (p=0.008), diabetes mellitus (p=0.017) and increasing age (p=0.042). The cumulative 30-day recurrence rate was higher in patients with low ABI (19.2%; 95%CI: 4.1-34.3) compared to the rest (3.3%; 95%CI: 0.4-6.2%; p=0.001). Atherothrombotic stroke (ASCO grade I; p<0.001), increasing age (p=0.002) and low ABI (p=0.004) were independent predictors of stroke recurrence on multivariate Cox regression models adjusting for confounders. Low ABI appears to be associated with a higher risk of early recurrent stroke in patients with ACI and no history of symptomatic PAD. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Clinical Neuroprotective Drugs for Treatment and Prevention of Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Kikuchi, Kiyoshi; Uchikado, Hisaaki; Morioka, Motohiro; Murai, Yoshinaka; Tanaka, Eiichiro

    2012-01-01

    Stroke is an enormous public health problem with an imperative need for more effective therapies. In therapies for ischemic stroke, tissue plasminogen activators, antiplatelet agents and anticoagulants are used mainly for their antithrombotic effects. However, free radical scavengers, minocycline and growth factors have shown neuroprotective effects in the treatment of stroke, while antihypertensive drugs, lipid-lowering drugs and hypoglycemic drugs have shown beneficial effects for the prevention of stroke. In the present review, we evaluate the treatment and prevention of stroke in light of clinical studies and discuss new anti-stroke effects other than the main effects of drugs, focusing on optimal pharmacotherapy. PMID:22837724

  12. Using antidepressants and the risk of stroke recurrence: report from a national representative cohort study.

    PubMed

    Juang, Hsiao-Ting; Chen, Pei-Chun; Chien, Kuo-Liong

    2015-06-05

    Evidence about the association between antidepressants and the risk of stroke recurrence was scanty. This study evaluated the risk of stroke recurrence according to using antidepressants in patients with stroke from a national representative cohort. This cohort study followed 16770 patients aged > =20 years who had an incident stroke from 2000 to 2009 from the National Health Insurance Research Database in Taiwan. Records of each antidepressant prescription were obtained during follow-up. The types of antidepressants were categorized by Anatomical Therapeutic Chemical classification system: tricyclic antidepressants (TCAs), selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs), monoamine oxidase inhibitors (MAOIs), and other antidepressants. The main outcome was a recurrent stroke during the follow-up period. The time-dependent Cox proportional hazards model was used in the analyses. During 63715 person-years of follow-up, we documented 3769 events for stroke recurrence. Antidepressants use was associated with an increased risk of stroke recurrence (adjusted hazard ratio [HR], 1.42; 95 % confidence interval [C.I.], 1.24-1.62), especially for ischemic stroke (HR, 1.48; 95 % C.I., 1.28-1.70), but not for hemorrhagic stroke (HR, 1.22; 95 % C.I., 0.86-1.73). The increased risk of stoke recurrence was found for TCAs use only (HR, 1.41; 95 % C.I., 1.14-1.74), SSRIs use only (HR, 1.31; 95 % C.I.,1.00-1.73),use of other types of antidepressants only(HR, 1.46; 95 % C.I.,1.15-1.84), or use of multiple types of antidepressants (HR, 1.84; 95 % C.I.,1.04-3.25). We demonstrated that use of antidepressants was associated with an increased risk of stroke recurrence, especially in ischemic stroke among Taiwanese. Further studies are warranted to confirm the possible underlying mechanisms of these findings.

  13. [Statins in the secondary prevention of stroke: New evidence from the SPARCL Study].

    PubMed

    Castilla-Guerra, Luis; Fernández-Moreno, María Del Carmen; López-Chozas, José Manuel

    2016-01-01

    Until recently there was little evidence that statin therapy reduced the risk of stroke recurrence. The SPARCL trial, published in 2006, was the first trial to show the benefits of statin therapy in preventing recurrent stroke. The SPARCL trial showed that treatment with atorvastatin 80mg/day reduced recurrent stroke in patients with a recent stroke or transient ischemic attack (TIA). Several post hoc analyses of different subgroups followed the SPARCL trial. They have not revealed any significant differences when patients were grouped by age, sex or type of stroke. The SPARCL trial has also helped to identify patients who may have a greater benefit from statins: Patients with carotid stenosis, with more intense lipid lowering, and those who achieve optimal levels of LDL-C, HDL-C, triglycerides, and blood pressure. The trial has also helped to identify individuals at high risk of new vascular events. Clearly there is a before and after in stroke prevention since the SPARCL trial was published. Copyright © 2015 Sociedad Española de Arteriosclerosis. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  14. Low-dose aspirin for preventing recurrent venous thromboembolism.

    PubMed

    Brighton, Timothy A; Eikelboom, John W; Mann, Kristy; Mister, Rebecca; Gallus, Alexander; Ockelford, Paul; Gibbs, Harry; Hague, Wendy; Xavier, Denis; Diaz, Rafael; Kirby, Adrienne; Simes, John

    2012-11-22

    Patients who have had a first episode of unprovoked venous thromboembolism have a high risk of recurrence after anticoagulants are discontinued. Aspirin may be effective in preventing a recurrence of venous thromboembolism. We randomly assigned 822 patients who had completed initial anticoagulant therapy after a first episode of unprovoked venous thromboembolism to receive aspirin, at a dose of 100 mg daily, or placebo for up to 4 years. The primary outcome was a recurrence of venous thromboembolism. During a median follow-up period of 37.2 months, venous thromboembolism recurred in 73 of 411 patients assigned to placebo and in 57 of 411 assigned to aspirin (a rate of 6.5% per year vs. 4.8% per year; hazard ratio with aspirin, 0.74; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.52 to 1.05; P=0.09). Aspirin reduced the rate of the two prespecified secondary composite outcomes: the rate of venous thromboembolism, myocardial infarction, stroke, or cardiovascular death was reduced by 34% (a rate of 8.0% per year with placebo vs. 5.2% per year with aspirin; hazard ratio with aspirin, 0.66; 95% CI, 0.48 to 0.92; P=0.01), and the rate of venous thromboembolism, myocardial infarction, stroke, major bleeding, or death from any cause was reduced by 33% (hazard ratio, 0.67; 95% CI, 0.49 to 0.91; P=0.01). There was no significant between-group difference in the rates of major or clinically relevant nonmajor bleeding episodes (rate of 0.6% per year with placebo vs. 1.1% per year with aspirin, P=0.22) or serious adverse events. In this study, aspirin, as compared with placebo, did not significantly reduce the rate of recurrence of venous thromboembolism but resulted in a significant reduction in the rate of major vascular events, with improved net clinical benefit. These results substantiate earlier evidence of a therapeutic benefit of aspirin when it is given to patients after initial anticoagulant therapy for a first episode of unprovoked venous thromboembolism. (Funded by National Health

  15. Intravenous thrombolysis on early recurrent cardioembolic stroke: 'Dr Jekyll' or 'Mr Hyde'?

    PubMed

    Cappellari, Manuel; Tomelleri, Giampaolo; Carletti, Monica; Bovi, Paolo; Moretto, Giuseppe

    2012-01-01

    Early recurrent cardioembolic stroke on the previously unaffected side has very rarely been reported during or after intravenous recombinant tissue plasminogen activator for acute ischemic stroke. For these cases, thrombolysis guidelines lack any clear recommendation. We report two cases of thrombolysed stroke patients, with paroxysmal atrial fibrillation but normal sinus rhythm on admission, who respectively developed recurrent ischemic stroke within few hours after complete improvement and during intravenous recombinant tissue plasminogen activator infusion. Intravenous thrombolysis was successfully repeated after echocardiographic evidence of left appendage thrombus in the first case and discontinued before complete administration in the second.

  16. Secondary Versus Primary Stroke Prevention in Atrial Fibrillation: Insights From the Darlington Atrial Fibrillation Registry.

    PubMed

    Mazurek, Michał; Shantsila, Eduard; Lane, Deirdre A; Wolff, Andreas; Proietti, Marco; Lip, Gregory Y H

    2017-08-01

    Although patients with atrial fibrillation (AF) who experienced an acute stroke are at high risk for recurrence, many patients are untreated or treated suboptimally for stroke prevention. The objective of this study is to compare clinical outcomes of AF patients with versus without previous stroke in relation to guideline-adherent antithrombotic treatment in a contemporary primary care population. Community cohort of 105 000 patients from 11 general practices in Darlington, England, was used to assess AF stroke prevention strategies against 2014 National Institute for Health and Care Excellence guidelines. Overall, 2259 (2.15%) patients with AF were identified, of which 18.9% constituted a secondary prevention cohort. For secondary prevention, antithrombotic treatment was guideline adherent in 56.3%, 18.9% were overtreated, and 24.8% undertreated; corresponding proportions for primary prevention were 49.5%, 11.7%, and 38.8%, respectively. One-year stroke rates were 8.6% and 1.6% for secondary and primary prevention, respectively (P<0.001); corresponding all-cause mortality rates were 9.8% and 9.4%, respectively (P=0.79). On multivariable analysis, lack of antithrombotic treatment guideline adherence was associated with increased stroke risk for primary prevention (odds ratio, 2.95; 95% confidence interval, 1.26-6.90; P=0.013 for undertreatment); for secondary prevention, lack of guideline adherence was associated with increased risk of recurrent stroke (odds ratio, 2.80; 95% confidence interval, 1.25-6.27; P=0.012 for overtreatment) and all-cause death (odds ratio, 2.75; 95% confidence interval, 1.33-5.69; P=0.006 for undertreatment). Only approximately half of eligible patients with AF are prescribed oral anticoagulation in line with guidelines. Guideline-adherent antithrombotic treatment significantly reduces the risk of stroke among primary prevention patients and both risk of recurrent stroke and death in patients with previous stroke. © 2017 American Heart

  17. Antiplatelet Agents for the Secondary Prevention of Ischemic Stroke or Transient Ischemic Attack: A Network Meta-Analysis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wen; Zhang, Lu; Liu, Weiming; Zhu, Qin; Lan, Qing; Zhao, Jizong

    2016-05-01

    Stroke can cause high morbidity and mortality, and ischemic stroke (IS) and transient ischemic attack (TIA) patients have a high stroke recurrence rate. Antiplatelet agents are the standard therapy for these patients, but it is often difficult for clinicians to select the best therapy from among the multiple treatment options. We therefore performed a network meta-analysis to estimate the efficacy of antiplatelet agents for secondary prevention of recurrent stroke. We systematically searched 3 databases (PubMed, Embase, and Cochrane) for relevant studies published through August 2015. The primary end points of this meta-analysis were overall stroke, hemorrhagic stroke, and fatal stroke. A total of 30 trials were included in our network meta-analysis and abstracted data. Among the therapies evaluated in the included trials, the estimates for overall stroke and hemorrhagic stroke for cilostazol (Cilo) were significantly better than those for aspirin (odds ratio [OR] = .64, 95% credibility interval [CrI], .45-.91; OR = .23, 95% CrI, .08-.58). The estimate for fatal stroke was highest for Cilo plus aspirin combination therapy, followed by Cilo therapy. The results of our meta-analysis indicate that Cilo significantly improves overall stroke and hemorrhagic stroke in IS or TIA patients and reduces fatal stroke, but with low statistical significance. Our results also show that Cilo was significantly more efficient than other therapies in Asian patients; therefore, future trials should focus on Cilo treatment for secondary prevention of recurrent stroke in non-Asian patients. Copyright © 2016 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Changes in pre-hospital management of vascular risk factors among patients admitted due to recurrent stroke in Poland from 1995 to 2013

    PubMed Central

    Bembenek, Jan P.; Karlinski, Michał; Kurkowska-Jastrzebska, Iwona

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The aim of this study was to investigate long-term trends in secondary stroke prevention through management of vascular risk factors directly before hospital admission for recurrent stroke. Material and methods This is a retrospective registry-based analysis of consecutive recurrent acute stroke patients from a highly urbanized area (Warsaw, Poland) admitted to a single stroke center between 1995 and 2013 with previous ischemic stroke. We compared between four consecutive time periods: 1995–1999, 2000–2004, 2005–2009 and 2010–2013. Results During the study period, 894 patients with recurrent strokes were admitted (18% of all strokes), including 867 with previous ischemic stroke (our study group). Among those patients, the proportion of recurrent ischemic strokes (88.1% to 93.9%) (p = 0.319) and males (44% to 49.7%) (p = 0.5) remained stable. However, there was a rising trend in patients’ age (median age of 73, 74, 76 and 77 years, respectively). There was also an increase in the use of antihypertensives (from 70.2% to 83.8%) (p = 0.013), vitamin K antagonists (from 4.8% to 15.6%) (p = 0.012) and statins (from 32.5% to 59.4%) (p < 0.001). Nonetheless, 21% of patients did not receive any antithrombotic prophylaxis. Tobacco smoking pattern remained unchanged. Conclusions Our data indicate a clear overall improvement of secondary stroke prevention. However, persistent use of antithrombotic drugs and tobacco smoking after the first ischemic stroke is constantly suboptimal. PMID:27482236

  19. Preventing Relapse/Recurrence in Recurrent Depression With Cognitive Therapy: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bockting, Claudi L. H.; Schene, Aart H.; Spinhoven, Philip; Koeter, Maarten W. J.; Wouters, Luuk F.; Huyser, Jochanan; Kamphuis, Jan H.

    2005-01-01

    This article reports on the outcome of a randomized controlled trial of cognitive group therapy (CT) to prevent relapse/recurrence in a group of high-risk patients diagnosed with recurrent depression. Recurrently depressed patients (N = 187) currently in remission following various types of treatment were randomized to treatment as usual,…

  20. Personalized medicine and stroke prevention: where are we?

    PubMed

    Kim, Joosup; Thrift, Amanda G; Nelson, Mark R; Bladin, Christopher F; Cadilhac, Dominique A

    2015-01-01

    There are many recommended pharmacological and non-pharmacological therapies for the prevention of stroke, and an ongoing challenge is to improve their uptake. Personalized medicine is seen as a possible solution to this challenge. Although the use of genetic information to guide health care could be considered as the apex of personalized medicine, genetics is not yet routinely used to guide prevention of stroke. Currently personalized aspects of prevention of stroke include tailoring interventions based on global risk, the utilization of individualized management plans within a model of organized care, and patient education. In this review we discuss the progress made in these aspects of prevention of stroke and present a case study to illustrate the issues faced by health care providers and patients with stroke that could be overcome with a personalized approach to the prevention of stroke.

  1. Personalized medicine and stroke prevention: where are we?

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Joosup; Thrift, Amanda G; Nelson, Mark R; Bladin, Christopher F; Cadilhac, Dominique A

    2015-01-01

    There are many recommended pharmacological and non-pharmacological therapies for the prevention of stroke, and an ongoing challenge is to improve their uptake. Personalized medicine is seen as a possible solution to this challenge. Although the use of genetic information to guide health care could be considered as the apex of personalized medicine, genetics is not yet routinely used to guide prevention of stroke. Currently personalized aspects of prevention of stroke include tailoring interventions based on global risk, the utilization of individualized management plans within a model of organized care, and patient education. In this review we discuss the progress made in these aspects of prevention of stroke and present a case study to illustrate the issues faced by health care providers and patients with stroke that could be overcome with a personalized approach to the prevention of stroke. PMID:26664130

  2. Recurrent stroke risk and cerebral microbleed burden in ischemic stroke and TIA

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Duncan; Charidimou, Andreas; Ambler, Gareth; Fox, Zoe V.; Gregoire, Simone; Rayson, Phillip; Imaizumi, Toshio; Fluri, Felix; Naka, Hiromitsu; Horstmann, Solveig; Veltkamp, Roland; Rothwell, Peter M.; Kwa, Vincent I.H.; Thijs, Vincent; Lee, Yong-Seok; Kim, Young Dae; Huang, Yining; Wong, Ka Sing; Jäger, Hans Rolf

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To determine associations between cerebral microbleed (CMB) burden with recurrent ischemic stroke (IS) and intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) risk after IS or TIA. Methods: We identified prospective studies of patients with IS or TIA that investigated CMBs and stroke (ICH and IS) risk during ≥3 months follow-up. Authors provided aggregate summary-level data on stroke outcomes, with CMBs categorized according to burden (single, 2–4, and ≥5 CMBs) and distribution. We calculated absolute event rates and pooled risk ratios (RR) using random-effects meta-analysis. Results: We included 5,068 patients from 15 studies. There were 115/1,284 (9.6%) recurrent IS events in patients with CMBs vs 212/3,781 (5.6%) in patients without CMBs (pooled RR 1.8 for CMBs vs no CMBs; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.4–2.5). There were 49/1,142 (4.3%) ICH events in those with CMBs vs 17/2,912 (0.58%) in those without CMBs (pooled RR 6.3 for CMBs vs no CMBs; 95% CI 3.5–11.4). Increasing CMB burden increased the risk of IS (pooled RR [95% CI] 1.8 [1.0–3.1], 2.4 [1.3–4.4], and 2.7 [1.5–4.9] for 1 CMB, 2–4 CMBs, and ≥5 CMBs, respectively) and ICH (pooled RR [95% CI] 4.6 [1.9–10.7], 5.6 [2.4–13.3], and 14.1 [6.9–29.0] for 1 CMB, 2–4 CMBs, and ≥5 CMBs, respectively). Conclusions: CMBs are associated with increased stroke risk after IS or TIA. With increasing CMB burden (compared to no CMBs), the risk of ICH increases more steeply than that of IS. However, IS absolute event rates remain higher than ICH absolute event rates in all CMB burden categories. PMID:27590288

  3. Recurrent stroke risk and cerebral microbleed burden in ischemic stroke and TIA: A meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Duncan; Charidimou, Andreas; Ambler, Gareth; Fox, Zoe V; Gregoire, Simone; Rayson, Phillip; Imaizumi, Toshio; Fluri, Felix; Naka, Hiromitsu; Horstmann, Solveig; Veltkamp, Roland; Rothwell, Peter M; Kwa, Vincent I H; Thijs, Vincent; Lee, Yong-Seok; Kim, Young Dae; Huang, Yining; Wong, Ka Sing; Jäger, Hans Rolf; Werring, David J

    2016-10-04

    To determine associations between cerebral microbleed (CMB) burden with recurrent ischemic stroke (IS) and intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) risk after IS or TIA. We identified prospective studies of patients with IS or TIA that investigated CMBs and stroke (ICH and IS) risk during ≥3 months follow-up. Authors provided aggregate summary-level data on stroke outcomes, with CMBs categorized according to burden (single, 2-4, and ≥5 CMBs) and distribution. We calculated absolute event rates and pooled risk ratios (RR) using random-effects meta-analysis. We included 5,068 patients from 15 studies. There were 115/1,284 (9.6%) recurrent IS events in patients with CMBs vs 212/3,781 (5.6%) in patients without CMBs (pooled RR 1.8 for CMBs vs no CMBs; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.4-2.5). There were 49/1,142 (4.3%) ICH events in those with CMBs vs 17/2,912 (0.58%) in those without CMBs (pooled RR 6.3 for CMBs vs no CMBs; 95% CI 3.5-11.4). Increasing CMB burden increased the risk of IS (pooled RR [95% CI] 1.8 [1.0-3.1], 2.4 [1.3-4.4], and 2.7 [1.5-4.9] for 1 CMB, 2-4 CMBs, and ≥5 CMBs, respectively) and ICH (pooled RR [95% CI] 4.6 [1.9-10.7], 5.6 [2.4-13.3], and 14.1 [6.9-29.0] for 1 CMB, 2-4 CMBs, and ≥5 CMBs, respectively). CMBs are associated with increased stroke risk after IS or TIA. With increasing CMB burden (compared to no CMBs), the risk of ICH increases more steeply than that of IS. However, IS absolute event rates remain higher than ICH absolute event rates in all CMB burden categories. © 2016 American Academy of Neurology.

  4. Risk factors of short-term stroke recurrence in patients with minor ischemic cerebrovascular events.

    PubMed

    Ghandehari, Kavian; Khajedaluei, Mohammad Reza; Yazdankhah, Zahra; Ghandehari, Kosar

    2013-03-01

    Assessing the risk of recurrent ischemic events in patients with transient ischemic attack (TIA) and minor ischemic stroke (MIS) is of a great importance in clinical practice. Consecutive patients with TIA or MIS who were visited in Ghaem Hospital, (Mashhad, Iran) were enrolled in a prospective cohort study during 2010 to 2011. Diagnosis of TIA or MIS was accomplished by a stroke neurologist. Only those who presented within 24 hours from the onset of symptoms were recruited. MIS was considered as an ischemic stroke with National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) < 4. The endpoint of the study was a new ischemic cerebrovascular event or vascular death in 90 days and additionally in 3 days. The decision to admit and type of treatment in each case was left to the discretion of the stroke neurologist. The association between 20 potential factors with recurrent ischemic events in 3 and 90 days was investigated using univariate and multivariate analysis (MVA). 393 TIA patients (238 males and 155 females) and 118 MIS patients (77 males and 41 females) were enrolled in the study. Stroke occurred in 117 (23.2%) patients, TIA in 99 (19.6%), and there was 11 (2.2%) vascular deaths within 3 months in the total 511 patients with minor ischemic events. Crescendo TIAs and multiple TIAs were associated with greater risk of stroke in 3 days in a univariate analysis (OR = 5.12, P < 0.001) and (OR = 3.98, P = 0.003), respectively. Patients with index stroke had 11.5% lower risk of recurrent stroke in 3 days than patients with index TIA in multivariate analysis (OR = 0.115, P = 0.039). Diabetes was independently associated with 3 months stroke recurrence in the patients with minor ischemic events (OR = 2.65, P = 0.039). Multiple and crescendo TIAs are the main predictors of stroke recurrence, derived from the univariate analysis of the patients with minor ischemic events.

  5. Population-based study of blood biomarkers in prediction of sub-acute recurrent stroke

    PubMed Central

    Segal, Helen C; Burgess, Annette I; Poole, Debbie L; Mehta, Ziyah; Silver, Louise E; Rothwell, Peter M

    2017-01-01

    Background and purpose Risk of recurrent stroke is high in the first few weeks after TIA or stroke and clinic risk prediction tools have only limited accuracy, particularly after the hyper-acute phase. Previous studies of the predictive value of biomarkers have been small, been done in selected populations and have not concentrated on the acute phase or on intensively treated populations. We aimed to determine the predictive value of a panel of blood biomarkers in intensively treated patients early after TIA and stroke. Methods We studied 14 blood biomarkers related to inflammation, thrombosis, atherogenesis and cardiac or neuronal cell damage in early TIA or ischaemic stroke in a population-based study (Oxford Vascular Study). Biomarker levels were related to 90-day risk of recurrent stroke as Hazard Ratio (95%CI) per decile increase, adjusted for age and sex. Results Among 1292 eligible patients there were 53 recurrent ischaemic strokes within 90 days. There were moderate correlations (r>0.40; p<0001) between the inflammatory biomarkers and between the cell damage and thrombotic subsets. However, associations with risk of early recurrent stroke were weak, with significant associations limited to Interleukin-6 (HR=1.12, 1.01-1.24; p=0.035) and C-reactive protein (1.16, 1.02-1.30; p=0.019). When stratified by type of presenting event, P-selectin predicted stroke after TIA (1.31, 1.03-1.66; p=0.028) and C-reactive protein predicted stroke after stroke (1.16, 1.01-1.34; p=0.042). These associations remained after fully adjusting for other vascular risk factors. Conclusion In the largest study to date, we found very limited predictive utility for early recurrent stroke for a panel of inflammatory, thrombotic and cell damage biomarkers. PMID:25158774

  6. [Determination of the Association Between Smoking and Recurrence of Ischemic Stroke using a Competing Risks Model].

    PubMed

    Zhan, Feng-yu; Yan, Pei-jing; Zhang, Juan; Ran, Meng-dong; Zhu, Cai-rong

    2015-09-01

    To determine the association between smoking and ischemic stroke recurrence. We conducted a prospective follow-up study of patients with first incidence of stroke. A competing risks model was used to establish the association between smoking and stroke recurrence. A total of 594 stroke patients were recruited. Among the 361 male patients, 59 recurrent events and 13 competing events occurred. Among the 233 female patients (all were non-smokers), 49 recurrent events and 11 competing events occurred. Adjusted for confounding factors, male nonsmokers exposed to passive smoking had a SHR of 3. 040 in comparison with those without exposure to smoking and the P value was borderline significant. Those who smoked 100-200 cigarettes a year had a SHR of 0. 947. The other groups with exposure to smoking had a greater than 1 SHR, but without statistical significance. Moreover, no significant associations between recurrence of ischemic stroke and smoking index/cumulative smoking were found. The female nonsmokers who had exposure to passive smoking only at follow-ups had a SHR of 1. 4 (and all other groups had less than 1 SHR). But no statistical significances were found in the comparisons. Further research with a larger sample size is needed to establish the association between smoking and recurrence of ischemic stroke.

  7. Obstructive Sleep Apnea as an Independent Stroke Risk Factor: A Review of the Evidence, Stroke Prevention Guidelines, and Implications for Neuroscience Nursing Practice.

    PubMed

    King, Sharon; Cuellar, Norma

    2016-06-01

    Stroke is a leading cause of death and disability affecting nearly 800,000 people in the United States every year. Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is found in over 60% of patients with stroke/transient ischemic attack (TIA) and identified as an independent stroke risk factor in large epidemiology studies and Canadian Stroke Prevention Guidelines (SPG) but not in the United States. The 2014 Secondary SPG recommend OSA screening and treatment as a consideration only, not a requirement. The twofold purpose of this article is, first, to present the evidence supporting OSA as an independent stroke risk factor in national SPG with mandatory recommendations and, second, to engage neuroscience nurses to incorporate OSA assessment and interventions into the nursing process and thereby promote excellence in stroke/TIA patient care. A systematic literature search was conducted in Medline, CINAHL, and PubMed to identify research from 2003 through 2013 on the independent risk, mortality, and prevalence relationship between OSA and stroke/TIA including recurrence and recovery outcomes with continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) therapy. Twenty-eight research articles were reviewed: 14 observational cohorts, five case-control studies, four cross-sectional studies, and four randomized control trials representing 12 countries and 10,671 subjects. OSA is highly prevalent in patients with stroke/TIA independently increasing stroke risk. CPAP studies revealed reduced stroke recurrence and improved recovery with feasible initiation in stroke units. Patients with stroke/TIA have less OSA-associated daytime sleepiness and obesity, making the usual screening tools insufficient and CPAP adherence challenging. Treating OSA decreases stroke prevalence and mortality. OSA initiatives empower neuroscience nurses to integrate this OSA evidence into clinical practice and improve stroke/TIA patient outcomes.

  8. Novel preventive and therapuetic strategy for post-stroke pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Teramoto, Shinji

    2009-08-01

    Pneumonia is a significant complication of ischemic stroke that increases mortality. Post-stroke pneumonia is defined as newly developed pneumonia following stroke onset. Clinically and chronologically, post-stroke pneumonia is divided into two types of aspiration pneumonia. First, acute-onset post-stroke pneumonia occurs within 1 month after stroke. Second, insidious or chronic-onset post-stroke pneumonia occurs 1 month after the stroke. The mechanisms of pneumonia are apparent aspiration and dysphagia-associated microaspiration. Stroke and the post-stroke state are the most significant risk factors for aspiration pneumonia. The preventive and therapeutic strategies have been developed thoroughly and appropriate antibiotic use, and both pharmacological and nonpharmacological approaches for the treatment of post-stroke pneumonia have been studied rigorously. Increases in substance P levels, oral care, and swallowing rehabilitation are necessary to improve swallowing function in post-stroke patients, resulting in a reduction in the incidence of post-stroke pneumonia in a chronic stage. The stroke must be a cause of aspiration pneumonia.

  9. Seizure Outcomes and Predictors of Recurrent Post-Stroke Seizure: A Retrospective Observational Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Motoyama, Rie; Fukuma, Kazuki; Miyagi, Tetsuya; Nishimura, Kazutaka; Toyoda, Kazunori; Nagatsuka, Kazuyuki

    2015-01-01

    Background Seizure is a common complication after stroke (termed “post-stroke seizure,” PSS). Although many studies have assessed outcomes and risk factors of PSS, no reliable predictors are currently available to determine PSS recurrence. We compared baseline clinical characteristics and post-stroke treatment regimens between recurrent and non-recurrent PSS patients to identify factors predictive of recurrence. Methods Consecutive PSS patients admitted to our stroke center between January 2011 and July 2013 were monitored until February 2014 (median 357 days; IQR, 160–552) and retrospectively evaluated for baseline clinical characteristics and PSS recurrence. Cumulative recurrence rates at 90, 180, and 360 days post-stroke were estimated by Kaplan—Meier analysis. Independent predictors of recurrent PSS were identified by Cox proportional-hazards analysis. Results A total of 104 patients (71 men; mean age, 72.1 ± 11.2 years) were analyzed. PSS recurred in 31 patients (30%) during the follow-up. Factors significantly associated with PSS recurrence by log-rank analysis included previous PSS, valproic acid (VPA) monotherapy, polytherapy with antiepileptic drugs (AEDs), frontal cortical lesion, and higher modified Rankin Scale score at discharge (all p < 0.05). Independent predictors of recurrent PSS were age <74 years (HR 2.38, 95% CI 1.02–5.90), VPA monotherapy (HR 3.86, 95% CI 1.30–12.62), and convulsions on admission (HR 3.87, 95% CI 1.35–12.76). Conclusions Approximately one-third of PSS patients experienced seizure recurrence within one year. The predictors of recurrent PSS were younger age, presence of convulsions and VPA monotherapy. Our findings should be interpreted cautiously in countries where monotherapy with second-generation AEDs has been approved because this study was conducted while second-generation AEDs had not been officially approved for monotherapy in Japan. PMID:26309124

  10. Recurrence of spinal schwannoma: Is it preventable?

    PubMed Central

    Senapati, Satya B.; Mishra, Sudhansu S.; Dhir, Manmath K.; Patnaik, Ashis; Panigrahi, Souvagya

    2016-01-01

    Spinal schwannomas account for about 25% of primary intradural spinal cord tumors in adult. The prognosis for spinal schwannomas is excellent in most cases. Complete resection is curative. However following subtotal removal, recurrence develops after several years. We describe a case of recurrent spinal schwannoma who had been operated twice before for same disease. The possible cause of recurrence and difficulties in reoperation are discussed. PMID:27695564

  11. Systems pharmacology dissection of multi-scale mechanisms of action for herbal medicines in stroke treatment and prevention.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jingxiao; Li, Yan; Chen, Xuetong; Pan, Yanqiu; Zhang, Shuwei; Wang, Yonghua

    2014-01-01

    Annually, tens of millions of first-ever strokes occur in the world; however, currently there is lack of effective and widely applicable pharmacological treatments for stroke patients. Herbal medicines, characterized as multi-constituent, multi-target and multi-effect, have been acknowledged with conspicuous effects in treating stroke, and attract extensive interest of researchers although the mechanism of action is yet unclear. In this work, we introduce an innovative systems-pharmacology method that combines pharmacokinetic prescreening, target fishing and network analysis to decipher the mechanisms of action of 10 herbal medicines like Salvia miltiorrhizae, Ginkgo biloba and Ephedrae herba which are efficient in stroke treatment and prevention. Our systematic analysis results display that, in these anti-stroke herbal medicines, 168 out of 1285 constituents with the favorable pharmacokinetic profiles might be implicated in stroke therapy, and the systematic use of these compounds probably acts through multiple mechanisms to synergistically benefit patients with stroke, which can roughly be classified as preventing ischemic inflammatory response, scavenging free radicals and inhibiting neuronal apoptosis against ischemic cerebral damage, as well as exhibiting lipid-lowering, anti-diabetic, anti-thrombotic and antiplatelet effects to decrease recurrent strokes. Relying on systems biology-based analysis, we speculate that herbal medicines, being characterized as the classical combination therapies, might be not only engaged in multiple mechanisms of action to synergistically improve the stroke outcomes, but also might be participated in reducing the risk factors for recurrent strokes.

  12. Systems Pharmacology Dissection of Multi-Scale Mechanisms of Action for Herbal Medicines in Stroke Treatment and Prevention

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jingxiao; Li, Yan; Chen, Xuetong; Pan, Yanqiu; Zhang, Shuwei; Wang, Yonghua

    2014-01-01

    Annually, tens of millions of first-ever strokes occur in the world; however, currently there is lack of effective and widely applicable pharmacological treatments for stroke patients. Herbal medicines, characterized as multi-constituent, multi-target and multi-effect, have been acknowledged with conspicuous effects in treating stroke, and attract extensive interest of researchers although the mechanism of action is yet unclear. In this work, we introduce an innovative systems-pharmacology method that combines pharmacokinetic prescreening, target fishing and network analysis to decipher the mechanisms of action of 10 herbal medicines like Salvia miltiorrhizae, Ginkgo biloba and Ephedrae herba which are efficient in stroke treatment and prevention. Our systematic analysis results display that, in these anti-stroke herbal medicines, 168 out of 1285 constituents with the favorable pharmacokinetic profiles might be implicated in stroke therapy, and the systematic use of these compounds probably acts through multiple mechanisms to synergistically benefit patients with stroke, which can roughly be classified as preventing ischemic inflammatory response, scavenging free radicals and inhibiting neuronal apoptosis against ischemic cerebral damage, as well as exhibiting lipid-lowering, anti-diabetic, anti-thrombotic and antiplatelet effects to decrease recurrent strokes. Relying on systems biology-based analysis, we speculate that herbal medicines, being characterized as the classical combination therapies, might be not only engaged in multiple mechanisms of action to synergistically improve the stroke outcomes, but also might be participated in reducing the risk factors for recurrent strokes. PMID:25093322

  13. [Experience of stroke prevention-Enlightenment for cancer research].

    PubMed

    You, Weicheng

    2015-08-01

    Cancer, stroke and heart diseases are most common causes of death. This paper summarized the experience of stroke prevention, which is an enlightenment for cancer research. In addition, this paper also described the progress of cancer epidemiological research, particular the primary and second preventions in China.

  14. Preventing Heart Attacks and Strokes: Increasing Awareness ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Summary: Chronic cardiovascular disease imposes a significant health and economic burden on individuals and communities. Despite decades of improvement in cardiovascular mortality, cardiovascular disease and stroke remain the leading cause of death in the U.S. and disparities in health outcomes persist. Moreover, the continuous improvement in cardiovascular mortality typical of the last four decades has ended motivating new and innovative approaches to improve population health and wellbeing. Apart from continued focus on traditional risk factor modification such as identification and treatment of high blood pressure and cholesterol, cessation of smoking, and appropriate use of evidence-based pharmacological prevention measures and disease management, other factors should be considered such as increasing physical activity, dietary sodium reduction and modification of social and environmental determinants known to cause heart attacks and stroke and exacerbate vascular disease. Such an approach will require greater cooperation among public health, environmental health, the broader public and private healthcare delivery and payment systems, and federal agencies. To introduce this concept the U.S. EPA held a workshop in September 2016 bringing together representatives of local and state public health officials, the healthcare system, educators, data analytics, and federal partners (CMS, CDC, Dept. of State and EPA) for the purpose of exploring the idea of prom

  15. Recurrent stroke and patent foramen ovale: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Katsanos, Aristeidis H; Spence, J David; Bogiatzi, Chrysi; Parissis, John; Giannopoulos, Sotirios; Frogoudaki, Alexandra; Safouris, Apostolos; Voumvourakis, Konstantinos; Tsivgoulis, Georgios

    2014-11-01

    Recurrent cerebrovascular events are frequent in medically treated patients with patent foramen ovale (PFO), but it still remains unclear whether PFO is a causal or an incidental finding. Further uncertainty exists on whether the size of functional shunting could represent a potential risk factor. The aim of the present study was to evaluate if the presence of PFO is associated with an increased risk of recurrent stroke or transient ischemic attack and to investigate further if this relationship is related to the shunt size. We conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis according to Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) guidelines of all available prospective studies reporting recurrent cerebrovascular events defined as cryptogenic stroke and transient ischemic attacks in medically treated patients with PFO diagnosed by echocardiography or transcranial sonography. We identified 14 eligible studies including a total of 4251 patients. Patients with stroke with PFO did not have a higher risk of the combined outcome of recurrent stroke/transient ischemic attack (risk ratio=1.18; 95% confidence interval=0.78-1.79; P=0.43) or in the incidence of recurrent strokes (risk ratio =0.85; 95% confidence interval=0.59-1.22; P=0.37) in comparison with stroke patients without PFO. In addition, PFO size was not associated with the risk of recurrent stroke or transient ischemic attack. We also documented no evidence of heterogeneity across the included studies. Our findings indicate that medically treated patients with PFO do not have a higher risk for recurrent cryptogenic cerebrovascular events, compared with those without PFO. No relation between the degree of PFO and the risk of future cerebrovascular events was identified. © 2014 American Heart Association, Inc.

  16. Suicide in stroke survivors: epidemiology and prevention.

    PubMed

    Pompili, Maurizio; Venturini, Paola; Lamis, Dorian A; Giordano, Gloria; Serafini, Gianluca; Belvederi Murri, Martino; Amore, Mario; Girardi, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    Stroke is a dramatic event and is associated with potentially severe consequences, including disability, mortality, and social costs. Stroke may occur at any age; however, most strokes occur in individuals aged 65 years and older. Previous research has found that stroke increases suicide risk, especially among women and younger patients. The aim of the current review is to investigate the relationship between suicide and stroke in order to determine which stroke patients are at elevated risk for suicide. Moreover, we review the literature in order to provide pharmacological treatment strategies for stroke patients at high risk of suicide. We performed a careful search to identify articles and book chapters focused on this issue, selecting only English-language articles published from 1990 to 2014 that addressed the issue of suicide after stroke and its pharmacological management. We found 12 clinical trials that explored the relationship between stroke and suicidal ideation and/or suicidal plans and 11 investigating suicide as the cause of death after stroke. We identified stroke as a significant risk factor for both suicide and suicidal ideation, especially among younger adult depressed patients in all articles, providing further support for the association between post-stroke and suicidality. Suicide risk is particularly high in the first 5 years following stroke. Depression, previous mood disorder, prior history of stroke, and cognitive impairment were found to be the most important risk factors for suicide. Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) represent the treatment of choice for stroke survivors with suicide risk, and studies in rats have suggested that carbolithium is a promising treatment in these patients. Early identification and treatment of post-stroke depression may significantly reduce suicide risk in stroke patients.

  17. Practice advisory: Recurrent stroke with patent foramen ovale (update of practice parameter): Report of the Guideline Development, Dissemination, and Implementation Subcommittee of the American Academy of Neurology.

    PubMed

    Messé, Steven R; Gronseth, Gary; Kent, David M; Kizer, Jorge R; Homma, Shunichi; Rosterman, Lee; Kasner, Scott E

    2016-08-23

    To update the 2004 American Academy of Neurology guideline for patients with stroke and patent foramen ovale (PFO) by addressing whether (1) percutaneous closure of PFO is superior to medical therapy alone and (2) anticoagulation is superior to antiplatelet therapy for the prevention of recurrent stroke. Systematic review of the literature and structured formulation of recommendations. Percutaneous PFO closure with the STARFlex device possibly does not provide a benefit in preventing stroke vs medical therapy alone (risk difference [RD] 0.13%, 95% confidence interval [CI] -2.2% to 2.0%). Percutaneous PFO closure with the AMPLATZER PFO Occluder possibly decreases the risk of recurrent stroke (RD -1.68%, 95% CI -3.18% to -0.19%), possibly increases the risk of new-onset atrial fibrillation (AF) (RD 1.64%, 95% CI 0.07%-3.2%), and is highly likely to be associated with a procedural complication risk of 3.4% (95% CI 2.3%-5%). There is insufficient evidence to determine the efficacy of anticoagulation compared with antiplatelet therapy in preventing recurrent stroke (RD 2%, 95% CI -21% to 25%). Clinicians should not routinely offer percutaneous PFO closure to patients with cryptogenic ischemic stroke outside of a research setting (Level R). In rare circumstances, such as recurrent strokes despite adequate medical therapy with no other mechanism identified, clinicians may offer the AMPLATZER PFO Occluder if it is available (Level C). In the absence of another indication for anticoagulation, clinicians may routinely offer antiplatelet medications instead of anticoagulation to patients with cryptogenic stroke and PFO (Level C). © 2016 American Academy of Neurology.

  18. Prevention and management of stroke in women.

    PubMed

    Howe, Matthew D; McCullough, Louise D

    2015-04-01

    Stroke is the leading cause of acquired disability and the third leading cause of death in women worldwide. Sex differences in risk factors, treatment response and quality of life after stroke complicate stroke management in women. Women have an increased lifetime incidence of stroke compared to men, largely due to a sharp increase in stroke risk in older postmenopausal women. Women also have an increased lifetime prevalence of stroke risk factors, including hypertension and atrial fibrillation in postmenopausal women, as well as abdominal obesity and metabolic syndrome in middle-aged women. Controversy continues over the risks of oral contraceptives, hormone therapy and surgical intervention for carotid stenosis in women. Pregnancy and the postpartum period represent a time of increased risk, presenting challenges to stroke management. Recognition of these issues is critical to improving acute care and functional recovery after stroke in women.

  19. Effect of socioeconomic status on secondary prevention of stroke

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Qun; Wang, Mingsheng; Guo, Jingcheng; Li, Jingxing; Li, Cuifen; Qian, Minhui

    2011-01-01

    Objective Cardiovascular risk factors increase risk for stroke recurrence. Secondary prevention of stroke may be affected not only by established risk factors, but also socioeconomic status. This study evaluates relationships between socioeconomic status and cardiovascular and behavioral factors. Design Cross-section study. Setting Public Health and Education Institute, Peking University. Participants Outpatients (n = 2354) with a past diagnosis of stroke or transient ischemic attack. Intervention(s) The investigation consisted of a questionnaire regarding patients' socioeconomic and living status, and a clinical examination at the research center. Main outcome measure(s) Control rates of risk factors for cardiovascular disease. Results With regard to hypertension patients, 67.0% were aware of having hypertension, 63.6% were treated and 53.9% had controlled hypertension; for patients with hypercholesterolemia, 46.7% were aware of having hypercholesterolemia, 38.6% were treated and 3.8% had controlled hypercholesterolemia; for patients with diabetes mellitus, 28.0% were aware of having diabetes mellitus, 25.7% were treated and 3.5% had controlled diabetes mellitus. After multivariate analysis, education was the strongest associated factor for controls of hypertension and diabetes mellitus. After adjustment for sex and age, strong and graduated relationships were noted between the level of education and control of risk factors, with the odds ratios increasing at every increment. Conclusion Education exerts the most important effect on the control of established cardiovascular risk factors; Successful intervention to reduce these risk factors will have to be addressed, not just with regard to specific risk factors, but also with the societal conditions that lead to the adoption and maintenance of high-risk behaviors. PMID:21622716

  20. Emerging Tools for Stroke Prevention in Atrial Fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Voukalis, Christos; Lip, Gregory Y H; Shantsila, Eduard

    2016-02-01

    Ischaemic strokes resulting from atrial fibrillation (AF) constitute a devastating condition for patients and their carers with huge burden on health care systems. Prophylactic treatment against systemic embolization and ischaemic strokes is the cornerstone for the management of AF. Effective stroke prevention requires the use of the vitamin K antagonists or non-vitamin K oral anticoagulants (NOACs). This article summarises the latest developments in the field of stroke prevention in AF and aims to assist physicians with the choice of oral anticoagulant for patients with non-valvular AF with different risk factor profile.

  1. Emerging Tools for Stroke Prevention in Atrial Fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    Voukalis, Christos; Lip, Gregory Y.H.; Shantsila, Eduard

    2016-01-01

    Ischaemic strokes resulting from atrial fibrillation (AF) constitute a devastating condition for patients and their carers with huge burden on health care systems. Prophylactic treatment against systemic embolization and ischaemic strokes is the cornerstone for the management of AF. Effective stroke prevention requires the use of the vitamin K antagonists or non-vitamin K oral anticoagulants (NOACs). This article summarises the latest developments in the field of stroke prevention in AF and aims to assist physicians with the choice of oral anticoagulant for patients with non-valvular AF with different risk factor profile. PMID:26981569

  2. Clinical predictors of seizure recurrence after the first post-ischemic stroke seizure.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyeon Jin; Park, Kee Duk; Choi, Kyoung-Gyu; Lee, Hyang Woon

    2016-11-05

    The number of patients suffering post-stroke seizure after ischemic stroke (PSSi) is quite considerable, especially because ischemic stroke is more prevalent than hemorrhage in the general population. This study aimed to determine the predicting factors for seizure recurrence in ischemic stroke survivors and develop a clinical scoring system for the prediction of risks for seizure recurrence after the first PSSi. We reviewed 3792 ischemic stroke patients from the Ewha Stroke Registry. A total of 124 (3.3 %) patients who experienced PSSi were recruited (mean follow-up for 44.4 months). Medical records concerning the etiology, functional disability, seizure onset latency from stroke, type of seizure, electroencephalography (EEG), and neuroimaging findings were statistically analyzed to derive a seizure recurrence risk scoring system. Seizures recurred in 35.4 % (17/48) of early PSSi patients (≤1 week since stroke onset) and 48.7 % (37/76) of late PSSi (>1 week) patients. Atrial fibrillation, large sized, and cortical stroke lesion were more common in late onset PSSi compared to those in early onset PSSi (p < 0.05). Seizure recurrence tended to be more prevalent in early PSSi patients with male gender, atrial fibrillation or cortical stroke lesion, severe functional disability, and partial seizures. Seizure recurrence in late PSSi group was more common in patients of young age (≤65 years old), male gender, large lesion size, and partial seizure type. The validity of seizure recurrence risk score in the early PSSi group was better when evaluating based on gender, atrial fibrillation, cortical lesion, functional disability, and partial seizure type, with sensitivity of 70.6 % and specificity of 71.0 %. Our study characterized the high risk group for seizure recurrence in patients with the first PSSi. PSSi patients with high risk score of seizure recurrence had a greater chance of developing epilepsy later. Therefore, they should be considered for

  3. Design and Rationale of the RELAXED (Recurrent Embolism Lessened by rivaroxaban, an Anti-Xa agent, of Early Dosing for acute ischemic stroke and transient ischemic attack with atrial fibrillation) Study.

    PubMed

    Yasaka, Masahiro; Minematsu, Kazuo; Toyoda, Kazunori; Yamagami, Hiroshi; Yoshimura, Shinichi; Nagao, Takehiko; Mori, Etsuro; Hirano, Teruyuki; Hamasaki, Toshimitsu; Yamaguchi, Takenori

    2016-06-01

    In the acute phase of cardioembolic stroke in patients with nonvalvular atrial fibrillation (NVAF), the recurrence rate is high. Nonvitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants may be appropriate for prevention of early recurrence because they have a much lower risk of hemorrhagic stroke than warfarin. RELAXED (Recurrent Embolism Lessened by rivaroxaban, an Anti-Xa agent, of Early Dosing for acute ischemic stroke and transient ischemic attack with atrial fibrillation) study is an observational study designed to investigate the optimal timing to start administration of rivaroxaban for prevention of recurrence in NVAF patients in the acute phase of cardioembolic stroke (ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT02129920 and UMIN-clinical trials registry: UMIN000013932). It will evaluate the efficacy and safety of rivaroxaban with regard to infarct size, timing of initiation of rivaroxaban medication, and other patient characteristics. A total of 2000 consecutive patients with acute ischemic stroke in the territory of the middle cerebral artery and NVAF will be enrolled in 100 institutes throughout Japan, and they will receive rivaroxaban within 30 days of the index stroke for secondary prevention of stroke. The infarct size within 48 hours after stroke onset will be measured by diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging. The primary efficacy endpoint is recurrent ischemic stroke, and the primary safety endpoint is major bleeding during the observational period of 3 months after stroke onset. The optimal timing to start treatment with rivaroxaban during the acute stage of ischemic stroke will be determined by analysis of the correlation between primary endpoints and the size of cerebral infarct. The RELAXED observational registry study will elucidate the optimal timing of the initiation of rivaroxaban in acute cardioembolic stroke associated with NVAF. Copyright © 2016 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Preventing stroke: the PRoFESS, ONTARGET, and TRANSCEND trial programs.

    PubMed

    Diener, Hans-Christoph

    2009-07-01

    Renin-angiotensin system blockers have been shown to reduce stroke risk, partly independent of their blood pressure-lowering effect. The PReventiOn regimen For Effectively avoiding Second Strokes (PRoFESS) trial, ONgoing Telmisartan Alone and in combination with Ramipril Global Endpoint Trial (ONTARGET) and Telmisartan Randomized AssessmeNt Study in aCE-iNtolerant subjects with cardiovascular Disease (TRANSCEND) recently showed potential benefits of the angiotensin II receptor blocker, telmisartan, in reducing secondary strokes. In PRoFESS, 20 332 ischemic stroke patients were randomized to telmisartan 80 mg versus placebo and to two antiplatelets in a 2 x 2 factorial design. After a mean exposure of 2 years, telmisartan showed a nonsignificant lower rate of recurrent stroke versus placebo [880 versus 934; hazard ratio 0.95; 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.86-1.04]. In a post-hoc analysis, from 6 months, telmisartan significantly reduced the number of strokes versus placebo (533 versus 608; hazard ratio 0.88; 95% CI 0.78-0.99; P = 0.042). In the stroke subgroup of ONTARGET, telmisartan 80 mg showed a trend toward reducing recurrent stroke versus ramipril 10 mg (hazard ratio 0.91; 95% CI 0.79-1.05). In the TRANSCEND study, 5926 patients who were intolerant to angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors were treated with 80 mg telmisartan or placebo. In a combined analysis of PRoFESS and TRANSCEND, the incidence of the composite of stroke, myocardial infarction, or vascular death was 12.8% for telmisartan versus 13.8% for placebo (hazard ratio 0.91; 95% CI 0.85-0.98; P = 0.013).

  5. ABCD2 score and secondary stroke prevention: meta-analysis and effect per 1,000 patients triaged.

    PubMed

    Wardlaw, Joanna M; Brazzelli, Miriam; Chappell, Francesca M; Miranda, Hector; Shuler, Kirsten; Sandercock, Peter A G; Dennis, Martin S

    2015-07-28

    Patients with TIA have high risk of recurrent stroke and require rapid assessment and treatment. The ABCD2 clinical risk prediction score is recommended for patient triage by stroke risk, but its ability to stratify by known risk factors and effect on clinic workload are unknown. We performed a systematic review and meta-analysis of all studies published between January 2005 and September 2014 that reported proportions of true TIA/minor stroke or mimics, risk factors, and recurrent stroke rates, dichotomized to ABCD2 score stroke prevention services. Twenty-nine studies, 13,766 TIA patients (range 69-1,679), were relevant: 48% calculated the ABCD2 score retrospectively; few reported on the ABCD2 score's ability to identify TIA mimics or use by nonspecialists. Meta-analysis showed that ABCD2 ≥4 was sensitive (86.7%, 95% confidence interval [CI] 81.4%-90.7%) but not specific (35.4%, 95% CI 33.3%-37.6%) for recurrent stroke within 7 days. Additionally, 20% of patients with ABCD2 <4 had >50% carotid stenosis or atrial fibrillation (AF); 35%-41% of TIA mimics, and 66% of true TIAs, had ABCD2 score ≥4. Among 1,000 patients attending stroke prevention services, including the 45% with mimics, 52% of patients would have an ABCD2 score ≥4. The ABCD2 score does not reliably discriminate those at low and high risk of early recurrent stroke, identify patients with carotid stenosis or AF needing urgent intervention, or streamline clinic workload. Stroke prevention services need adequate capacity for prompt specialist clinical assessment of all suspected TIA patients for correct patient management. © 2015 American Academy of Neurology.

