Sample records for preventive peptide lunasin

  1. Antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties of cancer preventive peptide lunasin in RAW 264.7 macrophages.

    PubMed

    Hernández-Ledesma, Blanca; Hsieh, Chia-Chien; de Lumen, Ben O

    2009-12-18

    Oxidative stress and inflammation are two of the most critical factors implicated in carcinogenesis and other degenerative disorders. We have investigated how lunasin, a known anti-cancer seed peptide, affect these factors. This peptide inhibits linoleic acid oxidation and acts as 2,2'-azinobis (3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonic acid) diammonium salt (ABTS) radical scavenger. Furthermore, using LPS-stimulated RAW 264.7 macrophages, we have demonstrated that lunasin reduces, in a significant dose-dependent manner, the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) by LPS-induced macrophages. Lunasin also inhibits the release of pro-inflammatory cytokines (tumor necrosis factor-alpha [TNF-alpha] and interleukine-6 [IL-6]). On the basis of these potent antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties, we propose lunasin not only as a cancer preventive and therapeutic agent but also as an agent against other inflammatory-related disorders.

  2. The protective role of the Bowman-Birk protease inhibitor in soybean lunasin digestion: the effect of released peptides on colon cancer growth.

    PubMed

    Cruz-Huerta, Elvia; Fernández-Tomé, Samuel; Arques, M Carmen; Amigo, Lourdes; Recio, Isidra; Clemente, Alfonso; Hernández-Ledesma, Blanca

    2015-08-01

    Lunasin is a naturally-occurring peptide demonstrating chemopreventive, antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties. To exhibit these activities, orally ingested lunasin needs to survive proteolytic attack of digestive enzymes to reach target tissues in active form/s. Preliminary studies suggested the protective role of protease inhibitors, such as the Bowman-Birk inhibitor and Kunitz-trypsin inhibitor, against lunasin's digestion by both pepsin and pancreatin. This work describes in depth the behaviour of lunasin under conditions simulating the transit through the gastrointestinal tract in the absence or presence of soybean Bowman-Birk isoinhibitor 1 (IBB1) in both active and inactive states. By liquid chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry (HPLC-MS/MS), the remaining lunasin at the end of gastric and gastro-duodenal phases was quantified. Protection against the action of pepsin was independent of the amount of IBB1 present in the analyzed samples, whereas an IBB1 dose-dependent protective effect against trypsin and chymotrypsin was observed. Peptides released from lunasin and inactive IBB1 were identified by MS/MS. The remaining lunasin and IBB1 as well as their derived peptides could be responsible for the anti-proliferative activity against colon cancer cells observed for the digests obtained at the end of simulated gastrointestinal digestion.

  3. Lunasin-aspirin combination against NIH/3T3 cells transformation induced by chemical carcinogens.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Chia-Chien; Hernández-Ledesma, Blanca; de Lumen, Ben O

    2011-06-01

    Carcinogenesis is a multistage process involving a number of molecular pathways sensitive to intervention. Chemoprevention is defined as the use of natural and/or synthetic substances to block, reverse, or retard the process of carcinogenesis. To achieve greater inhibitory effects on cancer cells, combination of two or more chemopreventive agents is commonly considered as a better preventive and/or therapeutic strategy. Lunasin is a promising cancer preventive peptide identified in soybean and other seeds. Its efficacy has been demonstrated by both in vitro and in vivo models. This peptide has been found to inhibit human breast cancer MDA-MB-231 cells proliferation, suppressing cell cycle progress and inducing cell apoptosis. Moreover, lunasin potentiates the effects on these cells of different synthetic and natural compounds, such as aspirin and anacardic acid. This study explored the role of lunasin, alone and in combination with aspirin and anacardic acid on cell proliferation and foci formation of transformed NIH/3T3 cells induced by chemical carcinogens 7,12-dimethylbenz[a]anthracene or 3-methylcholanthrene. The results revealed that lunasin, acting as a single agent, inhibits cell proliferation and foci formation. When combined with aspirin, these effects were significantly increased, indicating that this combination might be a promising strategy to prevent/treat cancer induced by chemical carcinogens.

  4. An effective and simple procedure to isolate abundant quantities of biologically active chemopreventive lunasin-protease inhibitor concentrate (LPIC) from soybean

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Lunasin is a 5-kDa soybean bioactive peptide with demonstrated anti-cancer and anti-inflammatory properties. The use of lunasin as a chemopreventive agent in large-scale animal studies and human clinical trials is hampered by the paucity of large quantities of lunasin. Recently, purification methods...

  5. Commercial processed soy-based food product contains glycated and glycoxidated lunasin proteoforms.

    PubMed

    Serra, Aida; Gallart-Palau, Xavier; See-Toh, Rachel Su-En; Hemu, Xinya; Tam, James P; Sze, Siu Kwan

    2016-05-18

    Nutraceuticals have been proposed to exert positive effects on human health and confer protection against many chronic diseases. A major bioactive component of soy-based foods is lunasin peptide, which has potential to exert a major impact on the health of human consumers worldwide, but the biochemical features of dietary lunasin still remain poorly characterized. In this study, lunasin was purified from a soy-based food product via strong anion exchange solid phase extraction and then subjected to top-down mass spectrometry analysis that revealed in detail the molecular diversity of lunasin in processed soybean foods. We detected multiple glycated proteoforms together with potentially toxic advanced glycation end products (AGEs) derived from lunasin. In both cases, modification sites were Lys24 and Lys29 located at the helical region that shows structural homology with a conserved region of chromatin-binding proteins. The identified post-translational modifications may have an important repercussion on lunasin epigenetic regulatory capacity. Taking together, our results demonstrate the importance of proper chemical characterization of commercial processed food products to assess their impact on consumer's health and risk of chronic diseases.

  6. Commercial processed soy-based food product contains glycated and glycoxidated lunasin proteoforms

    PubMed Central

    Serra, Aida; Gallart-Palau, Xavier; See-Toh, Rachel Su-En; Hemu, Xinya; Tam, James P.; Sze, Siu Kwan

    2016-01-01

    Nutraceuticals have been proposed to exert positive effects on human health and confer protection against many chronic diseases. A major bioactive component of soy-based foods is lunasin peptide, which has potential to exert a major impact on the health of human consumers worldwide, but the biochemical features of dietary lunasin still remain poorly characterized. In this study, lunasin was purified from a soy-based food product via strong anion exchange solid phase extraction and then subjected to top-down mass spectrometry analysis that revealed in detail the molecular diversity of lunasin in processed soybean foods. We detected multiple glycated proteoforms together with potentially toxic advanced glycation end products (AGEs) derived from lunasin. In both cases, modification sites were Lys24 and Lys29 located at the helical region that shows structural homology with a conserved region of chromatin-binding proteins. The identified post-translational modifications may have an important repercussion on lunasin epigenetic regulatory capacity. Taking together, our results demonstrate the importance of proper chemical characterization of commercial processed food products to assess their impact on consumer’s health and risk of chronic diseases. PMID:27189269

  7. Lunasin, with an arginine-glycine-aspartic acid motif, causes apoptosis to L1210 leukemia cells by activation of caspase-3.

    PubMed

    de Mejia, Elvira Gonzalez; Wang, Wenyi; Dia, Vermont P

    2010-03-01

    Lunasin is a novel chemopreventive peptide featuring a cell adhesion motif composed of arginine-glycine-aspartate (RGD) which has been associated to cytotoxicity to established cell lines. The objectives of this study were to determine the effect of lunasin on the viability of L1210 leukemia cells and to understand the underlying mechanisms involved. Pure lunasin and lunasin enriched soy flour (LES) caused cytotoxicity to L1210 leukemia cells with IC(50) of 14 and 16 microM (lunasin equivalent), respectively. Simulated gastrointestinal digestion showed that 25% of the original amount of lunasin survived 3 h of pepsin digestion and 3% of lunasin remained after sequential pepsin-pancreatin digestion for a total of 6 h. Cell cycle analysis showed that lunasin caused a dose-dependent G2 cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. Treatment of L1210 leukemia cells with 1 mg/mL of LES for 18 h led to an increase in the amount of apoptotic cells from 2 to 40%. Compared to untreated cells, treatment with 1 mg/mL LES showed a 6-fold increase on the expressions of caspases-8 and -9, and and a 12-fold increase on the expression of caspase-3. These results showed for the first time that lunasin, a naturally occurring peptide containing an RGD motif, caused apoptosis to L1210 leukemia cells through caspase-3 activation.

  8. Oral Administration of CardioAid and Lunasin Alleviates Liver Damage in a High-Fat Diet Nonalcoholic Steatohepatitis Model.

    PubMed

    Drori, Ariel; Rotnemer-Golinkin, Dvorah; Zolotarov, Lidya; Ilan, Yaron

    2017-01-01

    Several of the drugs in development for treatment of nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) target liver fibrosis or have side effects that prohibit their long-term use in patients with mild to moderate disease. Lunasin is a soy-derived peptide with anti-inflammatory properties. ADM's CardioAid™ is a plant sterol extract that exerts cholesterol- and triacylglycerol-lowering effects. To determine the immunomodulatory effects of CardioAid and lunasin in a high-fat diet (HFD) animal model of NASH. C57BL/6 mice on an HFD were orally administered CardioAid or lunasin for 25 weeks. The effects on the immune system, liver function, insulin resistance and lipid profile were studied. Treatment with CardioAid and lunasin was associated with a significant decrease in the CD4/CD8 ratio and an increase in CD4+CD25+ lymphocytes. A decrease in interleukin 1-alpha serum levels and an increase in transforming growth factor beta serum levels were noted. These were associated with alleviation of liver damage as indicated by a significant decrease in liver enzymes and improvement in the histological nonalcoholic fatty liver disease activity score (NAS). Decreases in both serum triglyceride and serum glucose levels were observed in treated mice. A decrease in total body fat measured by EchoMRI was also observed in treated mice. CardioAid and lunasin exerted hepatoprotective and glucose-protective effects in an HFD NASH model. These data and the high-safety profiles of CardioAid and Lunasin support their use in patients in the early stages of NASH to prevent deterioration due to the disease. © 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  9. Kunitz trypsin inhibitor in addition to Bowman-Birk inhibitor influence stability of lunasin against pepsin-pancreatin hydrolysis.

    PubMed

    Price, Samuel J; Pangloli, Philipus; Krishnan, Hari B; Dia, Vermont P

    2016-12-01

    Soybean contains several biologically active components and one of this belongs to the bioactive peptide group. The objectives of this study were to produce different lunasin-enriched preparations (LEP) and determine the effect of Bowman-Birk inhibitor (BBI) and Kunitz trypsin inhibitor (KTI) concentrations on the stability of lunasin against pepsin-pancreatin hydrolysis (PPH). In addition, the effect of KTI mutation on lunasin stability against PPH was determined. LEP were produced by calcium and pH precipitation methods of 30% aqueous ethanol extract from defatted soybean flour. LEP, lunasin-enriched commercially available products and KTI control and mutant flours underwent PPH and samples were taken after pepsin and pepsin-pancreatin hydrolysis. The concentrations of BBI, KTI, and lunasin all decreased after hydrolysis, but they had varying results. BBI concentration ranged from 167.5 to 655.8μg/g pre-hydrolysis and 171.5 to 250.1μg/g after hydrolysis. KTI concentrations ranged from 0.3 to 122.3μg/g pre-hydrolysis and 9.0 to 18.7μg/g after hydrolysis. Lunasin concentrations ranged from 8.5 to 71.0μg/g pre-hydrolysis and 4.0 to 13.2μg/g after hydrolysis. In all products tested, lunasin concentration after PPH significantly correlated with BBI and KTI concentrations. Mutation in two KTI isoforms led to a lower concentration of lunasin after PPH. This is the first report on the potential role of KTI in lunasin stability against PPH and must be considered in designing lunasin-enriched products that could potentially survive digestion after oral ingestion. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Efficient production of native lunasin with correct N-terminal processing by using the pH-induced self-cleavable Ssp DnaB mini-intein system in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Setrerrahmane, Sarra; Zhang, Yi; Dai, Guangzhi; Lv, Jing; Tan, Shuhua

    2014-09-01

    To develop an efficient and cost-effective approach for the production of small preventive peptide lunasin with correct natural N terminus, a synthetic gene was designed by OPTIMIZER & Gene Designer and cloned into pTWIN1 vector at SapI and PstI sites. Thus, lunasin was N-terminally fused to the pH-induced self-cleavable Ssp DnaB mini-intein linked to a chitin binding domain (CBD) with no extra residues. The resultant fusion protein was highly expressed by lactose induction in Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3) in a 7-l bioreactor and bound to a chitin affinity column. After washing the impurities, the Ssp DnaB intein mediated on-column self-cleavage was easily triggered by shifting pH and temperature to allow the native lunasin released. The final purified lunasin yielded up to 75 mg/l medium. Tricine/SDS-PAGE and matrix-assisted laser desorption time-of-flight (MALDI-TOF)/mass spectrometry (MS) verified the structural authenticity of the product, implying the correct cleavage at the junction between Ssp DnaB intein and lunasin. MTT assay confirmed its potent proliferation inhibitory activity to human cancer cells HCT-116 and MDA-MB-231; however, no cytotoxicity to normal human lens epithelial cell SRA01/04 and hepatoma HepG2. Taken together, we provide a novel strategy to produce recombinant native lunasin with correct N-terminal processing by using the pH-induced self-cleavable Ssp DnaB mini-intein.

  11. Kunitz trypsin inhibitor in addition to Bowman-Birk inhibitor influence stability of lunasin against pepsin-pancreatin hydrolysis

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Soybean contains several biologically active components and one of this belongs to the bioactive peptide group. The objectives of this study were to produce different lunasin-enriched preparations (LEP) and determine the effect of Bowman-Birk inhibitor and Kunitz trypsin concentrations on the stabil...

  12. The Effect of Lunasin on Receptor Activator of Nuclear Factor Kappa-B Ligand-mediated Osteoclast Formation from RAW 264.7 Cells.

    PubMed

    Bachala, Daisy; El-Refai, Nivine; Greenfield, Edward; Aminoshariae, Anita; Mickel, Andre

    2018-06-01

    To date, no study has investigated the antiresorptive property of lunasin. Hence, the present study aimed to assess the ability of lunasin to inhibit the osteoclast formation using RAW 264.7 cells. We hypothesized that lunasin is able to inhibit osteoclast formation. In the present study, the murine monocytic cell line RAW 264.7 was induced to differentiate into mature osteoclasts in the presence of recombinant receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa-B ligand. Tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase, a marker of osteoclasts, was used to identify osteoclasts. Cell lines were divided into different groups and exposed to different concentrations of 50 μmol/L, 75 μmol/L, and 100 μmol/L active and inactive lunasin. The control group was RAW 264.7 cells with receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa-B ligand. Tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase-positive cells of 3 or more nuclei, indicative of mature osteoclasts, were counted by 3 observers. The mean number of the data collected was analyzed using 1-way analysis of variance and the multiple comparison post hoc Bonferroni correction. There was a significant difference in the reduction of osteoclast formation in all the active lunasin groups (P < .001) compared with the control group and the inactive lunasin group (P < .001). Considering the suppressive effect of lunasin on osteoclastogenesis, the use of lunasin as a potential antiresorptive agent can be evaluated in future studies. Copyright © 2018 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Isolation of low-molecular albumins of 2S fraction from soybean (Glycine max (L.) Merrill).

    PubMed

    Galbas, Mariola; Porzucek, Filip; Woźniak, Anna; Słomski, Ryszard; Selwet, Marek

    2013-01-01

    Numerous studies have shown that consumption of soybean products decrease the risk of cancers in humans. Experiments at the molecular level have demonstrated that in most cases proteins and peptides are responsible for the anticancer properties of soybeen. Special attention should be paid to lunasin - a peptide described for the first time 16 years ago. Due to its structure it causes i.a., inhibition of cancer cell proliferation. A novel procedure for the isolation and purification of low-molecular-mass 2S soybean albumin protein is described in the present paper. A fraction of four peptides one of them corresponding to molecular mass and isoelectric point characteristic for lunasin. The obtained peptides decreased on the rate of HeLa cell proliferation.

  14. C-peptide replacement therapy as an emerging strategy for preventing diabetic vasculopathy.

    PubMed

    Bhatt, Mahendra Prasad; Lim, Young-Cheol; Ha, Kwon-Soo

    2014-11-01

    Lack of C-peptide, along with insulin, is the main feature of Type 1 diabetes mellitus (DM) and is also observed in progressive β-cell loss in later stage of Type 2 DM. Therapeutic approaches to hyperglycaemic control have been ineffective in preventing diabetic vasculopathy, and alternative therapeutic strategies are necessary to target both hyperglycaemia and diabetic complications. End-stage organ failure in DM seems to develop primarily due to vascular dysfunction and damage, leading to two types of organ-specific diseases, such as micro- and macrovascular complications. Numerous studies in diabetic patients and animals demonstrate that C-peptide treatment alone or in combination with insulin has physiological functions and might be beneficial in preventing diabetic complications. Current evidence suggests that C-peptide replacement therapy might prevent and ameliorate diabetic vasculopathy and organ-specific complications through conservation of vascular function, as well as prevention of endothelial cell death, microvascular permeability, vascular inflammation, and neointima formation. In this review, we describe recent advances on the beneficial role of C-peptide replacement therapy for preventing diabetic complications, such as retinopathy, nephropathy, neuropathy, impaired wound healing, and inflammation, and further discuss potential beneficial effects of combined C-peptide and insulin supplement therapy to control hyperglycaemia and to prevent organ-specific complications. Published on behalf of the European Society of Cardiology. All rights reserved. © The Author 2014. For permissions please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  15. Bioactive Peptide of Marine Origin for the Prevention and Treatment of Non-Communicable Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Pangestuti, Ratih; Kim, Se-Kwon

    2017-01-01

    Non-communicable diseases (NCD) are the leading cause of death and disability worldwide. The four main leading causes of NCD are cardiovascular diseases, cancers, respiratory diseases and diabetes. Recognizing the devastating impact of NCD, novel prevention and treatment strategies are extensively sought. Marine organisms are considered as an important source of bioactive peptides that can exert biological functions to prevent and treatment of NCD. Recent pharmacological investigations reported cardio protective, anticancer, antioxidative, anti-diabetic, and anti-obesity effects of marine-derived bioactive peptides. Moreover, there is available evidence supporting the utilization of marine organisms and its bioactive peptides to alleviate NCD. Marine-derived bioactive peptides are alternative sources for synthetic ingredients that can contribute to a consumer’s well-being, as a part of nutraceuticals and functional foods. This contribution focus on the bioactive peptides derived from marine organisms and elaborates its possible prevention and therapeutic roles in NCD. PMID:28282929

  16. A Chimeric Peptide Composed of a Dermaseptin Derivative and an RNA III-Inhibiting Peptide Prevents Graft-Associated Infections by Antibiotic-Resistant Staphylococci

    PubMed Central

    Balaban, Naomi; Gov, Yael; Giacometti, Andrea; Cirioni, Oscar; Ghiselli, Roberto; Mocchegiani, Federico; Orlando, Fiorenza; D'Amato, Giuseppina; Saba, Vittorio; Scalise, Giorgio; Bernes, Sabina; Mor, Amram

    2004-01-01

    Staphylococcal bacteria are a prevalent cause of infections associated with foreign bodies and indwelling medical devices. Bacteria are capable of escaping antibiotic treatment through encapsulation into biofilms. RNA III-inhibiting peptide (RIP) is a heptapeptide that inhibits staphylococcal biofilm formation by obstructing quorum-sensing mechanisms. K4-S4(1-13)a is a 13-residue dermaseptin derivative (DD13) believed to kill bacteria via membrane disruption. We tested each of these peptides as well as a hybrid construct, DD13-RIP, for their ability to inhibit bacterial proliferation and suppress quorum sensing in vitro and for their efficacy in preventing staphylococcal infection in a rat graft infection model with methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) or S. epidermidis (MRSE). In vitro, proliferation assays demonstrated that RIP had no inhibitory effect, while DD13-RIP and DD13 were equally effective, and that the chimeric peptide but not DD13 was slightly more effective than RIP in inhibiting RNA III synthesis, a regulatory RNA molecule important for staphylococcal pathogenesis. In vivo, the three peptides reduced graft-associated bacterial load in a dose-dependent manner, but the hybrid peptide was most potent in totally preventing staphylococcal infections at the lowest dose. In addition, each of the peptides acted synergistically with antibiotics. The data indicate that RIP and DD13 act in synergy by attacking bacteria simultaneously by two different mechanisms. Such a chimeric peptide may be useful for coating medical devices to prevent drug-resistant staphylococcal infections. PMID:15215107

  17. Vasoactive intestinal peptide prevents lung injury due to xanthine/xanthine oxidase.

    PubMed

    Berisha, H; Foda, H; Sakakibara, H; Trotz, M; Pakbaz, H; Said, S I

    1990-08-01

    Reactive oxygen species mediate injury and inflammation in many tissues. The addition of xanthine and xanthine oxidase to perfused rat lungs led to increases in peak airway pressure and perfusion pressure, pulmonary edema, and increased protein content in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. Treatment with 1-10 micrograms.kg-1.min-1 of vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP), a widely distributed neuropeptide, markedly reduced or totally prevented all signs of injury. Simultaneously, VIP also diminished or abolished the associated generation of arachidonate products. Similar protection was provided by catalase (100 micrograms/ml) but not by the VIP-related peptides secretin or glucagon. The pulmonary vasodilator papaverine (0.15 mg/ml) was also ineffective. Injured lungs that were not treated with VIP released large amounts of this peptide in the perfusate. The results indicate that VIP has potent protective activity against injury triggered by xanthine/xanthine oxidase and may be a physiological modulator of inflammatory tissue damage associated with toxic oxygen metabolites.

  18. Peptide vaccines prevent tumor growth by activating T cells that respond to native tumor antigens.

    PubMed

    Jordan, Kimberly R; McMahan, Rachel H; Kemmler, Charles B; Kappler, John W; Slansky, Jill E

    2010-03-09

    Peptide vaccines enhance the response of T cells toward tumor antigens and represent a strategy to augment antigen-independent immunotherapies of cancer. However, peptide vaccines that include native tumor antigens rarely prevent tumor growth. We have assembled a set of peptide variants for a mouse-colon tumor model to determine how to improve T-cell responses. These peptides have similar affinity for MHC molecules, but differ in the affinity of the peptide-MHC/T-cell receptor interaction with a tumor-specific T-cell clone. We systematically demonstrated that effective antitumor responses are generated after vaccination with variant peptides that stimulate the largest proportion of endogenous T cells specific for the native tumor antigen. Importantly, we found some variant peptides that strongly stimulated a specific T-cell clone in vitro, but elicited fewer tumor-specific T cells in vivo, and were not protective. The T cells expanded by the effective vaccines responded to the wild-type antigen by making cytokines and killing target cells, whereas most of the T cells expanded by the ineffective vaccines only responded to the peptide variants. We conclude that peptide-variant vaccines are most effective when the peptides react with a large responsive part of the tumor-specific T-cell repertoire.

  19. Evaluation of free or anchored antimicrobial peptides as candidates for the prevention of orthopaedic device-related infections.

    PubMed

    D'Este, Francesca; Oro, Debora; Boix-Lemonche, Gerard; Tossi, Alessandro; Skerlavaj, Barbara

    2017-10-01

    The prevention of implant-associated infection, one the most feared complications in orthopaedic surgery, remains a major clinical challenge and urges development of effective methods to prevent bacterial colonization of implanted devices. Alpha-helical antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) may be promising candidates in this respect due to their potent and broad-spectrum antimicrobial activity, their low tendency to elicit resistance and possible retention of efficacy in the immobilized state. The aim of this study was to evaluate the potential of five different helical AMPs, the cathelicidins BMAP-27 and BMAP-28, their (1-18) fragments and the rationally designed, artificial P19(9/G7) peptide, for the prevention of orthopaedic implant infections. Peptides were effective at micromolar concentrations against 22 Staphylococcus and Streptococcus isolates from orthopaedic infections, while only BMAP-28 and to a lesser extent BMAP-27 were active against Enterococcus faecalis. Peptides in solution showed activities comparable to those of cefazolin and linezolid, on a molar basis, and also a variable capacity to neutralize bacterial lipopolysaccharide, while devoid of adverse effects on MG-63 osteoblast cells at concentrations corresponding to the MIC. The (1-18) BMAP fragments and P19(9/G7) were selected for further examination, based on better selectivity indices, and showed effectiveness in the presence of hyaluronic acid and in synovial fluid, while human serum affected their activity to variable extents, with BMAP-27(1-18) best retaining activity. This peptide was immobilized on streptavidin-resin beads and retained activity against reference Staphylococcus epidermidis and Staphylococcus aureus strains, with negligible toxicity towards osteoblasts, underlining its potential for the development of infection-resistant biomaterials for orthopaedic application. Copyright © 2017 European Peptide Society and John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2017 European Peptide Society and

  20. Melanoma prevention by MC1R selective small peptide analogs of alpha MSH | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    This revised application will test the hypothesis that small peptide analogs of ¿-melanocortin (¿-MSH) that are selective agonists of the melanocortin 1 receptor (MC1R) will prevent melanoma tumor formation in transgenic mouse melanoma models by enhancing repair of ultraviolet radiation (UV)-induced DNA damage and stimulating melanogenesis. We have pioneered the research on

  1. PLGA nanoparticles loaded with beta-lactoglobulin-derived peptides modulate mucosal immunity and may facilitate cow's milk allergy prevention.

    PubMed

    Kostadinova, Atanaska I; Middelburg, Jim; Ciulla, Michele; Garssen, Johan; Hennink, Wim E; Knippels, Leon M J; van Nostrum, Cornelus F; Willemsen, Linette E M

    2018-01-05

    Beta-lactoglobulin (BLG)-derived peptides may facilitate oral tolerance to whey and prevent cow's milk allergy (CMA). Loading of BLG-peptides in poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) nanoparticles (Pep-NP) may improve this. Here we studied the uptake of NP and the capacity of NP and Pep-NP to activate bone marrow dendritic cells (BMDC). Furthermore, CMA prevention was evaluated by orally exposing three-week-old female C3H/HeOuJ mice to Pep-NP, NP or free peptides (PepMix) for 6 days before oral sensitization with whole whey protein and effects on the spleen and small intestine lamina propria (SI-LP) were studied. In BMDC, NP and Pep-NP enhanced CD40 expression and IL-6 and TNF-α secretion, while tended to decrease CD80 expression and prevented PepMix-induced IL-12 secretion. In vivo, oral exposure to Pep-NP, but not NP or PepMix, prior to whey sensitization tended to partially prevent the acute allergic skin response to whole whey protein. Splenocytes of NP-pre-exposed mice secreted increased levels of whey-specific IL-6, but this was silenced in Pep-NP-pre-exposed mice which also showed reduced TNF-α and IFN-γ secretion. In the SI-LP, Pep-NP pre-exposure reduced the CD4 + T cell frequency in CMA mice compared to PBS pre-exposure. In addition, while NP increased whey-specific IL-6 secretion in the SI-LP, Pep-NP did not and maintained regulatory TGF-β secretion. This study presents a proof-of-concept that PLGA nanoparticles facilitate the capacity of BLG peptides to suppress the allergic response to whole whey protein. Hence, PLGA nanoparticles may be further developed as an adjunct strategy for BLG-peptide-based oral tolerance induction and CMA prevention. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. C-peptide prevents SMAD3 binding to alpha promoters to inhibit collagen type IV synthesis.

    PubMed

    Li, Yanning; Zhong, Yan; Gong, Wenjian; Gao, Xuehan; Qi, Huanli; Liu, Kun; Qi, Jinsheng

    2018-07-01

    Activation of transforming growth factor β1 (TGFB1)/SMAD3 signaling may lead to additional synthesis of collagen type IV (COL4), which is a major contributor to extracellular matrix (ECM) accumulation in diabetic nephropathy (DN). C-peptide can attenuate fibrosis to have unique beneficial effects in DN. However, whether and how C-peptide affects TGFB1/SMAD3-activated COL4 synthesis is unclear. In this study, pathological changes, expression of COL4 a1-a5 chains ( Col4a1-a5 ), COL4 distribution and protein and TGFB1 and SMAD3 protein were first assessed in a rat model of diabetes. Then, rat mesangial cells were treated with high glucose (HG) and/or C-peptide to investigate the underlying mechanism. Col4a1-a5 expression, COL4 protein and secretion, TGFB1 protein, SMAD3 nuclear translocation and binding of SMAD3 to its cognate sites in the promoters of Col4a1a2 , Col4a3a4 and Col4a5 were measured. It was found that C-peptide attenuated glomerular pathological changes and suppressed renal Col4a1 -a5 mRNA expression, COL4 protein content and TGFB1 protein content. C-peptide had a dose-dependent effect to inhibit Col4a1-a5 mRNA expression, COL4 protein content and secretion, in HG-stimulated mesangial cells. In addition, the HG-induced increase in TGFB1 protein content was significantly reduced by C-peptide. Although not apparently affecting SMAD3 nuclear translocation, C-peptide prevented SMAD3 from binding to its sites in the Col4a1a2 , Col4a3a4 and Col4a5 promoters in HG-stimulated mesangial cells. In conclusion, C-peptide could prevent SMAD3 from binding to its sites in the Col4a1a2 , Col4a3a4 and Col4a5 promoters, to inhibit COL4 generation. These results may provide a mechanism for the alleviation of fibrosis in DN by C-peptide. © 2018 Society for Endocrinology.

  3. Sequestration of the Aβ Peptide Prevents Toxicity and Promotes Degradation In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    de Barros, Teresa Pereira; van Dijk Härd, Iris; Brorsson, Ann-Christin; Macao, Bertil; Persson, Cecilia; Crowther, Damian C.; Lomas, David A.; Ståhl, Stefan; Dobson, Christopher M.; Härd, Torleif

    2010-01-01

    Protein aggregation, arising from the failure of the cell to regulate the synthesis or degradation of aggregation-prone proteins, underlies many neurodegenerative disorders. However, the balance between the synthesis, clearance, and assembly of misfolded proteins into neurotoxic aggregates remains poorly understood. Here we study the effects of modulating this balance for the amyloid-beta (Aβ) peptide by using a small engineered binding protein (ZAβ3) that binds with nanomolar affinity to Aβ, completely sequestering the aggregation-prone regions of the peptide and preventing its aggregation. Co-expression of ZAβ3 in the brains of Drosophila melanogaster expressing either Aβ42 or the aggressive familial associated E22G variant of Aβ42 abolishes their neurotoxic effects. Biochemical analysis indicates that monomer Aβ binding results in degradation of the peptide in vivo. Complementary biophysical studies emphasize the dynamic nature of Aβ aggregation and reveal that ZAβ3 not only inhibits the initial association of Aβ monomers into oligomers or fibrils, but also dissociates pre-formed oligomeric aggregates and, although very slowly, amyloid fibrils. Toxic effects of peptide aggregation in vivo can therefore be eliminated by sequestration of hydrophobic regions in monomeric peptides, even when these are extremely aggregation prone. Our studies also underline how a combination of in vivo and in vitro experiments provide mechanistic insight with regard to the relationship between protein aggregation and clearance and show that engineered binding proteins may provide powerful tools with which to address the physiological and pathological consequences of protein aggregation. PMID:20305716

  4. Kefir Peptides Prevent Hyperlipidemia and Obesity in High-Fat-Diet-Induced Obese Rats via Lipid Metabolism Modulation.

    PubMed

    Tung, Yu-Tang; Chen, Hsiao-Ling; Wu, Hsin-Shan; Ho, Mei-Hsuan; Chong, Kowit-Yu; Chen, Chuan-Mu

    2018-02-01

    Obesity has reached epidemic proportions worldwide. Obesity is a complex metabolic disorder that is linked to numerous serious health complications with high morbidity. The present study evaluated the effects of kefir peptides on high fat diet (HFD)-induced obesity in rats. Kefir peptides markedly improved obesity, including body weight gain, inflammatory reactions and the formation of adipose tissue fat deposits around the epididymis and kidney, and adipocyte size. Treating high fat diet (HFD)-induced obese rats with kefir peptides significantly reduced the fatty acid synthase protein and increased the p-acetyl-CoA carboxylase protein to block lipogenesis in the livers. Kefir peptides also increased fatty acid oxidation by increasing the protein expressions of phosphorylated AMP-activated protein kinase, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-α, and hepatic carnitine palmitoyltransferase-1 in the livers. In addition, administration of kefir peptides significantly decreased the inflammatory response (TNF-α, IL-1β, and TGF-β) to modulate oxidative damage. These results demonstrate that kefir peptides treatment improves obesity via inhibition of lipogenesis, modulation of oxidative damage, and stimulation of lipid oxidation. Therefore, kefir peptides may act as an anti-obesity agent to prevent body fat accumulation and obesity-related metabolic diseases. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. Optimisation of Germination Time and Temperature on the Concentration of Bioactive Compounds in Brazilian Soybean Cultivar BRS 133 using Response Surface Methodology

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The objective was to optimize the effect of germination time and temperature on the concentration of soluble protein, lunasin, BBI, lectin, saponins and isoflavones in soybean seeds from cultivar BRS 133. Isoflavone and saponin concentrations were analysed by HPLC. Lunasin, Bowman-Birk inhibitor a...

  6. Tumstatin peptide, an inhibitor of angiogenesis, prevents glomerular hypertrophy in the early stage of diabetic nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Yoshihiko; Maeshima, Yohei; Kitayama, Hiroyuki; Kitamura, Shinji; Takazawa, Yuki; Sugiyama, Hitoshi; Yamasaki, Yasushi; Makino, Hirofumi

    2004-07-01

    In the early stage of diabetic nephropathy (one of the major microvascular complications of diabetes) glomerular hyperfiltration and hypertrophy are observed. It is clinically important to regulate glomerular hypertrophy for preventing glomerulosclerosis. The number of glomerular endothelial cells is known to be increased in diabetic nephropathy associated with enlarged glomerular tufts, suggesting that the mechanism is similar to that of angiogenesis. Tumstatin peptide is an angiogenesis inhibitor derived from type IV collagen and inhibits in vivo neovascularization induced by vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), one of the mediators of glomerular hypertrophy in diabetic nephropathy. Here, we show the effect of tumstatin peptide in inhibiting alterations in early diabetic nephropathy. Glomerular hypertrophy, hyperfiltration, and albuminuria were suppressed by tumstatin peptide (1 mg/kg) in streptozotocin-induced diabetic mice. Glomerular matrix expansion, the increase of total glomerular cell number and glomerular endothelial cells (CD31 positive), and monocyte/macrophage accumulation was inhibited by tumstatin peptide. Increase in renal expression of VEGF, flk-1, and angiopoietin-2, an antagonist of angiopoietin-1, was inhibited by tumstatin treatment in diabetic mice. Alteration of glomerular nephrin expression, a podocyte protein crucial for maintaining glomerular filtration barrier, was recovered by tumstatin in diabetic mice. Taken together, these results demonstrate the potential use of antiangiogenic tumstatin peptide as a novel therapeutic agent in early diabetic nephropathy.

  7. C-terminal N-alkylated peptide amides resulting from the linker decomposition of the Rink amide resin: a new cleavage mixture prevents their formation.

    PubMed

    Stathopoulos, Panagiotis; Papas, Serafim; Tsikaris, Vassilios

    2006-03-01

    Decomposition of the resin linkers during TFA cleavage of the peptides in the Fmoc strategy leads to alkylation of sensitive amino acids. The C-terminal amide alkylation, reported for the first time, is shown to be a major problem in peptide amides synthesized on the Rink amide resin. This side reaction occurs as a result of the Rink amide linker decomposition under TFA treatment of the peptide resin. The use of 1,3-dimethoxybenzene in a cleavage cocktail prevents almost quantitatively formation of C-terminal N-alkylated peptide amides. Oxidized by-product in the tested Cys- and Met-containing peptides were not observed, even if thiols were not used in the cleavage mixture. Copyright (c) 2005 European Peptide Society and John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  8. Cathepsin-Mediated Cleavage of Peptides from Peptide Amphiphiles Leads to Enhanced Intracellular Peptide Accumulation

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Acar, Handan; Samaeekia, Ravand; Schnorenberg, Mathew R.

    Peptides synthesized in the likeness of their native interaction domain(s) are natural choices to target protein protein interactions (PPIs) due to their fidelity of orthostatic contact points between binding partners. Despite therapeutic promise, intracellular delivery of biofunctional peptides at concentrations necessary for efficacy remains a formidable challenge. Peptide amphiphiles (PAs) provide a facile method of intracellular delivery and stabilization of bioactive peptides. PAs consisting of biofunctional peptide headgroups linked to hydrophobic alkyl lipid-like tails prevent peptide hydrolysis and proteolysis in circulation, and PA monomers are internalized via endocytosis. However, endocytotic sequestration and steric hindrance from the lipid tail are twomore » major mechanisms that limit PA efficacy to target intracellular PPIs. To address these problems, we have constructed a PA platform consisting of cathepsin-B cleavable PAs in which a selective p53-based inhibitory peptide is cleaved from its lipid tail within endosomes, allowing for intracellular peptide accumulation and extracellular recycling of the lipid moiety. We monitor for cleavage and follow individual PA components in real time using a resonance energy transfer (FRET)-based tracking system. Using this platform, components in real time using a Forster we provide a better understanding and quantification of cellular internalization, trafficking, and endosomal cleavage of PAs and of the ultimate fates of each component.« less

  9. Ligand-regulated peptide aptamers.

    PubMed

    Miller, Russell A

    2009-01-01

    The peptide aptamer approach employs high-throughput selection to identify members of a randomized peptide library displayed from a scaffold protein by virtue of their interaction with a target molecule. Extending this approach, we have developed a peptide aptamer scaffold protein that can impart small-molecule control over the aptamer-target interaction. This ligand-regulated peptide (LiRP) scaffold, consisting of the protein domains FKBP12, FRB, and GST, binds to the cell-permeable small-molecule rapamycin and the binding of this molecule can prevent the interaction of the randomizable linker region connecting FKBP12 with FRB. Here we present a detailed protocol for the creation of a peptide aptamer plasmid library, selection of peptide aptamers using the LiRP scaffold in a yeast two-hybrid system, and the screening of those peptide aptamers for a ligand-regulated interaction.

  10. Inhibition of the Electrostatic Interaction between β -amyloid Peptide and Membranes Prevents β -amyloid-induced Toxicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hertel, C.; Terzi, E.; Hauser, N.; Jakob-Rotne, R.; Seelig, J.; Kemp, J. A.

    1997-08-01

    The accumulation of β -amyloid peptides (Aβ ) into senile plaques is one of the hallmarks of Alzheimer disease. Aggregated Aβ is toxic to cells in culture and this has been considered to be the cause of neurodegeneration that occurs in the Alzheimer disease brain. The discovery of compounds that prevent Aβ toxicity may lead to a better understanding of the processes involved and ultimately to possible therapeutic drugs. Low nanomolar concentrations of Aβ 1-42 and the toxic fragment Aβ 25-35 have been demonstrated to render cells more sensitive to subsequent insults as manifested by an increased sensitivity to formazan crystals following MTT (3-[4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl]-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide) reduction. Formation of the toxic β -sheet conformation by Aβ peptides is increased by negatively charged membranes. Here we demonstrate that phloretin and exifone, dipolar compounds that decrease the effective negative charge of membranes, prevent association of Aβ 1-40 and Aβ 25-35 to negatively charged lipid vesicles and Aβ induced cell toxicity. These results suggest that Aβ toxicity is mediated through a nonspecific physicochemical interaction with cell membranes.

  11. A Cocoa Peptide Protects Caenorhabditis elegans from Oxidative Stress and β-Amyloid Peptide Toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Martorell, Patricia; Bataller, Esther; Llopis, Silvia; Gonzalez, Núria; Álvarez, Beatriz; Montón, Fernando; Ortiz, Pepa; Ramón, Daniel; Genovés, Salvador

    2013-01-01

    Background Cocoa and cocoa-based products contain different compounds with beneficial properties for human health. Polyphenols are the most frequently studied, and display antioxidant properties. Moreover, protein content is a very interesting source of antioxidant bioactive peptides, which can be used therapeutically for the prevention of age-related diseases. Methodology/Principal Findings A bioactive peptide, 13L (DNYDNSAGKWWVT), was obtained from a hydrolyzed cocoa by-product by chromatography. The in vitro inhibition of prolyl endopeptidase (PEP) was used as screening method to select the suitable fraction for peptide identification. Functional analysis of 13L peptide was achieved using the transgenic Caenorhabditis elegans strain CL4176 expressing the human Aβ1–42 peptide as a pre-clinical in vivo model for Alzheimer's disease. Among the peptides isolated, peptide 13L (1 µg/mL) showed the highest antioxidant activity (P≤0.001) in the wild-type strain (N2). Furthermore, 13L produced a significant delay in body paralysis in strain CL4176, especially in the 24–47 h period after Aβ1–42 peptide induction (P≤0.0001). This observation is in accordance with the reduction of Aβ deposits in CL4176 by western blot. Finally, transcriptomic analysis in wild-type nematodes treated with 13L revealed modulation of the proteosomal and synaptic functions as the main metabolic targets of the peptide. Conclusions/Significance These findings suggest that the cocoa 13L peptide has antioxidant activity and may reduce Aβ deposition in a C. elegans model of Alzheimer's disease; and therefore has a putative therapeutic potential for prevention of age-related diseases. Further studies in murine models and humans will be essential to analyze the effectiveness of the 13L peptide in higher animals. PMID:23675471

  12. Prevention of ESKAPE pathogen biofilm formation by antimicrobial peptides WLBU2 and LL37.

    PubMed

    Lin, Qiao; Deslouches, Berthony; Montelaro, Ronald C; Di, Y Peter

    2018-05-09

    Bacterial biofilm-dependent infections (e.g., cystic fibrosis, surgical sites, and medical implants) are associated with enhanced drug-resistance and thus difficult to eradicate. The goal of this study was to systematically compare three distinct classes of antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) that include the clinically used antibiotic colistin, the natural AMP LL37, the engineered cationic-AMP WLBU2, and four commonly used antibiotics with different bactericidal mechanisms (tobramycin, ciprofloxacin, ceftazidime and vancomycin) for biofilm prevention properties. Using biofilm-prevention assays, we detected bacterial biomass post-attachment in subinhibitory concentrations (1/3 of the MIC) for each AMP, by the crystal violet method, to distinguish the commonly known bactericidal from potentially distinct mechanisms of biofilm prevention. Biofilm regulatory gene expression was assessed using RT-qPCR for correlation with biofilm growth inhibition. Commonly used antibiotics at 1x MIC showed modest ESKAPE biofilm prevention while 1/3 MIC of AMPs demonstrated up to 90% of biofilm prevention. WLBU2 was generally more effective in preventing bacterial attachment than colistin and LL37. Changes in expression of bacterial genes known to affect biofilm regulation were consistent with biofilm prevention. The data warrant further exploration of AMPs with optimized structures to fill a knowledge gap on the potential application of AMPs to difficult-to-cure bacterial biofilm-related infections. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  13. Insect antimicrobial peptides: potential tools for the prevention of skin cancer.

    PubMed

    Tonk, Miray; Vilcinskas, Andreas; Rahnamaeian, Mohammad

    2016-09-01

    Antimicrobial peptides/proteins (AMPs) are biologically active molecules with diverse structural properties that are produced by mammals, plants, insects, ticks, and microorganisms. They have a range of antibacterial, antifungal, antiviral, and even anticancer activities, and their biological properties could therefore be exploited for therapeutic and prophylactic applications. Cancer and cancer drug resistance are significant current health challenges, so the development of innovative cancer drugs with minimal toxicity toward normal cells and novel modes of action that can evade resistance may provide a new direction for anticancer therapy. The skin is the first line of defense against heat, sunlight, injury, and infection, and skin cancer is thus the most common type of cancer. The skin that has been exposed to sunlight is particularly susceptible, but lesions can occur anywhere on the body. Skin cancer awareness and self-efficacy are necessary to improve sun protection behavior, but more effective preventative approaches are also required. AMPs may offer a new prophylactic approach against skin cancer. In this mini review, we draw attention to the potential use of insect AMPs for the prevention and treatment of skin cancer.

  14. A Peptide Filtering Relation Quantifies MHC Class I Peptide Optimization

    PubMed Central

    Goldstein, Leonard D.; Howarth, Mark; Cardelli, Luca; Emmott, Stephen; Elliott, Tim; Werner, Joern M.

    2011-01-01

    Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC) class I molecules enable cytotoxic T lymphocytes to destroy virus-infected or cancerous cells, thereby preventing disease progression. MHC class I molecules provide a snapshot of the contents of a cell by binding to protein fragments arising from intracellular protein turnover and presenting these fragments at the cell surface. Competing fragments (peptides) are selected for cell-surface presentation on the basis of their ability to form a stable complex with MHC class I, by a process known as peptide optimization. A better understanding of the optimization process is important for our understanding of immunodominance, the predominance of some T lymphocyte specificities over others, which can determine the efficacy of an immune response, the danger of immune evasion, and the success of vaccination strategies. In this paper we present a dynamical systems model of peptide optimization by MHC class I. We incorporate the chaperone molecule tapasin, which has been shown to enhance peptide optimization to different extents for different MHC class I alleles. Using a combination of published and novel experimental data to parameterize the model, we arrive at a relation of peptide filtering, which quantifies peptide optimization as a function of peptide supply and peptide unbinding rates. From this relation, we find that tapasin enhances peptide unbinding to improve peptide optimization without significantly delaying the transit of MHC to the cell surface, and differences in peptide optimization across MHC class I alleles can be explained by allele-specific differences in peptide binding. Importantly, our filtering relation may be used to dynamically predict the cell surface abundance of any number of competing peptides by MHC class I alleles, providing a quantitative basis to investigate viral infection or disease at the cellular level. We exemplify this by simulating optimization of the distribution of peptides derived from Human

  15. Cell-permeable, mitochondrial-targeted, peptide antioxidants.

    PubMed

    Szeto, Hazel H

    2006-04-21

    Cellular oxidative injury has been implicated in aging and a wide array of clinical disorders including ischemia-reperfusion injury; neurodegenerative diseases; diabetes; inflammatory diseases such as atherosclerosis, arthritis, and hepatitis; and drug-induced toxicity. However, available antioxidants have not proven to be particularly effective against many of these disorders. A possibility is that some of the antioxidants do not reach the relevant sites of free radical generation, especially if mitochondria are the primary source of reactive oxygen species (ROS). The SS (Szeto-Schiller) peptide antioxidants represent a novel approach with targeted delivery of antioxidants to the inner mitochondrial membrane. The structural motif of these SS peptides centers on alternating aromatic residues and basic amino acids (aromatic-cationic peptides). These SS peptides can scavenge hydrogen peroxide and peroxynitrite and inhibit lipid peroxidation. Their antioxidant action can be attributed to the tyrosine or dimethyltyrosine residue. By reducing mitochondrial ROS, these peptides inhibit mitochondrial permeability transition and cytochrome c release, thus preventing oxidant-induced cell death. Because these peptides concentrate >1000-fold in the inner mitochondrial membrane, they prevent oxidative cell death with EC50 in the nM range. Preclinical studies support their potential use for ischemia-reperfusion injury and neurodegenerative disorders. Although peptides have often been considered to be poor drug candidates, these small peptides have excellent "druggable" properties, making them promising agents for many diseases with unmet needs.

  16. Evolving Use of Natriuretic Peptides as Part of Strategies for Heart Failure Prevention.

    PubMed

    McDonald, Ken; Wilkinson, Mark

    2017-01-01

    Heart failure (HF) remains one of the major cardiovascular challenges to the Western world. Once established, HF is characterized by compromised life expectancy and quality of life with considerable dependence on hospital care for episodic clinical deterioration. Much is understood about the risk factors that predispose to the development of HF. With such a broad range of factors, it is clear that there is a large population at risk, potentially in excess of 25% of the adult population. Therein lies the major challenge at the outset of our efforts to prevent HF. With such a large population at risk, how do we develop an effective prevention strategy? HF prevention requires a multimodal approach. In this review, we focus primarily on the role of natriuretic peptide (NP) as a tool in a prevention strategy. Prevention of HF is a major public health challenge, underlined by the concerning epidemiological trends, the associated costs, and the continued difficulty to find effective therapies for the growing number of patients with preserved systolic function HF. Population-based approaches focusing on lifestyle and risk factor control have made some impact but not to a satisfactory level and also tend to result in a uniform approach across a population with different risk profiles. Individualizing risk is therefore required, with emerging data indicating that NP-guided risk stratification and intervention can reduce downstream incident HF and other cardiovascular events. © 2016 American Association for Clinical Chemistry.

  17. Whey peptides prevent chronic ultraviolet B radiation-induced skin aging in melanin-possessing male hairless mice.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Yoshiyuki; Sumiyoshi, Maho; Kobayashi, Toshiya

    2014-01-01

    Whey proteins or peptides exhibit various actions, including an antioxidant action, an anticancer action, and a protective action against childhood asthma and atopic syndrome. The effects of orally administered whey peptides (WPs) on chronic ultraviolet B (UVB) radiation-induced cutaneous changes, including changes in cutaneous thickness, elasticity, wrinkle formation, etc., have not been examined. In this study, we studied the preventive effects of WPs on cutaneous aging induced by chronic UVB irradiation in melanin-possessing male hairless mice (HRM). UVB (36-180 mJ/cm(2)) was irradiated to the dorsal area for 17 wk in HRM, and the measurements of cutaneous thickness and elasticity in UVB irradiated mice were performed every week. WPs (200 and 400 mg/kg, twice daily) were administered orally for 17 wk. WPs inhibited the increase in cutaneous thickness, wrinkle formation, and melanin granules and the reduction in cutaneous elasticity associated with photoaging. Furthermore, it has been reported that UVB irradiation-induced skin aging is closely associated with the increase in expression of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), Ki-67-, and 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG)-positive cells. WPs also prevented increases in the expression of MMP-2 and pro-MMP-9, VEGF, and Ki-67- and 8-OHdG-positive cells induced by chronic UVB irradiation. It was found that WPs prevent type IV collagen degradation, angiogenesis, proliferation, and DNA damage caused by UVB irradiation. Overall, these results demonstrate the considerable benefit of WPs for protection against solar UV-irradiated skin aging as a supplemental nutrient.

  18. Role of Host-Defence Peptides in Eye Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Kolar, Satya S.; McDermott, Alison M.

    2013-01-01

    The eye and its associated tissues including the lacrimal system and lids have evolved several defence mechanisms to prevent microbial invasion. Included among this armory are several host-defence peptides. These multifunctional molecules are being studied not only for their endogenous antimicrobial properties but also for their potential therapeutic effects. Here the current knowledge of host-defence peptide expression in the eye will be summarized. The role of these peptides in eye disease will be discussed with the primary focus being on infectious keratitis, inflammatory conditions including dry eye and wound healing. Finally the potential of using host-defence peptides and their mimetics/derivatives for the treatment and prevention of eye diseases is addressed. PMID:21584809

  19. Maize Bioactive Peptides against Cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Díaz-Gómez, Jorge L.; Castorena-Torres, Fabiola; Preciado-Ortiz, Ricardo E.; García-Lara, Silverio

    2017-06-01

    Cancer is one of the main chronic degenerative diseases worldwide. In recent years, consumption of whole-grain cereals and their derived food products has been associated with reduction risks of various types of cancer. Cereals main biomolecules includes proteins, peptides, and amino acids present in different quantities within the grain. The nutraceutical properties associated with peptides exerts biological functions that promote health and prevent this disease. In this review, we report the current status and advances on maize peptides regarding bioactive properties that have been reported such as antioxidant, antihypertensive, hepatoprotective, and anti-tumour activities. We also highlighted its biological potential through which maize bioactive peptides exert anti-cancer activity. Finally, we analyse and emphasize the possible areas of application for maize peptides.

  20. Physiological role of short peptides in nutrition.

    PubMed

    Tutel'yan, V A; Khavinson, V Kh; Malinin, V V

    2003-01-01

    Here we review new data about the physiological role of short peptides and their use as biologically active food additives (parapharmaceutics). Some approaches to the development of peptide preparations for peroral administration are considered and the mechanisms of nonspecific and tissue-specific effects produced by peroral peptide parapharmaceutics are discussed. Particular attention is given to biological properties of short peptides synthesized at the St. Petersburg Institute of Bioregulation and Gerontology. These peptides hold much promise for the synthesis of parapharmaceutics increasing organism's resistance to extreme factors and preventing accelerated aging and age-related diseases.

  1. Ligand-regulated peptides: a general approach for modulating protein-peptide interactions with small molecules.

    PubMed

    Binkowski, Brock F; Miller, Russell A; Belshaw, Peter J

    2005-07-01

    We engineered a novel ligand-regulated peptide (LiRP) system where the binding activity of intracellular peptides is controlled by a cell-permeable small molecule. In the absence of ligand, peptides expressed as fusions in an FKBP-peptide-FRB-GST LiRP scaffold protein are free to interact with target proteins. In the presence of the ligand rapamycin, or the nonimmunosuppressive rapamycin derivative AP23102, the scaffold protein undergoes a conformational change that prevents the interaction of the peptide with the target protein. The modular design of the scaffold enables the creation of LiRPs through rational design or selection from combinatorial peptide libraries. Using these methods, we identified LiRPs that interact with three independent targets: retinoblastoma protein, c-Src, and the AMP-activated protein kinase. The LiRP system should provide a general method to temporally and spatially regulate protein function in cells and organisms.

  2. Antimicrobial Peptides from Fish

    PubMed Central

    Masso-Silva, Jorge A.; Diamond, Gill

    2014-01-01

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are found widely distributed through Nature, and participate in the innate host defense of each species. Fish are a great source of these peptides, as they express all of the major classes of AMPs, including defensins, cathelicidins, hepcidins, histone-derived peptides, and a fish-specific class of the cecropin family, called piscidins. As with other species, the fish peptides exhibit broad-spectrum antimicrobial activity, killing both fish and human pathogens. They are also immunomodulatory, and their genes are highly responsive to microbes and innate immuno-stimulatory molecules. Recent research has demonstrated that some of the unique properties of fish peptides, including their ability to act even in very high salt concentrations, make them good potential targets for development as therapeutic antimicrobials. Further, the stimulation of their gene expression by exogenous factors could be useful in preventing pathogenic microbes in aquaculture. PMID:24594555

  3. Biodiscovery of aluminum binding peptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, Bryn L.; Sarkes, Deborah A.; Finch, Amethist S.; Hurley, Margaret M.; Stratis-Cullum, Dimitra

    2013-05-01

    Cell surface peptide display systems are large and diverse libraries of peptides (7-15 amino acids) which are presented by a display scaffold hosted by a phage (virus), bacteria, or yeast cell. This allows the selfsustaining peptide libraries to be rapidly screened for high affinity binders to a given target of interest, and those binders quickly identified. Peptide display systems have traditionally been utilized in conjunction with organic-based targets, such as protein toxins or carbon nanotubes. However, this technology has been expanded for use with inorganic targets, such as metals, for biofabrication, hybrid material assembly and corrosion prevention. While most current peptide display systems employ viruses to host the display scaffold, we have recently shown that a bacterial host, Escherichia coli, displaying peptides in the ubiquitous, membrane protein scaffold eCPX can also provide specific peptide binders to an organic target. We have, for the first time, extended the use of this bacterial peptide display system for the biodiscovery of aluminum binding 15mer peptides. We will present the process of biopanning with macroscopic inorganic targets, binder enrichment, and binder isolation and discovery.

  4. Grape-seed procyanidins prevent the cafeteria-diet-induced decrease of glucagon-like peptide-1 production.

    PubMed

    González-Abuín, Noemi; Martínez-Micaelo, Neus; Blay, Mayte; Ardévol, Anna; Pinent, Montserrat

    2014-02-05

    Grape-seed procyanidin extract (GSPE) has been reported to improve insulin resistance in cafeteria rats. Because glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) is involved in glucose homeostasis, the preventive effects of GSPE on GLP-1 production, secretion, and elimination were evaluated in a model of diet-induced insulin resistance. Rats were fed a cafeteria diet for 12 weeks, and 25 mg of GSPE/kg of body weight was administered concomitantly. Vehicle-treated cafeteria-fed rats and chow-fed rats were used as controls. The cafeteria diet decreased active GLP-1 plasma levels, which is attributed to a decreased intestinal GLP-1 production, linked to reduced colonic enteroendocrine cell populations. Such effects were prevented by GSPE. In the same context, GSPE avoided the decrease on intestinal dipeptidyl-peptidase 4 (DPP4) activity and modulated the gene expression of GLP-1 and its receptor in the hypothalamus. In conclusion, the preventive treatment with GSPE abrogates the effects of the cafeteria diet on intestinal GLP-1 production and DPP4 activity.

  5. Peptide Vaccines for Leishmaniasis.

    PubMed

    De Brito, Rory C F; Cardoso, Jamille M De O; Reis, Levi E S; Vieira, Joao F; Mathias, Fernando A S; Roatt, Bruno M; Aguiar-Soares, Rodrigo Dian D O; Ruiz, Jeronimo C; Resende, Daniela de M; Reis, Alexandre B

    2018-01-01

    Due to an increase in the incidence of leishmaniases worldwide, the development of new strategies such as prophylactic vaccines to prevent infection and decrease the disease have become a high priority. Classic vaccines against leishmaniases were based on live or attenuated parasites or their subunits. Nevertheless, the use of whole parasite or their subunits for vaccine production has numerous disadvantages. Therefore, the use of Leishmania peptides to design more specific vaccines against leishmaniases seems promising. Moreover, peptides have several benefits in comparison with other kinds of antigens, for instance, good stability, absence of potentially damaging materials, antigen low complexity, and low-cost to scale up. By contrast, peptides are poor immunogenic alone, and they need to be delivered correctly. In this context, several approaches described in this review are useful to solve these drawbacks. Approaches, such as, peptides in combination with potent adjuvants, cellular vaccinations, adenovirus, polyepitopes, or DNA vaccines have been used to develop peptide-based vaccines. Recent advancements in peptide vaccine design, chimeric, or polypeptide vaccines and nanovaccines based on particles attached or formulated with antigenic components or peptides have been increasingly employed to drive a specific immune response. In this review, we briefly summarize the old, current, and future stands on peptide-based vaccines, describing the disadvantages and benefits associated with them. We also propose possible approaches to overcome the related weaknesses of synthetic vaccines and suggest future guidelines for their development.

  6. Marine Peptides: Bioactivities and Applications

    PubMed Central

    Cheung, Randy Chi Fai; Ng, Tzi Bun; Wong, Jack Ho

    2015-01-01

    Peptides are important bioactive natural products which are present in many marine species. These marine peptides have high potential nutraceutical and medicinal values because of their broad spectra of bioactivities. Their antimicrobial, antiviral, antitumor, antioxidative, cardioprotective (antihypertensive, antiatherosclerotic and anticoagulant), immunomodulatory, analgesic, anxiolytic anti-diabetic, appetite suppressing and neuroprotective activities have attracted the attention of the pharmaceutical industry, which attempts to design them for use in the treatment or prevention of various diseases. Some marine peptides or their derivatives have high commercial values and had reached the pharmaceutical and nutraceutical markets. A large number of them are already in different phases of the clinical and preclinical pipeline. This review highlights the recent research in marine peptides and the trends and prospects for the future, with special emphasis on nutraceutical and pharmaceutical development into marketed products. PMID:26132844

  7. Chemopreventive role of food-derived proteins and peptides: A review.

    PubMed

    Hernández-Ledesma, Blanca; Hsieh, Chia-Chien

    2017-07-24

    Cancer is one of the leading causes of mortality and disability worldwide. Although great advances in cancer treatments such as chemotherapy, surgery, and radiation are currently being achieved, their application is associated with numerous and expensive adverse side effects. Epidemiological evidence has demonstrated that the consumption of certain foods potentially prevents up to 35% of cancer cases. Bioactive components are ubiquitous in nature, also in dietary food, providing an essential link in health maintenance, promotion, and prevention of chronic diseases, such as cancer. Development of bioactive proteins and peptides is a current and innovative strategy for cancer prevention/cure. A growing body of anticancer protein and peptides from natural sources has shown the ability to reduce tumor progression through multiple mechanisms including apoptotic, antiproliferative, antiangiogenic, and immunomodulatory activities. This review is focused on proteins and peptides from different food sources including plants, milk, egg, and marine organisms in which chemopreventive properties have been demonstrated. Other aspects such as mechanism of action, bioavailability, and identification and characterization of food-derived peptides by advance separated technologies are also included. This review highlights the potential application of food-derived peptides as functional food ingredients and pharmaceutical candidates in the auxiliary therapy of cancer.

  8. Whey-hydrolyzed peptide-enriched immunomodulating diet prevents progression of liver cirrhosis in rats.

    PubMed

    Jobara, Kanta; Kaido, Toshimi; Hori, Tomohide; Iwaisako, Keiko; Endo, Kosuke; Uchida, Yoichiro; Uemoto, Shinji

    2014-10-01

    Liver fibrosis and subsequent cirrhosis is a major cause of death worldwide, but few effective antifibrotic therapies are reported. Whey-hydrolyzed peptide (WHP), a major peptide component of bovine milk, exerts anti-inflammatory effects in experimental models. A WHP-enriched diet is widely used for immunomodulating diets (IMD) in clinical fields. However, the effects of WHP on liver fibrosis remain unknown. The aim of this study was to investigate the antifibrotic effects of WHP in a rat cirrhosis model. Progressive liver fibrosis was induced by repeated intraperitoneal administration of dimethylnitrosamine (DMN) for 3 wk. Rats were fed either a WHP-enriched IMD (WHP group) or a control enteral diet (control group). The degree of liver fibrosis was compared between groups. Hepatocyte-protective effects were examined using hepatocytes isolated from rats fed a WHP diet. Reactive oxygen species and glutathione in liver tissue were investigated in the DMN cirrhosis model. Macroscopic and microscopic progression of liver fibrosis was remarkably suppressed in the WHP group. Elevated serum levels of liver enzymes and hyaluronic acid, and liver tissue hydroxyproline content were significantly attenuated in the WHP group. Necrotic hepatocyte rates with DMN challenge, isolated from rats fed a WHP-enriched IMD, were significantly lower. In the DMN cirrhosis model, reactive oxygen species were significantly lower, and glutathione was significantly higher in the WHP group's whole liver tissue. A WHP-enriched IMD effectively prevented progression of DMN-induced liver fibrosis in rats via a direct hepatocyte-protective effect and an antioxidant effect through glutathione synthesis. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Peptide chemistry toolbox - Transforming natural peptides into peptide therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Erak, Miloš; Bellmann-Sickert, Kathrin; Els-Heindl, Sylvia; Beck-Sickinger, Annette G

    2018-06-01

    The development of solid phase peptide synthesis has released tremendous opportunities for using synthetic peptides in medicinal applications. In the last decades, peptide therapeutics became an emerging market in pharmaceutical industry. The need for synthetic strategies in order to improve peptidic properties, such as longer half-life, higher bioavailability, increased potency and efficiency is accordingly rising. In this mini-review, we present a toolbox of modifications in peptide chemistry for overcoming the main drawbacks during the transition from natural peptides to peptide therapeutics. Modifications at the level of the peptide backbone, amino acid side chains and higher orders of structures are described. Furthermore, we are discussing the future of peptide therapeutics development and their impact on the pharmaceutical market. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. An update on the potential role of C-peptide in diabetes and osteoporosis.

    PubMed

    Pujia, Arturo; Gazzaruso, Carmine; Montalcini, Tiziana

    2017-12-01

    C-peptide secretion is deficient or absent in type 1 diabetes mellitus. It is well accepted that insulin replacement therapy cannot prevent the development of long-term diabetes-related complications, which can often be disabling or even life-threatening. Several cross-sectional investigations have suggested that residual C-peptide production in patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus would help prevent a number of complications. In animal models of diabetes and in patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus, C-peptide replacement improves renal function, skin and skeletal muscle blood flow, nerve conduction, glucose utilization, and other diabetes-related complications. Recent investigations suggest a new beneficial effect of C-peptide, which to date has never been studied. It is known that osteoporosis is the most prevalent short-term complication in type 1 diabetes mellitus. This review will highlight new insights into the pathophysiology and future therapeutic modalities for osteoporosis in individuals with diabetes. This review provides a concise summary of old and new insights into the role of C-peptide in diabetes-related complications. The data suggest that C-peptide is a bioactive peptide, acting independently of insulin, which binds to a G-protein-coupled membrane binding site in different cell types. By triggering Ca 2+ -dependent intracellular signaling pathways, both Na + , K + -ATPase and endothelial nitric oxide synthase are activated. C-peptide may act on osteoblast cells by ERK 1/2 pathway activation, modulate collagen biosynthesis and RANKL expression. Furthermore, C-peptide-deficient postmenopausal women, not affected by diabetes, have a lower bone mineral density than those with normal C-peptide levels. Taken together these studies encourage further investigations to elucidate the role of C-peptide in preventing bone loss in type 1 diabetes mellitus and in those individuals with C-peptide deficiency and osteoporosis.

  11. Potent D-peptide inhibitors of HIV-1 entry

    PubMed Central

    Welch, Brett D.; VanDemark, Andrew P.; Heroux, Annie; Hill, Christopher P.; Kay, Michael S.

    2007-01-01

    During HIV-1 entry, the highly conserved gp41 N-trimer pocket region becomes transiently exposed and vulnerable to inhibition. Using mirror-image phage display and structure-assisted design, we have discovered protease-resistant D-amino acid peptides (D-peptides) that bind the N-trimer pocket with high affinity and potently inhibit viral entry. We also report high-resolution crystal structures of two of these D-peptides in complex with a pocket mimic that suggest sources of their high potency. A trimeric version of one of these peptides is the most potent pocket-specific entry inhibitor yet reported by three orders of magnitude (IC50 = 250 pM). These results are the first demonstration that D-peptides can form specific and high-affinity interactions with natural protein targets and strengthen their promise as therapeutic agents. The D-peptides described here address limitations associated with current L-peptide entry inhibitors and are promising leads for the prevention and treatment of HIV/AIDS. PMID:17942675

  12. Propensity of a single-walled carbon nanotube-peptide to mimic a KK10 peptide in an HLA-TCR complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Mei; Bell, David R.; Zhou, Ruhong

    2017-12-01

    The application of nanotechnology to improve disease diagnosis, treatment, monitoring, and prevention is the goal of nanomedicine. We report here a theoretical study of a functionalized single-walled carbon nanotube (CNT) mimic binding to a human leukocyte antigen-T cell receptor (HLA-TCR) immune complex as a first attempt of a potential nanomedicine for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) vaccine development. The carbon nanotube was coated with three arginine residues to imitate the HIV type 1 immunodominant viral peptide KK10 (gag 263-272: KRWIILGLNK), named CNT-peptide hereafter. Through molecular dynamics simulations, we explore the CNT-peptide and KK10 binding to an important HLA-TCR complex. Our results suggest that the CNT-peptide and KK10 bind comparably to the HLA-TCR complex, but the CNT-peptide forms stronger interactions with the TCR. Desorption simulations highlight the innate flexibility of KK10 over the CNT-peptide, resulting in a slightly higher desorption energy required for KK10 over the CNT-peptide. Our findings indicate that the designed CNT-peptide mimic has favorable propensity to activate TCR pathways and should be further explored to understand therapeutic potential.

  13. Nondepleting anti-CD4 monoclonal antibody prevents diabetes and blocks induction of insulin autoantibodies following insulin peptide B:9-23 immunization in the NOD mouse.

    PubMed

    Liu, Edwin; Moriyama, Hiroaki; Paronen, Johanna; Abiru, Norio; Miao, Dongmei; Yu, Liping; Taylor, Robert M; Eisenbarth, George S

    2003-11-01

    Insulin peptide B:9-23 is a major autoantigen in type 1 diabetes that induces insulin autoantibodies and prevents diabetes in the NOD. However, immunization with peptide without adjuvant may be insufficient to reverse disease or induce long-term tolerance. Furthermore, recent experience has demonstrated the potential dangers of disease exacerbation or anaphylaxis with peptide immunotherapy. Combination therapy of B:9-23 with a nondepleting anti-CD4 monoclonal antibody (YTS 177.9) was studied in female NOD mice from 4 through 6 weeks of age. Injections of either B:9-23 in saline, YTS 177.9 antibody, or both peptide and antibody were given to mice. By 52 weeks follow-up, 40% of B:9-23-treated, 100% of YTS177.9-treated, and 70% of B:9-23 and YTS177.9 combination-treated mice remained diabetes-free. IAA, both spontaneous and induced by B:9-23, was almost completely suppressed in mice receiving YTS 177.9. In addition to suppression of IAA expression, anti-B:9-23 peptide antibodies are also suppressed in mice receiving B:9-23 with YTS 177.9, compared to B:9-23 alone. A brief course of the nondepleting anti-CD4 monoclonal antibody (YTS 177.9) in NOD mice confers long-term protection from diabetes and insulitis and profoundly blocks spontaneous and B:9-23 peptide-induced insulin autoantibodies.

  14. Bioactive Peptides Derived from Seaweed Protein and Their Health Benefits: Antihypertensive, Antioxidant, and Antidiabetic Properties.

    PubMed

    Admassu, Habtamu; Gasmalla, Mohammed Abdalbasit A; Yang, Ruijin; Zhao, Wei

    2018-01-01

    Cardiovascular diseases and diabetes are the biggest causes of death globally. Therefore, prevention of these diseases is a focus of pharmaceuticals and functional food manufacturers. This review summarizes recent research trends and scientific knowledge in seaweed protein-derived peptides with particular emphasis on production, isolation and potential health impacts in prevention of hypertension, diabetes and oxidative stress. The current status and future prospects of bioactive peptides are also discussed. Bioactive peptides have strong potential for use in therapeutic drug and functional food formulation in health management strategy, especially cardiovascular disease and diabetes. Seaweeds can be used as sustainable protein sources in the production of these peptide-based drugs and functional foods for preventing such diseases. Many studies have reported that peptides showing angiotensin converting enzyme inhibition, antihypertensive, antioxidative and antidiabetics activities, have been successfully isolated from seaweed. However, further research is needed in large-scale production of these peptides, efficient isolation methods, interactions with functional foods and other pharmaceuticals, and their ease to digestion in in vivo studies and safety to validate the health benefits of these peptides. © 2017 Institute of Food Technologists®.

  15. [Assessment of work ability index in evaluation of small peptides geroprotective effect].

    PubMed

    Bashkireva, A S; Kachan, E Yu

    We have conducted a comparative analysis of the work ability index (WAI) application in evaluation of the effectiveness of small peptides (cytogens) used as geroprotectors in the system of preventive medical nutrition of those working with occupational hazards. Our study revealed the necessity of an inclusion of small peptides into the system of preventive medical nutrition, health promotion in people working with occupational hazards and thus subjected to an accelerated aging. The combined application of peptide geroprotectors makes it possible to restore and enhance adaptive resources as well as to correct work ability and maintain health and well-being in different professional groups.

  16. Bioactive Proteins and Peptides from Soybeans.

    PubMed

    Agyei, Dominic

    2015-01-01

    Dietary proteins from soybeans have been shown to offer health benefits in vivo and/or in vitro either as intact proteins or in partially digested forms also called bioactive peptides. Upon oral administration and absorption, soy-derived bioactive peptides may induce several physiological responses such as antioxidative, antimicrobial, antihypertensive, anticancer and immunomodulatory effects. There has therefore been a mounting research interest in the therapeutic potential of soy protein hydrolysates and their subsequent incorporation in functional foods and 'Food for Specified Health Uses' (FOSHU) related products where their biological activities may assist in the promotion of good health or in the control and prevention of diseases. This mini review discusses relevant patents and gives an overview on bioactive proteins and peptides obtainable from soybeans. Processes for the production and formulation of these peptides are given, together with specific examples of their therapeutic potential and possible areas of application.

  17. Lactoferrin-derived Peptides Active towards Influenza: Identification of Three Potent Tetrapeptide Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Scala, Maria Carmina; Sala, Marina; Pietrantoni, Agostina; Spensiero, Antonia; Di Micco, Simone; Agamennone, Mariangela; Bertamino, Alessia; Novellino, Ettore; Bifulco, Giuseppe; Gomez-Monterrey, Isabel M; Superti, Fabiana; Campiglia, Pietro

    2017-09-06

    Bovine lactoferrin is a biglobular multifunctional iron binding glycoprotein that plays an important role in innate immunity against infections. We have previously demonstrated that selected peptides from bovine lactoferrin C-lobe are able to prevent both Influenza virus hemagglutination and cell infection. To deeper investigate the ability of lactoferrin derived peptides to inhibit Influenza virus infection, in this study we identified new bovine lactoferrin C-lobe derived sequences and corresponding synthetic peptides were synthesized and assayed to check their ability to prevent viral hemagglutination and infection. We identified three tetrapeptides endowed with broad anti-Influenza activity and able to inhibit viral infection in a concentration range femto- to picomolar. Our data indicate that these peptides may constitute a non-toxic tool for potential applications as anti-Influenza therapeutics.

  18. Synthetic peptides that cause F-actin bundling and block actin depolymerization

    DOEpatents

    Sederoff, Heike [Raleigh, NC; Huber, Steven C [Savoy, IL; Larabell, Carolyn A [Berkeley, CA

    2011-10-18

    Synthetic peptides derived from sucrose synthase, and having homology to actin and actin-related proteins, sharing a common motif, useful for causing acting bundling and preventing actin depolymerization. Peptides exhibiting the common motif are described, as well as specific synthetic peptides which caused bundled actin and inhibit actin depolymerization. These peptides can be useful for treating a subject suffering from a disease characterized by cells having neoplastic growth, for anti-cancer therapeutics, delivered to subjects solely, or concomitantly or sequentially with other known cancer therapeutics. These peptides can also be used for stabilizing microfilaments in living cells and inhibiting growth of cells.

  19. Inhibition of pressure-activated cancer cell adhesion by FAK-derived peptides

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Bixi; Devadoss, Dinesh; Wang, Shouye; Vomhof-DeKrey, Emilie E.; Kuhn, Leslie A.; Basson, Marc D.

