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Sample records for prevents acute sunburn

  1. A novel mechanism of filaggrin induction and sunburn prevention by β-damascenone in Skh-1 mice

    SciTech Connect

    Uddin, Ahmed N.; Labuda, Ivica; Burns, Fredric J.

    2012-12-15

    Understanding how oral administration of aroma terpenes can prevent sunburn or skin cancer in mice could lead to more effective and safer ways of blocking sun damage to human skin. To establish sunburn preventive activity, female Skh-1 mice were given oral β-damascenone followed by irradiation with UVR from fluorescent ‘sunlamps’. The following endpoints were evaluated versus controls at various times between 1 and 12 days after the terpene: whole genome gene expression and in situ immunohistochemistry of PCNA, keratin10, filaggrin and caspase 14, and sunburn was evaluated at 5 days. UVR-induced sunburn was prevented by a single oral β-damascenone dose as low as 20 μL (0.95 mg/g body weight). Microarray analysis showed sunburn prevention doses of β-damascenone up-regulated several types of cornification genes, including keratins 1 and 10, filaggrin, caspase 14, loricrin, hornerin and 6 late cornified envelope genes. Immunohistochemical studies of PCNA labeling showed that β-damascenone increased the proliferation rates of the following cell types: epidermal basal cells, follicular outer root sheath cells and sebaceous gland cells. Keratin 10 was not affected by β-damascenone in epidermis, and filaggrin and caspase 14 were increased in enlarged sebaceous glands. The thickness of the cornified envelope plus sebum layer nearly doubled within 1 day after administration of the β-damascenone and remained at or above double thickness for at least 12 days. β-Damascenone protected against sunburn by activating a sebaceous gland-based pathway that fortified and thickened the cornified envelope plus sebum layer in a way that previously has been observed to occur only in keratinocytes. -- Highlights: ► Orally administered β-damascenone prevented UVB-induced sunburn in Skh-1 mice. ► Filaggrin and caspase 14 genes were induced in sebaceous gland cells. ► Numerous cornification genes were up-regulated by β-damascenone. ► β-Damascenone stimulated cell

  2. Polyphenols and Sunburn

    PubMed Central

    Saric, Suzana; Sivamani, Raja K.

    2016-01-01

    Polyphenols are antioxidant molecules found in many foods such as green tea, chocolate, grape seeds, and wine. Polyphenols have antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and antineoplastic properties. Growing evidence suggests that polyphenols may be used for the prevention of sunburns as polyphenols decrease the damaging effects of ultraviolet A (UVA) and ultraviolet B (UVB) radiation on the skin. This review was conducted to examine the evidence for use of topically and orally ingested polyphenols in prevention of sunburns. The PubMed database was searched for studies that examined polyphenols and its effects on sunburns. Of the 27 studies found, 15 met the inclusion criteria. Seven studies were conducted on human subjects and eight on animals (mice and rats). Eleven studies evaluated the effects of topical polyphenols, two studies examined ingested polyphenols, and two studies examined both topical and ingested polyphenols. Polyphenol sources included the following plant origins: green tea, white tea, cocoa, Romanian propolis (RP), Calluna vulgaris (Cv), grape seeds, honeybush, and Lepidium meyenii (maca). Eight studies examined green tea. Overall, based on the studies, there is evidence that polyphenols in both oral and topical form may provide protection from UV damage and sunburn, and thus are beneficial to skin health. However, current studies are limited and further research is necessary to evaluate the efficacy, mechanism of action, and potential side effects of various forms and concentrations of polyphenols. PMID:27618035

  3. Incidence and public health burden of sunburn among ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Sunburn, a preventable skin condition, is a major risk factor for skin cancer. Severe burns can result in emergency department visits and in some cases hospitalization. Many people spend hours in direct sunlight while at the beach, which could lead to sunburn. We pooled data from 13 prospective cohorts of beachgoers in the United States (n=84,411) to describe incidence of sunburn, risk factors associated with an increased risk of sunburn, and the health burden resulting from time lost from work or school, visits to the doctor, and medication use. The incidence of sunburn in this population in the 10-12 days after the beach visit was 14% (n=9,882), excluding those with sunburn at enrollment. Sunburn incidence increased with greater time spent in the sun. Approximately 8% of beachgoers only exposed for <1 hour reported sunburn, whereas almost 20% spending ≥5 hours in the sun reported sunburn (p<0.001). Those with any water contact were also more likely to report sunburn (15% versus 11%, p<0.001). Among all participants, 66% applied sunblock. When skin type was considered, the highest incidence was noted among those who report repeated sunburns (17%) or freckles when in the sun (13%) compared to 11% who typically get dark tans. The incidence of sunburn varied considerably by age group. Children ages <1 year had the lowest incidence of sunburn (2%) whereas adults between the ages of 19-35 had the highest incidence of sunburn (18%). Preliminary analyses indicate t

  4. Sunburn: Treatment and Prevention

    MedlinePlus

    ... some medications can cause a skin reaction to sunlight, and some medical conditions may make people more ... of age should be kept out of direct sunlight. If adequate clothing and shade are not available, ...

  5. When Might Sunburn Require Medical Attention?

    MedlinePlus

    Diseases and Conditions Sunburn When might sunburn require medical attention? Answers from Lawrence E. Gibson, M.D. Consult a doctor for sunburn treatment if: The sunburn is severe — with blisters — and ...

  6. Sunburn risk factors at Galveston beaches.

    PubMed

    Shoss-Glaich, Adrienne B; Uchida, Tatsuo; Wagner, Richard F

    2004-07-01

    Although the beach is a well-recognized environment for sunburn injury, specific risk factors for sunburn and their interactions are poorly understood. In this epidemiologic study, variables related to sunburn injury at the beach were analyzed. Beachgoers exposed to more than 4 hours of sun at the beach were significantly more likely to sunburn compared with those with less exposure. Other significant sunburn risk factors were lack of sunscreen use or use of sunscreen with a Sun Protection Factor of 15 or less and Fitzpatrick Skin Types I and II. Reasonable sunburn avoidance strategies should include limiting duration of sun exposure to fewer than 4 hours per day.

  7. 7 CFR 51.900 - Sunburn.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Sunburn. 51.900 Section 51.900 Agriculture Regulations... Standards for Grades of Table Grapes (European or Vinifera Type) 1 Definitions § 51.900 Sunburn. Sunburn... a sunken and discolored or dried area on the exposed surface....

  8. 7 CFR 51.900 - Sunburn.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Sunburn. 51.900 Section 51.900 Agriculture Regulations... Definitions § 51.900 Sunburn. Sunburn means injury to the berry caused by exposure to the sun, including “sulphur burn,” usually occurring as a sunken and discolored or dried area on the exposed surface....

  9. Incidence and public health burden of sunburn among beachgoers in the United States

    EPA Science Inventory

    Sunburn, a preventable skin condition, is a major risk factor for skin cancer. Severe burns can result in emergency department visits and in some cases hospitalization. Many people spend hours in direct sunlight while at the beach, which could lead to sunburn. We pooled data fro...

  10. Can Acute Myeloid Leukemia Be Prevented?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Causes, Risk Factors, and Prevention Can Acute Myeloid Leukemia Be Prevented? It’s not clear what causes most ... Myeloid Leukemia Be Prevented? More In Acute Myeloid Leukemia About Acute Myeloid Leukemia Causes, Risk Factors, and ...

  11. A possible cause of sunburn in fish

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    1958-01-01

    A LESION DESCRIBED AS A GRAY ΡATCH GENERALLY LOCATED ΑΝΤΕRIOR TO THE DORSAL FIN has been associated with high mortality of fish on numerous occasions in production hatcheries throughout the United States. This lesion has been called "sunburn" or "backpeel." No bacteria or other pathogens have been found in fish with these symptoms. For example, at a Montana hatchery in April 1956, mortality of 10 to 15 percent occurred daily and this lesion was the only syndrome found.  On occasion, shade has prevented this condition and even restored affected fish to an apparent normal condition; thus there has seemed to be a correlation between sunshine and the condition in fish. To our knowledge, this has been the only therapy attempted.

  12. Sunburn

    MedlinePlus

    ... ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2012:chap 87. Review Date 4/14/2015 Updated by: Kevin Berman, ... PhD, Atlanta Center for Dermatologic Disease, Atlanta, GA. Review provided by VeriMed Healthcare Network. Also reviewed by ...

  13. Towards Prevention of Acute Syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, A.; Thongprayoon, C.; Pickering, B.W.; Akhoundi, A.; Wilson, G.; Pieczkiewicz, D.; Herasevich, V.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Background Identifying patients at risk for acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) before their admission to intensive care is crucial to prevention and treatment. The objective of this study is to determine the performance of an automated algorithm for identifying selected ARDS predisposing conditions at the time of hospital admission. Methods This secondary analysis of a prospective cohort study included 3,005 patients admitted to hospital between January 1 and December 31, 2010. The automated algorithm for five ARDS predisposing conditions (sepsis, pneumonia, aspiration, acute pancreatitis, and shock) was developed through a series of queries applied to institutional electronic medical record databases. The automated algorithm was derived and refined in a derivation cohort of 1,562 patients and subsequently validated in an independent cohort of 1,443 patients. The sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive values of an automated algorithm to identify ARDS risk factors were compared with another two independent data extraction strategies, including manual data extraction and ICD-9 code search. The reference standard was defined as the agreement between the ICD-9 code, automated and manual data extraction. Results Compared to the reference standard, the automated algorithm had higher sensitivity than manual data extraction for identifying a case of sepsis (95% vs. 56%), aspiration (63% vs. 42%), acute pancreatitis (100% vs. 70%), pneumonia (93% vs. 62%) and shock (77% vs. 41%) with similar specificity except for sepsis and pneumonia (90% vs. 98% for sepsis and 95% vs. 99% for pneumonia). The PPV for identifying these five acute conditions using the automated algorithm ranged from 65% for pneumonia to 91 % for acute pancreatitis, whereas the NPV for the automated algorithm ranged from 99% to 100%. Conclusion A rule-based electronic data extraction can reliably and accurately identify patients at risk of ARDS at the time of hospital

  14. Sunburn and Lyme Disease: Two Preventable Injuries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pavlicin, Karen M.

    1995-01-01

    Stresses the importance of educating campers and staff about the dangers of overexposure to the sun and the transmission of Lyme disease. Discusses the importance of using an appropriate sunscreen and avoiding outdoor activities during peak hours of sunlight. Discusses how Lyme disease is transmitted, the life cycle of a tick, and how to remove…

  15. Exposure to indoor tanning without burning and melanoma risk by sunburn history.

    PubMed

    Vogel, Rachel Isaksson; Ahmed, Rehana L; Nelson, Heather H; Berwick, Marianne; Weinstock, Martin A; Lazovich, DeAnn

    2014-07-01

    Indoor tanning is carcinogenic to humans. Individuals report that they tan indoors before planning to be in the sun to prevent sunburns, but whether skin cancer is subsequently reduced is unknown. Using a population-based case-control study, we calculated the association between melanoma and indoor tanning after excluding exposed participants reporting indoor tanning-related burns, stratified by their number of lifetime sunburns (0, 1-2, 3-5, >5). Confounding was addressed using propensity score analysis methods. All statistical tests were two-sided. We observed increased risk of melanoma across all sunburn categories for participants who had tanned indoors without burning compared with those who never tanned indoors, including those who reported zero lifetime sunburns (odds ratio = 3.87; 95% confidence interval = 1.68 to 8.91; P = .002). These data provide evidence that indoor tanning is a risk factor for melanoma even among persons who reported never experiencing burns from indoor tanning or outdoor sun exposure.

  16. Exposure to indoor tanning without burning and melanoma risk by sunburn history.

    PubMed

    Vogel, Rachel Isaksson; Ahmed, Rehana L; Nelson, Heather H; Berwick, Marianne; Weinstock, Martin A; Lazovich, DeAnn

    2014-06-01

    Indoor tanning is carcinogenic to humans. Individuals report that they tan indoors before planning to be in the sun to prevent sunburns, but whether skin cancer is subsequently reduced is unknown. Using a population-based case-control study, we calculated the association between melanoma and indoor tanning after excluding exposed participants reporting indoor tanning-related burns, stratified by their number of lifetime sunburns (0, 1-2, 3-5, >5). Confounding was addressed using propensity score analysis methods. All statistical tests were two-sided. We observed increased risk of melanoma across all sunburn categories for participants who had tanned indoors without burning compared with those who never tanned indoors, including those who reported zero lifetime sunburns (odds ratio = 3.87; 95% confidence interval = 1.68 to 8.91; P = .002). These data provide evidence that indoor tanning is a risk factor for melanoma even among persons who reported never experiencing burns from indoor tanning or outdoor sun exposure.

  17. Prevention of Acute Exacerbations of COPD

    PubMed Central

    Bourbeau, Jean; Diekemper, Rebecca L.; Ouellette, Daniel R.; Goodridge, Donna; Hernandez, Paul; Curren, Kristen; Balter, Meyer S.; Bhutani, Mohit; Camp, Pat G.; Celli, Bartolome R.; Dechman, Gail; Dransfield, Mark T.; Fiel, Stanley B.; Foreman, Marilyn G.; Hanania, Nicola A.; Ireland, Belinda K.; Marchetti, Nathaniel; Marciniuk, Darcy D.; Mularski, Richard A.; Ornelas, Joseph; Stickland, Michael K.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: COPD is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in the United States as well as throughout the rest of the world. An exacerbation of COPD (periodic escalations of symptoms of cough, dyspnea, and sputum production) is a major contributor to worsening lung function, impairment in quality of life, need for urgent care or hospitalization, and cost of care in COPD. Research conducted over the past decade has contributed much to our current understanding of the pathogenesis and treatment of COPD. Additionally, an evolving literature has accumulated about the prevention of acute exacerbations. METHODS: In recognition of the importance of preventing exacerbations in patients with COPD, the American College of Chest Physicians (CHEST) and Canadian Thoracic Society (CTS) joint evidence-based guideline (AECOPD Guideline) was developed to provide a practical, clinically useful document to describe the current state of knowledge regarding the prevention of acute exacerbations according to major categories of prevention therapies. Three key clinical questions developed using the PICO (population, intervention, comparator, and outcome) format addressed the prevention of acute exacerbations of COPD: nonpharmacologic therapies, inhaled therapies, and oral therapies. We used recognized document evaluation tools to assess and choose the most appropriate studies and to extract meaningful data and grade the level of evidence to support the recommendations in each PICO question in a balanced and unbiased fashion. RESULTS: The AECOPD Guideline is unique not only for its topic, the prevention of acute exacerbations of COPD, but also for the first-in-kind partnership between two of the largest thoracic societies in North America. The CHEST Guidelines Oversight Committee in partnership with the CTS COPD Clinical Assembly launched this project with the objective that a systematic review and critical evaluation of the published literature by clinical experts and researchers in

  18. Managing and Preventing Acute Urinary Retention

    PubMed Central

    Lepor, Herbert

    2005-01-01

    Acute urinary retention (AUR), an uncomfortable and potentially dangerous condition, often occurs in men who have benign prostatic hyperplasia. Although the reported incidence of AUR varies in the literature, there are a number of events that are known to precipitate episodes of AUR, including ingestion of certain agents, infection, general anesthesia, and performance of various diagnostic genitourinary procedures. Because it is preferable to avoid the need for catheterization (and the associated risks) in men at high risk for AUR, certain measures have been studied as means to prevent AUR episodes. Specifically, α-blockers and 5-α-reductase inhibitors have been shown to reduce the incidence of initial and subsequent AUR episodes in certain at-risk men. PMID:16985887

  19. Can You Get a Sunburn Through Glass? Theory and an Experiment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bartels, Richard; Loxsom, Fred

    1995-01-01

    Discusses factors that determine whether or not a sunburn is possible under glass, including the spectral dependence of the skin's sensitivity to sunburn, the ground-level spectrum of solar radiation, and the wavelength dependence of the transmission for the particular piece of glass. Concludes that it is possible to get sunburned through glass.…

  20. Acute hepatitis C: prevention and treatment.

    PubMed

    Ozaras, Resat; Tahan, Veysel

    2009-04-01

    HCV can cause acute or chronic hepatitis and is a health problem all over the world. It is one of the leading causes of cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma, and is a common indication for liver transplantation. Unrecognized patients with HCV infection may transmit the virus to uninfected people. The acute form of the disease leads to chronic hepatitis in the majority of cases. Since the success rate of treatment given in the chronic phase is much lower than that given in the acute phase, recognizing acute hepatitis is critical. Although HCV is less prevalent since 1990s in the Western world after improved blood-donor screening programs, needle-exchange facilities and education among intravenous drug users, it is still endemic in some regions, including African countries, Egypt, Taiwan, China and Japan. Acute HCV infection may be a challenge for the clinician; since it is often asymptomatic, detection and diagnosis are usually difficult. After an incubation period of 7 weeks (2-12 weeks), only a minority of patients (10-15%) report symptoms. The spontaneous clearance of the virus is more frequent primarily during the first 3 months of clinical onset of the disease, but may occur anytime during the 6 months of acute infection. This spontaneous resolution seems to be more frequent in symptomatic cases. Viremia persisting more than 6 months is accepted as chronic infection. The virus is transmitted more frequently through infected blood or body fluids. Detection of antibodies against HCV is not a reliable method of diagnosing acute HCV infection since the appearance of antibodies against HCV can be delayed in up to 30% of patients at the onset of symptoms. Thus, the diagnosis of acute hepatitis C relies on the qualitative detection of HCV RNA, which may appear as early as 1-2 weeks after exposure quickly followed by highly elevated alanine aminotransferase. After a follow-up period of 8-12 weeks for allowing spontaneous resolution, treatment should be initiated

  1. Objective Assessment of Sunburn and Minimal Erythema Doses: Comparison of Noninvasive In Vivo Measuring Techniques after UVB Irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Min-Wei; Lo, Pei-Yu; Cheng, Kuo-Sheng

    2010-12-01

    Military personnel movement is exposed to solar radiation and sunburn is a major problem which can cause lost workdays and lead to disciplinary action. This study was designed to identify correlation parameters in evaluating in vivo doses and epidermis changes following sunburn inflammation. Several noninvasive bioengineering techniques have made objective evaluations possible. The volar forearms of healthy volunteers ([InlineEquation not available: see fulltext.]), 2 areas, 20 mm in diameter, were irradiated with UVB 100 mj/[InlineEquation not available: see fulltext.] and 200 mj/[InlineEquation not available: see fulltext.], respectively. The skin changes were recorded by several monitored techniques before and 24 hours after UV exposures. Our results showed that chromameter [InlineEquation not available: see fulltext.] value provides more reliable information and can be adopted with mathematical model in predicting the minimal erythema dose (MED) which showed lower than visual assessment by 10 mj/[InlineEquation not available: see fulltext.] (Pearson correlation coefficient [InlineEquation not available: see fulltext.]). A more objective measure for evaluation of MED was established for photosensitive subjects' prediction and sunburn risks prevention.

  2. Managing acute upper GI bleeding, preventing recurrences.

    PubMed

    Albeldawi, Mazen; Qadeer, Mohammed A; Vargo, John J

    2010-02-01

    Acute upper gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding is common and potentially life-threatening and needs a prompt assessment and aggressive medical management. All patients need to undergo endoscopy to diagnose, assess, and possibly treat any underlying lesion. In addition, patients found to have bleeding ulcers should receive a proton pump inhibitor, the dosage and duration of treatment depending on the endoscopic findings and clinical factors.

  3. Prevention of deterioration in acutely ill patients in hospital.

    PubMed

    Steen, Colin

    The shift towards providing critical care in general wards has changed the way acutely ill patients are identified, treated and managed in hospital. This requires the expertise of knowledgeable, informed and capable staff. Effective education and appropriate knowledge and skills are required to aid identification of the deteriorating patient and provide prompt, timely and appropriate intervention to prevent further deterioration and possibly death. This article provides information about a systematic approach that will enable healthcare professionals to intervene to prevent deterioration in acutely ill patients.

  4. The human sunburn reaction: histologic and biochemical studies

    SciTech Connect

    Gilchrest, B.A.; Soter, N.A.; Stoff, J.S.; Mihm, M.C. Jr.

    1981-01-01

    The ultraviolet-induced erythema reaction was investigated histologically and biochemically in four subjects, utilizing suction blister aspirates, analyzed for histamine and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), and Epon-embedded 1-mu skin biopsy sections from control skin and from irradiated skin at intervals for 72 hours after exposure to a Hanovia lamp. Major histologic alterations in the epidermis included dyskeratotic and vacuolated keratinocytes (sunburn cells), and disappearance of Langerhans cells. In the dermis the major changes were vascular, involving both the superficial and deep venular plexuses. Endothelial cell enlargement was first apparent within 30 minutes of irradiation, peaked at 24 hours, and persisted throughout the 72-hour study period. Mast cell degranulation and associated perivenular edema were first apparent at 1 hour and striking at the onset of erythema, 3 to 4 hours postirradiation; edema was absent and mast cells were again normal in number and granule content at 24 hours. Histamine levels rose approximately fourfold above control values immediately after the onset of erythema and returned to baseline within 24 hours. PGE2 levels were statistically elevated even before the onset of erythema and reached approximately 150% of the control value at 24 hours. These data provide the first evidence that histamine may mediate the early phase of the human sunburn reaction and increase our understanding of its complex histologic and biochemical sequelae.

  5. [Consensus conference on acute bronchiolitis (v): prevention of acute bronchiolitis. Review of scientific evidence].

    PubMed

    González de Dios, J; Ochoa Sangrador, C

    2010-05-01

    A review of the evidence on prevention of acute bronchiolitis is presented. Acute bronchiolitis prevention arises from three basic approaches: preventive treatment to reduce recurrent wheezing following an episode of acute bronchiolitis, preventive treatment to reduce the frequency and severity of RSV bronchiolitis in the population at risk (prematurity, bronchopulmonary dysplasia, congenital heart disease, etc.), and general preventive measures to reduce nosocomial infection with RSV. There is sufficient evidence on the lack of efficacy of inhaled corticosteroids, oral corticosteroids and montelukast. Intravenous RSV immunoglobulin has an unfavorable risk-benefit balance, particularly with the availability of monoclonal antibodies. Palivizumab is effective as preventive treatment of RSV infection in risk populations (high risk preterm infants and hemodynamically significant congenital heart disease), but not in the frequency and severity (ICU admission, need for mechanical ventilation and mortality) of the acute bronchiolitis. The benefits of palivizumab (less admissions) seem to be worth the adverse effects, but we do not know the cost-benefit ratio. The control and prevention measures of nosocomial transmission of RSV infection (isolation, hand washing, use of mask, gloves, cap and shoes) are based on indirect evidence.

  6. Acute Rheumatic Fever: Global Persistence of a Preventable Disease.

    PubMed

    Bono-Neri, Francine

    2016-10-21

    The persistence of acute rheumatic fever continues to be seen globally. Once thought to be eradicated in various parts of the world, the disease came back with a vengeance secondary to a lack of diligence on the part of providers. Today, the global burden of group A streptococcal infection, the culprit of the numerous sequelae manifested in acute rheumatic fever, is considerable. Although a completely preventable disease, rheumatic fever continues to exist. It is a devastating disease that involves long-term, multisystem treatment and monitoring for patients who were unsuccessful at eradicating the precipitating group A streptococcal infection. Prevention is the key to resolving the dilemma of the disease's global burden, yet the method to yield its prevention still remains unknown. Thus, meticulous attention to implementing proper treatment is the mainstay and remains a top priority.

  7. Human thermoregulatory responses during heat exposure after artificially induced sunburn.

    PubMed

    Pandolf, K B; Gange, R W; Latzka, W A; Blank, I H; Kraning, K K; Gonzalez, R R

    1992-04-01

    Thermoregulatory responses in the heat (ambient temperature 49 degrees C, 20% relative humidity, 1 m/s wind) were investigated in 10 unacclimated men during 50 min of cycle ergometer exercise (approximately 53% of maximal aerobic power) after a 10-min rest before as well as 24 h and 1 wk after twice the minimal erythemal dose of UV-B radiation that covered approximately 85% of the body surface area. In 7 subjects esophageal temperature (Tes) was recorded while in all 10 subjects five-site skin and rectal temperatures, heart rate, and back, left forearm, and shielded (12 cm2 area) right forearm sweating rates (msw) were recorded at 15-s intervals. Venous blood was collected before and after exercise-heat stress. Mean skin temperature, Tes, rectal temperature, heart rate, and total body sweating rate were not significantly (P greater than 0.05) affected by sunburn. Pre- and postexercise values of hematocrit, hemoglobin, plasma protein, plasma volume, and plasma osmolality were also not affected (P greater than 0.05) by sunburn. Analysis of presunburn and post-sunburn data showed that the Tes intercept for sweating (degrees C) was unaffected (P greater than 0.05), but msw/Tes and final msw from the left forearm (msw/Tes 0.24 +/- 0.02 vs. 0.17 +/- 0.01 mg.cm-2.min-1. degrees C-1, P less than 0.05; msw 0.60 +/- 0.05 vs. 0.37 +/- 0.02, mg.cm-2.min-1, P less than 0.05) and back (msw/Tes 0.43 +/- 0.03 vs. 0.36 +/- 0.01 mg.cm-2.min-1. degrees C-1, P = 0.052; msw 1.08 +/- 0.09 vs. 0.74 +/- 0.05 mg.cm-2.min-1, P less than 0.05) were significantly reduced 24 h postsunburn.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  8. Acute respiratory distress syndrome: prevention and early recognition.

    PubMed

    de Haro, Candelaria; Martin-Loeches, Ignacio; Torrents, Eva; Artigas, Antonio

    2013-04-24

    Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is common in critically ill patients admitted to intensive care units (ICU). ARDS results in increased use of critical care resources and healthcare costs, yet the overall mortality associated with these conditions remains high. Research focusing on preventing ARDS and identifying patients at risk of developing ARDS is necessary to develop strategies to alter the clinical course and progression of the disease. To date, few strategies have shown clear benefits. One of the most important obstacles to preventive interventions is the difficulty of identifying patients likely to develop ARDS. Identifying patients at risk and implementing prevention strategies in this group are key factors in preventing ARDS. This review will discuss early identification of at-risk patients and the current prevention strategies.

  9. Preventing Chronic Pain following Acute Pain: Risk Factors, Preventive Strategies, and their Efficacy

    PubMed Central

    McGreevy, Kai; Bottros, Michael M.; Raja, Srinivasa N.

    2011-01-01

    Chronic pain is the leading cause of disability in the United States. The transition from acute to persistent pain is thought to arise from maladaptive neuroplastic mechanisms involving three intertwined processes, peripheral sensitization, central sensitization, and descending modulation. Strategies aimed at preventing persistent pain may target such processes. Models for studying preventive strategies include persistent post-surgical pain (PPP), persistent post-trauma pain (PTP) and post-herpetic neuralgia (PHN). Such entities allow a more defined acute onset of tissue injury after which study of the long-term effects is more easily examined. In this review, we examine the pathophysiology, epidemiology, risk factors, and treatment strategies for the prevention of chronic pain using these models. Both pharmacological and interventional approaches are described, as well as a discussion of preventive strategies on the horizon. PMID:22102847

  10. Danaparoid sodium prevents cerulein-induced acute pancreatitis in rats.

    PubMed

    Hagiwara, Satoshi; Iwasaka, Hideo; Uchida, Tomohisa; Hasegawa, Akira; Asai, Nobuhiko; Noguchi, Takayuki

    2009-07-01

    Systemic inflammatory mediators, including the protein high-mobility group box 1 (HMGB1), play an important role in the development of acute pancreatitis. Anticoagulants such as danaparoid sodium (DA) may be able to inhibit sepsis-induced inflammation, but the mechanism of action is not well understood. We hypothesized that DA would act as an inhibitor of inflammation and prevent cerulein-induced acute pancreatitis. Male Wistar rats were used as subjects in this study. Each received a bolus of 50 U/kg of DA or saline-injected into the tail vein, followed by 4 injections of 50 mg/kg cerulean (i.p.) at 1-h intervals. Cytokine (IL-6), NO, and HMGB1 levels in serum and pancreatic tissue were measured after the cerulein injection. Pancreas histopathology and wet-dry ratio significantly improved in the DA-injected (50 U/kg) animals compared with saline-injected rats. Serum and pancreatic HMGB1 levels decreased over time in DA-treated animals. Danaparoid sodium also decreased cytokine, NO, and HMGB1 levels during cerulein-induced inflammation. As a result, DA ameliorated pancreas pathology in the rat model of cerulein-induced acute pancreatitis. This study demonstrates that DA treatment prevents cerulein-induced acute pancreatitis in a rat model. This effect may be mediated through inhibition of cytokines, NO, and HMGB1.

  11. Gouty Arthritis: A Review of Acute Management and Prevention.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Liza; Saseen, Joseph J

    2016-08-01

    Gouty arthritis is one of the most common rheumatic diseases. The clinical burden of gouty arthritis has historically been well recognized; however, gout is often misdiagnosed and mismanaged. The prevalence of gout is rising and is likely attributed to several factors including increased incidence of comorbidities, lifestyle factors, and increased use of causative medications. With the increasing prevalence, there have been several innovations and evidence-based updates related to the diagnosis and management of gout. Acute gouty arthritis should be treated with nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), colchicine, or corticosteroids, or a combination of two agents. Xanthine oxidase inhibitor therapy remains the consensus first-line treatment option for the prevention of recurrent gout. Add-on therapies that reduce serum urate concentration include traditional uricosuric agents and a novel uric acid reabsorption inhibitor. Prophylaxis of acute gout with NSAIDs, colchicine, or corticosteroids is universally recommended when initiating any urate-lowering therapy in order to prevent acute gouty arthritis for a period of at least 6 months. In this review, we discuss the epidemiology and risk factors for gouty arthritis and evaluate diagnostic strategies and therapeutic regimens for the management of gout, including a new drug approval.

  12. Current prevention and management of acute mountain sickness.

    PubMed Central

    Bia, F. J.

    1992-01-01

    Acute mountain sickness was known to the Chinese in ancient times, as they traversed mountain passes between the Great Headache and Little Headache mountains into present-day Afghanistan. The Jesuit priest, Father Joseph Acosta, lived in Peru during the sixteenth century; he described both this syndrome and deaths which occurred in the high Andes. The incidence of high-altitude illness will rise as previously remote sites become more accessible to trekkers and skiers. Prevention and treatment are important concerns for those physicians who wish to advise their more adventuresome patients properly. This article incorporates a selected review of pertinent investigations, in the English-language literature over the past five years, into material previously presented at travel symposia for clinicians managing the prophylaxis and treatment of acute mountain sickness. PMID:1290275

  13. Prevention of acute gastric mucosal lesions by Solcoseryl.

    PubMed

    Brzozowski, T; Radecki, T; Sendur, R; Gustaw, P; Konturek, S J

    1987-04-01

    Solcoseryl, a deproteinized extract from calf blood containing various biologically active substances, has been reported to promote the healing of skin wounds and gastric ulceration In this study, the gastroprotective effects of Solcoseryl vis-a-vis acute gastric mucosal damage were examined in rats. Solcoseryl significantly reduced the formation of acute lesions induced by intragastric application of absolute ethanol or acidified taurocholate and by water immersion and restraint stress, but failed to affect those caused by acidified aspirin. Since Solcoseryl did not offer protection in the absence of mucosal prostaglandins (PG) e.g. in aspirin-induced gastric damage, it is likely that PG may be involved in the observed gastroprotective activity of the drug. Solcoseryl failed to affect gastric acid or pepsin secretion, but increased mucosal blood flow. Thus PG generated by Solcoseryl might contribute to the maintenance of the observed mucosal microcirculation and the prevention of lesion formation by corrosive substances and stress conditions.

  14. Treatment of Neuromyelitis Optica Spectrum Disorder: Acute, Preventive, and Symptomatic

    PubMed Central

    Kessler, Remi A.; Mealy, Maureen A.; Levy, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Opinion statement Neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorder (NMOSD) is a rare, autoimmune disease of the central nervous system that primarily attacks the optic nerves and spinal cord leading to blindness and paralysis. The spectrum of the disease has expanded based on the specificity of the autoimmune response to the aquaporin-4 water channel on astrocytes. With wider recognition of NMOSD, a standard of care for treatment of this condition has condition based on a growing series of retrospective and prospective studies. This review covers the present state of the field in the treatment of acute relapses, preventive approaches, and therapies for symptoms of NMOSD. PMID:26705758

  15. [Treatment guidelines for acute and preventive treatment of cluster headache].

    PubMed

    Chen, Ping-Kun; Chen, Hsi-Ming; Chen, Wei-Hung; Chen, Yeng-Yu; Fuh, Jong-Ling; Lee, Lian-Hui; Liao, Yi-Chu; Lin, Kao-Chang; Tseng, Hung-Ping; Tsai, Jing-Jane; Wang, Po-Jen; Wang, Shuu-Jiun; Yang, Chun-Pai; Yiu, Chun-Hing; Wu, Zin-An

    2011-09-01

    The Treatment Guideline Subcommittee of the Taiwan Headache Society evaluated both the acute and the preventive treatments for cluster headache now being used in Taiwan, based on the principles of evidence- based medicine. We assessed the quality of clinical trials and levels of evidence, and referred to other treatment guidelines proposed by other countries. Throughout several panel discussions, we merged opinions from the subcommittee members and proposed a consensus on the major roles, recommended levels, clinical efficacy, adverse events and cautions of clinical practice regarding acute and preventive treatments of cluster headache. The majority of Taiwanese patients have episodic cluster headaches, because chronic clusters are very rare. Cluster headache is characterized by severe and excruciating pain which develops within a short time and is associated with ipsilateral autonomic symptoms. Therefore, emergency treatment for a cluster headache attack is extremely important. Within the group of acute medications currently available in Taiwan, the subcommittee determined that high-flow oxygen inhalation has the best evidence of effectiveness, followed by intranasal triptans. Both are recommended as first-line medical treatments for acute attacks. Oral triptans were determined to be second-line medications. For transitional prophylaxis, oral corticosteroids are recommended as the first-line medication, and ergotamine as the second-line choice. As for maintenance prophylaxis, verapamil has the best evidence and is recommended as the first-line medication. Lithium, melatonin, valproic acid, topiramate and gabapentin are suggested as the second-line preventive medications. Surgical interventions, including occipital nerve stimulation, deep brain stimulation, radiofrequency block of the sphenopalatine ganglion, percutaneous radiofrequency rhizotomy and trigeminal nerve section, are invasive and their long-term efficacy and adverse events are still not clear in

  16. Acute kidney injury by radiographic contrast media: pathogenesis and prevention.

    PubMed

    Andreucci, Michele; Faga, Teresa; Pisani, Antonio; Sabbatini, Massimo; Michael, Ashour

    2014-01-01

    It is well known that iodinated radiographic contrast media may cause kidney dysfunction, particularly in patients with preexisting renal impairment associated with diabetes. This dysfunction, when severe, will cause acute renal failure (ARF). We may define contrast-induced Acute Kidney Injury (AKI) as ARF occurring within 24-72 hrs after the intravascular injection of iodinated radiographic contrast media that cannot be attributed to other causes. The mechanisms underlying contrast media nephrotoxicity have not been fully elucidated and may be due to several factors, including renal ischaemia, particularly in the renal medulla, the formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), reduction of nitric oxide (NO) production, and tubular epithelial and vascular endothelial injury. However, contrast-induced AKI can be prevented, but in order to do so, we need to know the risk factors. We have reviewed the risk factors for contrast-induced AKI and measures for its prevention, providing a long list of references enabling readers to deeply evaluate them both.

  17. Ambroxol for the prevention of acute upper respiratory disease.

    PubMed

    Nobata, K; Fujimura, M; Ishiura, Y; Myou, S; Nakao, S

    2006-06-01

    Although acute upper respiratory diseases (AURDs) such as common cold and influenza are common, few interventions have been proven to be effective in their prevention and treatment. The aim of this study was to assess the efficacy of ambroxol for preventing AURD. Fifty-four patients were randomly divided into 3 groups: a rebamipide (non-mucoactive drug) group (300 mg/day), carbocisteine group (1500 mg/day) and ambroxol group (45 mg/day). The study was divided into 2 terms, the first half-year (summer season) and the second half-year (winter season). In the preceding winter, only 19.5% of the patients had been vaccinated against influenza viruses (flu). The primary goal of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of mucoactive drugs in decreasing the frequency of AURD. Treatment with ambroxol, but not carbocisteine, significantly reduced the median number of AURD episodes (P=0.0049 vs. rebamipide). Thirty-three patients without vaccination against flu were assessed especially during the second half-year. Treatment with ambroxol also significantly reduced the median number of AURD episodes in this assessment (P=0.0028 vs. rebamipide in the second half-year). In conclusion, ambroxol may be useful for preventing AURD.

  18. Emerging Therapies for the Prevention of Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Ruthman, Carl A.; Festic, Emir

    2015-01-01

    The development of the acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) carries significant risk of morbidity and mortality. To date, pharmacologic therapy has been largely ineffective for patients with ARDS. We present our personal review aimed at outlining current and future directions for the pharmacologic prevention of ARDS. Several available risk-stratification or prediction scores strategies for identification of patients at risk of ARDS have been reported. Although not ready for the clinical everyday use, they are and will be instrumental in the ongoing and future trials of pharmacoprevention of ARDS. Several systemic medications established the potential role in ARDS prevention based on the preclinical studies and observational data. Due to potential for systemic adverse effects to neutralize any pharmacologic benefits of systemic therapy, inhaled medications appear particularly attractive candidates for ARDS prevention. This is because of their direct delivery to the site of the proposed action (lungs), while pulmonary epithelial surface is still functional. We postulate that overall morbidity and mortality rates from ARDS in the future will be contingent upon decreasing the overall incidence of ARDS through effective identification of those at risk and early application of proven supportive care and pharmacologic interventions. PMID:26002528

  19. A robust impact assessment that informs actionable climate change adaptation: future sunburn browning risk in apple

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webb, Leanne; Darbyshire, Rebecca; Erwin, Tim; Goodwin, Ian

    2016-11-01

    Climate change impact assessments are predominantly undertaken for the purpose of informing future adaptation decisions. Often, the complexity of the methodology hinders the actionable outcomes. The approach used here illustrates the importance of considering uncertainty in future climate projections, at the same time providing robust and simple to interpret information for decision-makers. By quantifying current and future exposure of Royal Gala apple to damaging temperature extremes across ten important pome fruit-growing locations in Australia, differences in impact to ripening fruit are highlighted, with, by the end of the twenty-first century, some locations maintaining no sunburn browning risk, while others potentially experiencing the risk for the majority of the January ripening period. Installation of over-tree netting can reduce the impact of sunburn browning. The benefits from employing this management option varied across the ten study locations. The two approaches explored to assist decision-makers assess this information (a) using sunburn browning risk analogues and (b) through identifying hypothetical sunburn browning risk thresholds, resulted in varying recommendations for introducing over-tree netting. These recommendations were location and future time period dependent with some sites showing no benefit for sunburn protection from nets even by the end of the twenty-first century and others already deriving benefits from employing this adaptation option. Potential best and worst cases of sunburn browning risk and its potential reduction through introduction of over-tree nets were explored. The range of results presented highlights the importance of addressing uncertainty in climate projections that result from different global climate models and possible future emission pathways.

  20. The sunburn cell in hairless mouse epidermis: quantitative studies with UV-A radiation and mono- and bifunctional psoralens

    SciTech Connect

    Young, A.R.; Magnus, I.A.

    1982-10-01

    The production of the sunburn cell by UV-A radiation and topical psoralens in hairless mouse epidermis has been studied. It has been shown that the appearance of this cell is dependent on the dose of both UV-A radiation and of the psoralen. The time-course with 8-methoxypsoralen has peak sunburn cell numbers at 28 hr postirradiation. A comparison of 2 bifunctional (8-methoxypsoralen and 5-methoxypsoralen) and 2 monofunctional (angelicin and 3-carbethoxypsoralen) psoralens showed the former are more potent. This suggests that DNA crosslink lesions may play a rle in sunburn cell production.

  1. Proteomics approach reveals mechanism underlying susceptibility of loquat fruit to sunburn during color changing period.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Ji-Mou; Lin, Yong-Xiang; Chen, Yi-Yong; Deng, Chao-Jun; Gong, Hui-Wen; Xu, Qi-Zhi; Zheng, Shao-Quan; Chen, Wei

    2015-06-01

    The objective of this work was to investigate why loquat fruit peels are more sensitive to high temperature and strong sunlight, making them highly susceptible to sunburn, during the color changing period (CCP). Two dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE) of the fruit peel proteins was performed over three developmental periods, namely green fruit period (GFP), color changing period and yellow ripening period (YRP). Fifty-five protein spots with at least 2-fold differences in abundance were successfully identified by MALDI-TOF-TOF/MS. The identified proteins were divided into categories related to heat-shock response, stress response and defense, energy metabolism, photosynthesis and protein biosynthesis. The results showed that expression of proteins related to anaerobic respiration and photorespiration were increased while the proteins related to ROS scavenging, polyamine biosynthesis, defense pathogens and photosynthesis were decreased during CCP under heat stress. Our findings provide new insights into the molecular mechanism of loquat fruit susceptible to sunburn during CCP.

  2. The measurement of ultraviolet radiation and sunburn time over southern Ontario

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evans, W. F. J.

    1994-01-01

    Studies of the depletion of ozone which have been conducted from the TOMS instrument on the NIMBUS 7 satellite indicate that total ozone has declined by 5 percent over the last 12 years at most mid-latitudes in the Northern Hemisphere typical of southern Ontario. The measurement of the actual resultant increases in UVB is now important. A monitoring program of UVB (biologically active solar ultraviolet radiation) has been conducted for the last 24 months at a site near Bolton, Ontario. The sunburn time varies from less than 17 minutes in late July, to over 4 hours in December on clear days. The levels depend on solar insolation and total ozone column. The ultraviolet levels are strongly affected by cloud and sky conditions. The implications of present and future depletion on the sunburn time are discussed.

  3. A randomized study of the prevention of acute graft-versus-host disease

    SciTech Connect

    Ramsay, N.K.C.; Kersey, J.H.; Robison, L.L.; McGlave, P.B.; Woods, W.G.; Krivit, W.; Kim, T.H.; Goldman, A.I.; Nesbit, M.E., Jr.

    1982-02-01

    Acute graft-versus-host disease is a major problem in allogeneic bone-marrow transplantation. We performed a randomized study to compare the effectiveness of two regimens in the prevention of acute graft-versus-host disease. Thirty-five patients received methotrexate alone, and 32 received methotrexate, antithymocyte globulin, and prednisone. Of the patients who received methotrexate alone, 48 percent had acute graft-versus-host disease, as compared with 21 per cent of those who received methotrexate, antithymocyte globulin, and prednisone (P = 0.01). The age of the recipient was a significant factor in the development of acute graft-versus-host disease: Older patients had a higher incidence of the disease (P = 0.001). We conclude that the combination of methotrexate, antithymocyte globulin, and prednisone significantly decreased the incidence of acute graft-versus-host disease and should be used to prevent this disorder in patients receiving allogeneic marrow transplants.

  4. [Prevention and treatment of acute diarrhea in infants].

    PubMed

    Turck, D

    2007-11-01

    The prognosis of acute diarrhoea in infants is most often satisfactory in industrialized countries. However, it has been estimated that 10 to 15 children die every year in France from acute dehydration due to acute diarrhoea. In spite of an increasing use over the least few years, oral rehydration solutions (ORS) are used in only 70% of infants presenting with acute diarrhoea. The use of homemade ORS, plain water or fizzy drink should be strictly avoided. In case of acute diarrhoea there is no indication to stop breastfeeding or the use of infant formula for more than 4 hours. Lactose intolerance is observed in only 5-10% of infants. Lactose free formulae should only be used in infants with severe, persistent or recurrent diarrhoea. Under 3-4 months of age, infants with severe diarrhoea should receive for a period of 2-4 weeks lactose free protein hydrolysate formulae. Racecadotril is the only drug with anti-diarrheal properties, with a reduction of the stool output of 50%. Oral antibiotics should only be used in case of Shigella infection or in case of bacterial infection with severe sepsis or underlying debilitating disease. Oral Rotavirus vaccine, that is not reimbursed yet in France, has been shown to dramatically reduce the number of severe cases of diarrhoea with dehydration, and has been associated with a striking reduction of both morbidity and mortality, as well as of the number of hospitalisations during periods of epidemics.

  5. Fasting prevents acute pancreatitis induced by cerulein in rats.

    PubMed

    Otsuki, M; Tani, S; Okabayashi, Y; Fujii, M; Nakamura, T; Fujisawa, T; Koide, M; Itoh, H

    1990-07-01

    We examined the effect of fasting on the course of experimental acute pancreatitis induced in rats by four subcutaneous injections of 20 micrograms/kg body weight of cerulein at hourly intervals. Rats were either fasted from 24 hr before to 9 hr after the first cerulein injection or fed ad libitum throughout the experiment. Twenty-four hours of fasting reduced cerulein-induced increases in serum levels of amylase and anionic trypsin(ogen) to 50 and 70% of those in fed rats, respectively. Increases in pancreatic wet weight after cerulein injections were also less in fasted rats than in fed rats. Pancreatic content of trypsin was significantly decreased after a 24-hr fast, and no further changes were induced by cerulein injections. The histological signs of acute pancreatitis were greatly alleviated by fasting. However, 24 hr of fasting did not alter the sensitivity and responsiveness of the exocrine pancreas to cerulein in both in vivo and in vitro. Plasma CCK bioactivity and immunoreactive secretin concentration in 24-hr-fasted rats were significantly lower than those in fed rats. Administration of CCK receptor antagonist, loxiglumide, 12 hr prior to the induction of acute pancreatitis reduced the increase in serum amylase activity in fed rats to nearly the same levels as that in fasted rats and alleviated histological signs of pancreatitis to some extent. These present observations suggest that fasting lessens the severity of cerulein-induced acute pancreatitis by reducing endogenous CCK release.

  6. Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS) Prevention in Taiwan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liu, Hsueh-Erh

    2004-01-01

    Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS) is a newly identified respiratory disease that threatened Taiwan between April 14 and July 5, 2003. Chang Gung University experienced various SARS-related episodes, such as the postponement of classes for 7 days, the reporting of probable SARS cases, and the isolation of students under Level A and B…

  7. Preventing and Treating Acute Kidney Injury Among Hospitalized Patients with Cirrhosis and Ascites: A Narrative Review.

    PubMed

    Tapper, Elliot B; Bonder, Alan; Cardenas, Andres

    2016-05-01

    Acute kidney injury in the setting of ascites and cirrhosis is a medical emergency characterized by significant morbidity and mortality. Clinicians other than gastroenterologists are often the front line against acute kidney injury for patients with ascites. Owing to the specifics of cirrhotic physiology, the treatment and prevention of acute kidney injury in the setting of ascites has unique features, widespread knowledge of which will benefit our patients with cirrhosis. Early detection and treatment of infection, maximization of cardiac output, and avoidance of medications that limit cardiorenal adaptations to arterial underfilling are part of a multipronged strategy to protect the renal function of our patients with cirrhosis and ascites.

  8. Prevention, diagnosis, and management of acute postoperative bacterial endophthalmitis.

    PubMed

    Packer, Mark; Chang, David F; Dewey, Steven H; Little, Brian C; Mamalis, Nick; Oetting, Thomas A; Talley-Rostov, Audrey; Yoo, Sonia H

    2011-09-01

    This distillation of the peer-reviewed scientific literature on infection after cataract surgery summarizes background material on epidemiology, etiology, and pathogenesis, describes the roles of surgical technique and antibiotic prophylaxis in prevention, and discusses diagnostic and therapeutic interventions in cases of suspected endophthalmitis.

  9. Prevention of Acute Rheumatic Fever and Rheumatic Heart Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... also help ( Figure 3 ). 3 , 4 However, such strategies require sustainability, because prevention runs through several decades of life. Efforts from the World Heart Federation, the RhEACH initiative as well as the Global Heart Network to connect stakeholders to resources that ...

  10. [Prevention of peritoneal desiccation in acute adhesive intestinal obstruction].

    PubMed

    2014-01-01

    The research study was carried out on 30 white Wistar rats, which were divided into three groups. In the first group the effect of carboxyperitoneum on visceral peritoneum during a two hour period at a pressure of 9-10 mm Hg and after 20 minutes its further fractional replacement during 10 seconds was examined. In the second group, the study was carried out after modeling 12-hours acute adhesive intestinal obstruction. To the third group at the beginning was given a single injection of four component mixture (carboxyperitoneum gel carboxymetiltcellulose novocaine and antibiotic) into the abdominal cavity. In the first group under the condition of tension carboxyperitoneum after a day of use there were signs of desiccations of visceral peritoneum. The increase of lipid peroxidation products and decrease of antioxidant enzymes were also observed. In the second group of animals these processes were exacerbated by acute adhesive intestinal obstruction. In the third group intraabdominal use of four component disperse mixture reduced the negative organic and functional changes in visceral peritoneum and improved its protective properties.

  11. Preventive mechanisms of agmatine against ischemic acute kidney injury in rats.

    PubMed

    Sugiura, Takahiro; Kobuchi, Shuhei; Tsutsui, Hidenobu; Takaoka, Masanori; Fujii, Toshihide; Hayashi, Kentaro; Matsumura, Yasuo

    2009-01-28

    The excitation of renal sympathetic nervous system plays an important role in the development of ischemic acute kidney injury in rats. Recently, we found that agmatine, an adrenaline alpha(2)/imidazoline I(1)-receptor agonist, has preventive effects on ischemic acute kidney injury by suppressing the enhanced renal sympathetic nerve activity during renal ischemia and by decreasing the renal venous norepinephrine overflow after reperfusion. In the present study, we investigated preventive mechanisms of agmatine against ischemic acute kidney injury in rats. Ischemic acute kidney injury was induced by clamping the left renal artery and vein for 45 min followed by reperfusion, 2 weeks after the contralateral nephrectomy. Pretreatment with efaroxan (30 mumol/kg, i.v.), an alpha(2)/I(1)-receptor antagonist, abolished the suppressive effects of agmatine on the enhanced renal sympathetic nerve activity during renal ischemia and on the elevated norepinephrine overflow after reperfusion, and eliminated the preventing effects of agmatine on the ischemia/reperfusion-induced renal dysfunction and histological damage. On the other hand, pretreatment with yohimbine (6 mumol/kg, i.v.), an alpha(2)-receptor antagonist, eliminated the preventing effects of agmatine on the ischemia/reperfusion-induced renal injury and norepinephrine overflow, without affecting the lowering effect of agmatine on renal sympathetic nerve activity. These results indicate that agmatine prevents the ischemic renal injury by sympathoinhibitory effect probably via I(1) receptors in central nervous system and by suppressing the norepinephrine overflow through alpha(2) or I(1) receptors on sympathetic nerve endings.

  12. Human thermoregulatory responses during cold-water immersion after artificially-induced sunburn

    SciTech Connect

    Pandolf, K.B.; Gange, R.W.; Latzka, W.A.; Blank, I.H.; Young, A.J.; Sawka, M.N. Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston )

    1991-03-11

    Thermoregulatory responses during cold-water immersion (T{sub w} = 22C) were compared in 10 men prior to artificially-induced sunburn (CONB), as well as 24-h, and 1-wk after a 2 minimal erythemal dose of UV-B radiation (SUNB) which covered {approximately}85% of the body. After 10 min of rest in cold water, these men exercised for 50 min ({approximately}51% {dot V}O{sub 2}max). Esophageal (T{sub es}), rectal (T{sub re}), and mean skin ({bar T}{sub sk}) temperatures, mean heat flow ({bar h}{sub c}), and heart rate (HR) were measured. Venous blood samples were collected before and after immersion. The {bar T}{sub sk} was higher throughout the 60-min immersion both 24-h and 1-wk after SUNB compared to CONB. The {anti h}{sub c} was higher after 10 min resting immersion and during the first 10 min of exercise when 24-h SUNB waqs compared to CONB with the difference attributed to higher h{sub c} from the back and chest. While T{sub re} and HR did not differ between conditions, T{sub es} prior to and throughout the 60-min immersion was higher when 24-h SUNB was compared to CONB. Plasma volume increased after 1-wk SUNB compared to CONB while plasma protein was reduced. Post-exercise cortisol was greater 24-h SUNB compared to either CONB or 1-wk SUNB. In conclusion, sunburn impaired the ability of these men to vasoconstrict during cold-water immersion resulting in greater heat loss. These adverse effects were still present 1 wk after sunburn when the associated erythema had disappeared.

  13. Sunburn (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... peak hours of the sun's rays and apply sunscreen with a sun protection factor (SPF) of at ... UV protection and use a lip balm with sunscreen. Years of unprotected sun exposure can cause premature ...

  14. Treating Sunburn

    MedlinePlus

    ... your skin, hair, and nails Skin dictionary Camp Discovery Good Skin Knowledge lesson plans and activities Video library Find a ... your skin, hair, and nails Skin dictionary Camp Discovery Good Skin Knowledge lesson plans and activities Video library Find a ...

  15. Approaches to prevent acute bacterial meningitis in developing countries.

    PubMed Central

    Wright, P. F.

    1989-01-01

    Endemic acute bacterial meningitis of childhood appears to be neglected as a cause of morbidity and mortality in developing countries, probably because it has been overshadowed by the dramatic epidemics of meningococcal disease in sub-Saharan Africa. The available data based on reviews of hospitalized patients suggest that endemic meningitis is mostly a disease of young infants, Streptococcus pneumoniae and Haemophilus influenzae type b being the most important etiologic agents. The epidemiological pattern appears to be different in developing countries, compared with northern Europe or the USA, and closely resembles the early age of onset and high incidence of meningitis observed among the native American populations in Alaska. The mortality from meningitis appears to be much higher in developing countries than in industrialized countries. The availability of vaccines against the pneumococcus and haemophilus, particularly those in which the bacterial polysaccharide is conjugated to a protein, promises protection against systemic bacterial infection from these organisms. The assessment of the efficacy of such vaccines will have to include a close examination of meningitis as an outcome. It is suggested that before such vaccines become available careful clinical and epidemiological studies of meningitis will help both to define the impact of this disease and how to design an intervention strategy. PMID:2611973

  16. Action spectrum for bergamot-oil phototoxicity measured by sunburn cell counting.

    PubMed

    Yasui, Y; Hirone, T

    1994-05-01

    The present study investigated the phototoxic effect of bergamot oil and its photosensitive component, bergapten, on sunburn cell (SBC) production in guinea pig skin. The back skin was pretreated with bergamot oil or bergapten and exposed to monochromatic light under various conditions. After irradiation, skin specimens were excised, and histological sections were prepared. The number of sunburn cells in the interfollicular epidermis was counted. The SBC formation by bergamot oil or bergapten plus UVB radiation was the same as that without pretreatment with any photosensitizer. In contrast, a significant number of SBCs were induced by bergamot oil or bergapten plus UVA radiation, but no SBCs were found after the treatment with UVA alone. The result indicates that bergamot oil or bergapten was photosensitized by UVA irradiation. The SBCs were linearly increased in a UV-dose dependent manner. On the basis of the regression lines, an action spectrum and spectral peak for the photosensitizers plus UVA were obtained. The action spectrum for bergamot oil- and bergapten-induced SBC formation was in the ranges of 325-365 nm and 325-350 nm, and their spectral peaks were at 335-345 nm and 335-350 nm, respectively. The data are in good accordance with those estimated from skin erythema reactions. Therefore, counting SBCs is a very useful parameter for quantitative evaluation of phototoxicity.

  17. Strategies to Prevent Surgical Site Infections in Acute Care Hospitals: 2014 Update

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Deverick J.; Podgorny, Kelly; Berríos-Torres, Sandra I.; Bratzler, Dale W.; Dellinger, E. Patchen; Greene, Linda; Nyquist, Ann-Christine; Saiman, Lisa; Yokoe, Deborah S.; Maragakis, Lisa L.; Kaye, Keith S.

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE Previously published guidelines are available that provide comprehensive recommendations for detecting and preventing healthcare-associated infections (HAIs). The intent of this document is to highlight practical recommendations in a concise format designed to assist acute care hospitals in implementing and prioritizing their surgical site infection (SSI) prevention efforts. This document updates “Strategies to Prevent Surgical Site Infections in Acute Care Hospitals,”1 published in 2008. This expert guidance document is sponsored by the Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America (SHEA) and is the product of a collaborative effort led by SHEA, the Infectious Diseases Society of America (IDSA), the American Hospital Association (AHA), the Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology (APIC), and The Joint Commission, with major contributions from representatives of a number of organizations and societies with content expertise. The list of endorsing and supporting organizations is presented in the introduction to the 2014 updates.2 PMID:24799638

  18. Graduated compression stockings to prevent venous thromboembolism in hospital: evidence from patients with acute stroke.

    PubMed

    Kearon, Clive; O'Donnell, Martin

    2011-01-01

    Pulmonary embolism is the most common preventable cause of death in hospital patients and prevention of venous thromboembolism (VTE) is cost-saving in high-risk patients. Low-dose anticoagulation is very effective at preventing VTE but increases bleeding. Graduated compression stockings and intermittent pneumatic compression devices are also used to prevent VTE and do not increase bleeding, which makes their use appealing in patients who cannot tolerate bleeding, such as patients with acute stroke. Studies that evaluated mechanical methods of preventing VTE were small and mainly used asymptomatic deep vein thrombosis (DVT), detected using screening tests, as the study outcome. The recently published CLOTS Trial 1 (Clots in Legs Or sTockings after Stroke) compared thigh-level compression stockings with no stockings in about 2500 patients with stroke and immobility, and found that thigh-level stockings were not effective. Indirectly, the findings of this study question the ability of stockings to prevent VTE in other patient groups, including those after surgery. CLOTS 1 compared thigh-level and below-knee stockings in about 3000 patients with acute stroke. Given that thigh-level stockings were ineffective in CLOTS 1, it is surprising that they were more effective than below-knee stockings in CLOTS Trial 2. A possible explanation is that below-knee stockings increase DVT, although this seems unlikely. CLOTS 1 and CLOTS 2 question whether graduated compression stockings prevent VTE and suggest the need for further trials evaluating their efficacy in medical and surgical patients.

  19. Strategies for prevention of acute kidney injury in cardiac surgery: an integrative review

    PubMed Central

    Santana-Santos, Eduesley; Marcusso, Marila Eduara Fátima; Rodrigues, Amanda Oliveira; de Queiroz, Fernanda Gomes; de Oliveira, Larissa Bertacchini; Rodrigues, Adriano Rogério Baldacin; Palomo, Jurema da Silva Herbas

    2014-01-01

    Acute kidney injury is a common complication after cardiac surgery and is associated with increased morbidity and mortality and increased length of stay in the intensive care unit. Considering the high prevalence of acute kidney injury and its association with worsened prognosis, the development of strategies for renal protection in hospitals is essential to reduce the associated high morbidity and mortality, especially for patients at high risk of developing acute kidney injury, such as patients who undergo cardiac surgery. This integrative review sought to assess the evidence available in the literature regarding the most effective interventions for the prevention of acute kidney injury in patients undergoing cardiac surgery. To select the articles, we used the CINAHL and MedLine databases. The sample of this review consisted of 16 articles. After analyzing the articles included in the review, the results of the studies showed that only hydration with saline has noteworthy results in the prevention of acute kidney injury. The other strategies are controversial and require further research to prove their effectiveness. PMID:25028954

  20. Nrf2 activation prevents cadmium-induced acute liver injury

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Kai C.; Liu, Jie J.; Klaassen, Curtis D.

    2012-08-15

    Oxidative stress plays an important role in cadmium-induced liver injury. Nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) is a transcription factor that up-regulates cytoprotective genes in response to oxidative stress. To investigate the role of Nrf2 in cadmium-induced hepatotoxicity, Nrf2-null mice, wild-type mice, kelch-like ECH-associated protein 1-knockdown (Keap1-KD) mice with enhanced Nrf2, and Keap1-hepatocyte knockout (Keap1-HKO) mice with maximum Nrf2 activation were treated with cadmium chloride (3.5 mg Cd/kg, i.p.). Blood and liver samples were collected 8 h thereafter. Cadmium increased serum alanine aminotransferase (ALT) and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) activities, and caused extensive hepatic hemorrhage and necrosis in the Nrf2-null mice. In contrast, Nrf2-enhanced mice had lower serum ALT and LDH activities and less morphological alternations in the livers than wild-type mice. H{sub 2}DCFDA (2′,7′-dichlorodihydrofluoresein diacetate) staining of primary hepatocytes isolated from the four genotypes of mice indicated that oxidative stress was higher in Nrf2-null cells, and lower in Nrf2-enhanced cells than in wild-type cells. To further investigate the mechanism of the protective effect of Nrf2, mRNA of metallothionein (MT) and other cytoprotective genes were determined. Cadmium markedly induced MT-1 and MT-2 in livers of all four genotypes of mice. In contrast, genes involved in glutathione synthesis and reducing reactive oxygen species, including glutamate-cysteine ligase (Gclc), glutathione peroxidase-2 (Gpx2), and sulfiredoxin-1 (Srxn-1) were only induced in Nrf2-enhanced mice, but not in Nrf2-null mice. In conclusion, the present study shows that Nrf2 activation prevents cadmium-induced oxidative stress and liver injury through induction of genes involved in antioxidant defense rather than genes that scavenge Cd. -- Highlights: ► Cadmium caused extensive hepatic hemorrhage and necrosis in Nrf2-null mice. ► Keap1-KD and Keap1-HKO mice

  1. Prevention of post-rape psychopathology: preliminary findings of a controlled acute rape treatment study.

    PubMed

    Resnick, H; Acierno, R; Holmes, M; Kilpatrick, D G; Jager, N

    1999-01-01

    Violent sexual assault such as rape typically results in extremely high levels of acute distress. The intensity of these acute psychological reactions may play a role in later recovery, with higher levels of immediate distress associated with poorer outcome. Unfortunately, post-rape forensic evidence collection procedures may serve to increase, rather than reduce initial distress, potentially exacerbating future psychopathology. To address these concerns, an acute time-frame hospital-based video intervention was developed to: (a) minimize anxiety during forensic rape exams, and (b) prevent post-rape posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), panic, and anxiety. Preliminary data indicated that (1) psychological distress at the time of the exam was strongly related to PTSD symptomatology 6 weeks post-rape, and (2) the video intervention successfully reduced distress during forensic exams.

  2. Implementation of pressure ulcer prevention best practice recommendations in acute care: an observational study.

    PubMed

    Barker, Anna Lucia; Kamar, Jeannette; Tyndall, Tamara Jane; White, Lyn; Hutchinson, Anastasia; Klopfer, Nicole; Weller, Carolina

    2013-06-01

    Pressure ulcers are a common but preventable problem in hospitals. Implementation of best practice guideline recommendations can prevent ulcers from occurring. This 9-year cohort study reports prevalence data from point prevalence surveys during the observation period, and three practice metrics to assess implementation of best practice guideline recommendations: (i) nurse compliance with use of a validated pressure ulcer risk assessment and intervention checklist; (ii) accuracy of risk assessment scoring in usual-care nurses and experienced injury prevention nurses; and (iii) use of pressure ulcer prevention strategies. The prevalence of hospital-acquired pressure ulcers decreased following implementation of an evidence-based prevention programme from 12·6% (2 years preprogramme implementation) to 2·6% (6 years postprogramme implementation) (P < 0·001). Audits between 2003 and 2011 of 4368 patient medical records identified compliance with pressure ulcer prevention documentation according to best practice guidelines was high (>84%). A sample of 270 patients formed the sample for the study of risk assessment scoring accuracy and use of prevention strategies. It was found usual-care nurses under-estimated patients' risk of pressure ulcer development and under-utilised prevention strategies compared with experienced injury prevention nurses. Despite a significant reduction in prevalence of hospital-acquired pressure ulcers and high documentation compliance, use of prevention strategies could further be improved to achieve better patient outcomes. Barriers to the use of prevention strategies by nurses in the acute hospital setting require further examination. This study provides important insights into the knowledge translation of pressure ulcer prevention best practice guideline recommendations at The Northern Hospital.

  3. A Compendium of Strategies to Prevent Healthcare-Associated Infections in Acute Care Hospitals: 2014 Updates

    PubMed Central

    Yokoe, Deborah S.; Anderson, Deverick J.; Berenholtz, Sean M.; Calfee, David P.; Dubberke, Erik R.; Ellingson, Katherine D.; Gerding, Dale N.; Haas, Janet P.; Kaye, Keith S.; Klompas, Michael; Lo, Evelyn; Marschall, Jonas; Mermel, Leonard A.; Nicolle, Lindsay E.; Salgado, Cassandra D.; Bryant, Kristina; Classen, David; Crist, Katrina; Deloney, Valerie M.; Fishman, Neil O.; Foster, Nancy; Goldmann, Donald A.; Humphreys, Eve; Jernigan, John A.; Padberg, Jennifer; Perl, Trish M.; Podgorny, Kelly; Septimus, Edward J.; VanAmringe, Margaret; Weaver, Tom; Weinstein, Robert A.; Wise, Robert; Maragakis, Lisa L.

    2014-01-01

    Since the publication of “A Compendium of Strategies to Prevent Healthcare-Associated Infections in Acute Care Hospitals” in 2008, prevention of healthcare-associated infections (HAIs) has become a national priority. Despite improvements, preventable HAIs continue to occur. The 2014 updates to the Compendium were created to provide acute care hospitals with up-to-date, practical, expert guidance to assist in prioritizing and implementing their HAI prevention efforts. They are the product of a highly collaborative effort led by the Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America (SHEA), the Infectious Diseases Society of America (IDSA), the American Hospital Association (AHA), the Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology (APIC), and The Joint Commission, with major contributions from representatives of a number of organizations and societies with content expertise, including the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), the Institute for Healthcare Improvement (IHI), the Pediatric Infectious Diseases Society (PIDS), the Society for Critical Care Medicine (SCCM), the Society for Hospital Medicine (SHM), and the Surgical Infection Society (SIS). PMID:25026611

  4. A compendium of strategies to prevent healthcare-associated infections in acute care hospitals: 2014 updates.

    PubMed

    Yokoe, Deborah S; Anderson, Deverick J; Berenholtz, Sean M; Calfee, David P; Dubberke, Erik R; Ellingson, Katherine D; Gerding, Dale N; Haas, Janet P; Kaye, Keith S; Klompas, Michael; Lo, Evelyn; Marschall, Jonas; Mermel, Leonard A; Nicolle, Lindsay E; Salgado, Cassandra D; Bryant, Kristina; Classen, David; Crist, Katrina; Deloney, Valerie M; Fishman, Neil O; Foster, Nancy; Goldmann, Donald A; Humphreys, Eve; Jernigan, John A; Padberg, Jennifer; Perl, Trish M; Podgorny, Kelly; Septimus, Edward J; VanAmringe, Margaret; Weaver, Tom; Weinstein, Robert A; Wise, Robert; Maragakis, Lisa L

    2014-08-01

    Since the publication of "A Compendium of Strategies to Prevent Healthcare-Associated Infections in Acute Care Hospitals" in 2008, prevention of healthcare-associated infections (HAIs) has become a national priority. Despite improvements, preventable HAIs continue to occur. The 2014 updates to the Compendium were created to provide acute care hospitals with up-to-date, practical, expert guidance to assist in prioritizing and implementing their HAI prevention efforts. They are the product of a highly collaborative effort led by the Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America (SHEA), the Infectious Diseases Society of America (IDSA), the American Hospital Association (AHA), the Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology (APIC), and The Joint Commission, with major contributions from representatives of a number of organizations and societies with content expertise, including the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), the Institute for Healthcare Improvement (IHI), the Pediatric Infectious Diseases Society (PIDS), the Society for Critical Care Medicine (SCCM), the Society for Hospital Medicine (SHM), and the Surgical Infection Society (SIS).

  5. A Compendium of Strategies to Prevent Healthcare-Associated Infections in Acute Care Hospitals: 2014 Updates.

    PubMed

    Yokoe, Deborah S; Anderson, Deverick J; Berenholtz, Sean M; Calfee, David P; Dubberke, Erik R; Ellingson, Katherine D; Gerding, Dale N; Haas, Janet P; Kaye, Keith S; Klompas, Michael; Lo, Evelyn; Marschall, Jonas; Mermel, Leonard A; Nicolle, Lindsay E; Salgado, Cassandra D; Bryant, Kristina; Classen, David; Crist, Katrina; Deloney, Valerie M; Fishman, Neil O; Foster, Nancy; Goldmann, Donald A; Humphreys, Eve; Jernigan, John A; Padberg, Jennifer; Perl, Trish M; Podgorny, Kelly; Septimus, Edward J; VanAmringe, Margaret; Weaver, Tom; Weinstein, Robert A; Wise, Robert; Maragakis, Lisa L

    2014-08-01

    Since the publication of "A Compendium of Strategies to Prevent Healthcare-Associated Infections in Acute Care Hospitals" in 2008, prevention of healthcare-associated infections (HAIs) has become a national priority. Despite improvements, preventable HAIs continue to occur. The 2014 updates to the Compendium were created to provide acute care hospitals with up-to-date, practical, expert guidance to assist in prioritizing and implementing their HAI prevention efforts. They are the product of a highly collaborative effort led by the Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America (SHEA), the Infectious Diseases Society of America (IDSA), the American Hospital Association (AHA), the Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology (APIC), and The Joint Commission, with major contributions from representatives of a number of organizations and societies with content expertise, including the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), the Institute for Healthcare Improvement (IHI), the Pediatric Infectious Diseases Society (PIDS), the Society for Critical Care Medicine (SCCM), the Society for Hospital Medicine (SHM), and the Surgical Infection Society (SIS).

  6. Development of a Lubricant Therapy to Prevent Development of Osteoarthritis after Acute Injury of Synovial Joints

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-10-01

    AD______________ AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-14-1-0562 TITLE: Development of a Lubricant Therapy to Prevent Development of Osteoarthritis after Acute...Injury of Synovial Joints PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Robert L. Sah RECIPIENT: Dr. Prem Yadav, Ph.D. REPORT DATE: October 2015 TYPE OF REPORT...PLEASE DO NOT RETURN YOUR FORM TO THE ABOVE ADDRESS. 1. REPORT DATE October 2015 2. REPORT TYPE Annual 3. DATES COVERED 30 Sep 2014 - 29 Sep 2015 4

  7. Corticosteroids prevent acute lung dysfunction caused by thoracic irradiation in unanesthetized sheep

    SciTech Connect

    Loyd, J.E.; Bolds, J.M.; Wickersham, N.; Malcolm, A.W.; Brigham, K.L.

    1988-11-01

    We sought to determine the effect of corticosteroid therapy in a new acute model of oxidant lung injury, thoracic irradiation in awake sheep. Sheep were irradiated with 1,500 rads to the whole chest except for blocking the heart and adjacent ventral lung. Seven experimental sheep were given methylprednisolone (1 g intravenously every 6 h for four doses) and thoracic irradiation; control sheep received only irradiation. In irradiated control sheep, lung lymph flow increased from baseline (7.6 ml/h) to peak at 3 h (13.2), and lung lymph protein clearance increased from 5.1 to 9.7 ml/h. Mean pulmonary artery pressure increased in the irradiated control sheep from 19 to 32.4 cm H/sub 2/O, whereas the lung lymph thromboxane concentration increased from 0.09 to 6.51 ng/ml at 3 h. Arterial oxygen tension in irradiated control sheep fell gradually from 86 mm Hg at baseline to 65 mm Hg at 8 h. Methylprednisolone administration significantly prevented the increase in lung lymph protein clearance, mean pulmonary artery pressure, and lung lymph thromboxane concentration. Methylprednisolone also prevented the fall in arterial oxygen tension after thoracic irradiation, but did not prevent a further decrease in lymphocytes in blood or lung lymph after radiation. We conclude that corticosteroid therapy prevents most of the acute physiologic changes caused by thoracic irradiation in awake sheep.

  8. Strategies for the prevention of acute mountain sickness and treatment for large groups making a rapid ascent in China.

    PubMed

    Luo, Yongjun; Yang, Xiaohong; Gao, Yuqi

    2013-10-30

    Approximately 26.8% of China's land area has an elevation of 3000 m above sea level or higher. Because of recent demands for economic development and new construction in highland areas, many people have relocated from the plains to high plateau regions and have to face the possibility of contracting acute mountain sickness. Therefore, prevention and treatment strategies are necessary to reduce the incidence of acute mountain sickness in people who rapidly ascend to plateau areas. This paper describes the Chinese experience when large numbers of people moved to the plateau and the steps that were taken to deal with this illness. These steps included implementing basic prevention measures, increasing medical awareness among populations ascending to high altitudes, and installing standardized medical management systems to prevent and treat acute mountain sickness before, during, and after ascent. The incidence of acute mountain sickness can be reduced by improving prevention and treatment and by implementing the recommendations described in this manuscript.

  9. Preventing cerebral oedema in acute liver failure: the case for quadruple-H therapy.

    PubMed

    Warrillow, S J; Bellomo, R

    2014-01-01

    Severe cerebral oedema is a life-threatening complication of acute liver failure. Hyperammonaemia and cerebral hyperaemia are major contributing factors. A multimodal approach, which incorporates hyperventilation, haemodiafiltration, hypernatraemia and hypothermia (quadruple-H therapy), may prevent or attenuate severe cerebral oedema. This approach is readily administered by critical care clinicians and is likely to be more effective than the use of single therapies. Targeting of PaCO2 in the mild hyperventilation range, as seen in acute liver failure patients before intubation, aims to minimise hyperaemic cerebral oedema. Haemodiafiltration aims to achieve the rapid control of elevated blood ammonia concentrations by its removal and to reduce production via the lowering of core temperature. The administration of concentrated saline increases serum tonicity and further reduces cerebral swelling. In addition, the pathologically increased cerebral blood-flow is further attenuated by therapeutic hypothermia. The combination of all four treatments in a multimodal approach may be a safe and effective means of attenuating or treating the cerebral oedema of acute liver failure and preventing death from neurological complications.

  10. Carfilzomib-related acute kidney injury may be prevented by N-acetyl-L-cysteine.

    PubMed

    Wanchoo, Rimda; Khan, Seyyar; Kolitz, Jonathan E; Jhaveri, Kenar D

    2015-08-01

    Carfilzomib is a second-generation epoxyketone proteasome inhibitor that is approved for treatment of relapsed and refractory multiple myeloma. Phase 2 trials have reported that 25% of treated patients have renal adverse effects. Pre-renal/vasoconstriction-related insult from this chemotherapy agent has been documented. We describe a case of a 78-year-old man with refractory multiple myeloma with acute kidney injury associated with carfilzomib treatment. We show that use of N-acetyl-l-cysteine in our patient partially mitigated the renal injury upon re-challenge. This case report hypothesizes that acute renal injury from carfilzomib is caused by vasoconstriction of the renal vessels, which may be prevented by N-acetyl-l-cysteine.