  6. Magnetic Resonance Imaging in the Management of Cerebrovascular Disease to Prevent Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Thulborn, Keith R.

    2009-01-01

    Synopsis Cerebrovascular disease is a heterogeneous disease that may require objective criteria for developing optimal recurrent stroke prevention strategies. Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging and angiography together with MR perfusion and functional MR imaging provide sufficient parameters to tailor medical and surgical interventions for each patient and to monitor disease compensation or progression. These MR imaging procedures are demonstrated by clinical cases of advanced cerebrovascular pathology in which treatment varied from medical management to surgical intervention. PMID:19026896

  7. A Practical Approach to Preventing Postoperative Recurrence in Crohn's Disease.

    PubMed

    Hashash, Jana G; Regueiro, Miguel

    2016-05-01

    Postoperative Crohn's disease recurrence remains common, and preventing additional surgery remains a challenge. A critical step to postoperative management of Crohn's disease is being able to identify patients who should receive immediate postoperative therapy from the patients who can wait for recurrence prior to starting medications. All patients, regardless of their risk for recurrence, are advised to undergo a colonoscopy at 6 to 12 months after surgery to evaluate for endoscopic evidence of Crohn's disease. Further management of patients depends on symptoms and the presence or absence of endoscopic recurrence.

  8. Recurrent stroke predictors differ in medically treated patients with pathogenic vs. other PFOs.

    PubMed

    Thaler, David E; Ruthazer, Robin; Weimar, Christian; Mas, Jean-Louis; Serena, Joaquín; Di Angelantonio, Emanuele; Papetti, Federica; Homma, Shunichi; Mattle, Heinrich P; Nedeltchev, Krassen; Mono, Marie-Luise; Jaigobin, Cheryl; Michel, Patrik; Elkind, Mitchell S V; Di Tullio, Marco R; Lutz, Jennifer S; Griffith, John; Kent, David M

    2014-07-15

    To examine predictors of stroke recurrence in patients with a high vs a low likelihood of having an incidental patent foramen ovale (PFO) as defined by the Risk of Paradoxical Embolism (RoPE) score. Patients in the RoPE database with cryptogenic stroke (CS) and PFO were classified as having a probable PFO-related stroke (RoPE score of >6, n = 647) and others (RoPE score of ≤6 points, n = 677). We tested 15 clinical, 5 radiologic, and 3 echocardiographic variables for associations with stroke recurrence using Cox survival models with component database as a stratification factor. An interaction with RoPE score was checked for the variables that were significant. Follow-up was available for 92%, 79%, and 57% at 1, 2, and 3 years. Overall, a higher recurrence risk was associated with an index TIA. For all other predictors, effects were significantly different in the 2 RoPE score categories. For the low RoPE score group, but not the high RoPE score group, older age and antiplatelet (vs warfarin) treatment predicted recurrence. Conversely, echocardiographic features (septal hypermobility and a small shunt) and a prior (clinical) stroke/TIA were significant predictors in the high but not low RoPE score group. Predictors of recurrence differ when PFO relatedness is classified by the RoPE score, suggesting that patients with CS and PFO form a heterogeneous group with different stroke mechanisms. Echocardiographic features were only associated with recurrence in the high RoPE score group. © 2014 American Academy of Neurology.

  9. Carotid Plaque Hemorrhage on Magnetic Resonance Imaging Strongly Predicts Recurrent Ischemia and Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Hosseini, Akram A; Kandiyil, Neghal; MacSweeney, Shane T S; Altaf, Nishath; Auer, Dorothee P

    2013-01-01

    Objective There is a recognized need to improve selection of patients with carotid artery stenosis for carotid endarterectomy (CEA). We assessed the value of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-defined carotid plaque hemorrhage (MRIPH) to predict recurrent ipsilateral cerebral ischemic events, and stroke in symptomatic carotid stenosis. Methods One hundred seventy-nine symptomatic patients with ≥50% stenosis were prospectively recruited, underwent carotid MRI, and were clinically followed up until CEA, death, or ischemic event. MRIPH was diagnosed if the plaque signal intensity was >150% that of the adjacent muscle. Event-free survival analysis was done using Kaplan–Meier plots and Cox regression models controlling for known vascular risk factors. We also undertook a meta-analysis of reported data on MRIPH and recurrent events. Results One hundred fourteen patients (63.7%) showed MRIPH, suffering 92% (57 of 62) of all recurrent ipsilateral events and all but 1 (25 of 26) future strokes. Patients without MRIPH had an estimated annual absolute stroke risk of only 0.6%. Cox multivariate regression analysis proved MRIPH as a strong predictor of recurrent ischemic events (hazard ratio [HR] = 12.0, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 4.8–30.1, p < 0.001) and stroke alone (HR = 35.0, 95% CI = 4.7–261.6, p = 0.001). Meta-analysis of published data confirmed this association between MRIPH and recurrent cerebral ischemic events in symptomatic carotid artery stenosis (odds ratio = 12.2, 95% CI = 5.5–27.1, p < 0.00001). Interpretation MRIPH independently and strongly predicts recurrent ipsilateral ischemic events, and stroke alone, in symptomatic ≥50% carotid artery stenosis. The very low stroke risk in patients without MRIPH puts into question current risk–benefit assessment for CEA in this subgroup. ANN NEUROL 2013;73:774–784 PMID:23463579

  10. Recurrent Embolic Strokes of Undetermined Source in a Patient with Extreme Lipoprotein(a) Levels.

    PubMed

    Bulwa, Zachary; Kim, Audrey; Singh, Karandeep; Kantorovich, Alexander; Suhail, Faten

    2016-01-01

    Lipoprotein(a) is a plasma lipoprotein and known cardiovascular risk factor, most recently implicated in the development of high-risk carotid atherosclerotic plaques without significant carotid stenosis. We present a case of a young African-American female with recurrent embolic strokes of undetermined source. After our thorough investigation, we identified the link between a small, irregular plaque in the right internal carotid artery, and an extremely elevated plasma level of lipoprotein(a) as the source of her embolic strokes.

  11. Hypertensive patients using thiazide diuretics as primary stroke prevention make better functional outcome after ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Shih, Hong-Mo; Lin, Wei Chun; Wang, Cheng-Hsien; Lin, Leng-Chieh

    2014-10-01

    Thiazides have been used for the control of blood pressure and primary prevention of ischemic stroke. No previous studies have assessed the influence of thiazides on functional prognosis after ischemic stroke. Demographics, prestroke conditions, poststroke National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale score, and clinical and laboratory parameters were prospectively registered in 216 Taiwanese patients. One hundred forty patients who completed follow-up 3 months after experiencing ischemic stroke were assessed with the modified Rankin scale as functional prognoses. Twenty-one patients used thiazide to control hypertension before experiencing ischemic stroke. No differences of stroke subtypes and comorbidities before stroke were observed between the 2 groups. The emergency department National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale was lesser among thiazide users (4 [2-7] versus 6 [4-16], P = .02). Among 140 patients who completed follow-up in 90 days, thiazide users had more favorable functional status (modified Rankin scale ≤2: 42.4% versus 26.9%, P = .02, odds ratio 3.34, 95%, confidence interval .130-.862). Hypertensive patients treated with thiazides long term had a lesser severity of stroke and better functional outcomes after ischemic stroke. Copyright © 2014 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Treatment for the secondary prevention of stroke in older patients: the influence of dementia status.

    PubMed

    Moroney, J T; Tseng, C L; Paik, M C; Mohr, J P; Desmond, D W

    1999-07-01

    To investigate the influence of dementia status on treatment for the secondary prevention of stroke in older patients. Based on patient examinations and medical record review, we investigated the frequency of aspirin and/or warfarin use at hospital discharge for the prevention of recurrent stroke in older patients hospitalized with acute ischemic stroke. A large academic medical center. A cohort of 272 patients, mean age 72.1 +/- 8.5 years. We performed neurologic examinations and reviewed medical records to investigate the effects of a clinical diagnosis of dementia and other potentially relevant factors on treatment with aspirin or warfarin at hospital discharge. Thirty-one patients (11.4%) were not prescribed aspirin or warfarin at hospital discharge. Logistic regression determined that dementia (odds ratio (OR) = 2.57, 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.04-6.30) was a significant independent determinant of nontreatment with aspirin or warfarin, adjusting for abnormal gait (OR = 2.01, CI, .88-4.59); discharge to a nursing home or other institutional residence (OR = 2.55, CI, .83-7.81); cardiac disease (OR = .39, CI, .16-.95); cortical infarct location (OR = .45, CI, .18-1.10); male sex (OR = .47, CI, .20-1.15); age 80+ (OR = 1.14, CI, .46-2.82) and age 70-79 (OR = .96, CI, .32-2.88) versus age 60-69. Our results suggest that dementia is a significant independent determinant of nontreatment with aspirin or warfarin when otherwise indicated for the prevention of recurrent stroke. The underutilization of aspirin and warfarin in older stroke patients with dementia may be a modifiable basis for their increased risk of recurrence and death.

  13. Antiplatelet therapy for preventing stroke in patients with chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Kim, Suk Jae; Bang, Oh Young

    2013-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD), defined as reduced glomerular filtration rate and/or proteinuria, is a serious worldwide health problem. The incidence and prevalence of CKD are increasing with age, and patients with CKD are a population at very high risk for developing stroke. CKD may increase the risk for incident stroke independent of conventional stroke risk factors. A common pathological process including anemia, homocysteine, nitric oxide, oxidative stress, inflammation, and conditions promoting coagulation may be related to the development of stroke in the course of CKD. CKD can also serve as a marker of brain injury, because the cerebral microvascular system has similar hemodynamic features with the vascular beds of the kidney. CKD has been linked with markers of cerebral small artery disease including white matter lesions, lacunar infarctions, and cerebral microbleeds. CKD has been implicated with neurological deterioration during hospitalization, poor functional outcome, and hemorrhagic transformation in patients with acute stroke. Recurrence of stroke may also be higher in CKD patients compared with those having normal kidney function. However, there have been no specific recommendations for antiplatelet therapy in patients with ischemic stroke plus CKD. As CKD patients have distinct characteristics including high bleeding complications and poor response to antiplatelet agents, selecting and adjusting platelet aggregation inhibitors should be individualized. In addition, it should be noted that aspirin may aggravate renal dysfunction. Phosphodiesterase inhibitors restore endothelial dysfunction and may serve as a target for preventing stroke in CKD patients. Aside from antiplatelet therapy, other treatments including lipid control, blood pressure lowering, and renal transplantation are also important. Further studies are warranted for optimal treatment in stroke prevention in CKD patients.

  14. Carotid Web (Intimal Fibromuscular Dysplasia) Has High Stroke Recurrence Risk and Is Amenable to Stenting.

    PubMed

    Haussen, Diogo C; Grossberg, Jonathan A; Bouslama, Mehdi; Pradilla, Gustavo; Belagaje, Samir; Bianchi, Nicolas; Allen, Jason W; Frankel, Michael; Nogueira, Raul G

    2017-10-10

    Carotid webs have been increasingly recognized as a cause of recurrent stroke, but evidence remains scarce. We aim to report the clinical outcomes and first series of carotid stenting in a cohort of patients with strokes from symptomatic carotid webs. Prospective and consecutive data of patients <65 years old with cryptogenic stroke admitted within September 2014 to May 2017. Carotid web was defined by a shelf-like/linear filling defect in the posterior internal carotid artery bulb by computed tomographic angiography. Twenty-four patients were identified (91.6% strokes/8.4% transient ischemic attacks [TIAs]). Median age was 46 (41-59) years, 61% were female, and 75% were black. Median National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale score was 10.5 (3.0-16.0) and ASPECTS (Alberta Stroke Program Early CT Score) was 8 (7-8). There were no parenchymal hemorrhages, and 96% of patients were independent at 3 months. All webs caused <50% stenosis. In patients with bilateral webs (58%), median ipsilateral web length was larger than contralateral (3.1 [3.0-4.5] mm versus 2.6 [1.85-2.9] mm; P=0.01), respectively. Twenty-nine percent of patients had thrombus superimposed on the symptomatic carotid web. A recurrent stroke/TIA involving the territory of the previously symptomatic web occurred in 7 (32%; 6 strokes/1 TIA) patients: 3 <1 week, 2 1 year of follow-up. Two recurrences occurred on dual antiplatelet therapy, 3 on antiplatelet monotherapy, 1 within 24 hours of thrombolysis, and 1 off antithrombotics. Median follow-up was 12.2 (8.0-18.0) months. Sixteen (66%) patients were stented at a median 12.2 (7.0-18.7) days after stroke with no periprocedural complications. No recurrent strokes/TIAs occurred in stented individuals (median follow-up of 4 [2.4-12.0] months). Carotid web is associated with high recurrent stroke/TIA risk, despite antithrombotic use, and is amenable to carotid stenting. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  15. Recurrent Stroke with Rapid Development of Intracranial Stenoses in Polycythemia Vera.

    PubMed

    Crespo, Ane M; Abraira, Laura; Guanyabens, Nicolau; Millán, Mónica; Munuera, Josep; Dávalos, Antoni; López-Cancio, Elena

    2016-04-01

    Polycythemia vera (PV) is a blood disorder in which the first expression may be an ischemic stroke. Stroke mechanism in PV is usually attributed to a hypercoagulability state and blood stasis. We report a case of a patient with PV presenting with recurrent ischemic stroke associated with the development of large intracranial stenosis in a period of 1 month. Stenosis was associated with microembolic signals detected by transcranial Doppler. One year later and after hematocrit control, stenosis persisted but microembolic signals disappeared. We discuss similar reports in the literature and the possible pathophysiological mechanism of large-vessel damage in these patients.

  16. Early Recurrence and Cerebral Bleeding in Patients With Acute Ischemic Stroke and Atrial Fibrillation: Effect of Anticoagulation and Its Timing: The RAF Study.

    PubMed

    Paciaroni, Maurizio; Agnelli, Giancarlo; Falocci, Nicola; Caso, Valeria; Becattini, Cecilia; Marcheselli, Simona; Rueckert, Christina; Pezzini, Alessandro; Poli, Loris; Padovani, Alessandro; Csiba, Laszló; Szabó, Lilla; Sohn, Sung-Il; Tassinari, Tiziana; Abdul-Rahim, Azmil H; Michel, Patrik; Cordier, Maria; Vanacker, Peter; Remillard, Suzette; Alberti, Andrea; Venti, Michele; Scoditti, Umberto; Denti, Licia; Orlandi, Giovanni; Chiti, Alberto; Gialdini, Gino; Bovi, Paolo; Carletti, Monica; Rigatelli, Alberto; Putaala, Jukka; Tatlisumak, Turgut; Masotti, Luca; Lorenzini, Gianni; Tassi, Rossana; Guideri, Francesca; Martini, Giuseppe; Tsivgoulis, Georgios; Vadikolias, Kostantinos; Liantinioti, Chrissoula; Corea, Francesco; Del Sette, Massimo; Ageno, Walter; De Lodovici, Maria Luisa; Bono, Giorgio; Baldi, Antonio; D'Anna, Sebastiano; Sacco, Simona; Carolei, Antonio; Tiseo, Cindy; Acciarresi, Monica; D'Amore, Cataldo; Imberti, Davide; Zabzuni, Dorjan; Doronin, Boris; Volodina, Vera; Consoli, Domenico; Galati, Franco; Pieroni, Alessio; Toni, Danilo; Monaco, Serena; Baronello, Mario Maimone; Barlinn, Kristian; Pallesen, Lars-Peder; Kepplinger, Jessica; Bodechtel, Ulf; Gerber, Johannes; Deleu, Dirk; Melikyan, Gayane; Ibrahim, Faisal; Akhtar, Naveed; Mosconi, Maria Giulia; Bubba, Valentina; Silvestri, Ilenia; Lees, Kennedy R

    2015-08-01

    each independently led to a greater risk of recurrence and bleedings. Also, data showed that the best time for initiating anticoagulation treatment for secondary stroke prevention is 4 to 14 days from stroke onset. Moreover, patients treated with oral anticoagulants alone had better outcomes compared with patients treated with low molecular weight heparins alone or before oral anticoagulants. © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.

  17. Risk of Recurrent Neurologic Stroke or Transient Ischemic Attack in Patients with Cryptogenic Stroke and Intrapulmonary Shunt.

    PubMed

    Sinha, Rahul S; Hussain, Zeeshan; Bhatia, Nirmanmoh; Stoddard, Marcus F

    2016-02-01

    Cardio-embolic phenomenon is believed to underlie a significant proportion of cryptogenic strokes. We recently showed that intrapulmonary shunt (IPS) was associated with cryptogenic stroke and transient ischemic attack (TIA). We hypothesized that patients with prior cryptogenic stroke or TIA that had an IPS were at a higher risk for recurrent ischemic events. The population included subjects with cryptogenic cerebrovascular accident (CVA) or TIA. Inclusion criteria were age ≥18 years, sinus rhythm, and clinically indicated transesophageal echocardiography (TEE). Exclusion criteria were hemorrhagic CVA, septal defect, and patent foramen. Patients were followed from index TEE. Of 71 patients, 8 were lost to follow-up. A total of 23 patients had and 40 were without IPS. Average follow-up duration was 38.3 ± 19.2 months. Groups were similar at baseline. There was no significant difference in the recurrence of ischemic CVA or TIA in the IPS versus non-IPS groups (0% vs. 7.5%; P = NS). There was no difference between the incidence of hemorrhagic CVA in the IPS and non-IPS groups (4.3% vs. 5.0%; P = NS). The proportion of patients on warfarin in the IPS group was significantly higher compared to the non-IPS group (17.4% vs. 0%; P < 0.05). Patients with IPS and cryptogenic stroke or TIA did not have a higher recurrence of ischemic cerebral events. Warfarin was significantly higher at follow-up in the IPS compared to the non-IPS group, which may explain these findings. A study randomizing patients with IPS and cryptogenic stroke or TIA to warfarin or no warfarin would be of great interest. © 2015, Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Prevention strategies for cardioembolic stroke: present and future perspectives.

    PubMed

    Giacalone, Giacomo; Abbas, Mohammed Abballa; Corea, Francesco

    2010-06-15

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common cause of cardioembolism. An update on secondary prevention strategies, used to protect patients from the risk of stroke in many common cardiac conditions, is presented in the paper. The main line of actions of stroke prevention in cardioembolism is mostly connected with antithrombotic drugs, but also other, more invasive, techniques are quickly emerging. Also the classic pharmacological prevention with coumarins may soon be overcome by new generation anticoagulants. Is an aggressive treatment of Patent Foramen Ovale (PFO) always recommended? One of the main challenges of the future years will be to understand competitiveness between old and new preventive strategies.

  19. Apixaban for the prevention of stroke in atrial fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Littrell, Rachel; Flaker, Greg

    2012-02-01

    Until recently, pharmaceutical options for stroke prevention in atrial fibrillation were restricted to aspirin or vitamin K antagonist therapy. In recent years development has been underway for alternatives. Apixaban, a direct Factor Xa inhibitor, is orally dosed, target selective and has few known drug or food interactions. As such, it is a member of a new generation of anticoagulants expected to revolutionize the way we approach anticoagulation for stroke prevention in atrial fibrillation. Apixaban has been studied in Phase II and Phase III trials for a variety of indications. The AVERROES trial established apixaban as superior to aspirin for stroke reduction in patients with atrial fibrillation for whom vitamin K antagonist therapy is unsuitable. The recent ARISTOTLE trial found apixaban to be superior to warfarin for stroke prevention in a wide range of patients with atrial fibrillation, with significantly lower bleeding risk, and lower risk of all-cause mortality.

  20. Diabetes - preventing heart attack and stroke

    MedlinePlus

    Diabetes complications - heart; Coronary artery disease - diabetes; CAD - diabetes; Cerebrovascular disease - diabetes ... People with diabetes have a higher chance of having heart attacks and strokes. Smoking and having high blood pressure and high ...

  1. Probiotics in the prevention of recurrences of bacterial vaginosis.

    PubMed

    Parma, Marta; Stella Vanni, Valeria; Bertini, Marco; Candiani, Massimo

    2014-01-01

    Bacterial vaginosis (BV) is the most common cause of vaginal discharge in women during their fertile years. BV prevalence runs from 10%-50%, in part due to the high rate of recurrence after standard treatment. Women with BV may experience a decreased quality of life and are at risk of serious obstetric complications. Limited data are available regarding optimal management strategies for preventing recurrence of BV, emphasizing the importance of the availability of a comprehensive source of scientific information and therapeutic strategies. The aim of this study was to evaluate the frequency and clinical relevance of the recurrence of BV and to collect and review data about prophylactic approaches based on probiotic supplementation with lactobacilli (LB). A review of the literature was performed, based on combinations of the following keywords: bacterial vaginosis, bacterial vaginosis recurrences, vaginal discharge, vaginal flora, LB, Lactobacillus rhamnosus, and probiotic supplementation. The studies were evaluated in terms of the cure rates for BV, incidence of recurrence of BV, decrease in patients' discomfort, maintenance of a healthy vaginal recolonization, and occurrence of complications and side effects. Recurrence of BV after standard therapy is a relevant clinical problem, with an incidence of 30%-40% and a significant impact on women's quality of life and on their risk of infrequent but serious obstetric complications. Therefore, finding effective prophylactic therapies to avoid or decrease the recurrence of BV is important. Even when they are effective, typical antibacterial regimens for long-term maintenance are known to have side effects. Different schemes of treatment with exogenous LB have proven effective in preventing recurrence of BV, even in patients at high risk for relapse. Probiotic supplementation with vaginal LB proved to be crucial in hindering bacteria growth after antibiotic therapy; therefore this intervention may be considered a new

  2. Can Blood Pressure Be Lowered Safely in Older Adults with Lacunar Stroke? The Secondary Prevention of Small Subcortical Strokes Study Experience

    PubMed Central

    White, Carole L.; Szychowski, Jeff M.; Pergola, Pablo E.; Field, Thalia S.; Talbert, Robert; Lau, Helena; Peri, Kalyani; Benavente, Oscar R.

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES To determine safety and tolerability of lowering blood pressure in older adults with lacunar stroke. DESIGN Cohort study. SETTING The Secondary Prevention of Small Subcortical Strokes (SPS3) Trial, which compared the efficacy of two systolic blood pressure (SBP) targets (<130 mmHg and 130–149 mmHg) for secondary stroke prevention. PARTICIPANTS Of 3,020 SPS3 participants, 494 aged 75 and older at baseline were used in these analyses. MEASUREMENTS Rates of side effects related to lowering SBP and clinical outcomes, including stroke recurrence and vascular death, were examined. RESULTS Older participants achieved SBP levels similar to those of younger participants (mean SBP of 125 mmHg and 137 mmHg in lower and higher SBP target groups, respectively). At least once during the approximately 3.5 years of follow-up, 21% reported dizziness, and 15% reported lightheadedness when standing; the only significant difference between the younger and older groups was unsteadiness when standing (23% vs 32% respectively, P < .001). There was no difference according to treatment group. In younger adults, recurrent stroke was less likely in the lower than the higher SBP group (hazard ratio (HR) = 0.77, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 0.59–1.01) but not in older participants (HR = 1.01, 95% CI = 0.59– 1.73), although the interaction was not significant (P = .39). The lower SBP target was associated with a significant reduction in vascular death in older participants (HR = 0.42, 95% CI = 0.18–0.98), with a significant interaction between age and SBP group (P = .049). CONCLUSION Except for unsteadiness when standing, there was no difference according to age in individuals with lacunar stroke with respect to side effects potentially related to lowering blood pressure. Although the lower SBP target was not associated with lower likelihood of recurrent stroke, these exploratory analyses suggested a possible benefit related to vascular death. PMID:25850462

  3. Antiplatelet therapy for secondary prevention of noncardioembolic ischemic stroke: a critical review.

    PubMed

    O'Donnell, Martin J; Hankey, Graeme J; Eikelboom, John W

    2008-05-01

    For patients with ischemic stroke or transient ischemic attack caused by atherothromboembolism, immediate and long-term aspirin reduces the relative risk of recurrent stroke, MI, and death attributable to vascular causes. Oral anticoagulation is not more effective than aspirin. Long-term clopidogrel reduces the relative risk of stroke, MI, or vascular death by about 9% (0.3% to 16.5%) compared with aspirin. Any long-term benefits of clopidogrel combined with aspirin, compared with aspirin or clopidogrel alone, appear to be offset by increased major bleeding. The combination of aspirin and extended-release dipyridamole reduces the relative odds of stroke, MI, or vascular death by about 18% (odds ratio 0.82, 0.74 to 0.91) compared with aspirin alone without causing more bleeding. Cilostazole reduces the risk of stroke, MI, or vascular death by 39% compared to placebo. A large clinical trial comparing clopidogrel with the combination of aspirin and dipyridamole, in >20 000 patients with recent (<120 days) atherothrombotic ischemic stroke, is expected to report in 2008. Emerging antiplatelet therapies presently being evaluated for secondary prevention of atherothromboembolism include other P(2)Y(12) ADP receptor antagonists (prasugrel, cangrelor, AZD 6140), thromboxane receptor antagonists (eg, S18886 - terutroban), and thrombin receptor (PAR-1) antagonists (eg, SCH530348).

  4. Socioeconomic Status and the Risk of Stroke Recurrence: Persisting Gaps Observed in a Nationwide Swedish Study 2001 to 2012.

    PubMed

    Pennlert, Johanna; Asplund, Kjell; Glader, Eva-Lotta; Norrving, Bo; Eriksson, Marie

    2017-06-01

    This nationwide observational study aimed to investigate how socioeconomic status is associated with risk of stroke recurrence and how possible associations change over time. This study included 168 295 patients, previously independent in activities of daily living, with a first-ever stroke in the Swedish Stroke Register (Riksstroke) 2001 to 2012. Riksstroke was linked with Statistics Sweden as to add individual information on education and income. Subdistribution hazard regression was used to analyze time from 28 days after first stroke to stroke recurrence, accounting for the competing risk of other causes of death. Median time of follow-up was 3.0 years. During follow-up, 23 560 patients had a first recurrent stroke, and 53 867 died from other causes. The estimated cumulative incidence of stroke recurrence was 5.3% at 1 year, and 14.3% at 5 years. Corresponding incidence for other deaths were 10.3% and 30.2%. Higher education and income were associated with a reduced risk of stroke recurrence. After adjusting for confounding variables, university versus primary school education returned a hazard ratio of 0.902; 95% confidence interval, 0.864 to 0.942, and the highest versus the lowest income tertile a hazard ratio of 0.955; 95% confidence interval, 0.922 to 0.989. The risk of stroke recurrence decreased during the study period, but the inverse effect of socioeconomic status on risk of recurrence did not change significantly. Despite a declining risk of stroke recurrence over time, the differences in recurrence risk between different socioeconomic groups remained at a similar level in Sweden during 2001 to 2012. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  5. Left Atrial Size and Long-Term Risk of Recurrent Stroke After Acute Ischemic Stroke in Patients With Nonvalvular Atrial Fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Ogata, Toshiyasu; Matsuo, Ryu; Kiyuna, Fumi; Hata, Jun; Ago, Tetsuro; Tsuboi, Yoshio; Kitazono, Takanari; Kamouchi, Masahiro

    2017-08-15

    Among patients with ischemic stroke and atrial fibrillation, which ones are at high risk of recurrent stroke is unclear. This study aimed to determine whether left atrial size was associated with long-term risk of stroke recurrence in patients with nonvalvular atrial fibrillation. In this multicenter prospective cohort study, nonvalvular atrial fibrillation patients hospitalized for acute ischemic stroke were enrolled and followed up after discharge. Indexed-left atrial diameter was obtained by dividing left atrial diameter by body surface area. Cause-specific and subdistribution hazard ratios of recurrent stroke were estimated by Cox proportional hazards and Fine-Gray models, respectively. Risk prediction was evaluated by integrated discrimination improvement and net reclassification improvement. In total, 1611 patients (77.8±10.2 [mean±SD] years, 44.5% female) were included. During follow-up for 2.40±1.63 (mean±SD) years, 251 patients had recurrent stroke and 514 patients died. An increased indexed-left atrial diameter (per 1 cm/m(2)) was significantly associated with elevated risk of stroke recurrence (hazard ratio 1.60, 95% CI 1.30-1.98). The association was maintained when death was regarded as the competing risk and in 1464 patients who were treated with anticoagulants (hazard ratio 1.59, 95% CI 1.27-2.00). Risk prediction for recurrent stroke was significantly improved by adding indexed-left atrial diameter to the baseline model composed of the factors in the CHADS2 score or those in the CHA2DS2-VASc score. These findings suggest that left atrial enlargement is associated with an increased risk of recurrent stroke in nonvalvular atrial fibrillation patients with ischemic stroke. © 2017 The Authors. Published on behalf of the American Heart Association, Inc., by Wiley.

  6. Atrial ectopic activity in cryptogenic ischemic stroke and TIA: a risk factor for recurrence.

    PubMed

    Pinho, João; Braga, Carlos Galvão; Rocha, Sofia; Santos, Ana Filipa; Gomes, André; Cabreiro, Ana; Magalhães, Sónia; Ferreira, Carla

    2015-02-01

    To characterize atrial ectopic activity in patients with cryptogenic ischemic stroke (CIS) or transient ischemic attack (TIA) and determine its prognostic significance. Retrospective cohort study, in which 184 patients with CIS or TIA who had performed 24-hour Holter electrocardiogram were included. The median follow-up was 27.5 months. Baseline clinical and imagiologic characteristics, etiologic investigation results, and ischemic stroke and TIA recurrences information were collected. Number of atrial premature complexes (APCs) per hour was categorized as less than 10 APCs/hour, 10-30 APCs/hour, and more than 30 APCs/hour. Most of the patients had less than 10 APCs/hour (82.6%), 8.2% had 10-30 APCs/hour, and 9.2% had more than 30 APCs/hour. Patients with more than 30 APCs/hour had a greater median left atrium diameter than patients with 30 APCs/hour or less (42 mm vs. 38 mm; 95% confidence interval [CI], .50-7.00; P = .003). Annual recurrence rate of CIS or TIA was 2.9% in patients with less than 10 APCs/hour, 11.0% in 10-30 APCs/hour, and 22.6% in more than 30 APCs/hour (P = .001). More than 30 APCs/hour were independently associated with recurrence risk in multivariate survival analysis (hazard ratio, 3.40; 95% CI, 1.12-10.32; P = .030). In patients with CIS or TIA, frequent atrial ectopic activity (>30 APCs/h) was independently associated with increased risk of stroke or TIA recurrence. Further studies need to validate frequent atrial ectopic activity as a risk factor for recurrence in cryptogenic stroke and confirm its role as a predictor of occult atrial fibrillation. Copyright © 2015 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. The Alberta Stroke Prevention in TIAs and mild strokes (ASPIRE) intervention: rationale and design for evaluating the implementation of a province-wide TIA triaging system.

    PubMed

    Jeerakathil, Thomas; Shuaib, Ashfaq; Majumdar, Sumit R; Demchuk, Andrew M; Butcher, Kenneth S; Watson, Tim J; Dean, Naeem; Gordon, Deb; Edmond, Cathy; Coutts, Shelagh B

    2014-10-01

    Stroke risk after transient ischaemic attack is high and, it is a challenge worldwide to provide urgent assessment and preventive services to entire populations. To determine whether a province-wide transient ischaemic attack Triaging algorithm and transient ischaemic attack hotline (the Alberta Stroke Prevention in transient ischaemic attacks and mild strokes intervention) can reduce the rate of stroke recurrence following transient ischaemic attack across the population of Alberta, Canada (population 3·7 million, 90-day rate of post-stroke transient ischaemic attack currently 9·5%). It also seeks to improve upon current transient ischaemic attack triaging rules by incorporating time from symptom onset as a predictive variable. The transient ischaemic attack algorithm and hotline were developed with a broad consensus of clinicians, patients, policy-makers, and researchers and based on local adaptation of the work of others and research and insights developed within the province. Because neither patient-level nor region-level randomization was possible, we conducted a quasi-experimental design examining changes in the post-transient ischaemic attack rate of stroke recurrence before and after the 15-month implementation period using an interrupted time-series regression analysis. The design controls for changes in case-mix, co-interventions, and secular trends. A prospective transient ischaemic attack cohort will also be concurrently created with telephone follow-up at seven-days and 90 days as well as passive follow-up over the longer term using linkages to provincial healthcare administrative databases. The primary outcome measure is the change in recurrence rate of stroke following transient ischaemic attack at seven-days and 90 days, comparing a period of two-years before vs. two-years after the intervention is implemented. All cases of recurrent stroke will be validated. Secondary outcomes include functional status, hospitalizations, morbidity, and mortality

  8. Final 2 year results of the vascular imaging of acute stroke for identifying predictors of clinical outcome and recurrent ischemic eveNts (VISION) study

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Among patients with ischemic stroke, little attention has been paid to differentiation between stroke progression and recurrence. We assessed the role of MR imaging in predicting stroke progression, recurrent stroke, and death within 2 years of symptom onset. Methods Ischemic stroke or TIA patients were prospectively enrolled. They were examined within 12 hours and had a stroke MR completed within 24 hours of symptom onset. Patients were closely followed neurologically and examined if there was any deterioration in neurological status. Relationships between baseline clinical and imaging factors and outcomes were assessed. We also examined whether baseline stroke/TIA severity (NIHSS 0-5 versus NIHSS > 5) modified these relationships. Results A total of 334 patients were enrolled. The overall rates of progression, 2-year recurrence, and 2-year death were 8.7%, 8.0%, and 6.6%, respectively. Event rates were similar among patients with mild compared to more severe strokes: 8.3% versus 9.5% (p = 0.73) for progression, and 7.3% versus 9.9% (p = 0.59) for recurrence. The effect of baseline glucose > 8 mmol/l was consistent in predicting stroke progression, recurrent stroke and death, regardless of baseline stroke severity. In multivariable analyses, DWI lesion and intracranial occlusion predicted stroke progression only in the minor stroke/TIA group; symptomatic Internal Carotid Artery (ICA) stenosis predicted stroke recurrence only in the minor stroke/TIA group. Conclusions In a prospective study with early assessment and imaging we have found that stroke progression is different than stroke recurrence. Different imaging factors predict stroke progression versus stroke recurrence. Baseline hyperglycemia, a potentially modifiable factor, consistently predicted all three outcomes (stroke progression, recurrent stroke or death) regardless of baseline stroke severity. PMID:21513559

  9. Barriers to medication adherence for the secondary prevention of stroke: a qualitative interview study in primary care.

    PubMed

    Jamison, James; Graffy, Jonathan; Mullis, Ricky; Mant, Jonathan; Sutton, Stephen

    2016-08-01

    Medications are highly effective at reducing risk of recurrent stroke, but success is influenced by adherence to treatment. Among survivors of stroke and transient ischaemic attack (TIA), adherence to medication is known to be suboptimal. To identify and report barriers to medication adherence for the secondary prevention of stroke/TIA. A qualitative interview study was conducted within general practice surgeries in the East of England, UK. Patients were approached by letter and invited to take part in a qualitative research study. Semi-structured interviews were undertaken with survivors of stroke, caregivers, and GPs to explore their perspectives and views around secondary prevention and perceived barriers to medication adherence. Key themes were identified using a grounded theory approach. Verbatim quotes describing the themes are presented here. In total, 28 survivors of stroke, including 14 accompanying caregivers and five GPs, were interviewed. Two key themes were identified. Patient level barriers included ability to self-care, the importance people attach to a stroke event, and knowledge of stroke and medication. Medication level barriers included beliefs about medication and beliefs about how pills work, medication routines, changing medications, and regimen complexity and burden of treatment. Patients who have had a stroke are faced with multiple barriers to taking secondary prevention medications in UK general practice. This research suggests that a collaborative approach between caregivers, survivors, and healthcare professionals is needed to address these barriers and facilitate medication-taking behaviour. © British Journal of General Practice 2016.

  10. Barriers to medication adherence for the secondary prevention of stroke: a qualitative interview study in primary care

    PubMed Central

    Jamison, James; Graffy, Jonathan; Mullis, Ricky; Mant, Jonathan; Sutton, Stephen

    2016-01-01

    Background Medications are highly effective at reducing risk of recurrent stroke, but success is influenced by adherence to treatment. Among survivors of stroke and transient ischaemic attack (TIA), adherence to medication is known to be suboptimal. Aim To identify and report barriers to medication adherence for the secondary prevention of stroke/TIA. Design and setting A qualitative interview study was conducted within general practice surgeries in the East of England, UK. Method Patients were approached by letter and invited to take part in a qualitative research study. Semi-structured interviews were undertaken with survivors of stroke, caregivers, and GPs to explore their perspectives and views around secondary prevention and perceived barriers to medication adherence. Key themes were identified using a grounded theory approach. Verbatim quotes describing the themes are presented here. Results In total, 28 survivors of stroke, including 14 accompanying caregivers and five GPs, were interviewed. Two key themes were identified. Patient level barriers included ability to self-care, the importance people attach to a stroke event, and knowledge of stroke and medication. Medication level barriers included beliefs about medication and beliefs about how pills work, medication routines, changing medications, and regimen complexity and burden of treatment. Conclusion Patients who have had a stroke are faced with multiple barriers to taking secondary prevention medications in UK general practice. This research suggests that a collaborative approach between caregivers, survivors, and healthcare professionals is needed to address these barriers and facilitate medication-taking behaviour. PMID:27215572

  11. Prevention and Treatment of Recurrent Hepatitis B after Liver Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Maiwall, Rakhi; Kumar, Manoj

    2016-01-01

    Chronic hepatitis B is a global health problem that leads to development of various complications, such as cirrhosis, liver cancer, and liver failure requiring liver transplantation. The recurrence of hepatitis B virus (HBV) post-liver transplantation is a major cause of allograft dysfunction, cirrhosis of the allograft, and graft failure. Patients with high viral load at the time of transplantation, hepatitis B e antigen (HBeAg) positivity, or those with a history of anti-viral drug resistance are considered as high-risk for recurrent HBV post-liver transplantation, while patients with low viral load, including HBeAg negative status, acute liver failure, and hepatitis D virus (HDV) co-infection are considered to be at low-risk for recurrent HBV post-liver transplantation. Antivirals for patients awaiting liver transplantation(LT) cause suppression of HBV replication and reduce the risk of recurrent HBV infection of the allograft and, therefore, all HBV patients with decompensated cirrhosis should be treated with potent antivirals with high genetic barrier to resistance (entecavir or tenofovir) prior to liver transplantation. Prevention of post-liver transplantation recurrence should be done using a combination of hepatitis B immunoglobulin (HBIG) and antivirals in patients at high risk of recurrence. Low dose HBIG, HBIG-free protocols, and monoprophylaxis with high potency antivirals can still be considered in patients at low risk of recurrence. Even, marginal grafts from anti-HBc positive donors can be safely used in hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) negative, preferably in anti-hepatitis B core (HBc)/anti-hepatitis B surface (HBs) positive recipients. In this article, we aim to review the mechanisms and risk factors of HBV recurrence post-LT in addition to the various treatment strategies proposed for the prevention of recurrent HBV infection PMID:27047773

  12. Prevalence of positive diffusion-weighted imaging findings and ischemic stroke recurrence in transient ischemic attack.

    PubMed

    Gon, Yasufumi; Sakaguchi, Manabu; Okazaki, Shuhei; Mochizuki, Hideki; Kitagawa, Kazuo

    2015-05-01

    The relationship between transient ischemic attack (TIA) clinical etiology, positive diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) findings, and stroke recurrence is controversial. This study aimed to clarify the prevalence of positive DWI findings and TIA recurrence in relation to TIA patient characteristics. The subjects were patients admitted to our stroke unit within 7 days after symptom onset between January 2006 and July 2013. We examined DWI findings and TIA recurrence according to etiologic subtypes. We enrolled 139 patients with lacunar TIA (n = 17), atherothrombotic TIA (n = 35), cardioembolic TIA (n = 25), TIA due to other causes (n = 32), or TIA with undetermined etiology (n = 30). The prevalence of positive DWI findings was highest among the cardioembolic TIA patients (56.0%). No association was found between the prevalence of positive DWI findings and symptom duration, motor presence, or ABCD(2) score. Plasma d-dimer level was significantly higher in the DWI-positive group than that in the DWI-negative group (P = .01). The prevalence of TIA recurrence was highest (5 of 35, 14.3%) among the atherothrombotic TIA patients, regardless of positive DWI findings. None of the patients treated with the anticoagulant and antiplatelet combination therapy experienced a recurrence. In contrast, almost all patients with cardioembolic TIA received anticoagulant treatment and none experienced recurrence. The prevalence of positive DWI findings was high among the cardiogenic TIA patients. TIA recurrence was often observed among the atherothrombotic TIA patients treated with antiplatelets. Management of patients with atherothrombotic TIA requires further aggressive antithrombotic strategy. Copyright © 2015 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Clinical outcomes of secondary prevention strategies for young patients with cryptogenic stroke and patent foramen ovale.

    PubMed

    Danese, Alessandra; Stegagno, Chiara; Tomelleri, Giampaolo; Piccoli, Anna; Turri, Giulia; Carletti, Monica; Variola, Andrea; Anselmi, Maurizio; Mazzucco, Sara; Ferrara, Angela; Bovi, Paolo; Micheletti, Nicola; Cappellari, Manuel; Monaco, Salvatore; Vassanelli, Corrado; Ribichini, Flavio

    2017-08-01

    Background The aim of this study was to compare the immediate and long-term clinical outcomes of medical therapy and percutaneous patent foramen ovale (PFO) closure as secondary prevention strategies in patients younger than 55 years of age presenting with cryptogenic stroke and PFO. Methods Between January 2006 and April 2015, all patients with the diagnosis of cryptogenic stroke and PFO were analysed and prospectively followed. Stroke was confirmed in 159 out of 309 patients (51%). In the remaining cases, other neurological conditions were found and therefore excluded from further analysis. Patients received PFO closure or medical therapy on the basis of a pre-specified algorithm. Primary outcome was the assessment of recurrent ischaemic events at follow-up. Results Percutaneous PFO closure was performed in 77 patients (48%) and 82 (52%) were treated medically. Mean follow-up was 51.6 ± 34.8 months. Two ischaemic strokes occurred in the medical group only (2.4% vs 0%; P = 0.16) and no complications related to the invasive procedure were observed. Conclusions The diagnosis of stroke in patients with PFO could be confirmed in 50% of cases only, underlining the importance of a multidisciplinary evaluation of these patients. A very low ischaemic recurrence rate was observed in the medical therapy group, suggesting that a personalized treatment based on a prespecified diagnostic algorithm yields good clinical results irrespective of the treatment modality. Given the low number of recurrences, larger cohorts may be needed to prove significant differences.

  14. Left Atrial Appendage Occlusion for Stroke Prevention.

    PubMed

    Chanda, Arijit; Reilly, John P

    More than 2.3 million adults in the United States have atrial fibrillation (AF), which exposes them to a 5-fold increased risk of stroke. The left atrial appendage (LAA) appears to be the source of thrombus formation in the vast majority of these patients. Anticoagulation significantly reduces the risk of stroke, but often we encounter patients who have absolute or relative contraindication to anticoagulation. Percutaneous LAA exclusion offers an alternative to anticoagulation to decrease the risk of stroke. Three device systems are currently available in the United States. The WATCHMAN® device is the most studied and approved by Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to be used in patients with AF unsuitable for anticoagulation who are at a high risk of stroke. The Amulet® device is currently being used as part of the AMPLATZER® Amulet® LAA Occluder trial, which is a non-inferiority randomized trial comparing the Amulet® to the WATCHMAN® device. The third device in use is the LARIAT®, which is an FDA approved snare and pre-tied stich system. It is used to approximate soft tissue which in this case is the LAA. It is a hybrid system and requires both epicardial and endocardial access. The main obstacle to percutaneous LAA closure is procedural related complications, which can be minimized with optimum operator experience. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Epigenetic impact of curcumin on stroke prevention.

    PubMed

    Kalani, Anuradha; Kamat, Pradip K; Kalani, Komal; Tyagi, Neetu

    2015-04-01

    The epigenetic impact of curcumin in stroke and neurodegenerative disorders is curiosity-arousing. It is derived from Curcuma longa (spice), possesses anti-oxidative, anti-inflammatory, anti-lipidemic, neuro-protective and recently shown to exhibit epigenetic modulatory properties. Epigenetic studies include DNA methylation, histone modifications and RNA-based mechanisms which regulate gene expression without altering nucleotide sequences. Curcumin has been shown to affect cancer by altering epigenetic changes but its role as an epigenetic agent in cerebral stroke has not been much explored. Although curcumin possesses remarkable medicinal properties, the bioavailability of curcumin has limited its success in epigenetic studies and clinical trials. The present review is therefore designed to look into epigenetic mechanisms that could be induced with curcumin during stroke, along with its molecular designing with different moieties that may increase its bioavailability. Curcumin has been shown to be encapsulated in exosomes, nano-vesicles (<200 nm), thereby showing its therapeutic effects in brain diseases. Curcumin delivered through nanoparticles has been shown to be neuroregenerative but the use of nanoparticles in brain has limitations. Hence, curcumin-encapsulated exosomes along with curcumin-primed exosomes (exosomes released by curcumin-treated cells) are much needed to be explored to broadly look into their use as a novel therapy for stroke.

  16. What Is the Future of Stroke Prevention?

    PubMed Central

    Kernan, Walter N.; Launer, Lenore J.; Goldstein, Larry B.

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose The control of stroke risk factors remains challenging. The “polypill” concept represents a novel approach for reducing stroke and cardiovascular risk factors in the entire population. The polypill would include several components and be provided without prescription to all adults of a certain age. Results A polypill aimed at lowering blood pressure and cholesterol levels is estimated to potentially reduce the risk of a first ischemic stroke by 53%; this would translate to about 400 000 fewer strokes each year in the United States alone. Recommending a polypill for the entire older adult population would, however, include many individuals without the multiple risk factors targeted by its components, putting them at risk for drug-related side effects and responsible for the costs of a medication from which they would not derive benefit. Additional arguments for and against the polypill approach are discussed. Conclusions Only clinical trials can provide the evidence needed to determine the usefulness of the polypill approach. Issues related to defining the components of the polypill, evaluating the pharmacodynamics and pharmacokinetics of a multiple-component formulation, and establishing safety and cost-effectiveness when given to large populations, however, are not trivial. PMID:20876501

  17. Treatment Challenges of a Primary Vertebral Artery Aneurysm Causing Recurrent Ischemic Strokes

    PubMed Central

    Peruzzotti-Jametti, Luca; Fanelli, Giovanna; Simionato, Franco; Chiesa, Roberto; Rinaldi, Enrico; Comi, Giancarlo; Sessa, Maria

    2017-01-01

    Background. Extracranial vertebral artery aneurysms are a rare cause of embolic stroke; surgical and endovascular therapy options are debated and long-term complication may occur. Case Report. A 53-year-old man affected by neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) came to our attention for recurrent vertebrobasilar embolic strokes, caused by a primary giant, partially thrombosed, fusiform aneurysm of the left extracranial vertebral artery. The aneurysm was treated by endovascular approach through deposition of Guglielmi Detachable Coils in the proximal segment of the left vertebral artery. Six years later the patient presented stroke recurrence. Cerebral angiography and Color Doppler Ultrasound well characterized the unique hemodynamic condition developed over the years responsible for the new embolic event: the aneurysm had been revascularized from its distal portion by reverse blood flow coming from the patent vertebrobasilar axis. A biphasic Doppler signal in the left vertebral artery revealed a peculiar behavior of the blood flow, alternately directed to the aneurysm and backwards to the basilar artery. Surgical ligation of the distal left vertebral artery and excision of the aneurysm were thus performed. Conclusion. This is the first described case of NF1-associated extracranial vertebral artery aneurysm presenting with recurrent embolic stroke. Complete exclusion of the aneurysm from the blood circulation is advisable to achieve full resolution of the embolic source. PMID:28168068

  18. Canadian Stroke Best Practice Recommendations: secondary prevention of stroke guidelines, update 2014.

    PubMed

    Coutts, Shelagh B; Wein, Theodore H; Lindsay, M Patrice; Buck, Brian; Cote, Robert; Ellis, Paul; Foley, Norine; Hill, Michael D; Jaspers, Sharon; Jin, Albert Y; Kwiatkowski, Brenda; MacPhail, Carolyn; McNamara-Morse, Dana; McMurtry, Michael S; Mysak, Tania; Pipe, Andrew; Silver, Karen; Smith, Eric E; Gubitz, Gord

    2015-04-01

    Every year, approximately 62,000 people with stroke and transient ischemic attack are treated in Canadian hospitals. The 2014 update of the Canadian Secondary Prevention of Stroke guideline is a comprehensive summary of current evidence-based recommendations for clinicians in a range of settings, who provide care to patients following stroke. Notable changes in this 5th edition include an emphasis on treating the highest risk patients who present within 48 h of symptom onset with transient or persistent motor or speech symptoms, who need to be transported to the closest emergency department with capacity for advanced stroke care; a recommendation for brain and vascular imaging (of the intra- and extracranial vessels) to be completed urgently using computed tomography/computed tomography angiography; prolonged cardiac monitoring for patients with suspective cardioembolic stroke but without evidence for atrial fibrillation on electrocardiogram or holter monitoring; and de-emphasizing the need for routine echocardiogram. The Canadian Stroke Best Practice Recommendations include a range of supporting materials such as implementation resources to facilitate the adoption of evidence to practice, and related performance measures to enable monitoring of uptake and effectiveness of the recommendations using a standardized approach. The guidelines further emphasize the need for a systems approach to stroke care, involving an interprofessional team, with access to specialists regardless of patient location, and the need to overcome geographical barriers to ensure equity in access within a universal health-care system. © 2014 World Stroke Organization.