    2017-01-01

    Forces within the surgical milieu or circulation activate cancer cell adhesion and potentiate metastasis through signaling requiring FAK-Akt1 interaction. Impeding FAK-Akt1 interaction might inhibit perioperative tumor dissemination, facilitating curative cancer surgery without global FAK or AKT inhibitor toxicity. Serial truncation and structurally designed mutants of FAK identified a seven amino acid, short helical structure within FAK that effectively competes with Akt1-FAK interaction. Adenoviral overexpression of this FAK-derived peptide inhibited pressure-induced FAK phosphorylation and AKT-FAK coimmunoprecipitation in human SW620 colon cancer cells briefly exposed to 15mmHg increased pressure, consistent with laparoscopic or post-surgical pressures. Adenoviral FAK-derived peptide expression prevented pressure-activation of SW620 adhesion not only to collagen-I-coated plates but also to murine surgical wounds. A scrambled peptide did not. Finally, we modeled operative shedding of tumor cells before irrigation and closure by transient cancer cell adhesion to murine surgical wounds before irrigation and closure. Thirty minute preincubation of SW620 cells at 15mmHg increased pressure impaired subsequent tumor free survival in mice exposed to cells expressing the scrambled peptide. The FAK-derived sequence prevented this. These results suggest that blocking FAK-Akt1 interaction may prevent perioperative tumor dissemination and that analogs or mimics of this 7 amino acid FAK-derived peptide could impair metastasis. PMID:29228673

  20. Antiviral Peptides Targeting the West Nile Virus Envelope Protein▿

    PubMed Central

    Bai, Fengwei; Town, Terrence; Pradhan, Deepti; Cox, Jonathan; Ashish; Ledizet, Michel; Anderson, John F.; Flavell, Richard A.; Krueger, Joanna K.; Koski, Raymond A.; Fikrig, Erol

    2007-01-01

    West Nile virus (WNV) can cause fatal murine and human encephalitis. The viral envelope protein interacts with host cells. A murine brain cDNA phage display library was therefore probed with WNV envelope protein, resulting in the identification of several adherent peptides. Of these, peptide 1 prevented WNV infection in vitro with a 50% inhibition concentration of 67 μM and also inhibited infection of a related flavivirus, dengue virus. Peptide 9, a derivative of peptide 1, was a particularly potent inhibitor of WNV in vitro, with a 50% inhibition concentration of 2.6 μM. Moreover, mice challenged with WNV that had been incubated with peptide 9 had reduced viremia and fatality compared with control animals. Peptide 9 penetrated the murine blood-brain barrier and was found in the brain parenchyma, implying that it may have antiviral activity in the central nervous system. These short peptides serve as the basis for developing new therapeutics for West Nile encephalitis and, potentially, other flaviviruses. PMID:17151121

  1. ABCA1 agonist peptides for the treatment of disease

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Bielicki, John K.

    Purpose of review The review summarizes information pertaining to the preclinical development of new apolipoprotein (apo) E mimetic peptides that stimulate cellular cholesterol efflux. Recent findings Small α-helical peptides based on the C-terminal domain of apoE have been developed for therapeutic applications. These peptides stimulate cellular cholesterol efflux via the ATP-binding cassette transporter A1 (ABCA1) with high potency, like native apolipoproteins on a molar basis. This potent activity has been related to the unique ability of these peptides to maintain α-helix structure upon dilution. Recent structure-activity studies improving the safety features of these mimetic peptides have greatly improved their potentialmore » for clinical use. Structural features of the class A α-helix motif that induce muscle toxicity and hypertriglyceridemia have been identified. These may have implications for the design of other HDL mimetic peptides. Summary ABCA1 is an integral membrane protein that plays a central role in biology. Its principal function is to mediate the efflux of cholesterol and phospholipid from cells to extracellular apo, preventing a build-up of excess cholesterol in membranes. This process generates HDL particles that perform a variety of functions to protect against disease. A number of these functions can be viewed as directly or indirectly supporting ABCA1 activity, thus constituting a positive feedback system to optimize cellular lipid efflux responses and disease prevention. Consequently, therapeutic approaches that mimic the activities of apos may prove highly effective to combat disease. One such approach involves the use of peptides. The broad biological relevance of ABCA1 suggests these apo mimetic peptides may be useful for the treatment of a number of diseases, such as atherosclerosis, diabetes, and Alzheimer's disease.« less

  2. ABCA1 agonist peptides for the treatment of disease

    DOE PAGES

    Bielicki, John K.

    2016-02-01

    Purpose of review The review summarizes information pertaining to the preclinical development of new apolipoprotein (apo) E mimetic peptides that stimulate cellular cholesterol efflux. Recent findings Small α-helical peptides based on the C-terminal domain of apoE have been developed for therapeutic applications. These peptides stimulate cellular cholesterol efflux via the ATP-binding cassette transporter A1 (ABCA1) with high potency, like native apolipoproteins on a molar basis. This potent activity has been related to the unique ability of these peptides to maintain α-helix structure upon dilution. Recent structure-activity studies improving the safety features of these mimetic peptides have greatly improved their potentialmore » for clinical use. Structural features of the class A α-helix motif that induce muscle toxicity and hypertriglyceridemia have been identified. These may have implications for the design of other HDL mimetic peptides. Summary ABCA1 is an integral membrane protein that plays a central role in biology. Its principal function is to mediate the efflux of cholesterol and phospholipid from cells to extracellular apo, preventing a build-up of excess cholesterol in membranes. This process generates HDL particles that perform a variety of functions to protect against disease. A number of these functions can be viewed as directly or indirectly supporting ABCA1 activity, thus constituting a positive feedback system to optimize cellular lipid efflux responses and disease prevention. Consequently, therapeutic approaches that mimic the activities of apos may prove highly effective to combat disease. One such approach involves the use of peptides. The broad biological relevance of ABCA1 suggests these apo mimetic peptides may be useful for the treatment of a number of diseases, such as atherosclerosis, diabetes, and Alzheimer's disease.« less

  3. Fatty acid conjugation enhances the activities of antimicrobial peptides.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhining; Yuan, Penghui; Xing, Meng; He, Zhumei; Dong, Chuanfu; Cao, Yongchang; Liu, Qiuyun

    2013-04-01

    Antimicrobial peptides are small molecules that play a crucial role in innate immunity in multi-cellular organisms, and usually expressed and secreted constantly at basal levels to prevent infection, but local production can be augmented upon an infection. The clock is ticking as rising antibiotic abuse has led to the emergence of many drug resistance bacteria. Due to their broad spectrum antibiotic and antifungal activities as well as anti-viral and anti-tumor activities, efforts are being made to develop antimicrobial peptides into future microbial agents. This article describes some of the recent patents on antimicrobial peptides with fatty acid conjugation. Potency and selectivity of antimicrobial peptide can be modulated with fatty acid tails of variable length. Interaction between membranes and antimicrobial peptides was affected by fatty acid conjugation. At concentrations above the critical miscelle concentration (CMC), propensity of solution selfassembly hampered binding of the peptide to cell membranes. Overall, fatty acid conjugation has enhanced the activities of antimicrobial peptides, and occasionally it rendered inactive antimicrobial peptides to be bioactive. Antimicrobial peptides can not only be used as medicine but also as food additives.

  4. Novel Antimicrobial Peptides That Inhibit Gram Positive Bacterial Exotoxin Synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Merriman, Joseph A.; Nemeth, Kimberly A.; Schlievert, Patrick M.

    2014-01-01

    Gram-positive bacteria, such as Staphylococcus aureus, cause serious human illnesses through combinations of surface virulence factors and secretion of exotoxins. Our prior studies using the protein synthesis inhibitor clindamycin and signal transduction inhibitors glycerol monolaurate and α-globin and β-globin chains of hemoglobin indicate that their abilities to inhibit exotoxin production by S. aureus are separable from abilities to inhibit growth of the organism. Additionally, our previous studies suggest that inhibition of exotoxin production, in absence of ability to kill S. aureus and normal flora lactobacilli, will prevent colonization by pathogenic S. aureus, while not interfering with lactobacilli colonization. These disparate activities may be important in development of novel anti-infective agents that do not alter normal flora. We initiated studies to explore the exotoxin-synthesis-inhibition activity of hemoglobin peptides further to develop potential agents to prevent S. aureus infections. We tested synthesized α-globin chain peptides, synthetic variants of α-globin chain peptides, and two human defensins for ability to inhibit exotoxin production without significantly inhibiting S. aureus growth. All of these peptides were weakly or not inhibitory to bacterial growth. However, the peptides were inhibitory to exotoxin production with increasing activity dependent on increasing numbers of positively-charged amino acids. Additionally, the peptides could be immobilized on agarose beads or have amino acid sequences scrambled and still retain exotoxin-synthesis-inhibition. The peptides are not toxic to human vaginal epithelial cells and do not inhibit growth of normal flora L. crispatus. These peptides may interfere with plasma membrane signal transduction in S. aureus due to their positive charges. PMID:24748386

  5. Bioactive peptides from meat muscle and by-products: generation, functionality and application as functional ingredients.

    PubMed

    Lafarga, Tomas; Hayes, Maria

    2014-10-01

    Bioactive peptides are sequences of between 2-30 amino acids in length that impart a positive health effect to the consumer when ingested. They have been identified from a range of foods, including milk and muscle sources including beef, chicken, pork and marine muscles. The myriad of peptides identified from these sources have known antihypertensive, opioid, antioxidant, antithrombotic and other bioactivities. Indeed, bioactive peptides could play a role in the prevention of diseases associated with the development of metabolic syndrome and mental health diseases. The aim of this work is to present an overview of the bioactive peptides identified in muscle proteins and by-products generated during the processing of meat. The paper looks at the isolation, enrichment and characterisation strategies that have been employed to date to generate bioactive peptides and the potential future applications of these peptides in functional foods for the prevention of heart and mental health problems and obesity. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. The influence of body mass index and age on C-peptide at the diagnosis of type 1 diabetes in children who participated in the diabetes prevention trial-type 1.

    PubMed

    Sosenko, Jay M; Geyer, Susan; Skyler, Jay S; Rafkin, Lisa E; Ismail, Heba M; Libman, Ingrid M; Liu, Yuk-Fun; DiMeglio, Linda A; Evans-Molina, Carmella; Palmer, Jerry P

    2018-05-01

    The extent of influence of BMI and age on C-peptide at the diagnosis of type 1 diabetes (T1D) is unknown. We thus studied the impact of body mass index Z-scores (BMIZ) and age on C-peptide measures at and soon after the diagnosis of T1D. Data from Diabetes Prevention Trial-Type 1 (DPT-1) participants <18.0 years at diagnosis was analyzed. Analyses examined associations of C-peptide measures with BMIZ and age in 2 cohorts: oral glucose tolerance tests (OGTTs) at diagnosis (n = 99) and mixed meal tolerance tests (MMTTs) <6 months after diagnosis (n = 80). Multivariable linear regression was utilized. Fasting and area under the curve (AUC) C-peptide from OGTTs (n = 99) at diagnosis and MMTTs (n = 80) after diagnosis were positively associated with BMIZ and age (P < .001 for all). Associations persisted when BMIZ and age were included as independent variables in regression models (P < .001 for all). BMIZ and age explained 31%-47% of the variance of C-peptide measures. In an example, 2 individuals with identical AUC C-peptide values had an approximate 5-fold difference in values after adjustments for BMIZ and age. The association between fasting glucose and C-peptide decreased markedly when fasting C-peptide values were adjusted (r = 0.30, P < .01 to r = 0.07, n.s.). C-peptide measures are strongly and independently related to BMIZ and age at and soon after the diagnosis of T1D. Adjustments for BMIZ and age cause substantial changes in C-peptide values, and impact the association between glycemia and C-peptide. Such adjustments can improve assessments of β-cell impairment at diagnosis. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Perspective of Use of Antiviral Peptides against Influenza Virus

    PubMed Central

    Skalickova, Sylvie; Heger, Zbynek; Krejcova, Ludmila; Pekarik, Vladimir; Bastl, Karel; Janda, Jozef; Kostolansky, Frantisek; Vareckova, Eva; Zitka, Ondrej; Adam, Vojtech; Kizek, Rene

    2015-01-01

    The threat of a worldwide influenza pandemic has greatly increased over the past decade with the emergence of highly virulent avian influenza strains. The increased frequency of drug-resistant influenza strains against currently available antiviral drugs requires urgent development of new strategies for antiviral therapy, too. The research in the field of therapeutic peptides began to develop extensively in the second half of the 20th century. Since then, the mechanisms of action for several peptides and their antiviral prospect received large attention due to the global threat posed by viruses. Here, we discussed the therapeutic properties of peptides used in influenza treatment. Peptides with antiviral activity against influenza can be divided into three main groups. First, entry blocker peptides such as a Flupep that interact with influenza hemagglutinin, block its binding to host cells and prevent viral fusion. Second, several peptides display virucidal activity, disrupting viral envelopes, e.g., Melittin. Finally, a third set of peptides interacts with the viral polymerase complex and act as viral replication inhibitors such as PB1 derived peptides. Here, we present a review of the current literature describing the antiviral activity, mechanism and future therapeutic potential of these influenza antiviral peptides. PMID:26492266

  8. Administration of bovine casein-derived peptide prevents cognitive decline in Alzheimer disease model mice.

    PubMed

    Min, Li-Juan; Kobayashi, Yodai; Mogi, Masaki; Tsukuda, Kana; Yamada, Akio; Yamauchi, Koji; Abe, Fumiaki; Iwanami, Jun; Xiao, Jin-Zhong; Horiuchi, Masatsugu

    2017-01-01

    There is a growing interest in identifying natural food ingredients that may serve to prevent dementia such as that due to Alzheimer disease (AD). Peptides derived from food proteins have been demonstrated to have various physiological activities such as a hypotensive action. Recent findings have indicated possible associations of hypertension with AD progression, and suggest that angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors with potential to pass through the blood brain barrier (BBB) may reduce the risk of AD. In this study, we investigated the effect of milk peptide (CH-3) on cognitive function in AD model mice. CH-3 contains a tripeptide (methionine-lysine-proline, MKP) that has been found to have a strong ACE inhibitory effect and the potential to pass through the BBB. Adult male ddY mice were used in this study, and an animal model of AD was induced by intracerebroventricular (ICV) injection of Aβ1-42. CH-3 (250 mg/kg/day) or MKP (0.5 mg/kg/day) was orally administered every day starting 2 days before ICV injection. At 3 weeks after ICV injection, cognitive function was evaluated by the Morris water maze test. Brain samples were obtained after behavioral testing, and expression of inflammatory cytokines and NADPH oxidase subunits was measured by real-time quantitative RT-PCR. ICV injection of Aβ1-42 significantly impaired cognitive function compared with that in PBS-injected mice. Daily administration of CH-3 markedly attenuated this Aβ1-42-induced cognitive decline. Aβ1-42 injection significantly enhanced the expression of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and p22phox in the mouse hippocampus compared with PBS injection, and showed a tendency to increase the expression of monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1), p47phox and gp91phox, whereas CH-3 treatment markedly reduced Aβ1-42-induced TNF-α, MCP-1, iNOS, p47phox and gp91phox expression. Finally, administration of MKP also attenuated Aβ1-42-induced

  9. Peptides and methods against diabetes

    DOEpatents

    Albertini, Richard J.; Falta, Michael T.

    2000-01-01

    This invention relates to methods of preventing or reducing the severity of diabetes. In one embodiment, the method involves administering to the individual a peptide having substantially the sequence of a on-conserved region sequence of a T cell receptor present on the surface of T cells mediating diabetes or a fragment thereof, wherein the peptide or fragment is capable of causing an effect on the immune system to regulate the T cells. In particular, the T cell receptor has the V.beta. regional V.beta.6 or V.beta.14. In another embodiment, the method involves gene therapy. The invention also relates to methods of diagnosing diabetes by determining the presence of diabetes predominant T cell receptors.

  10. Oral treatment with β-lactoglobulin peptides prevents clinical symptoms in a mouse model for cow's milk allergy.

    PubMed

    Meulenbroek, Laura A P M; van Esch, Betty C A M; Hofman, Gerard A; den Hartog Jager, Constance F; Nauta, Alma J; Willemsen, Linette E M; Bruijnzeel-Koomen, Carla A F M; Garssen, Johan; van Hoffen, Els; Knippels, Léon M J

    2013-11-01

    Prior exposure to partial whey hydrolysates has been shown to reduce the allergic response to whey in mice. This effect was more pronounced in combination with a diet containing non-digestible oligosaccharides (scGOS/lcFOS/pAOS). It is unknown which fractions/epitopes are responsible for this effect. Therefore, the prophylactic ability of synthetic peptides of β-lactoglobulin with/without a scGOS/lcFOS/pAOS-containing diet to reduce the allergic response in a mouse model for cow's milk allergy was investigated. Of 31 peptides, nine peptides were selected based on human T cell data. Mice were pre-treated orally with three peptide mixtures or single peptides for six consecutive days. During this period, they received a control or scGOS/lcFOS/pAOS-containing diet. Subsequently, mice were orally sensitized to whey and received an intradermal and oral challenge. After sacrifice, serum and mesenteric lymph nodes (MLN) were collected for further analysis. Prior exposure to peptide mixtures 1 and 3 significantly reduced the acute allergic skin response to whey. Mixture 2 showed no effect. An additive effect of the scGOS/lcFOS/pAOS-containing diet was only observed for mixture 1. Of the peptides in mixture 1, one peptide (LLDAQSAPLRVYVEELKP) showed the strongest effect on the acute allergic skin response. This peptide also tended to decrease whey-specific antibody levels and to increase the percentages of CD11b+CD103+ dendritic cells and CD25+Foxp3+ T cells in the MLN. Prior exposure to specific peptides of β-lactoglobulin reduces the allergic response to whey, which may involve regulatory dendritic and T cells. Combining peptides with a sGOS/lcFOS/pAOS-containing diet enhances this effect. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Mycobacterial heat shock protein 65 (mbHSP65)-induced atherosclerosis: Preventive oral tolerization and definition of atheroprotective and atherogenic mbHSP65 peptides.

    PubMed

    Grundtman, Cecilia; Jakic, Bojana; Buszko, Maja; Onestingel, Elisabeth; Almanzar, Giovanni; Demetz, Egon; Dietrich, Hermann; Cappellano, Giuseppe; Wick, Georg

    2015-09-01

    The aim of this study was to identify atherogenic and atheroprotective peptides of bacterial HSP60 [taking mycobacterial HSP65 (mbHSP65) as a potent paradigmatic representative] that could be used as candidates for an orally applied tolerizing vaccine against atherosclerosis. ApoE(-/-) mice were immunized with mbHSP65 protein or peptides, given mbHSP65 orally and then kept either on chow or high cholesterol diet. Atherosclerosis was assessed by en face and immunohistological analysis. Anti-HSP autoantibodies were detected by ELISA. The number and in vitro suppressive function of splenic and lymph node regulatory T cells (Tregs) were analyzed by flow cytometry. Specific T cell reactivity against mbHSP65 protein or peptides was assessed by proliferation assay. Decreased lesion size was accompanied by (a) increased splenic Treg numbers; (b) increased interleukin (IL)-10 mRNA levels in the aorta; (c) increased levels of anti-mbHSP65 and anti-mouse HSP60 antibodies pointing to pro-eukaryotic HSP60 humoral crossreaction, not curtailed by oral tolerization; (d) most importantly, we identified and functionally characterized novel atherogenic and atheroprotective mbHSP65 epitopes. Atheroprotective mbHSP65 peptides may be considered as potential candidates for the development of a tolerizing vaccine to prevent and treat atherosclerosis, while keeping protective immunity to non-atherogenic domains of mbHSP65 intact. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Adsorption of insulin peptide on charged single-walled carbon nanotubes: significant role of ordered water molecules.

    PubMed

    Shen, Jia-Wei; Wu, Tao; Wang, Qi; Kang, Yu; Chen, Xin

    2009-06-02

    Ordered hydration shells: The more ordered hydration shells outside the charged CNT surfaces prevent more compact adsorption of the peptide in the charged CNT systems [picture: see text], but peptide binding strengths on the charged CNT surfaces are stronger due to the electrostatic interaction.Studies of adsorption dynamics and stability for peptides/proteins on single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) are of great importance for a better understanding of the properties and nature of nanotube-based biosystems. Herein, the dynamics and mechanism of the adsorption of the insulin chain B peptide on different charged SWNTs are investigated by explicit solvent molecular dynamics simulations. The results show that all types of surfaces effectively attract the model peptide. Water molecules play a significant role in peptide adsorption on the surfaces of charged carbon nanotubes (CNTs). Compared to peptide adsorption on neutral CNT surfaces, the more ordered hydration shells outside the tube prevent more compact adsorption of the peptide in charged CNT systems. This shield effect leads to a smaller conformational change and van der Waals interaction between the peptide and surfaces, but peptide binding strengths on charged CNT surfaces are stronger than those on the neutral CNT surface due to the strong electrostatic interaction. The result of these simulations implies the possibility of improving the binding strength of peptides/proteins on CNT surfaces, as well as keeping the integrity of the peptide/protein conformation in peptide/protein-CNT complexes by charging the CNTs.

  13. Antimicrobial Peptides: An Emerging Category of Therapeutic Agents.

    PubMed

    Mahlapuu, Margit; Håkansson, Joakim; Ringstad, Lovisa; Björn, Camilla

    2016-01-01

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs), also known as host defense peptides, are short and generally positively charged peptides found in a wide variety of life forms from microorganisms to humans. Most AMPs have the ability to kill microbial pathogens directly, whereas others act indirectly by modulating the host defense systems. Against a background of rapidly increasing resistance development to conventional antibiotics all over the world, efforts to bring AMPs into clinical use are accelerating. Several AMPs are currently being evaluated in clinical trials as novel anti-infectives, but also as new pharmacological agents to modulate the immune response, promote wound healing, and prevent post-surgical adhesions. In this review, we provide an overview of the biological role, classification, and mode of action of AMPs, discuss the opportunities and challenges to develop these peptides for clinical applications, and review the innovative formulation strategies for application of AMPs.

  14. Trehalose induced conformational changes in the amyloid-β peptide.

    PubMed

    Khan, Shagufta H; Kumar, Raj

    2017-06-01

    Alzheimer's disease is an irreversible and progressive brain disorder featured by the accumulation of Amyloid-β (Aβ) peptide, which forms insoluble assemblies that builds up into plaques resulting in cognitive decline and memory loss. The formation of fibrillar amyloid deposits is accompanied by conformational changes of the soluble Aβ peptide into β-sheet structures. Strategies to prevent or reduce Aβ aggregation using small molecules such as trehalose have shown beneficial effects under in vitro cell- and in vivo mouse- models. However, the role of trehalose in reducing Aβ peptide aggregation is still not clear. In the present study, using circular dichroism- and fluorescence emission- spectroscopies, we demonstrated that in the presence of trehalose, Aβ peptide adopts more helical content and undergoes a disorder/order conformational transition. Based on our findings, we conclude that trehalose affects the conformation of Aβ peptide to form α-helical structure, which may inhibit the formation of β-sheets and thereby aggregation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  15. Escape from R-peptide deletion in a {gamma}-retrovirus

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Schneider, Irene C.; Eckhardt, Manon; Brynza, Julia

    2011-09-30

    The R peptide in the cytoplasmic tail (C-tail) of {gamma}-retroviral envelope proteins (Env) prevents membrane fusion before budding. To analyse its role in the formation of replication competent, infectious particles, we developed chimeric murine leukaemia viruses (MLV) with unmodified or R-peptide deleted Env proteins of the gibbon ape leukaemia virus (GaLV). While titres of these viruses were unaffected, R-peptide deficiency led to strongly impaired spreading. Most remarkably, we isolated an escape mutant which had restored an open reading frame for a C-terminal extension of the truncated C-tail. A reconstituted virus encoding this escape C-tail replicated in cell culture. In contrastmore » to R-peptide deficient Env, particle incorporation of the escape Env was effective due to an enhanced protein expression and restored intracellular co-localisation with Gag proteins. Our data demonstrate that the R peptide not only regulates membrane fusion but also mediates efficient Env protein particle incorporation in {gamma}-retrovirus infected cells.« less

  16. [Ala12]MCD peptide: a lead peptide to inhibitors of immunoglobulin E binding to mast cell receptors.

    PubMed

    Buku, A; Condie, B A; Price, J A; Mezei, M

    2005-09-01

    An effort was made to discover mast cell degranulating (MCD) peptide analogs that bind with high affinity to mast cell receptors without triggering secretion of histamine or other mediators of the allergic reaction initiated by immunoglobulin E (IgE) after mast cell activation. Such compounds could serve as inhibitors of IgE binding to mast cell receptors. An alanine scan of MCD peptide reported previously showed that the analog [Ala12]MCD was 120-fold less potent in histamine-releasing activity and fivefold more potent in binding affinity to mast cell receptors than the parent MCD peptide. Because this analog showed marginal intrinsic activity and good binding affinity it was subsequently tested in the present study as an IgE inhibitor. In contrast to MCD peptide, [Ala12]MCD showed a 50% inhibition of IgE binding to the Fc epsilon RI alpha mast cell receptor by using rat basophilic leukemia (RBL-2H3) mast cells and fluorescence polarization. Furthermore, in a beta-hexosaminidase secretory assay, the peptide also showed a 50% inhibition of the secretion of this enzyme caused by IgE. An attempt was made to relate structural changes and biologic differences between the [Ala12]MCD analog and the parent MCD peptide. The present results show that [Ala12]MCD may provide a base for designing agents to prevent IgE/Fc epsilon RI alpha interactions and, consequently, allergic conditions.

  17. Prenatal treatment prevents learning deficit in Down syndrome model.

    PubMed

    Incerti, Maddalena; Horowitz, Kari; Roberson, Robin; Abebe, Daniel; Toso, Laura; Caballero, Madeline; Spong, Catherine Y

    2012-01-01

    Down syndrome is the most common genetic cause of mental retardation. Active fragments of neurotrophic factors release by astrocyte under the stimulation of vasoactive intestinal peptide, NAPVSIPQ (NAP) and SALLRSIPA (SAL) respectively, have shown therapeutic potential for developmental delay and learning deficits. Previous work demonstrated that NAP+SAL prevent developmental delay and glial deficit in Ts65Dn that is a well-characterized mouse model for Down syndrome. The objective of this study is to evaluate if prenatal treatment with these peptides prevents the learning deficit in the Ts65Dn mice. Pregnant Ts65Dn female and control pregnant females were randomly treated (intraperitoneal injection) on pregnancy days 8 through 12 with saline (placebo) or peptides (NAP 20 µg +SAL 20 µg) daily. Learning was assessed in the offspring (8-10 months) using the Morris Watermaze, which measures the latency to find the hidden platform (decrease in latency denotes learning). The investigators were blinded to the prenatal treatment and genotype. Pups were genotyped as trisomic (Down syndrome) or euploid (control) after completion of all tests. two-way ANOVA followed by Neuman-Keuls test for multiple comparisons, P<0.05 was used to denote statistical significance. Trisomic mice who prenatally received placebo (Down syndrome-placebo; n = 11) did not demonstrate learning over the five day period. DS mice that were prenatally exposed to peptides (Down syndrome-peptides; n = 10) learned significantly better than Down syndrome-placebo (p<0.01), and similar to control-placebo (n = 33) and control-peptide (n = 30). In conclusion prenatal treatment with the neuroprotective peptides (NAP+SAL) prevented learning deficits in a Down syndrome model. These findings highlight a possibility for the prevention of sequelae in Down syndrome and suggest a potential pregnancy intervention that may improve outcome.

  18. A Review of the Latest Advances in Encrypted Bioactive Peptides from Protein-Rich Waste

    PubMed Central

    Lemes, Ailton Cesar; Sala, Luisa; Ores, Joana da Costa; Braga, Anna Rafaela Cavalcante; Egea, Mariana Buranelo; Fernandes, Kátia Flávia

    2016-01-01

    Bioactive peptides are considered the new generation of biologically active regulators that not only prevent the mechanism of oxidation and microbial degradation in foods but also enhanced the treatment of various diseases and disorders, thus increasing quality of life. This review article emphasizes recent advances in bioactive peptide technology, such as: (i) new strategies for transforming bioactive peptides from residual waste into added-value products; (ii) nanotechnology for the encapsulation, protection and release of controlled peptides; and (iii) use of techniques of large-scale recovery and purification of peptides aiming at future applications to pharmaceutical and food industries. PMID:27322241

  19. Dendrimer-conjugated peptide vaccine enhances clearance of Chlamydia trachomatis genital infection.

    PubMed

    Ganda, Ingrid S; Zhong, Qian; Hali, Mirabela; Albuquerque, Ricardo L C; Padilha, Francine F; da Rocha, Sandro R P; Whittum-Hudson, Judith A

    2017-07-15

    Peptide-based vaccines have emerged in recent years as promising candidates in the prevention of infectious diseases. However, there are many challenges to maintaining in vivo peptide stability and enhancement of peptide immunogenicity to generate protective immunity which enhances clearance of infections. Here, a dendrimer-based carrier system is proposed for peptide-based vaccine delivery, and shows its anti-microbial feasibility in a mouse model of Chlamydia trachomatis. Chlamydiae are the most prevalent sexually transmitted bacteria worldwide, and also the causal agent of trachoma, the leading cause of preventable infectious blindness. In spite of the prevalence of this infectious agent and the many previous vaccine-related studies, there is no vaccine commercially available. The carrier system proposed consists of generation 4, hydroxyl-terminated, polyamidoamine (PAMAM) dendrimers (G4OH), to which a peptide mimic of a chlamydial glycolipid antigen-Peptide 4 (Pep4, AFPQFRSATLLL) was conjugated through an ester bond. The ester bond between G4OH and Pep4 is expected to break down mainly in the intracellular environment for antigen presentation. Pep4 conjugated to dendrimer induced Chlamydia-specific serum antibodies after subcutaneous immunizations. Further, this new vaccine formulation significantly protected immunized animals from vaginal challenge with infectious Chlamydia trachomatis, and it reduced infectious loads and tissue (genital tract) damage. Pep4 conjugated to G4OH or only mixed with peptide provided enhanced protection compared to Pep4 and adjuvant (i.e. alum), suggesting a potential adjuvant effect of the PAMAM dendrimer. Combined, these results demonstrate that hydroxyl-terminated PAMAM dendrimer is a promising polymeric nanocarrier platform for the delivery of peptide vaccines and this approach has potential to be expanded to other infectious intracellular bacteria and viruses of public health significance. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All

  20. The role of antimicrobial peptides in animal defenses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hancock, Robert E. W.; Scott, Monisha G.

    2000-08-01

    It is becoming clear that the cationic antimicrobial peptides are an important component of the innate defenses of all species of life. Such peptides can be constitutively expressed or induced by bacteria or their products. The best peptides have good activities vs. a broad range of bacterial strains, including antibiotic-resistant isolates. They kill very rapidly, do not easily select resistant mutants, are synergistic with conventional antibiotics, other peptides, and lysozyme, and are able to kill bacteria in animal models. It is known that bacterial infections, especially when treated with antibiotics, can lead to the release of bacterial products such as lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and lipoteichoic acid, resulting in potentially lethal sepsis. In contrast to antibiotics, the peptides actually prevent cytokine induction by bacterial products in tissue culture and human blood, and they block the onset of sepsis in mouse models of endotoxemia. Consistent with this, transcriptional gene array experiments using a macrophage cell line demonstrated that a model peptide, CEMA, blocks the expression of many genes whose transcription was induced by LPS. The peptides do this in part by blocking LPS interaction with the serum protein LBP. In addition, CEMA itself has a direct effect on macrophage gene expression. Because cationic antimicrobial peptides are induced by LPS and are able to dampen the septic response of animal cells to LPS, we propose that, in addition to their role in direct and lysozyme-assisted killing of microbes, they have a role in feedback regulation of cytokine responses. We are currently developing variant peptides as therapeutics against antibiotic-resistant infections.

  1. E-Peptides Control Bioavailability of IGF-1

    PubMed Central

    Piszczek, Agnieszka; Perlas, Emarald; Winn, Nadine; Nastasi, Tommaso; Rosenthal, Nadia

    2012-01-01

    Insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) is a potent cytoprotective growth factor that has attracted considerable attention as a promising therapeutic agent. Transgenic over-expression of IGF-1 propeptides facilitates protection and repair in a broad range of tissues, although transgenic mice over-expressing IGF-1 propeptides display little or no increase in IGF-1 serum levels, even with high levels of transgene expression. IGF-1 propeptides are encoded by multiple alternatively spliced transcripts including C-terminal extension (E) peptides, which are highly positively charged. In the present study, we use decellularized mouse tissue to show that the E-peptides facilitate in vitro binding of murine IGF-1 to the extracellular matrix (ECM) with varying affinities. This property is independent of IGF-1, since proteins consisting of the E-peptides fused to relaxin, a related member of the insulin superfamily, bound equally avidly to decellularized ECM. Thus, the E-peptides control IGF-1 bioavailability by preventing systemic circulation, offering a potentially powerful way to tether IGF-1 and other therapeutic proteins to the site of synthesis and/or administration. PMID:23251442

  2. A fluorescence assay for peptide translocation into mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Martinez-Caballero, Sonia; Peixoto, Pablo M V; Kinnally, Kathleen W; Campo, María Luisa

    2007-03-01

    Translocation of the presequence is an early event in import of preproteins across the mitochondrial inner membrane by the TIM23 complex. Import of signal peptides, whose sequences mimic mitochondrial import presequences, was measured using a novel, qualitative, fluorescence assay in about 1h. This peptide assay was used in conjunction with classical protein import analyses and electrophysiological approaches to examine the mechanisms underlying the functional effects of depleting two TIM23 complex components. Tim23p forms, at least in part, the pore of this complex while Tim44p forms part of the translocation motor. Depletion of Tim23p eliminates TIM23 channel activity, which interferes with both peptide and preprotein translocation. In contrast, depletion of Tim44p disrupts preprotein but not peptide translocation, which has no effect on TIM23 channel activity. Two conclusions were made. First, this fluorescence peptide assay was validated as two different mutants were accurately identified. Hence, this assay could provide a rapid means of screening mutants to identify those that fail an initial step in import, i.e., translocation of the presequence. Second, translocation of signal peptides required normal channel activity and disruption of the presequence translocase-associated motor complex did not modify TIM23 channel activity nor prevent presequence translocation.

  3. Treatment of Oral Biofilms by a D-Enantiomeric Peptide.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Tian; Wang, Zhejun; Hancock, Robert E W; de la Fuente-Núñez, César; Haapasalo, Markus

    2016-01-01

    Almost all dental diseases are caused by biofilms that consist of multispecies communities. DJK-5, which is a short D-enantiomeric, protease-resistant peptide with broad-spectrum anti-biofilm activity, was tested for its effect on oral multispecies biofilms. Peptide DJK-5 at 10 μg/mL effectively prevented the growth of these microbes in culture media in a time-dependent manner. In addition to the prevention of growth, peptide DJK-5 completely killed both Streptococcus mutans and Enterococcus faecalis suspended from biofilms after 30 minutes of incubation in liquid culture media. DJK-5 also led to the effective killing of microbes in plaque biofilm. The proportion of bacterial cells killed by 10 μg/mL of DJK-5 was similar after 1 and 3 days, both exceeding 85%. DJK-5 was able to significantly prevent biofilm formation over 3 days (P = 0.000). After 72 hours of exposure, DJK-5 significantly reduced and almost completely prevented plaque biofilm production by more than 90% of biovolume compared to untreated controls (P = 0.000). The proportion of dead biofilm bacteria at the 10 μg/mL DJK-5 concentration was similar for 1- and 3-day-old biofilms, whereby >86% of the bacteria were killed. DJK-5 was also able to kill >79% and >85% of bacteria, respectively, after one-time and three brief treatments of 3-day-old biofilms. The combination of DJK-5 and chlorhexidine showed the best bacterial killing among all treatments, with ~83% and >88% of bacterial cells killed after 1 and 3 minutes, respectively. No significant difference was found in the percentage of biofilm killing amongst three donor plaque samples after DJK-5 treatment. In particular, DJK-5 showed strong performance in inhibiting biofilm development and eradicating pre-formed oral biofilms compared to L-enantiomeric peptide 1018. DJK-5 was very effective against oral biofilms when used alone or combined with chlorhexidine, and may be a promising agent for use in oral anti-biofilm strategies in the future.

  4. Effect of Curcumin on the metal ion induced fibrillization of Amyloid-β peptide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banerjee, Rona

    2014-01-01

    The effect of Curcumin on Cu(II) and Zn(II) induced oligomerization and protofibrillization of the amyloid-beta (Aβ) peptide has been studied by spectroscopic and microscopic methods. Curcumin could significantly reduce the β-sheet content of the peptide in a time dependent manner. It also plays an antagonistic role in β-sheet formation that is promoted by metal ions like Cu(II) and Zn(II) as observed by Circular Dichroism (CD) spectroscopy. Atomic force microscopic (AFM) images show that spontaneous fibrillization of the peptide occurs in presence of Cu(II) and Zn(II) but is inhibited on incubation of the peptide with Curcumin indicating the beneficial role of Curcumin in preventing the aggregation of Aβ peptide.

  5. Engineered Chimeric Peptides as Antimicrobial Surface Coating Agents toward Infection-Free Implants

    PubMed Central

    Yazici, Hilal; O'Neill, Mary B.; Kacar, Turgay; Wilson, Brandon R.; Oren, E. Emre; Sarikaya, Mehmet; Tamerler, Candan

    2016-01-01

    Prevention of bacterial colonization and consequent biofilm formation remains a major challenge in implantable medical devices. Implant-associated infections are not only a major cause of implant failures but also their conventional treatment with antibiotics brings further complications due to the escalation in multidrug resistance to a variety of bacterial species. Owing to their unique properties, antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) have gained significant attention as effective agents to combat colonization of microorganisms. These peptides have been shown to exhibit a wide spectrum of activities with specificity to a target cell while having a low tendency for developing bacterial resistance. Engineering biomaterial surfaces that feature AMP properties, therefore, offer a promising approach to prevent implant infections. Here, we engineered a chimeric peptide with bifunctionality that both forms a robust solid-surface coating while presenting antimicrobial property. The individual domains of the chimeric peptides were evaluated for their solid-binding kinetics to titanium substrate as well as for their antimicrobial properties in solution. The antimicrobial efficacy of the chimeric peptide on the implant material was evaluated in vitro against infection by a variety of bacteria, including Streptococcus mutans, Staphylococcus. epidermidis, and Escherichia coli, which are commonly found in oral and orthopedic implant related surgeries. Our results demonstrate significant improvement in reducing bacterial colonization onto titanium surfaces below the detectable limit. Engineered chimeric peptides with freely displayed antimicrobial domains could be a potential solution for developing infection-free surfaces by engineering implant interfaces with highly reduced bacterial colonization property. PMID:26795060

  6. Engineered Chimeric Peptides as Antimicrobial Surface Coating Agents toward Infection-Free Implants.

    PubMed

    Yazici, Hilal; O'Neill, Mary B; Kacar, Turgay; Wilson, Brandon R; Oren, E Emre; Sarikaya, Mehmet; Tamerler, Candan

    2016-03-02

    Prevention of bacterial colonization and consequent biofilm formation remains a major challenge in implantable medical devices. Implant-associated infections are not only a major cause of implant failures but also their conventional treatment with antibiotics brings further complications due to the escalation in multidrug resistance to a variety of bacterial species. Owing to their unique properties, antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) have gained significant attention as effective agents to combat colonization of microorganisms. These peptides have been shown to exhibit a wide spectrum of activities with specificity to a target cell while having a low tendency for developing bacterial resistance. Engineering biomaterial surfaces that feature AMP properties, therefore, offer a promising approach to prevent implant infections. Here, we engineered a chimeric peptide with bifunctionality that both forms a robust solid-surface coating while presenting antimicrobial property. The individual domains of the chimeric peptides were evaluated for their solid-binding kinetics to titanium substrate as well as for their antimicrobial properties in solution. The antimicrobial efficacy of the chimeric peptide on the implant material was evaluated in vitro against infection by a variety of bacteria, including Streptococcus mutans, Staphylococcus. epidermidis, and Escherichia coli, which are commonly found in oral and orthopedic implant related surgeries. Our results demonstrate significant improvement in reducing bacterial colonization onto titanium surfaces below the detectable limit. Engineered chimeric peptides with freely displayed antimicrobial domains could be a potential solution for developing infection-free surfaces by engineering implant interfaces with highly reduced bacterial colonization property.

  7. Transthyretin Protects against A-Beta Peptide Toxicity by Proteolytic Cleavage of the Peptide: A Mechanism Sensitive to the Kunitz Protease Inhibitor

    PubMed Central

    Costa, Rita; Ferreira-da-Silva, Frederico; Saraiva, Maria J.; Cardoso, Isabel

    2008-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a neurodegenerative disorder characterized by the deposition of amyloid β-peptide (A-Beta) in the brain. Transthyretin (TTR) is a tetrameric protein of about 55 kDa mainly produced in the liver and choroid plexus of the brain. The known physiological functions of TTR are the transport of thyroid hormone T4 and retinol, through binding to the retinol binding protein. TTR has also been established as a cryptic protease able to cleave ApoA-I in vitro. It has been described that TTR is involved in preventing A-Beta fibrilization, both by inhibiting and disrupting A-Beta fibrils, with consequent abrogation of toxicity. We further characterized the nature of the TTR/A-Beta interaction and found that TTR, both recombinant or isolated from human sera, was able to proteolytically process A-Beta, cleaving the peptide after aminoacid residues 1, 2, 3, 10, 13, 14,16, 19 and 27, as determined by mass spectrometry, and reversed phase chromatography followed by N-terminal sequencing. A-Beta peptides (1–14) and (15–42) showed lower amyloidogenic potential than the full length counterpart, as assessed by thioflavin binding assay and ultrastructural analysis by transmission electron microscopy. A-Beta cleavage by TTR was inhibited in the presence of an αAPP peptide containing the Kunitz Protease Inhibitor (KPI) domain but not in the presence of the secreted αAPP derived from the APP isoform 695 without the KPI domain. TTR was also able to degrade aggregated forms of A-Beta peptide. Our results confirmed TTR as a protective molecule in AD, and prompted A-Beta proteolysis by TTR as a protective mechanism in this disease. TTR may prove to be a useful therapeutic agent for preventing or retarding the cerebral amyloid plaque formation implicated in AD pathology. PMID:18682830

  8. Kefir peptides prevent high-fructose corn syrup-induced non-alcoholic fatty liver disease in a murine model by modulation of inflammation and the JAK2 signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Chen, H L; Tsai, T C; Tsai, Y C; Liao, J W; Yen, C C; Chen, C M

    2016-12-12

    formation of fatty liver by activating JAK2 signal transduction through the JAK2/STAT3 and JAK2/AMPK pathways in the high-fructose-induced fatty liver animal model. Therefore, kefir peptides may have the potential for clinical application for the prevention or treatment of clinical metabolic syndrome.

  9. Kefir peptides prevent high-fructose corn syrup-induced non-alcoholic fatty liver disease in a murine model by modulation of inflammation and the JAK2 signaling pathway

    PubMed Central

    Chen, H L; Tsai, T C; Tsai, Y C; Liao, J W; Yen, C C; Chen, C M

    2016-01-01

    , inflammatory reaction and the formation of fatty liver by activating JAK2 signal transduction through the JAK2/STAT3 and JAK2/AMPK pathways in the high-fructose-induced fatty liver animal model. Therefore, kefir peptides may have the potential for clinical application for the prevention or treatment of clinical metabolic syndrome. PMID:27941940

  10. Tolerogenic insulin peptide therapy precipitates type 1 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Bergman, Marie-Louise; Lopes-Carvalho, Thiago; Martins, Ana-Catarina; Grieco, Fabio A; Eizirik, Décio L; Demengeot, Jocelyne

    2017-07-03

    Daniel et al. (https://doi.org/10.1084/jem.20110574) have previously published in JEM a study on the preventive effect of tolerogenic vaccination with a strong agonist insulin mimetope in type 1 diabetes. Our study now challenges these results and shows that osmotic pump delivery of the modified insulin peptide R22E did not prevent hyperglycemia, accelerated disease onset, increased its incidence, and worsened insulitis. © 2017 Bergman et al.

  11. Effectiveness of Antimicrobial Peptide Immobilization for Preventing Perioperative Cornea Implant-Associated Bacterial Infection

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Xiao Wei; Goh, Tze Wei; Saraswathi, P.; Nyein, Chan Lwin; Setiawan, Melina; Riau, Andri; Lakshminarayanan, R.; Liu, Shouping; Tan, Donald; Beuerman, Roger W.

    2014-01-01

    Titanium (Ti) is a promising candidate biomaterial for an artificial corneal skirt. Antimicrobial peptide (AMP) immobilization may improve the bactericidal effect of the Ti substrate. In this study, we tested the bactericidal efficacy of a functionalized Ti surface in a rabbit keratitis model. A corneal stromal pocket was created by a femtosecond laser. The Ti films were then inserted into the pocket, and Staphylococcus aureus or Pseudomonas aeruginosa was inoculated into the pocket above the implant films. The corneas with Ti-AMP implants were compared with the corneas implanted with unprotected Ti by slit lamp observation and anterior segment optical coherence tomography (AS-OCT). Inflammatory responses were evaluated by bacterium counting, hematoxylin-eosin staining, and immunostaining. There was a lower incidence and a lesser extent of infection on rabbit corneas with Ti-AMP implants than on those with unprotected Ti implants. The bactericidal effect of AMP against S. aureus was comparable to that of postoperative prophylactic antibiotic treatment; hence, SESB2V AMP bound to the Ti implant provided functional activity in vivo, but its efficacy was greater against S. aureus than against P. aeruginosa. This work suggests that SESB2V AMP can be successfully functionalized in a rabbit keratitis model to prevent perioperative corneal infection. PMID:24957820

  12. Inhibition of HIV infection by caerin 1 antimicrobial peptides.

    PubMed

    VanCompernolle, Scott; Smith, Patricia B; Bowie, John H; Tyler, Michael J; Unutmaz, Derya; Rollins-Smith, Louise A

    2015-09-01

    The major mode of transmission of the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) is by sexual intercourse. In the effort to halt the spread of HIV, one measure that holds great promise is the development of effective microbicides that can prevent transmission. Previously we showed that several amphibian antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) completely inhibit HIV infection of T cells while maintaining good viability of the T cell targets. These peptides also inhibited the transfer of HIV by dendritic cells (DCs) to T cells when added up to 8h after virus exposure. Here we report on the anti-HIV activity of 18 additional structurally related caerin 1 family peptides in comparison with our previous best candidate caerin 1.9. Nine peptides were equally effective or more effective in the inhibition of T cell infection and disruption of the HIV envelope as caerin 1.9. Of those nine peptides, three peptides (caerin 1.2, caerin 1.10, and caerin 1.20) exhibited excellent inhibition of HIV infectivity at low concentrations (12-25μM) and limited toxicity against target T cells and endocervical epithelial cells. There was a direct correlation between the effectiveness of the peptides in disruption of the viral envelope and their capacity to inhibit infection. Thus, several additional caerin 1 family peptides inhibit HIV infection have limited toxicity for vaginal epithelial cells, and would be good candidates for inclusion in microbicide formulations. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. CXCR4-antagonist Peptide R-liposomes for combined therapy against lung metastasis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ieranò, Caterina; Portella, Luigi; Lusa, Sara; Salzano, Giuseppina; D'Alterio, Crescenzo; Napolitano, Maria; Buoncervello, Maria; Macchia, Daniele; Spada, Massimo; Barbieri, Antonio; Luciano, Antonio; Barone, Maria Vittoria; Gabriele, Lucia; Caraglia, Michele; Arra, Claudio; De Rosa, Giuseppe; Scala, Stefania

    2016-03-01

    The chemokine CXCL12 activates CXCR4, initiating multiple pathways that control immune cell trafficking, angiogenesis and embryogenesis; CXCR4 is also overexpressed in multiple tumors affecting metastatic dissemination. While there has been great enthusiasm for exploiting the CXCR4-CXCL12 axis as a target in cancer therapy, to date the promise has yet to be fulfilled. A new class of CXCR4-antagonist cyclic peptides was recently developed and the compound named Peptide R was identified as the most active. With the intent to improve the efficacy and biodistribution of Peptide R, stealth liposomes decorated with Peptide R were developed (PL-Peptide R). In vitro PL-Peptide R efficiently inhibited CXCR4-dependent migration and in vivo it significantly reduced lung metastases and increased overall survival in B16-CXCR4 injected C57BL/6 mice. To evaluate if PL-Peptide R could also be a drug delivery system for CXCR4 expressing tumors, the PL-Peptide R was loaded with doxorubicin (DOX) (PL-Peptide R-DOX). PL-Peptide R-DOX efficiently delivered DOX to CXCR4 expressing cell lines with a consequent decrease in the DOX IC50 efficient dose. In vivo, B16-CXCR4 injected C57BL/6 mice treated with PL-Peptide R-DOX developed fewer lung metastases compared to PL-DOX treated mice. This work provides the proof-of-concept to prevent metastasis by using combined nanomedicine.The chemokine CXCL12 activates CXCR4, initiating multiple pathways that control immune cell trafficking, angiogenesis and embryogenesis; CXCR4 is also overexpressed in multiple tumors affecting metastatic dissemination. While there has been great enthusiasm for exploiting the CXCR4-CXCL12 axis as a target in cancer therapy, to date the promise has yet to be fulfilled. A new class of CXCR4-antagonist cyclic peptides was recently developed and the compound named Peptide R was identified as the most active. With the intent to improve the efficacy and biodistribution of Peptide R, stealth liposomes decorated with Peptide

  14. Peptides and Anti-peptide Antibodies for Small and Medium Scale Peptide and Anti-peptide Affinity Microarrays: Antigenic Peptide Selection, Immobilization, and Processing.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Fan; Briones, Andrea; Soloviev, Mikhail

    2016-01-01

    This chapter describes the principles of selection of antigenic peptides for the development of anti-peptide antibodies for use in microarray-based multiplex affinity assays and also with mass-spectrometry detection. The methods described here are mostly applicable to small to medium scale arrays. Although the same principles of peptide selection would be suitable for larger scale arrays (with 100+ features) the actual informatics software and printing methods may well be different. Because of the sheer number of proteins/peptides to be processed and analyzed dedicated software capable of processing all the proteins and an enterprise level array robotics may be necessary for larger scale efforts. This report aims to provide practical advice to those who develop or use arrays with up to ~100 different peptide or protein features.

  15. Therapeutic peptides for cancer therapy. Part II - cell cycle inhibitory peptides and apoptosis-inducing peptides.

    PubMed

    Raucher, Drazen; Moktan, Shama; Massodi, Iqbal; Bidwell, Gene L

    2009-10-01

    Therapeutic peptides have great potential as anticancer agents owing to their ease of rational design and target specificity. However, their utility in vivo is limited by low stability and poor tumor penetration. The authors review the development of peptide inhibitors with potential for cancer therapy. Peptides that arrest the cell cycle by mimicking CDK inhibitors or induce apoptosis directly are discussed. The authors searched Medline for articles concerning the development of therapeutic peptides and their delivery. Inhibition of cancer cell proliferation directly using peptides that arrest the cell cycle or induce apoptosis is a promising strategy. Peptides can be designed that interact very specifically with cyclins and/or cyclin-dependent kinases and with members of apoptotic cascades. Use of these peptides is not limited by their design, as a rational approach to peptide design is much less challenging than the design of small molecule inhibitors of specific protein-protein interactions. However, the limitations of peptide therapy lie in the poor pharmacokinetic properties of these large, often charged molecules. Therefore, overcoming the drug delivery hurdles could open the door for effective peptide therapy, thus making an entirely new class of molecules useful as anticancer drugs.

  16. Toxicity of Biologically Active Peptides and Future Safety Aspects: An Update.

    PubMed

    Khan, Fazlullah; Niaz, Kamal; Abdollahi, Mohammad

    2018-02-18

    Peptides are fragments of proteins with significant biological activities. These peptides are encoded in the protein sequence. Initially, such peptides are inactive in their parental form, unless proteolytic enzymes are released. These peptides then exhibit various functions and play a therapeutic role in the body. Besides the therapeutic and physiological activities of peptides, the main purpose of this study was to highlight the safety aspects of peptides. We performed an organized search of available literature using PubMed, Google Scholar, Medline, EMBASE, Reaxys and Scopus databases. All the relevant citations including research and review articles about the toxicity of biologically active peptides were evaluated and gathered in this study. Biological peptides are widely used in the daily routine ranging from food production to the cosmetics industry and also they have a beneficial role in the treatment and prevention of different diseases. These peptides are manufactured by both chemical and biotechnological techniques, which show negligible toxicity, however, some naturally occurring peptides and enzymes may induce high toxicity. Depending upon the demand and expected use in the food or pharmaceutical industry, we need different approaches to acertain the safety of these peptides preferentially through in silico methods. Intestinal wall disruption, erythrocytes and lymphocytes toxicity, free radical production, enzymopathic and immunopathic tissue damage and cytotoxicity due to the consumption of peptides are the main problems in the biological system that lead to various complicated disorders. Therefore, before considering biologically active peptides for food production and for therapeutic purpose, it is first necessary to evaluate the immunogenicity and toxicities of peptides. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  17. Peptides, polypeptides and peptide-polymer hybrids as nucleic acid carriers.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Marya

    2017-10-24

    Cell penetrating peptides (CPPs), and protein transduction domains (PTDs) of viruses and other natural proteins serve as a template for the development of efficient peptide based gene delivery vectors. PTDs are sequences of acidic or basic amphipathic amino acids, with superior membrane trespassing efficacies. Gene delivery vectors derived from these natural, cationic and cationic amphipathic peptides, however, offer little flexibility in tailoring the physicochemical properties of single chain peptide based systems. Owing to significant advances in the field of peptide chemistry, synthetic mimics of natural peptides are often prepared and have been evaluated for their gene expression, as a function of amino acid functionalities, architecture and net cationic content of peptide chains. Moreover, chimeric single polypeptide chains are prepared by a combination of multiple small natural or synthetic peptides, which imparts distinct physiological properties to peptide based gene delivery therapeutics. In order to obtain multivalency and improve the gene delivery efficacies of low molecular weight cationic peptides, bioactive peptides are often incorporated into a polymeric architecture to obtain novel 'polymer-peptide hybrids' with improved gene delivery efficacies. Peptide modified polymers prepared by physical or chemical modifications exhibit enhanced endosomal escape, stimuli responsive degradation and targeting efficacies, as a function of physicochemical and biological activities of peptides attached onto a polymeric scaffold. The focus of this review is to provide comprehensive and step-wise progress in major natural and synthetic peptides, chimeric polypeptides, and peptide-polymer hybrids for nucleic acid delivery applications.

  18. Anti-Biofilm Activity of a Self-Aggregating Peptide against Streptococcus mutans

    PubMed Central

    Ansari, Juliana M.; Abraham, Nabil M.; Massaro, Jenna; Murphy, Kelsey; Smith-Carpenter, Jillian; Fikrig, Erol

    2017-01-01

    Streptococcus mutans is the primary agent of dental cavities, in large part due to its ability to adhere to teeth and create a molecular scaffold of glucan polysaccharides on the tooth surface. Disrupting the architecture of S. mutans biofilms could help undermine the establishment of biofilm communities that cause cavities and tooth decay. Here we present a synthetic peptide P1, derived from a tick antifreeze protein, which significantly reduces S. mutans biofilm formation. Incubating cells with this peptide decreased biofilm biomass by approximately 75% in both a crystal violet microplate assay and an in vitro tooth model using saliva-coated hydroxyapatite discs. Bacteria treated with peptide P1 formed irregular biofilms with disconnected aggregates of cells and exopolymeric matrix that readily detached from surfaces. Peptide P1 can bind directly to S. mutans cells but does not possess bactericidal activity. Anti-biofilm activity was correlated with peptide aggregation and β-sheet formation in solution, and alternative synthetic peptides of different lengths or charge distribution did not inhibit biofilms. This anti-biofilm peptide interferes with S. mutans biofilm formation and architecture, and may have future applications in preventing bacterial buildup on teeth. PMID:28392782

  19. Milk proteins, peptides, and oligosaccharides: effects against the 21st century disorders.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Chia-Chien; Hernández-Ledesma, Blanca; Fernández-Tomé, Samuel; Weinborn, Valerie; Barile, Daniela; de Moura Bell, Juliana María Leite Nobrega

    2015-01-01

    Milk is the most complete food for mammals, as it supplies all the energy and nutrients needed for the proper growth and development of the neonate. Milk is a source of many bioactive components, which not only help meeting the nutritional requirements of the consumers, but also play a relevant role in preventing various disorders. Milk-derived proteins and peptides have the potential to act as coadjuvants in conventional therapies, addressing cardiovascular diseases, metabolic disorders, intestinal health, and chemopreventive properties. In addition to being a source of proteins and peptides, milk contains complex oligosaccharides that possess important functions related to the newborn's development and health. Some of the health benefits attributed to milk oligosaccharides include prebiotic probifidogenic effects, antiadherence of pathogenic bacteria, and immunomodulation. This review focuses on recent findings demonstrating the biological activities of milk peptides, proteins, and oligosaccharides towards the prevention of diseases of the 21st century. Processing challenges hindering large-scale production and commercialization of those bioactive compounds have been also addressed.

  20. Differences in signal peptide processing between GP3 glycoproteins of Arteriviridae.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Minze; Veit, Michael

    2018-04-01

    We reported previously that carbohydrate attachment to an overlapping glycosylation site adjacent to the signal peptide of GP3 from equine arteritis virus (EAV) prevents cleavage. Here we investigated whether this unusual processing scheme is a feature of GP3s of other Arteriviridae, which all contain a glycosylation site at a similar position. Expression of GP3 from type-1 and type-2 porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) and from lactate dehydrogenase-elevating virus (LDV) revealed that the first glycosylation site is used, but has no effect on signal peptide cleavage. Comparison of the SDS-PAGE mobility of deglycosylated GP3 from PRRSV and LDV with mutants having or not having a signal peptide showed that GP3´s signal peptide is cleaved. Swapping the signal peptides between GP3 of EAV and PRRSV revealed that the information for co-translational processing is not encoded in the signal peptide, but in the remaining part of GP3. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Novel chimeric peptide with enhanced cell specificity and anti-inflammatory activity.

    PubMed

    Kim, Young-Min; Kim, Nam-Hong; Lee, Jong-Wan; Jang, Jin-Sun; Park, Yung-Hoon; Park, Seong-Cheol; Jang, Mi-Kyeong

    2015-07-31

    An antimicrobial peptide (AMP), Hn-Mc, was designed by combining the N-terminus of HPA3NT3 and the C-terminus of melittin. This chimeric AMP exhibited potent antibacterial activity with low minimal inhibitory concentrations (MICs), ranging from 1 to 2 μM against four drug-susceptible bacteria and ten drug-resistant bacteria. Moreover, the hemolysis and cytotoxicity was reduced significantly compared to those of the parent peptides, highlighting its high cell selectivity. The morphological changes in the giant unilamellar vesicles and bacterial cell surfaces caused by the Hn-Mc peptide suggested that it killed the microbial cells by damaging the membrane envelope. An in vivo study also demonstrated the antibacterial activity of the Hn-Mc peptide in a mouse model infected with drug-resistant bacteria. In addition, the chimeric peptide inhibited the expression of lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced cytokines in RAW 264.7 cells by preventing the interaction between LPS and Toll-like receptors. These results suggest that this chimeric peptide is an antimicrobial and anti-inflammatory candidate as a pharmaceutic agent. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Self-Assembly Drug Delivery System Based on Programmable Dendritic Peptide Applied in Multidrug Resistance Tumor Therapy.

    PubMed

    Chen, Si; Fan, Jin-Xuan; Qiu, Wen-Xiu; Liu, Li-Han; Cheng, Han; Liu, Fan; Yan, Guo-Ping; Zhang, Xian-Zheng

    2017-11-01

    In recent decades, diverse drug delivery systems (DDS) constructed by self-assembly of dendritic peptides have shown advantages and improvable potential for cancer treatment. Here, an arginine-enriched dendritic amphiphilic chimeric peptide CRRK(RRCG(Fmoc)) 2 containing multiple thiol groups is programmed to form drug-loaded nano-micelles by self-assembly. With a rational design, the branched hydrophobic groups (Fmoc) of the peptides provide a strong hydrophobic force to prevent the drug from premature release, and the reduction-sensitive disulfide linkages formed between contiguous peptides can control drug release under reducing stimulation. As expected, specific to multidrug resistance (MDR) tumor cells, the arginine-enriched peptide/drug (PD) nano-micelles show accurate nuclear localization ability to prevent the drug being pumped by P-glycoprotein (P-gp) in vitro, as well as exhibiting satisfactory efficacy for MDR tumor treatment in vivo. This design successfully realizes stimuli-responsive drug release aimed at MDR tumor cells via an ingenious sequence arrangement. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. Pharmacological potential of exercise and RAS vasoactive peptides for prevention of diseases.

    PubMed

    Petriz, Bernardo de Assis; de Almeida, Jeeser Alves; Migliolo, Ludovico; Franco, Octavio Luiz

    2013-09-01

    The Renin-Angiotensin-System (RAS) molecular network has been widely studied, especially with attention to angiotensin II, the main effector peptide among RAS. The relation of Ang II to hypertension pathogenesis has led to research being extended to other molecules from the RAS, such as angiotensin III and IV, angiotensin (1-5), and angiotensin (1-9). Moreover, great pharmacologic advances have been made in hypertension treatment by inhibiting renin and angiotensin converting enzymes and blocking the bonding of angiotensin II to its receptor AT1. Thus, RAS molecular signaling and its effect on blood pressure as well as its relationship to renal function and cardiovascular disease are still being investigated. It is a great challenge to fully cover and understand all molecules from the RAS, especially those that interfere with or have vasoactive properties. Some of these targets respond to exercise, stimulating nitric oxide synthesis and endothelial vasodilation. The activation of these specific molecules via exercise is a systematic way of controlling high blood pressure without pharmacological treatment. Angiotensin (1-7) has been focused due to its vasodilation properties and its responses to exercise, improving vascular function. Thus, stimulation of the ACE2/Ang (1-7)/Mas axis has been gaining ground as a prospective clinical means to attenuate cardiovascular diseases such as hypertension by modulating RAS activity. This review focuses on the vasoactive peptides from the RAS, their responses to exercise and possible trends for pharmacological development. In several cases where exercise training is not achievable, cardiovascular drug therapy with vasodilator peptides may possibly be an option.

  4. Diet-influenced chromatin modification and expression of chemopreventive genes by the soy peptide, lunasin

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Epigenetic silencing of tumor suppressors and pro-apoptosis genes in cancer cells, unlike genetic mutations, can potentially be reversed by the use of DNA demethylating agents (to remove methylation marks on the DNA) and HDAC inhibitors (to increase histone acetylation). It is now well established t...

  5. Control of Viremia and Prevention of AIDS following Immunotherapy of SIV-Infected Macaques with Peptide-Pulsed Blood

    PubMed Central

    De Rose, Robert; Fernandez, Caroline S.; Smith, Miranda Z.; Batten, C. Jane; Alcântara, Sheilajen; Peut, Vivienne; Rollman, Erik; Loh, Liyen; Mason, Rosemarie D.; Wilson, Kim; Law, Matthew G.; Handley, Amanda J.; Kent, Stephen J.

    2008-01-01

    Effective immunotherapies for HIV are needed. Drug therapies are life-long with significant toxicities. Dendritic-cell based immunotherapy approaches are promising but impractical for widespread use. A simple immunotherapy, reinfusing fresh autologous blood cells exposed to overlapping SIV peptides for 1 hour ex vivo, was assessed for the control of SIVmac251 replication in 36 pigtail macaques. An initial set of four immunizations was administered under antiretroviral cover and a booster set of three immunizations administered 6 months later. Vaccinated animals were randomized to receive Gag peptides alone or peptides spanning all nine SIV proteins. High-level, SIV-specific CD4 and CD8 T-cell immunity was induced following immunization, both during antiretroviral cover and without. Virus levels were durably ∼10-fold lower for 1 year in immunized animals compared to controls, and a significant delay in AIDS-related mortality resulted. Broader immunity resulted following immunizations with peptides spanning all nine SIV proteins, but the responses to Gag were weaker in comparison to animals only immunized with Gag. No difference in viral outcome occurred in animals immunized with all SIV proteins compared to animals immunized against Gag alone. Peptide-pulsed blood cells are an immunogenic and effective immunotherapy in SIV-infected macaques. Our results suggest Gag alone is an effective antigen for T-cell immunotherapy. Fresh blood cells pulsed with overlapping Gag peptides is proceeding into trials in HIV-infected humans. PMID:18451982

  6. Endosomolytic Nano-Polyplex Platform Technology for Cytosolic Peptide Delivery To Inhibit Pathological Vasoconstriction.

    PubMed

    Evans, Brian C; Hocking, Kyle M; Kilchrist, Kameron V; Wise, Eric S; Brophy, Colleen M; Duvall, Craig L

    2015-06-23

    A platform technology has been developed and tested for delivery of intracellular-acting peptides through electrostatically complexed nanoparticles, or nano-polyplexes, formulated from an anionic endosomolytic polymer and cationic therapeutic peptides. This delivery platform has been initially tested and optimized for delivery of two unique vasoactive peptides, a phosphomimetic of heat shock protein 20 and an inhibitor of MAPKAP kinase II, to prevent pathological vasoconstriction (i.e., vasospasm) in human vascular tissue. These peptides inhibit vasoconstriction and promote vasorelaxation by modulating actin dynamics in vascular smooth muscle cells. Formulating these peptides into nano-polyplexes significantly enhances peptide uptake and retention, facilitates cytosolic delivery through a pH-dependent endosomal escape mechanism, and enhances peptide bioactivity in vitro as measured by inhibition of F-actin stress fiber formation. In comparison to treatment with the free peptides, which were endowed with cell-penetrating sequences, the nano-polyplexes significantly increased vasorelaxation, inhibited vasoconstriction, and decreased F-actin formation in the human saphenous vein ex vivo. These results suggest that these formulations have significant potential for treatment of conditions such as cerebral vasospasm following subarachnoid hemorrhage. Furthermore, because many therapeutic peptides include cationic cell-penetrating segments, this simple and modular platform technology may have broad applicability as a cost-effective approach for enhancing the efficacy of cytosolically active peptides.

  7. Treatment of Oral Multispecies Biofilms by an Anti-Biofilm Peptide.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhejun; de la Fuente-Núñez, Cesar; Shen, Ya; Haapasalo, Markus; Hancock, Robert E W

    2015-01-01

    Human oral biofilms are multispecies microbial communities that exhibit high resistance to antimicrobial agents. Dental plaque gives rise to highly prevalent and costly biofilm-related oral infections, which lead to caries or other types of oral infections. We investigated the ability of the recently identified anti-biofilm peptide 1018 to induce killing of bacterial cells present within oral multispecies biofilms. At 10 μg/ml (6.5 μM), peptide 1018 was able to significantly (p<0.05) prevent biofilm formation over 3 days. The activity of the peptide on preformed biofilms was found to be concentration-dependent since more than 60% of the total plaque biofilm cell population was killed by 10 μg/ml of peptide 1018 in 3 days, while at 5 μg/ml 50% of cells were dead and at 1 μg/ml the peptide triggered cell death in around 30% of the total bacterial population, as revealed by confocal microscopy. The presence of saliva did not affect peptide activity, since no statistically significant difference was found in the ability of peptide 1018 to kill oral biofilms using either saliva coated and non-saliva coated hydroxyapatite surfaces. Scanning electron microscopy experiments indicated that peptide 1018 induced cell lysis in plaque biofilms. Furthermore, combined treatment using peptide 1018 and chlorhexidine (CHX) increased the anti-biofilm activity of each compound compared to when these were used alone, resulting in >50% of the biofilm being killed and >35% being dispersed in only 3 minutes. Peptide 1018 may potentially be used by itself or in combination with CHX as a non-toxic and effective anti-biofilm agent for plaque disinfection in clinical dentistry.

  8. CXCR4-antagonist Peptide R-liposomes for combined therapy against lung metastasis.

    PubMed

    Ieranò, Caterina; Portella, Luigi; Lusa, Sara; Salzano, Giuseppina; D'Alterio, Crescenzo; Napolitano, Maria; Buoncervello, Maria; Macchia, Daniele; Spada, Massimo; Barbieri, Antonio; Luciano, Antonio; Barone, Maria Vittoria; Gabriele, Lucia; Caraglia, Michele; Arra, Claudio; De Rosa, Giuseppe; Scala, Stefania

    2016-04-14

    The chemokine CXCL12 activates CXCR4, initiating multiple pathways that control immune cell trafficking, angiogenesis and embryogenesis; CXCR4 is also overexpressed in multiple tumors affecting metastatic dissemination. While there has been great enthusiasm for exploiting the CXCR4-CXCL12 axis as a target in cancer therapy, to date the promise has yet to be fulfilled. A new class of CXCR4-antagonist cyclic peptides was recently developed and the compound named Peptide R was identified as the most active. With the intent to improve the efficacy and biodistribution of Peptide R, stealth liposomes decorated with Peptide R were developed (PL-Peptide R). In vitro PL-Peptide R efficiently inhibited CXCR4-dependent migration and in vivo it significantly reduced lung metastases and increased overall survival in B16-CXCR4 injected C57BL/6 mice. To evaluate if PL-Peptide R could also be a drug delivery system for CXCR4 expressing tumors, the PL-Peptide R was loaded with doxorubicin (DOX) (PL-Peptide R-DOX). PL-Peptide R-DOX efficiently delivered DOX to CXCR4 expressing cell lines with a consequent decrease in the DOX IC50 efficient dose. In vivo, B16-CXCR4 injected C57BL/6 mice treated with PL-Peptide R-DOX developed fewer lung metastases compared to PL-DOX treated mice. This work provides the proof-of-concept to prevent metastasis by using combined nanomedicine.

  9. Potent and Selective Peptide-based Inhibition of the G Protein Gαq*

    PubMed Central

    Charpentier, Thomas H.; Waldo, Gary L.; Lowery-Gionta, Emily G.; Krajewski, Krzysztof; Strahl, Brian D.; Kash, Thomas L.; Harden, T. Kendall; Sondek, John

    2016-01-01

    In contrast to G protein-coupled receptors, for which chemical and peptidic inhibitors have been extensively explored, few compounds are available that directly modulate heterotrimeric G proteins. Active Gαq binds its two major classes of effectors, the phospholipase C (PLC)-β isozymes and Rho guanine nucleotide exchange factors (RhoGEFs) related to Trio, in a strikingly similar fashion: a continuous helix-turn-helix of the effectors engages Gαq within its canonical binding site consisting of a groove formed between switch II and helix α3. This information was exploited to synthesize peptides that bound active Gαq in vitro with affinities similar to full-length effectors and directly competed with effectors for engagement of Gαq. A representative peptide was specific for active Gαq because it did not bind inactive Gαq or other classes of active Gα subunits and did not inhibit the activation of PLC-β3 by Gβ1γ2. In contrast, the peptide robustly prevented activation of PLC-β3 or p63RhoGEF by Gαq; it also prevented G protein-coupled receptor-promoted neuronal depolarization downstream of Gαq in the mouse prefrontal cortex. Moreover, a genetically encoded form of this peptide flanked by fluorescent proteins inhibited Gαq-dependent activation of PLC-β3 at least as effectively as a dominant-negative form of full-length PLC-β3. These attributes suggest that related, cell-penetrating peptides should effectively inhibit active Gαq in cells and that these and genetically encoded sequences may find application as molecular probes, drug leads, and biosensors to monitor the spatiotemporal activation of Gαq in cells. PMID:27742837

  10. RAId_DbS: Peptide Identification using Database Searches with Realistic Statistics

    PubMed Central

    Alves, Gelio; Ogurtsov, Aleksey Y; Yu, Yi-Kuo

    2007-01-01

    Background The key to mass-spectrometry-based proteomics is peptide identification. A major challenge in peptide identification is to obtain realistic E-values when assigning statistical significance to candidate peptides. Results Using a simple scoring scheme, we propose a database search method with theoretically characterized statistics. Taking into account possible skewness in the random variable distribution and the effect of finite sampling, we provide a theoretical derivation for the tail of the score distribution. For every experimental spectrum examined, we collect the scores of peptides in the database, and find good agreement between the collected score statistics and our theoretical distribution. Using Student's t-tests, we quantify the degree of agreement between the theoretical distribution and the score statistics collected. The T-tests may be used to measure the reliability of reported statistics. When combined with reported P-value for a peptide hit using a score distribution model, this new measure prevents exaggerated statistics. Another feature of RAId_DbS is its capability of detecting multiple co-eluted peptides. The peptide identification performance and statistical accuracy of RAId_DbS are assessed and compared with several other search tools. The executables and data related to RAId_DbS are freely available upon request. PMID:17961253

  11. A paradigm shift: Cancer therapy with peptide-based B-cell epitopes and peptide immunotherapeutics targeting multiple solid tumor types: Emerging concepts and validation of combination immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Kaumaya, Pravin TP

    2015-01-01

    There is a recognizable and urgent need to speed the development and application of novel, more efficacious anti-cancer vaccine therapies that inhibit tumor progression and prevent acquisition of tumor resistance. We have created and established a portfolio of validated peptide epitopes against multiple receptor tyrosine kinases and we have identified the most biologically effective combinations of EGFR (HER-1), HER-2, HER-3, VEGF and IGF-1R peptide vaccines/mimics to selectively inhibit multiple receptors and signaling pathways. The strategy is based on the use of chimeric conformational B-cell epitope peptides incorporating “promiscuous” T-cell epitopes that afford the possibility of generating an enduring immune response, eliciting protein-reactive high-affinity anti-peptide antibodies as potential vaccines and peptide mimics that act as antagonists to receptor signaling that drive cancer metastasis. In this review we will summarize our ongoing studies based on the development of combinatorial immunotherapeutic strategies that act synergistically to enhance immune-mediated tumor killing aimed at addressing mechanisms of tumor resistance for several tumor types. PMID:25874884

  12. Milk derived bioactive peptides and their impact on human health - A review.

    PubMed

    Mohanty, D P; Mohapatra, S; Misra, S; Sahu, P S

    2016-09-01

    Milk-derived bioactive peptides have been identified as potential ingredients of health-promoting functional foods. These bioactive peptides are targeted at diet-related chronic diseases especially the non-communicable diseases viz., obesity, cardiovascular diseases and diabetes. Peptides derived from the milk of cow, goat, sheep, buffalo and camel exert multifunctional properties, including anti-microbial, immune modulatory, anti-oxidant, inhibitory effect on enzymes, anti-thrombotic, and antagonistic activities against various toxic agents. Majority of those regulate immunological, gastrointestinal, hormonal and neurological responses, thereby playing a vital role in the prevention of cancer, osteoporosis, hypertension and other disorders as discussed in this review. For the commercial production of such novel bioactive peptides large scale technologies based on membrane separation and ion exchange chromatography methods have been developed. Separation and identification of those peptides and their pharmacodynamic parameters are necessary to transfer their potent functional properties into food applications. The present review summarizes the preliminary classes of bioactive milk-derived peptides along with their physiological functions, general characteristics and potential applications in health-care.

  13. Biochemical functionalization of peptide nanotubes with phage displayed peptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swaminathan, Swathi; Cui, Yue

    2016-09-01

    The development of a general approach for the biochemical functionalization of peptide nanotubes (PNTs) could open up existing opportunities in both fundamental studies as well as a variety of applications. PNTs are spontaneously assembled organic nanostructures made from peptides. Phage display has emerged as a powerful approach for identifying selective peptide binding motifs. Here, we demonstrate for the first time the biochemical functionalization of PNTs via peptides identified from a phage display peptide library. The phage-displayed peptides are shown to recognize PNTs. These advances further allow for the development of bifunctional peptides for the capture of bacteria and the self-assembly of silver particles onto PNTs. We anticipate that these results could provide significant opportunities for using PNTs in both fundamental studies and practical applications, including sensors and biosensors nanoelectronics, energy storage devices, drug delivery, and tissue engineering.