  11. Efficacy and harm of pharmacological prevention of acute mountain sickness: quantitative systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Dumont, Lionel; Mardirosoff, Chahé; Tramèr, Martin R

    2000-01-01

    Objective To quantify efficacy and harm of pharmacological prevention of acute mountain sickness. Data sources Systematic search (Medline, Embase, Cochrane Library, internet, bibliographies, authors) in any language, up to October 1999. Study selection Randomised placebo controlled trials. Data extraction Dichotomous data on efficacy and harm from 33 trials (523 subjects received 13 different interventions, 519 a placebo). Data synthesis At above 4000 m the mean incidence of acute mountain sickness with placebo was 67% (range 25% to 100%); incidence depended on the rate of ascent, but not on the altitude or the mode of ascent. Across all ascent rates, dexamethasone 8-16 mg prevented acute mountain sickness (relative risk 2.50 (95% confidence interval 1.71 to 3.66); number needed to treat (NNT) 2.8 (2.0 to 4.6)), without evidence of dose responsiveness. Acetazolamide 750 mg was also efficacious (2.18 (1.52 to 3.15); NNT 2.9 (2.0 to 5.2)), but 500 mg was not. In two trials, adverse reaction (including depression) occurred after dexamethasone was stopped abruptly (4.45 (1.08 to 18); NNT 3.7 (2.5 to 6.9)). With acetazolamide, paraesthesia (4.02 (1.71 to 9.43); NNT 3.0 (2.0 to 6.0)) and polyuria (4.24 (1.92 to 9.37); NNT 3.6 (2.5 to 6.2)) were reported. Data were sparse on nifedipine, frusemide (furosemide), dihydroxyaluminium-sodium, spironolactone, phenytoin, codeine, phenformin, antidiuretic hormone, and ginkgo biloba. Conclusions At above 4000 m, with a high ascent rate, fewer than three subjects need to be treated with prophylactic dexamethasone 8-16 mg or acetazolamide 750 mg for one subject not to experience acute mountain sickness who would have done so had they all received a placebo. Acetazolamide 500 mg does not work. PMID:10915127

  12. Metabolic causes and prevention of ventricular fibrillation during acute coronary syndromes.

    PubMed

    Oliver, Michael F

    2002-03-01

    The mechanisms leading to ventricular fibrillation that occur during acute myocardial ischemia are ill understood. Whether primary ventricular fibrillation is due to a transient imbalance of electrolytes, an alteration of membrane permeability, electrical re-entry phenomena, or other factors, one overriding influence is the development of regional myocardial energy crises. Acute alteration in the balance of substrate supply may lead, during greatly reduced blood flow, to instability of myocardial electrical conduction with the development of re-entry circuits. An immediate response to the angor animi and initial symptoms of an acute coronary syndrome is a rapid and marked increase in catecholamine release, which leads to adipose tissue lipolysis with an acute increase in plasma free fatty acid concentrations, suppression of insulin activity, and a reduction in glucose uptake by the myocardium. The utilization of free fatty acids instead of glucose by the ischemic myocardium could precipitate regional oxygen or energy crises. Prevention therefore should focus on minimizing the catecholamine response and providing the myocardium with an optimum supply of energy substrates. Since catecholamines are inotropic, the aim should be to redress the imbalance of substrate availability by controlling adipose lipolysis with reduction of plasma free fatty acid concentrations, increasing the availability of glucose, or both. Other approaches include inhibition of acylcarnitine transport and manipulation of fatty acid intermediaries. To combat primary ventricular fibrillation, preventive treatment must be established within 6 to 10 hours of the onset of ischemia. There is already experimental and clinical evidence that antilipolytic drugs decrease the incidence of ventricular fibrillation, but their potential has not been explored extensively.

  13. The Acute to Chronic Pain Transition: Can Chronic Pain Be Prevented?

    PubMed

    Pozek, John-Paul J; Beausang, David; Baratta, Jaime L; Viscusi, Eugene R

    2016-01-01

    Chronic postsurgical pain (CPSP) is a distressing disease process that can lead to long-term disability, reduced quality of life, and increased health care spending. Although the exact mechanism of development of CPSP is unknown, nerve injury and inflammation may lead to peripheral and central sensitization. Given the complexity of the disease process, no novel treatment has been identified. The preoperative use of multimodal analgesia has been shown to decrease acute postoperative pain, but it has no proven efficacy in preventing development of CPSP.

  14. [Preventive and cessation therapy of mental disorders in patients with the acute coronary syndrome].

    PubMed

    Medvedev, V E; Epifanov, A V; Zverev, K V

    2012-01-01

    An open prospective trial of 93 inpatients divided into two main groups (61 patients) - with mental disorders (31) and without mental disorders (30) and a comparison group (32 patients) was carried out. All patients survived the acute coronary syndrome (myocardial infarction, unstable angina). The efficacy and safety of both preventive and cessation therapy with pantogam active in mean doses 1.8 and 1.2 g /daily, respectively, was demonstrated in respect of heterogeneous depressive, anxiety and somatoform disorders of the neurotic level.

  15. Effects of UVB irradiation on epidermal adenylate cyclase responses in vitro: its relation to sunburn cell formation.

    PubMed

    Iizuka, H; Ishida-Yamamoto, A; Kajita, S; Tsutsui, M; Ohkuma, N

    1988-01-01

    UVB irradiation augmented the beta-adrenergic adenylate cyclase response of pig skin epidermis in vitro. The effect was observed 2-4 h following the irradiation and lasted at least for 48 h. There was no significant difference in cyclic AMP phosphodiesterase activity between control and UVB-irradiated epidermis at lower irradiation dose (150 mJ/cm2), which is the dose of the most marked beta-adrenergic augmentation effect. The augmentation effect was specific to the beta-adrenergic system; adenosine and histamine adenylate cyclase responses were unchanged or decreased depending on the irradiation dose. Histologically, marked sunburn-cell formation was observed following the UVB irradiation. It has been suggested that oxygen intermediates generated by ultraviolet radiation participate in sunburn-cell formation. The addition of superoxide dismutase (SOD) in the incubation medium significantly inhibited sunburn-cell formation. On the other hand, the beta-adrenergic augmentation effect was not affected by the addition of SOD. Other scavengers of oxygen intermediates (catalase, catalase + SOD, xanthine, or mannitol) did not inhibit the UVB-induced beta-adrenergic augmentation effect. Further, superoxide-anion generating systems (hypoxanthine-xanthine oxidase system and acetaldehyde-xanthine oxidase system) revealed no stimulatory effect on the beta-adrenergic response of epidermis. These results indicate that (a) the UVB-induced beta-adrenergic augmentation effect is inherent to skin and does not depend on systemic factors such as inflammatory infiltrates following UVB irradiation; (b) in contrast to sunburn-cell formation, induction of the beta-adrenergic adenylate cyclase response is not directly associated with oxygen intermediates generated by UVB irradiation.

  16. UVB radiation generates sunburn pain and affects skin by activating epidermal TRPV4 ion channels and triggering endothelin-1 signaling

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Carlene; Cevikbas, Ferda; Pasolli, H. Amalia; Chen, Yong; Kong, Wei; Kempkes, Cordula; Parekh, Puja; Lee, Suk Hee; Kontchou, Nelly-Ange; Yeh, Iwei; Jokerst, Nan Marie; Fuchs, Elaine; Steinhoff, Martin; Liedtke, Wolfgang B.

    2013-01-01

    At our body surface, the epidermis absorbs UV radiation. UV overexposure leads to sunburn with tissue injury and pain. To understand how, we focus on TRPV4, a nonselective cation channel highly expressed in epithelial skin cells and known to function in sensory transduction, a property shared with other transient receptor potential channels. We show that following UVB exposure mice with induced Trpv4 deletions, specifically in keratinocytes, are less sensitive to noxious thermal and mechanical stimuli than control animals. Exploring the mechanism, we find that epidermal TRPV4 orchestrates UVB-evoked skin tissue damage and increased expression of the proalgesic/algogenic mediator endothelin-1. In culture, UVB causes a direct, TRPV4-dependent Ca2+ response in keratinocytes. In mice, topical treatment with a TRPV4-selective inhibitor decreases UVB-evoked pain behavior, epidermal tissue damage, and endothelin-1 expression. In humans, sunburn enhances epidermal expression of TRPV4 and endothelin-1, underscoring the potential of keratinocyte-derived TRPV4 as a therapeutic target for UVB-induced sunburn, in particular pain. PMID:23929777

  17. UVB radiation generates sunburn pain and affects skin by activating epidermal TRPV4 ion channels and triggering endothelin-1 signaling.

    PubMed

    Moore, Carlene; Cevikbas, Ferda; Pasolli, H Amalia; Chen, Yong; Kong, Wei; Kempkes, Cordula; Parekh, Puja; Lee, Suk Hee; Kontchou, Nelly-Ange; Yeh, Iwei; Ye, Iwei; Jokerst, Nan Marie; Fuchs, Elaine; Steinhoff, Martin; Liedtke, Wolfgang B

    2013-08-20

    At our body surface, the epidermis absorbs UV radiation. UV overexposure leads to sunburn with tissue injury and pain. To understand how, we focus on TRPV4, a nonselective cation channel highly expressed in epithelial skin cells and known to function in sensory transduction, a property shared with other transient receptor potential channels. We show that following UVB exposure mice with induced Trpv4 deletions, specifically in keratinocytes, are less sensitive to noxious thermal and mechanical stimuli than control animals. Exploring the mechanism, we find that epidermal TRPV4 orchestrates UVB-evoked skin tissue damage and increased expression of the proalgesic/algogenic mediator endothelin-1. In culture, UVB causes a direct, TRPV4-dependent Ca(2+) response in keratinocytes. In mice, topical treatment with a TRPV4-selective inhibitor decreases UVB-evoked pain behavior, epidermal tissue damage, and endothelin-1 expression. In humans, sunburn enhances epidermal expression of TRPV4 and endothelin-1, underscoring the potential of keratinocyte-derived TRPV4 as a therapeutic target for UVB-induced sunburn, in particular pain.

  18. Galectin-7 overexpression is associated with the apoptotic process in UVB-induced sunburn keratinocytes

    PubMed Central

    Bernerd, Francoise; Sarasin, Alain; Magnaldo, Thierry

    1999-01-01

    Galectin-7 is a β-galactoside binding protein specifically expressed in stratified epithelia and notably in epidermis, but barely detectable in epidermal tumors and absent from squamous carcinoma cell lines. Galectin-7 gene is an early transcriptional target of the tumor suppressor protein P53 [Polyak, K., Xia, Y., Zweier, J., Kinzler, K. & Vogelstein, B. (1997) Nature (London) 389, 300–305]. Because p53 transcriptional activity is increased by genotoxic stresses we have examined the possible effects of ultraviolet radiations (UVB) on galectin-7 expression in epidermal keratinocytes. The amounts of galectin-7 mRNA and protein are increased rapidly after UVB irradiation of epidermal keratinocytes. The increase of galectin-7 is parallel to P53 stabilization. UVB irradiation of skin reconstructed in vitro and of human skin ex vivo demonstrates that galectin-7 overexpression is associated with sunburn/apoptotic keratinocytes. Transfection of a galectin-7 expression vector results in a significant increase in terminal deoxynucleotidyltransferase-mediated UTP end labeling-positive keratinocytes. The present findings demonstrate a keratinocyte-specific protein involved in the UV-induced apoptosis, an essential process in the maintenance of epidermal homeostasis. PMID:10500176

  19. Vaccines to prevent severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus-induced disease

    PubMed Central

    Enjuanes, Luis; DeDiego, Marta L.; Álvarez, Enrique; Deming, Damon; Sheahan, Tim; Baric, Ralph

    2009-01-01

    An important effort has been performed after the emergence of severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) epidemic in 2003 to diagnose and prevent virus spreading. Several types of vaccines have been developed including inactivated viruses, subunit vaccines, virus-like particles (VLPs), DNA vaccines, heterologous expression systems, and vaccines derived from SARS-CoV genome by reverse genetics. This review describes several aspects essential to develop SARS-CoV vaccines, such as the correlates of protection, virus serotypes, vaccination side effects, and bio-safeguards that can be engineered into recombinant vaccine approaches based on the SARS-CoV genome. The production of effective and safe vaccines to prevent SARS has led to the development of promising vaccine candidates, in contrast to the design of vaccines for other coronaviruses, that in general has been less successful. After preclinical trials in animal models, efficacy and safety evaluation of the most promising vaccine candidates described has to be performed in humans. PMID:17416434

  20. Individual phenolic response and peroxidase activity in peel of differently sun-exposed apples in the period favorable for sunburn occurrence.

    PubMed

    Zupan, Anka; Mikulic-Petkovsek, Maja; Slatnar, Ana; Stampar, Franci; Veberic, Robert

    2014-11-15

    Extreme weather events like high solar radiation can cause stress in apple fruits (Malus domestica Borkh.). The aim of the study was to make a screening of individual phenols and peroxidase activity in apple peel as a response to sunburn and different sun-exposures in the period when weather conditions are suitable for sunburn occurrence. Apple fruits of 'Golden Delicious' and 'Braeburn' were sampled. Fruit temperature and color were measured prior HPLC-MS(2) and peroxidase activity analyses. Sunburned peel was darker and more yellow-red in comparison to healthy peel, which appeared yellow-green. Fruit temperature, total as well as individual flavonols and dihydrochalcones, total hydroxycinnamics and perixodase activity were highest in sunburned peel in comparison with healthy sun-exposed peel, furthermore both were different than shaded sides of both fruits and peel of apples inside the tree crown; moreover in sunburned peel dihydrochalcones were determined for the first time. Chlorogenic acid was up to 2.5 times higher, 3-hydroxy-phloretin-2'-O-xyloglucoside was up to 10 times higher and quercetin-3-galactoside was up to 33 times higher in sunburned peel, comparing to shaded sided peels. Flavanols did not show a distinct pattern. A deeper insight in phenolic response against environmental stress caused by high solar radiation and high air temperatures has been made.

  1. Preventive Antibacterial Therapy in Acute Ischemic Stroke: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Klehmet, Juliane; Rogge, Witold; Drenckhahn, Christoph; Göhler, Jos; Bereswill, Stefan; Göbel, Ulf; Wernecke, Klaus Dieter; Wolf, Tilo; Arnold, Guy; Halle, Elke; Volk, Hans-Dieter; Dirnagl, Ulrich; Meisel, Andreas

    2008-01-01

    Background Pneumonia is a major risk factor of death after acute stroke. In a mouse model, preventive antibacterial therapy with moxifloxacin not only prevents the development of post-stroke infections, it also reduces mortality, and improves neurological outcome significantly. In this study we investigate whether this approach is effective in stroke patients. Methods Preventive ANtibacterial THERapy in acute Ischemic Stroke (PANTHERIS) is a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial in 80 patients with severe, non-lacunar, ischemic stroke (NIHSS>11) in the middle cerebral artery (MCA) territory. Patients received either intravenous moxifloxacin (400 mg daily) or placebo for 5 days starting within 36 hours after stroke onset. Primary endpoint was infection within 11 days. Secondary endpoints included neurological outcome, survival, development of stroke-induced immunodepression, and induction of bacterial resistance. Findings On intention-to treat analysis (79 patients), the infection rate at day 11 in the moxifloxacin treated group was 15.4% compared to 32.5% in the placebo treated group (p = 0.114). On per protocol analysis (n = 66), moxifloxacin significantly reduced infection rate from 41.9% to 17.1% (p = 0.032). Stroke associated infections were associated with a lower survival rate. In this study, neurological outcome and survival were not significantly influenced by treatment with moxifloxacin. Frequency of fluoroquinolone resistance in both treatment groups did not differ. On logistic regression analysis, treatment arm as well as the interaction between treatment arm and monocytic HLA-DR expression (a marker for immunodepression) at day 1 after stroke onset was independently and highly predictive for post-stroke infections. Interpretation PANTHERIS suggests that preventive administration of moxifloxacin is superior in reducing infections after severe non-lacunar ischemic stroke compared to placebo. In addition, the results emphasize the

  2. Hepatocyte Growth Factor Prevents Acute Renal Failure of Accelerates Renal Regeneration in mice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawaida, Kouichi; Matsumoto, Kunio; Shimazu, Hisaaki; Nakamura, Toshikazu

    1994-05-01

    Although acute renal failure is encountered with administration of nephrotoxic drugs, ischemia, or unilateral nephrectomy, there has been no effective drug which can be used in case of acute renal failure. Hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) is a potent hepatotropic factor for liver regeneration and is known to have mitogenic, motogenic, and morphogenic activities for various epithelial cells, including renal tubular cells. Intravenous injection of recombinant human HGF into mice remarkably suppressed increases in blood urea nitrogen and serum creatinine caused by administration of cisplatin, a widely used antitumor drug, or HgCl_2, thereby indicating that HGF strongly prevented the onset of acute renal dysfunction. Moreover, exogenous HGF stimulated DNA synthesis of renal tubular cells after renal injuries caused by HgCl_2 administration and unilateral nephrectomy and induced reconstruction of the normal renal tissue structure in vivo. Taken together with our previous finding that expression of HGF was rapidly induced after renal injuries, these results allow us to conclude that HGF may be the long-sought renotropic factor for renal regeneration and may prove to be effective treatment for patients with renal dysfunction, especially that caused by cisplatin.

  3. Acute nicotine treatment prevents REM sleep deprivation-induced learning and memory impairment in rat.

    PubMed

    Aleisa, A M; Helal, G; Alhaider, I A; Alzoubi, K H; Srivareerat, M; Tran, T T; Al-Rejaie, S S; Alkadhi, K A

    2011-08-01

    Rapid eye movement (REM) sleep deprivation (SD) is implicated in impairment of spatial learning and memory and hippocampal long-term potentiation (LTP). An increase in nicotine consumption among habitual smokers and initiation of tobacco use by nonsmokers was observed during SD. Although nicotine treatment was reported to attenuate the impairment of learning and memory and LTP associated with several mental disorders, the effect of nicotine on SD-induced learning and memory impairment has not been studied. Modified multiple platform paradigm was used to induce SD for 24 or 48 h during which rats were injected with saline or nicotine (1 mg kg(-1) s.c.) twice a day. In the radial arm water maze (RAWM) task, 24- or 48-h SD significantly impaired learning and short-term memory. In addition, extracellular recordings from CA1 and dentate gyrus (DG) regions of the hippocampus in urethane anesthetized rats showed a significant impairment of LTP after 24- and 48-h SD. Treatment of normal rats with nicotine for 24 or 48 h did not enhance spatial learning and memory or affect magnitude of LTP in the CA1 and DG regions. However, concurrent, acute treatment of rats with nicotine significantly attenuated SD-induced impairment of learning and STM and prevented SD-induced impairment of LTP in the CA1 and DG regions. These results show that acute nicotine treatment prevented the deleterious effect of sleep loss on cognitive abilities and synaptic plasticity.

  4. Efficacy of cilostazol in preventing aspiration pneumonia in acute cerebral infarction.

    PubMed

    Osawa, Aiko; Maeshima, Shinichiro; Tanahashi, Norio

    2013-08-01

    This retrospective study examined the effectiveness of cilostazol in preventing aspiration pneumonia in patients with acute cerebral infarction. The 189 subjects ranged in age from 31 to 95 years and included 57 with small-artery occlusion, 107 with large-artery atherothrombosis, and 25 with other disorders. Patients with cardiogenic cerebral embolism or preexisting pneumonia at the time of hospital admission were excluded from the analysis. Neurologic symptoms, cognitive function, and swallowing function were assessed at the first clinical examination, and the ability to perform activities of daily living was assessed at both hospital admission and discharge. Outcome and food intake status were also assessed at hospital discharge. Pneumonia was detected in 27 of 189 subjects (14.3%), in 20 subjects during nasogastric tube feeding implemented because of oral intake difficulties (fasting group) and in 7 subjects after initiation of oral feeding (oral intake group). Cilostazol was administered to 48 of the 189 subjects (25.4%). The incidence of pneumonia was 6.3% (3 of 48) in patients who received cilostazol, compared with 17% (24 of 141) in those who did not receive cilostazol. Our data suggest that cilostazol appears to prevent the occurrence of pneumonia in both the chronic and acute stages of cerebral infarction.

  5. Use of medicines recommended for secondary prevention of acute coronary syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Gaedke, Mari Ângela; da Costa, Juvenal Soares Dias; Manenti, Euler Roberto Fernandes; Henn, Ruth Liane; Paniz, Vera Maria Vieira; Nunes, Marcelo Felipe; da Motta, Monique Adriane; Olinto, Maria Teresa Anselmo

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT OBJECTIVE : To analyze if the demographic and socioeconomic variables, as well as percutaneous coronary intervention are associated with the use of medicines for secondary prevention of acute coronary syndrome. METHODS : In this cohort study, we included 138 patients with acute coronary syndrome, aged 30 years or more and of both sexes. The data were collected at the time of hospital discharge, and after six and twelve months. The outcome of the study was the simultaneous use of medicines recommended for secondary prevention of acute coronary syndrome: platelet antiaggregant, beta-blockers, statins and angiotensin-converting-enzyme inhibitor or angiotensin receptor blocker. The independent variables were: sex, age, education in years of attending, monthly income in tertiles and percutaneous coronary intervention. We described the prevalence of use of each group of medicines with their 95% confidence intervals, as well as the simultaneous use of the four medicines, in all analyzed periods. In the crude analysis, we verified the outcome with the independent variables for each period through the Chi-square test. The adjusted analysis was carried out using Poisson Regression. RESULTS : More than a third of patients (36.2%; 95%CI 28.2;44.3) had the four medicines prescribed at the same time, at the moment of discharge. We did not observe any differences in the prevalence of use in comparison with the two follow-up periods. The most prescribed class of medicines during discharge was platelet antiaggregant (91.3%). In the crude analysis, the demographic and socioeconomic variables were not associated to the outcome in any of the three periods. CONCLUSIONS : The prevalence of simultaneous use of medicines at discharge and in the follow-ups pointed to the under-utilization of this therapy in clinical practice. Intervention strategies are needed to improve the quality of care given to patients that extend beyond the hospital discharge, a critical point of transition

  6. Role of dexamethasone in the prevention of migraine recurrence in the acute care setting: a review.

    PubMed

    Giuliano, Christopher; Smalligan, Roger D; Mitchon, Greg; Chua, Matt

    2012-05-01

    Patients with migraine headaches are commonly encountered by clinicians both in the clinic and in the emergency department. Migraines impose a significant financial burden on patients, caregivers, and society. Up to 49% of patients treated acutely for migraine headache will have a recurrence within 72 hours. Recurrence of migraines is dependent on a number of factors, including the choice of abortive agent, age, sex, and initial severity of the migraine. Dexamethasone has been proposed and studied as a medication that may decrease the frequency of such recurrences of migraine headaches in affected patients. Dexamethasone is a corticosteroid that has been proposed to prevent recurrence of migraines through its prevention of neurogenic inflammation. Initial trials, with less-than-ideal methodology, showed large decreases in the number of patients experiencing recurrent migraines. Later randomized controlled trials revealed mixed results, with subsequent meta-analyses showing an overall benefit in the prevention of recurrence of migraines. These meta-analyses suggest that dexamethasone will prevent recurrence in about 10% of patients, although trials that used higher doses of dexamethasone and followed patients for ≥ 72 hours showed a larger benefit. Very few adverse events were reported in the randomized controlled trials following a single dose of dexamethasone. Given the benign side effect profile and wide tolerability to a single high dose of dexamethasone, it appears to be a safe and modestly effective addition to standard migraine abortive therapy for the prevention of migraine recurrence. Dexamethasone should not be used in patients with non-migraine headaches or contraindications to steroids. Further studies should help delineate if dexamethasone can be tailored to specific patient populations and hence enhance its therapeutic effectiveness.

  7. The clinical challenge of preventing sudden cardiac death immediately after acute ST-elevation myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Manolis, Antonis S

    2014-12-01

    Unfortunately, of all patients experiencing acute myocardial infarction (MI), usually in the form of ST-elevation MI, 25-35% will die of sudden cardiac death (SCD) before receiving medical attention, most often from ventricular fibrillation. For patients who reach the hospital, prognosis is considerably better and has improved over the years. Reperfusion therapy, best attained with primary percutaneous coronary intervention compared to thrombolysis, has made a big difference in reducing the risk of SCD early and late after ST-elevation MI. In-hospital SCD due to ventricular tachyarrhythmias is manageable, with either preventive measures or drugs or electrical cardioversion. There is general agreement for secondary prevention of SCD post-MI with implantation of a cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) when malignant ventricular arrhythmias occur late (>48 h) after an MI, and are not due to reversible or correctable causes. The major challenge remains that of primary prevention, that is, how to prevent SCD during the first 1-3 months after ST-elevation MI for patients who have low left ventricular ejection fraction and are not candidates for an ICD according to current guidelines, due to the results of two studies, which did not show any benefits of early (<40 days after an MI) ICD implantation. Two recent documents may provide direction as to how to bridge the gap for this early post-MI period. Both recommend an electrophysiology study to guide implantation of an ICD, at least for those developing syncope or non-sustained ventricular tachycardia, who have an inducible sustained ventricular tachycardia at the electrophysiology study. An ICD is also recommended for patients with indication for a permanent pacemaker due to bradyarrhythmias, who also meet primary prevention criteria for SCD.

  8. Acute and preventive treatment of cluster headache and other trigeminal autonomic cephalgias.

    PubMed

    Bussone, Gennaro; Rapoport, Alan

    2010-01-01

    Patients with cluster headache or any of the trigeminal autonomic cephalalgias (TACs) are often good candidates for preventive treatment as their headaches are frequent and severe. While acute and symptomatic therapies must be used often, they do not alter the course of the cluster period or the duration of the TACs, and they do not usually decrease the frequency of attacks. In this chapter we discuss the aim and the choice of prevention. Verapamil is considered the first choice for prevention of cluster headache, but as with all of the medications to be mentioned, it has various adverse effects to be aware of. Other frequently used preventives for cluster include lithium carbonate, methysergide where available, methylergonovine, clonidine, melatonin, valproate, gabapentin, topiramate, and others. Several other medications can be used as bridge therapy, to decrease the frequency of cluster temporarily, giving time for the preventives to begin to work. The most commonly used bridge therapies are 7-21 days of prednisone at high and then tapering doses and ergots such as ergotamine tartrate and dihydroergotamine. Patients with chronic cluster headache who are unresponsive to all medical therapies can be considered for occipital nerve stimulation and various surgical procedures such as ganglyogliolysis of all three branches of the ipsilateral trigeminal nerve at the root entry zone. A somewhat controversial but highly successful procedure, at least as done by the neurosurgeons in Professor Bussone's group at the Institute of Neurology in Milan, has been deep-brain stimulation of the posterior hypothalamus. Other TACs, such as short-lasting unilateral neuralgiform headache attacks with conjunctival injection and tearing (SUNCT), can be hard to treat effectively with medications, but the paroxysmal hemicranias and cluster tic respond somewhat better to traditional therapies.

  9. Remote ischaemic pre-conditioning for the prevention of acute kidney injury.

    PubMed

    Ho, Phoebe Wing-Lam; Pang, Wing-Fai; Szeto, Cheuk-Chun

    2016-04-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is a common complication associated with high morbidity and mortality in hospitalized patients. One potential mechanism underlying renal injury is ischaemia/reperfusion injury (IRI), which attributed the organ damage to the inflammatory and oxidative stress responses induced by a period of renal ischaemia and subsequent reperfusion. Therapeutic strategies that aim at minimizing the effect of IRI on the kidneys may prevent AKI and improve clinical outcomes significantly. In this review, we examine the technique of remote ischaemic preconditioning (rIPC), which has been shown by several trials to confer organ protection by applying transient, brief episodes of ischaemia at a distant site before a larger ischaemic insult. We provide an overview of the current clinical evidence regarding the renoprotective effect of rIPC in the key clinical settings of cardiac or vascular surgery, contrast-induced AKI, pre-existing chronic kidney disease (CKD) and renal transplantation, and discuss key areas for future research.

  10. Flaxseed lignans enriched in secoisolariciresinol diglucoside prevent acute asbestos-induced peritoneal inflammation in mice

    PubMed Central

    Pietrofesa, Ralph A.; Velalopoulou, Anastasia; Arguiri, Evguenia; Menges, Craig W.; Testa, Joseph R.; Hwang, Wei-Ting; Albelda, Steven M.

    2016-01-01

    Malignant mesothelioma (MM), linked to asbestos exposure, is a highly lethal form of thoracic cancer with a long latency period, high mortality and poor treatment options. Chronic inflammation and oxidative tissue damage caused by asbestos fibers are linked to MM development. Flaxseed lignans, enriched in secoisolariciresinol diglucoside (SDG), have antioxidant, anti-inflammatory and cancer chemopreventive properties. As a prelude to chronic chemoprevention studies for MM development, we tested the ability of flaxseed lignan component (FLC) to prevent acute asbestos-induced inflammation in MM-prone Nf2+/mu mice. Mice (n = 16–17 per group) were placed on control (CTL) or FLC-supplemented diets initiated 7 days prior to a single intraperitoneal bolus of 400 µg of crocidolite asbestos. Three days post asbestos exposure, mice were evaluated for abdominal inflammation, proinflammatory/profibrogenic cytokine release, WBC gene expression changes and oxidative and nitrosative stress in peritoneal lavage fluid (PLF). Asbestos-exposed mice fed CTL diet developed acute inflammation, with significant (P < 0.0001) elevations in WBCs and proinflammatory/profibrogenic cytokines (IL-1ß, IL-6, TNFα, HMGB1 and active TGFß1) relative to baseline (BL) levels. Alternatively, asbestos-exposed FLC-fed mice had a significant (P < 0.0001) decrease in PLF WBCs and proinflammatory/profibrogenic cytokine levels relative to CTL-fed mice. Importantly, PLF WBC gene expression of cytokines (IL-1ß, IL-6, TNFα, HMGB1 and TGFß1) and cytokine receptors (TNFαR1 and TGFßR1) were also downregulated by FLC. FLC also significantly (P < 0.0001) blunted asbestos-induced nitrosative and oxidative stress. FLC reduces acute asbestos-induced peritoneal inflammation, nitrosative and oxidative stress and may thus prove to be a promising agent in the chemoprevention of MM. PMID:26678224

  11. Chronic but not acute Li+ treatment prevents behavioral depression in rats.

    PubMed

    Teixeira, N A; Pereira, D G; Hermini, A H

    1995-09-01

    The effect of lithium administration on the learned helplessness model of depression was investigated. Female Wistar rats (190-210 g) received either tap water alone (N = 156) or 20 mM LiCL provided chronically (30 days; N = 127) or acutely (5 days; N = 22) in the drinking water. Three days before the end of treatment, each group was divided into two subgroups which received either inescapable shock (IS) or no shock (NS) treatment in shuttle boxes. All groups were subsequently submitted to an escape test on the following day and then sacrificed one day after the escape test, when blood samples were taken to measure serum Li+, Na+ and K+ concentrations by flame photometry. There were no significant differences in serum Na+ amongst the 4 groups. Chronically treated NS and IS rats both presented an increase in serum K+ compared to the control rats. The IS and not the NS chronically treated rats presented increased serum Li+ levels which cannot be accounted for in terms of differences in Li+ intake. The IS group treated chronically with lithium had a better escape performance than the IS group receiving either tap water or acute Li+ administration. We conclude that chronic but not acute Li+ treatment at a serum level within the prophylactic range (0.5 mEq/l) is able to prevent learned helplessness in the rat. These results agree with the data obtained in clinical practice indicating that Li+ is only effective after chronic administration and that Li(+)-induced hyperkalemia is a side effect.

  12. Preventive use of Lactobacillus plantarum LS/07 and inulin to relieve symptoms of acute colitis.

    PubMed

    Hijová, Emília; Šoltésová, Alena; Salaj, Rastislav; Kuzma, Jozef; Strojný, Ladislav; Bomba, Alojz; Gregová, Kristína

    2015-01-01

    The aim of presented study was to investigate the influence of Lactobacillus plantarum LS/07 and inulin on the activity of β-glucuronidase enzyme, and counts of coliform and lactobacilli in fresh caecal digesta, cytokine levels (IL-6, IL-8), and trancription nuclear factor kappa beta (NFκB) activities in colon tissue and blood samples of rats with dextran sulphate sodium (DSS) induced acute colitis. The rats were randomly divided into four groups - CG, AC, AC+PRE and AC+PRO. Colitis was induced using of 5% DSS in drinking water for 7d. DSS application increased activity of β-glucuronidase (P < 0.001), increased counts of coliforms, and decreased lactobacilli counts (P < 0.05) in comparison to control group. Serum and tissue levels of IL-6 and IL-8 as well as tissue NFκB activities showed increased expression in acute colitis group. Inulin diet modified counts of microorganims and decreased β-glucuronidase activity, suppressed NFκB activities (P < 0.001) and down regulate synthesis of IL-6 (P < 0.01) in serum and colon tissue and tissue IL-8 (P < 0.05). Lactobacillus plantarum LS/07 decreased β-glucuronidase activity (P < 0.05), levels of IL-6 and IL-8 (P < 0.001). These results were consistent with the addition of histological findings. Our results indicate that dietary intake of Lactobacillus plantarum LS/07 and inulin suppressed expression observed markers, which play an important role in the inflammatory process, which predisposes their use in prevention or treatment of acute colitis.

  13. Chronic mitochondrial uncoupling treatment prevents acute cold-induced oxidative stress in birds.

    PubMed

    Stier, Antoine; Massemin, Sylvie; Criscuolo, François

    2014-12-01

    Endotherms have evolved two major types of thermogenesis that allow them to actively produce heat in response to cold exposure, either through muscular activity (i.e. shivering thermogenesis) or through futile electro-chemical cycles (i.e. non-shivering thermogenesis). Amongst the latter, mitochondrial uncoupling is of key importance because it is suggested to drive heat production at a low cost in terms of oxidative stress. While this has been experimentally shown in mammals, the oxidative stress consequences of cold exposure and mitochondrial uncoupling are clearly less understood in the other class of endotherms, the birds. We compared metabolic and oxidative stress responses of zebra finches chronically treated with or without a chemical mitochondrial uncoupler (2,4-dinitrophenol: DNP), undergoing an acute (24 h) and a chronic (4 weeks) cold exposure (12 °C). We predicted that control birds should present at least a transient elevation of oxidative stress levels in response to cold exposure. This oxidative stress cost should be more pronounced in control birds than in DNP-treated birds, due to their lower basal uncoupling state. Despite similar increase in metabolism, control birds presented elevated levels of DNA oxidative damage in response to acute (but not chronic) cold exposure, while DNP-treated birds did not. Plasma antioxidant capacity decreased overall in response to chronic cold exposure. These results show that acute cold exposure increases oxidative stress in birds. However, uncoupling mitochondrial functioning appears as a putative compensatory mechanism preventing cold-induced oxidative stress. This result confirms previous observations in mice and underlines non-shivering thermogenesis as a putative key mechanism for endotherms in mounting a response to cold at a low oxidative cost.

  14. Acute and chronic cardiovascular effects of hyperkalemia: new insights into prevention and clinical management.

    PubMed

    McCullough, Peter A; Beaver, Thomas M; Bennett-Guerrero, Elliott; Emmett, Michael; Fonarow, Gregg C; Goyal, Abhinav; Herzog, Charles A; Kosiborod, Mikhail; Palmer, Biff F

    2014-01-01

    The plasma pool of potassium is a partial reflection of the overall body, transient cellular shifts, and potassium elimination regulated by the kidneys. Potassium concentrations elevating above the upper limit of normal (> 5.0 mEq/L) have become more common in cardiovascular practice due to the growing population of patients with chronic kidney disease and the broad applications of drugs that modulate potassium excretion by either reducing production of angiotensin II (angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, direct renin inhibitors, beta-adrenergic receptor antagonists), blocking angiotensin II receptors (angiotensin receptor blockers), or antagonizing the action of aldosterone on mineralocorticoid receptors (mineralocorticoid receptor antagonists). In addition, acute kidney injury, critical illness, crush injuries, and massive red blood cell transfusions can result in hyperkalemia. Progressively more severe elevations in potassium are responsible for abnormalities in cardiac depolarization and repolarization and contractility. Untreated severe hyperkalemia results in sudden cardiac death. Traditional management steps have included reducing dietary potassium and discontinuing potassium supplements; withdrawal of exacerbating drugs; acute treatment with intravenous calcium gluconate, insulin, and glucose; nebulized albuterol; correction of acidosis with sodium bicarbonate for short-term shifts out of the plasma pool; and, finally, gastrointestinal ion exchange with oral sodium polystyrene sulfonate in sorbitol, which is mainly used in the hospital and is poorly tolerated due to gastrointestinal adverse effects. This review explores hyperkalemia as a complication in cardiovascular patients and highlights new acute, chronic, and preventative oral therapies (patiromer calcium, cross-linked polyelectrolyte, ZS-9) that could potentially create a greater margin of safety for vulnerable patients with combined heart and kidney disease.

  15. Flaxseed lignans enriched in secoisolariciresinol diglucoside prevent acute asbestos-induced peritoneal inflammation in mice.

    PubMed

    Pietrofesa, Ralph A; Velalopoulou, Anastasia; Arguiri, Evguenia; Menges, Craig W; Testa, Joseph R; Hwang, Wei-Ting; Albelda, Steven M; Christofidou-Solomidou, Melpo

    2016-02-01

    Malignant mesothelioma (MM), linked to asbestos exposure, is a highly lethal form of thoracic cancer with a long latency period, high mortality and poor treatment options. Chronic inflammation and oxidative tissue damage caused by asbestos fibers are linked to MM development. Flaxseed lignans, enriched in secoisolariciresinol diglucoside (SDG), have antioxidant, anti-inflammatory and cancer chemopreventive properties. As a prelude to chronic chemoprevention studies for MM development, we tested the ability of flaxseed lignan component (FLC) to prevent acute asbestos-induced inflammation in MM-prone Nf2(+/mu) mice. Mice (n = 16-17 per group) were placed on control (CTL) or FLC-supplemented diets initiated 7 days prior to a single intraperitoneal bolus of 400 µg of crocidolite asbestos. Three days post asbestos exposure, mice were evaluated for abdominal inflammation, proinflammatory/profibrogenic cytokine release, WBC gene expression changes and oxidative and nitrosative stress in peritoneal lavage fluid (PLF). Asbestos-exposed mice fed CTL diet developed acute inflammation, with significant (P < 0.0001) elevations in WBCs and proinflammatory/profibrogenic cytokines (IL-1ß, IL-6, TNFα, HMGB1 and active TGFß1) relative to baseline (BL) levels. Alternatively, asbestos-exposed FLC-fed mice had a significant (P < 0.0001) decrease in PLF WBCs and proinflammatory/profibrogenic cytokine levels relative to CTL-fed mice. Importantly, PLF WBC gene expression of cytokines (IL-1ß, IL-6, TNFα, HMGB1 and TGFß1) and cytokine receptors (TNFαR1 and TGFßR1) were also downregulated by FLC. FLC also significantly (P < 0.0001) blunted asbestos-induced nitrosative and oxidative stress. FLC reduces acute asbestos-induced peritoneal inflammation, nitrosative and oxidative stress and may thus prove to be a promising agent in the chemoprevention of MM.

  16. An acute post-rape intervention to prevent substance use and abuse.

    PubMed

    Acierno, Ron; Resnick, Heidi S; Flood, Amanda; Holmes, Melisa

    2003-12-01

    The trauma of rape is routinely associated with extreme acute distress. Such peri-event anxiety increases risk of developing psychopathology and substance use or abuse post-rape, with the degree of initial distress positively predicting future problems. Unfortunately, the nature of post-rape forensic evidence collection procedures may exacerbate initial distress, thereby potentiating post-rape negative emotional sequelae. Consequently, substance use may increase in an effort to ameliorate this distress. To address this, a two-part video intervention was developed for use in acute post-rape time frames to (a) minimize anxiety during forensic rape examinations, thereby reducing risk of future emotional problems, and (b) prevent increased post-rape substance use and abuse. Pilot study data with 124 rape victims indicated that the low-cost, easily administered intervention was effective in reducing risk of marijuana abuse at 6 weeks. Nonstatistically significant trends also were evident for reduced marijuana use. Trends were also noted in favor of the intervention in the subgroup of women who were actively using substances pre-rape (among pre-rape alcohol users, 28% viewers vs. 43% nonviewers met criteria for post-rape alcohol abuse; among pre-rape marijuana users, the rates of post-marijuana use were 17% vs. 43%).

  17. Alginate Oligosaccharide Prevents Acute Doxorubicin Cardiotoxicity by Suppressing Oxidative Stress and Endoplasmic Reticulum-Mediated Apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Jun-Jie; Ma, Lei-Lei; Shi, Hong-Tao; Zhu, Jian-Bing; Wu, Jian; Ding, Zhi-Wen; An, Yi; Zou, Yun-Zeng; Ge, Jun-Bo

    2016-01-01

    Doxorubicin (DOX) is a highly potent chemotherapeutic agent, but its usage is limited by dose-dependent cardiotoxicity. DOX-induced cardiotoxicity involves increased oxidative stress and activated endoplasmic reticulum-mediated apoptosis. Alginate oligosaccharide (AOS) is a non-immunogenic, non-toxic and biodegradable polymer, with anti-oxidative, anti-inflammatory and anti-endoplasmic reticulum stress properties. The present study examined whether AOS pretreatment could protect against acute DOX cardiotoxicity, and the underlying mechanisms focused on oxidative stress and endoplasmic reticulum-mediated apoptosis. We found that AOS pretreatment markedly increased the survival rate of mice insulted with DOX, improved DOX-induced cardiac dysfunction and attenuated DOX-induced myocardial apoptosis. AOS pretreatment mitigated DOX-induced cardiac oxidative stress, as shown by the decreased expressions of gp91 (phox) and 4-hydroxynonenal (4-HNE). Moreover, AOS pretreatment significantly decreased the expression of Caspase-12, C/EBP homologous protein (CHOP) (markers for endoplasmic reticulum-mediated apoptosis) and Bax (a downstream molecule of CHOP), while up-regulating the expression of anti-apoptotic protein Bcl-2. Taken together, these findings identify AOS as a potent compound that prevents acute DOX cardiotoxicity, at least in part, by suppression of oxidative stress and endoplasmic reticulum-mediated apoptosis. PMID:27999379

  18. Clostridium Difficile Infection in Acute Care Hospitals: Systematic Review and Best Practices for Prevention.

    PubMed

    Louh, Irene K; Greendyke, William G; Hermann, Emilia A; Davidson, Karina W; Falzon, Louise; Vawdrey, David K; Shaffer, Jonathan A; Calfee, David P; Furuya, E Yoko; Ting, Henry H

    2017-04-01

    OBJECTIVE Prevention of Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) in acute-care hospitals is a priority for hospitals and clinicians. We performed a qualitative systematic review to update the evidence on interventions to prevent CDI published since 2009. DESIGN We searched Ovid, MEDLINE, EMBASE, The Cochrane Library, CINAHL, the ISI Web of Knowledge, and grey literature databases from January 1, 2009 to August 1, 2015. SETTING We included studies performed in acute-care hospitals. PATIENTS OR PARTICIPANTS We included studies conducted on hospitalized patients that investigated the impact of specific interventions on CDI rates. INTERVENTIONS We used the QI-Minimum Quality Criteria Set (QI-MQCS) to assess the quality of included studies. Interventions were grouped thematically: environmental disinfection, antimicrobial stewardship, hand hygiene, chlorhexidine bathing, probiotics, bundled approaches, and others. A meta-analysis was performed when possible. RESULTS Of 3,236 articles screened, 261 met the criteria for full-text review and 46 studies were ultimately included. The average quality rating was 82% according to the QI-MQCS. The most effective interventions, resulting in a 45% to 85% reduction in CDI, included daily to twice daily disinfection of high-touch surfaces (including bed rails) and terminal cleaning of patient rooms with chlorine-based products. Bundled interventions and antimicrobial stewardship showed promise for reducing CDI rates. Chlorhexidine bathing and intensified hand-hygiene practices were not effective for reducing CDI rates. CONCLUSIONS Daily and terminal cleaning of patient rooms using chlorine-based products were most effective in reducing CDI rates in hospitals. Further studies are needed to identify the components of bundled interventions that reduce CDI rates. Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol 2017;38:476-482.

  19. Supplemental vitamin A prevents the acute radiation-induced defect in wound healing

    SciTech Connect

    Levenson, S.M.; Gruber, C.A.; Rettura, G.; Gruber, D.K.; Demetriou, A.A.; Seifter, E.

    1984-10-01

    Acute radiation injury leads to thymic involution, adrenal enlargement, leukopenia, thrombocytopenia, gastrointestinal ulceration, and impaired wound healing. The authors hypothesized that supplemental vitamin A would mitigate these adverse effects in rats exposed to acute whole-body radiation. To test their hypothesis, dorsal skin incisions and subcutaneous implantation of polyvinyl alcohol sponges were performed in anesthetized Sprague-Dawley rats at varying times following sham radiation or varying doses of whole-body radiation (175-850 rad). In each experiment, the control diet (which contains about 18,000 IU vit. A/kg chow (3 X the NRC RDA for normal rats)) was supplemented with 150,000 IU vit. A/kg diet beginning at, before, or after sham radiation and wounding or radiation and wounding. The supplemental vitamin A prevented the impaired wound healing and lessened the weight loss, leukopenia, thrombocytopenia, thymic involution, adrenal enlargement, decrease in splenic weight, and gastric ulceration of the radiated (750-850 rad) wounded rats. This was true whether the supplemental vitamin A was begun before (2 or 4 days) or after (1-2 hours to 4 days) radiation and wounding; the supplemental vitamin A was more effective when started before or up to 2 days after radiation and wounding. The authors believe that prevention of the impaired wound healing following radiation by supplemental vitamin A is due to its enhancing the early inflammatory reaction to wounding, including increasing the number of monocytes and macrophages at the wound site; possible effect on modulating collagenase activity; effect on epithelial cell (and possible mesenchymal cell) differentiation; stimulation of immune responsiveness; and lessening of the adverse effects of radiation.

  20. Shockwaves prevent from heart failure after acute myocardial ischaemia via RNA/protein complexes.

    PubMed

    Tepeköylü, Can; Primessnig, Uwe; Pölzl, Leo; Graber, Michael; Lobenwein, Daniela; Nägele, Felix; Kirchmair, Elke; Pechriggl, Elisabeth; Grimm, Michael; Holfeld, Johannes

    2017-04-01

    Shock wave treatment (SWT) was shown to induce regeneration of ischaemic myocardium via Toll-like receptor 3 (TLR3). The antimicrobial peptide LL37 gets released by mechanical stress and is known to form complexes with nucleic acids thus activating Toll-like receptors. We suggested that SWT in the acute setting prevents from the development of heart failure via RNA/protein release. Myocardial infarction in mice was induced followed by subsequent SWT. Heart function was assessed 4 weeks later via transthoracic echocardiography and pressure-volume measurements. Human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) were treated with SWT in the presence of RNase and proteinase and analysed for proliferation, tube formation and LL37 expression. RNA release and uptake after SWT was evaluated. We found significantly improved cardiac function after SWT. SWT resulted in significantly higher numbers of capillaries and arterioles and less left ventricular fibrosis. Supernatants of treated cells activated TLR3 reporter cells. Analysis of the supernatant revealed increased RNA levels. The effect could not be abolished by pre-treatment of the supernatant with RNase, but only by a sequential digestion with proteinase and RNase hinting strongly towards the involvement of RNA/protein complexes. Indeed, LL37 expression as well as cellular RNA uptake were significantly increased after SWT. We show for the first time that SWT prevents from left ventricular remodelling and cardiac dysfunction via RNA/protein complex release and subsequent induction of angiogenesis. It might therefore develop a potent regenerative treatment alternative for ischaemic heart disease.

  1. Xanthohumol prevents carbon tetrachloride-induced acute liver injury in rats.

    PubMed

    Pinto, Carmen; Duque, Antonio L; Rodríguez-Galdón, Beatriz; Cestero, Juan J; Macías, Pedro

    2012-10-01

    Xanthohumol (XN), a prenyl flavonoid present in beer, prevents the acute hepatic injury induced by carbon tetrachloride (CCl4) in rats. Pre-treatment of rats with XN significantly reduced the increased liver weight observed in CCl4-intoxicated rats, normalised the increased values of plasma lactate dehydrogenase, glutamate oxaloacetate transaminase and glutamate pyruvate transaminase activities and reduced the incidence of histopathological alterations produced by CCl4. The oxidative stress induced by CCl4 administration elicited a significant decrease in the levels of reduced glutathione as well as an increase in thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) and H2O2 concentrations. Pre-treatment of rats with XN resulted in a significant (p<0.05) increase in reduced glutathione (GSH) content and a reduction in TBARS and H2O2 concentrations to their normal values. XN pre-treatment also prevented the significant reductions of superoxide dismutase, catalase, glutathione peroxidase, glutathione reductase and glutathione S-transferase activities observed in CCl4-treated rats compared to control animals. Our results suggest that the hepatoprotective effect of XN is based on its antioxidant properties as well as it being an efficient inhibitor of lipid peroxidation and a protector against the degradation of antioxidant enzymes induced by CCl4 intoxication.

  2. Framework for preventing falls in acute hospitals using passive sensor enabled radio frequency identification technology.

    PubMed

    Visvanathan, Renuka; Ranasinghe, Damith C; Shinmoto Torres, Roberto L; Hill, Keith

    2012-01-01

    We describe a distributed architecture for a real-time falls prevention framework capable of providing a technological intervention to mitigate the risk of falls in acute hospitals through the development of an AmbIGeM (Ambient Intelligence Geritatric Management system). Our approach is based on using a battery free, wearable sensor enabled Radio Frequency Identification device. Unsupervised classification of high risk falls activities are used to facilitate an immediate response from caregivers by alerting them of the high risk activity, the particular patient, and their location. Early identification of high risk falls activities through a longitudinal and unsupervised setting in real-time allows the preventative intervention to be administered in a timely manner. Furthermore, real-time detection allows emergency protocols to be deployed immediately in the event of a fall. Finally, incidents of high risk activities are automatically documented to allow clinicians to customize and optimize the delivery of care to suit the needs of patients identified as being at most risk.

  3. Will Parents Participate in and Comply with Programs and Regimens Using Xylitol for Preventing Acute Otitis Media in Their Children?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Danhauer, Jeffrey L.; Johnson, Carole E.; Baker, Jason A.; Ryu, Jung A.; Smith, Rachel A.; Umeda, Claire J.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Antiadhesive properties in xylitol, a natural sugar alcohol, can help prevent acute otitis media (AOM) in children by inhibiting harmful bacteria from colonizing and adhering to oral and nasopharyngeal areas and traveling to the Eustachian tube and middle ear. This study investigated parents' willingness to use and comply with a regimen…

  4. Inhibition of MDMA-induced increase in cortisol does not prevent acute impairment of verbal memory

    PubMed Central

    Kuypers, KPC; Torre, R; Farre, M; Pujadas, M; Ramaekers, JG

    2013-01-01

    Background Ecstasy use is commonly linked with memory deficits in abstinent ecstasy users. Similar impairments are being found during ecstasy intoxication after single doses of ± 3,4 metylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA). The concordance of memory impairments during intoxication and abstinence suggests a similar neuropharmacological mechanism underlying acute and chronic memory impairments. The mechanism underlying this impairment is to date not known. We hypothesized that cortisol might play an important role in this mechanism as cortisol, implicated in the regulation of memory performance, can be brought out of balance by stressors like MDMA. Methods In the present study, we aimed to block the MDMA-induced acute memory defect by giving participants a cortisol synthesis inhibitor (metyrapone) together with a single dose of MDMA. Seventeen polydrug MDMA users entered this placebo-controlled within subject study with four treatment conditions. The treatments consisted of MDMA (75 mg) and metyrapone (750 mg), alone and in combination, and double placebo. Pre-treatment with metyrapone or Placebo occurred 1 h prior to MDMA or Placebo administration. Memory performance was tested at peak drug concentrations by means of several memory tests. Cortisol levels were determined in blood and oral fluid; this served as a control measure to see whether manipulations were effective. Results Main findings indicated that whereas treatment with metyrapone blocked the expected MDMA-induced increase in cortisol levels in blood, it did not prevent the MDMA-induced memory deficit from happening. Conclusion We therefore conclude that MDMA-induced increments in cortisol concentrations are not related to MDMA-induced memory impairments. PMID:22946487

  5. Vitamin E pretreatment prevents histopathological effects in tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus) acutely exposed to cylindrospermopsin.

    PubMed

    Guzmán-Guillén, Remedios; Prieto Ortega, Ana I; Gutiérrez-Praena, Daniel; Moreno, Isabel M; Moyano, Rosario; Blanco, Alfonso; Cameán, Ana M

    2016-11-01

    Cylindrospermopsin (CYN) is a cyanotoxin frequently involved in blooms with a predominantly extracellular availability, which makes it easily taken up by a variety of aquatic organisms. CYN is a potent protein and glutathione synthesis inhibitor, and also induces genotoxicity, oxidative stress and several histopathological lesions. The present study investigates the protective role of a vitamin E pretreatment (700 mg vit E/kg fish bw/day, for 7 days) on the histopathological alterations induced in different organs of tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus) acutely exposed to a single oral dose of 400 µg pure CYN/kg bw fish. The major histological changes observed were degenerative glucogenic process and loss of the hepatic structure in the liver, glomerulopathy and tubular tumefaction in the kidney, myofibrolysis and edema in the heart, catarrhal enteritis and necrosis in the gastrointestinal tract, hyperemic processes in the gill lamellae, and high basophilia, degeneration and tumefaction of granular neurons in the brain. Vitamin E pretreatment was effective in preventing or ameliorating the abovementioned alterations induced by CYN. In addition, a morphometric study indicated that the average nuclear diameter of hepatocytes, and cross-sections of proximal and distal convoluted tubules, together with the cardiac fiber and capillaries diameters represent a useful tool to evaluate the damage induced by CYN. This is the first study reporting vitamin E prevention of histopathological damage in tissues (liver, kidney, heart, gastrointestinal tract, gills and brain) of fish intoxicated with CYN. Therefore, vitamin E can be considered a useful chemoprotectant in the treatment of histopathological changes induced in CYN-intoxicated fish. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Environ Toxicol 31: 1469-1485, 2016.

  6. Venous thromboembolism prevention during asparaginase-based therapy for acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Sibai, H.; Seki, J.T.; Wang, T.Q.; Sakurai, N.; Atenafu, E.G.; Yee, K.W.L.; Schuh, A.C.; Gupta, V.; Minden, M.D.; Schimmer, A.D.; Brandwein, J.M.

    2016-01-01

    Background Venous thromboembolism (vte) is a recognized complication in patients treated with asparaginase-containing chemotherapy regimens; the optimal preventive strategy is unclear. We assessed the safety and efficacy of prophylaxis using low-dose low molecular weight heparin in adult patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia in complete remission treated with an asparaginase-based post-remission chemotherapy regimen. Methods As part of the intensification phase of the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute 91-01 regimen, asparaginase was administered weekly to 41 consecutive patients for 21–30 weeks; these patients also received prophylaxis with enoxaparin 40 mg daily (60 mg for patients ≥80 kg). Outcomes were assessed against outcomes in a comparable cohort of 99 patients who received the same chemotherapy regimen without anticoagulation prophylaxis. Results The overall rate of symptomatic venous thrombosis was not significantly different in the prophylaxis and non-prophylaxis cohorts (18.92% and 21.74% respectively). Among patients receiving prophylaxis, vte occurred in higher proportion in those who weighed at least 80 kg (42.86% vs. 4.35%, p = 0.0070). No major bleeding complications occurred in the prophylaxis group (minor bleeding: 8.1%). Conclusions Prophylaxis with low-dose enoxaparin during the intensification phase was safe, but was not associated with a lower overall proportion of vte. PMID:27536184

  7. Acute intestinal injury induced by acetic acid and casein: prevention by intraluminal misoprostol

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, M.J.; Zhang, x.J.; Gu, x.A.; Clark, D.A. )

    1991-07-01

    Acute injury was established in anesthetized rabbits by intraluminal administration of acetic acid with and without bovine casein, into loops of distal small intestine. Damage was quantified after 45 minutes by the blood-to-lumen movement of {sup 51}Cr-labeled ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) and fluorescein isothiocyanate-tagged bovine serum albumin as well as luminal fluid histamine levels. The amount of titratable acetic acid used to lower the pH of the treatment solutions to pH 4.0 was increased by the addition of calcium gluconate. Luminal acetic acid caused a 19-fold increase in {sup 51}Cr-EDTA accumulation over saline controls; casein did not modify this effect. In saline controls, loop fluid histamine levels bordered on the limits of detection (1 ng/g) but were elevated 19-fold by acetic acid exposure and markedly increased (118-fold) by the combination of acid and casein. Intraluminal misoprostol (3 or 30 micrograms/mL), administered 30 minutes before acetic acid, significantly attenuated the increase in epithelial permeability (luminal {sup 51}Cr-EDTA, fluorescein isothiocyanate-bovine serum albumin accumulation) and histamine release (P less than 0.05). Diphenhydramine, alone or in combination with cimetidine, and indomethacin (5 mg/kg IV) were not protective. It is concluded that exposure of the epithelium to acetic acid promotes the transepithelial movement of casein leading to enhanced mast cell activation and mucosal injury. Damage to the epithelial barrier can be prevented by misoprostol.

  8. Nephropathy in dietary hyperoxaluria: A potentially preventable acute or chronic kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    Glew, Robert H; Sun, Yijuan; Horowitz, Bruce L; Konstantinov, Konstantin N; Barry, Marc; Fair, Joanna R; Massie, Larry; Tzamaloukas, Antonios H

    2014-01-01

    Hyperoxaluria can cause not only nephrolithiasis and nephrocalcinosis, but also renal parenchymal disease histologically characterized by deposition of calcium oxalate crystals throughout the renal parenchyma, profound tubular damage and interstitial inflammation and fibrosis. Hyperoxaluric nephropathy presents clinically as acute or chronic renal failure that may progress to end-stage renal disease (ESRD). This sequence of events, well recognized in the past in primary and enteric hyperoxalurias, has also been documented in a few cases of dietary hyperoxaluria. Estimates of oxalate intake in patients with chronic dietary hyperoxaluria who developed chronic kidney disease or ESRD were comparable to the reported average oxalate content of the diets of certain populations worldwide, thus raising the question whether dietary hyperoxaluria is a primary cause of ESRD in these regions. Studies addressing this question have the potential of improving population health and should be undertaken, alongside ongoing studies which are yielding fresh insights into the mechanisms of intestinal absorption and renal excretion of oxalate, and into the mechanisms of development of oxalate-induced renal parenchymal disease. Novel preventive and therapeutic strategies for treating all types of hyperoxaluria are expected to develop from these studies. PMID:25374807

  9. Prevention of reflex natriuresis after acute unilateral nephrectomy by neonatal administration of MSG

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, S.Y.; Wiedemann, E.; Deschepper, C.F.; Alper, R.H.; Humphreys, M.H.

    1987-02-01

    Acute unilateral nephrectomy (AUN) results in natriuresis from the remaining kidney through reflex pathways involving the central nervous system and requiring an intact pituitary gland. The natriuresis is accompanied by an increase in the plasma concentration of a peptide or peptides derived from the N-terminal fragment (NTF) of proopiomelanocortin. The authors measured plasma immunoreactive NTF-like material (IR-NTF) by radioimmunoassay, before and after AUN in control rats and rats treated neonatally with monosodium glutamate (MSG), a procedure that produces neuroendocrine dysfunction by destroying cell bodies in the hypothalamic arcuate nucleus, median eminence, and other brain regions. In control rats, IR-NTF increased from 85.8 +/- 54.9 (SD) to 207 +/- 98.1 fmol/ml after AUN as sodium excretion (U/sub Na/V) doubled. In MSG-treated rats, AUN produced no change in plasma IR-NTF concentration, nor did U/sub Na/V increase. Tissue content of IR-NTF was reduced in the arcuate nucleus and anterior lobe of pituitaries from MSG-treated rats compared with controls, but was no different in the neurointermediate lobe. These results indicate that the hypothalamic lesion produced by neonatal administration of MSG prevents both the increase in plasma IR-NTF concentration and the natruiuresis after AUN, and therefore lend further support to the concept of a casual relationship between these two consequences of AUN.

  10. Therapy for triggered acute risk prevention in subjects at increased cardiovascular risk.

    PubMed

    Tofler, Geoffrey H; Spinaze, Monica; Shaw, Elizabeth; Buckley, Thomas

    2013-06-15

    Heavy physical exertion, emotional stress, heavy meals, and respiratory infection transiently increase the risk of myocardial infarction, sudden cardiac death, and stroke; however, it remains uncertain how to use this information for disease prevention. We determined whether it was feasible for those with either risk factors for cardiovascular disease (CVD) or known CVD to take targeted medication for the hazard duration of the triggering activity to reduce their risk. After a run-in of 1 month, 20 subjects (12 women and 8 men) aged 68.6 years (range 58 to 83) recorded for 2 months all episodes of physical and emotional stress, heavy meal consumption, and respiratory infection. For each episode, the subjects were instructed to take either aspirin 100 mg and propranolol 10 mg (for physical exertion and emotional stress) or aspirin 100 mg alone (for respiratory infection and heavy meal consumption) and to record their adherence. Adherence with taking the appropriate medication was 86% according to the diary entries, with 15 of 20 subjects (75%) achieving ≥80% adherence. Propranolol taken before exertion reduced the peak heart rate compared with similar exercise during the run-in period (118 ± 21 vs 132 ± 16 beats/min, p = 0.016). Most subjects (85%) reported that it was feasible to continue taking the medication in this manner. In conclusion, it is feasible for those with increased CVD risk to identify potential triggers of acute CVD and to take targeted therapy at the time of these triggers.

  11. Preventing Acute Malnutrition among Young Children in Crises: A Prospective Intervention Study in Niger

    PubMed Central

    Langendorf, Céline; Roederer, Thomas; de Pee, Saskia; Brown, Denise; Doyon, Stéphane; Mamaty, Abdoul-Aziz; Touré, Lynda W.-M.; Manzo, Mahamane L.; Grais, Rebecca F.

    2014-01-01

    Background Finding the most appropriate strategy for the prevention of moderate acute malnutrition (MAM) and severe acute malnutrition (SAM) in young children is essential in countries like Niger with annual “hunger gaps.” Options for large-scale prevention include distribution of supplementary foods, such as fortified-blended foods or lipid-based nutrient supplements (LNSs) with or without household support (cash or food transfer). To date, there has been no direct controlled comparison between these strategies leading to debate concerning their effectiveness. We compared the effectiveness of seven preventive strategies—including distribution of nutritious supplementary foods, with or without additional household support (family food ration or cash transfer), and cash transfer only—on the incidence of SAM and MAM among children aged 6–23 months over a 5-month period, partly overlapping the hunger gap, in Maradi region, Niger. We hypothesized that distributions of supplementary foods would more effectively reduce the incidence of acute malnutrition than distributions of household support by cash transfer. Methods and Findings We conducted a prospective intervention study in 48 rural villages located within 15 km of a health center supported by Forum Santé Niger (FORSANI)/Médecins Sans Frontières in Madarounfa. Seven groups of villages (five to 11 villages) were allocated to different strategies of monthly distributions targeting households including at least one child measuring 60 cm–80 cm (at any time during the study period whatever their nutritional status): three groups received high-quantity LNS (HQ-LNS) or medium-quantity LNS (MQ-LNS) or Super Cereal Plus (SC+) with cash (€38/month [US$52/month]); one group received SC+ and family food ration; two groups received HQ-LNS or SC+ only; one group received cash only (€43/month [US$59/month]). Children 60 cm–80 cm of participating households were assessed at each monthly distribution from

  12. Acute O-GlcNAcylation prevents inflammation-induced vascular dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Hilgers, Rob H. P.; Xing, Dongqi; Gong, Kaizheng; Chen, Yiu-Fai; Chatham, John C.

    2012-01-01

    Acute increases in cellular protein O-linked N-acetyl-glucosamine (O-GlcNAc) modification (O-GlcNAcylation) have been shown to have protective effects in the heart and vasculature. We hypothesized that d-glucosamine (d-GlcN) and Thiamet-G, two agents that increase protein O-GlcNAcylation via different mechanisms, inhibit TNF-α-induced oxidative stress and vascular dysfunction by suppressing inducible nitric oxide (NO) synthase (iNOS) expression. Rat aortic rings were incubated for 3h at 37°C with d-GlcN or its osmotic control l-glucose (l-Glc) or with Thiamet-G or its vehicle control (H2O) followed by the addition of TNF-α or vehicle (H2O) for 21 h. After incubation, rings were mounted in a myograph to assess arterial reactivity. Twenty-four hours of incubation of aortic rings with TNF-α resulted in 1) a hypocontractility to 60 mM K+ solution and phenylephrine, 2) blunted endothelium-dependent relaxation responses to ACh and substance P, and 3) unaltered relaxing response to the Ca2+ ionophore A-23187 and the NO donor sodium nitroprusside compared with aortic rings cultured in the absence of TNF-α. d-GlcN and Thiamet-G pretreatment suppressed the TNF-α-induced hypocontractility and endothelial dysfunction. Total protein O-GlcNAc levels were significantly higher in aortic segments treated with d-GlcN or Thiamet-G compared with controls. Expression of iNOS protein was increased in TNF-α-treated rings, and this was attenuated by pretreatment with either d-GlcN or Thiamet-G. Dense immunostaining for nitrotyrosylated proteins was detected in the endothelium and media of the aortic wall, suggesting enhanced peroxynitrite production by iNOS. These findings demonstrate that acute increases in protein O-GlcNAcylation prevent TNF-α-induced vascular dysfunction, at least in part, via suppression of iNOS expression. PMID:22777418

  13. Alteration in inflammatory/apoptotic pathway and histone modifications by nordihydroguaiaretic acid prevents acute pancreatitis in swiss albino mice.

    PubMed

    Mahajan, Ujwal Mukund; Gupta, Chanchal; Wagh, Preshit Ravindra; Karpe, Pinakin Arun; Tikoo, Kulbhushan

    2011-11-01

    Reactive oxygen radicals, pro-inflammatory mediators and cytokines have been implicated in caerulein induced acute pancreatitis. Nordihydroguaiaretic acid (NDGA), a plant lignin, has marked anti-inflammatory properties. The present study aimed to investigate the possible protective effect of NDGA against caerulein induced pancreatitis. Acute pancreatitis was induced by intraperitoneal administration of eight doses of caerulein in male swiss albino mice. NDGA was administered after 9 h of acute pancreatitis induction. Pancreatic damage and the protective effect of NDGA were assessed by oxidative stress parameters and histopathology of pancreas. The mRNA expression of heat shock proteins (DNAJ C15 and HSPD1) was examined by real-time RT-PCR analysis. Expression of HSP 27, NF-κB, TNF-α, p-p38, Bcl-2, p-PP2A, procaspase-3, caspase-3 and histone modifications were examined by western blotting. NDGA attenuated the oxidative stress, led to increased plasma α-amylase and decreased IGF-1 in AP mice. It modulated the mRNA and protein levels of heat shock proteins and reduced the expression of NF-κB, TNF-α and p-p38. It increased the number of TUNEL positive apoptotic cells in the pancreas of AP mice. In addition, NDGA prevented the changes in modifications of histone H3 in acute pancreatitis. To best of our knowledge, this is the first report which suggests that NDGA prevents the progression of acute pancreatitis by involving alteration of histone H3 modifications and modulating the expression of genes involved in inflammatory/apoptotic cascade, which may be responsible for decreased necrosis and increased apoptosis in this model of acute pancreatitis.

  14. Rhodiola crenulata extract for prevention of acute mountain sickness: a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, crossover trial

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Rhodiola crenulata (R. crenulata) is widely used to prevent acute mountain sickness in the Himalayan areas and in Tibet, but no scientific studies have previously examined its effectiveness. We conducted a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled crossover study to investigate its efficacy in acute mountain sickness prevention. Methods Healthy adult volunteers were randomized to 2 treatment sequences, receiving either 800 mg R. crenulata extract or placebo daily for 7 days before ascent and 2 days during mountaineering, before crossing over to the alternate treatment after a 3-month wash-out period. Participants ascended rapidly from 250 m to 3421 m on two separate occasions: December 2010 and April 2011. The primary outcome measure was the incidence of acute mountain sickness, as defined by a Lake Louise score ≥ 3, with headache and at least one of the symptoms of nausea or vomiting, fatigue, dizziness, or difficulty sleeping. Results One hundred and two participants completed the trial. There were no demographic differences between individuals taking Rhodiola-placebo and those taking placebo-Rhodiola. No significant differences in the incidence of acute mountain sickness were found between R. crenulata extract and placebo groups (all 60.8%; adjusted odds ratio (AOR) = 1.02, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 0.69–1.52). The incidence of severe acute mountain sickness in Rhodiola extract vs. placebo groups was 35.3% vs. 29.4% (AOR = 1.42, 95% CI = 0.90–2.25). Conclusions R. crenulata extract was not effective in reducing the incidence or severity of acute mountain sickness as compared to placebo. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01536288. PMID:24176010

  15. The pattern and time course of somatosensory changes in the human UVB sunburn model reveal the presence of peripheral and central sensitization.

    PubMed

    Gustorff, Burkhard; Sycha, Thomas; Lieba-Samal, Doris; Rolke, Roman; Treede, Rolf-Detlef; Magerl, Walter

    2013-04-01

    The ultraviolet B (UVB) sunburn model was characterized with a comprehensive battery of quantitative sensory testing (QST). Primary hyperalgesia in UVB-irradiated skin and secondary hyperalgesia in adjacent nonirradiated skin were studied in 22 healthy subjects 24h after irradiation with UVB at 3-fold minimal erythema dose of a skin area 5 cm in diameter at the thigh and compared to mirror-image contralateral control areas. The time course of hyperalgesia over 96 h was studied in a subgroup of 12 subjects. Within the sunburn area, cold hyperesthesia (P=.01), profound generalized hyperalgesia to heat (P<.001), cold (P<.05), pinprick and pressure (P<.001), and mild dynamic mechanical allodynia (P<.001) were present. The finding of cold hyperalgesia and cold hyperesthesia is new in this model. The sunburn was surrounded by large areas of pinprick hyperalgesia (mean±SEM, 218±32 cm(2)) and a small rim of dynamic mechanical allodynia but no other sensory changes. Although of smaller magnitude, secondary hyperalgesia and dynamic mechanical allodynia adjacent to the UVB-irradiated area were statistically highly significant. Primary and secondary hyperalgesia developed in parallel within hours, peaked after 24-32 h, and lasted for more than 96 h. These data reveal that the UVB sunburn model activates a broad spectrum of peripheral and central sensitization mechanisms and hence is a useful human surrogate model to be used as a screening tool for target engagement in phases 1 and 2a of drug development.

  16. Prevention and treatment of diarrhoea with Saccharomyces boulardii in children with acute lower respiratory tract infections.

    PubMed

    Shan, L-S; Hou, P; Wang, Z-J; Liu, F-R; Chen, N; Shu, L-H; Zhang, H; Han, X-H; Han, X-X; Cai, X-X; Shang, Y-X; Vandenplas, Y

    2013-12-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether Saccharomyces boulardii prevents and treats diarrhoea and antibiotic-associated diarrhoea (AAD) in children. A total of 333 hospitalised children with acute lower respiratory tract infection were enrolled in a 2-phase open randomised controlled trial. During the 1st phase, all children received intravenous antibiotics (AB). They were randomly allocated to group A (S. boulardii 500 mg/day + AB, n=167) or group B (AB alone, n=166) and followed for 2 weeks. Diarrhoea was defined as ≥3 loose/watery stools/day during at least 2 days, occurring during treatment and/or up to 2 weeks after AB therapy had stopped. AAD was considered when diarrhoea was caused by Clostridium difficile or when stool cultures remained negative. In the 2nd phase of the study, group B patients who developed diarrhoea were randomly allocated to two sub-groups: group B1 (S. boulardii + oral rehydration solution (ORS)) and group B2 (ORS alone). Data from 283 patients were available for analysis. Diarrhoea prevalence was lower in group A than in group B (11/139 (7.9%) vs. 42/144 (29.2%); relative risk (RR): 0.27, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.1-0.5). S. boulardii reduced the risk of AAD (6/139 (4.3%) vs. 28/144 (19.4%); RR: 0.22; 95% CI: 0.1-0.5). When group B patients developed diarrhoea (n=42), S. boulardii treatment during 5 days (group B1) resulted in lower stool frequency (P<0.05) and higher recovery rate (91.3% in group B1 vs. 21.1% in B2; P<0.001). The mean duration of diarrhoea in group B1 was shorter (2.31±0.95 vs. 8.97±1.07 days; P<0.001). No adverse effects related to S. boulardii were observed. S. boulardii appeared to be effective in the prevention and treatment of diarrhoea and AAD in children treated with intravenous antibiotics.

  17. Persistence with Secondary Prevention Medications after Acute Myocardial Infarction: Insights from the TRANSLATE-ACS Study

    PubMed Central

    Mathews, Robin; Wang, Tracy Y.; Honeycutt, Emily; Henry, Timothy D.; Zettler, Marjorie; Chang, Michael; Fonarow, Gregg C.; Peterson, Eric D.

    2016-01-01

    Background Persistent use of secondary prevention therapies after acute myocardial infarction (MI) is critical to optimizing long-term outcomes. Methods Medication persistence was assessed among 7,955 MI patients in 216 hospitals participating in the TRANSLATE-ACS study from 2010 to 2012. Persistence was defined as continuation of aspirin, adenosine diphosphate receptor inhibitors (ADPRi), beta-blockers, angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEIs)/angiotensin receptor blockers (ARBs), and statins from discharge to 6 months post-MI. Multivariable logistic regression modeling was used to determine factors associated with non-persistence, defined as <80% persistence with all medication classes. Results Overall, 31% of MI patients stopped taking a least one medication by 6 months. The most common reasons cited for medications discontinuation were side effects and physician instruction (57%), while financial concerns were cited in 8% overall. After multivariable modeling, black race (odds ratio [OR] 1.36; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.15–1.62), older age (OR 1.07; 95% CI 1.02–1.12), atrial fibrillation (OR 1.67, 95% CI 1.33–2.09), dialysis (OR 1.79; 95% CI 1.15–2.78), and depression (OR 1.22; 95% CI 1.02–1.45) were associated with lower likelihood of persistence. Private insurance (OR 0.85, 95% 0.76–0.95), prescription cost assistance (OR 0.63; 95% CI 0.54–0.75), and outpatient follow-up arranged prior to discharge (OR 0.89. 95% CI 0.80–0.99) were associated with higher persistence. Conclusions Nearly one-third of MI patients are no longer persistent with their prescribed medications by 6 months. Patients at high risk of non-persistence may be identified by clinical and sociodemographic features. These observations underscore key opportunities to optimize longitudinal use of secondary prevention therapies. PMID:26093865

  18. Preventing cleavage of Mer promotes efferocytosis and suppresses acute lung injury in bleomycin treated mice

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Ye-Ji; Lee, Seung-Hae; Youn, Young-So; Choi, Ji-Yeon; Song, Keung-Sub; Cho, Min-Sun; Kang, Jihee Lee

    2012-08-15

    Mer receptor tyrosine kinase (Mer) regulates macrophage activation and promotes apoptotic cell clearance. Mer activation is regulated through proteolytic cleavage of the extracellular domain. To determine if membrane-bound Mer is cleaved during bleomycin-induced lung injury, and, if so, how preventing the cleavage of Mer enhances apoptotic cell uptake and down-regulates pulmonary immune responses. During bleomycin-induced acute lung injury in mice, membrane-bound Mer expression decreased, but production of soluble Mer and activity as well as expression of disintegrin and metalloproteinase 17 (ADAM17) were enhanced . Treatment with the ADAM inhibitor TAPI-0 restored Mer expression and diminished soluble Mer production. Furthermore, TAPI-0 increased Mer activation in alveolar macrophages and lung tissue resulting in enhanced apoptotic cell clearance in vivo and ex vivo by alveolar macrophages. Suppression of bleomycin-induced pro-inflammatory mediators, but enhancement of hepatocyte growth factor induction were seen after TAPI-0 treatment. Additional bleomycin-induced inflammatory responses reduced by TAPI-0 treatment included inflammatory cell recruitment into the lungs, levels of total protein and lactate dehydrogenase activity in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid, as well as caspase-3 and caspase-9 activity and alveolar epithelial cell apoptosis in lung tissue. Importantly, the effects of TAPI-0 on bleomycin-induced inflammation and apoptosis were reversed by coadministration of specific Mer-neutralizing antibodies. These findings suggest that restored membrane-bound Mer expression by TAPI-0 treatment may help resolve lung inflammation and apoptosis after bleomycin treatment. -- Highlights: ►Mer expression is restored by TAPI-0 treatment in bleomycin-stimulated lung. ►Mer signaling is enhanced by TAPI-0 treatment in bleomycin-stimulated lung. ►TAPI-0 enhances efferocytosis and promotes resolution of lung injury.