  19. Formal and informal prediction of recurrent stroke and myocardial infarction after stroke: a systematic review and evaluation of clinical prediction models in a new cohort.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Douglas D; Murray, Gordon D; Dennis, Martin; Sudlow, Cathie L M; Whiteley, William N

    2014-04-04

    The objective of this study was to: (1) systematically review the reporting and methods used in the development of clinical prediction models for recurrent stroke or myocardial infarction (MI) after ischemic stroke; (2) to meta-analyze their external performance; and (3) to compare clinical prediction models to informal clinicians' prediction in the Edinburgh Stroke Study (ESS). We searched Medline, EMBASE, reference lists and forward citations of relevant articles from 1980 to 19 April 2013. We included articles which developed multivariable clinical prediction models for the prediction of recurrent stroke and/or MI following ischemic stroke. We extracted information to assess aspects of model development as well as metrics of performance to determine predictive ability. Model quality was assessed against a pre-defined set of criteria. We used random-effects meta-analysis to pool performance metrics. We identified twelve model development studies and eleven evaluation studies. Investigators often did not report effective sample size, regression coefficients, handling of missing data; typically categorized continuous predictors; and used data dependent methods to build models. A meta-analysis of the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUROCC) was possible for the Essen Stroke Risk Score (ESRS) and for the Stroke Prognosis Instrument II (SPI-II); the pooled AUROCCs were 0.60 (95% CI 0.59 to 0.62) and 0.62 (95% CI 0.60 to 0.64), respectively. An evaluation among minor stroke patients in the ESS demonstrated that clinicians discriminated poorly between those with and those without recurrent events and that this was similar to clinical prediction models. The available models for recurrent stroke discriminate poorly between patients with and without a recurrent stroke or MI after stroke. Models had a similar discrimination to informal clinicians' predictions. Formal prediction may be improved by addressing commonly encountered methodological problems.

  20. Formal and informal prediction of recurrent stroke and myocardial infarction after stroke: a systematic review and evaluation of clinical prediction models in a new cohort

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The objective of this study was to: (1) systematically review the reporting and methods used in the development of clinical prediction models for recurrent stroke or myocardial infarction (MI) after ischemic stroke; (2) to meta-analyze their external performance; and (3) to compare clinical prediction models to informal clinicians’ prediction in the Edinburgh Stroke Study (ESS). Methods We searched Medline, EMBASE, reference lists and forward citations of relevant articles from 1980 to 19 April 2013. We included articles which developed multivariable clinical prediction models for the prediction of recurrent stroke and/or MI following ischemic stroke. We extracted information to assess aspects of model development as well as metrics of performance to determine predictive ability. Model quality was assessed against a pre-defined set of criteria. We used random-effects meta-analysis to pool performance metrics. Results We identified twelve model development studies and eleven evaluation studies. Investigators often did not report effective sample size, regression coefficients, handling of missing data; typically categorized continuous predictors; and used data dependent methods to build models. A meta-analysis of the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUROCC) was possible for the Essen Stroke Risk Score (ESRS) and for the Stroke Prognosis Instrument II (SPI-II); the pooled AUROCCs were 0.60 (95% CI 0.59 to 0.62) and 0.62 (95% CI 0.60 to 0.64), respectively. An evaluation among minor stroke patients in the ESS demonstrated that clinicians discriminated poorly between those with and those without recurrent events and that this was similar to clinical prediction models. Conclusions The available models for recurrent stroke discriminate poorly between patients with and without a recurrent stroke or MI after stroke. Models had a similar discrimination to informal clinicians' predictions. Formal prediction may be improved by addressing

  1. Eyeglass frame allergic contact dermatitis: does tacrolimus prevent recurrences?

    PubMed

    Nakada, Tokio; Iijima, Masafumi; Maibach, Howard I

    2005-10-01

    A 35-year-old man developed well-demarcated, oedematous and erosive erythematous lesions on the nasal bridge and retroauricular regions bilaterally. His eyeglass frame was repaired by an optician 2 weeks prior to symptom onset. Patch testing revealed a positive reaction to scrapings of nose pads and temples of the frame in petrolatum. Because the patient did not take our exhortation to change eyeglass frames, we advised him to cover their nose pads and temples with vinyl tape to prevent direct skin contact. Although topical corticosteroid therapy produced clinical resolution temporally, recurrences were not prevented. After starting tacrolimus ointment therapy, recurrence has not occurred for 9 months. Tacrolimus may be effective for allergic contact dermatitis patients who cannot avoid repeated allergen exposure, as it may not only reduce inflammation but inhibit recurrences.

  2. TRAF3 Epigenetic Regulation Is Associated With Vascular Recurrence in Patients With Ischemic Stroke.

    PubMed

    Gallego-Fabrega, Cristina; Carrera, Caty; Reny, Jean-Luc; Fontana, Pierre; Slowik, Agnieszka; Pera, Joanna; Pezzini, Alessandro; Serrano-Heras, Gemma; Segura, Tomás; Martí-Fàbregas, Joan; Muiño, Elena; Cullell, Natalia; Montaner, Joan; Krupinski, Jerzy; Fernandez-Cadenas, Israel

    2016-05-01

    Clopidogrel is one of the most used antiplatelet drugs in patients with cardiovascular disease. However, 16% to 50% of patients have a high on-clopidogrel platelet reactivity and an increased risk of ischemic events. The pathogenesis of high on-treatment platelet reactivity in patients with stroke is only partially explained by genetic variations. This study aims to find differentially methylated sites across the genome associated with vascular recurrence in ischemic stroke patients treated with clopidogrel. From a cohort of 1900 patients with ischemic stroke, we selected 42 patients treated with clopidogrel, including 21 with a recurrent vascular event and 21 without vascular recurrence during the first year of follow-up. Over 480 000 DNA methylation sites were analyzed across the genome. Differentially methylated CpG sites were identified by nonparametric testing using R. Replication analysis was performed in a new cohort of 191 subjects and results were correlated with platelet reactivity in a subset of 90 subjects using light transmission aggregometry. A total of 73 differentially methylated CpG sites (P<1×10(-05)) were identified; 3 of them were selected for further replication: cg03548645 (P=1.42×10(-05), TRAF3), cg09533145 (P=7.81×10(-06), ADAMTS2), and cg15107336 (P=1.89×10(-05), XRCC1). The cg03548645 CpG remained significant in the replication study (P=0.034), a deep analysis of this region revealed another methylation site associated with vascular recurrence, P=0.037. Lower cg03548645 (TRAF3) DNA methylation levels were correlated with an increased platelet aggregation (ρ=-0.29, P=0.0075). This study suggests for the first time that epigenetics may significantly contribute to the variability of clopidogrel response and recurrence of ischemic events in patients with stroke. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  3. Update on Antithrombotic Therapy for Stroke Prevention in Atrial Fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    Ovbiagele, Bruce

    2010-01-01

    Opinion statement Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common cardiac arrhythmia in the elderly, affecting 1 in 20 adults over the age of 70 years. Stroke is a major yet highly preventable complication of AF, and the strokes related to AF often are disabling and fatal. Warfarin is the treatment of choice in high-risk patients with AF, and its superior efficacy over aspirin for preventing stroke in these patients is widely recognized. However, several eligible patients with AF are not being treated with warfarin or are being treated inadequately, largely because of concerns regarding the attendant strict monitoring, drug interactions, and risk of major bleeding. As such, alternative antithrombotic therapies that can rival or exceed the efficacy of warfarin, yet compare favorably with its administration and side effect profile, are being sought. One such strategy, the use of a combination antiplatelet regimen, for stroke prevention in high-risk patients with nonvalvular AF was investigated recently in two clinical trials. This article reviews the role of combination antiplatelet regimens in stroke prevention for patients with AF. Other therapies discussed include oral anticoagulation, single antiplatelet therapies, oral anticoagulation plus antiplatelet treatment, direct thrombin inhibitors, and factor Xa inhibitors. PMID:20461116

  4. Stroke prevention in atrial fibrillation: do we still need warfarin?

    PubMed

    Diener, Hans-Christoph; Weber, Ralph; Lip, Gregory Y H; Hohnloser, Stefan H

    2012-02-01

    Oral anticoagulation with vitamin K antagonists (warfarin, phenprocoumon) is successful in both primary and secondary stroke prevention in patients with atrial fibrillation, yielding a 60-70% relative reduction in stroke risk compared with placebo, as well as a mortality reduction of 26%. However, these agents have a number of well documented shortcomings. Acetylsalicylic acid (ASA) reduces the relative risk of stroke by a nonsignificant 19% compared with placebo, and increased bleeding risk offsets any therapeutic gain from the combination of ASA with clopidogrel. This review describes the current landscape and developments in stroke prevention in patients with atrial fibrillation, with special reference to secondary prevention. A number of new drugs for oral anticoagulation that do not exhibit the limitations of vitamin K antagonists are under investigation. These include direct factor Xa inhibitors and direct thrombin inhibitors. Recent studies (RE-LY, ROCKET-AF, AVERROES, ARISTOTLE) provide promising results for new agents, including higher efficacy and significantly lower incidences of intracranial bleeds compared with warfarin. The new substances show similar results in secondary as in primary stroke prevention in patients with atrial fibrillation. New anticoagulants add to the therapeutic options for patients with atrial fibrillation, and offer a number of advantages over warfarin, for both the clinician and patient, including a favourable bleeding profile and convenience of use. Consideration of these new anticoagulants will improve clinical decision making.

  5. The prevention of recurrent suicidal acts

    PubMed Central

    Montgomery, S. A.; Roy, D.; Montgomery, D. B.

    1983-01-01

    1 There have been few controlled prospective investigations into the prevention of suicidal behaviour and by and large they have failed to demonstrate the efficacy of social work, psychotherapy or psychiatric treatment. 2 A group of 58 high-risk patients with multiple episodes of suicidal behaviour was treated with mianserin 30 mg at night or placebo in a six month double-blind trial of the efficacy of an antidepressant in reducing suicidal behaviour. 3 Patients were screened for depression, schizophrenia and organic disease. Patients were diagnosed as suffering from personality disorders according to DSM-III criteria mainly borderline or histrionic. 4 There was no significant difference in outcome between the mianserin and placebo treated group at any point in the six month study. 5 An item analysis of the MADRS showed that at entry the item `reduced appetite' predicted subsequent suicidal attempt. The total MADRS score did not predict further suicidal acts at entry but was highly significant at four weeks. At four weeks the items `reduced sleep' and `reduced appetite' were highly significant predictors of further suicidal acts and the items `lassitude', `suicidal thoughts', `inability to feel' and `pessimistic thoughts' were significant predictors. PMID:6824553

  6. Addressing Disparities in Stroke Prevention for Atrial Fibrillation: Educational Opportunities.

    PubMed

    Karcher, Rachel; Berman, Adam E; Gross, Hartmut; Hess, David C; Jauch, Edward C; Viser, Paul E; Solenski, Nina J; Wolf, Andrew M D

    2016-07-01

    Disparities in atrial fibrillation (AF)-related stroke and mortality persist, especially racial disparities, within the US "Stroke Belt." This study identified barriers to optimal stroke prevention to develop a framework for clinician education. A comprehensive educational needs assessment was developed focusing on clinicians within the Stroke Belt. The mixed qualitative-quantitative approach included regional surveys and one-on-one clinician interviews. Identified contributors to disparities included implicit racial biases, lack of awareness of racial disparities in AF stroke risk, and lack of effective multicultural awareness and training. Additional barriers affecting disparities included patient medical mistrust and clinician-patient communication challenges. General barriers included lack of consistency in assessing stroke and anticoagulant-related bleeding risk, underuse of standardized risk assessment tools, discomfort with novel anticoagulants, and patient education deficiencies. Effective cultural competency training is one strategy to reduce disparities in AF-related stroke and mortality by improving implicit clinician bias, addressing medical mistrust, and improving clinician-patient communication.

  7. Orthopantomography contribution to prevent isquemic stroke

    PubMed Central

    Chimenos-Küstner, Eduardo; López-López, osé

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: The ortopantomography (OPG) can be a valuable way for an early detection of calcified atheroma plaques, thus contributing for a preliminary stroke risk evaluation. The study looks for the existence of calcified atheroma plates through the use of OPG, comparing the results with the stenosis percentage found through eco-doppler. It has been analyzed the correlation of the number of years as a smoker, arterial hypertension and body mass index, against the risk of having calcified atheroma plaques. Study Design: Observational, transversal and prospective study with 84 patients from the Dental Center of Hospital Particular de Lisboa. First the patients answered to an inquiry and them they were submitted to an OPG and an eco-doppler. Results and Conclusions: It is possible to detect calcified atheroma plaques in the carotid artery through an OPG and patients who have them have got a fifteen fold greater risk of suffering from carotid stenosis. In this study, it has been confirmed the increase in carotid stenosis for long term smokers (OR = 1,033, n=18, 42,9%). The study results show that hypertension patients have a probability 5,426 greater than normal of developing atheroma plaques (with sig=0,049). Amid analyzed patients, the correlation between obesity and the existence of carotid atheroma plaques was significant, although negative (sig=0,047). OPG can help find patients with higher risk of isquemic stroke. Key words:Orthopantomography, Stroke, Carotid disease, Calcified atheroma. PMID:24790711

  8. Homocysteine-lowering therapy: a role in stroke prevention?

    PubMed

    Spence, J David

    2007-09-01

    On the basis of the results of several recent clinical trials, many researchers have concluded that vitamin therapy designed to lower total homocysteine concentrations is not effective in reducing the risk of cardiovascular events. However, whereas almost all myocardial infarctions are due to plaque rupture, stroke has many more pathophysiological mechanisms, and thrombosis-which is increased by raised total homocysteine concentrations-has an important role in many of these processes. Thus, stroke and myocardial infarction could respond differently to vitamin therapy. A detailed assessment of the results of the recent HOPE-2 trial and a reanalysis of the VISP trial restricted to patients capable of responding to vitamin therapy suggest that higher doses of vitamin B12 and perhaps new approaches to lowering total homocysteine besides routine vitamin therapy with folate, vitamin B6, and vitamin B12 could reduce the risk of stroke. Thus, therapy to lower homocysteine could still help to prevent stroke, if not other vascular outcomes.

  9. Free Floating Thrombus in Carotid Artery in a Patient with Recurrent Strokes

    PubMed Central

    Roy, Ashish Kumar; DeSanto, Jeffrey R.

    2017-01-01

    We present a case of 72-year-old male with reported past medical history of recurrent transient ischemic attacks (TIAs) presenting with myriad of neurological symptoms. Patient was transferred from outlying hospital with complaints of right sided facial droop and dysarthria. Computed tomography angiography (CTA) showed high grade proximal left internal carotid artery (ICA) stenosis along with interesting finding of a free floating thrombus (FFT) in the left ICA. After discussion with the neurosurgical team, our case was treated conservatively with combination of antiplatelet therapy with Aspirin and anticoagulation with Warfarin without recurrence of TIAs or strokes on six-month follow-up. PMID:28163720

  10. Bilateral Vertebral Artery Aneurysms at the Atlantoaxial Joint Level Causing Recurrent Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Komatsu, Kenichi; Ozaki, Akihiko; Iwasaki, Koichi; Matsumoto, Sadayuki

    2016-01-01

    Vertebral arteries (VAs) are vulnerable to mechanical stress between the atlas and axis, and subsequent VA dissection can cause posterior circulation infarction. We herein present a rare but informative case of bilateral VA aneurysms that caused recurrent stroke. The localization of the aneurysms and dynamic angiography with neck movement suggested a pathogenesis related to chronic mechanical injury of the VAs, though no skeletal abnormality was detected. The recurrences stopped and both aneurysms shrank after neck collar fixation and after the combination use of antithrombotics. For patients with posterior circulation infarction of unknown origin, a careful evaluation of VAs with physicians paying special attention to the atlantoaxial joint level is therefore recommended. PMID:27853085

  11. Free Floating Thrombus in Carotid Artery in a Patient with Recurrent Strokes.

    PubMed

    Roy, Moni; Roy, Ashish Kumar; DeSanto, Jeffrey R; Abdelsalam, Murad

    2017-01-01

    We present a case of 72-year-old male with reported past medical history of recurrent transient ischemic attacks (TIAs) presenting with myriad of neurological symptoms. Patient was transferred from outlying hospital with complaints of right sided facial droop and dysarthria. Computed tomography angiography (CTA) showed high grade proximal left internal carotid artery (ICA) stenosis along with interesting finding of a free floating thrombus (FFT) in the left ICA. After discussion with the neurosurgical team, our case was treated conservatively with combination of antiplatelet therapy with Aspirin and anticoagulation with Warfarin without recurrence of TIAs or strokes on six-month follow-up.

  12. Novel oral anticoagulants in secondary prevention of stroke.

    PubMed

    Diener, H C; Easton, J D; Hankey, G J; Hart, R G

    2013-06-01

    In patients with atrial fibrillation (AF) oral anticoagulation with vitamin-K antagonists (warfarin, phenprocoumon) is effective both for primary and secondary stroke prevention yielding a 60-70% relative reduction in stroke risk compared with placebo, as well as a mortality reduction of 26 percent. Vitamin-K antagonists have a number of well documented shortcomings. Recently the results of randomised trials for three new oral anticoagulants that do not exhibit the limitations of vitamin-K antagonists have been published. These include direct factor Xa inhibitors (rivaroxaban and apixaban) and a direct thrombin inhibitor (dabigatran). The studies (RE-LY, ROCKET-AF, ARISTOTLE, AVERROES) provide promising results for the new agents, including higher efficacy and a significantly lower incidence of intracranial bleeds compared with warfarin or aspirin. The new drugs show similar results in secondary as well as in primary stroke prevention in patients with AF. Apixaban was demonstrated to be clearly superior to aspirin and had the same rate of major bleeding complications. Meta-analyses show that the novel anticoagulants are superior to warfarin for the reduction of stroke, major bleeding and intracranial bleeds. New anticoagulants add to the therapeutic options for patients with AF, and offer a number of advantages over warfarin, for both the clinician and patient, including a favorable bleeding profile and convenience of use. Aspirin is no longer an option in secondary stroke prevention in patients with atrial fibrillation. Consideration of these new anticoagulants will improve clinical decision making.

  13. Stroke Prevention in Atrial Fibrillation: Focus on Latin America

    PubMed Central

    Massaro, Ayrton R.; Lippp, Gregory Y. H.

    2016-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common sustained cardiac arrhythmia, with an estimated prevalence of 1-2% in North America and Europe. The increased prevalence of AF in Latin America is associated with an ageing general population, along with poor control of key risk factors, including hypertension. As a result, stroke prevalence and associated mortality have increased dramatically in the region. Therefore, the need for effective anticoagulation strategies in Latin America is clear. The aim of this review is to provide a contemporary overview of anticoagulants for stroke prevention. The use of vitamin K antagonists (VKAs, eg, warfarin) and aspirin in the prevention of stroke in patients with AF in Latin America remains common, although around one fifth of all AF patients receive no anticoagulation. Warfarin use is complicated by a lack of access to effective monitoring services coupled with an unpredictable pharmacokinetic profile. The overuse of aspirin is associated with significant bleeding risks and reduced efficacy for stroke prevention in this patient group. The non-VKA oral anticoagulants (NOACbs) represent a potential means of overcoming many limitations associated with VKA and aspirin use, including a reduction in the need for monitoring and a reduced risk of hemorrhagic events. The ultimate decision of which anticoagulant drug to utilize in AF patients depends on a multitude of factors. More research is needed to appreciate the impact of these factors in the Latin American population and thereby reduce the burden of AF-associated stroke in this region. PMID:27533256

  14. Dabigatran in Secondary Stroke Prevention: Clinical Experience with 106 Patients

    PubMed Central

    DeFelipe-Mimbrera, Alicia; Cánovas, Araceli Alonso; Guillán, Marta; Matute, Consuelo; Cruz, Antonio; Vera, Rocío; Masjuan, Jaime

    2014-01-01

    Introduction. Our aim was to analyze our clinical experience with dabigatran etexilate in secondary stroke prevention. Methods. We retrospectively included patients starting dabigatran etexilate for secondary stroke prevention from March 2010 to December 2012. Efficacy and safety variables were registered. Results. 106 patients were included, median follow-up of 12 months (range 1–31). Fifty-six females (52.8%), mean age 76.4 (range 50–95, SD 9.8), median CHADS2 4 (range 2–6), CHA2DS2-VASc 5 (range 2–9), and HAS-BLED 2 (range 1–5). Indication for dabigatran etexilate was ischemic stroke in 101 patients and acute cerebral hemorrhage (CH) due to warfarin in 5 (4.7%). Dabigatran etexilate 110 mg bid was prescribed in 71 cases (67%) and 150 mg bid was prescribed in the remaining. Seventeen patients (16%) suffered 20 complications during follow-up. Ischemic complications (10) were 6 transient ischemic attacks (TIA), 3 ischemic strokes, and 1 acute coronary syndrome. Hemorrhagic complications (10) were CH (1), gastrointestinal bleeding (6), mild hematuria (2), and mild metrorrhagia (1), leading to dabigatran etexilate discontinuation in 3 patients. Patients with previous CH remained uneventful. Three patients died (pneumonia, congestive heart failure, and acute cholecystitis) and 9 were lost during follow-up. Conclusions. Dabigatran etexilate was safe and effective in secondary stroke prevention in clinical practice, including a small number of patients with previous history of CH. PMID:25133166

  15. Lipoprotein(a) Levels and Recurrent Vascular Events After First Ischemic Stroke.

    PubMed

    Lange, Kristin S; Nave, Alexander H; Liman, Thomas G; Grittner, Ulrike; Endres, Matthias; Ebinger, Martin

    2017-01-01

    The association of elevated lipoprotein(a) (Lp(a)) levels and the incidence of cardiovascular disease, especially coronary heart disease and ischemic stroke, is well established. However, evidence on the association between Lp(a) levels and residual vascular risk in stroke survivors is lacking. We aimed to elucidate the risk for recurrent cardiovascular and cerebrovascular events in the patients with first-ever ischemic stroke with elevated Lp(a). All patients with acute ischemic stroke who participated in the prospective Berlin C&S study (Cream & Sugar) between January 2009 and August 2014 with available 12-month follow-up data and stored blood samples were eligible for inclusion. Lp(a) levels were determined in serum samples using an isoform-insensitive nephelometry assay. We assessed the risk for the composite vascular end point of ischemic stroke, transient ischemic attack, myocardial infarction, nonelective coronary revascularization, and cardiovascular death with elevated Lp(a) defined as >30 mg/dL using Cox regression analyses. Of 465 C&S study participants, 250 patients were included into this substudy with a median National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale score of 2 (1-4). Twenty-six patients (10%) experienced a recurrent vascular event during follow-up. Among patients with normal Lp(a) levels, 11 of 157 subjects (7%) experienced an event at a median time of 161 days (interquartile range, 19-196 days), whereas in patients with elevated Lp(a) levels, 15 of 93 subjects (16%) experienced an event at a median time of 48 days (interquartile range, 9-194 days; P=0.026). The risk for a recurrent event was significantly higher in patients with elevated Lp(a) levels after adjustment for potential confounders (hazard ratio, 2.60; 95% confidence interval, 1.19-5.67; P=0.016). Elevated Lp(a) levels are associated with a higher risk for combined vascular event recurrence in patients with acute, first-ever ischemic stroke. This finding should be validated in larger

  16. An 18-year-old man with fenestrated vertebral arteries, recurrent stroke and successful angiographic coiling

    PubMed Central

    Bernard, Timothy J.; Mull, Brendan R.; Handler, Michael H.; Harned, Roger K.; Filley, Christopher M.; Kumpe, David A.; Tseng, Brian S.

    2010-01-01

    Fenestration of vertebral arteries has been reported in association with thromboembolic brain infarctions. However, few cases have been reported in which recurrent infarction occurred in spite of adequate anticoagulation. We report a young man with fenestrated vertebral arteries and stroke who failed to respond to standard anticoagulation therapy but did well with angiographic coil obliteration of an abnormal vertebral segment. An 18-year-old left-handed man presented with acute onset of dizziness and headache. No trauma or other stroke risk factors were identified. Left cerebellar infarction was seen on CT, but the cause could not be identified by brain and neck MRI, MRA, or CTA. Bilateral fenestrated vertebral arteries were identified with conventional angiography. Although the patient recovered fully and was treated with anticoagulation, he suffered a recurrent stroke 1 month later involving the right cerebellum while he was on a therapeutic dose of warfarin. Repeat arteriography showed a spontaneous dissection within one of the fenestrated vertebral segments. Since receiving angiographic coil obliteration of the pathologic segment, he has been free of all symptoms. We conclude that the patient sustained recurrent thromboembolic events in his posterior circulation due to spontaneous dissection within a fenestrated vertebral artery segment. Conventional angiography and emergent interventional embolization were essential to his diagnostic evaluation and therapeutic intervention. PMID:17568613

  17. Recurrent Stroke Due to Metastatic Pulmonary Tumor Emboli as an Important Clinical Entity.

    PubMed

    Takasugi, Junji; Sakaguchi, Manabu; Oyama, Naoki; Gon, Yasufumi; Terasaki, Yasukazu; Sasaki, Tsutomu; Nakahara, Susumu; Ohshima, Kenji; Hori, Yumiko; Morii, Eiichi; Mochizuki, Hideki

    2017-03-30

    We present an autopsy case of repetitive stroke due to tumor emboli, indistinguishable from thromboembolism with a hypercoagulable state in its clinical course. A 72-year-old man diagnosed with stage IVA oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma received chemoradiotherapy. Follow-up imaging revealed mediastinal lymph nodes and pulmonary metastasis. One year later, the patient experienced right arm weakness, and brain magnetic resonance imaging showed acute ischemic lesions in multiple vascular territories. He was diagnosed with paradoxical cerebral embolism due to cancer-associated venous thrombosis and treated with rivaroxaban. However, newly developed cerebral infarcts were confirmed 1 month later. Then, rivaroxaban treatment was switched to subcutaneous unfractionated heparin injection. He was admitted again for stroke recurrence and died of respiratory failure 8 days after admission. Autopsy demonstrated pulmonary metastasis invading the veins and tumor emboli in the culprit cerebral arteries. D-dimer was kept constant at a slightly higher level, ranging from 1 to 3 µg/mL during the course of recurrence. We should consider tumor embolism in the differential diagnosis of recurrent stroke along with pulmonary tumor and resistance to heparin preparations with unchanged D-dimer levels.

  18. Patent Foramen Ovale Closure and Medical Treatments for Secondary Stroke Prevention A Systematic Review of Observational and Randomized Evidence

    PubMed Central

    Kitsios, Georgios D.; Dahabreh, Issa J.; Abu Dabrh, Abd Moain; Thaler, David E.; Kent, David M.

    2012-01-01

    Background and Purpose Patients discovered to have a patent foramen ovale in the setting of a cryptogenic stroke may be treated with percutaneous closure, antiplatelet therapy, or anticoagulants. A recent randomized trial (CLOSURE I) did not detect any benefit of closure over medical treatment alone; the optimal medical therapy is also unknown. We synthesized the available evidence on secondary stroke prevention in patients with patent foramen ovale and cryptogenic stroke. Methods A MEDLINE search was performed for finding longitudinal studies investigating medical treatment or closure, meta-analysis of incidence rates (IR), and IR ratios of recurrent cerebrovascular events. Results Fifty-two single-arm studies and 7 comparative nonrandomized studies and the CLOSURE I trial were reviewed. The summary IR of recurrent stroke was 0.36 events (95% CI, 0.24–0.56) per 100 person-years with closure versus 2.53 events (95% CI, 1.91–3.35) per 100 person-years with medical therapy. In comparative observational studies, closure was superior to medical therapy (IR ratio=0.19; 95% CI, 0.07–0.54). The IR for the closure arm of the CLOSURE I trial was higher than the summary estimate from observational studies; there was no significant benefit of closure over medical treatment (P=0.002 comparing efficacy estimates between observational studies and the trial). Observational and randomized data (9 studies) comparing medical therapies were consistent and suggested that anticoagulants are superior to antiplatelets for preventing stroke recurrence (IR ratio=0.42; 95% CI, 0.18–0.98). Conclusions Although further randomized trial data are needed to precisely determine the effects of closure on stroke recurrence, the results of CLOSURE I challenge the credibility of a substantial body of observational evidence strongly favoring mechanical closure over medical therapy. PMID:22180252

  19. A Total Pleural Covering for Lymphangioleiomyomatosis Prevents Pneumothorax Recurrence

    PubMed Central

    Kurihara, Masatoshi; Mizobuchi, Teruaki; Kataoka, Hideyuki; Sato, Teruhiko; Kumasaka, Toshio; Ebana, Hiroki; Yamanaka, Sumitaka; Endo, Reina; Miyahashira, Sumika; Shinya, Noriko; Seyama, Kuniaki

    2016-01-01

    Background Spontaneous pneumothorax is a major and frequently recurrent complication of lymphangioleiomyomatosis (LAM). Despite the customary use of pleurodesis to manage pnenumothorax, the recurrence rate remains high, and accompanying pleural adhesions cause serious bleeding during subsequent lung transplantation. Therefore, we have developed a technique of total pleural covering (TPC) for LAM to wrap the entire visceral pleura with sheets of oxidized regenerated cellulose (ORC) mesh, thereby reinforcing the affected visceral pleura and preventing recurrence. Methods Since January 2003, TPC has been applied during video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery for the treatment of LAM. The medical records of LAM patients who had TPC since that time and until August 2014 are reviewed. Results TPC was performed in 43 LAM patients (54 hemithoraces), 11 of whom required TPC bilaterally. Pneumothorax recurred in 14 hemithoraces (25.9%) from 11 patients (25.6%) after TPC. Kaplan-Meier estimates of recurrence-free hemithorax were 80.8% at 2.5 years, 71.7% at 5 years, 71.7% at 7.5 years, and 61.4% at 9 years. The recurrence-free probability was significantly better when 10 or more sheets of ORC mesh were utilized for TPC (P = 0.0018). TPC significantly reduced the frequency of pneumothorax: 0.544 ± 0.606 episode/month (mean ± SD) before TPC vs. 0.008 ± 0.019 after TPC (P<0.0001). Grade IIIa postoperative complications were found in 13 TPC surgeries (24.1%). Conclusions TPC successfully prevented the recurrence of pneumothorax in LAM, was minimally invasive and rarely caused restrictive ventilatory impairment. PMID:27658250

  20. [New anticoagulants for stroke prevention in atrial fibrillation].

    PubMed

    Diener, H C; Hajjar, K; Frank, B; Perrey, M

    2012-06-01

    Oral anticoagulation with vitamin K antagonists (warfarin, phenprocoumon) is successful in both primary and secondary stroke prevention for patients with atrial fibrillation (AF), yielding a 60-70% relative reduction in stroke risk compared with placebo and a mortality reduction of 26%. However, these agents have a number of well documented shortcomings. This review describes the current landscape and developments in stroke prevention in patients with AF with special reference to secondary prevention. A number of new drugs for oral anticoagulation that do not exhibit the limitations of vitamin K antagonists are under investigation. These include direct factor Xa inhibitors and direct thrombin inhibitors. Recent studies (RE-LY, ROCKET-AF, AVERROES, ARISTOTLE) provide promising results for these new agents including higher efficacy and significantly lower incidences of intracranial bleeding compared with warfarin. The new substances show similar results in secondary as well as in primary stroke prevention in patients with AF. The new anticoagulants add to the therapeutic options for patients with AF and offer a number of advantages over warfarin for both clinician and patient, including a favorable bleeding profile and convenience of use. Consideration of these new anticoagulants will improve clinical decision-making.

  1. Preeclampsia: Reflections on How to Counsel About Preventing Recurrence.

    PubMed

    Costa, Maria Laura

    2015-10-01

    Preeclampsia is one of the most challenging diseases of pregnancy, with unclear etiology, no specific marker for prediction, and no precise treatment besides delivery of the placenta. Many risk factors have been identified, and diagnostic and management tools have improved in recent years. However, this disease remains one of the leading causes of maternal morbidity and mortality worldwide, especially in under-resourced settings. A history of previous preeclampsia is a known risk factor for a new event in a future pregnancy, with recurrence rates varying from less than 10% to 65%, depending on the population or methodology considered. A recent review that performed an individual participant data meta-analysis on the recurrence of hypertensive disorders of pregnancy in over 99 000 women showed an overall recurrence rate of 20.7%; when specifically considering preeclampsia, it was 13.8%, with milder disease upon recurrence. Prevention of recurrent preeclampsia has been attempted by changes in lifestyle, dietary supplementation, antihypertensive drugs, antithrombotic agents, and others, with much uncertainty about benefit. It is always challenging to treat and counsel a woman with a previous history of preeclampsia; this review will be based on hypothetical clinical cases, using common scenarios in obstetrical practice to consider the available evidence on how to counsel each woman during pre-conception and prenatal consultations.

  2. Cost considerations in the pharmacological prevention and treatment of stroke.

    PubMed

    Alexandrov, A V; Smurawska, L T; Bartle, W; Oh, P

    1997-05-01

    Stroke remains the leading cause of neurological disability and the third leading cause of death worldwide, consuming a large share of total healthcare expenditures. In this review, we discuss the cost effectiveness of stroke prevention for various risk factor-modification programmes and pharmacological interventions with aspirin (acetylsalicylic acid), ticlopidine and warfarin. Cost considerations and potential cost savings resulting from acute treatment are discussed for parenterally administered anticoagulants, such as heparin and nadroparin, and for intravenous thrombolysis with alteplase (recombinant tissue plasminogen activator; r-tPA). Patients with multiple risk factors for stroke require more aggressive prevention strategies which are associated with a greater risk of complications. The rates of complications, particularly intracerebral haemorrhage, should be kept low to achieve cost benefits for warfarin and alteplase. Reduced hospital length of stay is the key factor in the implementation of cost-effective stroke therapies. The analysis of future clinical trials of new stroke therapies should also include economic parameters, such as length of hospital stay and intensity of resource usage, to help guide formulary and therapeutic decision.

  3. Use of ramipril in preventing stroke: double blind randomised trial

    PubMed Central

    Bosch, Jackie; Yusuf, Salim; Pogue, Janice; Sleight, Peter; Lonn, Eva; Rangoonwala, Badrudin; Davies, Richard; Ostergren, Jan; Probstfield, Jeff

    2002-01-01

    Objective To determine the effect of the angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitor ramipril on the secondary prevention of stroke. Design Randomised controlled trial with 2×2 factorial design. Setting 267 hospitals in 19 countries. Participants 9297 patients with vascular disease or diabetes plus an additional risk factor, followed for 4.5 years as part of the HOPE study. Outcome measures Stroke (confirmed by computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging when available), transient ischaemic attack, and cognitive function. Blood pressure was recorded at entry to the study, after 2 years, and at the end of the study. Results Reduction in blood pressure was modest (3.8 mm Hg systolic and 2.8 mm Hg diastolic). The relative risk of any stroke was reduced by 32% (156 v 226) in the ramipril group compared with the placebo group, and the relative risk of fatal stroke was reduced by 61% (17 v 44). Benefits were consistent across baseline blood pressures, drugs used, and subgroups defined by the presence or absence of previous stroke, coronary artery disease, peripheral arterial disease, diabetes, or hypertension. Significantly fewer patients on ramipril had cognitive or functional impairment. Conclusion Ramipril reduces the incidence of stroke in patients at high risk, despite a modest reduction in blood pressure. What is already known on this topicTreatment with aspirin and lowering blood pressure reduce the incidence of strokeWhat this study addsRamipril, an angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitor, reduces strokes in patients at high risk whose blood pressure is not elevated, despite only a modest lowering of blood pressureThe benefits are observed even when patients receive aspirin and other blood pressure lowering treatments PMID:11909785

  4. Recurrent Strokes due to Transient Vasospasms of the Extracranial Internal Carotid Artery

    PubMed Central

    Wöpking, Sigrid; Kastrup, Andreas; Lentschig, Markus; Brunner, Freimuth

    2013-01-01

    Vasospasms of the intracranial arteries are a well-known complication of subarachnoid hemorrhage and are also frequently encountered in other disorders such as migraine, cerebral vasculitis or reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndrome. In contrast, recurrent spontaneous vasospasms of the extracranial circulation appear to be extremely rare and have most often been associated with migraine. We present a patient with recurrent strokes due to spontaneous transient vasospastic occlusions of the internal carotid artery (ICA) without migraine over a time period of at least 13 years. Initially, the patient had presented with a bilateral ICA occlusion and a cerebral infarct on the right side. While the right ICA remained occluded, a reopening of the left ICA could be detected 3 days after this initial event. In subsequent years, both duplex sonography and magnetic resonance angiography revealed recurrent occlusions of the left ICA, which resolved spontaneously within days. This case and other rare previous reports indicate that recurrent non-migrainous vasospasms of the extracranial carotid artery likely reflect a distinct entity which can cause ischemic strokes. PMID:24052791

  5. Prevention of secondary stroke and resolution of transfusional iron overload in children with sickle cell anemia using hydroxyurea and phlebotomy.

    PubMed

    Ware, Russell E; Zimmerman, Sherri A; Sylvestre, Pamela B; Mortier, Nicole A; Davis, Jacqueline S; Treem, William R; Schultz, William H

    2004-09-01

    Transfusions prevent secondary stroke in children with sickle cell anemia (SCA) but also cause iron overload. Alternatives for stroke prophylaxis with effective therapy to reduce iron burden are needed. For 35 children with SCA and stroke, transfusions were prospectively discontinued. Hydroxyurea was prescribed for stroke prophylaxis, and phlebotomy removed excess iron. Initial patients discontinued transfusions before hydroxyurea therapy, but later patients overlapped transfusions with hydroxyurea until tolerating full-dose therapy. Children received hydroxyurea for 42 +/- 30 months (range, 3-104 months). Hydroxyurea (26.7 +/- 4.8 mg/kg per day) led to mild neutropenia (3.9 +/- 2.3 x 10(9)/L) with significant increases in hemoglobin concentration, mean corpuscular volume, and fetal hemoglobin. Stroke recurrence rate was 5.7 events per 100 patient-years, but children receiving overlapping hydroxyurea therapy had only 3.6 events per 100 patient-years. For 26 children with >6 months of phlebotomy, 14,311 +/- 12,459 mL blood (315 +/- 214 mL/kg) was removed, with serum ferritin decreasing from a median of 2722 to 298 ng/mL. Among patients completing phlebotomy, liver biopsy documented normal histology and no excess iron deposition. For children with SCA and stroke, hydroxyurea effectively prevents secondary stroke and serial phlebotomy leads to complete resolution of transfusional iron overload.

  6. Secondary prevention and cognitive function after stroke: a study protocol for a 5-year follow-up of the ASPIRE-S cohort

    PubMed Central

    Williams, David; Gaynor, Eva; Bennett, Kathleen; Dolan, Eamon; Callaly, Elizabeth; Large, Margaret; Hickey, Anne

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Cognitive impairment is common following stroke and can increase disability and levels of dependency of patients, potentially leading to greater burden on carers and the healthcare system. Effective cardiovascular risk factor control through secondary preventive medications may reduce the risk of cognitive decline. However, adherence to medications is often poor and can be adversely affected by cognitive deficits. Suboptimal medication adherence negatively impacts secondary prevention targets, increasing the risk of recurrent stroke and further cognitive decline. The aim of this study is to profile cognitive function and secondary prevention, including adherence to secondary preventive medications and healthcare usage, 5 years post-stroke. The prospective associations between cognition, cardiovascular risk factors, adherence to secondary preventive medications, and rates of recurrent stroke or other cardiovascular events will also be explored. Methods and analysis This is a 5-year follow-up of a prospective study of the Action on Secondary Prevention Interventions and Rehabilitation in Stroke (ASPIRE-S) cohort of patients with stroke. This cohort will have a detailed assessment of cognitive function, adherence to secondary preventive medications and cardiovascular risk factor control. Ethics and dissemination Ethical approval for this study was granted by the Research Ethics Committees at Beaumont Hospital, Dublin and Connolly Hospital, Dublin, Mater Misericordiae University Hospital, Dublin, and the Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland. Findings will be disseminated through presentations and peer-reviewed publications. PMID:28348196

  7. Secondary preventive medication persistence and adherence 1 year after stroke

    PubMed Central

    Olson, D.M.; Zhao, X.; Pan, W.; Zimmer, L.O.; Goldstein, L.B.; Alberts, M.J.; Fagan, S.C.; Fonarow, G.C.; Johnston, S.C.; Kidwell, C.; LaBresh, K.A.; Ovbiagele, B.; Schwamm, L.; Peterson, E.D.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: Data on long-term use of secondary prevention medications following stroke are limited. The Adherence eValuation After Ischemic stroke–Longitudinal (AVAIL) Registry assessed patient, provider, and system-level factors influencing continuation of prevention medications for 1 year following stroke hospitalization discharge. Methods: Patients with ischemic stroke or TIA discharged from 106 hospitals participating in the American Heart Association Get With The Guidelines–Stroke program were surveyed to determine their use of warfarin, antiplatelet, antihypertensive, lipid-lowering, and diabetes medications from discharge to 12 months. Reasons for stopping medications were ascertained. Persistence was defined as continuation of all secondary preventive medications prescribed at hospital discharge, and adherence as continuation of prescribed medications except those stopped according to health care provider instructions. Results: Of the 2,880 patients enrolled in AVAIL, 88.4% (2,457 patients) completed 1-year interviews. Of these, 65.9% were regimen persistent and 86.6% were regimen adherent. Independent predictors of 1-year medication persistence included fewer medications prescribed at discharge, having an adequate income, having an appointment with a primary care provider, and greater understanding of why medications were prescribed and their side effects. Independent predictors of adherence were similar to those for persistence. Conclusions: Although up to one-third of stroke patients discontinued one or more secondary prevention medications within 1 year of hospital discharge, self-discontinuation of these medications is uncommon. Several potentially modifiable patient, provider, and system-level factors associated with persistence and adherence may be targets for future interventions. PMID:21900638

  8. Stroke Outreach in an Inner City Market: A Platform for Identifying African American Males for Stroke Prevention Interventions.

    PubMed

    Sharrief, Anjail Zarinah; Johnson, Brenda; Urrutia, Victor Cruz

    2015-01-01

    There are significant racial disparities in stroke incidence and mortality. Health fairs and outreach programs can be used to increase stroke literacy, but they often fail to reach those at highest risk, including African American males. We conducted a stroke outreach and screening program at an inner city market in order to attract a high-risk group for a stroke education intervention. A modified Framingham risk tool was used to estimate stroke risk and a 10-item quiz was developed to assess stroke literacy among 80 participants. We report results of the demographic and stroke risk analyses and stroke knowledge assessment. The program attracted a majority male (70%) and African American (95%) group of participants. Self-reported hypertension (57.5%), tobacco use (40%), and diabetes (23.8%) were prevalent. Knowledge of stroke warning signs, risk factors, and appropriate action to take for stroke symptoms was not poor when compared to the literature. Stroke outreach and screening in an inner city public market may be an effective way to target a high-risk population for stroke prevention interventions. Stroke risk among participants was high despite adequate stroke knowledge.

  9. Mesalamine (5-ASA) for the prevention of recurrent diverticulitis.

    PubMed

    Carter, Flloyd; Alsayb, Majd; Marshall, John K; Yuan, Yuhong

    2017-10-03

    Diverticular disease is a common condition that increases in prevalence with age. Recent theories on the pathogenesis of diverticular inflammation have implicated chronic inflammation similar to that seen in ulcerative colitis. Mesalamine, or 5-aminosalicylic acid (5-ASA), is a mainstay of therapy for individuals with ulcerative colitis. Accordingly, 5-ASA has been studied for prevention of recurrent diverticulitis. To evaluate the efficacy of mesalamine (5-ASA) for prevention of recurrent diverticulitis. We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL; 2017, Issue 8), in the Cochrane Library; Ovid MEDLINE (from 1950 to 9 September 2017); Ovid Embase (from 1974 to 9 September 2017); and two clinical trials registries for ongoing trials - Clinicaltrials.gov and the World Health Organization (WHO) International Clinical Trials Registry Platform database (9 September 2017).We also searched proceedings from major gastrointestinal conferences - Digestive Disease Week (DDW), United European Gastroenterology Week (UEGW), and the American College of Gastroenterology (ACG) Annual Scientific Meeting - from 2010 to September 2017. In addition, we scanned reference lists from eligible publications, and we contacted corresponding authors to ask about additional trials. We included randomised controlled clinical trials comparing the efficacy of 5-ASA versus placebo or another active drug for prevention of recurrent diverticulitis. We used standard methodological procedures as defined by Cochrane. Three review authors assessed eligibility for inclusion. Two review authors selected studies, extracted data, and assessed methodological quality independently. We calculated risk ratios (RRs) for prevention of diverticulitis recurrence using an intention-to-treat principle and random-effects models. We assessed heterogeneity using criteria for Chi(2) (P < 0.10) and I(2) tests (> 50%). To explore sources of heterogeneity, we conducted a priori subgroup analyses

  10. Stroke prevention care delivery: predictors of risk factor management outcomes.

    PubMed

    Ireland, Sandra E; Arthur, Heather M; Gunn, Elizabeth A; Oczkowski, Wieslaw

    2011-02-01

    Internationally, the development and implementation of stroke care guidelines have resulted in the evolution of stroke prevention outpatient clinics designed to accelerate patient access to treatment and behavioral risk reduction following transient ischemic attack or stroke. To examine the extent to which selected demographic, social-psychological, physiological, and adherence characteristics predicted achievement of blood pressure and glucose targets in a group of patients referred to a Canadian stroke prevention clinic with confirmed transient ischemic attack (TIA) or stroke and hypertension and/or diabetes. A total of 313, English speaking, adult patients who were referred from family or emergency department physicians to a stroke prevention clinic provided demographic data and received social-psychological screening testing at intake. Of these, 93 participants who met criteria of confirmed TIA or stroke plus hypertension and/or diabetes were identified as the study group. Seventy-seven of study group participants completed a 6-month follow-up. Admission screening tests included the Modified and Mini-Mental State Examinations, Trail Making Test, Clock Drawing Test, a medication self-efficacy scale, the Lubben Social Network Scale and the Geriatric Depression Scale. Family physician follow-up was ascertained 4-8 weeks after intake. At approximately 6 months after the initial screening measures, 77 study group participants completed additional measures of adherence, blood pressure and/or glycated hemoglobin. Transient ischemic attack was confirmed in 58% and stroke in 42% of the study group. Mean age was 69 years (SD=11); 53% were male; 97% had hypertension; and 25% were diabetic; some had both. Twenty-three percent were not followed-up by family practitioners. At 6-month follow-up, 97% reported ≥80% adherence to medication; only 57% met treatment targets. A logistic regression analysis identified three independent predictors of achieving blood pressure and

  11. Imaging Parameters and Recurrent Cerebrovascular Events in Patients With Minor Stroke or Transient Ischemic Attack

    PubMed Central

    Yaghi, Shadi; Rostanski, Sara K.; Boehme, Amelia K.; Martin-Schild, Sheryl; Samai, Alyana; Silver, Brian; Blum, Christina A.; Jayaraman, Mahesh V.; Siket, Matthew S.; Khan, Muhib; Furie, Karen L.; Elkind, Mitchell S. V.; Marshall, Randolph S.; Willey, Joshua Z.

