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Sample records for preventing stroke recurrence

  1. Antiplatelet therapy to prevent recurrent stroke: Three good options.

    PubMed

    Mansoor, Atizazul H; Mujtaba, Mohammad T; Silver, Brian

    2013-12-01

    Drugs that prevent platelets from sticking together-ie, aspirin, dipyridamole, and clopidogrel-are an important part of therapy to prevent recurrence of ischemic stroke of atherosclerotic origin. We discuss current indications for these drugs and review the evidence behind our current use of aspirin, dipyridamole, and clopidogrel. PMID:24307163

  2. Telmisartan to Prevent Recurrent Stroke and Cardiovascular Events

    PubMed Central

    Yusuf, Salim; Diener, Hans-Christoph; Sacco, Ralph L.; Cotton, Daniel; Ôunpuu, Stephanie; Lawton, William A.; Palesch, Yuko; Martin, Reneé H.; Albers, Gregory W.; Bath, Philip; Bornstein, Natan; Chan, Bernard P.L.; Chen, Sien-Tsong; Cunha, Luis; Dahlöf, Björn; De Keyser, Jacques; Donnan, Geoffrey A.; Estol, Conrado; Gorelick, Philip; Gu, Vivian; Hermansson, Karin; Hilbrich, Lutz; Kaste, Markku; Lu, Chuanzhen; Machnig, Thomas; Pais, Prem; Roberts, Robin; Skvortsova, Veronika; Teal, Philip; Toni, Danilo; VanderMaelen, Cam; Voigt, Thor; Weber, Michael; Yoon, Byung-Woo

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND Prolonged lowering of blood pressure after a stroke reduces the risk of recurrent stroke. In addition, inhibition of the renin–angiotensin system in high-risk patients reduces the rate of subsequent cardiovascular events, including stroke. However, the effect of lowering of blood pressure with a renin–angiotensin system inhibitor soon after a stroke has not been clearly established. We evaluated the effects of therapy with an angiotensin-receptor blocker, telmisartan, initiated early after a stroke. METHODS In a multicenter trial involving 20,332 patients who recently had an ischemic stroke, we randomly assigned 10,146 to receive telmisartan (80 mg daily) and 10,186 to receive placebo. The primary outcome was recurrent stroke. Secondary outcomes were major cardiovascular events (death from cardiovascular causes, recurrent stroke, myocardial infarction, or new or worsening heart failure) and new-onset diabetes. RESULTS The median interval from stroke to randomization was 15 days. During a mean followup of 2.5 years, the mean blood pressure was 3.8/2.0 mm Hg lower in the telmisartan group than in the placebo group. A total of 880 patients (8.7%) in the telmisartan group and 934 patients (9.2%) in the placebo group had a subsequent stroke (hazard ratio in the telmisartan group, 0.95; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.86 to 1.04; P = 0.23). Major cardiovascular events occurred in 1367 patients (13.5%) in the telmisartan group and 1463 patients (14.4%) in the placebo group (hazard ratio, 0.94; 95% CI, 0.87 to 1.01; P = 0.11). New-onset diabetes occurred in 1.7% of the telmisartan group and 2.1% of the placebo group (hazard ratio, 0.82; 95% CI, 0.65 to 1.04; P = 0.10). CONCLUSIONS Therapy with telmisartan initiated soon after an ischemic stroke and continued for 2.5 years did not significantly lower the rate of recurrent stroke, major cardiovascular events, or diabetes. (ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT00153062.) PMID:18753639

  3. Effects of a Web-Based Stroke Education Program on Recurrence Prevention Behaviors among Stroke Patients: A Pilot Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim, Jae-Il; Lee, Sook; Kim, Jung-Hee

    2013-01-01

    The effectiveness of methods to prevent stroke recurrence and of education focusing on learners' needs has not been fully explored. The aims of this study were to assess the effects of such interventions among stroke patients and their primary caregivers and to evaluate the feasibility of a web-based stroke education program. The participants were…

  4. Prevention of recurrent stroke in patients with patent foramen ovale.

    PubMed

    Wessler, Benjamin S; Kent, David M

    2015-05-01

    Patent foramen ovale (PFO) is common and only rarely related to stroke. The high PFO prevalence in healthy individuals makes for difficult decision making when a PFO is found in the setting of a cryptogenic stroke, because the PFO may be an incidental finding. Recent clinical trials of device-based PFO closure have had negative overall summary results; these trials have been limited by low recurrence rates. The optimal antithrombotic strategy for these patients is also unknown. Recent work has identified a risk score that estimates PFO-attributable fractions based on individual patient characteristics, although whether this score can help direct therapy is unclear.

  5. A program to improve secondary stroke prevention: the Colorado Neurological Institute stroke preventing recurrence of thromboembolic events through coordinated treatment program.

    PubMed

    Menard, Michelle M; Smith, Don B; Taormina, Cristina

    2011-08-01

    The key to secondary stroke prevention often lies in improved control of traditional stroke risk factors. Studies have shown that there is an evidence-practice gap, for both physicians and patients, when it comes to adhering to national stroke prevention guidelines. We developed a program to reinforce stroke prevention messages for 1 year after a patient's ischemic stroke or transient ischemic attack. Our results show encouraging improvement in our patients' adherence to treatment guidelines for 1 year after the event, as well as a reduction in recurrent strokes as compared with the number expected. PMID:21796042

  6. Hydroxyurea (HU) for prevention of recurrent stroke in sickle cell anemia (SCA).

    PubMed

    Sumoza, Abraham; de Bisotti, Renate; Sumoza, David; Fairbanks, Virgil

    2002-11-01

    Cerebrovascular accident (CVA) is a major cause of morbidity and death in sickle cell anemia (SCA). Transfusion of packed erythrocytes is widely used to prevent this complication. However, chronic transfusion may lead to iron overload, alloimmunization, or infections. Cost and compliance may compromise transfusion therapy. A possible alternative, the prophylactic use of hydroxyurea (HU), has not been tried to determine whether it may prevent recurrent stroke. We used HU in five children with SCA who had suffered stroke, in three of them after a first episode and in the other two after a second CVA. Four had infarctive stroke and one a transient ischemic attack (TIA). Four patients took HU at a dose of 40 mg/kg/d, one patient at 30 mg/kg/d. None of the patients had recurrent stroke during 42-112 months of observation. None experienced pain crises. In all, HbF increased significantly and was maintained above 14.7% during treatment. The total Hb concentration increased 19.5 g/L (median) above the value before treatment. HU was well tolerated. None of the five children had leukopenia or thrombocytopenia during therapy. HU appears to prevent recurrence of stroke in SCA without risk of major toxicity.

  7. Design of the Stenting and Aggressive Medical Management for Preventing Recurrent Stroke in Intracranial Stenosis Trial

    PubMed Central

    Chimowitz, Marc I.; Lynn, Michael J.; Turan, Tanya N.; Fiorella, David; Lane, Bethany F.; Janis, Scott; Derdeyn, Colin P.

    2011-01-01

    Background Patients with recent transient ischemic attack or stroke caused by 70–99% stenosis of a major intracranial artery are at high risk of recurrent stroke on usual medical management, suggesting the need for alternative therapies for this disease. Methods The Stenting and Aggressive Medical Management for Preventing Recurrent stroke in Intracranial Stenosis trial is an ongoing, randomized, multicenter, two-arm trial that will determine whether intracranial angioplasty and stenting adds benefit to aggressive medical management alone for preventing the primary endpoint (any stroke or death within 30 days after enrollment or after any revascularization procedure of the qualifying lesion during follow-up, or stroke in the territory of the symptomatic intracranial artery beyond 30 days) during a mean follow-up of 2 years in patients with recent TIA or stroke caused by 70–99% stenosis of a major intracranial artery. Aggressive medical management in both arms consists of aspirin 325 mg per day, clopidogrel 75mg per day for 90 days after enrollment, intensive risk factor management primarily targeting systolic blood pressure < 140 mm Hg (< 130 mm Hg in diabetics) and low density cholesterol < 70 mg / dl, and a lifetsyle modification program. The sample size required todetect a 35% reduction in the rate of the primary endpoint from angioplasty and stenting based on the log-rank test with an alpha of 0.05, 80% power, and adjusting for a 2% loss to follow-up and 5% crossover from the medical to the stenting arm is 382 patients per group. Conclusion This is the first randomized trial to compare intracranial angioplasty and stenting with medical therapy and to incorporate intensive management of multiple risk factors and a lifestyle modification program in the study design. Hopefully, the results of the trial will lead to more effective therapy for this high-risk disease. PMID:21729789

  8. What is the evidence for using family based interventions to prevent stroke recurrence?

    PubMed

    Lawrence, Maggie; McVey, Caroline; Kerr, Susan

    Stroke has a devastating impact on individuals and families. Risk factors for recurrence include lifestyle behaviours such as smoking, excessive alcohol consumption, an unhealthy diet and physical inactivity. This article describes a programme of research that aims to gather and synthesise the evidence required to inform the development and evaluation of a family centred, behavioural intervention designed to address lifestyle risk factors for recurrent stroke. We present an overview of the research undertaken to develop the evidence base. This included a survey of stroke nurse practice, a focus group study with people who had had a stroke as well as their family members, and a systematic review of the efficacy of lifestyle interventions.

  9. Peer education for secondary stroke prevention in inner-city minorities: Design and methods of the Prevent Recurrence of All Inner-city Strokes through Education randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Goldfinger, Judith Z.; Kronish, Ian M.; Fei, Kezhen; Graciani, Albert; Rosenfeld, Peri; Lorig, Kate; Horowitz, Carol R.

    2012-01-01

    Background The highest risk for stroke is among survivors of strokes or transient ischemic attacks (TIA). However, use of proven-effective cardiovascular medications to control stroke risk is suboptimal, particularly among the Black and Latino populations disproportionately impacted by stroke. Methods A partnership of Harlem and Bronx community representatives, stroke survivors, researchers, clinicians, outreach workers and patient educators used community-based participatory research to conceive and develop the Prevent Recurrence of All Inner-city Strokes through Education (PRAISE) trial. Using data from focus groups with stroke survivors, they tailored a peer-led, community-based chronic disease self-management program to address stroke risk factors. PRAISE will test, in a randomized controlled trial, whether this stroke education intervention improves blood pressure control and a composite outcome of blood pressure control, lipid control, and use of antithrombotic medications. Results Of the 582 survivors of stroke and TIA enrolled thus far, 81% are Black or Latino and 56% have an annual income less than $15,000. Many (33%) do not have blood pressures in the target range, and most (66%) do not have control of all three major stroke risk factors. Conclusions Rates of stroke recurrence risk factors remain suboptimal in the high risk, urban, predominantly minority communities studied. With a community-partnered approach, PRAISE has recruited a large number of stroke and TIA survivors to date, and may prove successful in engaging those at highest risk for stroke and reducing disparities in stroke outcomes in inner-city communities. PMID:22710563

  10. Preventing stroke

    MedlinePlus

    ... may ask you to keep track of your blood pressure at home . You should lower it and control it with a healthy diet, exercise, and by taking medicines your health care provider ... the chance of blood clots, which can lead to stroke. Clots are ...

  11. Recurrent stroke: what have we learnt?

    PubMed

    Rabia, K; Khoo, Em

    2007-01-01

    Stroke is the third leading cause of death, a major cause of disability in adults, and is frequently more disabling than fatal. With a decline in mortality from initial cerebral infarction and an increase in the life expectancy of the population, the number of patients with recurrent stroke and ensuing cardiovascular events will become greater. Thus it is important to find out those patients at high risk of stroke recurrence. This case report illustrates the process of recurrent stroke and the resulting disabilities and morbidities in a 42-year- old man. The role of integrated stroke rehabilitation programme is described. PMID:25606084

  12. A Retrospective Cohort Study Comparing Stroke Recurrence Rate in Ischemic Stroke Patients With and Without Acupuncture Treatment.

    PubMed

    Shih, Chun-Chuan; Liao, Chien-Chang; Sun, Mao-Feng; Su, Yi-Chang; Wen, Chi-Pang; Morisky, Donald E; Sung, Fung-Chang; Hsu, Chung Y; Lin, Jaung-Geng

    2015-09-01

    Little was known about the effects of acupuncture on stroke recurrence. The aim of this study is to investigate whether ischemic stroke patients receiving acupuncture treatment have a decreased risk of stroke recurrence. A retrospective cohort study of 30,058 newly diagnosed cases of ischemic stroke in 2000 to 2004 was conducted based on the claims of Taiwan National Health Insurance Research Database. The use of acupuncture treatment and stroke recurrence were identified during the follow-up period from 2000 to 2009. This study compared the risk of stroke recurrence between ischemic stroke cohorts with and without acupuncture treatment by calculating adjusted hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) of acupuncture associated with stroke recurrence in the Cox proportional hazard model. The stroke recurrence rate per 1000 person-years decreased from 71.4 without to 69.9 with acupuncture treatment (P < 0.001). Acupuncture treatment was associated with reduced risk of stroke recurrence (HR 0.88; 95% CI 0.84-0.91). The acupuncture effect was noted in patients with or without medical treatment for stroke prevention but its impact decreased with aging of stroke patients. Compared with stroke patients without acupuncture treatment and medication therapy, the hazard ratios of stroke recurrence for those had medication therapy only, acupuncture only, and both were 0.42 (95% CI 0.38-0.46), 0.50 (95% CI 0.43-0.57), and 0.39 (95% CI 0.35-0.43), respectively. This study raises the possibility that acupuncture might be effective in lowering stroke recurrence rate even in those on medications for stroke prevention. Results suggest the need of prospective sham-controlled and randomized trials to establish the efficacy of acupuncture in preventing stroke. PMID:26426630

  13. Effects of aspirin plus extended-release dipyridamole versus clopidogrel and telmisartan on disability and cognitive function after recurrent stroke in patients with ischaemic stroke in the Prevention Regimen for Effectively Avoiding Second Strokes (PRoFESS) trial: a double-blind, active and placebo-controlled study

    PubMed Central

    Diener, Hans-Christoph; Sacco, Ralph L; Yusuf, Salim; Cotton, Daniel; Ôunpuu, Stephanie; Lawton, William A; Palesch, Yuko; Martin, Reneé H; Albers, Gregory W; Bath, Philip; Bornstein, Natan; Chan, Bernard P L; Chen, Sien-Tsong; Cunha, Luis; Dahlöf, Björn; Keyser, Jacques De; Donnan, Geoffrey A; Estol, Conrado; Gorelick, Philip; Gu, Vivian; Hermansson, Karin; Hilbrich, Lutz; Kaste, Markku; Lu, Chuanzhen; Machnig, Thomas; Pais, Prem; Roberts, Robin; Skvortsova, Veronika; Teal, Philip; Toni, Danilo; VanderMaelen, Cam; Voigt, Thor; Weber, Michael; Yoon, Byung-Woo

    2009-01-01

    Summary Background The treatment of ischaemic stroke with neuroprotective drugs has been unsuccessful, and whether these compounds can be used to reduce disability after recurrent stroke is unknown. The putative neuroprotective effects of antiplatelet compounds and the angiotensin II receptor antagonist telmisartan were investigated in the Prevention Regimen for Effectively Avoiding Second Strokes (PRoFESS) trial. Methods Patients who had had an ischaemic stroke were randomly assigned in a two by two factorial design to receive either 25 mg aspirin (ASA) and 200 mg extended-release dipyridamole (ER-DP) twice a day or 75 mg clopidogrel once a day, and either 80 mg telmisartan or placebo once per day. The predefined endpoints for this substudy were disability after a recurrent stroke, assessed with the modified Rankin scale (mRS) and Barthel index at 3 months, and cognitive function, assessed with the mini-mental state examination (MMSE) score at 4 weeks after randomisation and at the penultimate visit. Analysis was by intention to treat. The study was registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NTC00153062. Findings 20 332 patients (mean age 66 years) were randomised and followed-up for a median of 2·4 years. Recurrent strokes occurred in 916 (9%) patients randomly assigned to ASA with ER-DP and 898 (9%) patients randomly assigned to clopidogrel; 880 (9%) patients randomly assigned to telmisartan and 934 (9%) patients given placebo had recurrent strokes. mRS scores were not statistically different in patients with recurrent stroke who were treated with ASA and ER-DP versus clopidogrel (p=0·38), or with telmisartan versus placebo (p=0·61). There was no significant difference in the proportion of patients with recurrent stroke with a good outcome, as measured with the Barthel index, across all treatment groups. Additionally, there was no significant difference in the median MMSE scores, the percentage of patients with an MMSE score of 24 points or less, the

  14. [Secondary stroke prevention].

    PubMed

    Ferro, J M; Correia, M; Freire, A; Perez y Sanchez, J; Abrunhosa, M A; Perez y Sanchez, M F

    1998-11-01

    The guidelines for secondary stroke prevention, graded following available scientific evidence, are presented. Stroke and TIA are defined and the indications for referral established. Basic assessment of stroke patients should include laboratory evaluation, ECG, brain CT, ultrasound examination of the extracranial vessels for events in the carotid distribution, and transthoracic or transesophageal echocardiogram if cardioembolism is suspected. The pharmacological and non-pharmacological reduction of blood pressure and serum cholesterol, stopping smoking and reducing alcohol intake are general measures recommended for secondary stroke prevention, together with healthier life-style changes (eating a Mediterranean type diet and performing regular moderate physical exercise). Concerning antithrombotic therapy, oral anticoagulants are recommended for patients with atrial fibrillation and other high to medium emboligenic cardiac risk conditions. Antiplatelet drugs are recommended for all other survivors of an ischemic cerebral event. Aspirin (75-325 mg/day) is the drug of choice. Alternative antiplatelet agents are clopidrogrel, ticlopidine, dipiridamol or triflusal. They can be used in patients with intolerance or contraindication to aspirin or in high-risk subjects. Endarterectomy of the symptomatic carotid is an additional procedure recommended for patients with ischemic stroke or TIA and carotid stenosis > 80% on the side of the symptomatic cerebral hemisphere. PMID:10021804

  15. Secondary stroke prevention: challenges and solutions.

    PubMed

    Esenwa, Charles; Gutierrez, Jose

    2015-01-01

    Stroke is the leading cause of disability in the USA and a major cause of mortality worldwide. One out of four strokes is recurrent. Secondary stroke prevention starts with deciphering the most likely stroke mechanism. In general, one of the main goals in stroke reduction is to control vascular risk factors such as hypertension, diabetes, dyslipidemia, and smoking cessation. Changes in lifestyle like a healthy diet and aerobic exercise are also recommended strategies. In the case of cardioembolism due to atrial fibrillation, mechanical valves, or cardiac thrombus, anticoagulation is the mainstay of therapy. The role of anticoagulation is less evident in the case of bioprosthetic valves, patent foramen ovale, and dilated cardiomyopathy with low ejection fraction. Strokes due to larger artery atherosclerosis account for approximately a third of all strokes. In the case of symptomatic extracranial carotid stenosis, surgical intervention as close as possible in time to the index event seems highly beneficial. In the case of intracranial large artery atherosclerosis, the best medical therapy consists of antiplatelets, high-dose statins, aggressive controls of vascular risk factors, and lifestyle modifications, with no role for intracranial arterial stenting or angioplasty. For patients with small artery occlusion (ie, lacunar stroke), the therapy is similar to that used in patients with intracranial large artery atherosclerosis. Despite the constant new evidence on how to best treat patients who have suffered a stroke, the risk of stroke recurrence remains unacceptably high, thus evidencing the need for novel therapies. PMID:26300647

  16. Prevention of recurrent nephrolithiasis.

    PubMed

    Goldfarb, D S; Coe, F L

    1999-11-15

    The first episode of nephrolithiasis provides an opportunity to advise patients about measures for preventing future stones. Low fluid intake and excessive intake of protein, salt and oxalate are important modifiable risk factors for kidney stones. Calcium restriction is not useful and may potentiate osteoporosis. Diseases such as hyperparathyroidism, sarcoidosis and renal tubular acidosis should be considered in patients with nephrolithiasis. A 24-hour urine collection with measurement of the important analytes is usually reserved for use in patients with recurrent stone formation. In these patients, the major urinary risk factors include hypercalciuria, hyperoxaluria, hypocitraturia and hyperuricosuria. Effective preventive and treatment measures include thiazide therapy to lower the urinary calcium level, citrate supplementation to increase the urinary citrate level and, sometimes, allopurinol therapy to lower uric acid excretion. Uric acid stones are most often treated with citrate supplementation. Data now support the cost-effectiveness of evaluation and treatment of patients with recurrent stones. PMID:10593318

  17. Antithrombotic Medication for Cardioembolic Stroke Prevention

    PubMed Central

    Font, M. Àngels; Krupinski, Jerzy; Arboix, Adrià

    2011-01-01

    Embolism of cardiac origin accounts for about 20% of ischemic strokes. Nonvalvular atrial fibrillation is the most frequent cause of cardioembolic stroke. Approximately 1% of population is affected by atrial fibrillation, and its prevalence is growing with ageing in the modern world. Strokes due to cardioembolism are in general severe and prone to early recurrence and have a higher long-term risk of recurrence and mortality. Despite its enormous preventive potential, continuous oral anticoagulation is prescribed for less than half of patients with atrial fibrillation who have risk factors for cardioembolism and no contraindications for anticoagulation. Available evidence does not support routine immediate anticoagulation of acute cardioembolic stroke. Anticoagulation therapy's associated risk of hemorrhage and monitoring requirements have encouraged the investigation of alternative therapies for individuals with atrial fibrillation. New anticoagulants being tested for prevention of stroke are low-molecular-weight heparins (LMWH), unfractionated heparin, factor Xa inhibitors, or direct thrombin inhibitors like dabigatran etexilate and rivaroxaban. The later exhibit stable pharmacokinetics obviating the need for coagulation monitoring or dose titration, and they lack clinically significant food or drug interaction. Moreover, they offer another potential that includes fixed dosing, oral administration, and rapid onset of action. There are several concerns regarding potential harm, including an increased risk for hepatotoxicity, clinically significant bleeding, and acute coronary events. Therefore, additional trials and postmarketing surveillance will be needed. PMID:21822469

  18. Secondary prevention of stroke--results from the Southern Africa Stroke Prevention Initiative (SASPI) study.

    PubMed Central

    Thorogood, M.; Connor, M. D.; Lewando-Hundt, G.; Tollman, S.; Ngoma, B.

    2004-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To describe the prevalence of risk factors and experience of preventive interventions in stroke survivors, and identilfy barriers to secondary prevention in rural South Africa. METHODS: A clinician visited individuals in the Agincourt field site (in South Africa's rural north east) who were identified in a census as possible stroke victims to confirm the diagnosis of stroke. We explored the impact of stroke on the individual's family, and health-seeking behaviour following stroke by conducting in-depth interviews in the households of 35 stroke survivors. We held two workshops to understand the knowledge, experience, and views of primary care nurses, who provide the bulk of professional health care. FINDINGS :We identified 103 stroke survivors (37 men), 73 (71%) of whom had hypertension, but only 8 (8%) were taking anti-hypertensive treatment. Smoking was uncommon; 8 men and 1 woman smoked a maximum of ten cigarettes daily. 94 (91%) stroke survivors had sought help, which involved allopathic health care for most of them (81; 79%). 42 had also sought help from traditional healers and churches, while another 13 people had sought help only from those sources. Of the 35 survivors who were interviewed, 29 reported having been prescribed anti-hypertensive pills after their stroke. Barriers to secondary prevention included cost of treatment, reluctance to use pills, difficulties with access to drugs, and lack of equipment to measure blood pressure. A negative attitude to allopathic care was not an important factor. CONCLUSION: In this rural area hypertension is the most important modifiable risk factor in stroke survivors. Effective secondary prevention may reduce the incidence of recurrent strokes, but there is no system to deliver such care. New strategies for care are needed involving both allopathic and non-allopathic-health care providers. PMID:15500283

  19. Twenty four hour pulse pressure predicts long term recurrence in acute stroke patients

    PubMed Central

    Tsivgoulis, G; Spengos, K; Zakopoulos, N; Manios, E; Xinos, K; Vassilopoulos, D; Vemmos, K

    2005-01-01

    Objectives: The impact of different blood pressure (BP) components during the acute stage of stroke on the risk of recurrent stroke is controversial. The present study aimed to investigate by 24 hour BP monitoring a possible association between acute BP values and long term recurrence. Methods: A total of 339 consecutive patients with first ever acute stroke underwent 24 hour BP monitoring within 24 hours of ictus. Known stroke risk factors and clinical findings on admission were documented. Patients given antihypertensive medication during BP monitoring were excluded. The outcome of interest during the one year follow up was recurrent stroke. The Cox proportional hazard model was used to analyse association of casual and 24 hour BP recordings with one year recurrence after adjusting for stroke risk factors, baseline clinical characteristics, and secondary prevention therapies. Results: The cumulative one year recurrence rate was 9.2% (95% CI 5.9% to 12.3%). Multivariate Cox regression analyses revealed age, diabetes mellitus, and 24 hour pulse pressure (PP) as the only significant predictors for stroke recurrence. The relative risk for one year recurrence associated with every 10 mm Hg increase in 24 hour PP was 1.323 (95% CI 1.019 to 1.718, p = 0.036). Higher casual PP levels were significantly related to an increased risk of one year recurrence on univariate analysis, but not in the multivariate Cox regression model. Conclusions: Elevated 24 hour PP levels in patients with acute stroke are independently associated with higher risk of long term recurrence. Further research is required to investigate whether the risk of recurrent stroke can be reduced to a greater extent by decreasing the pulsatile component of BP in patients with acute stroke. PMID:16170077

  20. Does cholesterol lowering prevent stroke?

    PubMed

    Henry, R Y; Kendall, M J

    1998-10-01

    The importance of lowering plasma cholesterol to reduce the incidence of coronary events is well established. However, in the prevention of stroke disease, control of hypertension has been the main aim of treatment and lipid lowering therapy has not hitherto been considered to be desirable or necessary. In this review, the evidence from large multicentre trials, imaging studies and meta-analyses is presented. It shows convincingly that HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors (Statins) reduce stroke risk. PMID:9875681

  1. [Secondary prevention of stroke through arterial blood pressure reduction].

    PubMed

    Mancia, G; Grassi, G

    1997-07-01

    Large scale observational studies have conclusively demonstrated that systolic and diastolic blood pressure values are linearly related to the incidence of cerebrovascular diseases and that high blood pressure is an important risk factor for both primary and secondary development of stroke. Interventional studies have shown that blood pressure lowering by antihypertensive treatment reduces the incidence of stroke in hypertensive patients without a history of previous stroke. Whether this is the case also for the secondary prevention of cerebral ischemic attacks has not been unequivocally shown, however. The PROGRESS ("Perindopril Protection Against Recurrent Stroke Study") study has been designed and is under way to collect information on this important issue of the antihypertensive treatment, its purpose being to evaluate the blood pressure lowering effects with an ACE-inhibitor on recurrent stroke in an overall population of 6000 patients with a positive history of previous cerebral ischemic attacks or stroke. PMID:9340173

  2. Stroke prevention in atrial fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Freedman, Ben; Potpara, Tatjana S; Lip, Gregory Y H

    2016-08-20

    Atrial fibrillation is found in a third of all ischaemic strokes, even more after post-stroke atrial fibrillation monitoring. Data from stroke registries show that both unknown and untreated or under treated atrial fibrillation is responsible for most of these strokes, which are often fatal or debilitating. Most could be prevented if efforts were directed towards detection of atrial fibrillation before stroke occurs, through screening or case finding, and treatment of all patients with atrial fibrillation at increased risk of stroke with well-controlled vitamin K antagonists or non-vitamin K antagonist anticoagulants. The default strategy should be to offer anticoagulant thromboprophylaxis to all patients with atrial fibrillation unless defined as truly low risk by simple validated risk scores, such as CHA2DS2-VASc. Assessment of bleeding risk using the HAS-BLED score should focus attention on reversible bleeding risk factors. Finally, patients need support from physicians and various other sources to start anticoagulant treatment and to ensure adherence to and persistence with treatment in the long term. PMID:27560276

  3. Capsular warning syndrome and crescendo lacunar strokes after atherosclerotic stenosis of the recurrent artery of Heubner.

    PubMed

    Cohen, José E; Rabinstein, Alejandro; Gomori, John M; Leker, Ronen R

    2012-12-01

    The stereotype of repetitive transient cerebral ischemia causing unilateral motor, sensory, or sensorimotor deficits that simultaneously affect the face, arm, and leg, clinically localized to the internal capsule, fits with the description of capsular warning syndrome (CWS). A high proportion of individuals with these symptoms develop subsequent capsular stroke, despite various proposed preventative measures. It has been postulated that the mechanism for such strokes is that of small-vessel single-penetrator disease. We present a patient with repetitive CWS intermingled with crescendo capsular strokes secondary to recurrent artery of Heubner disease. This report causally links CWS-crescendo lacunar strokes and Heubner artery atherosclerotic disease (intracranial branch atheromatous disease).

  4. The Secondary Prevention of Small Subcortical Strokes (SPS3) study

    PubMed Central

    Benavente, Oscar R.; White, Carole L.; Pearce, Lesly; Pergola, Pablo; Roldan, Ana; Benavente, Marie-France; Coffey, Christopher; McClure, Leslie A.; Szychowski, Jeff M.; Conwit, Robin; Heberling, Patricia A.; Howard, George; Bazan, Carlos; Vidal-Pergola, Gabriela; Talbert, Robert; Hart, Robert G.

    2014-01-01

    Background Small subcortical strokes, also known as lacunar strokes, comprise more than 25% of brain infarcts, and the underlying vasculopathy is the most common cause of vascular cognitive impairment. How to optimally prevent stroke recurrence and cognitive decline in S3 patients is unclear. The aim of the Secondary Prevention of Small Subcortical Strokes study (Trial registration: NCT00059306) is to define strategies for reducing stroke recurrence, cognitive decline, and major vascular events. Methods Secondary Prevention of Small Subcortical Strokes is a randomised, multicentre clinical trial (n = 3000) being conducted in seven countries, and sponsored by the US NINDS/NIH. Patients with symptomatic small subcortical strokes in the six-months before and an eligible lesion on magnetic resonance imaging are simultaneously randomised, in a 2 × 2 factorial design, to antiplatelet therapy – 325 mg aspirin daily plus 75 mg clopidogrel daily, vs. 325 mg aspirin daily plus placebo, double-blind – and to one of two levels of systolic blood pressure targets –‘intensive’ (<130 mmHg) vs. ‘usual’ (130–149 mmHg). Participants are followed for an average of four-years. Time to recurrent stroke (ischaemic or haemorrhagic) is the primary outcome and will be analysed separately for each intervention. The secondary outcomes are the rate of cognitive decline and major vascular events. The primary and most secondary outcomes are adjudicated centrally by those unaware of treatment assignment. Conclusions Secondary Prevention of Small Subcortical Strokes will address several important clinical and scientific questions by testing two interventions in patients with recent magnetic resonance imaging-defined lacunar infarcts, which are likely due to small vessel disease. The results will inform the management of millions of patients with this common vascular disorder. PMID:21371282

  5. [Non-pharmacological methods of stroke prevention].

    PubMed

    Planjar-Prvan, Miljenka

    2010-03-01

    Stroke is a major health problem and the leading cause of functional disability, so that effective primary prevention remains the best, easiest and most cost-effective approach to reduce serious consequences of stroke. It is well known that prevention includes pharmacological and non-pharmacological methods. However, it seems that non-pharmacological methods of stroke prevention are generally neglected and placed in an inferior position in relation to pharmacological prevention. Therefore, the objective of this review is to present the most relevant literature data on non-pharmacological methods of stroke prevention and highlight their effectiveness with the use of quantitative parameters of evidence-based medicine. The main sources of data were the American, European and Croatian guidelines for stroke prevention, along with recent research results. Literature data have shown the relative risk of stroke to be greater than 2.0 in the group with unhealthy lifestyle; in fact, healthy lifestyle predicts more than twofold difference in the incidence of stroke. It is important to emphasize the public health value of non-pharmacological stroke prevention and to underline that it should be constant, irrespective of taking pharmacotherapy for stroke prevention or not. Healthy lifestyle is fundamental for non-pharmacological stroke prevention and includes healthy diet, regular physical activity, low-normal body mass index, smoking abstinence, and moderate drinking of alcohol. It is essential to inform patients on the importance, value and benefits of non-pharmacological stroke prevention, in particular when it remains the only therapeutic option in case of adverse side effects of pharmacotherapy prevention. Numerous studies demonstrated that even small lifestyle modifications could significantly reduce the risk of stroke. Therefore, it is necessary that physicians promote moderate and healthy lifestyle and habits in primary and secondary stroke prevention because there is

  6. Strokes in young adults: epidemiology and prevention

    PubMed Central

    Smajlović, Dževdet

    2015-01-01

    Strokes in young adults are reported as being uncommon, comprising 10%–15% of all stroke patients. However, compared with stroke in older adults, stroke in the young has a disproportionately large economic impact by leaving victims disabled before their most productive years. Recent publications report an increased incidence of stroke in young adults. This is important given the fact that younger stroke patients have a clearly increased risk of death compared with the general population. The prevalence of standard modifiable vascular risk factors in young stroke patients is different from that in older patients. Modifiable risk factors for stroke, such as dyslipidemia, smoking, and hypertension, are highly prevalent in the young stroke population, with no significant difference in geographic, climatic, nutritional, lifestyle, or genetic diversity. The list of potential stroke etiologies among young adults is extensive. Strokes of undetermined and of other determined etiology are the most common types among young patients according to TOAST (Trial of Org 10172 in Acute Stroke Treatment) criteria. Prevention is the primary treatment strategy aimed at reducing morbidity and mortality related to stroke. Therefore, primary prevention is very important with regard to stroke in young adults, and aggressive treatment of risk factors for stroke, such as hypertension, smoking, and dyslipidemia, is essential. The best form of secondary stroke prevention is directed toward stroke etiology as well as treatment of additional risk factors. However, there is a lack of specific recommendations and guidelines for stroke management in young adults. In conclusion, strokes in young adults are a major public health problem and further research, with standardized methodology, is needed in order to give us more precise epidemiologic data. Given the increasing incidence of stroke in the young, there is an objective need for more research in order to reduce this burden. PMID:25750539

  7. Clinical features of recurrent stroke after intracerebral hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Nakase, Taizen; Yoshioka, Shotaroh; Sasaki, Masahiro; Suzuki, Akifumi

    2012-06-14

    There have been many reports about the prognosis and risk factors of stroke recurrence following brain infarction (BI). However, little is known about the stroke recurrence after primary intracerebral hemorrhage (PICH). Therefore, we explored the recurrent stroke patients after initial PICH retrospectively, to reveal the critical factors of stroke recurrence. Acute BI (n=4013) and acute PICH patients (n=1067) admitted to the hospital between April 2000 and March 2009 were consecutively screened. PICH patients with a history of ICH and BI patients with a history of ICH were then classified into the ICH-ICH group (n=64, age 70.8±9.5 years) and ICH-BI group (n=52, age 72.8±9.7years), respectively. ICH lesions were categorized into ganglionic and lober types according to the brain magnetic resonance imaging. Subtypes of BI were classified into cardioembolism, large-artery atherosclerosis, small-artery occlusion and others. There was no difference in incidence of risk factors between ICH-ICH and ICH-BI groups. Distribution of initial PICH lesions was significantly abundant in the lobar type in the ICH-ICH group (P<0.01) and in ganglionic type in the ICH-BI group (P<0.02). Age of onset was significantly older in recurrent lobar ICH compared with recurrent ganglionic ICH (P<0.01: 73.6±10.0 and 59.1±9.0 years, respectively). In conclusion, ganglionic ICH patients may have a chance of recurrent stroke in both brain infarction and ganglionic ICH, suggesting the participation of atherosclerosis in intracranial arteries. Lobar ICH patients were older and prone to recurrent lobar ICH, suggesting the participation of cerebral amyloid angiopathy as a risk of stroke recurrence. PMID:23139848

  8. Activated Protein C Resistance Does Not Increase Risk for Recurrent Stroke or Death in Stroke Patients

    PubMed Central

    Thaler, Christoph; Sonntag, Natalie; Schleef, Michael; Rondak, Ina-Christine; Poppert, Holger

    2016-01-01

    Background Activated protein C (APC) resistance is the most common inherited prothrombotic disorder. The role of APC resistance in ischemic stroke is controversially discussed. Objectives The aim of this single center follow up study was to investigate the effect of APC resistance on stroke recurrence and survival in stroke patients. Patients/Methods We retrospectively identified 966 patients who had had an ischemic stroke or transitory ischemic attack (TIA) and in whom laboratory tests for APC resistance had been conducted. These patients were contacted to determine the primary outcomes of recurrent ischemic stroke or death. Results A total of 858 patients with an average follow up time of 8.48 years were included. APC resistance did not influence cumulative incidence functions for stroke free and total survival. In multivariate analyses, crude and adjusted hazard ratios for recurrent stroke as well as for death where not significantly increased in patients with APC resistance. This also applies to the subgroups of young patients, patients with cryptogenic stroke and patients with atrial fibrillation. Conclusion APC-resistance is not a risk factor for subsequent stroke or death in patients with a first ischemic stroke or TIA. Testing for APC-resistance in stroke patients therefore cannot be routinely recommended. PMID:27508300

  9. Guidelines for the Primary Prevention of Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Meschia, James F.; Bushnell, Cheryl; Boden-Albala, Bernadette; Braun, Lynne T.; Bravata, Dawn M.; Chaturvedi, Seemant; Creager, Mark A.; Eckel, Robert H.; Elkind, Mitchell S.V.; Fornage, Myriam; Goldstein, Larry B.; Greenberg, Steven M.; Horvath, Susanna E.; Iadecola, Costantino; Jauch, Edward C.; Moore, Wesley S.; Wilson, John A.

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this updated statement is to provide comprehensive and timely evidence-based recommendations on the prevention of stroke among individuals who have not previously experienced a stroke or transient ischemic attack. Evidence-based recommendations are included for the control of risk factors, interventional approaches to atherosclerotic disease of the cervicocephalic circulation, and antithrombotic treatments for preventing thrombotic and thromboembolic stroke. Further recommendations are provided for genetic and pharmacogenetic testing and for the prevention of stroke in a variety of other specific circumstances, including sickle cell disease and patent foramen ovale. PMID:25355838

  10. Risk of First and Recurrent Stroke in Childhood Cancer Survivors Treated With Cranial and Cervical Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Mueller, Sabine; Sear, Katherine; Hills, Nancy K.; Chettout, Nassim; Afghani, Shervin; Gastelum, Erica; Haas-Kogan, Daphne; Fullerton, Heather J.

    2013-07-15

    Purpose: To assess, in a retrospective cohort study, rates and predictors of first and recurrent stroke in patients treated with cranial irradiation (CRT) and/or cervical irradiation at ≤18 years of age. Methods and Materials: We performed chart abstraction (n=383) and phone interviews (n=104) to measure first and recurrent stroke in 383 patients who received CRT and/or cervical radiation at a single institution between 1980 and 2009. Stroke was defined as a physician diagnosis and symptoms consistent with stroke. Incidence of first stroke was number of first strokes per person-years of observation after radiation. We used survival analysis techniques to determine cumulative incidence of first and recurrent stroke. Results: Among 325 subjects with sufficient follow-up data, we identified 19 first strokes (13 ischemic, 4 hemorrhagic, 2 unknown subtype) occurring at a median age of 24 years (interquartile range 17-33 years) in patients treated with CRT. Imaging was reviewed when available (n=13), and the stroke was confirmed in 12. Overall rate of first stroke was 625 (95% confidence interval [CI] 378-977) per 100,000 person-years. The cumulative incidence of first stroke was 2% (95% CI 0.01%-5.3%) at 5 years and 4% (95% CI 2.0%-8.4%) at 10 years after irradiation. With each 100-cGy increase in the radiation dose, the stroke hazard increased by 5% (hazard ratio 1.05; 95% CI 1.01-1.09; P=.02). We identified 6 recurrent strokes; 5 had available imaging that confirmed the stroke. Median time to recurrence was 15 months (interquartile range 6 months-3.2 years) after first stroke. The cumulative incidence of recurrent stroke was 38% (95% CI 17%-69%) at 5 years and 59% (95% CI 27%-92%) at 10 years after first stroke. Conclusion: Cranial irradiation puts childhood cancer survivors at high risk of both first and recurrent stroke. Stroke prevention strategies for these survivors are needed.

  11. Prevention of stroke: a strategic global imperative.

    PubMed

    Feigin, Valery L; Norrving, Bo; George, Mary G; Foltz, Jennifer L; Roth, Gregory A; Mensah, George A

    2016-09-01

    The increasing global stroke burden strongly suggests that currently implemented primary stroke prevention strategies are not sufficiently effective, and new primary prevention strategies with larger effect sizes are needed. Here, we review the latest stroke epidemiology literature, with an emphasis on the recently published Global Burden of Disease 2013 Study estimates; highlight the problems with current primary stroke and cardiovascular disease (CVD) prevention strategies; and outline new developments in primary stroke and CVD prevention. We also suggest key priorities for the future, including comprehensive prevention strategies that target people at all levels of CVD risk; implementation of an integrated approach to promote healthy behaviours and reduce health disparities; capitalizing on information technology to advance prevention approaches and techniques; and incorporation of culturally appropriate education about healthy lifestyles into standard education curricula early in life. Given the already immense and fast-increasing burden of stroke and other major noncommunicable diseases (NCDs), which threatens worldwide sustainability, governments of all countries should develop and implement an emergency action plan addressing the primary prevention of NCDs, possibly including taxation strategies to tackle unhealthy behaviours that increase the risk of stroke and other NCDs. PMID:27448185

  12. Prevention of stroke: a strategic global imperative.

    PubMed

    Feigin, Valery L; Norrving, Bo; George, Mary G; Foltz, Jennifer L; Roth, Gregory A; Mensah, George A

    2016-09-01

    The increasing global stroke burden strongly suggests that currently implemented primary stroke prevention strategies are not sufficiently effective, and new primary prevention strategies with larger effect sizes are needed. Here, we review the latest stroke epidemiology literature, with an emphasis on the recently published Global Burden of Disease 2013 Study estimates; highlight the problems with current primary stroke and cardiovascular disease (CVD) prevention strategies; and outline new developments in primary stroke and CVD prevention. We also suggest key priorities for the future, including comprehensive prevention strategies that target people at all levels of CVD risk; implementation of an integrated approach to promote healthy behaviours and reduce health disparities; capitalizing on information technology to advance prevention approaches and techniques; and incorporation of culturally appropriate education about healthy lifestyles into standard education curricula early in life. Given the already immense and fast-increasing burden of stroke and other major noncommunicable diseases (NCDs), which threatens worldwide sustainability, governments of all countries should develop and implement an emergency action plan addressing the primary prevention of NCDs, possibly including taxation strategies to tackle unhealthy behaviours that increase the risk of stroke and other NCDs.

  13. Aspirin and Extended-Release Dipyridamole versus Clopidogrel for Recurrent Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Sacco, Ralph L.; Diener, Hans-Christoph; Yusuf, Salim; Cotton, Daniel; Ôunpuu, Stephanie; Lawton, William A.; Palesch, Yuko; Martin, Reneé H.; Albers, Gregory W.; Bath, Philip; Bornstein, Natan; Chan, Bernard P.L.; Chen, Sien-Tsong; Cunha, Luis; Dahlöf, Björn; De Keyser, Jacques; Donnan, Geoffrey A.; Estol, Conrado; Gorelick, Philip; Gu, Vivian; Hermansson, Karin; Hilbrich, Lutz; Kaste, Markku; Lu, Chuanzhen; Machnig, Thomas; Pais, Prem; Roberts, Robin; Skvortsova, Veronika; Teal, Philip; Toni, Danilo; VanderMaelen, Cam; Voigt, Thor; Weber, Michael; Yoon, Byung-Woo

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND Recurrent stroke is a frequent, disabling event after ischemic stroke. This study compared the efficacy and safety of two antiplatelet regimens — aspirin plus extendedrelease dipyridamole (ASA–ERDP) versus clopidogrel. METHODS In this double-blind, 2-by-2 factorial trial, we randomly assigned patients to receive 25 mg of aspirin plus 200 mg of extended-release dipyridamole twice daily or to receive 75 mg of clopidogrel daily. The primary outcome was first recurrence of stroke. The secondary outcome was a composite of stroke, myocardial infarction, or death from vascular causes. Sequential statistical testing of noninferiority (margin of 1.075), followed by superiority testing, was planned. RESULTS A total of 20,332 patients were followed for a mean of 2.5 years. Recurrent stroke occurred in 916 patients (9.0%) receiving ASA–ERDP and in 898 patients (8.8%) receiving clopidogrel (hazard ratio, 1.01; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.92 to 1.11). The secondary outcome occurred in 1333 patients (13.1%) in each group (hazard ratio for ASA–ERDP, 0.99; 95% CI, 0.92 to 1.07). There were more major hemorrhagic events among ASA–ERDP recipients (419 [4.1%]) than among clopidogrel recipients (365 [3.6%]) (hazard ratio, 1.15; 95% CI, 1.00 to 1.32), including intracranial hemorrhage (hazard ratio, 1.42; 95% CI, 1.11 to 1.83). The net risk of recurrent stroke or major hemorrhagic event was similar in the two groups (1194 ASA–ERDP recipients [11.7%], vs. 1156 clopidogrel recipients [11.4%]; hazard ratio, 1.03; 95% CI, 0.95 to 1.11). CONCLUSIONS The trial did not meet the predefined criteria for noninferiority but showed similar rates of recurrent stroke with ASA–ERDP and with clopidogrel. There is no evidence that either of the two treatments was superior to the other in the prevention of recurrent stroke. PMID:18753638

  14. Guidelines for the prevention of stroke in patients with stroke or transient ischemic attack: a guideline for healthcare professionals from the american heart association/american stroke association.

    PubMed

    Furie, Karen L; Kasner, Scott E; Adams, Robert J; Albers, Gregory W; Bush, Ruth L; Fagan, Susan C; Halperin, Jonathan L; Johnston, S Claiborne; Katzan, Irene; Kernan, Walter N; Mitchell, Pamela H; Ovbiagele, Bruce; Palesch, Yuko Y; Sacco, Ralph L; Schwamm, Lee H; Wassertheil-Smoller, Sylvia; Turan, Tanya N; Wentworth, Deidre

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this updated statement is to provide comprehensive and timely evidence-based recommendations on the prevention of ischemic stroke among survivors of ischemic stroke or transient ischemic attack. Evidence-based recommendations are included for the control of risk factors, interventional approaches for atherosclerotic disease, antithrombotic treatments for cardioembolism, and the use of antiplatelet agents for noncardioembolic stroke. Further recommendations are provided for the prevention of recurrent stroke in a variety of other specific circumstances, including arterial dissections; patent foramen ovale; hyperhomocysteinemia; hypercoagulable states; sickle cell disease; cerebral venous sinus thrombosis; stroke among women, particularly with regard to pregnancy and the use of postmenopausal hormones; the use of anticoagulation after cerebral hemorrhage; and special approaches to the implementation of guidelines and their use in high-risk populations.

  15. [Primary and secondary prevention of stroke].

    PubMed

    Trenkwalder, Peter; Rüchardt, Andreas

    2015-10-01

    The basis for primary and secondary prevention of stroke (and also TIA) are both a healthy lifestyle with a healthy diet, non smoking, weight reduction and regular exercise, and consistent treatment of arterial hypertension with a target of < 140 /90 mmHg. The choice of the antihypertensive is depending on concomitant diseases, more important than the class of antihypertensive is treatment to target. Reduction of cholesterol with statins in primary prevention is dependant on total cardiovascular risk, in secondary prevention statins are integral part of modern treatment in non cardioembolic stroke. Atrial fibrillation is one of the major causes of stroke and should be treated with anticoagulation depending on the CHA2DS2-VASc score. Platelet inhibition is mandatory lifelong in all non cardioembolic strokes, in primary prevention only for patients with high total cardiovascular risk. Treatment of asymptomatic carotid artery stenosis should be determined on an individual basis. Symptomatic carotid artery stenosis should be treated immediately after the index stroke. PMID:26488098

  16. Mortality, Recurrence, and Dependency Rates Are Higher after Acute Ischemic Stroke in Elderly Patients with Diabetes Compared to Younger Patients.

    PubMed

    Long, Xue; Lou, Yongzhong; Gu, Hongfei; Guo, Xiaofei; Wang, Tao; Zhu, Yanxia; Zhao, Wenjuan; Ning, Xianjia; Li, Bin; Wang, Jinghua; An, Zhongping

    2016-01-01

    Stroke has a greater effect on the elderly than on younger patients. However, the long-term outcomes associated with stroke among elderly patients with diabetes are unknown. We aimed to assess the differences in long-term outcomes between young and elderly stroke patients with diabetes. A total of 3,615 acute ischemic stroke patients with diabetes were recruited for this study between 2006 and 2014. Outcomes at 12 and 36 months after stroke (including mortality, recurrence, and dependency) were compared between younger (age <75 years) and elderly (age ≥75 years) patients. The elderly group included 692 patients (19.1%) overall. Elderly patients were more likely than younger patients to have a Trial of Org 10172 in Acute Stroke Treatment classification of stroke due to cardioembolism, moderate and severe stroke, and atrial fibrillation, but less likely to have hypertension and dyslipidemia, current smokers, and alcohol consumers. Mortality, dependency, and recurrence rates at 12 months after stroke were 19.0, 48.5, and 20.9% in the elderly group and 7.4, 30.9, and 15.4% in the younger group, respectively (all P < 0.05). Corresponding rates at 36 months after stroke were 35.4, 78.7, and 53.8% in the elderly group and 13.7, 61.7, and 43.0% in the younger group, respectively (all P < 0.001). The mortality, dependency, and recurrence rates at 12 and 36 months after stroke were significantly higher in the elderly group than in the younger group after adjusting for stroke subtypes, stroke severity, and risk factors. Odds ratios (95% confidence interval) at 12 and 36 months after stroke were 2.18 (1.64-2.89) and 3.10 (2.35-4.08), respectively, for mortality, all P < 0.001; 1.81 (1.49-2.20) and 2.04 (1.57-2.34), respectively, for dependency, all P < 0.001; and 1.37 (1.06-1.76) and 1.40 (1.07-1.85), respectively, for recurrence, P = 0.016. The findings from this study suggest that management and secondary prevention should be emphasized in elderly patients with diabetes in

  17. Mortality, Recurrence, and Dependency Rates Are Higher after Acute Ischemic Stroke in Elderly Patients with Diabetes Compared to Younger Patients

    PubMed Central

    Long, Xue; Lou, Yongzhong; Gu, Hongfei; Guo, Xiaofei; Wang, Tao; Zhu, Yanxia; Zhao, Wenjuan; Ning, Xianjia; Li, Bin; Wang, Jinghua; An, Zhongping

    2016-01-01

    Stroke has a greater effect on the elderly than on younger patients. However, the long-term outcomes associated with stroke among elderly patients with diabetes are unknown. We aimed to assess the differences in long-term outcomes between young and elderly stroke patients with diabetes. A total of 3,615 acute ischemic stroke patients with diabetes were recruited for this study between 2006 and 2014. Outcomes at 12 and 36 months after stroke (including mortality, recurrence, and dependency) were compared between younger (age <75 years) and elderly (age ≥75 years) patients. The elderly group included 692 patients (19.1%) overall. Elderly patients were more likely than younger patients to have a Trial of Org 10172 in Acute Stroke Treatment classification of stroke due to cardioembolism, moderate and severe stroke, and atrial fibrillation, but less likely to have hypertension and dyslipidemia, current smokers, and alcohol consumers. Mortality, dependency, and recurrence rates at 12 months after stroke were 19.0, 48.5, and 20.9% in the elderly group and 7.4, 30.9, and 15.4% in the younger group, respectively (all P < 0.05). Corresponding rates at 36 months after stroke were 35.4, 78.7, and 53.8% in the elderly group and 13.7, 61.7, and 43.0% in the younger group, respectively (all P < 0.001). The mortality, dependency, and recurrence rates at 12 and 36 months after stroke were significantly higher in the elderly group than in the younger group after adjusting for stroke subtypes, stroke severity, and risk factors. Odds ratios (95% confidence interval) at 12 and 36 months after stroke were 2.18 (1.64–2.89) and 3.10 (2.35–4.08), respectively, for mortality, all P < 0.001; 1.81 (1.49–2.20) and 2.04 (1.57–2.34), respectively, for dependency, all P < 0.001; and 1.37 (1.06–1.76) and 1.40 (1.07–1.85), respectively, for recurrence, P = 0.016. The findings from this study suggest that management and secondary prevention should be emphasized in elderly patients with

  18. Mortality, Recurrence, and Dependency Rates Are Higher after Acute Ischemic Stroke in Elderly Patients with Diabetes Compared to Younger Patients.

    PubMed

    Long, Xue; Lou, Yongzhong; Gu, Hongfei; Guo, Xiaofei; Wang, Tao; Zhu, Yanxia; Zhao, Wenjuan; Ning, Xianjia; Li, Bin; Wang, Jinghua; An, Zhongping

    2016-01-01

    Stroke has a greater effect on the elderly than on younger patients. However, the long-term outcomes associated with stroke among elderly patients with diabetes are unknown. We aimed to assess the differences in long-term outcomes between young and elderly stroke patients with diabetes. A total of 3,615 acute ischemic stroke patients with diabetes were recruited for this study between 2006 and 2014. Outcomes at 12 and 36 months after stroke (including mortality, recurrence, and dependency) were compared between younger (age <75 years) and elderly (age ≥75 years) patients. The elderly group included 692 patients (19.1%) overall. Elderly patients were more likely than younger patients to have a Trial of Org 10172 in Acute Stroke Treatment classification of stroke due to cardioembolism, moderate and severe stroke, and atrial fibrillation, but less likely to have hypertension and dyslipidemia, current smokers, and alcohol consumers. Mortality, dependency, and recurrence rates at 12 months after stroke were 19.0, 48.5, and 20.9% in the elderly group and 7.4, 30.9, and 15.4% in the younger group, respectively (all P < 0.05). Corresponding rates at 36 months after stroke were 35.4, 78.7, and 53.8% in the elderly group and 13.7, 61.7, and 43.0% in the younger group, respectively (all P < 0.001). The mortality, dependency, and recurrence rates at 12 and 36 months after stroke were significantly higher in the elderly group than in the younger group after adjusting for stroke subtypes, stroke severity, and risk factors. Odds ratios (95% confidence interval) at 12 and 36 months after stroke were 2.18 (1.64-2.89) and 3.10 (2.35-4.08), respectively, for mortality, all P < 0.001; 1.81 (1.49-2.20) and 2.04 (1.57-2.34), respectively, for dependency, all P < 0.001; and 1.37 (1.06-1.76) and 1.40 (1.07-1.85), respectively, for recurrence, P = 0.016. The findings from this study suggest that management and secondary prevention should be emphasized in elderly patients with diabetes in

  19. Stroke prevention in atrial fibrillation--an Asian stroke perspective.

    PubMed

    Tse, Hung-Fat; Wang, Yong-Jun; Ahmed Ai-Abdullah, Moheeb; Pizarro-Borromeo, Annette B; Chiang, Chern-En; Krittayaphong, Rungroj; Singh, Balbir; Vora, Amit; Wang, Chun-Xue; Zubaid, Mohammad; Clemens, Andreas; Lim, Paul; Hu, Dayi

    2013-07-01

    Despite relatively lower prevalence of atrial fibrillation (AF) in Asians (~1%) than in Caucasians (~2%), Asia has a much higher overall disease burden because of its proportionally larger aged population. For example, on the basis of reported age-adjusted prevalence rates and projected population figures in China, there will be an estimated 5.2 million men and 3.1 million women with AF older than 60 years by year 2050. Stroke is a disabling complication of AF that is of increasing cause for concern in Asians patients. Implementing consensus expert recommendations for managing stroke risk in patients with AF can considerably reduce stroke rates. However, caution is necessary when aligning management of Asian patients with AF to that of their Caucasian counterparts. Current international guidelines and risk stratification tools for AF management are based on findings in predominantly Caucasian populations and may therefore have limited relevance, in certain respects, to Asian patients. Oral anticoagulants play an important role in preventing AF-related stroke. The vitamin K antagonist warfarin is recommended for reducing the risk of stroke and thromboembolism in high-risk patients with nonvalvular AF; however, warfarin interacts with many drugs and food ingredients, which may pose significant challenges in administration and monitoring among Asian patients. Further research is needed to inform specific guidance on the implications of different stroke and bleeding profiles in Asians vs Caucasians. Moreover, there is scope to improve physician perceptions and patient knowledge, as well as considering alternative new oral anticoagulants, for example, direct thrombin inhibitors or factor Xa inhibitors.

  20. Intensive risk factor control in stroke prevention

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Stroke prevention is an urgent priority because of the aging of the population and the steep association of age and risk of stroke. Direct costs of stroke are expected to more than double in the US between 2012 and 2030. By getting everything right, patients can reduce the risk of stroke by 80% or more; however, getting everything right is a tall order. Roughly in order of importance, this requires smoking cessation, maintenance of a healthy weight, a Cretan Mediterranean diet, blood pressure control, lipid-lowering drugs, appropriate use of antiplatelet agents and anticoagulants, and appropriate carotid endarterectomy and stenting. A new approach called “treating arteries instead of targeting risk factors” appears promising but requires validation in randomized trials. PMID:24167723

  1. Guidelines for the prevention of stroke in patients with stroke and transient ischemic attack: a guideline for healthcare professionals from the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association.

    PubMed

    Kernan, Walter N; Ovbiagele, Bruce; Black, Henry R; Bravata, Dawn M; Chimowitz, Marc I; Ezekowitz, Michael D; Fang, Margaret C; Fisher, Marc; Furie, Karen L; Heck, Donald V; Johnston, S Claiborne Clay; Kasner, Scott E; Kittner, Steven J; Mitchell, Pamela H; Rich, Michael W; Richardson, DeJuran; Schwamm, Lee H; Wilson, John A

    2014-07-01

    The aim of this updated guideline is to provide comprehensive and timely evidence-based recommendations on the prevention of future stroke among survivors of ischemic stroke or transient ischemic attack. The guideline is addressed to all clinicians who manage secondary prevention for these patients. Evidence-based recommendations are provided for control of risk factors, intervention for vascular obstruction, antithrombotic therapy for cardioembolism, and antiplatelet therapy for noncardioembolic stroke. Recommendations are also provided for the prevention of recurrent stroke in a variety of specific circumstances, including aortic arch atherosclerosis, arterial dissection, patent foramen ovale, hyperhomocysteinemia, hypercoagulable states, antiphospholipid antibody syndrome, sickle cell disease, cerebral venous sinus thrombosis, and pregnancy. Special sections address use of antithrombotic and anticoagulation therapy after an intracranial hemorrhage and implementation of guidelines.

  2. Newer Oral Anticoagulants: Stroke Prevention and Pitfalls

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Anand; Goddeau Jr, Richard P.; Henninger, Nils

    2016-01-01

    Warfarin is very effective in preventing stroke in patients with atrial fibrillation. However, its use is limited due to fear of hemorrhagic complications, unpredictable anticoagulant effects related to multiple drug interactions and dietary restrictions, a narrow therapeutic window, frequent difficulty maintaining the anticoagulant effect within a narrow therapeutic window, and the need for inconvenient monitoring. Several newer oral anticoagulants have been approved for primary and secondary prevention of stroke in patients with non-valvular atrial fibrillation. These agents have several advantages relative to warfarin therapy. As a group, these direct oral anticoagulants (DOAC), which include the direct thrombin inhibitor, dabigatran, and the factor Xa inhibitors (rivaroxaban, apixaban, and edoxaban), are more effective than dose adjusted warfarin for prevention of all-cause stroke (including both ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke), and have an overall more favorable safety profile. Nevertheless, an increased risk of gastrointestinal bleeding (with the exception of apixaban), increased risk for thrombotic complication with sudden discontinuation, and inability to accurately assess and reverse anticoagulant effect require consideration prior to therapy initiation, and pose a challenge for decision making in acute stroke therapy. PMID:27347226

  3. Prevention of Recurrent Staphylococcal Skin Infections

    PubMed Central

    Creech, C. Buddy; Al-Zubeidi, Duha N.; Fritz, Stephanie A.

    2015-01-01

    Synopsis Staphylococcus aureus infections pose a significant health burden. The emergence of community-associated methicillin-resistant S. aureus has resulted in an epidemic of skin and soft tissue infections (SSTI), and many patients experience recurrent SSTI. As S. aureus colonization is associated with subsequent infection, decolonization is recommended for patients with recurrent SSTI or in settings of ongoing transmission. S. aureus infections often cluster within households and asymptomatic carriers serve as reservoirs for transmission; therefore, a household approach to decolonization is more effective than measures performed by individuals alone. Other factors, such as environmental surface contamination, may also be considered. Novel strategies for the prevention of recurrent SSTI are needed. PMID:26311356

  4. Preventing recurrence of severe morning sickness

    PubMed Central

    Koren, Gideon; Maltepe, Caroline

    2006-01-01

    QUESTION A recent Motherisk article showed that initiating antinauseants even before symptoms start could prevent recurrence of severe morning sickness. In the study described, however, different physicians used different drugs. How can one be sure which drugs work? ANSWER The study of 26 women who had had severe morning sickness during previous pregnancies showed that using antiemetics before symptoms of morning sickness started appeared to prevent recurrence of severe morning sickness in subsequent pregnancies. Physicians in the United States used various antinauseant drugs. Physicians in Canada administered only one drug, the combination of doxylamine-pyridoxine (Diclectin®), to 12 women. Subanalysis of these 12 women revealed that pre-emptive use of doxylamine-pyridoxine significantly decreased the likelihood that severe morning sickness would recur. PMID:17279232

  5. The Japan Statin Treatment Against Recurrent Stroke (J-STARS): A Multicenter, Randomized, Open-label, Parallel-group Study

    PubMed Central

    Hosomi, Naohisa; Nagai, Yoji; Kohriyama, Tatsuo; Ohtsuki, Toshiho; Aoki, Shiro; Nezu, Tomohisa; Maruyama, Hirofumi; Sunami, Norio; Yokota, Chiaki; Kitagawa, Kazuo; Terayama, Yasuo; Takagi, Makoto; Ibayashi, Setsuro; Nakamura, Masakazu; Origasa, Hideki; Fukushima, Masanori; Mori, Etsuro; Minematsu, Kazuo; Uchiyama, Shinichiro; Shinohara, Yukito; Yamaguchi, Takenori; Matsumoto, Masayasu

    2015-01-01

    Background Although statin therapy is beneficial for the prevention of initial stroke, the benefit for recurrent stroke and its subtypes remains to be determined in Asian, in whom stroke profiles are different from Caucasian. This study examined whether treatment with low-dose pravastatin prevents stroke recurrence in ischemic stroke patients. Methods This is a multicenter, randomized, open-label, blinded-endpoint, parallel-group study of patients who experienced non-cardioembolic ischemic stroke. All patients had a total cholesterol level between 4.65 and 6.21 mmol/L at enrollment, without the use of statins. The pravastatin group patients received 10 mg of pravastatin/day; the control group patients received no statins. The primary endpoint was the occurrence of stroke and transient ischemic attack (TIA), with the onset of each stroke subtype set to be one of the secondary endpoints. Finding Although 3000 patients were targeted, 1578 patients (491 female, age 66.2 years) were recruited and randomly assigned to pravastatin group or control group. During the follow-up of 4.9 ± 1.4 years, although total stroke and TIA similarly occurred in both groups (2.56 vs. 2.65%/year), onset of atherothrombotic infarction was less frequent in pravastatin group (0.21 vs. 0.64%/year, p = 0.0047, adjusted hazard ratio 0.33 [95%CI 0.15 to 0.74]). No significant intergroup difference was found for the onset of other stroke subtypes, and for the occurrence of adverse events. Interpretation Although whether low-dose pravastatin prevents recurrence of total stroke or TIA still needs to be examined in Asian, this study has generated a hypothesis that it may reduce occurrence of stroke due to larger artery atherosclerosis. Funding This study was initially supported by a grant from the Ministry of Health, Labour and Welfare, Japan. After the governmental support expired, it was conducted in collaboration between Hiroshima University and the Foundation for Biomedical Research and

  6. The Prevention of Hemorrhagic Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Raymond, J.; Mohr, JP; the TEAM-ARUBA collaborative groups

    2008-01-01

    Summary There is currently no evidence that preventive treatment of unruptured aneurysms or AVMs is beneficial and randomized trials have been proposed to address this clinical uncertainty. Participation in a trial may necessitate a shift of point of view compared to a certain habitual clinical mentality. A review of the ethical and rational principles governing the design and realization of a trial may help integrate clinical research into expert clinical practices. The treatment of unruptured aneurysms and AVMs remains controversial, and data from observational studies cannot provide a normative basis for clinical decisions. Prevention targets healthy individuals and hence has an obligation of results. There is no opposition between the search for objective facts using scientific methods and the ethics of medical practice since a good practice cannot forbid physicians the means to define what could be beneficial to patients. Perhaps the most difficult task is to recognize the uncertainty that is crucial to allow resorting to trial methodology. The reasoning that is used in research and analysis differs from the casuistic methods typical of clinical work, but clinical judgement remains the dominant factor that decides both who enters the trial and to whom the results of the trial will apply. Randomization is still perceived as a difficult and strange method to integrate into normal practice, but in the face of uncertainty it assures the best chances for the best outcome to each participant. Some tension exists between scientific methods and normal practice, but they need to coexist if we are to progress at the same time we care for patients. PMID:20557736

  7. Neurological Symptom Severity after a Recent Non-cardioembolic Stroke and Recurrent Vascular Risk

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jong-Ho; Ovbiagele, Bruce

    2015-01-01

    Background There is a well-established relation of symptom severity with functional status and mortality after an index stroke. However, little is known about the impact of symptom severity of a recent index stroke on risk of recurrent vascular events. Methods We reviewed the dataset of a multicenter trial involving 3680 recent non-cardioembolic stroke patients aged ≥35 years and followed for 2 years. Independent associations of stroke severity (as measured by National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale [NIHSS] score) with recurrent stroke (primary outcome) and stroke/coronary heart disease (CHD)/vascular death (secondary outcome) were analyzed. NIHSS score was analyzed as a dichotomous (<4 vs. ≥4) and a continuous variable. Results Among study subjects, 550 (15%) had NIHSS scores ≥4 (overall scores ranged from 0 to 18, median score was 1 [25th to 75th percentile 0 to 2]). NIHSS was measured at a median 35 days after the index stroke. After adjusting for multiple covariates, NIHSS ≥4 was independently linked to higher risk of recurrent stroke (HR 1.37, 95% CI: 1.01–1.84) and risk of stroke/CHD/vascular death (HR 1.32, 95% CI: 1.07–1.64). Analysis of NIHSS score as a continuous variable also showed a higher risk of recurrent stroke (HR 1.06, 95% CI: 1.00–1.12) and stroke/CHD/vascular death (HR 1.05, 95% CI: 1.01–1.09) with increasing index stroke symptom severity. Conclusions Greater residual symptom severity after a recent stroke is associated with higher risk of recurrent vascular events. Future studies are needed to confirm this relationship and to clarify its underlying mechanisms. PMID:25817617

  8. Clinical Neuroprotective Drugs for Treatment and Prevention of Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Kikuchi, Kiyoshi; Uchikado, Hisaaki; Morioka, Motohiro; Murai, Yoshinaka; Tanaka, Eiichiro

    2012-01-01

    Stroke is an enormous public health problem with an imperative need for more effective therapies. In therapies for ischemic stroke, tissue plasminogen activators, antiplatelet agents and anticoagulants are used mainly for their antithrombotic effects. However, free radical scavengers, minocycline and growth factors have shown neuroprotective effects in the treatment of stroke, while antihypertensive drugs, lipid-lowering drugs and hypoglycemic drugs have shown beneficial effects for the prevention of stroke. In the present review, we evaluate the treatment and prevention of stroke in light of clinical studies and discuss new anti-stroke effects other than the main effects of drugs, focusing on optimal pharmacotherapy. PMID:22837724

  9. Personalized approach to primary and secondary prevention of ischemic stroke

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Primary and secondary prevention of ischemic stroke represents a significant part of stroke management and health care. Although there are official guidelines concerning stroke management, new knowledge are introduced to them with a slight delay. This article provides an overview of current information on primary and secondary prevention of ischemic stroke. It summarizes information especially in the field of cardioembolic stroke, the use of new anticoagulants and the management of carotid stenosis based on the results of recent clinical studies. The optimal approach in stroke management is to follow these recommendations, to know new strategies and to apply an individual personalized approach in our clinical decisions. PMID:24949113

  10. The Case for Diet: A Safe and Efficacious Strategy for Secondary Stroke Prevention

    PubMed Central

    Dearborn, Jennifer L.; Urrutia, Victor C.; Kernan, Walter N.

    2015-01-01

    Diet is strongly associated with risk for first stroke. In particular, observational and experimental research suggests that a Mediterranean-type diet may reduce risk for first ischemic stroke with an effect size comparable to statin therapy. These data for first ischemic stroke suggest that diet may also be associated with risk for recurrent stroke and that diet modification might represent an effective intervention for secondary prevention. However, research on dietary pattern after stroke is limited and direct experimental evidence for a therapeutic effect in secondary prevention does not exist. The uncertain state of science in this area is reflected in recent guidelines on secondary stroke prevention from the American Heart Association, in which the Mediterranean-type diet is listed with only a class IIa recommendation (level of evidence C). To change guidelines and practice, research is needed, starting with efforts to better define current nutritional practices of stroke patients. Food frequency questionnaires and mobile applications for real-time recording of intake are available for this purpose. Dietary strategies for secondary stroke prevention are low risk, high potential, and warrant further evaluation. PMID:25699006

  11. [Statins in the secondary prevention of stroke: New evidence from the SPARCL Study].

    PubMed

    Castilla-Guerra, Luis; Fernández-Moreno, María Del Carmen; López-Chozas, José Manuel

    2016-01-01

    Until recently there was little evidence that statin therapy reduced the risk of stroke recurrence. The SPARCL trial, published in 2006, was the first trial to show the benefits of statin therapy in preventing recurrent stroke. The SPARCL trial showed that treatment with atorvastatin 80mg/day reduced recurrent stroke in patients with a recent stroke or transient ischemic attack (TIA). Several post hoc analyses of different subgroups followed the SPARCL trial. They have not revealed any significant differences when patients were grouped by age, sex or type of stroke. The SPARCL trial has also helped to identify patients who may have a greater benefit from statins: Patients with carotid stenosis, with more intense lipid lowering, and those who achieve optimal levels of LDL-C, HDL-C, triglycerides, and blood pressure. The trial has also helped to identify individuals at high risk of new vascular events. Clearly there is a before and after in stroke prevention since the SPARCL trial was published. PMID:26150172

  12. [Statins in the secondary prevention of stroke: New evidence from the SPARCL Study].

    PubMed

    Castilla-Guerra, Luis; Fernández-Moreno, María Del Carmen; López-Chozas, José Manuel

    2016-01-01

    Until recently there was little evidence that statin therapy reduced the risk of stroke recurrence. The SPARCL trial, published in 2006, was the first trial to show the benefits of statin therapy in preventing recurrent stroke. The SPARCL trial showed that treatment with atorvastatin 80mg/day reduced recurrent stroke in patients with a recent stroke or transient ischemic attack (TIA). Several post hoc analyses of different subgroups followed the SPARCL trial. They have not revealed any significant differences when patients were grouped by age, sex or type of stroke. The SPARCL trial has also helped to identify patients who may have a greater benefit from statins: Patients with carotid stenosis, with more intense lipid lowering, and those who achieve optimal levels of LDL-C, HDL-C, triglycerides, and blood pressure. The trial has also helped to identify individuals at high risk of new vascular events. Clearly there is a before and after in stroke prevention since the SPARCL trial was published.

  13. Intravenous thrombolysis on early recurrent cardioembolic stroke: 'Dr Jekyll' or 'Mr Hyde'?

    PubMed

    Cappellari, Manuel; Tomelleri, Giampaolo; Carletti, Monica; Bovi, Paolo; Moretto, Giuseppe

    2012-01-01

    Early recurrent cardioembolic stroke on the previously unaffected side has very rarely been reported during or after intravenous recombinant tissue plasminogen activator for acute ischemic stroke. For these cases, thrombolysis guidelines lack any clear recommendation. We report two cases of thrombolysed stroke patients, with paroxysmal atrial fibrillation but normal sinus rhythm on admission, who respectively developed recurrent ischemic stroke within few hours after complete improvement and during intravenous recombinant tissue plasminogen activator infusion. Intravenous thrombolysis was successfully repeated after echocardiographic evidence of left appendage thrombus in the first case and discontinued before complete administration in the second. PMID:22089941

  14. Changes in pre-hospital management of vascular risk factors among patients admitted due to recurrent stroke in Poland from 1995 to 2013

    PubMed Central

    Bembenek, Jan P.; Karlinski, Michał; Kurkowska-Jastrzebska, Iwona

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The aim of this study was to investigate long-term trends in secondary stroke prevention through management of vascular risk factors directly before hospital admission for recurrent stroke. Material and methods This is a retrospective registry-based analysis of consecutive recurrent acute stroke patients from a highly urbanized area (Warsaw, Poland) admitted to a single stroke center between 1995 and 2013 with previous ischemic stroke. We compared between four consecutive time periods: 1995–1999, 2000–2004, 2005–2009 and 2010–2013. Results During the study period, 894 patients with recurrent strokes were admitted (18% of all strokes), including 867 with previous ischemic stroke (our study group). Among those patients, the proportion of recurrent ischemic strokes (88.1% to 93.9%) (p = 0.319) and males (44% to 49.7%) (p = 0.5) remained stable. However, there was a rising trend in patients’ age (median age of 73, 74, 76 and 77 years, respectively). There was also an increase in the use of antihypertensives (from 70.2% to 83.8%) (p = 0.013), vitamin K antagonists (from 4.8% to 15.6%) (p = 0.012) and statins (from 32.5% to 59.4%) (p < 0.001). Nonetheless, 21% of patients did not receive any antithrombotic prophylaxis. Tobacco smoking pattern remained unchanged. Conclusions Our data indicate a clear overall improvement of secondary stroke prevention. However, persistent use of antithrombotic drugs and tobacco smoking after the first ischemic stroke is constantly suboptimal. PMID:27482236

  15. Recurrent stroke risk and cerebral microbleed burden in ischemic stroke and TIA

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Duncan; Charidimou, Andreas; Ambler, Gareth; Fox, Zoe V.; Gregoire, Simone; Rayson, Phillip; Imaizumi, Toshio; Fluri, Felix; Naka, Hiromitsu; Horstmann, Solveig; Veltkamp, Roland; Rothwell, Peter M.; Kwa, Vincent I.H.; Thijs, Vincent; Lee, Yong-Seok; Kim, Young Dae; Huang, Yining; Wong, Ka Sing; Jäger, Hans Rolf

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To determine associations between cerebral microbleed (CMB) burden with recurrent ischemic stroke (IS) and intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) risk after IS or TIA. Methods: We identified prospective studies of patients with IS or TIA that investigated CMBs and stroke (ICH and IS) risk during ≥3 months follow-up. Authors provided aggregate summary-level data on stroke outcomes, with CMBs categorized according to burden (single, 2–4, and ≥5 CMBs) and distribution. We calculated absolute event rates and pooled risk ratios (RR) using random-effects meta-analysis. Results: We included 5,068 patients from 15 studies. There were 115/1,284 (9.6%) recurrent IS events in patients with CMBs vs 212/3,781 (5.6%) in patients without CMBs (pooled RR 1.8 for CMBs vs no CMBs; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.4–2.5). There were 49/1,142 (4.3%) ICH events in those with CMBs vs 17/2,912 (0.58%) in those without CMBs (pooled RR 6.3 for CMBs vs no CMBs; 95% CI 3.5–11.4). Increasing CMB burden increased the risk of IS (pooled RR [95% CI] 1.8 [1.0–3.1], 2.4 [1.3–4.4], and 2.7 [1.5–4.9] for 1 CMB, 2–4 CMBs, and ≥5 CMBs, respectively) and ICH (pooled RR [95% CI] 4.6 [1.9–10.7], 5.6 [2.4–13.3], and 14.1 [6.9–29.0] for 1 CMB, 2–4 CMBs, and ≥5 CMBs, respectively). Conclusions: CMBs are associated with increased stroke risk after IS or TIA. With increasing CMB burden (compared to no CMBs), the risk of ICH increases more steeply than that of IS. However, IS absolute event rates remain higher than ICH absolute event rates in all CMB burden categories. PMID:27590288

  16. Antiplatelet Agents for the Secondary Prevention of Ischemic Stroke or Transient Ischemic Attack: A Network Meta-Analysis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wen; Zhang, Lu; Liu, Weiming; Zhu, Qin; Lan, Qing; Zhao, Jizong

    2016-05-01

    Stroke can cause high morbidity and mortality, and ischemic stroke (IS) and transient ischemic attack (TIA) patients have a high stroke recurrence rate. Antiplatelet agents are the standard therapy for these patients, but it is often difficult for clinicians to select the best therapy from among the multiple treatment options. We therefore performed a network meta-analysis to estimate the efficacy of antiplatelet agents for secondary prevention of recurrent stroke. We systematically searched 3 databases (PubMed, Embase, and Cochrane) for relevant studies published through August 2015. The primary end points of this meta-analysis were overall stroke, hemorrhagic stroke, and fatal stroke. A total of 30 trials were included in our network meta-analysis and abstracted data. Among the therapies evaluated in the included trials, the estimates for overall stroke and hemorrhagic stroke for cilostazol (Cilo) were significantly better than those for aspirin (odds ratio [OR] = .64, 95% credibility interval [CrI], .45-.91; OR = .23, 95% CrI, .08-.58). The estimate for fatal stroke was highest for Cilo plus aspirin combination therapy, followed by Cilo therapy. The results of our meta-analysis indicate that Cilo significantly improves overall stroke and hemorrhagic stroke in IS or TIA patients and reduces fatal stroke, but with low statistical significance. Our results also show that Cilo was significantly more efficient than other therapies in Asian patients; therefore, future trials should focus on Cilo treatment for secondary prevention of recurrent stroke in non-Asian patients.