  19. Antioxidant effect of Phyllanthus emblica extract prevents contrast-induced acute kidney injury

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Contrast-induced acute kidney injury (CI-AKI) occurs after the administration of intravenous iodinated contrast agents. Oxidative stress has been proposed as one of the most important mechanisms in the pathogenesis of CI-AKI. The objective of this study was to investigate the antioxidant effect of the extract from Phyllanthus emblica (PE) in preventing CI-AKI. Methods Male Sprague Dawley rats were subjected into eight groups, were given water (control) or PE extract (125 or 250 or 500 mg/kg/day) for 5 days before the induction of CI-AKI. Renal function and oxidative stress markers; malondialdehyde (MDA), total antioxidant capacity (TAC), superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase (CAT) activity were determined in plasma and renal tissue. Kidney sections were performed for histopathological examination. Results In the contrast media (CM) group, increases in blood urea nitrogen and serum creatinine were demonstrated which correlated with severity of tubular necrosis, peritubular capillary congestion and interstitial edema. Moreover, an increase in MDA and a decrease in TAC SOD and CAT activity in CM group were significantly changed when compared with the control (P < 0.05). In contrast, CI-AKI-induced rats administrated with PE extract 250 and 500 mg/kg/day significantly preserved renal function and attenuated the severity of pathological damage (P < 0.05) as well as significantly lower MDA and higher TAC, SOD and CAT than the CM group (P < 0.05). Conclusions This study demonstrated the protective role of PE extract against CI-AKI. PMID:24755233

  20. Targeting Neutrophils to Prevent Malaria-Associated Acute Lung Injury/Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Soeiro-Pereira, Paulo V.; Gomes, Eliane; Neto, Antonio Condino; D' Império Lima, Maria R.; Alvarez, José M.; Portugal, Silvia; Epiphanio, Sabrina

    2016-01-01

    Malaria remains one of the greatest burdens to global health, causing nearly 500,000 deaths in 2014. When manifesting in the lungs, severe malaria causes acute lung injury/acute respiratory distress syndrome (ALI/ARDS). We have previously shown that a proportion of DBA/2 mice infected with Plasmodium berghei ANKA (PbA) develop ALI/ARDS and that these mice recapitulate various aspects of the human syndrome, such as pulmonary edema, hemorrhaging, pleural effusion and hypoxemia. Herein, we investigated the role of neutrophils in the pathogenesis of malaria-associated ALI/ARDS. Mice developing ALI/ARDS showed greater neutrophil accumulation in the lungs compared with mice that did not develop pulmonary complications. In addition, mice with ALI/ARDS produced more neutrophil-attracting chemokines, myeloperoxidase and reactive oxygen species. We also observed that the parasites Plasmodium falciparum and PbA induced the formation of neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) ex vivo, which were associated with inflammation and tissue injury. The depletion of neutrophils, treatment with AMD3100 (a CXCR4 antagonist), Pulmozyme (human recombinant DNase) or Sivelestat (inhibitor of neutrophil elastase) decreased the development of malaria-associated ALI/ARDS and significantly increased mouse survival. This study implicates neutrophils and NETs in the genesis of experimentally induced malaria-associated ALI/ARDS and proposes a new therapeutic approach to improve the prognosis of severe malaria. PMID:27926944

  1. N-Acetylcysteine Administration Prevents Nonthyroidal Illness Syndrome in Patients With Acute Myocardial Infarction: A Randomized Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Vidart, Josi; Wajner, Simone Magagnin; Leite, Rogério Sarmento; Manica, André; Schaan, Beatriz D.; Larsen, P. Reed

    2014-01-01

    Context: The acute phase of the nonthyroidal illness syndrome (NTIS) is characterized by low T3 and high rT3 levels, affecting up to 75% of critically ill patients. Oxidative stress has been implicated as a causative factor of the disturbed peripheral thyroid hormone metabolism. Objective: The objective of the study was to investigate whether N-acetylcysteine (NAC), a potent intracellular antioxidant, can prevent NTIS in patients with acute myocardial infarction. Design: This was a randomized, multicenter clinical trial. Settings: Consecutive patients admitted to the emergency and intensive care units of two tertiary hospitals in southern Brazil were recruited. Patients and intervention included 67 patients were randomized to receive NAC or placebo during 48 hours. Baseline characteristics and blood samples for thyroid hormones and oxidative parameters were collected. Main Outcome: Variation of serum T3 and rT3 levels was measured. Results: Baseline characteristics were similar between groups (all P > .05). T3 levels decreased in the placebo group at 12 hours of follow-up (P = .002) but not in NAC-treated patients (P = .10). Baseline rT3 levels were elevated in both groups and decreased over the initial 48 hours in the NAC-treated patients (P = .003) but not in the control group (P = .75). The free T4 and TSH levels were virtually identical between the groups throughout the study period (P > .05). Measurement of total antioxidant status and total carbonyl content demonstrated that oxidative balance was deranged in acute myocardial infarction patients, whereas NAC corrected these alterations (P < .001). Conclusions: NAC administration prevents the derangement in thyroid hormone concentrations commonly occurring in the acute phase of acute myocardial infarction, indicating that oxidative stress is involved in the NTIS pathophysiology. PMID:25148231

  2. Complete Suppression of the Gut Microbiome Prevents Acute Graft-Versus-Host Disease following Allogeneic Bone Marrow Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Vossen, Jaak M.; Guiot, Harry F. L.; Lankester, Arjan C.; Vossen, Ann C. T. M.; Bredius, Robbert G. M.; Wolterbeek, Ron; Bakker, Hanny D. J.; Heidt, Peter J.

    2014-01-01

    The hypothesis that elimination of facultative and strict anaerobic microorganisms from the gastro-intestinal tract by antimicrobial drugs in the period of time around allogeneic bone marrow transplantation (BMT) prevents acute graft-versus-host disease (GVHD), was examined in a cohort of 112 children grafted between 1989 and 2002 for hematological malignancies. All patients received T-cell replete marrow from human leukocyte antigens (HLA) matched sibling donors under identical transplantation conditions. To eliminate microorganisms from the gastro-intestinal tract, total gastro-intestinal decontamination (GID) was applied by high doses of non-absorbable antimicrobial drugs while the graft recipient was maintained in strict protective isolation. About half of the children (51%) proved to be successfully decontaminated, and about half (49%) unsuccessfully. One recipient got acute GVHD in the first group and 8 in the second group (p = 0.013). The degree of success of total GID was decisive for the occurrence of acute GVHD, irrespective of the presence of other risk factors such as higher age of recipient and/or donor, female donor for male recipient and carriership or reactivation of herpesviruses. Our results demonstrate that successful total GID of the graft recipient prevents moderate to severe acute GVHD. We suppose that substantial translocation of gastro-intestinal microorganisms or parts of these, functioning as microbial-associated molecular patterns (MAMP's), triggering macrophages/dendritic cells via pattern recognizing receptors (PRR's) is prohibited. As a consequence the initiation and progression of an inflammatory process leading to acute GVHD is inhibited. PMID:25180821

  3. Levofloxacin in Preventing Infection in Young Patients With Acute Leukemia Receiving Chemotherapy or Undergoing Stem Cell Transplantation

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-02-13

    Acute Leukemias of Ambiguous Lineage; Bacterial Infection; Diarrhea; Fungal Infection; Musculoskeletal Complications; Neutropenia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia and Other Myeloid Malignancies

  4. Prevention of venous thromboembolism in hospitalized acutely ill medical patients: focus on the clinical utility of (low-dose) fondaparinux.

    PubMed

    Di Nisio, Marcello; Porreca, Ettore

    2013-01-01

    Venous thromboembolism (VTE) is a frequent complication among acutely ill medical patients hospitalized for congestive heart failure, acute respiratory insufficiency, rheumatologic disorders, and acute infectious and/or inflammatory diseases. Based on robust data from randomized controlled studies and meta-analyses showing a reduced incidence of VTE by 40% to about 60% with pharmacologic thromboprophylaxis, prevention of VTE with low molecular weight heparin (LMWH), unfractionated heparin (UFH), or fondaparinux is currently recommended in all at-risk hospitalized acutely ill medical patients. In patients who are bleeding or are at high risk for major bleeding, mechanical prophylaxis with graduated compression stockings or intermittent pneumatic compression may be suggested. Thromboprophylaxis is generally continued for 6 to 14 days or for the duration of hospitalization. Selected cases could benefit from extended thromboprophylaxis beyond this period, although the risk of major bleeding remains a concern, and additional studies are needed to identify patients who may benefit from prolonged prophylaxis. For hospitalized acutely ill medical patients with renal insufficiency, a low dose (1.5 mg once daily) of fondaparinux or prophylactic LMWH subcutaneously appears to have a safe profile, although proper evaluation in randomized studies is lacking. The evidence on the use of prophylaxis for VTE in this latter group of patients, as well as in those at higher risk of bleeding complications, such as patients with thrombocytopenia, remains scarce. For critically ill patients hospitalized in intensive care units with no contraindications, LMWH or UFH are recommended, with frequent and careful assessment of the risk of bleeding. In this review, we discuss the evidence for use of thromboprophylaxis for VTE in acutely ill hospitalized medical patients, with a focus on (low-dose) fondaparinux.

  5. Efficacy of low dose gabapentin in acute herpes zoster for preventing postherpetic neuralgia: a prospective controlled study.

    PubMed

    Lee, Eo G; Lee, Hee J; Hyun, Dong J; Min, Kyunghoon; Kim, Dong H; Yoon, Moon S

    2016-05-01

    Postherpetic neuralgia (PHN) is a sequela of herpes zoster that adversely affects quality of life seriously. The risk factors for PHN are well known but the effective interventions that reduce the incidence of PHN are less studied. The objective of this study is to evaluate the efficacy of treatment with gabapentin in patients with acute herpes zoster for preventing PHN. We performed a prospective randomized controlled study of 120 participants diagnosed with acute herpes zoster, aged 50 and over and complaining moderate to severe pain. All patients were treated with valacyclovir and acetaminophen. Half of the participants were assigned to the gabapentin group and received gabapentin 300 mg three times a day additionally. The intensity of pain at every visit and the incidence of PHN in both groups were measured. Total 52 and 49 patients in the gabapentin group and the control group, respectively, had completed 12 weeks of follow-up period. Although the incidence of PHN was higher in the control group, the difference was not statistically significant (6.1% vs. 3.8%, p = 0.67). Our results indicate that the use of low-dose gabapentin in acute herpes zoster seems not effective in the prevention of PHN.

  6. Preventive effect of N-acetylcysteine in a mouse model of steroid resistant acute exacerbation of asthma

    PubMed Central

    Eftekhari, Parivash; Hajizadeh, Sohrab; Raoufy, Mohammad Reza; Masjedi, Mohammad Reza; Yang, Ming; Hansbro, Nicole; Li, Jing Jing; Foster, Paul S

    2013-01-01

    Oxidative stress appears to have an important role in glucocorticoid insensitivity, as a crucial problem in asthma therapy. We studied the preventive effect of antioxidant N-acetylcysteine (NAC) on the airway hyper-responsiveness (AHR) and the accumulation of inflammatory cells in the airways in an animal model of steroid resistant acute exacerbation of asthma. Systemically sensitized Balb/C mice were exposed to Ovalbumin aerosol on days 13, 14, 15 and 16, followed by intratracheal lipopolysaccharide (LPS) to induce acute exacerbation. NAC (intraperitoneal, 320 mg/kg 30 min before and 12 hours after each challenge) reduced hyper-responsiveness with/out dexamethasone. LPS application caused neutrophilia in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) and eosinophil count was higher than respective control in BALF as well as neutrophils after dexamethasone treatment. NAC significantly decreased neutrophil and eosinophil count in BALF as well as inflammatory cytokines (IL-13 and IL-5).We concluded that addition of NAC to asthma therapy has beneficial preventive effects in an animal model of steroid resistant acute exacerbation of asthma. PMID:26417226

  7. Dabigatran etexilate: a review of its use in the treatment of acute venous thromboembolism and prevention of venous thromboembolism recurrence.

    PubMed

    Greig, Sarah L; McKeage, Kate

    2014-10-01

    Dabigatran etexilate (Pradaxa(®), Prazaxa(®)) has recently been approved for the treatment of acute venous thromboembolism (VTE) and prevention of VTE recurrence. Dabigatran etexilate is an oral prodrug of dabigatran, a selective, reversible, competitive, direct thrombin inhibitor. Dabigatran etexilate has a wide therapeutic range that allows for fixed-dose administration without the need for routine monitoring, a requirement of standard vitamin K antagonist (VKA) therapy. In randomized phase III trials in patients with acute VTE (RE-COVER and RE-COVER II), long-term treatment with oral dabigatran etexilate 150 mg twice daily for 6 months after initial parenteral anticoagulation was noninferior to dose-adjusted warfarin with regard to the incidence of recurrent symptomatic VTE or related death. In randomized trials of patients with previously treated VTE, extended dabigatran etexilate treatment was noninferior to warfarin (RE-MEDY) and significantly more effective than placebo (RE-SONATE) with regard to the incidence of recurrent VTE or related death. Dabigatran etexilate was generally well tolerated, with a similar incidence of major bleeding to that with warfarin in individual studies (although pooled data showed a significantly lower incidence in patients with acute VTE), and significantly lower incidences of the combined endpoint of major or clinically relevant nonmajor bleeding and of any bleeding than with warfarin. However, in the RE-SONATE trial, dabigatran etexilate was associated with a higher risk of bleeding than placebo. In conclusion, dabigatran etexilate is a valuable treatment option for acute VTE and prevention of VTE recurrence, providing an effective and convenient alternative to standard VKA therapy with the potential for a lower overall rate of bleeding.

  8. Caspofungin Acetate or Fluconazole in Preventing Invasive Fungal Infections in Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia Who Are Undergoing Chemotherapy

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-01-31

    Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Childhood Acute Erythroleukemia (M6); Childhood Acute Megakaryocytic Leukemia (M7); Childhood Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Childhood Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Childhood Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Childhood Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Fungal Infection; Neutropenia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia and Other Myeloid Malignancies

  9. Acute upper thermal limits of three aquatic invasive invertebrates: hot water treatment to prevent upstream transport of invasive species.

    PubMed

    Beyer, Jessica; Moy, Philip; De Stasio, Bart

    2011-01-01

    Transport of aquatic invasive species (AIS) by boats traveling up rivers and streams is an important mechanism of secondary spread of AIS into watersheds. Because physical barriers to AIS movement also prevent navigation, alternate methods for preventing spread are necessary while allowing upstream navigation. One promising approach is to lift boats over physical barriers and then use hot water immersion to kill AIS attached to the hull, motor, or fishing gear. However, few data have been published on the acute upper thermal tolerance limits of potential invaders treated in this manner. To test the potential effectiveness of this approach for a planned boat lift on the Fox River of northeastern WI, USA, acute upper thermal limits were determined for three AIS, adult zebra mussels (Dreissena polymorpha), quagga mussels (Dreissena rostriformis bugensis), and spiny water fleas (Bythotrephes longimanus) from the local area employing temperatures from 32 to 54°C and immersion times from 1 to 20 min. Mortality was determined after immersion followed by a 20-min recovery period. Immersion at 43°C for at least 5 min was required to ensure 100% mortality for all three species, but due to variability in the response by Bythotrephes a 10 min immersion would be more reliable. Overall there were no significant differences between the three species in acute upper thermal limits. Heated water can be an efficient, environmentally sound, and cost effective method of controlling AIS potentially transferred by boats, and our results should have both specific and wide-ranging applications in the prevention of the spread of aquatic invasive species.

  10. Acute Upper Thermal Limits of Three Aquatic Invasive Invertebrates: Hot Water Treatment to Prevent Upstream Transport of Invasive Species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beyer, Jessica; Moy, Philip; de Stasio, Bart

    2011-01-01

    Transport of aquatic invasive species (AIS) by boats traveling up rivers and streams is an important mechanism of secondary spread of AIS into watersheds. Because physical barriers to AIS movement also prevent navigation, alternate methods for preventing spread are necessary while allowing upstream navigation. One promising approach is to lift boats over physical barriers and then use hot water immersion to kill AIS attached to the hull, motor, or fishing gear. However, few data have been published on the acute upper thermal tolerance limits of potential invaders treated in this manner. To test the potential effectiveness of this approach for a planned boat lift on the Fox River of northeastern WI, USA, acute upper thermal limits were determined for three AIS, adult zebra mussels ( Dreissena polymorpha), quagga mussels ( Dreissena rostriformis bugensis), and spiny water fleas ( Bythotrephes longimanus) from the local area employing temperatures from 32 to 54°C and immersion times from 1 to 20 min. Mortality was determined after immersion followed by a 20-min recovery period. Immersion at 43°C for at least 5 min was required to ensure 100% mortality for all three species, but due to variability in the response by Bythotrephes a 10 min immersion would be more reliable. Overall there were no significant differences between the three species in acute upper thermal limits. Heated water can be an efficient, environmentally sound, and cost effective method of controlling AIS potentially transferred by boats, and our results should have both specific and wide-ranging applications in the prevention of the spread of aquatic invasive species.

  11. Prevention and Therapeutic Effects and Mechanisms of Tanshinone IIA Sodium Sulfonate on Acute Liver Injury Mice Model

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Lunjie; Zhou, Jun; Zhang, Jingying; Che, Jun; Jiao, Yang; Zhang, Yusong

    2016-01-01

    Tanshinone IIA sodium sulfonate (TSS) is a water-soluble derivative of tanshinone IIA, which is the main pharmacologically active component of Salvia miltiorrhiza. This study aimed to verify the preventive and therapeutic effects of TSS and its combined therapeutic effects with magnesium isoglycyrrhizinate (MI) in D-galactosamine- (D-Gal-) induced acute liver injury (ALI) in mice. The potential regulatory mechanisms of TSS on ALI were also examined. Our results may provide a basis for the development of novel therapeutics for ALI. PMID:27274751

  12. Prevention

    MedlinePlus

    ... our e-newsletter! Aging & Health A to Z Prevention Basic Facts & Information Some factors that affect your ... control of the things that you can change. Preventive Recommendations for Adults Aged 65 and Older The ...

  13. Prevention

    MedlinePlus

    ... Is Strong Error processing SSI file About Heart Disease & Stroke Prevention Heart disease and stroke are an epidemic in ... to avoid secondhand smoke. Barriers to Effective Heart Disease & Stroke Prevention Many people with key risk factors for heart ...

  14. Chronic and acute adenosine A2A receptor blockade prevents long-term episodic memory disruption caused by acute cannabinoid CB1 receptor activation.

    PubMed

    Mouro, Francisco M; Batalha, Vânia L; Ferreira, Diana G; Coelho, Joana E; Baqi, Younis; Müller, Christa E; Lopes, Luísa V; Ribeiro, Joaquim A; Sebastião, Ana M

    2017-05-01

    Cannabinoid-mediated memory impairment is a concern in cannabinoid-based therapies. Caffeine exacerbates cannabinoid CB1 receptor (CB1R)-induced memory deficits through an adenosine A1 receptor-mediated mechanism. We now evaluated how chronic or acute blockade of adenosine A2A receptors (A2ARs) affects long-term episodic memory deficits induced by a single injection of a selective CB1R agonist. Long-term episodic memory was assessed by the novel object recognition (NOR) test. Mice received an intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection of the CB1/CB2 receptor agonist WIN 55,212-2 (1 mg/kg) immediately after the NOR training, being tested for novelty recognition 24 h later. Anxiety levels were assessed by the Elevated Plus Maze test, immediately after the NOR. Mice were also tested for exploratory behaviour at the Open Field. For chronic A2AR blockade, KW-6002 (istradefylline) (3 mg/kg/day) was administered orally for 30 days; acute blockade of A2ARs was assessed by i.p. injection of SCH 58261 (1 mg/kg) administered either together with WIN 55,212-2 or only 30 min before the NOR test phase. The involvement of CB1Rs was assessed by using the CB1R antagonist, AM251 (3 mg/kg, i.p.). WIN 55,212-2 caused a disruption in NOR, an action absent in mice also receiving AM251, KW-6002 or SCH 58261 during the encoding/consolidation phase; SCH 58251 was ineffective if present during retrieval only. No effects were detected in the Elevated Plus maze or Open Field Test. The finding that CB1R-mediated memory disruption is prevented by antagonism of adenosine A2ARs, highlights a possibility to prevent cognitive side effects when therapeutic application of CB1R drugs is desired.

  15. Anti-inflammatory and antioxidant effects of Aloe saponaria Haw in a model of UVB-induced paw sunburn in rats.

    PubMed

    Silva, Mariane Arnoldi; Trevisan, Gabriela; Hoffmeister, Carin; Rossato, Mateus Fortes; Boligon, Aline Augusti; Walker, Cristiani Isabel Banderò; Klafke, Jonatas Zeni; Oliveira, Sara Marchesan; Silva, Cássia Regina; Athayde, Margareth Linde; Ferreira, Juliano

    2014-04-05

    Ultraviolet B (UVB) irradiation mainly affects biological tissues by inducing an increase in reactive oxygen species (ROS) production which leads to deleterious outcomes for the skin, including pain and inflammation. As a protective strategy, many studies have focused on the use of natural products. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of Aloe saponaria on nociceptive, inflammatory, and oxidative parameters in a model of UVB-induced sunburn in adult male Wistar rats. Sunburned animals were topically treated with vehicle (base cream), 1% silver sulfadiazine (positive control) or A. saponaria (10%) once a day for 6days. UVB-induced nociception (allodynia and hyperalgesia), inflammation (edema and leukocyte infiltration) and oxidative stress (increases in H2O2, protein carbonyl levels and lipid peroxidation and a decrease in non protein thiol content) were reduced by both A. saponaria and sulfadiazine topical treatment. Furthermore, A. saponaria or its constituents aloin and rutin reduced the oxidative stress induced by H2O2 in skin homogenates in vitro. Our results demonstrate that topical A. saponaria treatment displayed anti-nociceptive and anti-inflammatory effects in a UVB-induced sunburn model, and these effects seem to be related to its antioxidant components.

  16. Treatment and Prevention of Acute Diarrhoea. Guidelines for the Trainers of Health Workers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    World Health Organization, Geneva (Switzerland).

    This booklet, intended primarily for the trainers of middle-level community health workers in underdeveloped countries, is designed to help such workers present the topic of diarrhea treatment and prevention in training courses. Divided into five sections, the booklet gives guidelines on treatment and prevention, with particular emphasis on the…

  17. Prevention of comorbidity and acute attack of gout by uric acid lowering therapy.

    PubMed

    Joo, Kowoon; Kwon, Seong-Ryul; Lim, Mie-Jin; Jung, Kyong-Hee; Joo, Hoyeon; Park, Won

    2014-05-01

    The object of this study was to evaluate the effect of uric acid lowering therapy in reducing the new development of comorbidities and the frequency of acute attacks in gout patients. We retrospectively reviewed patients who were diagnosed to have gout with at least 3 yr of follow up. They were divided into 2 groups; 53 patients with mean serum uric acid level (sUA)<6 mg/dL and 147 patients with mean sUA≥6 mg/dL. Comorbidities of gout such as hypertension (HTN), type II diabetes mellitus (DM), chronic kidney disease, cardiovascular disease (CVD) and urolithiasis were compared in each group at baseline and at last follow-up visit. Frequency of acute gout attacks were also compared between the groups. During the mean follow up period of 7.6 yr, the yearly rate of acute attack and the new development of HTN, DM, CVD and urolithiasis was lower in the adequately treated group compared to the inadequately treated group. Tight control of uric acid decreases the incidence of acute gout attacks and comorbidities of gout such as HTN, DM, CVD and urolithiasis.

  18. [Probiotics, prebiotics and zinc in the therapy and prevention of acute infectious diarrhoea in children: state of the art].

    PubMed

    Salvatore, S; Luini, C; Arrigo, S; Salmaso, M; Morando, L; Nespoli, L; Vandenplas, Y

    2007-12-01

    Selected probiotics (mainly Lactobacilli, and particularly LGG, and Saccharomyces boulardii) have recently demonstrated a therapeutic efficacy in acute diarrhoea, if used in the early phase of infection and at high concentration. Further data are needed to clarify their effect for prevention and travellers' diarrhoea. The mechanisms of action of probiotics need to be fully elucidated but seem to include a complex interaction of epithelial, molecular, metabolic and immune responses. There is an increasing evidence that different micro-organisms show different properties and efficacy. An accurate identification and selection of the strains, the dose and the patients are thus crucial for a correct therapeutic approach. Prebiotics can modify the intestinal flora and interact with the immune system of the host against specific pathogens. However, clinical trials are currently limited and a beneficial effect of prebiotics in acute diarrhoea is still lacking. In developing countries zinc supplementation demonstrated a significant reduction of fecal excretion, duration, severity and persistency of diarrhoea. Moreover, zinc may improve immune status, intestinal permeability, epithelial and enzymatic functions, and transport of electrolytes. The use of zinc in addition to oral rehydration solution (ORS) could thus theoretically improve the treatment and reduce the complications of diarrhoea worldwide. However, in developed countries, no trial using zinc supplementation in patients with acute diarrhoea has been published yet and the cost-benefit ratio of zinc supplementation needs to be assessed.

  19. Acetazolamide or dexamethasone use versus placebo to prevent acute mountain sickness on Mount Rainier.

    PubMed

    Ellsworth, A J; Meyer, E F; Larson, E B

    1991-03-01

    Eighteen climbers actively ascended Mount Rainier (elevation 4,392 m) twice during a randomized, double-blind, concurrent, placebo-controlled, crossover trial comparing the use of acetazolamide, 250 mg, dexamethasone, 4 mg, and placebo every 8 hours as prophylaxis for acute mountain sickness. Each subject was randomly assigned to receive placebo during one ascent and one of the active medications during the other ascent. Assessment of acute mountain sickness was performed using the Environmental Symptoms Questionnaire and a clinical interview. At the summit or high point attained above base camp, the use of dexamethasone significantly reduced the incidence of acute mountain sickness and the severity of symptoms. Cerebral and respiratory symptom severity scores for subjects receiving dexamethasone (0.26 +/- 0.16 and 0.20 +/- 0.19, respectively) were significantly lower than similar scores for both acetazolamide (0.80 +/- 0.80 and 1.20 +/- 1.05; P = 0.25) and placebo (1.11 +/- 1.02 and 1.45 +/- 1.27; P = .025). Neither the use of dexamethasone nor that of acetazolamide measurably affected other physical or mental aspects. Compared with placebo, dexamethasone appears to be effective for prophylaxis of symptoms associated with acute mountain sickness accompanying rapid ascent. The precise role of dexamethasone for the prophylaxis of acute mountain sickness is not known, but it can be considered for persons without contraindications who are intolerant of acetazolamide, for whom acetazolamide is ineffective, or who must make forced, rapid ascent to high altitude for a short period of time with a guaranteed retreat route.

  20. Acetazolamide or dexamethasone use versus placebo to prevent acute mountain sickness on Mount Rainier.

    PubMed Central

    Ellsworth, A. J.; Meyer, E. F.; Larson, E. B.

    1991-01-01

    Eighteen climbers actively ascended Mount Rainier (elevation 4,392 m) twice during a randomized, double-blind, concurrent, placebo-controlled, crossover trial comparing the use of acetazolamide, 250 mg, dexamethasone, 4 mg, and placebo every 8 hours as prophylaxis for acute mountain sickness. Each subject was randomly assigned to receive placebo during one ascent and one of the active medications during the other ascent. Assessment of acute mountain sickness was performed using the Environmental Symptoms Questionnaire and a clinical interview. At the summit or high point attained above base camp, the use of dexamethasone significantly reduced the incidence of acute mountain sickness and the severity of symptoms. Cerebral and respiratory symptom severity scores for subjects receiving dexamethasone (0.26 +/- 0.16 and 0.20 +/- 0.19, respectively) were significantly lower than similar scores for both acetazolamide (0.80 +/- 0.80 and 1.20 +/- 1.05; P = 0.25) and placebo (1.11 +/- 1.02 and 1.45 +/- 1.27; P = .025). Neither the use of dexamethasone nor that of acetazolamide measurably affected other physical or mental aspects. Compared with placebo, dexamethasone appears to be effective for prophylaxis of symptoms associated with acute mountain sickness accompanying rapid ascent. The precise role of dexamethasone for the prophylaxis of acute mountain sickness is not known, but it can be considered for persons without contraindications who are intolerant of acetazolamide, for whom acetazolamide is ineffective, or who must make forced, rapid ascent to high altitude for a short period of time with a guaranteed retreat route. PMID:2028586

  1. Chronic Desipramine Prevents Acute Stress-Induced Reorganization of Medial Prefrontal Cortex Architecture by Blocking Glutamate Vesicle Accumulation and Excitatory Synapse Increase

    PubMed Central

    Treccani, Giulia; Liebenberg, Nico; Chen, Fenghua; Popoli, Maurizio; Wegener, Gregers; Nyengaard, Jens Randel

    2015-01-01

    Background: Although a clear negative influence of chronic exposure to stressful experiences has been repeatedly demonstrated, the outcome of acute stress on key brain regions has only just started to be elucidated. Although it has been proposed that acute stress may produce enhancement of brain plasticity and that antidepressants may prevent such changes, we still lack ultrastructural evidence that acute stress-induced changes in neurotransmitter physiology are coupled with structural synaptic modifications. Methods: Rats were pretreated chronically (14 days) with desipramine (10mg/kg) and then subjected to acute foot-shock stress. By means of serial section electron microscopy, the structural remodeling of medial prefrontal cortex glutamate synapses was assessed soon after acute stressor cessation and stress hormone levels were measured. Results: Foot-shock stress induced a remarkable increase in the number of docked vesicles and small excitatory synapses, partially and strongly prevented by desipramine pretreatment, respectively. Acute stress-induced corticosterone elevation was not affected by drug treatment. Conclusions: Since desipramine pretreatment prevented the stress-induced structural plasticity but not the hormone level increase, we hypothesize that the preventing action of desipramine is located on pathways downstream of this process and/or other pathways. Moreover, because enhancement of glutamate system remodeling may contribute to overexcitation dysfunctions, this aspect could represent a crucial component in the pathophysiology of stress-related disorders. PMID:25522419

  2. Lycopene treatment prevents hematological, reproductive and histopathological damage induced by acute zearalenone administration in male Swiss mice.

    PubMed

    Boeira, Silvana Peterini; Filho, Carlos Borges; Del'Fabbro, Lucian; Roman, Silvane Souza; Royes, Luiz Fernando Freire; Fighera, Michele Rechia; Jessé, Cristiano Ricardo; Oliveira, Mauro Schneider; Furian, Ana Flávia

    2014-07-01

    Zearalenone (ZEA) is a mycotoxin commonly found as a contaminant in cereals. ZEA toxicity targets mainly the reproductive system, and oxidative stress plays an etiological role in its toxic effects. Therefore, the present study aimed to investigate the effect of lycopene, a potent carotenoid antioxidant, on markers of oxidative stress in liver, kidney and testes, and on reproductive, hematological and histopathological parameters after ZEA administration. Adult Swiss albino male mice received lycopene (20mg/kg, p.o.) for ten days before a single oral administration of ZEA (40mg/kg, p.o.), and 48h thereafter tissues (liver, kidney, testes and blood) were collected for biochemical, hematological and histological analyses. Lycopene prevented ZEA-induced changes in hematological parameters (increased number of leukocytes, segmented neutrophils, sticks, eosinophils and monocytes and decreased number of red blood cells (RBC), number of lymphocytes and platelets). Moreover, lycopene prevented the reduction in the number and motility of spermatozoa and the testicular tissue damage induced by ZEA. In addition, lycopene prevented the decrease in glutathione-S-transferase activity in kidney and testes and increased glutathione-S-transferase activity per se in the liver, kidneys and testes as well as superoxide dismutase activity in the liver. In summary, lycopene was able to prevent ZEA-induced acute toxic effects in male mice, suggesting that this antioxidant carotenoid may represent a promising prophylactic strategy against ZEA toxicity.

  3. Prebiotics in healthy infants and children for prevention of acute infectious diseases: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Lohner, Szimonetta; Küllenberg, Daniela; Antes, Gerd; Decsi, Tamás; Meerpohl, Joerg J

    2014-08-01

    Prebiotics, defined as nondigestible dietary ingredients resistant to gastric acidity and fermented by the intestinal flora, are used to positively influence the composition of intestinal flora, thereby promoting health benefits. The objective of this systematic review was to assess the efficacy of prebiotics in the prevention of acute infectious diseases in children. A systematic literature search was conducted using the Ovid Medline, Scopus, Web of Science, and Cochrane Library's Central databases. Finally, five randomized controlled trials, all of them investigating infants and children 0-24 months of age, were included in the review. Pooled estimates from three studies revealed a statistically significant decrease in the number of infectious episodes requiring antibiotic therapy in the prebiotic group as compared with the placebo group (rate ratio 0.68; 95% confidence interval 0.61-0.77). Studies available indicate that prebiotics may also be effective in decreasing the rate of overall infections in infants and children 0-24 months of age. Further studies in the age group 3-18 years are required to determine whether prebiotics can be considered for the prevention of acute infectious diseases in the older pediatric population.

  4. Intravenous Immunoglobulin Prevents Murine Antibody-Mediated Acute Lung Injury at the Level of Neutrophil Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS) Production

    PubMed Central

    Semple, John W.; Kim, Michael; Hou, Jing; McVey, Mark; Lee, Young Jin; Tabuchi, Arata; Kuebler, Wolfgang M.; Chai, Zhong-Wei; Lazarus, Alan H.

    2012-01-01

    Transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI) is a leading cause of transfusion-associated mortality that can occur with any type of transfusion and is thought to be primarily due to donor antibodies activating pulmonary neutrophils in recipients. Recently, a large prospective case controlled clinical study of cardiac surgery patients demonstrated that despite implementation of male donors, a high incidence of TRALI still occurred and suggested a need for additional interventions in susceptible patient populations. To examine if intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIg) may be effective, a murine model of antibody-mediated acute lung injury that approximates human TRALI was examined. When BALB/c mice were injected with the anti-major histocompatibility complex class I antibody 34-1-2s, mild shock (reduced rectal temperature) and respiratory distress (dyspnea) were observed and pre-treatment of the mice with 2 g/kg IVIg completely prevented these symptoms. To determine IVIg's usefulness to affect severe lung damage, SCID mice, previously shown to be hypersensitive to 34-1-2s were used. SCID mice treated with 34-1-2s underwent severe shock, lung damage (increased wet/dry ratios) and 40% mortality within 2 hours. Treatment with 2 g/kg IVIg 18 hours before 34-1-2s administration completely protected the mice from all adverse events. Treatment with IVIg after symptoms began also reduced lung damage and mortality. While the prophylactic IVIg administration did not affect 34-1-2s-induced pulmonary neutrophil accumulation, bone marrow-derived neutrophils from the IVIg-treated mice displayed no spontaneous ROS production nor could they be stimulated in vitro with fMLP or 34-1-2s. These results suggest that IVIg prevents murine antibody-mediated acute lung injury at the level of neutrophil ROS production and thus, alleviating tissue damage. PMID:22363629

  5. [Probiotics for the treating acute diarrhea and preventing antibiotic-associated diarrhea in children].

    PubMed

    Pérez, Carlos

    2015-02-07

    Probiotics are helpful in the treatment of acute diarrhea. Several systematic reviews show that the use of probiotics shortens the duration of diarrhea in one day and reduces by 59% the risk of diarrhea lasting longer than 4 days. Hospital stay is 24 hours shorter in children treated with probiotics. The benefitial effect of probiotics is species-specific; Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG and Saccharomyces boulardii are the two species with proven efficacy in the treatment of acute diarrhea. The use of probiotics reduces by 50% the risk of antibiotic-associated diarrhea. No significant side effects were found in the clinical trials but rare cases of invasive infections have been reported in immunosuppressed children or those with indwelling central venous catheters.

  6. Infection prevention and control measures for acute respiratory infections in healthcare settings: an update.

    PubMed

    Seto, W H; Conly, J M; Pessoa-Silva, C L; Malik, M; Eremin, S

    2013-01-01

    Viruses account for the majority of the acute respiratory tract infections (ARIs) globally with a mortality exceeding 4 million deaths per year. The most commonly encountered viruses, in order of frequency, include influenza, respiratory syncytial virus, parainfluenza and adenovirus. Current evidence suggests that the major mode of transmission of ARls is through large droplets, but transmission through contact (including hand contamination with subsequent self-inoculation) and infectious respiratory aerosols of various sizes and at short range (coined as "opportunistic" airborne transmission) may also occur for some pathogens. Opportunistic airborne transmission may occur when conducting highrisk aerosol generating procedures and airborne precautions will be required in this setting. General infection control measures effective for all respiratory viral infections are reviewed and followed by discussion on some of the common viruses, including severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) coronavirus and the recently discovered novel coronavirus.

  7. Preventive Effect of Cichorium Intybus L. Two Extracts on Cerulein-induced Acute Pancreatitis in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Minaiyan, Mohsen; Ghannadi, Ali-Reza; Mahzouni, Parvin; Abed, Ali-Reza

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: Acute pancreatitis is an inflammatory condition of pancreas with sudden onset, high mortality rate and multiple organ failure characteristics. It has been shown that oxygen free radicals have an important role in development of pancreatitis and its complications. Antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, anti-hepatotoxicity and gastroprotective properties of Cichorium intybus L. suggest that this plant may have beneficial effects in the management of acute pancreatitis. Methods: Five intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection of cerulean (50 μg/ kg at 1 h intervals) in mice resulted in acute pancreatitis, which was characterized by edema, neutrophil infiltration, as well as increases in the serum levels of amylase and lipase in comparison to normal mice. Different doses of C. intybus root (CRE) and aerial parts hydroalcoholic extract (CAPE) orally (50, 100, 200 mg/kg) and intraperitoneally (50, 100, 200 mg/kg) were administrated 1.0 and 0.5 h respectively before pancreatitis induction on separate groups of male mice (n=6). Control groups treated with normal saline (5 ml/ kg) similarly. Results: Both extracts in greater test doses (100 mg/kg and 200 mg/kg, i.p.) were effective to decrease amylase (23-36%) and lipase (27-35%) levels. In oral route, the dose of 200 mg/ kg showed a significant decrease in levels of amylase (16%) and lipase (24%) activity while the greatest dose (200 mg/kg, i.p.) was only effective to diminish inflammatory features like edema and leukocyte infiltration in pancreatitis tissue (P<0.01). Vacuolization was not significantly reduced in extracts treated groups. Conclusions: These data suggest that C. intybus hydroalcoholic extracts were effective to protect against experimental acute pancreatitis and the efficacy was partly dependent to the dose and was more significant after parenteral administration. PMID:22708031

  8. Acute hepatitis A in Italy: incidence, risk factors and preventive measures.

    PubMed

    Tosti, M E; Spada, E; Romanò, L; Zanetti, A; Mele, A

    2008-10-01

    The incidence of, and risk factors for, acute hepatitis A (AHA) were assessed by using data collected from the Italian surveillance system of acute viral hepatitis (SEIEVA). To this end, a case-control study within a population-based surveillance for acute viral hepatitis was performed. AHA incidence has been estimated since 1991; the association with considered risk factors was analysed from 2001 to 2006 employing cases of acute hepatitis B (AHB) as controls. The incidence of AHA declined from 4 / 100 000 in 1991 to 1.4/100 000 in 2006, with a peak during 1996-1998 due to an outbreak in southern Italy. The incidence of AHA was highest among persons aged 15-24 years. The case-fatality rate was 2.9 / 10 000. Contact with individuals with AHA [adjusted OR (OR(adj)) = 3.8, 95% CI 2.7-5.5; population-attributable risk (PAR) = 7.5%], travelling to endemic areas (OR(adj) = 3.1, 95% CI = 2.6-3.8; PAR = 19.5%), ingestion of raw shellfish (OR(adj) = 1.8, 95% CI = 1.6-2.1; PAR = 26.6%), and cohabitation with day care children (OR(adj) = 1.3, 95% CI = 1.01-1.7; PAR = 2.3%) were the main important risk factors. In 2003, an outbreak, with high case-fatality rate occurred among intravenous drug users, in a central Italian town. A weak association was found for male homosexuality when acute hepatitis C cases were employed as controls (OR(adj) = 1.4 CI, 95% CI = 1.1-1.9). Hepatitis A virus infections are currently occurring more frequently in adults, in whom the disease is most severe. In conclusion, looking at the attributable risks, at present most of the AHA infections are due to shellfish consumption, travel to endemic areas and contact with patients with AHA. Vaccination of individuals at increased risk of infection, as well as persons with underling liver disease and those at increased risk of complications, combined with surveillance of shellfish retail outlets are efficient control measures.

  9. Can non-invasive positive pressure ventilation prevent endotracheal intubation in acute lung injury/acute respiratory distress syndrome? A meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Luo, Jian; Wang, Mao-yun; Zhu, Hui; Liang, Bin-miao; Liu, Dan; Peng, Xia-ying; Wang, Rong-chun; Li, Chun-tao; He, Chen-yun; Liang, Zong-an

    2014-11-01

    The role of non-invasive positive pressure ventilation (NIPPV) in acute lung injury (ALI)/acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is controversial. The aim of this study was to investigate whether NIPPV could prevent endotracheal intubation and decrease mortality rate in patients with ALI/ARDS. Randomized controlled trials (RCT) which reported endotracheal intubation and mortality rate in patients with ALI/ARDS treated by NIPPV were identified in Pubmed, Medline, Embase, Central Cochrane Controlled Trials Register, Chinese National Knowledge Infrastructure, reference lists and by manual searches. Fixed- and random-effects models were used to calculate pooled relative risks. This meta-analysis included six RCT involving 227 patients. The results showed that endotracheal intubation rate was lower in NIPPV (95% confidence interval (CI): 0.44-0.80, z = 3.44, P = 0.0006), but no significant difference was found either in intensive care unit (ICU) mortality (95% CI: 0.45-1.07, z = 1.65, P = 0.10) or in hospital mortality (95% CI: 0.17-1.58, z = 1.16, P = 0.25). Only two studies discussed the aetiology of ALI/ARDS as pulmonary or extra-pulmonary, and neither showed statistical heterogeneity (I(2)  = 0%, χ(2)  = 0.31, P = 0.58), nor a significant difference in endotracheal intubation rate (95% CI: 0.35-9.08, z = 0.69, P = 0.49). In conclusion, the early use of NIPPV can decrease the endotracheal intubation rate in patients with ALI/ARDS, but does not change the mortality of these patients.

  10. Brain death provokes very acute alteration in myocardial morphology detected by echocardiography: preventive effect of beta-blockers.

    PubMed

    Ferrera, René; Hadour, Guylaine; Tamion, Fabienne; Henry, Jean-Paul; Mulder, Paul; Richard, Vincent; Thuillez, Christian; Ovize, Michel; Derumeaux, Geneviève

    2011-03-01

    Our objective was to evaluate immediate acute changes in myocardial function during the autonomic storm of brain death (BD). Wistar rats were divided into four groups (n = 8/group): controls without any treatment, β-blocker (Esmolol®, 10 mg/kg), calcium channel blocker (Diltiazem®, 10 mg/kg), or alpha-blocker (Prazosin®, 0.3 mg/kg). Treatments were administered intravenously 5 min before BD induction. Echocardiography (ATL-5000, 8 MHz) was performed to measure left ventricular (LV) dimensions and fractional shortening at baseline, during BD induction and 5 min and 15 min after BD. In controls, BD was immediately associated with an increase in wall thickness and a decrease in LV cavity dimension. This myocardial wall hypertrophy was completely prevented by β-blockers, but not with calcium- and alpha-blockers. Extensive myocardial interstitial edema was found in all groups, except in the β-blocker group. Myocardial wall hypertrophy was also prevented during a longer follow-up of 180 min after BD in β-blocker group as opposed to controls. In conclusion, BD is associated with an immediate and severe myocardial damage related to an important interstitial edema which is prevented by β-blockers.

  11. AT1 receptor antagonism before ischemia prevents the transition of acute kidney injury to chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Romo, Roxana; Benítez, Kenia; Barrera-Chimal, Jonatan; Pérez-Villalva, Rosalba; Gómez, Arturo; Aguilar-León, Diana; Rangel-Santiago, Jesús F; Huerta, Sara; Gamba, Gerardo; Uribe, Norma; Bobadilla, Norma A

    2016-02-01

    Despite clinical recovery of patients from an episode of acute kidney injury (AKI), progression to chronic kidney disease (CKD) is possible on long-term follow-up. However, mechanisms of this are poorly understood. Here, we determine whether activation of angiotensin-II type 1 receptors during AKI triggers maladaptive mechanisms that lead to CKD. Nine months after AKI, male Wistar rats develop CKD characterized by renal dysfunction, proteinuria, renal hypertrophy, glomerulosclerosis, tubular atrophy, and tubulointerstitial fibrosis. Renal injury was associated with increased oxidative stress, inflammation, α-smooth muscle actin expression, and activation of transforming growth factor β; the latter mainly found in epithelial cells. Although administration of losartan prior to the initial ischemic insult did not prevent or reduce AKI severity, it effectively prevented eventual CKD. Three days after AKI, renal dysfunction, tubular structural injury, and elevation of urinary biomarkers were present. While the losartan group had similar early renal injury, renal perfusion was completely restored as early as day 3 postischemia. Further, there was increased vascular endothelial growth factor expression and an early activation of hypoxia-inducible factor 1 α, a transcription factor that regulates expression of many genes that help reduce renal injury. Thus, AT1 receptor antagonism prior to ischemia prevented AKI to CKD transition by improving early renal blood flow recovery, lesser inflammation, and increased hypoxia-inducible factor 1 α activity.

  12. Nrf2 activation: a potential strategy for the prevention of acute mountain sickness.

    PubMed

    Lisk, Christina; McCord, Joe; Bose, Swapan; Sullivan, Tim; Loomis, Zoe; Nozik-Grayck, Eva; Schroeder, Thies; Hamilton, Karyn; Irwin, David C

    2013-10-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) formed during acute high altitude exposure contribute to cerebral vascular leak and development of acute mountain sickness (AMS). Nuclear factor (erythroid-derived 2)-related factor 2 (Nrf2) is a transcription factor that regulates expression of greater than 90% of antioxidant genes, but prophylactic treatment with Nrf2 activators has not yet been tested as an AMS therapy. We hypothesized that prophylactic activation of the antioxidant genome with Nrf2 activators would attenuate high-altitude-induced ROS formation and cerebral vascular leak and that some drugs currently used to treat AMS symptoms have an additional trait of Nrf2 activation. Drugs commonly used to treat AMS were screened with a luciferase reporter cell system for their effectiveness to activate Nrf2, as well as being tested for their ability to decrease high altitude cerebral vascular leak in vivo. Compounds that showed favorable results for Nrf2 activation from our screen and attenuated high altitude cerebral vascular leak in vivo were further tested in brain microvascular endothelial cells (BMECs) to determine if they attenuated hypoxia-induced ROS production and monolayer permeability. Of nine drugs tested, with the exception of dexamethasone, only drugs that showed the ability to activate Nrf2 (Protandim, methazolamide, nifedipine, amlodipine, ambrisentan, and sitaxentan) decreased high-altitude-induced cerebral vascular leak in vivo. In vitro, Nrf2 activation in BMECs before 24h hypoxia exposure attenuated hypoxic-induced hydrogen peroxide production and permeability. Prophylactic Nrf2 activation is effective at reducing brain vascular leak from acute high altitude exposures. Compared to acetazolamide, methazolamide may offer better protection against AMS. Nifedipine, in addition to its known vasodilatory activities in the lung and protection against high altitude pulmonary edema, may provide protection against brain vascular leak as well.

  13. Nrf2 Activation: A potential strategy for the prevention of Acute Mountain Sickness

    PubMed Central

    Lisk, Christina; McCord, Joe; Bose, Swapan; Sullivan, Tim; Loomis, Zoe; Nozik-Grayck, Eva; Schroeder, Thies; Hamilton, Karyn; Irwin, David C.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Reactive oxygen species (ROS) formed during acute high altitude exposure contributes to cerebral vascular leak and development of acute mountain sickness (AMS). Nuclear factor (erythroid-derived 2)-related factor 2 (Nrf2) is a transcription factor that regulates expression of greater than 90% of antioxidant genes, but prophylactic treatment with Nrf2 activators has not yet been tested as an AMS therapy. We hypothesized that prophylactic activation of the antioxidant genome with Nrf2 activators would attenuate high altitude-induced ROS formation and cerebral vascular leak, and that some drugs currently used to treat AMS symptoms have an additional trait of Nrf2 activation. Methods Drugs commonly used to treat AMS were screened with a luciferase reporter cell system for their effectiveness to activate Nrf2, as well as tested for their ability to decrease high altitude cerebral vascular leak in vivo. Compounds that showed favorable results for Nrf2 activation from our screen and attenuated high altitude cerebral vascular leak in vivo were further tested in brain microvascular endothelial cells (BMEC) to determine if they attenuated hypoxia-induced ROS production and monolayer permeability. Results Of 9 drugs tested, with the exception of dexamethasone, only drugs that showed the ability to activate Nrf2 (Protandim, methazolamide, nifedipine, amlodipine, ambrisentan, and sitaxentan) decreased high altitude-induced cerebral vascular leak in vivo. In vitro, Nrf2 activation in BMEC prior to 24 h hypoxia exposure attenuated hypoxic-induced hydrogen peroxide production and permeability. Conclusions Prophylactic Nrf2 activation is effective at reducing brain vascular leak from acute high altitude exposures. Compared to acetazolamide, methazolamide may offer better protection against AMS. Nifedipine, in addition to its known vasodilatory activities in the lung and protection against high altitude pulmonary edema, may provide protection against brain vascular leak

  14. Changing Paradigms for Acute Dental Pain: Prevention Is Better Than PRN.

    PubMed

    Dionne, Raymond A; Gordon, Sharon M

    2015-11-01

    A B S T R A C T The drugs available for the management of acute orofacial pain have changed very little since the introduction of ibuprofen into practice 40 years ago. Orally effective opioids, acetaminophen, aspirin and NSAIDs remain the mainstay of analgesic therapy. Increased recognition of the societal and personal impact of opioid diversion and abuse requires re-examination of the traditional approach of prescribing an opioid-containing analgesic combination to be administered by the patient "as needed" (PRN) starting postoperatively.

  15. Theanine prevents doxorubicin-induced acute hepatotoxicity by reducing intrinsic apoptotic response.

    PubMed

    Nagai, Katsuhito; Oda, Ayano; Konishi, Hiroki

    2015-04-01

    Doxorubicin (DOX) is widely used as an antitumor agent with topoisomerase II inhibiting activity; however, its dosage and duration of administration have been strictly limited due to dose-related organ damage. The present study investigated whether theanine, an amino acid found in green tea leaves, could reduce DOX-induced acute hepatotoxicity and the apoptotic response in mice. Activities of aspartate aminotransferase (AST) and alanine aminotransferase (ALT) in serum, biomarkers of hepatic impairment, were markedly increased after the administration of 20 mg/kg DOX, whereas the degree of these elevations was significantly attenuated by 10 mg/kg theanine, which was consistent with histological hepatic images assessed by microscopic examination. The hepatic expression of Bax and Fas, representative intrinsic and extrinsic apoptotic molecules, respectively, was significantly increased by dosing with DOX. However, the elevation in the hepatic expression of Bax, but not Fas, was suppressed to control levels by theanine. The formation of cleaved caspase-3 protein in the group given DOX with theanine was significantly lower than that in the group treated with DOX alone. These results suggest that theanine can protect against acute hepatic damage induced by DOX, which is attributed to the suppression of intrinsic caspase-3-dependent apoptotic signaling.

  16. Kynurenine–3–monooxygenase inhibition prevents multiple organ failure in rodent models of acute pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Mole, Damian J; Webster, Scott P; Uings, Iain; Zheng, Xiaozhong; Binnie, Margaret; Wilson, Kris; Hutchinson, Jonathan P; Mirguet, Olivier; Walker, Ann; Beaufils, Benjamin; Ancellin, Nicolas; Trottet, Lionel; Bénéton, Véronique; Mowat, Christopher G; Wilkinson, Martin; Rowland, Paul; Haslam, Carl; McBride, Andrew; Homer, Natalie ZM; Baily, James E; Sharp, Matthew GF; Garden, O James; Hughes, Jeremy; Howie, Sarah EM; Holmes, Duncan S; Liddle, John; Iredale, John P

    2015-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis (AP) is a common and devastating inflammatory condition of the pancreas that is considered to be a paradigm of sterile inflammation leading to systemic multiple organ dysfunction syndrome (MODS) and death1,2 Acute mortality from AP-MODS exceeds 20%3 and for those who survive the initial episode, their lifespan is typically shorter than the general population4. There are no specific therapies available that protect individuals against AP-MODS. Here, we show that kynurenine-3-monooxygenase (KMO), a key enzyme of tryptophan metabolism5, is central to the pathogenesis of AP-MODS. We created a mouse strain deficient for Kmo with a robust biochemical phenotype that protected against extrapancreatic tissue injury to lung, kidney and liver in experimental AP-MODS. A medicinal chemistry strategy based on modifications of the kynurenine substrate led to the discovery of GSK180 as a potent and specific inhibitor of KMO. The binding mode of the inhibitor in the active site was confirmed by X-ray co-crystallography at 3.2 Å resolution. Treatment with GSK180 resulted in rapid changes in levels of kynurenine pathway metabolites in vivo and afforded therapeutic protection against AP-MODS in a rat model of AP. Our findings establish KMO inhibition as a novel therapeutic strategy in the treatment of AP-MODS and open up a new area for drug discovery in critical illness. PMID:26752518

  17. Melatonin prevents acute kidney injury in severely burned rats via the activation of SIRT1

    PubMed Central

    Bai, Xiao-Zhi; He, Ting; Gao, Jian-Xin; Liu, Yang; Liu, Jia-Qi; Han, Shi-Chao; Li, Yan; Shi, Ji-Hong; Han, Jun-Tao; Tao, Ke; Xie, Song-Tao; Wang, Hong-Tao; Hu, Da-Hai

    2016-01-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is a common complication after severe burns. Melatonin has been reported to protect against multiple organ injuries by increasing the expression of SIRT1, a silent information regulator that regulates stress responses, inflammation, cellular senescence and apoptosis. This study aimed to investigate the protective effects of melatonin on renal tissues of burned rats and the role of SIRT1 involving the effects. Rat severely burned model was established, with or without the administration of melatonin and SIRT1 inhibitor. The renal function and histological manifestations were determined to evaluate the severity of kidney injury. The levels of acetylated-p53 (Ac-p53), acetylated-p65 (Ac-p65), NF-κB, acetylated-forkhead box O1 (Ac-FoxO1), Bcl-2 and Bax were analyzed to study the underlying mechanisms. Our results suggested that severe burns could induce acute kidney injury, which could be partially reversed by melatonin. Melatonin attenuated oxidative stress, inflammation and apoptosis accompanied by the increased expression of SIRT1. The protective effects of melatonin were abrogated by the inhibition of SIRT1. In conclusion, we demonstrate that melatonin improves severe burn-induced AKI via the activation of SIRT1 signaling. PMID:27599451

  18. O-Methylated flavonol isorhamnetin prevents acute inflammation through blocking of NF-κB activation.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ji Hye; Kim, Sang Chan; Shin, Bo Yeon; Jin, So Hee; Jo, Mi Jeong; Jegal, Kyung Hwan; Kim, Young Woo; Lee, Jong Rok; Ku, Sae Kwang; Cho, Il Je; Ki, Sung Hwan

    2013-09-01

    Here, we isolated isorhamnetin, a natural 3'-O-methylated flavonoid, from water dropwort (Oenanthe javanica, Umbelliferae) and investigated its ability to protect against acute inflammation in vivo and in vitro. To induce paw swelling, the hind paw of each rat was injected with a carrageenan 1h after vehicle or isorhamnetin treatment. In vitro effect and mechanism studies were performed in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-activated macrophages. Administration of isorhamnetin markedly inhibited the swelling volume and the thickness of hind paws. Moreover, isorhamnetin significantly reduced inflammatory cell infiltration and pro-inflammatory gene expression in rats. Isorhamnetin pretreatment inhibited inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) expression and NO release in LPS-stimulated cells. Activation of nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) and activating protein-1 (AP-1) is the key step in the iNOS gene induction. Isorhamnetin specifically inhibited NF-κB luciferase activity, but not AP-1. Pretreatment with isorhamnetin suppressed NF-κB nuclear translocation in accordance with decreased phosphorylation and degradation of inhibitory-κB. Consistently, TNF-α, IL-1β and IL-6 expression, representative NF-κB target genes, were almost completely prohibited by isorhamnetin. Furthermore, isorhamnetin inhibited LPS-induced JNK and AKT/IKKα/β phosphorylation. Our results suggest that isorhamnetin inhibited JNK, and AKT/IKKα/β activation, leading to NF-κB inactivation, which might contribute to the inhibition of the acute inflammatory response.

  19. Prevention

    MedlinePlus

    ... Ban For Clinicians Clinical Recognition Specimen Collection Treatment Smallpox Vaccine Guidance Infection Control: Hospital Infection Control: Home ... Mouth Infection) Poxvirus and Rabies Branch Travelers’ Health: Smallpox & Other Orthopoxvirus-Associated Infections Poxvirus Prevention Recommend on ...

  20. One compound of saponins from Disocorea zingiberensis protected against experimental acute pancreatitis by preventing mitochondria-mediated necrosis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Rui; Wen, Li; Shen, Yan; Shi, Na; Xing, Zhihua; Xia, Qing; Niu, Hai; Huang, Wen

    2016-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis (AP) is a painful inflammatory disorder of the exocrine pancreas, ranking as the most common gastrointestinal reasons for hospitalization with no specific therapy currently. Diosgenyl saponins extracted from natural products and diosgenin or its derivatives have been shown to exert anti-inflammatory effects in various diseases. However, the therapeutic effects of diosgenyl saponins from Dioscorea zingiberensis C. H. Wright in AP have not yet been determined. Five compounds were extracted and screened for taurocholate-induced necrosis in mouse pancreatic acinar cells. Particularly, 26-O-β-d-glucopyranosyl-3β, 22α, 26-trihydroxy-25(R)-furosta-5-en-3-O-[α-L-rhamnopyranosyl-(1 → 4)]-β-d-glucopyranoside (compound 1) exhibited the best protective effects with no toxicity observed. Next, we showed compound 1 concentration-dependently inhibited necrotic cell death pathway activation and 2.5 mM compound 1 also prevented the loss of mitochondrial membrane potential, adenosine triphosphate production, and reactive oxygen species generation in mouse pancreatic acinar cells. Finally, we showed compound 1 protected against three clinically representative murine models of AP and significantly improved pancreatitis-associated acute lung injury. These data provide in vitro and in vivo evidence that one compound of diosgenyl saponins can be potential treatment for AP. This study suggests natural saponins may serve as fruitful sources for exploring/identifying potential therapies for inflammatory diseases. PMID:27779235

  1. The design and rationale for the Acute Medically Ill Venous Thromboembolism Prevention with Extended Duration Betrixaban (APEX) study.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Alexander T; Harrington, Robert; Goldhaber, Samuel Z; Hull, Russell; Gibson, C Michael; Hernandez, Adrian F; Kitt, Michael M; Lorenz, Todd J

    2014-03-01

    Randomized clinical trials have identified a population of acute medically ill patients who remain at risk for venous thromboembolism (VTE) beyond the standard duration of therapy and hospital discharge. The aim of the APEX study is to determine whether extended administration of oral betrixaban (35-42 days) is superior to a standard short course of prophylaxis with subcutaneous enoxaparin (10 ± 4 days followed by placebo) in patients with known risk factors for post-discharge VTE. Patients initially are randomized to receive either betrixaban or enoxaparin (and matching placebo) in a double dummy design. Following a standard duration period of enoxaparin treatment (with placebo tablets) or betrixaban (with placebo injections), patients receive only betrixaban (or alternative matching placebo). Patients are considered for enrollment if they are older than 40 years, have a specified medical illness, and restricted mobility. They must also meet the APEX criteria for increased VTE risk (aged ≥75 years, baseline D-Dimer ≥2× upper the limit of "normal", or 2 additional ancillary risk factors for VTE). The primary efficacy end point is the composite of asymptomatic proximal deep venous thrombosis, symptomatic deep venous thrombosis, non-fatal (pulmonary embolus) pulmonary embolism, or VTE-related death through day 35. The primary safety outcome is the occurrence of major bleeding. We hypothesize that extended duration betrixaban VTE prophylaxis will be safe and more effective than standard short duration enoxaparin in preventing VTE in acute medically ill patients with known risk factors for post hospital discharge VTE.

  2. New program set to intervene to prevent readmissions, repeat ED visits due to acute exacerbations of asthma.

    PubMed

    2013-12-01

    Faculty at Indiana University School of Medicine are set to launch a community paramedicine program aimed at preventing repeat hospital and ED visits for acute exacerbations of asthma in children. Under the program, all children who are treated in the hospital or ED for asthma will receive home visits by specially trained paramedics within a few days of discharge. Paramedics will conduct a comprehensive assessment and make referrals as necessary for followup care. Nearly 30% of children who have been hospitalized for asthma require readmission to the hospital not long after discharge, and as many as 25% of children who have been treated in the ED for asthma will return to the ED within 30 days for another asthma-related visit. The one-time home visits will be comprehensive, enabling EMS providers to initiate stop-gap measures so that if a child is starting to get sick, paramedics can make sure the appropriate medicines are started and that acute care needs are met. Developers will monitor 30-day, 90-day, and one-year readmission metrics among patients who have received home visits.They hope that resulting cost-savings will sustain the program beyond the initial period, which is being funded through a grant from the Department of Health and Human Services.

  3. The efficacy of oral glutamine in prevention of acute radiotherapy-induced esophagitis in patients with lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Tutanc, Oznur Donmez; Aydogan, Akin; Sunbul, Ahmet Taner; Zincircioglu, Seyit Burhanedtin; Alpagat, Gulistan; Erden, Ersin Sukru

    2013-01-01

    Aim of the study This study explores the efficacy of oral glutamine in the prevention of acute radiotherapy-induced esophagitis in patients with lung cancer who are treated with thoracic radiotherapy. Material and methods This study was planned as a retrospective randomized experimental study. Forty-six patients with lung cancer, who were treated and kept under control between January 2008 and January 2010, were included in the study by the Department of Radiation Oncology, Faculty of Medicine, Dicle University. The patients were divided into two groups. The first group (n = 21) was given prophylactic oral powder glutamine (daily 30 g), while the second group (n = 25) was not given oral glutamine. Results There were 21 patients in Group 1 (45.7%) and 25 patients in Group 2 (54.3%). No significant statistical difference was observed between the two groups in terms of age, gender, stage, histopathological type, treatment choice, received radiation doses, esophagus length in RT field, or location of the tumor (p > 0.05). A significant statistical difference was observed between the glutamine-supplemented group (first group) and the glutamine-free group (second group) according to the grade of esophagitis (p < 0.0001). Conclusions In our retrospective randomized experimental study, we determined that the severity of acute radiotherapy-induced esophagitis might be decreased with oral glutamine in patients with lung cancer who were treated with thoracic radiotherapy. PMID:24592140

  4. Protective mechanism of sodium molybdate against the acute toxicity of cadmium in rats. II. Prevention of cytoplasmic acidification.

    PubMed

    Koizumi, T; Yokota, T; Fukuchi, M; Tatsumoto, H; Yamane, Y

    1991-10-01

    In order to clarify the protective mechanism of sodium molybdate against the acute toxicity of cadmium chloride in rat, the effect of in vivo sodium molybdate pretreatment on the cytotoxic action of cadmium in isolated hepatocytes was studied. The cytosolic pH of hepatocytes isolated from untreated rats immediately decreased with incubation in either neutral Hank's balanced salt solution (HBS), pH 7.4, containing 5 microM cadmium chloride minimum or acidic HBS (pH 7.1, 6.8, 6.5, and 6.2). The presence of 5 microM cadmium in HBS adjusted to pH 7.1 aggravated cytosolic acidification induced by the acidic medium alone. Cell viability of hepatocytes incubated in HBS at pH 6.2 was significantly reduced as compared to that of control cells in HBS at pH 7.4, but the presence of cadmium in the acidic HBS had no aggravating action against such a toxic action of the acidic medium although cellular uptake of the metal in the medium increased, as compared to that in HBS at pH 7.4. Molybdenum pretreatment alleviated cytoplasmic acidification induced by the treatment with HBS at pH 7.4 or 7.1 containing cadmium or by extracellular acid load without cadmium. This pretreatment also prevented the loss of cell viability induced by the treatment with HBS at pH 6.2 but could not attenuate that when cadmium was present in the medium. These facts suggest that molybdenum pretreatment alleviated the acute toxicity of cadmium in rat by preventing cytoplasmic acidification caused by the harmful metal.

  5. Effectiveness of a propolis and zinc solution in preventing acute otitis media in children with a history of recurrent acute otitis media.

    PubMed

    Marchisio, P; Esposito, S; Bianchini, S; Desantis, C; Galeone, C; Nazzari, E; Pignataro, L; Principi, N

    2010-01-01

    Recurrent acute otitis media (rAOM) is frequently encountered in infants and children and the lack of any definitive treatment has led parents and physicians to try complementary and alternative therapies. We evaluated the efficacy of a propolis and zinc suspension in preventing AOM in 122 children aged 1-5 years with a documented history of rAOM, who were prospectively, blindly, randomized 1:1 to receive the suspension plus elimination of environmental risk factors or elimination of environmental risk factors only. AOM- and respiratory-related morbidity were assessed at study entry and every four weeks. In the 3-month treatment period AOM was diagnosed in 31 (50.8%) children given the propolis and zinc suspension and in 43 (70.5%) controls (p=0.04). The mean number of episodes of AOM per child/month was 0.23+/-0.26 in the propolis and zinc group and 0.34+/-0.29 in controls (reduction 32.0%, p=0.03). The administration of a propolis and zinc suspension to children with a history of rAOM can significantly reduce the risk of new AOM episodes and AOM-related antibiotic courses, with no problem of safety or tolerability, and with a very good degree of parental satisfaction. No effect can be expected on respiratory infections other than AOM.

  6. Blood soluble drag-reducing polymers prevent lethality from hemorrhagic shock in acute animal experiments.

    PubMed

    Kameneva, Marina V; Wu, Zhongjun J; Uraysh, Arkady; Repko, Brandon; Litwak, Kenneth N; Billiar, Timothy R; Fink, Mitchell P; Simmons, Richard L; Griffith, Bartley P; Borovetz, Harvey S

    2004-01-01

    Over the past several decades, blood-soluble drag reducing polymers (DRPs) have been shown to significantly enhance hemodynamics in various animal models when added to blood at nanomolar concentrations. In the present study, the effects of the DRPs on blood circulation were tested in anesthetized rats exposed to acute hemorrhagic shock. The animals were acutely resuscitated either with a 2.5% dextran solution (Control) or using the same solution containing 0.0005% or 5 parts per million (ppm) concentration of one of two blood soluble DRPs: high molecular weight (MW=3500 kDa) polyethylene glycol (PEG-3500) or a DRP extracted from Aloe vera (AVP). An additional group of animals was resuscitated with 0.0075% (75 ppm) polyethylene glycol of molecular weight of 200 kDa (PEG-200), which possesses no drag-reducing ability. All of the animals were observed for two hours following the initiation of fluid resuscitation or until they expired. We found that infusion of the DRP solutions significantly improved tissue perfusion, tissue oxygenation, and two-hour survival rate, the latter from 19% (Control) and 14% (PEG-200) to 100% (AVP) and 100% (PEG-3500). Furthermore, the Control and PEG-200 animals that survived required three times more fluid to maintain their blood pressure than the AVP and PEG-3500 animals. Several hypotheses regarding the mechanisms underlying these observed beneficial hemodynamic effects of DRPs are discussed. Our findings suggest that the drag-reducing polymers warrant further investigation as a potential clinical treatment for hemorrhagic shock and possibly other microcirculatory disorders.

  7. Preventive effect of the microalga Chlamydomonas debaryana on the acute phase of experimental colitis in rats.

    PubMed

    Avila-Román, Javier; Talero, Elena; Alcaide, Antonio; Reyes, Carolina de Los; Zubía, Eva; García-Mauriño, Sofía; Motilva, Virginia

    2014-10-14

    Inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) are characterised by chronic uncontrolled inflammation of intestinal mucosa. Diet and nutritional factors have emerged as possible interventions for IBD. Microalgae are rich sources of n-3 PUFA and derived oxylipins. Oxylipins are lipid mediators involved in the resolution of many inflammatory disorders. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of the oxylipin-containing biomass of the microalga Chlamydomonas debaryana and its major oxylipin constituent, (9Z,11E,13S,15Z)-13-hydroxyoctadeca-9,11,15-trienoic acid ((13S)-HOTE), on acute 2,4,6-trinitrobenzenesulfonic acid (TNBS)-induced colitis in rats. Lyophilised microalgal biomass and (13S)-HOTE were administered by oral route 48, 24 and 1 h before the induction of colitis and 24 h later, and the rats were killed after 48 h. The treatment with the lyophilised microalga and (13S)-HOTE improved body-weight loss and colon shortening, as well as attenuated the extent of colonic damage and increased mucus production. Cellular neutrophil infiltration, with the subsequent increase in myeloperoxidase levels induced by TNBS, were also reduced after the administration of the lyophilised microalga or (13S)-HOTE. The anti-inflammatory effects of these treatments were confirmed by the inhibition of colonic TNF-α production. Moreover, lyophilised microalga or (13S)-HOTE down-regulated cyclo-oxygenase-2 and inducible nitric oxide synthase expression. The present study was the first to show the prophylactic effects of a lyophilised biomass sample of the microalga C. debaryana and the oxylipin (13S)-HOTE on TNBS-induced acute colitis in rats. Our findings suggest that the microalga C. debaryana or derived oxylipins could be used as nutraceuticals in the treatment of the active phase of IBD.

  8. The Prevention and Control of Epidemics of Acute Undifferentiated Diarrhea of Beef Calves in Western Canada

    PubMed Central

    Radostits, O. M.; Acres, S. D.

    1980-01-01

    It is frequently evident that outbreaks of diarrhea occur in spite of apparent “good management” and “good calving conditions”. This observation underlies the fact that we still do not understand many of the epidemiological factors which contribute to calf diarrhea outbreaks. For example, we still lack biological criteria by which to judge the degree of crowding and the degree of stress. Nevertheless, application of the principles described above will prevent or decrease the severity of many annual epidemics. To be successful, a program of prevention and control should be discussed with producers long before the calving season, preferably during the preceding summer or fall. Implementation of a complete program may take several calving seasons and producers should be made aware that prevention by improved management is an on-going, evolutionary process. More and improved vaccines are becoming available; however, as is the case with most biologicals, their impact cannot be determined until after they have been used for several years. They should be recognized as only one of several managent tools at the disposal of the veterinarian and livestock producer. PMID:7438007

  9. Evidence based prevention of acute injuries during physical exercise in a WHO safe community

    PubMed Central

    Timpka, T; Lindqvist, K

    2001-01-01

    Objective—To evaluate a community based programme for evidence based prevention of injuries during physical exercise. Design—Quasi-experimental evaluation using an intervention population and a non-random control population. Participants—Study municipality (population 41 000) and control municipality (population 26 000) in Sweden. Main outcome measures—Morbidity rate for sports related injuries treated in the health care system; severity classification according to the abbreviated injury scale (AIS). Results—The total morbidity rate for sports related injuries in the study area decreased by 14% from 21 to 18 injuries per 1000 population years (odds ratio 0.87; 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.79 to 0.96). No tendency towards a decrease was observed in people over 40. The rate of moderately severe injury (AIS 2) decreased to almost half (odds ratio 0.58; 95% CI 0.50 to 0.68), whereas the rate of minor injuries (AIS 1) increased (odds ratio 1.22; 95% CI 1.06 to 1.40). The risk of severe injuries (AIS 3–6) remained constant. The rate of total sports injury in the control area did not change (odds ratio 0.93; 95% CI 0.81 to 1.07), and the trends in the study and control areas were not statistically significantly different. Conclusion—An evidence based prevention programme based on local safety rules and educational programmes can reduce the burden of injuries related to physical exercise in a community. Future studies need to look at adjusting the programme to benefit all age groups. Key Words: injuries; prevention; evaluation; community; intervention; safety promotion PMID:11157457

  10. Prevention of Depression in At-Risk Adolescents: Predictors and Moderators of Acute Effects

    PubMed Central

    Weersing, V. Robin; Shamseddeen, Wael; Garber, Judy; Hollon, Steven D.; Clarke, Gregory N.; Beardslee, William R.; Gladstone, Tracy R.; Lynch, Frances L.; Porta, Giovanna; Iyengar, Satish; Brent, David A.