    2016-01-01

    IMPORTANCE Neurological worsening and recurrent stroke contribute substantially to morbidity associated with transient ischemic attacks and strokes (TIA-S). OBJECTIVE To determine predictors of early recurrent cerebrovascular events (RCVEs) among patients with TIA-S and National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale scores of 0 to 3. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS A retrospective cohort study was conducted at 2 tertiary care centers (Columbia University Medical Center, New York, New York, and Tulane University Medical Center, New Orleans, Louisiana) between January 1, 2010, and December 31, 2014. All patients with neurologist-diagnosed TIA-S with a National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale score of 0 to 3 who presented to the emergency department were included. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES The primary outcome (adjudicated by 3 vascular neurologists) was RCVE: neurological deterioration in the absence of a medical explanation or recurrent TIA-S during hospitalization. RESULTS Of the 1258 total patients, 1187 had no RCVEs and 71 had RCVEs; of this group, 750 patients (63.2%) and 39 patients (54.9%), respectively, were aged 60 years or older. There were 505 patients with TIA-S at Columbia University; 31 (6.1%) had RCVEs (15 patients had neurological deterioration only, 11 had recurrent TIA-S only, and 5 had both). The validation cohort at Tulane University consisted of 753 patients; 40 (5.3%) had RCVEs (24 patients had neurological deterioration only and 16 had both). Predictors of RCVE in multivariate models in both cohorts were infarct on neuroimaging (computed tomographic scan or diffusion-weighted imaging sequences on magnetic resonance imaging) (Columbia University: not applicable and Tulane University: odds ratio, 1.75; 95% CI, 0.82–3.74; P = .15) and large-vessel disease etiology (Columbia University: odds ratio, 6.69; 95% CI, 3.10–14.50 and Tulane University: odds ratio, 8.13; 95% CI, 3.86–17.12; P < .001). There was an increase in the percentage of

  12. B vitamins in stroke prevention: time to reconsider.

    PubMed

    Spence, J David; Yi, Qilong; Hankey, Graeme J

    2017-09-01

    B vitamin therapy lowers plasma total homocysteine concentrations, and might be a beneficial intervention for stroke prevention; however, cyanocobalamin (a form of vitamin B12) can accelerate decline in renal function and increase the risk of cardiovascular events in patients with impaired renal function. Although early trials did not show benefit in reduction of stroke, these results might have been due to harm in participants with impaired renal function. In patients with diabetic nephropathy, cyanocobalamin is harmful, whereas B vitamins appear to reduce cardiovascular events in study participants with normal renal function. Our meta-analysis of individual patient data from two large trials of B vitamin therapy (VISP and VITATOPS) indicates that patients with impaired renal function who are exposed to high-dose cyanocobalamin do not benefit from therapy with B vitamins for the prevention of stroke (risk ratio 1·04, 95% CI 0·84-1·27), however, patients with normal renal function who are not exposed to high-dose cyanocobalamin benefit significantly from this treatment (0.78, 0·67-0·90; interaction p=0·03). The potential benefits of B vitamin therapy with folic acid and methylcobalamin or hydroxycobalamin, instead of cyanocobalamin, to lower homocysteine concentrations in people at high risk of stroke warrant further investigation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Sulodexide for the Prevention of Recurrent Venous Thromboembolism

    PubMed Central

    Bignamini, Angelo A.; Davì, Giovanni; Palareti, Gualtiero; Matuška, Jiří; Holý, Martin; Pawlaczyk-Gabriel, Katarzyna; Džupina, Andrej; Sokurenko, German Y.; Didenko, Yury P.; Andrei, Laurentia D.; Lessiani, Gianfranco; Visonà, Adriana

    2015-01-01

    Background— Patients with a first episode of unprovoked venous thromboembolism have a high risk of recurrence after discontinuation of anticoagulant therapy. Extending anticoagulation reduces the risk of recurrence but is associated with increased bleeding. Sulodexide, a glycosaminoglycan, exerts antithrombotic and profibrinolytic actions with a low bleeding risk when administered orally, but its benefit for preventing recurrent venous thromboembolism is not well known. Methods and Results— In this multicenter, double-blind study, 615 patients with first-ever unprovoked venous thromboembolism who had completed 3 to 12 months of oral anticoagulant treatment were randomly assigned to sulodexide 500 lipasemic units twice daily or placebo for 2 years, in addition to elastic stockings. The primary efficacy outcome was recurrence of venous thromboembolism. Major or clinically relevant bleeding was the primary safety outcome. Venous thromboembolism recurred in 15 of the 307 patients who received sulodexide and in 30 of the 308 patients who received placebo (hazard ratio, 0.49; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.27–0.92; P=0.02). The analysis in which lost to follow-up was assigned to failure yielded a risk ratio among treated versus control subjects of 0.54 (95% confidence interval, 0.35–0.85; P=0.009). No major bleeding episodes occurred; 2 patients in each treatment group had a clinically relevant bleeding episode. Adverse events were similar in the 2 groups. Conclusion— Sulodexide given after discontinuation of anticoagulant treatment reduced the risk of recurrence in patients with unprovoked venous thromboembolism, with no apparent increase of bleeding risk. Clinical Trial Registration— URL: https://www.clinicaltrialsregister.eu/. Identifier: EudraCT number 2009-016923-77. PMID:26408273

  14. Unusual case of recurrent SMART (stroke-like migraine attacks after radiation therapy) syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Ramanathan, Ramnath Santosh; Sreedher, Gayathri; Malhotra, Konark; Guduru, Zain; Agarwal, Deeksha; Flaherty, Mary; Leichliter, Timothy; Rana, Sandeep

    2016-01-01

    Stroke-like migraine attacks after radiation therapy (SMART) syndrome is a rare delayed complication of cerebral radiation therapy. A 53-year-old female initially presented with headache, confusion and left homonymous hemianopia. Her medical history was notable for cerebellar hemangioblastoma, which was treated with radiation in 1987. Her initial brain MRI (magnetic resonance imaging) revealed cortical enhancement in the right temporo-parieto-occipital region. She improved spontaneously in 2 weeks and follow-up scan at 4 weeks revealed no residual enhancement or encephalomalacia. She presented 6 weeks later with aphasia. Her MRI brain revealed similar contrast-enhancing cortical lesion but on the left side. Repeat CSF studies was again negative other than elevated protein. She was treated conservatively and recovered completely within a week. Before diagnosing SMART syndrome, it is important to rule out tumor recurrence, encephalitis, posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) and stroke. Typically the condition is self-limiting, and gradually resolves. PMID:27570398

  15. Unusual case of recurrent SMART (stroke-like migraine attacks after radiation therapy) syndrome.

    PubMed

    Ramanathan, Ramnath Santosh; Sreedher, Gayathri; Malhotra, Konark; Guduru, Zain; Agarwal, Deeksha; Flaherty, Mary; Leichliter, Timothy; Rana, Sandeep

    2016-01-01

    Stroke-like migraine attacks after radiation therapy (SMART) syndrome is a rare delayed complication of cerebral radiation therapy. A 53-year-old female initially presented with headache, confusion and left homonymous hemianopia. Her medical history was notable for cerebellar hemangioblastoma, which was treated with radiation in 1987. Her initial brain MRI (magnetic resonance imaging) revealed cortical enhancement in the right temporo-parieto-occipital region. She improved spontaneously in 2 weeks and follow-up scan at 4 weeks revealed no residual enhancement or encephalomalacia. She presented 6 weeks later with aphasia. Her MRI brain revealed similar contrast-enhancing cortical lesion but on the left side. Repeat CSF studies was again negative other than elevated protein. She was treated conservatively and recovered completely within a week. Before diagnosing SMART syndrome, it is important to rule out tumor recurrence, encephalitis, posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) and stroke. Typically the condition is self-limiting, and gradually resolves.

  16. Primary prevention of cardiovascular disease through population-wide motivational strategies: insights from using smartphones in stroke prevention

    PubMed Central

    Feigin, Valery L; Norrving, Bo; Mensah, George A

    2017-01-01

    The fast increasing stroke burden across all countries of the world suggests that currently used primary stroke and cardiovascular disease (CVD) prevention strategies are not sufficiently effective. In this article, we overview the gaps in, and pros and cons of, population-wide and high-risk prevention strategies. We suggest that motivating and empowering people to reduce their risk of having a stroke/CVD by using increasingly used smartphone technologies would bridge the gap in the population-wide and high-risk prevention strategies and reduce stroke/CVD burden worldwide. We emphasise that for primary stroke prevention to be effective, the focus should be shifted from high-risk prevention to prevention at any level of CVD risk, with the focus on behavioural risk factors. Such a motivational population-wide strategy could open a new page in primary prevention of not only stroke/CVD but also other non-communicable disorders worldwide. PMID:28589034

  17. Primary prevention of cardiovascular disease through population-wide motivational strategies: insights from using smartphones in stroke prevention.

    PubMed

    Feigin, Valery L; Norrving, Bo; Mensah, George A

    2016-01-01

    The fast increasing stroke burden across all countries of the world suggests that currently used primary stroke and cardiovascular disease (CVD) prevention strategies are not sufficiently effective. In this article, we overview the gaps in, and pros and cons of, population-wide and high-risk prevention strategies. We suggest that motivating and empowering people to reduce their risk of having a stroke/CVD by using increasingly used smartphone technologies would bridge the gap in the population-wide and high-risk prevention strategies and reduce stroke/CVD burden worldwide. We emphasise that for primary stroke prevention to be effective, the focus should be shifted from high-risk prevention to prevention at any level of CVD risk, with the focus on behavioural risk factors. Such a motivational population-wide strategy could open a new page in primary prevention of not only stroke/CVD but also other non-communicable disorders worldwide.

  18. Cryptogenic stroke in young patients: long-term prognosis and recurrence.

    PubMed

    Arauz, A; Merlos-Benítez, M; Roa, L F; Hernández-Curiel, B; Cantú, C; Murillo, L; Roldán, J; Vargas-Barrón, J; Barinagarrementeria, F

    2011-06-01

    Around 40% of strokes in young people are labelled as infarcts of undetermined cause. The aim of this study was to determine the image characteristics, the long-term functional outcome and recurrence after cryptogenic ischaemic stroke. We studied ninety-eight patients under 45 years of age during a median follow up of 54 months (range 12-238), with ischaemic stroke of undetermined cause. We registered vascular risk factors, clinical syndrome, laboratory and imaging results. We used Rankin disability score to assess functional outcome. The cases were evaluated with intracranial and extracranial vascular imaging studies, echocardiogram, and at least two determinations of prothrombotic states. In our hospital 11% of the patients with cerebral infarction under 45 years of age were labelled as cryptogenic. The mean age of the cases was 39.5 ± 5, 48 (49%) were women, 6 (6%) had arterial hypertension, 7 (7%) prior history of migraine, 32 (33%) were active smokers, 11 (11%) had hypercholesterolemia, and 11 (11%) had alcoholism. All cases were treated with aspirin. We observed good functional outcome (Rankin 0-2) in 65 (65%) cases. The anterior circulation was the most affected (partial in 56%, total in 12%). Infarction was unique in 87 (88%) cases. Recurrence was observed in 4 (4%) cases. In this study cryptogenic cerebral infarctions were mostly single, had low recurrence and good functional outcome in the long-term follow-up. Total anterior circulation infarctions correlated with poor outcome. Copyright © 2010 Sociedad Española de Neurología. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  19. Computational Fluid Dynamics Modeling of Symptomatic Intracranial Atherosclerosis May Predict Risk of Stroke Recurrence

    PubMed Central

    Leng, Xinyi; Scalzo, Fabien; Ip, Hing Lung; Johnson, Mark; Fong, Albert K.; Fan, Florence S. Y.; Chen, Xiangyan; Soo, Yannie O. Y.; Miao, Zhongrong; Liu, Liping; Feldmann, Edward; Leung, Thomas W. H.; Liebeskind, David S.; Wong, Ka Sing

    2014-01-01

    Background Patients with symptomatic intracranial atherosclerosis (ICAS) of ≥70% luminal stenosis are at high risk of stroke recurrence. We aimed to evaluate the relationships between hemodynamics of ICAS revealed by computational fluid dynamics (CFD) models and risk of stroke recurrence in this patient subset. Methods Patients with a symptomatic ICAS lesion of 70–99% luminal stenosis were screened and enrolled in this study. CFD models were reconstructed based on baseline computed tomographic angiography (CTA) source images, to reveal hemodynamics of the qualifying symptomatic ICAS lesions. Change of pressures across a lesion was represented by the ratio of post- and pre-stenotic pressures. Change of shear strain rates (SSR) across a lesion was represented by the ratio of SSRs at the stenotic throat and proximal normal vessel segment, similar for the change of flow velocities. Patients were followed up for 1 year. Results Overall, 32 patients (median age 65; 59.4% males) were recruited. The median pressure, SSR and velocity ratios for the ICAS lesions were 0.40 (−2.46–0.79), 4.5 (2.2–20.6), and 7.4 (5.2–12.5), respectively. SSR ratio (hazard ratio [HR] 1.027; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.004–1.051; P = 0.023) and velocity ratio (HR 1.029; 95% CI, 1.002–1.056; P = 0.035) were significantly related to recurrent territorial ischemic stroke within 1 year by univariate Cox regression, respectively with the c-statistics of 0.776 (95% CI, 0.594–0.903; P = 0.014) and 0.776 (95% CI, 0.594–0.903; P = 0.002) in receiver operating characteristic analysis. Conclusions Hemodynamics of ICAS on CFD models reconstructed from routinely obtained CTA images may predict subsequent stroke recurrence in patients with a symptomatic ICAS lesion of 70–99% luminal stenosis. PMID:24818753

  20. Healing ulcers and preventing their recurrences in the diabetic foot

    PubMed Central

    Sabapathy, S. Raja; Periasamy, Madhu

    2016-01-01

    Fifteen percent of people with diabetes develop an ulcer in the course of their lifetime. Eighty-five percent of the major amputations in diabetes mellitus are preceded by an ulcer. Management of ulcers and preventing their recurrence is important for the quality of life of the individual and reducing the cost of care of treatment. The main causative factors of ulceration are neuropathy, vasculopathy and limited joint mobility. Altered bio-mechanics due to the deformities secondary to neuropathy and limited joint mobility leads to focal points of increased pressure, which compromises circulation leading to ulcers. Ulcer management must not only address the healing of ulcers but also should correct the altered bio-mechanics to reduce the focal pressure points and prevent recurrence. An analysis of 700 patients presenting with foot problems to the Diabetic Clinic of Ganga Hospital led to the stratification of these patients into four classes of incremental severity. Class 1 – the foot at risk, Class 2 – superficial ulcers without infection, Class 3 – the crippled foot and Class 4 – the critical foot. Almost 77.5% presented in either Class 3 or 4 with complicated foot ulcers requiring major reconstruction or amputation. Class 1 foot can be managed conservatively with foot care and appropriate foot wear. Class 2 in addition to measures for ulcer healing would need surgery to correct the altered bio-mechanics to prevent the recurrence. The procedures called surgical offloading would depend on the site of the ulcer and would need an in-depth clinical study of the foot. Class 3 would need major reconstructive procedures and Class 4 would need amputation since it may be life-threatening. As clinicians, our main efforts must be focused towards identifying patients in Class 1 and offer advice on foot care and Class 2 where appropriate surgical offloading procedure would help preserve the foot. PMID:28216809

  1. Edoxaban in venous thromboembolism and stroke prevention: an appraisal

    PubMed Central

    Proietti, Marco; Lip, Gregory YH

    2016-01-01

    Oral anticoagulation is the therapeutic cornerstone in preventing thromboembolic risk in both atrial fibrillation (AF) and venous thromboembolism (VTE). After decades of the sole therapeutic oral anticoagulation option being warfarin, the introduction of non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants has heralded a new era. Edoxaban is the latest addition to these available for clinical use. Edoxaban was as effective and safer than warfarin in preventing thromboembolic risk in AF patients. Similarly, edoxaban effectiveness and safety was evident when treating VTE patients to prevent recurrent VTE or VTE-related death. Therefore, edoxaban represents a valuable alternative in treating thromboembolic risk for AF and VTE patients. PMID:27013883

  2. Interventions for preventing recurrent urinary tract infection during pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Schneeberger, Caroline; Geerlings, Suzanne E; Middleton, Philippa; Crowther, Caroline A

    2012-11-14

    Recurrent urinary tract infections (RUTI) are common in women who are pregnant and may cause serious adverse pregnancy outcomes for both mother and child including preterm birth and small-for-gestational-age babies. Interventions used to prevent RUTI in women who are pregnant can be pharmacological (antibiotics) or non-pharmacological (cranberry products, acupuncture, probiotics and behavioural modifications). So far little is known about the best way to prevent RUTI in pregnant women. To assess the effects of interventions for preventing recurrent urinary tract infections in pregnant women.The primary maternal outcomes were RUTI before birth (variously defined) and preterm birth (before 37 weeks). The primary infant outcomes were small-for-gestational age and total mortality. We searched the Cochrane Pregnancy and Childbirth Group's Trials Register (8 June 2012) and reference lists of retrieved articles. Published, unpublished and ongoing randomised controlled trials (RCTs), quasi-RCTs, clustered-randomised trials and abstracts of any intervention (pharmacological and non-pharmacological) for preventing RUTI during pregnancy (compared with another intervention, placebo or with usual care). Two review authors independently evaluated the one identified trial for inclusion and assessed trial quality. Two review authors extracted data. Data were checked for accuracy. The review included one trial involving 200 women. The trial compared a daily dose of nitrofurantoin and close surveillance (regular clinic visit, urine cultures and antibiotics when a positive culture was found) with close surveillance only. No significant differences were found for the primary outcomes: recurrent pyelonephritis (risk ratio (RR) 0.89, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.31 to 2.53, one study, 167 women), recurrent urinary tract infection before birth (RR 0.30, 95% CI 0.06 to 1.38; one study 167 women) and preterm birth (before 37 weeks) (RR 1.18, 95% CI 0.42 to 3.35; one study 147 women). The

  3. Mediterranean diet in healthy lifestyle and prevention of stroke.

    PubMed

    Demarin, Vida; Lisak, Marijana; Morović, Sandra

    2011-03-01

    Several studies demonstrated the beneficial and preventive role of Mediterranean diet in the occurrence of cardiovascular diseases, chronic neurodegenerative diseases and neoplasms, obesity and diabetes. In randomized intervention trials, Mediterranean diet improved endothelial function and significantly reduced waist circumference, plasma glucose, serum insulin and homeostasis model assessment score in metabolic syndrome. Several studies support favorable effects of Mediterranean diet on plasma lipid profile: reduction of total and plasma LDL cholesterol levels, plasma triglyceride levels, and apo-B and VLDL concentrations, and an increase in plasma HDL cholesterol levels. This effect is associated with increased plasma antioxidant capacity, improved endothelial function, reduced insulin resistance, and reduced incidence of the metabolic syndrome. The beneficial impact of fish consumption on the risk of cardiovascular diseases is the result of synergistic effects of nutrients in fish. Fish is considered an excellent source of protein with low saturated fat, nutritious trace elements, long-chain omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (LCn3PUFAs), and vitamins D and B. Fish consumption may be inversely associated with ischemic stroke but not with hemorrhagic stroke because of the potential antiplatelet aggregation property of LCn3PUFAs. Total stroke risk reduction was statistically significant for fish intake once per week, while the risk of stroke was lowered by 31% in individuals who ate fish 5 times or more per week. In the elderly, moderate consumption of tuna/other fish, but not fried fish, was associated with lower prevalence of subclinical infarcts and white matter abnormalities on MRI examination. Dietary intake of omega-3 fatty acids in a moderate-to-high range does not appear to be associated with reduced plaque, but is negatively associated with carotid artery intima-media thickness. Greater adherence to Mediterranean diet is associated with significant

  4. Stroke prevention in atrial fibrillation: pharmacological rate versus rhythm control.

    PubMed

    Sherman, David G

    2007-02-01

    Atrial fibrillation is a common arrhythmia associated with increased risk for embolic stroke. Restoration of sinus rhythm in patients with atrial fibrillation is a logical strategy to prevent the cardiovascular and thromboembolic complications of this dysrhythmia. The most common strategy for restoration of sinus rhythm is pharmacological antiarrhythmic therapy with or without electrical cardioversion. Five randomized clinical trials compared rhythm to rate-control strategies in patients with atrial fibrillation. These trials examined mortality, thromboembolic complications, exercise tolerance, quality of life, hospital admissions and drug-related adverse reactions. Mortality ranged from 2.9% to 23.8% among the trial subjects randomized to rhythm control versus 1.0% to 21.3% in the rate control subjects. The risk of thromboemboli was greater: 2.9% to 7.9% in the rhythm-control subjects compared with 0% to 5.5% in the rate control subjects. Hospital admissions and drug-related adverse events were increased in the rhythm-control subjects. Stroke and systemic emboli occurred more often in the rhythm-control subjects many of whom had been withdrawn from anticoagulation. Rhythm-control offered no advantage compared with rate control for patients with atrial fibrillation at increased risk for stroke. One explanation for this finding is that those patients thought to have been successfully converted to sinus rhythm in fact had asymptomatic paroxysmal episodes of atrial fibrillation increasing their risk of stroke because they were unprotected by anticoagulation. Pharmacological attempts to restore atrial fibrillation to sinus rhythm do not improve mortality or reduce thromboembolic events. All patients with atrial fibrillation at increased risk for stroke should be continued on long-term anticoagulation even if they appear to have been successfully restored to sinus rhythm.

  5. Review of economics and cost-effectiveness analyses of anticoagulant therapy for stroke prevention in atrial fibrillation in the US.

    PubMed

    von Schéele, Birgitta; Fernandez, Maria; Hogue, Susan Lynn; Kwong, Winghan Jacqueline

    2013-05-01

    To summarize the available evidence on the issues in health economics related to oral anticoagulation for stroke prevention in atrial fibrillation (AF) in the US. A literature review was performed using PubMed, EMBASE, Cochrane Library, and International Pharmaceutical Abstracts, as well as the websites of professional organizations. The search was conducted according to a prespecified protocol, limiting articles to those published in English from 2001 to October 2012 and focused on the economics associated with AF and AF-related stroke in the US. Data from 27 studies were extracted and included in the review. Strokes in patients with AF are more debilitating and have higher recurrence rates and mortality compared with strokes unrelated to AF. However, data describing the long-term cost of AF-related stroke and stroke subtypes remain limited. The costs of major gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding and intracranial bleeding related to warfarin are significant, whereas the costs of the more frequent minor GI bleeding are relatively low. Overall, the cost-effectiveness of warfarin versus aspirin or no treatment in patients with at least 1 risk factor for stroke is well established. Economic evaluations based on results from randomized controlled clinical trials generally found that new anticoagulants were a cost-effective alternative to warfarin for stroke prevention in AF. However, these cost-effectiveness results are highly sensitive to how well optimal international normalized ratio control is maintained (within target of 2.0-3.0) for warfarin and the time horizon used for analysis. Time in therapeutic range for warfarin in routine clinical practice was lower than in clinical trials, as shown by previous studies. This review identified several areas of uncertainty regarding the economic benefit of anticoagulants. The generalizability of cost-effectiveness results of anticoagulant therapy in AF based on clinical trial data must be confirmed by comparative effectiveness

  6. The association between high on-treatment platelet reactivity and early recurrence of ischemic events after minor stroke or TIA.

    PubMed

    Rao, Zilong; Zheng, Huaguang; Wang, Fei; Wang, Anxin; Liu, Liping; Dong, Kehui; Zhao, Xingquan; Wang, Yilong; Cao, Yibin

    2017-08-01

    To evaluate the role of HTPR in predicting early recurrence of ischemic events in patients with minor ischemic stroke or high-risk TIA. From January 2014 to September 2014, a single center continuously enrolled patients with minor ischemic stroke or high-risk TIA and gave them antiplatelet therapy consisting of aspirin with clopidogrel. HTPR was assessed by TEG after 7 days of antiplatelet therapy and detected CYP2C19 genotype. The incidence of recurrent ischemic events was assessed 3 months after onset. The incidence of recurrent ischemic events was compared between the HTPR and NTPR groups with the Kaplan-Meier method, and multivariate Cox proportional hazards models were used to determine the risk factors associated with recurrent ischemic events. We enrolled 278 eligible patients with minor ischemic stroke or high-risk TIA. Through TEG testing, patients with HTPR were 22.7%, and carriers were not associated with HTPR to ADP by TEG-ADP(%) (p = 0.193). A total of 265 patients completed 3 months of follow-up, and Kaplan-Meier analysis showed that patients with HTPR had a higher percentage of recurrent ischemic events compared with patients with NTPR (p = 0.002). In multivariate Cox proportional hazards models, history of ischemic stroke or TIA (HR 4.45, 95% CI 1.77-11.16, p = 0.001) and HTPR (HR 3.34, 95% CI 1.41-7.91, p = 0.006) was independently associated with recurrent ischemic events. In patients with minor stroke or TIA, the prevalence of HTPR was 22.7%, and HTPR was independently associated with recurrent ischemic events.

  7. Environmental vascular risk factors: new perspectives for stroke prevention.

    PubMed

    Bernal-Pacheco, Oscar; Román, Gustavo C

    2007-11-15

    Despite intensive evaluation of acute stroke patients, perhaps only half of the attributable stroke risk is usually identified. In addition to traditional and non-traditional vascular risk factors-including most recently homocysteine, inflammation, and alterations of coagulation-a number of environmental risk factors for stroke have been identified in the last decade. In this update we review the following: lower education and poor socioeconomic status (probable surrogates for exposure to traditional high-risk behaviors such as smoking, poor nutrition, lack of prenatal control, absence of preventive medical and dental care, and non-compliance of treatment of conditions such as hypertension); depression, stress and affective disorders; obstructive sleep apnea; passive smoking and environmental pollution; infections, in particular periodontal diseases that increase C-reactive protein (CRP); raised body mass index (obesity); exercise, and diet. The possible role of high-fructose corn syrup in the epidemic of obesity in the USA is reviewed. Protective diets include higher consumption of fish, olive oil, grains, fruits and vegetables (Mediterranean diet), as well as probiotic bacteria in yogurt and dairy products. Careful attention should be given to the patient's environment looking for modifiable factors. The effects of clean environmental air and water, adequate diet and appropriate nutrition, healthy teeth, exercise, and refreshing sleep in the prevention of stroke and cardiovascular disease appear to be quite compelling. Although some of these modifiable risk factors lack evidence-based information, judicious clinical sense should be used to counteract the potentially damaging effects of adverse environmental vascular risk factors.

  8. Interventions for the prevention of recurrent erysipelas and cellulitis.

    PubMed

    Dalal, Adam; Eskin-Schwartz, Marina; Mimouni, Daniel; Ray, Sujoy; Days, Walford; Hodak, Emmilia; Leibovici, Leonard; Paul, Mical

    2017-06-20

    Erysipelas and cellulitis (hereafter referred to as 'cellulitis') are common bacterial skin infections usually affecting the lower extremities. Despite their burden of morbidity, the evidence for different prevention strategies is unclear. To assess the beneficial and adverse effects of antibiotic prophylaxis or other prophylactic interventions for the prevention of recurrent episodes of cellulitis in adults aged over 16. We searched the following databases up to June 2016: the Cochrane Skin Group Specialised Register, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), MEDLINE, Embase, and LILACS. We also searched five trials registry databases, and checked reference lists of included studies and reviews for further references to relevant randomised controlled trials (RCTs). We searched two sets of dermatology conference proceedings, and BIOSIS Previews. Randomised controlled trials evaluating any therapy for the prevention of recurrent cellulitis. Two authors independently carried out study selection, data extraction, assessment of risks of bias, and analyses. Our primary prespecified outcome was recurrence of cellulitis when on treatment and after treatment. Our secondary outcomes included incidence rate, time to next episode, hospitalisation, quality of life, development of resistance to antibiotics, adverse reactions and mortality. We included six trials, with a total of 573 evaluable participants, who were aged on average between 50 and 70. There were few previous episodes of cellulitis in those recruited to the trials, ranging between one and four episodes per study.Five of the six included trials assessed prevention with antibiotics in participants with cellulitis of the legs, and one assessed selenium in participants with cellulitis of the arms. Among the studies assessing antibiotics, one study evaluated oral erythromycin (n = 32) and four studies assessed penicillin (n = 481). Treatment duration varied from six to 18 months, and two studies

  9. SY 08-2 HYPERTENSION MANAGEMENT FOR SECONDARY PREVENTION OF STROKE.

    PubMed

    Shimada, Kazuyuki

    2016-09-01

    Stroke is known to frequently recur in patients with a history of cerebrovascular disease, and the control of hypertension is extremely important for the treatment of those patients. The robust relationship between the recurrent cerebrovascular disease and blood pressure control has been demonstrated in large-scale clinical studies. The antihypertensive drug therapy significantly reduces the recurrence rate of all types of cerebrovascular disease, incidences of myocardial infarction and all vascular events. Evidence suggests that any class of antihypertensive drugs including diuretics, Ca channel blockers, ARBs, and ACE inhibitors are shown to be similarly effective for the secondary prevention of stroke, except in some small study such as MOSES. Thus, most of the benefit obtained from drugs can be ascribed to a decrease in blood pressure.Then, how far should blood pressure be lowered? Target of blood pressure control has been somewhat controversial, since an excessive reduction of blood pressure might exacerbate cerebral ischemia in the area perfused by cerebral artery with a significant stenosis. In fact, some Japanese clinical study has shown that in patients with impaired perfusion demonstrated by PET-CT, the risk of recurrent stroke was high when the systolic blood pressure was <130 mmHg. In those without impaired perfusion, this risk may be high at a high blood pressure level. In the study involving patients with carotid artery stenosis, the risk of cerebrovascular disease significantly increased in a group in which the systolic blood pressure decreased to 140 mmHg among patients with symptomatic, 70% or greater stenosis of the bilateral carotid arteries (accounting for 2 to 3%), whereas there was no increase in this risk even when the systolic blood pressure decreased to 140 mmHg in patients with 70% or greater unilateral carotid artery stenosis. In the Warfarin-Aspirin Symptomatic Intracranial Disease (WASID) Study, among patients with symptomatic

  10. Secondary prevention of cardioembolic stroke: oldest and newest promises.

    PubMed

    Corea, F; Spinelli, M; Tambasco, N; Silvestrelli, G; Parnetti, L

    2006-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common cause of cardioembolism. An update on secondary prevention strategies used to protect from the risk of stroke AF patients is presented. The main line of actions of stroke prevention in AF are antithrombotics (anticoagulant or antiplatelet), antiarrhythmics (for rate control and sinus rhythm restore), mechanical means (for occlusion of the left atrial appendage or protection of the internal carotid artery from emboli). Classic pharmacological prevention with K vitamin Kantagonists such as warfarin may be overcome by direct thrombin inhibitors like ximelagatran and melagatran. New ablation technologies promise to cure, at least a part of Nonvalvolae AF in the community, restoring sinus rhythm. Recent achievements on endovascular procedures deploying carotid artery implants provide an opportunity to divert emboli to nonhazardous locations, whereas cardiac devices can seal left atrial appendages and avoid risk of clot migration in the blood stream. In the next decade, the challenge will be to understand competitiveness between old and new drugs with endovascular implants.

  11. [Cranberries for prevention of recurrent urinary tract infections].

    PubMed

    Nergård, Cecilie Sogn; Solhaug, Vigdis

    2009-02-12

    Cranberries have been used for prevention and treatment of urinary tract infections for decades. The berries contain proanthocyanidins that may reduce the susceptibility to infection by preventing bacteria from attaching to uroepithelial cells. Several clinical trials have been published during recent years. This article reviews documentation of cranberries on clinical effect, adverse events, drug interactions and use during pregnancy and lactation. Clinical effects of cranberries have been assessed based on the Cochrane review from January 2007 and literature on clinical trials retrieved from a systematic search of PubMed and Embase (from 1 January 2007 to 29 October 2008) with the search terms "cranberry", "Vaccinium macrocarpon", "Vaccinium oxycoccus". Some evidence exists on cranberries' preventive effect on recurrent symptomatic urinary tract infections in women. The evidence is inconclusive for children, men and older people (both men and women). Studies of people with neuropathic bladder are contradictory. Most of the clinical trials published have several flaws and have not used standardised products. More evidence is needed to determine the optimum dosage, method of administration and the minimum length of treatment. Cranberries should not be used during pregnancy and lactation due to lack of safety data. Further, properly designed studies with standardised products and relevant outcomes are needed.

  12. Failure of interpositional membrane to prevent recurrent arthrofibrosis.

    PubMed

    Meehan, John P; Abbi, Gaurav

    2010-09-01

    Silicone has been used in numerous health care roles, from catheters to finger joint arthroplasties, with proven success. Its use as an interpositional membrane for the prevention of adhesions has been attempted in various anatomic sites with unpredictable results. We present a case report of a patient with recurrent arthrofibrosis requiring multiple operative procedures including manipulations under anesthesia, arthroscopies, and unicompartmental and eventual total knee replacement. After developing stiffness after total knee arthroplasty, the patient received placement of a silicone interpositional membrane with the goal of minimizing scar formation. Arthrofibrosis recurred, and only eventual removal of the membrane and correction of the underlying overstuffed patellofemoral compartment has allowed for maintained functional improvement in motion after 3 years.

  13. Prevention

    MedlinePlus

    ... Error processing SSI file About Heart Disease & Stroke Prevention Heart disease and stroke are an epidemic in ... secondhand smoke. Barriers to Effective Heart Disease & Stroke Prevention Many people with key risk factors for heart ...

  14. Design and Rationale of the Intima-Medial Thickness Sub-Study of the PreventIon of CArdiovascular Events in iSchemic Stroke Patients with High Risk of Cerebral hemOrrhage (PICASSO-IMT) Study.

    PubMed

    Seo, Woo-Keun; Kim, Yong Jae; Lee, Juneyoung; Kwon, Sun U

    2017-09-01

    Atherosclerosis is one of the main mechanisms of stroke and cardiovascular diseases and is associated with increased risk of recurrent stroke and cardiovascular events. Intima-medial thickness (IMT) is a well-known surrogate marker of atherosclerosis and has been used to predict stroke and cardiovascular events. However, the clinical significance of IMT and IMT change in stroke has not been investigated in well-designed studies. The PreventIon of CArdiovascular events in iSchemic Stroke patients with high risk of cerebral hemOrrhage-Intima-Media Thickness (PICASSO-IMT) sub-study is designed to investigate the effects of cilostazol, probucol, or both on IMT in patients with stroke. PICASSO-IMT is a prospective sub-study of the PICASSO study designed to measure IMT and plaque score at 1, 13, 25, 37, and 49 months after randomization. The primary outcome is the change in mean carotid IMT, which is defined as the mean of the far-wall IMTs of the right and left common carotid arteries, between baseline and 13 months after randomization. PICASSO-IMT will provide the largest IMT data set in a stroke population and will provide valuable information about the clinical significance of IMT in patients with ischemic stroke. Copyright © 2017 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Preventive Ceftriaxone in Patients with Stroke Treated with Intravenous Thrombolysis: Post Hoc Analysis of the Preventive Antibiotics in Stroke Study

    PubMed Central

    Vermeij, Jan-Dirk; Westendorp, Willeke F.; Roos, Yvo B.; Brouwer, Matthijs C.; van de Beek, Diederik; Nederkoorn, Paul J.

    2016-01-01

    Background The Preventive Antibiotics in Stroke Study (PASS), a randomized open-label masked endpoint trial, showed that preventive ceftriaxone did not improve functional outcome at 3 months in patients with acute stroke (adjusted common OR 0.95; 95% CI 0.82-1.09). Post-hoc analyses showed that among patients who received intravenous thrombolysis (IVT), patients who received ceftriaxone had a significantly better outcome as compared with the control group. This study aimed to gain more insight into the characteristics of these patients. Methods In PASS, 2,550 patients were randomly assigned to preventive antibiotic treatment with ceftriaxone or standard care. In current post-hoc analysis, 836 patients who received IVT were included. Primary outcome included functional status on the modified Rankin Scale, analyzed with adjusted ordinal regression. Secondary outcomes included infection rate and symptomatic intracerebral hemorrhage (sICH) rate. Results For all patients in PASS, the p value for the interaction between IVT and preventive ceftriaxone regarding functional outcome was 0.03. Of the 836 IVT-treated patients, 437 were administered ceftriaxone and 399 were allocated to the control group. Baseline characteristics were similar. In the IVT subgroup, preventive ceftriaxone was associated with a significant reduction in unfavorable outcome (adjusted common OR 0.77; 95% CI 0.61-0.99; p = 0.04). Mortality at 3 months was similar (OR 0.75; 95% CI 0.48-1.18). Preventive ceftriaxone was associated with a reduction in infections (OR 0.43; 95% CI 0.28-0.66), and a trend towards an increased risk for sICH (OR 3.09; 95% CI 0.85-11.31). Timing of ceftriaxone administration did not influence the outcome (aOR 1.00; 95% CI 0.98-1.03; p = 0.85). Conclusions According to the post-hoc analysis of PASS, preventive ceftriaxone may improve the functional outcome in IVT-treated patients with acute stroke, despite a trend towards an increased rate of post-IVT-sICH. PMID:27336314

  16. Cost-Effectiveness of Proton Pump Inhibitor Co-Therapy in Patients Taking Aspirin for Secondary Prevention of Ischemic Stroke.

    PubMed

    Takabayashi, Nobuyoshi; Murata, Kyoko; Tanaka, Shiro; Kawakami, Koji

    2015-10-01

    Low-dose aspirin (ASA) is effective for secondary prevention of ischemic stroke but can increase the risks of hemorrhagic stroke, upper gastrointestinal bleeding (UGIB), and dyspepsia. Prophylactic administration of proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) reduces the risks of these digestive symptoms. We investigated the cost effectiveness of adding a PPI to ASA therapy for ischemic stroke patients in Japan. A Markov state-transition model was developed to compare the cost effectiveness of ASA monotherapy with ASA plus PPI co-therapy in patients with histories of upper gastrointestinal ulcers and ischemic stroke. The model takes into account ASA adherence rate and adverse effects due to ASA, including hemorrhagic stroke and UGIB. The analysis was performed from the perspective of healthcare payers in 2013. In the base case, total life-years by PPI co-therapy and monotherapy were 16.005 and 15.932, respectively. The difference in duration of no therapy (no ASA or PPI) between the therapies was 558.5 days, which would prevent 30.3 recurrences of ischemic stroke per 1000 person-years. The incremental cost-effectiveness ratio of PPI co-therapy relative to monotherapy was ¥1,191,665 (US$11,458) per life-year gained. In a one-way sensitivity analysis, PPI co-therapy was consistently cost effective at a willingness to pay of ¥5,000,000 (US$48,077) per life-year gained. In a probabilistic sensitivity analysis, the probability that PPI co-therapy was cost effective was 89.74% at the willingness to pay. Co-therapy with ASA plus PPI appears to be cost-effective compared with ASA monotherapy. The addition of PPI also appeared to prolong the duration of ASA therapy, thereby reducing the risk of ischemic stroke.

  17. Does inflammation predispose to recurrent vascular events after recent transient ischaemic attack and minor stroke? The North West of England transient ischaemic attack and minor stroke (NORTHSTAR) study.

    PubMed

    Selvarajah, Johann R; Smith, Craig J; Hulme, Sharon; Georgiou, Rachel; Sherrington, Charles; Staniland, John; Illingworth, Karen J; Jury, Francine; Payton, Antony; Ollier, William E; Vail, Andy; Rothwell, Nancy J; Hopkins, Stephen J; Tyrrell, Philippa J

    2011-06-01

    Inflammation is implicated in the pathogenesis and outcome of ischaemic injury. Poststroke inflammation is associated with outcome but it remains unclear whether such inflammation precedes or results from ischaemic injury. We hypothesised that inflammatory markers are associated with an increased risk of recurrent vascular events soon after transient ischaemic attack and minor stroke. This was a multicentre, prospective, nested case-control study. Plasma concentrations of C-reactive protein, interleukin-6, interleukin-1-receptor antagonist and fibrinogen, leucocyte counts, erythrocyte sedimentation rate and inflammatory gene allele frequencies were analysed in 711 patients with recent transient ischaemic attack or minor stroke. Cases were defined by the incidence of one or more recurrent vascular events during the three-month follow-up. Association of inflammatory markers with case-status was determined using conditional logistic regression. Plasma concentrations of C-reactive protein, interleukin-1-receptor antagonist and interleukin-6 were not associated with case-status. In secondary analyses, only erythrocyte sedimentation rate was significantly associated with case-status (odds ratio 1·39, 95% confidence interval 1·03-1·85; P=0·03), but this effect did not persist after adjustment for smoking and past history of transient ischaemic attack or stroke. Single nucleotide polymorphisms in four inflammatory genes (interleukin-6, fibrinogen, P-selectin and vascular cell adhesion molecule-1) were nominally associated with case-status. Circulating inflammatory markers were not associated with recurrent vascular events. Nominally significant associations between genetic markers and case-status will require replication. These data provide little evidence for an inflammatory state predisposing to stroke and other vascular events in a susceptible population. © 2011 The Authors. International Journal of Stroke © 2011 World Stroke Organization.

  18. Predictors of long-term recurrent vascular events after ischemic stroke at young age: the Italian Project on Stroke in Young Adults.

    PubMed

    Pezzini, Alessandro; Grassi, Mario; Lodigiani, Corrado; Patella, Rosalba; Gandolfo, Carlo; Zini, Andrea; Delodovici, Maria Luisa; Paciaroni, Maurizio; Del Sette, Massimo; Toriello, Antonella; Musolino, Rossella; Calabrò, Rocco Salvatore; Bovi, Paolo; Adami, Alessandro; Silvestrelli, Giorgio; Sessa, Maria; Cavallini, Anna; Marcheselli, Simona; Bonifati, Domenico Marco; Checcarelli, Nicoletta; Tancredi, Lucia; Chiti, Alberto; Del Zotto, Elisabetta; Spalloni, Alessandra; Giossi, Alessia; Volonghi, Irene; Costa, Paolo; Giacalone, Giacomo; Ferrazzi, Paola; Poli, Loris; Morotti, Andrea; Rasura, Maurizia; Simone, Anna Maria; Gamba, Massimo; Cerrato, Paolo; Micieli, Giuseppe; Melis, Maurizio; Massucco, Davide; De Giuli, Valeria; Iacoviello, Licia; Padovani, Alessandro

    2014-04-22

    Data on long-term risk and predictors of recurrent thrombotic events after ischemic stroke at a young age are limited. We followed 1867 patients with first-ever ischemic stroke who were 18 to 45 years of age (mean age, 36.8±7.1 years; women, 49.0%), as part of the Italian Project on Stroke in Young Adults (IPSYS). Median follow-up was 40 months (25th to 75th percentile, 53). The primary end point was a composite of ischemic stroke, transient ischemic attack, myocardial infarction, or other arterial events. One hundred sixty-three patients had recurrent thrombotic events (average rate, 2.26 per 100 person-years at risk). At 10 years, cumulative risk was 14.7% (95% confidence interval, 12.2%-17.9%) for primary end point, 14.0% (95% confidence interval, 11.4%-17.1%) for brain ischemia, and 0.7% (95% confidence interval, 0.4%-1.3%) for myocardial infarction or other arterial events. Familial history of stroke, migraine with aura, circulating antiphospholipid antibodies, discontinuation of antiplatelet and antihypertensive medications, and any increase of 1 traditional vascular risk factor were independent predictors of the composite end point in multivariable Cox proportional hazards analysis. A point-scoring system for each variable was generated by their β-coefficients, and a predictive score (IPSYS score) was calculated as the sum of the weighted scores. The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve of the 0- to 5-year score was 0.66 (95% confidence interval, 0.61-0.71; mean, 10-fold internally cross-validated area under the receiver operating characteristic curve, 0.65). Among patients with ischemic stroke aged 18 to 45 years, the long-term risk of recurrent thrombotic events is associated with modifiable, age-specific risk factors. The IPSYS score may serve as a simple tool for risk estimation.

  19. Thrombus deflector stent for stroke prevention: A simulation study.

    PubMed

    Choi, Hyo Won; Navia, Jose A; Kassab, Ghassan S

    2015-07-16

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is a dysfunction of heart rhythm and represents an increased predisposition to ischemic stroke in AF patients. It has been shown that the AF-induced hemodynamic conditions may contribute to the increased embolic propensity through the carotid arteries. We simulated a stroke-prevention device with a unique strut structure to deflect the trajectory of a blood clot to the carotid artery. We identified the important determinants of functionality in a device design using computational fluid dynamics simulations. Quantitative assessment of deflection efficacy over various clot dimensions was carried out for the device with different strut configurations under AF flow conditions. The simulations demonstrate that the trajectory of a clot destined to the left common carotid artery (LCCA) can be deflected by a strut-structured device at the LCCA inlet with virtually no change in flow resistance. The deflection efficacy of the device is dependent on the clot properties and strut designs of the device. A configuration of 0.75 mm thick and 0.75 mm distant struts with 50% of surface convexity were found to provide maximum deflection efficacy (e.g., 36% greater deflection efficacy than a flat filter) among the strut structures considered. The results suggest that a deflector stent implanted in the aortic branch may be an effective stroke-prevention device. The present simulations motivate pre-clinical animal studies as well as further studies on patient-specific design of the device that maximize the deflection efficacy while minimizing device safety issues. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Moyamoya syndrome in sickle cell anaemia: a cause of recurrent stroke

    PubMed Central

    Soares, Deanne; Bullock, Richard; Ali, Susanna

    2014-01-01

    Summary We report a case with interesting imaging findings as well as an unfortunate but not unexpected clinical outcome. Our patient, an 8-year-old Jamaican boy of Afro-Caribbean descent with homozygous sickle cell disease, presented with left-sided upper limb weakness. He had a history of recurrent cerebrovascular accidents and transient ischaemic attacks beginning at 4 years of age. MRI revealed old bilateral infarctions and the ivy sign on fluid-attenuated inversion recovery sequences. MR angiography demonstrated numerous collaterals, most apparently arising from the left internal carotid, consistent with moyamoya syndrome. The patient had a full recovery and remained well for almost 2 years when he suffered another stroke. PMID:25178886

  1. Extracorporeal abdominal massage may help prevent recurrent bile duct stones after endoscopic sphincterotomy

    PubMed Central

    Uchida, Naohito; Hamaya, Sae; Tatsuta, Miwa; Nakatsu, Toshiaki

    2016-01-01

    Background and study aims: Endoscopic sphincterotomy (EST) is effective, but recurrent bile duct stones are a common late complication. Because there are still no effective therapies for preventing this complication, some patients have experienced bile duct stone recurrence many times. We describe herein a method of abdominal massage to treat patients with prior cholecystectomy who have experienced recurrence of bile duct stones. PMID:27540575

  2. CSDC: a nationwide screening platform for stroke control and prevention in China.

    PubMed

    Jinghui Yu; Huajian Mao; Mei Li; Dan Ye; Dongsheng Zhao

    2016-08-01

    As a leading cause of severe disability and death, stroke places an enormous burden on Chinese society. A nationwide stroke screening platform called CSDC (China Stoke Data Center) has been built to support the national stroke prevention program and stroke clinical research since 2011. This platform is composed of a data integration system and a big data analysis system. The data integration system is used to collect information on risk factors, diagnosis history, treatment, and sociodemographic characteristics and stroke patients' EMR. The big data analysis system support decision making of stroke control and prevention, clinical evaluation and research. In this paper, the design and implementation of CSDC are illustrated, and some application results are presented. This platform is expected to provide rich data and powerful tool support for stroke control and prevention in China.

  3. Interventions for preventing recurrent urinary tract infection during pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Schneeberger, Caroline; Geerlings, Suzanne E; Middleton, Philippa; Crowther, Caroline A

    2015-07-26

    Recurrent urinary tract infections (RUTI) are common in women who are pregnant and may cause serious adverse pregnancy outcomes for both mother and child including preterm birth and small-for-gestational-age babies. Interventions used to prevent RUTI in women who are pregnant can be pharmacological (antibiotics) or non-pharmacological (cranberry products, acupuncture, probiotics and behavioural modifications). So far little is known about the best way to prevent RUTI in pregnant women. To assess the effects of interventions for preventing RUTI in pregnant women.The primary maternal outcomes were RUTI before birth (variously defined) and preterm birth (before 37 weeks). The primary infant outcomes were small-for-gestational age and total mortality. We searched the Cochrane Pregnancy and Childbirth Group's Trials Register (20 May 2015) and reference lists of retrieved articles. Published, unpublished and ongoing randomised controlled trials (RCTs), quasi-RCTs, clustered-randomised trials and abstracts of any intervention (pharmacological and non-pharmacological) for preventing RUTI during pregnancy (compared with another intervention, placebo or with usual care). Two review authors independently assessed trials for inclusion and risk of bias, extracted data and checked them for accuracy. The review included one trial involving 200 women and was at moderate to high risk of bias.The trial compared a daily dose of nitrofurantoin and close surveillance (regular clinic visit, urine cultures and antibiotics when a positive culture was found) with close surveillance only. No significant differences were found for the primary outcomes: recurrent pyelonephritis (risk ratio (RR) 0.89, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.31 to 2.53; one study, 167 women), RUTI before birth (RR 0.30, 95% CI 0.06 to 1.38; one study, 167 women), and preterm birth (before 37 weeks) (RR 1.18, 95% CI 0.42 to 3.35; one study, 147 women). The overall quality of evidence for these outcomes as assessed using

  4. Protocol for the comparison of triflusal and clopidogrel in secondary prevention of stroke based on cytochrome P450 2C19 genotyping (MASETRO study): A multicenter, randomized, open-label, parallel-group trial.

    PubMed

    Han, Sang Won; Kim, Yong-Jae; Ahn, Seong Hwan; Seo, Woo-Keun; Yu, Sungwook; Oh, Seung-Hun; Kim, Youn Nam; Lee, Kyung-Yul

    2016-06-01

    The antiplatelet effect of clopidogrel is reportedly influenced by cytochrome P450 2C19 (CYP2C19) polymorphisms. However, there is no data concerning the relationship between stroke recurrence and CYP2C19 polymorphisms in patients treated with clopidogrel for secondary prevention of ischemic stroke. Triflusal may be an alternative therapy for clopidogrel in patients with poor genotype. The Comparison of Triflusal and Clopidogrel Effects in Secondary Prevention of Stroke Based on Cytochrome P450 2C19 Genotyping (MAESTRO) study will investigate the effect of antiplatelet agents based on CYP2C19 polymorphisms in secondary prevention of ischemic stroke. Assuming that 55% of patients belong to the poor genotype group, the required sample size is 1080 patients with at least 24 months of follow-up. This study is designed as a prospective, multicenter, randomized, parallel-group, open-label, and blind genotype trial. Patients who experience their first non-cardiogenic ischemic stroke within 30 days prior to screening are eligible. Patients received 300 mg triflusal twice a day or 75 mg clopidogrel once daily during the trial. The study is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov (NCT01174693). The primary outcome is recurrent ischemic stroke or hemorrhagic stroke. Secondary outcomes consist of composite major vascular events including stroke, myocardial infarction, coronary revascularization, or vascular death. Personalized medicine may be essential for patients according to individual drug metabolism abilities. MAESTRO is the first prospective study designed to evaluate the effect of CYP2C19 polymorphism in secondary stroke prevention and will resolve several questions regarding preventive antiplatelet agents for recurrent stroke. © 2016 World Stroke Organization.

  5. Cranberries for Preventing Recurrent Urinary Tract Infections in Uncircumcised Boys.

    PubMed

    Wan, Kong-Sang; Liu, Chih-Kuang; Lee, Wen-Kai; Ko, Ming-Chung; Huang, Che-Sheng

    2016-11-01

    Background • Highly concentrated cranberry juice has long been considered to have protective properties against urinary tract infections (UTIs), on the basis of its content of cranberry proanthocyanidins, with A-type interflavan bonds. Objective • This study intended to evaluate the benefits of a highly concentrated cranberry juice for the prevention of repeated episodes of UTI in uncircumcised boys. Design • The study was a randomized, controlled trial. Setting • The study took place at Taipei City Hospital, Renai and Zhongxing Branches (Taipei City, Taiwan). Participants • Participants were 55 uncircumcised boys and 12 circumcised boys, aged 6 to 18 y, with histories of uncomplicated UTI, who were patients at the hospital. Intervention • The uncircumcised boys were randomly divided into 2 groups: (1) group 1 (n = 28) took 4 oz (120 mL) daily of cranberry juice for 6 mo; and (2) group 2 (n = 27), the negative control group, drank a placebo juice for 6 months. The circumcised boys in group 3, a positive control group, also drank a placebo juice for 6 mo. Outcome Measures • The time to UTI (ie, to the appearance of symptoms plus pyuria) was the main outcome. Asymptomatic bacteriuria, adherence to the treatment, and adverse effects were assessed at monthly visits. Results • After 6 mo of a prophylactic treatment with cranberry juice, the incidence of bacteriuria, mainly Escherichia coli, as shown in urine cultures at ≥1 × 105, were 25% (7/28), 37% (10/27), and 33.3% (4/12) in groups 1, 2 and 3, respectively. The comparisons of the rate of prevention of a recurrence of UTI between group 1 and group 2 and between group 1 and group 3 showed that group 1 had fewer recurrent episodes of UTI. No children withdrew from the study. No adverse events or side effects were recorded. Conclusions • Cranberry juice may reduce the number of repeated episodes of UTI in uncircumcised boys and may have beneficial effects against the growth of Gram

  6. Routine exposure of recurrent laryngeal nerve in thyroid surgery can prevent nerve injury★

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Chenling; Xiang, Mingliang; Wu, Hao; Ma, Yan; Chen, Li; Cheng, Lan

    2013-01-01

    To determine the value of dissecting the recurrent laryngeal nerve during thyroid surgery with respect to preventing recurrent laryngeal nerve injury, we retrospectively analyzed clinical data from 5 344 patients undergoing thyroidectomy. Among these cases, 548 underwent dissection of the recurrent laryngeal nerve, while 4 796 did not. There were 12 cases of recurrent laryngeal nerve injury following recurrent laryngeal nerve dissection (injury rate of 2.2%) and 512 cases of recurrent laryngeal nerve injury in those not undergoing nerve dissection (injury rate of 10.7%). This difference remained statistically significant between the two groups in terms of type of thyroid disease, type of surgery, and number of surgeries. Among the 548 cases undergoing recurrent laryngeal nerve dissection, 128 developed anatomical variations of the recurrent laryngeal nerve (incidence rate of 23.4%), but no recurrent laryngeal nerve injury was found. In addition, the incidence of recurrent laryngeal nerve injury was significantly lower in patients with the inferior parathyroid gland and middle thyroid veins used as landmarks for locating the recurrent laryngeal nerve compared with those with the entry of the recurrent laryngeal nerve into the larynx as a landmark. These findings indicate that anatomical variations of the recurrent laryngeal nerve are common, and that dissecting the recurrent laryngeal nerve during thyroid surgery is an effective means of preventing nerve injury. PMID:25206452

  7. Recurrent embolization during intravenous administration of tissue plasminogen activator in acute cardioembolic stroke. A case report.