  17. [Stroke from the Perspective of Neurologists (Part 3): Update in the Secondary Prevention].

    PubMed

    Schur, Patrick; Luft, Andreas

    2016-05-25

    In this third edition the secondary prevention of stroke will be discussed. After the acute phase in which recanalization of an occluded brain artery is in the focus, the risks for a recurrent stroke have to be minimized and rehabilitation should be started. A systematic workup, an extended evaluation of (non-) modifiable risk factors and the clinical-radiological findings are the source of an effective preventive therapy. Risk assessment of the major risk factors such as arterial hypertension, atrial fibrillation, diabetes and dyslipidemia is established. The obstructive sleep apnea syndrome and the complex atheromatosis with a complex structure are independent risk factors for stroke. The search for an etiology is usually a definition of probabilities. The most probable cause of stroke is assumed. PMID:27223418

  18. Systems pharmacology dissection of multi-scale mechanisms of action for herbal medicines in stroke treatment and prevention.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jingxiao; Li, Yan; Chen, Xuetong; Pan, Yanqiu; Zhang, Shuwei; Wang, Yonghua

    2014-01-01

    Annually, tens of millions of first-ever strokes occur in the world; however, currently there is lack of effective and widely applicable pharmacological treatments for stroke patients. Herbal medicines, characterized as multi-constituent, multi-target and multi-effect, have been acknowledged with conspicuous effects in treating stroke, and attract extensive interest of researchers although the mechanism of action is yet unclear. In this work, we introduce an innovative systems-pharmacology method that combines pharmacokinetic prescreening, target fishing and network analysis to decipher the mechanisms of action of 10 herbal medicines like Salvia miltiorrhizae, Ginkgo biloba and Ephedrae herba which are efficient in stroke treatment and prevention. Our systematic analysis results display that, in these anti-stroke herbal medicines, 168 out of 1285 constituents with the favorable pharmacokinetic profiles might be implicated in stroke therapy, and the systematic use of these compounds probably acts through multiple mechanisms to synergistically benefit patients with stroke, which can roughly be classified as preventing ischemic inflammatory response, scavenging free radicals and inhibiting neuronal apoptosis against ischemic cerebral damage, as well as exhibiting lipid-lowering, anti-diabetic, anti-thrombotic and antiplatelet effects to decrease recurrent strokes. Relying on systems biology-based analysis, we speculate that herbal medicines, being characterized as the classical combination therapies, might be not only engaged in multiple mechanisms of action to synergistically improve the stroke outcomes, but also might be participated in reducing the risk factors for recurrent strokes.

  19. Systems Pharmacology Dissection of Multi-Scale Mechanisms of Action for Herbal Medicines in Stroke Treatment and Prevention

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jingxiao; Li, Yan; Chen, Xuetong; Pan, Yanqiu; Zhang, Shuwei; Wang, Yonghua

    2014-01-01

    Annually, tens of millions of first-ever strokes occur in the world; however, currently there is lack of effective and widely applicable pharmacological treatments for stroke patients. Herbal medicines, characterized as multi-constituent, multi-target and multi-effect, have been acknowledged with conspicuous effects in treating stroke, and attract extensive interest of researchers although the mechanism of action is yet unclear. In this work, we introduce an innovative systems-pharmacology method that combines pharmacokinetic prescreening, target fishing and network analysis to decipher the mechanisms of action of 10 herbal medicines like Salvia miltiorrhizae, Ginkgo biloba and Ephedrae herba which are efficient in stroke treatment and prevention. Our systematic analysis results display that, in these anti-stroke herbal medicines, 168 out of 1285 constituents with the favorable pharmacokinetic profiles might be implicated in stroke therapy, and the systematic use of these compounds probably acts through multiple mechanisms to synergistically benefit patients with stroke, which can roughly be classified as preventing ischemic inflammatory response, scavenging free radicals and inhibiting neuronal apoptosis against ischemic cerebral damage, as well as exhibiting lipid-lowering, anti-diabetic, anti-thrombotic and antiplatelet effects to decrease recurrent strokes. Relying on systems biology-based analysis, we speculate that herbal medicines, being characterized as the classical combination therapies, might be not only engaged in multiple mechanisms of action to synergistically improve the stroke outcomes, but also might be participated in reducing the risk factors for recurrent strokes. PMID:25093322

  20. [Experience of stroke prevention-Enlightenment for cancer research].

    PubMed

    You, Weicheng

    2015-08-01

    Cancer, stroke and heart diseases are most common causes of death. This paper summarized the experience of stroke prevention, which is an enlightenment for cancer research. In addition, this paper also described the progress of cancer epidemiological research, particular the primary and second preventions in China.

  1. [Experience of stroke prevention-Enlightenment for cancer research].

    PubMed

    You, Weicheng

    2015-08-01

    Cancer, stroke and heart diseases are most common causes of death. This paper summarized the experience of stroke prevention, which is an enlightenment for cancer research. In addition, this paper also described the progress of cancer epidemiological research, particular the primary and second preventions in China. PMID:26733022

  2. Emerging Tools for Stroke Prevention in Atrial Fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Voukalis, Christos; Lip, Gregory Y H; Shantsila, Eduard

    2016-02-01

    Ischaemic strokes resulting from atrial fibrillation (AF) constitute a devastating condition for patients and their carers with huge burden on health care systems. Prophylactic treatment against systemic embolization and ischaemic strokes is the cornerstone for the management of AF. Effective stroke prevention requires the use of the vitamin K antagonists or non-vitamin K oral anticoagulants (NOACs). This article summarises the latest developments in the field of stroke prevention in AF and aims to assist physicians with the choice of oral anticoagulant for patients with non-valvular AF with different risk factor profile. PMID:26981569

  3. Emerging Tools for Stroke Prevention in Atrial Fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    Voukalis, Christos; Lip, Gregory Y.H.; Shantsila, Eduard

    2016-01-01

    Ischaemic strokes resulting from atrial fibrillation (AF) constitute a devastating condition for patients and their carers with huge burden on health care systems. Prophylactic treatment against systemic embolization and ischaemic strokes is the cornerstone for the management of AF. Effective stroke prevention requires the use of the vitamin K antagonists or non-vitamin K oral anticoagulants (NOACs). This article summarises the latest developments in the field of stroke prevention in AF and aims to assist physicians with the choice of oral anticoagulant for patients with non-valvular AF with different risk factor profile. PMID:26981569

  4. Primary prevention of stroke: blood pressure, lipids, and heart failure.

    PubMed

    Endres, Matthias; Heuschmann, Peter U; Laufs, Ulrich; Hakim, Antoine M

    2011-03-01

    Stroke contributes significantly to morbidity, mortality, and disability worldwide. Despite the successes accomplished in the acute treatment and rehabilitation of stroke, the global burden of this disease can only be tackled with co-ordinated approaches for primary prevention. Stroke is a heterogeneous disease and the contribution of individual risk factors to its occurrence estimated by population attributable risk differs from coronary heart disease. Here, we review evidence to demonstrate the prominent role of elevated blood pressure (BP) and heart disease on risk of stroke, while the influence of lipids on stroke is less clear; we also demonstrate that stroke is an important complication of heart failure. Current approaches to primary preventive action emphasize the need to target the absolute risk of cardiovascular diseases rather than individual risk factors. Lifestyle interventions serve as a basis for primary prevention of cardiovascular diseases. It is estimated that 70% of strokes are potentially preventable by lifestyle modification but prospective evidence is needed to support these hypotheses derived from epidemiological studies. Different strategies for drug interventions in primary prevention are discussed, including the polypill strategy. Additional measures are needed for the primary prevention of stroke which focus on BP, chronic heart failure, and possibly lipids.

  5. Recurrence of spinal schwannoma: Is it preventable?

    PubMed Central

    Senapati, Satya B.; Mishra, Sudhansu S.; Dhir, Manmath K.; Patnaik, Ashis; Panigrahi, Souvagya

    2016-01-01

    Spinal schwannomas account for about 25% of primary intradural spinal cord tumors in adult. The prognosis for spinal schwannomas is excellent in most cases. Complete resection is curative. However following subtotal removal, recurrence develops after several years. We describe a case of recurrent spinal schwannoma who had been operated twice before for same disease. The possible cause of recurrence and difficulties in reoperation are discussed.

  6. Recurrence of spinal schwannoma: Is it preventable?

    PubMed Central

    Senapati, Satya B.; Mishra, Sudhansu S.; Dhir, Manmath K.; Patnaik, Ashis; Panigrahi, Souvagya

    2016-01-01

    Spinal schwannomas account for about 25% of primary intradural spinal cord tumors in adult. The prognosis for spinal schwannomas is excellent in most cases. Complete resection is curative. However following subtotal removal, recurrence develops after several years. We describe a case of recurrent spinal schwannoma who had been operated twice before for same disease. The possible cause of recurrence and difficulties in reoperation are discussed. PMID:27695564

  7. Aspirin to prevent heart attack and stroke: what's the right dose?

    PubMed

    Dalen, James E

    2006-03-01

    Despite hundreds of clinical trials, the appropriate dose of aspirin to prevent myocardial infarction (MI) and stroke is uncertain. In the US, the doses most frequently recommended are 80, 160, or 325 mg per day. Because aspirin can cause major bleeding, the appropriate dose is the lowest dose that is effective in preventing both MI and stroke because these two diseases frequently co-exist. Five randomized clinical trials have compared aspirin with placebo or no therapy for the prevention of stroke and MI. These trials varied with regard to the dose of aspirin, the duration of treatment, and, most important, the populations selected for study varied in their baseline risk of stroke and MI. In men, 160 mg/day consistently lowered the risk of MI. In women, doses of 50 mg, 75, and 100 mg/day did not significantly decrease the risk of MI; therefore, the appropriate dose in women must exceed 100 mg/day. The appropriate dose for the primary prevention of stroke in men and women has not been established. Doses of 75 and 100 mg/day have been ineffective in men and women. The appropriate dose must be at least 160 mg/day. The lowest dose to prevent recurrent MI or death in patients with stable coronary artery disease (CAD) is 75 mg/day. In acute MI the lowest dose is 160 mg/day. In patients with a history of stroke or transient ischemic attack (TIA), 50 mg/day has been shown to be effective in men and women. In acute stroke, 160 mg/day is effective in preventing recurrent stroke or death. The risk of major bleeding with 160 mg/day is the same as with 80 mg/day: 1 to 2 cases per 1000 patient years of treatment, and the risk of fatal bleeding is the same with 80 and 160 mg/day. These studies indicate that the most appropriate dose for the primary and secondary prevention of stroke and MI is 160 mg/day.

  8. Recurrent Embolic Strokes of Undetermined Source in a Patient with Extreme Lipoprotein(a) Levels

    PubMed Central

    Bulwa, Zachary; Kim, Audrey; Singh, Karandeep; Kantorovich, Alexander; Suhail, Faten

    2016-01-01

    Lipoprotein(a) is a plasma lipoprotein and known cardiovascular risk factor, most recently implicated in the development of high-risk carotid atherosclerotic plaques without significant carotid stenosis. We present a case of a young African-American female with recurrent embolic strokes of undetermined source. After our thorough investigation, we identified the link between a small, irregular plaque in the right internal carotid artery, and an extremely elevated plasma level of lipoprotein(a) as the source of her embolic strokes.

  9. Functional gain following rehabilitation of recurrent ischemic stroke in the elderly: experience of a post-acute care rehabilitation setting.

    PubMed

    Mizrahi, E H; Fleissig, Y; Arad, M; Adunsky, A

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate whether rehabilitation of patients with recurrent ischemic strokes is associated with functional gain. We studied a total of 919 consecutive post-acute ischemic stroke elderly patients admitted for rehabilitation. 22% out of the patients had recurrent stroke on index day. Functional outcomes of first-ever stroke patients and recurrent ischemic stroke patients were assessed by the Functional Independence Measurement scale (FIM™) at admission and discharge. Data was analyzed by t-test, Chi-square test and by multiple linear regression analysis. There were 716 patients with first ever stroke and 203 patients with recurrent stroke. Total and motor FIM scores at admission and total, motor, gain and Montebello Rehabilitation Factor (RFG) FIM scores at discharge were similar in the two groups. A multiple linear regression analysis showed that age (beta=-0.13, p=0.001) length of stay (beta=0.21, p<0.001), Mini-Mental State Examination score (MMSE) (beta=0.1, p=0.01), and admission total FIM (beta=-0.12, p=0.01) emerged as the only independent predictors of higher gain FIM scores at discharge. The finding suggests that elderly patients with recurrent ischemic stroke admitted to rehabilitation ward, showed similar FIM gain scores at discharge, compared with first-ever stroke patients. It is concluded that recurrent stroke should not be considered as adversely affecting the short-term functional outcomes of patients in a post-acute rehabilitation setting.

  10. [Percutaneous closure of the left atrial appendage for stroke prevention].

    PubMed

    Loupis, Anastasia M; Backer, Ole De; Ihlemann, Nikolaj; Rosenberg, Tine S; Franzen, Olaf W; Søndergaard, Lars

    2014-09-15

    In patients with atrial fibrillation (AF) and increased risk of stroke, oral anticoagulation (OAC) is the standard treatment for stroke prevention - however, this therapy also carries a high risk of bleeding. Percutaneous closure of the left atrial appendage (LAA) has been suggested to be an alternative option for stroke prevention in AF patients with contraindication(s) for OAC treatment. In this paper, we discuss the rationale for LAA closure, the importance of a proper patient selection, as well as some pre- and post-procedural issues.

  11. Haemostatic biomarkers are associated with long-term recurrent vascular events after ischaemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Pedersen, Annie; Redfors, Petra; Lundberg, Linnea; Gils, Ann; Declerck, Paul J; Nilsson, Staffan; Jood, Katarina; Jern, Christina

    2016-08-30

    Ischaemic stroke patients continue to be at risk for recurrent vascular events for many years. Predictors of long-term prognosis are needed. It was the objective of this study to investigate levels of four haemostatic proteins as long-term predictors of recurrent vascular events after ischaemic stroke. We prospectively followed 548 ischaemic stroke patients, 18-69 years, and registered recurrent vascular events. Plasma levels of tissue-type plasminogen activator (t-PA), von Willebrand factor (VWF), fibrinogen and thrombin activatable fibrinolysis inhibitor activation peptide (TAFI-AP) were measured three months after index stroke. Cox regression models were used to assess associations to outcomes for single biomarkers and for a combined biomarker measure. For single biomarkers significantly associated with any of the outcomes, we performed subanalyses stratified for age, sex, diabetes and atherosclerosis. During 5,637 person-years of follow-up, we registered 74 vascular deaths, 90 recurrent strokes and 62 coronary events. Levels of t-PA, VWF and fibrinogen were significantly associated with vascular death and coronary events. After adjustment, the association between t-PA and vascular death remained (HR per 1 SD increase in plasma level 1.27, 95 % CI 1.00-1.61, p=0.047). The combined effect of t-PA, VWF and fibrinogen was associated with coronary events (adjusted HR 1.35, 1.02-1.80, p=0.04). In non-diabetic patients, an association with coronary events was seen for VWF levels (adjusted HR 2.23, 1.45-3.43, p<0.01). In conclusion, plasma levels of haemostatic factors were associated with vascular death and coronary events, but not with recurrent stroke. Our results suggest that the predictive value of biomarkers differ by specific outcome measure and subgroup of patients.

  12. Diabetes - preventing heart attack and stroke

    MedlinePlus

    Diabetes complications - heart; Coronary artery disease - diabetes; CAD - diabetes; Cerebrovascular disease - diabetes ... People with diabetes have a higher chance of having heart attacks and strokes. Smoking and having high blood pressure and high ...

  13. Apixaban for the prevention of stroke in atrial fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Littrell, Rachel; Flaker, Greg

    2012-02-01

    Until recently, pharmaceutical options for stroke prevention in atrial fibrillation were restricted to aspirin or vitamin K antagonist therapy. In recent years development has been underway for alternatives. Apixaban, a direct Factor Xa inhibitor, is orally dosed, target selective and has few known drug or food interactions. As such, it is a member of a new generation of anticoagulants expected to revolutionize the way we approach anticoagulation for stroke prevention in atrial fibrillation. Apixaban has been studied in Phase II and Phase III trials for a variety of indications. The AVERROES trial established apixaban as superior to aspirin for stroke reduction in patients with atrial fibrillation for whom vitamin K antagonist therapy is unsuitable. The recent ARISTOTLE trial found apixaban to be superior to warfarin for stroke prevention in a wide range of patients with atrial fibrillation, with significantly lower bleeding risk, and lower risk of all-cause mortality. PMID:22292869

  14. Homozygous MTHFR C677T gene mutation and recurrent stroke in an infant.

    PubMed

    Garoufi, Anastasia J; Prassouli, Alexia A; Attilakos, Achilleas V; Voudris, Konstantinos A; Katsarou, Eustathia S

    2006-07-01

    The role of homozygosity for the C677T mutation in the 5,10-methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) gene as an independent risk factor for primary and recurrent stroke has been questioned, although recent data appear to be supportive. However, the association of homozygous C677T MTHFR mutation with silent brain infarctions in infancy has not been reported. The authors describe an 11-month-old male who had suffered a silent brain infarction followed by a symptomatic arterial stroke. The evaluation revealed mildly elevated homocysteine levels secondary to homozygous C677T alleles for MTHFR and iron deficiency anemia. An extensive evaluation for other causes of infarction was negative. We suggest that the mother's homozygous MTHFR status played a role in the early onset of stroke and that iron deficiency anemia may have contributed to the recurrence. The patient was treated with anticoagulation therapy, folic acid, and iron supplementation and has not had a recurrent event during 3 years of follow-up. This case provides further evidence that homozygous MTHFR mutation is a predisposing factor for early and recurrent pediatric stroke, including silent infarcts, especially in the presence of other risk factors. PMID:16814086

  15. Pioglitazone for Secondary Prevention after Ischemic Stroke and Transient Ischemic Attack: Rationale and Design of the Insulin Resistance Intervention after Stroke (IRIS) Trial

    PubMed Central

    Viscoli, Catherine M.; Brass, Lawrence M.; Carolei, Antonio; Conwit, Robin; Ford, Gary A.; Furie, Karen L.; Gorman, Mark; Guarino, Peter D.; Inzucchi, Silvio E.; Lovejoy, Anne M.; Parsons, Mark W.; Peduzzi, Peter N.; Ringleb, Peter; Schwartz, Gregory G.; Spence, J. David; Tanne, David; Young, Lawrence H.; Kernan, Walter N.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Recurrent vascular events remain a major source of morbidity and mortality after stroke or transient ischemic attack (TIA). The Insulin Resistance Intervention after Stroke (IRIS) trial is evaluating an approach to secondary prevention based on the established association between insulin resistance and increased risk for ischemic vascular events. Specifically, IRIS will test the effectiveness of pioglitazone, an insulin-sensitizing drug of the thiazolidinedione class, for reducing the risk for stroke and myocardial infarction (MI) among insulin resistant, non-diabetic patients with a recent ischemic stroke or TIA. Design: Eligible patients for IRIS must have had insulin resistance defined by a Homeostasis Model Assessment-Insulin Resistance greater than 3.0 without meeting criteria for diabetes. Within 6 months of the index stroke or TIA, patients were randomly assigned to pioglitazone (titrated from 15mg to 45mg/day) or matching placebo and followed for up to 5 years. The primary outcome is time to stroke or MI. Secondary outcomes include time to stroke alone, acute coronary syndrome, diabetes, cognitive decline and all-cause mortality. Enrollment of 3876 participants from 179 sites in seven countries was completed in January, 2013. Participant follow-up will continue until July, 2015. Summary: The IRIS Trial will determine whether treatment with pioglitazone improves cardiovascular outcomes of non-diabetic, insulin-resistant patients with stroke or TIA. Results are expected in early 2016. PMID:25458644

  16. [Management of blood pressure for stroke prevention].

    PubMed

    Tanahashi, Norio

    2016-04-01

    Hypertension is a major risk factor for both cerebral infarction and intracerebral hemorrhage. The relationship between blood pressure (BP) and stroke risk is strong and continuous. Throughout the usual range of BPs, including the nonhypertensive range, the higher the BP is, the greater the risk of stroke. Regular BP screening and appropriate treatment of patients with hypertension, including life style modification and pharmacotherapy, are recommended. Patients who have hypertension should be treated with antihypertensive drugs to a target BP of < 140/90 mmHg. Successful reduction of BP is more important in reducing stroke risk than the choice of a specific agent, and treatment should be individualized on the basis of other patient characteristics and medication tolerance. In hypertensive patients with stroke, subjects to be treated with antihypertensive drugs and the target level of BP control are determined on the basis of clinical disease type, interval after onset, severity, age, and the use of antithrombotic. drugs. According to the guideline of the Japanese Society of Hypertension (JSH 2014), in the chronic phase of cerebral infarction, cerebral hemorrhage and subarachnoid hemorrhage, target BP should be < 140/ 90 mmHg. In patients with lacunar infarction, those taking antithrombotic drugs, cerebral hemorrhage and subarachnoid hemorrhage, a lower level, < 130/80 mmHg should be targeted if possible. Oral antihypertensive drugs such as Ca channel blockers, angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, angiotensin II receptor blockers and diuretics are recommended for patients with stroke. PMID:27333760

  17. Barriers to medication adherence for the secondary prevention of stroke: a qualitative interview study in primary care

    PubMed Central

    Jamison, James; Graffy, Jonathan; Mullis, Ricky; Mant, Jonathan; Sutton, Stephen

    2016-01-01

    Background Medications are highly effective at reducing risk of recurrent stroke, but success is influenced by adherence to treatment. Among survivors of stroke and transient ischaemic attack (TIA), adherence to medication is known to be suboptimal. Aim To identify and report barriers to medication adherence for the secondary prevention of stroke/TIA. Design and setting A qualitative interview study was conducted within general practice surgeries in the East of England, UK. Method Patients were approached by letter and invited to take part in a qualitative research study. Semi-structured interviews were undertaken with survivors of stroke, caregivers, and GPs to explore their perspectives and views around secondary prevention and perceived barriers to medication adherence. Key themes were identified using a grounded theory approach. Verbatim quotes describing the themes are presented here. Results In total, 28 survivors of stroke, including 14 accompanying caregivers and five GPs, were interviewed. Two key themes were identified. Patient level barriers included ability to self-care, the importance people attach to a stroke event, and knowledge of stroke and medication. Medication level barriers included beliefs about medication and beliefs about how pills work, medication routines, changing medications, and regimen complexity and burden of treatment. Conclusion Patients who have had a stroke are faced with multiple barriers to taking secondary prevention medications in UK general practice. This research suggests that a collaborative approach between caregivers, survivors, and healthcare professionals is needed to address these barriers and facilitate medication-taking behaviour. PMID:27215572

  18. Can aspirin prevent gallstone recurrence after successful extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy?

    PubMed

    Adamek, H E; Buttmann, A; Weber, J; Riemann, J F

    1994-04-01

    Extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy (ESWL) is a feasible procedure for the treatment of gallbladder stones in humans. Well-selected patients can achieve stone-free rates in a high percentage. With the gallbladder in situ, these patients are at risk of stone recurrence. There is considerable evidence that aspirin prevents cholesterol gallstone formation in animal models and may prevent gallstone recurrence in man. We attempted to clarify the risk of gallstone recurrence after successful piezoelectric lithotripsy in patients taking either low-dose aspirin or no medication. The first 45 patients shown to be completely free from stones after ESWL were randomized into two groups. One group received 100 mg aspirin daily; the other group did not receive any further medical therapy. Patients were further examined on an average of 19.6 months and 21.9 months, respectively. In the aspirin group the recurrence rate was 18.2%, whereas 21.7% of the patients in the control group developed recurrent stones. Seventy-eight per cent of these patients also had a recurrence of biliary pain. By life-table analysis we had, after a follow-up period of 24 months, a stone recurrence rate of 25% (+/- 11) in the aspirin group and 34% (+/- 14) in the control group. Our results indicate that recurrence prophylaxis remains one of the central questions in ESWL. In this preliminary study, 100 mg of aspirin daily was not able to reduce the recurrence rate after successful ESWL. Further studies will have to show whether higher doses of aspirin or other ways of preventing gallstone after ESWL are possible.

  19. Recurrent Embolic Strokes of Undetermined Source in a Patient with Extreme Lipoprotein(a) Levels.

    PubMed

    Bulwa, Zachary; Kim, Audrey; Singh, Karandeep; Kantorovich, Alexander; Suhail, Faten

    2016-01-01

    Lipoprotein(a) is a plasma lipoprotein and known cardiovascular risk factor, most recently implicated in the development of high-risk carotid atherosclerotic plaques without significant carotid stenosis. We present a case of a young African-American female with recurrent embolic strokes of undetermined source. After our thorough investigation, we identified the link between a small, irregular plaque in the right internal carotid artery, and an extremely elevated plasma level of lipoprotein(a) as the source of her embolic strokes. PMID:27630613

  20. Recurrent Embolic Strokes of Undetermined Source in a Patient with Extreme Lipoprotein(a) Levels

    PubMed Central

    Bulwa, Zachary; Kim, Audrey; Singh, Karandeep; Kantorovich, Alexander; Suhail, Faten

    2016-01-01

    Lipoprotein(a) is a plasma lipoprotein and known cardiovascular risk factor, most recently implicated in the development of high-risk carotid atherosclerotic plaques without significant carotid stenosis. We present a case of a young African-American female with recurrent embolic strokes of undetermined source. After our thorough investigation, we identified the link between a small, irregular plaque in the right internal carotid artery, and an extremely elevated plasma level of lipoprotein(a) as the source of her embolic strokes. PMID:27630613

  1. Evaluation of the possible impact of a care network for stroke and transient ischemic attack on rates of recurrence.

    PubMed

    Raffe, Florie; Jacquin, Agnès; Milleret, Olivier; Durier, Jérôme; Sauze, Damien; Peyron, Christine; Osseby, Guy Victor; Menassa, Michaël; Hervieu, Marie; Pelissier, Fanny; Routhier, Pierre; Beis, Jean-Noel; Giroud, Maurice; Béjot, Yannick

    2011-01-01

    We aimed to demonstrate that a stroke network is able to reduce the proportion of recurrent cerebrovascular events. In 2003, we set up a care network with the aim to reduce the proportion of stroke recurrence. For the statistical analysis, recurrent cerebrovascular events observed from 1985 to 2002 within the population of Dijon made it possible to model trends using Poisson logistic regression. From 1985 to 2002, we recorded 172 recurrent cerebrovascular events which were used to model trends before the creation of the care network. Within the period 2003-2007, we observed 162 recurrent cerebrovascular events compared with 196.7 expected cerebrovascular events with a significant standardized incidence rate of 0.82 (0.70-0.96; p = 0.01). After eliminating the role of some environmental factors, the possible hypothesis for the fall in recurrent stokes is probably the positive effect of the stroke care network.

  2. Orthopantomography contribution to prevent isquemic stroke

    PubMed Central

    Chimenos-Küstner, Eduardo; López-López, osé

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: The ortopantomography (OPG) can be a valuable way for an early detection of calcified atheroma plaques, thus contributing for a preliminary stroke risk evaluation. The study looks for the existence of calcified atheroma plates through the use of OPG, comparing the results with the stenosis percentage found through eco-doppler. It has been analyzed the correlation of the number of years as a smoker, arterial hypertension and body mass index, against the risk of having calcified atheroma plaques. Study Design: Observational, transversal and prospective study with 84 patients from the Dental Center of Hospital Particular de Lisboa. First the patients answered to an inquiry and them they were submitted to an OPG and an eco-doppler. Results and Conclusions: It is possible to detect calcified atheroma plaques in the carotid artery through an OPG and patients who have them have got a fifteen fold greater risk of suffering from carotid stenosis. In this study, it has been confirmed the increase in carotid stenosis for long term smokers (OR = 1,033, n=18, 42,9%). The study results show that hypertension patients have a probability 5,426 greater than normal of developing atheroma plaques (with sig=0,049). Amid analyzed patients, the correlation between obesity and the existence of carotid atheroma plaques was significant, although negative (sig=0,047). OPG can help find patients with higher risk of isquemic stroke. Key words:Orthopantomography, Stroke, Carotid disease, Calcified atheroma. PMID:24790711

  3. Addressing Disparities in Stroke Prevention for Atrial Fibrillation: Educational Opportunities.

    PubMed

    Karcher, Rachel; Berman, Adam E; Gross, Hartmut; Hess, David C; Jauch, Edward C; Viser, Paul E; Solenski, Nina J; Wolf, Andrew M D

    2016-07-01

    Disparities in atrial fibrillation (AF)-related stroke and mortality persist, especially racial disparities, within the US "Stroke Belt." This study identified barriers to optimal stroke prevention to develop a framework for clinician education. A comprehensive educational needs assessment was developed focusing on clinicians within the Stroke Belt. The mixed qualitative-quantitative approach included regional surveys and one-on-one clinician interviews. Identified contributors to disparities included implicit racial biases, lack of awareness of racial disparities in AF stroke risk, and lack of effective multicultural awareness and training. Additional barriers affecting disparities included patient medical mistrust and clinician-patient communication challenges. General barriers included lack of consistency in assessing stroke and anticoagulant-related bleeding risk, underuse of standardized risk assessment tools, discomfort with novel anticoagulants, and patient education deficiencies. Effective cultural competency training is one strategy to reduce disparities in AF-related stroke and mortality by improving implicit clinician bias, addressing medical mistrust, and improving clinician-patient communication. PMID:25788477

  4. Addressing Disparities in Stroke Prevention for Atrial Fibrillation: Educational Opportunities.

    PubMed

    Karcher, Rachel; Berman, Adam E; Gross, Hartmut; Hess, David C; Jauch, Edward C; Viser, Paul E; Solenski, Nina J; Wolf, Andrew M D

    2016-07-01

    Disparities in atrial fibrillation (AF)-related stroke and mortality persist, especially racial disparities, within the US "Stroke Belt." This study identified barriers to optimal stroke prevention to develop a framework for clinician education. A comprehensive educational needs assessment was developed focusing on clinicians within the Stroke Belt. The mixed qualitative-quantitative approach included regional surveys and one-on-one clinician interviews. Identified contributors to disparities included implicit racial biases, lack of awareness of racial disparities in AF stroke risk, and lack of effective multicultural awareness and training. Additional barriers affecting disparities included patient medical mistrust and clinician-patient communication challenges. General barriers included lack of consistency in assessing stroke and anticoagulant-related bleeding risk, underuse of standardized risk assessment tools, discomfort with novel anticoagulants, and patient education deficiencies. Effective cultural competency training is one strategy to reduce disparities in AF-related stroke and mortality by improving implicit clinician bias, addressing medical mistrust, and improving clinician-patient communication.

  5. Canadian Stroke Best Practice Recommendations: secondary prevention of stroke guidelines, update 2014.

    PubMed

    Coutts, Shelagh B; Wein, Theodore H; Lindsay, M Patrice; Buck, Brian; Cote, Robert; Ellis, Paul; Foley, Norine; Hill, Michael D; Jaspers, Sharon; Jin, Albert Y; Kwiatkowski, Brenda; MacPhail, Carolyn; McNamara-Morse, Dana; McMurtry, Michael S; Mysak, Tania; Pipe, Andrew; Silver, Karen; Smith, Eric E; Gubitz, Gord

    2015-04-01

    Every year, approximately 62,000 people with stroke and transient ischemic attack are treated in Canadian hospitals. The 2014 update of the Canadian Secondary Prevention of Stroke guideline is a comprehensive summary of current evidence-based recommendations for clinicians in a range of settings, who provide care to patients following stroke. Notable changes in this 5th edition include an emphasis on treating the highest risk patients who present within 48 h of symptom onset with transient or persistent motor or speech symptoms, who need to be transported to the closest emergency department with capacity for advanced stroke care; a recommendation for brain and vascular imaging (of the intra- and extracranial vessels) to be completed urgently using computed tomography/computed tomography angiography; prolonged cardiac monitoring for patients with suspective cardioembolic stroke but without evidence for atrial fibrillation on electrocardiogram or holter monitoring; and de-emphasizing the need for routine echocardiogram. The Canadian Stroke Best Practice Recommendations include a range of supporting materials such as implementation resources to facilitate the adoption of evidence to practice, and related performance measures to enable monitoring of uptake and effectiveness of the recommendations using a standardized approach. The guidelines further emphasize the need for a systems approach to stroke care, involving an interprofessional team, with access to specialists regardless of patient location, and the need to overcome geographical barriers to ensure equity in access within a universal health-care system. PMID:25535808

  6. Canadian Stroke Best Practice Recommendations: secondary prevention of stroke guidelines, update 2014.

    PubMed

    Coutts, Shelagh B; Wein, Theodore H; Lindsay, M Patrice; Buck, Brian; Cote, Robert; Ellis, Paul; Foley, Norine; Hill, Michael D; Jaspers, Sharon; Jin, Albert Y; Kwiatkowski, Brenda; MacPhail, Carolyn; McNamara-Morse, Dana; McMurtry, Michael S; Mysak, Tania; Pipe, Andrew; Silver, Karen; Smith, Eric E; Gubitz, Gord

    2015-04-01

    Every year, approximately 62,000 people with stroke and transient ischemic attack are treated in Canadian hospitals. The 2014 update of the Canadian Secondary Prevention of Stroke guideline is a comprehensive summary of current evidence-based recommendations for clinicians in a range of settings, who provide care to patients following stroke. Notable changes in this 5th edition include an emphasis on treating the highest risk patients who present within 48 h of symptom onset with transient or persistent motor or speech symptoms, who need to be transported to the closest emergency department with capacity for advanced stroke care; a recommendation for brain and vascular imaging (of the intra- and extracranial vessels) to be completed urgently using computed tomography/computed tomography angiography; prolonged cardiac monitoring for patients with suspective cardioembolic stroke but without evidence for atrial fibrillation on electrocardiogram or holter monitoring; and de-emphasizing the need for routine echocardiogram. The Canadian Stroke Best Practice Recommendations include a range of supporting materials such as implementation resources to facilitate the adoption of evidence to practice, and related performance measures to enable monitoring of uptake and effectiveness of the recommendations using a standardized approach. The guidelines further emphasize the need for a systems approach to stroke care, involving an interprofessional team, with access to specialists regardless of patient location, and the need to overcome geographical barriers to ensure equity in access within a universal health-care system.

  7. Novel oral anticoagulants in secondary prevention of stroke.

    PubMed

    Diener, H C; Easton, J D; Hankey, G J; Hart, R G

    2013-06-01

    In patients with atrial fibrillation (AF) oral anticoagulation with vitamin-K antagonists (warfarin, phenprocoumon) is effective both for primary and secondary stroke prevention yielding a 60-70% relative reduction in stroke risk compared with placebo, as well as a mortality reduction of 26 percent. Vitamin-K antagonists have a number of well documented shortcomings. Recently the results of randomised trials for three new oral anticoagulants that do not exhibit the limitations of vitamin-K antagonists have been published. These include direct factor Xa inhibitors (rivaroxaban and apixaban) and a direct thrombin inhibitor (dabigatran). The studies (RE-LY, ROCKET-AF, ARISTOTLE, AVERROES) provide promising results for the new agents, including higher efficacy and a significantly lower incidence of intracranial bleeds compared with warfarin or aspirin. The new drugs show similar results in secondary as well as in primary stroke prevention in patients with AF. Apixaban was demonstrated to be clearly superior to aspirin and had the same rate of major bleeding complications. Meta-analyses show that the novel anticoagulants are superior to warfarin for the reduction of stroke, major bleeding and intracranial bleeds. New anticoagulants add to the therapeutic options for patients with AF, and offer a number of advantages over warfarin, for both the clinician and patient, including a favorable bleeding profile and convenience of use. Aspirin is no longer an option in secondary stroke prevention in patients with atrial fibrillation. Consideration of these new anticoagulants will improve clinical decision making. PMID:23953901

  8. Glycated Hemoglobin Independently Predicts Stroke Recurrence within One Year after Acute First-Ever Non-Cardioembolic Strokes Onset in A Chinese Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Shuolin; Shi, Yuzhi; Wang, Chunxue; Jia, Qian; Zhang, Ning; Zhao, Xingquan; Liu, Gaifen; Wang, Yilong; Liu, Liping; Wang, Yongjun

    2013-01-01

    Objective Hyperglycemia is related to stroke. Glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) can reflect pre-stroke glycaemia status. However, the information on the direct association between HbA1c and recurrence after non-cardioembolic acute ischemic strokes is rare and there is no consistent conclusion. Methods The ACROSS-China database comprised of 2186 consecutive first-ever acute ischemic stroke patients with baseline HbA1c values. After excluding patients who died from non-stroke recurrence and patients lost to follow up, 1817 and 1540 were eligible for 3-month and 1-year analyses, respectively. Multivariate Cox regression was performed to evaluate the associations between HbA1c and 3-month and 1-year stroke recurrence. Results The HbA1c values at admission were divided into 4 levels by quartiles: Q1 (<5.5%); Q2 (5.5 to <6.1%); Q3 (6.1% to <7.2%); and Q4 (≥7.2%). The cumulative recurrence rates were 8.3% and 11.0% for 3 months and 1 year, respectively. In multivariate analyses, when compared with Q1, the adjusted hazard ratios (AHRs) were 2.83 (95% confidence interval (CI) 1.28-6.26) in Q3 and 3.71(95% CI 1.68-8.21) in Q4 for 3-month stroke recurrence; 3.30 (95% CI 1.31-8.34) in Q3 and 3.35 (95% CI 1.36-8.21) in Q4 for 1-year stroke recurrence. Adding fasting plasma glucose in the multivariate analyses did not modify the association: AHRs were 2.75 (95% CI 1.24-6.11) in Q3 and 3.67 (95% CI 1.59-8.53) in Q4 for 3-month analysis; AHRs were 3.08 (95% CI 1.10-8.64) in Q3 and 3.31(95% CI 1.35-8.14) in Q4 for 1-year analysis. Conclusions A higher “normal” HbA1c level reflecting pre-stroke glycaemia status independently predicts stroke recurrence within one year after non-cardioembolic acute ischemic stroke onset. HbA1c is recommended as a routine test in acute ischemic stroke patients. PMID:24236195

  9. Inhibition of Cyclooxygenase-2 Prevents Chronic and Recurrent Cystitis

    PubMed Central

    Hannan, Thomas J.; Roberts, Pacita L.; Riehl, Terrence E.; van der Post, Sjoerd; Binkley, Jana M.; Schwartz, Drew J.; Miyoshi, Hiroyuki; Mack, Matthias; Schwendener, Reto A.; Hooton, Thomas M.; Stappenbeck, Thaddeus S.; Hansson, Gunnar C.; Stenson, William F.; Colonna, Marco; Stapleton, Ann E.; Hultgren, Scott J.

    2014-01-01

    The spread of multidrug-resistant microorganisms globally has created an urgent need for novel therapeutic strategies to combat urinary tract infections (UTIs). Immunomodulatory therapy may provide benefit, as treatment of mice with dexamethasone during acute UTI improved outcome by reducing the development of chronic cystitis, which predisposes to recurrent infection. Here we discovered soluble biomarkers engaged in myeloid cell development and chemotaxis that were predictive of future UTI recurrence when elevated in the sera of young women with UTI. Translation of these findings revealed that temperance of the neutrophil response early during UTI, and specifically disruption of bladder epithelial transmigration of neutrophils by inhibition of cyclooxygenase-2, protected mice against chronic and recurrent cystitis. Further, proteomics identified bladder epithelial remodeling consequent to chronic infection that enhances sensitivity to neutrophil damage. Thus, cyclooxygenase-2 expression during acute UTI is a critical molecular trigger determining disease outcome and drugs targeting cyclooxygenase-2 could prevent recurrent UTI. PMID:26125048

  10. Guidelines for prevention of stroke in patients with ischemic stroke or transient ischemic attack: a statement for healthcare professionals from the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association Council on Stroke: co-sponsored by the Council on Cardiovascular Radiology and Intervention: the American Academy of Neurology affirms the value of this guideline.

    PubMed

    Sacco, Ralph L; Adams, Robert; Albers, Greg; Alberts, Mark J; Benavente, Oscar; Furie, Karen; Goldstein, Larry B; Gorelick, Philip; Halperin, Jonathan; Harbaugh, Robert; Johnston, S Claiborne; Katzan, Irene; Kelly-Hayes, Margaret; Kenton, Edgar J; Marks, Michael; Schwamm, Lee H; Tomsick, Thomas

    2006-02-01

    The aim of this new statement is to provide comprehensive and timely evidence-based recommendations on the prevention of ischemic stroke among survivors of ischemic stroke or transient ischemic attack. Evidence-based recommendations are included for the control of risk factors, interventional approaches for atherosclerotic disease, antithrombotic treatments for cardioembolism, and the use of antiplatelet agents for noncardioembolic stroke. Further recommendations are provided for the prevention of recurrent stroke in a variety of other specific circumstances, including arterial dissections; patent foramen ovale; hyperhomocysteinemia; hypercoagulable states; sickle cell disease; cerebral venous sinus thrombosis; stroke among women, particularly with regard to pregnancy and the use of postmenopausal hormones; the use of anticoagulation after cerebral hemorrhage; and special approaches for the implementation of guidelines and their use in high-risk populations.

  11. Guidelines for prevention of stroke in patients with ischemic stroke or transient ischemic attack: a statement for healthcare professionals from the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association Council on Stroke: co-sponsored by the Council on Cardiovascular Radiology and Intervention: the American Academy of Neurology affirms the value of this guideline.

    PubMed

    Sacco, Ralph L; Adams, Robert; Albers, Greg; Alberts, Mark J; Benavente, Oscar; Furie, Karen; Goldstein, Larry B; Gorelick, Philip; Halperin, Jonathan; Harbaugh, Robert; Johnston, S Claiborne; Katzan, Irene; Kelly-Hayes, Margaret; Kenton, Edgar J; Marks, Michael; Schwamm, Lee H; Tomsick, Thomas

    2006-03-14

    The aim of this new statement is to provide comprehensive and timely evidence-based recommendations on the prevention of ischemic stroke among survivors of ischemic stroke or transient ischemic attack. Evidence-based recommendations are included for the control of risk factors, interventional approaches for atherosclerotic disease, antithrombotic treatments for cardioembolism, and the use of antiplatelet agents for noncardioembolic stroke. Further recommendations are provided for the prevention of recurrent stroke in a variety of other specific circumstances, including arterial dissections; patent foramen ovale; hyperhomocysteinemia; hypercoagulable states; sickle cell disease; cerebral venous sinus thrombosis; stroke among women, particularly with regard to pregnancy and the use of postmenopausal hormones; the use of anticoagulation after cerebral hemorrhage; and special approaches for the implementation of guidelines and their use in high-risk populations.

  12. Asian strategy for stroke prevention in atrial fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Chiang, Chern-En; Wang, Kang-Ling; Lin, Shing-Jong

    2015-10-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) has become a major health burden in Asia. It is estimated that in year 2050 Asia will have 72 million AF patients, and 2.9 million among them will suffer from AF-associated stroke. Asian AF patients have similar cardiovascular co-morbidities as westerns, and the recently developed CHA2DS2-VASc score remains valid in predicting stroke risk in Asians, outperforming other scoring systems. There is little evidence supporting a role of aspirin in preventing AF-associated stroke in Asians. Warfarin is effective for the prevention of stroke in Asians, but is very difficult to use. Warfarin-induced bleeding events are more common in Asians. Four major clinical trials have been performed to test non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants (NOACs) vs. warfarin in the stroke prevention in AF. Warfarin produced higher risk of major bleeding and intra-cranial haemorrhage in Asians compared with those in non-Asians, even though anticoagulation intensity was lower in Asians. All these trials consistently demonstrated that NOACs were superior or non-inferior to warfarin. The benefits of NOACs were especially robust in Asians. The relative risk reduction in most of the efficacy endpoints and the safety endpoints was numerically greater in Asians than in non-Asians. There was no evidence of increased risk of gastro-intestinal bleeding associated with NOACs in Asians. Unless in a few conditions when NOACs are contraindicated, NOACs are preferred medications in the stroke prevention for AF in Asians. PMID:26842113

  13. [New anticoagulants for stroke prevention in atrial fibrillation].

    PubMed

    Diener, H C; Hajjar, K; Frank, B; Perrey, M

    2012-06-01

    Oral anticoagulation with vitamin K antagonists (warfarin, phenprocoumon) is successful in both primary and secondary stroke prevention for patients with atrial fibrillation (AF), yielding a 60-70% relative reduction in stroke risk compared with placebo and a mortality reduction of 26%. However, these agents have a number of well documented shortcomings. This review describes the current landscape and developments in stroke prevention in patients with AF with special reference to secondary prevention. A number of new drugs for oral anticoagulation that do not exhibit the limitations of vitamin K antagonists are under investigation. These include direct factor Xa inhibitors and direct thrombin inhibitors. Recent studies (RE-LY, ROCKET-AF, AVERROES, ARISTOTLE) provide promising results for these new agents including higher efficacy and significantly lower incidences of intracranial bleeding compared with warfarin. The new substances show similar results in secondary as well as in primary stroke prevention in patients with AF. The new anticoagulants add to the therapeutic options for patients with AF and offer a number of advantages over warfarin for both clinician and patient, including a favorable bleeding profile and convenience of use. Consideration of these new anticoagulants will improve clinical decision-making. PMID:22539096

  14. Vorapaxar for secondary stroke prevention: perspectives and obstacles.

    PubMed

    Serebruany, Victor L; Kim, Moo Hyun; Fortmann, Seth D; Hanley, Dan F

    2015-01-01

    Vorapaxar, a novel antiplatelet thrombin protease-activated receptor 1 (PAR-1) inhibitor, has been evaluated in the successful TRA2P trial and failed TRACER trial. The drug is currently approved for post myocardial infarction and peripheral artery disease indications on top of clopidogrel and/or aspirin. The stroke data after vorapaxar are mixed, dominated with heavy excess of intracranial bleeding risks and slightly worsened second stroke rates, but show less primary ischemic strokes. Fortunately, these conflicting data do not belong purely to vorapaxar per se but rather, reflect unreasonably aggressive strategies, including predominantly triple antiplatelet therapy, utilized in both Trial to Assess the Effects of SCH 530348 in Preventing Heart Attack and Stroke in Patients with Arteriosclerosis (TRA2P) and especially in Thrombin-Receptor Antagonist Vorapaxar in Acute Coronary Syndromes (TRACER). The FDA-confirmed evidence strongly suggests that unique pharmacokinetics and a very mild "comfort zone" antiplatelet profile makes vorapaxar a good candidate for improved secondary stroke prevention. The outcome-driven, randomized trial should test head-to-head monotherapy with vorapaxar (Zontivity®) versus clopidogrel (Plavix®) and versus dipyridamole with very low dose aspirin (Aggrenox®). The advantages and potential pitfalls of such a trial are discussed in this article. PMID:26566105

  15. Early detection of occult atrial fibrillation and stroke prevention.

    PubMed

    Keach, Joseph Walker; Bradley, Steven M; Turakhia, Mintu P; Maddox, Thomas M

    2015-07-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is a very common arrhythmia and significantly increases stroke risk. This risk can be mitigated with oral anticoagulation, but AF is often asymptomatic, or occult, preventing timely detection and treatment. Accordingly, occult AF may cause stroke before it is clinically diagnosed. Currently, guidelines for the early detection and treatment of occult AF are limited. This review addresses recent advancements in occult AF detection methods, identification of populations at high risk for occult AF, the treatment of occult AF with oral anticoagulation, as well as ongoing trials that may answer critically important questions regarding occult AF screening.

  16. The prevention of recurrent suicidal acts

    PubMed Central

    Montgomery, S. A.; Roy, D.; Montgomery, D. B.

    1983-01-01

    1 There have been few controlled prospective investigations into the prevention of suicidal behaviour and by and large they have failed to demonstrate the efficacy of social work, psychotherapy or psychiatric treatment. 2 A group of 58 high-risk patients with multiple episodes of suicidal behaviour was treated with mianserin 30 mg at night or placebo in a six month double-blind trial of the efficacy of an antidepressant in reducing suicidal behaviour. 3 Patients were screened for depression, schizophrenia and organic disease. Patients were diagnosed as suffering from personality disorders according to DSM-III criteria mainly borderline or histrionic. 4 There was no significant difference in outcome between the mianserin and placebo treated group at any point in the six month study. 5 An item analysis of the MADRS showed that at entry the item `reduced appetite' predicted subsequent suicidal attempt. The total MADRS score did not predict further suicidal acts at entry but was highly significant at four weeks. At four weeks the items `reduced sleep' and `reduced appetite' were highly significant predictors of further suicidal acts and the items `lassitude', `suicidal thoughts', `inability to feel' and `pessimistic thoughts' were significant predictors. PMID:6824553

  17. Secondary preventive medication persistence and adherence 1 year after stroke

    PubMed Central

    Olson, D.M.; Zhao, X.; Pan, W.; Zimmer, L.O.; Goldstein, L.B.; Alberts, M.J.; Fagan, S.C.; Fonarow, G.C.; Johnston, S.C.; Kidwell, C.; LaBresh, K.A.; Ovbiagele, B.; Schwamm, L.; Peterson, E.D.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: Data on long-term use of secondary prevention medications following stroke are limited. The Adherence eValuation After Ischemic stroke–Longitudinal (AVAIL) Registry assessed patient, provider, and system-level factors influencing continuation of prevention medications for 1 year following stroke hospitalization discharge. Methods: Patients with ischemic stroke or TIA discharged from 106 hospitals participating in the American Heart Association Get With The Guidelines–Stroke program were surveyed to determine their use of warfarin, antiplatelet, antihypertensive, lipid-lowering, and diabetes medications from discharge to 12 months. Reasons for stopping medications were ascertained. Persistence was defined as continuation of all secondary preventive medications prescribed at hospital discharge, and adherence as continuation of prescribed medications except those stopped according to health care provider instructions. Results: Of the 2,880 patients enrolled in AVAIL, 88.4% (2,457 patients) completed 1-year interviews. Of these, 65.9% were regimen persistent and 86.6% were regimen adherent. Independent predictors of 1-year medication persistence included fewer medications prescribed at discharge, having an adequate income, having an appointment with a primary care provider, and greater understanding of why medications were prescribed and their side effects. Independent predictors of adherence were similar to those for persistence. Conclusions: Although up to one-third of stroke patients discontinued one or more secondary prevention medications within 1 year of hospital discharge, self-discontinuation of these medications is uncommon. Several potentially modifiable patient, provider, and system-level factors associated with persistence and adherence may be targets for future interventions. PMID:21900638

  18. Recurrent gastric bezoars. A new approach to treatment and prevention.

    PubMed

    Klamer, T W; Max, M H

    1983-03-01

    A recurrent gastric phytobezoar was successfully dispersed using an endoscopically directed intermittent jet of dilute papain. Dissolution analysis of a retrieved bezoar fragment showed pancrelipase and Adolph's Meat Tenderizer to be effective specific solvents. The patient remained free of symptoms while on a prophylactic regimen of pancrelipase taken daily. However, when the patient discontinued his medication, the bezoar recurred. The dissolution process was successfully repeated. Selecting a reagent on the basis of demonstrated effectiveness should enhance the chance of successful dissolution of a phytobezoar, whereas prophylactic doses of the reagent may prevent its recurrence. PMID:6837873

  19. Probiotics for prevention of recurrent vulvovaginal candidiasis: a review.

    PubMed

    Falagas, Matthew E; Betsi, Gregoria I; Athanasiou, Stavros

    2006-08-01

    Vulvovaginal candidiasis (VVC) is a common infection affecting the quality of life of many women. Probiotics have been investigated as possible agents for the prevention of recurrences of VVC. We reviewed the available literature. In some studies the development of VVC was associated with either a low number of lactobacilli in the vagina or with the presence of H2O2-non-producing vaginal lactobacilli, although there are a few studies not supporting these statements. In addition, in vitro studies have shown that lactobacilli can inhibit the growth of Candida albicans and/or its adherence on the vaginal epithelium. The results of some clinical trials support the effectiveness of lactobacilli, especially Lactobacillus acidophilus, Lactobacillus rhamnosus GR-1 and Lactobacillus fermentum RC-14, administered either orally or intravaginally in colonizing the vagina and/or preventing the colonization and infection of the vagina by C. albicans, while the results of a small number of clinical trials do not corroborate these findings. Nevertheless, most of the relevant clinical trials had methodological problems such as small sample size, no control group (placebo) and included women without confirmed recurrent VVC, and thus they are not reliable for drawing definitive conclusions. Thus, the available evidence for the use of probiotics for prevention of recurrent VVC is limited. However, the empirical use of probiotics may be considered in women with frequent recurrence of VVC (more than three episodes per year), especially for those who have adverse effects from or contraindications for the use of antifungal agents, since adverse effects of probiotics are very rare. In any case women should be clearly informed about the unproven usefulness of probiotics for this purpose. In conclusion, despite the promising results of some studies, further research is needed to prove the effectiveness of probiotics in preventing the recurrences of VVC and to allow their wide use for this

  20. Stroke prevention in atrial fibrillation: an Asian perspective.

    PubMed

    Chiang, Chern-En; Wang, Kang-Ling; Lip, Gregory Y H

    2014-05-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common sustained cardiac arrhythmia. In 2050, it is estimated that there will be 72 million AF patients in Asia, accounting for almost 2.9 million patients suffering from AF-associated stroke. Asian AF patients share similar risk factor profiles as non-Asians, except that more Asians have a history of previous stroke. Clinical challenges are evident in the field of stroke prevention in AF, amongst Asians. Existing stroke and bleeding risk scores have not been well-validated in Asians. Asians are prone to bleeding when treated with warfarin, and the optimal international normalised ratio (INR) for warfarin use is yet to be determined in Asians, though Asian physicians tend to keep it in a lower range (e.g. INR 1.6-2.6) for elderly patients despite limited evidence to justify this. In general, warfarin is 'difficult' to use in Asians due to higher risk of bleeding and higher stroke rate in Asians than in non-Asians, as shown in randomised controlled trials. Excess of bleeding was not found in Asians when novel oral anticoagulants (NOACs) were used. Besides, the superiority of NOACs to warfarin in reducing thromboembolism was maintained in Asians. Therefore NOACs are preferentially indicated in Asians in terms of both efficacy and safety. Also, some preliminary data suggest that Asian patients with AF might not be the same. Future prospective randomised trials are needed for the selection of NOACs according to different ethnic background.

  1. Imaging Parameters and Recurrent Cerebrovascular Events in Patients With Minor Stroke or Transient Ischemic Attack

    PubMed Central

    Yaghi, Shadi; Rostanski, Sara K.; Boehme, Amelia K.; Martin-Schild, Sheryl; Samai, Alyana; Silver, Brian; Blum, Christina A.; Jayaraman, Mahesh V.; Siket, Matthew S.; Khan, Muhib; Furie, Karen L.; Elkind, Mitchell S. V.; Marshall, Randolph S.; Willey, Joshua Z.

    2016-01-01

    IMPORTANCE Neurological worsening and recurrent stroke contribute substantially to morbidity associated with transient ischemic attacks and strokes (TIA-S). OBJECTIVE To determine predictors of early recurrent cerebrovascular events (RCVEs) among patients with TIA-S and National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale scores of 0 to 3. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS A retrospective cohort study was conducted at 2 tertiary care centers (Columbia University Medical Center, New York, New York, and Tulane University Medical Center, New Orleans, Louisiana) between January 1, 2010, and December 31, 2014. All patients with neurologist-diagnosed TIA-S with a National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale score of 0 to 3 who presented to the emergency department were included. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES The primary outcome (adjudicated by 3 vascular neurologists) was RCVE: neurological deterioration in the absence of a medical explanation or recurrent TIA-S during hospitalization. RESULTS Of the 1258 total patients, 1187 had no RCVEs and 71 had RCVEs; of this group, 750 patients (63.2%) and 39 patients (54.9%), respectively, were aged 60 years or older. There were 505 patients with TIA-S at Columbia University; 31 (6.1%) had RCVEs (15 patients had neurological deterioration only, 11 had recurrent TIA-S only, and 5 had both). The validation cohort at Tulane University consisted of 753 patients; 40 (5.3%) had RCVEs (24 patients had neurological deterioration only and 16 had both). Predictors of RCVE in multivariate models in both cohorts were infarct on neuroimaging (computed tomographic scan or diffusion-weighted imaging sequences on magnetic resonance imaging) (Columbia University: not applicable and Tulane University: odds ratio, 1.75; 95% CI, 0.82–3.74; P = .15) and large-vessel disease etiology (Columbia University: odds ratio, 6.69; 95% CI, 3.10–14.50 and Tulane University: odds ratio, 8.13; 95% CI, 3.86–17.12; P < .001). There was an increase in the percentage of

  2. Language, Literacy, and Characterization of Stroke Among Patients Taking Warfarin for Stroke Prevention: Implications for Health Communication

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Margaret C.; Panguluri, Praveen; Machtinger, Edward L.; Schillinger, Dean

    2009-01-01

    Objective Warfarin is a medication commonly prescribed to prevent strokes associated with certain medical conditions such as atrial fibrillation; however, little is known about how people taking warfarin perceive the goal of therapy and how they describe strokes. We assessed the stroke-related health literacy of anticoagulated patients to inform ways in which to improve health communication among people taking warfarin. Methods We conducted a mixed-methods study of an ethnically and linguistically diverse sample of people taking warfarin to prevent stroke (N=183) and measured literacy using the short-form Test of Functional Health Literacy in Adults. We asked participants to (1) describe their indication for warfarin, and (2) describe a stroke. Transcribed answers were coded as concordant or discordant with established indications for warfarin and definitions of stroke. Results Forty-three percent of participants provided a discordant response when describing their indication for warfarin. Only 9.3% reported that the purpose of taking warfarin was to prevent stroke. Not speaking English [OR = 2.4 (1.1–5.6)] and less than a college education [OR = 3.3 (1.4–7.3)] were independently associated with discordant answers about warfarin. Nearly 40% of subjects had inaccurate perceptions of stroke, and only one-third of subjects described a symptom or sign of stroke. Among English and Spanish-speaking participants, inadequate literacy was strongly associated with discordant responses about stroke [OR = 5.8 (2.1–15.6)]. Conclusion Among high risk people taking warfarin to prevent stroke, significant gaps in stroke-related health literacy exist. These gaps likely represent mismatches in the ways clinicians teach and patients learn. Practice implications Since stroke risk awareness and early recognition of the signs and symptoms of stroke are critical aspects of stroke prevention and treatment, clinicians should more strongly link warfarin therapy to stroke prevention

  3. CYP2C19 Metabolizer Status and Clopidogrel Efficacy in the Secondary Prevention of Small Subcortical Strokes (SPS3) Study

    PubMed Central

    McDonough, Caitrin W; McClure, Leslie A; Mitchell, Braxton D; Gong, Yan; Horenstein, Richard B; Lewis, Joshua P; Field, Thalia S; Talbert, Robert L; Benavente, Oscar R; Johnson, Julie A; Shuldiner, Alan R

    2015-01-01

    Background The role of the CYP2C19 genotype on clopidogrel efficacy has been studied widely, with data suggesting reduced clopidogrel efficacy in loss-of-function variant carriers taking clopidogrel after percutaneous coronary intervention; however, data are limited regarding the association between CYP2C19 genetic variants and outcomes in stroke patients. We investigated whether CYP2C19 metabolizer status affects the risk of recurrent stroke or major bleeding in subcortical stroke patients taking dual antiplatelet therapy with aspirin and clopidogrel. Methods and Results CYP2C19*2 and CYP2C19*17 were genotyped in 522 patients treated with dual antiplatelet therapy from the Secondary Prevention of Small Subcortical Strokes (SPS3) study. CYP2C19 metabolizer status was inferred from genotype, and associations with the risk of recurrent stroke and major bleeding were assessed in the overall cohort and by race/ethnic group with logistic regression modeling. In the overall cohort, there were no differences in outcomes by CYP2C19 metabolizer status (recurrent stroke, odds ratio 1.81 [95% CI 0.76 to 4.30]; major bleeding, odds ratio 0.67 [95% CI 0.22 to 2.03]). In white participants, those with CYP2C19 intermediate or poor metabolizer status had higher odds of recurrent stroke (odds ratio 5.19 [95% CI 1.08 to 24.90]) than those with extensive or ultrarapid metabolizer status, but there was no evidence of difference in major bleeding. Conclusions There were significant differences in recurrent stroke by CYP2C19 genotype-inferred metabolizer status in white subcortical stroke patients receiving dual antiplatelet therapy with aspirin and clopidogrel, consistent with cardiovascular studies on CYP2C19 and clopidogrel; however, the bleeding risk that led to early termination of the antiplatelet arm of the SPS3 trial does not appear to be explained by CYP2C19 genotype. This study was relatively underpowered; therefore, these findings should be interpreted with caution and

  4. A Total Pleural Covering for Lymphangioleiomyomatosis Prevents Pneumothorax Recurrence

    PubMed Central

    Kurihara, Masatoshi; Mizobuchi, Teruaki; Kataoka, Hideyuki; Sato, Teruhiko; Kumasaka, Toshio; Ebana, Hiroki; Yamanaka, Sumitaka; Endo, Reina; Miyahashira, Sumika; Shinya, Noriko; Seyama, Kuniaki

    2016-01-01

    Background Spontaneous pneumothorax is a major and frequently recurrent complication of lymphangioleiomyomatosis (LAM). Despite the customary use of pleurodesis to manage pnenumothorax, the recurrence rate remains high, and accompanying pleural adhesions cause serious bleeding during subsequent lung transplantation. Therefore, we have developed a technique of total pleural covering (TPC) for LAM to wrap the entire visceral pleura with sheets of oxidized regenerated cellulose (ORC) mesh, thereby reinforcing the affected visceral pleura and preventing recurrence. Methods Since January 2003, TPC has been applied during video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery for the treatment of LAM. The medical records of LAM patients who had TPC since that time and until August 2014 are reviewed. Results TPC was performed in 43 LAM patients (54 hemithoraces), 11 of whom required TPC bilaterally. Pneumothorax recurred in 14 hemithoraces (25.9%) from 11 patients (25.6%) after TPC. Kaplan-Meier estimates of recurrence-free hemithorax were 80.8% at 2.5 years, 71.7% at 5 years, 71.7% at 7.5 years, and 61.4% at 9 years. The recurrence-free probability was significantly better when 10 or more sheets of ORC mesh were utilized for TPC (P = 0.0018). TPC significantly reduced the frequency of pneumothorax: 0.544 ± 0.606 episode/month (mean ± SD) before TPC vs. 0.008 ± 0.019 after TPC (P<0.0001). Grade IIIa postoperative complications were found in 13 TPC surgeries (24.1%). Conclusions TPC successfully prevented the recurrence of pneumothorax in LAM, was minimally invasive and rarely caused restrictive ventilatory impairment. PMID:27658250

  5. Recurrent stroke and multi-infarct dementia in systemic lupus erythematosus: association with antiphospholipid antibodies.

    PubMed Central

    Asherson, R A; Mercey, D; Phillips, G; Sheehan, N; Gharavi, A E; Harris, E N; Hughes, G R

    1987-01-01

    Four patients with recurrent stroke and multi-infarct dementia are presented in whom the dementia was progressive and severe. Three of the patients developed the dementia during the course of an illness which was punctuated by repeated episodes of cerebral infarction demonstrated by computed tomographic (CT) scans. The fourth patient presented with an illness dominated by progressive and deteriorating higher mental functions, which culminated in a major stroke 18 months later. Three patients fulfilled the American Rheumatism Association (ARA) criteria for the classification of systemic lupus erythematosus, the fourth had a 'lupus-like' disease. All had livedo reticularis, severe migraines, and also demonstrated antibodies to phospholipids. All four patients suffered deep vein thromboses. Images PMID:3116954

  6. Unusual case of recurrent SMART (stroke-like migraine attacks after radiation therapy) syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Ramanathan, Ramnath Santosh; Sreedher, Gayathri; Malhotra, Konark; Guduru, Zain; Agarwal, Deeksha; Flaherty, Mary; Leichliter, Timothy; Rana, Sandeep

    2016-01-01

    Stroke-like migraine attacks after radiation therapy (SMART) syndrome is a rare delayed complication of cerebral radiation therapy. A 53-year-old female initially presented with headache, confusion and left homonymous hemianopia. Her medical history was notable for cerebellar hemangioblastoma, which was treated with radiation in 1987. Her initial brain MRI (magnetic resonance imaging) revealed cortical enhancement in the right temporo-parieto-occipital region. She improved spontaneously in 2 weeks and follow-up scan at 4 weeks revealed no residual enhancement or encephalomalacia. She presented 6 weeks later with aphasia. Her MRI brain revealed similar contrast-enhancing cortical lesion but on the left side. Repeat CSF studies was again negative other than elevated protein. She was treated conservatively and recovered completely within a week. Before diagnosing SMART syndrome, it is important to rule out tumor recurrence, encephalitis, posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) and stroke. Typically the condition is self-limiting, and gradually resolves. PMID:27570398

  7. Unusual case of recurrent SMART (stroke-like migraine attacks after radiation therapy) syndrome.

    PubMed

    Ramanathan, Ramnath Santosh; Sreedher, Gayathri; Malhotra, Konark; Guduru, Zain; Agarwal, Deeksha; Flaherty, Mary; Leichliter, Timothy; Rana, Sandeep

    2016-01-01

    Stroke-like migraine attacks after radiation therapy (SMART) syndrome is a rare delayed complication of cerebral radiation therapy. A 53-year-old female initially presented with headache, confusion and left homonymous hemianopia. Her medical history was notable for cerebellar hemangioblastoma, which was treated with radiation in 1987. Her initial brain MRI (magnetic resonance imaging) revealed cortical enhancement in the right temporo-parieto-occipital region. She improved spontaneously in 2 weeks and follow-up scan at 4 weeks revealed no residual enhancement or encephalomalacia. She presented 6 weeks later with aphasia. Her MRI brain revealed similar contrast-enhancing cortical lesion but on the left side. Repeat CSF studies was again negative other than elevated protein. She was treated conservatively and recovered completely within a week. Before diagnosing SMART syndrome, it is important to rule out tumor recurrence, encephalitis, posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) and stroke. Typically the condition is self-limiting, and gradually resolves. PMID:27570398

  8. [Advances in the secondary prevention of cardioembolic stroke].

    PubMed

    Masjuan, Jaime

    2012-10-01

    Non-valvular atrial fibrillation (NVAF) is the main cause of cardioembolic stroke. Classically, prevention consists of oral antivitamin-K anticoagulants (AVK), which, despite their demonstrated efficacy, continue to be underused due to their numerous drawbacks. Recently, a new generation of oral anticoagulants has been shown to have a better safety profile and greater efficacy than AVK. The studies that have compared rivoraxaban, dabigatran and apixaban with warfarin have also included a substantial proportion of patients who had previously had a stroke. The results of the substudies performed in this population with a high risk of hemorrhagic and embolic events have been consistent with those in the overall populations in these studies. The new anticoagulants are a feasible alternative to AVK in the secondary prevention of ictus in patients with NVAF. When anticoagulant therapy is contraindicated, percutaneous closure of the left atrial appendage could be an alternative.

  9. Antibacterial perineal washing for prevention of recurrent urinary tract infections.

    PubMed

    Cass, A S; Ireland, G W

    1985-05-01

    Antibacterial ointment applied to the urethral meatus in females with recurrent urinary tract infections (UTIs) has been reported to decrease the incidence of UTIs. The value of perineal washing with the antibacterial lotion, hexachlorophene, in preventing urinary tract infections was determined in 56 females with recurrent UTIs. Of three groups of females one group used hexachlorophene perineal washings morning and night, another group used hexachlorophene perineal washings and an oral antibacterial daily (nitrofurantoin or trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole), and the third group used the oral antibacterials daily alone. The infections per patient were 3.4 with hexachlorophene washings, 0.5 with hexachlorophene washing and oral antibacterials daily, and 0.9 with oral antibacterials alone. These results suggest that hexachlorophene perineal washing was not effective in preventing UTI in females.

  10. Medical prevention of recurrent acute otitis media: an updated overview.

    PubMed

    Marchisio, Paola; Nazzari, Erica; Torretta, Sara; Esposito, Susanna; Principi, Nicola

    2014-05-01

    Acute otitis media (AOM) is one of the most common pediatric diseases; almost all children experience at least one episode, and a third have two or more episodes in the first three years of life. The disease burden of AOM has important medical, social and economic effects. AOM requires considerable financial assistance due to needing at least one doctor visit and a prescription for antipyretics and/or antibiotics. AOM is also associated with high indirect costs, which are mostly related to lost days of work for one parent. Moreover, due to its acute symptoms and frequent recurrences, AOM considerably impacts both the child and family's quality of life. AOM prevention, particularly recurrent AOM (rAOM), is a primary goal of pediatric practice. In this paper, we review current evidence regarding the efficacy of medical treatments and vaccines for preventing rAOM and suggest the best approaches for AOM-prone children. PMID:24678887

  11. Surgery to prevent stroke. High hopes and deep disappointment.

    PubMed

    Jennett, B

    1989-01-01

    Carotid endarterectomy and EC/IC bypass grafting have been widely adopted for patients considered at risk from stroke, without good evidence of efficacy. Unjustified claims for surgery usually derive from overestimating the dangers of the disease without surgery, while perioperative risks are underestimated. Inadequate follow-up and choosing irrelevant outcome measures often add to the confusion. All these factors apply to surgery for stroke. A trial of EC/IC bypass in 1,377 patients from three continents took 8 years to complete and showed no benefit in patients randomized to surgery. Reluctance to accept this result led to detailed critiques of this trial in several journals, largely based on the discovery that many patients had been operated on in some centers without having been randomized. In reply, the investigators showed that these cases did not affect the "resounding negativity of the results." Lack of good data about the prognosis of patients with TIAs or minor strokes was the fundamental reason for so much misplaced surgical effort. This applies equally to carotid endarterectomy, for which large trials are currently being completed. Had there been a reliable data base of patients at risk of stroke, prospectively collected and followed, the efficacy of these two operations could have been determined much sooner, and inappropriate diffusion might have been prevented.

  12. Edoxaban in venous thromboembolism and stroke prevention: an appraisal.

    PubMed

    Proietti, Marco; Lip, Gregory Y H

    2016-01-01

    Oral anticoagulation is the therapeutic cornerstone in preventing thromboembolic risk in both atrial fibrillation (AF) and venous thromboembolism (VTE). After decades of the sole therapeutic oral anticoagulation option being warfarin, the introduction of non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants has heralded a new era. Edoxaban is the latest addition to these available for clinical use. Edoxaban was as effective and safer than warfarin in preventing thromboembolic risk in AF patients. Similarly, edoxaban effectiveness and safety was evident when treating VTE patients to prevent recurrent VTE or VTE-related death. Therefore, edoxaban represents a valuable alternative in treating thromboembolic risk for AF and VTE patients. PMID:27013883

  13. Can circumcision prevent recurrent urinary tract infections in hospitalized infants?

    PubMed

    Cason, D L; Carter, B S; Bhatia, J

    2000-12-01

    Urinary tract infection (UTI) is an uncommon but concerning condition for hospitalized premature infants. A retrospective chart review of all male infants admitted to the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) from June 1996 through March 1999 was conducted at the Medical College of Georgia--a large academic medical center with a tertiary Level III NICU--to investigate the frequency and potential prevention of recurrent UTI in hospitalized infants. The effect of circumcision on recurrence of UTI was also investigated. There were 38 infants with 53 UTIs among 744 male infants admitted during the study period (5.1%). Infants were divided into two groups: A1 <37 weeks with a single UTI and A2 <37 weeks with more than one UTI. In groups A1 and A2, 57% of the first UTIs were due to Candida or E. coli, the remaining were due to other gram-negative organisms and Staphylococcus species. Mean gestational age (GA) in groups A1 and A2 were similar (29 +/- 2 weeks, and 29 +/- 4 weeks); however, mean GA of infants with Candida UTI was 27 +/- 2 weeks, and for bacterial UTI, 30 +/- 3 weeks (p<0.01). None of the premature infants in the study had a recurrent UTI once a circumcision was performed. Premature uncircumcised males had an increased risk for UTI (Odds Ratio=11.1, 95% CI, 3.3-28.9, p<0.001). Circumcision appears beneficial in reducing the risk for recurrent UTI in these infants.

  14. Stroke - risk factors

    MedlinePlus

    Preventing stroke; Stroke - prevention; CVA - prevention; TIA - prevention ... Biology; Council on Hypertension. Guidelines for the primary prevention of stroke: a statement for healthcare professionals from ...