    2016-01-01

    Objective To assess predictors and moderators of a cognitive-behavioral prevention (CBP) program for adolescent offspring of parents with depression. Method This four-site randomized trial evaluated CBP compared to usual community care (UC) in 310 adolescents with familial (parental depression) and individual (youth history of depression or current subsyndromal symptoms) risk for depression. As reported by Garber et al., a significant prevention effect favored CBP through 9 months; however, outcomes of CBP and UC did not significantly differ when parents were depressed at baseline. The current paper expanded on these analyses and examined a range of demographic, clinical, and contextual characteristics of families as predictors and moderators and used recursive partitioning to construct a classification tree to organize clinical response subgroups. Results Depression onset was predicted by lower functioning (HR=0.95, 95% CI: 0.92-0.98) and higher hopelessness (hazard ratio [HR]=1.06, 95% CI: 1.01-1.11) in adolescents. The superior effect of CBP was diminished when parents were currently depressed at baseline (HR=6.38, 95% CI: 2.38-17.1) or had a history of hypomania (HR=67.5, 95% CI: 10.9-417.1), or when adolescents reported higher depressive symptoms (HR=1.04, 95% CI: 1.00-1.08), higher anxiety (HR=1.05, 95% CI: 1.01-1.08), higher hopelessness (HR=1.10, 95% CI: 1.01-1.20), or lower functioning (HR=0.94, 95% CI: 0.89-1.00) at baseline. Onset rates varied significantly by clinical response cluster (0% to 57%). Conclusion Depression in adolescents can be prevented, but programs may produce superior effects when timed at moments of relative wellness in high-risk families. Future programs may be enhanced by targeting modifiable negative clinical indicators of response. PMID:26903255

  11. Bacterial lysate in the prevention of acute exacerbation of COPD and in respiratory recurrent infections

    PubMed Central

    Braido, F; Tarantini, F; Ghiglione, V; Melioli, G; Canonica, G W

    2007-01-01

    Respiratory tract infections (RTIs) represent a serious problem because they are one of the most common cause of human death by infection. The search for the treatment of those diseases has therefore a great importance. In this study we provide an overview of the currently available treatments for RTIs with particular attention to chronic obstructive pulmonary diseases exacerbations and recurrent respiratory infections therapy and a description of bacterial lysate action, in particular making reference to the medical literature dealing with its clinical efficacy. Those studies are based on a very large number of clinical trials aimed to evaluate the effects of this drug in maintaining the immune system in a state of alert, and in increasing the defences against microbial infections. From this analysis it comes out that bacterial lysates have a protective effect, which induce a significant reduction of the symptoms related to respiratory infections. Those results could be very interesting also from an economic point of view, because they envisage a reduction in the number of acute exacerbations and a shorter duration of hospitalization. The use of bacterial lysate could therefore represent an important means to achieve an extension of life duration in patients affected by respiratory diseases. PMID:18229572

  12. Maintenance therapy with unprocessed bran in the prevention of acute anal fissure recurrence.

    PubMed Central

    Jensen, S L

    1987-01-01

    The effect of unprocessed bran in a dose of 5 g three times daily and a dose of 2.5 g three times daily for one year on the recurrence rate of anal fissures was studied in a double-blind, placebo-controlled trial in 90 patients with recently healed acute posterior anal fissures. Fifteen patients (16.6%) were withdrawn before the code was broken due to failure to follow the trial protocol for various reasons. Significantly fewer recurrences occurred in patients receiving bran 5 g three times daily (recurrence rate 16%, 95% confidence limits, 4.54 to 36.08) when compared with patients receiving bran 2.5 g three times daily (60%; 38.67 to 78.87) (P less than 0.01) and with patients receiving placebo three times daily (68%; 46.50 to 85.05) (P less than 0.01). No significant difference in recurrences was found between patients on bran 2.5 g and those on placebo. PMID:3039130

  13. Peripheral blood monocyte-derived chemokine blockade prevents murine transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI).

    PubMed

    McKenzie, Christopher G J; Kim, Michael; Singh, Tarandeep K; Milev, Youli; Freedman, John; Semple, John W

    2014-05-29

    Transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI) is the leading cause of transfusion-related mortality and can occur with any type of transfusion. TRALI is thought to be primarily mediated by donor antibodies activating recipient neutrophils resulting in pulmonary endothelial damage. Nonetheless, details regarding the interactions between donor antibodies and recipient factors are unknown. A murine antibody-mediated TRALI model was used to elucidate the roles of the F(ab')2 and Fc regions of a TRALI-inducing immunoglobulin G anti-major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I antibody (34.1.2s). Compared with intact antibody, F(ab')2 fragments significantly increased serum levels of the neutrophil chemoattractant macrophage inflammatory protein 2 (MIP-2); however, pulmonary neutrophil levels were only moderately increased, and no pulmonary edema or mortality occurred. Fc fragments did not modulate any of these parameters. TRALI induction by intact antibody was completely abrogated by in vivo peripheral blood monocyte depletion by gadolinium chloride (GdCl3) or chemokine blockade with a MIP-2 receptor antagonist but was restored upon repletion with purified monocytes. The results suggest a two-step process for antibody-mediated TRALI induction: the first step involves antibody binding its cognate antigen on blood monocytes, which generates MIP-2 chemokine production that is correlated with pulmonary neutrophil recruitment; the second step occurs when antibody-coated monocytes increase Fc-dependent lung damage.

  14. Glycyrrhizic Acid Prevents Sepsis-Induced Acute Lung Injury and Mortality in Rats.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Hongyu; Zhao, Min; Wang, Yu; Li, Fengchun; Zhang, Zhigang

    2016-02-01

    Glycyrrhizic acid (GA), an active ingredient in licorice, has multiple pharmacological activities. However, the effects of GA on sepsis-induced acute lung injury (ALI) have not been determined. Tthe aim of this study was to investigate the molecular mechanism involved in the effects of GA against sepsis-induced ALI in rats. We found that GA alleviated sepsis-induced ALI through improvements in various pathological changes, as well as decreases in the lung wet/dry weight ratio and total protein content in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid, and a significant increase in the survival rate of treated rats. Additionally, GA markedly inhibited sepsis-induced pulmonary inflammatory responses. Moreover, we found that treatment with GA inhibited oxidative stress damage and apoptosis in lung tissue induced by ALI. Finally, GA treatment significantly inhibited NF-κ B, JNK and P38 MAPK activation. Our data indicate that GA has a protective effect against sepsis-induced ALI by inhibiting the inflammatory response, damage from oxidative stress, and apoptosis via inactivation of NF-κB and MAPK signaling pathways, providing a molecular basis for a new medical treatment for sepsis-induced ALI.

  15. Travelers' Health: Sunburn

    MedlinePlus

    ... Sunscreens should be applied to the skin before insect repellents. (Note: DEET-containing insect repellents may decrease the SPF of sunscreens by ... skin.) Avoid products that contain both sunscreens and insect repellents, because sunscreen may need to be reapplied ...

  16. Sunburn and Sunscreens.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henriksen, Peter N.; Payerle, Paul

    Sunlight (solar radiation) provides many beneficial contributions to mankind, including warmth and energy, vision and photoresponses, photosynthesis, and vitamin D synthesis. Along with these positive benefits attributed to solar radiation, there are also adverse effects. A particular adverse effect of current interest and concern which is…

  17. MDM2 prevents spontaneous tubular epithelial cell death and acute kidney injury

    PubMed Central

    Thomasova, Dana; Ebrahim, Martrez; Fleckinger, Kristina; Li, Moying; Molnar, Jakob; Popper, Bastian; Liapis, Helen; Kotb, Ahmed M; Siegerist, Florian; Endlich, Nicole; Anders, Hans-Joachim

    2016-01-01

    Murine double minute-2 (MDM2) is an E3-ubiquitin ligase and the main negative regulator of tumor suppressor gene p53. MDM2 has also a non-redundant function as a modulator of NF-kB signaling. As such it promotes proliferation and inflammation. MDM2 is highly expressed in the unchallenged tubular epithelial cells and we hypothesized that MDM2 is necessary for their survival and homeostasis. MDM2 knockdown by siRNA or by genetic depletion resulted in demise of tubular cells in vitro. This phenotype was completely rescued by concomitant knockdown of p53, thus suggesting p53 dependency. In vivo experiments in the zebrafish model demonstrated that the tubulus cells of the larvae undergo cell death after the knockdown of mdm2. Doxycycline-induced deletion of MDM2 in tubular cell-specific MDM2-knockout mice Pax8rtTa-cre; MDM2f/f caused acute kidney injury with increased plasma creatinine and blood urea nitrogen and sharp decline of glomerular filtration rate. Histological analysis showed massive swelling of renal tubular cells and later their loss and extensive tubular dilation, markedly in proximal tubules. Ultrastructural changes of tubular epithelial cells included swelling of the cytoplasm and mitochondria with the loss of cristae and their transformation in the vacuoles. The pathological phenotype of the tubular cell-specific MDM2-knockout mouse model was completely rescued by co-deletion of p53. Tubular epithelium compensates only partially for the cell loss caused by MDM2 depletion by proliferation of surviving tubular cells, with incomplete MDM2 deletion, but rather mesenchymal healing occurs. We conclude that MDM2 is a non-redundant survival factor for proximal tubular cells by protecting them from spontaneous p53 overexpression-related cell death. PMID:27882940

  18. Acute decompensated heart failure (ADHF): A comprehensive contemporary review on preventing early readmissions and postdischarge death.

    PubMed

    Rocha, Bruno M L; Menezes Falcão, Luiz

    2016-11-15

    Heart failure (HF) is an increasingly prevalent syndrome and a leading cause of both first hospitalization and readmissions. Strikingly, up to 25% of the patients are readmitted within 30 to 60-days, accounting for HF as the primary cause for readmission in the adult population. Given its poor prognosis, one could describe it as a "malignant condition". Acute decompensation is intrinsically related to increased right heart tele-diastolic pressures and often related to congestive symptoms. In-hospital strategies to adequately compensate and timely discharge patients are limited. Conversely, the fragile early postdischarge phase is a vulnerable period when one could potentially intervene cost-effectively to improve survival and to reduce morbidity. Promising transitional hospital-to-home programs may have a broader role in the near future, namely for selected higher risk patients. However, identifying patients at risk for hospital readmission has been challenging. Novel approaches, such as ferric carboxymaltose and valsartan/sacubitril, and reemerging drugs, particularly digoxin, may reduce hospitalizations. Despite this, optimizing the use of "older" therapies is still warranted. Right heart pressures monitoring may provide novel insights into promptly outpatient management. Unfortunately, randomized trials in the specific ADHF population are scarce. A novel paradigmatic approach is needed in order to suitably improve the currently poor prognosis of ADHF. Both improving survival and reducing hospitalizations are, therefore, primordial therapy goals. Lastly, no single drug has consistently proved to improve survival in HF with preserved ejection fraction (HFpEF); yet, some approaches may efficiently reduce hospitalizations. Awareness on HFpEF management beyond the failing heart is imperative.

  19. Acute alcohol exposure during mouse gastrulation alters lipid metabolism in placental and heart development: Folate prevention

    PubMed Central

    Han, Mingda

    2016-01-01

    Background Embryonic acute exposure to ethanol (EtOH), lithium, and homocysteine (HCy) induces cardiac defects at the time of exposure; folic acid (FA) supplementation protects normal cardiogenesis (Han et al., 2009, 2012; Serrano et al., 2010). Our hypothesis is that EtOH exposure and FA protection relate to lipid and FA metabolism during mouse cardiogenesis and placentation. Methods On the morning of conception, pregnant C57BL/6J mice were placed on either of two FA‐containing diets: a 3.3 mg health maintenance diet or a high FA diet of 10.5 mg/kg. Mice were injected a binge level of EtOH, HCy, or saline on embryonic day (E) 6.75, targeting gastrulation. On E15.5, cardiac and umbilical blood flow were examined by ultrasound. Embryonic cardiac tissues were processed for gene expression of lipid and FA metabolism; the placenta and heart tissues for neutral lipid droplets, or for medium chain acyl‐dehydrogenase (MCAD) protein. Results EtOH exposure altered lipid‐related gene expression on E7.5 in comparison to control or FA‐supplemented groups and remained altered on E15.5 similarly to changes with HCy, signifying FA deficiency. In comparison to control tissues, the lipid‐related acyl CoA dehydrogenase medium length chain gene and its protein MCAD were altered with EtOH exposure, as were neutral lipid droplet localization in the heart and placenta. Conclusion EtOH altered gene expression associated with lipid and folate metabolism, as well as neutral lipids, in the E15.5 abnormally functioning heart and placenta. In comparison to controls, the high FA diet protected the embryo and placenta from these effects allowing normal development. Birth Defects Research (Part A) 106:749–760, 2016. © 2016 The Authors Birth Defects Research Part A: Clinical and Molecular Teratology Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27296863

  20. N-acetylcysteine versus Dopamine to Prevent Acute Kidney Injury after Cardiac Surgery in Patients with Preexisting Moderate Renal Insufficiency

    PubMed Central

    Savluk, Omer Faruk; Guzelmeric, Fusun; Yavuz, Yasemin; Cevirme, Deniz; Gurcu, Emre; Ogus, Halide; Orki, Tulay; Kocak, Tuncer

    2017-01-01

    Objective Acute kidney injury after cardiac surgery is associated with mortality and morbidity. Therefore, strategies to prevent acute kidney injury are very important. The aim of this placebo-controlled randomized double-blind study was to compare the prophylactic efficacy of N-Acetylcysteine and dopamine administration in patients with pre-existing moderate renal insufficiency who were undergoing cardiopulmonary bypass. Methods This study included 135 patients with pre-existing moderate renal insufficiency who were scheduled for coronary artery bypass grafting surgery. Serum creatinine and GFR were recorded preoperatively and on the first and second postoperative days. Results On the first and second postoperative days, the drugs used showed statistically significant differences among the creatinine groups (P<0.001). According to Tukey’s HSD, on the first and second PO, the creatinine of Group N, D and P were significantly different (P<0.001). On the first and second PO, the used drugs showed statistically significant differences among the effects of eGFR (P<0.001). According to Tukey’s HSD on the first postoperative day, the average eGFR score of Group N compared to D and P were significantly difference (P<0.001). On the second postoperative day, the eGFR of Group N and D showed no difference (P=0.37), but P showed a difference (P<0.001). Conclusion We found that the prophylactic use of intravenous N-Acetylcysteine had a protective effect on renal function, whereas the application of renal dose dopamine did not have a protective effect in patients with pre-existing moderate renal failure.

  1. Perioperative Antibiotics to Prevent Acute Endophthalmitis after Ophthalmic Surgery: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Jinzhu; Wang, Xiaofang; Chen, Xiaohong; Song, Qiuyue; Liu, Wen; Lu, Laichun

    2016-01-01

    isolation rates (RR = 0.57, 95% CI (0.44, 0.74), p<0.0001). Conclusions This meta-analysis concluded intracameral antibiotics are effective at preventing endophthalmitis in ocular surgery. A randomized controlled trial confirms the efficacy of cefuroxime but recent large cohort studies support the efficacy of vancomycin/moxifloxacin intracamerally. Intracameral antibitoics are superior to subconjunctival injections but that irrigation antibitoic data are not of enough quality to make a comparison. Different results were found in two clinical outcomes between the use or lack of use of topical antibiotic therapy, we did not find sufficient evidence to conclude that its use prevents endophthalmitis. PMID:27824933

  2. An acute post-sexual assault intervention to prevent drug abuse: updated findings.

    PubMed

    Resnick, Heidi S; Acierno, Ron; Amstadter, Ananda B; Self-Brown, Shannon; Kilpatrick, Dean G

    2007-10-01

    Sexual assault and rape routinely produce extreme distress and negative psychological reactions in victims. Further, past research suggests that victims are at increased risk of developing substance use or abuse post-rape. The post-rape forensic medical exam may itself exacerbate peritraumatic distress because it includes cues that may serve as reminders of the assault, thereby potentiating post-assault negative sequelae. To address these problems, a two-part video intervention was developed to take advantage of the existing sexual assault forensic exam infrastructure, and to specifically (a) minimize anxiety/discomfort during forensic examinations, thereby reducing risk of future emotional problems, and (b) prevent increased substance use and abuse following sexual assault. Updated findings with a sample of 268 sexual assault victims participating in the forensic medical exam and completing one or more follow-up assessments at: (1)<3 months post-assault; (2) 3 to 6 months post-assault; or (3) 6 months or longer post-assault indicated that the video was associated with significantly lower frequency of marijuana use at each time point, among women who reported use prior to the assault.

  3. An Alpha-1A Adrenergic Receptor Agonist Prevents Acute Doxorubicin Cardiomyopathy in Male Mice

    PubMed Central

    Montgomery, Megan D.; Chan, Trevor; Swigart, Philip M.; Myagmar, Bat-erdene; Dash, Rajesh; Simpson, Paul C.

    2017-01-01

    Alpha-1 adrenergic receptors mediate adaptive effects in the heart and cardiac myocytes, and a myocyte survival pathway involving the alpha-1A receptor subtype and ERK activation exists in vitro. However, data in vivo are limited. Here we tested A61603 (N-[5-(4,5-dihydro-1H-imidazol-2-yl)-2-hydroxy-5,6,7,8-tetrahydronaphthalen-1-yl]methanesulfonamide), a selective imidazoline agonist for the alpha-1A. A61603 was the most potent alpha-1-agonist in activating ERK in neonatal rat ventricular myocytes. A61603 activated ERK in adult mouse ventricular myocytes and protected the cells from death caused by the anthracycline doxorubicin. A low dose of A61603 (10 ng/kg/d) activated ERK in the mouse heart in vivo, but did not change blood pressure. In male mice, concurrent subcutaneous A61603 infusion at 10 ng/kg/d for 7 days after a single intraperitoneal dose of doxorubicin (25 mg/kg) increased survival, improved cardiac function, heart rate, and cardiac output by echocardiography, and reduced cardiac cell necrosis and apoptosis and myocardial fibrosis. All protective effects were lost in alpha-1A-knockout mice. In female mice, doxorubicin at doses higher than in males (35–40 mg/kg) caused less cardiac toxicity than in males. We conclude that the alpha-1A-selective agonist A61603, via the alpha-1A adrenergic receptor, prevents doxorubicin cardiomyopathy in male mice, supporting the theory that alpha-1A adrenergic receptor agonists have potential as novel heart failure therapies. PMID:28081170

  4. Inhibition of leukotriene B4 synthesis does not prevent development of acute renal failure following storage and transplantation.

    PubMed

    Lane, N J; Thorniley, M S; Manek, S; Fuller, B J; Green, C J

    1994-12-27

    Compound BW B70C, a selective 5-lipoxygenase inhibitor was tested for its ability to reduce inflammatory damage in an in vivo rabbit model of renal storage and transplantation. Kidneys were stored at 0-2 degrees C for 48 hr prior to autografting. In controls, renal vein LTB4 levels rose significantly after 30 min reperfusion but fell after 2 hr to baseline. TxB2 levels remained at baseline for the 6 hr measured. 6-k-PGF1 alpha levels rose significantly after 1 hr of reperfusion and remained elevated thereafter. Histology after 6 hr reperfusion showed moderate-to-severe cortical edema and mild congestion. Infused colloidal carbon was retained in the perivascular area in a narrow band at the corticomedullary junction, indicating a zone of vascular permeability. At 3 days after transplant, kidneys exhibited widespread tubular necrosis and calcification but little inflammation. Serum creatinine and urea peaked between days 3 and 5. 3/6 rabbits showed no symptoms of renal failure after 3 weeks. Pretreatment with BW B70C prevented the increase in LTB4 but had little effect on TxB2 and 6-k-PGF1 alpha levels. Histology showed no amelioration of cortical edema at 6 hr and congestion and hemorrhage were exacerbated. BW B70C had no effect on either colloidal carbon retention or distribution but did significantly reduce tubular necrosis and calcification at day 3. There was very little inflammatory infiltrate. BW B70C treatment did not improve the long-term viability of transplanted kidneys: 2/6 rabbits showed no symptoms of renal failure after 3 weeks. These data indicate that inhibition of LTB4 synthesis by BW B70C does not prevent the development of acute renal failure following 48 hr hypothermic storage and transplantation.

  5. Strict blood glucose control by an artificial endocrine pancreas during hepatectomy may prevent postoperative acute kidney injury.

    PubMed

    Mita, Naoji; Kawahito, Shinji; Soga, Tomohiro; Takaishi, Kazumi; Kitahata, Hiroshi; Matsuhisa, Munehide; Shimada, Mitsuo; Kinoshita, Hiroyuki; Tsutsumi, Yasuo M; Tanaka, Katsuya

    2017-03-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the usefulness of a closed-loop system (STG-55; Nikkiso, Tokyo, Japan), a type of artificial endocrine pancreas for the continuous monitoring and control of intraoperative blood glucose, for preventing postoperative acute kidney injury (AKI) in patients undergoing hepatectomy. Thirty-eight patients were enrolled in this study. Glucose concentrations were controlled with either a manual injection of insulin based on a commonly used sliding scale (manual insulin group, n = 19) or the programmed infusion of insulin determined by the control algorithm of the artificial endocrine pancreas (programmed insulin group, n = 19). After the induction of anesthesia, a 20-G intravenous catheter was inserted into the peripheral forearm vein of patients in the programmed insulin group and connected to an artificial endocrine pancreas (STG-55). The target range for glucose concentrations was set to 100-150 mg/dL. The mean serum creatinine concentrations of preoperative, postoperative 24 and 48 h were 0.72, 0.78, and 0.79 mg/dL in the programmed insulin group, and 0.81, 0.95, and 1.03 mg/dL in the manual insulin group, respectively. Elevations in serum creatinine concentrations postoperative 48 h were significantly suppressed in the programmed insulin group. The STG-55 closed-loop system was effective for maintaining strict blood glucose control during hepatectomy with minimal variability in blood glucose concentrations and for suppressing elevations in serum creatinine concentrations. Strict blood glucose control by an artificial endocrine pancreas during hepatectomy may prevent postoperative AKI.

  6. Donor Atorvastatin Treatment in Preventing Severe Acute GVHD After Nonmyeloablative Peripheral Blood Stem Cell Transplant in Patients With Hematological Malignancies

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-01-13

    Aggressive Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Myelodysplastic/Myeloproliferative Neoplasm; Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Prolymphocytic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Aggressive Adult Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Recurrent Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia, BCR-ABL1 Positive; Recurrent Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Plasma Cell Myeloma; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Waldenstrom Macroglobulinemia

  7. Prevention of non-immune mediated transfusion-related acute lung injury; from blood bank to patient.

    PubMed

    van Bruggen, Robin; de Korte, Dirk

    2012-01-01

    Transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI) is a severe form of pulmonary insufficiency induced by transfusion. TRALI is the leading cause of transfusion-related death, and is caused by the infusion of either anti-leukocyte antibodies in plasma containing blood products or neutrophil priming substances that accumulate during storage of cellular blood products. Among these neutrophil priming substances are bioactive lipids, such as lyso-phosphatidylcholines (lysoPCs) and arachidonic acid, soluble CD40L (sCD40L) and possibly other, as yet unidentified substances. The accumulation of these substances during cellular blood product storage and their role in the induction of "non-immune mediated" TRALI pathogenesis are highly relevant for the current debate of the use of longer vs. shorter stored blood products. In this review, the accumulation of these different substances during storage, as well as their mode of action in inducing TRALI are discussed. In addition, different improvements in current blood banking procedures to prevent TRALI due to these non-immune mediators will be proposed.

  8. Affinity maturation of a broadly neutralizing human monoclonal antibody that prevents acute hepatitis C virus infection in mice.

    PubMed

    Keck, Zhen-Yong; Wang, Yong; Lau, Patrick; Lund, Garry; Rangarajan, Sneha; Fauvelle, Catherine; Liao, Grant C; Holtsberg, Frederick W; Warfield, Kelly L; Aman, M Javad; Pierce, Brian G; Fuerst, Thomas R; Bailey, Justin R; Baumert, Thomas F; Mariuzza, Roy A; Kneteman, Norman M; Foung, Steven K H

    2016-12-01

    Direct-acting antivirals (DAAs) have led to a high cure rate in treated patients with chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection, but this still leaves a large number of treatment failures secondary to the emergence of resistance-associated variants (RAVs). To increase the barrier to resistance, a complementary strategy is to use neutralizing human monoclonal antibodies (HMAbs) to prevent acute infection. However, earlier efforts with the selected antibodies led to RAVs in animal and clinical studies. Therefore, we identified an HMAb that is less likely to elicit RAVs for affinity maturation to increase potency and, more important, breadth of protection. Selected matured antibodies show improved affinity and neutralization against a panel of diverse HCV isolates. Structural and modeling studies reveal that the affinity-matured HMAb mediates virus neutralization, in part, by inducing conformational change to the targeted epitope, and that the maturated light chain is responsible for the improved affinity and breadth of protection. A matured HMAb protected humanized mice when challenged with an infectious HCV human serum inoculum for a prolonged period. However, a single mouse experienced breakthrough infection after 63 days when the serum HMAb concentration dropped by several logs; sequence analysis revealed no viral escape mutation.

  9. Does a home treatment acute relapse prevention strategy reduce admissions for people with mania in bipolar affective disorder?

    PubMed Central

    Murton, Claudia; Cooper, Michael; Dinniss, Stephen; Roberts, Shon; Booth, Nicola; Newell, Paul

    2014-01-01

    Aims and method To assess whether a home treatment team acute relapse prevention (ARP) strategy reduces admissions to hospital with mania. A retrospective design was used to analyse records for manic admissions since 2002. The number and length of admissions and detentions pre- and post-ARP were determined and rates of admissions and detentions calculated from this. Results We found reductions in admission and detention rates following the introduction of the ARP: 0.3 fewer admissions per person per year (95% bootstrap CI 0.09–0.62) and 0.25 fewer detentions per person per year (95% bootstrap CI 0.0–0.48). Wilcoxon signed-rank tests gave P<0.0001. Clinical implications A person-centred care plan such as the ARP which enables quick action in response to relapse-warning signs of mania appears to reduce rates of admission to hospital. The ARP could be used anywhere in the UK and fits with current mental health policy. PMID:25505627

  10. Evidence of poor adherence to secondary prevention after acute coronary syndromes: possible remedies through the application of new technologies.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Kevin; Ingram, Nicola; Keenan, Jan; Choudhury, Robin P

    2015-01-01

    Adherence to secondary prevention medications following acute coronary syndrome (ACS) is disappointingly low, standing around 40-75% by various estimates. This is an inefficient use of the resources devoted to their development and implementation, and also puts patients at higher risk of poor outcomes post-ACS. Numerous factors contribute to low adherence including poor motivation, forgetfulness, lack of education about medications, complicated polypharmacy of ACS regimens, (fear of) adverse side effects and limited practical support. Using technology to improve adherence in ACS is an emerging strategy and has the potential to address many of the above factors-computer-based education and mobile phone reminders are among the interventions trialled and appear to improve adherence in patients with ACS. As we move into an increasingly technological future, there is potential to use devices such as smartphones and tablets to encourage patient responsibility for medications. These handheld technologies have great scope for allowing patients to view online medical records, education modules and reminder systems, and although research specific to ACS is limited, they have shown initial promise in terms of uptake and improved adherence among similar patient populations. Given the overwhelming enthusiasm for handheld technologies, it would seem timely to further investigate their role in improving ACS medication adherence.

  11. The effect of a sweet potato, footbath, and acupressure intervention in preventing constipation in hospitalized patients with acute coronary syndromes.

    PubMed

    Ren, Kai; Qiu, Jingbo; Wang, Xiaohua; Niu, Fenglin; Jiang, Tingbo

    2012-01-01

    Constipation is a common health problem that adversely affects quality of life and the prognosis of hospitalized patients with acute coronary syndromes (ACS). The purpose of this study was to develop and test the sweet potato/footbath/acupressure massage (SFA) intervention as a safe treatment for prevention of constipation and to increase satisfaction with bowel emptying in hospitalized patients with ACS. The study was a prospective, randomized controlled trial with a sample of 93 patients (SFA group, n = 44; usual care group, n = 49). Patients in the SFA group received SFA intervention combined with usual care. The results showed that there were statistical differences between the two groups in terms of (1) the incidence of constipation; (2) the use of laxatives and enemas; (3) patients' subjective satisfaction with their bowel emptying during hospitalization; and (4) sensation of incomplete evacuation and anorectal obstruction/blockade. The SFA intervention was more effective, economical, and practical than usual care alone in managing constipation and satisfaction with defecation in patients hospitalized with ACS.

  12. Early traditional Chinese medicine bundle therapy for the prevention of sepsis acute gastrointestinal injury in elderly patients with severe sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yifei; Zhang, Yunhua; Jiang, Ronglin

    2017-01-01

    This study aimed to study the effect of early traditional Chinese medicine bundle therapy on the prevention of sepsis-associated acute gastrointestinal injury (AGI). This was a multicenter, prospective, observational, non-randomized cohort study of 296 consecutive patients with severe sepsis during 2013/3 and 2014/11; 150 patients received standard treatments (controls) and 146 received traditional Chinese medicine bundle therapy (intervention group) (herbal decoction gavage based on syndrome differentiation, Chinese acupuncture, application of mirabilite, and defecation mixture). D-lactic acid, diamine oxidase, endotoxin, gastrin, motilin, and intra-abdominal pressure were measured. AGI was categorized into four levels. Compared with controls, D-lactic acid, diamine oxidase, endotoxin, gastrin, and intra-abdominal pressure in the intervention group were decreased, and motilin was increased on day 7. AGI incidence in the intervention group was lower than in controls. GIF scores of the intervention AGI II and III groups were lower than in controls. The APACHE II scores of the intervention AGI II, III, and IV groups were lower than in controls. Compared with controls, mechanical ventilation time and ICU stay in the intervention group were shorter, and 28-day overall and AGI-attributed mortality were lower. For elderly patients with severe sepsis, early traditional Chinese medicine bundle therapy could decrease AGI incidence and improve prognosis. PMID:28382954

  13. Travel health: sun protection and skin cancer prevention for travellers.

    PubMed

    Wood, Cate

    The UK population likes to travel to sunny parts of the world, where the risk of sunburn is greater than it is at home. Sunburn and the cultural desire for a tan is one of the risk factors for the increase in skin cancer. The rise in foreign travel has resulted in an increased demand for pre-travel health services, with nurses in primary care acting as the main providers.Within these consultations, the traveller and their travel plans are risk assessed.Travel health consultations give an ideal opportunity to discuss and advise the public regarding sun burn and skin cancer protection. However, there are also other ways to impart safety in the sun message to travellers. Skin protection is a health promoting activity provided as a part of public health provision and all nurses can play a role in prevention.

  14. Role of probiotic in preventing acute diarrhoea in children: a community-based, randomized, double-blind placebo-controlled field trial in an urban slum.

    PubMed

    Sur, D; Manna, B; Niyogi, S K; Ramamurthy, T; Palit, A; Nomoto, K; Takahashi, T; Shima, T; Tsuji, H; Kurakawa, T; Takeda, Y; Nair, G B; Bhattacharya, S K

    2011-06-01

    Acute diarrhoea remains a major public health challenge in developing countries. We examined the role of a probiotic in the prevention of acute diarrhoea to discover if there was an effect directed towards a specific aetiology. A double-blind, randomized, controlled field trial involving 3758 children aged 1-5 years was conducted in an urban slum community in Kolkata, India. Participants were given either a probiotic drink containing Lactobacillus casei strain Shirota or a nutrient drink daily for 12 weeks. They were followed up for another 12 weeks. The primary outcome of this study was the occurrence of first episodes of diarrhoea. We assessed this during 12 weeks of intake of study agent and also for 12 weeks of follow-up. There were 608 subjects with diarrhoea in the probiotic group and 674 subjects in the nutrient group during the study period of 24 weeks. The level of protective efficacy for the probiotic was 14% (95% confidence interval 4-23, P<0·01 in adjusted model). The reduced occurrence of acute diarrhoea in the probiotic group compared to nutrient group was not associated with any specific aetiology. No adverse event was observed in children of either probiotic or nutrient groups. The study suggests that daily intake of a probiotic drink can play a role in prevention of acute diarrhoea in young children in a community setting of a developing country.

  15. Remote Ischemic Preconditioning for the Prevention of Contrast-Induced Acute Kidney Injury in Diabetics Receiving Elective Percutaneous Coronary Intervention

    PubMed Central

    Balbir Singh, Gillian; Ann, Soe Hee; Park, Jongha; Chung, Hyun Chul; Lee, Jong Soo; Kim, Eun-Sook; Choi, Jung Il; Lee, Jiho; Kim, Shin-Jae; Shin, Eun-Seok

    2016-01-01

    Objective Remote ischemic preconditioning (RIPC) induces transient episodes of ischemia by the occlusion of blood flow in non-target tissue, before a subsequent ischemia-reperfusion injury. When RIPC is applied before percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI), the kidneys may be protected against ischemia-reperfusion injury and subsequently contrast-induced acute kidney injury (CI-AKI). The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of RIPC for the prevention of CI-AKI in patients with diabetes with pre-existing chronic kidney disease (CKD) undergoing elective PCI. Methods This randomized, double-blind, sham-controlled study enrolled patients with diabetes scheduled for elective PCI with eGFR ≤60 ml/min/1.73 m2 or urinary albumin creatinine ratio of >300 mg/g to receive either RIPC or the sham ischemic preconditioning. Results One hundred and two patients (68.9 ± 8.2 years old, 47.1% men) were included. Baseline eGFR, creatinine and serum NGAL was similar between RIPC and control groups (48.5 ± 12 ml/min vs. 46.6 ± 10 ml/min, p = 0.391; 1.42 ± 0.58 mg/dl vs. 1.41 ± 0.34 mg/dl, p = 0.924; and 136.0 ± 45.0 ng/ml vs. 137.6 ± 43.3 ng/ml, p = 0.961, respectively). CI-AKI occurred in 13.7% (14/102) of the total subjects, with both RIPC and control groups having an equal incidence of 13.7% (7/51). No significant differences were seen in creatinine, NGAL, cardiac enzymes (troponin T, CKMB) and hs-CRP between the groups post-procedure. Conclusions In this study, RIPC applied prior to elective PCI was not effective in preventing CI-AKI in patients with diabetes with pre-existing CKD. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT02329444 PMID:27723839

  16. Acute administration of Δ⁹ tetrahydrocannabinol does not prevent enhancement of sensory gating by clozapine in DBA/2 mice.

    PubMed

    Smucny, Jason; Stevens, Karen E; Tregellas, Jason R

    2014-03-01

    Despite high rates of marijuana abuse in schizophrenia, the physiological interactions between tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) and antipsychotic medications are poorly understood. A well-characterized feature of schizophrenia is poor gating of the P50 auditory-evoked potential. This feature has been translationally modeled by the DBA/2 mouse, which exhibits poor suppression of the P20-N40 AEP, the rodent analog of the human P50. Previous work has demonstrated that this deficit is reversed by the antipsychotic clozapine. It is unknown, however, if this effect is altered by THC administration. Using a conditioning-testing paradigm with paired auditory stimuli, the effects of clozapine and dronabinol (a pharmaceutical THC formulation) on inhibitory P20-N40 AEP processing were assessed from in vivo hippocampal CA3 recordings in anesthetized DBA/2 mice. The effects of clozapine (0.33 mg/kg) and dronabinol (10 mg/kg) were assessed alone and in combination (0.33, 1 or 1.83 mg/kg clozapine with 10mg/kg dronabinol). Improved P20-N40 AEP gating was observed after acute administration of 0.33 mg/kg clozapine. Co-injection of 0.33 mg/kg clozapine and 10 mg/kg THC, however, did not improve gating relative to baseline. This effect was overcome by higher doses of clozapine (1 and 1.83 mg/kg), as these doses improved gating relative to baseline in the presence of 10 mg/kg THC. 10 mg/kg THC alone did not affect gating. In conclusion, THC does not prevent improvement of P20-N40 gating by clozapine.

  17. Aerosolised liposomal amphotericin B to prevent aspergillosis in acute myeloid leukaemia: Efficacy and cost effectiveness in real-life.

    PubMed

    Chong, Ga-Lai M; Broekman, Fleur; Polinder, Suzanne; Doorduijn, Jeanette K; Lugtenburg, Pieternella J; Verbon, Annelies; Cornelissen, Jan J; Rijnders, Bart J A

    2015-07-01

    Chemotherapy-induced neutropenia can be complicated by invasive pulmonary aspergillosis (IPA). In 2008, liposomal amphotericin B (L-AmB) inhalation was shown to prevent IPA in a placebo-controlled trial. Patients with acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) are the subset of haematology patients at high risk for IPA. In 2008, L-AmB inhalation prophylaxis became the standard of care for all AML patients in Erasmus MC. In this study, the efficacy and cost effectiveness of L-AmB inhalation were evaluated in a prospective cohort of AML patients. In total, 127 consecutive AML patients received chemotherapy and prophylactically inhaled L-AmB during their first and second chemotherapy cycles; 108 patients treated for AML at the same sites from 2005-2008 served as controls. A standardised diagnostic protocol was used and probable/proven IPA served as the primary endpoint. Diagnostic and therapeutic costs were also comprehensively analysed and compared. A significant decrease in probable/proven IPA in the L-AmB inhalation group was observed (L-AmB 9.5% vs. controls 23.4%; P=0.0064). Systemic antifungal therapy given at any time during the entire AML therapy decreased from 52.8% to 29.9%. Per-patient equipment and drug costs for L-AmB inhalation (1292 €/patient) were more than compensated for by a decrease in costs for diagnostics and therapeutic voriconazole use (-1816 €/patient). No serious adverse events related to L-AmB inhalation were observed. In an unselected AML patient group, L-AmB inhalation resulted in a significant and substantial decrease in IPA and was cost saving. Now that azole resistance is more frequent, non-azole-based prophylaxis may become an attractive strategy.

  18. Soy-derived phytoestrogens as preventive and acute neuroprotectors in experimental ischemic stroke: influence of rat strain.

    PubMed

    Castelló-Ruiz, M; Torregrosa, G; Burguete, M C; Salom, J B; Gil, J V; Miranda, F J; Jover-Mengual, T; Marrachelli, V G; Alborch, E

    2011-04-15

    The ability of a soy-based high-phytoestrogen diet (nutritional intervention) or genistein (pharmacological intervention), to limit ischemic brain damage in Wistar, Wistar-Kyoto (WKY) and spontaneously hypertensive (SHR) rats, has been assessed. As to the nutritional intervention, two groups from each strain received either a phytoestrogen-free (PE-0) or a high-phytoestrogen (PE-600) diet from weaning to adulthood. As to the pharmacological intervention, all animals were fed the standard soy-free AIN-93G diet and subsequently separated into two groups from each strain to receive either pure genistein (aglycone form, 1mg/kg/day intraperitoneal) or vehicle at 30 min reperfusion. After an episode of 90 min ischemia (intraluminal thread procedure) followed by 3 days reperfusion, cerebral infarct volume was measured. Arterial blood pressure (ABP) was significantly higher at the basal stage (just before ischemia) in SHR (140 ± 7 mmHg, n=17, p<0.05) than in Wistar (113 ± 4mmHg, n=23) and WKY (111 ± 6mmHg, n=14) rats. No significant differences were shown among the three stages (basal, ischemia, reperfusion) within each rat strain for both PE-0 and PE-600 diets. Wistar, but not WKY or SHR, rats fed the PE-600 diet showed significantly lower infarct volumes than their counterparts fed the PE-0 diet (30 ± 3% vs. 17 ± 3%, p<0.01). Genistein-treated Wistar, but not WKY or SHR, rats showed significantly lower infarct volumes than their vehicle-treated controls (27 ± 2% vs. 15 ± 2%, p<0.01). Our results demonstrate that: (1) the neuroprotective action of either chronic or acute exposure to soy isoflavones is strain-dependent, since it was shown in Wistar but not WKY or SHR rats; and (2) the soy-based diet does not prevent development of hypertension in SHR rats.

  19. Ultraviolet radiation-induced histopathologic changes in the skin of the marsupial Monodelphis domestica. II. Quantitative studies of the photoreactivation of induced hyperplasia and sunburn cell formation

    SciTech Connect

    Ley, R.D.; Applegate, L.A.

    1985-10-01

    Induction of sunburn cells (SBCs) and hyperplasia of the epidermis of the marsupial Monodelphis domestica by ultraviolet radiation (UVR) has been studied. A dose of 500 J/m2 (approximately 1 minimal erythemal dose) from an FS-40 sunlamp induced measurable numbers of SBCs with a peak number at 32-48 h post-UVR exposure of skin to photoreactivating light suppressed the induction of SBCs by approximately 75%. Pre-UVR exposure to photoreactivating light had no effect on the induction of SBCs. Induction of hyperplasia also was suppressed to a similar extent by post-UVR photoreactivation treatment. These studies identify pyrimidine dimers in DNA as the major photoproduct involved in the induction of SBCs and hyperplasia in M. domestica by UVR.

  20. The Effects of Topically Applied Glycolic Acid and Salicylic Acid on Ultraviolet Radiation-Induced Erythema, DNA Damage and Sunburn Cell Formation in Human Skin

    PubMed Central

    Kornhauser, Andrija; Wei, Rong-Rong; Yamaguchi, Yuji; Coelho, Sergio G.; Kaidbey, Kays; Barton, Curtis; Takahashi, Kaoruko; Beer, Janusz Z.; Miller, Sharon A.; Hearing, Vincent J.

    2009-01-01

    Background α-Hydroxy acids (αHA) are reported to reduce signs of aging in the skin and are widely used cosmetic ingredients. Several studies suggest that αHA can increase the sensitivity of skin to ultraviolet radiation. More recently, β-hydroxy acids (βHA), or combinations of αHA and βHA have also been incorporated into antiaging skin care products. Concerns have also arisen about increased sensitivity to ultraviolet radiation following use of skin care products containing β-HA. Objective To determine whether topical treatment with glycolic acid, a representative αHA, or with salicylic acid, a βHA, modifies the short-term effects of solar simulated radiation (SSR) in human skin. Methods Fourteen subjects participated in this study. Three of the four test sites on the mid-back of each subject were treated daily Monday - Friday, for a total of 3.5 weeks, with glycolic acid (10%), salicylic acid (2%), or vehicle (control). The fourth site received no treatment. After the last treatment, each site was exposed to SSR, and shave biopsies from all 4 sites were obtained. The endpoints evaluated in this study were erythema (assessed visually and instrumentally), DNA damage and sunburn cell formation. Results Treatment with glycolic acid resulted in increased sensitivity of human skin to SSR, measured as an increase in erythema, DNA damage and sunburn cell formation. Salicylic acid did not produce significant changes in any of these biomarkers. Conclusions Short-term topical application of glycolic acid in a cosmetic formulation increased the sensitivity of human skin to SSR, while a comparable treatment with salicylic acid did not. PMID:19411163

  1. The effects of a mid-winter 8-week course of sub-sunburn sunbed exposures on tanning, vitamin D status and colds.

    PubMed

    de Gruijl, Frank R; Pavel, Stan

    2012-12-01

    Like UV irradiation, which generates vitamin D(3) in the skin, the hormonally active metabolite, 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D(3), boosts innate immunity against viruses and bacteria. Epidemiologic studies have found high vitamin D levels to be associated with lower risk of infections of the upper respiratory tract (colds). We have therefore performed an intervention study in 105 young adults (ages 18-30 years; 91% female) over a mid-winter 8-week period (January-March 2010). The participants were randomised to 3 groups: (A) subjected to 3 times a week sub-sunburn sunbed exposure (n = 35), (B) daily vitamin D supplementation, @ 1000 IU (n = 37), and (C) a control group without any intervention (n = 33). The mean serum level of 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D) dropped from 62 to 55 nmol l(-1) in group C, while these levels rose from 62 to 109 and from 58 to 93 nmol l(-1) in groups A and B, respectively (p < 0.001). The skin on the chest darkened significantly in group A (mean difference in lightness, L*, equalled -5.7, p < 0.001), correlating significantly, but weakly, with increases in 25(OH)D (3.3 nmol l(-1) per unit drop in L*, R(2) = 0.17, p = 0.014). The percentage of self-reported colds with proper signs and symptoms was only slightly and not significantly reduced in groups A and B in comparison to group C: 57 and 51 versus 67%, respectively. Hence, the sub-sunburn sunbed treatment was effective in tanning and increasing the 25(OH)D serum level, more so than 1000 IU per day, but had no appreciable effect on colds.

  2. Neuromuscular training with injury prevention counselling to decrease the risk of acute musculoskeletal injury in young men during military service: a population-based, randomised study

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The rapidly increasing number of activity-induced musculoskeletal injuries among adolescents and young adults is currently a true public health burden. The objective of this study was to investigate whether a neuromuscular training programme with injury prevention counselling is effective in preventing acute musculoskeletal injuries in young men during military service. Methods The trial design was a population-based, randomised study. Two successive cohorts of male conscripts in four companies of one brigade in the Finnish Defence Forces were first followed prospectively for one 6-month term to determine the baseline incidence of injury. After this period, two new successive cohorts in the same four companies were randomised into two groups and followed prospectively for 6 months. Military service is compulsory for about 90% of 19-year-old Finnish men annually, who comprised the cohort in this study. This randomised, controlled trial included 968 conscripts comprising 501 conscripts in the intervention group and 467 conscripts in the control group. A neuromuscular training programme was used to enhance conscripts' motor skills and body control, and an educational injury prevention programme was used to increase knowledge and awareness of acute musculoskeletal injuries. The main outcome measures were acute injuries of the lower and upper limbs. Results In the intervention groups, the risk for acute ankle injury decreased significantly compared to control groups (adjusted hazards ratio (HR) = 0.34, 95% confidence interval (95% CI) = 0.15 to 0.78, P = 0.011). This risk decline was observed in conscripts with low as well as moderate to high baseline fitness levels. In the latter group of conscripts, the risk of upper-extremity injuries also decreased significantly (adjusted HR = 0.37, 95% CI 0.14 to 0.99, P = 0.047). In addition, the intervention groups tended to have less time loss due to injuries (adjusted HR = 0.55, 95% CI 0.29 to 1.04). Conclusions A

  3. Assessing Compliance With Mercaptopurine Treatment in Younger Patients With Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in First Remission | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    This randomized phase III trial studies compliance to a mercaptopurine treatment intervention compared to standard of care in younger patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia in remission. Assessing ways to help patients who have acute lymphoblastic leukemia to take their medications as prescribed may help them in taking their medications more consistently and may improve treatment outcomes. |

  4. Increased taurine in pre-weaned juvenile mdx mice greatly reduces the acute onset of myofibre necrosis and dystropathology and prevents inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Terrill, Jessica R.; Grounds, Miranda D; Arthur, Peter G.

    2016-01-01

    Background: The mdx mouse model for the fatal muscle wasting disease Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy (DMD) shows a very mild pathology once growth has ceased, with low levels of myofibre necrosis in adults. However, from about 3 weeks of post-natal age, muscles of juvenile mdx mice undergo an acute bout of severe necrosis and inflammation: this subsequently decreases and stabilises to lower adult levels by about 6 weeks of age. Prior to the onset of this severe dystropathology, we have shown that mdx mice are deficient in the amino acid taurine (potentially due to weaning), and we propose that this exacerbates myofibre necrosis and inflammation in juvenile mdx mice. Objectives: The purpose of this study was to increase taurine availability to pre-weaned juvenile mdx mice (from 14 days of age), to evaluate the impact on levels of myofibre necrosis and inflammation (at 22 days) during the acute period of severe dystropathology. Results: Untreated 22 day old mdx muscle was not deficient in taurine, with similar levels to normal C57 control muscle. However taurine treatment, which increased the taurine content of young dystrophic muscle (by 40%), greatly reduced myofibre necrosis (by 75%) and prevented significant increases in 3 markers of inflammation. Conclusion: Taurine was very effective at preventing the acute phase of muscle damage that normally results in myofibre necrosis and inflammation in juvenile mdx mice, supporting continued research into the use of taurine as a therapeutic intervention for protecting growing muscles of young DMD boys PMID:27679740

  5. Acute Hemorrhagic Retinopathy following Intravitreal Melphalan Injection for Retinoblastoma: A Report of Two Cases and Technical Modifications to Enhance the Prevention of Retinal Toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Aziz, Hassan A.; Kim, Jonathan W.; Munier, Francis L.; Berry, Jesse L.

    2017-01-01

    Aims To report the occurrence of acute hemorrhagic retinopathy following intravitreal melphalan injection for retinoblastoma. Methods This is a retrospective case series of 2 patients with retinoblastoma treated with intravitreal melphalan for vitreous seeding who developed acute hemorrhagic retinopathy. Results Patient 1 is a 6-month-old female with bilateral retinoblastoma (Group D right eye and Group B left eye) treated with 4 cycles of systemic chemotherapy and 2 intravitreal melphalan injections in each eye. Patient 2 is a 10-month-old male with unilateral Group D retinoblastoma treated with 6 cycles of systemic chemotherapy and 2 injections of intravitreal melphalan. At the 1-week follow-up after the second injection, both patients had an acute hemorrhagic retinopathy that resulted in chorioretinal toxicity with a sharp demarcation line between the normal and abnormal retina. At the last follow-up (22 and 12 months, respectively), there was total tumor control and resolution of vitreous seeding in both patients. Conclusions Although intravitreal melphalan injection is effective for vitreous seeding in eyes with retinoblastoma, acute hemorrhagic retinopathy and diffuse chorioretinal atrophy is a possible complication of this treatment modality. Given the clinical findings observed in these patients, the development of this retinal toxicity most likely results from a retrohyaloid overdose. Consequently we suggest preventive measures aimed at limiting the risk of retrohyaloid injection.

  6. Mechanism of mitochondrial permeability transition pore induction and damage in the pancreas: inhibition prevents acute pancreatitis by protecting production of ATP

    PubMed Central

    Mukherjee, Rajarshi; Mareninova, Olga A; Odinokova, Irina V; Huang, Wei; Murphy, John; Chvanov, Michael; Javed, Muhammad A; Wen, Li; Booth, David M; Cane, Matthew C; Awais, Muhammad; Gavillet, Bruno; Pruss, Rebecca M; Schaller, Sophie; Molkentin, Jeffery D; Tepikin, Alexei V; Petersen, Ole H; Pandol, Stephen J; Gukovsky, Ilya; Criddle, David N; Gukovskaya, Anna S

    2016-01-01

    Objective Acute pancreatitis is caused by toxins that induce acinar cell calcium overload, zymogen activation, cytokine release and cell death, yet is without specific drug therapy. Mitochondrial dysfunction has been implicated but the mechanism not established. Design We investigated the mechanism of induction and consequences of the mitochondrial permeability transition pore (MPTP) in the pancreas using cell biological methods including confocal microscopy, patch clamp technology and multiple clinically representative disease models. Effects of genetic and pharmacological inhibition of the MPTP were examined in isolated murine and human pancreatic acinar cells, and in hyperstimulation, bile acid, alcoholic and choline-deficient, ethionine-supplemented acute pancreatitis. Results MPTP opening was mediated by toxin-induced inositol trisphosphate and ryanodine receptor calcium channel release, and resulted in diminished ATP production, leading to impaired calcium clearance, defective autophagy, zymogen activation, cytokine production, phosphoglycerate mutase 5 activation and necrosis, which was prevented by intracellular ATP supplementation. When MPTP opening was inhibited genetically or pharmacologically, all biochemical, immunological and histopathological responses of acute pancreatitis in all four models were reduced or abolished. Conclusions This work demonstrates the mechanism and consequences of MPTP opening to be fundamental to multiple forms of acute pancreatitis and validates the MPTP as a drug target for this disease. PMID:26071131

  7. Phase III trials of new oral anticoagulants in the acute treatment and secondary prevention of VTE: comparison and critique of study methodology and results.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Alexander T; Imfeld, Stephan; Rider, Thomas

    2014-05-01

    The traditional treatment of venous thromboembolism (VTE) has been use of heparin and vitamin K antagonists (VKA), and although shown to be effective, they have numerous limitations. New oral anticoagulants (NOACs) including direct thrombin (factor IIa) inhibitors (dabigatran) and selective factor Xa inhibitors (rivaroxaban, apixaban and edoxaban) have emerged as promising alternatives with the potential to overcome the limitations of traditional treatments. Clinical trials have been performed with a view to making significant changes to the acute, long-term and extended treatment of VTE. Data are now available on the efficacy and safety, including bleeding rates, of the NOACs in comparison with VKA in the acute treatment and secondary prevention of VTE as well as in comparison with placebo extended VTE treatment. This review compares and contrasts the design and results of the Phase III trials of NOACs in VTE and discusses the implications of the NOACs in terms of treatment strategies in VTE patients.

  8. Potential of the angiotensin receptor blockers (ARBs) telmisartan, irbesartan, and candesartan for inhibiting the HMGB1/RAGE axis in prevention and acute treatment of stroke.

    PubMed

    Kikuchi, Kiyoshi; Tancharoen, Salunya; Ito, Takashi; Morimoto-Yamashita, Yoko; Miura, Naoki; Kawahara, Ko-ichi; Maruyama, Ikuro; Murai, Yoshinaka; Tanaka, Eiichiro

    2013-09-13

    Stroke is a major cause of mortality and disability worldwide. The main cause of stroke is atherosclerosis, and the most common risk factor for atherosclerosis is hypertension. Therefore, antihypertensive treatments are recommended for the prevention of stroke. Three angiotensin receptor blockers (ARBs), telmisartan, irbesartan and candesartan, inhibit the expression of the receptor for advanced glycation end-products (RAGE), which is one of the pleiotropic effects of these drugs. High mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) is the ligand of RAGE, and has been recently identified as a lethal mediator of severe sepsis. HMGB1 is an intracellular protein, which acts as an inflammatory cytokine when released into the extracellular milieu. Extracellular HMGB1 causes multiple organ failure and contributes to the pathogenesis of hypertension, hyperlipidemia, diabetes mellitus, atherosclerosis, thrombosis, and stroke. This is the first review of the literature evaluating the potential of three ARBs for the HMGB1-RAGE axis on stroke therapy, including prevention and acute treatment. This review covers clinical and experimental studies conducted between 1976 and 2013. We propose that ARBs, which inhibit the HMGB1/RAGE axis, may offer a novel option for prevention and acute treatment of stroke. However, additional clinical studies are necessary to verify the efficacy of ARBs.

  9. Single intrathecal administration of the transcription factor decoy AYX1 prevents acute and chronic pain after incisional, inflammatory, or neuropathic injury.

    PubMed

    Mamet, Julien; Klukinov, Michael; Yaksh, Tony L; Malkmus, Shelle A; Williams, Samantha; Harris, Scott; Manning, Donald C; Taylor, Bradley K; Donahue, Renee R; Porreca, Frank; Xie, Jennifer Y; Oyarzo, Janice; Brennan, Timothy J; Subieta, Alberto; Schmidt, William K; Yeomans, David C

    2014-02-01

    The persistence of pain after surgery increases the recovery interval from surgery to a normal quality of life. AYX1 is a DNA-decoy drug candidate designed to prevent post-surgical pain following a single intrathecal injection. Tissue injury causes a transient activation of the transcription factor EGR1 in the dorsal root ganglia-dorsal horn network, which then triggers changes in gene expression that induce neuronal hypersensitivity. AYX1 is a potent, specific inhibitor of EGR1 activity that mimics the genomic EGR1-binding sequence. Administered in the peri-operative period, AYX1 dose dependently prevents mechanical hypersensitivity in models of acute incisional (plantar), inflammatory (CFA), and chronic neuropathic pain (SNI) in rats. Furthermore, in a knee surgery model evaluating functional measures of postoperative pain, AYX1 improved weight-bearing incapacitance and spontaneous rearing compared to control. These data illustrate the potential clinical therapeutic benefits of AYX1 for preventing the transition of acute to chronic post-surgical pain.

  10. Effects of applying nerve blocks to prevent postherpetic neuralgia in patients with acute herpes zoster: a systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyun Jung; Ahn, Hyeong Sik; Lee, Jae Young; Choi, Seong Soo; Cheong, Yu Seon; Kwon, Koo; Yoon, Syn Hae

    2017-01-01

    Background Postherpetic neuralgia (PHN) is a common and painful complication of acute herpes zoster. In some cases, it is refractory to medical treatment. Preventing its occurrence is an important issue. We hypothesized that applying nerve blocks during the acute phase of herpes zoster could reduce PHN incidence by attenuating central sensitization and minimizing nerve damage and the anti-inflammatory effects of local anesthetics and steroids. Methods This systematic review and meta-analysis evaluates the efficacy of using nerve blocks to prevent PHN. We searched the MEDLINE, EMBASE, Cochrane Library, ClinicalTrials.gov and KoreaMed databases without language restrictions on April, 30 2014. We included all randomized controlled trials performed within 3 weeks after the onset of herpes zoster in order to compare nerve blocks vs active placebo and standard therapy. Results Nine trials were included in this systematic review and meta-analysis. Nerve blocks reduced the duration of herpes zoster-related pain and PHN incidence of at 3, 6, and 12 months after final intervention. Stellate ganglion block and single epidural injection did not achieve positive outcomes, but administering paravertebral blockage and continuous/repeated epidural blocks reduced PHN incidence at 3 months. None of the included trials reported clinically meaningful serious adverse events. Conclusions Applying nerve blocks during the acute phase of the herpes zoster shortens the duration of zoster-related pain, and somatic blocks (including paravertebral and repeated/continuous epidural blocks) are recommended to prevent PHN. In future studies, consensus-based PHN definitions, clinical cutoff points that define successful treatment outcomes and standardized outcome-assessment tools will be needed. PMID:28119767

  11. Possible role of the microbiome in the development of acute malnutrition and implications for food-based strategies to prevent and treat acute malnutrition

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A pattern of changes in the microbiome composition have been observed in the normal maturation of the human gut. Perturbations from this pattern have been described in malnourished humans and reproduced in animal models of severe malnutrition. Treatment and prevention of malnutrition in the future m...

  12. Safety evaluation of sunscreen formulations containing titanium dioxide and zinc oxide nanoparticles in UVB sunburned skin: an in vitro and in vivo study.

    PubMed

    Monteiro-Riviere, N A; Wiench, K; Landsiedel, R; Schulte, S; Inman, A O; Riviere, J E

    2011-09-01

    Sunscreens containing titanium dioxide (TiO(2)) and zinc oxide (ZnO) nanoparticles (NP) are effective barriers against ultraviolet B (UVB) damage to skin, although little is known about their disposition in UVB-damaged skin. Pigs were exposed to UVB that resulted in moderate sunburn. For in vitro studies, skin in flow-through diffusion cells were treated 24 h with four sunscreen formulations as follows: 10% coated TiO(2) in oil/water (o/w), 10% coated TiO(2) in water/oil (w/o), 5% coated ZnO in o/w, and 5% uncoated ZnO in o/w. TiO(2) (rutile, crystallite) primary particle size was 10 × 50 nm with mean agglomerates of 200 nm (range ca. 90 nm--460 nm); mean for ZnO was 140 nm (range ca. 60--200 nm). Skin was processed for light microscopy, scanning (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (TOF-SIMS). UVB-exposed skin had typical sunburn histology. TEM showed TiO(2) NP 17 layers into stratum corneum (SC), whereas ZnO remained on the surface. TOF-SIMS showed TiO(2) and ZnO epidermal penetration in both treatments. Perfusate analyzed by TEM/energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy or inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry detected no Ti or Zn, indicating minimal transdermal absorption. In vivo, skin was dosed at 24 h occluded with formulations and at 48 h. TiO(2) NP in o/w formulation penetrated 13 layers into UVB-damaged SC, whereas only 7 layers in normal skin; TiO(2) in w/o penetrated deeper in UVB-damaged SC. Coated and uncoated Zn NP in o/w were localized to the upper one to two SC layers in all skin. By SEM, NP were localized as agglomerates in formulation on the skin surface and base of hair. TOF-SIMS showed Ti within epidermis and superficial dermis, whereas Zn was limited to SC and upper epidermis in both treatments. In summary, UVB-damaged skin slightly enhanced TiO(2) NP or ZnO NP penetration in sunscreen formulations but no transdermal absorption was detected.

  13. Programmed Ventricular Stimulation to Risk Stratify for Early Cardioverter-Defibrillator Implantation to Prevent Tachyarrhythmias following Acute Myocardial Infarction (PROTECT-ICD): Trial Protocol, Background and Significance.

    PubMed

    Zaman, Sarah; Taylor, Andrew J; Stiles, Martin; Chow, Clara; Kovoor, Pramesh

    2016-11-01

    The 'Programmed Ventricular Stimulation to Risk Stratify for Early Cardioverter-Defibrillator Implantation to Prevent Tachyarrhythmias following Acute Myocardial Infarction' (PROTECT-ICD) trial is an Australian-led multicentre randomised controlled trial targeting prevention of sudden cardiac death in patients who have at least moderately reduced cardiac function following a myocardial infarct (MI). The primary objective of the trial is to assess whether electrophysiological study to guide prophylactic implantation of an implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (ICD) early following MI (first 40 days) will lead to a significant reduction in sudden cardiac death and non-fatal arrhythmia. The secondary objective is to assess the utility of cardiac MRI (CMR) in assessing early myocardial characteristics, and its predictive value for both inducible ventricular tachycardia (VT) at EPS and SCD/ non-fatal arrhythmia at follow-up.

  14. NAP prevents acute cerebral oxidative stress and protects against long-term brain injury and cognitive impairment in a model of neonatal hypoxia-ischemia.

    PubMed

    Greggio, Samuel; de Paula, Simone; de Oliveira, Iuri M; Trindade, Cristiano; Rosa, Renato M; Henriques, João A P; DaCosta, Jaderson C

    2011-10-01

    Hypoxia-ischemia (HI) is a common cause of neonatal brain damage with lifelong morbidities in which current therapies are limited. In this study, we investigated the effect of neuropeptide NAP (NAPVSIPQ) on early cerebral oxidative stress, long-term neurological function and brain injury after neonatal HI. Seven-day-old rat pups were subjected to an HI model by applying a unilateral carotid artery occlusion and systemic hypoxia. The animals were randomly assigned to groups receiving an intraperitoneal injection of NAP (3 μg/g) or vehicle immediately (0 h) and 24 h after HI. Brain DNA damage, lipid peroxidation and reduced glutathione (GSH) content were determined 24 h after the last NAP injection. Cognitive impairment was assessed on postnatal day 60 using the spatial version of the Morris water maze learning task. Next, the animals were euthanized to assess the cerebral hemispheric volume using the Cavalieri principle associated with the counting point method. We observed that NAP prevented the acute HI-induced DNA and lipid membrane damage and also recovered the GSH levels in the injured hemisphere of the HI rat pups. Further, NAP was able to prevent impairments in learning and long-term spatial memory and to significantly reduce brain damage up to 7 weeks following the neonatal HI injury. Our findings demonstrate that NAP confers potent neuroprotection from acute brain oxidative stress, long-term cognitive impairment and brain lesions induced by neonatal HI through, at least in part, the modulation of the glutathione-mediated antioxidant system.

  15. Joint bleeding in factor VIII deficient mice causes an acute loss of trabecular bone and calcification of joint soft tissues which is prevented with aggressive factor replacement

    PubMed Central

    Lau, Anthony G.; Sun, Junjiang; Hannah, William B.; Livingston, Eric W.; Heymann, Dominique; Bateman, Ted A.; Monahan, Paul E.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction While chronic degenerative arthropathy is the main morbidity of hemophilia, a very high prevalance of low bone density is also seen in men and boys with hemophilia. The current study investigates bone degradation in the knee joint of hemophilic mice resulting from hemarthrosis and the efficacy of aggressive treatment with factor VIII in the period surrounding injury to prevent bone pathology. Methods Skeletally mature factor VIII knock-out mice were subjected to knee joint hemorrhage induced by puncture of the left knee joint capsule. Mice received either intravenous Factor VIII treatment or placebo immediately prior to injury and at hours 4, 24, 48, 72 and 96 after hemorrhage. Mice were euthanized two-weeks after injury and the joint morphology and loss of bone in the proximal tibia was assessed using microCT imaging. Results Quantitative microCT imaging of the knee joint found acute bone loss at the proximal tibia following injury including loss of trabecular bone volumetric density and bone mineral density, as well as trabecular connectivity density, number, and thickness. Unexpectedly, joint injury also resulted in calcification of the joint soft tissues including the tendons, ligaments, menisci, and cartilage. Treatment with factor VIII prevented this bone and soft tissue degeneration. Conclusion Knee joint hemorrhage resulted in acute changes of adjacent bone including loss of bone density and mineralization of joint soft tissues. The rapid calcification and loss of bone has implications for the initiation and progression of osteoarthritic degradation following joint bleeding. PMID:24712867

  16. Effectiveness of the influenza vaccine at preventing hospitalization due to acute exacerbation of cardiopulmonary disease in Korea from 2011 to 2012.

    PubMed

    Seo, Yu Bin; Choi, Won Suk; Baek, Ji Hyeon; Lee, Jacob; Song, Joon Young; Lee, Jin Soo; Cheong, Hee Jin; Kim, Woo Joo

    2014-01-01

    There is a lack of targeted studies to validate the effectiveness of influenza vaccination on the reduction in influenza-related hospitalizations among patients with co-morbidities. In this study, we estimate the effectiveness of influenza vaccination on preventing hospitalizations in persons with cardiopulmonary disease and establish an evidence base for recommendations on influenza vaccination in this population. During the influenza epidemic in 2011-2012, we performed a multicenter, retrospective case-control study. Cases were patients hospitalized due to acute exacerbation of asthma, COPD, ischemic heart disease (IHD), and congestive heart failure (CHF). Controls were selected from outpatients who visited study hospitals but who were not hospitalized. Cases and controls were matched 1:1 based on age, gender, and date of hospital visit. Conditional logistic regression analyses were used to determine the effectiveness of vaccination. Between 25 December 2011 and 5 May 2012, 828 of each hospitalized and control subjects were identified. The influenza vaccination rate of the hospitalized and non-hospitalized patients was 54.2% and 60.4%, respectively (P = 0.006). The overall vaccine effectiveness for preventing hospitalization was 33.7% (95% confidence interval [CI] 14.0-49.0%; P = 0.002). Conditional logistic regression analysis showed that influenza vaccination significantly reduced the risk of hospitalization, especially due to acute exacerbation of IHD and CHF, in patients aged 65 y and older. The estimated vaccine effectiveness in these patients was 56.0% (95% CI 32.1-71.4%, P = 0.002). Influenza vaccination was associated with a reduction in the risk of hospitalization due to acute exacerbation of cardiopulmonary disease. We recommend the vaccine be given primarily to patients with underlying cardiovascular disease, particularly those 65 y of age and older.

  17. Skin cancer prevention in Australia.

    PubMed

    Sinclair, C; Foley, P

    2009-11-01

    Australia has one of the highest skin cancer incidence and mortality rates in the world. The reason for these high rates is due in part to the high ambient UV radiation levels, combined with a predominantly susceptible fair-skinned population. To address this problem, since 1980 Australians have been exposed to social marketing campaigns to raise awareness of skin cancer prevention. These campaigns have used mass media alongside interventions in schools, workplaces, and in community and leisure settings to motivate sun protective behaviour. As a result of these interventions it can be demonstrated that social marketing campaigns can be a very effective method to not only motivate behaviour change, reduce sunburn, and increase awareness but more importantly, reduce melanoma rates and bring positive economic returns to government. However long term investment in this area is required otherwise any population gains in behaviour are very likely to be quickly eroded.

  18. [Methods for the prevention and treatment of toxico-hypoxic encephalopathy in patients with acute severe poisoning].

    PubMed

    2011-01-01

    The study included 147 patients with toxico-hypoxic encephalopathy resulting from acute poisoning. It was shown that intensive therapy with cytoflavin (20 ml in 400 ml of 5% glucose solution twice daily for 7 days) reduced severity of hypoxic brain lesions and suppression of CNS as apparent from the improvement of its bioelectric activity. The recovery of CNS regulatory action on the life-sustaining systems of the body promoted normalization of the respiratory component of oxygen transport. The improvement of the patients' conditions in the acute phase contributed to accelerated recovery of cognitive-amnestic functions and social adaptation. Cytoflavin therapy improved the clinical picture of toxico-hypoxic encephalopathy due to the reduction in the duration of the comatose state from 45.3 +/- 8.2 to 27.7 +/- 6.9 hr and the decrease in the frequency of secondary pulmonary complications from 72.7 to 35.9%.

  19. Paediatric Dengue Fever diagnosed through parents' epidemiologic report and preventive strategy during the acute phase of infection.

    PubMed

    Poddighe, Dimitri; Bonomelli, Irene; Giardinetti, Silvia; Nedbal, Marco; Bruni, Paola

    2016-01-01

    In Europe, Dengue Fever is one of the most frequent imported diseases and also autochthonous cases occurred in areas where the insect vector is present. Here, we describe a child returning from Philippines and diagnosed with Dengue Fever, through the information provided by parents about an ongoing outbreak in their municipality. An appropriate clinical management in the hospital was established to monitor the occurrence of complications and to cancel the risk of dengue virus transmission in the acute phase of infection.

  20. Acute hemolytic vascular inflammatory processes are prevented by nitric oxide replacement or a single dose of hydroxyurea.

    PubMed

    Almeida, Camila Bononi; Souza, Lucas Eduardo Botelho; Leonardo, Flavia Costa; Costa, Fabio Trindade Maranhão; Werneck, Claudio C; Covas, Dimas Tadeu; Costa, Fernando Ferreira; Conran, Nicola

    2015-08-06

    Hemolysis and consequent release of cell-free hemoglobin (CFHb) impair vascular nitric oxide (NO) bioavailability and cause oxidative and inflammatory processes. Hydroxyurea (HU), a common therapy for sickle cell disease (SCD), induces fetal Hb production and can act as an NO donor. We evaluated the acute inflammatory effects of intravenous water-induced hemolysis in C57BL/6 mice and determined the abilities of an NO donor, diethylamine NONOate (DEANO), and a single dose of HU to modulate this inflammation. Intravenous water induced acute hemolysis in C57BL/6 mice, attaining plasma Hb levels comparable to those observed in chimeric SCD mice. This hemolysis resulted in significant and rapid systemic inflammation and vascular leukocyte recruitment within 15 minutes, accompanied by NO metabolite generation. Administration of another potent NO scavenger (2-phenyl-4,4,5,5-tetramethylimidazoline-1-oxyl-3-oxide) to C57BL/6 mice induced similar alterations in leukocyte recruitment, whereas hemin-induced inflammation occurred over a longer time frame. Importantly, the acute inflammatory effects of water-induced hemolysis were abolished by the simultaneous administration of DEANO or HU, without altering CFHb, in an NO pathway-mediated manner. In vitro, HU partially reversed the Hb-mediated induction of endothelial proinflammatory cytokine secretion and adhesion molecule expression. In summary, pathophysiological levels of hemolysis trigger an immediate inflammatory response, possibly mediated by vascular NO consumption. HU presents beneficial anti-inflammatory effects by inhibiting rapid-onset hemolytic inflammation via an NO-dependent mechanism, independently of fetal Hb elevation. Data provide novel insights into mechanisms of hemolytic inflammation and further support perspectives for the use of HU as an acute treatment for SCD and other hemolytic disorders.

  1. Efficacy of short-term cordyceps sinensis for prevention of contrast-induced nephropathy in patients with acute coronary syndrome undergoing elective percutaneous coronary intervention

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Kai; Lin, Yu; Li, Yong-Jian; Gao, Sheng

    2014-01-01

    Contrast-induced nephropathy (CIN) is one of the major causes of hospital-acquired acute renal failure. The pathophysiological mechanism of CIN remains unknown. There has been little evidence regarding the effects of Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) on CIN. Cordyceps sinensis (CS), a traditional Chinese herb, has been widely used clinically for the prevention of the progression of renal failure. We performed a prospective, randomized controlled trial to investigate the role of CS in the prevention of CIN in patients with acute coronary syndrome (ACS) undergoing elective percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). The 150 ACS patients were randomly assigned to three groups, basic treatment group (n=51), standard CS therapy group (n=49, corbrin capsule 2 g, 3 times/d were used 3 days before and after angiography), and intensive CS therapy group (n=50, corbrin capsule 3 g, 3 times/d were used 3 days before and after angiography). Renal function was assessed at the time of hospital admission and on days 1, 2, and 3 after PCI. CIN occurred in 13 of 150 patients (8.67%). The incidence of CIN was lower in the CS treatment groups than in the basic treatment group (P<0.05), and a significant decrease in the incidence of CIN in the intensive CS therapy group was shown (P<0.01). In conclusion, prophylactic treatment with CS during the peri-procedural stage in ACS patients undergoing elective PCI has a preventive role against CIN, and intensive CS therapy could be more effective. PMID:25664103

  2. Using Fresh Frozen Plasma for Acute Airway Angioedema to Prevent Intubation in the Emergency Department: A Retrospective Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Hagglund, Karen H.; Cigolle, Christine T.

    2016-01-01

    Background. Angioedema (AE) is a common condition which can be complicated by laryngeal edema, having up to 40% mortality. Although sporadic case reports attest to the benefits of fresh frozen plasma (FFP) in treating severe acute bouts of AE, little evidence-based support for this practice is available at present. Study Objectives. To compare the frequency, duration of intubation, and length of intensive care unit (ICU) stay in patients with acute airway AE, with and without the use of FFP. Methods. A retrospective cohort study was conducted, investigating adults admitted to large community hospital ICU with a diagnosis of AE during the years of 2007–2012. Altogether, 128 charts were reviewed for demographics, comorbidities, hospital courses, and outcomes. A total of 20 patients received FFP (108 did not). Results. Demographics and comorbidities did not differ by treatment group. However, nontreated controls did worse in terms of intubation frequency (60% versus 35%; p = 0.05) and ICU stay (3.5 days versus 1.5 days; p < 0.001). Group outcomes were otherwise similar. Conclusion. In an emergency department setting, the use of FFP should be considered in managing acute airway nonhereditary AE (refractory to steroid, antihistamine, and epinephrine). Larger prospective, better controlled studies are needed to devise appropriate treatment guidelines. PMID:26953061

  3. Salvianolic Acid B Prevents Iodinated Contrast Media-Induced Acute Renal Injury in Rats via the PI3K/Akt/Nrf2 Pathway.

    PubMed

    Tongqiang, Liu; Shaopeng, Liu; Xiaofang, Yu; Nana, Song; Xialian, Xu; Jiachang, Hu; Ting, Zhang; Xiaoqiang, Ding

    2016-01-01

    Contrast-induced acute renal injury (CI-AKI) has become a common cause of hospital-acquired renal failure. However, the development of prophylaxis strategies and approved therapies for CI-AKI is limited. Salvianolic acid B (SB) can treat cardiovascular-related diseases. The aim of the present study was to assess the effect of SB on prevention of CI-AKI and explore its underlying mechanisms. We examined its effectiveness of preventing renal injury in a novel CI-AKI rat model. Compared with saline, intravenous SB pretreatment significantly attenuated elevations in serum creatinine and the histological changes of renal tubular injuries, reduced the number of apoptosis-positive tubular cells, activated Nrf2, and lowered the levels of renal oxidative stress induced by iodinated contrast media. The above renoprotection of SB was abolished by the PI3K inhibitor (wortmannin). In HK-2 cells, SB activated Nrf2 and decreased the levels of oxidative stress induced by hydrogen peroxide and subsequently improved cell viability. The above cytoprotection of SB was blocked by the PI3K inhibitor (wortmannin) or siNrf2. Thus, our results demonstrate that, due to its antioxidant properties, SB has the potential to effectively prevent CI-AKI via the PI3K/Akt/Nrf2 pathway.