  14. Vasoactive intestinal peptide and electrical activity influence neuronal survival

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Brenneman, D.E.; Eiden, L.E.

    1986-02-01

    Blockage of electrical activity in dissociated spinal cord cultures results in a significant loss of neurons during a critical period in development. Decreases in neuronal cell numbers and SVI-labeled tetanus toxin fixation produced by electrical blockage with tetrodotoxin (TTX) were prevented by addition of vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) to the nutrient medium. The most effective concentration of VIP was 0.1 nM. At higher concentrations, the survival-enhancing effect of VIP on TTX-treated cultures was attenuated. Addition of the peptide alone had no significant effect on neuronal cell counts or tetanus toxin fixation. With the same experimental conditions, two closely related peptides,more » PHI-27 (peptide, histidyl-isoleucine amide) and secretin, were found not to increase the number of neurons in TTX-treated cultures. Interference with VIP action by VIP antiserum resulted in neuronal losses that were not significantly different from those observed after TTX treatment. These data indicate that under conditions of electrical blockade a neurotrophic action of VIP on neuronal survival can be demonstrated.« less

  15. Rational Design of Peptide Vaccines Against Multiple Types of Human Papillomavirus

    PubMed Central

    Dey, Sumanta; De, Antara; Nandy, Ashesh

    2016-01-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) occurs in many types, some of which cause cervical, genital, and other cancers. While vaccination is available against the major cancer-causing HPV types, many others are not covered by these preventive measures. Herein, we present a bioinformatics study for the designing of multivalent peptide vaccines against multiple HPV types as an alternative strategy to the virus-like particle vaccines being used now. Our technique of rational design of peptide vaccines is expected to ensure stability of the vaccine against many cycles of mutational changes, elicit immune response, and negate autoimmune possibilities. Using the L1 capsid protein sequences, we identified several peptides for potential vaccine design for HPV 16, 18, 33, 35, 45, and 11 types. Although there are concerns about the epitope-binding affinities for the peptides identified in this process, the technique indicates possibilities of multivalent, adjuvanted, peptide vaccines against a wider range of HPV types, and tailor-made different combinations of the peptides to address frequency variations of types over different population groups as required for prophylaxis and at lower cost than are in use at the present time. PMID:27279731

  16. Bioactive peptides derived from traditional Chinese medicine and traditional Chinese food: A review.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ming; Wang, Yunpu; Liu, Yuhuan; Ruan, Roger

    2016-11-01

    There is an urgent treat of numerous chronic diseases including heart disease, stroke, cancer, chronic respiratory diseases and diabetes, which have a significant influence on the health of people worldwide. In addition to numerous preventive and therapeutic drug treatments, important advances have been achieved in the identification of bioactive peptides that may contribute to long-term health. Although bioactive peptides with various biological activities received unprecedented attention, as a new source of bioactive peptides, the significant role of bioactive peptides from traditional Chinese medicine and traditional Chinese food has not fully appreciated compared to other bioactive components. Hence, identification and bioactivity assessment of these peptides could benefit the pharmaceutical and food industry. Furthermore, the functional properties of bioactive peptides help to demystify drug properties and health benefits of traditional Chinese medicine and traditional Chinese food. This paper reviews the generation and biofunctional properties of various bioactive peptides derived from traditional Chinese medicine and traditional Chinese food. Mechanisms of digestion, bioavailability of bioactive peptides and interactions between traditional Chinese medicine and traditional Chinese food are also summarized in this review. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Vasonatrin peptide: a unique synthetic natriuretic and vasorelaxing peptide.

    PubMed Central

    Wei, C M; Kim, C H; Miller, V M; Burnett, J C

    1993-01-01

    This study reports the cardiovascular and renal actions of a novel and newly synthesized 27-amino acid peptide termed vasonatrin peptide (VNP). VNP is a chimera of atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) and C-type natriuretic peptide (CNP). This synthetic peptide possesses the 22-amino acid structure of CNP, which is a cardiovascular selective peptide of endothelial origin and is structurally related to ANP. VNP also possesses the five-amino acid COOH terminus of ANP. The current study demonstrates both in vitro and in vivo that VNP possesses the venodilating actions of CNP, the natriuretic actions of ANP, and unique arterial vasodilating actions not associated with either ANP or CNP. Images PMID:8408658

  18. Facile and selective covalent grafting of an RGD-peptide to electrospun scaffolds improves HUVEC adhesion.

    PubMed

    Dettin, Monica; Zamuner, Annj; Roso, Martina; Iucci, Giovanna; Samouillan, Valerie; Danesin, Roberta; Modesti, Michele; Conconi, Maria Teresa

    2015-10-01

    The development of a biomimetic surface able to promote endothelialization is fundamental in the search for blood vessel substitutes that prevent the formation of thrombi or hyperplasia. This study aims at investigating the effect of functionalization of poly-ε-caprolactone or poly(L-lactic acid-co-ɛ-caprolactone) electrospun scaffolds with a photoreactive adhesive peptide. The designed peptide sequence contains four Gly-Arg-Gly-Asp-Ser-Pro motifs per chain and a p-azido-Phe residue at each terminus. Different peptide densities on the scaffold surface were obtained by simply modifying the peptide concentration used in pretreatment of the scaffold before UV irradiation. Scaffolds of poly-ε-caprolactone embedded with adhesive peptides were produced to assess the importance of peptide covalent grafting. Our results show that the scaffolds functionalized with photoreactive peptides enhance adhesion at 24 h with a dose-dependent effect and control the proliferation of human umbilical vein endothelial cells, whereas the inclusion of adhesive peptide in the electrospun matrices by embedding does not give satisfactory results. Copyright © 2015 European Peptide Society and John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  19. Effects of Different Concentrations of Collagenous Peptide from Fish Scales on Osteoblast Proliferation and Osteoclast Resorption.

    PubMed

    Hu, Chung-Hsuan; Yao, Chun-Hsu; Chan, Tzu-Min; Huang, Teng-Le; Sen, Yang; Huang, Chih-Yang; Ho, Chien-Yi

    2016-08-31

    The incidence of osteoporosis has increased among the elderly population. Establishing a model of bone remodeling for screening new drugs is critical to identify safe and effective treatments for osteoporosis. In this study, we established a platform to investigate the therapeutic effects of collagenous peptides extracted from scales of two kinds of fish, namely, sparidae and chanos. These peptides were prepared using seven concentrations of collagenous peptide: 100, 80, 60, 40, 20, 10 and 1 mg/ml. Experimental results indicated that collagenous peptides promoted the proliferation of osteoblasts and inhibited the proliferation of mature osteoclasts; the effective concentration of collagenous peptide-sparidae was 10 mg/ml and that of collagenous peptide-chanos was 40 mg/ml. These findings demonstrate that, to a certain extent, collagenous peptides extracted from fish scales can be used to prevent osteoporosis to assist bone remodeling.

  20. Milk Proteins, Peptides, and Oligosaccharides: Effects against the 21st Century Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Hsieh, Chia-Chien; Hernández-Ledesma, Blanca; Fernández-Tomé, Samuel; Weinborn, Valerie; Barile, Daniela; de Moura Bell, Juliana María Leite Nobrega

    2015-01-01

    Milk is the most complete food for mammals, as it supplies all the energy and nutrients needed for the proper growth and development of the neonate. Milk is a source of many bioactive components, which not only help meeting the nutritional requirements of the consumers, but also play a relevant role in preventing various disorders. Milk-derived proteins and peptides have the potential to act as coadjuvants in conventional therapies, addressing cardiovascular diseases, metabolic disorders, intestinal health, and chemopreventive properties. In addition to being a source of proteins and peptides, milk contains complex oligosaccharides that possess important functions related to the newborn's development and health. Some of the health benefits attributed to milk oligosaccharides include prebiotic probifidogenic effects, antiadherence of pathogenic bacteria, and immunomodulation. This review focuses on recent findings demonstrating the biological activities of milk peptides, proteins, and oligosaccharides towards the prevention of diseases of the 21st century. Processing challenges hindering large-scale production and commercialization of those bioactive compounds have been also addressed. PMID:25789308

  1. Chimeric peptides as implant functionalization agents for titanium alloy implants with antimicrobial properties.

    PubMed

    Yucesoy, Deniz T; Hnilova, Marketa; Boone, Kyle; Arnold, Paul M; Snead, Malcolm L; Tamerler, Candan

    2015-04-01

    Implant-associated infections can have severe effects on the longevity of implant devices and they also represent a major cause of implant failures. Treating these infections associated with implants by antibiotics is not always an effective strategy due to poor penetration rates of antibiotics into biofilms. Additionally, emerging antibiotic resistance poses serious concerns. There is an urge to develop effective antibacterial surfaces that prevent bacterial adhesion and proliferation. A novel class of bacterial therapeutic agents, known as antimicrobial peptides (AMP's), are receiving increasing attention as an unconventional option to treat septic infection, partly due to their capacity to stimulate innate immune responses and for the difficulty of microorganisms to develop resistance towards them. While host- and bacterial- cells compete in determining the ultimate fate of the implant, functionalization of implant surfaces with antimicrobial peptides can shift the balance and prevent implant infections. In the present study, we developed a novel chimeric peptide to functionalize the implant material surface. The chimeric peptide simultaneously presents two functionalities, with one domain binding to a titanium alloy implant surface through a titanium-binding domain while the other domain displays an antimicrobial property. This approach gains strength through control over the bio-material interfaces, a property built upon molecular recognition and self-assembly through a titanium alloy binding domain in the chimeric peptide. The efficiency of chimeric peptide both in-solution and absorbed onto titanium alloy surface was evaluated in vitro against three common human host infectious bacteria, S. mutans, S. epidermidis , and E. coli . In biological interactions such as occurs on implants, it is the surface and the interface that dictate the ultimate outcome. Controlling the implant surface by creating an interface composed chimeric peptides may therefore open up

  2. A novel peptide, colivelin, prevents alcohol-induced apoptosis in fetal brain of C57BL/6 mice: signaling pathway investigations

    PubMed Central

    Sari, Youssef; Chiba, Tomohiro; Yamada, Marina; Rebec, George V.; Aiso, Sadakazu

    2009-01-01

    Fetal alcohol exposure is known to induce cell death through apoptosis. We found that colivelin (CLN), a novel peptide with the sequence SALLRSIPAPAGASRLLLLTGEIDLP, prevents this apoptosis. Our initial experiment revealed that CLN enhanced the viability of primary cortical neurons exposed to alcohol. We then used a mouse model of fetal alcohol exposure to identify the intracellular mechanisms underlying these neuroprotective effects. On embryonic day 7 (E7), weight-matched pregnant females were assigned to the following groups: (1) ethanol liquid diet (ALC) 25% (4.49%, v/v) ethanol derived calories; (2) pair-fed control; (3) normal chow; (4) ALC combined with administration (i.p.) of CLN (20 μg/20 g body weight); and (5) pair-fed combined with administration (i.p.) of CLN (20 μg/20 g body weight). On E13, fetal brains were collected and assayed for TUNEL staining, caspase-3 colorimetric assay, ELISA, and MSD electrochemiluminescence. CLN blocked the alcohol-induced decline in brain weight and prevented alcohol-induced: apoptosis, activation of caspase-3 and increases of cytosolic cytochrome c, and decreases of mitochondrial cytochrome c. Analysis of proteins in the upstream signaling pathway revealed that CLN down-regulated the phosphorylation of the c-Jun N-terminal kinase. Moreover, CLN prevented alcohol-induced reduction in phosphorylation of BAD protein. Thus, CLN appears to act directly on upstream signaling proteins to prevent alcohol-induced apoptosis. Further assessment of these proteins and their signaling mechanisms is likely to enhance development of neuroprotective therapies. PMID:19782727

  3. A Trojan-Horse Peptide-Carboxymethyl-Cytidine Antibiotic from Bacillus amyloliquefaciens.

    PubMed

    Serebryakova, Marina; Tsibulskaya, Darya; Mokina, Olga; Kulikovsky, Alexey; Nautiyal, Manesh; Van Aerschot, Arthur; Severinov, Konstantin; Dubiley, Svetlana

    2016-12-07

    Microcin C and related antibiotics are Trojan-horse peptide-adenylates. The peptide part is responsible for facilitated transport inside the sensitive cell, where it gets processed to release a toxic warhead-a nonhydrolyzable aspartyl-adenylate, which inhibits aspartyl-tRNA synthetase. Adenylation of peptide precursors is carried out by MccB THIF-type NAD/FAD adenylyltransferases. Here, we describe a novel microcin C-like compound from Bacillus amyloliquefaciens. The B. amyloliquefaciens MccB demonstrates an unprecedented ability to attach a terminal cytidine monophosphate to cognate precursor peptide in cellular and cell free systems. The cytosine moiety undergoes an additional modification-carboxymethylation-that is carried out by the C-terminal domain of MccB and the MccS enzyme that produces carboxy-SAM, which serves as a donor of the carboxymethyl group. We show that microcin C-like compounds carrying terminal cytosines are biologically active and target aspartyl-tRNA synthetase, and that the carboxymethyl group prevents resistance that can occur due to modification of the warhead. The results expand the repertoire of known enzymatic modifications of peptides that can be used to obtain new biological activities while avoiding or limiting bacterial resistance.

  4. Peptide and protein nanoparticle conjugates: versatile platforms for biomedical applications.

    PubMed

    Spicer, Christopher D; Jumeaux, Coline; Gupta, Bakul; Stevens, Molly M

    2018-05-21

    Peptide- and protein-nanoparticle conjugates have emerged as powerful tools for biomedical applications, enabling the treatment, diagnosis, and prevention of disease. In this review, we focus on the key roles played by peptides and proteins in improving, controlling, and defining the performance of nanotechnologies. Within this framework, we provide a comprehensive overview of the key sequences and structures utilised to provide biological and physical stability to nano-constructs, direct particles to their target and influence their cellular and tissue distribution, induce and control biological responses, and form polypeptide self-assembled nanoparticles. In doing so, we highlight the great advances made by the field, as well as the challenges still faced in achieving the clinical translation of peptide- and protein-functionalised nano-drug delivery vehicles, imaging species, and active therapeutics.

  5. Peptide array-based interaction assay of solid-bound peptides and anchorage-dependant cells and its effectiveness in cell-adhesive peptide design.

    PubMed

    Kato, Ryuji; Kaga, Chiaki; Kunimatsu, Mitoshi; Kobayashi, Takeshi; Honda, Hiroyuki

    2006-06-01

    Peptide array, the designable peptide library covalently synthesized on cellulose support, was applied to assay peptide-cell interaction, between solid-bound peptides and anchorage-dependant cells, to study objective peptide design. As a model case, cell-adhesive peptides that could enhance cell growth as tissue engineering scaffold material, was studied. On the peptide array, the relative cell-adhesion ratio of NIH/3T3 cells was 2.5-fold higher on the RGDS (Arg-Gly-Asp-Ser) peptide spot as compared to the spot with no peptide, thus indicating integrin-mediated peptide-cell interaction. Such strong cell adhesion mediated by the RGDS peptide was easily disrupted by single residue substitution on the peptide array, thus indicating that the sequence recognition accuracy of cells was strictly conserved in our optimized scheme. The observed cellular morphological extension with active actin stress-fiber on the RGD motif-containing peptide supported our strategy that peptide array-based interaction assay of solid-bound peptide and anchorage-dependant cells (PIASPAC) could provide quantitative data on biological peptide-cell interaction. The analysis of 180 peptides obtained from fibronectin type III domain (no. 1447-1629) yielded 18 novel cell-adhesive peptides without the RGD motif. Taken together with the novel candidates, representative rules of ineffective amino acid usage were obtained from non-effective candidate sequences for the effective designing of cell-adhesive peptides. On comparing the amino acid usage of the top 20 and last 20 peptides from the 180 peptides, the following four brief design rules were indicated: (i) Arg or Lys of positively charged amino acids (except His) could enhance cell adhesion, (ii) small hydrophilic amino acids are favored in cell-adhesion peptides, (iii) negatively charged amino acids and small amino acids (except Gly) could reduce cell adhesion, and (iv) Cys and Met could be excluded from the sequence combination since they have

  6. A peptide N-terminal protection strategy for comprehensive glycoproteome analysis using hydrazide chemistry based method

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Junfeng; Qin, Hongqiang; Sun, Zhen; Huang, Guang; Mao, Jiawei; Cheng, Kai; Zhang, Zhang; Wan, Hao; Yao, Yating; Dong, Jing; Zhu, Jun; Wang, Fangjun; Ye, Mingliang; Zou, Hanfa

    2015-01-01

    Enrichment of glycopeptides by hydrazide chemistry (HC) is a popular method for glycoproteomics analysis. However, possible side reactions of peptide backbones during the glycan oxidation in this method have not been comprehensively studied. Here, we developed a proteomics approach to locate such side reactions and found several types of the side reactions that could seriously compromise the performance of glycoproteomics analysis. Particularly, the HC method failed to identify N-terminal Ser/Thr glycopeptides because the oxidation of vicinal amino alcohol on these peptides generates aldehyde groups and after they are covalently coupled to HC beads, these peptides cannot be released by PNGase F for identification. To overcome this drawback, we apply a peptide N-terminal protection strategy in which primary amine groups on peptides are chemically blocked via dimethyl labeling, thus the vicinal amino alcohols on peptide N-termini are eliminated. Our results showed that this strategy successfully prevented the oxidation of peptide N-termini and significantly improved the coverage of glycoproteome. PMID:25959593

  7. Potent and Selective Peptide-based Inhibition of the G Protein Gαq.

    PubMed

    Charpentier, Thomas H; Waldo, Gary L; Lowery-Gionta, Emily G; Krajewski, Krzysztof; Strahl, Brian D; Kash, Thomas L; Harden, T Kendall; Sondek, John

    2016-12-02

    In contrast to G protein-coupled receptors, for which chemical and peptidic inhibitors have been extensively explored, few compounds are available that directly modulate heterotrimeric G proteins. Active Gα q binds its two major classes of effectors, the phospholipase C (PLC)-β isozymes and Rho guanine nucleotide exchange factors (RhoGEFs) related to Trio, in a strikingly similar fashion: a continuous helix-turn-helix of the effectors engages Gα q within its canonical binding site consisting of a groove formed between switch II and helix α3. This information was exploited to synthesize peptides that bound active Gα q in vitro with affinities similar to full-length effectors and directly competed with effectors for engagement of Gα q A representative peptide was specific for active Gα q because it did not bind inactive Gα q or other classes of active Gα subunits and did not inhibit the activation of PLC-β3 by Gβ 1 γ 2 In contrast, the peptide robustly prevented activation of PLC-β3 or p63RhoGEF by Gα q ; it also prevented G protein-coupled receptor-promoted neuronal depolarization downstream of Gα q in the mouse prefrontal cortex. Moreover, a genetically encoded form of this peptide flanked by fluorescent proteins inhibited Gα q -dependent activation of PLC-β3 at least as effectively as a dominant-negative form of full-length PLC-β3. These attributes suggest that related, cell-penetrating peptides should effectively inhibit active Gα q in cells and that these and genetically encoded sequences may find application as molecular probes, drug leads, and biosensors to monitor the spatiotemporal activation of Gα q in cells. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  8. Surface Mediated Self-Assembly of Amyloid Peptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fakhraai, Zahra

    2015-03-01

    Amyloid fibrils have been considered as causative agents in many neurodegenerative diseases, including Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, type II diabetes and amyloidosis. Amyloid fibrils form when proteins or peptides misfold into one dimensional crystals of stacked beta-sheets. In solution, amyloid fibrils form through a nucleation and growth mechanism. The rate limiting nucleation step requires a critical concentration much larger than those measured in physiological conditions. As such the exact origins of the seeds or oligomers that result in the formation of fully mature fibrils in the body remain topic intense studies. It has been suggested that surfaces and interfaces can enhance the fibrillization rate. However, studies of the mechanism and kinetics of the surface-mediated fibrillization are technologically challenging due to the small size of the oligomer and protofibril species. Using smart sample preparation technique to dry the samples after various incubation times we are able to study the kinetics of fibril formation both in solution and in the vicinity of various surfaces using high-resolution atomic force microscopy. These studies elucidate the role of surfaces in catalyzing amyloid peptide formation through a nucleation-free process. The nucleation free self-assembly is rapid and requires much smaller concentrations of peptides or proteins. We show that this process resembles diffusion limited aggregation and is governed by the peptide adhesion rate, two -dimensional diffusion of the peptides on the surface, and preferential interactions between the peptides. These studies suggest an alternative pathway for amyloid formation may exist, which could lead to new criteria for disease prevention and alternative therapies. Research was partially supported by a seed grant from the National Institute of Aging of the National Institutes of Health (NIH) under Award Number P30AG010124 (PI: John Trojanowski) and the University of Pennsylvania.

  9. Prevention of fetal demise and growth restriction in a mouse model of fetal alcohol syndrome.

    PubMed

    Spong, C Y; Abebe, D T; Gozes, I; Brenneman, D E; Hill, J M

    2001-05-01

    Two peptides [NAPVSIPQ (NAP) and SALLRSIPA (ADNF-9)], that are associated with novel glial proteins regulated by vasoactive intestinal peptide, are shown now to provide protective intervention in a model of fetal alcohol syndrome. Fetal demise and growth restrictions were produced after intraperitoneal injection of ethanol to pregnant mice during midgestation (E8). Death and growth abnormalities elicited by alcohol treatment during development are believed to be associated, in part, with severe oxidative damage. NAP and ADNF-9 have been shown to exhibit antioxidative and antiapoptotic actions in vitro. Pretreatment with an equimolar combination of the peptides prevented the alcohol-induced fetal death and growth abnormalities. Pretreatment with NAP alone resulted in a significant decrease in alcohol-associated fetal death; whereas ADNF-9 alone had no detectable effect on fetal survival after alcohol exposure, indicating a pharmacological distinction between the peptides. Biochemical assessment of the fetuses indicated that the combination peptide treatment prevented the alcohol-induced decreases in reduced glutathione. Peptide efficacy was evident with either 30-min pretreatment or with 1-h post-alcohol administration. Bioavailability studies with [(3)H]NAPVSIPQ indicated that 39% of the total radioactivity comigrated with intact peptide in the fetus 60 min after administration. These studies demonstrate that fetal death and growth restriction associated with prenatal alcohol exposure were prevented by combinatorial peptide treatment and suggest that this therapeutic strategy be explored in other models/diseases associated with oxidative stress.

  10. Comparative Analysis of the Antimicrobial Activities of Plant Defensin-Like and Ultrashort Peptides against Food-Spoiling Bacteria.

    PubMed

    Kraszewska, Joanna; Beckett, Michael C; James, Tharappel C; Bond, Ursula

    2016-07-15

    Antimicrobial peptides offer potential as novel therapeutics to combat food spoilage and poisoning caused by pathogenic and nonpathogenic bacteria. Our previous studies identified the peptide human beta-defensin 3 (HBD3) as a potent antimicrobial agent against a wide range of beer-spoiling bacteria. Thus, HBD3 is an excellent candidate for development as an additive to prevent food and beverage spoilage. To expand the repertoire of peptides with antimicrobial activity against bacteria associated with food spoilage and/or food poisoning, we carried out an in silico discovery pipeline to identify peptides with structure and activity similar to those of HBD3, focusing on peptides of plant origin. Using a standardized assay, we compared the antimicrobial activities of nine defensin-like plant peptides to the activity of HBD3. Only two of the peptides, fabatin-2 and Cp-thionin-2, displayed antimicrobial activity; however, the peptides differed from HBD3 in being sensitive to salt and were thermostable. We also compared the activities of several ultrashort peptides to that of HBD3. One of the peptides, the synthetic tetrapeptide O3TR, displayed biphasic antimicrobial activity but had a narrower host range than HBD3. Finally, to determine if the peptides might act in concert to improve antimicrobial activity, we compared the activities of the peptides in pairwise combinations. The plant defensin-like peptides fabatin-2 and Cp-thionin-2 displayed a synergistic effect with HBD3, while O3TR was antagonistic. Thus, some plant defensin-like peptides are effective antimicrobials and may act in concert with HBD3 to control bacteria associated with food spoilage and food poisoning. Food spoilage and food poisoning caused by bacteria can have major health and economic implications for human society. With the rise in resistance to conventional antibiotics, there is a need to identify new antimicrobials to combat these outbreaks in our food supply. Here we screened plant peptide

  11. Molecular targets of antihypertensive peptides: understanding the mechanisms of action based on the pathophysiology of hypertension.

    PubMed

    Majumder, Kaustav; Wu, Jianping

    2014-12-24

    There is growing interest in using functional foods or nutraceuticals for the prevention and treatment of hypertension or high blood pressure. Although numerous preventive and therapeutic pharmacological interventions are available on the market, unfortunately, many patients still suffer from poorly controlled hypertension. Furthermore, most pharmacological drugs, such as inhibitors of angiotensin-I converting enzyme (ACE), are often associated with significant adverse effects. Many bioactive food compounds have been characterized over the past decades that may contribute to the management of hypertension; for example, bioactive peptides derived from various food proteins with antihypertensive properties have gained a great deal of attention. Some of these peptides have exhibited potent in vivo antihypertensive activity in both animal models and human clinical trials. This review provides an overview about the complex pathophysiology of hypertension and demonstrates the potential roles of food derived bioactive peptides as viable interventions targeting specific pathways involved in this disease process. This review offers a comprehensive guide for understanding and utilizing the molecular mechanisms of antihypertensive actions of food protein derived peptides.

  12. Molecular Targets of Antihypertensive Peptides: Understanding the Mechanisms of Action Based on the Pathophysiology of Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Majumder, Kaustav; Wu, Jianping

    2014-01-01

    There is growing interest in using functional foods or nutraceuticals for the prevention and treatment of hypertension or high blood pressure. Although numerous preventive and therapeutic pharmacological interventions are available on the market, unfortunately, many patients still suffer from poorly controlled hypertension. Furthermore, most pharmacological drugs, such as inhibitors of angiotensin-I converting enzyme (ACE), are often associated with significant adverse effects. Many bioactive food compounds have been characterized over the past decades that may contribute to the management of hypertension; for example, bioactive peptides derived from various food proteins with antihypertensive properties have gained a great deal of attention. Some of these peptides have exhibited potent in vivo antihypertensive activity in both animal models and human clinical trials. This review provides an overview about the complex pathophysiology of hypertension and demonstrates the potential roles of food derived bioactive peptides as viable interventions targeting specific pathways involved in this disease process. This review offers a comprehensive guide for understanding and utilizing the molecular mechanisms of antihypertensive actions of food protein derived peptides. PMID:25547491

  13. Histone deacetylase inhibition prevents the impairing effects of hippocampal gastrin-releasing peptide receptor antagonism on memory consolidation and extinction.

    PubMed

    Petry, Fernanda S; Dornelles, Arethuza S; Lichtenfels, Martina; Valiati, Fernanda E; de Farias, Caroline Brunetto; Schwartsmann, Gilberto; Parent, Marise B; Roesler, Rafael

    2016-07-01

    Hippocampal gastrin-releasing peptide receptors (GRPR) regulate memory formation and extinction, and disturbances in GRPR signaling may contribute to cognitive impairment associated with neurodevelopmental disorders. Histone acetylation is an important epigenetic mechanism that regulates gene expression involved in memory formation, and histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACis) rescue memory deficits in several models. The present study determined whether inhibiting histone deacetylation would prevent memory impairments produced by GRPR blockade in the hippocampus. Male Wistar rats were given an intrahippocampal infusion of saline (SAL) or the HDACi sodium butyrate (NaB) shortly before inhibitory avoidance (IA) training, followed by an infusion of either SAL or the selective GRPR antagonist RC-3095 immediately after training. In a second experiment, the infusions were administered before and after a retention test trial that served as extinction training. As expected, RC-3095 significantly impaired consolidation and extinction of IA memory. More importantly, pretraining administration of NaB, at a dose that had no effect when given alone, prevented the effects of RC-3095. In addition, the combination of NaB and RC-3095 increased hippocampal levels of the brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF). These findings indicate that HDAC inhibition can protect against memory impairment caused by GRPR blockade. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. [Plant signaling peptides. Cysteine-rich peptides].

    PubMed

    Ostrowski, Maciej; Kowalczyk, Stanisław

    2015-01-01

    Recent bioinformatic and genetic analyses of several model plant genomes have revealed the existence of a highly abundant group of signaling peptides that are defined as cysteine-rich peptides (CRPs). CRPs are usually in size between 50 and 90 amino acid residues, they are positively charged, and they contain 4-16 cysteine residues that are important for the correct conformational folding. Despite the structural differences among CRP classes, members from each class have striking similarities in their molecular properties and function. The present review presents the recent progress in research on signaling peptides from several families including: EPF/EPFL, SP11/SCR, PrsS, RALF, LURE, and some other peptides belonging to CRP group. There is convincing evidence indicating multiple roles for these CRPs as signaling molecules during the plant life cycle, ranging from stomata development and patterning, self-incompatibility, pollen tube growth and guidance, reproductive processes, and nodule formation.

  15. The use of chimeric vimentin citrullinated peptides for the diagnosis of rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Malakoutikhah, Morteza; Gómara, María J; Gómez-Puerta, José A; Sanmartí, Raimon; Haro, Isabel

    2011-11-10

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic autoimmune disease that causes inflammation and, in many cases, destruction of the joints. To prevent progressive and irreversible structural damage, early diagnosis of RA is of paramount importance. The present study addresses the search of new RA citrullinated antigens that could supplement or complement diagnostic/prognostic existing tests. With this aim, the epitope anticitrullinated vimentin antibody response was mapped using synthetic peptides. To improve the sensitivity/specificity balance, a vimentin peptide that was selected, and its cyclic analogue, were combined with fibrin- and filaggrin-related peptides to render chimeric peptides. Our findings highlight the putative application of these chimeric peptides for the design of RA diagnosis systems and imply that more than one serological test is required to classify RA patients based on the presence or absence of ACPAs. Each of the target molecules reported here (fibrin, vimentin, filaggrin) has a specific utility in the identification of a particular subset of RA patients.

  16. Cell Penetrating Peptides and Cationic Antibacterial Peptides

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez Plaza, Jonathan G.; Morales-Nava, Rosmarbel; Diener, Christian; Schreiber, Gabriele; Gonzalez, Zyanya D.; Lara Ortiz, Maria Teresa; Ortega Blake, Ivan; Pantoja, Omar; Volkmer, Rudolf; Klipp, Edda; Herrmann, Andreas; Del Rio, Gabriel

    2014-01-01

    Cell penetrating peptides (CPP) and cationic antibacterial peptides (CAP) have similar physicochemical properties and yet it is not understood how such similar peptides display different activities. To address this question, we used Iztli peptide 1 (IP-1) because it has both CPP and CAP activities. Combining experimental and computational modeling of the internalization of IP-1, we show it is not internalized by receptor-mediated endocytosis, yet it permeates into many different cell types, including fungi and human cells. We also show that IP-1 makes pores in the presence of high electrical potential at the membrane, such as those found in bacteria and mitochondria. These results provide the basis to understand the functional redundancy of CPPs and CAPs. PMID:24706763

  17. The Plasma Membrane as a Reservoir, Protective Shield, and Light-Triggered Launch Pad for Peptide Therapeutics.

    PubMed

    O'Banion, Colin P; Nguyen, Luong T; Wang, Qunzhao; Priestman, Melanie A; Holly, Stephen P; Parise, Leslie V; Lawrence, David S

    2016-01-18

    Although peptide-based therapeutics are finding increasing application in the clinic, extensive structural modification is typically required to prevent their rapid degradation by proteases in the blood. We have evaluated the ability of erythrocytes to serve as reservoirs, protective shields (against proteases), and light-triggered launch pads for peptides. We designed lipidated peptides that are anchored to the surface of red blood cells, which furnishes a protease-resistant environment. A photocleavable moiety is inserted between the lipid anchor and the peptide backbone, thereby enabling light-triggered peptide release from erythrocytes. We have shown that a cell-permeable peptide, a hormone (melanocyte stimulating hormone), and a blood-clotting agent can be anchored to erythrocytes, protected from proteases, and photolytically released to create the desired biological effect. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  18. Marine-Derived Bioactive Peptides for Biomedical Sectors: A Review.

    PubMed

    Ruiz-Ruiz, Federico; Mancera-Andrade, Elena I; Iqbal, Hafiz M N

    2017-01-01

    Marine-based resources such as algae and other marine by-products have been recognized as rich sources of structurally diverse bioactive peptides. Evidently, their structural characteristics including unique amino acid residues are responsible for their biological activity. Several of the above-mentioned marine-origin species show multi-functional bioactivities that are useful for a new discovery and/or reinvention of biologically active ingredients, nutraceuticals and/or pharmaceuticals. Therefore, in recent years, marine-derived bioactive peptides have gained a considerable attention with high-value biomedical and/or pharmaceutical potentials. Furthermore, a wider spectrum of bioactive peptides can be produced through proteolytic-assisted hydrolysis of various marine resources under controlled physicochemical (pH and temperature of the reaction media) environment. Owing to their numerous health-related beneficial effects and therapeutic potential in the treatment and/or prevention of many diseases, such marine-derived bioactive peptides exhibit a wider spectrum of biological activities such as anti-cancerous, anti-proliferative, anti-coagulant, antibacterial, antifungal, and anti-tumor activities among many others. Based on emerging evidence of marine-derived peptide mining, the above-mentioned marine resources contain noteworthy levels of high-value protein. The present review article mainly summarizes the marine-derived bioactive peptides and emphasizing their potential applications in biomedical and/or pharmaceutical sectors of the modern world. In conclusion, recent literature has provided evidence that marine-derived bioactive peptides play a critical role in human health along with many possibilities of designing new functional nutraceuticals and/or pharmaceuticals to clarify potent mechanisms of action for a wider spectrum of diseases. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  19. Peptide reranking with protein-peptide correspondence and precursor peak intensity information.

    PubMed

    Yang, Chao; He, Zengyou; Yang, Can; Yu, Weichuan

    2012-01-01

    Searching tandem mass spectra against a protein database has been a mainstream method for peptide identification. Improving peptide identification results by ranking true Peptide-Spectrum Matches (PSMs) over their false counterparts leads to the development of various reranking algorithms. In peptide reranking, discriminative information is essential to distinguish true PSMs from false PSMs. Generally, most peptide reranking methods obtain discriminative information directly from database search scores or by training machine learning models. Information in the protein database and MS1 spectra (i.e., single stage MS spectra) is ignored. In this paper, we propose to use information in the protein database and MS1 spectra to rerank peptide identification results. To quantitatively analyze their effects to peptide reranking results, three peptide reranking methods are proposed: PPMRanker, PPIRanker, and MIRanker. PPMRanker only uses Protein-Peptide Map (PPM) information from the protein database, PPIRanker only uses Precursor Peak Intensity (PPI) information, and MIRanker employs both PPM information and PPI information. According to our experiments on a standard protein mixture data set, a human data set and a mouse data set, PPMRanker and MIRanker achieve better peptide reranking results than PetideProphet, PeptideProphet+NSP (number of sibling peptides) and a score regularization method SRPI. The source codes of PPMRanker, PPIRanker, and MIRanker, and all supplementary documents are available at our website: http://bioinformatics.ust.hk/pepreranking/. Alternatively, these documents can also be downloaded from: http://sourceforge.net/projects/pepreranking/.

  20. Long-term physical exercise and atrial natriuretic peptide in obese Zucker rats.

    PubMed

    Pörsti, Ilkka; Kähönen, Mika; Wu, Xiumin; Arvola, Pertti; Ruskoaho, Heikki

    2002-07-01

    Endurance training increases natriuretic peptide synthesis in the hypertrophied myocardium of spontaneously hypertensive rats. We examined the effects of 22-week-long treadmill exercise on plasma and tissue atrial natriuretic peptide in Zucker rats, a model of genetic obesity and moderate hypertension without clear cardiac hypertrophy. The blood pressures of the animals were measured by the tail-cuff method, and plasma and tissue samples for the peptide determinations were taken at the end of the study. The training increased heart weight to body weight ratio, while atrial natriuretic peptide contents in the right and left atrium, ventricular tissue, and plasma did not change. The exercise prevented the elevation of blood pressure, which was observed in non-exercised obese Zucker rats, and also reduced blood pressure in the lean rats. In conclusion, these results suggest that in the absence of preceding myocardial hypertrophy, the long-term exercise-induced workload is not deleterious to the heart in experimental obesity, since no changes in plasma and tissue atrial natriuretic peptide were detected.

  1. Pharmacologic Effects in vivo in Brain by Vector-Mediated Peptide Drug Delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bickel, Ulrich; Yoshikawa, Takayoshi; Landaw, Elliot M.; Faull, Kym F.; Pardridge, William M.

    1993-04-01

    Pharmacologic effects in brain caused by systemic administration of neuropeptides are prevented by poor transport of the peptide through the brain vascular endothelium, which comprises the blood-brain barrier in vivo. In the present study, successful application of a chimeric peptide approach to enhance drug delivery through the blood-brain barrier for the purpose of achieving a central nervous system pharmacologic effect is described. The chimeric peptide was formed by linkage of a potent vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) analogue, which had been monobiotinylated, to a drug transport vector. The vector consisted of a covalent conjugate of avidin and the OX26 monoclonal antibody to the transferrin receptor. Owing to the high concentration of transferrin receptors on brain capillary endothelia, OX26 targets brain and undergoes receptor-mediated transcytosis through the blood-brain barrier. Systemic infusion of low doses (12 μg/kg) of the VIP chimeric peptide in rats resulted in an in vivo central nervous system pharmacologic effect: a 65% increase in cerebral blood flow. Biotinylated VIP analogue without the brain transport vector was ineffective.

  2. Cyclic peptides and their interaction with peptide coated surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palmer, F.; Tünnemann, R.; Leipert, D.; Stingel, C.; Jung, G.; Hoffmann, V.

    2001-05-01

    Focusing on biochemical and pharmaceutical inhibitor systems the interaction of cyclic peptides with model peptides have been investigated by ATR-FTIR-spectroscopy. Information about the participation of special functional groups e.g. COOH, COO -, NH 3+ or peptide backbone was gathered by observing cyclohexapeptides (c(X 1LX 2LX 3)) which are interacting with covalently coated Si-ATR-crystals ( L-arginine, tripeptide I (aNS), tripeptide II (SNa)). To determine the interaction, further studies about the band sequence (1800-1500 cm -1) for non-adsorbed cyclohexapeptides and for the interaction with the silicon surface (SiOH) were necessary. The spectra of the interacting cyclohexapeptides with the SiOH-groups were treated like reference spectra for the evaluation of the peptide-peptide interaction. Based on these spectra, we can conclude that there is peptide-peptide interaction with the coating and not with the residual OH-groups. Determination of interaction mechanisms was done by spectra which represent adsorbed molecules only. The amount of adsorbed molecules was considerably less than a monolayer. Therefore the intensities of the spectra are about 10 -4 absorbance units. The spectra contain information about both changes of the coating and of the cyclohexapeptide.

  3. SPR4-peptide Alters Bone Metabolism of Normal and HYP Mice

    PubMed Central

    Zelenchuk, Lesya V; Hedge, Anne-Marie; Rowe, Peter S N

    2015-01-01

    Context ASARM-peptides are substrates and ligands for PHEX, the gene responsible for X-linked hypophosphatemic rickets (HYP). PHEX binds to the DMP1-ASARM-motif to form a trimeric-complex with α5β3-integrin on the osteocyte surface and this suppresses FGF23 expression. ASARM-peptide disruption of this complex increases FGF23 expression. We used a 4.2 kDa peptide (SPR4) that binds to ASARM-peptide and ASARM-motif to study DMP1-PHEX interactions and to assess SPR4 for treating inherited hypophosphatemic rickets. Design Subcutaneously transplanted osmotic pumps were used to infuse SPR4-peptide or vehicle into wild-type mice (WT) and HYP-mice for 4 weeks. Results Asymmetrically distributed mineralization defects occurred with WT-SPR4 femurs. Specifically, SPR4 induced negative effects on trabecular bone and increased bone volume and mineralization in cortical-bone. Markedly increased sclerostin and reduced active β-catenin occurred with HYP mice. SPR4-infusion suppressed sclerostin and increased active β-catenin in WT and HYP mice and improved HYP-mice trabecular mineralization defects but not cortical mineralization defects. Conclusions SPR4-peptide has bimodal activity and acts by: (1) preventing DMP1 binding to PHEX and (2) sequestering an inhibitor of DMP1-PHEX binding, ASARM-peptide. In PHEX defective HYP-mice the second pathway predominates. Although SPR4-peptide improved trabecular calcification defects, decreased sclerostin and increased active β-catenin it did not correct HYP-mice cortical mineralization defects on a normal phosphate diet. Thus, for inherited hypophosphatemic rickets patients on a normal phosphate diet, SPR4-peptide is not a useful therapeutic. PMID:25460577

  4. Peptides derived from tryptic hydrolysate of Bacillus subtilis culture suppress fungal spoilage of table grapes.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Bo; Wang, Jingnan; Ning, Shuqing; Yuan, Quan; Chen, Xiangning; Zhang, Yanyan; Fan, Junfeng

    2018-01-15

    This study confirmed the anti-fungal effect of trypsin-treated Bacillus subtilis culture (BC) (tryptic hydrolysate, TH) on mold growth on Kyoho grapes. We examined the anti-fungal activity of TH by identifying TH peptides and performing a computational docking analysis. TH was more potent than untreated BC in suppressing fungal growth on grapes. Specifically, TH maintained grape freshness by inhibiting respiration and rachis browning, maintaining firmness, and preventing weight loss. Thirty-six inhibitory peptides against β-1,3-glucan synthase (GS) were screened from 126 TH peptides identified through proteomic analysis. Among them, 13 peptides bound tightly to GS active pockets with lower binding energies than that of GppNHp. The most potent peptides, LFEIDEELNEK and FATSDLNDLYR, were synthesized, and further experiments showed that these peptides had a highly suppressive effect on GS activity and Aspergillus niger and Penicillium chrysogenum growth. Our results confirm that tryptic treatment is effective for improving the anti-fungal activity of BC. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Functional characterization of a synthetic hydrophilic antifungal peptide derived from the marine snail Cenchritis muricatus.

    PubMed

    López-Abarrategui, Carlos; Alba, Annia; Silva, Osmar N; Reyes-Acosta, Osvaldo; Vasconcelos, Ilka M; Oliveira, Jose T A; Migliolo, Ludovico; Costa, Maysa P; Costa, Carolina R; Silva, Maria R R; Garay, Hilda E; Dias, Simoni C; Franco, Octávio L; Otero-González, Anselmo J

    2012-04-01

    Antimicrobial peptides have been found in mollusks and other sea animals. In this report, a crude extract of the marine snail Cenchritis muricatus was evaluated against human pathogens responsible for multiple deleterious effects and diseases. A peptide of 1485.26 Da was purified by reversed-phase HPLC and functionally characterized. This trypsinized peptide was sequenced by MS/MS technology, and a sequence (SRSELIVHQR), named Cm-p1 was recovered, chemically synthesized and functionally characterized. This peptide demonstrated the capacity to prevent the development of yeasts and filamentous fungi. Otherwise, Cm-p1 displayed no toxic effects against mammalian cells. Molecular modeling analyses showed that this peptide possible forms a single hydrophilic α-helix and the probable cationic residue involved in antifungal activity action is proposed. The data reported here demonstrate the importance of sea animals peptide discovery for biotechnological tools development that could be useful in solving human health and agribusiness problems. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  6. Cationic host defense peptides; novel antimicrobial therapeutics against Category A pathogens and emerging infections.

    PubMed

    Findlay, Fern; Proudfoot, Lorna; Stevens, Craig; Barlow, Peter G

    2016-01-01

    Cationic Host Defense Peptides (HDP, also known as antimicrobial peptides) are crucial components of the innate immune system and possess broad-spectrum antibacterial, antiviral, and immunomodulatory activities. They can contribute to the rapid clearance of biological agents through direct killing of the organisms, inhibition of pro-inflammatory mediators such as lipopolysaccharide, and by modulating the inflammatory response to infection. Category A biological agents and materials, as classified by the United States National Institutes for Health, the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and the US Department of Homeland Security, carry the most severe threat in terms of human health, transmissibility, and preparedness. As such, there is a pressing need for novel frontline approaches for prevention and treatment of diseases caused by these organisms, and exploiting the broad antimicrobial activity exhibited by cationic host defense peptides represents an exciting priority area for clinical research. This review will summarize what is known about the antimicrobial and antiviral effects of the two main families of cationic host defense peptides, cathelicidins, and defensins in the context of Category A biological agents which include, but are not limited to; anthrax (Bacillus anthracis), plague (Yersinia pestis), smallpox (Variola major), tularemia (Francisella tularensis). In addition, we highlight priority areas, particularly emerging viral infections, where more extensive research is urgently required.

  7. Chimeric Peptides as Implant Functionalization Agents for Titanium Alloy Implants with Antimicrobial Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yucesoy, Deniz T.; Hnilova, Marketa; Boone, Kyle; Arnold, Paul M.; Snead, Malcolm L.; Tamerler, Candan

    2015-04-01

    Implant-associated infections can have severe effects on the longevity of implant devices and they also represent a major cause of implant failures. Treating these infections associated with implants by antibiotics is not always an effective strategy due to poor penetration rates of antibiotics into biofilms. Additionally, emerging antibiotic resistance poses serious concerns. There is an urge to develop effective antibacterial surfaces that prevent bacterial adhesion and proliferation. A novel class of bacterial therapeutic agents, known as antimicrobial peptides (AMPs), are receiving increasing attention as an unconventional option to treat septic infection, partly due to their capacity to stimulate innate immune responses and for the difficulty of microorganisms to develop resistance towards them. While host and bacterial cells compete in determining the ultimate fate of the implant, functionalization of implant surfaces with AMPs can shift the balance and prevent implant infections. In the present study, we developed a novel chimeric peptide to functionalize the implant material surface. The chimeric peptide simultaneously presents two functionalities, with one domain binding to a titanium alloy implant surface through a titanium-binding domain while the other domain displays an antimicrobial property. This approach gains strength through control over the bio-material interfaces, a property built upon molecular recognition and self-assembly through a titanium alloy binding domain in the chimeric peptide. The efficiency of chimeric peptide both in-solution and absorbed onto titanium alloy surface was evaluated in vitro against three common human host infectious bacteria, Streptococcus mutans, Staphylococcus epidermidis, and Escherichia coli. In biological interactions such as occur on implants, it is the surface and the interface that dictate the ultimate outcome. Controlling the implant surface by creating an interface composed chimeric peptides may therefore

  8. αB-crystallin, a small heat-shock protein, prevents the amyloid fibril growth of an amyloid β-peptide and β2-microglobulin

    PubMed Central

    2005-01-01

    αB-crystallin, a small heat-shock protein, exhibits molecular chaperone activity. We have studied the effect of αB-crystallin on the fibril growth of the Aβ (amyloid β)-peptides Aβ-(1–40) and Aβ-(1–42). αB-crystallin, but not BSA or hen egg-white lysozyme, prevented the fibril growth of Aβ-(1–40), as revealed by thioflavin T binding, total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy and CD spectroscopy. Comparison of the activity of some mutants and chimaeric α-crystallins in preventing Aβ-(1–40) fibril growth with their previously reported chaperone ability in preventing dithiothreitol-induced aggregation of insulin suggests that there might be both common and distinct sites of interaction on α-crystallin involved in the prevention of amorphous aggregation of insulin and fibril growth of Aβ-(1–40). αB-crystallin also prevents the spontaneous fibril formation (without externally added seeds) of Aβ-(1–42), as well as the fibril growth of Aβ-(1–40) when seeded with the Aβ-(1–42) fibril seed. Sedimentation velocity measurements show that αB-crystallin does not form a stable complex with Aβ-(1–40). The mechanism by which it prevents the fibril growth differs from the known mechanism by which it prevents the amorphous aggregation of proteins. αB-crystallin binds to the amyloid fibrils of Aβ-(1–40), indicating that the preferential interaction of the chaperone with the fibril nucleus, which inhibits nucleation-dependent polymerization of amyloid fibrils, is the mechanism that is predominantly involved. We found that αB-crystallin prevents the fibril growth of β2-microglobulin under acidic conditions. It also retards the depolymerization of β2-microglobulin fibrils, indicating that it can interact with the fibrils. Our study sheds light on the role of small heat-shock proteins in protein conformational diseases, particularly in Alzheimer's disease. PMID:16053447

  9. Mechanism by which DHA inhibits the aggregation of KLVFFA peptides: A molecular dynamics study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Hong; Liu, Shengtang; Shao, Qiwen; Ma, Dongfang; Yang, Zaixing; Zhou, Ruhong

    2018-03-01

    Docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) is one of the omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids, which has shown promising applications in lowering Aβ peptide neurotoxicity in vitro by preventing aggregation of Aβ peptides and relieving accumulation of Aβ fibrils. Unfortunately, the underlying molecular mechanisms of how DHA interferes with the aggregation of Aβ peptides remain largely enigmatic. Herein, aggregation behaviors of amyloid-β(Aβ)16-21 peptides (KLVFFA) with or without the presence of a DHA molecule were comparatively studied using extensive all-atom molecular dynamics simulations. We found that DHA could effectively suppress the aggregation of KLVFFA peptides by redirecting peptides to unstructured oligomers. The highly hydrophobic and flexible nature of DHA made it randomly but tightly entangled with Leu-17, Phe-19, and Phe-20 residues to form unstructured but stable complexes. These lower-ordered unstructured oligomers could eventually pass through energy barriers to form ordered β-sheet structures through large conformational fluctuations. This study depicts a microscopic picture for understanding the role and mechanism of DHA in inhibition of aggregation of Aβ peptides, which is generally believed as one of the important pathogenic mechanisms of Alzheimer's disease.

  10. Peptide-formation on cysteine-containing peptide scaffolds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chu, B. C.; Orgel, L. E.

    1999-01-01

    Monomeric cysteine residues attached to cysteine-containing peptides by disulfide bonds can be activated by carbonyldiimidazole. If two monomeric cysteine residues, attached to a 'scaffold' peptide Gly-Cys-Glyn-Cys-Glu10, (n = 0, 1, 2, 3) are activated, they react to form the dipeptide Cys-Cys. in 25-65% yield. Similarly, the activation of a cysteine residue attached to the 'scaffold' peptide Gly-Cys-Gly-Glu10 in the presence of Arg5 leads to the formation of Cys-Arg5 in 50% yield. The significance of these results for prebiotic chemistry is discussed.

  11. Amide I SFG Spectral Line Width Probes the Lipid-Peptide and Peptide-Peptide Interactions at Cell Membrane In Situ and in Real Time.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Baixiong; Tan, Junjun; Li, Chuanzhao; Zhang, Jiahui; Ye, Shuji

    2018-06-13

    The balance of lipid-peptide and peptide-peptide interactions at cell membrane is essential to a large variety of cellular processes. In this study, we have experimentally demonstrated for the first time that sum frequency generation vibrational spectroscopy can be used to probe the peptide-peptide and lipid-peptide interactions in cell membrane in situ and in real time by determination of the line width of amide I band of protein backbone. Using a "benchmark" model of α-helical WALP23, it is found that the dominated lipid-peptide interaction causes a narrow line width of the amide I band, whereas the peptide-peptide interaction can markedly broaden the line width. When WALP23 molecules insert into the lipid bilayer, a quite narrow line width of the amide I band is observed because of the lipid-peptide interaction. In contrast, when the peptide lies down on the bilayer surface, the line width of amide I band becomes very broad owing to the peptide-peptide interaction. In terms of the real-time change in the line width, the transition from peptide-peptide interaction to lipid-peptide interaction is monitored during the insertion of WALP23 into 1,2-dipalmitoyl- sn-glycero-3-phospho-(1'- rac-glycerol) (DPPG) lipid bilayer. The dephasing time of a pure α-helical WALP23 in 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl- sn-glycero-3-phospho-(1'- rac-glycerol) and DPPG bilayer is determined to be 2.2 and 0.64 ps, respectively. The peptide-peptide interaction can largely accelerate the dephasing time.

  12. Secretion modification region-derived peptide blocks exosome release and mediates cell cycle arrest in breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Huang, Ming-Bo; Gonzalez, Ruben R; Lillard, James; Bond, Vincent C

    2017-02-14

    Discovery and development of a novel anticancer PEG-SMR-Clu peptide to prevent breast cancer metastasis. How breast cancer cells and primary mammary epithelial cells interact and communicate with each other to promote tumorigenesis and how to prevent tumor metastasis has long been a concern of researchers. Cancer cells secrete exosomes containing proteins and RNA. These factors can influence tumor development by directly targeting cancer cells and tumor stroma. In this study, we determined the effects of a peptide as an inhibitor of exosome secretion on breast tumors. We developed a peptide derived from the Secretion Modification Region (SMR) of HIV-1 Nef protein that was modified with PEG on the N-terminus and with a Clusterin (Clu)-binding peptide on the C-terminus. Attachment of PEG to the SMR peptide, termed PEGylation, offers improved water solubility and stability as well as reduced clearance through the kidneys, leading to a longer circulation time. The 12-mer Clu-binding peptide plays multiple roles in tumor development and metastasis. The Clu peptide can be detected by antibody in vivo, thus it has the potential to be used to monitor tumor status and treatment efficacy in animal studies and eventually in cancer patients. PEG-SMRwt-Clu and PEG-SMRwt peptides inhibited the growth of both of MCF-7 (estrogen responsive, ER+) and MDA-MD-231 (estrogen non-responsive, ER-) human breast cancer cells in a dose and time-dependent manner, without inducing cytotoxic effects. The SMRwt peptide, combined with paclitaxel, induced G2/M phase cell cycle arrest on MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 cells but did not promote apoptosis. PEG-SMRwt-Clu peptide treatment blocked exosome release from both MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 cells. This effect was blocked by knockdown of the chaperone protein mortalin by either antibody or siRNA. MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 breast tumor cells were treated with PEG-SMR-Clu peptide alone and in combination with paclitaxel and cisplatin. Cell proliferation and viabilty

  13. Taylor Dispersion Analysis as a promising tool for assessment of peptide-peptide interactions.

    PubMed

    Høgstedt, Ulrich B; Schwach, Grégoire; van de Weert, Marco; Østergaard, Jesper

    2016-10-10

    Protein-protein and peptide-peptide (self-)interactions are of key importance in understanding the physiochemical behavior of proteins and peptides in solution. However, due to the small size of peptide molecules, characterization of these interactions is more challenging than for proteins. In this work, we show that protein-protein and peptide-peptide interactions can advantageously be investigated by measurement of the diffusion coefficient using Taylor Dispersion Analysis. Through comparison to Dynamic Light Scattering it was shown that Taylor Dispersion Analysis is well suited for the characterization of protein-protein interactions of solutions of α-lactalbumin and human serum albumin. The peptide-peptide interactions of three selected peptides were then investigated in a concentration range spanning from 0.5mg/ml up to 80mg/ml using Taylor Dispersion Analysis. The peptide-peptide interactions determination indicated that multibody interactions significantly affect the PPIs at concentration levels above 25mg/ml for the two charged peptides. Relative viscosity measurements, performed using the capillary based setup applied for Taylor Dispersion Analysis, showed that the viscosity of the peptide solutions increased with concentration. Our results indicate that a viscosity difference between run buffer and sample in Taylor Dispersion Analysis may result in overestimation of the measured diffusion coefficient. Thus, Taylor Dispersion Analysis provides a practical, but as yet primarily qualitative, approach to assessment of the colloidal stability of both peptide and protein formulations. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Atrial natriuretic peptide stimulates salt secretion by shark rectal gland by releasing VIP

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Silva, P.; Stoff, J.S.; Solomon, R.J.

    1987-01-01

    Salt secretion by the isolated perfused rectal gland of the spiny dogfish shark, Squalus acanthias, is stimulated by synthetic rat atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP II) as well as extracts of shark heart, but not by 8-bromo-cyclic guanosine 5'-monophosphate. Cardiac peptides have no effect on isolated rectal gland cells or perfused tubules, suggesting that stimulation requires an intact gland. The stimulation of secretion by ANP II is eliminated by maneuvers that block neurotransmitter release. Cardiac peptides stimulate the release of vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP), known to be present in rectal glands nerves, into the venous effluent of perfused glands in parallelmore » with their stimulation of salt secretion, but the release of VIP induced by ANP II is prevented by perfusion with procaine. VIP was measured by radioimmunoassay. Cardiac peptides thus appear to regulate rectal gland secretion by releasing VIP from neural stores within the gland. It is possible that other physiological effects of these hormones might be explained by an action to enhanced local release of neurotransmitters.« less

  15. Broad neutralization of calcium-permeable amyloid pore channels with a chimeric Alzheimer/Parkinson peptide targeting brain gangliosides.

    PubMed

    Di Scala, Coralie; Yahi, Nouara; Flores, Alessandra; Boutemeur, Sonia; Kourdougli, Nazim; Chahinian, Henri; Fantini, Jacques

    2016-02-01

    Growing evidence supports a role for brain gangliosides in the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative diseases including Alzheimer's and Parkinson's. Recently we deciphered the ganglioside-recognition code controlling specific ganglioside binding to Alzheimer's β-amyloid (Aβ1-42) peptide and Parkinson's disease-associated protein α-synuclein. Cracking this code allowed us to engineer a short chimeric Aβ/α-synuclein peptide that recognizes all brain gangliosides. Here we show that ganglioside-deprived neural cells do no longer sustain the formation of zinc-sensitive amyloid pore channels induced by either Aβ1-42 or α-synuclein, as assessed by single-cell Ca(2+) fluorescence microscopy. Thus, amyloid channel formation, now considered a key step in neurodegeneration, is a ganglioside-dependent process. Nanomolar concentrations of chimeric peptide competitively inhibited amyloid pore formation induced by Aβ1-42 or α-synuclein in cultured neural cells. Moreover, this peptide abrogated the intracellular calcium increases induced by Parkinson's-associated mutant forms of α-synuclein (A30P, E46K and A53T). The chimeric peptide also prevented the deleterious effects of Aβ1-42 on synaptic vesicle trafficking and decreased the Aβ1-42-induced impairment of spontaneous activity in rat hippocampal slices. Taken together, these data show that the chimeric peptide has broad anti-amyloid pore activity, suggesting that a common therapeutic strategy based on the prevention of amyloid-ganglioside interactions is a reachable goal for both Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. C-peptide and Central Nervous System Complications in Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zhen-guo

    2004-01-01

    Substantial evidence collected from clinical data and experimental studies has indicated that CNS is not spared from diabetes complications. Impairments in CNS function are well documented in both type 1 and type 2 diabetic patients as well as in various animal models of diabetes, in terms of alterations in cognition, neuropsychology, neurobehavior, electrophysiology, structure, neurochemistry and apoptotic activities. These data suggest that primary diabetic encephalopathy exists as a definable diabetic complication. The mechanisms underlying this CNS complication are not clear. Experimental studies have suggested that neuronal apoptosis may play an important role in neuronal loss and impaired cognitive function. In diabetes multiple factors are responsible for neuronal apoptosis, such as a perturbed IGF system, hyperglycemia and the aging process itself. Recent data suggest that insulin/C-peptide deficiency may exert an eminent role. Administration of C-peptide partially corrects the perturbed IGF system in the brain and prevents neuronal apoptosis in hippocampus of type 1 diabetes. In neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells C-peptide provides a dose-dependent stimulation on cell proliferation and an anti-apoptotic effect as well. These studies provide a basis for administration of C-peptide as a potentially effective therapy for type 1 diabetes. PMID:15198373

  17. Antimicrobial Peptides in 2014

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Guangshun; Mishra, Biswajit; Lau, Kyle; Lushnikova, Tamara; Golla, Radha; Wang, Xiuqing

    2015-01-01

    This article highlights new members, novel mechanisms of action, new functions, and interesting applications of antimicrobial peptides reported in 2014. As of December 2014, over 100 new peptides were registered into the Antimicrobial Peptide Database, increasing the total number of entries to 2493. Unique antimicrobial peptides have been identified from marine bacteria, fungi, and plants. Environmental conditions clearly influence peptide activity or function. Human α-defensin HD-6 is only antimicrobial under reduced conditions. The pH-dependent oligomerization of human cathelicidin LL-37 is linked to double-stranded RNA delivery to endosomes, where the acidic pH triggers the dissociation of the peptide aggregate to release its cargo. Proline-rich peptides, previously known to bind to heat shock proteins, are shown to inhibit protein synthesis. A model antimicrobial peptide is demonstrated to have multiple hits on bacteria, including surface protein delocalization. While cell surface modification to decrease cationic peptide binding is a recognized resistance mechanism for pathogenic bacteria, it is also used as a survival strategy for commensal bacteria. The year 2014 also witnessed continued efforts in exploiting potential applications of antimicrobial peptides. We highlight 3D structure-based design of peptide antimicrobials and vaccines, surface coating, delivery systems, and microbial detection devices involving antimicrobial peptides. The 2014 results also support that combination therapy is preferred over monotherapy in treating biofilms. PMID:25806720

  18. Mung bean proteins and peptides: nutritional, functional and bioactive properties.

    PubMed

    Yi-Shen, Zhu; Shuai, Sun; FitzGerald, Richard

    2018-01-01

    To date, no extensive literature review exists regarding potential uses of mung bean proteins and peptides. As mung bean has long been widely used as a food source, early studies evaluated mung bean nutritional value against the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO)/the World Health Organization (WHO) amino acids dietary recommendations. The comparison demonstrated mung bean to be a good protein source, except for deficiencies in sulphur-containing amino acids, methionine and cysteine. Methionine and cysteine residues have been introduced into the 8S globulin through protein engineering technology. Subsequently, purified mung bean proteins and peptides have facilitated the study of their structural and functional properties. Two main types of extraction methods have been reported for isolation of proteins and peptides from mung bean flours, permitting sequencing of major proteins present in mung bean, including albumins and globulins (notably 8S globulin). However, the sequence for albumin deposited in the UniProt database differs from other sequences reported in the literature. Meanwhile, a limited number of reports have revealed other useful bioactivities for proteins and hydrolysed peptides, including angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitory activity, anti-fungal activity and trypsin inhibitory activity. Consequently, several mung bean hydrolysed peptides have served as effective food additives to prevent proteolysis during storage. Ultimately, further research will reveal other nutritional, functional and bioactive properties of mung bean for uses in diverse applications.

  19. Regulatory Peptides in Plants.

    PubMed

    Vanyushin, B F; Ashapkin, V V; Aleksandrushkina, N I

    2017-02-01

    Many different peptides regulating cell differentiation, growth, and development are found in plants. Peptides participate in regulation of plant ontogenesis starting from pollination, pollen tube growth, and the very early stages of embryogenesis, including formation of embryo and endosperm. They direct differentiation of meristematic stem cells, formation of tissues and individual organs, take part in regulation of aging, fruit maturation, and abscission of plant parts associated with apoptosis. Biological activity of peptides is observed at very low concentrations, and it has mainly signal nature and hormonal character. "Mature" peptides appear mainly due to processing of protein precursors with (or without) additional enzymatic modifications. Plant peptides differ in origin, structure, and functional properties. Their specific action is due to binding with respective receptors and interactions with various proteins and other factors. Peptides can also regulate physiological functions by direct peptide-protein interactions. Peptide action is coordinated with the action of known phytohormones (auxins, cytokinins, and others); thus, peptides control phytohormonal signal pathways.

  20. Peptide identification

    DOEpatents

    Jarman, Kristin H [Richland, WA; Cannon, William R [Richland, WA; Jarman, Kenneth D [Richland, WA; Heredia-Langner, Alejandro [Richland, WA

    2011-07-12

    Peptides are identified from a list of candidates using collision-induced dissociation tandem mass spectrometry data. A probabilistic model for the occurrence of spectral peaks corresponding to frequently observed partial peptide fragment ions is applied. As part of the identification procedure, a probability score is produced that indicates the likelihood of any given candidate being the correct match. The statistical significance of the score is known without necessarily having reference to the actual identity of the peptide. In one form of the invention, a genetic algorithm is applied to candidate peptides using an objective function that takes into account the number of shifted peaks appearing in the candidate spectrum relative to the test spectrum.

  1. Entrapment of Aβ1-40 peptide in unstructured aggregates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corsale, C.; Carrotta, R.; Mangione, M. R.; Vilasi, S.; Provenzano, A.; Cavallaro, G.; Bulone, D.; San Biagio, P. L.

    2012-06-01

    Recognizing the complexity of the fibrillogenesis process provides a solid ground for the development of therapeutic strategies aimed at preventing or inhibiting protein-protein aggregation. Under this perspective, it is meaningful to identify the possible aggregation pathways and their relative products. We found that Aβ-peptide dissolved in a pH 7.4 solution at small peptide concentration and low ionic strength forms globular aggregates without typical amyloid β-conformation. ThT binding kinetics was used to monitor aggregate formation. Circular dichroism spectroscopy, AFM imaging, static and dynamic light scattering were used for structural and morphological characterization of the aggregates. They appear stable or at least metastable with respect to fiber growth, therefore appearing as an incidental product in the pathway of fibrillogenesis.

  2. Local oral immunization with synthetic peptides induces a dual mucosal IgG and salivary IgA antibody response and prevents colonization of Streptococcus mutans.

    PubMed Central

    Lehner, T; Haron, J; Bergmeier, L A; Mehlert, A; Beard, R; Dodd, M; Mielnik, B; Moore, S

    1989-01-01

    A small cell surface antigen of Streptococcus mutans was partially sequenced and the amino terminal peptides of 11, 15 and 20 amino acid residues and a dimer of the 15 and 20 residues peptides were synthesized. The synthetic peptides (SP) were used in topical oral immunization of the gingivomucosal epithelium of macaque monkeys. Sequential examination for antibodies over a period of up to 30 weeks revealed that six applications of the linear or cyclized SP11 and a random SP11 induced negligible or very low antibody levels. In contrast, the SP17 (SP15 with added cysteine at each terminus), SP21 (SP20 with one cysteine) and the dimer (SP35) induced significant anti-SP as well as anti-native streptococcal antibodies in the gingival fluid and in saliva. The functional significance of this immune response was examined by studying its effect on oral colonization of S. mutans following feeding of a carbohydrate-rich diet. Whereas control animals, sham-immunized with a random SP of 11 residues, showed increased colonization of the teeth by S. mutans, there was no colonization or a significant reduction in colonization of animals immunized with the cyclized SP17, linear SP21 or dimerized SP35. These experiments suggest that local immunization with SP derived from the sequences of a streptococcal cell surface antigen induce a dual local immune response of gingival IgG and salivary IgA antibodies against the SP and native SA. These antibodies may be involved in preventing colonization of S. mutans, which is the principal agent in the development of dental caries. PMID:2759661

  3. Cationic host defense peptides; novel antimicrobial therapeutics against Category A pathogens and emerging infections

    PubMed Central

    Findlay, Fern; Proudfoot, Lorna; Stevens, Craig

    2016-01-01

    Cationic Host Defense Peptides (HDP, also known as antimicrobial peptides) are crucial components of the innate immune system and possess broad-spectrum antibacterial, antiviral, and immunomodulatory activities. They can contribute to the rapid clearance of biological agents through direct killing of the organisms, inhibition of pro-inflammatory mediators such as lipopolysaccharide, and by modulating the inflammatory response to infection. Category A biological agents and materials, as classified by the United States National Institutes for Health, the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and the US Department of Homeland Security, carry the most severe threat in terms of human health, transmissibility, and preparedness. As such, there is a pressing need for novel frontline approaches for prevention and treatment of diseases caused by these organisms, and exploiting the broad antimicrobial activity exhibited by cationic host defense peptides represents an exciting priority area for clinical research. This review will summarize what is known about the antimicrobial and antiviral effects of the two main families of cationic host defense peptides, cathelicidins, and defensins in the context of Category A biological agents which include, but are not limited to; anthrax (Bacillus anthracis), plague (Yersinia pestis), smallpox (Variola major), tularemia (Francisella tularensis). In addition, we highlight priority areas, particularly emerging viral infections, where more extensive research is urgently required. PMID:27315342

  4. Circulating natriuretic peptide concentrations reflect changes in insulin sensitivity over time in the Diabetes Prevention Program.

    PubMed

    Walford, Geoffrey A; Ma, Yong; Christophi, Costas A; Goldberg, Ronald B; Jarolim, Petr; Horton, Edward; Mather, Kieren J; Barrett-Connor, Elizabeth; Davis, Jaclyn; Florez, Jose C; Wang, Thomas J

    2014-05-01

    We aimed to study the relationship between measures of adiposity, insulin sensitivity and N-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP) in the Diabetes Prevention Program (DPP). The DPP is a completed clinical trial. Using stored samples from this resource, we measured BMI, waist circumference (WC), an insulin sensitivity index (ISI; [1/HOMA-IR]) and NT-proBNP at baseline and at 2 years of follow-up in participants randomised to placebo (n = 692), intensive lifestyle intervention (n = 832) or metformin (n = 887). At baseline, log NT-proBNP did not differ between treatment arms and was correlated with baseline log ISI (p < 0.0001) and WC (p = 0.0003) but not with BMI (p = 0.39). After 2 years of treatment, BMI decreased in the lifestyle and metformin groups (both p < 0.0001); WC decreased in all three groups (p < 0.05 for all); and log ISI increased in the lifestyle and metformin groups (both p < 0.001). The change in log NT-proBNP did not differ in the lifestyle or metformin group vs the placebo group (p > 0.05 for both). In regression models, the change in log NT-proBNP was positively associated with the change in log ISI (p < 0.005) in all three study groups after adjusting for changes in BMI and WC, but was not associated with the change in BMI or WC after adjusting for changes in log ISI. Circulating NT-proBNP was associated with a measure of insulin sensitivity before and during preventive interventions for type 2 diabetes in the DPP. This relationship persisted after adjustment for measures of adiposity and was consistent regardless of whether a participant was treated with placebo, intensive lifestyle intervention or metformin.

  5. Food protein-originating peptides as tastants - Physiological, technological, sensory, and bioinformatic approaches.

    PubMed

    Iwaniak, Anna; Minkiewicz, Piotr; Darewicz, Małgorzata; Hrynkiewicz, Monika

    2016-11-01

    Taste is one of the factors based on which the organism makes the selection of what to ingest. It also protects humans from ingesting toxic compounds and is one of the main attributes when thinking about food quality. Five basic taste sensations are recognized by humans: bitter, salty, sour, sweet, and umami. The taste of foods is affected by some molecules of some specific chemical nature. One of them are peptides derived from food proteins. Although they are not the major natural compounds originating from food sources that are responsible for the taste, they are in the area of scientific research due to the specific composition of amino acids which are well-known for their sensory properties. Literature data implicate that sweet, bitter, and umami are the tastes attributable to peptides. Moreover, the bitter peptide tastants are the dominant among the other tastes. Additionally, other biological activities like, e.g., inhibiting enzymes that regulate the body functions and acting as preventive food agents of civilization diseases, are also associated with the taste of peptides. The advance in information technologies has contributed to the elaboration of internet archives (databases) as well as in silico tools for the analysis of biological compounds. It also concerns peptides - namely taste carriers originating from foods. Thus, our paper provides a summary of knowledge about peptides as tastants with special attention paid to the following aspects: a) basis of taste perception, b) taste peptides detected in food protein sequences with special emphasis put on the role of bitter peptides, c) peptides that may enhance/suppress the taste of foods, d) databases as well as bioinformatic approaches suitable to study the taste of peptides, e) taste-taste interactions, f) basis of sensory analysis in the evaluation of the taste of molecules, including peptides, and g) the methodology applied to reduce/eliminate the undesired taste of peptides. The list of taste

  6. Multiplexed MRM-Based Protein Quantitation Using Two Different Stable Isotope-Labeled Peptide Isotopologues for Calibration.

    PubMed

    LeBlanc, André; Michaud, Sarah A; Percy, Andrew J; Hardie, Darryl B; Yang, Juncong; Sinclair, Nicholas J; Proudfoot, Jillaine I; Pistawka, Adam; Smith, Derek S; Borchers, Christoph H

    2017-07-07

    When quantifying endogenous plasma proteins for fundamental and biomedical research - as well as for clinical applications - precise, reproducible, and robust assays are required. Targeted detection of peptides in a bottom-up strategy is the most common and precise mass spectrometry-based quantitation approach when combined with the use of stable isotope-labeled peptides. However, when measuring protein in plasma, the unknown endogenous levels prevent the implementation of the best calibration strategies, since no blank matrix is available. Consequently, several alternative calibration strategies are employed by different laboratories. In this study, these methods were compared to a new approach using two different stable isotope-labeled standard (SIS) peptide isotopologues for each endogenous peptide to be quantified, enabling an external calibration curve as well as the quality control samples to be prepared in pooled human plasma without interference from endogenous peptides. This strategy improves the analytical performance of the assay and enables the accuracy of the assay to be monitored, which can also facilitate method development and validation.

  7. Molecular basis for erythromycin-dependent ribosome-stalling during translation of the ErmBL leader peptide

    PubMed Central

    Arenz, Stefan; Ramu, Haripriya; Gupta, Pulkit; Berninghausen, Otto; Beckmann, Roland; Vázquez-Laslop, Nora; Mankin, Alexander S.; Wilson, Daniel N.

    2014-01-01

    In bacteria, ribosome-stalling during translation of ErmBL leader peptide occurs in the presence of the antibiotic erythromycin and leads to induction of expression of the downstream macrolide resistance methyltransferase ErmB. The lack of structures of drug-dependent stalled ribosome complexes (SRCs) has limited our mechanistic understanding of this regulatory process. Here, we present a cryo-electron microscopy (EM) structure of the erythromycin-dependent ErmBL-SRC. The structure reveals that the antibiotic does not interact directly with ErmBL, but rather redirects the path of the peptide within the tunnel. Furthermore, we identify a key peptide-ribosome interaction that defines an important relay pathway from the ribosomal tunnel to the peptidyltransferase center (PTC). The PTC of the ErmBL-SRC appears to adopt an uninduced state that prevents accommodation of Lys-tRNA at the A-site, thus providing structural bases for understanding how the drug and the nascent peptide cooperate to inhibit peptide-bond formation and induce translation arrest. PMID:24662426

  8. A microbially derived tyrosine-sulfated peptide mimics a plant peptide hormone.

    PubMed

    Pruitt, Rory N; Joe, Anna; Zhang, Weiguo; Feng, Wei; Stewart, Valley; Schwessinger, Benjamin; Dinneny, José R; Ronald, Pamela C

    2017-07-01

    The biotrophic pathogen Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae (Xoo) produces a sulfated peptide named RaxX, which shares similarity to peptides in the PSY (plant peptide containing sulfated tyrosine) family. We hypothesize that RaxX mimics the growth-stimulating activity of PSY peptides. Root length was measured in Arabidopsis and rice treated with synthetic RaxX peptides. We also used comparative genomic analyses and reactive oxygen species burst assays to evaluate the activity of RaxX and PSY peptides. Here we found that a synthetic sulfated RaxX derivative comprising 13 residues (RaxX13-sY), highly conserved between RaxX and PSY, induces root growth in Arabidopsis and rice in a manner similar to that triggered by PSY. We identified residues that are required for activation of immunity mediated by the rice XA21 receptor but that are not essential for root growth induced by PSY. Finally, we showed that a Xanthomonas strain lacking raxX is impaired in virulence. These findings suggest that RaxX serves as a molecular mimic of PSY peptides to facilitate Xoo infection and that XA21 has evolved the ability to recognize and respond specifically to the microbial form of the peptide. © 2017 UT-Battelle LLC. New Phytologist © 2017 New Phytologist Trust.