  15. Mediterranean diet in healthy lifestyle and prevention of stroke.

    PubMed

    Demarin, Vida; Lisak, Marijana; Morović, Sandra

    2011-03-01

    Several studies demonstrated the beneficial and preventive role of Mediterranean diet in the occurrence of cardiovascular diseases, chronic neurodegenerative diseases and neoplasms, obesity and diabetes. In randomized intervention trials, Mediterranean diet improved endothelial function and significantly reduced waist circumference, plasma glucose, serum insulin and homeostasis model assessment score in metabolic syndrome. Several studies support favorable effects of Mediterranean diet on plasma lipid profile: reduction of total and plasma LDL cholesterol levels, plasma triglyceride levels, and apo-B and VLDL concentrations, and an increase in plasma HDL cholesterol levels. This effect is associated with increased plasma antioxidant capacity, improved endothelial function, reduced insulin resistance, and reduced incidence of the metabolic syndrome. The beneficial impact of fish consumption on the risk of cardiovascular diseases is the result of synergistic effects of nutrients in fish. Fish is considered an excellent source of protein with low saturated fat, nutritious trace elements, long-chain omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (LCn3PUFAs), and vitamins D and B. Fish consumption may be inversely associated with ischemic stroke but not with hemorrhagic stroke because of the potential antiplatelet aggregation property of LCn3PUFAs. Total stroke risk reduction was statistically significant for fish intake once per week, while the risk of stroke was lowered by 31% in individuals who ate fish 5 times or more per week. In the elderly, moderate consumption of tuna/other fish, but not fried fish, was associated with lower prevalence of subclinical infarcts and white matter abnormalities on MRI examination. Dietary intake of omega-3 fatty acids in a moderate-to-high range does not appear to be associated with reduced plaque, but is negatively associated with carotid artery intima-media thickness. Greater adherence to Mediterranean diet is associated with significant

  16. Sulodexide for the Prevention of Recurrent Venous Thromboembolism

    PubMed Central

    Bignamini, Angelo A.; Davì, Giovanni; Palareti, Gualtiero; Matuška, Jiří; Holý, Martin; Pawlaczyk-Gabriel, Katarzyna; Džupina, Andrej; Sokurenko, German Y.; Didenko, Yury P.; Andrei, Laurentia D.; Lessiani, Gianfranco; Visonà, Adriana

    2015-01-01

    Background— Patients with a first episode of unprovoked venous thromboembolism have a high risk of recurrence after discontinuation of anticoagulant therapy. Extending anticoagulation reduces the risk of recurrence but is associated with increased bleeding. Sulodexide, a glycosaminoglycan, exerts antithrombotic and profibrinolytic actions with a low bleeding risk when administered orally, but its benefit for preventing recurrent venous thromboembolism is not well known. Methods and Results— In this multicenter, double-blind study, 615 patients with first-ever unprovoked venous thromboembolism who had completed 3 to 12 months of oral anticoagulant treatment were randomly assigned to sulodexide 500 lipasemic units twice daily or placebo for 2 years, in addition to elastic stockings. The primary efficacy outcome was recurrence of venous thromboembolism. Major or clinically relevant bleeding was the primary safety outcome. Venous thromboembolism recurred in 15 of the 307 patients who received sulodexide and in 30 of the 308 patients who received placebo (hazard ratio, 0.49; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.27–0.92; P=0.02). The analysis in which lost to follow-up was assigned to failure yielded a risk ratio among treated versus control subjects of 0.54 (95% confidence interval, 0.35–0.85; P=0.009). No major bleeding episodes occurred; 2 patients in each treatment group had a clinically relevant bleeding episode. Adverse events were similar in the 2 groups. Conclusion— Sulodexide given after discontinuation of anticoagulant treatment reduced the risk of recurrence in patients with unprovoked venous thromboembolism, with no apparent increase of bleeding risk. Clinical Trial Registration— URL: https://www.clinicaltrialsregister.eu/. Identifier: EudraCT number 2009-016923-77. PMID:26408273

  17. Environmental vascular risk factors: new perspectives for stroke prevention.

    PubMed

    Bernal-Pacheco, Oscar; Román, Gustavo C

    2007-11-15

    Despite intensive evaluation of acute stroke patients, perhaps only half of the attributable stroke risk is usually identified. In addition to traditional and non-traditional vascular risk factors-including most recently homocysteine, inflammation, and alterations of coagulation-a number of environmental risk factors for stroke have been identified in the last decade. In this update we review the following: lower education and poor socioeconomic status (probable surrogates for exposure to traditional high-risk behaviors such as smoking, poor nutrition, lack of prenatal control, absence of preventive medical and dental care, and non-compliance of treatment of conditions such as hypertension); depression, stress and affective disorders; obstructive sleep apnea; passive smoking and environmental pollution; infections, in particular periodontal diseases that increase C-reactive protein (CRP); raised body mass index (obesity); exercise, and diet. The possible role of high-fructose corn syrup in the epidemic of obesity in the USA is reviewed. Protective diets include higher consumption of fish, olive oil, grains, fruits and vegetables (Mediterranean diet), as well as probiotic bacteria in yogurt and dairy products. Careful attention should be given to the patient's environment looking for modifiable factors. The effects of clean environmental air and water, adequate diet and appropriate nutrition, healthy teeth, exercise, and refreshing sleep in the prevention of stroke and cardiovascular disease appear to be quite compelling. Although some of these modifiable risk factors lack evidence-based information, judicious clinical sense should be used to counteract the potentially damaging effects of adverse environmental vascular risk factors. PMID:17655871

  18. SY 08-2 HYPERTENSION MANAGEMENT FOR SECONDARY PREVENTION OF STROKE.

    PubMed

    Shimada, Kazuyuki

    2016-09-01

    Stroke is known to frequently recur in patients with a history of cerebrovascular disease, and the control of hypertension is extremely important for the treatment of those patients. The robust relationship between the recurrent cerebrovascular disease and blood pressure control has been demonstrated in large-scale clinical studies. The antihypertensive drug therapy significantly reduces the recurrence rate of all types of cerebrovascular disease, incidences of myocardial infarction and all vascular events. Evidence suggests that any class of antihypertensive drugs including diuretics, Ca channel blockers, ARBs, and ACE inhibitors are shown to be similarly effective for the secondary prevention of stroke, except in some small study such as MOSES. Thus, most of the benefit obtained from drugs can be ascribed to a decrease in blood pressure.Then, how far should blood pressure be lowered? Target of blood pressure control has been somewhat controversial, since an excessive reduction of blood pressure might exacerbate cerebral ischemia in the area perfused by cerebral artery with a significant stenosis. In fact, some Japanese clinical study has shown that in patients with impaired perfusion demonstrated by PET-CT, the risk of recurrent stroke was high when the systolic blood pressure was <130 mmHg. In those without impaired perfusion, this risk may be high at a high blood pressure level. In the study involving patients with carotid artery stenosis, the risk of cerebrovascular disease significantly increased in a group in which the systolic blood pressure decreased to 140 mmHg among patients with symptomatic, 70% or greater stenosis of the bilateral carotid arteries (accounting for 2 to 3%), whereas there was no increase in this risk even when the systolic blood pressure decreased to 140 mmHg in patients with 70% or greater unilateral carotid artery stenosis. In the Warfarin-Aspirin Symptomatic Intracranial Disease (WASID) Study, among patients with symptomatic

  19. SY 08-2 HYPERTENSION MANAGEMENT FOR SECONDARY PREVENTION OF STROKE.

    PubMed

    Shimada, Kazuyuki

    2016-09-01

    Stroke is known to frequently recur in patients with a history of cerebrovascular disease, and the control of hypertension is extremely important for the treatment of those patients. The robust relationship between the recurrent cerebrovascular disease and blood pressure control has been demonstrated in large-scale clinical studies. The antihypertensive drug therapy significantly reduces the recurrence rate of all types of cerebrovascular disease, incidences of myocardial infarction and all vascular events. Evidence suggests that any class of antihypertensive drugs including diuretics, Ca channel blockers, ARBs, and ACE inhibitors are shown to be similarly effective for the secondary prevention of stroke, except in some small study such as MOSES. Thus, most of the benefit obtained from drugs can be ascribed to a decrease in blood pressure.Then, how far should blood pressure be lowered? Target of blood pressure control has been somewhat controversial, since an excessive reduction of blood pressure might exacerbate cerebral ischemia in the area perfused by cerebral artery with a significant stenosis. In fact, some Japanese clinical study has shown that in patients with impaired perfusion demonstrated by PET-CT, the risk of recurrent stroke was high when the systolic blood pressure was <130 mmHg. In those without impaired perfusion, this risk may be high at a high blood pressure level. In the study involving patients with carotid artery stenosis, the risk of cerebrovascular disease significantly increased in a group in which the systolic blood pressure decreased to 140 mmHg among patients with symptomatic, 70% or greater stenosis of the bilateral carotid arteries (accounting for 2 to 3%), whereas there was no increase in this risk even when the systolic blood pressure decreased to 140 mmHg in patients with 70% or greater unilateral carotid artery stenosis. In the Warfarin-Aspirin Symptomatic Intracranial Disease (WASID) Study, among patients with symptomatic

  20. The therapeutic value of laboratory testing for hypercoagulable states in secondary stroke prevention.

    PubMed

    Kalaria, Chandni; Kittner, Steven

    2015-05-01

    Although screening for hypercoagulable states is commonly performed as part of the evaluation of first arterial ischemic stroke in young adults, available evidence does not support this as a routine practice, even in patients with cryptogenic stroke and a positive family history of early thrombotic events or in patients with a patent foramen ovale. Testing for antiphospholipid antibodies is a possible exception because persistent antibodies are associated with an increased risk of recurrent stroke. Despite the lack of supporting data, screening for hypercoagulable states in recurrent early-onset cryptogenic cerebral ischemia could be considered. PMID:25907919

  1. Thrombus deflector stent for stroke prevention: A simulation study.

    PubMed

    Choi, Hyo Won; Navia, Jose A; Kassab, Ghassan S

    2015-07-16

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is a dysfunction of heart rhythm and represents an increased predisposition to ischemic stroke in AF patients. It has been shown that the AF-induced hemodynamic conditions may contribute to the increased embolic propensity through the carotid arteries. We simulated a stroke-prevention device with a unique strut structure to deflect the trajectory of a blood clot to the carotid artery. We identified the important determinants of functionality in a device design using computational fluid dynamics simulations. Quantitative assessment of deflection efficacy over various clot dimensions was carried out for the device with different strut configurations under AF flow conditions. The simulations demonstrate that the trajectory of a clot destined to the left common carotid artery (LCCA) can be deflected by a strut-structured device at the LCCA inlet with virtually no change in flow resistance. The deflection efficacy of the device is dependent on the clot properties and strut designs of the device. A configuration of 0.75 mm thick and 0.75 mm distant struts with 50% of surface convexity were found to provide maximum deflection efficacy (e.g., 36% greater deflection efficacy than a flat filter) among the strut structures considered. The results suggest that a deflector stent implanted in the aortic branch may be an effective stroke-prevention device. The present simulations motivate pre-clinical animal studies as well as further studies on patient-specific design of the device that maximize the deflection efficacy while minimizing device safety issues. PMID:26049978

  2. Moyamoya syndrome in sickle cell anaemia: a cause of recurrent stroke.

    PubMed

    Soares, Deanne; Bullock, Richard; Ali, Susanna

    2014-01-01

    Summary We report a case with interesting imaging findings as well as an unfortunate but not unexpected clinical outcome. Our patient, an 8-year-old Jamaican boy of Afro-Caribbean descent with homozygous sickle cell disease, presented with left-sided upper limb weakness. He had a history of recurrent cerebrovascular accidents and transient ischaemic attacks beginning at 4 years of age. MRI revealed old bilateral infarctions and the ivy sign on fluid-attenuated inversion recovery sequences. MR angiography demonstrated numerous collaterals, most apparently arising from the left internal carotid, consistent with moyamoya syndrome. The patient had a full recovery and remained well for almost 2 years when he suffered another stroke.

  3. H-Type Hypertension and C Reactive Protein in Recurrence of Ischemic Stroke.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qing; Qiu, De-Xing; Fu, Rong-Li; Xu, Tian-Fen; Jing, Meng-Juan; Zhang, Hui-Shan; Geng, He-Hong; Zheng, Long-Chao; Wang, Pei-Xi

    2016-01-01

    Hypertension with high homocysteine (HHcy) (H-type hypertension) and C reactive protein (CRP) can increase the incidence of ischemic stroke. However, it is not clear whether recurrent ischemic stroke (RIS) is related to H-type hypertension and CRP. The present study investigated the correlation of H-type hypertension and CRP level with RIS. Totally, 987 consecutive patients with acute ischemic stroke were recruited in a teaching hospital in Henan province, China during March 2014 to March 2015. The demographic and clinical characteristics and blood biochemical parameters of patients were analyzed. Elevated levels of CRP and homocysteine (Hcy) were defined as >8.2 mg/L and 10 μmol/L, respectively. Among the 987 patients, 234 were RIS. Thirty-eight percent of RIS patients had elevated CRP level and 91.5% of RIS patients had HHcy. In multivariate analysis, adjusted odds ratio (OR) of RIS in patients aged ≥60 years was 1.576 (95% CI: 1.125-2.207), in male patients 1.935 (95% CI: 1.385-2.704), in patients with diabetes 1.463 (95% CI: 1.037-2.064), CRP levels 1.013 (95% CI: 1.006-1.019), simple hypertension 3.370 (95% CI: 1.15-10.183), and H-type hypertension 2.990 (95% CI: 1.176-7.600). RIS was associated with older age, male, diabetes, H-type hypertension and CRP. Controlling H-type hypertension and CRP level may reduce the risk of RIS. PMID:27164124

  4. [Preventive efficacy of tianeptine in recurrent depression with frequent exacerbations].

    PubMed

    Mosolov, S N; Vertogradova, O P; Panteleeva, G P; Morozova, M A; Kostiukova, E G; Gorodnichev, A V; Abramova, L I; Bannikov, G S; Timofeef, I V; Oleĭchik, I V; Artiukh, V V

    2004-01-01

    The results of the studies of 4 Russian research centers are summarized. Tianeptine (coaxil) was used in the treatment of 55 patients with ICD-10 diagnosis of recurrent depressive disorder (F32.1), 50 patients have completely finished the treatment. Tianeptine was assigned in dosage of 12.5 mg 3 times daily (patients over 65 years old received 25.0 mg daily) during 12 months. The drug was shown to have a high preventive efficacy for the disorder. Sixty-one percent of patients were full-responders. Taken together with partial responders (13%), an improvement was observed in 74% patients. The drug demonstrated a well tolerability with a rare and mild expression of side-effects.

  5. A Community Engagement Symposium to Prevent and Improve Stroke Outcomes in Diverse Communities

    PubMed Central

    Bharmal, Nazleen; Lucas-Wright, Anna “Aziza”; Vassar, Stefanie D.; Jones, Felica; Jones, Loretta; Wells, Rebekah; Cienega, Jason; Brown, Arleen F.

    2016-01-01

    Background Racial/ethnic minorities have a higher burden of stroke, but lower awareness and understanding of stroke and its risk factors. Our community–academic collaborative hosted a symposium in South Los Angeles to increase awareness about stroke, provide information on the Los Angeles Stroke Intervention and Research Program (SPIRP), and facilitate bidirectional communication between researchers and community stakeholders. Objectives We discuss our partnered approach to increase stroke awareness, elicit community perspectives and perceptions about stroke prevention and research participation, and increase community involvement in research using a community engagement symposium (CES). Methods We used a community-partnered participatory research (CPPR) conference framework to guide symposium planning, implementation and analysis. The morning session included clinical lectures, a panel of researchers describing LA SPIRP, and a panel presentation by stroke caregivers and survivors. In afternoon breakout sessions, attendees identified 1) community-based strategies to prevent stroke and 2) methods to increase recruitment of diverse populations in stroke research studies. Attendees were surveyed about stroke knowledge before and after the morning session. Data from breakout sessions were analyzed using content analysis and pile sorting to identify themes. Conclusions We found that the CES based on CPPR principles was effective method to increase short-term stroke awareness and stimulate discussion about stroke research among community members and community stakeholders who serve racial/ethnic minorities. PMID:27018364

  6. Talk With Your Health Care Provider About Taking Aspirin to Prevent Strokes

    MedlinePlus

    ... Heart and Circulation For Women Talk With Your Health Care Provider About Taking Aspirin to Prevent Strokes Did ... attacks. Please see the brochure Talk with Your Health Care Provider About Taking Aspirin to Prevent Heart Attacks ...

  7. Stroke survivors', caregivers' and GPs' attitudes towards a polypill for the secondary prevention of stroke: a qualitative interview study

    PubMed Central

    Jamison, James; Graffy, Jonathan; Mullis, Ricky; Mant, Jonathan; Sutton, Stephen

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To understand the perspectives of stroke survivors, caregivers and general practitioners (GPs) on a polypill approach, consisting of blood pressure and cholesterol-lowering therapies, with or without aspirin, for the secondary prevention of stroke. Methods A qualitative interview study was undertaken in 5 GP surgeries in the East of England. 28 survivors of stroke/transient ischaemic attack (TIA) were interviewed, 14 of them with a caregiver present, along with a convenience sample of 5 GPs, to assess attitudes towards a polypill and future use. Topic guides explored participants attitudes, potential uptake and long-term use, management of polypill medication and factors influencing the decision to prescribe. Data were analysed using a grounded theory approach. Key themes are presented and illustrated with verbatim quotes. Results The analysis identified 3 key themes: polypill benefits, polypill concerns and polypill lessons for implementation. Stroke/TIA survivors were positive about the polypill concept and considered it acceptable in the secondary prevention of stroke. Perceived benefits of a polypill included convenience resulting in improved adherence and reduced burden of treatment. Caregivers felt that a polypill would improve medication-taking practices, and GPs were open to prescribing it to those at increased cardiovascular risk. However, concerns raised included whether a polypill provided equivalent therapeutic benefit, side effects through combining medications, consequences of non-adherence, lack of flexibility in regulating dosage, disruption to current treatment and suitability to the wider stroke population. Conclusions Participants acknowledged potential advantages in a polypill approach for secondary prevention of stroke; however, significant concerns remain. Further research on the efficacy of a polypill is needed to reassure practitioners whose concerns around inflexibility and treatment suitability are likely to influence the

  8. Extracorporeal abdominal massage may help prevent recurrent bile duct stones after endoscopic sphincterotomy

    PubMed Central

    Uchida, Naohito; Hamaya, Sae; Tatsuta, Miwa; Nakatsu, Toshiaki

    2016-01-01

    Background and study aims: Endoscopic sphincterotomy (EST) is effective, but recurrent bile duct stones are a common late complication. Because there are still no effective therapies for preventing this complication, some patients have experienced bile duct stone recurrence many times. We describe herein a method of abdominal massage to treat patients with prior cholecystectomy who have experienced recurrence of bile duct stones. PMID:27540575

  9. Questions and Answers about Treating Arterial Stenosis and Preventing Stroke

    MedlinePlus

    ... context of stroke, “stenosis” is usually caused by atherosclerosis, a condition where a blood vessel supplying blood ... high cholesterol. How does stenosis contribute to stroke? Atherosclerosis can activate cells involved in blood clotting. As ...

  10. 1 in 10 Stroke Rehab Interruptions May Be Preventable

    MedlinePlus

    ... policy. More Health News on: Spinal Cord Injuries Stroke Rehabilitation Recent Health News Related MedlinePlus Health Topics Rehabilitation Spinal Cord Injuries Stroke Rehabilitation About MedlinePlus Site Map FAQs Contact Us Get ...

  11. Could Stroke Trigger Be Prevented by Healthy Family Relationships?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rochette, Annie; Gaulin, Philippe; Tellier, Myriam

    2009-01-01

    Although major stroke risk factors are well documented, little is known about which life circumstances are perceived to be related to the actual triggering of a first stroke. The purpose was to explore self-perceived spontaneously related life circumstances surrounding the trigger of a first stroke. A qualitative design with a phenomenological…

  12. Neurological outcome and risk of recurrence depending on the anterior vs. posterior arterial distribution in children with stroke.

    PubMed

    Touré, A; Chabrier, S; Plagne, M D; Presles, E; des Portes, V; Rousselle, C

    2009-06-01

    We report the outcome of 46 previously healthy children with arterial ischemic stroke. After a mean follow-up of 26 months, five (11%) children suffered a recurrence and 28 (61%) were left with sequelae. The prevalence and the severity of the sequelae were similar irrespective of whether the localization of the accident was anterior or posterior. However, a recurrence was significantly more frequent in the posterior than in the anterior group (4/14 vs. 1/32; p=0.025). These observations may lead to the establishment of therapeutic guidelines according to the localization of the infarct.

  13. [Post Stroke Dementia].

    PubMed

    Ihara, Masafumi

    2016-07-01

    Post-stroke dementia (PSD) is a clinical entity that encompasses all types of dementia following an index stroke. Current evidence suggests that 25-30% of ischemic stroke survivors develop immediate or delayed vascular cognitive impairment or vascular dementia. The type of stroke can be either ischemic, hemorrhagic or hypoperfusive. There are multiple risk factors for PSD including older age, family history, genetic variants, low educational status, vascular comorbidities, prior transient ischemic attack or recurrent stroke and depressive illness. Pre-stroke dementia refers to the occurrence of cognitive impairment before the index stroke, which may be caused by a vascular burden as well as insidious neurodegenerative changes. Neuroimaging determinants of dementia after stroke include silent brain infarcts, white matter changes, lacunar infarcts and medial temporal lobe atrophy. Published clinical trials have not been promising and there is little information on whether PSD can be prevented using pharmacological agents. Control of vascular disease risk and prevention of recurrent strokes are key to reducing the burden of cognitive decline and post-stroke dementia. Modern imaging and analysis techniques will help to elucidate the mechanism of PSD and establish better treatment. PMID:27395459

  14. Homocysteine lowering for stroke prevention: Unravelling the complexity of the evidence.

    PubMed

    Spence, J David

    2016-10-01

    Elevated levels of total homocysteine impair endothelial dysfunction and increase thrombosis. Homocysteine is causal in animal models, and in human studies, elevated total homocysteine is significantly associated with carotid atherosclerosis, lacunar infarction, and markedly increased risk of stroke in atrial fibrillation. Because two of the early large trials of B vitamin therapy (Vitamin Intervention for Stroke Prevention and the Norwegian Vitamin Study) did not show any reduction of stroke, and the Heart Outcomes Prevention Evaluation 2 trial was mistakenly interpreted as not showing a reduction of stroke (because the authors could not think of a biological difference between stroke and myocardial infarction), there has been widespread pessimism regarding treatment to lower total homocysteine for stroke prevention. However, the Heart Outcomes Prevention Evaluation 2 trial, the French trial of folic acid and omega three oils, the Vitamins to Prevent Stroke subgroup excluding antiplatelet therapy all showed a significant reduction of stroke. Reasons why the Vitamin Intervention for Stroke Prevention trial were negative included folate fortification in North America, provision of injections of B12 to patients with low baseline serum B12, and as it turns out, harm from cyanide in cyanocobalamin among participants with impaired renal function. In the Diabetic Intervention with Vitamins in Nephropathy trial, B vitamins including cyanocobalamin were harmful, and in a Vitamin Intervention for Stroke Prevention subgroup excluding participants who received B12 injections and those with impaired renal function, there was a statistically significant reduction of stroke/myocardial infarction/vascular death. In 2015, the China Stroke Primary Prevention Trial (CSPPT), in over 20,000 participants followed for 5 years, showed a significant reduction of stroke with folic acid in a setting where folate fortification has not been implemented. In the setting of folate fortification

  15. Preventive Antibacterial Therapy in Acute Ischemic Stroke: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Klehmet, Juliane; Rogge, Witold; Drenckhahn, Christoph; Göhler, Jos; Bereswill, Stefan; Göbel, Ulf; Wernecke, Klaus Dieter; Wolf, Tilo; Arnold, Guy; Halle, Elke; Volk, Hans-Dieter; Dirnagl, Ulrich; Meisel, Andreas

    2008-01-01

    Background Pneumonia is a major risk factor of death after acute stroke. In a mouse model, preventive antibacterial therapy with moxifloxacin not only prevents the development of post-stroke infections, it also reduces mortality, and improves neurological outcome significantly. In this study we investigate whether this approach is effective in stroke patients. Methods Preventive ANtibacterial THERapy in acute Ischemic Stroke (PANTHERIS) is a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial in 80 patients with severe, non-lacunar, ischemic stroke (NIHSS>11) in the middle cerebral artery (MCA) territory. Patients received either intravenous moxifloxacin (400 mg daily) or placebo for 5 days starting within 36 hours after stroke onset. Primary endpoint was infection within 11 days. Secondary endpoints included neurological outcome, survival, development of stroke-induced immunodepression, and induction of bacterial resistance. Findings On intention-to treat analysis (79 patients), the infection rate at day 11 in the moxifloxacin treated group was 15.4% compared to 32.5% in the placebo treated group (p = 0.114). On per protocol analysis (n = 66), moxifloxacin significantly reduced infection rate from 41.9% to 17.1% (p = 0.032). Stroke associated infections were associated with a lower survival rate. In this study, neurological outcome and survival were not significantly influenced by treatment with moxifloxacin. Frequency of fluoroquinolone resistance in both treatment groups did not differ. On logistic regression analysis, treatment arm as well as the interaction between treatment arm and monocytic HLA-DR expression (a marker for immunodepression) at day 1 after stroke onset was independently and highly predictive for post-stroke infections. Interpretation PANTHERIS suggests that preventive administration of moxifloxacin is superior in reducing infections after severe non-lacunar ischemic stroke compared to placebo. In addition, the results emphasize the

  16. [Bleeding peptic ulcers--how can recurrent bleeding be prevented?].

    PubMed

    Labenz, J; Tillenburg, B; Peitz, U; Stolte, M; Börsch, G

    1995-01-01

    Bleeding is the most frequent complication of peptic ulcer disease. Patients with a previous ulcer hemorrhage have a high risk for future bleeding episodes. Therefore, treatment aiming at ulcer prophylaxis is mandatory. Helicobacter pylori infection, acid/pepsin and intake of Aspirin or NSAIDs are the main causal factors involved in the pathogenesis of peptic ulcer disease. Ulcers induced by nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs can be cured by gastric acid suppression (e.g. omeprazole) and prevented by withdrawal of the ulcerogenic substances or co-medication with omeprazole or misoprostol. Acid and Helicobacter pylori are necessary, albeit by themselves not sufficient factors in the causal web of the formerly idiopathic, gastritis-associated peptic ulcer disease of the stomach and the duodenum. Maintenance therapy with antisecretory drugs results in a marked decrease of ulcer recurrences and probably further ulcer complications after an index bleeding, but a definite cure of the ulcer disease is not feasible in the majority of patients. The proportion of patients remaining in remission is dependent on the degree of gastric acid suppression. Therefore, potent antisecretory drugs such as the proton pump inhibitor omeprazole should be used if a physician decides to initiate a long-term maintenance therapy. Several studies have demonstrated beyond doubt that cure of Helicobacter pylori eradication resulted in a stable remission of gastric and duodenal ulcer disease. In addition, a true reinfection after apparent eradication of the bacteria has been rarely observed in adults.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  17. Prevention of deep vein thrombosis and pulmonary embolism in patients with stroke.

    PubMed

    Field, Thalia S; Hill, Michael D

    2012-01-01

    Venous thromboembolism (VTE), encompassing deep venous thrombosis and pulmonary embolism, is a potentially fatal but preventable complication of stroke. Reported rates of VTE after stroke have decreased over the last four decades, possibly due to the implementation of stroke units, early mobilization and hydration, and increased early use of antiplatelets. Additional means of thromboprophylaxis in stroke include mechanical methods (ie, compression stockings) to prevent venous stasis and medical therapy including antiplatelets, heparins, and heparinoids. Risk of VTE must be balanced by potential risk of hemorrhagic complications from pharmacotherapy. Unfractionated heparin, low-molecular-weight heparin (LMWH), and danaparoid are acceptable options for chemoprophylaxis though none have shown superior efficacy for VTE prevention without an associated increase in major hemorrhage. The efficacy and timing of pharmacological thromboprophylaxis in hemorrhagic stroke are not well defined. Graduated compression stockings are associated with an increased rate of adverse events and are not recommended and intermittent pneumatic compression stockings require further investigation. PMID:21733942

  18. Evaluation of patients' attitudes towards stroke prevention and bleeding risk in atrial fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Lahaye, S; Regpala, S; Lacombe, S; Sharma, M; Gibbens, S; Ball, D; Francis, K

    2014-03-01

    Patient's values and preferences regarding the relative importance of preventing strokes and avoiding bleeding are now recognised to be of great importance in deciding on therapy for the prevention of stroke due to atrial fibrillation (SPAF). We used an iPad questionnaire to determine the minimal clinically important difference (Treatment Threshold) and the maximum number of major bleeding events that a patient would be willing to endure in order to prevent one stroke (Bleeding Ratio) for the initiation of antithrombotic therapy in 172 hospital in-patients with documented non-valvular atrial fibrillation in whom anticoagulant therapy was being considered. Patients expressed strong opinions regarding SPAF. We found that 12% of patients were "medication averse" and were not willing to consider antithrombotic therapy; even if it was 100% effective in preventing strokes. Of those patients who were willing to consider antithrombotic therapy, 42% were identified as "risk averse" and 15% were "risk tolerant". Patients required at least a 0.8% (NNT=125) annual absolute risk reduction and 15% relative risk reduction in the risk of stroke in order to agree to initiate antithrombotic therapy, and patients were willing to endure 4.4 major bleeds in order to prevent one stroke. In conclusion, there was a substantial amount of inter-patient variability, and often extreme differences in opinion regarding tolerance of bleeding risk in the context of stroke prevention in atrial fibrillation. These findings highlight the importance of considering patient preferences when deciding on SPAF therapy.

  19. Novel oral anticoagulants for stroke prevention in atrial fibrillation: focus on apixaban.

    PubMed

    Potpara, Tatjana S; Polovina, Marija M; Licina, Marina M; Stojanovic, Radan M; Prostran, Milica S; Lip, Gregory Y H

    2012-06-01

    Stroke prevention in atrial fibrillation (AF) has been challenging over decades, mostly due to a number of difficulties associated with oral vitamin K antagonists (VKAs), which have been the most effective stroke prevention treatment for a long time. The oral direct thrombin inhibitors (e.g., dabigatran) and oral direct inhibitors of factor Xa (e.g., rivaroxaban, apixaban) have emerged recently as an alternative to VKAs for stroke prevention in AF. These drugs act rapidly, and have a predictable and stable dose-related anticoagulant effect with a few clinically relevant drug-drug interactions. The novel oral anticoagulants are used in fixed doses with no need for regular laboratory monitoring of anticoagulation intensity. However, each of these drugs has distinct pharmacological properties that could influence optimal use in clinical practice. The following phase 3 randomized trials with novel oral anticoagulants versus warfarin for stroke prevention in AF have been completed: the Randomized Evaluation of Long-term Anticoagulant therapy (RE-LY) trial with dabigatran, the Rivaroxaban Once daily oral direct Factor Xa inhibition Compared with vitamin K antagonism for prevention of stroke and Embolism Trial in Atrial Fibrillation (ROCKET-AF) trial with rivaroxaban, and the Apixaban for Reduction of Stroke and Other Thromboembolism Events in Atrial Fibrillation (ARISTOTLE) trial with apixaban. Moreover, the Apixaban Versus Acetylsalicylic Acid to prevent Strokes (AVERROES) trial included patients with AF who have failed or were unsuitable for warfarin, and compared apixaban versus aspirin for stroke prevention in AF. Overall, apixaban has two large trials for stroke prevention in AF showing benefits not only over warfarin, but also over aspirin among those patients who have failed or refused warfarin. In the ARISTOTLE trial, apixaban was superior to warfarin in the reduction of stroke or systemic embolism, major bleeding, intracranial hemorrhage, and all-cause mortality

  20. Preventing Recurrence of Thromboembolic Events through Coordinated Treatment in the District of Columbia (PROTECT DC)

    PubMed Central

    Dromerick, Andrew; Gibbons, M. Chistopher; Edwards, Dorothy F; Farr, Deeonna E; Giannetti, Margot L; Sánchez, Brisa; Shara, Nawar M; Fokar, Ali; Jayam-Trouth, Annapurni; Ovbiagele, Bruce; Kidwell, Chelsea S

    2012-01-01

    Rationale PROTECT DC examines whether stroke navigators can improve cardiovascular risk factors in urban underserved individuals newly hospitalized for stroke or ischemic attack. Within one year of hospital discharge, up to one third of patients no longer adhere to secondary prevention behaviors. Adherence rates are lower in minority-underserved groups, contributing to health disparities. In-hospital programs increase use of stroke prevention therapies but may not be as successful in underserved individuals. In these groups, low literacy, limited health care access, and sparse community resources may reduce adherence. Lay community health workers (‘navigators’) improve adherence in other illnesses through education and assisting in overcoming barriers to achieving desired health behaviors and obtaining needed healthcare services. Aims and design PROTECT DC is a Phase II, single-blind, randomized, controlled trial comparing in-hospital education plus stroke navigators to usual care. Atherogenic ischemic stroke and transient ischemic attack survivors are recruited from Washington DC hospitals. Navigators meet with participants during the index hospitalization, perform home visits, and meet by phone. They focus on stroke education, medication compliance, and overcoming practical barriers to adherence. The interventions are driven by the theories of reasoned action and planned behavior. Study outcomes The primary dependent measure is a summary score of four objective measures of stroke risk factor control: systolic blood pressure, low-density lipoprotein, hemoglobin Hb A1C, and antiplatelet agent pill counts. Secondary outcomes include stroke knowledge, exercise, dietary modification, smoking cessation. Conclusion PROTECT DC will determine whether a Phase III trial of stroke navigation for urban underserved individuals to improve adherence to secondary stroke prevention behaviors is warranted. PMID:21951411

  1. Prevention of the recurrence of symptom and lesions after conservative surgery for endometriosis.

    PubMed

    Koga, Kaori; Takamura, Masashi; Fujii, Tomoyuki; Osuga, Yutaka

    2015-10-01

    Although surgical excision of endometriosis both improves pain and enhances fertility, recurrence can further exacerbate pain and reduce fertility, which in turn impacts the quality of life and increases personal as well as social costs. Therefore, it is crucial to prevent the recurrence of symptoms and lesions after conservative surgery. This article reviews evidence regarding the prevention of postoperative recurrence of endometriosis reported since the 1990s. Over the past 5 years, many new studies have been conducted and have demonstrated that long-term postoperative medication markedly reduces the recurrence. Most of these studies used oral contraceptives (OC), with either the cyclic or continuous regimen, while some used oral or intrauterine progestin. Continuous OC is more efficacious than cyclic OC, especially for dysmenorrhea. The levonorgestrel-releasing intrauterine system is also shown to prevent recurrence of dysmenorrhea and possibly endometriosis lesions. Dienogest, a new progestin, is shown to reduce the recurrence of endometrioma. Similar to the case of ovarian endometriosis, long-term postoperative medication after conservative surgery for deep infiltrating or extragenital endometriosis seems important, although data are limited. Regardless of the lesion and the medication type, patients who discontinued medication experienced a higher incidence of recurrence, indicating that the protective effect of these medications seems to vanish rapidly after the discontinuation. On the basis of these facts, together with the pathogenesis of recurrence (retrograde menstruation and ovulation), regular and prolonged medication until the patient wishes to conceive is highly recommended to prevent the postoperative recurrence of endometriosis.

  2. [Management of dyslipidemia for stroke prevention from the perspective of J-STARS].

    PubMed

    Hosomi, Naohisa; Matsumoto, Masayasu

    2016-04-01

    We have outlined the management of dyslipidemia for stroke prevention from the perspective of J-STARS. The current situation wherein the results of many large-scale clinical trials conducted in Western countries have been adapted for our daily medical treatment is not satisfactory. This is because many differences in medical situations, including stroke incidence rates and doses of medicine for clinical use, exist between Asians and Caucasians. Therefore, it is possible that adoption of clinical study results conducted in Caucasians for Asians is insubstantial. J-STARS results showed that low dose mild statin use may reduce atherothrombotic stroke incidence in patients with non-cardioembolic stroke. Currently, the desirable LDL-cholesterol level for preventing ischemic stroke in Asians is unclear. The results of further examinations are awaited regarding this aspect. PMID:27333752

  3. Recurrent Heat Stroke in a Runner: Race Simulation Testing for Return to Activity.

    PubMed

    Roberts, William O; Dorman, Jason C; Bergeron, Michael F

    2016-05-01

    Exertional heat stroke (EHS) occurs in distance runners and is a life-threatening condition. A 30-yr-old healthy recreational male distance runner (CR) collapsed at the 12-mile mark in two half marathon races 6 wk apart in fall 2009. In both episodes, CR was found on the ground confused, incoherent, sweaty, and warm to touch. The emergency medical team responded, and he was treated empirically for suspected EHS by cooling en route to the emergency department. In the emergency department, rectal temperatures were 40°C and 40.5°C for each episode, respectively. The first race start temperature was 16°C with 94% relative humidity (RH), and the second was 3°C, 75% RH. Heat tolerance test was within the normal range indicating low EHS risk. A race simulation test (environmental chamber, 25°C, 60% RH) at a treadmill pace of 10.5-12.9 km·h was stopped at 70 min coincident with a rectal temperature of 39.5°C. CR's body weight dropped 3.49 kg with an estimated sweat loss of 4.09 L and an estimated total sweat Na loss of 7610 mg. We recommended that he limit his runs to <1 h and replace salt and fluid during and (mostly) after activity, run with a partner, acclimate to heat before racing, and reduce his pace or stop at the first sign of symptoms. Race simulation testing should be considered in athletes with recurrent EHS to assist with the return-to-activity recommendation. PMID:26694842

  4. Stroke

    MedlinePlus

    ... emergency. Strokes happen when blood flow to your brain stops. Within minutes, brain cells begin to die. There are two kinds ... blocks or plugs a blood vessel in the brain. The other kind, called hemorrhagic stroke, is caused ...

  5. Oral anticoagulation in elderly patients as secondary prevention of cardioembolic strokes

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Stroke incidence increases with age. Atrial fibrillation (AF) is an important risk factor for ischemic stroke and its incidence also increases with age. However oral anticoagulant therapy (OAT) tends to be underused in the elderly population. Methods Elderly patients (> = 80 years) with an ischemic stroke admitted in our department between 1/7/2003 and 31/6/2005 were prospectively evaluated. Baseline characteristics, risk factors, treatment and etiology according to TOAST criteria were recorded. Patients treated with OAT were followed up in order to assess any side effect and stroke recurrence. Mean follow-up was of 19.5 months (7-45) from discharge. Results Sixty four out of a hundred and fifty nine elderly patients (40.25%) were classified as cardioembolic; mean age was 84.5 years (80-97) and 64.6% were women. AF had been previously identified in 60% of them (16.9% were on OAT and 40.6% on antiplatelet therapy). At discharge, 32 patients (49.2%) were on OAT. In the follow-up 4 patients (12.5%) suffered systemic haemorrhages (3 urinary, 1 gastrointestinal bleeding), with no change in their functional status. Mean INR in this group was 5.9 [3-11] and, in 3 of them, OAT was cancelled. No brain haemorrhages were recorded. Ischemic stroke recurred in 4 patients (INR < 1.8 in 3 of them; the other, INR 2.35). Three patients had died at the end of the follow-up, one of them as a consequence of ischemic stroke recurrence. Discussion Twenty eight point eight of stroke patients admitted in the period of study were >80 years. The high proportion of cardioembolic strokes in this age segment contrasts with the general underuse of OAT as antithrombotic prophylaxis. Our study suggests that OAT is a safe strategy when carefully prescribed, even for elderly patients. PMID:20525389

  6. Metformin for the Prevention of Bladder Cancer Recurrence: Is it Effective?

    PubMed Central

    Heidari, Fatemeh; Abbas Zade, Shahin; Mir Hosseini, Seyed Hassan; Ghadian, Alireza

    2016-01-01

    Background Many methods have been used for preventing and reducing recurrences of bladder cancers. In recent years, some investigators have examined the use of metformin for this purpose. First lines of evidence have shown that metformin inhibits cancer cell growth and prevents cancer occurrence in patients with type 2 diabetes. Objectives This study is designed to assess metformin usage in the prevention of bladder cancer recurrence after the trans-urethral resection of a bladder tumor (TUR-T). Patients and Methods In the present study, metformin was administered in the treatment of 32 patients with a history of bladder cancer, and their results were compared with those of 33 patients with bladder cancer recurrence (placebo group). Patients in the metformin group received 1000 mg metformin (2 tablets 500 mg) for 1 year. Frequency of tumor recurrence was calculated and compared with the placebo group. Results There was no statistical difference between the 2 groups with respect to the recurrence rate (P > 0.05). Although the recurrence interval was longer for the metformin group, this increase was not statistical significant (P > 0.05). Furthermore, tumor recurrence had no correlation with sex or the grade of the tumors. Conclusions According to our findings, it seems that metformin has no considerable inhibitory effect on the recurrence rate of bladder cancer, but that it can delay tumor recurrence. PMID:27570750

  7. 9 Out of 10 Strokes Could Be Prevented, Study Finds

    MedlinePlus

    ... of Health, the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, or federal policy. More Health News on: Exercise and Physical Fitness Nutrition Stroke Recent Health News Related MedlinePlus Health Topics ...

  8. [Increased thromboembolic risk in atrial fibrillation and stroke prevention in women].

    PubMed

    Undas, Anetta

    2014-01-01

    Female sex is a recognized risk factor for atrial fibrillation (AF) and ischemic stroke associated with AF, which is in part related to higher prevalence of comorbidities such as diabetes and heart failure. In recent years the proportion of anticoagulated women with AF is similar to that for men. Women receiving vitamin K antagonists (VKA) are more prone to have unstable anticoagulation and experience stroke during such prevention, in particular in individuals aged > or = 75 years. New oral anticoagulants recently approved for prevention of stroke in patients with nonvalvular AF are at least as efficacious as dose-adjusted warfarin in both women and men. The risk of bleeding on these new drugs is also similar in both sexes. The current review summarizes the epidemiological and pathophysiological data on the risk of thromboembolic events in women with AF and therapeutic challenges of stroke prevention in women.

  9. Direct oral anticoagulants: key considerations for use to prevent stroke in patients with nonvalvular atrial fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    Ment, Jerome

    2015-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common cardiac arrhythmia worldwide. Strokes that occur as a complication of AF are usually more severe and associated with a higher disability or morbidity and mortality rate compared with non-AF-related strokes. The risk of stroke in AF is dependent on several risk factors; AF itself acts as an independent risk factor for stroke. The combination of effective anticoagulation therapy, risk stratification (based on stroke risk scores, such as CHADS2 and CHA2DS2-VASc), and recommendations provided by guidelines is essential for decreasing the risk of stroke in patients with AF. Although effective in preventing the occurrence of stroke, vitamin K antagonists (VKAs; eg, warfarin) are associated with several limitations. Therefore, direct oral anticoagulants, such as apixaban, dabigatran etexilate, edoxaban, and rivaroxaban, have emerged as an alternative to the VKAs for stroke prevention in patients with nonvalvular AF. Compared with the VKAs, these agents have more favorable pharmacological characteristics and, unlike the VKAs, they are given at fixed doses without the need for routine coagulation monitoring. It remains important that physicians use these direct oral anticoagulants responsibly to ensure optimal safety and effectiveness. This article provides an overview of the existing data on the direct oral anticoagulants, focusing on management protocols for aiding physicians to optimize anticoagulant therapy in patients with nonvalvular AF, particularly in special patient populations (eg, those with renal impairment) and other specific clinical situations. PMID:26089678

  10. RECURRENT STROKE IN THE WARFARIN VERSUS ASPIRIN IN REDUCED EJECTION FRACTION (WARCEF) TRIAL

    PubMed Central

    Pullicino, Patrick M.; Qian, Min; Sacco, Ralph L.; Freudenberger, Ron; Graham, Susan; Teerlink, John R.; Mann, Douglas; Di Tullio, Marco R.; Ponikowski, Piotr; Lok, Dirk J.; Anker, Stefan D.; Lip, Gregory Y.H.; Estol, Conrado J.; Levin, Bruce; Mohr, J.P.; Thompson, John L. P.; Homma, Shunichi

    2014-01-01

    Background and Purpose WARCEF randomized 2305 patients in sinus rhythm with ejection fraction (EF) ≤35% to warfarin (INR 2.0–3.5) or aspirin 325 mg. Warfarin reduced the incident ischemic stroke (IIS) hazard rate by 48% over aspirin in a secondary analysis. The IIS rate in heart failure (HF) is too low to warrant routine anticoagulation but epidemiologic studies show that prior stroke increases the stroke risk in HF. We here explore IIS rates in WARCEF patients with and without baseline stroke to look for risk factors for IIS and determine if a subgroup with an IIS rate high enough to give a clinically relevant stroke risk reduction can be identified. Methods We compared potential stroke risk factors between patients with baseline stroke and those without using the exact conditional score test for Poisson variables. We looked for risk factors for IIS, by comparing IIS rates between different risk factors. For EF we tried cutoff points of 10%, 15% and 20%. 15% was used as it was the highest EF that was associated with a significant increase in IIS rate. IIS and EF strata were balanced as to warfarin/aspirin assignment by the stratified randomized design. A multiple Poisson regression examined the simultaneous effects of all risk factors on IIS rate. IIS rates per hundred patient years (/100PY) were calculated in patient groups with significant risk factors. Missing values were assigned the modal value. Results Twenty of 248 (8.1%) patients with baseline stroke and 64 of 2048 (3.1%) without had IIS. IIS rate in patients with baseline stroke (2.37/100PY) was greater than patients without (0.89/100PY)(rate ratio 2.68, p<0.001). Fourteen of 219 (6.4%) patients with ejection fraction (EF)<15% and 70 of 2079 (3.4%) with EF ≥15% had IIS. In the multiple regression analysis stroke at baseline (p<0.001) and EF<15% vs. ≥15% (p=.005) remained significant predictors of IIS. IIS rate was 2.04/100PY in patients with EF<15% and 0.95/100PY in patients with EF ≥15% (p=0

  11. Prevention of stricture recurrence following urethral internal urethrotomy: routine repeated dilations or active surveillance?

    PubMed

    Tian, Ye; Wazir, Romel; Wang, Jianzhong; Wang, Kunjie; Li, Hong

    2016-01-01

    Strictures of the urethra are the most common cause of obstructed micturition in younger men and there is frequent recurrence after initial treatment. Currently, routine repeated dilations, including intermittent self-catheterisation (ISC) are prescribed by urologists to prevent urethral stricture recurrence. There is, however, no high level evidence available supporting the effectiveness of practicing these painful techniques. Balancing efficacy, adverse effects and costs, we hypothesize that active surveillance is a better option for preventing stricture recurrence as compared with routine repeated dilations. However, well designed, adequately powered multi-center trials with comprehensive evaluation are urgently needed to confirm our hypothesis. .

  12. Prevention of stricture recurrence following urethral internal urethrotomy: routine repeated dilations or active surveillance?

    PubMed

    Tian, Ye; Wazir, Romel; Wang, Jianzhong; Wang, Kunjie; Li, Hong

    2016-01-01

    Strictures of the urethra are the most common cause of obstructed micturition in younger men and there is frequent recurrence after initial treatment. Currently, routine repeated dilations, including intermittent self-catheterisation (ISC) are prescribed by urologists to prevent urethral stricture recurrence. There is, however, no high level evidence available supporting the effectiveness of practicing these painful techniques. Balancing efficacy, adverse effects and costs, we hypothesize that active surveillance is a better option for preventing stricture recurrence as compared with routine repeated dilations. However, well designed, adequately powered multi-center trials with comprehensive evaluation are urgently needed to confirm our hypothesis. . PMID:27576888

  13. Statins for the Prevention of Stroke: A Meta-Analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wen; Zhang, Bo

    2014-01-01

    Background Stroke is a frequently encountered clinical event that has a detrimental impact on the quality of life. Evidence has increasingly shown that statins can substantially reduce the risk of coronary heart disease. However, it remains to be determined whether statins are definitively effective in preventing stroke. Methods We systematically searched the PubMed, Embase, and Central databases for studies that compared the effects of statins and placebo in patients at high risk for stroke. The outcome measures were overall incidence of stroke, incidence of fatal stroke, and incidence of hemorrhagic stroke. Results Eighteen randomized controlled trials satisfied all the inclusion criteria for the meta-analysis. The analysis revealed that statins reduced the overall incidence of stroke than placebo (odds ratio [OR]: 0.80; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.74–0.87; P<0.00001). In particular, statins showed efficacy in reducing the incidence of fatal stroke (OR: 0.90; 95% CI: 0.67–1.21; P = 0.47) and hemorrhagic stroke (OR: 0.87; 95% CI: 0.60–1.25; P = 0.45). On the contrary, they were found to increase the overall incidence of stroke (OR: 1.12; 95% CI: 0.89–1.41; P = 0.32) and fatal stroke (OR: 1.37; 95% CI: 0.93–2.03; P = 0.11) in renal transplant recipients and patients undergoing regular hemodialysis. Conclusion The results of this analysis suggest that statins may be beneficial in reducing the overall incidence of stroke and they may decrease the risk of fatal stroke and hemorrhagic stroke. However, statins should be used with caution in patients with a history of renal transplantation, regular hemodialysis, transient ischemic attack, or stroke. Further analyses should focus on multicentre, double-blind, placebo-controlled randomized trials with data stratification according to the nature of primary diseases and dose–effect relationship, to clarify the benefits of statins in protection against stroke. PMID:24643199

  14. Oxidative stress markers are associated to vascular recurrence in non-cardioembolic stroke patients non-treated with statins

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Since atherogenesis is related to oxidative stress, our objective was to study the association of oxidative stress markers with the vascular recurrence in non-cardioembolic stroke. Methods Atherosclerotic and oxidative stress markers were evaluated on admission, in 477 patients suffering from a first non-cardioembolic stroke. Patients were followed at 6 and 12 months after inclusion, recording cardiovascular events. As markers of endothelial oxidative stress we used oxidized LDL, Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase and 8-OH deoxiguanosine. 136 patients were being treated with statins at the moment of serum samples acquisition. Results Patients who suffered vascular recurrence or vascular-origin death had higher levels of 8-OHDG (40.06±24.70vs33.11±15.18;p=0.003). We also found associations between vascular recurrence or vascular origin death and Cu/ZnSOD (OR,1.02; 95%CI,1.00-1.03;p=0.0001) and 8-OHDG (OR,1.12;95%CI,1.08-1.16;p<0.0001) in a subgroup of 333 patients that were not in treatment with statins on admission. We also found associations between 8-OHDG and intima media thickness (IMT) (OR,1.13;95%CI,1.09-1.16;p<0.0001), presence of ipsilatieral stenosis≥50% (OR,1.03;95%CI1.00-1.05;p=0.007) and other atherosclerotic plaque characteristics. Conclusions Specific oxidative stress markers were found to be markers of atherosclerosis plaque types and vascular recurrence in non-statins treated patients at admission. PMID:22862793

  15. Compression for Primary Prevention, Treatment, and Prevention of Recurrence of Venous Leg Ulcers

    PubMed Central

    Yates, Stephanie; McNichol, Laurie; Gray, Mikel

    2016-01-01

    Chronic venous insufficiency is a prevalent disease that frequently leads to development of venous leg ulcers. While a number of evidence-based clinical practice guidelines have been developed that provide guidance for clinicians when caring for patients with chronic venous insufficiency, they lack adequate detail concerning selection and application of compression for prevention and management of venous leg ulcers. In order to address this need, the WOCN Society appointed a task force to develop an algorithm for compression for primary prevention, treatment, and prevention of recurrent venous leg ulcers in persons with chronic venous insufficiency. The task force used findings from a scoping literature review to identify current best evidence needed to support decision points and pathways within the algorithm. In addition, the task force convened a panel of 20 clinicians and researchers with expertise in lower extremity venous disorders in order to establish consensus around pathways and decision points within the algorithm lacking robust evidence. Following initial construction of the algorithm, a second interdisciplinary group of expert clinicians established content validity and provided additional qualitative feedback used to complete final revisions of the algorithm. This article reviews the process used to create this landmark algorithm, including generation of the evidence- and consensus-based statements used in its construction, the various pathways, and rich supplemental materials embedded within the algorithm, and the process used to establish content validity. PMID:27163774

  16. Detection of multiple annexin autoantibodies in a patient with recurrent miscarriages, fulminant stroke and seronegative antiphospholipid syndrome.

    PubMed

    Scholz, Philipp; Auler, Markus; Brachvogel, Bent; Benzing, Thomas; Mallman, Peter; Streichert, Thomas; Klatt, Andreas R

    2016-01-01

    Anti-phospholipid syndrome (APS) is one of the main causes for recurrent miscarriages. The diagnosis of APS is based on the occurrence of clinical symptoms such as thrombotic events or obstetric complications as well as the detection of antiphospholipid antibodies directed against β2-glycoprotein I and cardiolipin, or a positive lupus anticoagulant assay. However, there is a subpopulation of patients with clinical symptoms of APS, but the lack of serological markers (seronegative APS). In addition, a large proportion of patients with unexplained recurrent miscarriages exist. These cases may be attributed, at least in part, to a seronegative APS.
The presence of autoantibodies against annexins is potentially associated with APS. Here we used immunoassays and immunoblots to detect autoantibodies directed against annexin A1-5, and A8, respectively, in a patient with a seronegative APS and a history of six recurrent pregnancy losses and fulminant stroke. We found strong IgM isotype antibody reactivity directed against annexin A2 and annexin A8, and moderate to weak IgM isotype antibody reactivity directed against annexin A1, A3, and A5. Further studies will evaluate the diagnostic value of IgM isotype antibodies against annexin A1-A5, and A8 for seronegative APS and recurrent miscarriages. PMID:27346975

  17. Detection of multiple annexin autoantibodies in a patient with recurrent miscarriages, fulminant stroke and seronegative antiphospholipid syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Scholz, Philipp; Auler, Markus; Brachvogel, Bent; Benzing, Thomas; Mallman, Peter; Streichert, Thomas; Klatt, Andreas R.

    2016-01-01

    Anti-phospholipid syndrome (APS) is one of the main causes for recurrent miscarriages. The diagnosis of APS is based on the occurrence of clinical symptoms such as thrombotic events or obstetric complications as well as the detection of antiphospholipid antibodies directed against β2-glycoprotein I and cardiolipin, or a positive lupus anticoagulant assay. However, there is a subpopulation of patients with clinical symptoms of APS, but the lack of serological markers (seronegative APS). In addition, a large proportion of patients with unexplained recurrent miscarriages exist. These cases may be attributed, at least in part, to a seronegative APS.
The presence of autoantibodies against annexins is potentially associated with APS. Here we used immunoassays and immunoblots to detect autoantibodies directed against annexin A1-5, and A8, respectively, in a patient with a seronegative APS and a history of six recurrent pregnancy losses and fulminant stroke. We found strong IgM isotype antibody reactivity directed against annexin A2 and annexin A8, and moderate to weak IgM isotype antibody reactivity directed against annexin A1, A3, and A5. Further studies will evaluate the diagnostic value of IgM isotype antibodies against annexin A1-A5, and A8 for seronegative APS and recurrent miscarriages. PMID:27346975

  18. A review of apixaban for stroke prevention in atrial fibrillation: insights from ARISTOTLE.

    PubMed

    Hess, Connie N; Al-Khatib, Sana M; Granger, Christopher B; Lopes, Renato

    2013-09-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is associated with significant mortality and morbidity, and stroke represents the most-feared complication. Consequently, AF treatment has focused on thromboprophylaxis, with warfarin as the mainstay of therapy. However, concerns over ease of use and safety have limited its use. Three novel oral anticoagulants have been approved for use in stroke prevention in AF based on randomized data: 1) dabigatran, studied in Randomized Evaluation of Long-term Anticoagulation Therapy (RE-LY); 2) rivaroxaban, studied in Rivaroxaban Once-daily, Oral, Direct Factor Xa Inhibition Compared with Vitamin K Antagonism for Prevention of Stroke and Embolism Trial in Atrial Fibrillation (ROCKET AF); and 3) apixaban, studied in Apixaban for Reduction in Stroke and Other Thromboembolic Events in Atrial Fibrillation (ARISTOTLE). In this review, we focus on apixaban and discuss subgroup analyses that have been performed in the three trials comparing novel oral anticoagulants with warfarin. We conclude with recommendations regarding further investigations.

  19. The Mechanism of and Preventive Therapy for Stroke in Patients with Atrial Fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Young-Hoon; Roh, Seung-Young

    2016-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation is a major cardiac cause of stroke, and a pathogenesis involving thrombus formation in patients with atrial fibrillation is well established. A strategy for rhythm control that involves catheter ablation and anticoagulation therapy is evolving. A strategy for rhythm control that restores and maintains sinus rhythm should reduce the risk of ischemic stroke that is associated with atrial fibrillation; however, this is yet to be proven in large-scale randomized controlled trials. This paper reviews the emerging role of rhythm control therapy for atrial fibrillation to prevent stroke. PMID:27283277

  20. Tissue plasminogen activator prevents white matter damage following stroke

    PubMed Central

    Correa, Fernando; Gauberti, Maxime; Parcq, Jérôme; Macrez, Richard; Hommet, Yannick; Obiang, Pauline; Hernangómez, Miriam; Montagne, Axel; Liot, Géraldine; Guaza, Carmen; Maubert, Eric; Ali, Carine; Vivien, Denis

    2011-01-01

    Tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) is the only available treatment for acute stroke. In addition to its vascular fibrinolytic action, tPA exerts various effects within the brain, ranging from synaptic plasticity to control of cell fate. To date, the influence of tPA in the ischemic brain has only been investigated on neuronal, microglial, and endothelial fate. We addressed the mechanism of action of tPA on oligodendrocyte (OL) survival and on the extent of white matter lesions in stroke. We also investigated the impact of aging on these processes. We observed that, in parallel to reduced levels of tPA in OLs, white matter gets more susceptible to ischemia in old mice. Interestingly, tPA protects murine and human OLs from apoptosis through an unexpected cytokine-like effect by the virtue of its epidermal growth factor–like domain. When injected into aged animals, tPA, although toxic to the gray matter, rescues white matter from ischemia independently of its proteolytic activity. These studies reveal a novel mechanism of action of tPA and unveil OL as a target cell for cytokine effects of tPA in brain diseases. They show overall that tPA protects white matter from stroke-induced lesions, an effect which may contribute to the global benefit of tPA-based stroke treatment. PMID:21576385

  1. Adjuvant Chinese Herbal Products for Preventing Ischemic Stroke in Patients with Atrial Fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    Muo, Chih-Hsin; Chiu, Hsienhsueh Elley; Liu, Chun-Ting

    2016-01-01

    Objective Chinese herbal products (CHPs) are widely used for atrial fibrillation (AF) in Taiwan. We investigated the effect of adjuvant CHPs in preventing ischemic stroke in patients with AF. Methods Taiwanese patients in the Health Insurance Database newly diagnosed with AF during 2000–2011 were enrolled. Medication treatment with/without CHPs was administered within 7 days after the AF diagnosis. The clinical endpoint was an ischemic stroke. The Chi-square test, Fisher’s exact test, and Student t test were used to examine differences between the traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) and non-TCM cohorts. Cox proportional hazard regression was used to assess the risk for ischemic stroke between two cohorts. Results Three hundred and eleven patients underwent TCM treatment and 1715 patients did not. Compared to non-TCM users, TCM users had a lower incidence of stroke (12.59% vs. 1.93%, respectively) and lower risk of stroke [CHA2DS2-VASc score = 0–2 (hazard ratio = 0.20; 95% confidence interval = 0.06–0.65)]. Compared to non-TCM users, the stroke risk was significantly lower in TCM users with AF who were female or younger than 65 years, but not in males, people more than 65 years old, or people with comorbidities. Compared to TCM users, non-TCM users who received conventional treatment had a higher ischemic stroke risk. The risk for AF-related hospitalization was significantly lower in TCM users (0.64%) than in non-TCM users (38.1%). Conclusions Users of TCM with AF have a lower risk of new-onset ischemic stroke. Therefore, adjuvant CHP therapy may have a protective effect and may be used in AF patients to prevent ischemic stroke. PMID:27428543

  2. [Stroke].

    PubMed

    Luft, A R; Weller, M

    2009-11-01

    Ischemic stroke is a very frequent neurological disorder. It's incidence is increasing as western societies are aging. Effective therapies that reduce mortality and increase the chances of living symptom-free or, at least, in independence are available. Intravenous or intraarterial thrombolysis is an effective treatment with a number needed to treat of 6 if given within 4.5 hours after symptom onset. The safe use of thrombolysis requires an effective and repeatedly trained workflow established within a team of a neurologist and specialized nursing staff in an optimized environment (admission, imaging facility, laboratory, stroke unit). After peracute treatment, the patient should be transferred to a stroke unit. This unit is a spatially defined intermediate care unit with specifically trained personnel (physicians, nurses, therapists). Treating the patient in a stroke unit is as effective in improving outcome as thrombolysis and also reduces the length of hospital stay. In contrast to thrombolysis, which can be provided, on average, to only 5% of stroke patients, stroke unit care is applicable to most. The organization of medical care in most European countries and in Switzerland separate the acute phase from subacute rehabilitation and chronic stroke treatment. This can be highly confusing for the patient who, during the course of the disease, meets different physicians, nurses and therapists with often diverging opinions about prognosis and therapies. Consistent treatment approaches and patient/caregiver information is necessary and can only be implemented by providing a homogeneous pathway for continuous stroke care. PMID:20029781

  3. The Value of ABCD2F Scoring System (ABCD2 Combined with Atrial Fibrillation) to Predict 90-Day Recurrent Brain Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Almasi, Mostafa; Ghasemi, Faeze; Chardoli, Mojtaba

    2016-01-01

    Background. The ABCD2 score is now identified as a useful clinical prediction rule to determine the risk for stroke in the days following brain ischemic attacks. Aim. The present study aimed to introduce a new scoring system named “ABCD2F” and compare its value with the previous ABCD2 system to predict recurrent ischemic stroke within 90 days of the initial cerebrovascular accident (CVA). Methods. 138 consecutive patients with the final diagnosis of ischemic CVA or TIAs who referred to emergency ward of Rasoul-e-Akram general hospital in Tehran from September 2012 to December 2013 were eligible. By adding a new score in the presence of atrial fibrillation to ABCD2 system, the new scoring system as ABCD2F was introduced and the risk stratification was done again on this new system. Results. The area under the curve for ABCD2 was 0.434 and for ABCD2F it was 0.452 indicating low value of both systems for assessing recurrence of stroke within 90 days of primary event. Multivariable logistic regression analysis showed that none of the baseline factors could predict 90-day recurrent stroke. Conclusion. ABCD2 and/or atrial fibrillation are not good scoring candidates for assessing the risk of recurrent stroke within first 90 days. PMID:27642521

  4. The Value of ABCD2F Scoring System (ABCD2 Combined with Atrial Fibrillation) to Predict 90-Day Recurrent Brain Stroke.

    PubMed

    Almasi, Mostafa; Hodjati Firoozabadi, Nader; Ghasemi, Faeze; Chardoli, Mojtaba

    2016-01-01

    Background. The ABCD2 score is now identified as a useful clinical prediction rule to determine the risk for stroke in the days following brain ischemic attacks. Aim. The present study aimed to introduce a new scoring system named "ABCD2F" and compare its value with the previous ABCD2 system to predict recurrent ischemic stroke within 90 days of the initial cerebrovascular accident (CVA). Methods. 138 consecutive patients with the final diagnosis of ischemic CVA or TIAs who referred to emergency ward of Rasoul-e-Akram general hospital in Tehran from September 2012 to December 2013 were eligible. By adding a new score in the presence of atrial fibrillation to ABCD2 system, the new scoring system as ABCD2F was introduced and the risk stratification was done again on this new system. Results. The area under the curve for ABCD2 was 0.434 and for ABCD2F it was 0.452 indicating low value of both systems for assessing recurrence of stroke within 90 days of primary event. Multivariable logistic regression analysis showed that none of the baseline factors could predict 90-day recurrent stroke. Conclusion. ABCD2 and/or atrial fibrillation are not good scoring candidates for assessing the risk of recurrent stroke within first 90 days. PMID:27642521

  5. The Value of ABCD2F Scoring System (ABCD2 Combined with Atrial Fibrillation) to Predict 90-Day Recurrent Brain Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Almasi, Mostafa; Ghasemi, Faeze; Chardoli, Mojtaba

    2016-01-01

    Background. The ABCD2 score is now identified as a useful clinical prediction rule to determine the risk for stroke in the days following brain ischemic attacks. Aim. The present study aimed to introduce a new scoring system named “ABCD2F” and compare its value with the previous ABCD2 system to predict recurrent ischemic stroke within 90 days of the initial cerebrovascular accident (CVA). Methods. 138 consecutive patients with the final diagnosis of ischemic CVA or TIAs who referred to emergency ward of Rasoul-e-Akram general hospital in Tehran from September 2012 to December 2013 were eligible. By adding a new score in the presence of atrial fibrillation to ABCD2 system, the new scoring system as ABCD2F was introduced and the risk stratification was done again on this new system. Results. The area under the curve for ABCD2 was 0.434 and for ABCD2F it was 0.452 indicating low value of both systems for assessing recurrence of stroke within 90 days of primary event. Multivariable logistic regression analysis showed that none of the baseline factors could predict 90-day recurrent stroke. Conclusion. ABCD2 and/or atrial fibrillation are not good scoring candidates for assessing the risk of recurrent stroke within first 90 days.

  6. Systematic review and network meta-analysis of stroke prevention treatments in patients with atrial fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    Tawfik, Amy; Bielecki, Joanna M; Krahn, Murray; Dorian, Paul; Hoch, Jeffrey S; Boon, Heather; Husereau, Don; Pechlivanoglou, Petros

    2016-01-01

    Background In the last 4 years, four novel oral anticoagulants have been developed as alternatives to warfarin and antiplatelet agents for stroke prevention in atrial fibrillation (AF) patients. The objective of this review was to estimate the comparative effectiveness of all antithrombotic treatments for AF patients. Materials and methods Data sources were Medline Ovid (1946 to October 2015), Embase Ovid (1980 to October 2015), and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL, Issue 9, 2015). Randomized controlled trials of AF patients were selected if they compared at least two of the following: placebo, aspirin, aspirin and clopidogrel combination therapy, adjusted-dose warfarin (target international normalized ratio 2.0–3.0), dabigatran, rivaroxaban, apixaban, and edoxaban. Bayesian network meta-analyses were conducted for outcomes of interest (all stroke, ischemic stroke, myocardial infarction, overall mortality, major bleeding, and intracranial hemorrhage). Results Based on 16 randomized controlled trials of 96,826 patients, all oral anticoagulants were more effective than antiplatelet agents at reducing the risk of ischemic stroke and all strokes. Compared to warfarin, dabigatran 150 mg (rate ratio 0.65, 95% credible interval 0.52–0.82) and apixaban (rate ratio 0.82, 95% credible interval 0.69–0.97) reduced the risk of all strokes. Dabigatran 150 mg was also more effective than warfarin at reducing ischemic stroke risk (rate ratio 0.76, 95% credible interval 0.59–0.99). Aspirin, apixaban, dabigatran 110 mg, and edoxaban were associated with less major bleeding than warfarin. Conclusion All oral anticoagulants reduce the risk of stroke in AF patients. Some novel oral anticoagulants are associated with a lower stroke and/or major bleeding risk than warfarin. In addition to the safety and effectiveness of drug therapy, as reported in this study, individual treatment recommendations should also consider the patient’s underlying stroke

  7. Concepts in Onychomycosis Treatment and Recurrence Prevention: An Update.

    PubMed

    Rosen, Theodore

    2016-03-01

    In considering therapy for onychomycosis, the most important factor to take into account is patient selection rather than treatment selection. Patients should be screened and evaluated for the extent of nail involvement, the amount of subungual debris, the degree of dystrophy, their ability and willingness to follow the regimen, and whether comorbidities are present that may affect the efficacy and/or safety of one or more therapies. Onychomycosis is a chronic disease with a high recurrence rate. Commonsense measures to reduce the risk for reinfection include patient education and a clinician-patient team approach to long-term management. PMID:27074701

  8. Dietary Lignan and Proanthocyanidin Consumption and Colorectal Adenoma Recurrence in the Polyp Prevention Trial

    PubMed Central

    Bobe, Gerd; Murphy, Gwen; Albert, Paul S.; Sansbury, Leah B.; Lanza, Elaine; Schatzkin, Arthur; Cross, Amanda J.

    2011-01-01

    Lignans and proanthocyanidins are plant polyphenols that have shown protective properties against colorectal neoplasms in some human studies. Using logistic regression, we estimated odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) to prospectively evaluate the association between lignan and proanthocyanidin intake, estimated from databases linked to a food frequency questionnaire, and adenoma recurrence in 1,859 participants of the Polyp Prevention Trial. Overall, individual or total lignans or proanthocyanidins were not associated with colorectal adenoma recurrence. However, in sex-specific analyses, total lignan intake was positively associated with any adenoma recurrence in women (highest versus lowest lignan intake quartile OR = 2.07, 95% CI: 1.22-3.52, P trend = 0.004) but not in men (P interaction = 0.04). To conclude, dietary lignan and proanthocyanidin consumption was not generally related to colorectal adenoma recurrence; however, high lignan intake may increase the risk of adenoma recurrence in women. PMID:21618513

  9. Preferences and attitudes toward approaches to depression relapse/recurrence prevention among pregnant women.

    PubMed

    Dimidjian, Sona; Goodman, Sherryl H

    2014-03-01

    Patient preferences are increasingly recognized as important in clinical research and the delivery of evidence based practice in psychology. Although the prevention of depressive relapse/recurrence among perinatal women is an important public health goal, little is known about pregnant women's preferences and attitudes toward relapse/recurrence prevention interventions. Such information is important given low rates of care seeking among this population, and the potential for a relapse/recurrence prevention to avert negative outcomes among both vulnerable women and their offspring. Pregnant women seeking routine prenatal care in obstetric clinics (n = 200) were surveyed to assess their preferences for and attitudes about psychotherapy and pharmacological approaches to relapse/recurrence prevention. Women preferred psychotherapy (mindfulness based cognitive therapy and interpersonal therapy) more so than pharmacotherapy and reported significantly more favorable perceptions of the psychotherapy as compared to pharmacotherapy approaches to depression relapse/recurrence prevention. Results suggest also that depression history is important to consider in evaluating women's preferences and attitudes. Clinical and research implications of these findings are discussed.

  10. Percutaneous left atrial appendage occlusion for stroke prevention in atrial fibrillation: an update

    PubMed Central

    De Backer, O; Arnous, S; Ihlemann, N; Vejlstrup, N; Jørgensen, E; Pehrson, S; Krieger, T D W; Meier, P; Søndergaard, L; Franzen, O W

    2014-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common sustained cardiac arrhythmia encountered in clinical practice. One of its most devastating complications is the development of thromboembolism leading to fatal or disabling stroke. Oral anticoagulation (OAC, warfarin) is the standard treatment for stroke prevention in patients with AF with an increased stroke risk. However, there are several obstacles to long-term OAC therapy, including the risk of serious bleeding, several drug–drug interactions and the need for frequent blood testing. Although newer oral anticoagulants have been developed, these drugs also face issues of major bleeding and non-compliance. Therefore, alternative treatment options for stroke prevention in patients with AF with a high stroke risk are needed. Percutaneous left atrial appendage (LAA) occlusion is an evolving therapy, which should be taken into consideration in those patients with non-valvular AF with a high stroke risk and contraindications for OAC. This article aims to discuss the rationale for LAA closure, the available LAA occlusion devices and their clinical evidence until now. Moreover, we discuss the importance of proper patient selection, the role of various imaging techniques and the need for a more tailored postprocedural antithrombotic therapy. PMID:25332785

  11. Stroke in Latin America: Burden of Disease and Opportunities for Prevention.

    PubMed

    Avezum, Álvaro; Costa-Filho, Francisco F; Pieri, Alexandre; Martins, Sheila O; Marin-Neto, José A

    2015-12-01

    The epidemiological transition in Latin America toward older urban dwelling adults has led to the rise in cardiovascular risk factors and an increase in morbidity and mortality rates related to both stroke and myocardial infarction. As a result, there is an immediate need for effective actions resulting in better detection and control of cardiovascular risk factors that will ultimately reduce cardiovascular disease burden. Data from case-control studies have identified the following risk factors associated with stroke: hypertension; smoking; abdominal obesity; diet; physical activity; diabetes; alcohol intake; psychosocial factors; cardiac causes; and dyslipidemia. In addition to its high mortality, patients who survive after a stroke present quite frequently with marked physical and functional disability. Because stroke is the leading cause of death in most Latin American countries and also because it is a clearly preventable cause of death and disability, simple, affordable, and efficient strategies must be urgently implemented in Latin America. PMID:26014650

  12. Stroke in Latin America: Burden of Disease and Opportunities for Prevention.

    PubMed

    Avezum, Álvaro; Costa-Filho, Francisco F; Pieri, Alexandre; Martins, Sheila O; Marin-Neto, José A

    2015-12-01

    The epidemiological transition in Latin America toward older urban dwelling adults has led to the rise in cardiovascular risk factors and an increase in morbidity and mortality rates related to both stroke and myocardial infarction. As a result, there is an immediate need for effective actions resulting in better detection and control of cardiovascular risk factors that will ultimately reduce cardiovascular disease burden. Data from case-control studies have identified the following risk factors associated with stroke: hypertension; smoking; abdominal obesity; diet; physical activity; diabetes; alcohol intake; psychosocial factors; cardiac causes; and dyslipidemia. In addition to its high mortality, patients who survive after a stroke present quite frequently with marked physical and functional disability. Because stroke is the leading cause of death in most Latin American countries and also because it is a clearly preventable cause of death and disability, simple, affordable, and efficient strategies must be urgently implemented in Latin America.

  13. Antithrombotic Treatments for Stroke Prevention in Elderly Patients With Nonvalvular Atrial Fibrillation: Drugs and Doses.

    PubMed

    Kilickap, Mustafa; Bosch, Jackie; Eikelboom, John W; Hart, Robert G

    2016-09-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is a common cardiac rhythm disturbance and is associated with a 5-fold increased risk of stroke. The most important risk factors for stroke in patients with AF are previous stroke and age ≥ 75 years. Canadian guidelines recommend anticoagulant therapy for patients with AF who are older than the age of 65 years, but the elderly often remain undertreated, primarily because of concerns regarding bleeding. Non-vitamin K oral anticoagulants appear to be safer, at least as efficacious, and more convenient than warfarin, and are a cost-effective alternative for elderly patients with AF. We review the evidence for the use of antithrombotic agents for stroke prevention in elderly patients (age ≥ 75 years) with nonvalvular AF. PMID:27568871

  14. Apixaban for stroke prevention in atrial fibrillation: a review of the clinical trial evidence.

    PubMed

    Yates, Scott W

    2011-10-01

    The objective of this review is to summarize data from the Apixaban for Reduction in Stroke and Other Thromboembolic Events in Atrial Fibrillation (ARISTOTLE) and Apixaban Versus Acetylsalicylic Acid to Prevent Stroke in Atrial Fibrillation Patients Who Have Failed or Are Unsuitable for Vitamin K Antagonist Treatment (AVERROES) trials of apixaban for stroke prevention in patients with atrial fibrillation (AF). The ARISTOTLE trial compared apixaban with warfarin in 18 201 patients with AF and ≥ 1 additional risk factor for stroke. The AVERROES trial compared apixaban with aspirin in 5599 patients with AF who were at increased risk of stroke and for whom vitamin K antagonists were unsuitable. In ARISTOTLE, apixaban reduced the risk of stroke or systemic embolism by 21% compared with warfarin (1.27% vs 1.60% per year; hazard ratio, 0.79; 95% confidence interval, 0.66-0.95). The reduction was significant and demonstrated the superiority of apixaban over warfarin for the primary outcome of preventing stroke or systemic embolism (P = 0.01 for superiority). Apixaban also reduced all-cause mortality by 11% (P = 0.047) and major bleeding by 31% (P < 0.001) compared with warfarin. The benefits of apixaban observed in ARISTOTLE are further supported by the results from AVERROES, which demonstrated a 55% reduction in the risk of stroke or systemic embolism compared with aspirin. Risk of major bleeding was not significantly different between apixaban and aspirin. Subgroup analyses in both trials demonstrated that the effects of apixaban are highly consistent across various patient subpopulations. Discontinuation of study medication was significantly lower with apixaban than with either warfarin in ARISTOTLE or aspirin in AVERROES. Apixaban is the first new oral anticoagulant that has been shown to be superior to warfarin in reducing stroke or systemic embolism, all-cause mortality, and major bleeding in patients with AF. Moreover, in patients with AF who are considered

  15. Cryptogenic stroke

    PubMed Central

    Yaghi, Shadi

    2014-01-01

    Summary Cryptogenic, or unexplained, stroke is present in about 30%–40% of ischemic stroke patients. Pursuing a stroke mechanism is important in such patients to better choose therapy to reduce the stroke recurrence risk. Intracranial vessel imaging and cardiac evaluation with transesophageal echocardiogram and outpatient cardiac monitoring may help identify the stroke mechanism. This article highlights the diagnostic yield of various tests in identifying a stroke mechanism in stroke patients whose initial diagnostic evaluation is negative, and the implications for treatment. PMID:25317376

  16. [A case of Behçet disease developing recurrent ischemic stroke with fever and scrotal ulcers].

    PubMed

    Koike, Yuka; Sakai, Naoko; Umeda, Yoshitaka; Umeda, Maiko; Oyake, Mutsuo; Fujita, Nobuya

    2015-01-01

    A 30-year-old man, who was diagnosed with Behçet disease at 10 years of age, was hospitalized because of transient right hemiparesis after presenting with high fever and scrotal ulcers. Brain MRI revealed ischemic lesions in the area supplied by the anterior cerebral arteries. Analysis of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) showed pleocytosis and a high interleukin-6 (IL-6) concentration (668 pg/ml). The patient was diagnosed with acute ischemic stroke associated with exacerbation of Behçet disease. After initiation of corticosteroid therapy, his clinical symptoms improved, and the CSF IL-6 concentration decreased. One year later, the patient developed high fever and scrotal ulcers after the onset of transient left upper limb plegia. Brain MRI showed an acute ischemic lesion in the right putamen, and CSF analysis showed an elevated IL-6 concentration (287 pg/ml). Brain CT angiography revealed stenosis of the left anterior cerebral artery and occlusion of the right anterior cerebral artery, which had been well visualized one year previously. Involvement of the intracranial cerebral arteries in Behçet disease is extremely rare. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first case report of a patient with recurrent symptomatic ischemic stroke associated with high fever and scrotal ulcers, which suggests exacerbation of Behçet disease.

  17. New anticoagulants for the prevention of stroke in atrial fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Höchtl, Thomas; Huber, Kurt

    2012-02-01

    Oral anticoagulation in atrial fibrillation is obligatory to lower the risk of spontaneous cerebrovascular and systemic thromboembolism. For this purpose, vitamin K antagonists (coumarins) have been recommended as the most effective drugs for a long time. However, problems with the practical use of these agents, e.g. the need for frequent and regular coagulation controls, the inter-individual differences in maintaining a stable therapeutic range, as well as drug or food interactions, have led to the search and investigation of alternative compounds characterized by a more simple use (e.g. without regular controls of therapeutic levels), high efficacy, as well as low risk of bleeding. The direct thrombin inhibitor dabigatran and the direct factor Xa inhibitors rivaroxaban and apixaban have recently been investigated to prove whether they fulfill the high expectancy of an ideal anticoagulant with respect to a more favorable efficacy/safety profile and without the need for coagulation controls, thereby improving quality of life. Dabigatran (RE-LY) achieved an impressive reduction in stroke and non-central nervous system (non-CNS) embolism (110 mg: 1.5%/year; 150 mg: 1.1%/year) in contrast to warfarin (1.7%/year; P = 0.34 and P < 0.001) with a favorable action on bleeding hazards. The results of rivaroxaban which were obtained in the ROCKET AF study (on treatment analysis: stroke and non-CNS embolism: 1.7%/year vs. 2.15%/year with warfarin; P = 0.015; primary safety endpoint major and minor bleeding: 14.91 vs. 14.52%; P = 0.442) point in the same direction. And finally, compared to aspirin, apixaban reduced the combined primary efficacy endpoint by 52% with comparable rates of bleeding (AVERROES). This review gives a summary of the current knowledge about these agents and their potential future importance. PMID:21883447

  18. Recurrent Stroke due to Patent Foramen Ovale Closure Device Thrombus Eight Years after Implantation.

    PubMed

    Kodankandath, Thomas V; Mishra, Sanskriti; Libman, Richard B; Wright, Paul

    2016-09-01

    Patent foramen ovale (PFO) is a common heart defect and is found in about 25% of the general population. Although randomized trials have failed to show the superiority of percutaneous closure of PFO over medical management, the number of patients with closure device placement has grown over the years. Delayed complications from PFO closure are rare. We present a case of cardioembolic stroke secondary to a mobile thrombus on a PFO closure device 8 years after implantation. PMID:27444520

  19. The use of a sternothyroid muscle flap to prevent the re-recurrence of a recurrent tracheoesophageal fistula found 10 years after the primary repair.