  4. Potential Harmful Effects of PM2.5 on Occurrence and Progression of Acute Coronary Syndrome: Epidemiology, Mechanisms, and Prevention Measures

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Xu; Zhang, Ying; Yang, Kun-Qi; Yang, Yan-Kun; Zhou, Xian-Liang

    2016-01-01

    The harmful effects of particulate matter with an aerodynamic diameter of <2.5 µm (PM2.5) and its association with acute coronary syndrome (ACS) has gained increased attention in recent years. Significant associations between PM2.5 and ACS have been found in most studies, although sometimes only observed in specific subgroups. PM2.5-induced detrimental effects and ACS arise through multiple mechanisms, including endothelial injury, an enhanced inflammatory response, oxidative stress, autonomic dysfunction, and mitochondria damage as well as genotoxic effects. These effects can lead to a series of physiopathological changes including coronary artery atherosclerosis, hypertension, an imbalance between energy supply and demand to heart tissue, and a systemic hypercoagulable state. Effective strategies to prevent the harmful effects of PM2.5 include reducing pollution sources of PM2.5 and population exposure to PM2.5, and governments and organizations publicizing the harmful effects of PM2.5 and establishing air quality standards for PM2.5. PM2.5 exposure is a significant risk factor for ACS, and effective strategies with which to prevent both susceptible and healthy populations from an increased risk for ACS have important clinical significance in the prevention and treatment of ACS. PMID:27463723

  5. Salvianolic Acid B Prevents Iodinated Contrast Media-Induced Acute Renal Injury in Rats via the PI3K/Akt/Nrf2 Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Tongqiang, Liu; Shaopeng, Liu; Xiaofang, Yu; Nana, Song; Xialian, Xu; Jiachang, Hu; Ting, Zhang; Xiaoqiang, Ding

    2016-01-01

    Contrast-induced acute renal injury (CI-AKI) has become a common cause of hospital-acquired renal failure. However, the development of prophylaxis strategies and approved therapies for CI-AKI is limited. Salvianolic acid B (SB) can treat cardiovascular-related diseases. The aim of the present study was to assess the effect of SB on prevention of CI-AKI and explore its underlying mechanisms. We examined its effectiveness of preventing renal injury in a novel CI-AKI rat model. Compared with saline, intravenous SB pretreatment significantly attenuated elevations in serum creatinine and the histological changes of renal tubular injuries, reduced the number of apoptosis-positive tubular cells, activated Nrf2, and lowered the levels of renal oxidative stress induced by iodinated contrast media. The above renoprotection of SB was abolished by the PI3K inhibitor (wortmannin). In HK-2 cells, SB activated Nrf2 and decreased the levels of oxidative stress induced by hydrogen peroxide and subsequently improved cell viability. The above cytoprotection of SB was blocked by the PI3K inhibitor (wortmannin) or siNrf2. Thus, our results demonstrate that, due to its antioxidant properties, SB has the potential to effectively prevent CI-AKI via the PI3K/Akt/Nrf2 pathway. PMID:27382429

  6. Prevention of incontinence-related skin breakdown for acute and critical care patients: comparison of two products.

    PubMed

    Brunner, Mary; Droegemueller, Carol; Rivers, Sonja; Deuser, William E

    2012-01-01

    Perineal protection products were compared for their efficacy in preventing skin breakdown in the hospitalized patient with urinary and/or fecal incontinence. Each product was used for the duration of the hospital stay with daily observations for perineal skin condition. Results indicated the spray product and wipe product were comparable in rate of skin breakdown prevention. Findings suggest the wipe product is more cost-effective for use during hospitalization, and the spray product preserves skin integrity over a longer period of time, beyond average hospitalization duration.

  7. Vitamin D supplementation to prevent acute respiratory tract infections: systematic review and meta-analysis of individual participant data.

    PubMed

    Martineau, Adrian R; Jolliffe, David A; Hooper, Richard L; Greenberg, Lauren; Aloia, John F; Bergman, Peter; Dubnov-Raz, Gal; Esposito, Susanna; Ganmaa, Davaasambuu; Ginde, Adit A; Goodall, Emma C; Grant, Cameron C; Griffiths, Christopher J; Janssens, Wim; Laaksi, Ilkka; Manaseki-Holland, Semira; Mauger, David; Murdoch, David R; Neale, Rachel; Rees, Judy R; Simpson, Steve; Stelmach, Iwona; Kumar, Geeta Trilok; Urashima, Mitsuyoshi; Camargo, Carlos A

    2017-02-15

    Objectives To assess the overall effect of vitamin D supplementation on risk of acute respiratory tract infection, and to identify factors modifying this effect.Design Systematic review and meta-analysis of individual participant data (IPD) from randomised controlled trials.Data sources Medline, Embase, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, Web of Science, ClinicalTrials.gov, and the International Standard Randomised Controlled Trials Number registry from inception to December 2015.Eligibility criteria for study selection Randomised, double blind, placebo controlled trials of supplementation with vitamin D3 or vitamin D2 of any duration were eligible for inclusion if they had been approved by a research ethics committee and if data on incidence of acute respiratory tract infection were collected prospectively and prespecified as an efficacy outcome.Results 25 eligible randomised controlled trials (total 11 321 participants, aged 0 to 95 years) were identified. IPD were obtained for 10 933 (96.6%) participants. Vitamin D supplementation reduced the risk of acute respiratory tract infection among all participants (adjusted odds ratio 0.88, 95% confidence interval 0.81 to 0.96; P for heterogeneity <0.001). In subgroup analysis, protective effects were seen in those receiving daily or weekly vitamin D without additional bolus doses (adjusted odds ratio 0.81, 0.72 to 0.91) but not in those receiving one or more bolus doses (adjusted odds ratio 0.97, 0.86 to 1.10; P for interaction=0.05). Among those receiving daily or weekly vitamin D, protective effects were stronger in those with baseline 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels <25 nmol/L (adjusted odds ratio 0.30, 0.17 to 0.53) than in those with baseline 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels ≥25 nmol/L (adjusted odds ratio 0.75, 0.60 to 0.95; P for interaction=0.006). Vitamin D did not influence the proportion of participants experiencing at least one serious adverse event (adjusted odds ratio 0.98, 0.80 to 1.20, P

  8. Vitamin D supplementation to prevent acute respiratory tract infections: systematic review and meta-analysis of individual participant data

    PubMed Central

    Jolliffe, David A; Hooper, Richard L; Greenberg, Lauren; Aloia, John F; Bergman, Peter; Dubnov-Raz, Gal; Esposito, Susanna; Ganmaa, Davaasambuu; Ginde, Adit A; Goodall, Emma C; Grant, Cameron C; Griffiths, Christopher J; Janssens, Wim; Laaksi, Ilkka; Manaseki-Holland, Semira; Mauger, David; Murdoch, David R; Neale, Rachel; Rees, Judy R; Simpson, Steve; Stelmach, Iwona; Kumar, Geeta Trilok; Urashima, Mitsuyoshi; Camargo, Carlos A

    2017-01-01

    Objectives To assess the overall effect of vitamin D supplementation on risk of acute respiratory tract infection, and to identify factors modifying this effect. Design Systematic review and meta-analysis of individual participant data (IPD) from randomised controlled trials. Data sources Medline, Embase, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, Web of Science, ClinicalTrials.gov, and the International Standard Randomised Controlled Trials Number registry from inception to December 2015. Eligibility criteria for study selection Randomised, double blind, placebo controlled trials of supplementation with vitamin D3 or vitamin D2 of any duration were eligible for inclusion if they had been approved by a research ethics committee and if data on incidence of acute respiratory tract infection were collected prospectively and prespecified as an efficacy outcome. Results 25 eligible randomised controlled trials (total 11 321 participants, aged 0 to 95 years) were identified. IPD were obtained for 10 933 (96.6%) participants. Vitamin D supplementation reduced the risk of acute respiratory tract infection among all participants (adjusted odds ratio 0.88, 95% confidence interval 0.81 to 0.96; P for heterogeneity <0.001). In subgroup analysis, protective effects were seen in those receiving daily or weekly vitamin D without additional bolus doses (adjusted odds ratio 0.81, 0.72 to 0.91) but not in those receiving one or more bolus doses (adjusted odds ratio 0.97, 0.86 to 1.10; P for interaction=0.05). Among those receiving daily or weekly vitamin D, protective effects were stronger in those with baseline 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels <25 nmol/L (adjusted odds ratio 0.30, 0.17 to 0.53) than in those with baseline 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels ≥25 nmol/L (adjusted odds ratio 0.75, 0.60 to 0.95; P for interaction=0.006). Vitamin D did not influence the proportion of participants experiencing at least one serious adverse event (adjusted odds ratio 0.98, 0.80 to 1

  9. Preventive Effects of Dexmedetomidine on the Liver in a Rat Model of Acid-Induced Acute Lung Injury

    PubMed Central

    Şen, Velat; Güzel, Abdulmenap; Selimoğlu Şen, Hadice; Ece, Aydın; Uluca, Ünal; Söker, Sevda; Doğan, Erdal; Kaplan, İbrahim; Deveci, Engin

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine whether dexmedetomidine improves acute liver injury in a rat model. Twenty-eight male Wistar albino rats weighing 300–350 g were allocated randomly to four groups. In group 1, normal saline (NS) was injected into the lungs and rats were allowed to breathe spontaneously. In group 2, rats received standard ventilation (SV) in addition to NS. In group 3, hydrochloric acid was injected into the lungs and rats received SV. In group 4, rats received SV and 100 µg/kg intraperitoneal dexmedetomidine before intratracheal HCl instillation. Blood samples and liver tissue specimens were examined by biochemical, histopathological, and immunohistochemical methods. Acute lung injury (ALI) was found to be associated with increased malondialdehyde (MDA), total oxidant activity (TOA), oxidative stress index (OSI), and decreased total antioxidant capacity (TAC). Significantly decreased MDA, TOA, and OSI levels and significantly increased TAC levels were found with dexmedetomidine injection in group 4 (P < 0.05). The highest histologic injury scores were detected in group 3. Enhanced hepatic vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) expression and reduced CD68 expression were found in dexmedetomidine group compared with the group 3. In conclusion, the presented data provide the first evidence that dexmedetomidine has a protective effect on experimental liver injury induced by ALI. PMID:25165710

  10. Low-Dose Adrenaline, Promethazine, and Hydrocortisone in the Prevention of Acute Adverse Reactions to Antivenom following Snakebite: A Randomised, Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    de Silva, H. Asita; Pathmeswaran, Arunasalam; Ranasinha, Channa D.; Jayamanne, Shaluka; Samarakoon, Senarath B.; Hittharage, Ariyasena; Kalupahana, Ranjith; Ratnatilaka, G. Asoka; Uluwatthage, Wimalasiri; Aronson, Jeffrey K.; Armitage, Jane M.; Lalloo, David G.; de Silva, H. Janaka

    2011-01-01

    Background Envenoming from snakebites is most effectively treated by antivenom. However, the antivenom available in South Asian countries commonly causes acute allergic reactions, anaphylactic reactions being particularly serious. We investigated whether adrenaline, promethazine, and hydrocortisone prevent such reactions in secondary referral hospitals in Sri Lanka by conducting a randomised, double-blind placebo-controlled trial. Methods and Findings In total, 1,007 patients were randomized, using a 2×2×2 factorial design, in a double-blind, placebo-controlled trial of adrenaline (0.25 ml of a 1∶1,000 solution subcutaneously), promethazine (25 mg intravenously), and hydrocortisone (200 mg intravenously), each alone and in all possible combinations. The interventions, or matching placebo, were given immediately before infusion of antivenom. Patients were monitored for mild, moderate, or severe adverse reactions for at least 96 h. The prespecified primary end point was the effect of the interventions on the incidence of severe reactions up to and including 48 h after antivenom administration. In total, 752 (75%) patients had acute reactions to antivenom: 9% mild, 48% moderate, and 43% severe; 89% of the reactions occurred within 1 h; and 40% of all patients were given rescue medication (adrenaline, promethazine, and hydrocortisone) during the first hour. Compared with placebo, adrenaline significantly reduced severe reactions to antivenom by 43% (95% CI 25–67) at 1 h and by 38% (95% CI 26–49) up to and including 48 h after antivenom administration; hydrocortisone and promethazine did not. Adding hydrocortisone negated the benefit of adrenaline. Conclusions Pretreatment with low-dose adrenaline was safe and reduced the risk of acute severe reactions to snake antivenom. This may be of particular importance in countries where adverse reactions to antivenom are common, although the need to improve the quality of available antivenom cannot be overemphasized

  11. Garlic oil and DDB, comprised in a pharmaceutical composition for the treatment of patients with viral hepatitis, prevents acute liver injuries potentiated by glutathione deficiency in rats.

    PubMed

    Park, Eun Young; Ki, Sung Hwan; Ko, Myong Sok; Kim, Choon Won; Lee, Min Ho; Lee, Young Sok; Kim, Sang Geon

    2005-06-30

    A pharmaceutical composition PENNEL comprising garlic oil (GO) and dimethyl-4,4'-dimethoxy-5,6,5',6'-dimethylene dioxybiphenyl-2,2'-dicarboxylate (DDB) as ingredients active for phase II enzyme induction and liver protection, respectively, has been used as a curative preparation for patients with acute or chronic viral hepatitis. In spite of the wide clinical use of PENNEL in Asian and Middle Eastern countries, whether GO+DDB treatment synergistically protects the liver from injuries potentiated by GSH deficiency compared to the individual treatment has not been determined. This study investigated the effects of GO+DDB in comparison with each ingredient alone on chemical-induced liver injury potentiated by a GSH depleting agent. Rats that had been daily pretreated with GO+DDB, GO, DDB, ursodesoxycholic acid or silymarin for 6 days were exposed to buthionine sulfoximine (BSO) and then injected with a single dose of CCl4. The effects of the agents on acute liver toxicities induced by BSO, CCl4 or BSO+CCl4 were assessed by blood biochemistry and histopathology. GO+DDB pretreatment effectively prevented increases in plasma aminotransferases or lactate dehydrogenase activities in rats exposed to BSO+CCl4, compared to GO or DDB treatment alone. Whereas BSO potentiated CCl4-induced liver injuries as evidenced by elevations in central necrosis, hepatocyte degeneration and inflammation, pretreatment with GO+DDB abrogated BSO+CCl4-induced liver injuries more efficaciously than did that with GO or DDB. The hepatoprotective effect of GO+DDB was superior to that of ursodesoxycholic acid or silymarin. Also, blood biochemistry indicated that GO+DDB pretreatment prevented increases in plasma triglyceride contents in rats insulted with CCl4 or BSO+CCl4. The present study demonstrated that GO+DDB, when daily pretreated for six consecutive days, exerted synergistic protection of the liver from chemical-induced injury potentiated by the condition of GSH deficiency, and has additional

  12. Rituximab in Preventing Acute Graft-Versus-Host Disease in Patients Undergoing a Donor Stem Cell Transplant for Hematologic Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-05-28

    Accelerated Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Contiguous Stage II Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Graft Versus Host Disease; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Grade III

  13. Prevention of acute exacerbations of chronic obstructive bronchitis with carbocysteine lysine salt monohydrate: a multicenter, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Allegra, L; Cordaro, C I; Grassi, C

    1996-01-01

    The efficacy and safety of carbocysteine lysine salt monohydrate (SCMC-Lys) in the prevention of acute exacerbations associated with chronic obstructive bronchitis were evaluated in a multicenter double-blind, placebo-controlled, parallel group trial in 662 outpatients. After a 1-month run-in period, patients were randomized to three groups and assigned to receive one of the following oral treatments: continuous SCMC-Lys 2.7 g once daily, intermittent SCMC-Lys at the same dosage (1-week courses alternating with 1-week intervals on placebo) or placebo. Each treatment lasted for 6 months and spanned the cooler months of the year. Evaluation was based on a daily recording of relevant clinical symptoms and signs and subsequent evaluation of the collected data by three blinded independent physicians. A total of 146 patients (23%) failed to complete the 6-month treatment (mostly due to difficulties in complying with protocol requirements), without clear-cut differences in the dropout rate in the three groups. An intention-to-treat analysis revealed that the incidence of patients without exacerbations in the group assigned to continuous SCMC-Lys treatment was significantly higher than in the placebo-treated group (p < 0.001). The total number of patients with at least one exacerbation was 66 (29.6%) in the group treated with continuous SCMC-Lys compared with 100 (45.9%) with placebo. In the former group the time between initiation of treatment and first exacerbation was significantly prolonged. The average number of days with acute respiratory illness was significantly decreased in the group receiving continuous SCMC-Lys compared with the group receiving placebo, and this was associated with a significant reduction in the antibiotic consumption during the trial period. In patients assigned to intermittent treatment, results of the assessed endpoints did not differ significantly from those observed in the placebo group. No serious adverse effects were reported. It is

  14. [Value of intestinal decontamination by traditional Chinese medicine-X in the prevention of bacterial translocation complicated by severe acute pancreatitis in rats].

    PubMed

    Qiao, A; Zhang, Z; Liu, X; Jiang, J

    2000-09-01

    This study was designed to evaluate the efficacy of traditional Chinese Medicine-X in preventing the necrotic infection of the pancreas in severe acute pancreatitis (SAP). Sixty rats were randomly divided into five groups with 12 rats in each one: (1) normal control, (2) SAP + 0.9% normal saline (1 ml x 100 g-1 x 24 h-1), (3) SAP + gentamycin (2000 u x 100 g-1 x 24 h-1), (4) SAP + TCM-X (1.0 g x 100 g-1 x 24 h-1), and (5) SAP + gentamycin (2000 u x 100 g-1 x 24 h-1) + TCM-X (1.0 g x 100 g-1 x 24 h-1). The medicines were given by way of gastrotube, once every 24 hours, twice in all. Pancreatitis was induced by a single intraperitoneal injection of 500 mg.100 g-1 of L-arginine. Serum endotoxin were observed and the clone forming units from mesenteric lymphnode and pancreas were obtained after 48 hours treatment. 96 hours after the experiment, the bacteria found in the mesenteric lymphnodes and pancreas in groups three, four and five were reduced as compared to that in group two; the levels of serum endotoxin were reduced, too. These data indicate that TCM-X and gentamycin in decontamination by way of gastrotube are effective in preventing bacterial translocation complicated by SAP, and the effect of TCM-X is stronger than that of gentamycin.

  15. Acute low dose of MK-801 prevents memory deficits without altering hippocampal DARPP-32 expression and BDNF levels in sepsis survivor rats.

    PubMed

    Cassol-Jr, Omar J; Comim, Clarissa M; Constantino, Larissa S; Rosa, Daniela V F; Mango, Luiz Alexandre V; Stertz, Laura; Kapczinski, Flávio; Romano-Silva, Marco A; Quevedo, João; Dal-Pizzol, Felipe

    2011-01-01

    Sepsis is characterized by an intense inflammatory reaction with potential neurotoxic effects in the central nervous system and damage to memory and learning ability. We assessed the effects of acute low dose of MK-801 on the memory impairment, hippocampal BDNF levels and DARPP-32 expression ten days after sepsis. Under anesthesia, male Wistar rats underwent either cecal ligation and perforation (CLP) or sham. Then, the animals received either a single systemic injection of MK-801 (0.025 mg/kg) or saline solution. Ten days after CLP, the animals were submitted to the step-down inhibitory avoidance and object recognition tests. Also, the hippocampal BDNF protein levels and DARPP-32 expression were evaluated. MK-801 prevented cognitive impairment, but did not affect the hippocampal BDNF levels. DARPP-32 expression was significantly different only in the animals submitted to sepsis that received MK-801 treatment. Thus, we demonstrated that a single low dose of MK-801 prevented memory impairment without altering hippocampal DARPP-32 expression and BDNF levels.

  16. Multifaceted Intervention to Prevent Venous Thromboembolism in Patients Hospitalized for Acute Medical Illness: A Multicenter Cluster-Randomized Trial

    PubMed Central

    Roy, Pierre-Marie; Rachas, Antoine; Meyer, Guy; Le Gal, Grégoire; Durieux, Pierre; El Kouri, Dominique; Honnart, Didier; Schmidt, Jeannot; Legall, Catherine; Hausfater, Pierre; Chrétien, Jean-Marie; Mottier, Dominique

    2016-01-01

    Background Misuse of thromboprophylaxis may increase preventable complications for hospitalized medical patients. Objectives To assess the net clinical benefit of a multifaceted intervention in emergency wards (educational lectures, posters, pocket cards, computerized clinical decision support systems and, where feasible, electronic reminders) for the prevention of venous thromboembolism. Patients/Methods Prospective cluster-randomized trial in 27 hospitals. After a pre-intervention period, centers were randomized as either intervention (n = 13) or control (n = 14). All patients over 40 years old, admitted to the emergency room, and hospitalized in a medical ward were included, totaling 1,402 (712 intervention and 690 control) and 15,351 (8,359 intervention and 6,992 control) in the pre-intervention and intervention periods, respectively. Results Symptomatic venous thromboembolism or major bleeding (primary outcome) occurred at 3 months in 3.1% and 3.2% of patients in the intervention and control groups, respectively (adjusted odds ratio: 1.02 [95% confidence interval: 0.78–1.34]). The rates of thromboembolism (1.9% vs. 1.9%), major bleedings (1.2% vs. 1.3%), and mortality (11.3% vs. 11.1%) did not differ between the groups. Between the pre-intervention and intervention periods, the proportion of patients who received prophylactic anticoagulant treatment more steeply increased in the intervention group (from 35.0% to 48.2%: +13.2%) than the control (40.7% to 44.1%: +3.4%), while the rate of adequate thromboprophylaxis remained stable in both groups (52.4% to 50.9%: -1.5%; 49.1% to 48.8%: -0.3%). Conclusions Our intervention neither improved adequate prophylaxis nor reduced the rates of clinical events. New strategies are required to improve thromboembolism prevention for hospitalized medical patients. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01212393 PMID:27227406

  17. Bilirubin prevents acute DSS-induced colitis by inhibiting leukocyte infiltration and suppressing upregulation of inducible nitric oxide synthase.

    PubMed

    Zucker, Stephen D; Vogel, Megan E; Kindel, Tammy L; Smith, Darcey L H; Idelman, Gila; Avissar, Uri; Kakarlapudi, Ganesh; Masnovi, Michelle E

    2015-11-15

    Bilirubin is thought to exert anti-inflammatory effects by inhibiting vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1)-dependent leukocyte migration and by suppressing the expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS). As VCAM-1 and iNOS are important mediators of tissue injury in the dextran sodium sulfate (DSS) murine model of inflammatory colitis, we examined whether bilirubin prevents colonic injury in DSS-treated mice. Male C57BL/6 mice were administered 2.5% DSS in the drinking water for 7 days, while simultaneously receiving intraperitoneal injections of bilirubin (30 mg/kg) or potassium phosphate vehicle. Disease activity was monitored, peripheral blood counts and serum nitrate levels were determined, and intestinal specimens were analyzed for histological injury, leukocyte infiltration, and iNOS expression. The effect of bilirubin on IL-5 production by HSB-2 cells and on Jurkat cell transendothelial migration also was determined. DSS-treated mice that simultaneously received bilirubin lost less body weight, had lower serum nitrate levels, and exhibited reduced disease severity than vehicle-treated animals. Concordantly, histopathological analyses revealed that bilirubin-treated mice manifested significantly less colonic injury, including reduced infiltration of eosinophils, lymphocytes, and monocytes, and diminished iNOS expression. Bilirubin administration also was associated with decreased eosinophil and monocyte infiltration into the small intestine, with a corresponding increase in peripheral blood eosinophilia. Bilirubin prevented Jurkat migration but did not alter IL-5 production. In conclusion, bilirubin prevents DSS-induced colitis by inhibiting the migration of leukocytes across the vascular endothelium and by suppressing iNOS expression.

  18. Bone Marrow-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells Repaired but Did Not Prevent Gentamicin-Induced Acute Kidney Injury through Paracrine Effects in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Reis, Luciana A.; Borges, Fernanda T.; Simões, Manuel J.; Borges, Andrea A.; Sinigaglia-Coimbra, Rita; Schor, Nestor

    2012-01-01

    This study evaluated the effects of bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs) or their conditioned medium (CM) on the repair and prevention of Acute Kidney Injury (AKI) induced by gentamicin (G). Animals received daily injections of G up to 20 days. On the 10th day, injections of BMSCs, CM, CM+trypsin, CM+RNase or exosome-like microvesicles extracted from the CM were administered. In the prevention groups, the animals received the BMSCs 24 h before or on the 5th day of G treatment. Creatinine (Cr), urea (U), FENa and cytokines were quantified. The kidneys were evaluated using hematoxylin/eosin staining and immunohystochemistry. The levels of Cr, U and FENa increased during all the periods of G treatment. The BMSC transplantation, its CM or exosome injections inhibited the increase in Cr, U, FENa, necrosis, apoptosis and also increased cell proliferation. The pro-inflammatory cytokines decreased while the anti-inflammatory cytokines increased compared to G. When the CM or its exosomes were incubated with RNase (but not trypsin), these effects were blunted. The Y chromosome was not observed in the 24-h prevention group, but it persisted in the kidney for all of the periods analyzed, suggesting that the injury is necessary for the docking and maintenance of BMSCs in the kidney. In conclusion, the BMSCs and CM minimized the G-induced renal damage through paracrine effects, most likely through the RNA carried by the exosome-like microvesicles. The use of the CM from BMSCs can be a potential therapeutic tool for this type of nephrotoxicity, allowing for the avoidance of cell transplantations. PMID:22970165

  19. Prevention of venous thromboembolism in acutely ill medical patients after the results of recent trials with the new oral anticoagulants.

    PubMed

    Imberti, Davide; Benedetti, Raffaella; Ageno, Walter

    2013-12-01

    Venous thromboembolism (VTE) is a common potentially life-threatening complication in acutely ill medical patients; over 70 % of the fatal episodes of pulmonary embolism during hospitalization occur in non-surgical patients. In the absence of thromboprophylaxis, the incidence of venographically detected deep vein thrombosis is about 15 % in medical patients. Several trials and meta-analyses have clearly demonstrated the prophylactic role of unfractionated heparin, low molecular weight heparin and fondaparinux. Although over the past few years the knowledge of epidemiology, clinical features and prophylaxis in medical patients has significantly improved, there remain a number of controversial areas that require further investigation. Newer VTE risk assessment models have been proposed to select high risk hospitalized medical patients, but they still require external validation; scarce data are available to stratify patients to identify their individual bleeding risk. The optimal duration of thromboprophylaxis in medical patients is still a matter of debate; currently, extended prophylaxis after discharge is not recommended, but it may be required for subgroup of patients with persistently high VTE risk and a negligible risk of bleeding. Based on the results of recent studies, the new oral anticoagulants appear to have a very limited role, if any. However, a better risk stratification of patients who have a persistently increased risk of VTE is warranted to improve the risk to benefit profile of any anticoagulant drug to be used in this setting.

  20. Preventive effect of Hochu-ekki-to on lipopolysaccharide-induced acute lung injury in BALB/c mice.

    PubMed

    Tajima, Shunji; Bando, Masashi; Yamasawa, Hideaki; Ohno, Shoji; Moriyama, Hiroshi; Takada, Toshinori; Suzuki, Eiichi; Gejyo, Fumitake; Sugiyama, Yukihiko

    2006-01-01

    This study was designed to investigate the effect of Hochu-ekki-to (TJ-41), a Japanese herbal medicine, on the development of lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced acute lung injury (ALI) in mice. ALI was induced in female BALB/c mice by the intranasal administration of 0.1 mg/kg LPS. The mice were divided into a group receiving normal feed and another group receiving feed mixed with TJ-41 at a dose of 1 g/kg/day for 8 weeks before LPS challenge. In the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid, the preadministration of TJ-41 caused significant reduction in the absolute number of total cells, neutrophils, and macrophages. The preadministration of TJ-41 significantly inhibited increases in the serum level of keratinocyte chemoattractant (KC), which is a murine chemotaxin for neutrophils that corresponds to human interleukin-8, with respect to its concentration at 24 h after LPS challenge. Furthermore, the histopathologic findings indicated that alveolitis with leukocyte infiltration in the alveolar space was less severe in the TJ-41-treated mice than in the control mice. These findings indicated that the preadministration of TJ-41 could show an inhibitory effect on ALI in this experimental murine system associated with the suppression of chemokine production.

  1. Schiff Base Metal Derivatives Enhance the Expression of HSP70 and Suppress BAX Proteins in Prevention of Acute Gastric Lesion

    PubMed Central

    Gwaram, Nura Suleiman; Al-Obaidi, Mazen M. Jamil; Soleimani, A. F.; Ali, Hapipah Mohd; Abdul Majid, Nazia

    2013-01-01

    Schiff base complexes have appeared to be promising in the treatment of different diseases and disorders and have drawn a lot of attention to their biological activities. This study was conducted to evaluate the regulatory effect of Schiff base metal derivatives on the expression of heat shock proteins (HSP) 70 and BAX in protection against acute haemorrhagic gastric ulcer in rats. Rats were assigned to 6 groups of 6 rats: the normal control (Tween 20 5% v/v, 5 mL/kg), the positive control (Tween 20 5% v/v, 5 mL/kg), and four Schiff base derivative groups named Schiff_1, Schiff_2, Schiff_3, and Schiff_4 (25 mg/kg). After 1 h, all of the groups received ethanol 95% (5 mL/kg) but the normal control received Tween 20 (Tween 20 5% v/v, 5 mL/kg). The animals were euthanized after 60 min and the stomachs were dissected for histology (H&E), immunohistochemistry, and western blot analysis against HSP70 and BAX proteins. The results showed that the Schiff base metal derivatives enhanced the expression of HSP70 and suppressed the expression of BAX proteins during their gastroprotection against ethanol-induced gastric lesion in rats. PMID:24298554

  2. Glycyrrhizic acid pretreatment prevents sepsis-induced acute kidney injury via suppressing inflammation, apoptosis and oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Hongyu; Liu, Zhenning; Shen, Haitao; Jin, Shuai; Zhang, Shun

    2016-06-15

    Glycyrrhizic acid (GA), an active ingredient in licorice, has multiple pharmacological activities. The aim of our study was to investigate the molecular mechanism involved in the protective effects of GA in lipopolysaccharide (LPS) stimulated rat mesangial cells (HBZY-1) and septic rats. Sepsis model was established by injection of 5mg/kg LPS in rats or incubation with 1μg/ml LPS for 24h in HBZY-1 cells. A variety of molecular biological experiments were carried out to assess the effects of GA on inflammation, apoptosis, and oxidative stress. First we found that GA alleviated sepsis-induced kidney injury in vivo. Furthermore, GA suppressed inflammatory response in vivo and in vitro. Additionally, GA inhibited cell apoptosis and the changes in expressions of apoptosis related proteins induced by LPS. Moreover, GA markedly inhibited oxidative stress induced by LPS via activation of ERK signaling pathway. Finally GA could inhibit the activation of NF-κ B induced by LPS. Our present study indicates that GA has a protective effect against sepsis-induced inflammatory response, apoptosis, and oxidative stress damage, which provides a molecular basis for a new medical treatment of septic acute kidney injury.

  3. Prevention of acute radiation-induced proctosigmoiditis by balsalazide: A randomized, double-blind, placebo controlled trial in prostate cancer patients

    SciTech Connect

    Jahraus, Christopher D. . E-mail: cdjahraus@msn.com; Bettenhausen, Doug Phar; Malik, Uzma M.B.B.S.; Sellitti, Marguerite; St Clair, William H.

    2005-12-01

    Purpose: A common complication of pelvic radiotherapy (RT) is acute radiation-induced proctosigmoiditis (RIPS), for which a multitude of therapies have been tried. The 5-aminosalicylates (5-ASA), which are traditionally used to treat inflammatory bowel disease, have been tested; however, all but one prior randomized attempt to limit or prevent RIPS with 5-ASA-type agents have failed. We sought to evaluate balsalazide, a new 5-ASA drug, for its potential to prevent or limit RIPS in patients undergoing RT for carcinoma of the prostate, as a representative sample of pelvic RT patients. Balsalazide has a unique delivery system in that 99% of ingested drug is delivered to and activated in the colon, a higher yield than all other oral agents currently available in this class. Furthermore, it lacks the antigenic sulfa moiety present in sulfasalazine, the only other 5-ASA with demonstrated benefit in this setting. Thus, it was deemed an ideal candidate for preventing or limiting RIPS. Methods and Materials: Eligible patients included prostate cancer patients, American Joint Committee on Cancer Stage T1-3, M0 being treated with external beam radiotherapy in University of Kentucky Department of Radiation Medicine. Between January 1, 2003 and July 1, 2004, 27 eligible patients were enrolled in the study. Patients were administered 2250 mg of balsalazide or an identical-appearing placebo twice daily beginning 5 days before RT and continuing for 2 weeks after completion. Toxicities were graded weekly according to National Cancer Institute Common Toxicity Criteria v. 2.0 for each of the following: proctitis, diarrhea, dysuria, weight loss, fatigue, nausea, and vomiting. A symptom index was formulated for each toxicity consisting of the toxicity's numeric grade multiplied by the number of days it was experienced, and summed for each grade experienced throughout the course of RT. Results: With the exception of nausea or vomiting, seen in 3 patients on balsalazide and 2 on placebo

  4. Pressure ulcer prevalence, use of preventive measures, and mortality risk in an acute care population: a quality improvement project.

    PubMed

    Leijon, Siv; Bergh, Ingrid; Terstappen, Karin

    2013-01-01

    The primary aim of this quality improvement project was to determine pressure prevalence, risk of mortality, and use of preventive measures in a group of hospitalized patients. Two hundred fifty-eight patients recruited from Skaraborg Hospital in Sweden were assessed. A 1-day point prevalence study was carried out using a protocol advocated by the European PU Advisory Panel. Patients' age, gender, severity of PU (grades I-IV), anatomical location of PU, and use of preventive measures were recorded. The Swedish language version of the Modified Norton Scale was used for PU risk assessment. Data were collected by nurses trained according to the Web-based training: PU classification, "ePuclas2." After 21 months, a retrospective audit of the electronic records for patients identified with pressure ulcers was completed. The point prevalence of pressure ulcers was 23%. The total number of ulcers was 85, most were grade 1 (n = 39). The most common locations were the sacrum (n = 15) and the heel (n = 10). Three percent of patients (n = 9) had been assessed during their current hospital stay using a risk assessment tool. There was a statistically significant relationship between pressure ulcer occurrence and a low total score on the Modified Norton Scale. The patients' ages correlated significantly to the presence of a pressure ulcer. Patients with a pressure ulcer had a 3.6-fold increased risk of dying within 21 months, as compared with those without a pressure ulcer. Based on results from this quality improvement project, we recommend routine pressure ulcer risk assessment for all patients managed in a hospital setting such as ours. We further recommend that particular attention should be given to older and frail patients who are at higher risk for pressure ulcer occurrence and mortality.

  5. Swiss Haemovigilance Data and Implementation of Measures for the Prevention of Transfusion Associated Acute Lung Injury (TRALI).

    PubMed

    Jutzi, Markus; Levy, Guy; Taleghani, Behrouz Mansouri

    2008-01-01

    SUMMARY: In Switzerland, blood donations are collected exclusively from healthy non-remunerated voluntary blood donors mainly by 13 regional Blood Transfusion Services throughout the country. Thereby, self-sufficient blood supply for a population of about 7.5 million is achieved, and approximately 300,000 units of red cells, 75,000 therapeutic units of fresh plasma, and 20,000 therapeutic units of platelets are transfused annually. Reporting to Swissmedic (the Swiss agency for therapeutic products) of all suspected adverse transfusion events on a standardised form is mandatory. Data are then analysed to estimate the risks of the most serious transfusion events. Together with transfusion of an incorrect blood component and bacterial contamination of platelet concentrates, TRALI is a significant risk of transfusion in Switzerland and occurs in approximately every 8,000-20,000 FFP transfusions according to current haemovigilance data. Among 25 reported cases between 2002 and November 2007, 4 are proven immune TRALI, 2 are highly likely immune TRALI, 10 are possibly immune TRALI, 8 are non-immune TRALI, and 1 is a suspected case which could not be confirmed as TRALI. Based on the hypothesis of an immunological trigger of TRALI, an exclusion of the transfusion of plasma from female donors can be considered as a precautionary measure which might have prevented 4 cases of proven immune TRALI, 2 cases of highly likely immune TRALI, and an unknown number of the 10 cases of possibly immune TRALI. Based on these data and encouraging preliminary reports of the effects of comparable measures in other countries, the decision was made that starting with January 1st 2007 the production of quarantined FFP is restricted to donations from men or from women confirming that they have never been pregnant (to their knowledge) or with negative tests for antibodies against HLA class I and II. The analysis of further vigilance data is needed to elucidate the efficacy of this preventive

  6. Swiss Haemovigilance Data and Implementation of Measures for the Prevention of Transfusion Associated Acute Lung Injury (TRALI)

    PubMed Central

    Jutzi, Markus; Levy, Guy; Taleghani, Behrouz Mansouri

    2008-01-01

    Summary In Switzerland, blood donations are collected exclusively from healthy non-remunerated voluntary blood donors mainly by 13 regional Blood Transfusion Services throughout the country. Thereby, self-sufficient blood supply for a population of about 7.5 million is achieved, and approximately 300,000 units of red cells, 75,000 therapeutic units of fresh plasma, and 20,000 therapeutic units of platelets are transfused annually. Reporting to Swissmedic (the Swiss agency for therapeutic products) of all suspected adverse transfusion events on a standardised form is mandatory. Data are then analysed to estimate the risks of the most serious transfusion events. Together with transfusion of an incorrect blood component and bacterial contamination of platelet concentrates, TRALI is a significant risk of transfusion in Switzerland and occurs in approximately every 8,000–20,000 FFP transfusions according to current haemovigilance data. Among 25 reported cases between 2002 and November 2007, 4 are proven immune TRALI, 2 are highly likely immune TRALI, 10 are possibly immune TRALI, 8 are non-immune TRALI, and 1 is a suspected case which could not be confirmed as TRALI. Based on the hypothesis of an immunological trigger of TRALI, an exclusion of the transfusion of plasma from female donors can be considered as a precautionary measure which might have prevented 4 cases of proven immune TRALI, 2 cases of highly likely immune TRALI, and an unknown number of the 10 cases of possibly immune TRALI. Based on these data and encouraging preliminary reports of the effects of comparable measures in other countries, the decision was made that starting with January 1st 2007 the production of quarantined FFP is restricted to donations from men or from women confirming that they have never been pregnant (to their knowledge) or with negative tests for antibodies against HLA class I and II. The analysis of further vigilance data is needed to elucidate the efficacy of this preventive

  7. Dibucaine Mitigates Spreading Depolarization in Human Neocortical Slices and Prevents Acute Dendritic Injury in the Ischemic Rodent Neocortex

    PubMed Central

    Risher, W. Christopher; Lee, Mark R.; Fomitcheva, Ioulia V.; Hess, David C.; Kirov, Sergei A.

    2011-01-01

    Background Spreading depolarizations that occur in patients with malignant stroke, subarachnoid/intracranial hemorrhage, and traumatic brain injury are known to facilitate neuronal damage in metabolically compromised brain tissue. The dramatic failure of brain ion homeostasis caused by propagating spreading depolarizations results in neuronal and astroglial swelling. In essence, swelling is the initial response and a sign of the acute neuronal injury that follows if energy deprivation is maintained. Choosing spreading depolarizations as a target for therapeutic intervention, we have used human brain slices and in vivo real-time two-photon laser scanning microscopy in the mouse neocortex to study potentially useful therapeutics against spreading depolarization-induced injury. Methodology/Principal Findings We have shown that anoxic or terminal depolarization, a spreading depolarization wave ignited in the ischemic core where neurons cannot repolarize, can be evoked in human slices from pediatric brains during simulated ischemia induced by oxygen/glucose deprivation or by exposure to ouabain. Changes in light transmittance (LT) tracked terminal depolarization in time and space. Though spreading depolarizations are notoriously difficult to block, terminal depolarization onset was delayed by dibucaine, a local amide anesthetic and sodium channel blocker. Remarkably, the occurrence of ouabain-induced terminal depolarization was delayed at a concentration of 1 µM that preserves synaptic function. Moreover, in vivo two-photon imaging in the penumbra revealed that, though spreading depolarizations did still occur, spreading depolarization-induced dendritic injury was inhibited by dibucaine administered intravenously at 2.5 mg/kg in a mouse stroke model. Conclusions/Significance Dibucaine mitigated the effects of spreading depolarization at a concentration that could be well-tolerated therapeutically. Hence, dibucaine is a promising candidate to protect the brain from

  8. Streptococcus salivarius 24SMB administered by nasal spray for the prevention of acute otitis media in otitis-prone children.

    PubMed

    Marchisio, P; Santagati, M; Scillato, M; Baggi, E; Fattizzo, M; Rosazza, C; Stefani, S; Esposito, S; Principi, N

    2015-12-01

    This paper reports the results of the first study in which Streptococcus salivarius 24SMB, a safe α-haemolytic strain capable of producing bacteriocin-like substances with significant activity against acute otitis media (AOM) pathogens, was intranasally administered in an attempt to reduce the risk of new episodes of AOM in otitis-prone children. In this prospective, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study, 100 children aged 1-5 years with histories of recurrent AOM were randomized 1:1 to receive an intranasal S. salivarius 24SMB or placebo twice daily for 5 days each month for 3 consecutive months. Fifty treated children and 47 who received placebo who were compliant with study protocol were followed monthly for 6 months. The number of children who did not experience any AOM was higher among the children treated with the S. salivarius 24SMB preparation than among those in the placebo group (30.0 vs 14.9%; p = 0.076). Moreover, the number of children who received antibiotics during the study period was lower among the children treated with S. salivarius 24 SMB than among those who received placebo (70 vs 83.0%; p = 0.13). Compared with the children who were not colonized by S. salivarius 24SMB after treatment, the number of colonized children who experienced any AOM was significantly lower (42.8 vs 13.6%; p = 0.03). Similar results were observed when the children treated with antibiotics for AOM were analysed (67.8 vs 95.5%; p = 0.029). This study revealed the ability of intranasally administered S. salivarius 24SMB to reduce the risk of AOM in otitis-prone children.

  9. Ginkgo biloba for the prevention of severe acute mountain sickness (AMS) starting one day before rapid ascent.

    PubMed

    Gertsch, Jeffrey H; Seto, Todd B; Mor, Joanne; Onopa, Janet

    2002-01-01

    Previous studies suggest that 5 days of prophylactic ginkgo decreases the incidence of acute mountain sickness (AMS) during gradual ascent. This trial was designed to determine if ginkgo is an effective prophylactic agent if begun 1 day prior to rapid ascent. In this double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled trial, 26 participants residing at sea level received ginkgo (60 mg TID) or placebo starting 24 h before ascending Mauna Kea, Hawaii. Subjects were transported from sea level to the summit (4205 m) over 3 hours, including 1 hour at 2835 m. The Lake Louise Self-report Questionnaire constituted the primary outcome measure at baseline, 2835 m, and after 4 h at 4205 m. AMS was defined as a Lake Louise Self-report Score (LLSR) >/= 3 with headache. Subjects who developed severe AMS were promptly transported to lower altitude for the remainder of the study. The ginkgo (n = 12) and placebo (n = 14) groups were well matched (58% vs. 50% female; median age 28 yr, range 22-53 vs. 33 yr, range 21-53; 58% vs. 57% Caucasian). Two (17%) subjects on ginkgo and nine (64%) on placebo developed severe AMS and required descent for their safety (p = 0.021); all recovered without sequelae. Median LLSR at 4205 m was significantly lower for ginkgo versus placebo (4, range 1-8 vs. 5, range 2-9, p = 0.03). Ginkgo use did not reach statistical significance for lowering incidence of AMS compared with placebo (ginkgo 7/12, 58.3% vs. placebo 13/14, 92.9%, p = 0.07). Twenty-one of 26 (81%) subjects developed AMS overall. This is the first study to demonstrate that 1 day of pretreatment with ginkgo 60 mg TID may significantly reduce the severity of AMS prior to rapid ascent from sea level to 4205 m.

  10. Acute treatment with bis selenide, an organic compound containing the trace element selenium, prevents memory deficits induced by reserpine in rats.

    PubMed

    Bortolatto, Cristiani Folharini; Guerra Souza, Ana Cristina; Wilhelm, Ethel Antunes; Nogueira, Cristina Wayne

    2013-01-01

    Taking into account the promising pharmacological actions of (Z)-2,3-bis(4-chlorophenylselanyl) prop-2-en-1-ol) (bis selenide), an organic compound containing the trace element selenium, and the constant search for drugs that improve the cognitive performance, the objective of the present study was to investigate whether bis selenide treatment ameliorates memory deficits induced by reserpine in rats. For this aim, male adult rats received a single subcutaneous injection of reserpine (1 mg/kg), a biogenic amine-depleting agent used to induce memory deficit. After 24 h, bis selenide at doses of 25 and 50 mg/kg was administered to rats by intragastric route, and 1 h later, the animals were submitted to behavior tasks. The effects of acute administration of bis selenide on memory were evaluated by social recognition, step-down passive avoidance, and object recognition paradigms. Exploratory and locomotor activities of rats were determined using the open-field test. Analysis of data revealed that the social memory disruption caused by reserpine was reversed by bis selenide at both doses. In addition, bis selenide, at the highest dose, prevented the memory deficit resulting from reserpine administration to rats in step-down passive avoidance and object recognition tasks. No significant alterations in locomotor and exploratory behaviors were found in animals treated with reserpine and/or bis selenide. Results obtained from distinct memory behavioral paradigms revealed that an acute treatment with bis selenide attenuated memory deficits induced by reserpine in rats.

  11. Systematic, theoretically-grounded development and feasibility testing of an innovative, preventive web-based game for children exposed to acute trauma

    PubMed Central

    Marsac, Meghan L.; Winston, Flaura K.; Hildenbrand, Aimee K.; Kohser, Kristen L.; March, Sonja; Kenardy, Justin; Kassam-Adams, Nancy

    2015-01-01

    Background Millions of children are affected by acute medical events annually, creating need for resources to promote recovery. While web-based interventions promise wide reach and low cost for users, development can be time- and cost-intensive. A systematic approach to intervention development can help to minimize costs and increase likelihood of effectiveness. Using a systematic approach, our team integrated evidence on the etiology of traumatic stress, an explicit program theory, and a user-centered design process to intervention development. Objective To describe evidence and the program theory model applied to the Coping Coach intervention and present pilot data evaluating intervention feasibility and acceptability. Method Informed by empirical evidence on traumatic stress prevention, an overarching program theory model was articulated to delineate pathways from a) specific intervention content to b) program targets and proximal outcomes to c) key longer-term health outcomes. Systematic user-testing with children ages 8–12 (N = 42) exposed to an acute medical event and their parents was conducted throughout intervention development. Results Functionality challenges in early prototypes necessitated revisions. Child engagement was positive throughout revisions to the Coping Coach intervention. Final pilot-testing demonstrated promising feasibility and high user-engagement and satisfaction. Conclusion Applying a systematic approach to the development of Coping Coach led to the creation of a functional intervention that is accepted by children and parents. Development of new e-health interventions may benefit from a similar approach. Future research should evaluate the efficacy of Coping Coach in achieving targeted outcomes of reduced trauma symptoms and improved health-related quality of life. PMID:25844276

  12. Sunburn | Cancer Trends Progress Report

    Cancer.gov

    The Cancer Trends Progress Report, first issued in 2001, summarizes our nation's advances against cancer in relation to Healthy People targets set forth by the Department of Health and Human Services.

  13. Receipt of HIV prevention interventions is more common in community-based clinics than in primary care or acute care settings for Black men who have sex with men in the District of Columbia.

    PubMed

    Levy, Matthew E; Watson, Christopher Chauncey; Glick, Sara Nelson; Kuo, Irene; Wilton, Leo; Brewer, Russell A; Fields, Sheldon D; Criss, Vittoria; Magnus, Manya

    2016-01-01

    Characterization of structural barriers that impede the receipt of HIV prevention and care services is critical to addressing the HIV epidemic among Black men who have sex with men (BMSM). This study investigated the utilization of HIV prevention and general care services among a non-clinic-based sample of BMSM who reported at least one structural barrier to engagement in care. Proportions of participants who had received HIV prevention services and general care services in different settings were compared using Fisher's exact test and correlates of service receipt were assessed using logistic regression. Among 75 BMSM, 60% had accessed a community-based clinic, 21% had accessed a primary care setting, and 36% had accessed an acute care setting in the last 6 months. Greater proportions of participants who had accessed community-based clinics received HIV prevention services during these visits (90%) compared to those who had accessed primary care (53%) and acute care (44%) settings (p = .005). Opportunities for BMSM to receive HIV prevention interventions differed by care setting. Having access to health care did not necessarily facilitate the uptake of HIV prevention interventions. Further investigation of the structurally rooted reasons why BMSM are often unable to access HIV prevention services is warranted.

  14. Prevention of contrast-induced acute kidney injury in patients undergoing cardiovascular procedures-a systematic review and network meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Navarese, Eliano P.; Gurbel, Paul A.; Andreotti, Felicita; Kołodziejczak, Michalina Marta; Palmer, Suetonia C.; Dias, Sofia; Buffon, Antonino; Kubica, Jacek; Kowalewski, Mariusz; Jadczyk, Tomasz; Laskiewicz, Michał; Jędrzejek, Marek; Brockmeyer, Maximillian; Airoldi, Flavio; Ruospo, Marinella; De Servi, Stefano; Wojakowski, Wojciech; O’ Connor, Christopher; Strippoli, Giovanni F. M.

    2017-01-01

    Background Interventional diagnostic and therapeutic procedures requiring intravascular iodinated contrast steadily increase patient exposure to the risks of contrast-induced acute kidney injury (CIAKI), which is associated with death, nonfatal cardiovascular events, and prolonged hospitalization. The aim of this study was to investigate the efficacy of pharmacological and non-pharmacological treatments for CIAKI prevention in patients undergoing cardiovascular invasive procedures with iodinated contrast. Methods and findings MEDLINE, Google Scholar, EMBASE and Cochrane databases as well as abstracts and presentations from major cardiovascular and nephrology meetings were searched, up to 22 April 2016. Eligible studies were randomized trials comparing strategies to prevent CIAKI (alone or in combination) when added to saline versus each other, saline, placebo, or no treatment in patients undergoing cardiovascular invasive procedures with administration of iodinated contrast. Two reviewers independently extracted trial-level data including number of patients, duration of follow-up, and outcomes. Eighteen strategies aimed at CIAKI prevention were identified. The primary outcome was the occurrence of CIAKI. Secondary outcomes were mortality, myocardial infarction, dialysis and heart failure. The data were pooled using network meta-analysis. Treatment estimates were calculated as odds ratios (ORs) with 95% credible intervals (CrI). 147 RCTs involving 33,463 patients were eligible. Saline plus N-acetylcysteine (OR 0.72, 95%CrI 0.57–0.88), ascorbic acid (0.59, 0.34–0.95), sodium bicarbonate plus N-acetylcysteine (0.59, 0.36–0.89), probucol (0.42, 0.15–0.91), methylxanthines (0.39, 0.20–0.66), statin (0.36, 0.21–0.59), device-guided matched hydration (0.35, 0.12–0.79), prostaglandins (0.26, 0.08–0.62) and trimetazidine (0.26, 0.09–0.59) were associated with lower odds of CIAKI compared to saline. Methylxanthines (0.12, 0.01–0.94) or left ventricular

  15. How Strong Is the Evidence for Sodium Bicarbonate to Prevent Contrast-Induced Acute Kidney Injury After Coronary Angiography and Percutaneous Coronary Intervention?

    PubMed

    Dong, Yuhao; Zhang, Bin; Liang, Long; Lian, Zhouyang; Liu, Jing; Liang, Changhong; Zhang, Shuixing

    2016-02-01

    Hydration with sodium bicarbonate is one of the strategies to prevent contrast-induced acute kidney injury (CI-AKI). The purpose of this study was to determine how strong is the evidence for sodium bicarbonate to prevent CI-AKI after coronary angiography (CAG) and/or percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI).We conducted PubMed, EMBASE, and CENTRAL databases to search for randomized controlled trials (RCTs) comparing the efficacy of sodium bicarbonate with sodium chloride to prevent CI-AKI after CAG and/or PCI. Relative risk (RR), standardized mean difference (SMD), or weighted mean difference (WMD) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) was calculated. Heterogeneity, publication bias, and study quality were evaluated, sensitivity analyses, cumulative analyses, and subgroup analyses were performed. The risk of random errors was assessed by trial sequential analysis (TSA).Sixteen RCTs (3537 patients) met the eligibility criteria. Hydration with sodium bicarbonate showed significant beneficial effects in preventing CI-AKI (RR 0.67; 95% CI: 0.47-0.96, P = 0.029), decreasing the change in serum creatinine (SCr) (SMD -0.31 95% CI: -0.55 to -0.07, P = 0.011) and estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) (SMD -0.17 95% CI: -0.30 to -0.04, P = 0.013). But no significant differences were observed in the requirement for dialysis (RR 1.11; 95% CI: 0.60-2.07, P = 0.729), mortality (RR 0.71; 95% CI: 0.41-1.21, P = 0.204) and reducing the length of hospital stay (LHS) (WMD -1.47; 95% CI: -4.14 to 1.20, P = 0.279). The result of TSA on incidence of CI-AKI showed the required information size (RIS = 6614) was not reached and cumulative z curve did not cross TSA boundary. The result of TSA on the requirement for dialysis and mortality demonstrated the required information sizes (RIS = 170,510 and 19,516, respectively) were not reached, and the cumulative z-curve did not cross any boundaries.The evidence that sodium bicarbonate reduces the incidence of

  16. Optimisation of infection prevention and control in acute health care by use of behaviour change: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Edwards, Rachel; Charani, Esmita; Sevdalis, Nick; Alexandrou, Banos; Sibley, Eleanor; Mullett, David; Loveday, Heather P; Drumright, Lydia N; Holmes, Alison

    2012-04-01

    Changes in the behaviour of health-care workers (HCWs) are required to improve adherence to infection prevention and control (IPC) guidelines. Despite heavy investment in strategies to change behaviour, effectiveness has not been adequately assessed. We did a systematic review to assess the effectiveness and sustainability of interventions to change IPC behaviour and assessed exploratory literature for barriers to and facilitators of behaviour change. 21 studies published from 1999 to 2011 met our inclusion criteria: seven intervention studies and 14 exploratory studies. Of the intervention studies none explicitly incorporated psychological theory and only two contained elements of social marketing in the design, although five addressed sustainability. All elicited behaviour change, reduction in infection risk, or both. The exploratory studies identified social and cultural factors that affect the IPC behaviour of HCWs. To improve the standard of research and broaden the evidence base, we recommend that quality criteria are added to existing systematic review guidelines to enable the inclusion of qualitative research and to ensure robust design, implementation, and reporting of interventions.

  17. A Double-Blinded, Randomized, Placebo-Controlled Clinical Trial of Aminophylline to Prevent Acute Kidney Injury in Children following Congenital Heart Surgery with Cardiopulmonary Bypass

    PubMed Central

    Axelrod, David M.; Sutherland, Scott M.; Anglemyer, Andrew; Grimm, Paul C.; Roth, Stephen J.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Acute kidney injury (AKI) occurs commonly in children following congenital cardiac surgery with cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) and has been associated with increased morbidity and mortality. Aminophylline, a methylxanthine nonselective adenosine receptor antagonist, has been effective in the management of AKI in certain populations. This study sought to determine if post-operative administration of aminophylline attenuates AKI in children undergoing congenital cardiac surgery with CPB. Design Single-center, double-blinded, placebo-controlled, randomized clinical trial (RCT). Setting Tertiary center, pediatric cardiovascular intensive care unit. Patients 144 children after congenital heart surgery with CPB. Interventions Seventy-two patients were randomized to receive aminophylline and 72 patients received placebo. Study drug was administered every six hours for 72 hours. Measurements and Main Results The primary outcome variable was development of any AKI, defined by the serum creatinine criteria of the Kidney Diseases: Improving Global Outcomes (KDIGO) criteria. Secondary outcomes included the development of severe AKI, time between CVICU admission and first successful extubation, percent fluid overload, total fluid balance, urine output, bioelectrical impedance, and serum neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin (NGAL). The unadjusted rate and severity of AKI were not different between groups; 43/72 (60%) of the treatment group and 36/72 (50%) of the placebo group developed AKI (p=0.32). Stage 2/3 AKI occurred in 23/72 (32%) of the treatment group and 15/72 (21%) of the placebo group (p=0.18). Secondary outcome measures also demonstrated no significant difference between treatment and placebo groups. Aminophylline administration was safe; no deaths occurred in either group, and rates of adverse events were similar (14% in the treatment group versus 18% in the placebo group, p =0.30). Conclusions In this placebo-controlled RCT, we found no effect of

  18. Evaluation of efficacy of Caphosol in prevention and alleviation of acute side effects in patients treated with radiotherapy for head and neck cancers

    PubMed Central

    Jarzabski, Andrzej; Kawecki, Andrzej

    2016-01-01

    Aim of the study Oral mucositis is a common side effect of the oral mucosa due to anticancer therapy, especially for head and neck cancer. Caphosol is indicated for dryness of the mouth and oropharynx and treatment of mucositis due to irradiation or high-dose chemotherapy. The aim of the study was to evaluate the efficacy of Caphosol in preventing and alleviating mucositis due to radiotherapy in the head and neck region. Material and methods Caphosol was used from the beginning of the irradiation and for two weeks more after the treatment was completed. Mucositis, xerostomia, and dysphagia were scored by radiotherapists. Subjective evaluation was made by patients. Caphosol was assessed in a non-blinded, matched clinical study. Each treatment arm consisted of 50 patients. The groups were similar. The only difference in the management protocol between the treatment arms was the use of Caphosol in the experimental arm. Results A statistically significant difference in mean severity of early irradiation-induced side effects between the studied groups was observed with respect to: mucositis in the clinical target volume (CTV) area, mucositis in the increased dose (boost) area, dysphagia and xerostomia (p < 0.001 for all reactions). In the group of patients who used Caphosol, the mucositis was less intense, both in the CTV and in the boost area. Conclusions The use of Caphosol reduces the severity of acute mucositis, dysphagia and xerostomia, exerting a positive effect on comfort in the oral cavity in patients irradiated for head and neck tumors.

  19. Acute rheumatic fever and rheumatic heart disease--priorities in prevention, diagnosis and management. A report of the CSANZ Indigenous Cardiovascular Health Conference, Alice Springs 2011.

    PubMed

    Rémond, M G W; Wheaton, G R; Walsh, W F; Prior, D L; Maguire, G P

    2012-10-01

    Three priority areas in the prevention, diagnosis and management of acute rheumatic fever (ARF) and rheumatic heart disease (RHD) were identified and discussed in detail: 1. Echocardiography and screening/diagnosis of RHD – Given the existing uncertainty it remains premature to advocate for or to incorporate echocardiographic screening for RHD into Australian clinical practice. Further research is currently being undertaken to evaluate the potential for echocardiography screening. 2. Secondary prophylaxis – Secondary prophylaxis (long acting benzathine penicillin injections) must be seen as a priority. Systems-based approaches are necessary with a focus on the development and evaluation of primary health care-based or led strategies incorporating effective health information management systems. Better/novel systems of delivery of prophylactic medications should be investigated. 3. Management of advanced RHD – National centres of excellence for the diagnosis, assessment and surgical management of RHD are required. Early referral for surgical input is necessary with multidisciplinary care and team-based decision making that includes patient, family, and local health providers. There is a need for a national RHD surgical register and research strategy for the assessment, intervention and long-term outcome of surgery and other interventions for RHD.

  20. [Good practice in occupational health services--Certification of stroke as an accident at work. Need for secondary prevention in people returning to work after acute cerebrovascular events].

    PubMed

    Marcinkiewicz, Andrzej; Walusiak-Skorupa, Jolanta

    2015-01-01

    The classification of an acute vascular episode, both heart infarct and stroke, as an accident at work poses difficulties not only for post accidental teams, but also to occupational health professionals, experts and judges at labor and social insurance courts. This article presents the case of a 41-year-old office worker, whose job involved client services. While attending a very aggressive customer she developed solid stress that resulted in symptoms of the central nervous system (headache, speech disturbances). During her hospitalisation at the neurological unit ischemic stroke with transient mixed type aphasia was diagnosed. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scan of the head revealed subacute ischemia. After an analysis of the accident circumstances, the employer's post accidental team decided that ischemic stroke had been an accident at work, because it was a sudden incident due to an external cause inducing work-related traumatic stroke. As a primary cause tough stress and emotional strain due to the situation developed while attending the customer were acknowledged. During control medical check up after 5 months the patient was found to be fit for work, so she could return to work. However, it should be noted that such a check up examination of subjects returning to work after stroke must be holistic, including the evaluation of job predispositions and health education aimed at secondary prevention of heart and vascular diseases with special reference to their risk factors.

  1. Early warning and prevention of pneumonia in acute leukemia by patient education, spirometry, and positive expiratory pressure: A randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Møller, Tom; Moser, Claus; Adamsen, Lis; Rugaard, Grith; Jarden, Mary; Bøtcher, Tina S; Wiedenbein, Liza; Kjeldsen, Lars

    2016-03-01

    Long-lasting neutropenia associated with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and its treatment gives rise to a high risk of pneumonia. The use of broad-spectrum antibiotic prophylaxis during outpatient management has not completely protected patients against admission due to infections and neutropenic fever, emphasizing the need to approach infection protection with complementary efforts. In a randomized controlled design, we examined the applicability of patient-performed daily spirometry [forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1)] as an early warning tool and explored the effectiveness of positive expiratory pressure (PEP) in preventing pneumonia among 80 AML patients. Twenty-five incidences of pneumonia were detected among 23 patients (6 interventions, 17 controls), giving a prevalence of 28.75% during 5420 days of observation. We found a significant difference in incidence between intervention versus control group (2.17 per 1000 days vs. 6.52 per 1000 days, P = 0.021, respectively). A cross point at 80-76% of the personal FEV1 reference value showed high sensitivity and specificity on pneumonia development. Our data demonstrate the feasibility of educating AML patients in their continuous daily measurement of FEV1 and use of PEP. Daily measures of FEV1 may be an important early warning tool for assessment of pulmonary deterioration during critical phases of neutropenia. We suggest that strategic patient education in the use of spirometry and PEP should be part of standard of care for AML patients undergoing induction chemotherapy.

  2. Do Intravenous N-Acetylcysteine and Sodium Bicarbonate Prevent High Osmolal Contrast-Induced Acute Kidney Injury? A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Inda-Filho, Antonio Jose; Caixeta, Adriano; Manggini, Marcia; Schor, Nestor

    2014-01-01

    Background N-acetylcysteine (NAC) or sodium bicarbonate (NaHCO3), singly or combined, inconsistently prevent patients exposed to radiographic contrast media from developing contrast-induced acute kidney injury (CI-AKI). Objective We asked whether intravenous isotonic saline and either NaHCO3 in 5% dextrose or else a high dose of NAC in 5% dextrose prevent CI-AKI in outpatients exposed to high-osmolal iodinated contrast medium more than does saline alone. Methods This completed prospective, parallel, superiority, open-label, controlled, computer-randomized, single-center, Brazilian trial (NCT01612013) hydrated 500 adult outpatients (214 at high risk of developing CI-AKI) exposed to ioxitalamate during elective coronary angiography and ventriculography. From 1 hour before through 6 hours after exposure, 126 patients (group 1) received a high dose of NAC and saline, 125 (group 2) received NaHCO3 and saline, 124 (group 3) received both treatments, and 125 (group 4) received only saline. Results Groups were similar with respect to age, gender, weight, pre-existing renal dysfunction, hypertension, medication, and baseline serum creatinine and serum cystatin C, but diabetes mellitus was significantly less prevalent in group 1. CI-AKI incidence 72 hours after exposure to contrast medium was 51.4% (257/500), measured as serum creatinine > (baseline+0.3 mg/dL) and/or serum cystatin C > (1.1· baseline), and 7.6% (38/500), measured as both serum creatinine and serum cystatin C > (baseline+0.3 mg/dL) or > (1.25 · baseline). CI-AKI incidence measured less sensitively was similar among groups. Measured more sensitively, incidence in group 1 was significantly (p<0.05) lower than in groups 2 and 3 but not group 4; adjustment for confounding by infused volume equalized incidence in groups 1 and 3. Conclusion: We found no evidence that intravenous isotonic saline and either NaHCO3 or else a high dose of NAC prevent CI-AKI in outpatients exposed to high osmolal iodinated contrast

  3. Protective Effects of Soy Oligopeptides in Ultraviolet B-Induced Acute Photodamage of Human Skin

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Li-wen; Liu, Juan; Zhang, Jia-an; Xu, Yang; Wu, Di; Permatasari, Felicia

    2016-01-01

    Aim. We explored the effects of soy oligopeptides (SOP) in ultraviolet B- (UVB-) induced acute photodamage of human skin in vivo and foreskin ex vivo. Methods. We irradiated the forearm with 1.5 minimal erythemal dose (MED) of UVB for 3 consecutive days, establishing acute photodamage of skin, and topically applied SOP. Erythema index (EI), melanin index, stratum corneum hydration, and transepidermal water loss were measured by using Multiprobe Adapter 9 device. We irradiated foreskin ex vivo with the same dose of UVB (180 mJ/cm2) for 3 consecutive days and topically applied SOP. Sunburn cells were detected by using hematoxylin and eosin staining. Apoptotic cells were detected by using terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling assay. Cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPDs), p53 protein, Bax protein, and Bcl-2 protein were detected by using immunohistochemical staining. Results. Compared with UVB group, UVB-irradiated skin with topically applied SOP showed significantly decreased EI. Compared with UVB group, topical SOP significantly increased Bcl-2 protein expression and decreased CPDs-positive cells, sunburn cells, apoptotic cells, p53 protein expression, and Bax protein expressions in the epidermis of UVB-irradiated foreskin. Conclusion. Our study demonstrated that topical SOP can protect human skin against UVB-induced photodamage. PMID:27478534

  4. Protective Effects of Soy Oligopeptides in Ultraviolet B-Induced Acute Photodamage of Human Skin.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Bing-Rong; Ma, Li-Wen; Liu, Juan; Zhang, Jia-An; Xu, Yang; Wu, Di; Permatasari, Felicia; Luo, Dan

    2016-01-01

    Aim. We explored the effects of soy oligopeptides (SOP) in ultraviolet B- (UVB-) induced acute photodamage of human skin in vivo and foreskin ex vivo. Methods. We irradiated the forearm with 1.5 minimal erythemal dose (MED) of UVB for 3 consecutive days, establishing acute photodamage of skin, and topically applied SOP. Erythema index (EI), melanin index, stratum corneum hydration, and transepidermal water loss were measured by using Multiprobe Adapter 9 device. We irradiated foreskin ex vivo with the same dose of UVB (180 mJ/cm(2)) for 3 consecutive days and topically applied SOP. Sunburn cells were detected by using hematoxylin and eosin staining. Apoptotic cells were detected by using terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling assay. Cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPDs), p53 protein, Bax protein, and Bcl-2 protein were detected by using immunohistochemical staining. Results. Compared with UVB group, UVB-irradiated skin with topically applied SOP showed significantly decreased EI. Compared with UVB group, topical SOP significantly increased Bcl-2 protein expression and decreased CPDs-positive cells, sunburn cells, apoptotic cells, p53 protein expression, and Bax protein expressions in the epidermis of UVB-irradiated foreskin. Conclusion. Our study demonstrated that topical SOP can protect human skin against UVB-induced photodamage.

  5. Double-blinded, randomized, placebo-controlled study to evaluate the effectiveness of green tea in preventing acute gastrointestinal complications due to radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Emami, Hamid; Nikoobin, Farzaneh; Roayaei, Mahnaz; Ziya, Hamid Reza

    2014-01-01

    Background: Radiation-induced discomfort is frequently observed during pelvic radiotherapy. This study was performed to determine the effect of a green tea tablet to reduce the incidence of radiation-induced diarrhea and vomiting in patients with abdomen and pelvic malignancy. Materials and Methods: This randomized controlled clinical trial recruited 42 patients with abdomen and pelvic malignancy considered for treatment with 50 Gy radiotherapy, randomly assigned to the green tea tablet 450 mg (n = 21) or placebo group (n = 21) for 5 weeks. Acute gastrointesinal complications (Diarrhea and vomiting) were weekly assessed using Common Toxicity Criteria of the National Cancer Institute version 3.0 and functional living index emesis, respectively. Two-sample t-tests, Pearson's Chi-square, Mann-Whitney U-test, and Friedman were used for analysis. Results: There was a significant difference in frequency of reported diarrhea between two groups of study at the end of study (P < 0.002). About 81% of patients in green tea group reported no history of diarrhea at week 5. The treatment group have reported no history of severe diarrhea during radiotherapy. There was no significant difference between two groups of study in frequency of vomiting throughout the study, but 9.5% of cases in placebo group showed severe vomiting. Conclusion: Green tea contains a high concentration of catechins could be effective in decreasing the frequency and severity of radiotherapy induced diarrhea. Green tea (450 mg/day) could be considered to be a safe for prevention diarrhea and vomiting in patients undergoing pelvic or abdomen radiotherapy. PMID:25097628

  6. Use of OpdA, an Organophosphorus (OP) Hydrolase, Prevents Lethality in an African Green Monkey Model of Acute OP Poisoning

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, Colin J; Carville, Angela; Ward, Jeanine; Mansfield, Keith; Ollis, David L.; Khurana, Tejvir; Bird, Steven B.

    2014-01-01

    Organophosphorus (OP) pesticides are a diverse class of acetylcholinesterase (AChE) inhibitors that are responsible for tremendous morbidity and mortality worldwide, killing approximately 300,000 people annually. Enzymatic hydrolysis of OPs is a potential therapy for acute poisoning. OpdA, an OP hydrolase isolated from Agrobacterium radiobacter, has been shown to decrease lethality in rodent models of OP poisoning. This study investigated the effects of OpdA on AChE activity, plasma concentrations of OP, and signs of toxicity after administration of dichlorvos to nonhuman primates. A dose of 75 mg/kg dichlorvos given orally caused apnea within 10 minutes with a progressive decrease in heart rate. Blood AChE activity decreased to zero within ten minutes. Respirations and AChE activity did not recover. The mean dichlorvos concentration rose to a peak of 0.66 μg/ml. Treated monkeys received 1.2 mg/kg OpdA iv immediately after poisoning with dichlorvos. In Opda-treated animals, heart and respiratory rates were unchanged from baseline over a 240-minute observation period. AChE activity slowly declined, but remained above 25% of baseline for the entire duration. Dichlorvos concentrations reached a mean peak of 0.19 μg/ml at 40 minutes after poisoning and decreased to a mean of 0.05 μg/ml at 240 minutes. These results show that OpdA hydrolyzes dichlorvos in an African Green Monkey model of lethal poisoning, delays AChE inhibition, and prevents lethality. PMID:24447378

  7. Differential Benefit of Statin in Secondary Prevention of Acute Myocardial Infarction according to the Level of Triglyceride and High Density Lipoprotein Cholesterol

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kyung Hwan; Kim, Cheol Hwan; Ahn, Youngkeun; Kim, Young Jo; Cho, Myeong Chan; Kim, Wan; Kim, Jong Jin

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objectives The differential benefit of statin according to the state of dyslipidemia has been sparsely investigated. We sought to address the efficacy of statin in secondary prevention of myocardial infarction (MI) according to the level of triglyceride and high density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) on admission. Subjects and Methods Acute MI patients (24653) were enrolled and the total patients were divided according to level of triglyceride and HDL-C on admission: group A (HDL-C≥40 mg/dL and triglyceride<150 mg/dL; n=11819), group B (HDL-C≥40 mg/dL and triglyceride≥150 mg/dL; n=3329), group C (HDL-C<40 mg/dL and triglyceride<150 mg/dL; n=6062), and group D (HDL-C<40 mg/dL & triglyceride≥150 mg/dL; n=3443). We evaluated the differential efficacy of statin according to the presence or absence of component of dyslipidemia. The primary end points were major adverse cardiac events (MACE) for 2 years. Results Statin therapy significantly reduced the risk of MACE in group A (hazard ratio=0.676; 95% confidence interval: 0.582-0.785; p<0.001). However, the efficacy of statin was not prominent in groups B, C, or D. In a propensity-matched population, the result was similar. In particular, the benefit of statin in group A was different compared with group D (interaction p=0.042) Conclusion The benefit of statin in patients with MI was different according to the presence or absence of dyslipidemia. In particular, because of the insufficient benefit of statin in patients with MI and dyslipidemia, a different lipid-lowering strategy is necessary in these patients. PMID:27275169

  8. Early warning and prevention of pneumonia in acute leukemia by patient education, spirometry, and positive expiratory pressure: A randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Moser, Claus; Adamsen, Lis; Rugaard, Grith; Jarden, Mary; Bøtcher, Tina S.; Wiedenbein, Liza; Kjeldsen, Lars

    2016-01-01

    Long‐lasting neutropenia associated with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and its treatment gives rise to a high risk of pneumonia. The use of broad‐spectrum antibiotic prophylaxis during outpatient management has not completely protected patients against admission due to infections and neutropenic fever, emphasizing the need to approach infection protection with complementary efforts. In a randomized controlled design, we examined the applicability of patient‐performed daily spirometry [forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1)] as an early warning tool and explored the effectiveness of positive expiratory pressure (PEP) in preventing pneumonia among 80 AML patients. Twenty‐five incidences of pneumonia were detected among 23 patients (6 interventions, 17 controls), giving a prevalence of 28.75% during 5420 days of observation. We found a significant difference in incidence between intervention versus control group (2.17 per 1000 days vs. 6.52 per 1000 days, P = 0.021, respectively). A cross point at 80‐76% of the personal FEV1 reference value showed high sensitivity and specificity on pneumonia development. Our data demonstrate the feasibility of educating AML patients in their continuous daily measurement of FEV1 and use of PEP. Daily measures of FEV1 may be an important early warning tool for assessment of pulmonary deterioration during critical phases of neutropenia. We suggest that strategic patient education in the use of spirometry and PEP should be part of standard of care for AML patients undergoing induction chemotherapy. Am. J. Hematol. 91:271–276, 2016. © 2015 The Authors. American Journal of Hematology Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26661344

  9. Rationale and design of a randomized controlled trial evaluating Community Health Worker (CHW) based interventions for the secondary prevention of acute coronary syndromes in India (SPREAD)

    PubMed Central

    Kamath, Deepak Y; Xavier, Denis; Gupta, Rajeev; Devereaux, P.J.; Sigamani, Alben; Hussain, Tanvir; Umesh, Sowmya; Xavier, Freeda; Girish, Preeti; George, Nisha; Thomas, Tinku; Chidambaram, N.; Joshi, Rajnish; Pais, Prem; Yusuf, Salim

    2014-01-01

    Background There is a need to evaluate & implement cost-effective strategies to improve adherence to treatments in Coronary Heart Disease (CHD). There are no studies from Low Middle Income Countries (LMICs) evaluating trained Community Health Worker (CHW) based interventions for the secondary prevention of CHD. Methods We designed a hospital-based, open randomized trial of CHW based interventions versus standard care. Patients after an Acute Coronary Syndrome (ACS) were randomized to an intervention group (a CHW based intervention package, comprising education tools to enhance self-care and adherence, and regular follow-up by the CHW) or to standard care for 12 months during which study outcomes were recorded. The CHWs were trained over a period of 6 months. The primary outcome measure was medication adherence. The secondary outcomes were differences in adherence to lifestyle modification, physiological parameters (BP, body weight, BMI, heart rate, lipids) and major adverse cardiovascular events. Results We recruited 806 patients stabilized after an ACS from 14 hospitals in 13 Indian cities. The mean age was 56.4 (+/−11.32) and 17.2% were females. A high prevalence of risk factors -hypertension (43.4%), diabetes (31.9%), tobacco consumption (35.4%) and inadequate physical activity (70.5%) were documented. A little over half had ST elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI, 53.7%) and 46.3% had non-ST elevation myocardial infarction (NSTEMI) or unstable angina. Conclusion The CHW interventions and training for SPREAD have been developed and adapted for local use. The results and experience of this study will be important to counter the burden of Cardiovascular Diseases (CVD) in LMICs. PMID:25440797

  10. Palifermin and Chlorhexidine Mouthwashes in Prevention of Chemotherapy-Induced Mucositis in Children with Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia: a Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Gholizadeh, Narges; Mehdipoor, Masoumeh; Sajadi, Hasan; Moosavi, Mahdieh-Sadat

    2016-01-01

    Statement of the Problem: Over the past three decades, significant improvements have been achieved in the survival of children with cancer. However, the considerable morbidity which occurs as a result of chemotherapy often restricts the treatment intensity. One of the important dose-limiting and costly adverse effects of cancer therapy is mucositis. Children with hematological malignancies are greatly at risk of developing mucositis. Purpose: This study aimed to assess the effectiveness of palifermin in preventing mucositis in children with acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL) who undergo chemotherapy. Materials and Method: In this clinical trial, 90 children with ALL were randomized to receive chlorhexidine (n=45) or palifermin (n=45). One group received 60 μg/ kg/ day palifermin as an intravenous bolus once daily for 3 days before and 3 days after the chemotherapy. Chlorhexidine mouthwash was administered once daily for 3 days before and 3 days after the chemotherapy. The world health organization (WHO) oral toxicity scale was employed for grading the mucositis. The data were analyzed by using two-way ANOVA. Results: The two groups were matched for age and gender. The study groups were significantly different in terms of mucositis grading (P values after 1 and 2 week therapy were 0.00). Palifermin decreased the incidence and severity of chemotherapy-induced mucositis. Conclusion: Palifermin reduces the oral mucositis in children with ALL. Several mechanisms of action are suggested for keratinocyte growth factor (such as palifermin) including promotion of cell proliferation and cytoprotection, restraining the apoptosis, and changing the cytokine profile. PMID:27942550

  11. [Acute Kidney Injury].