    PubMed

    Yasaka, M; Yamaguchi, T; Yonehara, T; Moriyasu, H

    1994-06-01

    Treatment with recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (rt-PA) has been applied in acute cardioembolic stroke to reopen the occluded vessel and improve the patient's neurologic deficit. However, the effect of this therapy on intracardiac thrombus has not been documented previously. A forty-five-year-old man with dilated cardiomyopathy developed acute cardioembolic stroke with disturbance of consciousness, right hemianopia, right hemiplegia, and global aphasia. Cerebral angiography demonstrated occlusion of the left middle cerebral artery trunk. Intravenous administration of 30 megaunits (MU) of recombinant tissue plasminogen activator was commenced two hours after the ictus and completed within sixty minutes. Cerebral angiography was repeated just after this treatment and demonstrated a new occlusion of the left intracranial internal carotid artery along with occlusion of a branch of the left external artery. The authors subsequently performed two-dimensional echocardiography and found a mobile thrombus in the left ventricle. In patients with intracardiac mobile thrombi, recombinant tissue plasminogen activator seems to accelerate breakup or detachment of the thrombi and subsequent recurrent embolization. Therefore, it seems better to pay attention to the presence of mobile intracardiac thrombus before commencing intravenous infusion of rt-PA.

  8. Developing a culturally tailored stroke prevention walking programme for Korean immigrant seniors: a focus group study.

    PubMed

    Choi, Sarah E; Kwon, Ivy; Chang, Emiley; Araiza, Daniel; Thorpe, Carol Lee; Sarkisian, Catherine A

    2016-12-01

    To gain better understanding of (i) beliefs and knowledge about stroke; (ii) attitudes about walking for stroke prevention; and (iii) barriers and facilitators to walking among Korean seniors for the cultural tailoring of a stroke prevention walking programme. Physical inactivity is a major risk factor for stroke. Korean immigrant seniors are one of the most sedentary ethnic groups in the United States. An explorative study using focus group data. Twenty-nine Korean immigrant seniors (64-90 years of age) who had been told by a doctor at least once that their blood pressure was elevated participated in 3 focus groups. Each focus group consisted of 8-11 participants. Focus group audiotapes were transcribed and analysed using standard content analysis methods. Participants identified physical and psychological imbalances (e.g. too much work and stress) as the primary causes of stroke. Restoring 'balance' was identified as a powerful means of stroke prevention. A subset of participants expressed that prevention may be beyond human control. Overall, participants acknowledged the importance of walking for stroke prevention, but described barriers such as lack of personal motivation and unsafe environment. Many participants believed that providing opportunities for socialisation while walking and combining walking with health information sessions would facilitate participation in and maintenance of a walking programme. Korean immigrant seniors believe strongly that imbalance is a primary cause of stroke. Restoring balance as a way to prevent stroke is culturally special among Koreans and provides a conceptual base in culturally tailoring our stroke prevention walking intervention for Korean immigrant seniors. A stroke prevention walking programme for Korean immigrant seniors may have greater impact by addressing beliefs about stroke causes and prevention such as physical and psychological imbalances and the importance of maintaining emotional well-being. © 2016 John

  9. Use of antiplatelet agents to prevent stroke: what is the role for combinations of medications?

    PubMed

    Schwartz, Neil E; Albers, Gregory W

    2008-01-01

    Antiplatelet agents are the medications of choice for preventing non-cardioembolic strokes. The diverse pathways involved in platelet function suggest the possibility of synergistic effects by combining various agents. In heart disease and in the setting of coronary artery stents, antiplatelet therapy with clopidogrel and aspirin has established benefits. Although it is tempting to extrapolate the benefits of this combination for stroke prevention, recent clinical trials have not borne this out. Unacceptable bleeding risks without additional efficacy weigh against the routine use of clopidogrel with aspirin for stroke prophylaxis. The combination of aspirin and extended-release dipyridamole has demonstrated superiority over aspirin in two large secondary stroke prevention trials.

  10. Multimodal Secondary Prevention Behavioral Interventions for TIA and Stroke: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Lawrence, Maggie; Pringle, Jan; Kerr, Susan; Booth, Joanne; Govan, Lindsay; Roberts, Nicola J.

    2015-01-01

    Background Guidelines recommend implementation of multimodal interventions to help prevent recurrent TIA/stroke. We undertook a systematic review to assess the effectiveness of behavioral secondary prevention interventions. Strategy Searches were conducted in 14 databases, including MEDLINE (1980-January 2014). We included randomized controlled trials (RCTs) testing multimodal interventions against usual care/modified usual care. All review processes were conducted in accordance with Cochrane guidelines. Results Twenty-three papers reporting 20 RCTs (6,373 participants) of a range of multimodal behavioral interventions were included. Methodological quality was generally low. Meta-analyses were possible for physiological, lifestyle, psychosocial and mortality/recurrence outcomes. Note: all reported confidence intervals are 95%. Systolic blood pressure was reduced by 4.21 mmHg (mean) (−6.24 to −2.18, P = 0.01 I2 = 58%, 1,407 participants); diastolic blood pressure by 2.03 mmHg (mean) (−3.19 to −0.87, P = 0.004, I2 = 52%, 1,407 participants). No significant changes were found for HDL, LDL, total cholesterol, fasting blood glucose, high sensitivity-CR, BMI, weight or waist:hip ratio, although there was a significant reduction in waist circumference (−6.69 cm, −11.44 to −1.93, P = 0.006, I2 = 0%, 96 participants). There was no significant difference in smoking continuance, or improved fruit and vegetable consumption. There was a significant difference in compliance with antithrombotic medication (OR 1.45, 1.21 to 1.75, P<0.0001, I2 = 0%, 2,792 participants) and with statins (OR 2.53, 2.15 to 2.97, P< 0.00001, I2 = 0%, 2,636 participants); however, there was no significant difference in compliance with antihypertensives. There was a significant reduction in anxiety (−1.20, −1.77 to −0.63, P<0.0001, I2 = 85%, 143 participants). Although there was no significant difference in odds of death or recurrent TIA/stroke, there was a significant reduction in

  11. Stroke Prevention in Atrial Fibrillation: Focus on Latin America.

    PubMed

    Massaro, Ayrton R; Lip, Gregory Y H

    2016-08-11

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common sustained cardiac arrhythmia, with an estimated prevalence of 1-2% in North America and Europe. The increased prevalence of AF in Latin America is associated with an ageing general population, along with poor control of key risk factors, including hypertension. As a result, stroke prevalence and associated mortality have increased dramatically in the region. Therefore, the need for effective anticoagulation strategies in Latin America is clear. The aim of this review is to provide a contemporary overview of anticoagulants for stroke prevention. The use of vitamin K antagonists (VKAs, eg, warfarin) and aspirin in the prevention of stroke in patients with AF in Latin America remains common, although around one fifth of all AF patients receive no anticoagulation. Warfarin use is complicated by a lack of access to effective monitoring services coupled with an unpredictable pharmacokinetic profile. The overuse of aspirin is associated with significant bleeding risks and reduced efficacy for stroke prevention in this patient group. The non-VKA oral anticoagulants (NOACbs) represent a potential means of overcoming many limitations associated with VKA and aspirin use, including a reduction in the need for monitoring and a reduced risk of hemorrhagic events. The ultimate decision of which anticoagulant drug to utilize in AF patients depends on a multitude of factors. More research is needed to appreciate the impact of these factors in the Latin American population and thereby reduce the burden of AF-associated stroke in this region. Resumo A fibrilação atrial (FA) é a arritmia cardíaca sustentada mais comum, com uma prevalência estimada de 1-2% na América do Norte e Europa. O aumento da prevalência da FA na América Latina está associado com o envelhecimento da população geral, juntamente com um mal controle dos principais fatores de risco, incluindo a hipertensão arterial. Como resultado, a prevalência do acidente

  12. Talk With Your Health Care Provider About Taking Aspirin to Prevent Strokes

    MedlinePlus

    ... Heart and Circulation For Women Talk With Your Health Care Provider About Taking Aspirin to Prevent Strokes Did ... attacks. Please see the brochure Talk with Your Health Care Provider About Taking Aspirin to Prevent Heart Attacks ...

  13. A Community Engagement Symposium to Prevent and Improve Stroke Outcomes in Diverse Communities

    PubMed Central

    Bharmal, Nazleen; Lucas-Wright, Anna “Aziza”; Vassar, Stefanie D.; Jones, Felica; Jones, Loretta; Wells, Rebekah; Cienega, Jason; Brown, Arleen F.

    2016-01-01

    Background Racial/ethnic minorities have a higher burden of stroke, but lower awareness and understanding of stroke and its risk factors. Our community–academic collaborative hosted a symposium in South Los Angeles to increase awareness about stroke, provide information on the Los Angeles Stroke Intervention and Research Program (SPIRP), and facilitate bidirectional communication between researchers and community stakeholders. Objectives We discuss our partnered approach to increase stroke awareness, elicit community perspectives and perceptions about stroke prevention and research participation, and increase community involvement in research using a community engagement symposium (CES). Methods We used a community-partnered participatory research (CPPR) conference framework to guide symposium planning, implementation and analysis. The morning session included clinical lectures, a panel of researchers describing LA SPIRP, and a panel presentation by stroke caregivers and survivors. In afternoon breakout sessions, attendees identified 1) community-based strategies to prevent stroke and 2) methods to increase recruitment of diverse populations in stroke research studies. Attendees were surveyed about stroke knowledge before and after the morning session. Data from breakout sessions were analyzed using content analysis and pile sorting to identify themes. Conclusions We found that the CES based on CPPR principles was effective method to increase short-term stroke awareness and stimulate discussion about stroke research among community members and community stakeholders who serve racial/ethnic minorities. PMID:27018364

  14. Physical activity in the prevention of ischemic stroke and improvement of outcomes: a narrative review.

    PubMed

    Middleton, Laura E; Corbett, Dale; Brooks, Dina; Sage, Michael D; Macintosh, Bradley J; McIlroy, William E; Black, Sandra E

    2013-02-01

    Physical activity is an integral component of stroke prevention. Although approximately 80% of strokes are due to cerebral ischemia, the mechanisms linking physical activity to the incidence of and recovery from ischemic stroke are not completely understood. This review summarizes evidence from human and animal studies regarding physical activity in the prevention of overt and covert ischemic stroke and associated injury. In cohort studies, people who are physically active have reduced rates of overt ischemic stroke and ischemic stroke mortality. However, few human studies have examined physical activity and the incidence of covert stroke. Evidence from animal models of ischemic stroke indicates that physical activity reduces injury after ischemic stroke by reducing infarct size and apoptotic cell death. Accordingly, physical activity may reduce the magnitude of injury from ischemic stroke so that there are fewer or less severe symptoms. Future research should investigate physical activity and incidence of covert stroke prospectively, ascertain the optimal dose and type of exercise to prevent ischemic injury, and identify the underlying neuroprotective mechanisms.

  15. Prevention and treatment of hand oedema after stroke.

    PubMed

    Kuppens, Stefanie P M; Pijlman, Hanneke C P; Hitters, Minou W M G C; van Heugten, Caroline M

    2014-01-01

    As there is no evidence for a specific treatment for post-stroke-induced hand oedema, rehabilitation centre Blixembosch formalized a best practice protocol. We investigated whether the Blixembosch hand oedema protocol is usable in daily practice and leads to lower incidence (prevention) and shorter duration (treatment) compared with care as usual. In a non-randomised comparative trial, we investigated 206 post-stroke patients admitted to two Dutch rehabilitation centres. Hand volumes were measured at least bi-weekly using a volumeter. Treatment was started according the protocol (Blixembosch) or following care as usual (Leijpark). Usability was assessed with a survey among professionals. In the Blixembosch group, 16% developed oedema after admission, compared with 21% in the control group (p = 0.019). Average duration of oedema (both developed before and after admission) was 6.5 weeks in the Blixembosch group compared with 3.1 weeks in the control group (p = 0.000). Professionals were positive about the protocol. The study showed that the protocol is usable in daily practice and has a small beneficial effect on hand oedema incidence rates compared with care as usual. The negative effect on duration of hand oedema could also be caused by the difference in prognosis between the two groups.

  16. Advancement in antithrombotics for stroke prevention in atrial fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Umer Usman, Mohammed Haris; Raza, Sabreen; Raza, Shariq; Ezekowitz, Michael

    2008-08-01

    The focus of this review is the evolving field of antithrombotic drug therapy for stroke prevention in patients with atrial fibrillation (AF). The current standard of therapy includes warfarin, acenocoumarol and phenprocoumon which have proven efficacy by reducing stroke by 68% against placebo. However, a narrow therapeutic index, wide variation in metabolism, and numerous food and drug interactions have limited their clinical application to only 50% of the indicated population. Newer agents such as direct thrombin inhibitors, factor Xa inhibitors, factor IX inhibitors, tissue factor inhibitors and a novel vitamin K antagonist are being developed to overcome the limitations of current agents. The direct thrombin inhibitor dabigatran is farthest along in development. Further clinical trial testing, and eventual incorporation into clinical practice will depend on safety, efficacy and cost. Development of a novel vitamin K antagonist with better INR control will challenge the newer mechanistic agents in their quest to replace the existing vitamin K antagonists. Till then, the large unfilled gap to replace conventional agents remains open. This review will assess all these agents, and compare their mechanism of action, stage of development and pharmacologic profile.

  17. STroke imAging pRevention and treatment (START): A longitudinal stroke cohort study: Clinical trials protocol.

    PubMed

    Carey, Leeanne M; Crewther, Sheila; Salvado, Olivier; Lindén, Thomas; Connelly, Alan; Wilson, William; Howells, David W; Churilov, Leonid; Ma, Henry; Tse, Tamara; Rose, Stephen; Palmer, Susan; Bougeat, Pierrick; Campbell, Bruce C V; Christensen, Soren; Macaulay, S Lance; Favaloro, Jenny; O' Collins, Victoria; McBride, Simon; Bates, Susan; Cowley, Elise; Dewey, Helen; Wijeratne, Tissa; Gerraty, Richard; Phan, Thanh G; Yan, Bernard; Parsons, Mark W; Bladin, Chris; Barber, P Alan; Read, Stephen; Wong, Andrew; Lee, Andrew; Kleinig, Tim; Hankey, Graeme J; Blacker, David; Markus, Romesh; Leyden, James; Krause, Martin; Grimley, Rohan; Mahant, Neil; Jannes, Jim; Sturm, Jonathan; Davis, Stephen M; Donnan, Geoffrey A

    2015-06-01

    Stroke and poststroke depression are common and have a profound and ongoing impact on an individual's quality of life. However, reliable biological correlates of poststroke depression and functional outcome have not been well established in humans. Our aim is to identify biological factors, molecular and imaging, associated with poststroke depression and recovery that may be used to guide more targeted interventions. In a longitudinal cohort study of 200 stroke survivors, the START-STroke imAging pRevention and Treatment cohort, we will examine the relationship between gene expression, regulator proteins, depression, and functional outcome. Stroke survivors will be investigated at baseline, 24 h, three-days, three-months, and 12 months poststroke for blood-based biological associates and at days 3-7, three-months, and 12 months for depression and functional outcomes. A sub-group (n = 100), the PrePARE: Prediction and Prevention to Achieve optimal Recovery Endpoints after stroke cohort, will also be investigated for functional and structural changes in putative depression-related brain networks and for additional cognition and activity participation outcomes. Stroke severity, diet, and lifestyle factors that may influence depression will be monitored. The impact of depression on stroke outcomes and participation in previous life activities will be quantified. Clinical significance lies in the identification of biological factors associated with functional outcome to guide prevention and inform personalized and targeted treatments. Evidence of associations between depression, gene expression and regulator proteins, functional and structural brain changes, lifestyle and functional outcome will provide new insights for mechanism-based models of poststroke depression. © 2013 The Authors. International Journal of Stroke © 2013 World Stroke Organization.

  18. Relation of Candidate Genes that Encode for Endothelial Function to Migraine and Stroke: The Stroke Prevention in Young Women Study

    PubMed Central

    MacClellan, Leah R.; Howard, Timothy D.; Cole, John W.; Stine, O. Colin; Giles, Wayne H.; O’Connell, Jeffery R.; Wozniak, Marcella A.; Stern, Barney J.; Mitchell, Braxton D.; Kittner, Steven J.

    2009-01-01

    Background and Purpose Migraine with aura is a risk factor for ischemic stroke but the mechanism by which these disorders are associated remains unclear. Both disorders exhibit familial clustering, which may imply a genetic influence on migraine and stroke risk. Genes encoding for endothelial function are promising candidate genes for migraine and stroke susceptibility because of the importance of endothelial function in regulating vascular tone and cerebral blood flow. Methods Using data from the Stroke Prevention in Young Women (SPYW) study, a population-based case-control study including 297 women aged 15–49 years with ischemic stroke and 422 women without stroke, we evaluated whether polymorphisms in genes regulating endothelial function, including endothelin-1 (EDN), endothelin receptor type B (EDNRB), and nitric oxide synthase-3 (NOS3), confer susceptibility to migraine and stroke. Results EDN SNPs rs1800542 and rs10478723 were associated with increased stroke susceptibility in Caucasians, (OR = 2.1 (95% CI, 1.1 to 4.2) and OR = 2.2 (95% CI, 1.1 to 4.4); p = 0.02 and 0.02, respectively) as were EDNRB SNPs rs4885493 and rs10507875, (OR = 1.7 (95% CI, 1.1 to 2.7) and OR = 2.4 (95% CI, 1.4 to 4.3); p = 0.01 and 0.002, respectively). Only one of the tested SNPs (NOS3 - rs3918166) was associated with both migraine and stroke. Conclusions In our study population, variants in EDN and EDNRB were associated with stroke susceptibility in Caucasian but not in African-American women. We found no evidence that these genes mediate the association between migraine and stroke. PMID:19661472

  19. Use of vitamin K antagonists for secondary stroke prevention depends on the treating healthcare provider in Germany - results from the German AFNET registry.

    PubMed

    Haeusler, Karl Georg; Gerth, Andrea; Limbourg, Tobias; Tebbe, Ulrich; Oeff, Michael; Wegscheider, Karl; Treszl, András; Ravens, Ursula; Meinertz, Thomas; Kirchhof, Paulus; Breithardt, Günter; Steinbeck, Gerhard; Nabauer, Michael

    2015-08-05

    Anticoagulation using vitamin K antagonists (VKAs) significantly reduces the risk of recurrent stroke in stroke patients with atrial fibrillation (AF) and is recommended by guidelines. The German Competence NETwork on Atrial Fibrillation established a nationwide prospective registry including 9,574 AF patients, providing the opportunity to analyse AF management according to German healthcare providers. On enrolment, 896 (9.4 %) patients reported a prior ischaemic stroke or transient ischaemic attack. Stroke patients were significantly older, more likely to be female, had a higher rate of cardiovascular risk factors, and more frequently received anticoagulation (almost exclusively VKA) than patients without prior stroke history. Following enrolment, 76.4 % of all stroke patients without VKA contraindications received anticoagulation, which inversely associated with age (OR 0.95 per year; 95 % CI 0.92-0.97). General practitioners/internists (OR 0.40; 95 % CI 0.21-0.77) and physicians working in regional hospitals (OR 0.47; 95 % CI 0.29-0.77) prescribed anticoagulation for secondary stroke prevention less frequently than physicians working at university hospitals (reference) and office-based cardiologists (OR 1.40; 95 % CI 0.76-2.60). The impact of the treating healthcare provider was less evident in registry patients without prior stroke. In the AFNET registry, anticoagulation for secondary stroke prevention was prescribed in roughly three-quarters of AF patients, a significantly higher rate than in primary prevention. We identified two factors associated with withholding oral anticoagulation in stroke survivors, namely higher age and-most prominently-treatment by a general practitioner/internist or physicians working at regional hospitals.

  20. Stroke survivors', caregivers' and GPs' attitudes towards a polypill for the secondary prevention of stroke: a qualitative interview study

    PubMed Central

    Jamison, James; Graffy, Jonathan; Mullis, Ricky; Mant, Jonathan; Sutton, Stephen

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To understand the perspectives of stroke survivors, caregivers and general practitioners (GPs) on a polypill approach, consisting of blood pressure and cholesterol-lowering therapies, with or without aspirin, for the secondary prevention of stroke. Methods A qualitative interview study was undertaken in 5 GP surgeries in the East of England. 28 survivors of stroke/transient ischaemic attack (TIA) were interviewed, 14 of them with a caregiver present, along with a convenience sample of 5 GPs, to assess attitudes towards a polypill and future use. Topic guides explored participants attitudes, potential uptake and long-term use, management of polypill medication and factors influencing the decision to prescribe. Data were analysed using a grounded theory approach. Key themes are presented and illustrated with verbatim quotes. Results The analysis identified 3 key themes: polypill benefits, polypill concerns and polypill lessons for implementation. Stroke/TIA survivors were positive about the polypill concept and considered it acceptable in the secondary prevention of stroke. Perceived benefits of a polypill included convenience resulting in improved adherence and reduced burden of treatment. Caregivers felt that a polypill would improve medication-taking practices, and GPs were open to prescribing it to those at increased cardiovascular risk. However, concerns raised included whether a polypill provided equivalent therapeutic benefit, side effects through combining medications, consequences of non-adherence, lack of flexibility in regulating dosage, disruption to current treatment and suitability to the wider stroke population. Conclusions Participants acknowledged potential advantages in a polypill approach for secondary prevention of stroke; however, significant concerns remain. Further research on the efficacy of a polypill is needed to reassure practitioners whose concerns around inflexibility and treatment suitability are likely to influence the

  1. Microalgae for the prevention of cardiovascular disease and stroke.

    PubMed

    Raposo, Maria Filomena de Jesus; de Morais, Alcina Maria Miranda Bernardo

    2015-03-15

    This review focuses on and discusses the primary phytochemicals present in microalgal biomass - carotenoids, phenolic compounds, antioxidant vitamins, sterols, and polyunsaturated fatty acids - and also on the exopolysaccharides, which are produced by some types of microalgae and may play a significant role in the prevention of cardiovascular diseases (CVD) and strokes. We have listed several preclinical trials and clinical studies supporting the health benefits that most of these compounds may provide. Microalgae are very easy to grow and are not vulnerable to contaminants when grown under controlled conditions. Proper handling and growth conditions may improve the production of phytochemicals. Therefore, they may represent an excellent source of nutraceuticals and food supplements once their safety as a food supplement has been confirmed.

  2. The Five Ps of Acute Ischemic Stroke Treatment: Parenchyma, Pipes, Perfusion, Penumbra, and Prevention of Complications

    PubMed Central

    Felberg, Robert A.; Naidech, Andrew

    2003-01-01

    Stroke is a treatable disease. Despite the therapeutic nihilism of the past, the advent of thrombolysis has changed the way stroke treatment is approached. Acute ischemic stroke is a challenging and heterogeneous disease, and treatment must be based on an understanding of the underlying pathophysiology of ischemia. Interventions are designed to improve neuronal salvage and outcome. The underlying tenets of stroke therapy focus on the brain parenchyma, arterial flow (pipes), perfusion, the ischemic milieu or penumbra, and prevention of complications. This article focuses on the practical issues of ischemic stroke care with a brief review of supporting literature. PMID:22470250

  3. The Minnesota Heart Disease and Stroke Prevention Plan 2011-2020.

    PubMed

    Shanedling, Stanton; Mehelich, Mary Jo; Peacock, James

    2012-05-01

    Although Minnesota is known as a heart-healthy state, heart disease and stroke are still among the leading causes of death for people living here, especially those in certain racial and ethnic groups. To address this concern and reduce the overall incidence of heart disease and stroke, the Minnesota Department of Health's Heart Disease and Stroke Prevention Unit led an effortto create the Heart Disease and Stroke Prevention Plan 2011-2020. This article describes the plan's fundamentals and some of its recommendations.

  4. Could Stroke Trigger Be Prevented by Healthy Family Relationships?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rochette, Annie; Gaulin, Philippe; Tellier, Myriam

    2009-01-01

    Although major stroke risk factors are well documented, little is known about which life circumstances are perceived to be related to the actual triggering of a first stroke. The purpose was to explore self-perceived spontaneously related life circumstances surrounding the trigger of a first stroke. A qualitative design with a phenomenological…

  5. Could Stroke Trigger Be Prevented by Healthy Family Relationships?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rochette, Annie; Gaulin, Philippe; Tellier, Myriam

    2009-01-01

    Although major stroke risk factors are well documented, little is known about which life circumstances are perceived to be related to the actual triggering of a first stroke. The purpose was to explore self-perceived spontaneously related life circumstances surrounding the trigger of a first stroke. A qualitative design with a phenomenological…

  6. [Non-valvular atrial fibrillation and completed stroke: factors determining mortality, recurrence and prognosis after a first event in the Mexican population].

    PubMed

    Aburto-Murrieta, Y; Arauz-Góngora, A A; Murillo-Bonilla, L M; López-Gómez, M

    Non-valvular atrial fibrillation (NVAF) accounts for 25% of completed strokes (CS) of a cardioembolic origin in patients over 60 years old. Our aim was to define the predictors of a good and poor prognosis after a CS secondary to an NVAF in our milieu. We evaluated the risk factors (RF) and severity of CS in relation to death, functionality and recurrence at 5 years. 81 patients between the ages of 49 and 88 were followed up consecutively for 1 to 90 months; 38 (46.9%) of them were males. Multivariate analysis was performed with the following independent variables: age, gender, smoking, hypertension, heart disease, diabetes mellitus and characteristics of the stroke. The severity of the CS was assessed by means of the modified Rankin scale, which was dichotomised into a good prognosis (0-2) and a poor prognosis (> or = 3), both basal and at the end of the clinical control. We also evaluated the secondary preventive treatment used and its relation with recurrence, prognosis, death and complications. No RF was linked to a poor prognosis or recurrence; 88% had a poor prognosis. Antiplatelet drugs were used in 42% of cases and 39% received anticoagulants. A good final progression was observed in 9.5% of the patients treated with antiplatelet drugs versus 35% of those receiving anticoagulation therapy (p = 0.004). Severity of the CS on admission was worse in the aspirin group, with no differences in recurrence and mortality. A better prognosis was observed in patients from urban areas. Use of antiplatelet drugs, living in a rural area and a Rankin score of > or = 3 on admission are factors suggesting a poor prognosis in the clinical control at 5 years.

  7. Preventive Antibacterial Therapy in Acute Ischemic Stroke: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Klehmet, Juliane; Rogge, Witold; Drenckhahn, Christoph; Göhler, Jos; Bereswill, Stefan; Göbel, Ulf; Wernecke, Klaus Dieter; Wolf, Tilo; Arnold, Guy; Halle, Elke; Volk, Hans-Dieter; Dirnagl, Ulrich; Meisel, Andreas

    2008-01-01

    Background Pneumonia is a major risk factor of death after acute stroke. In a mouse model, preventive antibacterial therapy with moxifloxacin not only prevents the development of post-stroke infections, it also reduces mortality, and improves neurological outcome significantly. In this study we investigate whether this approach is effective in stroke patients. Methods Preventive ANtibacterial THERapy in acute Ischemic Stroke (PANTHERIS) is a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial in 80 patients with severe, non-lacunar, ischemic stroke (NIHSS>11) in the middle cerebral artery (MCA) territory. Patients received either intravenous moxifloxacin (400 mg daily) or placebo for 5 days starting within 36 hours after stroke onset. Primary endpoint was infection within 11 days. Secondary endpoints included neurological outcome, survival, development of stroke-induced immunodepression, and induction of bacterial resistance. Findings On intention-to treat analysis (79 patients), the infection rate at day 11 in the moxifloxacin treated group was 15.4% compared to 32.5% in the placebo treated group (p = 0.114). On per protocol analysis (n = 66), moxifloxacin significantly reduced infection rate from 41.9% to 17.1% (p = 0.032). Stroke associated infections were associated with a lower survival rate. In this study, neurological outcome and survival were not significantly influenced by treatment with moxifloxacin. Frequency of fluoroquinolone resistance in both treatment groups did not differ. On logistic regression analysis, treatment arm as well as the interaction between treatment arm and monocytic HLA-DR expression (a marker for immunodepression) at day 1 after stroke onset was independently and highly predictive for post-stroke infections. Interpretation PANTHERIS suggests that preventive administration of moxifloxacin is superior in reducing infections after severe non-lacunar ischemic stroke compared to placebo. In addition, the results emphasize the

  8. Update of the Preventive Antibiotics in Stroke Study (PASS): statistical analysis plan.

    PubMed

    Westendorp, Willeke F; Vermeij, Jan-Dirk; Dippel, Diederik W J; Dijkgraaf, Marcel G W; van der Poll, Tom; Prins, Jan M; Vermeij, Frederique H; Roos, Yvo B W E M; Brouwer, Matthijs C; Zwinderman, Aeilko H; van de Beek, Diederik; Nederkoorn, Paul J

    2014-10-01

    Infections occur in 30% of stroke patients and are associated with unfavorable outcomes. Preventive antibiotic therapy lowers the infection rate after stroke, but the effect of preventive antibiotic treatment on functional outcome in patients with stroke is unknown. The PASS is a multicenter, prospective, phase three, randomized, open-label, blinded end-point (PROBE) trial of preventive antibiotic therapy in acute stroke. Patients are randomly assigned to either ceftriaxone at a dose of 2 g, given every 24 h intravenously for 4 days, in addition to standard stroke-unit care, or standard stroke-unit care without preventive antibiotic therapy. The aim of this study is to assess whether preventive antibiotic treatment improves functional outcome at 3 months by preventing infections. This paper presents in detail the statistical analysis plan (SAP) of the Preventive Antibiotics in Stroke Study (PASS) and was submitted while the investigators were still blinded for all outcomes. The primary outcome is the score on the modified Rankin Scale (mRS), assessed by ordinal logistic regression analysis according to a proportional odds model. Secondary analysis of the primary outcome is the score on the mRS dichotomized as a favorable outcome (mRS 0 to 2) versus unfavorable outcome (mRS 3 to 6). Secondary outcome measures are death rate at discharge and 3 months, infection rate during hospital admission, length of hospital admission, volume of post-stroke care, use of antibiotics during hospital stay, quality-adjusted life years and costs. Complications of treatment, serious adverse events (SAEs) and suspected unexpected serious adverse reactions (SUSARs) are reported as safety outcomes. The data from PASS will establish whether preventive antibiotic therapy in acute stroke improves functional outcome by preventing infection and will be analyzed according to this pre-specified SAP. Current controlled trials; ISRCTN66140176. Date of registration: 6 April 2010.

  9. Medical management of moyamoya disease and recurrent stroke in an infant with Majewski osteodysplastic primordial dwarfism type II (MOPD II).

    PubMed

    Kılıç, Esra; Utine, Eda; Unal, Sule; Haliloğlu, Göknur; Oğuz, Kader Karli; Cetin, Mualla; Boduroğlu, Koray; Alanay, Yasemin

    2012-10-01

    We report an infant diagnosed with Majewski osteodysplastic primordial dwarfism type II at age 8 months, who experienced cerebrovascular morbidities related to this entity. Molecular analysis identified c.2609+1 G>A, intron 14, homozygous splice site mutation in the pericentrin gene. At age 18 months, she developed recurrent strokes and hemiparesis. Brain magnetic resonance imaging and magnetic resonance angiography showed abnormal gyral pattern, cortical acute infarcts, bilateral stenosis of the internal carotid arteries and reduced flow on the cerebral arteries, consistent with moyamoya disease. In Majewski osteodysplastic primordial dwarfism type II, life expectancy is reduced because of high risk of stroke secondary to cerebral vascular anomalies (aneurysms, moyamoya disease). Periodic screening for vascular events is recommended in individuals with Majewski osteodysplastic primordial dwarfism type II every 12-18 months following diagnosis. Our patient was medically managed with low molecular weight heparin followed with aspirin prophylaxis, in addition to carbamazepine and physical rehabilitation. We report an infant with moyamoya disease and recurrent stroke presenting 10 months after diagnosis (at age 18 months), and discuss the outcome of nonsurgical medical management. The presented case is the second youngest case developing stroke and moyamoya disease.

  10. PATENT FORAMEN OVALE AND STROKE

    PubMed Central

    Homma, Shunichi; Di Tullio, Marco R.

    2010-01-01

    SUMMARY The presence of a patent foramen ovale has been found to be associated with an increased risk of ischemic stroke of otherwise unknown origin (cryptogenic stroke). The present article will review the evidence regarding this association, the technical aspects of PFO detection, and the preventive options to decrease the risk of recurrent cerebral events. PMID:20591626

  11. Impact of the Act FAST stroke campaign delivered by student pharmacists on the primary prevention of stroke.

    PubMed

    Phan Vo, Lucy; Souksavong, JoAnna Han; Tran, Annie; Chang, Janet; Lor, Kajua B

    To evaluate the impact of an Act FAST educational intervention performed by student pharmacists on knowledge of stroke recognition and management. Stroke preparedness and knowledge of primary prevention were assessed with the use of pre- and post-intervention surveys targeting community members at health fairs. The intervention was an Act FAST educational session with blood pressure and blood glucose screenings provided by student pharmacists. Act FAST is a quick tool to help recognize and respond to a stroke. The acronym FAST stands for Face, Arms, Speech, and Time. Community health fairs in Vallejo, CA. Community members 18 years of age and older. Act FAST educational session delivered by student pharmacists. Knowledge of signs, symptoms, management, and risk factors of strokes as defined by the American Heart Association. Following the Act FAST educational intervention, total knowledge of signs, symptoms, and management of stroke significantly increased from moderate to high (n = 112; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.419-2.188; P <0.0001). Total knowledge of risk factors of stroke also significantly increased following the educational intervention (n = 88; 95% CI 0.6496-1.746; P <0.0001). The Act FAST educational intervention delivered by student pharmacists increased knowledge of signs, symptoms, immediate management, and modifiable risk factors of stroke. This suggests that student pharmacists may have a positive impact on community members' preparedness and knowledge of primary prevention of stroke. The Act FAST campaign may be a useful tool for all training health care professionals. Copyright © 2017 American Pharmacists Association®. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Guidelines for the preventive treatment of ischaemic stroke and TIA (II). Recommendations according to aetiological sub-type.

    PubMed

    Fuentes, B; Gállego, J; Gil-Nuñez, A; Morales, A; Purroy, F; Roquer, J; Segura, T; Tejada, J; Lago, A; Díez-Tejedor, E; Alonso de Leciñana, M; Alvarez-Sabin, J; Arenillas, J; Calleja, S; Casado, I; Castellanos, M; Castillo, J; Dávalos, A; Díaz-Otero, F; Egido, J A; López-Fernández, J C; Freijo, M; García Pastor, A; Gilo, F; Irimia, P; Maestre, J; Masjuan, J; Martí-Fábregas, J; Martínez-Sánchez, P; Martínez-Vila, E; Molina, C; Nombela, F; Ribó, M; Rodríguez-Yañez, M; Rubio, F; Serena, J; Simal, P; Vivancos, J

    2014-04-01

    To update the ad hoc Committee of the Cerebrovascular Diseases Study Group of The Spanish Neurological Society guidelines on prevention of ischaemic stroke (IS) and Transient Ischaemic Attack (TIA). We reviewed the available evidence on ischaemic stroke and TIA prevention according to aetiological subtype. Levels of evidence and recommendation levels are based on the classification of the Centre for Evidence-Based Medicine. In atherothrombotic IS, antiplatelet therapy and revascularization procedures in selected cases of ipsilateral carotid stenosis (70%-90%) reduce the risk of recurrences. In cardioembolic IS (atrial fibrillation, valvular diseases, prosthetic valves and myocardial infarction with mural thrombus) prevention is based on the use of oral anticoagulants. Preventive therapies for uncommon causes of IS will depend on the aetiology. In the case of cerebral venous thrombosis oral anticoagulation is effective. We conclude with recommendations for clinical practice in prevention of IS according to the aetiological subtype presented by the patient. Copyright © 2011 Sociedad Española de Neurología. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  13. Evaluation of patients' attitudes towards stroke prevention and bleeding risk in atrial fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Lahaye, S; Regpala, S; Lacombe, S; Sharma, M; Gibbens, S; Ball, D; Francis, K

    2014-03-03

    Patient's values and preferences regarding the relative importance of preventing strokes and avoiding bleeding are now recognised to be of great importance in deciding on therapy for the prevention of stroke due to atrial fibrillation (SPAF). We used an iPad questionnaire to determine the minimal clinically important difference (Treatment Threshold) and the maximum number of major bleeding events that a patient would be willing to endure in order to prevent one stroke (Bleeding Ratio) for the initiation of antithrombotic therapy in 172 hospital in-patients with documented non-valvular atrial fibrillation in whom anticoagulant therapy was being considered. Patients expressed strong opinions regarding SPAF. We found that 12% of patients were "medication averse" and were not willing to consider antithrombotic therapy; even if it was 100% effective in preventing strokes. Of those patients who were willing to consider antithrombotic therapy, 42% were identified as "risk averse" and 15% were "risk tolerant". Patients required at least a 0.8% (NNT=125) annual absolute risk reduction and 15% relative risk reduction in the risk of stroke in order to agree to initiate antithrombotic therapy, and patients were willing to endure 4.4 major bleeds in order to prevent one stroke. In conclusion, there was a substantial amount of inter-patient variability, and often extreme differences in opinion regarding tolerance of bleeding risk in the context of stroke prevention in atrial fibrillation. These findings highlight the importance of considering patient preferences when deciding on SPAF therapy.

  14. Barriers and facilitators to adherence to secondary stroke prevention medications after stroke: analysis of survivors and caregivers views from an online stroke forum.

    PubMed

    Jamison, James; Sutton, Stephen; Mant, Jonathan; De Simoni, Anna

    2017-07-16

    To identify barriers and facilitators of medication adherence in patients with stroke along with their caregivers. Qualitative thematic analysis of posts about secondary prevention medications, informed by Perceptions and Practicalities Approach. Posts written by the UK stroke survivors and their family members taking part in the online forum of the Stroke Association, between 2004 and 2011. 84 participants: 49 stroke survivors, 33 caregivers, 2 not stated, identified using the keywords 'taking medication', 'pills', 'size', 'side-effects', 'routine', 'blister' as well as secondary prevention medication terms. Perceptions reducing the motivation to adhere included dealing with medication side effects, questioning doctors' prescribing practices and negative publicity about medications, especially in regard to statins. Caregivers faced difficulties with ensuring medications were taken while respecting the patient's decisions not to take tablets. They struggled in their role as advocates of patient's needs with healthcare professionals. Not experiencing side effects, attributing importance to medications, positive personal experiences of taking tablets and obtaining modification of treatment to manage side effects were facilitators of adherence. Key practical barriers included difficulties with swallowing tablets, dealing with the burden of treatment and drug cost. Using medication storage devices, following routines and getting help with medications from caregivers were important facilitators of adherence. An online stroke forum is a novel and valuable resource to investigate use of secondary prevention medications. Analysis of this forum highlighted significant barriers and facilitators of medication adherence faced by stroke survivors and their caregivers. Addressing perceptual and practical barriers highlighted here can inform the development of future interventions aimed at improving adherence to secondary prevention medication after stroke. © Article author

  15. Barriers and facilitators to adherence to secondary stroke prevention medications after stroke: analysis of survivors and caregivers views from an online stroke forum

    PubMed Central

    Jamison, James; Sutton, Stephen; Mant, Jonathan; Simoni, Anna De

    2017-01-01

    Objective To identify barriers and facilitators of medication adherence in patients with stroke along with their caregivers. Design Qualitative thematic analysis of posts about secondary prevention medications, informed by Perceptions and Practicalities Approach. Setting Posts written by the UK stroke survivors and their family members taking part in the online forum of the Stroke Association, between 2004 and 2011. Participants 84 participants: 49 stroke survivors, 33 caregivers, 2 not stated, identified using the keywords ‘taking medication’, ‘pills’, ‘size’, ‘side-effects’, ‘routine’, ‘blister’ as well as secondary prevention medication terms. Results Perceptions reducing the motivation to adhere included dealing with medication side effects, questioning doctors’ prescribing practices and negative publicity about medications, especially in regard to statins. Caregivers faced difficulties with ensuring medications were taken while respecting the patient’s decisions not to take tablets. They struggled in their role as advocates of patient’s needs with healthcare professionals. Not experiencing side effects, attributing importance to medications, positive personal experiences of taking tablets and obtaining modification of treatment to manage side effects were facilitators of adherence. Key practical barriers included difficulties with swallowing tablets, dealing with the burden of treatment and drug cost. Using medication storage devices, following routines and getting help with medications from caregivers were important facilitators of adherence. Conclusions An online stroke forum is a novel and valuable resource to investigate use of secondary prevention medications. Analysis of this forum highlighted significant barriers and facilitators of medication adherence faced by stroke survivors and their caregivers. Addressing perceptual and practical barriers highlighted here can inform the development of future interventions aimed at

  16. Renal denervation prevents stroke and brain injury via attenuation of oxidative stress in hypertensive rats.

    PubMed

    Nakagawa, Takashi; Hasegawa, Yu; Uekawa, Ken; Ma, Mingjie; Katayama, Tetsuji; Sueta, Daisuke; Toyama, Kensuke; Kataoka, Keiichiro; Koibuchi, Nobutaka; Maeda, Masanobu; Kuratsu, Jun-Ichi; Kim-Mitsuyama, Shokei

    2013-10-14

    Although renal denervation (RD) is shown to reduce blood pressure significantly in patients with resistant hypertension, the benefit of RD in prevention of stroke is unknown. We hypothesized that RD can prevent the incidence of stroke and brain injury in hypertensive rats beyond blood pressure lowering. High-salt-loaded, stroke-prone, spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHRSP) were divided into 4 groups: (1) control; (2) sham operation; (3) bilateral RD; and (4) hydralazine administration to examine the effect of RD on stroke and brain injury of SHRSP. RD significantly reduced the onset of neurological deficit and death in SHRSP, and this protection against stroke by RD was associated with the increase in cerebral blood flow (CBF), the suppression of blood-brain barrier disruption, the limitation of white matter (WM) lesions, and the attenuation of macrophage infiltration and activated microglia. Furthermore, RD significantly attenuated brain oxidative stress, and NADPH oxidase subunits, P67 and Rac1 in SHRSP. On the other hand, hydralazine, with similar blood pressure lowering to RD, did not significantly suppress the onset of stroke and brain injury in SHRSP. Furthermore, RD prevented cardiac remodeling and vascular endothelial impairment in SHRSP. Our present work provided the first experimental evidence that RD can prevent hypertensive stroke and brain injury, beyond blood pressure lowering, thereby highlighting RD as a promising therapeutic strategy for stroke as well as hypertension.

  17. Bezlotoxumab for Prevention of Recurrent Clostridium difficile Infection.

    PubMed

    Wilcox, Mark H; Gerding, Dale N; Poxton, Ian R; Kelly, Ciaran; Nathan, Richard; Birch, Thomas; Cornely, Oliver A; Rahav, Galia; Bouza, Emilio; Lee, Christine; Jenkin, Grant; Jensen, Werner; Kim, You-Sun; Yoshida, Junichi; Gabryelski, Lori; Pedley, Alison; Eves, Karen; Tipping, Robert; Guris, Dalya; Kartsonis, Nicholas; Dorr, Mary-Beth

    2017-01-26

    Clostridium difficile is the most common cause of infectious diarrhea in hospitalized patients. Recurrences are common after antibiotic therapy. Actoxumab and bezlotoxumab are human monoclonal antibodies against C. difficile toxins A and B, respectively. We conducted two double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled, phase 3 trials, MODIFY I and MODIFY II, involving 2655 adults receiving oral standard-of-care antibiotics for primary or recurrent C. difficile infection. Participants received an infusion of bezlotoxumab (10 mg per kilogram of body weight), actoxumab plus bezlotoxumab (10 mg per kilogram each), or placebo; actoxumab alone (10 mg per kilogram) was given in MODIFY I but discontinued after a planned interim analysis. The primary end point was recurrent infection (new episode after initial clinical cure) within 12 weeks after infusion in the modified intention-to-treat population. In both trials, the rate of recurrent C. difficile infection was significantly lower with bezlotoxumab alone than with placebo (MODIFY I: 17% [67 of 386] vs. 28% [109 of 395]; adjusted difference, -10.1 percentage points; 95% confidence interval [CI], -15.9 to -4.3; P<0.001; MODIFY II: 16% [62 of 395] vs. 26% [97 of 378]; adjusted difference, -9.9 percentage points; 95% CI, -15.5 to -4.3; P<0.001) and was significantly lower with actoxumab plus bezlotoxumab than with placebo (MODIFY I: 16% [61 of 383] vs. 28% [109 of 395]; adjusted difference, -11.6 percentage points; 95% CI, -17.4 to -5.9; P<0.001; MODIFY II: 15% [58 of 390] vs. 26% [97 of 378]; adjusted difference, -10.7 percentage points; 95% CI, -16.4 to -5.1; P<0.001). In prespecified subgroup analyses (combined data set), rates of recurrent infection were lower in both groups that received bezlotoxumab than in the placebo group in subpopulations at high risk for recurrent infection or for an adverse outcome. The rates of initial clinical cure were 80% with bezlotoxumab alone, 73% with actoxumab plus bezlotoxumab, and 80

  18. Novel oral anticoagulants for stroke prevention in atrial fibrillation: focus on apixaban.

    PubMed

    Potpara, Tatjana S; Polovina, Marija M; Licina, Marina M; Stojanovic, Radan M; Prostran, Milica S; Lip, Gregory Y H

    2012-06-01

    Stroke prevention in atrial fibrillation (AF) has been challenging over decades, mostly due to a number of difficulties associated with oral vitamin K antagonists (VKAs), which have been the most effective stroke prevention treatment for a long time. The oral direct thrombin inhibitors (e.g., dabigatran) and oral direct inhibitors of factor Xa (e.g., rivaroxaban, apixaban) have emerged recently as an alternative to VKAs for stroke prevention in AF. These drugs act rapidly, and have a predictable and stable dose-related anticoagulant effect with a few clinically relevant drug-drug interactions. The novel oral anticoagulants are used in fixed doses with no need for regular laboratory monitoring of anticoagulation intensity. However, each of these drugs has distinct pharmacological properties that could influence optimal use in clinical practice. The following phase 3 randomized trials with novel oral anticoagulants versus warfarin for stroke prevention in AF have been completed: the Randomized Evaluation of Long-term Anticoagulant therapy (RE-LY) trial with dabigatran, the Rivaroxaban Once daily oral direct Factor Xa inhibition Compared with vitamin K antagonism for prevention of stroke and Embolism Trial in Atrial Fibrillation (ROCKET-AF) trial with rivaroxaban, and the Apixaban for Reduction of Stroke and Other Thromboembolism Events in Atrial Fibrillation (ARISTOTLE) trial with apixaban. Moreover, the Apixaban Versus Acetylsalicylic Acid to prevent Strokes (AVERROES) trial included patients with AF who have failed or were unsuitable for warfarin, and compared apixaban versus aspirin for stroke prevention in AF. Overall, apixaban has two large trials for stroke prevention in AF showing benefits not only over warfarin, but also over aspirin among those patients who have failed or refused warfarin. In the ARISTOTLE trial, apixaban was superior to warfarin in the reduction of stroke or systemic embolism, major bleeding, intracranial hemorrhage, and all-cause mortality

  19. Urethral recurrence after cystectomy: current preventative measures, diagnosis and management.

    PubMed

    Chan, Yvonne; Fisher, Patrick; Tilki, Derya; Evans, Christopher P

    2016-04-01

    To summarise the current literature on the diagnosis and management of urethral recurrence (UR) after radical cystectomy (RC), as UR after RC is rare but associated with high mortality. With the recently increased use of orthotopic bladder substitution and the questionable benefit of prophylactic urethrectomy, identification of patients at high risk of UR, management of the remnant urethra, and treatment of UR become critical questions. A review of the PubMed database from 1980 to 2014 was performed to identify studies evaluating recurrent urothelial cancer of the urethra after RC. The search terms used included 'urethral recurrence', 'cystectomy' or 'cystoprostatectomy'. Selected studies provided information on the type of urinary diversion performed, the incidence of UR, and the time to UR. Incidence of UR after RC ranges from 1% to 8% with most recurrences occurring within the first 2 years after surgery. Increased risk of UR is associated with involvement of the prostate, tumour multifocality, bladder neck involvement, and cutaneous diversion. The median overall survival after UR ranges from 6 to 54 months and the 5-year disease-specific survival after UR is reported to be between zero and 83%. UR remains a relatively rare event. Current literature suggests that urethral wash cytology may be useful in patients with intermediate- to high-risk of recurrence to enable early detection of non-invasive disease, which may be amenable to conservative therapy before urethrectomy.

  20. Aspiration Pneumonia After Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Armstrong, John R.; Mosher, Benjamin D.

    2011-01-01

    Fifteen million strokes occur worldwide each year with 5 million associated deaths and an additional 5 million people left permanently disabled. In the United States, about 780 000 people suffer a new or recurrent stroke each year. There were an estimated total 5.8 million stroke survivors as of 2008. Mortality from stroke is the third leading cause of death in America following heart disease and cancer. Chest infection may affect up to as many as one-third of stroke patients. This increases the morbidity and mortality of this patient population. Pneumonia causes the highest attributable mortality of all medical complications following stroke. A comprehensive multidisciplinary team approach is required at the hospital level. This requires active administrative commitment and participation. Implementation of evidence-based management strategies can improve outcomes and reduce costs. We sought to review the problem of post-stroke pneumonia and discuss strategies for prevention and intervention. PMID:23983842

  1. [Risk factors for stroke].