    PubMed

    Takayasu, Hajime; Masumoto, Kouji; Ishikawa, Miki; Sasaki, Takato; Ono, Kentaro

    2016-12-01

    Recurrent tracheoesophageal fistula (TEF) is still difficult to diagnose and repair. In almost all cases, recurrence appears relatively soon after the primary surgery. We herein describe a case of recurrent TEF that appeared 10 years after the primary repair. At 2 years of age, the patient suffered from mental retardation due to encephalitis and developed a hiatus hernia with gastro-esophageal reflux. He underwent the repair of a hiatus hernia and fundoplication at 3 years of age. However, the hiatus hernia recurred 6 months after the operation. The patient suffered from recurrent pneumonia for 6 years after the appearance of the recurrent hiatus hernia. At 9 years of age, he was hospitalized frequently due to recurrent severe pneumonia. After admission at 9 years of age, an endoscopic study under general anesthesia was performed and revealed subglottic stenosis and a dilated esophagus with a recurrent hiatus hernia. Tracheotomy or laryngotracheal separation was first planned in order to improve his upper airway and facilitate the safer repair of the recurrent hiatus hernia. After laryngotracheal separation, the patient still suffered from severe pneumonia. In addition, a small volume of nutritional supplement was aspirated from the tracheostomy. Thus, recurrent TEF was suspected. Tests using dye under both esophagoscopy and bronchoscopy confirmed recurrent TEF. The fistula recurred in the cervical area because of the elevation of the esophagus due to the recurrent hiatus hernia. The fistula was surgically closed, with a sternothyroid muscle flap to prevent re-recurrence. At 4 months after this operation, the recurrent hiatus hernia was repaired. Thereafter, the patient's respiratory symptoms showed a dramatic improvement. The patient is now doing well and free from further recurrences of TEF and hiatus hernia at 2 years after the final operation. PMID:27589983

  20. A tailored treatment strategy: a modern approach for stroke prevention in patients with atrial fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Lip, G Y H; Potpara, T; Boriani, G; Blomström-Lundqvist, C

    2016-05-01

    The main priority in atrial fibrillation (AF) management is stroke prevention, following which decisions about rate or rhythm control are focused on the patient, being primarily for management of symptoms. Given that AF is commonly associated with various comorbidities, risk factors such as hypertension, heart failure, diabetes mellitus and sleep apnoea should be actively looked for and managed in a holistic approach to AF management. The objective of this review is to provide an overview of modern AF stroke prevention with a focus on tailored treatment strategies. Biomarkers and genetic factors have been proposed to help identify 'high-risk' patients to be targeted for oral anticoagulation, but ultimately their use must be balanced against that of more simple and practical considerations for everyday use. Current guidelines have directed focus on initial identification of 'truly low-risk' patients with AF, that is those patients with a CHA2 DS2 -VASc [congestive heart failure, hypertension, age ≥75 years (two points), diabetes mellitus, stroke (two points), vascular disease, age 65-74 years, sex category] score of 0 (male) or 1 (female), who do not need any antithrombotic therapy. Subsequently, patients with ≥1 stroke risk factors can be offered effective stroke prevention, that is oral anticoagulation. The SAMe-TT2 R2 [sex female, age <60 years, medical history (>2 comorbidities), treatment (interacting drugs), tobacco use (two points), race non-Caucasian (two points)] score can help physicians make informed decisions on those patients likely to do well on warfarin (SAMe-TT2 R2 score 0-2) or those who are likely to have a poor time in therapeutic range (SAMe-TT2 R2 score >2). A clinically focused tailored approach to assessment and stroke prevention in AF with the use of the CHA2 DS2 VASc, HAS-BLED [hypertension, abnormal renal/liver function (one or two points), stroke, bleeding history or predisposition, labile international normalized ratio, elderly (>65

  1. Relapse and Recurrence Prevention in the Treatment for Adolescents with Depression Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simons, Anne D.; Rohde, Paul; Kennard, Betsy D.; Robins, Michele

    2005-01-01

    Relapse and recurrence in adolescent depression are important problems. Much less is known about relapse prevention compared to the acute treatment of depression in adolescents. Based on previous research, theoretical predictions, and clinical experience, the Treatment for Adolescents With Depression Study (TADS) protocol was designed to determine…

  2. Variants of COL3A1 are associated with the risk of stroke recurrence and prognosis in the Chinese population: a prospective study.

    PubMed

    Lv, Wenfei; Lin, Yahui; Song, Weihua; Sun, Kai; Yu, Hui; Zhang, Yinhui; Zhang, Channa; Li, Liang; Suo, Miaomiao; Hui, Rutai; Chen, Jingzhou

    2014-06-01

    Type III collagen plays an important role in activating platelets, forming thrombus, and maintaining the mechanical properties of arteries. This study aimed to test the hypothesis that genetic variants of COL3A1 (gene encoding type III collagen) contribute to recurrence and prognosis of stroke. We investigated the associations of three variants (rs2138533, rs11887092, and rs1800255) in the COL3A1 gene with stroke recurrence and prognosis in 1,544 patients with three subtypes of stroke: lacunar infarction (n = 442), atherothrombotic infarction (n = 670), and hemorrhage (n = 432). These associations were evaluated by Kaplan-Meier analysis and Cox regression models. Patients were followed up for 4.5 years. The A allele of rs1800255 in the COL3A1 gene coding region was significantly associated with a reduced risk of stroke recurrence in patients with lacunar infarction (adjusted hazard ratio [HR] 0.58, 95 % confidence interval [CI] 0.36-0.93, P = 0.024), but there was an increased risk of all-cause mortality of atherothrombotic patients (adjusted HR 1.43, 95 % CI 1.01-2.00, P = 0.044). The TT genotype of rs2138533 showed a significantly increased risk of death caused by cardiovascular disease or stroke in lacunar infarct patients (adjusted HR 2.98, 95 % CI 1.27-6.98, P = 0.012), but there was a reduced risk of all-cause mortality for patients with intracerebral hemorrhage (adjusted HR 0.34, 95 % CI 0.12-0.93, P = 0.036). The G allele of rs11887092 increased the risk of stroke recurrence in patients with atherothrombotic stroke (adjusted HR 1.59, 95 % CI 1.04-2.44, P = 0.035). In conclusion, variants of COL3A1 might play a vital role in determining the risk of recurrence and prognosis after stroke. PMID:24664438

  3. [Blood lipids and adaptation to stress as risk factors for stroke prevention].

    PubMed

    Anders, I; Esterbauer, E; Fink, A; Ladurner, G; Huemer, M; Wranek, U

    2000-01-01

    Do stroke prevention patients with increased blood-fat-protein compounds (total cholesterol, HDL- and LDL cholesterol and triglyceride) have a different method of coping than patients with normal blood fat? 1159 stroke prevention patients participated in the following stroke risk investigations at this hospital: biographical and risk factor-orientated anamnesis, a neurological status investigation, a laboratory investigation, a sonographic investigation and a psychological investigation. The differences in the coping strategies of those patients with normal and those with higher blood-fat-protein compounds were investigated. Patients with higher total cholesterol showed significantly higher values in the avoidance of stress situations (sig. 0.041) and a stronger tendency towards escapist behaviour (sig. 0.05). Patients with normal HDL cholesterol values indicated a tendency (sig. 0.07) to higher values in positive self-instruction in comparison to patients with reduced HDL cholesterol values. Those prevention patients with higher LDL values showed a tendency (sig. 0.08) to higher values in the intake of narcotic substances (nicotine, alcohol, tranquillisers, pharmaceutical agents). Patients with increased triglyceride indicated significantly higher values in coping by compensation (eating, shopping, reward behaviour, watching TV; sig. 0.037) and the intake of narcotic substances (sig. 0.044). Prevention patients with higher total cholesterol, LDL/HDL, or triglyceride values showed significantly different coping strategies in comparison to those patients with normal values. Increased avoidance and escapism behaviour and also compensation and the abuse of narcotic substances could be seen in connection with an increase in the risk of a stroke. In contrast, a constructive coping strategy such as positive self-instruction could reduce the risk of a stroke, which goes along with normal HDL cholesterol.

  4. Stroke Prevention in Atrial Fibrillation and Valvular Heart Disease

    PubMed Central

    Ahmad, Saad; Wilt, Heath

    2016-01-01

    There is a clinically staggering burden of disease stemming from cerebrovascular events, of which a majority are ischemic in nature and many are precipitated by atrial fibrillation (AF). AF can occur in isolation or in association with myocardial or structural heart disease. In the latter case, and when considering health at an international level, congenital and acquired valve-related diseases are frequent contributors to the current pandemic of AF and its clinical impact. Guidelines crafted by the American Heart Association, American College of Cardiology, European Society of Cardiology and Heart Rhythm Society underscore the use of vitamin K antagonists (VKAs) among patients with valvular heart disease, particularly in the presence of concomitant AF, to reduce the risk of ischemic stroke of cardioembolic origin; however, the non-VKAs, also referred to as direct, target-specific or new oral anticoagulants (NOACs), have not been actively studied in this particular population. In fact, each of the new agents is approved in patients with AF not caused by a valve problem. The aim of our review is to carefully examine the available evidence from pivotal phase 3 clinical trials of NOACs and determine how they might perform in patients with AF and concomitant valvular heart disease. PMID:27347228

  5. Stroke Prevention in Atrial Fibrillation and Valvular Heart Disease.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Saad; Wilt, Heath

    2016-01-01

    There is a clinically staggering burden of disease stemming from cerebrovascular events, of which a majority are ischemic in nature and many are precipitated by atrial fibrillation (AF). AF can occur in isolation or in association with myocardial or structural heart disease. In the latter case, and when considering health at an international level, congenital and acquired valve-related diseases are frequent contributors to the current pandemic of AF and its clinical impact. Guidelines crafted by the American Heart Association, American College of Cardiology, European Society of Cardiology and Heart Rhythm Society underscore the use of vitamin K antagonists (VKAs) among patients with valvular heart disease, particularly in the presence of concomitant AF, to reduce the risk of ischemic stroke of cardioembolic origin; however, the non-VKAs, also referred to as direct, target-specific or new oral anticoagulants (NOACs), have not been actively studied in this particular population. In fact, each of the new agents is approved in patients with AF not caused by a valve problem. The aim of our review is to carefully examine the available evidence from pivotal phase 3 clinical trials of NOACs and determine how they might perform in patients with AF and concomitant valvular heart disease. PMID:27347228

  6. Recurrent urinary tract infections in children: Preventive interventions other than prophylactic antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Tewary, Kishor; Narchi, Hassib

    2015-06-26

    Urinary tract infection (UTI) is one of the most common childhood infections. Permanent renal cortical scarring may occur in affected children, especially with recurrent UTIs, leading to long-term complications such as hypertension and chronic renal failure. To prevent such damage, several interventions to prevent UTI recurrences have been tried. The most established and accepted prevention at present is low dose long-term antibiotic prophylaxis. However it has a risk of break through infections, adverse drug reactions and also the risk of developing antibiotic resistance. The search is therefore on-going to find a safer, effective and acceptable alternative. A recent meta-analysis did not support routine circumcision for normal boys with no risk factors. Vaccinium Macrocarpon (cranberry), commonly used against UTI in adult women, is also effective in reducing the number of recurrences and related antimicrobial use in children. Sodium pentosanpolysulfate, which prevents bacterial adherence to the uroepithelial cells in animal models, has shown conflicting results in human trials. When combined with antibiotic, Lactobacillus acidophilus (LA-5) and Bifidobacterium, by blocking the in vitro attachment of uropathogenic bacteria to uroepithelial cells, significantly reduce in the incidence of febrile UTIs. Deliberate colonization of the human urinary tract of patients with recurrent UTI with Escherichia-coli (E. coli) 83972 has resulted in subjective benefit and less UTI requiring treatment. The non-pathogenic E. coli isolate NU14 DeltawaaL is a candidate to develop live-attenuated vaccine for the treatment and prevention of acute and recurrent UTI. Diagnosing and treating dysfunctional elimination syndromes decrease the incidence of recurrent UTI. A meta-analysis found the lack of robust prospective randomized controlled trials limited the strength of the established guidelines for surgical management of vesicoureteral reflux. In conclusion, several interventions

  7. Recurrent urinary tract infections in children: Preventive interventions other than prophylactic antibiotics

    PubMed Central

    Tewary, Kishor; Narchi, Hassib

    2015-01-01

    Urinary tract infection (UTI) is one of the most common childhood infections. Permanent renal cortical scarring may occur in affected children, especially with recurrent UTIs, leading to long-term complications such as hypertension and chronic renal failure. To prevent such damage, several interventions to prevent UTI recurrences have been tried. The most established and accepted prevention at present is low dose long-term antibiotic prophylaxis. However it has a risk of break through infections, adverse drug reactions and also the risk of developing antibiotic resistance. The search is therefore on-going to find a safer, effective and acceptable alternative. A recent meta-analysis did not support routine circumcision for normal boys with no risk factors. Vaccinium Macrocarpon (cranberry), commonly used against UTI in adult women, is also effective in reducing the number of recurrences and related antimicrobial use in children. Sodium pentosanpolysulfate, which prevents bacterial adherence to the uroepithelial cells in animal models, has shown conflicting results in human trials. When combined with antibiotic, Lactobacillus acidophilus (LA-5) and Bifidobacterium, by blocking the in vitro attachment of uropathogenic bacteria to uroepithelial cells, significantly reduce in the incidence of febrile UTIs. Deliberate colonization of the human urinary tract of patients with recurrent UTI with Escherichia-coli (E. coli) 83972 has resulted in subjective benefit and less UTI requiring treatment. The non-pathogenic E. coli isolate NU14 DeltawaaL is a candidate to develop live-attenuated vaccine for the treatment and prevention of acute and recurrent UTI. Diagnosing and treating dysfunctional elimination syndromes decrease the incidence of recurrent UTI. A meta-analysis found the lack of robust prospective randomized controlled trials limited the strength of the established guidelines for surgical management of vesicoureteral reflux. In conclusion, several interventions

  8. Recurrent urinary tract infections in children: Preventive interventions other than prophylactic antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Tewary, Kishor; Narchi, Hassib

    2015-06-26

    Urinary tract infection (UTI) is one of the most common childhood infections. Permanent renal cortical scarring may occur in affected children, especially with recurrent UTIs, leading to long-term complications such as hypertension and chronic renal failure. To prevent such damage, several interventions to prevent UTI recurrences have been tried. The most established and accepted prevention at present is low dose long-term antibiotic prophylaxis. However it has a risk of break through infections, adverse drug reactions and also the risk of developing antibiotic resistance. The search is therefore on-going to find a safer, effective and acceptable alternative. A recent meta-analysis did not support routine circumcision for normal boys with no risk factors. Vaccinium Macrocarpon (cranberry), commonly used against UTI in adult women, is also effective in reducing the number of recurrences and related antimicrobial use in children. Sodium pentosanpolysulfate, which prevents bacterial adherence to the uroepithelial cells in animal models, has shown conflicting results in human trials. When combined with antibiotic, Lactobacillus acidophilus (LA-5) and Bifidobacterium, by blocking the in vitro attachment of uropathogenic bacteria to uroepithelial cells, significantly reduce in the incidence of febrile UTIs. Deliberate colonization of the human urinary tract of patients with recurrent UTI with Escherichia-coli (E. coli) 83972 has resulted in subjective benefit and less UTI requiring treatment. The non-pathogenic E. coli isolate NU14 DeltawaaL is a candidate to develop live-attenuated vaccine for the treatment and prevention of acute and recurrent UTI. Diagnosing and treating dysfunctional elimination syndromes decrease the incidence of recurrent UTI. A meta-analysis found the lack of robust prospective randomized controlled trials limited the strength of the established guidelines for surgical management of vesicoureteral reflux. In conclusion, several interventions

  9. A Randomized Controlled Trial of Celecoxib to Prevent Recurrence of Non-Muscle–Invasive Bladder Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Sabichi, Anita L.; Lee, J. Jack; Grossman, H. Barton; Liu, Suyu; Richmond, Ellen; Czerniak, Bogdan A.; De la Cerda, Jorge; Eagle, Craig; Viner, Jaye L.; Palmer, J. Lynn; Lerner, Seth P.

    2014-01-01

    Significant morbidity and expense result from frequent recurrences of non-muscle invasive bladder cancer (NMIBC) after standard treatment, and carcinoma in situ (Tis) is a poor prognostic factor. Predicated on observational and preclinical data strongly supporting cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) in the pathogenesis, and the activity of COX-2 inhibitors, in bladder cancer, we conducted a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial to determine if celecoxib could reduce the time-to-recurrence (TTR) in NMIBC patients at high risk for recurrence. 146 patients were randomized to celecoxib (200 mg) or placebo orally twice daily for at least 12 months. The average treatment duration was 1.25 years. Primary intent-to-treat analysis revealed celecoxib did not statistically significantly prolong TTR compared with placebo (P = 0.17, log-rank). With a median follow-up of 2.49 years the relative risk of recurrence in the celecoxib vs placebo arms was 0.64 (95% CI, 0.38, 1.17). The recurrence-free rate at 12 months with celecoxib was 88% (95% CI, 0.81,0.96) versus 78% (95% CI, 0.69, 0.89) with placebo. After controlling for covariates with Cox regression analysis, recurrence rates did not differ between the two study arms (HR = 0.69; 95% CI, 0.37,1.29). Celecoxib had a marginally significant effect on reducing metachronous recurrences (vs. placebo) with hazard ratio of 0.56 (95% CI, 0.3,1.06; P=0.075). Celecoxib was well tolerated, with similar adverse events and quality-of-life in both arms. Our clinical trial results do not show a clinical benefit for celecoxib in preventing NMIBC recurrence but further investigation of COX-2 inhibitors in this setting is warranted. PMID:21881030

  10. Is it possible to prevent recurrent vulvovaginitis? The role of Lactobacillus plantarum I1001 (CECT7504).

    PubMed

    Palacios, S; Espadaler, J; Fernández-Moya, J M; Prieto, C; Salas, N

    2016-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to prospectively evaluate the impact of the use of L. plantarum I1001 applied vaginally on Vulvovaginal Candidiasis (VVC) time-until-recurrence after treatment with single-dose vaginal clotrimazole. This was a clinical open-label, prospective study of two non-randomized parallel cohorts with symptomatic acute VVC: (1) 33 sexually active women 18-50 years old, prescribed a standard single-dose 500 mg vaginal tablet of clotrimazole followed by vaginal tablets with L. plantarum I1001 as adjuvant therapy, and (2) 22 women of similar characteristics but prescribed single-dose clotrimazole only. Use of the probiotic and factors that might influence recurrence risk (age, recurrent VVC within previous year, antibiotic prior to study enrolment, diaphragm or IUD contraception, among others) were included in a multivariate Cox regression model to adjust for potential between-cohort differences. Probiotic use was associated with a three-fold reduction in the adjusted risk of recurrence (HR [95 %CI]: 0.30 [0.10-0.91]; P = 0.033). Adjusted free-survival recurrence was 72.83 % and 34.88 % for the probiotic and control groups, respectively. A higher cumulative recurrence was also observed in cases with use of antibiotics prior to enrolment (HR [95 %CI]: 10.46 [2.18-50.12]; P = 0.003). Similar findings were found at six months after azole treatment in women with RVVC. Overall, good compliance with the probiotic was reported for 91.3 % of women. The study suggests that follow-up therapy with vaginal tablets with L. plantarum I1001 could increase the effectiveness of single-dose 500 mg clotrimazole at preventing recurrence of VVC, an effect that was also observed in women with recurrent vulvovaginal candidiasis (RVVC) after six months of azole treatment. PMID:27393491

  11. Barriers to healthy-lifestyle participation in stroke: consumer participation in secondary prevention design.

    PubMed

    Lennon, Olive C; Doody, Catherine; Ni Choisdealbh, Cliodhna; Blake, Catherine

    2013-12-01

    The aim of the study was to explore community-dwelling stroke patients' perceived barriers to healthy-lifestyle participation for secondary disease prevention, as well as their preferred means for risk-reduction information dissemination and motivators to participation in healthy-lifestyle interventions. Four focus groups (5-6 stroke survivors per group) were defined from community support groups. Key questions addressed barriers to healthy-lifestyle adoption, preferred methods for receiving information and factors that would engage participants in a risk-reduction programme. Groups were audiotaped, transcribed verbatim and analysed for thematic content using a framework approach. Twenty-two participants, 12 men, 10 women, mean age 71.4 (53-87) years, were included in the study. Three overarching themes emerged as barriers to healthy-lifestyle participation: physical, mental and environmental. Exercise participation difficulties spread across all three themes; healthy eating and smoking cessation concentrated in environmental and mental dimensions. Talks (discussions) were noted as participants' preferred method of information provision. Risk-reduction programmes considered attractive were stroke specific, convenient and delivered by healthcare professionals and involved both social and exercise components. Many stroke patients appear unable to adopt healthy-lifestyle changes through advice alone because of physical, mental and environmental barriers. Risk-reduction programmes including interactive education should be specifically tailored to address barriers currently experienced and extend beyond the stroke survivor to others in their environment who influence lifestyle choices. PMID:23873221

  12. Barriers to healthy-lifestyle participation in stroke: consumer participation in secondary prevention design.

    PubMed

    Lennon, Olive C; Doody, Catherine; Ni Choisdealbh, Cliodhna; Blake, Catherine

    2013-12-01

    The aim of the study was to explore community-dwelling stroke patients' perceived barriers to healthy-lifestyle participation for secondary disease prevention, as well as their preferred means for risk-reduction information dissemination and motivators to participation in healthy-lifestyle interventions. Four focus groups (5-6 stroke survivors per group) were defined from community support groups. Key questions addressed barriers to healthy-lifestyle adoption, preferred methods for receiving information and factors that would engage participants in a risk-reduction programme. Groups were audiotaped, transcribed verbatim and analysed for thematic content using a framework approach. Twenty-two participants, 12 men, 10 women, mean age 71.4 (53-87) years, were included in the study. Three overarching themes emerged as barriers to healthy-lifestyle participation: physical, mental and environmental. Exercise participation difficulties spread across all three themes; healthy eating and smoking cessation concentrated in environmental and mental dimensions. Talks (discussions) were noted as participants' preferred method of information provision. Risk-reduction programmes considered attractive were stroke specific, convenient and delivered by healthcare professionals and involved both social and exercise components. Many stroke patients appear unable to adopt healthy-lifestyle changes through advice alone because of physical, mental and environmental barriers. Risk-reduction programmes including interactive education should be specifically tailored to address barriers currently experienced and extend beyond the stroke survivor to others in their environment who influence lifestyle choices.

  13. Myocardial infarction, stroke, and sudden cardiac death may be prevented by influenza vaccination.

    PubMed

    Meyers, David G

    2003-03-01

    Acute myocardial infarction (AMI) and atherothrombotic stroke share a common pathogenesis involving disrupted atherosclerotic plaque and intravascular thrombosis. Both AMI and stroke have their peak incidence in winter months. Similarly, the incidence of upper respiratory infections (URIs), 38% of which are due to influenza, also peaks in winter (November and December). URIs result in many biochemical, cellular, and hemostatic changes that could predispose to plaque disruption and thrombosis. Infections, particularly URIs, frequently precede AMI and stroke. Up to 16% of persons older than 60 years of age experience a URI each year. Nineteen percent of those suffering an AMI recall a URI in the 2 weeks prior to their event. Three epidemiologic and one small clinical trial suggest that influenza vaccination is associated with a 50% reduction in incidence of sudden cardiac death, AMI, and ischemic stroke. Influenza vaccine is extremely safe and has a 50% efficacy. Theoretically, up to 104,500 AMIs and 192,000 nonembolic ischemic strokes could be prevented each year by influenza vaccination.

  14. Prevention of experimental stroke by hypercapnic-hypoxic preconditioning.

    PubMed

    Yakushev, N N; Bespalov, A G; Kulikov, V P

    2008-09-01

    The effectiveness of hypercapnic hypoxic training in the prevention of acute disturbances in cerebral circulation was studied under experimental conditions. Hypercapnic hypoxic training was followed by a significant decrease in the severity of neurological deficit and locomotor and coordination disorders after cerebral ischemic injury. PMID:19240841

  15. Knowledge, attitudes, and practice patterns of recurrent urinary stones prevention in Saudi Arabia.

    PubMed

    Binsaleh, Saleh; Habous, Mohamad; Madbouly, Khaled

    2016-04-01

    The purpose of this study is to assess the knowledge, attitudes, and practice patterns of urologists in Saudi Arabia regarding prevention of recurrent stone formation and how much they follow preventive stone disease management guidelines. A questionnaire about knowledge, attitudes, and practice patterns of urologists in Saudi Arabia regarding prevention of recurrent stone formation was used. The survey comprised three domains: knowledge, attitudes, and practice patterns. Data about gender, duration of experience and health care sector were also collected. Individual responses were recorded, tabulated and compared using descriptive statistics. The overall response rate was 38.8%. All respondents were male urologists. Most of them (62, 71.3%) had an experience of 5-20 years in management of stone disease patients and the majority (74, 85.1%) belonged to the governmental health care sector. A total of 51% of the respondents answered in concordance with the best practice guidelines in at least half of the questions and 40% in all of the questions. Overall, practice patterns of 58% of the respondents were in concordance with the best practice guidelines in all the questions except for the question of practices regarding stone analysis. As regards to attitude domain, a total of 58.7% respondents expressed their agreement or strong agreement with the questions. Urologists' knowledge of stone recurrence preventive programs is suboptimal. They do not apply effectively the best stone prevention practice guidelines in their daily practice as well. Efforts to increase knowledge and enforce its application in daily practice are strongly warranted.

  16. The Role of Nonvitamin K Antagonist Oral Anticoagulants (NOACs) in Stroke Prevention in Patients with Atrial Fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Kuznetsov, Sofya; Barcelona, Robert; Josephson, Richard A; Mohan, Sri K Madan

    2016-05-01

    Anticoagulation is important in stroke prevention in patients with atrial fibrillation. Until recently, heparins and vitamin K antagonists were the only available therapy for stroke reduction in atrial fibrillation (AF) patients. Non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants (NOACs) including direct thrombin inhibitor (dabigatran) and direct factor Xa inhibitors (rivaroxaban, apixaban and edoxaban) are now available and offer new options for stroke prevention. This article reviews the available data on the use of NOACs for primary and secondary stroke prevention in AF patients and describes specific patient populations to guide clinician in making the informed decision regarding appropriate use of those agents. It also addresses the use of NOACs early after acute stroke and use of thrombolysis while on NOAC. PMID:27023335

  17. Dissecting Xuesaitong's mechanisms on preventing stroke based on the microarray and connectivity map.

    PubMed

    Wang, Linli; Yu, Yunru; Yang, Jihong; Zhao, Xiaoping; Li, Zheng

    2015-11-01

    Elucidating action mechanisms of Chinese medicines has remained a challenging task due to the chemical and biological complexity that needs to be resolved. In this study we applied a gene expression data and connectivity map (CMAP) based approach to study action mechanisms of a Chinese medicine Xuesaitong injection (XST) on preventing cerebral ischemia-reperfusion injury. XST is a standardized patent Chinese medicine of Panax notoginseng roots and it has long been used for the effective prevention and treatment of stroke in China. However, more research is needed to understand the mechanisms underlying its effects against ischemic stroke. We first evaluated the effect of XST against ischemic stroke in an ischemia-reperfusion rat animal model and dissected its mechanisms based on gene expression data of injured brain. The results showed that treatment with XST significantly attenuated infarct area and histological damage. Based upon pathway analysis and the CMAP query of microarray data, anti-inflammatory response and anti-platelet coagulation were found as the major mechanisms of XST against stroke, which were further validated in vitro and with pharmacological assays of serum. We demonstrated the feasibility of applying the combination of the microarray with the CMAP in identifying mechanisms of Chinese medicine. PMID:26305988

  18. Stroke injury, cognitive impairment and vascular dementia.

    PubMed

    Kalaria, Raj N; Akinyemi, Rufus; Ihara, Masafumi

    2016-05-01

    The global burden of ischaemic strokes is almost 4-fold greater than haemorrhagic strokes. Current evidence suggests that 25-30% of ischaemic stroke survivors develop immediate or delayed vascular cognitive impairment (VCI) or vascular dementia (VaD). Dementia after stroke injury may encompass all types of cognitive disorders. States of cognitive dysfunction before the index stroke are described under the umbrella of pre-stroke dementia, which may entail vascular changes as well as insidious neurodegenerative processes. Risk factors for cognitive impairment and dementia after stroke are multifactorial including older age, family history, genetic variants, low educational status, vascular comorbidities, prior transient ischaemic attack or recurrent stroke and depressive illness. Neuroimaging determinants of dementia after stroke comprise silent brain infarcts, white matter changes, lacunar infarcts and medial temporal lobe atrophy. Until recently, the neuropathology of dementia after stroke was poorly defined. Most of post-stroke dementia is consistent with VaD involving multiple substrates. Microinfarction, microvascular changes related to blood-brain barrier damage, focal neuronal atrophy and low burden of co-existing neurodegenerative pathology appear key substrates of dementia after stroke injury. The elucidation of mechanisms of dementia after stroke injury will enable establishment of effective strategy for symptomatic relief and prevention. Controlling vascular disease risk factors is essential to reduce the burden of cognitive dysfunction after stroke. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Vascular Contributions to Cognitive Impairment and Dementia edited by M. Paul Murphy, Roderick A. Corriveau and Donna M. Wilcock. PMID:26806700

  19. Stroke injury, cognitive impairment and vascular dementia☆

    PubMed Central

    Kalaria, Raj N.; Akinyemi, Rufus; Ihara, Masafumi

    2016-01-01

    The global burden of ischaemic strokes is almost 4-fold greater than haemorrhagic strokes. Current evidence suggests that 25–30% of ischaemic stroke survivors develop immediate or delayed vascular cognitive impairment (VCI) or vascular dementia (VaD). Dementia after stroke injury may encompass all types of cognitive disorders. States of cognitive dysfunction before the index stroke are described under the umbrella of pre-stroke dementia, which may entail vascular changes as well as insidious neurodegenerative processes. Risk factors for cognitive impairment and dementia after stroke are multifactorial including older age, family history, genetic variants, low educational status, vascular comorbidities, prior transient ischaemic attack or recurrent stroke and depressive illness. Neuroimaging determinants of dementia after stroke comprise silent brain infarcts, white matter changes, lacunar infarcts and medial temporal lobe atrophy. Until recently, the neuropathology of dementia after stroke was poorly defined. Most of post-stroke dementia is consistent with VaD involving multiple substrates. Microinfarction, microvascular changes related to blood–brain barrier damage, focal neuronal atrophy and low burden of co-existing neurodegenerative pathology appear key substrates of dementia after stroke injury. The elucidation of mechanisms of dementia after stroke injury will enable establishment of effective strategy for symptomatic relief and prevention. Controlling vascular disease risk factors is essential to reduce the burden of cognitive dysfunction after stroke. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Vascular Contributions to Cognitive Impairment and Dementia edited by M. Paul Murphy, Roderick A. Corriveau and Donna M. Wilcock. PMID:26806700

  20. Help Desk Answers: Do novel oral anticoagulants safely prevent stroke in patients with nonvalvular A-fib?

    PubMed

    Siewert, Ryan; Hostetter, Jeff

    2016-06-01

    Yes. Dabigatran, rivaroxaban, and apixaban are safe and effective compared with warfarin for preventing stroke in patients with nonvalvular atrial fibrillation. These novel oral anticoagulants (NOACs) are noninferior in reducing the number of strokes and systemic emboli and in lowering all-cause mortality while not increasing major bleeding complications and hemorrhagic events. PMID:27474824

  1. Prevention of post-stroke generalized anxiety disorder, using escitalopram or problem-solving therapy.

    PubMed

    Mikami, Katsunaka; Jorge, Ricardo E; Moser, David J; Arndt, Stephan; Jang, Mijin; Solodkin, Ana; Small, Steven L; Fonzetti, Pasquale; Hegel, Mark T; Robinson, Robert G

    2014-01-01

    This study examined the efficacy of antidepressant treatment for preventing the onset of generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) among patients with recent stroke. Of 799 patients assessed, 176 were randomized, and 149 patients without evidence of GAD at the initial visit were included in this double-blind treatment with escitalopram (N=47) or placebo (N=49) or non-blinded problem-solving therapy (PST; 12 total sessions; N=53). Participants given placebo over 12 months were 4.95 times more likely to develop GAD than patients given escitalopram and 4.00 times more likely to develop GAD than patients given PST. Although these results should be considered preliminary, the authors found that both escitalopram and PST were effective in preventing new onset of post-stroke GAD.

  2. Hypertension criterion for stroke prevention--to strengthen the principle of individualization in guidelines.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yicong; Chen, Xinran; Dang, Ge; Zhao, Yuhui; Ouyang, Fubing; Su, Zhenpei; Zeng, Jinsheng

    2015-03-01

    The diagnosis of hypertension, as recommended by most guidelines, is determined by systolic blood pressure ≥140 mm Hg and/or diastolic blood pressure ≥90 mm Hg. A threshold-based definition of hypertension, however, ignores sex and age, pathophysiology, and disparities in patient-specific conditions. Moreover, the harmful effects of hypertension-induced target organ damage cannot be ignored. Although the principle of individualization for hypertension management is recommended, especially for stroke prevention, how to practice it in a clinical setting has not been clearly elaborated. Therefore, we put forward a proposal for individualized hypertension management incorporating target organ damage, the main harmful effect of hypertension. We propose that hypertension should be diagnosed when an individual's blood pressure exceeds some difference from their own baseline in young adulthood, accompanied by any hypertension-induced target organ damage, confirmed by various detection methods. Application of this proposal to stroke prevention will hopefully strengthen the principle of individualized hypertension management.

  3. Recovery After Stroke: Recurrent Stroke

    MedlinePlus

    ... you have made an effort to eat healthy foods and exercise? Then it’s time to talk to your doctor. A doctor can advise you about better lifestyle choices. Medicine may also be needed. Many drugs can ...

  4. Role of rasayana in cure and prevention of recurrence of vicharchika (eczema).

    PubMed

    Kaur, Mandip; Chandola, H M

    2010-01-01

    Generally, skin diseases run a chronic course and the recurrence is very common. Mandip and Chandola (2009) reported that Shirishadi Decoction administered orally and simultaneously Snuhyadi Lepa applied externally to the patients of Vicharchika (Eczema) provided complete remission to 18.2% patients, marked improvement to 42.4% patients and moderate improvement to 36.4% patients but the recurrence rate was very high i.e. 80%. Charaka, in the context of the treatment of Apasmara mentions that in all the chronic diseases, Rasayana drugs should be prescribed. As eczema is a chronic disease and its recurrences are very common, therefore, it was thought desirable to evaluate the role of the Rasayana drugs in the cure and prevention of the recurrence of Vicharchika (Eczema). In this study, total 38 patients of Vicharchika (Eczema) were registered, among which 31 patients completed the full course of treatment. These patients were first subjected to Koshtha Shuddhi done with Aragvadha (Cassia fistula) Hima administered orally at bedtime for initial eight days. Thereafter 30 ml of Shirishadi Decoction and 6 gm of Guduchi (Tinospora cardifolia) and Bhringaraja (Eclipta alba) powder was given with Ghrita. Both the drugs were given twice daily after meals orally. Simultaneously, Snuhyadi Lepa was applied on the eczematous lesions. Results of the study showed that addition of Rasayana drugs provided complete remission to 22.6% and checked the recurrence of the disease in the 89.5% patients of Vicharchika (Eczema). PMID:22131682

  5. Prospective cohort comparison of flavonoid treatment in patients with resected colorectal cancer to prevent recurrence

    PubMed Central

    Hoensch, Harald; Groh, Bertram; Edler, Lutz; Kirch, Wilhelm

    2008-01-01

    AIM: To investigate biological prevention with flavonoids the recurrence risk of neoplasia was studied in patients with resected colorectal cancer and after adenoma polypectomy. METHODS: Eighty-seven patients, 36 patients with resected colon cancer and 51 patients after polypectomy, were divided into 2 groups: one group was treated with a flavonoid mixture (daily standard dose 20 mg apigenin and 20 mg epigallocathechin-gallat, n = 31) and compared with a matched control group (n = 56). Both groups were observed for 3-4 years by surveillance colonoscopy and by questionnaire. RESULTS: Of 87 patients enrolled in this study, 36 had resected colon cancer and 29 of these patients had surveillance colonoscopy. Among the flavonoid-treated patients with resected colon cancer (n = 14), there was no cancer recurrence and one adenoma developed. In contrast the cancer recurrence rate of the 15 matched untreated controls was 20% (3 of 15) and adenomas evolved in 4 of those patients (27%). The combined recurrence rate for neoplasia was 7% (1 of 14) in the treated patients and 47% (7 of 15) in the controls (P = 0.027). CONCLUSION: Sustained long-term treatment with a flavonoid mixture could reduce the recurrence rate of colon neoplasia in patients with resected colon cancer. PMID:18407592

  6. Percutaneous Left Atrial Appendage Ligation for Stroke Prevention in Atrial Fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Valderrábano, Miguel; Price, Matthew J

    2015-01-01

    Prevention of thromboembolic complications in atrial fibrillation remains a tremendous clinical challenge. Knowledge that the left atrial appendage (LAA) is the most common anatomical origin of cardioembolic strokes1 has been the main motivation to develop clinical and procedural strategies to exclude the LAA from the circulation, either surgically or percutaneously. This review discusses the rationale behind these strategies, their relative merits, and future prospects for LAA exclusion strategies. PMID:26306126

  7. Efficacy of Supplementation with B Vitamins for Stroke Prevention: A Network Meta-Analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Hongli; Pi, Fuhua; Ding, Zan; Chen, Wei; Pang, Shaojie; Dong, Wenya; Zhang, Qingying

    2015-01-01

    Background Supplementation with B vitamins for stroke prevention has been evaluated over the years, but which combination of B vitamins is optimal for stroke prevention is unclear. We performed a network meta-analysis to assess the impact of different combinations of B vitamins on risk of stroke. Methods A total of 17 trials (86 393 patients) comparing 7 treatment strategies and placebo were included. A network meta-analysis combined all available direct and indirect treatment comparisons to evaluate the efficacy of B vitamin supplementation for all interventions. Results B vitamin supplementation was associated with reduced risk of stroke and cerebral hemorrhage. The risk of stroke was lower with folic acid plus vitamin B6 as compared with folic acid plus vitamin B12 and was lower with folic acid plus vitamin B6 plus vitamin B12 as compared with placebo or folic acid plus vitamin B12. The treatments ranked in order of efficacy for stroke, from higher to lower, were folic acid plus vitamin B6 > folic acid > folic acid plus vitamin B6 plus vitamin B12 > vitamin B6 plus vitamin B12 > niacin > vitamin B6 > placebo > folic acid plus vitamin B12. Conclusions B vitamin supplementation was associated with reduced risk of stroke; different B vitamins and their combined treatments had different efficacy on stroke prevention. Folic acid plus vitamin B6 might be the optimal therapy for stroke prevention. Folic acid and vitamin B6 were both valuable for stroke prevention. The efficacy of vitamin B12 remains to be studied. PMID:26355679

  8. Development and Process Evaluation of a 5-Week Exercise Program to Prevent Falls in People after Stroke: The FALLS Program

    PubMed Central

    van Duijnhoven, H. J. R.; De Kam, D.; Hellebrand, W.; Smulders, E.; Geurts, A. C. H.; Weerdesteyn, V.

    2012-01-01

    Falls are a common complication after stroke, with balance and gait deficits being the most important risk factors. Taking into account the specific needs and capacities of people with stroke, we developed the FALLS program (FALL prevention after Stroke), based on the “Nijmegen falls prevention program” (a proven-effective 5-week exercise program designed for community-dwelling elderly people). The program was tested in twelve community-dwelling persons with stroke, and a process evaluation was conducted with patients, trainers, health care professionals, and managers. The FALLS program was considered suitable and feasible by people with stroke in the study and relevant health care professionals, and recommendations for implementation in clinical practice have been suggested. PMID:22195292

  9. Testing devices for the prevention and treatment of stroke and its complications.

    PubMed

    Bath, Philip M; Brainin, Michael; Brown, Chloe; Campbell, Bruce; Davis, Stephen M; Donnan, Geoffrey A; Ford, Gary A; Hacke, Werner; Iglesias, Cynthia; Lees, Kennedy R; Pugh, Stacey S; Saver, Jeff L; Schellinger, Peter D; Truelsen, Thomas

    2014-08-01

    We are entering a challenging but exciting period when many new interventions may appear for stroke based on the use of devices. Hopefully these will lead to improved outcomes at a cost that can be afforded in most parts of the world. Nevertheless, it is vital that lessons are learnt from failures in the development of pharmacological interventions (and from some early device studies), including inadequate preclinical testing, suboptimal trial design and analysis, and underpowered studies. The device industry is far more disparate than that seen for pharmaceuticals; companies are very variable in size and experience in stroke, and are developing interventions across a wide range of stroke treatment and prevention. It is vital that companies work together where sales and marketing are not involved, including in understanding basic stroke mechanisms, prospective systematic reviews, and education of physicians. Where possible, industry and academics should also work closely together to ensure trials are designed to be relevant to patient care and outcomes. Additionally, regulation of the device industry lags behind that for pharmaceuticals, and it is critical that new interventions are shown to be safe and effective rather than just feasible. Phase IV postmarketing surveillance studies will also be needed to ensure that devices are safe when used in the 'real-world' and to pick up uncommon adverse events.

  10. Prediction and personalised treatment of atrial fibrillation-stroke prevention: consolidated position paper of CVD professionals.

    PubMed

    Helms, Thomas M; Duong, Giang; Zippel-Schultz, Bettina; Tilz, Roland Richard; Kuck, Karl-Heinz; Karle, Christoph A

    2014-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is one of the major morbidity and health economic factors in Europe and often associated with several co-morbidities. This paper (1) underlines the importance of highly professional AF management utilising a multi-disciplinary expertise, especially considering the role of AF regarding the stroke risk and prevention, (2) demonstrates the consolidated position of CVD professionals and (3) emphasises those research aspects that could deepen the understanding of the emergence and the treatment of AF and therefore helps to provide a personalised preventive and more effective management of AF. Specialised calls are considered for that within the new European Programme 'Horizon 2020'.

  11. Prevention and Intervention Studies with Telmisartan, Ramipril and Their Combination in Different Rat Stroke Models

    PubMed Central

    Schmerbach, Kristin; Krikov, Maxim; Wengenmayer, Christina; Godes, Michael; Mueller, Susanne; Villringer, Arno; Steckelings, Ulrike

    2011-01-01

    Objectives The effects of AT1 receptor blocker, telmisartan, and the ACE inhibitor, ramipril, were tested head-to head and in combination on stroke prevention in hypertensive rats and on potential neuroprotection in acute cerebral ischemia in normotensive rats. Methods Prevention study: Stroke-prone spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR-SP) were subjected to high salt and randomly assigned to 4 groups: (1) untreated (NaCl, n = 24), (2) telmisartan (T; n = 27), (3) ramipril (R; n = 27) and (4) telmisartan +ramipril (T+R; n = 26). Drug doses were selected to keep blood pressure (BP) at 150 mmHg in all groups. Neurological signs and stroke incidence at 50% mortality of untreated SHR-SP were investigated. Intervention study: Normotensive Wistar rats were treated s.c. 5 days prior to middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) for 90 min with reperfusion. Groups (n = 10 each): (1) sham, (2) vehicle (V; 0,9% NaCl), (3) T (0,5 mg/kg once daily), (4) R (0,01 mg/kg twice daily), (5) R (0,1 mg/kg twice daily) or (6) T (0,5 mg/kg once daily) plus R (0,01 mg/kg twice daily). Twenty-four and 48 h after MCAO, neurological outcome (NO) was determined. Forty-eight h after MCAO, infarct volume by MRI, neuronal survival, inflammation factors and neurotrophin receptor (TrkB) were analysed. Results Stroke incidence was reduced, survival was prolonged and neurological outcome was improved in all treated SHR-SP with no differences between treated groups. In the acute intervention study, T and T+R, but not R alone, improved NO, reduced infarct volume, inflammation (TNFα), and induced TrkB receptor and neuronal survival in comparison to V. Conclusions T, R or T+R had similar beneficial effects on stroke incidence and NO in hypertensive rats, confirming BP reduction as determinant factor in stroke prevention. In contrast, T and T+R provided superior neuroprotection in comparison to R alone in normotensive rats with induced cerebral ischemia. PMID:21901125

  12. Chemotoxicity recurrence in older patients: Risk factors and effectiveness of preventive strategies. A prospective study

    PubMed Central

    Extermann, Martine; Reich, Richard R; Sehovic, Marina

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events(CTCAE) and adjustment rules after severe toxicity are derived by consensus, but little is known about the determinants of toxicity recurrence, especially in the elderly. Patients and Methods We prospectively accrued 200 patients (≥65 years) prior to chemotherapy. For those with grade 3–4 non-hematologic or grade 4 hematologic toxicity (severe toxicity), we recorded duration and functional impact, treatment modifications, and severe toxicity recurrence. The regimen’s toxicity was adjusted with the MAX2 index. Results Median patient age was 73 years(range 65–90). Among 163 patients evaluable for toxicity after ≥1 treatment cycle (receiving on average 4.73 cycles), 82 had severe toxicity, 10 were discontinued for toxicity, 6 for other reasons, and 5 died. Sixty-one patients had further chemotherapy, 41 without dose modification (16 with secondary prevention measures) and 20 with dose modifications. Without modification, 19(46%) had a recurrence (0 death). With modification, 7(35%) had a recurrence (1 death). In univariate analysis, treatment intent, hospitalization, and duration-adjusted Activities of Daily Living (ADL), quality of life impact, and fatigue were associated with dose modification. ADL remained associated in multivariate analysis(p=0.02). In univariate analysis for toxicity recurrence, ECOG PS and MAX2 score showed an association, with only the latter remaining significant in multivariate analysis(p=0.04). Conclusions If a severe toxicity does not have a long ADL impact, oncologists are less inclined to modify treatment. With proper supportive measures, this leads to recurrence risks similar to those shown in patients with modified treatment, with low risks of toxic deaths overall. PMID:26033177

  13. Hypertension and stroke in Asia: prevalence, control and strategies in developing countries for prevention.

    PubMed

    Singh, R B; Suh, I L; Singh, V P; Chaithiraphan, S; Laothavorn, P; Sy, R G; Babilonia, N A; Rahman, A R; Sheikh, S; Tomlinson, B; Sarraf-Zadigan, N

    2000-01-01

    Reliable statistics related to the prevalence, incidence and mortality of hypertension and stroke are not available from Asia. The data may be in national or institutional reports or journals published in the local language only. The mortality rate for stroke has been on the decline since the mid 1960s in the developed countries of Asia, such as Australia, New Zealand, and Japan, with some improvement in Singapore, Taiwan and Hong Kong, some areas of China and Malaysia about 15 years later. In India, China, Philippines, Thailand, Sri Lanka, Iran, Pakistan, Nepal, there has been a rapid increase in stroke mortality and prevalence of hypertension. The prevalence of hypertension according to new criteria (>140/90 mm Hg) varies between 15-35% in urban adult populations of Asia. In rural populations, the prevalence is two to three times lower than in urban subjects. Hypertension and stroke occur at a relatively younger age in Asians and the risk of hypertension increases at lower levels of body mass index of 23-25 kg/m2. Overweight, sedentary behaviour, alcohol, higher social class, salt intake, diabetes mellitus and smoking are risk factors for hypertension in most of the countries of Asia. In Australia, New Zealand and Japan, lower social class is a risk factor for hypertension and stroke. Population-based long-term follow-up studies are urgently needed to demonstrate the association of risk factors with hypertension in Asia. However prevention programmes should be started based on cross-sectional surveys and case studies without waiting for the cohort studies. PMID:11095165

  14. Decision-making around antithrombotics for stroke prevention in atrial fibrillation: the health professionals' views.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yishen; Bajorek, Beata

    2016-08-01

    Background For stroke prevention in patients with atrial fibrillation (AF), the decision-making around antithrombotic therapy has been complicated by older age, multiple comorbidities, polypharmacy and the different pharmacological properties of warfarin and the nonvitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants (NOACs). The complexity of decision-making has been associated with a reluctance by health professionals to use antithrombotic therapy, leading to poor clinical outcomes. In order to improve stroke prevention in patients with AF, the contemporary perspectives of health professionals on the decision-making around antithrombotic therapy needs exploration. Objective To elicit emerging themes describing health professionals' perspectives on the decision-making around antithrombotic therapy for stroke prevention in patients with AF. Setting Sydney metropolitan area of New South Wales, Australia. Method A qualitative study based on face-to-face interviews was conducted from August to October 2014. Seven pharmacists, seven specialists, six general practitioners and six nurses practising in the Sydney metropolitan area and managing antithrombotic therapy for AF were interviewed until theme saturation was achieved in each subgroup. Interview transcripts were analysed using manual inductive coding. Main outcome measure Emerging themes describing health professionals' perspectives on the decision-making around antithrombotic therapy for stroke prevention in patients with AF. Results Three overarching themes emerged. (1) Comprehensive assessment is necessary for decision-making but is not always implemented. Health professionals mostly focused on stroke risk assessment, not on the bleeding risk and medication safety issues. (2) Health professionals from different disciplines have different preferences for antithrombotic therapies. Although the majority of health professionals considered warfarin as the first-line therapy, NOACs were preferred by neurologists and

  15. Anticoagulation for the Acute Management of Ischemic Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, Austin A.; Ikuta, Kevin; Soverow, Jonathan

    2014-01-01

    Few prospective studies support the use of anticoagulation during the acute phase of ischemic stroke, though observational data suggest a role in certain populations. Depending on the mechanism of stroke, systemic anticoagulation may prevent recurrent cerebral infarction, but concomitantly carries a risk of hemorrhagic transformation. In this article, we describe a case where anticoagulation shows promise for ischemic stroke and review the evidence that has discredited its use in some circumstances while showing its potential in others. PMID:24910565

  16. Stroke risk factor knowledge in Hispanic and non-Hispanic white women in New Mexico: implications for targeted prevention strategies.

    PubMed

    Kattapong, V J; Longstreth, W T; Kukull, W A; Howard, D B; Bowes, J I; Wilson, B E; Bigney, J B; Becker, T M

    1998-01-01

    Hispanic women in New Mexico have recently experienced an increase in age-adjusted mortality compared with non-Hispanic white women. Since patients' knowledge of stroke risk factors may affect risk factor control, the present study was undertaken to characterize stroke risk factor understanding in Hispanic and non-Hispanic white women in New Mexico. We administered a stroke risk factor knowledge survey to 215 women hospitalized in Albuquerque, New Mexico. Patients were classified by each of three dichotomous groupings: stroke or nonstroke diagnosis; Hispanic or non-Hispanic white ethnicity; history of cardiovascular risk factors. The frequency of specific item responses was determined for each patient grouping. Two-way analysis of variance was used to determine whether composite knowledge score differed among patient groups. Stress was the attribute most commonly thought to be a risk factor for stroke. Although no ethnic differences were found on composite knowledge score, Hispanic women were significantly less likely to report hypertension as a stroke risk factor than non-Hispanic white women. We suggest that stroke risk factor understanding in Hispanic and non-Hispanic white women in New Mexico is inadequate. Insufficient understanding of the consequences of hypertension, including stroke, may diminish the degree of hypertension control that patients achieve. Further study of the relationship between stroke risk factor understanding and health behavior could enhance prevention efforts.

  17. Trends in the Attack Rates, Incidence, and Mortality of Stroke during 1986–2012: Data of Kaunas (Lithuania) Stroke Registry

    PubMed Central

    Radisauskas, Ricardas; Malinauskiene, Vilija; Milinaviciene, Egle; Kranciukaite-Butylkiniene, Daina; Tamosiunas, Abdonas; Bernotiene, Gailute; Luksiene, Dalia; Milasauskiene, Zemyna; Sopagiene, Diana; Rastenyte, Daiva

    2016-01-01

    Background There is a lack of reliable epidemiological data on longitudinal trends in stroke attack rates, incidence, and mortality in the countries of the Baltic region. Aims The aim of the present study was to explore the longitudinal trends of stroke in middle-aged urban population of Lithuania during the period of 1986 through 2012. Methods All stroke events in the studied population were ascertained and validated according to the standardized criteria outlined by the WHO MONICA Project. The study included all patients in Kaunas (Lithuania) city aged 25 to 64 years who experienced a stroke between 1986 and 2012. Estimates of time-trends of the annual percentage change in stroke attack rates, incidence of stroke, and mortality from this condition were made by applying the Joinpoint regression analysis. Results During the study period, 9,992 stroke events were registered. The overall proportion of recurrent events was 25.7%. Overall, 18.9% of the events (20.0% in men, and 17.4% in women) were fatal within 28 days. During the period of 1986 to 2012, a flat trend in the incidence of stroke was observed among both male and female middle-aged inhabitants of Kaunas city, while attack rates were increasing due to the increase in recurrent strokes. Both mortality and 28-day case fatality of stroke declined significantly over the study period in both sexes. Conclusions An increase both in the incidence and recurrence of stroke among middle-aged men residing in Kaunas city and in the recurrence of stroke among women denotes the inefficiency of measures applied both for primary and secondary prevention of stroke in Lithuania. The revision of current prevention strategies and the introduction of new ones are of paramount importance in order to fight the epidemic of stroke. PMID:27124412

  18. Supportive therapies for prevention of hepatocellular carcinoma recurrence and preservation of liver function

    PubMed Central

    Takami, Taro; Yamasaki, Takahiro; Saeki, Issei; Matsumoto, Toshihiko; Suehiro, Yutaka; Sakaida, Isao

    2016-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is one of the deadliest cancers in the world and is associated with a high risk of recurrence. The development of a wide range of new therapies is therefore essential. In this study, from the perspective of supportive therapy for the prevention of HCC recurrence and preservation of liver function in HCC patients, we surveyed a variety of different therapeutic agents. We show that branched chain amino acids (BCAA) supplementation and late evening snack with BCAA, strategies that address issues of protein-energy malnutrition, are important for liver cirrhotic patients with HCC. For chemoprevention of HCC recurrence, we show that viral control after radical treatment is important. We also reviewed the therapeutic potential of antiviral drugs, sorafenib, peretinoin, iron chelators. Sorafenib is a kinase inhibitor and a standard therapy in the treatment of advanced HCC. Peretinoin is a vitamin A-like molecule that targets the retinoid nuclear receptor to induce apoptosis and inhibit tumor growth in HCC cells. Iron chelators, such as deferoxamine and deferasirox, act to prevent cancer cell growth. These chelators may have potential as combination therapies in conjunction with peretinoin. Finally, we review the potential inhibitory effect of bone marrow cells on hepatocarcinogenesis.

  19. Supportive therapies for prevention of hepatocellular carcinoma recurrence and preservation of liver function.

    PubMed

    Takami, Taro; Yamasaki, Takahiro; Saeki, Issei; Matsumoto, Toshihiko; Suehiro, Yutaka; Sakaida, Isao

    2016-08-28

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is one of the deadliest cancers in the world and is associated with a high risk of recurrence. The development of a wide range of new therapies is therefore essential. In this study, from the perspective of supportive therapy for the prevention of HCC recurrence and preservation of liver function in HCC patients, we surveyed a variety of different therapeutic agents. We show that branched chain amino acids (BCAA) supplementation and late evening snack with BCAA, strategies that address issues of protein-energy malnutrition, are important for liver cirrhotic patients with HCC. For chemoprevention of HCC recurrence, we show that viral control after radical treatment is important. We also reviewed the therapeutic potential of antiviral drugs, sorafenib, peretinoin, iron chelators. Sorafenib is a kinase inhibitor and a standard therapy in the treatment of advanced HCC. Peretinoin is a vitamin A-like molecule that targets the retinoid nuclear receptor to induce apoptosis and inhibit tumor growth in HCC cells. Iron chelators, such as deferoxamine and deferasirox, act to prevent cancer cell growth. These chelators may have potential as combination therapies in conjunction with peretinoin. Finally, we review the potential inhibitory effect of bone marrow cells on hepatocarcinogenesis. PMID:27621572

  20. Supportive therapies for prevention of hepatocellular carcinoma recurrence and preservation of liver function

    PubMed Central

    Takami, Taro; Yamasaki, Takahiro; Saeki, Issei; Matsumoto, Toshihiko; Suehiro, Yutaka; Sakaida, Isao

    2016-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is one of the deadliest cancers in the world and is associated with a high risk of recurrence. The development of a wide range of new therapies is therefore essential. In this study, from the perspective of supportive therapy for the prevention of HCC recurrence and preservation of liver function in HCC patients, we surveyed a variety of different therapeutic agents. We show that branched chain amino acids (BCAA) supplementation and late evening snack with BCAA, strategies that address issues of protein-energy malnutrition, are important for liver cirrhotic patients with HCC. For chemoprevention of HCC recurrence, we show that viral control after radical treatment is important. We also reviewed the therapeutic potential of antiviral drugs, sorafenib, peretinoin, iron chelators. Sorafenib is a kinase inhibitor and a standard therapy in the treatment of advanced HCC. Peretinoin is a vitamin A-like molecule that targets the retinoid nuclear receptor to induce apoptosis and inhibit tumor growth in HCC cells. Iron chelators, such as deferoxamine and deferasirox, act to prevent cancer cell growth. These chelators may have potential as combination therapies in conjunction with peretinoin. Finally, we review the potential inhibitory effect of bone marrow cells on hepatocarcinogenesis. PMID:27621572

  1. Supporting Treatment decision making to Optimise the Prevention of STROKE in Atrial Fibrillation: The STOP STROKE in AF study. Protocol for a cluster randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Suboptimal uptake of anticoagulation for stroke prevention in atrial fibrillation has persisted for over 20 years, despite high-level evidence demonstrating its effectiveness in reducing the risk of fatal and disabling stroke. Methods The STOP STROKE in AF study is a national, cluster randomised controlled trial designed to improve the uptake of anticoagulation in primary care. General practitioners from around Australia enrolling in this ‘distance education’ program are mailed written educational materials, followed by an academic detailing session delivered via telephone by a medical peer, during which participants discuss patient de-identified cases. General practitioners are then randomised to receive written specialist feedback about the patient de-identified cases either before or after completing a three-month posttest audit. Specialist feedback is designed to provide participants with support and confidence to prescribe anticoagulation. The primary outcome is the proportion of patients with atrial fibrillation receiving oral anticoagulation at the time of the posttest audit. Discussion The STOP STROKE in AF study aims to evaluate a feasible intervention via distance education to prevent avoidable stroke due to atrial fibrillation. It provides a systematic test of augmenting academic detailing with expert feedback about patient management. Trial registration Australian Clinical Trials Registry Registration Number: ACTRN12611000076976. PMID:22770423

  2. Comparative Study of Different {beta}-Radiation Doses for Preventing Pterygium Recurrence

    SciTech Connect

    Yamada, Takayuki; Mochizuki, Hideki; Ue, Takahiro; Kiuchi, Yoshiaki; Takahashi, Yasuhiro; Oinaka, Matsuyoshi

    2011-12-01

    Purpose: To compare the pterygium recurrence rates after treatment with two different {beta}-radiation doses. Methods and Materials: A total of 84 patients with a mean age of 63.0 {+-} 10.3 years (men, 48 eyes, and women, 47 eyes) and initially treated with {beta}-radiation after pterygium excision were recruited. The mean follow-up period was 49.9 {+-} 51.3 months. The patients were assigned to two dose groups: a high-dose (40 Gy) or a low-dose (20 Gy) group. The statistical significance of differences in patient age, pterygium size, and interval between surgery and radiotherapy were analyzed in the 20-Gy group using the Cox proportional hazard model at p < .05. Results: The high- and low-dose groups included 28 and 67 eyes, respectively. Pterygia recurred in 11 eyes, all in the low-dose group. The interval between surgery and radiotherapy was not a significant predictor of recurrence. Smaller pterygia had a lower risk of recurrence than pterygia that had encroached the pupillary area (pterygium located within one-third of the corneal radius from the limbus, corrected hazard ratio [HR], 0.069; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.006-0.766; p = .030; pterygium extending beyond one-third of the corneal radius, corrected HR, 0.188; 95% CI, 0.018-0.696; p = 0.019; and pterygium reaching the pupillary area, corrected HR, 0.184; 95% CI, 0.036-0.929; p = .040). Older age was marginally significant as a negative predictor of recurrence (HR, 0.943; 95% CI, 0.887-1.003; p = .061). No scleromalacia developed during the follow-up period. Conclusions: {beta}-Radiation at 40 Gy was more efficacious than at 20 Gy in preventing pterygium recurrence without scleromalacia development, particularly for large-size pterygia and those in young patients.

  3. Stepping towards prevention of bone loss after stroke: a systematic review of the skeletal effects of physical activity after stroke.

    PubMed

    Borschmann, Karen; Pang, Marco Y C; Bernhardt, Julie; Iuliano-Burns, Sandra

    2012-06-01

    Bone loss after stroke is pronounced, and contributes to increased fracture risk. People who fracture after stroke experience reduced mobility and increased mortality. Physical activity can maintain or improve bone mineral density and structure in healthy older adults, likely reducing fracture risk. The purpose of this systematic review was to investigate the skeletal effects of physical activity in adults affected by stroke. A search of electronic databases was undertaken. Selection criteria of trials were • prospective and controlled • physical activity-based intervention • participants with history of stroke, and • bone-related outcome measures. Effect sizes were calculated for outcomes of paretic and nonparetic limbs. Three of 349 identified records met the inclusion criteria. Small effect sizes were found in favor of physical activity in adults with chronic stroke (n=95, 40% female, average age 63·8 years, more than one-year poststroke). Patients in intervention groups had significantly higher changes in femoral neck bone mineral density, tibial cortical thickness and trabecular bone mineral content of the paretic limb, compared with controls (P<0·05). It is not known whether these benefits reduced fracture risk. There are limited studies investigating the skeletal effect of physical activity for adults poststroke. Given the increased risk of, and poor outcomes following a fracture after stroke, randomized trials are warranted to investigate the benefits of physical activity on bone, after stroke. Interventions are likely to be beneficial if implemented soon after stroke, when bone loss appears to be rapid and pronounced. PMID:21967614

  4. A lifetime approach to major depressive disorder: The contributions of psychological interventions in preventing relapse and recurrence.

    PubMed

    Bockting, Claudi L; Hollon, Steven D; Jarrett, Robin B; Kuyken, Willem; Dobson, Keith

    2015-11-01

    Major depressive disorder (MDD) is highly disabling and typically runs a recurrent course. Knowledge about prevention of relapse and recurrence is crucial to the long-term welfare of people who suffer from this disorder. This article provides an overview of the current evidence for the prevention of relapse and recurrence using psychological interventions. We first describe a conceptual framework to preventive interventions based on: acute treatment; continuation treatment, or; prevention strategies for patients in remission. In brief, cognitive-behavioral interventions, delivered during the acute phase, appear to have an enduring effect that protects patients against relapse and perhaps others from recurrence following treatment termination. Similarly, continuation treatment with either cognitive therapy or perhaps interpersonal psychotherapy appears to reduce risk for relapse and maintenance treatment appears to reduce risk for recurrence. Preventive relapse strategies like preventive cognitive therapy or mindfulness based cognitive therapy (MBCT) applied to patients in remission protects against subsequent relapse and perhaps recurrence. There is some preliminary evidence of specific mediation via changing the content or the process of cognition. Continuation CT and preventive interventions started after remission (CBT, MBCT) seem to have the largest differential effects for individuals that need them the most. Those who have the greatest risk for relapse and recurrence including patients with unstable remission, more previous episodes, potentially childhood trauma, early age of onset. These prescriptive indications, if confirmed in future research, may point the way to personalizing prevention strategies. Doing so, may maximize the efficiency with which they are applied and have the potential to target the mechanisms that appear to underlie these effects. This may help make this prevention strategies more efficacious.

  5. Minimizing bleeding risk in patients receiving direct oral anticoagulants for stroke prevention

    PubMed Central

    Habert, Jeffrey Steven

    2016-01-01

    Many primary care physicians are wary about using direct oral anticoagulants (DOACs) in patients with nonvalvular atrial fibrillation (AF). Factors such as comorbidities, concomitant medications, and alcohol misuse increase concerns over bleeding risk, especially in elderly and frail patients with AF. This article discusses strategies to minimize the risk of major bleeding events in patients with AF who may benefit from oral anticoagulant therapy for stroke prevention. The potential benefits of the DOACs compared with vitamin K antagonists, in terms of a lower risk of intracranial hemorrhage, are discussed, together with the identification of reversible risk factors for bleeding and correct dose selection of the DOACs based on a patient’s characteristics and concomitant medications. Current bleeding management strategies, including the new reversal agents for the DOACs and the prevention of bleeding during preoperative anticoagulation treatment, in addition to health care resource use associated with anticoagulation treatment and bleeding, are also discussed. Implementing a structured approach at an individual patient level will minimize the overall risk of bleeding and should increase physician confidence in using the DOACs for stroke prevention in their patients with nonvalvular AF. PMID:27785089

  6. Development of apixaban: a novel anticoagulant for prevention of stroke in patients with atrial fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Hanna, Michael S; Mohan, Puneet; Knabb, Robert; Gupta, Elora; Frost, Charles; Lawrence, John H

    2014-11-01

    The factor Xa inhibitor apixaban is one of the novel anticoagulants to emerge as alternatives to long-standing standards of care that include low-molecular-weight heparin and warfarin. The development of apixaban reflects a strategy to optimize the clinical pharmacology profile, dosing posology, trial designs, and statistical analyses across multiple indications, and to seek alignment with global health authorities. The primary objective of dose selection was to maintain balance between efficacy and bleeding risk. Twice-daily dosing of apixaban, rather than once daily, was chosen to lower peak concentrations and reduce fluctuations between peak and trough levels. Our discussion here focuses on the use of apixaban for stroke prevention in nonvalvular atrial fibrillation (NVAF). Supporting this indication, a pair of registrational trials was conducted that enrolled the full spectrum of patients who, by guidelines, were eligible for anticoagulation. In the AVERROES study of patients who were unsuitable for warfarin therapy, apixaban was superior to aspirin in reducing the risk of stroke or systemic embolism (SSE), without a significant increase in major bleeding (MB). In the ARISTOTLE (Apixaban for Reduction In STroke and Other ThromboemboLic Events in Atrial Fibrillation) study, apixaban was superior to warfarin on the rates of SSE, MB, and all-cause mortality. Overall, these studies have demonstrated a substantially favorable benefit-risk profile for apixaban over warfarin and aspirin in NVAF. PMID:25377080

  7. Efficacy of Oral Anticoagulation in Stroke Prevention among Sinus-Rhythm Patients Who Lack Left Atrial Mechanical Contraction after Cryoablation.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Comendador, José; Gualis, Javier; Marcos-Vidal, José Miguel; Buber, Jonnatan; Martín, Carlos Esteban; Gomez-Plana, Jesús; Rodríguez, Miguel Angel; Iglesias-Garriz, Ignacio; Alonso, David; Soria, Carlos; Miguélez, Eva Higuera; Castaño, Mario

    2015-10-01

    The customary recommendation is that oral anticoagulation be withdrawn a few months after cryoablation for atrial fibrillation, independently of left atrial mechanical contraction in patients in sinus rhythm. Recently, a 5-fold increase in stroke has been described in sinus-rhythm patients who lack atrial mechanical contraction. One aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of oral anticoagulation in preventing postoperative stroke in such patients. This prospective study divided 154 sinus-rhythm patients into 2 groups, depending on the presence (108 patients) or absence (46 patients) of left atrial mechanical contraction at 6 months after surgery, and monitored them annually for 5 years. Those without left atrial contraction were maintained on acenocumarol. The primary endpoint was the occurrence of ischemic stroke. The median follow-up period was 29 ± 16 months; 4 patients (2.5%), all belonging to the group with preserved atrial contraction, had ischemic stroke; the group of patients without left atrial contraction had no episodes of stroke during follow-up. Logistic binary regression analyses showed no evidence of factors independently predictive of stroke. Among anticoagulated patients in sinus rhythm without left atrial contraction, we found the incidence of stroke to be zero. In a small, nonrandomized group such as this, we cannot discount the element of chance, yet we suggest that maintaining anticoagulation might lower the incidence of stroke in this population.

  8. Exploratory Network Meta Regression Analysis of Stroke Prevention in Atrial Fibrillation Fails to Identify Any Interactions with Treatment Effect

    PubMed Central

    Batson, Sarah; Sutton, Alex; Abrams, Keith

    2016-01-01

    Background Patients with atrial fibrillation are at a greater risk of stroke and therefore the main goal for treatment of patients with atrial fibrillation is to prevent stroke from occurring. There are a number of different stroke prevention treatments available to include warfarin and novel oral anticoagulants. Previous network meta-analyses of novel oral anticoagulants for stroke prevention in atrial fibrillation acknowledge the limitation of heterogeneity across the included trials but have not explored the impact of potentially important treatment modifying covariates. Objectives To explore potentially important treatment modifying covariates using network meta-regression analyses for stroke prevention in atrial fibrillation. Methods We performed a network meta-analysis for the outcome of ischaemic stroke and conducted an exploratory regression analysis considering potentially important treatment modifying covariates. These covariates included the proportion of patients with a previous stroke, proportion of males, mean age, the duration of study follow-up and the patients underlying risk of ischaemic stroke. Results None of the covariates explored impacted relative treatment effects relative to placebo. Notably, the exploration of ‘study follow-up’ as a covariate supported the assumption that difference in trial durations is unimportant in this indication despite the variation across trials in the network. Conclusion This study is limited by the quantity of data available. Further investigation is warranted, and, as justifying further trials may be difficult, it would be desirable to obtain individual patient level data (IPD) to facilitate an effort to relate treatment effects to IPD covariates in order to investigate heterogeneity. Observational data could also be examined to establish if there are potential trends elsewhere. The approach and methods presented have potentially wide applications within any indication as to highlight the potential benefit

  9. Oral anticoagulation to prevent thrombosis recurrence in polycythemia vera and essential thrombocythemia.

    PubMed

    Hernández-Boluda, Juan-Carlos; Arellano-Rodrigo, Eduardo; Cervantes, Francisco; Alvarez-Larrán, Alberto; Gómez, Montse; Barba, Pere; Mata, María-Isabel; González-Porras, José-Ramón; Ferrer-Marín, Francisca; García-Gutiérrez, Valentín; Magro, Elena; Moreno, Melania; Kerguelen, Ana; Pérez-Encinas, Manuel; Estrada, Natàlia; Ayala, Rosa; Besses, Carles; Pereira, Arturo

    2015-06-01

    It is unclear whether anticoagulation guidelines intended for the general population are applicable to patients with polycythemia vera (PV) and essential thrombocythemia (ET). In the present study, the risk of thrombotic recurrence was analyzed in 150 patients with PV and ET treated with vitamin K antagonists (VKA) because of an arterial or venous thrombosis. After an observation period of 963 patient-years, the incidence of re-thrombosis was 4.5 and 12 per 100 patient-years under VKA therapy and after stopping it, respectively (P < 0.0005). After a multivariate adjustment for other prognostic factors, VKA treatment was associated with a 2.8-fold reduction in the risk of thrombotic recurrence. Notably, VKA therapy offset the increased risk of re-thrombosis associated with a prior history of remote thrombosis. Both the protective effect of VKA therapy and the predisposing factors for recurrence were independent of the anatomical site involved in the index thrombosis. Treatment periods with VKA did not result in a higher incidence of major bleeding as compared with those without VKA. These findings support the use of long-term anticoagulation for the secondary prevention of thrombosis in patients with PV and ET, particularly in those with history of remote thrombosis.

  10. Preventive Audiology: Screening for Hearing Impairment in Children Having Recurrent URTI.

    PubMed

    Sharma, K; Pannu, M S; Arora, A; Sharma, V

    2016-06-01

    A late detection of hearing impairment in children can affect speech and language development. Otitis media with effusion (OME) associated with risk factors like recurrent upper respiratory tract infections (URTI) is considered the most common cause of silent hearing impairment among children. So this study was carried out to screen such at risk children for hearing impairment. The study was conducted on 1000 children in the age group of 2-12 years who presented to the OPD of ENT and Pediatrics Department, Govt Medical College with the complaint of recurrent URTI. The children were screened by history taking, general physical examination and local ENT examination. This was followed by impedance audiometry and pure tone audiometry (PTA, wherever indicated). Children with discharging ears and perforated tympanic membrane (TM) were excluded from the study. The most common presenting complaint was nasal discharge (67.9 %), followed by mouth breathing (66.3 %) and snoring (65 %). Only 16.2 % cases actually complained of some hearing impairment on exploratory history indicating the silent nature of OME. On examination 52.65 % cases had a normal looking TM whereas 41.2 % had a dull retracted TM. Results of impedance audiometry showed Type A graph in 56.75 %, Type B in 33.4 % indicating OME and Type C in 9.85 % indicating Eustachian tube dysfunction. PTA showed a mild conductive hearing loss in 26.7 % cases. OME is quite prevalent in high risk children and incidence of OME resulting in silent hearing impairment is quite high especially in young children having recurrent URTI. Impedance audiometry has been proved to be an objective screening tool for the same with a diagnostic accuracy of 87 % and thus under preventive audiology, it has a definite role in young children having recurrent URTI. PMID:27340630

  11. The FLASSH study: protocol for a randomised controlled trial evaluating falls prevention after stroke and two sub-studies

    PubMed Central

    Batchelor, Frances A; Hill, Keith D; Mackintosh, Shylie F; Said, Catherine M; Whitehead, Craig H

    2009-01-01

    Background Falls are common in stroke survivors returning home after rehabilitation, however there is currently a lack of evidence about preventing falls in this population. This paper describes the study protocol for the FLASSH (FaLls prevention After Stroke Survivors return Home) project. Methods and design This randomised controlled trial aims to evaluate the effectiveness of a multi-factorial falls prevention program for stroke survivors who are at high risk of falling when they return home after rehabilitation. Intervention will consist of a home exercise program as well as individualised falls prevention and injury minimisation strategies based on identified risk factors for falls. Additionally, two sub-studies will be implemented in order to explore other key areas related to falls in this population. The first of these is a longitudinal study evaluating the relationship between fear of falling, falls and function over twelve months, and the second evaluates residual impairment in gait stability and obstacle crossing twelve months after discharge from rehabilitation. Discussion The results of the FLASSH project will inform falls prevention practice for stroke survivors. If the falls prevention program is shown to be effective, low cost strategies to prevent falls can be implemented for those at risk around the time of discharge from rehabilitation, thus improving safety and quality of life for stroke survivors. The two sub-studies will contribute to the overall understanding and management of falls risk in stroke survivors. Trial registration This trial is registered with the Australian and New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry (ACTRN012607000398404). PMID:19335909

  12. mTOR inhibitor therapy: Does it prevent HCC recurrence after liver transplantation?

    PubMed

    Duvoux, Christophe; Toso, Christian

    2015-07-01

    Prevention of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) recurrence after liver transplantation is a clinical priority. The importance of the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway in cell growth and survival makes it a logical target for antitumor strategies, as borne out by clinical data in various types of malignancy. A number of studies have indicated that the mTOR inhibitors everolimus and sirolimus suppress cell proliferation and tumor growth in animal models of HCC. Coadministration of an mTOR inhibitor could permit lower dosing of chemotherapeutic agents in HCC management, and trials in non-transplant HCC population are exploring combined used with various agents including sorafenib, the vascular endothelial growth factor inhibitor bevacizumab and conventional agents. In terms of a preventive effect after liver transplantation for HCC, data from retrospective studies and non-randomized prospective analyses in which patients received an mTOR inhibitor with concomitant calcineurin inhibitor therapy have indicated that HCC recurrence rates and overall survival may be improved compared to a standard calcineurin inhibitor regimen. Meta-analyses have supported these findings, but controlled trials are required before any firm conclusions can be drawn. In two of the three randomized trials which have assessed de novo mTOR inhibitor therapy after liver transplantation, there was a numerically lower rate of HCC recurrence by one year post-transplant in patients given an mTOR inhibitor versus the control arm, but absolute numbers were low. Overall, based on the available data from retrospective studies, meta-analyses, and post-hoc assessments of randomized trials, it appears advisable to consider mTOR inhibition-based immunosuppression after transplantation for HCC, particularly in patients who exceed the Milan criteria. Prospective data are awaited. PMID:26071984

  13. Are High Proanthocyanidins Key to Cranberry Efficacy in the Prevention of Recurrent Urinary Tract Infection?

    PubMed

    Vostalova, Jitka; Vidlar, Ales; Simanek, Vilim; Galandakova, Adela; Kosina, Pavel; Vacek, Jan; Vrbkova, Jana; Zimmermann, Benno F; Ulrichova, Jitka; Student, Vladimir

    2015-10-01

    Most research on American cranberry in the prevention of urinary tract infection (UTI) has used juices. The spectrum of components in juice is limited. This study tested whether whole cranberry fruit powder (proanthocyanidin content 0.56%) could prevent recurrent UTI in 182 women with two or more UTI episodes in the last year. Participants were randomized to a cranberry (n = 89) or a placebo group (n = 93) and received daily 500 mg of cranberry for 6 months. The number of UTI diagnoses was counted. The intent-to-treat analyses showed that in the cranberry group, the UTIs were significantly fewer [10.8% vs. 25.8%, p = 0.04, with an age-standardized 12-month UTI history (p = 0.01)]. The Kaplan-Meier survival curves showed that the cranberry group experienced a longer time to first UTI than the placebo group (p = 0.04). Biochemical parameters were normal, and there was no significant difference in urinary phenolics between the groups at baseline or on day180. The results show that cranberry fruit powder (peel, seeds, pulp) may reduce the risk of symptomatic UTI in women with a history of recurrent UTIs. PMID:26268913

  14. Are High Proanthocyanidins Key to Cranberry Efficacy in the Prevention of Recurrent Urinary Tract Infection?

    PubMed

    Vostalova, Jitka; Vidlar, Ales; Simanek, Vilim; Galandakova, Adela; Kosina, Pavel; Vacek, Jan; Vrbkova, Jana; Zimmermann, Benno F; Ulrichova, Jitka; Student, Vladimir

    2015-10-01

    Most research on American cranberry in the prevention of urinary tract infection (UTI) has used juices. The spectrum of components in juice is limited. This study tested whether whole cranberry fruit powder (proanthocyanidin content 0.56%) could prevent recurrent UTI in 182 women with two or more UTI episodes in the last year. Participants were randomized to a cranberry (n = 89) or a placebo group (n = 93) and received daily 500 mg of cranberry for 6 months. The number of UTI diagnoses was counted. The intent-to-treat analyses showed that in the cranberry group, the UTIs were significantly fewer [10.8% vs. 25.8%, p = 0.04, with an age-standardized 12-month UTI history (p = 0.01)]. The Kaplan-Meier survival curves showed that the cranberry group experienced a longer time to first UTI than the placebo group (p = 0.04). Biochemical parameters were normal, and there was no significant difference in urinary phenolics between the groups at baseline or on day180. The results show that cranberry fruit powder (peel, seeds, pulp) may reduce the risk of symptomatic UTI in women with a history of recurrent UTIs.