    PubMed

    Brix, Silke; Stahl, Rolf

    2017-02-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is an important part of renal diseases and a common clinical problem. AKI is an acute decline in renal function. Due to a lack of therapeutic options, prevention and optimal management of patients with AKI are the most important strategies. Although seldom the sole cause of patients' death, AKI is associated with a significant increase in mortality. Our objective is to draw the attention towards the prevention of AKI of non-renal causes.

  12. 2-Chloroadenosine (2-CADO) treatment modulates the pro-inflammatory immune response to prevent acute lung inflammation in BALB/c mice suffering from Klebsiella pneumoniae B5055-induced pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Vijay; Harjai, Kusum; Chhibber, Sanjay

    2010-06-01

    Acute lung inflammation (ALI) is a life-threatening pathology and can develop during the course of several clinical conditions such as pneumonia, acid aspiration or sepsis. Adenosine plays a significant role in controlling acute inflammation via binding to A(2A) receptors on inflammatory cells, i.e. neutrophils or macrophages. The present study was designed to evaluate the anti-inflammatory and immunomodulatory effects of 2-chloroadenosine (2-CADO), alone or in combination with amoxicillin/clavulanic acid (AMC), in Klebsiella pneumoniae B5055-induced acute lung infection in mice. Acute lung infection in mice was induced by directly instilling the selected dose (10(4) colony-forming units/mL) of bacteria intranasally. Histopathological examination of the lungs was performed to reveal neutrophil infiltration into the lung alveoli. In addition to the major pro-inflammatory cytokines tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNFalpha) and interleukin (IL)-1alpha, levels of the anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10 were also determined. Intranasal instillation of bacteria caused profound neutrophil infiltration into the lung alveoli as well as a significant increase in the levels of pro-inflammatory mediators (i.e. TNFalpha and IL-1alpha). However, intravenous administration of 2-CADO 10 microg/kg/day, alone or in combination with an antibiotic (i.e. AMC), significantly decreased neutrophil infiltration into the lung alveoli. A significant decrease in TNFalpha and IL-1alpha along with elevation of IL-10 levels in the lung homogenate of mice with acute lung infection was observed upon treatment with 2-CADO alone, with no significant decrease in bacterial counts. Moreover, in combination with AMC, 2-CADO exhibited its immunomodulatory action in acute lung infection and prevented ALI, whilst an antibacterial action was exhibited by AMC.

  13. Aripiprazole for the treatment and prevention of acute manic and mixed episodes in bipolar I disorder in children and adolescents: a NICE single technology appraisal.

    PubMed

    Uttley, Lesley; Kearns, Ben; Ren, Shijie; Stevenson, Matt

    2013-11-01

    As part of its single technology process, the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) invited the manufacturers of aripiprazole (Otsuka Pharmaceutical Co. and Bristol Myers Squibb) to submit evidence of the clinical and cost effectiveness of aripiprazole for the treatment and prevention of acute manic and mixed episodes in bipolar I disorder in children and adolescents. The School of Health and Related Research Technology Appraisal Group at the University of Sheffield was commissioned to act as the independent Evidence Review Group (ERG). The ERG produced a critical review of the evidence for the clinical and cost effectiveness of the technology, based upon the manufacturers' submission to NICE. The evidence, which was derived mainly from a double-blind, phase III, placebo-controlled trial of aripiprazole in patients aged 10-17 years, showed that aripiprazole performed significantly better than placebo in reducing mania according to the primary outcome measurement (the Young Mania Rating Scale at 4 weeks). Safety outcomes indicated that aripiprazole was significantly more likely to cause extrapyramidal symptoms and somnolence than placebo. The manufacturers also presented a network meta-analysis of aripiprazole versus other atypical antipsychotics commonly used to treat manic episodes (olanzapine, quetiapine and risperidone) to show that aripiprazole performed similarly to the comparator drugs in terms of efficacy and safety. Aripiprazole was demonstrated to perform better in safety outcomes of (1) less weight gain than olanzapine and quetiapine; and (2) less prolactin increase than olanzapine, quetiapine and risperidone. Results from the manufacturers' economic evaluation showed that use of aripiprazole second-line dominated all of the other treatment strategies that were considered. However, there was considerable uncertainty in this result, and clinical advisors indicated that the actual treatment strategy employed in practice is likely to be

  14. Interleukin-1 Blockade With Anakinra to Prevent Adverse Cardiac Remodeling After Acute Myocardial Infarction (Virginia Commonwealth University Anakinra Remodeling Trial [VCU-ART] Pilot Study)

    PubMed Central

    Abbate, Antonio; Kontos, Michael C.; Grizzard, John D.; Biondi-Zoccai, Giuseppe G. L.; Van Tassell, Benjamin W.; Robati, Roshanak; Roach, Lenore M.; Arena, Ross A.; Roberts, Charlotte S.; Varma, Amit; Gelwix, Christopher C.; Salloum, Fadi N.; Hastillo, Andrea; Dinarello, Charles A.; Vetrovec, George W.

    2013-01-01

    Acute myocardial infarction (AMI) initiates an intense inflammatory response in which interleukin-1 (IL-1) plays a central role. The IL-1 receptor antagonist is a naturally occurring antagonist, and anakinra is the recombinant form used to treat inflammatory diseases. The aim of the present pilot study was to test the safety and effects of IL-1 blockade with anakinra on left ventricular (LV) remodeling after AMI. Ten patients with ST-segment elevation AMI were randomized to either anakinra 100 mg/day subcutaneously for 14 days or placebo in a double-blind fashion. Two cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) imaging and echocardiographic studies were performed during a 10- to 14-week period. The primary end point was the difference in the interval change in the LV end-systolic volume index (LVESVi) between the 2 groups on CMR imaging. The secondary end points included differences in the interval changes in the LV end-diastolic volume index, and C-reactive protein levels. A +2.0 ml/m2 median increase (interquartile range +1.0, +11.5) in the LVESVi on CMR imaging was seen in the placebo group and a –3.2 ml/m2 median decrease (interquartile range –4.5, –1.6) was seen in the anakinra group (p = 0.033). The median difference was 5.2 ml/m2. On echocardiography, the median difference in the LVESVi change was 13.4 ml/m2 (p = 0.006). Similar differences were observed in the LV end-diastolic volume index on CMR imaging (7.6 ml/m2, p = 0.033) and echocardiography (9.4 ml/m2, p = 0.008). The change in C-reactive protein levels between admission and 72 hours after admission correlated with the change in the LVESVi (R =+0.71, p = 0.022). In conclusion, in the present pilot study of patients with ST-segment elevation AMI, IL-1 blockade with anakinra was safe and favorably affected by LV remodeling. If confirmed in larger trials, IL-1 blockade might represent a novel therapeutic strategy to prevent heart failure after AMI. PMID:23453459

  15. Interleukin-1 blockade with anakinra to prevent adverse cardiac remodeling after acute myocardial infarction (Virginia Commonwealth University Anakinra Remodeling Trial [VCU-ART] Pilot study).

    PubMed

    Abbate, Antonio; Kontos, Michael C; Grizzard, John D; Biondi-Zoccai, Giuseppe G L; Van Tassell, Benjamin W; Robati, Roshanak; Roach, Lenore M; Arena, Ross A; Roberts, Charlotte S; Varma, Amit; Gelwix, Christopher C; Salloum, Fadi N; Hastillo, Andrea; Dinarello, Charles A; Vetrovec, George W

    2010-05-15

    Acute myocardial infarction (AMI) initiates an intense inflammatory response in which interleukin-1 (IL-1) plays a central role. The IL-1 receptor antagonist is a naturally occurring antagonist, and anakinra is the recombinant form used to treat inflammatory diseases. The aim of the present pilot study was to test the safety and effects of IL-1 blockade with anakinra on left ventricular (LV) remodeling after AMI. Ten patients with ST-segment elevation AMI were randomized to either anakinra 100 mg/day subcutaneously for 14 days or placebo in a double-blind fashion. Two cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) imaging and echocardiographic studies were performed during a 10- to 14-week period. The primary end point was the difference in the interval change in the LV end-systolic volume index (LVESVi) between the 2 groups on CMR imaging. The secondary end points included differences in the interval changes in the LV end-diastolic volume index, and C-reactive protein levels. A +2.0 ml/m(2) median increase (interquartile range +1.0, +11.5) in the LVESVi on CMR imaging was seen in the placebo group and a -3.2 ml/m(2) median decrease (interquartile range -4.5, -1.6) was seen in the anakinra group (p = 0.033). The median difference was 5.2 ml/m(2). On echocardiography, the median difference in the LVESVi change was 13.4 ml/m(2) (p = 0.006). Similar differences were observed in the LV end-diastolic volume index on CMR imaging (7.6 ml/m(2), p = 0.033) and echocardiography (9.4 ml/m(2), p = 0.008). The change in C-reactive protein levels between admission and 72 hours after admission correlated with the change in the LVESVi (R = +0.71, p = 0.022). In conclusion, in the present pilot study of patients with ST-segment elevation AMI, IL-1 blockade with anakinra was safe and favorably affected by LV remodeling. If confirmed in larger trials, IL-1 blockade might represent a novel therapeutic strategy to prevent heart failure after AMI.

  16. Calpastatin overexpression prevents progression of S-1,2-dichlorovinyl-L-cysteine (DCVC)-initiated acute renal injury and renal failure (ARF) in diabetes

    SciTech Connect

    Dnyanmote, Ankur V.; Sawant, Sharmilee P.; Lock, Edward A.; Latendresse, John R.; Warbritton, Alan A.; Mehendale, Harihara M. . E-mail: mehendale@ulm.edu

    2006-09-01

    Previously we have shown that 90% of streptozotocin (STZ)-induced type-1 diabetic (DB) mice survive from acute renal failure (ARF) and death induced by a normally LD{sub 9} dose (75 mg/kg, i.p.) of the nephrotoxicant S-1,2-dichlorovinyl-L-cysteine (DCVC). This remarkable protection is due to a combination of slower progression of DCVC-initiated renal injury and increased compensatory nephrogenic tissue repair in the DB kidneys. BRDU immunohistochemistry revealed that the DB condition led to 4-fold higher number of proximal tubular cells (PTC) entering S-phase of cell cycle. In the present study, we tested the hypothesis that DB-induced augmentation of PTC into S-phase is accompanied by overexpression of the calpain-inhibitor calpastatin, which endogenously prevents the progression of DCVC-initiated renal injury mediated by the calpain escaping out of damaged PTCs. Immunohistochemical detection of renal calpain and its activity in the urine, over a time course after treatment with the LD{sub 9} dose of DCVC, indicated progressive increase in leakage of calpain into the extracellular spaces of the injured PTCs of the non-diabetic (NDB) kidneys as compared to the DB kidneys. Calpastatin expression was minimally detected in the NDB kidneys, using immunohistochemistry, over the time course. On the other hand, consistently higher number of tubules in the DB kidney showed calpastatin expression over the time course. The lower leakage of calpain in the DB kidneys was commensurate with constitutively higher expression of calpastatin in the S-phase-laden PTCs of these mice. To test the protective role of newly divided/dividing PTCs, DB mice were given the anti-mitotic agent colchicine (CLC) (2 mg/kg and 1.5 mg/kg, i.p., on days 8 and 10 after STZ injection) prior to challenge with a LD{sub 9} dose of DCVC, which led to 100% mortality by 48 h. Mortality was due to rapid progression of DCVC-initiated renal injury, suggesting that newly divided/dividing cells are instrumental

  17. Targeting pro-inflammatory cytokines following joint injury: acute intra-articular inhibition of interleukin-1 following knee injury prevents post-traumatic arthritis

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Post-traumatic arthritis (PTA) is a progressive, degenerative response to joint injury, such as articular fracture. The pro-inflammatory cytokines, interleukin 1(IL-1) and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), are acutely elevated following joint injury and remain elevated for prolonged periods post-injury. To investigate the role of local and systemic inflammation in the development of post-traumatic arthritis, we targeted both the initial acute local inflammatory response and a prolonged 4 week systemic inflammatory response by inhibiting IL-1 or TNF-α following articular fracture in the mouse knee. Methods Anti-cytokine agents, IL-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1Ra) or soluble TNF receptor II (sTNFRII), were administered either locally via an acute intra-articular injection or systemically for a prolonged 4 week period following articular fracture of the knee in C57BL/6 mice. The severity of arthritis was then assessed at 8 weeks post-injury in joint tissues via histology and micro computed tomography, and systemic and local biomarkers were assessed in serum and synovial fluid. Results Intra-articular inhibition of IL-1 significantly reduced cartilage degeneration, synovial inflammation, and did not alter bone morphology following articular fracture. However, systemic inhibition of IL-1, and local or systemic inhibition of TNF provided no benefit or conversely led to increased arthritic changes in the joint tissues. Conclusion These results show that intra-articular IL-1, rather than TNF-α, plays a critical role in the acute inflammatory phase of joint injury and can be inhibited locally to reduce post-traumatic arthritis following a closed articular fracture. Targeted local inhibition of IL-1 following joint injury may represent a novel treatment option for PTA. PMID:24964765

  18. Tacrolimus and Mycophenolate Mofetil With or Without Sirolimus in Preventing Acute Graft-Versus-Host Disease in Patients Who Are Undergoing Donor Stem Cell Transplant for Hematologic Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-11-23

    Myelodysplastic/Myeloproliferative Neoplasm, Unclassifiable; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Refractory Plasma Cell Myeloma; Waldenstrom Macroglobulinemia; Accelerated Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia, BCR-ABL1 Positive; Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(9;11)(p22;q23); MLLT3-MLL; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13.1q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); PML-RARA; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); RUNX1-RUNX1T1; Atypical Chronic Myeloid Leukemia, BCR-ABL1 Negative; Blast Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia, BCR-ABL1 Positive; Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Childhood Burkitt Lymphoma; Childhood Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia, BCR-ABL1 Positive; Childhood Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Childhood Immunoblastic Lymphoma; Childhood Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Stage II Contiguous Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage II Contiguous Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage II Contiguous Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Stage II Contiguous Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage II Adult Contiguous Immunoblastic Lymphoma; Stage II Contiguous Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage II Grade 1 Contiguous Follicular Lymphoma; Stage II Grade 2 Contiguous Follicular Lymphoma; Stage II Grade 3 Contiguous Follicular Lymphoma; Stage II Contiguous Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage II Non-Contiguous Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage II Non-Contiguous Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage II Non-Contiguous Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Stage II Non-Contiguous Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage II Adult Non-Contiguous Immunoblastic Lymphoma; Stage II Non-Contiguous Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage II Grade 1 Non-Contiguous Follicular Lymphoma; Stage II Grade 2 Non-Contiguous Follicular Lymphoma

  19. Herbal SGR Formula Prevents Acute Ethanol-Induced Liver Steatosis via Inhibition of Lipogenesis and Enhancement Fatty Acid Oxidation in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Ping; Li, Xiang; Kong, De-song; Li, Huan-zhou; Niu, Cong-cong; Pan, Su-hua

    2015-01-01

    Our previous study indicated that herbal SGR formula partially attenuates ethanol-induced fatty liver, but the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. In the present study, mice were pretreated with SGR (100 and 200 mg/kg/d bw) for 30 d before being exposed to ethanol (4.8 g/kg bw). The biochemical indices and histopathological changes were examined to evaluate the protective effects and to explore potential mechanisms by investigating the adiponectin, tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), peroxisome proliferators-activated receptor-α (PPAR-α), sterol regulatory element binding protein-1c (SREBP-1c), adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK), and so forth. Results showed that SGR pretreatment markedly inhibited acute ethanol-induced liver steatosis, significantly reduced serum and hepatic triglyceride (TG) level, and improved classic histopathological changes. SGR suppressed the protein expression of hepatic SREBP-1c and TNF-α and increased adiponectin, PPAR-α, and AMPK phosphorylation in the liver. Meanwhile, acute toxicity tests showed that no death or toxic side effects within 14 days were observed upon oral administration of the extracts at a dose of 16 g/kg body wt. These results demonstrate that SGR could protect against acute alcohol-induced liver steatosis without any toxic side effects. Therefore, our studies provide novel molecular insights into the hepatoprotective effect of SGR formula, which may be exploited as a therapeutic agent for ethanol-induced hepatosteatosis. PMID:26101535

  20. The Sustained Impact of an Occupational Skin Cancer Prevention Program on Outdoor Workers (2004–2012)

    PubMed Central

    Walkosz, Barbara J.; Buller, David B.; Andersen, Peter A.; Scott, Michael D.; Cutter, Gary R.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Sustainability of prevention programs is a public health goal. Methods The effectiveness of Go Sun Smart (GSS), an occupational skin cancer prevention program, was evaluated five-seven years out from the conclusion of a controlled randomized dissemination trial that compared an enhanced v. basic dissemination strategy at 53 ski areas enrolled in the trial. Results Employees (n=2940) at ski areas in the enhanced condition reported fewer sunburns but did not differ from employees in the basic condition on other sun protection measures. Significant differences for all sun protection practices were identified at ski areas that displayed 9 or more GSS materials or a combined total of 9 or more GSS and other sun safety messages. Conclusion Exposure to prevention messages is an important determinant of program effectiveness and potentially of program sustainability. PMID:26539769

  1. Cystitis - acute

    MedlinePlus

    Uncomplicated urinary tract infection; UTI - acute cystitis; Acute bladder infection; Acute bacterial cystitis ... cause. Menopause also increases the risk for a urinary tract infection. The following also increase your chances of having ...

  2. Beclomethasone Dipropionate in Preventing Acute Graft-Versus-Host Disease in Patients Undergoing a Donor Stem Cell Transplant for Hematologic Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-03-05

    Hematopoietic/Lymphoid Cancer; Accelerated Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Atypical Chronic Myeloid Leukemia; Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Childhood Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Childhood Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Chronic Eosinophilic Leukemia; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Chronic Neutrophilic Leukemia; Chronic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Contiguous Stage II Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Essential Thrombocythemia; Extramedullary Plasmacytoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Graft Versus Host Disease; Isolated Plasmacytoma of Bone; Juvenile Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Meningeal Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Myelodysplastic/Myeloproliferative Disease, Unclassifiable; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Small

  3. A Phase II single-arm trial of palonosetron for the prevention of acute and delayed chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting in malignant glioma patients receiving multidose irinotecan in combination with bevacizumab

    PubMed Central

    Affronti, Mary Lou; Woodring, Sarah; Peters, Katherine B; Herndon, James E; McSherry, Frances; Healy, Patrick N; Desjardins, Annick; Vredenburgh, James J; Friedman, Henry S

    2017-01-01

    Purpose Given that the prognosis of recurrent malignant glioma (MG) remains poor, improving quality of life (QoL) through symptom management is important. Meta-analyses establishing antiemetic guidelines have demonstrated the superiority of palonosetron (PAL) over older 5-hydroxytryptamine 3-receptor antagonists in chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting (CINV) prevention, but excluded patients with gliomas. Irinotecan plus bevacizumab is a treatment frequently used in MG, but is associated with low (55%) CINV complete response (CR; no emesis or use of rescue antiemetic) with commonly prescribed ondansetron. A single-arm Phase II trial was conducted in MG patients to determine the efficacy of intravenous PAL (0.25 mg) and dexamethasone (DEX; 10 mg) received in conjunction with biweekly irinotecan–bevacizumab treatment. The primary end point was the proportion of subjects achieving acute CINV CR (no emesis or antiemetic ≤24 hours postchemotherapy). Secondary end points included delayed CINV CR (days 2–5), overall CINV CR (days 1–5), and QoL, fatigue, and toxicity. Materials and methods A two-stage design of 160 patients was planned to differentiate between CINV CR of 55% and 65% after each dose of PAL–DEX. Validated surveys assessed fatigue and QoL. Results A total of 63 patients were enrolled, after which enrollment was terminated due to slow accrual; 52 patients were evaluable for the primary outcome of acute CINV CR. Following PAL–DEX dose administrations 1–3, acute CINV CR rates were 62%, 68%, and 70%; delayed CINV CR rates were 62%, 66%, and 70%, and overall CINV CR rates were 47%, 57%, and 62%, respectively. Compared to baseline, there was a clinically meaningful increase in fatigue during acute and overall phases, but not in the delayed phase. There were no grade ≥3 PAL–DEX treatment-related toxicities. Conclusion Data suggest that PAL–DEX is effective in preventing CINV in MG patients, which ultimately maintains the QoL of patients with

  4. Bilateral lower limb polio, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and recurrent acute coronary syndrome in a poly tobacco user: a preventable triple tragedy.

    PubMed

    Aggarwal, Ramesh; Dwivedi, Shridhar

    2012-01-01

    Non communicable diseases in most of the developing countries have surpassed the morbidity and mortality arising from communicable diseases. However there are people who continue to suffer from the residual disabilities of some communicable disease acquired at younger age like polio and develop non communicable diseases like COPD and coronary syndrome at older age primarily because of their tobacco habits. Both of these combination of communicable and non communicable diseases are preventable if timely preventive measures and healthy life style is adopted. This case highlights one such case where patient despite suffering from polio and restrictive lung disease started using tobacco and suffered from obstructive lung disease and coronary syndrome.

  5. A feasible strategy for preventing blood clots in critically ill patients with acute kidney injury (FBI): study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Previous pharmacokinetic trials suggested that 40 mg subcutaneous enoxaparin once daily provided inadequate thromboprophylaxis for intensive care unit patients. Critically ill patients with acute kidney injury are at increased risk of venous thromboembolism and yet are often excluded from these trials. We hypothesized that for critically ill patients with acute kidney injury receiving continuous renal replacement therapy, a dose of 1 mg/kg enoxaparin subcutaneously once daily would improve thromboprophylaxis without increasing the risk of bleeding. In addition, we seek to utilize urine output prior to discontinuing dialysis, and low neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin in dialysis-free intervals, as markers of renal recovery. Methods/Design In a multicenter, double-blind randomized controlled trial in progress at three intensive care units across Denmark, we randomly assign eligible critically ill adults with acute kidney injury into a treatment (1 mg/kg enoxaparin subcutaneously once daily) or control arm (40 mg enoxaparin subcutaneously once daily) upon commencement of continuous renal replacement therapy. We calculated that with 133 patients in each group, the study would have 80% power to show a 40% reduction in the relative risk of venous thromboembolism with 1 mg/kg enoxaparin, at a two-sided alpha level of 0.05. An interim analysis will be conducted after the first 67 patients have been included in each group. Enrolment began in March 2013, and will continue for two years. The primary outcome is the occurrence of venous thromboembolism. Secondary outcomes include anti-factor Xa activity, bleeding, heparin-induced thrombocytopenia, filter lifespan, length of stay, ventilator free days, and mortality. We will also monitor neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin and urine volume to determine whether they can be used as prognostic factors for renal recovery. Discussion Critically ill unit patients with acute kidney injury present a

  6. Mulberry fruit prevents LPS-induced NF-κB/pERK/MAPK signals in macrophages and suppresses acute colitis and colorectal tumorigenesis in mice

    PubMed Central

    Qian, Zhengjiang; Wu, Zhiqin; Huang, Lian; Qiu, Huiling; Wang, Liyan; Li, Li; Yao, Lijun; Kang, Kang; Qu, Junle; Wu, Yonghou; Luo, Jun; Liu, Johnson J.; Yang, Yi; Yang, Wancai; Gou, Deming

    2015-01-01

    Here, we investigated the impact of mulberry fruit (MBF) extracts on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced inflammatory responses in RAW 264.7 macrophages, and the therapeutic efficacy of MBF diet in mice with dextran sulfate sodium (DSS)-induced acute colitis and MUC2−/− mice with colorectal cancer. In vitro, LPS-induced nitric oxide (NO) production was significantly inhibited by MBF extracts via suppressing the expression of proinflammatory molecules, including inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), interleukin-1 beta (IL-β) and IL-6. Particularly, a dose-dependent inhibition on LPS-induced inflammatory responses was observed following treatment with MBF dichloromethane extract (MBF-DE), in which linoleic acid and ethyl linolenate were identified as two active compounds. Moreover, we elucidated that MBF-DE attenuated LPS-induced inflammatory responses by blocking activation of both NF-κB/p65 and pERK/MAPK pathways. In vivo, DSS-induced acute colitis was significantly ameliorated in MBF-fed mice as gauged by weight loss, colon morphology and histological damage. In addition, MBF-fed MUC2−/− mice displayed significant decrease in intestinal tumor and inflammation incidence compared to control diet-fed group. Overall, our results demonstrated that MBF suppressed the development of intestinal inflammation and tumorgenesis both in vitro and in vivo, and supports the potential of MBF as a therapeutic functional food for testing in human clinical trials. PMID:26615818

  7. Preventative effect of OMZ-SPT on lipopolysaccharide-induced acute lung injury and inflammation via nuclear factor-kappa B signaling in mice.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ting; Hou, Wanru; Fu, Zhou

    2017-02-20

    Acute lung injury (ALI) is an early pathophysiologic change in acute respiratory distress syndrome and its management can be challenging. Omalizumab (Xolair™) is a recombinant DNA-derived, humanized antibody. OMZ-SPT is a polypeptide on the heavy chain of omalizumab monoclonal antibody. Here, we found that intramuscular administration of OMZ-SPT significantly improved survival and attenuated lung inflammation in female C57BL/6 mice suffering from lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced ALI. We also demonstrated that OMZ-SPT can inhibit expression of the inflammatory cytokines tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin-1β and interleukin-6 by ELISA in mice suffering from LPS-induced ALI and a mouse macrophage line (RAW264.7 cells). In addition, we showed that OMZ-SPT inhibited LPS-induced activation of nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) signaling and total expression of NF-κB by western blotting. These data suggest that OMZ-SPT could be a novel therapeutic choice for ALI.

  8. beta-Lactamase-producing Moraxella catarrhalis may prevent the emergence of penicillin-resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae in children with recurrent acute otitis media.

    PubMed

    Joki-Erkkilä, Veli-Pekka; Aittoniemi, Janne; Vuento, Risto; Puhakka, Heikki

    2002-05-15

    We studied the effect of concomitant nasopharyngeal carriage of beta-lactamase producing Moraxella catarrhalis and Haemophilus influenzae on the occurrence of penicillin resistance of Streptococcus pneumoniae. We took nasopharyngeal samples from 306 children with recurrent otitis media and a history of several antibiotic treatments. We could isolate at least one of the pathogens in 89 subjects. Of these children 13% carried more than one pathogen. Of the isolated M. catarrhalis and H. influenzae strains 93% and 43% produced beta-lactamase, respectively. Of the S. pneumoniae strains 25% were non-susceptible (I/R) to penicillin. However, in patients carrying beta-lactamase-producing M. catarrhalis together with pneumococci all strains were susceptible to penicillin (P=0.0353). This finding suggests that beta-lactamase producing M. catarrhalis may hinder the emergence of penicillin resistance of S. pneumoniae in children with recurrent acute otitis media.

  9. Clinical effectiveness of palifermin in prevention and treatment of oral mucositis in children with acute lymphoblastic leukaemia: a case-control study.

    PubMed

    Lauritano, Dorina; Petruzzi, Massimo; Di Stasio, Dario; Lucchese, Alberta

    2014-03-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of palifermin, an N-terminal truncated version of endogenous keratinocyte growth factor, in the control of oral mucositis during antiblastic therapy. Twenty patients undergoing allogeneic stem-cell transplantation for acute lymphoblastic leukaemia were treated with palifermin, and compared to a control group with the same number of subjects and similar inclusion criteria. Statistical analysis were performed to compare the outcomes in the treatment vs. control groups. In the treatment group, we found a statistically significant reduction in the duration of parenteral nutrition (P=0.002), duration of mucositis (P=0.003) and the average grade of mucositis (P=0.03). The statistical analysis showed that the drug was able to decrease the severity of mucositis. These data, although preliminary, suggest that palifermin could be a valid therapeutic adjuvant to improve the quality of life of patients suffering from leukaemia.

  10. Aerobic exercise acutely prevents the endothelial dysfunction induced by mental stress among subjects with metabolic syndrome: the role of shear rate.

    PubMed

    Sales, Allan R K; Fernandes, Igor A; Rocha, Natália G; Costa, Lucas S; Rocha, Helena N M; Mattos, João D M; Vianna, Lauro C; Silva, Bruno M; Nóbrega, Antonio C L

    2014-04-01

    Mental stress induces transient endothelial dysfunction, which is an important finding for subjects at cardiometabolic risk. Thus, we tested whether aerobic exercise prevents this dysfunction among subjects with metabolic syndrome (MetS) and whether an increase in shear rate during exercise plays a role in this phenomenon. Subjects with MetS participated in two protocols. In protocol 1 (n = 16), endothelial function was assessed using brachial artery flow-mediated dilation (FMD). Subjects then underwent a mental stress test followed by either 40 min of leg cycling or rest across two randomized sessions. FMD was assessed again at 30 and 60 min after exercise or rest, with a second mental stress test in between. Mental stress reduced FMD at 30 and 60 min after the rest session (baseline: 7.7 ± 0.4%, 30 min: 5.4 ± 0.5%, and 60 min: 3.9 ± 0.5%, P < 0.05 vs. baseline), whereas exercise prevented this reduction (baseline: 7.5 ± 0.4%, 30 min: 7.2 ± 0.7%, and 60 min: 8.7 ± 0.8%, P > 0.05 vs. baseline). Protocol 2 (n = 5) was similar to protocol 1 except that the first period of mental stress was followed by either exercise in which the brachial artery shear rate was attenuated via forearm cuff inflation or exercise without a cuff. Noncuffed exercise prevented the reduction in FMD (baseline: 7.5 ± 0.7%, 30 min: 7.0 ± 0.7%, and 60 min: 8.7 ± 0.8%, P > 0.05 vs. baseline), whereas cuffed exercise failed to prevent this reduction (baseline: 7.5 ± 0.6%, 30 min: 5.4 ± 0.8%, and 60 min: 4.1 ± 0.9%, P < 0.05 vs. baseline). In conclusion, exercise prevented mental stress-induced endothelial dysfunction among subjects with MetS, and an increase in shear rate during exercise mediated this effect.

  11. [Acute pulmonary edema secondary to acute upper airway obstruction].

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Ortega, J L; Carpintero-Moreno, F; Olivares-López, A; Borrás-Rubio, E; Alvarez-López, M J; García-Izquierdo, A

    1992-01-01

    We report a 72 years old woman with mild arterial hypertension and no other pathological history who presented an acute pulmonary edema due to acute obstruction of the upper airway secondary to vocal chord paralysis developing during the immediate postoperative phase of thyroidectomy. The acute pulmonary edema resolved after application of tracheal reintubation, mechanical ventilation controlled with end expiratory positive pressure, diuretics, morphine, and liquid restriction. We discuss the possible etiopathogenic possibilities of this infrequent clinical picture and we suggest that all patients who suffered and acute obstruction of the upper airways require a careful clinical surveillance in order to prevent the development of the pulmonary syndrome.

  12. Acute Hepatic Porphyria

    PubMed Central

    Bissell, D. Montgomery; Wang, Bruce

    2015-01-01

    The porphyrias comprise a set of diseases, each representing an individual defect in one of the eight enzymes mediating the pathway of heme synthesis. The diseases are genetically distinct but have in common the overproduction of heme precursors. In the case of the acute (neurologic) porphyrias, the cause of symptoms appears to be overproduction of a neurotoxic precursor. For the cutaneous porphyrias, it is photosensitizing porphyrins. Some types have both acute and cutaneous manifestations. The clinical presentation of acute porphyria consists of abdominal pain, nausea, and occasionally seizures. Only a small minority of those who carry a mutation for acute porphyria have pain attacks. The triggers for an acute attack encompass certain medications and severely decreased caloric intake. The propensity of females to acute attacks has been linked to internal changes in ovarian physiology. Symptoms are accompanied by large increases in delta-aminolevulinic acid and porphobilinogen in plasma and urine. Treatment of an acute attack centers initially on pain relief and elimination of inducing factors such as medications; glucose is administered to reverse the fasting state. The only specific treatment is administration of intravenous hemin. An important goal of treatment is preventing progression of the symptoms to a neurological crisis. Patients who progress despite hemin administration have undergone liver transplantation with complete resolution of symptoms. A current issue is the unavailability of a rapid test for urine porphobilinogen in the urgent-care setting. PMID:26357631

  13. [Preventive effects of troxipide on a newly developed model of acute gastric mucosal lesion (AGML) induced by ischemia/reperfusion plus ammonia in the rat].

    PubMed

    Momo, K; Hoshina, K; Ishibashi, Y; Saito, T

    1994-10-01

    We have developed a unique rat AGML model produced by ischemia/reperfusion plus 0.2% ammonia (I/R.NH3), either treatment which would not induce mucosal injury when used alone. The effects of troxipide and other gastric mucosal defensive drugs were investigated with this I/R.NH3-induced AGML model and other AGML models in rats. The following results were obtained: 1) Like allopurinol, troxipide at 50-200 mg/kg, p.o. dose-dependently prevented I/R.NH3-induced development of AGML and also the ischemia/reperfusion-induced increase of gastric mucosal thiobarbituric acid (TBA)-reactive substances; 2) Troxipide at 10(-6)-10(-4) M, like allopurinol, inhibited concentration-dependently in vitro xanthine oxidase activity in gastric mucosal homogenates; 3) Troxipide at 50-200 mg/kg, p.o. inhibited AGMLs induced by bleeding plus 0.2% ammonia and by 1.0% ammonia alone; and 4) Troxipide and sofalcone were similar in preventing all AGMLs tested and also the increase of mucosal TBA-reactive substances, but somewhat differed from teprenone, cetraxate hydrochloride, azulene plus L-glutamine and sucralfate. These findings suggest that troxipide may inhibit I/R.NH3-induced AGML development by preventing generation of oxygen free radicals and by protecting against mucosal fragility due to reduced energy metabolism from poor blood flow and also against ammonia-induced disruption of the gastric mucosal barrier. Therefore, troxipide may be highly effective for various AGMLs with multifactor involvement.

  14. Comparison of the Effects of the US Clean Air Act and of Smoking Prevention and Cessation Efforts on the Risk of Acute Myelogenous Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yan; Wu, Felicia; Lioy, Paul

    2011-01-01

    Objectives. We used 2 approaches based on published information to compare the impacts on leukemia incidence and benzene exposure of the 1990 US Clean Air Act (CAA) amendments and smoking prevention and cessation efforts. Methods. We extrapolated leukemia mortality related to community air pollution levels and to cigarette smoking from data from the US Environmental Protection Agency and the US Surgeon General. We also estimated relative decline in total exposures to benzene (a known human leukemogen) owing to the CAA amendments and to smoking prevention and cessation efforts. Results. We estimated that because of the CAA, there will be approximately 300 fewer leukemia deaths in the United States during the period 2000 through 2020. During the closest comparable period (1987–2007), we estimated that decline in cigarette smoking led to 7120 fewer leukemia deaths, of which 1282 to 3702 were attributable to benzene. Similarly, the decline in smoking led to about a tenfold greater decrease in total-population benzene exposure than did the 1990 CAA amendments. Conclusions. Both the CAA and smoking cessation activities contribute to a decrease in leukemia incidence. Smoking cessation activities have had a greater effect in the past. PMID:22021318

  15. Prevention of poststroke depression with milnacipran in patients with acute ischemic stroke: a double-blind randomized placebo-controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Ching-Shu; Wu, Chen-Long; Chou, Shih-Yong; Tsang, Hin-Yeung; Hung, Tai-Hsin; Su, Jian-An

    2011-09-01

    Poststroke depression (PSD) is one of the most frequent neuropsychiatric consequences of stroke. It has been shown to be associated with both impaired recovery and increased mortality. The purpose of this study is to investigate the prophylactic effect of milnacipran in PSD. Ninety-two patients were enrolled in the 12 months of this double-blind randomized placebo-controlled trial. The assessment was performed at baseline, and at the first, third, sixth, ninth and 12th month after enrollment. The definition of PSD was in accordance with the diagnostic criteria of major depressive episode based on the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual, fourth edition. Forty-six patients were randomized to the treatment group with milnacipran and another 46 patients to the placebo group. No significant differences were found between the two groups in terms of sex (P=0.83), age (P=0.08), marital status (P=0.66), occupation (P=0.22), educational level (P=0.29), and drug side-effects (P=0.73). The incidence of depression in the two groups was 2.22% and 15.22%, respectively. Milnacipran was proved to have a statistically significant advantage in preventing PSD (P<0.05). In conclusion, milnacipran could prevent the development of depression in the first year following a stroke and is safe to use without significant adverse effects in stroke patients.

  16. Ocular infection with herpes simplex virus type 1: prevention of acute herpetic encephalitis by systemic administration of virus-specific antibody.

    PubMed

    Davis, W B; Taylor, J A; Oakes, J E

    1979-10-01

    The effects of virus-specific antibody on the pathogenesis of infection due to herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) following corneal inoculation of young adult mice were studied. HSV-1 was inoculated onto the corneal surface immediately after trephination with a capillary pipette. After inoculation, virus spread to the trigeminal ganglion and brain within two days and caused acute herpetic encephalitis, which killed infected animals eight to 10 days after infection. Rabbit hyperimmune antisera to HSV-1 were prepared, diluted to contain antibody at a titer of 1:150, and administered intraperitoneally to mice 8 hr after corneal infection. Administration of antisera did not interfere with the spread of HSV-1 from the site of infection to the trigeminal ganglion and brain but did reduce the multiplication of virus within the central nervous system. Reduction in viral replication resulted in complete recovery of the animals that were given antibody to HSV-1. however, the animals were not protected if they were irradiated with 390 rad 24 hr prior to administration of antibody. This observation suggested that antibody-mediated protection was not the result of in vivo neutralization of virus but instead required the presence of antibody as well as one or more radiation-sensitive components.

  17. Regulation of A-Kinase-Anchoring Protein 12 by Heat Shock Protein A12B to Prevent Ventricular Dysfunction Following Acute Myocardial Infarction in Diabetic Rats.

    PubMed

    Selvaraju, Vaithinathan; Suresh, Sumanth C; Thirunavukkarasu, Mahesh; Mannu, Jayakanthan; Foye, Jocelyn L C; Mathur, Premendu P; Palesty, J Alexander; Sanchez, Juan A; McFadden, David W; Maulik, Nilanjana

    2017-03-09

    We examined the effects of overexpressing HSPA12B on angiogenesis and myocardial function by intramyocardial administration of adenovirus encoding HSPA12B (Ad. HSPA12B) in a streptozotocin-induced diabetic rat subjected to myocardial infarction. Rats were divided randomly into six groups: control sham (CS) + Ad.LacZ, control myocardial infarction (CMI) + Ad.LacZ, control MI + Ad.HSPA12B, diabetic sham (DS) + Ad.LacZ, diabetic MI + Ad.LacZ and diabetic MI + Ad.HSPA12B. Following MI or sham surgery, the respective groups received either Ad.LacZ or Ad.HSPA12B via intramyocardial injections. We observed increased capillary and arteriolar density along with reduced fibrosis and preserved heart functions in DMI-AdHSPA12B compared to DMI-AdLacZ group. Western blot analysis demonstrated enhanced HSPA12B, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), thioredoxin-1 (Trx-1) expression along with decreased expression of thioredoxin interacting protein (TXNIP) and A kinase anchoring protein 12 (AKAP12) in the DMI-AdHSPA12B compared to DMI-AdLacZ group. Our findings reveal that HSPA12B overexpression interacts with AKAP12 and downregulate TXNIP in diabetic rats following acute MI.

  18. Transitions of Care Between Acute and Chronic Heart Failure: Critical Steps in the Design of a Multidisciplinary Care Model for the Prevention of Rehospitalization.

    PubMed

    Comín-Colet, Josep; Enjuanes, Cristina; Lupón, Josep; Cainzos-Achirica, Miguel; Badosa, Neus; Verdú, José María

    2016-10-01

    Despite advances in the treatment of heart failure, mortality, the number of readmissions, and their associated health care costs are very high. Heart failure care models inspired by the chronic care model, also known as heart failure programs or heart failure units, have shown clinical benefits in high-risk patients. However, while traditional heart failure units have focused on patients detected in the outpatient phase, the increasing pressure from hospital admissions is shifting the focus of interest toward multidisciplinary programs that concentrate on transitions of care, particularly between the acute phase and the postdischarge phase. These new integrated care models for heart failure revolve around interventions at the time of transitions of care. They are multidisciplinary and patient-centered, designed to ensure continuity of care, and have been demonstrated to reduce potentially avoidable hospital admissions. Key components of these models are early intervention during the inpatient phase, discharge planning, early postdischarge review and structured follow-up, advanced transition planning, and the involvement of physicians and nurses specialized in heart failure. It is hoped that such models will be progressively implemented across the country.

  19. A truncated-dose regimen of daclizumab for prevention of acute rejection in kidney transplant recipients: a single-center experience.

    PubMed

    Soltero, Liliana; Carbajal, Hector; Sarkissian, Nadine; Khan, Abdul-Jabbar; Brennan, Stephen; Gonzalez, Juan M; Truong, Luan D; Suki, Wadi N

    2004-11-27

    Daclizumab can decrease the incidence of acute rejection (AR) in renal transplant (RTx) recipients. In this prospective study, 52 RTx patients were divided into two groups according to the dose of daclizumab: 1 mg/kg on day 0 and every 14 days for five doses (group 1, n = 30) or a truncated regimen of 2 mg/kg on day 0 and on the day of discharge (group 2, n = 22). The following variables were recorded: demographics; delayed graft function; AR at 3, 6, and 12 months; time to AR; chronic allograft nephropathy (CAN); and serum creatinine. The overall incidences of AR were 23% and 27% (P = 0.76) in groups 1 and 2, respectively, whereas at 6 months they were 21% and 18% (P = 1.0). Median time to AR was 10 days in group 1 and 94 days in group 2 (P = 0.09). The incidence of CAN was 6.6% in group 1 and 13% in group 2 (P = 0.63). These data suggest that the truncated dose of daclizumab is as effective as the standard regimen for AR prophylaxis.

  20. Prevention and treatment of acute radiation-induced skin reactions: a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Radiation-induced skin reaction (RISR) is a common side effect that affects the majority of cancer patients receiving radiation treatment. RISR is often characterised by swelling, redness, pigmentation, fibrosis, and ulceration, pain, warmth, burning, and itching of the skin. The aim of this systematic review was to assess the effects of interventions which aim to prevent or manage RISR in people with cancer. Methods We searched the following databases up to November 2012: Cochrane Skin Group Specialised Register, CENTRAL (2012, Issue 11), MEDLINE (from 1946), EMBASE (from 1974), PsycINFO (from 1806), CINAHL (from 1981) and LILACS (from 1982). Randomized controlled trials evaluating interventions for preventing or managing RISR in cancer patients were included. The primary outcomes were development of RISR, and levels of RISR and symptom severity. Secondary outcomes were time taken to develop erythema or dry desquamation; quality of life; time taken to heal, a number of skin reaction and symptom severity measures; cost, participant satisfaction; ease of use and adverse effects. Where appropriate, we pooled results of randomized controlled trials using mean differences (MD) or odd ratios (OR) with 95% confidence intervals (CI). Results Forty-seven studies were included in this review. These evaluated six types of interventions (oral systemic medications; skin care practices; steroidal topical therapies; non-steroidal topical therapies; dressings and other). Findings from two meta-analyses demonstrated significant benefits of oral Wobe-Mugos E for preventing RISR (OR 0.13 (95% CI 0.05 to 0.38)) and limiting the maximal level of RISR (MD -0.92 (95% CI -1.36 to -0.48)). Another meta-analysis reported that wearing deodorant does not influence the development of RISR (OR 0.80 (95% CI 0.47 to 1.37)). Conclusions Despite the high number of trials in this area, there is limited good, comparative research that provides definitive results suggesting the

  1. Choline or CDP-choline attenuates coagulation abnormalities and prevents the development of acute disseminated intravascular coagulation in dogs during endotoxemia.

    PubMed

    Yilmaz, Zeki; Ozarda, Yesim; Cansev, Mehmet; Eralp, Oya; Kocaturk, Meric; Ulus, Ismail H

    2010-06-01

    Sepsis/endotoxemia causes platelet dysfunctions, abnormalities in coagulation and hemostatic mechanisms leading to organ dysfunctions and mortality. Choline prevents organ injury and improves survival during endotoxemia. The main objective of the present study was to determine the effects of choline or cytidine-5'-diphosphocholine (CDP-choline) on endotoxin-induced activation of coagulation and development of disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC). Dogs were treated intravenously (i.v.) with saline, choline (20 mg/kg), or CDP-choline (70 mg/kg) three times with 4-h intervals starting 5 min before i.v. injection of endotoxin (1 mg/kg). Platelet counts and functions, prothrombin time (PT), activated partial thromboplastin time (aPTT), fibrinogen, coagulation factors, D-dimer and antithrombin (AT) were measured before and at 0.5-96 h after endotoxin. Circulating platelet, fibrinogen, coagulation factors and AT were decreased, whereas PT and aPTT were prolonged and serum D-dimer levels were elevated after endotoxin. Endotoxin-induced reductions in platelet counts and functions, fibrinogen, coagulation factors and AT were attenuated or blocked by choline or CDP-choline. Choline or CDP-choline blocked endotoxin-induced prolongation in PT and aPTT and enhancement in D-dimer. Elevated DIC scores were attenuated by choline and blocked by CDP-choline. Choline administration increased serum choline concentrations and caused bradycardia. Choline also increased choline and acetylcholine contents of circulating mononuclear cells and inhibited radioligand binding to their cholinergic receptors. These data show that choline administration, as choline chloride or CDP-choline, restores the abnormalities in the primary, secondary, and tertiary hemostasis and prevents the development of DIC during experimental endotoxemia in dogs probably by increasing both neuronal and non-neuronal cholinergic activity.

  2. Ugonin M, a Helminthostachys zeylanica Constituent, Prevents LPS-Induced Acute Lung Injury through TLR4-Mediated MAPK and NF-κB Signaling Pathways.

    PubMed

    Wu, Kun-Chang; Huang, Shyh-Shyun; Kuo, Yueh-Hsiung; Ho, Yu-Ling; Yang, Chang-Syun; Chang, Yuan-Shiun; Huang, Guan-Jhong

    2017-04-01

    Helminthostachys zeylanica (L.) Hook. is plant that has been used in traditional Chinese medicine for centuries for the treatment of inflammation, fever, pneumonia, and various disorders. The aims of the present study are to figure out the possible effectiveness of the component Ugonin M, a unique flavonoid isolated from H. zeylanica, and to elucidate the mechanism(s) by which it works in the LPS-induced ALI model. In this study, Ugonin M not only inhibited the production of pro-inflammatory mediators such as NO, TNF-α, IL-1β, and IL-6, as well as infiltrated cellular counts and protein content in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) of lipopolysaccharides (LPS)-induced acute lung injury (ALI) mice, but also ameliorated the severity of pulmonary edemas through the score of a histological examination and the ratio of wet to dry weight of lung. Moreover, Ugonin M was observed to significantly suppress LPS-stimulated protein levels of iNOS and COX-2. In addition, we found that Ugonin M not only obviously suppressed NF-κB and MAPK activation via the degradation of NF-κB and IκB-α as well as ERK and p38MAPK active phosphorylation but also inhibited the protein expression level of TLR4. Further, Ugonin M treatment also suppressed the protein levels of MPO and enhanced the protein expressions of HO-1 and antioxidant enzymes (SOD, GPx, and CAT) in lung tissue of LPS-induced ALI mice. It is anticipated that through our findings, there is strong evidence that Ugonin M may exert a potential effect against LPS-induced ALI mice. Hence, Ugonin M could be one of the major effective components of H. zeylanica in the treatment of inflammatory disorders.

  3. Does Pre-Treatment with High Dose Atorvastatin Prevent Microvascular Dysfunction after Percutaneous Coronary Intervention in Patients with Acute Coronary Syndrome?

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Bong-Ki; Nam, Chang-Wook; Doh, Joon-Hyung; Chung, Woo-Young; Cho, Byung-Ryul; Fearon, William F.

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objectives There is controversy surrounding whether or not high dose statin administration before percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) decreases peri-procedural microvascular injury. We performed a prospective randomized study to investigate the mechanisms and effects of pre-treatment high dose atorvastatin on myocardial damage in patients with non-ST-segment elevation acute coronary syndrome (NSTE-ACS) undergoing PCI. Subjects and Methods Seventy seven patients with NSTE-ACS were randomly assigned to either the high dose group (atorvastatin 80 mg loading 12 to 24 h before PCI with a further 40 mg loading 2 h before PCI, n=39) or low dose group (atorvastatin 10 mg administration 12 to 24 h before PCI, n=38). Index of microcirculatory resistance (IMR) was measured after stent implantation. Creatine kinase-myocardial band (CK-MB) and high sensitivity C-reactive protein (CRP) levels were measured before and after PCI. Results The baseline characteristics were not different between the two patient groups. Compared to the low dose group, the high dose group had lower post PCI IMR (14.1±5.0 vs. 19.2±9.3 U, p=0.003). Post PCI CK-MB was also lower in the high dose group (median: 1.40 ng/mL (interquartile range [IQR: 0.75 to 3.45] vs. 4.00 [IQR: 1.70 to 7.37], p=0.002) as was the post-PCI CRP level (0.09 mg/dL [IQR: 0.04 to 0.16] vs. 0.22 [IQR: 0.08 to 0.60], p=0.001). Conclusion Pre-treatment with high dose atorvastatin reduces peri-PCI microvascular dysfunction verified by post-PCI IMR and exerts an immediate anti-inflammatory effect in patients with NSTE-ACS. PMID:27482255

  4. Prevention and mitigation of acute radiation syndrome in mice by synthetic lipopeptide agonists of Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2).

    PubMed

    Shakhov, Alexander N; Singh, Vijay K; Bone, Frederick; Cheney, Alec; Kononov, Yevgeniy; Krasnov, Peter; Bratanova-Toshkova, Troitza K; Shakhova, Vera V; Young, Jason; Weil, Michael M; Panoskaltsis-Mortari, Angela; Orschell, Christie M; Baker, Patricia S; Gudkov, Andrei; Feinstein, Elena

    2012-01-01

    Bacterial lipoproteins (BLP) induce innate immune responses in mammals by activating heterodimeric receptor complexes containing Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2). TLR2 signaling results in nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-κB)-dependent upregulation of anti-apoptotic factors, anti-oxidants and cytokines, all of which have been implicated in radiation protection. Here we demonstrate that synthetic lipopeptides (sLP) that mimic the structure of naturally occurring mycoplasmal BLP significantly increase mouse survival following lethal total body irradiation (TBI) when administered between 48 hours before and 24 hours after irradiation. The TBI dose ranges against which sLP are effective indicate that sLP primarily impact the hematopoietic (HP) component of acute radiation syndrome. Indeed, sLP treatment accelerated recovery of bone marrow (BM) and spleen cellularity and ameliorated thrombocytopenia of irradiated mice. sLP did not improve survival of irradiated TLR2-knockout mice, confirming that sLP-mediated radioprotection requires TLR2. However, sLP was radioprotective in chimeric mice containing TLR2-null BM on a wild type background, indicating that radioprotection of the HP system by sLP is, at least in part, indirect and initiated in non-BM cells. sLP injection resulted in strong transient induction of multiple cytokines with known roles in hematopoiesis, including granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF), keratinocyte chemoattractant (KC) and interleukin-6 (IL-6). sLP-induced cytokines, particularly G-CSF, are likely mediators of the radioprotective/mitigative activity of sLP. This study illustrates the strong potential of LP-based TLR2 agonists for anti-radiation prophylaxis and therapy in defense and medical scenarios.

  5. Prevention and Mitigation of Acute Radiation Syndrome in Mice by Synthetic Lipopeptide Agonists of Toll-Like Receptor 2 (TLR2)

    PubMed Central

    Shakhov, Alexander N.; Singh, Vijay K.; Bone, Frederick; Cheney, Alec; Kononov, Yevgeniy; Krasnov, Peter; Bratanova-Toshkova, Troitza K.; Shakhova, Vera V.; Young, Jason; Weil, Michael M.; Panoskaltsis-Mortari, Angela; Orschell, Christie M.; Baker, Patricia S.; Gudkov, Andrei; Feinstein, Elena

    2012-01-01

    Bacterial lipoproteins (BLP) induce innate immune responses in mammals by activating heterodimeric receptor complexes containing Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2). TLR2 signaling results in nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-κB)-dependent upregulation of anti-apoptotic factors, anti-oxidants and cytokines, all of which have been implicated in radiation protection. Here we demonstrate that synthetic lipopeptides (sLP) that mimic the structure of naturally occurring mycoplasmal BLP significantly increase mouse survival following lethal total body irradiation (TBI) when administered between 48 hours before and 24 hours after irradiation. The TBI dose ranges against which sLP are effective indicate that sLP primarily impact the hematopoietic (HP) component of acute radiation syndrome. Indeed, sLP treatment accelerated recovery of bone marrow (BM) and spleen cellularity and ameliorated thrombocytopenia of irradiated mice. sLP did not improve survival of irradiated TLR2-knockout mice, confirming that sLP-mediated radioprotection requires TLR2. However, sLP was radioprotective in chimeric mice containing TLR2-null BM on a wild type background, indicating that radioprotection of the HP system by sLP is, at least in part, indirect and initiated in non-BM cells. sLP injection resulted in strong transient induction of multiple cytokines with known roles in hematopoiesis, including granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF), keratinocyte chemoattractant (KC) and interleukin-6 (IL-6). sLP-induced cytokines, particularly G-CSF, are likely mediators of the radioprotective/mitigative activity of sLP. This study illustrates the strong potential of LP-based TLR2 agonists for anti-radiation prophylaxis and therapy in defense and medical scenarios. PMID:22479357

  6. Caffeinated coffee does not acutely affect energy intake, appetite, or inflammation but prevents serum cortisol concentrations from falling in healthy men.

    PubMed

    Gavrieli, Anna; Yannakoulia, Mary; Fragopoulou, Elizabeth; Margaritopoulos, Dimitris; Chamberland, John P; Kaisari, Panagiota; Kavouras, Stavros A; Mantzoros, Christos S

    2011-04-01

    Our aim in this crossover study was to investigate the acute effects of caffeinated and decaffeinated coffee consumption on appetite feelings, energy intake, and appetite-, inflammation-, stress-, and glucose metabolism-related markers. Sixteen healthy men (age range, 21-39 y; BMI range, 19.7-28.6 kg/m(2)) received in a random order on 3 separate occasions a standard breakfast snack with 200 mL of either caffeinated coffee (3 mg caffeine/kg body weight), decaffeinated coffee, or water (control). Before intervention (-15 min) and at standard time points following breakfast consumption (0, 15, 30, 60, 90, 120, 150, and 180 min), participants recorded their appetite feelings and we collected blood samples for measurements of circulating glucose, insulin, cortisol, and appetite- and inflammation-related markers. At 180 min, participants consumed a meal ad libitum. The appetite-related ratings, the appetite plasma hormonal responses as well as the plasma glucose, serum insulin, and plasma and serum inflammatory marker responses did not show an overall intervention effect or a time x intervention interaction. Ad libitum energy intake did not differ among the 3 interventions. However, a significant intervention effect (P = 0.04) and a time x intervention interaction (P-interaction = 0.02) were found for serum cortisol; cortisol concentrations were significantly higher following the caffeinated coffee intervention, compared to control, at 60 min and thereafter. In conclusion, the usually consumed amount of caffeinated coffee does not have short-term effects on appetite, energy intake, glucose metabolism, and inflammatory markers, but it increases circulating cortisol concentrations in healthy men.

  7. Inducing cell proliferative prevention in human acute promyelocytic leukemia by miR-182 inhibition through modulation of CASP9 expression.

    PubMed

    Fasihi-Ramandi, Mahdi; Moridnia, Abbas; Najafi, Ali; Sharifi, Mohammadreza

    2017-03-11

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are one class of endogenous non-coding RNAs that involved in post-transcriptional regulation of the gene. MiRNAs through interaction with messenger RNA (mRNA) involved in several biological processes such as cell cycle, differentiation, growth, metabolism, aging and apoptosis. MiRNAs may act as an oncogene or a tumor suppressor via up or down regulation in cancerous cells. MiR-182 located in a miR-183/-96/-182 cluster, this is the highly conserved cluster to have an important role in cancer development and tumorigenesis. Abnormal expression of miR-182 in a variety of human cancers has reported. Oncogenic features of miR-182 confirmed through negative regulation of various tumor suppressor genes. In this study, miR-182 inhibition in acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) cell line (HL60) was performed by locked nucleic acid (LNA) anti-miR. MTT assay in three-time points 24, 48 and 72h after LNA-anti-miR-182 transfection was performed. Our study demonstrated inhibition of miR-182 can expansively decrease cell proliferation of APL cells. The Western blotting analysis presents that CASP9 expression associated with inhibition of miR-182. CASP9 protein has an important role in the mitochondrial cell death pathway as the initiator of apoptosis. These results can offer a way for inhibition of APL cells proliferates and produce translational medicine based on microgenomics and antisense therapy.

  8. β-Cell-targeted blockage of PD1 and CTLA4 pathways prevents development of autoimmune diabetes and acute allogeneic islets rejection.

    PubMed

    El Khatib, M M; Sakuma, T; Tonne, J M; Mohamed, M S; Holditch, S J; Lu, B; Kudva, Y C; Ikeda, Y

    2015-05-01

    Protection of β cells from autoimmune destruction potentially cures type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1D). During antigen presentation, interactions between cytotoxic T-lymphocyte antigen-4 (CTLA4) and B7 molecules, or programmed death 1 (PD1) and its ligand PDL1, negatively regulate immune responses in a non-redundant manner. Here we employed β-cell-targeted adeno-associated virus serotype 8 (AAV8)-based vectors to overexpress an artificial PDL1-CTLA4Ig polyprotein or interleukin 10 (IL10). β-Cell-targeted expression of PDL1-CTLA4Ig or IL10 preserved β-cell mass and protected NOD mice from T1D development. When NOD mice were treated with vectors at early onset of hyperglycemia, PDL1-CTLA4Ig or IL10 alone failed to normalize the early onset of hyperglycemia. When drug-induced diabetic mice received major histocompatibility complex (MHC)-matched allo-islets, with or without pretreatment of the PDL1-CTLA4Ig-expressing vector, PDL1-CTLA4Ig-expressing islets were protected from rejection for at least 120 days. Similarly, transplantation of PDL1-CTLA4Ig-expressing MHC-matched islets into mice with established T1D resulted in protection of allo-islets from acute rejection, although islet grafts were eventually rejected. Thus the present study demonstrates the potent immuno-suppressive effects of β-cell-targeted PDL1-CTLA4Ig overexpression against T1D development and allo-islet rejection. The gene-based simultaneous inhibition of PD1 and CTLA4 pathways provides a unique strategy for immunosuppression-free tissue/organ transplantation, especially in the setting of no established autoimmunity.

  9. Acute Bronchitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... can also cause acute bronchitis. To diagnose acute bronchitis, your health care provider will ask about your symptoms and listen to your breathing. You may also have other tests. Treatments include rest, fluids, and aspirin (for adults) or ...

  10. Neonatal Pressure Ulcer Prevention.

    PubMed

    Scheans, Patricia

    2015-01-01

    The incidence of pressure ulcers in acutely ill infants and children ranges up to 27 percent in intensive care units, with a range of 16-19 percent in NICUs. Anatomic, physiologic, and developmental factors place ill and preterm newborns at risk for skin breakdown. Two case studies illustrate these factors, and best practices for pressure ulcer prevention are described.

  11. Acute exercise prevents the development of neuropathic pain and the sprouting of non-peptidergic (GDNF- and artemin-responsive) c-fibers after spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Detloff, Megan Ryan; Smith, Evan J; Quiros Molina, Daniel; Ganzer, Patrick D; Houlé, John D

    2014-05-01

    -induced allodynia. Importantly, in SCI rats that received Ex, the incidence of tactile allodynia decreased to 7% (1/17) and there was maintenance of GDNF and artemin at normal levels, with a normal distribution of GFL-responsive fibers. These data suggest that GFLs and/or their downstream effectors may be important modulators of pain fiber plasticity, representing effective targets for anti-allodynic therapeutics. Furthermore, we highlight the potent beneficial effects of acute exercise after SCI.

  12. Acute exercise prevents the development of neuropathic pain and the sprouting of non-peptidergic (GDNF- and artemin-responsive) c-fibers after spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    Detloff, Megan Ryan; Smith, Evan J.; Molina, Daniel Quiros; Ganzer, Patrick D.; Houlé, John D

    2014-01-01

    -induced allodynia. Importantly, in SCI rats that received Ex, the incidence of tactile allodynia decreased to 7% (1/17) and there was a maintenance of GDNF and artemin at normal levels, with a normal distribution of GFL-responsive fibers. These data suggest that GFLs and/or their downstream effectors may be important modulators of pain fiber plasticity, representing effective targets for anti-allodynic therapeutics. Furthermore, we highlight the potent beneficial effects of acute exercise after SCI. PMID:24560714

  13. Four patients with a history of acute exacerbations of COPD: implementing the CHEST/Canadian Thoracic Society guidelines for preventing exacerbations

    PubMed Central

    Tsiligianni, Ioanna; Goodridge, Donna; Marciniuk, Darcy; Hull, Sally; Bourbeau, Jean

    2015-01-01

    The American College of Chest Physicians and Canadian Thoracic Society have jointly produced evidence-based guidelines for the prevention of exacerbations in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). This educational article gives four perspectives on how these guidelines apply to the practical management of people with COPD. A current smoker with frequent exacerbations will benefit from support to quit, and from optimisation of his inhaled treatment. For a man with very severe COPD and multiple co-morbidities living in a remote community, tele-health care may enable provision of multidisciplinary care. A woman who is admitted for the third time in a year needs a structured assessment of her care with a view to stepping up pharmacological and non-pharmacological treatment as required. The overlap between asthma and COPD challenges both diagnostic and management strategies for a lady smoker with a history of asthma since childhood. Common threads in all these cases are the importance of advising on smoking cessation, offering (and encouraging people to attend) pulmonary rehabilitation, and the importance of self-management, including an action plan supported by multidisciplinary teams. PMID:25950092

  14. What Causes a Sunburn and Suntan?

    MedlinePlus

    ... 2017 American Academy of Dermatology. All rights reserved. Reproduction or republication strictly prohibited without prior written permission. ... 2017 American Academy of Dermatology. All rights reserved. Reproduction or republication strictly prohibited without prior written permission. "); ( ...

  15. [THE ROLE OF MOTHER'S MILK AND BREAST FEEDING. MEDICAL PROBLEMS DURING THE LACTATION PERIOD LACTOBACILUS FERMENTUM--A NEW APPROACH TOWARDS THE PREVENTION AND THE TREATMENT OF ACUTE AND SUBACUTE MASTITIS].

    PubMed

    Popova, B; Mitev, D; Nikolov, A

    2016-01-01

    Breast feeding provides a lot of short and long-term benefits for the mother and the baby. It prevents the baby of gastrointestinal, urinary and respiratory infections, atopical conditions and assures long-term protection of cardiovascular and metabolic diseases. The breast feeding decreases the risk for the mother of ovary and breast carcinoma and creates a positive emotional bond between the mother and the baby Mother's milk is a species specific; its content is relatively stable regardless of mother's age race, way and place of living. Mother's milk is not sterile. There is a 10 year international trial held in Spanish and Finnish universities. It has identified and count all microorganisms in mother's milk (more than 700) and proved that their content and quantity varies according the age of the baby. Mother's milk is a source of lactobacillus for baby's intestines and most of them have probiotic potential. Lactobacillus fermentum Lc40 (hereditum) is isolated from mother's milk. It has a good viability in gastrointestinal system, high level of adhesion to intestinal epithelium cells, produces glutation--strong antioxidant, good antibacterial activity to entero-pathogens and potential of increasing the immunologic response. Clinical trials reveal that Lactobacillus fermentum plays important role to microflora balance of mother's milk in mastitis during lactation. Many trials estimating the efficiency of lactobacillus fermentum in prevention and treatment of acute and subacute mastitis have been carried out. The results of them open a new door in front of us in the treatment of these conditions--treatment with probiotics instead of antibiotics.

  16. Treatment of Children with APL (Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Childhood Leukemia Treatment of Children With Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (APL) Treatment of acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL), the ... With Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia (CML) More In Childhood Leukemia About Childhood Leukemia Causes, Risk Factors, and Prevention ...

  17. Preventing LVAD implantation by early short-term mechanical support and prolonged inodilator therapy : A case series with acute refractory cardiogenic shock treated with veno-arterial extracorporeal membrane oxygenation and optimised medical strategy.

    PubMed

    Brugts, J J; Manintveld, O; Constantinescu, A; Donker, D W; van Thiel, R J; Nieman, K; Jewbali, L S D; Zijlstra, F; Caliskan, K

    2014-04-01

    Cardiogenic shock continues to be a life-threatening condition carrying a high mortality and morbidity, where the prognosis remains poor despite intensive modern treatment modalities. In recent years, mainly technical improvements have led to a more widespread use of short- and long-term mechanical circulatory support, such as veno-arterial extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (VA-ECMO) and left ventricular assist devices (LVADs). Currently, LVADs are indispensable as 'bridge' to cardiac recovery, heart transplantation (HTX), and/or as destination therapy Importantly, both LVADs and HTX put a vast burden on financial resources, besides significant short- and long-term risks of morbidity and mortality. These considerations underscore the importance of optimal timing and appropriate patient selection for LVAD therapy, avoiding as much as possible an unfortunate and costly clinical path. In this report, we present a series of three cases with acute refractory cardiogenic shock ('crash and burn', INTERMACS profile 1) successfully treated by ECMO and early optimal medical therapy preventing a certain path towards LVAD and/or HTX, for which they were initially referred. This conservative approach in INTERMACS profile one patients warrants very early introduction of adequate medical heart failure therapy under the umbrella of a combination of short-term mechanical circulatory and inotropic support by phosphodiesterase inhibitors. Therefore, this novel combined medical-mechanical approach could have important clinical implications for this extremely challenging patient category, as it may avoid an unnecessary and costly clinical path towards LVAD and/or heart transplantation.

  18. Acute sun damage and photoprotective responses in whales.

    PubMed

    Martinez-Levasseur, Laura M; Gendron, Diane; Knell, Rob J; O'Toole, Edel A; Singh, Manuraj; Acevedo-Whitehouse, Karina

    2011-05-22

    Rising levels of ultraviolet radiation (UVR) secondary to ozone depletion are an issue of concern for public health. Skin cancers and intraepidermal dysplasia are increasingly observed in individuals that undergo chronic or excessive sun exposure. Such alterations of skin integrity and function are well established for humans and laboratory animals, but remain unexplored for mammalian wildlife. However, effects are unlikely to be negligible, particularly for species such as whales, whose anatomical or life-history traits force them to experience continuous sun exposure. We conducted photographic and histological surveys of three seasonally sympatric whale species to investigate sunburn and photoprotection. We find that lesions commonly associated with acute severe sun damage in humans are widespread and that individuals with fewer melanocytes have more lesions and less apoptotic cells. This suggests that the pathways used to limit and resolve UVR-induced damage in humans are shared by whales and that darker pigmentation is advantageous to them. Furthermore, lesions increased significantly in time, as would be expected under increasing UV irradiance. Apoptosis and melanocyte proliferation mirror this trend, suggesting that whales are capable of quick photoprotective responses. We conclude that the thinning ozone layer may pose a risk to the health of whales and other vulnerable wildlife.

  19. Prevention of Acute Mountain Sickness by Dexamethasone,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-07-27

    Fujishima M , Busto R. Mechanisms of cerebral vasodilatation in hypoxia. 3 Appi Physiol 1970; 29:223-9. 14. Severinghaus 3W, Chiodi H, Eger El...2? JUL 83 USARIEM- M -38/83 UNCLARSSIFIED F/G 6/5 N S 11111 - 1111 1.10 II1g j1.25 111 .4 j~.6 MICROCOPY RESOLUTION TEST CHART NATIONAL BUREAU OF...to a simulated altitude of 4570 m (15,000 ft) on two occasions. On S one occasion, they received dexamethasone (4 mg every 6 h) for 36 h before and

  20. Pathogenesis and Prevention of Acute Renal Failure

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-12-01

    to other intermediaries that are important. To explore this possibility, fructose- l ,6-diphosphate (FDP), a metabolite in the glycolytic pathway, was...Supported b- this contract. *1. Shapiro JI, Cheung C, Itabashi A , Chan L , Schrier RW: The protective effect of verapamil on renal function after warm and...proximal tubules. Am J Physiol, in press. *8. Shapiro JI, Chan L , Cheung C, Itabashi A , Rossi N, Schrier RW: The effect of ATP depletion in the isolated

  1. Acute Pancreatitis and Pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Pancreatitis Acute Pancreatitis and Pregnancy Acute Pancreatitis and Pregnancy Timothy Gardner, MD Acute pancreatitis is defined as ... pancreatitis in pregnancy. Reasons for Acute Pancreatitis and Pregnancy While acute pancreatitis is responsible for almost 1 ...

  2. Rape prevention

    MedlinePlus

    Date rape - prevention; Sexual assault - prevention ... Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Sexual assault and abuse and STDs. In: 2015 sexually transmitted diseases treatment guidelines 2015. Updated June 4, 2015. www.cdc.gov/ ...

  3. Practical approaches to treating acute bronchospasm.

    PubMed

    Cline, Douglas C

    2005-12-01

    Both the National Asthma Education Prevention Program (NAEPP) guidelines for asthma and the Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease (GOLD) guidelines for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) stress the importance of treating acute bronchospasm. Important steps for each disease are making a differential diagnosis, assessing the possibility of future exacerbations, applying disease management principles to prevent and/or treat bronchospasm exacerbations, identifying acutely ill patients, and determining when hospitalization or specialist referrals are appropriate.

  4. [Acute pancreatitis].

    PubMed

    Hecker, M; Mayer, K; Askevold, I; Collet, P; Weigand, M A; Krombach, G A; Padberg, W; Hecker, A

    2014-03-01

    Acute pancreatitis is a potentially fatal disease with individually differing expression of systemic involvement. For this reason early diagnosis with subsequent risk stratification is essential in the clinical management of this frequent gastroenterological disorder. Severe forms of acute pancreatitis occur in approximately 20 % of cases often requiring intensive care monitoring and interdisciplinary therapeutic approaches. In the acute phase adequate fluid replacement and sufficient analgesic therapy is of major therapeutic importance. Concerning the administration of antibiotics and the nutritional support of patients with acute pancreatitis a change in paradigms could be observed in recent years. Furthermore, endoscopic, radiological or surgical interventions can be necessary depending on the severity of the disease and potential complications.

  5. Bronchitis - acute

    MedlinePlus

    ... to breathe. Other symptoms of bronchitis are a cough and coughing up mucus. Acute means the symptoms ... diagnosed with chronic bronchitis, you must have a cough with mucus on most days for at least ...

  6. Acute Bronchitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... bronchitis? Acute bronchitis is inflammation of your bronchial tree. The bronchial tree consists of tubes that carry air into your ... weeks or months. This happens because the bronchial tree takes a while to heal. A lasting cough ...

  7. Secondary stroke prevention.

    PubMed

    Hankey, Graeme J

    2014-02-01

    Survivors of stroke and transient ischaemic attacks are at risk of a recurrent stroke, which is often more severe and disabling than the index event. Optimum secondary prevention of recurrent stroke needs rapid diagnosis and treatment and prompt identification of the underlying cardiovascular cause. Effective treatments include organised acute assessment and intervention with antithrombotic therapy, carotid revascularisation, and control of causal risk factors, as appropriate. However, effective treatments are not implemented optimally in clinical practice. Recurrent strokes continue to account for 25-30% of all strokes and represent unsuccessful secondary prevention. Immediate and sustained implementation of effective and appropriate secondary prevention strategies in patients with first-ever stroke or transient ischaemic attack has the potential to reduce the burden of stroke by up to a quarter.

  8. Practical management of acute asthma in adults.

    PubMed

    Hallstrand, Teal S; Fahy, John V

    2002-02-01

    All asthma patients are at risk for acute asthma exacerbations. Moderate to severe exacerbations account for many emergency department visits and subsequent hospitalizations each year. Recent studies have advanced our understanding of the pathogenesis and treatment of acute asthma. The purpose of this review is to provide practical guidance in the assessment and treatment of adults with acute asthma in the hospital setting. Managing patients with acute asthma involves assessing the severity of the exacerbation, implementing measures to rapidly reverse airflow limitation, and instituting therapies that limit the progression of airway inflammation. Some patients may benefit from other supportive measures such as heliox and noninvasive ventilation. If the patient continues to deteriorate and requires mechanical ventilation, then ventilator settings that minimize the risk of hyperinflation should be chosen. After an episode of acute asthma, long-term preventive medications, especially inhaled corticosteroids, should be prescribed and education should be provided to prevent future episodes.

  9. Acute abdomen. Outcomes.

    PubMed

    Madonna, M B; Boswell, W C; Arensman, R M

    1997-05-01

    The outcome for children with common surgical conditions that cause an acute abdomen is discussed. These conditions include appendicitis, intussusception, malrotation, inflammatory bowel disease, intestinal obstructions, and nonorganic pain. Emphasis is placed on surgical intervention and disease processes that significantly affect outcome. The outcome of many of the diseases discussed is strongly influenced by the timing of diagnosis and treatment. These children should have prompt care and intervention to prevent morbidity and mortality. In addition, many children who present with common pediatric surgical emergencies have other medical conditions and are best treated in an environment that has a multidisciplinary team to handle their care and decrease the long-term complications.

  10. Childhood Obesity: Prediction and Prevention.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Michael D.

    Obesity in children is a problem both insidious and acute. Childhood obesity has been indicated as a forerunner of adult obesity; it is also an immediate problem for the child. Given the lack of evidence for long term maintenance of any weight loss, this paper investigates the etiology of the disorder as a prelude to prevention. Upon review of the…

  11. Acute liver failure due to acute fatty liver of pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Wand, S; Waeschle, R M; Von Ahsen, N; Hawighorst, T; Bräuer, A; Quintel, M

    2012-04-01

    Acute fatty liver of pregnancy (AFLP) is a rare but serious liver disease and typically occurs during the third trimester. It carries the risk for significant perinatal and maternal mortality. Therefore an early diagnosis and delivery, followed by close monitoring and optimized management of the impaired liver function with all associated problems are necessary to prevent maternal and foetal death. This case report focuses on the management of acute liver failure due to AFLP in a 31 year old women treated in our intensive care unit (ICU) after an emergency C-section.