  9. A microbially derived tyrosine-sulfated peptide mimics a plant peptide hormone

    PubMed Central

    Pruitt, Rory N.; Joe, Anna; Zhang, Weiguo; Feng, Wei; Stewart, Valley; Schwessinger, Benjamin; Dinneny, José R.; Ronald, Pamela C.

    2018-01-01

    Summary The biotrophic pathogen Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae (Xoo) produces a sulfated peptide named RaxX, which shares similarity to peptides in the PSY (plant peptide containing sulfated tyrosine) family. We hypothesize that RaxX mimics the growth-stimulating activity of PSY peptides.Root length was measured in Arabidopsis and rice treated with synthetic RaxX peptides. We also used comparative genomic analyses and reactive oxygen species burst assays to evaluate the activity of RaxX and PSY peptides.Here we found that a synthetic sulfated RaxX derivative comprising 13 residues (RaxX13-sY), highly conserved between RaxX and PSY, induces root growth in Arabidopsis and rice in a manner similar to that triggered by PSY. We identified residues that are required for activation of immunity mediated by the rice XA21 receptor but that are not essential for root growth induced by PSY. Finally, we showed that a Xanthomonas strain lacking raxX is impaired in virulence.These findings suggest that RaxX serves as a molecular mimic of PSY peptides to facilitate Xoo infection and that XA21 has evolved the ability to recognize and respond specifically to the microbial form of the peptide. PMID:28556915

  10. Human cathelicidin peptide LL37 inhibits both attachment capability and biofilm formation of Staphylococcus epidermidis.

    PubMed

    Hell, E; Giske, C G; Nelson, A; Römling, U; Marchini, G

    2010-02-01

    The aim of this work was to investigate the possible effect of human cathelicidin antimicrobial peptide LL37 on biofilm formation of Staphylococcus epidermidis, a major causative agent of indwelling device-related infections. We performed initial attachment assay and biofilm formation solid surface assay in microtitre plates, as well as growth experiment in liquid medium using laboratory strain Staph. epidermidis ATCC35984. We found that already a low concentration of the peptide LL37 (1 mg l(-1)) significantly decreased both the attachment of bacteria to the surface and also the biofilm mass. No growth inhibition was observed even at 16 mg l(-1) concentration of LL37, indicating a direct effect of the peptide on biofilm production. As biofilm protects bacteria during infections in humans and allows their survival in a hostile environment, inhibition of biofilm formation by LL37 may have a key role to prevent bacterial colonization on indwelling devices. Our findings suggest that this host defence factor can be a potential candidate in prevention and treatment strategies of Staph. epidermidis infections in humans.

  11. Thioamide Substitution Selectively Modulates Proteolysis and Receptor Activity of Therapeutic Peptide Hormones.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xing; Mietlicki-Baase, Elizabeth G; Barrett, Taylor M; McGrath, Lauren E; Koch-Laskowski, Kieran; Ferrie, John J; Hayes, Matthew R; Petersson, E James

    2017-11-22

    Peptide hormones are attractive as injectable therapeutics and imaging agents, but they often require extensive modification by mutagenesis and/or chemical synthesis to prevent rapid in vivo degradation. Alternatively, the single-atom, O-to-S modification of peptide backbone thioamidation has the potential to selectively perturb interactions with proteases while preserving interactions with other proteins, such as target receptors. Here, we use the validated diabetes therapeutic, glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1), and the target of clinical investigation, gastric inhibitory polypeptide (GIP), as proof-of-principle peptides to demonstrate the value of thioamide substitution. In GLP-1 and GIP, a single thioamide near the scissile bond renders these peptides up to 750-fold more stable than the corresponding oxopeptides toward cleavage by dipeptidyl peptidase 4, the principal regulator of their in vivo stability. These stabilized analogues are nearly equipotent with their parent peptide in cyclic AMP activation assays, but the GLP-1 thiopeptides have much lower β-arrestin potency, making them novel agonists with altered signaling bias. Initial tests show that a thioamide GLP-1 analogue is biologically active in rats, with an in vivo potency for glycemic control surpassing that of native GLP-1. Taken together, these experiments demonstrate the potential for thioamides to modulate specific protein interactions to increase proteolytic stability or tune activation of different signaling pathways.

  12. Systematic Errors in Peptide and Protein Identification and Quantification by Modified Peptides*

    PubMed Central

    Bogdanow, Boris; Zauber, Henrik; Selbach, Matthias

    2016-01-01

    The principle of shotgun proteomics is to use peptide mass spectra in order to identify corresponding sequences in a protein database. The quality of peptide and protein identification and quantification critically depends on the sensitivity and specificity of this assignment process. Many peptides in proteomic samples carry biochemical modifications, and a large fraction of unassigned spectra arise from modified peptides. Spectra derived from modified peptides can erroneously be assigned to wrong amino acid sequences. However, the impact of this problem on proteomic data has not yet been investigated systematically. Here we use combinations of different database searches to show that modified peptides can be responsible for 20–50% of false positive identifications in deep proteomic data sets. These false positive hits are particularly problematic as they have significantly higher scores and higher intensities than other false positive matches. Furthermore, these wrong peptide assignments lead to hundreds of false protein identifications and systematic biases in protein quantification. We devise a “cleaned search” strategy to address this problem and show that this considerably improves the sensitivity and specificity of proteomic data. In summary, we show that modified peptides cause systematic errors in peptide and protein identification and quantification and should therefore be considered to further improve the quality of proteomic data annotation. PMID:27215553

  13. [Effect of pineal gland peptides on morphofunctional structure of the pancreas in ageing].

    PubMed

    Ryzhak, A P; Kostiuchek, I N; Kvetnoĭ, I M

    2007-01-01

    A study of pineal gland peptides effect on morphology and functions of the pancreas in the model of premature ageing in rats was performed with respect to the need in methods for premature ageing prevention. Structural, morphological and functional alterations in pancreas tissue, suggesting premature ageing of the gland, were identified by methods of immunohistochemistry and electronic microscopy. There was registered a geroprotective effect of the pineal gland peptides on pancreas tissue, manifested in the resistance of the latter to the impact of stress factors entailing premature ageing.

  14. The chromatography-free release, isolation and purification of recombinant peptide for fibril self-assembly.

    PubMed

    Hartmann, B M; Kaar, W; Yoo, I K; Lua, L H L; Falconer, R J; Middelberg, A P J

    2009-12-01

    One of the major expenses associated with recombinant peptide production is the use of chromatography in the isolation and purification stages of a bioprocess. Here we report a chromatography-free isolation and purification process for recombinant peptide expressed in Escherichia coli (E. coli). Initial peptide release is by homogenization and then by enzymatic cleavage of the peptide-containing fusion protein, directly in the E. coli homogenate. Release is followed by selective solvent precipitation (SSP) to isolate and purify the peptide away from larger cell contaminants. Specifically, we expressed in E. coli the self-assembling beta-sheet forming peptide P(11)-2 in fusion to thioredoxin. Homogenate was heat treated (55 degrees C, 15 min) and then incubated with tobacco etch virus protease (TEVp) to release P(11)-2 having a native N-terminus. SSP with ethanol at room temperature then removed contaminating proteins in an integrated isolation-purification step; it proved necessary to add 250 mM NaCl to homogenate to prevent P(11)-2 from partitioning to the precipitate. This process structure gave recombinant P(11)-2 peptide at 97% polypeptide purity and 40% overall yield, without a single chromatography step. Following buffer-exchange of the 97% pure product by bind-elute chromatography into defined chemical conditions, the resulting peptide was shown to be functionally active and able to form self-assembled fibrils. To the best of our knowledge, this manuscript reports the first published process for chromatography-free recombinant peptide release, isolation and purification. The process proved able to deliver functional recombinant peptide at high purity and potentially low cost, opening cost-sensitive materials applications for peptide-based materials.

  15. Selective algicidal action of peptides against harmful algal bloom species.

    PubMed

    Park, Seong-Cheol; Lee, Jong-Kook; Kim, Si Wouk; Park, Yoonkyung

    2011-01-01

    Recently, harmful algal bloom (HAB), also termed "red tide", has been recognized as a serious problem in marine environments according to climate changes worldwide. Many novel materials or methods to prevent HAB have not yet been employed except for clay dispersion, in which can the resulting sedimentation on the seafloor can also cause alteration in marine ecology or secondary environmental pollution. In the current study, we investigated that antimicrobial peptide have a potential in controlling HAB without cytotoxicity to harmless marine organisms. Here, antimicrobial peptides are proposed as new algicidal compounds in combating HAB cells. HPA3 and HPA3NT3 peptides which exert potent antimicrobial activity via pore forming action in plasma membrane showed that HPA3NT3 reduced the motility of algal cells, disrupted their plasma membrane, and induced the efflux of intracellular components. Against raphidoflagellate such as Heterosigma akashiwo, Chattonella sp., and C. marina, it displayed a rapid lysing action in cell membranes at 1~4 µM within 2 min. Comparatively, its lysing effects occurred at 8 µM within 1 h in dinoflagellate such as Cochlodium polykrikoides, Prorocentrum micans, and P. minimum. Moreover, its lysing action induced the lysis of chloroplasts and loss of chlorophyll a. In the contrary, this peptide was not effective against Skeletonema costatum, harmless algal cell, even at 256 µM, moreover, it killed only H. akashiwo or C. marina in co-cultivation with S. costatum, indicating to its selective algicidal activity between harmful and harmless algal cells. The peptide was non-hemolytic against red blood cells of Sebastes schlegeli, the black rockfish, at 120 µM. HAB cells were quickly and selectively lysed following treatment of antimicrobial peptides without cytotoxicity to harmless marine organisms. Thus, the antibiotic peptides examined in our study appear to have much potential in effectively controlling HAB with minimal impact on marine

  16. Peptide library synthesis on spectrally encoded beads for multiplexed protein/peptide bioassays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Huy Q.; Brower, Kara; Harink, Björn; Baxter, Brian; Thorn, Kurt S.; Fordyce, Polly M.

    2017-02-01

    Protein-peptide interactions are essential for cellular responses. Despite their importance, these interactions remain largely uncharacterized due to experimental challenges associated with their measurement. Current techniques (e.g. surface plasmon resonance, fluorescence polarization, and isothermal calorimetry) either require large amounts of purified material or direct fluorescent labeling, making high-throughput measurements laborious and expensive. In this report, we present a new technology for measuring antibody-peptide interactions in vitro that leverages spectrally encoded beads for biological multiplexing. Specific peptide sequences are synthesized directly on encoded beads with a 1:1 relationship between peptide sequence and embedded code, thereby making it possible to track many peptide sequences throughout the course of an experiment within a single small volume. We demonstrate the potential of these bead-bound peptide libraries by: (1) creating a set of 46 peptides composed of 3 commonly used epitope tags (myc, FLAG, and HA) and single amino-acid scanning mutants; (2) incubating with a mixture of fluorescently-labeled antimyc, anti-FLAG, and anti-HA antibodies; and (3) imaging these bead-bound libraries to simultaneously identify the embedded spectral code (and thus the sequence of the associated peptide) and quantify the amount of each antibody bound. To our knowledge, these data demonstrate the first customized peptide library synthesized directly on spectrally encoded beads. While the implementation of the technology provided here is a high-affinity antibody/protein interaction with a small code space, we believe this platform can be broadly applicable to any range of peptide screening applications, with the capability to multiplex into libraries of hundreds to thousands of peptides in a single assay.

  17. Remineralization of initial enamel caries in vitro using a novel peptide based on amelogenin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Danxue; Lv, Xueping; Tu, Huanxin; Zhou, Xuedong; Yu, Haiyang; Zhang, Linglin

    2015-09-01

    Dental caries is the most common oral disease with high incidence, widely spread and can seriously affect the health of oral cavity and the whole body. Current caries prevention measures such as fluoride treatment, antimicrobial agents, and traditional Chinese herbal, have limitations to some extent. Here we design and synthesize a novel peptide based on the amelogenin, and assess its ability to promote the remineralization of initial enamel caries lesions. We used enamel blocks to form initial lesions, and then subjected to 12-day pH cycling in the presence of peptide, NaF and HEPES buffer. Enamel treated with peptide or NaF had shallower, narrower lesions, thicker remineralized surfaces and less mineral loss than enamel treated with HEPES. This peptide can promote the remineralization of initial enamel caries and inhibit the progress of caries. It is a promising anti-caries agent with various research prospects and practical application value.

  18. A TNF receptor loop peptide mimic blocks RANK ligand–induced signaling, bone resorption, and bone loss

    PubMed Central

    Aoki, Kazuhiro; Saito, Hiroaki; Itzstein, Cecile; Ishiguro, Masaji; Shibata, Tatsuya; Blanque, Roland; Mian, Anower Hussain; Takahashi, Mariko; Suzuki, Yoshifumi; Yoshimatsu, Masako; Yamaguchi, Akira; Deprez, Pierre; Mollat, Patrick; Murali, Ramachandran; Ohya, Keiichi; Horne, William C.; Baron, Roland

    2006-01-01

    Activating receptor activator of NF-κB (RANK) and TNF receptor (TNFR) promote osteoclast differentiation. A critical ligand contact site on the TNFR is partly conserved in RANK. Surface plasmon resonance studies showed that a peptide (WP9QY) that mimics this TNFR contact site and inhibits TNF-α–induced activity bound to RANK ligand (RANKL). Changing a single residue predicted to play an important role in the interaction reduced the binding significantly. WP9QY, but not the altered control peptide, inhibited the RANKL-induced activation of RANK-dependent signaling in RAW 264.7 cells but had no effect on M-CSF–induced activation of some of the same signaling events. WP9QY but not the control peptide also prevented RANKL-induced bone resorption and osteoclastogenesis, even when TNFRs were absent or blocked. In vivo, where both RANKL and TNF-α promote osteoclastogenesis, osteoclast activity, and bone loss, WP9QY prevented the increased osteoclastogenesis and bone loss induced in mice by ovariectomy or low dietary calcium, in the latter case in both wild-type and TNFR double-knockout mice. These results suggest that a peptide that mimics a TNFR ligand contact site blocks bone resorption by interfering with recruitment and activation of osteoclasts by both RANKL and TNF. PMID:16680194

  19. Isolation of a 5-Kilodalton Actin-Sequestering Peptide from Human Blood Platelets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Safer, Daniel; Golla, Rajasree; Nachmias, Vivianne T.

    1990-04-01

    Resting human platelets contain ≈0.3 mM unpolymerized actin. When freshly drawn and washed platelets are treated with saponin, 85-90% of the unpolymerized actin diffuses out. Analysis by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis under nondenaturing conditions shows that the bulk of this unpolymerized actin migrates with a higher mobility than does pure G-actin, profilactin, or actin-gelsolin complex. When muscle G-actin is added to fresh or boiled saponin extract, the added muscle actin is shifted to the high-mobility form. The saponin extract contains an acidic peptide having a molecular mass in the range of 5 kDa, which has been purified to homogeneity by reverse-phase HPLC. This peptide also shifts muscle actin to the high-mobility form. Addition of either boiled saponin extract or the purified peptide to muscle G-actin also strongly and stoichiometrically inhibits salt-induced polymerization, as assayed by falling-ball viscometry and by sedimentation. We conclude that this peptide binds to the bulk of the unpolymerized actin in platelets and prevents it from polymerizing.

  20. Antigenic properties of HCMV peptides displayed by filamentous bacteriophages vs. synthetic peptides.

    PubMed

    Ulivieri, Cristina; Citro, Alessandra; Ivaldi, Federico; Mascolo, Dina; Ghittoni, Raffaella; Fanigliulo, Daniela; Manca, Fabrizio; Baldari, Cosima Tatiana; Li Pira, Giuseppina; Del Pozzo, Giovanna

    2008-08-15

    Several efforts have been invested in the identification of CTL and Th epitopes, as well as in the characterization of their immunodominance and MHC restriction, for the generation of a peptide-based HCMV vaccine. Small synthetic peptides are, however, poor antigens and carrier proteins are important for improving the efficacy of synthetic peptide vaccines. Recombinant bacteriophages appear as promising tools in the design of subunit vaccines. To investigate the antigenicity of peptides carried by recombinant bacteriophages we displayed different HCMV MHCII restricted peptides on the capsid of filamentous bacteriophage (fd) and found that hybrid bacteriophages are processed by human APC and activate HCMV-specific CD4 T-cells. Furthermore we constructed a reporter T-cell hybridoma expressing a chimeric TCR comprising murine alphabeta constant regions and human variable regions specific for the HLA-A2 restricted immunodominant NLV peptide of HCMV. Using the filamentous bacteriophage as an epitope carrier, we detected a more robust and long lasting response of the reporter T-cell hybridoma compared to peptide stimulation. Our results show a general enhancement of T-cell responses when antigenic peptides are carried by phages.

  1. Therapeutic peptides for cancer therapy. Part I - peptide inhibitors of signal transduction cascades.

    PubMed

    Bidwell, Gene L; Raucher, Drazen

    2009-10-01

    Therapeutic peptides have great potential as anticancer agents owing to their ease of rational design and target specificity. However, their utility in vivo is limited by low stability and poor tumor penetration. The authors review the development of peptide inhibitors with potential for cancer therapy. Peptides that inhibit signal transduction cascades are discussed. The authors searched Medline for articles concerning the development of therapeutic peptides and their delivery. Given our current knowledge of protein sequences, structures and interaction interfaces, therapeutic peptides that inhibit interactions of interest are easily designed. These peptides are advantageous because they are highly specific for the interaction of interest, and they are much more easily developed than small molecule inhibitors of the same interactions. The main hurdle to application of peptides for cancer therapy is their poor pharmacokinetic and biodistribution parameters. Therefore, successful development of peptide delivery vectors could potentially make possible the use of this new and very promising class of anticancer agents.

  2. Two-dimensional replica exchange approach for peptide-peptide interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gee, Jason; Shell, M. Scott

    2011-02-01

    The replica exchange molecular dynamics (REMD) method has emerged as a standard approach for simulating proteins and peptides with rugged underlying free energy landscapes. We describe an extension to the original methodology—here termed umbrella-sampling REMD (UREMD)—that offers specific advantages in simulating peptide-peptide interactions. This method is based on the use of two dimensions in the replica cascade, one in temperature as in conventional REMD, and one in an umbrella sampling coordinate between the center of mass of the two peptides that aids explicit exploration of the complete association-dissociation reaction coordinate. To mitigate the increased number of replicas required, we pursue an approach in which the temperature and umbrella dimensions are linked at only fully associated and dissociated states. Coupled with the reweighting equations, the UREMD method aids accurate calculations of normalized free energy profiles and structural or energetic measures as a function of interpeptide separation distance. We test the approach on two families of peptides: a series of designed tetrapeptides that serve as minimal models for amyloid fibril formation, and a fragment of a classic leucine zipper peptide and its mutant. The results for these systems are compared to those from conventional REMD simulations, and demonstrate good convergence properties, low statistical errors, and, for the leucine zippers, an ability to sample near-native structures.

  3. Surface modification and properties of Bombyx mori silk fibroin films by antimicrobial peptide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Liqiang; Zhu, Liangjun; Min, Sijia; Liu, Lin; Cai, Yurong; Yao, Juming

    2008-03-01

    The Bombyx mori silk fibroin films (SFFs) were modified by a Cecropin B ( CB) antimicrobial peptide, (NH 2)-NGIVKAGPAIAVLGEAAL-CONH 2, using the carbodiimide chemistry method. In order to avoid the dissolution of films during the modification procedure, the SFFs were first treated with 60% (v/v) ethanol aqueous solution, resulting a structural transition from unstable silk I to silk II. The investigation of modification conditions showed that the surface-modified SFFs had the satisfied antimicrobial activity and durability when they were activated by EDC·HCl/NHS solution followed by a treatment in CB peptide/PBS buffer (pH 6.5 or 8) solution at ambient temperature for 2 h. Moreover, the surface-modified SFFs showed the smaller contact angle due to the hydrophilic antimicrobial peptides coupled on the film surface, which is essential for the cell adhesion and proliferation. AFM results indicated that the surface roughness of SFFs was considerably increased after the modification by the peptides. The elemental composition analysis results also suggested that the peptides were tightly coupled to the surface of SFFs. This approach may provide a new option to engineer the surface-modified implanted materials preventing the biomaterial-centered infection (BCI).

  4. Systemic Administration of siRNA via cRGD-containing Peptide.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yuanyu; Wang, Xiaoxia; Huang, Weiyan; Cheng, Qiang; Zheng, Shuquan; Guo, Shutao; Cao, Huiqing; Liang, Xing-Jie; Du, Quan; Liang, Zicai

    2015-08-24

    Although small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) have been demonstrated to specifically silence their target genes in disease models and clinical trials, in vivo siRNA delivery is still the technical bottleneck that limits their use in therapeutic applications. In this study, a bifunctional peptide named RGD10-10R was designed and tested for its ability to deliver siRNA in vitro and in vivo. Because of their electrostatic interactions with polyarginine (10R), negatively charged siRNAs were readily complexed with RGD10-10R peptides, forming spherical RGD10-10R/siRNA nanoparticles. In addition to enhancing their serum stability by preventing RNase from attacking siRNA through steric hindrance, peptide binding facilitated siRNA transfection into MDA-MB-231 cells, as demonstrated by FACS and confocal microscopy assays and by the repressed expression of target genes. When RGD10 peptide, a receptor competitor of RGD10-10R, was added to the transfection system, the cellular internalization of RGD10-10R/siRNA was significantly compromised, suggesting a mechanism of ligand/receptor interaction. Tissue distribution assays indicated that the peptide/siRNA complex preferentially accumulated in the liver and in several exocrine/endocrine glands. Furthermore, tumor-targeted delivery of siRNA was also demonstrated by in vivo imaging and cryosection assays. In summary, RGD10-10R might constitute a novel siRNA delivery tool that could potentially be applied in tumor treatment.

  5. Systemic Administration of siRNA via cRGD-containing Peptide

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Yuanyu; Wang, Xiaoxia; Huang, Weiyan; Cheng, Qiang; Zheng, Shuquan; Guo, Shutao; Cao, Huiqing; Liang, Xing-Jie; Du, Quan; Liang, Zicai

    2015-01-01

    Although small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) have been demonstrated to specifically silence their target genes in disease models and clinical trials, in vivo siRNA delivery is still the technical bottleneck that limits their use in therapeutic applications. In this study, a bifunctional peptide named RGD10-10R was designed and tested for its ability to deliver siRNA in vitro and in vivo. Because of their electrostatic interactions with polyarginine (10R), negatively charged siRNAs were readily complexed with RGD10-10R peptides, forming spherical RGD10-10R/siRNA nanoparticles. In addition to enhancing their serum stability by preventing RNase from attacking siRNA through steric hindrance, peptide binding facilitated siRNA transfection into MDA-MB-231 cells, as demonstrated by FACS and confocal microscopy assays and by the repressed expression of target genes. When RGD10 peptide, a receptor competitor of RGD10-10R, was added to the transfection system, the cellular internalization of RGD10-10R/siRNA was significantly compromised, suggesting a mechanism of ligand/receptor interaction. Tissue distribution assays indicated that the peptide/siRNA complex preferentially accumulated in the liver and in several exocrine/endocrine glands. Furthermore, tumor-targeted delivery of siRNA was also demonstrated by in vivo imaging and cryosection assays. In summary, RGD10-10R might constitute a novel siRNA delivery tool that could potentially be applied in tumor treatment. PMID:26300278

  6. Mung bean proteins and peptides: nutritional, functional and bioactive properties

    PubMed Central

    Yi-Shen, Zhu; Shuai, Sun; FitzGerald, Richard

    2018-01-01

    To date, no extensive literature review exists regarding potential uses of mung bean proteins and peptides. As mung bean has long been widely used as a food source, early studies evaluated mung bean nutritional value against the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO)/the World Health Organization (WHO) amino acids dietary recommendations. The comparison demonstrated mung bean to be a good protein source, except for deficiencies in sulphur-containing amino acids, methionine and cysteine. Methionine and cysteine residues have been introduced into the 8S globulin through protein engineering technology. Subsequently, purified mung bean proteins and peptides have facilitated the study of their structural and functional properties. Two main types of extraction methods have been reported for isolation of proteins and peptides from mung bean flours, permitting sequencing of major proteins present in mung bean, including albumins and globulins (notably 8S globulin). However, the sequence for albumin deposited in the UniProt database differs from other sequences reported in the literature. Meanwhile, a limited number of reports have revealed other useful bioactivities for proteins and hydrolysed peptides, including angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitory activity, anti-fungal activity and trypsin inhibitory activity. Consequently, several mung bean hydrolysed peptides have served as effective food additives to prevent proteolysis during storage. Ultimately, further research will reveal other nutritional, functional and bioactive properties of mung bean for uses in diverse applications. PMID:29545737

  7. Ovalbumin-derived precursor peptides are transferred sequentially from gp96 and calreticulin to MHC I in the endoplasmic reticulum

    PubMed Central

    Kropp, Laura E.; Garg, Manish; Binder, Robert J.

    2010-01-01

    Cellular peptides generated by proteasomal degradation of proteins in the cytosol and destined for presentation by MHC I are associated with several chaperones. Hsp70, hsp90 and the TCP1-ring complex have been implicated as important cytosolic players for chaperoning these peptides. In this study we report that gp96 and calreticulin are essential for chaperoning peptides in the endoplasmic reticulum. Importantly we demonstrate that cellular peptides are transferred sequentially from gp96 to calreticulin and then to MHC I forming a relay line. Disruption of this relay line by removal of gp96 or calreticulin prevents the binding of peptides by MHC I and hence presentation of the MHC I-peptide complex on the cell surface. Our results are important for understanding how peptides are processed and trafficked within the endoplasmic reticulum before exiting in association with MHC I heavy chains and β2-microglobulin as a trimolecular complex. PMID:20410492

  8. Recombinant heat shock protein 70 functional peptide and alpha-fetoprotein epitope peptide vaccine elicits specific anti-tumor immunity.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiao-Ping; Wang, Qiao-Xia; Lin, Huan-Ping; Xu, Bing; Zhao, Qian; Chen, Kun

    2016-11-01

    Alpha-fetoprotein (AFP) is a marker of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and serves as a target for immunotherapy. However, current treatments targeting AFP are not reproducible and do not provide complete protection against cancer. This issue may be solved by developing novel therapeutic vaccines with enhanced immunogenicity that could effectively target AFP-expressing tumors. In this study, we report construction of a therapeutic peptide vaccine by linking heat shock protein 70 (HSP70) functional peptide to the AFP epitope to obtain HSP70-P/AFP-P. This novel peptide was administered into BALB/c mice to observe the effects. Quantification of AFP-specific CD8 + T cells that secrete IFN-γ in these mice via ELISPOT revealed the synergistic effects of HSP70-P/AFP-P with increased numbers of AFP-specific CD8 + T cells. Similarly, ELISA analysis showed increased granzyme B and perforin released by natural killer cells. Moreover, in vitro cytotoxic T-lymphocyte assays and in vivo tumor preventive experiments clearly showed the higher antitumor effects of HSP70-P/AFP-P against AFP-expressing tumors. These results show that treatment of BALB/c mice with HSP70-P/AFP-P induced stronger T-cells responses and improved protective immunity. Our data suggest that HSP70-P/AFP-P may be used as a therapeutic approach in the treatment of AFP-expressing cancers.

  9. Mitochondria targeted peptides protect against 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine neurotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Yang, Lichuan; Zhao, Kesheng; Calingasan, Noel Y; Luo, Guoxiong; Szeto, Hazel H; Beal, M Flint

    2009-09-01

    A large body of evidence suggests that mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative damage play a role in the pathogenesis of Parkinson's disease (PD). A number of antioxidants have been effective in animal models of PD. We have developed a family of mitochondria-targeted peptides that can protect against mitochondrial swelling and apoptosis (SS peptides). In this study, we examined the ability of two peptides, SS-31 and SS-20, to protect against 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP) neurotoxicity in mice. SS-31 produced dose-dependent complete protection against loss of dopamine and its metabolites in striatum, as well as loss of tyrosine hydroxylase immunoreactive neurons in substantia nigra pars compacta. SS-20, which does not possess intrinsic ability in scavenging reactive oxygen species, also demonstrated significant neuroprotective effects on dopaminergic neurons of MPTP-treated mice. Both SS-31 and SS-20 were very potent (nM) in preventing MPP+ (1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium)-induced cell death in cultured dopamine cells (SN4741). Studies with isolated mitochondria showed that both SS-31 and SS-20 prevented MPP+-induced inhibition of oxygen consumption and ATP production, and mitochondrial swelling. These findings provide strong evidence that these neuroprotective peptides, which target both mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative damage, are a promising approach for the treatment of PD.

  10. Peptide amphiphile nanofiber hydrogel delivery of sonic hedgehog protein to the cavernous nerve to promote regeneration and prevent erectile dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Choe, Shawn; Bond, Christopher W; Harrington, Daniel A; Stupp, Samuel I; McVary, Kevin T; Podlasek, Carol A

    2017-01-01

    Erectile dysfunction (ED) has high impact on quality of life in prostatectomy, diabetic and aging patients. An underlying mechanism is cavernous nerve (CN) injury, which causes ED in up to 80% of prostatectomy patients. We examine how sonic hedgehog (SHH) treatment with innovative peptide amphiphile nanofiber hydrogels (PA), promotes CN regeneration after injury. SHH and its receptors patched (PTCH1) and smoothened (SMO) are localized in PG neurons and glia. SMO undergoes anterograde transport to signal to downstream targets. With crush injury, PG neurons degenerate and undergo apoptosis. SHH protein decreases, SMO localization changes to the neuronal cell surface, and anterograde transport stops. With SHH treatment SHH is taken up at the injury site and undergoes retrograde transport to PG neurons, allowing SMO transport to occur, and neurons remain intact. SHH treatment prevents neuronal degeneration, maintains neuronal, glial and downstream target signaling, and is significant as a regenerative therapy. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  11. In silico optimization of a guava antimicrobial peptide enables combinatorial exploration for peptide design.

    PubMed

    Porto, William F; Irazazabal, Luz; Alves, Eliane S F; Ribeiro, Suzana M; Matos, Carolina O; Pires, Állan S; Fensterseifer, Isabel C M; Miranda, Vivian J; Haney, Evan F; Humblot, Vincent; Torres, Marcelo D T; Hancock, Robert E W; Liao, Luciano M; Ladram, Ali; Lu, Timothy K; de la Fuente-Nunez, Cesar; Franco, Octavio L

    2018-04-16

    Plants are extensively used in traditional medicine, and several plant antimicrobial peptides have been described as potential alternatives to conventional antibiotics. However, after more than four decades of research no plant antimicrobial peptide is currently used for treating bacterial infections, due to their length, post-translational modifications or  high dose requirement for a therapeutic effect . Here we report the design of antimicrobial peptides derived from a guava glycine-rich peptide using a genetic algorithm. This approach yields guavanin peptides, arginine-rich α-helical peptides that possess an unusual hydrophobic counterpart mainly composed of tyrosine residues. Guavanin 2 is characterized as a prototype peptide in terms of structure and activity. Nuclear magnetic resonance analysis indicates that the peptide adopts an α-helical structure in hydrophobic environments. Guavanin 2 is bactericidal at low concentrations, causing membrane disruption and triggering hyperpolarization. This computational approach for the exploration of natural products could be used to design effective peptide antibiotics.

  12. Superior Antifouling Performance of a Zwitterionic Peptide Compared to an Amphiphilic, Non-Ionic Peptide.

    PubMed

    Ye, Huijun; Wang, Libing; Huang, Renliang; Su, Rongxin; Liu, Boshi; Qi, Wei; He, Zhimin

    2015-10-14

    The aim of this study was to explore the influence of amphiphilic and zwitterionic structures on the resistance of protein adsorption to peptide self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) and gain insight into the associated antifouling mechanism. Two kinds of cysteine-terminated heptapeptides were studied. One peptide had alternating hydrophobic and hydrophilic residues with an amphiphilic sequence of CYSYSYS. The other peptide (CRERERE) was zwitterionic. Both peptides were covalently attached onto gold substrates via gold-thiol bond formation. Surface plasmon resonance analysis results showed that both peptide SAMs had ultralow or low protein adsorption amounts of 1.97-11.78 ng/cm2 in the presence of single proteins. The zwitterionic peptide showed relatively higher antifouling ability with single proteins and natural complex protein media. We performed molecular dynamics simulations to understand their respective antifouling behaviors. The results indicated that strong surface hydration of peptide SAMs contributes to fouling resistance by impeding interactions with proteins. Compared to the CYSYSYS peptide, more water molecules were predicted to form hydrogen-bonding interactions with the zwitterionic CRERERE peptide, which is in agreement with the antifouling test results. These findings reveal a clear relation between peptide structures and resistance to protein adsorption, facilitating the development of novel peptide-containing antifouling materials.

  13. Antimicrobial Peptides in Reptiles

    PubMed Central

    van Hoek, Monique L.

    2014-01-01

    Reptiles are among the oldest known amniotes and are highly diverse in their morphology and ecological niches. These animals have an evolutionarily ancient innate-immune system that is of great interest to scientists trying to identify new and useful antimicrobial peptides. Significant work in the last decade in the fields of biochemistry, proteomics and genomics has begun to reveal the complexity of reptilian antimicrobial peptides. Here, the current knowledge about antimicrobial peptides in reptiles is reviewed, with specific examples in each of the four orders: Testudines (turtles and tortosises), Sphenodontia (tuataras), Squamata (snakes and lizards), and Crocodilia (crocodilans). Examples are presented of the major classes of antimicrobial peptides expressed by reptiles including defensins, cathelicidins, liver-expressed peptides (hepcidin and LEAP-2), lysozyme, crotamine, and others. Some of these peptides have been identified and tested for their antibacterial or antiviral activity; others are only predicted as possible genes from genomic sequencing. Bioinformatic analysis of the reptile genomes is presented, revealing many predicted candidate antimicrobial peptides genes across this diverse class. The study of how these ancient creatures use antimicrobial peptides within their innate immune systems may reveal new understandings of our mammalian innate immune system and may also provide new and powerful antimicrobial peptides as scaffolds for potential therapeutic development. PMID:24918867

  14. Stepwise-activable multifunctional peptide-guided prodrug micelles for cancerous cells intracellular drug release

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jing; Li, Mengfei; Yuan, Zhefan; Wu, Dan; Chen, Jia-da; Feng, Jie

    2016-10-01

    A novel type of stepwise-activable multifunctional peptide-guided prodrug micelles (MPPM) was fabricated for cancerous cells intracellular drug release. Deca-lysine sequence (K10), a type of cell-penetrating peptide, was synthesized and terminated with azido-glycine. Then a new kind of molecule, alkyne modified doxorubicin (DOX) connecting through disulfide bond (DOX-SS-alkyne), was synthesized. After coupling via Cu-catalyzed azide-alkyne cycloaddition (CuAAC) click chemistry reaction, reduction-sensitive peptide-guided prodrug was obtained. Due to the amphiphilic property of the prodrug, it can assemble to form micelles. To prevent the nanocarriers from unspecific cellular uptake, the prodrug micelles were subsequently modified with 2,3-dimethyl maleic anhydride to obtain MPPM with a negatively charged outer shell. In vitro studies showed that MPPM could be shielded from cells under psychological environment. However, when arriving at mild acidic tumor site, the cell-penetrating capacity of MPPM would be activated by charge reversal of the micelles via hydrolysis of acid-labile β-carboxylic amides and regeneration of K10, which enabled efficient internalization of MPPM by tumor cells as well as following glutathione- and protease-induced drug release inside the cancerous cells. Furthermore, since the guide peptide sequences can be accurately designed and synthesized, it can be easily changed for various functions, such as targeting peptide, apoptotic peptide, even aptamers, only need to be terminated with azido-glycine. This method can be used as a template for reduction-sensitive peptide-guided prodrug for cancer therapy.

  15. Plant peptide hormone signalling.

    PubMed

    Motomitsu, Ayane; Sawa, Shinichiro; Ishida, Takashi

    2015-01-01

    The ligand-receptor-based cell-to-cell communication system is one of the most important molecular bases for the establishment of complex multicellular organisms. Plants have evolved highly complex intercellular communication systems. Historical studies have identified several molecules, designated phytohormones, that function in these processes. Recent advances in molecular biological analyses have identified phytohormone receptors and signalling mediators, and have led to the discovery of numerous peptide-based signalling molecules. Subsequent analyses have revealed the involvement in and contribution of these peptides to multiple aspects of the plant life cycle, including development and environmental responses, similar to the functions of canonical phytohormones. On the basis of this knowledge, the view that these peptide hormones are pivotal regulators in plants is becoming increasingly accepted. Peptide hormones are transcribed from the genome and translated into peptides. However, these peptides generally undergo further post-translational modifications to enable them to exert their function. Peptide hormones are expressed in and secreted from specific cells or tissues. Apoplastic peptides are perceived by specialized receptors that are located at the surface of target cells. Peptide hormone-receptor complexes activate intracellular signalling through downstream molecules, including kinases and transcription factors, which then trigger cellular events. In this chapter we provide a comprehensive summary of the biological functions of peptide hormones, focusing on how they mature and the ways in which they modulate plant functions. © 2015 Authors; published by Portland Press Limited.

  16. Prediction of the binding affinities of peptides to class II MHC using a regularized thermodynamic model

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The binding of peptide fragments of extracellular peptides to class II MHC is a crucial event in the adaptive immune response. Each MHC allotype generally binds a distinct subset of peptides and the enormous number of possible peptide epitopes prevents their complete experimental characterization. Computational methods can utilize the limited experimental data to predict the binding affinities of peptides to class II MHC. Results We have developed the Regularized Thermodynamic Average, or RTA, method for predicting the affinities of peptides binding to class II MHC. RTA accounts for all possible peptide binding conformations using a thermodynamic average and includes a parameter constraint for regularization to improve accuracy on novel data. RTA was shown to achieve higher accuracy, as measured by AUC, than SMM-align on the same data for all 17 MHC allotypes examined. RTA also gave the highest accuracy on all but three allotypes when compared with results from 9 different prediction methods applied to the same data. In addition, the method correctly predicted the peptide binding register of 17 out of 18 peptide-MHC complexes. Finally, we found that suboptimal peptide binding registers, which are often ignored in other prediction methods, made significant contributions of at least 50% of the total binding energy for approximately 20% of the peptides. Conclusions The RTA method accurately predicts peptide binding affinities to class II MHC and accounts for multiple peptide binding registers while reducing overfitting through regularization. The method has potential applications in vaccine design and in understanding autoimmune disorders. A web server implementing the RTA prediction method is available at http://bordnerlab.org/RTA/. PMID:20089173

  17. Pilot study on peptide purity—synthetic human C-peptide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Josephs, R. D.; Li, M.; Song, D.; Daireaux, A.; Choteau, T.; Stoppacher, N.; Westwood, S.; Wielgosz, R.; Xiao, P.; Liu, Y.; Gao, X.; Zhang, C.; Zhang, T.; Mi, W.; Quan, C.; Huang, T.; Li, H.; Melanson, J. E.; Ün, I.; Gören, A. C.; Quaglia, M.; Warren, J.

    2017-01-01

    Under the auspices of the Protein Analysis Working Group (PAWG) of the Comité Consultatif pour la Quantité de Matière (CCQM) a pilot study, CCQM-P55.2, was coordinated by the Bureau International des Poids et Mesures (BIPM) and the Chinese National Institute of Metrology (NIM). Four Metrology Institutes or Designated Institutes and the BIPM participated. Participants were required to assign the mass fraction of human C-peptide (hCP) present as the main component in the comparison sample for CCQM-P55.2. The comparison samples were prepared from synthetic human hCP purchased from a commercial supplier and used as provided without further treatment or purification. hCP was selected to be representative of the performance of a laboratory's measurement capability for the purity assignment of short (up to 5 kDa), non-cross-linked synthetic peptides/proteins. It was anticipated to provide an analytical measurement challenge representative for the value-assignment of compounds of broadly similar structural characteristics. The majority of participants used a quantitative nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (qNMR) corrected for peptide impurities. Other participants provided results obtained by peptide impurity corrected amino acid analysis (PICAA) or elemental analysis (PICCHN). It was decided to assign reference values based on the KCRVs of CCQM-K115 for both the hCP mass fraction and the mass fraction of the peptide related impurities as indispensable contributor regardless of the use of PICAA, mass balance or any other approach to determine the hCP purity. This allowed participants to demonstrate the efficacy of their implementation of the approaches used to determine the hCP mass fraction. In particular it allows participants to demonstrate the efficacy of their implementation of peptide related impurity identification and quantification. The assessment of the mass fraction of peptide impurities is based on the assumption that only the most exhaustive and

  18. Effect of time and temperature on bioactive compounds in germinated Brazilian soybean cultivar BRS 258

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The consumption of soybeans and soybean products has increased in the last few years due to the functional properties of bioactive compounds such as lunasin, Bowman Birk Inhibitor (BBI), lectin, saponins, and isoflavones. The objective of this study was to determine the effect of germination of soy...

  19. Peptide Array X-Linking (PAX): A New Peptide-Protein Identification Approach

    PubMed Central

    Okada, Hirokazu; Uezu, Akiyoshi; Soderblom, Erik J.; Moseley, M. Arthur; Gertler, Frank B.; Soderling, Scott H.

    2012-01-01

    Many protein interaction domains bind short peptides based on canonical sequence consensus motifs. Here we report the development of a peptide array-based proteomics tool to identify proteins directly interacting with ligand peptides from cell lysates. Array-formatted bait peptides containing an amino acid-derived cross-linker are photo-induced to crosslink with interacting proteins from lysates of interest. Indirect associations are removed by high stringency washes under denaturing conditions. Covalently trapped proteins are subsequently identified by LC-MS/MS and screened by cluster analysis and domain scanning. We apply this methodology to peptides with different proline-containing consensus sequences and show successful identifications from brain lysates of known and novel proteins containing polyproline motif-binding domains such as EH, EVH1, SH3, WW domains. These results suggest the capacity of arrayed peptide ligands to capture and subsequently identify proteins by mass spectrometry is relatively broad and robust. Additionally, the approach is rapid and applicable to cell or tissue fractions from any source, making the approach a flexible tool for initial protein-protein interaction discovery. PMID:22606326

  20. pH-dependent and pH-independent self-assembling behavior of surfactant-like peptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gurevich, Leonid; Fojan, Peter

    2012-02-01

    Self-assembly of amphiphilic peptides designed during the last years by several research groups leads to a large variety of 3D-structures that already found applications in stabilization of large protein complexes, cell culturing systems etc. In this report, we present synthesis and characterization of two novel families of amphiphilic peptides KAn and KAnW (n=6,5,4) that exhibits clear charge separation controllable by pH of the environment. As the pH changes from acidic to basic, the charge on the ends of the peptide molecule varies eventually leading to reorganization of KAn micelles and even micellar inversion. On contrary, the bulky geometry of the tryptophan residue in KAnW limits the variation of the surfactant parameter and hence largely prevents assembly into spherical or cylindrical micelles while favouring flatter geometries. The studied short peptide families demonstrate formation of ordered aggregates with well-defined secondary structure from short unstructured peptides and provide a simple system where factors responsible for self-assembly can be singled out and studied one by one. The ability to control the shape and structure of peptide aggregates can provide basis for novel designer pH sensitive materials including drug delivery and controlled release systems.

  1. Chlorella 11-Peptide Inhibits the Production of Macrophage-Induced Adhesion Molecules and Reduces Endothelin-1 Expression and Endothelial Permeability

    PubMed Central

    Shih, Mei Fen; Chen, Lih Chi; Cherng, Jong Yuh

    2013-01-01

    The inflammation process in large vessels involves the up-regulation of vascular adhesion molecules such as endothelial cell selectin (E-selectin), intercellular cell adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) and vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1) which are also known as the markers of atherosclerosis. We have reported that Chlorella 11-peptide exhibited effective anti-inflammatory effects. This peptide with an amino sequence Val-Glu-Cys-Tyr-Gly-Pro-Asn-Arg-Pro-Gln-Phe was further examined for its potential in preventing atherosclerosis in this study. In particular, the roles of Chlorella 11-peptide in lowering the production of vascular adhesion molecules, monocyte chemoattractant protein (MCP-1) and expression of endothelin-1 (ET-1) from endothelia (SVEC4-10 cells) were studied. The production of E-selectin, ICAM-1, VCAM-1 and MCP-1 in SVEC4-10 cells was measured with ELISA. The mRNA expression of ET-1 was analyzed by RT-PCR and agarose gel. Results showed that Chlorella 11-peptide significantly suppressed the levels of E-selectin, ICAM, VCAM, MCP-1 as well as ET-1 gene expression. The inhibition of ICAM-1 and VCAM-1 production by Chlorella 11-peptide was reversed in the presence of protein kinase A inhibitor (H89) which suggests that the cAMP pathway was involved in the inhibitory cause of the peptide. In addition, this peptide was shown to reduce the extent of increased intercellular permeability induced by combination of 50% of lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-activated RAW 264.7 cells medium and 50% normal SEVC cell culture medium (referred to as 50% RAW-conditioned medium). These data demonstrate that Chlorella 11-peptide is a promising biomolecule in preventing chronic inflammatory-related vascular diseases. PMID:24129228

  2. Identification of peptides in human Hsp20 and Hsp27 that possess molecular chaperone and anti-apoptotic activities.

    PubMed

    Nahomi, Rooban B; DiMauro, Michael A; Wang, Benlian; Nagaraj, Ram H

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies have identified peptides in the 'crystallin-domain' of the small heat-shock protein (sHSP) α-crystallin with chaperone and anti-apoptotic activities. We found that peptides in heat-shock protein Hsp20 (G71HFSVLLDVKHFSPEEIAVK91) and Hsp27 (D93RWRVSLDVNHFAPDELTVK113) with sequence homology to α-crystallin also have robust chaperone and anti-apoptotic activities. Both peptides inhibited hyperthermic and chemically induced aggregation of client proteins. The scrambled peptides of Hsp20 and Hsp27 showed no such effects. The chaperone activities of the peptides were better than those from αA- and αB-crystallin. HeLa cells took up the FITC-conjugated Hsp20 peptide and, when the cells were thermally stressed, the peptide was translocated from the cytoplasm to the nucleus. The two peptides inhibited apoptosis in HeLa cells by blocking cytochrome c release from the mitochondria and caspase-3 activation. We found that scrambling the last four amino acids in the two peptides (KAIV in Hsp20 and KTLV in Hsp27) made them unable to enter cells and ineffective against stress-induced apoptosis. Intraperitoneal injection of the peptides prevented sodium-selenite-induced cataract formation in rats by inhibiting protein aggregation and oxidative stress. Our study has identified peptides from Hsp20 and Hsp27 that may have therapeutic benefit in diseases where protein aggregation and apoptosis are contributing factors.

  3. Flanking signal and mature peptide residues influence signal peptide cleavage

    PubMed Central

    Choo, Khar Heng; Ranganathan, Shoba

    2008-01-01

    Background Signal peptides (SPs) mediate the targeting of secretory precursor proteins to the correct subcellular compartments in prokaryotes and eukaryotes. Identifying these transient peptides is crucial to the medical, food and beverage and biotechnology industries yet our understanding of these peptides remains limited. This paper examines the most common type of signal peptides cleavable by the endoprotease signal peptidase I (SPase I), and the residues flanking the cleavage sites of three groups of signal peptide sequences, namely (i) eukaryotes (Euk) (ii) Gram-positive (Gram+) bacteria, and (iii) Gram-negative (Gram-) bacteria. Results In this study, 2352 secretory peptide sequences from a variety of organisms with amino-terminal SPs are extracted from the manually curated SPdb database for analysis based on physicochemical properties such as pI, aliphatic index, GRAVY score, hydrophobicity, net charge and position-specific residue preferences. Our findings show that the three groups share several similarities in general, but they display distinctive features upon examination in terms of their amino acid compositions and frequencies, and various physico-chemical properties. Thus, analysis or prediction of their sequences should be separated and treated as distinct groups. Conclusion We conclude that the peptide segment recognized by SPase I extends to the start of the mature protein to a limited extent, upon our survey of the amino acid residues surrounding the cleavage processing site. These flanking residues possibly influence the cleavage processing and contribute to non-canonical cleavage sites. Our findings are applicable in defining more accurate prediction tools for recognition and identification of cleavage site of SPs. PMID:19091014

  4. Molecular specialization of breast vasculature: A breast-homing phage-displayed peptide binds to aminopeptidase P in breast vasculature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Essler, Markus; Ruoslahti, Erkki

    2002-02-01

    In vivo phage display identifies peptides that selectively home to the vasculature of individual organs, tissues, and tumors. Here we report the identification of a cyclic nonapeptide, CPGPEGAGC, which homes to normal breast tissue with a 100-fold selectivity over nontargeted phage. The homing of the phage is inhibited by its cognate synthetic peptide. Phage localization in tissue sections showed that the breast-homing phage binds to the blood vessels in the breast, but not in other tissues. The phage also bound to the vasculature of hyperplastic and malignant lesions in transgenic breast cancer mice. Expression cloning with a phage-displayed cDNA library yielded a phage that specifically bound to the breast-homing peptide. The cDNA insert was homologous to a fragment of aminopeptidase P. The homing peptide bound aminopeptidase P from malignant breast tissue in affinity chromatography. Antibodies against aminopeptidase P inhibited the in vitro binding of the phage-displayed cDNA to the peptide and the in vivo homing of phage carrying the peptide. These results indicate that aminopeptidase P is the receptor for the breast-homing peptide. This peptide may be useful in designing drugs for the prevention and treatment of breast cancer.

  5. A Peptide/MHCII conformer generated in the presence of exchange peptide is substrate for HLA-DM editing

    PubMed Central

    Ferrante, Andrea; Gorski, Jack

    2012-01-01

    The mechanism of HLA-DM (DM) activity is still unclear. We have shown that DM-mediated peptide release from HLA-DR (DR) is dependent on the presence of exchange peptide. However, DM also promotes a small amount of peptide release in the absence of exchange peptide. Here we show that SDS-PAGE separates purified peptide/DR1 complexes (pDR1) into two conformers whose ratio is peptide Kd-dependent. In the absence of exchange peptide, DM only releases peptide from the slower migrating conformer. Addition of exchange peptide converts the DM-resistant conformer to the slower migrating conformer, which is DM labile. Thus, exchange peptide generates a conformer of pDR1 which constitutes the intermediate for peptide exchange and the substrate for DM activity. The resolution of the intermediate favors the highest affinity peptide. However, once folded into the DM-resistant conformer, even low affinity peptides can be presented in the absence of free peptide, broadening the repertoire available for presentation. PMID:22545194

  6. Synthesis, molecular docking and anticancer studies of peptides and iso-peptides.

    PubMed

    Jabeen, Farukh; Panda, Siva S; Kondratyuk, Tamara P; Park, Eun-Jung; Pezzuto, John M; Ihsan-ul-Haq; Hall, C Dennis; Katritzky, Alan R

    2015-08-01

    Chiral peptides and iso-peptides were synthesized in excellent yield by using benzotriazole mediated solution phase synthesis. Benzotriazole acted both as activating and leaving group, eliminating frequent use of protection and subsequent deprotection. The procedure was based on the hypothesis that epimerization should be suppressed in solution due to a faster coupling rate than SPPS. All the synthesized peptides complied with Lipinski's Ro5 except for the rotatable bonds. Inhibition of cell proliferation of cancer cell lines is one of the most commonly used methods to study the effectiveness of any anticancer agents. Synthesized peptides and iso-peptides were tested against three cancer cell lines (MCF-7, MDA-MB 231) to determine their anti-proliferative potential. NFkB was also determined. Molecular docking studies were also carried out to complement the experimental results. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Antimicrobial Peptides as Mediators of Innate Immunity in Teleosts

    PubMed Central

    Katzenback, Barbara A.

    2015-01-01

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) have been identified throughout the metazoa suggesting their evolutionarily conserved nature and their presence in teleosts is no exception. AMPs are short (18–46 amino acids), usually cationic, amphipathic peptides. While AMPs are diverse in amino acid sequence, with no two AMPs being identical, they collectively appear to have conserved functions in the innate immunity of animals towards the pathogens they encounter in their environment. Fish AMPs are upregulated in response to pathogens and appear to have direct broad-spectrum antimicrobial activity towards both human and fish pathogens. However, an emerging role for AMPs as immunomodulatory molecules has become apparent—the ability of AMPs to activate the innate immune system sheds light onto the multifaceted capacity of these small peptides to combat pathogens through direct and indirect means. Herein, this review focuses on the role of teleost AMPs as modulators of the innate immune system and their regulation in response to pathogens or other exogenous molecules. The capacity to regulate AMP expression by exogenous factors may prove useful in modulating AMP expression in fish to prevent disease, particularly in aquaculture settings where crowded conditions and environmental stress pre-dispose these fish to infection. PMID:26426065

  8. Antimicrobial peptide coatings for hydroxyapatite: electrostatic and covalent attachment of antimicrobial peptides to surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Townsend, Leigh; Williams, Richard L.; Anuforom, Olachi; Berwick, Matthew R.; Halstead, Fenella; Hughes, Erik; Stamboulis, Artemis; Oppenheim, Beryl; Gough, Julie; Grover, Liam; Scott, Robert A. H.; Webber, Mark; Peacock, Anna F. A.; Belli, Antonio; Logan, Ann

    2017-01-01

    The interface between implanted devices and their host tissue is complex and is often optimized for maximal integration and cell adhesion. However, this also gives a surface suitable for bacterial colonization. We have developed a novel method of modifying the surface at the material–tissue interface with an antimicrobial peptide (AMP) coating to allow cell attachment while inhibiting bacterial colonization. The technology reported here is a dual AMP coating. The dual coating consists of AMPs covalently bonded to the hydroxyapatite surface, followed by deposition of electrostatically bound AMPs. The dual approach gives an efficacious coating which is stable for over 12 months and can prevent colonization of the surface by both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. PMID:28077764

  9. An enhancer peptide for membrane-disrupting antimicrobial peptides

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background NP4P is a synthetic peptide derived from a natural, non-antimicrobial peptide fragment (pro-region of nematode cecropin P4) by substitution of all acidic amino acid residues with amides (i.e., Glu → Gln, and Asp → Asn). Results In the presence of NP4P, some membrane-disrupting antimicrobial peptides (ASABF-α, polymyxin B, and nisin) killed microbes at lower concentration (e.g., 10 times lower minimum bactericidal concentration for ASABF-α against Staphylococcus aureus), whereas NP4P itself was not bactericidal and did not interfere with bacterial growth at ≤ 300 μg/mL. In contrast, the activities of antimicrobial agents with a distinct mode of action (indolicidin, ampicillin, kanamycin, and enrofloxacin) were unaffected. Although the membrane-disrupting activity of NP4P was slight or undetectable, ASABF-α permeabilized S. aureus membranes with enhanced efficacy in the presence of NP4P. Conclusions NP4P selectively enhanced the bactericidal activities of membrane-disrupting antimicrobial peptides by increasing the efficacy of membrane disruption against the cytoplasmic membrane. PMID:20152058

  10. Peptide and Peptide-Dependent Motions in MHC Proteins: Immunological Implications and Biophysical Underpinnings

    PubMed Central

    Ayres, Cory M.; Corcelli, Steven A.; Baker, Brian M.

    2017-01-01

    Structural biology of peptides presented by class I and class II MHC proteins has transformed immunology, impacting our understanding of fundamental immune mechanisms and allowing researchers to rationalize immunogenicity and design novel vaccines. However, proteins are not static structures as often inferred from crystallographic structures. Their components move and breathe individually and collectively over a range of timescales. Peptides bound within MHC peptide-binding grooves are no exception and their motions have been shown to impact recognition by T cell and other receptors in ways that influence function. Furthermore, peptides tune the motions of MHC proteins themselves, which impacts recognition of peptide/MHC complexes by other proteins. Here, we review the motional properties of peptides in MHC binding grooves and discuss how peptide properties can influence MHC motions. We briefly review theoretical concepts about protein motion and highlight key data that illustrate immunological consequences. We focus primarily on class I systems due to greater availability of data, but segue into class II systems as the concepts and consequences overlap. We suggest that characterization of the dynamic “energy landscapes” of peptide/MHC complexes and the resulting functional consequences is one of the next frontiers in structural immunology. PMID:28824655

  11. Peptide and Peptide-Dependent Motions in MHC Proteins: Immunological Implications and Biophysical Underpinnings.

    PubMed

    Ayres, Cory M; Corcelli, Steven A; Baker, Brian M

    2017-01-01

    Structural biology of peptides presented by class I and class II MHC proteins has transformed immunology, impacting our understanding of fundamental immune mechanisms and allowing researchers to rationalize immunogenicity and design novel vaccines. However, proteins are not static structures as often inferred from crystallographic structures. Their components move and breathe individually and collectively over a range of timescales. Peptides bound within MHC peptide-binding grooves are no exception and their motions have been shown to impact recognition by T cell and other receptors in ways that influence function. Furthermore, peptides tune the motions of MHC proteins themselves, which impacts recognition of peptide/MHC complexes by other proteins. Here, we review the motional properties of peptides in MHC binding grooves and discuss how peptide properties can influence MHC motions. We briefly review theoretical concepts about protein motion and highlight key data that illustrate immunological consequences. We focus primarily on class I systems due to greater availability of data, but segue into class II systems as the concepts and consequences overlap. We suggest that characterization of the dynamic "energy landscapes" of peptide/MHC complexes and the resulting functional consequences is one of the next frontiers in structural immunology.

  12. Insulin C-peptide test

    MedlinePlus

    C-peptide ... the test depends on the reason for the C-peptide measurement. Ask your health care provider if ... C-peptide is measured to tell the difference between insulin the body produces and insulin someone injects ...

  13. Application of synthetic peptides for detection of anti-citrullinated peptide antibodies.

    PubMed

    Trier, Nicole Hartwig; Holm, Bettina Eide; Slot, Ole; Locht, Henning; Lindegaard, Hanne; Svendsen, Anders; Nielsen, Christoffer Tandrup; Jacobsen, Søren; Theander, Elke; Houen, Gunnar

    2016-02-01

    Anti-citrullinated protein antibodies (ACPAs) are a hallmark of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and represent an important tool for the serological diagnosis of RA. In this study, we describe ACPA reactivity to overlapping citrullinated Epstein-Barr virus nuclear antigen-1 (EBNA-1)-derived peptides and analyze their potential as substrates for ACPA detection by streptavidin capture enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Using systematically overlapping peptides, containing a 10 amino acid overlap, labelled with biotin C-terminally or N-terminally, sera from 160 individuals (RA sera (n=60), healthy controls (n=40), systemic lupus erythematosus (n=20), Sjögren's syndrome (n=40)) were screened for antibody reactivity. Antibodies to a panel of five citrullinated EBNA-1 peptides were found in 67% of RA sera, exclusively of the IgG isotype, while 53% of the patient sera reacted with a single peptide, ARGGSRERARGRGRG-Cit-GEKR, accounting for more than half of the ACPA reactivity alone. Moreover, these antibodies were detected in 10% of CCP2-negative RA sera. In addition, 47% of the RA sera reacted with two or three citrullinated EBNA-1 peptides from the selected peptide panel. Furthermore, a negative correlation between the biotin attachment site and the location of citrulline in the peptides was found, i.e. the closer the citrulline was located to biotin, the lower the antibody reactivity. Our data suggest that citrullinated EBNA-1 peptides may be considered a substrate for the detection of ACPAs and that the presence of Epstein-Barr virus may play a role in the induction of these autoantibodies. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Coarse Graining to Investigate Membrane Induced Peptide Folding of Anticancer Peptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganesan, Sai; Xu, Hongcheng; Matysiak, Silvina

    Information about membrane induced peptide folding mechanisms using all-atom molecular dynamics simulations is a challenge due to time and length scale issues.We recently developed a low resolution Water Explicit Polarizable PROtein coarse-grained Model by adding oppositely charged dummy particles inside protein backbone beads.These two dummy particles represent a fluctuating dipole,thus introducing structural polarization into the coarse-grained model.With this model,we were able to achieve significant α- β secondary structure content de novo,without any added bias.We extended the model to zwitterionic and anionic lipids,by adding oppositely charged dummy particles inside polar beads, to capture the ability of the head group region to form hydrogen bonds.We use zwitterionic POPC and anionic POPS as our model lipids, and a cationic anticancer peptide,SVS1,as our model peptide.We have characterized the driving forces for SVS1 folding on lipid bilayers with varying anionic and zwitterionic lipid compositions.Based on our results, dipolar interactions between peptide backbone and lipid head groups contribute to stabilize folded conformations.Cooperativity in folding is induced by both intra peptide and membrane-peptide interaction.

  15. Stable and Long-Lasting, Novel Bicyclic Peptide Plasma Kallikrein Inhibitors for the Treatment of Diabetic Macular Edema.

    PubMed

    Teufel, Daniel P; Bennett, Gavin; Harrison, Helen; van Rietschoten, Katerine; Pavan, Silvia; Stace, Catherine; Le Floch, François; Van Bergen, Tine; Vermassen, Elke; Barbeaux, Philippe; Hu, Tjing-Tjing; Feyen, Jean H M; Vanhove, Marc

    2018-04-12

    Plasma kallikrein, a member of the kallikrein-kinin system, catalyzes the release of the bioactive peptide bradykinin, which induces inflammation, vasodilation, vessel permeability, and pain. Preclinical evidence implicates the activity of plasma kallikrein in diabetic retinopathy, which is a leading cause of visual loss in patients suffering from diabetes mellitus. Employing a technology based on phage-display combined with chemical cyclization, we have identified highly selective bicyclic peptide inhibitors with nano- and picomolar potencies toward plasma kallikrein. Stability in biological matrices was either intrinsic to the peptide or engineered via the introduction of non-natural amino acids and nonpeptidic bonds. The peptides prevented bradykinin release in vitro, and in vivo efficacy was demonstrated in both a rat paw edema model and in rodent models of diabetes-induced retinal permeability. With a highly extended half-life of ∼40 h in rabbit eyes following intravitreal administration, the bicyclic peptides are promising novel agents for the treatment of diabetic retinopathy and diabetic macular edema.

  16. Exploring high-affinity binding properties of octamer peptides by principal component analysis of tetramer peptides.

    PubMed

    Kume, Akiko; Kawai, Shun; Kato, Ryuji; Iwata, Shinmei; Shimizu, Kazunori; Honda, Hiroyuki

    2017-02-01

    To investigate the binding properties of a peptide sequence, we conducted principal component analysis (PCA) of the physicochemical features of a tetramer peptide library comprised of 512 peptides, and the variables were reduced to two principal components. We selected IL-2 and IgG as model proteins and the binding affinity to these proteins was assayed using the 512 peptides mentioned above. PCA of binding affinity data showed that 16 and 18 variables were suitable for localizing IL-2 and IgG high-affinity binding peptides, respectively, into a restricted region of the PCA plot. We then investigated whether the binding affinity of octamer peptide libraries could be predicted using the identified region in the tetramer PCA. The results show that octamer high-affinity binding peptides were also concentrated in the tetramer high-affinity binding region of both IL-2 and IgG. The average fluorescence intensity of high-affinity binding peptides was 3.3- and 2.1-fold higher than that of low-affinity binding peptides for IL-2 and IgG, respectively. We conclude that PCA may be used to identify octamer peptides with high- or low-affinity binding properties from data from a tetramer peptide library. Copyright © 2016 The Society for Biotechnology, Japan. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Diagnostic Peptide Discovery: Prioritization of Pathogen Diagnostic Markers Using Multiple Features

    PubMed Central

    Carmona, Santiago J.; Sartor, Paula A.; Leguizamón, María S.; Campetella, Oscar E.; Agüero, Fernán

    2012-01-01

    The availability of complete pathogen genomes has renewed interest in the development of diagnostics for infectious diseases. Synthetic peptide microarrays provide a rapid, high-throughput platform for immunological testing of potential B-cell epitopes. However, their current capacity prevent the experimental screening of complete “peptidomes”. Therefore, computational approaches for prediction and/or prioritization of diagnostically relevant peptides are required. In this work we describe a computational method to assess a defined set of molecular properties for each potential diagnostic target in a reference genome. Properties such as sub-cellular localization or expression level were evaluated for the whole protein. At a higher resolution (short peptides), we assessed a set of local properties, such as repetitive motifs, disorder (structured vs natively unstructured regions), trans-membrane spans, genetic polymorphisms (conserved vs. divergent regions), predicted B-cell epitopes, and sequence similarity against human proteins and other potential cross-reacting species (e.g. other pathogens endemic in overlapping geographical locations). A scoring function based on these different features was developed, and used to rank all peptides from a large eukaryotic pathogen proteome. We applied this method to the identification of candidate diagnostic peptides in the protozoan Trypanosoma cruzi, the causative agent of Chagas disease. We measured the performance of the method by analyzing the enrichment of validated antigens in the high-scoring top of the ranking. Based on this measure, our integrative method outperformed alternative prioritizations based on individual properties (such as B-cell epitope predictors alone). Using this method we ranked 10 million 12-mer overlapping peptides derived from the complete T. cruzi proteome. Experimental screening of 190 high-scoring peptides allowed the identification of 37 novel epitopes with diagnostic potential, while none

  18. Peptide-modified PELCL electrospun membranes for regulation of vascular endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Fang; Jia, Xiaoling; Yang, Yang; Yang, Qingmao; Gao, Chao; Zhao, Yunhui; Fan, Yubo; Yuan, Xiaoyan

    2016-11-01

    The efficiency of biomaterials used in small vascular repair depends greatly on their ability to interact with vascular endothelial cells (VECs). Rapid endothelialization of the vascular grafts is a promising way to prevent thrombosis and intimal hyperplasia. In this work, modification of electrospun membranes of poly(ethylene glycol)-b-poly(l-lactide-co-ε-caprolactone) (PELCL) by three different peptides for regulation of VECs were studied in order to obtain ideal bioactive biomaterials as small diameter vascular grafts. QK (a mimetic peptide to vascular endothelial growth factor), Arg-Glu-Asp-Val (REDV, a specific adhesive peptide to VECs) and Val-Ala-Pro-Gly (VAPG, a specific adhesive peptide to vascular smooth muscle cells) were investigated. Surface properties of the modified membranes and the response of VECs were verified. It was found that protein adsorption and platelet adhesion were effectively suppressed with the introduction of QK, REDV or VAPG peptides on the PELCL electrospun membranes. Both QK- and REDV-modified electrospun membranes could accelerate the proliferation of VECs in the first 9days, and the QK-modified electrospun membrane promoted cell proliferation more significantly than the REDV-modified one. The REDV-modified PELCL membrane was the most favorable for VECs adhesion than QK- and VAPG-modified membranes. It was suggested that QK- or REDV-modified PELCL electrospun membranes may have great potential applications in cardiovascular biomaterials for rapid endothelialization in situ. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Manual Solid-Phase Peptide Synthesis of Metallocene-Peptide Bioconjugates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kirin, Srecko I.; Noor, Fozia; Metzler-Nolte, Nils; Mier, Walter

    2007-01-01

    A simple and relatively inexpensive procedure for preparing a biologically active peptide using solid phase peptide synthesis (SPPS) is described. Fourth-year undergraduate students have gained firsthand experience from the solid-phase synthesis techniques and they have become familiar with modern analytical techniques based on the particular…

  20. Selective Algicidal Action of Peptides against Harmful Algal Bloom Species

    PubMed Central

    Park, Seong-Cheol; Lee, Jong-Kook; Kim, Si Wouk; Park, Yoonkyung

    2011-01-01

    Recently, harmful algal bloom (HAB), also termed “red tide”, has been recognized as a serious problem in marine environments according to climate changes worldwide. Many novel materials or methods to prevent HAB have not yet been employed except for clay dispersion, in which can the resulting sedimentation on the seafloor can also cause alteration in marine ecology or secondary environmental pollution. In the current study, we investigated that antimicrobial peptide have a potential in controlling HAB without cytotoxicity to harmless marine organisms. Here, antimicrobial peptides are proposed as new algicidal compounds in combating HAB cells. HPA3 and HPA3NT3 peptides which exert potent antimicrobial activity via pore forming action in plasma membrane showed that HPA3NT3 reduced the motility of algal cells, disrupted their plasma membrane, and induced the efflux of intracellular components. Against raphidoflagellate such as Heterosigma akashiwo, Chattonella sp., and C. marina, it displayed a rapid lysing action in cell membranes at 1∼4 µM within 2 min. Comparatively, its lysing effects occurred at 8 µM within 1 h in dinoflagellate such as Cochlodium polykrikoides, Prorocentrum micans, and P. minimum. Moreover, its lysing action induced the lysis of chloroplasts and loss of chlorophyll a. In the contrary, this peptide was not effective against Skeletonema costatum, harmless algal cell, even at 256 µM, moreover, it killed only H. akashiwo or C. marina in co-cultivation with S. costatum, indicating to its selective algicidal activity between harmful and harmless algal cells. The peptide was non-hemolytic against red blood cells of Sebastes schlegeli, the black rockfish, at 120 µM. HAB cells were quickly and selectively lysed following treatment of antimicrobial peptides without cytotoxicity to harmless marine organisms. Thus, the antibiotic peptides examined in our study appear to have much potential in effectively controlling HAB with minimal impact on

  1. Definition of agonists and design of antagonists for alloreactive T cell clones using synthetic peptide libraries.

    PubMed

    de Koster, H S; Vermeulen, C J; Hiemstra, H S; Amons, R; Drijfhout, J W; Koning, F

    1999-04-01

    Alloreactive T cells form an important barrier for organ transplantation. To reduce the risk of rejection patients are given immunosuppressive drugs, which increase the chance of infection and the incidence of malignancies. It has been shown that a large proportion of alloreactive T cells specifically recognize peptides present in the groove of the allogeneic MHC molecule. This implies that it might be possible to modulate the alloresponse by peptides with antagonistic properties, thus preventing rejection without the side effects of general immunosuppression. Peptide antagonists can be designed on the basis of the original agonist, yet for alloreactive T cells these agonists are usually unknown. In this study we have used a dedicated synthetic peptide library to identify agonists for HLA-DR3-specific alloreactive T cell clones. Based on these agonists, altered peptide ligands (APL) were designed. Three APL could antagonize an alloreactive T cell clone in its response against the library-derived agonist as well as in its response against the original allodeterminant, HLA-DR3. This demonstrates that peptide libraries can be used to design antagonists for alloreactive T cells without knowledge about the nature of the actual allostimulatory peptide. Since the most potent agonists are selected, this strategy permits detection of potent antagonists. The results, however, also suggest that the degree of peptide dependency of alloreactive T cell clones may dictate whether a peptide antagonist can be found for such clones. Whether peptide antagonists will be valuable in the development of donor-patient-specific immunosuppression may therefore depend on the specificity of the in vivo-generated alloreactive T cells.

  2. A Review of Potential Marine-derived Hypotensive and Anti-obesity Peptides.

    PubMed

    Manikkam, V; Vasiljevic, T; Donkor, O N; Mathai, M L

    2016-01-01

    Bioactive peptides are food derived components, usually consisting of 3-20 amino acids, which are inactive when incorporated within their parent protein. Once liberated by enzymatic or chemical hydrolysis, during food processing and gastrointestinal transit, they can potentially provide an array of health benefits to the human body. Owing to an unprecedented increase in the worldwide incidence of obesity and hypertension, medical researchers are focusing on the hypotensive and anti-obesity properties of nutritionally derived bioactive peptides. The role of the renin-angiotensin system has long been established in the aetiology of metabolic diseases and hypertension. Targeting the renin-angiotensin system by inhibiting the activity of angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) and preventing the formation of angiotensin II can be a potential therapeutic approach to the treatment of hypertension and obesity. Fish-derived proteins and peptides can potentially be excellent sources of bioactive components, mainly as a source of ACE inhibitors. However, increased use of marine sources, poses an unsustainable burden on particular fish stocks, so, the underutilized fish species and by-products can be exploited for this purpose. This paper provides an overview of the techniques involved in the production, isolation, purification, and characterization of bioactive peptides from marine sources, as well as the evaluation of the ACE inhibitory (ACE-I) activity and bioavailability.

  3. Improving Peptide Applications Using Nanotechnology.

    PubMed

    Narayanaswamy, Radhika; Wang, Tao; Torchilin, Vladimir P

    2016-01-01

    Peptides are being successfully used in various fields including therapy and drug delivery. With advancement in nanotechnology and targeted delivery carrier systems, suitable modification of peptides has enabled achievement of many desirable goals over-riding some of the major disadvantages associated with the delivery of peptides in vivo. Conjugation or physical encapsulation of peptides to various nanocarriers, such as liposomes, micelles and solid-lipid nanoparticles, has improved their in vivo performance multi-fold. The amenability of peptides to modification in chemistry and functionalization with suitable nanocarriers are very relevant aspects in their use and have led to the use of 'smart' nanoparticles with suitable linker chemistries that favor peptide targeting or release at the desired sites, minimizing off-target effects. This review focuses on how nanotechnology has been used to improve the number of peptide applications. The paper also focuses on the chemistry behind peptide conjugation to nanocarriers, the commonly employed linker chemistries and the several improvements that have already been achieved in the areas of peptide use with the help of nanotechnology.

  4. Differential stability of therapeutic peptides with different proteolytic cleavage sites in blood, plasma and serum.

    PubMed

    Böttger, Roland; Hoffmann, Ralf; Knappe, Daniel

    2017-01-01

    Proteolytic degradation of peptide-based drugs is often considered as major weakness limiting systemic therapeutic applications. Therefore, huge efforts are typically devoted to stabilize sequences against proteases present in serum or plasma, obtained as supernatants after complete blood coagulation or centrifugation of blood supplemented with anticoagulants, respectively. Plasma and serum are reproducibly obtained from animals and humans allowing consistent for clinical analyses and research applications. However, the spectrum of active or activated proteases appears to vary depending on the activation of proteases and cofactors during coagulation (serum) or inhibition of such enzymes by anticoagulants (plasma), such as EDTA (metallo- and Ca2+-dependent proteases) and heparin (e.g. thrombin, factor Xa). Here, we studied the presumed effects on peptide degradation by taking blood via cardiac puncture of CD-1 mice using a syringe containing a peptide solution. Due to absence of coagulation activators (e.g. glass surfaces and damaged cells), visible blood clotting was prevented allowing to study peptide degradation for one hour. The remaining peptide was quantified and the degradation products were identified using mass spectrometry. When the degradation rates (half-life times) were compared to serum derived freshly from the same animal and commercial serum and plasma samples, peptides of three different families showed indeed considerably different stabilities. Generally, peptides were faster degraded in serum than in plasma, but surprisingly all peptides were more stable in fresh blood and the order of degradation rates among the peptides varied among the six different incubation experiments. This indicates, that proteolytic degradation of peptide-based therapeutics may often be misleading stimulating efforts to stabilize peptides at degradation sites relevant only in vitro, i.e., for serum or plasma stability assays, but of lower importance in vivo.