  15. Pharmaceutical treatments to prevent recurrence of endometriosis following surgery: a model-based economic evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Sanghera, Sabina; Barton, Pelham; Bhattacharya, Siladitya; Horne, Andrew W; Roberts, Tracy Elizabeth

    2016-01-01

    Objective Conduct an economic evaluation based on best currently available evidence comparing alternative treatments levonorgestrel-releasing intrauterine system, depot-medroxyprogesterone acetate, combined oral contraceptive pill (COCP) and ‘no treatment’ to prevent recurrence of endometriosis after conservative surgery in primary care, and to inform the design of a planned trial-based economic evaluation. Methods We developed a state transition (Markov) model with a 36-month follow-up. The model structure was informed by a pragmatic review and clinical experts. The economic evaluation adopted a UK National Health Service perspective and was based on an outcome of incremental cost per quality-adjusted life year (QALY). As available data were limited, intentionally wide distributions were assigned around model inputs, and the average costs and outcome of the probabilistic sensitivity analyses were reported. Results On average, all strategies were more expensive and generated fewer QALYs compared to no treatment. However, uncertainty attributing to the transition probabilities affected the results. Inputs relating to effectiveness, changes in treatment and the time at which the change is made were the main causes of uncertainty, illustrating areas where robust and specific data collection is required. Conclusions There is currently no evidence to support any treatment being recommended to prevent the recurrence of endometriosis following conservative surgery. The study highlights the importance of developing decision models at the outset of a trial to identify data requirements to conduct a robust post-trial analysis. PMID:27084280

  16. The Preventive Effects of Neural Stem Cells and Mesenchymal Stem Cells Intra-ventricular Injection on Brain Stroke in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Hosseini, Seyed Mojtaba; Samimi, Nastaran; Farahmandnia, Mohammad; Shakibajahromi, Benafshe; Sarvestani, Fatemeh Sabet; Sani, Mahsa; Mohamadpour, Masoomeh

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Stroke is one of the most important causes of disability in developed countries and, unfortunately, there is no effective treatment for this major problem of central nervous system (CNS); cell therapy may be helpful to recover this disease. In some conditions such as cardiac surgeries and neurosurgeries, there are some possibilities of happening brain stroke. Inflammation of CNS plays an important role in stroke pathogenesis, in addition, apoptosis and neural death could be the other reasons of poor neurological out come after stroke. In this study, we examined the preventive effects of the neural stem cells (NSCs) and mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) intra-ventricular injected on stroke in rats. Aim: The aim of this study was to investigate the preventive effects of neural and MSCs for stroke in rats. Materials and Methods: The MSCs were isolated by flashing the femurs and tibias of the male rats with appropriate media. The NSCs were isolated from rat embryo ganglion eminence and they cultured NSCs media till the neurospheres formed. Both NSCs and MSCs were labeled with PKH26-GL. One day before stroke, the cells were injected into lateral ventricle stereotactically. Results: During following for 28 days, the neurological scores indicated that there are better recoveries in the groups received stem cells and they had less lesion volume in their brain measured by hematoxylin and eosin staining. Furthermore, the activities of caspase-3 were lower in the stem cell received groups than control group and the florescent microscopy images showed that the stem cells migrated to various zones of the brains. Conclusion: Both NSCs and MSCs are capable of protecting the CNS against ischemia and they may be good ways to prevent brain stroke consequences situations. PMID:26605202

  17. An open trial of mindfulness-based cognitive therapy for the prevention of perinatal depressive relapse/recurrence.

    PubMed

    Dimidjian, Sona; Goodman, Sherryl H; Felder, Jennifer N; Gallop, Robert; Brown, Amanda P; Beck, Arne

    2015-02-01

    Pregnant women with histories of depression are at high risk of depressive relapse/recurrence during the perinatal period, and options for relapse/recurrence prevention are limited. Mindfulness-based cognitive therapy (MBCT) has strong evidence among general populations but has not been studied among at-risk pregnant women to prevent depression. We examined the feasibility, acceptability, and clinical outcomes of depression symptom severity and relapse/recurrence associated with MBCT adapted for perinatal women (MBCT-PD). Pregnant women with depression histories were recruited from obstetrics clinics in a large health maintenance organization at two sites and enrolled in MBCT-PD (N = 49). Self-reported depressive symptoms and interview-based assessments of depression relapse/recurrence status were measured at baseline, during MBCT-PD, and through 6-months postpartum. Pregnant women reported interest, engagement, and satisfaction with the program. Retention rates were high, as were rates of completion of daily homework practices. Intent to treat analyses indicated a significant improvement in depression symptom levels and an 18 % rate of relapse/recurrence through 6 months postpartum. MBCT-PD shows promise as an acceptable, feasible, and clinically beneficial brief psychosocial prevention option for pregnant women with histories of depression. Randomized controlled trials are needed to examine the efficacy of MBCT-PD for the prevention of depressive relapse/recurrence during pregnancy and postpartum. PMID:25298253

  18. Tai Chi Chuan for the Primary Prevention of Stroke in Middle-Aged and Elderly Adults: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Guohua; Liu, Feiwen; Li, Shuzhen; Tao, Jing; Chen, Lidian

    2015-01-01

    Background. Stroke is a major healthcare problem with serious long-term disability and is one of the leading causes of death in the world. Prevention of stroke is considered an important strategy. Methods. Seven electronic databases were searched. Results. 36 eligible studies with a total of 2393 participants were identified. Primary outcome measures, TCC exercise combined with other intervention had a significant effect on decreasing the incidence of nonfatal stroke (n = 185, RR = 0.11, 95% CI 0.01 to 0.85, P = 0.03) and CCD (n = 125, RR = 0.33, 95% CI 0.11 to 0.96, P = 0.04). For the risk factors of stroke, pooled analysis demonstrated that TCC exercise was associated with lower body weight, BMI, FBG level, and decreasing SBP, DBP, plasma TC, and LDL-C level regardless of the intervention period less than half a year or more than one year and significantly raised HDL-C level in comparison to nonintervention. Compared with other treatments, TCC intervention on the basis of the same other treatments in patients with chronic disease also showed the beneficial effect on lowering blood pressure. Conclusion. The present systematic review indicates that TCC exercise is beneficially associated with the primary prevention of stroke in middle-aged and elderly adults by inversing the high risk factors of stroke. PMID:25784950

  19. Intracranial Pressure Elevation 24 h after Ischemic Stroke in Aged Rats Is Prevented by Early, Short Hypothermia Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Murtha, Lucy A.; Beard, Daniel J.; Bourke, Julia T.; Pepperall, Debbie; McLeod, Damian D.; Spratt, Neil J.

    2016-01-01

    Stroke is predominantly a senescent disease, yet most preclinical studies investigate treatment in young animals. We recently demonstrated that short-duration hypothermia-treatment completely prevented the dramatic intracranial pressure (ICP) rise seen post-stroke in young rats. Here, our aim was to investigate whether a similar ICP rise occurs in aged rats and to determine whether short-duration hypothermia is an effective treatment in aged animals. Experimental middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAo-3 h occlusion) was performed on male Wistar rats aged 19–20 months. At 1 h after stroke-onset, rats were randomized to 2.5 h hypothermia-treatment (32.5°C) or normothermia (37°C). ICP was monitored at baseline, for 3.5 h post-occlusion, and at 24 h post-stroke. Infarct and edema volumes were calculated from histology. Baseline pre-stroke ICP was 11.2 ± 3.3 mmHg across all animals. Twenty-four hours post-stroke, ICP was significantly higher in normothermic animals compared to hypothermia-treated animals (27.4 ± 18.2 mmHg vs. 8.0 ± 5.0 mmHg, p = 0.03). Infarct and edema volumes were not significantly different between groups. These data demonstrate ICP may also increase 24 h post-stroke in aged rats, and that short-duration hypothermia treatment has a profound and sustained preventative effect. These findings may have important implications for the use of hypothermia in clinical trials of aged stroke patients. PMID:27303291

  20. Prevention of Recurrence of Major Depression among Emerging Adults by a Group Cognitive-Behavioral/Interpersonal Intervention

    PubMed Central

    Sheets, Erin S.; Craighead, Linda Wilcoxon; Brosse, Alisha L.; Hauser, Monika; Madsen, Joshua W.; Craighead, W. Edward

    2012-01-01

    Background Among the most serious sequelae to an initial episode of Major Depressive Disorder (MDD) during adolescence is the significant increase in the probability of recurrence. This study reports on an integrated CBT/IPT program, provided in a group format, that was developed to decrease the rate of MDD recurrence in emerging adults. Methods Participants were 89 young adults who were not depressed at study entry but had experienced MDD during adolescence. Participants were assigned to a CBT/IPT prevention program or to an assessment only control condition and were followed through the first 2 years of college. Results Risk for MDD recurrence was reduced more than 50% for the prevention program participants compared to assessment only controls. The intervention also conferred beneficial effects on academic performance for those students who completed the majority of the group sessions. Limitations The study included a self-selected sample of emerging adults who were aware of their history of depression. Due to the small sample size, it will be important to evaluate similar interventions in adequately-powered trials to determine if this is a replicable finding. Conclusions With 51% of the assessment only participants experiencing a MDD recurrence during the first 2 years of college, these findings support the need for programs designed to prevent MDD recurrence in young adults. The current program, based on IPT and CBT principles, appears to reduce the rate of MDD recurrence among previously depressed emerging adults. PMID:23021821

  1. Deliberate Establishment of Asymptomatic Bacteriuria—A Novel Strategy to Prevent Recurrent UTI

    PubMed Central

    Wullt, Björn; Svanborg, Catharina

    2016-01-01

    We have established a novel strategy to reduce the risk for recurrent urinary tract infection (UTI), where rapidly increasing antibiotic resistance poses a major threat. Epidemiologic studies have demonstrated that asymptomatic bacteriuria (ABU) protects the host against symptomatic infections with more virulent strains. To mimic this protective effect, we deliberately establish ABU in UTI-prone patients, who are refractory to conventional therapy. The patients are inoculated with Escherichia coli (E. coli) 83972, now widely used as a prototype ABU strain. Therapeutic efficacy has been demonstrated in a placebo-controlled trial, supporting the feasibility of using E. coli 83972 as a tool to prevent recurrent UTI and, potentially, to outcompete antibiotic-resistant strains from the human urinary tract. In addition, the human inoculation protocol offers unique opportunities to study host-parasite interaction in vivo in the human urinary tract. Here, we review the clinical evidence for protection using this approach as well as some molecular insights into the pathogenesis of UTI that have been gained during these studies. PMID:27483325

  2. Prospects in cancer immunotherapy: treating advanced stage disease or preventing tumor recurrence?

    PubMed

    Manjili, Masoud H; Payne, Kyle K

    2015-06-01

    Human vaccines against infectious agents are often effective in a prophylactic setting. However, they are usually not effective when used post-exposure. Rabies vaccine is one of the exceptions, which can be used post-exposure, but is effective only when used in combination with other treatments. Similar results have been obtained with cancer vaccines and immunotherapies. Cancer immunotherapies generally prolong patients' survival when they are used during advanced stage disease. The potential of immunotherapy to cure cancer could be revealed when it is applied in a prophylactic setting. This article provides a brief overview of cancer immunotherapeutics and suggests that immunotherapy can cure cancer if used at the right time against the right target; we suggest that targeting cancer during dormancy in order to prevent tumor recurrence as advanced stage disease is potentially curative.

  3. Identifying the Non-recurrent Laryngeal Nerve: Preventing a Major Risk of Morbidity During Thyroidectomy

    PubMed Central

    Mahmodlou, Rahim; Aghasi, Mohammad Reza; Sepehrvand, Nariman

    2013-01-01

    Non-recurrent laryngeal nerve (NRLN) is a rare anomaly which is reported in 0.3%-0.8% of people on the right side and in 0.004% (extremely rare) on the left side. Damage to this nerve during the surgical procedure may lead to severe iatrogenic morbidity and should therefore be prevented from being damaged. The best way to avoid this damage to the nerve is to identify the nerve with a systematic diligent dissection based on usual anatomical landmarks and awareness about the possibility of their existence. Hereby, we are going to present a 26-year-old woman, a case of NRLN on the right side which was identified during thyroidectomy. The nervous anomaly was accompanied with vascular abnormality which was confirmed by computerized tomography (CT) angiography, post-operatively. PMID:23543847

  4. [History and current status of medical treatment for stroke].

    PubMed

    Yagita, Yoshiki

    2016-04-01

    In the last few decades, medical treatment for stroke has made progress greatly. Effective and safe antihypertensive drug dramatically reduced incidence of hemorrhagic stroke Although intravenous thrombolysis is effective therapeutic strategy, only limited patient can receive the benefit due to narrow time window. There are some ongoing trials to develop safer and more effective thrombolytic therapy. Antithrombotic therapy is important for prevention of recurrent stroke in the acute and chronic phase. Aspirin and warfarin have been used for a long period. Now, we can also choose clopidogrel, cilostazol and non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants. Researchers and physicians will continue effort to develop more effective strategy for management of stroke. PMID:27333740

  5. Aspirin prevents stroke but not MI in women; vitamin E has no effect on CV disease or cancer.

    PubMed

    Buring, Julie E

    2006-09-01

    Low-dose aspirin taken every other day helps prevent stroke in women aged 45 years and older, but does not prevent a first myocardial infarction (MI) or cardiovascular death among healthy women. Women receive no benefit from alternate-day vitamin E in the primary prevention of cardiovascular disease or cancer. These were the findings of the Women's Health Study, in which investigators followed 39,876 female health professionals over 10 years. The women were randomized to receive either 100 mg of aspirin or a placebo tablet every other day; they were also randomized to take 600 IU of vitamin E or a placebo capsule on the intervening days. No statistically significant differences were seen between the aspirin and placebo groups in the primary cardiovascular end point, which was the combined number of nonfatal MIs, nonfatal strokes, and cardiovascular deaths. Analysis of secondary cardiovascular end points revealed that aspirin use was associated with no significant effect on the number of total MIs, fatal MIs, and nonfatal MIs, and a nonsignificant decrease in cardiovascular mortality. However, aspirin users did experience significantly fewer strokes, in particular ischemic strokes. Vitamin E had very little impact on the primary prevention of both cardiovascular events and cancer.

  6. Up-regulation of endothelial nitric oxide activity as a central strategy for prevention of ischemic stroke - just say NO to stroke!

    PubMed

    McCarty, M F

    2000-11-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) produced by the endothelium of cerebral arterioles is an important mediator of endothelium-dependent vasodilation (EDV), and also helps to prevent thrombosis and vascular remodeling. A number of risk factors for ischemic stroke are associated with impaired EDV, and this defect is usually at least partially attributable to a decrease in the production and/or stability of NO. These risk factors include hypertension, high-sodium diets, homocysteine, diabetes, visceral obesity, and aging. Conversely, many measures which may provide protection from ischemic stroke - such as ample dietary intakes of potassium, arginine, fish oil, and selenium - can have a favorable impact on EDV. Protection afforded by exercise training, estrogen replacement, statin drugs, green tea polyphenols, and cruciferous vegetables may reflect increased expression of the endothelial NO synthase. IGF-I activity stimulates endothelial NO production, and conceivably is a mediator of the protection associated with higher-protein diets in Japanese epidemiology and in hypertensive rats. These considerations prompt the conclusion that modulation of NO availability is a crucial determinant of risk for ischemic stroke. Multifactorial strategies for promoting effective cerebrovascular NO activity, complemented by measures that stabilize platelets and moderate blood viscosity, should minimize risk for ischemic stroke and help maintain vigorous cerebral perfusion into ripe old age. The possibility that such measures will also diminish risk for Alzheimer's disease, and slow the normal age-related decline in mental acuity, merits consideration. A limited amount of ecologic epidemiology suggests that both stroke and senile dementia may be extremely rare in cultures still consuming traditional unsalted whole-food diets. Other lines of evidence suggest that promotion of endothelial NO activity may decrease risk for age-related macular degeneration. PMID:11058418

  7. Economic Evaluation of a Problem Solving Intervention to Prevent Recurrent Sickness Absence in Workers with Common Mental Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Arends, Iris; Bültmann, Ute; van Rhenen, Willem; Groen, Henk; van der Klink, Jac J. L.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives Workers with common mental disorders (CMDs) frequently experience recurrent sickness absence but scientifically evaluated interventions to prevent recurrences are lacking. The objectives of this study are to evaluate the cost-effectiveness and cost-benefit of a problem solving intervention aimed at preventing recurrent sickness absence in workers with CMDs compared to care as usual. Methods An economic evaluation was conducted alongside a cluster-randomised controlled trial with 12 months follow-up. Treatment providers were randomised to either a 2-day training in the SHARP-at work intervention, i.e. a problem solving intervention, or care as usual. Effect outcomes were the incidence of recurrent sickness absence and time to recurrent sickness absence. Self-reported health care utilisation was measured by questionnaires. A cost-effectiveness analysis (CEA) from the societal perspective and a cost-benefit analysis (CBA) from the employer’s perspective were conducted. Results The CEA showed that the SHARP-at work intervention was more effective but also more expensive than care as usual. The CBA revealed that employer’s occupational health care costs were significantly higher in the intervention group compared to care as usual. Overall, the SHARP-at work intervention showed no economic benefit compared to care as usual. Conclusions As implementation of the SHARP-at work intervention might require additional investments, health care policy makers need to decide if these investments are worthwhile considering the results that can be accomplished in reducing recurrent sickness absence. PMID:23951270

  8. An evidence-based review of apixaban and its potential in the prevention of stroke in patients with atrial fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Deedwania, Prakash; Huang, Grace W

    2012-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is a common cardiac arrhythmia, especially in the elderly population. It is associated with cardioembolic complications, particularly strokes, resulting in severe functional deficit or death. AF patients are first stratified into low, intermediate, and high risk for thromboembolic events using the CHADS(2) and CHA(2)DS(2)-VASc score systems. Depending on their risks, patients are treated with either therapeutic anticoagulation with warfarin or acetylsalicylic acid for stroke prevention. Although warfarin is the recommended therapy, it is underutilized clinically due to concern for narrow therapeutic window, drug-to-drug and drug-to-food interactions, and hemorrhagic complications. Newer anticoagulant agents such as dabigatran (a direct thrombin inhibitor) and rivaroxaban (a direct factor Xa inhibitor) have already been approved by US Food and Drug Administration for stroke prevention in patients with nonvalvular atrial fibrillation. Apixaban is the newest oral direct factor Xa inhibitor and it has been extensively studied in the AVERROES and ARISTOTLE trials. Apixaban demonstrated reduced incidence of primary outcome of stroke and bleeding events when compared with warfarin. Apixaban is currently being reviewed by the Food and Drug Administration as a stroke prophylactic agent. In addition, there are several other indirect factor Xa inhibitors and vitamin K antagonists under study presently. Results from these studies will provide us with information about possible alternatives to warfarin. PMID:22826692

  9. An evidence-based review of edoxaban and its role in stroke prevention in patients with nonvalvular atrial fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    Acharya, Tushar; Deedwania, Prakash

    2015-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation is the most common arrhythmia in the elderly. It is responsible for significant morbidity and mortality from cardioembolic complications like stroke. As a result, atrial fibrillation patients are risk-stratified using the CHADS2 or CHA2DS2-VASc scoring systems. Those at intermediate-to-high risk have traditionally been treated with therapeutic anticoagulation with warfarin for stroke prevention. Although effective, warfarin use is fraught with multiple concerns, such as a narrow therapeutic window, drug–drug and drug–food interactions, and excessive bleeding. Novel oral anticoagulant agents have recently become available as viable alternatives for warfarin therapy. Direct thrombin inhibitor dabigatran and factor Xa inhibitors like rivaroxaban and apixaban have already been approved by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for stroke prevention in patients with nonvalvular atrial fibrillation. Edoxaban is the latest oral direct factor Xa inhibitor studied in the largest novel oral anticoagulant trial so far: ENGAGE AF-TIMI 48. Treatment with a 30 mg or 60 mg daily dose of edoxaban was found to be noninferior to dose-adjusted warfarin in reducing the rate of stroke and systemic embolism in patients with nonvalvular atrial fibrillation, with a lower incidence of bleeding complications and cardiovascular deaths. Edoxaban was recently reviewed by an FDA advisory committee and recommended as a stroke-prophylaxis agent. Once approved, it promises to provide another useful alternative to warfarin therapy. PMID:26019695

  10. C-reactive Protein as a Prognostic Marker after Lacunar Stroke: The Levels of Inflammatory Markers in the Treatment of Stroke (LIMITS) Study

    PubMed Central

    Elkind, Mitchell S. V.; Luna, Jorge M.; McClure, Leslie A.; Zhang, Yu; Coffey, Christopher S.; Roldan, Ana; Del Brutto, Oscar H.; Pretell, Edwin Javier; Pettigrew, L. Creed; Meyer, Brett C.; Tapia, Jorge; White, Carole; Benavente, Oscar R.

    2014-01-01

    Background and Purpose Inflammatory biomarkers predict incident and recurrent cardiac events, but their relationship to stroke prognosis is uncertain. We hypothesized that high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP) predicts recurrent ischemic stroke after recent lacunar stroke. Methods Levels of Inflammatory Markers in the Treatment of Stroke (LIMITS) was an international, multicenter, prospective ancillary biomarker study nested within Secondary Prevention of Small Subcortical Strokes (SPS3), a Phase III trial in patients with recent lacunar stroke. Patients were assigned in factorial design to aspirin versus aspirin plus clopidogrel, and higher versus lower blood pressure targets. Patients had blood samples collected at enrollment, and hsCRP measured using nephelometry at a central laboratory. Cox proportional hazards models were used to calculate hazard ratios and 95% confidence intervals (HR, 95%CI) for recurrence risks before and after adjusting for demographics, comorbidities, and statin use. Results Among 1244 lacunar stroke patients (mean 63.3 ± 10.8 years), median hsCRP was 2.16 mg/L. There were 83 recurrent ischemic strokes (including 45 lacunes), and 115 major vascular events (stroke, myocardial infarction, vascular death). Compared with the bottom quartile, those in the top quartile (hsCRP >4.86 mg/L) were at increased risk of recurrent ischemic stroke (unadjusted HR 2.54, 95%CI 1.30–4.96), even after adjusting for demographics and risk factors (adjusted HR 2.32, 95%CI 1.15–4.68). HsCRP predicted increased risk of major vascular events (top quartile adjusted HR 2.04, 95%CI 1.14–3.67). There was no interaction with randomized antiplatelet treatment. Conclusions Among recent lacunar stroke patients, hsCRP levels predict risk of recurrent strokes and other vascular events. HsCRP did not predict response to dual antiplatelets. PMID:24523037

  11. Omega-3 fatty acid is a potential preventive agent for recurrent colon cancer.

    PubMed

    Vasudevan, Anita; Yu, Yingjie; Banerjee, Sanjeev; Woods, James; Farhana, Lulu; Rajendra, Sindhu G; Patel, Aamil; Dyson, Gregory; Levi, Edi; Maddipati, Krishna Rao; Majumdar, Adhip P N; Nangia-Makker, Pratima

    2014-11-01

    Increasing evidence supports the contention that many malignancies, including sporadic colorectal cancer, are driven by the self-renewing, chemotherapy-resistant cancer stem/stem-like cells (CSC/CSLC), underscoring the need for improved preventive and therapeutic strategies targeting CSCs/CSLCs. Omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (ω-3 PUFA), have been reported to inhibit the growth of primary tumors, but their potential as a preventive agent for recurring cancers is unexplored. The primary objectives of this investigation are (i) to examine whether eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA; one of the ω-3 PUFA) synergizes with FuOx (5-FU+Oxaliplatin), the backbone of colon cancer chemotherapy, and (ii) whether EPA by itself or in combination with conventional chemotherapy prevents the recurrence of colon cancer via eliminating/suppressing CSCs/CSLCs. FuOx-resistant (chemoresistant; CR) colon cancer cells, highly enriched in CSCs, were used for this study. Although EPA alone was effective, combination of EPA and FuOx was more potent in (i) inhibiting cell growth, colonosphere formation, and sphere-forming frequency, (ii) increasing sphere disintegration, (iii) suppressing the growth of SCID mice xenografts of CR colon cancer cells, and (iv) decreasing proinflammatory metabolites in mice. In addition, EPA + FuOx caused a reduction in CSC/CSLC population. The growth reduction by this regimen is the result of increased apoptosis as evidenced by PARP cleavage. Furthermore, increased pPTEN, decreased pAkt, normalization of β-catenin expression, localization, and transcriptional activity by EPA suggests a role for the PTEN-Akt axis and Wnt signaling in regulating this process. Our data suggest that EPA by itself or in combination with FuOx could be an effective preventive strategy for recurring colorectal cancer.

  12. Non-Surgical Procedures Open Blocked Arteries to Prevent and Treat Stroke

    MedlinePlus

    ... of the brain controls is affected through paralysis, language, motor skills, or vision. Stroke Prevalence Stroke is third leading cause of death in United States, behind high blood pressure and cancer Every 45 seconds someone in the United States has a stroke ...

  13. Dabigatran etexilate for secondary stroke prevention: the first year experience from a multicenter short-term registry

    PubMed Central

    Krogias, Christos; Sands, Kara A.; Sharma, Vijay K.; Katsanos, Aristeidis H.; Vadikolias, Konstantinos; Papageorgiou, Sokratis G.; Heliopoulos, Ioannis; Shiue, Harn; Mitsoglou, Athina; Liantinioti, Chrissoula; Athanasiadis, Dimitrios; Giannopoulos, Sotirios; Piperidou, Charitomeni; Voumvourakis, Konstantinos; Alexandrov, Andrei V.

    2014-01-01

    Background: There are growing concerns for the side effects of dabigatran etexilate (dabigatran), including higher incidence of dyspepsia and gastrointestinal bleeding. We conducted a multicenter early implementation study to prospectively evaluate the safety, efficacy and adherence to dabigatran for secondary stroke prevention. Methods: Consecutive atrial fibrillation (AF) patients with ischemic stroke (IS) or transient ischemic attack (TIA) received dabigatran for secondary stroke prevention during their hospital stay according to American Heart Association recommendations at five tertiary care stroke centers. The study population was prospectively followed and outcomes were documented. The primary and secondary safety outcomes were major hemorrhage and all other bleeding events respectively defined according to RE-LY trial methodology. Results: A total of 78 AF patients (mean age 71 ± 9years; 54% men; 81% IS, 19% TIA; median CHADS2 (Congestive heart failure, Hypertension, diabetes mellitus, age >75 years, prior stroke or TIA); range 2–5) score 4 were treated with dabigatran [(110mg bid (74%); 150mg bid (26%)]. During a mean follow-up period of 7 ± 5 months (range 1–18) we documented no cases of IS, TIA, intracranial hemorrhage, systemic embolism or myocardial infarction in AF patients treated with dabigatran. There were two (2.6%) major bleeding events (lower gastrointestinal bleeding) and two (2.6%) minor bleedings [hematuria (n = 1) and rectal bleeding (n = 1)]. Dabigatran was discontinued in 26% of the study population with high cost being the most common reason for discontinuation (50%). Discussion: Our pilot data indicate that dabigatran appears to be safe for secondary stroke prevention during the first year of implementation of this therapy. However, high cost may limit the long-term treatment of AF patients with dabigatran, leading to early discontinuation. PMID:24790645

  14. The TriGuard embolic deflection device for prevention of stroke and cerebral embolization during transcatheter aortic valve replacement.

    PubMed

    Baumbach, Andreas; Pietras, Cody; Lansky, Alexandra

    2015-01-01

    The incidence of embolic ischemic cerebral events during transcatheter aortic valve implantation remains high. The effects range from clinically silent embolic lesions in the brain to severe disabling stroke. Memory loss and other functional neurocognitive impairment are a direct result of embolic strokes. The TriGuard embolic deflection device is a nitinol frame filter that is placed across all three aortic cerebral vessel ostia to prevent particles from entering the brain circulation during the procedure. The results of clinical studies suggest that this procedure can lead to a reduction of embolic events, and an improvement of neurocognitive function when compared with unprotected transcatheter aortic valve implantation. PMID:26364995

  15. Stroke prevention in the elderly atrial fibrillation patient with comorbid conditions: focus on non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants

    PubMed Central

    Turagam, Mohit K; Velagapudi, Poonam; Flaker, Greg C

    2015-01-01

    Stroke prevention in elderly atrial fibrillation patients remains a challenge. There is a high risk of stroke and systemic thromboembolism but also a high risk of bleeding if anticoagulants are prescribed. The elderly have increased chronic kidney disease, coronary artery disease, polypharmacy, and overall frailty. For all these reasons, anticoagulant use is underutilized in the elderly. In this manuscript, the benefits of non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants compared with warfarin in the elderly patient population with multiple comorbid conditions are reviewed. PMID:26366064

  16. MELAS, an important consideration in the adult population presenting with unusual and recurrent stroke-like episodes.

    PubMed

    Corr, Alison; Gaughan, Maria; Moroney, Joan; Looby, Seamus

    2014-01-28

    A 48-year-old man was admitted for workup of stroke-like symptoms and generalised tonic-clonic seizures. History and examination revealed that the patient had background diagnoses of type 2 diabetes mellitus, epilepsy and had suffered a temporal lobe infarct 3 years ago. The unusual presentation and physical findings, along with subsequent MRI findings led to a diagnosis of mitochondrial myopathy, encephalopathy, lactic acidosis and stroke-like episodes (MELAS). MELAS is a mitochondrial disorder typified by the aforementioned symptoms, and is typically diagnosed in the first two decades of life.

  17. Extracranial-Intracranial Bypass Surgery for Stroke Prevention in Hemodynamic Cerebral Ischemia: The Carotid Occlusion Surgery Study: A Randomized Trial

    PubMed Central

    Powers, William J.; Clarke, William R.; Grubb, Robert L.; Videen, Tom O; Adams, Harold P.; Derdeyn, Colin P.

    2013-01-01

    and 22.7% (95% CI, 13.9% to 31.6%; 20 events) for the nonsurgical group (p=0.78, z-test); difference = 1.7% (95% CI, −10.4% to 13.8%). Thirty-day rates for ipsilateral ischemic stroke were 14.3% (14/97) in the surgical group and 2.0% (2/98) in the nonsurgical group; difference = (95% CI, 4.9% to 19.9%) Conclusions Among participants with recently symptomatic AICAO and hemodynamic cerebral ischemia, EC-IC bypass surgery plus medical therapy compared to medical therapy alone did not reduce the risk of recurrent ipsilateral ischemic stroke at 2 years. PMID:22068990

  18. [Consensus statement: Management of oral anticoagulation for stroke prevention in patients with nonvalvular atrial fibrillation].

    PubMed

    Helms, Thomas Maria; Silber, Sigmund; Schäfer, Andreas; Masuhr, Florian; Palm, Frederick; Darius, Harald; Schrör, Karsten; Bänsch, Dietmar; Bramlage, Peter; Hankowitz, Johannes; Karle, Christoph A; Stargardt, Tom; Weil, Joachim; Geller, Johann Christoph

    2016-09-01

    With the introduction of edoxaban last year in Germany, four nonvitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants are now available for stroke prevention in patients with nonvalvular atrial fibrillation. These novel oral anticoagulants (NOAC) represent an attractive new option compared to vitamin K antagonists (e.g., warfarin or phenprocoumon) due to simple use and fewer interactions with other drugs or food. Therefore, no INR monitoring and dosage adjustments are required for NOAC. The compelling clinical advantage of NOAC is the dramatic risk reduction of hemorhagic stroke and intracranial bleeding compared to current standard. In addition, total mortality is significantly reduced by 10 %. These effects are demonstrated for all four NOAC (dabigatran, rivaroxaban, apixaban and edoxaban). Therefore, current national and international guidelines recommend NOAC as the preferred option or at least as an attractive alternative compared to the former standard of vitamin K antagonists. The economic impact and reimbursement by Statutory Health Insurance (GKV) is of major importance for treatment in an outpatient setting. For apixaban and edoxaban, an additional benefit was granted by the institution of G‑BA and IQWiG in this clinical setting, whereas dabigatran and rivaroxaban were not assessed due to market entrance prior to 2011 before the AMNOG procedure was initiated. The members of this consensus paper recommend NOAC as the preferred option for patients with nonvalvular atrial fibrillation who are currently not treated with anticoagulant drugs in spite of clear indication for anticoagulation. For new patients with nonvalvular fibrillation, it should be decided on an individual basis which treatment option is adequate for the patient with their respective comorbidities. PMID:27576696

  19. Effects of a multifactorial fall prevention program on balance, gait, and fear of falling in post-stroke inpatients.

    PubMed

    Jung, Younuk; Lee, Kyeongbong; Shin, Seonhae; Lee, Wanhee

    2015-06-01

    [Purpose] This study investigated the effects of a multifactorial fall prevention program on balance, gait, and fear of falling in stroke patients. [Subjects] Twenty-five stroke patients were divided randomly into multifactorial fall prevention program group (n=15) and control treadmill group (n=10). [Methods] All interventions were applied for 30 min, five times per week, for five weeks. The fall prevention program included interventions based on the "Step Up to Stop Falls" initiative and educational interventions based on the Department of Health guidelines. For those in the treadmill group, the speed was increased gradually. The Korean falls efficacy scale and Korean activities-specific balance confidence scale were used to assess fear of falling. To assess balance and walking ability, the Korean performance-oriented mobility assessment scale and the 10-m and 6-minute walk tests were used. [Results] The fall prevention program interventions were found to be very effective at improving gait, balance, and fear of falling compared with the treadmill intervention and therefore seem appropriate for stroke patients. [Conclusion] A multifactorial fall prevention program is effective at improving balance, gait ability, and fear of falling. It is a more specific and broad intervention for reducing falls among inpatients in facilities and hospitals.

  20. Effects of a multifactorial fall prevention program on balance, gait, and fear of falling in post-stroke inpatients

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Younuk; Lee, Kyeongbong; Shin, Seonhae; Lee, Wanhee

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] This study investigated the effects of a multifactorial fall prevention program on balance, gait, and fear of falling in stroke patients. [Subjects] Twenty-five stroke patients were divided randomly into multifactorial fall prevention program group (n=15) and control treadmill group (n=10). [Methods] All interventions were applied for 30 min, five times per week, for five weeks. The fall prevention program included interventions based on the “Step Up to Stop Falls” initiative and educational interventions based on the Department of Health guidelines. For those in the treadmill group, the speed was increased gradually. The Korean falls efficacy scale and Korean activities-specific balance confidence scale were used to assess fear of falling. To assess balance and walking ability, the Korean performance-oriented mobility assessment scale and the 10-m and 6-minute walk tests were used. [Results] The fall prevention program interventions were found to be very effective at improving gait, balance, and fear of falling compared with the treadmill intervention and therefore seem appropriate for stroke patients. [Conclusion] A multifactorial fall prevention program is effective at improving balance, gait ability, and fear of falling. It is a more specific and broad intervention for reducing falls among inpatients in facilities and hospitals. PMID:26180337

  1. Comparative Effectiveness of Blood Pressure-lowering Drugs in Patients who have Already Suffered From Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wei-Ting; You, Li-Kai; Chiang, Chern-En; Sung, Shih-Hsien; Chuang, Shao-Yuan; Cheng, Hao-Min; Chen, Chen-Huan

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Hypertension is the most important risk factor for stroke and stroke recurrence. However, the preferred blood pressure (BP)-lowering drug class for patients who have suffered from a stroke has yet to be determined. To investigate the relative effects of BP-lowering therapies [angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor (ACEI), angiotensin receptor blockers (ARB), β blockers, calcium channel blockers (CCBs), diuretics, and combinations of these drugs] in patients with a prior stroke history, we performed a systematic review and meta-analysis using both traditional frequentist and Bayesian random-effects models and meta-regression of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) on the outcomes of recurrent stroke, coronary heart disease (CHD), and any major adverse cardiac and cerebrovascular events (MACCE). Trials were identified from searches of published hypertension guidelines, electronic databases, and previous systematic reviews. Fifteen RCTs composed of 39,329 participants with previous stroke were identified. Compared with the placebo, only ACEI along with diuretics significantly reduced recurrent stroke events [odds ratio (OR) = 0.54, 95% credibility interval (95% CI) 0.33–0.90]. On the basis of the distribution of posterior probabilities, the treatment ranking consistently identified ACEI along with diuretics as the preferred BP-lowering strategy for the reduction of recurrent stroke and CHD (31% and 35%, respectively). For preventing MACCE, diuretics appeared to be the preferred agent for stroke survivors (34%). Moreover, the meta-regression analysis failed to demonstrate a statistical significance between BP reduction and all outcomes (P = 0.1618 for total stroke, 0.4933 for CHD, and 0.2411 for MACCE). Evidence from RCTs supports the use of diuretics-based treatment, especially when combined with ACEI, for the secondary prevention of recurrent stroke and any vascular events in patients who have suffered from stroke. PMID:27082571

  2. Economic Evaluation of Apixaban for the Prevention of Stroke in Non-Valvular Atrial Fibrillation in the Netherlands

    PubMed Central

    Stevanović, Jelena; Pompen, Marjolein; Le, Hoa H.; Rozenbaum, Mark H.; Tieleman, Robert G.; Postma, Maarten J.

    2014-01-01

    Background Stroke prevention is the main goal of treating patients with atrial fibrillation (AF). Vitamin-K antagonists (VKAs) present an effective treatment in stroke prevention, however, the risk of bleeding and the requirement for regular coagulation monitoring are limiting their use. Apixaban is a novel oral anticoagulant associated with significantly lower hazard rates for stroke, major bleedings and treatment discontinuations, compared to VKAs. Objective To estimate the cost-effectiveness of apixaban compared to VKAs in non-valvular AF patients in the Netherlands. Methods Previously published lifetime Markov model using efficacy data from the ARISTOTLE and the AVERROES trial was modified to reflect the use of oral anticoagulants in the Netherlands. Dutch specific costs, baseline population stroke risk and coagulation monitoring levels were incorporated. Univariate, probabilistic sensitivity and scenario analyses on the impact of different coagulation monitoring levels were performed on the incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER). Results Treatment with apixaban compared to VKAs resulted in an ICER of €10,576 per quality adjusted life year (QALY). Those findings correspond with lower number of strokes and bleedings associated with the use of apixaban compared to VKAs. Univariate sensitivity analyses revealed model sensitivity to the absolute stroke risk with apixaban and treatment discontinuations risks with apixaban and VKAs. The probability that apixaban is cost-effective at a willingness-to-pay threshold of €20,000/QALY was 68%. Results of the scenario analyses on the impact of different coagulation monitoring levels were quite robust. Conclusions In patients with non-valvular AF, apixaban is likely to be a cost-effective alternative to VKAs in the Netherlands. PMID:25093723

  3. Physical Exercise as a Diagnostic, Rehabilitation, and Preventive Tool: Influence on Neuroplasticity and Motor Recovery after Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Pin-Barre, Caroline; Laurin, Jérôme

    2015-01-01

    Stroke remains a leading cause of adult motor disabilities in the world and accounts for the greatest number of hospitalizations for neurological disease. Stroke treatments/therapies need to promote neuroplasticity to improve motor function. Physical exercise is considered as a major candidate for ultimately promoting neural plasticity and could be used for different purposes in human and animal experiments. First, acute exercise could be used as a diagnostic tool to understand new neural mechanisms underlying stroke physiopathology. Indeed, better knowledge of stroke mechanisms that affect movements is crucial for enhancing treatment/rehabilitation effectiveness. Secondly, it is well established that physical exercise training is advised as an effective rehabilitation tool. Indeed, it reduces inflammatory processes and apoptotic marker expression, promotes brain angiogenesis and expression of some growth factors, and improves the activation of affected muscles during exercise. Nevertheless, exercise training might also aggravate sensorimotor deficits and brain injury depending on the chosen exercise parameters. For the last few years, physical training has been combined with pharmacological treatments to accentuate and/or accelerate beneficial neural and motor effects. Finally, physical exercise might also be considered as a major nonpharmacological preventive strategy that provides neuroprotective effects reducing adverse effects of brain ischemia. Therefore, prestroke regular physical activity may also decrease the motor outcome severity of stroke. PMID:26682073

  4. Valacyclovir for the prevention of recurrent herpes simplex virus eye disease after excimer laser photokeratectomy.

    PubMed Central

    Asbell, P A

    2000-01-01

    PURPOSE: A variety of factors have been reported as inducing the reactivation of latent herpes simplex virus (HSV), among them stress, trauma, and UV radiation. Excimer laser photorefractive keratectomy (PRK) is a surgical procedure utilizing a 193 nm ultraviolet light to alter the curvature of the cornea and hence correct vision. Reactivation of ocular herpes simplex keratitis following such excimer laser PRK has been reported. All published cases of HSV reactivation following excimer laser treatment in humans are reviewed. The present study evaluates whether stress, trauma of the corneal de-epithelialization prior to the laser, or the excimer laser treatment itself to the stromal bed induces this ocular reactivation of the latent HSV, and whether a systemic antiviral agent, valacyclovir, would prevent such laser PRK-induced reactivation of the HSV. METHODS: Forty-three normal 1.5- to 2.5-kg New Zealand white rabbits were infected on the surface of the cornea with HSV-1, strain RE. The animals were monitored until resolution, and then all animals were divided into 5 treatment groups: (1) de-epithelialization only, intraperitoneal (i.p.) saline for 14 days; (2) de-epithelialization plus laser, i.p. saline for 14 days; (3) de-epithelialization plus laser, valacyclovir 50 mg/kg per day i.p. for 14 days; (4) de-epithelialization plus laser, valacyclovir 100 mg/kg per day i.p. for 14 days; (5) de-epithelialization plus laser, valacyclovir 150 mg/kg per day i.p. for 14 days. Animals were evaluated in a masked fashion by clinical examination biweekly and viral cultures biweekly through day 28. RESULTS: The reactivation rates were as follows: group 1, 0%; group 2, 67%; group 3, 50%; group 4, 17%; and group 5, 0%. Viral titers were negative in animals that had no reactivation but persistently positive in those that had reactivation (day 6 through day 28). CONCLUSIONS: Excimer laser (193 nm) treatment can trigger reactivation of ocular herpes disease (67%) and viral

  5. Primary prevention of stroke by a healthy lifestyle in a high-risk group

    PubMed Central

    Åkesson, Agneta; Wolk, Alicja

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To examine the impact of a healthy lifestyle on stroke risk in men at higher risk of stroke because of other cardiovascular diseases or conditions. Methods: Our study population comprised 11,450 men in the Cohort of Swedish Men who had a history of hypertension, high cholesterol levels, diabetes, heart failure, or atrial fibrillation. Participants had completed a questionnaire about diet and lifestyle and were free from stroke and ischemic heart disease at baseline (January 1, 1998). We defined a healthy lifestyle as a low-risk diet (≥5 servings/d of fruits and vegetables and <30 g/d of processed meat), not smoking, ≥150 min/wk of physical activity, body mass index of 18.5 to 25 kg/m2, and low to moderate alcohol consumption (>0 to ≤30 g/d). Ascertainment of stroke cases was accomplished through linkage with the National Inpatient Register and the Swedish Cause of Death Register. Results: During a mean follow-up of 9.8 years, we ascertained 1,062 incident stroke cases. The risk of total stroke and stroke types decreased with increasing number of healthy lifestyle factors. The multivariable relative risk of total stroke for men who achieved all 5 healthy lifestyle factors compared with men who achieved 0 or 1 factor was 0.28 (95% confidence interval 0.14–0.55). The corresponding relative risks (95% confidence interval) were 0.31 (0.15–0.66) for ischemic stroke and 0.32 (0.04–2.51) for hemorrhagic stroke. Conclusions: A healthy lifestyle is associated with a substantially reduced risk of stroke in men at higher risk of stroke. PMID:25934859

  6. Recurrent 2,8-dihydroxyadenine nephropathy: a rare but preventable cause of renal allograft failure

    PubMed Central

    Zaidan, Mohamad; Palsson, Runolfur; Gall, Emilie Cornec-Le; Garstka, Antoine; Maggiore, Umberto; Deteix, Patrice; Battista, Michele; Gagné, Eve-Reine; Ceballos-Picot, Irène; Van Huyen, Jean-Paul Duong; Legendre, Christophe; Daudon, Michel; Edvardsson, Vidar O.; Knebelmann, Bertrand

    2015-01-01

    Adenine phosphoribosyltransferase (APRT) deficiency is a rare autosomal recessive enzyme defect of purine metabolism that usually manifests as 2,8-dihydroxyadenine (2,8-DHA) nephrolithiasis and more rarely chronic kidney disease. The disease is most often misdiagnosed and can recur in the renal allograft. We analyzed 9 patients with recurrent 2,8-DHA crystalline nephropathy, in all of whom the diagnosis had been missed prior to renal transplantation. The diagnosis was established for a median of 5 (range, 1.5–312) weeks following the transplant procedure. Patients had delayed graft function (n=2), acute-on-chronic (n=5) or acute (n=1) allograft dysfunction, whereas one patient had normal graft function at the time of diagnosis. Analysis of allograft biopsies showed birefringent 2,8-DHA crystals in renal tubular lumens, within tubular epithelial cells and interstitium. Fourier transformed infrared microscopy confirmed the diagnosis in all cases, which was further supported by 2,8-DHA crystalluria, undetectable erythrocyte APRT enzyme activity, and genetic testing. With allopurinol therapy, the allograft function improved (n=7), remained stable (n=1), or worsened (n=1). At last follow-up, 2 patients had experienced allograft loss and 5 had persistent chronic allograft dysfunction. 2,8-DHA nephropathy is a rare but underdiagnosed and preventable disorder that can recur in the renal allograft and may lead to allograft loss. PMID:25307253

  7. Washout after lobectomy: is water more effective than normal saline in preventing local recurrence?

    PubMed

    Tsakok, Teresa; Tsakok, Maria; Damji, Charlene; Watson, Robert

    2012-02-01

    A best evidence topic in thoracic surgery was written according to a structured protocol. The question addressed was: 'is water washout more effective than normal saline washout after lobectomy in preventing local recurrence?' Altogether more than 48 papers were found using the reported search, of which nine represented the best evidence to answer the clinical question. The authors, journal, date, country of publication, patient group studied, study type, relevant outcomes and results of these papers are tabulated. Tumour cell 'spillage' after cancer resection is linked to a worse prognosis, so washout to minimize contamination is an established surgical technique. While the mechanical effects of lavage are well validated, the differential cytocidal effects of water versus saline as irrigation fluids are not. There are currently no studies addressing this issue in the thoracic surgery setting, after lung cancer lobectomy. However, the majority of relevant papers describe the use of basic in vitro methods and animal models to produce data that can conceivably be extrapolated to the clinical question in hand. The number of studies is small, and some have technical limitations. While two of the better-designed experiments suggest that water exerts a superior cytocidal effect on tumour cells, data from other studies are somewhat unimpressive, with two studies reporting that water washout controls tumour growth to a lesser extent than saline. This, together with the complete paucity of clinical trials on the subject, leads us to conclude that water is unlikely to represent a superior irrigation fluid in lung cancer patients after lobectomy. PMID:22159256

  8. [Detection of early warning signs in schizophrenic patients. Possible applications in prevention of recurrence].

    PubMed

    Wiedemann, G; Hahlweg, K; Hank, G; Feinstein, E; Müller, U; Dose, M

    1994-07-01

    In the treatment of schizophrenia, two new strategies have been developed with the aim of adequate relapse prevention accompanied by lowest possible risk of side-effects. One strategy is to have the patient continue to take medication at a highly reduced dosage (10-20% of the standard dose). The other is to gradually stop neuroleptic medication after remission and to reinstitute medication only in the case of prodromal symptoms (termed targeted or intermittent treatment). According to Herz and Melville [13] many schizophrenic patients show signs of relapse well before recurrence of overt psychotic features. Monitoring to detect prodromal symptoms is especially important in targeted treatment because, otherwise, neuroleptic medication often cannot be initiated in time. In the present study of 51 schizophrenic patients we were able to replicate the results of Herz & Melville in the German-speaking countries. Prior to acute exacerbation of psychosis, most patients experience alterations of feelings and behaviour. These alterations may also be recognized by family members. Such early warning signs of relapse mainly consist of non-specific, non-psychotic symptoms: tenseness and nervousness, eating less, trouble concentrating and sleeping, depressive mood and seeing friends less. Furthermore, the regular monitoring and use of early warning signs specific to each patient in the aftercare of schizophrenic patients seems to be practicable, especially in psychoeducative family therapy.

  9. Management of Stroke Prevention in Canadian Patients with Atrial Fibrillation at Moderate to High Risk of Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Semchuk, William M; Levac, Brandon; Lara, Muria; Shakespeare, Annabelle; Evers, Thomas; Bolt, Jennifer

    2013-01-01

    Background Many patients with atrial fibrillation who are at moderate to high risk of stroke do not receive anticoagulation with vitamin K antagonists (VKAs) in accordance with recommendations. Objective: To determine (1) why Canadian patients with atrial fibrillation who are potentially eligible for VKA do not receive this therapy, (2) why Canadian primary care physicians discontinue VKA therapy, and (3) why VKA therapy is perceived as difficult to manage. Methods: The study involved a chart review of 3 cohorts of patients with nonvalvular atrial fibrillation at moderate to high risk of stroke: patients who had never received VKA treatment (VKA-naive), those whose treatment had been discontinued, and those whose VKA treatment was considered difficult to manage. Results: Charts for 187 patients (mean age 78.4 years, standard deviation 8.9 years) treated at 39 primary care sites were reviewed (62 treatment-naive, 42 with therapy discontinued, and 83 whose therapy was considered difficult to manage). Atrial fibrillation was paroxysmal in 82 (44%) of the patients, persistent in 47 patients (25%), and permanent in 58 (31%). One patient in each of the 3 cohorts had experienced a stroke during the 6 months before study participation. Bleeding events were more frequent among patients who had discontinued VKA therapy than in the other 2 groups. Among those whose therapy was discontinued and those whose therapy was difficult to manage, the mean time in the therapeutic range was 46.3% and 56.4%, respectively. The most common reason for not initiating VKA therapy in treatment-naive patients was the transient nature of atrial fibrillation (25/62 [40%]). The most common reason for discontinuation of VKA therapy was a bleeding event (10/42 [24%]). The presence of a concomitant chronic disease was the most common reason that a patient’s therapy was considered difficult to manage (46/83 [55%]). Conclusions: VKA therapy was not initiated or was discontinued for various reasons

  10. [Prevention of post-operative recurrence in Crohn's disease: a critical review of randomized controlled trials and meta-analyses of different therapeutic strategies].

    PubMed

    Margagnoni, Giovanna; Clemente, Valeria; Aratari, Annalisa; Fascì Spurio, Federica; De Gregorio, Angela Maria; Spagnolo, Annalisa; Koch, Maurizio; Papi, Claudio

    2013-04-01

    Surgery is an almost inevitable event in Crohn's disease but is not curative; post-operative recurrence follows a sequential and predictable course. Prevention of post-operative recurrence in Crohn's disease is therefore a relevant problem in the management of the disease. Several drugs have been evaluated to decrease the risk of recurrence: these include mesalazine, antibiotics, probiotics, budesonide, thiopurines and biologic agents. This review focuses on the randomised controlled trials and meta-analyses addressing different drugs and strategies for preventing post-operative recurrence in Crohn's disease.

  11. Verapamil is Less Effective than Triamcinolone for Prevention of Keloid Scar Recurrence After Excision in a Randomized Controlled Trial.

    PubMed

    Danielsen, Patricia L; Rea, Suzanne M; Wood, Fiona M; Fear, Mark W; Viola, Helena M; Hool, Livia C; Gankande, Thilanee U; Alghamdi, Mansour; Stevenson, Andrew W; Manzur, Mitali; Wallace, Hilary J

    2016-08-23

    A double-blind randomized controlled trial with a paired split-scar design compared verapamil, an L-type Ca2+ channel antagonist, and triamcinolone for prevention of keloid recurrence after excision. Ca2+ channel blocking activity of verapamil in keloid cells was explored. One keloid was excised per subject and each wound half randomized to receive intralesional injections of triamcinolone (10 mg/ml) or verapamil (2.5 mg/ml) at monthly intervals (4 doses). Interim analysis was performed after 14 subjects were completed. Survival analysis demonstrated significantly higher keloid recurrence with verapamil compared to triamcinolone 12 months post-surgery (log-rank test, p = 0.01) and higher overall risk of recurrence with verapamil (hazard ratio 8.44, 95% CI 1.62-44.05). The study was terminated early according to the stopping guideline (p < 0.05). Verapamil is safe but not as effective as triamcinolone in preventing keloid recurrence after excision. Further study is necessary to determine if clinical response to verapamil is linked to modulation of intracellular Ca2+. PMID:26911400

  12. Comparison study on effectiveness of pentoxifyllin with LD to prevent recurrent endometriosis

    PubMed Central

    Ghahiri, Ataollah; Najafian, Aida; Ghasemi, Mojdeh; Najafian, Alireza

    2012-01-01

    Background: About 75% of the symptomatic patients who involved with endometriosis have pelvic pain and dysmenorrhea. Pentoxifyllin is one of the drugs that according to its mechanism could be effective for pain relief of endometriosis which has been used for endometriosis treatment recently. Objective: We conducted a comparative study for detecting the effect of pentoxifylin (as an immonomodelator) in preventing recurrence endometriotic pain with pentoxifylin plus a combined contraceptive pill with low dose estrogen (LD) and also the LD pill alone. Materials and Methods: This was a comparative clinical trial on 83 patients with the chief complaint (CC) of pain (dysmenorrheal /or pelvic pain) and with the end diagnosis of endometriosis, in an operative laparoscopy. Patients, dividing to 3 groups, were treated with pentoxifylin, pentoxifylin+LD and LD alone for 10 months. The severity of pain (dismenorhea and/or pelvic pain) was detected by visual analogue scale (VAS) before and after the treatment. The severity of endometriosis in the patients was: I in class I and II in class II and III in class III. The groups were matched for the pain. The number of the patients in group 1, 2 and 3 were 28, 28 and 27 respectively. Results: The pain was reduced in the groups of pentoxifylin+LD (p<0.001) and LD alone (p=0.00). The pain relief was not significant in the group of pentoxifylin alone (p=0.136). After treatment, the severity of pain was not significantly different between the LD group and the LD+penthoxyfillin group, but there was difference between these two groups and the group of penthoxyfillin alone. Conclusion: This study showed that penthoxyfillin actually could not have any effect on the pain relief of endometriosis. It also made it clear that penthoxyfillin could not increase the efficacy of LD when used with this medication. PMID:25242996

  13. Cost-effectiveness of pretransplant sofosbuvir for preventing recurrent hepatitis C virus infection after liver transplantation.

    PubMed

    Vitale, Alessandro; Spolverato, Gaya; Burra, Patrizia; De Feo, Tullia Maria; Belli, Luca; Donato, Francesca; Baroni, Gianluca Svegliati; Marianelli, Tania; Picciotto, Antonio; Toniutto, Pierluigi; Bhoori, Sherrie; Passigato, Nicola; Lucà, Maria Grazia; Russo, Francesco Paolo; Cillo, Umberto; Fagiuoli, Stefano

    2015-09-01

    There are reports of pretransplant sofosbuvir (SOF) plus ribavirin being effective in preventing recurrent hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection after liver transplantation (LT). The aim of this study was to assess the cost-effectiveness of this strategy in the area served by the North Italy Transplant program. We retrospectively assessed the impact of HCV infection on post-LT survival in 2376 consecutive adult patients (MELD ≤ 25, unknown genotype, period 2004-2009) and the prevalence costs of conventional standard of care (SOC) antiviral therapy (pegylated interferon plus ribavirin) after LT. A Markov model was developed to compare two strategies: 12-24 weeks of SOF+ ribavirin for pre-LT anti-HCV treatment versus on-demand post-LT SOC antiviral therapy. Among the 1794 patients undergoing LT, 860 (48%) were HCV+ and 50% of them were given SOC therapy after LT (mean cost of drugs and adverse effect management = 14,421€ per patient). HCV etiology had a strong impact on post-LT survival (hazard ratio = 1.59, 95% CI = 1.22-2.09, P = 0.0007). After Monte Carlo simulation, pre-LT SOF therapy showed a median survival benefit of 1.5 quality-adjusted life years and an Incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER) of 30,663€/QALY, proving cost-effective in our particular Italian scenario. The costs of SOF therapy, sustained viral response rate 12 weeks after LT, and recipient's age were the main ICER predictors at multivariate analysis. This study proposes a dynamic model based on real-life data from northern Italy for adjusting the costs of pre-LT direct-acting antiviral therapies to the actual sustained virological response reached after LT. PMID:25865602

  14. Cost-effectiveness of pretransplant sofosbuvir for preventing recurrent hepatitis C virus infection after liver transplantation.

    PubMed

    Vitale, Alessandro; Spolverato, Gaya; Burra, Patrizia; De Feo, Tullia Maria; Belli, Luca; Donato, Francesca; Baroni, Gianluca Svegliati; Marianelli, Tania; Picciotto, Antonio; Toniutto, Pierluigi; Bhoori, Sherrie; Passigato, Nicola; Lucà, Maria Grazia; Russo, Francesco Paolo; Cillo, Umberto; Fagiuoli, Stefano

    2015-09-01

    There are reports of pretransplant sofosbuvir (SOF) plus ribavirin being effective in preventing recurrent hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection after liver transplantation (LT). The aim of this study was to assess the cost-effectiveness of this strategy in the area served by the North Italy Transplant program. We retrospectively assessed the impact of HCV infection on post-LT survival in 2376 consecutive adult patients (MELD ≤ 25, unknown genotype, period 2004-2009) and the prevalence costs of conventional standard of care (SOC) antiviral therapy (pegylated interferon plus ribavirin) after LT. A Markov model was developed to compare two strategies: 12-24 weeks of SOF+ ribavirin for pre-LT anti-HCV treatment versus on-demand post-LT SOC antiviral therapy. Among the 1794 patients undergoing LT, 860 (48%) were HCV+ and 50% of them were given SOC therapy after LT (mean cost of drugs and adverse effect management = 14,421€ per patient). HCV etiology had a strong impact on post-LT survival (hazard ratio = 1.59, 95% CI = 1.22-2.09, P = 0.0007). After Monte Carlo simulation, pre-LT SOF therapy showed a median survival benefit of 1.5 quality-adjusted life years and an Incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER) of 30,663€/QALY, proving cost-effective in our particular Italian scenario. The costs of SOF therapy, sustained viral response rate 12 weeks after LT, and recipient's age were the main ICER predictors at multivariate analysis. This study proposes a dynamic model based on real-life data from northern Italy for adjusting the costs of pre-LT direct-acting antiviral therapies to the actual sustained virological response reached after LT.

  15. Factors preventing African Americans from seeking early intervention in the treatment of ischemic strokes.

    PubMed Central

    King, D. F.; Trouth, A. J.; Adams, A. O.

    2001-01-01

    The most widely advocated drug that has been developed to decrease and possibly reverse the crippling effect of stroke is recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (rt-PA). In the treatment of ischemic stroke, rt-PA must be administered within the first 3 hr after the onset of symptoms for optimal efficacy and avoidance of life-threatening cerebral hemorrhage. This study sought to determine whether African-American stroke victims presented for treatment within the first 3 hr. In the study, we identified some of the more common reasons for the lack of prompt presentation. A prospective survey of 103 randomly selected acute stroke patients was performed. We found that less than half of this population sought assistance in the emergency department in time to take advantage of rt-PA therapy. When confronted with symptoms that were consistent with acute stroke, many patients either chose to ignore them or thought that they were experiencing transient phenomena. Three factors were identified as possible reasons for the lack of prompt response: (a) a lack of information about available treatment options; (b) the inability to recognize the early warning signs of an impending stroke; and (c) denial of illness. This study may help to evolve strategies that must be instituted to better educate the community about the early recognition of stroke and available treatment alternatives. PMID:12653381

  16. Stroke Associated with Atrial Fibrillation – Incidence and Early Outcomes in the North Dublin Population Stroke Study

    PubMed Central

    Hannon, Niamh; Sheehan, Orla; Kelly, Lisa; Marnane, Michael; Merwick, Aine; Moore, Alan; Kyne, Lorraine; Duggan, Joseph; Moroney, Joan; McCormack, Patricia M.E.; Daly, Leslie; Fitz-Simon, Nicola; Harris, Dawn; Horgan, Gillian; Williams, Emma B.; Furie, Karen L.; Kelly, Peter J.

    2009-01-01

    Background Prospective population-based studies are important to accurately determine the incidence and characteristics of stroke associated with atrial fibrillation (AF), while avoiding selection bias which may complicate hospital-based studies. Methods We investigated AF-associated stroke within the North Dublin Population Stroke Study, a prospective cohort study of stroke/transient ischaemic attack in 294,592 individuals, according to recommended criteria for rigorous stroke epidemiological studies. Results Of 568 stroke patients ascertained in the first year, 31.2% (177/568) were associated with AF (90.4%, i.e. 160/177 ischaemic infarcts). The crude incidence rate of all AF-associated stroke was 60/100,000 person-years (95% CI = 52–70). Prior stroke was almost twice as common in AF compared to non-AF groups (21.9 vs. 12.8%, p = 0.01). The frequency of AF progressively increased across ischaemic stroke patients stratified by increasing stroke severity (NIHSS 0–4, 29.7%; 5–9, 38.1%; 10–14, 43.8%; ≥15, 53.3%, p < 0.0001). The 90-day trajectory of recovery of AF-associated stroke was identical to that of non-AF stroke, but Rankin scores in AF stroke remained higher at 7, 28 and 90 days (p < 0.001 for all). Discussion: AF-associated stroke occurred in one third of all patients and was associated with a distinct profile of recurrent, severe and disabling stroke. Targeted strategies to increase anticoagulation rates may provide a substantial benefit to prevent severe disabling stroke at a population level. PMID:19893311

  17. Burden of upper gastrointestinal symptoms in patients prescribed dabigatran for stroke prevention

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Pak-Hei; Hai, Jo-Jo; Huang, Duo; Ho, Mei-Han; Chan, Esther W; Cheung, Bernard Man-Yung; Chan, Annie On-On; Wong, Ian Chi-Kei; Tse, Hung-Fat; Hung, Ivan Fan-Ngai; Siu, Chung-Wah

    2016-01-01

    Background: Dabigatran, a non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulant, has been shown to prevent stroke in patients with non-valvular atrial fibrillation. Nonetheless, studies show that 10%–30% of those prescribed dabigatran experience dyspepsia that may eventually lead to discontinuation of therapy and loss of clinical benefit. Aim: To evaluate the gastrointestinal tolerability of dabigatran utilizing a validated questionnaire, as well as determining subsequent non-compliance and drug discontinuation. Method: This is an observational study. All patients were assessed by a validated questionnaire, Hong Kong dyspepsia index, prior to drug prescription and again 4 weeks later. Results: In this study, 115 patients with non-valvular atrial fibrillation (mean age: 74.6 ± 11.4 years; mean CHA2DS2-VASc score was 3.39 ± 1.59) were prescribed dabigatran. At baseline, the mean Hong Kong dyspepsia index was 12.9 ± 1.6 and nine patients had significant dyspepsia (Hong Kong dyspepsia index ⩾ 16). After 4 weeks, the mean Hong Kong dyspepsia index was similar at 12.6 ± 1.9 (p = 0.23). There was no change in Hong Kong dyspepsia index after initiation of dabigatran in 59 (51.3%) patients, and improvement in 37 (32.2%). Only 19 (16.5%) patients had worsening of Hong Kong dyspepsia index, and among these 19 patients, only 1 patient (0.9%) discontinued dabigatran due to significant dyspepsia. Conclusion: Worsening of dyspepsia with dabigatran 110 mg twice daily was uncommon with correct drug administration and clear instructions provided. Systematic assessment of dyspeptic symptoms using a validated questionnaire (i.e. Hong Kong dyspepsia index) before and after treatment initiation allows a more objective comparison of dyspeptic symptoms. PMID:27551422

  18. A Surgeon's View on Endarterectomy and Stenting in 2011: Lest We Forget, It's All About Preventing Stroke

    SciTech Connect

    Naylor, A. Ross

    2012-04-15

    It has been nearly 60 years since Felix Eastcott published his seminal paper on carotid reconstruction, which paved the way for carotid endarterectomy (CEA) and then carotid artery stenting (CAS) to assume prominent roles in the prevention of stroke. Yet the ensuing 60 years has witnessed repeated cycles of challenges to practice, professional mistrust, conflicts of interest, dogmatic retention of traditional management strategies, inappropriate corporate interventions, and a general failure to adapt to new evidence. Even the performance of large-scale randomised trials has been associated with rancour and a lack of consensus. This article reviews the history of invasive interventions in the treatment of carotid disease and makes a plea to both the surgical and interventional communities that the fundamental priority must always be the prevention of stroke. It concludes with an appeal for colleagues to collaborate to determine how best to treat patients during the hyperacute period after the onset of symptoms and to identify a smaller cohort of asymptomatic patients who are truly at high risk for stroke in whom to target CAS or CEA.

  19. Emerging Treatments for Motor Rehabilitation After Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Krishnan, Chandramouli; Khot, Sandeep P.

    2015-01-01

    Although numerous treatments are available to improve cerebral perfusion after acute stroke and prevent recurrent stroke, few rehabilitation treatments have been conclusively shown to improve neurologic recovery. The majority of stroke survivors with motor impairment do not recover to their functional baseline, and there remains a need for novel neurorehabilitation treatments to minimize long-term disability, maximize quality of life, and optimize psychosocial outcomes. In recent years, several novel therapies have emerged to restore motor function after stroke, and additional investigational treatments have also shown promise. Here, we familiarize the neurohospitalist with emerging treatments for poststroke motor rehabilitation. The rehabilitation treatments covered in this review will include selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor medications, constraint-induced movement therapy, noninvasive brain stimulation, mirror therapy, and motor imagery or mental practice. PMID:25829989

  20. Cost-effectiveness of edoxaban versus rivaroxaban for stroke prevention in patients with nonvalvular atrial fibrillation (NVAF) in the US

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Jeffrey D; Ye, Xin; Lenhart, Gregory M; Farr, Amanda M; Tran, Oth V; Kwong, W Jackie; Magnuson, Elizabeth A; Weintraub, William S

    2016-01-01

    Background Understanding the value of new anticoagulation therapies compared with existing therapies is of paramount importance in today’s cost-conscious and efficiency-driven health care environment. Edoxaban and rivaroxaban for stroke prevention in nonvalvular atrial fibrillation (NVAF) patients with CHADS2 scores ≥2 have been evaluated in pivotal trials versus warfarin. The relative value of edoxaban versus rivaroxaban would be of interest to health care stakeholders and patients who prefer a once-daily treatment option for long-term stroke prevention in NVAF. Objective To evaluate the relative cost-effectiveness of two once-daily regimens of novel oral anticoagulation therapy – edoxaban (60 mg/30 mg dose-reduced) versus rivaroxaban (20 mg/15 mg dose-reduced) – for stroke prevention in NVAF patients from a US health-plan perspective. Materials and methods A Markov model simulated lifetime risk and treatment of stroke, systemic embolism, major bleeding, clinically relevant nonmajor bleeding, myocardial infarction, and death in NVAF patients treated with edoxaban or rivaroxaban. Efficacy and safety data were derived from a network meta-analysis that utilized data from patients enrolled in ENGAGE AF-TIMI 48 and ROCKET-AF. Health care cost and utility data were obtained from published sources. Incremental cost-effectiveness ratios of $150,000 per quality-adjusted life year (QALY) gained were used as thresholds for “highly cost-effective”, “cost-effective”, and “not cost-effective” treatment options, respectively, as per American Heart Association/American College of Cardiology guidelines. Results Edoxaban was dominant relative to rivaroxaban, such that it was associated with lower total health care costs and better effectiveness in terms of QALYs in the base-case analysis. Results were supported by probabilistic sensitivity analyses that showed edoxaban as either dominant or a highly cost-effective alternative

  1. The recruitment triangle: reasons why African Americans enroll, refuse to enroll, or voluntarily withdraw from a clinical trial. An interim report from the African-American Antiplatelet Stroke Prevention Study (AAASPS).

    PubMed Central

    Gorelick, P. B.; Harris, Y.; Burnett, B.; Bonecutter, F. J.

    1998-01-01

    Recruitment and retention of study subjects are key to the success of a clinical trial. In the case of minority patients, this may be challenging as minority patients have been underserved by the medical health-care system. Furthermore, minority patients are more likely to experience barriers to entry into a clinical trial such as mistrust of the medical system, economic disadvantages, lack of awareness of study programs, and communication barriers. An open-ended questionnaire was used to determine reasons why subjects in the African-American Antiplatelet Stroke Prevention Study (AAASPS) remained in the study or voluntarily withdrew in the absence of an adverse event. Potential enrollees who refused to participate in the AAASPS also were queried. Enrollees who remained in the program consistently stated that they participated to reduce the risk of stroke recurrence and to help others by finding a "cure" for stroke. Those who withdrew or refused to participate consistently stated that they were afraid of being used as "guinea pigs." A "recruitment triangle" emerged that might predict a patient's likelihood of participation in a clinical trial. The sides of the triangle include the patient, key family members and friends, and the primary medical doctor and other medical personnel. The organizers of a clinical trial need to be aware of the "recruitment triangle" and establish strategies to heighten and maintain its integrity. PMID:9549977

  2. Cardioembolic Stroke: Clinical Features, Specific Cardiac Disorders and Prognosis

    PubMed Central

    Arboix, Adrià; Alió, Josefina

    2010-01-01

    This article provides the reader with an overview and up-date of clinical features, specific cardiac disorders and prognosis of cardioembolic stroke. Cardioembolic stroke accounts for 14-30% of ischemic strokes and, in general, is a severe condition; patients with cardioembolic infarction are prone to early and long-term stroke recurrence, although recurrences may be preventable by appropriate treatment during the acute phase and strict control at follow-up. Certain clinical features are suggestive of cardioembolic infarction, including sudden onset to maximal deficit, decreased level of consciousness at onset, Wernicke’s aphasia or global aphasia without hemiparesis, a Valsalva manoeuvre at the time of stroke onset, and co-occurrence of cerebral and systemic emboli. Lacunar clinical presentations, a lacunar infarct and especially multiple lacunar infarcts, make cardioembolic origin unlikely. The more common high risk cardioembolic conditions are atrial fibrillation, recent myocardial infarction, mechanical prosthetic valve, dilated myocardiopathy, and mitral rheumatic stenosis. Transthoracic and transesophageal echocardiogram can disclose structural heart diseases. Paroxysmal atrial dysrhyhtmia can be detected by Holter monitoring. In-hospital mortality in cardioembolic stroke (27.3%, in our series) is the highest as compared with other subtypes of cerebral infarction. In our experience, in-hospital mortality in patients with early embolic recurrence (within the first 7 days) was 77%. Patients with alcohol abuse, hypertension, valvular heart disease, nausea and vomiting, and previous cerebral infarction are at increased risk of early recurrent systemic embolization. Secondary prevention with anticoagulants should be started immediately if possible in patients at high risk for recurrent cardioembolic stroke in which contraindications, such as falls, poor compliance, uncontrolled epilepsy or gastrointestinal bleeding are absent. PMID:21804774

  3. PROGRESS results: implementation in stroke guidelines.

    PubMed

    Donnan, Geoffrey A

    2003-06-01

    The most important issues facing clinicians is the transfer of evidence from clinical trials into practice. Physician, patient and community acceptance of the evidence are key components of this process. Although barriers to this exist, in the case of transfer of evidence from the Perindopril pROtection aGainst REcurrent Stroke Study (PROGRESS) into clinical practice, these are minimal. Hence, transfer of this information into clinical practice should put blood pressure lowering in place as the fourth major secondary prevention strategy for stroke. PMID:12953853

  4. Stroke pharmacogenomics.

    PubMed

    Billeci, Antonia M R; Agnelli, Giancarlo; Caso, Valeria

    2009-12-01

    Circulatory disease accounts for fifteen million deaths each year, of which stroke accounts for four and a half million- with an estimated nine million stroke survivors annually. The overall incidence rate of stroke is 2 to 2.5 per thousand adults with an approximate prevalence of 5 per thousand and an estimated 5-year risk of stroke recurrence of 15 to 40 percent. Conventional risk factors for stroke include: increasing age, hypertension, diabetes mellitus, smoking, increased body mass index, ischemic heart disease, heart failure, atrial fibrillation and lack of physical activity. Age is the strongest risk factor for both ischemic and haemorrhagic stroke with its incidence doubling for each successive decade after the age of fifty-five years. However, there is a substantial portion of patients with significant cerebrovascular disease who do not have any of these stroke risk-factors, leading to the speculation that there are other factors that have not been identified yet So as to improve diagnosis and treatment strategies, as well as to reduce the related public health burden, it could be helpful to successfully identify its extremely complex genetic determinants (polygenic, multiple genes play a role). Pharmacogenetics is the field of pharmacology that deals with the influence of genetic variation on drug response by correlating gene expression and gene variants with the efficacy or toxicity of drugs. The principle drugs in stroke medicine are antithrombotics. The aim of this paper was to review the most commonly used drugs for stroke such as rtPA in the acute phase as well as antiplatelets and wafarin for secondary prophylaxis. PMID:19925046

  5. Process evaluation of a problem solving intervention to prevent recurrent sickness absence in workers with common mental disorders.

    PubMed

    Arends, Iris; Bültmann, Ute; Nielsen, Karina; van Rhenen, Willem; de Boer, Michiel R; van der Klink, Jac J L

    2014-01-01

    Common mental disorders (CMDs) are a major cause of sickness absence. Twenty to 30% of the workers who return to work after sickness absence due to CMDs experience recurrent sickness absence. We developed the Stimulating Healthy participation And Relapse Prevention (SHARP)-at work intervention, a problem solving intervention delivered by occupational physicians (OPs), to prevent recurrent sickness absence in this worker population in The Netherlands. A process evaluation was conducted alongside a cluster-randomised controlled trial to (1) evaluate whether the SHARP-at work intervention was implemented according to the protocol and differed from treatment in the control group, and (2) to investigate the relationship between the key elements of the intervention and the effect outcome (i.e. recurrent sickness absence). We collected process data for both the intervention and control group on recruitment, reach, dose delivered, dose received, fidelity, context and satisfaction. Data on recurrent sickness absence was collected through the registry system of the collaborating occupational health service. The study was performed in the Netherlands, and between 2010 and 2012, 154 OPs and 158 participants participated. Compared to the control group, participants in the intervention group more frequently had two or more consultations with the OP (odds ratio [OR] = 3.2, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.2-8.8) and completed more assignments (OR = 33.8, 95% CI = 10.4-109.5) as recommended in the intervention protocol. OPs and participants were satisfied with the intervention and rated it as applicable. Several individual intervention components were linked to the effect outcome. The process evaluation showed that the SHARP-at work intervention was conducted according to the protocol for the majority of the participants and well-received by OPs and participants. Furthermore, the intervention differed from treatment in the control group. Overall, the results provide

  6. Process evaluation of a problem solving intervention to prevent recurrent sickness absence in workers with common mental disorders.