  12. Poison Prevention

    MedlinePlus

    ... the Word Shop AAP Find a Pediatrician Safety & Prevention Immunizations All Around At Home At Play On ... Listen Español Text Size Email Print Share Poison Prevention Page Content Article Body Post the Poison Help ...

  13. Acute Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Geokas, Michael C.

    1972-01-01

    For many decades two types of acute pancreatitis have been recognized: the edematous or interstitial and the hemorrhagic or necrotic. In most cases acute pancreatitis is associated with alcoholism or biliary tract disease. Elevated serum or urinary α-amylase is the most important finding in diagnosis. The presence of methemalbumin in serum and in peritoneal or pleural fluid supports the diagnosis of the hemorrhagic form of the disease in patients with a history and enzyme studies suggestive of pancreatitis. There is no characteristic clinical picture in acute pancreatitis, and its complications are legion. Pancreatic pseudocyst is probably the most common and pancreatic abscess is the most serious complication. The pathogenetic principle is autodigestion, but the precise sequence of biochemical events is unclear, especially the mode of trypsinogen activation and the role of lysosomal hydrolases. A host of metabolic derangements have been identified in acute pancreatitis, involving lipid, glucose, calcium and magnesium metabolism and changes of the blood clotting mechanism, to name but a few. Medical treatment includes intestinal decompression, analgesics, correction of hypovolemia and other supportive and protective measures. Surgical exploration is advisable in selected cases, when the diagnosis is in doubt, and is considered imperative in the presence of certain complications, especially pancreatic abscess. PMID:4559467

  14. Autophagy in Acute Kidney Injury

    PubMed Central

    Livingston, Man J.; Dong, Zheng

    2014-01-01

    Acute kidney injury is a major kidney disease associated with poor clinical outcomes. The pathogenesis of acute kidney injury is multifactorial and is characterized by tubular cell injury and death. Recent studies have demonstrated autophagy induction in proximal tubular cells during acute kidney injury. The regulatory mechanisms of tubular cell autophagy are poorly understood; however, some recent findings have set up a foundation for further investigation. Although autophagy may promote cell death under certain experimental conditions, pharmacological and autophagy-related gene knockout studies have established a renoprotective role for autophagy in acute kidney injury. The mechanisms by which autophagy protects cells from injury and how, possibly, its pro-survival role switches to pro-death under certain conditions are discussed. Further research is expected to help us understand the regulatory network of tubular cell autophagy, define its precise roles in specific context of acute kidney injury, and identify autophagy-targeting strategies for the prevention and treatment of acute kidney injury. PMID:24485026

  15. Atrial fibrillation (acute onset)

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Acute atrial fibrillation is rapid, irregular, and chaotic atrial activity of recent onset. Various definitions of acute atrial fibrillation have been used in the literature, but for the purposes of this review we have included studies where atrial fibrillation may have occurred up to 7 days previously. Risk factors for acute atrial fibrillation include increasing age, cardiovascular disease, alcohol, diabetes, and lung disease. Acute atrial fibrillation increases the risk of stroke and heart failure. The condition resolves spontaneously within 24 to 48 hours in more than 50% of people; however, many people will require interventions to control heart rate or restore sinus rhythm. Methods and outcomes We conducted a systematic review and aimed to answer the following clinical questions: What are the effects of interventions to prevent embolism, for conversion to sinus rhythm, and to control heart rate in people with recent-onset atrial fibrillation (within 7 days) who are haemodynamically stable? We searched: Medline, Embase, The Cochrane Library, and other important databases up to April 2014 (Clinical Evidence reviews are updated periodically; please check our website for the most up-to-date version of this review). We included harms alerts from relevant organisations such as the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the UK Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA). Results We found 26 studies that met our inclusion criteria. We performed a GRADE evaluation of the quality of evidence for interventions. Conclusions In this systematic review, we present information relating to the effectiveness and safety of the following interventions: amiodarone, antithrombotic treatment before cardioversion, atenolol, bisoprolol, carvedilol, digoxin, diltiazem, direct current cardioversion, flecainide, metoprolol, nebivolol, propafenone, sotalol, timolol, and verapamil. PMID:25430048

  16. NSAIDs and Acute Pancreatitis: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Pezzilli, Raffaele; Morselli-Labate, Antonio Maria; Corinaldesi, Roberto

    2010-01-01

    The resulting pain is the main symptom of acute pancreatitis and it should be alleviated as soon as possible. NSAIDs are the first line therapy for pain and they are generally administered to acute pancreatitis patients upon admission to the hospital. In addition, these drugs have also been used to prevent post-endoscopic cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) acute pancreatitis. On the other hand, there are several reports indicating that NSAIDs may be the actual cause of acute pancreatitis. We carried out a literature search on PubMed/MEDLINE; all full text papers published in from January 1966 to November 2009 on the use of NSAIDs in acute pancreatitis were collected; the literature search was also supplemented by a review of the bibliographies of the papers evaluated. Thus, in this article, we will systematically review the current literature in order to better illustrate the role of NSAIDs in acute pancreatitis, in particular: i) NSAIDs as a cause of acute pancreatitis; ii) their use to prevent post-retrograde ERCP pancreatitis and iii) their efficacy for pain relief in the acute illness of the pancreas. PMID:27713268

  17. Oral or parenteral administration of curcumin does not prevent the growth of high-risk t(4;11) acute lymphoblastic leukemia cells engrafted into a NOD/SCID mouse model

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The efficacy of orally and parenterally administered curcumin was evaluated in NOD.CB17-Prkdcscid/J mice engrafted with the human t(4;11) acute lymphoblastic leukemia line SEM. SEM cells were injected into the tail vein and engraftment was monitored by flow cytometry. Once engraftment was observed...

  18. Acute Vestibulopathy

    PubMed Central

    Cha, Yoon-Hee

    2011-01-01

    The presentation of acute vertigo may represent both a common benign disorder or a life threatening but rare one. Familiarity with the common peripheral vestibular disorders will allow the clinician to rapidly “rule-in” a benign disorder and recognize when further testing is required. Key features of vertigo required to make an accurate diagnosis are duration, chronicity, associated symptoms, and triggers. Bedside tests that are critical to the diagnosis of acute vertigo include the Dix-Hallpike maneuver and canalith repositioning manuever, occlusive ophthalmoscopy, and the head impulse test. The goal of this review is to provide the clinician with the clinical and pathophysiologic background of the most common disorders that present with vertigo to develop a logical differential diagnosis and management plan. PMID:23983835

  19. Acute Blindness.

    PubMed

    Meekins, Jessica M

    2015-09-01

    Sudden loss of vision is an ophthalmic emergency with numerous possible causes. Abnormalities may occur at any point within the complex vision pathway, from retina to optic nerve to the visual center in the occipital lobe. This article reviews specific prechiasm (retina and optic nerve) and cerebral cortical diseases that lead to acute blindness. Information regarding specific etiologies, pathophysiology, diagnosis, treatment, and prognosis for vision is discussed.

  20. Preventive aspects regarding back pain.

    PubMed

    Dorner, Thomas E; Crevenna, Richard

    2016-02-01

    Prevention, as the act of keeping from happening, aims to avert things that would occur if no intervention would be taken. From the epidemiology of back pain, consequences of the disease that are worth preventing can be derived. Biological, psychological, and social factors lead to back pain and chronification and ultimately to various adverse outcomes. The most important preventable consequences of back pain include loss of ability to function in daily life, loss of work productivity, sickness absence, and disability pension, excessive and inappropriate healthcare utilisation, impairments in quality of life, and disturbance of sexual life. The most important tools for prevention of back pain lie within rehabilitation after acute pain treatment and include exercise and physical training as well as health education and increasing health literacy. The bio-psycho-social nature of back pain must be taken into account in all preventive measures.

  1. Acute hepatitis after amiodarone infusion.

    PubMed

    Fonseca, Paulo; Dias, Adelaide; Gonçalves, Helena; Albuquerque, Aníbal; Gama, Vasco

    2015-10-16

    Acute hepatitis is a very rare, but potentially fatal, adverse effect of intravenous amiodarone. We present a case of an 88-year-old man with history of ischemic dilated cardiomyopathy and severely depressed left ventricular function that was admitted to our coronary care unit with diagnosis of decompensated heart failure and non-sustained ventricular tachycardia. A few hours after the beginning of intravenous amiodarone he developed an acute hepatitis. There was a completely recovery within the next days after amiodarone withdrawn and other causes of acute hepatitis have been ruled out. This case highlights the need for close monitoring of hepatic function during amiodarone infusion in order to identify any potential hepatotoxicity and prevent a fatal outcome. Oral amiodarone is, apparently, a safe option in these patients.

  2. Therapy for acute retinal necrosis.

    PubMed

    Kawaguchi, Tatsushi; Spencer, Doran B; Mochizuki, Manabu

    2008-01-01

    Acute retinal necrosis is a progressive necrotizing retinopathy caused by herpes simplex virus (HSV) or varicella zoster virus (VZV). The mainstay of its treatment is antiviral therapy against these pathogenic organisms, such as intravenous acyclovir or oral valacyclovir. Systemic and topical corticosteroids together with antiviral therapy are used as an anti-inflammatory treatment to minimize damages to the optic nerve and retinal blood vessels. Because the majority of severe cases of the disease show occlusive retinal vasculitis, a low dosage of aspirin is used as anti-thrombotic treatment. Vitreo-retinal surgery is useful to repair rhegmatogenous retinal detachment, one of the main late-stage complications. Moreover, recent articles have reported some encouraging results of prophylactic vitrectomy before rhegmatogenous retinal detachment occurs. The efficacy of laser photocoagulation to prevent the development or extension of rhegmatogenous retinal detachment is controversial. Despite these treatments, the visual prognosis of acute retinal necrosis is still poor, in particular VZV-induced acute retinal necrosis.

  3. [Enterobius vermicularis causing symptoms of acute appendicitis].

    PubMed

    Antal, András; Kocsis, Béla

    2008-08-01

    The authors present a case of enterobiasis of the appendix. Enterobius infection is an uncommon cause of acute appendicitis. Preoperative diagnosis of pinworm infestation is almost impossible unless there is a strong clinical suspicion. Parasites may produce symptoms which resemble acute appendicitis. Careful observation of the appendix stump may lead to intraoperative diagnosis of enterobiasis. A quick diagnosis and appropriate treatment may prevent future complications.

  4. Setting up an acute pain management service.

    PubMed

    Schwenk, Eric S; Baratta, Jaime L; Gandhi, Kishor; Viscusi, Eugene R

    2014-12-01

    Successful implementation of an acute pain management service involves a team approach in which team members have clearly defined roles. Clinical protocols are designed to help address common problems and prevent errors. As the complexity of surgery and patients' diseases continues to increase, current knowledge of new analgesic medications, acute pain literature, and skills in regional anesthesia techniques is imperative. Emphasizing a multimodal approach can improve analgesia and decrease opioid-related side effects.

  5. Preventative Maintenance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Migliorino, James

    Boards of education must be convinced that spending money up front for preventive maintenance will, in the long run, save districts' tax dollars. A good program of preventive maintenance can minimize disruption of service; reduce repair costs, energy consumption, and overtime; improve labor productivity and system equipment reliability; handle…

  6. Definition and Implications of the Preventable Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Fisher, Mark; Moores, Lisa; Alsharif, Mohamad N.; Paganini-Hill, Annlia

    2016-01-01

    IMPORTANCE Although patients with acute stroke are routinely evaluated for potential treatment (ie, treatability of the stroke), preventability of the presenting stroke is generally not seriously considered. OBJECTIVE To systematically analyze stroke preventability. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS We evaluated medical records of 274 consecutive patients discharged with a diagnosis of ischemic stroke between December 2, 2010, and June 11, 2012, at the University of California Irvine Medical Center. Mean (SE) patient age was 67.2 (0.8) years. Data analysis was conducted from July 3, 2014, to August 4, 2015. EXPOSURES Medical records were systematically examined for demographic information, stroke risk factors, stroke severity, and acute stroke treatment. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES We defined stroke preventability as the degree to which the patient’s presenting stroke was preventable. Using variables easily determined at onset of stroke, we developed a 10-point scale (0, not preventable; 10, most preventable) to classify the degree of stroke preventability. Our focus was effectiveness of treatment of hypertension (0–2 points), hyperlipidemia (0–2 points), and atrial fibrillation (0–4 points), as well as use of antithrombotic treatment for known prior cerebrovascular and cardiovascular disease (0–2 points). RESULTS Total risk scores ranged from 0 to 8 (mean [SE], 2.2 [0.1]), with 207 patients (75.5%) exhibiting some degree of preventability (score of 1 or higher). Seventy-one patients (25.9%) had scores of 4 or higher, indicating that the stroke was highly preventable. Severity of stroke as determined by the National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale score was not related to preventability of stroke. However, 21 of 71 patients (29.6%) whose stroke was highly preventable were treated with intravenous or intra-arterial acute stroke therapy while these treatments were provided for only 13 of 67 patients (19.4%) with scores of 0 (no preventability) and 19 of

  7. The pathophysiology of developmental and acute laminitis.

    PubMed

    Hood, D M

    1999-08-01

    This review implies that although we know more regarding the enigma of developmental and acute laminitis today than previously, there is still more to investigate. As these investigations are conducted and interpreted, new and more effective preventive and therapeutic regimens are likely to be developed, tested, and made available. As this occurs, the impact of laminitis should undoubtedly decrease. Unfortunately, due to the lack of clinical symptoms in the developmental phase and the shortness of the acute phase, it is also evident that the two sequelae of acute laminitis, subacute and chronic laminitis, are likely to continue to pose a major problem for some time.

  8. Acute exacerbation of COPD.

    PubMed

    Ko, Fanny W; Chan, Ka Pang; Hui, David S; Goddard, John R; Shaw, Janet G; Reid, David W; Yang, Ian A

    2016-10-01

    The literature of acute exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is fast expanding. This review focuses on several aspects of acute exacerbation of COPD (AECOPD) including epidemiology, diagnosis and management. COPD poses a major health and economic burden in the Asia-Pacific region, as it does worldwide. Triggering factors of AECOPD include infectious (bacteria and viruses) and environmental (air pollution and meteorological effect) factors. Disruption in the dynamic balance between the 'pathogens' (viral and bacterial) and the normal bacterial communities that constitute the lung microbiome likely contributes to the risk of exacerbations. The diagnostic approach to AECOPD varies based on the clinical setting and severity of the exacerbation. After history and examination, a number of investigations may be useful, including oximetry, sputum culture, chest X-ray and blood tests for inflammatory markers. Arterial blood gases should be considered in severe exacerbations, to characterize respiratory failure. Depending on the severity, the acute management of AECOPD involves use of bronchodilators, steroids, antibiotics, oxygen and noninvasive ventilation. Hospitalization may be required, for severe exacerbations. Nonpharmacological interventions including disease-specific self-management, pulmonary rehabilitation, early medical follow-up, home visits by respiratory health workers, integrated programmes and telehealth-assisted hospital at home have been studied during hospitalization and shortly after discharge in patients who have had a recent AECOPD. Pharmacological approaches to reducing risk of future exacerbations include long-acting bronchodilators, inhaled steroids, mucolytics, vaccinations and long-term macrolides. Further studies are needed to assess the cost-effectiveness of these interventions in preventing COPD exacerbations.

  9. Prevent Cyberbullying

    MedlinePlus

    ... Policies & Laws | Español Search Stopbullying.gov WHAT IS BULLYING Definition The Roles Kids Play Other Types of Aggressive Behavior CYBER BULLYING What is Cyberbullying? Prevent Cyberbullying Report Cyberbullying WHO ...

  10. Preventing Influenza

    MedlinePlus

    ... spread in respiratory droplets distributed by coughing and sneezing, they readily spread from person to person. Additionally, ... and nose with a tissue when coughing or sneezing, you may help prevent those around you from ...

  11. [Acute respiratory distress syndrome].

    PubMed

    Matĕjovic, M; Novák, I; Srámek, V; Rokyta, R; Hora, P; Nalos, M

    1999-04-26

    Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is the general term used for severe acute respiratory failure of diverse aetiology. It is associated with a high morbidity, mortality (50-70%), and financial costs. Regardless of aetiology, the basic pathogenesis of ARDS is a systemic inflammatory response leading to a diffuse inflammatory process that involves both lungs, thus causing diffuse alveolar and endothelial damage with increased pulmonary capillary permeability and excessive extravascular lung water accumulation. ARDS is commonly associated with sepsis and multiple organ failure. The clinical picture involves progressive hypoxaemia, radiographic evidence of pulmonary oedema, decreased lung compliance and pulmonary hypertension. Despite the scientific and technological progress in critical care medicine, there is no specific ARDS therapy available at the moment and its management remains supportive. Therapeutic goals include resolution of underlying conditions, maintenance of acceptable gas exchange and tissue oxygenation and prevention of iatrogenic lung injury. Many new specific therapeutic strategies have been developed, however, most of them require further scientific evaluation. The paper reviews definition, basic pathogenesis and pathophysiology of ARDS and discusses current concepts of therapeutic possibilities of ARDS.

  12. [An acute monoclonal gammopathy?].

    PubMed

    Presle, Alexandra; Bertocchio, Jean-Philippe; Schneider, Nathalie; Maquart, François-Xavier; Ramont, Laurent; Oudart, Jean-Baptiste

    2015-01-01

    Serum protein electrophoresis is commonly used in case of acute or chronic renal failure. It can lead to the etiologic diagnosis by detecting monoclonal gammopathies which are frequently complicated by renal failure, such as cast nephropathy, Randall's disease or amyloidosis, or to explore an associated inflammatory syndrome. We report the occurrence of two monoclonal components in a patient without any monoclonal component 10 days earlier. The sudden appearance of these two monoclonal components associated to the context of sepsis of urinary origin suggested the diagnosis of transient monoclonal gammopathy. This hypothesis was confirmed by monitoring serum protein electrophoresis that showed a gradual decrease of these two monoclonal components few weeks after the resolution of the infectious disease. The main etiological factors of transient monoclonal gammopathies are infectious or autoimmune diseases. In this context, it is important to delay the achievement of serum protein electrophoresis after the acute episode, in order to avoid to falsely conclude to hematologic malignancy diagnosis. This can prevent costly biological examinations of these transient monoclonal gammopathies and invasive procedures like bone marrow examination.

  13. Acute Kidney Injury

    PubMed Central

    Zuk, Anna; Bonventre, Joseph V.

    2016-01-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is a global public health concern associated with high morbidity, mortality, and healthcare costs. Other than dialysis, no therapeutic interventions reliably improve survival, limit injury, or speed recovery. Despite recognized shortcomings of in vivo animal models, the underlying pathophysiology of AKI and its consequence, chronic kidney disease (CKD), is rich with biological targets. We review recent findings relating to the renal vasculature and cellular stress responses, primarily the intersection of the unfolded protein response, mitochondrial dysfunction, autophagy, and the innate immune response. Maladaptive repair mechanisms that persist following the acute phase promote inflammation and fibrosis in the chronic phase. Here macrophages, growth-arrested tubular epithelial cells, the endothelium, and surrounding pericytes are key players in the progression to chronic disease. Better understanding of these complex interacting pathophysiological mechanisms, their relative importance in humans, and the utility of biomarkers will lead to therapeutic strategies to prevent and treat AKI or impede progression to CKD or end-stage renal disease (ESRD). PMID:26768243

  14. A general systems approach to suicide prevention: lessons from cardiac prevention and control.

    PubMed

    Sanddal, Nels D; Sanddal, Teri L; Berman, Alan L; Silverman, Morton M

    2003-01-01

    The pathology of cardiac disease includes genetic, physical, biochemical, psychological, social, and environmental vectors. Factors contributing to suicide have been identified in these same areas. Survival from an acute cardiac event requires a systematized and multisectoral response. Communities that do not have systematized response capabilities to acute cardiac events have poorer survival outcomes. Suicide prevention and control may also be responsive to an integrated community response system. This paper examines the development of a community cardiac care model, explores potential parallels for a community suicide prevention and control model, and outlines a general systems theory framework for a suicide prevention and control system.

  15. Acute laminitis.

    PubMed

    Baxter, G M

    1994-12-01

    Laminitis is an inflammation of the sensitive laminae along the dorsal aspect of the digit and is considered to be a secondary complication of several predisposing or primary factors. Affected horses are usually very lame, have increased digital pulses, are painful to hoof testers along the toe of the foot, and have evidence of downward rotation or distal displacement of the distal phalanx present on radiographs. Treatments for acute laminitis include anti-inflammatory drugs, anti-endotoxin therapy, vasodilators, antithrombotic therapy, corrective trimming and shoeing, and surgical procedures. Treatment regimens are very controversial and the true efficacy of these treatments is unknown. The quality of laminae damage that occurs with laminitis, however, probably has greater influence on the success of treatment and outcome of the horse than the treatment regimen itself.

  16. UV radiation-induced immunosuppression is greater in men and prevented by topical nicotinamide.

    PubMed

    Damian, Diona L; Patterson, Clare R S; Stapelberg, Michael; Park, Joohong; Barnetson, Ross St C; Halliday, Gary M

    2008-02-01

    UV radiation-induced immunosuppression augments cutaneous carcinogenesis. The incidence of skin cancer continues to increase despite increased use of sunscreens, which are less effective at preventing immunosuppression than sunburn. Using the Mantoux reaction as a model of skin immunity, we investigated the effects of solar-simulated (ss) UV and its component UVA and UVB wavebands and tested the ability of topical nicotinamide to protect from UV-induced immunosuppression. Healthy, Mantoux-positive volunteers were UV-irradiated on their backs, with 5% nicotinamide or vehicle applied to different sites in a randomized, double-blinded manner. Subsequent Mantoux testing at irradiated and adjacent unirradiated sites enabled measurement of UV-induced immunosuppression with and without nicotinamide. Suberythemal ssUV caused significant immunosuppression, although component UVB and UVA doses delivered independently did not. Men were immunosuppressed by ssUV doses three times lower than those required to immunosuppress women. This may be an important cause of the higher skin cancer incidence and mortality observed in men. Topical nicotinamide prevented immunosuppression, with gene chip microarrays suggesting that the mechanisms of protection may include alterations in complement, energy metabolism and apoptosis pathways. Nicotinamide is a safe and inexpensive compound that could be added to sunscreens or after-sun lotions to improve protection from immunosuppression. immunosuppression.JID JOURNAL CLUB ARTICLE: For questions, answers, and open discussion about this article, please go to http://network.nature.com/group/jidclub

  17. What Are the Risk Factors for Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia?

    MedlinePlus

    ... and Prevention What Are the Risk Factors for Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia? A risk factor is something that affects your ... this is unknown. Having an identical twin with ALL Someone who has an identical twin who develops ...

  18. Acute scurvy during treatment with interleukin-2.

    PubMed

    Alexandrescu, D T; Dasanu, C A; Kauffman, C L

    2009-10-01

    The association of vitamin C deficiency with nutritional factors is commonly recognized. However, an acute form of scurvy can occur in patients with an acute systemic inflammatory response, which is produced by sepsis, medications, cancer or acute inflammation. The frequency of acute hypovitaminosis C in hospitalized patients is higher than previously recognized. We report the occurrence of acute signs and symptoms of scurvy (perifollicular petechiae, erythema, gingivitis and bleeding) in a patient hospitalized for treatment of metastatic renal-cell carcinoma with high-dose interleukin-2. Concomitantly, serum vitamin C levels decreased to below normal. Better diets and longer lifespan may result a lower frequency of acute scurvy and a higher frequency of scurvy associated with systemic inflammatory responses. Therefore, increased awareness of this condition can lead to early recognition of the cutaneous signs of acute scurvy in hospitalized patients with acute illnesses or in receipt of biological agents, and prevent subsequent morbidity such as bleeding, anaemia, impaired immune defences, oedema or neurological symptoms.

  19. Prevention of Infection Due to Clostridium difficile.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Christopher C; Jump, Robin L P; Chopra, Teena

    2016-12-01

    Clostridium difficile is one of the foremost nosocomial pathogens. Preventing infection is particularly challenging. Effective prevention efforts typically require a multifaceted bundled approach. A variety of infection control procedures may be advantageous, including strict hand decontamination with soap and water, contact precautions, and using chlorine-containing decontamination agents. Additionally, risk factor reduction can help reduce the burden of disease. The risk factor modification is principally accomplished though antibiotic stewardship programs. Unfortunately, most of the current evidence for prevention is in acute care settings. This review focuses on preventative approaches to reduce the incidence of Clostridium difficile infection in healthcare settings.

  20. Acute diarrhea.

    PubMed

    Tobillo, E T; Schwartz, S M

    1998-10-01

    Diarrhea can result from damage to the intestinal lining caused by viruses or bacteria, malabsorption, inflammatory processes, bile salt and pancreatic enzyme deficiency, abnormal motility, or the presence of osmotically active solutes in the gut. While it is important to elicit information to determine the possible cause of diarrhea, be sure to check circulatory status first. Some patients may need rehydration therapy more urgently than they need a diagnosis. The main goals of treatment are to prevent dehydration and correct electrolyte imbalance, to provide supportive and symptomatic therapy, and to treat underlying disease. In most cases, a specific diagnosis is not necessary to guide initial treatment.

  1. Is acute appendicitis still misdiagnosed?

    PubMed Central

    Danys, Donatas; Poskus, Tomas; Mikalauskas, Saulius; Poskus, Eligijus; Jotautas, Valdemaras; Beisa, Virgilijus; Strupas, Kestutis

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objective The optimal diagnostics and treatment of acute appendicitis continues to be a challenge. A false positive diagnosis of appendicitis may lead to an unnecessary operation, which has been appropriately termed negative appendectomy. The aim of our study was to identify the effectiveness of preoperative investigations in preventing negative appendectomy. Methods A retrospective study was performed on adult patients who underwent operation for suspected acute appendicitis from 2008 to 2013 at Vilnius University Hospital Santariskiu Klinikos. Patients were divided into two groups: group A underwent an operation, where appendix was found to be normal (non-inflamed); group B underwent an appendectomy for inflamed appendix. Groups were compared for preoperative data, investigations, treatment results and pathology findings. Results 554 patients were included in the study. Preoperative laboratory tests results of hemoglobin, hematocrit concentrations and white blood cell count were significantly higher in group B (p<0.001). Ultrasonography was performed for 78 % of patients in group A and 74 % in group B and did not provide any statistically significant results. Comparing Alvarado score results, there were more patients with Alvarado score less than 7 in group A than in group B. In our large series we could find only four independent risk factors, and they could only account for 24 % of cases. Conclusions In summary, acute appendicitis is still often misdiagnosed and the ratio of negative appendectomies remains rather high. Additional investigations such as observation and computed tomography should be used to prevent this.

  2. Wogonin prevents lipopolysaccharide-induced acute lung injury and inflammation in mice via peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma-mediated attenuation of the nuclear factor-kappaB pathway

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Jing; Pan, Di; Zhao, Yue; Zhao, Li; Sun, Jie; Wang, Yu; You, Qi-Dong; Xi, Tao; Guo, Qing-Long; Lu, Na

    2014-01-01

    Acute lung injury (ALI) from a variety of clinical disorders, characterized by diffuse inflammation, is a cause of acute respiratory failure that develops in patients of all ages. Previous studies reported that wogonin, a flavonoid-like chemical compound which was found in Scutellaria baicalensis, has anti-inflammatory effects in several inflammation models, but not in ALI. Here, the in vivo protective effect of wogonin in the amelioration of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) -induced lung injury and inflammation was assessed. In addition, the in vitro effects and mechanisms of wogonin were studied in the mouse macrophage cell lines Ana-1 and RAW264.7. In vivo results indicated that wogonin attenuated LPS-induced histological alterations. Peripheral blood leucocytes decreased in the LPS-induced group, which was ameliorated by wogonin. In addition, wogonin inhibited the production of several inflammatory cytokines, including tumour necrosis factor-α, interleukin-1β (IL-1β) and IL-6, in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid and lung tissues after LPS challenge, while the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ) inhibitor GW9662 reversed these effects. In vitro results indicated that wogonin significantly decreased the secretion of IL-6, IL-1β and tumour necrosis factor-α in Ana-1 and RAW264.7 cells, which was suppressed by transfection of PPARγ small interfering RNA and GW9662 treatment. Moreover, wogonin activated PPARγ, induced PPARγ-mediated attenuation of the nuclear translocation and the DNA-binding activity of nuclear factor-κB in vivo and in vitro. In conclusion, all of these results showed that wogonin may serve as a promising agent for the attenuation of ALI-associated inflammation and pathology by regulating the PPARγ-involved nuclear factor-κB pathway. PMID:24766487

  3. Treatment of mice with the suppressor of cytokine signaling-1 mimetic peptide, tyrosine kinase inhibitor peptide, prevents development of the acute form of experimental allergic encephalomyelitis and induces stable remission in the chronic relapsing/remitting form.

    PubMed

    Mujtaba, Mustafa G; Flowers, Lawrence O; Patel, Chintak B; Patel, Ravi A; Haider, Mohammad I; Johnson, Howard M

    2005-10-15

    We have previously characterized a novel tyrosine kinase inhibitor peptide (Tkip) that is a mimetic of suppressor of cytokine signaling 1 (SOCS-1) and inhibits JAK2 phosphorylation of the transcription factor STAT1alpha. We show in this study that Tkip protects mice against experimental allergic encephalomyelitis (EAE), an animal model for multiple sclerosis. Mice are immunized with myelin basic protein (MBP) for induction of disease. Tkip (63 mug) administered every other day suppressed the development of acute EAE in 75% of New Zealand White (NZW) mice. Furthermore, Tkip completely protected SJL/J mice, which where induced to get the relapsing/remitting form of EAE, against relapses compared with control groups in which >70% of the mice relapsed after primary incidence of disease. Protection of mice by Tkip was similar to that seen with the type I IFN, IFN-tau. Protection of mice correlated with lower MBP Ab titers in Tkip-treated groups as well as suppression of MBP-induced proliferation of splenocytes taken from EAE-afflicted mice. Cessation of Tkip and IFN-tau administration resulted in SJL/J mice relapsing back into disease. Prolonged treatment of mice with Tkip produced no evidence of cellular toxicity or weight loss. Consistent with its JAK2 inhibitory function, Tkip also inhibited the activity of the inflammatory cytokine TNF-alpha, which uses the STAT1alpha transcription factor. The data presented in this study show that Tkip, like the type I IFN, IFN-tau, inhibits both the autoreactive cellular and humoral responses in EAE and ameliorates both the acute and chronic relapsing/remitting forms of EAE.

  4. Preventing Tragedy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    One Feather, Sandra

    2003-01-01

    The Navajo supervisor in the Office of Environmental Health in New Mexico identifies diseases and their risk factors, administers an injury prevention program, and ensures compliance with various health-related codes. She assists in the planning and direction of environmental health programs and public health education for local Navajo…

  5. Bullying Prevention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kemp, Patrice

    2016-01-01

    The focus of the milestone project is to focus on bridging the gap of bullying and classroom instruction methods. There has to be a defined expectations and level of accountability that has to be defined when supporting and implementing a plan linked to bullying prevention. All individuals involved in the student's learning have to be aware of…

  6. Shoplifting Prevention.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Everhardt, Richard M.

    The retailers' concern about shoplifting and shoplifting losses provided impetus for the development of this programed text. The self-instructional booklet is designed for all retail employees as an aid to preventing financial losses to the store caused by shoplifting. The common characteristics of shoplifters, methods used by shoplifters, and a…

  7. Emergency management of acute adult asthma.

    PubMed Central

    Grunfeld, A. F.; Ho, K.

    1995-01-01

    Despite advances in understanding the pathophysiology of acute asthma and the development of new, effective therapies, patients still die. While physicians agree that most asthma deaths could be prevented if patients were treated adequately, evidence suggests that both patients and physicians continue to underestimate the severity of asthma attacks and delay adequate treatment. PMID:8563508

  8. [Triggering of acute coronary syndromes. Pathophysiologic relationships].

    PubMed

    González Pliego, José Angel

    2006-01-01

    In this review, the relationship of external triggers with the development of acute coronary syndromes is described. Based on current evidence, the pathophysiological mechanisms that probably result in the rupture of vulnerable coronary plaques are revised and preventive measures to stop the functional and lethal consequences of its occurrence are proposed.

  9. Models for effective prevention.

    PubMed

    Perry, C L; Kelder, S H

    1992-07-01

    The social influence models do provide some optimism for primary prevention efforts. Prevention programs appear most effective when 1) the target behavior of the intervention has received increasing societal disapproval (such as cigarette smoking), 2) multiple years of behavioral health education are planned, and 3) community-wide involvement or mass media complement a school-based peer-led program (45,46). Short-term programs and those involving alcohol use have had less favorable outcomes. Future research in primary prevention should address concerns of high-risk groups and high-risk countries, such as lower income populations in the United States or countries that have large adolescent homeless populations. The utilization of adolescent leaders for program dissemination might be particularly critical in these settings. A second major and global concern should focus upon alcohol use and alcohol-related problems. In many communities adolescent alcohol use is normative and even adult supported. Thus, young people are getting quite inconsistent messages on alcohol from their schools, from TV, from peers, and from parents. This inconsistency may translate into many tragic and avoidable deaths for young people. Clearly, in the area of alcohol-related problems, community-wide involvement may be necessary. A third direction for prevention research should involve issues of norms, access, and enforcement including policy interventions, such as involve the availability of cigarette vending machines or the ease of under-age buying or levels of taxation. These methods affect adolescents more acutely since their financial resources, for the most part, are more limited. These policy level methods also signify to adolescents what adults consider appropriate.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  10. Association between pneumonia in acute stroke stage and 3-year mortality in patients with acute first-ever ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Yu, Yi-Jing; Weng, Wei-Chieh; Su, Feng-Chieh; Peng, Tsung-I; Chien, Yu-Yi; Wu, Chia-Lun; Lee, Kuang-Yung; Wei, Yi-Chia; Lin, Shun-Wen; Zhu, Jun-Xiao; Huang, Wen-Yi

    2016-11-01

    The influence of pneumonia in acute stroke stage on the clinical presentation and long-term outcomes of patients with acute ischemic stroke is still controversial. We investigate the influence of pneumonia in acute stroke stage on the 3-year outcomes of patients with acute first-ever ischemic stroke. Nine-hundred and thirty-four patients with acute first-ever ischemic stroke were enrolled and had been followed for 3years. Patients were divided into two groups according to whether pneumonia occurred during acute stroke stage or not. Clinical presentations, risk factors for stroke, laboratory data, co-morbidities, and outcomes were recorded. The result showed that a total of 100 patients (10.7%) had pneumonia in acute stroke stage. The prevalence of older age, atrial fibrillation was significantly higher in patients with pneumonia in acute stroke stage. Total anterior circulation syndrome and posterior circulation syndrome occurred more frequently among patients with pneumonia in acute stroke stage (P<0.001 and P=0.009, respectively). Multivariate Cox regression revealed that pneumonia in acute stroke stage is a significant predictor of 3-year mortality (hazard ratio=6.39, 95% confidence interval=4.03-10.11, P<0.001). In conclusion, pneumonia during the acute stroke stage is associated with increased risk of 3-year mortality. Interventions to prevent pneumonia in acute stroke stage might improve ischemic stroke outcome.

  11. Developing Cognitive Behavioral Therapy to Prevent Depressive Relapse in Youth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kennard, Betsy D.; Stewart, Sunita M.; Hughes, Jennifer L.; Jarrett, Robin B.; Emslie, Graham J.

    2008-01-01

    Relapse rates for children and adolescents with major depressive disorder (MDD) range from 30% to 40% within 1 to 2 years after acute treatment. Although relapse rates are high, there have been relatively few studies on the prevention of relapse in youth. While acute phase pharmacotherapy has been shown to reduce symptoms rapidly in depressed…

  12. Fluid resuscitation in acute pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Aggarwal, Aakash; Manrai, Manish; Kochhar, Rakesh

    2014-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis remains a clinical challenge, despite an exponential increase in our knowledge of its complex pathophysiological changes. Early fluid therapy is the cornerstone of treatment and is universally recommended; however, there is a lack of consensus regarding the type, rate, amount and end points of fluid replacement. Further confusion is added with the newer studies reporting better results with controlled fluid therapy. This review focuses on the pathophysiology of fluid depletion in acute pancreatitis, as well as the rationale for fluid replacement, the type, optimal amount, rate of infusion and monitoring of such patients. The basic goal of fluid epletion should be to prevent or minimize the systemic response to inflammatory markers. For this review, various studies and reviews were critically evaluated, along with authors’ recommendations, for predicted severe or severe pancreatitis based on the available evidence. PMID:25561779

  13. Preeclampsia prevention

    PubMed Central

    Herrera-Medina, Rodolfo; Pineda, Lucia M

    2015-01-01

    Background: Preeclampsia is the main complication of pregnancy in developing countries. Calcium starting at 14 weeks of pregnancy is indicated to prevent the disease. Recent advances in prevention of preeclampsia endorse the addition of conjugated linoleic acid. Objective: To estimate the protective effect from calcium alone, compared to calcium plus conjugated linoleic acid in nulliparous women at risk of preeclampsia. Methods: A case-control design nested in the cohort of nulliparous women attending antenatal care from 2010 to 2014. The clinical histories of 387 cases of preeclampsia were compared with 1,054 normotensive controls. The exposure was prescriptions for calcium alone, the first period, or calcium plus conjugated linoleic acid, the second period, from 12 to 16 weeks of gestational age to labor. Confounding variables were controlled, allowing only nulliparous women into the study and stratifying by age, education and ethnic group. Results: The average age was 26.4 yrs old (range= 13-45), 85% from mixed ethnic backgrounds and with high school education. There were no differences between women who received calcium carbonate and those who did not (OR= 0.96; 95% CI= 0.73-1.27). The group of adolescents (13 to 18 years old) in the calcium plus conjugated linoleic acid was protected for preeclampsia (OR= 0.00; 95% CI= 0.00-0.44) independent of the confounder variables. Conclusions: 1. Calcium supplementation during pregnancy did not have preventive effects on preeclampsia. 2. Calcium plus Conjugated Linoleic acid provided to adolescents was observed to have preventive effect on Preeclampsia. PMID:26848195

  14. Role of a proprietary propolis-based product on the wait-and-see approach in acute otitis media and in preventing evolution to tracheitis, bronchitis, or rhinosinusitis from nonstreptococcal pharyngitis

    PubMed Central

    Di Pierro, Francesco; Zanvit, Alberto; Colombo, Maria

    2016-01-01

    Antipyretics and/or anti-inflammatory drugs along with a wait-and-see approach are the only treatments recommended in early acute otitis media (AOM) or viral pharyngitis. Propolis has been widely investigated for its antibacterial, antiviral, and anti-inflammatory properties and could perhaps be administered as an add-on therapy during watchful waiting in AOM or for better control of symptoms in nonstreptococcal pharyngitis. However, propolis has well-known problems of poor solubility and low oral bioavailability. We therefore analyzed a proprietary propolis-based product (Propolisina®) developed to overcome these limitations, in a retrospective, open-label, controlled study of Streptococcus pyogenes-negative children with a diagnosis of AOM or pharyngitis. Our results show that the use of propolis supplement for 72 hours lessens the severity of AOM and viral pharyngitis, reduces the use of antipyretics and anti-inflammatory drugs, and decreases the rate of evolution to tracheitis, bronchitis, and rhinosinusitis. Our study shows that propolis could be used as a safe add-on therapy in case of AOM and/or viral pharyngitis. PMID:27956842

  15. Role of a proprietary propolis-based product on the wait-and-see approach in acute otitis media and in preventing evolution to tracheitis, bronchitis, or rhinosinusitis from nonstreptococcal pharyngitis.

    PubMed

    Di Pierro, Francesco; Zanvit, Alberto; Colombo, Maria

    2016-01-01

    Antipyretics and/or anti-inflammatory drugs along with a wait-and-see approach are the only treatments recommended in early acute otitis media (AOM) or viral pharyngitis. Propolis has been widely investigated for its antibacterial, antiviral, and anti-inflammatory properties and could perhaps be administered as an add-on therapy during watchful waiting in AOM or for better control of symptoms in nonstreptococcal pharyngitis. However, propolis has well-known problems of poor solubility and low oral bioavailability. We therefore analyzed a proprietary propolis-based product (Propolisina(®)) developed to overcome these limitations, in a retrospective, open-label, controlled study of Streptococcus pyogenes-negative children with a diagnosis of AOM or pharyngitis. Our results show that the use of propolis supplement for 72 hours lessens the severity of AOM and viral pharyngitis, reduces the use of antipyretics and anti-inflammatory drugs, and decreases the rate of evolution to tracheitis, bronchitis, and rhinosinusitis. Our study shows that propolis could be used as a safe add-on therapy in case of AOM and/or viral pharyngitis.

  16. Acute high-altitude illness: a clinically orientated review

    PubMed Central

    Smedley, Tom

    2013-01-01

    Acute high-altitude illness is an encompassing term for the range of pathology that the unacclimatised individual can develop at increased altitude. This includes acute mountain sickness, high-altitude cerebral oedema and high-altitude pulmonary oedema. These conditions represent an increasing clinical problem as more individuals are exposed to the hypobaric hypoxic environment of high altitude for both work and leisure. In this review of acute high-altitude illness, the epidemiology, risk factors and pathophysiology are explored, before their prevention and treatment are discussed. Appropriate ascent rate remains the most effective acute high-altitude illness prevention, with pharmacological prophylaxis indicated in selected individuals. Descent is the definitive treatment for acute high-altitude illness, with the adjuncts of oxygen and specific drug therapies. PMID:26516505

  17. Pentoxifylline Treatment in Acute Pancreatitis (AP)

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-09-14

    Acute Pancreatitis (AP); Gallstone Pancreatitis; Alcoholic Pancreatitis; Post-ERCP/Post-procedural Pancreatitis; Trauma Acute Pancreatitis; Hypertriglyceridemia Acute Pancreatitis; Idiopathic (Unknown) Acute Pancreatitis; Medication Induced Acute Pancreatitis; Cancer Acute Pancreatitis; Miscellaneous (i.e. Acute on Chronic Pancreatitis)

  18. Cheerleading Injuries. Patterns, Prevention, Case Reports.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hutchinson, Mark R.

    1997-01-01

    Although cheerleading carries a relatively low injury risk, injuries that do occur can be severe, commonly affecting the ankle, head, and neck. Two case reports are presented that illustrate acute injuries typical of cheerleading. Prevention recommendations are offered related to supervising, screening, limiting stunts, optimizing the environment…

  19. Angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors in preventing remodeling and development of heart failure after acute myocardial infarction: results of the German multicenter study of the effects of captopril on cardiopulmonary exercise parameters (ECCE).

    PubMed

    Kleber, F X; Sabin, G V; Winter, U J; Reindl, I; Beil, S; Wenzel, M; Fischer, M; Doering, W

    1997-08-04

    Early action of angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors after myocardial infarction (MI) has been shown in large scale clinical trials to reduce mortality over the first weeks. However, the mechanisms involved are yet unclear and several trials showed a tendency toward a small, albeit unexpected, rise in cardiogenic shock or mortality. Since cardiopulmonary exercise testing (CPX) has become a "gold standard" in assessing the severity of heart failure, we studied--after finishing a pilot trial--the effect of captopril versus placebo in 208 patients who were individually titrated (titrated dose, mean 46/69 mg/day after 7 days/4 weeks, respectively) in order to preserve their blood pressure in the acute phase of myocardial infarction; we followed the development of congestive heart failure (CHF) over 4 weeks by measuring oxygen consumption. After 4 weeks, overall oxygen consumption at the anaerobic threshold (VO2-AT; 13.7 vs 13.1), maximal oxygen consumption (VO2max 19.3 vs 18.9 mL/kg per min) and exercise duration (896 vs 839 sec) showed a nonsignificant difference in favor of the captopril group. The predefined, categorized, combined endpoint of severe heart failure or death (heart failure necessitating ACE inhibition, VO2max < 10 mL/kg per min, or death) was significantly reduced in the captopril group (n = 7/104) versus placebo (n = 18/104; p = 0.03). Differences were mainly caused by fewer CHF events (delta n = 10). We conclude that ACE inhibition with individualized dose titration markedly reduces the 4-week incidence of severe heart failure or death; > 10 patients per 100 treated gained major benefits from this therapy.

  20. The Vitamin D Assessment (ViDA) Study: design of a randomized controlled trial of vitamin D supplementation for the prevention of cardiovascular disease, acute respiratory infection, falls and non-vertebral fractures.

    PubMed

    Scragg, Robert; Waayer, Debbie; Stewart, Alistair W; Lawes, Carlene M M; Toop, Les; Murphy, Judy; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Camargo, Carlos A

    2016-11-01

    Observational studies have shown that low vitamin D status is associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular disease, acute respiratory infection, falls and non-vertebral fractures. We recruited 5110 Auckland adults, aged 50-84 years, into a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial to test whether vitamin D supplementation protects against these four major outcomes. The intervention is a monthly cholecalciferol dose of 100,000IU (2.5mg) for an estimated median 3.3 years (range 2.5-4.2) during 2011-2015. Participants were recruited primarily from family practices, plus community groups with a high proportion of Maori, Pacific, or South Asian individuals. The baseline evaluation included medical history, lifestyle, physical measurements (e.g. blood pressure, arterial waveform, lung function, muscle function), and a blood sample (stored at -80°C for later testing). Capsules are being mailed to home addresses with a questionnaire to collect data on non-hospitalized outcomes and to monitor adherence and potential adverse effects. Other data sources include New Zealand Ministry of Health data on mortality, hospitalization, cancer registrations and dispensed pharmaceuticals. A random sample of 438 participants returned for annual collection of blood samples to monitor adherence and safety (hypercalcemia), including repeat physical measurements at 12 months follow-up. The trial will allow testing of a priori hypotheses on several other endpoints including: weight, blood pressure, arterial waveform parameters, heart rate variability, lung function, muscle strength, gait and balance, mood, psoriasis, bone density, and chronic pain.

  1. Allergy prevention.

    PubMed

    Muche-Borowski, Cathleen; Kopp, Matthias; Reese, Imke; Sitter, Helmut; Werfel, Thomas; Schäfer, Torsten

    2010-09-01

    The further increase of allergies in industrialized countries demands evidence-based measures of primary prevention. The recommendations as published in the guideline of 2004 were updated and consented on the basis of a systematic literature search. Evidence from the period February 2003-May 2008 was searched in the electronic databases Cochrane and MEDLINE as well as in reference lists of recent reviews and by contacting experts. The retrieved citations were screened for relevance first by title and abstract and in a second step as full paper. Levels of evidence were assigned to each included study and the methodological quality of the studies was assessed as high or low. Finally the revised recommendations were formally consented (nominal group process) by representatives of relevant societies and organizations including a self-help group. Of originally 4556 hits, 217 studies (4 Cochrane Reviews, 14 meta-analyses, 19 randomized controlled trials, 135 cohort and 45 case-control studies) were included and critically appraised. Grossly unchanged remained the recommendations on avoiding environmental tobacco smoke, breast-feeding over 4 months (alternatively hypoallergenic formulas for children at risk), avoiding a mold-promoting indoor climate, vaccination according to current recommendations, and avoidance of furry pets (especially cats) in children at risk. The recommendation on reducing the house dust mite allergen exposure as a measure of primary prevention was omitted and the impact of a delayed introduction of supplementary food was reduced. New recommendations were adopted concerning fish consumption (during pregnancy / breast-feeding and as supplementary food in the first year), avoidance of overweight, and reducing the exposure to indoor and outdoor air pollutants. The revision of this guideline on a profound evidence basis led to (1) a confirmation of existing recommendations, (2) substantial revisions, and (3) new recommendations. Thereby it is possible

  2. Acute bacterial parotitis following acute stroke.

    PubMed

    Lee, V K; Kimbrough, D J; Jarquin-Valdivia, A A

    2009-06-01

    Acute bacterial parotitis (ABP) is a relatively uncommon condition that tends to occur in debilitated older patients. We report a case of an older woman that presented with an acute intracerebral hemorrhage who developed ABP. This morbidity led to endotracheal intubation, mechanical ventilation, tracheostomy and gastrostomy, all of which were not initially needed. We discuss the proposed physiopathology and etiopathogenesis of ABP in adults.

  3. Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... hard for blood to do its work. In acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL), also called acute lymphoblastic leukemia, there are too ... of white blood cells called lymphocytes or lymphoblasts. ALL is the most common type of cancer in ...

  4. Acute arterial occlusion - kidney

    MedlinePlus

    Acute renal arterial thrombosis; Renal artery embolism; Acute renal artery occlusion; Embolism - renal artery ... kidneys need a good blood supply. The main artery to the kidney is called the renal artery. ...

  5. Acute kidney failure

    MedlinePlus

    Kidney failure; Renal failure; Renal failure - acute; ARF; Kidney injury - acute ... There are many possible causes of kidney damage. They include: ... cholesterol (cholesterol emboli) Decreased blood flow due to very ...

  6. Acute phosphate nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Monfared, Ali; Habibzadeh, Seyed Mahmoud; Mesbah, Seyed Alireza

    2014-05-01

    We present acute phosphate nephropathy in a 28-year-old man, which was developed after a car accident due to rhabdomyolysis. Treatment of acute kidney injury was done with administration of sodium bicarbonate.

  7. Acute Pancreatitis and Pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    ... and Pregnancy Acute Pancreatitis and Pregnancy Timothy Gardner, MD Acute pancreatitis is defined as the sudden inflammation ... the incidence of recurrent attacks minimized. Timothy Gardner, MD is Director of Pancreatic Disorders at Dartmouth-Hitchcock ...

  8. Acute Appendicitis in Patients with Acute Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Ki Up; Kim, Jin Kyeung; Won, Jong Ho; Hong, Dae Sik; Park, Hee Sook; Park, Kyeung Kyu

    1993-01-01

    The decision to operate for abdominal pain in patients with leukopenia can be exceedingly difficult. Surgical exploration may be the only effective way to differentiate acute appendicitis from other causes, but it involves considerable risk of infectious complications due to immunesuppression. Leukemic patients, who presented significant RLQ pain, had been indicated for operation, despite having advanced disease or having had received chemotherapy or steroids. Four adult leukemia patients, complicated by acute appendictis, were reviewed. Two patients were in induction chemotherapy, one receiving salvage chemotheapy due to relapse and the other was in conservative treatment. Two patients were acute myelocytic leukemia (AML), one had acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL), and the other had aleukemic leukemia. All patients underwent appendectomy and recovered without complication. Our experience supports the theory that the surgical management of appendicitis in acute leukemia is the most effective way, in spite of leukopenia. PMID:8268146

  9. Cancer Prevention Research–Then and Now

    PubMed Central

    Bode, Ann M.; Dong, Zigang

    2010-01-01

    Throughout history, human kind has won many battles against deadly diseases, including small pox, polio, tuberculosis and more recently severe acute respiratory syndrome. All of these diseases were defeated by prevention. Achieving cancer prevention is a global priority, but history tells us that the pathway to achievement is difficult and full of detours and roadblocks. Epidemiology and clinical evidence clearly indicate that specific factors are associated with an increased risk for cancer development. What can we learn from the past that is applicable to the reality of successful cancer prevention? PMID:19536108

  10. [Skin cancer: use of preventive measures and demographic profile of a risk group in the city of Botucatu].

    PubMed

    Popim, Regina Célia; Corrente, José Eduardo; Marino, Jaqueline Aparecida Geromel; de Souza, Carolina Arantes

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this paper was to establish the demographic profile of an at-risk group for skin cancer and to assess the preventive measures taken by the studied individuals and by the employer. The methods chosen was a quantitative study with a sample of 33 mail carriers from the Empresa Brasileira de Correios e Telégrafos in Botucatu, Brazil. Information regarding the demographic profile, how long the individual had been working for the company, hours of sun exposure, history of sunburns, family cancer history and skin cancer prevention strategies used by the company was collected by means of a questionnaire. The data were analyzed using Fisher's Exact Test at a 5% probability. The predominant age groups were 26-30 and 31-35 years corresponding to 42,42%. The predominant skin color was white (93,94%) and 81,82% of the studied individuals were working in the company for over five years. 63,63% of the interviewees use sunscreen habitually; those who do not explain this with a lack of habit (in 75% of the cases). As refers to supply of protective equipment by the company, 100% of the subjects answered positively. These findings allow characterizing the studied population as a skin cancer risk group. Prophylactic measures in form of educational actions for awareness building should be adopted and stimulated.

  11. New therapeutic approaches for the prevention and treatment of migraine.

    PubMed

    Diener, Hans-Christoph; Charles, Andrew; Goadsby, Peter J; Holle, Dagny

    2015-10-01

    The management of patients with migraine is often unsatisfactory because available acute and preventive therapies are either ineffective or poorly tolerated. The acute treatment of migraine attacks has been limited to the use of analgesics, combinations of analgesics with caffeine, ergotamines, and the triptans. Successful new approaches for the treatment of acute migraine target calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) and serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine, 5-HT1F) receptors. Other approaches targeting the transient receptor potential vanilloid (TRPV1) receptor, glutamate, GABAA receptors, or a combination of 5-HT1B/1D receptors and neuronal nitric oxide synthesis have been investigated but have not been successful in clinical trials thus far. In migraine prevention, the most promising new approaches are humanised antibodies against CGRP or the CGRP receptor. Non-invasive and invasive neuromodulation approaches also show promise as both acute and preventive therapies, although further studies are needed to define appropriate candidates for these therapies and optimum protocols for their use.

  12. Cognitive Therapy to Prevent Depressive Relapse in Adults

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The high prevalence, frequent relapse, and recurrence of major depressive disorder (MDD) increase its personal and societal costs. Cognitive therapy (CT) aims to decrease depressive symptoms and prevent relapse/recurrence. We review prevention evidence for acute, continuation, and maintenance CTs for patients whose depression is active, remitted, and recovered, respectively. Evidence suggests that patients relapse less often after discontinuing acute phase CT versus discontinuing pharmacotherapy. Continuation CT further decreases relapse relative to inactive controls and similarly to active pharmacotherapy. Maintenance CT may decrease recurrence but needs rigorous evaluation. Post-acute CT’s preventive effects appear greater for higher-risk patients (e.g., with residual depressive symptoms, unstable acute-phase treatment response, childhood trauma, more prior depressive episodes), although risks may vary by specific CTs. PMID:25729758

  13. Protocol for a Controlled Experiment to Identify the Causal Role of Acute Alcohol Consumption in Condomless Sex among HIV-Positive MSM: Study Procedures, Ethical Considerations, and Implications for HIV Prevention

    PubMed Central

    Shuper, Paul A.; Joharchi, Narges; Rehm, Jürgen

    2015-01-01

    Although alcohol consumption is frequently perceived as a driver of condomless sex and subsequent HIV acquisition, the causal nature of this relationship remains unclear, and little is known about alcohol’s direct versus indirect impact on the sexual risk dynamics of those who are HIV-positive. To address this gap, we present the protocol for an in-progress NIAAA-funded controlled experiment, wherein a sample of HIV-positive men-who-have-sex-with-men (MSM) undergoes an alcohol consumption manipulation (alcohol/placebo/control) and sexual arousal induction (sexually aroused/non-aroused), and then reports intentions to engage in condom-protected and condomless sexual acts with hypothetical sexual partners differing in HIV serostatus (HIV+/HIV−/HIV status unknown), condom use preference (use/don’t use/not stated), and physical attractiveness (attractive/unattractive). Study outcomes will identify alcohol’s impact on HIV-positive MSM’s condomless sex intentions in the context of experimentally-manipulated factors as well as risk-relevant personality traits and alcohol-related expectancies. Detailed experimental procedures, ethical considerations, and potential implications for HIV prevention are discussed. PMID:26163147

  14. Protocol for a Controlled Experiment to Identify the Causal Role of Acute Alcohol Consumption in Condomless Sex among HIV-Positive MSM: Study Procedures, Ethical Considerations, and Implications for HIV Prevention.

    PubMed

    Shuper, Paul A; Joharchi, Narges; Rehm, Jürgen

    2016-01-01

    Although alcohol consumption is frequently perceived as a driver of condomless sex and subsequent HIV acquisition, the causal nature of this relationship remains unclear, and little is known about alcohol's direct versus indirect impact on the sexual risk dynamics of those who are HIV-positive. To address this gap, we present the protocol for an in-progress NIAAA-funded controlled experiment, wherein a sample of HIV-positive men-who-have-sex-with-men (MSM) undergoes an alcohol consumption manipulation (alcohol/placebo/control) and sexual arousal induction (sexually aroused/non-aroused), and then reports intentions to engage in condom-protected and condomless sexual acts with hypothetical sexual partners differing in HIV serostatus (HIV+/HIV-/HIV status unknown), condom use preference (use/don't use/not stated), and physical attractiveness (attractive/unattractive). Study outcomes will identify alcohol's impact on HIV-positive MSM's condomless sex intentions in the context of experimentally-manipulated factors as well as risk-relevant personality traits and alcohol-related expectancies. Detailed experimental procedures, ethical considerations, and potential implications for HIV prevention are discussed.

  15. Acute loss of consciousness.

    PubMed

    Tristán, Bekinschtein; Gleichgerrcht, Ezequiel; Manes, Facundo

    2015-01-01

    Acute loss of consciousness poses a fascinating scenario for theoretical and clinical research. This chapter introduces a simple yet powerful framework to investigate altered states of consciousness. We then explore the different disorders of consciousness that result from acute brain injury, and techniques used in the acute phase to predict clinical outcome in different patient populations in light of models of acute loss of consciousness. We further delve into post-traumatic amnesia as a model for predicting cognitive sequels following acute loss of consciousness. We approach the study of acute loss of consciousness from a theoretical and clinical perspective to conclude that clinicians in acute care centers must incorporate new measurements and techniques besides the classic coma scales in order to assess their patients with loss of consciousness.

  16. [Prevention of melanoma by sun protective measures in childhood. Temporal changes in awareness of parents].

    PubMed

    Kölmel, K F; Pfahlberg, A; Gefeller, O

    1997-06-01

    Numerous epidemiological studies on risk factors of malignant melanoma confirm the etiologic role of excessive UV-exposure especially in childhood. Preventive educational campaigns directed to parents of pre-school children have been inaugurated in several countries. In Germany the information was distributed by the "Working group for Preventive Measures in Dermatology" in cooperation with different public health institutions and the media starting in 1993. To evaluate the influence of these efforts on the knowledge and behaviour of the parents, two successive cross-sectional studies at all 56 nursery schools using the same standardised questionnaire were performed. The first interview took place in spring 1993 (before the campaign) with 1341 evaluable questionnaires', the second in fall 1994 (after the campaign) with 1150 evaluable questionnaire. The knowledge of the parents on melanoma risk factors was significantly improved in the second interview. Also the parental behavior regarding sun-protective measures when their children were outdoor at the beach or in the garden definitely changed. In 1993 the best textile sun protection was used by 21% of the parents at the beach and 36% in the garden. These numbers rose to 34% (beach) and 57% (garden) by the second interview. The percentage of children with no sunburn recorded during the preceding summer rose from 39% to 51%. According to the child's gender the parental behavior was different between the sexes; boys were always better protected than girls. The design of this study with two cross-sectional surveys in the same populations does not provide a methodologically sound basis for attributing the observed positive changes to the campaign. Without any doubt it can be stated that the parental knowledge and their attention to sun protection in their children showed substantial improvement in the second survey after the campaign. Thus, these results provide some evidence for the success of the preventive activities

  17. Anaphylaxis: acute treatment and management.

    PubMed

    Ring, Johannes; Grosber, Martine; Möhrenschlager, Matthias; Brockow, Knut

    2010-01-01

    Anaphylaxis is the maximal variant of an acute life-threatening immediate-type allergy. Due to its often dramatic onset and clinical course, practical knowledge in the management of these reactions is mandatory both for physicians and patients. It has to be distinguished between acute treatment modalities and general recommendations for management of patients who have suffered from an anaphylactic reaction. Acute treatment comprises general procedures like positioning, applying an intravenous catheter, call for help, comfort of the patient as well as the application of medication. The acute treatment modalities are selected depending upon the intensity of the clinical symptomatology as they are categorized in 'severity grades'. First of all it is important to diagnose anaphylaxis early and consider several differential diagnoses. This diagnosis is purely clinical and laboratory tests are of no help in the acute situation. Epinephrine is the essential antianaphylactic drug in the pharmacologic treatment. It should be first applied intramuscularly, only in very severe cases or under conditions of surgical interventions intravenous application can be tried. Furthermore, glucocorticosteroids are given in order to prevent protracted or biphasic courses of anaphylaxis; they are of little help in the acute treatment. Epinephrine autoinjectors can be used by the patient him/herself. Histamine H(1)-antagonists are valuable in mild anaphylactic reactions; they should be given intravenously if possible. The replacement of volume is crucial in antianaphylactic treatment. Crystalloids can be used in the beginning, in severe shock colloid volume substitutes have to be applied. Patients suffering from an anaphylactic episode should be observed over a period of 4-10 h according to the severity of the symptomatology. It is crucial to be aware or recognize risk patients as for example patients with severe uncontrolled asthma, or under beta-adrenergic blockade. When bronchial

  18. Decitabine in Treating Children With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia or Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-22

    Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Childhood Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  19. Aspirin dosing in cardiovascular disease prevention and management: an update.

    PubMed

    Ganjehei, Leila; Becker, Richard C

    2015-11-01

    Aspirin has been in use for prevention and management of cardiovascular diseases for several decades. Clinical and epidemiological literature suggests that while net benefits of aspirin in primary prevention of CVDs are less clear, the benefits of aspirin in acute scenarios and secondary prevention settings are well established. However, its optimum dosing requirements have been up for debate especially in various settings of acute coronary syndrome and stable ischemic heart disease. The role of clinician in stratifying individual risk score to achieve net clinical benefit is an important determinant of initiating aspirin therapy. The purpose of this article is to review association of aspirin and CVD in general, and to review its dosing regimens in acute settings as well as primary and secondary prevention as suggested by various established guidelines. We also aim to provide the readers an update on recent changes and current evidence based practice trends.

  20. Resolution of acute inflammation in the lung.

    PubMed

    Levy, Bruce D; Serhan, Charles N

    2014-01-01

    Acute inflammation in the lung is essential to health. So too is its resolution. In response to invading microbes, noxious stimuli, or tissue injury, an acute inflammatory response is mounted to protect the host. To limit inflammation and prevent collateral injury of healthy, uninvolved tissue, the lung orchestrates the formation of specialized proresolving mediators, specifically lipoxins, resolvins, protectins, and maresins. These immunoresolvents are agonists for resolution that interact with specific receptors on leukocytes and structural cells to blunt further inflammation and promote catabasis. This process appears to be defective in several common lung diseases that are characterized by excess or chronic inflammation. Here, we review the molecular and cellular effectors of resolution of acute inflammation in the lung.

  1. Resolution of Acute Inflammation In The Lung

    PubMed Central

    Levy, Bruce D.; Serhan, Charles N.

    2015-01-01

    Acute inflammation in the lung is essential to health. So too is its resolution. In response to invading microbes, noxious stimuli or tissue injury, an acute inflammatory response is mounted to protect the host. To limit inflammation and prevent collateral injury of healthy, uninvolved tissue, the lung orchestrates the formation of specialized pro-resolving mediators, specifically lipoxins, resolvins, protectins and maresins. These immunoresolvents are agonists for resolution that interact with specific receptors on leukocytes and structural cells to blunt further inflammation and promote catabasis. This process appears to be defective in several common lung diseases that are characterized by excess or chronic inflammation. Here, we review the molecular and cellular effectors of resolution of acute inflammation in the lung. PMID:24313723

  2. Organ protection possibilities in acute heart failure.

    PubMed

    Montero-Pérez-Barquero, M; Morales-Rull, J L

    2016-04-01

    Unlike chronic heart failure (HF), the treatment for acute HF has not changed over the last decade. The drugs employed have shown their ability to control symptoms but have not achieved organ protection or managed to reduce medium to long-term morbidity and mortality. Advances in our understanding of the pathophysiology of acute HF suggest that treatment should be directed not only towards correcting the haemodynamic disorders and achieving symptomatic relief but also towards preventing organ damage, thereby counteracting myocardial remodelling and cardiac and extracardiac disorders. Compounds that exert vasodilatory and anti-inflammatory action in the acute phase of HF and can stop cell death, thereby boosting repair mechanisms, could have an essential role in organ protection.

  3. Acute otitis media and acute bacterial sinusitis.

    PubMed

    Wald, Ellen R

    2011-05-01

    Acute otitis media and acute bacterial sinusitis are 2 of the most common indications for antimicrobial agents in children. Together, they are responsible for billions of dollars of health care expenditures. The pathogenesis of the 2 conditions is identical. In the majority of children with each condition, a preceding viral upper respiratory tract infection predisposes to the development of the acute bacterial complication. It has been shown that viral upper respiratory tract infection predisposes to the development of acute otitis media in 37% of cases. Currently, precise microbiologic diagnosis of acute otitis media and acute bacterial sinusitis requires performance of tympanocentesis in the former and sinus aspiration in the latter. The identification of a virus from the nasopharynx in either case does not obviate the need for antimicrobial therapy. Furthermore, nasal and nasopharyngeal swabs are not useful in predicting the results of culture of the middle ear or paranasal sinus. However, it is possible that a combination of information regarding nasopharyngeal colonization with bacteria and infection with specific viruses may inform treatment decisions in the future.

  4. Acute rheumatic fever and rheumatic heart disease in indigenous populations.

    PubMed

    Steer, Andrew C; Carapetis, Jonathan R

    2009-12-01

    Acute rheumatic fever and rheumatic heart disease are diseases of socioeconomic disadvantage. These diseases are common in developing countries and in Indigenous populations in industrialized countries. Clinicians who work with Indigenous populations need to maintain a high index of suspicion for the potential diagnosis of acute rheumatic fever, particularly in patients presenting with joint pain. Inexpensive medicines, such as aspirin, are the mainstay of symptomatic treatment of rheumatic fever; however, antiinflammatory treatment has no effect on the long-term rate of progression or severity of chronic valvular disease. The current focus of global efforts at prevention of rheumatic heart disease is on secondary prevention (regular administration of penicillin to prevent recurrent rheumatic fever), although primary prevention (timely treatment of streptococcal pharyngitis to prevent rheumatic fever) is also important in populations in which it is feasible.

  5. Prevention of nuclear war

    SciTech Connect

    Lifton, R.J.

    1980-10-01

    Physicians are exercising their responsibility as healers in their efforts to prevent nuclear war. Death for Hiroshima survivors was experienced in four stages: the immediate impact of destruction, the acute impact of radiation, delayed radiation effects, and later identification as an atomic bomb survivor. Each phase had its physical and psychological impacts and negates Hiroshima as a model for rational behavior despite those who claim survival is possible for those who are prepared. The psychic effects of modern nuclear, chemical, and germ warfare need to be challenged with a symbolization of life and immortality. Studies of psychological reactions to the terror children felt during practice air-raid drills indicate that the fears can be surpressed and re-emerge in adult life as a linking of death with collective annihilation. Other themes which emerge are feelings of impermanence, craziness, identification with the bomb, and a double existence. Psychic numbing and the religion of nuclearism cause dangerous conflicts with the anxieties caused by increasing awareness of death. (DCK)

  6. Acute pancreatitis in infants and children.

    PubMed Central

    Hillemeier, C.; Gryboski, J. D.

    1984-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis is being encountered more often in children due to antimetabolite therapy, accidental injury, and traumatic battering. Pancreatitis may occur in the absence of traditionally elevated serum amylase and lipase, and initial diagnosis may depend upon ultrasonography. Traditional therapy of enteric rest with nasogastric suction has been supported by the use of parenteral nutrition. Newer pharmaceutical agents have been ineffective in altering the course of the illness or in preventing complications of pseudocyst or abscess. PMID:6382834

  7. [Acute rheumatic fever].

    PubMed

    Maier, Alexander; Kommer, Vera

    2016-03-01

    We report on a young women with acute rheumatic fever. Acute rheumatic fever has become a rare disease in Germany, especially in adults. This carries the risk that it can be missed in the differential diagnostic considerations of acute rheumatic disorders and febrile status. If rheumatic fever is not diagnosed and treated correctly, there is a considerable risk for rheumatic valvular heart disease. In this article diagnosis, differential diagnosis and therapy of rheumatic fever are discussed extensively.

  8. Acute and recurring pericarditis: More colchicine, less corticosteroids

    PubMed Central

    Farand, Paul; Bonenfant, Francis; Belley-Côté, Emilie P; Tzouannis, Nicholas

    2010-01-01

    Acute and recurring pericarditis are frequently encountered clinical entities. Given that severe complications such as tamponade and constrictive pericarditis occur rarely, the majority of patients suffering from acute pericarditis will have a benign clinical course. However, pericarditis recurrence, with its painful symptoms, is frequent. In effect, recent studies have demonstrated a beneficial role of colchicine in preventing recurrence, while also suggesting an increase in recurrences with the use of corticosteroids, the traditional first-line agent. PMID:21191540

  9. Prevention of distal embolization and no-reflow in patients with acute myocardial infarction and total occlusion in the infarct-related vessel: a subgroup analysis of the cohort of acute revascularization in myocardial infarction with excimer laser-CARMEL multicenter study.

    PubMed

    Dahm, Johannes B; Ebersole, Douglas; Das, Tony; Madyhoon, Hooman; Vora, Kishor; Baker, John; Hilton, David; Topaz, On

    2005-01-01

    To overcome the adverse complications of percutaneous coronary interventions in thrombus laden lesions (i.e., distal embolization, platelet activation, no-reflow phenomenon), mechanical removal of the thrombus or distal embolization protection devices are frequently required. Pulsed-wave ultraviolet excimer laser light at 308 nm can vaporize thrombus, suppress platelet aggregation, and, unlike other thrombectomy devices, ablate the underlying plaque. The following multicenter registry was instituted to evaluate the safety and efficacy of laser ablation in patients presenting with acute myocardial infarction (AMI) complicated by persistent thrombotic occlusions. Patients with AMI and complete thrombotic occlusion of the infarct-related vessel were included in eight participating centers. Patients with further compromising conditions (i.e., cardiogenic shock, thrombolysis failures) were also included. Primary endpoint was procedural respective laser success; secondary combined endpoints were TIMI flow and % stenosis by quantitative coronary analysis and visual assessment at 1-month follow-up. Eighty-four percent of all patients enrolled (n = 56) had a very large thrombus burden (TIMI thrombus scale > or = 3), and 49% were compromised by complex clinical presentation, i.e., cardiogenic shock (21%), degenerated saphenous vein grafts (26%), or thrombolysis failures (5%). Laser success was achieved in 89%, angiographic success in 93%, and the overall procedural success rate was 86%. The angiographic prelaser total occlusion was reduced angiographically to 58% +/- 25% after laser treatment and to 4% +/- 13% final residual stenosis after adjunctive balloon angioplasty and/or stent placement. TIMI flow increased significantly from grade 0 to 2.7 +/- 0.5 following laser ablation (P < 0.001) and 3.0 +/- 0.2 upon completion of the angioplasty procedure (P > 0.001 vs. baseline). Distal embolizations occurred in 4%, no-reflow was observed in 2%, and perforations in 0.6% of cases

  10. Acute injuries in orienteerers.

    PubMed

    Kujala, U M; Nylund, T; Taimela, S

    1995-02-01

    The aim of this study was to characterize the type and severeity of acute injuries occurring in Finnish orienteerers in 1987 to 1991. The study is based on the orienteering license insurance records accounting for 2189 orienteering injuries during 69268 person-years of exposure in active orienteerers. Of these orienteerers, 73.0% were male; 73.5% (N = 1608) of all injuries occurred in males, so the injury rate was similar in males and females. The rate was highest in orienteerers 20 to 24 years of age and lowest in children. Injuries occurred most commonly during May to September (78.9% or all injuries), the months which include the orienteering competition season, and were more common during competitions (59.8%) than during training. A high number of the injuries occurred during weekends (58.9% of injuries) including 68.1% of all competition injuries and 44.9% of all training injuries. The lower limbs were involved in 1611 (73.6%) of cases, the ankle (28.7%) and the knee (23.2%) being the two most common injury locations. Sprains, strains and contusions were the most common injuries. Wounds were proportionally more common in males than in females while ankle sprains were more common in females. Fractures, seven open and 94 closed, accounted for 4.6% of injuries; they were most common in the hand/wrist/forearm (N = 44) and ankle (N = 16), and were more frequent during competition (62.3%) than during training. The most important areas for preventive measures seem to be the ankle and the knee.

  11. Noninvasive ventilation for acute respiratory failure.

    PubMed

    Hess, Dean R

    2013-06-01

    Noninvasive ventilation (NIV) for acute respiratory failure has gained much academic and clinical interest. Despite this, NIV is underutilized. The evidence strongly supports its use in patients presenting with an exacerbation of COPD and in patients with acute cardiogenic pulmonary edema. As reviewed in this paper, there is now evidence supporting or not supporting the use of NIV in various other presentations of acute respiratory failure. It is important not only to know when to initiate NIV, but also when this therapy is failing. Whether NIV in the setting of acute respiratory failure can be managed appropriately outside the ICU setting is controversial. Although a variety of interfaces are available, the oronasal mask is the best initial interface in terms of leak prevention and patient comfort. Some critical care ventilators have NIV modes that compensate well for leaks, but as a group the ventilators that are designed specifically for NIV have better leak compensation. NIV should be part of the armamentarium of all clinicians caring from patients with acute respiratory failure.

  12. Severe hypertriglyceridemia-related acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Stefanutti, Claudia; Labbadia, Giancarlo; Morozzi, Claudia

    2013-04-01

    Acute pancreatitis is a potentially life-threatening complication of severe hypertriglyceridemia. In some cases, inborn errors of metabolism such as lipoprotein lipase deficiency, apoprotein C-II deficiency, and familial hypertriglyceridemia have been reported as causes of severe hypertriglyceridemia. More often, severe hypertriglyceridemia describes various clinical conditions characterized by high plasma levels of triglycerides (>1000 mg/dL), chylomicron remnants, or intermediate density lipoprotein like particles, and/or chylomicrons. International guidelines on the management of acute pancreatitis are currently available. Standard therapeutic measures are based on the use of lipid-lowering agents (fenofibrate, gemfibrozil, niacin, Ω-3 fatty acids), low molecular weight heparin, and insulin in diabetic patients. However, when standard medical therapies have failed, non-pharmacological approaches based upon the removal of triglycerides with therapeutic plasma exchange can also provide benefit to patients with severe hypertriglyceridemia and acute pancreatitis. Plasma exchange could be very helpful in reducing triglycerides levels during the acute phase of hyperlipidemic pancreatitis, and in the prevention of recurrence. The current evidence on management of acute pancreatitis and severe hypertriglyceridemia, focusing on symptoms, treatment and potential complications is reviewed herein.

  13. Acute phase reaction and acute phase proteins*

    PubMed Central

    Gruys, E.; Toussaint, M.J.M.; Niewold, T.A.; Koopmans, S.J.