  5. An endostatin-derived peptide orally exerts anti-fibrotic activity in a murine pulmonary fibrosis model.

    PubMed

    Nishimoto, Tetsuya; Mlakar, Logan; Takihara, Takahisa; Feghali-Bostwick, Carol

    2015-10-01

    Pulmonary fibrosis causes high morbidity and mortality in affected individuals. Recently, we showed that parenteral or intratracheal administration of a peptide derived from endostatin, called E4, prevents and ameliorates fibrosis using different models of dermal and pulmonary disease. No marketed orally delivered peptide drugs are currently available for progressive pulmonary fibrosis; however oral delivery of drugs is the preferred route for treating most chronic diseases. Thus, we investigated whether oral administration of E4 peptide exerted anti-fibrotic activity in a murine pulmonary fibrosis model. Bleomycin (1.2mU/g body weight) was intratracheally administrated to male 6-8-week-old C57BL/6J mice. E4 peptide (20, 10, 5, and 1 μg/mouse) or scrambled control peptide (20 μg/mouse) was orally administered on the same day as bleomycin. In some experiments, E4 peptide (10 and 5 μg/mouse) was orally administered three times on days 0, 3, and 6 post-bleomycin treatment. Lungs were harvested on day 21 for histological analysis and hydroxyproline assay. Histological analysis and hydroxyproline assay revealed that bleomycin successfully induced pulmonary fibrosis, and that 20 μg of oral E4 peptide ameliorated the fibrosis. The lower doses of E4 peptide (10, 5, and 1 μg) were insufficient to exert anti-fibrotic activity when given as a single dose. Multiple doses of E4 peptide efficiently exerted anti-fibrotic activity even at lower doses. E4 peptide shows oral bioavailability and exerts anti-fibrotic activity in a bleomycin-induced pulmonary fibrosis model. We suggest that E4 peptide is a novel oral drug for fibroproliferative disorders. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. An endostatin-derived peptide orally exerts anti-fibrotic activity in a murine pulmonary fibrosis model

    PubMed Central

    Nishimoto, Tetsuya; Mlakar, Logan; Takihara, Takahisa; Feghali-Bostwick, Carol

    2016-01-01

    Objective Pulmonary fibrosis causes high morbidity and mortality in affected individuals. Recently, we showed that parenteral or intratracheal administration of a peptide derived from endostatin, called E4, prevents and ameliorates fibrosis using different models of dermal and pulmonary disease. No marketed orally delivered peptide drugs are currently available for progressive pulmonary fibrosis; however oral delivery of drugs is the preferred route for treating most chronic diseases. Thus, we investigated whether oral administration of E4 peptide exerted anti-fibrotic activity in a murine pulmonary fibrosis model. Methods Bleomycin (1.2mU/g body weight) was intratracheally administrated to male 6–8-week-old C57BL/6J mice. E4 peptide (20, 10, 5, and 1 μg/mouse) or scrambled control peptide (20 μg/mouse) were orally administered on the same day as bleomycin. In some experiments, E4 peptide (10 and 5 μg/mouse) was orally administered three times on days 0, 3, and 6 post-bleomycin treatment. Lungs were harvested on day 21 for histological analysis and hydroxyproline assay. Results Histological analysis and hydroxyproline assay revealed that bleomycin successfully induced pulmonary fibrosis, and that 20μg of oral E4 peptide ameliorated the fibrosis. The lower doses of E4 peptide (10, 5, and 1 μg) were insufficient to exert anti-fibrotic activity when given as a single dose. Multiple doses of E4 peptide efficiently exerted anti-fibrotic activity even at lower doses. Conclusion E4 peptide shows oral bioavailability and exerts anti-fibrotic activity in a bleomycin-induced pulmonary fibrosis model. We suggest that E4 peptide is a novel oral drug for fibroproliferative disorders. PMID:26315492

  7. Analysis of the endogenous peptide profile of milk: identification of 248 mainly casein-derived peptides.

    PubMed

    Baum, Florian; Fedorova, Maria; Ebner, Jennifer; Hoffmann, Ralf; Pischetsrieder, Monika

    2013-12-06

    Milk is an excellent source of bioactive peptides. However, the composition of the native milk peptidome has only been partially elucidated. The present study applied matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-MS) directly or after prefractionation of the milk peptides by reverse-phase high-performance liquid chromatography (RP-HPLC) or OFFGEL fractionation for the comprehensive analysis of the peptide profile of raw milk. The peptide sequences were determined by MALDI-TOF/TOF or nano-ultra-performance liquid chromatography-nanoelectrospray ionization-LTQ-Orbitrap-MS. Direct MALDI-TOF-MS analysis led to the assignment of 57 peptides. Prefractionation by both complementary methods led to the assignment of another 191 peptides. Most peptides originate from α(S1)-casein, followed by β-casein, and α(S2)-casein. κ-Casein and whey proteins seem to play only a minor role as peptide precursors. The formation of many, but not all, peptides could be explained by the activity of the endogenous peptidases, plasmin or cathepsin D, B, and G. Database searches revealed the presence of 22 peptides with established physiological function, including those with angiotensin-converting-enzyme (ACE) inhibitory, immunomodulating, or antimicrobial activity.

  8. The molecular mechanism of fullerene-inhibited aggregation of Alzheimer's β-amyloid peptide fragment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Luogang; Luo, Yin; Lin, Dongdong; Xi, Wenhui; Yang, Xinju; Wei, Guanghong

    2014-07-01

    Amyloid deposits are implicated in the pathogenesis of many neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's disease (AD). The inhibition of β-sheet formation has been considered as the primary therapeutic strategy for AD. Increasing data show that nanoparticles can retard or promote the fibrillation of amyloid-β (Aβ) peptides depending on the physicochemical properties of nanoparticles, however, the underlying molecular mechanism remains elusive. In this study, our replica exchange molecular dynamics (REMD) simulations show that fullerene nanoparticle - C60 (with a fullerene : peptide molar ratio greater than 1 : 8) can dramatically prevent β-sheet formation of Aβ(16-22) peptides. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) experiments further confirm the inhibitory effect of C60 on Aβ(16-22) fibrillation, in support of our REMD simulations. An important finding from our REMD simulations is that fullerene C180, albeit with the same number of carbon atoms as three C60 molecules (3C60) and smaller surface area than 3C60, displays an unexpected stronger inhibitory effect on the β-sheet formation of Aβ(16-22) peptides. A detailed analysis of the fullerene-peptide interaction reveals that the stronger inhibition of β-sheet formation by C180 results from the strong hydrophobic and aromatic-stacking interactions of the fullerene hexagonal rings with the Phe rings relative to the pentagonal rings. The strong interactions between the fullerene nanoparticles and Aβ(16-22) peptides significantly weaken the peptide-peptide interaction that is important for β-sheet formation, thus retarding Aβ(16-22) fibrillation. Overall, our studies reveal the significant role of fullerene hexagonal rings in the inhibition of Aβ(16-22) fibrillation and provide novel insight into the development of drug candidates against Alzheimer's disease.Amyloid deposits are implicated in the pathogenesis of many neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's disease (AD). The inhibition of

  9. Metal stabilization of collagen and de novo designed mimetic peptides

    PubMed Central

    Parmar, Avanish S.; Xu, Fei; Pike, Douglas H.; Belure, Sandeep V.; Hasan, Nida F.; Drzewiecki, Kathryn E.; Shreiber, David I.; Nanda, Vikas

    2017-01-01

    We explore the design of metal binding sites to modulate triple-helix stability of collagen and collagen-mimetic peptides. Globular proteins commonly utilize metals to connect tertiary structural elements that are well separated in sequence, constraining structure and enhancing stability. It is more challenging to engineer structural metals into fibrous protein scaffolds, which lack the extensive tertiary contacts seen in globular proteins. In the collagen triple helix, the structural adjacency of the carboxy-termini of the three chains makes this region an attractive target for introducing metal binding sites. We engineered His3 sites based on structural modeling constraints into a series of designed homotrimeric and heterotrimeric peptides, assessing the capacity of metal binding to improve stability and in the case of heterotrimers, affect specificity of assembly. Notable enhancements in stability for both homo and heteromeric systems were observed upon addition of zinc(II) and several other metal ions only when all three histidine ligands were present. Metal binding affinities were consistent with the expected Irving-Williams series for imidazole. Unlike other metals tested, copper(II) also bound to peptides lacking histidine ligands. Acetylation of the peptide N-termini prevented copper binding, indicating proline backbone amide metal-coordination at this site. Copper similarly stabilized animal extracted Type I collagen in a metal specific fashion, highlighting the potential importance of metal homeostasis within the extracellular matrix. PMID:26225466

  10. Metal Stabilization of Collagen and de Novo Designed Mimetic Peptides.

    PubMed

    Parmar, Avanish S; Xu, Fei; Pike, Douglas H; Belure, Sandeep V; Hasan, Nida F; Drzewiecki, Kathryn E; Shreiber, David I; Nanda, Vikas

    2015-08-18

    We explore the design of metal binding sites to modulate triple-helix stability of collagen and collagen-mimetic peptides. Globular proteins commonly utilize metals to connect tertiary structural elements that are well separated in sequence, constraining structure and enhancing stability. It is more challenging to engineer structural metals into fibrous protein scaffolds, which lack the extensive tertiary contacts seen in globular proteins. In the collagen triple helix, the structural adjacency of the carboxy-termini of the three chains makes this region an attractive target for introducing metal binding sites. We engineered His3 sites based on structural modeling constraints into a series of designed homotrimeric and heterotrimeric peptides, assessing the capacity of metal binding to improve stability and in the case of heterotrimers, affect specificity of assembly. Notable enhancements in stability for both homo- and heteromeric systems were observed upon addition of zinc(II) and several other metal ions only when all three histidine ligands were present. Metal binding affinities were consistent with the expected Irving-Williams series for imidazole. Unlike other metals tested, copper(II) also bound to peptides lacking histidine ligands. Acetylation of the peptide N-termini prevented copper binding, indicating proline backbone amide metal-coordination at this site. Copper similarly stabilized animal extracted Type I collagen in a metal-specific fashion, highlighting the potential importance of metal homeostasis within the extracellular matrix.

  11. Acetone-Linked Peptides: A Convergent Approach for Peptide Macrocyclization and Labeling.

    PubMed

    Assem, Naila; Ferreira, David J; Wolan, Dennis W; Dawson, Philip E

    2015-07-20

    Macrocyclization is a broadly applied approach for overcoming the intrinsically disordered nature of linear peptides. Herein, it is shown that dichloroacetone (DCA) enhances helical secondary structures when introduced between peptide nucleophiles, such as thiols, to yield an acetone-linked bridge (ACE). Aside from stabilizing helical structures, the ketone moiety embedded in the linker can be modified with diverse molecular tags by oxime ligation. Insights into the structure of the tether were obtained through co-crystallization of a constrained S-peptide in complex with RNAse S. The scope of the acetone-linked peptides was further explored through the generation of N-terminus to side chain macrocycles and a new approach for generating fused macrocycles (bicycles). Together, these studies suggest that acetone linking is generally applicable to peptide macrocycles with a specific utility in the synthesis of stabilized helices that incorporate functional tags. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. Cationic antimicrobial peptide resistance mechanisms of streptococcal pathogens.

    PubMed

    LaRock, Christopher N; Nizet, Victor

    2015-11-01

    Cationic antimicrobial peptides (CAMPs) are critical front line contributors to host defense against invasive bacterial infection. These immune factors have direct killing activity toward microbes, but many pathogens are able to resist their effects. Group A Streptococcus, group B Streptococcus and Streptococcus pneumoniae are among the most common pathogens of humans and display a variety of phenotypic adaptations to resist CAMPs. Common themes of CAMP resistance mechanisms among the pathogenic streptococci are repulsion, sequestration, export, and destruction. Each pathogen has a different array of CAMP-resistant mechanisms, with invasive disease potential reflecting the utilization of several mechanisms that may act in synergy. Here we discuss recent progress in identifying the sources of CAMP resistance in the medically important Streptococcus genus. Further study of these mechanisms can contribute to our understanding of streptococcal pathogenesis, and may provide new therapeutic targets for therapy and disease prevention. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Bacterial Resistance to Antimicrobial Peptides. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Mechanical characteristics of beta sheet-forming peptide hydrogels are dependent on peptide sequence, concentration and buffer composition

    PubMed Central

    Müller, Michael; König, Finja; Meyer, Nina; Gattlen, Jasmin; Pieles, Uwe; Peters, Kirsten; Kreikemeyer, Bernd; Mathes, Stephanie; Saxer, Sina

    2018-01-01

    Self-assembling peptide hydrogels can be modified regarding their biodegradability, their chemical and mechanical properties and their nanofibrillar structure. Thus, self-assembling peptide hydrogels might be suitable scaffolds for regenerative therapies and tissue engineering. Owing to the use of various peptide concentrations and buffer compositions, the self-assembling peptide hydrogels might be influenced regarding their mechanical characteristics. Therefore, the mechanical properties and stability of a set of self-assembling peptide hydrogels, consisting of 11 amino acids, made from four beta sheet self-assembling peptides in various peptide concentrations and buffer compositions were studied. The formed self-assembling peptide hydrogels exhibited stiffnesses ranging from 0.6 to 205 kPa. The hydrogel stiffness was mostly affected by peptide sequence followed by peptide concentration and buffer composition. All self-assembling peptide hydrogels examined provided a nanofibrillar network formation. A maximum self-assembling peptide hydrogel dissolution of 20% was observed for different buffer solutions after 7 days. The stability regarding enzymatic and bacterial digestion showed less degradation in comparison to the self-assembling peptide hydrogel dissolution rate in buffer. The tested set of self-assembling peptide hydrogels were able to form stable scaffolds and provided a broad spectrum of tissue-specific stiffnesses that are suitable for a regenerative therapy. PMID:29657766

  14. Antimicrobial peptides: a review of how peptide structure impacts antimicrobial activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soares, Jason W.; Mello, Charlene M.

    2004-03-01

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) have been discovered in insects, mammals, reptiles, and plants to protect against microbial infection. Many of these peptides have been isolated and studied exhaustively to decipher the molecular mechanisms that impart protection against infectious bacteria, fungi, and viruses. Unfortunately, the molecular mechanisms are still being debated within the scientific community but valuable clues have been obtained through structure/function relationship studies1. Biophysical studies have revealed that cecropins, isolated from insects and pigs, exhibit random structure in solution but undergo a conformational change to an amphipathic α-helix upon interaction with a membrane surface2. The lack of secondary structure in solution results in an extremely durable peptide able to survive exposure to high temperatures, organic solvents and incorporation into fibers and films without compromising antibacterial activity. Studies to better understand the antimicrobial action of cecropins and other AMPs have provided insight into the importance of peptide sequence and structure in antimicrobial activities. Therefore, enhancing our knowledge of how peptide structure imparts function may result in customized peptide sequences tailored for specific applications such as targeted cell delivery systems, novel antibiotics and food preservation additives. This review will summarize the current state of knowledge with respect to cell binding and antimicrobial activity of AMPs focusing primarily upon cecropins.

  15. Inhibition of the aggregation of lactoferrin and (-)-epigallocatechin gallate in the presence of polyphenols, oligosaccharides, and collagen peptide.

    PubMed

    Yang, Wei; Liu, Fuguo; Xu, Chenqi; Sun, Cuixia; Yuan, Fang; Gao, Yanxiang

    2015-05-27

    The aggregation of lactoferrin and (-)-epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG) was inhibited by polyphenols, oligosaccharides, and collagen peptide in this study. Polyphenols, oligosaccharides, or collagen peptide can effectively prevent the formation of lactoferrin-EGCG aggregates, respectively. The addition sequence of lactoferrin, polyphenols (oligosaccharides or collagen peptide) and EGCG can affect the turbidity and particle size of the ternary complexes in the buffer solution; however, it hardly affected the ζ-potential and fluorescence characteristics. With either positive or negative charge, polyphenols and collagen peptide disrupted the formation of lactoferrin-EGCG aggregate mainly through the mechanism of its competition with EGCG molecules which surrounded the lactoferrin molecule surface with weaker binding affinities, forming polyphenols or a collagen peptide-lactoferrin-EGCG ternary complex; for neutral oligosaccharides, the ternary complex was generated mainly through steric effects, accompanied by a change in the lactoferrin secondary structure induced by gallic acid, chlorogenic acid, and xylo-oligosaccharide. Polyphenols, oligosaccharides, or collagen peptide restraining the formation of lactoferrin-EGCG aggregate could be applied in the design of clear products in the food, pharmaceutical, and cosmetic industries.

  16. Intestinal immunomodulation. Role of regulative peptides and promising pharmacological activities.

    PubMed

    Motilva, V; Talero, E; Calvo, J R; Villegas, I; Alarcón-de-la-Lastra, C; Sánchez-Fidalgo, S

    2008-01-01

    About 50 peptides, and a similar number of peptide receptors, are known to be present in the gut and this amount is likely to rise significantly over the next few years. While there has been a massive research effort to define their functions and their anatomical distribution in the central nervous system (CNS), the understanding of their roles in the gut is far more limited. Classically, the physiological functions include the control of motility, fluids, electrolytes, and digestive enzymes secretion, or vascular and visceral pain function, and more recently, the role-played in cell proliferation and survival, and in immune-inflammatory responses. The term inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) that encompasses Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis, is clearly an inflammatory disease where several mediators such as cytokines, chemokines, prostanoids, nitric oxide or free radicals, produced by infiltrating cells, play a critical role in intestine tissue alteration. Some peptides, initially known for their neuroregulative properties, have been suggested to act as endogenous immune factors, with predominant antiinflammatory effects. Based on these actions, these molecules are proposed as potential agents for the treatment of IBD and selective peptide analogs are being developed as novel therapeutic strategies for IBD patients. Patients with IBD have an increased risk for developing colorectal cancer (CRC). Up to the present time, no known genetic basis has been identified to explain CRC predisposition in these IBD. Instead, it is assumed that chronic inflammation is what causes cancer. This is supported by the fact that colon cancer risk increases with longer duration of colitis, greater anatomic extent of colitis, the concomitant presence of other inflammatory manifestations, and the fact that certain drugs used to treat inflammation, may prevent the development of CRC. However, though different regulative peptides play a beneficial role in experimental IBD, an

  17. Expression and purification of the antimicrobial peptide GSL1 in bacteria for raising antibodies.

    PubMed

    Meiyalaghan, Sathiyamoorthy; Latimer, Julie M; Kralicek, Andrew V; Shaw, Martin L; Lewis, John G; Conner, Anthony J; Barrell, Philippa J

    2014-11-04

    The Gibberellin Stimulated-Like (GSL) or Snakin peptides from higher plants are cysteine-rich, with broad spectrum activity against a range of bacterial and fungal pathogens. To detect GSL peptides in applications such as western blot analysis and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA), specific antibodies that recognise GSL peptides are required. However, the intrinsic antimicrobial activity of these peptides is likely to prevent their expression alone in bacterial or yeast expression systems for subsequent antibody production in animal hosts. To overcome this issue we developed an Escherichia coli expression strategy based on the expression of the GSL1 peptide as a His-tagged thioredoxin fusion protein. The DNA sequence for the mature GSL1 peptide from potato (Solanum tuberosum L.) was cloned into the pET-32a expression vector to produce a construct encoding N-terminally tagged his6-thioredoxin-GSL1. The fusion protein was overexpressed in E. coli to produce soluble non-toxic protein. The GSL1 fusion protein could be easily purified by using affinity chromatography to yield ~1.3 mg of his6-thioredoxin-GSL1 per L of culture. The fusion protein was then injected into rabbits for antibody production. Western blot analysis showed that the antibodies obtained from rabbit sera specifically recognised the GSL1 peptide that had been expressed in a wheat germ cell-free expression system. We present here the first report of a GSL1 peptide expressed as a fusion protein with thioredoxin that has resulted in milligram quantities of soluble protein to be produced. We have also demonstrated that a wheat germ system can be used to successfully express small quantities of GSL1 peptide useful as positive control in western blot analysis. To our knowledge this is the first report of antibodies being produced against GSL1 peptide. The antibodies will be useful for analysis of GSL1peptides in western blot, localization by immunohistochemistry (IHC) and quantitation by ELISA.

  18. Current scenario of peptide-based drugs: the key roles of cationic antitumor and antiviral peptides

    PubMed Central

    Mulder, Kelly C. L.; Lima, Loiane A.; Miranda, Vivian J.; Dias, Simoni C.; Franco, Octávio L.

    2013-01-01

    Cationic antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) and host defense peptides (HDPs) show vast potential as peptide-based drugs. Great effort has been made in order to exploit their mechanisms of action, aiming to identify their targets as well as to enhance their activity and bioavailability. In this review, we will focus on both naturally occurring and designed antiviral and antitumor cationic peptides, including those here called promiscuous, in which multiple targets are associated with a single peptide structure. Emphasis will be given to their biochemical features, selectivity against extra targets, and molecular mechanisms. Peptides which possess antitumor activity against different cancer cell lines will be discussed, as well as peptides which inhibit virus replication, focusing on their applications for human health, animal health and agriculture, and their potential as new therapeutic drugs. Moreover, the current scenario for production and the use of nanotechnology as delivery tool for both classes of cationic peptides, as well as the perspectives on improving them is considered. PMID:24198814

  19. Biomedical Applications of Organometal-Peptide Conjugates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Metzler-Nolte, Nils

    Peptides are well suited as targeting vectors for the directed delivery of metal-based drugs or probes for biomedical investigations. This chapter describes synthetic strategies for the preparation of conjugates of medically interesting peptides with covalently bound metal complexes. Peptides that were used include neuropeptides (enkephalin, neuropeptide Y, neurotensin), uptake peptides (TAT and poly-Arg), and intracellular localization sequences. To these peptides, a whole variety of transition metal complexes has been attached in recent years by solid-phase peptide synthesis (SPPS) techniques. The metal complex can be attached to the peptide on the resin as part of the SPPS scheme. Alternatively, the metal complex may be attached to the peptide as a postsynthetic modification. Advantages as well as disadvantages for either strategy are discussed. Biomedical applications include radiopharmaceutical applications, anticancer and antibacterial activity, metal-peptide conjugates as targeted CO-releasing molecules, and metal-peptide conjugates in biosensor applications.

  20. Antimicrobial peptide coatings for hydroxyapatite: electrostatic and covalent attachment of antimicrobial peptides to surfaces.

    PubMed

    Townsend, Leigh; Williams, Richard L; Anuforom, Olachi; Berwick, Matthew R; Halstead, Fenella; Hughes, Erik; Stamboulis, Artemis; Oppenheim, Beryl; Gough, Julie; Grover, Liam; Scott, Robert A H; Webber, Mark; Peacock, Anna F A; Belli, Antonio; Logan, Ann; de Cogan, Felicity

    2017-01-01

    The interface between implanted devices and their host tissue is complex and is often optimized for maximal integration and cell adhesion. However, this also gives a surface suitable for bacterial colonization. We have developed a novel method of modifying the surface at the material-tissue interface with an antimicrobial peptide (AMP) coating to allow cell attachment while inhibiting bacterial colonization. The technology reported here is a dual AMP coating. The dual coating consists of AMPs covalently bonded to the hydroxyapatite surface, followed by deposition of electrostatically bound AMPs. The dual approach gives an efficacious coating which is stable for over 12 months and can prevent colonization of the surface by both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. © 2017 The Author(s).

  1. CART PEPTIDE IN THE NUCLEUS ACCUMBENS REGULATES PSYCHOSTIMULANTS: CORRELATIONS BETWEEN PSYCHOSTIMULANT AND CART PEPTIDE EFFECTS

    PubMed Central

    JOB, MARTIN O.; KUHAR, MICHAEL J.

    2017-01-01

    In this study, we reexamined the effect of CART peptide on psychostimulant (PS)-induced locomotor activity (LMA) in individual rats. The Methods utilized were as previously published. The PS-induced LMA was defined as the distance traveled after PS administration (intraperitoneal), and the CART peptide effect was defined as the change in the PS-induced activity after bilateral intra-NAc administration of CART peptide. The experiments included both male and female Sprague-Dawley rats, and varying the CART peptide dose and the PS dose. While the average effect of CART peptide was to inhibit PS-induced LMA, the effect of CART peptide on individual PS treated animals was not always inhibitory and sometimes even produced an increase or no change in PS-induced LMA. Upon further analysis, we observed a linear correlation, reported for the first time, between the magnitude of PS-induced LMA and the CART peptide effect. Because CART peptide inhibits PS-induced LMA when it is large, and increases PS-induced LMA when it is small, the peptide can be considered a homeostatic regulator of dopamine (DA)-induced LMA, which supports our earlier homeostatic hypothesis. PMID:28215744

  2. Purification of angiotensin I-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitory peptides from casein hydrolysate by IMAC-Ni2.

    PubMed

    Wu, Shanguang; Feng, Xuezhen; Lu, Yuan; Lu, Yuting; Liu, Saisai; Tian, Yuhong

    2017-10-01

    Casein proteins were hydrolyzed by papain to identify inhibitory peptides of angiotensin I-converting enzyme (ACE). The hydrolysate was fractionized by immobilized metal affinity chromatography (IMAC-Ni 2+ ). The fraction with high ACE inhibitory activity was enriched and further chromatographed on a reverse-phase column to yield four fractions. Among the fractions, the L4 fraction exhibited the highest ACE inhibitory activity and was identified by sequence analysis as Trp-Tyr-Leu-His-Tyr-Ala (WYLHYA), with IC 50 value of 16.22 ± 0.83 µM in vitro. This peptide was expected to be applied as an ingredient for preventing hypertension and IMAC-Ni 2+ may provide a simple method for purification of ACE inhibitory peptides.

  3. Designed Coiled-Coil Peptides Inhibit the Type Three Secretion System of Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Larzábal, Mariano; Mercado, Elsa C.; Vilte, Daniel A.; Salazar-González, Hector; Cataldi, Angel; Navarro-Garcia, Fernando

    2010-01-01

    Background Enteropathogenic E. coli (EPEC) and enterohemorrhagic E. coli (EHEC) are two categories of E. coli strains associated with human disease. A major virulence factor of both pathotypes is the expression of a type three secretion system (TTSS), responsible for their ability to adhere to gut mucosa causing a characteristic attaching and effacing lesion (A/E). The TTSS translocates effector proteins directly into the host cell that subvert mammalian cell biochemistry. Methods/Principal Findings We examined synthetic peptides designed to inhibit the TTSS. CoilA and CoilB peptides, both representing coiled-coil regions of the translocator protein EspA, and CoilD peptide, corresponding to a coiled–coil region of the needle protein EscF, were effective in inhibiting the TTSS dependent hemolysis of red blood cells by the EPEC E2348/69 strain. CoilA and CoilB peptides also reduced the formation of actin pedestals by the same strain in HEp-2 cells and impaired the TTSS-mediated protein translocation into the epithelial cell. Interestingly, CoilA and CoilB were able to block EspA assembly, destabilizing the TTSS and thereby Tir translocation. This blockage of EspA polymerization by CoilA or CoilB peptides, also inhibited the correct delivery of EspB and EspD as detected by immunoblotting. Interestingly, electron microscopy of bacteria incubated with the CoilA peptide showed a reduction of the length of EspA filaments. Conclusions Our data indicate that coiled-coil peptides can prevent the assembly and thus the functionality of the TTSS apparatus and suggest that these peptides could provide an attractive tool to block EPEC and EHEC pathogenesis. PMID:20140230

  4. The PeptideAtlas Project.

    PubMed

    Deutsch, Eric W

    2010-01-01

    PeptideAtlas is a multi-species compendium of peptides observed with tandem mass spectrometry methods. Raw mass spectrometer output files are collected from the community and reprocessed through a uniform analysis and validation pipeline that continues to advance. The results are loaded into a database and the information derived from the raw data is returned to the community via several web-based data exploration tools. The PeptideAtlas resource is useful for experiment planning, improving genome annotation, and other data mining projects. PeptideAtlas has become especially useful for planning targeted proteomics experiments.

  5. Virtual screening of a milk peptide database for the identification of food-derived antimicrobial peptides.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yufang; Eichler, Jutta; Pischetsrieder, Monika

    2015-11-01

    Milk provides a wide range of bioactive substances, such as antimicrobial peptides and proteins. Our study aimed to identify novel antimicrobial peptides naturally present in milk. The components of an endogenous bovine milk peptide database were virtually screened for charge, amphipathy, and predicted secondary structure. Thus, 23 of 248 screened peptides were identified as candidates for antimicrobial effects. After commercial synthesis, their antimicrobial activities were determined against Escherichia coli NEB5α, E. coli ATCC25922, and Bacillus subtilis ATCC6051. In the tested concentration range (<2 mM), bacteriostatic activity of 14 peptides was detected including nine peptides inhibiting both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. The most effective fragment was TKLTEEEKNRLNFLKKISQRYQKFΑLPQYLK corresponding to αS2 -casein151-181 , with minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of 4.0 μM against B. subtilis ATCC6051, and minimum inhibitory concentrations of 16.2 μM against both E. coli strains. Circular dichroism spectroscopy revealed conformational changes of most active peptides in a membrane-mimic environment, transitioning from an unordered to α-helical structure. Screening of food peptide databases by prediction tools is an efficient method to identify novel antimicrobial food-derived peptides. Milk-derived antimicrobial peptides may have potential use as functional food ingredients and help to understand the molecular mechanisms of anti-infective milk effects. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  6. An immunoproteomic approach revealing peptides from Sporothrix brasiliensis that induce a cellular immune response in subcutaneous sporotrichosis.

    PubMed

    de Almeida, José Roberto Fogaça; Jannuzzi, Grasielle Pereira; Kaihami, Gilberto Hideo; Breda, Leandro Carvalho Dantas; Ferreira, Karen Spadari; de Almeida, Sandro Rogério

    2018-03-08

    Sporothrix brasiliensis is the most virulent fungus of the Sporothrix complex and is the main species recovered in the sporotrichosis zoonotic hyperendemic area in Rio de Janeiro. A vaccine against S. brasiliensis could improve the current sporotrichosis situation. Here, we show 3 peptides from S. brasiliensis immunogenic proteins that have a higher likelihood for engaging MHC-class II molecules. We investigated the efficiency of the peptides as vaccines for preventing subcutaneous sporotrichosis. In this study, we observed a decrease in lesion diameters in peptide-immunized mice, showing that the peptides could induce a protective immune response against subcutaneous sporotrichosis. ZR8 peptide is from the GP70 protein, the main antigen of the Sporothrix complex, and was the best potential vaccine candidate by increasing CD4 + T cells and higher levels of IFN-γ, IL-17A and IL-1β characterizing a strong cellular immune response. This immune environment induced a higher number of neutrophils in lesions that are associated with fungus clearance. These results indicated that the ZR8 peptide induces a protective immune response against subcutaneous sporotrichosis and is a vaccine candidate against S. brasiliensis infection.

  7. PH dependent adhesive peptides

    DOEpatents

    Tomich, John; Iwamoto, Takeo; Shen, Xinchun; Sun, Xiuzhi Susan

    2010-06-29

    A novel peptide adhesive motif is described that requires no receptor or cross-links to achieve maximal adhesive strength. Several peptides with different degrees of adhesive strength have been designed and synthesized using solid phase chemistries. All peptides contain a common hydrophobic core sequence flanked by positively or negatively charged amino acids sequences.

  8. Selective detection of target proteins by peptide-enabled graphene biosensor.

    PubMed

    Khatayevich, Dmitriy; Page, Tamon; Gresswell, Carolyn; Hayamizu, Yuhei; Grady, William; Sarikaya, Mehmet

    2014-04-24

    Direct molecular detection of biomarkers is a promising approach for diagnosis and monitoring of numerous diseases, as well as a cornerstone of modern molecular medicine and drug discovery. Currently, clinical applications of biomarkers are limited by the sensitivity, complexity and low selectivity of available indirect detection methods. Electronic 1D and 2D nano-materials such as carbon nanotubes and graphene, respectively, offer unique advantages as sensing substrates for simple, fast and ultrasensitive detection of biomolecular binding. Versatile methods, however, have yet to be developed for simultaneous functionalization and passivation of the sensor surface to allow for enhanced detection and selectivity of the device. Herein, we demonstrate selective detection of a model protein against a background of serum protein using a graphene sensor functionalized via self-assembling multifunctional short peptides. The two peptides are engineered to bind to graphene and undergo co-assembly in the form of an ordered monomolecular film on the substrate. While the probe peptide displays the bioactive molecule, the passivating peptide prevents non-specific protein adsorption onto the device surface, ensuring target selectivity. In particular, we demonstrate a graphene field effect transistor (gFET) biosensor which can detect streptavidin against a background of serum bovine albumin at less than 50 ng/ml. Our nano-sensor design, allows us to restore the graphene surface and utilize each sensor in multiple experiments. The peptide-enabled gFET device has great potential to address a variety of bio-sensing problems, such as studying ligand-receptor interactions, or detection of biomarkers in a clinical setting. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. A Bioinformatics Workflow for Variant Peptide Detection in Shotgun Proteomics*

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jing; Su, Zengliu; Ma, Ze-Qiang; Slebos, Robbert J. C.; Halvey, Patrick; Tabb, David L.; Liebler, Daniel C.; Pao, William; Zhang, Bing

    2011-01-01

    Shotgun proteomics data analysis usually relies on database search. However, commonly used protein sequence databases do not contain information on protein variants and thus prevent variant peptides and proteins from been identified. Including known coding variations into protein sequence databases could help alleviate this problem. Based on our recently published human Cancer Proteome Variation Database, we have created a protein sequence database that comprehensively annotates thousands of cancer-related coding variants collected in the Cancer Proteome Variation Database as well as noncancer-specific ones from the Single Nucleotide Polymorphism Database (dbSNP). Using this database, we then developed a data analysis workflow for variant peptide identification in shotgun proteomics. The high risk of false positive variant identifications was addressed by a modified false discovery rate estimation method. Analysis of colorectal cancer cell lines SW480, RKO, and HCT-116 revealed a total of 81 peptides that contain either noncancer-specific or cancer-related variations. Twenty-three out of 26 variants randomly selected from the 81 were confirmed by genomic sequencing. We further applied the workflow on data sets from three individual colorectal tumor specimens. A total of 204 distinct variant peptides were detected, and five carried known cancer-related mutations. Each individual showed a specific pattern of cancer-related mutations, suggesting potential use of this type of information for personalized medicine. Compatibility of the workflow has been tested with four popular database search engines including Sequest, Mascot, X!Tandem, and MyriMatch. In summary, we have developed a workflow that effectively uses existing genomic data to enable variant peptide detection in proteomics. PMID:21389108

  10. Isoflavone-deprived soy peptide suppresses mammary tumorigenesis by inducing apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Park, Kyoungsook; Choi, Kyusam; Kim, Hyemee; Kim, Kwangbae; Lee, Mi Hee; Kim Rim, Jean Chinock

    2009-01-01

    During carcinogenesis, NF-κB mediates processes associated with deregulation of the normal control of proliferation, angiogenesis, and metastasis. Thus, suppression of NF-κB has been linked with chemoprevention of cancer. Accumulating findings reveal that heat shock protein 90 (HSP90) is a molecular chaperone and a component of the IκB kinase (IKK) complex that plays a central role in NF-κB activation. HSP90 also stabilizes key proteins involved in cell cycle control and apoptosis signaling. We have determined whether the exogenous administration of isoflavone-deprived soy peptide prevents 7,12-dimethylbenz[α]anthracene (DMBA)-induced rat mammary tumorigenesis and investigated the mechanism of action. Dietary administration of soy peptide (3.3 g/rat/day) significantly reduced the incidence of ductal carcinomas (50%), the number of tumors per multiple tumor-bearing rats (49%; P < 0.05), and extended the latency period of tumor development (8.07 ± 0.92 weeks) compared to control diet animals (10.80 ± 1.30; P < 0.05). Our results have further demonstrated that soy peptide (1) dramatically inhibits the expression of HSP90, thereby suppressing signaling pathway leading to NF-κB activation; (2) induces expression of p21, p53, and caspase-3 proteins; and (3) inhibits expression of VEGF. In agreement with our in vivo data, soy peptide treatment inhibited the growth of human breast MCF-7 tumor cells in a dose-dependent manner and induced apoptosis. Taken together, our in vivo and in vitro results suggest chemopreventive and tumor suppressive functions of isoflavone-deprived soy peptide by inducing growth arrest and apoptosis. PMID:19322027

  11. Spectroscopic investigation of Ginkgo biloba terpene trilactones and their interaction with amyloid peptide Aβ(25-35)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Jiangtao; Petrovic, Ana G.; Dzyuba, Sergei V.; Berova, Nina; Nakanishi, Koji; Polavarapu, Prasad L.

    2008-04-01

    The beneficial effects of Ginkgo biloba extract in the "treatment" of dementia are attributed to its terpene trilactone (TTL) constituents. The interactions between TTLs and amyloid peptide are believed to be responsible in preventing the aggregation of peptide. These interactions have been investigated using infrared vibrational absorption (VA) and circular dichroism (VCD) spectra. Four TTLs, namely ginkgolide A (GA), ginkgolide B (GB), ginkgolide C (GC) and bilobalide (BB) and amyloid Aβ(25-35) peptide, as a model for the full length peptide, are used in this study. GA-monoether and GA-diether have also been synthesized and investigated to help understand the role of individual carbonyl groups in these interactions. The precipitation and solubility issues encountered with the mixture of ginkgolide + Aβ peptide for VA and VCD studies were overcome using binary ethanol-D 2O solvent mixture. The experimental VA and VCD spectra of GA, GB, GC and BB, GA-monoether and GA-diether have been analyzed using the corresponding spectra predicted with density functional theory. The time-dependent experimental VA and VCD spectra of Aβ(25-35) peptide and the corresponding experimental spectra in the presence of TTLs indicated that the effect of the TTLs in modulating the aggregation of Aβ(25-35) peptide is relatively small. Such small effects might indicate the absence of a specific interaction between the TTLs and Aβ(25-35) peptide as a major force leading to the reduced aggregation of amyloid peptides. It is possible that the therapeutic effect of G. biloba extract does not originate from direct interactions between TTLs and the Aβ(25-35) peptide and is more complex.

  12. Virtual screening using combinatorial cyclic peptide libraries reveals protein interfaces readily targetable by cyclic peptides.

    PubMed

    Duffy, Fergal J; O'Donovan, Darragh; Devocelle, Marc; Moran, Niamh; O'Connell, David J; Shields, Denis C

    2015-03-23

    Protein-protein and protein-peptide interactions are responsible for the vast majority of biological functions in vivo, but targeting these interactions with small molecules has historically been difficult. What is required are efficient combined computational and experimental screening methods to choose among a number of potential protein interfaces worthy of targeting lead macrocyclic compounds for further investigation. To achieve this, we have generated combinatorial 3D virtual libraries of short disulfide-bonded peptides and compared them to pharmacophore models of important protein-protein and protein-peptide structures, including short linear motifs (SLiMs), protein-binding peptides, and turn structures at protein-protein interfaces, built from 3D models available in the Protein Data Bank. We prepared a total of 372 reference pharmacophores, which were matched against 108,659 multiconformer cyclic peptides. After normalization to exclude nonspecific cyclic peptides, the top hits notably are enriched for mimetics of turn structures, including a turn at the interaction surface of human α thrombin, and also feature several protein-binding peptides. The top cyclic peptide hits also cover the critical "hot spot" interaction sites predicted from the interaction crystal structure. We have validated our method by testing cyclic peptides predicted to inhibit thrombin, a key protein in the blood coagulation pathway of important therapeutic interest, identifying a cyclic peptide inhibitor with lead-like activity. We conclude that protein interfaces most readily targetable by cyclic peptides and related macrocyclic drugs may be identified computationally among a set of candidate interfaces, accelerating the choice of interfaces against which lead compounds may be screened.

  13. Exploration of the Medicinal Peptide Space.

    PubMed

    Gevaert, Bert; Stalmans, Sofie; Wynendaele, Evelien; Taevernier, Lien; Bracke, Nathalie; D'Hondt, Matthias; De Spiegeleer, Bart

    2016-01-01

    The chemical properties of peptide medicines, known as the 'medicinal peptide space' is considered a multi-dimensional subset of the global peptide space, where each dimension represents a chemical descriptor. These descriptors can be linked to biofunctional, medicinal properties to varying degrees. Knowledge of this space can increase the efficiency of the peptide-drug discovery and development process, as well as advance our understanding and classification of peptide medicines. For 245 peptide drugs, already available on the market or in clinical development, multivariate dataexploration was performed using peptide relevant physicochemical descriptors, their specific peptidedrug target and their clinical use. Our retrospective analysis indicates that clusters in the medicinal peptide space are located in a relatively narrow range of the physicochemical space: dense and empty regions were found, which can be explored for the discovery of novel peptide drugs.

  14. Peptide Signaling in Plant Development

    PubMed Central

    Katsir, Leron; Davies, Kelli A.; Bergmann, Dominique C.; Laux, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    Cell-to-cell communication is integral to the evolution of multicellularity. In plant development, peptide signals relay information coordinating cell proliferation and differentiation. These peptides are often encoded by gene families and bind to corresponding families of receptors. The precise spatiotemporal expression of signals and their cognate receptors underlies developmental patterning, and expressional and biochemical changes over evolutionary time have likely contributed to the refinement and complexity of developmental programs. Here, we discuss two major plant peptide families which have central roles in plant development: the CLAVATA3/ENDOSPERM SURROUNDING REGION (CLE) peptide family and the EPIDERMAL PATTERNING FACTOR (EPF) family. We discuss how specialization has enabled the CLE peptides to modulate stem cell differentiation in various tissue types, and how differing activities of EPF peptides precisely regulate the stomatal developmental program, and we examine the contributions of these peptide families to plant development from an evolutionary perspective. PMID:21549958

  15. Key comparison study on peptide purity—synthetic human C-peptide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Josephs, R. D.; Li, M.; Song, D.; Westwood, S.; Stoppacher, N.; Daireaux, A.; Choteau, T.; Wielgosz, R.; Xiao, P.; Liu, Y.; Gao, X.; Zhang, C.; Zhang, T.; Mi, W.; Quan, C.; Huang, T.; Li, H.; Flatschart, R.; Borges Oliveira, R.; Melanson, J. E.; Ohlendorf, R.; Henrion, A.; Kinumi, T.; Wong, L.; Liu, Q.; Oztug Senal, M.; Vatansever, B.; Ün, I.; Gören, A. C.; Akgöz, M.; Quaglia, M.; Warren, J.

    2017-01-01

    Under the auspices of the Protein Analysis Working Group (PAWG) of the Comité Consultatif pour la Quantité de Matière (CCQM) a key comparison, CCQM-K115, was coordinated by the Bureau International des Poids et Mesures (BIPM) and the Chinese National Institute of Metrology (NIM). Eight Metrology Institutes or Designated Institutes and the BIPM participated. Participants were required to assign the mass fraction of human C-peptide (hCP) present as the main component in the comparison sample for CCQM-K115. The comparison samples were prepared from synthetic human hCP purchased from a commercial supplier and used as provided without further treatment or purification. hCP was selected to be representative of the performance of a laboratory's measurement capability for the purity assignment of short (up to 5 kDa), non-cross-linked synthetic peptides/proteins. It was anticipated to provide an analytical measurement challenge representative for the value-assignment of compounds of broadly similar structural characteristics. The majority of participants used a peptide impurity corrected amino acid analysis (PICAA) approach as the amount of material that has been provided to each participant (25 mg) is insufficient to perform a full mass balance based characterization of the material by a participating laboratory. The coordinators, both the BIPM and the NIM, were the laboratories to use the mass balance approach as they had more material available. It was decided to propose KCRVs for both the hCP mass fraction and the mass fraction of the peptide related impurities as indispensable contributor regardless of the use of PICAA, mass balance or any other approach to determine the hCP purity. This allowed participants to demonstrate the efficacy of their implementation of the approaches used to determine the hCP mass fraction. In particular it allows participants to demonstrate the efficacy of their implementation of peptide related impurity identification and quantification

  16. Anti-cancer vaccination by transdermal delivery of antigen peptide-loaded nanogels via iontophoresis.

    PubMed

    Toyoda, Mao; Hama, Susumu; Ikeda, Yutaka; Nagasaki, Yukio; Kogure, Kentaro

    2015-04-10

    Transdermal vaccination with cancer antigens is expected to become a useful anti-cancer therapy. However, it is difficult to accumulate enough antigen in the epidermis for effective exposure to Langerhans cells because of diffusion into the skin and muscle. Carriers, such as liposomes and nanoparticles, may be useful for the prevention of antigen diffusion. Iontophoresis, via application of a small electric current, is a noninvasive and efficient technology for transdermal drug delivery. Previously, we succeeded in the iontophoretic transdermal delivery of liposomes encapsulating insulin, and accumulation of polymer-based nanoparticle nanogels in the stratum corneum of the skin. Therefore, in the present study, we examined the use of iontophoresis with cancer antigen gp-100 peptide KVPRNQDWL-loaded nanogels for anti-cancer vaccination. Iontophoresis resulted in the accumulation of gp-100 peptide and nanogels in the epidermis, and subsequent increase in the number of Langerhans cells in the epidermis. Moreover, tumor growth was significantly suppressed by iontophoresis of the antigen peptide-loaded nanogels. Thus, iontophoresis of the antigen peptide-loaded nanogels may serve as an effective transdermal delivery system for anti-cancer vaccination. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Antifungal activity of a β-peptide in synthetic urine media: Toward materials-based approaches to reducing catheter-associated urinary tract fungal infections.

    PubMed

    Raman, Namrata; Lee, Myung-Ryul; Rodríguez López, Angélica de L; Palecek, Sean P; Lynn, David M

    2016-10-01

    Catheter-associated urinary tract infections (CAUTI) are the most common type of hospital-acquired infection, with more than 30 million catheters placed annually in the US and a 10-30% incidence of infection. Candida albicans forms fungal biofilms on the surfaces of urinary catheters and is the leading cause of fungal urinary tract infections. As a step toward new strategies that could prevent or reduce the occurrence of C. albicans-based CAUTI, we investigated the ability of antifungal β-peptide-based mimetics of antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) to kill C. albicans and prevent biofilm formation in synthetic urine. Many α-peptide-based AMPs exhibit antifungal activities, but are unstable in high ionic strength media and are easily degraded by proteases-features that limit their use in urinary catheter applications. Here, we demonstrate that β-peptides designed to mimic the amphiphilic helical structures of AMPs retain 100% of their structural stability and exhibit antifungal and anti-biofilm activity against C. albicans in a synthetic medium that mimics the composition of urine. We demonstrate further that these agents can be loaded into and released from polymer-based multilayer coatings applied to polyurethane, polyethylene, and silicone tubing commonly used as urinary catheters. Our results reveal catheters coated with β-peptide-loaded multilayers to kill planktonic fungal cells for up to 21days of intermittent challenges with C. albicans and prevent biofilm formation on catheter walls for at least 48h. These new materials and approaches could lead to advances that reduce the occurrence of fungal CAUTI. Catheter-associated urinary tract infections are the most common type of hospital-acquired infection. The human pathogen Candida albicans is the leading cause of fungal urinary tract infections, and forms difficult to remove 'biofilms' on the surfaces of urinary catheters. We investigated synthetic β-peptide mimics of natural antimicrobial peptides as an

  18. PeptidePicker: a scientific workflow with web interface for selecting appropriate peptides for targeted proteomics experiments.

    PubMed

    Mohammed, Yassene; Domański, Dominik; Jackson, Angela M; Smith, Derek S; Deelder, André M; Palmblad, Magnus; Borchers, Christoph H

    2014-06-25

    One challenge in Multiple Reaction Monitoring (MRM)-based proteomics is to select the most appropriate surrogate peptides to represent a target protein. We present here a software package to automatically generate these most appropriate surrogate peptides for an LC/MRM-MS analysis. Our method integrates information about the proteins, their tryptic peptides, and the suitability of these peptides for MRM which is available online in UniProtKB, NCBI's dbSNP, ExPASy, PeptideAtlas, PRIDE, and GPMDB. The scoring algorithm reflects our knowledge in choosing the best candidate peptides for MRM, based on the uniqueness of the peptide in the targeted proteome, its physiochemical properties, and whether it previously has been observed. The modularity of the workflow allows further extension and additional selection criteria to be incorporated. We have developed a simple Web interface where the researcher provides the protein accession number, the subject organism, and peptide-specific options. Currently, the software is designed for human and mouse proteomes, but additional species can be easily be added. Our software improved the peptide selection by eliminating human error, considering multiple data sources and all of the isoforms of the protein, and resulted in faster peptide selection - approximately 50 proteins per hour compared to 8 per day. Compiling a list of optimal surrogate peptides for target proteins to be analyzed by LC/MRM-MS has been a cumbersome process, in which expert researchers retrieved information from different online repositories and used their own reasoning to find the most appropriate peptides. Our scientific workflow automates this process by integrating information from different data sources including UniProt, Global Proteome Machine, NCBI's dbSNP, and PeptideAtlas, simulating the researchers' reasoning, and incorporating their knowledge of how to select the best proteotypic peptides for an MRM analysis. The developed software can help to

  19. Expression of the cationic antimicrobial peptide lactoferricin fused with the anionic peptide in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ha-Kun; Chun, Dae-Sik; Kim, Joon-Sik; Yun, Cheol-Ho; Lee, Ju-Hoon; Hong, Soon-Kwang; Kang, Dae-Kyung

    2006-09-01

    Direct expression of lactoferricin, an antimicrobial peptide, is lethal to Escherichia coli. For the efficient production of lactoferricin in E. coli, we developed an expression system in which the gene for the lysine- and arginine-rich cationic lactoferricin was fused to an anionic peptide gene to neutralize the basic property of lactoferricin, and successfully overexpressed the concatemeric fusion gene in E. coli. The lactoferricin gene was linked to a modified magainin intervening sequence gene by a recombinational polymerase chain reaction, thus producing an acidic peptide-lactoferricin fusion gene. The monomeric acidic peptide-lactoferricin fusion gene was multimerized and expressed in E. coli BL21(DE3) upon induction with isopropyl-beta-D-thiogalactopyranoside. The expression levels of the fusion peptide reached the maximum at the tetramer, while further increases in the copy number of the fusion gene substantially reduced the peptide expression level. The fusion peptides were isolated and cleaved to generate the separate lactoferricin and acidic peptide. About 60 mg of pure recombinant lactoferricin was obtained from 1 L of E. coli culture. The purified recombinant lactoferricin was found to have a molecular weight similar to that of chemically synthesized lactoferricin. The recombinant lactoferricin showed antimicrobial activity and disrupted bacterial membrane permeability, as the native lactoferricin peptide does.

  20. Synthesis of peptide .alpha.-thioesters

    DOEpatents

    Camarero, Julio A [Livermore, CA; Mitchell, Alexander R [Livermore, CA; De Yoreo, James J [Clayton, CA

    2008-08-19

    Disclosed herein is a new method for the solid phase peptide synthesis (SPPS) of C-terminal peptide .alpha. thioesters using Fmoc/t-Bu chemistry. This method is based on the use of an aryl hydrazine linker, which is totally stable to conditions required for Fmoc-SPPS. When the peptide synthesis has been completed, activation of the linker is achieved by mild oxidation. The oxidation step converts the acyl-hydrazine group into a highly reactive acyl-diazene intermediate which reacts with an .alpha.-amino acid alkylthioester (H-AA-SR) to yield the corresponding peptide .alpha.-thioester in good yield. A variety of peptide thioesters, cyclic peptides and a fully functional Src homology 3 (SH3) protein domain have been successfully prepared.

  1. Inhibition of Dengue Virus Entry into Target Cells Using Synthetic Antiviral Peptides

    PubMed Central

    Alhoot, Mohammed Abdelfatah; Rathinam, Alwin Kumar; Wang, Seok Mui; Manikam, Rishya; Sekaran, Shamala Devi

    2013-01-01

    Despite the importance of DENV as a human pathogen, there is no specific treatment or protective vaccine. Successful entry into the host cells is necessary for establishing the infection. Recently, the virus entry step has become an attractive therapeutic strategy because it represents a barrier to suppress the onset of the infection. Four putative antiviral peptides were designed to target domain III of DENV-2 E protein using BioMoDroid algorithm. Two peptides showed significant inhibition of DENV when simultaneously incubated as shown by plaque formation assay, RT-qPCR, and Western blot analysis. Both DET4 and DET2 showed significant inhibition of virus entry (84.6% and 40.6% respectively) using micromolar concentrations. Furthermore, the TEM images showed that the inhibitory peptides caused structural abnormalities and alteration of the arrangement of the viral E protein, which interferes with virus binding and entry. Inhibition of DENV entry during the initial stages of infection can potentially reduce the viremia in infected humans resulting in prevention of the progression of dengue fever to the severe life-threatening infection, reduce the infected vector numbers, and thus break the transmission cycle. Moreover these peptides though designed against the conserved region in DENV-2 would have the potential to be active against all the serotypes of dengue and might be considered as Hits to begin designing and developing of more potent analogous peptides that could constitute as promising therapeutic agents for attenuating dengue infection. PMID:23630436

  2. Peptides in melanoma therapy.

    PubMed

    Mocellin, Simone

    2012-01-01

    Peptides derived from tumor associated antigens can be utilized to elicit a therapeutically effective immune response against melanoma in experimental models. However, patient vaccination with peptides - although it is often followed by the induction of melanoma- specific T lymphocytes - is rarely associated with tumor response of clinical relevance. In this review I summarize the principles of peptide design as well as the results so far obtained in the clinical setting while treating cutaneous melanoma by means of this active immunotherapy strategy. I also discuss some immunological and methodological issues that might be helpful for the successful development of peptide-based vaccines.

  3. The good taste of peptides.

    PubMed

    Temussi, Piero A

    2012-02-01

    The taste of peptides is seldom one of the most relevant issues when one considers the many important biological functions of this class of molecules. However, peptides generally do have a taste, covering essentially the entire range of established taste modalities: sweet, bitter, umami, sour and salty. The last two modalities cannot be attributed to peptides as such because they are due to the presence of charged terminals and/or charged side chains, thus reflecting only the zwitterionic nature of these compounds and/or the nature of some side chains but not the electronic and/or conformational features of a specific peptide. The other three tastes, that is, sweet, umami and bitter, are represented by different families of peptides. This review describes the main peptides with a sweet, umami or bitter taste and their relationship with food acceptance or rejection. Particular emphasis will be given to the sweet taste modality, owing to the practical and scientific relevance of aspartame, the well-known sweetener, and to the theoretical importance of sweet proteins, the most potent peptide sweet molecules. Copyright © 2011 European Peptide Society and John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  4. Identification and characterization of a salivary-pellicle-binding peptide by phage display.

    PubMed

    Cukkemane, Nivedita; Bikker, Floris J; Nazmi, Kamran; Brand, Henk S; Veerman, Enno C I

    2014-05-01

    Dental biofilms are associated with oral diseases, making their control necessary. One way to control them is to prevent initial bacterial adherence to the salivary pellicle and thereby eventually decrease binding of late colonizing potential pathogens. The goal of this study was to generate a salivary-pellicle-binding peptide (SPBP) with antifouling activity towards primary colonizing bacteria. In order to achieve this goal we aimed to: (i) identify novel SPBPs by phage display; (ii) characterize the binding and antifouling properties of the selected SPBPs. A library of 2×10(9) phages displaying a random sequence of 12-mer peptides was used to identify peptides that bound selectively to the in vitro salivary pellicle. Three rounds of panning resulted in the selection of 10 pellicle-binding phages, each displaying a novel peptide sequence. The peptides were synthesized and their binding to the in vitro salivary pellicle was characterized in the presence and absence of calcium ions and Tween-20. The antifouling property of hydroxyapatite (HA) and saliva-coated HA discs treated with and without SPBPs were evaluated against Streptococcus gordonii. Ten unique SPBPs were identified using the phage display. One of these peptides, SPBP 10 (NSAAVRAYSPPS), exhibited significant binding to the in vitro salivary pellicle which was neither influenced by calcium ions, nor affected by up to 0.5% Tween-20. Its antifouling property against S. gordonii was significantly higher on the treated surfaces than on untreated surfaces. Use of the phage display library enabled us to find a specific SPBP with antifouling property towards S. gordonii. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Identification of tissue-specific targeting peptide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Eunkyoung; Lee, Nam Kyung; Kang, Sang-Kee; Choi, Seung-Hoon; Kim, Daejin; Park, Kisoo; Choi, Kihang; Choi, Yun-Jaie; Jung, Dong Hyun

    2012-11-01

    Using phage display technique, we identified tissue-targeting peptide sets that recognize specific tissues (bone-marrow dendritic cell, kidney, liver, lung, spleen and visceral adipose tissue). In order to rapidly evaluate tissue-specific targeting peptides, we performed machine learning studies for predicting the tissue-specific targeting activity of peptides on the basis of peptide sequence information using four machine learning models and isolated the groups of peptides capable of mediating selective targeting to specific tissues. As a representative liver-specific targeting sequence, the peptide "DKNLQLH" was selected by the sequence similarity analysis. This peptide has a high degree of homology with protein ligands which can interact with corresponding membrane counterparts. We anticipate that our models will be applicable to the prediction of tissue-specific targeting peptides which can recognize the endothelial markers of target tissues.

  6. Contribution of Peptide Backbone to Anti-Citrullinated Peptide Antibody Reactivity

    PubMed Central

    Trier, Nicole Hartwig; Dam, Catharina Essendrup; Olsen, Dorthe Tange; Hansen, Paul Robert; Houen, Gunnar

    2015-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is one of the most common autoimmune diseases, affecting approximately 1–2% of the world population. One of the characteristic features of RA is the presence of autoantibodies. Especially the highly specific anti-citrullinated peptide antibodies (ACPAs), which have been found in up to 70% of RA patients’ sera, have received much attention. Several citrullinated proteins are associated with RA, suggesting that ACPAs may react with different sequence patterns, separating them from traditional antibodies, whose reactivity usually is specific towards a single target. As ACPAs have been suggested to be involved in the development of RA, knowledge about these antibodies may be crucial. In this study, we examined the influence of peptide backbone for ACPA reactivity in immunoassays. The antibodies were found to be reactive with a central Cit-Gly motif being essential for ACPA reactivity and to be cross-reactive between the selected citrullinated peptides. The remaining amino acids within the citrullinated peptides were found to be of less importance for antibody reactivity. Moreover, these findings indicated that the Cit-Gly motif in combination with peptide backbone is essential for antibody reactivity. Based on these findings it was speculated that any amino acid sequence, which brings the peptide into a properly folded structure for antibody recognition is sufficient for antibody reactivity. These findings are in accordance with the current hypothesis that structural homology rather than sequence homology are favored between citrullinated epitopes. These findings are important in relation to clarifying the etiology of RA and to determine the nature of ACPAs, e.g. why some Cit-Gly-containing sequences are not targeted by ACPAs. PMID:26657009

  7. Focused Screening of ECM-Selective Adhesion Peptides on Cellulose-Bound Peptide Microarrays.

    PubMed

    Kanie, Kei; Kondo, Yuto; Owaki, Junki; Ikeda, Yurika; Narita, Yuji; Kato, Ryuji; Honda, Hiroyuki

    2016-11-19

    The coating of surfaces with bio-functional proteins is a promising strategy for the creation of highly biocompatible medical implants. Bio-functional proteins from the extracellular matrix (ECM) provide effective surface functions for controlling cellular behavior. We have previously screened bio-functional tripeptides for feasibility of mass production with the aim of identifying those that are medically useful, such as cell-selective peptides. In this work, we focused on the screening of tripeptides that selectively accumulate collagen type IV (Col IV), an ECM protein that accelerates the re-endothelialization of medical implants. A SPOT peptide microarray was selected for screening owing to its unique cellulose membrane platform, which can mimic fibrous scaffolds used in regenerative medicine. However, since the library size on the SPOT microarray was limited, physicochemical clustering was used to provide broader variation than that of random peptide selection. Using the custom focused microarray of 500 selected peptides, we assayed the relative binding rates of tripeptides to Col IV, collagen type I (Col I), and albumin. We discovered a cluster of Col IV-selective adhesion peptides that exhibit bio-safety with endothelial cells. The results from this study can be used to improve the screening of regeneration-enhancing peptides.

  8. Focused Screening of ECM-Selective Adhesion Peptides on Cellulose-Bound Peptide Microarrays

    PubMed Central

    Kanie, Kei; Kondo, Yuto; Owaki, Junki; Ikeda, Yurika; Narita, Yuji; Kato, Ryuji; Honda, Hiroyuki

    2016-01-01

    The coating of surfaces with bio-functional proteins is a promising strategy for the creation of highly biocompatible medical implants. Bio-functional proteins from the extracellular matrix (ECM) provide effective surface functions for controlling cellular behavior. We have previously screened bio-functional tripeptides for feasibility of mass production with the aim of identifying those that are medically useful, such as cell-selective peptides. In this work, we focused on the screening of tripeptides that selectively accumulate collagen type IV (Col IV), an ECM protein that accelerates the re-endothelialization of medical implants. A SPOT peptide microarray was selected for screening owing to its unique cellulose membrane platform, which can mimic fibrous scaffolds used in regenerative medicine. However, since the library size on the SPOT microarray was limited, physicochemical clustering was used to provide broader variation than that of random peptide selection. Using the custom focused microarray of 500 selected peptides, we assayed the relative binding rates of tripeptides to Col IV, collagen type I (Col I), and albumin. We discovered a cluster of Col IV-selective adhesion peptides that exhibit bio-safety with endothelial cells. The results from this study can be used to improve the screening of regeneration-enhancing peptides. PMID:28952593

  9. [Distiller Yeasts Producing Antibacterial Peptides].

    PubMed

    Klyachko, E V; Morozkina, E V; Zaitchik, B Ts; Benevolensky, S V

    2015-01-01

    A new method of controlling lactic acid bacteria contamination was developed with the use of recombinant Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains producing antibacterial peptides. Genes encoding the antibacterial peptides pediocin and plantaricin with codons preferable for S. cerevisiae were synthesized, and a system was constructed for their secretory expression. Recombinant S. cerevisiae strains producing antibacterial peptides effectively inhibit the growth of Lactobacillus sakei, Pediacoccus pentasaceus, Pediacoccus acidilactici, etc. The application of distiller yeasts producing antibacterial peptides enhances the ethanol yield in cases of bacterial contamination. Recombinant yeasts producing the antibacterial peptides pediocin and plantaricin can successfully substitute the available industrial yeast strains upon ethanol production.

  10. Inclusion of Zinc Oxide Nanoparticles into Virus-Like Peptide Nanocapsules Self-Assembled from Viral β-Annulus Peptide

    PubMed Central

    Fujita, Seiya; Matsuura, Kazunori

    2014-01-01

    A viral β-annulus peptide connected with a zinc oxide (ZnO)-binding sequence (HCVAHR) at its N-terminal was synthesized, and the inclusion behavior of quantum-sized ZnO nanoparticles into the peptide nanocapsules formed by self-assembly of the peptide in water was investigated. Dynamic light scattering (DLS) measurements showed that ZnO nanoparticles (approximately 10 nm) in the presence of the peptide (0.1 mM) formed assemblies with an average size of 48 ± 24 nm, whereas ZnO nanoparticles in the absence of the peptide formed large aggregates. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) observations of the ZnO nanoparticles in the presence of the peptide revealed that ZnO nanoparticles were encapsulated into the peptide nanocapsules with a size of approximately 50 nm. Fluorescence spectra of a mixture of the peptide and ZnO nanoparticles suggested that the ZnO surface and the peptide interact. Template synthesis of ZnO nanoparticles with the peptide nanocapsules afforded larger nanoparticles (approximately 40 nm), which are not quantum-sized ZnO. PMID:28344248

  11. Characterisation and evaluation of antiviral recombinant peptides based on the heptad repeat regions of NDV and IBV fusion glycoproteins

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Wang Xiaojia, E-mail: wangxj@cau.edu.cn; Li Chuangen; Chi Xiaojing

    Mixed virus infections can cause livestock losses that are more devastating than those caused by single virus infections. Newcastle disease virus (NDV) and infectious bronchitis virus (IBV), serious threats to the poultry industry, can give rise to complex mixed infections that hinder diagnosis and prevention. In this study, we show that newly designed peptides, which are based on the heptad repeat (HR) region of the fusion glycoproteins from NDV and IBV, have more potent antiviral activity than the mother HR peptides. Plaque formation and chicken embryo infectivity assays confirmed these results. The novel peptides completely inhibited single virus infections andmore » mixed infections caused by NDV and IBV. Furthermore, we assessed cell toxicity and possible targets for the peptides, thereby strengthening the notion that HR2 is an attractive site for therapeutic intervention. These results suggest the possibility of designing a relatively broad-spectrum class of antiviral peptides that can reduce the effects of mixed-infections.« less

  12. Piracetam inhibits the lipid-destabilising effect of the amyloid peptide Abeta C-terminal fragment.

    PubMed

    Mingeot-Leclercq, Marie-Paule; Lins, Laurence; Bensliman, Mariam; Thomas, Annick; Van Bambeke, Françoise; Peuvot, Jacques; Schanck, André; Brasseur, Robert

    2003-01-10

    Amyloid peptide (Abeta) is a 40/42-residue proteolytic fragment of a precursor protein (APP), implicated in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease. The hypothesis that interactions between Abeta aggregates and neuronal membranes play an important role in toxicity has gained some acceptance. Previously, we showed that the C-terminal domain (e.g. amino acids 29-42) of Abeta induces membrane permeabilisation and fusion, an effect which is related to the appearance of non-bilayer structures. Conformational studies showed that this peptide has properties similar to those of the fusion peptide of viral proteins i.e. a tilted penetration into membranes. Since piracetam interacts with lipids and has beneficial effects on several symptoms of Alzheimer's disease, we investigated in model membranes the ability of piracetam to hinder the destabilising effect of the Abeta 29-42 peptide. Using fluorescence studies and 31P and 2H NMR spectroscopy, we have shown that piracetam was able to significantly decrease the fusogenic and destabilising effect of Abeta 29-42, in a concentration-dependent manner. While the peptide induced lipid disorganisation and subsequent negative curvature at the membrane-water interface, the conformational analysis showed that piracetam, when preincubated with lipids, coats the phospholipid headgroups. Calculations suggest that this prevents appearance of the peptide-induced curvature. In addition, insertion of molecules with an inverted cone shape, like piracetam, into the outer membrane leaflet should make the formation of such structures energetically less favourable and therefore decrease the likelihood of membrane fusion.

  13. Peptides having reduced toxicity that stimulate cholesterol efflux

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Bielicki, John K.; Johansson, Jan; Danho, Waleed

    The present invention provides a family of non-naturally occurring polypeptides having cholesterol efflux activity that parallels that of full-length apolipoproteins (e.g., Apo AI and Apo E), and having high selectivity for ABCA1 that parallels that of full-length apolipoproteins. Further, the peptides of the invention have little or no toxicity when administered at therapeutic and higher doses. The invention also provides compositions comprising such polypeptides, methods of identifying, screening and synthesizing such polypeptides, and methods of treating, preventing or diagnosing diseases and disorders associated with dyslipidemia, hypercholesterolemia and inflammation.

  14. Bioavailability and transport of peptides and peptide drugs into the brain.

    PubMed

    Egleton, R D; Davis, T P

    1997-01-01

    Rational drug design and the targeting of specific organs has become a reality in modern drug development, with the emergence of molecular biology and receptor chemistry as powerful tools for the pharmacologist. A greater understanding of peptide function as one of the major extracellular message systems has made neuropeptides an important target in neuropharmaceutical drug design. The major obstacle to targeting the brain with therapeutics is the presence of the blood-brain barrier (BBB), which controls the concentration and entry of solutes into the central nervous system. Peptides are generally polar in nature, do not easily cross the blood-brain barrier by diffusion, and except for a small number do not have specific transport systems. Peptides can also undergo metabolic deactivation by peptidases of the blood, brain and the endothelial cells that comprise the BBB. In this review, we discuss a number of the recent strategies which have been used to promote peptide stability and peptide entry into the brain. In addition, we approach the subject of targeting specific transport systems that can be found on the brain endothelial cells, and describe the limitations of the methodologies that are currently used to study brain entry of neuropharmaceuticals.

  15. Self-Assembled Hydrogels from Poly[N-(2-hydroxypropyl)methacrylamide] Grafted with β-Sheet Peptides

    PubMed Central

    Radu-Wu, Larisa C.; Yang, Jiyuan; Wu, Kuangshi; Kopeček, Jindřich

    2009-01-01

    A new hybrid hydrogel based on poly[N-(2-hydroxypropyl)methacrylamide] grafted with a β-sheet peptide, Beta11, was designed. Circular dichroism spectroscopy indicated that the folding ability of β-sheet peptide was retained in the hybrid system, whereas the sensitivity of the peptide towards temperature and pH variations was hindered. The polymer backbone also prevented the twisting of the fibrils that resulted from the antiparallel arrangement of the β-strands, as proved by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. Thioflavin T binding experiments and transmission electron microscopy showed fibril formation with minimal lateral aggregation. As a consequence, the graft copolymer self-assembled into a hydrogel in aqueous environment. This process was mediated by association of β-sheet domains. Scanning electron microscopy revealed a particular morphology of the network, characterized by long-range order and uniformly aligned lamellae. Microrheology results confirmed that concentration-dependent gelation occurred. PMID:19591463

  16. Utilisation of the isobole methodology to study dietary peptide-drug and peptide-peptide interactive effects on dipeptidyl peptidase IV (DPP-IV) inhibition.

    PubMed

    Nongonierma, Alice B; FitzGerald, Richard J

    2015-01-01

    Inhibition of dipeptidyl peptidase-IV (DPP-IV) is used as a means to regulate post-prandial serum glucose in type 2 diabetics. The effect of drug (Sitagliptin®)/peptide and binary peptide mixtures on DPP-IV inhibition was studied using an isobole approach. Five peptides (Ile-Pro-Ile-Gln-Tyr, Trp-Lys, Trp-Pro, Trp-Arg and Trp-Leu), having DPP-IV half maximum inhibitory concentration values (IC₅₀)<60 μM and reported to act through different inhibition mechanisms, were investigated. The dose response relationship of Sitagliptin : peptide (1:0, 0:1, 1:852, 1:426 and 1:1704 on a molar basis) and binary Ile-Pro-Ile-Gln-Tyr : peptide (1:0, 0:1, 1:1, 1:2 and 2:1 on a molar basis) mixtures for DPP-IV inhibition was characterised. Isobolographic analysis showed, in most instances, an additive effect on DPP-IV inhibition. However, a synergistic effect was observed with two Sitagliptin:Ile-Pro-Ile-Gln-Tyr (1:426 and 1:852) mixtures and an antagonistic effect was seen with one Sitagliptin : Trp-Pro (1:852) mixture, and three binary peptide mixtures (Ile-Pro-Ile-Gln-Tyr : Trp-Lys (1:1 and 2:1) and Ile-Pro-Ile-Gln-Tyr:Trp-Leu (1:2)). The results show that Sitagliptin and food protein-derived peptides can interact, thereby enhancing overall DPP-IV inhibition. Combination of Sitagliptin with food protein-derived peptides may help in reducing drug dosage and possible associated side-effects.

  17. Destruction of amyloid fibrils by graphene through penetration and extraction of peptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Zaixing; Ge, Cuicui; Liu, Jiajia; Chong, Yu; Gu, Zonglin; Jimenez-Cruz, Camilo A.; Chai, Zhifang; Zhou, Ruhong

    2015-11-01

    Current therapies for Alzheimer's disease (AD) can provide a moderate symptomatic reduction or delay progression at various stages of the disease, but such treatments ultimately do not arrest the advancement of AD. As such, novel approaches for AD treatment and prevention are urgently needed. We here provide both experimental and computational evidence that pristine graphene and graphene-oxide nanosheets can inhibit Aβ peptide monomer fibrillation and clear mature amyloid fibrils, thus impacting the central molecular superstructures correlated with AD pathogenesis. Our molecular dynamics simulations for the first time reveal that graphene nanosheets can penetrate and extract a large number of peptides from pre-formed amyloid fibrils; these effects seem to be related to exceptionally strong dispersion interactions between peptides and graphene that are further enhanced by strong π-π stacking between the aromatic residues of extracted Aβ peptides and the graphene surface. Atomic force microscopy images confirm these predictions by demonstrating that mature amyloid fibrils can be cut into pieces and cleared by graphene oxides. Thioflavin fluorescence assays further illustrate the detailed dynamic processes by which graphene induces inhibition of monomer aggregation and clearance of mature amyloid fibrils, respectively. Cell viability and ROS assays indicate that graphene oxide can indeed mitigate cytotoxicity of Aβ peptide amyloids. Our findings provide new insights into the underlying molecular mechanisms that define graphene-amyloid interaction and suggest that further research on nanotherapies for Alzheimer's and other protein aggregation-related diseases is warranted.Current therapies for Alzheimer's disease (AD) can provide a moderate symptomatic reduction or delay progression at various stages of the disease, but such treatments ultimately do not arrest the advancement of AD. As such, novel approaches for AD treatment and prevention are urgently needed. We

  18. Plant peptides in defense and signaling.

    PubMed

    Marmiroli, Nelson; Maestri, Elena

    2014-06-01

    This review focuses on plant peptides involved in defense against pathogen infection and those involved in the regulation of growth and development. Defense peptides, defensins, cyclotides and anti-microbial peptides are compared and contrasted. Signaling peptides are classified according to their major sites of activity. Finally, a network approach to creating an interactomic peptide map is described. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Destabilization of Human Insulin Fibrils by Peptides of Fruit Bromelain Derived From Ananas comosus (Pineapple).

    PubMed

    Das, Sromona; Bhattacharyya, Debasish

    2017-12-01

    Deposition of insulin aggregates in human body leads to dysfunctioning of several organs. Effectiveness of fruit bromelain from pineapple in prevention of insulin aggregate was investigated. Proteolyses of bromelain was done as par human digestive system and the pool of small peptides was separated from larger peptides and proteins. Under conditions of growth of insulin aggregates from its monomers, this pool of peptides restricted the reaction upto formation of oligomers of limited size. These peptides also destabilized preformed insulin aggregates to oligomers. These processes were followed fluorimetrically using Thioflavin T and 1-ANS, size-exclusion HPLC, dynamic light scattering, atomic force microscopy, and transmission electron microscopy. Sequences of insulin (A and B chains) and bromelain were aligned using Clustal W software to predict most probable sites of interactions. Synthetic tripeptides corresponding to the hydrophobic interactive sites of bromelain showed disaggregation of insulin suggesting specificity of interactions. The peptides GG and AAA serving as negative controls showed no potency in destabilization of aggregates. Disaggregation potency of the peptides was also observed when insulin was deposited on HepG2 liver cells where no formation of toxic oligomers occurred. Amyloidogenic des-octapeptide (B23-B30 of insulin) incapable of cell signaling showed cytotoxicity similar to insulin. This toxicity could be neutralized by bromelain derived peptides. FT-IR and far-UV circular dichroism analysis indicated that disaggregated insulin had structure distinctly different from that of its hexameric (native) or monomeric states. Based on the stoichiometry of interaction and irreversibility of disaggregation, the mechanism/s of the peptides and insulin interactions has been proposed. J. Cell. Biochem. 118: 4881-4896, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Detoxification depot for beta-amyloid peptides.