    PubMed

    Mandić, Milan; Rancić, Natasa

    2011-01-01

    Stroke is the third cause of mortality both in men and in women throughout the world. In Serbia, stroke is the first cause of mortality in women older than 55 years of age and the second cause of death in men of the same age. Both ischemic heart diseases and ischemic stroke correlate with the same predisposing, potentially modifiable risk factors (hypertension, abnormal blood lipids and lipoproteins, cigarette smoking, physical inactivity, obesity, diabetes mellitus). Stroke does not usually occur on its own. Patients with stroke have a high prevalence of associated medical problems. These conditions may predict the stroke ("preexisting conditions"), occur for the first time after stroke ("post-stroke complications"), or present as manifestations of preexisting medical conditions after stroke. Risk factors for stroke are divided into the three groups: risk factors which cannot be influenced on such as: age, gender, positive family history of stroke, race: those which are modifiable such as: hypertension, diabetes mellitus, smoking cigarettes, obesity, physical inactivity and the third group consists of potential risk factors for stroke (consumption of alcohol, hormones, changes in fibrinolysis, changes in blood. Stroke remains a leading cause of long-term disability and premature death of both men and women. Consequently, stroke survivors are often handicapped and doomed to sedentary lifestyle which restrains performance of activities of daily living, increases the risk for falls, and may contribute to a higher risk for recurrent stroke and cardiovascular disease. Prevention of stroke is still a great medical and social problem. Further studies are required to investigate potential risk factors for the occurrence of stroke as well as the measures of primary and secondary prevention.

  2. Prevention of Development of Recurrent Growth of Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-02-01

    targets; developed a hybrid immunostaining protocol for comparison of expression of antigens in proliferating versus non-proliferating cells; collected ...The purpose of the proposed studies is to identify and then target one gene or a small number of genes critical for the development of recurrent

  3. Stroke Prevention Trial in Sickle Cell Anemia (STOP): extended follow-up and final results.

    PubMed

    Lee, Margaret T; Piomelli, Sergio; Granger, Suzanne; Miller, Scott T; Harkness, Shannon; Brambilla, Donald J; Adams, Robert J

    2006-08-01

    The Stroke Prevention Trial in Sickle Cell Anemia (STOP) was a randomized trial to evaluate whether chronic transfusion could prevent initial stroke in children with sickle-cell anemia at high risk as determined by transcranial Doppler (TCD). The trial demonstrated a large benefit of transfusion and was halted early. After termination of the trial, patients participated in a post-trial follow-up study. More patients in the transfusion group (70%) elected transfusion for primary stroke prevention compared with those on standard care (45%). Six patients with persistently abnormal TCD results developed stroke. A minority with initially abnormal TCD results remained stroke-free without transfusion. Except for lower baseline and follow-up TCD velocities compared with those with stroke, no predictive features of this apparent lower-risk subgroup could be determined. TCD results at last testing in 108 patients that did not have stroke were: normal (44.4%), conditional (26.9%), abnormal (22.2%), and inadequate (6.5%). Patients on transfusion were more likely to have normal TCD results. Transfusion resulted in iron overload and alloimmunization, but no infection. The study provides new information on acceptance rates and long-term effects of transfusion. Persistent TCD elevation signals ongoing stroke risk. Reduction in TCD results over time without transfusion is observed in some patients and requires further study.

  4. Compression for Primary Prevention, Treatment, and Prevention of Recurrence of Venous Leg Ulcers

    PubMed Central

    Yates, Stephanie; McNichol, Laurie; Gray, Mikel

    2016-01-01

    Chronic venous insufficiency is a prevalent disease that frequently leads to development of venous leg ulcers. While a number of evidence-based clinical practice guidelines have been developed that provide guidance for clinicians when caring for patients with chronic venous insufficiency, they lack adequate detail concerning selection and application of compression for prevention and management of venous leg ulcers. In order to address this need, the WOCN Society appointed a task force to develop an algorithm for compression for primary prevention, treatment, and prevention of recurrent venous leg ulcers in persons with chronic venous insufficiency. The task force used findings from a scoping literature review to identify current best evidence needed to support decision points and pathways within the algorithm. In addition, the task force convened a panel of 20 clinicians and researchers with expertise in lower extremity venous disorders in order to establish consensus around pathways and decision points within the algorithm lacking robust evidence. Following initial construction of the algorithm, a second interdisciplinary group of expert clinicians established content validity and provided additional qualitative feedback used to complete final revisions of the algorithm. This article reviews the process used to create this landmark algorithm, including generation of the evidence- and consensus-based statements used in its construction, the various pathways, and rich supplemental materials embedded within the algorithm, and the process used to establish content validity. PMID:27163774

  5. Antiplatelet therapies for secondary stroke prevention: an update on clinical and cost–effectiveness

    PubMed Central

    Rothlisberger, Julia M; Ovbiagele, Bruce

    2015-01-01

    Stroke exacts a huge toll physically, mentally and economically. Antiplatelet therapy is the cornerstone of secondary stroke prevention, and proven drugs available to successfully realize this therapeutic strategy for the long term include aspirin, dipyridamole plus aspirin and clopidogrel. However, government agencies, corporations, health plans and patients desire more information about the clinical- and cost–effectiveness of these established therapies in real-world settings. This paper provides an update on evidence-based secondary stroke prevention with antiplatelet medications, discusses cost-related issues and offers perspective about the future. PMID:26274799

  6. Antiplatelet therapies for secondary stroke prevention: an update on clinical and cost-effectiveness.

    PubMed

    Rothlisberger, Julia M; Ovbiagele, Bruce

    2015-08-01

    Stroke exacts a huge toll physically, mentally and economically. Antiplatelet therapy is the cornerstone of secondary stroke prevention, and proven drugs available to successfully realize this therapeutic strategy for the long term include aspirin, dipyridamole plus aspirin and clopidogrel. However, government agencies, corporations, health plans and patients desire more information about the clinical- and cost-effectiveness of these established therapies in real-world settings. This paper provides an update on evidence-based secondary stroke prevention with antiplatelet medications, discusses cost-related issues and offers perspective about the future.

  7. Renal Denervation Prevents Stroke and Brain Injury via Attenuation of Oxidative Stress in Hypertensive Rats

    PubMed Central

    Nakagawa, Takashi; Hasegawa, Yu; Uekawa, Ken; Ma, Mingjie; Katayama, Tetsuji; Sueta, Daisuke; Toyama, Kensuke; Kataoka, Keiichiro; Koibuchi, Nobutaka; Maeda, Masanobu; Kuratsu, Jun‐ichi; Kim‐Mitsuyama, Shokei

    2013-01-01

    Background Although renal denervation (RD) is shown to reduce blood pressure significantly in patients with resistant hypertension, the benefit of RD in prevention of stroke is unknown. We hypothesized that RD can prevent the incidence of stroke and brain injury in hypertensive rats beyond blood pressure lowering. Methods and Results High‐salt‐loaded, stroke‐prone, spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHRSP) were divided into 4 groups: (1) control; (2) sham operation; (3) bilateral RD; and (4) hydralazine administration to examine the effect of RD on stroke and brain injury of SHRSP. RD significantly reduced the onset of neurological deficit and death in SHRSP, and this protection against stroke by RD was associated with the increase in cerebral blood flow (CBF), the suppression of blood–brain barrier disruption, the limitation of white matter (WM) lesions, and the attenuation of macrophage infiltration and activated microglia. Furthermore, RD significantly attenuated brain oxidative stress, and NADPH oxidase subunits, P67 and Rac1 in SHRSP. On the other hand, hydralazine, with similar blood pressure lowering to RD, did not significantly suppress the onset of stroke and brain injury in SHRSP. Furthermore, RD prevented cardiac remodeling and vascular endothelial impairment in SHRSP. Conclusions Our present work provided the first experimental evidence that RD can prevent hypertensive stroke and brain injury, beyond blood pressure lowering, thereby highlighting RD as a promising therapeutic strategy for stroke as well as hypertension. PMID:24125845

  8. Novel oral anticoagulants for stroke prevention in atrial fibrillation: a focus on the older patient

    PubMed Central

    Yates, Scott W

    2013-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is a common arrhythmia that is associated with an increased risk of stroke, particularly in the elderly. Traditionally, a vitamin K antagonist such as warfarin is prescribed for stroke prevention. Warfarin is effective at lowering stroke risk but has several limitations due to food restrictions, drug interactions, and a narrow therapeutic window. Various novel oral anticoagulants (NOACs) are available or under development to provide alternative treatment options. This article reviews the efficacy and safety of three NOACs (dabigatran etexilate, rivaroxaban, and apixaban) in addition to warfarin and aspirin, for prevention of stroke in patients with AF, focusing on the elderly population. Results of clinical trials demonstrate that the efficacy of NOACs for stroke prevention in patients with AF is as good as or better than that of warfarin. The NOACs are also associated with an equivalent or lower risk of bleeding. Regardless of the medication chosen, older patients with AF must be treated cautiously due to an increased risk of stroke and bleeding, as well as potential challenges related to drug interactions and monitoring requirements. NOACs may be suitable alternatives to warfarin for stroke prevention in older patients due to several advantages, including a faster onset of action, few drug or food interactions, and no requirement for regular monitoring. However, dose adjustments may be required for certain patients, such as those with severe renal impairment or in the setting of drug interactions. PMID:23687449

  9. Treating blood pressure to prevent strokes: The age factor.

    PubMed

    Chrysant, Steven G

    2013-03-26

    The importance of systolic blood pressure (SBP), diastolic blood pressure (DBP), and pulse pressure (PP), on the incidence of coronary heart disease (CHD) and stroke are known. However, the importance of blood pressure (BP)-age shifts regarding the stroke incidence is not clearly known. The BP changes with the advancement of age from the predominance of DBP in the young to the predominance of SBP in the old. This change is due to the stiffening of the large arteries as a result of the aging process and the replacement of the elastic fibers with collagen fibers. This change results in the loss of compliance and the elastic recoil of these vessels leading to increase in pulse wave velocity, central SBP and widening of pulse pressure leading to an increased incidence of CHD and strokes. It has been demonstrated epidemiologically that the SBP rises linearly with age, whereas the DBP rises up to the age of 45-50 years, and then begins to decline after the age of 60 years leading to a progressive widening of PP. Several studies have shown an inverse relationship between DBP and CHD, whereas no such relationship has been demonstrated for stroke. However, a recent study showed an inverse relationship with DBP and stroke when it dropped below 71 mmHg in subjects 50 years of age or older. In contrast, there was a positive association between BP and stroke when both SBP and DBP were ≥ 71 mmHg. These findings suggest that in treating systolic hypertension in the elderly to reduce stroke risk, attention should be paid on the potential harm of low DBP and the widening of PP regarding CHD and stroke. The implications of BP shifts with age and the potential risks of low DBP regarding the risk of stroke will be discussed in this concise review.

  10. Treating blood pressure to prevent strokes: The age factor

    PubMed Central

    Chrysant, Steven G

    2013-01-01

    The importance of systolic blood pressure (SBP), diastolic blood pressure (DBP), and pulse pressure (PP), on the incidence of coronary heart disease (CHD) and stroke are known. However, the importance of blood pressure (BP)-age shifts regarding the stroke incidence is not clearly known. The BP changes with the advancement of age from the predominance of DBP in the young to the predominance of SBP in the old. This change is due to the stiffening of the large arteries as a result of the aging process and the replacement of the elastic fibers with collagen fibers. This change results in the loss of compliance and the elastic recoil of these vessels leading to increase in pulse wave velocity, central SBP and widening of pulse pressure leading to an increased incidence of CHD and strokes. It has been demonstrated epidemiologically that the SBP rises linearly with age, whereas the DBP rises up to the age of 45-50 years, and then begins to decline after the age of 60 years leading to a progressive widening of PP. Several studies have shown an inverse relationship between DBP and CHD, whereas no such relationship has been demonstrated for stroke. However, a recent study showed an inverse relationship with DBP and stroke when it dropped below 71 mmHg in subjects 50 years of age or older. In contrast, there was a positive association between BP and stroke when both SBP and DBP were ≥ 71 mmHg. These findings suggest that in treating systolic hypertension in the elderly to reduce stroke risk, attention should be paid on the potential harm of low DBP and the widening of PP regarding CHD and stroke. The implications of BP shifts with age and the potential risks of low DBP regarding the risk of stroke will be discussed in this concise review. PMID:23539515

  11. Oral anticoagulation in elderly patients as secondary prevention of cardioembolic strokes

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Stroke incidence increases with age. Atrial fibrillation (AF) is an important risk factor for ischemic stroke and its incidence also increases with age. However oral anticoagulant therapy (OAT) tends to be underused in the elderly population. Methods Elderly patients (> = 80 years) with an ischemic stroke admitted in our department between 1/7/2003 and 31/6/2005 were prospectively evaluated. Baseline characteristics, risk factors, treatment and etiology according to TOAST criteria were recorded. Patients treated with OAT were followed up in order to assess any side effect and stroke recurrence. Mean follow-up was of 19.5 months (7-45) from discharge. Results Sixty four out of a hundred and fifty nine elderly patients (40.25%) were classified as cardioembolic; mean age was 84.5 years (80-97) and 64.6% were women. AF had been previously identified in 60% of them (16.9% were on OAT and 40.6% on antiplatelet therapy). At discharge, 32 patients (49.2%) were on OAT. In the follow-up 4 patients (12.5%) suffered systemic haemorrhages (3 urinary, 1 gastrointestinal bleeding), with no change in their functional status. Mean INR in this group was 5.9 [3-11] and, in 3 of them, OAT was cancelled. No brain haemorrhages were recorded. Ischemic stroke recurred in 4 patients (INR < 1.8 in 3 of them; the other, INR 2.35). Three patients had died at the end of the follow-up, one of them as a consequence of ischemic stroke recurrence. Discussion Twenty eight point eight of stroke patients admitted in the period of study were >80 years. The high proportion of cardioembolic strokes in this age segment contrasts with the general underuse of OAT as antithrombotic prophylaxis. Our study suggests that OAT is a safe strategy when carefully prescribed, even for elderly patients. PMID:20525389

  12. Pre-Stroke Use of Beta-Blockers Does Not Lower Post-Stroke Infection Rate: An Exploratory Analysis of the Preventive Antibiotics in Stroke Study

    PubMed Central

    Westendorp, Willeke F.; Vermeij, Jan-Dirk; Brouwer, Matthijs C.; Roos, Y.B.W.E.M.; Nederkoorn, Paul J.; van de Beek, Diederik

    2016-01-01

    Background Stroke-associated infections occur frequently and are associated with unfavorable outcome. Previous cohort studies suggest a protective effect of beta-blockers (BBs) against infections. A sympathetic drive may increase immune suppression and infections. Aim This study is aimed at investigating the association between BB treatment at baseline and post-stroke infection in the Preventive Antibiotics in Stroke Study (PASS), a prospective clinical trial. Methods We performed an exploratory analysis in PASS, 2,538 patients with acute phase of stroke (24 h after onset) were randomized to ceftriaxone (intravenous, 2 g per day for 4 days) in addition to stroke unit care, or standard stroke unit care without preventive antibiotic treatment. All clinical data, including use of BBs, was prospectively collected. Infection was diagnosed by the treating physician, and independently by an expert panel blinded for all other data. Multivariable analysis was performed to investigate the relation between BB treatment and infection rate. Results Infection, as defined by the physician, occurred in 348 of 2,538 patients (14%). Multivariable analysis showed that the use of BBs at baseline was associated with the development of infection during clinical course (adjusted OR (aOR) 1.61, 95% CI 1.19-2.18; p < 0.01). BB use at baseline was also associated with the development of pneumonia (aOR 1.56, 95% CI 1.05-2.30; p = 0.03). Baseline BB use was not associated with mortality (aOR 1.14, 95% CI 0.84-1.53; p = 0.41) or unfavorable outcome at 3 months (aOR 1.10, 95% CI 0.89-1.35; p = 0.39). Conclusions Patients treated with BBs prior to stroke have a higher rate of infection and pneumonia. PMID:27701170

  13. How French general practitioners manage and prevent recurrent respiratory tract infections in children: the SOURIRRE survey

    PubMed Central

    Chicoulaa, Bruno; Haas, Hervé; Viala, Jérôme; Salvetat, Maryline; Olives, Jean-Pierre

    2017-01-01

    Background Recurrent respiratory tract infections (RRTIs) are the most common reason for children’s visits to primary care physicians in France; however, little is known about general practitioners’ (GPs) opinions and expectations concerning the management and prevention of these common and recurrent pathologies. Purpose To describe French GPs’ daily practice in the management of respiratory infections and the prevention of their recurrence in children. Methods A sample group of French GPs answered a structured questionnaire on risk factors, RRTI management, antibiotic use and prevention measures. Results A total of 358 GPs participated in the survey. Rhinopharyngitis, the most frequent respiratory infection, was considered to be recurrent if six or more episodes occurred in a year. Four risk factors were acknowledged as substantial: living in communities, passive smoking, pollution and allergies. Around 63% of GPs said that RRTIs are too often treated with antibiotics. More than 85% thought that prevention of RRTIs is possible. Smoking cessation, vaccination, allergen avoidance and hygiene were identified as the main preventive measures. A large majority of GPs (84%) prescribed products for prevention and ~90% would prescribe a product stimulating immunity if the efficacy and tolerability of these agents was proven and confirmed in their daily practice. Conclusions French GPs are well aware of the health and socioeconomic burdens resulting from RRTIs, as well as the risk of antibiotic overuse. They have a prevention-oriented approach, implement preventive measures when possible and prescribe products for prevention. PMID:28293116

  14. Economic assessment of the secondary prevention of ischaemic stroke with dipyridamole plus aspirin (Aggrenox/Asasantin) in France.

    PubMed

    Marissal, Jean-Pierre; Selke, Bernard

    2004-01-01

    To assess the cost effectiveness of aspirin 25 mg plus dipyridamole 200 mg twice daily in the secondary prevention of ischaemic stroke, according to the French social security perspective, using efficacy data from the second European Stroke Prevention Study (ESPS-2). The ESPS-2 was a double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial which assessed the efficacy of four secondary prevention strategies: (i) placebo; (ii) aspirin (acetylsalicylic acid) 25 mg twice daily; (iii) dipyridamole 200 mg twice daily; and (iv) aspirin 25 mg plus dipyridamole 200 mg twice daily. We performed a cost-effectiveness analysis with Monte Carlo simulations to compute confidence intervals. We combined data from various sources including the Dijon Stroke Registry, Institut National de la Statistique et des Etudes Economiques, Etude du Coût de l'Infarctus Cérébral (Study of the Cost of Cerebral Infarction [ECIC]) study and the ESPS-2 trial. According to our findings, a preventive strategy with aspirin 25 mg plus dipyridamole 200 mg twice daily is associated with net benefits per avoided stroke recurrence amounting to USD 23,932 (95% CI -USD 32,609, USD 35,772) compared with aspirin 25 mg twice daily alone, and USD 31,555 (95% CI USD 4921, USD 74,515) compared with dipyridamole alone (1997 values). Sensitivity analysis demonstrated that dipyridamole plus aspirin was still cost effective when the average cost of adverse effects per episode (ignored in the original estimation of the cost-effectiveness ratios due to a lack of data) was assumed to be USD 8600 (50,000 French francs); this cost is unlikely as most of the adverse effects associated with aspirin plus dipyridamole are only slight to moderate in severity. In the secondary prevention of stroke in France, this study suggests, given its underlying assumptions and data, that aspirin 25 mg plus dipyridamole 200 mg twice daily is likely to be a cost-effective strategy from the social security perspective, when compared with other

  15. Distribution of Estimated 10-Year Risk of Recurrent Vascular Events and Residual Risk in a Secondary Prevention Population.

    PubMed

    Kaasenbrood, Lotte; Boekholdt, S Matthijs; van der Graaf, Yolanda; Ray, Kausik K; Peters, Ron J G; Kastelein, John J P; Amarenco, Pierre; LaRosa, John C; Cramer, Maarten J M; Westerink, Jan; Kappelle, L Jaap; de Borst, Gert J; Visseren, Frank L J

    2016-11-08

    Among patients with clinically manifest vascular disease, the risk of recurrent vascular events is likely to vary. We assessed the distribution of estimated 10-year risk of recurrent vascular events in a secondary prevention population. We also estimated the potential risk reduction and residual risk that can be achieved if patients reach guideline-recommended risk factor targets. The SMART score (Second Manifestations of Arterial Disease) for 10-year risk of myocardial infarction, stroke, or vascular death was applied to 6904 patients with vascular disease. The risk score was externally validated in 18 436 patients with various manifestations of vascular disease from the TNT (Treating to New Targets), IDEAL (Incremental Decrease in End Points Through Aggressive Lipid Lowering), SPARCL (Stroke Prevention by Aggressive Reduction in Cholesterol Levels), and CAPRIE (Clopidogrel Versus Aspirin in Patients at Risk of Ischemic Events) trials. The residual risk at guideline-recommended targets was estimated by applying relative risk reductions from meta-analyses to the estimated risk for targets for systolic blood pressure, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, smoking, physical activity, and use of antithrombotic agents. The external performance of the SMART risk score was reasonable, apart from overestimation of risk in patients with 10-year risk >40%. In patients with various manifestations of vascular disease, median 10-year risk of a recurrent major vascular event was 17% (interquartile range, 11%-28%), varying from <10% in 18% to >30% in 22% of the patients. If risk factors were at guideline-recommended targets, the residual 10-year risk would be <10% in 47% and >30% in 9% of the patients (median, 11%; interquartile range, 7%-17%). Among patients with vascular disease, there is very substantial variation in estimated 10-year risk of recurrent vascular events. If all modifiable risk factors were at guideline-recommended targets, half of the patients would have a 10

  16. Direct oral anticoagulants: key considerations for use to prevent stroke in patients with nonvalvular atrial fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    Ment, Jerome

    2015-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common cardiac arrhythmia worldwide. Strokes that occur as a complication of AF are usually more severe and associated with a higher disability or morbidity and mortality rate compared with non-AF-related strokes. The risk of stroke in AF is dependent on several risk factors; AF itself acts as an independent risk factor for stroke. The combination of effective anticoagulation therapy, risk stratification (based on stroke risk scores, such as CHADS2 and CHA2DS2-VASc), and recommendations provided by guidelines is essential for decreasing the risk of stroke in patients with AF. Although effective in preventing the occurrence of stroke, vitamin K antagonists (VKAs; eg, warfarin) are associated with several limitations. Therefore, direct oral anticoagulants, such as apixaban, dabigatran etexilate, edoxaban, and rivaroxaban, have emerged as an alternative to the VKAs for stroke prevention in patients with nonvalvular AF. Compared with the VKAs, these agents have more favorable pharmacological characteristics and, unlike the VKAs, they are given at fixed doses without the need for routine coagulation monitoring. It remains important that physicians use these direct oral anticoagulants responsibly to ensure optimal safety and effectiveness. This article provides an overview of the existing data on the direct oral anticoagulants, focusing on management protocols for aiding physicians to optimize anticoagulant therapy in patients with nonvalvular AF, particularly in special patient populations (eg, those with renal impairment) and other specific clinical situations. PMID:26089678

  17. Direct oral anticoagulants: key considerations for use to prevent stroke in patients with nonvalvular atrial fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Ment, Jerome

    2015-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common cardiac arrhythmia worldwide. Strokes that occur as a complication of AF are usually more severe and associated with a higher disability or morbidity and mortality rate compared with non-AF-related strokes. The risk of stroke in AF is dependent on several risk factors; AF itself acts as an independent risk factor for stroke. The combination of effective anticoagulation therapy, risk stratification (based on stroke risk scores, such as CHADS2 and CHA2DS2-VASc), and recommendations provided by guidelines is essential for decreasing the risk of stroke in patients with AF. Although effective in preventing the occurrence of stroke, vitamin K antagonists (VKAs; e.g., warfarin) are associated with several limitations. Therefore, direct oral anticoagulants, such as apixaban, dabigatran etexilate, edoxaban, and rivaroxaban, have emerged as an alternative to the VKAs for stroke prevention in patients with nonvalvular AF. Compared with the VKAs, these agents have more favorable pharmacological characteristics and, unlike the VKAs, they are given at fixed doses without the need for routine coagulation monitoring. It remains important that physicians use these direct oral anticoagulants responsibly to ensure optimal safety and effectiveness. This article provides an overview of the existing data on the direct oral anticoagulants, focusing on management protocols for aiding physicians to optimize anticoagulant therapy in patients with nonvalvular AF, particularly in special patient populations (e.g., those with renal impairment) and other specific clinical situations.

  18. Effects of a Stroke Primary Prevention Program on Risk Factors for At-Home Elderly.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Mi Yang; Jeong, HyeonCheol

    2015-11-28

    BACKGROUND To prevent stroke from occurring, stroke risk factors in at-risk subjects should be controlled and the diseases causing stroke should be managed. This study evaluated a nursing intervention to prevent stroke in at-risk elderly living at home. The program consisted of stroke and nutrition education as well as exercise guidance. MATERIAL AND METHODS This study targeted 93 elderly people living at home residing in E province with 1 or more stroke risk factors, including high blood pressure, diabetes, hyperlipidemia, obesity, smoking, or drinking alcohol. The 12-week program included a stroke education class once a week, a nutrition management class once a week, and exercise guidance 3 times a week. Each session lasted 50-70 min. Each disease education and nutrition management session lasted for 20 min and each exercise session lasted for 30-50 min. RESULTS The experimental group's body mass index (BMI) (t=8.27, p<.001), systolic blood pressure (t=2.39, p=.021), fasting blood sugar (t=0.39, p=.700), total cholesterol (t=4.18, p<.001), triglyceride levels (t=2.50, p=.016), and depression scores (t=5.48, p<.001) were significantly reduced and high-density phospholipid protein levels increased significantly by the end of the program (t=-2.94, p=.005). CONCLUSIONS Based on the results of this study, participating in a stroke prevention program enabled at-risk elderly participants who lived at home in rural areas to perform health-promoting behaviors. This program may reduce the incidence of stroke by reducing risk factors and managing stroke precursor diseases.

  19. High dietary fiber intake prevents stroke at a population level.

    PubMed

    Casiglia, Edoardo; Tikhonoff, Valérie; Caffi, Sandro; Boschetti, Giovanni; Grasselli, Carla; Saugo, Mario; Giordano, Nunzia; Rapisarda, Valentina; Spinella, Paolo; Palatini, Paolo

    2013-10-01

    This research was aimed at clarifying whether high dietary fiber intake has an impact on incidence and risk of stroke at a population level. In 1647 unselected subjects, dietary fiber intake (DFI) was detected in a 12-year population-based study, using other dietary variables, anagraphics, biometrics, blood pressure, heart rate, blood lipids, glucose, insulin, uricaemia, fibrinogenaemia, erytrosedimentation rate, diabetes, insulin resistance, smoking, pulmonary disease and left ventricular hypertrophy as covariables. In adjusted Cox models, high DFI reduced the risk of stroke. In analysis based on quintiles of fiber intake adjusted for confounders, HR for incidence of stroke was lower when the daily intake of soluble fiber was >25 g or that of insoluble fiber was >47 g. In multivariate analyses, using these values as cut-off of DFI, the risk of stroke was lower in those intaking more that the cut-off of soluble (HR 0.31, 0.17-0.55) or insoluble (HR 0.35, 0.19-0.63) fiber. Incidence of stroke was also lower (-50%, p < 0.003 and -46%, p < 0.01, respectively). Higher dietary DFI is inversely and independently associated to incidence and risk of stroke in general population. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd and European Society for Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism. All rights reserved.

  20. Cardiac procedures to prevent stroke: patent foramen ovale closure/left atrial appendage occlusion.

    PubMed

    Freixa, Xavier; Arzamendi, Dabit; Tzikas, Apostolos; Noble, Stephane; Basmadjian, Arsene; Garceau, Patrick; Ibrahim, Réda

    2014-01-01

    Stroke is a major contributor to population morbidity and mortality. Cardiac thromboembolic sources are an important potential cause of stroke. Left atrial appendage (LAA) thromboembolism in association with atrial fibrillation is a major contributor to stroke occurrence, particularly in elderly individuals. Patent foramen ovale (PFO) acts as a potential conduit from the right-sided circulation to the brain, and has been suggested to be an important factor in cryptogenic stroke in the young patients. Advances in interventional cardiology have made it possible to deal with these potential stroke sources (LAA and PFO), but the available methods have intrinsic limitations that must be recognized. Furthermore, the potential value of LAA and PFO closure depends on our ability to identify when the target structure is importantly involved in stroke risk; this is particularly challenging for PFO. This article addresses the clinical use of PFO and LAA closure in stroke prevention. We discuss technical aspects of closure devices and methods, questions of patient selection, and clinical trials evidence. We conclude that for PFO closure, the clinical trials evidence is thus far negative in the broad cryptogenic stroke population, but closure might nevertheless be indicated for selected high-risk patients. LAA closure has an acceptable balance between safety and efficacy for atrial fibrillation patients with high stroke risk and important contraindications to oral anticoagulation. Much more work needs to be done to optimize the devices and techniques, and better define patient selection for these potentially valuable procedures.

  1. Status and costs of primary prevention for ischemic stroke in China.

    PubMed

    Zhao, J J; He, G Q; Gong, S Y; He, L

    2013-10-01

    Despite the benefits in reducing the risk of stroke, primary prevention is not well translated into practice. We sought to evaluate patient compliance with guidelines and the cost of primary stroke prevention in southwest China. We consecutively enrolled 305 patients with headaches and/or dizziness who were at high risk of stroke from our hospital. We retrospectively obtained their information, including the extent of their knowledge of stroke risk factors, adherence to guidelines, medications taken, and costs of primary prevention for stroke within the past year. Only 45.9% of patients had any knowledge of primary prevention, and only 17.0% had completely followed guidelines. Moreover, 79.0% of the patients were using medications, but only 39.3% took their medication as recommended. In patients who took medication, 89.6% were prescribed by physicians. The annual costs of primary prevention were estimated to be US$517.8 per capita, which included direct medical costs (US$435.4), direct non-medical costs (US$18.1), and indirect costs (US$64.3). Costs in the hypertension group were less than those reported by a similar international study. Although our population sample may not be representative of the population at high risk of stroke in China, it is appropriate for the evaluation of our primary prevention system. Primary prevention for stroke in southwest China is very challenging, with few medical resource investments. There is a current urgency to improve patient knowledge of primary prevention, which would bridge the gaps between guidelines and practice and increase medical resource investments.

  2. Recent advances in recurrent urinary tract infection from pathogenesis and biomarkers to prevention

    PubMed Central

    Jhang, Jia-Fong; Kuo, Hann-Chorng

    2017-01-01

    Recurrent urinary tract infection (UTI) might be one of the most common problems in urological clinics. Recent research has revealed novel evidence about recurrent UTI and it should be considered a different disease from the first infection. The pathogenesis of recurrent UTI might include two mechanisms, bacterial factors and deficiencies in host defense. Bacterial survival in the urinary bladder after antibiotic treatment and progression to form intracellular bacterial communities might be the most important bacterial factors. In host defense deficiency, a defect in pathogen recognition and urothelial barrier function impairment play the most important roles. Immunodeficiency and urogenital tract anatomical abnormalities have been considered the essential risk factors for recurrent UTI. In healthy women, voiding dysfunction and behavioral factors also increase the risk of recurrent UTI. Sexual intercourse and estrogen deficiency in postmenopausal women might have the strongest association with recurrent UTI. Traditional lifestyle factors such as fluid intake and diet are not considered independent risk factors now. Serum and urine biomarkers to predict recurrent UTI from the first infection have also attracted a wide attention recently. Current clinical evidence suggests that serum macrophage colony-stimulating factor and urinary nerve growth factor have potential predictive value for recurrent UTI. Clinical trials have proven the efficacy of the oral immunoactive agent OM-89 for the prevention of UTI. Vaccines for recurrent UTI are recommended by the latest guidelines and are available on the market. PMID:28974905

  3. Role of dexamethasone in the prevention of migraine recurrence in the acute care setting: a review.

    PubMed

    Giuliano, Christopher; Smalligan, Roger D; Mitchon, Greg; Chua, Matt

    2012-05-01

    Patients with migraine headaches are commonly encountered by clinicians both in the clinic and in the emergency department. Migraines impose a significant financial burden on patients, caregivers, and society. Up to 49% of patients treated acutely for migraine headache will have a recurrence within 72 hours. Recurrence of migraines is dependent on a number of factors, including the choice of abortive agent, age, sex, and initial severity of the migraine. Dexamethasone has been proposed and studied as a medication that may decrease the frequency of such recurrences of migraine headaches in affected patients. Dexamethasone is a corticosteroid that has been proposed to prevent recurrence of migraines through its prevention of neurogenic inflammation. Initial trials, with less-than-ideal methodology, showed large decreases in the number of patients experiencing recurrent migraines. Later randomized controlled trials revealed mixed results, with subsequent meta-analyses showing an overall benefit in the prevention of recurrence of migraines. These meta-analyses suggest that dexamethasone will prevent recurrence in about 10% of patients, although trials that used higher doses of dexamethasone and followed patients for ≥ 72 hours showed a larger benefit. Very few adverse events were reported in the randomized controlled trials following a single dose of dexamethasone. Given the benign side effect profile and wide tolerability to a single high dose of dexamethasone, it appears to be a safe and modestly effective addition to standard migraine abortive therapy for the prevention of migraine recurrence. Dexamethasone should not be used in patients with non-migraine headaches or contraindications to steroids. Further studies should help delineate if dexamethasone can be tailored to specific patient populations and hence enhance its therapeutic effectiveness.

  4. Concepts in Onychomycosis Treatment and Recurrence Prevention: An Update.

    PubMed

    Rosen, Theodore

    2016-03-01

    In considering therapy for onychomycosis, the most important factor to take into account is patient selection rather than treatment selection. Patients should be screened and evaluated for the extent of nail involvement, the amount of subungual debris, the degree of dystrophy, their ability and willingness to follow the regimen, and whether comorbidities are present that may affect the efficacy and/or safety of one or more therapies. Onychomycosis is a chronic disease with a high recurrence rate. Commonsense measures to reduce the risk for reinfection include patient education and a clinician-patient team approach to long-term management.

  5. Is it possible to apply secondary stroke prevention guidelines to very old populations?

    PubMed

    Brescacín, Laura

    2011-03-01

    The aging population is an undeniable reality which must be faced by all health systems all over the world. Among people over 80 years old, increase in stroke incidence, high mortality rates and adverse outcomes are problems of major public concern. Lack of evidence-based data to guide rational decision making on vascular risk factors management to avoid recurrence in elderly stroke patients increases the areas of uncertainty, and sometimes favors medical inertia at the time of taking care of this growing elderly population.

  6. RECURRENT STROKE IN THE WARFARIN VERSUS ASPIRIN IN REDUCED EJECTION FRACTION (WARCEF) TRIAL

    PubMed Central

    Pullicino, Patrick M.; Qian, Min; Sacco, Ralph L.; Freudenberger, Ron; Graham, Susan; Teerlink, John R.; Mann, Douglas; Di Tullio, Marco R.; Ponikowski, Piotr; Lok, Dirk J.; Anker, Stefan D.; Lip, Gregory Y.H.; Estol, Conrado J.; Levin, Bruce; Mohr, J.P.; Thompson, John L. P.; Homma, Shunichi

    2014-01-01

    Background and Purpose WARCEF randomized 2305 patients in sinus rhythm with ejection fraction (EF) ≤35% to warfarin (INR 2.0–3.5) or aspirin 325 mg. Warfarin reduced the incident ischemic stroke (IIS) hazard rate by 48% over aspirin in a secondary analysis. The IIS rate in heart failure (HF) is too low to warrant routine anticoagulation but epidemiologic studies show that prior stroke increases the stroke risk in HF. We here explore IIS rates in WARCEF patients with and without baseline stroke to look for risk factors for IIS and determine if a subgroup with an IIS rate high enough to give a clinically relevant stroke risk reduction can be identified. Methods We compared potential stroke risk factors between patients with baseline stroke and those without using the exact conditional score test for Poisson variables. We looked for risk factors for IIS, by comparing IIS rates between different risk factors. For EF we tried cutoff points of 10%, 15% and 20%. 15% was used as it was the highest EF that was associated with a significant increase in IIS rate. IIS and EF strata were balanced as to warfarin/aspirin assignment by the stratified randomized design. A multiple Poisson regression examined the simultaneous effects of all risk factors on IIS rate. IIS rates per hundred patient years (/100PY) were calculated in patient groups with significant risk factors. Missing values were assigned the modal value. Results Twenty of 248 (8.1%) patients with baseline stroke and 64 of 2048 (3.1%) without had IIS. IIS rate in patients with baseline stroke (2.37/100PY) was greater than patients without (0.89/100PY)(rate ratio 2.68, p<0.001). Fourteen of 219 (6.4%) patients with ejection fraction (EF)<15% and 70 of 2079 (3.4%) with EF ≥15% had IIS. In the multiple regression analysis stroke at baseline (p<0.001) and EF<15% vs. ≥15% (p=.005) remained significant predictors of IIS. IIS rate was 2.04/100PY in patients with EF<15% and 0.95/100PY in patients with EF ≥15% (p=0

  7. Uric Acid Therapy Prevents Early Ischemic Stroke Progression: A Tertiary Analysis of the URICO-ICTUS Trial (Efficacy Study of Combined Treatment With Uric Acid and r-tPA in Acute Ischemic Stroke).

    PubMed

    Amaro, Sergio; Laredo, Carlos; Renú, Arturo; Llull, Laura; Rudilosso, Salvatore; Obach, Víctor; Urra, Xabier; Planas, Anna M; Chamorro, Ángel

    2016-11-01

    Identification of neuroprotective therapies in acute ischemic stroke is imperative. We report a predefined analysis of the URICO-ICTUS trial (Efficacy Study of Combined Treatment With Uric Acid and r-tPA in Acute Ischemic Stroke) assessing the efficacy of uric acid (UA) compared with placebo to prevent early ischemic worsening (EIW) and the relevance of collateral circulation. URICO-ICTUS was a double-blind, placebo-controlled, phase 2b trial where a total of 411 patients treated with alteplase within 4.5 hours of stroke onset were randomized (1:1) to receive UA 1000 mg (n=211) or placebo (n=200) before the end of alteplase infusion. EIW defined an increment ≥4 points in the National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale score within 72 hours of treatment in the absence of hemorrhage or recurrent stroke. Logistic regression models assessed the interaction between therapy and the collateral circulation in 112 patients who had a pretreatment computed tomographic angiography. EIW occurred in 2 of 149 (1%) patients with good outcome and 23 of 262 (9%) patients with poor outcome (χ(2); P=0.002). EIW occurred in 7 of 204 (3%) patients treated with UA and in 18 of 200 (9%) patients treated with placebo (χ(2); P=0.01). There was a significant interaction between the efficacy of UA to prevent EIW and collaterals (P=0.029), with lower incidence in patients with good collaterals treated with UA compared with placebo (2% versus 15%, respectively; P=0.048). UA therapy may prevent EIW after acute stroke in thrombolysed patients. Optimal access of UA to its molecular targets through appropriate collaterals may modify the magnitude of the neuroprotective effect. URL: http://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier: NCT00860366. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  8. Community physicians' knowledge of secondary prevention after ischemic stroke: a questionnaire survey in Shanxi Province, China.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chen; Qiao, Xiaoyuan; Kang, Huijie; Ding, Ling; Bai, Lixia; Wang, Jintao

    2015-11-03

    This cross-sectional, questionnaire-based survey, conducted in Shanxi Province, China, evaluated the knowledge of community physicians of secondary prevention of ischemic stroke and transient ischemic attacks (TIAs). A total of 1910 physicians practicing at 832 community-based clinics, hospitals and other care centers in 11 prefectures of Shanxi Province completed the questionnaires between 1 July and 30 September 2013. Over 90 % of participants were aware of the most common risk factors for stroke, but lifestyle-related factors were seen as of low or medium importance for secondary prevention. Only about 50 % of physicians were aware of the existence of commonly used stroke scales, and fewer said that they would use those scales in their clinical practice. There were slight differences in the responses to some of the questions on risk factors and stroke scales were associated with the physicians' gender, academic qualifications, practice duration and location. Less than half of the participants were aware of the secondary prevention recommendations included in the most recent guidelines. The survey revealed a huge gap in knowledge of current guidelines for secondary prevention of ischemic stroke and TIA among the physicians surveyed. Continuing education and training of community physicians, administered as a public health program, is needed to improve the healthcare of ischemic stroke and TIA patients.

  9. Cost-benefit analysis of the polypill in the primary prevention of myocardial infarction and stroke.

    PubMed

    Wald, Nicholas J; Luteijn, Johannes Michiel; Morris, Joan K; Taylor, David; Oppenheimer, Peter

    2016-04-01

    The primary prevention of cardiovascular disease is a public health priority. To assess the costs and benefits of a Polypill Prevention Programme using a daily 4-component polypill from age 50 in the UK, we determined the life years gained without a first myocardial infarction (MI) or stroke, together with the total service cost (or saving) and the net cost (or saving) per year of life gained without a first MI or stroke. This was estimated on the basis of a 50 % uptake and a previously published 83 % treatment adherence. The total years of life gained without a first MI or stroke in a mature programme is 990,000 each year in the UK. If the cost of the Polypill Prevention Programme were £1 per person per day, the total cost would be £4.76 bn and, given the savings (at 2014 prices) of £2.65 bn arising from the disease prevented, there would be a net cost of £2.11 bn representing a net cost per year of life gained without a first MI or stroke of £2120. The results are robust to sensitivity analyses. A national Polypill Prevention Programme would have a substantial effect in preventing MIs and strokes and be cost-effective.

  10. Oxidative stress markers are associated to vascular recurrence in non-cardioembolic stroke patients non-treated with statins

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Since atherogenesis is related to oxidative stress, our objective was to study the association of oxidative stress markers with the vascular recurrence in non-cardioembolic stroke. Methods Atherosclerotic and oxidative stress markers were evaluated on admission, in 477 patients suffering from a first non-cardioembolic stroke. Patients were followed at 6 and 12 months after inclusion, recording cardiovascular events. As markers of endothelial oxidative stress we used oxidized LDL, Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase and 8-OH deoxiguanosine. 136 patients were being treated with statins at the moment of serum samples acquisition. Results Patients who suffered vascular recurrence or vascular-origin death had higher levels of 8-OHDG (40.06±24.70vs33.11±15.18;p=0.003). We also found associations between vascular recurrence or vascular origin death and Cu/ZnSOD (OR,1.02; 95%CI,1.00-1.03;p=0.0001) and 8-OHDG (OR,1.12;95%CI,1.08-1.16;p<0.0001) in a subgroup of 333 patients that were not in treatment with statins on admission. We also found associations between 8-OHDG and intima media thickness (IMT) (OR,1.13;95%CI,1.09-1.16;p<0.0001), presence of ipsilatieral stenosis≥50% (OR,1.03;95%CI1.00-1.05;p=0.007) and other atherosclerotic plaque characteristics. Conclusions Specific oxidative stress markers were found to be markers of atherosclerosis plaque types and vascular recurrence in non-statins treated patients at admission. PMID:22862793

  11. Detection of multiple annexin autoantibodies in a patient with recurrent miscarriages, fulminant stroke and seronegative antiphospholipid syndrome.

    PubMed

    Scholz, Philipp; Auler, Markus; Brachvogel, Bent; Benzing, Thomas; Mallman, Peter; Streichert, Thomas; Klatt, Andreas R

    2016-01-01

    Anti-phospholipid syndrome (APS) is one of the main causes for recurrent miscarriages. The diagnosis of APS is based on the occurrence of clinical symptoms such as thrombotic events or obstetric complications as well as the detection of antiphospholipid antibodies directed against β2-glycoprotein I and cardiolipin, or a positive lupus anticoagulant assay. However, there is a subpopulation of patients with clinical symptoms of APS, but the lack of serological markers (seronegative APS). In addition, a large proportion of patients with unexplained recurrent miscarriages exist. These cases may be attributed, at least in part, to a seronegative APS.
The presence of autoantibodies against annexins is potentially associated with APS. Here we used immunoassays and immunoblots to detect autoantibodies directed against annexin A1-5, and A8, respectively, in a patient with a seronegative APS and a history of six recurrent pregnancy losses and fulminant stroke. We found strong IgM isotype antibody reactivity directed against annexin A2 and annexin A8, and moderate to weak IgM isotype antibody reactivity directed against annexin A1, A3, and A5. Further studies will evaluate the diagnostic value of IgM isotype antibodies against annexin A1-A5, and A8 for seronegative APS and recurrent miscarriages.

  12. Stroke

    MedlinePlus

    ... emergency. Strokes happen when blood flow to your brain stops. Within minutes, brain cells begin to die. There are two kinds ... blocks or plugs a blood vessel in the brain. The other kind, called hemorrhagic stroke, is caused ...

  13. Recent advances in the understanding and management of atrial fibrillation: a focus on stroke prevention

    PubMed Central

    Shahid, Farhan; Shantsila, Eduard; Lip, Gregory Y. H.

    2016-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is associated with an increased risk of stroke compared with the general population. It is anticipated that by 2030 an estimated 14–17 million patients will be diagnosed with this most prevalent arrhythmia within the European Union. AF-related stroke confers a higher mortality and morbidity risk, and thus early detection and assessment for the initiation of effective stroke prevention with oral anticoagulation (OAC) is crucial. Recent guidelines point to the use of non-vitamin K antagonist OACs (NOACs) where appropriate in stroke prevention of patients with non-valvular AF. At present, there are four NOACS available, with no direct head-to-head comparisons to suggest the superiority of one drug over another. Simple and practical risk assessment tools have evolved over the years to facilitate stroke and bleeding risk assessment in busy clinics and wards to aid decision-making. At present, the CHA 2DS 2VASc (congestive heart failure, hypertension, age 65–74/>75, diabetes mellitus, stroke/transient ischemic attack/thromboembolism, vascular disease, female sex) score is recommended by many international guidelines as a simple and practical method of assessing stroke risk in such patients. Alongside this, use of the HAS BLED (hypertension systolic blood pressure >160 mmHg, abnormal liver/renal function [with creatinine ≥200 μmol/L], stroke, bleeding history or predisposition, labile international normalized ratio [range <60% of the time], elderly [>65], concomitant drugs/alcohol) score aims to identify patients at high risk of bleeding for more regular review and follow-up and draws attention to potentially reversible bleeding risk factors. The aim of this review article is to provide an overview of recent advances in the understanding and management of AF with a focus on stroke prevention. PMID:28105320

  14. Prevention of Stroke in Patients With Silent Cerebrovascular Disease: A Scientific Statement for Healthcare Professionals From the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association.

    PubMed

    Smith, Eric E; Saposnik, Gustavo; Biessels, Geert Jan; Doubal, Fergus N; Fornage, Myriam; Gorelick, Philip B; Greenberg, Steven M; Higashida, Randall T; Kasner, Scott E; Seshadri, Sudha

    2017-02-01

    Two decades of epidemiological research shows that silent cerebrovascular disease is common and is associated with future risk for stroke and dementia. It is the most common incidental finding on brain scans. To summarize evidence on the diagnosis and management of silent cerebrovascular disease to prevent stroke, the Stroke Council of the American Heart Association convened a writing committee to evaluate existing evidence, to discuss clinical considerations, and to offer suggestions for future research on stroke prevention in patients with 3 cardinal manifestations of silent cerebrovascular disease: silent brain infarcts, magnetic resonance imaging white matter hyperintensities of presumed vascular origin, and cerebral microbleeds. The writing committee found strong evidence that silent cerebrovascular disease is a common problem of aging and that silent brain infarcts and white matter hyperintensities are associated with future symptomatic stroke risk independently of other vascular risk factors. In patients with cerebral microbleeds, there was evidence of a modestly increased risk of symptomatic intracranial hemorrhage in patients treated with thrombolysis for acute ischemic stroke but little prospective evidence on the risk of symptomatic hemorrhage in patients on anticoagulation. There were no randomized controlled trials targeted specifically to participants with silent cerebrovascular disease to prevent stroke. Primary stroke prevention is indicated in patients with silent brain infarcts, white matter hyperintensities, or microbleeds. Adoption of standard terms and definitions for silent cerebrovascular disease, as provided by prior American Heart Association/American Stroke Association statements and by a consensus group, may facilitate diagnosis and communication of findings from radiologists to clinicians.

  15. Secondary stroke prevention: patent foramen ovale, aortic plaque, and carotid stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Meier, Bernhard; Frank, Benedikt; Wahl, Andreas; Diener, Hans C.

    2012-01-01

    Stroke is the most debilitating cardiovascular event. It has a variety of causes that may be present simultaneously. In young or otherwise healthy people, the search for a patent foramen ovale (PFO) has become standard. In stroke of the elderly, atherosclerosis and atrial fibrillation are in the foreground but the PFO should not be ignored. The risk of a PFO-related stroke over time is controversial and so is its prevention by device closure. The association of proximal aortic plaques in arteries subtending the brain and stroke is considered strong, ignoring that it is as putative as that of the PFO. Statins can prevent progression of such plaques. Antiplatelet agents in asymptomatic and surgical endarterectomy in symptomatic patients or highly ulcerated lesions are the treatment of choice. Stenting with protection devices was shown competitive in selected patients. PMID:22422912

  16. A review of apixaban for stroke prevention in atrial fibrillation: insights from ARISTOTLE.

    PubMed

    Hess, Connie N; Al-Khatib, Sana M; Granger, Christopher B; Lopes, Renato

    2013-09-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is associated with significant mortality and morbidity, and stroke represents the most-feared complication. Consequently, AF treatment has focused on thromboprophylaxis, with warfarin as the mainstay of therapy. However, concerns over ease of use and safety have limited its use. Three novel oral anticoagulants have been approved for use in stroke prevention in AF based on randomized data: 1) dabigatran, studied in Randomized Evaluation of Long-term Anticoagulation Therapy (RE-LY); 2) rivaroxaban, studied in Rivaroxaban Once-daily, Oral, Direct Factor Xa Inhibition Compared with Vitamin K Antagonism for Prevention of Stroke and Embolism Trial in Atrial Fibrillation (ROCKET AF); and 3) apixaban, studied in Apixaban for Reduction in Stroke and Other Thromboembolic Events in Atrial Fibrillation (ARISTOTLE). In this review, we focus on apixaban and discuss subgroup analyses that have been performed in the three trials comparing novel oral anticoagulants with warfarin. We conclude with recommendations regarding further investigations.

  17. Management and prevention of recurrent herpes labialis in immunocompetent patients.

    PubMed

    Gilbert, Stanley C

    2007-12-01

    A range of topical and systemic therapies exists for treating recurrent herpes labialis. Among the topical agents, aciclovir and its derivatives can lessen the symptoms and duration of disease if applied frequently in the proper vehicle and started during the prodromal phase. Delivering these agents to the lesion via novel devices or vehicles may enhance their topical efficacy in the future. Among the systemic agents, new high-dose, 1-day regimens using either famciclovir or valaciclovir offer greater convenience and cost-effectiveness compared with traditional 5-7-day therapy. Combining either topical or systemic antinucleoside agents with topical anti-inflammatories such as corticosteroids may also lead to enhanced efficacy. Novel agents such as docosanol, toll-like receptor agonists, and viral ribonucleoside reductase inhibitors may also play a larger role in the future.