    2005-01-01

    A review of the systemic acute phase reaction with major cytokines involved, and the hepatic metabolic changes, negative and positive acute phase proteins (APPs) with function and associated pathology is given. It appears that APPs represent appropriate analytes for assessment of animal health. Whereas they represent non-specific markers as biological effect reactants, they can be used for assessing nutritional deficits and reactive processes, especially when positive and negative acute phase variables are combined in an index. When such acute phase index is applied to separate healthy animals from animals with some disease, much better results are obtained than with single analytes and statistically acceptable results for culling individual animals may be reached. Unfortunately at present no cheap, comprehensive and easy to use system is available for assessing various acute phase proteins in serum or blood samples at the same time. Protein microarray or fluid phase microchip technology may satisfy this need; and permit simultaneous analysis of numerous analytes in the same small volume sample and enable integration of information derived from systemic reactivity and nutrition with disease specific variables. Applying such technology may help to solve health problems in various countries not only in animal husbandry but also in human populations. PMID:16252337

  14. Infant acute myocarditis mimicking acute myocardial infarction

    PubMed Central

    Tilouche, Samia; Masmoudi, Tasnim; Sahnoun, Maha; Chkirbène, Youssef; Mestiri, Sarra; Boughamoura, Lamia; Ben Dhiab, Mohamed; Souguir, Mohamed Kamel

    2016-01-01

    Myocarditis is an inflammatory disease of the myocardium with heterogeneous clinical manifestations and progression. In clinical practice, although there are many methods of diagnosis of acute myocarditis, the diagnosis remains an embarrassing dilemma for clinicians. The authors report the case of 9-month-old infant who was brought to the Pediatric Emergency Department with sudden onset dyspnea. Examination disclosed heart failure and resuscitation was undertaken. The electrocardiogram showed an ST segment elevation in the anterolateral leads with a mirror image. Cardiac enzyme tests revealed a significant elevation of troponin and creatine phosphokinase levels. A diagnosis of acute myocardial infarction was made, and heparin therapy was prescribed. The infant died on the third day after admission with cardiogenic shock. The autopsy showed dilatation of the ventricles and massive edema of the lungs. Histological examinations of myocardium samples revealed the presence of a marked lymphocytic infiltrate dissociating myocardiocytes. Death was attributed to acute myocarditis. The authors call attention to the difficulties of differential diagnosis between acute myocarditis and acute myocardial infarction especially in children, and to the important therapeutic implications of a correct diagnosis. PMID:28210569

  15. Cardiac Arrhythmias and Abnormal Electrocardiograms After Acute Stroke.

    PubMed

    Ruthirago, Doungporn; Julayanont, Parunyou; Tantrachoti, Pakpoom; Kim, Jongyeol; Nugent, Kenneth

    2016-01-01

    Cardiac arrhythmias and electrocardiogram (ECG) abnormalities occur frequently but are often underrecognized after strokes. Acute ischemic and hemorrhagic strokes in some particular area of brain can disrupt central autonomic control of the heart, precipitating cardiac arrhythmias, ECG abnormalities, myocardial injury and sometimes sudden death. Identification of high-risk patients after acute stroke is important to arrange appropriate cardiac monitoring and effective management of arrhythmias, and to prevent cardiac morbidity and mortality. More studies are needed to better clarify pathogenesis, localization of areas associated with arrhythmias and practical management of arrhythmias and abnormal ECGs after acute stroke.

  16. Complete Vision Loss following Orbital Cellulitis Secondary to Acute Dacryocystitis

    PubMed Central

    Pfeiffer, Margaret L.; Hacopian, Alexander; Merritt, Helen

    2016-01-01

    We present a case of a 50-year-old woman with acute dacryocystitis that was complicated by posterior rupture of the lacrimal sac causing an orbital cellulitis with subsequent visual acuity of no light perception. Upon presentation, she was immediately started on broad-spectrum antibiotics and underwent surgical incision and drainage of the lacrimal sac abscess but never regained vision. There are 4 cases in the literature of permanent severe vision loss from acute dacryocystitis. Prompt diagnosis and close monitoring of acute dacryocystitis are therefore essential to prevent extension into the orbit and possible optic nerve compromise. PMID:27803829

  17. Macrolides for Acute Wheezing Episodes in Preschool Children

    PubMed Central

    Blake, Kathryn

    2016-01-01

    The National Asthma Education and Prevention Program's Expert Panel Report 3, Guidelines for the Diagnosis and Management of Asthma does not recommend antibiotics for the management of acute episodes of asthma exacerbation. Macrolides seem to have some potential effect beyond or in addition to their antibacterial effect. It has been reported that macrolides may potentially benefit patients with chronic inflammatory airway diseases due to their antibacterial, antiviral, and/or anti-inflammatory effects. This review presents recent data on use of azithromycin in prevention and management of acute exacerbation of respiratory symptoms in infants and young children. PMID:27458539

  18. Prevention of chronic pain after whiplash

    PubMed Central

    Ferrari, R

    2002-01-01

    The acute whiplash injury is a significant health burden for patients and the healthcare system. Traditional approaches to treatment fail to resolve this ever growing medicolegal and social problem. A new biopsychosocial model of whiplash disorder encourages new ways of treating and preventing of the chronic disability. This biopsychosocial model takes into account the mechanism by which acute pain becomes chronic pain, and how this can be prevented. Specific education and treatments encourage a behaviour after whiplash injury that is conducive to more rapid recovery, and provides the whiplash patient with insight into the mediators of chronic pain. The article describes in practical terms how to use education, reassurance, a more judicious use of therapy, and exercise to achieve this goal. Practical guidelines are provided on educating the patient about other symptoms that may cause concern. PMID:12421777

  19. Adult Acute Leukaemia

    PubMed Central

    Atkinson, K.; Wells, D. G.; Clink, H. McD.; Kay, H. E. M.; Powles, R.; McElwain, T. J.

    1974-01-01

    Seventy-eight adult patients with acute leukaemia were classified cytologically into 3 categories: acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL), acute myelogenous leukaemia (AML) or acute undifferentiated leukaemia (AUL). The periodic acid-Schiff stain was of little value in differentiating the 3 groups. The treatment response in each group was different: 94% of patients with ALL (16/17) achieved complete remission with prednisone, vincristine and other drugs in standard use in childhood ALL; 59% of patients with AML (27/46) achieved complete remission with cytosine arabinoside and daunorubicin (22 patients), or 6-thioguanine and cyclophosphamide (2 patients), 6-thioguanine, cyclophosphamide and Adriamycin (1 patient), and cytosine and Adriamycin (1 patient); only 2 out of 14 patients (14%) with acute undifferentiated leukaemia achieved complete remission using cytosine and daunorubicin after an initial trial of prednisone and vincristine had failed. Prednisone and vincristine would seem to be of no value in acute undifferentiated leukaemia. It would seem also that no benefit is obtained by classifying all patients with acute leukaemia over 20 years of age as “adult acute leukaemia” and treating them with the same polypharmaceutical regimen. The problems posed by each disease are different and such a policy serves only to obscure them. ImagesFig. 1Fig. 2Fig. 3 PMID:4141625

  20. Acute Disseminated Encephalomyelitis.

    PubMed

    Gray, Matthew Philip; Gorelick, Marc H

    2016-06-01

    Acute disseminated encephalomyelitis is a primarily pediatric, immune-mediated disease characterized by demyelination and polyfocal neurologic symptoms that typically occur after a preceding viral infection or recent immunization. This article presents the pathophysiology, diagnostic criteria, and magnetic resonance imaging characteristics of acute disseminated encephalomyelitis. We also present evaluation and management strategies.

  1. Acute kidney injury during pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Van Hook, James W

    2014-12-01

    Acute kidney injury complicates the care of a relatively small number of pregnant and postpartum women. Several pregnancy-related disorders such as preeclampsia and thrombotic microangiopathies may produce acute kidney injury. Prerenal azotemia is another common cause of acute kidney injury in pregnancy. This manuscript will review pregnancy-associated acute kidney injury from a renal functional perspective. Pathophysiology of acute kidney injury will be reviewed. Specific conditions causing acute kidney injury and treatments will be compared.

  2. Acute Respiratory Infections in Children

    PubMed Central

    Laxdal, Oliver E.; Robertson, H. E.; Braaten, Virgil; Walker, W. Alan

    1963-01-01

    During a seven-month period from November 1960 to May 1961, 181 infants and children, hospitalized because of acute respiratory infections, were studied intensively to determine the responsible etiologic agents. Forty-two per cent of the illnesses in this group appeared to be caused by bacterial agents, either primary or secondary to virus. Parainfluenza viruses were identified as causes of laryngotracheobronchitis in nearly 50% of the cases. Adenoviruses were also found to be important pathogens, particularly as causes of pneumonia in infants. The over-all infection rate attributed to adenoviruses was 11.6%. An epidemic due to Influenza B virus affected approximately 40% of children in this city just following the hospital study. This study was conducted as the first step in a long-term project undertaken at the Regina General Hospital to determine the effectiveness of vaccines in the prevention and treatment of respiratory infections in children. PMID:20327546

  3. [Chronic pancreatitis, acute pancreatitis].

    PubMed

    Mabuchi, T; Katada, N; Nishimura, D; Hoshino, H; Shimizu, F; Suzuki, R; Sano, H; Kato, K

    1998-11-01

    MRCP has been recognized as a safe and noninvasive diagnostic method. In the present study we evaluated the usefulness of MRCP in diagnosis of chronic and acute pancreatitis. Two-dimensional fast asymmetric spin-echo (FASE) MRCP was performed in 40 patients with chronic pancreatitis and 13 with acute pancreatitis. In 29 patients (72.5%) with chronic pancreatitis and 9 (66.7%) with acute pancreatitis, main pancreatic duct (MPD) was visualized entirely. MRCP could demonstrate the characteristic findings of chronic pancreatitis such as dilatation and irregularity of MPD in most cases. In acute pancreatitis, MRCP indicated that MPD was normal in diameter, but irregular in configuration compared with that of the control group. MRCP may facilitate the diagnosis of chronic and acute pancreatitis.

  4. Acute disseminated encephalomyelitis.

    PubMed

    Alper, Gulay

    2012-11-01

    Acute disseminated encephalomyelitis is an immune-mediated inflammatory and demyelinating disorder of the central nervous system, commonly preceded by an infection. It principally involves the white matter tracts of the cerebral hemispheres, brainstem, optic nerves, and spinal cord. Acute disseminated encephalomyelitis mainly affects children. Clinically, patients present with multifocal neurologic abnormalities reflecting the widespread involvement in central nervous system. Cerebrospinal fluid may be normal or may show a mild pleocytosis with or without elevated protein levels. Magnetic resonance image (MRI) shows multiple demyelinating lesions. The diagnosis of acute disseminated encephalomyelitis requires both multifocal involvement and encephalopathy by consensus criteria. Acute disseminated encephalomyelitis typically has a monophasic course with a favorable prognosis. Multiphasic forms have been reported, resulting in diagnostic difficulties in distinguishing these cases from multiple sclerosis. In addition, many inflammatory disorders may have a similar presentation with frequent occurrence of encephalopathy and should be considered in the differential diagnosis of acute disseminated encephalomyelitis.

  5. Pressure Ulcer Prevention

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Executive Summary In April 2008, the Medical Advisory Secretariat began an evidence-based review of the literature concerning pressure ulcers. Please visit the Medical Advisory Secretariat Web site, http://www.health.gov.on.ca/english/providers/program/mas/tech/tech_mn.html to review these titles that are currently available within the Pressure Ulcers series. Pressure ulcer prevention: an evidence based analysis The cost-effectiveness of prevention strategies for pressure ulcers in long-term care homes in Ontario: projections of the Ontario Pressure Ulcer Model (field evaluation) Management of chronic pressure ulcers: an evidence-based analysis (anticipated pubicstion date - mid-2009) Purpose A pressure ulcer, also known as a pressure sore, decubitus ulcer, or bedsore, is defined as a localized injury to the skin/and or underlying tissue occurring most often over a bony prominence and caused by pressure, shear, or friction, alone or in combination. (1) Those at risk for developing pressure ulcers include the elderly and critically ill as well as persons with neurological impairments and those who suffer conditions associated with immobility. Pressure ulcers are graded or staged with a 4-point classification system denoting severity. Stage I represents the beginnings of a pressure ulcer and stage IV, the severest grade, consists of full thickness tissue loss with exposed bone, tendon, and or muscle. (1) In a 2004 survey of Canadian health care settings, Woodbury and Houghton (2) estimated that the prevalence of pressure ulcers at a stage 1 or greater in Ontario ranged between 13.1% and 53% with nonacute health care settings having the highest prevalence rate (Table 1). Executive Summary Table 1: Prevalence of Pressure Ulcers* Setting Canadian Prevalence,% (95% CI) Ontario Prevalence,Range % (n) Acute care 25 (23.8–26.3) 23.9–29.7 (3418) Nonacute care† 30 (29.3–31.4) 30.0–53.3 (1165) Community care 15 (13.4–16.8) 13.2 (91) Mixed health care‡ 22 (20.9

  6. Acute kidney injury: global health alert.

    PubMed

    Li, Philip Kam Tao; Burdmann, Emmanuel A; Mehta, Ravindra L

    2013-05-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is increasingly prevalent in developing and developed countries and is associated with severe morbidity and mortality. Most etiologies of AKI can be prevented by interventions at the individual, community, regional and in-hospital levels. Effective measures must include community-wide efforts to increase an awareness of the devastating effects of AKI and provide guidance on preventive strategies, as well as early recognition and management. Efforts should be focused on minimizing causes of AKI, increasing awareness of the importance of serial measurements of serum creatinine in high-risk patients, and documenting urine volume in acutely ill people to achieve early diagnosis; there is as yet no definitive role for alternative biomarkers. Protocols need to be developed to systematically manage prerenal conditions and specific infections. More accurate data about the true incidence and clinical impact of AKI will help to raise the importance of the disease in the community, and increase awareness of AKI by governments, the public, general and family physicians and other healthcare professionals to help prevent the disease. Prevention is the key to avoid the heavy burden of mortality and morbidity associated with AKI.

  7. Fullerenol nanoparticles prevents doxorubicin-induced acute hepatotoxicity in rats.

    PubMed

    Jacevic, Vesna; Djordjevic, Aleksandar; Srdjenovic, Branislava; Milic-Tores, Vukosava; Segrt, Zoran; Dragojevic-Simic, Viktorija; Kuca, Kamil

    2017-03-16

    Doxorubicin (DOX), commonly used antineoplastic agent, affects bone marrow, intestinal tract and heart, but it also has some hepatotoxic effects. Main mechanism of its toxicity is the production of free reactive oxygen species. Polyhidroxilated C60 fullerene derivatives, fullerenol nanoparticles (FNP), act as free radical scavengers in in vitro systems. The aim of the study was to investigate potential FNP protective role against DOX-induced hepatotoxicity in rats. Experiments were performed on adult male Wistar rats. Animals were divided into five groups: (1) 0.9% NaCl (control), (2) 100mg/kg ip FNP, (3) 10mg/kg DOX iv, (4) 50mg/kg ip FNP 30min before 10mg/kg iv DOX, (5) 100mg/kg ip FNP 30min before 10mg/kg iv DOX. A general health condition, body and liver weight, TBARS level and antioxidative enzyme activity, as well as pathohistological examination of the liver tissue were conducted on days 2 and 14 of the study. FNP, applied alone, did not alter any examinated parameters. However, when used as a pretreatment it significantly increased survival rate, body and liver weight, and decreased TBARS level, antioxidative enzyme activity and hepatic damage score in DOX-treated rats. FNP administered at a dose of 100mg/kg significantly attenuated effects of doxorubicin administered in a single high dose in rats, concerning general condition, body and liver weight, lipid peroxidation level and antioxidative enzyme activity as well as structural alterations of the hepatic tissue.

  8. Levosimendan for the Prevention of Acute Organ Dysfunction in Sepsis.

    PubMed

    Gordon, Anthony C; Perkins, Gavin D; Singer, Mervyn; McAuley, Daniel F; Orme, Robert M L; Santhakumaran, Shalini; Mason, Alexina J; Cross, Mary; Al-Beidh, Farah; Best-Lane, Janis; Brealey, David; Nutt, Christopher L; McNamee, James J; Reschreiter, Henrik; Breen, Andrew; Liu, Kathleen D; Ashby, Deborah

    2016-10-27

    Background Levosimendan is a calcium-sensitizing drug with inotropic and other properties that may improve outcomes in patients with sepsis. Methods We conducted a double-blind, randomized clinical trial to investigate whether levosimendan reduces the severity of organ dysfunction in adults with sepsis. Patients were randomly assigned to receive a blinded infusion of levosimendan (at a dose of 0.05 to 0.2 μg per kilogram of body weight per minute) for 24 hours or placebo in addition to standard care. The primary outcome was the mean daily Sequential Organ Failure Assessment (SOFA) score in the intensive care unit up to day 28 (scores for each of five systems range from 0 to 4, with higher scores indicating more severe dysfunction; maximum score, 20). Secondary outcomes included 28-day mortality, time to weaning from mechanical ventilation, and adverse events. Results The trial recruited 516 patients; 259 were assigned to receive levosimendan and 257 to receive placebo. There was no significant difference in the mean (±SD) SOFA score between the levosimendan group and the placebo group (6.68±3.96 vs. 6.06±3.89; mean difference, 0.61; 95% confidence interval [CI], -0.07 to 1.29; P=0.053). Mortality at 28 days was 34.5% in the levosimendan group and 30.9% in the placebo group (absolute difference, 3.6 percentage points; 95% CI, -4.5 to 11.7; P=0.43). Among patients requiring ventilation at baseline, those in the levosimendan group were less likely than those in the placebo group to be successfully weaned from mechanical ventilation over the period of 28 days (hazard ratio, 0.77; 95% CI, 0.60 to 0.97; P=0.03). More patients in the levosimendan group than in the placebo group had supraventricular tachyarrhythmia (3.1% vs. 0.4%; absolute difference, 2.7 percentage points; 95% CI, 0.1 to 5.3; P=0.04). Conclusions The addition of levosimendan to standard treatment in adults with sepsis was not associated with less severe organ dysfunction or lower mortality. Levosimendan was associated with a lower likelihood of successful weaning from mechanical ventilation and a higher risk of supraventricular tachyarrhythmia. (Funded by the NIHR Efficacy and Mechanism Evaluation Programme and others; LeoPARDS Current Controlled Trials number, ISRCTN12776039 .).

  9. Polio and Prevention

    MedlinePlus

    ... Essays Photo Collections Videos Polio Today → Polio + Prevention Polio + Prevention Polio and prevention Polio is a crippling ... for poliovirus within 48 hours of onset. Bulbar polio More extensive paralysis, involving the trunk and muscles ...

  10. Preventing Deep Vein Thrombosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Education & Events Advocacy For Patients About ACOG Preventing Deep Vein Thrombosis Home For Patients Search FAQs Preventing ... Vein Thrombosis FAQ174, August 2011 PDF Format Preventing Deep Vein Thrombosis Women's Health What is deep vein ...

  11. National Suicide Prevention Lifeline

    MedlinePlus

    ... Best Practices Our Network Media Resources National Suicide Prevention Lifeline We can all help prevent suicide. The ... The Lifeline Everyone Plays A Role In Suicide Prevention Here are some helpful links: GET HELP NOW ...

  12. What Is Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia (ALL)?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Adults About Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia (ALL) What Is Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia? Cancer starts when cells in the body begin ... Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia Research and Treatment? More In Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia About Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia Causes, Risk Factors, and ...

  13. Targeted Therapy for Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... Adults Treating Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia Targeted Therapy for Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia In recent years, new drugs that target specific ... Typical Treatment of Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia More In Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia About Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia Causes, Risk Factors, and ...

  14. Treatment of Acute Promyelocytic (M3) Leukemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... Acute Myeloid Leukemia Treatment of Acute Promyelocytic (M3) Leukemia Early diagnosis and treatment of acute promyelocytic leukemia ( ... Comes Back After Treatment? More In Acute Myeloid Leukemia About Acute Myeloid Leukemia Causes, Risk Factors, and ...

  15. [Boxing: traumatology and prevention].

    PubMed

    Cabanis, Emmanuel-Alain; Iba-Zizen, Marie-Thérèse; Perez, Georges; Senegas, Xavier; Furgoni, Julien; Pineau, Jean-Claude; Louquet, Jean-Louis; Henrion, Roger

    2010-10-01

    In 1986, a surgeon who, as an amateur boxer himself was concerned with boxers' health, approached a pioneering Parisian neuroimaging unit. Thus began a study in close cooperation with the French Boxing Federation, spanning 25 years. In a first series of 52 volunteer boxers (13 amateurs and 39 professionals), during which MRI gradually replaced computed tomography, ten risk factors were identified, which notably included boxing style: only one of 40 "stylists" with a good boxing technique had cortical atrophy (4.5 %), compared to 15 % of "sloggers". Changes to the French Boxing Federation rules placed the accent on medical prevention. The second series, of 247 boxers (81 amateurs and 266 professionals), showed a clear improvement, as lesions were suspected in 14 individuals, of which only 4 (1.35 %) were probably due to boxing. The third and fourth series were part of a protocol called "Brain-Boxing-Ageing", which included 76 boxers (11 having suffered KOs) and 120 MRI scans, with reproducible CT and MRI acquisitions (9 sequences with 1.5 T then 3 T, and CT). MRI anomalies secondary to boxing were found in 11 % of amateurs and 38 % of professionals (atrophy, high vascular T2 signal areas, 2 cases of post-KO subdural bleeding). CT revealed sinus damage in 13 % of the amateurs and 19 % of the professionals. The risk of acute and chronic facial and brain damage was underline, along with detailed precautionary measures (organization of bouts, role of the referee and ringside doctor, and application of French Boxing Federation rules).

  16. Acute renal failure.

    PubMed

    Bellomo, Rinaldo

    2011-10-01

    Acute renal failure (now acute kidney injury) is a common complication of critical illness affecting between 30 and 60% of critically ill patients. The development of a consensus definition (RIFLE--risk, injury, failure, loss, end-stage system) has allowed standardization of reporting and epidemiological work. Multicenter multinational epidemiological studies indicate that sepsis is now the most common cause of acute renal failure in the intensive care unit (ICU) followed by cardiac surgery-associated acute kidney injury. Unfortunately, our understanding of the pathogenesis of acute renal failure in these settings remains limited. Because of such limited understanding, no reproducibly effective therapies have been developed. In addition the diagnosis of acute renal failure still rests upon the detection of changes in serum creatinine, which only occur if more than 50% of glomerular filtration is lost and are often delayed by more than 24 hours. Such diagnostic delays make the implementation of early therapy nearly impossible. In response to these difficulties, there has been a concerted effort to use proteomics to identify novel early biomarkers of acute renal failure. The identification and study of neutrophil gelatinase- associated lipocalin has been an important step in this field. Another area of active interest and investigation relates to the role of intravenous fluid resuscitation and fluid balance. Data from large observational studies and randomized, controlled trials consistently indicate that a positive fluid balance in patients with acute renal failure represents a major independent risk factor for mortality and provides no protection of renal function. The pendulum is clearly swinging away from a fluid-liberal approach to a fluid-conservative approach in these patients. Finally, there is a growing appreciation that acute renal failure may identify patients who are at increased risk of subsequent chronic renal dysfunction and mortality, opening the way

  17. Acute isoniazid intoxication: an uncommon cause of convulsion, coma and acidosis.

    PubMed

    Uzman, Sinan; Uludağ Yanaral, Tümay; Toptaş, Mehmet; Koç, Alparslan; Taş, Aytül; Bican, Gülşen

    2013-01-01

    Despite the widespread use, suicidal ingestion of isoniazid is a rare condition in Turkey. We reported a case of acute isoniazid intoxication associated with alcohol intake presenting with convulsion, coma and metabolic acidosis. The patient was treated successfully with intravenous pyridoxine administration. Early recognation and appropriate treatment in the intensive care unit is very important to prevent mortality in patients with acute isoniazid toxicity.

  18. Free fat interpositional graft in acute physeal injuries: the anticipatory Langenskiöld procedure.

    PubMed

    Foster, B K; John, B; Hasler, C

    2000-01-01

    Free fat graft interposition has been used extensively in management of physeal injuries with established growth disturbances. The use of this technique as part of the management of acute physeal injuries has not been reported. Here we report on its application in acute physeal injuries, where it has prevented the formation of an anticipated physeal arrest.

  19. Traumatic forequarter amputation associated acute lung injury (ALI): report of one case.

    PubMed

    Liang, K; Gan, X; Deng, Z

    2012-07-01

    One case of traumatic forequarter amputation associated acute lung injury (ALI) was presented. A discussion reviewing the treatment guidelines for this devastating injury, and pointing out the importance of supporting the lung and preventing the development of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) was included.

  20. Drug-induced cutaneous photosensitivity: incidence, mechanism, prevention and management.

    PubMed

    Moore, Douglas E

    2002-01-01

    The interaction of sunlight with drug medication leads to photosensitivity responses in susceptible patients, and has the potential to increase the incidence of skin cancer. Adverse photosensitivity responses to drugs occur predominantly as a phototoxic reaction which is more immediate than photoallergy, and can be reversed by withdrawal or substitution of the drug. The bias and inaccuracy of the reporting procedure for these adverse reactions is a consequence of the difficulty in distinguishing between sunburn and a mild drug photosensitivity reaction, together with the patient being able to control the incidence by taking protective action. The drug classes that currently are eliciting a high level of adverse photosensitivity are the diuretic, antibacterial and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). Photosensitising chemicals usually have a low molecular weight (200 to 500 Daltons) and are planar, tricyclic, or polycyclic configurations, often with heteroatoms in their structures enabling resonance stabilisation. All absorb ultraviolet (UV) and/or visible radiation, a characteristic that is essential for the chemical to be regarded as a photosensitiser. The photochemical and photobiological mechanisms underlying the adverse reactions caused by the more photoactive drugs are mainly free radical in nature, but reactive oxygen species are also involved. Drugs that contain chlorine substituents in their chemical structure, such as hydrochlorthiazide, furosemide and chlorpromazine, exhibit photochemical activity that is traced to the UV-induced dissociation of the chlorine substituent leading to free radical reactions with lipids, proteins and DNA. The photochemical mechanisms for the NSAIDs that contain the 2-aryl propionic acid group involve decarboxylation as the primary step, with subsequent free radical activity. In aerated systems, the reactive excited singlet form of oxygen is produced with high efficiency. This form of oxygen is highly reactive towards

  1. Acute pulmonary oedema.

    PubMed

    Powell, Jessica; Graham, David; O'Reilly, Sarah; Punton, Gillian

    2016-02-03

    Acute pulmonary oedema is a distressing and life-threatening illness that is associated with a sudden onset of symptoms. For the best possible patient outcomes, it is essential that nurses in all clinical areas are equipped to accurately recognise, assess and manage patients with acute pulmonary oedema. This article outlines the pathophysiology of acute cardiogenic and non-cardiogenic pulmonary oedema, and suggests a systematic approach to the recognition and management of its most serious manifestations. Long-term care and symptom recognition are discussed and suggestions for ongoing patient self-management are provided.

  2. Acute porphyric disorders.

    PubMed

    Moore, A W; Coke, J M

    2000-09-01

    Acute porphyrias are classified into 3 distinct groups of rare genetic disorders of metabolic enzyme biosynthesis. Acute porphyrias can significantly impact multiple organ systems, which often provides a challenge to the dentist presented with such a patient. A case of hereditary coproporphyria is reported in a patient with many of the classical signs and symptoms. The patient also had complex dental needs that required special medical and pharmacotherapeutic modifications. The acute porphyrias are reviewed by the authors with presentation of this challenging case. Recommendations for other dental health care professionals encountering these patients are then presented.

  3. Noninvasive ventilation in acute respiratory failure

    PubMed Central

    Mas, Arantxa; Masip, Josep

    2014-01-01

    After the institution of positive-pressure ventilation, the use of noninvasive ventilation (NIV) through an interface substantially increased. The first technique was continuous positive airway pressure; but, after the introduction of pressure support ventilation at the end of the 20th century, this became the main modality. Both techniques, and some others that have been recently introduced and which integrate some technological innovations, have extensively demonstrated a faster improvement of acute respiratory failure in different patient populations, avoiding endotracheal intubation and facilitating the release of conventional invasive mechanical ventilation. In acute settings, NIV is currently the first-line treatment for moderate-to-severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease exacerbation as well as for acute cardiogenic pulmonary edema and should be considered in immunocompromised patients with acute respiratory insufficiency, in difficult weaning, and in the prevention of postextubation failure. Alternatively, it can also be used in the postoperative period and in cases of pneumonia and asthma or as a palliative treatment. NIV is currently used in a wide range of acute settings, such as critical care and emergency departments, hospital wards, palliative or pediatric units, and in pre-hospital care. It is also used as a home care therapy in patients with chronic pulmonary or sleep disorders. The appropriate selection of patients and the adaptation to the technique are the keys to success. This review essentially analyzes the evidence of benefits of NIV in different populations with acute respiratory failure and describes the main modalities, new devices, and some practical aspects of the use of this technique. PMID:25143721

  4. Impact of Global Fxr Deficiency on Experimental Acute Pancreatitis and Genetic Variation in the FXR Locus in Human Acute Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Nijmeijer, Rian M.; Schaap, Frank G.; Smits, Alexander J. J.; Kremer, Andreas E.; Akkermans, Louis M. A.; Kroese, Alfons B. A.; Rijkers, Ger. T.; Schipper, Marguerite E. I.; Verheem, André; Wijmenga, Cisca; Gooszen, Hein G.; van Erpecum, Karel J.

    2014-01-01

    Background Infectious complications often occur in acute pancreatitis, related to impaired intestinal barrier function, with prolonged disease course and even mortality as a result. The bile salt nuclear receptor farnesoid X receptor (FXR), which is expressed in the ileum, liver and other organs including the pancreas, exhibits anti-inflammatory effects by inhibiting NF-κB activation and is implicated in maintaining intestinal barrier integrity and preventing bacterial overgrowth and translocation. Here we explore, with the aid of complementary animal and human experiments, the potential role of FXR in acute pancreatitis. Methods Experimental acute pancreatitis was induced using the CCK-analogue cerulein in wild-type and Fxr-/- mice. Severity of acute pancreatitis was assessed using histology and a semi-quantitative scoring system. Ileal permeability was analyzed in vitro by Ussing chambers and an in vivo permeability assay. Gene expression of Fxr and Fxr target genes was studied by quantitative RT-PCR. Serum FGF19 levels were determined by ELISA in acute pancreatitis patients and healthy volunteers. A genetic association study in 387 acute pancreatitis patients and 853 controls was performed using 9 tagging single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) covering the complete FXR gene and two additional functional SNPs. Results In wild-type mice with acute pancreatitis, ileal transepithelial resistance was reduced and ileal mRNA expression of Fxr target genes Fgf15, SHP, and IBABP was decreased. Nevertheless, Fxr-/- mice did not exhibit a more severe acute pancreatitis than wild-type mice. In patients with acute pancreatitis, FGF19 levels were lower than in controls. However, there were no associations of FXR SNPs or haplotypes with susceptibility to acute pancreatitis, or its course, outcome or etiology. Conclusion We found no evidence for a major role of FXR in acute human or murine pancreatitis. The observed altered Fxr activity during the course of disease may be a

  5. Weight Loss & Acute Porphyria

    MedlinePlus

    ... 2017 Apr 05, 2017 National Porphyria Awareness Week! Mar 23, 2017 National Porphyria Awareness Week is ONE ... 2017 National Porphyria Awareness Week (NPAW) 2017 date: Mar 1, 2017 FDA Meeting for Acute Porphyrias is ...

  6. [Acute radiation injury].

    PubMed

    Saito, Tsutomu

    2012-03-01

    Cell death due to DNA damage by ionizing radiation causes acute radiation injury of tissues and organs. Frequency and severity of the injuries increase according to dose increase, when the dose becomes more than threshold dose. The threshold dose of acute human radiation death is 1 Gy and LD50 of human is 4 Gy. Human dies due to the cerebrovascular syndrome, the gastrointestinal syndrome or the hematopoetic syndrome, when he received more than 20 Gy, 10-20 Gy or 3-8 Gy to his total body, respectively. Any tissue or organ, including embryo and fetus, does not show the acute injury, when it received less than 100 mSv. Acute injuries are usually reversible, and late injuries are sometimes irreversible.

  7. Acute Coronary Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... angina? This content was last reviewed July 2015. Heart Attack • Home • About Heart Attacks Acute Coronary Syndrome (ACS) ... Recovery FAQs • Heart Attack Tools & Resources • Support Network Heart Attack Tools & Resources What Is a Heart Attack? How ...

  8. Acute genital ulcers

    PubMed Central

    Delgado-García, Silvia; Palacios-Marqués, Ana; Martínez-Escoriza, Juan Carlos; Martín-Bayón, Tina-Aurora

    2014-01-01

    Acute genital ulcers, also known as acute vulvar ulcers, ulcus vulvae acutum or Lipschütz ulcers, refer to an ulceration of the vulva or lower vagina of non-venereal origin that usually presents in young women, predominantly virgins. Although its incidence is unknown, it seems a rare entity, with few cases reported in the literature. Their aetiology and pathogenesis are still unknown. The disease is characterised by an acute onset of flu-like symptoms with single or multiple painful ulcers on the vulva. Diagnosis is mainly clinical, after exclusion of other causes of vulvar ulcers. The treatment is mainly symptomatic, with spontaneous resolution in 2 weeks and without recurrences in most cases. We present a case report of a 13-year-old girl with two episodes of acute ulcers that fit the clinical criteria for Lipschütz ulcers. PMID:24473429

  9. Preventive Ethics Through Expanding Education.

    PubMed

    Ho, Anita; MacDonald, Lisa Mei-Hwa; Unger, David

    2016-03-01

    Healthcare institutions have been making increasing efforts to standardize consultation methodology and to accredit both bioethics training programs and the consultants accordingly. The focus has traditionally been on the ethics consultation as the relevant unit of ethics intervention. Outcome measures are studied in relation to consultations, and the hidden assumption is that consultations are the preferred or best way to address day-to-day ethical dilemmas. Reflecting on the data from an internal quality improvement survey and the literature, we argue that having general ethics education as a key function of ethics services may be more important in meeting the contemporaneous needs of acute care settings. An expanded and varied ethics education, with attention to the time constraints of healthcare workers' schedules, was a key recommendation brought forward by survey respondents. Promoting ethical reflection and creating a culture of ethics may serve to prevent ethical dilemmas or mitigate their effects.

  10. Treatment of acute and remote symptomatic seizures.

    PubMed

    Koppel, Barbara S

    2009-07-01

    In principle, the use of anticonvulsant drugs does not differ between acute and remote symptomatic seizures, but control of acute symptomatic seizures requires simultaneous treatment of the underlying etiology. Prevention of remote seizures when the risk is known to be high has been the subject of intense efforts at antiepileptogenesis, but the optimal duration of treatment after an injury is not yet known. Appropriate evaluation of a seizure depends on individual circumstances, but findings on examination, laboratory tests (serum electrolytes, magnesium, glucose, assessment of hepatic and renal function), and brain imaging (CT scan or MRI) are necessary to determine the most likely cause. Lumbar puncture is always required when there is suspicion of meningitis or encephalitis. Preferred medications for treatment of acute symptomatic seizures or status epilepticus are those available for intravenous use, such as benzodiazepines, fosphenytoin or phenytoin, valproate, levetiracetam, and phenobarbital. Diazepam is also available as a gel for rectal administration. Seizures that occur in patients with epilepsy because of missed antiepileptic drugs or inadequate serum levels should be treated with additional doses of their regular medications; loading doses can be administered with minimal toxicity in tolerant patients. Surgery is rarely necessary in the acute setting except for intracerebral lesions with rapidly rising intracranial pressure and impending herniation. After seizures are controlled, the provoking condition must also be determined and treated.

  11. Acute kidney injury in the pregnant patient.

    PubMed

    Nwoko, Rosemary; Plecas, Darko; Garovic, Vesna D

    2012-12-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is costly and is associated with increased mortality and morbidity. An understanding of the renal physiologic changes that occur during pregnancy is essential for proper evaluation, diagnosis, and management of AKI. As in the general population, AKI can occur from prerenal, intrinsic, and post-renal causes. Major causes of pre-renal azotemia include hyperemesis gravidarum and uterine hemorrhage in the setting of placental abruption. Intrinsic etiologies include infections from acute pyelonephritis and septic abortion, bilateral cortical necrosis, and acute tubular necrosis. Particular attention should be paid to specific conditions that lead to AKI during the second and third trimesters, such as preeclampsia, HELLP syndrome, acute fatty liver of pregnancy, and TTP-HUS. For each of these disorders, delivery of the fetus is the recommended therapeutic option, with additional therapies indicated for each specific disease entity. An understanding of the various etiologies of AKI in the pregnant patient is key to the appropriate clinical management, prevention of adverse maternal outcomes, and safe delivery of the fetus. In pregnant women with pre-existing kidney disease, the degree of renal dysfunction is the major determining factor of pregnancy outcomes, which may further be complicated by a prior history of hypertension.

  12. [Prevention of virus hepatitis A to E].

    PubMed

    Cornberg, M; Manns, M P

    2011-03-01

    Infection with hepatitis viruses can lead to acute hepatitis with the risk of developing liver failure. Chronic viral hepatitis may evolve into liver cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. Thus, prevention of viral hepatitis and its sequels is essential. Vaccination against hepatitis A is successful in almost all individuals. Protective antibodies maintain for at least 20 years. Booster vaccinations are not necessary. Since the introduction of hepatitis A vaccines, the incidence of new HAV-infections has declined significantly. Hepatitis B vaccines are safe and highly effective. Special populations such as dialysis patients or immunocompromised patients require special vaccine schedules. New vaccines with improved adjuvants are currently being tested in clinical trials. So far there is no hepatitis C vaccine on the horizon. Prophylaxis of HCV-infections relies primarily on hygiene measures. Early therapy of acute hepatitis C can prevent chronic hepatitis C. HDV-infection can only be established if HBsAg is present. Thus, prevention of hepatitis B or elimination of HBsAg means prevention of hepatitis delta. Hepatitis E vaccines have been evaluated in phase III studies. The development of HEV vaccines becomes more relevant since chronic HEV infections have been reported in immunosuppressed individuals.

  13. Pathophysiology of acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Bhatia, Madhav; Wong, Fei Ling; Cao, Yang; Lau, Hon Yen; Huang, Jiali; Puneet, Padmam; Chevali, Lakshmi

    2005-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis is a common clinical condition. It is a disease of variable severity in which some patients experience mild, self-limited attacks while others manifest a severe, highly morbid, and frequently lethal attack. The exact mechanisms by which diverse etiological factors induce an attack are still unclear. It is generally believed that the earliest events in acute pancreatitis occur within acinar cells. Acinar cell injury early in acute pancreatitis leads to a local inflammatory reaction. If this inflammatory reaction is marked, it leads to a systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS). An excessive SIRS leads to distant organ damage and multiple organ dysfunction syndrome (MODS). MODS associated with acute pancreatitis is the primary cause of morbidity and mortality in this condition. Recent studies have established the role played by inflammatory mediators in the pathogenesis of acute pancreatitis and the resultant MODS. At the same time, recent research has demonstrated the importance of acinar cell death in the form of apoptosis and necrosis as a determinant of pancreatitis severity. In this review, we will discuss about our current understanding of the pathophysiology of acute pancreatitis.

  14. Paeoniflorin ameliorates acute necrotizing pancreatitis and pancreatitis‑induced acute renal injury.

    PubMed

    Wang, Peng; Wang, Weixing; Shi, Qiao; Zhao, Liang; Mei, Fangchao; Li, Chen; Zuo, Teng; He, Xiaobo

    2016-08-01

    Acute renal injury caused by acute necrotizing pancreatitis (ANP) is a common complication that is associated with a high rate of mortality. Paeoniflorin is the active ingredient of paeonia radix and exhibits a number of pharmacological effects, such as anti‑inflammatory, anticancer, analgesic and immunomodulatory effects. The present study detected the potential treatment effects of paeoniflorin on acute renal injury induced by ANP in a rat model. The optimal dose of paeoniflorin for preventing acute renal injury induced by ANP was determined. Then, the possible protective mechanism of paeoniflorin was investigated. The serum levels of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)‑α, interleukin (IL)‑1β and IL‑6 were measured with enzyme‑linked immunosorbent assay kits. Renal inflammation and apoptosis were measured by immunohistochemistry and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase‑mediated dUTP nick end labeling assay. The expression of nitric oxide in kidney tissues was also evaluated. The p38 mitogen‑activated protein kinases (MAPKs) were measured by western blotting. The results shown that paeoniflorin may ameliorate acute renal injury following ANP in rats by inhibiting inflammatory responses and renal cell apoptosis. These effects may be associated with the p38MAPK and nuclear factor‑κB signal pathway.

  15. Prevention of VTE in Nonsurgical Patients

    PubMed Central

    Kahn, Susan R.; Lim, Wendy; Dunn, Andrew S.; Cushman, Mary; Dentali, Francesco; Akl, Elie A.; Cook, Deborah J.; Balekian, Alex A.; Klein, Russell C.; Le, Hoang; Schulman, Sam

    2012-01-01

    Background: This guideline addressed VTE prevention in hospitalized medical patients, outpatients with cancer, the chronically immobilized, long-distance travelers, and those with asymptomatic thrombophilia. Methods: This guideline follows methods described in Methodology for the Development of Antithrombotic Therapy and Prevention of Thrombosis Guidelines: Antithrombotic Therapy and Prevention of Thrombosis, 9th ed: American College of Chest Physicians Evidence-Based Clinical Practice Guidelines in this supplement. Results: For acutely ill hospitalized medical patients at increased risk of thrombosis, we recommend anticoagulant thromboprophylaxis with low-molecular-weight heparin (LMWH), low-dose unfractionated heparin (LDUH) bid, LDUH tid, or fondaparinux (Grade 1B) and suggest against extending the duration of thromboprophylaxis beyond the period of patient immobilization or acute hospital stay (Grade 2B). For acutely ill hospitalized medical patients at low risk of thrombosis, we recommend against the use of pharmacologic prophylaxis or mechanical prophylaxis (Grade 1B). For acutely ill hospitalized medical patients at increased risk of thrombosis who are bleeding or are at high risk for major bleeding, we suggest mechanical thromboprophylaxis with graduated compression stockings (GCS) (Grade 2C) or intermittent pneumatic compression (IPC) (Grade 2C). For critically ill patients, we suggest using LMWH or LDUH thromboprophylaxis (Grade 2C). For critically ill patients who are bleeding or are at high risk for major bleeding, we suggest mechanical thromboprophylaxis with GCS and/or IPC at least until the bleeding risk decreases (Grade 2C). In outpatients with cancer who have no additional risk factors for VTE we suggest against routine prophylaxis with LMWH or LDUH (Grade 2B) and recommend against the prophylactic use of vitamin K antagonists (Grade 1B). Conclusions: Decisions regarding prophylaxis in nonsurgical patients should be made after consideration of risk

  16. [Management of an acute exacerbation of asthma and COPD].

    PubMed

    Leuppi, Jörg D; Ott, Sebastian R

    2014-05-01

    Asthma and chronic obstructive airways disease are chronic pulmonary diseases which have a high prevalence world-wide. Both conditions can deteriorate acutely and potentially put patients into life-threatening situations. Management of an acute exacerbation starts in the emergency consultation-setting and ends only once the longterm management has been thoroughly assessed and optimised in order to prevent future exacerbations. Exacerbation frequency is strongly associated with long-term morbidity and mortality in both diseases. Recent data have shown that short-course systemic steroids (5 days) for the treatment of an acute exacerbation of COPD are as successful as long-course treatments (14 days) in preventing exacerbations during the subsequent 6 months. Similarly the targeted use of antibiotics is discussed in this review.

  17. Acute antibody-mediated rejection in kidney transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    Davis, Scott; Cooper, James E

    2017-01-01

    Antibody-mediated rejection has now been recognized as one of the most important causes of graft loss. Transplantation across HLA barriers and nonadherence can result in acute antibody-mediated rejection, which is associated with particularly worse graft outcomes. New technologies, including genomic studies and assays to detect and define donor-specific antibodies, have provided important insights into the pathophysiology and diagnosis of acute antibody-mediated rejection but have engendered many questions about the clinical application of these tests in the prognosis and prevention of this protean disease process. In this article, we review the pathophysiology of acute antibody-mediated rejection, the evolving diagnostic criteria, and specific challenges related to its prognosis, treatment, and prevention.

  18. Recurrence of Acute Page Kidney in a Renal Transplant Allograft

    PubMed Central

    Zayas, Carlos; Mulloy, Laura; Jagadeesan, Muralidharan

    2016-01-01

    Acute Page Kidney (APK) phenomenon is a rare cause of secondary hypertension, mediated by activation of renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS). Timely intervention is of great importance to prevent any end organ damage from hypertension. We present a unique case of three episodes of APK in the same renal transplant allograft. PMID:27725836

  19. Recurrence of Acute Page Kidney in a Renal Transplant Allograft.

    PubMed

    Kapoor, Rajan; Zayas, Carlos; Mulloy, Laura; Jagadeesan, Muralidharan

    2016-01-01

    Acute Page Kidney (APK) phenomenon is a rare cause of secondary hypertension, mediated by activation of renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS). Timely intervention is of great importance to prevent any end organ damage from hypertension. We present a unique case of three episodes of APK in the same renal transplant allograft.

  20. Optimizing the Treatment of Acute Duct-Destructive Pancreatitis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhakiev, Bazylbek S.; Karsakbayev, Uteugali G.; Kelimberdiev, Mersaid S.; ?uhamedgalieva, Bodagoz M.; K?nonenko, Aleksander F.

    2016-01-01

    The search for new methods for treating duct-destructive pancreatitis is a relevant problem. Endogenous intoxication and oxidative stress that accompany acute pancreatitis often progress even after surgery, which forces one to search for additional possibilities of preventing these severe consequences. This research studied the effect of small…

  1. Acute pancreatitis: Manifestation of acute HIV infection in an adolescent

    PubMed Central

    Bitar, Anas; Altaf, Muhammad; Sferra, Thomas J.

    2012-01-01

    Summary Background: Pancreatitis in the pediatric age group is not as common as in adults. Etiologies are various and differ from those in adults. Although infectious etiology accounts for a significant number of cases of pancreatitis, acute infection with Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) was rarely reported as a possible etiology for acute pancreatitis in adults. Acute pancreatitis has never been reported as a presenting manifestation of acute HIV infection in children. Case Report: We describe a pediatric patient who presented with acute pancreatitis that revealed acute HIV infection. Conclusions: Acute pancreatitis as a primary manifestation of HIV infection is very rare. It may represent an uncommon aspect of primary HIV infection. We suggest that acute HIV infection should be considered in the differential diagnosis of acute pancreatitis at all ages. PMID:23569476

  2. Acute cerebellar ataxia, acute cerebellitis, and opsoclonus-myoclonus syndrome.

    PubMed

    Desai, Jay; Mitchell, Wendy G

    2012-11-01

    Acute cerebellar ataxia and acute cerebellitis represent a process characterized by parainfectious, postinfectious, or postvaccination cerebellar inflammation. There is considerable overlap between these entities. The mildest cases of acute cerebellar ataxia represent a benign condition that is characterized by acute truncal and gait ataxia, variably with appendicular ataxia, nystagmus, dysarthria, and hypotonia. It occurs mostly in young children, presents abruptly, and recovers over weeks. Neuroimaging is normal. Severe cases of cerebellitis represent the other end of the spectrum, presenting with acute cerebellar signs often overshadowed by alteration of consciousness, focal neurological deficits, raised intracranial pressure, hydrocephalus, and even herniation. Neuroimaging is abnormal and the prognosis is less favorable than in acute cerebellar ataxia. Acute disseminated encephalomyelitis may be confused with acute cerebellitis when the clinical findings are predominantly cerebellar, but lesions on neuroimaging are usually widespread. Paraneoplastic opsoclonus-myoclonus syndrome is often initially misdiagnosed as acute cerebellar ataxia, but has very specific features, course, and etiopathogensis.

  3. Discharging patients from acute care hospitals.

    PubMed

    Goodman, Helen

    2016-02-10

    Planning for patient discharge is an essential element of any admission to an acute setting, but may often be left until the patient is almost ready to leave hospital. This article emphasises why discharge planning is important and lists the essential principles that should be addressed to ensure that patients leave at an optimum time, feeling confident and safe to do so. Early assessment, early planning and co-ordination of all the teams involved in the patient's care are essential. Effective communication between the various teams and with the patient and their family or carer(s) is necessary. Patients should leave hospital with all the information, medications and equipment they require. Appropriate plans should have been developed and communicated to the receiving community or non-acute team. When patient discharge is effective, complications as a result of extended lengths of hospital stay are prevented, hospital beds are used efficiently and readmissions are reduced.

  4. Cardiorenal biomarkers in acute heart failure

    PubMed Central

    Choudhary, Rajiv; Gopal, Dipika; Kipper, Ben A.; De La Parra Landa, Alejandro; Lee, Hermineh Aramin Elizabeth; Shah, Saloni; Maisel, Alan S.

    2012-01-01

    Managing patients with heart failure (HF) is a challenging task within itself, but the presence of associated worsening renal function can greatly increase mortality and morbidity. Early diagnosis and treatment is the key to prevent re-hospitalizations and reduce healthcare costs. Biomarkers have long been established as highly sensitive and specific tools in diagnosing and prognosticating patients with HF. Reflecting distinct pathophysiological events and ongoing cellular insult, biomarkers have been proven superior to conventional laboratory tests. Availability of better assays and rapid analysis has allowed the use of biomarkers as point-of-care tests in the emergency department and at the patient's bed-side. Acute HF patients often go on to develop worsening renal function, termed as acute cardiorenal syndrome. The growing breadth of studies has shown the implications of combining multiple biomarkers to better chart outcomes and produce desirable results in such patients. PMID:23097660

  5. Prostanoid receptors and acute inflammation in skin.

    PubMed

    Hohjoh, Hirofumi; Inazumi, Tomoaki; Tsuchiya, Soken; Sugimoto, Yukihiko

    2014-12-01

    Prostanoids such as prostaglandins (PGs) and thromboxanes exert a wide variety of actions via nine types of G protein-coupled receptors, including four PGE2 receptors (EPs) and two PGD2 receptors (DPs). Recent studies have revealed that prostanoids trigger or modulate acute inflammation in the skin via multiple mechanisms involving distinct receptors and molecules; PGE2 elicits vascular permeability and edema formation via EP3 receptor on mast cells, and PGE2 increases blood flow by eliciting vasodilatation via EP2/EP4 receptors on smooth muscle cells. PGD2-DP1 signaling plays a role in mast cell maturation and mast cell-mediated inflammation. Therefore, the local inhibition of specific prostanoid receptor signaling is expected to be an effective strategy for the prevention and treatment of acute inflammation.

  6. Genetics of the acute coronary syndrome

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Acute coronary artery syndrome in the leading cause of morbidity and mortality in Western countries, and its epidemiological burden is also constantly increasing worldwide, including Asia. Due to social and economic consequences, a number of experimental and epidemiological studies have analyzed its etiology so far, in order to develop effective preventive and treatment measures. Thanks to these studies, it is now clear that coronary artery disease (CAD) is a complex multifactorial disorder, resulting from close interaction between acquired and inherited risk factors. In particular, considerable advances were made in the last decade about our understanding of the genetic causes of CAD, mainly propelled by the progresses in whole genome scanning and the development of genome wide association studies. This narrative review is hence dedicated to explore the role of genetic factors in the risk of developing acute CAD. PMID:27294088

  7. Acute antibody-mediated rejection after intestinal transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Guo-Sheng; Cruz Jr, Ruy J; Cai, Jun-Chao

    2016-01-01

    AIM To investigate the incidence, risk factors and clinical outcomes of acute antibody-mediated rejection (ABMR) after intestinal transplantation (ITx). METHODS A retrospective single-center analysis was performed to identify cases of acute ABMR after ITx, based on the presence of donor-specific antibody (DSA), acute tissue damage, C4d deposition, and allograft dysfunction. RESULTS Acute ABMR was identified in 18 (10.3%) out of 175 intestinal allografts with an average occurrence of 10 d (range, 4-162) after ITx. All acute ABMR cases were presensitized to donor human leukocyte antigens class I and/or II antigens with a detectable DSA. A positive cross-match was seen in 14 (77.8%) cases and twelve of 18 patients (66.7%) produced newly-formed DSA following ITx. Histological characteristics of acute ABMR include endothelial C4d deposits, interstitial hemorrhage, and severe congestion with focal fibrin thrombin in the lamina propria capillaries. Multivariate analysis identified a liver-free graft and high level of panel reactive antibody as a significant independent risk factor. Despite initial improvement after therapy, eleven recipients (61.1%) lost transplant secondary to rejection. Of those, 9 (50%) underwent graft removal and 4 (22.2%) received second transplantation following acute ABMR. At an average follow-up of 32.3 mo (range, 13.3-76.4), 8 (44.4%) recipients died. CONCLUSION Our results indicate that acute ABMR is an important cause of intestine graft dysfunction, particularly in a liver-exclusive graft and survivors are at an increased risk of developing refractory acute rejection and chronic rejection. More effective strategies to prevent and manage acute ABMR are needed to improve outcomes. PMID:28058223

  8. Immune-modulating therapy in acute pancreatitis: fact or fiction.

    PubMed

    Akinosoglou, Karolina; Gogos, Charalambos

    2014-11-07

    Acute pancreatitis (AP) is one of the most common diseases of the gastrointestinal tract, bearing significant morbidity and mortality worldwide. Current treatment of AP remains unspecific and supportive and is mainly targeted to aggressively prevent systemic complications and organ failure by intensive care. As acute pancreatitis shares an indistinguishable profile of inflammation with sepsis, therapeutic approaches have turned towards modulating the systemic inflammatory response. Targets, among others, have included pro- and anti-inflammatory modulators, cytokines, chemokines, immune cells, adhesive molecules and platelets. Even though, initial results in experimental models have been encouraging, clinical implementation of immune-regulating therapies in acute pancreatitis has had a slow progress. Main reasons include difficulty in clinical translation of experimental data, poor understanding of inflammatory response time-course, flaws in experimental designs, need for multimodal approaches and commercial drawbacks. Whether immune-modulation in acute pancreatitis remains a fact or just fiction remains to be seen in the future.

  9. Treatment for acute asthma in the Emergency Department: practical aspects.

    PubMed

    Urso, D L

    2010-03-01

    This article describes the management of acute asthma exacerbation in the Emergency Department (ED). An asthma exacerbation can be defined as clinical worsening of disease or an asymptomatic decrease in peak flows. Acute exacerbations of asthma may represent reactions to airway irritants or failures of chronic treatment. Hospitalizations and ED visits account for a large proportion of the health-care cost burden of asthma. The assessment of an asthma exacerbation constitutes a process with two different dimensions: to determine the severity of attack, and to evaluate the response to treatment. The principal goals of managing an asthma acute exacerbation may be summarized as maintenance of adequate arterial oxygen saturation with supplemental oxygen, relief of airflow obstruction with repetitive administration of short acting beta-2 agonists (SABA), and treatment of airway inflammation with systemic corticosteroids (CS) to prevent future relapses. SABA, oxygen, and CS form the basis of management of acute asthma exacerbation but a role is emerging for anthicolinergics.

  10. Dilemma in the emergency setting: hypomagnesemia mimicking acute stroke

    PubMed Central

    Rico, María; Martinez-Rodriguez, Laura; Larrosa-Campo, Davinia; Calleja, Sergio

    2016-01-01

    Background Stroke mimics may account for up to 30% of all acute stroke consultations. However, in the emergency setting, accurate diagnosis is not always possible. Methods Case report and review of the literature. Results A 73-year-old woman was admitted to the emergency department with acute aphasia and right hemiparesis. The National Institute of Health Stroke Score was 21, compatible with severe stroke, so she received thrombolysis. Laboratory testing demonstrated severe hypomagnesemia. She had been taking proton pump inhibitors for years and neuroimaging did not demonstrate signs of acute ischemic disease. After correcting the metabolic alterations with intravenous and oral supplemental magnesium, the patient was discharged asymptomatic. No further episodes have been registered to date. Conclusion Hypomagnesemia might cause acute neurological symptoms that could be confused with stroke. A careful history is essential for diagnosis but suspicion of stroke mimic should not prevent tPA administration. PMID:27354832

  11. Representing and Retrieving Patients' Falls Risk Factors and Risk for Falls among Adults in Acute Care through the Electronic Health Record

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pfaff, Jann

    2013-01-01

    Defining fall risk factors and predicting fall risk status among patients in acute care has been a topic of research for decades. With increasing pressure on hospitals to provide quality care and prevent hospital-acquired conditions, the search for effective fall prevention interventions continues. Hundreds of risk factors for falls in acute care…

  12. Outcomes in patients with mixed phenotype acute leukemia in Morocco.

    PubMed

    Bachir, Fatima; Zerrouk, Jihane; Howard, Scott C; Graoui, Omar; Lahjouji, Ali; Hessissen, Leila; Bennani, Sanae; Quessar, Assmae; El Aouad, Rajae

    2014-08-01

    Mixed phenotype acute leukemia (MPAL) includes biphenotypic and bilineal types of leukemia, which constitute rare subtypes that require individualized therapy. Outcomes in Moroccan patients with MPAL are unknown. Among 1264 patients with acute leukemia, 20 were classified as having MPAL, including 17 with biphenotypic acute leukemia (1.3%) and 3 with bilineal leukemia (0.2%). There were 8 adults and 12 children. In 12 cases (60%), leukemic blasts expressed myeloid and T-lymphoid antigens, and, in 5 cases (25%), leukemic blasts expressed B lymphoid antigens plus myeloid antigens. Patients were initially treated on protocols for acute myeloid leukemia (n=4), acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL, n=14), or with palliative care (n=2). The probability of survival at 2 years in MPAL cases was 52%± 14%. Six of the 12 patients younger than 15 years remain alive versus 1 of 8 adult patients. Patients treated with ALL-directed therapy had significantly higher overall survival than those treated with acute myeloid leukemia-directed therapy (P=0.003). There was no association between the phenotypic characteristics and the clinical outcome (P=0.83). In conclusion, MPAL represents 1.5% of acute leukemia in Morocco. The prognosis is poor, but initial treatment with therapy directed toward ALL, improved supportive care, and the prevention of abandonment of therapy may improve outcomes in this subgroup of patients.

  13. Flavopiridol, Cytarabine, and Mitoxantrone in Treating Patients With Acute Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-10-07

    Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  14. [Risk and prophylaxis acute pancreatitis while enteral tube feeding in patients operated for destructive cholecystitis].

    PubMed

    Zhurikhina, A V; Kitiashvili, I Z; Kutukov, V V; Kondrashova, Iu V

    2011-01-01

    Determined by risk and method of prophylaxis of acute pancreatitis in the postoperative enteral tube feeding in patients with destructive cholecystitis, analyzed levels of a-amylase in blood serum and clinical manifestations of acute pancreatitis in 135 operated patients. It was established that the use of nasoduodenal access is more likely to cause the elevated level of serum amylase (p<0,05) and more incidence of sings of acute pancreatitis in contrast to nasoduodenal tube placement. For the prevention of acute pancreatitis with enteral tube feeding is preferred mode designed using nasoduodenal access.

  15. Acute Appendicitis Secondary to Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez, Eduardo A.; Lopez, Marvin A.; Valluri, Kartik; Wang, Danlu; Fischer, Andrew; Perdomo, Tatiana

    2015-01-01

    Patient: Female, 43 Final Diagnosis: Myeloid sarcoma appendicitis Symptoms: Abdominal pain • chills • fever Medication: — Clinical Procedure: Laparoscopic appendectomy, bone marrow biopsy Specialty: Gastroenterology and Hepatology Objective: Rare disease Background: The gastrointestinal tract is a rare site for extramedullary involvement in acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL). Case Report: A 43-year-old female with no past medical history presented complaining of mild abdominal pain, fever, and chills for the past day. On examination, she was tachycardic and febrile, with mild tenderness of her right lower quadrant and without signs of peritoneal irritation. Laboratory examination revealed pancytopenia and DIC, with a fibrinogen level of 290 mg/dL. CT of the abdomen showed a thickened and hyperemic appendix without perforation or abscess, compatible with acute appendicitis. The patient was given IV broad-spectrum antibiotics and was transfused with packed red blood cells and platelets. She underwent uncomplicated laparoscopic appendectomy and bone marrow biopsy, which revealed neo-plastic cells of 90% of the total bone marrow cellularity. Flow cytometry indicated presence of 92.4% of immature myeloid cells with t (15: 17) and q (22: 12) mutations, and FISH analysis for PML-RARA demonstrated a long-form fusion transcript, positive for APL. Appendix pathology described leukemic infiltration with co-expression of myeloperoxidase and CD68, consistent with myeloid sarcoma of the appendix. The patient completed a course of daunorubicin, cytarabine, and all trans-retinoic acid. Repeat bone marrow biopsy demonstrated complete remission. She will follow up with her primary care physician and hematologist/oncologist. Conclusions: Myeloid sarcoma of the appendix in the setting of APL is very rare and it might play a role in the development of acute appendicitis. Urgent management, including bone marrow biopsy for definitive diagnosis and urgent surgical intervention

  16. Acute and chronic effects of rat colon after photodynamic therapy and radiotherapy: a comparative study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sassy, T.; Breiter, N.; Sroka, Ronald; Ernst, Helmut

    1994-03-01

    After clinical photodynamic therapy (PDT) and radiotherapy (RT) of the colon carcinoma acute and late damages on adjacent normal tissue were seen. Therefore it was the aim of this experimental study to investigate these damages on normal colon tissue of rats after PDT in comparison with RT. Within the first hours after PDT the endoscopic examination showed a severe acute damage. The histopathological examination showed that the acute ulceration depends on the energy density applied within the first three days. This study indicates different progresses of acute effects after PDT and RT, respectively. Late damages were observed only by RT in contrast to PDT. Synthetic diet prevents acute damages after PDT. However, the synthetic diet after RT can prevent the late damage for the duration of the diet administration.

  17. Molecular Mechanism by Which Retinoids Prevent Breast Cancer Development

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-06-01

    clinicians to conquer this disease is to prevent the incidence, detect early and treat breast cancer with effective therapy resulting in long overall... biological functions such as embryogenesis, growth, differentiation, vision and reproduction (3-6). Retinoids also contain anti- proliferative...and are currently available to treat psoriasis , acne, photoaging, actinic keratosis or cancers such as acute promelocytic leukemia, cutaneous T-cell

  18. About Supportive and Palliative Care Research | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The program supports research in three areas: prevention or treatment of acute or chronic symptoms and morbidities related to cancer, its treatment and caregiving (symptom management research); effects on quality of life from cancer, its treatment and caregiving (quality of life research); and end-of-life psychosocial issues, caregiving and treatment strategies (end-of-life research). |

  19. Endoscopic management of acute peptic ulcer bleeding.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yidan; Chen, Yen-I; Barkun, Alan

    2014-12-01

    This review discusses the indications, technical aspects, and comparative effectiveness of the endoscopic treatment of upper gastrointestinal bleeding caused by peptic ulcer. Pre-endoscopic considerations, such as the use of prokinetics and timing of endoscopy, are reviewed. In addition, this article examines aspects of postendoscopic care such as the effectiveness, dosing, and duration of postendoscopic proton-pump inhibitors, Helicobacter pylori testing, and benefits of treatment in terms of preventing rebleeding; and the use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, antiplatelet agents, and oral anticoagulants, including direct thrombin and Xa inhibitors, following acute peptic ulcer bleeding.

  20. Acute kidney injury in the elderly.

    PubMed

    Rosner, Mitchell H

    2013-08-01

    Most patients who develop acute kidney injury (AKI) are older than 65 years. Specific structural and functional changes that occur in the aging kidney predispose the elderly patient to AKI. This risk is further compounded by comorbid conditions, polypharmacy, and the need for invasive procedures. When AKI does occur, it is associated with significant morbidity and mortality. Although morbidity and mortality increases with advancing age, many elderly patients can survive AKI and do well. Thus, decision making should be thoughtful and individualized, and not dependent on age. Whenever possible, preventive approaches should be pursued to lessen the burden of AKI.

  1. An Evaluation of UV-Monitoring Enhanced Skin Cancer Prevention among Farm Youth in Rural Virginia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Yi-Chun; Ohanehi, Donatus C.; Redican, Kerry J.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Health districts in southwest Virginia have one of the highest ultraviolet (UV) radiation exposure and sunburn rate. Due to higher levels of UV exposure, rural farm youth are at higher risk for skin cancer than non-farm youth. Few studies have been published that explore best practices for decreasing UV exposure among this population.…

  2. Acute viral myocarditis

    PubMed Central

    Dennert, Robert; Crijns, Harry J.; Heymans, Stephane

    2008-01-01

    Acute myocarditis is one of the most challenging diagnosis in cardiology. At present, no diagnostic gold standard is generally accepted, due to the insensitivity of traditional diagnostic tests. This leads to the need for new diagnostic approaches, which resulted in the emergence of new molecular tests and a more detailed immunohistochemical analysis of endomyocardial biopsies. Recent findings using these new diagnostic tests resulted in increased interest in inflammatory cardiomyopathies and a better understanding of its pathophysiology, the recognition in overlap of virus-mediated damage, inflammation, and autoimmune dysregulation. Novel results also pointed towards a broader spectrum of viral genomes responsible for acute myocarditis, indicating a shift of enterovirus and adenovirus to parvovirus B19 and human herpes virus 6. The present review proposes a general diagnostic approach, focuses on the viral aetiology and associated autoimmune processes, and reviews treatment options for patients with acute viral myocarditis. PMID:18617482

  3. Acute Decompensated Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Joseph, Susan M.; Cedars, Ari M.; Ewald, Gregory A.; Geltman, Edward M.; Mann, Douglas L.

    2009-01-01

    Hospitalizations for acute decompensated heart failure are increasing in the United States. Moreover, the prevalence of heart failure is increasing consequent to an increased number of older individuals, as well as to improvement in therapies for coronary artery disease and sudden cardiac death that have enabled patients to live longer with cardiovascular disease. The main treatment goals in the hospitalized patient with heart failure are to restore euvolemia and to minimize adverse events. Common in-hospital treatments include intravenous diuretics, vasodilators, and inotropic agents. Novel pharmaceutical agents have shown promise in the treatment of acute decompensated heart failure and may simplify the treatment and reduce the morbidity associated with the disease. This review summarizes the contemporary management of patients with acute decompensated heart failure. PMID:20069075

  4. Acute Treatment of Migraine

    PubMed Central

    ÖZTÜRK, Vesile

    2013-01-01

    Migraine is one of the most frequent disabling neurological conditions with a major impact on the patient’s quality of life. Migraine has been described as a chronic disorder that characterized with attacks. Attacks are characterized by moderate–severe, often unilateral, pulsating headache attacks, typically lasting 4 to 72 hours. Migraine remains underdiagnosed and undertreated despite advances in the understanding of its pathophysiology. This article reviews management of migraine acute pharmacological treatment. Currently, for the acute treatment of migraine attacks, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and triptans (serotonin 5HT1B/1D receptor agonists) are recommended. Before intake of NSAID and triptans, metoclopramide or domperidone is useful. In very severe attacks, subcutaneous sumatriptan is first choice. The patient should be treated early in the attack, use an adequate dose and formulation of a medication. Ideally, acute therapy should be restricted to no more than 2 to 3 days per week to avoid medication overuse.

  5. Acute abdominal pain.

    PubMed

    Stone, R

    1998-01-01

    Abdominal pain is among the most frequent ailments reported in the office setting and can account for up to 40% of ailments in the ambulatory practice. Also, it is in the top three symptoms of patients presenting to emergency departments (ED) and accounts for 5-10% of all ED primary presenting ailments. There are several common sources for acute abdominal pain and many for subacute and chronic abdominal pain. This article explores the history-taking, initial evaluation, and examination of the patient presenting with acute abdominal pain. The goal of this article is to help differentiate one source of pain from another. Discussion of acute cholecystitis, pancreatitis, appendicitis, ectopic pregnancy, diverticulitis, gastritis, and gastroenteritis are undertaken. Additionally, there is discussion of common laboratory studies, diagnostic studies, and treatment of the patient with the above entities.

  6. Low back pain (acute)

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Low back pain affects about 70% of people in resource-rich countries at some point in their lives. Acute low back pain can be self-limiting; however, 1 year after an initial episode, as many as 33% of people still have moderate-intensity pain and 15% have severe pain. Acute low back pain has a high recurrence rate; 75% of those with a first episode have a recurrence. Although acute episodes may resolve completely, they may increase in severity and duration over time. Methods and outcomes We conducted a systematic review and aimed to answer the following clinical questions: What are the effects of oral drug treatments for acute low back pain? What are the effects of local injections for acute low back pain? What are the effects of non-drug treatments for acute low back pain? We searched: Medline, Embase, The Cochrane Library, and other important databases up to December 2009 (Clinical Evidence reviews are updated periodically, please check our website for the most up-to-date version of this review). We included harms alerts from relevant organisations such as the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the UK Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA). Results We found 49 systematic reviews, RCTs, or observational studies that met our inclusion criteria. We performed a GRADE evaluation of the quality of evidence for interventions. Conclusions In this systematic review we present information relating to the effectiveness and safety of the following interventions: acupuncture, advice to stay active, analgesics (paracetamol, opioids), back exercises, back schools, bed rest, behavioural therapy, electromyographic biofeedback, epidural corticosteroid injections, lumbar supports, massage, multidisciplinary treatment programmes, muscle relaxants, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), spinal manipulation, temperature treatments (short-wave diathermy, ultrasound, ice, heat), traction, and transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation

  7. Antioxidants and Cancer Prevention

    MedlinePlus

    ... 23 ). Selenium and Vitamin E Cancer Prevention Trial (SELECT) : This U.S. trial investigated whether daily supplementation with ... the Selenium and Vitamin E Cancer Prevention Trial (SELECT). JAMA 2009;301(1):39-51. [PubMed Abstract] ...

  8. Antimicrobial (Drug) Resistance Prevention

    MedlinePlus

    ... Visitor Information Contact Us Research > NIAID's Role in Research > Antimicrobial (Drug) Resistance > Understanding share with facebook share with twitter ... Prevention, Antimicrobial (Drug) Resistance Antimicrobial (Drug) Resistance Antimicrobial ... To prevent antimicrobial resistance, you and your healthcare ...

  9. HPV Cancer Prevention

    MedlinePlus

    HPV CANCER PREVENTION HPV VACCINE IS CANCER PREVENTION HPV vaccine protects against HPV types that most commonly cause ... professionals are the key to protecting adolescents from HPV cancers. VACCINATE YOUR 11-12 YEAR OLDS. www. cdc. ...

  10. High Blood Pressure Prevention

    MedlinePlus

    ... version of this page please turn Javascript on. High Blood Pressure Prevention Steps You Can Take You can take steps to prevent high blood pressure by adopting these healthy lifestyle habits. Follow a ...

  11. Risk Factors and Prevention

    MedlinePlus

    ... atherosclerosis (“clogged” arteries) and High Blood Pressure . Preventing Arrhythmias and Heart Disease Prevent heart disease by lowering ... cholesterol, diabetes, and thyroid disease. Risk Factors For Arrhythmias and Heart Disease The following conditions can increase ...

  12. Settings for Suicide Prevention

    MedlinePlus

    ... Primary Care Justice System Adult Justice System Juvenile Justice System ... About Suicide Effective Prevention Resources & Programs Training & Events News & Highlights Organizations The Suicide Prevention Resource Center (SPRC) is supported ...

  13. High Blood Cholesterol Prevention

    MedlinePlus

    ... this? Submit What's this? Submit Button Related CDC Web Sites Division for Heart Disease and Stroke Prevention ... this? Submit What's this? Submit Button Related CDC Web Sites Division for Heart Disease and Stroke Prevention ...

  14. Preventing High Blood Pressure

    MedlinePlus

    ... this? Submit What's this? Submit Button Related CDC Web Sites Division for Heart Disease and Stroke Prevention ... this? Submit What's this? Submit Button Related CDC Web Sites Division for Heart Disease and Stroke Prevention ...

  15. Preventing Eye Injuries

    MedlinePlus

    ... Stories Español Eye Health / Eye Health A-Z Eye Injuries Sections Preventing Eye Injuries Recognizing and Treating ... Infographic Five Steps to Safer Champagne Celebrations Preventing Eye Injuries Reviewed by: Brenda Pagan-Duran MD Mar. ...

  16. Preventing Diabetes Problems

    MedlinePlus

    ... Other Dental Problems Diabetes & Sexual & Urologic Problems Preventing Diabetes Problems View or Print All Sections Heart Disease & ... prevent or delay sexual and urologic problems. Depression & Diabetes Depression is common among people with a chronic, ...

  17. Liver (Hepatocellular) Cancer Prevention

    MedlinePlus

    ... Treatment Liver Cancer Prevention Liver Cancer Screening Research Liver (Hepatocellular) Cancer Prevention (PDQ®)–Patient Version What is ... to keep cancer from starting. General Information About Liver (Hepatocellular) Cancer Key Points Liver cancer is a ...

  18. [Experimental models of acute pancreatitis].

    PubMed

    Ceranowicz, Piotr; Cieszkowski, Jakub; Warzecha, Zygmunt; Dembiński, Artur

    2015-02-21

    Acute pancreatitis is a severe disease with high mortality. Clinical studies can bring some data about etiology, pathogenesis and the course of acute pancreatitis. However, studies concerning early events of this disease and the new concepts of treatment cannot be performed on humans, due to ethical reasons. Animal models of acute pancreatitis have been developed to solve this problem. This review presents currently used experimental models of acute pancreatitis, their properties and clinical relevance. Experimental models of acute pancreatitis can be divided into in vivo (non-invasive and invasive) and ex vivo models. The onset, development, severity and extent of acute pancreatitis, as well as the mortality, vary considerably between these different models. Animal models reproducibly produce mild, moderate or severe acute pancreatitis. One of the most commonly used models of acute pancreatitis is created by administration of supramaximal doses of cerulein, an analog of cholecystokinin. This model produces acute mild edematous pancreatitis in rats, whereas administration of cerulein in mice leads to the development of acute necrotizing pancreatitis. Acute pancreatitis evoked by retrograde administration of sodium taurocholate into the pancreatic duct is the most often used model of acute severe necrotizing pancreatitis in rats. Ex vivo models allow to eliminate the influence of hormonal and nervous factors on the development of acute pancreatitis.

  19. Hypothyroid acute renal failure.

    PubMed

    Birewar, Sonali; Oppenheimer, Mark; Zawada, Edward T

    2004-03-01

    Muscular disorders and even hypothyroid myopathy with elevated muscle enzymes are commonly seen in hypothyroidism. In this paper, we report a case of acute renal failure in a 35-year old male patient with myalgia. His serum creatinine reached a level of 2.4 mg/dl. Later, his myalgia was found to be due to hypothyroidism with TSH of over 500 uiv/ml. With thyroid replacement therapy, myalgia and his serum creatinine stabilized and subsequently improved. Hypothyroidism, although rare, has been reported as a definite and authentic cause of rhabdomyolysis. As a result, hypothyroidism must be considered in patients presenting with acute renal failure and elevated muscle enzymes.

  20. Acute sinusitis in children.

    PubMed

    Brook, Itzhak

    2013-04-01

    Acute rhinosinusitis is a common illness in children. Viral upper respiratory tract infection is the most common presentation of rhinosinusitis. Most children resolve the infection spontaneously and only a small proportion develops a secondary bacterial infection. The proper choice of antibiotic therapy depends on the likely infecting pathogens, bacterial antibiotic resistance, and pharmacologic profiles of antibiotics. Amoxicillin-clavulanate is currently recommended as the empiric treatment in those requiring antimicrobial therapy. Isolation of the causative agents should be considered in those who failed the initial treatment. In addition to antibiotics, adjuvant therapies and surgery may be used in the management of acute bacterial rhinosinusitis.