    PubMed

    Sundaram, Ranjini K; Kasinathan, Chinnaswamy; Stein, Stanley; Sundaram, Pazhani

    2008-02-01

    Alzheimer's Disease (AD) is caused by the deposition of insoluble and toxic amyloid peptides (Abeta) in the brain leading to memory loss and other associated neurodegenerative symptoms. To date there is limited treatment options and strategies for treating AD. Studies have shown that clearance of the amyloid plaques from the brain and thus from the blood could be effective in stopping and or delaying the progression of the disease. Small peptides derived from the Abeta-42 sequence, in particular KLVFF, have shown to be effective binders of Abeta peptides and thus could be useful in delaying progression of the disease. We have taken advantage of this property by generating the retro-inverso (RI) version of this peptide, ffvlk, in different formats. We are presenting a new detox gel system using poly ethylene glycol (PEG), polymerized and cross linked with the RI peptides. We hypothesize that detox gel incorporating RI peptides will act like a 'sink' to capture the Abeta peptides from the surrounding environment. We tested these detox gels for their ability to capture biotinylated Abeta-42 peptides in vitro. The results showed that the detox gels bound Abeta-42 peptides effectively and irreversibly. Gels incorporating the tetramer RI peptide exhibited maximum binding capacity. The detox gel could be a potential candidate for treatment strategies to deplete the brain of toxic amyloid peptides.

  1. Antimicrobial Peptides in Biomedical Device Manufacturing.

    PubMed

    Riool, Martijn; de Breij, Anna; Drijfhout, Jan W; Nibbering, Peter H; Zaat, Sebastian A J

    2017-01-01

    Over the past decades the use of medical devices, such as catheters, artificial heart valves, prosthetic joints, and other implants, has grown significantly. Despite continuous improvements in device design, surgical procedures, and wound care, biomaterial-associated infections (BAI) are still a major problem in modern medicine. Conventional antibiotic treatment often fails due to the low levels of antibiotic at the site of infection. The presence of biofilms on the biomaterial and/or the multidrug-resistant phenotype of the bacteria further impair the efficacy of antibiotic treatment. Removal of the biomaterial is then the last option to control the infection. Clearly, there is a pressing need for alternative strategies to prevent and treat BAI. Synthetic antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are considered promising candidates as they are active against a broad spectrum of (antibiotic-resistant) planktonic bacteria and biofilms. Moreover, bacteria are less likely to develop resistance to these rapidly-acting peptides. In this review we highlight the four main strategies, three of which applying AMPs, in biomedical device manufacturing to prevent BAI. The first involves modification of the physicochemical characteristics of the surface of implants. Immobilization of AMPs on surfaces of medical devices with a variety of chemical techniques is essential in the second strategy. The main disadvantage of these two strategies relates to the limited antibacterial effect in the tissue surrounding the implant. This limitation is addressed by the third strategy that releases AMPs from a coating in a controlled fashion. Lastly, AMPs can be integrated in the design and manufacturing of additively manufactured/3D-printed implants, owing to the physicochemical characteristics of the implant material and the versatile manufacturing technologies compatible with antimicrobials incorporation. These novel technologies utilizing AMPs will contribute to development of novel and safe

  2. Antimicrobial Peptides in Biomedical Device Manufacturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riool, Martijn; de Breij, Anna; Drijfhout, Jan W.; Nibbering, Peter H.; Zaat, Sebastian A. J.

    2017-08-01

    Over the past decades the use of medical devices, such as catheters, artificial heart valves, prosthetic joints and other implants, has grown significantly. Despite continuous improvements in device design, surgical procedures and wound care, biomaterial-associated infections (BAI) are still a major problem in modern medicine. Conventional antibiotic treatment often fails due to the low levels of antibiotic at the site of infection. The presence of biofilms on the biomaterial and/or the multidrug-resistant phenotype of the bacteria further impair the efficacy of antibiotic treatment. Removal of the biomaterial is then the last option to control the infection. Clearly, there is a pressing need for alternative strategies to prevent and treat BAI. Synthetic antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are considered promising candidates as they are active against a broad spectrum of (antibiotic-resistant) planktonic bacteria and biofilms. Moreover, bacteria are less likely to develop resistance to these rapidly-acting peptides. In this review we highlight the four main strategies, three of which applying AMPs, in biomedical device manufacturing to prevent BAI. The first involves modification of the physicochemical characteristics of the surface of implants. Immobilization of AMPs on surfaces of medical devices with a variety of chemical techniques is essential in the second strategy. The main disadvantage of these two strategies relates to the limited antibacterial effect in the tissue surrounding the implant. This limitation is addressed by the third strategy that releases AMPs from a coating in a controlled fashion. Lastly, AMPs can be integrated in the design and manufacturing of additively manufactured / 3D-printed implants, owing to the physicochemical characteristics of the implant material and the versatile manufacturing technologies compatible with antimicrobials incorporation. These novel technologies utilizing AMPs will contribute to development of novel and safe

  3. Peptide Integrated Optics.

    PubMed

    Handelman, Amir; Lapshina, Nadezda; Apter, Boris; Rosenman, Gil

    2018-02-01

    Bio-nanophotonics is a wide field in which advanced optical materials, biomedicine, fundamental optics, and nanotechnology are combined and result in the development of biomedical optical chips. Silk fibers or synthetic bioabsorbable polymers are the main light-guiding components. In this work, an advanced concept of integrated bio-optics is proposed, which is based on bioinspired peptide optical materials exhibiting wide optical transparency, nonlinear and electrooptical properties, and effective passive and active waveguiding. Developed new technology combining bottom-up controlled deposition of peptide planar wafers of a large area and top-down focus ion beam lithography provides direct fabrication of peptide optical integrated circuits. Finding a deep modification of peptide optical properties by reconformation of biological secondary structure from native phase to β-sheet architecture is followed by the appearance of visible fluorescence and unexpected transition from a native passive optical waveguiding to an active one. Original biocompatibility, switchable regimes of waveguiding, and multifunctional nonlinear optical properties make these new peptide planar optical materials attractive for application in emerging technology of lab-on-biochips, combining biomedical photonic and electronic circuits toward medical diagnosis, light-activated therapy, and health monitoring. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  4. A synthetic peptide blocking TRPV1 activation inhibits UV-induced skin responses.

    PubMed

    Kang, So Min; Han, Sangbum; Oh, Jang-Hee; Lee, Young Mee; Park, Chi-Hyun; Shin, Chang-Yup; Lee, Dong Hun; Chung, Jin Ho

    2017-10-01

    Transient receptor potential type 1 (TRPV1) can be activated by ultraviolet (UV) irradiation, and mediates UV-induced matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-1 and proinflammatory cytokines in keratinocytes. Various chemicals and compounds targeting TRPV1 activation have been developed, but are not in clinical use mostly due to their safety issues. We aimed to develop a novel TRPV1-targeting peptide to inhibit UV-induced responses in human skin. We designed and generated a novel TRPV1 inhibitory peptide (TIP) which mimics the specific site in TRPV1 (aa 701-709: Gln-Arg-Ala-Ile-Thr-Ile-Leu-Asp-Thr, QRAITILDT), Thr 705 , and tested its efficacy of blocking UV-induced responses in HaCaT, mouse, and human skin. TIP effectively inhibited capsaicin-induced calcium influx and TRPV1 activation. Treatment of HaCaT with TIP prevented UV-induced increases of MMP-1 and pro-inflammatory cytokines such as interleukin (IL)-6 and tumor necrosis factor-α. In mouse skin in vivo, TIP inhibited UV-induced skin thickening and prevented UV-induced expression of MMP-13 and MMP-9. Moreover, TIP attenuated UV-induced erythema and the expression of MMP-1, MMP-2, IL-6, and IL-8 in human skin in vivo. The novel synthetic peptide targeting TRPV1 can ameliorate UV-induced skin responses in vitro and in vivo, providing a promising therapeutic approach against UV-induced inflammation and photoaging. Copyright © 2017 Japanese Society for Investigative Dermatology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Alternatives to antibiotics: bacteriocins, antimicrobial peptides and bacteriophages.

    PubMed

    Joerger, R D

    2003-04-01

    Bacteriocins, antimicrobial peptides, and bacteriophage have attracted attention as potential substitutes for, or as additions to, currently used antimicrobial compounds. This publication will review research on the potential application of these alternative antimicrobial agents to poultry production and processing. Bacteriocins are proteinaceous compounds of bacterial origin that are lethal to bacteria other than the producing strain. It is assumed that some of the bacteria in the intestinal tract produce bacteriocins as a means to achieve a competitive advantage, and bacteriocin-producing bacteria might be a desirable part of competitive exclusion preparations. Purified or partially purified bacteriocins could be used as preservatives or for the reduction or elimination of certain pathogens. Currently only nisin, produced by certain strains of Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis, has regulatory approval for use in certain foods, and its use for poultry products has been studied extensively. Exploration of the application of antimicrobial peptides from sources other than bacteria to poultry has not yet commenced to a significant extent. Evidence for the ability of chickens to produce such antimicrobial peptides has been provided, and it is likely that these peptides play an important role in the defense against various pathogens. Bacteriophages have received renewed attention as possible agents against infecting bacteria. Evidence from several trials indicates that phage therapy can be effective under certain circumstances. Numerous obstacles for the use of phage as antimicrobials for poultry or poultry products remain. Chiefly among them are the narrow host range of many phages, the issue of phage resistance, and the possibility of phage-mediated transfer of genetic material to bacterial hosts. Regulatory issues and the high cost of producing such alternative antimicrobial agents are also factors that might prevent application of these agents in the near future.

  6. Effective modification of cell death-inducing intracellular peptides by means of a photo-cleavable peptide array-based screening system.

    PubMed

    Kozaki, Ikko; Shimizu, Kazunori; Honda, Hiroyuki

    2017-08-01

    Intracellular functional peptides that play a significant role inside cells have been receiving a lot of attention as regulators of cellular activity. Previously, we proposed a novel screening system for intracellular functional peptides; it combined a photo-cleavable peptide array system with cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs). Various peptides can be delivered into cells and intracellular functions of the peptides can be assayed by means of our system. The aim of the present study was to demonstrate that the proposed screening system can be used for assessing the intracellular activity of peptides. The cell death-inducing peptide (LNLISKLF) identified in a mitochondria-targeting domain (MTD) of the Noxa protein served as an original peptide sequence for screening of peptides with higher activity via modification of the peptide sequence. We obtained 4 peptides with higher activity, in which we substituted serine (S) at the fifth position with phenylalanine (F), valine (V), tryptophan (W), or tyrosine (Y). During analysis of the mechanism of action, the modified peptides induced an increase in intracellular calcium concentration, which was caused by the treatment with the original peptide. Higher capacity for cell death induction by the modified peptides may be caused by increased hydrophobicity or an increased number of aromatic residues. Thus, the present work suggests that the intracellular activity of peptides can be assessed using the proposed screening system. It could be used for identifying intracellular functional peptides with higher activity through comprehensive screening. Copyright © 2017 The Society for Biotechnology, Japan. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. PeptideNavigator: An interactive tool for exploring large and complex data sets generated during peptide-based drug design projects.

    PubMed

    Diller, Kyle I; Bayden, Alexander S; Audie, Joseph; Diller, David J

    2018-01-01

    There is growing interest in peptide-based drug design and discovery. Due to their relatively large size, polymeric nature, and chemical complexity, the design of peptide-based drugs presents an interesting "big data" challenge. Here, we describe an interactive computational environment, PeptideNavigator, for naturally exploring the tremendous amount of information generated during a peptide drug design project. The purpose of PeptideNavigator is the presentation of large and complex experimental and computational data sets, particularly 3D data, so as to enable multidisciplinary scientists to make optimal decisions during a peptide drug discovery project. PeptideNavigator provides users with numerous viewing options, such as scatter plots, sequence views, and sequence frequency diagrams. These views allow for the collective visualization and exploration of many peptides and their properties, ultimately enabling the user to focus on a small number of peptides of interest. To drill down into the details of individual peptides, PeptideNavigator provides users with a Ramachandran plot viewer and a fully featured 3D visualization tool. Each view is linked, allowing the user to seamlessly navigate from collective views of large peptide data sets to the details of individual peptides with promising property profiles. Two case studies, based on MHC-1A activating peptides and MDM2 scaffold design, are presented to demonstrate the utility of PeptideNavigator in the context of disparate peptide-design projects. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Cell-penetrating peptides and antimicrobial peptides: how different are they?

    PubMed Central

    Henriques, Sónia Troeira; Melo, Manuel Nuno; Castanho, Miguel A. R. B.

    2006-01-01

    Some cationic peptides, referred to as CPPs (cell-penetrating peptides), have the ability to translocate across biological membranes in a non-disruptive way and to overcome the impermeable nature of the cell membrane. They have been successfully used for drug delivery into mammalian cells; however, there is no consensus about the mechanism of cellular uptake. Both endocytic and non-endocytic pathways are supported by experimental evidence. The observation that some AMPs (antimicrobial peptides) can enter host cells without damaging their cytoplasmic membrane, as well as kill pathogenic agents, has also attracted attention. The capacity to translocate across the cell membrane has been reported for some of these AMPs. Like CPPs, AMPs are short and cationic sequences with a high affinity for membranes. Similarities between CPPs and AMPs prompted us to question if these two classes of peptides really belong to unrelated families. In this Review, a critical comparison of the mechanisms that underlie cellular uptake is undertaken. A reflection and a new perspective about CPPs and AMPs are presented. PMID:16956326

  9. Self Assembled Bi-functional Peptide Hydrogels with Biomineralization-Directing Peptides

    PubMed Central

    Gungormus, Mustafa; Branco, Monica; Fong, Hanson; Schneider, Joel P.; Tamerler, Candan; Sarikaya, Mehmet

    2014-01-01

    A peptide-based hydrogel has been designed that directs the formation of hydroxyapatite. MDG1, a twenty-seven residue peptide, undergoes triggered folding to form an unsymmetrical β-hairpin that self-assembles in response to an increase in solution ionic strength to yield a mechanically rigid, self supporting hydrogel. The C-terminal portion of MDG1 contains a heptapeptide (MLPHHGA) capable of directing the mineralization process. Circular dichroism spectroscopy indicates that the peptide folds and assembles to form a hydrogel network rich in β-sheet secondary structure. Oscillatory rheology indicates that the hydrogel is mechanical rigid (G′ ∼ 2500 Pa) before mineralization. In separate experiments, mineralization was induced both biochemically and with cementoblast cells. Mineralization-domain had little effect on the mechanical rigidity of the gel. SEM and EDS show that MDG1 gels are capable of directing the formation of hydroxapatite. Control hydrogels, prepared by peptides either lacking the mineral-directing portion or reversing its sequence, indicated that the heptapeptide is necessary and its actions are sequence specific. PMID:20591477

  10. Viral peptides-MHC interaction: Binding probability and distance from human peptides.

    PubMed

    Santoni, Daniele

    2018-05-23

    Identification of peptides binding to MHC class I complex can play a crucial role in retrieving potential targets able to trigger an immune response. Affinity binding of viral peptides can be estimated through effective computational methods that in the most of cases are based on machine learning approach. Achieving a better insight into peptide features that impact on the affinity binding rate is a challenging issue. In the present work we focused on 9-mer peptides of Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 and Human herpes simplex virus 1, studying their binding to MHC class I. Viral 9-mers were partitioned into different classes, where each class is characterized by how far (in terms of mutation steps) the peptides belonging to that class are from human 9-mers. Viral 9-mers were partitioned in different classes, based on the number of mutation steps they are far from human 9-mers. We showed that the overall binding probability significantly differs among classes, and it typically increases as the distance, computed in terms of number of mutation steps from the human set of 9-mers, increases. The binding probability is particularly high when considering viral 9-mers that are far from all human 9-mers more than three mutation steps. A further evidence, providing significance to those special viral peptides and suggesting a potential role they can play, comes from the analysis of their distribution along viral genomes, as it revealed they are not randomly located, but they preferentially occur in specific genes. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Flunarizine Prevents Hepatitis C Virus Membrane Fusion in a Genotype-dependent Manner by Targeting the Potential Fusion Peptide within E1

    PubMed Central

    Perin, Paula M.; Haid, Sibylle; Brown, Richard J. P.; Doerrbecker, Juliane; Schulze, Kai; Zeilinger, Carsten; von Schaewen, Markus; Heller, Brigitte; Vercauteren, Koen; Luxenburger, Eva; Baktash, Yasmine M.; Vondran, Florian W. R.; Speerstra, Sietkse; Awadh, Abdullah; Mukhtarov, Furkat; Schang, Luis M; Kirschning, Andreas; Müller, Rolf; Guzman, Carlos A.; Kaderali, Lars; Randall, Glenn; Meuleman, Philip; Ploss, Alexander; Pietschmann, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    To explore mechanisms of hepatitis C virus (HCV) replication we screened a compound library including licensed drugs. Flunarizine, a diphenylmethylpiperazine used to treat migraine, inhibited HCV cell entry in vitro and in vivo in a genotype-dependent fashion. Analysis of mosaic viruses between susceptible and resistant strains revealed that E1 and E2 glycoproteins confer susceptibility to flunarizine. Time of addition experiments and single particle tracking of HCV demonstrated that flunarizine specifically prevents membrane fusion. Related phenothiazines and pimozide also inhibited HCV infection and preferentially targeted HCV genotype 2 viruses. However, phenothiazines and pimozide exhibited improved genotype coverage including the difficult to treat genotype 3. Flunarizine-resistant HCV carried mutations within the alleged fusion peptide and displayed cross-resistance to these compounds, indicating that these drugs have a common mode of action. Conclusion: These observations reveal novel details about HCV membrane fusion. Moreover, flunarizine and related compounds represent first-in-class HCV fusion inhibitors that merit consideration for repurposing as cost-effective component of HCV combination therapies. PMID:26248546

  12. Hypothesis driven development of new adjuvants: short peptides as immunomodulators.

    PubMed

    Dong, Jessica C; Kobinger, Gary P

    2013-04-01

    To date, vaccinations have been one of the key strategies in the prevention and protection against infectious pathogens. Traditional vaccines have well-known limitations such as safety and efficacy issues, which consequently deems it inappropriate for particular populations and may not be an effective strategy against all pathogens. This evidence highlights the need to develop more efficacious vaccination regiments. Higher levels of protection can be achieved by the addition of immunostimulating adjuvants. Many adjuvants elicit strong, undefined inflammation, which produces increased immunogenicity but may also lead to undesirable effects. Hypothesis driven development of adjuvants is needed to achieve a more specific and directed immune response required for optimal and safe vaccine-induced immune protection. An example of such hypothesis driven development includes the use of short immunomodulating peptides as adjuvants. These peptides have the ability to influence the immune response and can be extrapolated for adjuvant use, but requires further investigation.

  13. Peptides and Ageing.

    PubMed

    Khavinson, Vladimir Kh

    2002-01-01

    A technology has been developed for manufacturing of biologically active complex peptide preparations from extracts of different tissues. In particular, the pineal preparation (Epithalamin) augments the in vitro outgrowth of explants from the pineal gland but not from other tissues, the latter being stimulated by peptide preparations from respective tissues. Epithalamin increases melatonin production by the pineal gland of rats, improves immunological parameters in rats and mice, produces anticarcinogenic effects in different experimental models, stimulates antioxidant defenses, and restores the reproductive function in old rats. These effects are combined in the ability of Epithalamin to increase the lifespan in rats, mice, and fruit flies. Many of these effects are reproduced in clinical trials, which have demonstrated the geroprotector activity of Epithalamin in humans. Among the effects of the thymic preparation Thymalin, those related to its ability to stimulate immunity are the most prominent. This ability is associated with anticarcinogenic and geroprotector activities. Clinical trials of the peptide preparations obtained from other organs including the prostate, the cerebral cortex, and the eye retina, have demonstrated beneficial effects reflected by the improvement of the conditions of respective organs. Based on the data about the amino acid compositions of the peptide preparations, novel principles of the design of biologically active short peptides possessing tissue-specific activities has been developed. Dipeptides specific for the thymus and tetrapeptides specific for the heart, liver, brain cortex, and pineal glands stimulate the in vitro outgrowth of explants of respective organs. Interestingly, for eye retina and the pineal gland, a common tetrapeptide Ala-Glu-Asp-Gly (Epitalon) has been designed, probably reflecting the common embryonal origin of these two organs. Epitalon reproduces the effects of Epithalamin including those related to its

  14. Bromine isotopic signature facilitates de novo sequencing of peptides in free-radical-initiated peptide sequencing (FRIPS) mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Nam, Jungjoo; Kwon, Hyuksu; Jang, Inae; Jeon, Aeran; Moon, Jingyu; Lee, Sun Young; Kang, Dukjin; Han, Sang Yun; Moon, Bongjin; Oh, Han Bin

    2015-02-01

    We recently showed that free-radical-initiated peptide sequencing mass spectrometry (FRIPS MS) assisted by the remarkable thermochemical stability of (2,2,6,6-tetramethyl-piperidin-1-yl)oxyl (TEMPO) is another attractive radical-driven peptide fragmentation MS tool. Facile homolytic cleavage of the bond between the benzylic carbon and the oxygen of the TEMPO moiety in o-TEMPO-Bz-C(O)-peptide and the high reactivity of the benzylic radical species generated in •Bz-C(O)-peptide are key elements leading to extensive radical-driven peptide backbone fragmentation. In the present study, we demonstrate that the incorporation of bromine into the benzene ring, i.e. o-TEMPO-Bz(Br)-C(O)-peptide, allows unambiguous distinction of the N-terminal peptide fragments from the C-terminal fragments through the unique bromine doublet isotopic signature. Furthermore, bromine substitution does not alter the overall radical-driven peptide backbone dissociation pathways of o-TEMPO-Bz-C(O)-peptide. From a practical perspective, the presence of the bromine isotopic signature in the N-terminal peptide fragments in TEMPO-assisted FRIPS MS represents a useful and cost-effective opportunity for de novo peptide sequencing. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  15. Evolving Role of Natriuretic Peptides from Diagnostic Tool to Therapeutic Modality.

    PubMed

    Pagel-Langenickel, Ines

    2018-01-01

    Natriuretic peptides (NP) are widely recognized as key regulators of blood pressure, water and salt homeostasis. In addition, they play a critical role in physiological cardiac growth and mediate a variety of biological effects including antiproliferative and anti-inflammatory effects in other organs and tissues. The cardiac release of NPs ANP and BNP represents an important compensatory mechanism during acute and chronic cardiac overload and during the pathogenesis of heart failure where their actions counteract the sustained activation of renin-angiotensin-aldosterone and other neurohormonal systems. Elevated circulating plasma NP levels correlate with the severity of heart failure and particularly BNP and the pro-peptide, NT-proBNP have been established as biomarkers for the diagnosis of heart failure as well as prognostic markers for cardiovascular risk. Despite activation of the NP system in heart failure it is inadequate to prevent progressive fluid and sodium retention and cardiac remodeling. Therapeutic approaches included administration of synthetic peptide analogs and the inhibition of NP-degrading enzyme neutral endopeptidase (NEP). Of all strategies only the combined NEP/ARB inhibition with sacubitril/valsartan had shown clinical success in reducing cardiovascular mortality and morbidity in patients with heart failure.

  16. C-Peptide Is a Sensitive Indicator for the Diagnosis of Metabolic Syndrome in Subjects from Central Mexico.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez-Mejia, M Elba; Porchia, Leonardo M; Torres-Rasgado, Enrique; Ruiz-Vivanco, Guadalupe; Pulido-Pérez, Patricia; Báez-Duarte, Blanca G; Pérez-Fuentes, Ricardo

    2016-05-01

    Metabolic Syndrome (MetS) is associated with elevated risk for developing diabetes and cardiovascular disease. A key component of MetS is the development of insulin resistance (IR). The homeostatic model assessment (HOMA) model can determine IR by using insulin or C-peptide concentrations; however, the efficiency of insulin and C-peptide to determine MetS has not been compared. The aim of the study was to compare the efficiency of C-peptide and insulin to determine MetS in Mexicans. Anthropometrics, glucose, insulin, C-peptide, triglycerides, and high-density lipoproteins were determined in 156 nonpregnant females and 114 males. Subjects were separated into normal or positive for MetS. IR was determined by the HOMA2 calculator using insulin or C-peptide. Correlations were calculated using the Spearman correlation coefficient (ρ). Differences between correlations were determined by calculating Steiger's Z. The sensitivity was determined by the area under receiver operating characteristics curve (AUC) analysis. Independent of the MetS definition [Adult Treatment Panel III (ATP III), International Diabetes Federation (IDF), or World Health Organization (WHO)], C-peptide and insulin were significantly higher in MetS subjects (P < 0.05). C-peptide and insulin correlated with all components of MetS; however, for waist circumference, waist-to-hip ratio, and fasting plasma glucose, C-peptide correlated better than insulin (P < 0.05). Moreover, C-peptide (AUC = 0.72-0.78) was a better marker than insulin (AUC = 0.62-0.72) for MetS (P < 0.05). Finally, HOMA2-IR calculated with C-peptide (AUC = 0.80-0.84) was more accurate than HOMA2-IR calculated with insulin (AUC = 0.68-0.75, P < 0.05) at determining MetS. C-peptide is a strong indicator of MetS. Since C-peptide has recently emerged as a biomolecule with significant importance for inflammatory diseases, monitoring C-peptide levels will aid clinicians in preventing MetS.

  17. A Fusion-Inhibiting Peptide against Rift Valley Fever Virus Inhibits Multiple, Diverse Viruses

    PubMed Central

    Koehler, Jeffrey W.; Smith, Jeffrey M.; Ripoll, Daniel R.; Spik, Kristin W.; Taylor, Shannon L.; Badger, Catherine V.; Grant, Rebecca J.; Ogg, Monica M.; Wallqvist, Anders; Guttieri, Mary C.; Garry, Robert F.; Schmaljohn, Connie S.

    2013-01-01

    For enveloped viruses, fusion of the viral envelope with a cellular membrane is critical for a productive infection to occur. This fusion process is mediated by at least three classes of fusion proteins (Class I, II, and III) based on the protein sequence and structure. For Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV), the glycoprotein Gc (Class II fusion protein) mediates this fusion event following entry into the endocytic pathway, allowing the viral genome access to the cell cytoplasm. Here, we show that peptides analogous to the RVFV Gc stem region inhibited RVFV infectivity in cell culture by inhibiting the fusion process. Further, we show that infectivity can be inhibited for diverse, unrelated RNA viruses that have Class I (Ebola virus), Class II (Andes virus), or Class III (vesicular stomatitis virus) fusion proteins using this single peptide. Our findings are consistent with an inhibition mechanism similar to that proposed for stem peptide fusion inhibitors of dengue virus in which the RVFV inhibitory peptide first binds to both the virion and cell membranes, allowing it to traffic with the virus into the endocytic pathway. Upon acidification and rearrangement of Gc, the peptide is then able to specifically bind to Gc and prevent fusion of the viral and endocytic membranes, thus inhibiting viral infection. These results could provide novel insights into conserved features among the three classes of viral fusion proteins and offer direction for the future development of broadly active fusion inhibitors. PMID:24069485

  18. pH responsive micelle self-assembled from a new amphiphilic peptide as anti-tumor drug carrier.

    PubMed

    Liang, Ju; Wu, Wen-Lan; Xu, Xiao-Ding; Zhuo, Ren-Xi; Zhang, Xian-Zheng

    2014-02-01

    An acid-responsive amphiphilic peptide that contains KKGRGDS sequence in hydrophilic head and VVVVVV sequence in hydrophobic tail was designed and prepared. In neutral or basic medium, this amphiphilic peptide can self-assemble into micelles through hydrogen bonding and hydrophobic interactions. If changing the solution pH to an acidic environment, the electrostatic repulsion interaction among the ionized lysine (K) residues will prevent the self-assembly of the amphiphilic peptide, leading to the dissociation of micelles. The anti-tumor drug of doxorubicin (DOX) was chosen and loaded into the self-assembled micelles of the amphiphilic peptide to investigate the influence of external pH change on the drug release behavior. As expected, the micelles show a sustained DOX release in neutral medium (pH 7.0) but fast release behavior in acidic medium (pH 5.0). When incubating these DOX-loaded micelles with HeLa and COS7 cells, due to the over-expression of integrins on cancer cells, the micelles can efficiently use the tumor-targeting function of RGD sequence to deliver the drug into HeLa cells. Combined with the low cytotoxicity of the amphiphilic peptide against both HeLa and COS7 cells, the amphiphilic peptide reported in this work may be promising in clinical application for targeted drug delivery. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Synthesis of peptide thioacids at neutral pH using bis(2-sulfanylethyl)amido peptide precursors.

    PubMed

    Pira, Silvain L; Boll, Emmanuelle; Melnyk, Oleg

    2013-10-18

    Reaction of bis(2-sulfanylethyl)amido (SEA) peptides with triisopropylsilylthiol in water at neutral pH yields peptide thiocarboxylates. An alkylthioester derived from β-alanine was used to trap the released bis(2-sulfanylethyl)amine and displace the equilibrium toward the peptide thiocarboxylate.

  20. The effect of oral and intravenous dextrose on C-peptide secretion in ponies.

    PubMed

    de Laat, M A; van Haeften, J J; Sillence, M N

    2016-02-01

    Managing equine hyperinsulinemia is crucial for preventing laminitis, but our understanding of the mechanisms involved in insulin dysregulation in this species is incomplete. C-peptide is co-secreted with insulin but is resistant to hepatic metabolism and can be used to study insulin dysregulation. This study examined C-peptide secretion in serial blood samples collected after oral and i.v. dextrose (0.75 g/kg) administration to 9 ponies (BCS, 7.1 ± 0.5). The ponies were designated as hyperinsulinemic (HI) or normoinsulinemic (NI) responders before the study, using oral glucose tests and fasted glucose-to-insulin ratios, and responses were compared between the 2 groups. C-peptide concentrations increased ( < 0.01) rapidly from fasted levels after both oral and i.v. dextrose, with similar area under the concentration-time curve (AUC) for both tests and a significant correlation with AUC. The AUC was similar in HI and NI ponies after i.v. dextrose, indicating similar pancreatic capacity for both groups. However, for oral dextrose, the AUC and the AUC were markedly higher ( < 0.05) in the HI ponies, indicating a greater secretion rate of these peptides. Slower insulin clearance might have also contributed to the larger AUC in HI ponies, but this hypothesis requires further investigation with specific measures of hepatic insulin clearance.

  1. Adenosine A2A receptor blockade prevents synaptotoxicity and memory dysfunction caused by beta-amyloid peptides via p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway.

    PubMed

    Canas, Paula M; Porciúncula, Lisiane O; Cunha, Geanne M A; Silva, Carla G; Machado, Nuno J; Oliveira, Jorge M A; Oliveira, Catarina R; Cunha, Rodrigo A

    2009-11-25

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is characterized by memory impairment, neurochemically by accumulation of beta-amyloid peptide (namely Abeta(1-42)) and morphologically by an initial loss of nerve terminals. Caffeine consumption prevents memory dysfunction in different models, which is mimicked by antagonists of adenosine A(2A) receptors (A(2A)Rs), which are located in synapses. Thus, we now tested whether A(2A)R blockade prevents the early Abeta(1-42)-induced synaptotoxicity and memory dysfunction and what are the underlying signaling pathways. The intracerebral administration of soluble Abeta(1-42) (2 nmol) in rats or mice caused, 2 weeks later, memory impairment (decreased performance in the Y-maze and object recognition tests) and a loss of nerve terminal markers (synaptophysin, SNAP-25) without overt neuronal loss, astrogliosis, or microgliosis. These were prevented by pharmacological blockade [5-amino-7-(2-phenylethyl)-2-(2-furyl)-pyrazolo[4,3-e]-1,2,4-triazolo[1,5-c]pyrimidine (SCH58261); 0.05 mg . kg(-1) . d(-1), i.p.; for 15 d] in rats, and genetic inactivation of A(2A)Rs in mice. Moreover, these were synaptic events since purified nerve terminals acutely exposed to Abeta(1-42) (500 nm) displayed mitochondrial dysfunction, which was prevented by A(2A)R blockade. SCH58261 (50 nm) also prevented the initial synaptotoxicity (loss of MAP-2, synaptophysin, and SNAP-25 immunoreactivity) and subsequent loss of viability of cultured hippocampal neurons exposed to Abeta(1-42) (500 nm). This A(2A)R-mediated control of neurotoxicity involved the control of Abeta(1-42)-induced p38 phosphorylation and was independent from cAMP/PKA (protein kinase A) pathway. Together, these results show that A(2A)Rs play a crucial role in the development of Abeta-induced synaptotoxicity leading to memory dysfunction through a p38 MAPK (mitogen-activated protein kinase)-dependent pathway and provide a molecular basis for the benefits of caffeine consumption in AD.

  2. Photodissociative Cross-Linking of Non-covalent Peptide-Peptide Ion Complexes in the Gas Phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Huong T. H.; Andrikopoulos, Prokopis C.; Rulíšek, Lubomír; Shaffer, Christopher J.; Tureček, František

    2018-05-01

    We report a gas-phase UV photodissociation study investigating non-covalent interactions between neutral hydrophobic pentapeptides and peptide ions incorporating a diazirine-tagged photoleucine residue. Phenylalanine (Phe) and proline (Pro) were chosen as the conformation-affecting residues that were incorporated into a small library of neutral pentapeptides. Gas-phase ion-molecule complexes of these peptides with photo-labeled pentapeptides were subjected to photodissociation. Selective photocleavage of the diazirine ring at 355 nm formed short-lived carbene intermediates that underwent cross-linking by insertion into H-X bonds of the target peptide. The cross-link positions were established from collision-induced dissociation tandem mass spectra (CID-MS3) providing sequence information on the covalent adducts. Effects of the amino acid residue (Pro or Phe) and its position in the target peptide sequence were evaluated. For proline-containing peptides, interactions resulting in covalent cross-links in these complexes became more prominent as proline was moved towards the C-terminus of the target peptide sequence. The photocross-linking yields of phenylalanine-containing peptides depended on the position of both phenylalanine and photoleucine. Density functional theory calculations were used to assign structures of low-energy conformers of the (GLPMG + GLL*LK + H)+ complex. Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics trajectory calculations were used to capture the thermal motion in the complexes within 100 ps and determine close contacts between the incipient carbene and the H-X bonds in the target peptide. This provided atomic-level resolution of potential cross-links that aided spectra interpretation and was in agreement with experimental data. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  3. Peptides Derived from a Phage Display Library Inhibit Adhesion and Protect the Host against Infection by Paracoccidioides brasiliensis and Paracoccidioides lutzii

    PubMed Central

    de Oliveira, Haroldo C.; Michaloski, Jussara S.; da Silva, Julhiany F.; Scorzoni, Liliana; de Paula e Silva, Ana C. A.; Marcos, Caroline M.; Assato, Patrícia A.; Yamazaki, Daniella S.; Fusco-Almeida, Ana M.; Giordano, Ricardo J.; Mendes-Giannini, Maria J. S.

    2016-01-01

    Paracoccidioides brasiliensis and Paracoccidioides lutzii are dimorphic fungi and are the etiological agents of paracoccidioidomycosis (PCM). Adhesion is one of the most important steps in infections with Paracoccidioides and is responsible for the differences in the virulence of isolates of these fungi. Because of the importance of adhesion to the establishment of an infection, this study focused on the preliminary development of a new therapeutic strategy to inhibit adhesion by Paracoccidioides, thus inhibiting infection and preventing the disease. We used two phage display libraries to select peptides that strongly bind to the Paracoccidioides cell wall to inhibit adhesion to host cells and extracellular matrix (ECM) components (laminin, fibronectin, and type I and type IV collagen). This approach allowed us to identify four peptides that inhibited up to 64% of the adhesion of Paracoccidioides to pneumocytes in vitro and inhibited the adhesion to the ECM components by up to 57%. Encouraged by these results, we evaluated the ability of these peptides to protect Galleria mellonella from Paracoccidioides infection by treating G. mellonella larvae with the different peptides prior to infection with Paracoccidioides and observing larval survival. The results show that all of the peptides tested increased the survival of the larvae infected with P. brasiliensis by up to 64% and by up to 60% in those infected with P. lutzii. These data may open new horizons for therapeutic strategies to prevent PCM, and anti-adhesion therapy could be an important strategy. PMID:28066254

  4. Prospects in the use of aptamers for characterizing the structure and stability of bioactive proteins and peptides in food.

    PubMed

    Agyei, Dominic; Acquah, Caleb; Tan, Kei Xian; Hii, Hieng Kok; Rajendran, Subin R C K; Udenigwe, Chibuike C; Danquah, Michael K

    2018-01-01

    Food-derived bioactive proteins and peptides have gained acceptance among researchers, food manufacturers and consumers as health-enhancing functional food components that also serve as natural alternatives for disease prevention and/or management. Bioactivity in food proteins and peptides is determined by their conformations and binding characteristics, which in turn depend on their primary and secondary structures. To maintain their bioactivities, the molecular integrity of bioactive peptides must remain intact, and this warrants the study of peptide form and structure, ideally with robust, highly specific and sensitive techniques. Short single-stranded nucleic acids (i.e. aptamers) are known to have high affinity for cognate targets such as proteins and peptides. Aptamers can be produced cost-effectively and chemically derivatized to increase their stability and shelf life. Their improved binding characteristics and minimal modification of the target molecular signature suggests their suitability for real-time detection of conformational changes in both proteins and peptides. This review discusses the developmental progress of systematic evolution of ligands by exponential enrichment (SELEX), an iterative technology for generating cost-effective aptamers with low dissociation constants (K d ) for monitoring the form and structure of bioactive proteins and peptides. The review also presents case studies of this technique in monitoring the structural stability of bioactive peptide formulations to encourage applications in functional foods. The challenges and potential of aptamers in this research field are also discussed. Graphical abstract Advancing bioactive proteins and peptide functionality via aptameric ligands.

  5. High-density antimicrobial peptide coating with broad activity and low cytotoxicity against human cells.

    PubMed

    Rai, Akhilesh; Pinto, Sandra; Evangelista, Marta B; Gil, Helena; Kallip, Silvar; Ferreira, Mario G S; Ferreira, Lino

    2016-03-01

    Medical device-associated infections are a multi-billion dollar burden for the worldwide healthcare systems. The modification of medical devices with non-leaching coatings capable of killing microorganisms on contact is one of the strategies being investigated to prevent microorganism colonization. Here we developed a robust antimicrobial coating based on the chemical immobilization of the antimicrobial peptide (AMP), cecropin-melittin (CM), on gold nanoparticles coated surfaces. The concentration of AMP immobilized (110 μg/cm(2)) was higher than most of the studies reported so far (<10 μg/cm(2)). This translated onto a coating with high antimicrobial activity against Gram positive and negative bacteria sp., as well as multi-drug resistant bacteria. Studies with E. coli reporter bacteria showed that these coatings induced the permeability of the outer membrane of bacteria in less than 5 min and the inner membrane in approximately 20 min. Importantly, the antimicrobial properties of the coating are maintained in the presence of 20% (v/v) human serum, and have low probability to induce bacteria resistance. We further show that coatings have low toxicity against human endothelial and fibroblast cells and is hemocompatible since it does not induce platelet and complement activation. The antimicrobial coating described here may be promising to prevent medical device-associated infections. In recent years, antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) have been chemically immobilized on surfaces of medical devices to render them with antimicrobial properties. Surfaces having immobilized cationic peptides are susceptible to be adsorbed by plasma proteins with the subsequent loss of antimicrobial activity. Furthermore, with the exception of very few studies that have determined the cytotoxicity of surfaces in mammalian cells, the effect of the immobilized AMP on human cells is relatively unknown. Here we report a coating based on cecropin-melittin peptide (CM) that maintains its

  6. Tissue-specific effects of peptides.

    PubMed

    Khavinson, V K

    2001-08-01

    Synthetic peptides (cytogens) Cortagen, Epithalon, Livagen, and Vilon stimulated the growth of explants from rat brain cortex, subcortical structures, liver, and thymus, respectively, in organotypic cultures. These peptides produced tissue-specific effects: they stimulated the growth of explants from tissues, whose cytomedins (peptide complexes) were used for chemical synthesis.

  7. Food-derived immunomodulatory peptides.

    PubMed

    Santiago-López, Lourdes; Hernández-Mendoza, Adrián; Vallejo-Cordoba, Belinda; Mata-Haro, Verónica; González-Córdova, Aarón F

    2016-08-01

    Food proteins contain specific amino acid sequences within their structures that may positively impact bodily functions and have multiple immunomodulatory effects. The functional properties of these specific sequences, also referred to as bioactive peptides, are revealed only after the degradation of native proteins during digestion processes. Currently, milk proteins have been the most explored source of bioactive peptides, which presents an interesting opportunity for the dairy industry. However, plant- and animal-derived proteins have also been shown to be important sources of bioactive peptides. This review summarizes the in vitro and in vivo evidence of the role of various food proteins as sources of immunomodulatory peptides and discusses the possible pathways involving these properties. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry.

  8. Peptides that influence membrane topology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, Gerard C. L.

    2014-03-01

    We examine the mechanism of a range of polypeptides that influence membrane topology, including antimicrobial peptides, cell penetrating peptides, viral fusion peptides, and apoptosis proteins, and show how a combination of geometry, coordination chemistry, and soft matter physics can be used to approach a unified understanding. We will also show how such peptides can impact biomedical problems such as auto-immune diseases (psoriasis, lupus), infectious diseases (viral and bacterial infections), and mitochondrial pathologies (under-regulated apoptosis leads to neurodegenerative diseases whereas over-regulated apoptosis leads to cancer.)

  9. Peptides and peptidomimetics as immunomodulators

    PubMed Central

    Gokhale, Ameya S; Satyanarayanajois, Seetharama

    2014-01-01

    Peptides and peptidomimetics can function as immunomodulating agents by either blocking the immune response or stimulating the immune response to generate tolerance. Knowledge of B- or T-cell epitopes along with conformational constraints is important in the design of peptide-based immunomodulating agents. Work on the conformational aspects of peptides, synthesis and modified amino acid side chains have contributed to the development of a new generation of therapeutic agents for autoimmune diseases and cancer. The design of peptides/peptidomimetics for immunomodulation in autoimmune diseases such as multiple sclerosis, rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus and HIV infection is reviewed. In cancer therapy, peptide epitopes are used in such a way that the body is trained to recognize and fight the cancer cells locally as well as systemically. PMID:25186605

  10. Insect Peptides - Perspectives in Human Diseases Treatment.

    PubMed

    Chowanski, Szymon; Adamski, Zbigniew; Lubawy, Jan; Marciniak, Pawel; Pacholska-Bogalska, Joanna; Slocinska, Malgorzata; Spochacz, Marta; Szymczak, Monika; Urbanski, Arkadiusz; Walkowiak-Nowicka, Karolina; Rosinski, Grzegorz

    2017-01-01

    Insects are the largest and the most widely distributed group of animals in the world. Their diversity is a source of incredible variety of different mechanisms of life processes regulation. There are many agents that regulate immunology, reproduction, growth and development or metabolism. Hence, it seems that insects may be a source of numerous substances useful in human diseases treatment. Especially important in the regulation of insect physiology are peptides, like neuropeptides, peptide hormones or antimicrobial peptides. There are two main aspects where they can be helpful, 1) Peptides isolated from insects may become potential drugs in therapy of different diseases, 2) A lot of insect peptide hormones show structural or functional homology to mammalian peptide hormones and the comparative studies may give a new look on human disorders. In our review we focused on three group of insect derived peptides: 1) immune-active peptides, 2) peptide hormones and 3) peptides present in venoms. In our review we try to show the considerable potential of insect peptides in searching for new solutions for mammalian diseases treatment. We summarise the knowledge about properties of insect peptides against different virulent agents, anti-inflammatory or anti-nociceptive properties as well as compare insect and mammalian/vertebrate peptide endocrine system to indicate usefulness of knowledge about insect peptide hormones in drug design. The field of possible using of insect delivered peptide to therapy of various human diseases is still not sufficiently explored. Undoubtedly, more attention should be paid to insects due to searching new drugs. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  11. Helicity of short E-R/K peptides.

    PubMed

    Sommese, Ruth F; Sivaramakrishnan, Sivaraj; Baldwin, Robert L; Spudich, James A

    2010-10-01

    Understanding the secondary structure of peptides is important in protein folding, enzyme function, and peptide-based drug design. Previous studies of synthetic Ala-based peptides (>12 a.a.) have demonstrated the role for charged side chain interactions involving Glu/Lys or Glu/Arg spaced three (i, i + 3) or four (i, i + 4) residues apart. The secondary structure of short peptides (<9 a.a.), however, has not been investigated. In this study, the effect of repetitive Glu/Lys or Glu/Arg side chain interactions, giving rise to E-R/K helices, on the helicity of short peptides was examined using circular dichroism. Short E-R/K-based peptides show significant helix content. Peptides containing one or more E-R interactions display greater helicity than those with similar E-K interactions. Significant helicity is achieved in Arg-based E-R/K peptides eight, six, and five amino acids long. In these short peptides, each additional i + 3 and i + 4 salt bridge has substantial contribution to fractional helix content. The E-R/K peptides exhibit a strongly linear melt curve indicative of noncooperative folding. The significant helicity of these short peptides with predictable dependence on number, position, and type of side chain interactions makes them an important consideration in peptide design.

  12. Hevein-Like Antimicrobial Peptides of Plants.

    PubMed

    Slavokhotova, A A; Shelenkov, A A; Andreev, Ya A; Odintsova, T I

    2017-12-01

    Plant antimicrobial peptides represent one of the evolutionarily oldest innate immunity components providing the first line of host defense to pathogen attacks. This review is dedicated to a small, currently actively studied family of hevein-like peptides that can be found in various monocot and dicot plants. The review thoroughly describes all known peptides belonging to this family including data on their structures, functions, and antimicrobial activity. The main features allowing to assign these peptides to a separate family are given, and the specific characteristics of each peptide are described. Further, the mode of action for hevein-like peptides, their role in plant immune system, and the applications of these molecules in biotechnology and medicine are considered.

  13. Treatment of both native and deamidated gluten peptides with an endo-peptidase from Aspergillus niger prevents stimulation of gut-derived gluten-reactive T cells from either children or adults with celiac disease.

    PubMed

    Toft-Hansen, Henrik; Rasmussen, Karina S; Staal, Anne; Roggen, Erwin L; Sollid, Ludvig M; Lillevang, Søren T; Barington, Torben; Husby, Steffen

    2014-08-01

    Celiac disease (CD) is characterized by an inappropriate immunological reaction against gluten driven by gluten-specific CD4+ T cells. We screened 25 proteases and tested 10 for their potential to degrade gluten in vitro. Five proteases were further tested for their ability to prevent the proliferative response by a gluten-specific CD4+ T cell clone and seven gluten-reactive T cell lines to protease-digested gluten peptides. A proline-specific endo-peptidase from Aspergillus niger (AnP2) was particularly efficient at diminishing proliferation after stimulation with cleaved antigen, and could completely block the response against both native and deamidated gluten peptides. We found that AnP2 was efficient down to a 1:64 protease:substrate ratio (w:w). When AnP2 was tested in assays using seven gluten-reactive T cell lines from individual CD patients (three adults and four children), the response to gluten was diminished in all cases. Our study indicates a therapeutic benefit of AnP2 to CD patients. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Processing of mammalian preprogastrin-releasing peptide.

    PubMed

    Reeve, J R; Cuttitta, F; Vigna, S R; Shively, J E; Walsh, J H

    1988-01-01

    The processing of preprogastrin-releasing peptide in mammalian tissues and in cultured cells takes place at discrete sites (Figure 6). Signal peptidase cleaves away the signal peptide from the amino terminus of gastrin-releasing peptide. An exopeptidase activity may remove dipeptides from the amino terminus. The amidation site (not shown in Fig. 6; see Fig. 2) has the same general sequence (Gly-Lys-Lys) seen for other amidated peptides. Cleavage after single basic residues yields gene-related products from Form I or II preproGRP. A unique non-basic cleavage yields a gene-related product from Form III preproGRP. The processing that occurs to form GRP, GRP, and GRP gene-related peptides is shown in Figure 7. ProGRP is cleaved by a series of enzymes to form GRP with an amidated carboxyl-terminal methionine (indicated by an asterisk in Fig. 7). GRP is cleaved to form the decapeptide GRP. The carboxyl-terminal flanking peptides of all three mRNA translation products are cleaved to form several gastrin-releasing peptide gene-related products. Knowledge of the processing of gastrin-releasing peptide and its gene-related products will allow synthesis of duplicates of the stored forms of these peptides, which can then be used for biological testing.

  15. Peptide and non-peptide opioid-induced hyperthermia in rabbits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kandasamy, S. B.; Williams, B. A.

    1983-01-01

    The intracerebroventricular administration of prototype nonpeptide opioid receptor (mu, kappa, and sigma) agonists, morphine, ketocyclazocine, and N-allyl-normetazocine was found to induce hyperthermia in rabbits. The similar administration of peptide opioids like beta-endorphin (BE), methionine-enkephalin (ME), and its synthetic analogue D-ala2-methionine-enkephalinamide (DAME) was also found to cause hyperthermia. Results indicate that only the liver-like transport system is important to the ventricular inactivation of BE and DAME. Prostaglandins and norepinephrine were determined not to be involved in peptide and nonpeptide opioid-induced hyperthermia. In addition, cAMP was not required since a phosphodiesterase inhibitor, theophylline, did not accentuate the hyperthermia due to peptide and nonpeptide opioids. Naloxone-sensitive receptors were found to be involved in the induction of hyperthermia by morphine, BE, ME, and DAME since naloxone attenuated them. However, the hyperthermic response to ketocyclazocine and N-allyl-normetazocine was not antagonized by naloxone.

  16. Membrane Perturbation Induced by Interfacially Adsorbed Peptides

    PubMed Central

    Zemel, Assaf; Ben-Shaul, Avinoam; May, Sylvio

    2004-01-01

    The structural and energetic characteristics of the interaction between interfacially adsorbed (partially inserted) α-helical, amphipathic peptides and the lipid bilayer substrate are studied using a molecular level theory of lipid chain packing in membranes. The peptides are modeled as “amphipathic cylinders” characterized by a well-defined polar angle. Assuming two-dimensional nematic order of the adsorbed peptides, the membrane perturbation free energy is evaluated using a cell-like model; the peptide axes are parallel to the membrane plane. The elastic and interfacial contributions to the perturbation free energy of the “peptide-dressed” membrane are evaluated as a function of: the peptide penetration depth into the bilayer's hydrophobic core, the membrane thickness, the polar angle, and the lipid/peptide ratio. The structural properties calculated include the shape and extent of the distorted (stretched and bent) lipid chains surrounding the adsorbed peptide, and their orientational (C-H) bond order parameter profiles. The changes in bond order parameters attendant upon peptide adsorption are in good agreement with magnetic resonance measurements. Also consistent with experiment, our model predicts that peptide adsorption results in membrane thinning. Our calculations reveal pronounced, membrane-mediated, attractive interactions between the adsorbed peptides, suggesting a possible mechanism for lateral aggregation of membrane-bound peptides. As a special case of interest, we have also investigated completely hydrophobic peptides, for which we find a strong energetic preference for the transmembrane (inserted) orientation over the horizontal (adsorbed) orientation. PMID:15189858

  17. Perspectives and Peptides of the Next Generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brogden, Kim A.

    Shortly after their discovery, antimicrobial peptides from prokaryotes and eukaryotes were recognized as the next potential generation of pharmaceuticals to treat antibiotic-resistant bacterial infections and septic shock, to preserve food, or to sanitize surfaces. Initial research focused on identifying the spectrum of antimicrobial agents, determining the range of antimicrobial activities against bacterial, fungal, and viral pathogens, and assessing the antimicrobial activity of synthetic peptides versus their natural counterparts. Subsequent research then focused on the mechanisms of antimicrobial peptide activity in model membrane systems not only to identify the mechanisms of antimicrobial peptide activity in microorganisms but also to discern differences in cytotoxicity for prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells. Recent, contemporary work now focuses on current and future efforts to construct hybrid peptides, peptide congeners, stabilized peptides, peptide conjugates, and immobilized peptides for unique and specific applications to control the growth of microorganisms in vitro and in vivo.

  18. The CNGRC-GG-D(KLAKLAK)2 peptide induces a caspase-independent, Ca2+-dependent death in human leukemic myeloid cells by targeting surface aminopeptidase N/CD13.

    PubMed

    Bouchet, Sandrine; Tang, Ruoping; Fava, Fanny; Legrand, Ollivier; Bauvois, Brigitte

    2016-04-12

    The CD13 antigen's binding site for the Asn-Gly-Arg (NGR) motif enables NGR-containing chemotherapeutic drugs to be delivered to CD13-positive tumours. Human CD13-positive acute myeloid leukemia (AML) cells proliferate abnormally and escape death. Here, we show that the CNGRC-GG-D(KLAKLAK)2 peptide induces death in AML cell lines (U937, THP-1, NB4, HL-60) and primary blood cells from AML patients. Cell death was characterized as a caspase-independent mechanism, without DNA fragmentation, but phosphatidylserine externalization and membrane disruption. Our results demonstrate in U937 cells that (i) the NGR-peptide triggers the loss of mitochondrial potential(ΔΨm) and generates superoxide anion (O2-), (ii) N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC) and extra/intracellular Ca2+ chelators (BAPTA) prevent both O2- production and cell death, (iii) the Ca2+-channel blocker nifedipine prevents cell death (indicating that Ca2+ influx is the initial death trigger), and (iv) BAPTA, but not NAC, prevents ΔΨm loss (suggesting O2- is a mitochondrial downstream effector). AML cell lines and primary blasts responding to the lethal action of NGR-peptide express promatrix metalloproteinase-12 (proMMP-12) and its substrate progranulin (an 88 kDa cell survival factor). A cell-free assay highlighted proMMP-12 activation by O2-. Accordingly, NGR-peptide's downregulation of 88 kDa progranulin protein was prevented by BAPTA and NAC. Conversely, AML blast resistance to NGR-peptide is associated with the expression of a distinct, 105 kDa progranulin isoform. These results indicate that CNGRC-GG-D(KLAKLAK)2 induces death in AML cells through the Ca2+-mitochondria-O2.-pathway, and support the link between proMMP-12 activation and progranulin cleavage during cell death. Our findings may have implications for the understanding of tumour biology and treatment.

  19. Tidbits for the synthesis of bis(2-sulfanylethyl)amido (SEA) polystyrene resin, SEA peptides and peptide thioesters.

    PubMed

    Ollivier, Nathalie; Raibaut, Laurent; Blanpain, Annick; Desmet, Rémi; Dheur, Julien; Mhidia, Reda; Boll, Emmanuelle; Drobecq, Hervé; Pira, Silvain L; Melnyk, Oleg

    2014-02-01

    Protein total chemical synthesis enables the atom-by-atom control of the protein structure and therefore has a great potential for studying protein function. Native chemical ligation of C-terminal peptide thioesters with N-terminal cysteinyl peptides and related methodologies are central to the field of protein total synthesis. Consequently, methods enabling the facile synthesis of peptide thioesters using Fmoc-SPPS are of great value. Herein, we provide a detailed protocol for the preparation of bis(2-sulfanylethyl)amino polystyrene resin as a starting point for the synthesis of C-terminal bis(2-sulfanylethyl)amido peptides and of peptide thioesters derived from 3-mercaptopropionic acid. Copyright © 2013 European Peptide Society and John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  20. Affinity fluorescence-labeled peptides for the early detection of cancer in Barrett's esophagus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Meng; Lu, Shaoying; Piraka, Cyrus; Appelman, Henry; Kwon, Rich; Soetikno, Roy; Kaltenbach, Tonya; Wang, Thomas D.

    2009-02-01

    Fluorescence-labeled peptides that affinity bind to neoplastic mucsosa are promising for use as a specific contrast agent in the detection of pre-malignant tissue in the esophagus. This method is can be used to identify expression of biological markers associated with dysplasia on endoscopic imaging as a guide for biopsy and represents a novel method for the early detection and prevention of cancer. We demonstrate the use of phage display to select affinity peptides and identify the sequence "ASYNYDA" that binds with high target-to-background ratio to dysplastic esophageal mucosa compared to that of intestinal metaplasia. Validation of preferential binding is demonstrated for neoplasia in the setting of Barrett's esophagus. An optimal tradeoff between sensitivity and specificity of 82% and 85% was found at the relative threshold of 0.60 with a target-to-background ratio of 1.81 and an area under the ROC curve of 0.87. Peptides are a novel class of ligand for targeted detection of pre-malignant mucosa for purposes of screening and surveillance.

  1. Activity of Genital Tract Secretions and Synthetic Antimicrobial Peptides against Group B Streptococcus.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, Nidhi; Buckley, Niall; Nakra, Natasha; Gialanella, Philip; Yuan, Weirong; Ghartey, Jeny P

    2015-12-01

    Genital tract secretions inhibit Escherichia coli (E. coli) through antimicrobial peptides (AMP) secreted by the host and vaginal microbiota. However, there are limited data against group B Streptococcus (GBS). Group B Streptococcus were incubated with cervico-vaginal lavage (CVL) samples from healthy non-pregnant women (n = 12) or synthetic AMP and monitored for bacterial growth using a turbidimetric approach. E. coli inhibitory activity was determined by a colony-forming unit assay. None of the CVL samples inhibited GBS. The human neutrophil peptide-1 and human defensin 5 inhibited GBS growth by ≥80% at concentrations ≥20 μg/mL and ≥50 μg/mL, respectively, while human beta-defensin 2 and LL-37 did not inhibit at highest concentration tested (100 μg/mL). In contrast, all AMP inhibited E. coli. Antimicrobial peptides may protect against E. coli colonization but have more limited activity against GBS. Future studies will focus on augmenting host defense with specific AMP to prevent genitourinary infection with these pathogenic organisms. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Exploring peptide hormones in plants: identification of four peptide hormone-receptor pairs and two post-translational modification enzymes

    PubMed Central

    MATSUBAYASHI, Yoshikatsu

    2018-01-01

    The identification of hormones and their receptors in multicellular organisms is one of the most exciting research areas and has lead to breakthroughs in understanding how their growth and development are regulated. In particular, peptide hormones offer advantages as cell-to-cell signals in that they can be synthesized rapidly and have the greatest diversity in their structure and function. Peptides often undergo post-translational modifications and proteolytic processing to generate small oligopeptide hormones. In plants, such small post-translationally modified peptides constitute the largest group of peptide hormones. We initially explored this type of peptide hormone using bioassay-guided fractionation and later by in silico gene screening coupled with biochemical peptide detection, which led to the identification of four types of novel peptide hormones in plants. We also identified specific receptors for these peptides and transferases required for their post-translational modification. This review summarizes how we discovered these peptide hormone–receptor pairs and post-translational modification enzymes, and how these molecules function in plant growth, development and environmental adaptation. PMID:29434080

  3. Exploring peptide hormones in plants: identification of four peptide hormone-receptor pairs and two post-translational modification enzymes.

    PubMed

    Matsubayashi, Yoshikatsu

    2018-01-01

    The identification of hormones and their receptors in multicellular organisms is one of the most exciting research areas and has lead to breakthroughs in understanding how their growth and development are regulated. In particular, peptide hormones offer advantages as cell-to-cell signals in that they can be synthesized rapidly and have the greatest diversity in their structure and function. Peptides often undergo post-translational modifications and proteolytic processing to generate small oligopeptide hormones. In plants, such small post-translationally modified peptides constitute the largest group of peptide hormones. We initially explored this type of peptide hormone using bioassay-guided fractionation and later by in silico gene screening coupled with biochemical peptide detection, which led to the identification of four types of novel peptide hormones in plants. We also identified specific receptors for these peptides and transferases required for their post-translational modification. This review summarizes how we discovered these peptide hormone-receptor pairs and post-translational modification enzymes, and how these molecules function in plant growth, development and environmental adaptation.

  4. Amino-Terminal Pro-B-Type Natriuretic Peptide and B-Type Natriuretic Peptide

    PubMed Central

    McKie, Paul M.; Rodeheffer, Richard J.; Cataliotti, Alessandro; Martin, Fernando L.; Urban, Lynn H.; Mahoney, Douglas W.; Jacobsen, Steven J.; Redfield, Margaret M.; Burnett, John C.

    2007-01-01

    Recent studies report that, in the absence of heart failure and renal failure, plasma B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP) has prognostic value for mortality. We sought to confirm and extend these previous studies to assess BNP, measured by 3 distinct assays, as a biomarker for mortality in a strategy to enhance efforts at primary prevention and to better understand the clinical phenotype of such subjects at risk. We used a community-based cohort of 2042 subjects from Olmsted County, Minn, and individuals with heart or renal failure were excluded. BNP was assessed using 3 assays including Biosite and Shionogi for mature, biologically active BNP and the Roche assay for apparently nonbiologically active amino-terminal pro-BNP (NT-proBNP). Thorough echocardiographic and clinical data were recorded for all of the participants. Median follow-up for mortality was 5.6 years. BNP by all 3 of the assays was predictive of mortality. NT-proBNP and Biosite assays remained significant even after adjustment for traditional clinical risk factors and echocardiographic abnormalities including left ventricular hypertrophy and diastolic dysfunction. Echocardiography documented widespread structural changes in those with increasing BNP levels yet below levels observed in heart failure. We report in a large, well-characterized community-based cohort, free of heart failure, the first study to compare 3 distinct BNP assays as biomarkers for mortality in the same cohort. Our findings confirm the potential use of NT-proBNP and BNP biomarkers for future events and underscore that these peptides may also serve as biomarkers for underlying cardiac remodeling secondary to diverse cardiovascular disease entities. PMID:16585413

  5. Collagen peptide-based biomaterials for protein delivery and peptide-promoted self-assembly of gold nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ernenwein, Dawn M.

    2011-12-01

    Bottom-up self-assembly of peptides has driven the research progress for the following two projects: protein delivery vehicles of collagen microflorettes and the assembly of gold nanoparticles with coiled-coil peptides. Collagen is the most abundant protein in the mammals yet due to immunogenic responses, batch-to-batch variability and lack of sequence modifications, synthetic collagen has been designed to self-assemble into native collagen-like structures. In particular with this research, metal binding ligands were incorporated on the termini of collagen-like peptides to generate micron-sized particles, microflorettes. The over-arching goal of the first research project is to engineer MRI-active microflorettes, loaded with His-tagged growth factors with differential release rates while bound to stem cells that can be implemented toward regenerative cell-based therapies. His-tagged proteins, such as green fluorescent protein, have successfully been incorporated on the surface and throughout the microflorettes. Protein release was monitored under physiological conditions and was related to particle degradation. In human plasma full release was obtained within six days. Stability of the microflorettes under physiological conditions was also examined for the development of a therapeutically relevant delivery agent. Additionally, MRI active microflorettes have been generated through the incorporation of a gadolinium binding ligand, DOTA within the collagen-based peptide sequence. To probe peptide-promoted self-assemblies of gold nanoparticles (GNPs) by non-covalent, charge complementary interactions, a highly anionic coiled-coil peptide was designed and synthesized. Upon formation of peptide-GNP interactions, the hydrophobic domain of the coiled-coil were shown to promote the self-assembly of peptide-GNPs clustering. Hydrophobic forces were found to play an important role in the assembly process, as a peptide with an equally overall negative charge, but lacking an

  6. Natriuretic peptides: Diagnostic and therapeutic use

    PubMed Central

    Pandit, Kaushik; Mukhopadhyay, Pradip; Ghosh, Sujoy; Chowdhury, Subhankar

    2011-01-01

    Natriuretic peptides (NPs) are hormones which are mainly secreted from heart and have important natriuretic and kaliuretic properties. There are four different groups NPs identified till date [atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP), B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP), C-type natriuretic peptide (CNP) and dendroaspis natriuretic peptide, a D-type natriuretic peptide (DNP)], each with its own characteristic functions. The N-terminal part of the prohormone of BNP, NT-proBNP, is secreted alongside BNP and has been documented to have important diagnostic value in heart failure. NPs or their fragments have been subjected to scientific observation for their diagnostic value and this has yielded important epidemiological data for interpretation. However, little progress has been made in harnessing the therapeutic potential of these cardiac hormones. PMID:22145138

  7. A Cyclic Peptidic Serine Protease Inhibitor: Increasing Affinity by Increasing Peptide Flexibility

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Longguang; Paaske, Berit; Kromann-Hansen, Tobias; Jensen, Jan K.; Sørensen, Hans Peter; Liu, Zhuo; Nielsen, Jakob T.; Christensen, Anni; Hosseini, Masood; Sørensen, Kasper K.; Nielsen, Niels Christian; Jensen, Knud J.; Huang, Mingdong; Andreasen, Peter A.

    2014-01-01

    Peptides are attracting increasing interest as protease inhibitors. Here, we demonstrate a new inhibitory mechanism and a new type of exosite interactions for a phage-displayed peptide library-derived competitive inhibitor, mupain-1 (CPAYSRYLDC), of the serine protease murine urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA). We used X-ray crystal structure analysis, site-directed mutagenesis, liquid state NMR, surface plasmon resonance analysis, and isothermal titration calorimetry and wild type and engineered variants of murine and human uPA. We demonstrate that Arg6 inserts into the S1 specificity pocket, its carbonyl group aligning improperly relative to Ser195 and the oxyanion hole, explaining why the peptide is an inhibitor rather than a substrate. Substitution of the P1 Arg with novel unnatural Arg analogues with aliphatic or aromatic ring structures led to an increased affinity, depending on changes in both P1 - S1 and exosite interactions. Site-directed mutagenesis showed that exosite interactions, while still supporting high affinity binding, differed substantially between different uPA variants. Surprisingly, high affinity binding was facilitated by Ala-substitution of Asp9 of the peptide, in spite of a less favorable binding entropy and loss of a polar interaction. We conclude that increased flexibility of the peptide allows more favorable exosite interactions, which, in combination with the use of novel Arg analogues as P1 residues, can be used to manipulate the affinity and specificity of this peptidic inhibitor, a concept different from conventional attempts at improving inhibitor affinity by reducing the entropic burden. PMID:25545505

  8. Sequencing Cyclic Peptides by Multistage Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Mohimani, Hosein; Yang, Yu-Liang; Liu, Wei-Ting; Hsieh, Pei-Wen; Dorrestein, Pieter C.; Pevzner, Pavel A.

    2012-01-01

    Some of the most effective antibiotics (e.g., Vancomycin and Daptomycin) are cyclic peptides produced by non-ribosomal biosynthetic pathways. While hundreds of biomedically important cyclic peptides have been sequenced, the computational techniques for sequencing cyclic peptides are still in their infancy. Previous methods for sequencing peptide antibiotics and other cyclic peptides are based on Nuclear Magnetic Resonance spectroscopy, and require large amount (miligrams) of purified materials that, for most compounds, are not possible to obtain. Recently, development of mass spectrometry based methods has provided some hope for accurate sequencing of cyclic peptides using picograms of materials. In this paper we develop a method for sequencing of cyclic peptides by multistage mass spectrometry, and show its advantages over single stage mass spectrometry. The method is tested on known and new cyclic peptides from Bacillus brevis, Dianthus superbus and Streptomyces griseus, as well as a new family of cyclic peptides produced by marine bacteria. PMID:21751357

  9. Peptides and the blood-brain barrier.

    PubMed

    Banks, William A

    2015-10-01

    The demonstration that peptides and regulatory proteins can cross the blood-brain barrier (BBB) is one of the major contributions of Dr. Abba J. Kastin. He was the first to propose that peptides could cross the BBB, the first to show that an endogenous peptide did so, and the first to describe a saturable transport system at the BBB for peptides. His work shows that in crossing the BBB, peptides and regulatory proteins act as informational molecules, informing the brain of peripheral events. Brain-to-blood passage helps to control levels of peptides with the brain and can deliver information in the brain-to-blood direction. He showed that the transporters for peptides and proteins are not static, but respond to developmental and physiological changes and are affected by disease states. As such, the BBB is adaptive to the needs of the CNS, but when that adaption goes awry, the BBB can be a cause of disease. The mechanisms by which peptides and proteins cross the BBB offer opportunities for drug delivery of these substances or their analogs to the brain in the treatment of diseases of the central nervous system. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  10. Peptides and the blood–brain barrier

    PubMed Central

    Banks, William A.

    2016-01-01

    The demonstration that peptides and regulatory proteins can cross the blood–brain barrier (BBB) is one of the major contributions of Dr. Abba J. Kastin. He was the first to propose that peptides could cross the BBB, the first to show that an endogenous peptide did so, and the first to describe a saturable transport system at the BBB for peptides. His work shows that in crossing the BBB, peptides and regulatory proteins act as informational molecules, informing the brain of peripheral events. Brain-to-blood passage helps to control levels of peptides with the brain and can deliver information in the brain-to-blood direction. He showed that the transporters for peptides and proteins are not static, but respond to developmental and physiological changes and are affected by disease states. As such, the BBB is adaptive to the needs of the CNS, but when that adaption goes awry, the BBB can be a cause of disease. The mechanisms by which peptides and proteins cross the BBB offer opportunities for drug delivery of these substances or their analogs to the brain in the treatment of diseases of the central nervous system. PMID:25805003

  11. A Specific Mixture of Fructo-Oligosaccharides and Bifidobacterium breve M-16V Facilitates Partial Non-Responsiveness to Whey Protein in Mice Orally Exposed to β-Lactoglobulin-Derived Peptides

    PubMed Central

    Kostadinova, Atanaska I.; Meulenbroek, Laura A. P. M.; van Esch, Betty C. A. M.; Hofman, Gerard A.; Garssen, Johan; Willemsen, Linette E. M.; Knippels, Léon M. J.

    2017-01-01

    Oral tolerance is a promising approach for allergy prevention in early life, but it strongly depends on allergen exposure and proper immune environment. Small tolerance-inducing peptides and dietary immunomodulatory components may comprise an attractive method for allergy prevention in at-risk infants. This study aimed to investigate whether early oral exposure to β-lactoglobulin-derived peptides (BLG-peptides) and a specific synbiotic mixture of short- and long- chain fructo-oligosaccharides (scFOS/lcFOS, FF) and Bifidobacterium breve (Bb) M-16V (FF/Bb) can prevent cow’s milk allergy (CMA). Three-week-old female C3H/HeOuJ mice were orally exposed to phosphate buffered saline (PBS), whey protein, or a mixture of four synthetic BLG-peptides combined with a FF/Bb-enriched diet prior to intragastric sensitization with whey protein and cholera toxin. To assess the acute allergic skin response and clinical signs of allergy, mice were challenged intradermally with whole whey protein. Serum immunoglobulins were analyzed after a whey protein oral challenge. Cytokine production by allergen-reactivated splenocytes was measured and changes in T cells subsets in the spleen, mesenteric lymph nodes, and intestinal lamina propria were investigated. Pre-exposing mice to a low dosage of BLG-peptides and a FF/Bb-enriched diet prior to whey protein sensitization resulted in a significant reduction of the acute allergic skin response to whey compared to PBS-pretreated mice fed a control diet. Serum immunoglobulins were not affected, but anaphylactic symptom scores remained low and splenocytes were non-responsive in whey-induced cytokine production. In addition, preservation of the Th1/Th2 balance in the small intestine lamina propria was a hallmark of the mechanism underlying the protective effect of the BLG-peptides–FF/Bb intervention. Prior exposure to BLG-peptides and a FF/Bb-enriched diet is a promising approach for protecting the intestinal Th1/Th2 balance and reducing the

  12. Functional selection of a type IV pili-binding peptide that specifically inhibits Salmonella Typhi adhesion to/invasion of human monocytic cells.

    PubMed

    Wu, Hong-Yan; Zhang, Xiao-Lian; Pan, Qin; Wu, Jianguo

    2005-11-01

    Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi (S. Typhi) is an important pathogen which infects humans exclusively and causes typhoid or enteric fever. Recently it has been discovered that type IVB pili, encoded by the S. Typhi pil operon located in the major pathogenicity island, may be important in the pathogenesis of epidemic enteric fever. To further investigate the roles of type IVB pili of S. Typhi, a 12-mer peptide (RQERSSLSKPVV), binding to the structural protein PilS of the type IVB pili of S. Typhi, was isolated with a ribosome display system. This peptide was designated as peptide R. We found that peptide R inhibited adhesion to/invasion of human monocytic THP-1 cells by piliated S. Typhi bacteria, but had no effects on nonpiliated S. Typhi bacteria. A random 12-mer peptide, of size and solubility equal to peptide R, served as a control on the specificity of peptide R. The specific interaction and binding equilibrium between the 12-mer peptide R and PilS protein was determined by isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) and a binding constant Ka determined to be between 0.4 x 10(5) and 2.2 x 10(5)L mol(-1). Our findings suggest that the type IV pili-binding peptide R holds potential as an antibacterial peptide effective against S. Typhi infections, both in terms of prevention and therapeutic treatment. The data further provide insights into the understanding of the pathogenic roles of the type IVB pili of S. Typhi.