    PubMed

    Arends, Iris; Bültmann, Ute; Nielsen, Karina; van Rhenen, Willem; de Boer, Michiel R; van der Klink, Jac J L

    2014-01-01

    Common mental disorders (CMDs) are a major cause of sickness absence. Twenty to 30% of the workers who return to work after sickness absence due to CMDs experience recurrent sickness absence. We developed the Stimulating Healthy participation And Relapse Prevention (SHARP)-at work intervention, a problem solving intervention delivered by occupational physicians (OPs), to prevent recurrent sickness absence in this worker population in The Netherlands. A process evaluation was conducted alongside a cluster-randomised controlled trial to (1) evaluate whether the SHARP-at work intervention was implemented according to the protocol and differed from treatment in the control group, and (2) to investigate the relationship between the key elements of the intervention and the effect outcome (i.e. recurrent sickness absence). We collected process data for both the intervention and control group on recruitment, reach, dose delivered, dose received, fidelity, context and satisfaction. Data on recurrent sickness absence was collected through the registry system of the collaborating occupational health service. The study was performed in the Netherlands, and between 2010 and 2012, 154 OPs and 158 participants participated. Compared to the control group, participants in the intervention group more frequently had two or more consultations with the OP (odds ratio [OR] = 3.2, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.2-8.8) and completed more assignments (OR = 33.8, 95% CI = 10.4-109.5) as recommended in the intervention protocol. OPs and participants were satisfied with the intervention and rated it as applicable. Several individual intervention components were linked to the effect outcome. The process evaluation showed that the SHARP-at work intervention was conducted according to the protocol for the majority of the participants and well-received by OPs and participants. Furthermore, the intervention differed from treatment in the control group. Overall, the results provide

  7. High-Dose Viscum album Extract Treatment in the Prevention of Recurrent Bladder Cancer: A Retrospective Case Series

    PubMed Central

    von Schoen-Angerer, Tido; Wilkens, Johannes; Kienle, Gunver S; Kiene, Helmut; Vagedes, Jan

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Viscum album extract (European mistletoe), containing immuno-active compounds with dose-dependent cytotoxic activity, is being used as an adjuvant cancer treatment in Europe. Few studies have yet been done with high-dose, fever-inducing Viscum album treatment. Objective: To explore whether subcutaneous injections of high-dose Viscum album have a preventive effect on risk of recurrence of bladder cancer. Methods: We retrospectively analyzed the case records of patients with resectable bladder cancer who underwent initiation of high-dose Viscum album treatment at our clinic between January 2006 and December 2012. Main Outcome Measures: We calculated tumor recurrence and progression risk and explored case records to assess whether treatment had a likely, possible, or unlikely beneficial effect. Results: Eight patients were identified, 7 of whom had nonmuscle-invasive bladder cancer and 1 with muscle-invasive cancer. Four patients had frequently recurring tumors before treatment. Among the 8 patients, 28 episodes of recurrence were observed. Median tumor-free follow-up duration was 48.5 months. High-dose Viscum album showed a possible beneficial effect in 5 of 8 patients, could not be assessed in 2 patients, and had an uncertain effect in 1 patient. No tumor progression was observed. Treatment was generally well tolerated and no patient stopped treatment because of side effects. Conclusion: High-dose Viscum album treatment may have interrupted frequently recurring tumors in individual patients with recurrent bladder cancer. Prospective studies are needed to assess whether this treatment offers an additional, bladder-sparing preventive option for patients with intermediate- to high-risk nonmuscleinvasive bladder cancer. PMID:26517439

  8. Stroke prevention in valvular heart disease: from the procedure to long-term management.

    PubMed

    Giustino, Gennaro; Dangas, George D

    2015-09-01

    Stroke in patients with valvular heart disease undergoing transcatheter intervention is relatively rare but associated with significant morbidity and mortality. Risks vary according to the underlying valve disease and proposed procedure. While major improvements have been made in developing and understanding the technical factors associated with intra- and peri-procedural stroke, uncertainty exists regarding the optimal antithrombotic management strategy after transcatheter heart valve intervention and the utility of routine cerebral embolic protection. Further clinical studies are warranted to minimise these complications. PMID:26384184

  9. Mindfulness-Based Cognitive Therapy to Prevent Relapse in Recurrent Depression

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kuyken, Willem; Byford, Sarah; Taylor, Rod S.; Watkins, Ed; Holden, Emily; White, Kat; Barrett, Barbara; Byng, Richard; Evans, Alison; Mullan, Eugene; Teasdale, John D.

    2008-01-01

    For people at risk of depressive relapse, mindfulness-based cognitive therapy (MBCT) has an additive benefit to usual care (H. F. Coelho, P. H. Canter, & E. Ernst, 2007). This study asked if, among patients with recurrent depression who are treated with antidepressant medication (ADM), MBCT is comparable to treatment with maintenance ADM (m-ADM)…

  10. Maintenance therapy with unprocessed bran in the prevention of acute anal fissure recurrence.

    PubMed Central

    Jensen, S L

    1987-01-01

    The effect of unprocessed bran in a dose of 5 g three times daily and a dose of 2.5 g three times daily for one year on the recurrence rate of anal fissures was studied in a double-blind, placebo-controlled trial in 90 patients with recently healed acute posterior anal fissures. Fifteen patients (16.6%) were withdrawn before the code was broken due to failure to follow the trial protocol for various reasons. Significantly fewer recurrences occurred in patients receiving bran 5 g three times daily (recurrence rate 16%, 95% confidence limits, 4.54 to 36.08) when compared with patients receiving bran 2.5 g three times daily (60%; 38.67 to 78.87) (P less than 0.01) and with patients receiving placebo three times daily (68%; 46.50 to 85.05) (P less than 0.01). No significant difference in recurrences was found between patients on bran 2.5 g and those on placebo. PMID:3039130

  11. Defining the Surgical Limits of Adenoidectomy so as to Prevent Recurrence of Adenoids.

    PubMed

    Agrawal, Vikas; Agarwal, Pranay Kumar; Agrawal, Aniruddh

    2016-06-01

    This study aims to define the surgical boundaries of adenoidectomy by demonstrating that recurrence of adenoids and its symptoms can be avoided if a complete adenoidectomy is performed, by following these surgical limits. A prospective descriptive study was carried out at Speciality ENT Hospital, Mumbai, India. Endoscopic adenoidectomy was performed in 83 patients using coblation technology. In all patients, adenoids were removed superiorly till the periosteum over the body of sphenoid; posteriorly till the pharyngobasilar fascia; laterally till fossa of Rosenmuller in the posterior part and till the torus tubarius in the anterior part; and inferiorly till the Passavant's ridge. The patients were followed up postoperatively and a nasal endoscopy was done at the end of 1 year to look for any recurrence or regrowth of adenoids, so as to determine the efficacy of the procedure. A total of 83 patients underwent adenoidectomy with a mean age of 12.80 years. 12 patients were lost to follow up. Of the remaining 71 patients, no patient showed any evidence of recurrence of adenoid on follow-up nasal endoscopy done at the end of 1 year. Recurrence of adenoid post adenoidectomy is not seen if there is complete removal of adenoids. So it is essential that all adenoid tissue be removed during adenoidectomy. The complete removal of adenoids can be ensured by following the surgical limits of adenoidectomy.

  12. ARISTOTLE RE-LYs on the ROCKET. What's new in stroke prevention in patients with atrial fibrillation?

    PubMed

    Tendera, Michał; Syzdół, Marcin; Parma, Zofia

    2012-01-01

    Warfarin has long been considered the gold standard for stroke prevention in patients with atrial fibrillation (AF). Recently, three major trials comparing the efficacy and safety of new drugs: a thrombin inhibitor dabigatran and two inhibitors of factor Xa - rivaroxaban and apixaban, with that of warfarin, have been published. The aim of this paper is to present the main results of the RE-LY, ROCKET AF and ARISTOTLE trials, compare study populations and outcomes, and discuss clinical implications of their results for the long-term anticoagulation in patients with nonvalvular AF.

  13. Prevention of Relapse and Recurrence in Adults with Major Depressive Disorder: Systematic Review and Meta-Analyses of Controlled Trials

    PubMed Central

    Lau, Wai Keat; Sim, Jordan; Sum, Min Yi; Baldessarini, Ross J.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Findings of substantial remaining morbidity in treated major depressive disorder (MDD) led us to review controlled trials of treatments aimed at preventing early relapses or later recurrences in adults diagnosed with MDD to summarize available data and to guide further research. Methods: Reports (n = 97) were identified through systematic, computerized literature searching up to February 2015. Treatment versus control outcomes were summarized by random-effects meta-analyses. Results: In 45 reports of 72 trials (n = 14 450 subjects) lasting 33.4 weeks, antidepressants were more effective than placebos in preventing relapses (response rates [RR] = 1.90, confidence interval [CI]: 1.73–2.08; NNT = 4.4; p < 0.0001). In 35 reports of 37 trials (n = 7253) lasting 27.0 months, antidepressants were effective in preventing recurrences (RR = 2.03, CI 1.80–2.28; NNT = 3.8; p < 0.0001), with minor differences among drug types. In 17 reports of 22 trials (n = 1 969) lasting 23.7 months, psychosocial interventions yielded inconsistent or inconclusive results. Conclusions: Despite evidence of the efficacy of drug treatment compared to placebos or other controls, the findings further underscore the substantial, unresolved morbidity in treated MDD patients and strongly encourage further evaluations of specific, improved individual and combination therapies (pharmacological and psychological) conducted over longer times, as well as identifying clinical predictors of positive or unfavorable responses and of intolerability of long-term treatments in MDD. PMID:26152228

  14. Cost-effectiveness of amlodipine compared with valsartan in preventing stroke and myocardial infarction among hypertensive patients in Taiwan

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Lung; Chen, Chen-Huan; Hwang, Juey-Jen; Yeh, San-Jou; Shyu, Kou-Gi; Lin, Ruey-Tay; Li, Yi-Heng; Liu, Larry Z; Li, Jim Z; Shau, Wen-Yi; Weng, Te-Chang

    2016-01-01

    Hypertension is a major risk factor for strokes and myocardial infarction (MI). Given its effectiveness and safety profile, the calcium channel blocker amlodipine is among the most frequently prescribed antihypertensive drugs. This analysis was conducted to determine the costs and quality-adjusted life years (QALYs) associated with the use of amlodipine and valsartan, an angiotensin II receptor blocker, in preventing stroke and MI in Taiwanese hypertensive patients. A state transition (Markov) model was developed to compare the 5-year costs and QALYs for amlodipine and valsartan. Effectiveness data were based on the NAGOYA HEART Study, local studies, and a published meta-analysis. Utility data and costs of MI and stroke were retrieved from the published literature. Medical costs were based on the literature and inflated to 2011 prices; drug costs were based on National Health Insurance prices in 2014. A 3% discount rate was used for costs and QALYs and a third-party payer perspective adopted. One-way sensitivity and scenario analyses were conducted. Compared with valsartan, amlodipine was associated with cost savings of New Taiwan Dollars (NTD) 2,251 per patient per year: costs were NTD 4,296 and NTD 6,547 per patient per year for amlodipine and valsartan users, respectively. Fewer cardiovascular events were reported in patients receiving amlodipine versus valsartan (342 vs 413 per 10,000 patients over 5 years, respectively). Amlodipine had a net gain of 58 QALYs versus valsartan per 10,000 patients over 5 years. Sensitivity analyses showed that the discount rate and cohort age had a larger effect on total cost and cost difference than on QALYs. However, amlodipine results were more favorable than valsartan irrespective of discount rate or cohort age. When administered to Taiwanese patients for hypertension control, amlodipine was associated with lower cost and more QALYs compared with valsartan due to a lower risk of stroke and MI events. PMID:27330323

  15. Cost-effectiveness of amlodipine compared with valsartan in preventing stroke and myocardial infarction among hypertensive patients in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Chan, Lung; Chen, Chen-Huan; Hwang, Juey-Jen; Yeh, San-Jou; Shyu, Kou-Gi; Lin, Ruey-Tay; Li, Yi-Heng; Liu, Larry Z; Li, Jim Z; Shau, Wen-Yi; Weng, Te-Chang

    2016-01-01

    Hypertension is a major risk factor for strokes and myocardial infarction (MI). Given its effectiveness and safety profile, the calcium channel blocker amlodipine is among the most frequently prescribed antihypertensive drugs. This analysis was conducted to determine the costs and quality-adjusted life years (QALYs) associated with the use of amlodipine and valsartan, an angiotensin II receptor blocker, in preventing stroke and MI in Taiwanese hypertensive patients. A state transition (Markov) model was developed to compare the 5-year costs and QALYs for amlodipine and valsartan. Effectiveness data were based on the NAGOYA HEART Study, local studies, and a published meta-analysis. Utility data and costs of MI and stroke were retrieved from the published literature. Medical costs were based on the literature and inflated to 2011 prices; drug costs were based on National Health Insurance prices in 2014. A 3% discount rate was used for costs and QALYs and a third-party payer perspective adopted. One-way sensitivity and scenario analyses were conducted. Compared with valsartan, amlodipine was associated with cost savings of New Taiwan Dollars (NTD) 2,251 per patient per year: costs were NTD 4,296 and NTD 6,547 per patient per year for amlodipine and valsartan users, respectively. Fewer cardiovascular events were reported in patients receiving amlodipine versus valsartan (342 vs 413 per 10,000 patients over 5 years, respectively). Amlodipine had a net gain of 58 QALYs versus valsartan per 10,000 patients over 5 years. Sensitivity analyses showed that the discount rate and cohort age had a larger effect on total cost and cost difference than on QALYs. However, amlodipine results were more favorable than valsartan irrespective of discount rate or cohort age. When administered to Taiwanese patients for hypertension control, amlodipine was associated with lower cost and more QALYs compared with valsartan due to a lower risk of stroke and MI events.

  16. Similar Secondary Stroke Prevention and Medication Persistence Rates among Rural and Urban Patients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rodriguez, Daniel; Cox, Margueritte; Zimmer, Louise O.; Olson, DaiWai M.; Goldstein, Larry B.; Drew, Laura; Peterson, Eric D.; Bushnell, Cheryl D.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: Rural residents are less likely to obtain optimal care for many serious conditions and have poorer health outcomes than those residing in more urban areas. We determined whether rural vs urban residence affected postdischarge medication persistence and 1 year outcomes after stroke. Methods: The Adherence eValuation After Ischemic…

  17. Role of Virechana Karma in cure and prevention of recurrence of Vicharchika (Eczema)

    PubMed Central

    Kaur, Mandip; Chandola, Harimohan

    2012-01-01

    Mandip and Chandola reported that administration of Rasayana (Guduchi and Bhringaraja) after Koshtha Shuddhi with Aragvadha Hima and simultaneous giving of Shirishadi decoction orally and applying of Snuhyadi Lepa externally provided complete remission to 22.6% patients of Vicharchika (Eczema) and checked the recurrences of the disease in the 89.5% patients. As in this group, cure rate was not up to the expectation; therefore, it was thought desirable to see whether performing of Virechana Karma instead of Koshtha Shuddhi prior to the administration of the above drugs enhances the cure rate for the Vicharchika (Eczema) patients. For the present study, 39 patients of Vicharchika (Eczema) were registered, of which 32 patients completed the full course of the treatment. These patients were given Virechana after preparing with the proper internal Snehana, Abhyanga, and Svedana as per classical method. After the Samsarjana Krama, they were administered the Shirishadi decoction and Guduchi-Bhringraja Rasayana powder orally with simultaneous local application of Snuhyadi Lepa on the eczematous lesions. The results of this study showed that when Virechana Karma was performed prior to the administration of Guduchi-Bhringaraja Rasayana and Shirishadi decoction orally and SnuhyadiLepa externally, it not only increased the cure rate to 81.3% in the patients of Vicharchika (Eczema) but also checked the recurrences to great extent as only negligible number of the patients reported the recurrence. PMID:23723667

  18. Intrapleural talc for the prevention of recurrence in benign or undiagnosed pleural effusions.

    PubMed

    Vargas, F S; Milanez, J R; Filomeno, L T; Fernandez, A; Jatene, A; Light, R W

    1994-12-01

    Chemical pleurodesis has become the preferred treatment for definitive management of malignant pleural effusions. The treatment of patients with recurrent benign or undiagnosed pleural effusions, however, remains a difficult clinical problem. Tetracycline has been widely used as a sclerosing agent, but parenteral tetracycline is no longer available. Therefore, alternative sclerosing agents are needed. Talc was used for the first time in 1935, and subsequently there have been several reports documenting its effectiveness in the treatment of malignant pleural effusion and pneumothorax. The objective of this study is to present our experience with a low dose of aerosolized talc for controlling nonmalignant pleural effusions. Between May 1985 and October 1992, twenty-two patients underwent talc pleurodesis at the time of thoracoscopy for control of a nonmalignant effusion. The cause of the effusion was cirrhosis in six patients, systemic lupus erythematosus in two, chylothorax in five, and no diagnosis in nine patients. Follow-up has ranged from 18 days to 5 years. Only two patients (9 percent), one with cirrhosis and another with an undiagnosed pleural effusion, had a recurrence of the effusions. We conclude that the intrapleural administration of 2 g of aerosolized talc is an effective treatment for recurrent benign (including chylothorax) or undiagnosed pleural effusions. PMID:7988198

  19. [Prevention of brain infarction in patients with atrial fibrillation].

    PubMed

    Ogata, Toshiyasu; Yasaka, Masahiro

    2007-01-01

    The patients with cardioembolic stroke sometimes suffer from severe neurological deficit and from recurrent strokes. Since atrial fibrillation, especially non-valvular atrial fibrillation (NVAF) is associated with over half of the cardioembolic strokes, the prevention of cardioembolic stroke in patients with NVAF is important. There have been some reports about how to prevent stroke. They have indicated that the best medication for preventing from stroke was anticoagulation by warfarin. Therefore, the guidelines recommended the patients with NVAF to take warfarin. In case with the older patients under 70 years, prothrombin international normalized ratio (PT-INR) should be kept from 2.0 to 3.0. On the other hand, if the patients with NVAF are over 70 years, PT-INR has to be controlled from 1.6 to 2.6. Before extraction of a tooth, anticoagulation should not be call off.

  20. Stroke prevention in patients with non-valvular atrial fibrillation: new insight in selection of rhythm or rate control therapy and impact of mean platelet volume.

    PubMed

    Hong, Soon-Pyo; Choi, Dong-Hyun; Kim, Hyun-Wook; Kim, Bo-Bae; Chung, Joong-Wha; Koh, Young-Youp; Chang, Kyong-Sig

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the impact of mean platelet volume (MPV) on the strategy for treatment of atrial fibrillation (AF) with respect to stroke prevention. MPV was analyzed in 265 patients with AF who were undergoing treatment using rhythm or rate control. The primary endpoint was ischemic stroke or a transient ischemic attack (TIA) event. Kaplan-Meier analysis revealed a significantly higher stroke rate in the rate control group compared to the rhythm control group. A significantly higher stroke rate was observed in the higher tertile MPV group (≥7.9 fL) compared to the lower tertile MPV group (<7.3 fL). When the MPV cut-off level was set to 7.85 fL using the receiver operating characteristic curve, the sensitivity was 80.0% and the specificity was 70.4% for differentiating between the group with stroke and the group without stroke. In the Cox proportional hazard analysis, after adjusting for sex, treatment strategy for AF, high MPV level, antithrombotic treatment, and high CHADS2 score, higher MPV, rate control strategy for treatment of AF, and high CHADS2 score were found to be independent predictors of stroke risk. In addition, patients with AF who were treated using rate control had high stroke risk with an MPV over 7.85 fL and high CHADS2 score. The results of this study demonstrate that the MPV and the rate control strategy for treatment of AF were predictive markers for stroke; its predictive power for stroke was independent of female sex and high CHADS2 score in patients with AF.

  1. Use of aspirin and statins for the primary prevention of myocardial infarction and stroke in patients with human immunodeficiency virus infection.

    PubMed

    Park, Tae Eun; Yusuff, Jameela; Sharma, Roopali

    2016-05-01

    This retrospective, cross-sectional study evaluated whether HIV-infected patients received aspirin and statins for the primary prevention of myocardial infarction and stroke. Among the 258 patients included, 50.4% (n = 130/258) of the patients had a high risk of myocardial infarction and 14% (n = 36/258) of stroke. Overall, 43.1% (n = 56/130) and 50% (n = 18/36) of the patients were prescribed aspirin for the primary prevention of myocardial infarction and stroke, respectively. Among the patients who required statin therapy, 42.5% (n = 34/80) and 37.1% (n = 13/35) of patients received it for the primary prevention of myocardial infarction and stroke, respectively. The patients who had hypertension (odds ratio 3.8, 95% confidence interval 1.5-10.9) and diabetes mellitus (odds ratio 5.6, 95% confidence interval 2.6-12.4) were more likely to receive aspirin. Interventions are needed to improve provider awareness of the use of aspirin and statins in the primary prevention of myocardial infarction and stroke in HIV-infected patients.

  2. Inhibition of tumor-cell attachment to extracellular matrix as a method for preventing tumor recurrence in a surgical wound.

    PubMed Central

    Whalen, G F; Ingber, D E

    1989-01-01

    Studies with four different transplantable murine tumors demonstrated that surgical instruments contaminated by contact with a tumor mass could produce tumors in a surgical wound. Eighty-seven per cent of mice with wounds made by invisibly contaminated scissors developed tumors. Irrigation with water did not prevent tumor growth. Before spilled tumor cells can invade and grow into a recurrence in the wound site, they must first attach to underlying extracellular matrix. We have devised a simple in vitro assay to identify inhibitors of tumor-cell attachment to develop therapeutic compounds that can prevent tumor-cell reimplantation. Various test compounds, including proteases (trypsin and Dispase), known modulators of matrix metabolism (proline analogues, cycloheximide, heparin, cortisone, cortexolone, and heparin-steroid combinations), large molecular weight polymers (agarose, dextran, polyethylene oxide), and synthetic fibronectin peptides were tested for their ability to inhibit mouse melanoma (B16-F10) cell attachment to gelatinized dishes. Most of these compounds had little or no effect on tumor-cell adhesion when cells were plated in serum-containing medium. However we identified three compounds that inhibited tumor-cell attachment in a reversible fashion: (1) a specific inhibitor of collagen deposition (L-azetidine-2-carboxylic acid); (2) a bacterial neutral protease (Dispase); and (3) synthetic fibronectin peptides that contained the arginine-glycine-asparate (RGD) sequence that is responsible for cell binding. Dispase and the RGD-containing peptides also inhibited cell implantation and prevented tumor formation in a surgical wound. We propose that inhibitors of attachment might be used either alone or with other biologic modifiers to prohibit implantation of free tumor cells at the time of surgery and thus, to prevent local tumor recurrence. PMID:2686568

  3. Trials of Novel Oral Anticoagulants for Stroke Prevention In Patients with Non-valvular Atrial Fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    Halperin, Jonathan L; Dorian, Paul

    2014-01-01

    Patients with non-valvular atrial fibrillation (AF) face an increased risk of stroke compared with those in normal sinus rhythm. The vitamin K antagonist warfarin, available for over half a century, is highly effective in reducing the risk of stroke in patients with AF, but it is a difficult drug to use properly. As a result, it is challenging to keep the anticoagulant effect of warfarin in the desired range. Newer oral anticoagulants (NOACs) that directly inhibit Factor IIa (thrombin) or Factor Xa provide reliable anticoagulation when administer in fixed oral doses without routine coagulation monitoring. This manuscript will review in detail the pivotal trials of these NOACs that led to their approval as well as comment on the factors that should influence their selection. PMID:24821657

  4. Cost-effectiveness of apixaban vs. current standard of care for stroke prevention in patients with atrial fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    Dorian, Paul; Kongnakorn, Thitima; Phatak, Hemant; Rublee, Dale A.; Kuznik, Andreas; Lanitis, Tereza; Liu, Larry Z.; Iloeje, Uchenna; Hernandez, Luis; Lip, Gregory Y.H.

    2014-01-01

    Aims Warfarin, a vitamin K antagonist (VKA), has been the standard of care for stroke prevention in patients with atrial fibrillation (AF). Aspirin is recommended for low-risk patients and those unsuitable for warfarin. Apixaban is an oral anticoagulant that has demonstrated better efficacy than warfarin and aspirin in the ARISTOTLE and AVERROES studies, respectively, and causes less bleeding than warfarin. We evaluated the potential cost-effectiveness of apixaban against warfarin and aspirin from the perspective of the UK payer perspective. Results and methods A lifetime Markov model was developed to evaluate the pharmacoeconomic impact of apixaban compared with warfarin and aspirin in VKA suitable and VKA unsuitable patients, respectively. Clinical events considered in the model include ischaemic stroke, haemorrhagic stroke, intracranial haemorrhage, other major bleed, clinically relevant non-major bleed, myocardial infarction, cardiovascular hospitalization and treatment discontinuations; data from the ARISTOTLE and AVERROES trials and published mortality rates and event-related utility rates were used in the model. Apixaban was projected to increase life expectancy and quality-adjusted life years (QALYs) compared with warfarin and aspirin. These gains were expected to be achieved at a drug acquisition-related cost increase over lifetime. The estimated incremental cost-effectiveness ratio was £11 909 and £7196 per QALY gained with apixaban compared with warfarin and aspirin, respectively. Sensitivity analyses indicated that results were robust to a wide range of inputs. Conclusions Based on randomized trial data, apixaban is a cost-effective alternative to warfarin and aspirin, in VKA suitable and VKA unsuitable patients with AF, respectively. PMID:24513791

  5. Stroke prevention in atrial fibrillation in older adults: existing knowledge gaps and areas for innovation: a summary of an American Federation for Aging research seminar.

    PubMed

    Lubitz, Steven A; Bauer, Kenneth A; Benjamin, Emelia J; Besdine, Richard W; Forman, Daniel E; Gurol, Mahmut E; Reddy, Vivek Y; Singer, Daniel E

    2013-10-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is a common and morbid cardiac arrhythmia that increases in prevalence with advancing age. The risk of ischemic stroke, a primary and disabling hazard of AF, also increases with advancing age. The aging of the population is anticipated to contribute to a rising burden of AF-related morbidity and economic costs, given the close association between the arrhythmia and aging. Recent biological, diagnostic, and therapeutic developments raise hope that AF-related stroke can be largely prevented, yet despite advances in stroke prevention for individuals with AF, numerous scientific and clinical knowledge gaps remain, particularly as these developments are applied to older adults. Given the public health importance of AF-related stroke in elderly adults, a group of clinician-investigators convened on April 5, 2012, to identify promising areas for investigation that may ultimately reduce stroke-related morbidity. This article summarizes the meeting discussion and emphasizes innovative topic areas that may ultimately facilitate the application of novel preventive, diagnostic, and therapeutic insights into the management of older adults with AF. The opinions of those that participated in the meeting limit this report, which may not represent all of the questions that other experts in this field might raise.

  6. Use of Aspirin for Prevention of Recurrent Atherosclerotic Cardiovascular Disease Among Adults — 20 States and the District of Columbia, 2013.

    PubMed

    Fang, Jing; George, Mary G; Hong, Yuling; Loustalot, Fleetwood

    2015-07-17

    The effectiveness of regular aspirin therapy in reducing risk (secondary prevention) for myocardial infarction, ischemic stroke, and fatal coronary events among persons with preexisting atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (ASCVD) is well established and recommended in current guidelines. Reported use of aspirin or other antiplatelet agents for secondary ASCVD prevention has varied widely across settings and data collection methods, from 54% of outpatient visits for those with ischemic vascular disease to 98% at the time of discharge for acute coronary syndrome. To estimate the prevalence of aspirin use for secondary ASCVD prevention among community-dwelling adults, CDC analyzed 2013 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS) data from 20 states and the District of Columbia. Overall, 70.8% of adult respondents with existing ASCVD reported using aspirin regularly (every day or every other day). Within this group, 93.6% reported using aspirin for heart attack prevention, 79.6% for stroke prevention and 76.2% for both heart attack and stroke prevention. Differences in use were found by age, sex, race/ethnicity, and ASCVD risk status, and state. Most of the state differences were not statistically significant; however, these estimates can be used to promote the use of aspirin as a low-cost and highly effective intervention.

  7. Cerebrovascular Complications Related to Atrial Fibrillation Ablation and Strategies for Periprocedural Stroke Prevention.

    PubMed

    Csanadi, Zoltan; Nagy-Baló, Edina; Danik, Stephan; Barrett, Conor; Burkhardt, J David; Sanchez, Javier; Santangeli, Pasquale; Santoro, Francesco; Di Biase, Luigi; Natale, Andrea

    2014-03-01

    Transcatheter treatment of atrial fibrillation (AF) is a complex intervention performed in patients who are at inherently increased risk of a thromboembolic complication, including stroke. It is therefore not surprising that cerebrovascular accidents have been among the most feared complications since the inception of AF ablation. While improvements have been made to limit the incidence of thromboembolic events during catheter ablation of AF, the optimal strategy to minimize such complications has yet to be determined. It is hoped that larger trials using periprocedural anticoagulation strategies can be undertaken to definitively address these important concerns. PMID:27063826

  8. New Oral Anticoagulants for Stroke Prevention in Atrial Fibrillation: More Choices Bring More Challenges

    PubMed Central

    Howard, Patricia A.

    2013-01-01

    For patients with atrial fibrillation, anticoagulant therapy is essential to reduce the risk of ischemic stroke that is associated with this arrhythmia. Historically, warfarin has been the preferred treatment for patients at moderate to high risk despite many potential limitations. With the development of newer oral anticoagulants, clinicians now have 3 additional options: dabigatran, rivaroxaban, and apixaban. Although these agents clearly offer some advantages over warfarin, they may not be appropriate for all patients. This article will discuss factors that should be considered when selecting among these various anticoagulants. PMID:24421491

  9. The Indian consensus guidance on stroke prevention in atrial fibrillation: An emphasis on practical use of nonvitamin K oral anticoagulants.

    PubMed

    Dalal, Jamshed; Bhave, Abhay; Oomman, Abraham; Vora, Amit; Saxena, Anil; Kahali, Dhiman; Poncha, Fali; Gambhir, D S; Chaudhuri, Jaydip Ray; Sinha, Nakul; Ray, Saumitra; Iyengar, S S; Banerjee, Suvro; Kaul, Upendra

    2015-12-01

    The last ten years have seen rapid strides in the evolution of nonvitamin K oral anticoagulants (NOACs) for stroke prevention in patients with atrial fibrillation (AF). For the preparation of this consensus, a comprehensive literature search was performed and data on available trials, subpopulation analyses, and case reports were analyzed. This Indian consensus document intends to provide guidance on selecting the right NOAC for the right patients by formulating expert opinions based on the available trials and Asian/Indian subpopulation analyses of these trials. A section has been dedicated to the current evidence of NOACs in the Asian population. Practical suggestions have been formulated in the following clinical situations: (i) Dose recommendations of the NOACs in different clinical scenarios; (ii) NOACs in patients with rheumatic heart disease (RHD); (iii) Monitoring anticoagulant effect of the NOACs; (iv) Overdose of NOACs; (v) Antidotes to NOACs; (vi) Treatment of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) with AF using NOACs; (vii) NOACs dose in elderly, (viii) Switching between NOACs and vitamin K antagonists (VKA); (ix) Cardioversion or ablation in NOAC-treated patients; (x) Planned/emergency surgical interventions in patients currently on NOACs; (xi) Management of bleeding complications of NOACs; (xii) Management of acute coronary syndrome (ACS) in AF with NOACs; (xiii) Management of acute ischemic stroke while on NOACs.

  10. An integrated and coordinated approach to preventing recurrent coronary heart disease events in Australia.

    PubMed

    Briffa, Tom G; Kinsman, Leigh; Maiorana, Andrew J; Zecchin, Robert; Redfern, Julie; Davidson, Patricia M; Paull, Glenn; Nagle, Amanda; Denniss, A Robert

    2009-06-15

    Implementing existing knowledge about cardiac rehabilitation (CR) and heart failure management could markedly reduce mortality after acute coronary syndromes and revascularisation therapy. Contemporary CR and secondary prevention programs are cost-effective, safe and beneficial for patients of all ages, leading to improved survival, fewer revascularisation procedures and reduced rehospitalisation. Despite the proven benefits attributed to these secondary prevention interventions, they are not well attended by patients. Modern programs must be flexible, culturally safe, multifaceted and integrated with the patient's primary health care provider to achieve optimal and sustainable benefits for most patients.

  11. The Vascular Effects of Infection in Pediatric Stroke (VIPS) Study

    PubMed Central

    Fullerton, Heather J.; Elkind, Mitchell S. V.; Barkovich, James A.; Glaser, Carol; Glidden, David; Hills, Nancy K.; Leiva-Salinas, Carlos; Wintermark, Max; deVeber, Gabrielle A.

    2012-01-01

    Background The most common cause of arterial ischemic stroke (AIS) in a previously healthy child is a large vessel cerebral arteriopathy. Varicella zoster virus is an established etiology, and recent data implicate a non-specific effect of additional common viral infections on cerebral vessels. The Vascular effects of Infection in Pediatric Stroke (VIPS) study is a multicenter cohort study that will test the hypotheses that (1) infection can lead to childhood AIS by causing vascular injury, and (2) the resultant arteriopathy, and inflammatory markers, predict recurrent stroke. Methods We are prospectively enrolling 480 children (aged 1 month through 18 years) with AIS and collecting (1) extensive infectious histories (through parental interview), (2) blood and serum samples (and CSF, when clinically obtained), and (3) clinically obtained but standardized brain and cerebrovascular imaging studies. Imaging studies are being centrally reviewed and adjudicated. Centralized laboratory assays will include serologies (acute and convalescent) and molecular assays for herpes viruses, and levels of inflammatory markers. Subjects are followed prospectively for recurrent ischemic events for the duration of the study (minimum of 1 year). We are banking biological specimens (including DNA) for future studies of specific infectious agents and mediators of inflammation relevant to thrombosis and vascular injury. Analysis Plan In a cross-sectional analysis, we will use logistic regression techniques to measure the association between markers of infection (from the clinical history and laboratory assays) and cerebral arteriopathy. In a prospective cohort analysis, we will use survival analysis techniques to determine whether cerebral arteriopathy and inflammatory markers predict recurrent stroke. Conclusions VIPS will shed light on the vascular effects of infection in childhood stroke. Because arteriopathy is likely the major predictor of recurrent stroke in children, a better

  12. Dabigatran for the prevention of stroke and systemic embolism in atrial fibrillation: A NICE single technology appraisal.

    PubMed

    Faria, Rita; Spackman, Eldon; Burch, Jane; Corbacho, Belen; Todd, Derick; Pepper, Chris; Woolacott, Nerys; Palmer, Stephen

    2013-07-01

    The National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence (NICE) invited the manufacturer of dabigatran etexilate (Boehringer Ingelheim Ltd, UK) to submit evidence for the clinical and cost-effectiveness of this drug for the prevention of stroke and systemic embolism in patients with non-valvular atrial fibrillation (AF) as part of the NICE single technology appraisal process. The Centre for Reviews and Dissemination and the Centre for Health Economics at the University of York were commissioned to act as the evidence review group (ERG). This article presents a summary of the manufacturer's submission, the ERG report and the subsequent development of NICE guidance for the use of dabigatran within the UK National Health Service. Dabigatran was granted marketing authorisation by the European Medicines Agency for a sequential dosing regimen (DBG sequential), in which patients under 80 years are treated with dabigatran 150 mg twice daily (DBG150) and patients 80 years and over are given dabigatran 110 mg twice daily (DBG110). NICE decisions are bound by the marketing authorisation; therefore, the decision problem faced by the committee was whether the DBG sequential regimen was effective and cost-effective compared with warfarin or aspirin for patients with non-valvular AF and one or more risk factors. The RE-LY trial, a large multi-centre non-inferiority randomised clinical trial, was the primary source of clinical evidence. DBG150 was shown to be non-inferior, and subsequently superior to warfarin, for the primary outcome of all stroke/systemic embolism. DBG110 was found to be non-inferior to warfarin. Results were presented for a post hoc subgroup analysis for patients under and over 80 years of age, where DBG110 showed a statistically significant reduction of haemorrhagic stroke and intracranial haemorrhage in comparison to warfarin in patients over 80 years of age. This post hoc subgroup analysis by age was the basis for the licensed DBG sequential regimen

  13. Mindfulness-based cognitive therapy is effective as relapse prevention for patients with recurrent depression in Scandinavian primary health care.

    PubMed

    Lilja, Josefine L; Zelleroth, Clara; Axberg, Ulf; Norlander, Torsten

    2016-10-01

    This study examined the effectiveness of mindfulness-based cognitive therapy (MBCT) in primary care for patients with recurrent depression (major depressive disorder: MDD). According to the World Health Organization (WHO), MDD is now the leading cause of disease burden in middle- and high-income countries. Patients (N = 45) with three or more previous depressive episodes were recruited to participate in MBCT as a preventative intervention. Using a benchmarking approach, outcome data was compared with data from a recent efficacy study. The methodology is a rigorous approach to assessing effectiveness when evidence-based UK protocols are transferred into the existing Scandinavian service delivery. Additionally, a person-centred methodological approach was used to assess clinical significance on the Reliable Change Index (RCI). The analysis revealed comparable or larger effects from pre-test to post-test in reduced psychiatric symptoms, increased quality of life and level of mindfulness, and the effects were maintained over 14 months. Analysis of the relapse rate in the current study (16%) compared to the TAU in the efficacy study (68%) yielded an h value of 0.78, a moderate effect size. Only 13% dropped out of the treatment. According to the RCI findings, 65% to 67% of participants in the clinical group improved, no individual worsened, and women showed a significantly greater improvement of depression and anxiety than men. Therapeutic alliance and motivation had no impact on the outcome. The overall result suggests that MBCT can be implemented successfully in Scandinavian primary health care as a preventive intervention for patients with recurrent depression. PMID:27358165

  14. Recurrent Issues in Efforts to Prevent Homicidal Youth Violence in Schools: Expert Opinions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dill, Karen E.; Redding, Richard E.; Smith, Peter K.; Surette, Ray; Cornell, Dewey G.

    2011-01-01

    Developmental research on social influences on adolescents can guide practices aimed to prevent homicidal youth violence. School shootings have repeatedly raised questions about the contributory role of bullying and entertainment violence, how news media publicity might produce copycat crimes, and whether stiffer criminal sanctions might have a…

  15. Compression for Primary Prevention, Treatment, and Prevention of Recurrence of Venous Leg Ulcers: An Evidence-and Consensus-Based Algorithm for Care Across the Continuum.

    PubMed

    Ratliff, Catherine R; Yates, Stephanie; McNichol, Laurie; Gray, Mikel

    2016-01-01

    Chronic venous insufficiency is a prevalent disease that frequently leads to development of venous leg ulcers. While a number of evidence-based clinical practice guidelines have been developed that provide guidance for clinicians when caring for patients with chronic venous insufficiency, they lack adequate detail concerning selection and application of compression for prevention and management of venous leg ulcers. In order to address this need, the WOCN Society appointed a task force to develop an algorithm for compression for primary prevention, treatment, and prevention of recurrent venous leg ulcers in persons with chronic venous insufficiency. The task force used findings from a scoping literature review to identify current best evidence needed to support decision points and pathways within the algorithm. In addition, the task force convened a panel of 20 clinicians and researchers with expertise in lower extremity venous disorders in order to establish consensus around pathways and decision points within the algorithm lacking robust evidence. Following initial construction of the algorithm, a second interdisciplinary group of expert clinicians established content validity and provided additional qualitative feedback used to complete final revisions of the algorithm. This article reviews the process used to create this landmark algorithm, including generation of the evidence- and consensus-based statements used in its construction, the various pathways, and rich supplemental materials embedded within the algorithm, and the process used to establish content validity.

  16. Compression for Primary Prevention, Treatment, and Prevention of Recurrence of Venous Leg Ulcers: An Evidence-and Consensus-Based Algorithm for Care Across the Continuum.

    PubMed

    Ratliff, Catherine R; Yates, Stephanie; McNichol, Laurie; Gray, Mikel

    2016-01-01

    Chronic venous insufficiency is a prevalent disease that frequently leads to development of venous leg ulcers. While a number of evidence-based clinical practice guidelines have been developed that provide guidance for clinicians when caring for patients with chronic venous insufficiency, they lack adequate detail concerning selection and application of compression for prevention and management of venous leg ulcers. In order to address this need, the WOCN Society appointed a task force to develop an algorithm for compression for primary prevention, treatment, and prevention of recurrent venous leg ulcers in persons with chronic venous insufficiency. The task force used findings from a scoping literature review to identify current best evidence needed to support decision points and pathways within the algorithm. In addition, the task force convened a panel of 20 clinicians and researchers with expertise in lower extremity venous disorders in order to establish consensus around pathways and decision points within the algorithm lacking robust evidence. Following initial construction of the algorithm, a second interdisciplinary group of expert clinicians established content validity and provided additional qualitative feedback used to complete final revisions of the algorithm. This article reviews the process used to create this landmark algorithm, including generation of the evidence- and consensus-based statements used in its construction, the various pathways, and rich supplemental materials embedded within the algorithm, and the process used to establish content validity. PMID:27163774

  17. Recurrent infarctions due to a dome-shaped pannus above the mitral valve prosthesis

    PubMed Central

    Inoue, Yoshito; Suzuki, Satoru

    2016-01-01

    This report describes a unique case of a 56-year-old female who suffered from recurrent stroke after double mechanical valve replacement. During the four years after the surgery, she remained in normal sinus rhythm, received adequate anticoagulation therapy, and no apparent left atrial thrombus was detected. She underwent redo surgery to prevent further stroke after fourth instance of cerebral infarction. Intraoperative findings revealed a ‘dome-shaped’ pannus formation covering the sewing ring of the mitral prosthesis circumferentially, probably leading to clot formation and repeated infarctions. She has been stroke free for three years after pannus resection. PMID:26904241

  18. Bacterial lysate in the prevention of acute exacerbation of COPD and in respiratory recurrent infections

    PubMed Central

    Braido, F; Tarantini, F; Ghiglione, V; Melioli, G; Canonica, G W

    2007-01-01

    Respiratory tract infections (RTIs) represent a serious problem because they are one of the most common cause of human death by infection. The search for the treatment of those diseases has therefore a great importance. In this study we provide an overview of the currently available treatments for RTIs with particular attention to chronic obstructive pulmonary diseases exacerbations and recurrent respiratory infections therapy and a description of bacterial lysate action, in particular making reference to the medical literature dealing with its clinical efficacy. Those studies are based on a very large number of clinical trials aimed to evaluate the effects of this drug in maintaining the immune system in a state of alert, and in increasing the defences against microbial infections. From this analysis it comes out that bacterial lysates have a protective effect, which induce a significant reduction of the symptoms related to respiratory infections. Those results could be very interesting also from an economic point of view, because they envisage a reduction in the number of acute exacerbations and a shorter duration of hospitalization. The use of bacterial lysate could therefore represent an important means to achieve an extension of life duration in patients affected by respiratory diseases. PMID:18229572

  19. Recurrent bilateral occipital infarct with cortical blindness and anton syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kwong Yew, Kiu; Abdul Halim, Sanihah; Liza-Sharmini, Ahmad Tajudin; Tharakan, John

    2014-01-01

    Bilateral cortical blindness and Anton syndrome, are most commonly caused by ischaemic stroke. In this condition, patients have loss of vision but deny their blindness despite objective evidence of visual loss. We report a case of a patient with multiple cardiovascular risk factors who developed recurrent bilateral occipital lobe infarct with Anton syndrome. A suspicion of this condition should be raised when the patient has denial of blindness in the presence of clinical and radiological evidence of occipital lobe injury. Management of this condition should focus on the underlying cause, in which our patient requires secondary stroke prevention and rehabilitation. PMID:24744933

  20. Recurrent issues in efforts to prevent homicidal youth violence in schools: expert opinions.

    PubMed

    Dill, Karen E; Redding, Richard E; Smith, Peter K; Surette, Ray; Cornell, Dewey G

    2011-01-01

    Developmental research on social influences on adolescents can guide practices aimed to prevent homicidal youth violence. School shootings have repeatedly raised questions about the contributory role of bullying and entertainment violence, how news media publicity might produce copycat crimes, and whether stiffer criminal sanctions might have a deterrent effect. This article presents the thoughts and recommendations of a group of experts on these topics summarizing the current knowledge base. In brief, bullying reduction programs may be a useful early prevention effort. Television and video games with violent themes can encourage aggressive behavior, but these media can be used to teach more prosocial behavior as well. The potential copycat effects of highly publicized crimes might be diminished with more restrained reporting, although more research is needed. Finally, there is substantial evidence that increased criminal sanctions for youthful offenders have not had a deterrent effect.

  1. Recurrent issues in efforts to prevent homicidal youth violence in schools: expert opinions.

    PubMed

    Dill, Karen E; Redding, Richard E; Smith, Peter K; Surette, Ray; Cornell, Dewey G

    2011-01-01

    Developmental research on social influences on adolescents can guide practices aimed to prevent homicidal youth violence. School shootings have repeatedly raised questions about the contributory role of bullying and entertainment violence, how news media publicity might produce copycat crimes, and whether stiffer criminal sanctions might have a deterrent effect. This article presents the thoughts and recommendations of a group of experts on these topics summarizing the current knowledge base. In brief, bullying reduction programs may be a useful early prevention effort. Television and video games with violent themes can encourage aggressive behavior, but these media can be used to teach more prosocial behavior as well. The potential copycat effects of highly publicized crimes might be diminished with more restrained reporting, although more research is needed. Finally, there is substantial evidence that increased criminal sanctions for youthful offenders have not had a deterrent effect. PMID:21491577

  2. New pooled cohort risk equations: Application to a recent stroke patient population

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jong-Ho; Kwon, Hyung-Min; Ovbiagele, Bruce

    2014-01-01

    Background Recently, Pooled Cohort Risk (PCR) equations, which incorporates new sex- and race-specific estimates of the 10-year risk for atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (ASCVD) including stroke, for ASCVD-free adults was introduced. Given the importance of secondary stroke prevention and benefit of a potential tool to readily identify stroke patients at high intermediate-term vascular risk for appropriate treatment, we evaluated the prediction and discrimination of the PCR and Framingham Cardiovascular Risk (FCR) equations after a recent stroke. Method We conducted an analysis of Vitamin Intervention for Stroke Prevention dataset of 3555 recent non-cardioembolic stroke patients aged ≥35 years and followed for 2 years. ≥ Subjects were categorized as having low-PCR/low-FCR (<%), high-PCR/high-FCR (≥), and known-ASCVD. Independent associations of high-PCR/high-FCR with recurrent stroke (primary outcome) and stroke/coronary heart disease (CHD)/vascular death (secondary outcomes) were assessed. Results Both PCR and FCR were independently related to both outcomes: compared with low-PCR, high-PCR was associated with stroke (adjusted hazard ratio, 1.79; 95% CI, 1.25–2.57) and stroke/CHD/vascular death (2.05; 1.55–2.70). Compared with low-FCR, high-FCR was associated with stroke (2.06; 1.34–3.16) and stroke/CHD/vascular death (1.57; 1.12–2.20). The c-statistic of PCR/FCR as a continuous variable for stroke was 0.56 (95% CI, 0.54–0.58) and 0.56 (0.54–0.57), respectively and for stroke/CHD/vascular death was 0.62 (0.60–0.63) and 0.61 (0.59–0.63), respectively. Conclusions Both PCR and FCR are significant predictors of recurrent vascular events among patients after a recent non-cardioembolic stroke, but neither one of them is an optimal model for discriminating intermediate-term ASCVD prediction among stroke patients already receiving secondary stroke prevention. PMID:25510378

  3. European Progestin Club Guidelines for prevention and treatment of threatened or recurrent (habitual) miscarriage with progestogens.

    PubMed

    Schindler, Adolf E; Carp, Howard; Druckmann, René; Genazzani, Andrea R; Huber, Johannes; Pasqualini, Jorge; Schweppe, Karl W; Szekeres-Bartho, Julia

    2015-06-01

    This guideline has been developed based on studied and clinical investigations. Therefore, it appears to be appropriate to use all the available evidence, which are very encouraging, in a summarized form to propose guidelines by a group of European experts in order to give the gynecologists, obstetricians and reproductive medicine specialists have direction with regard to the prevention or treatment of miscarriage for the benefit of the endangered pregnancies. There are a number of statements, opinions and guidelines already published for this topic, which are not entirely in agreement. PMID:25976550

  4. Effect of multiple cranial burr hole surgery on prevention of recurrent ischemic attacks in children with moyamoya disease.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, R S de; Amato, M C M; Simão, G N; Abud, D G; Avidago, E B; Specian, C M; Machado, H R

    2009-12-01

    Moyamoya disease (MMD) is an uncommon cerebrovascular disorder characterized by progressive stenosis of the terminal portion of the internal carotid artery and its main branches. Direct and indirect bypass techniques have been devised with the aim of promoting neoangiogenesis. The current study aimed to investigate the role of multiple cranial burr hole (MCBH) operations in the prevention of cerebral ischemic attacks in children with MMD. Seven children suffering from progressive MMD were submitted to the MCBH and arachnoid opening technique. Ten to 20 burr holes were drilled in the fronto-temporo-parieto-occipital area of each hemisphere in each patient, depending on the site and extent of the disease. All patients were evaluated pre- and postoperatively by means of Barthel index (BI), CT, MR, angio-MR, and angiography. Patients had no recurrence of ischemic attacks postoperatively. Neoangiogenesis was observed in both hemispheres. One patient developed a persistent subdural collection after surgery, thus requiring placement of a subdural-peritoneal shunt. Postoperative BI was statistically significantly improved (P=0.02). This report suggests that MCBH for revascularization in MMD is a simple procedure with a relatively low risk of complications and effective for preventing cerebral ischemic attacks in children. In addition, MCBH may be placed as an adjunct to other treatments for MMD.

  5. Ovarian Cancer: Prevention, Detection and Treatment of the Disease and Its Recurrence. Molecular Mechanisms and Personalized Medicine Meeting Report

    PubMed Central

    Modugno, Francesmary; Edwards, Robert P.

    2012-01-01

    Objective To review the current understanding of the underlying molecular, biologic and genetic mechanisms involved in ovarian cancer development and how these mechanisms can be targets for prevention, detection and treatment of the disease and its recurrence. Methods In May 2012, we convened a meeting of researchers, clinicians and consumer advocates to review the state of current knowledge on molecular mechanisms and identify fruitful areas for further investigations. Results The meeting consisted of seven scientific sessions, ranging from Epidemiology, Early Detection, and Biology to Therapeutics and Quality of Life. Sessions consisted of talks and panel discussions by international leaders in ovarian cancer research. A special career-development session by the CDMRP Department of Defense Ovarian Cancer Academy as well as an oral abstract and poster session showcased promising new research by junior scientists. Conclusions Technological advances in the last decade have increased our knowledge of the molecular mechanisms involved in a host of biological activities related to ovarian cancer. Understanding the role these mechanisms play in cancer initiation and progression will help lead to the development of prevention and treatment modalities that can be personalized to each patient, thereby helping to overcome this highly-fatal malignancy. PMID:23013733

  6. Reflections by contrarians on the post-CREST evaluation of carotid stenting for stroke prevention.

    PubMed

    Barnett, Henry J M; Pelz, David M; Lownie, Stephen P

    2010-12-01

    Carotid angioplasty and stenting has become a popular alternative to carotid endarterectomy for the treatment of carotid stenosis in stroke. Evidence from early randomized controlled trials comparing these interventions revealed mixed results. The largest such trial, the Carotid Revascularization Endarterectomy vs. Stenting Trial recently showed equivalence of the procedures in a mixed cohort of both symptomatic and asymptomatic patients. These results have been heralded in North America as definitively demonstrating the safety and efficacy of carotid angioplasty and stenting, making it an attractive alternative to carotid endarterectomy. It is therefore probable that many more asymptomatic patients will be subjected to Carotid angioplasty and stenting, perceived by many to be less invasive than carotid endarterectomy. The authors argue that the design of Carotid Revascularization Endarterectomy vs. Stenting Trial was flawed by the mixture of two dissimilar patient groups, thus violating the principle of ceteris paribus, essential for the validity of a randomized controlled trials. The evidence for any invasive treatment of asymptomatic carotid disease is weak, with recent data favouring purely medical management. The authors believe that carotid angioplasty and stenting in asymptomatic patients should cease until better evidence is available. PMID:21050401

  7. Mindfulness-based cognitive therapy for prevention of recurrence of suicidal behavior.

    PubMed

    Williams, J Mark G; Duggan, Danielle S; Crane, Catherine; Fennell, Melanie J V

    2006-02-01

    Once suicidal thoughts have emerged as a feature of depression they are likely to be reactivated as part of a suicidal mode of mind whenever sad mood reappears. This article reviews the methods and the usefulness of mindfulness-based cognitive therapy (MBCT) as a treatment for the prevention of the reactivation of the suicidal mode. MBCT integrates mindfulness meditation practices and cognitive therapy techniques. It teaches participants to develop moment-by-moment awareness, approaching ongoing experience with an attitude of nonjudgment and acceptance. Participants are increasingly able to see their thoughts as mental events rather than facts (metacognitive awareness). A case example illustrates how mindfulness skills develop with MBCT and how they relate to the cognitive processes that fuel suicidal crises. An ongoing controlled trial will provide further evidence, but pilot work suggests that MBCT is a promising intervention for those who have experienced suicidal ideation in the past.

  8. Heart Failure in Acute Ischemic Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Cuadrado-Godia, Elisa; Ois, Angel; Roquer, Jaume

    2010-01-01

    Heart failure (HF) is a complex clinical syndrome that can result from any structural or functional cardiac disorder that impairs the ability of the ventricle to fill with or eject blood. Due to the aging of the population it has become a growing public health problem in recent decades. Diagnosis of HF is clinical and there is no diagnostic test, although some basic complementary testing should be performed in all patients. Depending on the ejection fraction (EF), the syndrome is classified as HF with low EF or HF with normal EF (HFNEF). Although prognosis in HF is poor, HFNEF seems to be more benign. HF and ischemic stroke (IS) share vascular risk factors such as age, hypertension, diabetes mellitus, coronary artery disease and atrial fibrillation. Persons with HF have higher incidence of IS, varying from 1.7% to 10.4% per year across various cohort studies. The stroke rate increases with length of follow-up. Reduced EF, independent of severity, is associated with higher risk of stroke. Left ventricular mass and geometry are also related with stroke incidence, with concentric hypertrophy carrying the greatest risk. In HF with low EF, the stroke mechanism may be embolism, cerebral hypoperfusion or both, whereas in HFNEF the mechanism is more typically associated with chronic endothelial damage of the small vessels. Stroke in patients with HF is more severe and is associated with a higher rate of recurrence, dependency, and short term and long term mortality. Cardiac morbidity and mortality is also high in these patients. Acute stroke treatment in HF includes all the current therapeutic options to more carefully control blood pressure. For secondary prevention, optimal control of all vascular risk factors is essential. Antithrombotic therapy is mandatory, although the choice of a platelet inhibitor or anticoagulant drug depends on the cardiac disease. Trials are ongoing to evaluate anticoagulant therapy for prevention of embolism in patients with low EF who are at

  9. Visual disorders or "eye stroke"after heart surgery: can we prevent it?

    PubMed

    Tagarakis, Georgios I; Tsolaki, Fani; Daskalopoulos, Marios E; Karantzis, Ioannis; Baddour, Andony S; Karangelis, Dimos; Tsilimingas, Nikolaos B

    2009-01-01

    The aim of the study was to elucidate the problem of visual disorders after heart surgery, focusing on aetiology, modes of prevention and treatment. Information from a literature search and the authors' personal experience are provide clues as to the modes of development and the means of avoidance and therapy of this category of postoperative, neurosensory complications. Multiple morbid situations, such as preoperative augmented ocular pressure, perioperative bleeding and hypotension, are shown to be predisposing and precipitating factors. Medical treatment seems to be less important than minimisation of risk factors. Prevention rather than treatment is more helpful for heart-operated patients, as far as postoperative visual disorders are concerned. PMID:20380269

  10. Poor stroke-related risk factor control even after stroke: an opportunity for rehabilitation professionals.

    PubMed

    Ellis, Charles; Breland, Hazel L

    2014-01-01

    The burden of chronic disease worldwide is substantial. Unfortunately, risk factor control for most chronic diseases remains poor even after diagnoses. This is a major concern because poor risk factor control often leads to secondary consequences of the disease and the development of co-existing diseases. Stroke is a chronic condition that frequently requires the services of rehabilitation professionals who can also play an important role in risk factor management to reduce recurrent stroke. Approaches to the management of stroke risk factors in stroke survivors vary greatly and consequently outcomes vary in a similar fashion. The current literature suggests that uniform offering of structured risk factor control programs over time to individuals with chronic disease can improve knowledge of stroke risk factors, knowledge of action to control risk factors and in turn facilitate self-management practices that reduce the negative consequences of chronic diseases. Rehabilitation professionals can play a vital role in the management and secondary prevention of chronic diseases during the rehabilitation process via patient education and training. Implications for Rehabilitation Evidence suggests that risk factor control remains poor in many individuals with chronic conditions such as stroke. Rehabilitation professionals can play a key role in programs designed to improve risk factor control in chronic conditions. Future risk factor control programs can be structured and implemented over time to include rehabilitation professionals.

  11. Chronic Management of Hypertension after Stroke: The Role of Ambulatory Blood Pressure Monitoring

    PubMed Central

    Castilla-Guerra, Luis; Fernandez-Moreno, Maria del Carmen

    2016-01-01

    Hypertension is the most important potentially reversible risk factor for stroke in all age groups; high blood pressure (BP) is also associated with increased risk of recurrent stroke in patients who have already had an ischemic or hemorrhagic event. Twenty-four hour ambulatory BP monitoring (ABPM) has become an important tool for improving the diagnosis and management of hypertension, and is increasingly used to assess patients with hypertension. Nevertheless, although ABPM devices are increasingly used for assessment of hypertension, their value in the chronic management of hypertension in patients with stroke has not been systematically studied. In fact, among large-scale randomized trials for secondary stroke prevention, only the Morbidity and Mortality After Stroke, Eprosartan Compared With Nitrendipine for Secondary Prevention trial included 24-hour ABPM. ABPM has demonstrated chronic disruption of the circadian rhythm of BP after acute phase of stroke and has shown higher sensitivity compared to office BP in evaluating the effectiveness of antihypertensive treatment among stroke survivors. High 24-hour BP is an independent predictor for cerebrovascular events, brain microbleeds, and subsequent development of dementia. Nevertheless, although stroke care guidelines endorse the importance of hypertension management, the specific role of ABPM among stroke survivors after the acute phase of disease has not been established. Further studies are needed to clarify whether routine application of ABPM among these patients should be recommended. PMID:26687120

  12. [Good practice in occupational health services--Certification of stroke as an accident at work. Need for secondary prevention in people returning to work after acute cerebrovascular events].

    PubMed

    Marcinkiewicz, Andrzej; Walusiak-Skorupa, Jolanta

    2015-01-01

    The classification of an acute vascular episode, both heart infarct and stroke, as an accident at work poses difficulties not only for post accidental teams, but also to occupational health professionals, experts and judges at labor and social insurance courts. This article presents the case of a 41-year-old office worker, whose job involved client services. While attending a very aggressive customer she developed solid stress that resulted in symptoms of the central nervous system (headache, speech disturbances). During her hospitalisation at the neurological unit ischemic stroke with transient mixed type aphasia was diagnosed. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scan of the head revealed subacute ischemia. After an analysis of the accident circumstances, the employer's post accidental team decided that ischemic stroke had been an accident at work, because it was a sudden incident due to an external cause inducing work-related traumatic stroke. As a primary cause tough stress and emotional strain due to the situation developed while attending the customer were acknowledged. During control medical check up after 5 months the patient was found to be fit for work, so she could return to work. However, it should be noted that such a check up examination of subjects returning to work after stroke must be holistic, including the evaluation of job predispositions and health education aimed at secondary prevention of heart and vascular diseases with special reference to their risk factors. PMID:26536976

  13. [Good practice in occupational health services--Certification of stroke as an accident at work. Need for secondary prevention in people returning to work after acute cerebrovascular events].

    PubMed

    Marcinkiewicz, Andrzej; Walusiak-Skorupa, Jolanta

    2015-01-01

    The classification of an acute vascular episode, both heart infarct and stroke, as an accident at work poses difficulties not only for post accidental teams, but also to occupational health professionals, experts and judges at labor and social insurance courts. This article presents the case of a 41-year-old office worker, whose job involved client services. While attending a very aggressive customer she developed solid stress that resulted in symptoms of the central nervous system (headache, speech disturbances). During her hospitalisation at the neurological unit ischemic stroke with transient mixed type aphasia was diagnosed. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scan of the head revealed subacute ischemia. After an analysis of the accident circumstances, the employer's post accidental team decided that ischemic stroke had been an accident at work, because it was a sudden incident due to an external cause inducing work-related traumatic stroke. As a primary cause tough stress and emotional strain due to the situation developed while attending the customer were acknowledged. During control medical check up after 5 months the patient was found to be fit for work, so she could return to work. However, it should be noted that such a check up examination of subjects returning to work after stroke must be holistic, including the evaluation of job predispositions and health education aimed at secondary prevention of heart and vascular diseases with special reference to their risk factors.

  14. Helicobacter pylori Eradication for Prevention of Metachronous Recurrence after Endoscopic Resection of Early Gastric Cancer.

    PubMed

    Bang, Chang Seok; Baik, Gwang Ho; Shin, In Soo; Kim, Jin Bong; Suk, Ki Tae; Yoon, Jai Hoon; Kim, Yeon Soo; Kim, Dong Joon

    2015-06-01

    Controversies persist regarding the effect of Helicobacter pylori eradication on the development of metachronous gastric cancer after endoscopic resection of early gastric cancer (EGC). The aim of this study was to assess the efficacy of Helicobacter pylori eradication after endoscopic resection of EGC for the prevention of metachronous gastric cancer. A systematic literature review and meta-analysis were conducted using the core databases PubMed, EMBASE, and the Cochrane Library. The rates of development of metachronous gastric cancer between the Helicobacter pylori eradication group vs. the non-eradication group were extracted and analyzed using risk ratios (RRs). A random effect model was applied. The methodological quality of the enrolled studies was assessed by the Risk of Bias table and by the Newcastle-Ottawa Scale. Publication bias was evaluated through the funnel plot with trim and fill method, Egger's test, and by the rank correlation test. Ten studies (2 randomized and 8 non-randomized/5,914 patients with EGC or dysplasia) were identified and analyzed. Overall, the Helicobacter pylori eradication group showed a RR of 0.467 (95% CI: 0.362-0.602, P < 0.001) for the development of metachronous gastric cancer after endoscopic resection of EGC. Subgroup analyses showed consistent results. Publication bias was not detected. Helicobacter pylori eradication after endoscopic resection of EGC reduces the occurrence of metachronous gastric cancer.

  15. Omega-3 supplementation to prevent recurrent preterm birth: a systematic review and metaanalysis of randomized controlled trials.

    PubMed

    Saccone, Gabriele; Berghella, Vincenzo

    2015-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of omega-3 supplementation for the prevention of recurrent preterm birth (PTB) in asymptomatic singleton gestations with previous PTB. We searched fish oil, long chain polyunsaturated fatty acids, pregnancy, and omega-3 in MEDLINE, OVID, Scopus, ClinicalTrials.gov, the PROSPERO International Prospective Register of Systematic Reviews, EMBASE, and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials from inception of each database to December 2014 with no limit for language. In addition the reference lists of all identified articles were examined to identify studies that were not captured by electronic searches. We performed a metaanalysis of randomized controlled trials of asymptomatic singleton gestations with previous PTB who were assigned randomly to prophylactic omega-3 supplementation vs control (either placebo or no treatment). The primary outcome was predefined as PTB at <37 weeks of gestation. The pooled results were reported as relative risk (RR) with 95% confidence interval (95% CI). The protocol of this review was registered with PROSPERO (registration number: CRD42015016371). Two randomized controlled trials that included 1080 women were analyzed. The mean gestational age at randomization was approximately 134 days in both groups (mean difference, 0.01 days; 95% CI, -0.13 to 0.14). Women who received omega-3 had similar rates of PTB at <37 weeks of gestation (34.5% vs 39.8%; RR, 0.81; 95% CI, 0.59-1.12) and PTB at <34 weeks of gestation (12.0% vs 15.4%; RR, 0.62; 95% CI, 0.26-1.46) compared with control subjects. The omega-3 groups had a statistically significantly longer latency (mean difference, 2.10 days; 95% CI, 1.98-2.22) and higher birthweight (mean difference, 102.52 g; 95% CI, 20.09-184.95) compared with control subjects; the other secondary outcomes (which included gestational age at delivery, spontaneous PTB at <37 and 34 weeks of gestation, admission to the intensive care unit

  16. Preventing stroke: a narrative review of community interventions for improving hypertension control in black adults.

    PubMed

    Connell, Patricia; Wolfe, Charles; McKevitt, Christopher

    2008-03-01

    Incidence rates for stroke and hypertension are higher in black ethnic groups of African descent in the USA and UK than in white groups, suggesting a need for targeted intervention. We conduct a narrative review of published research evidence on community interventions to manage hypertension among black ethnic groups, and explore the concept of cultural sensitivity in these interventions. Data sources comprised computer-aided searches of published studies over the years 1981 to March 2006, on community strategies for improving hypertension control targeting black groups, and further references from these articles. Twenty-seven relevant studies were identified. Health education was associated with improvements in knowledge about hypertension, while education combined with individualised support for patients to self-manage hypertension, including goal setting and monitoring to enhance patient self-management of hypertension, and family support in managing hypertension were associated with reductions in blood pressure levels and improvements in blood pressure control. Collaboration with black communities, using local or minority ethnic staff, conducting preliminary research with target groups to investigate perceptions and canvass ideas for the intervention design were common methods assumed to achieve cultural sensitivity. Studies, however, provided insufficient robust evidence of the effectiveness of these strategies in terms of quantifiable outcomes, although this criterion is contested, with social justice arguments being offered instead. Implicit assumptions about homogeneity and shared interests within the 'community', and representation of 'community' views have implications for the effectiveness of interventions. These findings highlight areas for the future development of interventions to reduce hypertension rates in black groups, and factors that need to be robustly investigated and explicitly addressed in intervention design.

  17. National collegiate athletic association strength and conditioning coaches' knowledge and practices regarding prevention and recognition of exertional heat stroke.

    PubMed

    Valdes, Anna S; Hoffman, Jay R; Clark, Margaret H; Stout, Jeffrey R

    2014-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess and determine content knowledge of National Collegiate Athletic Association Strength and Conditioning Coaches (SCCs) regarding prevention and recognition of exertional heat stroke (EHS) and to determine whether the type of professional certification is an indicator of enhanced content knowledge. A questionnaire was e-mailed to 1305 SCCs and was used to assess SCC's EHS knowledge in the areas of extrinsic risk factors (ERF), intrinsic risk factors (IRF), recognition of EHS (R), and general training safety knowledge (TSK). The 319 SCC participants who responded were separated into 4 groups based on certification: Certified Strength and Conditioning Specialists (CSCS) (116), Strength and Conditioning Coach Certification (SCCC) (46), combined CSCS/SCCC (62), or no certification (NC) (95). Only 2.2% of the total coaches surveyed scored ≥90% on the total score, whereas 47% earned a score ≤59%. When comparing across certifications, NC scored significantly lower (p ≤ 0.05) on total score, and the IRF and TSK constructs than CSCS, SCCC, and CSCS/SCCC. CSCS/SCCC coaches performed significantly better on the total score than SCCC (p = 0.047), whereas a trend toward a higher score (p = 0.085) was seen in CSCS compared with SCCC. CSCS coaches and the combined CSCS/SCCC certifications scored significantly higher (p < 0.000) than NC in the ERF and R constructs. In conclusion, SCCs seemed to lack essential knowledge to prevent or recognize EHS in each of the factors assessed. It is recommended that consideration be given to include EHS prevention and recognition competencies as part of the professional preparation and certification requirements for SCCs. PMID:24402452

  18. Radiation therapy for favorable histology Wilms tumor: Prevention of flank recurrence did not improve survival on National Wilms Tumor Studies 3 and 4

    SciTech Connect

    Breslow, Norman E. . E-mail: norm@u.washington.edu; Beckwith, J. Bruce; Haase, Gerald M.; Kalapurakal, John A.; Ritchey, Michael L.; Shamberger, Robert C.; Thomas, Patrick; D'Angio, Giulio J.; Green, Daniel M.

    2006-05-01

    Purpose: To determine whether radiation therapy (RT) of patients with Wilms tumor of favorable histology prevented flank recurrence and thereby improved the survival outcomes. Methods and Materials: Recurrence and mortality risks were compared among groups of patients with Stage I-IV/favorable histology Wilms tumor enrolled in the third (n = 1,640) and fourth (n = 2,066) National Wilms Tumor Study Group studies. Results: Proportions of patients with flank recurrence were 0 of 513 = 0.0% for 20 Gy, 12 of 805 = 1.5% for 10 Gy, and 44 of 2,388 = 1.8% for no flank RT (p trend 0.001 adjusted for stage and doxorubicin); for intra-abdominal (including flank) recurrence they were 5 of 513 = 1.0%, 30 of 805 = 3.7%, and 58 of 2,388 = 2.4%, respectively (p trend = 0.02 adjusted). Survival percentages at 8 years after intra-abdominal recurrence were 0 of 5 = 0% for 20 Gy, 10 of 30 = 33% for 10 Gy, and 34 of 58 = 56% for no RT (p trend = 0.0001). NWTS-4 discontinued use of 20 Gy RT, and the 8-year flank recurrence risk increased to 2.1% from 1.0% on NWTS-3 (p = 0.013). However, event-free survival was unaltered (88% vs. 86%, p = 0.39), and overall survival was better (93.8% vs. 90.8%, p = 0.036) on NWTS-4. Conclusions: Partly because of lower postrecurrence mortality among nonirradiated patients, prevention of flank recurrence by RT did not improve survival. It is important to evaluate entire treatment policies with regard to long-term outcomes.

  19. Expression of androgen receptor in non-muscle-invasive bladder cancer predicts the preventive effect of androgen deprivation therapy on tumor recurrence

    PubMed Central

    Miyamoto, Hiroshi; Miyoshi, Yasuhide; Ota, Junichi; Moriyama, Masatoshi; Murai, Tetsuo; Hayashi, Hiroyuki; Inayama, Yoshiaki; Ohashi, Kenichi; Yao, Masahiro; Uemura, Hiroji

    2016-01-01

    Our recent retrospective study revealed a significantly reduced risk of bladder cancer (BC) recurrence in men who received androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) for their prostate cancer. However, whether androgen receptor (AR) signals contributed to the preventive effect of ADT remained unclear because ADT could reduce serum estrogens as well. The purpose of this study is to investigate the associations between the expression of AR/estrogen receptors (ERs) and BC recurrence in patients treated with ADT. We immunohistochemically stained 72 BCs and 42 corresponding normal urothelial tissues. AR/ERα/ERβ were positive in 44(61%)/22(31%)/39(54%) tumors and 35(83%)/24(57%)/34(81%) corresponding normal urothelial tissues, respectively. There were no statistically significant correlations between AR/ERα/ERβ expression and clinicopathological features of BC. With a median follow-up of 31.3 months, 12 (43%) of 28 patients with AR-negative tumor versus 11 (23%) of 44 patients with AR-positive tumor experienced BC recurrence. Thus, patients with AR-positive tumor had a significantly lower risk of BC recurrence (P=0.031), compared with those with AR-negative tumor. Meanwhile, the expression of ERα/ERβ in tumors and that of AR/ERα/ERβ in normal urothelial tissues were not significantly correlated with BC recurrence. A multivariate analysis revealed AR positivity in tumors as an independent prognosticator (hazard ratio: 0.27; 95% confidence interval: 0.11-0.67) for BC recurrence. These results indicate that ADT prevents BC recurrence via the AR pathway, but not via the ERα/ERβ pathways. PMID:26885620

  20. Cardioembolic Stroke and Postmyocardial Infarction Stroke.

    PubMed

    Hornung, Marius; Franke, Jennifer; Gafoor, Sameer; Sievert, Horst

    2016-05-01

    Ischemic stroke following acute myocardial infarction (AMI) is a rare but serious complication due to left ventricular thrombus formation and atrial fibrillation. Early revascularization of the culprit coronary lesion is essential. Treatment trends may affect the risk. Conversely, the greater use of antiplatelet agents to reduce the risk of ischemic stroke could increase the risk of hemorrhagic stroke. The risk of stroke after AMI has decreased significantly with more use of percutaneous coronary intervention and antithrombotic therapies in the acute setting, and statins, antihypertensive medications, and dual antiplatelet therapy as secondary prevention strategies. PMID:27150168

  1. Effects of Blood Pressure Targets in Patients with Recent Lacunar Stroke

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND Lowering blood pressure (BP) prevents stroke, however optimal target levels of blood reduction to prevent stroke recurrence are lacking. We hypothesized that targeting systolic BP of <130 mmHg would reduce stroke recurrence in patients with recent lacunar stroke. METHODS The Secondary Prevention of Small Subcortical Strokes (SPS3) was a multi-center international trial, involving 3020 patients with recent symptomatic MRI-defined lacunar infarcts randomized to two target levels of systolic BP: a) higher group 130–149 mm Hg vs. b) lower group <130 mm Hg, and followed for a mean of 3.7 years. The primary outcome was all recurrent stroke (including ischemic strokes and intracranial hemorrhages). The study is registered, NCT 00059306. FINDINGS Mean participant age was 63 years; after 1 year mean systolic BP was 138 mm Hg (95% CI 137 to 139) in the higher group and 127 mm Hg (95% CI, 126 to 128) in the lower group. At last study visit, the difference in systolic BP between groups averaged 11 mm Hg (±SD 16). The annualized rate of recurrent stroke in the higher target group was 2.77% (n=152) compared with 2.25% (n=125) in the lower target group (HR 0.81, 95% CI 0.64, 1.03, p-value 0.08). Similar trends were observed for reductions in disabling/fatal stroke (HR 0.81, 95%CI 0.53, 1.23, p-value 0.32) and in the composite outcome of stroke, myocardial infarct or vascular death (HR 0.84, 95%CI 0.68,1.01, p-value 0.10). Intracerebral hemorrhage was reduced by 63% in those assigned to the lower target group (HR 0.37 95% CI, 0.14, 0.89, p-value 0.03). Serious complications of BP lowering were in frequent, and not significantly different in frequency between groups. INTERPRETATION In patients with recent lacunar stroke, targeting asystolic BP of< 130 mm Hg did not significantly reduce all stroke, but markedly reduced intracerebral hemorrhage. The lower target was safe and well tolerated. PMID:23726159

  2. Rivaroxaban in the Prevention of Stroke and Systemic Embolism in Patients with Non-Valvular Atrial Fibrillation: Clinical Implications of the ROCKET AF Trial and Its Subanalyses.

    PubMed

    Spencer, Ryan J; Amerena, John V

    2015-12-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is an increasingly common cause of stroke and systemic embolism. While warfarin has been the mainstay of stroke prevention in patients with AF, newer novel oral anticoagulant medications are now available. Rivaroxaban, a direct factor Xa inhibitor with a rapid onset and offset after oral administration, offers potential advantages over warfarin, predominantly due to its predictable pharmacokinetics across wide patient populations. It requires no coagulation monitoring, and only two different doses are needed (20 mg daily for patients with normal renal function and 15 mg daily in those with reduced renal function). A large randomized trial (ROCKET AF) has shown non-inferiority to warfarin for preventing stroke or systemic embolism in the per-protocol population and superiority to warfarin in the on-treatment safety population. Several subanalyses confirm that the treatment effect of rivaroxaban is consistent across different patient subgroups, including those with reduced renal function. The tolerability of rivaroxaban appears similar to that of warfarin, with comparable overall bleeding rates in clinical trials. In ROCKET AF, significantly lower rates of fatal and intracranial bleeding were seen with rivaroxaban, while lower rates of gastrointestinal bleeding were seen with warfarin. Important contraindications to rivaroxaban include valvular AF, the presence of a prosthetic valve (mechanical or bioprosthetic) or valve repair, the need for concurrent dual antiplatelet therapy, and creatinine clearance <30 ml/min. Once-daily dosing and the lack of coagulation monitoring may increase utilization and adherence compared with warfarin, potentially decreasing the large burden of care associated with stroke secondary to AF. Overall, rivaroxaban offers a useful alternative to warfarin for stroke prevention in patients with AF.

  3. The Migraine–Stroke Connection

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Mi Ji; Lee, Chungbin; Chung, Chin-Sang

    2016-01-01

    Migraine and stroke are common neurovascular disorders which share underlying physiological processes. Increased risks of ischemic stroke, hemorrhagic stroke, and subclinical ischemic lesions have been consistently found in migraineurs. Three possible associations are suggested. One is that underlying pathophysiology of migraine can lead to ischemic stroke. Second, common comorbidities between migraine and stroke can be present. Lastly, some syndromes can manifest with both migraine-like headache and cerebrovascular disease. Future studies should be targeted on bidirectional influence of migraine on different stroke mechanisms and optimal prevention of stroke in migraine patients. PMID:27283278

  4. Sex differences in stroke.

    PubMed

    Haast, Roy A M; Gustafson, Deborah R; Kiliaan, Amanda J

    2012-12-01

    Sex differences in stroke are observed across epidemiologic studies, pathophysiology, treatments, and outcomes. These sex differences have profound implications for effective prevention and treatment and are the focus of this review. Epidemiologic studies reveal a clear age-by-sex interaction in stroke prevalence, incidence, and mortality. While premenopausal women experience fewer strokes than men of comparable age, stroke rates increase among postmenopausal women compared with age-matched men. This postmenopausal phenomenon, in combination with living longer, are reasons for women being older at stroke onset and suffering more severe strokes. Thus, a primary focus of stroke prevention has been based on sex steroid hormone-dependent mechanisms. Sex hormones affect different (patho)physiologic functions of the cerebral circulation. Clarifying the impact of sex hormones on cerebral vasculature using suitable animal models is essential to elucidate male-female differences in stroke pathophysiology and development of sex-specific treatments. Much remains to be learned about sex differences in stroke as anatomic and genetic factors may also contribute, revealing its multifactorial nature. In addition, the aftermath of stroke appears to be more adverse in women than in men, again based on older age at stroke onset, longer prehospital delays, and potentially, differences in treatment.

  5. Prevention of recurrence of atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome post renal transplant with the use of higher-dose eculizumab
.