  18. Do thiazides prevent recurrent idiopathic renal calcium oxalate stones?

    PubMed

    Wolf, H; Brocks, P; Dahl, C

    1983-01-01

    In a double-blind controlled clinical trial 62 patients with recurrent idiopathic renal calcium oxalate stone formation were allocated either to treatment with bendroflumethiazide, 2.5 mg three times a day, or placebo. In each group the rate of stone formation during medication (average follow-up period 36 months) was compared with the rate of stone formation before medication (average control period 36 months). In both groups a similar striking fall in the rate of stone formation was found, indicating that thiazides in this study did not alter the spontaneous course of idiopathic renal calcium oxalate stone formation. It is doubtful whether life-long prophylaxis with thiazide is justified in patients with a moderate rate of stone formation.

  19. Ethnic Comparison of 30-Day Potentially Preventable Readmissions After Stroke in Hawaii.

    PubMed

    Nakagawa, Kazuma; Ahn, Hyeong Jun; Taira, Deborah A; Miyamura, Jill; Sentell, Tetine L

    2016-10-01

    Ethnic disparities in readmission after stroke have been inadequately studied. We sought to compare potentially preventable readmissions (PPR) among a multiethnic population in Hawaii. Hospitalization data in Hawaii from 2007 to 2012 were assessed to compare ethnic differences in 30-day PPR after stroke-related hospitalizations. Multivariable models using logistic regression were performed to assess the impact of ethnicity on 30-day PPR after controlling for age group (<65 and ≥65 years), sex, insurance, county of residence, substance use, history of mental illness, and Charlson Comorbidity Index. Thirty-day PPR was seen in 840 (8.4%) of 10 050 any stroke-related hospitalizations, 712 (8.7%) of 8161 ischemic stroke hospitalizations, and 128 (6.8%) of 1889 hemorrhagic stroke hospitalizations. In the multivariable models, only the Chinese ethnicity, compared with whites, was associated with 30-day PPR after any stroke hospitalizations (odds ratio [OR] [95% confidence interval {CI}], 1.40 [1.05-1.88]) and ischemic stroke hospitalizations (OR, 1.42 [CI, 1.04-1.96]). When considering only one hospitalization per individual, the impact of Chinese ethnicity on PPR after any stroke hospitalization (OR, 1.22 [CI, 0.89-1.68]) and ischemic stroke hospitalization (OR, 1.21 [CI, 0.86-1.71]) was attenuated. Other factors associated with 30-day PPR after any stroke hospitalizations were Charlson Comorbidity Index (per unit increase) (OR, 1.21 [CI, 1.18-1.24]), Medicaid (OR, 1.42 [CI, 1.07-1.88]), Hawaii county (OR, 0.78 [CI, 0.62-0.97]), and mental illness (OR, 1.37 [CI, 1.10-1.70]). In Hawaii, Chinese may have a higher risk of 30-day PPR after stroke compared with whites. However, this seems to be driven by the high number of repeated PPR within the Chinese ethnic group. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  20. LAA occluder device for stroke prevention: Data on WATCHMAN and other LAA occluders.

    PubMed

    Bergmann, Martin W

    2017-08-01

    NOAC therapy has become the standard for stroke prevention in patients with atrial fibrillation. Yet some patients suffer extracranial bleeding events or have other reasons to seek non-pharmacologic stroke protection. LAA occlusion with the WATCHMAN device has been proven safe and effective for such patients and is now recommended in current guidelines for this patient group; other devices also seek approval. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  1. Tissue plasminogen activator prevents white matter damage following stroke

    PubMed Central

    Correa, Fernando; Gauberti, Maxime; Parcq, Jérôme; Macrez, Richard; Hommet, Yannick; Obiang, Pauline; Hernangómez, Miriam; Montagne, Axel; Liot, Géraldine; Guaza, Carmen; Maubert, Eric; Ali, Carine; Vivien, Denis

    2011-01-01

    Tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) is the only available treatment for acute stroke. In addition to its vascular fibrinolytic action, tPA exerts various effects within the brain, ranging from synaptic plasticity to control of cell fate. To date, the influence of tPA in the ischemic brain has only been investigated on neuronal, microglial, and endothelial fate. We addressed the mechanism of action of tPA on oligodendrocyte (OL) survival and on the extent of white matter lesions in stroke. We also investigated the impact of aging on these processes. We observed that, in parallel to reduced levels of tPA in OLs, white matter gets more susceptible to ischemia in old mice. Interestingly, tPA protects murine and human OLs from apoptosis through an unexpected cytokine-like effect by the virtue of its epidermal growth factor–like domain. When injected into aged animals, tPA, although toxic to the gray matter, rescues white matter from ischemia independently of its proteolytic activity. These studies reveal a novel mechanism of action of tPA and unveil OL as a target cell for cytokine effects of tPA in brain diseases. They show overall that tPA protects white matter from stroke-induced lesions, an effect which may contribute to the global benefit of tPA-based stroke treatment. PMID:21576385

  2. Graduated compression stockings to prevent venous thromboembolism in hospital: evidence from patients with acute stroke.

    PubMed

    Kearon, Clive; O'Donnell, Martin

    2011-01-01

    Pulmonary embolism is the most common preventable cause of death in hospital patients and prevention of venous thromboembolism (VTE) is cost-saving in high-risk patients. Low-dose anticoagulation is very effective at preventing VTE but increases bleeding. Graduated compression stockings and intermittent pneumatic compression devices are also used to prevent VTE and do not increase bleeding, which makes their use appealing in patients who cannot tolerate bleeding, such as patients with acute stroke. Studies that evaluated mechanical methods of preventing VTE were small and mainly used asymptomatic deep vein thrombosis (DVT), detected using screening tests, as the study outcome. The recently published CLOTS Trial 1 (Clots in Legs Or sTockings after Stroke) compared thigh-level compression stockings with no stockings in about 2500 patients with stroke and immobility, and found that thigh-level stockings were not effective. Indirectly, the findings of this study question the ability of stockings to prevent VTE in other patient groups, including those after surgery. CLOTS 1 compared thigh-level and below-knee stockings in about 3000 patients with acute stroke. Given that thigh-level stockings were ineffective in CLOTS 1, it is surprising that they were more effective than below-knee stockings in CLOTS Trial 2. A possible explanation is that below-knee stockings increase DVT, although this seems unlikely. CLOTS 1 and CLOTS 2 question whether graduated compression stockings prevent VTE and suggest the need for further trials evaluating their efficacy in medical and surgical patients.

  3. Patent foramen ovale closure vs medical therapy for stroke prevention: meta-analysis of randomized trials and review of heterogeneity in meta-analyses.

    PubMed

    Udell, Jacob A; Opotowsky, Alexander R; Khairy, Paul; Silversides, Candice K; Gladstone, David J; O'Gara, Patrick T; Landzberg, Michael J

    2014-10-01

    Patent foramen ovale (PFO) might be a risk factor for unexplained ("cryptogenic") stroke or transient ischemic attack (TIA). We sought to determine the efficacy and safety of transcatheter PFO closure compared with antithrombotic therapy for secondary prevention of cerebrovascular events among patients with cryptogenic stroke. We performed a systematic review and meta-analysis of MedLine and Embase (from inception to March 2013) for randomized controlled trials (RCTs) that compared transcatheter PFO closure with medical therapy in subjects with cryptogenic stroke. Data were independently extracted on trial conduct quality, baseline characteristics, efficacy, and safety events from published articles and appendices. Risk ratios (RRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for the composite of stroke or TIA, and adverse cardiovascular events including atrial fibrillation/flutter were constructed. Three RCTs of 2303 subjects with previous stroke, TIA, or systemic arterial embolism (mean age, 45.7 years; 47.3% women; mean follow-up, 2.6 years) were included. PFO closure did not significantly reduce the risk of recurrent stroke/TIA (3.7% vs 5.2%; RR, 0.73; 95% CI, 0.50-1.07; P = 0.10); however, an increased risk of incident atrial fibrillation/flutter was detected (3.8% vs 1.0%; RR, 3.67; 95% CI, 1.95-6.89; P < 0.0001). No significant heterogeneity was detected for any end point among subgroups of patients stratified according to age, sex, index cardiovascular event, device type, interatrial shunt size, and presence of an atrial septal aneurysm (all P interactions ≥ 0.09). Meta-analysis of RCTs that assessed transcatheter PFO closure for secondary prevention of cerebrovascular events in subjects with cryptogenic stroke does not demonstrate benefit compared with antithrombotic therapy, and suggests potential risks. Copyright © 2014 Canadian Cardiovascular Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Natural history and preventative treatment of recurrent mood disorders.

    PubMed

    Frank, E; Thase, M E

    1999-01-01

    This chapter focuses on recent developments in our understanding of the etiology, epidemiology, and treatment of recurrent mood disorders. It addresses the changing relationship between endogenous and exogenous factors over time in the etiology of mood episodes. In the area of epidemiology, the chapter presents new information on the prevalence of various subtypes and male/female differences in lifetime risk. Complications of the mood disorders, such as suicide, and important comorbidities, including alcoholism and substance abuse, are discussed. In the area of treatment, the life-long nature of many of the mood disorders is described, as is the consequent role of the primary care physician in their management. The evidence for the efficacy of the depression-specific psychotherapies, cognitive therapy and interpersonal therapy, is reviewed. Current issues in the pharmacotherapy of mood disorders are discussed, including the relative efficacy of the older antidepressants versus the newer selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) and the treatment of various subtypes of mood disorders, including dysthymia, chronic depression, and atypical depression. Finally, the chapter describes recent advances in the treatment of bipolar disorder.

  5. How do stroke survivors and their carers use practitioners' advice on secondary prevention medications? Qualitative study of an online forum.

    PubMed

    Izuka, Nkeonye J; Alexander, Matthew A W; Balasooriya-Smeekens, Chantal; Mant, Jonathan; De Simoni, Anna

    2017-09-01

    Secondary prevention medications reduce risk of stroke recurrence, yet many people do not receive recommended treatment, nor take medications optimally. Exploring how patients report making use of practitioners' advice on secondary prevention medicines on an online forum and what feedback was received from other participants. Thematic analysis of the archive of Talkstroke (2004-2011), UK. Posts including any secondary prevention medication terms, General Practitioner (GP) and their replies were identified. Fifity participants talked about practitioners' advice on secondary prevention medications in 43 discussion threads. Patients consulted practitioners for reassurance and dealing with side effects. Practitioners' advice varied from altering to maintaining current treatment. Three main themes emerged from the use of practitioners' advice: patients following advice (reassured, happy when side effects made tolerable, or still retaining anxiety about treatment); patients not following advice (admitting adherence on-off or stopping medications as side effects still not tolerable); asking other participants for feedback on advice received. Practitioners' advice was disregarded mainly when related to dealing with statin side effects, after one or two consultations. Themes for feedback involved sharing experience, directing back to practitioners, or to external evidence. Side effects of secondary prevention medications and statins in particular, cause anxiety and resentment in some patients, and their concerns are not always addressed by practitioners. Practitioners could consider more proactive strategies to manage such side effects. Forum feedback was appropriate and supportive of the practitioners' advice received. Our findings from peer-to-peer online conversations confirm and widen previous research.

  6. Adjuvant Chinese Herbal Products for Preventing Ischemic Stroke in Patients with Atrial Fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    Muo, Chih-Hsin; Chiu, Hsienhsueh Elley; Liu, Chun-Ting

    2016-01-01

    Objective Chinese herbal products (CHPs) are widely used for atrial fibrillation (AF) in Taiwan. We investigated the effect of adjuvant CHPs in preventing ischemic stroke in patients with AF. Methods Taiwanese patients in the Health Insurance Database newly diagnosed with AF during 2000–2011 were enrolled. Medication treatment with/without CHPs was administered within 7 days after the AF diagnosis. The clinical endpoint was an ischemic stroke. The Chi-square test, Fisher’s exact test, and Student t test were used to examine differences between the traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) and non-TCM cohorts. Cox proportional hazard regression was used to assess the risk for ischemic stroke between two cohorts. Results Three hundred and eleven patients underwent TCM treatment and 1715 patients did not. Compared to non-TCM users, TCM users had a lower incidence of stroke (12.59% vs. 1.93%, respectively) and lower risk of stroke [CHA2DS2-VASc score = 0–2 (hazard ratio = 0.20; 95% confidence interval = 0.06–0.65)]. Compared to non-TCM users, the stroke risk was significantly lower in TCM users with AF who were female or younger than 65 years, but not in males, people more than 65 years old, or people with comorbidities. Compared to TCM users, non-TCM users who received conventional treatment had a higher ischemic stroke risk. The risk for AF-related hospitalization was significantly lower in TCM users (0.64%) than in non-TCM users (38.1%). Conclusions Users of TCM with AF have a lower risk of new-onset ischemic stroke. Therefore, adjuvant CHP therapy may have a protective effect and may be used in AF patients to prevent ischemic stroke. PMID:27428543

  7. Randomized, controlled trial of ibuprofen syrup administered during febrile illnesses to prevent febrile seizure recurrences.

    PubMed

    van Stuijvenberg, M; Derksen-Lubsen, G; Steyerberg, E W; Habbema, J D; Moll, H A

    1998-11-01

    Febrile seizures recur frequently. Factors increasing the risk of febrile seizure recurrence include young age at onset, family history of febrile seizures, previous recurrent febrile seizures, time lapse since previous seizure <6 months, relative low temperature at the initial seizure, multiple type initial seizure, and frequent febrile illnesses. Prevention of seizure recurrences serves two useful purposes: meeting parental fear of recurrent febrile seizures in general and reducing the (small) risk of a long-lasting and eventually injurious recurrent seizure. In daily practice, children with febrile seizures often are treated with antipyretics during fever to prevent febrile seizure recurrences. Thus far, no randomized placebo-controlled trial has been performed to assess the efficacy of intermittent antipyretic treatment in the prevention of seizure recurrence. We performed a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial. Children 1 to 4 years of age who had had at least one risk factor for febrile seizure recurrence were enrolled. They were randomly assigned to either ibuprofen syrup, 20 mg/mL, 0.25 mL (= 5 mg) per kilogram of body weight per dose, or matching placebo, to be administered every 6 hours during fever (temperature, >/=38.5 degrees C). Parents were instructed to take the child's rectal temperature immediately when the child seemed ill or feverish and to promptly administer the study medication when the temperature was >/=38.5 degrees C. Doses were to be administered every 6 hours until the child was afebrile for 24 hours. The parents were instructed not to administer any other antipyretic drug to the child. For measuring rectal temperature, a Philips HP5316 digital thermometer (Philips, Eindhoven, The Netherlands) was distributed. During subsequent treatment of the fever episode, parents had to call the investigator at least once each day to notify the investigator in case of febrile seizure recurrence. The investigator could be contacted by

  8. [Postoperative recurrence of Crohn's disease, and its prevention].

    PubMed

    Lakatos, László; Lakatos, Péter László

    2010-05-23

    Crohn's disease is a chronic, progressive disabling condition ultimately leading to stricturing and/or penetrating complications. The need for surgery may be as high as 70% in patients with severe active disease or complications. However, relapse may develop in a significant proportion of the patients after surgery leading to frequent re-operations. Despite emerging data, postoperative prevention is still controversial. After careful evaluation of the individual risk a tailored therapy should be considered. In patients with small risk for relapse mesalazine or in selected cases no-treatment may be an option. In patients with a moderate-to-high risk azathioprine should be considered together with metronidazole in the three months. Follow-up ileocolonoscopy 6-12 months after the surgery is helpful in the determination of endoscopic severity and may assist in the optimization of the therapy. In most severe cases anti-TNF agents may be appropriate for postoperative prevention and therapy.

  9. Systematic review and network meta-analysis of stroke prevention treatments in patients with atrial fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    Tawfik, Amy; Bielecki, Joanna M; Krahn, Murray; Dorian, Paul; Hoch, Jeffrey S; Boon, Heather; Husereau, Don; Pechlivanoglou, Petros

    2016-01-01

    Background In the last 4 years, four novel oral anticoagulants have been developed as alternatives to warfarin and antiplatelet agents for stroke prevention in atrial fibrillation (AF) patients. The objective of this review was to estimate the comparative effectiveness of all antithrombotic treatments for AF patients. Materials and methods Data sources were Medline Ovid (1946 to October 2015), Embase Ovid (1980 to October 2015), and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL, Issue 9, 2015). Randomized controlled trials of AF patients were selected if they compared at least two of the following: placebo, aspirin, aspirin and clopidogrel combination therapy, adjusted-dose warfarin (target international normalized ratio 2.0–3.0), dabigatran, rivaroxaban, apixaban, and edoxaban. Bayesian network meta-analyses were conducted for outcomes of interest (all stroke, ischemic stroke, myocardial infarction, overall mortality, major bleeding, and intracranial hemorrhage). Results Based on 16 randomized controlled trials of 96,826 patients, all oral anticoagulants were more effective than antiplatelet agents at reducing the risk of ischemic stroke and all strokes. Compared to warfarin, dabigatran 150 mg (rate ratio 0.65, 95% credible interval 0.52–0.82) and apixaban (rate ratio 0.82, 95% credible interval 0.69–0.97) reduced the risk of all strokes. Dabigatran 150 mg was also more effective than warfarin at reducing ischemic stroke risk (rate ratio 0.76, 95% credible interval 0.59–0.99). Aspirin, apixaban, dabigatran 110 mg, and edoxaban were associated with less major bleeding than warfarin. Conclusion All oral anticoagulants reduce the risk of stroke in AF patients. Some novel oral anticoagulants are associated with a lower stroke and/or major bleeding risk than warfarin. In addition to the safety and effectiveness of drug therapy, as reported in this study, individual treatment recommendations should also consider the patient’s underlying stroke

  10. Vaginal delivery of carboplatin-loaded thermosensitive hydrogel to prevent local cervical cancer recurrence in mice.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xue; Wang, Jin; Wu, Wenbin; Li, Hongjun

    2016-11-01

    Local tumor recurrence after cervical cancer surgery remains a clinical problem. Vaginal delivery of thermosensitive hydrogel may be suited to reduce tumor relapse rate with more efficacy and safety. A pilot study was carried out to evaluate the efficacy of carboplatin-loaded poloxamer hydrogel to prevent local recurrence of cervical cancer after surgery. In vivo vaginal retention evaluation of 27% poloxamer hydrogel in mice was proven to be a suitable vaginal drug delivery formulation due to its low gelation temperature. A mimic orthotopic cervical/vaginal cancer recurrence model after surgery was established by injecting murine cervical cancer cell line U14 into the vaginal submucosa to simulate the residual tumor cells infiltrated in the surgical site, followed by drug administration 24 h later to interfere with the formation/recurrence of the tumor. By infusing fluorescein sodium-loaded hydrogel into the vagina of mice, a maximized accumulation of fluorescein sodium (Flu) in the vagina was achieved and few signals were observed in other organs. When used in the prevention of the cervical cancer formation/recurrence in mice, the carboplatin-loaded poloxamer hydrogel exhibited great efficacy and systemic safety. In conclusion, thermosensitive hydrogel presents a simple, practical approach for the local drug delivery via vagina against cervical cancer recurrence.

  11. Impact of USPSTF recommendations for aspirin for prevention of recurrent preeclampsia.

    PubMed

    Tolcher, Mary Catherine; Chu, Derrick M; Hollier, Lisa M; Mastrobattista, Joan M; Racusin, Diana A; Ramin, Susan M; Sangi-Haghpeykar, Haleh; Aagaard, Kjersti M

    2017-09-01

    The US Preventive Services Task Force recommends low-dose aspirin for the prevention of preeclampsia among women at high risk for primary occurrence or recurrence of disease. Recommendations for the use of aspirin for preeclampsia prevention were issued by the US Preventive Services Task Force in September 2014. The objective of the study was to evaluate the incidence of recurrent preeclampsia in our cohort before and after the US Preventive Services Task Force recommendation for aspirin for preeclampsia prevention. This was a retrospective cohort study designed to evaluate the rates of recurrent preeclampsia among women with a history of preeclampsia. We utilized a 2-hospital, single academic institution database from August 2011 through June 2016. We excluded multiple gestations and included only the first delivery for women with multiple deliveries during the study period. The cohort of women with a history of preeclampsia were divided into 2 groups, before and after the release of the US Preventive Services Task Force 2014 recommendations. Potential confounders were accounted for in multivariate analyses, and relative risk and adjusted relative risk were calculated. A total of 17,256 deliveries occurred during the study period. A total of 417 women had a documented history of prior preeclampsia: 284 women before and 133 women after the US Preventive Services Task Force recommendation. Comparing the before and after groups, the proportion of Hispanic women in the after group was lower and the method of payment differed between the groups (P <.0001). The prevalence of type 1 diabetes was increased in the after period, but overall rates of pregestational diabetes were similar (6.3% before vs 5.3% after [P > .05]). Risk factors for recurrent preeclampsia included maternal age >35 years (relative risk, 1.83; 95% confidence interval, 1.34-2.48), Medicaid insurance (relative risk, 2.08; 95% confidence interval, 1.15-3.78), type 2 diabetes (relative risk, 2.13; 95

  12. [Outlook for recurrence prevention from the viewpoint of the guidelines on urolithiasis].

    PubMed

    Miyazawa, Katsuhito; Morita, Nobuyo; Suga, Kodai; Moriyama, Manabu T; Suzuki, Koji

    2012-12-01

    In Japan, the number of patients with urolithiasis has continued to increase at a faster rate, with a lifetime morbidity in 2005 of 15.1% for males and 6.8% for females, possibly due to : 1) westernization of dietary habits and lifestyle, 2) improvement of diagnostic technologies (CT and ultrasound examination), and 3) aging of the population. Additionally, this disease has a higher recurrence rate ; for example, approximately 50% for calcium-containing calculi. The guidelines on urolithiasis consist primarily of the guidelines for treatment and recurrence prevention, and the items concerning recurrence prevention were added in the 2007 updated Guidelines on Urolithiasis by the European Association of Urology (EAU) and the American Urological Association (AUA) (EAU/AUA guidelines). These facts reflect the importance of recurrence prevention. On the other hand, the Japanese guidelines on urolithiasis are now being revised and will adopt the form of "clinical questions". This paper provides an overview of the examination methods for recurrence, lifestyle guidance, and drug therapies based on the current guidelines for diagnosis and treatment of urolithiasis as well as the points for clinical questions to be included in the revised guidelines for a deeper understanding and, consequently, return to routine clinical practice.

  13. [Primary and secondary cardiovascular prevention results in patients with stroke: relapse risk and associated survival (Ebrictus study)].

    PubMed

    Clua-Espuny, Josep Ll; Piñol-Moreso, Josep Ll; Gil-Guillén, Vicente F; Orozco-Beltrán, Domingo; Panisello-Tafalla, Anna; Lucas-Noll, Jorgina; Queralt-Tomás, M Lluïssa; Pla-Farnós, Roger

    2012-01-16

    The prevalence and cardiovascular risk factors control (CVRF) are determining to suffer a stroke and its relapse which arise the mortality and disability. To estimate the incidence of the first episode of ictus and describe the results in primary and secondary cardiovascular prevention. Observational and prospective study of a fix cohort of 130,649 people, 15-90-year-old assigned to participants centers between 01/04/2006 and 31/03/2008. Community based register. Analyses were performed with the use of time-to-event methods, included Cox's multivariate on survival, risk of it's relapse; the CVRF diagnosed and it's relative risk (RR); cardiovascular risk. 553 patients were enrolled (48,8% female), average age 73.3 ± 11.6 years with the first episode of stroke. After the episode, the hypertension (74.9% vs 88.7%), atrial fibrillation (9.9% vs 16%) and dislipemia (37.8% vs 49.8%) increased significantly as well its control. The 47% (95% CI = 42.8-51.2) of the cases had high risk of relapsing. In the 15.7% of the patients happened relapse of cardiovascular event, 48.3% of which were stroke. The main predictors variables were history of recurrent cardiovascular event (RR = 6.7; 95% CI = 2.2-21.7) and the aging (RR = 1,08; 95% CI = 1.01-1.2). The cardiovascular secondary prevention seems to be more effective both in CVRF's detection and its control and is extremely important to get better results of survival.

  14. Effectiveness of chemical pleurodesis in spontaneous pneumothorax recurrence prevention: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Hallifax, R J; Yousuf, A; Jones, H E; Corcoran, J P; Psallidas, I; Rahman, N M

    2016-11-01

    Spontaneous pneumothorax is a common pathology. International guidelines suggest pleurodesis for non-resolving air leak or recurrence prevention at second occurrence. This study comprehensively reviews the existing literature regarding chemical pleurodesis efficacy. We systematically reviewed the literature to identify relevant randomised controlled trials (RCTs), case-control studies and case series. We described the findings of these studies and tabulated relative recurrence rates or ORs (in studies with control groups). Meta-analysis was not performed due to substantial clinical heterogeneity. Of 560 abstracts identified by our search strategy, 50 were included in our systematic review following screening. Recurrence rates in patients with chest tube drainage only were between 26.1% and 50.1%. Thoracoscopic talc poudrage (four studies (n=249)) provided recurrence rates of between 2.5% and 10.2% with the only RCT suggesting an OR of 0.10 compared with drainage alone. In comparison, talc administration during video-assisted thoracic surgery (VATS) from eight studies (n=2324) recurrence was between 0.0% and 3.2%, but the RCT did not demonstrate a significant difference compared with bleb/bullectomy alone. Minocycline appears similarly effective post-VATS (recurrence rates 0.0-2.9%). Prolonged air leak and recurrence prevention using tetracycline via chest drain (n=726) is likely to provide recurrence rates between 13.0% and 33.3% and autologous blood patch pleurodesis (n=270) between 15.6% and 18.2%. Chemical pleurodesis postsurgical treatment or via thoracoscopy appears to be most effective. Evidence for definitive success rates of each agent is limited by the small number of randomised trials or other comparative studies. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  15. [Stroke prevention in sickle-cell disease: results, hurdles and future perspectives].

    PubMed

    Bernaudin, Françoise; Verlhac, Suzanne

    2008-10-01

    Sickle cell disease (SCD) is the most frequent cause of stroke during infancy, and stroke is the most serious complication of SCD in children. Sludge-induced distal vasculopathy explains 25% of strokes in SCD, while proximal vasculopathy is responsible for 75% of cases. The stenoses observed in SCD-related proximal vasculopathy are progressive and can be detected by transcranial Doppler (TCD), a reliable, non-invasive and low-cost imaging method. High velocities (> 2 mls) are associated with a 40% risk of stroke within 36 months, but initiation of a transfusion program maintaining the HbS level under 30% reduces the risk to less than 2%. TCD must be performed in all children at 12-18 months of age to detect cerebral vasculopathy and prevent stroke. This approach has been adopted in our institution, based on a cohort of SCD newborns screened at birth: the risk of stroke was reduced from the expected 11% to less than 2% at 18 years. Genoidentical stem cell transplantation, which safely obviates the need for transfusion programs and provides a 95% chance of cure, should be offered early to patients at risk of stroke. When possible, sibling cord blood cryopreservation is recommended

  16. Dabigatran for Stroke Prevention in Nonvalvular Atrial Fibrillation: Answers to Challenging “Real-World” Questions

    PubMed Central

    Ferreira, Jorge; Ferreira, Daniel; Viana-Baptista, Miguel; Bettencourt, Paulo; Cernadas, Rui; Crespo, Francisco

    2012-01-01

    Dabigatran etexilate is a novel, oral, reversible, direct thrombin inhibitor that constitutes a major breakthrough for stroke prevention in patients with nonvalvular atrial fibrillation (AF). Dabigatran was the first new oral anticoagulant approved in Europe and became available in Portugal, for stroke prevention in nonvalvular AF, earlier than in most European countries. This paper is the joint effort of a panel of experts from different specialties and provides information on the use of dabigatran, in anticipation of the challenges that will come with increased usage. PMID:22645678

  17. Methenamine: a forgotten drug for preventing recurrent urinary tract infection in a multidrug resistance era.

    PubMed

    Lo, Tze Shien; Hammer, Kimberly D P; Zegarra, Milagros; Cho, William C S

    2014-05-01

    In the era of multidrug resistance, it is critical to utilize antibiotics in an appropriate manner and to identify new treatments or revisit the use of 'forgotten' drugs. Because urinary tract infections (UTIs) are common, particularly in an increasing elderly population, the 'forgotten' drug, methenamine, may become important as a preventive therapy for recurrent UTIs. Methenamine, a urinary antibacterial agent, can be used as methenamine hippurate or methenamine mandelate preparations and is United States Food and Drug Administration-approved. This article discusses the place of preventive therapy for recurrent UTIs, chemistry, mechanism of action, pharmacology, clinical uses, dosage, adverse reactions and safety, and drug interactions of methenamine. Because of its unique antiseptic property, the authors suggest that methenamine should be considered when more commonly used antibiotics fail to suppress recurrent UTIs.

  18. Stroke in Latin America: Burden of Disease and Opportunities for Prevention.

    PubMed

    Avezum, Álvaro; Costa-Filho, Francisco F; Pieri, Alexandre; Martins, Sheila O; Marin-Neto, José A

    2015-12-01

    The epidemiological transition in Latin America toward older urban dwelling adults has led to the rise in cardiovascular risk factors and an increase in morbidity and mortality rates related to both stroke and myocardial infarction. As a result, there is an immediate need for effective actions resulting in better detection and control of cardiovascular risk factors that will ultimately reduce cardiovascular disease burden. Data from case-control studies have identified the following risk factors associated with stroke: hypertension; smoking; abdominal obesity; diet; physical activity; diabetes; alcohol intake; psychosocial factors; cardiac causes; and dyslipidemia. In addition to its high mortality, patients who survive after a stroke present quite frequently with marked physical and functional disability. Because stroke is the leading cause of death in most Latin American countries and also because it is a clearly preventable cause of death and disability, simple, affordable, and efficient strategies must be urgently implemented in Latin America.

  19. A cost evaluation of the Georgia Stroke and Heart Attack Prevention Program.

    PubMed

    Rein, David B; Constantine, Roberta T; Orenstein, Diane; Chen, Hong; Jones, Patricia; Brownstein, J Nell; Farris, Rosanne

    2006-01-01

    Hypertension is a leading cause of stroke, coronary artery disease, heart attack, and heart and kidney failure in the United States, all of which contribute to the rising costs of health care. The Georgia Stroke and Heart Attack Prevention Program is an education and direct service program for low-income patients with hypertension. This project evaluated the cost-effectiveness of the program compared with the following two alternative scenarios: no treatment for high blood pressure and the typical hypertension treatment received in the private sector nationwide (usual care). We estimated the preventive treatment costs and number of adverse health events averted (hemorrhagic and ischemic stroke, heart disease, and kidney failure) associated with the Georgia Stroke and Heart Attack Prevention Program in two Georgia health districts. We used program cost and service usage data obtained from the Georgia Department of Human Resources and probabilities and costs of expected adverse events published in peer-reviewed sources. We compared program costs and number of expected adverse health events averted with those expected from 1) no preventive care and 2) usual care for high blood pressure. The Georgia Stroke and Heart Attack Prevention Program was less costly and resulted in better health outcomes than either no preventive care or usual care. Compared with no preventive care in the two districts, the program was estimated to result in 54% fewer expected adverse events; compared with usual care, the program was estimated to result in 46% fewer expected adverse events. Combining the costs of preventive treatment with the costs of expected adverse events, the Georgia Stroke and Heart Attack Prevention Program cost an average of 486 dollars per patient annually, compared with average annual costs of 534 dollars for no care and 624 dollars for usual care. Maintaining a publicly financed stroke and heart attack prevention program is more cost-effective and results in greater

  20. Efficacy of Supplementation with B Vitamins for Stroke Prevention: A Network Meta-Analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials.

    PubMed

    Dong, Hongli; Pi, Fuhua; Ding, Zan; Chen, Wei; Pang, Shaojie; Dong, Wenya; Zhang, Qingying

    2015-01-01

    Supplementation with B vitamins for stroke prevention has been evaluated over the years, but which combination of B vitamins is optimal for stroke prevention is unclear. We performed a network meta-analysis to assess the impact of different combinations of B vitamins on risk of stroke. A total of 17 trials (86 393 patients) comparing 7 treatment strategies and placebo were included. A network meta-analysis combined all available direct and indirect treatment comparisons to evaluate the efficacy of B vitamin supplementation for all interventions. B vitamin supplementation was associated with reduced risk of stroke and cerebral hemorrhage. The risk of stroke was lower with folic acid plus vitamin B6 as compared with folic acid plus vitamin B12 and was lower with folic acid plus vitamin B6 plus vitamin B12 as compared with placebo or folic acid plus vitamin B12. The treatments ranked in order of efficacy for stroke, from higher to lower, were folic acid plus vitamin B6 > folic acid > folic acid plus vitamin B6 plus vitamin B12 > vitamin B6 plus vitamin B12 > niacin > vitamin B6 > placebo > folic acid plus vitamin B12. B vitamin supplementation was associated with reduced risk of stroke; different B vitamins and their combined treatments had different efficacy on stroke prevention. Folic acid plus vitamin B6 might be the optimal therapy for stroke prevention. Folic acid and vitamin B6 were both valuable for stroke prevention. The efficacy of vitamin B12 remains to be studied.

  1. Lipoprotein-associated phospholipase A(2) activity is associated with large-artery atherosclerotic etiology and recurrent stroke in TIA patients.

    PubMed

    Delgado, Pilar; Chacón, Pilar; Penalba, Anna; Pelegri, Dolors; García-Berrocoso, Teresa; Giralt, Dolors; Santamarina, Estevo; Ribó, Marc; Maisterra, Olga; Alvarez-Sabín, José; Rosell, Anna; Montaner, Joan

    2012-01-01

    Lipoprotein-associated phospholipase A(2) (Lp-PLA(2)) has emerged as a novel biomarker in cardiovascular diseases due to its ability to predict stroke in population-based studies. We aimed to investigate Lp-PLA(2) levels in transient ischemic attack (TIA) patients and to study their relationship with stroke recurrence. Lp-PLA(2) mass and activity were measured by means of the PLAC test with an automated Olympus analyzer and by a colorimetric activity method (diaDexus) in 166 TIA patients and 144 healthy controls. Vascular risk factors and stroke etiology were assessed. Outcome was defined as the presence of recurrent stroke/TIA within 7 and 30 days after the index TIA. Multivariate analyses were performed to identify potential predictors of recurrence. Both Lp-PLA(2) mass and activity (p < 0.05) were higher in TIA than in controls. Several risk factors or previous treatments were associated with Lp-PLA(2) mass and activity level. During follow-up, 20 strokes/TIA (12%) occurred within the first 30 days and the presence of a large-artery atherosclerosis etiology of stroke (HR 3.28, p = 0.011), together with the past medical history of hyperlipidemia (HR 3.68, p = 0.008) and Lp-PLA(2) activity of >207 nmol/ml/min (HR 2.7, p = 0.042) were all significant predictors for recurrent stroke/TIA. Lp-PLA(2) activity might add significant prognostic information in the early evaluation of TIA patients. Copyright © 2011 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  2. Randomized controlled trial of a coordinated care intervention to improve risk factor control after stroke or transient ischemic attack in the safety net: Secondary stroke prevention by Uniting Community and Chronic care model teams Early to End Disparities (SUCCEED).

    PubMed

    Towfighi, Amytis; Cheng, Eric M; Ayala-Rivera, Monica; McCreath, Heather; Sanossian, Nerses; Dutta, Tara; Mehta, Bijal; Bryg, Robert; Rao, Neal; Song, Shlee; Razmara, Ali; Ramirez, Magaly; Sivers-Teixeira, Theresa; Tran, Jamie; Mojarro-Huang, Elizabeth; Montoya, Ana; Corrales, Marilyn; Martinez, Beatrice; Willis, Phyllis; Macias, Mireya; Ibrahim, Nancy; Wu, Shinyi; Wacksman, Jeremy; Haber, Hilary; Richards, Adam; Barry, Frances; Hill, Valerie; Mittman, Brian; Cunningham, William; Liu, Honghu; Ganz, David A; Factor, Diane; Vickrey, Barbara G

    2017-02-06

    Recurrent strokes are preventable through awareness and control of risk factors such as hypertension, and through lifestyle changes such as healthier diets, greater physical activity, and smoking cessation. However, vascular risk factor control is frequently poor among stroke survivors, particularly among socio-economically disadvantaged blacks, Latinos and other people of color. The Chronic Care Model (CCM) is an effective framework for multi-component interventions aimed at improving care processes and outcomes for individuals with chronic disease. In addition, community health workers (CHWs) have played an integral role in reducing health disparities; however, their effectiveness in reducing vascular risk among stroke survivors remains unknown. Our objectives are to develop, test, and assess the economic value of a CCM-based intervention using an Advanced Practice Clinician (APC)-CHW team to improve risk factor control after stroke in an under-resourced, racially/ethnically diverse population. In this single-blind randomized controlled trial, 516 adults (≥40 years) with an ischemic stroke, transient ischemic attack or intracerebral hemorrhage within the prior 90 days are being enrolled at five sites within the Los Angeles County safety-net setting and randomized 1:1 to intervention vs usual care. Participants are excluded if they do not speak English, Spanish, Cantonese, Mandarin, or Korean or if they are unable to consent. The intervention includes a minimum of three clinic visits in the healthcare setting, three home visits, and Chronic Disease Self-Management Program group workshops in community venues. The primary outcome is blood pressure (BP) control (systolic BP <130 mmHg) at 1 year. Secondary outcomes include: (1) mean change in systolic BP; (2) control of other vascular risk factors including lipids and hemoglobin A1c, (3) inflammation (C reactive protein [CRP]), (4) medication adherence, (5) lifestyle factors (smoking, diet, and physical activity

  3. Apixaban for stroke prevention in atrial fibrillation: a review of the clinical trial evidence.

    PubMed

    Yates, Scott W

    2011-10-01

    The objective of this review is to summarize data from the Apixaban for Reduction in Stroke and Other Thromboembolic Events in Atrial Fibrillation (ARISTOTLE) and Apixaban Versus Acetylsalicylic Acid to Prevent Stroke in Atrial Fibrillation Patients Who Have Failed or Are Unsuitable for Vitamin K Antagonist Treatment (AVERROES) trials of apixaban for stroke prevention in patients with atrial fibrillation (AF). The ARISTOTLE trial compared apixaban with warfarin in 18 201 patients with AF and ≥ 1 additional risk factor for stroke. The AVERROES trial compared apixaban with aspirin in 5599 patients with AF who were at increased risk of stroke and for whom vitamin K antagonists were unsuitable. In ARISTOTLE, apixaban reduced the risk of stroke or systemic embolism by 21% compared with warfarin (1.27% vs 1.60% per year; hazard ratio, 0.79; 95% confidence interval, 0.66-0.95). The reduction was significant and demonstrated the superiority of apixaban over warfarin for the primary outcome of preventing stroke or systemic embolism (P = 0.01 for superiority). Apixaban also reduced all-cause mortality by 11% (P = 0.047) and major bleeding by 31% (P < 0.001) compared with warfarin. The benefits of apixaban observed in ARISTOTLE are further supported by the results from AVERROES, which demonstrated a 55% reduction in the risk of stroke or systemic embolism compared with aspirin. Risk of major bleeding was not significantly different between apixaban and aspirin. Subgroup analyses in both trials demonstrated that the effects of apixaban are highly consistent across various patient subpopulations. Discontinuation of study medication was significantly lower with apixaban than with either warfarin in ARISTOTLE or aspirin in AVERROES. Apixaban is the first new oral anticoagulant that has been shown to be superior to warfarin in reducing stroke or systemic embolism, all-cause mortality, and major bleeding in patients with AF. Moreover, in patients with AF who are considered

  4. Relapse and Recurrence Prevention in the Treatment for Adolescents with Depression Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simons, Anne D.; Rohde, Paul; Kennard, Betsy D.; Robins, Michele

    2005-01-01

    Relapse and recurrence in adolescent depression are important problems. Much less is known about relapse prevention compared to the acute treatment of depression in adolescents. Based on previous research, theoretical predictions, and clinical experience, the Treatment for Adolescents With Depression Study (TADS) protocol was designed to determine…

  5. Relapse and Recurrence Prevention in the Treatment for Adolescents with Depression Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simons, Anne D.; Rohde, Paul; Kennard, Betsy D.; Robins, Michele

    2005-01-01

    Relapse and recurrence in adolescent depression are important problems. Much less is known about relapse prevention compared to the acute treatment of depression in adolescents. Based on previous research, theoretical predictions, and clinical experience, the Treatment for Adolescents With Depression Study (TADS) protocol was designed to determine…

  6. Sex differences in ischaemic stroke: potential cellular mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Chauhan, Anjali; Moser, Hope; McCullough, Louise D

    2017-04-01

    Stroke remains a leading cause of mortality and disability worldwide. More women than men have strokes each year, in part because women live longer. Women have poorer functional outcomes, are more likely to need nursing home care and have higher rates of recurrent stroke compared with men. Despite continued advancements in primary prevention, innovative acute therapies and ongoing developments in neurorehabilitation, stroke incidence and mortality continue to increase due to the aging of the U.S.

  7. Role of Endovascular Closure of the Left Atrial Appendage in Stroke Prevention for Atrial Fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Kiani, Jawad; Holmes, David R

    2015-11-01

    The pathophysiologic mechanism of thromboembolic stroke in the setting of non-valvular atrial fibrillation (AF) resides in the left atrial appendage (LAA). In this setting, approximately 90 % of all strokes originate from this structure. Percutaneous left atrial appendage occlusion (LAAO) therapy has recently emerged as an important strategy for prevention of stroke and systemic embolism in patients with non-valvular AF. Systemic anticoagulation therapy in this AF population, while effective, is associated with a significant bleeding risk, drug compliance issues, and limited reversal strategies. In this manuscript, we will review the percutaneous devices and techniques that allow endovascular closure of the LAA, including their efficacy in stroke prevention, the safety profile of these local site-specific therapies, comparison of the multiple approaches being studied, the index patient populations involved, and long-term follow-up in comparison with systemic anticoagulation therapy. The percutaneous LAAO approach indeed represents an exciting and revolutionary advance in the field of stroke prevention in AF.

  8. Secondary prevention of stroke with antiplatelet agents in patients with diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Piechowski-Jozwiak, Bartlomiej; Maulaz, Alexander; Bogousslavsky, Julien

    2005-01-01

    The prevalence of diabetes mellitus (DM) varies from 1.2 to 13.3% in the general population. The most frequent is type 2 (non-insulin-dependent) DM, which constitutes 90-95% of all cases. DM increases the risk of cardiac disease, stroke, retinopathy, nephropathy, neuropathy and gangrene, and the disease is associated with an increased prevalence of other cardiovascular risk factors such as hypertension, hypercholesterolaemia, asymptomatic carotid artery disease, and obesity. The risk of stroke may be directly and indirectly increased by the presence of DM. Epidemiological data show that DM independently amplifies the risk of ischaemic stroke from 1.8- up to 6-fold, so that prevention of cardiovascular risk in diabetics is of utmost importance. The main goal is to control glycaemia, although it has never been shown to be beneficial in stroke patients. Other preventive strategies include antiplatelet treatment. The open-label Primary Prevention Project trial tested the efficacy of low-dose acetylsalicylic acid (ASA) in prevention of ischaemic events in high-risk patients, but failed to demonstrate a significant benefit of ASA in diabetic patients. However, in the CAPRIE trial, the benefit of clopidogrel was amplified in patients with DM versus those without DM in preventing ischaemic events. This difference was even more striking when comparing patients treated with insulin versus non-diabetics. Another trial -- MATCH -- tested the benefit of adding ASA to clopidogrel versus clopidogrel alone in the prevention of ischaemic events in high-risk cerebrovascular patients, two-thirds of whom had DM. Further research is needed to clarify the effects of different antiplatelet regimens in stroke prevention in diabetic patients, who should be considered as high vascular-risk patients.

  9. Rivaroxaban for stroke prevention in East Asian patients from the ROCKET AF trial.

    PubMed

    Wong, Ka Sing Lawrence; Hu, Dai Yi; Oomman, Abraham; Tan, Ru-San; Patel, Manesh R; Singer, Daniel E; Breithardt, Günter; Mahaffey, Kenneth W; Becker, Richard C; Califf, Robert; Fox, Keith A A; Berkowitz, Scott D; Hacke, Werner; Hankey, Graeme J

    2014-06-01

    In Rivaroxaban Once Daily Oral Direct Factor Xa Inhibitor Compared With Vitamin K Antagonism for Prevention of Stroke and Embolism Trial in Atrial Fibrillation (ROCKET AF) trial, rivaroxaban was noninferior to dose-adjusted warfarin in preventing stroke or systemic embolism among patients with nonvalvular atrial fibrillation at moderate to high stroke risk. Because of differences in patient demographics, epidemiology, and stroke risk management in East Asia, outcomes and relative effects of rivaroxaban versus warfarin were assessed to determine consistency among East Asians versus other ROCKET AF participants. Baseline demographics and interaction of treatment effects of rivaroxaban and warfarin among patients within East Asia and outside were assessed. A total of 932 (6.5%) ROCKET AF participants resided in East Asia. At baseline, East Asians had lower weight, creatinine clearance, and prior vitamin K antagonist use; higher prevalence of prior stroke; and less congestive heart failure and prior myocardial infarction than other participants. Despite higher absolute event rates for efficacy and safety outcomes in East Asians, the relative efficacy of rivaroxaban (20 mg once daily; 15 mg once daily for creatinine clearance of 30-49 mL/min) versus warfarin with respect to the primary efficacy end point (stroke/systemic embolism) was consistent among East Asians and non-East Asians (interaction P=0.666). Relative event rates for the major or nonmajor clinically relevant bleeding in patients treated with rivaroxaban and warfarin were consistent among East Asians and non-East Asians (interaction P=0.867). Observed relative efficacy and safety of rivaroxaban versus warfarin were similar among patients within and outside East Asia. Rivaroxaban, 20 mg once daily, is an alternative to warfarin for stroke prevention in East Asians with nonvalvular atrial fibrillation. http://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier: NCT00123456. © 2014 American Heart Association, Inc.

  10. Prevention of post-operative recurrence of Crohn’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Vaughn, Byron Philip; Moss, Alan Colm

    2014-01-01

    Endoscopic and clinical recurrence of Crohn’s disease (CD) is a common occurrence after surgical resection. Smokers, those with perforating disease, and those with myenteric plexitis are all at higher risk of recurrence. A number of medical therapies have been shown to reduce this risk in clinical trials. Metronidazole, thiopurines and anti-tumour necrosis factors (TNFs) are all effective in reducing the risk of endoscopic or clinical recurrence of CD. Since these are preventative agents, the benefits of prophylaxis need to be weighed-against the risk of adverse events from, and costs of, therapy. Patients who are high risk for post-operative recurrence should be considered for early medical prophylaxis with an anti-TNF. Patients who have few to no risk factors are likely best served by a three-month course of antibiotics followed by tailored therapy based on endoscopy at one year. Clinical recurrence rates are variable, and methods to stratify patients into high and low risk populations combined with prophylaxis tailored to endoscopic recurrence would be an effective strategy in treating these patients. PMID:24574791

  11. Stroke

    MedlinePlus

    ... Is a Stroke? A stroke occurs if the flow of oxygen-rich blood to a portion of the brain ... pressure from the leaked blood damages brain cells. High blood pressure and ... A TIA occurs if blood flow to a portion of the brain is blocked ...

  12. Recurrent urinary tract infections in children: Preventive interventions other than prophylactic antibiotics

    PubMed Central

    Tewary, Kishor; Narchi, Hassib

    2015-01-01

    Urinary tract infection (UTI) is one of the most common childhood infections. Permanent renal cortical scarring may occur in affected children, especially with recurrent UTIs, leading to long-term complications such as hypertension and chronic renal failure. To prevent such damage, several interventions to prevent UTI recurrences have been tried. The most established and accepted prevention at present is low dose long-term antibiotic prophylaxis. However it has a risk of break through infections, adverse drug reactions and also the risk of developing antibiotic resistance. The search is therefore on-going to find a safer, effective and acceptable alternative. A recent meta-analysis did not support routine circumcision for normal boys with no risk factors. Vaccinium Macrocarpon (cranberry), commonly used against UTI in adult women, is also effective in reducing the number of recurrences and related antimicrobial use in children. Sodium pentosanpolysulfate, which prevents bacterial adherence to the uroepithelial cells in animal models, has shown conflicting results in human trials. When combined with antibiotic, Lactobacillus acidophilus (LA-5) and Bifidobacterium, by blocking the in vitro attachment of uropathogenic bacteria to uroepithelial cells, significantly reduce in the incidence of febrile UTIs. Deliberate colonization of the human urinary tract of patients with recurrent UTI with Escherichia-coli (E. coli) 83972 has resulted in subjective benefit and less UTI requiring treatment. The non-pathogenic E. coli isolate NU14 DeltawaaL is a candidate to develop live-attenuated vaccine for the treatment and prevention of acute and recurrent UTI. Diagnosing and treating dysfunctional elimination syndromes decrease the incidence of recurrent UTI. A meta-analysis found the lack of robust prospective randomized controlled trials limited the strength of the established guidelines for surgical management of vesicoureteral reflux. In conclusion, several interventions

  13. Prediction of major vascular events after stroke: the stroke prevention by aggressive reduction in cholesterol levels trial.

    PubMed

    Ovbiagele, Bruce; Goldstein, Larry B; Amarenco, Pierre; Messig, Michael; Sillesen, Henrik; Callahan, Alfred; Hennerici, Michael G; Zivin, Justin; Welch, K Michael A

    2014-04-01

    Identifying patients with recent stroke or transient ischemic attack (TIA) at high risk of major vascular events (MVEs; stroke, myocardial infarction, or vascular death) may help optimize the intensity of secondary preventive interventions. We evaluated the relationships between the baseline Framingham Coronary Risk Score (FCRS) and a novel risk prediction model and with the occurrence of MVEs after stroke or TIA in subjects enrolled in the Stroke Prevention by Aggressive Reduction in Cholesterol Level (SPARCL) trial. Data from the 4731 subjects enrolled in the SPARCL study were analyzed. Hazard ratios (HRs) from Cox regression models were used to determine the risk of subsequent MVEs based on the FCRS predicting 20% or more 10-year coronary heart disease risk. The novel risk model was derived based on multivariable modeling with backward selection. Model discrimination (c-statistics) was assessed using the areas under the receiver operating characteristic curves. Of 3969 subjects with complete data, 27% had a baseline FCRS of 20% or more. In multivariable analysis, an FCRS of 20% or more was associated with twice the risk of subsequent MVEs (HR = 1.92, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.63-2.27). The novel model based on a multivariable analysis included age (HR = 1.37, 95% CI: 1.25-1.51 per 10 years), diabetes (HR = 1.82, 95% CI: 1.51-2.18), male sex (HR = 1.35, 95% CI: 1.12-1.61), and an apolipoprotein (APO)-B/APO-A1 ratio (HR = 1.56, 95% CI: 1.16-2.11). The c-statistic was .58 (95% CI: .55-.60) for the FCRS of 20% or more and .65 (95% CI: .63-.67) for the novel model. Both a baseline FCRS of 20% or more and a novel predictive model were associated with future MVEs in SPARCL trial subjects. The novel model needs to be validated, and the benefits of using either the FCRS or the novel model in clinical practice needs to be assessed. Copyright © 2014 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Using behavioral risk factor surveillance data for heart disease and stroke prevention programs.