  13. Novel peptides from adrenomedullary chromaffin vesicles.

    PubMed Central

    Sigafoos, J; Chestnut, W G; Merrill, B M; Taylor, L C; Diliberto, E J; Viveros, O H

    1993-01-01

    The adrenal medulla chromaffin vesicle (CV) contains, on a weight basis, as much soluble protein and peptide as catecholamine. The bulk of the protein is accounted for by chromogranins (Cgr) A, B and C. Additionally, a large variety of neuropeptides and their precursor proteins have been found recently within these vesicles. Nevertheless, fractionation of CV lysates indicates the presence of many more peptides than previously reported. In the hope of finding novel bioactive peptides, we initiated a systematic isolation and characterisation of CV peptides. Bovine CV pellets were prepared by sucrose gradient centrifugation and immediately boiled in water to avoid degradation of native proteins and peptides. The water lysates were fractionated through a battery of reversed-phase and ion-exchange high-performance chromatographic steps. We fully or partially characterised a substantial number of novel peptides derived from CgrA and CgrB. A tetradecapeptide and a 13 kDa extended peptide were derived from the bovine homologue of rat secretogranin III. Peptides corresponding to C-terminal fragments of 7B2 and proteoglycan II were also found. Additionally, several sequences had no known precursors. Of the sequences derived from known precursors some corresponded to fragments bracketed by pairs of basic amino acids, but others were preceded or followed by single basic residues or by unusual putative cleavage sites. Some of these peptides were postranslationally modified (pyroglutamylation, glycosylation, phosphorylation, amidation). A significant degree of structural conservation of some of these peptides across species suggests that they may exert biological effects when cosecreted with catecholamines during splanchnic stimulation. PMID:8300415

  14. Survival analysis of multiple peptide vaccination for the selection of correlated peptides in urological cancers.

    PubMed

    Noguchi, Masanori; Koga, Noriko; Moriya, Fukuko; Suekane, Shigetaka; Yutani, Shigeru; Yamada, Akira; Shichijo, Shigeki; Kakuma, Tatuyuki; Itoh, Kyogo

    2018-06-25

    Peptide-based cancer vaccines are able to induce strong immune responses, but their clinical results are unsatisfactory. To determine clinically correlated peptides, we analyzed survival data from urological cancer patients treated by personalized peptide vaccination (PPV), in which different multiple peptides were used for individual patients based on human leukocyte antigen (HLA) type and pre-existing immunity. Survival data were obtained from a database of 265 urological cancer patients treated in 5 clinical PPV trials comprising 154 patients with castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) and 111 patients with advanced urothelial cancer (UC). The expression of tumor-associated antigens (TAAs) was evaluated in 10 prostate cancer tissues, 4 metastatic lymph nodes from prostate cancer and 10 UC tissues using immunohistochemical staining. The clinical efficacy of individual peptides for overall survival was evaluated by the Cox proportional hazards regression model. All TAAs coding candidate peptides used in PPV treatment were expressed in tumor cells from prostate cancer and UC samples except for p56Lck in both, and PSA, PAP and PSMA in the UC samples. Patients with the following peptides had a significantly longer survival than patients without the peptides (Hazard ratio < 1.0, 95% confidence intervals < 1.0 and P < 0.05): SART3-109, PTHrP-102, HNPRL-140, SART3-302 and Lck-90 in CRPC patients, and EGF-R-800, Lck-486, PSMA-624, CypB-129 and SART3-734 in advanced UC patients, respectively. Correlated peptides selected using both survival data and pre-existing immunity for PPV treatment may enhance the clinical benefits for urological cancer patients. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  15. Isoelectric focusing of proteins and peptides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Egen, N.

    1979-01-01

    Egg-white solution was chosen as the reference solution in order to assess the effects of operational parameters (voltage, flow rate, ampholine pH range and concentration, and protein concentration) of the RIEF apparatus on protein resolution. Topics of discussion include: (1) comparison of RIEF apparatus to conventional IEF techniques (column and PAG) with respect to resolution and throughput; (2) peptide and protein separation (AHF, Thymosin - Fraction 5, vasoactive peptide, L-asparaginase and ACP); and (3) detection of peptides - dansyl derivatives of amino acids and peptides, post-focusing fluorescent labeling of amino acids, peptides and proteins, and ampholine extraction from focused gels.

  16. Phage selection of peptide "microantibodies".

    PubMed

    Fujiwara, Daisuke; Fujii, Ikuo

    2013-01-01

    A bioactive peptide capable of inhibiting protein-protein interactions has the potential to be a molecular tool for biological studies and a therapeutic by disrupting aberrant interactions involved in diseases. We have developed combinatorial libraries of peptides with helix-loop-helix structure, from which the isolated peptides have the constrained structure to reduce entropy costs in binding, resulting in high binding affinities for target molecules. Previously, we designed a de novo peptide of helix-loop-helix structure that we termed a "microantibody." Using the microantibody as a library scaffold, we have constructed a phage-display library to successfully isolate molecular-targeting peptides against a cytokine receptor (granulocyte colony-stimulating factor receptor), a protein kinase (Aurora-A), and a ganglioside (GM1). Protocols in this article describe a general procedure for the library construction and the library screening.

  17. Bacterial expression of self-assembling peptide hydrogelators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sonmez, Cem

    For tissue regeneration and drug delivery applications, various architectures are explored to serve as biomaterial tools. Via de novo design, functional peptide hydrogel materials have been developed as scaffolds for biomedical applications. The objective of this study is to investigate bacterial expression as an alternative method to chemical synthesis for the recombinant production of self-assembling peptides that can form rigid hydrogels under physiological conditions. The Schneider and Pochan Labs have designed and characterized a 20 amino acid beta-hairpin forming amphiphilic peptide containing a D-residue in its turn region (MAX1). As a result, this peptide must be prepared chemically. Peptide engineering, using the sequence of MAX1 as a template, afforded a small family of peptides for expression (EX peptides) that have different turn sequences consisting of natural amino acids and amenable to bacterial expression. Each sequence was initially chemically synthesized to quickly assess the material properties of its corresponding gel. One model peptide EX1, was chosen to start the bacterial expression studies. DNA constructs facilitating the expression of EX1 were designed in such that the peptide could be expressed with different fusion partners and subsequently cleaved by enzymatic or chemical means to afford the free peptide. Optimization studies were performed to increase the yield of pure peptide that ultimately allowed 50 mg of pure peptide to be harvested from one liter of culture, providing an alternate means to produce this hydrogel-forming peptide. Recombinant production of other self-assembling hairpins with different turn sequences was also successful using this optimized protocol. The studies demonstrate that new beta-hairpin self-assembling peptides that are amenable to bacterial production and form rigid hydrogels at physiological conditions can be designed and produced by fermentation in good yield at significantly reduced cost when compared to

  18. All-trans retinoic acid stimulates gene expression of the cardioprotective natriuretic peptide system and prevents fibrosis and apoptosis in cardiomyocytes of obese ob/ob mice.

    PubMed

    Manolescu, Daniel-Constantin; Jankowski, Marek; Danalache, Bogdan A; Wang, Donghao; Broderick, Tom L; Chiasson, Jean-Louis; Gutkowska, Jolanta

    2014-10-01

    In hypertensive rodents, retinoic acid (RA) prevents adverse cardiac remodelling and improves myocardial infarction outcome, but its role in obesity-related changes of cardiac tissue are unclear. We hypothesized that all-trans RA (ATRA) treatment will improve the cardioprotective oxytocin-natriuretic peptides (OT-NP) system, preventing apoptosis and collagen accumulation in hearts of ob/ob mice, a mouse model of obesity and insulin resistance. Female 9-week-old B6.V-Lep/J ob/ob mice (n = 16) were divided into 2 groups: 1 group (n = 8) treated with 100 μg of ATRA dissolved in 100 μL of corn oil (vehicle) delivered daily (∼2 μg·g body weight(-1)·day(-1)) by stomach intubation for 16 days, and 1 group (n = 8) that received the vehicle alone. A group of nonobese littermate mice (n = 9) served as controls. Ob/ob mice exhibited obesity, hyperglycaemia, and downregulation of the cardiac OT-NP system, including the mRNA for the transcription factor GATA4, OT receptor and brain NP, and the protein expression for endothelial nitric oxide synthase. Hearts from ob/ob mice also demonstrated increased apoptosis and collagen accumulation. ATRA treatment induced weight loss and decreased adipocytes diameter in the visceral fat, thus reducing visceral obesity, which is associated with a high risk for cardiovascular disease. RA treatment was associated with a reduction in hyperglycemia and a normalization of the OT-NP system's expression in the hearts of ob/ob mice. Furthermore, ATRA treatment prevented apoptosis and collagen accumulation in hearts of ob/ob mice. The present study indicates that ATRA treatment was effective in restoring the cardioprotective OT-NP system and in preventing abnormal cardiac remodelling in the ob/ob mice.

  19. Toxins and antimicrobial peptides: interactions with membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlamadinger, Diana E.; Gable, Jonathan E.; Kim, Judy E.

    2009-08-01

    The innate immunity to pathogenic invasion of organisms in the plant and animal kingdoms relies upon cationic antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) as the first line of defense. In addition to these natural peptide antibiotics, similar cationic peptides, such as the bee venom toxin melittin, act as nonspecific toxins. Molecular details of AMP and peptide toxin action are not known, but the universal function of these peptides to disrupt cell membranes of pathogenic bacteria (AMPs) or a diverse set of eukaryotes and prokaryotes (melittin) is widely accepted. Here, we have utilized spectroscopic techniques to elucidate peptide-membrane interactions of alpha-helical human and mouse AMPs of the cathelicidin family as well as the peptide toxin melittin. The activity of these natural peptides and their engineered analogs was studied on eukaryotic and prokaryotic membrane mimics consisting of <200-nm bilayer vesicles composed of anionic and neutral lipids as well as cholesterol. Vesicle disruption, or peptide potency, was monitored with a sensitive fluorescence leakage assay. Detailed molecular information on peptidemembrane interactions and peptide structure was further gained through vibrational spectroscopy combined with circular dichroism. Finally, steady-state fluorescence experiments yielded insight into the local environment of native or engineered tryptophan residues in melittin and human cathelicidin embedded in bilayer vesicles. Collectively, our results provide clues to the functional structures of the engineered and toxic peptides and may impact the design of synthetic antibiotic peptides that can be used against the growing number of antibiotic-resistant pathogens.

  20. Identification of multifunctional peptides from human milk.

    PubMed

    Mandal, Santi M; Bharti, Rashmi; Porto, William F; Gauri, Samiran S; Mandal, Mahitosh; Franco, Octavio L; Ghosh, Ananta K

    2014-06-01

    Pharmaceutical industries have renewed interest in screening multifunctional bioactive peptides as a marketable product in health care applications. In this context, several animal and plant peptides with potential bioactivity have been reported. Milk proteins and peptides have received much attention as a source of health-enhancing components to be incorporated into nutraceuticals and functional foods. By using this source, 24 peptides have been fractionated and purified from human milk using RP-HPLC. Multifunctional roles including antimicrobial, antioxidant and growth stimulating activity have been evaluated in all 24 fractions. Nevertheless, only four fractions show multiple combined activities among them. Using a proteomic approach, two of these four peptides have been identified as lactoferrin derived peptide and kappa casein short chain peptide. Lactoferrin derived peptide (f8) is arginine-rich and kappa casein derived (f12) peptide is proline-rich. Both peptides (f8 and f12) showed antimicrobial activities against both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. Fraction 8 (f8) exhibits growth stimulating activity in 3T3 cell line and f12 shows higher free radical scavenging activity in comparison to other fractions. Finally, both peptides were in silico evaluated and some insights into their mechanism of action were provided. Thus, results indicate that these identified peptides have multiple biological activities which are valuable for the quick development of the neonate and may be considered as potential biotechnological products for nutraceutical industry. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Chemical methods for peptide and protein production.

    PubMed

    Chandrudu, Saranya; Simerska, Pavla; Toth, Istvan

    2013-04-12

    Since the invention of solid phase synthetic methods by Merrifield in 1963, the number of research groups focusing on peptide synthesis has grown exponentially. However, the original step-by-step synthesis had limitations: the purity of the final product decreased with the number of coupling steps. After the development of Boc and Fmoc protecting groups, novel amino acid protecting groups and new techniques were introduced to provide high quality and quantity peptide products. Fragment condensation was a popular method for peptide production in the 1980s, but unfortunately the rate of racemization and reaction difficulties proved less than ideal. Kent and co-workers revolutionized peptide coupling by introducing the chemoselective reaction of unprotected peptides, called native chemical ligation. Subsequently, research has focused on the development of novel ligating techniques including the famous click reaction, ligation of peptide hydrazides, and the recently reported α-ketoacid-hydroxylamine ligations with 5-oxaproline. Several companies have been formed all over the world to prepare high quality Good Manufacturing Practice peptide products on a multi-kilogram scale. This review describes the advances in peptide chemistry including the variety of synthetic peptide methods currently available and the broad application of peptides in medicinal chemistry.

  2. Stability of peptide drugs in the colon.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jie; Yadav, Vipul; Smart, Alice L; Tajiri, Shinichiro; Basit, Abdul W

    2015-10-12

    This study was the first to investigate the colonic stability of 17 peptide molecules (insulin, calcitonin, glucagon, secretin, somatostatin, desmopressin, oxytocin, Arg-vasopressin, octreotide, ciclosporin, leuprolide, nafarelin, buserelin, histrelin, [D-Ser(4)]-gonadorelin, deslorelin, and goserelin) in a model of the large intestine using mixed human faecal bacteria. Of these, the larger peptides - insulin, calcitonin, somatostatin, glucagon and secretin - were metabolized rapidly, with complete degradation observed within 5 min. In contrast, a number of the smaller peptides - Arg-vasopressin, desmopressin, oxytocin, gonadorelin, goserelin, buserelin, leuprolide, nafarelin and deslorelin - degraded more slowly, while octreotide, histrelin and ciclosporin were seen to be more stable as compared to the other small peptides under the same conditions. Peptide degradation rate was directly correlated to peptide lipophilicity (logP); those peptides with a higher logP were more stable in the colonic model (R(2)=0.94). In the absence of human faecal bacteria, all peptides were stable. This study highlights the impact of the colonic environment - in particular, the gut microbiota - on the metabolism of peptide drugs, and identifies potential peptide candidates for drug delivery to the colon. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Natriuretic peptide type C induces sperm attraction for fertilization in mouse

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Nana; Xu, Xiaoting; Zhang, Yu; Wang, Yakun; Hao, Xiaoqiong; Zhao, Yu; Qiao, Jie; Xia, Guoliang; Zhang, Meijia

    2017-01-01

    Mammalian spermatozoa undergo selective movement along the isthmus of the oviduct to the ampulla during ovulation, which is a prerequisite for fertilization. The factor(s) that involves in selective spermatozoa movement is still unknown. In this study, we found that the oviductal epithelium in mouse ampulla expressed high levels of natriuretic peptide type C (NPPC) in the presence of ovulated oocyte-cumulus complexes (OCCs). Spermatozoa expressed NPPC receptor natriuretic peptide receptor 2 (NPR2, a guanylyl cyclase) on the midpiece of flagellum. NPPC increased intracellular levels of cGMP and Ca2+ of spermatozoa, and induced sperm accumulation in the capillary by attraction. Importantly, spermatozoa from Npr2 mutant mice were not attracted by NPPC, preventing fertilization in vivo. Oocyte-derived paracrine factors promoted the expression of Nppc mRNA in the ampulla. Therefore, NPPC secreted by oviductal ampulla attracts spermatozoa towards oocytes, which is essential for fertilization. PMID:28054671

  4. Interactions Between Peptide and Preservatives: Effects on Peptide Self-Interactions and Antimicrobial Efficiency In Aqueous Multi-Dose Formulations.

    PubMed

    Heljo, P; Ross, A; Zarraga, I E; Pappenberger, A; Mahler, H-C

    2015-10-01

    Antimicrobial preservatives are known to interact with proteins and potentially affect their stability in aqueous solutions. In this systematic study, the interactions of a model peptide with three commonly used preservatives, benzyl alcohol, phenol and m-cresol, were evaluated. The impact on peptide oligomerization was studied using GC-MALS, SEC-MALS and DLS, antimicrobial efficiency of different formulations were studied using the Ph. Eur. antimicrobial efficacy test, and the molecular adsorption of preservative molecules on reversible peptide oligomers was monitored using NMR. The hydrodynamic radius and molar mass of the peptide oligomers was shown to clearly increase in the presence of m-cresol but less significantly with phenol and benzyl alcohol. The increase in size was most likely caused by peptide self-interactions becoming more attractive, leading to reversible oligomerization. On the other hand, increasing the concentration of peptide in multi-dose formulations led to reduced molecular mobility and decreased antimicrobial efficacy of all preservatives. Peptide-preservative interactions not only affect peptide self-interactions, but also antimicrobial efficiency of the preservatives and are thus of significant relevance. Adsorption of preservatives on oligomeric states of peptides is proposed as a mechanism to explain this reduced antimicrobial efficacy.

  5. Discovery of a polystyrene binding peptide isolated from phage display library and its application in peptide immobilization.

    PubMed

    Qiang, Xu; Sun, Keyong; Xing, Lijun; Xu, Yifeng; Wang, Hong; Zhou, Zhengpin; Zhang, Juan; Zhang, Fang; Caliskan, Bilgen; Wang, Min; Qiu, Zheng

    2017-06-01

    Phage peptide display is a powerful technique for discovery of various target-specific ligands. However, target-unrelated peptides can often be obtained and cause ambiguous results. Peptide PB-TUP has been isolated repeatedly in our laboratory on different targets and we conducted a research on PB-TUP phage to investigate their binding properties and rate of propagation. ELISA and phage recovery assay demonstrated that PB-TUP phage had a significant superior affinity to polystyrene solid surface compared with control phage clones. In this study, some incidental bindings are excluded like blocking agents and non-specific binding of secondary antibodies. Propagation rate assays of the selected phage clones showed that the growth rate of PB-TUP phage was not superior to the control phages. Furthermore, the binding of PB-TUB to polystyrene was concentration dependent and varied with solution pH. Molecular modeling revealed that stable structures of α-helix and β-turn may contribute to the binding of PB-TUP to polystyrene plate. The PB-TUP sequence was fused to the N-terminus of peptide P2 and the fusion peptide significantly increased the binding affinity to polystyrene. The fusion peptide also enhanced the cell adhesion ability of peptide P2 with human umbilical vein endothelial cell (HUVEC). The addition of the polystyrene binding peptide provided a convenient method for peptide immobilization.

  6. Bifidobacterium bifidum in a Rat Model of Necrotizing Enterocolitis: Antimicrobial Peptide and Protein Responses

    PubMed Central

    Underwood, Mark A.; Kananurak, Anchasa; Coursodon, Christine F.; Adkins-Reick, Camille K.; Chu, Hiutung; Bennett, Stephen H.; Wehkamp, Jan; Castillo, Patricia A.; Leonard, Brian C.; Tancredi, Daniel J.; Sherman, Michael P.; Dvorak, Bohuslav; Bevins, Charles L.

    2013-01-01

    Necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC) is a devastating disease of premature infants. Probiotics decrease the risk of NEC in clinical and experimental studies. Antimicrobial peptides protect the gut against noxious microbes and shape the commensal microbiota, but their role in NEC remains unclear. We report that like in human ontogeny, the rat pup has low expression of Paneth cell antimicrobials, which increases rapidly during normal development. To investigate the expression of antimicrobial peptides in experimental NEC and the impact of probiotics on their expression, premature rats were divided into three groups: dam fed (DF), hand fed with formula (FF), or hand fed with formula containing Bifidobacterium bifidum (FF+BIF). All groups were exposed to asphyxia and cold stress. The expression of lysozyme, secretory phospholipase A2, pancreatic-associated proteins 1 and 3 mRNA was elevated in the FF (NEC) group, compared to the DF and FF+BIF groups where disease was attenuated. We conclude that induction of antimicrobial peptides occurs in experimental NEC similar to that reported in human disease and is attenuated when disease is averted by probiotic B. bifidum. The induction of antimicrobial peptides is likely an adaptive mucosal response that is often not sufficient to prevent disease in the premature gut. PMID:22322385

  7. Peptides and peptidomimetics in medicine, surgery and biotechnology.

    PubMed

    Gentilucci, Luca; Tolomelli, Alessandra; Squassabia, Federico

    2006-01-01

    Despite the fact that they have been used for a century to treat several kinds of diseases, peptides and short proteins are now considered the new generation of biologically active tools. Indeed, recent findings suggest a wide range of novel applications in medicine, biotechnology, and surgery. The efficacy of native peptides has been greatly enhanced by introducing structural modifications in the original sequences, giving rise to the class of peptidomimetics. This review gives an overview of both classical applications and promising new categories of biologically active peptides and analogs. Besides the new entries in well known peptide families, such as antibiotic macrocyclic peptides, integrin inhibitors, as well as immunoactive, anticancer, neuromodulator, opioid, and hormone peptides, a number of novel applications have been recently reported. Outstanding examples include peptide-derived semi-synthetic vaccines, drug delivery systems, radiolabeled peptides, self-assembling peptides, which can serve as biomaterials in tissue engineering for creating cartilage, blood vessels, and other tissues, or as substrates for neurite outgrowth and synapse formation, immobilized peptides, and proteins. Finally, peptide-based biomaterials can find applications in bio-nanotechnology for bio-microchips, peptide nanorods and nanotubes, bio-sensors, bio-electronic devices, and peptide-metal wires.

  8. Screening and Identification of Peptides Specifically Targeted to Gastric Cancer Cells from a Phage Display Peptide Library

    PubMed

    Sahin, Deniz; Taflan, Sevket Onur; Yartas, Gizem; Ashktorab, Hassan; Smoot, Duane T

    2018-04-25

    Background: Gastric cancer is the second most common cancer among the malign cancer types. Inefficiency of traditional techniques both in diagnosis and therapy of the disease makes the development of alternative and novel techniques indispensable. As an alternative to traditional methods, tumor specific targeting small peptides can be used to increase the efficiency of the treatment and reduce the side effects related to traditional techniques. The aim of this study is screening and identification of individual peptides specifically targeted to human gastric cancer cells using a phage-displayed peptide library and designing specific peptide sequences by using experimentally-eluted peptide sequences. Methods: Here, MKN-45 human gastric cancer cells and HFE-145 human normal gastric epithelial cells were used as the target and control cells, respectively. 5 rounds of biopannning with a phage display 12-peptide library were applied following subtraction biopanning with HFE-145 control cells. The selected phage clones were established by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and immunofluorescence detection. We first obtain random phage clones after five biopanning rounds, determine the binding levels of each individual clone. Then, we analyze the frequencies of each amino acid in best binding clones to determine positively overexpressed amino acids for designing novel peptide sequences. Results: DE532 (VETSQYFRGTLS) phage clone was screened positive, showing specific binding on MKN-45 gastric cancer cells. DE-Obs (HNDLFPSWYHNY) peptide, which was designed by using amino acid frequencies of experimentally selected peptides in the 5th round of biopanning, showed specific binding in MKN-45 cells. Conclusion: Selection and characterization of individual clones may give us specifically binding peptides, but more importantly, data extracted from eluted phage clones may be used to design theoretical peptides with better binding properties than even experimentally selected ones

  9. Novel Synthetic Antimicrobial Peptides against Streptococcus mutans▿

    PubMed Central

    He, Jian; Eckert, Randal; Pharm, Thanh; Simanian, Maurice D.; Hu, Chuhong; Yarbrough, Daniel K.; Qi, Fengxia; Anderson, Maxwell H.; Shi, Wenyuan

    2007-01-01

    Streptococcus mutans, a common oral pathogen and the causative agent of dental caries, has persisted and even thrived on the tooth surface despite constant removal and eradication efforts. In this study, we generated a number of synthetic antimicrobial peptides against this bacterium via construction and screening of several structurally diverse peptide libraries where the hydrophobicity and charge within each library was varied incrementally in order to generate a collection of peptides with different biochemical characteristics. From these libraries, we identified multiple peptides with robust killing activity against S. mutans. To further improve their effectiveness, the most bactericidal peptides from each library were synthesized together as one molecule, in various combinations, with and without a flexible peptide linker between each antimicrobial region. Many of these “fusion” peptides had enhanced killing activities in comparison with those of the original nonconjoined molecules. The results presented here illustrate that small libraries of biochemically constrained peptides can be used to generate antimicrobial peptides against S. mutans, several of which may be likely candidates for the development of anticaries agents. PMID:17296741

  10. Small molecule and peptide-mediated inhibition of Epstein-Barr virus nuclear antigen 1 dimerization

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Kim, Sun Young; Song, Kyung-A; Samsung Biomedical Research Institute

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Evidence that targeting EBNA1 dimer, an EBV onco-antigen, can be achievable. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A small molecule and a peptide as EBNA1 dimerization inhibitors identified. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Both inhibitors associated with EBNA1 and blocked EBNA1 DNA binding activity. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Also, prevented its dimerization, and repressed viral gene transcription. -- Abstract: Latent Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection is associated with human B cell lymphomas and certain carcinomas. EBV episome persistence, replication, and gene expression are dependent on EBV-encoded nuclear antigen 1 (EBNA1)'s DNA binding domain (DBD)/dimerization domain (DD)-mediated sequence-specific DNA binding activity. Homodimerization of EBNA1 is essential for EBNA1 DNA binding and transactivation.more » In this study, we characterized a novel small molecule EBNA1 inhibitor EiK1, screened from the previous high throughput screening (HTS). The EiK1 compound specifically inhibited the EBNA1-dependent, OriP-enhanced transcription, but not EBNA1-independent transcription. A Surface Plasmon Resonance Biacore assay revealed that EiK1 associates with EBNA1 amino acid 459-607 DBD/DD. Consistent with the SPR data, in vitro gel shift assays showed that EiK1 suppressed the activity of EBNA1 binding to the cognate familial repeats (FR) sequence, but not control RBP-J{kappa} binding to the J{kappa} site. Subsequently, a cross-linker-mediated in vitro multimerization assay and EBNA1 homodimerization-dependent yeast two-hybrid assay showed that EiK1 significantly inhibited EBNA1 dimerization. In an attempt to identify more highly specific peptide inhibitors, small peptides encompassing the EBNA1 DBD/DD were screened for inhibition of EBNA1 DBD-mediated DNA binding function. The small peptide P85, covering EBNA1 a.a. 560-574, significantly blocked EBNA1 DNA binding activity in vitro, prevented dimerization in vitro and in vivo, associated

  11. Investigating Endogenous Peptides and Peptidases using Peptidomics

    PubMed Central

    Tinoco, Arthur D.; Saghatelian, Alan

    2012-01-01

    Rather than simply being protein degradation products, peptides have proven to be important bioactive molecules. Bioactive peptides act as hormones, neurotransmitters and antimicrobial agents in vivo. The dysregulation of bioactive peptide signaling is also known to be involved in disease, and targeting peptide hormone pathways has been successful strategy in the development of novel therapeutics. The importance of bioactive peptides in biology has spurred research to elucidate the function and regulation of these molecules. Classical methods for peptide analysis have relied on targeted immunoassays, but certain scientific questions necessitated a broader and more detailed view of the peptidome–all the peptides in a cell, tissue or organism. In this review we discuss how peptidomics has emerged to fill this need through the application of advanced liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) methods that provide unique insights into peptide activity and regulation. PMID:21786763

  12. Fe(+) chemical ionization of peptides.

    PubMed

    Speir, J P; Gorman, G S; Amster, I J

    1993-02-01

    Laser-desorbed peptide neutral molecules were allowed to react with Fe(+) in a Fourier transform mass spectrometer, using the technique of laser desorption/chemical ionization. The Fe(+) ions are formed by laser ablation of a steel target, as well as by dissociative charge-exchange ionization of ferrocene with Ne(+). Prior to reaction with laser-desorbed peptide molecules, Fe(+) ions undergo 20-100 thermalizin collisions with xenon to reduce the population of excited-state metal ion species. The Fe(+) ions that have not experienced thermalizing collisions undergo charge exchange with peptide molecules. Iron ions that undergo thermalizing collisions before they are allowed to react with peptides are found to undergo charge exchange and to form adduct species [M + Fe(+)] and fragment ions that result from the loss of small, stable molecules, such as H2O, CO, and CO2, from the metal ion-peptide complex.

  13. A novel chimeric peptide with antimicrobial activity.

    PubMed

    Alaybeyoglu, Begum; Akbulut, Berna Sariyar; Ozkirimli, Elif

    2015-04-01

    Beta-lactamase-mediated bacterial drug resistance exacerbates the prognosis of infectious diseases, which are sometimes treated with co-administration of beta-lactam type antibiotics and beta-lactamase inhibitors. Antimicrobial peptides are promising broad-spectrum alternatives to conventional antibiotics in this era of evolving bacterial resistance. Peptides based on the Ala46-Tyr51 beta-hairpin loop of beta-lactamase inhibitory protein (BLIP) have been previously shown to inhibit beta-lactamase. Here, our goal was to modify this peptide for improved beta-lactamase inhibition and cellular uptake. Motivated by the cell-penetrating pVEC sequence, which includes a hydrophobic stretch at its N-terminus, our approach involved the addition of LLIIL residues to the inhibitory peptide N-terminus to facilitate uptake. Activity measurements of the peptide based on the 45-53 loop of BLIP for enhanced inhibition verified that the peptide was a competitive beta-lactamase inhibitor with a K(i) value of 58 μM. Incubation of beta-lactam-resistant cells with peptide decreased the number of viable cells, while it had no effect on beta-lactamase-free cells, indicating that this peptide had antimicrobial activity via beta-lactamase inhibition. To elucidate the molecular mechanism by which this peptide moves across the membrane, steered molecular dynamics simulations were carried out. We propose that addition of hydrophobic residues to the N-terminus of the peptide affords a promising strategy in the design of novel antimicrobial peptides not only against beta-lactamase but also for other intracellular targets. Copyright © 2015 European Peptide Society and John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  14. Extraction and identification of α-amylase inhibitor peptides from Nephelium lappacheum and Nephelium mutabile seed protein using gastro-digestive enzymes.

    PubMed

    Evaristus, Natashya Anak; Wan Abdullah, Wan Nadiah; Gan, Chee-Yuen

    2018-04-01

    The potential of N. lappacheum and N. mutabile seed as a source of α-amylase inhibitor peptides was explored based on the local traditional practice of using the seed. Different gastro-digestive enzymes (i.e. pepsin or chymotrypsin) or a sequential digestion were used to extract the peptides. The effects of digestion time and enzyme to substrate (E:S) ratio on the α-amylase inhibitory activity were investigated. Results showed that chymotrypsin was effective in producing the inhibitor peptides from rambutan seed protein at E:S ratio 1:20 for 1 h, whereas pepsin was more effective for pulasan seed protein under the same condition. A total of 20 and 31 novel inhibitor peptides were identified, respectively. These peptides could bind with the subsites of α-amylase (i.e. Trp58, Trp59, Tyr62, Asp96, Arg195, Asp197, Glu233, His299, Asp300, and His305) and formed a sliding barrier that preventing the formation of enzyme/substrate intermediate leading to lower α-amylase activity. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. A specific RAGE-binding peptide biopanning from phage display random peptide library that ameliorates symptoms in amyloid β peptide-mediated neuronal disorder.

    PubMed

    Cai, Cuizan; Dai, Xiaoyong; Zhu, Yujie; Lian, Mengyang; Xiao, Fei; Dong, Fangyuan; Zhang, Qihao; Huang, Yadong; Zheng, Qing

    2016-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is an age-related neurodegenerative disorder in which amyloid β (Aβ) peptide accumulates in the brain. The receptor for advanced glycation end product (RAGE) is a cellular binding site for Aβ peptide and mediates amyloid β-induced perturbations in cerebral vessels, neurons, and microglia in AD. Here, we identified a specific high-affinity RAGE inhibitor (APDTKTQ named RP-1) from a phage display library. RP-1 bound to RAGE and inhibited Aβ peptide-induced cellular stress in human neuroblastoma SH-SYSY cells in vitro. Three amino acids in RP-1 are identical to those in the Aβ peptide. RP-1 shows high homology to the 16-23 (KLVFFAED) regions in Aβ peptide and high-affinity RAGE. Functional analyses indicated that RP-1 significantly reduced the level of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and ROS products and that it enhanced catalase and glutathione peroxidase (GPx) activity. Furthermore, it inactivated caspase3 and caspase9 and inhibited the upregulation of RAGE, nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB), and beta-site amyloid precursor protein-cleaving enzyme 1 (BACE1) protein expression. In addition, RP-1 activated the PI3K/AKT signaling pathway, inhibiting the interaction between Bax and Bcl-2. Our data suggest that RP-1 is a potent RAGE blocker that effectively controls the progression of Aβ peptide-mediated brain disorders and that it may have potential as a disease-modifying agent for AD.

  16. Revisiting the arthritogenic peptide theory: quantitative not qualitative changes in the peptide repertoire of HLA-B27 allotypes.

    PubMed

    Schittenhelm, Ralf B; Sian, Terry C C Lim Kam; Wilmann, Pascal G; Dudek, Nadine L; Purcell, Anthony W

    2015-03-01

    The association of HLA-B27 with spondyloarthropathy is one of the strongest documented for any autoimmune disease. A common hypothesis for this association is the arthritogenic peptide concept. This dictates that differences in the peptide binding preferences of disease-associated and non-disease-associated HLA-B27 allotypes underlie the presentation of bacterial and self-peptides, leading to cross-reactive T cell immunity and subsequent autoimmune attack of affected tissues. The aim of this study was to analyze and compare self-peptides from 8 HLA-B27 allotypes, to increase existing data sets of HLA-B27 ligands, to refine and compare their consensus-binding motifs, and to reveal similarities and differences in the peptide repertoire of the HLA-B27 subtypes. Qualitative differences in the peptides bound to the 8 most frequent HLA-B27 subtypes were determined by tandem mass spectrometry, and quantitative changes in allelic binding specificities were determined by highly sensitive and targeted multiple reaction monitoring mass spectrometry. We identified >7,500 major histocompatibility complex class I peptides derived from the 8 most common HLA-B27 allotypes (HLA-B*27:02 to HLA-B*27:09). We describe individual binding motifs for these alleles for the 9-12-mer ligands. The peptide repertoires of these closely related alleles showed significant overlap. Allelic polymorphisms resulting in changes in the amino acid composition of the antigen-binding cleft manifested largely as quantitative changes in the peptide cargo of these molecules. Absolute binding preferences of HLA-B27 allotypes do not explain disease association. The arthritogenic peptide theory needs to be reassessed in terms of quantitative changes in self-peptide presentation, T cell selection, and altered conformation of bound peptides. Copyright © 2015 by the American College of Rheumatology.

  17. Antimicrobial activity and interactions of cationic peptides derived from Galleria mellonella cecropin D-like peptide with model membranes.

    PubMed

    Oñate-Garzón, José; Manrique-Moreno, Marcela; Trier, Steven; Leidy, Chad; Torres, Rodrigo; Patiño, Edwin

    2017-03-01

    Antimicrobial peptides are effector molecules of the innate immune system against invading pathogens. The cationic charge in their structures has a strong correlation with antimicrobial activity, being responsible for the initial electrostatic interaction between peptides and the anionic microbial surface. This paper contains evidence that charge modification in the neutral peptide Gm cecropin D-like (WT) improved the antimicrobial activity of the modified peptides. Two cationic peptides derived from WT sequence named as ΔM1 and ΔM2, with net charge of +5 and +9, respectively, showed at least an eightfold increase in their antimicrobial activity in comparison to WT. The mechanism of action of these peptides was investigated using small unilamellar vesicles (SUVs) as model membranes. To study permeabilization effects of the peptides on cell membranes, entrapped calcein liposomes were used and the results showed that all peptides induced calcein release from 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoglycerol (POPG) SUVs, whereas in 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (POPC), POPC/POPG and 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine (POPE)/POPG SUVs, only ΔM1 and ΔM2 induced a notable permeabilization. In addition, interactions of these peptides with phospholipids at the level of the glycerol backbone and hydrophobic domain were studied through observed changes in generalized polarization and fluorescence anisotropy using probes such as Laurdan and DPH, respectively. The results suggest that peptides slightly ordered the bilayer structure at the level of glycerol backbone and on the hydrophobic core in 1,2-dimyristoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoglycerol (DMPG) SUVs, whereas in 1,2-dimyristoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DMPC)/DMPG SUVs, only ΔM1 and ΔM2 peptides increased the order of bilayers. Thus, peptides would be inducing clustering of phospholipids creating phospholipid domains with a higher phase transition temperature.

  18. Avian Antimicrobial Host Defense Peptides: From Biology to Therapeutic Applications

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Guolong; Sunkara, Lakshmi T.

    2014-01-01

    Host defense peptides (HDPs) are an important first line of defense with antimicrobial and immunomoduatory properties. Because they act on the microbial membranes or host immune cells, HDPs pose a low risk of triggering microbial resistance and therefore, are being actively investigated as a novel class of antimicrobials and vaccine adjuvants. Cathelicidins and β-defensins are two major families of HDPs in avian species. More than a dozen HDPs exist in birds, with the genes in each HDP family clustered in a single chromosomal segment, apparently as a result of gene duplication and diversification. In contrast to their mammalian counterparts that adopt various spatial conformations, mature avian cathelicidins are mostly α-helical. Avian β-defensins, on the other hand, adopt triple-stranded β-sheet structures similar to their mammalian relatives. Besides classical β-defensins, a group of avian-specific β-defensin-related peptides, namely ovodefensins, exist with a different six-cysteine motif. Like their mammalian counterparts, avian cathelicidins and defensins are derived from either myeloid or epithelial origin expressed in a majority of tissues with broad-spectrum antibacterial and immune regulatory activities. Structure-function relationship studies with several avian HDPs have led to identification of the peptide analogs with potential for use as antimicrobials and vaccine adjuvants. Dietary modulation of endogenous HDP synthesis has also emerged as a promising alternative approach to disease control and prevention in chickens. PMID:24583933

  19. Efficient Covalent Bond Formation in Gas-Phase Peptide-Peptide Ion Complexes with the Photoleucine Stapler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaffer, Christopher J.; Andrikopoulos, Prokopis C.; Řezáč, Jan; Rulíšek, Lubomír; Tureček, František

    2016-04-01

    Noncovalent complexes of hydrophobic peptides GLLLG and GLLLK with photoleucine (L*) tagged peptides G(L* n L m )K (n = 1,3, m = 2,0) were generated as singly charged ions in the gas phase and probed by photodissociation at 355 nm. Carbene intermediates produced by photodissociative loss of N2 from the L* diazirine rings underwent insertion into X-H bonds of the target peptide moiety, forming covalent adducts with yields reaching 30%. Gas-phase sequencing of the covalent adducts revealed preferred bond formation at the C-terminal residue of the target peptide. Site-selective carbene insertion was achieved by placing the L* residue in different positions along the photopeptide chain, and the residues in the target peptide undergoing carbene insertion were identified by gas-phase ion sequencing that was aided by specific 13C labeling. Density functional theory calculations indicated that noncovalent binding to GL*L*L*K resulted in substantial changes of the (GLLLK + H)+ ground state conformation. The peptide moieties in [GL*L*LK + GLLLK + H]+ ion complexes were held together by hydrogen bonds, whereas dispersion interactions of the nonpolar groups were only secondary in ground-state 0 K structures. Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics for 100 ps trajectories of several different conformers at the 310 K laboratory temperature showed that noncovalent complexes developed multiple, residue-specific contacts between the diazirine carbons and GLLLK residues. The calculations pointed to the substantial fluidity of the nonpolar side chains in the complexes. Diazirine photochemistry in combination with Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics is a promising tool for investigations of peptide-peptide ion interactions in the gas phase.

  20. Peptide-membrane Interactions by Spin-labeling EPR

    PubMed Central

    Smirnova, Tatyana I.; Smirnov, Alex I.

    2016-01-01

    Site-directed spin labeling (SDSL) in combination with Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) spectroscopy is a well-established method that has recently grown in popularity as an experimental technique, with multiple applications in protein and peptide science. The growth is driven by development of labeling strategies, as well as by considerable technical advances in the field, that are paralleled by an increased availability of EPR instrumentation. While the method requires an introduction of a paramagnetic probe at a well-defined position in a peptide sequence, it has been shown to be minimally destructive to the peptide structure and energetics of the peptide-membrane interactions. In this chapter, we describe basic approaches for using SDSL EPR spectroscopy to study interactions between small peptides and biological membranes or membrane mimetic systems. We focus on experimental approaches to quantify peptide-membrane binding, topology of bound peptides, and characterize peptide aggregation. Sample preparation protocols including spin-labeling methods and preparation of membrane mimetic systems are also described. PMID:26477253

  1. Highly sensitive detection of influenza virus by boron-doped diamond electrode terminated with sialic acid-mimic peptide.

    PubMed

    Matsubara, Teruhiko; Ujie, Michiko; Yamamoto, Takashi; Akahori, Miku; Einaga, Yasuaki; Sato, Toshinori

    2016-08-09

    The progression of influenza varies according to age and the presence of an underlying disease; appropriate treatment is therefore required to prevent severe disease. Anti-influenza therapy, such as with neuraminidase inhibitors, is effective, but diagnosis at an early phase of infection before viral propagation is critical. Here, we show that several dozen plaque-forming units (pfu) of influenza virus (IFV) can be detected using a boron-doped diamond (BDD) electrode terminated with a sialic acid-mimic peptide. The peptide was used instead of the sialyloligosaccharide receptor, which is the common receptor of influenza A and B viruses required during the early phase of infection, to capture IFV particles. The peptide, which was previously identified by phage-display technology, was immobilized by click chemistry on the BDD electrode, which has excellent electrochemical characteristics such as low background current and weak adsorption of biomolecules. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy revealed that H1N1 and H3N2 IFVs were detectable in the range of 20-500 pfu by using the peptide-terminated BDD electrode. Our results demonstrate that the BDD device integrated with the receptor-mimic peptide has high sensitivity for detection of a low number of virus particles in the early phase of infection.

  2. The central repeat domain 1 of Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) latency associated-nuclear antigen 1 (LANA1) prevents cis MHC class I peptide presentation

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Kwun, Hyun Jin; Ramos da Silva, Suzane; Department of Pathology, Botucatu School of Medicine at Sao Paulo State University, Sao Paulo

    KSHV LANA1, a latent protein expressed during chronic infection to maintain a viral genome, inhibits major histocompatibility complex class I (MHC I) peptide presentation in cis as a means of immune evasion. Through deletional cloning, we localized this function to the LANA1 central repeat 1 (CR1) subregion. Other CR subregions retard LANA1 translation and proteasomal processing but do not markedly inhibit LANA1 peptide processing by MHC I. Inhibition of proteasomal processing ablates LANA1 peptide presentation. Direct expression of LANA1 within the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) overcomes CR1 inhibition suggesting that CR1 acts prior to translocation of cytoplasmic peptides into the ER.more » By physically separating CR1 from other subdomains, we show that LANA1 evades MHC I peptide processing by a mechanism distinct from other herpesviruses including Epstein-Barr virus (EBV). Although LANA1 and EBV EBNA1 are functionally similar, they appear to use different mechanisms to evade host cytotoxic T lymphocyte surveillance.« less

  3. Biological assay using T cell response for Cry-consensus peptide designed for the peptide-based immunotherapy of Japanese cedar pollinosis.

    PubMed

    Kozutsumi, Daisuke; Tsunematsu, Masako; Yamaji, Taketo; Kino, Kohsuke

    2007-01-01

    Cry-consensus peptide is a linearly linked peptide of T-cell epitopes for the management of Japanese cedar (JC) pollinosis and is expected to become a new drug for immunotherapy. However, the mechanism of T-cell epitopes in allergic diseases is not well understood, and thus, a simple in vitro procedure for evaluation of its biological activity is desired. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) were isolated from 27 JC pollinosis patients and 10 healthy subjects, and cultured in vitro for 4 days in the presence of Cry-consensus peptide and (3)H-thymidine. The relationship between growth stimulation (stimulation index; SI) and antigen-specific IgE levels in serum was also investigated in JC pollinosis patients. Moreover, to confirm the importance of the primary sequence in Cry-consensus peptide, heat-treated Cry-consensus peptide and a mixture of the amino acids of which Cry-consensus peptide is composed, and their (3)H-thymidine uptake was compared with Cry-consensus peptide. Finally, whether Cry-consensus peptide stimulates PBMCs from healthy subjects was investigated. The mean SI of JC patients showed a good correlation with Cry-consensus peptide concentration in the culture medium; however, the SI was independent of the anti-Cry j 1 IgE level. Heat-denatured Cry-consensus peptide retained a PBMC proliferation stimulatory effect comparable to the original Cry-consensus peptide, while the mixture of amino acids constituting Cry-consensus peptide did not stimulate PBMC proliferation. PBMCs from healthy subjects did not respond to Cry-consensus peptide at all. These data indicate that the PBMC response of patients suffering from JC pollinosis to Cry-consensus peptide is specific for the sequence of T cell epitopes thereof and may be useful for the evaluation of the efficacy of Cry-consensus peptide in vivo.

  4. Toward structure prediction of cyclic peptides.

    PubMed

    Yu, Hongtao; Lin, Yu-Shan

    2015-02-14

    Cyclic peptides are a promising class of molecules that can be used to target specific protein-protein interactions. A computational method to accurately predict their structures would substantially advance the development of cyclic peptides as modulators of protein-protein interactions. Here, we develop a computational method that integrates bias-exchange metadynamics simulations, a Boltzmann reweighting scheme, dihedral principal component analysis and a modified density peak-based cluster analysis to provide a converged structural description for cyclic peptides. Using this method, we evaluate the performance of a number of popular protein force fields on a model cyclic peptide. All the tested force fields seem to over-stabilize the α-helix and PPII/β regions in the Ramachandran plot, commonly populated by linear peptides and proteins. Our findings suggest that re-parameterization of a force field that well describes the full Ramachandran plot is necessary to accurately model cyclic peptides.

  5. Synthesis of a Bifunctional Peptide Inhibitor-IgG1 Fc Fusion That Suppresses Experimental Autoimmune Encephalomyelitis.

    PubMed

    White, Derek R; Khedri, Zahra; Kiptoo, Paul; Siahaan, Teruna J; Tolbert, Thomas J

    2017-07-19

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a neurodegenerative disease that is estimated to affect over 2.3 million people worldwide. The exact cause for this disease is unknown but involves immune system attack and destruction of the myelin protein surrounding the neurons in the central nervous system. One promising class of compounds that selectively prevent the activation of immune cells involved in the pathway leading to myelin destruction are bifunctional peptide inhibitors (BPIs). Treatment with BPIs reduces neurodegenerative symptoms in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), a mouse model of MS. In this work, as an effort to further improve the bioactivity of BPIs, BPI peptides were conjugated to the N- and C-termini of the fragment crystallizable (Fc) region of the human IgG1 antibody. Initially, the two peptides were conjugated to IgG1 Fc using recombinant DNA technology. However, expression in yeast resulted in low yields and one of the peptides being heavily proteolyzed. To circumvent this problem, the poorly expressed peptide was instead produced by solid phase peptide synthesis and conjugated enzymatically using a sortase-mediated ligation. The sortase-mediated method showed near-complete conjugation yield as observed by SDS-PAGE and mass spectrometry in small-scale reactions. This method was scaled up to obtain sufficient quantities for testing the BPI-Fc fusion in mice induced with EAE. Compared to the PBS-treated control, mice treated with the BPI-Fc fusion showed significantly reduced disease symptoms, did not experience weight loss, and showed reduced de-myelination. These results demonstrate that the BPI peptides were highly active at suppressing EAE when conjugated to the large Fc scaffold in this manner.

  6. SATPdb: a database of structurally annotated therapeutic peptides

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Sandeep; Chaudhary, Kumardeep; Dhanda, Sandeep Kumar; Bhalla, Sherry; Usmani, Salman Sadullah; Gautam, Ankur; Tuknait, Abhishek; Agrawal, Piyush; Mathur, Deepika; Raghava, Gajendra P.S.

    2016-01-01

    SATPdb (http://crdd.osdd.net/raghava/satpdb/) is a database of structurally annotated therapeutic peptides, curated from 22 public domain peptide databases/datasets including 9 of our own. The current version holds 19192 unique experimentally validated therapeutic peptide sequences having length between 2 and 50 amino acids. It covers peptides having natural, non-natural and modified residues. These peptides were systematically grouped into 10 categories based on their major function or therapeutic property like 1099 anticancer, 10585 antimicrobial, 1642 drug delivery and 1698 antihypertensive peptides. We assigned or annotated structure of these therapeutic peptides using structural databases (Protein Data Bank) and state-of-the-art structure prediction methods like I-TASSER, HHsearch and PEPstrMOD. In addition, SATPdb facilitates users in performing various tasks that include: (i) structure and sequence similarity search, (ii) peptide browsing based on their function and properties, (iii) identification of moonlighting peptides and (iv) searching of peptides having desired structure and therapeutic activities. We hope this database will be useful for researchers working in the field of peptide-based therapeutics. PMID:26527728

  7. Peptides for functionalization of InP semiconductors.

    PubMed

    Estephan, Elias; Saab, Marie-belle; Larroque, Christian; Martin, Marta; Olsson, Fredrik; Lourdudoss, Sebastian; Gergely, Csilla

    2009-09-15

    The challenge is to achieve high specificity in molecular sensing by proper functionalization of micro/nano-structured semiconductors by peptides that reveal specific recognition for these structures. Here we report on surface modification of the InP semiconductors by adhesion peptides produced by the phage display technique. An M13 bacteriophage library has been used to screen 10(10) different peptides against the InP(001) and the InP(111) surfaces to finally isolate specific peptides for each orientation of the InP. MALDI-TOF/TOF mass spectrometry has been employed to study real affinity of the peptide towards the InP surfaces. The peptides serve for controlled placement of biotin onto InP to bind then streptavidin. Our Atomic Force Microscopy study revealed a total surface coverage of molecules when the InP surface was functionalized by its specific biotinylated peptide (YAIKGPSHFRPS). Finally, fluorescence microscopy has been employed to demonstrate the preferential attachment of the peptide onto a micro-patterned InP surface. Use of substrate specific peptides could present an alternative solution for the problems encountered in the actually existing sensing methods and molecular self-assembly due to the unwanted unspecific interactions.

  8. The optimization of peptide cargo bound to MHC class I molecules by the peptide-loading complex.

    PubMed

    Elliott, Tim; Williams, Anthony

    2005-10-01

    Major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I complexes present peptides from both self and foreign intracellular proteins on the surface of most nucleated cells. The assembled heterotrimeric complexes consist of a polymorphic glycosylated heavy chain, non-polymorphic beta(2) microglobulin, and a peptide of typically nine amino acids in length. Assembly of the class I complexes occurs in the endoplasmic reticulum and is assisted by a number of chaperone molecules. A multimolecular unit termed the peptide-loading complex (PLC) is integral to this process. The PLC contains a peptide transporter (transporter associated with antigen processing), a thiooxido-reductase (ERp57), a glycoprotein chaperone (calreticulin), and tapasin, a class I-specific chaperone. We suggest that class I assembly involves a process of optimization where the peptide cargo of the complex is edited by the PLC. Furthermore, this selective peptide loading is biased toward peptides that have a longer off-rate from the assembled complex. We suggest that tapasin is the key chaperone that directs this action of the PLC with secondary contributions from calreticulin and possibly ERp57. We provide a framework model for how this may operate at the molecular level and draw parallels with the proposed mechanism of action of human leukocyte antigen-DM for MHC class II complex optimization.

  9. Lactobacillus paracasei CBA L74 interferes with gliadin peptides entrance in Caco-2 cells.

    PubMed

    Sarno, Marco; Lania, Giuliana; Cuomo, Marialaura; Nigro, Federica; Passannanti, Francesca; Budelli, Andrea; Fasano, Francesca; Troncone, Riccardo; Auricchio, Salvatore; Barone, Maria Vittoria; Nigro, Roberto; Nanayakkara, Merlin

    2014-12-01

    Several recent reports describe a role of probiotics as a therapeutic approach for celiac disease (CD). Two undigested A-gliadin peptides, P31-43 and P57-68, are central to CD pathogenesis, inducing an innate and an adaptive immune response, respectively. They enter enterocytes and localize to vesicular compartment to induce their toxic/immunogenics effects. In this article, we tested the effect of probiotic Lactobacillus paracasei (LP) CBA L74 (International Depository Accession Number LMG P-24778), its supernatant and LP-fermented cereals on gliadin peptides, P31-43 and P57-68, entrance in Caco-2 cells. Both LP CBA L74 and its supernatant inhibit P31-43 (intensity of fluorescence; FI: 75%) and P57-68 (FI: 50%) entrance in Caco2 cells, indicating that this biological effect is due to some product included in LP CBA L74 supernatant. This effect was present also after fermentation of cereals. This study describes a novel effect of probiotics in the prevention of undigested gliadin peptides toxic effects.

  10. Chemical reactions directed Peptide self-assembly.

    PubMed

    Rasale, Dnyaneshwar B; Das, Apurba K

    2015-05-13

    Fabrication of self-assembled nanostructures is one of the important aspects in nanoscience and nanotechnology. The study of self-assembled soft materials remains an area of interest due to their potential applications in biomedicine. The versatile properties of soft materials can be tuned using a bottom up approach of small molecules. Peptide based self-assembly has significant impact in biology because of its unique features such as biocompatibility, straight peptide chain and the presence of different side chain functionality. These unique features explore peptides in various self-assembly process. In this review, we briefly introduce chemical reaction-mediated peptide self-assembly. Herein, we have emphasised enzymes, native chemical ligation and photochemical reactions in the exploration of peptide self-assembly.

  11. Isolation and characterisation of sericin antifreeze peptides and molecular dynamics modelling of their ice-binding interaction.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jinhong; Rong, Yuzhi; Wang, Zhengwu; Zhou, Yanfu; Wang, Shaoyun; Zhao, Bo

    2015-05-01

    This study aimed to isolate and characterise a novel sericin antifreeze peptide and investigate its ice-binding molecular mechanism. The thermal hysteresis activity of ice-binding sericin peptides (I-SP) was measured and their activity reached as high as 0.94 °C. A P4 fraction, with high hypothermia protective activity and inhibition activity of ice recrystallisation, was obtained from I-SP, and a purified sericin peptide, named SM-AFP, with the sequence of TTSPTNVSTT and a molecular weight of 1009.50 Da was then isolated from the P4 fraction. Treatment of Lactobacillus delbrueckii Subsp. bulgaricus LB340 LYO with 100 μg/ml synthetic SM-AFP led to 1.4-fold increased survival (p < 0.05). Finally, an SM-AFP/ice binding model was constructed and results of molecular dynamics simulation suggested that the binding of SM-AFP with ice and prevention of ice crystal growth could be attributed to hydrogen bond formation, hydrophobic interaction and non-bond interactions. Sericin peptides could be developed into beneficial cryoprotectants and used in frozen food processing. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Treating autoimmune disorders with venom-derived peptides.

    PubMed

    Shen, Bingzheng; Cao, Zhijian; Li, Wenxin; Sabatier, Jean-Marc; Wu, Yingliang

    2017-09-01

    The effective treatment of autoimmune diseases remains a challenge. Voltage-gated potassium Kv1.3 channels, which are expressed in lymphocytes, are a new therapeutic target for treating autoimmune disease. Consequently, Kv1.3 channel-inhibiting venom-derived peptides are a prospective resource for new drug discovery and clinical application. Area covered: Preclinical and clinical studies have produced a wealth of information on Kv1.3 channel-inhibiting venom-derived peptides, especially from venomous scorpions and sea anemones. This review highlights the advances in screening and design of these peptides with diverse structures and potencies. It focuses on representative strategies for improving peptide selectivity and discusses the preclinical research on those venom-derived peptides as well as their clinical developmental status. Expert opinion: Encouraging results indicate that peptides isolated from the venom of venomous animals are a large resource for discovering immunomodulators that act on Kv1.3 channels. Since the structural diversity of venom-derived peptides determines the variety of their pharmacological activities, the design and optimization of venom-peptides for improved Kv1.3 channel-specificity has been advanced through some representative strategies, such as peptide chemical modification, amino acid residue truncation and binding interface modulation. These advances should further accelerate research, development and the future clinical application of venom-derived peptides selectively targeting Kv1.3 channels.

  13. Self-Assembled Peptide-Lanthanide Nanoclusters for Safe Tumor Therapy: Overcoming and Utilizing Biological Barriers to Peptide Drug Delivery.

    PubMed

    Yan, Jin; He, Wangxiao; Yan, Siqi; Niu, Fan; Liu, Tianya; Ma, Bohan; Shao, Yongping; Yan, Yuwei; Yang, Guang; Lu, Wuyuan; Du, Yaping; Lei, Bo; Ma, Peter X

    2018-02-27

    Developing a sophisticated nanomedicine platform to deliver therapeutics effectively and safely into tumor/cancer cells remains challenging in the field of nanomedicine. In particular, reliable peptide drug delivery systems capable of overcoming biological barriers are still lacking. Here, we developed a simple, rapid, and robust strategy to manufacture nanoclusters of ∼90 nm in diameter that are self-assembled from lanthanide-doped nanoparticles (5 nm), two anticancer peptides with different targets (BIM and PMI), and one cyclic peptide iNGR targeted to cancer cells. The peptide-lanthanide nanoclusters (LDC-PMI-BIM-iNGR) enhanced the resistance of peptide drugs to proteolysis, disassembled in response to reductive conditions that are present in the tumor microenvironment and inhibited cancer cell growth in vitro and in vivo. Notably, LDC-PMI-BIM-iNGR exhibited extremely low systemic toxicity and side effects in vivo. Thus, the peptide-lanthanide nanocluster may serve as an ideal multifunctional platform for safe, targeted, and efficient peptide drug delivery in cancer therapy.

  14. Renalase prevents AKI independent of amine oxidase activity.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ling; Velazquez, Heino; Moeckel, Gilbert; Chang, John; Ham, Ahrom; Lee, H Thomas; Safirstein, Robert; Desir, Gary V

    2014-06-01

    AKI is characterized by increased catecholamine levels and hypertension. Renalase, a secretory flavoprotein that oxidizes catecholamines, attenuates ischemic injury and the associated increase in catecholamine levels in mice. However, whether the amine oxidase activity of renalase is involved in preventing ischemic injury is debated. In this study, recombinant renalase protected human proximal tubular (HK-2) cells against cisplatin- and hydrogen peroxide-induced necrosis. Similarly, genetic depletion of renalase in mice (renalase knockout) exacerbated kidney injury in animals subjected to cisplatin-induced AKI. Interestingly, compared with the intact renalase protein, a 20-amino acid peptide (RP-220), which is conserved in all known renalase isoforms, but lacks detectable oxidase activity, was equally effective at protecting HK-2 cells against toxic injury and preventing ischemic injury in wild-type mice. Furthermore, in vitro treatment with RP-220 or recombinant renalase rapidly activated Akt, extracellular signal-regulated kinase, and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinases and downregulated c-Jun N-terminal kinase. In summary, renalase promotes cell survival and protects against renal injury in mice through the activation of intracellular signaling cascades, independent of its ability to metabolize catecholamines, and we have identified the region of renalase required for these effects. Renalase and related peptides show potential as therapeutic agents for the prevention and treatment of AKI. Copyright © 2014 by the American Society of Nephrology.

  15. Understanding Peptide Oligomeric State in Langmuir Monolayers of Amphiphilic 3-Helix Bundle-Forming Peptide-PEG Conjugates

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Lund, Reidar; Ang, JooChuan; Shu, Jessica Y.

    Coiled-coil peptide-polymer conjugates are an emerging class of biomaterials. Fundamental understanding of the coiled-coil oligomeric state and assembly process of these hybrid building blocks is necessary to exert control over their assembly into well-defined structures. Here in this paper, we studied the effect of peptide structure and PEGylation on the self-assembly process and oligomeric state of a Langmuir monolayer of amphiphilic coiled-coil peptide-polymer conjugates using X-ray reflectivity (XR) and grazing-incidence X-ray diffraction (GIXD). Our results show that the oligomeric state of PEGylated amphiphiles based on 3-helix bundle-forming peptide is surface pressure dependent, a mixture of dimers and trimers was formedmore » at intermediate surface pressure but transitions into trimers completely upon increasing surface pressure. Moreover, the interhelical distance within the coiled-coil bundle of 3-helix peptide-PEG conjugate amphiphiles was not perturbed under high surface pressure. Present studies provide valuable insights into the self-assembly process of hybrid peptide-polymer conjugates and guidance to develop biomaterials with controlled multivalency of ligand presentation.« less

  16. Understanding Peptide Oligomeric State in Langmuir Monolayers of Amphiphilic 3-Helix Bundle-Forming Peptide-PEG Conjugates

    DOE PAGES

    Lund, Reidar; Ang, JooChuan; Shu, Jessica Y.; ...

    2016-10-26

    Coiled-coil peptide-polymer conjugates are an emerging class of biomaterials. Fundamental understanding of the coiled-coil oligomeric state and assembly process of these hybrid building blocks is necessary to exert control over their assembly into well-defined structures. Here in this paper, we studied the effect of peptide structure and PEGylation on the self-assembly process and oligomeric state of a Langmuir monolayer of amphiphilic coiled-coil peptide-polymer conjugates using X-ray reflectivity (XR) and grazing-incidence X-ray diffraction (GIXD). Our results show that the oligomeric state of PEGylated amphiphiles based on 3-helix bundle-forming peptide is surface pressure dependent, a mixture of dimers and trimers was formedmore » at intermediate surface pressure but transitions into trimers completely upon increasing surface pressure. Moreover, the interhelical distance within the coiled-coil bundle of 3-helix peptide-PEG conjugate amphiphiles was not perturbed under high surface pressure. Present studies provide valuable insights into the self-assembly process of hybrid peptide-polymer conjugates and guidance to develop biomaterials with controlled multivalency of ligand presentation.« less

  17. A synthetic peptide shows retro- and anterograde neuronal transport before disrupting the chemosensation of plant-pathogenic nematodes.

    PubMed

    Wang, Dong; Jones, Laura M; Urwin, Peter E; Atkinson, Howard J

    2011-03-07

    Cyst nematodes are a group of plant pathogens each with a defined host range that cause major losses to crops including potato, soybean and sugar beet. The infective mobile stage hatches from dormant eggs and moves a short distance through the soil to plant roots, which it then invades. A novel strategy for control has recently been proposed in which the plant is able to secrete a peptide which disorientates the infective stage and prevents invasion of the pathogen. This study provides indirect evidence to support the mechanism by which one such peptide disrupts chemosensory function in nematodes. The peptide is a disulphide-constrained 7-mer with the amino acid sequence CTTMHPRLC that binds to nicotinic acetylcholine receptors. A fluorescently tagged version of this peptide with both epifluorescent and confocal microscopy was used to demonstrate that retrograde transport occurs from an aqueous environment along bare-ending primary cilia of chemoreceptive sensilla. The peptide is transported to the cell bodies of these neurons and on to a limited number of other neurons to which they connect. It appears to be localised in both neuronal processes and organelles adjacent to nuclei of some neurons suggesting it could be transported through the Golgi apparatus. The peptide takes 2.5 h to reach the neuronal cell bodies. Comparative studies established that similar but less abundant uptake occurs for Caenorhabditis elegans along its well studied dye-filling chemoreceptive neurons. Incubation in peptide solution or root-exudate from transgenic plants that secrete the peptide disrupted normal orientation of infective cyst nematodes to host root diffusate. The peptide probably undergoes transport along the dye-filling non-cholinergic chemoreceptive neurons to their synapses where it is taken up by the interneurons to which they connect. Coordinated responses to chemoreception are disrupted when the sub-set of cholinergic interneurons secrete the peptide at synapses that

  18. Structure-activity relationships of an antimicrobial peptide plantaricin s from two-peptide class IIb bacteriocins.

    PubMed

    Soliman, Wael; Wang, Liru; Bhattacharjee, Subir; Kaur, Kamaljit

    2011-04-14

    Class IIb bacteriocins are ribosomally synthesized antimicrobial peptides comprising two different peptides synergistically acting in equal amounts for optimal potency. In this study, we demonstrate for the first time potent (nanomolar) antimicrobial activity of a representative class IIb bacteriocin, plantaricin S (Pls), against four pathogenic gram-positive bacteria, including Listeria monocytogenes. The structure-activity relationships for Pls were studied using activity assays, circular dichroism (CD), and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. The two Pls peptides and five Pls derived fragments were synthesized. The CD spectra of the Pls and selected fragments revealed helical conformations in aqueous 2,2,2-trifluoroethanol. The MD simulations showed that when the two Pls peptides are in antiparallel orientation, the helical regions interact and align, mediated by strong attraction between conserved GxxxG/AxxxA motifs. The results strongly correlate with the antimicrobial activity suggesting that helix-helix alignment of the two Pls peptides and interaction between the conserved motifs are crucial for interaction with the target cell membrane.

  19. Mass spectrometric survey of peptides in cephalopods with an emphasis on the FMRFamide-related peptides.

    PubMed

    Sweedler, J V; Li, L; Floyd, P; Gilly, W

    2000-12-01

    A matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) mass spectrometric (MS) survey of the major peptides in the stellar, fin and pallial nerves and the posterior chromatophore lobe of the cephalopods Sepia officinalis, Loligo opalescens and Dosidicus gigas has been performed. Although a large number of putative peptides are distinct among the three species, several molecular masses are conserved. In addition to peptides, characterization of the lipid content of the nerves is reported, and these lipid peaks account for many of the lower molecular masses observed. One conserved set of peaks corresponds to the FMRFamide-related peptides (FRPs). The Loligo opalescens FMRFa gene has been sequenced. It encodes a 331 amino acid residue prohormone that is processed into 14 FRPs, which are both predicted by the nucleotide sequence and confirmed by MALDI MS. The FRPs predicted by this gene (FMRFa, FLRFa/FIRFa and ALSGDAFLRFa) are observed in all three species, indicating that members of this peptide family are highly conserved across cephalopods.

  20. Selective activation of the B natriuretic peptide receptor by C-type natriuretic peptide (CNP).

    PubMed

    Koller, K J; Lowe, D G; Bennett, G L; Minamino, N; Kangawa, K; Matsuo, H; Goeddel, D V

    1991-04-05

    The natriuretic peptides are hormones that can stimulate natriuretic, diuretic, and vasorelaxant activity in vivo, presumably through the activation of two known cell surface receptor guanylyl cyclases (ANPR-A and ANPR-B). Although atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) and, to a lesser extent, brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) are efficient activators of the ANPR-A guanylyl cyclase, neither hormone can significantly stimulate ANPR-B. A member of this hormone family, C-type natriuretic peptide (CNP), potently and selectively activated the human ANPR-B guanylyl cyclase. CNP does not increase guanosine 3',5'-monophosphate accumulation in cells expressing human ANPR-A. The affinity of CNP for ANPR-B is 50- or 500-fold higher than ANP or BNP, respectively. This ligand-receptor pair may be involved in the regulation of fluid homeostasis by the central nervous system.

  1. Antithrombotic Protective Effects of Arg-Pro-Gly-Pro Peptide during Emotional Stress Provoked by Forced Swimming Test in Rats.

    PubMed

    Grigor'eva, M E; Lyapina, L A

    2017-01-01

    Blood coagulation was enhanced and all factors (total, enzyme, and non-enzyme) of the fibrinolytic system were suppressed in rats in 60 min after forced swimming test. Argininecontaining tetrapeptide glyproline Arg-Pro-Gly-Pro administered prior to this test activated fibrinolysis and prevented hypercoagulation. Administration of this peptide in 5 min after swimming test also enhanced anticoagulant, fibrinolytic, and antithrombotic activity of the blood. Therefore, glyproline Arg-Pro-Gly-Pro exerted both preventive and curative effects on the hemostasis system and prevented enhancement of blood coagulation provoked by emotional stress modeled by forced swimming test.

  2. Improved Peptide and Protein Torsional Energetics with the OPLSAA Force Field.

    PubMed

    Robertson, Michael J; Tirado-Rives, Julian; Jorgensen, William L

    2015-07-14

    The development and validation of new peptide dihedral parameters are reported for the OPLS-AA force field. High accuracy quantum chemical methods were used to scan φ, ψ, χ1, and χ2 potential energy surfaces for blocked dipeptides. New Fourier coefficients for the dihedral angle terms of the OPLS-AA force field were fit to these surfaces, utilizing a Boltzmann-weighted error function and systematically examining the effects of weighting temperature. To prevent overfitting to the available data, a minimal number of new residue-specific and peptide-specific torsion terms were developed. Extensive experimental solution-phase and quantum chemical gas-phase benchmarks were used to assess the quality of the new parameters, named OPLS-AA/M, demonstrating significant improvement over previous OPLS-AA force fields. A Boltzmann weighting temperature of 2000 K was determined to be optimal for fitting the new Fourier coefficients for dihedral angle parameters. Conclusions are drawn from the results for best practices for developing new torsion parameters for protein force fields.

  3. Peptide bioregulators inhibit apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Khavinson, V K; Kvetnoii, I M

    2000-12-01

    The effects of peptide bioregulators epithalon and vilon on the dynamics of irradiation-induced apoptotic death of spleen lymphocytes in rats indicate that these agents inhibit physiologically programmed cell death. The antiapoptotic effect of vilon was more pronounced, which corroborates the concept on tissue-specific effect of peptide bioregulators.

  4. Definition of Proteasomal Peptide Splicing Rules for High-Efficiency Spliced Peptide Presentation by MHC Class I Molecules

    PubMed Central

    Berkers, Celia R.; de Jong, Annemieke; Schuurman, Karianne G.; Linnemann, Carsten; Meiring, Hugo D.; Janssen, Lennert; Neefjes, Jacques J.; Schumacher, Ton N. M.; Rodenko, Boris

    2015-01-01

    Peptide splicing, in which two distant parts of a protein are excised and then ligated to form a novel peptide, can generate unique MHC class I–restricted responses. Because these peptides are not genetically encoded and the rules behind proteasomal splicing are unknown, it is difficult to predict these spliced Ags. In the current study, small libraries of short peptides were used to identify amino acid sequences that affect the efficiency of this transpeptidation process. We observed that splicing does not occur at random, neither in terms of the amino acid sequences nor through random splicing of peptides from different sources. In contrast, splicing followed distinct rules that we deduced and validated both in vitro and in cells. Peptide ligation was quantified using a model peptide and demonstrated to occur with up to 30% ligation efficiency in vitro, provided that optimal structural requirements for ligation were met by both ligating partners. In addition, many splicing products could be formed from a single protein. Our splicing rules will facilitate prediction and detection of new spliced Ags to expand the peptidome presented by MHC class I Ags. PMID:26401003

  5. Chemical Reactions Directed Peptide Self-Assembly

    PubMed Central

    Rasale, Dnyaneshwar B.; Das, Apurba K.

    2015-01-01

    Fabrication of self-assembled nanostructures is one of the important aspects in nanoscience and nanotechnology. The study of self-assembled soft materials remains an area of interest due to their potential applications in biomedicine. The versatile properties of soft materials can be tuned using a bottom up approach of small molecules. Peptide based self-assembly has significant impact in biology because of its unique features such as biocompatibility, straight peptide chain and the presence of different side chain functionality. These unique features explore peptides in various self-assembly process. In this review, we briefly introduce chemical reaction-mediated peptide self-assembly. Herein, we have emphasised enzymes, native chemical ligation and photochemical reactions in the exploration of peptide self-assembly. PMID:25984603

  6. How much of virus-specific CD8 T cell reactivity is detected with a peptide pool when compared to individual peptides?

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wenji; Moldovan, Ioana; Targoni, Oleg S; Subbramanian, Ramu A; Lehmann, Paul V

    2012-10-29

    Immune monitoring of T cell responses increasingly relies on the use of peptide pools. Peptides, when restricted by the same HLA allele, and presented from within the same peptide pool, can compete for HLA binding sites. What impact such competition has on functional T cell stimulation, however, is not clear. Using a model peptide pool that is comprised of 32 well-defined viral epitopes from Cytomegalovirus, Epstein-Barr virus, and Influenza viruses (CEF peptide pool), we assessed peptide competition in PBMC from 42 human subjects. The magnitude of the peptide pool-elicited CD8 T cell responses was a mean 79% and a median 77% of the sum of the CD8 T cell responses elicited by the individual peptides. Therefore, while the effect of peptide competition was evident, it was of a relatively minor magnitude. By studying the dose-response curves for individual CEF peptides, we show that several of these peptides are present in the CEF-pool at concentrations that are orders of magnitude in excess of what is needed for the activation threshold of the CD8 T cells. The presence of such T cells with very high functional avidity for the viral antigens can explain why the effect of peptide competition is relatively minor within the CEF-pool.

  7. High Specific Selectivity and Membrane-Active Mechanism of Synthetic Cationic Hybrid Antimicrobial Peptides Based on the Peptide FV7

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Tingting; Wu, Di; Li, Weizhong; Zheng, Xin; Li, Weifen; Shan, Anshan

    2017-01-01

    Hybrid peptides integrating different functional domains of peptides have many advantages, such as remarkable antimicrobial activity, lower hemolysis and ideal cell selectivity, compared with natural antimicrobial peptides. FV7 (FRIRVRV-NH2), a consensus amphiphilic sequence was identified as being analogous to host defense peptides. In this study, we designed a series of hybrid peptides FV7-LL-37 (17–29) (FV-LL), FV7-magainin 2 (9–21) (FV-MA) and FV7-cecropin A (1–8) (FV-CE) by combining the FV7 sequence with the small functional sequences LL-37 (17–29) (LL), magainin 2 (9–21) (MA) and cecropin A (1–8) (CE) which all come from well-described natural peptides. The results demonstrated that the synthetic hybrid peptides, in particular FV-LL, had potent antibacterial activities over a wide range of Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria with lower hemolytic activity than other peptides. Furthermore, fluorescent spectroscopy indicated that the hybrid peptide FV-LL exhibited marked membrane destruction by inducing outer and inner bacterial membrane permeabilization, while scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) demonstrated that FV-LL damaged membrane integrity by disrupting the bacterial membrane. Inhibiting biofilm formation assays also showed that FV-LL had similar anti-biofilm activity compared with the functional peptide sequence FV7. Synthetic cationic hybrid peptides based on FV7 could provide new models for combining different functional domains and demonstrate effective avenues to screen for novel antimicrobial agents. PMID:28178190

  8. Discovery of GPX4 inhibitory peptides from random peptide T7 phage display and subsequent structural analysis.

    PubMed

    Sakamoto, Kotaro; Sogabe, Satoshi; Kamada, Yusuke; Matsumoto, Shin-Ichi; Kadotani, Akito; Sakamoto, Jun-Ichi; Tani, Akiyoshi

    2017-01-08

    The phospholipid hydroperoxidase glutathione peroxidase (GPX4) is an enzyme that reduces lipid hydroperoxides in lipid membranes. Recently, GPX4 has been investigated as a target molecule that induces iron-dependent cell death (ferroptosis) selectively in cancer cells that express mutant Ras. GPX4 inhibitors have the potential to become novel anti-cancer drugs. However, there are no druggable pockets for conventional small molecules on the molecular surface of GPX4. To generate GPX4 inhibitors, we examined the use of peptides as an alternative to small molecules. By screening peptide libraries displayed on T7 phages, and analyzing the X-ray crystal structures of the peptides, we successfully identified one peptide that binds to near Sec73 of catalytic site and two peptides that bind to another site on GPX4. To our knowledge, this is the first study reporting GPX4 inhibitory peptides and their structural information. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Biodegradable copolymers carrying cell-adhesion peptide sequences.

    PubMed

    Proks, Vladimír; Machová, Lud'ka; Popelka, Stepán; Rypácek, Frantisek

    2003-01-01

    Amphiphilic block copolymers are used to create bioactive surfaces on biodegradable polymer scaffolds for tissue engineering. Cell-selective biomaterials can be prepared using copolymers containing peptide sequences derived from extracellular-matrix proteins (ECM). Here we discuss alternative ways for preparation of amphiphilic block copolymers composed of hydrophobic polylactide (PLA) and hydrophilic poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO) blocks with cell-adhesion peptide sequences. Copolymers PLA-b-PEO were prepared by a living polymerisation of lactide in dioxane with tin(II)2-ethylhexanoate as a catalyst. The following approaches for incorporation of peptides into copolymers were elaborated. (a) First, a side-chain protected Gly-Arg-Gly-Asp-Ser-Gly (GRGDSG) peptide was prepared by solid-phase peptide synthesis (SPPS) and then coupled with delta-hydroxy-Z-amino-PEO in solution. In the second step, the PLA block was grafted to it via a controlled polymerisation of lactide initiated by the hydroxy end-groups of PEO in the side-chain-protected GRGDSG-PEO. Deprotection of the peptide yielded a GRGDSG-b-PEO-b-PLA copolymer, with the peptide attached through its C-end. (b) A protected GRGDSG peptide was built up on a polymer resin and coupled with Z-carboxy-PEO using a solid-phase approach. After cleavage of the delta-hydroxy-PEO-GRGDSG copolymer from the resin, polymerisation of lactide followed by deprotection of the peptide yielded a PLA-b-PEO-b-GRGDSG block copolymer, in which the peptide is linked through its N-terminus.