    PubMed

    Riddell, Amy; Goodship, Tim; Bingham, Coralie

    2016-10-01

    Eculizumab, a terminal complement inhibitor, has recently been used successfully to both prevent and treat the recurrence of atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome (aHUS) post renal transplantation. We describe a case that highlights the need to monitor the effects of eculizumab on the complement system and in this case alter the dosage. Despite taking the standard recommended dose of eculizumab for an adult, this aHUS patient developed a low-grade thrombotic microangiopathy on biopsy within months of renal transplantation. Complement assays (trough CH50) showed small amounts of residual terminal pathway activity suggesting inadequate complement blockade on 1,200 mg eculizumab every 2 weeks. Following an increase in the dose of eculizumab to 1,500 mg every 2 weeks, lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), proteinuria, and creatinine decreased, and CH50 assay showed 0%. This case emphasizes the need to monitor clinical parameters and complement activity to ensure that adequate therapeutic blockade is achieved.
.

  6. Efficacy of Bacillus clausii spores in the prevention of recurrent respiratory infections in children: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Marseglia, Gian Luigi; Tosca, Mariangela; Cirillo, Ignazio; Licari, Amelia; Leone, Maddalena; Marseglia, Alessia; Castellazzi, Anna Maria; Ciprandi, Giorgio

    2007-03-01

    Probiotic milk has been previously demonstrated to reduce the number of respiratory infections (RI) among children attending day care centres. Thus, this pilot study was aimed to assess the efficacy and the safety of 3 month treatment with Bacillus clausii in the prevention of recurrent respiratory infections (RRI) in children. Eighty children with RRI were studied: 40 of them were randomly treated with B. clausii for 3 months, and followed up for further 3 months; 40 were included in the control group during the same period. Children treated with B. clausii had shorter duration of RI in comparison with the control group both during the treatment phase (mean 11.7 days vs 14.37; p=0.037) and the follow-up period (mean 6.6 days vs 10.92; p=0.049). This effect was evident also in allergic children during the follow-up. In conclusion, this pilot study provides the first preliminary evidence that B. clausii may exert a significant and persistent impact on RI in children and is safe and well tolerated. PMID:18360611

  7. A Study on the Occurrence and Prevention of Perioperative Stroke after Coronary Artery Bypass Grafting

    PubMed Central

    Nakata, Kin-Ichi; Iida, Mitsuru; Yoshitake, Isamu; Wakui, Shinji; Osaka, Shunji; Kimura, Haruka; Takahashi, Kana; Ishi, Yusuke; Yaoita, Hiroko; Arimoto, Munehito; Hata, Hiroaki; Shiono, Motomi; Takayama, Tadateru; Hirayama, Atsushi

    2015-01-01

    Cerebral infarction after coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) is a serious complication and a problem that remains unsolved. We will report the onset of cerebral infarction in CABG patients in our institution, and its cause, preventive method. The subjects of this research were 761 patients who underwent on-pump isolated CABG. Preoperative, intraoperative and postoperative factors, onset of cerebral infarction and atrial fibrillation were investigated. Postoperative cerebral infarction and postoperative atrial fibrillation were recognized in 1.4% and 24% of the patients, respectively. The risk factors for cerebral infarction were carotid artery stenosis, cardiopulmonary bypass time >180 min, postoperative atrial fibrillation, and β-blocker non-use. The risk factors for postoperative atrial fibrillation were 75 or higher years of age, chronic kidney diseases, emergency surgery, cardiopulmonary bypass time >180 min, intraoperative carperitide non-use, intraoperative landiolol hydrochloride non-use, preoperative angiotensin II receptor blockers (ARB) non-use, preoperative calcium antagonist use, preoperative statin use, postoperative β-blocker non-use, and postoperative aldosterone blocker non-use. The results of this study showed that cerebral infarction occurs frequently in patients who have developed atrial fibrillation, and it was considered that perioperative cerebral infarction can be prevented by perioperative β-blocker, carperitide, anticoagulation therapy and adequate extracorporeal circulation. Since preoperative, intraoperative and postoperative drug use is closely involved in the risk factor for postoperative atrial fibrillation, it was considered possible that adequate perioperative drug therapy can prevent atrial fibrillation and onset of cerebral infarction. (This article is a secondary publication of J Jpn Coron Assoc 2014; 20: 91–7.)

  8. [Pharmacological primary prevention of myocardial infarction, stroke and death: A possible task?].

    PubMed

    Keller, Christian; Müller-Ehmsen, Jochen

    2016-09-01

    The HOPE-3-Trial investigated the effect of primary prevention on cardio- and neurovascular events in patients without known atherosclerotic disease, but with intermediate risk. In a factorial design Rosuvastatin 10 mg, Candesartan 16 mg/HCT 12.5 mg or both were compared with placebo. Rosuvastatin effectively lowered LDL-cholesterol and the rate of cardio- and neurovascular complications with a NNT of approximately 500/year without detectable effect on mortalitiy. Candesartan 16 mg/HCT 12.5 mg did not influence any endpoint, however, the predefined subgroup of patients with hypertension level I had a benefit. Patients with systolic pressure <131 mmHg even trended towards a higher risk if treated. The combination of statin and blood pressure-lowering agents showed no additive effects. The benefit was solely the result of statin therapy alone. Primary prevention with Rosuvastatin can be recommended if the cardio- and neurovascular risk is 1-2%/year, independent of the initial LDL, although the NNT of 500-1400/year is high and mortalitiy is not decreased. Possibly there will be future studies with longer term follow up to verify a reduction in mortality. Therapy with Candesartan 16 mg/HCT 12,5 mg has a beneficial effect only in patients with hypertension. Further studies with different antihypertensives and more intensive blood pressure lowering are desirable. The approach of combining all three drugs within a poly-pill for primary prevention in an intermediate risk population without elevated blood pressure is not recommended. PMID:27598921

  9. Stroke recovery and prevention barriers among young African-American men: Potential avenues to reduce health disparities

    PubMed Central

    Blixen, Carol; Perzynski, Adam; Cage, Jamie; Smyth, Kathleen; Moore, Shirley; Sila, Cathy; Pundik, Svetlana; Sajatovic, Martha

    2016-01-01

    Background African-Americans (AA) who experience a first time stroke are younger, and have double the stroke rate and more post-stroke complications than other Americans. Objective To assess perceived post-stroke care barriers among younger AA men and their care partners (CPs) in order to inform development of acceptable and effective improvements in post-stroke care for this high-risk group. Methods Ten community-dwelling AA stroke survivors and 7 of their care partners (CPs) participated in focus groups and advisory board meetings. Survivors had stroke or transient ischemic attack within one year and a Barthel ADL Index >60. In focus groups, using a semi-structured interview guide, survivors and CPs identified self-perceived barriers and facilitators to post-stroke care. Thematic analysis of session transcripts and the constant comparative method were used to generate themes. Results Survivor age ranged from 34 to 64. Mean Barthel was 95.5. CPs, all AA women, ranged in age from 49–61. CPs were 5 wives, a fianceé and a niece. Participants cited multiple personal, social, and societal stroke recovery challenges. While hypertension and smoking risks were acknowledged, stress, depression, PTSD, anger/frustration, personal identity change, and difficulty communicating unique needs as AA men were much more frequently noted. Facilitators included family support, stress reduction and dietary changes. Conclusions Younger AA men and their CPs perceive multiple post-stroke care barriers. Biological risk reduction education may not capture all salient aspects of health management for AA stroke survivors. Leveraging family and community strengths, addressing psychological health, and directly engaging patients with healthcare teams may improve care management. PMID:25341388

  10. Pre-stroke living situation and depression contribute to initial stroke severity and stroke recovery

    PubMed Central

    Aron, Abraham W.; Staff, Ilene; Fortunato, Gilbert; McCullough, Louise D.

    2014-01-01

    Substantial evidence from both experimental and clinical studies has demonstrated that social isolation can increase stroke incidence and impair recovery. Social isolation leads to higher rates of recurrent stroke but is often not reported as a risk factor. We examined prospectively collected stroke center database variables, which included pre-stroke living situation, to determine if social isolation could be determined from existing data using living arrangement as a proxy. Patients were categorized into 4 groups hypothesized to represent increasing levels of social isolation: Living with Spouse, Living with Family, Living alone with visiting services and Living Alone. Initial stroke severity and recovery were measured using the National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale and Barthel Index, respectively. A multivariate model was used to determine the relationship between pre-stroke living situation, stroke severity and functional outcome. Patients living alone had less severe strokes on admission and better recovery at 3 months compared to the other cohorts. Patients living alone or those that lived with a spouse had less severe strokes on presentation and better recovery at both 3 and 12 months after stroke compared to the other cohorts. However, upon detailed examination, it was found that these patients also had significantly higher pre-stroke function. Pre-existing depression was significantly higher in women and depressed patients had poorer outcomes 3 months after stroke. Information regarding isolation is notably absent from most large stroke databases. A more comprehensive evaluation of social interaction should be obtained to more accurately measure social isolation. PMID:25524014

  11. Stroke: New Developments and Their Application in Clinical Practice.

    PubMed

    Kelly, Peter J; Kavanagh, Eoin; Murphy, Sean

    2016-08-01

    Significant advances have been made in recent years in primary stroke prevention, improved stroke outcomes in high-income populations, emergency stroke therapy, and stroke prevention. In this article, we review recent trends in stroke epidemiology, improvements in delivery of intravenous thrombolysis (via stroke system-wide approaches, application of 'Lean Principles' to improve workflow processes, and re-evaluation of exclusion criteria), recent stroke thrombectomy trials, and new developments in stroke prevention, with emphasis on risk prediction in transient ischemic attack, choice and timing of anticoagulation therapy for secondary stroke prevention, and emerging concepts in risk stratification for management of symptomatic carotid stenosis. PMID:27643898

  12. Pediatric Stroke

    MedlinePlus

    ... Trials News About Neurology Image Library Search The Internet Stroke Center Patients & Families About Stroke Stroke Diagnosis ... UT Southwestern Medical Center. Copyright © 1997-2016 - The Internet Stroke Center. All rights reserved. The information contained ...

  13. Ischemic Stroke

    MedlinePlus

    A stroke is a medical emergency. There are two types - ischemic and hemorrhagic. Ischemic stroke is the most common type. It is usually ... are at risk for having a more serious stroke. Symptoms of stroke are Sudden numbness or weakness ...

  14. Two doses of rivaroxaban versus aspirin for prevention of recurrent venous thromboembolism. Rationale for and design of the EINSTEIN CHOICE study.

    PubMed

    Weitz, Jeffrey I; Bauersachs, Rupert; Beyer-Westendorf, Jan; Bounameaux, Henri; Brighton, Timothy A; Cohen, Alexander T; Davidson, Bruce L; Holberg, Gerlind; Kakkar, Ajay; Lensing, Anthonie W A; Prins, Martin; Haskell, Lloyd; van Bellen, Bonno; Verhamme, Peter; Wells, Philip S; Prandoni, Paolo

    2015-08-31

    Patients with unprovoked venous thromboembolism (VTE) are at high risk for recurrence. Although rivaroxaban is effective for extended VTE treatment at a dose of 20 mg once daily, use of the 10 mg dose may further improve its benefit-to-risk ratio. Low-dose aspirin also reduces rates of recurrent VTE, but has not been compared with anticoagulant therapy. The EINSTEIN CHOICE study is a multicentre, randomised, double-blind, active-controlled, event-driven study comparing the efficacy and safety of two once daily doses of rivaroxaban (20 and 10 mg) with aspirin (100 mg daily) for the prevention of recurrent VTE in patients who completed 6-12 months of anticoagulant therapy for their index acute VTE event. All treatments will be given for 12 months. The primary efficacy objective is to determine whether both doses of rivaroxaban are superior to aspirin for the prevention of symptomatic recurrent VTE, while the principal safety outcome is the incidence of major bleeding. The trial is anticipated to enrol 2,850 patients from 230 sites in 31 countries over a period of 27 months. In conclusion, the EINSTEIN CHOICE study will provide new insights into the optimal antithrombotic strategy for extended VTE treatment by comparing two doses of rivaroxaban with aspirin (clinicaltrials.gov NCT02064439).

  15. Fungus Infections: Preventing Recurrence

    MedlinePlus

    ... Sections of the JAOCD JAOCD Archive Published Members Online Dermatology Journals Edit This Favorite Name: Category: Share: Yes ... 2/2017 2017 AOCD Spring Current Concepts in Dermatology Meeting more Latest News ... Surveys About AOCD The AOCD was recognized in ...

  16. Different time course for prevention of coronary and stroke events by atorvastatin in the Anglo-Scandinavian Cardiac Outcomes Trial-Lipid-Lowering Arm (ASCOT-LLA).

    PubMed

    Sever, Peter S; Poulter, Neil R; Dahlöf, Björn; Wedel, Hans

    2005-09-01

    The lipid-lowering properties of statins reduce rates of coronary artery disease (CAD) events and strokes. Findings of recently conducted, longitudinal intervention studies suggest that these benefits occur early and may be, in part, independent of the lipid-lowering properties of statin therapy. We analyzed data from the Anglo-Scandinavian Cardiac Outcomes Trial-Lipid-Lowering Arm (ASCOT-LLA) to determine the timing of cardiovascular risk reduction. Relative risk reductions in CAD events were large compared with placebo, becoming apparent at 30 days and significant within 3 months, but they tended to decrease with time. Risk reductions in stroke were also apparent at 30 days but remained constant throughout the trial. Significant differences in hazard ratio between atorvastatin and placebo occurred at 2-year follow-up. Such apparently differential effects on CAD and stroke events suggest that mechanisms of action for CAD and stroke prevention may be different. These observations support the hypothesis that non-lipid-lowering actions of atorvastatin may have contributed to early protection against CAD in ASCOT-LLA.

  17. Cost-Effectiveness of New Direct-Acting Antivirals to Prevent Post-Liver Transplant Recurrent Hepatitis.

    PubMed

    Cortesi, P A; Mantovani, L G; Ciaccio, A; Rota, M; Mazzarelli, C; Cesana, G; Strazzabosco, M; Belli, L S

    2015-07-01

    Preliminary studies on HCV-cirrhotics listed for transplant suggest that sofosbuvir in combination with ribavirin is very effective in promoting viral clearance and preventing disease recurrence. Unfortunately, the high cost of such treatment (€46 500 per 12 weeks of treatment) makes its cost-effectiveness questionable. A semi-Markov model was developed to assess the cost-effectiveness of sofosbuvir/ribavirin treatment in cirrhotic patients without HCC (HCV-CIRRH) and with HCC (HCV-HCC) listed for transplant. In the base-case analysis, the incremental cost-effectiveness ratio for 24 weeks of sofosbuvir/ribavirin was €44 875 per quality-adjusted life-year gained in HCV-CIRRH and €60 380 in HCV-HCC patients. Both results were above the willingness to pay threshold of €37 000 per quality-adjusted life-year. Our data also show that in order to remain cost-effective (with a 24-week treatment), any novel interferon-free treatment endowed with ideal efficacy should cost less than €67 224 or €95 712 in HCV-cirrhotics with and without HCC, respectively. The results shows that sofosbuvir/ribavirin therapy, given to patients listed for transplant, is not cost-effective at current prices despite being very effective, and new, more effective treatments will have little economic margins to remain cost-effective. New interferon-free combinations have the potential to revolutionize the treatment and prognosis of HCV-positive patients listed for transplant; however, without sustainable prices, this revolution is unlikely to happen. PMID:26086300

  18. Prevention of Recurrent Foot Ulcers With Plantar Pressure–Based In-Shoe Orthoses: The CareFUL Prevention Multicenter Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Ulbrecht, Jan S.; Hurley, Timothy; Mauger, David T.

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To assess the efficacy of in-shoe orthoses that were designed based on shape and barefoot plantar pressure in reducing the incidence of submetatarsal head plantar ulcers in people with diabetes, peripheral neuropathy, and a history of similar prior ulceration. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Single-blinded multicenter randomized controlled trial with subjects randomized to wear shape- and pressure-based orthoses (experimental, n = 66) or standard-of-care A5513 orthoses (control, n = 64). Patients were followed for 15 months, until a study end point (forefoot plantar ulcer or nonulcerative plantar forefoot lesion) or to study termination. Proportional hazards regression was used for analysis. RESULTS There was a trend in the composite primary end point (both ulcers and nonulcerative lesions) across the full follow-up period (P = 0.13) in favor of the experimental orthoses. This trend was due to a marked difference in ulcer occurrence (P = 0.007) but no difference in the rate of nonulcerative lesions (P = 0.76). At 180 days, the ulcer prevention effect of the experimental orthoses was already significant (P = 0.003) when compared with control, and the benefit of the experimental orthoses with respect to the composite end point was also significant (P = 0.042). The hazard ratio was 3.4 (95% CI 1.3–8.7) for the occurrence of a submetatarsal head plantar ulcer in the control compared with experimental arm over the duration of the study. CONCLUSIONS We conclude that shape- and barefoot plantar pressure–based orthoses were more effective in reducing submetatarsal head plantar ulcer recurrence than current standard-of-care orthoses, but they did not significantly reduce nonulcerative lesions. PMID:24760263

  19. Optical probes for molecular-guided surgery: Using photomedicine to prevent recurrence in the surgical bed (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spring, Bryan Q.; Sears, R. Bryan; Zheng, Lei Z.; Mai, Zhiming; Watanabe, Reika; Villa, Elizabeth; Hasan, Tayyaba

    2016-03-01

    Residual tumor deposits missed by conventional treatments frequently seed local and distal recurrence utilizing a network of molecular signaling mechanisms. Beyond providing contrast for molecular-guided surgery, this talk will highlight new concepts in phototherapy to address residual cancer cells in danger zones of recurrence, including selective treatment of microscopic disease using molecular-targeted, activatable immunoconjugates, and photo-initiated release of multikinase inhibitors that suppress multiple modes of tumor escape using optically active nanoparticles. These new approaches support an expanded role for the use of light in fluorescence-guided surgery—for phototherapy and for focused drug release to maximize tumor debulking with suppression of disease recurrence.

  20. Edoxaban versus warfarin for stroke prevention in non-valvular atrial fibrillation: a cost-effectiveness analysis.

    PubMed

    Rognoni, Carla; Marchetti, Monia; Quaglini, Silvana; Liberato, Nicola Lucio

    2015-02-01

    Edoxaban, an oral direct factor Xa inhibitor, has been found non-inferior to warfarin for preventing stroke and systemic embolism in patients with non-valvular atrial fibrillation (NVAF), with a lower rate of intracranial bleeding. The aim of our investigation was to assess the cost-effectiveness of edoxaban versus warfarin from the perspective of the Italian health-care system. A Markov decision model was used to evaluate lifetime cost and quality-adjusted life expectancy of NVAF patients treated with warfarin or edoxaban. Transition probabilities were obtained from the ENGAGE AF-TIMI 48 trial, cost estimates were based on Italian prices and tariffs, utilities were obtained from the literature. One-way and second-order sensitivity analyses were performed. In the base case, lifetime costs were €18,658 for edoxaban and €14,060 for warfarin. Discounted quality-adjusted survival was 9.022 years for edoxaban and 8.425 years for warfarin, leading to an incremental cost-utility ratio of €7,713 per quality-adjusted life year (QALY) gained. Results were sensitive to time horizon, time in therapeutic range of warfarin and to the relative impact of warfarin versus edoxaban therapy onto quality of life. Probabilistic sensitivity analysis showed edoxaban to be cost-effective versus warfarin in 92.3 % of the simulations at a willingness-to-pay threshold of €25,000 per QALY. In conclusion, edoxaban proved to be a cost-effective alternative to warfarin in patients with moderate-to-high-risk NVAF.

  1. Prevention of poststroke depression with milnacipran in patients with acute ischemic stroke: a double-blind randomized placebo-controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Ching-Shu; Wu, Chen-Long; Chou, Shih-Yong; Tsang, Hin-Yeung; Hung, Tai-Hsin; Su, Jian-An

    2011-09-01

    Poststroke depression (PSD) is one of the most frequent neuropsychiatric consequences of stroke. It has been shown to be associated with both impaired recovery and increased mortality. The purpose of this study is to investigate the prophylactic effect of milnacipran in PSD. Ninety-two patients were enrolled in the 12 months of this double-blind randomized placebo-controlled trial. The assessment was performed at baseline, and at the first, third, sixth, ninth and 12th month after enrollment. The definition of PSD was in accordance with the diagnostic criteria of major depressive episode based on the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual, fourth edition. Forty-six patients were randomized to the treatment group with milnacipran and another 46 patients to the placebo group. No significant differences were found between the two groups in terms of sex (P=0.83), age (P=0.08), marital status (P=0.66), occupation (P=0.22), educational level (P=0.29), and drug side-effects (P=0.73). The incidence of depression in the two groups was 2.22% and 15.22%, respectively. Milnacipran was proved to have a statistically significant advantage in preventing PSD (P<0.05). In conclusion, milnacipran could prevent the development of depression in the first year following a stroke and is safe to use without significant adverse effects in stroke patients. PMID:21811172

  2. Booster Vaccination in Preventing Disease Recurrence in Previously Vaccinated Patients With Melanoma That Has Been Removed By Surgery

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-01-23

    Recurrent Melanoma; Stage IA Skin Melanoma; Stage IB Skin Melanoma; Stage IIA Skin Melanoma; Stage IIB Skin Melanoma; Stage IIC Skin Melanoma; Stage IIIA Skin Melanoma; Stage IIIB Skin Melanoma; Stage IIIC Skin Melanoma; Stage IV Skin Melanoma

  3. Efficacy and safety of apixaban compared with warfarin according to age for stroke prevention in atrial fibrillation: observations from the ARISTOTLE trial

    PubMed Central

    Halvorsen, Sigrun; Atar, Dan; Yang, Hongqiu; De Caterina, Raffaele; Erol, Cetin; Garcia, David; Granger, Christopher B.; Hanna, Michael; Held, Claes; Husted, Steen; Hylek, Elaine M.; Jansky, Petr; Lopes, Renato D.; Ruzyllo, Witold; Thomas, Laine; Wallentin, Lars

    2014-01-01

    Aims The risk of stroke in patients with atrial fibrillation (AF) increases with age. In the ARISTOTLE trial, apixaban when compared with warfarin reduced the rate of stroke, death, and bleeding. We evaluated these outcomes in relation to patient age. Methods and results A total of 18 201 patients with AF and a raised risk of stroke were randomized to warfarin or apixaban 5 mg b.d. with dose reduction to 2.5 mg b.d. or placebo in 831 patients with ≥2 of the following criteria: age ≥80 years, body weight ≤60 kg, or creatinine ≥133 μmol/L. We used Cox models to compare outcomes in relation to patient age during 1.8 years median follow-up. Of the trial population, 30% were <65 years, 39% were 65 to <75, and 31% were ≥75 years. The rates of stroke, all-cause death, and major bleeding were higher in the older age groups (P < 0.001 for all). Apixaban was more effective than warfarin in preventing stroke and reducing mortality across all age groups, and associated with less major bleeding, less total bleeding, and less intracranial haemorrhage regardless of age (P interaction >0.11 for all). Results were also consistent for the 13% of patients ≥80 years. No significant interaction with apixaban dose was found with respect to treatment effect on major outcomes. Conclusion The benefits of apixaban vs. warfarin were consistent in patients with AF regardless of age. Owing to the higher risk at older age, the absolute benefits of apixaban were greater in the elderly. PMID:24561548

  4. SOD1 overexpression prevents acute hyperglycemia-induced cerebral myogenic dysfunction: relevance to contralateral hemisphere and stroke outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Coucha, Maha; Li, Weiguo; Hafez, Sherif; Abdelsaid, Mohammed; Johnson, Maribeth H.; Fagan, Susan C.

    2014-01-01

    Admission hyperglycemia (HG) amplifies vascular injury and neurological deficits in acute ischemic stroke, but the mechanisms remain controversial. We recently reported that ischemia-reperfusion (I/R) injury impairs the myogenic response in both hemispheres via increased nitration. However, whether HG amplifies contralateral myogenic dysfunction and whether loss of tone in the contralateral hemisphere contributes to stroke outcomes remain to be determined. Our hypothesis was that contralateral myogenic dysfunction worsens stroke outcomes after acute hyperglycemic stroke in an oxidative stress-dependent manner. Male wild-type or SOD1 transgenic rats were injected with saline or 40% glucose solution 10 min before surgery and then subjected to 30 min of ischemia/45 min or 24 h of reperfusion. In another set of animals (n = 5), SOD1 was overexpressed only in the contralateral hemisphere by stereotaxic adenovirus injection 2–3 wk before I/R. Myogenic tone and neurovascular outcomes were determined. HG exacerbated myogenic dysfunction in contralateral side only, which was associated with infarct size expansion, increased edema, and more pronounced neurological deficit. Global and selective SOD1 overexpression restored myogenic reactivity in ipsilateral and contralateral sides, respectively, and enhanced neurovascular outcomes. In conclusion, our results show that SOD1 overexpression nullified the detrimental effects of HG on myogenic tone and stroke outcomes and that the contralateral hemisphere may be a novel target for the management of acute hyperglycemic stroke. PMID:25552308

  5. World Stroke Organization global stroke services guidelines and action plan.

    PubMed

    Lindsay, Patrice; Furie, Karen L; Davis, Stephen M; Donnan, Geoffrey A; Norrving, Bo

    2014-10-01

    Every two seconds, someone across the globe suffers a symptomatic stroke. 'Silent' cerebrovascular disease insidiously contributes to worldwide disability by causing cognitive impairment in the elderly. The risk of cerebrovascular disease is disproportionately higher in low to middle income countries where there may be barriers to stroke care. The last two decades have seen a major transformation in the stroke field with the emergence of evidence-based approaches to stroke prevention, acute stroke management, and stroke recovery. The current challenge lies in implementing these interventions, particularly in regions with high incidences of stroke and limited healthcare resources. The Global Stroke Services Action Plan was conceived as a tool to identifying key elements in stroke care across a continuum of health models. At the minimal level of resource availability, stroke care delivery is based at a local clinic staffed predominantly by non-physicians. In this environment, laboratory tests and diagnostic studies are scarce, and much of the emphasis is placed on bedside clinical skills, teaching, and prevention. The essential services level offers access to a CT scan, physicians, and the potential for acute thrombolytic therapy, however stroke expertise may still be difficult to access. At the advanced stroke services level, multidisciplinary stroke expertise, multimodal imaging, and comprehensive therapies are available. A national plan for stroke care should incorporate local and regional strengths and build upon them. This clinical practice guideline is a synopsis of the core recommendations and quality indicators adapted from ten high quality multinational stroke guidelines. It can be used to establish the current level of stroke services, target goals for expanding stroke resources, and ensuring that all stages of stroke care are being adequately addressed, even at the advanced stroke services level. This document is a start, but there is more to be done

  6. World Stroke Organization global stroke services guidelines and action plan.

    PubMed

    Lindsay, Patrice; Furie, Karen L; Davis, Stephen M; Donnan, Geoffrey A; Norrving, Bo

    2014-10-01

    Every two seconds, someone across the globe suffers a symptomatic stroke. 'Silent' cerebrovascular disease insidiously contributes to worldwide disability by causing cognitive impairment in the elderly. The risk of cerebrovascular disease is disproportionately higher in low to middle income countries where there may be barriers to stroke care. The last two decades have seen a major transformation in the stroke field with the emergence of evidence-based approaches to stroke prevention, acute stroke management, and stroke recovery. The current challenge lies in implementing these interventions, particularly in regions with high incidences of stroke and limited healthcare resources. The Global Stroke Services Action Plan was conceived as a tool to identifying key elements in stroke care across a continuum of health models. At the minimal level of resource availability, stroke care delivery is based at a local clinic staffed predominantly by non-physicians. In this environment, laboratory tests and diagnostic studies are scarce, and much of the emphasis is placed on bedside clinical skills, teaching, and prevention. The essential services level offers access to a CT scan, physicians, and the potential for acute thrombolytic therapy, however stroke expertise may still be difficult to access. At the advanced stroke services level, multidisciplinary stroke expertise, multimodal imaging, and comprehensive therapies are available. A national plan for stroke care should incorporate local and regional strengths and build upon them. This clinical practice guideline is a synopsis of the core recommendations and quality indicators adapted from ten high quality multinational stroke guidelines. It can be used to establish the current level of stroke services, target goals for expanding stroke resources, and ensuring that all stages of stroke care are being adequately addressed, even at the advanced stroke services level. This document is a start, but there is more to be done

  7. Edoxaban versus placebo, aspirin, or aspirin plus clopidogrel for stroke prevention in atrial fibrillation. An indirect comparison analysis.

    PubMed

    Blann, A D; Skjøth, F; Rasmussen, L H; Larsen, T B; Lip, G Y H

    2015-08-01

    As non-valvular atrial fibrillation (AF) brings a risk of stroke, oral anticoagulants (OAC) are recommended. In 'real world' clinical practice, many patients (who may be, or perceived to be, intolerant of OACs) are either untreated or are treated with anti-platelet agents. We hypothesised that edoxaban has a better net clinical benefit (NCB, balancing the reduction in stroke risk vs increased risk of haemorrhage) than no treatment or anti-platelet agents. We performed a network meta-analysis of published data from 24 studies of 203,394 AF patients to indirectly compare edoxaban with aspirin alone, aspirin plus clopidogrel, and placebo. Edoxaban 30 mg once daily significantly reduced the risk of all stroke, ischaemic stroke and mortality compared to placebo and aspirin. Compared to aspirin plus clopidogrel, there was a lower risk of intra-cranial haemorrhage (ICH). Edoxaban 60 mg once-daily had a reduced risk of any stroke and systemic embolism compared to placebo, aspirin, and aspirin plus clopidogrel. Mortality rates for both edoxaban doses were estimated to be lower compared to any anti-platelet, and significantly lower compared to placebo. With overall reduced risk of ischemic stroke and ICH, both edoxaban doses bring a NCB of mean (SD) 1.68 (0.15) saved events per 100 patients per year compared to anti-platelet drugs in a clinical trial population. The NCB was demonstrated to be lower, at 0.77 (0.12) events saved (p< 0.01) when modeled to data from a 'real world' cohort of AF patients. In conclusion, edoxaban is likely to provide even better protection from stroke and ICH than placebo, aspirin alone, or aspirin plus clopidogrel in both clinical trial populations and unselected community populations. Both edoxaban doses would also bring a positive NCB compared to anti-platelet drugs or placebo/non-treatment based on 'real world' data.

  8. Vertebrobasilar ectasia in patients with lacunar stroke: The SPS3 trial

    PubMed Central

    Nakajima, Makoto; Pearce, Lesly A.; Ohara, Nobuyuki; Field, Thalia S.; Bazan, Carlos; Anderson, David C.; Hart, Robert G.; Benavente, Oscar R.

    2015-01-01

    Objective The clinical implications of vertebrobasilar ectasia (VBE) in patients with cerebral small artery disease are not well defined. We investigated whether VBE is associated with recurrent stroke, major hemorrhage, and death in a large cohort of patients with recent lacunar stroke. Materials and methods Maximum diameters of the vertebral and basilar arteries were measured by magnetic resonance angiography and computed tomographic angiography in 2621 participants in the Secondary Prevention of Small Subcortical Strokes (SPS3) trial. VBE was defined a priori as basilar artery >4.5 mm and/or vertebral artery >4.0 mm. Patient characteristics and risks of stroke recurrence and mortality during follow-up (median 3.5 years) were compared between patients with and without VBE. Results VBE affecting ≥1 artery was present in 200 (7.6%) patients. Patient features independently associated with VBE were increasing age, male sex, white race-ethnicity, hypertension, and higher baseline diastolic blood pressure. Baseline systolic blood pressure was inversely associated with VBE. After adjustment for other risk factors, VBE was not predictive of recurrent stroke (HR 1.3, 95% CI 0.85-1.9) or major hemorrhage (HR 1.5, CI 0.94-2.6), but was of death (HR 1.7, CI 1.1-2.7). Conclusion In this large well-characterized cohort of patients with recent lacunar stroke, VBE was predictive of death, but not recurrent stroke or major hemorrhage. In these exploratory analyses, the frequency of VBE was directly related to diastolic blood pressure but inversely related to systolic blood pressure. PMID:25817614

  9. Brain Basics: Preventing Stroke

    MedlinePlus

    ... valve defects, irregular heart beat (atrial fibrillation), and enlargement of one of the heart's chambers can result ... of atrial fibrillation; LVH = diagnosis of left ventricular hypertrophy Points 0 +1 +2 +3 +4 +5 +6 + ...

  10. [The perioperative period in cancer surgery: a critical moment! Is there a role for regional anesthesia in preventing cancer recurrence?].

    PubMed

    Beloeil, H; Nouette-Gaulain, K

    2012-06-01

    Surgical treatment of cancer is usually necessary but it can paradoxically aggravate the patient outcome by increasing the risk of recurrence. Many perioperative factors have been shown to contribute to the dissemination of the tumor: surgery itself, stress, inflammation, pain, anaesthetic drugs, blood transfusion, etc. The type of anaesthesia chosen in the cancer patient could then be crucial and influence the evolution of the disease. Experimental, preclinical and retrospective studies have suggested that a regional anesthesia associated or not with a general anesthesia for carcinologic surgery might reduce the risk of cancer recurrence. This text reviews the factors promoting the recurrence of tumors after carcinologic surgery and the potential possibilities of protection associated with the type of anaesthesia chosen.

  11. Reduction of Long‐Term Care Dependence After an 8‐Year Primary Care Prevention Program for Stroke and Dementia: The INVADE Trial

    PubMed Central

    Bickel, Horst; Ander, Karl‐Heinz; Brönner, Monika; Etgen, Thorleif; Gnahn, Hans; Gotzler, Othmar; Poppert, Holger; Pürner, Klaus; Sander, Dirk; Förstl, Hans

    2012-01-01

    Background Stroke and dementia are the major causes for long‐term care (LTC) dependence in old age. This intervention trial compared a multidomain prevention program for stroke and dementia with usual medical care in reducing the need for LTC. Methods and Results The Intervention Project on Cerebrovascular Disease and Dementia in the District of Ebersberg (INVADE) was a general practice–based 8‐year trial in 2 defined catchment areas in Upper Bavaria, Germany. All 11 317 insurants of a statutory health insurance plan who were ≥55 years of age and lived in the intervention district were offered the opportunity to participate in a prevention program; 3908 enrolled. The 13 301 insurants in the reference district received usual medical care. The intervention consisted of the systematic identification and evidence‐based treatment of vascular risk factors. The primary clinical end point was incidence of LTC dependence according to external assessment by a special medical service in the framework of the statutory German LTC insurance. Age‐ and sex‐specific incidence rates from the reference district were used to calculate the expected number of cases of LTC dependence under usual medical care. The expected number was compared with the observed number of cases in the intervention district. Analysis was by intention to treat. During the 5 years after completion of the recruitment period, significantly fewer incident cases of LTC dependence arose in the intervention district than expected (χ2=13.25; P<0.001). In women, the incidence was reduced by 10% (P<0.01). In men, the incidence was reduced by 9.6% (P<0.05). Conclusions Our results support the feasibility and effectiveness of a primary care prevention program for stroke and dementia to reduce the risk of developing LTC dependence. Clinical Trial Registration URL: http://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier: NCT01107548. (J Am Heart Assoc. 2012;1:e000786 doi: 10.1161/JAHA.112.000786.) PMID:23130154

  12. Recurrent Urinary Tract Infections Among Women: Comparative Effectiveness of 5 Prevention and Management Strategies Using a Markov Chain Monte Carlo Model

    PubMed Central

    Eells, Samantha J.; Bharadwa, Kiran; McKinnell, James A.; Miller, Loren G.

    2014-01-01

    Background. Recurrent urinary tract infections (UTIs) are a common problem among women. However, comparative effectiveness strategies for managing recurrent UTIs are lacking. Methods. We performed a systematic literature review of management of women experiencing ≥3 UTIs per year. We then developed a Markov chain Monte Carlo model of recurrent UTI for each management strategy with ≥2 adequate trials published. We simulated a cohort that experienced 3 UTIs/year and a secondary cohort that experienced 8 UTIs/year. Model outcomes were treatment efficacy, patient and payer cost, and health-related quality of life. Results. Five strategies had ≥2 clinical trials published: (1) daily antibiotic (nitrofurantoin) prophylaxis; (2) daily estrogen prophylaxis; (3) daily cranberry prophylaxis; (4) acupuncture prophylaxis; and (5) symptomatic self-treatment. In the 3 UTIs/year model, nitrofurantoin prophylaxis was most effective, reducing the UTI rate to 0.4 UTIs/year, and the most expensive to the payer ($821/year). All other strategies resulted in payer cost savings but were less efficacious. Symptomatic self-treatment was the only strategy that resulted in patient cost savings, and was the most favorable strategy in term of cost per quality-adjusted life-year (QALY) gained. Conclusions. Daily antibiotic use is the most effective strategy for recurrent UTI prevention compared to daily cranberry pills, daily estrogen therapy, and acupuncture. Cost savings to payers and patients were seen for most regimens, and improvement in QALYs were seen with all. Our findings provide clinically meaningful data to guide the physician–patient partnership in determining a preferred method of prevention for this common clinical problem. PMID:24065333

  13. Preventing Depressive Relapse and Recurrence in Higher Risk Cognitive Therapy Responders: A Randomized Trial of Continuation Phase Cognitive Therapy, Fluoxetine, or Matched Pill Placebo

    PubMed Central

    Jarrett, Robin B.; Minhajuddin, Abu; Gershenfeld, Howard; Friedman, Edward S.; Thase, Michael E.

    2014-01-01

    Context Strategies to improve the course of recurrent major depressive disorder (MDD) have great public health relevance. To reduce the risk of relapse/recurrence after acute phase Cognitive Therapy (CT), a continuation phase model of therapy (C-CT) may improve outcomes. Objectives To test the efficacy of C-CT and fluoxetine (FLX) for relapse prevention in a placebo (PBO) controlled randomized trial and compare the durability of prophylaxis after discontinuation of treatments. Design A sequential, three stage design with: acute phase (all patients received 12 weeks of CT), 8 month experimental phase (responders at higher risk were randomized to C-CT, FLX, or PBO), and 24 months of longitudinal, post-treatment follow-up. Setting Two university-based specialty clinics. Patients 523 adults with recurrent MDD began acute phase CT, of which 241 “higher risk” responders were randomized and 181 subsequently entered the follow-up. Interventions CT responders at higher risk for relapse were randomized to receive 8 months of C-CT (n = 86), FLX (n = 86) or PBO (n = 69). Main Outcome Measures Survival analyses of relapse/recurrence rates, as determined by “blinded” evaluators using DSM-IV criteria and the LIFE interview. Results As predicted, the C-CT or FLX groups were significantly less likely to relapse than the PBO group across 8 months. Relapse/recurrence rates for C-CT and FLX were nearly identical during the 8 months of treatment, although C-CT patients were more likely to accept randomization, stayed in treatment longer, and attended more sessions than those in FLX/PBO. Contrary to prediction, relapse/recurrence rates following the discontinuation of C-CT and FLX did not differ. Conclusions Relapse risk was reduced by both C-CT and FLX in an “enriched” randomization sampling only CT responders. The preventive effects of C-CT were not significantly more ‘durable’ than those of FLX after treatment was stopped, suggesting that some higher risk patients may

  14. Feasibility and cost-effectiveness of stroke prevention through community screening for atrial fibrillation using iPhone ECG in pharmacies. The SEARCH-AF study.

    PubMed

    Lowres, Nicole; Neubeck, Lis; Salkeld, Glenn; Krass, Ines; McLachlan, Andrew J; Redfern, Julie; Bennett, Alexandra A; Briffa, Tom; Bauman, Adrian; Martinez, Carlos; Wallenhorst, Christopher; Lau, Jerrett K; Brieger, David B; Sy, Raymond W; Freedman, S Ben

    2014-06-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) causes a third of all strokes, but often goes undetected before stroke. Identification of unknown AF in the community and subsequent anti-thrombotic treatment could reduce stroke burden. We investigated community screening for unknown AF using an iPhone electrocardiogram (iECG) in pharmacies, and determined the cost-effectiveness of this strategy.Pharmacists performedpulse palpation and iECG recordings, with cardiologist iECG over-reading. General practitioner review/12-lead ECG was facilitated for suspected new AF. An automated AF algorithm was retrospectively applied to collected iECGs. Cost-effectiveness analysis incorporated costs of iECG screening, and treatment/outcome data from a United Kingdom cohort of 5,555 patients with incidentally detected asymptomatic AF. A total of 1,000 pharmacy customers aged ≥65 years (mean 76 ± 7 years; 44% male) were screened. Newly identified AF was found in 1.5% (95% CI, 0.8-2.5%); mean age 79 ± 6 years; all had CHA2DS2-VASc score ≥2. AF prevalence was 6.7% (67/1,000). The automated iECG algorithm showed 98.5% (CI, 92-100%) sensitivity for AF detection and 91.4% (CI, 89-93%) specificity. The incremental cost-effectiveness ratio of extending iECG screening into the community, based on 55% warfarin prescription adherence, would be $AUD5,988 (€3,142; $USD4,066) per Quality Adjusted Life Year gained and $AUD30,481 (€15,993; $USD20,695) for preventing one stroke. Sensitivity analysis indicated cost-effectiveness improved with increased treatment adherence.Screening with iECG in pharmacies with an automated algorithm is both feasible and cost-effective. The high and largely preventable stroke/thromboembolism risk of those with newly identified AF highlights the likely benefits of community AF screening. Guideline recommendation of community iECG AF screening should be considered.

  15. Feasibility and cost-effectiveness of stroke prevention through community screening for atrial fibrillation using iPhone ECG in pharmacies. The SEARCH-AF study.

    PubMed

    Lowres, Nicole; Neubeck, Lis; Salkeld, Glenn; Krass, Ines; McLachlan, Andrew J; Redfern, Julie; Bennett, Alexandra A; Briffa, Tom; Bauman, Adrian; Martinez, Carlos; Wallenhorst, Christopher; Lau, Jerrett K; Brieger, David B; Sy, Raymond W; Freedman, S Ben

    2014-06-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) causes a third of all strokes, but often goes undetected before stroke. Identification of unknown AF in the community and subsequent anti-thrombotic treatment could reduce stroke burden. We investigated community screening for unknown AF using an iPhone electrocardiogram (iECG) in pharmacies, and determined the cost-effectiveness of this strategy.Pharmacists performedpulse palpation and iECG recordings, with cardiologist iECG over-reading. General practitioner review/12-lead ECG was facilitated for suspected new AF. An automated AF algorithm was retrospectively applied to collected iECGs. Cost-effectiveness analysis incorporated costs of iECG screening, and treatment/outcome data from a United Kingdom cohort of 5,555 patients with incidentally detected asymptomatic AF. A total of 1,000 pharmacy customers aged ≥65 years (mean 76 ± 7 years; 44% male) were screened. Newly identified AF was found in 1.5% (95% CI, 0.8-2.5%); mean age 79 ± 6 years; all had CHA2DS2-VASc score ≥2. AF prevalence was 6.7% (67/1,000). The automated iECG algorithm showed 98.5% (CI, 92-100%) sensitivity for AF detection and 91.4% (CI, 89-93%) specificity. The incremental cost-effectiveness ratio of extending iECG screening into the community, based on 55% warfarin prescription adherence, would be $AUD5,988 (€3,142; $USD4,066) per Quality Adjusted Life Year gained and $AUD30,481 (€15,993; $USD20,695) for preventing one stroke. Sensitivity analysis indicated cost-effectiveness improved with increased treatment adherence.Screening with iECG in pharmacies with an automated algorithm is both feasible and cost-effective. The high and largely preventable stroke/thromboembolism risk of those with newly identified AF highlights the likely benefits of community AF screening. Guideline recommendation of community iECG AF screening should be considered. PMID:24687081

  16. Ischemic Stroke

    MedlinePlus

    ... Spread the Word Advocate Share Spread the Word Contact Us Contact Us 1-800-STROKES (787-6537) 9707 E. ... Stroke En Espanol Stroke Facts Come Back Strong Contact Us 1-800-787-6537 9707 E. Easter ...

  17. Stroke Rehabilitation

    MedlinePlus

    A stroke can cause lasting brain damage. People who survive a stroke need to relearn skills they lost because of ... them relearn those skills. The effects of a stroke depend on which area of the brain was ...

  18. Hemorrhagic Stroke

    MedlinePlus

    A stroke is a medical emergency. There are two types - ischemic and hemorrhagic. Hemorrhagic stroke is the less common type. It happens when ... an artery wall that breaks open. Symptoms of stroke are Sudden numbness or weakness of the face, ...

  19. Stroke - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    ... National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke. Post-stroke rehabilitation fact sheet. Available at: www.ninds.nih.gov/disorders/stroke/poststrokerehab.htm . Accessed September 2, 2014. The American ...

  20. Regulatory, policy and quality update for venous thromboembolism and stroke in United States hospitals.

    PubMed

    Mahan, Charles E

    2012-10-01

    Stroke and venous thromboembolism (VTE) have a large impact on the United States (US) healthcare system. It is estimated that up to 1.7million new and recurrent stroke and VTE events are occurring in the US on an annual basis with the combined cost approaching over $200billion per year. A significant amount of stroke and VTE are preventable from appropriate antithrombotic use in at-risk patients and the Center for Medicaid and Medicare Services, the Joint Commission, the National Quality Forum and other key quality and regulatory entities have prioritized minimizing the impact of morbidity, mortality and avoidable costs related to these diseases. This review provides a brief history, overview, and update for the development of quality measures, quality systems, and regulatory and policy changes as related to stroke and VTE within the US healthcare system. PMID:22841661

  1. Illustration of Cost Saving Implications of Lower Extremity Nerve Decompression to Prevent Recurrence of Diabetic Foot Ulceration.

    PubMed

    Rankin, Timothy M; Miller, John D; Gruessner, Angelika C; Nickerson, D Scott

    2015-07-01

    The US diabetic foot ulcer (DFU) incidence is 3-4% of 22.3 million diagnosed diabetes cases plus 6.3 million undiagnosed, 858 000 cases total. Risk of recurrence after healing is 30% annually. Lower extremity multiple nerve decompression (ND) surgery reduces neuropathic DFU (nDFU) recurrence risk by >80%. Cost effectiveness of hypothetical ND implementation to minimize nDFU recurrence is compared to the current $6.171 billion annual nDFU expense. A literature review identified best estimates of annual incidence, recurrence risk, medical management expense, and noneconomic costs for DFU. Illustrative cost/benefit calculations were performed assuming widespread application of bilateral ND after wound healing to the nDFU problem, using Center for Medicare Services mean expense data of $1143/case for unilateral lower extremity ND. Calculations use conservative, evidence-based cost figures, which are contemporary (2012) or adjusted for inflation. Widespread adoption of ND after nDFU healing could reduce annual DFU occurrences by at least 21% in the third year and 24% by year 5, representing calculated cost savings of $1.296 billion (year 3) to $1.481 billion (year 5). This scenario proffers significant expense reduction and societal benefit, and represents a minimum 1.9× return on the investment cost for surgical treatment. Further large cost savings would require reductions in initial DFU incidence, which ND might achieve by selective application to advanced diabetic sensorimotor polyneuropathy (DSPN). By minimizing the contribution of recurrences to yearly nDFU incidence, ND has potential to reduce by nearly $1 billion the annual cost of DFU treatment in the United States.

  2. Illustration of Cost Saving Implications of Lower Extremity Nerve Decompression to Prevent Recurrence of Diabetic Foot Ulceration

    PubMed Central

    Rankin, Timothy M.; Miller, John D.; Gruessner, Angelika C.; Nickerson, D. Scott

    2015-01-01

    The US diabetic foot ulcer (DFU) incidence is 3-4% of 22.3 million diagnosed diabetes cases plus 6.3 million undiagnosed, 858 000 cases total. Risk of recurrence after healing is 30% annually. Lower extremity multiple nerve decompression (ND) surgery reduces neuropathic DFU (nDFU) recurrence risk by >80%. Cost effectiveness of hypothetical ND implementation to minimize nDFU recurrence is compared to the current $6.171 billion annual nDFU expense. A literature review identified best estimates of annual incidence, recurrence risk, medical management expense, and noneconomic costs for DFU. Illustrative cost/benefit calculations were performed assuming widespread application of bilateral ND after wound healing to the nDFU problem, using Center for Medicare Services mean expense data of $1143/case for unilateral lower extremity ND. Calculations use conservative, evidence-based cost figures, which are contemporary (2012) or adjusted for inflation. Widespread adoption of ND after nDFU healing could reduce annual DFU occurrences by at least 21% in the third year and 24% by year 5, representing calculated cost savings of $1.296 billion (year 3) to $1.481 billion (year 5). This scenario proffers significant expense reduction and societal benefit, and represents a minimum 1.9× return on the investment cost for surgical treatment. Further large cost savings would require reductions in initial DFU incidence, which ND might achieve by selective application to advanced diabetic sensorimotor polyneuropathy (DSPN). By minimizing the contribution of recurrences to yearly nDFU incidence, ND has potential to reduce by nearly $1 billion the annual cost of DFU treatment in the United States. PMID:26055081

  3. Dehydration, Heat Stroke, or Hyponatremia? The Recognition, Treatment, and Prevention of Hyponatremia Caused by High Exercise Outdoor Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cochran, Brent

    Hyponatremia (severe sodium depletion) has symptoms similar to heat exhaustion and heat stroke and can easily be misdiagnosed. The number of wilderness users and extreme adventure activities has increased in recent years, and more cases are being diagnosed. Given that a 1993 study found that 1 in 10 cases of heat-related illnesses were…

  4. Stroke is an emergency.

    PubMed

    Futrell, N; Millikan, C H

    1996-04-01

    Stroke is an emergency. Ischemic stroke is similar to myocardial infarction in that the pathogenesis is loss of blood supply to the tissue, which can result in irreversible damage if blood flow is not restored quickly. Public education is needed to emphasize the warning signs of stroke. Patients should seek medical help immediately, using emergency transport systems. Therapy geared toward minimizing the damage from an acute stroke should be started without delay in the emergency room. This includes measures to protect brain tissue, support perfusion pressure, and minimize cerebral edema. Strategies for improving recovery should also begin immediately. All major medical centers need stroke teams and stroke units. Stroke prevention should be given high priority as a public health strategy. Risk factor management should be part of general health care and should begin in childhood, with emphasis on nutrition, exercise, weight control, and avoidance of tobacco. Health screening and early treatment of hypertension and hypercholesterolemia has decreased the incidence of stroke and heart disease, but these efforts need to be expanded to reach all segments of the population. Basic research has opened the door to new therapies aimed at re-establishing blood flow and limiting tissue damage. Clinical trials have already led to changes in stroke prevention, including studies of carotid endarterectomy and ticlopidine and warfarin therapy (for patients with atrial fibrillation). Trials in progress are testing the usefulness of ancrod, neuroprotective agents, antioxidant agents, anti-inflammatory agents, low-molecular-weight heparin, thrombolytic drugs, and angioplasty. Any delay starting therapy after an acute stroke will result in progressive, irreversible loss of brain tissue. Clinicians should remember that for a stroke patient, time is brain tissue.

  5. Phytochemicals in Ischemic Stroke.

    PubMed

    Kim, Joonki; Fann, David Yang-Wei; Seet, Raymond Chee Seong; Jo, Dong-Gyu; Mattson, Mark P; Arumugam, Thiruma V

    2016-09-01

    Stroke is the second foremost cause of mortality worldwide and a major cause of long-term disability. Due to changes in lifestyle and an aging population, the incidence of stroke continues to increase and stroke mortality predicted to exceed 12 % by the year 2030. However, the development of pharmacological treatments for stroke has failed to progress much in over 20 years since the introduction of the thrombolytic drug, recombinant tissue plasminogen activator. These alarming circumstances caused many research groups to search for alternative treatments in the form of neuroprotectants. Here, we consider the potential use of phytochemicals in the treatment of stroke. Their historical use in traditional medicine and their excellent safety profile make phytochemicals attractive for the development of therapeutics in human diseases. Emerging findings suggest that some phytochemicals have the ability to target multiple pathophysiological processes involved in stroke including oxidative stress, inflammation and apoptotic cell death. Furthermore, epidemiological studies suggest that the consumption of plant sources rich in phytochemicals may reduce stroke risk, and so reinforce the possibility of developing preventative or neuroprotectant therapies for stroke. In this review, we describe results of preclinical studies that demonstrate beneficial effects of phytochemicals in experimental models relevant to stroke pathogenesis, and we consider their possible mechanisms of action. PMID:27193940

  6. Neurological emergencies: acute stroke

    PubMed Central

    Davenport, R.; Dennis, M.

    2000-01-01

    Stroke causes a vast amount of death and disability throughout the world, yet for many healthcare professionals it remains an area of therapeutic nihilism, and thus uninteresting. This negative perception is shared by the general public, who often have a poor understanding of the early symptoms and significance of a stroke. Yet within the past few years there have been many important developments in the approach to caring for stroke patients, for both the acute management and secondary prevention. After the completion of numerous clinical trials, there is now robust evidence to either support or discredit various interventions. Even more exciting is the prospect of yet more data becoming available in the near future, testing a whole array of treatments, as clinical interest in stroke expands exponentially. In this review an evidence based approach to the management of acute stroke within the first few days is presented, including ischaemic and haemorrhagic events, but not subarachnoid haemorrhage. It is explained why stroke is regarded as a medical emergency, and the importance of a rational, methodic approach to the initial assessment, which is the key to accurate diagnosis and subsequent management, is emphasised. The potential early problems associated with stroke are identified and specific interventions for different stroke types are discussed. The review ends with a brief discussion of the implications that the evolving treatments have for the organisation of modern stroke services.

 PMID:10675208

  7. Non-Vitamin K Antagonist Oral Anticoagulants and Antiplatelet Therapy for Stroke Prevention in Patients With Atrial Fibrillation: A Meta-Analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Shashi; Danik, Stephan B; Altman, Robert K; Barrett, Conor D; Lip, Gregory Y H; Chatterjee, Saurav; Roubin, Gary S; Natale, Andrea; Danik, Jacqueline S

    2016-01-01

    Non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants (NOACs) are frequently used to prevent stroke in patients with atrial fibrillation. These patients are often also on aspirin or other antiplatelet agents. It is possible that treatment with both NOACs and aspirin or other antiplatelet drug may be effective in decreasing stroke, but data are sparse regarding the efficacy and safety of using both agents for stroke prevention. To address these issues, data were pooled from the 4 recent randomized, controlled trials of NOACs: apixaban, rivaroxaban, dabigatran, and edoxaban, which included 42,411 patients; 14,148 (33.4%) were also on aspirin or other antiplatelet drug. The number of thromboembolic events among participants on NOAC and aspirin/antiplatelet was compared with the number of events in patients on NOAC alone. Bleeding rates were also compared between those on NOAC + aspirin/antiplatelet and on NOAC alone. These results were compared with thromboembolic and bleeding events in the warfarin + aspirin/antiplatelet versus warfarin alone. No greater risk for thromboembolism was seen in patients on NOACs compared with patients on both NOACs and aspirin/antiplatelet drug. In this nonrandomized comparison, there was initially a signal toward higher thromboembolic rates among NOAC users also on aspirin/antiplatelet drugs (relative risk, 1.16; 95% confidence intervals, 1.05, 1.29) when compared with NOAC alone. This likely reflected the higher CHADS2 scores of those on aspirin/antiplatelet drugs. When the analysis was limited to studies that included aspirin rather than other antiplatelet drugs, no difference was seen for thromboembolic rates comparing dual therapy to NOAC alone (relative risk, 1.02; 95% confidence intervals, 0.90, 1.15). Higher rates of bleeding were seen with aspirin/antiplatelet drug in conjunction with NOAC. In this meta-analysis and nonrandomized comparison of aspirin/antiplatelet users and nonusers also on anticoagulation, there was no additional

  8. Antiplatelet regimens in the long-term secondary prevention of transient ischaemic attack and ischaemic stroke: an updated network meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Niu, Peng-Peng; Guo, Zhen-Ni; Jin, Hang; Xing, Ying-Qi; Yang, Yi

    2016-01-01

    Objective To examine the comparative efficacy and safety of different antiplatelet regimens in patients with prior non-cardioembolic ischaemic stroke or transient ischaemic attack. Design Systematic review and network meta-analysis. Data sources As on 31 March 2015, all randomised controlled trials that investigated the effects of antiplatelet agents in the long-term (≥3 months) secondary prevention of non-cardioembolic transient ischaemic attack or ischaemic stroke were searched and identified. Outcome measures The primary outcome measure of efficacy was serious vascular events (non-fatal stroke, non-fatal myocardial infarction and vascular death). The outcome measure of safety was any bleeding. Results A total of 36 randomised controlled trials (82 144 patients) were included. Network meta-analysis showed that cilostazol was significantly more effective than clopidogrel (OR 0.77, 95% credible interval 0.60–0.98) and low-dose (75–162 mg daily) aspirin (0.69, 0.55–0.86) in the prevention of serious vascular events. Aspirin (50 mg daily) plus dipyridamole (400 mg daily) and clopidogrel reduced the risk of serious vascular events compared with low-dose aspirin; however, the difference was not statistically significant. Furthermore, low-dose aspirin was as effective as higher daily doses. Cilostazol was associated with a significantly lower bleeding risk than most of the other regimens. Moreover, aspirin plus clopidogrel was associated with significantly more haemorrhagic events than other regimens. Direct comparisons showed similar results as the network meta-analysis. Conclusions Cilostazol was significantly more effective than aspirin and clopidogrel alone in the long-term prevention of serious vascular events in patients with prior non-cardioembolic ischaemic stroke or transient ischaemic attack. Cilostazol was associated with a significantly lower bleeding risk than low-dose aspirin (75–162 mg daily) and aspirin (50 mg daily) plus

  9. Local triple-combination therapy results in tumour regression and prevents recurrence in a colon cancer model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conde, João; Oliva, Nuria; Zhang, Yi; Artzi, Natalie

    2016-10-01

    Conventional cancer therapies involve the systemic delivery of anticancer agents that neither discriminate between cancer and normal cells nor eliminate the risk of cancer recurrence. Here, we demonstrate that the combination of gene, drug and phototherapy delivered through a prophylactic hydrogel patch leads, in a colon cancer mouse model, to complete tumour remission when applied to non-resected tumours and to the absence of tumour recurrence when applied following tumour resection. The adhesive hydrogel patch enhanced the stability and provided local delivery of embedded nanoparticles. Spherical gold nanoparticles were used as a first wave of treatment to deliver siRNAs against Kras, a key oncogene driver, and rod-shaped gold nanoparticles mediated the conversion of near-infrared radiation into heat, causing the release of a chemotherapeutic as well as thermally induced cell damage. This local, triple-combination therapy can be adapted to other cancer cell types and to molecular targets associated with disease progression.

  10. The effect of serum vitamin D normalization in preventing recurrences of benign paroxysmal positional vertigo: A case-control study

    PubMed Central

    Sheikhzadeh, Mahboobeh; Lotfi, Yones; Mousavi, Abdollah; Heidari, Behzad; Bakhshi, Enyatollah

    2016-01-01

    Background: Benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV) is a condition with recurrent attacks in a significant proportion of patients. The present case- control study was conducted to assess the influence of serum vitamin D normalization on recurrent attacks of vitamin D deficient patients. Methods: Diagnosis of BPPV was made based on history and clinical examination and exclusion of other conditions. Serum 25-hydroxy vitamin D (25-OHD) was measured using ELISA method and a levels of < 20 ng/ml was considered a deficiency of vitamin D. Inclusion criteria were as follows: history of recurrent attacks and serum 25-OHD<20.ng/ml. While the patients with history of trauma, surgery and chronic systemic diseases were excluded. The patients were classified into two groups: treatment and control, intermittently. Both groups received Epley rehabilitation therapy one session per week for 4 weeks but the treatment group received an additional supplement of 50.000 IU of vitamin D (cholecalciferol) weekly for two months to achieve serum 25-OHD ≥ 30 ng/ml and the study patients were followed-up for 6 months. Results: Twenty-seven patients were allocated to each group. At baseline, serum 25-OHD was similar (10.7±2.3 vs 11.41±1.9, P=0.23). At month 2, serum 25-OHD in the treatment group increased significantly to ≥ 30 ng/ ml, whereas serum 25-OHD in the control group remained unchanged (34.2±3.3 vs 10.6 10.6±2.2 ng/ml, P=0.001). During the follow-up period, attacks of BPPV in the treatment group decreased significantly compared with the control group (14.8% vs 96.3% OR= 0.18, P=0.001). Conclusion: The findings of this study indicate that the normalization of serum vitamin D significantly reduces BPPV recurrences.

  11. An overview of antithrombotics in ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Schweickert, Patricia A; Gaughen, John R; Kreitel, Elizabeth M; Shephard, Timothy J; Solenski, Nina J; Jensen, Mary E

    2016-06-19

    The use of antithrombotic medications is an important component of ischemic stroke treatment and prevention. This article reviews the evidence for best practices for antithrombotic use in stroke with focused discussion on the specific agents used to treat and prevent stroke. PMID:27153001

  12. Preventing High Blood Pressure

    MedlinePlus

    ... this? Submit What's this? Submit Button Related CDC Web Sites Division for Heart Disease and Stroke Prevention ... this? Submit What's this? Submit Button Related CDC Web Sites Division for Heart Disease and Stroke Prevention ...

  13. High Blood Cholesterol Prevention

    MedlinePlus

    ... this? Submit What's this? Submit Button Related CDC Web Sites Division for Heart Disease and Stroke Prevention ... this? Submit What's this? Submit Button Related CDC Web Sites Division for Heart Disease and Stroke Prevention ...

  14. Cocaine use and stroke

    PubMed Central

    Treadwell, Sean D; Robinson, Tom G

    2007-01-01

    Stroke is the third most common cause of death in developed countries. In England and Wales, 1000 people under the age of 30 have a stroke each year. Cocaine is the most commonly used class A drug, and the first report of cocaine‐induced stroke was in 1977. Since the development of alkaloidal “crack” cocaine in the 1980s, there has been a significant rise in the number of case reports describing both ischaemic and haemorrhagic stroke associated with cocaine use. Cocaine is a potent central nervous system stimulant, and acts by binding to specific receptors at pre‐synaptic sites preventing the reuptake of neurotransmitters. The exact mechanism of cocaine‐induced stroke remains unclear and there are likely to be a number of factors involved including vasospasm, cerebral vasculitis, enhanced platelet aggregation, cardioembolism, and hypertensive surges associated with altered cerebral autoregulation. The evidence surrounding each of these factors will be considered here. PMID:17551070

  15. Efficacy of metoprolol and sotalol in the prevention of recurrences of sustained ventricular tachyarrhythmias in patients with an implantable cardioverter defibrillator.

    PubMed

    Kettering, Klaus; Mewis, Christian; Dörnberger, Volker; Vonthein, Reinhard; Bosch, Ralph F; Kühlkamp, Volker

    2002-11-01

    ICDs provide protection against sudden cardiac death in patients with life-threatening ventricular arrhythmias. Nevertheless, most ICD recipients receive adjunctive antiarrhythmic drug therapy to reduce the number of recurrent episodes and ICD discharges. The aim of the study was to compare the efficacy of metoprolol and d,l-sotalol in preventing VT/VF recurrences in patients with an ICD in a prospective, randomized trial. One hundred patients (83 men, 17 women; mean age 59 years, SD +/- 11 years) were randomized to receive metoprolol or sotalol after implantation of an ICD. There were no significant differences between the two groups with regard to age, sex, underlying cardiac disease, left ventricular ejection fraction, NYHA class assessment and clinical arrhythmia. The median follow-up was 728 days (25th percentile: 530 days, 75th percentile: 943 days) in the metoprolol group and 727 days (25th percentile: 472 days, 75th percentile: 1,223 days) in the sotalol group (P = 0.52). Thirty-three patients treated with metoprolol and 30 patients receiving sotalol had at least one episode during the follow-up. Event-free survival curves were generated for the two treatment arms using the Kaplan-Meier method and showed no significant difference (P = 0.68). Eight patients treated with metoprolol and six patients treated with sotalol died during follow-up. Total mortality was not significantly different between the two study groups (P = 0.43). Metoprolol is as efficacious as sotalol in preventing VT/VF recurrences in patients with an ICD.

  16. Acetyl-L-Carnitine Hydrochloride in Preventing Peripheral Neuropathy in Patients With Recurrent Ovarian Epithelial Cancer, Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer, or Fallopian Tube Cancer Undergoing Chemotherapy

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-12-29

    Fatigue; Malignant Ovarian Mixed Epithelial Tumor; Neuropathy; Neurotoxicity Syndrome; Ovarian Brenner Tumor; Ovarian Clear Cell Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Endometrioid Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Mucinous Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Serous Cystadenocarcinoma; Pain; Recurrent Fallopian Tube Carcinoma; Recurrent Ovarian Carcinoma; Recurrent Primary Peritoneal Carcinoma

  17. Twice- or Once-Daily Dosing of Novel Oral Anticoagulants for Stroke Prevention: A Fixed-Effects Meta-Analysis with Predefined Heterogeneity Quality Criteria

    PubMed Central

    Clemens, Andreas; Noack, Herbert; Brueckmann, Martina; Lip, Gregory Y. H.

    2014-01-01

    Background A number of novel oral anticoagulants (direct thrombin inhibitors or factor Xa inhibitors) are in clinical use for various indications. The dosing regimens differ between twice-daily and once-daily dosing for the prevention of stroke in patients with atrial fibrillation. With the availability of the results from four phase 3 studies (>70,000 patients), we explored whether twice-daily or once-daily dosing provides better risk-benefit balance among novel oral anticoagulants. Methods We conducted a strict, stepwise, fixed-effects meta-analysis with predefined heterogeneity quality criteria to generate the most appropriate common estimates for twice-daily (BID) or once-daily (QD) dosing regimens. An indirect comparison of these dosing regimens with fixed-effects meta-analysis common estimates (where available), or individual compound results, was done respectively. Results Comparing indirectly BID vs QD dosing regimens resulted in hazard ratios (HR [95% confidence interval]) for stroke and systemic embolism of 0.75 (0.58–0.96) for dabigatran 150 mg BID, and 0.91 (0.73–1.13) for apixaban BID vs the QD dosing regimen. For ischemic stroke, the HR of BID vs QD was 0.85 (0.69–1.05). For intracranial hemorrhage, BID vs rivaroxaban QD was 0.57 (0.37–0.88) and, vs edoxaban QD, 0.81 (0.54–1.22). Due to heterogeneity, common estimates for major bleeding QD or BID were not justified, therefore indirect comparison of regimens were not possible. All non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants reduced all-cause mortality vs warfarin with a HR of 0.90 (0.86–0.96) without differences between regimen. Conclusions Based on the available phase 3 study evidence, the twice-daily dosing regimen of non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants appears to offer a more balanced risk-benefit profile with respect to stroke prevention and intracranial hemorrhage. PMID:24911432

  18. Audit of the Use of Regular Haem Arginate Infusions in Patients with Acute Porphyria to Prevent Recurrent Symptoms.

    PubMed

    Marsden, Joanne T; Guppy, Simon; Stein, Penelope; Cox, Timothy M; Badminton, Michael; Gardiner, Tricia; Barth, Julian H; Stewart, M Felicity; Rees, David C

    2015-01-01

    The National Acute Porphyria Service (NAPS) provides acute care support and clinical advice for patients in England with active acute porphyria requiring haem arginate treatment and patients with recurrent acute attacks.This audit examined the benefits and complications of regular haem arginate treatment started with prophylactic intent to reduce the frequency of recurrent acute attacks in a group of patients managed through NAPS. We included 22 patients (21 female and 1 male) and returned information on diagnosis, indications for prophylactic infusions, frequency and dose, analgesia, activity and employment and complications including thromboembolic disease and iron overload.The median age at presentation with porphyria was 21 years (range 9-44), with acute abdominal pain as the predominant symptom. Patients had a median of 12 (1-400) attacks before starting prophylaxis and had received a median of 52 (0-1,350) doses of haem arginate. The median age at starting prophylaxis was 28 years (13-58) with a median delay of 4 years (0.5-37) between presentation and prophylaxis. The frequency of prophylactic haem arginate varied from 1 to 8 per month, and 67% patients were documented as having a reduction in pain frequency on prophylaxis. Only one patient developed clinically significant iron overload and required iron chelation, but the number of venous access devices required varied from 1 to 15, with each device lasting a median of 1.2 years before requiring replacement. Six patients stopped haem arginate and in three this was because their symptoms had improved. Prophylactic haem arginate appears to be beneficial in patients with recurrent acute porphyria symptoms, but maintaining central venous access may prove challenging. PMID:25762493

  19. Long-Term Prognosis of Ischemic Stroke in Young Adults

    PubMed Central

    Varona, Jose F.

    2011-01-01

    There is limited information about long-term prognosis of ischemic stroke in young adults. Giving the potentially negative impact in physical, social, and emotional aspects of an ischemic stroke in young people, providing early accurate long-term prognostic information is very important in this clinical setting. Moreover, detection of factors associated with bad outcomes (death, recurrence, moderate-to-severe disability) help physicians in optimizing secondary prevention strategies. The present paper reviews the most relevant published information concerning long-term prognosis and predictors of unfavorable outcomes of ischemic stroke affecting young adults. As a summary, we can conclude that, in the long term, stroke in the young adult increases slightly the risk of mortality, implies higher risk of future cardiovascular events, and determines functional limitations in a significant percentage of patients. Nevertheless, in every individual case the prognosis has to be considered depending on several factors (stroke subtype, initial severity, cardiovascular risk factors) that determine the long-term outcomes. PMID:21197408

  20. Treatment patterns associated with stroke prevention in patients with atrial fibrillation in three major cities in the People’s Republic of china

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Bao; Liu, Larry Z; Xuan, Jianwei; Luo, Man; Li, Yansheng; Duan, Chaohui; Cheng, Hongqin; Yang, Xiaohui

    2014-01-01

    Background Atrial fibrillation (AF) is associated with an increased risk of stroke. This study assessed treatment patterns associated with stroke prevention among patients with AF in three major cities of the People’s Republic of China. Methods A random sample of 2,862 medical charts for patients with AF at six tertiary hospitals located in Beijing, Shanghai, and Guangzhou between 2003 and 2008 were reviewed. Patient demographics, clinical characteristics, and treatment patterns were extracted from medical charts. Antithrombotic regimens included antiplatelets, anticoagulants, and a combination of both. Descriptive analyses were performed to summarize basic antithrombotic patterns. A logistic regression model examined demographic and clinical factors associated with antithrombotic treatment patterns. Results Of the patient sample, 55% were male, the average age was 72 years (49% ≥75 years), 15% had valvular AF, 78% had nonvalvular AF, and the remainder had unspecified AF. CHADS2 scores ≥2 were reported for 53% of patients. Antithrombotic treatment was not received by 17% of patients during hospitalization, and 66% did not receive warfarin. Among patients with valvular or nonvalvular AF, 33%, 30%, and 20% received antiplatelet, anticoagulation, and antiplatelet plus anticoagulation treatments, respectively. For patients with CHADS2 scores of 0, 1, 2, 3, and ≥4, 52%, 42%, 28%, 21%, and 21%, respectively, were treated with warfarin. Predictors of no antithrombotic treatment included age and hospital location. Conclusion Anticoagulation therapy was underused in Chinese patients with AF. Antithrombotic treatment was not associated with stroke risk. Further studies need to examine the clinical consequences of various antithrombotic treatment patterns in Chinese patients with AF. PMID:24379692

  1. Early markers of occult megaloblastosis for low-cost detection of hyperhomocysteinemia in patients with ischaemic stroke: preventive approach for primary health care.

    PubMed

    Neogi, Sohini Sengupta; Thomas, Monica; Sharma, Archna; Kumar, Jaishree; Khanduri, Uma

    2014-09-01

    Recent studies have focussed on the association between elevated homocysteine levels with megaloblastic changes and thromboembolic events, but the relationship between occult megaloblastosis (with normal haemoglobin levels) and ischaemic stroke has not been widely explored. The objective of this study is to establish a simple and economical marker for the detection of occult megaloblastosis at the community health care level in developing countries. A hundred patients who met the inclusion criteria were studied. At the 5% level of significance, the levels of cobalamin and folate were significantly lower, while the number of hypersegmented neutrophils on the peripheral smear was higher in patients from Group A (70 patients with high homocysteine) compared with the patients in Group B (30 patients with normal homocysteine). Forty-five (64.2%) of the 70 patients in Group A showed hypersegmentation of neutrophils in the peripheral smear. The high cost and difficulty in performing the vitamin assays limit their use as early markers of megaloblastosis. Hence, we conclude that in developing countries, the detection of hypersegmented neutrophils can be used at the primary healthcare level for early diagnosis of occult megaloblastosis, so that early therapeutic interventions with vitamins can prevent attacks of hyperhomocysteinemia-induced ischaemic stroke. PMID:25068715

  2. Protective effects of cilostazol against hemorrhagic stroke: Current and future perspectives.

    PubMed

    Takagi, Toshinori; Hara, Hideaki

    2016-07-01

    Cilostazol is a phosphodiesterase-3 inhibitor and is known to have pleiotropic effects including antiplatelet and vasodilatation effects and protective effects on endothelial cells. Cilostazol also reportedly reduced stroke recurrence, poststroke intracranial hemorrhage, and extracranial bleeding in a meta-analysis. Although it is known that cilostazol has the potential to suppress hemorrhagic stroke, the precise mechanisms remained unclear. Therefore, we evaluated the protective effects and mechanisms of cilostazol against hemorrhagic stroke. We found that cilostazol prevented the hemorrhagic transformation induced by focal cerebral ischemia in mice treated with intravenous tissue plasminogen activator or warfarin via protecting endothelial cells and tight junction proteins. We also demonstrated that cilostazol attenuated collagenase-induced intracranial hemorrhage in mice. In vitro studies showed that endothelial cells, pericytes, tight junction proteins, adherence junction proteins, and the basement membrane, which are all components of the blood-brain barrier, were protected by the administration of cilostazol following collagenase injury. These results suggested that cilostazol reduces hemorrhagic stroke by protecting the entire blood-brain barrier. Here, we review the protective effects of cilostazol on the blood-brain barrier that result in the prevention of hemorrhagic stroke, discuss the results we obtained using multiple hemorrhagic stroke models, and introduce potential future applications of cilostazol.

  3. IL-6 Inhibition With MEDI5117 Decreases The Fraction of Head and Neck Cancer Stem Cells and Prevents Tumor Recurrence.

    PubMed

    Finkel, Kelsey A; Warner, Kristy A; Kerk, Samuel; Bradford, Carol R; McLean, Scott A; Prince, Mark E; Zhong, Haihong; Hurt, Elaine M; Hollingsworth, Robert E; Wicha, Max S; Tice, David A; Nör, Jacques E

    2016-05-01

    Head and neck squamous cell carcinomas (HNSCC) exhibit a small population of uniquely tumorigenic cancer stem cells (CSC) endowed with self-renewal and multipotency. We have recently shown that IL-6 enhances the survival and tumorigenic potential of head and neck cancer stem cells (i.e. ALDH(high)CD44(high) cells). Here, we characterized the effect of therapeutic inhibition of IL-6 with a novel humanized anti-IL-6 antibody (MEDI5117) using three low-passage patient-derived xenograft (PDX) models of HNSCC. We observed that single agent MEDI5117 inhibited the growth of PDX-SCC-M1 tumors (P < .05). This PDX model was generated from a previously untreated HNSCC. In contrast, MEDI5117 was not effective at reducing overall tumor volume for PDX models representing resistant disease (PDX-SCC-M0, PDX-SCC-M11). Low dose MEDI5117 (3 mg/kg) consistently decreased the fraction of cancer stem cells in PDX models of HNSCC when compared to IgG-treated controls, as follows: PDX-SCC-M0 (P < .001), PDX-SCC-M1 (P < .001), PDX-SCC-M11 (P = .04). Interestingly, high dose MEDI5117 (30 mg/kg) decreased the CSC fraction in the PDX-SCC-M11 model (P = .002), but not in PDX-SCC-M0 and PDX-SCC-M1. MEDI5117 mediated a dose-dependent decrease in the number of orospheres generated by ALDH(high)CD44(high) cells cultured in ultra-low attachment plates (P < .05), supporting an inhibitory effect on head and neck cancer stem cells. Notably, single agent MEDI5117 reduced the overall recurrence rate of PDX-SCC-M0, a PDX generated from the local recurrence of human HNSCC. Collectively, these data demonstrate that therapeutic inhibition of IL-6 with low-dose MEDI5117 decreases the fraction of cancer stem cells, and that adjuvant MEDI5117 inhibits recurrence in preclinical models of HNSCC.

  4. Racial/ethnic disparities in access to physician care and medications among US stroke survivors

    PubMed Central

    Neidecker, M.V.; Kiefe, C.I.; Karve, S.; Williams, L.S.; Allison, J.J.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Mexican Americans and non-Hispanic blacks have higher stroke recurrence rates and lower rates of secondary stroke prevention than non-Hispanic whites. As a potential explanation for this disparity, we assessed racial/ethnic differences in access to physician care and medications in a national sample of US stroke survivors. Methods: Among all 4,864 stroke survivors aged ≥45 years who responded to the National Health Interview Survey years 2000–2006, we compared access to care within the last 12 months by race/ethnicity before and after stratification by age (45–64 years vs ≥65 years). With logistic regression, we adjusted associations between access measures and race/ethnicity for sex, comorbidity, neurologic disability, health status, year, income, and health insurance. Results: Among stroke survivors aged 45–64 years, Mexican Americans, non-Hispanic blacks, and non-Hispanic whites reported similar rates of no generalist physician visit (approximately 15%) and inability to afford medications (approximately 20%). However, among stroke survivors aged ≥65 years, Mexican Americans and blacks, compared with whites, reported greater frequency of no generalist visit (15%, 12%, 8%; p = 0.02) and inability to afford medications (20%, 11%, 6%; p < 0.001). Mexican Americans and blacks more frequently reported no medical specialist visit (54%, 49%, 40%; p < 0.001) than did whites and rates did not differ by age. Full covariate adjustment did not fully explain these racial/ethnic differences. Conclusions: Among US stroke survivors at least 65 years old, Mexican Americans and blacks reported worse access to physician care and medications than whites. This reduced access may lead to inadequate risk factor modification and recurrent stroke in these high-risk minority groups. PMID:21084692

  5. [Cerebellar stroke].