    PubMed

    Greenlund, Kurt J; Denny, Clark H; Mokdad, Ali H; Watkins, Nancy; Croft, Janet B; Mensah, George A

    2005-12-01

    An effective state heart disease and stroke prevention program must be able to monitor changes in heart disease and stroke risk factors of the state population. The Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS), a state-based telephone survey, has been an important source for monitoring health-related factors and evaluating the success of programs. The BRFSS currently includes modules on hypertension and cholesterol screening and awareness, cardiovascular disease preventive practices, and recognition of the signs and symptoms of heart attack and stroke as well as relevant modules on fruit and vegetable intake, physical activity, tobacco use, and diabetes. Publication topics included monitoring risk factors and clinical services, assessing progress toward national goals, assessing health disparities, and health status and health-related quality of life issues. States have used the BRFSS data for monitoring health risks in the state, assessing state and national health objectives, determining and providing data for public health campaigns, providing information for legislative proposals, and providing information that helps to initiate collaboration. Major methodologic issues involve validating self-reported data against direct measurement and assessing the effects of changes in telecommunications. As Centers for Disease Control's (CDC) national heart disease and stroke prevention program and each state health department program develop, state and even local level data will become more important to measure the burden of disease and program impact. State heart disease and stroke prevention programs are encouraged to work closely with state BRFSS coordinators to obtain vital information to measure the burden of heart disease and stroke in their state and to be able to measure program impact on addressing the first and third leading causes of death in the U.S.

  15. A Randomized Controlled Trial of Celecoxib to Prevent Recurrence of Non-Muscle–Invasive Bladder Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Sabichi, Anita L.; Lee, J. Jack; Grossman, H. Barton; Liu, Suyu; Richmond, Ellen; Czerniak, Bogdan A.; De la Cerda, Jorge; Eagle, Craig; Viner, Jaye L.; Palmer, J. Lynn; Lerner, Seth P.

    2014-01-01

    Significant morbidity and expense result from frequent recurrences of non-muscle invasive bladder cancer (NMIBC) after standard treatment, and carcinoma in situ (Tis) is a poor prognostic factor. Predicated on observational and preclinical data strongly supporting cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) in the pathogenesis, and the activity of COX-2 inhibitors, in bladder cancer, we conducted a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial to determine if celecoxib could reduce the time-to-recurrence (TTR) in NMIBC patients at high risk for recurrence. 146 patients were randomized to celecoxib (200 mg) or placebo orally twice daily for at least 12 months. The average treatment duration was 1.25 years. Primary intent-to-treat analysis revealed celecoxib did not statistically significantly prolong TTR compared with placebo (P = 0.17, log-rank). With a median follow-up of 2.49 years the relative risk of recurrence in the celecoxib vs placebo arms was 0.64 (95% CI, 0.38, 1.17). The recurrence-free rate at 12 months with celecoxib was 88% (95% CI, 0.81,0.96) versus 78% (95% CI, 0.69, 0.89) with placebo. After controlling for covariates with Cox regression analysis, recurrence rates did not differ between the two study arms (HR = 0.69; 95% CI, 0.37,1.29). Celecoxib had a marginally significant effect on reducing metachronous recurrences (vs. placebo) with hazard ratio of 0.56 (95% CI, 0.3,1.06; P=0.075). Celecoxib was well tolerated, with similar adverse events and quality-of-life in both arms. Our clinical trial results do not show a clinical benefit for celecoxib in preventing NMIBC recurrence but further investigation of COX-2 inhibitors in this setting is warranted. PMID:21881030

  16. Is it possible to prevent recurrent vulvovaginitis? The role of Lactobacillus plantarum I1001 (CECT7504).

    PubMed

    Palacios, S; Espadaler, J; Fernández-Moya, J M; Prieto, C; Salas, N

    2016-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to prospectively evaluate the impact of the use of L. plantarum I1001 applied vaginally on Vulvovaginal Candidiasis (VVC) time-until-recurrence after treatment with single-dose vaginal clotrimazole. This was a clinical open-label, prospective study of two non-randomized parallel cohorts with symptomatic acute VVC: (1) 33 sexually active women 18-50 years old, prescribed a standard single-dose 500 mg vaginal tablet of clotrimazole followed by vaginal tablets with L. plantarum I1001 as adjuvant therapy, and (2) 22 women of similar characteristics but prescribed single-dose clotrimazole only. Use of the probiotic and factors that might influence recurrence risk (age, recurrent VVC within previous year, antibiotic prior to study enrolment, diaphragm or IUD contraception, among others) were included in a multivariate Cox regression model to adjust for potential between-cohort differences. Probiotic use was associated with a three-fold reduction in the adjusted risk of recurrence (HR [95 %CI]: 0.30 [0.10-0.91]; P = 0.033). Adjusted free-survival recurrence was 72.83 % and 34.88 % for the probiotic and control groups, respectively. A higher cumulative recurrence was also observed in cases with use of antibiotics prior to enrolment (HR [95 %CI]: 10.46 [2.18-50.12]; P = 0.003). Similar findings were found at six months after azole treatment in women with RVVC. Overall, good compliance with the probiotic was reported for 91.3 % of women. The study suggests that follow-up therapy with vaginal tablets with L. plantarum I1001 could increase the effectiveness of single-dose 500 mg clotrimazole at preventing recurrence of VVC, an effect that was also observed in women with recurrent vulvovaginal candidiasis (RVVC) after six months of azole treatment.

  17. Recurrent stroke in patients with patent foramen ovale: An observational prospective study of percutaneous closure of PFO versus non-closure.

    PubMed

    Mirzada, Naqibullah; Ladenvall, Per; Hansson, Per-Olof; Eriksson, Peter; Dellborg, Mikael

    2015-09-15

    Observational studies favor percutaneous closure of patent foramen ovale (PFO) over medical therapy to reduce the risk of recurrent stroke, whereas randomized clinical trials have not shown significant differences. This study aims to compare long-term outcomes of PFO closure versus non-closure. Patients with PFO and stroke considered for PFO closure were invited to a long-term clinical follow-up. Of the 314 patients, 151 (48%) were accepted for closure and 163 (52%) were not accepted (mean age 50 vs. 58 years). The cumulative incidence of all-cause mortality, stroke or transient ischemic attacks (TIAs) for closure vs. non-closure under a mean follow-up time of five years was 10.6% (16 events) vs. 12.9% (21 events), p=0.53. Six patients, 3.7% vs. 3.6%, died in each group, but no deaths were associated with PFO closure, recurrent stroke or TIA. The incidence of recurrent stroke or TIA for closure vs. non-closure was 6.6% (10 events) vs. 9.2% (15 events), p=0.63. The respective event rates for stroke were 3.9% (6 events) vs. 5.5% (9 events), p=0.50 and for TIA, 2.6% (4 events) vs. 3.7% (6 events), p=0.59. PFO closure was associated with a low risk of recurrent events; however, compared to the non-closure group, no significant differences could be demonstrated. Careful patient selection can avoid under- as well as over-treatment of PFO patients. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. [A case of Behçet disease developing recurrent ischemic stroke with fever and scrotal ulcers].

    PubMed

    Koike, Yuka; Sakai, Naoko; Umeda, Yoshitaka; Umeda, Maiko; Oyake, Mutsuo; Fujita, Nobuya

    2015-01-01

    A 30-year-old man, who was diagnosed with Behçet disease at 10 years of age, was hospitalized because of transient right hemiparesis after presenting with high fever and scrotal ulcers. Brain MRI revealed ischemic lesions in the area supplied by the anterior cerebral arteries. Analysis of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) showed pleocytosis and a high interleukin-6 (IL-6) concentration (668 pg/ml). The patient was diagnosed with acute ischemic stroke associated with exacerbation of Behçet disease. After initiation of corticosteroid therapy, his clinical symptoms improved, and the CSF IL-6 concentration decreased. One year later, the patient developed high fever and scrotal ulcers after the onset of transient left upper limb plegia. Brain MRI showed an acute ischemic lesion in the right putamen, and CSF analysis showed an elevated IL-6 concentration (287 pg/ml). Brain CT angiography revealed stenosis of the left anterior cerebral artery and occlusion of the right anterior cerebral artery, which had been well visualized one year previously. Involvement of the intracranial cerebral arteries in Behçet disease is extremely rare. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first case report of a patient with recurrent symptomatic ischemic stroke associated with high fever and scrotal ulcers, which suggests exacerbation of Behçet disease.

  19. Metabolic vitamin B12 deficiency: a missed opportunity to prevent dementia and stroke.

    PubMed

    Spence, J David

    2016-02-01

    The purpose of this narrative review is to highlight insights into the importance and frequency of metabolic vitamin B12 (B12) deficiency, reasons why it is commonly missed, and reasons for the widespread but mistaken belief that treatment of B12 deficiency does not prevent stroke or improve cognitive function. Metabolic B12 deficiency is common, being present in 10%-40% of the population; is frequently missed; is easily treated; and contributes importantly to cognitive decline and stroke in older people. Measuring serum B12 alone is not sufficient for diagnosis; it is necessary to measure holotranscobalamin or functional markers of B12 adequacy such as methylmalonic acid or plasma total homocysteine. B-vitamin therapy with cyanocobalamin reduces the risk of stroke in patients with normal renal function but is harmful (perhaps because of thiocyanate accumulation from cyanide in cyanocobalamin) in patients with renal impairment. Methylcobalamin may be preferable in renal impairment. B12 therapy slowed gray matter atrophy and cognitive decline in the Homocysteine and B Vitamins in Cognitive Impairment Trial. Undiagnosed metabolic B12 deficiency may be an important missed opportunity for prevention of dementia and stroke; in patients with metabolic B12 deficiency, it would be prudent to offer inexpensive and nontoxic supplements of oral B12, preferably methylcobalamin or hydroxycobalamin. Future research is needed to distinguish the effects of thiocyanate from cyanocobalamin on hydrogen sulfide, and effects of treatment with methylcobalamin on cognitive function and stroke, particularly in patients with renal failure.

  20. Evidence for the Prevention and Treatment of Stroke in Dialysis Patients

    PubMed Central

    Herrington, William; Haynes, Richard; Staplin, Natalie; Emberson, Jonathan; Baigent, Colin; Landray, Martin

    2015-01-01

    The risks of both ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke are particularly high in dialysis patients of any age and outcomes are poor. It is therefore important to identify strategies that safely minimize stroke risk in this population. Observational studies have been unable to clarify the relative importance of traditional stroke risk factors such as blood pressure and cholesterol in those on dialysis, and are affected by biases that usually make them an inappropriate source of data on which to base therapeutic decisions. Well-conducted randomized trials are not susceptible to such biases and can reliably investigate the causal nature of the association between a potential risk factor and the outcome of interest. However, dialysis patients have been under-represented in the cardiovascular trials which have proven net benefit of commonly used preventative treatments (e.g., antihypertensive treatments, low-dose aspirin, carotid revascularization, and thromboprophylaxis for atrial fibrillation), and there remains uncertainty about safety and efficacy of many of these treatments in this high-risk population. Moreover, the efficacy of renal-specific therapies that might reduce cardiovascular risk, such as modulators of mineral and bone disorder, online hemodiafiltration, and daily (nocturnal) hemodialysis, have not been tested in adequately powered trials. Recent trials have also demonstrated how widespread current practices could be causing stroke. Therefore, it is important that reliable information on the prevention and treatment of stroke (and other cardiovascular disease) in dialysis patients is generated by performing large-scale randomized trials of many current and future treatments. PMID:25040468

  1. Optimal Systolic Blood Pressure Levels for Primary Prevention of Stroke in General Hypertensive Adults: Findings From the CSPPT (China Stroke Primary Prevention Trial).

    PubMed

    Fan, Fangfang; Yuan, Ziwen; Qin, Xianhui; Li, Jianping; Zhang, Yan; Li, Youbao; Yu, Tao; Ji, Meng; Ge, Junbo; Zheng, Meili; Yang, Xinchun; Bao, Huihui; Cheng, Xiaoshu; Gu, Dongfeng; Zhao, Dong; Wang, Jiguang; Sun, Ningling; Chen, Yundai; Wang, Hong; Wang, Xiaobin; Parati, Gianfranco; Hou, Fanfan; Xu, Xiping; Wang, Xian; Zhao, Gang; Huo, Yong

    2017-04-01

    We aimed to investigate the relationship of time-averaged on-treatment systolic blood pressure (SBP) with the risk of first stroke in the CSPPT (China Stroke Primary Prevention Trial). A post hoc analysis was conducted using data from 17 720 hypertensive adults without cardiovascular disease, diabetes mellitus, and renal function decline from the CSPPT, a randomized double-blind controlled trial. The primary outcome was first stroke. Over a median follow-up duration of 4.5 years, the association between averaged on-treatment SBP and risk for first stoke followed a U-shape curve, with increased risk above and below the reference range of 120 to 130 mm Hg. Compared with participants with time-averaged on-treatment SBP at 120 to 130 mm Hg (mean, 126.2 mm Hg), the risk of first stroke was not only increased in participants with SBP at 130 to 135 mm Hg (mean, 132.6 mm Hg; 1.5% versus 0.8%; hazard ratio, 1.63; 95% confidence interval, 1.01-2.63) or 135 to 140 mm Hg (mean, 137.5 mm Hg; 1.9% versus 0.8%; hazard ratio, 1.85; 95% confidence interval, 1.17-2.93), but also increased in participants with SBP <120 mm Hg (mean, 116.7 mm Hg; 3.1% versus 0.8%; hazard ratio, 4.37; 95% confidence interval, 2.10-9.07). Similar results were found in various subgroups stratified by age, sex, and treatment group. Furthermore, lower diastolic blood pressure was associated with lower risk of stroke, with a plateau at a time-average on-treatment diastolic blood pressure <80 mm Hg. In conclusion, among adults with hypertension and without a history of stroke or myocardial infarction, diabetes mellitus, or renal function decline, a lower SBP goal of 120 to 130 mm Hg, as compared with a target SBP of 130 to 140 mm Hg or <120 mm Hg, resulted in the lowest risk of first stroke. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  2. Long-term prehypertension treatment with losartan effectively prevents brain damage and stroke in stroke-prone spontaneously hypertensive rats.

    PubMed

    He, De-Hua; Zhang, Liang-Min; Lin, Li-Ming; Ning, Ruo-Bing; Wang, Hua-Jun; Xu, Chang-Sheng; Lin, Jin-Xiu

    2014-02-01

    Prehypertension has been associated with adverse cerebrovascular events and brain damage. The aims of this study were to investigate ⅰ) whether short‑ and long-term treatments with losartan or amlodipine for prehypertension were able to prevent blood pressure (BP)-linked brain damage, and ⅱ) whether there is a difference in the effectiveness of treatment with losartan and amlodipine in protecting BP-linked brain damage. In the present study, prehypertensive treatment with losartan and amlodipine (6 and 16 weeks treatment with each drug) was performed on 4-week‑old stroke-prone spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHRSP). The results showed that long-term (16 weeks) treatment with losartan is the most effective in lowering systolic blood pressure in the long term (up to 40 weeks follow-up). Additionally, compared with the amlodipine treatment groups, the short‑ and long-term losartan treatments protected SHRSP from stroke and improved their brains structurally and functionally more effectively, with the long-term treatment having more benefits. Mechanistically, the short‑ and long-term treatments with losartan reduced the activity of the local renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS) in a time-dependent manner and more effectively than their respective counterpart amlodipine treatment group mainly by decreasing AT1R levels and increasing AT2R levels in the cerebral cortex. By contrast, the amlodipine treatment groups inhibited brain cell apoptosis more effectively as compared with the losartan treatment groups mainly through the suppression of local oxidative stress. Taken together, the results suggest that long-term losartan treatment for prehypertension effectively protects SHRSP from stroke-induced brain damage, and this protection is associated with reduced local RAAS activity than with brain cell apoptosis. Thus, the AT1R receptor blocker losartan is a good candidate drug that may be used in the clinic for long-term treatment on prehypertensive

  3. New anticoagulants for the prevention of stroke in atrial fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Höchtl, Thomas; Huber, Kurt

    2012-02-01

    Oral anticoagulation in atrial fibrillation is obligatory to lower the risk of spontaneous cerebrovascular and systemic thromboembolism. For this purpose, vitamin K antagonists (coumarins) have been recommended as the most effective drugs for a long time. However, problems with the practical use of these agents, e.g. the need for frequent and regular coagulation controls, the inter-individual differences in maintaining a stable therapeutic range, as well as drug or food interactions, have led to the search and investigation of alternative compounds characterized by a more simple use (e.g. without regular controls of therapeutic levels), high efficacy, as well as low risk of bleeding. The direct thrombin inhibitor dabigatran and the direct factor Xa inhibitors rivaroxaban and apixaban have recently been investigated to prove whether they fulfill the high expectancy of an ideal anticoagulant with respect to a more favorable efficacy/safety profile and without the need for coagulation controls, thereby improving quality of life. Dabigatran (RE-LY) achieved an impressive reduction in stroke and non-central nervous system (non-CNS) embolism (110 mg: 1.5%/year; 150 mg: 1.1%/year) in contrast to warfarin (1.7%/year; P = 0.34 and P < 0.001) with a favorable action on bleeding hazards. The results of rivaroxaban which were obtained in the ROCKET AF study (on treatment analysis: stroke and non-CNS embolism: 1.7%/year vs. 2.15%/year with warfarin; P = 0.015; primary safety endpoint major and minor bleeding: 14.91 vs. 14.52%; P = 0.442) point in the same direction. And finally, compared to aspirin, apixaban reduced the combined primary efficacy endpoint by 52% with comparable rates of bleeding (AVERROES). This review gives a summary of the current knowledge about these agents and their potential future importance.

  4. Antibiotic prophylaxis for preventing recurrent cellulitis: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Oh, Choon Chiat; Ko, Henry Chung Hung; Lee, Haur Yueh; Safdar, Nasia; Maki, Dennis G; Chlebicki, Maciej Piotr

    2014-07-01

    A significant proportion of patients who have had a first episode of erysipelas or uncomplicated cellulitis will subsequently develop a recurrence. There is disagreement about how effective antibiotic prophylaxis is for preventing recurrent cellulitis. To determine if antibiotic prophylaxis is effective in preventing recurrent cellulitis compared to no prophylaxis using a systematic review and meta-analysis. Studies in any language identified by searching Medline, EMBASE, Cochrane Library, CINAHL, TRIP database, clinical practice guidelines websites, and ongoing trials databases up to 31st August 2012. Search terms included cellulitis, erysipelas, controlled clinical trial, randomized, placebo, clinical trials, randomly, and trial. Only controlled trials comparing antibiotic prophylaxis to no antibiotic prophylaxis in patients age 16 years and above, and after 1 or more episodes of cellulitis, were included. Independent extraction of articles was done by 2 investigators using predefined data extraction templates, including study quality indicators. PROSPERO registration number: CRD42012002528. Meta-analyses were done using random-effects models. The primary outcome was the number of patients with a recurrence of cellulitis. Secondary outcomes were (1) the time to next episode of recurrence, (2) quality of life measures, and (3) adverse events (e.g. allergic reactions, nausea). Five randomized controlled trials (n = 535), with 260 patients in the intervention arm and 275 in the comparator group met our inclusion criteria. 44 patients (8%) in the antibiotic prophylaxis group and 97 patients (18%) in the comparator group had an episode of cellulitis. Antibiotic prophylaxis significantly reduced the number of patients having recurrent cellulitis, with a risk ratio (RR) of 0.46 (95% CI 0.26-0.79). None of the studies reported severe adverse effects to antibiotics. There was methodological heterogeneity amongst the studies in terms of types of antibiotic used, delivery

  5. Genetic Associations with Plasma B12, B6, and Folate Levels in an Ischemic Stroke Population from the Vitamin Intervention for Stroke Prevention (VISP) Trial

    PubMed Central

    Keene, Keith L.; Chen, Wei-Min; Chen, Fang; Williams, Stephen R.; Elkhatib, Stacey D.; Hsu, Fang-Chi; Mychaleckyj, Josyf C.; Doheny, Kimberly F.; Pugh, Elizabeth W.; Ling, Hua; Laurie, Cathy C.; Gogarten, Stephanie M.; Madden, Ebony B.; Worrall, Bradford B.; Sale, Michele M.

    2014-01-01

    Background: B vitamins play an important role in homocysteine metabolism, with vitamin deficiencies resulting in increased levels of homocysteine and increased risk for stroke. We performed a genome-wide association study (GWAS) in 2,100 stroke patients from the Vitamin Intervention for Stroke Prevention (VISP) trial, a clinical trial designed to determine whether the daily intake of high-dose folic acid, vitamins B6, and B12 reduce recurrent cerebral infarction. Methods: Extensive quality control (QC) measures resulted in a total of 737,081 SNPs for analysis. Genome-wide association analyses for baseline quantitative measures of folate, Vitamins B12, and B6 were completed using linear regression approaches, implemented in PLINK. Results: Six associations met or exceeded genome-wide significance (P ≤ 5 × 10−08). For baseline Vitamin B12, the strongest association was observed with a non-synonymous SNP (nsSNP) located in the CUBN gene (P = 1.76 × 10−13). Two additional CUBN intronic SNPs demonstrated strong associations with B12 (P = 2.92 × 10−10 and 4.11 × 10−10), while a second nsSNP, located in the TCN1 gene, also reached genome-wide significance (P = 5.14 × 10−11). For baseline measures of Vitamin B6, we identified genome-wide significant associations for SNPs at the ALPL locus (rs1697421; P = 7.06 × 10−10 and rs1780316; P = 2.25 × 10−08). In addition to the six genome-wide significant associations, nine SNPs (two for Vitamin B6, six for Vitamin B12, and one for folate measures) provided suggestive evidence for association (P ≤ 10−07). Conclusion: Our GWAS study has identified six genome-wide significant associations, nine suggestive associations, and successfully replicated 5 of 16 SNPs previously reported to be associated with measures of B vitamins. The six genome-wide significant associations are located in gene regions that have shown previous associations with measures of B

  6. [Heat stroke related to the use of topiramate. The importance of prevention].

    PubMed

    Rosich Del Cacho, M; Pareja Grande, J; Martínez Jiménez, M D; Latorre Latorre, J F; Bejarano Ramírez, N; López-Menchero Oliva, C

    2014-09-01

    Heat stroke is the most severe pathology related to heat. It is defined as an increase in core body temperature accompanied by signs of neurological dysfunction. In the absence of an early treatment, it has a very high mortality rate. Topiramate is a well known drug widely used in epilepsy treatment and migraine prevention. Oligohydrosis has been described amongst topiramate side effects, favouring the risk of hyperthermia and heatstroke. We present the case of a patient who developed heat stroke due to physical exercise while under topiramate treatment. Copyright © 2013 Asociación Española de Pediatría. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  7. [Evaluation of treatment and preventive care for recurrent urolithiasis in children].

    PubMed

    Gołabek, B; Słowik, M; Grabowska, M; Kowalska, B; Nowakowska, K; Nowaczewska, I

    1999-01-01

    Among 425 children with urolithiasis treated in the Paediatric Clinical Department of the National Research Institute of Mother and Child in Warsaw between 1976-1997, 50 of them i.e. 11.7% (26 boys and 24 girls) had recurrent urolithiasis. Patients' age was from 10 months to 16 years and 5 months. The number of recurrences of uroliothiasis before treatment in the Institute was from 1 to 8. Most of the children had numerous surgical operations, some of them excreted stones spontaneously. The etiology was determined in all cases. A metabolic cause of urolithiasis was found in 34 cases, i.e. 68% of the analysed group. They were as follows: idiopathic hypercalcuria--24 cases, uric acid urolithiasis--5 cases, cystynuria--4 cases, and incomplete distal renal tubular acidosis--1 case. Other reasons for urolithiasis were: infection--7 cases, idiopathic urolithiasis--8 cases, ren spongiosum--1 case. Prevention of recurrences depending on the etiology was successful. In 45 cases no recurrences were found. Recurrent urolithiasis was observed in 4 cases of cystynuria and in one case of incomplete tubular acidosis. The observation period was from 3-19 years.

  8. Availability of patient decision aids for stroke prevention in atrial fibrillation: A systematic review.

    PubMed

    O'Neill, Elizabeth S; Grande, Stuart W; Sherman, Ariel; Elwyn, Glyn; Coylewright, Megan

    2017-09-01

    Atrial fibrillation is a common irregular heart rhythm that increases patients' risk of stroke. Aspirin, warfarin, direct oral anticoagulants, and an implantable device can reduce this risk. Given the availability of multiple comparable options, this decision depends on patient preferences and is appropriate for the use of decision aids and other efforts to promote shared decision making. The objective of this review was to examine the existence and accessibility of, as well as select outcomes associated with, published, formally evaluated patient decision aids for stroke prevention in atrial fibrillation. Six databases were searched from inception to March 2016 with a research librarian. Two authors independently reviewed potential articles, selected trials meeting inclusion criteria, and assessed outcome measures. Outcomes included patient knowledge, involvement, choice, and decisional conflict. The search resulted in 666 articles; most were excluded for not examining stroke prevention in atrial fibrillation and 7 studies were eventually included. Six decision aids displayed combinations of aspirin, warfarin, or no therapy; 1 included a direct oral anticoagulant. Interventions were associated with increased patient knowledge, increased likelihood of making a choice, and low decisional conflict. Use of decision aids in this review was associated with less selection of warfarin. None of the tested decision aids are currently available. Published patient decision aids for stroke prevention in atrial fibrillation are not accessible for clinical use. Given the availability of multiple comparable options, there is a need to develop and test new patient decision aids in this context. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Randomized controlled trials of new oral anticoagulants for stroke prevention in atrial fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Liew, Aaron; Eikelboom, John W; O'Donnell, Martin

    2012-07-01

    The prevalence of atrial fibrillation is increasing because of an aging population. Vitamin K antagonists have been the standard therapy for stroke prevention in atrial fibrillation but are underutilized and often poorly managed because of their inherent limitations. This study critically reviews the recently completed phase 3 randomized controlled trials of new oral anticoagulants (OACs) for stroke prevention in patients with nonvalvular atrial fibrillation: RE-LY (dabigatran), AVERROES (apixaban), ARISTOTLE (apixaban) and ROCKET-AF (rivaroxaban). On the basis of their favorable pharmacological characteristics and excellent efficacy and safety profile as demonstrated by the results of the randomized controlled trials, the new OACs have the potential to replace vitamin K antagonists as the first-line treatment for stroke prevention in atrial fibrillation, with warfarin reserved for patients with contraindications to the new OACs and those unable to afford them. The new OACs represent a major advance for patients with atrial fibrillation with the potential to reduce morbidity and mortality due to cardioembolic stroke.

  10. Strategies for the Prevention of Recurrent Hepatitis B Virus Infection After Liver Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Manne, Vignan; Allen, Ruby M.; Saab, Sammy

    2014-01-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection is an international public health concern, and chronic infection can lead to the development of cirrhosis, liver failure, or hepatocellular carcinoma as well as the need for liver transplantation. The recurrence of HBV infection following liver transplantation was disproportionately high prior to the introduction of proper prophylactic treatment. Risk factors associated with the recurrence of HBV infection post-transplant include hepatitis B e antigen positivity, high levels of serum HBV DNA, and the presence of an antiviral drug-resistant strain prior to transplantation. The prevention of HBV recurrence began with the introduction of hepatitis B immunoglobulin (HBIG) in the early 1 990s. Nucleos(t)ide analog (NA) antiviral drugs were next to be introduced and, in combination with HBIG, are considered to be extremely effective for the prevention of recurrence. Because of concerns with HBIG, whether HBIG can be used for a short time or discontinued altogether is under debate. All of the NA antiviral drugs have been proven to be effective against HBV, at least in the pretransplant setting, and can be used safely posttransplant. Further investigation is still needed to standardize treatment in the posttransplant setting. PMID:24829544

  11. Efficacy of Subconjunctival Bevacizumab Injections before and after Surgical Excision in Preventing Pterygium Recurrence

    PubMed Central

    Tridico, Federico

    2017-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the efficacy of subconjunctival bevacizumab injections, before and after surgical excision with bare sclera technique, in preventing postoperative pterygium recurrence. Material and Methods 83 eyes of 83 patients affected with primary pterygia underwent surgical excision. 42 eyes received two subconjunctival bevacizumab injections, at the dosage of 2.5 mg/0.1 ml, one week prior surgery and one week after intervention. Recurrence rate was evaluated among the two groups. Moreover, modifications of pterygium size and grade one week after the first injection were evaluated. Results At 6 months after surgery, the recurrence rate was 7.14% in the bevacizumab group and 24.39% in the control group. Significant changes of pterygium size and grade were reported after the first injection. No important complications related to bevacizumab subconjunctival injections were registered. Conclusions The application of subconjunctival bevacizumab injections, at the dosage of 2.5 mg/0.1 ml, before and after surgical pterygium excision, may be useful in preventing lesion recurrence after bare scleral procedures. Furthermore, bevacizumab subconjunctival administration is well tolerated and may represent a safer alternative if compared with other surgical techniques and adjunctive drugs. This trial is retrospectively registered with ISRCTN Registry on 18 April 2017, TRN: ISRCTN11424742. PMID:28634544

  12. Telestroke in stroke survivors.

    PubMed

    Joubert, Jacques; Joubert, Lynette B; de Bustos, Elizabeth Medeiros; Ware, Dallas; Jackson, David; Harrison, Terrence; Cadilhac, Dominique

    2009-01-01

    Stroke is a high-frequency disorder placing a significant burden on the health care systems, being the foremost cause of complex chronic disability in adults. Devising systems that can enhance the prevention of stroke recurrence is an important priority and challenge in both the developed and the developing world. The potential for recurrent stroke can be substantially reduced by effective management of vascular risk factors. Telestroke is a tool with potential application to improve risk management of stroke survivors. Lack of acknowledgment of existing practices as well as lack of awareness of potential financial barriers to diffusion of telestroke can lead to limited implementation. Telestroke offers service providers the opportunity to access large numbers of stroke survivors targeting secondary prevention. The ideal 'telestroke model' provides service support, education for the patient and caregiver, as well as integration of specialist and primary care services. Effective use of technological advances, with adequate recognition of the importance of human interaction in the long-term management of a largely elderly population of stroke survivors is challenging but possible. Telestroke should be systems- and not technology-driven. Barriers in the implementation of telestroke have been identified as insufficient planning of IT infrastructure, lack of long-term vision for sustainability, a lack of contextual perspective as well as poor communication across domains. Future telestroke models should provide effective action in an integrated model of care recognizing and involving all existing players and practices.

  13. [Blood lipids and adaptation to stress as risk factors for stroke prevention].

    PubMed

    Anders, I; Esterbauer, E; Fink, A; Ladurner, G; Huemer, M; Wranek, U

    2000-01-01

    Do stroke prevention patients with increased blood-fat-protein compounds (total cholesterol, HDL- and LDL cholesterol and triglyceride) have a different method of coping than patients with normal blood fat? 1159 stroke prevention patients participated in the following stroke risk investigations at this hospital: biographical and risk factor-orientated anamnesis, a neurological status investigation, a laboratory investigation, a sonographic investigation and a psychological investigation. The differences in the coping strategies of those patients with normal and those with higher blood-fat-protein compounds were investigated. Patients with higher total cholesterol showed significantly higher values in the avoidance of stress situations (sig. 0.041) and a stronger tendency towards escapist behaviour (sig. 0.05). Patients with normal HDL cholesterol values indicated a tendency (sig. 0.07) to higher values in positive self-instruction in comparison to patients with reduced HDL cholesterol values. Those prevention patients with higher LDL values showed a tendency (sig. 0.08) to higher values in the intake of narcotic substances (nicotine, alcohol, tranquillisers, pharmaceutical agents). Patients with increased triglyceride indicated significantly higher values in coping by compensation (eating, shopping, reward behaviour, watching TV; sig. 0.037) and the intake of narcotic substances (sig. 0.044). Prevention patients with higher total cholesterol, LDL/HDL, or triglyceride values showed significantly different coping strategies in comparison to those patients with normal values. Increased avoidance and escapism behaviour and also compensation and the abuse of narcotic substances could be seen in connection with an increase in the risk of a stroke. In contrast, a constructive coping strategy such as positive self-instruction could reduce the risk of a stroke, which goes along with normal HDL cholesterol.

  14. Final Results of Cilostazol-Aspirin Therapy against Recurrent Stroke with Intracranial Artery Stenosis (CATHARSIS)

    PubMed Central

    Uchiyama, Shinichiro; Sakai, Nobuyuki; Toi, Sono; Ezura, Masayuki; Okada, Yasushi; Takagi, Makoto; Nagai, Yoji; Matsubara, Yoshihiro; Minematsu, Kazuo; Suzuki, Norihiro; Tanahashi, Norio; Taki, Waro; Nagata, Izumi; Matsumoto, Masayasu

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To compare the effect of cilostazol plus aspirin versus aspirin alone on the progression of intracranial arterial stenosis (IAS), and to compare ischemic and hemorrhagic events in patients with symptomatic IAS, an investigator-driven, nationwide multicenter cooperative randomized controlled trial (CATHARSIS; ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier 00333164) was conducted. Methods 165 noncardioembolic ischemic stroke patients with >50% stenosis in the responsible intracranial artery after 2 weeks to 6 months from the onset were randomly allocated to receive either cilostazol 200 mg/day plus aspirin 100 mg/day (n = 83, CA group) or aspirin 100 mg/day alone (n = 82, A group). The primary endpoint was the progression of IAS on magnetic resonance angiography at 2 years after randomization. Secondary endpoints were any vascular events, any cause of death, serious adverse events, new silent brain infarcts, and worsening of the modified Rankin Scale score. Results Progression of IAS was observed in 9.6% of the CA group patients and in 5.6% of the A group patients, with no significant intergroup difference (p = 0.53). The incidence of the secondary endpoints tended to be lower in the CA group compared with the A group, although the differences were not significant. By using exploratory logistic regression analysis adjusted for patient background characteristics, it was shown that the risk for certain combinations of secondary endpoints was lower in the CA group than in the A group [all vascular events and silent brain infarcts: odds ratio (OR) = 0.37, p = 0.04; stroke and silent brain infarcts: OR = 0.34, p = 0.04; all vascular events, worsening of modified Rankin Scale scores and silent brain infracts: OR = 0.41, p = 0.03]. Major hemorrhage was observed in 4 patients of the CA group and in 3 of the A group. Conclusion Progression of IAS during the 2-year observation period appears to be less frequent than previously reported in stroke patients on antiplatelet agents after

  15. A meta-analysis of transcatheter closure of patent foramen ovale versus medical therapy for prevention of recurrent thromboembolic events in patients with cryptogenic cerebrovascular events.

    PubMed

    Pineda, Andrés M; Nascimento, Francisco O; Yang, Solomon C; Kirtane, Ajay J; Sommer, Robert J; Beohar, Nirat

    2013-11-15

    We sought to perform a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) comparing percutaneous patent-foramen-ovale (PFO) closure with medical therapy for preventing recurrent thromboembolic events after cryptogenic stroke. Observational studies suggested that transcatheter PFO closure decreases recurrent events after cryptogenic stroke; however, three recent RCTs failed to demonstrate such benefit. Trials were identified from the PubMed and Cochrane databases. Primary endpoint was the composite of transient ischemic attack (TIA) and ischemic cerebrovascular events (CVA). Both intention-to-treat (ITT) and as-treated analyses (AT) were performed. Three RCTs met inclusion criteria. The pooled data provided 2,303 patients, of which 1,150 were in the PFO closure group and 1,153 in the medical therapy group. In the ITT analysis, there were 43 events (3.7%) of the composite end point in the closure group compared with 61 events (5.3%) in the medical therapy group, with a trend in favor of the PFO closure (OR = 0.70; 95% CI, 0.47-1.05, P = 0.08). The incidences of TIA, ischemic CVA, and bleeding were not statistically different between the groups. There was a trend for the more frequent occurrence of atrial fibrillation in the PFO closure group (OR = 3.29; 95% CI, 0.86-12.60, P = 0.08). In the AT analysis, the composite end point was significantly less frequent in the PFO closure group (OR = 0.62; 95% CI, 0.41-0.94, P = 0.02). In this meta-analysis of contemporary RCTs, successful transcatheter closure of PFO might be more effective than medical therapy alone for the prevention of recurrent thromboembolic events. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Stroke Prevention in Atrial Fibrillation and Valvular Heart Disease

    PubMed Central

    Ahmad, Saad; Wilt, Heath

    2016-01-01

    There is a clinically staggering burden of disease stemming from cerebrovascular events, of which a majority are ischemic in nature and many are precipitated by atrial fibrillation (AF). AF can occur in isolation or in association with myocardial or structural heart disease. In the latter case, and when considering health at an international level, congenital and acquired valve-related diseases are frequent contributors to the current pandemic of AF and its clinical impact. Guidelines crafted by the American Heart Association, American College of Cardiology, European Society of Cardiology and Heart Rhythm Society underscore the use of vitamin K antagonists (VKAs) among patients with valvular heart disease, particularly in the presence of concomitant AF, to reduce the risk of ischemic stroke of cardioembolic origin; however, the non-VKAs, also referred to as direct, target-specific or new oral anticoagulants (NOACs), have not been actively studied in this particular population. In fact, each of the new agents is approved in patients with AF not caused by a valve problem. The aim of our review is to carefully examine the available evidence from pivotal phase 3 clinical trials of NOACs and determine how they might perform in patients with AF and concomitant valvular heart disease. PMID:27347228

  17. Stroke Prevention in Atrial Fibrillation and Valvular Heart Disease.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Saad; Wilt, Heath

    2016-01-01

    There is a clinically staggering burden of disease stemming from cerebrovascular events, of which a majority are ischemic in nature and many are precipitated by atrial fibrillation (AF). AF can occur in isolation or in association with myocardial or structural heart disease. In the latter case, and when considering health at an international level, congenital and acquired valve-related diseases are frequent contributors to the current pandemic of AF and its clinical impact. Guidelines crafted by the American Heart Association, American College of Cardiology, European Society of Cardiology and Heart Rhythm Society underscore the use of vitamin K antagonists (VKAs) among patients with valvular heart disease, particularly in the presence of concomitant AF, to reduce the risk of ischemic stroke of cardioembolic origin; however, the non-VKAs, also referred to as direct, target-specific or new oral anticoagulants (NOACs), have not been actively studied in this particular population. In fact, each of the new agents is approved in patients with AF not caused by a valve problem. The aim of our review is to carefully examine the available evidence from pivotal phase 3 clinical trials of NOACs and determine how they might perform in patients with AF and concomitant valvular heart disease.

  18. Priming the Tumor Immune Microenvironment Improves Immune Surveillance of Cancer Stem Cells and Prevents Cancer Recurrence

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-10-01

    properties and provides candidate therapeutic reagents in Ewing sarcoma . Cancer Cell 2012; 21: 807–821. 5 Garzon R, Marcucci G. Potential of...Unlimited The views, opinions and/or findings contained in this report are those of the author( s ) and should not be construed as an official...Surveillance of cancer stem cells and prevents cancer recurrence 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-10-1-0764 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR( S

  19. Prevention of stroke--a report from collaboration project between Zagreb and Barcelona.

    PubMed

    Demarin, V; Rundek, T; Tomljanović, B; Carillo-Pintos, J; Masso-Estrade, J

    1991-01-01

    Cerebrovascular disease (CVD) is the main killer in the modern society and the most frequent cause of death and disability. According to the experiences of highly developed Western countries, especially of the U.S.A., the incidence of stroke can be reduced by the development and introduction of preventive actions and change of life style. Incidence of cerebrovascular disease is high in Croatia as well as in Spain (46% in the 46-59 age range) with an increasing tendency in younger population. As prevention is the only way of CVD incidence reduction, it is indispensable to organize an integral preventive neurologic network. Within the W.H.O. project "Health for All by the Year 2000 and the project "Zagreb"--Healthy City" a preventive action under the slogan 'With perfect brain and veins--enjoy the healthy days', has been organized with the aim to reduce the incidence of stroke for 20% during the following 10-year period. A standardized work of preventive network in Zagreb has also been established in Barcelona as a joint work. Using the interdisciplinary counselling approach, medical teams are still making examinations. In Zagreb Center for Neurological Sciences and Brain Research, data of risk factor distributions and trends of stroke incidence changes have been collected and the results have been analyzed. The Zagreb Center has also become a center for continuous evaluation and further planning. In this article functions of preventive centers, the preventive standardized protocol and structural and functional preventive network are introduced. The results of preventive action in Zagreb are also briefly presented.

  20. Stroke prevention by percutaneous closure of patent foramen ovale: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Wolfrum, Mathias; Froehlich, Georg M; Knapp, Guido; Casaubon, Leanne K; DiNicolantonio, James J; Lansky, Alexandra J; Meier, Pascal

    2014-03-01

    The role of percutaneous closure of patent foramen oval (PFO) in patients with cryptogenic stroke has been very controversial for years due to a lack of clear evidence. Systematic review and meta-analysis of the effect of percutaneous PFO closure for secondary prevention of cryptogenic strokes as compared to best medical therapy (BMT). Trials were identified through a literature search until 28 May 2013. Controlled clinical trials (randomised and non-randomised) comparing percutaneous PFO closure with BMT. Main end point of interest was stroke. A random effects model was used to calculate the pooled relative risks (RR) with 95% CIs. A total of 14 studies (three randomised controlled trials (RCT) and 11 non-randomised observational studies (non-RCT)), and a total of 4335 patients were included for this analysis. There was no significant treatment effect of PFO closure regarding stroke among the RCT (RR 0.66, 95% CI 0.37 to 1.19, p=0.171). However, among non-RCT stroke was reduced (RR 0.37, 95% CI 0.20 to 0.67, p<0.001) after PFO closure. A time-to-event (stroke) analysis, combining all three RCT and the two non-RCT which applied strict multivariate adjustments, showed a borderline significant risk reduction after PFO closure (HR 0.58, 95% CI 0.33 to 0.99, p=0.047). Neither risk of bleeding nor mortality differed significantly between the groups. However, there was a higher incidence of new onset atrial fibrillation in the closure group (RR 3.50, 95% CI 1.47 to 8.35, p=0.005). Percutaneous closure of PFO in patients with cryptogenic stroke does not appear superior to medical therapy according to currently available randomised data. Furthermore, it is associated with an increased incidence of atrial fibrillation. However, there are signals pointing towards a potential benefit and more research should be strongly encouraged.

  1. Telemedicine-guided education on secondary stroke and fall prevention following inpatient rehabilitation for Texas patients with stroke and their caregivers: a feasibility pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Jhaveri, Mansi M; Benjamin-Garner, Ruby; Rianon, Nahid; Sherer, Mark; Francisco, Gerard; Vahidy, Farhaan; Kobayashi, Kayta; Gaber, Mary; Shoemake, Paige; Vu, Kim; Trevino, Alyssa; Grotta, James; Savitz, Sean

    2017-01-01

    Introduction The aftermath of stroke leaves many consequences including cognitive deficits and falls due to imbalance. Stroke survivors and families struggle to navigate the complex healthcare system with little assistance posthospital discharge, often leading to early hospital readmission and worse stroke outcomes. Telemedicine Guided Education on Secondary Stroke and Fall Prevention Following Inpatient Rehabilitation feasibility study examines whether stroke survivors and their caregivers find value in telerehabilitation (TR) home visits that provide individualised care and education by a multidisciplinary team after discharge from inpatient rehabilitation. Methods and analysis A prospective, single arm, pilot study is designed to evaluate the feasibility of weekly TR home visits initiated postdischarge from inpatient rehabilitation. Newly diagnosed patients with stroke are recruited from a Houston-based comprehensive stroke centre inpatient rehabilitation unit, loaned an iPad with data plan and trained to use information technology security-approved videoconferencing application. After hospital discharge, six weekly TR home visits are led by rotating specialists (pharmacist, physical/occupational therapist, speech therapist, rehabilitation physician, social worker, geriatrician specialised in fracture prevention) followed by satisfaction survey on week 7. Specialists visually assess patients in real time, educate them on secondary stroke and fall prevention and suggest ways to improve function including direct medical interventions when indicated. Primary outcomes are proportion of eligible patients consenting to the study, participation rate in all six TR home visits and satisfaction score. The study started 31 December 2015 with plan to enrol up to 50 patients over 24 months. Feasibility study results will inform us as to whether a randomised controlled trial is warranted to determine efficacy of TR home visit intervention in improving stroke outcomes. Ethics

  2. Left atrial appendage exclusion for stroke prevention in patients with nonrheumatic atrial fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Onalan, Orhan; Crystal, Eugene

    2007-02-01

    The efficacy of oral anticoagulation (OAC) for stroke prevention in patients with nonrheumatic atrial fibrillation (AF) has clearly been established. However, a substantial number of patients with AF who are at high risk for thromboembolic events are not candidates for long-term OAC. The left atrial appendix (LAA) is the most common place of thrombosis in patients with AF, and it can easily be excluded from the systemic circulation at the time of cardiac surgery by excision, ligation, suturing, or stapling. Currently, removal of the LAA at the time of mitral valve surgery is recommended to reduce future stroke risk. The ongoing LAA Occlusion Study (LAAOS) is evaluating the efficacy of the routine LAA occlusion in patients undergoing elective coronary artery bypass graft surgery. Recently, two devices specifically designed for percutaneous transcatheter LAA occlusion have been introduced: the Percutaneous LAA Transcatheter Occlusion (PLAATO; Appriva Medical Inc) and WATCHMAN LAA system (Atritech, Inc). More than 200 PLAATO devices were implanted worldwide in patients with nonrheumatic AF who were at high risk for ischemic stroke and not candidates for long-term OAC. In a follow-up time of 258 patient-years, an estimated 61% reduction in stroke risk was achieved with PLAATO procedure. The WATCHMAN Left Atrial Appendage System for Embolic PROTECTion in Patients With Atrial Fibrillation (PROTECT AF) study was designed to demonstrate the safety and efficacy of the WATCHMAN device in patients with nonvalvular AF who are eligible for long-term OAC. The trial is assessing whether the treatment arm (WATCHMAN device) is noninferior to the control arm (warfarin). Although present results suggest that LAA occlusion may reduce the long-term stroke risk, available data are still very limited. At present, percutaneous LAA occlusion may be an acceptable option in selected high-risk patients with AF who are not candidates for OAC. The current understanding of LAA exclusion for the

  3. Testing devices for the prevention and treatment of stroke and its complications.

    PubMed

    Bath, Philip M; Brainin, Michael; Brown, Chloe; Campbell, Bruce; Davis, Stephen M; Donnan, Geoffrey A; Ford, Gary A; Hacke, Werner; Iglesias, Cynthia; Lees, Kennedy R; Pugh, Stacey S; Saver, Jeff L; Schellinger, Peter D; Truelsen, Thomas

    2014-08-01

    We are entering a challenging but exciting period when many new interventions may appear for stroke based on the use of devices. Hopefully these will lead to improved outcomes at a cost that can be afforded in most parts of the world. Nevertheless, it is vital that lessons are learnt from failures in the development of pharmacological interventions (and from some early device studies), including inadequate preclinical testing, suboptimal trial design and analysis, and underpowered studies. The device industry is far more disparate than that seen for pharmaceuticals; companies are very variable in size and experience in stroke, and are developing interventions across a wide range of stroke treatment and prevention. It is vital that companies work together where sales and marketing are not involved, including in understanding basic stroke mechanisms, prospective systematic reviews, and education of physicians. Where possible, industry and academics should also work closely together to ensure trials are designed to be relevant to patient care and outcomes. Additionally, regulation of the device industry lags behind that for pharmaceuticals, and it is critical that new interventions are shown to be safe and effective rather than just feasible. Phase IV postmarketing surveillance studies will also be needed to ensure that devices are safe when used in the 'real-world' and to pick up uncommon adverse events. © 2014 World Stroke Organization.

  4. Stroke prevention with losartan in the context of other antihypertensive drugs.

    PubMed

    Chrysant, Steven G

    2004-09-01

    Several large clinical trials have demonstrated that successful control of blood pressure decreases the incidence of strokes. Also, drugs that stimulate the production of angiotensin II, such as diuretics, calcium channel blockers (CCBs) and angiotensin receptor blockers (ARBs), provide additional stroke reduction than drugs that suppress angiotensin II production such as beta-blockers and angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors. Since the stroke-protective effect of angiotensin II is mediated through stimulation of the AT2 receptors, drugs that selectively block the AT1, such as the ARBs, provide greater stroke protection than the other antihypertensive drugs. The blockade of the AT1 receptors lessens local brain ischemia, whereas the stimulation of the AT2 receptors increases local blood flow through recruitment of collateral vessels. Among the ARBs, losartan possesses certain unique properties not shared by other members of its class, which enhance its stroke-protective effects. These include the prevention of platelet adhesiveness and aggregation and the decrease of serum uric acid levels, which both lead to reduction in cardiovascular and cerebrovascular events. ( (c) 2004 Prous Science.

  5. Barriers to healthy-lifestyle participation in stroke: consumer participation in secondary prevention design.

    PubMed

    Lennon, Olive C; Doody, Catherine; Ni Choisdealbh, Cliodhna; Blake, Catherine

    2013-12-01

    The aim of the study was to explore community-dwelling stroke patients' perceived barriers to healthy-lifestyle participation for secondary disease prevention, as well as their preferred means for risk-reduction information dissemination and motivators to participation in healthy-lifestyle interventions. Four focus groups (5-6 stroke survivors per group) were defined from community support groups. Key questions addressed barriers to healthy-lifestyle adoption, preferred methods for receiving information and factors that would engage participants in a risk-reduction programme. Groups were audiotaped, transcribed verbatim and analysed for thematic content using a framework approach. Twenty-two participants, 12 men, 10 women, mean age 71.4 (53-87) years, were included in the study. Three overarching themes emerged as barriers to healthy-lifestyle participation: physical, mental and environmental. Exercise participation difficulties spread across all three themes; healthy eating and smoking cessation concentrated in environmental and mental dimensions. Talks (discussions) were noted as participants' preferred method of information provision. Risk-reduction programmes considered attractive were stroke specific, convenient and delivered by healthcare professionals and involved both social and exercise components. Many stroke patients appear unable to adopt healthy-lifestyle changes through advice alone because of physical, mental and environmental barriers. Risk-reduction programmes including interactive education should be specifically tailored to address barriers currently experienced and extend beyond the stroke survivor to others in their environment who influence lifestyle choices.

  6. Preventing increased blood pr