  10. T7 lytic phage-displayed peptide libraries exhibit less sequence bias than M13 filamentous phage-displayed peptide libraries.

    PubMed

    Krumpe, Lauren R H; Atkinson, Andrew J; Smythers, Gary W; Kandel, Andrea; Schumacher, Kathryn M; McMahon, James B; Makowski, Lee; Mori, Toshiyuki

    2006-08-01

    We investigated whether the T7 system of phage display could produce peptide libraries of greater diversity than the M13 system of phage display due to the differing processes of lytic and filamentous phage morphogenesis. Using a bioinformatics-assisted computational approach, collections of random peptide sequences obtained from a T7 12-mer library (X(12)) and a T7 7-mer disulfide-constrained library (CX(7)C) were analyzed and compared with peptide populations obtained from New England BioLabs' M13 Ph.D.-12 and Ph.D.-C7C libraries. Based on this analysis, peptide libraries constructed with the T7 system have fewer amino acid biases, increased peptide diversity, and more normal distributions of peptide net charge and hydropathy than the M13 libraries. The greater diversity of T7-displayed libraries provides a potential resource of novel binding peptides for new as well as previously studied molecular targets. To demonstrate their utility, several of the T7-displayed peptide libraries were screened for streptavidin- and neutravidin-binding phage. Novel binding motifs were identified for each protein.

  11. Slc15a1 is involved in the transport of synthetic F5-peptide into the seminiferous epithelium in adult rat testes.

    PubMed

    Su, Linlin; Zhang, Yufei; Cheng, Yan C; Lee, Will M; Ye, Keping; Hu, Dahai

    2015-11-05

    Spermiation and BTB restructuring, two critical cellular events that occur across seminiferous epithelium in mammalian testis during spermatogenesis, are tightly coordinated by biologically active peptides released from laminin chains. Our earlier study reported that F5-peptide, synthesized based on a stretch of 50 amino acids within laminin-γ3 domain IV, could reversibly induce the impairment of spermatogenesis, disruption of BTB integrity, and germ cell loss, and thus is a promising male contraceptive. However, how F5-peptide when administered intratesticularly enters seminiferous tubules and exerts effects beyond BTB is currently unknown. Here we demonstrated that Slc15a1, a peptide transporter also known as Pept1, was predominantly present in peritubular myoid cells, interstitial Leydig cells, vascular endothelial cells and germ cells, while absent in Sertoli cells or BTB site. The steady-state protein level of Slc15a1 in adult rat testis was not affected by F5-peptide treatment. Knockdown of Slc15a1 by in vivo RNAi in rat testis was shown to prevent F5-peptide induced disruptive effects on spermatogenesis. This study suggests that Slc15a1 is involved in the transport of synthetic F5-peptide into seminiferous epithelium, and thus Slc15a1 is a novel target in testis that could be genetically modified to improve the bioavailability of F5-peptide as a prospective male contraceptive.

  12. Peptide-directed self-assembly of hydrogels

    PubMed Central

    Kopeček, Jindřich; Yang, Jiyuan

    2009-01-01

    This review focuses on the self-assembly of macromolecules mediated by the biorecognition of peptide/protein domains. Structures forming α-helices and β-sheets have been used to mediate self-assembly into hydrogels of peptides, reactive copolymers and peptide motifs, block copolymers, and graft copolymers. Structural factors governing the self-assembly of these molecules into precisely defined three-dimensional structures (hydrogels) are reviewed. The incorporation of peptide motifs into hybrid systems, composed of synthetic and natural macromolecules, enhances design opportunities for new biomaterials when compared to individual components. PMID:18952513

  13. (Lipo)polysaccharide interactions of antimicrobial peptides.

    PubMed

    Schmidtchen, Artur; Malmsten, Martin

    2015-07-01

    Due to rapidly increasing resistance development against conventional antibiotics, as well as problems associated with diseases either triggered or deteriorated by infection, antimicrobial and anti-inflammatory peptides have attracted considerable interest during the last few years. While there is an emerging understanding of the direct antimicrobial function of such peptides through bacterial membrane destabilization, the mechanisms of their anti-inflammatory function are less clear. We here summarize some recent results obtained from our own research on anti-inflammatory peptides, with focus on peptide-(lipo)polysaccharide interactions. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Myoinhibiting peptides are the ancestral ligands of the promiscuous Drosophila sex peptide receptor

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Male insects change behaviors of female partners by co-transferring accessory gland proteins (Acps) like sex peptide (SP), with their sperm. The Drosophila sex peptide receptor (SPR) is a G protein-coupled receptor expressed in the female’s nervous system and genital tract. While most Acps show a fa...

  15. Antimicrobial Peptides from Plants

    PubMed Central

    Tam, James P.; Wang, Shujing; Wong, Ka H.; Tan, Wei Liang

    2015-01-01

    Plant antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) have evolved differently from AMPs from other life forms. They are generally rich in cysteine residues which form multiple disulfides. In turn, the disulfides cross-braced plant AMPs as cystine-rich peptides to confer them with extraordinary high chemical, thermal and proteolytic stability. The cystine-rich or commonly known as cysteine-rich peptides (CRPs) of plant AMPs are classified into families based on their sequence similarity, cysteine motifs that determine their distinctive disulfide bond patterns and tertiary structure fold. Cystine-rich plant AMP families include thionins, defensins, hevein-like peptides, knottin-type peptides (linear and cyclic), lipid transfer proteins, α-hairpinin and snakins family. In addition, there are AMPs which are rich in other amino acids. The ability of plant AMPs to organize into specific families with conserved structural folds that enable sequence variation of non-Cys residues encased in the same scaffold within a particular family to play multiple functions. Furthermore, the ability of plant AMPs to tolerate hypervariable sequences using a conserved scaffold provides diversity to recognize different targets by varying the sequence of the non-cysteine residues. These properties bode well for developing plant AMPs as potential therapeutics and for protection of crops through transgenic methods. This review provides an overview of the major families of plant AMPs, including their structures, functions, and putative mechanisms. PMID:26580629

  16. HSP70 peptide-bearing and peptide-negative preparations act as chaperokines

    PubMed Central

    Asea, Alexzander; Kabingu, Edith; Stevenson, Mary Ann; Calderwood, Stuart K.

    2000-01-01

    We recently elucidated a novel function for the 70-kDa heat shock protein (HSP70) as a chaperone and a cytokine, a chaperokine in human monocytes. Here we show that peptide-bearing and peptide-negative HSP70 preparations isolated from EMT6 mammary adenocarcinoma cells (EMT6-HSP70) act as chaperokines when admixed with murine splenocytes. EMT6-HSP70 bound with high affinity to the surface of splenocytes recovered from naive BALB/c mice. The [Ca2+]i inhibitor BAPTA dose dependently inhibited HSP70- but not LPS-induced NF-κB activity and subsequent augmentation of proinflammatory cytokine TNF-α, IL-1β, and IL-6 production. Taken together, these results suggest that presence of peptide in the HSP70 preparation is not required for spontaneous activation of cells of the innate immune system. PMID:11189447

  17. Studies on lactoferricin-derived Escherichia coli membrane-active peptides reveal differences in the mechanism of N-acylated versus nonacylated peptides.

    PubMed

    Zweytick, Dagmar; Deutsch, Günter; Andrä, Jörg; Blondelle, Sylvie E; Vollmer, Ekkehard; Jerala, Roman; Lohner, Karl

    2011-06-17

    To improve the low antimicrobial activity of LF11, an 11-mer peptide derived from human lactoferricin, mutant sequences were designed based on the defined structure of LF11 in the lipidic environment. Thus, deletion of noncharged polar residues and strengthening of the hydrophobic N-terminal part upon adding a bulky hydrophobic amino acid or N-acylation resulted in enhanced antimicrobial activity against Escherichia coli, which correlated with the peptides' degree of perturbation of bacterial membrane mimics. Nonacylated and N-acylated peptides exhibited different effects at a molecular level. Nonacylated peptides induced segregation of peptide-enriched and peptide-poor lipid domains in negatively charged bilayers, although N-acylated peptides formed small heterogeneous domains resulting in a higher degree of packing defects. Additionally, only N-acylated peptides perturbed the lateral packing of neutral lipids and exhibited increased permeability of E. coli lipid vesicles. The latter did not correlate with the extent of improvement of the antimicrobial activity, which could be explained by the fact that elevated binding of N-acylated peptides to lipopolysaccharides of the outer membrane of gram-negative bacteria seems to counteract the elevated membrane permeabilization, reflected in the respective minimal inhibitory concentration for E. coli. The antimicrobial activity of the peptides correlated with an increase of membrane curvature stress and hence bilayer instability. Transmission electron microscopy revealed that only the N-acylated peptides induced tubular protrusions from the outer membrane, whereas all peptides caused detachment of the outer and inner membrane of E. coli bacteria. Viability tests demonstrated that these bacteria were dead before onset of visible cell lysis.

  18. Studies on Lactoferricin-derived Escherichia coli Membrane-active Peptides Reveal Differences in the Mechanism of N-Acylated Versus Nonacylated Peptides*

    PubMed Central

    Zweytick, Dagmar; Deutsch, Günter; Andrä, Jörg; Blondelle, Sylvie E.; Vollmer, Ekkehard; Jerala, Roman; Lohner, Karl

    2011-01-01

    To improve the low antimicrobial activity of LF11, an 11-mer peptide derived from human lactoferricin, mutant sequences were designed based on the defined structure of LF11 in the lipidic environment. Thus, deletion of noncharged polar residues and strengthening of the hydrophobic N-terminal part upon adding a bulky hydrophobic amino acid or N-acylation resulted in enhanced antimicrobial activity against Escherichia coli, which correlated with the peptides' degree of perturbation of bacterial membrane mimics. Nonacylated and N-acylated peptides exhibited different effects at a molecular level. Nonacylated peptides induced segregation of peptide-enriched and peptide-poor lipid domains in negatively charged bilayers, although N-acylated peptides formed small heterogeneous domains resulting in a higher degree of packing defects. Additionally, only N-acylated peptides perturbed the lateral packing of neutral lipids and exhibited increased permeability of E. coli lipid vesicles. The latter did not correlate with the extent of improvement of the antimicrobial activity, which could be explained by the fact that elevated binding of N-acylated peptides to lipopolysaccharides of the outer membrane of Gram-negative bacteria seems to counteract the elevated membrane permeabilization, reflected in the respective minimal inhibitory concentration for E. coli. The antimicrobial activity of the peptides correlated with an increase of membrane curvature stress and hence bilayer instability. Transmission electron microscopy revealed that only the N-acylated peptides induced tubular protrusions from the outer membrane, whereas all peptides caused detachment of the outer and inner membrane of E. coli bacteria. Viability tests demonstrated that these bacteria were dead before onset of visible cell lysis. PMID:21515687

  19. HbAHP-25, an In-Silico Designed Peptide, Inhibits HIV-1 Entry by Blocking gp120 Binding to CD4 Receptor.

    PubMed

    Bashir, Tahir; Patgaonkar, Mandar; Kumar, Selvaa C; Pasi, Achhelal; Reddy, Kudumula Venkata Rami

    2015-01-01

    Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV-1) poses a serious threat to the developing world and sexual transmission continues to be the major source of new infections. Therefore, the development of molecules, which prevent new HIV-1 infections, is highly warranted. In the present study, a panel of human hemoglobin (Hb)-α subunit derived peptides and their analogues, with an ability to bind gp120, were designed in-silico and their anti-HIV-1 activity was evaluated. Of these peptides, HbAHP-25, an analogue of Hb-α derived peptide, demonstrated significant anti-HIV-1 activity. HbAHP-25 was found to be active against CCR5-tropic HIV-1 strains (ADA5 and BaL) and CXCR4-tropic HIV-1 strains (IIIB and NL4-3). Surface plasmon resonance (SPR) and ELISA revealed direct interaction between HbAHP-25 and HIV-1 envelope protein, gp120. The peptide prevented binding of CD4 to gp120 and blocked subsequent steps leading to entry and/or fusion or both. Anti-HIV activity of HbAHP-25 appeared to be specific as it failed to inhibit the entry of HIV-1 pseudotyped virus (HIV-1 VSV). Further, HbAHP-25 was found to be non-cytotoxic to TZM-bl cells, VK2/E6E7 cells, CEM-GFP cells and PBMCs, even at higher concentrations. Moreover, HbAHP-25 retained its anti-HIV activity in presence of seminal plasma and vaginal fluid. In brief, the study identified HbAHP-25, a novel anti-HIV peptide, which directly interacts with gp120 and thus has a potential to inhibit early stages of HIV-1 infection.

  20. HbAHP-25, an In-Silico Designed Peptide, Inhibits HIV-1 Entry by Blocking gp120 Binding to CD4 Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Bashir, Tahir; Patgaonkar, Mandar; Kumar C, Selvaa; Pasi, Achhelal; Reddy, Kudumula Venkata Rami

    2015-01-01

    Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV-1) poses a serious threat to the developing world and sexual transmission continues to be the major source of new infections. Therefore, the development of molecules, which prevent new HIV-1 infections, is highly warranted. In the present study, a panel of human hemoglobin (Hb)-α subunit derived peptides and their analogues, with an ability to bind gp120, were designed in-silico and their anti-HIV-1 activity was evaluated. Of these peptides, HbAHP-25, an analogue of Hb-α derived peptide, demonstrated significant anti-HIV-1 activity. HbAHP-25 was found to be active against CCR5-tropic HIV-1 strains (ADA5 and BaL) and CXCR4-tropic HIV-1 strains (IIIB and NL4-3). Surface plasmon resonance (SPR) and ELISA revealed direct interaction between HbAHP-25 and HIV-1 envelope protein, gp120. The peptide prevented binding of CD4 to gp120 and blocked subsequent steps leading to entry and/or fusion or both. Anti-HIV activity of HbAHP-25 appeared to be specific as it failed to inhibit the entry of HIV-1 pseudotyped virus (HIV-1 VSV). Further, HbAHP-25 was found to be non-cytotoxic to TZM-bl cells, VK2/E6E7 cells, CEM-GFP cells and PBMCs, even at higher concentrations. Moreover, HbAHP-25 retained its anti-HIV activity in presence of seminal plasma and vaginal fluid. In brief, the study identified HbAHP-25, a novel anti-HIV peptide, which directly interacts with gp120 and thus has a potential to inhibit early stages of HIV-1 infection. PMID:25915507

  1. Constructing bioactive peptides with pH-dependent activities.

    PubMed

    Tu, Zhigang; Volk, Melanie; Shah, Khushali; Clerkin, Kevin; Liang, Jun F

    2009-08-01

    Many bioactive peptides are featured by their arginine and lysine rich contents. In this study, lysine and arginine residues in lytic peptides were selectively replaced by histidines. Although resulting histidine-containing lytic peptides had decreased activity, they did show pH-dependent cytotoxicity. The activity of the constructed histidine-containing lytic peptides increased 2-8 times as the solution pH changed from 7.4 to 5.5. More importantly, these histidine-containing peptides maintain the same cell killing mechanism as their parent peptides by causing cell lysis. Both the activity and pH-sensitivity of histidine-containing peptides are tunable by adjusting histidine substitution numbers and positions. This study has presented a general strategy to create bioactive peptides with desired pH-sensitivity to meet the needs of various applications such as cancer treatments.

  2. Microfluidic Assembly of a Multifunctional Tailorable Composite System Designed for Site Specific Combined Oral Delivery of Peptide Drugs.

    PubMed

    Araújo, Francisca; Shrestha, Neha; Shahbazi, Mohammad-Ali; Liu, Dongfei; Herranz-Blanco, Bárbara; Mäkilä, Ermei M; Salonen, Jarno J; Hirvonen, Jouni T; Granja, Pedro L; Sarmento, Bruno; Santos, Hélder A

    2015-08-25

    Multifunctional tailorable composite systems, specifically designed for oral dual-delivery of a peptide (glucagon-like peptide-1) and an enzymatic inhibitor (dipeptidyl peptidase 4 (DPP4)), were assembled through the microfluidics technique. Both drugs were coloaded into these systems for a synergistic therapeutic effect. The systems were composed of chitosan and cell-penetrating peptide modified poly(lactide-co-glycolide) and porous silicon nanoparticles as nanomatrices, further encapsulated in an enteric hydroxypropylmethylcellulose acetylsuccinate polymer. The developed multifunctional systems were pH-sensitive, inherited by the enteric polymer, enabling the release of the nanoparticles only in the simulated intestinal conditions. Moreover, the encapsulation into this polymer prevented the degradation of the nanoparticles' modifications. These nanoparticles showed strong and higher interactions with the intestinal cells in comparison with the nonmodified ones. The presence of DPP4 inhibitor enhanced the peptide permeability across intestinal cell monolayers. Overall, this is a promising platform for simultaneously delivering two drugs from a single formulation. Through this approach peptides are expected to increase their bioavailability and efficiency in vivo both by their specific release at the intestinal level and also by the reduced enzymatic activity. The use of this platform, specifically in combination of the two antidiabetic drugs, has clinical potential for the therapy of type 2 diabetes mellitus.

  3. Wheat peptides reduce oxidative stress and inhibit NO production through modulating μ-opioid receptor in a rat NSAID-induced stomach damage model.

    PubMed

    Yin, Hong; Cai, Hui-Zhen; Wang, Shao-Kang; Yang, Li-Gang; Sun, Gui-Ju

    2015-01-01

    Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) induce tissue damage and oxidative stress in animal models of stomach damage. In the present study, the protective effects of wheat peptides were evaluated in a NSAID-induced stomach damage model in rats. Different doses of wheat peptides or distilled water were administered daily by gavage for 30 days before the rat stomach damage model was established by administration of NSAIDs (aspirin and indomethacin) into the digestive tract twice. The treatment of wheat peptides decreased the NSAID-induced gastric epithelial cell degeneration and oxidative stress and NO levels in the rats. Wheat peptides significantly increased the superoxide dismutase (SOD) and glutathione peroxidase (GPx) activities and decreased iNOS activity in stomach. The mRNA expression level of μ-opioid receptor was significantly decreased in wheat peptides-treated rats than that in in the control rats. The results suggest that NSAID drugs induced stomach damage in rats, wchih can be prevented by wheat peptides. The mechanisms for the protective effects were most likely through reducing NSAID-induced oxidative stress. Copyright © 2015 China Pharmaceutical University. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Hydroxyapatite Growth Inhibition Effect of Pellicle Statherin Peptides.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Y; Karttunen, M; Jalkanen, J; Mussi, M C M; Liao, Y; Grohe, B; Lagugné-Labarthet, F; Siqueira, W L

    2015-08-01

    In our recent studies, we have shown that in vivo-acquired enamel pellicle is a sophisticated biological structure containing a significant portion of naturally occurring salivary peptides. From a functional aspect, the identification of peptides in the acquired enamel pellicle is of interest because many salivary proteins exhibit functional domains that maintain the activities of the native protein. Among the in vivo-acquired enamel pellicle peptides that have been newly identified, 5 peptides are derived from statherin. Here, we assessed the ability of these statherin pellicle peptides to inhibit hydroxyapatite crystal growth. In addition, atomistic molecular dynamics (MD) simulations were performed to better understand the underlying physical mechanisms of hydroxyapatite growth inhibition. A microplate colorimetric assay was used to quantify hydroxyapatite growth. Statherin protein, 5 statherin-derived peptides, and a peptide lacking phosphate at residues 2 and 3 were analyzed. Statherin peptide phosphorylated on residues 2 and 3 indicated a significant inhibitory effect when compared with the 5 other peptides (P < 0.05). MD simulations showed a strong affinity and fast adsorption to hydroxyapatite for phosphopeptides, whereas unphosphorylated peptides interacted weakly with the hydroxyapatite. Our data suggest that the presence of a covalently linked phosphate group (at residues 2 and 3) in statherin peptides modulates the effect of hydroxyapatite growth inhibition. This study provides a mechanism to account for the composition and function of acquired enamel pellicle statherin peptides that will contribute as a base for the development of biologically stable and functional synthetic peptides for therapeutic use against dental caries and/or periodontal disease. © International & American Associations for Dental Research 2015.

  5. Peptide-Like Molecules (PLMs): A Journey from Peptide Bond Isosteres to Gramicidin S Mimetics and Mitochondrial Targeting Agents

    PubMed Central

    Wipf, Peter; Xiao, Jingbo; Stephenson, Corey R. J.

    2010-01-01

    Peptides are natural ligands and substrates for receptors and enzymes and exhibit broad physiological effects. However, their use as therapeutic agents often suffers from poor bioavailability and insufficient membrane permeability. The success of peptide mimicry hinges on the ability of bioisosteres, in particular peptide bond replacements, to adopt suitable secondary structures relevant to peptide strands and position functional groups in equivalent space. This perspective highlights past and ongoing studies in our group that involve new methods development as well as specific synthetic library preparations and applications in chemical biology, with the goal to enhance the use of alkene and cyclopropane peptide bond isosteres. PMID:20725595

  6. Peptide profiling of bovine kefir reveals 236 unique peptides released from caseins during its production by starter culture or kefir grains.

    PubMed

    Ebner, Jennifer; Aşçı Arslan, Ayşe; Fedorova, Maria; Hoffmann, Ralf; Küçükçetin, Ahmet; Pischetsrieder, Monika

    2015-03-18

    Kefir has a long tradition in human nutrition due to its presupposed health promoting effects. To investigate the potential contribution of bioactive peptides to the physiological effects of kefir, comprehensive analysis of the peptide profile was performed by nano-ESI-LTQ-Orbitrap MS coupled to nano-ultrahigh-performance liquid chromatography. Thus, 257 peptides were identified, mainly released from β-casein, followed by αS1-, κ-, and αS2-casein. Most (236) peptides were uniquely detected in kefir, but not in raw milk indicating that the fermentation step does not only increase the proteolytic activity 1.7- to 2.4-fold compared to unfermented milk, but also alters the composition of the peptide fraction. The influence of the microflora was determined by analyzing kefir produced from traditional kefir grains or commercial starter culture. Kefir from starter culture featured 230 peptide sequences and showed a significantly, 1.4-fold higher proteolytic activity than kefir from kefir grains with 127 peptides. A match of 97 peptides in both varieties indicates the presence of a typical kefir peptide profile that is not influenced by the individual composition of the microflora. Sixteen of the newly identified peptides were previously described as bioactive, including angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE)-inhibitory, antimicrobial, immunomodulating, opioid, mineral binding, antioxidant, and antithrombotic effects. The present study describes a comprehensive peptide profile of kefir comprising 257 sequences. The peptide list was used to identify 16 bioactive peptides with ACE-inhibitory, antioxidant, antithrombotic, mineral binding, antimicrobial, immunomodulating and opioid activity in kefir. Furthermore, it was shown that a majority of the kefir peptides were not endogenously present in the raw material milk, but were released from milk caseins by proteases of the microbiota and are therefore specific for the product. Consequently, the proteolytic activity and the

  7. Self-Assembly of Tetraphenylalanine Peptides.

    PubMed

    Mayans, Enric; Ballano, Gema; Casanovas, Jordi; Díaz, Angélica; Pérez-Madrigal, Maria M; Estrany, Francesc; Puiggalí, Jordi; Cativiela, Carlos; Alemán, Carlos

    2015-11-16

    Three different tetraphenylalanine (FFFF) based peptides that differ at the N- and C-termini have been synthesized by using standard procedures to study their ability to form different nanoassemblies under a variety of conditions. The FFFF peptide assembles into nanotubes that show more structural imperfections at the surface than those formed by the diphenylalanine (FF) peptide under the same conditions. Periodic DFT calculations (M06L functional) were used to propose a model that consists of three FFFF molecules defining a ring through head-to-tail NH3(+)⋅⋅⋅(-)OOC interactions, which in turn stack to produce deformed channels with internal diameters between 12 and 16 Å. Depending on the experimental conditions used for the peptide incubation, N-fluorenylmethoxycarbonyl (Fmoc) protected FFFF self-assembles into a variety of polymorphs: ultra-thin nanoplates, fibrils, and star-like submicrometric aggregates. DFT calculations indicate that Fmoc-FFFF prefers a parallel rather than an antiparallel β-sheet assembly. Finally, coexisting multiple assemblies (up to three) were observed for Fmoc-FFFF-OBzl (OBzl = benzyl ester), which incorporates aromatic protecting groups at the two peptide terminals. This unusual and noticeable feature is attributed to the fact that the assemblies obtained by combining the Fmoc and OBzl groups contained in the peptide are isoenergetic. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  8. The CNGRC-GG-D(KLAKLAK)2 peptide induces a caspase-independent, Ca2+-dependent death in human leukemic myeloid cells by targeting surface aminopeptidase N/CD13

    PubMed Central

    Bouchet, Sandrine; Tang, Ruoping; Fava, Fanny; Legrand, Ollivier; Bauvois, Brigitte

    2016-01-01

    The CD13 antigen's binding site for the Asn-Gly-Arg (NGR) motif enables NGR-containing chemotherapeutic drugs to be delivered to CD13-positive tumours. Human CD13-positive acute myeloid leukemia (AML) cells proliferate abnormally and escape death. Here, we show that the CNGRC-GG-D(KLAKLAK)2 peptide induces death in AML cell lines (U937, THP-1, NB4, HL-60) and primary blood cells from AML patients. Cell death was characterized as a caspase-independent mechanism, without DNA fragmentation, but phosphatidylserine externalization and membrane disruption. Our results demonstrate in U937 cells that (i) the NGR-peptide triggers the loss of mitochondrial potential(ΔΨm) and generates superoxide anion (O2−), (ii) N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC) and extra/intracellular Ca2+ chelators (BAPTA) prevent both O2− production and cell death, (iii) the Ca2+-channel blocker nifedipine prevents cell death (indicating that Ca2+ influx is the initial death trigger), and (iv) BAPTA, but not NAC, prevents ΔΨm loss (suggesting O2− is a mitochondrial downstream effector). AML cell lines and primary blasts responding to the lethal action of NGR-peptide express promatrix metalloproteinase-12 (proMMP-12) and its substrate progranulin (an 88 kDa cell survival factor). A cell-free assay highlighted proMMP-12 activation by O2−. Accordingly, NGR-peptide's downregulation of 88 kDa progranulin protein was prevented by BAPTA and NAC. Conversely, AML blast resistance to NGR-peptide is associated with the expression of a distinct, 105 kDa progranulin isoform. These results indicate that CNGRC-GG-D(KLAKLAK)2 induces death in AML cells through the Ca2+-mitochondria-O2.-pathway, and support the link between proMMP-12 activation and progranulin cleavage during cell death. Our findings may have implications for the understanding of tumour biology and treatment. PMID:26655501

  9. Novel Structures of Self-Associating Stapled Peptides

    PubMed Central

    Bhattacharya, Shibani; Zhang, Hongtao; Cowburn, David; Debnath, Asim K.

    2012-01-01

    Hydrocarbon stapling of peptides is a powerful technique to transform linear peptides into cell-permeable helical structures that can bind to specific biological targets. In this study, we have used high resolution solution NMR techniques complemented by Dynamic Light Scattering to characterize extensively a family of hydrocarbon stapled peptides with known inhibitory activity against HIV-1 capsid assembly to evaluate the various factors that modulate activity. The helical peptides share a common binding motif but differ in charge, the length and position of the staple. An important outcome of the study was to show the peptides share a propensity to self-associate into organized polymeric structures mediated predominantly by hydrophobic interactions between the olefinic chain and the aromatic side-chains from the peptide. We have also investigated in detail the structural significance of the length and position of the staple, and of olefinic bond isomerization in stabilizing the helical conformation of the peptides as potential factors driving polymerization. This study presents the numerous challenges of designing biologically active stapled peptides and the conclusions have broad implications for optimizing a promising new class of compounds in drug discovery. PMID:22170623

  10. Encrypted Antimicrobial Peptides from Plant Proteins.

    PubMed

    Ramada, M H S; Brand, G D; Abrão, F Y; Oliveira, M; Filho, J L Cardozo; Galbieri, R; Gramacho, K P; Prates, M V; Bloch, C

    2017-10-16

    Examples of bioactive peptides derived from internal sequences of proteins are known for decades. The great majority of these findings appear to be fortuitous rather than the result of a deliberate and methodological-based enterprise. In the present work, we describe the identification and the biological activities of novel antimicrobial peptides unveiled as internal fragments of various plant proteins founded on our hypothesis-driven search strategy. All putative encrypted antimicrobial peptides were selected based upon their physicochemical properties that were iteratively selected by an in-house computer program named Kamal. The selected peptides were chemically synthesized and evaluated for their interaction with model membranes. Sixteen of these peptides showed antimicrobial activity against human and/or plant pathogens, some with a wide spectrum of activity presenting similar or superior inhibition efficacy when compared to classical antimicrobial peptides (AMPs). These original and previously unforeseen molecules constitute a broader and undisputable set of evidences produced by our group that illustrate how the intragenic concept is a workable reality and should be carefully explored not only for microbicidal agents but also for many other biological functions.

  11. Biosynthetic engineering of nonribosomal peptide synthetases.

    PubMed

    Kries, Hajo

    2016-09-01

    From the evolutionary melting pot of natural product synthetase genes, microorganisms elicit antibiotics, communication tools, and iron scavengers. Chemical biologists manipulate these genes to recreate similarly diverse and potent biological activities not on evolutionary time scales but within months. Enzyme engineering has progressed considerably in recent years and offers new screening, modelling, and design tools for natural product designers. Here, recent advances in enzyme engineering and their application to nonribosomal peptide synthetases are reviewed. Among the nonribosomal peptides that have been subjected to biosynthetic engineering are the antibiotics daptomycin, calcium-dependent antibiotic, and gramicidin S. With these peptides, incorporation of unnatural building blocks and modulation of bioactivities via various structural modifications have been successfully demonstrated. Natural product engineering on the biosynthetic level is not a reliable method yet. However, progress in the understanding and manipulation of biosynthetic pathways may enable the routine production of optimized peptide drugs in the near future. Copyright © 2016 European Peptide Society and John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 European Peptide Society and John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  12. Biomathematical Description of Synthetic Peptide Libraries

    PubMed Central

    Trepel, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Libraries of randomised peptides displayed on phages or viral particles are essential tools in a wide spectrum of applications. However, there is only limited understanding of a library's fundamental dynamics and the influences of encoding schemes and sizes on their quality. Numeric properties of libraries, such as the expected number of different peptides and the library's coverage, have long been in use as measures of a library's quality. Here, we present a graphical framework of these measures together with a library's relative efficiency to help to describe libraries in enough detail for researchers to plan new experiments in a more informed manner. In particular, these values allow us to answer-in a probabilistic fashion-the question of whether a specific library does indeed contain one of the "best" possible peptides. The framework is implemented in a web-interface based on two packages, discreteRV and peptider, to the statistical software environment R. We further provide a user-friendly web-interface called PeLiCa (Peptide Library Calculator, http://www.pelica.org), allowing scientists to plan and analyse their peptide libraries. PMID:26042419

  13. Peptide inhibitors of botulinum neurotoxin serotype A: design, inhibition, cocrystal structures, structure-activity relationship and pharmacophore modeling

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Kumar G.; Swaminathan S.; Kumaran, D.

    Clostridium botulinum neurotoxins are classified as Category A bioterrorism agents by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). The seven serotypes (A-G) of the botulinum neurotoxin, the causative agent of the disease botulism, block neurotransmitter release by specifically cleaving one of the three SNARE (soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor attachment protein receptor) proteins and induce flaccid paralysis. Using a structure-based drug-design approach, a number of peptide inhibitors were designed and their inhibitory activity against botulinum serotype A (BoNT/A) protease was determined. The most potent peptide, RRGF, inhibited BoNT/A protease with an IC{sub 50} of 0.9 {micro}M and a K{sub i} ofmore » 358 nM. High-resolution crystal structures of various peptide inhibitors in complex with the BoNT/A protease domain were also determined. Based on the inhibitory activities and the atomic interactions deduced from the cocrystal structures, the structure-activity relationship was analyzed and a pharmacophore model was developed. Unlike the currently available models, this pharmacophore model is based on a number of enzyme-inhibitor peptide cocrystal structures and improved the existing models significantly, incorporating new features.« less

  14. Peptide inhibitors of botulinum neurotoxin serotype A: design, inhibition, cocrystal structures, structure-activity relationship and pharmacophore modeling.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Gyanendra; Kumaran, Desigan; Ahmed, S Ashraf; Swaminathan, Subramanyam

    2012-05-01

    Clostridium botulinum neurotoxins are classified as Category A bioterrorism agents by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). The seven serotypes (A-G) of the botulinum neurotoxin, the causative agent of the disease botulism, block neurotransmitter release by specifically cleaving one of the three SNARE (soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor attachment protein receptor) proteins and induce flaccid paralysis. Using a structure-based drug-design approach, a number of peptide inhibitors were designed and their inhibitory activity against botulinum serotype A (BoNT/A) protease was determined. The most potent peptide, RRGF, inhibited BoNT/A protease with an IC(50) of 0.9 µM and a K(i) of 358 nM. High-resolution crystal structures of various peptide inhibitors in complex with the BoNT/A protease domain were also determined. Based on the inhibitory activities and the atomic interactions deduced from the cocrystal structures, the structure-activity relationship was analyzed and a pharmacophore model was developed. Unlike the currently available models, this pharmacophore model is based on a number of enzyme-inhibitor peptide cocrystal structures and improved the existing models significantly, incorporating new features. © 2012 International Union of Crystallography

  15. Phage-display screening identifies LMP1-binding peptides targeting the C-terminus region of the EBV oncoprotein.

    PubMed

    Ammous-Boukhris, Nihel; Mosbah, Amor; Sahli, Emna; Ayadi, Wajdi; Hadhri-Guiga, Boutheina; Chérif, Ameur; Gargouri, Ali; Mokdad-Gargouri, Raja

    2016-11-01

    Latent membrane protein 1 (LMP1), a major oncoprotein of Epstein Barr Virus (EBV) is responsible for transforming B lymphocytes in vitro. LMP1 is overexpressed in several EBV-associated malignancies, and different approaches have been developed to reduce its level and accordingly its oncogenic function in tumor tissues. This study aimed to use phage display peptide library to obtain peptides which could specifically bind to the cytoplasmic region of LMP1 to prevent its interaction with signaling proteins. The LMP1 C-terminus region was produced in bacterial E. coli and used as target for the phage library panning. After 3 rounds, 20 phage clones were randomly selected and 8 showed high binding affinity to the recombinant C-terminus LMP1 protein. The most interesting candidates are the FO5 "QPTKDSSPPLRV" and NO4 "STTSPPAVPHNN" peptides since both bind the C-terminus LMP1 as showed by molecular docking. Furthermore, sequence alignment revealed that the FO5 peptide shared sequence similarity with the Death Receptor 4 which belongs to the tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing receptor which plays key role in anti-tumor immunity. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Peptide nanostructures in biomedical technology.

    PubMed

    Feyzizarnagh, Hamid; Yoon, Do-Young; Goltz, Mark; Kim, Dong-Shik

    2016-09-01

    Nanostructures of peptides have been investigated for biomedical applications due to their unique mechanical and electrical properties in addition to their excellent biocompatibility. Peptides may form fibrils, spheres and tubes in nanoscale depending on the formation conditions. These peptide nanostructures can be used in electrical, medical, dental, and environmental applications. Applications of these nanostructures include, but are not limited to, electronic devices, biosensing, medical imaging and diagnosis, drug delivery, tissue engineering and stem cell research. This review offers a discussion of basic synthesis methods, properties and application of these nanomaterials. The review concludes with recommendations and future directions for peptide nanostructures. WIREs Nanomed Nanobiotechnol 2016, 8:730-743. doi: 10.1002/wnan.1393 For further resources related to this article, please visit the WIREs website. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Biomimetic graphene sensors: functionalizing graphene with peptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishigami, Masa; Nyon Kim, Sang; Naik, Rajesh; Tatulian, Suren A.; Katoch, Jyoti

    2012-02-01

    Non-covalent biomimetic functionalization of graphene using peptides is one of more promising methods for producing novel sensors with high sensitivity and selectivity. Here we combine atomic force microscopy, Raman spectroscopy, and attenuated total reflection Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy to investigate peptide binding to graphene and graphite. We choose to study a dodecamer peptide identified with phage display to possess affinities for graphite and we find that the peptide forms a complex mesh-like structure upon adsorption on graphene. Moreover, optical spectroscopy reveals that the peptide binds non-covalently to graphene and possesses an optical signature of an ?-helical conformation on graphene.

  18. Combinatorial contextualization of peptidic epitopes for enhanced cellular immunity.

    PubMed

    Ito, Masaki; Hayashi, Kazumi; Adachi, Eru; Minamisawa, Tamiko; Homma, Sadamu; Koido, Shigeo; Shiba, Kiyotaka

    2014-01-01

    Invocation of cellular immunity by epitopic peptides remains largely dependent on empirically developed protocols, such as interfusion of aluminum salts or emulsification using terpenoids and surfactants. To explore novel vaccine formulation, epitopic peptide motifs were co-programmed with structural motifs to produce artificial antigens using our "motif-programming" approach. As a proof of concept, we used an ovalbumin (OVA) system and prepared an artificial protein library by combinatorially polymerizing MHC class I and II sequences from OVA along with a sequence that tends to form secondary structures. The purified endotoxin-free proteins were then examined for their ability to activate OVA-specific T-cell hybridoma cells after being processed within dendritic cells. One clone, F37A (containing three MHC I and two MHC II OVA epitopes), possessed a greater ability to evoke cellular immunity than the native OVA or the other artificial antigens. The sensitivity profiles of drugs that interfered with the F37A uptake differed from those of the other artificial proteins and OVA, suggesting that alteration of the cross-presentation pathway is responsible for the enhanced immunogenicity. Moreover, F37A, but not an epitopic peptide, invoked cellular immunity when injected together with monophosphoryl lipid A (MPL), and retarded tumor growth in mice. Thus, an artificially synthesized protein antigen induced cellular immunity in vivo in the absence of incomplete Freund's adjuvant or aluminum salts. The method described here could be potentially used for developing vaccines for such intractable ailments as AIDS, malaria and cancer, ailments in which cellular immunity likely play a crucial role in prevention and treatment.

  19. Role of stress peptides during human pregnancy and labour.

    PubMed

    Hillhouse, Edward W; Grammatopoulos, Dimitris K

    2002-09-01

    Premature birth is the major source of perinatal death and disability. Furthermore, the intrauterine health of the baby is important for preventing certain adult diseases. However, the molecular mechanisms driving the onset of human labour remain uncertain, although several key players have been identified. It is becoming clear that there are many pathways to parturition in humans. Stress peptides, in particular placental corticotrophin releasing hormone (CRH) and possibly the related peptide urocortin, appear to play important roles throughout pregnancy. Plasma CRH is a predictor of the duration of human gestation. During most of pregnancy, CRH, acting via specific CRH receptor subtypes, plays a 'protective' role by promoting myometrial quiescence via the generation of cAMP and cGMP, and upregulation of nitric oxide synthase expression. At term, myometrial contractility is enhanced by a complex series of molecular switches, involving the upregulation of oxytocin receptor expression and crosstalk between the oxytocin and CRH receptors. This results in protein kinase C-induced phosphorylation of specific CRH receptor subtypes, with subsequent desensitization and a shift in the intracellular microenvironment to enhance contractility. CRH/urocortin, via specific receptor isoforms, is now able to activate Gq and potentially enhance the oxytocin-driven generation of inositol triphosphate. In addition, CRH/urocortin, via specific CRH receptor subtypes, may generate prostaglandins from the fetal membranes and decidua, play a role in placental vasodilatation and participate in fetal adrenal function and organ maturation. These peptides and receptors are phylogenetically ancient and well preserved across species. They may have evolved as a mechanism to protect against the 'stress' of premature birth.

  20. Measuring peptide translocation into large unilamellar vesicles.

    PubMed

    Spinella, Sara A; Nelson, Rachel B; Elmore, Donald E

    2012-01-27

    There is an active interest in peptides that readily cross cell membranes without the assistance of cell membrane receptors(1). Many of these are referred to as cell-penetrating peptides, which are frequently noted for their potential as drug delivery vectors(1-3). Moreover, there is increasing interest in antimicrobial peptides that operate via non-membrane lytic mechanisms(4,5), particularly those that cross bacterial membranes without causing cell lysis and kill cells by interfering with intracellular processes(6,7). In fact, authors have increasingly pointed out the relationship between cell-penetrating and antimicrobial peptides(1,8). A firm understanding of the process of membrane translocation and the relationship between peptide structure and its ability to translocate requires effective, reproducible assays for translocation. Several groups have proposed methods to measure translocation into large unilamellar lipid vesicles (LUVs)(9-13). LUVs serve as useful models for bacterial and eukaryotic cell membranes and are frequently used in peptide fluorescent studies(14,15). Here, we describe our application of the method first developed by Matsuzaki and co-workers to consider antimicrobial peptides, such as magainin and buforin II(16,17). In addition to providing our protocol for this method, we also present a straightforward approach to data analysis that quantifies translocation ability using this assay. The advantages of this translocation assay compared to others are that it has the potential to provide information about the rate of membrane translocation and does not require the addition of a fluorescent label, which can alter peptide properties(18), to tryptophan-containing peptides. Briefly, translocation ability into lipid vesicles is measured as a function of the Foster Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET) between native tryptophan residues and dansyl phosphatidylethanolamine when proteins are associated with the external LUV membrane (Figure 1). Cell

  1. The nature of peptide interactions with acid end-group PLGAs and facile aqueous-based microencapsulation of therapeutic peptides.

    PubMed

    Sophocleous, Andreas M; Desai, Kashappa-Goud H; Mazzara, J Maxwell; Tong, Ling; Cheng, Ji-Xin; Olsen, Karl F; Schwendeman, Steven P

    2013-12-28

    An important poorly understood phenomenon in controlled-release depots involves the strong interaction between common cationic peptides and low Mw free acid end-group poly(lactic-co-glycolic acids) (PLGAs) used to achieve continuous peptide release kinetics. The kinetics of peptide sorption to PLGA was examined by incubating peptide solutions of 0.2-4mM octreotide or leuprolide acetate salts in a 0.1M HEPES buffer, pH7.4, with polymer particles or films at 4-37°C for 24h. The extent of absorption/loading of peptides in PLGA particles/films was assayed by two-phase extraction and amino acid analysis. Confocal Raman microspectroscopy, stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) and laser scanning confocal imaging, and microtome sectioning techniques were used to examine peptide penetration into the polymer phase. The release of sorbed peptide from leuprolide-PLGA particles was evaluated both in vitro (PBST+0.02% sodium azide, 37°C) and in vivo (male Sprague-Dawley rats). We found that when the PLGA-COOH chains are sufficiently mobilized, therapeutic peptides not only bind at the surface, a common belief to date, but also can be internalized and distributed throughout the polymer phase at physiological temperature forming a salt with low-molecular weight PLGA-COOH. Importantly, absorption of leuprolide into low MW PLGA-COOH particles yielded ~17 wt.% leuprolide loading in the polymer (i.e., ~70% of PLGA-COOH acids occupied), and the absorbed peptide was released from the polymer for >2 weeks in a controlled fashion in vitro and as indicated by sustained testosterone suppression in male Sprague-Dawley rats. This new approach, which bypasses the traditional encapsulation method and associated production cost, opens up the potential for facile production of low-cost controlled-release injectable depots for leuprolide and related peptides. © 2013.

  2. The nature of peptide interactions with acid end-group PLGAs and facile aqueous-based microencapsulation of therapeutic peptides

    PubMed Central

    Sophocleous, Andreas M.; Desai, Kashappa-Goud H.; Mazzara, J. Maxwell; Tong, Ling; Cheng, Ji-Xin; Olsen, Karl F.; Schwendeman, Steven P.

    2013-01-01

    An important poorly understood phenomenon in controlled-release depots involves the strong interaction between common cationic peptides and low Mw free acid end-group poly(lactic-co-glycolic acids) (PLGAs) used to achieve continuous peptide release kinetics. The kinetics of peptide sorption to PLGA was examined by incubating peptide solutions of 0.2-4 mM octreotide or leuprolide acetate salts in 0.1 M HEPES buffer, pH 7.4, with polymer particles or films at 4-37 °C for 24 h. The extent of absorption/loading of peptides in PLGA particles/films was assayed by two-phase extraction and amino acid analysis. Confocal Raman microspectroscopy and stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) and laser scanning confocal imaging techniques were used to examine peptide penetration in the polymer phase. The release of sorbed peptide from leuprolide-PLGA particles was evaluated both in vitro (PBST + 0.02% sodium azide, 37 °C) and in vivo (male Sprague-Dawley rats). We found that when the PLGA-COOH chains are sufficiently mobilized, therapeutic peptides not only bind at the surface, a common belief to date, but can also internalized and distributed throughout the polymer phase at physiological temperature forming a salt with low-molecular weight PLGA-COOH. Importantly, absorption of leuprolide into low MW PLGA-COOH particles yielded ~17 wt% leuprolide loading in the polymer (i.e., ~70% of PLGA-COOH acids occupied), and the absorbed peptide was released from the polymer for > 2 weeks in a controlled fashion in vitro and as indicated by sustained testosterone suppression in male Sprague-Dawley rats. This new approach, which bypasses the traditional encapsulation method and associated production cost, opens up the potential for facile production of low-cost controlled-release injectable depots for leuprolide and related peptides. PMID:24021356

  3. Analysis of Major Histocompatibility Complex-Bound HIV Peptides Identified from Various Cell Types Reveals Common Nested Peptides and Novel T Cell Responses

    PubMed Central

    Rucevic, Marijana; Kourjian, Georgio; Boucau, Julie; Blatnik, Renata; Garcia Bertran, Wilfredo; Berberich, Matthew J.; Walker, Bruce D.; Riemer, Angelika B.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Despite the critical role of epitope presentation for immune recognition, we still lack a comprehensive definition of HIV peptides presented by HIV-infected cells. Here we identified 107 major histocompatibility complex (MHC)-bound HIV peptides directly from the surface of live HIV-transfected 293T cells, HIV-infected B cells, and primary CD4 T cells expressing a variety of HLAs. The majority of peptides were 8 to 12 amino acids (aa) long and mostly derived from Gag and Pol. The analysis of the total MHC-peptidome and of HLA-A02-bound peptides identified new noncanonical HIV peptides of up to 16 aa that could not be predicted by HLA anchor scanning and revealed an heterogeneous surface peptidome. Nested sets of surface HIV peptides included optimal and extended HIV epitopes and peptides partly overlapping or distinct from known epitopes, revealing new immune responses in HIV-infected persons. Surprisingly, in all three cell types, a majority of Gag peptides derived from p15 rather than from the most immunogenic p24. The cytosolic degradation of peptide precursors in corresponding cells confirmed the generation of identified surface-nested peptides. Cytosolic degradation revealed peptides commonly produced in all cell types and displayed by various HLAs, peptides commonly produced in all cell types and selectively displayed by specific HLAs, and peptides produced in only one cell type. Importantly, we identified areas of proteins leading to common presentations of noncanonical peptides by several cell types with distinct HLAs. These peptides may benefit the design of immunogens, focusing T cell responses on relevant markers of HIV infection in the context of HLA diversity. IMPORTANCE The recognition of HIV-infected cells by immune T cells relies on the presentation of HIV-derived peptides by diverse HLA molecules at the surface of cells. The landscape of HIV peptides displayed by HIV-infected cells is not well defined. Considering the diversity of HLA

  4. Interleukin-2 concentration in hypothalamic structures of rats receiving peptides during mild stress.

    PubMed

    Barabanova, S V; Artyukhina, Z E; Kazakova, T B; Khavinson, V Kh; Malinin, V V; Korneva, E A

    2006-04-01

    The number of hypothalamic IL-2-containing cells changed in rats receiving Vilon and Epithalon during mild stress (handling). The number of IL-2-positive cells in hypothalamic structures decreased 24 h after intramuscular injection of Epithalon and 2 h after intranasal administration of the test peptides. Adaptation of animals to experimental conditions prevented the decrease in the number of IL-2-positive cells in the supraoptic nucleus after intranasal administration of Epithalon.

  5. Modification of Titanium Substrates with Chimeric Peptides Comprising Antimicrobial and Titanium-Binding Motifs Connected by Linkers To Inhibit Biofilm Formation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zihao; Ma, Shiqing; Duan, Shun; Xuliang, Deng; Sun, Yingchun; Zhang, Xi; Xu, Xinhua; Guan, Binbin; Wang, Chao; Hu, Meilin; Qi, Xingying; Zhang, Xu; Gao, Ping

    2016-03-02

    Bacterial adhesion and biofilm formation are the primary causes of implant-associated infection, which is difficult to eliminate and may induce failure in dental implants. Chimeric peptides with both binding and antimicrobial motifs may provide a promising alternative to inhibit biofilm formation on titanium surfaces. In this study, chimeric peptides were designed by connecting an antimicrobial motif (JH8194: KRLFRRWQWRMKKY) with a binding motif (minTBP-1: RKLPDA) directly or via flexible/rigid linkers to modify Ti surfaces. We evaluated the binding behavior of peptides using quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) techniques and investigated the effect of the modification of titanium surfaces with these peptides on the bioactivity of Streptococcus gordonii (S. gordonii) and Streptococcus sanguis (S. sanguis). Compared with the flexible linker (GGGGS), the rigid linker (PAPAP) significantly increased the adsorption of the chimeric peptide on titanium surfaces (p < 0.05). Concentration-dependent adsorption is consistent with a single Langmuir model, whereas time-dependent adsorption is in line with a two-domain Langmuir model. Additionally, the chimeric peptide with the rigid linker exhibited more effective antimicrobial ability than the peptide with the flexible linker. This finding was ascribed to the ability of the rigid linker to separate functional domains and reduce their interference to the maximum extent. Consequently, the performance of chimeric peptides with specific titanium-binding motifs and antimicrobial motifs against bacteria can be optimized by the proper selection of linkers. This rational design of chimeric peptides provides a promising alternative to inhibit the formation of biofilms on titanium surfaces with the potential to prevent peri-implantitis and peri-implant mucositis.

  6. Peptide-bacteria interactions using engineered surface-immobilized peptides from class IIa bacteriocins.

    PubMed

    Etayash, Hashem; Norman, Lana; Thundat, Thomas; Kaur, Kamaljit

    2013-03-26

    Specificity of the class IIa bacteriocin Leucocin A (LeuA), an antimicrobial peptide active against Gram-positive bacteria, including Listeria monocytogenes , is known to be dictated by the C-terminal amphipathic helical region, including the extended hairpin-like structure. However, its specificity when attached to a substrate has not been investigated. Exploiting properties of LeuA, we have synthesized two LeuA derivatives, which span the amphipathic helical region of the wild-type LeuA, consisting of 14- (14AA LeuA, CWGEAFSAGVHRLA) and 24-amino acid residues (24AA LeuA, CSVNWGEAFSAGVHRLANGGNGFW). The peptides were purified to >95% purity, as shown by analytical RP-HPLC and mass spectrometry. By including an N-terminal cysteine group, the tailored peptide fragments were readily immobilized at the gold interfaces. The resulting thickness and molecular orientation, determined by ellipsometry and grazing angle infrared spectroscopy, respectively, indicated that the peptides were covalently immobilized in a random helical orientation. The bacterial specificity of the anchored peptide fragments was tested against Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. Our results showed that the adsorbed 14AA LeuA exhibited no specificity toward the bacterial strains, whereas the surface-immobilized 24AA LeuA displayed significant binding toward Gram-positive bacteria with various binding affinities from one strain to another. The 14AA LeuA did not show binding as this fragment is most likely too short in length for recognition by the membrane-bound receptor on the target bacterial cell membrane. These results support the potential use of class IIa bacteriocins as molecular recognition elements in biosensing platforms.

  7. StraPep: a structure database of bioactive peptides

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jian; Yin, Tailang; Xiao, Xuwen; He, Dan; Xue, Zhidong; Jiang, Xinnong; Wang, Yan

    2018-01-01

    Abstract Bioactive peptides, with a variety of biological activities and wide distribution in nature, have attracted great research interest in biological and medical fields, especially in pharmaceutical industry. The structural information of bioactive peptide is important for the development of peptide-based drugs. Many databases have been developed cataloguing bioactive peptides. However, to our knowledge, database dedicated to collect all the bioactive peptides with known structure is not available yet. Thus, we developed StraPep, a structure database of bioactive peptides. StraPep holds 3791 bioactive peptide structures, which belong to 1312 unique bioactive peptide sequences. About 905 out of 1312 (68%) bioactive peptides in StraPep contain disulfide bonds, which is significantly higher than that (21%) of PDB. Interestingly, 150 out of 616 (24%) bioactive peptides with three or more disulfide bonds form a structural motif known as cystine knot, which confers considerable structural stability on proteins and is an attractive scaffold for drug design. Detailed information of each peptide, including the experimental structure, the location of disulfide bonds, secondary structure, classification, post-translational modification and so on, has been provided. A wide range of user-friendly tools, such as browsing, sequence and structure-based searching and so on, has been incorporated into StraPep. We hope that this database will be helpful for the research community. Database URL: http://isyslab.info/StraPep PMID:29688386

  8. Intravitreal injection or topical eye-drop application of a μ-calpain C2L domain peptide protects against photoreceptor cell death in Royal College of Surgeons' rats, a model of retinitis pigmentosa.

    PubMed

    Ozaki, Taku; Nakazawa, Mitsuru; Yamashita, Tetsuro; Sorimachi, Hiroyuki; Hata, Shoji; Tomita, Hiroshi; Isago, Hitomi; Baba, Ayaka; Ishiguro, Sei-Ichi

    2012-11-01

    Mitochondrial μ-calpain initiates apoptosis-inducing factor (AIF)-dependent apoptosis in retinal photoreceptor degeneration. Mitochondrial μ-calpain inhibitors may represent therapeutic targets for the disease. Therefore, we sought to identify inhibitors of mitochondrial calpains and determine their effects in Royal College of Surgeons' (RCS) rats, an animal model of retinitis pigmentosa (RP). We synthesized 20-mer peptides of the C2-like (C2L) domain of μ-calpain. Two μ-calpain peptides N2 and N9 inhibited mitochondrial μ-calpain activity (IC(50); 892 and 498nM, respectively), but not other proteases. Western blotting showed that 50μM of both μ-calpain peptides caused specific degradation of mitochondrial μ-calpain. Three-dimensional structure of calpains suggested that the peptides N2 and N9 corresponded to the regions forming salt bridges between the protease core domain 2 and the C2L domain. We determined the inhibitory regions of μ-calpain peptides N2 and N9 using 10-mers, and one peptide, N2-10-2, inhibited the activity of mitochondrial μ-calpain (IC(50); 112nM). We next conjugated the peptide N2-10-2 to the C-terminal of HIV-1 tat (HIV), a cell-penetrating peptide. Using isolated rat liver mitochondria, 50μM HIV-conjugated μ-calpain N2-10-2 peptide (HIV-Nμ, IC(50); 285nM) significantly inhibited AIF truncation. The intravitreal injection of 20mM HIV-Nμ also prevented retinal photoreceptor apoptosis determined by TUNEL staining, and preserved retinal function assessed by electroretinography in RCS rats. Topical application of 40mM HIV-Nμ also prevented apoptosis of retinal photoreceptors in RCS rats. Our results demonstrate that HIV-Nμ, a peptide inhibitor of mitochondrial μ-calpain, offers a new modality for treating RP. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Design of specific peptide inhibitors of phospholipase A2: structure of a complex formed between Russell's viper phospholipase A2 and a designed peptide Leu-Ala-Ile-Tyr-Ser (LAIYS).

    PubMed

    Chandra, Vikas; Jasti, Jayasankar; Kaur, Punit; Dey, Sharmistha; Srinivasan, A; Betzel, Ch; Singh, T P

    2002-10-01

    Phospholipase A(2) (EC 3.1.1.4) is a key enzyme of the cascade mechanism involved in the production of proinflammatory compounds known as eicosanoids. The binding of phospholipase A(2) to membrane surfaces and the hydrolysis of phospholipids are thought to involve the formation of a hydrophobic channel into which a single substrate molecule diffuses before cleavage. In order to regulate the production of proinflammatory compounds, a specific peptide inhibitor of PLA(2), Leu-Ala-Ile-Tyr-Ser, has been designed. Phospholipase A(2) from Daboia russelli pulchella (DPLA(2)) and peptide Leu-Ala-Ile-Tyr-Ser (LAIYS) have been co-crystallized. The structure of the complex has been determined and refined to 2.0 A resolution. The structure contains two crystallographically independent molecules of DPLA(2), with one molecule of peptide specifically bound to one of them. The overall conformations of the two molecules are essentially similar except in three regions; namely, the calcium-binding loop including Trp31 (residues 25-34), the beta-wing consisting of two antiparallel beta-strands (residues 74-85) and the C-terminal region (residues 119-133). Of these, the most striking difference pertains to the orientation of Trp31 in the two molecules. The conformation of Trp31 in molecule A was suitable to allow the binding of peptide LAIYS, while that in molecule B prevented the entry of the ligand into the hydrophobic channel. The structure of the complex clearly showed that the OH group of Tyr of the inhibitor formed hydrogen bonds with both His48 N(delta1) and Asp49 O(delta1), while O(gamma)H of Ser was involved in a hydrogen bond with Trp31. Other peptide backbone atoms interact with protein through water molecules, while Leu, Ala and Ile form strong hydrophobic interactions with the residues of the hydrophobic channel.

  10. Clinical-grade generation of peptide-stimulated CMV/EBV-specific T cells from G-CSF mobilized stem cell grafts.

    PubMed

    Gary, Regina; Aigner, Michael; Moi, Stephanie; Schaffer, Stefanie; Gottmann, Anja; Maas, Stefanie; Zimmermann, Robert; Zingsem, Jürgen; Strobel, Julian; Mackensen, Andreas; Mautner, Josef; Moosmann, Andreas; Gerbitz, Armin

    2018-05-09

    A major complication after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (aSCT) is the reactivation of herpesviruses such as cytomegalovirus (CMV) and Epstein-Barr virus (EBV). Both viruses cause significant mortality and compromise quality of life after aSCT. Preventive transfer of virus-specific T cells can suppress reactivation by re-establishing functional antiviral immune responses in immunocompromised hosts. We have developed a good manufacturing practice protocol to generate CMV/EBV-peptide-stimulated T cells from leukapheresis products of G-CSF mobilized and non-mobilized donors. Our procedure selectively expands virus-specific CD8+ und CD4+ T cells over 9 days using a generic pool of 34 CMV and EBV peptides that represent well-defined dominant T-cell epitopes with various HLA restrictions. For HLA class I, this set of peptides covers at least 80% of the European population. CMV/EBV-specific T cells were successfully expanded from leukapheresis material of both G-CSF mobilized and non-mobilized donors. The protocol allows administration shortly after stem cell transplantation (d30+), storage over liquid nitrogen for iterated applications, and protection of the stem cell donor by avoiding a second leukapheresis. Our protocol allows for rapid and cost-efficient production of T cells for early transfusion after aSCT as a preventive approach. It is currently evaluated in a phase I/IIa clinical trial.

  11. Alkynyl-Containing Peptides of Marine Origin: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Chai, Qiu-Ye; Yang, Zhen; Lin, Hou-Wen; Han, Bing-Nan

    2016-01-01

    Since the 1990s, a number of terminal alkynyl residue-containing cyclic/acyclic peptides have been identified from marine organisms, especially cyanobacteria and marine mollusks. This review has presented 66 peptides, which covers over 90% marine peptides with terminal alkynyl fatty acyl units. In fact, more than 90% of these peptides described in the literature are of cyanobacterial origin. Interestingly, all the linear peptides featured with terminal alkyne were solely discovered from marine cyanobacteria. The objective of this article is to provide an overview on the types, structural characterization of these unusual terminal alkynyl fatty acyl units, as well as the sources and biological functions of their composed peptides. Many of these peptides have a variety of biological activities, including antitumor, antibacterial, antimalarial, etc. Further, we have also discussed the evident biosynthetic origin responsible for formation of terminal alkynes of natural PKS (polyketide synthase)/NRPS (nonribosome peptide synthetase) hybrids. PMID:27886049

  12. Novel ZnO-binding peptides obtained by the screening of a phage display peptide library

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golec, Piotr; Karczewska-Golec, Joanna; Łoś, Marcin; Węgrzyn, Grzegorz

    2012-11-01

    Zinc oxide (ZnO) is a semiconductor compound with a potential for wide use in various applications, including biomaterials and biosensors, particularly as nanoparticles (the size range of ZnO nanoparticles is from 2 to 100 nm, with an average of about 35 nm). Here, we report isolation of novel ZnO-binding peptides, by screening of a phage display library. Interestingly, amino acid sequences of the ZnO-binding peptides reported in this paper and those described previously are significantly different. This suggests that there is a high variability in sequences of peptides which can bind particular inorganic molecules, indicating that different approaches may lead to discovery of different peptides of generally the same activity (e.g., binding of ZnO) but having various detailed properties, perhaps crucial under specific conditions of different applications.

  13. Accurate de novo design of hyperstable constrained peptides

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Bhardwaj, Gaurav; Mulligan, Vikram Khipple; Bahl, Christopher D.

    Covalently-crosslinked peptides present attractive opportunities for developing new therapeutics. Lying between small molecule and protein therapeutics in size, natural crosslinked peptides play critical roles in signaling, virulence and immunity. Engineering novel peptides with precise control over their three-dimensional structures is a significant challenge. Here we describe the development of computational methods for de novo design of conformationally-restricted peptides, and the use of these methods to design hyperstable disulfide-stabilized miniproteins, heterochiral peptides, and N-C cyclic peptides. Experimentally-determined X-ray and NMR structures for 12 of the designs are nearly identical to the computational models. The computational design methods and stable scaffolds providemore » the basis for a new generation of peptide-based drugs.« less

  14. Discovering Peptide Inhibitors of Human Squalene Synthase Through Screening the Phage-Displayed Cyclic Peptide c7c Library.

    PubMed

    Shiuan, David; Chen, Yue-Hao; Lin, Hwan-Kang; Huang, Kao-Jean; Tai, Da-Fu; Chang, Ding-Kwo

    2016-06-01

    Many drugs for the treatment of hypercholesterolemia are targeting the enzymes involved in human cholesterol biosynthesis pathway. Squalene synthase, the rate-limiting enzyme located at the downstream of cholesterol synthesis pathway, has become a better candidate to develop next-generation hypocholesterolemia drugs. In the present study, we cloned and expressed the recombinant human squalene synthase (hSQS) as the lure to isolate potential peptide inhibitors from screening the conformation-constrained phage-displayed cyclic peptide c7c library. Their binding capabilities were further estimated by ELISA. Their pharmaceutical potentials were then analyzed through molecular modeling and the ADMET property evaluations. Four ennea-peptides and nine tetra-peptides were finally synthesized to evaluate their inhibitory potentials toward hSQS. The results indicate that the ennea-peptide CLSPHSMFC, tetra-peptides SMFC, CKTE, and WHQW can effectively inhibit hSQS activities (IC50 values equal to 64, 76, 87, and 90 μM, respectively). These peptides may have potentials to develop future cholesterol-lowering therapeutics. The ligand-protein interaction analysis also reveals that the inner hydrophobic pocket could be a more critical site of hSQS.

  15. Determination of the sequences of protein-derived peptides and peptide mixtures by mass spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Morris, Howard R.; Williams, Dudley H.; Ambler, Richard P.

    1971-01-01

    Micro-quantities of protein-derived peptides have been converted into N-acetylated permethyl derivatives, and their sequences determined by low-resolution mass spectrometry without prior knowledge of their amino acid compositions or lengths. A new strategy is suggested for the mass spectrometric sequencing of oligopeptides or proteins, involving gel filtration of protein hydrolysates and subsequent sequence analysis of peptide mixtures. Finally, results are given that demonstrate for the first time the use of mass spectrometry for the analysis of a protein-derived peptide mixture, again without prior knowledge of the protein or components within the mixture. PMID:5158904

  16. De Novo Design of Skin-Penetrating Peptides for Enhanced Transdermal Delivery of Peptide Drugs.

    PubMed

    Menegatti, Stefano; Zakrewsky, Michael; Kumar, Sunny; De Oliveira, Joshua Sanchez; Muraski, John A; Mitragotri, Samir

    2016-03-09

    Skin-penetrating peptides (SPPs) are attracting increasing attention as a non-invasive strategy for transdermal delivery of therapeutics. The identification of SPP sequences, however, currently performed by experimental screening of peptide libraries, is very laborious. Recent studies have shown that, to be effective enhancers, SPPs must possess affinity for both skin keratin and the drug of interest. We therefore developed a computational process for generating and screening virtual libraries of disulfide-cyclic peptides against keratin and cyclosporine A (CsA) to identify SPPs capable of enhancing transdermal CsA delivery. The selected sequences were experimentally tested and found to bind both CsA and keratin, as determined by mass spectrometry and affinity chromatography, and enhance transdermal permeation of CsA. Four heptameric sequences that emerged as leading candidates (ACSATLQHSCG, ACSLTVNWNCG, ACTSTGRNACG, and ACSASTNHNCG) were tested and yielded CsA permeation on par with previously identified SPP SPACE (TM) . An octameric peptide (ACNAHQARSTCG) yielded significantly higher delivery of CsA compared to heptameric SPPs. The safety profile of the selected sequences was also validated by incubation with skin keratinocytes. This method thus represents an effective procedure for the de novo design of skin-penetrating peptides for the delivery of desired therapeutic or cosmetic agents. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. Antigenic peptides containing large PEG loops designed to extend out of the HLA-A2 binding site form stable complexes with class I major histocompatibility complex molecules.

    PubMed Central

    Bouvier, M; Wiley, D C

    1996-01-01

    Recognition of peptides bound to class I major histocompatibility complex (MHC) molecules by specific receptors on T cells regulates the development and activity of the cellular immune system. We have designed and synthesized de novo cyclic peptides that incorporate PEG in the ring structure for binding to class I MHC molecules. The large PEG loops are positioned to extend out of the peptide binding site, thus creating steric effects aimed at preventing the recognition of class I MHC complexes by T-cell receptors. Peptides were synthesized and cyclized on polymer support using high molecular weight symmetrical PEG dicarboxylic acids to link the side chains of lysine residues substituted at positions 4 and 8 in the sequence of the HLA-A2-restricted human T-lymphotrophic virus type I Tax peptide. Cyclic peptides promoted the in vitro folding and assembly of HLA-A2 complexes. Thermal denaturation studies using circular dichroism spectroscopy showed that these complexes are as stable as complexes formed with antigenic peptides. Images Fig. 2 Fig. 4 PMID:8643447

  18. Natriuretic peptide-guided management in heart failure.

    PubMed

    Chioncel, Ovidiu; Collins, Sean P; Greene, Stephen J; Ambrosy, Andrew P; Vaduganathan, Muthiah; Macarie, Cezar; Butler, Javed; Gheorghiade, Mihai

    2016-08-01

    Heart failure is a clinical syndrome that manifests from various cardiac and noncardiac abnormalities. Accordingly, rapid and readily accessible methods for diagnosis and risk stratification are invaluable for providing clinical care, deciding allocation of scare resources, and designing selection criteria for clinical trials. Natriuretic peptides represent one of the most important diagnostic and prognostic tools available for the care of heart failure patients. Natriuretic peptide testing has the distinct advantage of objectivity, reproducibility, and widespread availability.The concept of tailoring heart failure management to achieve a target value of natriuretic peptides has been tested in various clinical trials and may be considered as an effective method for longitudinal biomonitoring and guiding escalation of heart failure therapies with overall favorable results.Although heart failure trials support efficacy and safety of natriuretic peptide-guided therapy as compared with usual care, the relationship between natriuretic peptide trajectory and clinical benefit has not been uniform across the trials, and certain subgroups have not shown robust benefit. Furthermore, the precise natriuretic peptide value ranges and time intervals of testing are still under investigation. If natriuretic peptides fail to decrease following intensification of therapy, further work is needed to clarify the optimal pharmacologic approach. Despite decreasing natriuretic peptide levels, some patients may present with other high-risk features (e.g. elevated troponin). A multimarker panel investigating multiple pathological processes will likely be an optimal alternative, but this will require prospective validation.Future research will be needed to clarify the type and magnitude of the target natriuretic peptide therapeutic response, as well as the duration of natriuretic peptide-guided therapy in heart failure patients.

  19. Double quick, double click reversible peptide "stapling".

    PubMed

    Grison, Claire M; Burslem, George M; Miles, Jennifer A; Pilsl, Ludwig K A; Yeo, David J; Imani, Zeynab; Warriner, Stuart L; Webb, Michael E; Wilson, Andrew J

    2017-07-01

    The development of constrained peptides for inhibition of protein-protein interactions is an emerging strategy in chemical biology and drug discovery. This manuscript introduces a versatile, rapid and reversible approach to constrain peptides in a bioactive helical conformation using BID and RNase S peptides as models. Dibromomaleimide is used to constrain BID and RNase S peptide sequence variants bearing cysteine (Cys) or homocysteine ( h Cys) amino acids spaced at i and i + 4 positions by double substitution. The constraint can be readily removed by displacement of the maleimide using excess thiol. This new constraining methodology results in enhanced α-helical conformation (BID and RNase S peptide) as demonstrated by circular dichroism and molecular dynamics simulations, resistance to proteolysis (BID) as demonstrated by trypsin proteolysis experiments and retained or enhanced potency of inhibition for Bcl-2 family protein-protein interactions (BID), or greater capability to restore the hydrolytic activity of the RNAse S protein (RNase S peptide). Finally, use of a dibromomaleimide functionalized with an alkyne permits further divergent functionalization through alkyne-azide cycloaddition chemistry on the constrained peptide with fluorescein, oligoethylene glycol or biotin groups to facilitate biophysical and cellular analyses. Hence this methodology may extend the scope and accessibility of peptide stapling.

  20. What peptides these deltorphins be.

    PubMed

    Lazarus, L H; Bryant, S D; Cooper, P S; Salvadori, S

    1999-02-01

    The deltorphins are a class of highly selective delta-opioid heptapeptides from the skin of the Amazonian frogs Phyllomedusa sauvagei and P. bicolor. The first of these fascinating peptides came to light in 1987 by cloning of the cDNA of from frog skins, while the other members of this family were identified either by cDNA or isolation of the peptides. The distinctive feature of deltorphins is the presence of a naturally occurring D-enantiomer at the second position in their common N-terminal sequence, Tyr-D-Xaa-Phe, comparable to dermorphin, which is the prototype of a group of mu-selective opioids from the same source. The D-amino acid and the anionic residues, either Glu or Asp, as well as their unique amino acid compositions are responsible for the remarkable biostability, high delta-receptor affinity, bioactivity and peptide conformation. This review summarizes a decade of research from many laboratories that defined which residues and substituents in the deltorphins interact with the delta-receptor and characterized pharmacological and physiological activities in vitro and in vivo. It begins with a historical description of the topic and presents general schema for the synthesis of peptide analogues of deltorphins A, B and C as a means to document the methods employed in producing a myriad of analogues. Structure activity studies of the peptides and their pharmacological activities in vitro are detailed in abundantly tabulated data. A brief compendium of the current level of knowledge of the delta-receptor assists the reader to appreciate the rationale for the design of these analogues. Discussion of the conformation of these peptides addresses how structure leads to further hypotheses regarding ligand receptor interaction. The review ends with a broad discussion of the potential applications of these peptides in clinical and therapeutic settings.

  1. Cardioprotection by a nonerythropoietic, tissue-protective peptide mimicking the 3D structure of erythropoietin

    PubMed Central

    Ueba, Hiroto; Brines, Michael; Yamin, Michael; Umemoto, Tomio; Ako, Junya; Momomura, Shin-ichi; Cerami, Anthony; Kawakami, Masanobu

    2010-01-01

    Erythropoietin (EPO), originally identified for its critical hormonal role in regulating production and survival of erythrocytes, is a member of the type 1 cytokine superfamily. Recent studies have shown that EPO has cytoprotective effects in a wide variety of tissues, including the heart, by preventing apoptosis. However, EPO also has undesirable effects, such as thrombogenesis. In the present study, we investigated whether a helix B-surface peptide (HBSP), a nonerythropoietic, tissue-protective peptide mimicking the 3D structure of erythropoietin, protects cardiomyocytes from apoptosis in vitro and in vivo. In cultured neonatal rat cardiomyocytes, HBSP clearly inhibited apoptosis (≈80%) induced by TNF-α, which was comparable with the effect of EPO, and activated critical signaling pathways of cell survival, including Akt, ERK1/2, and STAT3. Among these pathways, Akt was shown to play an essential role in HBSP-induced prevention of apoptosis, as assessed by using a small interfering RNA approach. In the dilated cardiomyopathic hamster (J2N-k), whose cardiac tissues diffusely expressed TNF-α, HBSP also inhibited apoptosis (≈70%) and activated Akt in cardiomyocytes. Furthermore, the levels of serum creatine kinase activity and of cardiac expression of atrial natriuretic peptide, a marker of chronic heart failure, were down-regulated in animals treated with HBSP. These data demonstrate that HBSP protects cardiomyocytes from apoptosis and leads to a favorable outcome in failing hearts through an Akt-dependent pathway. Because HBSP does not have the undesirable effects of EPO, it could be a promising alternative for EPO to treat cardiovascular diseases, such as myocardial infarction and heart failure. PMID:20660739

  2. Surfactant-induced assembly of enzymatically-stable peptide hydrogels

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Jones, Brad H.; Martinez, Alina M.; Wheeler, Jill S.

    The secondary structure of peptides in the presence of interacting additives is an important topic of study, having implications in the application of peptide science to a broad range of modern technologies. Surfactants constitute a class of biologically relevant compounds that are known to influence both peptide conformation and aggregation or assembly. In addition, we have characterized the secondary structure of a linear nonapeptide composed of a hydrophobic alanine/phenylalanine core flanked by hydrophilic acid/amine units. We show that the anionic surfactant sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) induces the formation of β-sheets and macroscopic gelation in this otherwise unstructured peptide. Through comparisonmore » to related additives, we propose that SDS-induced secondary structure formation is the result of amphiphilicity created by electrostatic binding of SDS to the peptide. In addition, we demonstrate a novel utility of surfactants in manipulating and stabilizing peptide nanostructures. SDS is used to simultaneously induce secondary structure in a peptide and to inhibit the activity of a model enzyme, resulting in a peptide hydrogel that is impervious to enzymatic degradation. These results complement our understanding of the behavior of peptides in the presence of interacting secondary molecules and provide new potential pathways for programmable organization of peptides by the addition of such components.« less