    PubMed

    Paradowski, Michał; Zimny, Anna; Paradowski, Bogusław

    2015-01-01

    Cerebellar stroke belongs to a group of rare diseases of vascular origin. Cerebellum, supplied by three pairs of arteries (AICA, PICA, SCA) with many anastomoses between them is less susceptible for a stroke, especially ischemic one. Diagnosis of the stroke in this region is harder due to lower sensibility of commonly used CT of the head in case of stroke suspicion. The authors highlight clinical symptoms distinguishing between vascular territories or topographical locations of the stroke, diagnostic procedures, classical and surgical treatment, the most common misdiagnoses are also mentioned. The authors suggest a diagnostic and therapeutic algorithm development, including rtPA treatment criteria for ischemic cerebellar stroke. PMID:26181157

  6. Optimal Combination Treatment and Vascular Outcomes in Recent Ischemic Stroke Patients by Premorbid Risk Level

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jong-Ho; Ovbiagele, Bruce

    2015-01-01

    Background Optimal combination of secondary stroke prevention treatment including antihypertensives, antithrombotic agents, and lipid modifiers is associated with reduced recurrent vascular risk including stroke. It is unclear whether optimal combination treatment has a differential impact on stroke patients based on level of vascular risk. Methods We analyzed a clinical trial dataset comprising 3680 recent non-cardioembolic stroke patients aged ≥35 years and followed for 2 years. Patients were categorized by appropriateness level 0 to III depending on the number of the drugs prescribed divided by the number of drugs potentially indicated for each patient (0=none of the indicated medications prescribed and III=all indicated medications prescribed [optimal combination treatment]). High-risk was defined as having a history of stroke or coronary heart disease (CHD) prior to the index stroke event. Independent associations of medication appropriateness level with a major vascular event (stroke, CHD, or vascular death), ischemic stroke, and all-cause death were analyzed. Results Compared with level 0, for major vascular events, the HR of level III in the low-risk group was 0.51 (95% CI: 0.20–1.28) and 0.32 (0.14–0.70) in the high-risk group; for stroke, the HR of level III in the low-risk group was 0.54 (0.16–1.77) and 0.25 (0.08–0.85) in the high-risk group; and for all-cause death, the HR of level III in the low-risk group was 0.66 (0.09–5.00) and 0.22 (0.06–0.78) in the high-risk group. Conclusion Optimal combination treatment is related to a significantly lower risk of future vascular events and death among high-risk patients after a recent non-cardioembolic stroke. PMID:26044963

  7. Cost-effectiveness of non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants for stroke prevention in non-valvular atrial fibrillation: a systematic and qualitative review.

    PubMed

    Liberato, Nicola Lucio; Marchetti, Monia

    2016-01-01

    The introduction of non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants (NOACs) into clinical practice represented a major change in the treatment of non-valvular atrial fibrillation (NVAF); drugs as effective as the gold standard were available, rapidly functioning and without major interferences with drugs and foods. However, a huge increase in the economic burden of NVAF was predicted, and many cost-effectiveness analyses were developed to aid policy makers and clinicians in implementing strategies for the prevention of stroke in NVAF. The present systematic review identified 54 studies from 21 different countries, reporting the incremental cost-effectiveness of dabigatran, apixaban, rivaroxaban and edoxaban. A critical appraisal of the studies was conducted in order to highlight consolidated results and biases. PMID:26817497

  8. Therapeutic application of injectable thermosensitive hydrogel in preventing local breast cancer recurrence and improving incision wound healing in a mouse model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, Na; Gong, Changyang; Qian, Zhiyong; Luo, Feng; Wang, Cheng; Wang, Helan; Wei, Yuquan

    2012-08-01

    Many drug delivery systems (DDSs) have been investigated for local targeting of malignant disease with the intention of increasing anti-tumor activity and minimizing systemic toxicity. An injectable thermosensitive hydrogel was applied to prevent locoregional recurrence of 4T1 breast cancer in a mouse model. The presented hydrogel, which is based on poly(ethyleneglycol)-poly(ε-caprolactone)-poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG-PCL-PEG, PECE), flows freely at normal temperature, forms a gel within seconds in situ at body temperature, and eventually releases the drug in a consistent and sustained fashion as it gradually biodegrades. Locoregional recurrence after primary tumor removal was significantly inhibited in mice treated with the paclitaxel (PTX)-loaded PECE hydrogel subcutaneously (9.1%) administered, compared with the blank hydrogel (80.0%), systemic (77.8%) and locally (75.0%) administered PTX, and the control group (100%) (P < 0.01). In addition, tensile strength measurements of the surgical incisions showed that the PECE hydrogel accelerates wound healing at postoperative day 7 (P < 0.05), and days 4 and 14 (P > 0.05), in agreement with histopathological examinations. This novel DDSs represents a promising approach for local adjuvant therapy in malignant disease.

  9. Health Professional Shortage Areas, Insurance Status, and Cardiovascular Disease Prevention in the Reasons for Geographic and Racial Differences in Stroke (REGARDS) Study

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Todd M.; Parmar, Gaurav; Durant, Raegan W.; Halanych, Jewell H.; Hovater, Martha; Muntner, Paul; Prineas, Ronald J.; Roth, David L.; Samdarshi, Tandaw E.; Safford, Monika M.

    2013-01-01

    Individuals with cardiovascular disease (CVD) living in Health Professional Shortage Areas (HPSA) may receive less preventive care than others. The Reasons for Geographic And Racial Differences in Stroke Study (REGARDS) surveyed 30,221 African American (AA) and White individuals older than 45 years of age between 2003–2007. We compared medication use for CVD prevention by HPSA and insurance status, adjusting for sociodemographic factors, health behaviors, and health status. Individuals residing in partial HPSA counties were excluded. Mean age was 64±9 years, 42% were AA, 55% were women, and 93% had health insurance; 2,545 resided in 340 complete HPSA counties and 17,427 in 1,145 non-HPSA counties. Aspirin, beta-blocker, and ACE-inhibitor use were similar by HPSA and insurance status. Compared with insured individuals living in non-HPSA counties, statin use was lower among uninsured participants living in non-HPSA and HPSA counties. Less medication use for CVD prevention was not associated with HPSA status, but less statin use was associated with lack of insurance. PMID:22080702

  10. Know Stroke

    MedlinePlus

    ... Director, National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke Photo courtesy of NIH/NINDS Welcome to this special section on stroke, the third leading cause of death in the United States. Each year, there are more than 700, ...

  11. Stroke: advances in medical therapy and acute stroke intervention.

    PubMed

    Barrett, Kevin M; Lal, Brajesh K; Meschia, James F

    2015-10-01

    Evidence-based therapeutic options for stroke continue to emerge based on results from well-designed clinical studies. Ischemic stroke far exceeds hemorrhagic stroke in terms of prevalence and incidence, both in the USA and worldwide. The public health effect of reducing death and disability related to ischemic stroke justifies the resources that have been invested in identifying safe and effective treatments. The emergence of novel oral anticoagulants for ischemic stroke prevention in atrial fibrillation has introduced complexity to clinical decision making for patients with this common cardiac arrhythmia. Some accepted ischemic stroke preventative strategies, such as carotid revascularization for asymptomatic carotid stenosis, require reassessment, given advances in risk factor management, antithrombotic therapy, and surgical techniques. Intra-arterial therapy, particularly with stent retrievers after intravenous tissue plasminogen activator, has recently been demonstrated to improve functional outcomes and will require investment in system-based care models to ensure that effective treatments are received by patients in a timely fashion. The purpose of this review is to describe recent advances in medical and surgical approaches to ischemic stroke prevention and acute treatment. Results from recently published clinical trials will be highlighted along with ongoing clinical trials addressing key questions in ischemic stroke management and prevention where equipoise remains.

  12. The Efficacy of Surgical Treatment for the Secondary Prevention of Stroke in Symptomatic Moyamoya Disease: A Meta-Analysis.

    PubMed

    Qian, Cong; Yu, Xiaobo; Li, Jianru; Chen, Jingyin; Wang, Lin; Chen, Gao

    2015-12-01

    The treatment of moyamoya disease (MMD) is controversial and often depends on the doctor's experience. In addition, the choice of surgical procedure to treat MMD can differ in many ways. In this study, we performed a meta-analysis to determine whether surgical treatment of MMD is superior to conservative treatment and to provide evidence for the selection of an appropriate surgical treatment.The human case-control studies regarding the association of MMD treatment were systematically identified through online databases (PubMed, Web of Science, Elsevier Science Direct, and Springer Link). Inclusion and exclusion criteria were defined for the eligible studies. The fixed-effects model was performed when homogeneity was indicated. Alternatively, the random-effects model was utilized.This meta-analysis included 16 studies. Surgical treatment significantly reduced the risk of stroke (odds ratio (OR) of 0.17, 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.12-0.26, P < 0.01). A subgroup analysis showed that surgical treatment was more beneficial to hemorrhagic MMD (OR of 0.23, 95% CI, 0.15-0.38, P < 0.01), but there was no significant difference between surgical treatment and conservative treatment on ischemic MMD treatment (OR of 0.45, 95% CI, 0.15-1.29, P = 0.14). Further analysis indicated that compared to direct bypass surgery, indirect bypass surgery had a lower efficacy on secondary stroke risk reduction (OR of 1.79, 95% CI, 1.14-2.82, P = 0.01), while no significant difference was detected for perioperative complications.Surgery is an effective treatment for symptomatic MMD patients, and direct bypass surgery may bring more benefits for these patients.

  13. Pediatric Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Goun; Lim, Byung Chan

    2015-01-01

    Pediatric stroke is relatively rare but may lead to significant morbidity and mortality. Along with the advance of brain imaging technology and clinical awareness, diagnosis of pediatric stroke is increasing wordwide. Pediatric stroke differs from adults in variable risk factor/etiologies, diverse and nonspecific clinical presentation depending on ages. This review will be discussed pediatric stroke focusing on their clinical presentations, diagnosis and etiologies/risk factors. PMID:26180605

  14. Safety and efficacy of Intraurethral Mitomycin C Hydrogel for prevention of post-traumatic anterior urethral stricture recurrence after internal urethrotomy

    PubMed Central

    Moradi, Mahmoudreza; Derakhshandeh, Katayoun; Karimian, Babak; Fasihi, Mahtab

    2016-01-01

    Abstract: Background: Evaluation of the safety and efficacy of intraurethral Mitomycin C (MMC) hydrogel for prevention of post-traumatic anterior urethral stricture recurrence after internal urethrotomy. Methods: A thermoresponsive hydrogel base consisting of 0.8 mg MMC with 1cc water and propylene glycol to PF-127 poloxamer was used in theater. 40 male patients with short, non-obliterated, urethral stricture were randomized into 2 groups: control and MMC. After internal urethrotomy, the MMC group patients received the MMC-Hydrogel while the others were just catheterized. Both groups had their catheters for at least 1 week. After surgery, they were followed up by means of medical history and physical examination, monitoring voiding patterns and retrograde urethrogram at 1 month, 6 months and 1 year after surgery. Results: 40 male patients between 14 to 89 years old (Mean = 54.15) underwent internal urethrotomy. The average age for the control and MMC group was 54.55±21.25 and 53.75±24.75 respectively. In a comparison of age between the two groups, they were matched (P=0.574). Stricture length was 10.7±5.9 and 9.55±4.15 mm for the control and MMC group respectively. There were no statistically meaningful differences between the two groups (P=0.485). Fifteen patients had a history of one previous internal urethrotomy which in a comparison between the two groups meant there was no meaningful difference (P = 0.327). During postoperative follow up, total urethral stricture recurrence happened in 12 patients: 10 patients (50%) in control group and 2 patients (10%) in MMC group. The difference was statistically significant (P = 0.001). There were no significant complications associated with the MMC injection in our patients. Conclusions: Based on our results, MMC Hydrogel may have an anti-fibrotic action preventing post-traumatic anterior urethral stricture recurrence with no side effects on pre-urethral tissue. Due to our study limitations, our follow up time and the

  15. Acupuncture treatment for ischaemic stroke in young adults: protocol for a randomised, sham-controlled clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Lifang; Fang, Jianqiao; Jin, Xiaoming; Keeler, Crystal Lynn; Gao, Hong; Fang, Zhen; Chen, Qin

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Stroke in young adults is not uncommon. Although the overall incidence of stroke has been recently declining, the incidence of stroke in young adults is increasing. Traditional vascular risk factors are the main cause of young ischaemic stroke. Acupuncture has been shown to benefit stroke rehabilitation and ameliorate the risk factors for stroke. The aims of this study were to determine whether acupuncture treatment will be effective in improving the activities of daily living (ADL), motor function and quality of life (QOL) in patients of young ischaemic stroke, and in preventing stroke recurrence by controlling blood pressure, lipids and body weight. Methods and analysis In this randomised, sham-controlled, participant-blinded and assessor-blinded clinical trial, 120 patients between 18 and 45 years of age with a recent (within 1 month) ischaemic stroke will be randomised for an 8-week acupuncture or sham acupuncture treatment. The primary outcome will be the Barthel Index for ADL. The secondary outcomes will include the Fugl-Meyer Assessment for motor function; the World Health Organization Quality of Life BREF (WHOQOL-BREF) for QOL; and risk factors that are measured by ambulatory blood pressure, the fasting serum lipid, body mass index and waist circumference. Incidence of adverse events and long-term mortality and recurrence rate during a 10-year and 30-year follow-up will also be investigated. Ethics and dissemination Ethics approval was obtained from the Ethics Committee of The Third Affiliated Hospital of Zhejiang Chinese Medical University. Protocol V.3 was approved in June 2013. The results will be disseminated in a peer-reviewed journal and presented at international congresses. The results will also be disseminated to patients by telephone during follow-up calls enquiring on the patient's post-study health status. Trial registration number ChiCTR-TRC- 13003317; Pre-results. PMID:26739742

  16. [Pregnancy and acute ischemic stroke].

    PubMed

    Bereczki, Dániel

    2016-05-15

    Pregnancy-related ischemic strokes play an important role in both maternal and fetal morbidity and mortality. Changes in hemostaseology and hemodynamics as well as risk factors related to or independent from pregnancy contribute to the increased stroke-risk during gestation and the puerperium. Potential teratogenic effects make diagnostics, acute therapy and prevention challenging. Because randomized, controlled trials are not available, a multicenter registry of patients with gestational stroke would be desirable. Until definite guidelines emerge, management of acute ischemic stroke during pregnancy remains individual, involving experts and weighing the risks and benefits.

  17. Recurrent varicocele

    PubMed Central

    Rotker, Katherine; Sigman, Mark

    2016-01-01

    Varicocele recurrence is one of the most common complications associated with varicocele repair. A systematic review was performed to evaluate varicocele recurrence rates, anatomic causes of recurrence, and methods of management of recurrent varicoceles. The PubMed database was evaluated using keywords “recurrent” and “varicocele” as well as MESH criteria “recurrent” and “varicocele.” Articles were not included that were not in English, represented single case reports, focused solely on subclinical varicocele, or focused solely on a pediatric population (age <18). Rates of recurrence vary with the technique of varicocele repair from 0% to 35%. Anatomy of recurrence can be defined by venography. Management of varicocele recurrence can be surgical or via embolization. PMID:26806078

  18. SLAP/SLAP2 prevent excessive platelet (hem)ITAM signaling in thrombosis and ischemic stroke in mice.

    PubMed

    Cherpokova, Deya; Bender, Markus; Morowski, Martina; Kraft, Peter; Schuhmann, Michael K; Akbar, Sarah M; Sultan, Cheryl S; Hughes, Craig E; Kleinschnitz, Christoph; Stoll, Guido; Dragone, Leonard L; Watson, Steve P; Tomlinson, Michael G; Nieswandt, Bernhard

    2015-01-01

    Glycoprotein VI and C-type lectin-like receptor 2 are essential platelet activating receptors in hemostasis and thrombo-inflammatory disease, which signal through a (hem)immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif (ITAM)-dependent pathway. The adapter molecules Src-like adapter proteins (SLAP and SLAP2) are involved in the regulation of immune cell surface expression and signaling, but their function in platelets is unknown. In this study, we show that platelets expressed both SLAP isoforms and that overexpression of either protein in a heterologous cell line almost completely inhibited glycoprotein VI and C-type lectin-like receptor 2 signaling. In mice, single deficiency of SLAP or SLAP2 had only moderate effects on platelet function, whereas double deficiency of both adapters resulted in markedly increased signal transduction, integrin activation, granule release, aggregation, procoagulant activity, and thrombin generation in response to (hem)ITAM-coupled, but not G protein-coupled, receptor activation. In vivo, constitutive SLAP/SLAP2 knockout mice displayed accelerated occlusive arterial thrombus formation and a dramatically worsened outcome after focal cerebral ischemia. This was attributed to the absence of both adapter proteins in platelets, as demonstrated by adoptive transfer of Slap(-/-)/Slap2(-/-) platelets into wild-type mice. Our results establish SLAP and SLAP2 as critical inhibitors of platelet (hem)ITAM signaling in the setting of arterial thrombosis and ischemic stroke.

  19. Early Experiences from a guideline-based computerized clinical decision support for stroke prevention in atrial fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Rong; Valladares, Carlos; Corbal, Iago; Anani, Nadim; Koch, Sabine

    2013-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) affects 1-2% of the population. Twenty percent of all strokes are caused by AF. In this study, we represented the clinical knowledge in the European Society of Cardiology guideline using Guideline Definition Language (GDL), a format that binds openEHR archetypes, rule languages, and reference terminologies together. The computerized guidelines are applied to electronic health record (EHR) data retrospectively in order to identify possible gaps between current clinical practice and optimal care recommended by the evidence-based guidelines. Treatment compliance is checked in two patient groups: one received treatment from a cardiologist who is responsible for AF treatment in the region (n=514) and the other was a much larger patient group from the whole region (n=8130). The compliance checking shows the cardiologist group has substantially higher percentage of compliant treatment compared with that of the general population group. Based on this important finding, we are now implementing at-point-of-care clinical decision support reusing the same computerized guideline knowledge in GDL format in order to increase the guideline adherence of the treatment. PMID:23920553

  20. Diabetes, Heart Disease, and Stroke

    MedlinePlus

    ... Disease, and Other Dental Problems Diabetic Eye Disease Diabetes, Heart Disease, and Stroke Having diabetes or prediabetes ... can help prevent future health problems. What is diabetes? Diabetes is a disorder of metabolismthe way our ...

  1. Use of microencapsulated iron(II) fumarate sprinkles to prevent recurrence of anaemia in infants and young children at high risk.

    PubMed Central

    Zlotkin, Stanley; Antwi, Kojo Yeboah; Schauer, Claudia; Yeung, George

    2003-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To compare the effectiveness of microencapsulated iron(II) fumarate sprinkles (with and without vitamin A), iron(II) sulfate drops, and placebo sprinkles in preventing recurrence of anaemia and to determine the long-term haematological outcomes in children at high risk of recurrence of anaemia 12 months after the end of supplementation. METHODS: A prospective, randomized, placebo-controlled design was used to study 437 Ghanaian children aged 8-20 months who were not anaemic (haemoglobin > or = 100 g/l). Four groups were given microencapsulated iron(II) fumarate sprinkles, microencapsulated iron(II) fumarate sprinkles with vitamin A, iron(II) sulfate drops or placebo sprinkles daily for six months. Primary outcome measures were change in haemoglobin and anaemic status at baseline and study end. Non-anaemic children at the end of the supplementation period were reassessed 12 months after supplementation ended. FINDINGS: Overall, 324 children completed the supplementation period. Among the four groups, no significant changes were seen in mean haemoglobin, ferritin or serum retinol values from baseline to the end of the supplementation period. During the trial, 82.4% (267/324) of children maintained their non-anaemic status. Sprinkles were well accepted without complications. At 12 months post-supplementation, 77.1% (162/210) of children with no intervention remained non-anaemic. This proportion was similar for children among the four groups. CONCLUSION: In most children previously treated for anaemia, further supplementation was not needed to maintain their non-anaemic status. These results may have important implications for community intervention programmes in which initial high-dose treatment is needed because of a high prevalence of anaemia. PMID:12756979

  2. Regression of stroke-like lesions in MELAS-syndrome after seizure control.

    PubMed

    Finsterer, Josef; Barton, Peter

    2010-12-01

    There are some indications that seizure activity promotes the development of stroke-like episodes, or vice versa, in patients with mitochondrial encephalopathy, lactic acidosis and stroke-like episodes (MELAS) syndrome or other syndromic mitochondrial disorders. A 41-year-old Caucasian female with MELAS syndrome, presenting with short stature, microcytic anaemia, increased blood-sedimentation rate, myopathy, hyper-gammaglobulinaemia, an iron-metabolism defect, migraine-like headaches, and stroke-like episodes, developed complex partial and generalised seizures at age 32 years. Valproic acid was ineffective but after switching to lamotrigine and lorazepam, she became seizure-free for five years and stroke-like episodes did not recur. Cerebral MRI initially showed enhanced gyral thickening and a non-enhanced T2-hyperintensity over the left parieto-temporo-occipital white matter and cortex and enhanced caudate heads. After two years without seizures, the non-enhanced hyperintense parieto-temporo-occipital lesion had disappeared, being attributed to consequent seizure control. The caudate heads, however, remained hyperintense throughout the observational period. This case indicates that adequate seizure control in a patient with MELAS syndrome may prevent the recurrence of stroke-like episodes and may result in the disappearance of stroke-like lesions on MRI.

  3. Should Blood Pressure Targets After Lacunar Stroke Vary by Body Size? The SPS3 Trial

    PubMed Central

    McClure, Leslie A.; White, Carole L.; Pergola, Pablo E.; Hart, Robert G.; Benavente, Oscar R.; Hill, Michael D.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND It is unknown whether the physiological impact of a given blood pressure (BP) varies by body size. We explored interactions between higher vs. lower systolic BP (SBP) targets and anthropometric measures (body mass index (BMI), body surface area (BSA), height, weight) and recurrent stroke and death in the Secondary Prevention of Small Subcortical Strokes (SPS3) Trial. METHODS Patients with recent magnetic resonance imaging-proven lacunar infarcts were randomized to 2 BP targets (130–149mm Hg vs. <130) in a prospective, open-label, blinded end-point design. Time to outcome was evaluated with Cox proportional hazard models and compared between targets. We examined multiplicative interactions between each anthropometric measure and target and mean difference in achieved BP 1 year after randomization between BP groups by quartile. We also computed rates of recurrent stroke and death by quartiles of anthropometrics. RESULTS Three thousand and twenty patients were followed over a mean of 3.7 (SD 2.0) years. Mean age was 63; 63% were male. Mean height was 167 (SD 11) cm, weight 81 (18) kg, BMI 29 (5.9) kg/m2, and BSA 1.9 (0.25) m2. Achieved BP at 1 year was comparable between quartiles for each anthropometric measurement. We found no consistent interactions between BP target and anthropometrics for either outcome, nor were there any significant associations between hazard of stroke or death when assessed by BMI, BSA, height, or weight. CONCLUSIONS We found no interactions between BP target groups and quartiles of anthropometrics for rates of stroke and death in SPS3. There is no evidence at this time supporting body size-based modifications to current BP targets for secondary prevention after lacunar stroke. CLINICAL TRIALS REGISTRATION Trial Number NCT00059306 PMID:25452300

  4. Local heat stroke prevention plans in Japan: characteristics and elements for public health adaptation to climate change.

    PubMed

    Martinez, Gerardo Sanchez; Imai, Chisato; Masumo, Kanako

    2011-12-01

    The adverse health effects from hot weather and heat waves represent significant public health risks in vulnerable areas worldwide. Rising temperatures due to climate change are aggravating these risks in a context of fast urbanization, population growth and societal ageing. However, environmental heat-related health effects are largely preventable through adequate preparedness and responses. Public health adaptation to climate change will often require the implementation of heat wave warning systems and targeted preventive activities at different levels. While several national governments have established such systems at the country level, municipalities do not generally play a major role in the prevention of heat disorders. This paper analyzes selected examples of locally operated heat-health prevention plans in Japan. The analysis of these plans highlights their strengths, but also the need of local institutions for assistance to make the transition towards an effective public health management of high temperatures and heat waves. It can also provide useful elements for municipal governments in vulnerable areas, both in planning their climate change and health adaptation activities or to better protect their communities against current health effects from heat.

  5. Local Heat Stroke Prevention Plans in Japan: Characteristics and Elements for Public Health Adaptation to Climate Change

    PubMed Central

    Martinez, Gerardo Sanchez; Imai, Chisato; Masumo, Kanako

    2011-01-01

    The adverse health effects from hot weather and heat waves represent significant public health risks in vulnerable areas worldwide. Rising temperatures due to climate change are aggravating these risks in a context of fast urbanization, population growth and societal ageing. However, environmental heat-related health effects are largely preventable through adequate preparedness and responses. Public health adaptation to climate change will often require the implementation of heat wave warning systems and targeted preventive activities at different levels. While several national governments have established such systems at the country level, municipalities do not generally play a major role in the prevention of heat disorders. This paper analyzes selected examples of locally operated heat-health prevention plans in Japan. The analysis of these plans highlights their strengths, but also the need of local institutions for assistance to make the transition towards an effective public health management of high temperatures and heat waves. It can also provide useful elements for municipal governments in vulnerable areas, both in planning their climate change and health adaptation activities or to better protect their communities against current health effects from heat. PMID:22408589

  6. Prevention: What You Can Do

    MedlinePlus

    ... this? Submit What's this? Submit Button Related CDC Web Sites Division for Heart Disease and Stroke Prevention ... this? Submit What's this? Submit Button Related CDC Web Sites Division for Heart Disease and Stroke Prevention ...

  7. Anticoagulation for the prevention of stroke in non-valvular AF in general practice: room for improvement

    PubMed Central

    Ioannou, Adam; Metaxa, Sofia; Kassianos, George; Missouris, Constantinos G.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Our aim was to assess whether the recommendations and guidelines for thromboprophylaxis in patients with atrial fibrillation (AF) have been adopted in general practice (GP). Methods: We conducted a retrospective study using the GP computer database (Hatfield, UK) on all 9400 patients to assess the quality of anticoagulation in patients with a recorded diagnosis of AF. Results: Of the 180 patients with a diagnosis of AF, 107 (59.4%) were treated with warfarin, 19 (10.6%) with a novel oral anticoagulant (NOAC), 31 (17.2%) with aspirin or clopidogrel, and 23 (12.8%) received none. Thirty-seven patients (34.6%) who were taking warfarin had a time in the therapeutic range (TTR) of less than 65%. Forty-five (27.6%) of the 163 patients who had a CHA2DS2VASc score of two or more were not prescribed a vitamin K antagonist (VKA) or a NOAC. None had a HAS-BLED greater than the CHA2DS2VASc score. Conclusion: Our study demonstrates that one in four patients with non-valvular AF, at risk of a stroke, is not being adequately treated with an oral anticoagulant in primary care. The majority were treated with warfarin, a third of which had a low TTR. A high proportion of patients are prescribed antiplatelet therapy instead. This is despite overwhelming evidence that VKAs and NOACs, and not aspirin or clopidogrel, improve outcome in patients with non-valvular AF. We suggest that a review of GP practice databases should be considered to identify patients with non-valvular AF, at risk of a disabling or fatal event, and measures taken to initiate anticoagulant therapy. PMID:27403193

  8. Rationale and design of a secondary prevention trial of lowering normal plasma cholesterol levels after acute myocardial infarction: the Cholesterol and Recurrent Events trial (CARE)

    PubMed

    Sacks, F M; Pfeffer, M A; Moye', L; Brown, L E; Hamm, P; Cole, T G; Hawkins, C M; Braunwald, E

    1991-12-01

    Recent clinical trials of primary and secondary prevention of cardiovascular disease have demonstrated that lowering plasma cholesterol decreases the incidence of coronary heart disease in patients with elevated plasma cholesterol. However, it is not known whether patients with established coronary artery disease and normal plasma cholesterol can be benefited. Several previous prevention trials reviewed in this report found that patients who had plasma cholesterol levels at baseline in the upper portion of the eligibility range (e.g., greater than 240 mg/dl) received greater benefit from hypolipidemic diet or drug therapy than patients who had lower plasma cholesterol levels at baseline. The recent availability of drugs that are more potent and less prone to cause adverse reactions than previous regimens permits this important question to be addressed. The Cholesterol and Recurrent Events trial is testing whether pravastatin, a hydroxymethylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase inhibitor, will decrease the sum of fatal coronary heart disease and nonfatal myocardial infarction (MI) in patients who have recovered from a MI and who have normal total cholesterol levels. Fatal cardiovascular disease and total mortality are important secondary end points. The trial is enrolling 4,000 men and women from 80 centers throughout North America, age 21 to 75 years, who have survived MI for 3 to 20 months, who have plasma total cholesterol less than 240 mg/dl (6.2 mmol/liter) and low-density cholesterol of 115 to 174 mg/dl (3.0 to 4.5 mmol/liter), and who are representative of the general population of patients with MI. Patients are randomized to either active or inactive drug therapy. Active therapy consists of pravastatin, 40 mg/day, designed to achieve an average decrease in low-density lipoprotein cholesterol of approximately 30%, and an increase in high-density lipoprotein of 5%. The average duration of follow-up will be greater than or equal to 5 years. To protect against a lower

  9. Urinary metabolites of prostanoids and risk of recurrent colorectal adenomas in the Aspirin/Folate Polyp Prevention Study (AFPPS).

    PubMed

    Fedirko, Veronika; Bradshaw, Patrick T; Figueiredo, Jane C; Sandler, Robert S; Barry, Elizabeth L; Ahnen, Dennis J; Milne, Ginger L; Bresalier, Robert S; Baron, John A

    2015-11-01

    Aspirin has been shown to protect against colorectal neoplasms; however, the optimal chemopreventive dose and underlying mechanisms are unclear. We aimed to study the relationship between prostanoid metabolites and aspirin's effect on adenoma occurrence. We used data from the Aspirin/Folate Polyp Prevention Study, in which 1,121 participants with a recent adenoma were randomized to placebo or two doses of aspirin (81 or 325 mg/d) to be taken until the next surveillance colonoscopy, anticipated about 3 years later. Urinary metabolites of prostanoids (PGE-M, PGI-M, and dTxB2) were measured using liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry or GC/NICI-MS in 876 participants near the end of treatment follow-up. Poisson regression with a robust error variance was used to calculate relative risks and 95% confidence intervals. PGE-M, PGI-M, and dTxB2 levels were 28%, 37%, and 60% proportionately lower, respectively, in individuals who took 325 mg of aspirin compared with individuals who took placebo (all P < 0.001). Similarly, among individuals who took 81 mg of aspirin, PGE-M, PGI-M, and dTxB2 were, respectively, 18%, 30%, and 57% proportionally lower compared with placebo (all P < 0.005). None of the metabolites or their ratios were statistically significantly associated with the risk of adenoma occurrence. The effect of aspirin in reducing adenoma risk was independent of prostanoid levels. Aspirin use is associated with lower levels of urinary prostanoid metabolites. However, our findings do not support the hypothesis that these metabolites are associated with adenoma occurrence, suggesting that COX-dependent mechanisms may not completely explain the chemopreventive effect of aspirin on colorectal neoplasms. PMID:26304466

  10. Predictors of Recurrent AKI.

    PubMed

    Siew, Edward D; Parr, Sharidan K; Abdel-Kader, Khaled; Eden, Svetlana K; Peterson, Josh F; Bansal, Nisha; Hung, Adriana M; Fly, James; Speroff, Ted; Ikizler, T Alp; Matheny, Michael E

    2016-04-01

    Recurrent AKI is common among patients after hospitalized AKI and is associated with progressive CKD. In this study, we identified clinical risk factors for recurrent AKI present during index AKI hospitalizations that occurred between 2003 and 2010 using a regional Veterans Administration database in the United States. AKI was defined as a 0.3 mg/dl or 50% increase from a baseline creatinine measure. The primary outcome was hospitalization with recurrent AKI within 12 months of discharge from the index hospitalization. Time to recurrent AKI was examined using Cox regression analysis, and sensitivity analyses were performed using a competing risk approach. Among 11,683 qualifying AKI hospitalizations, 2954 patients (25%) were hospitalized with recurrent AKI within 12 months of discharge. Median time to recurrent AKI within 12 months was 64 (interquartile range 19-167) days. In addition to known demographic and comorbid risk factors for AKI, patients with longer AKI duration and those whose discharge diagnosis at index AKI hospitalization included congestive heart failure (primary diagnosis), decompensated advanced liver disease, cancer with or without chemotherapy, acute coronary syndrome, or volume depletion, were at highest risk for being hospitalized with recurrent AKI. Risk factors identified were similar when a competing risk model for death was applied. In conclusion, several inpatient conditions associated with AKI may increase the risk for recurrent AKI. These findings should facilitate risk stratification, guide appropriate patient referral after AKI, and help generate potential risk reduction strategies. Efforts to identify modifiable factors to prevent recurrent AKI in these patients are warranted.

  11. Effectiveness of a propolis and zinc solution in preventing acute otitis media in children with a history of recurrent acute otitis media.

    PubMed

    Marchisio, P; Esposito, S; Bianchini, S; Desantis, C; Galeone, C; Nazzari, E; Pignataro, L; Principi, N

    2010-01-01

    Recurrent acute otitis media (rAOM) is frequently encountered in infants and children and the lack of any definitive treatment has led parents and physicians to try complementary and alternative therapies. We evaluated the efficacy of a propolis and zinc suspension in preventing AOM in 122 children aged 1-5 years with a documented history of rAOM, who were prospectively, blindly, randomized 1:1 to receive the suspension plus elimination of environmental risk factors or elimination of environmental risk factors only. AOM- and respiratory-related morbidity were assessed at study entry and every four weeks. In the 3-month treatment period AOM was diagnosed in 31 (50.8%) children given the propolis and zinc suspension and in 43 (70.5%) controls (p=0.04). The mean number of episodes of AOM per child/month was 0.23+/-0.26 in the propolis and zinc group and 0.34+/-0.29 in controls (reduction 32.0%, p=0.03). The administration of a propolis and zinc suspension to children with a history of rAOM can significantly reduce the risk of new AOM episodes and AOM-related antibiotic courses, with no problem of safety or tolerability, and with a very good degree of parental satisfaction. No effect can be expected on respiratory infections other than AOM.

  12. Proteomic footprinting of drug-treated cancer cells as a measure of cellular vaccine efficacy for the prevention of cancer recurrence.

    PubMed

    Balashova, Elena E; Dashtiev, Maxim I; Lokhov, Petr G

    2012-02-01

    The comparative proteomic study of cell surfaces of native and drug-treated cancer cells was performed. To this end, cell proteomic footprinting, which reflects the mass spectrometry profiling of cell surface proteins, was applied to breast adenocarcinoma cells (MCF-7), which were untreated or treated with doxorubicin, tamoxifen, or etoposide. The footprints of drug-treated cells were compared with the footprints of untreated cells and the footprint of a randomly selected control cancer cell culture. It was found that drug-treated cells have reproducible, pronounced, and drug-specific changes in cell surface protein expression. Cytotoxicity assays, which are an in vitro model of human antitumor vaccination, revealed that the degree of these changes correlates directly with the ability of the cancer cells to escape cell death induced by a cytotoxic T-cell-mediated immune response. Moreover, cancer cells escape from the immune response was linearly approximated (R(2) equal to 0.99) with the degree by which their proteomic footprints diverged from the footprint of the targeted (native) cancer cells. From these findings, it was concluded that the design of anticancer vaccines intended to prevent cancer recurrence after primary treatment should consider the drug-specific changes in cancer cell-surface antigens. Such changes can be easily identified by cell proteomic footprinting, renewing hopes for development of efficient cellular cancer vaccines.

  13. Evaluating quality and its determinants in lipid control for secondary prevention of heart disease and stroke in primary care: a study in an inner London Borough

    PubMed Central

    Dodhia, Hiten; Kun, Liu; Logan Ellis, Hugh; Crompton, James; Wierzbicki, Anthony S; Williams, Helen; Hodgkinson, Anna; Balazs, John

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To assess quality of management and determinants in lipid control for secondary prevention of cardiovascular disease (CVD) using multilevel regression models. Design Cross-sectional study. Setting Inner London borough, with a primary care registered population of 378 000 (2013). Participants 48/49 participating general practices with 7869 patients on heart disease/stroke registers were included. Outcome measures (1) Recording of current total cholesterol levels and lipid control according to national evidence-based standards. (2) Assessment of quality by age, sex, ethnicity, deprivation, presence of other risks or comorbidity in meeting both lipid measurement and control standards. Results Some process standards were not met. Patients with a current cholesterol measurement >5 mmol/L were less likely to have a current statin prescription (adjusted OR=3.10; 95% CI 2.70 to 3.56). They were more likely to have clustering of other CVD risk factors. Women were significantly more likely to have raised cholesterol after adjustment for other factors (adjusted OR=1.74; 95% CI 1.53 to 1.98). Conclusions In this study, the key factor that explained poor lipid control in people with CVD was having no current prescription record of a statin. Women were more likely to have poorly controlled cholesterol (independent of comorbid risk factors and after adjusting for age, ethnicity, deprivation index and practice-level variation). Women with CVD should be offered statin prescription and may require higher statin dosage for improved control. PMID:26656014

  14. Recovering after stroke

    MedlinePlus

    Stroke rehabilitation; Cerebrovascular accident - rehabilitation; Recovery from stroke; Stroke - recovery; CVA - recovery ... LIVE AFTER A STROKE Most people will need stroke rehabilitation (rehab) to help them recover after they leave ...

  15. Stroke Warning Signs

    MedlinePlus

    ... News Advocate Stroke Warning Signs Quiz Stroke Warning Signs and Symptoms THINK YOU ARE HAVING A STROKE? ... Learn more stroke signs and symptoms >>>> Stroke Warning Signs Hip-Hop F.A.S.T. Video Updated Guidelines ...

  16. Stroke and the female brain.

    PubMed

    Bushnell, Cheryl D

    2008-01-01

    Stroke is a major public health problem. The female population carries a higher stroke burden than the male population, both because females have a longer life expectancy and because most stroke deaths occur in women. Differences between the sexes in relation to stroke are increasingly being recognized; for example, among stroke survivors, women tend to have worse outcomes than men, as indicated by more-severe disability and an increased likelihood of institutionalization in women. Women and men with stroke also differ in their risk factor profiles, and they respond differently to primary-prevention and acute stroke treatment. Women experience variations in endogenous estrogens throughout their life cycle and might also be exposed to exogenous estrogens, both of which markedly affect the brain. An understanding of the effects of endogenous and exogenous estrogens on cerebral hemodynamics could guide research into explaining how hormone therapy increases the risk of stroke in postmenopausal women. This Review summarizes the sex differences related to stroke, and the effect of endogenous and exogenous hormones on the cerebrovasculature of the female brain. It also proposes potential research approaches, the results of which could fill in gaps in our knowledge regarding the mechanism of action of estrogen in the brain.

  17. Role of echocardiography in patients with stroke.

    PubMed

    Nakanishi, Koki; Homma, Shunichi

    2016-08-01

    Investigation of potential embolic source is an important diagnostic step in treating patients with ischemic stroke and transient ischemic attack. Cardiogenic embolism has been estimated to be the causative factor in 15-30% of all cases of ischemic stroke. Cardioembolic strokes are generally severe and recurrence and mortality rate high. Various cardiac disorders including atrial fibrillation, ventricular thrombus, valvular heart disease, cardiac tumors, and structural heart defects can cause cardioembolic stroke. Although the aortic arch is not a cardiac structure, it is usually considered under source of cardiac embolism (cardioaortic source) and is reviewed in this article. Echocardiography (both transthoracic and transesophageal) is a widely used and versatile technique that can provide comprehensive information of thromboembolic risk in patients with stroke. This article reviews potential cardiac sources of stroke and discusses the role of echocardiography in clinical practice. PMID:27256218

  18. Worldwide under-funding of stroke research.

    PubMed

    Pendlebury, Sarah T

    2007-05-01

    The clinical and financial burdens of stroke are considerable. Stroke is the leading cause of death and disability in the developed world and incidence is rapidly increasing in the developing world. However, investment in research to combat stroke has been remarkably poor. Studies from the United Kingdom, Europe and the United States have shown a highly consistent picture, with considerably lower levels of funding for stroke research compared with cancer and heart disease. Without better funding for stroke research, it is unlikely that progress in prevention and treatment will offset the projected increases in the burden of stroke. Stroke physicians and public interest groups need to be active advocates in securing increased funding for stroke research.

  19. Ischemic Stroke.

    PubMed

    Capriotti, Teri; Murphy, Teresa

    2016-05-01

    Each year, more than 795,000 people in the United States suffer a stroke and by 2030, it is estimated that 4% of the U.S. population will have had a stroke. Home healthcare clinicians will be increasingly called upon to assist stroke survivors and their caregivers adjust to disability and assist the survivor during their reintegration into the community. Therapeutic modalities are changing with advanced technology. Great strides are being made in the treatment of acute stroke; particularly endovascular interventions. More patients are surviving the acute stroke event and therefore will need to learn how to live with various degrees of disability. It is important for home healthcare clinicians to understand the process from acute event to medical stabilization, and from rehabilitation to long-term adaptation.

  20. Ischemic Stroke.

    PubMed

    Capriotti, Teri; Murphy, Teresa

    2016-05-01

    Each year, more than 795,000 people in the United States suffer a stroke and by 2030, it is estimated that 4% of the U.S. population will have had a stroke. Home healthcare clinicians will be increasingly called upon to assist stroke survivors and their caregivers adjust to disability and assist the survivor during their reintegration into the community. Therapeutic modalities are changing with advanced technology. Great strides are being made in the treatment of acute stroke; particularly endovascular interventions. More patients are surviving the acute stroke event and therefore will need to learn how to live with various degrees of disability. It is important for home healthcare clinicians to understand the process from acute event to medical stabilization, and from rehabilitation to long-term adaptation. PMID:27145407

  1. Association of the Idiotype:Antiidiotype Antibody Ratio With the Efficacy of Intravenous Immunoglobulin Treatment for the Prevention of Recurrent Autoimmune-Associated Congenital Heart Block

    PubMed Central

    Routsias, John G.; Kyriakidis, Nikolaos C.; Friedman, Deborah M.; Llanos, Carolina; Clancy, Robert; Moutsopoulos, Haralampos M.; Buyon, Jill; Tzioufas, Athanasios G.

    2013-01-01

    Id–anti-Id network of a specific pathogenic autoantibody. Specifically, we showed that IVIG enhanced the anti-Id antibody response in pregnant women with anti-La/SSB antibodies. A high Id:anti-Id ratio in both the IVIG preparation and the maternal serum may explain the absence of an effect of IVIG in preventing recurrent neonatal lupus in some cases. PMID:21618202

  2. [Reducing the burden of stroke in Israel].

    PubMed

    Tanne, David; Goldbourt, Uri

    2008-11-01

    Stroke is the third most common cause of death in Israel. Stroke is a leading cause of severe long-term disability and is associated with staggering economic costs. Ethnic variations observed in stroke mortality rates support that undetermined inherent genetic or sociocultural differences act to increase stroke mortality rates in immigrants from Asia and North Africa over that predicted from their profile of traditional risk factors. In accordance with other Western countries, there has been a decline in mortality rates from stroke, concomitantly with a decline observed in coronary heart disease mortality. With the aging of the population, the burden of stroke is projected to further increase. Moreover, brain infarcts detected by brain imaging are 5-times more common than the clinical syndrome of acute stroke, detected in about 20% of healthy elderly and up to 50% of high risk patients. Estimates of the incidence of stroke, characteristics of patients, management and outcome became available from the tri-annual national acute stroke Israeli survey (NASIS) program, initiated during 2004. The annual incidence of hospitalized acute cerebrovascular events is approximately 13,000 and rates, particularly in women, seem even higher than those observed for acute myocardial infarction. Findings also highlight critical deficiencies in acute stroke units and systems for urgent evaluation and intervention in acute stroke. Action plans are urgently required, in accordance with the experience from other countries, in order to upgrade the stroke infrastructure nationwide for more effective prevention and management of acute stroke.

  3. Early real-world evidence of persistence on oral anticoagulants for stroke prevention in non-valvular atrial fibrillation: a cohort study in UK primary care

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Michelle E; Lefèvre, Cinira; Collings, Shuk-Li; Evans, David; Kloss, Sebastian; Ridha, Essra; Maguire, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To examine the characteristics and persistence in patients newly initiated with oral anticoagulants (OACs) for stroke prevention in non-valvular atrial fibrillation (NVAF). Design Cohort study in Clinical Practice Research Datalink. Setting UK primary care. Participants 15 242 patients with NVAF newly prescribed apixaban, rivaroxaban, dabigatran or vitamin K antagonists (VKAs) between 1 December 2012 and 31 October 2014. 13 089 patients were OAC naïve. Outcome measures Patient characteristics and risk of non-persistence compared to apixaban using Cox regression models over the entire follow-up and using a time-partitioned approach to handle non-proportional hazards. Results Among the OAC naïve patients, VKAs were most common (78.1%, n=10 218), followed by rivaroxaban (12.1%, n=1589), dabigatran (5.7%, n=741) and apixaban (4.1%, n=541). High baseline stroke risk (CHA2DS2VASc ≥2) ranged from 80.2% (dabigatran) to 88.4% (apixaban and rivaroxaban). History of stroke and bleeding was the highest among apixaban (23.7% and 31.6%) and lowest among VKA patients (15.9% and 27.5%). Across the entire follow-up period, adjusting for differences in characteristics, there was no evidence of a difference in non-persistence between VKA and apixaban (HR 0.92 (95% CI 0.68 to 1.23)). Non-persistence was higher with dabigatran (HR 1.67 (1.20 to 2.32)) and rivaroxaban (HR 1.41 (1.02 to 1.93)) than apixaban. Using the partitioned approach, non-persistence was lower with VKA (HR 0.33 (0.22 to 0.48)), and higher with dabigatran (HR 1.65 (1.08 to 2.52)) compared to apixaban in the first 2 months of follow-up. After 2 months, non-persistence was higher with VKA (HR 1.70 (1.08 to 2.66)) and dabigatran (HR 2.10 (1.30 to 3.41)). Pooling OAC naïve and experienced patients, non-persistence was also higher with rivaroxaban compared to apixaban after 2 months of follow-up (HR 1.69 (1.19 to 2.39)). Conclusions Observed differential prescribing of OACs can result in

  4. ESCAPS study protocol: a feasibility randomised controlled trial of ‘Early electrical stimulation to the wrist extensors and wrist flexors to prevent the post-stroke complications of pain and contractures in the paretic arm’

    PubMed Central

    Fletcher-Smith, Joanna C; Walker, Dawn-Marie; Sprigg, Nikola; James, Marilyn; Walker, Marion F; Allatt, Kate; Mehta, Rajnikant; Pandyan, Anand D

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Approximately 70% of patients with stroke experience impaired arm function, which is persistent and disabling for an estimated 40%. Loss of function reduces independence in daily activities and impacts on quality of life. Muscles in those who do not recover functional movement in the stroke affected arm are at risk of atrophy and contractures, which can be established as early as 6 weeks following stroke. Pain is also common. This study aims to evaluate the feasibility of a randomised controlled trial to test the efficacy and cost-effectiveness of delivering early intensive electrical stimulation (ES) to prevent post-stroke complications in the paretic upper limb. Methods and analysis This is a feasibility randomised controlled trial (n=40) with embedded qualitative studies (patient/carer interviews and therapist focus groups) and feasibility economic evaluation. Patients will be recruited from the Stroke Unit at the Nottingham University Hospitals National Health Service (NHS) Trust within 72 h after stroke. Participants will be randomised to receive usual care or usual care and early ES to the wrist flexors and extensors for 30 min twice a day, 5 days a week for 3 months. The initial treatment(s) will be delivered by an occupational therapist or physiotherapist who will then train the patient and/or their nominated carer to self-manage subsequent treatments. Ethics and dissemination This study has been granted ethical approval by the National Research Ethics Service, East Midlands Nottingham1 Research Ethics Committee (ref: 15/EM/0006). To our knowledge, this is the first study of its kind of the early application (within 72 h post-stroke) of ES to both the wrist extensors and wrist flexors of stroke survivors with upper limb impairment. The results will inform the design of a definitive randomised controlled trial. Dissemination will include 2 peer-reviewed journal publications and presentations at national conferences. Trial

  5. Post-emergency department management of stroke.

    PubMed

    Brown, Devin L; Haley, E Clarke

    2002-08-01

    All stroke patients ideally should be admitted to a stroke unit in which personnel are familiar with strategies for taking care of stroke patients. Prevention of worsening cerebral ischemia by appropriate blood pressure and serum glucose management, fever control, and supplemental oxygen for hypoxemic patients is recommended. Recognition of common complications, such as aspiration pneumonia and deep venous thrombosis, highlights the need for swallowing evaluation and the use of pneumatic compression devices or subcutaneous heparin. Patients should be monitored closely for deterioration in their neurologic status and should have complications appropriately addressed. After evaluation of stroke etiology, appropriate secondary stroke prophylaxis should be selected and initiated before hospital discharge.

  6. Relations between Recent Past Leisure Activities with Risks of Dementia and Cognitive Functions after Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Adrian; Lau, Alexander Y. L.; Lo, Eugene; Tang, Michael; Wang, Zhaolu; Liu, Wenyan; Tanner, Nicole; Chau, Natalie; Law, Lorraine; Shi, Lin; Chu, Winnie C. W.; Yang, Jie; Xiong, Yun-yun; Lam, Bonnie Y. K.; Au, Lisa; Chan, Anne Y. Y.; Soo, Yannie; Leung, Thomas W. H.; Wong, Lawrence K. S.; Lam, Linda C. W.; Mok, Vincent C. T.

    2016-01-01

    Background Leisure activity participation has been shown to lower risks of cognitive decline in non-stroke populations. However, effects of leisure activities participation upon cognitive functions and risk of dementia after stroke are unclear. The purpose of this study is to examine the effects of recent past leisure activities participation upon cognitive functions and risk of incident dementia after stroke. Methods Hospital-based, retrospective cohort study. 88 of 1,013 patients with stroke or TIA having no prestroke dementia were diagnosed to have incident poststroke dementia (PSD) 3–6 months after stroke. Regular participation (≥3 times per week) in intellectual, recreational, social and physical activities over the year before the index stroke was retrospectively recorded at 3–6 months after stroke. Results Logistic regression analyses showed that regular participation in intellectual (RR 0.36, 95%CI 0.20–0.63) and stretching & toning physical exercise (0.37, 0.21–0.64) was significantly associated with a reduced risk of PSD after controlling for age, education, prestroke cognitive decline, stroke subtype, prior strokes and chronic brain changes including white matter changes, old infarcts and global atrophy. Results were similar in patients with past strokes in unadjusted models. Participation in increased number of activities in general (r = 0.41, p<0.01) and in intellectual (r = 0.40, p<0.01), recreational (r = 0.24, p<0.01), strenuous aerobic (r = 0.23, p<0.01) and mind-body (r = 0.10, p<0.01) activities was associated with higher poststroke Mini-mental State Examination scores in models adjusted for prestroke cognitive decline. Conclusions Regular participation in intellectual activities and stretching & toning exercise was associated with a significantly reduced short-term risk of PSD in patients with and without recurrent strokes. Participation in greater number of recent past leisure activities was associated with better poststroke cognitive

  7. Stroke in Children With Cardiac Disease: Report From the International Pediatric Stroke Study Group Symposium

    PubMed Central

    Sinclair, Adriane J.; Fox, Christine K.; Ichord, Rebecca N.; Almond, Christopher S.; Bernard, Timothy J.; Beslow, Lauren A.; Chan, Anthony K.C.; Cheung, Michael; deVeber, Gabrielle; Dowling, Michael M.; Friedman, Neil; Giglia, Therese M.; Guilliams, Kristin P.; Humpl, Tilman; Licht, Daniel J.; Mackay, Mark T.; Jordan, Lori C.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Cardiac disease is a leading cause of stroke in children, yet limited data support the current stroke prevention and treatment recommendations. A multidisciplinary panel of clinicians was convened in February 2014 by the International Pediatric Stroke Study group to identify knowledge gaps and prioritize clinical research efforts for children with cardiac disease and stroke. RESULTS Significant knowledge gaps exist, including a lack of data on stroke incidence, predictors, primary and secondary stroke prevention, hyperacute treatment, and outcome in children with cardiac disease. Commonly used diagnostic techniques including brain computed tomography and ultrasound have low rates of stroke detection, and diagnosis is frequently delayed. The challenges of research studies in this population include epidemiologic barriers to research such as small patient numbers, heterogeneity of cardiac disease, and coexistence of multiple risk factors. Based on stroke burden and study feasibility, studies involving mechanical circulatory support, single ventricle patients, early stroke detection strategies, and understanding secondary stroke risk factors and prevention are the highest research priorities over the next 5-10 years. The development of large-scale multicenter and multispecialty collaborative research is a critical next step. The designation of centers of expertise will assist in clinical care and research. CONCLUSIONS There is an urgent need for additional research to improve the quality of evidence in guideline recommendations for cardiogenic stroke in children. Although significant barriers to clinical research exist, multicenter and multispecialty collaboration is an important step toward advancing clinical care and research for children with cardiac disease and stroke. PMID:25532775

  8. Evaluation of docosahexaenoic acid deficiency as a preventable risk factor for recurrent affective disorders: current status, future directions, and dietary recommendations.

    PubMed

    McNamara, Robert K

    2009-01-01

    Major recurrent affective disorders, including major depressive disorder (MDD) and bipolar disorder, represent a growing public health crisis in the United States. Evidence from cross-national and cross-sectional epidemiological surveys, comparative peripheral and central composition studies, and placebo-controlled intervention trials suggest that n-3 fatty acid deficiency may contribute to the pathoaetiology of affective disorders. These data are reviewed with the objective of estimating a daily docosahexaenoic acid (DHA, 22:6n-3) intake value that is projected to be efficacious in mitigating vulnerability. It is proposed that daily DHA intake sufficient to increase erythrocyte DHA composition to a level found in healthy subjects from Japan (7%), where the lifetime prevalence rates of MDD and bipolar disorder are several fold lower than the US, represents an appropriate target. To achieve this target, preliminary DHA intervention trials indicate that a daily dose of 400-700 mg/d in children and 700-1000 mg/d in adults would be required. Based on the results of placebo-controlled intervention trials, a higher daily DHA dose in the order of 1000-1500 mg/d in a 2:1 eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA, 20:5n-3):DHA ratio may be optimal for the treatment of established affective disorders. These recommendations are intended to guide future dose-ranging placebo-controlled DHA intervention trials in patients with established affective disorders, as well as in asymptomatic subjects at elevated risk for developing affective disorders. Such early intervention studies are currently feasible and will ultimately be required to definitively evaluate whether DHA is a required nutrient for the prevention of affective disorders.

  9. Prevention

    MedlinePlus

    ... our e-newsletter! Aging & Health A to Z Prevention Basic Facts & Information Some factors that affect your ... control of the things that you can change. Preventive Recommendations for Adults Aged 65 and Older The ...

  10. Optimizing Stroke Prevention in Patients With Atrial Fibrillation: A Cluster-Randomized Controlled Trial of a Computerized Antithrombotic Risk Assessment Tool in Australian General Practice, 2012–2013

    PubMed Central

    Magin, Parker J.; Hilmer, Sarah N.; Krass, Ines

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Clinicians have expressed a need for tools to assist in selecting treatments for stroke prevention in patients with atrial fibrillation. The objective of this study was to evaluate the impact of a computerized antithrombotic risk assessment tool (CARAT) on general practitioners’ prescribing of antithrombotics for patients with atrial fibrillation. Methods A prospective, cluster-randomized controlled trial was conducted in 4 regions (in rural and urban settings) of general practice in New South Wales, Australia (January 2012–June 2013). General practitioner practices were assigned to an intervention arm (CARAT) or control arm (usual care). Antithrombotic therapy prescribing was assessed before and after application of CARAT. Results Overall, the antithrombotic therapies for 393 patients were reviewed by 48 general practitioners; we found no significant baseline differences in use of antithrombotics between the control arm and intervention arm. Compared with control patients, intervention patients (n = 206) were 3.1 times more likely to be recommended warfarin therapy (over any other treatment option; P < .001) and 2.8 times more likely to be recommended any anticoagulant (in preference to antiplatelet; P = .02). General practitioners agreed with most (75.2%) CARAT recommendations; CARAT recommended that 75 (36.4%) patients change therapy. After application of CARAT, the proportion of patients receiving any antithrombotic therapy was unchanged from baseline (99.0%); however, anticoagulant use increased slightly (from 89.3% to 92.2%), and antiplatelet use decreased (from 9.7% to 6.8%). Conclusion Tools such as CARAT can assist clinicians in selecting antithrombotic therapies, particularly in upgrading patients from antiplatelets to anticoagulants. However, the introduction of novel oral anticoagulants has complicated the decision-making process, and tools must evolve to weigh the risks and benefits of these new therapy options. PMID:27418212

  11. Association between Body Mass Index and All-Cause Mortality in Hypertensive Adults: Results from the China Stroke Primary Prevention Trial (CSPPT)

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Wei; Li, Jian-Ping; Zhang, Yan; Fan, Fang-Fang; Xu, Xi-Ping; Wang, Bin-Yan; Xu, Xin; Qin, Xian-Hui; Xing, Hou-Xun; Tang, Gen-Fu; Zhou, Zi-Yi; Gu, Dong-Feng; Zhao, Dong; Huo, Yong

    2016-01-01

    The association between elevated body mass index (BMI) and risk of death has been reported in many studies. However, the association between BMI and all-cause mortality for hypertensive Chinese adults remains unclear. We conducted a post-hoc analysis using data from the China Stroke Primary Prevention Trial (CSPPT). Cox regression analysis was performed to determine the significance of the association of BMI with all-cause mortality. During a mean follow-up duration of 4.5 years, 622 deaths (3.0%) occurred among the 20,694 participants aged 45–75 years. A reversed J-shaped relationship was observed between BMI and all-cause mortality. The hazard ratios (HRs) for underweight (<18.5 kg/m2), overweight (24.0–27.9 kg/m2), and obesity (≥28.0 kg/m2) were calculated relative to normal weight (18.5–23.9 kg/m2). The summary HRs were 1.56 (95% CI, 1.11–2.18) for underweight, 0.78 (95% CI 0.64–0.95) for overweight and 0.64 (95% CI, 0.48–0.85) for obesity. In sex-age-specific analyses, participants over 60 years of age had optimal BMI in the obesity classification and the results were consistent in both males and females. Relative to normal weight, underweight was associated with significantly higher mortality. Excessive weight was not associated with increased risk of mortality. Chinese hypertensive adults had the lowest mortality in grade 1 obesity. PMID:27338470

  12. Prevention of EP Migratory Contamination in a Cluster Randomized Trial to Increase tPA Use in Stroke (The INSTINCT Trial)

    PubMed Central

    Weston, Victoria C.; Meurer, William J.; Frederiksen, Shirley M.; Fox, Allison K.; Scott, Phillip A.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Cluster randomized trials (CRTs) are increasingly utilized to evaluate quality improvement interventions aimed at healthcare providers. In trials testing emergency department interventions, migration of emergency physicians (EPs) between hospitals is an important concern, as contamination may affect both internal and external validity. We hypothesized that geographically isolating emergency departments would prevent migratory contamination in a CRT designed to increase ED delivery of tPA in stroke (The INSTINCT Trial). Methods INSTINCT was a prospective, cluster randomized, controlled trial. 24 Michigan community hospitals were randomly selected in matched pairs for study. Contamination was defined at the cluster level, with substantial contamination defined a priori as >10% of EPs affected. Non-adherence, total crossover (contamination + non-adherence), migration distance and characteristics were determined. Results 307 emergency physicians were identified at all sites. Overall, 7 (2.3%) changed study sites. 1 moved between control sites, leaving 6 (2.0%) total crossovers. Of these, 2 (0.7%) moved from intervention to control (contamination) and 4 (1.3%) moved from control to intervention (non-adherence). Contamination was observed in 2 of 12 control sites, with 17% and 9% contamination of the total site EP workforce at follow-up, respectively. Average migration distance was 42 miles for all EPs moving in the study and 35 miles for EPs moving from intervention to control sites. Conclusion The mobile nature of emergency physicians should be considered in the design of quality improvement CRTs. Increased reporting of contamination in CRTs is encouraged to clarify thresholds and facilitate CRT design. PMID:25440230

  13. Cardiovascular Disease Burden: Evolving Knowledge of Risk Factors in Myocardial Infarction and Stroke through Population-Based Research and Perspectives in Global Prevention.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Gustavo B F; Avezum, Alvaro; Roever, Leonardo

    2015-01-01

    Current knowledge and research perspectives on the top ranking causes of mortality worldwide, i.e., ischemic heart disease and cerebrovascular diseases have developed rapidly. In fact, until recently, the evidence describing the incidence of acute myocardial infarction, the underlying risk factors, and the clinical outcomes of those who have this acute ischemic coronary event has largely been based on studies conducted in developed countries, with limited data for women and usually of low-ethnic diversity. Recent reports by the WHO have provided striking public health information, i.e., the global burden of cardiovascular mortality for the next decades is expected to predominantly occur among developing countries. Therefore, multiethnic population-based research including prospective cohorts and, when appropriate, case-control studies, is warranted. These studies should be specifically designed to ascertain key public health measures, such as geographic variations in non-communicable diseases, diagnosis of traditional and potential newly discovered risk factors, causes of death and disability, and gaps for improvement in healthcare prevention (both primary and secondary) and specific treatments. As an example, a multinational, multiethnic population-based cohort study is the Prospective Urban and Rural Epidemiology study, which is the largest global initiative of nearly 200,000 adults aged 35-70 years, looking at environmental, societal, and biological influences on obesity and chronic health conditions, such as ischemic heart disease, stroke, and cancer among urban and rural communities in low-, middle-, and high-income countries, with national, community, household, and individual-level data. Implementation of population-based strategies is crucial to optimizing limited health system resources while improving care and cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. PMID:26664903

  14. Stroke prevention in atrial fibrillation and ‘real world’ adherence to guidelines in the Balkan Region: The BALKAN-AF Survey

    PubMed Central

    Potpara, Tatjana S.; Dan, Gheorghe-Andrei; Trendafilova, Elina; Goda, Artan; Kusljugic, Zumreta; Manola, Sime; Music, Ljilja; Musetescu, Rodica; Badila, Elisabeta; Mitic, Gorana; Paparisto, Vilma; Dimitrova, Elena S.; Polovina, Marija M.; Petranov, Stanislav L.; Djergo, Hortensia; Loncar, Daniela; Bijedic, Amira; Brusich, Sandro; Lip, Gregory Y. H.; Potpara, Tatjana S.; Polovina, Marija; Milanov, Srdjan; Pavlovic, Marija; Petrovic, Marijana; Simovic, Stefan; Mitic, Gorana; Milanov, Marko; Savic, Jelena; Gnip, Sanja; Radovic, Pavica; Markovic, Snezana; Koncarevic, Ivana; Gavrilovic, Jelena; Acimovic, Tijana; Djikic, Dijana; Malic, Semir; Hodzic, Jusuf; Stojanovic, Milovan; Ilic, Marina Deljanin; Zlatar, Milan; Matic, Dragan; Lazic, Snezana; Peric, Vladan; Markovic, Sanja; Kovacevic, Snezana; Arandjelovic, Aleksandra; Asanin, Milika; Zdravkovic, Marija; Dan, Gheorghe-Andrei; Breha, Anca; Dan, Anca Rodica; Musetescu, Rodica; Popescu, Mircea Ioachim; Badila, Elisabeta; Georgescu, Catalina Arsenescu; Pop, Sorina; Popescu, Raluca; Neamtu, Simina; Oancea, Floriana; Trendafilova, Elina; Dimitrova, Elena; Goshev, Evgenii; Velichkova, Anna; Petranov, Stanislav; Kamenova, Delyana; Kamenova, Penka; Elefterova, Svetoslava; Shterev, Valentin; Zekova, Maria; Diukiandzhieva, Stela; Dimitrov, Boiko; Sotirov, Tihomir; Simeonova, Valentina; Drianovska, Dimitrina; Boiadzhieva, Liliya Ivanova Vasileva; Buchukova, Darina; Goda, Artan; Paparisto, Vilma; Gjergo, Hortensia; Mijo, Alma; Shirka, Ervina; Gjini, Viktor; Ekmekciu, Uliks; Refatllari, Ina; Kusljugic, Zumreta; Loncar, Daniela; Mrsic, Denis; Tulumovic, Hazim; Pojskic, Belma; Sijamija, Alma; Bijedic, Amira; Karamujic, Indira; Bijedic, Irma; Halilovic, Sanela; Sokolovic, Sekib; Manola, Sime; Zeljkovic, Ivan; Pavlovic, Nikola; Radeljic, Vjekoslav; Brusich, Sandro; Anic, Ante; Jeric, Melita; Pekic, Petar; Milas, Kresimir; Music, Ljilja; Bulatovic, Nebojsa; Nenezic, Ana; Asanovic, Dijana

    2016-01-01

    Data on the management of atrial fibrillation (AF) in the Balkan Region are limited. The Serbian AF Association (SAFA) prospectively investigated contemporary ‘real-world’ AF management in clinical practice in Albania, Bosnia&Herzegovina, Bulgaria, Croatia, Montenegro, Romania and Serbia through a 14-week (December 2014-February 2015) prospective, multicentre survey of consecutive AF patients. We report the results pertinent to stroke prevention strategies. Of 2712 enrolled patients, 2663 (98.2%) with complete data were included in this analysis (mean age 69.1 ± 10.9 years, female 44.6%). Overall, 1960 patients (73.6%) received oral anticoagulants (OAC) and 762 (28.6%) received antiplatelet drugs. Of patients given OAC, 17.2% received non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants (NOACs). CHA2DS2-VASc score was not significantly associated with OAC use. Of the ‘truly low-risk’ patients (CHA2DS2-VASc = 0 [males], or 1 [females]) 56.5% received OAC. Time in Therapeutic Range (TTR) was available in only 18.7% of patients (mean TTR: 49.5% ± 22.3%). Age ≥ 80 years, prior myocardial infarction and paroxysmal AF were independent predictors of OAC non-use. Our survey shows a relatively high overall use of OAC in AF patients, but with low quality of vitamin K antagonist therapy and insufficient adherence to AF guidelines. Additional efforts are needed to improve AF-related thromboprophylaxis in clinical practice in the Balkan Region. PMID:26869284

  15. Estimating the lifetime economic burden of stroke according to the age of onset in South Korea: a cost of illness study

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The recently-observed trend towards younger stroke patients in Korea raises economic concerns, including erosion of the workforce. We compared per-person lifetime costs of stroke according to the age of stroke onset from the Korean societal perspective. Methods A state-transition Markov model consisted of three health states ('post primary stroke event', 'alive post stroke', and 'dead') was developed to simulate the natural history of stroke. The transition probabilities for fatal and non-fatal recurrent stroke by age and gender and for non-stroke causes of death were derived from the national epidemiologic data of the Korean Health Insurance Review and Assessment Services and data from the Danish Monitoring Trends in Cardiovascular Disease study. We used an incidence-based approach to estimate the long-term costs of stroke. The model captured stroke-related costs including costs within the health sector, patients' out-of-pocket costs outside the health sector, and costs resulting from loss of productivity due to morbidity and premature death using a human capital approach. Average insurance-covered costs occurring within the health sector were estimated from the National Health Insurance claims database. Other costs were estimated based on the national epidemiologic data and literature. All costs are presented in 2008 Korean currency values (Korean won = KRW). Results The lifetime costs of stroke were estimated to be: 200.7, 81.9, and 16.4 million Korean won (1,200 KRW is approximately equal to one US dollar) for men who suffered a first stroke at age 45, 55 and 65 years, respectively, and 75.7, 39.2, and 19.3 million KRW for women at the same age. While stroke occurring among Koreans aged 45 to 64 years accounted for only 30% of the total disease incidence, this age group incurred 75% of the total national lifetime costs of stroke. Conclusions A higher lifetime burden and increasing incidence of stroke among younger Koreans highlight the need for more

  16. Prestroke living situation and depression contribute to initial stroke severity and stroke recovery.

    PubMed

    Aron, Abraham W; Staff, Ilene; Fortunato, Gilbert; McCullough, Louise D

    2015-02-01

    Substantial evidence from both experimental and clinical studies has demonstrated that social isolation can increase stroke incidence and impair recovery. Social isolation leads to higher rates of recurrent stroke but is often not reported as a risk factor. We examined prospectively collected stroke center database variables, which included prestroke living situation, to determine if social isolation could be determined from existing data using living arrangement as a proxy. Patients were categorized into 4 groups hypothesized to represent increasing levels of social isolation: living with spouse, living with family, living alone with visiting services, and living alone. Initial stroke severity and recovery were measured using the National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale and Barthel Index, respectively. A multivariate model was used to determine the relationship among prestroke living situation, stroke severity, and functional outcome. Patients living alone had less severe strokes on admission and better recovery at 3 months compared with the other cohorts. Patients living alone or those who lived with a spouse had less severe strokes on presentation and better recovery at both 3 and 12 months after stroke compared with the other cohorts. However, on detailed examination, it was found that these patients also had significantly higher prestroke function. Pre-existing depression was significantly higher in women, and depressed patients had poorer outcomes 3 months after stroke. Information regarding isolation is notably absent from most large stroke databases. A more comprehensive evaluation of social interaction should be obtained to more accurately measure social isolation.

  17. Recurrent wheezing in children

    PubMed Central

    Piazza, Michele; Piacentini, Giorgio

    2016-01-01

    Recurrent wheezing have a significant morbidity and it’s estimated that about one third of school-age children manifest the symptom during the first 5 years of life. Proper identification of children at risk of developing asthma at school age may predict long-term outcomes and improve treatment and preventive approach, but the possibility to identify these children at preschool age remains limited. For many years authors focused their studies to identify early children with recurrent wheezing at risk to develop asthma at school age. Different phenotypes have been proposed for a more precise characterization and a personalized plan of treatment. The main criticism concerns the inability to define stable phenotypes with the risk of overestimating or underestimating the characteristics of symptoms in these children. The aim of this review is to report the recent developments on the diagnosis and treatment of recurrent paediatric wheezing. PMID:26835404

  18. Stroke Treatments

    MedlinePlus

    ... weakened blood vessels that also cause hemorrhagic stroke: aneurysms and arteriovenous malformations (AVMs). Treatment differs depending on ... the leg or arm, then guided to the aneurysm or AVM ; it then deposits a mechanical agent, ...

  19. Patent foramen ovale (PFO), stroke and pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Chen, Lei; Deng, Wenjun; Palacios, Igor; Inglessis-Azuaje, Ignacio; McMullin, David; Zhou, Dong; Lo, Eng H; Buonanno, Ferdinando; Ning, MingMing

    2016-06-01

    Patent foramen ovale (PFO)-related stroke is increasingly recognized as an important etiology of ischemic embolic stroke-accounting for up to 50% of strokes previously considered 'cryptogenic' or with an unknown mechanism. As a 'back door to the brain,' PFO can allow venous clots to enter arterial circulation via interatrial right-to-left shunting, potentially resulting in ischemic stroke. We observe that clinically, PFO-related stroke affects women of childbearing age, and that pregnancy-owing to major changes in hemocoagulative, hormonal, and cardiovascular parameters-can enhance stroke risks. However, no systematic study has been performed and little is known regarding complications, pregnancy outcomes and treatment for PFO-related stroke during pregnancy. To identify and characterize the complications and clinical outcomes related to PFOs during pregnancy, we performed a literature review and analysis from all reported cases of pregnancy with PFO-related complications in the medical literature from 1970 to 2015. We find that during pregnancy and post-partum, PFO is associated with complications affecting multiple organs, including the brain, heart and lung. The three principal complications reported are stroke, pulmonary emboli and myocardial infarction. In contrast to other pregnancy-related stroke etiologies, which peak during later pregnancy and postpartum, PFO-related stroke peaks during early pregnancy (first and second trimester-60%), and most patients had good neurological outcome (77%). In patients with PFO with recurrent stroke during pregnancy, additional key factors include high-risk PFO morphology (atrial septal aneurysm), larger right-to-left shunt, multiple gestation and concurrent hypercoagulability. Compared to strokes of other etiologies during pregnancy, most PFO stroke patients experienced uneventful delivery (93%) of healthy babies with a good clinical outcome. We conclude with recommended clinical treatment strategies for pregnant patients

  20. Preliminary pediatric clinical evaluation of the oral probiotic Streptococcus salivarius K12 in preventing recurrent pharyngitis and/or tonsillitis caused by Streptococcus pyogenes and recurrent acute otitis media

    PubMed Central

    Di Pierro, Francesco; Donato, Guido; Fomia, Federico; Adami, Teresa; Careddu, Domenico; Cassandro, Claudia; Albera, Roberto

    2012-01-01

    Background The oral probiotic Streptococcus salivarius K12 has been shown clearly to antagonize the growth of Streptococcus pyogenes, the most important bacterial cause of pharyngeal infections in humans, by releasing two bacteriocins named salivaricin A2 and salivaricin B. Unpublished observations indicate that it can also antagonize the growth of other bacteria involved in acute otitis media. Because of its ability to colonize the oral cavity and its safety profile, we have tested its efficacy in reducing the incidence of streptococcal pharyngitis and/or tonsillitis and episodes of acute otitis media. Methods We enrolled 82 children, including 65 with and 17 without a recent diagnosis of recurrent oral streptococcal pathology. Of those with recurrent pathology, 45 were treated daily for 90 days with an oral slow-release tablet containing five billion colony-forming units of S. salivarius K12 (Bactoblis®), and the remaining 20 served as an untreated control group. The 17 children without a recent diagnosis of recurrent oral pathology were used as an additional control group. After 90 days of treatment, a 6-month follow-up period without treatment was included to evaluate a possible persistent protective role for the previously administered product. Results The 41 children who completed the 90-day course of Bactoblis showed a reduction in their episodes of streptococcal pharyngeal infection (about 90%) and/or acute otitis media (about 40%), calculated by comparing infection rates in the previous year. The 90-day treatment also reduced the reported incidence of pharyngeal and ear infections by about 65% in the 6-month follow-up period during which the product was not administered. Subjects tolerated the product well, with no side effects or dropouts reported. Conclusion Prophylactic administration of S. salivarius K12 to children with a history of recurrent oral streptococcal pathology reduced episodes of streptococcal pharyngeal infections and/or tonsillitis as

  1. Soy Isoflavones in Preventing Head and Neck Cancer Recurrence in Patients With Stage I-IV Head and Neck Cancer Undergoing Surgery

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-09-01

    Recurrent Hypopharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Laryngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Laryngeal Verrucous Carcinoma; Recurrent Lip and Oral Cavity Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Oral Cavity Verrucous Carcinoma; Recurrent Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage I Hypopharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage I Laryngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage I Laryngeal Verrucous Carcinoma; Stage I Lip and Oral Cavity Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage I Oral Cavity Verrucous Carcinoma; Stage I Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage II Hypopharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage II Laryngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage II Laryngeal Verrucous Carcinoma; Stage II Lip and Oral Cavity Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage II Oral Cavity Verrucous Carcinoma; Stage II Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage III Hypopharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage III Laryngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage III Laryngeal Verrucous Carcinoma; Stage III Lip and Oral Cavity Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage III Oral Cavity Verrucous Carcinoma; Stage III Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IV Hypopharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVA Laryngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVA Laryngeal Verrucous Carcinoma; Stage IVA Lip and Oral Cavity Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVA Oral Cavity Verrucous Carcinoma; Stage IVA Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Tongue Carcinoma

  2. Trypanosomiasis, cardiomyopathy and the risk of ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Carod-Artal, Francisco Javier

    2010-05-01

    American (Chagas disease) and African (sleeping sickness) trypanosomiasis are neglected tropical diseases and are a heavy burden in Latin America and Africa, respectively. Chagas disease is an independent risk factor for stroke. Apical aneurysm, heart failure and cardiac arrhythmias are associated with ischemic stroke in chagasic cardiomyopathy. Not all chagasic patients who suffer an ischemic stroke have a severe cardiomyopathy, and stroke may be the first manifestation of Chagas disease. Cardioembolism affecting the middle cerebral artery is the most common stroke subtype. Risk of recurrence is high and careful evaluation of recurrence risk should be addressed. Repolarization changes, low voltage and prolonged QT interval are common electrocardiography alterations in human African trypanosomiasis, and can be found in more than 70% of patients. Epidemiological studies are needed to asses the risk of stroke in African trypanosomiasis perimyocarditis.

  3. [Current management of antithrombotic treatment in patients with non valvular atrial fibrillation and prior history of stroke or transient ischemic attack].

    PubMed

    Masjuán, Jaime; Álvarez-Sabín, José; Blanco, Miguel; de Felipe, Alicia; Gil-Núñez, Antonio; Gállego-Culleré, Jaime; Vivancos, José

    2014-07-01

    Atrial fibrillation is the most frequent arrhythmia seen in clinical practice and is one of the most important risk factors for suffering a stroke. Strokes associated to atrial fibrillation are more severe, present highe